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DOCUMENTS 

OP THE 

Assembly 

OP THB 

5 TA te of New York. 
one hundred and thirty-third session. 

I9IO. 



Vol. XIII.— No. 29 — Part 1. 



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IW1VEIWITY «jf GW«H 
LIBRARIES 
26*892 
MARCH I9S0 



State of New York 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OPTHB 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



For the school year ending July 31, 1909 



1 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISLATURE JANUARY 24, 1910 



ALBANY 

IfBW YOU 8TATI EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

I9IO 



STATS OF NEW YORK 

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Regent* of the University 

With yean when terms expire 

1913 Whitelaw Reid M.A. LL.D. D.C.L. Chancellor New York 

1917 St Clair McKelway M.A. LL.D. Vice Chancellor Brooklyn 

1919 Daniel Beach Ph.D. LL.D. ----- Watkins 

1914 Pliny T. Sexton LL.B. LL.D. ----- Palmyra 
1912 T. Guilford Smith M.A. C.E. LL.D. - - - Buffalo 

1918 William Nottingham M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. - - Syracuse 

1 910 Chester S. Lord M.A. LL.D. ----- New York 

1915 Albert Vander Veer M.D. M.A. Ph.D. LL.D. Albany 

191 1 Edward Lauterbach M.A. LL.D. - - - - New York 

1920 Eugene A. Philbin LL.B. LL.D. - - - - New York 

1916 Lucian L. Shedden LL.B. LL.D. - - - - Plattsburg 

1921 Francis M. Carpenter ------- Mount Kisco 

Commissioner of Education 

Andrew S. Draper LL.B. LL.D. 

Assistant Commissioners 

Augustus S. Downing M.A. Pd.D. LL.D. First Assistant 
Frank Rollins Ph.D. Second Assistant 
Thomas E. Finbgan M.A. Pd.D. Third Assistant 

Director of 8tate Library 

Jambs I. Wybr, Jr, M.L.S. 

Director of 8dence and State^Museum 

John M. Clarke Ph.D. Sc.D. LL.D. 

Chiefs of Divisions 

Administration, Harlan H. Horner B.A. 

Attendance, Jambs D. Sullivan 

Educational Extension, William R. Eastman M.A. M.L.S. 

Examinations, Charles F. Whbblock B.S. LL.D. 

Inspections, Frank H. Wood M.A. 

Law, Frank B. Gilbert B.A. 

School Libraries, Charles E. Fitch L.H.D. 

Statistics, Hiram C. Case 

Trades Schools, Arthur D. Dean B.S. 

Visual Instruction, Alfred W. Abrams Ph.B. 



State of New York 



No. 29 



IN ASSEMBLY 



January 24, 1910 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



STATE OF NEW YORK 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Albany, January 24, 1910 
Honorable James W. Wadsworth, jr 

Speaker of the Assembly, Assembly Chamber, Albany, N. Y. 

Sir : Pursuant to law, the annual report of the Education De- 
partment is herewith submitted to the Legislature. 

Very respectfully yours 

WHITELAW REID 

Chancellor of the University 

ANDREW S. DRAPER 

Commissioner of Education 



1 



New York State Education Department 

SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

State of New York 
Education Department 

commissioner's room 

Albany, January 24, 1910 
To the Legislature: 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Education Depart- 
ment, as required by section 335 of the Education Law. This re- 
port covers the year ending July 31, 1909, It is the sixth annual 
report of the Education Department, and includes the one hundred 
and twenty-third annual report of the Regents of the University of 
the State of New York. 

The separate titles are as follows : 
I Elementary Education 

II Secondary Education 

III Higher Education 

IV Vocational Schools 
V The State Library 

VI Educational Extension 

VII The State Museum and State Science Work 

VIII The Journal of the Board of Regents 

IX The Judicial Decisions of the Commissioner of Education 

X list of Department Publications 

XI New York Colleges and Universities the State System of 

Education (Commissioner's special theme) 

XII Summaries and Conclusions 



Title I 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Elementary education, always the matter in which the people of 
the State have the liveliest concern and which demands for its 
maintenance the largest public expenditures, has never attracted 
more attention, been administered more faithfully or shown better 
results than in the past school year. Notably has its efficiency 
manifested itself in the opening of new fields for its agencies and 
the fostering of activities, which once ignored or unnecessary, have 
now become vital to its further development The elementary 
schools have, upon the whole, given evidence of their usefulness, 
progress and conformity to enlightened pedagogical standards. 
Among the marked developments of the year may be noted the more 
thorough execution of the Compulsory Education Law, the increased 
facilities for playgrounds and gymnasiums, for vacation and evening 
schools, for better and more practical teaching, and, above all, the 
establishment of vocational departments as a coordinate part of 
our public school system. 

In the ensuing text and tables the principal features of the year's 
work are set forth, with such recommendations for improvement 
therein as experience suggests. 

SUanOTTABY SYLLABUS 

The revised Elementary Syllabus which goes into effect Septem- 
ber I, 1910, is submitted with this report. In the preparation of 
this syllabus the most illuminating information obtainable has been 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 7 

sought. A committee from the elementary teachers and the super- 
intendents of the State representing various phases of elementary 
education were invited by the Education Department to a confer- 
ence upon the revision of the syllabus. These men responded cheer- 
fully and have rendered valuable assistance to the Department and 
a service of importance to the schools of the State. All teachers 
and others interested in the schools have been encouraged to express 
their views upon the proposed changes ; many leading teachers have 
been consulted; and the opinions expressed by various local and 
State educational organizations have been carefully considered. The 
information obtained from all of these sources has been an important 
factor in determining the content of this syllabus. 

A syllabus covering the first six grades is submitted. As much 
of the present elementary course as has seemed feasible has been 
placed in the first six years. That which has been regarded as non- 
essential in the present course has been eliminated. The work as 
outlined for these six years has been of course adjusted to the ages 
and mental capacity of the children attending such grades. It has 
not been possible nor was it expected that all of the present work 
of the seventh and eighth grades could be put in the six years course. 
It was distinctly stated in the annual report of last year that the 
proposed six year elementary course would not complete the ele- 
mentary school work, but that the six year course would include the 
work which would be general in character and adapted to all children 
until that period of their development where they manifest differ- 
ent interests, mental powers and tastes which is usually at the age 
of 12. It was also stated that certain elementary work in arithmetic, 
history, English and other subjects would be continued in the seventh 
and eighth grades. 

The intermediate course covering such grades to round out the 
elementary course has been prepared. It is in this two years course 
that the elementary work will begin to differentiate. The regular 
course will lead to the present high school course. It includes 
arithmetic, history, English, physiology, and modern languages and 
other subjects which have previously been considered in academic 
work. Bringing certain work from the academic course which is 
elementary in its nature down in the seventh and eighth grades in 
place of the nonessentials which have been eliminated and of that 
which has been placed in the six years below will reduce the pressure 
and strain under which pupils have labored in the present high 
school course. 



8 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

This two years course also includes work specially adapted to pre- 
pare pupils for commercial and industrial courses in high schools 
and in trades schools. 

It has not been claimed that the school years of a child are to be 
shortened under this course. Indeed the school life of the child is 
to be lengthened and each year made more profitable. The changes 
authorized in the syllabus will not afford a short cut to academic or 
collegiate instruction. It is claimed, however, that these changes in 
the fundamental direction of elementary instruction will save much 
of the time which pupils now waste. Essentials only are to be 
taught ; these more thoroughly and intensively and presented in that 
related order of the course where a child is able to get a more com- 
prehensive grasp of the subjects. 

The execution of this plan will not involve friction or embarrass- 
ment of any kind in the present organization of our elementary 
school system. It does not involve any question of school buildings. 
It simply means that the superintendents and teachers shall substitute 
the new syllabus for the old and with the equipment which they 
now possess adjust their instruction to the new lines. If the progress 
of the work calls for additional preparation, service or equipment, 
those in charge of these schools will meet the obligation and responsi- 
bility as they have met others in the past. 

It is stated here as it has been previously stated that no dis- 
trict or city is to be coerced in adopting this syllabus. It is sub- 
mitted on its merits and in the firm belief that those schools operat- 
ing under it will prepare their boys and girls for more efficient and 
profitable service. 

NORMAL SCHOOLS 

The new building for the State Normal School at New Paltz was 
completed during the year. The expense of construction and its 
equipment was $195,586.85. The site in the business part of the 
village upon which the old building stood was exchanged for a 
site of 11 acres located in the upper part of the village and having 
a commanding view of the surrounding country for miles. This 
institution is now splendidly equipped to render valuable service 
to the State in the preparation of teachers. 

The State has purchased a new site comprising about 27 acres on 
the shore of Lake Ontario for the State Normal School at Oswego. 
This site is the old homestead of Dr E. A. Sheldon who was princi- 
pal of this school for many years and who rendered a distinct service 
in the educational work of the state and the nation. The Legislature 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 9 

of 1909 authorized the preparation of plans and the awarding of 
contracts for a new building on this site at a cost of $300,000. The 
construction of this building and certain repairs to the buildings at 
Buffalo and Potsdam will place all of the normal school buildings in 
very good modern condition. 

During the year there has been a change in the principalship of 
three of the State normal schools. Dr John C. Bliss, who had been 
a successful high school principal and who had also served in im- 
portant positions in the Education Department for several years 
succeeded Dr Myron T. Scudder at New Paltz. Dr Jeremiah M. 
Thompson, who has achieved success as a high school principal, a 
village superintendent and an institute instructor, succeeded Dr 
Thomas B. Stowell at Potsdam. Dr Stowell had tendered his resig- 
nation during the previous year and in severing his connection with 
this institution terminated a period of 40 years service in the normal 
schools of this State. Principal Daniel Upton of the Buffalo Tech- 
nical High School succeeded Dr James M. Cassety at Buffalo. Dr 
Cassety has spent his life in the teaching service of the State, hav- 
ing been a member of the faculty of the Fredonia and Cortland 
normal schools and principal of the Buffalo school for 20 years. 

The normal schools are charged with the special duty of training 
teachers for the elementary schools. The character of the courses 
of study in the elementary schools is undergoing a revolution. The 
elementary schools are forced to assume lines of instruction which 
place additional responsibilities upon the normal schools. The ele- 
mentary work of the seventh and eighth grades is to be so radically 
changed under the new syllabus that special provision must be made 
for training teachers for these grades so that more men will enter 
this field of teaching. The foundation of industrial education is in 
the elementary grades. General courses for the professional train- 
ing of elementary teachers must therefore include the study of 
methods and purposes involved in industrial education. The present 
elementary course should therefore be modified by including suffi- 
cient work in domestic science and domestic art to bring all grade 
teachers into sympathy with the general purpose of industrial edu- 
cation. Teachers for the industrial and commercial courses are not 
readily found- There will be a gradual increase in the number of 
schools maintaining these courses in the populous centers of the 
State and the demand for teachers of such courses will increase 
from year to year. Agricultural courses will be established in the 
schools located in the best farming sections of the State and already 



10 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

the complaint is made that competent teachers for these courses can 
not be obtained. There is also an increase in the demand for special 
teachers of vocal music and drawing in the grades. There are 300 
school districts maintaining libraries of more than 500 volumes each, 
and 300 districts having libraries of more than 1000 volumes each. 
These libraries should be under the supervision and care of a 
trained librarian. Sufficient agencies are not organized to train an 
adequate supply of librarians. The maintenance and the proper 
use of a library is a vital part of the equ : pment of a school. The 
State should therefore provide for the training of librarians for 
this purpose. The normal schools should do this work. Many of 
our best rural schools pay salaries equal to the salaries paid in the 
cities and villages of the State and a special course might be pro- 
vided to prepare these teachers. A substantial uplift could be 
given such schools if teachers could be trained for them in the State 
normal schools. 

The 10 normal schools must assume the responsibility of prepar- 
ing teachers for any of the courses maintained in the elementary 
schools of the State. It is of vital importance to the educational 
interests of the State that the normal schools shall enter upon this 
additional work at the beginning of the ensuing school year. If 
these institutions assume this work with the interest and outlook 
which its importance demand, they will enter upon a period of 
service to the State which has not been equaled since their organi- 
zation. 

At present these schools are maintaining but two courses. These 
courses are the kindergarten and the regular elementary course for 
teachers in the grades. To meet the demands of the general trend 
of public education it will be necessary not only to modify the 
present courses in the normal schools as suggested above, but it will 
also be necessary to maintain in the normal schools the following 
professional courses: (1) kindergarten, (2) elementary, (3) trade 
and industrial school, (4) agricultural, (5) drawing, (6) vocal 
music, (7) library, (8) rural school. 

It is not intended that all of these courses shall be maintained in 
each of the normal schools. Each of these is so organized and 
located as to possess special advantages for doing the work of 
some of these courses. To undertake to maintain all of such courses 
in each normal school would require an unnecessary duplication of 
equipment and faculty. These special courses will be planned during 
the year and the normal schools will be designated to maintain such 
of these courses as appear adaptable to their location and equipment 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT II 

There are certain features of the normal school work which need 
careful consideration. Reference is made thereto in this report so 
that those particularly interested in these schools may give the 
matter careful reflection before final determination is reached. Since 
these schools are to train elementary teachers only the necessity 
and the wisdom of maintaining academic departments in the practice 
departments of normal schools is open to serious question. All work 
below the high school department in the State Normal College has 
been discontinued since that institution is exclusively engaged in the 
training of teachers for the secondary schools. Upon what just 
ground can the State defend an expenditure of its funds for the 
maintenance of academic departments in these schools? None of 
the normal students are now required to do practice teaching in 
academic subjects. All the practice teaching of normal students is 
in the elementary grades. It should therefore be carefully deter- 
mined whether the interests of the normal schools would not be pro- 
moted by the discontinuance of high school work in the practice 
schools. 

Graduates of the State normal schools receive a diploma which the 
law declares to be a license to teach in the public schools of the 
State. The holders of these diplomas are the only teachers exempt 
from examination. If final examinations were made a requirement 
for graduation from these institutions it would undoubtedly result 
in more thorough teaching. There are objections to the introducing 
of these examinations, but there are also many advantages. The 
question is one worthy of consideration and is submitted for the 
purpose of bringing it to the attention of those most directly in- 
terested in the normal schools. 

T&AIHZVO 80H00L8 

Section 551 of the Education Law, formerly chapter 1031 of the 
laws of 1895, provides that the professional course in a training 
school shall be at least 38 weeks or one school year. For several 
years all the training schools in the State except one have maintained 
a course of two years. This is as it should be and the law should 
be amended so as to require a two years course. The number of 
students completing the training school course and licensed to teach 
in the elementary schools of cities was 815. This is an increase of 
193 over the previous year. The large majority of these graduates 
are now teaching in the elementary schools of cities. 



12 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

T&AOTZVG rrr.iaawp 

The training classes of the State should be made a more efficient 
agency for preparing rural school teachers. To effect this result it 
is necessary to accomplish two things. First, students of better 
scholarship must be obtained for membership in these classes ; and 
second the best schools of the State must be induced to organize 
such classes. Important changes were made during the past year in 
the Department regulations and the law which will render material 
assistance in reaching these ends and in improving training class 
work generally. 

The qualifications prescribed for admission to training classes are 
too low. Candidates may now enter these classes on an elementary 
teachers certificate. This is a very low standard. The requirement 
in English for this certificate is first year English. A person possess- 
ing only this meager knowledge of English and who receives only 
20 weeks instruction in that subject after entering the class may 
receive a license to teach practically for life in the rural schools. It 
is necessary in order to maintain a proper teaching standard to 
increase these requirements and it would appear only reasonable to 
prescribe as a minimum qualification for eligibility to these classes, 
the completion of two years' high school work or its equivalent. 
Special consideration should be given teachers of successful ex- 
perience. 

High school graduates should be encouraged to enter the teaching 
service. If they are unable to enter a normal school they should 
pursue the course given in the training classes. High school gradu- 
ates holding Regents academic diplomas are now admitted irre- 
spective of the subjects which such diplomas include. To be 
admitted on such credentials under previous rules these diplomas 
were required to include advanced United States history or Amer- 
ican history and civics, history of Great Britain and Ireland, physics, 
biology including physiology, advanced arithmetic and advanced 
drawing. Most high school graduates have not completed all of 
these subjects in their high school courses. This requirement there- 
fore practically barred high school graduates from entering these 
classes. The number of students enrolled in the training classes in 
September 1908 was 1321, and of this number only 147 were high 
school graduates. Many of these were conditioned in some of the 
subjects specified as necessary to be included in the academic 
diploma. 

The failure of the State to pay adequate compensation to a school 
for maintaining a training class resulted in many of the strongest 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 13 

schools of the State discontinuing such classes. These schools did 
not desire to maintain such classes because of the financial benefit 
which they might receive but they were unwilling to maintain them 
at a considerable loss. The action of the Legislature in increasing 
the amount to be apportioned to schools for this purpose has induced 
many schools which have not previously maintained such classes to 
apply to this Department to be designated to organize them. It 
should be clearly understood that only the best schools of the State, 
located so as to serve the interests of the greatest number of candi- 
dates and equipped so as to give the most satisfactory instruction 
will receive the appointment to organize training classes. It should 
also be understood that the applications of schools which have main- 
tained satisfactory classes for many years at a financial loss will be 
given first consideration. Schools which have a small number of 
pupils, small and weak faculties, inadequate equipment, and which 
desire to maintain these classes for financial profit will not be author- 
ized to assume this work. 

The most important change in the law affecting training classes 
which has been made in many years was the amendment thereto by 
the Legislature of 1909 modifying the method of apportioning State 
funds to the schools maintaining these classes. The Consolidated 
School Law provided that each school district designated to conduct 
a training class should receive $1 per week for each student under 
instruction in such class. This provision of the law, however, was 
obsolete as the Legislature had provided for many years a different 
basis of apportionment in the annual appropriation bills. Under such 
basis of apportionment each school was paid a quota of $500 for 
conducting a class. The school also received a teacher's quota 
of $100 for the training class teacher employed. The amount 
which a district received for maintaining a training class was there- 
fore $600, but under a Department regulation each school is required 
to pay its training class teacher a salary of $500 at least. A large 
majority of the schools paid their training class teachers $600 and 
several schools paid a higher salary. There are always other items 
of expenditure incident to the maintenance of a training class. Each 
district was therefore conducting a training class at a financial loss. 
Gties which have maintained training schools have always been paid 
from the State funds on the basis of $1 per week for each student 
under instruction, and as the number of students in attendance upon 
these schools has increased the aggregate amount paid to cities for 
this purpose has also increased. The number of training classes 
maintained in the State has annually decreased for several years and 



• • 



• • 



• • 



14 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

the aggregate amount paid for the maintenance of such classes has 
therefore decreased. The amount apportioned by this Department 
for these two purposes since 1904 has been as follows : 

TRAINING CLASSES TRAINING SCHOOLS 
X904-.' $57 965 50 $39 9» .. 

1905 56493 .. 45337 

1906 53 180 50 53 592 

W7 45 475 • • 68 3" 

1908 • 41 125 . . 71 252 

1909 38 500 . . 75 491 75 

This was not an equitable apportionment of State funds. The 
training schools prepare teachers for the elementary schools of their 
respective cities. Very few of the graduates of such schools ever 
teach in the* rural schools. The schools which maintain training 
classes are not preparing teachers for their own schools. Training 
class graduates are even prohibited from teaching in schools main- 
taining academic departments, unless they are high school graduates 
and even then until they have had three years* experience in teaching 
in other districts. The districts maintaining training classes are 
preparing teachers for the rural schools and receive no direct benefit 
therefrom. The training classes supplied the rural schools for the 
year 1908-9 with nearly 1000 teachers while the training schools 
supplied their respective cities with a few more than 600 teachers. 

The Legislature regarded these conditions as sufficient ground 
for amending the law regulating the apportionment of funds for the 
professional training of teachers by increasing the amount which a 
school should receive for conducting a training class. Under this 
provision of law each district maintaining such class will receive 
$700 and the apportionment to such districts from the State funds 
must be made before an apportionment is made to cities for main- 
taining training schools. After such apportionment is made the 
balance of the amount appropriated by the Legislature for the sup- 
port of training classes and training schools is apportioned to such 
.cities ratably according to the aggregate number of days attendance 
of pupils regularly admitted to such schools. la order to avoid 
any considerable reduction in the aggregate amount which may be 
apportioned to cities in support of training schools the Legislature 
generously increased the appropriation for the professional training 
of teachers $25,000. The cities will therefore undoubtedly continue 
to receive the aggregate amount, nearly, which is now apportioned 
them. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 15 

The law formerly provided that training classes should be in ses- 
sion at least 16 weeks, but the Commissioner of Education was given 
authority to formulate rules governing such classes. Under this 
authority a regulation was prescribed fixing the term of a draining 
class at 36 weeks. The recent Legislature amended the Education 
Law by providing that the term of these classes shall be 36 weeks, 
thus making the statute conform to what the practice has been for 
several years. It is not possible to give the students of these classes 
adequate instruction in a shorter period of time. It is also important 
that the term of these classes be fixed by law and not be subject 
to modification under Department regulations. 

The rule has been that the holders of training class certificates 
who entered the class upon high school graduation should be eligible 
to teach in the elementary grades of schools maintaining academic 
departments after they have had four years experience in teaching. 
This rule has been modified so as to require only three years' experi- 
ence of such telphers. The statute defining the qualifications of 
teachers in the primary and grammar grades of cities provides that 
teachers of three years' experience shall be eligible to teach in such 
grades. It is obviously unjust to permit teachers of such qualifica- 
tions to teach in the elementary schools of a city and prohibit them 
from teaching in such schools in a district maintaining an academic 
department. » 

Other minor modifications of training class regulations have been 
made which relate largely to the smooth administration of this work. 
The course of study has been modified so as to give a more equitable 
distribution throughout the year. Too much work has been required 
in training class examinations for the time given. Additional time 
may be allowed by distributing the work over five days without 
embarrassment and with benefit and justice 'to the students. 

A syllabus has been prepared for the guidance of those who con- 
duct training classes. This contains a detailed analysis of study in 
each of the subjects included in the training class curriculum and it 
should prove of great service in providing a definite standard of 
work. 

85 classes were maintained during the year and 865 students satis- 
factorily completed the course and have entered the teaching service 
in the rural schools of the State. 

TKAOKSM INSTITUTES 

The change in the personnel of the teaching force is great each 
yean A large number of inexperienced teachers are annually em- 



l6 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

ployed. Even though many of these teachers have had professional 
training, real experience begins with service in the schoolroom. To 
meet with other teachers and to receive the instruction and guidance 
of those who have had long and successful experience with the 
questions and problems which a brief service in actual teaching has 
developed is an invaluable aid to these teachers. 

The institute is likewise of great service to the many supervising 
principals of union and high schools who take up their work with 
little or no experience and consequently with a limited knowledge of 
methods in the primary and grammar grades. 

For the majority of teachers the institute is the only educational 
meeting of the year and the benefit to. these teachers is not solely 
what they learn but what they feel and gain from association with 
instructors and coworkers. 

The general sessions of the institutes deal with topics that tend 
to create a true professional spirit and a desire for greater pro- 
ficiency in work. They are therefore centers from which emanate 
and radiate influences which result in better teaching, greater pro- 
fessional spirit and greater consecration to the work. 

Being the only meeting of the year that brings together the entire 
teaching force of a commissioner district, the institutes serve as a 
great medium for acquainting the teachers with the purposes and 
policies of the commissioner and the laws, rules and regulations of 
the Education Department. 

The large number of cities and villages employing a superin- 
tendent, and exempt by law from attendance upon institutes, which 
voluntarily close their schools in order that their teachers may 
regularly attend their sessions, or which call for special institutes of 
their own, furnishes one of the best proofs of the value of institute 
work. 

The evidence to show that institutes have been beneficial and 
popular with all classes of teachers during the past year is abundant. 

TEACHERS OEBTZHOATES 

The regulations governing the issuance of teachers certificate* 
were revised soon after the reorganization of the Department in 
1904 by the merging of the uniform examinations into the Regents 
examinations so far as such examinations related purely to subject- 
matter. It was expected that the operation of a system of examina- 
tions resulting from the consolidation of these two former systems 
would reveal minor difficulties of administration and deficiencies in 
educational and professional standards which could be discovered in 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT VJ 

no other way. These regulations have given general satisfaction 
but our experience in working under them for five years has demon- 
strated that they might be modified so as to serve the interests of 
the schools of the State more completely and advantageously. The 
main objects to be attained in revising these regulations was to 
simplify them so that they could be readily interpreted by teachers 
and school officers ; to establish a more equitable basis of determining 
the qualifications of teachers ; and to provide an adequate supply of 
qualified teachers for the rural schools. 

No teacher is now employed in the elementary schools of the cities 
of the State who has not been professionally trained or who has 
not had successful experience in teaching. Teachers employed in 
the elementary grades of the union free school districts which main- 
tain academic departments are required to possess similar qualifica- 
tions. The teachers in these schools are supplied through the city 
training schools, the State normal schools and the colleges and 
universities. High school graduation is a prerequisite for admission 
to the courses in any of these institutions. The elementary schools 
of the cities and of the populous districts of the State which maintain 
academic departments are therefore supplied as new appointments 
are made with teachers who possess a high standard of scholarship 
and adequate professional training or experience. 

The State may justly require this standard of qualifications for 
teachers employed in these schools, but the justice or propriety under 
present conditions of insisting upon similar qualifications for the 
teachers employed in the rural schools is open to serious question. 
The cities and the union free school districts are financially able 
to pay the salaries which these trained teachers command and 
the teachers of such training and culture usually prefer to teach in 
the cities and villages instead of in the rural districts. 

It has not been possible during the past few years to supply the 
rural schools of the State with duly licensed teachers. The training 
classes have been practically the only source from which teachers 
of professional training have been supplied the rural schools. Be- 
cause of the inability of many of these schools to pay the salaries 
vrtiich trained teachers command and because of the great deficiency 
in die number of teachers required it is not feasible to provide in 
the regulations governing the issuance of teachers certificates that 
all teachers employed in the rural schools shall have had professional 
training. 

Provision has always been made for the licensing of teachers who 
hove shown certain standards of scholarship. The bill enacted into 



l8 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

law which now prescribes the minimum qualifications of teachers in 
the elementary schools of the cities of the State was once vetoed 
by a governor because it did not contain the provision which author- 
ized the acceptance of successful experience for professional train- 
ing. Teachers who are not able to attend a training class or a 
normal school, but who may acquire professional skill through 
experience and scholarship through study which will prepare them 
for efficient service in our rural schools, should be afforded the 
opportunity whereby they may obtain legal authority to teach. Such 
teachers should not by the enforcement of technical rules be arbi- 
trarily driven from the teaching service. On the contrary, provision 
should be made whereby a young teacher who does successful work 
and who makes reasonable progress in study shall be encouraged 
to remain in the service. This has always been one of the funda- 
mental principles governing the certification of teachers in this State. 
The important changes authorized by the present regulations are 
based upon this principle. These changes are as follows : 

1 Candidates for an elementary certificate may have four instead 
of three trials to complete the work for such certificate. This 
affords boys and girls in the rural schools the privilege of entering 
examinations at the age of 16 and earning certificates by the time 
they become 18 — the age fixed by law at which a person may be 
licensed to teach. 

2 The previous requirement for a renewal of an elementary cer- 
tificate was the completion of 18 Regents counts. This is the 
equivalent of the completion of one year of regular work in a high 
school. It is impossible for a person to do this amount of work and 
teach at the same time. Because of this rigid requirement few of 
these certificates have ever been renewed. The regulations now 
provide that an elementary certificate may be renewed one year for 
each eight Regents counts earned while the certificate is in force. 
This represents the completion of a year's work in two average 
academic subjects. 

3 During the last three years this Department has issued to 
the graduates of our high schools nearly 8000 Regents academic 
diplomas, but during that period it has issued to these same high 
school graduates less than 350 academic certificates. In other words 
about 4 per cent of the graduates of our high schools who earn 
Regents diplomas have become teachers in the public schools. The 
reason so few high school graduates have entered the teaching 
service is due to the regulation which has required them to pass 
several additional subjects not generally included in high school 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT. 19 

courses or required for other teachers certificates. The Regents 
academic diploma is issued to those only who complete a four years 
high school course and who earn in Regents examinations at least 
72 counts, which must be distributed among the several groups of 
subjects so as to give a properly balanced course. A person of the 
required age who has passed the preliminary subjects and three 
academic subjects in Regents examinations and who may never 
have been in attendance upon a high school has been deemed properly 
qualified to receive a teachers certificate valid for two years in a 
school district not maintaining an academic department. To deny a 
person, who has devoted four years to the study of an approved 
academic course and who has passed Regents examinations in sub- 
jects amounting to 72 counts, at least equal recognition is an unwar- 
ranted discrimination against the person of better preparation and 
superior scholarship. The present rules therefore provide for the 
issuance of an academic certificate to those who complete a four 
years high school course and earn a Regents academic diploma. 
This certificate will be valid in school districts only which do not 
maintain an academic department. A school commissioner is given 
the discretion to determine in what particular district the holder of 
an academic certificate shall be allowed to teach. The holder of one 
of these certificates is encouraged to remain in the teaching profes- 
sion by a regulation authorizing the renewal of such certificates. 
These certificates may be renewed one year for each 18 counts which 
their holders earn in examinations for life State certificates. The 
examinations for life State certificates are based upon a higher 
standard of scholarship than Regents examinations and embrace 
several professional subjects. This provision will undoubtedly in- 
duce many successful teachers who desire to continue in the teach- 
ing service to take up the advanced work for a life State certificate 
while they are fresh from their academic studies. 

The regulations also provide for the issuance of a new certificate 
known as a rural school renewable certificate. This certificate is 
intended to be a permanent license for teachers, who are employed 
in the rural schools and who are not able to attend a training class or 
a normal school, but whose experience and scholarship enable them 
to render very efficient service in the rural schools. Upon the dis- 
continuance of the first grade certificate there would be no way by 
which successful teachers who had held elementary and academic 
certificates could earn in examinations a permanent certificate except 
by obtaining a life State certificate. In most cases this would be 
impossible. This new certificate should therefore supply the rural 



20 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

schools of every school commissioner district with many proficient 
teachers. All the subjects prescribed for the first grade certificate 
are required for the rural school renewable certificate except physics 
and bookkeeping. In the place of these two subjects nature study 
and agriculture and one subject from the history group of academic 
subjects have been substituted. The educational requirements are 
therefore the full equivalent of the requirements for the first grade 
certificate, although the rural school renewable certificate is not 
valid in a school district maintaining an academic department. 

The regulations also provide that hereafter all certificates shall 
be issued so that they shall expire at the end of a school year. This 
will avoid the embarrassment that often occurs of a teacher being 
compelled to stop teaching in the middle of a term or in one con- 
tinuing to teach after the expiration of her certificate without legal 
authority to do so. A trustee contracting with a teacher who is 
legally certified at the beginning of a school year will also understand 
that such teacher may legally teach the full school year. 

SPECIAL TEA0EEB8 AND 8TTPEBVI80S8 

Nearly all cities and all villages employing a superintendent and 
many of the union free school districts employ teachers or super- 
visors along special lines of work. These lines of work are 
generally drawing, music and kindergarten. The State normal 
schools and some of the training schools maintain kindergarten 
courses. There is a supply of kindergarten teachers and super- 
visors sufficient to meet the demand for this class of special teachers. 
Special courses are not maintained in the normal schools for teachers 
or supervisors of drawing and of music. An increased number of 
teachers are employed in these lines from year to year. Some 
private institutions maintain satisfactory courses in these lines and 
those who have completed the drawing course in such institutions 
have been admitted to examinations for a special certificate issued 
under the regulations of the Education Department. Those who 
have completed a vocal music course in such institutions and an 
approved high school course are given a vocal music certificate. 
Teachers certificates which are classed as general certificates, such 
as the academic, first grade, training class, etc., contain no restrictions 
as to the subjects which their holders may teach and the holders of 
such certificates are therefore legally qualified to teach these special 
subjects, although they may never have received special instruction 
in such subjects. School authorities have generally employed such 
teachers as appeared to them qualified for this special work. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 21 

It is as important that the teachers of these special subjects shall 
be properly qualified as it is that teachers of general subjects or 
courses shall be so qualified. Since the necessity of the employment 
of such teachers is generally recognized, local school authorities 
should be protected in the employment of properly qualified teachers. 
Special qualifications should therefore be prescribed for these 
teachers and supervisors. 

XVADBQUATB 80HOOL A000XX0DATX0V8 

Unless prompt action is taken by the local authorities of several 
cities to provide additional school accommodations a portion of the 
children of such cities must be placed in the near future upon half 
time. For several years thousands of the children in New York city 
have been denied their right, to a full day's attendance upon school. 
It was believed that the causes of this situation were temporary and 
that the authorities of that city would provide within a reasonable 
time sufficient sittings to accord all its children a full day's attendance 
at school. The situation has improved but little in years. The 
official statement of the authorities of that city shows that there are 
still nearly 50,000 children upon half time. This open neglect of the 
education of children should not exist in any city in this country. Its 
existence in the richest city in the land is a stain upon the pride of a 
state which is recognized as a leader in public education. 

In many of the other cities whose population is increasing the 
attendance upon school now exceeds the proper seating capacity of 
the school buildings and the result of course is an overcrowded con- 
dition in many schools. Local authorities in these cities should put 
into operation at once all necessary measures to provide adequate 
school accommodations for the present and the future needs of their 
cities. Children are not only entitled to attend school but under the 
Compulsory Education Law they must attend. It has long been held 
that a school day under the Compulsory Education Law means a ses- 
sion in the morning and one in the afternoon. Emergencies may 
arise from an unusual and unexpected attendance, presenting con- 
ditions which should be treated considerately, but negligence or fail- 
ure to provide accommodations to meet demands which have long 
been known should not be tolerated. 

OOMFULSOBY EDTTOATXOV 

The first Compulsory Education Law in this State was enacted in 
1874. It was a cumbersome statute, fundamentally wrong in its 
construction and therefore its provisions were never enforced. It 



22 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

was repealed in 1894 and in its place the present Compulsory Edu- 
cation Law was enacted. This law has been amended in many 
particulars several times. As enacted in 1894 it was not expressed 
in clear, simple English. The amendments have made it even more 
confusing and ambiguous. Its intelligent enforcement must always 
depend in a large measure upon a clear understanding of its pro- 
visions by the teachers, truant officers, trustees and other school 
officers of the several districts and cities of the State. The neces- 
sity of this law being expressed in the simplest form possible is 
therefore apparent. To illustrate : Section 5 of this act as it stood 
in title 16 of the old Consolidated School Law covered nearly two 
pages and consisted of a single sentence. This sentence was so 
long and its grammatical construction so complicated that its in- 
terpretation was difficult by even a student of English familiar with 
legal phraseology. 

This law was rewritten during the past year for the purpose of 
simplifying it and bringing its meaning within the grasp of school 
officers who are officially charged with its enforcement. Condition* 
have so changed in the cities and populous centers of the State since 
the enactment of 1894 that many of its provisions were inade- 
quate to effect the results sought by a law of this character. The 
Legislature of 1909 therefore amended the provisions of this law 
applying to cities and villages having a population of 5000 or more 
in several important particulars. 

Previous to these amendments the law had applied to children 
between the ages of 8 and 16 years. These amendments make it 
apply to children between the ages of 7 and 16 who reside in cities 
and in villages having a population of 5000 or more. Children be- 
tween the ages of 7 and 8 years and residing in populous centers 
with school facilities easily accessible might better be in school than 
roving about the street and questionable places. The period during 
which children were required to attend school under the old law was 
from the 1st of October to the 1st of June following. Under the 
amended law children who reside in cities and in villages of 5000 or 
more are required to attend school during the whole time the public 
schools are in session. If a child is in attendance upon a private 
school he must attend during the whole period such private school 
is in session. In other words, the child is required to enter school 
at the time the school which he is to attend opens instead of waiting 
until the 1st of October and then entering two or three weeks late. 

No change has been made in the ages of children residing outside 
of cities and villages of 5000 or more to wh«ch the Compulsory Edu- 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 2% 

cation Law applies, nor in the period of time which these children 
must attend upon instruction. For such parts of the State the com- 
pulsory ages are still 8 to 16 and the time from October ist to June 
i st In many cases throughout the country districts the distance 
which children are required to travel to attend school is too great to 
compel those under the age of 8 years to walk to and from school 
daily. The compulsory age therefore was not lowered for such sec- 
tions of the State. 

The law now provides that instruction in all schools, which chil- 
dren within the compulsory ages attend, shall be in the English 
language. It was necessary to incorporate this provision in the 
law as in many of the cities private schools have been maintained 
by the foreign element in which the English language has not 
been taught. 

Since the Legislature of 1908 authorized the establishment of 
trades schools, attendance upon such school should be recognized 
as equivalent to attendance upon an evening school. A boy who is 
in attendance upon a trades school and who is within the compulsory 
ages is entitled to have such attendance stand to his credit on the 
same basis that attendance upon an evening school does. The law 
was therefore amended by giving such recognition to attendance 
upon these schools. 

Under the law of 1894 a parent was required to cause his child to 
attend upon instruction the time specified in such law or be subject 
to the penalty provided therein. There was a provision in the law 
to the effect that a parent should be exempt from such penalty if he 
presented to the school authorities of his city or district his affidavit 
that he was unable to compel his child to attend upon instruction. 
The effect of this provision was to induce parents whose children 
were truants from instruction to make an affidavit that they could 
not compel such children to attend school. In other words the law 
itself pointed out to parents who violated such law with impunity a 
method of escape from the penalties therefor. This objectionable 
feature of the law has been eliminated and a parent or a person in 
parental relation to a child is personally charged with the responsi- 
bility of causing such child to attend upon instruction subject to the 
penalties provided by statute. 

The Labor Law provided one penalty for the illegal employment 
of children and the Compulsory Education Law a different penalty. 
It is essential that the provisions of these two laws should be in 
harmony upon this point. The Compulsory Education Law was 
therefore amended by making the penalty prescribed in that law for 



24 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

the illegal employment of children conform to the penalty provided 
for a like offense under the Labor Law. 

A decision of the Court of Appeals rendered in September 1908 
(People v. Taylor, 192 N. Y. 398), should give very substantial 
assistance to the proper enforcement of the Compulsory Education 
Law in the populous centers of the State. This decision interprets 
section 70 of the Labor Law which provides in substance that no 
child under the age of 14 shall be employed in a factory and that 
no child between 14 and 16 years of age " shall be employed, per- 
mitted or suffered to work" in a factory without an employment 
certificate. To protect the child's right to an education both the 
Labor Law and the Compulsory Education Law have contained pro- 
visions prohibiting manufacturing establishments from employing 
children within these age limitations. A representative of the State 
Labor Department prosecuted the superintendent of a factory for 
the employment of a girl under 16 years of age who had no 
employment certificate. The superintendent of the factory was con- 
victed and the conviction was affirmed by the Appellate Division. 
The Court of Appeals reversed the conviction, but in so doing ex- 
pressed a very clear interpretation of this statute. The evidence in 
the case showed that the superintendent did not contract with the 
employees of the factory and was in no way responsible for their 
employment. Neither did he have any financial interest as stock- 
holder, part owner or otherwise in the factory. The employment of 
this girl appears to have been made by an employee subordinate to 
the superintendent and without the knowledge or consent and con- 
trary to the expressed direction of the superintendent. The Court 
of Appeals therefore held that the superintendent had not violated 
this statute. 

The court held that the Labor Law is a police regulation for the 
protection of the public health and a prohibitive statute, and the rule 
is that such statutes shall be strictly construed. Prosecutions for a 
violation of this statute should be instituted against the person or 
corporation owning the factory in which a child is employed in vio- 
lation of such statute, or the officer or employee of the corporation 
who actually hires a child in violation of such statute. 

STATE TRTTAHT 80H00LS 

The primary purpose of the Legislature and others interested in 
the enactment of the attendance law was, first, to secure to the 
truant child a common school education, which he was failing to get, 
and second, to turn him from a path that leads to a criminal life. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 2$ 

The law provides for his apprehension and commitment, but neg- 
lects to furnish the institution or home for his reception. 

The State has thus far not only failed to provide a place for the 
truant, but also apparently fails to understand the kind of child the 
truant is. He belongs to a distinct class, differing widely from the 
average child. He is peculiar, if not subnormal. Almost without 
exception he is subnormal in size and weight for a child of his years. 
More often than otherwise he comes from a home of poverty, im- 
providence or destitution. Not only his parents, but his ancestors, 
near and remote as well, are of the destitute class. He is one of a 
large family with small income, and his number in our cities is vastly 
in excess of what we are inclined to think. The truant is usually a 
product of the city, seldom of the country. Life in the country does 
not produce truancy. The tenement life of the city does. The over- 
crowded, wretched tenement or foul basement home begets truancy. 
The truant is the victim of untoward circumstances, mismated 
parents incompatible in temperament, separation, divorce, wife- 
abandonment, step-parents, divided parental authority, cruelty, 
drunkenness, want of proper and nutritious food, scant clothing — 
all these help to make him first a delinquent and then a truant. The 
city schools without playgrounds, and with teachers who lack sym- 
pathy for unfortunate children, have no attraction for this half 
starved, half clad being. Truancy affords him respite. The school- 
room and its equipment have no attraction for this kind of child. 
He does not fit into any of the machinery of the regulation school. 
He is an all around misfit. He is, in fact subnormal What is the 
remedy? The law provides that a truant child may be committed 
to a truant school. Where are the schools? Rochester and New 
York have recently established in the country truant homes for the 
exclusive use of their respective cities and these two, each of limited 
capacity, are really the only truant homes in the State. 

Our eleemosynary institutions are overcrowded with unfortunate 
children who are not truants. Private institutions can accommodate 
only a very small part of our truants and they are at the best poorly 
equipped. These institutions — and they are our only dependence — 
furnish but little relief and no remedy. The remedy lies in the es- 
tablishment of State truant homes for the State at large. In the 
country, remote from the city with its distractions, amid pleasures 
and healthful surroundings, should be colonized these restless, ner- 
vous, underfed and generally wretched children. Schools should be 
provided that shall be real homes where such children, properly fed 
and clothed, shall be taught by teachers — yes, mothered and 



26 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

fathered by those whose hearts are warm with love for children and 
whose sympathies are alive to the needs of these unfortunates. Iti 
these schools agriculture, manual training and industrial arts should 
have a large share in the daily occupation of the children. Employ- 
ment in the trades and agriculture is what the truant boy needs quite 
as much or more than book knowledge. He cares but little for 
books and less for schools, but he is usually willing to work and as 
a rule he has aptitude for some line of useful employment. In State 
truant schools, properly organized and properly maintained, the 
natural bent of each boy could be discovered and directed and from 
such institutions would go out into the world boys who had received 
not only instruction in common English branches, but who had also 
acquired the habit of self-control and the ability to apply themselves 
to useful industry. 

In this connection it is well to note how many truant children 
were arrested and committed in the cities of the State during the last 
school year and also in the State at large : 

Total number arrested in cities 13 934 

" " towns 1 046 

14980 

" committed in cities 1 314 

towns 80 

1394 

— 1 1 

The above table should not lead one to think that all the truant 
children in the State were arrested last year. Far from it. The 
number actually arrested represents a small part only of our large 
army of truants. More were not arrested because local authorities 
had no place in which to commit them. The actual number com- 
mitted, 1394, represents but a small part of the number that should 
have been committed. More were not committed from the fact that 
there were no institutions to which they could be sent. Again if 
private institutions were able and willing to receive all our truants, 
experience leads us to believe that only a small part would be actually 
committed from the fact that under the present statute the cost of 
maintenance is a local charge, and when the average school board 
learns that the cost of committing and maintaining three truant 
children would be equal to the cost of employing an extra teacher. 
the three truants are not committed to an institution but, sad to 
say, are usually committed and condemned to the streets, to go from 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 27 

bad to worse until they land behind prison bars — confirmed 
criminals. 

That the State has thus far failed to provide truant homes for 
these unfortunate children must not be regarded as evidence of the 
State's parsimony. The State has always been generous when an 
enlightened public sentiment has been aroused in favor of the ex- 
penditure of necessary moneys for the education and protection of 
her children. There has been maintained for many years at large 
expense a reformatory for juvenile delinquents on Randall's Island, 
a penal institution for the reformation of boys committed thereto for 
crime. This institution represents an investment of $2,600,649, anc ^ 
the State Industrial School at Rochester, maintained for the same 
purpose, represents an investment of $638,951, making a total invest- 
ment of $3,239,600 on the part of the State for the purpose of re- 
forming youngsters who have drifted into a criminal life. The num- 
ber of boys at the Randall's Island Institution at this time is 663 and 
at Rochester 606. These juvenile reformatories are needed. The 
State is to be commended for establishing and maintaining them, but 
there would be less need of these institutions did the State establish 
and maintain State truant homes. 

The personal history of the unfortunate boys at these institutions 
shows in almost every instance that the boy was first a truant and 
next a criminal; and it is an interesting fact, as well as a pathetic 
one, that the largest number of these boys were led to commit a 
crime by being driven to stealing to appease their hunger. These 
boys from the tenement and overcrowded sections of our cities 
usually steal things to eat, or else steal money with which to pur- 
chase the things to eat. Therefore, is it not self-evident that the 
State should take over to itself these truant boys and furnish them a 
proper home where they will be fed and clothed and saved from a 
criminal life? 

The superintendent of the refuge on Randall's Island recently 
was asked : " Were these 663 boys first truants ?" and he answered 
unhesitatingly, "Almost without exception." He was further asked : 
" Do you think that if the State had provided suitable truant homes 
for these boys during their period of truancy it would now be obliged 
to maintain them in a penal institution?" He answered: "Doubt- 
less the majority of them would have been saved from taking the 
first step in crime." 

The State is generous in her appropriations to maintain her 
prisons and reformatories, yet up to this time she has failed to estab- 



28 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

lish State truant homes, apparently losing sight of the fact that the 
truant of today is the criminal of tomorrow. Condemn, as is the 
practice in every city, the truant child to the street and inevitably 
you augment our criminal ranks. The question previously asked in 
these reports is here repeated: If the State can justify herself in 
maintaining a prison for the criminal of tomorrow, what excuse can 
she offer for failing to maintain a reform school for the truant of 
today? 

BETTER PLAYGROUND FACILITIES FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN 

The time has come when the State should face squarely and 
attempt to solve the problem of proper playground and gymnasium 
facilities for school children. The State, through its Compulsory 
Education Law, has become the agent of the parent and thus 
assumed duties and obligations which can not be avoided. Grave 
responsibilities have been voluntarily undertaken and no matter how 
expensive, the parent has a right to demand that the physical and 
moral welfare of the child be guarded as well as his mental powers 
developed. Compulsory education laws take the child by force from 
the home during definite hours of the day and days of the week, 
leaving no choice in the matter to the parent, and compel the child 
to submit to dangers and conditions that should no longer be toler- 
ated. 

The State has insisted on mental dicipline and training and ex- 
pended large sums of money for this purpose every year. Much 
has been done for the health and comfort of the pupil by insisting 
on good school sanitation and proper school buildings; but much is 
still lacking in our school equipment and this defect is the matter of 
school playgrounds and gymnasiums. The mental discipline feature 
of education has been emphasized to the point where physicians are 
warning the educator that serious consequences to health are in- 
volved in the present method of instruction. Frequent examinations 
and close confinement in schoolrooms without proper outdoor exer 
cise have already shown their influence upon the nervous conditiop 
of school children and the problem involved is serious. 

The matter of accidents to school children is attracting much at- 
tention. In our cities and larger towns the school children are com- 
pelled to play in the streets — school grounds are not properly pro- 
vided — and the newspapers are daily recording the serious acci- 
dents that occur. One writer has collected some very signifi- 
cant statistics and they should be considered by the State in con- 
nection with its compulsory education laws. In the month of June, 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 29 

1908, newspapers reported 162 cases of children who were run over 
by trolley cars, 142 by wagons and carriages, 84 by automobiles, 50 
by bicycles, 52 by trains, 79 by horses ; and during the 100 days prior 
to the 28th day of May 1909, according to the report of the Board 
of Education, 422 children in New York city alone had been 
maimed by vehicles while playing in front of school buildings. 

Society is fighting the white plague today and the school authori- 
ties must do their part. Physical training is necessary for the child 
if he is to escape this disease. Confinement in the warm school- 
room winter and summer, without proper exercise in gymnasium and 
on playground, enervates the pupil and renders him susceptible to 
all kinds of maladies. The State can do much to meet its obligation 
to the parents, from whom it has forcibly taken the children, by 
insisting that, in connection with every school building, provision be 
made for suitable land for playgrounds and gymnasiums for physi- 
cal training. And prompt action is urgent because land will never be 
cheaper nor more accessible. The law should be amended so as to 
provide that no plans for new school buildings should be approved in 
the future which have not provision for adequate playgrounds and 
gymnasiums. Proper playgrounds, well-equipped gymnasiums, under 
the direction of competent men who understand children, would do 
more for the moral and physical welfare of the coming gener- 
ation than any other combination of forces. The schools must pro- 
tect the bodies as well as fill the brains of the children if they are 
to become strong and useful citizens. 

VACATION SCHOOLS 

Vacation schools for children were maintained in many of the 
cities of the State during the past year. The large attendance, which 
is wholly optional, testifies to their popularity, and their success 
demonstrates that they meet a real need. Many different classes of 
children profit by them. 

In the cities, and in the larger villages as well, there are many 
children who must spend the long summer vacations at their homes 
where there is no suitable opportunity for play or recreation of any 
kind. It is better for such children to be in these schools than upon 
the streets. Some of them, and other children as well, fall behind 
in their classes, and a short period of study each day will save them 
the loss of a year or a half year in their school course. The vacation 
school, however, does not consider this work its only or even its 
chief function. Girls are taught cooking, sewing and other forms of 



30 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

home work, while the boys are taught simple work in manual train- 
ing. In some cases, school gardens are maintained to an excellent 
advantage. 

Play is ah important factor in the work of the vacation schools. 
Opportunities for play are much more favorable than in the homes 
of most of the children of the vacation schools. In fact some of the 
children would have no opportunity for play but for these schools 
and play is a very important factor in the education of a child. 

Perhaps the most important educational problem of this country 
is that of making good American citizens of the great mass of chil- 
dren who are either foreign born, or the children of foreign born 
parents, who come to us from many lands, each race having its own 
ideal of social life and government. Ideal will clash with ideal, to 
the general disadvantage, until we have developed a homogeneous 
conception comprising the best that each race brings to us. The pub- 
lic school has always been a great factor in this work, but the va- 
cation school offers opportunities that the regular school can not. 
The vacation school with its games, its friendly play, the various 
groups and their leaders, develops courage, self-reliance and a de- 
sire to excel and results in a common and patriotic interest 
among all the children. 

The movement for the establishment of vacation schools is a very 
promising one and should receive the most earnest and sympathetic 
attention of the local school authorities of each city and village in 
the State. 

SCHOOL TJBBAHTE1 

Outside the cities, there are approximately 300 school libraries 
containing more than 1000 volumes each, and 300 containing from 
500 to 1000 volumes, each. There are thus about 600 school libraries 
in the State outside the cities having more than 500 books each. 
As the school libraries increase in size, the necessity of adopting 
and maintaining an orderly system of caring for them is more 
and more impressed on the teachers. The mere physical protec- 
tion of the books will not suffice. To be of value, they must 
be read. Therefore, their classification and an effective charging 
system are important, as well as the selection, the arrangement, the 
protection and repair of the books included therein. It, therefore, 
follows that all persons in charge of large libraries, especially, should 
have instruction in and preparation for their duties, as some of them 
now have. The office of librarian should be more generally rated 
as useful and honorable and be given more substantial recognition in 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 31 

our school system ; and this the Education Department is endeavor- 
ing to accomplish. Among the present agencies for giving instruc- 
tion in this branch of educational work are regular library schools, 
summer library schools, normal schools, and some high schools, many 
of which are already doing their duty in this line, and it only remains 
for others to follow their leading. 

For the purpose of indicating ways to avoid some of the diffi- 
culties with regard to these matters which still confront teachers 
and school boards, this Department has recently published a hand- 
book on Care of School Equipment 

Considered from a financial point of view, the school libraries of 
the State represent an investment of approximately $2,000,000, and 
common business prudence requires that they shall be carefully pre- 
served and made to yield the highest return. Considered from an 
educational point of view, they are school adjuncts of such high im- 
portance that without a liberal use of them the standard of efficiency 
would be very perceptibly lowered. 

It can not be expected that so large an equipment of school library 
books, scattered over the entire State, and administered in inde- 
pendent sections by thousands of teachers having no special train- 
ing as librarians, would always be managed carefully or economically. 
Valuable books are sometimes subject to unnecessary exposure and 
injury, to loss in not recalling loans, or to neglect of their proper 
arrangement. It is freely acknowledged that, in the main, the 
teachers in this State are alert and intensely interested in the 
libraries under their charge and that they are doing all that could 
fairly be expected. The difficulty is not in intentional neglect, but 
rather in lack of professional knowledge and experience in the work 
indicated. 

Much can be done and has been done by the regular supervisory 
officers, including principals, superintendents, school commissioners, 
and Department inspectors, to meet the increasing need of thorough 
and systematic care of library books, and much is being done by the 
Department by requiring reports of local conditions, advising by 
letter, and distributing printed suggestions. It is suggested, how- 
ever, that the interests of the State may require the services of one 
or more visiting experts who, by individual advice and demonstra- 
tion, shall supplement previous instruction in the most direct and 
helpful manner. 

It seems apparent also that the Legislature should either definitely 
prescribe a minimum equipment of library books and apparatus, or 
authorize methods of securing the same for the elementary schools. 



32 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Pupils and teachers should not labor under tne disadvantage of hav- 
ing no books for reading and reference, no globe or other apparatus 
to illustrate the subjects of study, and little or nothing with which 
to do the work outlined in the Elementary Syllabus because of the 
ignorance of a trustee or the indifference of a community. 

The demand on the part of the general public for loans of books 
from school libraries, particularly where there are no free public 
circulating libraries, was never so strong as during the past year. As 
it now stands, the school law permits lending to pupils, teachers and 
school officers only, but there is no sufficient reason why the use of 
such books as are not needed by the schools for frequent reading 
or reference should not be freely granted to any persons of responsi- 
ble age residing within the respective districts. Indeed, so long as 
the schools are not permitted to suffer disadvantage, it is highly 
desirable that, in the interest of general intelligence and morality, 
the use of the books by youths and adults outside of the schools shall 
be encouraged. The equipment could thus be made to yield a larger 
return, and taxpayers would justly be enabled more directly to enjoy 
and profit by the use of public property which they have helped 
pay for. 

MEDICAL INSPECTION IV THE 80E00L8 

There is no general law which authorizes the medical examination 
of children in attendance upon the public schools. Nor is there any 
general law which authorizes a board of trustees to expend the funds 
of a district or city for the medical inspection of school children. 
The local school acts of certain cities or the provisions of the 
charters of some cities do authorize such inspection and the 
expenditure of city funds therefor. The right of school authori- 
ties to expend money for this purpose and the right of the people 
of a city or district to authorize a tax to raise funds for this pur- 
pose are questions which have been coming to this Department more 
and more during the past two or three years for determination. The 
ruling of the Education Department has been that, without some 
express declaration in a special statute relating to a city either 
authorizing the school authorities to use funds set apart for school 
purposes or empowering the people to vote funds to be raised by 
tax, boards of education have not the right to use such funds or to 
raise a tax to meet the expenses incurred for the physical or medical 
inspection of children. The ruling has also been that there is no 
provision of the Education Law which authorizes a school district or 
city to vote a tax for such purpose. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 33 

If the demand for medical inspection of children is to be met and 
made effective, there must be additional legislation. If the Legis- 
lature deems it wise to extend the powers of school authorities in 
thi^ direction, there are certain fundamental principles which should 
be observed. A proper distinction must be preserved between the 
functions of the school authorities and the health authorities. The 
schools are under the management and supervision of properly 
constituted authorities. The responsibilities of such authorities 
should not be divided or shared with other authorities of a munici- 
pality. Whatever is done should be under the exclusive control and 
management of the school authorities. Regulations for the pro- 
tection of the public health or to arrest or correct a disease in its 
incipiency should be formulated by the health authorities, but the 
enforcement of that regulation in the schools should be under the 
direction of the school authorities. In other words, the school 
authorities should stand in the same relation to the school that a 
parent does to the home, and the health authorities should not have 
the right to enter a school except for reasons which would legally 
entitle them to enter a home. 

For three years the Education Department has cooperated with 
the State Commissioner of Health to bring about the inspection of 
the eyes, ears, noses and throats of the children in attendance upon 
the schools in cities and incorporated villages. The Commissioner 
of Health has forwarded to the school authorities of these cities and 
villages printed matter for distribution among the teachers, giving 
complete instruction in the method to be pursued in making this 
examination. These tests are harmless, painless, uncomplicated and 
made without the use of instruments. In order to make the plan 
efficient and to interest the largest number of teachers possible, 
institute conductors were instructed to explain to teachers in attend- 
ance upon teachers institutes the method of making such examina- 
tions. A representative of the Health Department interviewed each 
institute conductor and went over the whole general plan with him. 
It was understood with the State Commissioner of Health that the 
whole plan should be entered upon voluntarily and that teachers 
were not required to make these tests unless the local school authori- 
ties were willing to direct such action without the slightest feeling 
that they were being coerced. Institute conductors were directed 
to make it perfectly clear to teachers and trustees that the law does 
not require these tests to be made. They were also instructed to 
inform teachers that any parent who objects to having his children 
examined is within his legal rights and that his objection must be 

2 



34 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

respected. Teachers were also instructed to report to parents all 
cases where the examination reveals that the child is suffering from 
any of the ordinary diseases of these organs. It was also pointed 
out that, if at any time during the year, a child should be afflicted 
with a disease which appears to be contagious, the teacher should 
report such fact to the parent and to the health authorities. Fur- 
ther than above stated, school officers or teachers were directed 
to assume no responsibility whatever. 

The plan has worked satisfactorily to the Education Department 
and to the Commissioner of Health and without friction between the 
local school authorities and the parents of children in attendance 
upon school. The pupils of 450 schools located in the incorporated 
villages of the State were examined last year, and a service vital 
to the physical and mental condition of the children of the State may 
be rendered by a continuation of this voluntary action of the school 
authorities. 

OOVTAAOT 8Y8TSX 

About 500 school districts in the State maintaining district 
organizations do not maintain home schools, but provide for the 
education of their children in other districts under the contract sys- 
tem. The provision of the Education Law authorizing such con- 
tracts was enacted in the interest of those districts not having suffi- 
cient property or children to maintain a home school and containing 
children required to attend school who live so far from the school- 
house of another district as to be unable to walk to and from school. 
To dissolve a district of this kind might operate as a hardship upon 
some of the children and prevent them from receiving the rudiments 
of an education. A parent in many instances is unable to provide 
transportation, but as the public money of a district may be used to 
pay the actual expense of transportation, a district may contract and 
pay both the tuition and transportation from the money apportioned 
the district by the State. If there are no children in a district resid- 
ing too far from the schoolhouse of an adjoining district to walk to 
and from school, and such district is unable financially or numerically 
to maintain a school, the course of procedure would be the disso- 
lution of such district and the annexation of its territory to other 
districts. 

It often occurs that school districts able to maintain a satisfactory 
school prefer to contract with another district or with a city because 
it costs less than to maintain a home school, or because of the better 
school facilities which the children receive through such arrange- 
ment. In many cases the plan is satisfactory but the soundness of 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 35 

the whole scheme is open to some question. The question of con- 
veyance of pupils is a source of great trouble in the contracting dis- 
tricts and to this Department. In many districts the feeling is so 
intense that the value of the school to the contracting district is 
almost wholly nullified. The transportation of children under the 
contract system was judicially determined by the Commissioner of 
Education in 1905 in decision no. 5219, and in view of the many 
misunderstandings over this question during the past year the 
fundamental holdings upon this question as laid down in that deci- 
sion are given here. They are as follows : 

The moral and legal obligation rests upon every parent to 
give his child the advantages of the school facilities afforded 
by our system of public education. He should do this even at 
great inconvenience and expense if necessary. He should not 
expect remuneration nor should it be given for such trouble 
as may reasonably be expected of a parent to enable his chil- 
dren to attend school. 

To vote compensation to a parent from the public funds for 
taking his child to and from school was not intended under the 
contract law. 

Payment to a parent for conveying his children to school 
comes dangerously near being an improper consideration to 
influence his vote in favor of the contract system when it might 
be more desirable to maintain a home school. 

The intent of the law in providing transportation is that it 
should be regular and daily ; that individual parents should not 
derive pecuniary advantage from it; and that nothing should be 
left to parental convenience or caprice. 

The general rule should be that one person of proper char- 
acter, furnishing suitable accommodations, should be regularly 
employed and the contract for transportation should be awarded, 
after opportunity for competition, to the most reliable party 
who will furnish the best transportation at the lowest cost 
to the district. 

TIME SCHEDULES 

In order to obtain definite information on the subject and furnish 
a fair basis for comparison the inspectors of the Department were 
instructed at the beginning of the school year to report the total 
number of minutes per week given to recitation in every subject of 
the course to each grade or section of a grade. A study of the 
schedules of 606 union schools and schools in the city systems thus 
reported, sustains the following conclusions: 

1st Lack of unity of thought or purpose in the time schedules of 
a school. 2d Allotments in some subjects excessively high in cer- 
tain grades and excessively low in preceding or succeeding grades. 



36 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



3d Too much time to formal recitation and too little to study and 
to teaching pupils how to study. 4th Recitation periods too long, 
longer than the concentrated attention of pupils under ordinary con- 
ditions can be held. 5th Disregard of the fact that certain subjects 
should receive special stress at certain stages of the course. 6th 
Recitation periods in many schools in certain subjects from 50 per 
cent to 100 per cent longer than other schools similarly circum- 
stanced. 7th Wide discrepancy in time schedules where two or 
more sections of a grade recite to different teachers. 8th 396 
schedules out of a total of 606 — 65 per cent of all reported — make 
no allotment for reading in the eighth grade; 152, or 25 per cent, 
make no provision for reading either in the seventh or eighth grade. 
There are upwards of 25 schools that make no provision for reading 
in one or more of the preceding grades. 

School officials apparently fail to realize that the time schedule or 
recitations in a school or system of schools largely determines some 
of the most vital points of its school economy. The relative value 
of different subjects in the course of instruction, the precedence and 
correlation of subjects, the stages in the mental development of the 
child, when certain subjects should receive maximum or minimum 
attention or no attention at all, the proportionate amount of time that 
should be devoted to study and the amount to recitation, whether 
there should be home study or not, and if so, where it should begin 
and how much there should be of it, how long the concentrated 
attention of pupils in recitation can be held economically at the suc- 
cessive periods of school life — all these are questions that should 
receive due and intelligent consideration in the formulation of the 
time schedule, and the results of such consideration should be clearly 
discernible in it throughout. 

A summary of the schedules of these 606 schools has been pre- 
pared in the form of a general average table, which follows : 



SUBJECTS 


First 
grade 


Scoond 
grade 


Thlrd 
grade 


Fourth 
grade 


Fifth 
grade 


Sixth 
grade 


Seventh 
grade 


Eighth 
grade 


Total 


Rending 


230+ 
46+ 
77+ 
05 
89 

1+ 


47 

• ■ • • • 

19 
10+ 


207+ 

70+ 

72 

83+ 

114+ 

6+ 



62+ 

■ • • • • 

28+ 
26 


172+ 

74+ 

70 

98+ 
130 

72+ 


56 

• • « • • 

28 
11+ 


130+ 
71+ 
66 

111+ 

138+ 

113+ 

2+ 

57 

• • • • • 

34 
10 


118+ 

71+ 

68+ 

119+ 

142+ 

119+ 

49+ 

5ft+ 

■ • ■ • • 

37 
8 


107+ 

69+ 

60+ 

129+ 

149+ 

130+ 

65+ 

58+ 

• • ■ • ■ 

89 

6+ 


74 
72 

45+ 

140+ 

160+ 

159+ 

74+ 

56+ 

• ■ * • « 

41 
5 


84 

49+ 

23 

189+ 
189+ 

50+ 
172 

68+ 

> • • * • 

47+ 

8+ 


1097+ 


Spelling 


534+ 


Writing 


487+ 


Language, literature, grammar. . . 


962+ 
1117+ 




666+ 




408+ 


Drawing and manual training. . . . 

Industrial and trade training 

Physiology 


440+ 
27&+ 




76+ 




617+ 


898+ 


748+ 


761+ 


819+ 


fUSU- 


895+ 


886+ 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



37 



Though the average schedule is clearly not above criticism, the 
wide discrepancies in the individual programs very largely disappear 
in the averages. This average schedule is in general a better guide 
in determining relative allotments than the best individual schedules. 

Four exhibits are given below to illustrate common defects and 
irregularities found to exist in time schedules: 

Exhibit i shows the maximum and minimum allotments found in 
the elementary schools of a city of the second class. 

Exhibit 2 shows the allotments to the two sections of each grade 
in the same school in a city of the third class. 

Exhibit 3 shows the corresponding allotments to the grades in 
two schools in a village employing a superintendent of schools. 

Exhibit 4 gives the complete time schedule of the elementary de- 
partment of a school located in a village that does not employ a 
superintendent of schools. 

Exhibit x 



SUBJECTS 


First 
grade 


8econd 
grade 


Third 
grade 


Fourth 
grade 


Fifth 
grade 


Sixth 
grade 


Seventh 
grade 


Eighth 
grade! 


Reading 


100 
450 


100 
50 

150 


150 
50 
300 


100 

400 
50 

175 


150 
20 

150 
75 

aoo 


30 


100 

400 
50 

200 
45 

140 
50 

175 
100 

450 
50 

200 


100 

875 
50 

150 
45 

150 
100 

250 
150 

350 
75 

226 


75 

400 
50 

150 
25 

150 
100 

300 
100 

600 
85 

250 


00 

250 
60 

150 
25 

125 
125 

260 
150 

450 
100 

260 

60 


75 

226 
60 

150 
35 

125 
125 

300 
200 

450 
125 

300 
60 
250 



300 


%*%« , , 


30 
100 


Witting 


30 
125 


Language, literature 
gruunar 


175 

526 


ftrtthmntlr 


225 

526 










225 

300 



Exhibit 2 



SUBJECTS 


Firet 
grade 


Second 
grade 


Third 
grade 


Fourth 
grade 


Fifth 
grade 


Sixth 
grade 


Seventh 
grade 


Eighth 
grade 


Hrwfirur 


375 

650 
125 


125 

150 
75 


200 
50 


200 

225 
75 

100 
100 

100 
100 _ 
75* 
200 

125 

100 

100 
100 


175 

200 
100 

100 
75 

100 
100 

100! 

200 

200 
100 

100 

75 

50 
100 
100 


100 

150 
100 

100 
75 

50 
150 

126 
200 

150 
150 

125 

75 

50 
100 
100 


150 

150 
100 

75 
75 

75 
150 

150 
150 

150 
150 

150 

75 

75 
100 
100 


150 

150 
75 

75 
75 

75 
150 

150 
175 

150 
150 
150 

75 

75 
150 
150 


175 

175 
75 

75 
88 

88 
175 

175 
175 
175 

175 
175 

87 

87 
150 
150 


175 
175 


SmHtaff' 






88 
88 


Laagoage.ltteieiia^ grammar — 
ArtniMtle 


175 

175 
175 

175 






Ancrkaa hbtory 




175 
176 


«* ■ 


100 

100 
100 

100 


87 

87 
150 
150 


Physiology In )*** **** <** term for 




i ar= 







38 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Exhibit 3 



SUBJECTS 



Reading 

Spelling 

Writing 

Language, literature, grammar. 

Arithmetic 

Geography 

American history 

Drawing and manual training. . 



First 
grade 



800 



160 
100 



175 
75 



1* 



75 



150 



100 



100 



150 



00 



Second 
grade 



200 



100 
150 
150 



175 



125 
60 
40 
00 



100 



00 



00 



Third 
grade 



160 



100 
150 
150 
150 



100 



50 
40 
00 



400 



100 



40 



125 



80 



Fourth 
grade 



125 
1 
50 



125 
150 



150 

) 

150 



125 



75 
150 



100 



175 



150 



125 



80 



Fifth 
grade 



100 



150 



75 

50 

150 



75 
75 



125 



150 



150 



100 



150 



00 



90 



Sixth 
grade 



75 

45 

150 

150 

125 



75 

80 

125 

125 

125 



80 



00 



Exhibit 4 



SUBJECTS 


First 
grade 


Second 
grade 


Third 
grade 


Fourth 
grade 


Fifth 

grade 


Sixth 
grade 


Seventh 
grade 


Eighth 
grade 




160 


300 

150 

76 

15 

250 

50 
50 
30 
30 


276 
50 
75 
100 
100 
100 

75 
50 
50 


205 
120 
80 
125 
200 
120 

75 
75 
30 
45 


250 

150 

00 

225 

225 

180 

80 

76 

75 

20 


150 

00 

30 

150 

150 

160 

30 

75 

75 

30 

80 


150 

150 

150 

200 

120 

75 

75 

30 




Spelling 




Writing 


100 

100 

50 




Language, literature, grammar 


200 
200 


GeosraDhy 




American history 




215 


Musis 


75 

75 

75 

100 


00 
60 


Physiology 


80 




*••■••• 



OOXKEXOBATXVE EVENTS 

Notable commemorative events during the year observed under 
the direction of the Department were the Lincoln centenary, the 
tercentenary of the discovery of Lake Champlain, and the celebra- 
tion of the discovery of the Hudson river 300 years ago and its 
initial navigation by steam in 1807. 

The Lincoln centenary was widely observed by the schools, in 
conformity with the brochure published in the last annual report, 
and valuable lessons in patriotism were imparted by the review of 
the life and service of the savior of the republic. 

The brochures issued in connection with the splendid celebration 
by the State of the two great events in its history are elaborate in 
design and data. They present the biographies of Champlain, Hud- 
son and Fulton with considerable detail, and indicate the historic 
significance of their achievements. They also contain descriptions, 
maps, plates of scenery, portraits and facsimiles of the handwriting 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 39 

of distinguished men related to the development of the territory 
which discovery opened to civilization ; with programs of the public 
ceremonies, suggestions for local observances, composition, debate, 
constructive work, tableaux; and full bibliographies. The Depart- 
ment takes a pardonable pride in these issues, both for their artistic 
excellence and their instructive character. They were widely dis- 
tributed among the schools and were uniformly received with favor. 
Their educative influence — the interest they have inspired among 
the pupils of the State, its coming citizens, in* the glories of its 
history — can not be estimated too highly. 

ARBOR BAT 

The Arbor Day manual was especially attractive and instructive, 
as it has been for several years past; and the day was observed 
throughout the State by suitable exercises. Zeal in the planting of 
trees and the beautifying of school grounds is increasing. There 
were 117,043 live trees in and about these grounds in 1909, as com- 
pared with 112,384 in 1908: but there is still less of continuous care 
of these throughout the year than there should bo. and school author- 
ities need to be further impressed with their duty in this regard. 

AVOTAL SCHOOL MEETINGS 

The annual meetings of school districts are now held on the first 
Tuesday in August. The people would exhibit a keener interest in 
these meetings if they were held in the spring when the schools are 
in session and they would more generally attend such meetings then 
to give their approval of a good school or to express their dis- 
approval of a poor school than they would two months after such 
school had closed. 

Appropriations for repairs are usually voted at the annual meeting 
and it generally takes the trustee from one to three weeks to obtain 
material and make the necessary preparation to begin such repairs. 
It is then time for school to open. In such cases the opening of 
school must be delayed or the work of the school interrupted by 
such repairs being made while the school is in session. If the annual 
meeting was held earlier in the year and repairs or improvements 
to the school property should then be authorized, trustees would have 
ample time to make all necessary arrangements to begin the work 
on such repairs or improvements as soon as 9chool closed. This 
work could be performed during the summer vacation and the school 
be ready for occupancy at the usual time for the opening of school 
in September. 



40 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Teachers of rural schools desire to know early in the year where 
they are to teach the following school year. Many of them are 
unwilling to wait to enter into contracts until the annual meetings 
have been held. The practice of a sole trustee employing a teacher 
for the ensuing year before the expiration of his term is becoming 
more and more general. The law confers upon a trustee this power. 
The object of this provision of law was to enable a district to con- 
tinue the service from year to year of a satisfactory teacher. It 
often operates directly contrary to what was intended. In many 
cases a trustee for personal reasons retains a teacher for the ensuing 
year when the best interests of the district demand a change. Many 
school controversies arise over this question which destroy the effi- 
ciency of a school for the whole year. These unfortunate dis- 
agreements could be avoided and adequate provision made for the 
reengagement of satisfactory teachers if the annual meetings were 
held in the spring. It is therefore recommended that the date of the 
annual meeting be changed from the first Tuesday in August to the 
second Tuesday in May. 

If the Legislature should act favorably upon this recommendation, 
no change should be made in the dates defining a school year and 
the term of a trustee should be coincident with the school year, but 
the trustee elect should be given the power to hire teachers for the 
ensuing school year any time after his election. A trustee should 
also be prohibited from employing a teacher for a period beyond 
his term of office. 

REVISION OF EDUCATION LAW 

The Consolidated School Law, the University Law and several 
independent statutes relating to the public school system were 
included in the work of the Board of Statutory Consolidation into 
one chapter under the title Education Law. This chapter is 16 of 
the consolidated laws. This proves to be a wise arrangement of the 
statutes relating to public education and this arrangement serves a 
great convenience to school officers throughout the State. 

The statutes now embraced in the Education Law fiave not been 
revised in many years. Many provisions in the law as it now stands 
have been obsolete for a long period. There has been no legislation 
since the unification act of 1904 to bring all the statutes bearing upon 
the public school system into harmonious relation with that act. The 
Board of Statutory Consolidation was not authorized to change the 
substance of any of the general statutes and did not therefore repeal 
or modify these conflicting provisions of law. The work of that 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 41' 

board, however, did place the Education Law in good form for a 
thorough revision. This Department has rewritten this law during 
the year so as to improve the order of its arrangement, clarify its 
form, eliminate obsolete matter, make it more clearly to support 
the constructions which judicial decisions have placed upon it, and 
change its provisions concerning the relations of the Board of 
Regents and the Commissioner of Education so that they will con- 
form to what has come to be the actual practice. No material 
changes in the substance of the law have been made. The enactment 
of this proposed revision into law would simplify school administra- 
tion and aid all school district officers in the proper performance of 
their duties. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

27 cities in the State, an increase of four over the previous year, 
maintained evening schools. The period of time devoted to a ses- 
sion in these schools was generally two hours. The number of 
evenings on which such schools were in session ranged from 40 to 
273. In New York city there were sessions on 210 evenings and in 
Utica on 273 evenings. Evening schools serve such an important 
function in the school system of the State that the period of their 
sessions should cover very nearly the same period which the 
day schools cover. The number of persons in attendance upon 
such schools was 132,233 and of this number 108,571 were abovfip 
the age of 16 and their attendance was therefore wholly voluntary. 
In four of these cities not a person under the age of 16 was in 
attendance. Evening schools should be maintained in all our large 
cities, not only for those under 16 who have not completed the 
elementary course, but for the instruction of adult foreigners in 
the English language and in American history. Special grants of 
State funds should be authorized by the Legislature to those cities 
maintaining such schools. Such expenditure would be a wise in- 
vestment on the part of the State. The expense of the mainte- 
nance of these schools was $830,775.86 and of this amount $784,- 
300.02 was raised by local taxation. 

SCHOOLS FOR THE DEAJ 

The State is paying for the education of deaf children in 10 
private institutions. During the year, the city of New York has 
opened a day school for the deaf in connection with the public 
schools. There are also several private schools in which fees are 
charged. 



42 NBW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Methods of instructing the deaf are varied and, while the subject 
is being constantly discussed, no decision as to the best method 
has yet been reached. The three methods employed in the schools 
of the State are, the oral, the manual spelling and the combined. 
Each has its advocates and its critics but there is a general agreement 
that oral instruction should be given to all pupils who are capable of 
receiving it. The time ought soon to come for an authoritative 
determination as to which method is preferable and which shall be 
encouraged and supported by the State. 

With 10 schools for the deaf in the State, it ought to be possible 
to classify pupils according to their degrees of deafness and to 
segregate the mentally defective from normal children. Such a 
classification would greatly improve the work of these schools. 

A standard of attainment ought to be established for schools for 
the deaf. Several schools have adopted the elementary course of 
the Department as a standard of graduation and that, or some 
modification of it to be agreed upon, should be accepted by all. 

The question of extending the attendance law to include deaf 
children is being discussed. Manifestly, something should be done 
to get more of these afflicted children into the schools. 

SCHOOLS FOR THE BUKD 

The developments of the year show an inclination on the part 
of the larger municipalities to provide for the instruction of the 
blind in the public schools. This seems to be entirely feasible, as 
the instruction of the blind presents no features that require specially 
prepared teachers and much of the work may be done successfully 
by the blind in classes with seeing children. 

The two schools for the blind that receive State pupils are doing 
good work along conventional lines. Just what school work is best 
for these children is a matter that deserves careful consideration. 
The improved methods of producing books have greatly widened the 
outlook for the blind and made instruction an easier task. 

Physical training receives considerable attention in the Batavia 
school with excellent results. The New York school has been 
handicapped in caring for the health of pupils by a poor location and 
building. The new buildings which are being planned, away from 
the noise and dirt of the city and with ample grounds, will give 
the school a new impulse and enable it to do much that has hitherto 
been impossible in providing for the physical welfare of pupils. 



sixth annual report 43 

xvdxa* schools 

There are 982 children of school age on the several Indian reser- 
vations. The number registered during the year in Department 
schools is 870 and the number reported as attending other schools 
242. Making allowances for inaccuracies in the records and for the 
duplication of names, there are in round numbers more than 1000 
Indian children in the State whose education is being provided at 
public cost and directed by the Education Department. 

The State meets the responsibility by maintaining a system of 
elementary day schools similar to those provided for white children. 
These schools are scattered over the sparsely inhabited reservations 
and for the most part are in charge of white teachers. They are 
doing fairly good work under adverse conditions. They are well 
equipped and supplied with material essential to effective work. The 
teaching is well up to the standard of the rural school and is under 
proper supervision. Each reservation has a principal teacher who 
looks after all the schools. Progress has been made during the year 
towards a more effective organization of the work and a better 
adaptation of the instruction to the condition and needs of the chil- 
dren. The industrial idea is more prominent than ever before and 
more work is being done in this line than in the average white school 
of corresponding grade. 

There are limitations upon the work, however, that hamper 
progress and should be removed. The salaries paid are so small 
that it is difficult to secure and retain the right kind of teachers. In 
many cases suitable boarding places are not available and the social 
deprivation is so great that teachers look elsewhere for employment. 
The small number of children in a school makes it practically im- 
possible to provide the kind and variety of training most desirable. 
Long distances from school, bad roads, lack of suitable clothing, 
health conditions, home influences and Indian customs are great 
obstacles to making the existing schools in the highest degree 
efficient. 

A change of policy seems desirable. Instead of many small 
schools a few central schools would be preferable. These might be 
day schools to which the children might be transported, or boarding 
schools, either for the entire time or for the school week. Such a 
plan would remove most of the existing difficulties. The teachers 
could live near the schools, the children would be prompt and 
regular, industrial training could be made more effective. 



44 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Educating the children on the reservations seems preferable to 
sending them away to school and then having them return. The 
children who are sent away for an education should remain among 
white people. The right policy seems to be to fit the children for their 
home environment and encourage the building up of home industries- 

The establishment of the industrial department in the Onondaga 
school seems to be a step in the right direction. It opens the way 
for the children of the reservation to learn how to use tools and 
machinery and thus prepare themselves for profitable employment 
outside of the reservation. 

The ultimate end in view in the education of Indians should be 
preparation for the responsibilities and duties of citizenship. The 
educational policy should include attention to the homes and to the 
instruction of adults, as far as possible, in home duties. The school 
influence should be extended to include the general health, morals 
and material prosperity of the community. 

PRISON SCHOOLS 

The work of the prison schools is no longer an experiment. 
Its practicability and value have been demonstrated. As a fac- 
tor in all prison administration having in view the improvement 
of the convict and his preparation to return to society a more 
efficient and better man, the school, properly organized and con- 
ducted, must hold high rank. 

These schools, organized four years ago, were possibly the 
first of the kind ever established in any country. Schools for 
boys in reformatories have long been common, but schools for 
adults in prisons are a new development in social effort. 

The prison schools of New York have followed no precedents 
in their administration and methods. They are not periodical 
schools nor night schools. They are in session every day, ex- 
cept Sundays and holidays, and those who are registered as stu- 
dents attend every day, for at least one hour. 

Reading is regarded as the chief reliance in the work. Men 
are taught to read and directed in their reading. Reading starts 
in the classroom and continues outside. It is supervised by the 
head teachers; the men are questioned upon what they read and 
often write down the substance of it. 

Because of a lack of room, only about one third of the men 
are in the schools. The most illiterate and needy are admitted. 
It is a great hindrance to the rounding out of the work that 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 45 

men have to be dropped too soon, to make room for others. 
This removes men from the schools at a point where they are 
getting the greatest good from the work. 

The value of the work in prison schools depends upon its 
character and this in turn depends upon the men in charge. 
Such work poorly and mechanically done is worse than useless. 
It calls for the highest qualities of head and heart, and only 
men of the right stamp can do it effectively. The State should, 
therefore, be most liberal in its appropriations of money for the 
salaries of the head teachers and for the employment of needed 
help. Parsimony here is waste and threatens the continued 
efficiency of the work. 

THE GEORGE JTOXOB REPUBLIC SCHOOL 

This institution maintains a public school. Its territory forms 
a separate school district. A superintendent and nine teachers 
are employed. This school is under the same regulations that 
govern the public schools of the State. It is subject to the 
supervision of this Department and reports annually to it. Its 
teachers are also licensed under the regulations of this De- 
partment. 

It is a unique and interesting effort to fit boys and girls for 
real life by training them to self-reliance. Necessity is made 
the incentive to effort. A citizen must work if he would have 
food, clothing and shelter. The degree of comfort he enjoys 
and his position in society depend on his own exertions. 

The citizens make and enforce the laws under which they 
live, get the benefits of good laws and suffer the loss and in- 
conveniences of bad ones. 

Industrial training and a practical education in citizenship are 
the fundamental features of the life of the Republic. The citi- 
zens learn to do by doing and by experiencing the natural ef- 
fects of their actions. They create wealth, get the most possible 
for their labor, buy and sell. They live in such style as their 
means will allow. Idleness leads to poverty and industry and 
thrift to prosperity, as in real life. Opportunity is given for 
learning to handle tools, to run machinery and to get the funda- 
mentals of trades. Manufacturing is carried on to a certain 
extent. 

There is a court, a police force, and a jail and plenty of work 
for them all. There is a well managed literary school and citi- 



46 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

zens are paid for their time while in attendance. Pupils are 
prepared for college or for business. 

The citizenship of the Republic is made up of minors, most 
of whom have been passed upon by outside society as incorrigi- 
ble, delinquent or criminally inclined. 

A visitor is impressed with the mental alertness of the young 
men and women. Those who have been in the Republic for 
some years have an air of responsibility, of self-reliance, of abil- 
ity to do things, of independence in thinking and expressing 
opinions. They seem free to question things, though possibly, 
they are not very studious in school. They seem to acquire a 
respect for law and enforce and accept penalties without a murmur. 

The whole spirit of the George Junior Republic is in contrast 
with that of the prisons. Here, freedom of action is encour- 
aged; in the prison system, repression is the weapon employed. 
In the one case, reform is sought through self-activity and in- 
itiative; in the other, through the use of the club. The plan 
in operation here has a most commendable aim — the correc- 
tion of delinquents before they are far advanced in evil courses. 

VISUAL INSTRUCTION 

Visual instruction is not restricted to the use of certain means 
provided by the Education Department, such as lantern slides 
and photographs. All instruction by which the external world 
is presented to the mind through the sense of sight in such a 
way that correct concepts are formed may be called visual. In 
a somewhat narrower sense visual instruction is a term used 
to describe teaching through graphic representations and pic- 
torial reproductions. Such teaching is by no means new. In 
theory its importance has been recognized since the rise of the 
school of realists in the 17th century, though in practice school 
exercises too often deal with words merely rather than with the 
primary material on which real thinking depends. The proper 
use of pictures is far from " soft pedagogy." The first require- 
ments for sound thinking are accurate precepts and clear con- 
cepts. These conditions can not be secured by the use of verbal 
language alone when objective realities are involved. 

It was in recognition of the value of visual instruction that 
the State of New York began in 1886 in a rather large way to 
prepare lantern slides for use in schools engaged in training 
persons for teaching. In 1895 a *d * n the use of such material 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 47 

was extended to cities and villages employing a superintendent. 
Since that time approximately 200,000 State slides have been de- 
posited in these school systems for the use of teachers in class- 
room work and for the benefit of mechanics, artisans and others 
living in the communities thus favored. In addition to this a 
large number of slides has been lent each year for short periods 
to village schools, study clubs, libraries and other organizations. 
The slides illustrate a wide range of topics of general interest 
in geography, travel, history, science, literature and art. The 
State has, properly, provided for the use of all of these insti- 
tutions and organizations what no one of them could for obvi- 
ous reasons, unaided, provide for itself. Much benefit has, un- 
doubtedly, been derived from the use of this material. 

The time has come when the use of this means of objective 
teaching should be extended, enlarged and further systematized. 
The larger privileges heretofore enjoyed exclusively by schools 
employing a superintendent can well be extended to the schools 
and academies not under a superintendent. A large proportion 
of these schools, located in the smaller communities of the 
State, are maintaining essentially the same course of study as 
the cities and can derive proportional benefit from the use of 
this means of instruction. A larger and longer loan of slides 
and photographs should be given these schools on the same 
liberal terms of payment of transportation charges and guar- 
anty of proper protection of the property of the State under 
which schools employing a superintendent have had done. 

While the usefulness of these aids has been fully demonstrated 
yet the fact remains that the full benefit of them has not yet 
been realized in many cases. The use of illustrative material 
has not been regarded with sufficient seriousness. It has been 
employed too exclusively for lectures of popular character given 
by principals and superintendents. Teachers should under- 
stand that the State provides this means of instruction for class- 
room use in developing the topics of the course of study adopted 
for the school. 

A selection of material from the State collection should be 
made by each school with special reference to the particular 
ends to be accomplished. When local school authorities have 
selected from the entire collection illustrative material for any 
particular subject and grade, it should be understood that all 
teachers of that subject and grade are to make use of it the same 



48 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

as they would of any other apparatus or material thus provided. 
Tests of results should be made as in the use of any other means 
employed. The capacity of pupils to develop ability to visualize 
or form correct mental concepts should be studied and meas- 
ured, and the character of instruction determined accordingly. 

As conditions upon which any city or school district shall con- 
tinue to receive such aids from the State it must be shown that 
the local school authorities are providing adequate facilities for 
the general use of the property by teachers in instructing classes, 
that a plan is in operation for making it readily available for the 
use of teachers, and that it is properly protected against loss or 
damage. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



49 



Comparative school statistics for elementary schools 

FINANCIAL 





Year 


Com'r dista. 


Cities 


State 




§S §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §§ §| 


$5 808 882 31 
5 570 046 75 


$22 769 580 46 
21 488 991 46 


$28 678 462 77 
27 059 038 21 




Inc. $238 835 56 


Inc.$l 280 589 .. 


Inc. $1 619 424 56 




$384 26 
370 87 


$1033 34 
1 017 81 


$769 23 
748 89 




Inc. $13 30 


Inc. $15 53 


Inc. $20 34 




$11 30 
10 97 


$26 77 
26 10 


$21 73 
21 16 




Inc. $ 33 


Inc. $67 


Inc. $57 


Expended for bufldinge, cftea. furniture, 


$744 314 12 
742 707 19 


$0 580 486 64 
12 377 130 95 


$10 824 750 76 




13 119 838 14 




Inc. $1 606 93 


Dec. $2 796 694 31 


Deo. $2 795 067 38 




$53 674 08 
118 161 16 


$10 290 07 
10 483 82 


$63 964 15 
128 644 98 




Dee. $64 487 08 


Dec. $193 75 


Dec $64 680 83 


Expended for tchool llbrartfiB 


$132 053 89 
97 523 34 


$98 206 84 
72 300 03 


$230 262 73 




169 823 37 




Inc. $34 530 55 


Inc. $25 908 81 


Inc. $60 439 30 


AD othrr mrklrntal exnenaee - .--.,., 


$2 069 370 70 
1 926 501 97 


$5 879 911 82 
6 060 923 13 


$7 949 282 52 




7 987 425 10 




Inc. $142 868 73 


Dec. $181 011 31 


Deo. $38 142 58 




$8 808 295 10 
8 454 940 41 


$38 338 427 83 
40 009 829 39 


$47 146 722 93 




48 464 769 80 




Inc. $353 354 69 


Dec.$l 671 401 56 


Den.$l 318 046 87 


Average annual eott per pupil baced od 
average daily attendance 


$29 64 
29 18 


$52 36 
56 60 


$45 80 




48 63 


• 


Inc. $46 


Dec $4 24 


Dec. $2 83 


Avenge annual cost per pupil based on 
reftotration 


$22 47 
21 61 


$42 95 
45 34 


$36 70 




38 05 




Inc. $86 


Dec. $2 89 


Dec.$l 35 



BSGBTRATION AND ATTBNDANC1 



Number of children between 5 and 18 
years of age attending school (omit 
ting dnpBcatea) 



Number of children over 18 yean of age 
attending eohool (omitting duplicates) 



Average daily attendance of children be- 
,5 and 18 jean of age 



1909 
1908 


300 947 
390 241 


802 377 
882 254 


1 283 324 
1 272 495 




Inc. 706 


Inc. 10 123 


Inc. 10 829 


1909 
1908 


1089 
992 


316 
267 


1 405 
1 250 




Inc. 97 


Inc. 49 


Inc. 146 


1909 
1906 


296 651 
289 205 


731 874 
706 711 


1028 525 
995 916 




Inc. 7 446 


Inc. 25 163 


Inc. 32 609 



So 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Comparative school statistics for elementary schools (continued) 

R1OTTBATI0M ABD ATRNDAHCI (conokukd) 





Year 


Com'r digit. 


Cities 


State 


Average daily attendance of pupils over 


1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 


608 
532 


269 
228 


777 




760 




Dee. 24 


Inc. 41 


Inc. 17 


Average number of days each pupil at- 
tended 


134 
133 


156 
167 


149 




140 




Incl 


Decl 









Number of school districts. 



SCHOOL 

1909 
1908 



DBTRICTS AMD BUILDINGS 



Number of schoolhouses . 



Number of log schoolhouses. 



Number of frame schoolhouses. 



Number of brick schoolhouses. 



Number of stone schoolhouses. 



Value of schoolhouses and sites. 



Volumes in library. 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



10 592 
10 595 


1 153 
1 147 


11 745 
11 742 


Dec 3 


Inc. 6 


Inc. 3 


10 836 
10 879 


1 153 
1 147 


11 969 

12 026 


Dec 43 


Inc. 6 


Dec 37 


10 
11 




10 




11 






Dec.l 




Dec.1 






9553 
9594 


211 
219 


9 764 
9 818 


Dec. 41 


Dec 8 


Dec 49 


992 
987 


936 
922 


1 928 
1 909 


Inc. 5 


Inc. 14 


Lie 19 


281 
287 


6 
6 


287 
293 


Dec. 6 




Dec 6 






$21 090 815 
19 395 601 


$132 502 273 
125 074 309 


$153 593 088 
144 469 910 


Inc$l 695 214 


Inc$7 427 964 


Inc$9 123 178 


1 258 213 
1 072 435 


931 720 
902 000 


2 189 933 
1 974 435 


Inc. 185 778 

1 


Inc. 29 720 


Jnc215 498 



Number of licensed teachers employed 
for 160 days or more 



Teachers employed for 
some portion of the 



Hen. 



Women. 



Total. 



1909 
1908 


TiAcaraa 

15 117 
15 019 


22 035 
21 113 


87 152 
36 133 




Inc98 


Inc922 


Incl 020 


1909 
1908 


1 695 
1 627 


1 733 
1 816 


3428 
3 443 




Inc68 


Dec. 83 


Dec 15 


1909 
1908 


14 411 
14 363 


21 119 
20 598 


85 530 
34 961 




Inc. 48 


Inc. 521 


Inc. 569 


1909 
1908 


16 106 
15 990 


22 852 
22 414 


38 958 
38 404 




Incll6 


Inc. 488 


Inc554 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



51 



school statistic* for elementary schools (concluded) 



UCKNSES BSLD 



College graduate and professional ear- 



Neraal dipionai. 



Tramtof class or school certificates. 



Local and commissioner licenses. 



Tear 



1909 
1906 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



1909 
1908 



Com'r dfets. 



201 
165 



lac 46 



204 
147 



Inc. 67 



3368 
3262 



Inc. 106 



5962 
5844 



Inc. 108 



5 730 
5703 



Inc. 27 



Cities 



2281 
2 562 



Dec 281 



1 122 
1 603 



Dec 481 



4 238 
4 119 



Inc. 119 



6233 
5400 



Inc. 827 



8842 
8 612 



Inc230 



State 



2482 
2 717 



Dee. 235 



1 326 
1 750 



Dec 424 



7596 
7871 



Inc. 225 



12 186 
11 250 



Inc. 935 



14 572 
14 316 



Inc. 267 



TBACH1RS nUOflNO CLASSSB 



Students reDorted first term 


1909 
1998 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 


Men 

82 
57 


Women 

1227 
1 101 


Total 

1 309 




1 158 




Inc. 26 


Inc. 126 


Inc 161 


Students reported second term 


85 
57 


1205 
974 


1 290 




1031 




Inc. 28 


Inc. 231 


Inc 260 


Visfti by school commissioner 






275 








271 
















Inc 4 
















117 








174 
















Dec 57 
















865 








1 013 
















Dec 148 
















$39 500 








39 475 
















Inc $25 













52 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Exhibit A 

Comparative school statistics for all public schools 



FINANCIAL 





Year 


Com'rdJsts. 


Cities 


State 




1909 
1908 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1906 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 


17 162 308 96 
6 830 702 57 


$26 042 348 52 
24 507 766 80 


$33 204 657 48 
31 338 469 37 




Inc. $331 606 39 


Inc.$l 534 581 72 


Inc.$l 866 188 11 




$422 90 
407 29 


$1 071 92 
1 055 78 


$805 33 
783 78 




Inc. $15 61 


Inc. $16 14 


Inc. $21 55 




$12 44 
12 05 


$27 77 
27 07 


$22 75 
22 14 




Inc.$ 39 


Inc. $ 70 


Inc$ 61 


Exponded for buildings, sites, furniture, 
repairs ete 


$937 214 66 
929 022 81 


$9 959 408 93 
13 301 191 24 


$10 896 623 59 




14 230 214 05 




Inc. $8 191 85 


Dec. $3 341 782 31 


Deo. $3 333 590 46 


Expended for school apparatus 


$79 246 26 
149 389 34 


$40 492 12 
30 622 75 


$119 738 38 




180 012 09 




Dec. $70 143 08 


' Inc. $9 869 37 


Dec. $00 278 71 


Expended for school libraries 


$162 083 24 
126 256 67 


$123 073 37 
86 764 81 


$285 156 61 




213 021 48 




Inc. $35 826 57 


Inc. $36 306 56 


Inc. $72 135 13 


All other incidentaTexpenses 


$2 782 502 30 
2 614 974 17 


$6 674 205 05 
6 675 658 09 


$9 456 707 35 




9 290 632 26 




Inc. $167 528 13 


Dec. $1 453 04 


Inc. $166 075 09 


Total expenditures, ...,,.,,... r . . 


$11 123 355 42 
10 650 845 56 


$42 8S9 627 99 
44 602 003 60 


$53 962 883 41 




55 252 349 25 




Inc. $473 009 86 


Dec$l 762 475 70 


Dcc.$l 289 455 84 


Average annual cost per pupil based on 
average daily attendance . .... r , .... . 


$34 47 
34 10 


$54 72 

59 45 


$48 81 




52 .. 




Inc. $37 


Dec. $4 73 


Dec. $3 19 


Average annual cost per pupil based on 


$26 25 
25 39 


$44 49 
47 19 


$38 91 




40 48 




Inc. $ 86 


Dec $2 70 


Dec.$l 57 



SCHOOL DOTRICIS AND BUILDINGS 



Number of school districts. 



Number of schoolhouses. 



Number of log schoolhouses . 



Number of frame schoolhouses. 



1909 
1908 


10 592 
10 595 


1 203 
I 194 


11 795 
11 789 




Dec. 3 


Inc. 9 


Inc. 6 


1909 
1908 


10 866 
10 898 


1 203 
1 194 


12 069 
12 092 




Dec 32 


Inc. 9 


Dec 23 


1909 


10 
11 




10 


1908 




11 










Decl 




Decl 








1909 
1908 


9555 
9596 


212 
220 


9 767 
9 816 




Dec. 41 


Dec. 8 


Dec. 49 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



S3 



Comparative school statistic* for all public schools (continued) 

SCHOOL DBIBICn AXD BUILDINGS («mch«W) 





Year 


Com'rdtots. 


Cities 


State 


Number of brlek schoolho*:ses 


§3 §§ §3 §§ 


1 010 
1 000 


962 
966 


1 992 




1 966 




Inc. 10 


Inc. 16 


Inc. 26 


Number of stone ichoolhouses 


291 
291 


9 
8 


300 




299 






Inc.l 


Inc. 1 




• 




Yalce of sohoolhousei and sites 


126 842 317 .. 
25 275 818 . . 


$150 890 955 .. 
142 180 779 . . 


$177 733 272 . . 




167 456 592 . . 




Inc. 11 566 504 .. 


Inc$8 710 176 .. 


lne.$10 276 680 .. 


Avenge rah* of schooUiouses and sites. 


12 470 30 
2 319 31 


$125 428 89 
119 079 38 


$14 726 43 
13 848 54 




Inc. $150 99 


Inc. $6 349 51 


Inc. $877 89 



CB1SJBS AND ARIHDAXC1 



Number of children of school age. 



Xaaber of children between 5 and 18 
jara of age attending school (omit- 
ting duplicates) 



Number of children over 18 yean of age 
atteading school (omitting duplicates). 



Average daily attendance of children be- 
tvaeo 5 and IS years of age 

Average daily attendance of pupils over 
'S yean oi age 

Arenas oumber of days each pupil at- 



1909 
1908 


461 913 
463 580 


1 465 022 
1 407 084 


1 926 935 

1 870 664 




Deal 667 


Inc. 57 938 


Inc. 56 271 


1909 
1908 


417 760 
414 077 


954 821 
938 120 


1 872 581 
1 852 197 




Inc. 3 683 


Inc. 16 701 


Inc. 20 384 


1909 
1908 


6050 
5 433 


8081 
7000 


14 131 
12 433 




Inc. 617 


Incl 081 


Incl 698 


1909 
1908 


318 881 
308 486 


776 907 
745 062 


1 095 288 
1 058 568 




Inc. 9 895 


Inc. 31 825 


Inc. 41 720 


1909 
1906 


4 269 

3 821 


6990 
5 182 


10 259 
9 003 




Inc. 448 


Inc. 808 


Inc. 1 256 


1909 
1908 


135 
134 


154 
155 


149 
149 




Inc. 1 


Deal 









54 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Comparative school statistics for all public schools {continued) 

TBACHXHS 





Year 


Com'r dfeta. 


Cities 


State 


Number of licensed tea 
for 160 days or more. 


chera employed 


1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 


16 936 
16 771 


24 295 
23 213 


41 231 




39 984 




Inc. 165 


Inc. 1 082 


lad 247 




[Men 


2 394 
2 329 


2 629 
2 667 


5023 




Total 


4 996 




Inc. 65 


Dec. 38 


Inc. 27 


Teachers employed dur- 
ing some portion of 
the year 


15 680 

16 597 


22 569 
21 995 


38 249 
37 602 


Inc. 83 


Inc. 574 


Inc. 657 




18 074 
17 926 


25 198 
24 662 


43 272 
42 588 




Inc. 148 


Inc. 536 


Inc. 684 



Bute certificates. 



College graduate certificates. 



Normal diplomas. 



Training class or school certificates. 



Local and commiaskmer licenses. 



1909 
1906 


LICENSES HELD 

838 

293 


2422 
2 677 


2 760 
2 970 




Inc. 45 


Dec 255 


Dec. 210 


1909 
1908 


1 079 
916 


1 787 

2 247 


2 857 

3 163 




Inc. 154 


Dec 460 


Dec 306 


1909 
1906 


4092 
4 046 


4 514 
4 381 


8606 
8427 




Inc. 46 


Inc. 133 


Inc. 179 


1909 
1908 


5 991 
5 881 


6 293 
5 456 


12 284 
11 337 




Inc. 110 


Inc. 837 


Inc. 947 


1909 
1908 


5883 
5 864 


9996 
9 739 


15 879 
15 603 




Inc. 19 


Inc. 257 


Inc. 276 



Average length of school term In days. . 



Volumes in library. 



C0XPUL80BT EDUCATION 



Number of children committed to truant 
schools 



Number of truants arrested by truant 
officer „ 



Number of parents prosecuted . 



1909 
1908 


MISCELLANEOUS 

170 
169 


193 
195 


177 
177 




Inc. 1 


Dec. 2 








1909 
1908 


1 762 296 
1 551 149 


1 157 560 
1 113 329 


2 919 856 

2 664 478 




Inc. 211 147 


Inc. 44 231 


Inc. 255 378 



1909 
1908 


104 
80 


797 
1 314 


901 
1 894 




Inc. 24 


Dec 517 


Dec 493 


1909 
1908 


775 
1 046 


5008 
13 934 


5783 
14 980 




Dec. 271 


Dec, 8 926 


Dec 9 197 


1909 
1908 


987 
741 


1 557 
852 


2544 
1 593 




Inc. 246 


Inc. 705 


Inc. 951 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



55 



Comparative school statistics for all public schools (concluded) 

NORMAL 8CB00IA 

Total number registered, mil departments 1909 

1908 



Total number registered, normal department only 1909 

1906 



Average daily attendance In normal schools 1909 

1908 



Number graduating from normal schools 1909 

1908 



Total cost of norma] achoola (fiscal year). 



8 494 
6600 



Dee. 166 



1 889 
20U 



Dec l*o 



5 SuA 

5 5-* 



Dec ltfd 



8 

967 

-04 



Dec — 
=37 



.1909 8471 438 = 

1908 572 586 89 

-26 



Dec $101 147 — 
3 7 

image eoat per graduate, excluding new buildings 1909 $481 = 

1908 491 44 

48 



Dec $10 



04 



Table 1 

Cost of maintaining schools 



TEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


$7 878 507 30 
8 340 117 77 


+ $461 520 47 


$5 406 889 34 
5 420 551 80 




$13 284 986 64 
13 760 669 57 




1887 


+$14 162 46 


+ $475 682 93 


1888 


209 464 14 


+ 869 846 87 


6 771 377 33 


+ 850 825 53 


14 980 841 47 


+ 1 220 171 90 


1889 


798 044 79 


+ 588 580 65 


6 078 800 12 


+ 307 422 79 


15 875 844 91 


+ 89600344 


1899 


11 317 463 73 


+ 1 519 418 94 


6 075 607 88 


— 3792 24 


17 892 471 61 


+ 1 515 626 70 


1891 


10 849 593 79 


— 467 869 94 


6 325 241 50 


+250 233 62 


17 174 835 29 — 217 636 32 


1832 


11 408 491 28 


+ 558 897 49 


6 795 496 76 


+ 470 255 26 


18 203 988 04+1 029 152 75 


1893 


11 720 596 32 


+ 312 107 04 


7 200 647 35 


+405 150 59 


18 921 245 67 


+ 717 257 63 


1894 


12 101 745 52 


4- 381 147 20 


7 206 825 67 


+ 6 178 22 


19 308 571 09 


+ 887 32542 


1895 


13 494 007 45 


+ 1 392 861 93 


7 456 006 67 


+ 249 181 10 


20 305 614 12 


+ 1 642 043 03 


1896 


15 542 071 50 


+2 047 464 05 


7 631 759 40 


+ 175 752 73 


23 173 830 90 


+2 228 216 78 


1897 


19 152 644 40 


+3 610 572 90 


7 537 212 31 


— 94 547 09 


26 689 856 71 


+3 516 026 22 


1898 


21 215 074 47 


+2 062 430 07 


7 260 797 41 


—278 414 90 


28 475 871 88 


+ 1 786 015 17 


1899 


20 854 544 52 


— 360 029 95 


7 198 445 97 


— 62 351 44 


28 052 990 49 


— 422 881 39 


1900 


25 897 502 28 


+5 043 047 76 


7523 899 09 


+ 325 453 12 


33 421 491 37 


+5 368 500 88 


1901 


28 717 148 56 


+2 819 556 28 


7 678 120 96 


+ 154 221 87 


36 395 269 52 


+2 973 778 15 


1992 


29 519 166 80 


+ 802 018 24 


7 849 851 06 


+ 171 730 12 


37 369 017 88 


+ 973 748 86 


1901 


33 234 586 49 


+ 3 715 419 69 


8 183 509 38 


+333 658 28 


41 418 095 85 


+ 4 049 077 97 


1904 


34 936 566 57 


+ 1 701 980 08 


8 813 710 26 


+ 630 200 90 


43 750 276 83 


+2 332 180 98 


1995 


38 949 897 92 


+4 013 331 35 


8 853 774 41 


+ 40 064 15 


47 803 672 33 


+4 053 395 50 


1906 


43 216 062 04 


+4 266 164 12 


9 055 798 79 


+202 024 38 


52 271 860 83 


+4 468 188 50 


1907 


44 122 238 38 


+ 906 178 34 


9806 437 48 


+ 750 638 69 


53 928 675 86 


+ 1 656 815 03 


1908 


44 602 003 69 


+ 479 765 31 


10 650 345 56 


+843 906 06 


55 252 349 25 


+ 1 323 673 39 


1909 


42 839 527 99 


— 1 762 475 70 


11 123 355 42 


+478 009 86 


58 962 883 41 


— 1 289 465 84 



56 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 
Amount expended for teachers' wages 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


$5 236 730 




13 865 537 




$9 102 268 




1887 


5 415 202 


+ $178 472 


3 891 222 


+ 


$25 685 


9 306 425 


+ 


$204 157 


1888 


5683 855 


+ 268 653 


3992 236 


+ 


101 014 


9 676 091 


+ 


369 666 


1889 


5 727 541 


+ 43 686 


4 007 062 


+ 


14 826 


9804 604 


+ 


128 513 


1890 


6 129 229 


+ 401 688 


4 292 942 


+ 


285 880 


10 422 171 


+ 


617 567 


1891 


6 564 805 


+ 435 136 


4 448 620 


+ 


155 678 


11 012 986 


+ 


690 815 


1892 


7 048 412 


+ 484 047 


4 572 653 


+ 


124 033 


11 621 066 


+ 


606 080 


1893 


7 146 693 


+ 96 281 


4 736 401 


+ 


163 748 


11 883 094 


+ 


262 028 


1894 


7 264 613 


+ 117 920 


4 788 404 


+ 


62 003 


12 053 017 


+ 


169 923 


1895 


8 010 135 


+ 745 522 


4 898 699 


+ 


110 295 


12 908 834 


+ 


855 817 


1896 


8 674 683 


+ 664 548 


4 944 544 


+ 


45 845 


13 619 227 


+ 


710 993 


1897 


9 158 205 


+ 483 522 


5 001 854 


+ 


57 810 


14 160 059 


+ 


340 882 


1898 


10 273 987 


+ 1 115 782 


4 882 291 


— 


119 563 


15 156 278 


+ 


996 219 


1899 


11 534 572 


+ 1 260 585 


4 950 075 


+ 


67 784 


16 484 647 


+ 


1 328 889 


1900 


14 166 808 


+ 2 632 236 


5052 085 


+ 


102 010 


19 218 893 


+ 


2 734 246 


1901 


16 320 989 


+ 2 154 181 


5 183 630 


+ 


131 545 


21 504 619 


+ 


2 285 726 


1902 


17 443 750 


+ 1 122 760 


5 272 587 


+ 


88 957 


22 716 337 


+ 


1 211 718 


1903 


18 509 203 


+ 1 065 453 


5 461 963 


+ 


189 376 


23 971 166 


+ 


1 254 829 


1904 


10 446 285 


+ 937 082 


5 709 896 


+ 


247 435 


25 155 683 


+ 


1 184 517 


1905 


20 700 015 


+1 253 730 


6 862 978 


+ 


153 575 


26 562 987 


+ 


1 407 304 


1906 


22 725 840 


+2 025 825 


6035 906 


+ 


172 933 


28 761 745 


+ 


2 198 758 


1907 


23 956 131 


+ 1 230 291 


6 448 346 


+ 


412 440 


30 404 477 


+ 


1 642 732 


1908 


24 507 767 


+ 551 636 


6830 703 


+ 


382 357 


31 338 460 


+ 


933 992 


1909 


26 042 349 


+ 1 534 582 


7 162 309 


+ 


831 606 


33 204 657 


+ 


1 866 188 



Table 3 
Amount expended for schoolnouses, sites, furniture and repairs 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


1 

Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


$1 405 773 
1 587 249 


+ $181 476 


$870 681 
806 754 


« 


$2 276 454 
2 394 004 




1887 


— 


$163 927 


+ $117 549 


1888 


1 855 433 


+ 263 184 


1 011087 


+ 


204 383 


2 866 521 


+ 472 517 


1889 


2 538 025 


+ 682 592 


1 206 534 


+ 


195 417 


3 744 559 


+ 878 038 


1890 


. 3 634 917 


+ 1 096 892 


958 347 


— 


248 187 


4 593 264 


+ 848 705 


1801 


2 707 165 


— 927 752 


998 798 


+ 


40 451 


3 705 964 


— 887 300 


1892 


2 669 918 


— 37 247 


1 255 272 


+ 


256 474 


3 925 191 


+ 219 227 


1893 


2 688 966 


+ 19 048 


1 372 126 


+ 


116 854 


4 061 092 


+ 135 901 


1894 


2 916 950 


+ 227 984 


1 222*345 


— 


149 781 


4 139 295 


+ 78 203 


1895 


3 493 724 


+ 576 774 


1 365 410 


+ 


143 065 


4 859 135 


+ 719 840 


1896 


4 410 055 


+ 916 331 


1 417 280 


+ 


51 870 


5827 836 


+ 968 201 


1897 


7 228 700 


+2 816 645 


1 171 977 


— 


245 303 


8 398 677 


+ 2 571 342 


1893 


7 553 570 


+ 326 870 


1 057 979 


— 


113 998 


8 611 549 


+ 212 872 


1899 


5 521 923 


—2 031 647 


895 993 


— 


161 986 


6 417 960 


— 2 193 633 


1900 


7 518 250 


+ 1 998 927 


1 030 393 


+ 


134 400 


8 548 643 


+ 2 130 727 


1901 


7 414 827 


— 103 422 


971 531 


— 


58 862 


8 386 858 


— 162 284 


1902 


7 092 179 


— 322 647 


1 007 503 


+ 


35 971 


8099 682 


— 286 675 


1903 


8 926 964 


+ 1 834 785 


984 959 


— 


22 544 


9 911 923 


+ 1 812 241 


1904 


9 258 476 


+ 331 512 


1 211 477 


+ 


226 518 


10 469 953 


+ 558030 


1905 


12 346 542 


+ 3 088 066 


775 357 


— 


436 120 


13 121 898 


+ 2 651 944 


1906 


14 719 053 


+2 372 511 


701 816 


— 


73 542 


15 420 868 


+ 2 298 970 


1907 


14 021 659 


— 697 394 


825 699 


+ 


123 883 


14 847 357 


— 573 511 


1908 


13 301 191 


— 720 468 


929 023 


+ 


103 324 


14 230 214 


— 617 143 


1909 


9 959 409 


—3 341 782 


937 215 


+ 


8 192 


10 896 624 


— 3 833 590 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



57 



Table 4 
Aggregate Yalue of tcnoolhouae* and titei 



TEAR 


Gltfcs 


Increase or 


Towns 


hawse or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1805 

1*96 

1897 

1808 

1809 

1100 

1901 

MOB 

1903 

1104 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 


939 861 478 

48 901 074 

49 784 988 
56 012 562 

50 208 868 
66 468 911 
73 375 726 
75 104 086 
82 174 215 
89 182 367 

101 742 635 
114 707 347 
128 579 824 
142 180 779 
150 890 955 


+14 539 601 
+ 5888 909 
+ 6 227 579 
+ 8256 291 
+ 6 195 068 
+ 4. 911 815 
+ 4728 800 
+ 7 070 129 
+ 6 958 152 
+ 12 610 268 
+ 12 964 712 
+ 14 171 977 
+ 13 801 455 
+ 8 710 176 


$14 038 543 
16 482 052 
16 292 617 
15 819 949 

15 884 762 

16 804 584 

16 916 688 

17 103 887 

17 494 026 

18 420 797 

19 970 082 
21 330 069 
23 488 141 

25 275 813 

26 842 817 


+82 893 509 

- 189 485 

— 472 666 
+ 64 818 
+ 419 822 
+ 612 104 
+ 186 699 
+ 380680 
+ 926 741 
+ 1 546 265 
+ 1 360 037 
+ 2 158 072 
+ 1 787 672 
+ 1 566 504 


853 400 016 

60 838 126 

66 077 600 

71 882 511 

75 153 615 

81 768 495 

87 292 414 

92 207 473 

99 666 241 

107 553 134 

121 712 667 

136 037 416 

152 367 465 

167 456 502 

177 788 272 


+86 988 110 
+ 5 744 474 
+ 6 764 911 
+ 8 321 104 
+ 6 614 880 
+ 5 528 919 
+ 4 915 050 
+ 7 460 768 
+ 7884 893 
+ 14 159 588 
+ 14 824 749 
+ 16 830 049 
+ 15 069 127 
+ 10 276 680 



Table 5 
Amount expended for libraries 



TEAR 


does 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


IMS 


120 746 




119 762 




140 508 




1887 


17 628 


-13 123 


22 008 


+12 336 


80 721 


— 1787 


1888 


20 121 


+ 2 498 


24 783 


+ 2 685 


44 854 


+ 5 133 


1880 


26 160 


+ 6 0394 


28 682 


— 1 151 


49 742 


+ 4 888 


1800 


22 426 


— 3 734 


27 468 


+ 3 881 


49 880 


+ 147 


1801 


24 620 


+ 2 194 


27 538 


+ 75 


52 158 


+ 2 269 


1802 


81 037 


+ 6 417 


80 782 


+ 8244 


61 819 


+ 9 661 


1893 


45 882 


+ 14 845 


48 468 


+ 17 686 


94 850 


+ 82 531 


1804 


59 626 


+ 13 744 


58 554 


+ 10 086 


118 180 


+ 23 830 


1805 


74 091 


+ 14 465 


58 848 


+ 294 


132 939 


+ 14 759 


1801 


71 585 


— 2506 


64 784 


+ 5936 


186 869 


+ 3 430 


1807 


95 074 


+23 489 


67 632 


+ 2848 


162 706 


+ 26 337 


1808 


88 866 


-8706 


78 601 


+ 10 969 


164 969 


+ 2 263 


1800 


68 743 


—17 625 


72 956 


— 5645 


141 609 


— 23 270 


H09 


58 426 


—10 317 


88 782 


+ 10 776 


142 158 


+ 450 


H01 


58 805 


+ 879 


82 078 


— 1 654 


140 883 


— 1 274 


U03 


108 176 


+49 870 


84 085 


+ 1 957 


192 211 


+ 51 827 


IM8 


69 997 


—88 179 


88 208 


+ 4268 


158 295 


— 83 916 


2*4 


160 253 


+00 256 


96 295 


+ 9997 


258 448 


+ 100 253 


iff* I 


84 901 


—76 852 


142 087 


+43 742 


226 988 


— 81 610 


iioo 1 


91 068 


+ 6 167 


160 868 


+ 18 831 


251 936 


+ 24 998 


1007 | 


86 472 


— 4596 


182 258 


—28 610 


218 730 


— 33 206 


I0Q8 | 


86 765 


+ 203 


126 256 


— 6002 


213 021 


— 5 709 


1M0 J 


123 073 


+ 86 808 


162 068 


+ 85 827 


285 156 


+ 72 135 



58 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 6 
Number, sixes and distribution of school libraries 1908-9 





00 
■c 

00 

3 


no. of 
1 districts 


secondary 
^hools 


NUMBER AND SIZES OF SCHOOL LIBRARIES 


of districts 
ng libraries 


ricts 
ries 


COUNTIES 






100 


200 


500 




r dist 
t libra 




Whole 
schoo 




1 to 


50 to 


to 


to 


to 


1 000 


= 




a 
8 

1 


49 


99 


199 


499 


999 


+ 


> 


No. 

with< 




43 


2 


2 


8 


25 


6 


2 




43 






2 
3 


65 
37 


1 


20 
5 


26 
9 


4 
7 


2 

9 






62 
31 


13 






1 


6 




1 


130 


6 


39 


39 


35 


4 


4 


1 


122 


8 




2 


116 


11 


40 


31 


24 


6 


4 


5 


110 


6 




1 


106 


2 


20 


31 


27 


7 


1 


1 


87 


19 




2 


97 


5 


29 


44 


10 


5 


4 


1 


93 


4 


Cattaraugus 


1 


114 


6 


14 


43 


35 


14 


3 


4 


113 


1 




2 


81 


6 


4 


21 


44 


5 


4 


3 


81 






3 


88 


6 


8 


36 


30 


6 


2 


3 


83 


5 


Cayuga 


1 
2 


97 
128 


6 
3 


17 
15 


37 
56 


22 
43 


6 
7 


3 
2 


1 

1 


86 
124 


11 




4 


Chautauqua .... 


1 


90 


6 


5 


26 


40 


9 


1 


4 


85 


5 




2 


96 


5 


9 


27 


42 


10 


2 


5 


95 


1 




3 


91 


8 


4 


27 


42 


8 


5 


2 


88 


3 






111 


6 


40 


40 


13 


14 




4 


11* 






1 


128 


6 


15 


40 


47 


9 


1 


4 


12 




2 


127 


7 


25 


43 


40 


4 


1 


4 


117 


10 


Clinton 


1 
2 


74 
45 


3 
1 


4 
7 


15 
22 


39 
13 


14 
2 


1 


2 


74 
45 






• • » • • 




3 


67 


4 


15 


20 


20 


5 


1 


2 


63 


4 




1 


70 


1 


5 


24 


25 


13 


3 




70 


• • » • • 




2 


81 


4 


8 


19 


30 


14 


5 


4 


80 


1 




1 


72 


3 


32 


17 


6 


2 


2 


• • • • • 


59 


13 




2 


73 


2 


16 


30 


13 


2 




1 


62 


11 




1 


180 


5 


45 


73 


27 


3 


1 


4 


153 


27 




2 


167 


7 


32 


78 


26 


7 




4 


147 


20 




1 


94 


6 


15 


27 


31 


7 


1 


5 


86 


8 




2 


89 


8 


7 


30 


29 


14 


7 


2 


87 


2 


Erie 


1 
2 


92 
95 


9 

7 


4 
18 


29 
24 


15 
10 


2 
2 


5 
7 


75 
91 


17 




4 




3 


83 


5 


21 


36 


15 


6 


2 


2 


82 


1 


EfUMx , r , r , 


1 
2 


85 
79 


6 
6 


13 
19 


22 
29 


33 

20 


8 
3 


1 
3 


2 

2 


79 
76 


6 




3 




1 


94 


3 


18 


38 


17 


9 




3 


85 


9 




2 


83 


8 


25 


17 


16 


6 


4 


3 


70 


13 






99 

124 

72 

72 


3 

11 

5 

3 


34 
11 
11 

14 


35 
24 
11 
30 


13 
65 
27 
20 


4 
11 
14 

3 


1 
5 
3 
3 


1 
5 
2 


88 

121 

68 

70 


11 






3 




1 
2 


4 




2 


Hamilton 




35 

89 


3 
5 


5 

8 


8 
24 


14 
38 


5 
9 


1 

4 


1 
2 


34 
85 


1 




1 


4 




2 


94 


3 


13 


24 


39 


9 


1 


3 


89 


5 




1 


111 


3 


17 


28 


61 


9 


2 


1 


108 


3 




2 


114 


10 


45 


22 


13 


4 


6 


4 


93 


21 




3 


123 


9 


28 


30 


42 


5 


5 


3 


113 


10 




1 
2 


98 

no 


4 
2 


19 
14 


31 
67 


36 
16 


4 
6 


4 
1 


2 


94 
106 


4 




4 




1 


88 


6 


7 


23 


42 


7 


3 


3 


85 


3 




2 


87 


5 


18 


25 


18 


3 


1 


3 


68 


19 




1 


115 


12 


27 


28 


20 


1 


10 


1 


87 


28 




2 


84 


5 


6 


25 


28 


10 


4 


3 


75 


9 




1 
2 


90 
110 


8 
5 


13 
19 


38 
33 


23 
38 


9 
12 


2 
2 


5 
3 


90 
107 






3 






109 


6 


17 


35 


29 


16 




6 


103 


6 






60 
66 


19 
1 


4 


2 
21 


7 
30 


23 
10 


17 


11 

1 


60 
66 






1 


. • . • • 




2 


89 


3 


13 


26 


32 


14 


1 


2 


88 


1 




1 


54 


5 


3 


20 


16 


5 


1 


4 


49 


5 




2 


04 


9 


10 


31 


30 


8 


8 


2 


89 


5 




3 


83 


2 


13 


30 


32 


2 


1 


1 


79 


4 




4 


126 


4 


16 


71 


23 


6 


1 


1 


118 


8 




1 


78 


8 


5 


33 


24 


5 


2 


4 


73 


5 




2 


85 


5 


6 


34 


26 


9 




4 


79 


6 




3 


92 


1 


9 


23 


35 


11 


4 


3 


85 


7 


Ontario 


1 
2 


88 
105 


4 
5 


12 
16 


15 
45 


38 
29 


15 
7 


2 
1 


2 

4 


84 
102 


4 




3 


Orange 


1 
2 


75 

94 


8 
6 


8 
7 


21 
17 


22 
43 


12 
16 


5 
3 


1 

4 


69 
90 


6 




4 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



59 



Table 6 — (concluded) 
dumber, sizes ud distribution of school libraries 1908-9 




1 NUMBKB AND SIZES OF SCHOOL UBKAKIBS 


h 

15-g 


38 














-9& 














•0.0 


V* 














a 


S3 


/ 1 to 


50 to 


100 
to 


200 
to 


500 
to 


1 000 


o3 


*s 


j 49 


99 


199 


499 




+ 




No. 

with* 


11 


41 


56 


10 


3 


3 


124 




18 


37 


28 


2 




1 


86 


3 


22 


28 


19 


2 


2 


2 


75 


11 


16 


49 


24 


1 


2 


2 


94 


6 


11 


36 


58 


11 


3 


5 


124 


19 


30 


47 


41 


9 


6 


4 


136 


18 


7 


16 


18 


9 


3 


2 


55 


1 


18 


21 


15 


3 


3 


1 


61 


18 


6 


17 


45 


14 


1 




83 


1 


1 


2 


8 


20 


9 


5 


45 


2 


58 


41 


28 


4 


1 


1 


133 


18 


49 


64 


32 


7 


3 


3 


158 


19 


39 


57 


33 


7 


4 


3 


143 


6 


5 


36 


42 


3 


2 


4 


92 


9 


25 


41 


10 


7 




4 


87 


10 


22 


15 


13 


3 


1 


• • 9 ■ ■ 


64 


7 


25 


26 


22 


3 




2 


78 


9 


17 


25 


29 


6 


2 


2 


81 


11 


17 


43 


27 


10 


2 


1 


100 


5 


6 


33 


36 


12 


1 


3 


91 


1 


37 


42 


14 


7 


5 


3 


108 


18 


40 


46 


17 


5 


2 


2 


112 


8 


64 


35 


8 


2 


1 


2 


112 


11 


5 


3 


13 


15 


6 


5 


47 


9 


4 


5 


23 


26 


11 


9 


78 


2 


13 


37 


24 


7 


1 


1 


83 


3 


15 


38 


21 


3 


3 




80 


7 


60 


48 


14 


9 


2 


4 


137 


11 


Jl 


15 


32 


6 


1 


1 


65 


6 


*4 


15 


40 


7 


5 


1 


72 


10 


1 


8 


15 


12 


• ■ * • * 


1 


37 


• » • • 


1 


23 


38 


18 


3 


1 


84 


2 


27 


37 


20 


4 




1 


89 


6 


11 


14 


15 


4 




3 


47 


1 


14 


21 


20 


3 


1 


1 


60 


4 


33 


37 


24 


1 


4 


2 


101 


7 


55 


25 


3 


4 


3 


2 


92 


26 


17 


40 


35 


6 


2 


4 


104 





6 


25 


45 


9 


3 


4 


92 


4 








2 
10 


4 
4 


5 

7 


11 
36 


1 


2 


2 


11 


1 


5 


9 


33 


15 


7 


2 


71 


2 


35 


29 


15 


3 




3 


85 


6 


17 


28 


21 


1 


3 


2 


72 


5 


12 


36 


41 


10 


2 


1 


102 


2 


1 954 


3 351 


3 028 


884 


297 


299 


9 813 


779 



<&k* &j wshool ditt^H a *«*<» not including cities 

iSSSi 01 ■ ch00 »3iSS^ u^StiteT not including cities, that had libraries con- 



J toh S* 



100 
200 
500 



<f **OT*. 






u 



9 813 
7 859 
4 508 
1 480 
506 
299 



Increase 



10 502 



276 

1 196 

1 401 

239 

27 

33 



XnSS? "j^Wflcbi «... Y-V.inAd no schools of their own 888 

lK££ i^^t m mSauln^d Schools and had no libraries 381 

-SW^Me of 226. 



ATiunbe 



number of comSSS? OI i-Su^na for State money to apply toward library books 
*<* Put^SSoftS ?R^i^?ad toward maps and globes tor rural schools that 

was * decrease of 1485. 



part 6 833 



6o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



E 

E 

9 




•s 

CO 



5 

£ 



3 
G 



a 



i 



if 

**00 


00 

b. 

00 


oe« 

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06 00 




Ob- 

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0»IO 


CO 
IO 


82 

OS 


too 


»o 


r* 1 - 


00 


CO Ok 


CO 


no 


-«oo 


to 


*»co 


I* 


<*co 


r-i 


»■* 


? + 


04 


+ + 


f< 








+ 


+ 


ss 


04 

b- 


ST 

T 










? + 


4» 
+ 



COCO 
CO 04 

o»o» 
oao» 

0004 
04 



04 *H 

O* 
04-* 

+ + 



CO 

3 

»■* 
06 

04 



3 

+ 



oo 

04^ 

b-00 


o 

s 


*HIO 

CO 04 

0»04 


b- 

lO 




pH 



00 b- 
CO 

Sis 
CO 

CO 



IO 
b« 



2 

CO 



CO 00 
b-00 

04 CO 

0400 



t-cp 

0400 


CO 


O»04 


04 


«; 


b- 
04 


+ 


si 


b- 


C0-* 


b- 


C0»-« 


* 


iH 


iH 



00 b. 


o 


00 o» 
oo 

O»C0 


00 

o 

CO 


04f-4 


CO 

8 

+ 



s 



iO 

00 
04 



IOC0 
^04 



ON 
Ob- 

coio 

COIO 



IOC4 

b-^ 

HO 

+ 



2d 

Eo 

WoB 



•o 
d 



I 



s 
•s 

oo 

d 



*» OS 

S8 



1* "3 



6« 






•a 

•a 
a» 

•O 

cJ 

J3 
8 

J3 



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53 



Is 
§8 

5£ 



3 

♦* 

e 

a. 

cS 

= 

•s 



3 
£ 



e 



d 

3 
O 

e 



CO 
b- 
04 



00 
CO 

00 
CO 

b- 



b- 

00 

o» 

S 

o> 

4» 

+ 



ss 


b- 
C0 


b-iO 

oo 


00*? 

©co 

0400 


CO 

b- 

o 


OC4 

o»o 

0404 


00 ■* 
O)04 

4» 


8 


OO 

«-ico 

4» 



04 



8 



O 



ooo 


b- 


04 CO 


00 


IO04 


b- 


00 • 


b-CO 


■* 


©3 


*H 


too 


•o 


o • 


b-CO 


*H 


CO 








ss 


»-t 


H + 


*H 


ocp 

C0O> 

iO04 


co 

04 


b-CO 

00 iO 


»■« 


IO 


IO 


00 


<*C0 


+ + 


04 


1-H 


r4 








+ 


+ 


+ 


8+ 


IO 

8 


s? 










+ 


+ 


1 



00 

o 
co 



o 

b- 



28 


s 


Sol 


iO 


OiO 
00 CO 


3! 


0000 

OH 


04O 


04 


0404 


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00 3J 

>oo 


04 


COCO 
0404 


CO 


coo 

"5 04 


8 


■*©4 

b-b- 


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Si 


oo 


O 


CQIO 


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b- 


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4» 


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© 

04 

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04 

a. 

b- 



£ 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



6l 



Table 8 
Whole number of teachera employed at any time 







Increase 1 


Increase 




Increase 




Increase 




Increase 


YEAR 


Ha 


or I Women 


or 


Cities 


or 


Towns 


or 


State 


or 






decrease 




decrease 




decrease 




decrease 






1885. . . . 


5052 




25 371 




8525 




22 800 




31 325 




IfloY .... 


5 821 


—131 


25 497 


+ 126 


8832 


+ 307 


22 486 


— 314 


31 318 


— 7 


ISSo. ... 


5 651 


—170 


26 075 


+ 578 


9 106 


+ 276 


22 618 


+ 132 


31 726 


+ 406 


158. . . . 


5549 1 


—102 


26 438 


+ 363 


9456 


+ 360 


22 529 


— 89 


31 987 


+ 261 


1890.... 


5358 


—191 


26 345 


— 93 


9980 


+ 522 


21 723 


— 806 


31 703 


— 284 


1981.... 


5359 


+ 1 


26 623 


+ 278 


10 482 


+ 502 


21 500 


— 223 


81 982 


+ 279 


18U.... 


5292 


— 67 


26 869 


+ 246 


10 902 


+ 420 


21 259 


— 241 


82 161 


+ 179 


1883 


5088 


—224 


27 408 


+ 539 


11 162 


+ 260 


21 814 


+ 56 


32 476 


+ 315 


*W» • • • • 


5096 


+ 28 


27 833 


+ 425 


11 751 


+ 589 


21 178 


— 136 


32 929 


+ 463 


1995. . . . 


5 476 


+380 


30 148 


+2 315 


12 530 


+ 779 


23 094 


+ 1 916 


35 624 


+2 695 


HW. . . . 


5 421 


— 55 


28 399 


—1 749 


13 489 


+ 959 


20 331 


—2 763 


83 820 


—1 804 


1887 


5461 


+ 40 


28 924 


+ 525 


15 288 


+ 1 794 


19 102 


—1 229 


34 385 


+ 566 


1888 


5254 


—207 


27 819 


—1 105 


14 819 


- 464 


18 254 


— 848 


83 073 


—1 312 


18W 


5405 


+ 151 


28 587 


+ 768 


16 116 


+ 1 297 


17 876 


— 878 


33 992 


+ 919 


1900.... 


5 188 


—217 


29 660 


+ 1073 


17 256 


+ 1 139 


17 593 


— 288 


34 848 


+ 856 


1901.... 


5 147 


— 41 


30 444 


+ 784 


18 199 


+ 944 


17 392 


— 201 


85 591 


+ 743 


1902 


5060 


— 87 


31 576 


+1 182 


19 373 


+ 1 174 


17 263 


— 129 


36 636 


+ 1 045 


1903.. 


4909 


—151 


34 916 


+ 3 340 


22 637 


+3 264 


17 188 


— 75 


39 825 


+ 3 189 


1904.... 


4 901 


— 8 


33 632 


—1 284 


21 236 


—1 401 


17 297 


+ 109 


38 533 


—1 292 


1905.... 


4709 


—192 


34 372 


+ 740 


21 620 


+ 384 


17 461 


+ 164 


39 081 


+ 548 


1908.... 


4062 


— 47 


35 665 


+ 1 293 


22 811 


+ 1 191 


17 516 


+ 55 


40 327 


+ 1 246 


1907.... 


4770 


+ 108 


36 427 


+ 762 


28 421 


+ 610 


17 776 


+ 260 


41 197 


+ 870 


1908.... 


4996 


+226 


37 592 


+1 165 


24 662 


+1 241 


17 926 


+ 150 


42 588 


+ 1 391 


1900.... 


5023 


+ 27 


38 249 


+ 657 


25 196 


+ 536 


18 074 


+ 148 


43 272 


+ 684 



Table 9 

Number of teachers employed at the tame time for the legal term of achool 

in each year 



TEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


• 

Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


7467 
7 881 




14 773 
14 827 




22 240 
22 708 




1887 


+ 414 


+ 54 


+ 468 


1888 


8068 


+ 187 


14 966 


+ 139 


23 034 


+ 326 


1889 


8 317 


+ 249 


15 096 


+ 130 


23 413 


+ 379 


1890 


8 761 


+ 444 


15 074 


— 22 


28 835 


+ 422 


1881 


9126 


+ 365 


15 231 


+ 157 


24 857 


+ 522 


1892 


9 515 


+ 389 


15 369 


+ 138 


24 884 


+ 627 


1883 


9 812 


+ 297 


15 602 


+233 


25 414 


+ 530 


1884 


10 264 


+ 452 


15 632 


+ 80 


25 896 


+ 482 


1895 


10 924 


+ 660 


15 765 


+ 183 


26 689 


+ 793 


1896 


11 902 


+ 1 038 


15 962 


+217 


27 944 


+ 1 255 


1887 


12 718 


+ 756 


16 863 


—119 


28 581 


+ 637 


1888 


13 819 


+ 1 101 


15 511 


-852 


29 230 


+ 749 


1888 


14 950 


+ 1 181 


15 549 


+ 38 


30 499 


+ 1 169 


1900 


16 112 


+ 1 102 


15 656 


+ 107 


31 768 


+ 1 269 


1801 


16 713 


+ 601 


15 740 


+ 84 


82 453 


+ 685 


1902 


17 759 


+ 1 046 


15 631 


—109 


83 390 


+ 937 


1003 


18 633 


+ 874 


15 820 


+189 


84 458 


+ 1 063 


1904 


19 445 


+ 812 


16 107 


+287 


85 552 


+ 1099 


1905 


19 976 


+ 531 


16 139 


+ 32 


36 115 


+ 563 


1906 


20 843 


+ 867 


16 417 


+278 


87 260 


+ 1 145 


1907 


22 024 


+ 1 181 


16 633 


+216 


38 657 


J, +1 897 


1906 


23 213 


+1189 


16 771 


+ 138 


39 984 


+ 1 327 


1809 


24 295 


+ 1082 


16 936 


+ 165 


41 231 


+ 1247 



62 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 10 
Average weekly salaries of teachers 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


$17 66 
17 39 




$7 78 
7 76 




$11 46 
11 44 




1887 


— $27 


—$02 


—$02 


1888 


17 70 


+ 31 


789 


+ 13 


11 68 


+ 24 


1889 


17 47 


— 28 


808 


+ 19 


11 79 


+ 11 


1890 


17 40 


— 07 


8 .. 


— 08 


11 70 


— 09 


1891 


17 89 


+ 49 


8 27 


+ 27 


12 18 


+ 48 


1892 


18 75 


+ 86 


8 38 


+ 11 


12 62 


+ 44 


1893 


18 67 


— 08 


860 


+ 22 


12 74 


+ 12 


1894 


18 06 


— 61 


8 75 


+ 15 


12 72 


— 02 


1895 


19 61 


+ 1 55 


896 


+ 21 


13 74 


+1 02 


1896 


18 59 


— 1 02 


9 15 


+ 19 


13 92 


+ 18 


1897 


18 75 


+ 16 


9 33 


+ 18 


14 23 


+ 81 


1898 


19 36 


+ 61 


920 


— 13 


14 68 


+ 45 


1899 


19 88 


+ 52 


9 31 


+ 11 


15 27 


+ 59 


1900 


22 66 


+ 2 78 


9 54 


+ 23 


17 28 


+2 01 


1901 


25 04 


+ 2 38 


963 


+ 09 


18 72 


+ 1 44 


1902 


25 19 


+ 15 


992 


+ 29 


19 22 


+ 50 


1903 


25 44 


+ 25 


10 10 


+ 18 


19 65 


+ 43 


1904 


25 89 


+ 47 


10 36 


+ 26 


19 99 


+ 34 


1905 


27 27 


+ 1 38 


10 68 


+ 32 


20 89 


+ 90 


1906 


27 96 


+ 69 


10 75 


+ 07 


21 68 


+ 79 


1907 


27 89 


— 07 


11 40 


+ 65 


22 22 


+ 54 


1908 


27 07 


— 82 


12 05 


+ 65 


22 14 


— 08 


1909 


27 77 


+ 70 


12 44 


+ 99 


22 75 


+ 61 



Table 11 
Average annual salaries of teachers 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


$701 81 

687 12 
702 92 

688 65 
694 29 

719 30 
740 76 
728 36 
707 77 
733 35 
725 19 

720 09 
743 47 
771 54 
879 27 
976 54 
982 25 
992 08 

1 000 07 
1 036 24 
1 090 33 
1087 73 
1 055 78 
1 071 92 




$261 66 
262 44 

266 75 
270 07 
285 49 
292 10 
297 52 
303 57 
306 32 
810 73 
309 38 
315 82 
314 76 
318 35 
322 49 
329 85 
- 337 32 
£45 26 
854 47 
363 28 
367 66 
387 68 
407 29 
422 90 




$409 27 
409 88 
419 75 
418 79 
436 71 
452 16 
467 .. 
467 58 
465 44 
483 68 
487 37 
495 48 
516 75 
540 50 
604 78 
662 64 
660 33 
695 76 
707 57 
735 51 
771 92 
786 52 
783 78 
805 33 




1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 


—$14 19 

+ 15 80 

— 14 27 
+ 564 
+ 25 01 
+ 21 46 

— 12 40 

— 20 59 
+ 25 58 

— 8 16 

— 5 10 
+ 23 38 
+ 28 07 
+ 107 73 
+ 97 27 
+ 5 71 
+ 983 
+ 793 
+ 36 17 
+ 54 09 

— 260 

— 31 95 
+ 16 14 


+ $78 
+ 4 31 
+ 3 32 
+ 15 42 
+ 6 81 
+ 542 
+ 6 05 
+ 2 75 
+ 441 

— 1 35 
+ 594 

— 56 
+ 359 
+ 4 14 
+ 686 
+ 7 97 
+ 794 
+ 9 21 
+ 8 81 
+ 4 38 
+20 02 
+ 19 61 
+ 15 61 


+$ 56 
+ 992 

— 96 
+17 92 
+ 15 46 
+ 14 84 
+ 68 
-2 14 
+ 18 24 
+ 860 
+ 806 
+21 32 
+23 75 
+64 28 
+ 57 86 
+17 69 
+ 15 48 
+ 1181 
+27 94 
+ 86 41 
+ 14 60 

— 2 74 
+2155 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



63 



Tabus 12 
Number of children of school age 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1888 


938 688 
968 144 




801 385 
794 971 




1 735 073 
1 763 115 




1887 


+ 34 456 


- 6 414 


+ 28 042 


1888 


997 155 


+ 29 011 


775 803 


— 19 168 


1 772 958 


+ 9843 


1880 


1 029 411 


+ 32 256 


774 256 


— 1 547 


1 803 667 


+ 80 '«09 


1890 


1 068 088 


+ 68 677 


756 508 


— 17 748 


1 844 596 


+ 40 929 


law 


1 074 630 


— 13 458 


747 143 


— 8365 


1 821 773 


— 22 823 


1882 


1 112 296 


+ 37 666 


733 223 


— 13 920 


1 845 519 


+ 23 746 


1883 


1 166 794 


+ 54 498 


725 594 


— 7629 


1 892 388 


+ 46 869 


18M 


1 206 885 


+ 42 071 


723 440 


- 2 154 


1 932 325 


+ 89 937 


1895 


1 251 328 


+ 42 443 


694 917 


— 28 523 


1 946 245 


+ 13 920 


1896 


1 066 070 


a— 185 258 


585 787 


—109 129 


1 651 858 


-294 887 


1897 


1 113 899 


+ 47 443 


555 050 


— 30 738 


1 668 940 


+ 17 091 


1806 


1 000 423 


—113 476 


518 385 


— 36 665 


1 518 808 


—150 141 


1808 


1 639 906 


+ 39 483 


510 173 


— 8 212 


1 550 079 


+ 81 271 


1900 


1 064 635 


+ 24 729 


505 018 


— 5 155 


1 569 653 


+ 19 574 


1901 


1 123 817 


+ 59 182 


497 270 


— 7793 


1 621 087 


+ 51 434 


1902 


1 146 926 


+ 23 109 


483 776 


— 13 494 


1 630 702 


+ 9 615 


1903 


1 264 431 


+ 117 605 


476 329 


— 7 447 


1 740 760 


+ 110 058 


1904 


1 295 015 


+ 30 584 


465 971 


— 10 358 


1 760 966 


+ 20 226 


1905 


1 331 615 


+ 36 600 


465 623 


— 848 


1 797 238 


+ 36 252 


1906 


1 352 99S 


+ 21 383 


469 416 


+ 3793 


1 822 414 


+ 25 176 


1907 


1 374 672 


+ 21 674 


466 966 


— 2450 


1 841 638 


+ 19 224 


1908 


1 407 084 


+ 32 412 


463 580 


— 3386 


1 870 664 


+ 29 026 


1909 


1 465 022 


+ 57 938 


461 913 


— 1 667 


1 926 935 


+ 56 271 



sSebool at* changed from 6-21 to 5-18. 



Table 13 
Vmnoer of children who hare attended school at any time during the year 



TEAR 


CKies 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


457 816 
479 928 




569 951 
557 889 




1 027 767 
1 037 812 




1887 


+22 107 


—12 062 


+ 10 045 


1888 


481 909 


+ 1 986 


551 360 


— 6 529 


1 033 269 


— 4 543 


1889 


488 203 


+ 6294 


546 610 


— 5850 


1 033 813 


+ 544 


1890 


501 449 


+ 13 246 


540 711 


— 4 899 


1 042 160 


+ 8 847 


1891 


513 066 


+ 11 617 


540 978 


+ 267 


1 054 044 


+ 11 884 


1892 


538 660 


+25 594 


534 433 


— 6545 


1 073 093 


+ 19 049 


1893 


550 634 


+ 11 974 


532 594 


— 1 839 


1 083 228 


+ 10 135 


1894 


589 363 


+38 729 
+27 250 


536 635 


+ 3 041 


1 124 998 


+41 770 


189$ 


616 613 


541 730 


+ 6095 


1 158 589 


+83 591 


1896 


653 696 
685 803 


+ 37 085 


522 376 


—19 854 


1 176 074 


+ 17 485 


1897 


+32 105 


617 896 


— 4980 


1 203 199 


+27 126 


1896 


691 543 


+ 5 740 


477 451 


—89 945 


1 168 994 


-34 206 


1899 


720 532 


+28 969 


458 819 


—18 632 


1 179 351 


+ 10 857 


1900 


755 359 


+ 34 827 


454 215 


— 4 604 


1 209 574 


+ 30 223 


1901 


795 994 


+40 635 


446 422 


— 7 793 


1 242 416 


+ 32 842 


1902 


832 910 


+ 36 916 


435 716 


—10 707 


1 268 625 


+26 209 


1908 


827 541 


— 5369 


429 333 


— 6882 


1 256 874 


—11 751 


1904 


878 654 


+49 113 


423 411 


— 5 922 


1 300 065 


+43 191 


1905 


882 087 


+ 5433 


429 021 


+ 5 610 


1 311 108 


+11043 


1906 


907 438 


+25 851 


428 116 


— 905 


1 335 554 


+24 446 


1907 


922 032 


+ 14 594 


421 847 


— 6 769 


1 843 379 


+ 7 825 


1908 


945 120 


+28 088 


419 510 


— 1 837 


1 364 630 


+21 251 
+22 OSS 


1909 


962 902 


+ 17 782 


423 810 


+ 4 800 


1 386 712 



6 4 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 14 
Whole number of days of attendance 



YEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 

($ v 


Towns 


Increase or 
decrease 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1906 

1909 


105 469 110 
109 588 119 

116 473 937 
121 643 469 
126 425 264 
131 749 368 
135 384 798 
138 801 659 
146 591 917 
148 632 384 


+4 119 009 

+5 885 818 
+6 169 582 
+4 781 795 
+ 5 324 104 
+ 3 635 430 
+3 416 861 
+ 7 790 258 
+2 040 467- 


53 970 035 

52 948 869 

53 468 762 
53 474 548 
53 585 499 

55 425 280 

56 727 005 
56 359 193 

56 207 884 

57 374 861 


—1 021 176 
+ 517 903 
+ 7 786 
+ 60 951 
+ 1 889 781 
+ 1 801 725 

— 867 812 

— 151 809 
+ 1 106 977 


150 489 145 
162 586 978 
168 940 699 
175 118 017 
179 960 763 
187 174 648 
192 111 803 
195 160 862 
202 799 801 
206 007 245 


+3 097 883 
+ 6 403 721 
+ 6 177 818 
+4 842 746 
+ 7 213 885 
+4 937 155 
+3 049 049 
+7 638 949 
+8 207 444 



Table 15 
Average daily attendance 



TEAR 


Cities 


Increase or 
decrease 


Towns 


Increase or 


State 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


304 667 
312 446 
818 768 
324 387 
836 018 
344 009 
861 767 
871 551 
407 955 
429 114 
454 190 
488 068 
508 412 
546 657 
551 688 
575 741 
608 780 
680 855 
661 241 
686 642 
705 743 
722 604 
750 264 
782 897 




321 146 
313 164 

311 832 

318 150 
806 966 
805 408 
803 807 

316 546 
313 108 
328 580 

317 864 
332 186 

319 240 
802 773 
805 800 
297 410 
299 671 
297 480 
302 539 

809 791 

312 009 

810 466 
312 807 

322 650 




625 813 
625 610 
630 895 

687 487 
642 964 
650 017 
656 574 

688 097 
721068 
767 694 
772 054 
820 254 
827 652 
849 480 
867 488 
878 157 
908 401 
928 835 
963 780 
996 483 

1 018 352 
1088 070 
1 062 571 
1 105 547 




1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1909 


+ 7 779 
+ 6 817 
+ 5 574 
+ 11 681 
+ 8 591 
+ 17 158 
+ 9784 
+ 86 404 
+21 159 
+25 178 
+ 83 878 
+20 344 
+88 245 
+ 5 081 
+24 058 
+ 82 969 
+22 125 
+ 30 886 
+25 401 
+ 19 101 
+ 16 861 
+ 27 600 
+ 82 633 


-7982 

— 1 382 
+ 1 318 

— 6 184 

— 1 558 

— 1 601 
+ 12 739 

— 8488 
+ 15 472 
—10 716 
+ 14 822 
—12 946 
—16 467 
+ 8 027 
-8 384 
+ 2255 

— 2 191 
+ 6059 
+ 7252 
+ 2 818 

— 2 143 
+ 1 841 
+ 10 343 


— 203 
+ 4085 
+ 6802 
+ 5 407 
+ 7033 
+ 15 557 
+22 523 
+ 82 066 
+ 86 631 
+ 14 860 
+48 200 
+ 7 808 
+21 778 
+ 8058 
+ 15 669 
+35 244 
+ 1% 034 
+ 35 445 
+ 32 663 
+21 019 
+ 14 718 
+29 601 
+42 076 



Total Expenditures for Elementary 
Secondary & Higher Institutions 



lELEMEKTAHY 



■SECONDARY C 



1904 



1907 



M^WIVMI 



XL 



MILLIONS 
49- 




Jfl 



Figures since 1905 do not include foreign colleges. 



tXFENDITUIIfl rOR fUHIC SCHOOL ■ 



Expenditures for Public School 

Purposes 1808 



TOTAL EXraUtTURES Otttttt 




• UMMfYfttfMMTUS 
19,1**404895 



Salaries ofTe, 



Public Schools 



nut 


AMOUNT 


NILU0N0 
5 10 20 30 40 


m 


1 

14100000 














m 


15 s* 2 * pBIHIHIHpHH 












m 


* WM7 PHBJHHHHHp 










mo 


«ao 002 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 










noi 


21904S19 ■■■■■■■■■■■i 










1902 


22710337 ■■■■■■■■■ 












003 


2307110$ iHHHIILHiHiHHHHIIIIHpHLl 








O04 


155 004|HHHHHHpHH|HHHHi 








i 


20S08oo7HHH^HBHHHIBHHiHiH 






1906 


^70ii^i|HHBI|BHHHiHHIHHHHB 






1907 


30404477pBBHBBBiBHBH|^BHiH 








1908 


31330400 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■IIHI 




009 


33204007|L9LfllLHHIHHLH 





Average Annual Salary of Teachers 



dCITY 



STATE 




Aggregate Value op Public 
schoolhouses ano sites 




Total Enrollment in Public Schools 



TOWNS 



i i 



CITIES 




Decrease in towns partially attributable to erection of new cities. 



Teachers Employed 



Public Schools for the Legal Term 




Grade op Licenses 
held «v Teachers in Public Schools 
1808 






* <**, 



'*/., 



"«*«. 



Students in Tramnno Schools 
and Certificates Issued 

EflEsl STUOOfTS t i comncATts 




Students in Training Classes 
and Certificates Issued 



czm COmnCATES 




Total Enrollment 
in Normal Schools a Graduates 

Normal Department only 
= 6raduates — - enrolls* 




Figures for 1909 exclude State Normal College. 



Arbor Day 

School Distiicts Repotim and Trees Planted 



W*' ! 


TREES 




IHOWtMK 






- 




















■RT 




i « m m m 


ROT 


*2St 

mi 

1027 

sta 

St* 


177SS 
•429 
«Sf7 
ISOM 
1D101 

»sa* 

1S0S9 
OS2S 
ttltl 
111S2 

f22fft 












































































, j 


= 


























^D 






















P 


_j 


























































I 








T 


































. J 














1 


Qfy j*** 3 ! 














JflOt f •** l ll179* 














b 


IfUM 1*^4* H 


IJCftl 












. ) 


1 ™ I 




>*••• 














. 1 



Number op High Schools and Academics 



the State 



c=] ACADEMES 



HIGH SCHOOLS 




Apportionment of Academic & Library Fund 
1808 



TOTAL APPORTIONMENT * S7S2S2 



2996-*1655C7 



UTEMOAKE OF ACADEMIC STUDENTS 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



65 



Table 16 
School terms 



Table 17 
Number of school districts 



TEAR 


Average 

length of 

school term 

In the State 

by weeks 


TEAR 


Districts 


Increase or 
decrease 


1886 


88.6 

33.8 

83.3 

33.4 

85.7 

35.8 

35.5 

85.8 

35 

35.1 

35 

34.8 

35.2 

35.4 

85 

85.4 

36.4 

35.4 

35.4 

35.2 

35.6 

35.4 

85.4 

35.4 


1886 


11 262 
11 253 
11 245 
11238 
11 216 
11 196 
11 180 
11 161 
11 121 
11 089 
11 047 
10 965 
10 864 
10 823 
10 719 
10 741 
10 690 
10 683 
10 651 
10 625 
10 626 
10 620 
10 595 
10 502 


+ 8 


1887 


1887 


— 9 


1888 


1888 


— 8 


1889 


1889 


— 7 


1890 


1890 


— 22 


1891 


1891 


— 20 


1882 


1892 


— 16 


1893 


1893 


— 19 


1894 


1894 


— 40 


1805 


1895 


— 82 


1806 


1896 


— 42 


1897 


1897 


— 82 


1808 


1898 


—101 


1809 


1899 


— 41 


1900 


1900 


— 32 


1901 


1901 


— 50 


1902 


1902 


— 51 


1903 


1903 


— 7 


1904 


1004 


— 82 


1905 


1905 


— 26 


1906 


1906 


4- 1 


1907 


1907 


— 6 


1908 


1908 


— 25 


1909 


1909 


— 3 









Table 18 • 
Average value of schoolhouses and sites in the towns 



YEAR 


Value 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


1886 


$1 062 80 
1 061 67 
1 084 83 
1 145 58 
1 191 03 
1 700 92 
1 296 54 
1 384 59 
1 402 81 
1 266 89 
1458 .. 
1 463 32 
1 438 83 
1 445 12 
1 484 66 
1 545 47 
1 570 70 
1 614 58 
1 701 37 
1 833 63 

1 950 76 

2 155 27 
2 319 31 
2 470 30 


+$14 12 


1887 


+ 8 87 


1888 


+ 23 16 


1889 


+ 60 76 


1800 


+ 45 45 


1891 


+506 89 


1W 


—104 38 


1893 


+ 88 05 


1894 


+ 18 22 


1806 


—135 92 


1806 


+ 191 11 


1897 


+ 532 


1808 


— 24 49 


1900 


+ 629 
+ 29 54 


1901 


+ 60 81 


1998 


+ 25 23 
+ 43 88 


1904 


+ 86 79 


1906 


+ 182 26 


1906 


+ 126 13 


1907 


+195 61 


1908 


+ 164 04 




+ 150 99 



66 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 19 
Normal schools 



YEAR 


Average 


Increase or 


Number of 


Increase or 


Total ex- 


Increase or 


attendance 


decrease 


graduates 


decrease 


penditures 


decrease 


1886 


4 112 

4 490 




364 
388 




$192 868 
278 654 




1887 


+ 378 


+ 24 


+885 786 


1888 


4 622 


+ 132 


426 


+ 38 


242 181 


— 35 523 


1889 


4 835 


+ 213 


527 


+ 111 


272 581 


+ 29 451 


1890 


5 271 


+ 436 


569 


+ 32 


332 313 


+ 59 732 


1891 


6706 


+ 435 


672 


+ 103 


316 126 


— 16 187 


1892 


6 118 


+ 412 


982 


+ 310 


823 492 


+ 7366 


1893 


6866 


— 252 


503 


-479 


355 535 


+ 32 042 


1894 


6 875 


+ 9 


594 


+ 91 


352 190 


— 3345 




6990 


+ 1 115 


715 


+ 121 


458 608 


+ 106 418 


1896 


7 521 


+ 531 


860 


+ 145 


481.825 


+ 23 217 


1897 


7939 


+ 418 


1 036 


+ 176 


353 264 


—128 561 


1808 


8 121 


+ 182 


1088 


+ 52 


422 889 


+ 69 025 


1899 


8025 


— 90 


1 110 


+ 22 


367 486 


— 53 403 


1900 


8002 


+ 67 


1 166 


+ 56 


400 994 


+ 83 506 


1901 


7 789 


— 303 


1 089 


— 77 


436 647 


+ 35 653 


1902 


7659 


— 130 


1 046 


— 43 


424 257 


— 12 390 


1903 


7 331 


— 328 


951 


— 95 


404 021 


— 20 236 


1904 


7 321 


— 10 


969 


+ 18 


469 403 


+ 65 382 


1905 


7 173 


— 148 


1009 


+ 40 


469 020 


— 383 


1906 


6 753 


— 420 


900 


—109 


522 299 


+ 53 279 


1907 


6 718 


— 35 


1 132 


+232 


488 639 


— 83 660 


1908 


5998 


— 720 


1 038 


— 94 


815 399 


+326 760 


1909 


o5 331 


— 667 


o867 


—171 


o471 439 


-343 960 



a This year's figures do not include data for New York State Normal College heretofore included. 



Table 20 — Arbor Day 
Number of school districts in the State reporting and number of trees planted 



YEAR 

■ 


Number of 
districts 
reporting 


Number of 

trees 

planted 


1890 


8 106 
8956 
8809 

8 783 

9 057 
8450 
9823 
9 921 
9885 
9888 

10 251 
9803 
9898 
9 793 
9827 
9531 
9 641 

10 037 
9 621 
9443 


27 097 


1891 


25 786 


1892 


20 622 


1893 


16 078 


1894 


16 534 


1895 


16 073 


1896 


16 560 


1897 


17 796 


1896 


18 429 


1899 .• 


16 357 


1900 


15 045 


1901 


16 701 


1902 


19 820 


1903 


16 099 


1904 


13 829 


1905 


12 788 


1906 


11 782 


1907 


11 482 


1908 


11 726 


1909 


13 665 








831 537 



Exhibit B 

STATISTICAL TABLES GIVING APPORTIONMENT OF SCHOOL HONEY 
FROM THE FREE SCHOOL FUND, AND DATA BT COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS AND CITIES ON ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDU- 
CATION Of THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE STATE 

Table I Apportionment of school moneys 

Table 2 Buildings, property, library, teachers and census 

Table 3 Registration and attendance of pupils 

Table 4 Financial statement showing receipts and expenditures 

Table 5 Miscellaneous and compulsory education 

Table 6 Indian schools 

Table 7 Evening schools 1908-9 

Table 8 Bonded indebtedness 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 — STATISTICS 
Buildings, property, library. 





3 

1 

1 

6 




BUILDINGS 








PBOPERTT 






COMMISSIONER 
(.DISTRICTS 


M 

.3 

• • 


9 

30 
30 

61 


* 

2 

12 

2 

13 

1 


i 

CO 

1 

• • • 

1 
2 


i 


8 

9 

1* 

• 

1 


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9 

• 
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i 

as 

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1 


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9 

1 


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1 


Albany co., 1st com'r dlst. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


43 

2 

43 

65 


43 
2 

44 

64 


$13 260 

2500 

15 760 

3345 


100 880 

15 540 

115 420 

31 707 


|2 141 

866 

3 007 

1 536 


$3 876 

020 

4796 

1 823 


$944 


$120 110 
10 820 


044 
350 


130 936 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. . 


38S51 


Total 


65 

37 

1 

37 

130 

6 

130 

116 

11 

116 

106 

2 

106 

07 

5 

07 

114 

6 

114 

81 

6 

81 

88 

6 

88 

07 

5 

07 

128 

3 

128 

00 

6 

00 


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• a 

■ • 

• * 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• a 

■ ■ 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


61 

25 
25 

128 

3 

128 

107 

2 

108 

105 

1 

105 

04 

2 

04 

no 

1 

no 

84 

2 

84 

83 

2 

83 

76 
76 

115 
115 

86 

6 

86 


1 

11 

1 

11 

3 
3 
3 

11 



11 

1 
1 
1 

5 
3 
5 

7 
6 
7 



4 


6 
4 
6 

18 

5 

18 

10 

3 

10 

4 


2 
2 

• • • 

2 

• • • 

• • ■ 

• • * 

• ■ • 

• • •• 

• • • 

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• • • 

1 
1 

• ■ • 

• • • 

• • • 

• ■ • 

• a • 

• • • 

3 

• a • 

8 
3 

• • • 

3 

• • • 


64 

88 
1 

38 

131 

6 

131 

118 
11 

no 

106 

2 

106 

00 

5 

00 

117 

7 
118 

03 

6 

03 

88 

6 

88 

07 

6 

07 

128 

3 

128 

00 

6 

00 


3345 

24 775 
400 

25 175 

13 063 
2 667 

15 630 

10 790 
12 625 
32 416 

10 070 

850 

10 020 

21 370 

3050 

25 320 

15 275 

8600 

18 875 

17 215 
8200 

25 415 

0680 

2 510 

12 100 

14 850 
8 266 

18 125 

14 868 
017 

15 275 

10 680 

2226 

12 005 


31 797 

120 706 

5650 

135 856 

107 583 

31 217 

188 800 

107 785 
110 500 
308 285 

73 555 
10 000 
83 555 

166 310 

28 580 

183 800 

145 025 

60 600 

204 525 

156 642 

20 588 

186 230 

104 763 

30 016 

135 670 

07 752 

27 800 

126 552 

112 364 

18 865 

125 710 

100 845 

16 864 

117 700 


1 536 

2287 

675 

2062 

6 131 
8120 
0260 

7787 

7 375 
15 162 

3 561 

1 103 

4 754 

3 325 

2 075 
5400 

4428 
8008 
7 431 

3 263 
4200 

7 463 

6 678 

5 572 
11250 

3 801 
2838 

6 189 

5825 

2 880 

8 714 

2488 

3 014 

6 447 


1 823 

5542 

850 

6892 

7635 

2 577 
10 212 

6 840 

6 680 

13 520 

6060 

1 900 
7060 

4 867 
3225 
8082 

0504 

4 011 
18 515 

0676 
4428 

14 103 

8 182 

5 188 
13 870 

5580 

2 343 
7082 

8354 

1 840 

10 104 

7 516 
2080 

10 495 


850 
4685 


38 851 


3d com'r disk 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 

Allegany co., 1st com'r 

dtat 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


166 045 
7 575 


4 635 

725 
200 
025 

1260 

635 

1 885 

607 
250 
857 

010 

345 

1265 

1 785 

200 

1985 

60 

50 

110 

1030 

121 

2060 

3000 

275 

4265 

1 218 

185 

1 348 

504 

012 

1 206 


174 520 

185 137 

39 690 

174 827 


2d com'r disk 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 


233 402 
137 815 
871 217 


Broome co., 1st com'r dtat 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


93 853 

14 193 

108 046 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob . . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 


185 772 

38 175 

223 947 


Cattaraugus co* 1st com'r 
dbt 
Elementary schoob. . 
Seooodary 


176 017 
70 314 


Total 


240 331 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 


188 855 

46 466 
283 321 


3d com'r dtat 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob . . . 
Total 


130 242 

44 307 

174 549 


Cayuga co., 1st com'r dbt 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


125 491 

36 522 

162 013 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 


142 104 

10 140 

161 250 


Chautauqua co., 1st com'r 
dbt 
Elementary sohoob. . 
Secondary schoob . . . 


122 067 
25 695 




4 


* • ■ 


I 147 762 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teachers and census 



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74 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Chautauqua co., (amfi) 

2d con?r dtot. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 

3d oom'r dbt 
Elementary schools . . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 

Chemung co. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary school*. . . 

Total 



Chenango co., 1st oom'r 

disk 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools... 

Total 

2d com'r disk 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



GUnton co., 1st com'r dtot 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 

2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



3d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools.. 
Total 



Columbia ©a, 1st com'r 

diss. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools... 

Total 



2d oom'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Cortland co., 1st com'r 

cost. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d oom'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Delaware co., 1st com'r 

dtot. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



96 

5 

06 



01 

8 

01 



HI 

6 

HI 



128 

6 

128 



127 

7 
127 



74 

3 

74 



45 

1 

45 



67 

4 

67 



70 

1 

70 



81 
4 

81 



72 

8 

72 



78 

2 

78 



180 

5 

180 





BUILDINGS 




2 


| 


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• 
e 

i 


I 




84 


15 


• • • 


90 


• ■ 


1 


4 


• • • 


5 


■ • 


84 


15 


• • • 


00 




84 


7 


• • • 


01 




5 


3 


• • m 


8 




84 


7 


* • • 


01 




105 


6 


• • • 


HI 




4 


2 


• • • 


6 




105 


6 


• • • 


111 


• • 


127 


6 




• • «• 


133 




4 


2 


• • • 


6 


• • 


127 


6 


• • • 


133 


• • 


122 


5 


• • • 


127 


• • 


8 


4 


• » * 


7 


• • 


122 


5 


• ■ • 


127 


3 


68 





4 


84 


• • 


2 


1 


• • • 


3 


3 


68 


9 


4 


84 


1 


44 

1 






45 
1 






i 

• • 


44 

54 






45 

68 


12 


2 


.. 


4 






4 


• • 


54 


12 


2 


68 


• » 


67 


4 


• a • 


71 






1 


« • • 


1 


■ • 


67 


4 


• « ■ 


71 




73 


10 


• • ■ 


83 




2 


2 


• • • 


4 


■ * 


73 


10 


• • • 


83 


■ • 


70 


2 


• • • 


72 


• • 

• • 


8 
70 






3 
72 


2 


• • a 




70 


3 


• ■ • 


73 


• • 

• • 


2 

70 






2 
73 


3 


• ■ * 




177 


4 


1 


182 


• ■ 


2 


2 


1 


6 


■ • 


177 


4 


1 


182 



noFlBTT 



125 150 

6395 

31 545 



13 202 

3083 

16 285 



15 660 

3 801 

18 061 



28 507 
17 408 
41 005 



11 543 

3 167 

14 710 



6040 

550 

7 400 



3835 

250 

3585 



8 178 
1013 
101 



18 662 
600 

14 262 



16 778 

3 567 

20 845 



6640 
1050 
7600 



7420 
1 250 
8 670 



23 540 

4 067 

28 507 



8203 563 

70 101 

2S2 754 



122 995 

39 172 

162 167 



127 336 

36 854 

164 100 



143 017 

72 347 

215 364 



117 257 

41 328 

158 585 



65 407 

5 750 

71 247 



26 465 
750 

27 215 



72 645 
21 312 
03 057 



88 635 

3000 

86 635 



136 018 

24 734 

160 752 



47 613 

8727 

56 340 



76 811 
21 834 
07 645 



178 004 

52 667 

226 661 



$5 533 

8266 

11 709 



3 941 
3005 
6946 



4 386 
2 845 
7 231 



4 194 
3689 
7883 



6 977 

8 218 

9 195 



2886 
908 

3794 



1 800 

400 

1 790 



2003 
1 724 
3727 



2 393 

175 

2 568 



3 128 
2940 
6066 



2 718 
1263 

3 976 



2257 
1957 
4 214 



6 951 

6203 

12 164 



I 

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$11 476 

8048 

19 524 



8099 

3366 

11 455 



5848 
3 211 
9059 



8 322 

7 777 
16 099 



8446 

4 797 

18 243 



6 513 

1 887 
8400 



2 367 

475 

2842 



4483 
2 934 
7 417 



5 855 

250 
5605 



12 351 

6 019 

18 870 



2 394 
1063 

3 457 



2785 
1996 

4780 



9488 

6800 
16 288 



I 

o 

-a 



$500 

2000 
2500 



868 

242 

1 110 



4 329 

641 

4 970 



25 851 
840 

26 691 



4 149 
3 017 
7 166 



1 509 

607 

2 116 



351 



351 



6 275 

100 

5 375 



1 412 

850 

2262 



5 914 
10 170 
16 064 



580 



680 



1 078 
350 

1 428 



1 055 

700 

1 756 



J 
ll 

3 
© 



$246 222 
101 900 

348 122 



149 095 

48 868 

197 963 



157 559 

46 852 

204 411 



204 981 
102 051 
307 042 



147 372 

55 527 

202 «9 



83 345 

9 702 
93 047 



33 908 
1 875 

35 783 



02 584 

27 083 

119 667 



106 457 
111 332 



174 ISO 

47 430 

221 619 



50 940 
12 108 
72 04c 



W &51 

26 866 

116 757 



215 023 

f- 7© 337 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



75 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teachers and census 



II 



6 
35 



16 258 

8 005 

24 262 






11 li 



8-a 

Hi 



12 

4 IS 

16 429 



8669 

3 920 

12 589 



14 549 
U067 
25 61C 



12 417 

6 139 
18 576 



10 774 

2 194 

12 9® 



3 184 

309 

3553 



3207 

96 

3 305 



5 
© 



318 
175 
403 



3755 

734 

4480 



4 153 

116 

4200 



163f 
24} 
188 



131 

17 

148 



140 

11 

151 



158* 
21* 
180 



144 

17 

161 



3 2531 104* 

56 61 

3 Sill HI 



1 015 

*i 6i5 



6 8381 

3 269 

10 107] 


1 567 

23 

1 500 


10 412 

5S 

10 0% 


1 797 

50 
1 847 



17 967 
7 190 
25 1471 



3249 

1930 
4 319 



2 328 
2855 



418 

11 

429 



53 

2 

55 



81 

89 



84} 

u 

86 



113 

11 

124 



81 



31 



9 817 

33D4 

12 121 


263 

31 

204 


12 442 

8390 

21 812 


1 694 

263 

1 1057 



89 



77 

6 

83 



2211 
23] 
246 



2 

• • 

2 

:: 

6 
6 

17 
17 

6 
*6 



2 
2 

1 

« • 

1 



8 



8 



I 



3 

S 
m 



1 
1 



1 
1 



1 

i 



3 
3 



S 

«9 



t 



10 
10 






4 

^3 



68 

9 

77 



27 
12 
39 



13 

4 

17 



19 

6 
25 



20 

3 

23 



11 

3 
14 



13 

4 

17 



11 



11 



15 

6 

21 



21 

4 

25 



16 

2 

IS 



29 

5 
34 



i 

H 

•H 



83 
1 

84 



55 
1 

56 



53 
53 



105 

ios 



88 

1 

89 



31 

1 

32 



37 



37 



33 



33 



17 



17 



8 



8 

29 
29 

23 
'23 

94 



30 

2 

32 



56 

1 

57 



89 

3 

92 



60 

2 

62 



54 

M 



56 
56 



19 
19 



39 



39 

49 
49 



77 10 

...j.. 



77 10 



94 



55 
65 



33 

1 

34 



102 

1 

108 



3 



12 



12. 



a 

I 



i 



1 
i 

6 



$ 

I 
b 

•o 

i 



2 



17 

8 

25 



14 

8 
22 



10 

8 

18 



20 

6 

26 



14 

7 

21 



8 

4 

12 



18 

1 

19 



14 

4 

18 



13 

3 
16 



17 

1 

18 



45 

6 

51 



169 

17 

186 



134 

11 

145 



150 

6 

155 



170 

18 

188 



161 

11 

172 



97 

3 
100 



61 

1 

62 



88 

4 

92 



67 



67 



97 

9 

106 



103 

4 

107 



59 

6 

66 



195 

19 

214 



s 



o 

S5 



171 
195 
171 



170 
199 
170 



170 
194 
170 



163 
192 
163 



163 
197 
163 



164 
195 
164 



162 
208 
162 



162 
197 
162 



179 
195 
179 



176 
196 
176 



164 
194 
161 



162 
192 
162 



163 
192 
163 



CIK8U8 



No. of children between 5 
and 18 yean of age resid- 
ing In the district August 
80,1908 







I 














2964 


2 799 


5 763 








1814 


1 784 


3598 








1 639 


1 605 


3 244 








1 826 


1 799 


3625 








1 425 


1 391 


2 816 








1886 


1 870 


3 756 








890 


848 


1 738 








1 609 


1 499 


3 108 








1 203 


1 167 


2 370 








1 729 


1 692 


3 421 








846 


865 


1 711 








858 


811 


1 669 









2 313 



2266 



4 579 



7 6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATTS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Delaware co., (continued) 

2d com'r dbt 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 

Dutchess co., 1st com'r 

dist 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dist 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Erie co., 1st com'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



2d com'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



3d com'r dist 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Essex co. ( 1st com'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



2d com'r dist. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



Franklin co., 1st com'r 

dtot 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 
Total 



Fulton oo. 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Genesee oo. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



BUTLDINGB 



i 



167 

7 

167 



94 

6 

94 



89 

8 

89 



92 

9 

92 



96 

7 

95 



83 

6 

83 



85 

6 

85 



79 

5 

79 



94 

3 

94 



83 

8 

83 



99 

3 

99 



124 

11 

124 



166 

6 

166 



89 

2 

89 



81 
4 

81 



74 

3 
74 



85 

4 

85 



81 

3 

81 



79 

3 

79 



75 

3 

75 



102 

2 

102 



86 

7 

86 



97 

1 

97 



113 

7 

113 



s 



13 
4 

13 



25 

5 

25 



11 

3 

11 



11 

1 

11 



OD 



1 



9 

3 

10 



PROPERTY 



167 
7 

167 



97 

6 

97 



94 

8 

94 



105 

9 

105 



96 

7 

96 



83 

5 

83 



88 

6 

88 



87 

6 

87 



111 

3 

112 



90 

8 

90 



99 

3 

99 



133 

11 

134 



I 

8 
US 

"B 
fi 
"3 



$20 670 

9 175 

29 845 



28 314 

5 561 
33 875 



20 412 

3 063 

23 495 



35 170 

7950 

43 120 



29 167 

5003 

34 170 



13 553 

5788 

19 291 



7583 

2 857 

10 440 



11 285 

6485 

17 770 



36 728 
15 387 
52 115 



9700 

2250 

11 950 



6 690 
485 

7 175 



47 566 
29 686 
77 252 



1 

§ 



$134 732 

45 033 

179 765 



264 341 

64 286 

328 627 



169 509 

31 299 

200 808 



275 302 

54 086 

329 338 



180 730 

42 073 

222 803 



107 248 

47 362 

154 610 



88 332 

22 947 

111279 



118 331 

79 200 

197 531 



188 852 

47 903 

236 255 



86 745 

30 185 

116 930 






3 
I 



$5 662 

3 1S6 
8848 



4 512 
3253 
7765 



4 519 
3 445 
7964 



7 319 

6052 

13 371 



4296 

6 097 

10 392 



3 959 

2 837 
6 796 



3546 
1 977 
5523 



8 824 
2 570 
5894 



6 182 
3 150 
9 382 



2 648 
4 212 
6 860 



67 469 

5 573 

73 042 


2 511 
600 

3 111 


298 746 
119 806 
418 552 


7 133 

5660 

12 783 



I 






$7 020 

7 351 

14 371 



6 578 

3608 

10 188 



8826 

3 947 

12 278 



10 514 

5407 

15 921 



10 725 

7 675 

18 400 



6 162 
8270 
9 432 



5453 
8 133 
8580 



5 075 
3 935 
9 010 



9088 

7260 

18 298 



4 607 
4 418 
9025 



3634 
1 428 
5062 



13 532 
18 137 
31 609 



- - ^i 



•i 

> 



$629 
350 
979 



1 

334 
1 363 



2706 
1 300 

4006 



17 563 
15 330 
32 893 



2 186 

50 

2236 



5830 

5525 

11 355 



860 

166 

1016 



755 

900 

1 655 



1080 



1080 



425 
250 
675 



130 



130 



29 223 
25 120 
64 343 



1 

h 

n 



3 



$168 713 

65 095 

283 806 



304 774 
77 042 

SSI 816 



905 471 

43 074 

248 545 



845 80S 

88 775 

434 643 



227 103 

00 808 

288 001 



136 753 

64 732 

201 4S4 



105 764 
31 OS) 

136 m 



138 770 
93 090 

231 860 



241 3SD 

73 TOT 
315 0* 



104 125 
41 31", 

145 440 



80 434 

8 0(4 

88 520 



406 200 
198 Sft 
604 59tf 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
tuchera end censna 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 {continued) — STATIS- 

Duil dings, property, library, 



Total 

2d oom'r Jlat. 
Eluuatarj Betook. . 



ToUl 

HttHmer 00., lit ulln'l 

Elemvatarj Bchooh. . 
Secondary ache ' 
Total 



Total.. 

LI*lG<BtiXL CO-, 



Becondarj tchooat. . . 



B7 




3 


B7 


1 


3 


07 


4 


3 


07 




! 


40 












80 




2 


80 




2 


7a 


13 


7 


78 


10 


7 


w 




10 


w 




10 


w: 


j 


7 
4 


108 


4 


14 


100 


5 


14 


60 


2 




90 


1 




10) 


S 


2 


103 





2 


7S 


7 


3 


78 


7 


3 


83 


4 




83 


4 





s no 

2 100 
7 210 



13 070 
4 500 
18 170 



24 410 
7 390 
31 7*0 

11 732 
3 090 
14 411 



171 577 
50 071 
221 048 



1 555 


285 


turn 












7 403 


3 173 


10 7H 


3 173 


8 157 


<H0 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



79 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Uacben and census 



I 

6 

a 



« 



e 



11310 

3435 

14 875 



as 



e 

1 150 



5136 
1237 
6 373 



11 782 

3530 

15 312 



13 313 

2 745 

16 063 



12 

1 656 

14 26* 



9 ISO 

6 853 

15 



11 

5062 

16 345 



10 

2 
12 865 



15 327 
2 
17 



13 

3504 

16 711 



11 

5 lf 



2 076 

161 

2237 



1 756 



1 756 



1 244 

106 
1 350 



2 648 

117 

2 765 



2406 

130 

2 545 



4 2S6 

204 

4 490 



964 



1 023 



3371 

119 

3 490 



2 678 

118 

2 696 



25 



8660 

130 

8690 



7424 1 
4 9281 
12 Sll 1 



1 768 
51 



3 



128 



8 ii 

90 



4 II 

62 



1 

* * 

1 

6 
6 



141 
14 
161 



a,..; 

1 4 



158 



129 



5 
5 

10 

io 






li 
27J 
183 



154 

19 

173 



10 ?l 

115 



129 

10 

139 



124 

20 

144 



3 

m • 

3 
1 

i 

5 
5 



8 
1 
1 

I 

CO 



"8 a 

123 I 3 



S 

i 



2 
1 
31 



! 



^3 



19 

5 

24 



9 

3 

12 



10 

6 

16 



42 

6 

48 



35 

6 

41 



21 

9 

30 



11 

7 

18 



15 

6 

20 



9 
4 

13 



63 
14 
77 



28 

7 

35 



i 



J* 

"3 



15 

is 

5 
"5 

14 

ii 
45 



45 
54 



54 

80 
80 



70 

3 

73 



96 



96 



63 



24 

24 

60 



60 



S 
11 



6 



69 

2 

71 



60 

2 

71 



21 

1 

22 



69 



46 



46 



49 

1 

50 



57 
1 

. 58 



75 

4 

79 



47 
1 

48 



48 

1 

49 



80 

2 

32 



14 



9 



10 



16 



6 



2 



2 



14 2 



B 

I 



i 



1 1 



1 
1 
2. 



2... 



83 

5 

38 



18 

8 

21 



7 

3 

10 



20 

5 

25 



9 

8 

17 



19 

4 

23 



13 

9 

22 



26 
11 
37 



9 

4 

13 



11 

4 

15 



14 

6 

20 



9 

6 

15 



86 
10 
96 



73 

6 

79 



38 

4 
42 



158 

11 

160 



136 

14 

150 



122 

3 

125 



140 

21 

161 



164 

12 

176 



121 

6 

126 



119 

6 

125 



108 

16 

124 



98 

10 

108 



a 

1 

h 



I 



170 
192 
170 



167 
197 
167 



170 
195 
170 



171 
193 
171 



169 
195 
169 



163 
191 
163 



165 
194 
165 



165 
196 
165 



159 
197 
159 



165 
198 
165 



16S 
193 
165 



162 
193 
162 



CZNBTJB 



No. of children between 6 
and 18 yean of Age resid- 
ing in the dktrlct August 
30,1906 



I 



1 824 



1 112 



497 



1979 



1 965 



1 204 



2 087 



1 979 



1 041 



1 588 



2 271 






1 859 



990 



509 



2006 



1 884 



1 193 



2 051 



1886 



984 



1 608 



2 057 



1 449 1 444 



3 

© 



3683 



2 HI 



1 006 



3985 



3 849 



2 397 



4 138 



3865 



2025 



8 196 



4 328 



2 803 



8o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



co., lit eom'r 

dtot. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary sehoob. . . 

Total 



2d eom'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Monroe oo., 1st eom'r dtat 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d eom'r dtot. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools., 
Total 



Montgomery co. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



Nassau co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Niagara co., 1st eom'r dtot 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 

2d eom'r dtot 
Elementary schools*.. 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



Oneida eo. f 1st eom'r dtot 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



2d eom'r dtot 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools . . 
Total 



3d eom'r dtot 
Elementary schools ■ 
Secondary schools . . 
Total 



4th eom'r dtot 
Elementary sehoob. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



BUILDINGS 



$ 



115 

12 

115 



84 

5 

84 



90 

8 

90 



110 

5 

110 



109 

6 

109 



60 
19 
60 



66 

1 

66 



89 
3 



89 . 



54 

5 

54 



94 

9 

94 



83 

2 

83 



126 
4 

126 



110 

9 

110 



79 
4 

79 



57 
"57 



72 

2 

72 



90 
90 



60 
14 
60 



45 
45 



61 
oi 



49 

2 

49 



81 

4 
81 



80 

1 

80 



123 

3 

123 



OQ 



8 
28 



26 

3 

26 



13 

4 

14 



14 

5 

14 



13 

1 

13 



24 

3 

24 



1 
1 



2 
1 

• • 

1 

6 
5 

12 

■ • • 

12 






8 
8 

7 

• • 

7 



2 



FBOFEBTT 



1 2 



115 

12 

115 



86 

5 

86 



90 

8 

90 



110 

5 
110 



108 

6 

109 



74 
19 
74 



66 

1 

66 



02 

3 

92 



54 

5 

54 



95 

9 

95 



83 

2 

83 



126 
4 

126 



•8 

I 



I 



$10 258 

3 627 
13 880 



12 690 

3 700 

16 390 



30 797 

4 533 

35 330 



29 850 

5400 

35 250 



20 477 

4283 

24 760 



193 770 

69 330 

263 100 



12 275 

350 

12 625 



25 140 

2025 

27 165 



12 450 

2260 

14 710 



12 670 

4 729 

17 399 



8 135 

800 

8 935 



9900 

1 275 

11 175 



$102 559 

41 456 

144 015 



122 440 

32 616 

155 056 



207 169 

56 445 

263 614 



235 757 

46 146 

281 903 



179 118 

45 567 

224 685 



1 019 585 

216 065 

1 235 650 



85 650 

5000 

90 650 



115 275 

12 475 

127 750 



87 845 

17 700 

105 545 



110 710 

40 341 

151051 



80 418 

8 167 

88 585 



84 142 
13 750 
97 892 



$3 789 
3 494 
7283 



3492 
2 994 
6486 



4640 
8 251 
7 891 



4 318 
5637 
9955 



4 563 
3044 
7 607 



12 088 

13 209 
25 297 



3094 

350 

3444 



3655 

943 

4598 



2 857 
2 081 
4938 



5 354 
3 769 
9 123 



8 662 
1 261 
4923 



4 710 
1 771 
8 481 



$4 949 

5 144 

10 093 



7 291 

4 381 

11 872 



7 156 

3 776 

10 932 



9 477 

2 914 

12 391 



8397 

6 231 

14 628 



18 456 
12 745 
81201 



4 435 

150 
4 585 



6602 
2 325 
8927 



4902 
3305 
8 207 



$1 689 

50 

1 739 



1 125 



1 125 



3226 
1 310 
4536 



564 



564 

1 974 
i'974 



14 915 

4 180 

19 095 



1 740 



1 740 



3 035 

560 

3 595 



1 146 
200 

1 346 



7652 

5 270 

12 922 


4087 

450 

4537 


4833 
1 290 
6 123 


495 

30 

525 


5 921 
2 629 


3 501 


8550 


3 50i 



$123 239 

53 771 

177 010 



147 038 

43 691 

190 729 



252 988 

69 315 

322 303 



279 966 

60 097 

340 063 



214 529 

59 125 

273 654 


1 258 814 

315 529 

1 574 343 


107 194 

5 850 

113 014 


153 707 

18 328 

172 035 


109 200 

25 546 

134 746 


140 473 

54 559 

195 032 


97 543 

11 548 

109 091 


1083174 

19 425 

127 599 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
tctcben ud eenmu 



82 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Onondaga co., life oom'r 

dfat. 
Elementary schools . . 
Secondary schools. . . 

Total 

2d com*r diet. 
Elementary schools . . 
Secondary schools. .. 
Total 

3dcom*rdtoi 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools . . . 
Total 



Ontario co. 1st com'r dfat 

Elementary schools . . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Orange co., 1st com'r dist. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools . . . 

Total 



2d com'r dtat 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Orleans co. 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Oswego co., 1st com'r dlst 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



3d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Otseco co., 1st com'r dist. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary sehoota. . . 
Total 



2d com'r diat. 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools.. 
Total 



78 

8 

78 



85 

5 

85 



02 

7 

02 



88 

4 

88 



105 

5 

105 



75 

8 

75 



04 

6 

94 



124 

6 

124 



89 

2 

89 



86 
4 

86 



100 
4 

100 



143 

10 

143 



154 

7 

154 



BUILDINGS 



5 



63 

'63 



71 



73 

2 

73 



58 



58 



99 

2 

99 



49 

2 

49 



69 

1 

69 



93 

1 

93 



77 

1 

77 



78 

2i 
781 



98 

1 

98 



129 

6 

129 



150 
5 

..I 150 



i 



17 

8 

17 



12 

5 
12 



10 
4 

10 



24 

4 
24 





3 

10 



19 

6 

19 



18 

5 

18 



15 

8 

15 



2 



I 

03 



21 

2 

22 



2 



I 1 
21 2 



I 



80 

8 

80 



89 

5 

89 



92 

7 

92 



88 

4 
88 



112 

5 

113 



75 

8 

75 



96 

6 

96 



129 

6 
130 



2 
80 



85 
4 



101 

4 

102 



135 

10 

185 



154 

7 

154 



818 680 

7305 

25 965 



19 850 

8600 

27 950 



18 420 

5 150 

23 670 



16 009 
1 616 

17 685 



24 900 
18 200 
43 100 



29 570 

7400 

36 070 



24 377 

4 273 

28 650 



43 445 
10 380 
53 825 



9 073 

250 

9823 



7440 
1 515 
8 955 



10 210 

2400 

12 610 



32 220 

6983 

39 203 



13 858 

2 876 

16 234 



$139 550 

42 600 

182 150 



153 232 

47 768 

201 000 



183 797 

61 500 

245 297 



130 050 

22 721 

152 771 



282 041 
182 444 
361485 



222 577 

67 973 

290 550 



219 995 

46 855 

266 850 



235 957 

90 763 

326 720 



72 550 

6008 

78 558 



66 985 
17 700 
84 686 



95 250 

80 000 

126 250 



190 069 

57 805 

247 864 



127 606 

31 877 

160 483 



$3 580 
4 763 
8343 



1 863 
4 967 
6830 



4065 
5 167 
9232 



4 375 
2336 
6 711 



4 216 

8 219 

12 435 



5 767 
3286 
9053 



3256 
3789 
7045 



4853 
3 776 
8629 



3009 

672 

8 671 



2 231 

3 270 
5 601 



3295 
2 156 
5 451 



5 017 

5688 

10 600 



5 878 
3687 
8965 



I 

l 



86 319 

6404 

11723 



6900 

8900 

10 800 



10 058 

4894 

14 952 



6909 
3 019 
9988 



9296 
12 799 
22 095 



7868 

3 102 

10 470 






I 



81 762 
1 267 
3029 



250 
1800 
2050 



3 634 
500 

3 134 



4469 



4649 



1 218 

11 219 

12 437 



3036 
1 899 
4935 



9 521 

4090 

13 611 


20 533 

4 570 

25 103 


9 432 

4 810 

14 242 


13 650 

2000 

15 650 


4850 
763 


620 


5 113 


620 


6 782 
2690 
8822 


717 
190 
907 


6 822 

4906 

10 728 


1 186 
1 860 
2486 


10 249 

7607 

17 866 


2 472 
8849 
6 821 


10 911 

6490 

16 401 


8667 

8688 

12 090 



1 



$169 891 

61 339 

231 230 



181 606 

67 035 

248 680 



218 974 

77 211 

296 185 



162 112 

29 602 

191 804 



271 671 
182 881 
464 552 



268 818 

83 660 

351 078 



277 682 

63 577 

841 250 



807 337 
111 720 
419 066 



80 502 

7503 

97 186 



83 106 

25 206 

106 870 



115 712 

40 812 

166 624 



240 017 

81 827 

821 844 



166 810 
46 868 

213 173 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



83 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teachers and census 



E 

h 

2 



c 



9455 

5 3?6 
14 TBI 



13 335 

4 811 
IS 146 



14 5561 

5330 

19 886 



12 026 

3704 

15 730 



13 249 
11 207 
24 456 



11 415 

4 541 

15 956 



15 466 

5 195 

20 661 



15 406 

5 117 

20 523 



7705 
1070 
8775 



«655] 

3430 

10 065 



9231 

5002 

14 233 



15 818J 4 
11 15H| 
26976( 4 



17 4401 

6734 

24 194 




1 

i 



o 
S3 



4 104 
183] 
4 2801 



83 
96 
83 



93 
97 
93 



75 
95 
75 



77 
98 
77 



65 
97 
65 



87 
98 
87 



86 
97 
86 



70 
99 
70 



65 
92 
65 



65 
97 
65 



64 
98 
64 



64 
92 
64 



63 
93 
63 



CKNBTJB 



No. of children between 5 
and 18 yean of age resid- 
ing In the district August 
30,1908 



I 




I 














1 905 


1 811 


8 716 








2 402 


2 418 


4820 








2 081 


2040 


4 121 








1 836 


1 756 


3 592 








2099 


2050 


4 i49 








2 937 


3 029 


5966 








2 842 


2 699 


5 541 








3 254 


3 203 


6 457 








1 249 


1 181 


2 430 








1 174 


1177 


2 351 








1 302 


1 244 


2 546 








1 072 


1 638 


3 310 









1 643J 



1 566 



3 209 



84 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Putnam oo. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Rensselaer co., 1st com'r 

dlst 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r diet. 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Rockland co. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



St Lawrence co., 1st com'r 

dlst. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 



2d com'r dlst. 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools.. 
Total 



3d com'r diet 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Saratoga co., 1st com'r 

dirt. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



8ehenectady co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Schoharie co., 1st com'r 

dlst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 

Total 



2d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools.. 
Total 



56 

4 
56 



79 

5 

70 



84 

1 

84 



47 

8 

47 



151 

8 

151 



177 

9 

177 



149 

6 

149 



101 

6 

101 



97 

4 
97 



61 

2 

61 



87 
2 

87 



92 

4 

92 



Buimnras 



$ 






50 

3 

50 



70 

1 

70 



77 
'77 



85 

1 

35 



145 

6 

145 



160 

8 

160 



128 

3 

123 



71 
'71 



83 
83 



45 

1 

45 



84 
84 



90 

2 

90 



S 



15 
4 

16 



11 

6 

11 



14 

5 

14 



26 

3 

26 



30 

6 

30 



16 

4 

17 



12 

1 

12 



oo 



3 
3 

4 

• • 

4 
2 

• • 

2 



2 ... 



i 



56 

4 
56 



86 

5 

87 



84 

1 

84 



48 

8 

48 



156 

8 

156 



177 

9 

177 



151 

6 

151 



104 

6 

104 



103 

4 

104 



59 

2 

59 



87 
2 

87 



92 

4 

92 



$22 100 

3 100 

25 200 



38 777 

5 183 

43 910 



11 667 

200 

11 867 



62 153 
14 997 
67 150 



18 748 

7242 

25 990 



17 569 

6 021 

23 590 



18 752 

3895 

22 647 



21 863 
10 302 
82 265 



29 491 
17 750 
47 241 



15 505 

2200 

17 706 



8 182 
1 883 
9465 



11428 

2 718 

14 146 



1125 540 

20 289 

145 829 



217 859 

61060 

268 919 



87 270 

1 876 

89 145 



384 942 

83 858 

418 795 



171 242 

55 033 

226 275 



194 049 

26 391 

220 440 



217 736 

31091 

248 826 



166 162 

82 117 

248 279 



308 094 

97 800 

400 894 



125 317 

22 573 

147 890 



67 517 
18 768 
81285 



87 597 

20 788 

106 830 



13 117 
1 741 
4868 



2 945 
4029 
6 974 



2887 

100 

2987 



6360 

5806 

12 166 



5905 
3597 
9502 



7 387 
2277 
9664 



6662 
2427 
9089 



3645 
2895 
6540 



8 942 
5565 
9507 



2 297 

634 

2 981 



2297 
1425 
8722 



2 841 
1 791 
4 182 



84 482 
2 499 
6 931 



6802 
2909 
9 271 



7244 

400 

7644 



10 121 

5 177 

15 298 



8 198 

3402 

11 600 



7 756 

3 617 

11 278 



9 849 

2666 

12 015 



8 651 

8766 

17 417 



6028 

4 750 

10 778 



2942 

572 

3 514 



4302 

1 781 
6033 



5459 
2484 
7 



1617 
"617 



5645 
1 200 
6845 



885 

'885 



4400 

132 

4582 



640 
100 
740 



992 

100 
1092 



5026 
2 494 
7520 



819 

700 

1519 



1 803 

100 

1 403 



1 621 

93 

1 714 



695 
'695 



514 
Hi 



1 

it 



I 



$155 806 

27 629 

183 435 

!- 

r - 

271(528 

64 391 

3351919 



109 953 

2 575 

112 528 



4071976 
109 965 

517^41 



204 733 

69 374 

274 107 



227 753 

38 ?06 

266 059 



257 534 

42 573 

300 097 



201 140 
104 870 
306 010 



343 858 

135 965 

449 823 



147 682 

26 072 

173 754 



83 943 

18 257 

101 200 



197 
27 876 

135 015 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 











"i 

3 


2 
1 

a 

7 
3 
10 

4 
1 


3 

a 

1 

o 

10 


I] 
t 

n 

8 

as 


8 
30 

n 

8 


41 

2 

48 

04 

1 
95 

53 


T 






















■si 


1 ... 


1 . 


. 4 

2 ... 
2 4 




7 ... 


1 












1 

11 

is 

■ 

1 

t 

10 

1 

4 
I 

8 
i 

I 


7 

87 
12 
» 

24 

13 
37 

39 
1 
11 

n 

7 
78 

2 
21 

46 
I 

54 

13 
1 
15 

i 

: 

8 

8 
3 
11 


» 

14 

88 
88 

103 

118 
118 

83 
85 

80 
80 

:s 
as 

22 
22 

27 
2 
29 


S3 

55 

82 

103 
2 
105 

B2 
2 

18 . 
85 

«s 

45 

4! 

43 

M 
U 

82 








'SI 


2... 


2 . 


. 5 

2 ... 
2 5 

6 ... 

1 
4 1 

6 ... 
fl ... 

. 2 

4 "a 


m 


2 ... 


2 


in 

■a 


3 
3 

"i 

7 
.... 

2 

"i 

2 

"a 

"'i 

t 

6 

fl 

"'( 


1 

1 
i 

8 

I 


4 ... 


,. 


'St 


8 ... 


4 


'SI 


1 2 


2 . 


■st 


1 2 

5 ... 

6 1 




"SI 


2 . 




1 
S 


: 


















2 ... 


1 . 


„ ... 

2 ... 

2 ... 




■ 


.... 


w 

■Bl 


2 ... 
1 ... 


1 




82 


1 ... 


2 



ud IS ntn ol in mid- 



86 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Sohuyler co. 

Elementary schoob . 

Secondary school*. . 

Total 



Seneca oo. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools . . . 

Total 

Steuben co., 1st com'r dlst. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



3d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



Suffolk co., 1st com'r dfet 

Elementary schools. , 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Sullivan co., 1st com'r 

dlst. 

Elementary schools . . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Tioga co. 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Tompkins co., 1st eom'r 

dbt. 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 



105 

2 

105 



92 

5 

92 



120 

10 

120 



120 

4 

120 



123 
4 

123 



50 
11 
50 



80 
15 
80 



80 

2 

80 



87 

3 

87 



148 

8 

148 



70 

2 

70 



5 
82 



BUILDINGS 



I 



102 

1 

102 



00 

1 

00 



120 



120 



110 

1 

110 



119 

2 

119 



52 

8 
52 



80 
11 
80 



82 

1 

82 



88 

8 

88 



140 

4 

140 



07 

1 

07 



80 

4 

80 



i 



30 
4 

37 



i 

co 



i 



2 
1 
2.. 



100 

2 

100 



97 

5 

96 



128 
10 

128 



128 

4 

128 



124 

4 

124 



57 
11 
57 



89 
15 

89 



80 

2 

80 



88 

3 
88 



153 

8 

158 



70 

2 

70 



82 

5 

82 



PROPERTY 






114 515 

4 800 

19 315 



20 055 

5 375 

31 430 



21 185 

5850 

27 035 



25 028 

8 100 

88 128 



9 910 

1 020 

11 530 



52 110 
12 484 
04 000 



92 518 

85 517 

128 035 



12 818 

1 800 

14 018 



19 970 

3 850 

23 820 



29 759 

9 060 

39 409 



5905 

000 

505 



9882 

4 433 

14 315 



198 805 

15 200 

113 505 



185 740 

05 893 

251 042 



100 772 

40 024 

207 890 



145 800 

38 500 

188 700 



70 935 
11 830 
88 705 



381 135 
102 901 
484 030 



088 417 
182 897 
821 814 



85 800 
12 400 
97 700 



70 050 

7500 

83 550 



214 008 

57 570 

272 178 



51 224 
10 800 
82 024 



00 020 
15 950 
81 970 



i 

09 


«s 


s 
2 


$4 180 

I 200 
5 330 


4044 
4 770 
9420 


4 587 

153 

10 740 


4 150 
3206 
7804 


3 017 
2 075 
5092 


3008 
5009 
8 732 


0858 

8788 

15 Ml 


3 724 
717 

4 441 


3099 

885 
4 584 


5455 

0435 

11 890 


2 040 
870 

3 522 


3 470 
1 804 
5884 



I 

2 



10 500 
1 100 
7000 



0890 

4 481 

11 377 



5 914 

453 

12 307 



5802 
3284 
8590 



3950 
2 101 
117 



8088 
4438 

13 121 



12 919 

8985 

21 854 



4704 
1 600 
0204 



5 470 
1 109 
0089 



7520 

8260 

15 780 



3988 
1 477 
5405 



7 197 
2 110 
813 



I 




SI 935 

350 

2285 



234 

5254 

11488 



2209 

90 

2290 



4 100 
1 000 

5 100 



200 
100 
300 



18 078 

2 582 

15 010 



5502 
1 072 
7 174 



3 970 
800 

4 770 



780 
780 




3 245 
3245 



488 

25 

458 



805 

50 

915 



3125 445 

22 050 

146 095 



229 578 

ft5 779 

315 257 



194 007 

05 170 

259 837 



188 91* 
54 042 

237 «00 



94 61S 

17 786 

112 404 



456 675 

127 424 
580 099 



756 209 
237 «tf 

994 01$ 



110 570 

17 217 

127 793 



105 925 

13 404 

119 329 



2*o 5*3 

SI 91 » 

342 50* 



64 194 

13 77* 
77 974 



*7 434 

24 415 
HI ->47 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
teuton »nd cennu 



88 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS J 



Ulster co. t 1st oom'r dirt 

. Elementary schools.. 

1' * Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



3d oom'r dist 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 

Warren co., 1st oom'r dist. 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



Washington oo., 1st oom'r 
dbt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools. . 
Secondary schools. . . 
Total 



Wayne co., 1st com'r dist. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 



2d oom'r dist. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 
Total 



Westchester co., 1st com'r 

dbt. \ 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools . . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
Total 



3d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob... 
Total 



37 

1 

37 



86 

3 
86 



05 

1 

96 



$ 



48 

2 

48 



64 

3 

64 



106 

5 

108 



118 

7 

118 



113 

6 

113 



06 

7 

06 



12 

5 

12 



37 
11 
87 



73 

6 

73 



BUILDINGS 



28 
1 

28 



76 

2 

76 



04 

1 

04 



44 

2 
44 



60 

1 

60 



00 
00 



00 

2 

00 



00 

1 

01 



74 
1 

74 



■a 

s 



30 
2 

30 



66 

3 

66 



8 



i 



3 



21 

5 

21 



24 

5 

24 





6 

14 



18 

5 

18 



18 

7 

10 



2 



1 



15 ... 

8 
15 



38 

1 

38 



86 
3 



07 

1 

07 



40 

2 

40 



64 

3 

64 



111 

5 

111 



118 

7 

125 



107 

6 

118 



06 

7 

06 



23 

5 

23 



51 
11 
52 



75 

5 

75 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Buildings, property, library, 



$14 550 

1 800 
16 350 



21 825 
1500 

22 825 



12 575 

1500 

14 075 



13 130 

2 700 

15 830 



4 861 
080 

5 841 



17 558 

4302 

21860 



17 320 
12 776 
30 005 



22 700 

7 421 

30 130 



17 070 

5 250 

28 220 



134 802 

22 718 

157 608 



178 150 

00 850 

260 000 



60 050 
12 300 
81 350 



FROraSTT 



100 000 

16 200 
114 200 



125 655 

U 650 

137 805 



05 575 

5000 

101 475 



54 206 

8500 

62 706 



60 660 
15 700 
76 450 



167 633 

35 282 

202 865 



162 450 

50 500 

221 050 



215 014 

50 206 

265 210 



147 000 

55 688 
203 637 



668 470 
204 252 
872 731 



748 711 

334 723 

1 088 434 



415 015 

77 750 

402 765 



$2 218 

000 

3 118 



4 163 

765 

4028 



3 451 
700 

4 151 



1 652 
1 535 
3 187 



1 861 
1 430 
3 201 



4 153 

3 475 
7 



3 410 
4220 
7630 



4 748 

5070 

10 727 



3 137 

4 830 
7 467 



8840 
5 260 

8600 



6007 

166 

16 163 



4556 

3 061 
7637 



i 

! 



13 175 
2 850 
5525 



8 701 
1 187 
0888 



4 766 

400 

5166 



3500 
1 780 
6 



3 

1 870 
5 517 



6 180 
3285 
0465 



4433 
4790 
0232 



675 

8 757 

18 482 



8 174 

5660 

13 834 



4 676 
4008 
8685 



7060 

6455 

14 424 



8640 

1020 

10 560 



$484 

"434 

032 



032 



1450 



"St? 



£ 



1450 



711 
1050 
1 761 



631 
350 

081 



3 561 
2500 
6 061 



4282 
1 260 
5542 



1 328 

334 

1662 



1210 

281 

1401 



84 721 

2 643 

37 364 



7405 

414)0 

11 405 



1 384 

175 

1 569 



$110 377 

20 250 
130 627 



100 776 

15 102 

175 878 



117 817 

8500 
126 317 



73 379 
15 515 
88 804 



71 660 
20 429 



190 085 

48 791 

247 879 



191 8tf 
82 554 

274 449 



253 474 
72 094 

170 



178 490 

71 15$ 

249 649 



840 10* 

238 S9» 

1 084 99T 



940 2S 

445 1*4 

1894 42t 



498 64^ 

95 22' 

593 871 



sixth: annual report 



89 



TICS OP PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teachers and census 



i 



o 

z, 









ens 

3 587 

10 305. 



am 3 
ism 3 568 



Sal w 

TO t 



•s 

6 




7* ; 2 033 

4241 

.79001 2033 



119 



125 



im i4» 



I MM l 758 

12871 

"391 1 752 



10164 

3223 

13 487 



5 

3 




1 



8 



1 

i 



8 

ll 

4 



1 

ll 

2 




7 
8 



7 
5 



12 



3 



2 
12 
14 



6 
19 
25 



42 

4 
46 



8 

2 

10 



24 

9 

33 



23 
11 
34 



39 

8 
47 



35 

9 

44 



114 

8 

122 



136 

23 

159 



6 
75 



15 



15 

21 
*2i 



52 

1 

53 



34 



84 



38 



38 



51 



51 



55 



55 

75 
*75 

67 



7 
7 



19 

2 

21 



12 

12 



i 



82 



32 

54 
54 



62 

1 

63 



28 



28 



42 



42 



67 

2 

69 



112 

1 

113 



43 

2 

45 



36 

36 



J 



7 
*7 

18 



18 



3 



8 



8 



19 

1 

20 



43 

4 

47 



57 

3 

60 







2 



1 



1 

i 



2 
2 



1 
i 



i 



10 
10 



3 
3 



1 
1 



6 

1 • ■ 

6 
12 

■ • • 

12 



2 
2 



30 

3 

33 



24 
'24 



11 

4 

15 



9 

4 

13 



15 

9 

24 



7 

8 

15 



7 

5 

12 



13 
21 
34 



17 

3 

20 



53 
4 

57 



104 

2 

106 



115 

6 

121 



64 

3 

67 



87 

1 

91 



140 

14 

154 



201 

18 

219 



150 

17 

167 



136 

19 

155 



145 

19 

164 



217 

31 

248 



131 

17 

148 



i 



8 
•9 



o 

25 



CENBOI 



No. of children between 5 
and 18 yean of ace resid- 
ing In the district August 
30,1908 



187 

186 
187 



182 
198 
182 



170 
193 
170 



163 
195 
163 



162 
195 
162 



165 
194 
165 



162 
194 
162 



173 
198 
173 



169 
197 
169 



200 
195 
200 



199 
193 
199 



1 



1 563 



2 709 



2099 



957 



1030 



2054 



2869 



2259 



2 300 



3724 



6 305 



193 
195 
193' 3 183 



$ 



1 543 



2 605 



2052 



1049 



1 068 



1 877 



2884 



2 269 



2295 



3 643 



6 260 



3 211 



3 



3096 



5 314 



4 151 



2 006 



2098 



3 931 



5 753 



4 528 



4 595 



7 367 



12 565 



6 394 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS 
Buildings, property, librar 



Wyomlcf m.. lat com'r 

Elemer.Urj schooli . 
Saonutary Kbcob. . 
Total 

3d oom'r dM. 
Elmwitarj ■anook. 
Secondary ithooli. . 

Total 



I 


1 


1 


TJ 


■8 


"8 


| 


i 


| 



SI 60 
1S7 !B 



Total.. 



27 
27 

1 

8 



3 000 


i sac 


350 
4 000 

4 MO 


SflS 

1 553 
S 180 


.1 90S 

ewe 


4 843 

sin 

8*2 


us era 
«o no 

178 188 


la 4i4 

73 020 


SIS 
700 

1 033 


1 448 
1 200 

sots 


1 OX 
1 BIO 


100 
1 400 
1 M0 


no 

1 31.1 
1 603 


850 
2700 
1350 


1500 
2 07S 
4 575 


1 500 

2 000 

4 100 


1 82. 

sex 


7 418 
8087 

10 sot 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
teichen and cenraa 



92 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Bttildings, property, library, 





3 

1 

1 

d 
55 


BUILDINGS 


PROPERTY 


CITIES 


.3 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 


l 
l 

l 
l 

l 
l 

l 
i 

l 
l 

l 
l 


6 
1 
6 

5 
1 
5 

3 
1 
3 

9 

2 

10 

5 
1 
5 

3 
1 
3 

5 
1 
5 

12 

1 

12 

4 
1 
4 

6 
2 

7 

4 
1 
4 

3 
1 

4 

8 
1 
9 


1 

00 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• » • 

• • • 

• • • 

■ • • 

• * ■ 

• • * 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • a 

• • a 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • « 

• • • 

• • a 

• » a 

• • a 

• • • 
a • » 

1 

■ • * 

1 

• • • 

• a • 
» • • 

• a • 

• • ■ 

• • ■ 

1 

• • • 

1 


1 


1 

§ 


j 

9 

•a 
> 


■*» 
OS 

•s 
S 
I 


1 

"8 

s 

I 


1 

s 

•a 
> 


| 

■1 

It 


Fulton 

Elementary schools , , 


7 
1 
7 

6 
1 

5 

4 

.1 
.4 



2 

10 

■ 

5 
1 
5 

3 
1 
3 

6 
1 

6 

13 

1 

13 

5 
1 
5 

8 
2 
9 

4 
1 
4 

3 
1 
4 

9 

1 

10 


7 
1 
7 

5 
1 
5 

4 

1 
4 

9 

2 

10 

5 

1 
5 

3 
1 
3 

6 
1 
6 

13 

1 

13 

5 
1 
5 

8 
2 


4 

1 
4 

3 
1 
4 


1 

10 


16 300 
2 100 
8400 

14 850 
5000 

19 350 

30 000 
30 000 
60 000 

11 600 

20 000 
81 500 

25 060 
10 000 

35 000 

0000 
6000 

15 000 

41000 

12 000 
53 000 

105 900 

15 000 
120 900 

12 000 
12 000 
24 000 

36 227 
27 025 
63 252 

16 000 
14 000 
30 000 

50 000 
30 000 
80 000 

50 000 
33 000 
83 000 


$96 200 

22 200 

118 400 

104 688 

68 152 
172 810 

124 000 
86 000 

210 000 

141 000 

80 000 

221 000 

100 000 
25 000 

125 000 

73 000 
17 000 
90 000 

159 300 

77 550 

236 850 

310 000 

57 000 
367 000 

102 716 

17 916 

120 632 

247 823 

58 140 
305 463 

116 289 

29 132 

145 421 

75 000 

45 000 

120 000 

214 000 
132 500 
846 500 


1800 

2000 
2800 

551 

2407 
2 058 

1 250 
1 250 

200 
1 200 
1 400 

200 
3000 
3200 

600 
1 400 
1 900 

1 100 
3300 
4400 

2 100 
5800 
7900 

344 
2587 
2931 

235 

6353 
6588 

478 

648 

1 126 

1 000 

5000 
6000 

4 500 
4 200 
8 700 


$1000 
850 

1 850 

2 076 
6 861 
8927 

2500 
1 900 
4400 

1 000 

950 
1 950 

2500 
1 500 
4000 

500 
1 000 

1 500 

1 850 
5650 
7500 

3 150 

6 711 
9 861 

1 078 
3830 
4908 

4 675 

3000 

7 675 

1 182 

244 

1426 

1 600 
1 500 

8000 

3000 
1 900 
4900 




$104 300 


Secondary schools . . . 




27 ISO 


Total 




131 450 


Geneva 

Elemental? school? - - 




121 685 


Secondary schools. . . 
Total 


$710 
710 


83 120 
204 7S5 


Glens FaDs 

Elementary whnolf . . 


156 500 


Secondary schools . . . 




119 150 


Total 




275 650 


Gloversville 

Elementary schools . . 




153 TOO 


Secondary schools. . . 
Total 




102 150 




255 850 


Hornell 

Elementary schools- - 




127 700 


Secondary schools. . . 
Total 




39 500 




167 200 


Hudson 

Elementary schools . . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 




83 000 




25 400 




106 400 


Ithaca 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


4 500 

2 500 

7000 

6000 
3000 
9000 

1 565 

200 
1 765 

87 907 

7380 

45 237 

3 219 
632 

8 851 

5000 


207 730 
101 000 
308 750 


Jamestown 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


427 150 

87 511 

514 661 


Johnstown 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools . . . 

Total 


117 703 

36 &3i 

154 2ZA 


Kingston 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


326 S67 
101 MS 
428 215 


Lackawanna 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


137 168 
44 656 

181 624 


tittle Falls 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


132 500 
81 500 


5000 

4500 

3200 
7700 


214 000 


Lockpprt 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


276 000 

174 800 
450 600 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



93 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

tetchers and cenraa 




CBNBUB 



No. of children between 5 
and 18 years of age resid- 
ing in dty August 30, 
1908 



I 



086 



1 128 



075 



1 538 



1 350 



701 



1 215 



2 800 



950 



2 829 



1 164 



1 000 



1 750 






905 



1 154 



993 



1 534 



1 450 



768 



1 176 



2 885 



911 



2 891 



1 064 



1 000 



1 750 



I 



1 891 



2 282 



1 968 



3 072 



2 800 



1 460 



2 S01 



5 784 



1 861 



5 720 



2 228 



2000 



3500 



94 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 {continued) — STATI&- 

Buildings, property, library, 



CITIES 



MddbtowB 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Mount Vernon 

Elementary schools.. 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



Newfourgh 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



NewRocheDe 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



New York 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Niagara Falls 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



N. Tonawanda 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Ogdeosburg 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Oleaa 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Oneida 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 



Oneonta 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



Oswego 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 



Plattoburg 

Elementary schools. 

• Secondary schools,. 

25 tTotal 





2 

11 



14 

1 

14 



572 

19 

591 



14 

1 

15 



12 

1 

13 



BUILDINGS 



6 



131 



131 



•8 

s 



7 
1 
8 



10 



441 

19 

460 



10 

1 

11 



S 

s 

CO 



8 



9 

2 

11 



7 
2 



14 

1 

14 



572 

19 

591 



14 

1 

16 



12 

1 

13 



PBOPOTT 



$27 000 

2000 

29 600 



99 000 

18 000 

117 000 



34 400 
17 500 
51900 



57 500 
25 000 
82 500 



26 158 518 

3 096 618 

29 255 136 



59 069 
26 000 
85 069 



18 000 

5000 

23 000 



13 750 
13 000 
26 750 



23 000 
20 000 
43 000 



4000 

6000 

10 000 



5500 

7000 

12 500 



18 000 

5000 

23 000 



12 000 

8000 

20 000 



1180 000 

25 000 

205 000 



502 663 

75 064 

577 727 



336 000 

80 000 

416 000 



326 156 
177 050 
503 206 



84 743 397 

8 407 144 

93 150 541 



267 453 
161 035 
428 488 



118 060 

85 040 

203 100 



120 000 

30 000 

150 000 



140 000 

80 000 

220 000 



47100 
45 200 
92 300 



38 000 
115 000 
153 000 



116 000 

29 000 

144 000 



50 000 

50 000 

100 0001 



-4» 

i 

9 



i 



16 000 
6000 



5000 
3504 
8504 



500 

3400 
3900 



885 

3 297 

4 182 



19 428 
158 042 
177 470 



2 100 
6200 
8300 



13 670 

3800 

17 470 



800 
2000 
2 800 



3200 
3200 



850 
1 650 
2000 



290 
1827 
2 117 



1 200 
1 800 

3000 



250 
2030 
2 



•8 

s 
2 



$2 175 
2 175 



I 



I* 



3 



2 112 
2 112 



1 850 
3 500 
5350 



2 600 
873 

3 473 



480 548 

82 552 

563 100 



1 850 
2450 
4 300 



3 750 
3 750 



2 500 

800 

3 300 



1 400 
1 750 
3 150 



1 200 

8 100 
9300 



326 
1 046 
1 870 



2900 
1 125 
4025 



1 
2 
4 



803 



8450 
450 



1080 764 

228 244 

1 307 00b 



1 800 
1 500 

3300 



950 

175 

1 126 



1 100 
1 SSI 



8207 600 

35 173 

242 775 



606 663 

98 680 

705 343 



372 750 
101 4flO 
477 150 



887 141 
206 670 
503 Ml 



112 482 «tf 

11 970 600 

124 453 255 



332 272 
197 1S5 
529 457 



149 730 

97 500 

247 320 



187 050 

45 800 

182 860 



164J40O 
104^950 
269_360 



62*660 
601950 

U3.60O 



45 005 
125 047 
170 112 



137 100 

36 925 

174 025 



64 OSS 

03 13d 
128 121 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



95 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teachers and census 



UBSABT 



TK1CHKR3 



8 



o 
Z 



1 706 
1 708 




« 



^11 



£ 



5 
5 




1 

1 2851 



3 534 
1 3S 

4 909< 



38861 
835 
4 721 



585 456 

71 796 
657 254 



3 415 
07D 



350 
350 



130 

25 

164 



103 550 

6 734 

110 284 



4 385J 

\rn 

1 272 



415 
21 






4 774 
1 570 



110 
110 



6 344 



2 061) 
1 603 

3 754 



3 794 

6 656 

10 



1 347 



511 
241 



7561 

752 

1 5381 



6 206 

667 

6873 



2 315 

3 167 

4 482 



57 
11 
68 



126 

30 

156 



03 

17 
110 



120 

17 

137 



15 697 
1 218 

16 015 



126 

25 

151 



50) 

12 

62 



42 
10 
52 



67 
16 
83 



26 

9 

35 



28 

9 
37 



75 
15 
90 



S3 

9 
42 



CO 



2 010 

56 

2 060 



7 

4 

11 



1 
1 



3 

I* 



15 
15 



15 
15 



723 
111 
834 



6 
6 



2 

2 



02 

8 

100 



55 

4 

60 



107 

2 

109 



1 771 
76 
847 



84 
15 
99 



41 
2 

43 



15 

2 

17 



50 

3 

53 



13 

1 

14 



18 

1 

19 



75 
11 
86 



26 

1 

27 



s 



1 
40 



4 426 

27 

4 453 



11 

ii 



6 
*6 

20 
20 



* 



22 

1 

23 



32 

2 

84 



36 

5 

41 



14 



14 



6 991 
931 

7 922 



27 

3 

30 



§ 

S3 



a 



I 



21 

2 

23 



• • • 

• • • 



18 
18 
36 



I 



1 
1 



2 



303 

28 

331 



2 



5 

6 

11 



529 
592 
2 121 



6 
4 

10 



1 
1 



< • • 



59 

6 

65 



134 

24 

158 



89 

13 

102 



130 

12 

142 



14 734 

657 

16 391 



124 

22 

146 



52 
10 
62 



43 

4 

47 



65 
10 
75 



25 

7 



28 

8 

36 



75 
12 
87 



34 

9 

43 



I 
8 



o 
25 



191 
191 
191 



191 
191 
191 



192 
192 
192 



188 
188 
188 



191 
191 
191 



196 
198 
198 



193 
193 
193 



191 
191 
191 



194 
194 
194 



189 
189 
189 



192 
192 
192 



200 
200 
200 



193 
189 
193 



CENSUS 



No. of children between 6 
and 18 years of age resid- 
ing In city August 30, 



R 

2 



1 295 



3 389 



2 892 



2 850 



536 764 



3350 



1 275 



1 624 



1 758 



800 



718 



2 860 



1 172 






1 353 



3 702 



2 954 



3060 



554 221 



3 450 



1 263 



1 611 



1 777 



825 



690 



2 913 



1 188 



1 



2 648 



7 091 



5846 



5 910 



1 090 965 



6800 



2 638 



3235 



3.535 



11625 



12408 



5 773 



2 360 



I 



96 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Bvildinga, property, library 





i 

• 

si 

6 
1 
6 

10 

1 

11 

3 
1 
3 

34 

2 

36 

7 
1 
7 

18 

2 

20 

37 

3 

40 

5 
1 
5 

20 

1 

• 21 

25 

1 

26 

12 

1 

13 

6 
1 
6 

20 

1 

21 


BUILDINGS 


PBOPERTT 


CITIES 


• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

• • 

■ • 

• • 

• • 

■ • 


, 


1 


j 

1 

• • • 

1 

■ • # 

• • ■ 

• • • 

• ■ • 

■ • ■ 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • « 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

■ • • 

• • • 

• • * 

■ • • 

■ • • 

• • ■ 

• • • 

• • • 

1 
1 

• • • 

• • • 

• ■ • 

• ■ • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • ■ 

■ ■ • 

• • ■ 

• • • 

■ • * 


3 


i 



11 

*8 

1 


•8 

j 


S 

« 

s 

2 


1 

•8 

1 


1 
1 


1 

1! 


PortJcrvfa 

Elementary echoob. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


2 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3 
3 

2 
2 

3 


8 
1 
8 

9 

1 

10 

8 
1 
8 

34 

2 
86 

6 
1 
6 

17 

2 

19 

34 

3 
37 

8 
1 
8 

17 


6 
1 
6 

10 

1 

11 

8 
1 
8 

34 

2 

36 

7 
1 
7 

18 

2 

20 

87 

3 

40 

5 
1 
5 

20 

1 

21 

25 

1 

26 

12 

1 

13 

6 
1 
6 

20 

1 

21 


810 950 

6000 

16 950 

16 000 

7000 

23 000 

6000 
600 

6600 

337 061 

68 000 

405 061 

27 000 
12 000 
89 000 

100 000 

80 000 

130 000 

265 200 
135 000 
400 200 

6000 

4000 

10 000 

119 400 

35 000 

154 400 

135 000 

15 000 

160 000 

60 000 
20 000 
70 000 

15 000 
1 000 

16 000 

240 000 

47 350 

287 360 


859 500 
28 500 

88 000 

176 500 

65 000 

241 500 

77 500 
15 000 
02 600 

1460 000 

615 500 

2 075 600 

99 800 

83 700 

183 600 

900 000 

120 000 

1020*000 

1 169 100 

654 000 

1 828 100 

90 000 

40 000 

180 000 

514 137 
165 000 
679 137 

412 575 

79 026 
491 601 

600 000 
110 000 
710 000 

80 700 
20 300 

101 000 

1 484 255 

212 000 

1 696 266 


8420 
1 850 
2270 

1 600 

2000 
3600 

1 100 
1 270 
2370 

21 600 

54 000 

75 600 

1 000 
3 300 
4300 

4600 

6 715 

11 315 

6000 

22 200 
28 200 

250 
800 

1060 

6 150 

5000 

11 160 

2000 
2600 
4600 

2 600 

5 300 
7800 

2000 
1 700 
3700 

8 304 
16 483 
24 787 


8220 
565 

785 

763 

717 

1480 

1 826 
976 

2802 

56 000 
12 210 

68 210 

2000 
575 

2 575 

1425 
3000 
4 425 

18 895 

8284 

27 179 

1000 
4200 
5200 

6266 

2 578 
7844 

2000 
3500 
6600 

2800 
4400 
7200 

800 
1200 
2000 

7884 

3 192 
11076 


82 600 


873* 
36 $ 


2600 


110 > 


Poughkeepele 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


1 
194 7f 




74 71 




269 In 


Rensselaer 

Elementary schools. . 
Seoondary schools. . . 




85 B 




17 74 


Total." 




103 O 


Rochester 

Elementary schools . . 

Secondary schools . . . 

Total 


7000 

2000 

10 000 

4500 

8400 
7 900 

2500 
2500 
6000 

80 00O 
19 450 
99 460 


1 881 a 
75S"5 

2 634 51 


Rome 

Elementary schools . . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total..., 

Schenectady 

Elementary schools. . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


134< 

102 n 

237 53 

1 009* 

162 It 

1 170 Tfi 


Syracuse 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


1 539« 
S35.3 

2 37a 3 


Tonawanda 

Elementary schoob. . 

Seoondary schoob. . . 

Total 


97 S 




49H 




146 3 


Tro> 

Elementary schoob . . 
Secondary schoob. . . 


88 200 

5 000 

98 200 


733 IS 
212 S3 


Total 


■ ■ 

« ■ 

• • 


3 

4 

4 


17 

21 

1 

22 

12 

1 

18 

6 
1 
6 

20 

1 

21 


9453 


Uttca 

Elementary schoob . . 

Secondary schools. . . 

Total 


551 S3 




100 a 




651* 


Watertown 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


UOOO 

1 00O 

12 00O 


6fl$l 

1401 
8071 


Waterrllet 

Elementary schoob. . 

Secondary schoob. . . 

Total 


9£l 




24) 




122' 


YonJkert 

Elementary schoob. . 
Secondary schoob. . . 
^ Total 


46 00O 
17 000 
68 000 


1 re* 

2 OtCl 







SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



97 



TICS OP PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

tetchen and census 




CENSUS 



No. of children' between 5 
and 18 years of age resid- 
ing in city August 30 



I 




I 














1063 


1 021 


2064 








2 226 


2453 


4 679 








043 


1006 


1951 








18 150 


18 850 


37 000 








1 326 


1 440 


2 765 








5 716 


6565 


11 301 








15 400 


15 000 


30 400 








1 123 


1 044 


2 167 








5255 


5204 


10 459 








7 739 


7030 


14 769 








2 463 


2 449 


4 912 








i 505 


1 520 


3025 








7 350 


7200 


14 550 






98 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (concluded) — STATIS- 

Buildinga, property, library, 



1 



I 



Cities, elementary. , 
Towns, elementary . 



Total, elementary... 



Cities, secondary . , 
Towns, secondary . 



Total 



Total cities. 
Total towns. 

Total state. 



dary. 



N. Y.Inst, for the Blind 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Total 



N.Y State School for the 
Blind 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Total , 



1 153 
10 592 



BUILDINGS 



PROPERTY 



11 745 






10 
10 



80 
605 



685 



1 203 
10 502 



11 705 



Normal OoL of the City of 
N. Y 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Total 



Special schools, elementary 
Special schools, secondary 



Total, special schools. . 



211 
553 



S 



764 



2 
271 



109 



10 



273 

~212 
555 



767 



036 
092 



I 

CO 



1 928 



75 
308 



383 



082 
1 010 



1 992 



1 
1 
2 

4 

4 



6 
281 



287 



3 

o 
H 



I 

J 



\S 
1-8 



1 153 
10 836 



11 989 



8 
27 



30 



9 
291 

300 



80 
606 



686 



1 203 
10 866 



12 069 



1 
1 



8 
I 



$29 
2 



357 360 
612 260 



I 

.a 



S 

•a 

> 



n 



$103144 913 
18478 556 



$31 909 620 



14 



351 333 
753 473 



$5 104 806 



$33 
3 



708 603 
365 733 



137 074 426 



1 
1 



1 
1 
2 

5 
5 



1181 143 

14 571 

145 714 



16 000 

4000 
20 000 



250 000 
500 000 
750 000 

897 143 
518 571 



•s 

S 

■a 



$241 870 
457 380 



$121623468 



$699 250 



$14 037 349 
4 998 029 



$19 035 378 



$117182 262 
23476584 



$140 058 846 11524 307 



$915 714 



$217 741 

24 194 

241935 



803 200 

75 800 

879 000 



100 000 
810 667 
416 667 

690 941 
416 661 



$1 037 602 



i 

i 



$709 
781 



268 
958 



I 






S 

•a 



$1 640 029 
382 406 



$1 491 226 



$465 606 
359 451 



$825 057 



$707 476 
816 831 



$2 520 

280 

2800 



19 200 

4800 

24 000 



1 
1 



833 

833 



21 720 
6 913 



$244 
433 



891 
349 



$678 240 



$954 
1 215 



159 
307 



$2 109 466 



$28 633 



$4 307 

479 
4786 



3200 
800 

4000 



1 833 
1 



$2 028 435 



$347 531 
155 607 



$503 138 



$1 993 560 
538 013 



i 
if 

3 



$135 099 44 

22 712 55 



$157 811 99 



$19 446 71' 
6 699 90! 



$26 146 m 



$154 546 IX 
29 412 4ft 



$2 531 57$ 



$183 958 6? 



$1 287 513 

143 057 

1 430 570 



7 507 

8 112 



$10 619 



1000 

5000 

6000 

1288 513 
148 057 



$1 643 a 
182 5 

1 825 96 



3410 

85 # 
427 0D 



351 90 
825 C 

1 176 23 

2 335 tt 
1 099 34 



$1 436 570 $3 429 * 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



99 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

teacher* and census 



No. of children between 5 
end 18 vean of age resid- 
ing in the district August 
30. 190S 




TOO 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 — STATISTICS 

Registration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


NO. Of PUPILS OVER 5 AND 
UNDER 18 YEARS Of AOE 
WHO HAVE BEEN EBOB- 
TKRED DURING TBI YEAR 


NO. Of PUPILS OVER 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS 07 AOE PRE- 
VIOUSLY Rioia- 
tsred in other 
schools op hub 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 YEARS OP AOE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THE YEAR 


no. op pupils over 
18 years op aoe 
previously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op thq 
stats this yeas 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Ibany co., 1st oom'r 
dtot 
Elementary schools. 


961 

. 88 

999 

570 


1041 

42 

1063 

498 


2002 

80 

2062 

1 088 


74 


89 


163 










■ 




Secondary schools. . 




2 
2 

2 


2 
2 

5 








Total 


74 
46 


89 
48 


163 
94 


8 








2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


1 




1 


Total 


570 

1 881 

16 

1 897 

1 584 
104 

1 688 

2 607 
209 

2 816 

1305 

53 

1 358 

1 701 

68 

1 769 

• 
- 

1 762 

100 

1 862 

1 895 

125 

2020 

1 485 

103 

1 588 

1 367 

69 

1 436 

1 545 

40 

1 585 


498 

1820 

27 

1 847 

1 482 
186 

1 618 

2 887 
292 

2659 

1293 

76 

1 869 

1 651 

101 

1 752 

1 645 

156 

1 801 

1 606 

174 

1870 

1424 

150 

1 583 

1 295 

108 

1 403 

1 444 

77 
1 521 


1 068 

2 701 

43 
2 744 

3066 

240 

8806 

4 974 
501 

5 475 

2 508 
129 

2 727 

3 352 
169 

3 521 

3407 

256 

3 663 

3 501 

299 

3 890 

2 909 

262 

8 171 

2 662 
177 

2 830 

2989 
117 

3 106 


46 

103 

2 

105 

200 

2 

202 

166 

1 

167 

120 
1 

130 

180 

1 

181 

■ 

142 

2 

144 

118 
118 

142 
1 

143 

142 

1 

143 

153 
153 


48 

93 

1 

94 

158 

1 

159 

150 

5 

155 

152 
152 

199 

5 

204 

135 

3 

138 

102 

1 

103 

137 
137 

165 
165 

174 

3 

177 


94 

196 

8 

199 

358 

8 

361 

316 

6 

322 

281 

1 

282 

379 

6 

385 

277 

5 

282 

220 

1 

221 

279 

1 

280 

307 

1 

306 

827 

3 

830 


3 

2 
2 

4 

6 
17 
23 

20 
65 

85 

7 
11 
18 

3 
10 
13 

5 
19 
24 

1 

24 
25 

6 
16 
22 

1 

12 
13 

8 
11 
14 


2 

1 
8 
9 

2 

26 
28 

8 
104 
112 

8 
19 
27 

3 
13 
16 

2 
31 
83 

5 
88 

43 

2 
18 
20 

16 
15 

3 
12 
15 


5 

3 
10 
13 

8 
43 
51 

28 
169 
197 

15 
39 
45 

6 
23 
29 

7 
50 
57 

6 
62 
68 

8 
34 
42 

1 

27 
28 

6 
23 

29 


1 

2 
2 

4 


1 
1 

2 


... „ 


Bd oom'r disk 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 

A legany co., 1st oom'r 
dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


2 

1 
3 

6 


Total 


4 

2 

2 

1 


2 

1 
1 


6 


2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 
2 
8 


Broome co., 1st com'r 
dtot. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


1 


Total 


1 




1 


2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools. . 
Total 


2 


1 
1 


1 
1 


^■^MH|m ftft^ lit, 

conv r dtot. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


2 


Total 


2 
11 


3 


2 


2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


14 


Total 


11 


3 


14 


8d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools . . 








Total 








Cayuga co., 1st com'r 
dtot 
Elemen tary schools . 








Secondary schools . . 








Total 








2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 


12 


8 


20 


Total 


12 


8 


20 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IOI 



OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendaace of pupils 



A0QSBOATB MUHMS OF DATS* ATTEND- 
ANCE 9 ALL PUPILS 1BTWUN 5 AMD 


AGGREGATE DATB* ATTEND A ECE 
OF ALL PUPILS OTOB 18 YBABS 


AVEBAOB DAILT ATTBND- 
ANCB OP PUPILS BETWEEN 


AVEBAOB DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OP PU- 
mi mm 1ft tsar* 


18 TEAM OP AOE 




OP AOB 




5 AMD 


18 TBABS OP AGS 


OF AOB 




Boys 


Oris 1 


Total 


Boya 


Girk 


Total 


Boys 


Girla 


Total 


Boys 


Oirb 


Total 1 


120 815 


127 561 

6 241 

133 802 


248 376 

11 791 

260 167 








673 

29 

702 


717 

33 

750 


1 300 

62 

1 452 








5550 
126 366 




295 
295 


295 
295 




2 
2 


2 
2 


50 931 


52 434 


112 365 


55 


196 


251 


375 


325 


700 




1 


1 


50 031 


52 434 


112 365 


55 


196 


251 


375 


825 


700 




1 


1 


173 005 


160 219 

4 361 

173 580 


842 224 

6 767 
348 991 


189 
336 
475 


84 
1 084 
1 168 


223 
1 420 
1 643 


934 

13 

947 


934 

23 

957 


1 868 

36 

1 904 








2406 
175 411 


2 
2 


6 
6 


8 
8 


180 244 

14 560 

106 804 


164 594 

20 469 

185 063 


344 838 

35 029 

379 867 


341 
2 142 
2 483 


189 
8635 
3824 


530 

5 777 

6 307 


1085 

78 

1 163 


966 

109 

1 095 


2071 

187 

2258 


1 

12 
13 


1 

20 
21 


'2 
82 
84 


an 933 

30 961 
152 804 


293 962 
44 685 

338 947 


615 895 

75 946 

691841 


2255 

8385 
10 640 


713 
12 994 
18 707 


2968 
21 879 
24 347 


1 892 
163 

2 055 


1 729 

236 

1 965 


3 621 

399 

4020 


19 
46 
66 


4 
79 
74 


23 
116 
139 


151 440 

7080 
IK 529 


141 695 

11 983 

153 678 


293 144 

19 063 
312 207 


253 
1 450 
1 703 


270 
2 027 
2297 


523 
3 477 
4000 


900 

38 

938 


844 

64 

908 


1 744 

102 

1 846 


1 

8 
9 


2 

11 
13 


3 
19 
22 


210 424 

10 283 

220 707 


206 253 

13 818 

220 071 


416 677 

24 101 

440 778 


160 
1 121 
1 281 


38 
1 805 
1 843 


196 
2 026 
8 124 


1 197 

54 

1 251 


1 173 

73 

1 246 


2 370 

127 

2 497 


1 
6 

7 


10 
19 


1 

16 
17 


210 400 

13 948 

224 357 


193 660 
21 990 

215 650 


404 069 

35 938 

440 007 


292 

2 745 

3 037 


133 
4248 
4 381 


425 
6993 
7 418 


1 172 

74 

1 246 


1 128 

117 

1 245 


2 300 

191 

2 491 


3 
15 
18 


2 
22 
24 


■ 

6 
37 
42 


243 944 

18 968 
282 912 


210 873 

27 410 

247 283 


463 817 

46 378 

510 195 


197 
3 249 
3 446 


561 
5424 
5985 


758 

8 673 

9 431 


1 385 

99 

1 484 


1 353 

142 

1 495 


2 738 

241 

2 979 


17 
17 


3 
29 

32 


3 

46 
49 


189152 
15 696 

204 848 


178 321 

24 263 

202 584 


367 473 

39 950 

407 432 


488 
2 202 
2 600 


1023 
2545 
3568 


1 511 

4 747 
6258 


1 083 

81 

1 164 


1 017 

127 

1 144 


2 100 

208 

2 308 


2 
12 
14 


6 
13 
18 


7 

25 
32 


155 625 


150 402 

16 456 

166 857 


306 027 

25 928 

831955 


25 

1 860 
1 885 




25 
4 116 
4 141 


899 

49 

948 


865 

86 

951 


1764 

135 

1 899 








9 473 
166 098 


2256 
2 256 


10 
10 


12 

12 


22 
22 


181623 

6 273 

199 896/ 


172 816 

10 100 

182 916 


357 489 

16 373 

373 812 


157 
1 384 
1 541 


309 

1 738 

2 047 


466 

3 122 

3588 


1079 

32 

1 111 


1 002 

52 

1 054 


2 061 

84 

2 165 


1 
7 
8 


2 

9 

11 


3 
16 
19 



102 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Tablb 3 (continued) — STATI&- 

Registration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


NO. Of PUPILS OYER 5 AMD 
UNDER 18 TEARS Of AGE 
WHO HATE BEEN REGIS- 
TERED DURING THE THAR 

r 


NO. 07 PUPILS OVER 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS 07 AOB PRE- 
VIOUSLY REGIS- 
TERED IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS Or THIS 

state this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 
18 TEARS Or AOE 
WHO HATE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THE TEAR 


i 

NO. Or PUPILS OTER 
18 TEARS Or AOB 
PREYIOUSLT BEQB- 
TERBD IN OTHER 

schools or m 
•tate thk4 tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Chautauqua oo., 1st 
com'r dfai 
Elementary schools. 


1 305 
62 

1 867 

2525 
156 

2 681 

1 822 

94 

1 916 

1 705 

66 

1 771 

1 818 

141 

1 959 

1419 

97 

1 516 

1 751 

42 

1 793 

1 028 


1 260 
107 

1 367 

2 384 
251 

2 635 

1 745 
144 

1 889 

1 653 

83 

1 736 

1 762 

228 

1 990 

1 358 

137 

1 495 

1 677 

49 

1 726 

870 

13 

883 

1 319 

47 

1 366 

1 127 

15 

1 142 

1 630 

85 

1 715 

836 

57 

893 


2 565 
169 

2 734 

4909 

407 

5 316 

3 567 
238 

3805 

3358 

149 

3507 

3580 

369 

3 949 

2 777 
234 

8 011 

3 428 

91 
3 519 

1 896 
13 

1 911 

2 732 

82 
2 814 

2 307 
30 

2 337 

8 301 
158 

3 459 

1660 

88 

1 748 


83 
4 

87 

166 
4 

170 

184 

3 

187 

188 

4 

192 

165 
165 

133 

2 

135 

113 


102 

5 

107 

187 

5 

192 

169 
169 

175 

4 

179 

154 

1 

155 

131 

1 

132 

136 


185 

9 

194 

858 

9 

862 

358 

8 

856 

863 

8 

371 

819 

1 

320 

264 

3 

267 

249 


7 
21 
28 

13 
44 
57 

6 
27 
33 

3 
10 
13 

8 
22 
30 

2 

16 
18 

7 


6 
25 
81 

8 
52 
55 

8 
24 

27 

1 
21 
22 

4 
50 
64 

2 
17 
19 

3 
5 
8 

2 
2 
4 

9 
22 
81 


13 
46 
50 

16 

96 

112 

9 
51 
60 

4 

31 
35 

12 
72 

84 

4 

83 
87 

10 

6 

15 

11 

5 

16 

16 
27 

43 

2 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 




3 

9 


3 

3 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools.. 
Total 


1 
1 




1 
1 


3d com'r dlst. 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 








Chemung co. 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools.. 
Total 


1 
1 


2 


1 
1 


Chenango co., 1st com'r 
dht > n 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


2 


Total 




2 


2 


2d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 

4 


7 


1 
1 


Cliaton co., 1st com'r 
dirt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


11 


Total 


113 
31 


136 
30 


249 
61 


7 

9 

8 

12 

7 

5 

12 

2 


4 


7 


11 


2d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools . . 








Total 


1028 

1 413 

35 

1 448 

1 180 

15 

1 195 

1 671 

78 

1 744 

824 
31 

855 


31 
131 


30 
98 


61 
229 








3d com'r dlst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 


1 
1 


1 
1 
2 


2 
1 


Total 


131 
82 


98 
88 


229 

170 


3 


Columbia co., 1st com'r 
diet 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 


82 

168 
168 

101 

1 

102 


88 

121 

2 

123 

92 

1 

93 


170 

280 

2 

291 

193 

2 

195 


2 

4 

18 
17 

2 
10 
12 


1 

15 
16 

4 

6 
10 


2 

6 
28 
88 

6 
16 
22 








9d com'r dist 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 








Total 








Cortland co., 1st com'r 
dlst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 














Total '.'. 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IO3 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



aooooati kuxbbr or days atrmd- 
Axcs or all ranu betwben 5 and 

18TBAB3 0T AQB 



Boys 



Gta-h 



163 062 

8589 

170 611 



3(1 980 

33 335 

365 315 



223 465 
14 295 
760 



303 502 

9282 

212 884 



19 
245 760 



163 364 
14 698 

178 052 



183 875 

5028 

188 903 



87 718 
877i8 



146 896 

4 511 

151 407 



143 382 

2 141 

145 523 



189 449 

11073 

216 5221 



151 928 

17 254 
169 182 



311 555 

40 254 
351 809 



215 528 

22 397 

237 925 



196 531 

12 134 

208 665 



223 190 

36 700 

259 950 



157 044 

21905 

178 949 



176 955 

7343 

184 298 



83 082 
2302 

85 384 



134 216 

7 436 

141 652 



134 682 

2008 

136 690 



199 454 

14 332 

213 786 



tt 350 94 549 

4 193 8 460 

97543 102 9991 



Total 



AGGREGATI DATS ATTBHDANCB 
Or ALL PUPILS OYER 18 YEARS 
or AQB 



813 960 

25 813 

339 793 



653 535 

63 589 

717 124 



437 993 

86 692 

474 685 



400 123 

21 426 

421 549 



449 552 

56 158 

505 710 



320 398 

36 603 

357 001 



360 830 

12 371 

373 201 



170 800 

2 302 

173 102 



281 112 

11 947 

293 059 



278 064 

4 149 

282 213 



398 903 

25 405 

434 308 



Boys 



552 
2930 
3482 



810 
6 216 
7026 



550 
3538 
4088 



189 
1557 
1 746 



619 
4 201 
4820 



154 
2 495 
2 649 



298 

'296 



132 
446 
578 



679 
720 



84 
84 



260 
2 107 
2367 



187 899' 223 

12 643! 1 370 

300 542! 1 593 



Girfa 



211 
3550 
8 761 



416 

7 332 
7 748 



311 
8625 
3936 



140 
2 773 
2 913 



618 
6 270 
6888 



252 

2 845 

3 097 



294 

707 

1001 



122 
363 
485 



988 
2 414 
3402 



66 
2 352 

2 418 



439 

887 

1 326 



Total 



763 
6480 
7243 



1 226 

13 548 

14 774 



861 
7 163 
8024 



329 
4 330 

4 659 



1 237 

10 471 

11 708 



406 
5340 
5 746 



592 

707 

1299 



254 

809 
1063 



1 667 
8 134 
4 801 



84 
84 



326 
4459 

4 785 



AVERAGE DAILT ATTEND- 
ANCE Or PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TEARS OP AGS 



2 257 
2 919 



Boys 



895 
45 

940 



1 887 
123 

2 010 



1 269 

75 

1 344 



1 158 

49 

1207 



1 317 

103 

1 420 



946 

77 

1023 



1 087 

26 

1 118 



555 



555 



883 
24 

907 



797 

11 

808 



1 110 

60 

1 170 



559 

22 

581 



Glris 



845 

90 

935 



1 720 

210 

1 930 



1 223 

117 

1 340 



1 121 

64 

1 185 



1 304 

195 

1 499 



907 

115 

1 022 



1 053 

38 

1091 



498 

12 

510 



801 

39 

840 



750 

11 

761 



1 110 

77 
1 187 



559 

46 

605 



Total 



AVERAGE DAILT AT- 
TBNDANCB or PU- 
PILS OYBB 18 TEARS 
OP AQB 



Boys J Girls 



1 740 

135 

1 875 



3607 

333 

3940 



2 492 

192 

2 684 



2 279 

113 

2 392 



2 621 

298 

2 919 



1 853 
192 

2 045 



2 140 

64 

2 204 



1053 

12 

1065! 



1 684 

63 
1 747 



1 547 

22 

1 569 



2 220 

137 

2 357 



1 118 

68 

1 186 



14 
15 
29 



2 
33 
35 



3 
18 
21 



1 
22 
23 



14 
14 



2 
11 
13 



Total 



5 
19 
24 



2 
89 
41 



1 

191 
20 



15 
15 



2 
84 

36 



16 
16 



6 
12 

18 



13 
13 



19 
34 
53 



4 

72 
76 



4 

37 
41 



1 

28 
24 



3 
56 

59 



30 
30 



3 

4 

7 



1 
4 
5 



11 
15 
26 



2 
24 
26 



3 
12 
15 



104 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Tabu* 3 (continued) — STATI&- 

Registration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


to. or pupils oyer 5 and 

UNDER 18 TIAB8 Of AGE 
WHO HAYB BBEN REGIS- 
TERED DURING IBB YEAR 


NO. OP PUPILS OVEB 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEAKS OP AOB PRE- 
VIOUSLY REGB- 
TBRED IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS OP THtt 

stats this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEARS OP AGI 
WHO HATE BBBN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THE TEAR 


NO. OP PUPILS OTBR 
18 TEARS OP AQB 
PRETIOU8LT RBQJB- 
TBRBD IN OTHER 

schools op ibb 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girfa 


Total 


Boys 


Girfa 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Girla 


Total 


Cortland co. (coni d) 
2d com'r dirt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schoob. . 
Total 


801 
58 

850 

2 746 

120 

2866 

1 055 

03 
2048 

2500 

100 

2000 

2 102 

77 
2260 

2 738 

154 

2802 

2 678 

160 

2 736 

1 648 

80 
1 737 

1 522 

50 

1 572 

1 621 
02 

1 713 

2 751 
120 

2 871 

2 120 

83 

2 212 


787 

68 

805 

2 654 

172 
2826 

1 821 
151 

1 072 

2 382 
148 

2 530 

2 143 

117 

2260 

2 745 

182 

2 027 

2468 

188 

2 656 

1 478 

117 

1 505 

1 4S4 

55 

1 530 

1 540 
162 

1 711 

2680 

238 

2027 

2 046 

156 
2 2021 


1588 

126 

1 664 

6400 

202 

6602 

8 776 

244 

4020 

4882 

248 
5 130 

4835 
104 

4520 

5 483 

338 

5 810 

6044 

848 

5 802 

3 126 

206 

8332 

3006 

105 

3 111 

3 170 
2M 

3424 

5440 
358 

5708 

4 175 
230 

4 414 


81 


65 


146 

• 


7 
7 

18 
50 

77 

20 

28 
48 

3 
10 

13 

1 
2 
3 

3 
10 
22 

5 

10 
24 

2 

16 
18 

25 
21 
46 

2 
12 
14 

6 
48 
54 

4 
30 
34 


8 
10 
22 

18 
61 
70 


43 

52 

4 
10 
23 

18 
18 

1 
26 
27 

2 
27 
20 

1 
28 
28 

. 

18 
80 

7 
23 

30 

6 

58 
50 

2 
80 
82 


3 
26 
20 

36 
120 
156 

20 

71 

100 

7 
20 














81 

262 

2 

264 

187 

2 

180 

200 

4 
204 

214 
214 

101 

12 

203 

106 

4 

200 

158 

1 

150 

100 

2 

102 

07 
07 

213 


66 

261 

1 

262 

174 

2 

176 

106 

2 

108 

221 

1 

222 

216 

16 

231 

106 

7 

203 

117 
117 

117 
117 

00 

1 

01 

223 


146 

623 

8 

526 

881 

4 

365 

806 

6 

402 

435 

1 

486 

407 

27 

434 

382 

11 

403 

275 

1 

276 

217 

2 

210 

187 

1 

188 

436 








Delaware co., 1st com'r 

dirt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 

2d oosn'r dbt 
Elementary schoob . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


6 

1 

6 

1 
1 
2 

1 


1 
1 
2 


6 

2 
8 

1 
1 
2 


Dutchess oo., 1st com'r 
dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob. . 


I 


Total 


36 


1 




1 


2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schoob . 
Secondary schoob. . 
Total 


1 
20 
21 

4 
45 
40 

7 
46 
53 

3 
44 

" 

40 

30 
85 


86 
44 

12 
101 
113 

6 
60 
66t 


















Erie co., 1st com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob. . 
Total 




















2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob. . 
Total 








1 
1 


2 
2 


8 
8 


8d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 




Secondary schoob . . 
Total 














Essex ce., 1st com'r dbt. 

Elementary schoob . 

Secondary schoob . . 

Total 




2 


3 


4 


2 

2 
2 
4 


3 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob . 
Secondary schoob . . 
Total 


6 
2 
8 


Franklin co., 1st com'r 

out 
Elementary schoob . 
Secondary schoob. . 

Total 






8 
8 


4 


213 

201 
2 

203 


223 

222 

1 

2231 


436 

513 

3 

5161 


4 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob . 
Secondary schoob . . 1 
Total 1 






1 
1 


1 
1 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



I05 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pmpils 




of dats' attcnd- 
5ahd 



Poj* 



93 168 

3984 
108 132 



314 800 
17 751 
551 



426 
IS 112 
Mi 538 



314 529 
16 385 
911 



27$ 046 

16 688 

285 734 



344 925 
21 887 
812 



337 918 
22 469 
S87 



176 296 

13 330 

189 026 



179 572 

7 041 

186 613 



Girls 



196 332 

12 870 

206 202 




87 996 
10 8391 
98 885 



297 726 

25 947 

323 673 



213 3S9 

22 924 

236 313 



297 778 

23 584 

321 



254 360 

17 974 

272 354 



349 238 

28 075 

377 313 



327 317 

29 348 

356 665 



164 486 

17 608 

182 094 



163 927 

9509 

173 436 



187 505 

24 049 

211 554 



312 442 

38 863 

351 306 



249 294 

25 578 

274 7721 



Total 



181 164 

19 808 

209 967 



613 526 

43 698 

657 224 



446 815 

36 036 

482 851 



612 302 

39 969 

652 271 



529 426 

28 662 

558 088 



604 163 

49 962 

744 125 



665 235 

51 817 
717 052 



340 782 

20 938 

371 720 



343 499 

16 550 

360 049 



882 837 

36 919 

419 756 



647 888 

56 061 

703 949 



482 087 

37 320 

519 407 



AOORKATB DATS* ATRKDANOB 
Of ALL PUPILS OYER 18 TSARS 
OF AGS 



Boys 



1 206 
1 206 



1 600 

8534 
10 134 



1 882 
3863 
5 745 



316 
1 099 
1 415 



28 
227 
255 



864 

2 763 

3 127 



403 
2 544 
2 947 



276 
1915 
2 191 



1 324 

2 354 

3 678 



20 
1 285 
1 805 



428 
7 117 

7 545 



255 
4386 
4 641 



Girls 



148 
2 504 
2 652 



1 588 

9002 
10 590 



470 
6 488 
6 958 



492 
2 733 
8 225 



1 
2659 
2 660 



176 
4 167 
4 343 



184 

3 962 

4 146 



158 
8 991 
4 149 



1 668 
1 581 
3 249 



548 
2 328 
2 876 



767 
7734 
8 501 



499 
4062 
4 561 



Totd 



148 
3 710 

3858 



3 188 

17 536 
20 724 



2 852 

10 351 
12 703 



806 

3 832 

4 640 



29 
2 886 
2 915 



540 

6 930 

7 470 



587 
6506 
7 093 



434 
5906 
6 340 



2 992 

3 935 
6 927 



568 

3 613 

4 181 



1 195 
14 851 
16 046 



754 

8 448 

9 202 



ATRRACW OAILT ATWITD- 
ANCR OV PUPILS BCTWSEN 
5 AMD 18 TSARS OP AG! 



Boys 



548 
48 



1 688 

95 

1 788 



1 381 

70 

1451 



1 719 

86 
1 805 



1 497 

57 

1 554 



1 875 

114 

1989 



1 824 

118 

1 942 



1 043 

72 

1 115 



1 029 

37 

1 066 



1 127 

68 

1 195 



1 933] 

90 

2023 



1 451 

62 

1 513 



Gtrb 



534 

58 

592 



1 629 

139 

1 768 



1266 

122 

1 388 



1 624 

124 

1 748 



1 387 

06 

1 483 



1 903 
146 

2 049 



1 758 

155 

1 913 



971 

94 

1 065 



979 

501 

1029 



1 076 

130 

1 206 



1 813 
204 

2 017 



1 437 

136 

1 573 



Total 



1082 

106 

1 188 



3 317 

234 

3 551 



2 647 

192 

2839 



3 343 

210 

3553 



2884 
153] 
3037 



3 778 
260 

4 038 



3582 

273 

3855 



2 014 

166 

2 180 



2008 

87 

2095 



2 203 

198 

2 401 



3 746 

294 

4040 



2 888 

198 

3086 



AVERAGE DAILY AT- 
TKNDANCl OP PU- 
PILS OVER 18 TXABS 

or act 



Boys 


Giris 


1 


10 


6 


13 


7 


23 


9 


• 

9 


47 


48 


56 


57 


11 


6 


20 


34 


81 


40 


2 


3 


6 


14 


8 


17 


1 


1 


1 


14 


2 


16 


2 


1 


15 


22 


17 


23 


1 


1 


14 


21 


15 


22 


2 


1 


10 


21 


12 


22 


7 


9 


12 


8 


19 


17 


• • • • • 


2 


7 


12 


7 


14 


3 


4 


37 


41 


40 


45 


1 


2 


23 


22 


24 


24 



Total 



11 
19 
30 



18 

96 

113 



17 
54 

71 



5 
20 
25 



15 
17 



3 
37 
40 



2 
35 
37 



3 
31 
34 



16 
20 
36 



2 
19 
21 



7 
78 
85 



3 

45 
48 



io6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Regiatration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


no. or runu over 5 and 

UNDER 18 TEARS Of AOE 
WHO HAV1 BKKN RBOB*- 
TSRKD DURING THE TEAR 


so. or pupils oveh 

5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS Of AOB PRE- 
viously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TRABS OP AGE 
WHO HATE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THB TEAR 


no. op pupils over 
18 trabs op age 
prbtioublt regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Fulton co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 


1 346 

16 

1 362 

3 160 

211 

3380 

1 617 

04 

1 711 

1 108 

86 

1 144 

473 
15 

488 

1 831 
111 

1 042 

1078 
143 

2 121 

1 331 
56 

1 387 

2068 
146 

2 214 

1 033 

135 

2068 

1060 

31 

1 100 

1 568 

61 

1 620 

1 072 

122 

2004 


1 878 

20 

1 407 

2036 

801 

3287 

1 518 

120 

1 638 

000 

68 
1 067 

487 

22 

500 

1 828 

177 

2005 

1 803 
218 

2 111 

1242 

71 

1 313 

1 061 
223 

2 184 

1 841 

146 

1 087 

073 

55 

1028 

1476 

103 

1 570 

1 746 

152 

1 806 


2 724 
45 

2 760 

6 105 

512 

6 617 

3 135 
214 

3 340 

2 107 
104 

2 211 

060 

37 

007 

3 650 

288 
3 047 

3 871 
361 

4 232 

2 573 

127 

2 700 

4 020 

OOV 

4 308 

8 774 

281 

4055 

2 042 
86 

2 128 

3044 

164 

3208 

3 718 
274 

3002 


112 
112 

323 

3 

326 

104 

1 

105 

07 

1 

08 

25 


152 

2 

154 

262 

5 

267 

08 

1 

00 

00 

3 

102 

21 


264 

2 

266 

585 

8 
503 

202 

2 

204 

106 

4 

200 

46 


3 
8 
6 

12 
61 
73 

4 
21 
25 

7 

8 

15 

5 
3 
8 

6 
18 
24 

4 

23 
27 

7 

5 

12 

7 
21 
28 

8 
26 
34 

2 
3 
5 

7 
20 
27 

6 
28 
34 


2 
2 
4 

6 
77 

27 
28 

10 
18 
28 

1 
4 

5 

6 
35 
41 

1 

40 
41 

6 
15 
20 


45 
54 

4 

21 
25 

1 

16 
17 

2 

27 
20 

6 
32 
37 


5 

6 

10 

18 
132 
150 

5 

48 
53 

17 
26 

43 

6 

7 

13 

12 
53 
65 

5 
63 
68 

12 
20 
32 

16 

66 
82 

12 
47 
50 

3 
10 
22 



47 
66 

11 
60 
71 




















Genesee co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 


7 
7 


7 
1 

8 


14 
15 


Qreene co., 1st eom'rdbt 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 




1 
1 




; . 


2d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 






1 




Hamilton co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 










25 

163 
163 

166 
166 

105 

1 

106 

210 

2 

212 

102 

10 

202 

106 
106 

138 

1 

130 

168 

4 

172 


21 

161 

1 

162 

120 

1 

130 

180 

1 

181 

200 

2 

211 

161 

7 

168 

102 

1 

103 

131 

5 

136 

142 

1 

143 


46 

324 

1 

325 

205 
1 

206 

375 

2 

377 

410 

4 

423 

353 

17 

370 

208 

1 

200 

260 

6 

275 

810 

5 

315 








Herkimer co., 1st com'r 

dbt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 


1 




1 


1 

3 


5 


1 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


8 


8 
1 


5 


8 


Jefferson co., 1st com'r 

dbt 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schoob. . 

Total 


1 


1 




1 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob. . 
Total 
















3d com'r dbt. 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob . . 


1 


1 


2 


Total 


1 


1 
2 


*, 


Lewfa co., 1st com'r dbt. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schoob . . 


2 


Total 


3 
3 

11 


2 

1 
1 
2 

10 


2 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob . . 
Total 


1 

4 

5 


Livingston co., 1st eom'r 
dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob. . 


21 


Total 


ii 


io 


21 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



107 



TIOS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 




i NUMBER op dayb' attend- 

ALL PUPILB BBTWBBN 5 AND 
OP AGS 



Boys 



148 468 

2 367 
ISO 835 



90 136 



197 094 

14 340 

211 434 



132 609 

62091 

137 818 



66 148 

2035 

67 183 



216 423 

16 081 

262 484 



185 
21 867 
062 



148 382 

7964 

166 296 



217 826 

21 921 

269 747 



229 803 

20 961 

250 764 



115 024 

43 
119 387 



169 752 

9270 

179 022 



Oris 



16 770 
257 40* 



147 804 

4670 

152 374 



369 391 

46 746 

415 137 



185 486 

17 660 

203 146 



116 082 

9 737 

125 819 



66 375 

3260 

69 635 



239 816 

28 613 

286 429 



254 898 

33 789 

288 687 



134 098 

10 314 

144 410 



236 901 

33 165 

270 066 



224 886 

22 630 

247 496 



101 110 

8938 

110 048 



158 911 

17 884 

176 295 



217 294 

23 509 

240 808 



Total 



296 272 

6 937 

303 209 



759 627 

75 632 

886 159 



382 580 

82 000 

414 580 



248 691 

14 946 

263 637 



111 623 

5295 

116 818 



486 239 

44 674 

680 913 



519 083 
66 656 

674 739 



282 428 

18 278 

300 706 



484 727 

65 066 

639 813 



454 669 

43 591 

498 260 



216 134 

13 301 

229 485 



328 663 

26 664 

355 317 



457 926 

40 279 

498 206 



AOORBQATE DATS' ATTENDANCE 
OP ALL PUPILS OTBB 18 TEARS 
OPAOS 



Boys 



81 
528 
609 



952 
8 430 
9882 



137 
3087 
3224 



208 
1 168 
1 376 



418 
222 
686 



2 694 
3062 



268 
8 757 



213 
381 
594 



304 
3 162 
3466 



361 
3 188 
8 649 



29 

278 
807 



742 
2864 
3606 



367 
3 251 
3 618 



Gtrfe 



336 
290 
626 



767 
11 153 
11920 



45 
2 758 
2803 



410 
2 119 
2529 



71 
462 
683 



347 
5 261 

5608 



6367 
6367 



700 
2055 
2 755 



744 
5 518 
6262 



367 
3223 
3590 



2062 
2062 



293 
3 700 
3 993 



OOD 

4 627 

5 193 



Total 



417 

818 
1 235 



1 719 
19 583 
21 302 



182 
5 845 
6027 



618 
8287 
3905 



484 

684 

1 168 



735 
7955 
8690 



268 

9856 

10 124 



913 

2 436 

3 349 



1 048 
8 680 
9728 



728 

6 411 

7 139 



29 
2 340 
2 



1035 
6564 
7599 



933 
7878 
8 811 



AVKBAOB DAILT ATTEND- 
ANCE OP PUPILB BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TKAB8 OP AON 



Boys 



880 

13 

893 



2 197 

161 

2 358 



1098 

76 

1 174 



773 

27 

800 



823 

11 

834 



1 361 

86 

1446 



1 478 

116 

1 594 



890 

48 

933 



1 375 

116 

1 491 



1 352 

HI 

1 463 



673 

22 

695 



1032 

48 

1 080 



1 375 

91 

1 466 



Gtrb 



873 

24 

897 



2086 

245 

2 331 



1024 

95 

1 119 



677 

51 

728 



327 

18 

345 



1 320 

152 

1472 



1 424 

178 

1 602 



813 

55 

868 



1 317 

176 

1 493 



1 328 

118 

1 446 



632 

46 

678 



955 

89 

1044 



1 238 

127 

1 365 



Total 



1 753 

37 

1 790 



4283 

406 

4 689 



2 122 

171 

2293 



1450 

78 
1 528 



650 

29 

679 



2 681 

237 

2 918 



2902 

294 

3 196 



1 703 

98 

1 801 



2 692 

292 

2984 



2680 

229 

2909 



1 305 

68 

1 373 



1 987 
137 

2 124 



2 613 

218 

2 831 



AVERAGE DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OP PU- 
PILS OVBB 18 TEARS 
OPAOS 



Boys 


Gtrb 




1 


8 


2 


8 


3 


7 


4 


44 


60 


51 


64 




1 


17 


14 


17 


15 


1 


2 


6 


12 


7 


14 


2 




1 


2 


3 


* 2 


2 


1 


15 


29 


17 


30 


2 




18 


35 


20 


35 


1 


4 


2 


11 


3 


15 




8 


17 


29 


17 


32 


3 


1 


17 


18 


20 


19 


1 




1 


11 


2 


11 


5 


1 


14 


20 


19 


21 


1 


3 


18 


25 


19 


28 



Total 



1 

r'5 
.6 



11 
104 
115 



1 

31 
32 



3 
18 
21 



2 
3 
5 



3 

44 
47 



2 
53 
55 



5 
13 
18 



3 

46 
49 



4 

35 
39 



1 

12 
13 



34 
40 



4 

43 
47 



io8 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICT8 


MO. OF PUPILS OTBM 5 AND 
vmtm. 18 TBABB OP AOE 
WHO HAVE BEBN REGIS- 
TERED DURING THE TBAB 


no. of pupils over 
5 and under 18 
tbabb op age pre- 
viously regis- 
tered in othxb 
schools op this 
stat1 this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEAKS OP AOE 
WHO HAVB BEBN 
BSOIBTERED DURING 
THE TEAR 


NO. OP PUPILS OTBB 
18 TBABB OP AOB 
PBSVIOU8LT RBOJB- 
TEBBD IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS OP TtUB 

state thjb tbab 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Otrte 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Livingston oo. (cont'd) 
2d com'r dtet 
Elementary schools . 


1 242 

81 

1 323 

1 321 

99 

1 420 

1 577 
88 

1 665 

2 784 
157 

2 941 

2 553 

77 

2 630 

2 257 

116 

2 373 

7 746 
305 

8 051 

1031 

51 

1 082 

1 911 

29 

1 940 

1 395 
55 

1 450 

1 802 

117 

1919 

1 136 

43 

1 179 

1 356 

55 

1 411 


1 172 

102 

1 274 

1 219 

192 

1 411 

1509 
119 

1 628 

2506 
189 

2 095 

2 338 

157 

2 495 

2 158 

147 

2 305 

7388 

437 

7825 

985 

74 

1059 

1757 

51 

1 808 

1285 

70 

1 355 

1 595 

183 

1 778 

1 139 

65 

1 204 

1 312 

112 

1 424 


2 414 

183 

2 507 

2 540 
291 

2 831 

8066 

207 

3 293 

5290 

346 

5636 

4 891 
234 

5 125 

4 415 

263 

4 678 

15 134 

742 

15 876 

2 016 
125 

2 141 

3668 
80 

3 748 

2680 
125 

2 805 

3 397 
300 

3 697 

2 275 

108 

2 383 

2 668 

167 

2 835 


67 

2 

69 

140 

2 

142 

130 
130 

257 

3 

260 

225 

13 

238 

178 

5 

183 

536 

6 

542 

134 

1 

135 

198 


48 

1 

49 

144 

3 

147 

144 

3 

147 

242 

1 

243 

203 

9 

212 

187 

4 

191 

483 

9 

492 

138 
138 

176 


115 
3 

118 

284 
5 

289 

274 

3 
277 

499 

4 

503 

428 

22 

450 

365 

9 
874 

1 019 

15 

1 0S4 

272 

1 

273 

374 


6 

21 
27 

1 

16 
19 

8 
29 
37 

4 
15 
19 

7 

8 

15 

6 

15 
21 

23 
23 
46 

1 
1 

5 


3 
25 

28 

11 
36 
47 

7 
28 
85 

4 

24 
28 

1 

19 
20 

6 
35 

40 

36 
41 
77 

2 
4 

6 

13 
13 


9 
46 
55 

12 
54 

66 

15 
67 
72 

8 
89 
47 

8 
27 
35 

11 

50 
61 

59 

64 

123 

3 
4 

7 

5 
13 

18 








Secondary'schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 




1 
1 


Madison co., 1st oom'r 
dirt. 
Fleme ntary schools . 




Secondary'schools. . 








Total 








2d coot dtet 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 

3 
3 


• 1 


1 
1 


Monroe co., 1st oom'r 

dtet 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


8 
1 
4 


2d com'r disk 
Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 








Montgomery oo. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


6 
1 

7 


12 
12 


18 

1 

19 


Nassau eo. 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 








Niagara oo., 1st com'r 
dtet 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 








Total.. 








2d com'r dtet 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 








Total 


198 

123 
123 

132 

2 

134 

103 

1 

104 

161 

1 

162 


176 

104 
2 

106 

117 
117 

97 
97 

150 

1 

151 


374 

227 

2 

229 

249 

2 

251 

200 

1 

201 

311 

2 

313 


5 








Oneida so., 1st com'r dtet 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 


4 
4 

6 

30 
35 

5 
12 
17 

9 
20 
29 


15 
15 

3 
34 
37 

7 
14 
21 

8 
24 
32 


19 
19 

8 
64 
72 

12 
26 
38 

17 
44 

61 








Total 








2d com'r dtet 
Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


2 
2 




2 
2 


3d com'r dtet 
Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 








4th oom'r dtet 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 





1 

... 


1 

i 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IO9 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 




<» DATS' ATTBND- 

5 AND 



IS 733 

11 531 

166 284 



157 200 

14 065 

171365 



196 811 

11 658 

200 460 



MS 160 

23 686 

371846 



306 612 

11 663 
317 175 



16 106 
V7 939 



1041715 

45 244 

1 



116 057 
18415] 
125 372 



219 840 
4633 

226 482 



181773 

8107 

189 880 



221647 
115 909 
219 556 



6298 



159 719 

0087 



Qfrb 



143 438 

16 084 

159 522 



144 005 

28 779 

172 784 



192 902 

18 809 

211 711 



313 028 

30 914 

343 944 



294 306 

25 673 

319 919 



274 742 

22 460 

297 202 



971557 

63 932 

1035 489 



110 814 

13 260 

124 074 



211775 

8331 

220.106 



175 201 

11 038 

186 239 



196 493 

26 883 
223 376 



133 188 

9 375 

142 563 



149 865 

16 779 

166 6141 



Total 



296 171 

27 615 

823 786 



301205 

42 844 

344 049 



387 713 

30 467 

418 180 



661 188 

54 602 

715 790 



599 918 

37 236 

637 154 



566 575 

38 566 

605 141 



2 013 272 

109 176 

2 122 448 



227 771 

21 675 

249 446 



431 624 

12 964 

444 588 



356 974 

19 145 

376 119 



421 140 

42 792 

463 932 



263 118 

15 673 

278 791 



800 584 

25 866 

826 459 



AGGREGATE DATS ATTENDANCE 
OF ALL PUPILB OTO 18 TBAH8 
0» A OB 






Boys 


Oris 


438 

.2 935 
8 373 


301 
3963 
4264 


73 
2466 
2 479 


646 
4923 
5569 


396 
3828 
4224 


723 

3 919 

4 642 


379 

1 831 

2 210 


396 
3787 
4 183 


725 
1 247 
1972 


170 
2 825 
2 995 


243 
2285 
2528 


556 

5045 
5 601 


2 241 

3 101 
5342 


8 056 
5295 
8 851 


20 
20 


34 

636 
670 


461 




461 


2259 
2259 


637 
637 


2288 
2288 


614 

3 847 

4 461 


132 
5806 
6938 


380 
1 378 
1 758 


614 
2 132 
2 746 


856 
2 051 
3897 


972 
2 237 
3209 



Total 



739 
6866 
7637 



719 
7329 
8048 



1 119 

7 747 
8866 



775 

5 618 

6 393 



895 
4072 
4 967 



799 

7 330 

8 129 



5297 

8 396 

13 



54 

636 
690 



461 
2250 
2720 



2 925 
2925 



746 

9653 

10 399 



3 510 

4 504 



1 828 
5 188 
7 016 



AYXRAGB DAILY ATTEND- 
ANCE Or PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TKABS OP AGE 



Boys 



Girls 



869 

62 

931 



932 

75 

1007 



1 1161 

61 

1 177 



1 938 

126 

2064 



1 718 

60 

1 778 



1 614 

86 

1 700 



5 617 

243 

5860 



660 

43 

712 



1 2471 
24 
1271 



988 

41 

1029 



1290 

87 

1 377 



773 

33 

806j 



885 

48 

933 



841 

87 

928 



865 

154 

1 019 



1 101 

101 

1202 



1 765 

164 

1 929 



1 655 

134 

1 789 



1 516 

120 

1 636 



5 243 

347 
5590 



636 

68 

704 



1 196 

43 

1 241 



965 

57 

1022 



1 145 

146 

1 291 



790 

50 

840 



896 

90 

986 



Total 



1 710 

149 

1 



1 797 

229 

2026 



2 217 

162 

2 3F9 



3 703 

290 

3 993 



3 373 

194 

8567 



3 130 

206 

3 



10 860 
560 

11 450 



1 305 

HI 

1 416 



2 445 

67 

2512 



1953 

98 

2 051 



2 485 

283 
2 668 



1 563 

83 

1 646 



1 781 
138 
1 919J 



AVEBAQB DAILY AT- 
TENDANCE or PU- 
PILS OVEB 18 YIABS 
OP AOT 



Boys 



2 
16 

18 



3 
13 
16 



2 
21 
23 



2] 
10 
12 



at 

8 
11 



1 

12 
13 



13 
16 
29 



4 

20 
24 



5 
16 
21 



Girls 



2 
21 
23 



1 

28 
29 



3 

22 
25 



3 
20 
23 



1 

15 
10 



1 

27 
28 



m 

29 

44] 



12 
12 



12 
12 



32 
32 



3 
11 
14 






5 
12 
17 



Total 



4 

37 
41 



4 
41 
45 



5 
43 
48 



5 
30 
35 



4 
28 

27 



2 
39 
41 



45 
78 



3 
3 



2 

12 
14 



16 
16 



4 

52 
56 



5 
18 
23 



10 
28 
88 



no 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


no. ot pupils ovbb 5 and 

UNDER 18 TEARS Of AGE 
WHO HAVB BEEN REGB- 
TBHED DUBING THB TBAB 


NO. Of PUPILS over 

5 and under 18 
tkabs op ags pre- 
viously bbgb- 
tuubd in other 
schools op thb 
state thb tbab 
(duplicate*) 


no. or pupils orai 

18 TBAHS OT AGE 
WHO HAVB BEEN 
REGBTBBBD DUBING 
THB TBAB 


no. op pupils ovbr 
18 tbab8 op aob 
pbbtioublt rbob- 
tbrbd in othbb 
schools op thb 
8tatb thb tbab 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Onondaga co., 1st oom'r 
dfat 
Elementary schools. 


1 787 
138 

1 905 

2 066 
139 

2205 

1 895 

131 

2026 

1 751 

63 

1 814 

1 837 
143 

1 960 

2 768 
129 

2*97 

2 605 

108 

2 713 

2 765 

237 

3002 

1 316 

22 

1 338 

1 171 

54 

1 225 

1 366 

80 

1 446 

1 805 

126 

1 931 

1 640 

97 

1 737 


1 684 
199 

1 883 

2 011 
224 

2 235 

1 812 

171 

1 983 

1 609 

78 

1 687 

1 772 
247 

2 019 

2 784 

189 

2 973 

2 440 

122 

2 562 

2 551 

303 

2854 

1 164 

29 
1 193 

1 157 

114 

1 271 

1 284 

117 

1 401 

1 694 

187 
1 881 

1 502 

143 

1 645 


8 451 
337 

3788 

4077 

363 

4440 

3707 

302 

4009 

8360 

141 

3 501 

3609 

890 

3999 

5552 

818 

5 870 

5 045 
230 

5 275 

6 816 
540 

5856 

2 480 

51 

2 531 

2 328 

168 

2 496 

2 650 
197 

2 847 

3 499 

313 
3 812 

3 142 

240 

3 382 


180 

7 

187 

152 

1 

153 

170 

1 

171 

190 

2 

192 

168 

1 

169 

220 

3 

223 

200 

8 

203 

254 
4 

258 

126 


185 

7 

192 

145 

4 

149 

143 

2 

145 

162 

1 
163 

147 

1 

148 

198 

1 

199 

183 

1 

184 

212 

7 

219 

130 


365 

14 

379 

297 

5 

802 

313 

3 

316 

352 

3 

355 

315 

2 

817 

418 
4 

422 

88? 

4 

387 

466 

11 

477 

256 


2 
28 
25 

4 
31 
85 

4 

10 
14 

6 

8 

14 

10 
43 
53 

2 
18 
15 

6 
6 

17 
54 

71 


2 

26 
28 

5 
25 
80 

■ • * • ■ 

6 
6 

2 

20 
22 

4 
44 

48 

20 
20 

1 

19 
20 

9 
68 
72 


4 
49 
58 

9 
56 
65 

4 

16 
20 

8 

28 
36 

14 

87 

101 

2 
33 
85 

1 

25 
26 

26 
117 
143 








Secondary schools. . 








Total 








2d com'r dtst 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 

2 


3d com'r dfat 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 










Total 








Ontario co. t 1st com'r 

dfat 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 


1 




1 


1 

2 
2 


8 
3 


1 


2d com'r dfat 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


8 
3 

5 


Orange co., 1st oom'r 

dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 
















3d com'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 




















Orleans eo. 

Elemen tary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 
















Oswego eo* 1st com'r 

dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 








8 
8 

2 
13 
15 

6 

27 
33 

8 
41 
49 

6 

20 
26 


2 
2 

2 
19 
21 

1 

82 
88 

8 
48 

51 

6 
37 
43 


10 
10 

4 

82 
36 

7 
59 
66 

11 

89 

100 

12 
67 
69 








126 

123 

1 

124 

140 

2 

142 

180 

1 

181 

159 

1 

160 


130 

97 

2 
99 

169 

5 

174 

169 

3 

172 

124 

2 

126 


256 

220 

3 

223 

309 

7 
816 

349 

4 

853 

283 

8 

286 








2d oom'r dtot. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 








i 
1 


3 
3 


4 

4 


3d com'r dfat 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 






1 
1 


1 
1 


Otsasjo co., 1st com'r dtst 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 
















2d com'r d<9t 
Elementary schools. 
Stcondsry schooh. . 
Tut-.l 





















i 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



III 



TIOS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



AOOBEOATB NUMBER OF DATS* ATTEND- 
ANCE QT ALL PUPILB BETWEEN 5 AMD 
18 TEARS OP A<K 


ACKBBQATE DATB* ATTENDANCE 
OP ALL PUPILS OVBB 18 TBABS 
OP AGE 


AYEBAOE DAILT ATTEND- 
ANCE OP PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TBABS OP AOB 


AVBBAGfl DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OP PU- 
PILS OVR 18 TBABS 
OP AGS 


Boys 


Girh 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Ob* 


Total 


Boys 


Girt 


Total 


231 278 

21 831 

253 109 


226 346 

32 725 

259 071 


457 624 

54 556 

512 180 


350 
3046 
3 896 


36 
4 129 
4 164 


385 
7 175 
7560 


1 239 

115 

1 354 


1 194 

172 

1 366 


2 433 

287 

2720 


1 

16 
17 


1 

21 
22 


2 
87 
39 


278 472 

19 313 

297 785 


272 841 

33 442 

306 283 


551 813 

52 755 

604 068 


462 
5 101 
5563 


485 

3 418 
3903 


947 
8 619 
9466 


1 571 

102 

1 673 


1 470 

176 

1 646 


8 041 

278 

3 319 


3 
27 
30 


4 

17 
21 


7 
44 

61 


241 712 


235 427 

26 383 

261 790 


477 139 

45 976 

523 115 


257 
1 647 
1994 


, 


257 
2 676 
2933 


1 349 

102 

1 451 


1 306 

141 

1 447 


2655 

243 

2898 


2 

8 
10 


6 
6 


2 


19 613 
291 325 


1029 
1029 


14 
16 


216 963 

9 389 

226 352 


206 804 

12 960 

219 764 


423 767 

22 349 

446 116 


548 
1 300 
1 848 


824 
2 632 
2956 


872 
3932 
4804 


1216 

48 

1 264 


1 121 

67 
1 188 


2387 

115 

2462 


2 

7 
9 


2 
14 
16 


4 

21 
25 


235 588 

21 489 
257 077 


205 518 

86 661 

242 179 


441 106 

58 150 

499 256 


648 
6 142 
6790 


451 
6 441 

6892 


1099 

12 583 

13 682 


1 274 

112 

1 386 


1 226 

192 

1 418 


2500 
304 

2804 


8 
31 
34 


2 
34 
36 


5 
65 
70 


356 460 


352 234 
30 125 

382 359 


708 694 

49 084 

757 778 


68 
1 768 
1 836 




68 
4 629 
4 697 


1 865 

99 

1 964 


1 826 

158 

1 984 


3 601 

257 

3948 








18 969 
375 419 


2 861 
2861 


9 
9 


15 
15 


24 
24 


30 460 

17 156 

350 616 


310 880 

18 963 

329 843 


644 340 

36 119 

680 450 


623 
623 


210 
2990 
3200 


210 
3 613 
3 823 


1 766 

91 

1 857 


1 640 

99 

1 739 


3406 

190 

3596 


4 

4 


1 

17 
18 


1 

21 
22 


342 625 
34 396 

376 921 


828 745 

47 000 

375 745 


671 270 

81 896 

752 666 


1 415 
7 622 
9037 


562 
10 322 
10 884 


1 977 
17 944 
19 921 


1927 

178 

2 105 


1 853 

248 

2096 


3780 

421 

4 201 


7 
40 

47 


3 
54 
57 


19 

94 

104 


138 578 


130 781 

4 201 

134 982 


269 359 

6 841 

276 200 








861 
13 

864 


802 

22 

824 


1 653 

35 

1 668 








2640 
141218 


1 210 
1 210 


348 

348 


1 658 
1 558 


6 
6 


2 
2 


8 
8 


132 580 


134 106 

18 237 

152 845 


266 688 

26 716 

293 404 


1 706 
1 706 


146 
2729 
2 876 


146 
4 435 
4 581 


798 

44 

842 


810 

96 

906 


1 608 

140 

1 748 








8 479 
141969 


9 
9 


15 
15 


24 
24 


154173 

10 861 

164 534 


148 697 

17 405 

166 102 


302 870 

27 766 

330 636 


671 
3233 
3904 


158 
4662 
4805 


824 

7885 
8709 


919 

55 

974 


881 

94 

976 


1 800 

149 

1 949 


2 

18 
20 


2 
25 
27 


4 

43 

47 


242 276 

17 712 

289 968 


205 284 

26 903 

232 277 


447 560 

44 705 

492 265 


834 
4932 
5 766 


230 
6925 
7 155 


1 064 

11 857 

12 921 


1219 

96 

1 815 


1 176 

143 

1 319 


2 896 

239 
2 634 


5 
25 

30 


38 

38 


5 
63 
66 


197994 

13 711 

211705 


180 679 

23 000 

208 679 


378 673 

36 711 

415 384 


497 
3 001 
8498 


487 
5433 
6920 


964 

8434 

1 9 418 


1 139 

73 

1 212 


1 098 

122 

1 220 


2287 

195 

2 482 


6 
16 
20 


4 

28 
82 


9 
43 
52 



112 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registr&tion and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 5 AND 
UNDER 18 TEARS OF AGE 
WHO HAVB BEEN RBOB- 
TERED DURING THE TEAR 


no. of pupils over 
5 and under 18 
tears op aob pre- 
viously, regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEARS OP AOB 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THE TEAR 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEARS OP AOB 
PREVIOUSLY RSmB- 
TERED IN OTHER 

schools op thb 
stats this tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Putnam co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


1 180 
49 

1 229 

2 421 

183 

2 604 

1 455 
6 

1 461 

3 789 
212 

4 001 

2 384 

131 
2 515 

2 617 

141 

2 758 

2 682 

118 

2800 

2 760 

134 

2894 

2 730 

245 

2 975 

1 478 

34 

1 512 

1038 

27 

1 065 

1 308 

86 

1 394 

1 232 

39 

1 271 


1 215 
85 

1 300 

2290 
226 

2 516 

1 320 
4 

1 324 

3656 

272 

8 928 

2296 
254 

2 550 

2 491 

201 

2 692 

2 467 

127 

2 594 

2 665 

193 

2858 

2 509 

264 

2 773 

1 306 

40 
1 346 

1 025 

32 

1 057 

1253 

106 

1 859 

1 332 

53 

1 385 


2 395 

134 

2529 

4 SI 

5 120 

2 775 

10 

2 785 

7445 

484 

7929 

4 680 

385 

5 065 

5 108 

342 

5450 

5 149 

245 

5394 

5425 

327 
5 752 

5 239 
509 

5 748 

2 784 

74 

2 858 

2063 

59 

2 122 

2 561 

192 

2 753 

2 564 

92 

2 656 


55 


60 


115 


1 

2 
3 

2 
26 
28 


1 
1 

1 

36 
37 


1 
3 
4 

3 
62 
65 














55 

120 

1 

121 

106 


60 

120 

7 

127 

90 


115 

240 

8 

248 

196 








Rensselaer co., 1st eom'r 

disk 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 




1 

1 
2 


1 
1 
2 


2d oora'r dtot 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary sehools . . 
















Total. '. 


106 

191 

5 

196 

243 

1 

244 

249 

3 

252 

318 

I 

819 

240 

2 

242 

151 

1 

153 

112 


90 

199 

8 

207 

203 

5 

208 

244 

3 

247 

253 

3 

266 

185 

8 

193 

142 

2 

144 

80 


196 

390 

13 

403 

446 

6 

452 

493 

6 

409 

571 

4 

675 

435 
10 

435 

293 

3 

296 

192 














Rockland co. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


4 

18 
22 

6 
3* 
45 

9 
25 
34 

6 
20 
26 

09 
22 
91 

5 
15 
20 


1 

3D 
31 

5 
44 
49 

9 
54 
63 

1 

23 
24 

86 

25 

111 

2 
14 
16 


5 

48 
53 

11 
83 
94 

18 
79 
97 

7 
43 
50 

155 

47 

202 

7 
29 


i 








1 
1 


1 
1 


8t Lawrence oo., 1st 

eom'r disk 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 

Total 
















2d eom'r diet. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 




















3d eom'r disk 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 




















Saratoga co., 1st eom'r 

dlst. 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools.. 

Total 


1 


3 


4 


1 


3 


4 


2d eom'r diet. 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary sehools. . 
Total 
















Schenectady eo. 

Elementary schools. 


2 


4 


6 


Secondary schools. . 










Total 


112 

94 

1 

95 

102 

1 

103 

118 

1 

114 


80 

107 
107 

120 

1 

121 

116 

2 

118 


193 

301 
1 

202 

222 

2 

224 

229 

3 

232 








2 


4 


6 


Schoharie co., 1st eom'r 

diet 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 


5 
10 
15 

'6 
17 
23 

9 
13 
22 


2 
13 
15 

9 
16 
25 

6 
17 
23 


7 
23 
30 

15 
33 

48 

15 
30 
45 
















2d eom'r disk 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


3 

3 


2 
1 
3 


5 

1 

% 


Schuyler co. 

Elementary schools. 
Secondary school*. . 




Total 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"3 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



AQQBBQftTB NUMBER Of DATS* ATTEND- 
ANCE OT AXX PUPILS BETWEEN 5 AND 
18 TBABS OP AOB 


AGGREGATE DATS* ATTENDANCE 
OP AU. PUPILS OVBB 18 TBABS 
OP AGE 


AYBBAQB DA1LT ATTEND- 
ANCE OP PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TEARS OP AGE 


AVERAGE DAILY AT- 
TENDANCE OP PU- 
PILS OVEtt 18 TBABS 
OP AGE 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Girla 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


1S2 528 


152 173 

13 114 

165 287 


304 701 

20 606 
325 307 


150 
351 
501 




150 
534 
684 


822 

38 

860 


814 

68 

882 


1 636 

106 

1 742 


1 

2 

3 


1 
1 


1 


7492 

166 020 


183 
183 


3 
4 


322 457 

26 576 

340 033 


302 340 

32 101 

334 450 


624 806 

58 677 
663 483 


91 
8336 
8 427 


163 
4599 
4 762 


254 
7035 
8 180 


1 847 

147 

1 994 


1 701 

176 

1 876 


3548 

322 

3 870 


1 

18 
19 


8 
24 
27 


4 

42 
46 


167 607 


150 968 

723 

151681 

496 292 

30 882 

538 174 


318 465 
1 531 

319 996 

1 020 162 

70 996 

1 001 158 








965 

4 

969 

2 781 

168 

2 949 


863 
4 

867 

2 605 

214 

2909 


1 828 

8 

1 836 

5 476 

382 

5858 








868 














166 316 














521 870 

31 114 

658 964 


804 
2 753 
8 057 


104 
5 165 
5269 


406 

7 918 

8 326 


2 
14 
16 


1 
27 
28 


3 
41 
44 


277 896 

20 309 

206 207 


270 486 

30 388 

800 844 


548 384 

59 667 

608 051 


680 
6 141 
6 821 


852 
7448 
7800 


1 032 

13 580 

14 621 


1 611 

107 

1 718 


1 567 

206 

1 773 


3 178 

313 
3 491 


3 

33 
36 


2 
39 
41 


5 

72 
77 


896 518 

30 999 

326 477 


282 150 

32 410 

314 560 


586 668 

53 369 

640 037 


804 
3 106 
3 912 


1 454 
8 129 
9583 


2258 
11 237 
13 496 


1 812 

109 

1 921 


1 663 

171 
1 834 


8 475 

280 

3 755 


6 
15 
21 


7 
42 
40 


13 
57 
70 


367 082 

18 450 

826 482 


285 448 

19 785 

306 183 


592 480 

38 185 

630 666 


671 
2920 
3591 


154 
8965 
4 139 


825 
6905 
7730 


1 798 

99 

1 897 


1 654 
104 

1 758 

• 


3452 

203 

3 655 


2 
16 
18 


22 
22 


2 
38 

40 


862 735 

10 600 

386 425 


857 470 

20 086 

386 665 


720 214 

48 776 
768 990 


423 
2655 
8078 


843 
3 495 
4388 


1 266 

6 150 

7 416 


2 049 

104 
2 153 


1914 

155 

2069 


3963 

259 

4222 


8 
14 
17 


4 
19 
23 


7 

33 
40 


8BB061 

38 790 

367 741 


277 306 

36 392 

813 700 


586 259 

75 182 

661441 


803 
2 431 
2734 


158 
1 788 
1 946 


461 
4 219 
4680 


2 017 

200 

2 217 


1 804 

188 

1 992 


3 821 
4209 


2 
13 
15 


1 

9 

10 


3 
22 
25 


186 230 


150 480 

5634 

165 123 

106 320 

4820 

113 140 


844 719 

10 697 

355 416 

221 361 

8 673 

230 064 








1 041 

28 

1 069 

6S2 

21 

708 


906 

30 

935 

654 

26 

680 


1 946 

58 

2004 

1 836 

47 

1 383 








6063 














190 203 














118 071 

3858 
116 924 


446 
1 107 
1 553 


216 

1 958 

2 174 


662 
3065 
3727 


3 
6 
9 


1 

11 
12 


4 
17 
21 


161903 

13 607 

161510 


140 304 

16 822 

157 216 


292 297 

29 429 
321 726 


200 
1 822 
2022 


376 
2 262 
2 638 


576 
4064 
4660 


907 

67 

974 


838 

89 

927 


1 745 

156 

1 901 


11 
11 


2 
12 
14 


2 
23 
26 


165 790 

6637 

171327 


' 146 314 

8080 

154 394 


312 104 

13 617 
325 721 


680 
2 603 
2688 


270 
2 537 
2 816 


969 
4 540 
5400 


970 

30 

ill 009 


' 848 

4S 

801 


1 827 

73 

1 900 


2 
11 
13 


1 

13 
14 


3 
24 

27 



"4 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Rcgiatration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 


ho. of pupils om 5 and 

UNDBB 18 TBABS OP AQB 
WHO HAVH BBBN UGB- 
TBBBD DUBIMQ THB TBAB 


no. op pupils ovbb 
5 and undeb 18 
tbabs op aqb pbb- 
tiouslt bbob- 
tbbbd in othbb 
schools op thb 
stat* thb tbab 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OTBR 
18 TBABS OP AQB 
WHO HAVB BBBN 
BBODJTBBBD during 
THB TBAB 


no. op pupils otbb 
18 tbam op aqb 
pbbti0uslt bsobv 
tbbbd in othbb 
schools op thb 
8tatb thb tbah 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Gfrb 


Total 


Seneca 00. 

Elementary schoob . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


1 764 
120 

1 803 

2006 
187 

2 103 

2 052 
06 

2 148 

1 416 

60 

1 476 

8027 
224 

3 251 

5 268 

273 

5 541 

1 680 
44 

1 724 

2 180 

51 
2240 

2220 

200 

2 438 

620 

32 

652 

1 044 

40 

1 003 

1 842 
26 

1 368 

2608 

28 

2631 


1 602 

205 

1 807 

1 030 
278 

2 217 

2058 

161 

2 210 

1 400 
05 

1 504 

2 732 
235 

2 067 

5063 

410 

6 473 

1 523 
75 

1 508 

2035 
65 

2 100 

2 137 

272 

2400 

617 

80 

656 

025 

72 

007 

1 202 
44 

1 836 

2 441 

84 
2 475 


3456 

334 

3 700 

3 045 
465 

4 410 

4 110 
257 

4 367 

2 825 

155 

2080 

5 750 
450 

6 218 

10 331 
683 

11 014 

3203 

110 

8 322 

4224 
116 

4340 

4 366 

481 

4 847 

1237 

71 

1 808 

1060 

121 

2000 

2634 

70 

2704 

5040 
57 

5 106 


163 
163 

104 

2 

106 

188 

6 

103 

133 


164 

1 

165 

208 

3 

211 

in 

4 

181 

133 


327 

1 

328 

402 

5 

407 

365 



374 

266 


3 
31 
34 

15 
42 
57 

6 
24 
20 


12 
21 

28 
24 

47 

3 
22 
25 

2 
10 
12 

8 
14 
22 

11 
87 
48 

7 
12 
10 



5 

14 

2 


5 
32 
87 

6 
45 
51 

4 

20 
24 

4 
15 
10 

27 
45 
72 

1 

80 
40 

4 

5 


8 



17 

6 
57 
63 

1 

17 
18 

8 
10 
27 

8 
8 

25 

8 

28 


8 
63 
71 

21 

87 

108 


44 

53 

13 
27 
40 

50 
60 

no 

4 
61 
65 

6 
15 
21 

16 
23 
80 

17 

04 

HI 

8 

20 
87 

17 
24 
41 

2 

8 

10 

87 

5 

42 




1 


1 


5 

5 

4 


1 

6 
1 
7 

1 


1 


8teuben co., lit oom'r 

dirt. 
Elementary schoob. 
Secondary schoob . . 

Total 


11 

1 

12 


2d com'r dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 


5 


4 


1 


6 


3d com'r diet 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary sohoob. . 
Total 










133 

137 

3 

140 

201 



300 

144 
144 

170 


133 

105 

2 

107 

316 

6 

322 

125 

2 

127 

174 


266 

242 

5 

247 

607 

15 

622 

269 

2 

271 

844 








Suffolk eo. t 1st com'r 
dbt 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 


4 


8 


7 


Total 


4 


8 


7 


2d oom'r dtat 
Elementary schools . 




Secondary "schools. . 
Total 














SnUrran eo., 1st com'r 

dtat 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


3 


5 


8 


8 
1 


6 
2 


8 


2d com'r dtat 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 


3 


Total 


170 

180 

8 

102 

64 

2 

66 

no 

2 
112 

05 


174 

187 

7 

104 

75 

1 

76 

09 
4 

108 

77 


344 

376 

10 

388 

130 

3 

142 

209 

6 

215 

172 


1 


2 


3 


Tioga 00. 

Elementary whoob . 




Secondary "schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 

2 


Tompkins co. ( 1st com'r 
dbt 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary 'schools. . 
Total 




7 
7 


7 

7 


2d com'r dtat 
Elementary schools. 




Secondary 'schools. . 
Total 




2 
2 


2 
2 


Ulster 00., 1st com'r dbt. 
Elementary schoob. 




Secondary schoob. . 


1 


1 
1 


1 


Total 


05 
248 


77 
195 


172 
488 


2 

12 

2 

14 


1 


2d oom'r dbt 
Elementary schoob. 
8eeondary (nhoob . . 


1 


Total 


243 


106 


488 


1 




1 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"5 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



ambwaib anion o» dais' attbnd- 


▲OCBIOATB datb' attendance 


AYBBAOI 


. DAILT 


ATTEND- 


AYEBAOB DAILT AT- 

#M •Hkk A ftf 4VfB 4%V MffT 


Ajccm or all pupils bottom 5 and 


Or ALL PUPILS OTSB 18 TBAH8 


ANCB Or PUPILS BETWEEN 


TENDANCE OP PU- 

VTTJi Ann 1 fi ra*na 


18TBAXBOr AOB 




or AG* 




5 AND 


18 YEABS Or AGS 


*U£3 WStt AO 

OP AOB 


!■■■■ 


Boy* 


Gfafe 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


225 310 


216 915 


442 225 


160 


638 


798 


1 256 


1 219 


2 475 


1 


6 


7 


22 535 


30 922 


53 457 


4832 


5258 


10 090 


117 


162 


279 


25 


27 


52 


217 845 


247 837 


495 682 


4992 


5898 


10 888 


1 373 


1 381 


2 754 


26 


83 


59 


260 644 


240 286 


490 930 


1 084 


743 


1 827 


1 437 


1 374 


2 811 


7 


5 


12 


20 620 


43 279 


09 899 


5054 


6795 


11 849 


142 


230 


372 


26 


36 


62 


277 284 


283 565 


560 829 


6 138 


7538 


f 18 876 


1 679 


1 604 


3 183 


33 


41 


74 


257 819 


234 950 


492 799 


329 


486 


815 


1444 


1 346 


2 790 


1 


2 


3 


13 584 


24 801 


38 385 


3 465 


2 470 


5 935 


70 


129 


199 


18 


14 


32 


271 433 


250 751 


531 184 


3794 


2956 


6 750 


1 514 


1 475 


2989 


19 


16 


35 


158 805 


155 816 


814 621 


655 


287 


942 


962 


939 


1 901 


3 


2 


5 


8 345 


14 206 


22 551 


1 419 


2200 


3 619 


44 


78 


117 


8 


11 


19 


167 150 


170 022 


337 172 


2 074 


2487 


4 561 


1006 


1 012 


2 018 


11 


13 


24 


428 700 


380 613 


807 322 


529 


104 


638 


2 303 


2 057 


4360 


2 




2 


32 643 


36 217 


68 860 


3 421 


6058 


9 479 


178 


195 


373 


19 


34 


53 


459 352 


416 830 


878 182 


3950 


6 162 


10 112 


2 481 


2 252 


4 733 


21 


34 


55 


718 446 


689 476 


1 407 922 


384 


186 


570 


3852 


3684 


7536 


2 




2 


39 452 


63 631 


103 083 


3 115 


5980 


9095 


211 


337 


548 


17 


31 


48 


757 898 


753 107 


1 511 005 


3 499 


6 166 


9 665 


4063 


4 021 


8084 


19 


31 


50 


200 835 


174 591 


375 426 


176 


503 


679 


1 302 


892 


2 194 




4 


4 


6 170 


10 283 


16 453 


1 510 


485 


1 995 


32 


54 


86 


8 


2 


10 


207 005 


184 874 


391 879 


1 686 


988 


2 674 


1 334 


946 


2280 


8 


6 


14 


260 155 


223 123 


473 278 


639 


315 


954 


1 463 


1 313 


2 776 


1 




1 


6606 


9 015 


15 623 


1 455 


1 778 


3228 


35 


47 


82 


8 


9 


17 


296 763 


232 138 


488 901 


2094 


2088 


4 182 


1 498 


1 360 


2858 


9 


9 


18 


280 871 


277 756 


558 627 


951 


608 


1 559 


1 587 


1 566 


3 153 


5 


3 


8 


31430 


40 664 


72 103 


5005 


7 577 


12 582 


165 


214 


379 


27 


40 


67 


312 310 


318 420 


630 730 


5956 


8 185 


14 141 


1 752 


1 780 


3532 


82 


43 


75 


72 602 


69 807 


142 309 


349 


186 


535 


433 


412 


845 




1 


1 


4844 


5605 


10 449 


1 836 


1 636 


3 472 


26 


30 


56 


10 


8 


18 


77 346 


75 412 


152 758 


2 185 


1822 


4007 


459 


442 


901 


10 


9 


19 


123 505 


110 294 


233 799 


711 


1 132 


1 843 


719 


642 


1 361 


3 


6 


9 


7221 


10 344 


17 565 


620 


2962 


35S2 


39 


55 


94 


4 


16 


20 


130 726 


120 638 


251 364 


1 331 


4094 


5425 


758 


697 


1455 


7 


22 


29 


159 812 


148 637 


308 449 


112 




112 


894 


834 


1 728 


1 




1 


3 813 


6 376 


10 189 




i 269 


1 260 


21 


35 


56 




7 


7 


163 625 


155 013 


318 638 


112 


1 269 


1 38) 


915 


869 


1 784 


1 


7 


8 


292 765 


277 575 


570 340 


713 


2090 


2 803 


1 609 


1 527 


3 136 

89 

1 3 176 


4 


11 


15 


2 789 


4 789 


7 578 


188 


551 


789 


14 


25 


1 


3 


4 


295 554 


282 8641 


677 918 


901 


2 641 


3542 


1 623 


1 552 


5 


14 


19 



n6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Tabm 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRK7T8 



NO. Or PUPILS OYCB 5 AND 
UNDER 18 TEARS OF AOE 
WHO HAT! BERN RBSIS- 
DUR1NO TH1 TRAB 



Ubtflr to. (a«f*rf) 
3d eom'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

Warren co., 1st eom'r 

dtat 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 

3d eom'r dtat 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

Washington co., 1st eom'r 

dbt 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 

2d eom'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

Wayne co., 1st eom'r 

dtot 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools . . 

T<**«d 

2d eom'r dtat 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

Westchester co., 1st 
eom'r dlst. 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 
Total 

2d eom'r dtat 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

3d oom'r dist 
Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools. . 
Total 

Wyoming co., 1st eom'r 

dist 
Etamentary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 

Total 

2d oom'r dtat 
Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools . . 
Total 

Yates eo. 

Semen tary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 



Boys 



1 996 

47 

2 043 



719 

24 

743 



1 010 

42 

1 052 



2063 

129 

2 192 



2 516 

155 

2 671 



2 138 

171 

2 309 



2529 

126 

2655 



3 057 

150 

3207 



4633 
287 

4920 



2 765 

106 

2 873 



1 673 

134 

1 807 



1 179 

72 

1 251 



1 598 

106 

1 704 



Girta 



1 926 

62 

1 



750 
24 

774 



1 077 

45 

1 122 



1 867 

183 

2050 



2 578 

255 

2833 



2088 

245 

2 333 



2284 

213 

2 447 



2*972 

208 

3 175 



4 589 

362 

4 951 



2 875 

145 

3020 



1 688 

193 

1 8716 



1 037 

102 

1 139 



1 622 

195 

1 817 



Total 



3922 

109 

4 031 



1 469 

48 

1 517 



2087 

87 

2 174 



8930 

312 

4242 



5094 

410 

5504 



4226 

416 

4642 



4763 

339 

5 102 



6029 

358 

6382 



9222 

649 

9 871 



5640 

253 

5 893 



3356 
327 

3 683 



2 216 

174 

2390 



8220 

301 

3 521 



NO. OF PUPILS OVER 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS OF AOl PRE- 
YtOTOLT 
TS3UR9 ZBJ 

schools or 
8tatb thb tear 
(duplicates) 



Boys 



140 

1 

141 



64 

1 

65 



92 

1 

93 



128 

2 

130 



169 

2 

171 



193 

5 

198 



226 

3 

229 



164 

1 

165 



276 

10 

286 



188 

"i88 



Girta 



145 

2 

147* 



110 

iio 



173 

1 

174 



117 

8 

120 



59 



Total 



59 

108 
108 



113 

1 

114 



172 

5 

177 



172 

14 

186 



222 

7 

229 



133 

2 

135 



259 

9 

268 



161 

1 

162 



131 

2 

188 



95 

1 

96 



150 

2 

152 



257 

4 

261 



128 

1 

124 



200 

1 
201 



241 

3 

244 



841 

7 

848 



365 

19 
384 



448 

10 

458 



297 

3 
300 



585 

19 
554 



NO. Or PUPILS OTTO 
18 TSARS OP AGE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
RROBTRRSD DUHXNQ 
THE TEAR 



Boys 



1 
360 



276 
4 

280 



205 

1 

206 



823 

3 

326 



5 
11 
16 



1 

13 
14 



2 
81 
33 



11 
25 



8 
34 
42 



10 
23 
88 



10 

10 
20 



8 
35 

43 



2 

42 
44 



7 

16 
22 



4 

81 
35 



Girta 



6 
12 
18 



3 

8 
11 



7 

9 

16 



3 
49 

52 



10 
67 
77 



4 

51 
55 



7 
42 
49 



9 
21 
80 



11 
45 
56 



3 
45 

48 



3 
17 

20 



1 

76 
77 



Total 



11 
23 
34 



8 
12 
20 



8 
22 
30 



6 

80 
85 



21 

92 

113 



12 
85 

97 



17 
65 



19] 
81 
50 



19 
80 
99 



5 
12 
17 



5 

87 



10 
82 
42 



6 
107 
112 



NO. OP PUPILS 01 
18 TSARS OP AOE 
PBRY10U8LT RMRV 
TBBBD IN 
SCHOOLS OP 
STATE THB TEAR 
(DUPLICATE*) 



Boys 



Girta 



27 

2 

29 



1 



24 

1 
25 



Total 



2 
1 
8 



2 

2 



1 

i 



i 

2 
3 



51 

3 

54 



2 
2 



1 
1 
2 



2 
2 



4 

*4 



3 

*3 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"7 



TIGS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Mtmi ut cc of pupils 



DA^ 



Mi 



5 AND 



** 



t 



2sm 

1777 
8M4S 



71*84 

I6S7 
« Ml 



210 

S 



in 



MM 



us 




449 610 

15 579 

465 198 



157 554 

7 095 
104 «9 



238 798 

13 197 

241 995 



508 878 
48 031 

556 817 



074 
56 897 
971 



9151 



37 8981 

aoa M6| 



274 5801 
29 934] 
304 



lft 



410 646 
30 408 
45ft 1301 440 988 



636 899 

54 496 

691 397 



2H 

9 4751 

29*99? 



193 238 

win 

148 931 



134 7101 

M991 

199 701 



21 984 
404 886 



218 780 

30 306 

249 085 



130 913 

16 974 

147 887 



187 507 

27 738 

215 345 



536 828 

62 634 

509 462 



555 475 

46 170 

601 645 



843 971 

53 111 

897 082 



1 275 576 

94 912 

1 370 488 



750 242 

40 909 

791 151 



433 800 

50 780] 
484 089 



260 151 
27 687 

896 818 



372 217 

42 729 

414 946 



or ALL 
or 



DAW* ATTSMDANCI 
18 



Boys 



1 584 

18*0 



1*3 
382 

515 



140 
1 769 

1 842 



43 

4 184 
4 227 



1516 
3 172 
4688 



522 
4870 
4 



726 
3306 
4632 



564 

1 927 
1891 



749 

4 992 

5 741 



202 
806 

1007 



87 
6806 
6895 



506 

2286 
2854 



176 
4283 
4409 



Gfeh 



315 
1 768 
2063 



281 

968 

1249 



090 
0901 



312 
6 857 
6669 



773 
8546 
9 819 



98 
7439 
7532 



436 
6 137 
6 578 



IS 
2 567 
2580 



825 

6 413 
6 738 



360 
1003 
1 453 



166 
7 142 
7308 



454 

2 040 

3 494 



123 
9520 
9 613 



Total 



3852 
3 933 



434 

1 330 
1 764 



140 
2 792 
2 932 



10 541 
10 896 



2 

11 718 
14 007 



615 

11 809 

12 434 



1 162 

9 443 

10 605 



577 
3804 
4 471 



1 074 

11 405 

12 479 



582 
1 898 
2460 



253 
13 450 
13 703 



1 022 
4 328 
5348 



299 

13 753 

14 062 



ATBJUOS DAILT ATRITD- 

ANca or pupils bxtwbsn 

5 AMD 18 T1AJB Or AM 



Boys 



1 337 

36 

1 373 



473 

19 

492 



728 



1 524 

101 

1 625 



1 778j 

124 

1 897 



1499 

130 

1 629 



1 612 

85 

1 697 



2304 

120 

2424 



3 459 

216 

3 675 



1 972 
101 

2 0781 



1 251 

HI 

1 362 



814 

55 

869 



1 049 

79 

1 138 



Ofrfa 



1 266 

47 

1 313 



477 

18 

49* 



692 

36 

7% 



1 345 

154 

1 499 



1789 

191 

1 980 



1 477 

196 

1 675 



1 573 

159 

1 732 



2 184 

161 

2 345 



3 447 

292 

3 739 



2 050 

119 

2 169 



1 278 

164 

1 442 



742 

88 

830 



1 058 

146 

1 199 



Total 



26081 

83 

2 686 



950 

87 

987 



1 387 

69 

1 456 



2869 
255 

3 124 



8563 

315 

8 877 



2976 

828 

3804 



3 185 

244 

3429 



4 488 

281 

4 769 



6906 

506 

7 414 



4022 

220 

4242 



2529 
275 

2804 



1 556 

143 

1699 



2 103 

225 

2 327 



ATSBAOI DAILT AT- 
TIKDAHCS OF PU- 
PILS OTA 18 YIABS 
OP AGS 



Boys 



1 

9 

10 



1 

22 
23 



4 

16 
30 



3 
22 
25 



2 
19 
21 



3 

7 

101 



4 

27 
31 



Girls 



35 

35 



1 

12 
13 



I 

22 
28 



1 

10 
11 



5 

7 



2i 
34 
361 



2 

47 
49 



2 
38 

40 



2 

38 
35 



14 
14 



85 
35 



39 
39 



1 

11 
12 



50 

50 



Total 



n8 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



CITIES 


HO. 0V PUPILS OVER 6 AND 
UNDER 18 TSARS Of AGE 
WHO HAVB BUN REGIS- 
TERED DURING THE TEAS 


so. or PUPILS OVER 

5 and under 18 
tears of ags pre- 
viously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state thb tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OYER 
18 TEARS OP AGE 
WHO HAVE RBBN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THB TEAR 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 

18 tears op age 
prbyiouslt regis- 
tered in other 
schools op thb 
state thb tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Albany 

FSeinentary schools . 


5 573 

436 

6009 

1 520 

127 

1 656 

1 608 

218 

1 016 

3272 

841 

3 613 

20 850 

1 863 

31 713 

1075 

61 

1 136 

387 
109 
496 

661 

91 

752 

943 

116 

1 058 

2 159 
299 

2458 

818 
122 
935 

608 

94 

702 

761 

76 

837 

1 884 

160 

1 544 


5 314 

605 

5 919 

1 560 

167 

1 727 

1 621 

225 

1 846 

3235 

802 

3627 

28 028 
1 922 

29 950 

1062 
70 

1 132 

430 
116 

546 

567 
159 
726 

894 

114 

1008 

2 028 
415 

2 443 

831 

157 

.988 

505 
121 
718 

762 
115 
877 

1 250 

201 

1 451 


10 887 

1 041 
11028 

3080 

204 

3383 

8 310 
443 

3 762 

6 507 

733 

7240 

57 878 

3785 

61 663 

2 137 
181 

2268 

817 

225 

1042 

1 238 

250 

1 478 

1 837 

229 

2066 

4 187 
714 

4 001 

1 644 

270 
1 023 

1 203 

215 

1418 

1 523 
191 

1 714 

2 634 
361 

2995 


125 

11 

186 

4 

2 
6 

45 


100 

8 
106 

18 

6 

24 

46 


225 

10 

244 

22 

8 

30 

01 


2 
49 
51 


1 

61 
62 


3 

no 

113 








Secondary schools . . 








Total./ 








Amsterdam 

Fkmentary schools . 








Secondary schools . . 
Total 


32 
32 

5 
32 
87 

1 

83 
84 


88 
88 

39 
39 

1 

80 
90 


70 
70 

5 
71 
76 

2 
172 
174 


i 

1 




1 
1 


Auburn 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 
Total 








45 

107 

1 

108 


46 

82 

82 


01 

180 

1 

100 








Binghamton 

Elementary schools. 
Secondary schools . . 




1 


1 


Total 




1 


1 


Buffalo 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary 'schools. . 
Total 


9 
9 

27 


2 
2 

29 


11 
11 

56 


284 
284 


219 
219 


503 
503 


2 
2 


i 

1 


3 

3 


Gohoes 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools . . 


4 
4 


12 
12 


16 
16 








Total 


27 
12 


29 
15 


56 
27 








Corning 

Elementary schools . 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


8 
8 

3 
20 
23 

5 
30 
35 

2 
70 
72 

1 
7 
8 

1 

38 
39 

2 
22 
24 

2 
22 
24 


9 
9 

34 

34 

5 
37 
42 

4 

64 
68 

1 
3 
4 

1 

53 
54 

1 
19 

20 

1 

34 
35 


17 
17 

3 
54 

57 

10 
67 
77 

6 
134 
140 

2 
10 
12 

2 
91 
93 

3 
41 
44 

8 
56 

50 








12 


15 


27 








Cortland 

Elementary schools . 








Secondary schools . . 














Total 














Dunkirk 

Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools . . 


10 


19 


29 














Total 


10 

70 

1 

71 

51 
51 

11 

1 

12 

10 

2 

12 

56 

4 

60 


19 

62 

1 

63 

70 

5 

75 



2 

11 

11 
11 

55 
55 


29 

132 

2 

134 

121 

5 

126 

20 

3 

23 

21 

2 

23 

HI 

4 

115 








Elmira 

Elementary schools , 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 
2 


Fulton 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 
















Geneva 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 




















Glens Falls 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 








1 
1 




1 
1 


Gfoversvflle 

EkmontAry «hOOb . 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



119 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



AGGBBQATB NUMBER OF DATS* ATTBND- 
AXCS OF ALL PUPILS BETWEEN 5 AND 
18 TSABS OF ASM 


AGGREGATE DAT*' ATTENDANCE 
OP ALL PUPILS OVER 18 TEARS 
OP AGS 


AVERAGE DAILY ATTBND- 
ANCI OP PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TBAB8 OP AGE 


AVBBAGB DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OP PU- 
PILS OVER 18 TEARS 
OP AGB 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


BoyB 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


811 303 
65 668 

876 ATI 


765 820 

86 130 

851 950 


1 577 123 

151 798 

1 728 921 


300 
5809 
6 199 


7491 
7 491 


300 
13 390 
13 690 


4507 

365 

4872 


4255 

479 

4784 


8 762 

844 

9606 


2 
33 
35 


42 
42 


2 
75 

77 


247 815 


257 320 
26 438 

283 758 


505 135 

45 320 

550 455 








1 304 

99 

1 403 


1 354 

139 

1493 


2658 

238 

2 896 








18 882 
266 697 


5066 
5066 


6 183 
6 183 


11 249 
11 249 


27 
27 


33 
33 


60 
60 


264 074 


252 426 

35 044 

287 470 


517 400 

60 855 

587 255 


524 
4928 
5 452 




524 
11 071 
11 505 


1 432 

188 

1 620 


1 364 

189 

1 553 


2 796 
377 

3 173 


3 
27 
30 


33 
33 


3 


34 811 
299 785 


6 143 
6 143 


60 
63 


536 640 
'61 090 

587 730 


521235 

60 255 

581490 


1057 875 

111 845 

1 160 220 


12 480 
12 480 


195 

14 820 

15 015 


195 
27 300 
27 495 


2 752 
262 

3 014 


2 673 

309 

2982 


5425 

571 

5996 


64 
64 


1 

76 
77 


1 
140 
141 


4 047 936 


3780 006 

300 818 

4 080 914 


7828 032 

602 690 

8430 722 








21083 

1 547 

22 630 


19 688 

1 644 

21 832 


40 771 

3 191 

43 962 








282 872 
4340 808 


46 085 
46 085 


36 946 
36 946 


83 031 
83 031 


243 
243 


195 
195 


438 

438 


153 450 


145 955 

11 028 

156 983 


299 405 

20 152 

319 557 








808 

48 

856 


768 
58 

826 


1 576 

106 

1 682 








9 124 
162 574 


618 
618 


1534 
1 534 


2 152 
2 152 


3 
3 


8 
8 


11 
11 


60 293 


61 118 
18 528 
79 646 


121 411 

35 954 

157 365 








322 

93 

415 


827 

99 

426 


649 
192 
841 








17 426 
77 719 


821 
821 


1 291 
1 291 


2 112 
2 112 


4 
4 


7 
7 


11 
11 


108 959 


95 952 

24 477 

120 420 


204 911 

87 978 

242 889 


437 
3307 
3 744 




487 

8288 
8725 


577 

71 

648 


508 
130 
638 


1 085 

201 

1286 


2 

17 
19 


26 
26 


2 


13 501 
123 460 


4 981 
4 961 


43 
45 


151 330 

18 300 

169 639 


138 679 

18 633 

157 312 


290 018 

36 933 

326 951 


568 

3 870 

4 438 


509 
5460 
5969 


1 077 

9330 

10 407 


797 

96 

893 


730 

96 

828 


1 527 

194 

1 721 


3 
20 
23 


8 

29 
32 


6 
49 
65 


339 593 

47 575 

387 168 


815 677 

66 007 

381 774 


655 270 
113 672 
768 942 


287 
9200 
9 467 


437 
10 142 
10 679 


704 

19 342 

20 046 


1 778 
249 

2 027 


1 653 

346 

1 999 


3 431 
595 

4 026 


1 

48 
49 


2 

53 
55 


3 
101 
104 


130 765 
U7 477 
148 242 


130 835 

22 334 

153 160 


261 600 

39 811 

301 411 


469 

799 

1 258 


961 

471 

1 432 


1 420 

1 270 

2 690 


688 

92 

780 


689 
118 
807 


1 377 

210 

1 587 


2 
4 

6 


5 
2 
7 


7 

6 

13 


93 868 

14 742 

108 610 


90 315 

19 084 

100 309 


184 183 

33 826 

218 009 


93 
5666 
5 750 


185 
8 413 
8696 


278 
14 079 
14 357 


491 

77 

568 


473 
100 
573 


964 

177 

1 141 


29 
29 


1 

44 
45 


1 

73 
74 


118 973 

10 008 

123 981 


106 447 

15 346 

121 793 


220 420 

25 354 

245 774 


118 
2623 
2 741 


169 
3009 
3 178 


287 
5632 
5 919 


616 

54 

670 


575 

83 

658 


1 191 

137 

1 328 


1 

14 
15 


1 

16 
17 


2 
30 
32 

• 


218 603 

22 60S 

241 169 


190 507 

31 014 

221 611 


409 100 

53 676 

462 776 


104 

3 133 

1 3237 


157 
4738 
4895 


261 
7871 
8 182 


1 126 

117 

1 243 


982 

160 

1 142 


2 108 

277 

2 385 


1 

16 
17 


1 
24 
25 


■ 

2 

40 

I 42 



120 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Tabm 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registratioa asi 



CITIES 


NO. OP 1 
UHDd 
WHO 
TBBED 


rants ovBB 5 and 

l 18 TEARS OP AGE 

BATB BMW BBOB- 

DURI1VG TH1 TEAR 


no. op pupils over 
5 and dndbb 18 
years 09 agb pre- 
viously rbgbv- 
tbbsd in other 
schools op tbs) 
state this tbab 
(duplicate*) 


NO. OP PUPILS OTEK 
18 TSARS OP AGE 
WHO HATE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THBTEAB 


no. op pupils oyer 
18 tears op agb 
previously kbgbv 
tebbd in other 
schools op »1s 
state this tbab 
(duplicates) 




Roys 


Qlrls 


Total 


Boys 


QMb 


Total 


Boys 


Qlrfe 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


HorneU 

Elementary schools 


932 

148 

1 075 

574 

69 

643 

871 
260 

1 131 

2 464 
167 

2631 

811 

94 

906 

1 741 

230 

1 971 

652 

29 

681 

557 

85 

642 

1 283 

129 

1 412 

1092 
82 

1 174 

2 649 
806 

2965 

1 703 
183 

1 886 

2 854 

148 
2502 


1 039 

199 

1 238 

554 

116 
669 

848 
272 

1 120 

2422 
250 

2 674 

738 

91 

629 

1 689 

237 

1926 

594 

39 

633 

545 

96 

641 

1 294 

145 

1 439 

1 096 
117 

1 213 

2 600 

403 
3008 

1 701 

192 

1 898 

2208 

151 

2359 


i vn 

842 

2 318 

1 128 

184 

1 812 

1 719 
532 

2251 

4886 

419 

5305 

1549 

185 

1 784 

3 430 
467 

3807 

1 246 

68 

1 314 

1 102 
181 

1 283 

2 577 
274 

2 861 

2 188 
199 

2387 

5 249 

709 

6968 

3404 
875 

3 779 

4562 
299 

4 861 


89 
89 

21 


97 

6 

103 

22 


186 

6 

192 

43 


1 

81 

82 

1 

9 

10 

1 

88 
89 

7 
42 
40 

2 

16 
18 

2 

88 
40 


31 
81 

1 

11 
12 

4 

64 
68 

7 
64 

71 

5 
19 
24 

52 
52 


1 

62 
68 

2 

20 
22 

5 

152 
157 

14 

106 
120 

7 
85 

42 

2 
90 
98 








Secondary schools. . 








Total 








Hudson 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 




1 


1 


21 


22 


48 




1 


1 


Ithaca 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 




























Jamestown 

Elementary scboab. 


50 

2 

52 


41 

1 

42 

/ 


91 

3 

94 








Secondary schools . . 








total. '. 








Johnstown 

pTerofsitaT schools. 








Secondary schools. . 














Total 














Klnnkm 

Elementary schools. 


92 

7 

99 

29 


78 

6 

63 

21 


170 

12 

182 

50 








9eoo"d«ry schools . . 








Total 









iAckawanna 

Elementary schools. 








Sscondary schools. . 


4 
4 




4 
4 








Total 


29 

4 
4 

45 

1 

46 

48 

1 

49 

161 


21 

4 
1 
5 

27 
27 

61 

1 

62 

131 


50 

8 
1 
9 

72 

1 

78 

109 

2 

111 

292 








Little Palb 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


19 
19 

46 
46 


18 
18 

4 

34 
38 


87 
87 

4 

80 
84 


1 
1 




1 
1 


Lockport 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools . . 








Total 








Middletown 

EfofMHitary schools 








Secondary schools. . 


19 
19 

5 
31 
36 


16 
16 

4 
46 
50 


36 
85 

9 
77 
86 








Total 








Mount Yernon 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools . . 








Total 


161 

47 

1 

48 

59 

7 

66 


131 

39 

1 

40 

54 

6 

60 


292 

86 

2 

88 

113 

13 

126 








Newburgh 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


17 
17 

8 
17 
20 


15 
15 

5 
15 
20 


82 
32 

8 
82 

40 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 
2 


1 
1 


New RocheUe 

Elementary scboob. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 


1 
2 
3 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



121 



TIOS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



AonVAia mm os» days' attewd- 
Ajicm or all pupils between 5 and 
IStbabsop aob 


AGGREGATE DATB* ATTENDANCE 
Of ALL PUPILS OTBB 18 YBABS 

or age 


AVERAGE DAILY ATTEND- 
ANCE Or PUPIL! BETWEEN 
5 AMD 18 YBABS OP AGE 


AVERAGE DAILY AT- 
TEND A NCI OP PU- 
PILS OVER 18 YEARS 
OP AGE 


DOjl 


Qrk 


Total 


Boys 


Qfris 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


134 973 


150 287 

81 076 

181 343 


285 240 

53 024 

888 264 


77 
3 470 
3 547 




77 
7926 
8003 


728 
118 
844 


808 

167 
975 


1 534 

285 

1 819 








21918 
158 921 


4456 

4456 


19 

19 


24 
24 


43 

43 


88 376 

9609 

95 965 


85 052 

18 236 

103 288 


171428 

27 845 

199 273 


164 
1 276 
1 440 


88 
1 502 
1 540 


202 
2 778 
2960 


459 

52 

511 


452 

96 

550 


911 

150 

1061 


1 
7 
8 


8 
8 


1 

15 
16 


188 890 


134 209 

44 081 

178 290 


270 599 
86 563 

857 162 


22 
12 403 
12 425 


41 
10 258 
10 299 


88 
22 061 
22 724 


707 
220 
927 


695 
228 
926 


1 402 

448 
1850 








43 482 
178 872 


64 
64 


58 
58 


117 
117 


880 568 

25 260 
415 828 


875 853 

40 715 

416 566 


766 421 

65 975 

832 306 


365 

6 417 
6782 


662 

8888 
9550 


1 027 

15 305 

16 382 


2045 

132 

2 177 


1 968 
213 

2 181 


4 013 

345 

4 858 


2 
84 
36 


8 
47 
50 


5 
81 
86 


128 591 
14 438 

148 029 


117 779 

13 443 

131222 


246 370 

87 881 

274 251 


865 
1 897 
2262 


460 
2 573 
8 038 


825 

4 470 

5 295 


670 

75 

745 


613 

70 

663 


1283 

145 

1 428 


2 
10 
12 


2 
13 
15 


4 

23 
27 


254 161 

84 162 

288 823 


245 157 

35 914 

281071 


499 318 

70 076 

509 394 


265 

5 976 

6 241 


130 
7 412 
7 551 


404 
13 888 
13 792 


1 352 

184 

1 536 


1 304 

193 

1 497 


2656 

877 

3033 


1 

82 
33 


1 

40 
41 


2 
72 
74 


88 646 


73 558 

5702 

79 260 

82 970 
16 069 
99 059 


160 204 
9 149 

169 353 

170 857 
29 499 

199 856 


58 

442 
500 




58 

442 
500 


454 

18 
472 

460 

71 

531 


385 

30 
415 

437 

85 

522 


839 

48 
887 

897 

156 

1053 








3 447 




2 
2 




2 


60 093 




2 


87 387 






13 410 
100 797 


1885 
1 885 


1 696 
1 696 


3 581 
8 581 


10 
10 


9 
9 


19 
19 


198 008 

19 186 

212 194 


193 665 

23 777 

217 442 


886 673 

42 963 

439 636 


661 
6 661 


874 

5 468 
5842 


874 
12 129 
12 503 


1 M9 

104 

1 153 


1053 

129 

1 182 


2 102 

233 

2335 


86 

86 


2 
80 
82 


2 
66 

68 


167 414 


162 807 

17 206 

180 015 


830 221 

29 359 

869 580 








900 

65 

965 


875 

93 

968 


1775 

158 

1 933 








12 151 
179 565 


2956 
2956 


2809 
2809 


6765 
5765 


io 
16 


15 
15 


31 
31 


881 399 

44 807 

485 706 


371 229 

55 103 

426 332 


752 628 

99 410 

852 038 


375 
3839 
4 214 


815 
5 397 
5 742 


720 
9286 
9966 


2 051 

238 

2289 


1996 

296 

2292 


4 047 

534 

4 581 


2 
21 
23 


2 

29 
81 


4 
59 
54 


*3* MO 


280 533 

80 775 

891 808J 


519 063 

56 989 

578 072 








1 390 

152 

1 542 


1 401 

166 

1 666 


2 791 

317 

8 108 








28 214! 

286 764 


2 497 
2 497 


2 267 
2267 


4784 
4 764 


13 
13 


12 
12 


25 
26 

>•* 

'4 
19 
23 


mm 
20005 


815 040} 
80 721 


802 429 

41 626 

304 065 


460 

1 759 

2 219 


206 

1 809 

2 875 


666 

3628 
4294 


1 911 

115 

2026 


1 734 

114 

1 848 


3645 

229 

3 874 


3 

9 

12 


1 

10 
11 



122 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



CITIES 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 6 AND 
UNDER 18 TRARB OF A<K 
WHO HAYR BERN BIOB- 
TERRD DURING THB TBAB 


NO. OF PUPILS OVHR 
6 AND UNDBR 18 
TEARS OP AOl PRB- 

viouslt regb- 
tbrkd in other 
schools op thb 
stat* this tiar 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TRARB OP AOl 
WHO HATB BRBN 
RROBTERRD DURING 
TBRTRAR 


no. op pupils otrr 
18 trarb op age 
prbvioublt jkob- 
trrbd in other 
schools op this 
8tatb thb trar 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


New York 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary sohools. . 

Total 


341 412 

18 281 

359 093 

2055 

225 

2280 

875 

80 

955 

760 

77 

837 

1221 

136 

1 357 

607 

92 

099 

506 
47 

643 

1 382 

176 

1 558 

759 

65 

824 

845 
117 
962 

1 527 

213 

1 740 

726 

62 

788 

11 827 

1 183 

13 010 


332 053 
21 584 

354 537 

1 963 
287 

2 250 

723 

102 
825 

732 

89 

821 

1 178 

205 

1 883 

600 
101 
701 

581 
100 
681 

1 406 

271 

1 677 

670 

69 

739 

847 
145 
992 

1 485 

263 

1 748 

750 

80 

830 

11 158 
1 234 

12 392 


674 365 

39 865 
714 230 

4 018 

512 

4530 

1 598 

182 

1 780 

1 492 

166 

1 658 

2 399 
341 

2 740 

1 207 

193 

1 400 

1 177 
147 

1 324 

2 788 
447 

3 235 

1 429 

134 

1 563 

1 692 

262 

1 954 

3 012 

476 

3488 

1 476 
142 

1 618 

22 985 

2 417 
25 402 


10 860 
911 

11 771 

113 

2 

115 


9 183 

538 

9 721 

90 

2 

92 


20 043 
1 449 

21 492 

203 

4 

207 


65 
1 460 
1 525 

3 

50 
53 

2 

23 
25 

10 
27 
87 


57 
2 264 
2 321 

67 
67 

2 
21 
23 

5 
36 
41 


122 

3724 
3846 

8 
117 
120 

4 

44 

48 

15 
63 

78 


5 
2 
7 


75 

25 

100 


80 

27 

107 


Niagara Falls 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools . . 








Total 








N. Tonawnnda 

Elementary schools . 








8eeondary schools. . 
Total 


9 


1 
1 

6 


1 
1 

15 


i 

1 




1 
1 


Ogdensburg 

Elementary schools . 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 


9 

26 


6 
20 


15 
46 








Olean 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools . . 


28 
28 

1 

13 
14 


30 
30 

21 
21 


58 
58 

1 

34 
85 








Total 


26 

37 
37 

34 


20 

36 

1 

37 

48 


46 

73 

1 

74 

82 








Oneida 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools . . 








Total 








Oneonta 

Elementary aohools . 








Secondary schools. . 


17 
17 

1 

35 
36 

2 
28 
30 


27 
27 

42 
42 

19 
19 


44 
44 

1 

77 
78 

2 
47 
49 








Total 


34 

20 
25 
45 

30 

1 

31 

12 


48 

19 
23 
42 

16 

1 

17 

11 


82 

89 

48 
87 

46 

2 

48 

23 








Oswego 

Elementary schools . 
Secondary schools. . 


1 




1 


Total 


1 




1 


Plattstarg 

Elementary schools. 




Secondary schools. . 








Total 








PortJervta 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary schools. . 


14 
14 


10 
10 


24 
24 








Total 


12 

62 

2 

64 

48 
46 

360 

59 

419 


11 

81 

1 

82 

40 

1 

41 

814 

82 
396 


23 

143 

3 

146 

86 

1 

87 

674 
141 
815 








Foushkeepsle 

Elementary schools . 








Secondary schools. . 


20 
20 

1 
7 
8 


41 
41 

17 
17 


61 
61 

1 
24 
25 








Total 








Rensselaer 

Elementary schools. 








Secondary aohools . . 








Total 








Rochester 

Elementary schools . 








Secondary schools. . 
Total 


180 
180 


167 
167 


347 
347 


i 


il 


3 

3 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TIOS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



is 



OF DATS* ATTKND- 
5 AND 



Girls 



Total 



52 571 951 ISO 885 838 
2 191 342/ 2 574 342/ 
54 7163 203153 460 180 



45 533 



HO 
10 



115 
14 



31 
218 



311 4471 

35 896) 

347 345/ 



131291 
14 707) 
146 058/ 



120 149 

12 117 

132 265 



188 712 

20 902 

209 614 



85 194 
13 901 
99 095 



73 523 

6 941 

89 454 



218 017 

23 446 

241463 



10 3091 
117TO 



125 3331 

15 7881 

142 1211 



42 1491 
250 956 

HO «1£| 

124 ©56 

17888991 1 6» §g*l 
173 7461 179 «g] 
I M4 8M 1 812 i»i 



15 9TO 
103 71-4 

74 513 
15 065 
go «8 



21« ZS 
41 932 



94 

105 1971 



147 029J 



103 457 699 

4 765 684 
106 223 383 



612 809 

81 431 

693 740 



241 668 

81 293 

272 961 



235 557 
26 653 

262 210 



374 993 

52 686 

427 679 



172 938 

29 871 

202 809 



148 036 

22 906 

170 942 



434 774 

65 378 

500 152 



201 857 

21 109 

222 966 



251 701 

38 049 

289 750 



423 960 

76 249 

500 209 



216 554 

22 982 

239 536 



3 401 717 

855 068 
3 756 785 



AOOBJMUTE DATS ATTENDANCE 

or all purls ovaa 18 

OP AQB 



Boys 



4 017 
185 783 
189 800 



203 
7 703 
7906 



876 
3288 
3664 



725 

4 078 
4 803 



4 
4 



683 
683 



179 
1 519 
1 698 



2571 
2 571 



47 
5064 
5111 



279 
3724 
4 003 



2 177 
2 177 



2963 
2983 



164 
1 048 
1 207 



21519 
21519 



Gtris 



5 579 
285 732 
291 311 



10 127 
10 127 



374 
2 490 
2884 



433 
5652 
6085 



4668 
4668 



3 123 
8123 



4 

4 



373 
873 



6066 
6066 



2 
2833 



679 
679 



6129 
6129 



2556 
2 556 



28 748 
23 748 



Total 



9596 
471 515 
481 111 



203 

17 830 

18 033 



750 
6 778 
6528 



1 158 

9 730 

10 888 



9 
9 



351 
351 



179 
4 642 
4 821 



6944 
6944 



47 
11 130 
11 177 



279 
6 557 
8836 



3856 
8 856 



9 112 
9 112 



164 
3599 
3 763 



45 267 
45 267 



AYHLAOB DAILY ATTEND- 
ANCE OF PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 YBABB OJT AGE 



Boys 


Girls 


275 775 
11 499 

287 274 


266 935 

13 512 

280 447 


1 614 

186 

1 800 


1 559 

236 

1 795 


608 
79 

777 


587 

88 

675 


646 

65 

711 


620 

78 

698 


1009 

112 

1 121 


996 

170 

1 166 


463 

76 

539 


477 

87 

564 


393 

37 

430 


398 

85 

483 


1 130 

121 

1251 


1 123 

217 

1 340 


578 

57 

635 


508 

59 

567 


653 

87 

740 


658 
111 
769 


1 169 

185 

1 354 


1 135 

229 

1 354 


576 

63 

629 


600 

70 

670 


9 719 

966 

10 685 


8 972 
985 

9 957 



Total 



542 710 

25 011 

567 721 



3 173 

422 

3505 



1285 

167 

1 452 



1266 

143 

1 409 



2005 

282 

2287 



940 

163 

1 103 



791 
122 
913 



2 253 

338 

2 591 



1 086 

116 

1 202 



1 311 

198 

1 509 



2 304 

414 

2 718 



1 176 

123 

1 299 



18 691 

1 951 

20 642 



AVERAGE DA 
TENDANCE 
FILSOTSBl 
OP AGE 



Boys 



21 
977 
998 



1 

40 
41 



2 
17 

19 



4 

22 

26 



118 
118 



25 


2i 


25 


21 


1 




8 


1\ 


9 


1\ 


14 


2J 


14 


2] 


26 


31 


26 


31 


2 




20 


11 


22 


If 


11 


i 


11 


( 


16 


K 


16 


33 


1 




6 


1-1 


7 


H 



124 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



CITIES 



Rome 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 

Schenectady 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

Syracuse 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

Tonawanda 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

Troy 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

UtSca 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

Watertown 

Elementary schools. 

Secondary schools . . 

Total 

Waterrlet 

Elementary schools . 

Secondary schools. . 

Total 

xonkers 

Elementary schools. 

**econdary schools . . 

Total 

Cities, elementary 

Towns, elementary 

Total, elementary 

Cities, secondary 

Towns, secondary 

Total, secondary.. 

lotalfdUes 

Total, towns 

Total state 



m>. or pupils otto 5 and 

UNDKR 18 TEARS OT AOB 
WHO HATE BEEN RBdlB 
TEEED DURING IBS TEAS 



Boys 



990 

122 

1 102 



4 633 

283 

4 916 



9 776 

1 02 

16 802 



817 

81 

898 



2 912 
216 

3 128 



4 977 
324 

5 301 



2 147 

216 

2 363 



750 

64 

823 



5662 

415 

6 077 



Girls 



465 651 
218 324 



683 975 



29 53S 
11 209 



40 747 



495 189 
229 533 



724 722 



934 

133 

1 067 



4 467 

318 

4785 



9 566 

1 179 

10 745 



686 
116 
802 



2 662 

254 

2 916 



4 678 

344 

5022 



2048 

301 

2 349 



764 
106 
870 



5 421 

476 

5 897 



451 777 

208 aw 



659 831 



34 845 
16 103 



50 948 



486 622 
224 157 



710 779 



Total 



1 914 
255 

2 169 



9 100 

601 

9 701 



19 842 

2205 

21 547 



1 503 

197 

1 700 



5 574 

470 

6044 



9655 

668 

10 323 



4 195 

517 
4 712 



1 523 

170 

1 693 



11 063 

891 

11 974 



917 428 
426 378 


1 343 806 


64 383 
27 312 


91 695 


981 811 
453 690 


1 435 501 



NO. OF PUPILS OVER 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS Or AOE PHI- 
TIOUBLT BBGIS- 

TEBED IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS Or THIS 

state this teas 
(duplicates) 



Boys 



59 



59 



107 

2 

109 



75 
75 



51 
M 



15 



15 



150 

1 

151 



63 



63 

13 
13 



179 

4 

183 



13 419 
18 258 



31 677 



1 132 

216 



1 348 



14 551 
18 474 



33 025 



Girls 



39 



39 



103 

2 

105 



96 
96 



17 

2 

19 



13 



13 



286 
2 



58 



58 



14 

6 

20 



147 
4 

151 



11 632 
17 173 



28 805 



807 
283 



1090 



12 439 

17 456 



29 895 



Total 



08 
98 



210 

4 

214 



no. or PUPILS OVEE 
18 TEAE8 Or AOE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
SEOBTEBED during 
THE TEAS 



171 
171 



68 

2 

70 



28 



28 



436 

3 

489 



121 



121 



27 
6 

S3 



8 
334 



25 051 
35 431 



60 483 



1 939 
499 



2 436 



26 990 
35 930 



62 920 



Boys 



3 

20 
23 



1 

84 
85 



71 
136 
207 



1 
19 



1 

35 
86 



3 
36 



5 
58 
63 



10 
10 



2 

48 
50 



218 
748 



966 



3426 
2 062 



5 508 



3 644 
2 830 



6 474 



Girls 



28 



2 
79 
81 



76 
171 
247 



21 
21 



25 
25 



59 
69 



2 
56 

581 



90 
20 



2 
77 
79 



191 
613 



804 



4 394 
2 952 



7 346 



4 585 

3 565 



8 150 



Total 



3 

48 
51 



3 
163 
166 



147 
807 
454 



1 

40 
41 



1 

60 
61 



8 
95 
99 



7 
114 
121 



30) 
30 



4 

125 
1291 



409 
1 361 



1 770 



7 820 
5 034 



12 854 



8 229 
6 395 



14 624 



no. ot pupils oteb 
18 tears op aoe 
pbbtxoublt rbot- 
tbrsd iii otheb 
schools ot thi8 
state tub teas 
(duplicates) 



Boys 



11 
143 



154 



20 
29 



49 



81 
172 



293 



Girls 



82 
129 



211 



35 
44 



117 
173 



Total 



1 

i 



s 

3 



9 
9 



1 
1 



8 
8 



93 
272 



365 



55 

73 



128 



148 
345 



493 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"5 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

tttwiitnra of pupils 



jMuats ffuuuB or dais* attixd- 


Aaaamra days* attswdakci 


Arauoi 


I DAILY 


AllJWLK 


ATaaAQB DAILT AT- 


AKB OF AU PUPILS BBTWWf 5 AH© 


OP ALL PUPILS OTBB 18 TBAB8 


ANca or pupils between 


ANDANCB or rV- 

•ii a n van 19 taiH 


18 rata* or a« 




or ACM 




5amd 


18 teaks or AOB 


or AOB 


laua 


Bop 


Qkk 


Total 


B0J8 


Qirk 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Gtrb 


Total 


LS3 7B1 


144 150 
21 691 


297 911 
41070 


206 
3350 




206 

7 712 


822 

104 


771 
115 


1 603 
219 


1 

18 


23 


1 


19 479 


4 382 


41 


171210 


165 741 


338 081 


3556 


4 362 


7 018 


926 


8*6 


1 812 


19 


29 


42 


en 087 


640 753 


1 340 840 


179 


270 


440 


3839 


3 610 


7 449 


1 


2 


3 


44 855 


40 582 


03 937 


10 685 


12 521 


23 206 


246 


275 


521 


59 


70 


129 


7*442 


690 335 


1434 777 


10 864 


12 791 


23 655 


4085 

■ 


3885 


7 970 


60 


72 


132 


1406 771 


1 392 963 


2802 734 


12 415 


13 561 


25 976 


7381 


7296 


14 674 


65 


71 


136 


142 935 


160 664 


312 599 


21 533 


27 146 


48 679 


760 


901 


1 661 


114 


144 


258 


1MB 706 


1 562 827 


3 115 333 


33 948 


40 707 


74 655 


8 141 


8 194 


18 335 


179 


216 


304 


119 857 


100 778 
10 166 


220 635 
32 792 


146 
2 611 




146 
5806 


631 

72 


530 
101 


1 161 
173 


1 
14 


*Z 


1 


13 ©4 


8 195 


tt 


IS 481 


110 946 


253 427 


2 757 


3 195 


5062 


703 


631 


1 334 


15 


17 

1 


32 


415107 


399 901 
38 796 


828 098 
72 283 


117 
5 573 




117 
9540 


2434 

187 


2 198 

217 


4626 
404 


1 
31 


22 


1 


»437 


3967 


53 


mm 


411 W 


990 321 


5600 


3967 


657 


2621 


2409 


5030 


32 


2* 


44 


725 199 


667 422 
66 842 


1 892 621 
107 906 


411 
6 274 




411 
16 425 


3 817 
269 


8 513 
299 


7330 
568 


2 

33 


63 


2 


'51064 


10 151 


86 


776 263 


724 204 


1 500 527 


6685 


10 151 


16 836 


4086 


3 812 


7808 


35 


53 


88 


337 794 


311 757 


649 551 


534 


878 


012 


1 778 


1 641 


3 419 


3 


2 


5 


» 512 


45 408 


77 980 


8 128 


8662 


16 790 


171 


239 


410 


43 


45 


88 


330 206 


357 225 


727 531 


8662 


9040 


17 702 


1 949 


1 880 


3829 


46 


47 


93 


IV 746 


115 790 
16 635 


228 545 
26 177 








633 
54 


651 
93 


1 284 

147 








1542 


1 152 


3 222 


4 374 


6 


18 


24 


70 288 


132 434 


254 722 


1 152 


3222 


4 874 


687 


744 


1 431 


6 


18 


24 


873 275 


825 244 


1 608 519 


310 


287 


597 


4 695 


4 437 


9 132 


2 


2 


4 


72 401 


66 040 


138 540 


8400 


13 475 


21 875 


390 


355 


745 


45 


72 


117 


945 786 


801 293 


1837 050 


8 710 


13 762 


22 472 


5065 


4 792 


9 877 


47 


74 


121 


19 813 531 


68 172 540 


138 986 071 


25 329 


25 760 


51089 


372 908 


358 966 


731 874 


134 


135 


269 


26 909 243 


25 550 510 


52 468 762 


50 103 


44 429 


94 532 


152 180 


144 471 


296 651 


270 


238 


508 


97 722 774 


93 732 050 


191454 833 


75 432 


70 180 


145 621 


525 088 


503 437 


1 028 525 


404 


373 


777 


8909 196 


4 604 121 


8 613 316 


460 814 


612 094 


1061 908 


20 678 


24 355 


45 083 


2485 


3236 


5 721 


1644 921 


2460 560 


4 105 481 


287 444 


418 642 


706 086 


8707 


13 022 


21 730 


1 527 


2234 


3 781 


5 464 116 


7 004 681 


12 618 797 


757 258 


1 030 736 


1 787 994 


29 385 


37 37J- 


66 763 


4 012 


5 470 


9482 


74 722 726 


72 770 661 


147 499 387 


496 143 


637 854 


1 132 097 


393 586 


383 32' 


776 907 


2 619 


3 371 


5990 


28 564 164 


28 020 079 


60 574 243 


337 547 


463 071 


800 618 


160 887 


157 49> 


318 381 


1 797 


2 472 


4269 


M6 279 880 


100706740 


204 073 680 


832 690 




1 100 025 


1 983 615 


554 473 


540 81: 

1 '" ' 


I 095 288 


4 416 


5 843 


10 259 



126 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (concluded) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



CITIES 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 5 AND 
UNDER 18 TEARS *0P AOE 
WHO HAVE BEEN REGIS- 
TERED DURING THEi.TBAR 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
5 AND UNDER 18 
TEARS OP AOE PRE- 
VIOUSLY REGIS- 
TERED IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS OP THIS 
STATE ffHB TEAR 

(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OYER 
18 TEARS OP AGE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
REGBTERBD DURING 
THE TEAR 


NO. OP pupils over 
18 tears op age 
prsyiouslt begis- 
tbred in other 
schools op thb 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


N.Y. Inst for the Blind. 
Elementary schools . 


84 

6 

90 

69 

4 

68 

267 
267 

410 

10 
420 


46 

1 

47 

44 

2 

46 

778 

2 496 

3 273 

868 

2 496 
8866 


180 

7 

187 

103 

6 

109 

1 045 

2 495 

3 540 

1 278 

2508 
3786 








17 

6 
23 

15 
11 
26 


11 

7 

18 

8 

9 

17 


28 
13 
41 

23 
20 
43 








Secondary schools. . 














Total 














N. Y. State School for 
the Blind 
Elementary schools . 














Secondary schools . . 














Total 














Normal Col. of the City 
of New York 
Elementary schools. 














Secondary schools. . 




















Total 




















Special schools, elemen- 
tary 








32 

17 
49 


19 

16 
85 


51 

83 
84 








Special schools, second- 
Total special schools 









































SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



127, 



TICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

attendance of pupils 



AOOMill KUMBEB OV DAY*' AITOND- 
AMCB 09 ALL PUPILS BBTWZSN 5 AUD 
l&YBABSOP AOB 


AGQBMATB DATB* ATTIKDANCB: 
OP ALL PUPILS OYER 18 TBABS 
OP ACT 


AYKRAGI DAILY ATTEND- 
ANCE OV PUPILS BBTWZ1N 
5 AND 18 TSAB8 OP AOl 


AVBBAGN DAILY AT- 
TCMDANC1 OP PU- 
PILS OYER 18 YIABB 
OP AGS 


Boys 


Giris 


Total 


Boys 


Girfc 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


11 206 
962 

12 188 

11625 
538 

12 163 

28 234 


6469 

177 

6646 

7552 

180 

7 782 

104 109 
315 420 
419 529 

118 130 

315 777 
433 907 


17 675 

1 159 

18 834 

19 177 
718 

19 896 

132 343 
315 420 
447 763 

169 195 

817 297 

486 492 


2 541 
870 

3 411 

2 517 
1259 

3 776 


1 568 

1 209 

2 777 

1 153 

577 

1 730 


4 109 

2079 
6 188 

3 670 
1 836 
5506 


63 

6 

69 

63 

8 

66 

154 


86 

1 

37 

41 

1 

42 

566 

1 696 
2262 

643 

1 696 

2 841 


99 

7 

106 

104 

4 

108 

720 

1 696 

2 416 

923 

1 707 
2630 


14 

5 

19 

13 

7 

20 


9 

7 
16 

6 
3 
9 


28 
12 
35 

19 
10 
29 
















28 234 








154 

280 

9 
289 








510651 

1 520/ 
32 3851 


5058 

2 129 

7 187 


2 721 

1 786 
4 607 


7 779 

3 915 
11 694 


27 

12 
89 


16 

10 
25 


42 

22 
64 



128 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4— STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Financial statement showing receipts and payments 

RECEIPTS 



COMMISSIONER 
DISTRICTS 



Albany co. 
1st oom'r dbt. 
2d oom'r dbt. 
3d oom'r dbt. 

Allegany ca 
1st com'r dbt. 
2d com'r dbt. 

Broome oo. 
1st oom'r dbt, 
2d com'r dbt. 

Cattarauinv co. 
1st com'r dbt, 
2d com'r dbt. 
3d oom'r dbt. 

Cayuga oo. 
1st oom'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 

Chautauqua co. 
1st com'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 
3d com'r dbt 

Chemung oo 

Chenango oo. 
1st com'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 

Clinton oo. 
1st oom'r dbt 
2d com'r dbt. 
3d oom'r dbt. 

Columbia oo. 
1st com'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 

Cortland co. 
1st oom'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 

Delaware oo. 
1st oom'r dbt 
2d oom'r dbt. 

Dutchess co. 
1st oom'r dbt 
2d com'r dbt. 

Erie co, 
1st com'r dbt 
2d com'r dbt. 
8d oom'r dbt. 

Essex oo. 
1st com'r dbt 
2 oom'r dbt. 



Balance 

on hand 

Aug. 1, 1008 


Public 
money 

received 
for 

teachers' 
wages 


State aid 
for llbnury, 
apparatus, 
academic 
quota and 
attendance 
and non- 
resident 
tuition 


Tuition 

from 
districts 

under 

contract 

and from 

Individual 

pupib not 

paid by 

State 


Tax on 
property 


i 

| 

i 

AUotber 
sources 


Total 


81 860 05 
2 010 73 
288 85 


$8 086 61 

10 708 51 

8 421 08 


81 358 17 

20 18 
1 203 82 


8160 75 
520 .. 
327 10 


$30 014 85 
12 120 66 
45 314 58 


' $1600 34 

266 80 

1 187 53 


$43 ISO 67 
25 670 88 
65 742 07 


4 046 44 
12 006 64 


26 523 34 

28 047 76 


4 058 IS 

5 677 20 


1054 08 
2 413 45 


44 443 56 
02 614 87 


14 557 07 
14 200 65 


06 582 65 

156O40 16 


7 060 31 
4 841 00 


10 472 23 
21 116 88 


1 671 48 

2 000 41 


552 46 
031 54 


36 750 76 
60 326 68 


1 416 00 
1 580 07 


66 032 33 
80 797 57 


10 405 66 
700 12 
4 216 28 


22 763 57 
10 855 13 
18 382 03 


3 516 04 
3 356 40 
2 880 67 


780 57 
303 05 
612 07 


55 000 20 

62 366 88 
48 455 06 


3 278 27 

12 732 32 

6300 03 


05 852 40 

106 322 99 

80 047 74 


5 123 00 

6 503 76 


16 603 27 
20 606 03 


2 656 06 
1 850 12 


1 340 00 

758 50 


42 810 85 
45 004 60 


2 130 07 

3 575 24 


70 674 14 
70 3b7$4 


8002 33 

11 482 44 

4 018 74 


18 562 50 
23 650 .. 
10 547 30 


3 778 23 
5 680 06 

4 110 48 


1 022 16 
1 571 45 
1 251 20 


48 801 02 
76 022 44 
55 053 23 


< 

10 211 72 

15 026 60 

2 505 43 


04 462 06 

134 3>? 06 

88 201 56 


7668 08 


21884 50 


2 028 74 


680 61 


55 586 00 


2436 68 


00 226 50 


8 183 63 
7 742 87 


26 704 39 
24 053 45 


4 667 02 
4 271 80 


2 456 38 
1 601 67 


50 776 41 
52 041 33 


6 347 48 
1 548 50 


108 135 28 
02 240 80 


3080 56 
2 HI 70 
2 253 62 


16 461 25 

0625 .. 

14 815 31 


1 203 .. 

551 70 

1 304 07 


162 02 

43 60 

806 80 


37 506 76 
11 251 40 
27 450 25 


1 513 38 

36 25 

082 62 


50 035 07 
23 610 83 
47 211 36 


1 047 65 

2 800 68 


11 160 .. 
15 855 26 


786 80 
2 758 67 


201 86 
68106 


84 283 20 
61 300 78 


045 00 
1485 42 


40 325 . 
84 077 71 


3 038 64 
4428 50 


13 827 07 

14 044 07 


1 201 66 
1 752 24 


561 35 
80102 


20 085 22 
22 124 18 


1 348 44 
800 36 


41 003 28 
44 040 41 


8 031 78 
5 138 68 


38 260 30 
33 501 71 


5 403 56 
3008 08 


1 305 80 
1 850 84 


84 871 24 
68 254 40 


4 240 31 
5008 64 


143 121 08 
118 652 35 


5 103 42 
8002 85 


10 741 82 
17 881 .. 


3 282 81 
2 827 24 


006 37 
1 123 45 


88 060 53 
73 276 03 


11 080 66 
4623 48 


120 183 U 
107 224 05 


16 626 60 
8050 55 
4 328 51 


20 184 02 
10 743 75 
15 000 .. 


4 124 14 
8 053 17 
3 187 17 


1 388 61 

1 777 08 

667 03 


107 180 40 
77 876 73 

30 427 00 


7 562 56 
4026 86 
2244 50 


157 026 50 

110 336 14 

65 745 20 


11 075 68 
7 700 37 


10 125 . . 
10 833 62 


2 360 06 
3044 80 


860 55 
832 80 


44 055 24 
64 567 26 


4824 64 
2020 33 


84 120 00 
08 008 1/ 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



129 



Table 4 (continued) — STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Financial statement showing receipts and payments 

RECEIPTS 



COMMI&IOHER 
DISTRICTS 



Franklin co. 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d mart dirt 

Fatten eo 

Genesee co 

Greene on. 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dirt 

Hamilton eo 

Herkimer eo. 

1st eom'r dtot 

2d eom'r dirt 

Jefferson co. 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dtot 

3d eom'r dirt 

Levis eo. 

Lit eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dirt 

Livingston eo. 
1st eom'r dirt.... 
2d eom'r dirt 

Madison eo. 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dirt 

nooroe eo. 
1st eom'r dirt .... 
2d eom'r dirt 

klootgusufly co. .... 

Nassau eo. 

Niagara eo. 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dmt 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r dmt 

3d eom'r dirt 

4th eom'r dmt. . . . 

>Dondagaea 

1st eom'r dirt 

2d eom'r ami 

3d eom'r dmt 

H r i£sxto co. 

1st eom'r diet 

2deon'rdirt 

Grange eo. 

1st eom'r dkt 

2d eom'r dmt 

5 



Balance 

on hand 

Aug. 1, 1908 



$9 630 96 
5844 52 

4060 55 

10 174 04 



3071 99 

1 566 94 

2 501 66 



5 928 11 
3 027 31 



8 478 38 
6 786 05 
6 834 15 



6 672 31 

7 841 12 



5205 88 
3 511 93 



6 190 40 
5 23195 



6 819 53 

7 458 94 

6929 83 
56 297 45 



4037 84 
5907 39 



4 547 70 
5724 02 
3 414 47 
7 158 84 



6 656 91 

14 297 82 

5 834 61 



4 653 21 
19 306 32 



5627 64 
10 918 33 



Public 
money 

received 
for 

teachers' 
wages 



$24 229 51 
19 311 81 

18 867 75 

26 796 .. 



16 897 78 
14 100 . . 

6 775 .. 



21 029 46 
20 950 . 



19 200 82 
24 559 .. 
22 728 12 



18 983 86 
22 198 60 



16 090 22 
16 371 83 



23 290 58 
17 992 52 



18 515 . . 

19 546 09 

21 266 88 
43 449 38 



9 426 
14 425 



12 125 . 
20 925 . 
16 025 28 
25 825 57 



16 350 . 
19 650 . 
18 843 52 



15 266 12 
21 813 75 



17 975 . 
20 106 10 



State aid 
for library, 
apparatus, 
academic 
quota and 
attendance 
and non- 
resident 
tuition 



$4 175 02 

2 858 36 

872 54 
7 333 58 



2 772 44 
2 120 13 

734 65 



3 106 36 
3065 65 



2 443 62 
4 153 67 

3 150 74 



1 919 . 

2 501 03 



4 529 29 
3296 79 



3 412 04 
2 383 09 



4 962 75 
3 606 41 

3 319 75 

5 867 82 



1 730 55 
1 706 W 



2 001 77 
4 621 45 

1 650 29 

2 782 29 



4 603 14 
4 154 25 
3 410 97 



2 497 85 
6036 85 



3 535 57 
3 050 41 



Tuition 

from 

districts 

under 

contract 

and from 

individual 

pupils not 

paid by 

State 



$1 428 02 
608 15 

162 80 

1 862 71 



1 027 65 
1 306 37 

8 . 



1 132 05 

2 363 11 



1 108 61 
1 391 12 
1 123 44 



476 82 
1 055 24 



1 021 51 
503 62 



3 344 57 
140108 



1 454 32 

1 734 22 

836 35 

2 407 22 



425 02 
523 05 



1046 57 

3 205 26 

256 28 

1 683 56 



1 603 50 

2 237 20 
2 308 60 



852 10 
2 889 86 



1 624 13 
1 572 84 



Tax on 
property 



$82 023 10 
46 941 22 

33 455 52 

133 735 87 



59 773 22 

26 682 09 

27 538 16 



85 882 08 
72 554 71 



36 151 24 
81 812 80 
58 551 74 



24 054 84 
35 748 32 



76 240 68 
48 045 66 



48 691 33 
50 980 53 



80 974 57 
89 928 19 

83 876 01 

415 374 95 



27 024 56 
45 010 41 



40 052 87 
53 706 54 
27 860 93 
34 502 97 



54 780 16 
77 558 10 
70 695 10 



52 269 96 
79 026 93 



96 269 75 
101 425 44 



All other 
sources 



$17 789 89 
1 535 02 

1 325 57 

22 663 38 



7 754 52 
938 58 

1 987 76 



3 123 27 
6 141 23 



1 134 90 
7 363 31 

2 617 51 



1 171 18 
1 447 81 



1 593 96 

2 196 18 



1 586 50 

2 798 90 



10 848 16 
5 518 33 

4940 98 

93 913 36 



683 53 
1 037 66 



934 53 
4 052 19 

514 67 
2 826 14 



6 546 97 
2 767 80 
5 429 80 



2 165 82 
8464 80 



13 784 89 
5 690 76 



Total 



$1392326 50 
77 099 08 

68 744 73 

202 565 58 



91 297 60 
46 714 11 

39 545 23 



120 201 33 
108 102 01 



63 517 57 

126 065 95 

95 005 70 



52 278 01 
70 792 12 



104 681 54 

73 926 01 



86 615 42 

80 788 07 



123 594 33 
127 792 18 

121 109 80 

617 310 18 



43 226 50 
68 610 45 



60 798 44 
92 234 46 
49 721 M 
74 779 61 



89 630 68 
120 665 17 
106 522 60 



77 705 06 
137 538 51 



138 816 98 
142 763 M 



130 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Iable 4 (continued) — STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Financial statement showing receipts and payments 

RECEIPTS 



COMMISSIONER 
.. DISTRICTS 



Orleans oo 

Oswego co. 
|L 1st eom'r dist 
d 2d oom'r dlst. 
L3d eom'r dlst. 

OtWgO.OO. 

L 1st eom'r dlst 
L 2d eom'r dtot. 

Putnam oo 

Rensselaer eo. 
fc, 1st eom'r dist 
ti, 2d oom'r dist. 

Rockland co.... 

St'Lawrence co. 
fe 1st eom'r dist 
C 2d eom'r dlst. 
LSd oom'r dlst. 

Saratoga eo. 
L 1st eom'r dist 
2d oom'r diet. 

8chenectady co. 

Schoharie' eo. 
Sb. 1st oom'r dist 
•.. 2d eom'r dist. 

8chuylereo.... 
Seneca co 

Steuben oo. 
1st oom'r dlst 
2d oom'r dist. 
3d oom'r dbt. 

Suffolk eo. 
1st eom'r dlst 
2d eom'r dist. 

Sullivan eo. 
1st oom'r dlst 
2d eom'r dbt. 

Tioga oo 

Tompkins oo. 
1st eom'r dist 
2d oom'r dlst. 

Ulster eo. 
1st oom'r dist 
2d eom'r dist. 
3d eom'r dist. 

Warreo oo. 
1st eom'r dist 
2d com** dirt. 



lib? ! • 

Balance 

on hand 

Aug. 1, 1908 



$29 820 66 



4*341 31 
4*034 25 
6.368 59 



4 689 83 
7 245 61 

9 537 26 



12 921 94 

5 072 15] 

34.942 34 



9 983 57 
9 196 70 
8 531 70 



6 875 67 
14 786 39 

3229 22 



1 369 56 
3505 44 

41722 26 

101036 99 



6 024 41 
6 393 06 
4726 62 



21 491 39 
32 014 20 



6 455 61 
6 012 67 

11262 86 



1 857 50 
3634 05 



3720 64 
6 831 60 
4 759 68 



5 188 38 
4 930 87 



Public 
money 

received 
for 

teachers' 



$24 843 13 



14 744 35 
17 435 53 
20 850 . 



29 460 51 
29 117 . . 

11 150 . . 



22 399 50 
14 238 .. 

20 925 .. 



29 104 78 
33 082 34 
29 527 74 



24 937 62 

25 993 35 

12 122 64 



16 353 86 

17 091 19 

19 425 .. 

18 150 . . 



26 207 75 
24 693 20 
22 027 03 



19 550 
33 000 



17 371 60 
19 953 81 

32 117 82 



12 098 38 
.14 900 . 



8 046 50 
17 194 42 
19 767 08 



10 275 
14 275 



State aid 
for library, 
apparatus, 
academic 
quota and 
attendance 
and non- 
resident 
tuition 



16 853 53 

1 115 21 

2 481 62 

3 275 22 



5 740 32 
4 399 63 

1 483 46 



3 015 91 
961 76 

4 499 03 



4 989 91 

5 26105 
4 318 13 



3671 02 
2 757 31 

474 69 



1 470 49 

2 533 93 

1 868 74 

3 756 85 



5639 44 
3 110 59 
2 598 84 



4 221 20 
6935 37 



1 697 85 
1092 40 

5 018 04 



1 828 96 
2406 04 



1042 . 
1 835 04 
1815 82 



964 98 
1 113 60 



Tuition 

from 

districts 

under 

eon tract 

and from 

Individual 

pupils not 

paid by 

State 



63 187 74 



739 90 
1 472 21 
1050 47 



2 210 53 
2 146 80 

565 67 



1976 44 
65 . 

2856 42 



1 449 93 
1 780 89 
1 816 84 



1 242 25 
754 16 

420 86 



11236 74 
1.231 19 

719 17 

951 35 



1 944 82 

1 633 34 

445 12 



3295 77 
3795 63 



1 709 40 
1278 54 

192197 



1 590 54 
878 50 



217 50 
495 01 
599 36 



80 . 
114 50 



Tax on 
property 



$103 207 76 



27 021 '33 
24 197;84 
34 278^16 



73 408 50 
51 426 99 

48 456 14 



981054 54 
32 088 77 

171 155 44 



70'575 32 
721538 28 
66.320 29 



86 426 38 
103 385 56 

55 201 04 



27 952 70 
40.518 99 

36 596 90 

68 727 12 



71 799 96 
60 532 87 
37 889 67 



144 359 46 
253 566 56 



35 026 70 
41 824 92 

79 809 46 



17 410 69 
26 118 61 



33 621 74 
54 132 77 
40 730 15 



21 966 61 
25 476 02 



Another 
sources 



$4 556 43 



1 192 67 

211 35 

2772 29 



4 143 71 
9 689 71 

3638 40 



7 226 19 
1275 11 

20 844 54 



3 675 91 
5.949 24 
7 785 39 



4 681 14 
2 875 49 

2589 44 



1063 44 
994 70 

1 268 09 

5 754 23 



7955 80 
3 HI 12 
2 313 99 



10 877 86 
87 363 05 



4390 32 
2 749 91 

18 568 651 



1027 49 
5 408 57 



8 742 30 
2 163 26 
3237 63 



2 966 10 
287 031 



Total 



$172 469 25 



49 154 77 
49 832 80 
68 584 73 



119 653 40 
104 025 74 

74 830 » 



145 504 62 
63 700*1 

255 223 7? 



119 779 43 
127 808 41 
118 300 01 



127 834 
150 562 3 

74 037 9 



49 440 71 
65 965 4 

64 000 * 

107 376 5 



HO 572 9 
90 474 * 

00 4517 



203 705 I 
365 674 I 



66 651 t 
71 912 t 

148 696 1 



35 813 1 

58 340' 



55 390* 
82 153 I 

70 900) 



41 441' 
46 197 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 (continued) — STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
Financial statement showing receipts and payments 

RECEIPTS 





Public 


Am. 1. 1808 


fat 



■J^ 


I tun 43 
3 WO M 

.- 1 ■-. 02 
70 IIS M 

» m 74 














US.". 31 

?'■ ■■■ If 

546 34 

Ml 82 
2S3O0 36 
132 73 
ISMS tl 
17 378 07 
20O2O40 
120 83 










>P*Bj 












ion n 

48*14 

30 7*2 09 
T «S1 05 

S3 847 22 

■■» <K 117 
138 OK 63 
1 8M25 

Mimas 

14 M 433 H 

7 MM 
47 51 








EL" 


















B4<;ot 
U033 so 






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3(33 48 

34 81? 60 

MM 

331 652 06 




EX.::::. 
"««=* 










































































































































































74 487 














































































































































































































































S3 945 28 



122 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4 (concluded) — STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Financial statement showing receipts and payments 

RECEIPTS 



■ 

CITIES 


Balance 

on hand 

Aug. 1, 1908 


Pubiio 
money 

received 
for 

teachers 
wages 


State aid 
for library, 
apparatus, 
academio 
quota and 
attendance 
and non- 
resident 
tuition 


Tuition 

from 

districts 

under 

contract 

and from 

Individual 

puplk not 

paid by 

State 


Tax on 
property 


AQother 
sources 


Total 


Schenectady 


$6 411 03 

241 059 87 

124 97 


$25 325 .. 
52 125 .. 

4 437 50 
22 425 .. 

29 925 .. 
13 925 .. 

5 625 .. 

30 225 .. 


$4 826 07 

6 780 39 
1 071 82 

1 576 . . 

2 294 83 
2 315 05 

760 93 
2 110 80 


$2 408 20 


$359 070 90 
518 024 73 

35 625 37 
259 685 79 
221 849 64 

91 780 .. 

25 343 02 
431 771 65 


$800 .. 

13 532 49 

10 332 88 

2 860 46 

43 610 84 

1 142 03 
20 420 15 

2 606 04 


$396 433 . . 


Syracuse 


883 930 68 


Tonawanda 


51 502 54 


Troy 


760 .. 
1 283 95 
1 210 72 

283 .. 

920 .. 


287 807 25 


Utica 


145 210 41 
35 616 51 
27 104 58 
24 734 85 


444 174 67 


Watertown 


145 989 31 


Watervllet 


79 538 68 




492 868 34 






Total, cities 


$16 300 466 59 
937 462 30 


$2 337 437 49 
2 266 749 25 


$207 533 62 
354 586 58 


$50 705 75 
148 067 85 


$40 018 518 10 
7 687 454 88 


$377 289 15 
765 527 70 


$59 291 950 70 


Total, towns 


12 159 848 56 






Total state. 


$17 237 928 89 


$4 604 186 74 


$562 120 20 


$198 773 60 


$47 705 972 98 


$1 142 816 85 


$71 451 799 26 






N. T. Inst, for the Blind. . . . 


$86 301 68 
294 11 










$416 589 14 

43 635 36 

212 455 .. 


$502 890 82 


N. Y. State School for the 
Blind 










43 929 47 


Normal CoL of the City of 
N.Y 




$5 417 44 






217 872 44 














Total, special schools. . . 


$86 595 79 




$5 417 44 






$672 679 50 


$764 602 73 












s 



i&iipjij&sip 



134 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



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165 





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Exhibit C 

STATISTICAL TABLES GIVING DATA BY COUNTIES ON ELEMENTARY AND SEC 
ONDARY EDUCATION IN THE PRIVATE ACADEMIES IN THE STATE 

Table I Buildings, property, library and teachers 

Table 2 Registration and attendance of pupils 

Table 3 Financial statement showing receipts and expenditures 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 — STATISTICS 

Registration and 



COUNTIES 


no. or pupils over 5 and 

UNDKB 18 TEARS OF AGE 
WHO HAVB BEEN UGJS- 
TEUD DURING XEB TUB 


NO. OF PUPILS OVBJI 

5 and under 18 
ybabs op age pre- 
viously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state thb tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEARS OP AGE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THB TEAR 


no. op pupils over 
18 teabs op age 
previously bmb- 
tmred in other 
schools op this 
state ibb teas 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Albany 00. 

HAnnndarv 


1 667 

215 

1882 

16 
14 
30 

125 

10 

135 

180 

30 

228 

14 
24 
38 

220 

27 

247 

203 

7 

210 

170 

21 

191 


1 733 
443 

2 176 

23 
13 
86 

141 

24 

165 

100 

49 

239 

13 
27 
40 

204 

35 

239 

287 

60 

847 

173 

25 

198 

28 
17 
45 

919 

842 

1 261 

257 

56 

313 

808 

30 

888 

175 

29 

204 


3400 

658 

4058 

39 
27 
66 

266 

34 

800 

379 

88 

467 

27 
61 
78 

424 

62 

486 

490 

67 

557 

343 

46 

889 

28 

93 

121 

1 725 

779 

2504 

502 

74 

576 

576 

40 

816 

319 

52 

871 


21 

6 

27 


50 

8 

53 


71 

9 

80 


25 
25 

24 

34 

58 


3 
96 
99 

9 
27 
36 


3 
121 
124 

33 
61 
94 




3 


3 


Total 




c 


3 


Allegany oo. 

fiennndarv 
















Total 














Broome co. 

Secondary . . . 


• • 




















3 
3 

18 
18 

6 
6 


3 
3 

4 
55 

59 

1 

16 
17 








Total .. . 
















Cattaraugus 00. 

Secondare 




1 


1 


4 

37 
41 

1 

10 
11 














Total 




1 


1 








Cayuga co. 

fWondarv 




. 
















Total 














Chautauqua co. 

Secondary 






















2 
2 


2 
2 








Total 
















Clinton oo. 

Secondary 
























16 
16 


16 
16 








Total 
















Columbia co. 

Secondary 


































Total 




















Dutchess co. 

Elementary 


3 
3 

4 


5 
2 
7 


6 

5 

10 

4 


16 
16 

18 
16 

6 
10 
16 


1 
3 
4 

1 

50 
51 

2 
14 
16 


1 

19 
20 

1 

66 
67 

rs 

24 
32 








Secondary 


76 
76 

806 

437 

1 243 

245 

18 

263 

268 

10 

278 

144 

23 

167 




• 




Total 








Erie co. 

Elementary 

Secondary 














Total 


4 




4 








Essex 00. 

Elementary. ....... 








Secondary ......... 














Total 














Franklin oo. 

Elementary 

Secondary 










4 
* 












1 
1 


1 
1 








" Total 
















Genesee co. 

Elementary. ....... 


2 


2 


4 










Secondary 














Total 


2 


2 


4 




:::::: ::::::i:::::: 







SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



177 



OF ACADEMIES 
attendance of pupils 



AGGREGATE NUMBER Of DATB* ATTEND- 


AGGREGATE DATB* 1 


LTTBNDANCS 


AVERAGE DAJLT 


' ATTBND- 


ATERAGB DAILT AT- 


ANCE Off ALL PUPILS BETWEEN 5 AND 


OP ALL PUPILS OVEE 18 TEARS 


ANCE OP PUPILS BETWEEN 


TENDANCE OP PUPILS 


18TEAB8 


or AGE 




07 AGE 




5 ANE 


» 18 TEARS OP AGE 


OVER 


18 TEARS OP 




















AGE 






Boys 


Gtrb 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


261 242 

32 091 

293 333 


270 084 

74 889 

344 973 


531 326 
106 980 
638 306 


3 997 
3 997 


479 
18 359 
18 838 


479 
22 356 
22 835 


1 392 

173 

1 565 


1 444 

401 

1 845 


2 836 
574 

3 410 


22 
22 


2 
94 
96 


2 
116 
118 


1647 
2297 
3944 


3 455 
2 141 

5596 


5 102 
4 438 
9 540 


3 436 
5 167 
8 603 


1 211 

3 765 

4 976 


4 647 

8 932 

13 579 


9 
12 
21 


18 
11 
29 


27 
23 
50 


18 
27 
45 


6 
20 
26 


24 
47 
71 


18 557 


18 733 

3 447 

22 ISO 


37 290 

4 831 

42 121 








98 

7 

105 


99 

18 

117 


197 

25 

222 








1 384 
19 941 




448 

448 


448 
448 




2 
2 


2 
2 


32 528 


30 709 

8 834 

39 543 


63 237 
16 547 
79 784 


700 

7 738 

8 438 




700 

10 996 

11 696 


175 

36 

211 


185 

46 

231 


360 

82 

442 


4 

35 
39 


17 
17 


4 


7 713 
40 241 


3 25S 
3258 


52 
56 


2 063 


1 787 
4096 
5883 


3850 

7 685 

11 535 


172 
1268 
1 440 




172 
2 133 
2 305 


12 
21 
33 


10 
23 
33 


22 
44 

66 


1 

7 
8 


6 
5 


1 


3589 
5652 


865 
865 


12 
13 


33 319 


30 057 

5029 

35 086 

41 976 

8 717 

50 603 


63 376 

8 887 

72 263 

69 753 

9482 

79 235 








180 

21 

201 

147 
4 

151 


162 

27 

189 

225 

48 
273 


342 

48 

390 

372 

52 

424 








3858 




50 
50 


50 
50 








37 177 








27 777 








765 
28 542 




1 975 
1 975 


1 975 
1 975 




10 
10 


10 
10 


29 361 


26 863 

4 384 

31 247 

47600 
1 380 
6.980 


56 224 

7 823 

64 047 

4 600 
14 820 
19 420 








155 

18 

173 

70 
70 


142 

23 

165 

25 

8 

33 


297 

41 

338 

25 

78 
103 








3439 














32 800 














13*440 
13:440 


2 688 
2 688 


97 
460 
557 


97 
3 148 
3 245 


14 
14 


1 
8 
4 


1 

17 
18 


144 538 


162 790 

54 499 

217 289 


307 328 
123 115 
430 443 


2 648 
2 648 


48 
7 666 
7 714 


48 
10 314 
10 362 


761 

385 

1 146 


847 

298 

1 145 


1 608 
683 

2 291 








68 616 
213 154 


15 
15 


42 
42 


57 
57 


36 148 

2880 

39 028 


40 470 

8 447 

48 917 


76 618 
11 327 
87 945 


583 
1 186 
1 769 


276 

1 777 

2 053 


859 
2963 
3822 


194 

15 

209 


216 

44 

260 


410 

59 

469 


3 
6 
9 


1 

9 

10 


4 

15 
19 


38 404 


47 219 

4 541 

51 760 


85 623 

6 107 

91 730 








194 

8 

202 


239 

24 

263 


433 

32 

466 








1566 
39 970 




113 
113 


113 
113 




1 
1 


i 

1 


20 814 


23 390 
»4 352 
27 742 


44 204 
•7i805 
52*009 








112 

19 

131 


126 

23 

149 


238 

42 

280 








3453 














24 267 















i 7 8 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



COUNTIES 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 5 AND 
UNDEB 18 TEABS OF AGE 
WHO HAVE BBBN REGIS- 
TERED DUaiNO THB YEAR 


no. or pupils oveb 

5 AND UNDEB 18 
YEABS OF AGS 
PBSVIOUSLY REQB- 
TBRBD IN OTHER 
SCHOOLS Or THIS 

state thb tbar 
(duplicates) 


NO. Or PUPILS OVER 
18 TEABS Or AOE 
WHO HAVE BBBN 
BBaBTEBBD DURING. 
TAB TBAB 


NO. Or PUPILS OTBB 
18 TEABS Of AGE 

pbbyioublt rbob- 
tbrbd in other 
schools op thb 
state thb thar 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Greene co. 


116 

12 

128 

264 

16 

280 

142 

21 

163 

35 

2 

37 

15 
37 
52 


126 

12 

138 

306 

42 

350 

143 

64 

207 

60 

5 

65 

13 
41 
54 


242 
24 

266 

572 

58 

630 

285 

85 

370 

85 

7 

92 

28 

78 

106 








































Total 




















Herkimer eo. 








































Total 




















Jefferson eo. 

Elementary 








3 

7 

10 


1 
5 
6 


4 

12 
16 






















Total 














Lewis oo. 














Secondary 




















Total 




















Livingston co. 








9 
63 
72 


1 

53 
54 


10 
116 
126 






















Total 














Madison co. 

Elementary 














Secondary 


50 
60 

81 

82 

163 

340 

51 

391 

38 

6 

44 

3 168 
5253 

8 421 

10 
47 
57 

406 

78 
484 

917 

221 

1 138 


10 
10 

181 
209 
390 

325 

38 

383 

32 
12 
44 

4828 
1 834 
6 662 

5 
41 
46 

552 

146 
698 

854 
115 
969 


60 
60 

262 
291 
553 

665 

89 

754 

70 

18 
88 

7996 

7 087 

15 083 

15 

88 

103 

958 

224 

1 182 

1 771 
336 

2 107 


1 
1 




1 
1 


93 
93 

53 

85 

138 


4 
4 

13 
27 

40 


97 
97 

66 
112 
178 








Total 








Monroe eo. 

Elementary .... . . 






















Total 














Montgomery co. 

Elementary 














Secondary 








1 
1 

1 
4 
5 

4 

592 
596 


1 
1 

2 
336 
838 


1 
1 

1 
5 
6 

6 
928 
934 








Total 














Nassau co. 

Elementary 














Secondary 














Total 














N. Y. (Greater) 

Secondary 


272 
183 
455 


270 

9 

279 


542 
192 
734 


1 

9 
10 




1 
9 


Total 


10 


Niagara co. 

Secondary 




15 
15 

3 
1 
4 

71- 


7 


15 
15 

3 
1 
4 

78 
20 
9S 


89 
89 




89 
89 








Total 








Oneida co. 

Secondary 




















Total 














Onondaga co. 

Elementary 

Secondary 


6 
169 
175 


12 
19 
31 


18 
188 
206 








191 1 
90 8 


14 
14 




14 


Total 


14 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



179 



TICS OF ACADEMIES 

attendance of pupils 



AGGREGATE NUMBER OF DATS* ATTEND- 
ANCE OF ALL PUPILS BETWEEN 5 AND 
18 TEABS OP AGB 


AGGREGATE DATS* ATTENDANCE 
OP ALL PUPILS OVER 18 TSARS 
OP AGB 


AVERAGE DAILY ATTEND- 
ANCE OP PUPILS BBTWBBN 
5 AND 18 TEABS OP AON 


AVERAGE DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OP PUPILS 
OVBR 18 TSARS OP 
AQB 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Oirls 


Total 


Boys 


Girb 


Total 


BOVB 


Girb 


Total 


15 004 


17 522 

1 752 

19 274 

58 705 

6387 

65 002 

23 872 
10 857 
34 720 

10 155 

802 

10 057 

1 755 
6040 
8 605 


33 428 

3 507 

36 033 

100 052 

070 
118 122 

45 826 
14 180 
60 015 

16 823 

1 170 
18 002 

3 404 
12 645 
16 130 








80 
10 
99 

253 

18 

266 

114 

17 
131 

33 

2 

35 

9 
80 
39 


97 

10 

107 

295 
32 

327 

125 

53 
178 

49 

5 

54 

9 
37 
46 


186 

20 
206 

45 
593 

239 

70 

809 

82 

7 

89 

IS 
67 
85 








1 755 














17 650 














50 347 














2 683 














53 030 














21 054 

3332 

25 286 

6 666 


298 

on 

1 200 


80 
773 
862 


387 

1 684 

2 071 


2 
5 

7 


4 

4 


2 



11 


377 














7 045 














1 739 
5705 
7444 


1 385 

146 
10 531 


185 
7 857 
8042 


1 570 

17 003 

18 573 


7 

48 
55 


1 
41 
42 


8 
80 
07 


7 650 
7650 

12 868 

13 007 
25 875 

65 073 


1 208 
1 208 

30 104 
34 612 
64 806 

61 600 

7456 

60 146 

4 781 
1 814 

6 505 

770 060 

276 024 

1 055 003 

704 

7 476 

8 270 

01085 

25 067 

116 152 

130 130 

17 768 

1561808 


8858 
8858 

43 062 

47 610 
90 681 

126 763 

16 105 
142 058 

10 040 

2 752 

12 702 

1 252 811 

1 100 346 

2 353 157 

2 215 
14 075 

17 190 

157 311 

33 709 

191 080 

284 012 

48 685 
333 547 


15 271 
15 271 

5 620 
13 251 
18 880 


500 
500 

036 
4 044 
5880 


i5 870 
15 870 

6565 
18 105 
24 760 


43 
43 

70 

72 

142 

327 

44 

371 

29 

5 

34 

2 588 
4 573 
7 161 

8 
41 
49 

347 

46 

393 

771 
168 
939 


6 
6 

162 
185 
347 

310 

37 

347 

27 
10 
37 

4 173 
1 526 
5699 

4 
40 
44 

474 
130 
604 

739 

96 

835 


49 
49 

232 
257 
489 

637 

81 

718 

56 
15 

71 

6 761 

6099 

12 860 

12 
81 
93 

821 
178 
907 

1 510 

264 

1 774 


88 
86 

31 

73 

104 


u 

3 

6 
26 
31 


80 
80 

36 

00 

135 


8 730 


105 
195 

160 
590 
750 

504 
04 450 
04 063 




105 
105 

160 
750 
028 

843 

147 753 

148 506 


1 
1 

1 
3 
4 

3 
510 
522 


1 
1 

2 
296 
298 


1 


73 812 




1 


5 250 




1 


038 
6 107 

473 742 

823 422 

1297 164 

1 421 


ieo 

160 

330 
53 294 
53 633 


4 

5 

5 
815 
820 


7499 
8920 

66 226 


16 051 
16 051 




16 051 
16 051 


88 
88 




88 




88 






8 702 














74 928 














145 782 

30 967 

1761649 


002 

26 011 

27 003 


1 575 

2 373 
3048 


2 567 
20 284 
31 851 


5 
151 
156 



14 
23 


14 

165 

1 170 



i8o 



NEW YORK STAT^: EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (continued) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



COUNTIES 


NO. OF PUPIL* OVER 5 AND 
UNDER 18 TEARS OF AGE 
WHO HAVB BERN REGIS- 
TERED DURING THE TEAR 


NO. OF PUPILS OYER 
5 AND UNDBB 18 
TEARS Or AGS 
PREVIOUSLY REGIS- 
TERED IN OTHBB 
SCHOOL* Of THB 

state isis tbab 
(duplicates) 


NO. Or PUPILS OYKB 
18 TEAKS OP AOE 
WHO HAVB BEEN 
RBGISTBBED DURING 
THE TBAB 


NO. OF PUPTLS OVER 

18 tears op age 
previously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op thb 
state thb tbar 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Ontario co. 


1 


12 

8 
20 

195 

84 
279 

6 
14 
20 

30 
42 
72 

1 876 
319 

2 195 

HI 

6 

117 

396 

76 

472 

221 

7 

228 

23 
23 
46 

231 

19 

250 

184 

38 

222 


13 

8 

21 

326 
185 
511 

21 
28 
49 

30 
42 
72 

3839 

582 

4 421 

207 

9 

216 

737 
116 
853 

445 

16 

461 

43 
47 
90 

473 

38 

511 

184 

38 

222 




















Secondary 




















Total 


1 

131 
101 
232 

15 
14 
29 




















Or&njn co. 

Elementary 


1 
2 
3 




1 
2 
3 














Secondary 


19 

19 


7 
7 

1 
4 

5 


26 
26 

1 

10 
11 








Total 








Otsegpco. 

Elementary 








Secondary 








6 
6 








Total 














Putnam co. 

Elementary 


























8 
8 

54 
54 


8 
8 

1 

99 

100 








Total 


















Rensselaer co. 

Secondary 


1 963 
263 

2 226 

96 

3 

99 

341 

40 
381 

224 

9 

233 

20 
24 
44 

242 

19 

261 


6 


1 


7 


1 

45 
46 


1 
1 

2 




1 
1 


Total 


6 


1 


7 


2 


Rockland co. 

Elementary 




Secondary 




















Total 




















St Lawrence co. 

Secondary 


4 


3 


7 


1 

10 
11 


16 
16 


1 

26 
27 














Total 


4 


3 


7 








Schenectady oo. 

Secondary 


























Total 




















Schuyler co. 

Secondary 








12 
23 
35 


10 

7 

17 


22 
30 
52 




















Total 














Steuben co. 

Secondary 
































Total 




















Suffolk co. 










32 
32 
64 


32 
32 
64 








Secondary 


















Total 


















Tompkins co. 




















30 
30 

464 

65 

529 


533 

88 

021 


30 
30 

997 

153 

1 150 








50 
50 

6 
11 
17 


9 
9 


50 
50 

6 
20 
26 








Total 














Warren co. 














Secondary' 














Total 















SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



181 



TICS OF ACADEMIES 
attendance of pupil* 



AGGREGATE NUMBER OF DATS* ATTEND- 
ANCE Or ALL PUPILS BETWEEN 5 AND 
18 TSARS OP AGE 


AGGREGATE DATS* ATTENDANCE 
OP ALL PUPILS OVER 18 TEARS 
OP AGE 


AVERAGE DAILT ATTEND- 
ANCE OP PUPILS BETWEEN 
5 AND 18 TEAB8 OP AQB 


AVERAGE DAILT AT- 
TENDANCE OF PUPILS 
OVER 18 TEARS OP 

AGE 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


60 


1 896 
1 221 

3 117 

28 424 
14 139 
42 563 

791 

1 925 

2 716 

4 375 
6650 

11 025 

300 084 

51 752 

351 836 

18 887 
849 

19 736 

62 678 

12 192 
74 870 

31 825 
726 

32 551 

2 164 

3 675 
5839 

78 988 

3 376 

82 364 

23 684 

6403 

30 087 


1 956 
1221 

3 177 

48 780 
30 658 
79 438 

2 575 

3 869 
6444 

4 375 
6 650 

11 025 

610 605 

93 720 

704 325 

35 375 
1 413 

36 788 

114 569 

19 025 

133 594 

63 451 

1 686 

65 137 

4 273 
6 954 

11 227 

162 069 

6 730 

168 799 

23 684 

6 403 

30 087 










11 

7 

18 

155 

78 
233 

4 
11 
15 

25 
38 
63 

1 620 

287 

1 907 

99 
4 

103 

338 

66 

404 

171 

4 

175 

12 
20 
32 

220 

18 

238 

• 

133 

35 

168 


11 

7 
18 

267 
171 
438 

14 
22 
36 

25 
38 
63 

3290 

616 

3 806 

185 

7 

192 

618 
103 
721 

341 

9 

350 

23 
38 

61 

448 

36 

484 

133 

35 

168 
























60 
















20 356 








112 

93 
205 

10 
11 
21 








16 519 
36 875 

1 784 
1 944 
3728 


3 174 
3 174 

754 
754 


1 253 
1 253 

90 
545 
635 


4427 
4 427 

90 
1 299 
1 389 


18 

18 

4 
4 




25 
25 

1 

7 
8 




164 
6925 
7089 


1 225 
1 225 


1 225 
1 225 

164 
15 599 
15 763 


1 670 

229 

1 899 

86 

3 

89 

280 

37 

817 

170 

5 

175 

11 
18 
29 

228 

18 

248 


1 
39 

40 


52 
52 


7 




7 


310 521 


1 


41 968 
352 489 

16 488 


8 674 
8 674 


91 
92 


564 














17 052 














51 891 


104 
602 
706 




104 
1 930 
2034 


1 
3 
4 


7 
7 


1 


6833 
58 724 

31 628 


1 328 
1 328 


10 
11 


960 














32 586 














2 109 

3 279 
5388 

83 081 


871 

2 991 

3 862 


320 

808 

1 128 


1 191 
3 799 
4990 


5 
16 
21 


2 
4 

6 


7 

20 
27 


3 354 














86 435 


















4648 

5 545 

10 193 


4648 

5 545 

10 193 




25 
30 
55 


25 




30 




55 






3 818 




3 818 
8 818 

140 714 

23 838 

164 552 


6640 
6640 

603 

1 598 

2 201 




6640 
6640 

603 
2 701 
3304 


23 
23 

341 

53 

394 


402 

75 

477 


23 
23 

743 
128 
871 


40 
40 

3 

9 

12 


6 
6 


40 


3 818 






40 


65 262 


75 452 

' 13 881 
) 80 333 




3 


9 951 
75 2K 


1 103 
1 103 


15 

18 



182 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 2 (concluded) — STATIS- 

Registration and 



COUNTIES 


no. or pupils orai 5 and 

UNDER 18 TUBS 07 AGB 
WHO HAVE BEEN REGIS- 
TERED DURING IRE TEAR 


no. op pupils over 
5 and under 18 
tears op age 
previously regis- 
tered in other 
schools op this 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 


NO. OP PUPILS OVER 
18 TEABS OP AGE 
WHO HAVE BEEN 
REGISTERED DURING 
THE TEAR 


no. op pupils otkr 
18 tears op age 
previously bbgrv 
terbd in other 
schools op this 
state this tear 
(duplicates) 




Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Boys 


Glrfa 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Glrb 


Total 


Washington oo. 


























Secondary 




34 
34 

138 

61 

197 

16 
15 
31 


34 
34 

245 
274 
519 

35 
S8 
73 










17 
17 


17 
17 








Total 


















Westchester eo. 

Secondary 


109 
213 
322 

19 
23 
42 




3 


8 










3D 

30 

7 
43 
50 


4 

33 
. 37 


30 
30 

11 

76 
87 








Totol 




3 


3 








Yates oo. 

Elementary 

Secondary 




















Total 






























13 224 
7 601 


15 838 
4 553 


29 062 
12 154 


384 
230 


342 
15 


726 
245 


13S 
1 4S8 


92 

m 


230 
2 356 


2 
24 


3 


5 
24 


Total, academies.... 


20 825 


20 391 


41 216 


614 


357 


971 


1 626 


960 


2 586 


26 


3 


29 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



183 



TICS OF ACADEMIES 
attendance of pupils 



AQGRSGATB NUMNB OF DATB* ATTIND- 
ANCS OF ALL PUPILS BBTWIEN 5 AND 
18 TBABB Or AOB 


AQGBSGATB DATS' ATTINDANCX 
Or ALL PUPILS OTBB 18 YBABS 
OP AGK 


AYBBAGB OAILT ATTEND- 
ANCE or PUPILS BBTWBBN 
5 AND 18 TBABS 0/ AOS 


AVBBAGS DAILT AT- 
TBNDANCB Or PUPILS 
OYIB 18 TBABB OP 
AGS 


Boys 


Gtrb 


Total 


Boys 


Girl* 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 




























4 200 
4200 

18 188 

8 872 

27 060 

2 267 
2 197 
4 464 


4200 
4200 

36 128 
44 396 

80 524 

5 382 

4 920 

10 302 




2 600 
2 500 


2 500 
2 500 


92 

182 
274 

16 
15 
31 


24 
24 

102 

50 

152 

12 

12 
24 


24 
24 

194 
232 
426 

28 
27 
55 




14 
14 


14 




14 


17 940 




35 £24 


5 110 
5 110 

1 793 
5 305 
7098 




5 110 
5 110 

2 699 

8 427 

11 126 


25 
25 

9 
29 
38 


5 
1G 
21 


25 


53 454 




25 


3 115 
2 723 
5838 


906 
3 122 
4028 


14 
45 
59 


2 117 614 
1 187 210 


2 570 588 
715 877 


4 688 202 
1 908 087 


17 403 
234 576 


11 190 
134 848 


28 602 
369 424 


11 033 
6540 


13 50G 
3 890 


24 589 
10 430 


94 
1 283 


60 
734 


154 
2 017 


3 304 824 


3 286 405 


6 591 289 


251 979 


146 047 


398 026 


17 623 


17 396 


35 019 


1 377 


794 


2 171 



184 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



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192 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Exhibit D 

Comparative statistics in detail 

SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

The number of school districts in the towns of the State July 
31, 1908, and July 31, 1909, was: 

1909 10 592 

1908 10 595 

Decrease 3 



SCHOOLHOUSES 

The number of schoolhouses, with their classification according 
to the materials of which they are constructed, was as follows at 
the close of the years 1908 and 1909: 

1009 Log Frame Brick Stone Total 

Cities 212 982 9 1 203 

Towns 10 9 55s 1 010 391 10 866 

Total 10 9 767 1 992 300 12 069 

1008 Log Frame Brick Stone Total 

Cities 220 966 8 1 194 

Towns 11 9596 1000 291 10898 

Total 11 9816 1966 299 12093 



The following table shows a steady improvement in the character 
of school buildings in respect to the material with which they were 
constructed during the period from 1865 to 1909: 

Log 
1865 202 

1875 90 

1885 70 

1895 33 

1905 " 

I906 II 

I907 II 

I908 II 

I909 IO 



Frame 


Brick 


Stone 


Total 


9 874 1 


[ OIO 


532 i 


[I 6l8 


10 004 i 


t 255 


439 > 


[I 788 


10 083 i 


t 386 


373 .1 


LI 912 


10 072 j 


1 575 


305 i 


[I 985 


9 839 > 


[ 867 


288 ] 


[2 005 


9 787 1 


t 961 


287 ] 


[2 O46 


9 806 i 


c 958 


293 i 


C2 068 


9 816 ] 


[ 966 


299 i 


[2 092 


9 767 j 


[ 992 


300 i 


[2 069 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



193 



The following table shows for each commissioner district and 
city of the State, the number of children of school age residing in 
district for each qualified teacher; the whole number of children 
attending school any portion of the year for each qualified teacher; 
the average daily attendance per teacher; the percentage of daily 
attendance based on total enrolment; cost per pupil based on 
average daily attendance : 



COUNTIES 


1 

! 

E 

a 
8 


No. of children in district 
over 5 and under 18 years 
of age for each qualified 
teacher 


Whole no. of children 
attending school any por- 
tion of the year for each 
qualified teacher 


Average dally attendance 
per teacher 


Percentage of daily attend- 
ance based on total 
enrolment 


Cost per pupil based on 
average daily attendance 




1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 


33 
13 
44 

18 

24 

21 

22 

23 

26 

23 

22 

17 

20 

31 

24 

21 

20 

17 

34 

32 

35 

28 

28 

19 

20 

19 

17 

33 

34 

43 

36 

28 

24 

26 

32 

32 

25 

31 

30 

23 

19 

25 

24 

19 

23 

22 

18 

23 

80 

24 


33 

18 

38 

20 

26 

22 

24 

23 

25 

24 

24 

21 

21 

29 

26 

23 

22 

19 

32 

35 

32 

27 

28 

20 

20 

24 

19 

31 

31 

32 

32 

28 

25 

24 

32 

31 

24 

30 

28 

25 

19 

25 

27 

21 

24 

24 

19 

23 

28 

22 




23 

12 

26 

14 

19 

15 

17 

15 

19 

17 

16 

15 

15 

21 

18 

16 

17 

13 

20 

19 

20 

18 

19 

14 

15 

15 

14 

21 

21 

22 

23 

18 

17 

17 

23 

22 

16 

21 

19 

17 

13 

18 

21 

14 

17 

17 

12 

16 

20 

15 


69.8 

65.2 

69.4 

68.3 

73.3 

67.4 

70.8 

68.1 

76.5 

72.8 

67.0 

69.7 

69.0 

74.0 

70.5 

68.2 

73.9 

68.1 

62.5 

55.6 

62.1 

67.1 

68.2 

67.9 

71.9 

62.6 

70.6 

69.3 

67.3 

69.5 

71.5 

65.6 

66.7 

69.8 

69.8 

69.9 

64.7 

70.9 

68.3 

68.6 

67.6 

73.9 

75.6 

66.6 

67.7 

71.7 

64.5 

66.3 

70.8 

71.6 


$28 01 


• 


84 68 

31 38 
39 51 




33 77 
33 66 




33 64 
33 29 




32 71 

32 72 

33 73 




33 32 
40 19 




31 37 
30 68 
34 85 




1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


33 43 


Clinton 


39 99 
25 19 


Columbia 


20 29 
26 16 
30 10 


Cortland 


33 69 
30 68 




32 71 
36 74 




38 73 
33 78 


Erie 


32 75 

33 44 




27 71 
27 77 
36 79 


Franklin 


37 54 
31 35 




23 .. 
30 36 






39 88 




1 
2 


37 41 




28 56 
53 42 




1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


38 30 




32 46 

33 10 




36 91 
30 25 
34 02 




29 73 
83 92 




36 50 



194 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEtAOTMENT 



COUNTIES 



Madison. 
Monroe. 



Montgomery. 

Nassau 

Niagara 



Oneida. 



Onondaga. 



Ontario , 
Orange. 



Orleans , 
Oswego, 



Otsego. 



Putnam.. . 
Rensselaer. 



Rockland . . . 
St Lawrence. 



Saratoga.... 

Schenectady. 
Schoharie . . . 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

Steuben 



Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins . . 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Westchester , 

Wyoming . . 
Yates 



1 
2 
1 
2 



1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
4 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 



1 
2 
3 
1 
2 



1 
2 



1 
2 
3 
1 
2 

i 

2 



1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 

i 

2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 




18 
22 
35 
37 
26 
42 
33 
32 
31 
24 
22 
17 
26 
29 
27 
28 
25 
37 
33 
31 
28 
22 
19 
18 
19 
27 
35 
28 
46 
22 
22 
26 
30 
29 
33 
20 
21 
21 
30 
23 
19 
20 
34 
38 
20 
20 
22 
18 
19 
48 
39 
33 
31 
24 
23 
29 
24 
28 
42 
45 
38 
26 
20 
23 



20 
24 
35 
31 
27 
38 
28 
32 
29 
25 
23 
19 
27 
27 
27 
28 
24 
36 
32 
28 
29 
23 
21 
21 
20 
28 
29 
28 
39 
24 
25 
26 
30 
29 
32 
22 
24 
22 
25 
28 
26 
21 
35 
36 
31 
34 
22 
19 
20 
42 
38 
33 
24 
25 
26 
28 
25 
32 
37 
35 
35 
26 
22 
25 



14 
17 
25 
21 
19 
28 
18 
21 
21 
18 
16 
13 
19 
20 
19 
20 
17 
25 
22 
20 
19 
16 
15 
14 
14 
19 
22 
19 
29 
17 
17 
18 
21 
21 
22 
14 
17 
15 
18 
16 
17 
14 
26 
26 
21 
22 
16 
13 
14 
28 
23 
22 
16 
17 
19 
20 
18 
21 
27 
27 
26 
20 
16 
17 



71.8 
72.1 
70.8 
69.6 
71.3 
72.0 
66.1 
67.1 
73.2 
72.3 
68.9 
67.6 
71.8 
73.6 
72.3 
70.0 
70.1 
67.3 
68.3 
71.8 
66.7 
70.0 
68.5 
69.1 
72.0 
68.9 
75.5 
65.9 
73.9 
69.2 
69.0 
67.9 
71.6 
73.2 
70.1 
65.2 
68.8 
71.3 
72.9 
72.1 
68.4 
67.6 
75.6 
73.4 
68.6 
65.7 
72.9 
68.4 
69.7 
66.0 
62.0 
66.6 
64.8 
66.7 
73.6 
70.3 
71.1 
67.2 
74.6 
75.0 
72.0 
76.2 
70.9 
66.1 



138 96 

31 49 

29 08 

32 10 

34 15 
45 95 
27 75 

25 03 
27 .. 
31 88 

27 13 

35 23 

30 51 

31 20 

34 76 

29 53 
42 24 

33 14 

36 74 

32 33 

26 22 
26 18 
31 90 
42 87 
39 68 

37 77 

35 86 
26 54 

35 34 
31 03 

30 42 

30 14 

28 22 

31 73 

34 29 
34 17 

32 60 
31 52 

36 40 

34 80 

28 87 
31 74 

37 26 
39 64 
26 56 

22 96 
36 98 

36 66 

33 63 

29 57 

23 34 
23 43 

35 40 

28 43 

29 61 

30 70 

34 46 
30 62 
67 04 
60 24 

37 28 
29 85 
33 62 
33 15 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



195 



CITIES 


No. of children in city over 
5 and under 18 years of 
age for each qualified 
teacher 


Whole no. of children 
attending school any por- 
tion of the year for each 
qualified teacher 


Average daily attendance 
per teacher 


Percentage of daily attend- 
ance Dased on total 
enrolment 


Cost per pupil based on 
average daily attendance 


Albany 


49 
53 
42 
38 
65 
78 
62 
41 
52 
38 
38 
36 
40 
37 
41 
41 
36 
42 
39 
54 
74 
54 
39 
39 
45 
52 
43 
64 
45 
41 
62 
43 
46 
38 
64 
66 
44 
50 
39 
50 
46 
40 
57 
50 
47 
49 
36 
54 
45 


35 
37 
27 
35 
43 
35 
37 
88 
30 
30 
39 
24 
36 
37 
35 
37 
36 
40 
37 
38 
44 
35 
33 
36 
39 
35 
36 
42 
31 
29 
33 
34 
41 
37 
37 
38 
42 
38 
33 
35 
37 
34 
41 
40 
27 
34 
34 
31 
37 


28 
31 
22 
28 
31 
26 
29 
33 
25 
25 
33 
19 
28 
30 
27 
30 
29 
32 
30 
29 
30 
29 
27 
29 
30 
28 
28 
34 
24 
24 
28 
28 
32 
26 
29 
29 
33 
30 
26 
28 
31 
29 
31 
32 
23 
26 
28 
26 
31 


80.4 
85.6 
84.3 
82.7 
71.4 
74.1 
80.5 
86.7 
83.3 
81.9 
82.6 
80.4 
77.4 
79.6 
78.5 
80.7 
81.7 
81.9 
81.9 
77.9 
67.2 
81.2 
81.9 
81.1 
76.7 
82.2 
79.5 
79.4 
79.3 
81.3 
84.5 
83.5 
78.7 
69.4 
79.9 
76.9 
77.3 
78.0 
80.3 
81.1 
83.5 
82.1 
76.1 
78.4 
83.3 
76.6 
81.1 
84.4 
82.6 


• $37 89 


Amsterdam 


31 30 


Auburn 


44 22 


Ptnghamton 


27 04 


Buffalo 


40 88 


Gohoes 


33 62 


Corning 


37 65 


Cortland 


43 66 


Dunkirk 


62 35 


Elmira 


36 19 


Fulton 


23 66 


Geneva 


51 68 


Glens Falls 


47 70 


Gloversville 


42 67 




36 08 


Hudson 


29 40 


Ithaca 


45 74 


Jamestown 


35 76 




28 14 


Kingston .... 


36 50 


Lackawanna 


53 14 


Little Falls 


38 08 


Lockport 


32 25 


Middletown 


35 78 


Mount Vernon 


55 19 




83 61 


New Rochelle 


47 77 


New York 


60 48 


Niagara Falls 


37 06 


North Tonawanda 


50 95 


Ogdensburg 


28 59 


Olean 


38 79 


Oneida 


31 26 


Oneonta 


44 77 


Oswego 


25 47 


Plattiburg 


28 79 


Port Jervfs 


27 45 


Poughkeepsie 


31 08 


Rensselaer , 


38 38 




42 64 


Rome 


28 56 


Schenectady 


33 98 




35 01 




36 40 


Troy 


56 52 


Utica 


42 87 


Watertown 


28 65 


Watervliet 


33 02 




49 13 








60 


41 


32 


79.1 


54 72 




27 


27 


19 


70.1 


34 47 


Average for State 


47 


35 


27 


76.2 


48 81 







I96 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

REGISTRATION 

The number of pupils registered in the several classes of schools, 
during the year was as follows : 

Common schools 1 386 712 

Academies 42 802 

Normal schools 6 494 

Training classes and schools 3 579 

Indian schools 870 

Private schools (estimated) 225 000 

Special schools 3 870 

Evening schools 132 410 

Total 1 801 737 



i., ; j 



TEACHERS LICENSES 

The following statement shows by what authority the teachers 
employed in the schools were licensed: 

Train- Oommis- 
College ing class sioners. 

Normal State graduate and train- or local Other 

1909 school certificates certificates ing school authority licenses Total 

Cities 4 514 2 422 1 787 6 293 9 996 186 25 198 

Towns 4 092 338 1 070 s 991 5 883 700 18 074 

Total 8 606 2 760 2 857 12 284 15 879 886 43 272 



T" 



Train- Commis- 
Oollege ing class doners, 
Normal State graduate and train- or local Other 
r* 1908 school certificates ^certificates Lingjschooi;[authorlty^Llioense8 Total 

Cities 4 381 2 677 2 247 5 456 9 739 162 24 662 

Towns. . — 4 046 293 916 5 881 5 864 926 17 926 

Total 8 427 2 970 3 163 11 337 15 603 1 088 42 588 



^ . 1 



The apportionment for the school year 1908-9 is as follows: 

District and teachers quotas $4 601 479 69 

Supervision in cities and villages 68 000 . . 

Supplementary apportionment 13 061 45 

Indian schools 5 250 . . 

Library and apparatus 141 479 18 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT I97 

Academic attendance $204 616 21 

Academic quota 64 700 . . 

Nonresident tuition 165 566 78 

Training schools and classes 113 402 . . 

Total $5 377 555 3i 



By deducting from the totals, under the head of payments, the 
sum remaining on hand July 31, 1908, it appears that the actual 
expense of maintaining the common schools during the year was 
as follows: 

Cities $42 839 527 99 

Towns 11 123 355 42 

Total $53 962 883 41 

Corresponding total for 1908 55 252 349 25 

Decrease $1 289 465 84 



Payments from all appropriations made to the Education De- 
partment for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 1908, and ending 
September 30, 1909: 

Salaries $338 141 . . 

Albany Normal College — new building 96 409 87 

Care and cleaning 10 677 34 

Educational Extension Division, traveling libraries. 6 377 80 

Indian schools — maintenance and betterments 19 537 06 

Indian youth in normal schools 458 72 

Office expenses 12 070 99 

Postage and transportation 26 023 20 

Printing 29 652 44 

Professional examinations 41 266 57 

Rent of malthouse 1 200 . . 

School commissioners' salaries 112 872 20 

Science Division expenses 7 439 14 

State Library — books for blind 1 044 83 

Law library 2 659 08 

Medical library 2 158 27 



I98 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

State Library — purchase of books $20 097 23 

State Library elevator — repairs 17 95 

Teachers institutes, expenses 23 339 18 

Temporary services .' 12 556 68 

Training classes 113 402 . . 

Traveling expenses 17 802 64 

Visual Instruction — purchase of slides and nega- 
tives 9 563 34 

Normal schools — maintenance and betterments 

Albany 62 485 44 

Brockport 35 9 2 5 6 3 

Buffalo 33 235 22 

Cortland 48 941 45 

Fredonia 41 681 25 

Geneseo 50 598 95 

New Paltz 43 on 84 

Oneonta 46 655 81 

Oswego 38 094 63 

Plattsburg 34 967 . . 

Potsdam 44 293 46 

Apportionments and grants 

Cities, academies, academic departments and li- 
braries 576 362 17 

Common schools 4 686 547 73 

Grants to libraries 30 826 50 

Iron ore deposits 470 01 

Onondaga Indian reservation — new school- 
house 432 75 

Onondaga Indian reservation — schoolhouse ap- 
paratus and supplies 1 000 . . 

Trades schools — expenses 1 450 91 

Indian deaf mutes 300 . . 

New Paltz Normal School — equipment and 

grading ' 14 934 65 

Albany Normal College — equipment 3 094 . . 

Total $6 700 076 93 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT I99 

The total expenditures for the maintenance of our public schools 
in each of the years mentioned, from 1850 to the present time, is 
shown in the following table: 

1850 $1 607 684 85 

x 86o 3 744 246 95 

l &70 9 905 514 22 

1880 10 296 977 26 

1890 17 392 471 61 

I 9<>o 33 421 491 37 

*9<>i 36 395 269 52 

1902 37 369 017 88 

1903 41 418 095 85 

1904 43 7SO 276 83 

1905 47 803 672 33 

1906 52 271 860 83 

1907 S3 928 675 86 

1908 ss 252 349 25 

1909 53 962 883 41 



The following table shows the number of volumes reported in 
the school libraries by 10 year periods and the amounts appro- 
priated and expended for such libraries for each year given: 

No. of volumes Appropriated Expended 

1853 i 604 210 $55000 $49 499 39 

i860 1 266 536 55 000 34 035 87 

1870 986 697 55 000 30 651 82 

1880 735 653 50 000 30 398 51 

1890 787 972 50 000 49 890 05 

1900 1 560 858 55 000 142 158 3S 

1901 1 665 826 55 000 140 883 78 

1902 1 716 128 55 000 192 211 55 

1903 1 7,17 95 1 55000 15829508 

1904 2 009 820 55 000 258 547 81 

1905 2 138 959 100 000 226 937 91 

1906 2 435 897 251 936 10 

1907 2 576 910 218 729 94 

1908 2 664 478 213 021 48 

1909. 2 919 856 285 156 61 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Exhibit E 

School Commissioners for the Term of Three Years Ending December 

31, 1911 

Ranted to Aiifiut 15, 1900 





■ 


„„».„„„ 






Ravena 






























; hen on go Fork* 












Randolph 
















Union Sprinjri 


















Norwich 






KeeMvill* 
Ellen huru 
Mooeri Porka 
CIbveikcIc 






Marathon 

Homer 
Haywood 
Davenport Center 
LaGimnfevQle 
Rbinebeck 

East Aurora 

Sprinjfvillc 
Keeseville 
Crown Point 
Saranac Lakr 

Btoadalbin 

^takfll 

Nonhville 
Hinckley 
































































Canaatota 
Fairport 
Adami Basin 
Fonda 




> 


Ransom ville 
New York Mill! 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



201 



School commisaioners {ooncluded) 



COUNTY 



Onondaga 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orleans 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Putnam 

Rensselaer... . 

Rockland 

St Lawrence . . 



Com'r 
Dist. 



Saratoga, 



Schenectady . 
Schoharie . . . 

Schuyler. . . . 

Seneca 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins . . . 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington.. 



Wayne 

Westchester . 

Wyoming. . . 
Yates 



z 
a 

3 

x 

a 
z 

a 

■ • 

x 

a 

3 

x 
a 

» • 

x 

a 

x 

a 

3 

I 

a 

z 
a 



x 
a 

3 

x 

a 
z 
a 



a 
z 
a 

3 

x 

a 
z 
a 

z 
a 
x 
a 

3 
x 

9 



NAMS 



aManford D. Green 
oCharles W. Lanning . . . 

Jacob L. Wright 

aWillis A. Ingalls 

Jesse A. Wheeler 

aGeorge W. Flood 

a William P. Kaufmann, 

ajohn M. Brown 

a Warren S. Gardner. . . 
aWillard C. Richards. . . 
aHerman W. Kandt 

John B. McManus 

oMay Firman 

ojames H. Brooks 

Clinton W. Scriven . . . . 
aEdwin S. Comstock. . . 
aHerman T. Hopper. . . 

a William T. Clark 

a Forrest H. Gibbons . . . 

aAlbert I. Fields 

oEdward S. Coons 

Theodore Elixman 

oTames Wingate 

M. Burr Mann 

Frank M. Hix 

ajane Mae Hazing 

aWilmer S. Wilson 

Robert J. MaGill 

frGeorge M. Riffle 

aLeslie A. Baker 

oCharles H. Howell 

aEdwin S. Moore 

aTames Hall 

Voleny R. Voorhiea. . . . 

Arthur E. Belden 

Fred A. Beardsley 



POST oppicb 



aHattie K. Buck 

aBdmund M. Wilber. 

Emily S. Burnett 

aThomas C. Perry. . . 

Franklin F. Gunn 

Brwin L. Stafford 

oGrant J. Tefft 

aMyra L. Ingalsbe . . . 



alda E. Cosad 

aAlbert H. McMurray. . 
a John C. Rockwell 
oCharles H. Cheney. . . . 

aGeorge H. Covey 

aErnest D. Jones 

George H. Stratton 
a William H. Savage 



Liverpool 

Otisco 

Brewerton.. . . , 

Phelps 

Holcomb , 

Highland Falls. 

Port Jervis 

Holley 

Minetto 

Parish , 

Altmar 

Cooperstown . . . 

Oneonta 

Garrison 

Grafton 

Nassau 



Mousey , 

Hailesoorough . . . . 

Russell 

Winthrop 

Ballston Spa 

Corinth 

Princetown 

Middleburg *. 

Carlisle 

Watkins 

Ovid 

Bath 

Lindley 

Canisteo 

Riverhead 

Bay Shore 

Narrowsburg 

Livingston Manor. 

Owego 

Trumansburg, R. 

D. 3* 

North Lansing 

Saugerties 

Port Ewen 

Kerhonkson 

Glens Falls 

Chestertown 

Greenwich 

Hartford 



F. 



Wolcott 

Walworth . . . 
Port Chester. 
White Plains. 
Katonah. . . . 

Wyoming 

Castile 

Rushville 



BXPRB88 OPPICB 



Liverpool 

Tully 

Brewerton 

Phelps 

Holcomb 

Highland Falls 

Port Jervis 

Holley 

Minetto 

Parish 

Altmar 

Cooperstown 

Oneonta 

Garrison 

Grafton (via Troy) 

Nassau 

Mousey 

Gouverneur 

Hermon 

Winthrop 

Ballston Spa 

Corinth 

South Schenectady 

Middleburg 

Central Bridge 

Watkins 

Ovid 

Bath 

Lindley 

Canisteo 

Riverhead 

Bay Shore 

Narrowsburg 

Livingston Manor 

Owego 

Taughannock Falls 

North Lansing 

Saugerties 

Port Ewen 

Kerhonkson 

Glens Falls 

Chestertown 

Greenwich 

Hartford (via Smith's 

Basin) 
Wolcott 
Walworth 
Port Chester 
White Plains 
Katonah 
Wyoming 
Castile 
Rushville 



oReelected. 
^Previous experience. 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Superintendents of schools in the cities of the State 
Rallied la Aofutt 15, 1909 



Albany 

Amsterdam . 

Cohoe*.'.'.'!! 
uCorning. . . 
Cortland. . . 
Dunkirk.... 

Fiifton! ! ! : 

Gleni Fall* . 
Glovenville. 
oHornell. . . 
Hudnon .... 

KinsMon . . . 
Little Pall* . 

Middletown'. 

Mount Verm 



Newburgb 
New RocbalJe 
New York 

Nunn Vh.U 
N^Tone-acd* 
OaderuburR 
lOleaB 

U"imu 

Plett*burB . 
Port jet™ 
PooBhksemie 
Renajalacr.. . 
Rochener. . 

Schenectady 

gSSii-.: 

Upei'.'. '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Watertown . , 
WaMrvlle:.. 



lame* M. Crane 
Albert Leonard 
William H. Ibtn 
R. A. Taylor 

h! H. So'ti'thwick 
Samuel J Slawtoi. 
George R. Staler 

H. W. Rockwell 
George E. Bullis 



ffillian 



nith 



Prank K. Sutler 



Prank S. TIadale 



Superintendents of schools in villages having a population of more t 
5000 

Reviied to Auguil 15, 1909 



Albion 

Canandalgu*. 

Catakill 

Predonia 
Glen Cove, . . 
Havemraw.. 

HeSSf".'!'.: 
Hooaick Kail 1 
Huntington . . 

Ilkra 

Laniingburg . 

Melons. . . . . . 

Mamaroneck . 
Mechanicville 

Norwich'.'.'.;! 



W. G. Carmer 

tihn Kennedy 
uther N.Steele 

J . T. P. Calkin* 

William D. Blaimdell 
Sidney G. Firman.. . 

L.O.Markbam 

A. H.Courtenay... 

C. L. Mo.her 

Clyde L. Harvey. .. 
Robert X. Tom.... 
Frank D. Warren... 
George P. Sawyer. . . 

Fred DeL. King 

Lamont P. Hodge. . 
Georae J. Mc Andrew 

L. E.Blakemsn 

T.C. VanEtten 

Stanford J. Gibion.. 



Nyeck 

Draining 

Patcnogue 

PeekakPll, dilt. 7. 
Peeluk ill. dint. 8. 

Pann Yan 

Port Cheater.... 
Salamanca 

Saratoga Spring! 
Seneca Pall* 

WaterfonK !! ! ! ! 

Wavsrly 

Wat Seneca 

Whitehall 

White Plain*.... 



Edward J, Bonner 
W. H. Ryan 
Ijaec S. Carroll 
W. E. Gordon 



France* A. TefEt 
Thomu R. Kneil 
Frederick J. Medden 
C. O. Richard* 
Georae H. Harten 
B. B. Robbin* 
A.B.Cook 
George S. Ellis 
Charles C. Ramaay 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



203 



Exhibit K 

Examination statistics ' 
Table i 
Uniform teachers certificates issued by school commissioners 



COUNTIES 


Commis- 
sioner 
district 


First 
grade 


Training 
class 


Elemen- 
tary 


Aca- 
demic 


Special 


Tempo- 
rary 
licenses 


Albany 


l 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 

1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


4 
2 
2 

4 
4 
8 
5 
8 
2 

9 
7 

4 
3 
9 
4 
1 
7 

3 
4 
2 
7 
1 
8 
2 
4 
2 
2 
5 
4 
6 
4 
8 
1 
2 
1 
6 
4 
2 
4 
1 
3 
6 
8 

17 
5 

4 
3 
3 

17 
2 

38 
4 
2 
1 

"1 

5 


23 
16 

16 

23 

1 

14 

12 
9 

21 
2 

15 
12 

11 

17 
16 

7 

12 

6 

9 

10 
25 
15 
12 

14 

10 

21 
16 
11 

16 

12 
8 

13 

i3 
8 

9 

12 


5 

15 
9 

11 
6 

19 
3 
9 

11 
5 

11 
7 

12 
2 

10 

16 
9 
3 

11 

10 
1 
6 
8 

15 
8 

12 

15 

19 
9 

15 
3 
1 
7 

10 
2 
6 
5 

16 
7 
9 

ii 

12 

7 

13 

3 

5 

6 

7 

5 

3 

12 

4 

12 

13 

4 

14 

6 

6 

18 

10 

11 


2 
2 

2 
1 
12 
2 
1 
1 
3 
6 

3 

4 

2 
2 
2 

1 
6 

2 
1 

2 

4 

1 
1 
1 

8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
6 
1 
3 

3 
1 
2 

1 

4 
2 


8 

3 

1 

4 
1 

1 

1 

i 

1 
1 

2 

1 

3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


11 


Allegany 


19 
3 


Broome 


5 

15 


Cattaraugus 


4 
11 


Cayuga 


16 
7 
8 




3 
10 


Otonango 


19 
2 
6 


Clinton 


9 
17 


Columbia 


21 

7 
11 


Cortland 


26 
8 


Delaware 


11 
19 


Dutchess 


13 
16 


Erie 


18 

7 




2 

5 
8 


Franklin 


6 
12 


■ 

Fulton 


6 
1 






3 


Greene 4 . . 4 


1 
2 


17 




7 
5 




1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 


19 




18 
6 




|8 

7 


Livingston 


6 
* 7 




5 
13 


Monroe 


6 

1 




11 
11 
18 


"fegare 


1 
2 
1 
2 

8 


8 


Oneida 


3 

4 




1ft 
18 
19 



2Q4 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table i (continued) 



COUNTIES 


Commis- 
sioner 
district 


First 
grade 


Training 
class 


Elemen- 
tary 


Aca- 
demic 


Special 


Tempo- 
rary 
licenses 


Onondaga , , . 


1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


8 
2 
3 
2 

4 
7 
5 
7 

6 

3 

4 

10 
9 
1 

12 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
4 
6 
6 

3 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
7 
8 
3 
3 
4 
5 
5 
3 
3 
5 

10 
2 
4 
1 
1 

11 
2 
4 
6 


19 
20 

15 

9 

12 

7 

18 

8 

19 

13 
16 

6 
14 

15 

13 
23 
10 
18 

• + ••£• 

6 

2i 
16 

11 
6 

1 
10 
19 
11 

14 
11 
20 


2 
4 
7 
8 
3 
7 
7 
9 
3 

15 
6 

12 
4 

11 

10 

21 
4 

26 

22 
7 
9 
8 

16 
8 

13 
9 
7 
8 

19 
9 

10 

12 

6 

10 

11 

14 

6 

3 

5 

15 

23 

6 

6 

1 

10 

2 

4 
5 


2 
1 
1 
1 

3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 

2 

4 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
2 

2 

4 

1 
3 
2 

1 
2 

2 


3 
1 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

i 

1 

2 

2 
1 
1 

3 
1 


8 


Ontario 


2 

6 
6 


Orange 


12 
21 


Orleans 


20 

1 


Oswego 


1 
2 
3 
1 
2 


3 


Otsego 


13 
6 

12 


Putnam 


5 
13 


Renwmlaer , 


1 
2 


12 


Rockland 


26 
5 


8t Lawrence 


i 

2 
3 

I 

1 
2 


9 


Saratoga 


10 

1 

15 


Schoharie 


18 
10 
19 


Schuyler 


18 
3 


Seneca 




3 


Steuben 


1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 


5 


Suffolk 


15 
8 
5 


Sullivan . . 


15 
10 


Tioga 


26 
2 


Tompkins 


1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 




Ulster 


9 
18 


Warren 


14 
24 

1 


Washington 


4 
10 


Wayne 


13 
1 


Westchester 


9 
6 


Wyoming 


5 

17 

2 


Yates 


1 
8 








Total 




528 


878 


1 013 


156 


65 


1 088 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



205 



Table 2 
Uniform teachers certificates issued by city superintendents 



1 — = : = =— = 

CITIES 


First 
grade 


Training 
school 


Special 


Tem- 
porary 
licenses 


Arnfltardam 




22 

8 

24 

8 

7 
3 

093 

24 

2 

5 

11 

8 


1 
2 

2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
2 

4 

4 
1 

1 
1 

1 
6 
2 

2 

1 

4 


1 








Auburn 


1 


1 


Buffalo. 




Cohoes 






Dunkirk , 




1 


Elmlra 






Geneva 






Hornell , , 




3 


Hudson 




l 


Jamestown 






Johnstown 






Little Falls 






Lockport 






Mt Vernon. 






New Rochelle 




2 


New York 






Niagara Falls 




2 


Ogdensburg 


2 

1 




Oneida 




Oneonta 


i 


Fiattsburg 






Poughkeepsie 




1 


Rochester 




4 


Rome 






Schenectady 


3 


6 


Syracuse 


2 


Troy 


6 


2 


Utica 


4 


Watertown 




1 






1 



Table 3 

Teachers certificates issued by the Commissioner of Education 

August x, 1908 -July 31, 1909 

Temporary licenses 1125 

Temporary normal 85 

State life 54 

College graduate life 122 

College graduate limited 183 

College professional life 60 

College professional provisional 856 

Teachers certificates issued by school commissioners and city 

superintendents 

First grade 541 

Elementary 1013 

Academic 156 

Special 111 

Training class 878 

Training school 815 

Teachers certificates issued by normal schools 

Normal diplomas,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,«,♦, 881 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table a 
Pint grade certificates issued by school commiiaioners 



11 

1! 


COUNTT, DISTHICT AND HAM! 


Poat offlce addieee 


Date of 
certificate 




A Ibany county — Jim di&lriet 




Amtust 

August 

January 

Auaust 

January 
Auauat 








. lftoa 

, IMS 
, lBOtt 
















Albany county — fcond d.-tntt 








Praeloo, Hollow .... 


.1008 




Albany county ■ Mini dufrid 




Mmweil, Kate Loul9e 

Alttaany county »• ' ■ ■ ' 


















,1908 

looo 
















Broom countv — "'*t dulcet 


Great BenrL 1 ■•> 

Cuiikllii station 
G-wt Bend. P> 








1908 
,1308 
1908 

.1908 












tdd.xria 
















1008 










, 1903 












1008 






Wb liner's Point ... 




Cattaraugut county— fir tt di-Jrirt 


,1008 














1008 














1008 




Caltarauovt county — trcervl itulrict 


Weal Salamanca 






1908 






KOI 11 ..*-•!, 






, 1008 












1008 
, 1908 
















Cattaraugui county — Win* dlsfnX 












1008 




Cayuga county — teond ilitrut 










1008 














, laps 

1908 










Peckhun, Florence E 

Rlchler, Berth* E 
















MOO 









SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 



11 


COL-NTT, DISTRICT AND NAME 


Poet ^office ."address 


Data 'of 
certificate 


mi 


Chautawnia county-~fint dittriet 


FIMIey Lake 








August 1, 190S 
August 1, 190S 
January 1, 1909 
January l, 1909 
January 1, 1900 
January 1, 1909 






Nortti Clymer 


























Chautauqua county ■ tecond dittnd 










August I, 1908 














i iii iiii 

lili 




Chautaugua county — : •. '. .';»;..■ 


















•ttditfnrt 




























August 1, 1908 














August 1, 1908 
August 1. 1908 
January 1, 1909 

August 1, 1908 

Ausust I, 1908 
Auaust 1, 1008 

August 1, 1903 

August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1003 
AuSUSt 1, 1908 
















Chenango amnio— ftrtt !:>:■■■' 






















•ii, 


Chenango aunty- teeand dittrut 






Clinton county .•'.'•I district 




























Hi P 

III II 
















Clinton county— tecond diXritt 
















August 1, 1908 
Ausust 1, 1908 
AucuBt 1, 1008 






















CHntan county — third dutrict 


Mow™ Forks ... 


January 1, 1009 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 












Cobunbio county— firm dittriet 










August 1. 1008 














January 1, 1900 
August 1. 190" 




Columbia county- -tecond dtttnet 




8*38 







NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 




842S 
MM 
0666 
0W7 



Cortland aninly — ftnt 

wnlll, Anna A 

H»ir::i«tt>n. Lena S 
HoujTi Harriett M 

Perkins, Nellie. . . . - . 

Kqrnold . Hassle M . . 

StlUman, L. Maere - 

Baplee. 1«W 

Cortland countv—tetond ditlnct 
Wtllcox. Hart? J 

y—flrM dittrut 

b< 

Bi 

Ft 

Ki 

Be 

W leL .... 

W__. . '.v.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Dtlovxxrt county — tmmd dutrttx 

Peck. Raymond G 

Taylor. Martha M . . . . 

ifjirha* count*— lira dvtrtit. 

Berafy, Atnm E 

Deveaon. Addle E 

From. Anna KlUebeib 

McGinn. .Nellie 1 

Dulelui* county — ttcond disfnti 
EsteUe. Brlen (1 H 
Tremper. Clara Louise 

Brie county— flrtt dittrict 

Flanagan. Minnie J.... 

Creao. Geoice Raymond 

Brit county — «■.'..' itittnci 

Burr, AJille E. - 

Herold, ste.Ja M 

Redmond, Kaihryn V 

r-.nif. «■!■..- i 

Clark. RIME ... ... 

Brie county — third dittnet 

Anthony. Alice Hldrcd 

NeC. LU Louisa 

Pierce. William K 

Brown. Myrtle. 

JMMa count)/ — flrtt dittnet 

Dacey. Mary B - 

Sexton, Bernard Patrick 

HaaeHu:i. Mary E 

HorTnanle. J-'' 1 » May 

Todd. Mamie J ... 

Butt county— ttamd ■■■:■■■■ 

Cronln. Rose A . . 

Lynch. Kaiher Anna 

Mcllr.. ., fJixabeih G 

Blgalcw. B. Haeburn. Miss 

franklin MuMti — flrtt dtttriet 

Allen. Anna U 

Cooney. E.ltsbeth M 

Lanfford, Jean McK . . — 

WUcoj. F:erfut M 

Bonln. Ida Uae. 

Henry. Mary A. 

Slick. ."V. Mary Wood . . 

WllUnertb, Eva M 



McDonouch 

Ithaca 

Harford Mill* 
Bludp-it M.li, 

Cortland 

Walking 

Forest Borne. . 

Granton — 

Shavertown 

Kelaey .'.'.' '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 
DownsrlUe . 

Do Lanoey 

Sidney Center . . . 

Stamford 

Booert 

Matteavan 

KIshklU-on-Huilaor. 
Malleawan 

Ciennam 

Bupeamll Junction 

Rhloeoeck , ., 

Bprlngvtne, 

Orchard Park . ... 

Vlctofblil* '.'.'.'.'.". 

Bamburt. 

Uambura 

Cotden — 

Aahiord. . 

WUUnk 

Belmont ..... 

Au sable Forks 

Burrlcnne 

BaeeHon. . 
Wiilaboro . . 
Elltabetbtown 

Mlnafra 

Indian LakP 
Morten (Jenu i 
Fori Henry 

Malone). . 

ReynoMslon 
Malone 

Saranao Lake 
Burke 









1. 1S08 



1. 1908 
1, 1908 

i. leos 

1, 1908 
1.1909 



1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 (continued) 

First grade certificates issued by school com 




0067 
SOBS 

•716 



MacKenna, Don 

Fulton county — tote dittrict 

Cook. Don I 

Topllff, Delia B. lira 

(Tmeses county — sole dittrict 
Ward, Lewellyn Jay 

Greene county— flrtt district 

Brandon. Marlon B 

Mosennn, M. i' l>- 

Yops, FTMlMIca L 

Bogardus, Carrie Estelle 

Bolan, Eltn-I ! » . . 

Beach, Louise Avery 

Greene countu — trcond rtiVnct 

Adams, Emma I. Mrs 

Lockwoori. Helen Court. 

Boots, En Roe. , 

Bsiinay, Ward L 

Hamilton eountv — toll duinci 

Earley, Pearl K. 

Hsnley, Charles B 

Htrkiwier uounlif first dittrict 

Bauer, Jennie A 

Darcerikolb. A. Pearl 

Lucey, Jennie M 

Newberry, Nellie A 

Herkimer emmlv—ttronil diMricI 
House, Grace Looejia 

Jeffmm cuuntv — flrtt dtMriet 

Cram, HaHle Maud 

Gardner, Mai? A . . . . . 

Lee, Ruth Hwtton 

Jtfftrtm amain — *ercmd dittrict 

Dumas, Bearle 

Gayne. Hable J 

Baldwin, Warren C 

Frost, Ones M 

Dumas, Christie M . . 

Peanell, Bessie Nina 

Jefferaon county — thi'd distrvi 

Coming, Raymond , , . . 

Dady, Helen E. , 

Mayer, Elizabeth Linnell 

Lewii emmta — i - -' ■ - •'"■■( 



Cranberry Creek. . 



iV-k;.! 
Cawall. 



August 1, 1903 

August 1. 1°0S 

August 1, 1Q0S 

August 1, 1908 

List I, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

■— ust 1,1908 

_..ust 1, 1908 

January l, 1909 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1. 1908 

August 1, 1908 

January 1, 1909 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 



Cold Brook 
1. 1 tile Fella 
Newport . . . 



Clayton 

I a Fa: Re vi Le 

Clayton 



August 



August l 
January 1 

August 1. 
August 1 . 



10'JS 



Lyons Falls. . . 
Colllnmllle .. 

Lyons Falls . , 
Port tieyden . 
Port Leyden . 

Port Leyden . , . 
runstsbflvilie 
f.'oiiMab evllie 
llonstab evli:r 
Const ab etllle 

Co. -ISIir.il> 

Lvooe Falls . 
West I-eyden 
Port Leyden 
CotWrrtSrrrtUe. 



January 1, 1009 
January 1, 1000 
Jan uary.l, 1909 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued try school commissioners 



fi 


COUNTT, IH8T3ICT AND KAHI 


Post oBce tddren 


DUe of 
certlOcsle 




Liu-il court v — second district 




August 
Aucuat 

Aiieu Rt 

AlUUtt 

Auiust 
AusuH 










, ioos 
























Maditon county — ftrtt dtttnet 












, 190B 






VilunlM, Ind 










Madtion county — tecona '>:-.<; 


New Woodstock 




















Monro* county — Jlrtt :.■ <■ ' 










Hoiwoje Fttlls 












Monro* anmhr—ttcond :.»<-.■: 




.1008 














, 1003 
,1908 




































.1008 














, 1008 














, 1908 














. 1008 














, 1008 
.1008 

.1008 
,1008 

. 1008 










Montgomery county — *o(t district 












Nmtau county — tolt ditttui 
















, 1908 














, 1908 


























\ 








New York 


,1008 



































. 1008 


























. 1908 














. 1908 














. 1008 
.ISM 

.100S 















SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 



S2 

1! 



diftrid (continued) 




Oneida council — flrM ■-,■■.:■ 



Suiter, James T 



Jy—teeond dmrid 



8*72 
B471 



Oneida founlir — Uurd ■:■■"..■■■: 

York. Floyd R . . . 

"--hen, WUIard George 

Oneida county — fourth dwtnit 
Boyce. Grane A , 

WOliokCtMaA.. 

Plants. Nettie K 

Burhyta, Charles H . . 

Richardson, l.uellt Mrs 

Onondooa eaunfV— flnt duttitt 



Poly rroiiB 
N™ York 
New York 
Nhw York 
\.- W.. 
I[o'y (.Two 
Ne» '■ ' 

Long Kddy 
" York... 

York , 

York 

flyo 

Lockport — . 

Lockport . 

Tonawanda . . 
Lockport ... . 

•(Jiri.,1 v .■■•■ . 
YourigSlOn-|l . 

Wallcsboro. . 

Veraoo Center 
w»t Wl-ihV -i 
Verona Station 

Paris 

Mohawk. . . . 

Ullca 

Hcrmon . . . . 

Bildjcevaler . 

Clinton. '.'.'.'. 

Ooblesklll, 

Clinton 

Florence 

[toUrevtlie ".'.'.'. 
wv^. wi:;iie:-. 

Oneida 

Delhi 

Augusta . . . . 
Wmhlrjrtofi Ml! 
KedSeld 

'•-I.V.I 

Olnton 

Utlca 

Treadwell .... 
Camden ..... 

Camden, .... 

Boonvllle . 
Point Korji 

H.KVI vi . ... 

Barneveld . . . 

Him.:. ■.-!,:.■ . . 

Baldvturrltlri 

BaldjrtnsMJo 






1008 



August 1,1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1MB 
August 1, 1008 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1009 
January l, 1909 
January 1, 1004 
January l, 1909 
January 1, 1900 



January 1, 1909 



January 1, 1900 



January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 

Wt « 

August 1 1, 190B 

iSMllS 



212 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 






6398 
4778 
6670 
6695 
6696 



6494 
6761 



6507 
6399 
6655 



6481 
6560 



6321 
6266 
6660 
6701 



6548 
6492 
6400 
6491 
6322 
6344 
6744 



6244 
6287 
6289 
6323 
6451 



6523 
6296 
6221 
5199 
6342 
6745 
6756 



6592 
6453 
6652 
6676 
6747 
6676 



6401 
6727 
6764 



6553 
6482 
6324 
6712 



COUNTY, DISTRICT AND NAM! 



Onondaga county--ftrst district {concluded) 
McAuhffe, Mary E 



Sand wick, Mabel E. 
Jones, Clara Eunice . 
Kennedy, Julia V. . . 
M'Keon, Gertrude M 



Onondaga county — second district 

Bowker, Fred H 

Henderson, Jessie M 



Onondaga county — third district 

Maltby, Frances E 

Tiffany, Clara F. B. Mrs 

Oley, Katheryn E 



Ontario county — first district 

Donley, S. Gertrude 

Fraher, Katheryn Bolger 



Ontario county — second diUrici 

Goodrich, M. Delos 

Parmelee, Mary J 

Deal, Ruth E 

Huntley, Lois A 



Orange county — first district 



Greene, Nathaniel 
Jackson, Margaret E 

Kurtz, Hattie 

McMunn, Daisy 

Marius, Maybelle M . 
Watson, Florence R. 
McCarter, Eva E 



Orange county — second district 

Arkills, Nellie 

Cleary, Anna Nolan 

Crane, Edith F 

Ketcham, Nellie K 

Kiernan, Acnes L 



Orleans county — sole district 

Brightly, Willis E 

Hulihan, Margaret 

Martin, Cora Evelyn 

Robinson, May Isabelle 

Bacon, Clara 

Dun wick, Maudo I 

Yagge, Albertina L 



Oswego county — second district 

Spencer, Evelyn L 

Thompson, Edna Mae 

McManus, Julia E 

Regan, Mollie A 

Edick, Ethel A 

Schumacher, Cassie B 



Otsego county — first district 

Jaycox, Edna E 

White, Budd H 

Davis, Lulu Belle 



Otsego county — second district 

Pomeroy, Flossie B 

Roulston, Agnes Mrs 

Squire, Evalena 

Gregory, Ida M. Mrs 



Post office address 



Warner. . 
Syracuse . 
Phoenix. 
Memphis , 
Syracuse. 



Mandana . . . 
Skaneateles. 



Fayetteville 
Syracuse . . . 
Pompey 



Phelps . 
Stanley. 



Naples 

Albany 

E. Bloomfield 
Cheshire 



Mountain Dale 

Campbell Hall 

Highland Falls 

Campbell Hall 

Highland Falls 

Cornwall-on- Hudson 
Mlddletown 



Middletown 

Port Jervis . . . . 

Pert Jervis 

Otisville 

Cuddebackvillc. 



Holley 

Barker 

Yates Center. 
Waterport. . . 
Clarkson 
Holley.. •.... 
Medina 



Phoenix. 
Phoenix. 
Phoenix. 
Phoenix. 
Parish . . 
Parish. . 



E. Worcester . 
Worcester 
Cherry Valley. 



Sidney Center. 

Oneonta 

Otego 

GarrattsviUe.. 



Date of 
certificate 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
January 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 



August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

January 

January 



1,1908 
1,1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1909 



1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1,1908 



1,1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1908 
1,1908 
1, 1908 
1, 1909 
1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 



II 


COUNTS', DISTRICT AMD HAMS 


Post office address 


Data of 

coi-Liflcate 


6338 
6358 
0590 
9407 
0402 
0498 
04B6 
6403 
6401 
8835 

8427 
8360 

8384 
0228 


BhukIia amntv — ft'st district 


Noon:!-* Fails 

lii;a-:r. . nt.'.tr 


August 

August 

August 

August 
August 
August 
August 
January 

January 

Aueu Bt 
August 

August 
August 

January 

August 
January 

August 

August 
January 
January 

August 
January 


, 1908 




















































«d district 


West Rand Lake 


, 1908 
























8S77 
8672 
8758 
8757 

6206 

645S 
6454 

6299 
6303 

tuto* 

6325 
6610 
0278 
6508 
6301 
6452 
6673 

6568 

6680 
0603 

6456 
0569 
6653 

0406 

6713 
0766 

0412 
0366 


























Boctlmd county — tote district 






«uiu> - first i/iilnrl 




































































SI Lavirmce eouWn — second dxntrict 


















St Laurtna county — third district 


Bnsbei Kails. . 


tons 








M»ve:is ripilnns , . . 




Saratoga county — first district 






Ralleton like 

Ballstoc Lake 








Saratoga county — ttcond district 




















8414 
8580 
6504 

6326 
8318 

683B 


Schenectady wunlji — tote district 


















Schoharie county— AM district 























2*4 



ttfeW VORfc S?At£ EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 4 (continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 






% 



6457 
6241 
6416 
6674 
6676 
6706 



6246 
6499 
6271 
6426 
6614 
6732 



6370 
6686 
6802 

w> 

6549 
6416 
6525 
6633 



6343 
6275 
6687 



6417 



6469 
6265 
6677 



6550 



6418 
6604 
6251 
6587 
6603 
6637 
6725 



6458 
6220 
6520 
6518 
6419 
6716 
6733 
6760 



6367 
6627 
6752 



6555 
6411 
6283 



COUNTY, DISTRICT AND NAME 



Schoharie county — second district 

Herron, Elizabeth 

Hoose, Martin W 

Nichols, Daisy Campbell 

Best, Bertha E. Foland 

Jump, Harold 

Carl, Luman 

Schuyler county — sole district 

Baker, Olln James 

Fairchleld. Lena E 

Phelps, Edna C 

Dean, Delia Mae 

Van Lone. Ethel M 

Durkee, Nellie Lee 

Steuben county— first district 

Lounsberry, Jennie C 

Fogal, Roy E 

Stinson, Katharine J 

Steuben county — second district 

Glfford, Ethel B 

Hopper, Henrietta 

Waliath. Nina 

Reasor, Raymond E 

Steuben county — third district 

Fisher, Michael C 

Litchard, Rog. G 

Waight, Julda 

Suffolk county— first district 
Jones, Aaron M 

Suffolk county — second district 

Pearsall. Estella 

Stepanek, Charles B 

McDonald, Mary Agnes 

Sullivan county— first district 
Starr, Edna E 

Hi 

+* Sullivan county — second district 

^Benedict, Wilbur S 

Freer, Arden 

Hodge, Myra C 

Lewis, Walter W 

IManion. Lucy M 

Mitchell, Harold 8 

lO'Keefe, Alice 

Tioga county — sole district 

Bingham, Mary A 

Oakes, Grace G 

Stowe, Juanlta Mae 

Walters, Lillian Edgerton 

J Wilson, Charlie M 

Terpenning, Fannie E 

IGrtmn. Maude E. Dorn 

SFordTN. Ethel 

Tompkins county — first district 

Hine, Iva Emma 

Lewis, Theodore La Verne 

Whitney, Mary O 

Tompkins county — second district 

Apgar. Clara I 

Chevalier. Grada B 

Hyde, Dibble Townley 



Post office address 



E. Cobleskill 

Vintonton 

Jefferson 

Seward 

Summit 

W. Fulton 

Beaver Dams 

Valois 

Watkins 

Newfleld 

Alpine 

Montour Falls 

Branchpoint 

Cohocton 

Bath 

Corning 

Corning 

Woodhull 

Addison 

Greenwood 

Canaseraga 

Jasper 

Phoenix 

Babylon 

Bohemia 

Bonkonkoma 

Bethel 

Stevensvtlle 

Neverslnk 

Livingston Manor . . . 
White Sulphur Spa . . 
White Sulphur Spa. . 

Callicoon 

DeBruoe 

Lockwood 

Newark Valley 

Spencer 

Lockwood 

Candor 

Newark Valley 

Candor 

Owego 

Ithaca 

W. Danby 

Newfleld 

Groton 

Harford 

Groton 



Date of 
certificate 



August 

August 

August 

January 

January 

January 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
January 



1, 1908 
1,1908 
1, 1908 
1,1909 
1, 1909 
1,1909 



1, 1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1, 1908 
1,1908 
1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1, 1969 



August 1,1908 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
January 



1,1908 
1, 1908 
1,1908 
1, 1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1909 



August 

August 

August 

August 

August 

January 

January 

January 



1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1, 1909 
1,1909 
1,1909 



August 1,1908 
August 1,1908 
January 1, 1909 



August 1,1908 
August 1,1908 
August 1,1908 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 4 {continued) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioi 



= S 

If 


—*.——.— 


Post office addreaa 


Date of 

certificate 


<im 


E/bfer county — jlrjf dwfrtel 




January 

Ausust 

January 
January 

January 
January 

August 


UK* 


























(/Mfr tounljf ■ - tnond tiittrict 


























Pouahkeepele 












VUUr county — Win/ dirfnti 








Wanda, Erelyn Itavl* 






























IPofrtn eoufUp — Jlr« <K»(nf t 
























}!'D-m county — attend dittrtrt 
























W MUWftm oobWb— Jlf* du*rvi 








































V — iceond dittritt 


































V'S..\:v i,ra<VJie 












































Waynt county — /(■»,* ■(;« p.f ; 
















Van* county— aseond dittritt 
































WtttcJutttr counQr— Jtraf district 


III Loretto. B. L 

M; Loretto. a 1 

Sacred Heart. ,, 

PncMiiliw fliun . 






WalcJutter county — uctmtt ailtntt 


1908 




wwirurr temUt— third •;,«(-...' 




















Mt Bt Vincent 


















0357 




linos 



2l6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



o v 

V 3 

S3 



6624 
6625 
6638 
6641 



6493 
6463 



6222 
6513 
6473 
6618 



6599 
6464 
6465 
6480 
6331 
6724 



Table 4 (concluded) 
First grade certificates issued by school commissioners 



COUNTY, DISTRICT AND NAME 



Post office address 



Westchester county — third district (concTd) 

Quigley, Mary 

Weimar, Charlotte 

McCarthy, Henry A 

Tripp, Alice 

Wyoming county — first district 

Munger, N. Gertrude 

Smith, Viola Agnes 

Wyoming county — second district 

Merrill, Anna M 

Murphy, Frances E 

Stryker, Lillian Hughes 

Watkins, Esme 

Totes county — sole district 

BIodgett.Mary C 

Cornish, Thomas C 

Hayes, M. May , 

Miller, Emma H 

Tyler, Arthur Ira 

wetherby, Anne V , 



New York . . 
New York. . 
Amawalk. . . 
North Castle 

Warsaw 

Pavilion 

Rushford 

North Java. 

Arcade 

Arcade 

Rushville 

Naples , 

Dresden 

Saunders. . . 

Pulteney 

Italy 



Date of 
certificate 



August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 



August 1,1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 



August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
January 



1, 1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1908 
1,1909 



Table 5 
First grade certificates issued in cities 



.ace 

it 



6694 



6567 
6253 



6643 



6620 
6622 
6644 



6526 
6576 
6531 
6255 
6744 
6763 



NAME AND CITY 



Auburn 
Lawton, Mariam 

Ogdensburg 

Mallon, Anna 

Qulgley, Louise 

Oneida 
Deering, Mary Gertrude . . 

Schenectady 

Relyea, Delia 

Lester, Alice Gasking 

Esselstyn, Florence C 

Troy 

Conroy, Jane M 

Delaney, Mary C 

Hannan, Margaret E 

Wellworth, Mary G 

Dolan, Mary R 

Murphy, Catherine T 



Post office address 



Auburn .... 

Ogdensburg. 
Ogdensburg. 

Oneida 

Schenectady 
Altamont . . . 
Schenectady 

Troy 

Troy 

Troy 

Troy 

Troy 

Troy 



Date of 
certificate 



January 1, 1909 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 

August 1, 1908 



August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
August 1, 1908 
January 1. 1909 
January 1, 1909 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Table 6 
Examinations for State certificates, August igoB 



™ 


EXAMINES 


Number 
of can- 
didates 


Certificates 






40 
23 
16 
28 
11 
43 
20 
89 
10 

S 
4 
IS 
22 
34 
11 
24 
20 

23 
















Buffalo (Sacred Heart Academy;. 










































































































608 











Table 7 
Successful candidates for State certificates, 1008 

Audermiu, Raymond 



g,M«yL 

Boyce, BMra Marie 
Bramao, Wallace J. 
Brown. Nellie L 
Butterfield, Boy L. 
CbuMfneux. Jobn p. 
Clark. Lena M. 



-, Etta G. 



OartL 

Conolly, 

Cooper, Ada L. 
Cullen. Margalot C. 
Dunham, Harriet B. 
Fairchlld. Cornelia H. 
Ferry, Charles P. 
Plnneaao, Susanna L- 
FaS, Ada Z. 
Pour, Paul A. 
Fowler. Cnrtntlne Cecilia 
Francis, Adah J. 
Frauds, Grace M. 
Frtfble, William G. 
Gilbert, Emily B. 
Giiard, Arthur L. 
Heist, Charles A. 
Helmet, Grace C. 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



223 



Table 10 
Summary of training class examinations 1909 



Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 

English 

Arithmetic 

Geography 

History 

Physiology 

Drawing 

History of education 

Psychology 

Agriculture 

School management . 
School law 

Total 



Examined 0-74 



I 254 


95 


1 394 
1 465 


104 
266 


1 399 
1 389 


277 
296 


1 270 

1 329 
1 183 


179 
188 
108 


1 223 

1 320 


99 
206 


1 402 
1 280 
1 356 


307 
154 
260 


1 201 


22 



18 475 



56i 



76-79 



564 
I 166 

142 

58i 

309 
661 

371 
465 

352 
436 
570 
444 
5io 
160 



6 73i 



80-89 



519 
124 

435 
465 

493 
388 

492 

555 

53o 
423 
362 
611 
464 
5" 



6 373 



90-100 



76 

63a 

76 

291 

42 

278 

55 
242 

«55 
163 

7i 
122 

507 



2 810 



Table 11 
Summary of training school examinations 1909 



Phonics, reading and spel- 
hng 

Language, composition and 
grammar 

Arithmetic 



Geography 

Drawing 

History of education 

Psychology and principles of 

education 

Nature study, physiology 

and hygiene 

School management 

History, civics and school 

law 

Total 



Examined 



1 269 



176 

«55 
167 
978 
1 068 

849 



1 202 
1 049 

97o 
10 983 



0-74 



35 

67 
448 
230 

74 
141 

48 

17 
84 

*£ 

1 157 



76-79 



344 

390 
5*8 

385 
443 
353 

*33 

117 
373 

81 
3 *47 



80-89 



702 

610 

353 
392 

413 
449 

371 

555 
47i 

412 
4 628 



90-100 



188 

109 

26 

160 

48 
225 

197 

5i3 
121 

464 
2 051 



224 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 12 
Kindergarten examinations 1909 



History of education 

Psychology and principles of education 

School management 

Special kindergarten methods 

Special primary methods 

Total 




Papers 
accepted 



96 
70 
82 

95 
«3 



426 



Table 13 
Examinations for teachers State certificates 1908 



Papers 
accepted 




Algebra 

Arithmetic 

American history 

Geography 

Grammar 

Orthography 

Physiology and hygiene 

Astronomy 

Bookkeeping 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Civil government 

Composition and rhetoric. . . . 

Drawing 

General history 

General literature 

Geology 

Methods and school economy 

Plane geometry 

Physics 

School law 

Zoology 

Latin 

French 

German 

History of education 



Total 



3 347 



Table 14 

Examinations for drawing teachers certificates 1909 

Papers submitted 31 

Papers accepted 35 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 229 

Brockport 

LOCAL BOARD 

Alfred M. White, of Brockport, was appointed a member of 
the local board by Commissioner Draper in June 1908, in place 
of Wilson H. Moore, deceased. Mr White took his seat as a 
member of the board on the twenty-third of June aforesaid. 
There are no other changes. The following comprise the board 
as at present constituted: John D. Burns, president; Daniel 
Holmes, secretary and treasurer; Elijah C. Chriswell; Thomas 
H. Dobson; George B. Harmon; Edward Harrison; Henry Har- 
rison ; Alfred M. White and Henry S. Madden. 

FACULTY 

The following changes have taken place during the current 
year: 

On September 19, 1908, the following appointments were 
made: Miss Alletta C. Edwards was appointed assistant in 
English, in place of Miss Louise Glennie, resigned; Miss Effie 
M. Wilson was appointed teacher of vocal music in place of 
Miss Edith Sharpe, resigned; Miss Florence I. Blades was ap- 
pointed critic of the fourth grade in place of Miss Elta Loomis, 
resigned; Miss Lucy N. Tomkins was appointed critic of the 
third grade, in place of Miss J. Florence Gilliland, resigned; 
Miss Lilian L. Crafts was appointed critic of grade 2; the term 
of each appointee to commence at the beginning of the suc- 
ceeding school year. On January 16th, 1909, the resignation of 
Miss Jane A. Barnard, teacher in the domestic science and art 
department was received, and on recommendation of the princi- 
pal, Miss Margaret L. Barnard was elected to the same position. 
On the fifth of February, Charles Fleetwood, rated on the salary 
list a laborer, resigned, and Daniel C. Himes was chosen for the 
same position. On the 28th day of February, 1909, the resigna- 
tion of Miss Hannah V. Harding, critic in grade 6, was ac- 
cepted by the board. On the second of April, the resignation of 
Miss Lois B. White, assistant teacher of science, was received 
and accepted to take effect at the close of the current school 
year. On the seventh day of May, the resignation of Misses 
Mary F. Coble, Ruth E. Russum, and Effie M. Wilson, were re- 
ceived and accepted to take effect at the end of the school year. 
On the 18th day of August, the following appointments were 
made by the local board for the ensuing school year: Miss 
Nina M. Gage, as assistant teacher of science; Miss Eleanor 



230 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



B. Forman, as critic of grade 4; Miss Caroline E. Blodgett, 
as teacher of music; Miss Catherine Cavanaugh, as critic of 
grade 8; Miss Nellie A. Lewis, as teacher of French and German 

Each appointment has been approved by the Department. 
The following is a list of the faculty, with their positions: 

C. T. McFarlane, principal and pedagogy; William H. Lennon, 
science; Charles D. Seely, Latin and Greek; William L. Vos- 
burgh, mathematics ; Fred A. Belland, physical culture and man- 
ual training; Miss Mary P. Rhoades, preceptress and English; 
Miss Sara A. Saunders, superintendent training department; 
Miss Flora C. Willsea, German and history ; Miss Ermina Tucker, 
elocution and physical training; Miss Alletta C. Edwards, 
assistant in English; Miss Elizabeth F. Palmer, drawing; Miss 
Nellie A. Lewis, French and assistant in German ; Miss Caroline 
E. Blodgett, music ; Miss Ruth K. Todd, assistant in Latin and 
history; Miss Nina M. Gage, assistant in science; Miss Margaret 
Barnard, domestic science and art; Miss Catherine Cavanaugh, 
critic grade 8; Miss Mabel W. Vanderhoof, critic grade 7; Miss 
Florence I. Blades, critic grade 6; Miss Mabel Wombough, 
critic grade 5; Miss Eleanor B. Forman, critic grade 4; Miss 
Lucy N. Tomkins, critic grade 3; Miss Lilian L. Crafts, critic 
grade 2; Miss Amy F. Arey, critic grade 1; Miss S. Janette 
Reynolds, library science. 

OTHER EMPLOYEES 

Miss Helen E. Kirby, clerk; Silas H. Holbrook, janitor; 
William P. Elwell, engineer; Daniel E. Himes, laborer; Daniel 
Holmes, secretary and treasurer. 



GRADUATES 

Normal department 
Classical course 



Lucy May Breckenridge, Clarkson 
Viofettc Hale Hornsby, Clarkson 



Bertha May Knapp, Manchester 
Beatrice Winne, Brockport 



Two year professional course 



Phila Estella Babcock, Albion 

Catherine Anne Barrett, Pittsford 

Sarah M. Blott, Albion 

Golda Mae Dalrymple, Sinclairville 

Margaret Daisy Dee, Brockport 

Edith Adelle Deming, South Greece 

Elizabeth Augusta Ellis, Dundee 

Dorothy Alice Giddings, Savannah 

Alice May Gilman, Manchester 

Maud Sarah Hale, Palmyra 

Florence Fannie Hunt. New Berlin 

Ethel May Hutton, Chili Station 

Bertha Ada Kelley, Newark 

Beatrice Franc La Salle, 33 Upton Pane, 

Rochester 
Julia Aloysia Laverty, 113 University 

ave., Rochester 



Grace Evangeline Leavens, Albion 
Lxnna May Lincoln, Spring Lake 
Carrie Alberta Little, Argusville 
Arlena Mae Lockwood, Monterey 
Clare Emily Mason, Spencerport 
Dora Lee McGurk, Shortsville 
Helen Ruth Ottley, Phelps 
Frank Mark Post, Lockport 
May Louise Rogers, Spencerport 
Tames Henry Rowe, Holley 
Helen Laing Scribner, Victor 
Anna Whitney Smith, Savannah 
Elsie Anna Stewart, Holley 
Pauline Vail, Geneva 
Nellie Awilda Vosburgh, Canajoharfe 
Alice Ruth Waldner, Medina 
Amy Walker, Lockport 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 23 1 

High school department 
Normal preparatory 

Ethel B. Corbett, Brockport Ruth Harriet Millener, Brockport 

In* Leonette Root, Brockport 

College preparatory 

Ephraim Clarence Crippen, Brockport Sherman Merritt Smith, Clarlcson 

Robert Ray McCormick, Qarkson Jean Rose Stewart, Brockport 

Buffalo 

LOCAL BOARD 

No change has occurred in the local board since the last re- 
port. The members of the local board and its organization are 
as follows : Edward H. Butler, president ; Henry W. Hill, secre- 
tary and treasurer ; Henry Lapp ; Charles W. Goodyear ; Stephen 
M. Clement; Robert L. Fryer; George A. Davis. 

FACULTY 

The faculty during the past year has been as follows : James 
M. Cassety Ph.D., principal; Mark M. Maycock, Pd.M., draw- 
ing and physical geography ; Marcus A. G. Meads, mathematics 
and logic; Irving P. Bishop, nature study and science; Joseph 
Mischka, vocal music; Mark E. Reed, assistant in drawing and 
library; Gertrude M. Bacon, supervisor of teaching; Isabella 
Gibson, history of education and records; Helen L. Dunston, 
civics, school law and English; Lucy C. Mott, mathematics; 
Grace Viele, rhetoric, composition and ancient history; Maud 
T. Lovejoy, reading, elocution and calisthenics; Georgina E. 
Chamot, manual training; Susan F. Chase, psychology and Eng- 
lish literature ; Bessie L. Bishop, assistant in science department ; 
Ida L. Kempke, grammar and English ; Louise M. Cassety, prin- 
cipal kindergarten department ; Ernina S. Smith, assistant kinder- 
garten department; Mary E. Janes, assistant kindergarten depart- 
ment. 

TRAINING DEPARTMENT 

The teachers in the training department or school of practice 
during the past year and its organization are as follows: 
Edith L. Huson, superintendent of school of practice in charge 
of grade 9; Carrie Benson, assistant superintendent of school of 
practice in charge of grade 4; Mary P. Fowler, critic in grade 8; 
Annie E. Davies, critic in grade 7; Lillian W. Walker, critic in 
grade 6; Margie P. Shuman, critic in grade 5; Ella M. Smith, 
critic in grade 3 ; Teresa Roeschler, critic in grade 2 ; Ernina S. 
Smith, critic in grade 1. 



232 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

RESIGNATION OF PRINCIPAL CASSETY 

Principal James M. Cassety resigned as principal of the State 
Normal School at Buffalo, to take effect August 1, 1909, and 
thereafter Mr Daniel Upton was nominated for the position of 
principal of the State Normal School at Buffalo and his nomina- 
tion was approved and confirmed by the Hon. Andrew S. Draper, 
State Commissioner of Education, on July 30, 1909. 

Mr Edward P. Cassety resigned his position as secretary to 
the principal, to take effect on August 1, 1909 and thereafter 
the name of Dean R. Hill was presented by the board of managers, 
with the approval of Mr Daniel Upton, principal of the State 
Normal School at Buffalo, and his appointment as secretary to 
the principal of the State Normal School at Buffalo was ap- 
proved by the State Commissioner of Education on August 10, 
1909. 

The resignation of Dr James M. Cassety, who had been the 
principal of the State Normal School at Buffalo for 25 years, 
was received by this board with deep regret. An effort was 
made to persuade Dr Cassety to postpone the period of his re- 
tirement from the service of the State in that capacity. When 
it became known, however, that his decision was not to be de- 
layed and was final, proper action was taken to put on record a 
due appreciation of his long and excellent service at the head of 
the school. 

Dr Cassety was at once a highly accomplished instructor in 
the special field for which normal schools are created, but he 
was in addition endowed with the faculties of the able man of 
business. All the books and records of the school were kept 
with faultless accuracy. The accounts were never out of bal- 
ance. He gave his whole mind and heart and time to the duties 
of his position. It satisfied his ambition, it occupied his mind, 
it engaged his attention and he gave the best of himself with- 
out stint to the welfare of the institution. He knew all the 
students by name. He was interested in their advancement after 
leaving the school. His large experience before coming to Buf- 
falo had taught him the needs of those who are to make teaching 
their profession and he met that need to a degree that is un- 
usual in schools devoted to the training of teachers. 

His own profound mastery in mathematics led him to feel the 
need of a thorough grounding in essentials as the true base of 
all excellence in teaching, and he spared no pains to teach his 
students habits of accuracy, the patient acquisition of learning 



SlXTfc ANNUAL REPOfcf 



*33 



and the habit of looking things squarely in the face before judg- 
ment about them. He held the teaching profession in the highest 
honor and imparted to those who sat at his feet the same spirit 
that animated himself, and the effect of his teaching has made 
the graduates of the Buffalo Normal School notable among 
teachers for their high estimate of the profession, their appre- 
ciation of its value, especially in a free country where education 
is one of the sheet-anchors of the security of the State. He 
thus, as it were, marked his graduates so that everywhere they 
have borne excellent reputation for knowledge of their profes- 
sion and at the same time for enthusiasm in its pursuit. 

No other school has been more successful than his in the plac- 
ing of teachers in positions as soon as they were ready and fit 
for their tasks. It had become understood that his graduates 
were at least thoroughly trained and knew their business. And 
thus from year to year he led his corps of young people to an 
equipment that gave the school so fine a reputation as to draw 
students from every state in the Union and even from some 
foreign countries. 

The board of trustees of the school feel that this tribute to 
Dr Cassety's career and his personal worth is but a feeble state- 
ment in comparison with his merits but it is added to this report 
with the feeling that, if it is less than his due, it is at least a 
sincere expression of the feeling of every member of the board 
and especially of those who were longest in contact with him 
in an official capacity. 



GRADUATES, JANUARY 26, I909 

Classical course 



Margaret Conley, Barker 



Francis D. Leopold, Buffalo 



Louisa Menge, Buffalo 
Catherine J. Ryan, Sloan 



English course 

Cora Belle Treat, Tonawanda 

Normal course 



Martha Anderson, Akron 
Mabel D. Austin, Gowanda 
Lulu L. Barker, Niobe 
Annie Mary Bryan, Salamanca 
Grace Florence Conrad, Frankfort 
Julia Ida Conrad, Frankfort 
Eunice Elderkin Crocker, Stafford 
Jennie F. Dick, East Aurora 
Viola E. Donatelli, Delevan 
Elizabeth M. Forbes, Niagara Falls 
Marguerite Veronica Groves, Port Ches- 
ter 
Katherine Lucille Keleher, Port Chester 
Kathryn M. Kooman, Buffalo 



Charlotte M. Kraemer, Buffalo 
Gertrude E. Lapp, Willlamsvflle 
Emma C Nalor, Williamsville 
Adelaide Carolyn Ott, Lancaster 
Helena Louise Peckes, Buffalo 
Helen Louise Pollard, Buffalo 
Edna P. Prince, Buffalo 
Emma Baker Renagel, Eden Center 
Hattie E. Smith, Naples 
Emogene Phoebe Stiles, Corfu 
Lillian E. Upson, Orchard Park 
Lillian I. Veness, Millers 
Edith Wells, Gowanda 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
Primary and kindergarten course 



Sinclairville 



Clara M. Kiefer, Buffali 
GRADUATES, JUNE 22, IG09 

Classical course 



English course 

Genevieve Amy Dayton, Collini Center Freida Carolyn Nurse, Buffalo 

Normal course 



Agnes Anaitaoia Gerrlty, Lockport 
Efiie T. Grant, Buffalo 
Morns E. Hall, Akron 
Rose A. Hartwtck, Tonawinda 
Bern ice B. Hatch, Delevan 
Flora T. Hauck. Hamburg 
Mabelle Allene Heath. Hamburg- 
Adelia A.Heitmen. Buffalo 
Mine Irene Holahan, Barker 
Ruth Holly Westfirld 

Ette"Alice Hoaehke, Niagara Falla 
Alice Maud Humphrey, Ransomville 
Florence Frances Johnston, Buffalo 
Winnifred Lorena Keeler. Union 
Ads Mar Kidder. Buffalo 
Alice A. King, Buffalo 



Primary and kindergarten course 

Elate Baltic Newman, Poland 



LOCAL BOARD 

William H. Clark, chairman; Theodore H. Wickwire, secretary; 
Lawrence J. Fitzgerald, treasurer; Hugh Duffy; Orris U. Kellogg; 
Israel T. Deyo; James M. Gilbert; John W. Suggett. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 235 

FACULTY 

Louis F. Snow Ph.D., who was appointed a member of the faculty 
in September 1908, after one year of most satisfactory service was 
called to the deanship of the department of education of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky and, therefore, tendered his resignation to take 
effect at the close of the school year. 

Principal Ulysses F. Axtell of Tuxedo Park was appointed to fill 
the place thus made vacant. Mr Axtell has had several years' ex- 
perience in public school work. He is a graduate of Colgate Uni- 
versity and comes to us well recommended. Lotta L. Stiles, who for 
three years had held the position of critic and model teacher in our 
primary department, resigned at the close of the school year. Her 
resignation was accepted and Alice C. Giff ord, a graduate of Bridge- 
water Normal School and Wellesley College, was appointed to the 
position. Emily C. Ormsby, critic and model teacher in the primary 
department, on account of ill health requested a year's leave of ab- 
sence without pay. Because of Miss Ormsby's long and faithful 
service this request was readily granted and her place was filled by 
the appointment of Jean Y. Ayer, a graduate of Bridgewater (Mass.) 
Normal School. Miss Ayer has had large and successful experience 
in the public schools of the State of New York. Owing to the re- 
organization of the courses of the normal school and the addition of 
a kindergarten department, Minnie M. Alger's work in music had 
grown to such an extent that it was deemed advisable to give her an 
assistant. For this position Jenny L. Robinson, a graduate of the 
Cortland Normal School and Syracuse University, was selected. 

Owing to the above changes the faculty for the coming year is as 
follows: Francis J. Cheney A.M. Ph.D., principal; William A. 
Cornish A.B, mathematics and arithmetic methods; Charles B. 
Robinson A.B. A.M., methods and superintendent of the school of 
practice; Leyton S. Hawkins A.B., science and science methods; 
R. Elliott Owens A.B., Latin, Greek and Latin methods ; Daniel R. 
Campbell A.B., assistant in science; Ulysses F. Axtell A.B., logic, 
elocution and literature methods; Clara E. Booth, German; Helen 
M. Goodhue, drawing; Caroline M. C. Hawkins A.B., Latin, Eng- 
lish and grammar methods; Minnie M. Alger, music and music 
methods; Mary W. Butler, physical training and methods; Agnes 
Orr-Carson, French; Harriet Day A.B., high school English; M. 
Elizabeth Mason Ph.B., history, civics and methods of American' 
history; Mary A. Lattimer, manual training; Emma J. Davies, 
assistant in physical training ; George O. Moore A.B., principal and 



236 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

critic intermediate department; Ella Gale, critic and model teacher 
intermediate department; Katherine E. Moran, critic and model 
teacher intermediate department; Jenny L. Robinson, critic and 
model teacher intermediate department; Ella M. Van Hoesen, 
principal and critic primary department ; Lela E. Wilson, critic and 
model teacher primary department ; Jean Y. Ayer, critic and model 
teacher primary department; Alice C. Gifford, critic and model 
teacher primary department; Ellen C. Lombard, principal kinder- 
garten department; Bertha L. Hill, assistant kindergartener; Edith 
F. Rainev, stenographer and confidential clerk. 

GRADUATES 



Eva Lindsey, Di-yden 

Elmer A. McAllister, Cortlinil 

Mabel Blanche Miller, Cortland 

CecileJ. Mott, Cortland 

Lena Emelioe Spencer, Blodgctt Mill: 

Scnora A. P. Stedman, Cortland 

Laura Lydia Slrowbridge, Cortlan " 

Tuna TiBoUon, «—'---■ 



Tuna TiHouon, Hartford 
Rath A. T " 

Maud Well 



English course 



Professional course 

Louise Alden Adams, Slingerlanda 



jid, SotnL 

Helen Marie Billings. Earlville 
Florence May Bosworth, Truiton 
Florence Olive Bradley, Binghamton 
Grace Breadon, Cuba 
Edward J. Buckley. Cortland 
Margaret E. Bump. Cortland 
Margaret May Burke, J.mesville 
Elisabeth V. Caveney, Ithaca 
Agnes Belle Chandler, Pitcher 
Alpha F. O ark. En sen ore 
Georgia A via Coleman, Trumansburg 
ft, Gertrude Comerford, Tnuton 
Agnes B^ Connelly, ^ial 



Cortland 



. Elmii 



Frances E. Daffy, Clinton 
Jeanette England, Palatine Bridge 
ferrule Kloriue Eppley. Port Chester 
Minnie Coleman Esten, Tioga Center 



I. Gaxon. Etna 
train* Gerard, Elmtra 
e W. Gilmore. Cato 

"a Ging, Greenpon 



Ada Belle Hamilton, Cayugm 
Anna Josephine Hanly, Clinton 
Clifford L. Harding, Brccsport 



Dorothy C Heffernan, Moravia 
Jane Stevens Higham, Rome 
Tiljie Belle Hilhs, Bingnamton 
' Ella A. Horton, Walworth 
.Libbie Aletta Howard, Sherburne 
•Grace A. Howell, Riverhead 

-Vedah Maud 

Cora Jane I: 

GraceE. Hot _. _ _ 

Phebe C. Hnrlburt, Cohocton 
Bernice A. Jakway, Ctto 
. Nena May Jones, Norway 
Winifred Belle Kellogg, Brewerton 
Georgian F. Laaon, Homer 
Jennie A, Loomia, Hubbardivllle 
Edna L. Lotridge, Cincinnatua 

Ssephine W, Lynch, Cortland 
arguerite Alice Lynch, Utica 
Marie K. Lynch, Owego 
Mary A- Lyons, Cortland 
Anna P. Mack, Marathon 
Mary Electa Mat : ' " 



1 Maybui 



Kate Mayeumber. Cortland 
Wilms F. McDowell, Savona 
Mary E. Meagher, fcirkville 
France. R. Miles, Greenport 
Harriet J. Monka, Big Flab 
Lillian iodic Monks, Big Plata 
Edith ElUabeth Monaon, Deposit 
Nellie E. Morse, Leranna 
Adah M. E. Newton, Cortland 
Mary Elizabeth Nlver, McGraw 
Caroline Louisa OaJcea, McGraw 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Maude A. Smith, Bath 
Stella Agnea Stark. Greenport 
Ague. E. Sweeney. Ceylon 
Lillian A. Tracy. Tally 

Anna E. Preaton, be Ruyter Florence E. Tucker. Homer 

Ellen A. Quinn, Cuba Ellie H. Van Duyne, Moravia 

May Either Riley, Cortland Ethel Irene Walrath, Fayetteville 

wimmU. R o n njn. r™.i.„j Daily W. Whiting, Jordan 

Isabelle M. Whitmore, Cortland 
Lola Agnes WJIdman, McGraw 
Mabel E. Williama, Ithaca 
Martha T. Wilion Valoii 



a i, vviiion. vuou 
: B. Wood, Ogdrnsb 



Primary-kindergarten course 

Jeaaie Bartholomew, Cortland Charlotta A. Herring, Glov 

Maude E. Colby, Owego 

Kindergarten course 



a F. E. Sheri . ,., 

Clara H. Stall, Binghamton 
Edith I. White, Syracuse 



High school course 



. , Cortland William S. Hereon, Cortland 

tine M. Burt, Blodgett Mill Tamca Edward Lanigan, Cortla 

France* Butler, Cortland Harry A. Maaon, McLean 

Helen Clark, Cortland Gerald Dayton Peet, Cortland 

Ethel M. Cumminga, Preble Morria G. Shepard, Cortland 



LOCAL BOARD 

Samuel H. Albro Ph.D., president; Howard M. Clarke, secretary 

and treasurer ; Samuel C. Crandall ; W. A. Holcomb ; William S. 

Stearns. 

FACULTY 

At the close of the school year 1908-9, Miss Grace McKinstry, 
teacher of French' and German, was granted leave of absence for 
one year by the board, which action was subsequently approved by 
the Department. The board also received, at the close of the last 
school year, the resignation of Mr Glenn W. Woodin, teacher of 
history. On June 12 Miss Mina L. Nitschke was elected by the 
board to teach French and German for one year to cover period of 
leave of absence granted to Miss McKinstry. On July 27 Miss 
Rachel M. Jarrold was elected teacher of history. Both elections 
were subsequently approved by the Department 



238 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



The faculty for the coming year is as follows : 

Myron T. Dana Ph.B. Pd.D., principal, pedagogy; Andrew Y. 
Freeman, superintendent of practice; Franklin N. Jewett A.M., 
sciences; Homer L. Holcomb A.B., ancient languages; George G. 
McEwen A.M. Pd.B., mathematics ; John L. Dahl A.B., assistant in 
sciences; Anna McLaury B.S. Ph.M., English; Grace McKinstry 
B.S. A.M., modern languages ; Julia J. Shepard, drawing and Manual 
training; Edna Fuller, director of physical training; Carrie L. 
Record, primary methods and principal of junior department; Jessie 
E. Hillman, instrumental music ; Edith N. Curtis, assistant in draw- 
ing and manual training; Margaret H. Start, vocal music; Mina L. 
Nitschke A.B., French and German ; Rachel M. Jarrold A.M., his- 
tory; Julia D. Sherman, principal of senior department; Jennie M. 
Merrill, criticism and model teaching; Clara M. Dailey, criticism 
and model teaching; Harriet E. Putnam, criticism and model teach- 
ing; Laura E. Treadway, criticism and model teaching; Frances H. 
Killen, criticism and model teaching; Jessamine Ellison, criticism 
and model teaching; Ethel L. Kilts, criticism and model teaching; 
Edith Graves, supervisor of kindergarten ; Ama L. Lester, director 
of kindergarten ; Clara A. Ross, principal's clerk. 



GRADUATES 



Professional course 



Agnes Francis Adams, Forestville 
Esther Elizabeth Clark, Jamestown 
Grace May Cookingham, Cherry Crcclc 
Erie Edward Crane, Portland 
Margaret W. Crane, Dunkirk 
Rose J. Harley, Frewsburg 
Hilda Morse Hequembourg, Dunkirk 
Winifred Ingersoll, South Dayton 
Neva Tracy Kingsley, Falconer 
Sadie E. Markham, Dunkirk 
Gertrude Matters, Dunkirk 
Dora Blasdcll Merrill, Dayton 
Edith B. Nason, Portland 
Mabel M. Newlove, North East 



Alice M. Oberg, Frewsburg 
Nina Belle Oehser, Dunkirk 
Josephine Ogniben, Fredonia 
Florence C. Parker, Mayville 
Florence Ellen Parsons, Dunkirk 
Alice McClanathan Rolph, Fredonia 
Genevieve Anna Ryan, Steamburg 
Corabel Shannon, Perrysburg 
Mildred R. Shenfield, Knapps Creek 
Tessie Caroline Sullivan, Brocton 
Mary Thornton, Frewsburg 
A. Ella Williams, Verona Mills 
Julia E. Winchester, Fredonia 
Laura Dysa Worster, North East 



Kindergarten course 



Mabel Harriett Jackett, South Dayton 
Olive Helen Lovell, Fredonia 



Laura Beatrice Schwartz, Youngstown 



Normal preparatory course 



Dorothy Lampert Beebe, Fredonia 
Harvey M. Harrington, Frewsburg 



Ellen May Shero, Fredonia 



College preparatory course 



Flora Edith Benjamin, Fredonia 
Clara Durlin Dana, Fredonia 
Ruth Eleanor Flanklin, Fredonia 
Ethel Adelaide Gould, Fredonia 



Lawrence David Johnson, Fredonia 
Edith Smith, Fredonia 
James A. Valone, Fredonia 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



239 



Piano music course 



Maude Baumgartner, Dunkirk 
Hildegarde Bohn, Dunkirk 
Sidney E. Dark, Fredonia 
Susan K. Dieffenbach. Dunkirk 
Suxette Flagler, Westfield 



Frances Loomis Knight, Westfield 
Florence C. Parker, Mayville 
Mildred Rogger, Dunkirk 
Jesse McLean Sidey, Dunkirk 



Geneseo 



LOCAL BOARD 

Since the last report John R. Strange resigned from the local 
board and his place was filled by Frank K. Cook. The membership 
of the board is now as follows : 

William A. Brodie, president; Lockwood R. Doty, secretary; 
Lloyd W. Crossett, treasurer; James W. Wadsworth; William A. 
Wadsworth ; Frank K. Cook ; George B. Adams ; Walter E. Lauder- 
dale; Otto Kelsey. 

FACULTY 

Mr Bailey was excused during the first half of the year in order 
to complete his course at Syracuse University and his place was 
filled during that time by Joseph L. Briggs jr. Miss Rebecca S. 
Knight resigned about the first of March to take a position in the 
Bellingham Normal School, Bellingham, Wash., and her work was 
finished by Miss Harriet Bushnell. The following is the faculty for 
1908-9. 

James V. Sturges M.A., principal, didactics; Frank E. Welles 
Ph.D., vice principal, Latin and Greek; W. Fowler Bucke Ph.D., 
principal of training school and pedagogy; Charles J. Campbell 
B.A., science ; Reuben L. Countryman, mathematics ; Guy A. Bailey, 
biology; Byron S. Whitney, physical training; Lydia I. Jones Ph.B., 
methods; Ida M. Mendenhall M.A., methods; Christabel Abbott 
Ph.B., English and expression; Annie O. Collins B.A., English; 
Alfaretta L. Curry, vocal music; Mary E. Day, drawing; Emeline 
S. Curtiss, history; Emily A. Beseler, French and German; Cas- 
sandra Harmon, physical training; Georgia H. Reeve, principal 
intermediate department and methods ; M. Louise Russell, principal 
primary department and methods ; Elizabeth J. Burlingame, criticism 
and model teaching ; Rebecca S. Knight, criticism and model teach- 
ing; Florence P. Tuttle, criticism and model teaching; Grace 
Frechette, criticism and model teaching ; Anna J. Gannett, criticism 
and model teaching ; Mary H. Knight, criticism and model teaching ; 
May E. Lanpher, criticism and model teaching; Mary E. Wilcox, 
criticism and model teaching; Maude Bussing, kindergarten; Mary 
A. Thompson, assistant in kindergarten; Anna D. Beitzel B. Pd., 
secretary. 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

GRADUATES 
Professional course 

d Minerva May Hoag, Pougbkeepslt 

Adda Hockenbery. Bradford, Pa. 
Alice Nolasco Hughe., Rochester 
Carrie L. Jamison. Canisteo 
Dora Annabel Keilerman, Blanch 
Rhea C. Kittell, Baldwinjville 
Bertha Kyle. Ml Morris 



Mary 

Evclyi 



ac Link, Ml Morris 

Belle Leete, East BloomSeld 

i MicAlpin, Bradford, Pa. 

Idella McFarland, Farmersville Sta- 



Helen Fuller Mason. Hamburg 
Isabelle H. M»»on, Homell 
Winifred Merrill, Rushford 
Mabel Evelyn Monroe, New R 
Minnie Moran, Olean 
Lena E. Moraheimer, Lyons 
Millie Olmstead, Livonia 
"laud E. R. F' - 



Bertha L. Sharer, Cc__ 
Clara l'\ Sinrbir, Caledi 
Rtlith Vivian Teeta. Ho 



d San ford, Kendal] 
'.Naples' 1 ' " 



Earl W. Bennett, Groveland Wright R. Ilenty. Avon 

Frances A. Brown, Gmeseo Herbert G. Honeywell, Gene* 

Raymond Arthur Brown, Genesco E. Ola Miller, York 

Jjifia E. Cafaill, Gencseo Elmini Curtice Robinson, (let 



English course 

Mary E. Wheeler, Geneseo 



Primary-kindergarten course 

Sadie E, Morse. I 

Bessie Frances Rnc .... 

Bertha A. Rogers, Castile 



Alice I. Bryan, Savona Sadie E, Morse. Rochester 

T E, Coddln " _ . - ... . 

Maude o'^C^Me&a^RMheTtVr' Lillian" s''Wa*eT," New" Sochelle 



iry E. Coddington, Geneaeo Bessie Frances Rhodes. Palenville 

lith Margaret Mac" ' - ■' * " - ■" 



New Paltz 

LOCAL BOARD 

Albert K. Smiley, president ; Alton B. Parker ; Jacob D. Wurts ; 
Josiah, J. Hasbrouck, treasurer; John Schmid, secretary; Charles M s 
IJarcfwirt ; G. D. J}, Hasbrouck ; Daniel Smiley ; Frank J. LeFevre.. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 24I 

The year has been important in the history of the school, marking 
as it does, the completion of the new building and the consequent 
reorganization of the school. The new building is well adapted to 
meet the needs of the school, while the work of the school has been 
so planned as to make the most of the building. Some radical 
changes in organization have been effected. The arbitrary division 
between the primary and grammar departments has been removed, 
three principalships have been abolished, and all the departments of 
the school have been brought into close relationship. The one ses- 
sion day has been replaced by the two session day and the elaborate 
scheme of student self-government has been done away with. The 
course of study has been simplified, waste of time and effort is re- 
duced, and increased efficiency results. 

FACULTY 

There have been a number of changes in the faculty during the 
year. Early in the fall Miss Burgess resigned on account of poor 
health, and Miss Morgan to accept a better position elsewhere. In 
November Doctor White passed away quite suddenly. He was a 
most estimable man as well as an efficient teacher, and his loss is not 
only that of the school but also of the profession. 

The faculty for the year just closed follows : John C. Bliss A.B. 
Pd.D., principal; Elmer E. Arnold A.B., mathematics; Angie E. 
Badger, drawing supervisor; Luna E. Bigelow B.S., geography, 
grade supervisor; Grace V. Brown, grade supervisor; 1 Lillian M. 
Burgess, grade supervisor; Alix S. Cameron, drawing; Michalena 
Carroll, history ; John B. Corcoran, manual training ; Inez F. Damon, 
Mus.B., music ; Grace M. Drake, clerk ; Ida Evans, grade supervisor ; 
Ella A. Fallon, reading, assistant in charge of practice work; Wil- 
liam G. Fuller Ph.G., science ; Kitty A. Gage A.B. A.M., Latin and 
French ; Letitia Harris, physical director ; Anna B. Herrig, general 
method, in charge of practice work; Maud Keator, penmanship, 
grade supervisor; Cora M. Littlefield, history of education, grade 
supervisor ; *Anna M. Morgan, physical director ; Sarah A. Nichols, 
domestic science ; May H. Noyes, kindergarten ; Charlotte E. Reeve, 
arithmetic, grade supervisor; Ellen E. Shaw B.S,, nature study, 
grade supervisor; Blanche B. Shelp, assistant in training school; 
Margaret K. Smith Ph.D., psychology, logic and German; Alva T. 
Southworth A.B., English ; **William F. White A.B. A.M., mathe- 
matics. 

1 Resigned. 
IDecease* 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION ) 



GRADUATES 

Normal course 

Maud S. Livingston, Clintondale 



Marior. _. -_ , 

"■ r M. Peacock, t 



1 E. Ryan, ~. 
id C. Itydi 



Ryder, Monroe 

hars <_. hihi achoon maker. Lake Mohonk 

Eva j. D Ethel D. Schoppe, New York 

Elsie DuBois, Forest Glen Edna M. Schulu. Unionville 

Hirforla DuBois, New Palti Ha«l A. Silvernail, Poughkeeosie 

Caroline A. DuMond. Yonkers Mabel Snyder. High Falls 

Daisy M. Ellsworth, Port Ewen Margaret K. Stewart, Ncwburgh 

Edith M. Gwkell, Ellenville Arrietta Stilwell, New PatU 

Katherine F. S. Glenn, Glenham Mabel Talada, Rhinebedc 

Florence E. Gone, Kingston Mary J, Thomas, Ovid 

Eupheme J. Guernsey, Yonkers Came Van Syckle, New Palti 

Florence L. C. Harrison, Jamaica Adele Duryee Van Wagenen, New Palti 

Cora C Ionian. New York Lrla M. Wilkina, Yonkers 

Gladys B. Jones. Gloversville Ola Wissing. Staatsburg 

Lucy C Kelly, Matteawan Elisabeth V. Wynn, Rosendsle 

Mabel W. Krautc, Yonkers Eliiabeth Young, Newburgh 
Beatrice P. Leonard, Kingston 

Primary-kindergarten course 

Eunice M. Browning, Hyde Park Alice M. Ford, Highland 

Jennie L. Dann, Honticello Bertha Given, Dumont, N. J. 

Oneonta 

LOCAL BOARD 

The presidency of the local board of managers is made vacant by 
the death of William H. Morris. Mr Morris had been president 
since the establishment of the school in 1889, and a large part of the 
success of the institution has been due to his abilities, his wise coun- 
sel, and his zealous devotion. In his death the school has suffered 
great loss, and the members of the local board and the faculty 
mourn for him as a wise and able official and a warm persona! friend. 

The present membership of the board consists of the following 
gentlemen : 

Henry Bull, secretary and treasurer; Walter L. Brown; James 
Stewart; George I. Wilber; Eugene Raymond; Willard E. Yager; 
George Kirkland ; Frederick A. Mead ; Hobart Krum ; Harry W. 
Lee. 

FACULTY 

In June, Howard Lyon, for 16 years professor of science, resigned. 
Miss Ada K. Smith, graduate of the State Normal and Training 
School at Oneonta, and of Syracuse University, and a teacher with 
several years of experience, was appointed to the position made 
vacant by the resignation of Professor Lyon. In April, Miss Helen 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 243 

Grant Irving, for four years critic and model teacher, resigned. 
Miss Sarah M. Walker, graduate of the State Normal and Training 
School at Brockport, with several years of experience in the schools 
of Yonkers, was appointed to the position made vacant by the resig- 
nation of Miss Irving. In April, Miss Florence M. Richards, for 
three years critic and model teacher, resigned. Miss Mabel Par- 
sons, graduate of the State Normal and Training School at Platts- 
burg, with several years of experience in the schools of Yonkers, 
was appointed to the position made vacant by the resignation of 
Miss Richards. In June, Miss Bertha M. Loveland, for two years 
critic and model teacher resigned; Miss Katharine H. Tobey, 
graduate of Wellesley College and Columbia University, was ap- 
pointed to the position made vacant by the resignation of Miss Love- 
land. In July, Miss Ida E. Bach,, for one year teacher of music, 
resigned. Miss Elizabeth Gleason, graduate of Mount Holyoke 
College, was appointed to the position made vacant by the resig- 
nation of Miss Bach. In December, Miss Helen M. S. Sanborn, for 
10 years teacher of elocution, resigned. Miss Lotta A. Jones, 
graduate of the Emerson College of Oratory, and a teacher of suc- 
cessful experience, was appointed to the position made vacant by the 
resignation of Miss Sanborn. In November, Miss Jessie M. Whal- 
lay, for two years teacher of drawing, resigned. Miss Caroline 
Jenkins, graduate of Syracuse University, with several years of ex- 
perience in the Utica Free Academy, was appointed to the position 
made vacant by the resignation of Miss Whallay. 

The faculty for the year 1909-10 is as follows: Percy I. Bug- 
bee A.M., D.Sc, principal; Arthur M. Curtis B.S.. mathematics and 
methods; Edwin F. Bacon Ph.D., modern languages; Frank D. Blod- 
gett, A.B. A.M., logic, history and science of education ; Charles A. 
Schumacher A.B. Ph.D., psychology and methods of literature; Ada 
K. Smith B.A., sciences and methods; Kate M. Denison, methods 
and English; Elizabeth Gleason B.A., music; Caroline Jenkins, 
drawing ; Lotta A. Jones, reading and elocution ; Florence M. Matte- 
son B.S., history and methods ; Louisa P. Hicks, physical training ; 
Frank G. Sanford, manual training; Eliza E. Gee, principal inter- 
mediate department, model teaching and criticism; Cora H. Petit, 
principal primary department, model teaching and criticism ; Sarah 
M. Walker, model teaching and criticism; Helen C. Fritts Pd.B., 
model teaching and criticism ; Frances Alice Terrill, model teaching 
and criticism ; Caroline D. Hurlbutt, model teaching and criticism : 
Katharine H. Tobey B.A. M.A., model teaching and criticism ; Mabel 
Parsons, model teaching and criticism; Kate B. Cristman, model 



244 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



teaching and criticism ; Mary V. Donnellan B.A., model teaching and 
criticism ; Jessie Scott Himes, kindergarten ; Edith H. Murray, 
kindergarten assistant; E. May Hurlbutt, principal's clerk; Claire 
A. Tlurlbut, special assistant. 

At the Center Street School : 

Addie E. Hatfield, principal ; Estella Matteson, model teaching and 
criticism, grade 7 ; Anna B. Seaver, model teaching and criticism, 
grade 6 ; Mabelle M. Boynton, model teaching and criticism, grade 
5 ; Alice L. Esmond, model teaching and criticism, grade 4 ; Blanche 
C. Fuller, model teaching and criticism, grade 3 ; Jennie M. Greene, 
model teaching and criticism, grade 2; Ellen E. Hitchcock, model 
teaching and criticism, grade 1. 



GRADUATES IOjOO. 

Normal course 



A. Lou 



Alexander. Croton-on-Hudaon 
1 Andrew. Corinth 
Atkin. Patchoeue 



Etbel 

Willi™ H. Austin, ucuiora sit 
Grace L. Avery, Ilion 
Miry Elizabeth Bier, Oriskany 
Dora L. Baker. Ballston 
Pearl C. Baldwin, Leonardsville 
Haiel M. Ballard, Walton 
May E. Barrett, BultviHe 



Grac. 






Marie H. 1 
H. Augusta 



Kinky 



Albany 






Elizabeth T. Cotter, Glens F 
Anna Coughlin, Kingston 
Ina B. Crosier. Salem 
Grace L. Daymon, Mamaron. 
Emily Dersey, Rome 
Nelle E. Dowie, Andes 
Ethel A. Eddy, West Wsrdil 
Anna F_ Ehrenfele, OneonU 
Nina J. Elphick, Earlville 
Minnie L. Eratnona, Worcei 
Marjorie M. Failey.Utica 
Maude L. Farant, Ticondero 
Elizabeth J. Finite, Unedilla 
Peart E. Gage. Gilbcrtiville 



Ava Jenks. Oneonta 
Grace B. Jones, Ulica 
Beulah G. Judo, Oneonta 
Helena F. Kelley. Hamilton 
Anna S. Kentzel. Sandy Hill 
Lou Knapn, Nsrrowsburg 
Ellen F. Lawler, Richfield Springs 
Lillian S. Lent, Mont Rose 
Florence E. Lewis. Fownal, Vt. 
Claude L. McCabe. Oneonta 
Mary H. McCarthy. Udca 
Margaret MeDoogai, Walton 
Ellen M. McLaughlin, Mamaroneck 
Marguerite M. McMahon, New Hartford 
Marguerite MacDuff, Schenevua 
Cornelia Mackey, Gilboa 
Elizabeth K. Mac-Millan, Schenectady 
ITate-1 E. Makelcy, Hcn«onvi11e 
Margaret K. Malatiey. Ticondtroga 
Anna M. Malloy. Ilion 
Winifred M. Mayer*, New Rochelle 
'■ . Miller, Oneonta 



Elizabeth J. Miller. Argyle 
Alma 7. Miner, West Oneonta 
Anna B. Moon, Cooperslown 



A. More, North Harpersfield 
umx O. Moshier, Ulica 
Alice E. Munson, Windham 
Jessie H. Murray, Seneca Falls 
Marcia B. Nellis. Oneonta 

S:nnie E. Northun, Moriah 
eba E. Owen, Rem-en 
Mary A. Palmer, Delhi 
Myrtle E. Parker. Edmeaton 
Grace Peck. Camden 
Edith D. Peel, Laurens 
Edna Earle Penney, Port Cheater 
Irene L. Pfleeger, Deerneld 
Emma A. Pieraon, Lake Mzhonac 
Helen T. Potter, Marcy 
Anna M. Rauacher. Vernon 
Mabel M. Reed, Cooperatowo 
Ellsworth H. Rni-.inson, Center Mor 
Lillian M. Si.rdam. Hoosick Falls 
Ethel Sarah Teachout, Oneonta 
Sadie J. Teetaell, Saugertiea 
Lillian D. Robb, Norwich 
Helen Rowe, Oneonta 
Celia C Royles. Uric* 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPOfct 



245 



Maud V. Ryder, Goulds 

Janet L. Sayles, Mohawk 

Lucy M. Seltzer, Wellsville 

Margaret M. Seymour, Center Moriches 

Nellie Barber Snippy, Sandy Hill 

Iva G. Smith, Oneonta 

Mildred H. Smith, Milford 

Stephen V. Smith, Port Washington 

Golda B. Snell, Utica 

Lillian Stack, Oneonta 

Mary K. Steen, Blue Point 

Marcia F. Stewart, Norwich 

Lillian St John, Port Jervls 

Nina Til den, Brooklyn 

Martha B. Tobey, Walton 



Mercye E. Traver, Corinth 

Mae Truman, Oneonta 

Virgil Joel Ullman, Sharon Springs 

Mary Vanwoert, Bainbridge 

Ursula L. Vogt, Utica 

Irene Walker, Utica 

Mary E. Walters, Prospect 

Martha Eliza Ward, Poultney, Vt. 

Nellie V. Wedderspoon, Cooperstown 

Henrietta K. Wheeler, Interlaken 

Margaret White, Utica 

Ethel M. Whiting. Middleville 

Ethel P. Wilcox, Milford 

Pearl E. York, New Berlin 



Kindergarten — primary course 



Eva H. Breese, Gouverneur 
Marcia Z. Brown, Remsen 
Elizabeth P. Dickinson, Oneonta 
Margaret Durfee, Gloversville 
Inez L. Gordon, Patchogue 
Stella A. Hackley, Bridgewater 
L. Hazel Hall, Richmond Hill 
Mary A. Haynes, Patterson 
Nellie L. Hull, Fort Edward 
Ivah Kniskern, Bainbridge 
Frances T. Manion, Herkimer 



Mabel E. Manion, Herkimer 
Maude Elizabeth Miller, Utica 
Bessie C. Porter, Gloversville 
A. Hope Robertson, New York 
Eunice E. Shearer, Mineville 

iessie B. Sherwood, Binghamton 
luth Vanwoert, Bainbridge 
Bertha H. Wesel, Nyack 
Olive H. Westcott, Fairhaven, Vt. 
Edith Young, Camden 



Classical course 



Claire B. Ackley, West Oneonta 
Maida Blanchard, Oneonta 
Grace M. Heath. Middle Granville 
Frank Charles Huntington, Oneonta 



Iva L. Ottaway, Oneonta 

Cora M. Quackenbush, Oneonta 

Florence Z. Shafer, Argus vi lie 



English course 

Pearl Bradshaw, Schenectady Luzerne Westcott Crandall, Oneonta 

Kindergarten course 

Mary B. Sizeland, Syracuse 



Academic course 



Marian Lois Carr, Oneonta 

George Nelson Eddy, Pleasant Valley 

Wesley Hanford, Oneonta 



Harry Mull, Oneonta 
George Scatchard, Oneonta 
Harvey A. Strong, Laurens 



Oswego 



LOCAL BOARD 



Gilbert Mollison, president; John Dowdle, secretary; Robert A. 
Downey, treasurer; Cadwell B. Benson; Laurence Qancy; Fred- 
erick O. Clarke; S. Mortimer Coon; Francis E. Cullen; P. W. 
Cullinan ; Thomas D. Lewis ; Merrick Stowell. 



FACULTY 



Isaac B. Poucher A.M. Pd.D., principal; Walker G. Rappleye 
B.S., methods of arithmetic, algebra and geometry, also algebra and 
geometry; Charles S. Sheldon, botany, physiology, zoology, nature 



246 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



methods, and criticism of teaching same in the training school; 
Amos W. Farnham A.M., physical geography, methods of teaching 
geography, criticism of teaching same in the training school, school 
economy and school law; Richard K. Piez Pd.D., psychology, his- 
tory of education, form and drawing methods ; David Gibbs Ph.D., 
superintendent of the training school, and general method; Joseph 
C. Park, manual training, criticism of teaching same in the training 
school, and drawing; Chester Higbee Tether Ph.B., methods of ad- 
vanced and elementary science, criticism of teaching same in the 
training school, physics, and chemistry; Herbert J. Smith A.M., 
Greek, Latin, methods of Latin, and logic; Caroline L. G. Scales 
Ph.B., methods in literature, ancient history, English history, Eng- 
lish composition, and English fourth year; Lydia E. Phoenix M.A., 
methods in reading, physical culture, vocal music; Mary H Mac 
Elroy, methods American history, Teacher in English third year, 
story work methods and criticism of teaching same in the training 
school ; Madame Jeannette Grossen, French, German, Spanish, Ital- 
ian ; Carrie V. Sinnamon, principal of grammar department of train- 
ing school, critic in training school, teacher of English first year, and 
methods in grammar; Mary L. O'Geran, principal of intermediate 
department in training school, methods in penmanship, sewing, bas- 
ketry, weaving, and critic in the training school ; Harriet E. Stevens, 
principal of primary department, supervisor of clay modeling, 
methods of primary reading, and critic in the training school; 
Katherine A. Hayes, general assistant, critic in arithmetic, and 
methods in number; Amanda P. Funnelle, principal of the kinder- 
garten department and teacher of kindergarten methods; Elizabeth 
G. Holmes, assistant in kindergarten; Sarah I. Brown, A grammar 
grade, teacher of English second year, assistant librarian ; Florence 
Bunker, supervisor of drawing, American history, librarian, assist- 
ant in vocal music; Allen W. Poucher, private secretary to the 
principal. 

GRADUATES, JANUARY I909 

Normal course 

• 

Sadie A. McFerran, IHoti 

Ellen A. McGraw, Syracuse 

Emma McWilliams, Middletown 

Katherine Murray, Syracuse 

Ella Elizabeth Nodda, Oswego 

Bertha F. Penny, Adams 

Amy E. J. Seel ye, Vorkville 

Alice Rose Stevenson, Oswego, R. F. D. 5 

Mattie Elaine Swezey, Patchogue 

Margaret King Welsh, Oswego 

Elizabeth Whitcombe, Knoxboro 



MTGertrude Cahill, Utica 
Lottie H. Case, Marcellus 
Bertha E. Cuyler, Red Creek 
Catherine Loretta Fitzgerald, Oneida 
Mary Martina Hayes, Syracuse 
Margaret C. Heagerty, Oswego 
Mane R. Keefe, Syracuse 
Nellie Stewart Kettle. Oswego 
Agnes Kirwan Lee. Oswego 
Marc ell a Martin, Oswego 
Edith M. Mac Vicar, Syracuse 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



247 



Kindergarten-primary course 



i 



Roberta Jackson Ayres, Mlddletown 
~osephine Helen Bough, Oswego 
rfary Evelyn Carroll, Oswego 
Bertna Louise Comings, Middletown 
Rutb Anna Coughlin, Fayetteville 
Mabel Louise Culkin, Duluth, Minn. 
Lulu Farrell, Oswego 
Mabel Alice Hamlin, Baldwinsville 
Veronica Margaret Hanson, Oswego 



Evelyn Rose Healy, Oswego 
Carrie Calista Jackson, Syracuse 
Emma Mary Kanzog, Little Falls 
Emma Dorothea Kirshner, Oswego 
Ethel Augusta Lawrence, Middletown 
Charlotte Norton, Oswego 
Catherine Winifred Roche, Oswego 
Jane Taylor. Oswego 
Sadie E. Whittemore, R. F. D. 4, Oswego 



Kindergarten course 

Marea R. Brandt, Syracuse 



GRADUATES, JUNE I909 

Normal course 



Edna Rozina Andrews, Oswego 
Stella May Bennett, Milford 
Jean Betzner, Hornell 
Nellie Edith Bits. Plainville 
Mary Florence Buckley, Utica 
Florence Bunker, Oswego 
Claire L. Cook, Syracuse 
Margaret Frances Cullinan, Yonkcrs 
Helen Marion Decker, Oswego 
Margaret Helena Depew, Peekskill 
Ella M. Dickerman, Peekskill 
Effa Louise Dillin t Adams Center 
Mary Adetaide Failey, Auburn 
Nellie Mabel Fitch, Pulaski 
Frances Theodora Fleming, Syracuse 
Bertha Margaret Hager, Auburn 
Nellastine G. Hartshorne, Hamilton 
Edythe Snyder Hill, Greenwich 
Jessie Etola Holley, Mexico 
Catharine Agnes Keating, Rome 
Clara Josephine Kelly, Oswego 
Irene Gertrude Kelly, Oswego 
Clarence F. Larav, Constableville 
Mary Ethel Macklin, Oswego 
Catherine Monica Major, Peekskill 
Anna Agatha Manning, Red Creek 
Agnes Mansfield, Syracuse 
Blanche M. Maynard, Fair Haven 



Harold Leishman McCall, Oswego 

Bessie C. McDay, II ion 

Marguerite Connelly McEnery, Syracuse 

Elizabeth A. McKeon, Ilion 

Mary Thyne McLane, Hamilton 

Anna M. Melody, Oswego 

Agnes Maria Morgan. Trenton Falls 

Blanche L. Morgan, Parish 

Kathryn May Morgan, Parish 

Ethel M. Orvis, Mexico 

Helen S. Osborne, Fulton 

Regina Josephine O'Shea, LeRoy 

Ella Mae Ralph. Belleville 

Emma Marion Regan, Oswego 

J. Clive Reynolds. Red (Creek 

Sarah K. Riley, Oneida 

Vera Luella Roberts, South Ilion 

Helen B. Rose, Patchogue 

Myrtie Folsom Scofield, Spencer 

Isabelle Boardman Smith, Chateaugay 

Bertha Inez Spaulding, Marcellus 

Everett Milton Stanley, South W. Oswego 

Estelle Dumont .Stone. Trumansburg 

Gladys L. Summers, Oswego 

Celeste Catharine Ward, Seneca Falls 

Veda M. Ward, Seneca Falls 

Mac Martin Weeks, Patchogue 



Kindergarten-primary course 



Marina M. Gardner, Oswego 
Ruth F. Lamoree, Oswego 
Olive M. Rosser, Marcellus 



Clara Cadwell Still, Middletown 
Josephine L. Worts, Herkimer 



Kindergarten course 

Carrie Grace Barrus, Fair Haven 



Paul Howard Galvin, Oswego 



Critic course 

Carrie V. Sinnamon, Oswego 



Manual training and mechanical drawing course 



Marea R. Brandt, Syracuse 
Clarence F. Lamy, Constableville 



Harold Leishman McCall, Oswego 
J. Clive Reynolds, Red Creek 



248 fcfeW YORK StAffi EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Plattsburg 

LOCAL BOARD 

Since submitting the last report the local board has been decreased 
by the deaths of the treasurer, Alfred Guibord and of Alex. 
Bertrand. E. C. Baker has been appointed treasurer in place of 
Mr Guibord, still retaining the position of secretary. 

The present composition of the local board is as follows: John 

B. Riley, president; E. C. Baker, secretary and treasurer; David 
Sherwood Kellogg A.M. ; Rowland C. Kellogg; John H. Moffitt; 
John F. O'Brien ; James Rogers ; George S. Weed ; John M. Wever. 

FACULTY 

At the close of the school year the resignation of Jenny Lind 
Robinson, model teacher and critic for the seventh grade and Lillian 

C. Dunn, model teacher and critic for the sixth grade, were presented 
and the places filled by the appointment of Anna M. Powers of 
Ilion, and Kate E. Hull of Plattsburg, respectively. 

The faculty is now composed of the following persons : George 
K. Hawkins M.A. D.Sc., principal; George H. Hudson, sciences; 
A. N. Henshaw Ph.D., ancient languages and pedagogy; O. W. 
Kitchell D.Sc, mathematics and logic; Guy W. Shallies, English; 
Henry F. Feuering A.M., modern languages; Elizabeth W. Bump 
Ph.B. Pd.B., history; Genevieve Andrews, drawing; Alice L. 
O'Brien, reading and elocution ; Margaret M. Garrity, music ; Anna 
L. Carroll, assistant in sciences; Edward A. Parks, principal of 
model school ; Anna M. Powers, critic grade 7 ; Kate E. Hull, critic 
grade 6; Lucy E. Tracy, critic grade 5; Sarepta E. Ross, critic 
grade 4; Mabel L. Chase, critic grade 3; Louise A. Perry, critic 
grade 2 ; Harriette A. Ingalls, critic grade 1 ; M. Alice Martin B.S., 
kindergarten ; Charlotte E. Chase, assistant in kindergarten ; Alice A. 
Crouch, physical director ; Edwin L. Taylor, manual training ; Anne 
J. O'Brien, librarian; Ollie H. Amsden, secretary. 



GRADUATES I909 

Classical course 

Frances Eleanor Bellegarde, Plattsburg Harriet Elma Mclntyre, Peru 

Una Marion Bigwood. Plattsburg Minnie Eleanor Manning, Half Moon 

Olive Wood Culver, Plattsburg Mary Agnes Potter, Stephentown 

B. Mabel Davison. Plattsburg Alma N. Trombley, Plattsburg 

Mary M. Hood, Ausable Forks Mary Elizabeth Trudo. Altona 

Edna M. Jacques, Morrisonville Anna Mary Vogan, Plattsburg 
Ethel L. Mclntyre, Peru 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 249 

English course 

Emma Mae Doyle, Plattsburg Marion Catherine Thew, Morrisonville 

Gertrude Frances Ryan, Jay Alice Eliza Weaver, Morrisonville 

General professional 

Agnes Helena Butler, Plattsburg Irene Elsie Hogue, Plattsburg 

Mae Ellen Calhoun, Middlebury, Vt. Georgia Ethel Lewis, Ticonderoga 

Olive Ada Deminp, Elizabethtown Genevieve S. McCannah, Ticonderoga 

Margaret Esther Finch, Lake Placid Club Marion Powell Mickle, New York 

Martha Mary Finch, Lake Placid Club Kathryn Minerva Nolan, Willsboro 

Valeda Alma Gagnon. Dannemora Gertrude Mary O'Mcara, Plattsburg 

Mary Agnes Geary, Ausable Forks Sara Louise Smith, Saratoga Springs 
Nona Agnes Grey, Ticonderoga 

Primary and kindergarten 

Harriet Mary Banfield, Plattsburg Anna Elizabeth Leonard, Whitehall 

Lottie Louana Belden, Plattsburg Ethel Mae Sleight, Whitehall 

Rose Mary Black, Fort Edward Mae Walker, Plattsburg 

Margaret Anna Carmody, Plattsburg Mary Emily Wilkins, Lake Placid 

Florence Martha Fisher, Burlington, Vt. Cora Amelia Wilson. Whitehall 

Kittie Mae Galvin, Qintonville Margaret Mollie Wolfe, Plattsburg 

Helen Preacott Lansing, Plattsburg 1 

Potsdam 

LOCAL BOARD 

Edwin A. Merritt LL.D., president ; George W. F. Smith A.B., 
treasurer; George H. Sweet A.M. LL.B., secretary; William R. 
Weed; Thomas Spratt; Frederick L. Dewey A.M. Ph.D.; 
Charles H. Leete A.M. Ph.D. 

FACULTY 

At the close of the first semester Professor Ara E. Ball re- 
signed as assistant in mathematics. The vacancy was filled by 
the election of Miss Myrtle G. Bond A.B. Miss Bond is a classi- 
cal graduate of this normal school, also a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and a teacher of successful experience. 
Miss Elizabeth Adams tendered her resignation as teacher of 
German for continued study abroad. Miss Alice M. Grandey 
Ph.B. was elected to fill the vacancy. Professor J. C. Tressler 
A.B. resigned to accept a position in New York city. Professor 
William Hawley Davis A.M., of Harvard, was elected as his 
successor. At the opening of the spring semester Miss Myra 
Hitchcock was elected as assistant in drawing. 

The faculty for 1908-9 was composed as follows: Thomas 
B. Stowell A.M. Ph.D., principal, psychology and pedagogy; 
Katherine M. Kellas Ph.B., preceptress, English, methods; 
Edward W. Flagg A.M., history, English literature, history of 
education; Julia Etta Crane, vocal music, methods; Freeman 
H. Allen A.M., arithmetic, American history, methods; Willis 



250 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



E. Bond A.B., mathematics, logic; C. A. Rosegrant A.B., Latin, 
methods; Adelaide Norris, principal of intermediate department, 
geography, methods; Wilhelmina Caldwell, principal kinder- 
garten department, kindergarten methods; Elizabeth M. Adams 
Ph.B., German; Jessie M. Leith, drawing methods; Edward D. 
Curtis A.M., Latin, French; Fayette T. Owen A.M., physics, 
chemistry; Rose E. Reeve, model teacher; Jennie C. Johnson, 
model teacher; Clara C. Russell, kindergarten assistant; Des- 
salee Ryan, model teacher; Alice H. Damon A.B., principal 
primary department, primary methods ; Mabel J. Cousins, model 
teacher; Anna P. Draime, Ph.B., English; Ernest W. Blood, di- 
rector of physical training; Minnie E. Plank, principal's secre- 
tary; J. C. Tressler A.B., English, public speaking; Ralph E. 
Wager A.M. Ph.D., physical geography, biology; Margaret B. 
Hawley Ph.B., English, librarian; Mildred Simonds, kindergar- 
ten assistant: Ara E. Ball, assistant mathematics; F. E. Haw- 
thorne, director, piano, organ, harmony; Harriet Crane Bryant, 
voice culture; Edith M. Austin, assistant vocal music; Richard 
M. Tunnicliffe, ^assistant vocal music; Irma Rassmussen, assist- 
ant vocal music; George A. White, janitor; John Forster, engi- 
neer and fireman. 

GRADUATES I909 

Classical 



Adella Veronica Broderick 
Mary M. Common 
Maude Hazel Emerson 
Marguerite Louise Gurley 
Florence Elizabeth Hunter 
Adelaide May Poole 
Margaret M. Regan 



Dennis Emmett Dullea 
John Bernard Guiney 
Ruth Margaret Lawrence 
Theresa Mary Looby 
Martha Louise Kendall 



Erne Georgia Ballou 
Elizabeth Marion Bicknell 
Hazel Jean Brown 
Ethel Mae Burton 
Genevieve Blanche Cardiff 
Catherine Louise Carey 
Lucy Maude Carmichael 
Charles Bridges Carruthers 
Margaret Estella Claffey 
Leda Leone Cline 
Florence Elizabeth Culver 
Mary Una Dandy 
Floetta Davis 
Winifred Davis 
Ethel Amanda Gilmour 
Ruby Mason House 
Freida Isabelle Hurst 
Edna Mae Ives 
Irene Jenkins 
Amy Brown Jones 



Nora Frances Regan 
Elizabeth Reynolds 
Howard Rolhn Sanford 
Mary 'Margaret Sullivan 
Myrtle Jeanne Thompson 
Sallie Allen Wright 



English 



Harold Franklin Martin 
Charlotte Catherine Morgan 
Irene Bridget Morgan 
William McNulty 
Anna Teresa Sullivan 



Normal 



Margaret Kelley 
Mary Ethel Lazenby 
Margaret Mathilde Liston 
Emma Luther 
Elizabeth Mary Mannix 
Mabel McCadam 
Grace Emma Messer 
Gladys Mary Louise Potter 
Agnes D. Randall 
Helen Marriette Rogers 
Elva Gertrude Sawyer 
Elizabeth Mae Smith 
Virginia Electa Snell 
Sarah Edith Sprague 
Mabel Edith Stancliffe 
Veda Belle Tanner 
Cynthia J. Thomas 
Minnie Elizabeth Tracey 
Blanche May Wainwright 
Floy Lois Williams 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



251 



Bertha Althea Constine 
Ercile Mae Farwell 
Nina Elizabeth Jeffers 
Agnes Gertrude Kellogg 
Mary Eleanor McCarter 
Elsie Shepard Miller 



Primary and kindergarten 



Celia Palow 
Marguerite Quigley 
Alice Nancy Rodger 
Ruth Hamblin Sails 
Mabellc Sayles 
Anna Teresa Sullivan 



Agnes Gertrude Kellogg 
Ercile Grace Lawrence 



Herbert Richmond Bicknell 



Verna Belle Austin 
Mildred Gladys Boomhowcr 
Emma Caroline Diehm 
Florence Felton 
Cora Evelyn Fuller 
Mary Elizabeth Haynes 
Harriett Louise James 



Kindergarten 

Eva May Peacock 

Classical academic 

Harry Leroy French 

English academic 

William Henry Joy 

Special music teachers 

Edward Frederic Joncas 

Flora Morrill 

Minnie A. Persons 

Zelia Reed 

Ethel Amiee Wager 

Jessie May Wicknam 

Cora Williams 



Bessie Mabel Avery 
Leah Marie Haywood 



Piano course 

Ora Phrenetta Lomber 



The Thomas S. Clarkson prize in pedagogics ($100) was 
awarded to Miss Adelaide Poole of the February class, and to 
Mr Howard Sanford of the June class. 



252 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



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Title II 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Among matters of especial importance that have recently en- 
gaged the attention of those who are concerned with secondary 
education are the growing interest in education for vocational 
ends, the quinquennial revision of the Academic Syllabus, and the 
rapidly extending acceptance of the diplomas granted by the 
New York State Education Department for purposes of admis- 
sion to colleges and universities. In their proper order these 
subjects will be considered in this section of the annual report. 



HTDTOTBIAL ARTS IN TEE HIGH SCHOOL 

Until recent years instruction in industrial arts in the United 
States has been left to private enterprise and beneficence. Here 
and there in most of the states the larger cities have established 
public manual training high schools, mostly during the last two 
decades, and private enterprise has provided abundant oppor- 
tunities for such education in the secondary grades. Prior to 
July 1908 four manual training or technical schools had been 
organized in the State of New York with teachers and students 
as represented by the following tabulation: 

Manual training and technical high schools 





TEA CHE B8 


STUDENTS 


mem school 


Men 


Women 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Manual Training (Brooklyn) 

Technical (Buffalo) 


46 

37 

6 

10 


58 

9 
83 


104 
37 
15 
93 


1 528 

1 236 

365 


1 622 

10 
3 895 


3 150 

1 236 

375 


Washington Irving (Manhattan) . 


3 895 


Totals 


99 


150 


249 


3 129 


5 527 


8 656 







264 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 255 

In addition to the opportunities offered by the above named 
schools, departments for manual training or domestic science 
or both have been established in the high schools of Albany, Bing- 
hamton, Glens Falls, Gloversville, Long Island City, Olean, Pough- 
keepsie, Saratoga Springs and Syracuse which doubtless swell the 
number of students taking such work in public secondary schools of 
the State to a total of 10,000. Similar courses in private institutions 
of secondary grade with highly specialized vocational courses pro- 
vide for the instruction of more than 10,000 students, so that the 
grand total of boys and girls, young men and women of the State 
taking courses in industrial arts exceeds 20,000. It is true that 
the majority of these students by special and extended training 
aspire to become directors of labor rather than laborers in the 
ordinary sense; but most of them must win their way to di- 
rective positions by promotion from the ranks, and although 
they may ultimately cease to be counted among the ranks of 
laborers, their progress through a shortened period of appren- 
ticeship and their final promotion to managing positions will 
serve as a wholesome stimulus to their fellow workers. 

So great and general has become the appreciation of second- 
ary education for vocational ends that several states have re- 
cently undertaken to make provision for training boys and girls 
directly for effective and profitable manual labor. As early as 
1894 Louisiana established the Industrial Institute at Ruston 
for the education of white children of Louisiana in the arts and 
sciences together with such practical industries as from time to 
time may be suggested by experience or such as will tend to 
promote the general object of said institute, to wit, the fitting 
and preparing of such children, male and female, for the prac- 
tical industries of the age. This institution now has property 
valued at $400,000 and maintains a five year course of instruction 
for about 600 pupils. Within the current decade the following 
named states have enacted laws for the promotion of industrial 
education, that is for the training of craftsmen as distinguished 
from manual training for general efficiency and culture : California 
1907, Connecticut 1907, Maryland 1908, Michigan 1907, New Jersey 
1907, New York 1908, and Wisconsin 1907. In Connecticut legis- 
lation has not resulted in the establishment of a single school. In 
Massachusetts the operation of the law and of the commission 
appointed in accordance with its provisions has resulted in the 
establishment of many evening trade schools widely distributed 



256 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

over the State and of a few industrial day schools. In New Jersey 
the result of the law of 1907 seems to have been mainly the collect- 
ing and compiling of data in regard to existing institutions, although 
the law makes generous provision for the establishment and mainte- 
nance of new schools for industrial education, duplicating all 
moneys raised by local subscription or taxation to any amount not 
exceeding seven thousand dollars for any municipality. 

MODIFICATIONS OF BEOTXBEMENTS FOB ACADEMIC AND COLLEGE 

ENTRANCE DIPLOMAS 

By action of the Regents on April 1, 1909 the requirements 
for academic and college entrance diplomas were modified so 
as to provide that the lowest grade of diploma shall be based 
upon a minimum passing mark of 60 per cent in each subject. 
This action was taken after much discussion in the Department 
and in the State Examinations Board and after many confer- 
ences and prolonged correspondence with college authorities rela- 
tive to the following requirements for academic and college entrance 
diplomas : 

1 In general, candidates for diplomas must prepare for ex- 
aminations in schools that have complied with the requirements 
of the State Education Department in respect to buildings, lab- 
oratories, laboratory equipment, libraries, and courses of study. 

2 In the public high schools of the State, instruction must be 
given by teachers of ascertained qualifications, licensed by the 
State Education Department or by local authorities, in accord- 
ance with regulations prescribed by the Department. 

3 In all secondary schools recognized by the State Education 
Department methods of instruction must have the approval of the 
Department based upon the reports of official inspector's who 
regularly visit the schools. 

4 The syllabuses or outlines in accordance with which studies 
are pursued have been prepared under the direction of the State 
Education Department by committees of well known teachers 
in secondary schools and colleges. 

5 All question papers for the semiannual examinations are 
prepared by committees consisting of three members each, viz, 
a representative of the secondary schools, a representative of 
the colleges and a representative of the State Education De- 
partment. These committees are appointed by the Commis- 
sioner of Education upon nomination of the New York State 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



257 



Examinations Board. All question papers are carefully reviewed 
by a committee of the State Examinations Board, known as the 
Committee on Final Revision, which consists of four represen- 
tatives of the State Education Department, two representatives 
of colleges and two representatives of secondary schools. 

6 All answer papers are read originally by teachers of the 
school in which they are written and then forwarded to the 
Examinations Division of the State Education Department in 
Albany for rereading and rating by the examiners of the Depart- 
ment. No paper is accepted or assigned credit for a diploma if its 
final rating falls below 60 per cent. 

Papers written by students who are unable to produce certifi- 
cates of instruction within approved schools for adequate time are 
not accepted upon a final rating of less than 75 per cent. 

In view of the above described exacting requirements, it was 
maintained that the academic and college entrance diplomas 
issued by the New York State Education Department are worthy 
of recognition by the colleges and universities for purposes of 
admission; and in recognition of the high standards of instruc- 
tion and scholarship demanded by these requirements the fol- 
lowing named institutions have agreed to accept, for purposes 
of admission, diplomas issued by the New York State Educa- 
tion Department in accordance with the amendment of the Re- 
gents Revised Rules, in so far as the qualifications for those 
diplomas meet the requirements for admission to the several 
institutions. 



NAMB OF COLLEGE 



Adelphi College 

Alfred University 

Amherst College 

Bates College 

Boston University. . . 

Bowdoin College 

Canisius College 

Colgate University. . . 
College of the City of 

New York 

College of St Francis 

Xavier 

Columbia University . 
Cornell University. . . 
Dartmouth College. . . 

9 



LOCATION 



Brooklyn, N. Y . . . . 

Alfred, N. Y 

Amherst, Mass 

Lewiston, Me 

Boston, Mass 

Brunswick, Me 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Hamilton, N. Y . . . . 

New York city 

New York city 

New York city 

Ithaca, N. Y 

Hanover, N. H 



PRESIDENT 



Charles H. Levermore Ph.D. 
Boothe C. Davis PhJD. D.D. 
George Harris LL.D. 
George C. Chase D .D . LL.D . 
William E. Huntington LL.D. 
William De Witt Hyde D .D . 
Rev. Augustine A. Miller S.J. 
Elmer Burritt Bryan 

John H. Pinley LL.D. 

Rev. Thomas J. McCluskey S.J. 
Nicholas Murray Butler LL.D. 
Jacob Gould Schurman LL.D . 
Ernest Fox Nichols Sc. D. 
LL.D. 



258 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF COLLEGE 



Dickinson College 

Elmira College 

Fordham University. 

Franklin & Marshall 
College 

Hamilton College. . . . 

Hiram College 

Holy Cross College . . . 

Keuka College 

Manhattan College. . . 

Middlebury College . . 

New York State Nor- 
mal College 

New York University 

Normal College of the 
City of New York.. 

Polytechnic Institute. 

Rensselaer Polytech- 
nic Institute 

St Bona venture's Col- 
lege 

St Francis College 

St Lawrence Univers- 
ity 

St Stephen's College. . 

Simmons College .... 

Swarthmore College. . 

Trinity College 

Tufts College 

Union University. . . . 

University of Maine. . 

University of Penn- 
sylvania 

University of Roch- 
ester 

Wesleyan University. 

Williams College .... 

Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute 



LOCATION 



Carlisle, Pa 

Elmira, N. Y 

New York city 

Lancaster, Pa 

Clinton, N. Y 

Hiram, Ohio 

Worcester, Mass. . . . 
Keuka Park, N. Y.. 

New York city 

Middlebury, Vt 

Albany, N. Y 

New Y ork city 

New York city 

Brooklyn, N. V . . . . 

Troy, N. Y 

Allegany, N. Y 

Brooklyn, N. Y . . . . 

Canton, N. Y 

Annandale, N. Y . . . 

Boston, Mass 

Swarthmore, Pa ... . 

Hartford, Ct 

Medford, Mass 

Schenectady, N. Y. . 
Orono, Me 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Rochester, N. Y 

Middletown, Ct 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Worcester, Mass 



PRESIDENT 



George Edward Reed S.T.D. 

LL.D. 
A. Cameron MacKenzie D.D. 

LL.D. 
Rev. Daniel J. Quinn S.J. 

John S. StahrDD. LL.D. 

M. Woolsey Stryker D .D . LL.D . 

Miner Lee Bates M. A. 

Rev. Thomas E. Murphy S.J . 

Arthur Braden B.A. 

Rev. Brother Jerome 

John M. Thomas D.D. 

William J. Milne Ph.D. LL.D. 
Henry M. MacCracken LL.D . 

George S. Davis LL.D . 
Frederick W. Atkinson Ph.D. 

Palmer E. Ricketts C.E. 

Rev. Joseph F. Butler 
Brother Stanislaus 

Almon Gunnison LL.D . 
William C. Rodgers S.T.D. 
Henry LefavourPh.D. LL.D. 
Joseph Swain M.S. LL.D. 
Flavel S. Luther Ph.D. LL.D. 
Frederick W. Hamilton D.D. 

LL.D. 
Charles A. Richmond D D . 
George E. Fellows Ph.D. LL.D. 

Charles C. Harrison LL.D . 

Rush Rhees LL.D. 
William A. Shanklin D.D. 
Harry A. Garfield LL.D. 

Edmund A. Engler Ph.D. 
LL.D. 



The above list includes the names of 43 colleges and universities 
as against 31 included in the report of the preceding year, or a gain 
of nearly 40 per cent. 



ACADEMIC EXAMINATIONS 



During the year persistent care has been taken to make the 
academic examinations reasonable in severity without becoming 
unduly lenient. Questions have been based upon fundamental 
principles of the subjects under examination and upon the ordinary 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 259 

and regular aspects of the subject such as are thoroughly taught and 
carefully reviewed in the course of instruction. Questions which 
deal with exceptions and unusual forms, conditions and construc- 
tions have been sparingly used and have been made as subordinate 
in the examinations as the facts or conditions which they represent 
are subordinate in the body of instruction. While questions involv- 
ing constructions or demonstrations which require independent and 
original thinking have not been wholly excluded from the examina- 
tions, especially in mathematics and science, it has been recognized 
that such questions must not predominate in examinations which 
must be written within a limited time by students who are under 
the. stress of a prolonged mental effort and confronted with the 
consequences of success or failure. 

Especial care has been taken to arrange questions in such groups 
that candidates are required to cover every major division of a 
subject outlined in its syllabus. 

For the excellent content and form of the question papers much 
credit is due to Superintendent Edward L. Stevens, Principal La- 
mont F. Hodge, President Daniel J. Quinn, and President John H. 
Finley, who devoted their time unsparingly, with the Assistant 
Commissioners and the Chief of the Examinations Division to the 
final revision of the question papers. Credit is also due to the 
following committees of representative teachers and members of 
the Department who prepared the original drafts of the question 
papers. 

English 

Gilbert S. Blakely, first assistant in English, Morris High School, 

New York city 
Dartmouth, B. A., M. A. ; Harvard, M. A.. 

George R. Carpenter, professor of rhetoric and English com- 
position, Columbia University 
Harvard, B.A.; University of the South, D.C.L 

Mae E. Schreiber, instructor in English, State Teachers Institutes 



Hiram H. Bice, first assistant in Latin and Greek, DeWitt Clinton 

High School, New York city 
Johns Hopkins, B.A. ; Hamilton, M.A. 

Henry F. Burton, professor of Latin, University of Rochester 
University of Michigan, M.A. 

Vera Thompson, examiner in Latin, Education Department 
Cornell, Ph.B. 



260 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Greek 

Ernest L. Meritt, principal of high school, Gloversville 
Wesleyan University, B.A.; Yale, M.A. 

Newton Lloyd Andrews, professor of Greek, Colgate University 
Colgate, B.A., M.A. ; Hamilton, Ph.D.; Chicago, LL.D. 

Annie T. Keyser, State Education Department 
Vassar, i year; Cornell, 2 years 

Hebrew 

Max Radin, first assistant, Newtown High School, New York 

city 
College of the City of New York, B. A. ; New York University, LL.B. ; 
Columbia University, Ph.D. 

Charles P. Fagnani, associate professor of Old Testament lan- 
guage and literature, Union Theological Seminary, New 
York city 

College of the City of New York, B.A., B.S.; Columbia University, 
LL.B.; Western Reserve University, D.D. 

Loring W. Batten, professor of Old Testament literature and 
interpretation, General Theological Seminary, New York city 
Harvard, B.A.; University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D. ; Hobart College, 
S.T.D. 

German 

Helen M. Knox, head of German department, Ithaca High School 
Cornell, B.A. ; University of Berlin, special course 

Herman C. G. Brandt, professor of German, Hamilton College 
Hamilton, B.A., Ph.D. 

Horace L. Field, examiner, State Education Department 
Cornell, B.A. ; Columbia, M.A. 

French 

Elwin A. Ladd, principal high school, Batavia 

Cornell, PLB. 

Charles A. Downer, professor of Romance languages, College of 
the City of New York 
College of the City of New York, B.A. ; Columbia University, Ph. D. 

Agnes O. Carson, teacher of French, Cortland Normal School 

Student in Paris, 1898-1901 

Spanish 

Earl S. Harrison, instructor in Spanish, Commercial High School, 

Brooklyn 
University of Toronto, B.A. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 26l 

Clarence K. Moore, professor of the Romance languages, Uni- 
versity of Rochester 
Harvard, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

John T. Fitzpatrick, Education Department 
Cornell, B.A. 

Italian 

Harry A. Potter, Girls High School, New York city 
Harvard, B.A. 

Everett Ward Olmsted, professor of Romance languages and 
literatures, Cornell University 
Cornell, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Francesco Ettari, instructor of Romance languages, College of 

the City of New York 
Royal University of Naples, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Lit.D. 

History and economics 

William Fairley, first assistant in history, Commercial High 

School, Brooklyn 
Amherst, B.A., M.A. ; University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D. 

Frederic C. Foster, professor of history and acting professor of 

political science, St Lawrence University 
Wabash College, B.A., M.A. 

Eugene W. Lyttle, State inspector of schools, Education Depart- 
ment 
Hamilton, B.A., Ph.D. 

Mathematics 

Arthur M. Scripture, principal of high school, New Hartford 
Hamilton, B.A., M.A. 

Thomas S. Fiske, professor of mathematics, Columbia University 
Columbia, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Mary E. Shaw, examiner of mathematics, State Education De- 
partment 
Cornell, B.A. 

Physics 

George M. Turner, head of science department, Masten Park High 
School, Buffalo 
Amherst, B.S. 

John S. Shearer, professor of physics, Cornell University 
Cornell, RS., Ph.D. 



262 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Howard Lyon, teacher of science and science methods, State 

Normal School, Oneonta 
Lafayette College, M.S.; Harvard, B.A. 

Chemistry 

Robert W. Fuller, first assistant in physics and chemistry, 

Stuyvesant High School, New York city 
Harvard, B.A., M.A. 

Arthur P. Saunders, professor of agricultural and general chem- 
istry, Hamilton College. 
Toronto University, B.A. ; Johns Hopkins, Ph.D. 

Charles N. Cobb, State inspector of schools, Education Depart- 
ment 

Syracuse, B.A., M.A. 

Biology 

Arthur E. Hunt, first assistant in biology, Manual Training 
High School, Brooklyn 
Syracuse, Ph.B. 

William D. Merrell, assistant professor of biology, University 
of Rochester 
Rochester, B.A.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 

Arthur G. Clement, State inspector of schools, Education 
Department 
Rochester, B.A. 

Physical geography 

Edward P. Smith, principal of high school, North Tonawanda 
Rochester, B.A. 

Thomas C. Hopkins, professor of geology, Syracuse Univer- 
sity 
De Pauw University, B.S., M.S.; Leland Stanford Jr University, M.A. ; 
Chicago University, Ph.D. 

Charles T. McFarlane, principal State Normal School, Brock- 
port 

Michigan State Normal College, Pd.M. ; New York State Normal Col- 
lege, Pd.D. 

Commercial subjects 
William E. Weafer, principal commercial department, Cen- 
tral High School, Buffalo 
Henry H. Denham, principal Business High School, Syracuse 
Michigan, B.S. ; Cornell, graduate student, 1893-95 

Grace D. Allen, examiner, State Education Department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 263 

Drawing 

Harold H. Brown, Stuyvesant High School, New York city 

Student, one year, Lowell School of Design, Boston; diploma, four 

years, Massachusetts Normal Art School, Boston; student, two years, 

£cole des Beaux Arts, Paris 

Julia A. Hill, head of the normal art department, Syracuse 
University 
University of Oregon, B.A. ; Columbia University, B.S., diploma in fine 
arts 

Mark M. Maycock, head of the drawing department, State 

Normal School, Buffalo 
Syracuse, B.P., M.P. 

Music 

Hollis E. Dann, professor of music, Cornell University 
Alfred University, Mus.D. 

For college graduate professional certificate 

Psychology, history of education, principles of education and 
methods of teaching 

Jacob R. Street, dean Teachers College, Syracuse University 
Victoria University, B.A. ; Toronto University, M.A. ; Clark University, 
Ph.D. 

Thomas M. Balliet, dean New York University, New York 

city 
Franklin and Marshall, Ph.D. 

Edward N. Jones, principal Training School for Teachers, 

New York city 
Hamilton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Preacademic 

English, history and spelling 
Erie S. Ackley, principal of high school, Richfield Springs 
Syracuse University, Ph.B., Ph.M., Pd.B. 

John D. Wilson, principal of Putnam School, Syracuse 
Mae E. Schreiber, Education Department 

Arithmetic and geography 

Seward S. Travis, principal of high school, Greenport 
Columbus N. Millard, supervisor of grammar grades, Buffalo 

public schools 
Jeremiah M. Thompson, principal State Normal School, Potsdam 
Colgate, Ph.B.; State Normal College, Pd.D. 



3i 938 


27 474 


33 922 


32 795 


H 239 


11 628 


16 102 


14 662 



264 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

STATISTICS OF ACADEMIC EXAMINATIONS 

Held in schools 1906 1907 1908 1909 

Answer papers written... 270 546 263 526 327 326 385 113 

Answer papers claimed... 218 282 215 623 261 467 315 225 

Answer papers allowed. . . 180 411 181 975 229 014 280 680 
Percentage of all papers 

allowed 66.6 69.1 70 72.9 

Held for professional students 
in Buffalo. Syracuse. Albany and 
New York 

Answer papers written . . . 
Answer papers allowed. . . 
Percentage of all papers 

allowed 44.6 42.3 47.5 44.7 

The total increase in the number of papers written in schools 
over the number for the previous year is 63,800, and over the 
number for 1907 the increase is 121,587. The percentage of 
papers allowed based upon the total number of papers written 
is 72.9 per cent as against 70 per cent for the previous year. 
It is probable that the slight increase in the percentage of suc- 
cess is due in part to the recommendation of the Examinations 
Board that question papers be shortened and in part to the con- 
scious effort of the examiners to make questions based more 
upon the commonplace body of subject-matter thoroughly 
taught and well drilled and less upon unusual and exceptional 
matter. 

Of the papers claimed by the schools 89.2 per cent were al- 
lowed by the Department as against 87.6 per cent allowed dur- 
ing the previous year. This seems to indicate that the stand- 
ards maintained in the schools are more and more nearly ap- 
proximating the standards established by the Department. 

BESULTB OF ACADEMIC EXAMINATIONS IN SCHOOLS 

The following table will show the results of examinations held 
in secondary schools during the entire year 1908-9. Results of 
the examinations held for professional students will be found 
in the complete tabulation under Exhibit I. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



265 



Academic examinations in schools, January and June 1909 



English 

1 st year 

ad " 

3d - 

three years 

4th year 

four years, N. Y. C. . 

grammar 

hist. Eng. language 
& lit 



German 
zst year. 

ad - . 

3 i " ■ 

4th " . 



French 
1 st year. 
ad " . 

3d - . 
4th " . 



Spanish 
1st year. 

ad ■ . 
3<* " . 



Italian 
1st year. 

ad r . 



Latin 

iSv yctir. • ••»••••« 

grammar 

elem. composition . . . 

Caesar's Com 

Cicero 

intermediate, N. Y. C. 

Virgil's Aeneid 

advanced, N. Y. C. . . 
prose composition . . . 

prose at sight 

poetry at sight 



•a 
« 
M 
P. 

06 

*M 
«H 
2 H 

M 
« 

a 

D 
55 



26 335 
13 613 
10 091 

6 399 

10 487 

399 

8 384 

628 



76 036 

9 7i6 

9 234 

4 373 

37i 



33 693 

4 189 

4 404 

1 935 

25» 



zo 786 

no 

183 

23 



3x6 

8 
ia 



17 

9 
10 

ia 

4 

1 

a 

a 
a 
1 



20 

641 
641 

584 
776 

255 
935 
275 
534 
910 
05a 
133 



r 



H 

M * 

H 
0. 



23 
3-0 

3.6 

6.1 
z.o 

23 
10.7 



32 

43 

3.6 

0.8 

1.6 



30 

3-o 
1.3 

0.7 
2.3 



z.8 

36 
4.9 

31 .7 



57 

OO.O 
OO.O 



OO.O 

S o 
3.8 

1-9 
42 

25 
O.9 

2.4 

1-7 

1.8 
17.0 
15.6 



65 726 4.0 



H 

M 

eo 
M 1 
OB 6 
Ooo 

H S 

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• Pi 

£* 

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to 6 

o f 

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ssss 
mm 

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Pi 



M 

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IS 1 
17.8 

'ft 

so. o 
3.0 

13.3 
34.8 



15.4 
17.4 

11 .6 

8.0 

11 .6 



320 
36.0 

33 -o 
37.9 

34.o 

16.4 

18.8 

37.4 



133 

13.8 
10.9 

7-8 
11. 6 



11. 5 

10. o 

18.0 

8.7 



145 

00.0 
33-4 



313 

36.7 

19-3 
30.7 

31.3 



30.4 

30-9 
33-2 
42.4 
31.3 
48.3 
33.3 

33.6 



22.6 



34.3 
38.0 

23-5 
16.3 



25.4 

n. 8 
19.7 

31 .7 



17. 1 

12.5 
25.O 



31.2 
36.0 

37.1 

36-9 

36.1 



28.6 

37.3 

33.1 
31.8 
37.3 



30.1 
18.3 

19. 1 
00.0 



17.4 

12.5 

8.3 



20.0 20.0 



13.8 

11. 8 
8.3 

17-3 
16.3 

10. o 

30.6 

13. 

15-3 

3ii 
36.0 



30. o 

33.3 
17.8 

25.4 

33-5 
37.3 
3».3 

33 -o 
30.6 

243 
34.1 



14.4 337 



zo.o 



23.3 

27-3 

36.3 
38.3 
39-0 
36.0 

35-o 

24 -5 

13-0 
15.0 



35 3 



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fit 



30. 3 
X2.3 

15.2 
SO. I 

8.0 
32.4 

43-5 
14.5 



18.9 

25.6 

39-4 
336 

39.4 



33.5 

318 
37.8 
36.3 
43.6 



31.2 

56.4 
38.3 
47-9 



45 3 

75-o 
33-3 



50.0 

38.0 

34.9 
46.6 

36.9 

19-5 
33.8 

13.8 

l8 -3 
37.8 

14.6 
19-3 



33.6 



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85.6 
93.0 
88.5 
84.9 
95.6 

75-3 
74.2 

930 



87.2 

85-1 
76.0 

84.3 
87-3 



80.0 
87.7 
84.8 

799 
93.0 

67.6 
56.5 

85.5 



81.4 67.5 



81. 1 
86.5 
78.6 
80.9 



82.8 

70.9 

74.3 
73-9 



73.1 

63.5 
91.7 



80.0 

71. 1 

74.1 

64.7 
84.3 

91. 1 

83.9 

94.7 
86.0 

83.3 
93.4 
92.3 



81. 1 

74-4 
60.6 
66.4 
70.6 



68.3 
73. a 
63.8 

57-4 



68.8 

43-6 
61.7 
52.1 



547 

25.0 
66.7 



50.0 

63.0 

651 
53-4 

73-1 
80.5 

77.3 
87.3 
81.7 
73.3 

854 
80 7 



77. 2| 6? 4 



266 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Academic examinations in schools, January and June 1909 (continued) 



Greek 

1 st year 

grammar 

elem. composition . . 
Xenophon s Anabasis 

Homer's Iliad 

advanced, N. Y. C. . . 
prose composition . . . 

prose at sight 

Homer " 



Hebrew 

grammar 

Psalms of David . 



Mathematics 
advanced arithmetic 
elementary algebra 
intermediate • 
advanced " 

plane geometry . . . 
solid 

plane trigonometry 
spheric " 



Science 

physics 

chemistry 

biology 

elem. botany 

adv. - 

elem. zoology 

adv. - 

physiology 

physical geography. . 



History & social science 
ancient, 3 hour 

- 5 " 

European, 3 hour 

;> «... 

Great Britain, 3 hour 

American history & 

civics 

economics 



CO 

ft. 

H 

0. 

< 
ft. 

ex 

< ex 

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ti 
M 

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a 

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237 
321 

226 

3i 
18 

60 
149 

95 
61 



z 652 



1 

31 

7 

z 

18 

2 
1 



160 

639 
016 

177 
562 

676 

S4i 
629 



64 400 



11 

3 



092 

195 
10 629 

9 284 

473 

4 27° 

337 
14 236 

3 287 



56 803 



i 



5 
4 



811 
882 
118 

255 
556 
122 



8 690 

1 439 
907 



35 78o 



H 

M 
(A 

Si 
°3 

« 

M 
ft. 



IO.5 
6.2 

10.8 

8.5 
6.7 

9-4 

6.3 

213 



93 

00.0 
00.0 



00.0 

8.9 
19.0 

139 
26.9 

12.2 

15-9 

25-9 
11 .1 



16.4 

7.0 
6.7 
7.0 
6.9 

5-7 
9.9 

o-3 



6.3 

59 
6.9 

25 

5-5 

5-5 
4.0 

3-i 
1.6 

8.3 



51 



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ex 
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l8.2 
l8. I 

239 
22.8 

37-8 
30.0 

255 

30-5 
32.8 



24.4 

IOO. O 
IOO. o 



100.0 

15-4 
17.9 

16.5 
18.9 

14.9 

20.4 
20.8 

15.3 



17.0 

16.8 
18.6 

21. 1 

20.I 

I4.6 

28.2 

6.5 

14.5 
16.5 



I8.4 

16.3 
16.3 

93 

7-i 

J l' s 
18.0 

15.6 

9.0 

26.0 



16.3 



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22.8 
26.2 
29.6 
28.6 
29.8 

35-0 
28.9 

24.2 

27.9 



37.5 

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OO.O 



OO.O 

17-7 
20.6 

159 

16.3 

17.7 
18.3 

14. 1 

16. s 



18.8 

24.3 
27.0 

29.6 

26.3 

24.3 
29.9 

16.3 

27.2 

30 -2 



27.2 



237 
22.5 

16.2 

22.7 

243 
27. I 

273 
l6.8 

33-9 



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22.1 
I9.9 
I9.4 
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20.0 
l8. 1 
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9.8 



19.2 

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OO.O 



OO.O 

23- 
16.9 

15-7 
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19-5 
16.7 

152 

16.9 



17.6 

273 
26.1 

27.0 

26.6 

23-9 
19.8 

19.9 

25.2 

295 



347 



26.0 

32.5 
28.7 

46.6 

29.0 

3o-5 
27-3 
31-4 
19.7 
20.3 



29.6 



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253 
27.4 

17.3 
18.4 

18. 1 

179 
8.2 



19.6 

00.0 
00.0 



00.0 

349 
25.6 

38.0 

22.8 

35-7 
28.7 

24.0 
40.2 



30.2 

24.6 
21.6 

i5-3 
20.1 

31-5 
12.2 

57.o 

28.8 

20.0 



22. 1 

21.6 

25.6 

25.4 

35-7 
22.2 

23.6 

22.6 

52.9 
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24.3 



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«**£; 


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°*2 

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ft. 


84.4 


74.7 


8:5 


72.6 
82.7 


88.9 


8l.6 


92.0 


86.7 


96.7 


91.7 


89.3 


81.9 


92.6 


82.1 


95.1 


91.8 



87.2 

1 00.0 
100.0 



100.0 

75-3 
78.6 

4.0 



»37 
71.8 

75-7 
82.2 

75o 



76.1 

81.9 
84.6 
90.0 

87.5 
83-1 
94.1 
77.2 
82.2 
89.4 



85.9 

88.6 
82.8 
02.4 
80.4 
84.7 
86.4 
86.4 

79-3 
99 -o 



80.4 

100.0 
100.0 



zoo.o 

65.1 

74.4 

62.0 

77.2 

64.3 
71.3 

76.0 

59.8 



69.8 

7 §* 4 

78.4 
84.7 

79-9 
68.5 

87.8 
43 -o 



I 



1.2 
0.0 



856 



779 

78.4 
74.4 
74.6 

643 
77.8 

76.4 
77-4 

*7 X 
88.5 



75 7 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



267 



Academic examinations in schools, 


January and June 


1909 


(cone 


luded) 






* fc 


£ 


H 


H 


H J 


■ • 

H H 




n 


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« 


4 


06 


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09 


09 6 


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5? 55 


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X <* 


* - 


K ~ 


K 


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n n 


a"'© 




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H 


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H Q 


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35 H 


*B 


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* H 


M 
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^ 06 


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M £ 


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55 rf ° 


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n 


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95 


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0. 


0. 


0. 


0, 


h 


Commercial subjects 
















business corresp 


733 


2.6 


"■3 


20.9 


20.7 


44.5 


88.5 


55.5 
28.1 


* arithmetic . . 


1 853 


1.2 


43 


9.0 


>3-6 


71.9 


44.1 


com'l geography .... 
• law 


1 963 


3-6 


10.4 


I9.6 


30.8 


35" 


72.0 


64.4 


867 
153 


10.3 
11. 7 


24.5 
177 


29.6 

*3 -5 


249 
17.7 


10.7 
294 


92.2 
83.O 


89.3 

70.6 


history of commerce . 


stenography, 1st test. 


1 57o 


25-3 


27.8 


136 


8.8 


24.5 


89.O 


75.5 


ad test. 


809 


22.0 


24.2 


8.9 


57 


39-2 


88.4 


60.8 


bookkeeping 


6 135 


12.7 
6.8 


20.1 


21.0 


21.5 


24.7 


83.9 


75.3 


adv. bookkeeping. . . . 


860 


11 .6 


20.2 


23.1 


38.3 


797 


61.7 


business practice .... 


191 


2.6 


IS 'Z 


33.0 


251 


24.6 


91. I 


754 




3 303 


i-7 


15.8 


27.9 


23-4 


312 


91.4 


68.8 


tvpewritinc 


1 3 2 ° 


6.4 


235 


27.1 


24.0 


19.0 


91 .1 


81.0 








19 756 


9.0 


17.4 


20.7 


20.7 


32.2 


8l.7 


678 


Drawing 


















elementary 


ao 65a 
6 36a 


a .a 


12 .O 


24.2 


25-9 
21.7 


35-7 
20.5 

44.8 


Z5- 8 
87.8 


643 
797 


advanced general. ... 


7-7 


22.4 


27.9 


art 


25a 


1. a 


12.3 


x 3-i 


28.6 


86.9 


55-2 


• mechanical 


528 


47 


l8.2 


21.0 


18.2 


37-9 


77-5 


62.1 




27 794 


3 5 


144 


24.9 


24.9 


323 


78.7 


677 


Other subjects 












1 






psychology and prin. 












| 






of ed 


53i 
z 080 


7-4 
6.3 


20.7 
18.O 


3«-3 
28.5 


21-5 
23-9 


14. 1 


94. 5 


85-9 
76.7 


history & prin. of ed 
harmony & counter- 


23-3 


94.8 


















point 


14 


7 . 1 


IA. 1 


21 .4 


28.6 


28.6 


85.7 

3 J -4 


71-4 
16.6 


rudiments of music . . 


663 


O.5 2.1 


4.8 


9.2 


83.4 


ear train. & mus. diet. 


17 


17.7 


a 3-5 


17.7 


11. 7 


29.4 


88.2 


70.6 


musical form & analy- 


















sis 


17 


23-5 


17.6 


17.7 


23-5 


17.7 


94. 1 


82.3 


acoustics & hist, of 




music 


27 


3-7 


14.8 


18.5 


7-4 


55-6 


81.5 


44-4 








2 349 


5 1 


14. 1 


23 3 


18.9 


38.6 


76.6 


61.4 


Total 


385 "3 


65 


15.8 


24.9 


25-7 


27.1 


81.9 


72.9 




WW 



268 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The following tabulations and summaries show the volume 
of business accomplished by the Examinations Division during 
the year: 

Papers rated in the Department 1909 

Preliminary 98 949 

Academic (schools) 315 225 

Professional 32 795 

Training class 18 475 

Training school 10 983 

Cornell scholarship 2 447 

State certificate 4 090 

Other teachers 1 926 

Total 1909 484 890 

Total 1908 391 848 

Increase 93 042 

Papers reported to the Department and recorded by the Ex- 
aminations Division 

Preliminary 256 196 

Academic , 348 020 

Cornell scholarship 2 747 

Training class . 18 475 

Training school 10 983 

State teachers 4 090 

Other teachers 1 926 

Medical 5 192 

Dental 1 890 

Veterinary 218 

C.P.A 306 

Nurse 5 634 

Optometry 121 

Total 1909 655 798 

Total 1908 593 415 



Increase 62 383 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 269 

Credentials issued 

Teachers certificates of all kinds 6 880 

College entrance diplomas 172 

Diplomas for high school subjects 1 307 

Academic diplomas 1 336 

Advanced diplomas 562 

Preliminary certificates 25 650 

Professional licenses on examination 1 368 

Professional licenses without examination 2 134 

Qualifying certificates 2 948 



42.357 

The total number of days' work spent in reading answer 
papers was 5492. The total number of days spent in clerical 
and other work of various kinds was 1 4,272 J^. It thus appears 
that the work of rating answer papers constitutes only 28$ of 
the work of the Examinations Division. 

A summary of the work of the division for the year would be 
as follows: 

Printing and distributing about 2,000,000 question papers; 
rating 463,039 answer papers ; issuing and recording 42,357 cre- 
dentials, including diplomas, licenses and certificates of all kinds ; 
indexing and recording under the names of about 1200 institu- 
tions 633,946 answer papers. 

Even these tables and summaries do not give an adequate 
account of the work. The correspondence of the division occu- 
pying the entire time of four stenographers and some of the 
time of more than four, in answering the endless variety of 
questions, the giving of special information related to the work, 
passing upon admissions to examinations, especially the pro- 
fessional examinations, and the large variety of things that can 
not be classified, are all to be considered in this connection, al- 
though they do not admit of classification and tabulation. 



270 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 






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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



jillil 

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-: 1 



272 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

STUDENTS 

The whole number of academic students reported for the year is 
121,600 including 107,090 in public high schools, 14,510 in 
academies and the preparatory departments of colleges. The net 
increase of academic students for the year is 14,181 indicating a 
normal and wholesome growth in this department of the educa- 
tional system. 



Registration of secondary students 1908-9 



in a in 

PUBLIC PRIYATB 

HIGH SCHOOLS ACADEMIB8 



First year 49 025 5 594 

Second year 27 908 3 654 

Third year 17 205 2 876 

Fourth year 11 335 1 777 

Unclassified 1 617 609 

Total 107 090 14 .510 

Graduated 1908-9 8 837 1 935 

DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN CITIES, TOWNS 

AND VILLAGES 

In cities 72 203 

In villages over 5000 6 113 

In villages between 2000 and 5000 7 634 

In villages under 2000 18 599 

SPECIAL 

Normal College, New York city 2 495 

New York Institution for the Blind, New York city. . . 20 

New York School for the Blind, Batavia 26 



107 090 



The gain in the enrolment in public high schools over that of the 
previous year was 11,920 or 11 per cent. The total number of gradu- 
ates from secondary schools was 10,772 or 8.9 per cent of all stu- 
dents enrolled as against 8.5 per cent for the previous year. 

a Includes academies departments of colleges (not included last year). 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 273 

Students entering higher institutions 

Training 
Normal classes and 
schools professional 

and and 

normal technical 
Colleges colleges schools Total 

From public secondary schools ... 2 147 648 2 139 4 934 

From private academies (includ- 
ing preparatory departments of 
colleges) 736 81 231 1048 

1 

Total 2 883 729 2 370 5 982 

Per cent gain over previous year. 38 50 51 44 

The total number of students entering higher institutions is 55.5 
per cent of the total number of graduates as compared with 45.7 
per cent for the previous year. From the above figures it would 
seem that the secondary schools of the State are rapidly gaining in 
efficiency to retain their students for the completion of courses 
and to inspire them to seek the advantages of higher education. 
This increase of efficiency in connection with a decreased per capita 
cost of maintenance amounting to about 10 per cent is gratifying 
to the officers of the Department as it must also be to legislators 
and taxpayers. 

APPORTIONMENT FOB FREE TUITION 
• Boys Girls Total Amount paid 

To cities 620 830 1 450 $25 754 88 

To villages of at least 5000 

inhabitants 469 630 1 099 19 045 87 

To villages of at least 2000 

inhabitants 908 1 331 2 239 39 059 37 

To villages of fewer than 

2000 inhabitants 2 623 4 139 6 762 114 184 01 

4 620 6 930 11 550 $198 044 13 

CHANGES IN LIST OF SEOONDABT SCHOOLS 

Academic departments of union free .school districts have 
been admitted to the University during the year at Croton-on- 
Hudson, Dickinson Center, Freeville (Hunt Memorial School), 
Griffin Corners, Jeffersonville, Manhasset, Mattituck, Morrison- 
ville, Rotterdam Junction, Syracuse (North High School) and 
Wallkill. The academic departments of the following unincor- 



274 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

porated schools were admitted: St Clara's Academic School, 
East Aurora; St Clare's School, Mt Hope; St Joseph's Academic 
School, Schenectady; and St Mary's High School, Lancaster. 

Provisional charters were granted to Chamberlain Military 
Institute of Randolph, to the Dickinson-Hurst School of Syra- 
cuse, to The Homestead School for Girls of Flushing and to 
the Travis Preparatory School of Syracuse. The provisional 
charter heretofore granted to Staten Island Academy (new or- 
ganization, nonstock corporation) has been replaced by an ab- 
solute charter. 

The Barlow School of Industrial Arts, Binghamton; Cary Col- 
legiate Seminary, Oakfield; Easton Union School; Hogansburg 
Academy; St Brigid's Academy, New York city; St Philomena's 
School of Brushton, and Staten Island Academy, New Brighton 
(old organization, stock corporation) were dropped and dis- 
continued from the University roll. 

During the year the names of "academic institutions were 
changed as follows: Augustinian Institute, Carthage to "Au- 
gustinian Academy of Carthage"; Callicoon Depot Union 
School to " Callicoon Union School " ; Despatch Union School 
to " East Rochester Union School " ; Syracuse Business High 
School to "Syracuse Technical High School"; and Ursuline 
Convent, Bedford Park, New York city, to "Academy of Mount 
Saint Ursula, Bedford Park, New York city." 

The following named schools have been registered as giving 
approved instruction : Wood's Business School of Brooklyn and 
Irving School, West 84th street, New York city. 

One junior and 14 senior schools have been advanced to high 
school grade; seven junior and six middle schools have been 
advanced to senior grade; and 12 junior schools to middle grade. 
The Altmar Union School was reduced from senior to junior 
grade, Buchanan Union School from middle to junior and Fish- 
kill Union School from senior to middle. 



The total amount expended for secondary schools during the 
year was $9,397,268.16, of which $7,060,314.72 was expended for 
public high schools and $2,336,953.44 for private academies. This 
represents an increase of $88,329.60 for public high schools and 
an increase of $166,000.32 for private academies, or a total net 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 275 

increase of $254,329.92 in the total expenditures for secondary 
education. 

The estimated value of grounds and buildings for public second- 
ary schools is $25,075,416; for private academies $9,757,366. These 
amounts represent an increase of $1,193402 for public high schools, 
and an increase of $2,859,016° for the academies, or a total increase 
of $4,052,418°. 

For building sites, repairs and furniture, the sum of $580,966.29 
was expended for the tax-supported high schools, representing a 
decrease of $534,977.62. The amount expended for the same pur- 
poses by academies was $581,271.50, an increase of $351,172.36*. 

In the tax-supported schools $4,768,578.38 was expended for 
teachers' salaries, an increase for the year of $364,779.58, the 
expenditure for the wages of teachers in academies was $618,541.02, 
an increase of $159,010.17°. 

The following table shows the per capita expenditure for sec- 
ondary education based upon registration in public high schools 
and in private academies. Both classes of institutions have materi- 
ally reduced the cost per pupil. 

1904-5 1905-6 1906-7 1907-8 1908-9 
Public secondary 

schools $76 97 $80 08 $79 62 $73 26 $65 93 

Private academies. 154 41 196 85 179 97 171 80 149 .. 

APPROPRIATION OP ACADEMIC AND LIBRARY FUND 

The amounts apportioned from the academic and library fund 
to the schools of the State for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1909, were as follows : 

For quota of $100 to each nonsectarian secondary 

school $64 700 . . 

For library books, apparatus and pictures 141 479 18 

For tuition of nonresident students 165 566 78 

For attendance of academic students 204 616 21 

Total $576 362 17 

NUMBER AND GRADE OP SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

The following table shows the number and grades of the 
secondary schools for the year ending July 31, 1909, and for the 
year preceding: 

a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 



276 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

High Senior Middle Junior Total 

1909 465 123 34 70 692 

1908 , 454 122 30 75 681 

PRIVATE ACADEMIES 

High Senior Middle Junior Special Total 

1909 126 6 9 20 1 162 

1908 . ... 118 10 8 21 2 159 

DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS IN CITIES, TOWNS AND 

VILLAGES 

In cities 75 

In villages over 5000 38 

In villages between 2000 and 5000 81 

Villages under 2000 495 

SPECIAL 

Cities 2 

Villages over 5000 1 



692 

REVISION OF THE ACADEMIC SYLLABUS 

In accordance with established custom the quinquennial re- 
vision of the Academic Syllabus has been in progress during the 
year. The thorough and scholarly work accomplished in the 
preparation of the syllabus of 1905 has precluded the necessity 
of making radical changes in subjects whose content and meth- 
ods have been established. A number of subjects, however, 
have not as yet become fixed in form or in content as high 
school subjects and some will appear for the first time in the 
syllabus of 1910. Among these are biology, physical geography, 
drawing, music, agriculture, domestic science, Italian and He- 
brew. Teachers in the colleges and high schools of the State 
have contributed generous service to the revision of the syllabus, 
and organizations of teachers have suggested desirable modifica- 
tions which will be incorporated in the new edition. Thus in a 
large sense the Academic Syllabus is a product of the schools 
of the State presenting the experience and practice of the best 
for the guidance and benefit of all. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



277 



STATE INSPECTION OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

During the year the inspectors of the Department have given 
careful attention to the maintenance of approved courses of 
study and to securing a rational apportionment of time among 
the subjects of the curriculum. This has involved a large amount 
of correspondence and discussions between the schools and the 
Department, but it has resulted in correcting much erratic and 
ill advised procedure. Careful attention has also been given to 
methods oi instruction and discipline and to supervision and 
administration in graded schools. Vigilant attention has been 
given to the proper care of books and apparatus provided in 
part by the State, and the Department has been insistent in its 
demands for the proper housing of the boys and girls in second- 
ary schools. 

During the year plans have been approved by the Commis- 
sioner of Education for new secondary school buildings as fol- 
lows : 



CITY OR TOWN 



Afton 

Angelica 

Auburn 

Boonville 

Briarcliff Manor 

Brown ville 

Candor 

Chautauqua. . . . 
Copenhagen .... 

Corning 

Croton 

Cuba 

Huntington .... 

Johnstown 

LeRoy 

Lindenhurst.. . . 

Luzerne 

Oceanside 

Ogdensburg. . . . 

Peekskill 

Pelham 

Pleasant ville . . . 

Rye 

Salamanca 

Skaneateles 

Springyille 

Wyoming 



MATERIAL OP 
CONSTRUCTION 



Brick 

u 
u 
It 

M 

it 

m 
« 
u 

M 

4 
u 

M 

w 
w 
w 

« 

M 

u 
u 

w 

« 

M 

M 
u 
u 



ROOMS 



ESTIMATED 
COST 



II 

8 

20 

19 
12 

6 
10 
8 
6 
8 
16 

13 
16 

22 

20 

16 

10 

22 

21 

35 
12 

12 

8 

18 

15 
26 

8 



$20 
21 

150 
40 

45 

15 

*5 

*5 
20 

48 

100 

5o 

95 
67 
80 

35 
20 

'5 
to 

150 

50 

50 

35 
90 

40 

75 
15 



£ 



000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



Total 



388 



$1 516 000 



278 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

While the above noted activity in providing substantial modern 
buildings for secondary schools is largely due to the public spirit 
and good business foresight of local authorities and of the people, 
it is also due to the readiness of the Department to supply plans 
and provisional estimates and in extreme cases to reinforce the 
influence of local boards with the authority of the State. 

TKB HUDSON-FUXTON OELEB&ATIOlf 

The Hudson-Fulton Celebration Commission, through its General 
Commemorative Exercises Committee, assigned to the Commissioner 
of Education the task of extending to the schools of the State 
information relative to the celebration; and for the purpose of 
arousing general interest in the schools the Commission offered two 
medals to each high school and to each academy in the State for 
the best essays on the discovery of the Hudson river or of the 
application of steam to navigation thereon, one medal to be awarded 
to a boy and one to a girl in each school. 

The Commissioner of Education immediately caused to be pre- 
pared an illustrated pamphlet for general distribution in the schools 
containing in compact form much valuable historical matter and 
suggestions for the preparation of essays, debates, maps and charts 
and other graphic representations, constructive work for smaller 
children, and tableaux for all ages and grades. The pamphlet also 
contained a short bibliography of accessible and helpful books to be 
consulted in the preparation of essays and debates. 

Under date of April 26, 1909, the commission sent to the principals 
of all high schools and academies a letter of instructions concerning 
the essay contest, and designating September 25 as the date on 
which the contest should be closed. 

No statistics have been collected showing how many essays were 
written ; but 387 high schools and academies reported the names of 
703 successful contestants to whom have been awarded handsome 
bronze medals with the names of the winners engraved thereon. It 
would be difficult to estimate in concrete and definite terms the 
widespread interest that was aroused by this contest in the history 
of the State of New York, or the permanence of that interest which 
will be perpetuated as the medals continue to be handed down from 
generation to generation. 

Medals were awarded to the following named students : 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



279 



Hudson-Fulton essay contest 

Winners of medals in public high schools 



NAME OF TOWN 



BOY 



GIRL 



Adams 

Akron 

Albany (High School) 

Albany (academic dep't 

N. Y. State Normal 

College) 
Alexandria Bay 
Altamont 
Altmar 
Amenia 
Amityville 
Andes 
Andover 
Angola 
Arcade 
Argyle 
Athens 
Auburn 

Ausable Forks 

Babylon 

Bainbridge 

Ballston Spa 

Batavia 

Bath (Haverling H. S.) 

Bay Shore 

Belfast 

Bergen 

Berlin 

Binghamton 

Black River 

Brewster 

Broadalbin 

Brocton 

Brooklyn [See New 

York city] 
Buchanan 

Buffalo (Central H. S.) 
Burdett 

Cairo 

Callicoon 

Canandaigua 

Candor 

Cape Vincent 

Cato 

Catskill 

Center Moriches 

Central Valley 

Champlain 

Chateaugay 

Chatham 

Chenango Forks 

Cherry Creek 



Everett J. Stafford 
Ransom M. Eckerson 
John A. Reilly 
Willis H. Morton 



John Davis Comstock 
William S. Christman 
W. Jay Ellis 



Gladys Tucker 
Pearl E. Barney 
Dorothy Pulis Lathrop 
Jessie E. Luck 



Blanche Frederick 



Perry Belmont Duryea 
James Aitken 
J. Archie Diffin 



Raymond Smith 
Harry McDougall 
Leslie Van Woert 
Kenneth Willoughby 

Moore 
Merry man T. Bosley 

Paul A. B assert 
George N. Moore 
H. Wells Person 
Abraham Levy 



Hazel G. Sellars 
Laura M. Bird 
Bernardine Smalling 
Edith Campbell 
Marguerite Earley 
Angeline H. Lograsso 
Florence Davis 



Ruth Self 



Addie Duprey 

Lucy A. House 
Pearl Decker 



Ralph C. Harris 
Benton Elwood Bar- 
ringer 
Harold C. Peck 
Paul Sonne 
Ralph M. Vincent 
Clarence M. Slack 
Leon S. Mygatt 
David Chapman 
Carrol B. Johnson 



James Edgar 
Harold A. Grotke 
Edmund Fahl 

J. Wesley Bulmer 
William B. Hartung 
Emmett Fiske 
Earl Delevan Dean 
Walter C. Best 
Clifford Knapp 
Rodney Lethbridge 
George Hawkins 
Howard B. Gregory 
Oscar Bredenberg 
M. Gerald Ryan 
Ray J. Battershall 
Ralph Terwilliger 
Charles Allnatt 



Ruth T. Farrall 
Genevieve Schoch 
Flora R. Brandsema 
Bernice Lyon 

Elizabeth Cecil Keenan 
Mildred Hull 



Hazel E. Merriman 
Myra Stannard 
Mae Holloran 
Marjorie G. Skinner 



May Wohlmacker 
Etta T. Becker 
Grace Lovell 

Minda Miller 
Lillie Thorwelle 
T. Esabell Donovan 
Ruth Helena Downing 
Jennie Bennett 
Jennie Murphy 
Margaret E. Watson 
Florence L. Tuttle 
Dorothy E. Terry 



Margaret S. Hicks 
Helen N. Tobias 
Florence Butts 
Ethel Harper 



28o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF TOWN 

Cherry Valley 

Chester 

Churchville 

Clarence 

Clinton 

Cobleskill 

Coeymans 

Cohoes (Egberts H. S.) 

Cold Spring-on-Hudson 

Cooperstown 

Corfu 

Corinth 

Corning (North Side 

H. SO 
Cornwall 

Corn wall-on- Hudson 
Cortland 
Coxsackie 
Cuba 

Dansville 

Dayton 

Delhi 

Depew 

Deposit 

De Ruyter 

Dexter 

Dickinson Center 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dolgeville 

Downsville 

Dundee 

Dunkirk 

Earlville 
East Aurora 
East Islip 
East Randolph 
East Worcester 
Eaton 
Edmeston 
Elbridge 
Ellenberg 
Ellicottville 
Ellington 
Elmira 

Fairport 

Fayetteville 

Fishkill-on-Hudson 

Fonda 

Forestville 

Fort Ann 

Fort Edward 

Frankfort 

Freeville 

Frewsburg 

Fultonville 



BOY 

Earl L. Georgia 
Thomas Roe 



Walter Schworm 
Harry 8. Elkington 
Francis Van Schaick 
Lauren Robbins 
Earl MacNeill 
Abram Harman 
William H. Michaels jr 
Anson Lawrence 



GIRL 

Hilda E. Streeter 
Helen Roe 
Lois Lemmon 



Erford L. Bedient 



Bartley G. Furey 
Ferdinand Di Bartolo 
Elliott Ryder 



Harry Bixby 
Howard Graham 
Martin Tyrrell 
Francis Hathaway 
Archie Webstero 
C. Emmett Crittenton 
Ernest Aiken 
Charles Cunningham 
Werner F. Reith 

Fred D. Wilson 
Wendell P. Shattuck 
Alexander Fink 

Mark Hoadley 
Earl B. Miller 
William J. Drab 
Percy Paisley 

Willard Durfee 
Vaughan W. Dutton 
Frank Dye 
Herbert O. Bell 
Sidney Johnston 



Willard Jones 

Lawrence J. Steele 
Donald Armstrong 
Ignace Hart 
Raymond R. Jansen 
Lee H. Sharpe 
Lawrence S. Cramer 



Newell Brewer 
Rollo Hinton 
Harold C. Hobart 
Louis M. Lounsbery 



Mildred A. Boden 
Mildred Noxon 
E. Vera Tobin 
Anna May Bowden 
Beatrice L. Bullock 
Elsie Green 
Mary Holihan 
Isabella May Hardie 



Alice May Brewster 
Carolyn M. Velten 
Mabel M. Ellison 
Ada Brandow 
Mabel French 

Anna J. Hammond 
Leah Richardson 
Evelyn Clark 
Rachel Armstrong 
Florence Axtell 
Marcia Brown 
Ruth A. Maynard 
Ethel McComber. 
Lucie Rehaut 
Catharine G. Van Valk- 

enburg 
Maggie E. Turnbull 



Hazel Moser 

Gertrude Billings 
Margery Clyde Abbott 
Helen Smisek 
Frances Sterling 
Olena C. Skinner 
Ethel M. Wheeler 



Clarice O'Connor 
Cora A. Gibson 



Eleanor Hopkins 
Ethel Coventry 

Amelia E. Bluhm 
Marion Dawson 
Helen J. Keating 
Ruth Howard 
Gertrude R. Pattyson 
Vertna Curtis 
Marion H. Mills 
Lily Pierce 
Glenola Sutfin 
Audre L. Little 
Leah M. Bauder 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



28l 



NAME OF TOWN 

Gardcnville 
Geneva 

Gilbertsville 

Glen Cove 

Glens Falls 

Gloversville 

Good Ground 

Gouverneur 

Gowanda 

Granville 

Great Valley 

Greene 

Greenport 

Groveland 

Guilford 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hannibal 

Harrison 

Harrisville 

Haverstraw 

Hempstead 

Herkimer 

Hermon 

Heuvelton 

Highland 

Highland Falls 

Hobart 

Honeoye Falls 

Hoosick Falls 

Hornell 

Hudson 

Hunter 

Indian Lake 

Interlakcn 

Trvington 

Islip 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnstown 
Jordan 

Katonah 
Keeseville 
Kingston (Kingston 

Acad.) 
Kingston (Ulster Acad) 

Lafargeville 

Lafayette 

Lawrence 

Leroy 

Lestershire 

Lewiston 



BOY 

Paul Halmhuber 
Alfred Nelson Hall 

James H. Dixson 
Marple Mower 
John Eddy 
Floyd Lansing 
Arthur W. Silliman 
Thomas Canfield 
John Gayton 
Leon M. Layden 
Devere Flint 



gisl 

Hilda Bender 
Katharine Elizabeth 

Gracey 
Ethel G. Toles 
Dorothy Bowne 
Meribah Moore 
Ida Ruth Morein 
Annie A. Fanning 



Charles Benjamin 
James S. Kingston 



Harley A. Williams 
Crossman Calvert 
Paul Smith 
John Gill 
G. Hubert Bon sail 
Charles W. Whitehouse 
Raymond Wood 
Floyed Woods 
Myron Mayne 
Harold J. Upright 
James O'Neill 
Edwin G. Simmons 



Doris Dalarymple 
Florence H. Tenney 
Velma Smith 
Laura Wolcott 
Bertha B. Terry 

Ono Bradley 

Saville McConnell 
Elizabeth Brigham 
Willma Williams 
Rhea Lewis 
Marguerite Wightwick 
Helena Mannigan 
Jennie M. Sutherland 
Helga Mortenson 
Marian Race 
Olga Westurn 



John J. Keefe 
Roscoe Conklin Eaton 
Raymond L. Aken 
Claude Lake 

Guy Fish 
Wesley Kellogg 
Walter C. Elder 
David Schafer 
Vincent Leonard 

Floyd Gardner Bushey 

Olin Still Putnam 
Silas Parry 

Peter Noe 
Roy Richard 
Edson L. Wood 

C. Harry Peters 

Everett McCormick 
Herbert L. Albing 



Myra E. Covert 
Rose Rosenburg 
Margaret E. George 
Lyda Bancroft 



Agnes Hagen 
Ethel Haines 

Julia Cross 
Florence V. Boyer 
Ina Scott 

Helen Leroy Edwards 
Lydia Grace Cotton 

Ida Charlotte Eng- 

strom 
Edith Bryant 
Marie G. Mclnteer 

Hazel Strakosch 



Mary Celestina Keefe 



Paul Olmstead Samson 
Romaine MacMinn 
Ward Hoffman 



Marcia Coon 
Helene C. Mannheim 
Anna McGinn 



Lila Taylor 
Frances Beggs 



282 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF TOWN 

Liberty 
Limestone 
Little Falls 
Lowville 
Lyndonville 

Malone 

Mamaroneck 

Mamaroneck (Rye Neck 

H. S.) 
Manchester 
Marathon 
Margaretville 
Massena 
Mattituck 
Mayfield 
Mayville 
Mechanicville 
Mexico 
Middleburg 
Middle Granville 
Middlesex 
Mid die town 
Middleville 
Mohawk 
Montgomery 
Mooers 
Moravia 
Morris 
Moscow 
Mt Morris 

New Berlin 

Newburgh 

Newfield 

New York City 



BOY 

Stephen W. Royce 



Charles W. Fowler 
W. Manville Johnson 



Albert S. Robinson 
Robert R. Titus 
J. Ross Coffin 

Gordon K. Cole 
Lew E. Harvey 
Andrew S. Coulter 
Frank E. Duvey 
Vere G. Hazard 
Lewis Reynolds 



GIRL 

Margery Weyrauch 
Florence Brands 
Marion C. Burney 
Vera M. Burrington 
Margaret A. Beecher 

Beatrice Reynolds 
Ethel F. Tyler 
Alice Barker 

Esther Comiskey 
Nina B. Go wan 
Leone Archibald 



Frederick CornwelJ 
Lawrence Norton 
Oliver Smith 
Lester J. Conkling 
Charles S. Wooster 
Edward Burns 



Irma E. Reeve 
Hazel Lewis 
Ruth Jones 
Theresa M. Hines 
Amelia H. Munson 
Mildred Wells 
Anna Grace Quinlan 
Alice Bardwell 
Nellie Agnes Rose 



James Howard Green 
Lynn D. Hunt 
James McCormick 
Jackson Osborne 



Flossie Williams 
Eleanor M. Van Keuren 
Carolyn Leonard 
Frances Mary Bigelow 
Blanche M. Foote 
Catherine L. Ash 
Margaret Donovan 



Burleigh Names Phelps Marie Isadore Chewning 
Daniel Wilkes Brown Roberta Eleanor Smyth 



Bryant H. S., Long George Grotz 

Island City * 

Commercial H. S.J Julius Hennig 

Brooklyn I Morris Diamond 

Curtis H. S., New Joseph Ansheles 

Brighton r 

DeWitt Clinton H. S.J Scott Umsted 

New York lHarold L. Meierhoff 

Eastern District H. S., Joseph J. McCann 

Brooklyn 
Erasmus Hall H. S., 

Brooklyn 
Far Rockaway H. S., Lawrence S. Kubie 

Far Rockaway 
Flushing H. S., Flush- Paul S. Towne 

ing 
Girls H. S., Brooklyn 



Helen Dassance 
Lillian M. Bradley 
(No girls in school) 
Amy Harrington 



Rose Oblas 

Shirley Rolfe Chamber- 
lain 
May McKenna 

Grace L. Hubbard 

f Gertrude W. Barnum 
\Lillian Gladys Avery 



High School of Com- Sidney Bobbe 

merce, New York 
Jamaica H. S., Ja- Joseph Greenberg 

maica 
Morris H. S., New Augustus Morgan Arm- Julia W. Rauch 

York strong 



Edna D. Johnson 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



283 



NAME OF TOWN BOY 

New York City (cont'd) 
Newtown H. S., Elm- J. Leonard Doyle 

hurst 
Richmond Hill H. S., William E. Clark 

Richmond Hill 
Stuyvesant H. S., New f Carl J. Austrian 

York 1 Albert E. Welch 
Wadleigh H. S., New 

York 

Washington Irving 

H. S. f New York 

New York Mills 

New York Mills, No. 2 

New Rochelle 

Niagara Falls 

Nichols 

North Cohocton and 

Atlanta 
North Lawrence 
North Tarrytown 
North Tonawanda 
Northport 

Oakfield 
Ocean Side 
Olean 

Onondaga Valley 

Ossining 

Ovid 

Oxford 



GOtL 



Dorothy Homans 
Dorothy G. Stewart 



J. Howard Finch 
Ernest Whynall 
Herman Krouskoff 
Carl Laurier 
Howard M. Keyser 
Edward Jay Cottrell 

Harley D. Farnsworth 
Everett Russell 
Warren Mundie 
James Bowen Clarke 

William Stevens 

Clarence Bird 

William Coast Conkling 



Amy E. Schechter 

{Emmelina Dethierry 
Walker 
Ethel Gross 
Emma J. Ferguson 
Clara I. Veitch 
Helen Augur 



Ruth Dunham 
Marion Beecher 

S. Ruth Merrill 
Marvel Dedrick 
Edith Stoll 
Rose Estelle Don- 
nocker 



Herbert Gerlach 
Willis B. Combs 
Morgan K. Harris 



Palenville 
Palmyra 
Patterson 
Pearl River 
Peekskill (Drum 

H. S.) 
Phelps 
Philadelphia 
Philmont 
Phoenix 
Piermont 
Pike 

Plattsburg 
Pleasantville 
Poland 
Pompey 
Port Chester 
Port Henry 
Port Jervis 
Poughkeepsie 
Prattsburg 
Pulaski 

Randolph 
Ravena 
Red Creek 
Red Hook 



J. Hobart Holcomb 
Leon A. Plumb 
George Knapp 
Charles F. Bohr 
Hill Clarence C. Conklin 

Howard G. Mickelsen 
Rowland K. Bennett 
Louis Van Dyck 



Harold H. Cassidy 
Harry Cross 
Leo R. Gauthier 
Charles S. Jamison 



Frank L. Kelly 
Albert W. Protheroc 
Walter R. Carr 
Wendell E. Phillips 
Richard Connell jr 
Earl Van Scoy 
Charles C. Johnson 

John Wyllys 
Paul L. Kelch 



Helen Bungart 
Caroline Elizabeth 

Morris 
Margaret E. Slocum 
Carrie Davis 
May L. Morris 
Nenah Ostrom 

Edith L. Giles 
Eloise Converse 
Eva E. Garnsey 
Jennie S. Boyd 
Bessie C. Taylor 

Maud E. Donnelly 
Grace M. Danfoth 
Edna L. Simmons 
Stella Remington 
Charlotte Crowley 
Lillian C. Russell 
Frances Neally Baker 
Harriette L. Horton 
Florence Read 
Winifred L. Conan 
Bertha C. Anderson 
Rena Bigalow 



Herbert S. Havens 



Florence Traviss 
Rhobie Stone 
Ruth Adams 

Marjorie Carlisle 
Lillian M. King 
Hermione D. Cartner 
Marjorie Barringer 



284 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF TOWN 

Rensselaer 

Rhinebeck 

Richfield Springs 

Richmondville 

Ripley 

Riverhead 

Rochester (East H. S.) 

Rochester (Mechanics 

Institute) 
Rochester (West H. S.) 

Roscoe 
Roslyn 
Roxbury 
Rushville 



BOY 

Charles A. Snyder 
Parker C. Miles 
Jesse Ayer 



GIRL 

Mahala Clute 
Albertina T. B. Traver 



Verne Barnes 



Sag Harbor 
St Johnsville 

St Regis Falls 
Sandy Creek 
Sandy Hill 
Saranac Lake 
Saratoga Springs 
Saugerties 

Schenectady 
Schuylerville 

Scio 
Scotia 
Sea Cliff 
Seneca Falls 
Sinclairville 
Sodus 

South Dayton 
South Glens Falls 
South Otselic 
Spencer 
Spencerport 
Spring Valley 
Springville 
Staatsburg 
Stony Point 
Syracuse (High School) 
Syracuse (North H. S.) 
Syracuse (Technical 
H. S.) 

Theresa 

Ticonderoga 

Tivoli 

Tomkins Cove 

Troupsburg 

Troy (High School) 

Troy (Lansingburg H. 

S.) 
Tuckahoe 



{Russell A. Lipscomb 
Leon Starkey 
William H. Stevens 
Robert Edwin Ross 

William Hones jr 
H. Ernest Conklin 
Grant D. Morse 
Irwin Read 

Harry Restopski 
Bliss Jacob Youker 

Harry L. Griffin 



Ada Cullman 
Laura Hildred 
Marjorie Penny 
Pearl Darron 



Mary McLean Suth- 
erland 



Hazel Woodin 
Alice Hubbell 
Mildred Greene 



Ralph Edward Bennett 



Marie Louise Dock- 

erty 
June Lampson 
Flora E. Stone 



Clarence F. Meehan 
Hugh S. Chidester 



Joseph Roy Wood 

Ivan Howe 

James Gould 

Elias Raff 

Raymond Perre Donley 



Helen Mae Johnson 
Helen A. Smith 
Marguerite V. V. 

Smith 
Sarah M. Gregg 
Loretto Frances Bar- 
rett 
Mildred Loomis 
Ethel Stewart 



F. Leslie Robinson 

Clair Sweetland 

Ralph Rolland Sherman 

John C. Church 

Warren Seely 

John Rogers 

H. Parker Talman 

John M. Salzler 

Theophilud Dimmick 

Hanford B. Hurd 

Louis D. Burrill 



Lulu L. Cross 
Alice E. Mills 
Bessie M. Johnson 
Florence M. Holleran 
Susie E. Miner 
Autumn Barrett 
Gertrude Dunn 
Edith R. Schapiro 
Esther Shuttleworth 
Helen G. Stickel 
Ada Ten Eyck 



Charles Edward Es- 
linger 

Wells Hendrickson 
Robert H. Hill 
Charles Burnett 
Leland S. Hastings 
Robert A. Plaisted 
George B. Roth 



Jessie Ingram 

Sarah Elizabeth Egloff 



Cassie Nedeau 
Florence A. Peelor 
Anna E. Hastings 
Alice M. Wyckoff 
Mildred Beatrice Col- 
lins 
Mary Kenyon 



Philip Charles Rum- 

mel 
William Vincent Fitz- Maurine Leslie Illig 

gerald 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



28s 



NAME OF TOWN 


BOY 




Turin 


W. Stuart Holdcn 


Carrie Sattes 


Tuxedo Park 


George Stanly Dart 


Grace Hall 


Valatie 


Guy Richelieu Haddy 


Delia McConnell 


Victor 


Gilbert Albridge 


Elsie Sheck 


Walrlen 




T nmcp "hA T p^rlc 


TV alUCU 

Washingtonville 


Andrew J. Miller 


Ellen M. Peterson 


Waterford 


Henry F. Wagner 


Bertha H. Clute 


Waterville 


Everett L. Jones 


Helen Hilsinger 


Watkins 


Harry Gabriel 


Ellen C. Wigsten 


Waverly 


Raymond Smith 


Elnora Quick 


Webster 


David William Jones 


Edna R. Scutt 


West Valley 


Leo £. Gibbin 


Clara Ehmann 


Westbury 


Francis Kivlighn 


Gertude Brown 


Westfield 


Fred S. Richardson 


Olive Kunkel 


Westhampton Beach 


William Hulse 


Ruth Carter 


Westport 


Daniel Newell 


Mary Ryan 


White Plains 


Henry Coe Place 


Lula Amelia Carpenter 


Whitehall 


Harry Kilburn 


Louise Davis Dennis 


Whitesville 


Glen H. Potter 


Laura Sellers 


Williamsville 


Arthur Morley 


Laura Steinbrenner 


Windham 


Elbert B. Mattoon 


Alice J. Osborn 


Yonkers 


John W. Draper 


Sadie R. Lull 



Winners of medals in academies 



NAME OF ACADEMY 



BOY 



Academy of Mt St Vin- 

cent, New York 
Academy of Mt St Ur- 

sula, Bedford Park 
Academy of the Sacred William E. McClusky 

Heart, Syracuse 
Academy of St Joseph, 

Brentwood 
All Saints Academy, 

1967 Madison av., 

New York 
Augustine Academy, Edward J. Whalen 

Carthage 



Canisius College (acad. 
dep't), Buffalo 

Cathedral Academy, Al- 
bany 

Cathedral School, New 
York 

Champlain Academy, 
Port Henry 

Christian Brothers Ac- 
ademy, Albany 

Clason Point Military 
Academy, West- 
chester 

Cook Academy, Mont- 
our Falls 



{Herbert D. Chabot 
George W. Wannen- 
macher 
James A. Flanagan 



Gerard Truman 

Joseph M. Cantwell 
Edward Delehanty 
Frank Walls Young 
Robert J. Rooney 



GIRL 

{Laurette Reynaud 
Ora Every 
{Katherine Conlon 
Margaret Hammer 
Mary E. Cullivan 



Olga A. Cooke 
»Rosa A. Metzner 
Katherine V. Griffin 
Marie Roach 

Marie Reynolds 



Loretta A. Clancy 

{Helen Montague 
Margaret Small 
Luraine Hedding 



Gertrude M. Hurd 



286 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF ACADEMY BOY 

De La Salle Institute, /Francis Edebohls 
New York \ Gerald Grant 

De Veaux School, Ni-f Thomas Cook Brown 
agara Falls "^Howard Bertram Willis 

D'Youville Academy, 

Plattsburg 



GIRL 



Female Academy of the 

Sacred Heart, Ken- 
wood, Albany 

Fordham University, St /Hugh Allen 
John's College H. S.^jjoseph A. Kerwin 

Glens Falls Academy, Paul B. West 
Glens Falls 

Holy Cross Academic William Scheibly 

School, Albany 
Holy Cross Academy, 

New York 
Holy Ghost Academic Ulric Plante 

School, Tupper Lake 

Immaculate Heart Aca- Alexander Hastings 
demy, Watertown 

Lady cl iff e Academy, 

Highland Falls 
LaSalle Academy, New J Joseph Connery 

York i John Goggin 

LaSalle Institute, Troyfjoseph B. Higgins 

-[William J. Ryan 

McAuley Academy, 

Keeseville 

Mt Mercy Academy, 

Buffalo 
Mt St Joeseph Aca- 

demy, Buffalo 



Nazareth Academy, 
Rochester 



Palmer Institute, Lake- Clarence H. Pedley 

mont 
Pawling School Wesley M. Oler jr 



Queen of the Rosary 
Academy, Amityville 



Sacred Heart Academic Frank Ouimette 

School, Cohoes 
St Agnes Female Semi- 

nary, Brooklyn 
St Angela's Hall Aca- 

demy, Brooklyn 
St Ann's Academic John William O'Brien 

School, Nyack 
St Augustine's Aca- Francis B. Geary 

demic School, Troy 



{Martha E. Roger 
Florence M. Maple 

{Margaret Loftus 
Mary Regina Irwin 



Geraldine Lockhart 

1 

Marie Seger 

{Ellen E. Grogan 
Marie C. Williams 
Beatrice Coutu 



Ella Mclver 

{Nora Dobbins 
Mary T. Morgan 



J Amy E. Harding 
Helen P. Reagan 
Catharine O'Connor 
Agnes Joyce 
^Florence Post 
Martha Schnieder 

{Jiistifia Cunningham 
Emily Lyons 



{Esther Sherlock 
Frederica Eckl 

Marie Boudreau 



Anna B. Catherwood 
Irene M. Dailey 
'Isabel F. McCloskey 
Florence A. Boyce 
^Mary F. Sheeky 

Helen M. Dundon 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



287 



NAME OF ACADEMY BOY 

St Bernard's Academy, Edward Corcoran 

Cohoes 
St Catherine's Academy, ■ 

New York 
St Clara's Academic Vincent Ragan 

School, East Aurora 
St Francis Xavier Aca- 

demy, Brooklyn 
St James Academy, 

Brooklyn 
St John s Academic William H. Stapleton 

School, Schenectady 
St John's Academy, Al- 

bany | 

St John's Academy, James Hanrahan 

Rensselaer 
St Joseph's Academic Joseph A. Maher 

School, Batavia 
St Joseph's Academic Peter Clute 

School, Schnectady 
St Joseph's Academy, Joseph W. Lauer 

Albany 
St Joseph's Academy, Harry Carl 

Binghamton 
St Joseph's Academy, 

Lockport 
St Joseph's Academy, 

Mt Vernon 
St Joseph's Academy, Charles Carey 

Troy 
St Joseph's Collegiate JHarry B. Bingham 

Institute, Buffalo 1 John E. Horbett 
St Lucy's Academy, William J. Farricy 

Syracuse 
St Mary's Academy, Miles H. Burke 

Dunkirk 



James M. Brahan 
Thomas W. Flatley 



Edwin C. Dinneen 



St Mary's Academy, 

Hoosick Falls 
St Mary's Academy, 

Hudson 
St Mary's Academy, 

Little Falls 
St Mary's Academy, 

Ogdensburg 
St Mary's Academy & 

Industrial Female 

School, Buffalo 
St Mary's High School, Theodore Loecher 

Lancaster 
St Mary's Institute, 

Amsterdam 
St Patrick's Academy, John Welsh 

Catskill 
St Patrick's Academy, 

Troy 
St Peter's Academy, 

Troy 
St Teresa's School, 

Brooklyn 
St Thomas Aquinas 

Academy, Brooklyn 



Aloysius Bergen 



James McCormick 



James F. Sammon 



{ 



GIRL 

Irene Greeley 

May Hawkins 
Agnes O' Gorman 
Nechia M. Russell 



m Loretto F. Clarke 
^Irene C. Mahoney 
/Josephine M. Bohan 
\Katherine M. Gaffney 
Emma Elliott Taylor 

{Mary Gill 
Catherine Jordan 
Mary Sennett 

Anna L. McMahon 

Margaret Pitts 

Winifred A. Kelly 

1 

Mary Brennan 

/Dolores Miiller 

1 Gertrude S. Murphy 

*Hope Boyle 
i Martha Miles 

Lucy Benson 



Elizabeth Colbert 
Clara Mazany 
Zita Whitkop 
Julia M. Hayes 

{Cecelia Cunningham 
Marguerite Fleming 
Helene Bovard 

{Nanette Lancaster 
Nellie Madden 

Melinda Adolf 

Winifred Collins 

Jane Wicks 

/Catherine Hall 
\Marie Blake 
Irene Hoffmeister 

Margaret M. Quinn 

Mary A. Deery 



288 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME OF ACADEMY 

Troy Academy, Troy 

Ursuline Academic 
School, Middletown 

Ursuline Academy, 
New Rochelle 

Utica Catholic Aca- 
demy, Utica 



BOY 

JJohn Thatcher Morris 
"j Harvey Wilbur Bow- 

V. man 



GIRL 



man 



Francis J. O'Hanlon 



Watervliet Academy William A. Lipp 



Cecelia Mullany 
Ruth Gemmill 
Eleanor G. Brady 
Frances M. Petty 
Anna Loretto Coyne 



Vera F. Connell 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

The year ending in June 1909 marked the completion of the 
period when the State Normal College was compelled to conduct 
its class work in scattered buildings never intended for such pur- 
poses. It was, however, a year of sustained interest and effort 
which were not in any degree below the record of previous years. 
The enrolment was over 200, including the entering class of Sep- 
tember 1908, which was of very encouraging size in spite of the 
unfavorable conditions for work. The graduating class, however, 
was smaller than usual, since the college was completing at that time 
only the third year of the new four year courses and had no gradu- 
ates from the full college courses; it was composed of college 
graduates, normal school graduates, and students who had entered 
from other colleges with advanced standing. 

The new college buildings attract general attention because of 
their architectural beauty and the charming grounds surrounding 
them. Many of the large and beautiful trees growing upon the site 
were spared and they give an air of maturity as well as relief from 
the barrenness usually characteristic of newly laid out grounds. 

The erection of the buildings was finished in advance of the time 
set by the contract and good opportunity was given to arrange for 
the furnishing before the opening of the fall session. The wood- 
work is of dark weathered oak and the office and classroom furni- 
ture, as well as that of the laboratories and the library and the 
auditorium, is also of the same material. The students' chairs are 
provided with movable writing tablets, noiseless and compact, which 
are the invention of Miss Mary A. McClelland, a member of the 
Normal College faculty. In the laboratories the equipment includes 
the best modern facilities for careful scientific work; and although 
the furnishing of these departments is incomplete, a very high grade 
of material has been supplied to the extent of the appropriation. 
Steel lockers for both students and teachers are provided in the 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 289 

basement as well as ample toilets and baths; additional toilets are 
placed on every floor in each building. The auditorium is equipped 
with attractive and serviceable opera chairs and the gymnasium 
which is located in the same building is provided with apparatus 
needful for proper physical training* It is probably the most com- 
pletely equipped gymnasium in this part of New York State 

To provide furnishings and equipment for the new buildings 
the Legislature of 1909 was asked to appropriate $109,000. This 
amount was thought necessary after careful consideration and 
detailed estimates of the cost of the requirements for adequate 
work in the various departments of the college. But after due 
deliberation, the Legislature settled upon $50,000 as the sum to be 
appropriated for this purpose. It was not sufficient to install all 
the equipment called for by the new courses of study and conse- 
quently it was decided by the Commissioner of Education and the 
trustees to postpone for a year the inauguration of the course in 
domestic science and manual and industrial training. 

As the plan of the new college made no provision for a separate 
building for the practice school, the work of the model high school 
is conducted in a group of classrooms apart from the rooms where 
college students regularly meet. This was more easily possible since 
it had been decided that the Normal College was to confine its work 
to the preparation of teachers for secondary schools ; that the prac- 
tice school should consist of a model high school only; and that, 
consequently, beginning with September 1909 the lower schools 
should be abolished. This ruling, however, was modified, so as to 
continue the seventh and eighth grades for two years and one year 
respectively for the benefit of the students in these classes who 
desired to complete in the model school their preparation for the 
model high school. Rooms for these grammar grade classes are 
provided temporarily in the quarters to be utilized later by the 
domestic science department. 

Regular class work began in the new buildings September 8. The 
entering class numbered nearly 120 approximately twice as large as 
the number that entered the previous year. The senior class, which 
was augmented by a considerable number of college graduates, is 
made up for the most part of students who will have spent four 
years in the Normal College, this being the first class to have com- 
pleted from the beginning the new reorganized four year courses 
leading to the degrees of B. A. and B. S. This lengthening of the 
course from two to four years has wrought a very perceptible and 

IO 



29O NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

most satisfying increase in the development of the students and has 
given a strength and force to their professional as well as their 
academic equipment that amply warrant the additional time and 
effort entailed. Furthermore, the combination of the professional 
studies in the same four years course with the academic studies 
puts the entire work of the student into a professional atmosphere, 
bringing it in all departments in direct relation to his future occu- 
pation. He is striving to gain knowledge not for its own sake merely 
but in order that he may utilize it later as a teacher, and in this 
process he gains necessarily an enlarged and more comprehensive 
view of each subject pursued. He is led to see also the various 
methods of treating and presenting subjects, and to understand the 
relations that should exist between teachers and pupils, so that he 
gains that professional spirit which always distinguishes the efficient 
teacher from the indifferent one. Thus the very character of the 
work done at the Normal College in performing its special function 
to prepare teachers for service in the secondary and normal schools 
of the State, operates naturally to give the students the bearing and 
point of view of teachers in the special fields of academic study, in 
which they have attained a high grade of scholarship. 

The student body has been made up, as in other years, of those 
who are high school graduates and are pursuing regular four year 
courses leading to the degrees of B. A. and B. S. ; those who have 
completed a course at a normal school of the State or at the State 
Normal College before the courses were lengthened to four years 
and are permitted under special conditions to finish the above named 
courses in two years ; those who are graduates of other colleges and 
are taking the one year professional courses designed for such stu- 
dents, which leads to the degree of Pd.B. ; and those who have been 
admitted to advanced standing from other institutions and are pur- 
suing the regular courses. Some of those students have already had 
teaching experience and are more mature than the others, having 
undertaken the more advanced work because of a conscious lack of 
scholarship which is demanded for the most successful teaching. 
But all the students whether they have had previous experience in 
teaching or not, whether they have had high school, normal school 
or college preparation, are brought together in the same professional 
atmosphere, by the same professional spirit, and united in the pur- 
suit of a definite preparation for their life work as teachers. Ani- 
mated, therefore, by one common aim, they show a most gratifying 
appreciation of the opportunities afforded them and are earnest and 
enthusiastic workers. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 2QI 

On October 28, 1909, exercises were held for the dedication of 
the new college buildings which brought together a larger and more 
representative gathering of students, teachers and educators than has 
been seen in Albany in many years. Besides the Governor of the 
State there were present the State Commissioner of Education, his 
three assistants, and many other officials from the State Education 
Department, several college presidents, nearly all the normal school 
principals of the State, about 60 superintendents of schools, several 
hundred teachers from all parts of the State, besides representative 
clergymen, professional men and friends, aggregating not less than 
twelve hundred persons. It was a most auspicious occasion. After 
the exercises of dedication and congratulations, the buildings were 
opened for public inspection and were the objects of much generous 
and spontaneous admiration for their beauty, spaciousness and per- 
fect adaptation to the work for which they were erected. The 
formal dedicatory exercises under the direction of President William 
J. Milne Ph.D. LL.D. included addresses by His Excellency, Charles 
Evans Hughes LL.D., Governor of the State of New York, 
Andrew Sloan Draper LLB. LL.D., State Commissioner of Edu- 
cation, and Hon. St Clair McKelway LL.D. D.C.L., Vice Chan- 
cellor of the Regents of the University of the State of New York. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

The following gentlemen compose the board of trustees in charge 
of the college : Commissioner Andrew S. Draper LL.B. LL.D., chair- 
man; Samuel B. Ward M.D. Ph.D., secretary and treasurer; Led- 
yard Cogswell M.A. ; Thomas E. Finegan M.A. Pd.D. ; James B. 
McEwan, B.A. 



William Bayard Van Rensselaer, for several years a member of 
the board, died September 25, 1909. By his death the trustees have 
lost a very valuable member of their board. Mr Van Rensselaer was 
a man who interested himself very thoroughly in the work of the col- 
lege and gladly devoted his time and his talents to the discharge of 
the duties which were assigned him by the board. His genial dis- 
position, his clear and intelligent grasp of the problems coming be- 
fore the board, his earnest wish to do everything possible to make 
the college conspicuous for its worth to the State of New York make 
the memory of his life and his service a cherished possession of his 
colleagues. 



292 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

On October 28, 1909, by the concurrent action of the Commis- 
sioner of Education and the Board of Regents, Mr James B. 
McEwan was appointed a trustee of the college to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Mr Van Rensselaer. 

CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 

During the year David Hutchinson B.D. M.A. was appointed as- 
sistant professor in history ; Adam A. Walker B.A. was appointed as- 
sistant professor in government and economics and Barnard S. Bron- 
son B.A. was appointed assistant professor in chemistry. Alfred E. 
Rejall M.A. was appointed professor of psychology and philosophy 
instead of Miss E. Helen Hannahs who resigned after a period of 
20 years of service to accept a similar position in Adelphi College, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Richard H. Kirtland M.A. was appointed professor 
in English ; Adna W. Risley B.A. was appointed professor in history 
and Fannie A. Dunsford B.A. was appointed to take charge of the 
department of physical culture and gymnastics. 

In consequence of the discontinuance of most of the work in the 
grammar, primary and kindergarten departments the following teach- 
ers were relieved from duty ; Ida M. Isdell, Helen L. Sewell from 
the kindergarten department ; and Kathleen A. Phillip from grammar 
department. Anne L. Cushing was appointed assistant in high school 
department ; and Angeline Finney and Elizabeth F. Shaver were ap- 
pointed to take charge of the seventh and eighth grades which are 
to continue for the year 1909-10. Mr Horatio Pollock left during 
the year to accept a position in Union College, Schenectady. 

faculty 1909-10 

William J. Milne Ph.D. LL.D., president; William B. Aspinwall 
Pd.M. Ph.D., assistant to the president, history and principles of 
education ; Albert N. Husted M.A. Ph.D., mathematics ; William V. 
Jones M.A. Ph.D., commercial branches ; Mary A. McClelland, his- 
tory ; Samuel B. Belding, vocal music ; Anna E. Pierce, elementary 
education; Margaret S. Mooney, English; Edith Bodley, secretary 
to the faculty ; Edward W. Wetmore M.A. Pd.D., physical science ; 
M. Harriet Bishop, elementary education; Leonard W. Richardson 
M.A. LL.D., Greek and Latin; Eunice A. Perine, fine arts and 
botany ; Caroline R. Home B.A. Pd.B., Greek and Latin ; H. Louise 
McCutcheon B.A. Pd.B., French ; John M. Sayles B.A. Pd.B., prin- 
cipal of high school department; Charlotte Loeb B.A. Pd.B., Ger- 
man ; Clifford A. Woodard B.A. Pd.B., zoology and earth science ; 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 293 

Harry Birchenough B.A. Pd.B., mathematics; Winfred C. Decker 
BA. Pd.B., German; Louise W. Clement B.A. Pd.B., English and 
history; Ruth A. Cook B.A. Pd.B., French; Barnard S. Bronson 
B.A., chemistry; David Hutchinson D.B. M.A., history; Adam A. 
Walker B.A., government and economics; Anne L. Cushing Pd.B., 
Greek and history; Elizabeth F. Shaver B.A. Pd.B., model teaching; 
Angeline Finney Pd.B., model teaching; Adna W. Risley B.A., 
history; Alfred E. Rejall M.A., psychology and philosophy; Richard 
H. Kirtland Ph.M., English; Fannie A. Dunsford B. A., physical 
culture. 

GRADUATES, JUNE 22, I909 

Collegiate courses 

Bachelor of arts 

Javier S. Adrianzen, Chiclayo { Peru 

Olive Angelia Briggs, Bainbridge, Chenango co. 

Annie DeWitt Pd.B., Skaneateles, Onondoga co. 

Louise Moore Hersey Pd.B., Watertown, Jefferson co. 

Leah Hollands Pd.B., Watervliet, Albany co. 

Clarence Ashton Wood Ph.B. LL. B., E. Onondaga, Onondaga co. 

Baohelor of tolenoe 
Arline Denison, Geneseo, Livingston co. 

Graduate course 

•Baohelor of pedagogy 

Jessie Auringer B.A., Cohoes, Albany co. 
Mary Billings Eddy B.A., Albany, Albany co. 
Erskine Burt Halley B.A., Troy, Rensselaer co. 
Florence Hunter B.A., Fulton, Otfwego co. 
Edith J. Perry B.A., Utica, Oneida co. 
Mary Aucutt Thomas B.A., Utica, Oneida co. 

The following honorary degrees in pedagogy were conferred : 

Doctor of pedagogy 

Thomas E. Finegan M.A., Third Assistant Commissioner of Education, Albany 

Jeremiah M. Thompson M.A., Principal Normal School, Potsdam 
ames V. Sturges M.A., Principal Normal School, Geneseo 



294 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Exhibit I 

Table 1 
Comparative statistics for high schools and academies in 1908 and 2909 





Year 


High schools 


a Academies 


Total 


Expended for teachers' sal- 


1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 

1909 
1908 


$4 768 578 38 

4 403 798 80 


$618 541 02 
459 530 85 


$5 387 119 40 




4 863 329 65 




+ S364 779 58 


+ $159 010 17 


+ $523 789 75 


Expended for buildings, 
sites, furniture, repairs 


$580 966 29 
1 115 943 91 


$581 271 50 
230 099 14 


$1 162 237 79 




1 346 043 05 




—$534 977 62 


+ $351 172 36 


—$183 805 26 


Expended for school li- 
braries 


$55 293 88 
43 259 05 


$8 404 69 
6 645 60 


$63 698 57 




49 904 65 




+ $12 034 83 


+ $1 759 09 


+ $13 793 92 


Total expenditures (lnclud- 


$7 060 314 72 
6 971 985 12 


$2 336 953 44 
2 170 953 12 


$9 397 268 16 
9 142 938 24 




+ $88 329 60 


+ $166 000 32 


+ $254 329 92 


Average annual cost per 
pupil (excluding invest- 


$65 93 
73 26 


$150 68 
171 80 


$76 04 




80 51 




— $7 33 


—$21 12 


— $4 47 


Value of buildings and 
grounds 


$25 075 416 
23 882 014 


$9 757 366 
6 898 350 


$34 832 782 




30 780 364 




+ S1 193 402 


+ $2 859 016 


+ $4 052 418 


Number of schools report- 
ing 


687 
676 


153 
134 


840 




810 




+ 11 


+ 19 


+ 30 




4 182 
3 934 


935 
728 


6 117 
4 662 




+ 248 


+ 207 


+455 


Number of pupils 


107 090 
95 170 


14 510 
7 563 


121 600 




102 733 




+ 11 920 


+ 6 947 


+ 18 867 




735 394 
697 905 


250 602 
212 054 


985 896 
909 959 




+37 489 


+38 448 


+ 75 937 



o.ThlsTyear's figures include academic departments of colleges which are omitted in 1908. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



295 



Table 2 
Number of secondary schools reporting 1895-1909 



YEAR 


High 
schools 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Academies 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Total 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


1895 


373 
421 
465 
514 
541 
565 
595 
621 
636 
655 
665 
668 
672 
676 
687 


+ 59 
+ 48 
+44 
+ 49 
+ 27 
+ 24 
+ 30 
+ 26 
+ 15 
+ 19 
+ 10 
+ 3 
+ 4 
+ 4 
+ 11 


131 
128 
119 
131 
134 
140 
146 
145 
144 
144 
141 
137 
133 
134 
153 


+ 8 

— 3 

— 9 
+ 12 
+ 3 
+ 6 
+ 6 

— 1 

— 1 

— 3 

— 4 

— 4 

+ 1 
a+19 


504 
549 
584 
645 
675 
705 
741 
766 
780 
799 
806 
805 
805 
810 
840 


+67 


1896 


+45 


1897 


+35 


1898 


+61 


1899 


+30 


1900 


+30 


1901 


+36 


1902 


+ 25 


1903 


+ 14 


1904 


+ 19 


1905 


+ 7 


1906 


— 1 


1907 




1908 


+ 5 


1909 


a +30 







a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 

Tabue 3 
Secondary schools reporting classified by grades 1897-1909 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



YEAR 



1897. 

1898. 

1899 

1900. 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 



o 
o 

O 
00 

03 
W 

S 



247 
267 
311 
341 
361 
373 
393 
409 
417 
434 
447 
454 
465 



!J 

o 

d 



+ 20 
+ 44 
+30 
+ 20 
+ 12 
+ 20 
+ 16 
+ 8 
+ 17 
+ 13 
+ 7 
+ 11 



09 

o 

o 

O 

O 



26 

24 

30 

36 

39 

37 

54 

55 

55 

60 

102 

122 

122 



5 

a 



— 2 

+ 6 
+ 6 
+ 3 

— 2 

+ 17 
+ 1 

• • • • 

'+ 5 
+ 42 
+ 20 



o 
; 2 

• S3 

.2" 
3 



50 

61 

61 

61 

67 

69 

60 

60 

57 

52 

38 

30 

34 



+ 11 



— 4 
+ 12 

— 9 

• ■ • • 

— 3 

— 5 
—14 

— 8 
+ 4 



CO 

»■« 

o 
o 

O 

o 

■a 



140 

160 

137 

125 

136 

138 

126 

127 

136 

122 

85 

70 

66 



• • • • 

+ 20 

—23 

—12 

+ 11 

+ 2 

—12 

+ 1 

+ 9 

—14 

—37 

—15 

— 4 



S 



463 
512 
539 
663 
593 
617 
633 
651 
665 
668 
672 
676 
687 



+49 
+ 27 
+ 24 
+ 30 
+ 24 
+ 16 
+ 18 
+ 14 
+ 3 
+ 4 
+ 4 
+ 11 



296 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 3 (concluded) 
Secondary schools reporting classified by grades 1897-1909 



ACADEMIES 



• YEAR 


3 

B 

•0 

< 


Increase or 
decrease 


Senior 
academic 
schools 


Increase or 
decrease 


Middle 
academic 
schools 


Increase or 

decrease 


Junior 
academic 
schools 


Increase or 
decrease 


*3 
8 


Increase or 
decrease 


1897 


90 
99 
103 
104 
108 
107 
103 
102 
104 
99 
100 
103 
120 


• • ■ * 

+ 9 
+ 4 
+ 1 
+ 4 
—1 

—1 
+ 2 
—5 

+ 1 

+ 3 

a + 17 


2 
3 
4 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
6 
9 
6 


• • • ■ 

+ 1 
+ 1 

• • • ■ 

—2 

+ 1 

• • ■ • 

• • ■ • 

• • • • 

+ 1 
+ 2 
+ 3 
—3 


6 

8 

8 

11 

11 

12 

12 

12 

10 

9 

9 

7 

9 


• « • • 

+ 2 

• ■ • • 

+ 3 

+ i 

• ■ * ■ 
■ • • • 

—2 

—1 

• • • • 

—2 

+ 2 


20 
19 
16 
17 
21 
20 
23 
24 
24 
25 
18 
15 
18 


• * • • 

—1 

—3 
+ 1 
+ 4 
—1 
+ 3 
+ 1 

• • * ■ 

+ 1 
—7 
—3 
+3 


118 
129 
131 
136 
142 
142 
141 
141 
141 
137 
133 
134 
153 




1898 


+ 11 


1899 


+ 2 


1900 


+ 5 


1901 


+ 6 


1902 




1903 


— 1 


1904 




1905 




1906 


— 4 


1907 


— 4 


1908 


+ 1 


1909 


a+19 







a This year's figures Include academic departments of colleges. 

Tabi-b 4 
Faculty of secondary schools 1895-1909 



YEAR 



1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



HIGH SCHOOLS 


ACADEMIES 


d 


d 

1 


*3 


d 
53 


d 

§ 




*3 

8 


517 

580 

636 

781 

888 

939 

1 055 

1 120 

1 157 

1 276 

1 261 

1 281 

1 316 

1 401 

1 468 


920 
1 153 
1 637 
1 612 
1 657 
1 844 

1 998 

2 116 
2 349 
2 630 
2 018 
2 209 
2 324 
2 533 
2 714 


1 437 

1 733 

2 173 
2 293 
2 545 

2 783 

3 053 
3 236 
3 506 
3 900 
3 279 
3 490 
3 640 

3 934 

4 182 


444 

408 
399 
373 
401 
430 
483 
509 
509 
470 
268 
229 
257 
268 
482 


661 
632 
719 
620 
645 
675 
730 
736 
779 
745 
446 
445 
433 
460 
453 


1 105 

1 040 

1 118 

993 

1 046 

1 105 

1 213 

1 245 

1 288 

1 215 

714 

674 

690 

728 

935 



Total 
second- 
ary 



2 542 

2 773 

3 291 
3 286 
3 591 

3 888 
266 
481 
794 
121 
993 
164 
330 

4 662 

5 117 



4 

4 
4 
5 
3 

4 
4 



Increase 

or 
decrease 



115 
231 
518 
5 
305 
297 
378 
215 
313 
«+ 327 
—1 128 
+ 171 
+ 166 
+ 332 
a+ 455 



+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



297 



Table 5 
Students in secondary schools 2895-1909 





HIGH SCHOOLS 


ACADEMIES 


Total 
second- 
ary 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


YEAR 


CO 

to 

2 


73 

a 


71 


to 
to 

O 


73 
3 


•— • 


1895 


17 267 

18 814 

19 594 
23 482 
25 382 
28 515 
30 360 
32 965 

34 024 
37 251 

35 987 

36 734 

37 719 
40 306 
46 282 


21 450 

23 396 

24 322 
31 593 
34 270 
38 414 
40 200 
44 550 
47 084 

51 424 
50 749 
50 608 

52 188 
54 864 
60 808 


38 717 

42 210 

43 916 
55 075 
59 632 
66 929 
70 560 
77 515 
81 108 

88 675 

86 736 

87 342 

89 907 
95 170 

107 090 


5 658 
4 761 

4 653 

5 260 

4 861 

5 721 

5 988 

6 213 
6 098 
5 849 
3 211 
3 049 
3 138 
.3 170 
9 089 


6 562 

5 512 

4 895 

6 022 

5 283 

7 001 

7 648 

8 153 
8 261 
7 755 
4 469 
4 456 
4 592 

4 393 

5 421 


11 220 

10 273 
9 548 

11 282 
10 144 

12 722 

13 636 

14 366 
14 359 

13 604 
7 680 
7 505 
7 730 
7 563 

14 510 


49 937 

52 483 

53 464 
66 357 
69 776 
79 365 
83 796 
91 583 
95 096 

101 893 
94 416 
94 847 
97 637 

102 733 
121 600 


+ 4 901 


1896 


+ 2 546 


1897 


+ 981 


1898 


+ 12 893 


1899 


+ 3 419 


1900 


+ 9 589 


1901 


+ 4 431 


1902 


+ 7 787 


1904 


+ 3 513 

+ 6 797 


1905 


— 7 477 


1906 


+ 431 


1907 


+ 2 790 


1908 


+ 5 096 


1909 


a +18 867 







a This year's figures Include academic departments of colleges. 



Table 6 
Expenditures of secondary schools 1895-1909 



YEAR 


Teachers' 
salaries 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Schoolhouses, 

sites, furniture 

and repairs 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


1895 


$1 692 539 89 
1 858 951 56 
1 757 708 55 

1 983 720 10 

2 361 897 83 
2 433 974 52 

2 952 265 78 

3 205 376 65 
3 496 154 97 

3 873 354 98 

4 009 162 64 
4 066 400 26 
4 471 947 26 

4 863 329 65 

5 387 119 40 


+ S41 372 14 
+ 166 411 67 
— 101 243 01 
+ 226 Oil 55 
+ 378 177 73 
+ 72 076 69 
+ 518 291 26 
+ 253 110 87 
+ 290 778 32 
+ 377 200 01 
+ 135 807 66 
+ 57 237 62 
+ 405 647 . . 
+ 391 382 39 
<l + 523 789 75 


$337 373 65 

393 301 11 

418 053 06 

452 098 OS 

1 381 737 68 

1 660 049 24 

989 522 89 

1 325 977 11 

1 532 500 94 

1 984 013 27 

2 338 138 98 
2 285 520 43 
1 730 250 42 
1 346 043 05 
1 162 237 79 


— S183 372 04 


1896 


+ 55 927 46 


1897 


+ 24 751 95 


1898 


+ 34 045 02 


1899 


+ 929 639 60 


1900 


+ 278 311 56 


1901 


— 670 526 35 


1902 


+ 336 454 22 


1903 


+ 206 523 83 


1904 


+ 451 512 33 


1905 


+ 354 125 71 


1906 


— 52 618 55 


1907 


— 555 270 01 


1908 


— 384 207 37 


1909 


a— 183 805 26 



a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 



298 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 6 (concluded) 
Expenditures of secondary schools 1895-1909 







Increase 




Increase 




Increase 


YEAR 


Apparatus 


or 
decrease 


Library 


or 
decrease 


Total 


or 
decrease 


1895. . 


$21 204 37 


— $1 640 81 


$41 519 11 


— $460 30 


$3 133 218 13 


— $171 485 . . 


1896.. 


31 233 41 


+ 10 029 04 


48 598 63 


+ 7 079 52 


3 560 802 47 


+ 427 584 34 


1897.. 


47 720 49 


+ 16 487 08 


45 321 . . 


— 3 277 63 


3 284 246 18 


— 276 556 29 


1898. . 


43 910 82 


— 3 809 67 


57 614 48 


+ 12 293 48 


3 729 913 03 


+ 445 666 85 


1899. . 


169 838 05 


+ 125 927 23 


57 264 86 


— 349 62 


5 226 824 83 


+ 1 496 911 80 


1900.. 


175 144 02 


+ 5 305 97 


56 097 94 


— 1 166 92 


6 096 374 41 


+ 869 549 58 


1901.. 


77 828 16 


— 97 315 86 


58 544 24 


+ 2 446 30 


5 702 717 52 


— 393 656 89 


1902.. 


67 581 07 


— 10 247 09 


54 052 52 


— 4 491 72 


6 627 708 66 


+ 924 991 14 


1903.. 


73 733 82 


+ 6 152 75 


76 894 94 


+ 22 842 42 


7 106 999 90 


+ 479 291 24 


1904.. 


74 188 57 


+ 454 75 


54 670 46 


— 22 224 48 


8 111 368 90 


+ 1 004 369 .. 


1905.. 


75 587 82 


+ 1 399 25 


62 181 92 


+ 7 511 46 


7 846 388 14 


— 264 980 76 


1906.. 


111 324 44 


+ 35 736 62 


59 890 97 


— 2 290 95 


8 471 830 03 


+ 625 441 89 


1907.. 


80 867 32 


— 30 457 12 


58 521 90 


— 1 369 07 


8 549 614 03 


+ 77 784 . . 


1908.. 


62 638 98 


— 18 228 34 


49 904 65 


— 8 617 25 


9 142 938 24 


+ 593 324 21 


1909.. 


72 239 94 


+ a9 600 96 


63 698 57 


+ al3 793 92 


9 397 268 16 


+ a 254 329 92 



a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 

Table 7 
Total expenditures of secondary schools 1895-1909 



YEAR 


High 
schools 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Acad- 
emies 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Total 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


1895 


$1 803 675 


— $151 178 


$1 329 543 


_ 


$20 307 


$3 133 218 


— $171 485 




1 813 132 


+ 9 457 


1 747 670 


+ 


418 127 


3 560 802 


+ 427 584 


1897 


1 892 960 


+ 79 828 


1 391 286 


— 


356 384 


3 284 246 


— 276 556 




2 239 226 


+ 346 266 


1 490 687 


+ 


99 401 


3 729 913 


+ 445 667 




3 708 196 


+ 1 468 970 


1 518 629 


+ 


27 942 


5 226 825 


+ 1 496 912 


1900 


4 077 421 


+ 369 225 


2 018 954 


+ 


500 325 


6 096 375 


+ 869 550 




3 596 674 


— 480 747 


2 106 044 


+ 


87 090 


5 702 718 


— 393 657 




4 445 083 


+ 848 409 


2 182 625 


+ 


76 581 


6 627 708 


+ 924 990 


1903 


5 007 055 


+ 561 972 


2 099 945 


— 


82 680 


7 107 000 


+ 479 292 


1904 


6 015 340 


+ 1 008 285 


2 096 029 


— 


3 916 


8 111 369 


+ 1 004 369 


1905 


6 660 492 


+ 645 152 


1 185 897 


— 


910 132 


7 846 389 


— 264 980 




6 994 497 


+ 334 005 


1 477 333 


+ 


291 436 


8 471 830 


+ 625 441 




7 158 425 


+ 183 928 


1 391 189 


— 


86 144 


8 549 614 


+ 77 784 


1908 


6 971 985 


— 186 440 


2 170 953 


+ 


779 764 


9 142 938 


+ 593 324 


1909 


7 060 315 


+ 88 330 


2 336 953 


+ 


a 166 000 


9 397 268 


+ a 254 330 



a This year's figures include academic departments of colleges. 

Table 8 

Net property of secondary schools 1895-1909 



YEAR 


High 
schools 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Acad- 
emies 


Increase 

or 
decrease 


Total 


Increase 

or 
decrease 




$7 506 655 


+ $165 927 


$10 062 338 


+ $1 349 786 


$17 568 993 


+ $1 515 713 




7 464 234 


— 42 421 


15 841 548 


+ 5 779 210 


23 305 782 


+ 5 736 789 


1897 


7 667 883 


+ 203 649 


15 493 519 


— 348 029 


23 161 402 


— 144 380 




9 339 536 


+ 1 671 653 


16 508 034 


+ 1 014 515 


25 847 570 


+ 2 686 168 


1899 


10 496 416 


+ 1 156 880 


16 856 991 


+ 348 957 


27 353 407 


+ 1 505 837 




11 124 461 


+ 628 045 


17 287 724 


+ 430 733 


28 412 185 


+ 1 058 778 


1901 


10 738 383 


— 386 078 


18 150 206 


+ 8G2 482 


28 888 589 


+ 476 404 


1902 


11 619 339 


+ 881 006 


19 106 318 


+ 956 112 


30 725 707 


+ 1 837 118 


1903 


14 400 278 


+ 2 780 889 


19 370 728 


+ 264 410 


33 771 006 


+ 3 045 299 


1904 


18 613 990 


+ 4 213 712 


20 185 850 


+ 815 122 


33 799 840 


+ 5 028 834 


1905 


18 670 277 


+ 56 287 


15 652 752 


— 4 533 098 


34 323 029 


— 4 476 811 


1906 


20 644 512 


+ 1 974 235 


a 8 258 161 




<z28 902 673 




1907 


24 403 079 


+ 3 758 567 


a 8 777 955 


+ 519 794 


33 181 034 


+ 4 278 861 




26 024 543 


+ 1 621 464 


a 9 388 818 


+ 610 863 


35 413 3P1 


+ 2 232 327 




27 239 933 


+ 1 215 390 


12 572 919 


4-63 184 101 


39 812 852 


+ 54 399 491 



a Figures for previous years include elementary departments, b This year's figures In 
elude academic departments of college*. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



299 



3 

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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



301 



Table 10 
Names of institutions changed 1908-9 



From 




Augustinian Institute, Carthage 

Callicoon Depot Union School 

Despatch Union School 

Syracuse Business High School 

ursuline Convent, Bedford Park, New 
York city 



Augustinlan Academy of Carthage. . 

Callicoon Union School 

East Rochester Union School 

Syracuse Technical High School . . . 

Academy of Mt St Ursula, Bedford 
Park, «ew York city 



Date 



June 17, 1909 
Oct. 22, 1908 
June 17, 1909 
June 17, 1909 



Dec. 10, 1908 



Table 11 
Calendar of academic examinations 1908-9 



DATE 


Secondary 
schools 


Schools not maintaining aca- 
demic department (examina- 
tions given by request of 
school commissioner) 


By the Department 
for professional 
students 


Number 

of 
subjects 


1908 
Aug. 12-14 




117 


4 
5 

22 
22 


24 


Sept. 14-16 




42 


1909 
Jan. 25-29 
June 14-18 


820 
827 


248 
264 


90 
95 



302 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



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3o6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 
Important statistics for 

▲CADEltIC DBPASTMffNTS 





•a 


iCAcms 






1 


I 


RBOBTBATIOR 




1 
1 


1 


1 


i 

! 


j 


I 




1 

* 

t 

I 


Adams H. 8 ,,..,, , . , , 


H. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

IL 

8. 

U. 

H. 
H. 

8. 


2 

,i 

1 

13 
4 

1 

\ 

2 

1 

i 

i 
1 

i 

J 


J 

2 
3 

28 
4t 
1 

2i 

3i 
2 
1 

11 

i 

2 
2i 
10 
2 

il 

8i 
1 

1 

r 

i 

2 
3 
2i 
2 
2i 

5 
4 

8 
2 

I. 
3 

2 
2 
1 

* 

19 

!i 


57 
10 
48 
18 
88 

449 
105 

29 
2 

12 

26 

23 

4 

6 
15 

11 
28 
16 
162 
24 

41 

12 

5 

24 

8 

10 
23 
22 
259 
17 

19 
82 
22 
17 
17 

62 

63 

104 

87 

» 

86 
4 
18 
82 
13 

16 

2 

465 

12 

12 


27 
6 
20 
15 
24 

811 

79 

19 

8 

17 

20 
8 
9 
8 

18 

6 
15 

2 
74 
13 

13 

12 

8 

20 

7 

5 

2 

23 

132 

3 

12 
24 
12 
9 
14 

83 
25 
69 
18 
8 

15 


16 
4 

18 

13 

9 

228 

86 

8 


10 




48 
9 
89 
22 
25 

485 
110 

83 
1 

17 

85 
15 

8 
10 
18 

9 

25 

15 

169 

28 

86 
14 
8 
23 
21 

11 

8 

89 

250 

14 

20 
87 
19 
14 
15 

60 

81 

123 

82 

8 

24 
1 

12 
88 

20 

11 

2 

424 

15 

1 18 


62 
11 
57 
81 
64 

666 

134 

35 

4 

23 

45 
28 
20 
14 
85 

7 

84 

22 

205 

23 

34 

82 

6 

88 

17 

14 
19 
49 
264 
11 

82 
64 

42 
19 
21 

91 
66 
146 
28 
14 

49 
3 
32 
44 
20 

15 

4 

481 

82 

20 


110 


Adam* Center U. 8 


20 


Addtoon H. 8 


7 
7 
7 

163 
18 
12 


8 
1 

6 


96 


Afton H. 8 


68 




79 


Albany H. 8 


1 161 


Albion H. 8 


244 


Alden H. 8 


68 


Alexander U. 8. ....... . 


5 


Alexandria Bay H. 8 ... 


7 

13 
6 
6 
2 
6 


4 

10 
5 
3 
3 

10 


12 
1 
6 
5 
4 


40 




80 


Allegany H. 8 


48 




28 


Almnnri H T S 


H. 
H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

U. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

S. 

3. 

H. 

H. 

S. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

8. 

H. 
J. 
H. 
H. 

8. 

& 
J. 
H. 
H. 


24 


Altamont H. 8 


58 


Allow TT. 8 ... . 


16 


Amenta H. 8 


8 

9 

60 

4 

8 
14 


6 

8 

48 

5 

8 
6 


2 

2 

20 

6 

2 


60 


Amltyville H. 8 


87 


Amsterdam H. 8 


864 


Andorer H.S 


51 


Angola H. 8 


70 


Antwerp H. 8 


46 


Apalachfn TJ. 8 


13 


Arcade H. 8 


9 
18 

10 

2 

29 

43 

6 

10 
19 
12 

4 
2 

S3 
7 

48 
6 
3 

11 


8 
8 


2 


61 


Argyle H. 8 


88 


Arkport U. 8 


25 


Athens U. 8 






27 


Attica H. 8 


14 
72 


8 


88 


Auburn H. 8 


514 


Ausable Forkf TJ. 8 


26 


AvoeaH.8 


10 

14 

15 

8 

1 

22 
12 
44 

4 


1 
2 

2 

1 

14 


52 


Avon H. 8 


91 


Babylon H. 8 


61 


Balnbridge H. 8 


S3 


Baldwin H. 8 


86 


Baldwlnsville F. A 


161 


Ballston Spa H. 8 


97 


Batavla l£ 8 


269 


Bay Shore H. 8 


60 


Baynort TJ. 8 


22 


Belfast H. 8 


10 


1 


78 


BeHport U. 8 


4 


Belmont H. 8 


12 
21 
14 

4 
4 

243 
10 
14 


9 

10 

9 

8 


5 
9 
4 

2 


10 
1 


44 




82 


Berfahlre TJ. 8 


40 


Berlin TJ. 8 


26 


Big Flats U. 8 


6 


Btnghamton H. 8 


97 

10 

9 


102 

11 

2 


8 
4 
1 


905 


Blade River H. 8 


47 


BbsdeUH.8 


H. I 1 


1 38 



a ILshigh school; S.=«enlor; M.=mlddle and J.=junlor ■ehooL 



each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 







41 


N 














17 


:t 


































« 


X 


















a 






















■e 






































3u 


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36 










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4 

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11 

1 

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14 

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2 

• 


10 

u 

IS 

i 
* 

4 


! 


I 

4 


1 


; 


i 


1 


7 


10 


! 


7 




, 




a 


2 


4 


1 


• 
1 


1 


: 


1 


8 












4 


a 

i 


43 
1 


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2v 
1 


111 







« ftuo 
1 *'. 


an 






416 


41 


2 SCO 

aoo 


Ti 
30 
10 
SB 
7 


I7S 


49 
10 


; ■ ■ 


331 


7iiC 

: I't.- 
■i-. 


13 

84 


450 


H 




71 
12 


4 000 


342 

300 


7J. 

■•■ 

J16 


68 


1 160 


137 


1 W. 
1 em 
AiS 


43 

31 
M 


Tiu 


144 






ion 


17 
W 


ITS 
■r 


s 

63 
1*1 


W 


iot 



3o8 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 



Bloomtagdale U. 8 

Bolivar H. 8 

Bolton U. 8. (Bolton Landing). 

Bombay U. 8 

BoonvtlleH.3 



Bradford U. 8 

Brasher ft Stockholm H. 8. (Brasher Falls). 

BreesportU.S 

Brewster H. 8 

Brlarcllff U. 8. (Briarcllff Manor) 



Bridgehampton U. 8. 
BridgewaterU.S.... 

Broedalbln U. 8 

BroctonH.8 

BrookfieldH. 8 



Brooklyn Boys H. 8 

Brown vllle H . S 

BmahtonH. S 

Bryant H. & (Long Island City). 
Buchanan U. 8 



Buffalo Central H. 8. 

BurdettU. 8 

Cairo U. 8 

Caledonia H. 8 

CalllcoonU. 8 



Cambridge H. 8.. 

Camden H. 8 

CamlllusH.8.... 
Campbell U. 8. . . 
Canajoharie H. 6. 



Canandalgua A. , 
CanaseragaU. 8. 
CanastotaH. 8. . 
Candor H. 8.... 
CantateoH.8... 



Canton H. 8 

Cape Vincent H. 8. 

Oarmcl H. 8 

Carthage H.S.... 
Cassadaga U. 8. . . 



Castile H- 8 

Castleton U. 8. . . 

CatoH.8 

CatakillH. 8 

Cattaraugus H. 8. 



Cayuga U. 8 

CaicnoviaH. 8 

Center Moriches U.S. . 
Central Square H. 8... 
Central Valley U.S.... 

oH^high school; 8.= 





TK1CHKBS 


8 






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H. 


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H. 


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J. 
H. 


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H. 


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H. 


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BZQDTBATION 



I 


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17 


15 


8 


2 


18 


5 


1 


3 


6 


7 


22 


14 


13 


11 


1 141 


652 


15 


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32 


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744 


308 


fi 






426 


14 


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7 


24 


20 


12 


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31 


21 


68 


23 


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118 


74 


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416 
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148 



894 

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212 

7 

10 

106 



141 



10 
1 

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21 

7 

9 

15 

13 

84 
8 
1 

10 
2 



14 



2 
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4 



1 



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17 


12 


6 


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16 


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2 




11 


4 


4 



2 

35 

7 

5 

82 

6 

11 

4 

17 
6 

11 
1 

8 
17 
10 

2 421 

25 

24 

577 

4 

402 
13 
11 
83 
12 

33 
44 

17 

4 
88 

99 
14 
47 
28 
43 

85 
18 
10 



24 

6 

9 

81 

25 

4 

29 

10 

20 

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12 
37 
6 
16 
66 

4 

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4 

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3 

12 

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37 

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24 
55 

784 
2 

573 
18 
13 
36 
24 

68 
63 
19 
6 
45 

149 

27 
57 
42 
69 

117 
19 
26 
58 

18 

28 
4 
22 
91 
42 

9 
38 

6 
22 

7 



I 



t 



14 
72 
13 
21 



10 

23 

8 

46 

8 

23 
4 
14 
54 
35 

2 421 
49 
79 

1311 
6 

975 
26 
24 
69 
36 

101 

107 

36 

10 

83 

248 
41 

101 
70 

112 

202 
37 
35 
91 
23 



10 

31 

172 

67 

13 
67 
16 
42 
12 



rotor; M.=mlddle and J.=junlor school. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



( continued) 

each academic department 



5 W2 
SUi 
I ■>■■ 



J SJ1 

a an 

1 243 











Ill 












22S 


SI 
10 






1 


It 


.V 
1 075 


03 

1 364 
88 

63 

US 


\btr. 
tic 

i ; -.- 
207 


1 i.l 
SO 

IK 
SB 

40 


.-■■ 
...i 
S 73? 


H 

07 

MS 


to 

... 


02 

en 

60 


314 


ft 

03 


.125 


l»" 






1.'.: 


207 


m 








v- 
2V0 


> 

00 



1 757 12 
657 IB 

2 060 02 

2 083 11 

1 7*0 03 

710 . 

1 003 51 

3 021 40 

3 5M 09 

183 303 OS 

2 204 10 

3 319 00 
81 350 64 

1 384 SB 

50 12! 29 
1 309 73 
1 414 79 

S 285 52 
1 013 71 

4 459 88 

1 285 13 

2 458 98 

5 394 90 
.30 349 02 

6 D'l Si 

3 722 21 
5 6*5 71 

10 503 28 



1 711 00 

8 737 01 
4 058 52 

811 14 
2000 .. 
S! 352 74 
1 800 58 
1 794 78 



3io 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Tabus 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DBPABXMS5T8 





•a 


mom 






1 


6 

1 


RTCBTEATTOM 




! 


I 
1 


1 


i 

to 

i 


I 

CO 


1 


JS 
A 
O 


i 

f 

3 




Champlain H. 8 


H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
8. 

8. 
J. 

a 

H. 
H. 

H. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

8. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
& 
8. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
EL 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
S. 

J. 
H. 

8. 
J. 
H. 

H. 

H. 

3. 

H. 

H. 


1* 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
i 

1 
1 

'i 

l 

i 
l 
i 

i 

i 

77 
1 
1 
1 
1 

\ 
3 
1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 

17 
\ 

\ 

H 
1 

i! 

1 
1 

* 
1 
1 


2 

2* 
8 
4 
t 

2* 

t 

2 

a 

3 
2 
1 
2 

li 

1 

44 
1 

f! 

2 
f 

t 

5 
1 
li 

2 
5 

U 
2 

7 

4 

t 

3 
20 

1 

3 
2 

l\ 

4 
2 


5 
43 
47 
56 
17 

12 

8 

11 

17 

2 

27 
23 
18 
27 
7 

14 
15 
38 
59 


68 

14 

8 

7 

18 

1 798 
10 
40 
17 
18 

28 

141 

15 

19 

117 

32 

15 

32 

502 

4 

12 

36 

1 

12 
SI 

21 
26 
19 
32 
82 


8 

5 

23 

35 

5 

7 
2 
4 

18 
5 

8 
17 
11 
21 

4 

11 
11 
27 
12 
3 

48 
5 

16 
5 
6 

743 

8 

31 

9 

4 

22 
50 
10 
18 
97 

18 

6 

22 

236 

2 


8 
6 
6 
20 
3 

4 


4 

6 
6 
9 


3 


15 
18 
31 
56 
10 


1 

5 

22 

8 

18 
24 
15 
80 
4 

6 
10 
50 
40 

8 

76 


19 
8 

18 

2 950 
6 

47 
14 
11 

34 

117 

13 

24 

111 

22 
8 

30 

455 

3 

5 

50 

1 

8 

29 

15 
22 
18 
37 
20 


10 


25 


Charlotte H. 8 


45 1 63 


Chateaugay H. 8 


51 82 


Chatham ft. 8 


64 
15 

18 
4 


120 


Chaumont U. 8 . , . . . . . . . . . . 


25 


Chautauqua U. 8. . . 1 1 . , i . . . . . ... x ...... . - 


4 




27 


Ghasy U. 8 


5 


Chenango Forks U. 8 


4 

13 

6 

6 
11 

2 
15 

8 

2 

8 
26 
15 

6 

21 
2 
6 
5 
4 

409 

5 

19 

5 

4 

13 
23 
7 
15 
53 

10 
3 

15 

149 

2 


2 
3 

4 
4 
1 
8 

5 
4 

17 

3 

14 
3 
6 
4 
6 


1 
2 
2 

6 

3 


15| 20 
281 50 


Cherry Creek H. 8 


Cherry Valley H. 8 


8 16 


Chester H. 8 


29 
31 
17 

32 
12 

26 

28 


47 


Churehrllle H. 8 


55 


Cincinnati^ U. 8 


32 


Clayton H. 8 


71 


ClayvlllelLS 


16 


CWdand V. 8 


32 


Clifton Spring* H. 8 


38 


Clinton H.8 


58' 108 


Clyde H. 8 


55! 95 


ClymflrTJ. 8 


13 21 


rVthfaHllF, R 


81 
15 
20 
13 
15 

21 
62 
27 
24 

38 

125 

22 

39 

193 

48 

18 

49 

565 

7 

» 

4 

56 

5 

11 

54 

17 
38 
29 
60 
40 


157 


Goeymans U. S 


24 


Cohoeton H. 8 


39 


Collins Center U. 8 


21 


Cotton U. 8 


33 


Ownmmial H. 8. (Brooklyn) 


2 950 


Constablevllle U. 8" T . '. 


4 

13 
4 
7 


15 

3 
10 
36 



2 

10 

133 

2 


6 
6 
2 

13 

1 
1 

1 


27 


Cooperstown H. 8 


109 


Oopflnhagen H. 8 


41 


Corfu H."8 


35 


Corinth H. 8 


72 


Corning F. A 


242 


Cornwall H. 8 


35 


Cornwall-on-Hudson H. 8 


63 


Cortland H. 8... ... 


304 


Coxsackie H. 8 


70 


Crown Point U. 8 


26 


Cuba H. 8 


79 


Curtto H. 8. (New Brighton) 


1 020 


Dalton U. 8 


10 


Dannemora U. 8 


12 


n* n «villA H 8 


29 
5 
7 

25 

4 
16 
14 
40 
14 


23 


15 


3 


108 


Dayton U. 8 


6 


De Kalb Junction U. 8 








19 


Delaware A. A U. 8. (Delhi) 


19 

4 
9 
5 
16 
7 


14 

2 
5 
8 
6 
5 


3 

1 
4 
1 
3 
2 


83 


Delaware Literary Inst, A U. 8. (Franklin) 


32 


Delcvan H. S 


60 


Depew U. S 


47 


Deposit H. 8 


97 


DeRuyterH.8 


60 



a H^hlgh school; 8.=eenJor; M.=mlddle and J.=junlor tohooL 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 





s 
a 


t 


























8 


n 














s: 


M 


u 


19 


11 


13 










































,7 












2 


t 


8 


1 


22 





























3 







l 














100 

42a 
tee 

1 S87 

280 
738 
407 
TOO 

see 

715 

1 SOT 

2 362 

2 IS 

1 706 
403 

2800 
SIS 

1 100 

2692 

708 
t 318 

3 185 

486 

1 000 
1 11« 

12! 

2200 

400 
316 
550 
3352 
484 

233 

837 
424 
222 
1543 
700 
851 

2451 


2a 


too 

2S0 
650 
600 

885 

2250 
320 
350 
480 

260 
620 

391 

2M 

780 

568 
7O0 
400 
250 

10 600 
292 
1 398 
419 

1 62t 
300 
400 

1 313 

TOO 

400 

3000 
350 

77; 

240 
109 
500 

800 

550 
925 
568 










I 
) 


1 




95 

20 
39 

368 


! 

1 

■ 

1 


i 

a 
t 

i 


4 
* 
1 
8 


u 
ii 
u 


! 

: 












60 






32 

57 
25 
12 
11 


; 
i 

134 

1 
t 


t 

i 
i 
i 
i 

i 

i 
i 

i 
i 


i 
t 

u 

i 

184 








3 


8 


2 




19 
























20 












f 

i 

8 






33 
850 

651 

68 
31 

V 


s 


( 


i 

ii 


490 

13S 


i 

t 
i 

ii 

s 


10 

j 

i 

23 

) 


s 

lu 
15 
1 

10 
IS 

t 


1 

! 
1 
i 








i 
1 

18 


i 

I 

i 






331 


21 
67 


45 




10 

IS 
53! 

20 
13 


111 
167 


a 


( 

; 


« 


1 


« 


i. 








6 


s 


• 


11 


1 


1 




















3 


13 
1 

e 

I 


1 
J 


8 
■ 
I 


1 


7 


222 

100 


48 

ISO 


: 

: 


1 


15 
121 





6 167 2B 

1 382 21 

2 379 95 

4 252 74 

1 452 20 

5 5,-9 05 
1 470 70 

1 433 44 

? 775 . 

•- .-' -i 



2 839 04 

I KHfl 70 
1 256 20 

178 629 85 
1 384 81 

9 -M> 75 

i aw . . 

■i m as 



8 535 89 

3 360 66 
1 5.-8 M 
3 379 22 
87 143 51 
1 361 81 

i D08 78 

s suil 53 



312 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DBPABTMBNTS 





(9 


TAA.CHXBS 






1 


i 


EBOBTRATION 




i 

1 


I 

T3 
O 

1 




1 


to 


1 


1 
O 


i 


De Witt Clinton H. S. (New York) 


H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

8. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

J. 
H. 

S. 
8. 
J. 

S. 
H. 
M. 
H. 

S. 

8. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
8. 
H. 
M. 

H. 
M. 

H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
M. 
H. 


61 

24 

43 

1 
1 


17 
2 

2 
H 

1 

7 

il 

7 

2 

41 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
5 

50 
1 

1 

1 

6 
H 

1 

1 

l 

51 

3 

1! 

23 
2 
55 
* 

1 

11 

4 

21 
5 

2 I 

1 


1 191 
25 
13 
13 
32 

5 
1 

36 
19 
34 

109 
16 
39 
21 
25 

12 

8 

20 

13 

3 

9 

73 
6 

1 903 

6 

4 

16 
13 
68 
12 

13 

5 

8 

72 

27 

8 
319 

2 642 

3 

4 
4 

10 
9 

40 

20 
72 
15 
6 
23 


856 
16 


474 
10 


233 
9 


3 


2 757 

25 

4 

10 

32 

6 


38 

9 

17 

40 

9 

1 

55 

24 

65 

151 
30 
58 
34 
30 

7 

18 
22 
10 

3 

15 

63 

6 

2 182 

16 

IS 
21 

8 

82 
18 

20 
14 
15 
74 
41 

27 

479 

11 

3 124 

6 

4 
13 
16 
13 
48 

36 

124 

29 

10 

1 21 


2 757 


Dexter H. S 


63 


Dickinson U. 8 


13 


Dobbs Ferry H. 8 


7 
17 

4 


5 
12 

5 


2 
10 

1 


1 


27 


Dolgevllle M. S 


72 


Downsvllle U. 8 


15 


Doyle U. 8 


1 


Drum Hffl H. 8. (PeekakM) 


22 
15 
23 

86 
13 
37 
17 
14 

2 
9 
8 
5 
2 

9 
22 

5 

810 

6 

3 

5 

3 

33 

7 

12 

9 

8 

17 

18 

15 
249 

8 
796 

2 

5 
7 

10 
3 

21 

23 

54 

11 

6 

6 


21 

4 

16 

63 
10 
16 

7 
7 


20 

3 

17 

34 

7 

10 

14 

9 


1 
3 
4 


45 
17 
28 

145 
16 
44 

25 
25 

7 

8 

10 

12 

2 

9 

57 

5 

1 026 

5 

4 
15 

8 
65 
14 

18 

10 
3 

58 
82 

21 

369 

17 

1 136 

4 

6 
4 

11 
11 
45 

30 
85 
18 
4 
22 


100 


Dryden H. 8. . . . .' 


41 


Dundee H. 8 


93 


Dunkirk H. 8 


296 


Earlvllle H. 8 


46 


East Aurora H. 8 


103 


East Bloomfield H. 8 


59 


Fjut Hampton H. 8 . 


55 


East Iallp U. 8 


14 


East Pembroke H. 8 


6 
3 
4 


3 
1 




26 


East Randolph U. 8 


82 


East Rochester U. S 


22 


East Rockaway U. 8 






5 


East Springfield U. S 


5 
14 


1 
11 




24 


East Syracuse H. 8 


120 


East Worcester U. 8 


11 


Eastern District H. 8. (Brooklyn) 


29S 
7 

6 
4 


197 
2 

4 
8 


8 


3 208 


Eaton U. 8 


21 


Eden U. 8 


17 


Edmeston H. 8 


36 


Edwards U. 8 


16 


Egberts H. 8. (Oohoes) 


19 

7 

6 

4 

2 

16 

13 

5 
165 

5 
518 

5 

5 
4 

8 
20 

19 

69 

14 

1 

6 


27 
6 

2 
2 


4 


147 


Elba H. 8 


32 


Elbridge U. 8. A A 


33 


Elisabethtown H. 8 


24 


EUenburg Depot U. 8 


18 


Ellenville H. 8 


23 
7 

17 
91 


4 

8 

3 
24 


132 


Elllcottville H. 8 


73 


Ellington H. 8 


48 


Elmlra F. A 


84S 


Elmlra Heights U. 8 


28 


Erasmus Hall H. 8. (Brooklyn) 


304 




4 260 


Erieville U. 8 


10 


F49QT H- S . . 


1 

3 

4 

11 

2 

14 

6 

1 7 


1 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 


10 


Evans Mills U. 8 


17 


Fabins H. 8 


27 


Fair Haven H. 8 


24 


FairportH. 8 


93 


Falconer H. 8 


66 


Far Rockaway H. 8 


209 


Fayetteville fl. 8 


47 


Felts Mills U. 8 


14 


Fillmore H. 8 


43 



H.=hlgh school; 8.=senlor; M.=mlddle and J.=junior sehooL 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



1 

e 

8 
! 


1 

10 

u 

4 

t 

: 
I 


s 

X 

1 

14 

a 


a 


| 


3 

3 


i 


3 


s 




' 


i 


1 


t 

i 
































I 

8 




li 








» 


1 


« 


2" 

I 


18 
1 

! 


io-s 
) 

i 


u 




77 
1 


















■ 
] 


18 


IS 

1 






4 


i 
i 


t 






1 


11 
t 

21 


11 


33 
1 

81 






3 






3 


77 


SI 


109 


140 


31 
1 




















! 


i 

! 
i 


1 

J 
U 
1 


! 

! 












2 


' 




3 

















683 


16 


1 11" 




675 


38 


sso 

70* 

-a 
r; 

32.' 

*ie 
1 w 


» 
31 

in 

30 
181 
U 


11 






■■*: 
121 


11 

42 


70 

*.< 
5SC 


7 


78 

39 
34 


4J* 




80 


1 ;■ 


188 


■ v> 


180 






t: 
■r. 

SO) 
883 


187 
81 
70 
88 


I M 


48 


212 


in 



Mt 


83 


; ■-.'. 


480 






two 


11 


188 


82 
11 

100 


2 594 


iii 


1 yM 


830 
17 




16 

409 


r-i 












TOO 


28 
89 










11 IJ00 

IK 


I 412 
82 


an 


104 
24 


460 

2 inn 

100 

.41 

M0 


81 

at 

£7 



2 600 08 

7204 eo 

4 793 25 

3 17A OS 

2 390 48 

1 992 20 

1 005 30 

2 828 48 
1 112 49 

3 189 58 
8 00V 25 

730 86 
171 388 38 
I 382 80 

1 391 44 

3 «W M 



1 743 Ofl 

1 H59 47 
!. 073 . . 
3 127 17 

i sei ei 

15 515 98 

4B77 40 

220 944 44 

1 210 W 



314 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

▲CADIKIC DBPABTMINT8 





•a 


niGHUS 






1 


fr 


■JQBTRATIOH 




1 


I 


a 

9% 


1 

! 


1 


1 


I 


s 

1 

1 


Fiocfley Lake U. 8 


& 

M. 

H. 
H. 
H. 

J. 
H. 
8. 
H. 
EL 

a 

H. 
H. 
H. 
8. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
J. 
8. 
H. 

8. 
J. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
J. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
8. 
H. 

H. 
8. 
H. 
8. 
H. 

M. 

H. 
H. 

8. 
8. 


14 

4 
24 

9 

2 
2 

It 

\\ 


1 

i 
3 
13 
2 

* 
2 

H 

2 

3} 

3 
3 
6 
2 
1 

5* 
1 

U 

4 

8 

1 
li 

1 
14 

,1 

106 
6 

8 
18 

4 

84 

8 

44 

2 

1 

8 

1 

3 

si 

4 

2 

! 


5 
9 

24 
265 

15 

10 
17 
11 
21 
23 

27 

87 

107 

35 

6 

49 

6 

22 

36 

139 

15 

13 

9 

9 

113 

8 
5 

13 
1980 

83 

80 

172 

3 

29 
105 

51 
39 
14 
9 
23 

49 
16 
64 
16 
28 

1 

60 
24 

I 


8 

2 

12 

135 

6 

5 
20 
10 
14 

18 

18 

13 

57 

9 

4 

27 

5 

10 

18 

100 

7 

17 

6 

3 

85 

• 




2 




3 
6 

22 

237 
16 

2 
89 
11 
25 

28 

81 
85 

82 

25 

6 

60 

8 

18 

80 

129 

13 

16 

7 

6 

132 

10 

1 

19 


7 
6 

41 
863 

28 

13 
88 
15 
37 

86 

88 

89 

144 

84 

5 

62 

8 

21 

62 

160 

19 

21 

9 

10 

174 

14 

4 

19 

3885 

34 

184 

285 

4 

35 

183 

64 
64 
25 
10 
44 

63 

17 
60 
20 
OS 

\ ri 
« 

1 42 

3 

1 1 


10 


FtohrilU.8 


ii 


FlshV<ll-on-F"<Wi H. S 


17 
98 
12 


8 
92 

6 


2 


63 


Flushing H. 8* 


590 


Fonda H. 8 


89 


Forestpott XJ. 8 


15 


Forestville F. A 


21 

8 

11 

10 

16 

10 

29 

8 

1 

21 
3 
8 

11 

80 

8 
4 
1 
2 
66 

4 


19 

2 

16 

13 

5 

10 

26 

7 

1 

21 

2 

3 

13 

20 

3 
3 


8 
4 

7 

4 

1 
4 

4 


77 


Fort Ann XJ. 8 


26 


Fort Covington H. 8 


62 


Fort Edward H. 8 


64 


Fort Plain H. 8 


69 


Frankfort H. 8 


74 


Franklin A. (Malone) 


226 


Franklin A. 4 Fratteburg H. 8. (Prattsburg) 

Freedom U. 8 


59 
11 




122 


Freeville H. 8 


16 




39 


Friendship H. 8 


82 


Fulton HTS 


289 


FultonTlUe H. 8 


82 


Gainesville H. 8 


87 


Galway U. S 


16 


Gardenville U. 8 


2 
29 

4 


13 


16 




806 




24 


Gerry U. 8 


5 


Gilbertsville H. 8 


13 
1 008 

16 

93 

124 

4 

23 

84 

84 
43 
15 
5 
21 

22 
3 

22 
6 

11 

7 

44 

17 

1 

4 


4 

527 
6 

33 
85 


8 

870 

2 

19 
86 




38 


Girls H. 8. (Brooklyn) 


3 885 


Glen Cove H. 8 


2 
7 


25 

98 

182 

3 

34 
107 

42 

48 

10 

7 

83 

49 
11 
61 

7 

sa 
e 

62 

21 

1 


59 


Glens Falls H. 8 


232 


GloverevUle H. 8 


417 


Good Ground D. 8 


7 


Goshen H. 8 


12 
64 

12 

16 

4 

8 

12 

10 
7 

14 
6 

10 

8 

40 
20 




8 
27 

9 

14 

2 


2 
10 


69 


Gouverneur H. 8. ............. - r , , 


290 


Gowanda H. 8 


106 


Granville H. 8 


112 


Great Neck H. 8 


35 


Great Valley U. 8 


17 


Greene H. 8 . . . . t , 


20 

14 

2 
13 


1 

7 
8 


77 


Greenport H. 8 


102 


Greenville F. A 


28 


Greenwich H. 8 


) 121 


Greenwood D. 8 


I 27 


Qreinvllle H. S 


9 





i 58 


Grlffin-Flefschmanns U. 8. (Griffin Corners) 


» 11 


Griffith Inst ft U. 8. (SprtngvlUe) 


22 


a 

2 


1 160 


Groton H. 8 


i\ SB 


Gn>»eland U. 8 ....,,,.. 


! 4 




1 a 


! ] 


1 


ll 11 



a ILsfalgh school; S.^eator; lf.=middle and J.=junlor sehooL 



SIXTIP ANNUAL REPORT 



each academic department 

0» PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



rtnna 


unuir 


iH>iUTD» 


MM, 




8 

M 

a 
s 

K 

s; 

K 

1 
1 

11 

32 

IS 
11 

1 
S 
144 

11 
J 

17 
2 651 

98 

18; 

3! 

Ut 

55 
20 
t 
40 

3fl 
1 

a 
i 

76 
38 

i 
3 






j 


a 

S 


f 


l 
1 

j 


I, 
1 


ToMeipen» 
of uutemlc 






m 

M 

1 312 
4 070 
1862 

3S4 
1082 

EM 
M 

874 

680 

in 

1063 

H 

377 

300 
730 
1 IK 

1 031 

nx 

770 
7938 

HO 

346 

833 

• 358 

305 

3 300 

2 322 
100 

1 503 
1 305 

1 352 
053 

1 630 
480 

1« 

I 385 

410 
736 
411 

IN 
2360 
742 
200 
501 




811) 

601 
688 
•73 

170 
760 
350 
400 
C50 

450 
1 100 
1 150 
006 
210 

000 

350 

u 

2001 

823 

2a 

501 

3 407 

350 

Ul 

20 561 
1 150 

1 250 

1 201 

1 OS 

> an 

063 
1 205 
500 
250 
000 

75! 

1 501 
460 
800 

17S 
1 300 

700 
118 








5- 
31 

n 
si 

62 
53 

ffi 

18.' 
4( 

104 
10 
32 
K 

318 

25 
27 
13 
11 

350 

i 
32 

a as; 

45 

n; 

e 

6] 

76 
6.1 

2S 
12 

74 

16 

n 

20 
40 

7 

120 

K 
1 















22 
173 
121 

86 

S 

67 




1 653 37 
B 507 18 
07 315 53 
4O70S7 

838 00 




11 


1 

2). 
9 


■ 








1141 

132 
28 


' 


13 




11 

3 












10 


» 






a 








1088 45 





1 

1 

s 

u 


e 

s 

2 
1 


15 

10 

4 

u 


3 

J 

! 


3 
3 


; 
1 






» 


as 


32 

87 
104 
166 


4 538 71 

5 876 81 
8377 80 
8068 52 
3 663 31 
I 103 70 

17 78t 32 
1 646 28 


29 


u 

50 

20 

40 












53 


i 
< 


11 
! 
11 


! 
13 

30 

1 

3 


4 




i 


114 




3 
< 

1 


3 


s 
s 

i 






SO 

it 


70 
30 

30 


58 
105 

100 


4 027 43 
8 843 66 

2 323 76 










13 
150 


1072 52 

1 710 . . 
18 344 OS 

1071 07 
681 67 

2 700 02 
222 868 15 

7053 78 

23 541 13 
27 811 36 
1 320 58 
5 888 11 
10 043 47 

5 351 04 






11 


3 
33 

4 








25i 




U 


4 






I 












15 


i 

a 

6 


31! 

1 


1 

; 

if 
it 


Si 

1 

1 


1 
3 

3 
1 


in 

i 


62 
303 
S 

300 
171 


St 

2! 

80 
154 


is 

m 

IS 


89 


1 
14 

1 

1 


: 

( 

I 

3 


i 

37 

: 


3 
11 


9 

6 


s 

3 

! 


22 
25 


45 
78 






207 




140 


8 847 48 
1 388 86 
4 821 70 








i 




2* 




18 

s 


30 

14 
! 
13 


I 

2 

1 
2 


s 
1 


50 
IS 


18 










17 








80 
102 
31 


1 478 64 
3 263 18 

2 014 36 
267 56 

3 088 30 


20 


7 


3 





3 




SO 

2t 

; 

42 


50 


1 


: 


IS 

s 


; 




6 




I 




i 








: 







3i6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics f or 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 





•a 


TBACHKBS 


1 


















1 


£ 


uaanunoN 




I 

I 


1 




I 


! 

0Q 


I 




is 

f 


HaUesboro U. 8 


J. 

H. 
H. 
H. 

8. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
J. 
8. 

8. 
8. 
J. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
J. 
H. 

H. 

S. 

J. 
H. 
H. 
IL 

8. 

H. 
H. 
8. 
H. 
S. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
M. 

H. 
S. 
H. 

J. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 


* 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

i 
1 

1 

4 

t 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

58 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

t 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
8 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

u 

2 
5 

14 J 


2 

4 
3 
1 

3 

1 

1 
2 

4 

3* 
7 

7J 

5 
1 
1 

2 
2 
1 

2 

1* 
1 

21 
1 

21 

3 

4 

l\ 

5* 
14 
3 
5 
1 

4* 

7 

it 

t 

3 

2 
16 
18 


6 
17 
43 
27 
26 

82 
59 
21 
11 
11 

11 

16 
11 
45 
67 

42 

15 

67 

9 

. 15 

4 

1 352 

12 

45 

13 

10 
7 
7 

12 
6 

19 

48 
47 
12 
33 

70 

160 

39 

72 

6 

34 
15 
97 

6 
10 

8 

27 

24 

235 

579 












6 
28 
62 
50 
30 

51 
58 
26 
7 
15 

25 
17 
11 

80 
87 

80 
10 
104 
15 
22 

3 

23 
G2 

18 

28 
19 
15 
17 
7 

40 
72 
72 
13 

53 

97 
230 

66 
126 

17 

69 

8 

134 

9 

26 

4 

27 

40 

336 

719 


6 


Haldane H. S. (Cold Spring) 


12 
26 
10 
12 

22 
20 
14 


9 

23 

9 

4 

12 

12 

8 


8 
16 
12 

5 

14 
7 
5 


4 
8 

1 
3 
1 


18 
50 
11 
17 

30 
43 
23 
4 
13 

9 
16 
11 
53 
59 

42 
10 
64 
9 
16 

1 

2 153 

12 

39 

14 

15 

7 

9 

17 

15 

31 
55 
67 
9 
24 

91 
174 
39 
78 
10 

83 
8 

88 
5 

13 

4 

20 

25 

848 

353 


46 


Hamburg H. 8 


112 


Hamilton H 8 


61 


Hammond U. 8 


47 


Hammondsport H. 8 


81 


Hancock H" S 


101 


Hannibal H. 8 


49 


Harrison U. 8 


11 


HarrlBYllle TT. 8 


8 

13 
10 
6 
31 
40 

33 
5 

52 
6 

12 


8 

8 

6 

2 

27 

27 

30 


1 

6 

2 

3 

26 

10 

11 


1 

4 
2 

6 


28 


Hartford U. S 


34 


Hartwlck U. 8 


S3 


Hastings-on-Hudson U. S 


• 22 


Haverling fl. 8. (Bath) 


133 


Haverstraw H. 8 


146 


Hempstead H. S 


122 


Henderson U. S 


20 


HurHmAr H, 8. . , 


28 
5 
8 


17 
4 

3 


4 


168 




24 


Heuvelton U. 8 


88 


Hlcksville U. 8 


4 


High School of Commerce (New York) 


472 

7 

16 

10 

8 
8 
8 
10 
8 

29 
36 
39 
6 
23 

49 

120 

27 

66 

6 

34 
1 

43 

7 

11 


202 

6 

16 

5 

9 
9 

4 
4 

14 
19 
15 
3 
13 

36 
81 
20 
32 
7 

24 


112 
8 
9 
4 

16 
4 
1 
8 
4 

9 

23 

27 

1 

5 

32 
38 
17 
28 
9 

10 


15 
5 

3 

1 
1 

3 

1 
5 
2 
6 


2 153 


Highland H. S 


35 


ffjpM*ndF*n* H. 8, 


91 


Hillsdale U. 8 


32 


Hilton H. S 


43 


Hilton Memorial H. S. (Andes) 


26 


Hinsdale U. 8 


24 


Hobart H. 8 


34 


Holland U. S 


22 


Holland Patent H. S 


71 


Holley H. 8 


127 


Homer A. & U. S 


129 


Honeoye H. 8 


22 


Honeoye Falls H. 8 


77 


Hoosick Falls H. 8 


188 


HorneUsville H. 8 


404 


Horseheads H. S 


105 


Hudson H. 8 


204 


Hunter H. S 


27 


Huntington H. 8 


102 


Hyde Park U. 8 


16 


Dion H. 8 


34 
1 
8 


35 


13 


222 


TnHiap x*k* TT. 8 


14 


Interlaken HL S 


9 


1 


39 


Irondequoit U. S 


g 


IrvingtonH. 8 


13 

25 

153 

241 


3 

7 

166 

124 


4 

8 

116 

128 


1 
14 


47 


Islip H. S 


65 


Ithaca H. 8 


CM 
1 1072 





o H.=high school; S.=senior; &L=middJe and J.=juntor school 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IS 


23 


20 


in 

41 
11 


7 


20 
13 


1 
W 


W 
69 


32 


m 


4V 
IS 


«2 

12 
ID 

1 

18 

11 


1 304 

a 

29 

>• 


a 


26 


i. 


13 




35 
63 


i 


4^ 


ii 
3 
w 
i 


n 

191 

n 

12 


21 


% 


: 


1M 


1U 


a 


tl 

2* 
188 


2X1 
416 



1 

1 


4 

! 

; 


I 
11 

< 


1 

: 


3 

1 

1 


i 
i? 

9 


1 


1 
1 


I 

1 


, 






i 
! 


6 
2 


13 
i 

4 


a 
i' 

1 


1 

26 
t 

1 




g 


1 

: 


11 
S 
1 


4 
I 


1 

1 


5 


: 
5 

3 

H 

; 
: 


i 
: 

: 

1 

i 

i 

tl 

2. 
HI 

l< 


1 

i 

9 

1 

. 

SI 

3> 

r 
li 
t 


9 




2 


3 
1 


: 


1 




! 


' 


' 


1 

1 

T 

;• 
i 

4 


i 

! 
i 
1 


1 

7 

S 

1 
7 


I 




2 


11 


30 


31 


12 

: 


1 

i 


> 


1 




1 


: 

i 
28 


: 
37 


4 

9 

82 
05 


4 

1 

71 
27 


< 


3 
35 



300 


10 










































1 Ml 




















■>m 




.' ■,', 










u 






































650 


so 


BT7 






































23 











































:.« 


16 




« 




































24 






















r. 






























43 


3 U' 


86 






























• ' 


87 




I 














4 000 


sis 



2 037 30 

3 Ml 74 



1 441 01 

2 515 A3 

1 338 05 
1*2 557 06 

2 671 28 

3 446 90 

2 074 01 

2 no bo 

2 576 21 



8 257 B2 

11 .',71 30 
6 672 05 

S 600 12 
2 7iL 77 



1 643 93 
a 803 . . 
5 895 35 
31 953 06 
68 259 20 



3i8 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



t 














Table 13 
Important statistics for 

▲CADIHIC DEPARTMENTS 




1 

8 

•a 
S 

© 


TBA.CHUB 






J 


J 


ooanuTiON 


• 


i 

1 


a 


! 


1 
1 


en 




6 


1 

s 

t 

o 


Jamestown H. S 


H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

M. 

H. 
J. 
M. 
H. 

91 

S. 

M. 

H. 

8. 

8. 

H. 

U. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

S. 

H. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
J. 

a 

H. 

H. 

8. 

S. 

H. 

H. 
J. 

8. 

H. 

M. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

S. 

H. 

H. 

& 

EL 

H. 

8. 


7 
1 
1 
3 
1 

1 
1 

i 
1 
8 

1 
1 
1 
9 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2* 

1 
1 
1 

x i 

l 
i 

* 
l 

2 
1 

* 

1 

i 

4 

1 
1 
2 
t 

1 
1 
1 
1 

It 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


17 
1 
1 
7 
2 

2 
2 

I 

9 

J 

i 

1 
2 

:'! 

6 

4 

34 
1 
4 
3f 

U 

* 

1 

7 
2 
2 

11 
3 

13 

4 
1 

2 

2 ) 
2 

4 

i 

* 
i 

i 


264 

9 

10 

84 

16 

25 

20 

6 

5 

231 

11 
9 

12 

539 

2 

9 

19 

18 

13 

121 

33 
41 
9 
44 
36 

4 

43 

13 

6 

4 

50 

16 
18 
17 
51 

125 

9 

13 

75 

9 

11 

25 

46 

5 

73 

Vc 
4 

15 

12 

6 


87 

11 

4 

64 
16 

8 
9 


82 
6 
7 

45 
20 

3 

8 


62 
1 
3 

18 
13 

3 
14 


30 

2 
9 
2 


209 

13 

9 

110 
31 

13 

23 

2 

4 

170 

7 

4 

14 

728 

8 

12 
28 
17 
28 
100 

28 
39 
12 
51 
29 

6 
44 

9 

4 
4 

104 
26 

17 
10 
43 

175 

3 

10 

54 

1 

16 
20 
49 
1 
52 

10 
7 

15 
7 

15 


316 
14 
17 

110 
36 

26 

28 

4 

8 

205 

8 

13 

7 

933 

9 

14 
25 
24 

28 
118 

34 
51 
16 
73 
38 

10 
38 

22 
2 
9 

114 
25 
21 
25 
54 

179 

9 

13 

88 
8 

18 
26 
50 
10 
77 

17 
6 
18 
22 
25 


525 




27 


Jefferson H. 8 


26 


Johnffowp H. 8 


220 


Jordan F. A 


67 


***<mahTT. 8 


38 


Keeeevllle H. 8 


51 




6 


Undertook U. 8 


5 
54 

4 

4 

4 

527 

9 

8 
18 

5 
19 
38 

17 

20 

6 

33 

19 

3 
17 

8 


2 
51 






12 


Kingston F. A .„..,. t 


39 




375 


Knowlerville U. 8 


15 


Knoxboro U. 8 


4 

5 

304 

4 

7 
7 
4 

17 
29 

7 
15 

3 
32 

6 

9 
7 
5 






17 


Lafargeville U. 8 






21 


Lafayette H. 8. of Buffalo 


257 
2 

2 
3 
9 
5 
29 

4 

10 

10 

14 

6 


34 

1 
5 
2 
1 

1 
4 

1 


1 661 


La rfurette tJ. 8 


17 


Lake George U. 8 


26 


take Placid H. 8 


63 


Lakewond H. 8 . * 


41 


Lancaster H. 8 ...... . . 


56 




218 


Lawrence H. S 


62 


Leavenworth L * Woleott H. 8. (Wolcott) 

T^roiardavilla TT. 8 


90 
28 


LeRojH. tf 


124 




67 


Lewbton U. 8 


16 


Liberty H. 8 


7 
5 


8 


83 


Limestone H. 8 


31 




6 


LMeU. 8 . . u>Jlil 


5 

76 
12 
10 
9 
28 

102 

3 

3 

86 


4 

51 

16 

8 

6 

8 

71 






13 


Little Falb H. 8 


31 
4 
2 
3 
7 

50 


1 
3 

8 

6 


218 


Little Valley H. 8 


51 


Liverpool U. 8 


3S 


LMnoton Manor U. 8 


35 


UwoniaH. 8 


97 


Loekport H. 8 


354 


LodJlTS 


12 


Lonclake U. 8 


3 
20 


2 
11 


2 


23 




142 




9 




9 
12 
29 

3 
21 

7 
4 

5 

6 

17 


7 

8 

16 

16 

2 
5 
9 
6 
10 


7 

15 

8 

14 

8 


1 
2 

5 

2 


34 




46 


Lyndonvitte H 8 


108 




11 




129 


Lyons Fafli H. 8 


27 




IS 


Mncedon H. 8 i . . . t 


4 

6 



1 


33 


McGrawville H. 8. (McGiaw) 


» 




10 



a &=hlgh echool; Senior; lUmJddk and J.^unlor eenooL 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(continued) 

each academic department 





i 


I 
1 


2 
12 








soo 
i '■■ 

K 

me 

2 140 
401 

311 

3 133 

3M 

(67 

762 
S46 

l 13* 
UI 

3503 

850 
fl?4 
1 766 
803 

320 
330 
070 
347 
414 

1 662 
1 M4 

260 
3» 
760 

•46 
IN 
«3> 


11 

a 

IK 


300 
UI 

440 

4 41K 

100 
333 
233 

5 18ft 
SCO 

678 
634 

tss 

777 
1 1M 

1 600 
27S 

too 

610 
140 
320 

6000 

903 
376 

630 

4 300 
80 
400 


» 


* 


3 


















are 


u 


32 


34 


t 




i 
















43: 

» 
« 

11 














i 


I *K 


11! 

j 

4 
J 

1 


10 

: 
i 
; 
ts 

t 


311 

; 
1 

32 

.1 
lu 
1 

t 

£ 


t- 


a 


)( 










* 












4. 


■ 


i 
i 


I 

4 


1" 


34 


72 


4 




M 

n 


1 


: 


J 


310 
81 




3 


b 
1 


7 
5 








-:.. 


1 


> 




se 
n 
















176 
44 


14 
) 

S 
» 


11 
4 

: 

37 


; 
1 

7 
4* 


. ID 


I 


) 

7 


288 

i 
e 












i 


1 




■-•» 


M 




s 


1 


1 








toe 




i 


> 


i 




630 

735 
M 

M 

602 

4336 

334 
300 

400 
621 
0C4 


31 
II 

a) 


176 

BOO 

480 
400 
300 
1 100 

431 

643 




1 


4 


. 


i 




1 




s 


1 
8 

I 


i 
i 


• 




*> 


3 


I 














1 

1 


1 


( 














i 


4 





1 340 31 

1 Sill IS 
IS 458 24 

1 223 40 
1 ?M SO 

1 405 48 
57 063 03 

3 530 35 

2 225 .. 

4 72 B 20 

3 122 04 

5 348 20 
10 443 71 

5 623 64 

4 900 35 

1 332 09 
* '-t II 

6 784 74 

2 305 22 

3 2i3 Ti 
2 358 52 
2 284 



3 074 75 

3 326 31 

2 137 62 
6 521 64 

3 446 36 

1 175 75 



■i> 17 



320 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 





1 
•5 

| 

O 


TBACHXB8 




















1 


o 


BBGBnATION 




! 
1 


3 
>> 

■a 

i 


! 


8 


■a 
•z 


I 


* 

O 


§ 

4 
f 

e 

o 


McLean D. 8 


J. 

S. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

J. 

U. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
M. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

S. 

H. 

U. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 

S. 

H. 
8. 
H. 
H. 

8. 


1 
1 
1 

1 

4 
1 

57 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

* 

6 

i 
1 
1 
2 
1 

t 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

i 

5 
1 
2 

1 
1 

I 

i 

2* 

36 


i 

H 

1 

2i 
52 
2 
2i 

3 

a 

4 

30 

3 

21 
3 
5 

3 

3 

3 

6 
1 

2} 
1 
1 

2* 

1* 
1 

i 
1 
8 

1 

2* 
2 
63 
1* 

1 

2* 
3J 


3 

6 

26 

23 

12 

5 

37 

1 630 

15 

28 

12 
22 
15 
44 
430 

19 
10 
15 
56 
63 

9 
39 
15 
25 
13 

53 
2 

66 
9 
9 

16 

5 

8 

12 

16 

18 
13 
8 
13 
39 

19 
35 
16 
1 616 
15 

8 

7 

17 

25 

7 


8 
3 

16 

18 

4 

2 

21 

1 086 

15 

23 

19 
8 
1 

32 
343 

26 








2 

7 

14 

24 

15 

1 

29 

1 816 

19 

33 

20 

12 

7 

54 

570 

28 
4 

15 
46 
61 

5 
31 

6 

28 
11 

51 

2 

101 

12 
9 

21 
5 
9 
7 

13 

18 
8 
4 

8 
42 

9 

34 

20 

1 232 

9 

10 

8 

17 

17 

8 


9 

9 

42 

38 
14 

6 
38 

1 714 

24 
42 

40 

29 

9 

58 

635 

46 

23 
66 
87 

4 
56 

38 
32 
25 

78 

7 

133 

22 

18 

26 

25 

8 

5 

22 

39 
24 
15 
18 
56 

42 
53 
25 

2 858 

24 

15 
12 
19 
38 
12 


11 


Madhon TT. 8 


7 

5 

10 

3 






16 


Madrid H. 8 


8 

10 

6 


1 

1 

4 


56 




62 




29 




7 


Mftnll'u H. 8 


4 

488 

6 

13 

11 
5 


5 

326 

7 

10 

14 
6 


1 
4 


67 


Manual Training H. 8. (New York) 


3 530 


Marathon H. 8 


43 


MarcfilluH H. R 


75 


Marsaretrille H. 8 


60 


Marion H. S 


41 


Marlboro U. 8 


16 




21 
259 

12 


14 
152 

12 


1 
21 

5 


112 


Maaten Park H. 8. (Buffalo) 


1 205 




74 


Mayfield U. S 


10 


MnyYiilfl H. 8 


9 
21 
44 


7 
13 
21 


5 
20 
18 


2 
2 
2 


38 


Mechanicville H. 8 


112 


Medina H. 8 


148 


Meridian U. 8 


9 


Mexico A. & H. 8 


12 

13 

16 

6 

40 

7 

107 

8 

10 

16 
8 
9 


22 
8 

12 
6 

22 


13 
6 
7 

11 

12 


1 
2 

2 


87 


Middle Granville U. 8 


44 


Middleburg H. 8 


60 


Mlddlebury A. A U. S. (Wyoming) 


36 


Middleport H. 8 


129 


Middlesex U. 8 


9 


Middktown H. 8 


38 
9 
5 

10 
12 


23 
4 

3 

8 
5 


4 

2 


234 


Mlddleville H. 8 


34 


MilfordH, 8 


27 


Millbrook Memorial 8 


47 


Mlllerton H. 8 


90 


Mineola XJ. 8 


17 


Minetto U. 8 








12 


Mineville H. 8 


12 

21 
9 
7 
4 

28 

11 

29 

8 

908 

10 

7 
7 
8 
19 
8 


10 

9 
6 
4 

8 
20 

15 
9 

14 

627 

2 

7 

7 
8 
2 


7 

9 
3 


1 


45 


Mohawk H. 8 


57 


Moira H. 8 


32 


Monroe U. 8 


19 




1 
10 

5 

10 

6 

539 

6 

3 
1 
4 
3 
3 


1 

1 

4 
1 


26 


Monticello H. 8 


98 


Mooere H. 8 


51 


Moravia H. 8 


87 




45 


Morris H. 8. of New York 


3 590 


Morrlstown U. 8 


33 


Morrisville H. 8 


25 


Moscow U. 8 


15 


Mt Klsco H. 8 


36 




55 


Mt Upton U. 8 


20 



a H.=high school; S.=*enior; M.=mlddle and J.=junlor school. 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 















70 
3 
1 

a 
1 


! 

1 

: 


5 
112 

1 
1 


SI 


1 

1 
3 


SB 

t 
1 


41 
S 


t; 


14 

m 
1 


27 

1 


I 

22 


29 


2 
1 
7 


i! 
11 


6 
30 
18 






2 


6 


1 

1 


6 

1 

2 

g 


5 
1 
! 
6 

t 


10 
1 

: 

8 
U 


a 


1 




l 


1 


2 
J 

1 






i 

! 


11 

a 

i 

; 


1 

: 
: 


* 




3 


s 
1 


1 












2 
2 




4 

■ 

1 


4 

B 
1 


, 


2 








1 

2 
1 

9t 

3 


i 
1 

IK 

4 


i 

1 

1 

1 


I 




1 


1 




2 
2 
IK 


H 


2 








: 
1 


i 

2 


1 

: 
















I 





511 
4 ISO 


27 

4 
266 




no 


12 




1 100 
Ml 


K 




4S3 
2 ISO 


8 
40 




en 


IB 
47 




8 400 


SO 

10 






















1 lis 


40 










i rat 


1 

s 










420 
1 208 
132 


11 

80 

17 




1 OKI 


20 




801 
521 


1 

41 




044 


il 










MO 
1 200 
6 130 


a 

is 




314 
240 

TOO 
2 1ST 
42» 


106 

4 
SI 





3M 


23 




7 SOI 


10T 

n 




4M 
1 WO 
400 
42S 
13 02H 


10 
01 

i 

Ml 




1 092 


W 
U 




SOD 


28 










75. 


4S 
















260 


41 




0000 


333 










SSO 


11 










1 070 


73- 




«04 

4S0 
JOB 






4S0 


* 










1 380 

678 

10 BM 

180 


71 



m 
ii 




173 


14 




CM 


11 





237 228 83 
2830 17 
3 330 82 



7H»M 
718 S7 



4 007 73 

B 283 38 

1 874 IS 

2 900 50 
2 771 1* 
4 861 17 

■ OUST 



322 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 



• 


1 

S 

o 
o 

1 


TEACHERS 






1 

6 
1 

i 

1 

i 

5 

1 

1 

.1 

4 
1 
i 

6 
4 
1 
1 
5 

3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

i 
4 

1 
1 

H 

1 

1 

1 

1 

H 
1 

i 
6 

6 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

* 
1 
1 
3 


§ 


REGBTBATKW 




1 


1 

1 


! 


1 

1 


CO 


1 


a 


a 

a 
s 

£ 


Mt Vernon H, 8. 


H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

J. 

J. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

IL 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 
M. 
M. 

H. 
H. 

8. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

EL 

EL 

H. 
H. 
EL 
8. 

a 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
J. 

s. 

8. 
H. 


24 

it 

2 

8* 
12 

i 

5 

2 

13 

11 

12 

21 

1 

«* 

14 

* 

2 
li 

Jl 

8 
1 
8 

4i 

II 

8 

H 

2 

6* 

li 
4 

10 

7 
8 
3i 
2 

t 

1 
1 

4 


389 

9 

52 

22 

19 

38 

165 

8 

2 

8 

66 
18 
163 
14 
14 

322 

281 

8 

8 

798 

270 

3 

12 

11 

15 

5 
27 
92 
15 
24 

58 
13 
105 
20 
11 

68 
16 
37 
12 
92 

131 

102 

97 

53 

15 

20 
5 

17 
9 

36 


189 

8 

83 

16 

16 

18 

78 

3 

2 

1 

33 

16 

124 

7 

6 

145 

174 

2 


108 

5 

18 

10 

12 

9 
47 


100 

5 

20 

15 

11 

10 
33 


4 

1 

1 

8 


337 

9 

58 

20 

19 

85 

165 

6 

3 

5 

58 
26 
200 
11 
11 

246 

275 

9 

4 


449 
18 
60 
43 
40 

41 

166 

5 

1 

4 

82 
20 
207 
23 
26 

881 

354 

14 

4 

2495 

272 

4 

3 

19 

14 

14 

24 

123 

15 
38 

93 
19 
144 
80 
24 

78 
27 
50 
12 
125 

285 

122 

137 

05 

86 

18 
1 

22 
11 
54 


786 


Munnsville U. 8 


27 


Mynderse A. (Seneca Falls) 


127 


Naples H. 8 


63 


New Berlin H. 8 


59 


New Hartford H. 8 


76 


New Rochelle H. 8 


331 


New Woodstock U. 8 


11 


New York Mills U. 8 








4 


New York Mills U. 8. No. 2 








9 


Newark H. 8 


33 

8 

86 

8 

8 

81 

114 

5 


14 
4 

26 
2 
9 

59 

47 

3 


4 

8 
3 

13 
5 


140 


Newark Valley H. 8 


46 


Newburgh F. A 


407 


NewfieldH.8 


84 


Newport H. 8 


87 


Newtown H. S. (Elmhurst) 


607 


Niagara Falls H. 8 .' 


629 


Nichols H. 8 


23 


Norfolk U.8 


8 


Normal College of the City of New York, H. 8. dep't . . 
North H. 8. (Syracuse) 


826 

114 
5 


528 
69 


343 
42 




2 495 


15 


238 

4 

9 

17 

13 

6 

22 

103 

16 

22 

58 

7 

102 

32 

29 

48 

24 

84 

9 

104 

164 

105 

64 

27 

15 

21 

4 

5 

13 

56 


510 


North Bansor D. 8 


8 


North Brookfield U. 8 








12 


N. Cohocton 6 Atlanta U. H. a (N. Cohocton) 

North Collins H. 8 


11 

7 

5 
12 
31 

6 
16 

43 
8 
55 
17 
13 

33 
16 
25 

7 
73 

128 
70 
49 
26 
21 

7 


10 
1 

6 

5 

44 

8 
10 

28 
5 
63 
17 
17 

16 
9 

13 
1 

82 

74 

35 

20 

9 

8 

6 


4 
2 

4 
2 

21 
8 

10 

20 


2 

38 
4 

2 


36 
27 


North Lawrence U. 8 


20 


North Tarrytown H. 8 


46 


North Tonawanda H. 8 


226 


Northcreek H. 8 


31 


Northport H. 8 


60 


Northside EL 8. (Corning) 


151 


Northvllle U. 8 


26 


Norwich H. S 


19 

8 

11 

8 
9 
9 
1 
22 

57 

20 

22 

4 

4 

6 


4 

1 

1 
1 

10 
9 
3 
3 


246 


Norwood H. 8 


62 


Nunda H. 8 


53 


NyackH.8 


128 


OakfieldH. 8 


51 


feVfU* H 8. (PtekBklll) 


81 


Ocean Side U. S 


21 


Ogrieraburc F. A . , , ... 


229 


Olean H. 8 


399 


Oneida H. 8 


227 


Oneonta EL 8 


191 


Onondaga F. A. (Onondaca Valley) 


92 


Ontario H. 8 


51 


Orchard Park H. 8 


39 


Orient U. 8 


5 


Ortakany U. 8 


7 

8 

39 


3 

7 

13 






27 


Ortakany Falls U. 8 






24 


Omntng H. 8 


U 


10 


110 



« H^=high school; 8.=tenior; li=middle and J^junior. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(continued) 

each academic department 















; 
a 

M 

20 


t 
1 

? 

1 
t 


U 

: 
a 

. 


i 


7 


t 








8 
t 


, 


n 
i 
i 












III 


a 


n 


117 






. 


i 














1 

. 

II 
3 

8 


: 

13 


3 

; 
li 

30 






I 




I 






3 


4 
1 
1 

I 






2 




3 



! 
1 

: 

1 

■x 

i 


IS 

] 

1 

1 
I 

32 

I 
II 

! 

1 

1 


1 

11 
1 

. 
71 

£2 
U 

X 

• 
1 


1 
1 




' 




1 








6 
1 

1 






I 

10 

1 

3 

2 


1 
1 


























f 

















855 


n 


1 OBI 


45 






625 
1 233 


10 


1 675 
970 


110 
31 

t 


3SB6 


410 


645 


045 
81 


74£ 


12 
30 


440 


HO 


1 272 


110 


1 5S2 


391 






860 
7 087 

631 
1 050 


50 
122 


1 842 
780 


30 




* 


1 093 

ease 

75! 


823 
341 

30 
20 


780 


20 


810 


32 


m 









600 


48 


a 40U 

80S 

600 


80 


3 570 
0200 
000 


104 

000 
53 


J 833 


500 


3000 


1 500 










500 


28 


AOC 

aw 


74 

083 

27 


1 500 
475 
1 300 

050 
500 


138 
18 

200 
14 
100 






515 
300 
600 


32 
204 
256 


3 200 
1 050 

1 821 


340 
203 
344 










33 
325 


si 

84 


1 193 


707 



722 03 

2 887 77 

3 750 40 

27 419 04 
938 70 

1 450 80 
1 731 95 

7 970 39 
3 845 58 

28 360 (0 



12 320 00 
4828 84 
3 IBB 01 



33 833 38 

5 307 51 
3482 93 



3^4 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC OTPABTMJ6NTS 





j 


naCHBBS 






J 


1 


UCHKBATKM 


• 


1 


I 


! 


I 


! 


1 


i 


I 
I 


Oinrantffhte IT. 8 


J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

BL 

H. 

BL 

H. 

8. 

H. 

a 

H. 
3. 
H. 
H. 

a 

8. 
H. 
H. 
8. 

a 

H. 
J. 

M. 
H. 

H. 
M. 

i 

a. 

H. 

j. 

H. 
H. 
J. 

H. 

& 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 1 


3 1 

1 
1 

2 

t 

1 
1 
i 

1 
1 
1 

i 

1 

1 
1 
1 

i« 

2 

f 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

2 
1 
1 

1 

t 
1 
2 
1 

1 
2 
1 

* 

1 

1 

7 

H 

1 

1 


i 

12 

H 

3 

5 

8 
4 

H 

1 

4* 
H 

i 

1 

I 1 

1 

6 

i 

2} 

2 

i 
3 
4 

1 

2 
1 

7 
2i 

1 

6 
H 

2 

7 
1 
8 
3i 

2 

11 
3 

l\ 


5 

174 

13 

39 

66 

21 
27 

10 

4 
36 

14 
18 
16 
27 

74 

3 
6 
7 
6 
12 

78 

45 

9 

6 

27 

84 
18 
25 
83 

8 

18 

5 

65 

15 

5 

7 
12 
27 
85 
14 

25 

172 

7 

16 

22 

24 

250 
88 

18 
21 


12 

127 

7 

28 

34 

25 

26 

6 

3 

27 

3 

9 

6 

13 

87 

7 
5 
9 
8 
7 

75 
84 
13 
3 
24 

11 
12 
29 
13 
9 

18 
4 

53 
7 








6 

211 

7 

84 
82 

24 
30 
15 
2 
84 

11 
15 
11 
26 
64 

6 


n 

813 
21 
64 
68 

40 
87 
11 
12 

67 

12 
83 
15 
29 
89 

4 

15 
14 
11 
17 

188 

73 
9 
7 

42 

27 
16 
88 

41 
16 

28 

7 

88 

16 

1 

80 
6 
86 
97 
86 

48 

166 
16 
16 
84 

81 

804 

68 

n 


17 




93 

7 

10 

28 

8 
6 
7 
2 
16 

2 

11 

5 

7 

19 


130 
1 

13 
21 

10 
9 
8 
4 

11 

3 
10 


8 
1 

1 
2 

1 


524 


OtegoH. 8 


28 


Ovid H. 8 


98 


Oweco P. A 


150 


Oxford A. A U. B 


64 


Oyster Bay EL 8 


67 


hinted Port H. 8 


26 


Palatine Bridge IT. 8 , . 


14 


Pfclmyrn (7lM(llC»l H. 8 


91 


rVnama V. 8 


23 


rVlahH.S 


48 


PartehviUe U. 8 


25 


Parker H. 8. (Clarence) 


6 
20 


2 
8 


55 


Patohogue H. 8 


153 


Patterson U. 8 


10 


Pavilion U. 8 


8 
3 

1 
10 

46 
24 


2 

4 

1 
1 

27 
20 




IS 


Pawling H. 8 


60 
2 


9 

6 

18 

96 

62 

18 

2 

87 

84 

16 
26 
26 
10 

29 

2 

98 

12 

4 

10 
6 
27 
87 
19 

81 

181 

9 

18 
18 

24 
288 

1 

89 


21 


Pearl River H. 8 


11 


Penfield U. 8 


88 


Penn Yan A 


281 




12S 


Peru U. 8 


23 










1 


Phelpe V. & CImcM 8 


15 
9 


9 

7 


4 


71 


Philadelphia H. 8 


61 




80 




15 

13 

7 

6 


7 
7 
2 

13 


2 
8 

2 


78 


Pbraon H. 8. (Sag Harbor) 


68 


Pfte Seminary U.~8 


26 




a 


PhUnville U. 8 


« 


Plattaburg H. 8 


42 

2 


17 
4 


4 


181 


PfcaumtvIII* H. 8 


28 


Poeantlco Hllto , 


3 


Poland H. 8. 


8 
1 

14 
44 
12 

22 

67 

2 

9 
16 

13 

126 

82 

7 

18 


4 


11 




a 




13 




10 

80 

6 

16 

81 

7 

4 

7 

3 

96 
.22 

£ 
10 


7 

22 

8 

* 

23 

6 


4 

8 

9 

■ 

2 
8 
2 


a 


Port Cheater BL 8 


is 




41 




71 




281 




24 


Port Waahtngton U. 8 


21 


PortvflleH.8 


5 

5 

65 
9 
8 
9 


2 

i 

• 


S 


Aal-I.— "Q 1 O 


41 




59 


Pnlaaki A. k TT. 8 


10 


BniidolpoH. 8 


8 




S 



aH^nlghaefaool; 8^«enlor; M.=*niddle and J.=junior school 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



'3£™ 


_ 


„JSSS™ 


i 


1 


J 




l 


| 


! 


1 

jll 


i 




8 
KG 
IS 
IS 
50 

S3 
2S 
1 
( 

n 

10 

21 
S3 

11 

12 
1 

15 

139 

111 
i 
1 

37 

2t 

4' 
33 
13 

19 

1 

i 

11 

21 
74 
25 

34 

19 

11 
» 

as 

44 

18 
23 


12 
B05 
24 
83 
121 

El 
63 
IS 
11 
77 

16 
39 
20 
45 
121 

i: 
11 

20 

210 
101 

11 
ei 

61 
22 
68 
N 

41 

IS 
IS 

5( 

41 

50 

21S 
10 

31 

41 
403 
7fl 
26 
44 














1« 

05 
IB 

as 
id 


20 

( 
1 

8 
1 

1 


25 

I 

7 

9 

a 
i 

4 

1 

i 


IE 
1 
li 

to 

I 
i 

4 
11 

t 

10 


> 

4 

7 

! 


20 
1 


i 


t 


i 




s 

1 
4 


30 
o 

12 


1 


« 
> 
3 




t 

IS 


i 

7 


II 




53 




8 






t 


) 










S 










1 


' 












1 

I 

4 


• 


1( 


11 


27 
18 


a 
i 
















1 


31 


, 





I 
8 


4 




1 


> 




1 


t 

< 


i 
1 

12 


» 










f 








31 


J 




1 


77 
8 


s 


II 


17 

4 


s 


a 


S 


8 


4 


J 


11 




i 


4 

: 
s 

s 


21 


M 

08 


i 



i 


1 

n 


8 

a 
as 


: 

! 
1 


i 
: 

t 

i 










i 


2 
1 

5 
J 




i 
ii 

a 


31 
1 
i 


B 

6 

Ml 
II 

: 

7 




12 
301 
52 


It 
1 


i 
j 
i 


n 




i 









■'■': 


05 

115 
M 


1 008 


87 
80 


1 39* 


11 


004 

501 

'.V 


17 
50 
48 
80 
40 










1- 
1 407 
830 


is 

00 
171 


041 
] 3*U 


48 
50 

83 


530 
227 


10 


•29 
65 


23 


434 

286 
:■- 

541 


51 
18 
50 
28 


401 
667 

.-■ 

»«4 


31 
10 
80 
49 


MS 


16 






M 


41 

100 



3 303 93 

12 855 51 
8 041 48 

1 200 50 



2963 80 

10 308 39 

184 43 

1 400 07 

1 978 38 
1 009 71 



326 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DBPABTMBNTS 



Red Greek U.S. 
Red Hook H. 8. 
Redwood U.S.. 
RemieaH. 3... 
Rensselaer H. 8. 



Rensselaer Falls U. 8. . 

RhinebeckH. 8 

RlehburgU. 8 

Richfield Springs H. 8. 
Richmond Hill H. 8... 



Richmond ville U. 8. 

RlchvtlleU.S 

Ripley H. 8 

RiverheadELS.... 
Rochester H. 8.... 



Rome F. A 

RosooeU.S , 

Roalyn H. 8 

Rotterdam U.S.. 
Round Lake U.S. 



Rouse's Point H. 8.. 
Rowena Memorial S. 

RpzburyH.8 

RushfordH.8 

RushvilleH.8 



(Palenvllle). 



Russell U. 8 

RyeU.S 

Rye Neck H. 8. (Ifamoroneck). 
8. 8. Seward Inst (Florida). . . 
Socket H. 8 



StJohntvilleH.S.. 
8t Recto Falls H.S. 
Salamanca H. S.... 
Sandy Creek H. 8.. 
Sandy Hill H.S... . 



S&ranao Lake H. 8 

Saratoga Springs H. 8. 

Sardinia U.S 

8augerttesH.S 

SauquoltU. S 



Savannah H. S 

SavonaH. 8 

SayviUe H. 8 

Schaghtieoke H. S. 
8chenectady H. 8. 



Schenevus H. 8 

Schoharie H. 8 

Sohroon Lake U. 8 

Schuyler's Lake U. 8 

Schuylerville H. S 

a H.=high school; S.=senior; 



1 



EL 
H. 

s. 

H. 
H. 

8. 

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8. 

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120 

6 

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335 

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18 



REGISTRATION 



a 



8 
12 

6 
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42 

6 
17 

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23 
163 

8 

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5 

38 

397 

68 
5 
6 



8 
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62 

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24 
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38 
33 
25 
27 
166 

23 

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18 

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759 

23 

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86 

103 

1 577 

803 
22 
31 
13 
16 

28 
12 
31 
» 
20 

22 
47 
34 

31 
» 

76 
43 

177 
48 

1*8 



96 


151 


179 


366 


13 


20 


52 


73 


10 


27 


40 


61 


26 


40 


40 


63 


15 


1$ 


897 


761 


82 


41 


13 


22 


18 


22 


11 


17 


22 


37 



M.=mlddle and J^junior school. 



{continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



1 
1 

72 
11 


1 

91 

u 


8 






2 
2 
10 


I 

60 

a 


4 

I 
1 




1 


4 


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1 


1 














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1 


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t 

1 


65 

: 

! 


in 
i 

2 
2 


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t 

3 


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2 






2 





















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, 














640 


32C 


































1 J22 


817 


















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1 113 





877 


U 


30 000 

3 TO 

210 
WO 


1073 

148 
«3 
120 
109 


nr 








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11' 


M 


w 


182 


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ti 


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101 


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190 


41 

21 
129 

2 


GDC 
« 716 


28 
44 
42 

1 250 






200 


«J 







2 617 58 

1 600 41 
114 882 43 

12 *M 33 
2082 04 

2 512 24 
1 130 22 

1 538 83 

2 072 SI 

B 13S 50 

3 -153 V9 

2 083 80 
1 592 H 

831 75 

5 312 07 

5 687 85 

3 368 05 



2 057 07 
2 151 48 



328 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DBPABTKENT8 



SdoU.S 

Scotia U.8 

Scottsvllle H. 8 

SeadlffH. S 

Seymour Smith A. (Fine Plains) . 



Sharon Springs H. 8. 
Shelter Island U.S.. 

Sherburne H. 8 

Sherman H. 8 

ShorUvllk H. 8 



Sidney H. 8 

8Uver Creek H. 8... 
SQver Springs H. 8. 
SfnclalrvilleH.8... 
Skaneateles H. S... 



Sloan U. 8 

Smlthville U. 8. (Smithvllle Flats). 

Smyrna D. 8 

SodusH.S 

SolTayH.8 



South Byron U. 8 

South Dayton U.S.... 
South Glens Falls EL 8. 
South New Berlin U. 8. 
8outh Ottelic U. 8 



Smith Side H. 8. (Rockvllle Center). 

Southampton H. S 

SoutholdH.8 

Spencer H. 8 

Speneerport EL 8 



8pring Valley H. 8.... 
Springfield Center U. 8. 

Springwater U. 8 

StoatsburgU. S 

Stamford Sem. 4 U.S. 



Stillwater H.S 

Stockton U.8 

Stony Point H. 8 

Stonybrook U. 8 

Stuyveeant H. S. (New York). 



Suffers H. 8 

Syracuse H.S 

Syracuse Technical H. 8 

Tappan Zee H. & (Ptermont). 
Technical H. 8. of Buffalo... . 



Ten Broeck F. A. (Franklin ville). 

Theresa H. S 

Three Mile Bay U. S 

Tleonderoga H. 8 

Tioga Center U. S 



J. 

S. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

8. 
H. 

a 

H. 

EL 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

J. 

J. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

M. 

8. 

H. 

M. 

s. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 

8. 

J. 

J. 

H. 

H. 
M. 
H. 
M. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
8. 
H. 
J. 



TEACHSRS 






i 



l 

2 



1 
2 



1 
2 

I 



a 
i 

2 
1 

H 

1 

1 

* 

2 

1 
1 



I 



SO 



10 
5 



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1 
1 
1 

2* 
i 



8 
2 
2 
If 

2 
1 

ij 

1 

4 

1 
1 
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1 
2 
7 



1 
2 
1 



a 



2t 

1 



2 

5 



4 

48 

8 

2i 
12 

8 

3 



KBQBTKATIOJf 



1 

1 


1 

a 

1 


1 


1 

1 

o 


1 


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3 


8 


4 
14 

7 








7 

80 
8 


5 
81 
18 


88 


9 
6 






7 


6 


1 


12 


4 


8 


2 




7 


14 


12 


14 


8 


1 




13 


22 


5 


6 


3 


6 




7 


12 


8 


3 


1 


1 




4 


9 


42 


15 


5 


12 


1 


21 


64 


22 


7 


14 


8 


4 


20 


85 


18 


7 
26 


3 
19 






9 
85 


14 
44 


25 


8 


1 


81 


26 


19 


18 


8 


81 


66 


19 


10 


5 


8 


' 8 


14 


26 


10 


12 


9 


2 


2 


15 


20 


35 


23 


14 


19 




41 


50 


7 










4 
4 
4 


S 

5 
10 


5 


4 
4 








3 


5 


2 




80 


18 


25 


14 


1 


83 


65 


42 


26 

6 
6 


20 


17 




48 

2 
13 


67 

8 
22 


10 


5 


10 


4 


16 


23 


12 


12 




24 


89 


7 


5 
11 


11 






5 
12 


18 
12 


8 


6 




48 


25 


8 


13 




84 


60 


47 


18 


15 


8 


6 


43 


51 


10 


11 


6 


3 


2 


12 


20 


13 


18 


8 


8 


1 


18 


80 


26 


20 


16 


8 


4 


20 


64 


86 


22 


13 


10 




38 


43 


10 


8 

2 

3 

19 


10 






10 
3 
6 

28 


IS 
2 
5 

42 


8 






8 








25 


10 


8 


8 


9 


12 


8 


4 




17 


16 


14 


7 
7 


2 
4 






9 
9 


14 

21 


16 


8 




1 


5 


1 


1 




1 


7 


1 890 


881 


148 


81 


8 


2008 




28 


33 


15 


3 


5 


48 


86 


684 


428 


281 


201 


76 


737 


8B8 


212 


88 


56 


23 


3 


187 


IBS 


9 


13 


4 


9 




18 


17 


114 


188 


184 


11 




447 




82 


17 


13 


11 


3 


34 


42 


21 


19 


4 


2 




21 


25 


7 


4 

88 


1 
19 






9 

45 


8 
65 


87 


12 


4 


6 


1 









2 


6 



g 

9 



f 



o 



12 
61 
26 
21 
85 

19 
13 
, 75 
55 
23 

79 
97 
40 
35 
91 

7 

• 

14 

88 

105 

5 
35 
63 
23 
24 

94 
94 

32 
48 
74 

81 
28 
5 
11 
70 

83 
23 
30 

8 
2 008 

84 

1 630 

3S2 

35 
447 

76 

46 

12 

110 

7 



a ILshigh school; 8.4enfor; M.=mlddle and J.=junlor school 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



: 
! 


1 

11 


1 




1 


1 








* 


1 


• 


1 
1 


1 

V 

: 


13 

; 

14 






2 








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1 




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4 


1 
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2 


1 


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1 


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1 
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i 


tl 
1 

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i 


a 

78 


t 


IS 
2 






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, 


I 


5 


t 


1 




J 


s 







130 

70 


3384 7B 
1 SUM 






to 
• 

13 


3900 W 

SIOBB 
1 710 71 






«10 
87 

too 
soc 


ISO 036 74 

IWt) 
MM IB 

17 480 U 


1 Sim 


M884 8 


IS 

; 

7S 


»0M7f 
1 03104 
10 400 17 



33o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACADEMIC DBPABTMEXTS 



frvolfU.8 

Tompkins Cove U. 8. 

Tonawanda EL 8 

Troupsburg U. 8 

Troy H. 8 



TrumanabunrH. 8. 

TnjxtonU. 8 

TuByH.8 

Tapper Lake H. S. 
Turin U. 8 



Turner U. 8 

Tuxedo U. 8. (Tuxedo Park) . 

Ulster F. A (Rondout) 

UnadfflaH.8 

Unadilla Forks U. 8 



UnionEndlcottH. 8. 
Union Springs H. 8.. 

UtieaF.A 

VaktleH.8 

Valley FaHeH. 8.... 



VanEttenU.8.. 

Vernon H. 8 

Verona U. 8 

Victor H. 8 

Waddington U. S. 



Wadlelgh H. 8. (New York). 

WaldenH.8 

WallklUU.8 

Walton H. 8 

Walworth U. 8 



Wapplngcrs Falls U. 8. 

Warner H. 8 

Warrensburg H. S 

Warsaw H. 8 

Warwick Inst 



Washington A. (Salem) 

Washington Irving H. a (New York). 
Washington Irving H. 8. (Tarry town). 

Washingtonville U. 8 

WaterlordH.8 



Waterloo H. 8.. 
WatcrportU.8. 
WatertownH.S. 
WaterrlUe H. 8. 
Watervllet H. 8. 



WatkinsH.8 

WaverlyH.8 

Waverly H. 8. of Tuckahoe. 

WarlandH. 8 

Webster H. 8 



2 

i 



M. 

H. 

8. 
EL 

H. 

8. 

H. 

H. 

8. 

J. 

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H. 

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H. 
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H. 
H. 
H. 

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8. 

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8. 

H. 

a 
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H. 

H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
M. 
H. 

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8. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
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H. 
H. 

a 



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81 



81 
2 
15 

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1 

1 
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8 



109 
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2 
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3 

78 

4 

* 

3 



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17 
3 
6 

3 
6 
3 
3 
3 




7 

102 
15 

207 

22 
9 
18 
10 
10 

11 

6 

118 

16 

4 

22 
17 

300 
9 
7 

8 
17 

9 

26 
18 

1 781 

29 
11 
59 
10 

14 
21 
20 
77 
35 

20 

2 077 

87 
15 
56 

37 

7 

163 

19 

84 

39 
71 
34 

28 
36 



4 
4 

74 

2 

144 

16 
14 
21 
12 
9 

6 
8 

29 

32 

7 

16 

11 

150 

6 

7 

4 

19 
6 

25 
9 

637 
15 



47 
8 

8 

9 

25 

42 

23 

21 
1047 
38 
11 
22 

29 

3 

183 

23 

66 

19 
43 
10 
41 
40 



4 

1 

25 

1 

109 

11 



I 

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11 
9 
8 

2 
2 

26 
18 



18 

5 

147 

5 

3 

8 
17 

6 
22 

9 

407 
11 



80 
6 



6 
11 
20 

9 

15 

743 

22 

7 

15 

30 

2 

168 

16 

26 

19 

25 

9 

6 

8 



2 
29 



65 
12 



6 
9 



4 

9 

18 



4 
6 
85 
2 
4 

6 
10 

6 
12 

6 

882 

8 



20 



8 

8 

18 

8 

12 

205 

20 



24 

3 
84 

8 
18 

16 

11 

4 

11 
16 



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5 

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1 

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2 
29 



83 
8 
6 

3 
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6 

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100 

11 

251 

33 

8 

21 

21 

9 

13 

6 
98 
81 

5 

26 
13 

360 
12 

. 4 

9 
26 
11 
38 
13 



26 
6 

80 
7 

9 
14 

32 
74 
37 

17 



44 

15 
49 



9 

274 

23 

74 

39 
53 
24 
41 
45 





§ 




♦* 




& 




I 


i 


S 

o 


a 


E-» 


11 


17 


9 


14 


137 


237 


7 


18 


279 


530 


83 


66 


15 


23 


35 


56 


20 


41 


16 


27 


6 


19 


14 


20 


84 


182 


59 


90 


6 


11 


29 


55 


27 


40 


403 


763 


10 


22 


17 


21 


12 


21 


39 


«5 


16 


27 


62 


85 


24 


37 


8 187 


3 187 


39 


65 


5 


11 


105 


185 


12 


19 


13 


22 


25 


39 


S3 


66 


91 


165 


89 


76 


51 


© 


4072 


4073 


73 


117 


18 


33 


51 


100 


09 


121 


6 


15 


857 


631 


51 


74 


126 


309 


57 


96 


125 


in 


33 


57 


51 


92 


58 


103 



a H.=high school; 8.=senior; M.=mlddle and J.=junior school 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



'■ST 


SUHtlB 


DM 




i 


| 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 






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na 

i 

339 

as 

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48 
22 

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l: 

■ 


16 

1 

: 
8 


: 

i 
( 

( 







i sx 

Ml 


3C 


93! 
] - 


66 
100 
103 
108 


99* 

4 894 
. 1- 
742 


t 

104 
IS 

u 

39 


92! 


89 
87 

( 


i an 

7m, 
1M 


84 


654 


84 


200 
1 OK 


14 
It 


r.: 


20 


Ill 
3 377 
2 159 


3 
089 

30 


533 


130 


503 


3 


8 S32 


100 


1 .'> 


H 






3 st;: 
910 
616 
680 


BO 

38 

40 



1 893 84 

3 94S 36 

4 710 45 



3 121 95 

1 WV IB 
3 17(1 ft! 

2 005 66 

238 458 84 
S S74 97 

1 178 33 
9442 79 
1 306 SO 



12 441 07 

l :■:.-, 05 

g mi io 

8 524 90 



!1 692 T, 



9 097 28 

8 672 22 
« '14 14 
14 442 81 
4 623 17 
3 968 73 



33* 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics far 

ACA.DBMIC DIPABT1CCXT6 







TK&CHERS 


















• 


1 


1 








MOBTBATIOW 










1 


! 

Tsl 


1 


! 


i 

CO 


1 


i 


i 
t 

3 


WeedsimrtH. 8 


H. 

J. 

J. 

H. 

H. 

H. 

J. 

H. 

8. 

H. 

8. 
H. 
J. 
H. 

8. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

8. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 
H. 

H. 
H. 
H. 

8. 
8. 

H. 
H. 
H. 
M. 

S. 
EL 


1 
i 
i 

5 
16 

1 
1 
1 

1 
i 

4 

1 

1 
5 

! 

1 

It 
l 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
l 

1 

i 

11 

1 
1 


21 

5 

29 

3 

1 
2 
4 

1 

1 

2 
9 

2 
1 
2 
1 
2 

2 
1 
2 

H 
2 

2 

2 

23 

1 

2 
2 


16 

7 

12 

82 

392 

31 
4 
11 
80 
88 

17 
29 
11 
137 
12 

15 
130 
63 
13 
15 

20 
11 
23 
8 
31 

29 

10 

20 

6 

4 

7 

23 

372 

9 

6 
9 


24 


18 


12 


8 


29 
8 
5 

78 
566 

25 

8 

16 

22 

83 

12 
26 

8 
98 

9 

15 

184 
81 
11 
10 

14 

8 
87 
11 
28 

15 

11 

97 

8 

3 

16 

24 

463 

6 

12 
15 


49 

4 

7 

111 

622 

40 
4 

10 
83 
89 

19 

46 

7 

141 

20 

22 
174 
52 
17 
10 

22 
21 
25 
7 
22 

68 
21 
85 

20 
10 

94 
22 

663 
6 

8 
11 


78 


Wells tJ. 8 


7 


Welkbwi TI. 8 










12 


WeltavilbH.8 


4ft 
257 

14 

3 

6 

6 

19 

8 
22 

4 

46 

9 

8 

76 

14 

8 

5 

6 
11 

18 
1 
5 

16 

10 

19 

7 

5 

17 

13 

242 

5 

5 
6 


80 
264 

11 


16 
262 

9 


8 
12 


1S4 


Wert H. 8. (Rochester) 


1 187 


Wert Carthage H. 8 


65 


Wert Eaton U. 8 


7 


Wert Hampton Bmoh H. 3. . . , 


3 
19 

8 

2 
13 


6 




25 


Wert Hebron U. 8 


55 




6 

4 

7 


1 


72 


Wert VftD«y XJ. 8 


31 


Wert Wtnfield H. 8 


71 


Wertbury U. 8. (Wertbury Station) 


15 


Wertfleld A. A TT. 8 ". 


24 

7 

10 

48 

11 

8 


27 
1 

3 
29 

8 
4 


5 

1 

26 
2 


289 


Westmoreland T7. 8 


29 




37 


White Plain* H. 8. 


308 


Whlfohnll H. 8. 


83 


WhltesboroH. 8, 


28 


Whltetville U. 8 


20 


Whitney's Point H. 8 


4 

2 

13 

8 

5 

8 
7 
14 
8 
2 

4 

5 

179 


7 
6 
6 
4 
9 

10 
5 
3 
2 
2 

8 
4 

93 


2 
2 

6 
5 

4 

1 

180 


37 


Williamson H. 8 


29 


WlIHanunrHV) H. 8 


62 


Wflhbonwsh H. 8 


18 


Wilson A. (Angelica) 


50 


Wilson H. 8 


63 


Wlodtam H. 8 


32 


WiwfaorH. 8 


62 


WoodhullU.8 


28 


Woodmen TT. 8 , . . 


13 


VflQT^t^^MA^^AM ^^ CI 


40 


Yate* H. 8. (Chlttenanp>) , 


46 




1 016 




14 


N. Y. Intt . for the Blind 


o 
6 


6 
8 


2 


20 


M. Y. State School for Blind (Batavla) 


26 






Total 


1468 


2 714 


49 025 


27 908 


17 266 


11 336 


1 617 


46 282 


60 806 


107 019 









a H.=hlgh school; S.=eenlar; M.=mlddle and J.=junIor school. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



333 



(continued) 



each academic department 

OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



vara* 


UflftABT 


APPABATOB 


ixnNDTftmne 


ATOUGS 
DAILY 

ATmmAJiCB 


OBADUATW 


SNTOIH4 
HICDXKR 
imillOHONB 


Number of volumes In 
library 


Number of relumes added 
during the year 


Value of apparatus owned 
by school 


It 

F 






i 


I 


R 

2 




I 


i 


Normal schools 
and normal col- 
leges 


Rofeaslonei and 
technical schools 


Total expense 

of academic 

department 

during 

the year 


24 


30 
8 
6 

80 
407 

27 

8 

7 

24 

80 

11 

40 

5 

106 

18 

17 

131 

86 

18 

6 

17 

18 

21 

5 

16 

42 
15 
26 
14 
10 

22 

.18 

427 

5 

8 
4 


63 

6 

8 

150 

050 

46 
5 
17 
45 
50 

18 
60 
12 
184 
25 

28 
220 

50 
21 
12 

28 
24 
47 
14 
86 

64 
24 

43 
20 
12 

83 
85 

862 
12 

10 
14 


6 


7 


13 






1 


' 1 138 
200 
261 

1 500 
4722 

620 
866 

100 
800 
406 

150 
726 
608 

2 858 
500 

210 

2024 

285 

408 

60 

716 
700 
742 
1 800 
431 

2000 
800 
638 
781 
240 

800 
8535 

2080 
250 

661 
1 224 


22 


8060 

100 

47 

1 500 

24 000 

818 
118 
200 
100 
648 

100 
600 
226 
2864 
272 

100 
1046 
750 
421 
160 

400 
600 
000 

405 

550 

600 

557 
625 
255 
805 

780 

460 

16 483 

68 

280 
4800 




$5 150 .. 


8 






121 

MS 

720 

8 
2 


028 00 


2 












1 

5 

16 

• 


10 


080 67 


61 


5 
64 

2 


7 
72 

7 


12 
126 




6 
65 


1 

8 


10 601 20 


455 

10 


147 
107 


71 205 16 
5 704 04 


2 








571 01 


10 


1 


3 


4 


3 






23 

100 

05 

8 


2 861 68 


21 






40 
10 

70 
4 


1 503 fl 


20 
7 


1 
3 


5 
7 


6 

3 
7 




8 




0800 U 
2 755 51 


20 


i 






8 803 28 


7 






82 
22 
40 

80 


2 080 61 


76 
7 


6 


21 


27 


7 


2 


3 


100 
10 


10 884 61 
1 102 78 


11 


2 
7 
1 
1 


1 

16 
1 
3 


i 

3 

23 
2 
4 






3 

7 
3 


8 686 78 


06 


8 
2 


2 
2 


042 
102 

60 


57 716 04 


38 

8 


85 
45 


8 880 14 

2 564 48 


6 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
4 


3 

2 
1 


1 550 04 


11 


3 
1 
3 
2 
6 

1 
2 
1 

2 

1 

36 


4 

4 
3 
1 
8 


3 
2 
1 
2 

6 

8 

56 


i 
5 
6 
3 


10 
5 
3 
1 
2 

8 

4 

01 




25 


3 080 18 


6 


5 
2 


8 433 60 


26 




8 010 06 







1 800 68 


20 
12 


1 


3 


1 


18 


80 

80 
6 


2 534 86 
2 053 82 











1 850 10 


17 






3 


86 


2 700 14 


6 








2 128 60 


2 






2 


45 

40 
118 
100 


18 

80 

28 

2 147 


3 132 47 


11 






3 227 61 


17 

43o 
7 


i 

27 


6 


1 


2 882 60 

75 480 45 

1 005 45 


11 
















82 


m 

70 280 76 


10 




1 


1 






1 


14 


8 770 48 












83 418 


44 556 


77 074 


8838 


5400 


8887 


2 147 


648 


2 180 


785 804 


87 740 


$831070 


150 805 


87 060 314 72 



334 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACAD 



A. M. Chesbrough Sem., N. Chili. 
A. of Mt St Ursula, Bedford Park. 
A. of Mt St Vincent, New York. . 

A. of Sacred Heart, Syracuse 

A. of St Joseph, Brentwood 



aA. of the Holy Angels, Buffalo. 
A. of the Holy Names, Albany. . 
A. of the Holy Names of Rome . 

Adelphl A., Brooklyn 

Albany A 



Albany A for Girb 

©AlfredA 

All Saints A. S. of Manhattan. . 
Auguatinian A. of Carthage — 
Augustinlan A., Tompkinsvflle. 



Berkeley Inst for Young Ladies, Brooklyn . 

Brooklyn College, acad. dep't 

Buffalo A. of Sacred Heart 

Buffalo 8cm 

Canlsius College, acad. dep't 



CascadlUa S., Ithaca 

Cathedral A., Albany 

She) Cathedral 8., New York, 
yuga Lake A., Aurora 

Casenovia Sem 



Chamberlain Military Inst., Randolph. 

Champlain A., Fort Henry 

(The) Charlton a, New York 

Christian Brothers A. of Syracuse. . . . 
Christian Brothers A., Albany 



Claeon Point Military A., Westchester 

Colgate A., Hamilton 

College of St Francis Xavier, Xavier H. 8. 
College of City of New York, acad. dep't. . 
Cook A., Montour Falls 



De Laneey S., Geneva 

De La 8aUe Inst. New York., 
De Veaux S., Niagara Falls. . . 
D'Youville A., Plattsburg. . . . 
Dlcldnson-Hurst S., Syracuse. 



Drew Sem. for Young Women, Carmel. 
Father Leo MemorialSchool Groghan. 

Fern. A. of Sacred Heart, Albany 

Fern. A. of Sacred Heart, New York. . . 
Fern. A. of Sacred Heart, Rochester. . . 



J 

•3 

1 



A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 



Fem. Inst of Visitation, Brooklyn A. 6 

Fordham Univ., St John's College H. 8 A. 12} 

port Edward CoL Inst A. 1 

Franklin 8. of Buffalo J. A. i 

priends A., Locust Valley A. l\ 

c No report received. 6 Data given under Alfred Union School. 
A.-jonlor academic, d Included in college report 



A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 

A 
A 
A. 
A. 

A 



A. 
A. 
A 
A. 
A. 

A. 
A 
A 
A. 
J. A 



A. 
M.A 

A 
A 
A. 



I 



2i 



10 
7 



2 

1 

7i 



13 
9J 



i! 



2* 



5 
4 

4 

7 
14 
93 

4 



9 
2* 



! 



RBOBTSATION 



I 
1 



2 

3* 

8 

U 
4 



7 

7 
7 



4 
2 



6 



7 

8* 



4 

5* 



10 
5 

23 
17 
10 



31 
20 
62 
17 

20 



15 
12 
12 

16 

116 

23 

22 

131 



11 
4 

17 

13 

7 



I 



23 
17 
72 



23 



3 
4 



2* 



3 

7 
1 
8 
7 
5 

14 



20 
03 



3 
6 

21 
3 

14 



i 

•3 

S 

o 

fa 



17 

16 

61 

» 

20 



7 
7 

20 
7 

11 



OQ 



2 



14 
14 
48 
16 

17 



8 
4 
21 



10 

6 


8 
84 
15 

14 

28 

145 

1702 



3 
17 

6 
17 

8 

17 
3 

23 
20 
10 

14 

101 

5 

12 

8 



8 
13 

7 

10 
46 
19 
22 

87 

18 

21 

84 

3 

8 

6 

8 

5 

83 

11 

8 

21 

89 

779 

30 

2 
31 

5 
18 

4 

20 
4 
15 
26 
12 

8 
81 

8 
11 

9 



7 

16 

4 

14 
21 
10 
36 
57 

41 
11 
15 
4 
10 

3 

7 

5 

13 

12 

4 

28 

59 

685 

4 

2 
27 

4 
13 

3 

8 



90 



69 



10 

ii 



I 

o 



3 



18 
24 

9 

7 

89 

16 

5 

8 



14 
17 
7 
14 
27 



8 
20 

3 
11 

3 

'4 

8 

8 

13 

8 
25 
52 



73 
80 



11 
27 



200 



16 

1 
22 

3 
8 
6 



16 
16 



18 



302| 

80 
15 



10 
25 

18 
6 



88 

51 

34 

118 

361 

3 166 

47 



11 



3 
6 

8 

4 

77 

10 

3 

2 



12 



108 

18 



47 
348 



10 



21 
21 
101 
29 
43 



156 

76 

160 



83 



36 



59 



60 
95 



45 

162 



14 



26 
23 



30 
8 



56 
21 

50 
5 
65 
85 
41 



51 
31 
131 



& 

3 

o 



31 
21 
101 
40 
43 



156 
76 



80 
83 



32 

47 
27 



200 

60 

95 

302 



00 

1G2 

10 



IS 
31 
23 
88 
51 

34 

118 

361 

3 166 

n 

8 

108 

18 

56 

21 

59 
7 

65 
85 
41 

47 
318 

51 
SI 



e A.-academy; 8. A=eenior academio; If. A.=mJddls academic: 



(continued) 
each academic department 

EMIE3 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 





1 53 

1 20 

8t 


153 
... 

72 


IS 
11 


10 

5 

;.< 

20 


10 
* 

20 


4 
1* 



8 

3 


1 


MS 
1 105 

1 356 
731 


31 
132 

340 


4 415 

1 775 
6000 
1 107 


825 

100 
70 








u 


26 522 00 




50 


146 


46 428 35 








28 

"v 

50 

M 

3N 

IS 

24 

4S 

19 

45 

1 
t 
R2 

at 

* 

2 


3« 
22 

44 

iru 
so 

251 

a 

4M 
132 
1 
» 

If 

4; 

a 

109 

; ;■.) 

1M 

1. 

ll 

41 

S 
81 

■I 

43 

342 

28 


12 
it 


] 

« 
J 


r 
2. 

M 




3 
i 


1 
1 


BOO 
850 

eoo 

1 082 

1 000 

1 eu 

2 no 

3 300 

652 
1 040 
SOS 

1 12s 

(525 

1 600 
420 
870 
1220 
1 WO 

1 028 

2 775 
10 333 

1 6ftS 

2 281 
1000 

1 032 

139 

1 500 
300 

8 07! 
6 843 
1 SCO 

1 360 

48C 
663 


TB 
150 


BOO 

1 333 


300 
















5 




9 

1000 

42 

5 
60 


OS 














t 
18 

18 


:::::: 


1 


2 180 
3(01 

300 

1 076 
435 
643 

(245 

4 200 
BOO 
B35 
4O0 

1 too 

36S 

3 000 
24DO 

6 040 

BOO 
10 001 


It 


















57 846 72 




J 


1 


2) 


30 
13 






1 
8 

8 

11 

ic 
s 

8 
1 


1 

t 
3 

8 

i 


I! 

1! 
1 

: 

5 
10 

■ 

50 
11 

; 








1 














40 


10 
275 




.. 


2 
1 










1 


1 


40 

e 

HOG 
55 

25 
200 

e 
t 
9 






67 
» 
40 

02 

228 
10O 

10 




42 


] 




i 


4 004 23 

10)2 .. 




18 
26 
Ml 

g 




7 
1 


17 435 17 

43 123 17 


M 




t 


16 003 81 


i<n 


. 




1 


90 


17 043 75 




1 










800 
380 

4 10. 
2070 

TOO 

3000 

5 BOC 

41 


* 








2 


It 080 N 




1 

2* 

13 

9C 
d 


200 

1000 

10 






13 


< 

1 
2 


1 




































BO 
BO 




MI 


3D 






4 

20 700 .. 


1 








T 


ie on 01 



336 



NEW YORK. STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 

Important statistics for 

ACAD 





•8 


TEA CHUM 






1 


§ 

o 


UGJBTBATIDN 




1 

i 

n* 


i 


1 


1 


GO 


I 


3 


8 

1 


(Wr Initt, Go§h«l. . . . 


J. A 

A. 

A 

A 

A 

A. 

M.A 
J. A 
A. 
J. A. 

A 
A 
A. 

A 
A. 

A. 
A 
A 
A 
M.A 

A 
A 
A 
M.A. 

A. 

A. 
A. 
A 
A. 
A 

A. 
A. 
A 
A. 
A 

Sp. 
J. A. 
A 
A 
A 

M.A 

J. A 
J. A 
J. A 
A 

A 

J. A 
S.A 
J. A 
A 


7* 

U 

10 
3 

5* 
2 
20 

e 

2 

5 

5 


U 

4 
1) 

1 

2 ! 

5 

U 

17 

11 

3 
5 


11 

46 

8 

9 

19 

87 
14 
4 
88 
12 

85 
21 
11 
14 
7 

24 
65 

42 


7 
65 
10 
23 

7 

14 
4 


4 

48 

10 

14 

3 

6 


6 
84 

6 
12 

8 

12 


6 
1 


11 
100 
18 
64 
20 

60 
8 


17 
94 
19 

18 

19 
10 
4 
82 
13 

231 
40 
18 
46 
22 

46 


28 


(hnam Wedeyan Bern., Lima 


191 


Glen*, v&m A / . . . 


37 


Heekiey R., Tarrytown 


64 


Hartwtek Bern., acad. dep't 


38 


Holy Angels CoL Inst., Buffalo 


60 


Holy Qnm A. 8. of Albany 


18 


Holy Crass A 8. of Ogdensbnrg 








4 


Holy Crass A. of Manhattan. . 7 


20 
4 

119 
15 

4 
19 

6 

8 
89 
31 


10 
3 

109 

21 

1 

6 

8 

7 
13 
22 


14 
1 

86 
9 
4 
6 

12 

8 

2 

10 






82 


Holy Qhort A. 3., Tupper Lake.. , . 


73 
22 


7 

241 

48 

4 


20 


Horace Mann S., acad. dep't 


472 


Houghton Wesleyan MethT 8em 


88 


Immaculate Heart A. 8., Wstertown 


20 


Inst of Sisters of 8t Joseph, Buffalo 


46 


Ke n k* Tnf ^, Kevke Park , . . . , 


9 
2 


20 

2 
109 

107 


42 


Ladyeliff A, Highland Falk 


47 


La fclle A, New York 


109 


La 8aUe Inst., Troy 


107 


aLowville A ." 




McAuley A. 8., KeeMivflle 


10 
ft 

• ■•••« 


li 

4 

1 
81 


10 

26 

7 

20 

6 

88 






1 

62 

10 

7 


e 


2 
154 


9 

27 

7 
173 


11 


Manhattan College, acad. dep't 


31 

7 

18 

63 


45 
3 

12 
1 

17 


154 


Mt Mercy A.. Buffalo 


27 


Mt Pleasant A., Ossinlng 




67 


67 


1ft 8t 1»"y'i A„ Newburgh 


7 


Nasaieth A., Rochester. .". 


16 


3 


4 


177 


eNew York Froebcl Normal Inst 




New York Military A., Cornwatt-on-Hudson 

Niagara Univ., acad. dep't . 


12 
6 
8 
4 

4 



18 

8 

•■•••■ 

* 
i 

••■«•• 
•••••■ 

i 

8 

i 


*8 

5 

H 
2i 

2 

i 
6 
2 
4i 

2 
1 

4 

4 

2 
4 

i 

9 


28 
65 

16 
136 

17 

21 

64 

119 

9 

45 

8 

18 

24 

2 

38 

5 

4 
14 
28 

11 
62 
11 
9 
15 


31 
16 
13 
91 

14 

21 

87 

107 

6 

62 


29 
20 
14 
75 

6 

31 

11 

111 

6 

15 


19 
20 
10 
61 

19 
19 
20 
64 
6 


7 
4 

79 

16 


107 

118 

24 

46 

92 

122 

401 


38 
442 

26 

27 

1 

72 
21 
16 

19 
6 
4 

17 
02 

S3 

25 

7 

02 


107 
118 


Oakwood Sem. t Union Springs 


67 


^M*fr Col. Inst, Brooklyn 


442 


Palmer Inst-Starkey 8cm., Lakemont 


72 


Pawling School " '. 


92 


Peekskfll A 


122 


Polytechnic Inst of Brooklyn, prep, school 


401 


Queen of the Rosary A, Amityrllle 


27 


Rochester Ath. k Mech. List 


8 


119 

3 


120 


Sacred Heart A. 8. of Oohoes 


3 


St Agnes Fein. Seao., Brooklyn 


15 
2 


21 

11 

1 


18 

7 

11 




72 


St Aloysius A., Rome 




21 


42 


St Angela's Hall A, Brooklyn 


16 


St Ann's A, 8., Hornell 




19 

3 


88 


St Ann's A 8.1 Nyack 


4 











St Anthony's 8. 








4 


St Augustine's A. 8L, Troy ,. 


10 
34 

14 


7 
18 

16 


2 
10 

9 




16 
28 

60 
29 

5 


S3 


8t Bernard's A, Cohoes 


90 


St Bonaventuit's CoL acad. dep't 


60 


St Bridget's A. 8. of Buffalo 


63 


St Catharine's A 8. of New York 


7 

8 

13 


4 


2 


1 


25 


Pt Clam's A. ft, East Aurora. t , . , 


12 




9 


is 


io 


02 



a Data given under LowviUe Union School b No report received. 
J. A.=junior academic; 8p.«speelaL d Burned. 



c A^cademy; S. A.^eenlor academic; M. A.=mlddle academic; 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(coniimied) 

eich academic department 



nw 


unm 


1»11UT« 


mHhmui 


'SSSr* 


™™ 




*^S° 


I 

11 

1 


1 
F 


1 

I 

11 

■a 
i 


1! 




f 


1 


I 


1 


i 


I 




s 

1 

i 


Total emm* 


1 


14 

75 
11 

14 

is 

1 

4 
• 

210 
11 
11 
* 
ID 


23 
1M 
a- 
57 
H 

01 
U 

41 

422 
70 
IS 
SS 

12 

46 

e 

102 


1 

i 
a 

« 

8 


2 

B 
2 






400 

2700 

.1223 

2300 

2500 

iia 

SI 
1 IN 

ua 

1 su 

1011 

Ml 

1 JOS 

2 >W 
J 220 
4 350 

HI 

8 188 
750 
0000 
1 43C 
1 000 




1 80) 

621 
1 600 

666 
210 
100 
1031 

62 

1 763 
1 160 
1 103 
050 
1 116 

4 713 

its 

1 800 

in 

3 111 

too 

707 

2 260 

4 318 








4 
1 




1 


i 




vn 






8 
















3GO 

10 


20 


S 311 22 
8 460 .. 


































Sit .. 
16(51 87 




20 
1 



1 


11 
1 

42 

1 

.' 

a 

D 


li 

62 
1 

1 
6 

12 

a 

! 


1 




' 


10 
12 

76 
60 

IOC 

in 

48 
71 
84 
60 
100 

121 


MO 




112 


n 

i 






3» 

m 


66 246(4 








10 SK 14 
(666 78 










4 


i 












< 
i 




19 1(13 




a 




60 
60 


5 804 20 








818 70 
9 001 78 




1 

13 

8 
181 


• 

184 

50 
9 
IV 












3 


133 
1M 




t 


10 


« 


ii 










(MT8 


■ 


a 
















• 747 63 
IN 44 






u 


U 


2 


1 


1 


is 


118 




m 
u 

it 

70 

ii 

1! 

: 
ft 

18 
1 

■ 


47 

Kn 
to 

84 

100 
842 

i 
i 

X 

ii 

8" 

2H 
N 

41 

M 
17 

s 
u 


20 

11 
11 

17 
(7 


X 

i 


17 

20 

a 
u 

10 

i: 

5 


J 






« 15U 
0000 
1 3X 

4 012 
SOD 

i 

t 847 
6(5 

418 

788 
471 
48£ 

816 

102 
175 

87b 
897 

1 SB 
PC 

« 




2 500 
10 000 

1 500 
8 060 

2 757 


400 
750 
11 

11 

n 










400 

271 
217 

42 


moso .. 

16 883 7* 
78 800 .. 

28 Ml 80 




* 
11 

: 


2 


1 


fc 


2 


3 




3 


2 

s 








873 
76 

25 


a km 

700 
8 4CK 

7K 

380 
418 

a» 

86 
450 

1000 
710 

tw 

10C 


. 614 
1680 


•0 4S5K 
17K .. 

22 M2» 










. 












4 


is 
i 


18 








80 


61 
36 
14 


2148 87 


















22 
66 

ia 

26 


4 an .. 
ion 06 








































1 


1 788*8 




i 
t 


• 


ii 
« 












1 


13 


S 

w 

10 

X 










6(00 










is 

10 
60 


1148(7 
1867 66 

2 044 75 






* 


3 




















1! 


11 




3 





338 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 

Important statistics for 

ACAD 



8t Faith's A., Poughkeepsle 

8t Francis A., Brooklyn 

St Francb Xavfers A., Brooklyn. 
St Gabriel's A of Manhattan. . . 
St Gabriel's 8., New York 



St James A. of Brooklyn 

St John's A. S. of Schenectady. 

St John's A., Albany 

St John's A. of Brookl; 
St John's A. of Rei 



QOKiyn.. 
nsseiaer. 



St John's Oath. A., Syracuse. . . . 
St John's Military &, Manllus. . 
St Joseph's A S., Brasher Falls. 
St Joseph's A & of Batavia. . . . 
St Joseph's A & of Ut Vernon. 



St Joseph's A., Albany 

St Joseph's A, Blnghamton 

St Joseph's A., Troy 

St Joseph's A. k Ind. Fein. 8., Lockport. 
St Joseph's A of llakme 



St Joseph's CoL Inst, Buffalo. . 
St Lawrence's A. of Manhattan. 

St Lucy's A 8., Syracuse 

St Margaret's SL, Buffalo 

StMary'sA&ofOlean 



8t Mary's A, Dunkirk 

St Mary's A., Ogdensburg 

St Mary's A. k Ind. Fern. S., Buffalo. 

St Mary's A. of Glens Falls 

St Mary's A of Hoodck Falls 



St Mary's A. of Hudson 

St Mary's A of Little Falls. 

St Mary's Oath. Inst, Amsterdam. 

St Patrick's A S. of Cohoes 

St Patrick's A & of Rouse Point. . 



St Patrick's A. of Cataklll 

St Patrick's A. of Troy 

oSt Paul's A. of Oswego 

St Peter's A, Troy 

St Stanislaus A 8., Keesevllle. 



St Thomas Aquinas A, Brooklyn. 
St Walburga's A 8., New York. . 

Sallas A. S., Bedford 

Sherman Col. Inst, Morlah 

SUten Island A., New Brighton. . 



A. 
A 
A. 
A 

8. A 

A. 

BL A. 

A 

A 

A 

A 
A. 

J. A 
M.A 
M.A. 

A 

A 

A 

S.A. 

A 

A 
A 

S.A 
A 
J. A 

A. 

A. 

S.A 

A. 

A. 

S.A 
A. 
A 

J. A. 
J. A 

A 

A. 
A 
A 
J. A. 

A 
M.A 

J. A 

A 

A 



I 



18 
U 



15 

17 

8 



Travis Preparatory 8 A 3 

Trinity a, New York A 8} 

Troy A A 4 

Troy Fern. Sem A 

Union A of BeUerlUe A 1} 

a No report received. 6 A^cademy; S. A, ■enter aoademlc; M. A=mlddle academic; J. A=3unJor academic 



6 
1 



13 



6 
§ 



13 



2 



i 

31 



H 



i 



i 



5* 

1 

2 



3 
2 



3 
2 
1 

2 
3 



I 



3i 
8 
6* 
1 

3 

3} 

4 

5i 
2 

2 

3 

3* 

1 

1 



i 



3 
1 

4 
4 

1 
1 



BBOIS1IU110N 



3 


17 




45 


4 


21 


8 


31 




61 



1! 



44 

16 
11 
80 
18 

20 
65 
15 
20 
2 

38 
12 
53 
18 
4 

27 
12 
16 
12 
13 

36 
20 
15 
47 
26 

14 

19 

31 

5 

4 

16 
25 



24 
1 

17 
15 
7 
26 
17 



10 
80 
16 
22 
11 



3 
81 
15 
16 
37 

20 



13 
45 
18 

18 
60 
14 
20 
3 

14 

15 

96 

7 

5 

22 

7 

22 





15 
27 
18 
32 
12 

16 

17 

18 

4 

5 

5 
7 



30 

3 

16 
10 
3 
12 
17 

18 



82 

17 

8 

11 

23 



I 

I 



28 
16 
11 
15 

30 



25 
10 

3 

48 

12 

7 

3 

20 
4 

11 
9 
4 

12 

10 

11 

5 



I 



136 



42 



I 



20 



27 67 
3 



7 

30 

6 

5 



15 
6 

15 
7 
3 

5 

10 

7 

7 



12 
20 

6 
28* 

8 

6 

8 
18 



2 
12 
13 
22 

1 

10 
14 
23 



9 
3 

244 
19 

13 

203 

7 

23 



10 
56 



3 



7 
1 



3 
67 

'is 

"8 

27 
43 



11 
2 

11 
10 



9 
16 



20 
18 
21 
26 
4 



12 
8 



58 
15 

21 

16 

52 

3 

7 

12 
9 



25 
5 



13 



16 

15 

9 

29 

6 



12 



1 

28 
1 



18 
43 



96 
•1 



13 



69 
66 
82 

117 

7 

25 



35 



40 
29 

8 

65 
27 
66 
41 
16 



39 

43 

83 

5 

87 
48 
52 
78 
S3 



25 
42 

88 
6 
7 

12 

85 



61 
4 

50 

.87 

18 

81 



17 



20 

186 

60 

66 

124 

117 
16 
28 

244 

58 

48 

203 

47 

62 

8 

87 
37 
122 
41 
21 

67 
39 
56 

33 

13 

64 

91 

52 

136 

48 

46 
58 

90 

9 

14 

24 
44 



86 
9 

50 
37 
13 
47 
7$ 

64 

96 

61 

122 

30 



(continued) 

each academic department 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 





25 

a 

3 
33 

■ 

s 

40 
1 

B 

)- 

• 
» 

2. 
» 

. 

a 


20C 

»! 

190 

42 
7 

ii 
101 

41 

ss 

s 

44 

ID 
*>. 

r, 
u< 
(1 

K 

I 

■#' 

St 


16 

i. 
i 


I 

B 
1 


13 

a 

7 

27 

1 


I 






2 000 
1 176 

1 «T: 

1 171 
902 
670 

422 

eu 

3000 

2 .<*■. 
460 

TOi 
HI 6 
687 
348 

630 

i eao 

062 
W) 
746 

82! 

4J 

600 
OX 




3 050 
400 

821 

1 800 
3034 

186 
100 

660 
833 

2 461 

360 
740 

811 

S2S 
100 

1 307 
600 

2 613 

4 701 
1 400 

426 
436 
1 084 
210 
100 

400 
74t 


1060 

25 




17 


1 




103 

an 


1 87S .. 




19 


















M 

K6 

n 

660 










I 


44 

3* 

44 
ft 












t 


a 


1 

1 

10 


1 

li 
! 
1 

i 

10 




1 


i 
i 

t 

3 

4 


6006 .. 




800 
100 










ISO 

!« 

47 
S 

336 


II 

U 








1 




3* 


40 








; 






M 
7 








1 


t 


1 








.. 


e 


j 
It 


i 

u 

13 
22 






I 


.28 














4 


i 


IS 








218 

40 

101 

100 






14 

60 
SI 

I 

60 
60 

10 
10 




11 


ii 


i 


10 
M 
















4 






1 


i 












* 


1 
1 

s 


i 

« 
s 




















10 

30 










3 














w 

i 

a 
& 
i 

is 
r 

3 

119 

in 


71 

■1 

t 

» 

M 
M 

34 
IIS 

25 












10 


1 160 
463 

1 03« 

860 

374 

1 660 

3062 

400 
336 
•50 
3 061 
763 


u 

14 

30 

no 

i 


4 287 
170 

1 340 

4&i 
too 
I too 

400 
10ft 

1 86C 
381 


















66 

10 
47S 








e 


B 






8 










































248 

no 






s 

2f 
11 

e 

j 


« 

4 


B 

1 


1 

10 

; 






too 

40 
26 
I 
71 








; 

i 


7042 .. 


« 


J 
I* 


038168 


II 





340 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Table 13 
Important statistics for 

ACAD 



Undine A. S.. lftddktown. . . 

Ureuline A., New York 

UrauHne 8em. f New Roeheile. 
Utie*Cath.A 



aUttca Fern. A. 



Wagner Memorial Luth. CoL, Rochester. 
WaErvl 



diet A 
Westerleigh Coll Inst, New Brighton 



Total. 



J. A. 

A 

A. 

A. 

A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 



TBACHERS 



I 



5 



482 



£ 



3 
5* 
7 
3 



1 



4M 



■BOBTBinON 






13 
30 
20 
42 



10 
16 
66 



56M 



20 
11 
28 



8 
12 

8 



8854 






7 
19 
12 
22 



2 876 



! 



a 



2 
11 
10 
14 



7 
12 
11 



1777 



CD 



10 



3 



600 






67 



84 
17 
62 



0089 



© 



22 
90 
53 
49 



82 

30 



6 421 



S 



t 



90 

63 

106 



84 
49 
92 



14 610 



« No report received, b A.=academy; 8. A=eenl«r academic; M. A.=middle academic; J. A.=junior academic. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



341 



(concluded) 



each academic department 

EMIES 



PUFUfl 



ATBBAQB 

DAILY 

ATIBNDAIfCB 



* 

£ 



85 



3 



22 
52 
43 
44 



I 



22 
52 
43 
TO 



OBADUATS6 



I 



3 



2 
11 

7 
12 



3 



2 

11 

7 

u 



■NTUnifQ 

HIQBBB 

INBT1TUTION8 




1 



LIBRARY 



1 



1 

*8a 



i 



490 

580 

734 

4 251 



18 
80 



15 



APPABATOB 



$525 

2 800 

570 

1 146 



$37 

300 

143 

32 



BXPBNDRUBB1 



Total 

of academic 

department 

during 

the year 



12 206 48 
7 756 82 

13 706 06 
2 219 22 



29 
15 

43 



27 
14 



29 

42 
57 



10 
3 



3 
11 
11 



1 
11 



3 
4 



1040 

579 

1000 



80 



500 

1 000 

800 



13 



8 176 36 

11 264 90 

5 121*87 



7823 



4694 



12 447 



706 



1 935 



736 



81 



231 



250 502 



10 733 



$244 995 



$15 933 



$2 336 953 44 



Title III 

HIGHER EDUCATION 

Progress in the field of higher education is intended to be 
the keynote of this portion of the annual report. It purports to 
give prominent items in the whole field and in the several divisions 
thereof — universities, colleges, professional schools, technical and 
others. The advance without the State is shown from reports 
of national conferences and associations; within the State, by 
reports and summaries. 

The National Association of State Universities at its 13th annual 
meeting held November 15 and 16, 1908 at Washington, D. C. 
adopted the report of its committee on standards of American 
universities. In the words of the committee: 

There are certain clearly marked tendencies or forces at work 
in our American society toward the development at no distant 
date of a typical institution of learning which we may not im- 
properly call the Standard American University. 

This institution will, for an indefinite time, include as an im- 
portant part of its organization what we may call a Standard 
American College with a four years curriculum, with a tendency 
to differentiate its parts in such a way that the first two years 
will be looked upon as a continuation of and a supplement to 
the work of secondary instruction as given in the high school, 
while the last two years will be shaped more and more dis- 
tinctly in the direction of special, advanced or university in- 
struction, rising gradually into the advanced work of the gradu- 
ate school. 

The Standard American University will also include as a dis- 
tinct department the graduate school or philosophical faculty. 

It will also include as organic parts of the institution in its 
fully developed form various professional schools, such as law, 
medicine and engineering. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 343 

During the discussion and adoption of this report the chair- 
man said: 

We have got to standardize though a great many of us would 
prefer to have no such thing. Let it be understood that standard- 
izing is disagreeable work and that we wish that we did not 
have it to do but if we do not do it in this association it is being 
done for us and we have no share in the doing of it. It is being 
done rapidly by national professional associations. It is being 
done by voluntary associations; it is being done on a basis in 
these institutions that has not the breadth that we propose in 
this report. 

The association defined the Standard American University to be 
an institution 

i Which requires for admission the completion of the cur- 
riculum of the Standard American High School with a four 
years course which will enable pupils to offer for admission not 
less than 14 units of five periods each, or their equivalent. 

2 Which offers in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
two years of general or liberal work completing or supplement- 
ing the work in the high school. 

3 Which offers a further course of two years so arranged 
that the student may begin work of university character lead- 
ing to the bachelor's degree at the end and reaching forward 
to the continuation of this work in the graduate school or the 
professional school. 

4 Which offers professional courses in law, medicine, or en- 
gineering based upon the completion of two years of college 
work. 

5 Which offers in the graduate school an adequate course 
leading to the degree of doctor of philosophy. 

6 That the association recognize any institution in whole or 
in part doing work of this grade as, in so far, doing work of 
university quality. 

The association «then adopted 

I 60 year hours or units of collegiate work for the bachelor's 
degree. 

II Qualifications of teachers and institutional facilities. It is 
expected that a high school teacher possess the bachelor's de- 
gree, the master's being recommended ; a teacher of college work 
possess the doctor of philosophy or its equivalent. 

III Equipment, including library, laboratories and apparatus. 



344 NEVV YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

IV Time units for degrees: three years from the beginning 
of the junior year for the degree of master of arts; five years 
for the doctor of philosophy. 

V Scope of curriculum. 

VI Provision for recognition and committee on standards. 

The Association of American Universities at its ioth annual con- 
ference held at Ithaca, N. Y., January 1909 discussed the re- 
port of a special committee on university nomenclature, which 
recommended 

1 That the term department be restricted to the various sub- 
jects taught in the university, i.e. the department of Latin. 

2 That the term course be restricted to the subdivisions of a 
subject, e.g. course 1 in English. 

3 That the term college be restricted to a part of the univer- 
sity, the standard of admission to which is the equivalent of that 
required by the Carnegie Foundation for the advancement of 
teaching and which offers instruction leading to a first degree 
in arts, letters or sciences. 

4 That the term school be restricted to a part of the university, 
the standard of admission to which is not less than the equiva- 
lent of two years' work in the college and which offers instruction 
of not less than two years' duration leading to a technical or a 
professional degree. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The 
third annual report issued October 1908 gives in part 4, " Educa- 
tional Progress and Problems," several specially interesting 
items, notably, progress toward unity in college requirements 
for admission, and the organization of higher education. The 
former shows the marked influence of the foundation on the 
colleges of the country, and the latter states an important prob- 
lem in process of solution. It reports for the year a marked 
progress in the direction of reasonable and uniform standards 
for admission to college and says : 

In the United States today there are nearly 1000 institutions 
which call themselves colleges. The work offered by these 
institutions varies from that of a true college articulating with 
the standard high school and offering four years of fruitful 
study to institutions so low in grade that their courses of study 
do not equal those of a good high school. This confusion is 
the result of a number of causes among which especially sig- 
nificant are the newness of our educational development, the 
lack of any intelligent supervision of higher education, and the 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 345 

tendency of colleges in the past to remain isolated schools un- 
related to the general system of education. The first of these 
is a perfectly natural phase of our extraordinary national and 
industrial growth. 

Commenting on the lack of any intelligent supervision it says : 

The absence in nearly all states of the Union of any form of 
supervision over higher education is a singular feature of our 
educational history. The University of the State of New York 
(which is a board not a teaching institution) represents almost 
the only effective agency in any state of the Union which has 
the power to supervise or even to criticize institutions devoted 
to higher education and to professional training. In the State 
of New York the term college has a definite meaning and an 
institution, whether for academic or professional training, must, 
before it can confer degrees, comply with certain standards and 
must have certain facilities for education. In most states of the 
Union, at least until very recently, any body of men who chose 
to do so for any purpose whatever could incorporate under the 
general laws and organize what they called a college, a medical 
or a law school, to be conducted according to their own standards 
of ambitions and without any relation to the general system of 
education. . . These may legally confer all the degrees of 
higher learning which the strongest and most scrupulous col- 
lege can confer — a right they are not slow to make use of. 
The District of Columbia has been prolific in paper colleges 
which scatter degrees far and wide, the distribution beginning 
usually with the members of their own faculties. 

The report gives as example the Medico-chirurgical and Theo- 
logical College of Christ's Institution, which applied for and 
failed to receive the Regents recognition soon after its incorpo- 
ration and entered on the same disreputable career among the 
blacks that the discreditable Old Physio-medical College has 
been pursuing among the whites, to which attention is called 
later. 

Education for November 1908 in an article on the accrediting 
of high schools by state universities brings out the fact that in 
11 out of 15 of the North Central and Pacific States maintain- 
ing universities, inspection by these institutions is regularly es- 
tablished for this purpose. The 15 states referred to are Ohio, 
Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Mis- 
souri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Colo- 
rado, California and Washington. 

The General Bulletin on Professional Education issued by the 
Regents in 1899 enumerated all institutions of the United States 



346 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

that gave lists of secondary schools accredited on inspection or 
any other method. That list included 27 institutions. 

The results of these clearly marked tendencies or forces of 
national character have been quite apparent in New York State 
and the statement that standardizing is often disagreeable work 
can be exemplified from many experiences of the Education 
Department. It is interesting to note that the first principle de- 
fining the Standard American University became operative in 
this State in August 1896 and that the more severe tests of 
Regents examinations for college entrance diplomas crystallized 
into Regents revised rule 361 which was adopted in October 
1907 and has been in full force this year. The differentiation 
of college and university has been going forward steadily as 
shown by the records of the Statistics Division. 

The recommendations of university nomenclature appeared early 
in the University Law and had crystallized in permanent form in 
1899 when the General Bulletin on Professional Education was pub- 
lished. The reorganization of the unified system employed terms 
that had been worked out in New York's experience and the Regents 
Revised Rules of 1908 still further defined these terms now of 
national character — high school, college and professional schools. 
Whether the effort to base professional courses in law, medicine and 
engineering on two years of undergraduate college work will prove 
successful or not remains to be demonstrated, but a number of uni- 
versities have inaugurated the plan and the outcome will be watched 
with interest and with profit. 

Turning now from these discussions which are in a sense academic, 
to the field of statistics an interesting comparison has been instituted 
between the matriculates of German universities and the students 
in higher education in the State of New York, during the same 
period. The statistics of the two countries will differ as their edu- 
cational systems differ, but they are of sufficient accuracy and 
similarity to illustrate the relative importance attached to higher 
education in the two countries. 

The Deutscher Universitatskalendar for the winter semester 1908-9 
publishes an interesting statistical table of the matriculates of the 
German universities by giving the number in attendance from the 
German Empire, from the other countries of Europe and from the 
other continents of the world — America, Asia, Africa and Australia. 
The 21 universities matriculated 44,640 students from the German 
Empire ; 3552 from other European countries ; 333 from America, 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 347 



i 

* 



and 192 from Asia, Africa and Australia, a total of 48,717. The 
number of women matriculates unclassified by countries was 1077. 
There were matriculated the preceding summer semester 47,799 — 
918 less students. 

The census of 1905 showed a total population of the 26 states of 
the German Empire to be 60,641,278. 

The population of New York in 1905 was 8,067,308. The per- 
centage of population in New York to the German Empire is about 

The number of students in higher institutions in New York 
(corresponding as closely to the matriculates of the German uni- 
versities as the differences in school systems and reports permit) for 
the school year 1908-9 was 36,287 — 74.5 per cent of the number in 
the German universities. 

Comment on these figures is unnecessary except that owing to the 
recognized efficiency of the universities and colleges and the stand- 
ardized requirements of this State the figures for New York include 
at least several thousand students that are residents of other states 
who will return to their own several states after the completion of 
their education. 

The statistics of the German universities, giving in detail as they 
do the numbers in attendance on each state university from each 
state of the German Empire from other countries of Europe and 
from other continents of the world, reveal a lack in the educational 
system of the United States worthy of serious consideration, namely : 
concise, clear, accurate statistics regarding every phase of education 
in the United States as a whole and in the individual states. 

Would it not be possible to secure by conference and correspond- 
ence a concerted action among 10 or 12 leading states whereby more 
accurate data should become available at less expense of time and 
labor both on the part of the recording and reporting officials? 

Legislation. One of the most important items of the current 
year in the State was the consolidation of the general laws relating 
to education whioh was reported by the Board of Statutory Consoli- 
dation, passed by the Legislature, approved by the Governor, and 
became chapter 21 of the laws of 1909, the Education Law. This 
Education Law that brought together the Consolidated School Law 
and the University Law, with others relating to schools, to the Uni- 
versity, and to the practice of the professions was published in 
Bulletin 449 and appears as a supplemental volume of the Depart- 
ment's Fifth Annual Report. The Board of Statutory Consolidation 



348 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

did not venture to do much in the way of change of form, which left 
much to be desired in the way of good form and on the Commis- 
sioner's recommendation the Regents voted in their April 1909 meet- 
ing to approve the plan presented by the Commissioner for a com- 
plete rewriting of the Education Law and requested him to present 
the results to the law committee before the annual meeting of the 
Board. 

Section 1095 of the Education Law defines the institutions of the 
University, which include all institutions of higher education that 
are now or may hereafter be incorporated in this State and such 
other libraries, museums, or other institutions for higher education 
as may in conformity with the ordinances of the Regents, after 
official inspection, be admitted to or incorporated by the University. 

Section 1097 entitled Charters enumerates the institutions that 
may be incorporated by the Regents: "Any university, college, 
academy, library, museum, or other institution or association for the 
promotion of science, literature, art, history, or other department of 
knowledge." 

Handbook 24 entitled Organization and Institutions is printed 
annually on the opening of the new school year and was ready for 
distribution before Convocation. It was carefully revised to con- 
form by title with the definition of institutions as set forth in section 
1095 and io 97 oi the Education Law. 

UNIVERSITY OOHVOOATIOH 

The 47th University Convocation of the State of New York was 
held October 28, 29 and 30, 1909 in the Senate Chamber, Dr St Clair 
McKelway presiding. The afternoon session of October 28 com- 
prised the dedication exercises of the new State Normal College 
buildings, President Milne presiding. The opening address was by 
Gov. Charles E. Hughes ; the dedicatory address by Com'r Andrew 
S. Draper, and closing address by Vice Chanc. St Clair McKelway. 
The Thursday evening session was made noteworthy by the presence 
of former Chancellor Bishop William Croswell Doane, whose feeble 
health compelled him to leave Convocation at the close of his invo- 
cation. Vice Chancellor McKelway delivered the Chancellor's ad- 
dress. He was followed by Dean LeBaron Russell Briggs of the 
faculty of arts and sciences, Harvard College, who delivered a 
scholarly address on the American College and the American Uni- 
versity. There was an informal reception in the Senate lobby at the 
close of the addresses. The members of Convocation and guests 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 349 

were received by the Regents of the University and the Commis- 
sioner of Education. The leading speakers at subsequent sessions 
and their topics were: W. Dawson Johnston, Librarian Columbia 
University, The Library as a Reinforcement of the School ; James 
M. Green, President State Normal School, Trenton, N. J., Teaching 
as an Occupation for Men, Influences Adverse and Favorable; 
Nicholas Murray Butler, President Columbia University (absent be- 
cause of illness) Which are the Professions? ; Andrew S. Draper, 
Commissioner of Education, The Relative Educational Standing of 
New York State; John M. Thomas, President Middlebury College, 
Vermont, Moral Education in High Schools and Colleges; Rush 
Rhees, President University of Rochester, Applied Science and 
Liberal Culture; Julius Sachs, Columbia College, Improved Stand- 
ards in Teaching Latin ; Judge R. C. S. Drummond, Auburn, The 
Organization and Direction of Athletic Sports in Secondary Schools, 
The attendance upon all the sessions was excellent, that at the 
Normal College phenomenal. Representatives of the colleges and 
universities were present in greater numbers than last year. The 
proceedings, including the formal papers and discussions appear in 
Bulletin 460. 

ASSOCIATION OF 00XXECKE8 IH THE STATE 07 HEW YORK 

At the December meeting of the Board of Regents the Commis- 
sioner brought to the attention of the Regents their revised rule, 
section 23, subdivision e " a college or university may be registered 
as maintaining a satisfactory standing for one full year of medicine 
when the combined course for the baccalaureate and medical degrees 
is not less than seven years." A rule worked out in accord with sec- 
tion 166, subdivision 4, of the medical practice act which specifies 
that " the Regents may, in their discretion, accept as the equivalent 
of the first year of the fourth requirement (the study of medicine 
not less than four school years, including four satisfactory courses 
of at least seven months each, in four different calendar years in a 
medical school registered as maintaining at the time a standard 
satisfactory to the Regents) provided that sudh college course shall 
have included not less than the minimum requirements prescribed 
by the Regents for such admission to advanced standing." President 
Hadley of Yale University appeared before the Board and on formal 
motion the question, as presented by the Commissioner and dis- 
cussed by President Hadley, was referred to the committee on 
higher education for consideration and further report. 



350 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

As a result of this conference the fourth annual meeting of the 
Association of Colleges was called for February 9, 1909 at Albany 
and took the form of a conference for the consideration of a com- 
bined six years course leading to the B.A. and M.D. degrees. The 
colleges and universities of the State signified their intentions to have 
representatives present as follows : Adelphi College, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
one or more of the faculty; Alfred University, Alfred, N. Y., 
President Davis ; Canisius College, Buffalo, N. Y., Father William 
F. Clark; Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y., one or more dele- 
gates; College of the City of New York, Pres. John H. Finley ; Col- 
lege of St Angela, New Rochelle, N. Y., representative ; College of 
St Francis Xavier, Pres. Thomas J. McCluskey ; Columbia Univer- 
sity, New York, Pres. Nicholas Murray Butler, Samuel W. Lambert, 
and Prof. William H. Carpenter ; Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., 
Dr Charles H. Hull; Elmira College, Elmira, N. Y., Pres. A. C. 
McKenzie; Fordham University, Fordham, N. Y., representative; 
Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., Pres. M. W. Stryker; Hobart 
College, Geneva, N. Y, representative ; New York University, New 
York, N. Y., John H. McCracken and Dr Egbert LeFevre ; Niagara 
University, Niagara Falls, N. Y., Pres. Edward J. Walsh; Normal 
College of the City of New York, representative ; St Bonaventure's 
College, Allegheny, N. Y, Rev. Joseph F. Butler ; St Lawrence Uni- 
versity, Canton, N. Y., Pres. Almon Gunnison; St Stephen's Col- 
lege, Annandale-on-Hudson, N. Y., Rev. George W. Anthony; 
University of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y., representative; Vassar 
College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Pres. James M. Taylor ; Wells College, 
Aurora, N. Y., Dr Lowe. The following were unable to have repre- 
sentatives present : Keuka College, Keuka Park, N. Y. ; Manhattan 
College, New York; and Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Com'r Andrew S. Draper and First Assistant Com'r Augustus S. 
Downing were also present. 

At the April meeting Regent Vander Veer reported that the Com- 
mittee had given the question full consideration and, upon recom- 
mendation of the Committee, the Regents modified the section to the 
extent of permitting a university that maintains a registered medical 
school to be registered as maintaining a satisfactory standing if it 
confers academic degrees and medical degrees as a result of a com- 
bined course covering six years provided the diploma conferring the 
academic degree, whether conferred at the end of four years or at 
the end of six years, shall clearly indicate that such degree js con- 
ferred as a result of concurrent courses covering six years, which in 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 351 

no case must be construed to mean that less than four years' work 
in subjects essential to a liberal education will be approved as the 
basis of the academic degree. 

At the close of the conference the association met to fill vacancies 
in the committee of selection for the Rhodes Scholarship as shown 
under that title. 

Handbook 9, Medicine, published the list of colleges approved 
under section 402, Baccalaureate and medical degrees. 

RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS 

As announced in the Fifth Annual Report, under the rules of the 
Rhodes scholarships every three years is omitted in the nomination 
of scholarships, consequently there will be no appointment from the 
United States for the year beginning October 1909. The qualifying 
examination therefore for Rhodes scholarships held in October 1909 
was for scholars who will begin residence in Oxford in October 
1910. 

The New York State Association of Colleges appointed Dean 
Crawshaw, then acting president of Colgate University, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of President Merrill ; elected David J. 
Quinn, Fordham University, to the vacancy caused by the expiration 
of the term of President McCluskey ; and Pres. M. Woolsey Stryker, 
Hamilton, to fill a vacancy in a two years term caused by failure to 
elect a successor to President Rhees when his term expired. 

The committee of selection for the year 1909. then, comprises: 
Dean. Crawshaw, Colgate University, chairman ; Pres. M. Woolsey 
Stryker, Hamilton College ; President Quinn, Fordham University ; 
First Assistant Commissioner Downing, permanent secretary. 

Following previous customs qualifying examinations were pro- 
vided in four places throughout the State: Albany, Education De- 
partment; Ithaca, Cornell University; New York, Columbia Uni- 
versity; Rochester, University of Rochester. 

The conditions under which the Rhodes scholarships are given 
and the range of subjects were printed in full in the Fifth Annual 
Report as a matter of record and for information of school authori- 
ties. 

The qualifying examinations for schools of the United States 
under the Rhodes bequest were held in October 1909, the selection 
of students will be completed before the end of March 1910 and 
the. elected scholars will begin residence at Oxford in October of 
that year. The scholarships are of the value of £300 a year and are 



352 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



tenable for three years. It will be understood that these examina- 
tions are not competitive but simply qualifying. They are merely 
intended to give assurance that every selected scholar is up to the 
standard of the first examination (Responsion) which the University 
of Oxford demands of all candidates for the B.A. degree. 

Rhodes scholarships examinations were conducted on behalf of 
the trustees of the Rhodes bequest October 19 and 20, 1909 in the 
Assembly Parlor of the Capitol at Albany, under the supervision of 
H. L. Taylor Ph.D., Syracuse University; in Cornell University, ' 
Ithaca, N. Y., by Fellows designated by President Schurman; in 
Hamilton Hall, Columbia University, New York, by Adam LeRoy 
Jones, chairman committee on undergraduate admissions, Columbia 
University ; no candidates presented themselves for admission to the 
examinations in the University of Rochester. 

Candidates were present as follows : 



SURNAME 

Caldwell 

Dukes 

Eaton 
Russell 
Shepardson 
Sherwood 

Smith 
Verwiebe 



FIRST NAME IN PULL 



ADDRESS 



Wallace Everett 

Gordon Bennett 

Philip L. 
Franeslin 
Whitney Hart * 
William T. 

Geddes 
Walter August 



no Henry St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
no Montague St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sheffield, Mass. 
University Heights, N.Y. 
Hamilton, N. Y. 
Annandale~on-Hudson, 

N.Y. 
Orange, N. J. 
728 State st., 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



EXAMINED AT 

Ithaca, N. Y. 

Ithaca, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Albany, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



TIME TABLE OF EXAMINATIONS 
Tneadiy, October It 

10 a. m. to 12 m. Translation from Latin into English 
2 p. m. to 4 p. m. Latin prose 
5 p. m. to 7 p. m. Arithmetic 

Wednesday* October SO 

10 a. ra. to 12 m. Translation from Greek into English 
2 p. m. to 3 p. m. Latin grammar 
3.10 p. m. to 4.10 p. m. Greek grammar 
5 p. m. to 7 p. m. Algebra or geometry 



WOTEWOETHY FACTS EEOX THE STATE'S STATISTICS Of KXGHEE XVSTKVO- 

TIOK 

The more important facts in the report from higher institutions 
in this State the current year are the increase of property in build- 



Expenditures df 
Universities Colleges Professional 
and Technical Schools 




Figures since igos do not include expenditures in foreign colleges. 



Students 

Universities Colleges Professional 
and Technical Schools 









i 




1 


WOMEN BBBBB ¥ 

THOUSANDS 
20 


IEN 








TEAR 


TOTAL 


« 


40 


1397 

me 

1999 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1304 
1909 
1906 
1907 

1909 
1909 


20733 

21600 

22503 

23267 

29143 

26330 

29011 

30090 

28344 

30140 

33734 

34773 
36287 


















8989 b^b^b^BE^EH 










6918 b^b^b^b^b^BHiEF^H 














7407 


15096 BM 












7388 


15879 ■ 












9110 1 


17038 RB^RBS 








*• 








3792 


I 18138 RBH 














8828 1 


19183 
















10664 


| 19196 




















943B 1 


19409 


















10611 


1 20129 RBlBM 
















11517 


■ 22217 ■ 
















11488 


■ 23275 
















12096 bKFIHb^b^b^b^b^b^b^b^b^bV 


f 
















- 





Figures since 1905 omit foreign colleges and extension students. 



Faculties of 
Universities Colleges Professional 
and Technical Schools 



YEAH 


NUMBER 


THOUSANDS 
12 3 4 5 6 


1699 


3009 


























1899 


3179 WKM 


















I960 


3229 [■■■■■■■■■ 


















1901 


3321 IH^HH 


















1902 


3420 ■■■■■ 




i 












1903 


3632 ■■ 






















1904 


3851 ■■■■■■■ 


















1305 


3884 ■■ 




















1906 


3775 ■■ 














1907 


3884 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■M 










1909 


4175 ■■ 


















1909 


4231 ■■! 






























"ill 







Figures since 1905 omit foreign colleges. 



Students in Colleges of Liberal Arts 



YEAR 


NUMBER 


THOUSANDS 
1 5 10 


1887 


8841 
























1888 


7242 ■HHJeHHHeHe«M 












1888 


8022 ■■■■■■■■■■■! 












1800 


8883 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 












001 


7088 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 










1802 


7513 ■■■■■■■■■pi 










1808 


7875 PHI1^I^^^HHe«HHe«^e«SBHHeH 








1804 


8253 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 








1805 


8387 ■■^■■■■■■■■■iHH 








1808 


8531 ■■■■■■■■^■■■H 








1807 


3324 ■■■■■■■■■■■Hi 








O00 


10219 ■■!■■■■■■■ 


> 


O00 


10858 ■■■■■■■^ 









Students in Law Schools 






VEM 


NUNBCR 


HUNDREDS 
8 10 20 30 40 


m? 


2041 










mm 


2218 










1899 


2194 










1900 


2288 










1901 


2387 










002 


2191 










1908 


2818 








B04 


2848 








1905 


2716 








eot 


27SS | 








1907 


3025 1 








1906 


3022 1 






1609 

I 


2979 1 






... 



Students in Medical Schools 



YEAR 


NUMfeER 


HUNDREDS 
5 10 20 30 40 


m? 


4025 






1999 


3592 






1999 


3935 








1900 


3449 








1901 


3429 








1902 


3744 








1903 


3722 






1904 


3552 






1909 


3443 








1906 


3257 








1907 


3223 








1909 


3012 










1909 


2915 











Students in Medical Department of Syrian Protestant College omitted 

since 1905. 



Students in Dental Schools 



YEAR 


MUMBD 


HUNDREDS 
1 5 10 


1897 


S11 






. 








1838 


439 ■HIHIHHIHHi 












1889 


499 ■■■■■IIMiHHBBi 












1900 


558 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 










1901 


705 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 






1902 


899 ■■■^■■■■■■■■IMIHH 






1903 


903 ■■■■■■■■■■IHHLIL^HH^ 




1904 


9i4 ■■■■hii[i^h|hibhhhi^Hh 




1909 


910 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 




1908 


9i5 ■■■■■■IIHHHHHiH 




1907 


595 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 










O00 


519 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 












1909 


492 ■■■■■■■■llHHHi 













Students in Schools 
op Engineering and Technology 



YEAR 


HUMPH 


THOUSANDS 
1 2 3 A ! 


1889 


1397 












1900 


1SS3 ■■■■■■■ 

• i i 








1801 


1787 HElHEflBEflEBEBI 




% 




1802 


2061 iEBEBEflEBEHHElHi 






1803 


2461 ■■■■■ 








1804 


2804 BHeBeIeI 










1908 


2866 ■■■EMHBEaE^H 








1806 


3182 ■■■■■ 










1807 


3263 PeBHeBBI 






BeSeV 




1808 


3566 mtt^KKf^KKtKtKaKi^^Kmm 




1808 


9813 













SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 353 

ings a little less than $1,700,000; the increase in total expenditures 
a little more than $4,000,000; and the increase in graduate 
students 298, the average of the previous five years being less than 
100. 

The differentiation of university statistics from college and uni- 
versity reports has been in progress for some years. 

The College Department Report, volume 1, 1898, gives the rank 
in teachers, students, property and expenditures of eight universities. 

Later, the requirement that at least four departments, colleges or 
schools be in active operation to rank in table one changed the list 
of such institutions and the First Annual Report of the Department 
in 1905 gives statistics of six universities, etc. 

The important item of gifts and bequests to higher education ap- 
pears in the following pointed statement from the report of the year 
which we hope to make more exhaustive in the next report 

GIFTS AND BEQUESTS TO HIGHER INSTITUTIONS I908-9 

$1 821 606 52 excluding special schools 
65 691 08 special schools 



$1 887 297 60 total 

This does not include extraordinary receipts in Cooper Union of 
$100,000. 

OHABTZlf AVD D1QUS8 

During the year the Regents revised their rules touching incorpo- 
ration by amending section 20 (which does away with limited char- 
ters) April 1, 1909, as follows: 

The action of the Board of Regents in incorporating institu- 
tions, changing their corporate names, altering, suspending or 
revoking their charters, dissolving their corporate existence, ap- 
proving transfers of their property, the approval of the accept- 
ance of conditional gifts, and all action of the Board obviously 
requiring such suitable exemplifying, shall, in addition to the 
record made in the journal of their proceedings, be evidenced by 
charters, decrees, certificates, or other appropriate instruments, 
which shall embody the said record of their Journal, be executed 
by and in behalf of the Board of Regents under the seal of the 
University, which is hereby declared to be the seal of such 
Board, be attested by the official signature of the Chancellor, 
or Vice Chancellor, and of the Commissioner of Education, and 
be recorded in the office of the Regents in their permanent pub- 
lic records. 

12 



354 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Section 1099. Conditions of incorporation. This section of 
the Education Law requires that no institution shall be given power 
to confer degrees unless it has resources of at least $500,000, suit- 
able provisions approved by the Regents for buildings, furniture, 
educational equipment, aftd proper maintenance. 

Other sections of the Education Law and the Regents Revised 
Rules still further protect degrees in this State. Under these pro- 
visions the Regents have incorporated during the year the following 
higher institutions: 

Batavia Training School for Nurses of the Woman's Hospital 
Association of Batavia 

Institute of Scientific Study, 462 Madison av., New York 

Lockport City Hospital Training School for Nurses 

Putnam County Historical Society, Cold Spring 

Rochester School of Optometry, Rochester 

St Joseph's Seminary and College, Yonkers 

School of Domestic Art and Science, 143 E. 89th st., New York 

Ticonderoga Historical Society, Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

Training School for Nurses of Buffalo German Deaconess Hos- 
pital, Buffalo 

During the year degrees were conferred by the Regents on gradu- 
ates of institutions incorporated by them under provisional charters, 
in numbers as follows: master of arts, 5; bachelor of arts, 53; 
bachelor of science, 3 ; bachelor of science in civil engineering, 14 ; 
bachelor of science in electrical engineering, 6; bachelor of divinity, 
26 ; doctor of medicine, 4 ; doctor of dental surgery, 113; bachelor of 
library science, 1 1 ; total degrees conferred by the Regents for the 
year, 235. The following degrees conferred by the University 
during the year were granted to the students of higher institutions 
of the State: 

Master of arts. On the following five (5) graduates of Adelphi 
College : 



Besscy, Mabel Abbott 
Delano, Grace 



Winter, John Joseph 



Jelliffe, Elizabeth May 
Phipard, Leonora Elizabeth 



Bachelor of arts. On the following 52 graduates of Adelphi 
College : 



Allaire; Ruth . 
Blair, Leila Elizabeth 
Brandt, Wilhelmine Sophie 
Chappie, Louis Albert 
Cinnamond, Helen Christiana 
Commiskey, M. Agnes 
Cone, Marion Chappell 



Corcilius, Josephine 
Cuevas, Rosalia del Pilar 
Downs, Josephine Anais 
Foster, Mabel 
Frost, Madeleine Antoinette 
Fulton, Mary Elizabeth 
Geiss, M. H. Matilda 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



355 



Griswold, Virginia Antoinette 
Guion, Bessie Rose 
Haaf, Johanna 
Haskins, Theresa Howard 
Hobbs, Alice Emily 
Hoschke, Louise Margaret 
Howell, Ethel May 
Hyde, Justus Chauncey 
Jaggi, Clara Jennie 
Kavanagh, Mary Elizabeth 
Kennedy, Alicia Maude 
Kipp, Ethel Margaret 
Lindlar, William 
Lyons, Marie Beynon 
Morison, Norma Gray 
Nevins, Nannie Russell 
Nichols, Ellen Elizabeth 
Patterson, Martha Judson 
Peck, Emily Seymour 



Powell, Mary Emma 
Reilly, Edna Genevieve 
Rosenberg, Nettie 
Rowell, Ella Chapin 
Schnurr, Edith Winifred 
Schradieck, Margaret 
Stebbins, Delia Adams 
Stevens, Mary Sidney 
Tinney, Mary Catherine 
Townsend, May Edna 
Vimont, Louise Leonie 
Waldo, Ruth Fanshaw 
Walker, Emma 
Walker, Jennie 
Weeks, Marion Isabel 
Wendel, Corinne Rosalys 
Wickham, Laura Florence 
Wilcox, Jessie Eloise 
Wolferz, Helen Amalia 



On the following graduate of Keuka College : 

Lockhart, Cecile Buckbee 

Bachelor of science. On the following three graduates of 
Keuka College: 



Ball, Genevieve Kinne 



fc 



Colelli, Vincent Othello 



aynard, Bert Ellis 

Bachelor of science in civil engineering. On the following 
seven graduates of Thomas S. Clarkson Memorial School of Tech- 
nology : 



Ames, Jeremiah Leland 
Baker, Roy George 
Biche, Adrian James 



Mayhen, Valier 
Strough, Roscoe Perrin 
Walker, George Ernest 
Walker, Loy Ellsworth 



On the following seven graduates of Mackenzie College, San 
Paulo, Brazil: 



Corner, Benjamin Jorge 
da Cunha, Joas Alves 
de Lima, Coriolano, jr 



Lofgren, Luiz Bruno 
Nogueira, Oscar de Andrade 
Ribeiro, Arthur Souto 
Ruffin, Jula Henrique 



Bachelor of science in electrical engineering. On the follow- 
ing six graduates of Thomas S. Clarkson Memorial School of Tech- 
nology : 

McCullough, Lee William 
Morse, Bryan Woodward 
Scofield, Hervey Noble 



Burch, Byron F. 
Buskirk, Edwin Roger 
Gorman, Lawrence Joseph 



Bachelor of divinity. 
Theological Seminary : 

Aue, Charles Frederick 
Bailey, James Garfield 
Black, Archibald 



On the following 26 graduates of Union 



Blackwood, Irvin Aiken 
Chidley, Howard James 
Clements, Edgar Thomas 



356 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Coss, John Jacob 
Emerson, Chester Burge 
Goodwin, Edna 
Graham, Dwight Worden 
Haydn, Howell Merriman 
Howe, Herbert Barber 
Hunter, Graham Chambers 
Jordan, Henry Nelson 
Klein, Arthur J. 
Luccock, Halford Edward 



McClelland, George Hamilton 
Miller, Robert Sanford 
Moses, Joseph 
Nasmith, Augustus Inglesbe 
Pestke, Paul John Walter 
Sally, Ashmun Clark 
Steen, John Ewing 
Thomas, David 
Weber, Joseph John 
Wells, Clarence Elmore 



Doctor of medicine. On the following four graduates of New 
York Medical College and Hospital for Women : 



Burlingame, Lillian M. 
Rieger, Frances F. 



Schultz, Augusta P. 
Sullivan, Mary I. 



Doctor of dental surgery. On the following 37 graduates of 
New York College of Dental and Oral Surgery: 



Auspitz, Rudolph William 
Blum, Charles 
Carr, Lewis Henry 
Chambers, Frank Leslie 
Cigal, Leisor 
Cordes, John H. 
Curtis, Gertrude Elizabeth 
De Camp, Charles Alexander 
Eliowicz, Gilele 
Goldman, David 
Gordon, Abraham Isaac 
Grosberg, Max Waldo 
Hall, Rose 
Herman, Ida Klupt 
Horwitt, Rebecca 
Klein, Julia Anna 
Koob, Joseph John 
Kreisberg, Benjamin 
Kunstler, Isidore 



Lerner, Louis 

Lewis, Arthur William 

Lunenfeld, Bernard 

McKeevcr, Eleanor Martineau 

McPhillips, Matthew Francis, A.B. 

Pierson. Alfred Hammond 

Rosenblume, Joseph 

Rothenberg, Maurice Frederick 

Schektman, Herman Nathaniel 

Schneider, Esther 

Schoen, David 

Singer, Alexander Leslie 

Sol off, Samuel 

Starke, George Gonner 

Sterling, Ferdinand Alfonso 

Williams, Floyd Edward 

Wright, George Henry 

Yoder, Ralph Ernest, A.M. 



On the following 76 graduates of the New York College of Den- 
tistry : 



Arkin, David Maurice 
Asch, Jacob 
Berger, Adolph 
Blum, Henry 
Both, Hans 

Boughton, Arthur Herriot 
Bronston, Samuel William 
Browd, David Konstant, Ph.G. 
Bruckheimer, Milton Phoebus 
Brush, Roger Chauncey 
Bugden, Frank Edward 
Cohen, Joseph Maxwell 
Corcoran, John Arthur 
Feinbcrg, Arthur 
Feitelson, Jacob 
Feldman, Max Hillel 
Feldman, Morris Henry 
Finkelstein, Frank 



Franken, Sigmund Walter Anthony 
Fraunhar, Jacque 
Goldin, Jacob Edward 
Goldman, Aaron 
Goldstein, Jacob William 
Grcenberg, Meyer 
Greenstein, Jacob 
Grossman, Jacob 
Haight, David Germain 
Haimowitz, Sigmund Sidney 
Hermann, Jacob 
Heyman, George Harrison 
Hildebrant, William Lambert 
Hochberg, Paul 
Holzman, Sidney Henry 
Horwitz, Solomon 
Kantro, Jacob Maurice 
Labin, Leon 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



357 



Levine, Robert George 
Levitch, Samuel 
Lifshitz, Jacob Oscar 
Lindsay, Elmer Alvin 
London, Emanuel 
Lubliner, Leo Maurice 
Lustgarten, Benjamin Jacob 
Lyons, Maurice James 
Male, Hyman 
Margolis, Edward Horace 
Moreau, Henry Louis 
Miller, Fred 
Nadelson, Philip 
Needles, Carl 
Osofs, Morris Louis 
Palmer, Ray Sutherland, C.E. 
Pentz, James Bolton, M.D. 
Peters, John Louis 
Rachlin, John 
Ritter, Max 



Rosenberg, Abraham 
Rosenblatt, Morris 
Rosenkranz, Harry 
Schneer, Jacob Bernard 
Schwarz, Jacob 
Schweitzer, Heinrich, M.D. 
Scudder, Harrison Vance 
Shapiro, Benjamin David 
Sheff, Samuel 
Singher, Alexandre 
Smorack, Samuel George 
Sobelman, Nathan 
Stavisky, Nathan Meyre 
Steinberg, Martin 
Steinberg, Solomon 
Tichenor, Walter Kemp 
Walker, Arthur Clifford 
Weissman, Eugene 
Wolff, William Henry 
Zametkin, Joel Michael 



Bachelor of library science. On the following u graduates of 
the New York State Library School : 



Blanchard, Linn R. 
Fay, Lucy E. 
Gillette, Fredericka B. 
Gray, Florence B. 
Hawkins, Emma Jean 



Fhipps, Gertrude E. 
Reed, Lois A. 
Roberts, Ethel D. 
Strong, George F. 
Wheeler, Joseph L. 
Wilson, Mabel Z. 



XJ0EVBE8 

Under the professional laws the Regents conducted examinations 
for admission to the practice of teaching, medicine, dentistry, veter- 
inary medicine and optometry, for the registration of nurses and the 
certifying of public accountants at stated intervals during the year. 
The State Board of Law Examiners conducted examinations for 
admission to the bar and the State Board of Pharmacy for admis- 
sion to the practice of pharmacy. 

They also issued licenses under exemptions, which naturally 
diminish year by year. 

During the year the Regents licensed as the results of State exami- 
nations : 559 physicians ; 4 osteopaths ; 145 dentists ; 30 veterinary 
surgeons ; 561 registered nurses ; 48 certified public accountants ; and 
21 optometrists. They revoked the licenses of three, viz, Edward 
Conrad, Robert Ormsby and Francis Gray Blinn. 

Under the exemptions of the various professional laws the 
Regents also licensed during the year 81 physicians, 1 osteopath, 58 
dentists, 1 veterinary surgeon, 74 registered nurses, 1919 optome- 
trists. 



358 - NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The licenses granted by the Regents during the year on exami- 
nation and exemption follow in tabular form. 

In the tables the candidates are given in three groups : group I, 
New York schools ; group 2, schools in other states ; group 3, schools 
in foreign countries, with information regarding their education, 
preliminary and professional, their method of securing a license 
and the standings attained on examination. 

The subordinate divisions of the information include the name 
and address of the applicant at the date of his application for 
admission to examination and the year of his birth. Under the 
heading " Preliminary education " the date of his matriculation in 
his professional school is given with the count value of his prepara- 
tion as determined by the Department on (x) examination, (sx) 
examination on set subjects, or (eq) the equivalent on certificate, 
or (pq) on partial equivalent, certificate and examination. Under 
the heading " Professional education " the number of years of his 
professional course required by statute at the date of his matricula- 
tion is given with the date of his degree from the professional 
school. The method of licensing the candidate is given under the 
heading " Examinations," figures indicating the number of trials : 
(Ex) the full examination; (Px) partial; (Fx) final. The column 
headed " Month " gives the month in which the candidate was ex- 
amined: J, January; F, February; M, May; Je, June; S, Septem- 
ber ; O, October. Under the heading " Minimum standing " is 
given the lowest standing attained in (A) anatomy; (C) chemistry; 
(D) diagnosis; (H) hygiene and sanitation; (H dental tables) 
histology; (O) obstetrics and gynecology; (O) operative dentistry; 
(Pa) pathology and bacteriology; (P) physiology; (Dp) prosthetic 
dentistry; (S) surgery, or (T) therapeutics and materia medica. 
An average of the standings attained in all subjects taken is given 
under the letters F, failed; P, passed, and H, honors. No appli- 
cant passes the examination whose standing falls below 75 per 
cent. In medicine, honors are given to students having 90 per cent 
or above in all of the required subjects ; in dentistry and veterinary 
medicine, honors are given to students having 90 per cent in three 
fourths of the required subjects. 

September 1, 1891, the medical statute required all persons to 
be licensed by the Regents unless previously registered and legally 
authorized, and subsequent statutes exacted the same of dentists 
and veterinarians. There are six methods of admission to medical 
practice in the State arising from the advancing requirements of 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 359 

the medical practice act: (i) license on examination Ex; (2) by 
indorsement of license, IL (applicants examined and licensed by 
other state boards registered by the Regents as maintaining stand- 
ards not Ipwer than those provided by the statute) ; (3) by indorse- 
ment for eminence and authority, EA (the Commissioner on ap- 
proval of the Regents may indorse a license or diploma of a phy- 
sician that has reached a position of conceded eminence and author- 
ity in his profession) ; (4) by indorsement of diploma, ID (appli- 
cants that matriculated in a New York State medical school before 
June 5, 1890 and that received the degree from a registered medical 
school before August 1, 1895) ; (5) on recommendation of the State 
Board of Medical Examiners, Rec (to make valid imperfect regis- 
trations) ; (6) indorsement of a certificate, Ct (for registry in 
another county if such certificate clearly shows that the original 
registration was of an authority issued under seal by the Regents 
or if such certificate itself was indorsed by the Regents. 



3<5o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Fhyiiciana licensed at examination*, Aug. i 



ConmiT. William F. 
Cook., Arthur Q ... 
Dnk.. H.rryH... 



™5£lii™ 



Girlie"- FmdtrlckJ. 



n.HnryB... 
ipio, William 3 



Enim«, ClurlM V... 

lEllert. EUta 

[rlly. CturlaJ.. .. 
KnlcltH. Fmbrldt L 

rids, Arthur 

rtillUt ddy.J Bn .«n 



Neuendorf, Fr.nl U 
Nowllrt d™ 7 J .. 

N.Jm. D.vldC 

P*lw.N>UB 



Putt, Mima W 

Pml, R.lpllR 

Qnlnl.n. F'miwUH... 
R.flwly. WUItamF.. 

Ralniy, lobn 1 

RMbb'.m. Wllll.m R 



Uwbiini, WlllnrdT. 
Rm.ll.dif.iurL... 
flchlf lernwh« Jjcott 6. 

Swo.EmflJ 

Bbwr, Clwrli* E 

8nwr.Pr.nkS . 

SUSord.PotrlcltE.... 
V*i>thu, Frodwlrk R 
WiUrbun, WilUtH. 
V7.U., Arthur E 



4a Elm «.. AJb.ni, «. Y 

Wemtoim NY 



JS8 N. Pwrt it., Albany. N. ¥. 
Hold KUswwl, JnWnwi, N. V. 

■ .nrt., Alntny. N. Y . 

N. Y. . 



480 Hud*. 

Norlh Adam*, Hid 

I Cilntranq, Albany, N. Y . 

r'ditot, H.ap... i:u™. N. Y... 

r, iU.. Troy. hi. Y. 

KullHiva..lLLH. 

304 lUmlltm ».. Alhur, N. 
IfobnN ¥ 



347Hiid»n.T.. Albujiy N. Y. 

Sbwtdnn •». Troy. N.Y 

434 E.S4h.L. Brooklyn. N.Y.. 



afl Elm it . Cortbir.il if. Y 
305Cornma.it. Troy N. ' 

oH,r,«l.dy. N. Y 

40 Cnndillit.. GlmiF.' 



Smlopi Springs, N. Y.. 



4 Chatm* M.. Albuy. S 



y. S. Y. . . 



•..r.f.d:6.. 



38 Dlvlikin «t., CnUkill, N. Y.. 

(lie™ r'ulbi. N. Y 

i21l Brondmj. Ksw'--- " ' 
31J Fnnrth it, Troy, n 

O.iwiorurta.N.'Y " 

Obwt. Coi. «., N. Y 

48 Fourth «.. Dtpoilt. R. T. . . 

Ru,i™h. r .s.y. 

lotp.. Troy, N. Y. . 

MmN. X. 

N. Y. C 

-*. N. Y . 
NY... 



»., Uolp.Ula, N 
tr tv.. Albmiy, N. 



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F. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



361 



Physicians licensed at examination*, Aug. 1, loos-July 31, 1909 (eonlinutd) 

Group 1, New York scnools: (roup 3. schools in other stales; croup 3, tcbool* In 

foreign countries 



AJlee. Theodore H . 
Altai, Freostc 4. 

Ank&jiiii' ".':. 

kyn*. i»—i R . 

Bertw. ft Ulu H 
Ben.HL, Nnhi-trl 
Be menr. Oeon I 
Be-ton. ■»» K 
Bak Abrthem ... 
Bloo*. AM. P 
B .. II v - 

Bnd>h». *.:jm.. U 
Er « II Bmltl . . 
RtowiieU. Enrett 

BrjrkhMDn. RjOpk I 
B .ItU). Ewntb 



Comiwmlo. Jobs II 



Ei-lom-L.y-Ai -i 
EhnftKb. 9»a>.iil 
Enu. Ednrd Ft 



Enuu. Jotm iiun 



eta. Cewn U 
j. Relpe P . 



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Q rsfB> rs> Lo-pk . . , 
Bile. PnnT if 
BuTl*ct».J«mcaT 
Rolen DwublR. ! 



Slorii Hot. HotjL, Wlb «. * IOUj 



ll« tin *.. BnoUn, N Y 

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3WE ndN.4 Y. C ........ 

N Mi n ■..-■■■! N. J .... 

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V C 



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•uv :.-. ■. N' V . ... 

!E 7Mrt.rf Y C ... . 

*'.d.-<m» i, * iuth it. N. Y. C 

MM Belmont »>-N Y C... . 

17ft Mtb«.N Y.C 

l#nei ntw Hao.N J......... 

60* f. Iftfeb^.S YC 

Ill « »l«n S Y.C . 

2*8* iitb «.. N. Y C . 

<*• ■••■«« «. ( i 

Renew, ft. Y. ,. 

Manet**. N J. . 

;•-.-. Cv. H P. D. I, en « 
ft"iliuni Hebbiu 

atJ«5h t |loro.Yo"W».N V 

•JSE-Ssih^N Y C 

183A>tn.*r..t. Y.C 

Henbel. Sum Bom.. Weide li 

M i r.-L.r;.:.iwi,i-.r.Nv 

KK tmhet.N Y. C 

IU ttemon et. K. Y.C 

HMW loHtil N. Y. C . .... 
521 rla-.le**ri Rock»«j> IWt. 

H. 1 . ... 

IBD Rjchooed roed. TompBo. 

fine. sTV . 



T..Mit* Mom , T-.M.V. N V 
U..U,, f*i- 11/,. v Va. 

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79C 
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76P 
840 

76C 
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80C 

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362 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. I, 1908-July 31, 1909 (continued) 



SEW TORE SCHOOLS ((WSmed) 

W »■!> n.. N. Y C 

Omod ».. gantog •■■■■■ 



Knapp. Robert P. 
Kraora, Fletcher I. 
KudUeh, Huii E. . 

Lancer, John J 

-Uniworthj. H. T. 



IfcCartby. Clarice A. . 



U>Ltm.C. Stlfloid. 

He Nulty. Edsitd T. 
Mayer. f-». 

Filler, Hjjjjjin R. . , . 



:l,CarlR. 
Monroe, Otho L. .... 
■cat, Fnnek W. jr. 
Worrit Dudley H.... 

■ott,WilterW 

"afford. Howard?... 
Pardee, Harold E.B 
PHtEdMrdi A . . . . 



Phelps, (louiorneiir'l 
Pblppi, Ha-srd 11. . 

Popper, Joeepb 

Porter, Charts H. jr 

Quimi.CiMlwM... 
Ralnaford. Iiwrrnf* 



BcLile, Hilton 

BlbbsL Armln J 

Spalding, Alfred M.. 
Bt*i»t,BUr.leyE.... 
Stlebellni Alfred H.. 

Button. Waller 3 

B™m, Arthur W 

Te Gumlnklq, Wllilam. 
Tbd Brook, Gin. J.... 
VauKhadobnC... 

Vine 11 je, Robert M... 



12 WublDitai pL, East Orange. 



1S3 W. 2lit it , K Y.C 

100 Broad it. Slarjloo. N. V . 
1333 VatUoUn-H Y.C . 

34B v. s;ib n. s. V. C 



HudaooHl Hoap N T. C 
254 A a. Kent it, . F. Ora-pffl.N , 
22 E. 13013 it, N Y.C 
N. Y. Puii Grid. Bon*. 303 F 2 

it, N Y.C . . . 
St Vlner.fi Bow, 1» f. 1 



at, H. Y. C. 

Bi •.'. k "i. 

41 i'ti.'Beook1l».n.Y. 

lii .lOOihii, * Hidbor. 

44 nr.l':.-ilr.! 

a . 13<Mb is. i L. 

N. fc, 7 W. ifjtli 

40 L, BrooUn. N. 

181 V Hilh it. K Y C 
1MW Ulmt.S Y.C. 
I38Qlr.Mi.it. rhwalyn. K ¥ 
74W.«iihiV. N. Y C 



112 E. BttH n. N V C 



Lebanon lion. . S'. Y. C 
Gen'! Htm. Hon*. I W, lot 

lioki'.. *i..l W il: 
RoatnUt Horra . W oOtb it.N Y C 
Preab.tefUn Hon... Hadauo *», * 

7CUU..H. V C 

Beller.e flap.. N. Y.C. ... 
97 Culumbu UMfbU. Brooklyn, 



■ntttu Hi 

S. Y. C 



11 W. llotbM.. N Y.C 



128 W. 1131b n,. N. Y.C . . 
Genoa.. Hoin.. Buflilo, N. Y 
413 V Hotbtt N Y C . . . 

7SW. 183d it.. K. Y.C 

250 Bts m ]„:■ iL,: ; fit. S Y 
Roo«<ti '■»; w Nit n,.* Y (' 
Rt™e«!l Bon i, W G0tHK..KYC 
81 ttbit-K. YC 



Pmbnertan H.»;.. "Oil. il A 
34 0rin,e.cVpiir,N.Y.C! 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



363 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. 1, 1908 July 31, 1909 (continued) 
Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools In other stales: group 3, schools in 



7 J Sfciliul 



Wr^drldsB, JslMS C. 

WurtbDHiii, John W. 



WsIUim, John W 131 Huptlns t-„ Aital». L. I. 

Wsxd, lisik H 129 W. Mth it. N. Y. C 

Kmhr.Hury M W. 127th st, N. Y. C 



281 V. 127th ■L-N.Y.O. 
n»Flr>t«.,N.Y.C... 
senUr, JisoW CsUw 



Andsrson, VlrtoVw. 
Arnold. Edimrd A.. 
Aitsll. CUrton H... 



fflr, (tors T. 

n, SUM f. . . 



Brtfllfc John E 

Bmltnwn, Chjiles.. . 
Budlnikm, Hmrold P. 



Cobsn, Hanrr I 

Dum, UuprMi. . 
Dennhton. Frank... 
Do.rdls,Ed.«d.... 

Diidfey, Helen 

Durand. Albert C. 



ta I. . . 

Mdjtdn, Beracrd... 
FnrJtUi). Albert V. . . 
Friedman. JetaeD... 
GWIlle, William E.. 
Goldstein, WUIism... 

Uoi.ld, Lei-tsA 

Gnihsn, J" 1 - " 



Qrsvst, Osylord W.. 



Holtim, WidleT B.... 
Hopkins, Rtcbird T, . 
HowelirwillliinL... 

Isq-ilth. John H 

Jublonn. Benjamin. .. 
Jptobowlti, Adolnh. . 
KlDDi Mai. ........ 



LaciTock. Edwin . . . 

Us, WLUlamF 

Llthtsaslslu, Pstey U. 



L»n m»iM..N. Y.C .... 
si E 7U) it . Onto: N Y 
103?i»teiv. [ <rc..i 1 iy ■• V 
921 V. Stair it . lUuc*. N Y. 
Mniibs.tta.il Suits Hasp. Wards Is . 



171 V 



:i".n 



.Y.C 

V.H. Y.C 



211311 iMiVii'i.c. 

Intense. N Y 

Hetli ian- iliS3.BrooUrn.N-' 
12 P1--S n . Bnshncnton. S Y 
[Wf Itstn et-.Tort Plsio. H. Y 
1384 Clnioi«..N. Y.C ... . 
Bellov . I! M p . 2tU. rt. 4 • 

N. Y.C 
B4E.MfaN.jt. Y. C . 

17D (■- '. st. y :■:■•■ i 

831 3ssdfofd .... Fl ,ihuu 

leRov. 8 Y 

127 tkrrteo-. a. . BrooHsn. N. Y. 
185A Vwpoo s. . Briri ,t. N v 
B3RE (Kbit. N Y.C .. .. 
lBIA.tr sB.S.Y.C. ... 

llSldst. N. Y.C 

Hsekettso.-r. N.J 

N. Y !■« I,r-d Hoso.N Y 
St Vi-t-i. Hosp.. M7 W. : 

st..N. Y C 

181! LeDr.glon si.. N. Y.C... 
87 Alenndsr n. . Rocnuwr . N Y 
Sta E. lHIb sL. N. Y.C. 



364 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Phyririani licensed at Examination*, Aug. 



1908-July 31, 1909 (continued) 
it her Mate*; (roup 3, school* In 



kb Costa, Carl E... 
Mmk.EdvudH... 
Mutlii, Arthur C. . . 

Martin, Arthur H... 

lUrtln, Kabal A.... 
MstUrr. W.ltrr L.. 



Ratnoff, llyraan L. . . 

Jtaddlnt a«ln J. V 

Kallly, Daniel R 

Rtln, Leopold 

Roohu. /amen P.... 
Rulbou Elbert T. if. 
Sacco, Anthony G..,. 

SohlfamaTL, bil 

Schnrr , Harmnn E . . . 
ctonla>KiLL , aumim A 
Simpson, Raubea S, , 

Smttt "» ■*- ■ 

sa: 



TonsUiwTllb. N. Y 

210 E. OOtb it.. N. Y. C 



Marter, Jim 
win, John 8. . . 

Weber. Sato 

Wlltord. Luru If 
Wilson, M., 0. . 
Wolf. Chaffee.,.. 
Wolfl, Solon C... 
Yum, Willi™. . . 

Bdtetti Midlai CiOtn 
AbnmowtU, Benjamin "" *»--'-■■■-' -• 
CnnUa. Paul ™ 



MB E. *to it.. KenUnslon, Brook' 
lyn.N.Y 

HempeKed. N. Y 

4*8 «b«t7 Brooklyn. N. Y 

Barton City Hasp.. Hnrrleon it. 
S, E.. Botlon. Hae). 



157Robli 

418 Front it., Buflulo, 
Catalill. N. Y. 






uvdt, Roeklend to.. N . Y. . 



s"V?c 

nntoo A'. Hasp.. Brooklyn .N.Y. 



t.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y... 



187 B._ 

5» Sutter 

Santos* Bprlnaa, 

lSlE.»dtt,N. 

1 1* 8. Tlh •.., Loni Branch, N. J 

118 Oretord it, H.V C 

UHhet.N." " 



BtlitTue Hup, it 
WW.lMiiit.N.Y.C.. 

t!t„. 



Fins. SlU 
Fried, H< 



14H Orchard it, N. Y.C 

108& LMlnjtwi av, N. Y. 

J23 E. 28th it, N. Y. C 

Scbroon River, fj. Y. 

SIB Broom at, N. Y.C... . 

Ml Buebwlck »Y- Brooklyn, N. Y 



(nun, Jimp 



. TOE. 117th it, K. Y.C... 
. 88 E. 113th it, N. Y. C ... 
" "2ds».,H.Y.C... 



Tioklyn.'^Y. 



T»nnr,ih,Vlcior.... 



1B2 E. S~Lhit, N. Y.C... 



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Bono. 





Jl 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



365 



Physician* licensed at examinations, Aug. 1, 1908-July 31, 1909 (1 

Group t, New York schools: group 2, echools In Other mites; croup 3, 



Etinta. Williua M... 

Fl««. P.[n*l J 

Qancr. Frank R,... 
Goldblatl. Lo»H L. . 

Qrlmlw, Jobn G. I.. 
Qnmui. Vnt... 
Idndwoui. Hattf.. 

<W*»^»lH.... 

NitWikj. Lu'-k 



4 Joapo • Hom.. PtohiiIsdm. K. 1 



S33F. Ill it.N V i" . 



i«v i*«i cm* U«tJ 



AltW Uvnon T. . 
Bull. CSurb»B .A.... 
Bttomkl. Pn-il E . . 
Brawn* WnldtmnrT. 
Browwll. aiffofd W.. 



Colin, Ow. . 

Colli™. Jim* J 

Con oil j, Jownh B.,.. 

Difk,ThonuO. ... 
deUmW., FWroJ. 

D. Sunclk. Nlcbolr. i 



Don nail*. William J. A. 
D'Orontlo, Joseph B. 
Doutkfc Willie. C... 



Fm.II*. Kmum P.. 



Omy. Robert H... 



Jackson, Jarocnt M. . 



WiS!Hi.S™..yo. ». ¥ 

StOUMfl'tt Hotp. Buib.itk 
Br-.i,. N ¥ 



lit Cod Ho».B™t»o. N. ¥ 



L I. Coll Hen.. Brooklrr. f. V 
IHIWr ti.BmoUiO* ¥ 
390 Heron «W. RrokJ™. N. V 
26* Jfflonon «.. DronUrc. N ¥ 



» USrtk si, Ricbmo 



Workba-a Hap. RtMk-tu, I 



nuinn. Roto. . bVooklra, V. 
311 Conns ek. bnoUia M, Y 
130 K. Su. rt, S. V t. ., 





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366 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. i, 1908- July 31, 1909 (continued) 
Group 1. New York schools; (roup 2 schools In other states; aroup 3, schools In 



JuuUMn Mayer. 
J.coby, Mai. . 

Kmp, David H 



HEW YORE SCHOOLS 

Ut Idaad Ctttf B-rUd («irfi»B*0 

f~i-.. :.. . . k. 8. Y. 



Klepptr. Junia 1 

Kmlfc, M. Main. 

Lwnbnrdl, Herbert H 

LeTlno. Isldor. 

LavlUn, Hlchul 

Lawk. Slioiromt L. . . 

Lupo, Slldutl G 

Lynch. TboOM A. .... 
McF.reotj, Chafhi L , 
McOdnj.Wlllltn.H.. 
McltJl.cOwrraA.. 
IboVi. LlboHumF.. 

BKttau, Jirns. E 

HsU. Philip B 



Z23Usraonii>.BmoU*i.!t.Y 
7»K W.H.N. V.C 
1217 P tun. «... Bnwkljn. N V 
2(« SrbaioHluxT, ft- B air>, N V 
M WlUi.m. 1. . Dmakly*. -i . Y 
ITt ■VVOBt s.., RVooUyp, N Y 
Cilli;.. ..■■ rj*. tli.N V 

sw w mm 11 s y.c 

B7t Onion «.. Bmnilyn. N* Y 
»7-n.i. «™.,r.V V 
11-J ttw.Tmad.nr. V.C 
207 Q-. -.ei it. Hmoaltn. S. V.. 
63 Pa/l .... K ((rings. N J 
178 More™.. lMjtti)-».N Y 



« Arlloltoo ».„ Jera-i OlJ. V J 



BP.Ji«knt..Bmikl,-..S''V 



» Fb^. M Y, ft P. D. I , 

Unntlr.... Brooklyn. N.Y . 
rou-tbit.. Brooklyn. S. Y 



n. Humid... 



Pabat.Ch«rl*«F... 
Pace, QeorieD.,.. 
pMlm.sndr.wD. 
Pirk.DKtd.V7.... 

Poion. Louh 

Reaamsn, Irving I. 

Roach. CMs F 

Rodeman, Wabmn F. I. 
RoBmthil.Bonjnmin.. 

RoHBtlul. Udor 

Rata, William I. 



331 E (Mb*. M. Y C 

1117 MarBa'tsr. a. . arni.yn. V 1 
.102 !■•. ;»m« pi . I.rx. ,i. s Y 
334 Dam'.-... Brook; in.N Y. 
32HK Ti rt.N. Y.C . . . . 

31 i.. 12 iml. N. Y C 

102* .'npm « . NYC 
2S7li«w. ik.brooklr.. N Y 
580 Jj ■r-t.l.Br-.lV..', V 
188» «.-djon »t_ N Y.C. . . 

55Seomdi..N Y.C. 

218 E. 37IB at. N Y C 

T7I"i, a. Smtk. B. J 

301 Rnuitant, N Y.C. 

253 TW, at. NYC 

237u vi'ulJafMa .«, H. V . C 



RoUudsb. Him 
SehuminB, Coil 
Scott, RnbnrtH. 
Serbert, Otlo J . . 
Biutau Juol.. 
SmBay, ["int.. 
Bnilth, FhJlp E. j 
BMW, Louis R. 



248 ffyckufl ii. Brooklyn. K V 



Id at. Brooklyn. S 
.. . .. •■■,u« i 5 

39 Hsrwo at. Nawark, N. J 
!..«,<. S' y C . 



Hjij. 1 



1 
a 

i 

7SP 

SOP 
76C 

76A 
78D 

7SH 
7SP 
7iP 

■im 

7X 
7SP 
78 F 

Jit! 

7SC 
»«: 

75 A 

■m: 

7C 

sw 

TAP 

TOP 

81C 

MP 


I 

F 
P 

P 

P 

P 
P 
.P 

P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
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P 
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P 
P 
P 

P 

P 

P 
P 
P 
F 

F 


8SC 

aoc 

75 A 
7SC 
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SOD 

76P 
K20 

nc 

84C 

soo 

791' 

sio 
r;t; 
7.ip 

7*: 
78C 
75A 

70F 

75P 
TOP 

7"0 
S3A 
7« 

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7.SC 
75H 


P 
P 
P 

P 

P 
P 
P 
P 
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P 
P 
P 
F 
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P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
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F 


ISC 


P 

"P 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



367 



Physician! licensed at examinations, Aug. 1, 1908-July 31, 1909 (continued) 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools In other stales; group 3, schools In 
foreign countries 



NBW TORE SCHOOLS (cnthmi) 
Lt*9 lAnd CoBsji B&pUd (onultiM) 

1883 Bergen rt.. Brooklrn, K. ¥.. 

S30 E. 138th «- N VTc. .. . 

LLColLBos&.Hmolilra.N. Y 

493 Wendo™ i»„ S. Y. C . 

423E.84ttirt.. N. Y.C 

Bjshwlck H»p . It— My .. ".' V 



KlcWdP. 
.... 
Louis W. 



Nac Tcrk B sawpaAfa tiiHal CoSojt «J Hsttflal 

Ayers, Hnrics E 3S1 Madison »v. N. Y. C 

Brrwitor, D..id T. jr. iffiir : 9u«m>3uuu CO- P« 



Daoc, famirj B 

Duoitwarth, Wlllnrd E 
EMtKin, FmiikL... 



Murdoch, Franklin F. 
OhottTOaatca P. jr. . 

Phalli Hukdl 8.'. - 



121 Aabjrj a> Aibur Pwk. S 
823 W. Wit LH.T.C... 
WW.PfcrpontH.KJaB-.oo. N*. ' 

isi b. nwTrt.. n, y.c!T:. 



13 LafirMto pi. Yonkera. H. Y 

E.Omn««.rI.J .-. 

nGnritaasCB.Oreajnt.il. 1 
338 W. Mth sCii' T. C . . '.'.'. 



Bnrnsr. Clrda 

BaBhiasr. CUraica H. . 
BeaUey. Neman P. . . 
Blodpstt. Hlrrj ff.... 
Csnpbsll.EdirinK.ir. 

Oasa. Oearts B 

Chili, Donald 8 



Conwij, DsildL... 
OarnnIL Uon H. 
D**, Edward J.... 

Dunn. Iran. U 

Etuis. Chariaa H. . , 

Qritnr.OulJ 

Olrvln. Howard W.. 
OuldJii, Jne E 



"V-?. 



... Byr»oTW.N. Y. 

B34 a Clinton it, Bjrrnoiiea, N. Y. 

Smyrna, Cbnianno co., N. Y 

§t Joaepli'i Hwp., ProridsnonJLL 

BTtieuie.N. Y 
tjnmiiniN. Y. 

.. Bmcuse, N. Y. 

St Uwrenaa atala Hoap., Osd^ns- 



bia»N.Y.... 
Ooondssn VaH»j, 
101 CoUana pi, Sjtmum, N. Y . . . . 

SnE.8Sest.,N.Y.C 

1M Renwlet pi, Sjraeuas, N. Y... 

Mtooa. N. Y 

(41 N. BeJlnnil.ajTM.ina.N. Y. 
SOt Wnlnut pi, SjranMo, N. Y. . . . 
614 B. Crouna er. Bmeuaa, N. Y. 
Qarman Hap. of B'kljra, Brook- 

JJOflBiO™ nr^ 'sjrsi™ N.' jf .".! 
411 & Cronsa ST, SjTsaaa.'N. Y . . 

































































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NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



PhyaicUai licensed at 

Group 1, New York i 



I0«»-Tllly 31, 1909 (continued) 

1: (roup 3, »cboolB in 



IfKW YORK SCHOOLS (mmmH 

Broom Vntowtit*. cam 4 KWkw {mdM 
3. W«i»ii 14,, ByreruM, N. 



KlnijCn ni Uoro. Blijr. S V 
5H8Cn>nii>.llpi-J»S V. 
611 E ItoiBKtt JW ». N V 



St L t» Hotp.. I'Uex N Y 
BE l« ■«.. fernim. N Y 
Si Jmm* 1 Bom-. Smc- •>. S 
SOB Mam .1. Hor-dl. N V 
AraovOtdw Hoto . 
A it - Ot» " 



.N™?' 



, ,N* V 



Fr.nMort.SV 

121 Hk-< A . OpKua. N Y .. 
308 UHne. •< . S»tm w. N Y 
lltN y.i-rt..N,..rk.N ) 
Ml t Wlb.t.N. Y C . - 
34 N Cb.rcb.i | CortUoc-.S Y 



N. Y 



34t fV YT ■ r H . Bl 



'■»».8ftttl« 



Unhurt* and 
Atkernuno, Edwnrd 
«AU.n,Ir»A 

*pfX^. Sidor..'.: 

A.irl.nder, Unrrto. . 

fodtr, IhTUt 

Bil.m' Ik, Horaon I 
Banal. Hwiry A.... 
BaUta, Ftukmfo. . , 
fB«(Ut. Willi™ J.. 
Barknwlt*. Barry. . , 
BsfruWn,rUm.i«l J 



Bnnim. Harwell. . . 
Bnnrx-n. Fnnek F. 
Brill, Abnbom .... 
Brook*. Nntbin Itl P 
BfOirn.Rl.hKd J... 
«B>rk,DirldF.... 
aim. DeWluF.... 
Oole, Cho-tar W.... 
ColtM. StdnarJ.... 
Oonnnlly, Philip R . 
Co ■irtan. Henry C... 
D»«teH. ArtbT... . 
«D. Vita, Jons C. 
Dj«. Tbonuu C. . . . 



,,..11* To-rpkM 

■ loum.. V Y 



SI E 1: u r. s .. . 

JlF«llt*d....C.r*fJd. S. J ... 
El In -in Ow. How. Diuboth, 



ChiuloiUi»n N H. 

67T.ibruN.wr.. N J . . 
W«it™..ilk. 9 Lin- n> N Y 
100 R r*wi tt. Brook: r>v S Y 
Brwklyi Hap . RronUrv K. Y 



. rW.Pu,.S. - 

City ll-aj, . Mvfr'Ji U. S. Y 0. 

US' IWil.N Y.C.. 

SW ?(*1"!d-« « ' Or»rJ.N-J 
38 0""«».l "rank lyn. S. Y 
31SU l-tl r.. V V .' 



> De4TV (rum UnlnnltT of Hw City if Nl> York, 
e Dtgm from BcDevue Hwptttl Btdial CoJ*s»- 



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S10 
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76P 
780 
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76A 

75C 
7SC 
75C 
780 
8SH 

80C 

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S0O 

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75F 

780 
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SIXTH ANNUAL REFOHT 



369 



Physician" licensed at examinations, Aug. 

Group 1, New York school*; group 2, schools In otht 

foreign countries 



BHW TORS SCHOOLS (MlM 
tit, mi BrfUne B-ftht, JfdiNl C*B#* (mfi) 

■lid, Kibun.... 2M1 Finl.t.N.Y.C. 

Htrry B 3hlwinnlvfy.Pt. 

ifftSoloniimE. Bin A. 1 ton. S. Y 

f.AbrEhiBi 11 fi.un-. «.. Hertford. It 

>,HiiH N. V Pott drill Hmp_ 20tb «t « 



igoa-July 31, 1909 (ooniinued) 
■roup 3. schools In 



Frtadal, Hum... 
Frtedmin, Jwph 
FruUnlght, Henry 



&ii>£ekl,8t«pW 
Grin*, Edwin A.... 



drew, Unpaid 

Hufwd, JohaH.. 



Hirwffl«. E^ (me Q 
•Hoffman, Charlee 

H«bnu.M>... 

•UilbHHw>0.. 

Iw.. Edwin I. . . . . . 

Keller. Cluuta 11. P 



KllntJeblrJ. .... 
Knppe]. Lupoid A 
KoniB, Benjamin.. 

Kramer. Benjamin. 
LeJborki. Martin J 
Utrv.JoehniH.. 
Lanetihj, Darid. . . 
Lesnon, FnmcIaJ. 

Urine. Bemud 

UudcnBld, *"en tworth 

8 

Mrfllrerln, Edward : 

Uuiuk.'ibrito I. '. 
Muor..llorr*A.... 

liny.EdwirdJ 

He n dei, Albert A... 
Mnitr, Raymond A . 



. -.. R Y. C 



53 

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JerK%fK,H™p.;rrefir!Iv.> .' 
«4 Oenene « . l'u». N. Y 

Bellre r)J«p.,N Y.C . 

Ittt 1Mb ».. Newark. S. J 

285Se«nibii.S V C-. 

HUE. Fo rtl>et.N Y.C 

21 Attor-.e, eL. N. Y C. . . 
Jeraey Lily Hnrp.. Jersey City. N* J 
Beth In* Hoep 17 /eflenon tt. 

H.V C 

217 F- Thin! rt.. N Y.C. 

209 Rtntun .... to-kln. K V 

I79L 109tSit..M.Y.C. . . 

664 W ieSth.U.N. Y.C 

SI John. Riwiade iJoep. York 

tw.N. Y 

'lOAUorw, ec.NY.C-. - 

2SUn; *S :••• !Y.:e, It.S Y 



338 1" lHtmi.il VC 



» Btnry tt.. K. Y. C 

774 q i-.fr «.. rWiWy-,. M Y . 
of the Clly of New York. 



i 

70C 
78D 

800 


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77P 

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90A 

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700 
82P 
80H 
790 

75C 

78 P 

75C 
78P 
SflH 

85A 
70 A 
80 It 

79P 

81H 
810 

soc 

S4P 

7SA 

7flA 

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7SC 
85A 
7SP 

81 H 

75D 
83P 
82C 


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m Delta™. HoepiUI Kadloal College. 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. I, igoS-July 31, 1909 (continued) 

Group 1, New York schools; croup 2, schools In other states; group 3, schools In 



Pennock. Willi™ J.. 

Philips. Jacob 

PhtrL Afutta 

Pomwoy, Juiin L 



RetUxn, Boraiid., 

Sacks. Rtnuunl 

Suds.OrdL 



Tupper. Gchtie B. 
rVan Zlle, Bandit 
Wnms-.Johnff... 

Wuhnltwr, Frcdtr: 
W.IL W»ltar D. . . . 
WtfcB. I/)IJ|» 



. Brood Brook. Ct ;; 



NewsrtN.J... 

J Prendei'giuit 1 



Wrm, Ranhwl J.. 

Zjiblsx, Benjamin M 
Zlieherraiii. Divld. 



Brown, Stanley Joh 
BruiuUn, Fninlt E. 
Cctola, Anthony J. . 

Oark. James J 

Cohen, JulluaY... 
Cooper. David G... 
□ostello. Cbuwir V 
Crelghton. Banua! S 
Dot!, Warren Z. ... 
Duffy. Benedict J.. 
Ends, Edward H 



Fees, Knyicond C 

FUber. Soy C , 

Flood. Frances: UjibeL 



358 E. Seventh at., N. Y.C... 



„ „,Jn»n st., Bellows Fills, Vt., 

Haywood. N.J 

?03E. Fourth ii_,N. Y.C 



Arthur at., N. Y.C 

Blolni«..Pat*rBon.N.J.... 

S2 8t Mirk's pi, N. Y. C 

"~H*T.,HHih*tbn!,N.Y.C. . 

uihon »t.. N. Y. C 

.VBrookijn.'N.'Y.'.;; 
,'n."V.'c. '.".*.' '.'.'.'... 

iUM.'V."0.". '.'.'.'. 

«..„N.Y.C 

it., Brooklyn. N.Y... 
)la road, Wuhlniton, 



L.rJ.Y.C 

i. Honp-. Paleisnn, N.J. 
iv., Rochester. N.Y. . 

■ iiOTyTc 

Hudaon ST., WeehnwEc 
HelthU,N.J 

_J1 vTlim *., N. Y. C 

192 8. 4th st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

""■urUtit.H.Y.C. 

/ Buffalo, Mediai DjpirHn.nl 



. i'i'i W. Furry st„ BuBalo. N. Y. 
*5 Front bt., Buffalo. N. Y. . . . 
WN.Thltdft.,01o^.N. Y... 
-- ■ i.., Buffalo. H.Y... 



Uudaonst', IS i 



• Student at 1 



On. Deaconon Hasp., Buffalo, ff. 

42 Lawrence pi.. Buffalo, K. Y . 

192 Allen it.. Buffalo, N. Y 

illy of tU City ol Now York. 
i* Hosplul Madid Collsn. 



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MeDmje HosjsW UrdJnKMfcfn- 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Physician*, licensed at examinations, Aug. i 

Group 1. New York schools; group 2, schools Ir 



iooa-Jnly 31, 1909 (continued) 

ither states; group 3, schoolo In 



I I 






Forbss-OUbertdeL... 
Olmbront. Jonah P.. . 

Qow. EdnrdC 

Greene, ChrtatliBiU.. 
Griffin, Clwa 


KendaO.N. Y. . 

247iror.:a. . RcrUo. N Y . 
Emn/geiey Hoar . B1B.1I >. S V 
7SBentl-.gHW.HBA.. ■-* Y 
345V .-en, .r.BJtilo. S Y 
HMLb.rj.S Y 




Hevd. Charls G 

Holmes,' AUan W. .".'.'. 

Horn, Wilton 

Hughes, Ralph R 

HummelL Harry C... 

Hurley. Jobs ph fc 

Jacobaor.. Benjamin . . . 


483 IteU-are a. . Buffalo. N Y . 

D;..b»iortue. N. V... 

lOuHatat. B.ffelo. N Y. 
Substation 7. rV.ihasenele. N Y 
707Oes«nts>.B e.l... N Y 
StU^.tUosp.Rorhnur. V Y 
10FSelpea».hV*liee-.rr. N Y . 
138 tied" n B OjIo. S Y 
T« Obn-offlJ *» . B- »>l... N* Y 
S7o Jeff*™ 11.. B ••Jo. \ V 
U2 SI .j.*«.rl,ej... N Y 
MO * I i-lon St. Fjidi-b, N Y 
1360 Proednay, B *- ■ 3, Y 
215 A-1.ll-.1rw H. P.lo. "i V 
03U-.eiwlti.ll.MD. M * 
590K™-1«v. B fljln. N Y 
001 N DliWss *, Huff-Jo, N. Y 
Erie Co lioej, Boffs.o, N V 
444 Pserl n. rklblo. NY.. 
38flKsdlaonst.U.fl.:., N Y 
121 HI- M.. 11. Ovj. N Y ... 
105 Feudist.. Buffalo. N Y 
LSZLtodgsst. Buffalo. N V . . 


Kavlnoky. Na.dlnar... 
Kkckrar. Frank C. . . . 
Lnwler, Arthur V 
McCarthy, (suras P.. 
Machemer. Waltw L 
ktuikell, Nathalie K... 
HUlor. B<tftc4I C 

Beyoolda. OtorlB ff 
Roth«rBuiteT,eW.... 

BayILn, Gcorar J 

Sehrelner, Bernard 1* . . 
Sparry, Frederick E .. . 
aids, August H 


SiiDna, Jama C 


Olsm.N. Y 


Towns, Frank H 

Tracy, Wliljara J 
Wagner, Albert W... 
Walker. Hiram D 


Moses Wa H^u.W SoT>eea.N' 1 
D.irlee.Ysle»fo.N. Y . .. 
Uo-mI »,.H J .pW.3e-.nn.N. Y 
337 High St.. Bu5.lo. NY.. . 

































































































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SCHOOLS in OTHER STATES 

California 

irirernoj of Cdifunia. Medical Dtpartnimt 




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c Degree from Niagara UnrrersHy, Medical Deportment. 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physician! licenwd at examination*, Aug. 1,1908- July 31, 1909 ( continued) 
Group 1, New York schools; (roup 2, schools In other states; group S. schools li 

foreign cr '" 



I I 



|„|. 



Tow (Uml| M . . 

ofuphy, Cbult. C . . I lULtantt.. Brapkbn, N. Y 

Psrkor, John E !20 Column .t.. CWlertoo, S. C. 

Brrak Emll M ChlllWo Fm Hap., Detroit, 

Mich 

Volfcnbtiin. Mendel. .. I Relle*ui Hoop., N. Y. C 

District of Columbia 



ft*, Sum*! 11131 N. it, N. W.. Wsthlnr 

I D.C . 

Gergojwa Pobnwv, StAoel rf Wdicii 



Hsra.10.Ii 
Math™, A 



Lerutun, Lawn 
B«s*I Csflojt at EdicHc 



Jos' Aurov*, CHI™** 



Cum, Coored H . . 

Nn.msn. Mar* 3 ... 



BalT, Ho 1 I , 

Oronr, Orte H 

Locaoood. Benjnmiu F 

Ban, Ransom A 

Bbopberd. Liic* U 
8*lft, Charles L 



foot Otis' Svi paw. Coiosas 
2947 Mlthltan .*., railrato. IB . 
W AnbBf St.. Bmoklyo, 1(. Y . 



Vetial Coitus. Okies* 



1M K.illoi. iv, Rifhestet, N. Y.. 
440 VenHtr Ion ok, Potsrson.N. , 
Coots) Creak. N. Y 



Rtineb *f afloat CeBeji, OUeo* 



(ma rjalaa-iUii. Womm'i Affdiojt CsOoK C 
Emma C....[ 1700 Bromlos*. N.Y.C,,.. 



if o&aj Cottier at (odium, /sdleaeaetir 
(, BdoariD....! RorhoKoi. .1. Y.. i 

House. 



of WbKsomb 
■afoaaJI siitm CoBo» V /kHooo. failonooolli 






•dn wtion walsed under statute. 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. i, 1908-JiiIy 31, 1909 {continued) 

Group 1, New York school*-; group 2, schools Id othsr stales; sroup 3, school* In 

foreign countries 



I***, Edwin r..;: 

Union. KannathK. 
Raad.Rnlpo.6 



Hnlal Aberdeen. N. Y. C . .. 

BS8 Uadlaon it., Brooklyn, N. ¥.. 

U. Amboa, N. J. BoiMO 

JM E. Poi.rO. it. N. Y. C 

]03Hmrjil., M. Y.C 

Maryland Ga. Hoap., Baklmor. 



n. N. Y. . 



»o.N.Y.. 



Wbltwmb, KorrbB... Walton, N. S. 



T»'HmiUd'«fc.'Hobokii t 'N. J 

41BE. Third «.. NY. C 

W Cbnnnlnf it., K<w London, CI 
Fmnlhir Un.11. Mala * Riley it. 

Bl.!I«Io, N.Y 

Hotel ChunJuu, N. Y. ft 



tlr.Dley.Cl 
* Bora, CI 



City How., luMH I".. N Y 
2443 E. 1e it.. Baltimore. Md 

11 E. 70th *.. N. Y. C 

Rnquetta Lnli, Hamilton «... N.Y 



Orient*/ M Virvtaid, SnW 4 Af efciM. Salli*u 



Howard, Roberta ... 118 Leilniton .t„ S. Y. C 

Pattonon. Cbarlee E. . Loom. Sanitarium, Liberty. N. Y. 
Blna. WIULim W | Durham. N.Y 

BdHtm Ifniinf nt» SoW 0/ KaatcwH 

Xahn. Paul I Long Brnnnh, N. J 

Sllbereteln. Samuel....] HI Broadway, Palereon, N. J 

Vt'iKta'a Medial CetfoM a/ AoUiMer f 

FndW. AmeUe M. . . . | 1 Ml Madam »t.. H. Y. C 

tlon nrred undo statute. 



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NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. i 

Croup 1, New York schools; (roup 2, schools In 
foreign coiin 



1 908- July 31, 1909 {continued) 
trier stales; group 3, schools In 




.-..4, Archibald St C. 
HcCirthj. John C.... . 



274V.»Hor«i*..J™(,.i 

iagw.i»tbrt.N. vTc 



m Citj Ho*p.. Dona 

MmiorAuiHd Colltgt if Orfeenjtfv BaU* 
8nnurd,HiroklW...| 178eib it. kW.rji, N ' 

Lord,' M1U7 W." ! ! ! ! I 61 Fourth «.'. Troy." S I 

7VM CeOegt Medial -:■.. '..-.. 



Cote, lUlph 
Derter, Roger. 



U«Jth A *'-r:: ■ 
Srrvlre. Skeleton. S 1 
StattHosn.D.nnen-nF.. N 
Kinn 1 .-. Suit Hap, bogs 

Hsredlta. N. ft..." 
Hockvllie Center. L I 



Kino P"i Rtit* Buy. l-'i 
P.rk.N.Y . . .. 



Rob, John Robert. . 



HkbJfU 

DeporlMtnt of Medicine and oWatrv. Afichiaan (,'m 

BennetLSlephenH...] Greenirood.N. Y .... 

Edmund*. Henry B, .. SlnelAlrMIIe. N V . 

P«le,Gn«D New EejoW.d Haeii tur tt"..c 

Cl.Udnw. limit* «.. II 



HtSSOnri 

31 1<wK i/nlwriUy &fa>al of if eficine 
Friedman. Theodore... | 1780 HudUon iv.. N. Y.C . . 



Amriam o'cAooJ 0/ OtfeoBtUAy, fflrtirigt 

Bingham, Leak) J j MIOEIiln nv.. Plttnbi.ro, Fa.,.. 

Cocbdl,Imn 901 Delaware *v., Wik 31™, [; 

Le-Bgood.RobertR... 118 8. Kd |L FrJkrMpbl*. F». . 
Swunt, luiw W Booslck, N. Y 



OarbtwJA Medial 



ffiff* 



Nolu, John H | 216 E. 78th it, N. Y. C. . . . 

J FlelimlnEn education waived under ititute. 
t Sevan regular lubjeetsz. 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Phyiidast licensed at examinations, Aug. i, 1908-Jnly ; 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2. schools in other states; kt< 



Ohio 

Oaimi HmutyaMc Jf adtcaa CoHtj. 
Edgar I f W. Panda it^ Buffalo, N. 



Coflaje of Pbtiiiiau mi Swgeoiu. dndmd 

• "-"Til Department, Ohio V-- 1 - — " ' 

' "W3E.W 

BdKtie Mtdtal /luKIWi, Cindimat i 
Seer/, Chanee W | Alton, H. Y 

Waanrto rf Ctnrimori Mailed Daaitunt 
Wriaht Elisabeth W..| 17 W. lOtrtet, N.Y. C ... 



Lap*, Qurlas P 

WibiVwiuiuiiT'.!! 



Cumberland St. Heap.. Brooklyn. 



Cumberland St Ho-p.. Brooklyn, 



HarrfcHi 

Kim, Li:tl 



HDormui.AJDVn J . , 
Xlcbolla, RobertD.. 

O'Reilly. Han? M. , 
SmltbTlIuT 



ial CsOqi, PhOaidphia 

1700 WJnut jt, PoSladelphlB, Pa. 

Ray at. k Shell™ av.. Jamais. 

N.Y 

Klngo County Hoap., Brooklyn, 



Iphla, Pa. 

___oklyn.N.' 

General Hoap., Faltraoii, N. J . . . 



UnianKini 

Amain. Edward S, . 
Haras 1, Conrad, jr.. . 
Beat. William H. . . . 



Bonn, Albert 

Bndgman.T. Pnneb. 
Brown, Raymond W . 
Cbylon, Join C 



605 D. 6. Uortu bide., Buffak 

N.Y _.... ' 

M Llvinjat™ at., BnwUyn, N. Y. 
Fortvtlle,N.Y.....!7r: 

ifseniru of MstlcHU and Surm 
,| 77B State at, (Schenectady. >," Y. . 

mmiinmla. ilrdiail Dejartmnt, 
PhUaMvhu 

1331 a&ln it, Buffalo, N.Y 

1707 Arch at, Philadelphia. Pa. . 
44 Palmetto it, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 



Cefllrj, Frank H.... 
DeTto. Frederick A.. 
Hsiunu, Maurice T. . 
Hcilcomb. Carloa P. . 
Jones, John F.X... 
Bulllyan, GeurgeF. 

WeHTer, Walter B... 



Manhattan SI 

N.Y 

B77Matypl.,N.Y.C... 

-™ T . "tJJk*. 

N. Y. C... 



320 Lamar at., Weathcrlticd, Tea. . 



207 8. Main at, .... 

ISIS Coastal* at, Philadelphia, Tr> 

Bt Vincent's Hoer.., 11th st. * 7t! 

B...N.Y.C.T 

»J N. Duke st, Lancaster, Pa . . . 



1909 (continued) 



J LICENSE [STAND 





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376 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Physician* licensed at examination*!, Aug. X, 1900-July 31, 1909 (continued) 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2, sthoole In other states; group 3, schools in 
foreign countries 



IPhhuh'i MrJiad Cdltet 0/ Pmnnaoniia. /•tflflrfrfjiAl'a 

Bnastt. khr, t I Cwpwrtown. N. Y 

Jefleru, Fitb. L Bxby'l Hoap., 135 F_ 55th rt.. : 

Y.C. 

ItonUar, Muy E. J IK tt. 79th it.. N. Y. C 



South Carotloa 

Mafiml Onflow if Ui StoW of Sai//A Carolina. CWI»[o* 
Lynih, Staty L I Hoffnun Hose. Bmutwiy * 25ti. 



Teiiiieiiee 

FandrrWi l/nine-.ir*. A/roW Dnxrhtml 
Crlgkr, Lewi, W 1 210 E. Mfc A, H. YYC 

Mitarrjl WdiaJ Dcjmrtmmt, Wttidm Vnutnity. KoiAriB. 



ISarber, Hurry 1 

Bud I niton. Walter I 
Chapman, Arthur W 



OrinnlkWIlUunH.: 
Hibbord, Sum id T.. 

Horer, Oenrge C 

Nlcaoh. Elmod A. . . 
Pie™. Harbert L. . . . 



213 Frank it. Rochatar, N 

FortKent, N. ¥ 

S. Olen, Fnlb, N. Y 



0.C0I 



D*nby.B„tUnd«)..Vt. 

EdsevstiT. N.J 

City Bank bldi., L'tlca, N. Y 

HwmN.T 

" ■ St Hup., Brooklyn. 



K.Y 

Arlington. Vt. . 



Virgli 

ImrfTt 



Mtiial Ccltiet sTTrtrinia, Rl&xumi 



VnittnUy a) Virginia, Mutual Dvartnmt, Charkamill, 
ishn. Alfred 1 203 W. 106th rt, N. Y. C 



Msraiuea (/niwitty, AfrdiaJ Dnvtnsii. AfiiiraiLtn 

a J Buffalo, N. Y7 

SCHOOLS IF FOREIGH COOHTRIES 
AmtrU 

Unittnifj at Vima* 

BoWk, SJonwo I 1333 Fifth iv., N. Y. C 

xi willed under statute. 



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SIXTH ANNUAL REPOST 



Physicians licensed at examinations, Aug. I, 1908-Jttly 31, 1909 ( 

Group 1, New York schools; croup 2, schools In otber stales; croup 3, schools i 
lore I an countries 





ADDRESS 


| 

IS 




ED0CATIOK 




P^ltalnsry 






* 


1 

3 




V 

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iw™w gw 

120 W. 8Mb. St. N. Y. C 

■nift, Munirrct, Qmbte 
Adlrond.c* Cntuen San., Tnideeu 

N. Y. BoitJ 

299 Rider et, HrooUyn, N. Y..... 

Hope.ell Junction, tf.Y 

A. sable Forks. N. Y 

635 W. laStt A, N. Y. G 


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, 


Liwrtmce, Watson A . 
Lwka, Ernest E 


iJebon.N. Y. 

BMW. l3BH.it, N.Y.C 


t 


TWfibi<U. James ft'... 
Tombull, Jobs A 

Ontario Medical Ca 
Baiter. Alice 


«7 W. Mthit. N. Y.C 

Clark's Harbor, Nov* Sootto, Can . . 

mttar Women, Ttnmtt, Oitlaria 
SI Uimia Btal* Hoep., Odi«ie 


t 


Qwu tfsfeareibjSi 
Bradlej, EketU 
Dvjtt. Jamee 
Jonee. taoojird W , . , . 

McCall™. Samuel ... . 

TrMti Miditrii 

Dnia, John F 

Kerr, Henry K 

UnatrtUn of Si. 


W v! if aJidm, (fleaa-on, Onha-is 
tit VLiln St.. JjimsiUirD, N. Y.. . . 

110 E. Mtb it, N. Y. C. 

84 East st.. RoeluMer. N. Y 

37 Queeu it. Niaeara tills, fen. . 

Cc&it, Tannlt, GWte 
1288 Jefferson it., Buffalo, N. Y.. . 
HnmmMd.N. Y 

n'l Cotlsee, it ens-eel, Quebec 


B 

4 
4 

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1 


{7st«r« 
Brij, Hanj A 


By if TWonfo. Culsrlo 
N. Y. State Hep. for Indptent 
TubniJmls, RoTbrmk, R. YT.. 


4 


Glob. William B. 
HieKeoile, Cturlee R. 
UeLatlaa, Wllbert E... 

BjwJI, John D 

FWorla 
Genres, WUllaui R. B. 

tassisl -flan 
Bshspjh Hermaa 

DM 


St John'i Horn, Brooklyn. N. Y. . 
Ntiiotri FslleDm., Onlnrlo. Can . 
Haiibeitan En « Ear Hasp,, 210 

E Mtb it, N. Y. C 

Klnss County Hasp., Qwtoon it.. 

rVooeljT.. N. Y 

iwrt., Coesrj, 0*Hrte 
188#.l!3dst.,M.Y.C. 

rinlsnd 

t/h- i;ni™-Hiv, fftbtashrs 
137E,57tbit, N. Y. C 

lennan* 

wtit*- 0/ Hffi in 


1 
I 


laws', JuUus C 
Urusw. Conittr.tlne.. 


537 Broadway, L. L City, N, Y. . . . 

203 L 141b at, N. Y. C 


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378 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Phyaidana licensed at examination*, Aug. i, 1908-July 31, 1909 (concluded) 

Group 1, New York ichooli; f 



N99 


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Italy 

Vnitrrtiiu of Catania 
on, I ! -■? Union tk. Brooklyn. N Y 





■■•"■.:, of ■.-.-. 


t/» 


- .-:; ' \l,.(l 






Beli.10. V.SI-uit 


IM tal »... Nmvfc S. J . ... 






Cwlbort, FriMnui S 


?.'4 Ttonaaoo it . N. Y.C 


















1. al-.r.!.,. OLkodK A 


Ml '■-•■■ ■•.. Brooklyn. K. V 


kbfici. rracrowo . . 


304 F. l!itbit.N. Y.C 






















Hlo. TmcmoB 


io««CNtaua*, N. V.C.. . . 











Cnixmno/Aiiw 
FUta. FrancsocoE....] 304 E. 1I3MhL,N. Y. C. . 

C»rmil| 4 furia 
Sii^'Fii™™.'.'." | SB W.Bth it. »! Y.* C.'. ! 1 



.Alexander..! 87 E. Sill it, N. Y. C 

/■ipa-ial Psiwriito Si FlaJi™-, .fiif 
ly, Jsnttl H . | 143 iFofry it. Newark, N. J 



BcGrltor. Henry J 



L'niwiift d Abirden 
....] The Ben.iyltr. ST W. 
N.Y.C 



Uniwiilt 4 Efabwsk 
Id K. .1 Slate Cam. In Lunacy, I 1 
I N.Y 



Switzerland 

Vm-nito of fin 

,.| 807 Wffloiniiby w.. Brooklyn, N.Y. 

V %lmtt*_ 4 Zvith 

..] 200 ft. 118th it.. N. Y. C 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Dentists licensed at examinations Aug. 

Group 1, Now York schools; group 2, schools 



u 



HEW YORK SCHOOLS 



Bhun, ChuiM... 

Curtli] Qorirutl* E. 

Da CtmD. Charka A... 

Elfcuria, OtM 

Ooldmmn.Dnrld... 
Gordon. Abraham I 
Gnrteri. MmW.. 



. <37E It 



tCrtl tbwg, Bccjaioln . 



471 Lnci .... N. Y. C 

2BRI/-I .1. SUml rd.Cl 
i-l m**.* Y C 
44 Ht. .» n. N. Y. C . . 
. 1S71 f. lion .. . N. Y C . 
. 6E.lt:n.l.N Y t: . 
WE. 7-.6H.N Y C . 
■■■"(rr,«-_N Y.C.. .- 
H?ibrt, N.Y.C ... 
rrrt-N. Y.C.. . 

401 Onn rt.. Brooklyn. B. Y 

K3J. Hits. S V :: ... 

'. iBia".3oikrt.".*V , C."'"" 
. SO I*t«»«e n . Bnwkljn. N 
Dolor, pi. * *■■:» rt- "--■•". 
n "b. Brooklyn. H. Y ' 

:;«■« sv ' 

Btb it. Brooklyn. » Y 



i JsOo 



Hj7.WLB.-udU.. 

Pierrot., Alfred H. 

Rcaenblura, Jospt 

RothenbettMil'irlctF. 

Runde. AJsui T 

Bobektmnn, Herman N. 
Sehneldtr, Esther. 

Bclmeii, Dsvld . . . . 



th rt., Brooklyn. N 1 
dNno «... N. Y. C 



SE. lulttrt- n Y r 

iia:K-rt.fu..s Y c 

1744 WniM-gton •». N. Y. C... 



nie «... Brooklyn^ N. Y 
klta ... tf. Y. C . . 



H7K Bfiprr. it. ?- ' I ■-. . 
1300 St John • pi. Brooklyn. 



Aitfa. d.tW ».... 

Aach.J*«b 

Berirr, Adolph . . . 
Btmst«ln. Alexin dt 
Blun, Henry 

Boughton, Arthur ] 
Bnwd. David K... 

Browrotan, Srmwel 

Brush, Roarr C 

Biwolen. Frsjdt E _ 

CoSen. Joseph II 288Cheny St., N. Y. C... 

a "Ft WBodiola (bat the rratrtahtton oTUie cnndldnts fallowing ths abbreviation oc 
prior to that plven which fa the turning point for. an adviuiclng requirement 



_.__mTentir..N.Y.C 

. 230 Wh it., N.Y.C 

I M First m„ H. Y. C 



87 Dot™ .» 
II E. 117th rt 



38o 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Dentiati licenaed at examinations! Aug. i, 1908-Jnly 31, 1909 (continued) 

Group 1, New York schools; group 2,scbou]« without the 3t»te 



I] 



S. T. Coll. v DntMr* (e 



((otHumA 
• pi.. Brooklyn 

WCiratH.. CUeuN Y . 
U N ■(..:■■ « s- V C ... 
191 ELSdu.N V C 

11 :-. i:v. t.\ i : 



''■i'W It"** 



lii Hiitin •».. B-ookltr,. N Y 
lt23V»IWi>,N.y.C . . 
M E. 1054b lU. N. ¥. C 



wnt. Sgjrn is. 



MStHuk-.pl u ; ¥ C 



Bmu, Q 



IJmtta. Bokaaa. 
Kditra. Jacob H. . . 

Konopel. Joto *- 

l^int Robert 
LevlL-b. Sam «l . . 
: »•- -Ui Jacob . . 
Li'.^ut. Klow A . 
Loodon. Emu iL 
Luektr. BoBjisus F 



BW.llMn.lt. V c . 



»H Wfllltn it Port Cherts. H. V 



Pgtn. Join L 

K j V: Jobs 

Rlttw. Mil ...... 

Rime km. AbnSRic 
K'Mn 1-iPtl «. ■-■ 
Rowikeuit. Hut; .. 



<H i*>ml •• . Toopklurili*. S 1 



4- T on ;ki .. .. . Brooklyn. N. y 
'.. iM--i.pl.. MY, C . .. 
4M>Trnlo>'.BraaU>o N V 
'"- ' onu-Uijci-i ?■ 1 

. N. Y. C 

I....N.Y C ... 
BC...S.Y.C . . 
. l30W.4HJnu.N- Y.C.. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Dentiatl licensed at (laminations Aug. I, igoS-Tnly 31, 1909 ( continued ) 
Group 1, 'New York Kbooll; group 2. schools without the State 



BmcncL, Bemud 0. 
Bob.un»i r N.tlUD... 
Bto.Hk>, N.Uum H. 



Iteheaor. W.lm- K. 
Walker, Arthur C... 



cf DaUiti (cm, 
10» Serai ' " . NYC 

So E. 7th .k, N V.C 

201 Bemud it. H. V. C . . . 
144 DtUxt*, K.. N V.C... 
92 Hlvrnflon tl, H V C 
11(1 Dbrrty a. . Brook™, N. 
146. L.Hi (to. tt .. NYC 
2117 lleinvc ».. N. Y.C . . 



20 Araoue D. N. V C 



■l*U h. V.C. .".'.'.' 



Black, Harts, W.. 
Eerley. 4 Judd.'.V. 



Kumimuk, Antbonr 



Lewh, Edward 

Idtmtr. Hun £ . . . . 
M> Redmond, Dennis K 
HuwelL, Huhnai L. 



Pieiics, Joaepb P. 
Bmnll. Clurh. H . . 



315 C 

« PmpecttV.ukB.il' I 

78 ft. Ovi-ood pi.. Buffalo, N. V 

Woleort S Y 

89 3. Halo n. Bouc. N. V . . . 

dlJot-..ii..S V 

500 RubM tilde,. Jamaiion. 
N.Y 



N Y 



828 *„:,.. n (..;.N* 
SCutllni Hate, An* Arbor. Hlrb 

44 Chiiai, at. N V.C 

431! N DtftaM *. Buffalo. N. V 



2S7St.»"lhrt.. n..(laij.S V 



lerhijcuirw" at. B I 
UttaHlrH.N.V. 

r«« Vu.N r 



>. N V C (New Tort 
;' H. T. 



District of Columbia 

Oawja Waikinokm I/nii.. Waiknigtm 

She*. James E I 273 ft. Chun mm p!.. Elmlra. N. 1 

Gwuifrv* L'a.w.ifc,. Daniel Drrvtmnt, W/uibtftcn 
GrKfln.Jnhr, J. . I 1 111 Ceritr*l .1., W ,lrh«r.,. Mmj. . 
Hunlehui, Richard J 9 Elk iL. AmaterdMDi, .*. Y 



.1 J8 State «-,Tro,.N.Y... 











































































































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3»2 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Dentists licensed at examinations Aug. i, 1908- July 31, 1909 (continued) 
Group 1, New York schools; group 2, schools without the State 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



BeachjErwin J.. 
Beal, Thomas A.. 
Burgess,James K 
Mason, Edgar P.. 



Small, Percy L 



Maryland 

Baltimore College of Dtntal Svroery 

109 Ridgewood av., Newark, N. J . . 

ClarbiBllh, Pa 

12 W. 46th st, N. Y. G 

Yooker* a?., A Wilbur it, Yonkers, 

N Y 
14 Foster' it, Danbury, Ct . .' ' 



White, William A Phelps, N.Y 



Baltimore Medical College, Dental Department 
Buckley, George J.... 



Samuel George Henry , 



42 R. R. a?., Hooeick Falls, N. Y. . 
156 Ontario st, Cohoes,N.Y 



University o/ Ma\, Dental D 



Bush, Walter Q 
Rosengardt Solomon 



Baltimore 



Malooe, N. 

402 Bradford st, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 



Massachusetts 

Boston Dental CoUego 

(Now Tufts College Dental School) 



Ryder, Franc* A | Blairetown, N. J. 



B r?.°.T u *. D r!*. s ^. B ? , r.. 



TvftsCoU 
Burr, Le Roy E... 
Maaiter, James S. . 



Tt Dental School. Boston 
146 Pine st, Kingston, N. Y. 



118th at, N.YC 



Babcock, Adelbert B 



Michigan 

UnivartityoTMiekigan 
College of Dental Surgery, Ann Arbor 



Burley, Wright J. 
Burns, Elmer F.. 
Moblej, Lewis K. 
O'Neill Walter B. 
Smith, Claude B. . 
Sport, Flora M. . . 



The Hermitage, Broadway A 42d 

Master*, N.Y 

1371 Main st, Buffalo, N. Y 

88 E. 01st st, N. Y. C 

28 Sazton st, Rochester, N. Y. . . . 

190 Lewis st, Geneva, N. Y 

188 E. 80th st, N. Y. C 



Missouri 
Kansas City Dental CoUego 
Schumann, Washing- 
ton E I 1207 Parkas Alameda. Gal. 



Washington Univ. (Missouri Dental College) St Louie 
Cunningham, Peter T..| 35 W. 42d st, N. Y. C 

Western Denial College, Kansas City 



Ohio 

Cincinnati College of Dental Surgery 
Simpkmson, Charles W. I Avenue M A E. 22d st., Brooklyn, 

I N.Y 



Western Reserve University, College of Dentistry, Cleveland 
Hervcy, George E | 851 W. 114th st, N. Y. C 

Pennsylvania 

Medico Chtrurgical College, Denial Dep't, Philadelphia 



Hawley, Francis J. . . 



7147 Frankstown av., Pittsburg, Pa. 



is 



S 



71 
62 

70 

77 

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SI 
57 



82 
83 



81 
82 



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63 



88 
72 



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73 

84 
82 
86 
85 
83 
80 



75 
71 
83 

71 
72 

86 
78 
70 
87 



EDUCATION 



Preliminary 






89 
S88 
89 

O05 
06 
OOfl 
S79 



O05 
Prto 
Ja05 



O02 
O04 



Prto 
96 



87 



S06 
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095 
092 
802 

90 
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60eq 



60pq 
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45eq 



15eq 



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60x 

60x 

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45eq 



60eq 



45pq 
45pq 
45eq 
60pq 



Profes- 
sional 



I 



3 
2 
2 

3 
3 
3 
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3 

3 



3 
3 



3 
4 



3 
8 



92 

90 
91 

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C9 
09 
81 



08 
09 



05 
07 



99 
08 



G9 
04 



2 
3 
3 
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3 
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3 



3 
3 
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2 
4 



4 

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3 
31 



94 
08 
08 
07 
08 
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99 



98 
95 
06 

93 
98 



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09 
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38C 



78P 



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a Requirements not fully met 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



383 



Dentiiti licensed at examinations Aug. I, 1908- July 31, 1909 (concluded) 
Group 1, New York schools; group Z, schools without the State 



•tniteln, McrrfaB.. 



' Dmlai Svhtv. f 
J, Sunn, NY... 



Watartoirn,' N. Y., Routs A,' Bo 



TlrO%T,\o6mtm,% , i'.'.'.. 

117 Diamond it, Phlla.. Pa 

U »y. A 41ri »t. N. Y. C 



Tower, Guy C. .i SMbian Falb. Maaa 

r„ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PS i&nWpSia D eUH CaBati 

25S W. 127th ■*., N. Y. C 

121 W. Orange it, UneMttr. Pi 
174 E. Mnlo it ..Rocoeeler. N. Y . 



Qroie. Edwurd P. . . 
.L-oo.BurrT 

ecarnmoa, Herbert I 
Behmuta. Louis R.. 



udrdaus, N. Y 
Fbllaaolphla it 



on Court, 601 W. 143d i 



Bernard, rvullam E 
Carahore, William J 
Umiik, Uinrln. . . . 
Crilley, Ellsworth T 
IWauty. John T.. 
Farmer, Olen P.... 
Feud. Matthias. . 
Ferrln, Whitman 0. 



Hahn, Morton S. . . 

H equ amb ourg, AJ 

O'Connor,' George C 
OrtomlrrineA... 



FnUfcT. William 8. 
Bud, Frank, jr.... 
Reynoldi, tUny F.. 
Shaddock, Alfred 0. . 
Sherman, Frank «.. 



Sisrk, AdolpbD.... 
Btllov Chart. G. 
Waddel]. Ralph W.. 
Wallace. William FL 
Weinberger, Bel 



n'l n Omiiifrv, PailaaVJptfa 
)T7 Profpect pL Brooklyn, N. Y . 
J4 Rlrerdrlve, PaamkTN. J . . . . 
■- — ' l.. Phlladolphta,Pi. 



12S W.' Cental it. Itabarioy Clty.Pc 



S184 Delaneej it, W. Philadelphia, 



738 Centre! a*.. Dunkirk, N.Y.. 

Parry bldg., UaghDrne, Pa 

2» Central e»., Rochester, N. Y. 

SOg Wllloughby a... Brooklyn, N.Y 
1453 Spruce ft, Philadelphia, P.. . . 
17 Weahlngton it, Cartxradale, Pa. 
1417 75th it, Brooklyn, N. Y.. . . 

S Denver it, Rochwtar, H. Y.... 

480 Rocket-ay a*. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



122 Federal it, Greenfield, Han .. . 
23 Bodlne at. W. N. Brighton, S. I . 
3338 Walnut at, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Canandalgua, N. Y. Boa 34fll 

Hotel 3t Loreni, 72d at * Isling- 
ton ay- N.Y.C 



PWe-Wf Unit., Dip't e! Dmfulry 
Powell, James D | 00 W. 10th at., H. Y. C 

r/aoV taaiKim bu 1 901. cAoptw 110 
Sachter, Henry G | 66 Mclilbbon at., Brooklyn, H. Y. 



SOS 




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384 



NEW YOBK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Veterinarian! licensed at examinations Aufc I, 1908 July 31, igog 

Group 1, New York scuoola; (roup 3, schools without the Stale 



I I 



HEW YORK BCHOC 
Km Trk Anuria* VUrb 
Chvlaa.. 987 Herkimer «t. fewklrt. N.Y 



QriaflsoLi. La 11 
k>t Rolled T 


1M«Ltnc(iMii,N. Y.C .. 
SIS bceulr .... RirbaHKd HilL L t 







-Vi» Tut Sun .iW'-ry C< 



Pc*.Uro, V .. 
HuM.. Bjuti B 
S. ^ita-i. Ofred U 



«T* 



OvW. 1W.» (0.. N. T 

Oow PU1-* S. Y .. 

lOIBwndit.. ltlun.N. Y. 

VII,.r,«H.IlLSV 

rnfrtWN Y 
v K ne ,,N.Y 

Cuhorbn. N Y. 

113 Crine ft-, Roek'Oe. ft . 
Kpeenr. N Y 
-t.. *L'nlrc 
irliocwr- > 



G.lleat " : . |M 
Umrmni'lllcCt 
IJ7 Ur,an. Mid. Ii 



TnottMbiiri N. Y V.'.*"*"" 
t*7 E. State ot. llbn, N. Y 
)» ft IBOtb eu. N. Y. C 
11 M.m .L. Si-elb ■«. K.tti Km 



iadmeJ en BouertK of r«WreHe> 

ipbO 1 *ie Hnin «. Mubbjg, 1 

1 (KwcoWm. 



fnine-nrt 0/ PmmjJwnui. StJwof of Felsruurv MtditiH., 
BcUetaer, Chirl«iC..| 1047 PraperlnT., H. Y. C 

Half 

Bowl Superior Sdumi of Sofoena r/niwroilj 
CetMii, OluUo ] 3 GO Braomt.L. X. V. C. 





S95 
























































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804 


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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



38s 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, 

July si, 1909 

GROUP 1, HEW YORK SCHOOLS] 




Albany 
Archer, Rachel Eleanor. . 

Birch, L. Edna 

Browne, Mary A 

Faulkner, Una Teresa 

Ford, Stella Moore 

Hilke, Cordelia Howard . . 

Holly, Eleanor V 

McLean, Mary Agnes 
Wooster, Carrie May 



Hospital Training School 

Nurses Home, Albany Hosp., Albany, 

N. Y 

xo8 Chestnut St., Albany, N. Y 

293 Hamilton st., Albany, N. Y 

9a Jay st., Albany, N. Y 

378 Hamilton st., Albany, N. Y 

375 Hudson av., Albany, N. Y 

108 Chestnut st.. Albany, N. Y 

246 Second St., Albany, N. Y 

393 Hamilton st., Albany, N. Y 



•T 



Amsterdam City Hospital Training School 
Stewart, Mary B | Care City Hosp., Amsterdam, N. 



Y. 



Arnot-Ogden Memorial Hospital 
Mcintosh, Christiana B | 1239 Pratt St., Elmira, N. Y 



Bcllruue Hospital-Mills Training School 



Brown, Harry D 

Cole, George I 

English, William John. . . . 

Fore, John Henry 

Gavin, Joseph 

Johnson, Jonn Peter 

Lomber. Frank Timothy. . . 
Tempest, Elmer Wood .... 



• • • • • 



• • • • 



113 East 38th st.. N. Y. C. 
113 East 38th st., N. Y. C. 
113 East 38th st., N. Y. C. 
113 East 28th st., N. Y. C. 

X044 Fifth av., N. Y. C 

113 East 38th st., N. Y. C. 

1 13 East 38th st„ N. Y. C 

151 Decatur St., Brooklyn, N. Y., care 
Mrs George Seager 



Arthur, Lennie B 

Ball, Florence Irene 

Christin, Anna Coron 

Coleman, Cecelia 

Cosgrove, Grace Constance. 

Devennie, Elizabeth 

Egginton, Helen J 

Fraser, Evelyn 

Frost, Hattie M 

Hill, Gertrude F 

Irving, Adelaide 

Knelly, Sue M 

Mac Hugh, Cecelia A 

Mann, Alice V 

Melvin, Mary R 

O'Connor, Mary A 

Perry, Helen Hastings. . . . 

Petersdorf , Martha 

Powers, Mary G 

Rutledge, Teresa 

Ryan. Mary Agatha 

Sears. Julia Marie 

Smith, L. Louise 

Staniforth, Margaret 

Swaney, Sarah F 

Sweeney, Anna M 

Tanney, Florence Amelia. . 
Tucker, Ellen 

* Requirements not met. 

13 



BdUvu* Hospital Training School 



440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 

Middletown, N. J 

440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 

440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 

144 East 60th st., N. Y. C 

440 East a6th st., N. Y. C 

35 St Nicholas av., N. Y. C. . . . 

373 Manhattan av., N. Y. C 

Bellevue Hosp., E. s6th st., N. Y 
808 Lexington av., N. Y. C. . . . 

440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 

646 W. Diamond av., Hazleton, Pa 

440 East 26th st., N. Y. C 

373 Manhattan av., N. Y. C. . . 
373 Manhattan av.. N. Y. C. . . . 

113 West 96th st., N. Y. C 

440 East 26th st., N. Y. C, care Belle 
vue Hospital 



Riverton, Wy. 

5 Orient St., Wo>vwi>«>, «*< 

440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 



r orcester, Mass. 



Y. 



833 Willis av., Syracuse, N 
440 East 36th st., N. Y. C... 
1 West 103d st., N. Y. C. . . 
440 East 36th st., N. Y. C... 
475 South Pearl st., Albany, N. Y 

500 West 135th st., N. Y. C 

1705 W. Genesee st., Syracuse, N 
440 East 36th st., N. Y. C 



09 
09 
08 
09 
07 
09 
09 
08 
09 



09 
09 



09 

06 
98 
00 

04 
03 

03 
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05 



08 
06 
08 

09 
09 
09 
07 
09 
07 
03 
08 
09 
09 
08 

05 
09 

09 
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NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nutim licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. 
July 3>> 1909 {continued) 
QROTJP 1, HBW YORE SCHOOLS (confirm*!) 




Brooklyn Hospital- 

Brome. Clara Florine I ij» I 

Dwrar.Ji ~ ' 

Outerbi-'" 



Eve. 



Roueelle, Caroline J . . . . 

Ryan L Violet Campbell. 
Seld. Hiro 

Skehan. 



Steve 



, Bliube 






ingS. 

j Lafayette av.! 
j Curl ton 



, N. Y. 



I.Y. 



Brock] yn Hoi! 

Raymond it., a * . 1 . . . . 

i7> Lafayette »».. , N. Y.. 

Brooklyn Hoip.,I >-.. Brook 

lyo. N. Y 

W Lafayette a v., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
17a Lafayette av.. Brooklyn, N. Y. . 



Hart, Amelia S. . 

Hautaer. Anna 

Reirhert, Charlotte A. . 



Brooklyn HonuBfosktt Hospital 



.^Brooklyn. N. ' 

.'..'v.'y.c.'.'.'.'. 



Buffalo Homoofathic Hospital 

1. Rose M I i«o York at., Buffalo, N. Y 

, 380 Franklin *t a Buffalo N. Y.. 



sleda A 74 Lullh«c &i.., uummh 

is, Sarah B | Silver Creek, N. Y... 

Buffalo Statt Hospital 
ta, Florence I I Oxford. N. Y 

City of Kingston Hospital Training School 



Jenkins. Laura £ 



. raining L- 

:68 Fair St.. Kingston. N. Y 

I r-leiahmann-B K F 

Clifton Springs Sanlta, 



in N. Y 

Clifron Spnng*. N. Y 

Clark Manor House. Canandaigua. 

N.Y 

Clifton RpriTiBtf. N. y 

Care Sanitarium. CI if too Springs, N.Y. 
Clifton Spring*, N. Y 



Cortland Hospital Training School 



Carr. Joaephine Magdalene. 
Powell. Elisabeth G. 

d Strut Hos 



^antieji LAun d... . .. . 

Caulfield. Kathleen 

Forbe*. Irene H 

FredaalL Alma Olive 

Hayea, Suean M 

Lauch. Prances Clara Gen- 



McConney, Catharine Ur 
llahoney, Jennie. 



'ownaenri at.. Syracuse. N'.'Y. 

ital, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

t Marks av., Brooklyn, N. Y.. . 

lastem Parkway, Brooklyn. N.Y 

.delphi st., Brooklyn, N.Y 

.delphi st., Brooklyn. N.Y 

umberlaod St.. Brooklyn, N. Y 

umberiand at., Brooklyn. N. Y 

delphi st., Brooklyn. N.Y 

■ '■■ Brooklyn. N. Y. . 



Strafford. Rose. 
Terwuliger, Jeatit 



EUit Hospital, Schnuctady, N. Y. 



Vnmlten av.. Schenectady. 

B,. 'Sc'hmecMdy.N. V! 







F eg 
Je 09 




is 






Ur 09 

ft 3 




Ag oS 


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SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



387 



Norses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, 190&- 

Jnly 31, 1909 {continued) 
GROUP x HBW YORK SCHOOLS {continued) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 




Emergency Hospital — Sisters of Charity, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Schieswohl, Sister Zoe | zo8 Pine St., Buffalo, N. Y 



Erie County Hospital, Training School 

Dane, Laura Emelia I 3399 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y 

Ellis, Margaret Geneva City Hospital, Geneva. N. Y. 

Wagner, Eleanor J ' Erie County Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y . . 

Faxton Hospital Training School 
Metzger, Jeanette Edith. . . | 213 Bellinger St., Herkimer, N. Y. . . . 



Hand, Edith 

Ridge, Maude Catheryne 



Fox Memorial Hospital Training School 

Care Pox Memorial Hosp., Oneonta, 

N. Y 

Care Fox Memorial Hosp., Oneonta, 

N. Y 



French Benevolent Society Hospital Training School 



Henehan, Margaret 

Kelly, Anna 

McSweeney, Agnes 
thage 



Car- 



German Hospital 
Bubrmann, Dorothea A. W. 



Grim, Charlotte Adams .... 

Hoffman, Frieda 

Sherman, Leila Cooledge.. . 

Smith, Etcel E 

Spencer, Mary A 



113 W. 84th st., N. Y. C 

1 13 W. 84th st., N. Y. C 

33 Rutgers st.. N. Y. C 

Training School, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
German Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



130 Hull st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

iaa Putnam av., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 
689 Lafayette av., Brooklyn, N. Y.. 
a8o St James pi., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 
355 Lafayette av., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 



German Hospital Training School, Buffalo. N. Y. 
Cullinan, Catherine Millard. | 78 Sage av., Buffalo, N. Y. . . 



German Hospital 
Becht, Bertha Henrietta. . . 
Heuer, Lillian Theodora. . . 

Manning, Mary A 

Rusager, Mette Marie 

Schleicher, Louise A 

Silverquiet, Cecelia 



and Dispensary Training School 

146 East 89th st., N. Y. C 

85 West 1 1 8th st. f N. Y. C 

108 East 87th st., N. Y. C 

141 East 76th st., N. Y. C 

lis East 77th st., N. Y. C 

420 West n6th st., N. Y. C 



Gowanda State Homeopathic Hospital 

Scudder, Adele I Care State Hospital, Gowanda. N. Y.. 

Sweet, Alyce I Care Mr M. Van Slyke. Collins, N. Y.. . 

Hahnemann Hospital Training School, N. Y. C, 
Barnes, Flora Isabel I 104 East 60th st., N. Y. C 

Good Shepherd, Syracuse, N. Y. 

138 South av., Syracuse, N. Y 

138 South av., Syracuse, N. Y 

3x3 Herkimer st., Syracuse, N. Y 

1 306 E. Adams st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
116 Merriman av., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
400 Wilkinson st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
xoxa E. Adams St., Syracuse, N. Y.. . 
119 E. Castle st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 
6x4 S. Crouse av., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
Hosp. of Good Shepherd, Syracuse, 

N. Y 

116 Merriman av., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 

237 Kellogg st., Syracuse. N. Y 

3608 Lodi st., Syracuse, N. Y 

3x3 Herkimer st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 

327 Sabine st., Syracuse, N. Y 

Hill View, Lake George, N. Y 



Hospital of the 

Belknap, Fannie Maria 

Blackmail, Mabel Philanda 

Broadhurst, Jessie 

Davis, Anna Baggerly 

Davis, Emily Ella 

Gee, Kathenne Gilson 

Hernandez, Concepcion. . . . 

Tones, Myrtle 

Lange, Lucie Beatrice 

Miller, Mary Alice 



Myers, Mabel S 

Parker, Evella Charlotte. . . 
Salmon, Lauretta Beatrice. 
Saunders, Melissa Maye . . . 
Scheme!, Katherine Anna . 
Van Deusen, Grace M 



DATB OP 



04 



09 
06 
09 



08 

09 
09 

08 
08 

09 



09 
09 
09 
09 
08 
08 
09 



08 



08 
08 
08 
08 
07 
07 



OS 

09 



09 
09 
08 
09 
08 
08 
09 
08 
09 

o 
o 

08 
08 
09 
07 
09 



Ex- 
anima- 
tion 



J 



e 09 
e 09 
e 09 



F 09 

Je 09 
Je 09 



F 09 
F 09 

F 09 



F 09 
e 09 
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I 



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F 09 



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09 
09 
09 

09 



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Je 09 
Je 09 
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09 

F 09 
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■ 09 
Je 09 
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Waiver 



D 08 



* Requirements not met. 



388 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, x 

July 31, 1909 (continued) 
GROUP z NEW TORE SCHOOLS (continued) 




Hudson City Hospital Training School 
Snyder, Gertrude M I 310 Washington av., Bat a via, N. Y. 

Jackson Sanatorium Training School 



Beecher, Katberine LeAnna 
Mac Ed ward, Ethel Gray.. . 
Mason, Marian Czarina .... 
Page, Florence Elizabeth.. . 
Paterson, Mary Lindsay . . . 



Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. 
Dansville Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. 
Lakeside Hosp., Cleveland, O 



■ •••••• 



5 Livingston pi., N. Y. C. . . 
Jackson Health Resort, Dansville, 

N. Y. 



Shuler, Grace Mary I Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. 

Jamaica Hospital Training School 

84 New York av., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 

8a New Yorkav., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 
Jamaica Hosp., 8a New York av., 

Jamaica, L. I., N. Y 

Massena, N. Y., Box 931 



Ballard, Margaret May. . . . 
Heatherington, Gertrude 

Melissa 

Schultz, Tora Mathilde . . . 

Young, Nora 



Andrews, Joyce Beatrice. . . 

• 



Jewish Hospital Training School 

Jewish Hosp., Prospect pi., Brooklyn, 



Caulfield, Annie P 

Dora, Anna Lucille 

Pearn, Sara Hannah 

Fitzgerald Nellie M 

Goodrich, Edna Matilda. . 

Haas, Louise Victoria 

Hoorman, Augusta Geor- 

gine 

Reiche, Anna L 

Shortall, Elizabeth E 



Jewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y 

503 Reid st., Brooklyn, N. Y 
ewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y 

469 Prospect pi., Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Swedish Hosp., Rogers av. and Stcr- 
- - -- i/fi. " 



ling pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Jewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
ewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
ewish Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



• ••••• 



Kings County Hospital Training School 

Hawthorne, Jessica L I Bradford Street Hosp., Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Neill, Julia Vincent | 19 Doscher St., Brooklyn, N.Y 

Kings Park Stat* Hospital Training School 

Bohan, Katie 441 Last 84th st., N^Y. C. . 

Bourke, John 

Brooking, Florence A . . . . 
Bunker, Kathleen Mable . . 

Gorey, Alice C 

Lenihan, Kate 

Mull, Ida 

Quail, Mary 



Wray, Martha, 



State Hosp., Kings Park, L. I., N. Y. 

Northport, L. I., N. Y 

State Hosp.. Kings Park. L. I., N. Y 

571 Lexington av., N. Y. C 

Kings Park Hosp., L. I., N. Y 

Kings Park, New York, care Hospital 
Kings Park State Hosp., Kings Park. 

L. I..N. Y 

Kings Park Hosp., Kings Park, N. Y. . 



Laura Franklin Free Hospital for Children Training Class 
Selden, Charlotte Colgate.. 

Selden, Elizabeth 

av., N. Y. C 



19 East zixth st., N. Y. C 

Harlem Hosp., 136th st. and Lenox 



Blaine, Mary H 
Carter, Mary Bacon.. 

Goodwin, Mabel 

Phillips, Alta Ethelyn 



Lexington Heights Hospital Training School 



2x6 Richmond av., Buffalo, N. Y. . . 

Lewis ton, N. Y 

179 Lexington av., Buffalo, N. Y. . . 
137 Lexington av., Buffalo, N. Y. . . 



Patterson, Ellen Maude 
Turner, Jane Carey 

* Requirements not met. 



Lincoln Hospital and Home 

Lincoln Hospital and Home, East 

i4i8tst. and S. Boulevard, N. Y. C. 

Lincoln Hospital and Home, East 



09 



OO 
08 
08 
08 

08 
09 



08 

08 

08 
09 



08 
09 

3 

09 
09 

09 
09 

09 
09 
09 



08 
09 



08 

3 

07 
09 
07 
06 

08 

06 



08 
06 



04 
OS 
OS 
99 



09 
09 



Je 09 



9 



09 
09 
09 
09 



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Je 09 

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F 09 

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! 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



389 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. 1, 1908- 

July 31, 1909 (continued) 

GROUP X HBW YORK SCHOOLS (continued) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Little Falls Hospital Training School 
Christmann, Marguerite. . .| 6 Hager St., Utica, N. Y. 



Long Island College Hospital Training School 



Alexander, Blanche M . 

Anderson, Lynda C 

Ballantyne, Eva Georgie 

Isabel 

Barnum, Ruth Anna 

Barrett. Mabel R 

Barry, Nellie Cecilia 

Brads haw, Caroline E 

Brown, Margaret Shaffer. . . 

Clint. Mildred L 

Decker, Bertha Crawford. . . 

Douglas, Lola Grace 

Edwards, Katherine Ann. . . 
Enright, Ellen 



Eppler, Mary 

Praser, Margaret P 

Goll, Johanna 

Haig, Leonora 

Henry, Elisabeth A 

Kenney .Helen 

Kunze, Edith Rosalie 

Leach, Amy Moxley 

Lynch, Roselle 

McKee, Isabelle Evelyn. . 
Mays, Mary Madeleine. . . . 

Merkley, Ida Evelyn 

Osborn. Katharine 



Palmer, Lorena 

Pedersen, Hilda Constance. 
Rose, Pauline Elizabeth. . . . 
Shelley, Mary Constance. . . 
Sherwood, Sadie A 

Straus, Carol Lewis 

Waugh, Hilda Mabel 

Wheeler, Jean Edna 



128 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 
66 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



333 Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y, 
128 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



157 Henry st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

L. I. College Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

L. I. College Hospital. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

333 Clinton st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

147 Pacific st., Brooklyn. N. Y 

16 x Snediker av., Brooklyn, N. Y.. . . 

X47 Pacific st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

ia8 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y 

St Catharine's Hosp., Bushwick av., 
Brooklyn, N. Y 

178 6th av., Brooklyn, N. Y 

184 Amity st., Brooklyn. N. Y 

700 Park pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 

128 Pacific st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

xoa Pierrepont st., Brooklyn, N. Y... 

128 Pacific st.. Brooklyn, N. Y 

Hyde Park, tf. Y 

174 Hull st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

163 Congress st., Brooklyn. N. Y. . . . 

333 Clinton st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

163 Congress St.. Brooklyn. N. Y. . . . 

157 Henry st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Long Is. Coll. Hosp., Henry st., 
Brooklyn, N. Y 

358 Henry st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

337 54th st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

xi4 McDonough st., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

1284 Dean st., Brooklyn, N. V 

3051 Kingsbridge terrace, Kings- 
bridge. N. Y 

66 Pierrepont st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

147 Pacific st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

163 Congress st., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 



Clune, Helen 
Kenny, Elizabeth J 



Long Island State Hospital Training School 

State Hosp., Flat bush, 



Rich. Elizabeth. . 
Thomas, Adelaide 



Brooklyn, 

N. Y 
Long Is. State Hosp., Clarkson st.. 

Brooklyn, N. Y 

Flat bush Hosp.. Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 
408 West 57th at., N. Y. C 



Manltattan State Hospital — Training School 
Murphy, Margaret M I Kingston Av. Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Methodist Episcopal Hospital Training School 
Albrecht, Caroline Joseph 



me 

Barton, Mary Angelina . 

* 



Erskine, Cornelia Douglas. 



Howell, Henrietta M 
Jewett, Edith Marie. 



Sims, Harriet Evelyn 

Tyler, Dorothy Hope 

Weec, Minnie Beatrice 

* Requirements not met. 



141 Seventh av., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
374 6th av., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 



Methodist Episcopal Hosp.. Brook- 
lyn, N. Y 



Bellport. L. I., N. Y.. Box 415 
137 7th av., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



32a Park pi.. Brooklyn, N. Y 

322 Park pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Methodist Episcopal Hosp., Brooklyn, 





DATS OP 


Grad- 


Ex- 


uation 


amina- 
tion 


09 


Je 09 


97 




07 


Je 09 


09 


F 09 


08 


F 09 


11 


Je 09 
F 09 


09 


Je 09 


11 


Je 09 


F 09 


08 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 
F 09 


08 


88 




09 


F 09 


95 




08 


F 09 


98 


» • • » • 


07 


F 09 


08 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 


% 


Je 09 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 
F 09 


08 


95 




09 


Je 09 


09 


Je 09 


95 




07 


F 09 


08 


F 09 


09 
07 


Je 09 
F 09 


08 


F 09 


08 


F 09 


06 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 


04 




09 


Je 09 


07 


Jo 09 


08 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 
Je 09 


09 


09 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 
F 09 


09 


08 


F 09 


09 


Je 09 
Jc 09 


09 


09 


Je 09 


09 


Je 09 



Waiver 



Ap 09 



Ap 09 
Ja 09 
D " 08 



Mr 09 



O 08 



O 08 



390 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. i, i 

July 31, 1909 (continued) 

GROUP x NEW YORK SCHOOLS (conUnumt) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Metropolitan 

Babin, Jeanne S 

Cappell, Mary C 

Christie, E. Beatrice 

D rise oil, Kathleen 

Finnegan, Mary Anne 

F razee, Etta Marguerite . . . 

Gavan, Mary I 

Goodwin, Eleanor Pearle.. 



Hammond, Margaret Edith 

Lny.I 
O'Neill, Kathryn 



McEnan: 



I. Margi 
Lily, M 



argaret. . . 



O'Rourke, Eleanor Teresa. . 



O'Rourke, Mary Jessie. 
Rudd, Margaret 



Sheffield, Clara Elizabeth . . 
Smart, Emily Mortimer. . . 



Wilshire, Clara Emma. . . . 



Mount Sinai 
Allan, Mahala Caroline. . . . 

Anderson, Annie B 

Baldwin, Nellie 

Bed worth, Hannah 

Borden, Abbie Durfce Kin- 
sley 

Bowers, Blanche A 

Brand, Augusta A 

Byrne, Ethel H 

Carlsted, Caroline Miller. . . 

Casho, Marion Morrill 

Collins, Katherine Wern- 
ham 

Currie, Daisy 

Daly, Frances Maxwell. . . . 

Daly, Mary Frances 

Doane, Susie Elsie 

Edwards. Mary I 

Erwin, Mary Rose 

Ferguson, Cora 

Flannery, Maud Lucille 

Fowler, Eleanor M 

Gallagher, Elizabeth H 

Garcia. Cecelia 

Griggs, Ethel Marguerite. . . 

Hallow, Mamie 

Homer, Blanche 

Keegan, Margaret F 

Lenehan, Catherine M 

Lloyd, Hazel A 

Mac Edward, Anne 

Mansbridge, Edna Marion. . 

Moore, Carolyn H 

Moran, Anna Katherine. . . . 

* Requirements not met. 



Hospital Training School 

aooa 5th av., N. Y. C 

6 Court sq„ Brooklyn, N. Y 

Metropolitan Hosp., Blackwells Is., 

N. Y.C 

650 57th st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

369 Alexander av., N. Y. C 

Metropolitan Hosp., Blackwells Is., 

N. yTc 

457 Manor av., Wood haven, L. I 
Metropolitan Hosp., Blackwells Is., 

N. Y. C 

333 zst av., L. I. City, N. Y 

5 Broadway, Newburgh, N. Y. 



tt 



etro poli tan 
N. yTc 



Hosp., Blackwells Is., 



430 West 1 1 6th st. t N. Y. C, Sesrum 

Club 

4ao West 1 x6th st., N. Y. C. . 
Metropolitan Hosp., Blackwells Is., 

N. YTC 



196 McDonough st., Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
Metropolitan Hosp., Blackwells Is., 
N. YTC 



Metropolitan 



etropol 
N. Y.i 



Hosp., Blackwells Is., 



Hospital Training School 
Mt Sinai Hosp., Madison av. and 101st 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

64 East 81st st., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

350 Manhattan av., N. Y. C 

40 West 137th st., N. Y. C. 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., loist st. and Madison 

3088 7th av., N. Y. C 

Manchester, Ct 

Riverhead.N. Y 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

14th av. and 48th st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

loist st. and Madison av., N. Y. C. . . . 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Care Mt. Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

Mt Sinai Hosp., N. Y. C 

10 Pipe Line road, London, Ontario 

Can 

83 a Union st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

61 East 86th st., N.Y.C 



DATB OF 



Grad- 
uation 



09 

09 



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08 

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09 

09 

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Ex- 
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Waiver 



Mr 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 39* 

Hnrsea Licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. i, 1908- 
Jnly 31, 1909 (continued) 
OROUP 1 HEW YORE SCHOOLS (ctmtinuedl 





S „ M 




„„.. 




NAME 


Grad- 


Bx- 


Waiver 


Mount Sinai !!. if • 

Osborne, Ella Jane 

Perry, Celia Marie 

Schofield, Evelyn Lois. . . 
Solomon. Emma Marion . 


j.' T'oiatnt School UondndtSl 

..,-■ M- v.nft :■■: — . •; ■ i- 

Mthav. and «Sths-.. Brooklyn. N Y 
" "* 7. Bcrougb park. 

61 S. y.ct: 

M * Y.C 


es 

IS 

oS 


P OS 
P OS 

p 11 

F os 
F 09 

lis 

F 09 

F 00 

F 09 

F ea 
F 09 




Traeger, Anna Nontte.... 
Upson, Chris", me AjfijsU. 

Ward. Lottie Lillian 

White. Edna Isabel 

.\'<ii*,'t L.i 


11 lew Haven. Ct 

M *. Y.C ... 

M 1. Y.C ... 

M J. Y.C 

6. N. Y. C 

our Hotpuol rrainxc School 

N-.iv.™ : ,::*,': <t -: . IV.: v, ;,..-.:> 








Keeney, Ella Louise 


Care Nathan Littauer Hoao.. Glovers- 












.8 West Centre St.. Gloversviile. N. Y 
..-■Iv lr.,..nin, School 

(!<.< , J --:'lg^-,nV..N Y.C 

New York Cny Truing S.h.*.' 

!'...-kw-l:s Is. N Y.C 

414 S. Broad St.. Philadelphia. Pa. . . 




Ntw Yot 

Apger, Ed;tb Mae 

Barbar, E.lythe at 
















Campbell. Cicely Mary 


St James. Long Island. N. V. C.. care 


z 




Davidson. M. Edna Violet, . 


New York C.lv Tn,,„..„g School to. 

Nurses. Blackwells Is N Y.C. 
New York C.lv Train.n* ScU-.l. 

Nurses Home. Blackwells Is . 

N. Y. C 

N-m YnrH City Training School lor 

Nurses. Blackwells U . N. Y. C . . . . 




Heller, Adelaide Peters. 












New York City Training School. 
Blackwells Is . N Y C 


i 
11 




, 












New York City Tra.oio* School lol 
Nurses. Blackwells Is.. N Y.C 

New York City Training School lor 
Snivv li.,. .»p •. \i N V 1 

111, K, .-..: ,* N v 1: 

141 West i( ?-.li a! . N Y.C 

it«S Uthuimiv.. N. Y.C 

New York City Training School, 
Illarkwp.ls UN Y C 

148 liast to-.b si. N Y. C 

n8t U.iogtoo av. N. Y. C. care 




MacDonold. Amy Pope 

McGonigle. Rose Mary.. . . . 

McHutfh. Cecilia 

McKinlay, Prances R 


Mr 09 


Murphy, Mary Constance . . 






jooi s"hav. N. Y. C... 

BoB Lexington av , N, Y C 




Poole, Adelaide R 




Robinson, Winifred Hill... 


1 SjoAmethyM8l..VanNest.N Y. . 

New York City Training School lor 

Nurses. Blackwells Is^N. Y.C. . 








Smith, Rebecca Lewisa 

Snell, Henrietta Catherine., 
Sullivan. Helena Gertrude. . 


Harlem ttosp . Lenox av, and iiblrt 

si.. N. Y.C 

K v V.r— ,: s: llr.-,i-v... N V 
n8sLe«lnston»»..N, V. C 


Ja 09 


Wilt. Clara Irene 


il8< Lexinntooav. N Y.C 





NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Knrtes licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. 
July 31, 1909 (continued) 
GROUP 1 HEW YORK SCHOOLS (wtuWiuerf) 




Mrdical Collig, 
W«Iden.N .Y.Bb it*.. 
Flower Hosn.N Y C... 
Pelham Manor. N. Y.. 



Nta York H 



Cromwell, R., Lee 

D wight, Anna P 

Greenwood, Carrie Ethel. . 

Hubbard. Lena Marin 

Mackie. Rom Alma 

Mom, Marie 

Olmttead. Sarah C 

Osborne. Catherine 



Uumey May 

m. Ethel Estey. .. 
1, Julia Catherine.. 



Thorn p*on, Ruth 

Wllaon. Margaret Helen.. 
Work, Henrietta Lawton. 

Ntw . 

Barclay, Virginia 

Stockton 

Carmthen, Violet C 

Chase. Gertrude Ethel. . . 

Cornwall. Bertha M 

Decker. Bertha Georgina. . 
Gammon. Ella Leo ...... 



Lalor, Percy Mary 

MacPhee.Mary 

Roe., Ella Maud 

ijeaver. Marion Elizabeth 

Stable, Rose 

Steel*, Minnie lean 

Swenaon, Josephine Matil 



« Sarah.. 



Tucker. Kathi 

Warburton. Margaret 

Whittingham. Edith Cyn- 



Willerd, Gertrude M. Da; 



,, .. ■ N. Y.C 

6SW. M«.N. Y.C 

68 W. 8,d it . N. Y. C 

• 96 Leilngton »».. H. Y, C 

174 W. 96th «.. N. Y-C 

SOC Leniagton av . N Y.C 

596 Lexington *w.. N, Y.C 

.j* W. 96th «.. rf. Y. C , 

iseChennut it. Albany. N Y..., 

S96 Lexington av . N Y. C 

ji W. SjdV. N V. C 



Wilson. Marie Stmyne 

Ogdmsburs C< 
Hughe., Anna" ; - 

Le Clair, Helet 
Swain. Jose phi 
White, Mary I 



Niagara Falls Mtmorial Hospital 
« A I IOJ3 South av., Niagara Pall., N.Y 



1 ]th at.. Niagara Falls, N. Y.. . 

Hospital Training School 
Ogdenabura City Hoipital, Ogdcnt- 

City Hosp., Ogdensburg, N. V 

City Hnn„ ORdeneburg. N. Y 

Care City Huap., Ogdeoaburg, N, Y. . 

OsVMga Hospital Training School 

Curtii. Mabel Francei I City Hoio.. Oswego. N. Y 

Harkneu, M. E.Grace.... I Cswego Hosp,. Oiwego. N. Y 

Onr Lady of Victory Sanatorium Training School 
Brown, Eliiabeth Magda-I Bonedictinc Sanitarium. Kingston. 

lent N.Y 

Hagelweide. Lillian Bella... 99 W. Chestnut St.. Kingston, N. Y.. 



ft 3 

P 09 

fir 



. ic-stoat . rf.Y.'.C..' Hijjh Bridge 

t..N. Y.C... 

.,N. Y.C 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Kunea licensed at examination! and under the waiver Aug. 
July 31, 1909 (continued} 
GROUP 1 KBW TORE SCHOOLS (continued) 



Our Lady of Victory Sanatorium Training School (.condudtd) 

McEntce, Florence I agChestnut St., Kingston, N. Y 

O'Shea. Anna May 6 Webster St., Kingston. N. V 

Was". Martha Kathryn.. , I oj Clinton av., Kingston. N. Y 



Parks Hospital Training School 



Close, Catherine 

Race. Mary Rr.bekah . . 
Tidmarab, Anna E 



it.. 6lensFalls L N. Y.. 

othst..N. Y. C 

it.. Sandy Hill, N. Y.. 



Ptmkskill Hospital Training School 

Cooni, Flavin Bristol ] Hospital, FeekaJdU. N. Y 

Maguire. Bertha I 17 Oakwoodav., White PI 



Plainu.N. Y.. 



i'S 



■ Waelt.. 

Benson. Ella Elisabett 

Bentlcy, Bertha 

Boulter. Mary Olive 

Bulmer. Elizabeth Ethel 



Decker. Bessie 



Lyon.'Cbarity Wilson.. ... 

MeClung. Edith M 

Mac Kay Agnes Logan. , 



MOnck. Laura Charlotte.. 
O'Neill, Clnudia Maria... 
Phillip.. Elisabeth Mat 

Pitcher. Bessie Kingsbury. 
Powell, Helen Chi? ' 



vtfj 






Baker, Linda Com 

Bill, Anna Elisabeth 

Davis, Delia Mahamah .... 
Freshwater. Margaret Sarah 
Gardner, Harriet Rebecca . 
Heberger. Carolyn Cecelia. . 

Hoffman, Josephine 

Hood. Mary Florence 



1 TiM st.N. Y.C.. 
: list st . K Y C 

: TiMit . N. v. c 

tr City Hetpitol Tratmng School 



N. Y 

6f C.I.J-. »v N Rochester, N Y. 
Bj Selye terracf. Rconcuer, IY. Y. . 

JS L.:f 11.. Rochester. N. Y^ 

of, C.:-:«!> av N K*s«n N ^ 
54 M.- ■■■■ -i;.le ivR.N Y C 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nurses licensed at examinations and nnder the waiver Aug. ■ 
July 31, 1909 (continued) 

OROUP 1 HEW YORK SCHOOLS (ewntoued) 





ADDRESS 




NAME 


Si 


Ex- 


Waiver 


ReckttUr City Half 

Hunt, ]™nieGale 


ital Training School icondndig) 

Interlaken. Seneca co.. N. Y 

8a Selye terrace. Rochester, N. Y 

City Hosp., Rochester, N. Y 

1 1 Edgewood park, Rochester, N. Y . 
■ 05 Kenwood av., Rochester, N. Y.. . 
ids Kenwood av., Rochester. N. Y.. . 

alhic Hospital TrainiHt School 
,7 AverilUv.. Rochester. N, Y 

555 Averill av.. Rochester. M.Y.. ... 
SSJ Avenllav . Rochester, N Y.... 
39 Berkeley Bt . Rreheater. NY. 
n< Ale.stdt. at. Rochester. N Y . 
j»4_Ale*an.!rr st . Rochester, N. V . 
64 Weld at . R " ' J 

"i Lalaje-te'i if..'.! 
iSWinthropai «*.... 

1 Lafayette tark Roihtjtt.. N Y 
J14 A'.esemler st . Rochester. N. Y 
J!4 A>ia. -:■ ■■: . K...W-:. * V 
,j S.lV.on <: . H.<:-,;t,. N Y.... 
71 S Union st . :■<• 'ester. N. Y. . . 
3,, A:<:xa<i'!rr si . Rochester. N. Y . 
iSr S. ii:»:.!Tsr. 1: Ko;hcsier. M V 
114 Alexander st . Rochester. N. Y. . 

Hospital Training Sthool 

State Hosp . Rochester. N Y 

oipiial ■■:-.■■ -1 School 

Rooseveit Hosp N. Y.C. 

183 W ,.d at . N Y. C 


08 

dS 

bI 

1 

3 

08 

is 


08 


7 09 

' It 

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* 09 
" 09 

. tt 

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Stephen, Minnie Maud.... 
Williams. Ruby Jessie 




, Roihrtttt Homo 
Bevan, Phoebe Sharrod. . . 
Bonenblust, Mary Kath- 








De Mallie, Bertha 

Flannery, Catherine Mary. . 








Lang-don, Susan Emma 

Leake. Ruth Antoinette. . . 

Me Genn. Elaa May 

Mc Mahon, Elisabeth Ruth 

Mettger, Mae Iaabelle 
Pincott. Margaret Susan... 

Priest, Helen Inicho 

Reed. Lillian Alice 

Viele. Jennie Cordelia 
Williams, Elisabeth Mills.. 

Rochisttr Slali 
Kjelberg, Rachel E 

Rcosmlt J 

Annitage. Ethel Blanche. . . 






Rooaevelt Homi . N Y.C. 

jjo W S rtb st. N. Y.C 

Werior.-ta. Montgomery co. Pa .. . 

Roosevelt Hosp.. M Y. C. 

WMtfield. Chautauqua co., N, Y . . 

3)7 W .,-.: V . N V C. . 

CareK..»-i-': :! .-.: N V 1 

Roosevelt Hosp . \ Y C. 

Roosevelt Hoap.. N Y C 

Rooaevelt H0.0 . N Y.C. 

Rooaevelt Hosp. NYC... 

Care Roosevelt Hosp . N Y.C 

Pompton l.ake. K J 

Rooseve;t Hosp.. K Y.C 

Roc-sew.- ::..... N V C 

1S3 W ,jd st.. N. Y C. car* Mrs 




Carter, Mabel Helen Jean . . 

Casey, Mary Yamell 

Daniels, Ruth Lane 

Dlclcerman. Mary Caroline . 

Duncan, Mary Agnes 

Ferr, Winone Marie 

Graham, Catherine Moffat. . 
Graham, Florence Beatrice 

Grant, Janet Gibb 

Herron, Edytbe May 

Howard, Evelyn I. V 
Howman. Pauline V.W.... 
Kirkputiick, Agnes E. A... 

Maedonnell. Lucille M 




McKerlie. Mary Bell 

Mitchener. Elsie F. (Mrs)... 

Owen, Lydia Eloise 

Parke. Marguerite 

Rutherford. Nellie 


jjs W ;,tKst..N. Y.C 

jjo W i:thst . N Y.C 

3S1 W (jtb:.; \* V 1 
.74 W R v th st . .M Y <: 

Roosevelt Hosp N Y C 

U3 P-..-1.;- : ,.v . Nveck N. Y 

Rome ■■. ■ -1; . N ¥ C. .. 

Roosc-fi M..s ; . N Y.C ,. 

Care ft ..■-:■. il-^i .*. Y.C. 

3.7 VV --'Il st . N Y. C. ... .... 

42 W. «nhst..N. Y C 

Rcnsc . '. Hosp. svth st aod *thav 
N.Y. C 




Scott, Maude Agnese 

Smedley, Arreathea M 

Smith, Marian Louise 

Stenson, Anna Lillian 




Watte. Isabel Mary 





SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



395 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, 1908- 

July 31, 1909 {continued) 
GROUP x NEW YORK SCHOOLS (continued) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



St Joachim's 

Bates, Marian Edna 

Benson. Agnes Josephine. . 

Carey, Mollie Marie 

Donihee, Alice Helena 

Parmer, Alice Theresa .... 

Finnegan, Mary Veronica 

(Sr. Mary Stella Maria) 

Lafleche, Adeline Cecilia. . . 
McCann, Anastasia Magde- 
len 



Hospital Training School 
2x8 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y, 
2x9 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y. 
218 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y. 
ax8 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y. 
528 Pearl St., Watertown, N. Y. 



Ouinn, Elisabeth M . . . 
Senecal, Loretta Hazel 
Shaver, Myrtle Anna. . 



St Joachim's Hosp., 218 Stone St., 

Watertown, N. Y 

Delta, Ontario, Can 



2x8 Stone st„ Watertown, N. Y, 
ax8 Stone St., Watertown, N. Y, 
a 18 Stone st„ Watertown, N. Y, 
2x8 Stone st., Watertown, N. Y 



Arnberg^Agnes Christina . . 

Carton, Flora Beryl 

Denison, Harriet Kate Hep- 
bourne 



St John* s Hospital Training School 



de Veer, Alice Jeanette . . . . 

{ensen, Kirsten 
.udlam, Ruth 

Munson, Ruth 

Northmore, Adeline Ger- 
trude 



Phillips, Ethel M.... 
Plunkett, Jennie. . . . 
Schneemann, Emily 
gusta , 



Au- 



Scott, Catharine Crerar 

Simpson, Annie 

Smith, Hazel May 

Smith, Helen Lowrie 

Stanley, Frances Lee 

Van Vleet, Harriet Helen. . . 



16 Irving pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 



1 



St John's Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y 



St John's Hosp., 1521 Atlantic av., 

Brooklyn, N. tf 

Van Wicklen pi., Ozone Park, N. Y. . . 

195 Ninth st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

41 Decatur st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

41 Decatur St., Brooklyn, N. Y 



DATS OF 



Grad- 
uation 



14 16 Beverly road, Flatbush, Brook- 
lyn. N. Y 

549 McDonough st., Brooklyn, N. Y. . 
41 Decatur st., Brooklyn, N. Y 



Long Island College Hosp., Brooklyn, 

N. Y 

169 Decatur st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

169 Decatur st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

xo8 Garfield pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 

St John's Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 

41 Decatur St., Brooklyn, N. Y 

xo8 Garfield pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 



Frost, Harriet.. 

Mc Donald, Catherine Effie 

Vail, Anne Louise 



St John's Riverside Hospital 

St John's Hospital, Yonkers, N. Y. . . 

4 Union pi.. Yonkers, N. Y 

St Tohn's Riverside Hosp., Yonkers, 



St Joseph's Hospital Training School 
Devine, Alice Start | 403 Landon av., Syracuse, N. Y. 

St Lawrence State Hospital Training School 
Sheehan, Agnes N | 202 Waverly av., Syracuse, N. Y 

St Luke's Hospital Training School 



Armstrong, Victoria Lena. . 
Burke, Maud Diamond (Mrs) 
Carling, Florence Evelyn . . 

Cooke, Grace Irene 

De Voe, Gertrude 

Dow, Ivy May 



Forry, Katherine Elizabeth 

Frazier, Jane Merrill 

Garland, Olive Frances 

Gulick, Emily Reed 

Hewes, Caroline K 

McDougall, Mary Mac 

Gregor 

Metcalf , Alice Maud 



Carapbellford , Ontario, Can 

420 W. xx6th st., N. Y. C 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C 

I rvington-on- Hudson, N. Y. 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C 

Upper Woodstock, New Brunswick, 

Can 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C. . . 



753 Asylum av., Hartford, Ct 
Ci -- - - 



• • • • 



barberry, Manitoba, Can 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C 

St Luke's Hosp., N. Y. C 

Sos W. 112th st., N. Y. C 



09 

09 

o 

o 



09 
09 



08 
09 
08 
08 
08 



08 
08 
08 



08 
09 
09 
09 
08 
08 
08 



06 
09 

08 



00 



02 



09 
07 
09 
09 
09 

09 
09 
09 
09 
09 
09 

09 
09 



Ex- 
amina- 
tion 



09 


4 e 


09 


07 


i e 


09 


09 


F 


09 


09 


F 


09 


08 


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09 


09 


F 


09 


09 


Je 


09 



r 



je 



£ 



I 

F 
F 



£ 



£ 



i 



09 
09 
09 
09 



09 
09 



F 09 

e 09 

F 09 

F 09 



F 09 
g 09 
F 09 



09 

09 
09 
09 
09 

09 
09 



F 09 
F 09 

F 09 



09 

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F 09 

F 09 
Je 09 



09 
09 
09 
09 
09 
09 



F 09 
F 09 



Waiver 



N 08 



Mr 09 



396 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, 1908- 

July 31, xgog (continued) 
GROUPS; NEW JsYORK SCHOOLS (continued) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



St Luke's Hospital Training School (concluded) 
Osborne, Marguerite Eliza- 
beth Adelaide 

Pogose, Weenie H 

Post. Florence 

Small, Margaret 

Swartfinger, Grace 



7 W. xo8thst. f N. Y. C... 

Tappan, N. Y 

620 W. 115th st., N. Y. C. 
4x9 W. 1x5th st., N. Y. C. . 
Monroe av„ Oneonta, N. Y 



Duerr, Lillian 

Hartmann, Anna Elise. . . . 

Mason, Gladys Anne Louise 



St Mark's Hospital Training School 



Moulton, Georgianna, 



Bayside, L. I., care Mrs W. R. Teller . . 

Germ an town. N. Y 

St Mark's Hosp., 177 Second av., 

N. Y.C 

52 W. 39th st.. N. Y. C 



Bruce, Constance Elspeth 
Campbell, Margaret Hughes 

Fellows, Clara Emma 

Hyde, Teresa Kimball 

Manget, Felicie Du Bouchet 

Piatt, Dorothy 

Piatt, Eleanor Wilson 

Reinecke, Hilda Mary 



St Mary's Free Hospital for Children 



Wessells, Henrietta. 



193 Bloor st. West, Toronto, Can. 

Harlem Hosp., N. Y. C 

550 Greene av., Brooklyn, N. Y. . 

405 W. 34th st., N. Y. C 

405 W. 34th st., N. Y. C. 
95 Randolph av., Dover 

§5 Randolph av., Dover 
t Mary's Free Hosp. 
407 W. 34th st., N. Y. C 
aox Union av., Peekskill, N. Y 



Br. N. J.. 
Br, N. J. . 
. for Chi 



hildren, 



Lynch, Anna M 

McCabe, Sadie V 

Marwick, Katherine Helena 
O'Rourke, Mary A. J 



St Mary's Hospital Training School 



Smith, Emily M. 



417 W. 145th st., N. Y. C 

54 Tompkins pi., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 

2340 Seventh av., N. Y. C 

St Mary's Hosp. Training School, St 

Mark's av., Brooklyn. N. Y 

449 Jefferson av., Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 



Conlin. Mary Helena 
Conroy, Helena K 



St Peter's Hospital Training School 



Spellacy, Anna V. 



5 Fulton st., Glens Falls. N. Y 
4x1 23d st., Watervliet, N. Y. 



73 West st., Albany, N. Y. 



St Vincent's 
Bowman, Catherine Mary.. 
Clement, Marguerite Eva. . . 
Cloughcrty ; Ella Veronica. . 
Connelly, Kathryn Pauline. 

Doyle, Margaret J 

Finley, Katherine Marcello. 

Gaire, Margaret Mary 

Marques. Caroline V 

O'Conneil, Mary Dempsey.. 

Piper, Mary Frances 

Reddy, Ellen Elizabeth 



Hospital Training School 

2 Church st.. Glens Falls, N. Y 

St Vincent's Hosp.. W. 12th st., N. Y. C. 

146 W. 83d st., N. Y. C 

158 W. X2th st., N. Y. C 

149 E. 63d st., N. Y. C 

126 W. 12th st.. N. Y. C 

114 E. 53d st., N. Y. C 

St John s Hosp., L. I. City, N. Y 

156 W. 12th st., N. Y. C 

St Vincent's Hosp., N. Y. C 

99 Hooker av., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. . 



Agnew, Hazel Eugenie 
Armstrong, Lauretta Ger- 
trude 

Clark, Margaret L 

Devlin. Elizabeth 

Ernst, Frances Elizabeth.. . 

Haynes, Lupy Cutting 

Ott, Margaret Grace 

Shea, Mary Magdalene 

Soden, Edith Carolyn 

Stevenson, Margaret J . . . . 

* Requirements not met. 



Samaritan Hospital Training School 



Port Henry, N. Y 



Samaritan Hospital, Troy, N. Y. 

559 Second av., Troy, N. Y 

1726 Fifth av., Trov, N. Y 

149 8th st., Troy, N. Y 



Samaritan Hosp., Troy, N. Y, 
261 Fifth av., Troy, N._ Y 



DATS OP 



Grad- 
uation 



365 Fourth av., Troy, N. Y 

Samaritan Hospital, Troy, N. Y 

Young Women's Association, 33 2d st., 
Troy, N. Y 



ox 

o 

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09 

09 



1 



09 

96 

09 

98 



•9 

09 
09 



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09 
09 



08 
09 
08 

09 
08 



09 
09 
09 
09 



09 
09 

3 
98 
08 
09 
97 
09 
09 
08 



Ex- 

amina- 

tion 



£ 



e 09 

F 09 
Je 09 



Je 09 
Je 09 



J 



i 



i 



9 



I 



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1 



09 
09 



e 09 

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F 09 



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09 
09 

09 

09 
09 




09 

09 
09 
09 

■ • ■ 

09 
09 



e 09 

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09 



Waiver 



Mr 08 

F ' ' e 9 
O "08 

F 09 



Mr 09 
Mr 09 



09 


Je 


09 


09 


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09 


09 


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09 


08 


F 


09 


08 


F 


09 


09 


Je 


09 


08 


F 


09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



397 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. 

July 31, 2909 {continued) 
GROUP x NBW YORK SCHOOLS (concluded) 



I, 1908- 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Hughes, Sheila Aggie 
Maher, Mary Ellen 



Saratoga Hospital Training School 

a 16 Washington st., Saratoga Springs, 

9x6 Washington st., Saratoga Springs, 
N.Y 



Sydenham Hospital Training School 
Schulte, Wilhelmina | axo E. 64th st., N. Y. C . . . 



Syracuse Homeopathic Hospital 

\ [ xao W. Castle St., Syrac 

Harrer.Kathryne Madelaine 390 Madison av., Albany, N. Y. 



Brocks' Margaret. 



Castle st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . . 



Syracuse Hospital for Women and Children 
Bendall, Laura Louise 



Brackett, Lucy Belle 
Crockett. Elizabeth Helen. 
Erway, Helen Arabella. . . . 

Gile, Florence M 

Graham, Mary Ann 

Grout, Annie J 

Kinyon, Georgian a Bell. . . . 

Lucey, Florence Alice 

Montana, Ada Belle 



918 W. Colvin st., Syracuse, N. Y. . 
X214 W. Genesee st., Syracuse, N. Y 

Jamesville, N. Y., R. F. D. 1 

3x1 W. 14th st., Elmira Heights, N.Y 
xxx Shonnard St., Syracuse. N. Y. . . 
xxoi E. Genesee st., Syracuse, N. Y. 
ix x Shonnard st., Syracuse, N. Y. . . 
ax8 W. Colvin St., Syracuse, N. Y. . 
xxox E. Genesee st., Syracuse, N. Y. 
xxox E. Genesee St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



Thrall Hospital Training School 
Dunning, Lena Elisabeth . .1 Thrall Hosp., Middletown, N. Y. 
Starkweather, Amy Wini- 
fred I Thrall Hosp., Middletown, N. Y. 



Troy Hospital Training School 

Burke, Mary Agnes 

Corcoran, Catherine E 

Head, Elizabeth Josephine. 
Hopkins, M. Rose (Sister) . 

Kirby, M. Cyril (Sister) 

Noonan, Bridget Monica. . . 
Pattison, Ethel A 



35 Jackson sL, N. Adams, Mass 

594 19th st., Watervliet, N. Y 

Cor. 9th and Hoosick st., Troy, N. Y. . 

Troy Hosp., Troy, N. Y 

Troy Hosp., Troy, N. Y 

6th st., Waterford, N.Y 

18x0 5th av., Troy, N.Y 



Bennett, Mabel Adelle . 
Henneberger, Edwina. . . 
Liscomb, Maud Lillian . . 



Utica General Hospital Training School 



44 Scott st., Utica, N. Y 

356 Blandina St., Utica, N. Y. . 
xoo Brinkeroff av., Utica, N. Y. 



Deyo, Mildred 
Rood, Lena Blanche 



Vassar Brothers* Hospital Training School 

Vassar Brothers Hosp., Poughkecpsie, 



Smith, Sarah Ann Virginia . 
Workman, Celia J 



N.Y 
Vassar Brothers Hosp., Poughkeepsie, 

N. Y 

90 Virginia av., Poughkeepsie, N. Y.. 
140 Montgomery St., Poughkeepsie, 



White Plains Hospital Training School 



Ford 7 Rachel 

Mernraan, Mary Jane 



Willard State Hospital Training School 



State Hosp., Willard, N. Y 
Willard, N. Y 



DATS OP 



Grad- 
uation 



09 
09 

07 

08 
09 

08 
08 
08 
08 

II 

09 
09 
08 
09 

09 
09 



09 
08 

09 
03 
99 
09 
08 



09 
06 
09 



08 

08 
06 

09 



09 



99 
94 



Ex- 
amina- 
tion 



Jo 09 
Je 09 

F 09 



Je 09 
F 09 



Je 09 
F 09 
09 
09 
09 
09 
F 09 
Je 09 
F 09 
Je 09 



r 



Je 09 
Je 09 



Je 09 

F 09 

Je 09 



* 



c 09 
09 



i 



e 09 
e 09 
Je 09 



F 09 

F 09 

Je 09 

Je 09 



Waiver 



Ag 08 
Ag 08 



ja 09 



Ja 09 
O 08 



* Requirements not met. 



398 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. i, z 

July 31, 1909 {continued) 

GROUP a 8CHOOLS IH OTHER STATES 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



District of Columbia 
Freedman's Hospital Training. School 

Carter, Edith Maria 

Tyler, Elizabeth Williams. . 
Wilson, Emma Carew 



ntngz 

So Harrison St., New Rochelle, N. Y. 

154 W. 6ad st., N. Y. C 

X54 W. 6ad st., N. Y. C 



Illinois 

ispital 7 
Jackson, Esther Theodore. . | Ellis Hosp., Schenectady, N. Y, , 



Augustana Hospital Training School 
" "Ulis ~ - 



Maryland 
Johns Hopkins Hospital Training School 
Freese, Francina | Cayuga, N. Y 



Massachusetts 

Boston City Hospital Training School 

Bell, Jessie May | 157 Henry st., Brooklyn, N. Y 

McLean Hospital Training School 
McCarver, Margaret | 131 E. 78th st., N. Y. C 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Phillips, Anna Crawford. . . I 4a W. 46th st., N. Y. C 

Sutherland, Myral I Corning Hosp., Corning, N. Y 

Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital 
Man well, Theodosia Parker. | 219 Bryant st., Buffalo, N. Y 



New England Hospital for Women and Children 
Hill, Aurora | 31 Dartmouth st., Boston, Mass, 



Newton Hospital Training School 
Watson, Susie Augusta .... I S. R. Smith Infirmary, Tompkinsville, 



S. I., N. Y. 



Minnesota 

Asbury and Rebecca Methodist Episcopal Deaconess Hospital 

and Home 
Greene, Eleanor L I Chateaugay, N. Y 



Hew Jersey 
Christ Hospital Training School 
Whyte, Lily May | 115 W. 84th st., N. Y. C 

Elisabeth General Hospital Training School 
Evans, Edith Annie I 15 Trull st., Dorchester, Mass 



Morristown Memorial Hospital 
Furgerson, Ada Mae I 13 J Pine st., Morristown, N. J 

Orange Memorial Hospital 

Gaston, Agnes Jane Wilson. I 340 W. 24th st., N. Y. C 

Riter, Eudora A I 24s W. 14th st., N. Y. C 

Ohio 
Good Samaritan Hospital 
Foley, Josephine B | 137 W. axst St., N. Y. C 



# • • • • 



Pennsylvania 

Philadelphia General Hospital 
Bescherer, Frances Hamil 

ton 

Hearle, Susan Caroline .... 
Noma, Hattie Viola 



390 Madison av., Albany. N. Y. . 
Albany Hosp., Albany, N. Y. . . . 
Ellis Hosp., Schenectady, N. Y. . 



University of Pennsylvania Hospital 
Schulze, Anna L | Saratoga Hosp., Saratoga, N. Y 



DATS OF 



Grad 
uation 



98 
96 

99 



04 



ox 



OS 



04 



07 
00 



ox 
OS 

OS 

OS 

09 

OS 

03 

89 
93 

99 



96 

91 

04 

98 



Ex- 
amina- 
tion 



Je 09 



Je 09 



Waiver 



O 

N 
D 



08 
08 
08 



D 08 



Mr 09 



Je 09 



Je 09 



Ja 09 



Je 09 



O 08 



Ap 09 



O 08 



N 08 



Ag 08 



Vt 09 
P 09 



Je 09 



I 



1 09 
_1 09 
Ag 08 



Mr 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



399 



Nurses licensed at examinations and under the waiver Aug. x, i 

July 31, 2909 {concluded) 
GROUP 3 SCHOOLS IN OTHER STATES (concluded) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



Ontario, Can. 

Victoria Hospital Training School 
Chichester, Caroline E. L.. . I 47 Eagle St., Albany, N. Y. 
Davis, Agnes | 50 W. 97th st. f N. Y. C . . . 



Quebec, Can. 
Montreal General Hospital 
Taylor, Marian Anne I 54 W. 37th St., N. Y. C 



DATS OP 



Grad- 
uation 



9* 
96 



05 



Ex- 

anima- 
tion 



Je 09 



Waiver 



O 08 



Je 09 



Certified public accountant certificates issued on examinations Aug. x, 1908- 

Jnly 31, 1909 



Aderer, Alexander 
aAnzer, William H. S. 
aAtldns, Harold B. 
Atkins, Robert 
Banks, Howard M. 
Batchelder, Francis J. 
aBauer, George P. jr 
a Bell, Hermon F. 
aBrown, Robert H. 
oCraemer, William 
Dillman. Albert P. 
Doty, Albert M. 
aDuff , Daniel V. 
aDuffy, Edward J. 
oEhrhch, Theodore 
aPairbanks. Kenneth 
aParrell, Tames P. 
Pernald, HenryB. 
Firth, Joseph W. 
G unts, James D. 
Graef, Joseph E. 
aGray, Elmer O. 
aHarper, Donald L. 
aHawkins, Arthur H. 
In addition to above 



Hip well, Herbert 
a Home, Henry Abbott 
alvimey, Charles J. 
ojacobson, Charles 
Johnson, William B. 
oKarmel, Abraham 
aMcCormack. Hugh A. 
aMcHeffey, T. Leonard 
Miller, Philip N. 
Neville, Francis D. 
Peet, David K. 
Scovell, Clinton H. 
aShipway. George W. 
Smith, Edward C. 
Smith. P. Harold 
Stark, Dana P. 
Stone, Edmund N. 
Thornton, Prank W. 
aWeston, George, jr 
Whittlesey, WUlis Savage 
Wildman, John R. 
aWillvonseder, Ernest 
aWinans, De Kay 
Wood, John Frederick E. 
43 candidates were examined but were unsuccessful. 



a Awaiting decision of board. 



The following received certificates to practise optometry on examination 

Aug. 1, 1908- July 31, 1909 

Brown, Turner Chase 540 W. 143d st. t N. Y. C 

Dassance, Forrest Newfield, N. Y 

Dil worth, Patrick Augustine 744 Lexington av., N. Y. C 

Failing, Wilson R 388 Welling st.. Richmond Hill, N. Y 

Fuller, Morris Leslie Phoenix, N. Y 

Hahn, John Frederick 4x3 Sterling pi., Brooklyn, N. Y 

Hayden, Daniel Elias 207 Garfield av., Syracuse, N. Y 

Kelsey, Albert W Franklinville, N. Y 

Lockwood, Robert M x Maiden Lane, N. Y. C 

McMullen, Horace Stanley 194 Herkimer St., Buffalo, N. Y 

Marsh, Harry N E. Main St., Fredonia, N. Y 



Mitchell, Clarence A 379 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y 

Neil, William Herbert 37 Gardner bldg., Utica, N. Y 

Pattison, Leroy C Westport, Essex 00., N. Y 

Quick. Vernon H Catatonk, Tioga co., N. Y 

Rockefeller, Pisher D 54 Hamilton av.. Auburn, N. Y 

Ryer, Elmer Le Roy aoo Broadway, N. Y. C 

Seiko witz, Isidor J 769 E. 158th st., N. Y. C 

Simon, Jacob C 61 St James pl. ( Buffalo, N. Y 

Stone, Fred Clayton Y. M. C. A. bldg.. Liberty st., Warren, Pa 

Strickler, Howard Roswell 136 Buffum St., Buffalo, N. Y 

West, Clark Darwin is E. 3d st., Jamestown, N. Y 



Exp. 
Sch. 
Exp. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Exp. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sch. 
Sen. 
Sen. 
Sch. 



400 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x 9 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 19089 chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, ch. 49) 

Date of 
cer- 

NAME ADDRESS tificatc 

Abbott. Luther G Perry, N. Y Jl 09 

Abell. Andy J Lilly Dale, N. Y Je 09 

Abell.JuliaA Lilly Dale. N. Y Je 09 

Abramowitz, Henry J 217-19 E. 105th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Abramson, Max 9536 8th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ackerman, Prank A ax Reynolds Arcade, Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Adams, Robert Gordon A. A 16 W. 134th St., N. Y. C D 08 

Adner, Abraham 574 ad av., Troy, N. Y Ja 09 

Agens, Ernest Allen Lowville, N. Y D 08 

Ager, Simon H 145 Avenue C., N. Y. C D 08 

Ailrin, Floyd L 346 Main st.. Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Aitchison, John Rankin Bayside, L. I., N. Y Ap 09 

A ken, J. Henry Ticonderoga, N. Y Ap 09 

Albee, John W Rosooe, N. Y Ap 09 

Albin, Archer Overton 1427 60th st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Aldridge, Leroy W 520 Brisbane bldg., Buffalo, N. Y D 08 

Alexander, Abraham 2x00 7th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Alexander, Henri P 12 E. 125th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Alexander, Jacob 6a E. 125th st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Alexander, Joseph 34 W. 125th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Alexander, Louis 106 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Alger, Warren W 6th av. & 33d St.. N. Y. C D 08 

Allen, Delmer Clyde 56 W. 1 asth st.. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Allen, Lewis 37 Greene st., Amsterdam, N. Y D 08 

Allen, William A Port Chester, N. Y Ap o 

Alter, Jay W Gloversville, N. Y D o 

Amadon, Fred L S. Main st., Ticonderoga, N. Y Ap o 

Ambs, Daniel 73 a Melrose av., N. Y. C D o 

Ammann, George Sylvan 1520 Third av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Amols, Louis 435 Fulton St., Brooklyn. N. Y Ap 09 

Andersen, Christian 261 1 Atlantic av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Anderson, Frank Claud 54a Columbus av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Anderson, Nelson 33 Front St., Ballston Spa, N. Y Je 09 

Anderson, Swan Edward 10 E. ad st., Jamestown, N. Y Je 09 

Anderson. William Henry 1 N. Water st., Ogdensburg, N. Y D 08 

Andrus, George L 4x5 Main st. E., Rochester, N. Y . . % D 08 

Angles. William Frederick Walden, N. Y D 08 

Applebaum, Ralph S 303 Throop av., Brooklyn, N. Y Je 09 

Ariessohn, Louis 510 Amsterdam av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Arnemann, Martin 504 13th St., College Point, N. Y D 08 

Arniel, William J Brockport, N. Y Ja 09 

Arnzen, Benjamin W 143 Fulton St., N. Y. C, care C. E. Cordeau.. . . Ja 09 

Arrington, Edward Everett 39 Clinton av. S., Rochester. N. Y D 08 

Arzt, Joseph 339 East 719th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ascher, Clarence too State st., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Ash, John Walter Lestershire, N. Y Ja 09 

Ash, Stephen Bernard 629 Madison st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Ashley, John J. jr 1327 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Ashman, Maurice Wolf 168 Dean st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Assetta, Caesar 31 Prince St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Austin, Lewis N North Collins, N. Y Je 09 

Avignone, Frank 50 Mac Dougal st., N. Y. C M 09 

Ayers, John S Newark Valley, N. Y Je 09 

Babcock, Lewis H Canisteo, N. Y D 08 

Babenzien, Max F 996 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Badgley. Henry C 317 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Bailat, Alfred, jr 199 Bridge St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Bailey, Charles 62 Ford St., Ogdensburg, N. Y Ja 09 

Baird, Hugh 34 Ormond pi., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Baird, John Smith 4 Paddock block, Watertown, N. Y Ap 09 



Baird, William H 63 Main st._ E^ Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Balderson, Frank S Theresa. N. Y.V. I!!!!!".!!!'.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! D 08 



Baker, Roland H ._. Madison, _N. _Y Ap oj 

09 



Baldwin, Charles Ernest Olean, N. Y Ap 

Balfour. William S 75 Mohawk st., Cohoes, N. Y Ap 09 

Balizer, Adolph 1333 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Balizer, Isidore 1223 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Ball, Samuel 34 E. 116th st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Ball, Sanford Assel Potsdam, N. Y Je 09 

Balmer, John Henry as Grand av., Corona, L. I Ap 09 

Bantel, William Frederick 70 Sumner av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Barber, William Theodore Belmont. N. Y Je 09 

Barclift, Fred Emil 164-66 Montague st., Brooklyn, N. Y., care 

Richard E. Walsh, Counselor at law M 00 

Baringer, Edward Monroe Gloversville, N. Y D 08 

Barkas, Morris 1x57 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 401 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i 9 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 
cer- 

NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Barker, Albert Suydam 23 Flatbush av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Barker, Jonathan M Randolph, N. Y M 09 

Barker, J. Ray. Niobe, N. Y M 09 

Barnes, Clare Don Gowanda, N. Y Ja 09 

Barnes, Harrison 729 Manhattan av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Barnes, Newel P Conewango Valley, N. Y Ja 09 

Barnett, Arthur Delance Crown Point, N. Y Ap 09 

Barnett, John Walter 694 Sackett st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Barrett, William H 482 Washington st v Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Barron, Edward E Wappingers Palls, N. Y Ap 09 

Barry, William 615 State St., Schenectady, N. Y Ja 09 

Bartholomew, Prank Ellicottvilje, N. Y Ap 09 

Basser, Pinkus D Lake Placid, N. Y D 08 

Bassinger, George H Glens Palls, N. Y Ap 09 

Bates, Edwin Eugene 8 Wallace bldg., Cortland, N. Y D 08 

Bauer, Albert 336 E. 90th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Bauer, Conrad E Waldorf Astoria, N. Y. C, care P. A. Meyrowitz. . Ap 09 

Bauer, Henry J 401 Bridge st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Bauer, Hermann 1266 Lexington av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Bauer, Pauline A 1366 Lexington av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Bauer, William C 310 Main st., Poughkeepsie, N. Y % . Ta 09 

Baum. Menzo E Tully, N. Y D 08 

Bausch, Edward E 6 Main st. E., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Bausch, George 400 Walnut pi. , Syracuse, N. Y . . D 08 

Bausch, George R 6 Main st. E.. Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Beadle, Daniel W 1x5 College pi., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Bean, Charles W Warrensburg, N. Y Ap 09 

Beard, James Joseph so* 5th av./N. Y. C D 08 

Beardslev, Erford C Sidney, N. Y Ap 09 

Bebus, Franklin E Harrison, N. Y., Box 480 Ja 09 

Bechtold, Robert Francis 1x9 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Beck, Alexander 1576 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Beck, John, jr Ravena.N. Y Ja 09 

Becker, Barnett L 203 E. Broadway, N. Y. C D 08 

Becker, David 203 E. Broadway, N. Y. C Ja 09 

Becker, John A Delmar, N. Y D 08 

Becker, Louis B no E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Becker, Samuel 429 Clinton st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Beckwith, Emma Marilla 9 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Beers, Leonard E Apulia Station, N. Y Ja 09 

Bell, G. Pierson Waterloo, N. Y D 08 

Bell, John Edwin 18 Ford St., Ogdensburg, N. Y Ja 09 

Bendtx, Arthur J 800 3d av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Benedict, Creswell Main st.. Mount Kisco, N. Y Ap 09 

Benedict, Edward J , ox Main st. E., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Benjamin, Alvin LivingstonvOle, N. Y Ap 09 

Benjaminson, David 250 Hart St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Bennett, Francis C 3 N. Main st., Gloversville, N. Y D 08 

Bensel, Leonard J 2079 Lexington av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Benson, Charles Herbert 851 Lake St., Elmira, N. Y Ja 09 

Berger, John 504 E. x 7th St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Berger, Paul 151 Fulton st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Bergman, Abraham 181 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Berlin, Joseph Irving Phoenix bldg.. Room 93, 16 Court St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y Ap 09 

Berman, Charles 151 Hudson av., Rochester, N. Y Ap 09 

Bernstein, Henry G 135 E. 1x3th st., N. Y. C Je 09 

Bernstein, Joseph 920 Grape St., Syracuse, N. Y Ja 09 

Bernstein, Max 200 High St., Elmira, N . Y Ja 09 

Bertrand, Henry Stephen Warrensburg, N. Y Ja 09 

Bessett, Joseph H 121 Saratoga av., Northside, Cohocs, N. Y Ap 09 

Best, Albert James x z Genesee St., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Bestor, Harry Martin 29 Clinton av. S., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Betts, Charles Henry 41 Niagara St., Tonawanda, N. Y Ap 09 

Beverly, George Curtis Fort Edward, N. Y Ap 09 

Bevillard, Edward P 25 Steuben St., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Bickelmann, Charles 255 State st., Schenectady, N. Y Ap 09 

Biederman, Charles Innes, sr . . . . 129 Main st., Oneonta, N. Y Je 09 

Biederman, Charles Ogden Oneonta, N. Y D 08 

Bilello, Philip 18 Jefferson st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08. 

Billingham, Prank L 177 Bay 20th st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Bishop, John Bruce Canaseraga, N. Y Ja 09 

Bissell. Williston W 91 Main st. E., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Black, Minnie 1 70 B. 78th st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Black. William E 234 Koons av., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Blackburn, Daniel O Lockwood, N. Y Ap 09 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Certificate! to practise optometry were issued to the folio wine Aug. i, i 
T ..«_ __»... , I9o8i ci^pjgj ^ (Pnbii c Health Law : 



Blair, Prodi W. 



:. KaDuruM Olga . . 

;!•»»:. J:ho Wj'jrt 

B anck. Joachim H . 

B ink Bernard Herman.. . 



. Brooklyn, N, v 

H..N. Y.C 

t.. But Aaron. N. Y 
.. Brooklyn. N. Y 



X s .. 



Vu« at,. Bro 
UsUen Unt. 
S, Portland a 
N. Y.. 



. Brooklyn. N. Y.. 



4>e Plymouth av.. Rochester. N. Y., 

ilmB LiconaN Y 



BSodgett. M< 

B odgette. Fred N . Clenfk 

B ueetnoe. llynan S 

Blum, Henry A 

Blum, Myer 

B umberg. laadofB. 
B umbcra. Uyer . 
B ufflb* rg. Saeouei J 



'.V 



t , Syracuse. N, Y. 
,rJ. Y.C. 

M^tale"™ Auh-jrn. N*'Y .'. . . ! * ! 
Mj Madison st , Syracuse, N. Y. 

44 Slate at.. Auburn, N. Y 

45 Rlnogton »t . N.Y C . 

»)i Wulougbbyst., Brooklyn. N. 
ill E..)dst.. N. Y.C 

- Third at.. Du ' 



>»„«;? 



(. N. Y. 
oldyc. N. ■ 



■J«B 



Brenner Uev<d 



186 G«lf-«e« St.. — - . 

. jij Pulton «.. Brooklyn, N. Y 

Ball a*. Bayside, L. I,. SI. Y. 

oij Stbav.. M. Y C. can L Lewie 

Rait Worcester. N Y . 

1074 Jackson av . N Y.C 

Hobart.N. Y 

. n B. Mem it. Jameelown. N. Y 

• ,(., S.itfii . Srt.ei.Kia.ly. N, Y 

Glens PaLi. tf. Y. . . 

Ssratosa Spnngt, N. Y 

Glens Palls. hYY... 

. 6 Colbert Court, Rochester. N. Y 

. Lyon Mouctain. N. Y... . ......... 

. Betavie. N. Y 

Weedsport.N. Y 

. W.tlune. N. Y. 

LowvUle.N. Y 

. Oneonte. N. Y. . 

104 Kosecbloom bids.. Syncuse, N. V 

.o Mmn «t.. Attica. R Y. 

BlonmvUle, N. Y 

6)6 Second ev.N Y. C 

699 Grand it . Brooklyn. N Y . 

176 Jowmh av.. Rochester. N. Y... 

(JleoaPaaa-N Y 

4»J E. 117th at.. N. Y.C 

. 117) jctb St.. Brooklyn, I" 



.Sj Brnadwi 



Bntcb. Brayton 
Broban. James Edward 
Broker. John Albert.... 
Bronner John G-. 
Brooke. Benjamin H... . 

Brooke. Irta iBj Broadwi 

Brooke, Isidore. * Fleibusb a' 

Brooks. Joseph K. 54 Great Jooei 

Brooka. Stephen H. . . "9" Broadway. , 

Brown. Bert Crouch Coboctoo, N. Y. . . 

Brown. Iferlm Jay . 184 Bmslle St., Buffalo. N. Y 

Brown. Millard R Addiaon. N. Y. . 

Brown RelphC Riveras:' N Y 

ii V-. Albert " 

1. Wuliam E. 

Buehl, Russ*:i tJttrander 
Bueltmsnn. Pndenck A. 



—It."*.!:::: 

rooklyn. N. Y 

ruoklyn. N Y.. 
Brooklyn. N. Y 
. N. Y.C 

N, Y.C 



Brundldge, Albert S WaJden. (•/. Y 

* Painted Poet. N, Y 

. 04 Grant it.. B-j»a:o,.N\ Y , . 



Bull. Dav.d W7 

Bunte. I.iidwig C. . ...... 

Bunny. Arthur Waller 

Burbank, Charlea 1. . . . 

Burchard. Jjbo Altrt ■■'. 

Burghaf.i. George C. . . 
Burg hat'. I Udj Ffoeman 
BurEans. Edgar Blunge . 
Burke. Edward P.. 



, '■ .•■.. 



N. Y. C 



68 Bowery ,_N. Y. C. . . . . 

Owego.lTV 

Roselle Park. N. J. . . 

■^raiac Lake. N. Y 

.S E. 1581b at . N. Y.C. . 

■■■ ier. N Y 

xinftoo av.N. Y.C 



K5 



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i," 


3 



Geneva 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Certificates to practise optometry were loaned to the following Aug. i, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under lawi 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 



Burke! William IUa 

Burlinghan . H >Hft3d Yates. 
BurerHenrr Walatm . 



Burstein, Sam-.r; h'tmt 
Burtiss. James Robert . . 
Burton, Frederick I«ble , . 



ADDRESS 

Wolcott.N, Y. 

. W. Martinsburt, Lewie co., N.Y, 



134 O.W.I. 



rU'.i ;urw ■-» 
me. N V 



. . ....x. N. Y.. 

N. Y, C 

Utic*. N, Y ... 



Buskirk. C>,er:es 



Cotaoes N V .R. P. D. 1 

« Triangle b:<1n . Rocheiter. N Y... 
. So Third St.. Troy. N. Y 



__...„ .„,..._ N.Y.C. 

Campbell. CU.rlrs RLrkwell. . Cameron MiKt. N V 

C*a*T C Kdward James 4 l*lie »l . R>ch&e;.1 Springs, 

Capita. OaMM Alfred T>8 Myrtle u.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

Cerbino. David ...Ml" ' ' 



i. N Y . 



Cariin, Walter Edward 130 Sixtt 

Cm. Prank I . 18 Divisi 

Can. JamesM - ° " 

Carr. .■o*eph J., 



Cohen, Nathan... 
Cohen, Samuel . . . 
Cohen Samuel J.. 



PortEweo. NY. 

Deposit. N. Y.... 

Brooklyn. N. Y. . 
.. Alhsr.y. N. V 

..,8. Meado* at . Itbaea, N. Y 
. =117 M..1. si. N'.aaara Fall.. N. 

aaalCaiom .New R.s telle. N Y. . 
. >o Court at . Binghamlon. N. Y . . 

4j Sixth av.N.T" C 

N.Rose. NY 

Cortland. N. Y 

. 417 E. jtittt.. N Y.C 

1710 W«k» av.. Bronx. N. Y C. . 

08 Moore at . Brooklyn. NY 

. Philmont.N, Y ... 

sii Frost av . RocliesWr. N. Y. .. 



GloveravLle. 

, Norwich. N. Y. . 

jib Fultoo «.. Brooklyn. N, Y. 



N~™. ... 

75 Mmn s! .^Buffalo. N. Y ..... 
) Main «t. W. Rochester. N V 

5 Main at . Oneida. N, Y 

Market at., Amsterdam. N Y 



iClansr.Hon bldg.ftiw. N. Y.. . 

5 Triangle bldR.. Rcch's-.er. N Y 

ape EaSngtcm e» a N. Y. C . ... 

431 S. EaHnaet .Syracuse. N, Y... 
. CohocUn.N Y... 

Caoandaig-ja, N. Y.. 

Jamaice 4 Myrtle av . Richmond 11 

Catsldll. N. Y.... 

Honeoye Pulta, N. Y. ... .. 

133 Stai* at.. Schenectady. NY, 

Caienovta, N.Y. 

. De Kalb JunctH>n. N. Y 

43 Mass av . Buffalo. N. Y 

71 Pike « i'u- >!i:». V Y 
. 440 Fullon tt . Brooklyn. N. Y. . . . 

Ashville. N. Y ... . 



404 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, 190S- 
*"'" " — J ~ ' -limptei 460 (Public Health Law igog, 



ADDRESS tificate 

106 8. )d »v.. Hi Vernon, NY . Ap eg 

>tS Stanton at.. N. Y, C Ap « 

PaAbvilto. N V.... D 08 



J. o 9 

la 09 

Ap o 9 



. £'*! ... 

Mein.t.. Woudhull. N. Y J« eg 

. Lyon.. NY Ja og 

Corinth. N. Y Jo eg 

- Own. N, Y b el 

U> § Sl.= r. tt . Elmlra, N. Y D at 

Center Moncbee. L I , N. Y. . . n n« 

3'' S Sallna at . SyiuiiH, N. Y 

Caaenovie. Madison CO.. N, Y . . 
. MtMorri.. N. Y. 

Port Covington. N, Y 

. )i NtMtu ilj N Y. C Ja eg 

at Main it.. PtuthiMj. N. Y Ap 09 

>6t Stein-ayav. L. 1. City, N. Y... Ap 09 

. ijj Broadway, Buffalo. N. V. Ja 00 

Huntington. NY D ol 

ijj Broadway. Buflaj., N, Y Ja 09 

IJT W. 1,8th M. N. Y. C Ap 09 

. .16 P.. i.dtb tt . K. Y. C. . . . . . . Ap 09 

Sidney. IS Y, ._ .. ... .... Ja 09 

. 16 N. Broadway. Yonks-re.' N. Y.'.".'.'.".' '.'.'.'.'. Jc eg 

. Salem. N. Y Ap t» 

«r. N. Y . . D oS 



.. N. Y.C Ja. 

. N Y Ap 09 

Riverbead. L. I .. N. Y. D ol 



Pwn;«l Pi 

suchampton, N. Y . 



', HUton.N Y '...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Ja eg 

Plallaburg. NY Ap eg 

. t) Gouverneur pi., N. Y. C . Ap eg 

Bt Lcungton »- M v r >« » 

work Falla. 1 



-..., . _ . . aaway, Troy. N, Y \ ... '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. D el 

Cox. Richard H so Grand n -- - 



an. George W. M . 



■ -. , Albany. N. Y 
59th U.S.YC . 



Crayton.Rueeelt Edward j William at.. Glen* Fella. N Y D 08 

Crnnin, Come .-j Jiim-i >.■> ¥■.:■.„•- %■ . :.irr, Fn. «. «\pf; ■ ■■-. . S V J. 09 

Creasy. John J. .. . t.6 Pn-*;*ct ... Bi.- :.',vn. N. Y ... Ja og 

- - - William C ,,C™«eti.\Vuburu.N Y D eS 



?Xd%- 



. . . N. Y. C '. 
(ui-U'.d. N. Y 



Cnrren.John 5* W. i.jtb at . N. Y C Ap ea 

Curtia. William.... £je Manhattan av.. Bmrklyn. N Y D at 

Cmhing, CbarSp. FreHenck . . Arr.de bldfl - J Pall..-. . Niagara PeU*. N. V. . Ja eg 

Cu.hing, Willi. Eerie Arcade bids . j Pell. f... N^gare Pa;:.. N. Y. . Ja 09 

Dachtera, Andre" J. . *B W. ,, s ih at . N Y C Ap eg 

Deehtera, WlCm Maxianliac. . . w. W. m:hn K Y.C.I Apeg 

Dadd, Benjamin 5t» >d av , N. Y. C Ap eg 

Dahm. Charlea Oliver Main at . Breweter. N. Y Ap 00 

Dailev. Clmreiiie : ftlnwrevilta K \ . D 08 

.'lett.burg. N'.'Y'.. '.'....'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. D of 

Dolgevdle. N. Y Ap 09 

—.,, ..-.,., .«,« 110 Broadway. N. YC . Ja 09 

Daly. Joaeph Michael. . . i8j8 Itb av.. N. Y. C. Apoo 

DamTSn.Her-r-.ar: 8 S t ■■~"::- ■':»* av . N V Ap 09 

Daniel.. Charlea A GJbertvllle^ N. Y Ap eg 

Daniel., George H whitoty'. Point. N. Y Ap og 

Daniel.. George R 160 1 Union at . OJeeo.. N. Y M eg 

Daniel.. John I> Veiwo. ... Albion. N. Y . . Ap eg 

Darling. Dealer H Guilford, N. Y. Ap og 

Damm. Jared A (.:»*«-.;■»-,, *. N V D oS 

DavidoH, BenjamiD c-S ft. te,th «... N, Y. C. D 08 

Davidum, Adela tgt Avenue A, N. Y. C. . - . Ap og 

Daviea. David Stephen . . . OrUkany Palla. N. Y. . . Jl 09 

Davi.. Beojamio i] WOly av., Liberty. N. Y . . . . Ap og 

Davie. Edward L Polaaki. N. Y. D oi 

Davia. John jS Kins it. Troy. N. Y . . Ja 09 

Day^OjcarE Mohawk. N. Y -Ja og 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 405 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAMB ADDRESS tificate 

Delfox, Paul 5x8 Greene av. t Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

De Long. Otis C 193 Main st. t Oneonta, N. Y D 08 

Dembo, Leopold 1686 3d av., N. Y. C Ap 00 

Dembo, Rae Silverstone 3a Court St., Bingham ton, N. Y D 08 

Dembo, Samuel Barian 32 Court St., Binghamton, N. Y D 08 

Dengler, William P 40 W. x asth St.. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Dennin, Attfield Clark 326 Smith st., Brooklyn, N. Y Jl 09 

de Tartas^Augustus R 408 Lenox av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

©9 
09 
09 



Dettling, Paul Emil 658 Clinton St., Buffalo. N. Y Je 

De Vaney, William Joseph 57 Cherry St., Geneva, N. Y Ja 

Devin, John C 55 W. 131st St., N. Y. C M 

De Witt, Ambrose Arnold 8 Columbia av., Maspeth, L. I., N. Y Ap 09 

De Witt, Hugo 23,8 W. iaad st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Dey, Samuel C Pillmore, N. Y Ap 09 

Dey, Stuart P Geneva, N. Y D 08 

Deyoe, Simeon De Witt Cortland, N. Y..R. P. D. 3 D 08 

Dibble, Amasa Parker Westfield, N. Y D 08 

Dibble, Gains Halsey Unadilla, N. Y Ja 09 

Dick, John David 7x6 State st., Watertown, N. Y D 08 

Dicbold, Albert J 1227 Jefferson st., Buffalo, N. Y Je 09 

Diehl, Herman Jamestown, N. Y Ja 09 

Diestel^arl John Monticello, N. Y ± Ja 09 

"09 
09 



Dietz, William 20 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 

Dil worth, Patrick Augustine 1032 $d av., N. Y. C Ja 

Dimmick, Prank Huse Norwich, N. Y . . . Ja 09 



Dimon, Dennis S Candor, N.Y Ja 00 

Dodge, Herbert Otterson Plattsburg, N. Y D 08 

Doring, Joseph Charles 119 Fifth av., Troy, N. Y D 08 

Dorn, Lorenzo Gloversville, N.Y D 08 

Dort, Wallace W Belfast, N.Y Ap 09 

Doty, Vern W 53a Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Do udiet, Ernest A 429 xst st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Dower, Charles Herman 307 Dillage bldg., Syracuse, N. Y Ja 09 

Downey, James J 320 Pulton St., Brooklyn, N.Y Ap 09 

Downs, Eli Orvif ; . . . 15 Main st., Canisteo, N. Y Ja 09 

Drake, John Ellery Westside, Main St., Bolivar, N. Y Ja 00 

Drakeford. James Haile ana Beverly road, Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Dreher, August M 209 E. 189th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Dreher, Frederick 343 E. Pordham road, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Drcschnack, Frank J Lyndhurst, N. J Ap 09 

Dreyfus, Arthur David 85 5th av., Brooklyn, N.Y Je 09 

Dubin, Davis Centreville Station, N. Y., Box 13 1 Ja 09 

Du Bois, Calvin Walton, N.Y Ap 09 

Du Bois, Tosiah C Main st., Herkimer, N.Y Ap 09 

Du Bois, Myron Walton, N.Y Ap 09 

Dumbolton, Columbus H Westons Mills, N.Y Ap 09 

Duncan, William Edward 125 W. 43d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Dunn, Andrew G Fort Plain, N. Y Ja 09 

Durney, George 124 S. Salina st., Syracuse, N.Y Jl 09 

Durussel, George A 35 Lake st., Owego, N.Y Ap 09 

Dusenberry, D.^Wfflis 14 North St., Middletown .N. Y Ap 09 

Dusenberry, John F JiNorth st., Middletown, N. Y Ap 00 

Dutcher, Dwight Warwick, N.Y D 08 

Dygert, Charles H 184 Monroe av., Rochester, N. Y Ap 09 

Eastman, Francis Albert 14 John St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Eastman, Sylvester xa Maiden Lane, N. Y. C D 08 

Ebenstein, Alfred 129 W. 125th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Eckert. Henry J 1529 Broadway, Watervliet, N.Y Ap 09 

Eddy, Warren Bridgenson a 19 De Kalb av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Ehmann, William 316 Elk st., Buffalo, N. Y Je 09 

Ehmann, William Frederick 316 Elk st., Buffalo, N. Y Je 09 

Ehrlich, Frank 350 6th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, George Washington 166 W. 1 29th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, Henry 1145 E. 139th st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Ehrlich, Henry H 887 Longwood av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, Herman 217 Broadway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, Jacob 217 Broadway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, Louis 1274 Broadway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ehrlich, William aa3 6th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Eising, Max 1322 3d av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Eisler, Jacob 621 E. «th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Elbe, Max Henry 105 Falls St., Niagara Palls, N.Y M 09 

El dredge, William H Leon, Cattaraugus co., N. Y Ja 09 

Ellett, Joseph Henry 14 Tompkins St., Binghamton, N. Y Ja 09 

Elliott, Almon B Chenango Porks, N.Y Ap 09 

Elliott, David 251 Main st., Saugerties, N.Y Ja 09 



4o6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 

NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Elliott. Frederick A Whitney's Point, N. Y Ap o 9 

Ellis, Ely 981 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y D o* 

Ellis, George H 75 Cherry St.. Geneva.lN. Y D o* 

Ellis, Ray &Hornell, N. Y Ap o9 

Elmer, Frank Allen 6x0 Warren St., Hudson, N. Y D oj 

Elston, Edwin Curtis 3x9 E. Water st., Elmira, N. Y D o* 

Elting, Randolph D 617 6th av., N. Y. C Ap o9 

Emens, W. Jay 1 State St., Auburn, N. Y Ja o9 

Emerson, John F 14 Liberty St., Bath, N. Y Ja o9 

Engel, J. Henry Brockport, N. Y D o* 

Enhaus, William H 31 John St., N. Y. C Ap o9 

Enquest, Charles Augustus 50 Arcade bldg., Utica, N. Y D 08 

Epstein, Max a 15 E. Broadway, N. Y. C Ap o9 

Ernisse, James John 40 Main st. W., Rochester, N. Y Ap o9 

Ervay, Lee Walter Alpine, Schuyler 00., N. Y Ap o9 

Esaac, Herman 194 Broadway, N. Y. C D 08 

Esldn, Samuel B 1709 Pitkin av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap o9 

Eskin, Solomon B 1709 Pitkin av., Brooklyn. N. Y Ap o9 

Essling, Reinhold August Hicksville, L. I., N. Y., Box 336 D o» 

Evans, Charles Thomas aaa-a4 Columbia st., Utica, N. Y Ap o9 

Evans, Henry James 50 N. Pearl st., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Eveleigh, Olin B 436 State St., Schenectady, N. Y Ja o9 

EypeL Bernhard a8 Jackson av., L. I. City, N. Y Ja o9 

Fail, Robert Campbell 453 6th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Failing, Gray Martin 455 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y Ja o9 

Failing, Martin L 516 Mass. av., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Failing, Nelson 5x4 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap o9 

Fairburn, John B 317 Willow st., Syracuse, N. Y Ja 09 

Fairchild, Irving Eugene Johnstown, N. Y D 08 

Fairchild, William W 70 Nassau st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Fancher, Ward Irving Glen Cove. N. Y Ja 09 

Fanning, Maurice H Roxbury, N. Y Ja 09 

Fare, William E x6a8 E. xath st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Farjeon, Jacque 6 Broadway. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Farrand, William Savannah. N. Y Ap 09 

Fassett, Lillian A Palmyra, N. _Y ._ Ap 09 

09 
. 09 

Faulk, Wflliam T McDonough, N. Y Ap 09 

Faulkner, Richard 737 Eightn av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Fay, Waldo Guy 133 Nassau st., N. Y. C D 08 

Fayel, Amy D. (Mrs) Theresa, N. Y Ja 09 

Feinbloom, Louis 165a Pitkin av., Brooklyn, N. Y Je 09 

Fein gold, Benjamin 528 6th av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Feingold, Herman 390 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Feldman, Jeanette 3d av. & 59th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Fell man, Robert City Opera House block, Watertown, N. Y . . . . Ja 09 



Fassett. Roy D 69 Main st., Palmyra, N. Y Ja 

Fauer, Samuel x8a Second av., N. Y. C Ap 



* 



Felshaw, Nelson B Boonville, N. Y Ja 09 

Felson, Arthur M 409 State St., Schenectady, N. Y M 09 

Ferguson* , Louis Leonard 170 Broadway, Manhattan Borough, N. Y Ja 09 

Fersko. Max Samuel 1888 3d av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Fessenden, Florence Eva Sag Harbor, N. Y D 08 

Field, Frank A xoa Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Finberg, Michael 3x9 Nepperhan av., Yonkers, N. Y Ap 09 

Finch, George D E. Pembroke, N. Y Ja 09 

Fink, Irene 109 Broad st., Stapleton. N. Y Ap 09 

Finkelstein, Leon 858 Grape St., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Finkel8tein, Max 600 E. Adams St., Syracuse, N. Y Ja 09 

Finn, Albert G. jr 38s Monroe block, Syracuse, N. Y , D oft 

Fischel, Daniel C a George St., Green Island, N. Y D 08 

Fischer, Henry 10 W. 39th St., N. Y. C Je 09 



: 



Fish, Glenn Russell 48a Washington st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Fisher, Frank J Whitehall, N. Y D 08 

Fisher, Hosea D 7 W. Bridge st., Oswego, N. Y D 08 

Fisher, Theodore M 3 South st., Auburn, N . Y Ap 09 

Fisher. Willard Berling Mt Kisco, N. Y Ap 09 

Fisk, Nelson Thomas Brasher Falls, N. Y D 08 

Flad.GeorgeT Hicks ville, N. Y D 08 

Fleisher, David L 51 Joiner st., Rochester. N. Y Ja 09 

Fletcher, Gilbert William <o Castle St., Geneva, N. Y Ja 09 

Flint, John Stewart Schroon Lake, N. Y Ja 09 

Flynn, John N 21 Jackson av., L. I. City, N. Y Ap 09 

Flynn, Robert E Clyde, N. Y D 08 

Fogarty, William 37 Thompson st.. Port Jervis, N. Y Ja 09 

Foley, Wflliam Edward 491 18th St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Folgeman, Abraham 56 S. Chase av., Rockaway Beach, L. I Je 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 407 

Certificatei to ptactije optometry wore issued to the following Aug. 1, 1908- 
Jnly 31, 1909 under law* 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (ooJiiimted) 

Date of 



a! 



,. Buffalo N. Y 



PoDetl.— .... . . 

Folts, Richard SpeUmao 
Pord, Witter Arihar. - 

Forrest. Robert . . i». uiaui .... ......... ... . , . . 

Forth, Arthur jjS Puiion at.. Brooklyn. S. ¥. 

Fowler, CliDtonOeorge. .. ' s 

Powler, George L. 

Fowler, Harvey Acker Lambei 
Post, Edward Brown ,,.,.,., 

Fox, George Rudil 

FOX, Herbert Lm 

Flunk, Arbor 

Frmnkel. Abeam U 

Franklin. Cberie* Benjamin 
Free, Albert Johnston ... 
Freed. Abraham L.- ... . 
Freed, Katique P 
Fr»ediander. 



.. .» .V 

Tarrytown. NY , 

vi Mam at,. Plashing. tl.K.Y. 

44 W, .ethst N. Y. C 

Ail Main St.. Buffalo, N. Y . . . . 
jj F-. jd it., cor Park «.-.. Dunkirk 

ji Nassau tt. NYC 

i1<oi Oibav N. Y. C 



17 W. ,stbtt..N. V C 

■ 15 W, i.ethit.. NYC 

ni w. ,, vt - .< . x 1 < 

• e< r.leowood «v„ Buffalo, N Y 
1 3 nh iv . Ml Vernon. N Y 

. ... .11 Grand si, Brooklyn. X Y 

Freimao. Jacob 701 Grand it . Brooklyn. N. Y. . 

French. Francis M Homer, N. Y 

Frenier, Waiiuui P River * Pulton St., Troy, N. Y , 

Prick, Otto H, W... ■■ Florence av.. Buffalo. N. Y . 

Frieke. George E 170 Bruadway. N. Y C . care C. W. Little.. 

Friedlas It.-. Joseph 8 Maiden ijoe. N Y. C 

Friedlander, Louis jo John St.. N. Y C 

Friedman. Abraham ..... ... 511 Myrtle av . Hmcfclyu. N Y 

Friedman. Bentel 191 W. 143d st . N Y. C 

Friedman. Harry. t : v i }d ay.. N Y. C. . ... 

Friedman. Norman sat Lenox aw.. N Y. C .. 

Friedman. Samuel ... ...... 47 Mortimer St., Buffalo. NY. 

Friedner, Louie tSji First av., N Y .C. 



Fry, Wulam Hum 
Puller. Charles Jesuer 
Fuller, Charles . 



O 



Poller, William H 

Pyfe, George 

Gainor, Edward P. .... 
Gale, Wm.aai Mkbard . . 
Galushs. Morris Louis. . 

Ganapol. Isaac 

Gardner. Erving Warren 

Gardner. Gihbie B 

Gardner. Thomas Henry. ,, 

Garfinke). Morris S 11 

Garfinke". Samuel U . ......... t< 

Gaeaer. T.motby B Ct 

Gaune, :isrry Day 41 

fieigcr. WflnMD -- SI 

Geist, Charles j« 

Georgeo. Vance* Mead •'. 

Georgen, W.r.iara Theodore >« 

Gerhard. Frederick H tj 

Ghiggen. Victor B. .. tj 

Gibson. Charles David page ge 

Gibson, George T. A . <l 

Gibson. James G £4 

Gibson, Robert Hamilton. . . . . 41 

Gierina. Charles Jacob 7 



441 Genesee §t„ BuBalo. N Y 
. Sag Harbor. XV , 

Kinderbook. N Y. 

Pbonla N. Y 

t.j N. Colon si.. Ole»n, 

Mercellns. N. Y 

tit Kirk block. Syracus 

Silver Creek. NY . . 
. |iW Merrick road. Pneii;ri. 1. I 

tt. River « ir ■■■ NY. 



e. N. Y.. 



-eG. HirabGeld. 



7_J?te 



Gilbert, Aimer W 

Gilbert, Edward John Pi 

Gilbert. W.lbur H. . . i) 1. N. Y. . 

Gillls, Nathan 01 -n. N. Y. . 

Gill la, Paul me »> -n. N. Y . . 

Giniburg. MorrU 14. .. - 

Gleason.Cbarlea 11 18 Stats St.. Auburn. N. Y ,. 

Glhiess, <'■-. :-.>i.-. Uai. ■*.... ,: <. K torh •' . N Y ; 

Godfrey, David Stearns. 64 Groton av Ijirt-si." N ^ 

Goff, Jonn Baker Tuonsr Lake. N. Y 

Goldbacber. Ernest 108 E. jJ3n., NYC 



408 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, 190S- 

July 31, 1909 under laws 19089 chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAMB ADDRESS tificate 

Goldbacker, Edward 9* Pulton it.. N. Y. C Ja 09 

Goldblum, Frank 9x44 3d av., N. Y. C , a 09 

Goldbus. Hyman 934 Grape St., Syracuse, N. Y ,1 09 

Golder, Adelbert Grant 1278. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y , a 09 

Golder, Albert WUliam Seneca Palls, N. Y D 08 

Golding, Ephraim Percy Montour Palls, N. Y D 08 

Goldschmidt, David 47a 3d av.. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Goldstein, Jacob 333 E. 66th St.. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Goldstone, Barnett 4>8 Grand St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Goldstone, Hyman 9x4 S. State St., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Goldwasser, Philip M 65 St Mark's pi., N. Y. C D 08 

Gomph, Charles r 140 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y Ja 09 

Goodman, Milton xxo Cornwall bids., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Goodman, Samuel 100 Grand St., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Goodnough, Ross E 105 Main St., Gouverneur, N. Y Ja 09 

Gordon, Caleb R Marlboro, N. Y Ap 09 

Gordon, Hyman 95 Railroad av., White Plains, N. Y Ap 09 

Gordon, Isaac 864 Columbus av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Gorham, William B CamiUus, N. Y D 08 

Gorrie, Robert H Newburgh, N. Y Ap 09 



Gorton, Charles H Gloversville, N. Y D 08 

Gorton, Morris H 40 Main St., Leroy, N. Y 

Gosper, Chauncey Ward 81 Court St., Bingham ton, N. Y 



Gorton, Morris H 40 Main St., Leroy, N. Y Ja 00 

Gosper, Chauncey Ward 81 Court St., Bingham ton, N. Y D 08 

Gotthold, Louis 9345 8th av u N. Y. C Ap 09 



Gottlieb, Henrietta 3870 White Plains av.. Williamsbridge, N. Y. . . Ap 09 

Gottlieb, Louis 378 Main st„ Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Gougelman, Paul Reina 163 W. 97th St., N. Y. C . Ap 09 

Gouse, William P 503 Hamilton St., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Grady, Edward Thomas 94a E. a6th St., N. Y. C M 09 

Graeber. WUliam E 9115 Seneca St., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Graff, Philip William a6 Canal St., Lyons, N. Y Ap 09 

Grathwol, Leopold Charles 139 Fifth av., Troy, N. Y D 08 

Graves, Charles Lytle Rensselaer Palls, N. Y D 08 

Graves, Colonel P Nassau, N. Y Ap 09 

Graves, Herbert P Parish, N. Y Ap 09 

Graves. Milo A Main St., Mexico, N. Y Je 09 

Gray, Almon James 455 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Gray, Herbert Lee S. New Berlin, N. Y Ap 09 

Gray, Hobart Henry, jr 70 Milton st., Geneva, N. Y D 08 

Gray, Hobart Henry, sr Carrollton House, Geneva, N. Y Ap 09 

Greaves, Julia Annie 1 107 Bedford av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Greenberg, Philip 34a 7th av., Brooklyn. N. Y. . . r Ap 09 

Greene, Martin 35 N. Main St., Port Chester, N. Y M 09 

Greenland, Arvid 45 Railroad av., White Plains, N. Y Ap 09 

Greenland, William Bert 3a E. Main St., Amsterdam, N. Y Ja 09 

Greenman, Henry Richfield Springs, N. Y Ap . 09 

Greiff , Joseph 1x5 W. 143d St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Gribben, Walter 314 Halsey St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Griebner, Charles Andrew Grand Court, Ellicott sq., Buffalo, N. Y., care 

C. A. Schopp Ja 09 

Griffin, George A 430 3d St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Griswold, Joel Wellington Avoca, N. Y Ap 09 

Griswold, John Robie Bath, N. Y Ja 09 

Groat, Adelbert D 39 Post st., Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Grohe. Frederick William 530 W. 178th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Gros, Charles Henry 8 W. Main st., Cuba, N. Y Ja 09 

Gross, Adolph 1337 Hancock st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Grossman, David 343 3d av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Grossman, David Leonard 359 Stockton st., Brooklyn, N. Y M 09 

Grossman, Heiman S za Belvidere st., Brooklyn, N. Y M 09 

Grubman, Joseph D 1623 East Park, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Gurney, B. Egbert Newburgh, N. Y D 08 

Gust in, WUliam H 4a State st., Albion, N. Y Ta 09 

Gutowite, Morris Amityville, N. Y D 08 

Guttentag, Nathan ax4 W. 140th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Guy, Walton B Saratoga Springs, N. Y D 08 

Guyott, Lexiam Frederick M alone, N. Y Ja 09 

Hadacek, Frank WUliam 13 W. 43d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Hahn, Anna Meta 4x3 Sterling pi.. Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Hahn, George Henry 96 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Hahn, John W 26 E. a 3 d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Hahnemann Gustav P 23 William st., Buffalo. N. Y Ap 09 

Hall, Charles Kasson 54 Tweddle bldg., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Hall, Edwin Kirk 47 Main St., Gouverneur, N. Y Ja 09 

Hall, Franklin G x 16 Arsenal st., Watertown, N. Y D 08 

Hall, Jesse W < 1 Albany st., Cazenovia, N. Y Je 09 

Hall, John Matthew Liberty, N. Y Ap 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug, i, 1908- 
July 31, igog under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Data of 



NAME 
HalhnDock. PreutU* W . . . . 
Hallindi Georve Win» m . 

Halon. J.,.-b. 

"alpern, Maria, 

«j«y, Wr* 

amborgtr' Jacob 

amiltor.. George V, 

■ mi] to-- !">.nW , 

ammoo-. KredC 

ammon.'. Har'o" K. 
ammond. Wilber P. . . . 
•Rimar.-l. W : -ierd H.. 
ammond. W,: „~ H,„, y 
nmpton. 'ujrph W al | e 



ADDRESS 

CaMldJI, N. Y. 

. loo Main si . Pouahkeepeia. N Y . 

mi Attorney at. N Y.C .... 

itj W „th tt ,_N V.C 

3 Halsey at . Brooklyn. N. Y. . 



Henn;bal. N. Y 

■„ Buffalo. N. Y 

t . Cweenport. N. Y 



in. Cera Mar 



:rfl 

86 Rttntfi 
So Mam el 
. 16 N, H...». - 
>6 N. Broad* 
171 Millhvni 
Singr'bleg.., 



6 Carolina 



.Coboes.N Y. 



its 




H 


6 p :i 



-rdy, George Guerdon 
nwd.feopbta Peters 



. Eben L... 
>n!On A. V 



65 U.M 



3.N, Y. 

..„, New RmhrUa. N. Y. . 

. jjc. Grand at .NY C 

'. iUb,, V*Y a ... 

.. Alh»ny. N. Y. 



.. Brooklyn. N. Y 



i. Cert L 

i, David P 

I, (1-- 'v- Wnsbiw 



Glen. Palls. N. Y 

6 ffflirr :■: . »,r>K' ,:■,■.. ... N ■, 

NorthyJJe. N " 

BmcMn, 

WeslCb 
Ear|vr> 



_. N Y * 

!. jjdtt. N Y.C.... . fl 

W. ,d at Mt Veraoo. N. Y J 

Air,.-., B. N.Y7C It 

Pulton «.. N. Y C J 

Main at .. Delhi. N Y . care Harper". Jewelry 



at., Brooklyn. N, Y . 
„ k, Y.C 



Hamster. Charles Frederick 
Hswe*. *,i:-sm W lnn . . 



f>, CbarUx King 
-_,_«. lame, Henry Brur 
jayncs. W.ll.am Irv.ng. . . 

wood. Cbar'ea Eugene 

th, Henry A 

ton. Edward Lorenao . 

ioget. William P..'.'..'. 



uo8 Herkim. 
144 W. xetb 

Saratoga Son 

. isj laalnaC^aatiriRiTlT.'Y.'. ?.'" 

. .633 Stfc av . N Y C 

Horaeheede. N, Y . 

ioj W, tojdst. N. Y. C 

Qeyton, Jrt!trv»> co . N, Y 

Ferry.tf. Y 

The Wilton, cor Treroont A Aolhon 

Broni.N. Y.C 

. Groton. N. Y . 

. ■») Gleoet,.G]«osPa!le. N. Y 

3. Wellme-. bldg,. Jam*eiowo.N, Y . 
.. .93 Publican, Waltrtoivo. N. Y 

Herkimer. N, V 

Schoharie. N. Y.... 

Potsdam N.Y 

, <oN uthat.. Newark. N. J.. . 

Canton. N. Y 

. Canton. N. Y. . 

1009 Broadway. Brooklyn. M, Y . 

. 1009 Broadway. Brooklyn. N Y. 

raj Nass-j tt . N Y C 

i S ij S^rfav. Coney Island. N Y . . 

ji E.oo-tbst.. N. Y.C 



. Ap eo 
. M eg 



f SI 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



NAME ADDRESS 

Hcawood. Richard I«w e :l ... t*j Coon at.. Binibunton. N. Y. 

Hepburn. W.jl.am Pniu . 104 R .3d it., STY. C. 

Herbert. Prim Uuia CtatbHn.N Y . Bnx. «j 

Hermann. Jobo lit] Simpson »t . N Y. C 

Herm.ntni. CutUve 90 R Petri it.. Albany. NY 

Herriek. Pred Eugene r„- ■ N V 
Htrn.in.. Abraham 



lly. John 



olme*. Ricbard C. . 



nig. "Joseph 



t**lie. 

opkini. Edwa'nl 11 
: Newt 






160 Sm.th n . Brooklyn, N. Y. . 

jiu E u-atat N. Y.6.. 
. la* W. tiMb it.. N. Y. C . . . 
. .>> W iiOtbet., NYC 
. Pulaakt. N. Y 

jMj. jdav . N Y C. 

To-.i(^i:>. N Y 

.6 Broad »t . Waterford. N Y . 

in Franklin at, Buffalo. N Y . 

104 I. "•' '■ :.. S V 1: 

160 Brsbthav . N. Y. C 

r»i.lo:i.N. Y 

. L.ttl* Valley. N. Y 

S-. ..!»v N y C. 

S-- iJav.. N. Y. C. 

,0 id av., N. Y C 

>i; W. ,»d«.." " 
. Fulton NY 

Caniiteo. N Y 

41 Mama! . Oneida. N. Y. . 
' ..N V C 



„ NYC . 



: =..ll 



4tk Pi 



N Y C . . 
_.,N Y 
Hall, Rsorn 1 



Harmony Hajj. Rsom «, s* it.. Troy. I 

1 >(. Lenoator. av„ N Y. C 

000 Bramh.:i «v JeneyCiy. N J. 
]>< Birdav. Buflalo. NY 

. .11 jtbav.. N. Y C 

i.itiir Pa.:. N V 
Ceotral block. Main it . Dolgevtl 
,8 W nqtbat.N. Y.C., 
J' 8 V *1 



joklyn. NY.. 



offmso. Samuel B . ... .. jai i-'J jd •> Brooklyn. N Y . 

offmao. Stepheo R .. .. , ti , Broadway. Brooklyn N Y 

oaan. John j jo South at . M.ddletown. NY 



"■'?. 



. N Y. 1: 



I Y C 



den. Jamea no MorHaomeryi; . Syracuse. N. Y . 

ler. Henry J. . . no Broadway Brooluyn, N Y . 

.... „ j...-. B.rch»v.. Glen* Fall*. N Y. 

Ill Pcnn av. Elro.ra.N. Y ... 

17 PUtbuaha... Brooklyn^' Y 

ii North it . Middletown. NY., 
tain M.. Gowaad*. N. Y 

, Frederick . 88* Manhattan av . N. Y. C . 

<•-*-• •-- McBridc at. Syracu*e. N Y 

S Sal.na H, Syracuse. N Y. 

E. >id« t N Y C 

•■.NY... 



,(.. Hofln 



N Y 

■ - -- P.,..,..., 
N Y C 



N. Y... . 



x W,..,^ J 4,, B. tilth „.. N. Y. C. 

1, Momt H .. . <) Toronto ni a v.. Brooklyn. N Y 

ibeck. Cornelius Predenck Cortlar.d. N Y . 

_._on. Jamea A .., 30, Court at.. Watertown. N Y. 

otalir.g. Elmer Edward. . j_» E. ijd at . N. Y. C 

oward. WUIard Kroeat . . . Philmoot. N Y 

oyt. Arthur Theron . . Moravia. N. Y... 

utbarrl. W,;l, am Arthur so Main st , Leroy. N. Y. . . . 

ubbs. George W Destef. N. V 

ftbnl. Jphnjoiepb. IJS4 Avenue A.N. Y.C... . .. 

uber.trr.ile. ji; Blsecker at., N. Y C 

uboman, Joaeoh. j68 Grand at.. N. Y. C 

ufnagel Edward Henry i, S. 4th av . Mt Vernon. S Y.. 

ughea. Charles P w Court at.. Brooklyn. NY. . . 

uTett. ilarvrv K ",.. , .Irr- «.. \ ,' 

ull, PrcJrnfi P.mea; San»nae l^lte. N. Y. . 

ull, Nelaon Youpg . too Broadway. N. Y. C 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 411 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Humphrey, Charles B Bainbridge, N. Y D 08 

Hard, Albert Clark 144 Sixth av., Troy, N. Y Ap 09 

Hurwitz, Esther R 830 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Hurwitz, Samuel 830 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Hurwitz, Samuel Abraham 4a Delancey St., N. Y. C M 09 

Hussey, Clark Sylvanus S. Dayton, N. Y Ap 09 

Hutchinson, George Winfield 403 E. 3d St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Hutchinson, William H as Lake St., Owe go, N. Y Ap 09 

Hyde, Phillip S Care Gouvernuer Dental Parlor, 274 Henry St., 

N. Y. C Ap 09 

Hyman, Samuel G 509 Kosciusko st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Hynes, Frank P X78 B. 95th St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Ide, Charles H Seneca St., Dundee, N. Y Ja 09 

Ingraham, Fred R Main st., Holcomb, N. Y Ja 09 

Ives, Franklin J 159 Main st., Oneonta, N. Y Ja 09 

vison, William xix Railroad av., White Plains, N. Y Ja 09 

ackle, Oscar C 866 3d av., N. Y. C M 09 

ackson, Emanuel 58 K. 96th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Jackson, Frank Dickens 859 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Jackson, Walter A 664 New Jersey av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

, acoby, Arthur Julius 17s 6th av., N. Y. C Ja 

, acoby, Jacob 17s 6th av., N. Y. C 

Jacoby, Morris 76 Nassau st., N. Y C ,,_ 

acques, Jacob 163 E. Broadway^ NVY^C Je 09 

" a 09 



09 
09 
a 09 
a 09 



, affe, Jacob 31 W. 118th st., N. Y. C _„ 

, arvis, John Wilson 2x4 Franklin st., Buffalo, N. Y D 08 

, aynes, Fred G 510 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

, effrey, Robert J Allegany, N. Y Ap 09 

, enkins, Charles L, Greenfield Centre, N. Y Ap 09 

, bhnquest, Rudolph N 1x1 Railroad av.. White Plains, N. Y M 09 

, bhnson, Lee H 4 Paddock block, Watertown, N. Y Ap 09 

, bhnson, William A 533 W. 135th st., N. Y. C D 08 

, bhnston, Charles Ray Dresden, N . Y D 08 

, ones, Arthur Ebenezer x a6 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y Ap 09 

, ones, C. Clark aIol Fayette St., Utica, N. Y Ap 09 

Jones, Edward W Waterford, N. Y., Box 204 Ja 09 

Jones, Frank De Forest Saratoga Springs, N. Y Ap 09 

Jones, Seth Carlos 18 Jefferson Co. Savings Bank bldg., Watertown, 

N. Y D 08 

, ones, Willard S 17 North St., Middletown, N. Y Ja 09 

, ordan, Fred A xox E. Water St., Blmira, N. Y Ja 09 

, brgenson, William Griffin aa63Broadway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

, bseph Isaac, 535 Warren st., Hudson, N. Y D 08 

Joseph, Joseph Julius a 18 W. 146th St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

, ospe, David Far Rockaway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

, ospe, Theodore Glencove, N. Y Jl 09 

, by, John Norfolk, St Lawrence co., N. Y Je 09 

, ttdkms, John Stanton 139a Bedford av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

, udson, John Burton Un ad ilia, N. Y Ap 09 

, uvet, Louis Paul 1 Bay st., Glens Falls, N. Y Ja 09 

. Cahn, Adolph E 194 Broadway, N. Y. C D 08 

Kahn, George H 153 W. 80th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Kaiser, Philipp Herman 706 Halsey St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kaliald, David 47 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C M 09 

Kamp, Albert Ossining. N. Y D 08 

Kannl, Herman 167 St Nicholas av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Kaplan, David 16 S. Main St., Port Chester. N. Y Ap 09 

Karner, Luther S Stottsville, N. Y., Box 161 D 08 

Karsh, Frederick W 641 8th av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Kartevold, Theodor 6x Hamilton av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kaufman, Samuel Chatham, N. Y Ap 09 

Kaufmann, Max W 1646 43d St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kaupmann, Henry 436 B. 138th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kay, Henry Levi North Chatham, N. Y Je 09 

Kay, James W 617 6th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Keast, John Alfred William 363 State st., Schenectady, N. Y D 08 

Keener, Oscar Charles 214 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y., care J. W. 

Jarvis Ja 09 

Keiper, Benjamin Hampton 2963 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kelley, Margaret Elizabeth 117 Bleecker st., Utica, N. Y Ja 09 

Kellogg, Frank S Adams Centre, N. Y D 08 

Kellogg, Frederic Julien Alexandria Bay, N. Y D 08 

Kellogg, William T s« W. State st., Ithaca, N. Y D 08 

Kelly, Harry Joseph yaW. 143d st, N. Y. C Ja 09 

Kelsey. Albert W Franklinville, N. Y Je 09 

Kelsey, Franklin Daniel 648 Main st., East Aurora, N. Y Ja 09 



412 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 

CCY" 

NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Kempf , Frederick 104 Euclid av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kenney, Arthur Marcus 23a Genesee St., Utica, N. Y D 08 

Kenney, Everett Dudley 93a Genesee st., Utica, N. Y Ja 09 

Kenney, Manley Corwin 200 E. State St., Ithaca. N. Y Je 09 

Kenney, Marcus Eudorus 23a Genesee St., Utica, N. Y Ja 09 

Kenny, John Joseph 1 107 Bedford av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kent, Harry Franklin 114/Court st., Bingham ton, N. Y Ap 09 

Kern, August 95 Weddale way, Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Kerner, Jacob A 1474 Washington av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Kernochan, Frank D 17 North St., Middletown, N. Y Ap 09 

Kerr. William J no Chenango St., Buffalo, N. Y M 09 

Kettler. William Harry 54 W. iasth St., N. Y. C Ad 09 

Kiefer, Frank aooi Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kilburn, Charles Harvey 104 E. 3d St., Jamestown, N. Y Ja 09 

Kindler, Leo William 42 Herald St., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

King, Frank L 45 E. 3d st., Dunkirk, N. Y Ap 09 

King, Fred J 507 Orange St.. Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

King, Roy H 448 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Kinner, Lucius Legrand Wayland, N. Y Ap 09 

Kinsley, Arthur George 1723 74th st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kipnis, Alexander 320 Bleecker St., N. Y. C Je 09 

Kirschner, Charles 415E. 83d St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kitchell, George Carleton Rockville Centre, Long Island, N. Y Ap 09 

Kitchell, William Lounsberry 324 Front St., Hempstead, N. Y Ap 09 

Kitchen, Edwin K Waverly, N. Y D 08 

Kleiger, Morris Parksville, Sullivan co., N. Y., Box 3 Ap 09 

Klein, Elizabeth 6th av. & 23d st., N. Y. C, care Ehrich Bros. . . Ap 09 

Klein, Joseph 1 167 Broadway, N. Y. C Ja 

Kleiner, John C 319 Hamburg av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

Kle infield, Morris Bertain 222 E. 103d St., N. Y. C Ap _, 

Kleysteuber, Carl J. H 470s 3d av., Brooklyn, N. Y Jl 09 

Klingbeil, Fred 75 Water st., Newburgh, N. Y Ap 09 

Klingbeil .Walter Irving 783 Sterling pi., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

Kloeber, Edward Fred x 234 Simpson St., Bronx, N. Y. C Ap 

Knapp, Clifford S 40 W. 125th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Knauber, Henry A 21 Bond St., Brooklyn, N. Y Jl 09 

Knoop, Theodore 97 Remsen st., Co hoes ,N .Y Ap 09 

Knoop, William 301 Rockaway av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Knowles, May Frost 200 Claremont av., N. Y. C M 09 

Knudson, William 132 E. 34th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Koch, George William Woodhavcn, Long Island, N. Y., Box 12 Jl 09 

Kocher, John Henry Jeffersonville, N. Y Ap 09 

Koetsch, Ernest A 50 Webster St., N. Tonawanda, N. Y Ap 09 

Konzelmann, Conrad 1348 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Konzelmann, Ernest Fred, jr 1348 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N, Y Ap 09 

Konzelmann, John 1348 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Koontz, William 2088 3d av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kornblueth, Sigmund 64 McKibben st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kornfeld, Edward J. 1 to E. 23d st., N. Y. C Je 09 

Kostenbader, Earl W Groton, N. Y Ap 09 

Kowal, Wojciech Bernard 24 Lake St., Dunkirk, N. Y M 09 

Kraft, Charles C 112 W. 31st st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kraft, Fred 50 Church St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kramer, Leon H 379 Grand st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kramer, Sadie 379 Grand st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Kreuter, Ferdinand 39 W. 43d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kreuter, Henry 1 10 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kronenberger, Frank 808 Westchester av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kruse, Robert Martin 424 E. 157th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kuehn, Otto 442 Central Park W., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Kuhn, Hubert George 274 Main st., Poughkeepsie, N. Y Ap 09 

Kummli, Herman 276 Heyward St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kunemund, Oscar C 744 Hancock St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Kurtis, Isaac Meyer 1028 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Kurts, George Lambert Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y D 08 

Laabs, Max Alfred 436 W. 124th st.,- N. Y. C Ap 09 

Laber, Alphonse 23 W. 42d st., N. Y. C D 08 

Lambert, Elliott Clyde 1 1 E. 43d st., N. Y. C M 09 

Lam pert, Jacob 264 Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y M 09 

Lanae, Isidor 941 3d av., N. Y. C D 08 

Landgraf, William Philip 87 E. Genesee St., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Landseadel, William 2937 3d av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Lane, Charles S Friendship, N. Y Ja 09 

Lane, Dclmer C 12$ Beach av.. Auburn, N. Y D 08 

Lang, John F 548 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Langer, Oscar Tannersville, Greene co. , N. Y Ja 09 



09 
•9 
09 
09 
09 

09 

09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



ch. 49) (continued) 



NAME 


ADDRESS 


Ap oo 
Ap o» 

M 

D P oa 

D oB 

S a 


Langfotd. Nathaniel . 

Lanoint. CasaC 

Laikfn. Frederick. ,t 

Laaber Wd:,an> J 


o6» Anuterdatn «v.. N V C 

h Jay at., Schenectady. N. Y 

1IS l-andrr. v. . BaSalt. N Y 

in St James pi .Buffalo. N. Y... 

4 Warren »t . Gicn. Pall.. N Y 

til W«rren « Hudun. N. Y . 

Randolph. N Y 

P:att.burg. N Y 

no w. ootbit.. N. Y.C 


Lt^b* 




114.11 Work* .t.. Syracuse. N, Y.... 


Leach. 




jet. W, ujtbit.. N. Y.C. 


*m. Prank 


Mercph... NY 

Ma^n .t.Cmehao. N. Y 


ft 3 








Leigh, Allen C 


. Y 


Lemu, Louii Prank . 

■erop. Michael 

Lent. WtKace Winfield . . 


sa.N. Y 

,N Y 

N. Y 


D oa 

D oS 

ft 3 

:S 3 




Y 








la oa 






Levee. WOJard. . . . 
■evio. Robert 


Y 


Ap oo 


-ev,r.*on,M&x . 

-ev.uE.PranciaN 


N. Y.. 

«. N, Y .... 












N. Y. 

4. Y 


ft a 

A" 3 


£:r J 


:d-in D 

'erdinand Cleghora. .. 


N. Y 


:ft 3 

M oo 

£ p 3 

D oo 

o'a 

D oS 

ft 3 

a r 1 

. D P °S 
Apo, 


obn B 


.. Little FWla. N, V.. 

on Prusoect av ,S Y. C . .. 


-it. :■: 

„<■•:.■ 

Jcht. : 


o. laaac M 

in. Julius L . . . 
.Mm. Charles A ... , 
stein. Eugene B . ... 
tula. Solomon W 

•eh. Jacob C 

k, Charles Heory 


70 Georsee si . Auburn. N Y . 

140 Renwick pi .Syracuse., .V Y .. 

■ ;o Wesi F.nd av . N. Y. C 

Sso West Endav. N. Y.C...-. 

a;o Wru End av.. N, Y. C 

14! J«t»v., N Y.C 

7*4 River *t. .Troy. N. Y 








,ir. ■ .« - 

4pcbt< 

.it..'. ■". 


ll. Otto 

. Arvtd A 

. Edward P . 
It, David 

Ceylon Kendrick 


• Mt Broad*- ..v Br.-s.yiv N V 

5K0 F.fih av.. Brovklyo. N. Y, 

. ituClioton jv s . RuKhrv.tr. N. Y. 

Main si.. Cattaraugus. N. Y 

C >j>enHo«o. N Y 


Ap an 
D o» 

•ft a 






.J ». ■ 
■ona.l 


<xt. Charles ■■>.-. 
od. Robert Mmum. 
od. Rww'l B. . 

ssSS£ 


s t Main v. . Heiuirtaad. N' Y ... 

. Ma.den Lane. ti. V, C 

Walion. N. Y 

. Arkvule.N, Y 

BrliMt.N. Y 

Belfast. N. Y 

(it W. MTtbat.. N. Y.C 


d"3 

. D SB 

Ap es 

Ap 09 

Ap oo 

. Ja oo 



414 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) {oontinued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Loudon, Clarence T Rushville, N. Y D 08 

Loup, Charles 93 Ralph St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 00 

Lowe, Prank H Port Byron, N. Y D 08 

Lueck, Samuel Ellis 1361 3d av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Lugene, Ernest Newell 650 Madison av., N. Y. C Ap 00 

Luke, Edwin Homer Pinch Ilion, N. Y D 08 

Lund, Ole Charles x E. Third St., Mt Vernon, N. Y Ap 09 

Lundy, John Henry 2210 Linwood av., Niagara Palls, N. Y Ja 09 

Lupovits, William xo E. x 19th St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Luther, Alonzo 67 N. Swan St., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Luthy, Walter Julius 1956 3d av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Luxton, Edward C 14 South av., Chautauqua, N. Y Je 09 

Mabie, Edward S Camden, Oneida 00., N. Y Ja] 09 

McAfee, Chester Archie Bank bldg.. Coulter block, Saranac Lake, N. Y. Ja o < 

MacAUaster, William 348 Hamilton St., Albany, N. Y Ap 00 

McBurnie, Thomas 1215 Bedford av., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Mace, Daniel 8x0 Albany at., Schenectady, N. Y Ap 09 

McConkey, Irving Henry Johnstown, N. Y Ap 09 

McConneil, Thomas J Hancock. N. Y D 08 

McCoy. Arthur Williams 41 E. 43a St., N. Y. C D 08 

McCurdy, Delo x 18 W. 89th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

McCutcheon, H. Gillette Main st., Arcade, N. Y Ja 09 

McEachron, "John Henry Hoosick Palls, N. Y Ap 09 

McEneany, George Thomas x 39 E. 23d St., N. Y. C Ja 09 

McFadden, Pay Granville, N. Y D 08 

McParland, Frank Hervey 76 Front st., Bingham ton, N. Y D 08 

McParland, Robert Davenport, Delaware co., N. Y Ap 09 

McGowan, Nicholas J 436 E. 138th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

McGrady, Charles S 22 Canisteo St., Hornell, N. Y Ja 09 

McHenry. William Russell Hornell, N. Y Ap 09 

Mclntyre. Duncan M 16 Main st., Gloversville, N. Y Ap 09 

Mack, William E Fort Plain, N. Y Ap 09 

McKee, David C a First St., Edwards, N. Y Ja 09 

McKenney, Henry S 6 Canisteo st., Hornell. N. Y Ja 09 

McKenzie, Edward L Greene, N. Y Ja 09 

McKensie. William A Ausable Forks, N. Y Ap 09 

MacKeown, Joseph J VI ^- * 2C * 8t> » N. Y. C Ja 09 

McLeod, Jacob Nelson Fine, St Lawrence co.. N. Y Ap 09 

McOmber, Guy D Main st., Honeoye Palls, N. Y Ja 09 

McPhee, William Archibald Canton, St Lawrence co., N. Y Ja 09 

Mc Wharf, George Wolcott, N. Y Ap 09 

Madlenger. Edward H 12 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C D 08 

Maguire, John Hugh 126 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Maguire. Robert Emmet 126 E. 33d st.. N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mahler, Gustave 702 Columbus av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Main, James A Main st., Warsaw, N. Y Ja 09 

Maisel, Alexander 9x5 Broadway, Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Mandigp, Aaron V Main st., N. Lawrence, N. Y Je 09 

Mann, Tgnats xoo Nassau St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Manne, Max 208 West St., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Marans, Jacob Moses 201 E. Houston st., N. Y. C D 08 

MarchantJPrank Brewer 56 Platbush av., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Markens, Walter Henry 549 Manhattan av., N. Y. C D 08 

Markewitz, Alexander 178 7th av., Brooklyn, N. Y., care Ph. Greenberg. Ap 09 

Marks, Abraham 26 Broad st., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Marks, Casper 1095 Gates av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Marqusee, Harry Louis. '. 115 Jefferson St., E. Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Markwick, Alger Bruce 76 Parker st., Gouverneur, N. Y Ap 09 

Marryott, Robert S 1200 Fulton St.. Brooklyn. N. Y Je 09 

Marsh, Charles F x 5 E. Main st., Predonia, N. Y /a 09 

Marsh, Gertrude E 147 Lenox av., Oneida, N. Y , a 09 

Marsh, John 38 Main St., Antwerp, N. Y Ja 09 

Marter, William Emerson 310 Columbus av., N. Y. C Ap 00 

Martin, Alexander 17 W. 28th St., N. Y. C D 08 

Martin, De Witt Leckie 390 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y M 09 

Martin, Edward H 1x27 Lexington av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Martin, Frederick 1086 Broadway, Brooklyn. N. Y Ap 09 

Martin, Philo John 24 Elam pi., Buffalo, N. Y Js 

Mason, Charles Franklin 26 Main St., Cortland, N. Y Ts 

Mason, Edward R 69 Court st., Binghamton, N. Y D 

Mason, Prank Maurice 335 E. 3 1st st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mason, Herbert L Gluck bldg., Room x, Niagara Palls, N. Y Ap 09 

Mason, John Chamberlain 217 Main st., Jamestown, N. Y M 09 

Mathews, Charles «x Greene av., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Matthez, Louis Henry Hoffman House, Broadway & 25th st., N. Y. C. M 09 

Matthysse, Leon J 741 Tremont av., Bronx, N. Y. C Ap 09 



09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 415 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date o 
_ cer- 

NAMB ADDRESS tificate 

Matsinger, Gustav 106-8 Fulton at., N. Y. C D 08 

Maxson, Charles Ellsworth Cortland St., De Ruyter, N. Y Ap 09 

May, Charles P 19N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y Ap 09 

May, Harry Stottville, N. Y Ap 09 

Mayer, Leo Morris 535 Lenox av., N. Y Ap 09 

Mayer, Theodor Wilfaelm 608 Elm st., Buffalo, N. Y Je 09 

Mead, Morgan Smalley 39 W. 43d St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Medoff, Harry A 151 Metropolitan av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Mehl, Edward Henry 71 E. Genesee St., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Mein, William J 209 N. Broad st., Norwich, N. Y Ap 09 

Meineke. William C 37 E. 38th st., Bayonne, N.J M 09 

Mende, Carl P 1 Clinton av., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Mende. Otto Raymond 305 Central av., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Mendelovits, Samuel 64 E. 105th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Mendelsohn, Reuben 35 Forest st., Gloversville, N. Y D 08 

Mendelson, David 369 Watkins st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Mendelssohn, Herman E 193 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

Mensink, James Howard 379 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 

Merckling, Louis 888 Manhattan av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

Merckling, Louis* jr Enrich Bros., 6th av. ft 33d st., N. Y. C Je 09 

Meren, Sidney A 159 Myrtle av., Brooklyn, N. Y Je 09 

Merin, Aaron Louis 890 8th av., N. Y. C D 08 

Merkel, George H 3»7 Willis av., Bronx, N. Y. C Ja 09 

Mermelstein, Bertha 393 Grand St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mermelstein, Gerson S 76 Avenue B, N. Y. C D 08 

Mermelstein, Harry H 393 Grand st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mermelstein, Sophia 592 Grand st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Merrell, Robert L Main st., Geneseo, N. Y J 

Merriman, Sidney Grant 336 Genesee st., Utica, N. Y J 

Merritt, Earl Vincent Walton, N. Y Ja 09 

Merwin, Wilfred Charles 105 Monroe st. .Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Mesmer, Frederick Franklyn Larned block, Warren st., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Messier, Edward F 158 E. 44th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Messinger, Joseph H 103* St Mark's pi., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Mestel, Herman 56 Essex St., N. Y. C M 09 

Metzner, Felix 143 Woodbine St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Meyer, Charles Burchard, jr 105 New Main st., Yonkers, N. Y Ap 09 

Meyer, Gustave Hirsch 1697 Park av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Meyer, John Ernest 636 6th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Meyer, John G 363 Wyckoff av\, Brooklyn, N. Y M 09 

Meyer, Louisa Adalinc Thayer 143 Grove St., Winneld, L. I., N. Y Ap 09 

Meyer, Peter H 533 Main st.. Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Meyer, Samuel Louis 337 W. 140th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Meyers, C. Stanley 14 North St., Middle town, N. Y Ap 09 

Meyers, Herman Julius 30 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C M 09 

Meyers, Jacob Joseph 4430 15th av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Meyrowitz, Paul Alexander 389 sth av., N. Y. C D 



09 
09 
09 



a 09 
09 



>9 5tn av., n . x.Vx...... u 09 

Michel, David S 308 W. 93d st.. N. Y. C Ja 09 

Michelm, Louis Ferdinand 1330 Brook av., Bronx, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Michell. Richard Main st., Brewster, N. Y Ap 09 

Midlam, H. Clavton 174 W. Dominick st., Rome, N. Y Ja 09 

Mielke, Henry Charles 151 Clinton av. N., Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Miller, Eugene P 78 Division st., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Miller, Henry 630 Fifth av., Brooklyn. N. Y Ap 09 

Miller, Jacob 370 Woodbine st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Miller, Jeremiah Aleigh 807 Tinton av., N. Y. C D 08 

Miller, John George 36 W. Huron st., Buffalo, N. Y D 08 

Miller, Joshua H 304 4th st., Watkins, N. Y Ap 09 

Miller, Julius Louis 50 Clinton av. N., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Miller, Mark 147 Fulton st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Miller, Melvin Alonzo 78 Division St., Albany, N. Y Ap 09 

Miller, Maxwell 495 Manhattan av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Miller, Otto 109 Union st., Olean, N. Y Ja 09 

Miller, Samuel M alone, N. Y D 08 

Mills, Alexander 4705 3d av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Mills, Frederic Huntington Carthage, N. Y D 08 

Mills, Robert Stewart Akron, N. Y Ja 09 

Mills, Thomas E no E. 33d st., N. Y. C Je 09 

Mills, William Somen Fillmore, N. Y Ap 09 

Mincer, Edwin Nathaniel Moravia, N. Y D 08 

Mincer, Julian Louis 385 Main st. E., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Mincer, Louis Labe 5 Clinton av. S., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Miner, Charles Warren 45 Main St., Mt Morris, N. Y Ja 09 

Minsterxnan, Michael George 68 N. Pearl st., Albany, N. Y Ja 09 

Misel. Isaac 338 S. First St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Mitchell, James John 37 Colden st., Newburgh, N. Y Ap 09 



4i6 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, 1908- 
July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) {continued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAMB ADDRESS tificate 

MitchnickjCbarles 32&Clinton St., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

"09 
09 



Moehlan, Ferdinand H 9 W. Mohawk st.. Buffalo, N. Y Ap 

Molineaux, Maurice a 9 6 4 3°* av « N. Y. C Ja 

Monroej_Leo G 29 Clinton av. S._, Rochester, N. Y Ap 09 

09 



Moore, William J 727 8th av.. N. tf. C Ja _ 

Moore, William L Hinsdale, N. Y Ap 09 

Morgan, Bert S Main st., Cooperstown, N. Y Ap 09 

Morgan, Edwin Joseph 332 Ninth st., Brooklyn. N. Y Jl 09 

Morgan, William Clark 1x3 Cayuga st., Pulton, N. Y D 08 

Morine, Edwin Clifford 104 E. 23d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Morris, Prank V Carthage, N. Y Ja 09 

Morris, Isaac 7 E. 113th st., N. Y. C Je 09 

Morrison, Edward C 28 Market St., Amsterdam, N. Y D 08 

Morse, Louise Harriet 84 Main st., Batavia, N. Y Ja 09 

Morse, S. Irving 40 E. Main St., Amsterdam, N. Y Ja 09 

Morse, William J zozt Chamber of Commerce bldg., Rochester, 

N. Y D 08 

Moses, Ambrose E Krumville, Ulster co., N. Y Ja 09 

Moses, Jacob Louis 327 Pulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Moses, Judah 327 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ja 09 

Moses, Wolfe 327 Pulton st., Brooklyn', N. Y Ja 09 

Mosher, Walter J Martville, Cayuga co., N. Y Ap 09 

Mosier, Louis J 391 Walnut st., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Moskovitz, Julius 3 Park row, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mott, Emil G 795 E. 160th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Mott, Zebulon C 519 Pulton st.. Elmira, N. Y Ja 09 

Mount, Herbert Clinton Cherry Creek, N. Y., Box 74 Ap 09 

Mucke, Berthold 2633 8th av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Muir, Matthew R 584 Pulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y Je 09 

Mailer, Albert C 21 10 S. Salina St., E. Onondaga, N. Y Je 09 

Muller, Ernest Edward 17 E, Main st., M alone, N. Y Ap 09 

Munch, Theodore Conrad 153 Hopkinson av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Mundorff, Theodore 1167 Broadway, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Murdock, John D Geneseo, N. Y Ja 09 

Murray, Thomas John 45 Green st., Albany, N. Y Ja 09 

Myers, James 16 Washington st., Poughkeepsie, N. Y Ap 00 

Myers, Meyer 213 McLennan av., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Myers, Nicholas J 356 Pulton st., Troy, N. Y Je 09 

Naylor, Benjamin Franklin 86th st & 3d av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Naylor, James 1058 Bergen st.. Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Neff, Frederick Woodruff 17 Sheather st., Hammondsport, N. Y Ap 09 

Neill, William' Alexander, jr 8 Agate court. Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Nelson, Andrew John Massena, N. Y D 08 

Nelson, Hal 124 Congress St., Buffalo, N. Y M 09 

Nelson, James Richard 42 Main st., Massena, N. Y Ap 09 

Nelson, Julien 64 S. 4th av u Mt Vernon, N. Y Ap 09 

Neuman, George Ferdinand 524 5th st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Neuwirth, Abraham 788 2d av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Newberg, Isaac 1036 Park av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Newbcrgjjacob 327 Beekman av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Newell, William Frederick Mt Vision, N. Y Ap 09 

Newing. Egbert A 5 Lydia st., Binghamton, N. Y D 08 

Newing, Judson Shultz 86 Court St., Binghamton, N. Y D 08 

Newman, Guy W Watkins, N. Y D 08 

Newman, Louis 227 Plymouth av., Buffalo. N. Y Ja o 

Newman, Parry 307 Brown st., Rochester, N. Y D o 

Newman, Simon Owego, N. Y D 08 

Nichols. Harry Poillon 539 5th av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Nield, Arthur Ernest 669 Main St., Bast Aurora, N. Y. Ap 09 

Nierenberg, Joseph 70 Forsyth St., N. Y. C M 09 

Nightingale, David Ely 142 E. 8th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

NUes, William Lyndon Cobleskill. N. Y Ja 09 

Noll, John 80 Clinton av., Albany, N. Y D 08 

Nommenson, Carsten 987 Pulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Noot, Abraham C 228 7th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Nordstrom, Prank G 2x3 Main st., Jamestown, N. Y Ja 09 

Norton, Arthur C Public sq., Holley, N. Y Jl 09 

Norton. Edward Prazier 88 Main St., Salamanca, N. Y Ja 09 

Norton, George Freer Pleasant ville, N. Y D 08 

Noyes, Thomas B 170 Broadway. N. Y. C D 08 

Nunes, Angelo S 14 E. 43d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Nunes.Victor Neville 14B. Aad st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Nuse, Prank Paul 65-67 Grant st., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Nusser, John M - 229 Saxton st., Rochester, N. Y Ja 09 

Nye. Alexander S 31 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Nyeboe, Ancher 29 3d av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 417 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 

July 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (oontinued) 

Date of 
cer- 
NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Oakes, Ray W 9x4 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 00 

Obrig, Ernst Adolph 103 Van Wyck av., Jamaica, L. I., N. Y D 08 

Obrig, Jacob August Theodore ... x W . 4ad St., N. Y. C D 08 

O'Connor, Jerry F 6a Genesee St., Utica, N. Y M 09 

O'Donnell, William A 12a Genesee St.. Utica, N. Y Ja 09 

Oelschlaeger, Albert Edward 1 xo E. 33d St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Oelschlaeger, Oswald no E. 33d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Oertel, William D 205 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Offenhaeuser, Otto Tarrvtown, N. Y D 08 

Offenhaeuser, Otto, jr % 37 Main St., Tarrytown, N. Y Ap 09 

O'Hara. Michael J Camillus. N. Y ja 09 

Ohmann, Amos Main & Bank St., Albion, N. Y Ja 09 

Ohmann, Burt C William st., Lyons, N. Y Ap 09 

Olbricht, Benjamin, jr 730 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y. D 08 

Oliver, Joseph Robert 39 Market St., Amsterdam. N. Y Ap 09 

Olschewski, John 320 Washington st., Geneva, N. Y D 08 

O'Neill, Arthur P 1187 Hancock St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Opava, Francis 1370 1st av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Op pel, George Anthony 561 E. Main st., Little Falls, N. Y „ Ap 09 

Oppel, Irving Madison 561 Main st.. Little Falls, N. Y Ja 09 

Ornstedt, Henry Edward Boonville. N. Y Ja 09 

Orton, Eugene S xo E. Main st., Amsterdam, N. Y D 08 

Osborn, Romaine Jewett, N. Y Ap 09 

Oshorn, William Romaine Jewett, N. Y Ap 09 

Osborne. William Pulver Main st., Dryden, N. Y Jl 09 

Osterburg, Paul Max 1 594 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Ottenheimer, David C 1015 Gates av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Ottenheimer, Louis 7015 Gates av., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Outwater-John as Savings Bank bldg., Lock port, N. Y Ja 09 

Overton, Birred H 39 Main st.. Westfield, N. Y Ap 09 

Page, Charles Edward 270 W. Ferry st., Buffalo, N. Y D 08 

Page. William 466 Fulton st , Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Palley, Fred G Oneida. N. Y D 08 

Palmer, Arthur O Montour Falls, N. Y Ap 09 

Palmer, Henry Guy 60 N. Main st., Mechanicville, N. Y Ap 09 

Palmer, William Henry 139 Benedict av.. Wood haven, L. I Ap 09 

Paris. Charles Harry a86 River St., Troy, N. Y Je 00 

Parish, Edward Albert us Hornell. N. Y D 08 

Parish, Fred Melvin Hornell, N. Y D 08 

Parker, Albert Judd 159 Main st., Oneonta, N. Y Ap 09 

Parker. Roy Danford 51 Monhagen av., Middletown, N. Y Ap 09 

Parshall, Frederick Carlten Little & Parshall Co., Margaret st., Plattsburg, 

N.Y Ja 09 

Parsons, George Fish 13 W. 43d st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Partridge, L. Roy North Cohocton, N.Y Ap 09 

Patten, John H 105 W. 125th st., N. Y. C Ap 00 

Payne, George Willoughby 88 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y D 08 

Peabody. Edward Amenia. N. Y D 08 

Pearce, Frank Edward 32 Linden st., Geneva, N.Y Ja 09 

Pearse, Robert A Milford. N.Y Ap 09 

Peck, Arthur J Watkins, N. Y D 08 

Pellow, Arthur Stone road, Barnards, Greece, near Rochester. . . Ap 09 

Perine, Albert F 491 Fulton st., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Perkins, Charles Henry 286 Main st., Poughkeepsie, N. Y Ap 09 

Perkins, Daniel Leonard. Horseheads. N. Y Ja 09 

Perkins. John A Horseheads, N.Y D 08 

Perlen, Richard x 1 7 Bleecker St., Utica, N. Y D 08 

Perrin, William Freeman Oneida, N.Y D 08 

Perry, George Alexander 43 Hancock st., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Peters, Edmund Judson 45 Green st., Albany, N.Y Ja 09 

Petersen, Fred J 137 Genesee st., Buffalo, N.Y Ja 09 

Peterson, Nes Norwich. N. Y D 08 



Peterson, William John Main st.. Bolivar, N. Y Ap 09 

Petit, Louis A 535 Warren st.. Hudson, N. Y D 08 

Peto, Charles Richard 49 Liberty st., N. Y. C Ap 



09 
o\ 

Pettersson, Charles 44a St Nicholas av., N. Y. C Ap o< 

Pettinger, Otto J 33 Water st., Newburgh, N.Y D oi 

Pettit, Irving S a8 E. Main st., Patchogue. N.Y Ap 09 

Pfeiffer, Charles Gotthilf aa Flower st., Rochester, N. Y D 08 

Pflants, Henry J ao8 S. Pearl St., Albany, N. Y Je 09 

Phelps, Allis May Cor. Canal ft Chapel st.. Belfast, Allegany co., 

N.Y Ap 09 

Phelps, George Henry Hugh st., Belfast, Allegany co., N.Y Ja 08 

Phillips, Ernest T Wolcott,N.Y D 08 

Phillips, Floyd L McGraw, N. Y M 09 

14 



Petro, George 33 1 Oak st.. Rochester, N.Y Ja 09 

Pettersson, Charles 44a St Nicholas av., N. Y. C Ap 00 

Pettinger, Otto J 33 Water st., Newburgh, N.Y D 08 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



ch. 49) (continued) 



PhiSlip.i, Orrn Preston . . 
Picard. ItKisdoi* P.eTTB 
Piccard. Louis Martin 
Pickup, 'ii ■.-■ • 

Pierce, Pred 

Pilger, Charles Leonard. 
Pinkafskv, Heory ..... 

Pinney, W.li.sm M 

Piper. E Cbarlee 

Pippitt, '>»rry Joseph., 
Pitts. Harry Priaby . . 
Place. W..-- m 
Plimpton, Arthur H. ., 
Plumb, lienry I! 

Podoi, Abraham. . 



■M 



saJ 



ADDRESS tificate 

N. Y Ap as 

Care Guarantee Optica] Co. Je 09 

ons'Park.'N.'Y.. »*~ ~ 

la. N. Y. 



JV:*:v::::::: 

. in \ _ if. c 

., „„„.,. ,. »*?» Atlantic av . B-onklyo. N. Y. 

Pobs.Jacot. 1044 Herkimer tt . Brooklyn. N. Y 

Pole, John William.. oj B. M.hirt. Rochester. N Y , .. .. 

P„i_ J »ii ,., Attorneys! .NYC 

no High M . FJinira. N. Y 

Si Maiden Laoe.N V C. 

JSsCrnr.d u. Brooklyn. N Y . 

■ 54<>ruid it.. Brooklyn. M Y. 

4SJ Bergrn.t. Brooklyn, N. Y 

18 Ford tt . Oudensburg, N, V 

Ocean *v . Pat. hnRue, ft. Y 

Seiwa it . Manlius. ti Y 

51s w it»dt»..K Y.C 

115 S Warren it . Syracuse. NY 



Pcllak, ; 
Pollak. Sy. 
Pollock, A I 



Potter. Samuel Gipeo 

Powell, lsasr B 

Powell. Wdlwm H . 
Power,, John C.W.. 



t- <.*■:. \. Bunion. N Y 

■A, :„■:.!■ . . . Ticov Itroga, N. Y 

ire, I.™is lames. Main it . Fraoklort. S. Y 

-.i'«-!im. ... Park Avenue Hotel. N. Y.C . 



Prentta Chalman. Park Avenue Hr-el. \ Y 

Prentice. 'IharleaF 1S1 Broadway. N. Y. C. . 

Prescot; A.twrt B... North Creek. N. Y 

Preston. Myles B. 1 Maiden I«e. N Y C. ........ . 

Preston. Stephen, jf jS 8. <tb av . Mt Vernon. N. Y 



'. 41 J 6th av, N " 
Cor. State A U 

. J98 Mwcya,*..' 



. Greer. St.. Port njmm. n, 1 

. S3, Bedfjrd av.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

. .68 W tiatfa St . N. Y. C. 

107 Washington st.. Waiertowo. N. Y 

. 107 Waahinavrast. Watenown.N. Y.... 
■ . N Y.C. Bos i>6> 



. . ......e.N. Y 

. Saranac Lake. N. Y ... 

. Lake st. Richfield Spring*, N. Y. . 
. 8«i Manhattan av.. BroeTidyn. tt. Y. 

Van Etteu. N. Y 

. IS Chenango st . B.oghacotnn. N Y, 
. is Chenango st . Bir.gbamton. N. Y. 
. 10] W .|J«.N. Y"c 

S 6« Park av . N. Y. C 

. 7S Na*aau«.N. Y.C 

. M Hickory it.. Rochester. N. Y..., 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



eh. 4g) (continued) 



NAME 

Reiner . Harry If 

Reiner. F 1 nlcui ... 

Reinewald, Henry 

Reyno'Ht. Adalbert 

Rice. Harvey 8 

Richard*. George Byron 
Riceajilno. E:iawor".b M 

Rkl I. Asm WatM 

RhJunoad Wttlam R . 
Rici ■.. .I'berle* W.,,. 
HiclL-r-!. vdm J 



ADDRESS 

)t Second ef.N V. C 

nj E.ehtbav NYC 

. .is North >t . Mlddtetowa, N. Y 

Glen. Pall., (.' Y 



Me,-. 



Ad < 



Riekler. Caaael H 
Riefier. Pred A 
Riecer. Kalmeo L, 



Ricio. At h J l« 



W»ifl ." WV|h™nf°N y"*"~" .''".'. "'..*"!.; Ap og 

js Cl.n'.so •>• N . Roche.ter. N, Y. D oB 

Oneida.N.Y D eS 

jisClintonav N Rochester, N Y Ap 09 

..o M«h^»n «.. BuflaJo. N. V Ap -« 

Cf, CaaMwel: av . N Y. C Ap 

itg W Mar.:.u»« , P.ut Syracuse. N, Y D 

>. rihrrrver . Bath. N. Y D 

... . ^Brooklyn, N. Y .., D 

K Main •■ I -.:.. 1. N ** 

41 Sprtnaet . N. Y.C 

Edward.. 10. ft'. Water at. *• 



-o . n. y. . : 



Robin. Loula. 

Robio. William.. 

Robittton. '■»"■" s 

Robicaon. Toeepta., 

Robinaon. Oamon C 

Robinmn. 1'bineae KLiwortb. 

Roedcl. Fred William., 

" eard Bruce 



■: N'ir 



mr./N:v': 






... .t.N. V.. 

Balb Beach. Brooklyn. N \ 

;i:- v.vn N Y 



a 



;: 



idw.y. N Y C 



A, ■ 

in 



Roger*. Edward 
Rojera. rank, . 

Roee" 1 Ai,?ra 1 H.7.*. '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Rosen Chertea 

Roseobeum. Saly 

Roaenberfi. Jacob. .... 
Roaenbloom. O.erlee A. , 
Roseobloom, Reuben S 

' Id. David 



Utica. N. Y. . . 
.. Brooklyn. N, Y.. 



V -.<■-■. ■ > 



Rnaenalraua. !!m,» , . 
Roaenetrau*. Maunce il 
Rosen *:r».us. Yiclor, . . . 

Roe.. Samuel 

Ross Sanderson A. ... . 



f 3 



Rumble. CharSn A.'.'.'.'. '.'.'.'- 
Runway. Claremo Btuana 

Russell. Areata J 

RusacU. John Tbomas 

RtuaeJI. LeroT Edgar 

Ryer. Elmer Leroy 

Ryer. Richard Wealey 

Saalorachter. John A 



Sachs. Theodore Hermann 

Sacks. Abraham ... 

Sacks. Annie. ... . 

Sack*, (leorfie 

Sacla. Harris. 

Sacks. Herman. ..... . 

SaffoM. Cbariea Henry. 1 

Sewer, * .Herd J.. I 

Sefiaa. Pbilip Vi hilettonr. .-■ 

Sanborn. Elmer E j*B W nitbtt 

Sanborn, Kre-t E *' 
Sanda. Harry At. - 
Saoford. Cbartea B 
Senior." "" ' ' 

Sarg. .:' ibariet Edward 
Sawyer. Edward Sand) 



. j*8 W. nstl 

West port. N. 



. N. Y.C. 

N.Y.V 



Ap oo 

, . , D ei 
.... D 08 

.... Sp n 

::::fc p 3 

D eS 

::::&3 

-..63 

:::: i? 3 

fcs 

::::* 3 
if 3 

!*:: if 11 

:::.d'3 



rd. Cberfra B. . .1.ehanon el. Hamilton. N. Y la 09 

rd. Silas Judeoji S Halo it . Il^rv.v.e S* V - Je 09 

r. Harry Pargo Rochester * Halo at . Lima. N. Y Je eg 






uckahoe. N. Y 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Certificate! to practia* optometry were issued to the following Ai 
July 31, 1009 under lawi 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health 
CK «) 



-W. i, 19c 
Law 19 



. Greenport, 
, ti Maiden 
. Stapleton. 
. De Kuyur 



! jojFtft 



:. I- I.. V. V . 

.1 Laoe.N. Y.C 

. J. N Y. 

luyter.N, Y. , 

,Cl;iUOO •■.. N. Y. C. 

Clark*-- : : 1 Albany co . N. Y 

398 E Houston it . N Y C 

, 119 N K»l"i»« . Syracuae, N. Y 

Sjo Bntbanebld. . Buffalo. N. Y 

. Cannup, N Y 

. 510 Maditoo it , Buffalo, N, Y 

607 Broadway. Burials. N Y 

. 4B1 AuI.jst. "v n. : »a> S V 
. iSj S. Goodman it . Rochester. N. Y. . 

11 E.ndit.N Y.C. 

. ii Mils at. E.. Rochester. N. Y. 

£96 Tinton av , N Y C 

, 56 EutitV, S Y C 

100E jjth»t J M Y.C 

. >i Seneca at., Buffalo. N. Y 

:. so6E. i6idit .N Y C 

61 Naau-nt . N Y C. 

19 Rivmgton it , N Y.C 

. in] Broadway, Buffalo. N. Y 

CambreUngev.. S. Y.C 

»tiaa.N. Y 

N. Y.C 

. ,. ... ...jat.N. Y.C 

. 14 Elm at . Gloversv,:le. N. Y 

. »tj Lincoln pi.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

.76.Madno.1avN Y C 

137 Of nam tt.. Buffalo. N.Y 

S15 Eckford ai ,Creer.i>cint. Brooklyn. N, V 

. too Vesey at . tf. Y.C 

i6ii<d», N. Y C . 

Huntington .Una latond, N. Y. . 

Siojri av . Brooklyn. N. Y... 
atb, Sttubn: co., N. Y 

. )S]E. i(?tbst.,N Y C 

ngE ijost.r.' Y.C 

, 600 Pifthav.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

Trumaniburs. N Y 

. ,*,. r.aua a., Brooklyn. N. Y 

ijS^ id at .Qiwago.N. Y. 

ij Church at . GMvenvtile. N Y . 

i.j E ij.! M . N. V C 
, Haiti at . Coblrakil!. N. Y. 

Main •! . (VX..-.I V Y 

SBjolh av..N. Y.C 

3*= Columbia u , Brooklyn, N. Y 

. i»8o I'.Ilon a... Brooklyn, N. Y 

«S Jd a-. Bnx.tyn.rf. Y 

h«t Broadway. N. V. care Mundorfl.. 

S a N. Main «.. Alfred. N. Y 

. ji Ma;n .t. Alfred, N Y 

. 618 Main at , Buffalo. N. Y-... 

, Peon Yen. N. Y... - 

46 Richmond a- . Port Richmond. S. 1.... 
. 46 Richmom! av.. Port Richmond. SI.. 
. Otego. Onegoco.. N. Y 

6o, Geneae* at., Auburn. N, Y 

. Hanllua. N. Y 

. Alt E usthiUN. Y.C. 

. tflddlebjrg. NY 

, iji Broadway. N. Y. C 

. eg, Linden at. Ridgewood. N. Y . 

. 1170 Second a.. N. Y.C... 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Certificates to practiae optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, i 
July 31, 1909 under Uwa ioofi, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 
ch. 4g) (oonlHNtad) 



5 lvcrmim, Edward I. . 

Silverman, John 

S Iverman. How* B 

BUventein, Jnllu* 

Slmco*. John I'tnv 

5 mmoni, Lippman, 

6 rnon, Louii 

S rnon. William I , , 

S mpKii. Benjamin Otis. .... 

S mpeon. Oku Henry * Main 11.. . — .j~... ....... 

Bros,AlbertW 1 Orchard el.. Tarryloiro, N Y.. 

Sing, Charles R M Main at . rJYack, N V 

Singer. Bernard !« Puhon «t.. N. Y C 

S agar. Clan 

Singer, Morria ....... 



V,ll 



it (Mrs) . . 



Smith, Lewis Young . 

Smith. Oscar Charles. . . 

Smith. Robert Gibeon. .. 

Smith, Samuel 

Smith. Waiter HartweJ . . 

Smith, William J 

Snell. George A , 

Snltaer. Don 

Snitter, Jacob L. . . 

Scow, Altron OdeU.. 



. ,.N. Y.C 

N. Y.C 

■wn.N. Y.. 



,, Dunkirk. N Y 

Utfca. N, Y 

Utica. N. Y 

N, Y 

at.. Cohoea. N. Y. 

N. Y C 

K. Y. C .. 

St., Rochester, N * 

Port Jervte, N. Y. 
it. Albany. N. Y.. 



il'c 



S V-.iul 






1, 8. Y. 

161 Ceotral av ., Par Kutka»ay. I 
. .oCannteoit. HoroeK. N Y. 

^- : ev.rai a*. .Albany. N Y ... 

i6< Hlohat . Watertown. N. Y... 
. id Burgoyne at.. Schuylerville. Saratoga c 

. nollty.'NY'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'. 

, )) Stewart bldg, Utica. N. Y 

. .joi jd av . >J V C... 

■■, V. . :>„jital tt . Brooklyn. K Y. 

4 Exchange block. Id Payette eq., 
anasiota. M Y 

. 01 1 E Main at. Untie Palla. N. Y 

. >r6 E Broadway. N .Y.C 

. no E Broadway. N Y C 

i) W, Mam at . Goehen. N. Y 

910 S Warren it Syracuse. N Y 
. »i}(_Brosdw«y, N. Y C. 

ijoX. tjdat.. ilV.C 

no K jd it.. N Y.C 

. nofi Mam it . Niagara Pallj. X Y. 

Mionc.N. Y , 

. Malone. N Y.. .. 

. g»N. Peart ei. Albany, N. Y. . 



. tttg 



'.!." 



. i.v.;... 

,N. Y C 

pa. N. Y . . . 

o«.. HudaonjN Y.. 
lan.N Y.C 
k. Monterey, N. Y... 

Brooklyn L N. Y .. 

a:s-.au*f. . Bufialo. NY.. 



. . . Court'.andt a 
. Prewafgrg. M Y 

10. ChettDDt tt 

. )■ Mam at.. TottenviHe. 



NT Y. C 

N Y. 
__ .... lottenvme. w. Y. . . . 

.1 E. jdat . Dunkirk. N. Y 

. j iS Central av . Dunkirk. N Y 

).o Swan «.. Buffalo. N. Y 

. iiij Chenango at . Bingbamlnc. N, 1 
. is8 Roelyn it . Rochester. N Y. . 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



ch. 49) (continued) 



Jj^y.^. Ap o» 



3 

n'y': 

3ph ijo Ap 09 

f 3 



N V . 



Moses E.... »i Niwiu., N. Y. C .. Boi «6s.... 

Samuel Roo'Jsui ata . Kingston. N. Y D 

■ ■■'■ r. r «.. p«»- ih.n"y™ - .!''.. V.".".;!!.;;;;; j> 3 

iter Stedman.... . . . )■ Maiden Lane.tt. Y.C . . Ja oe 

a Alexander t6 Divisions'. , Amsterdam. N. Y D o£ 

lurt ... ii) Main « . Elm, re. N. Y D 0* 

1. Waller Stewart i)i Vanderbili en, , Syracuse. N. Y D oS 

Chanel Ke.d aiSMninw.. Delhi. N, Y Ap 09 

"«v : *? o* 

:fr 3 



Stem, Suiiufl, >r Rood out ata.. Kingston, f 

Sternberg. Guetav jc ijth av , Lod( Island City. N, Y Ap ( 

Sternberg. MrnuD L Late. N. Y Ap t 

Steve™ K :! »-.r. Ln««o Walton. M Y. .. . '■■ ■ 

Stevens. W,;i„m Daoiel Mem st , Warwick. N. Y . 

Sttwut, Kluebeth S 16 [). vision st , Amsterdam. N. Y. . 

"*■- t,Ou»W.... R. R St.. PawfioH.N. Y. 

' " -•-! Stedman. ■■ ■ . 1 .. 



N. Y.C 

St John i'Monie R lit Vau! ev . Bioghamton, N, Y 

Stoebr. Frank Tfe...'.cre . . "K N Pearl at . Albany. N. Y 

Stone, George Harlan Page. .. . llion, N Y... 

Stone, louil L Corning. N, Y 

Stone, Snl 8 Homi it . Rocheetei. N. Y D 08 

Strang. Elvlo T. . Alpine. N. Y Ap on 

St urges, Aden De Witt Norwich. NY D o* 

Sturges. Robert. Jr Congress it , Troy. N Y In eg 

St ylea, George B, it toj Wall it., Kmgiion. NY Ap 09 

Stylos. Harry C... joj Wall r. Kingston, S* Y Ap 09 

BncbVT, BennunlB i-n l : .:r.:,i< 111- aly- N v a- — 

1. Louie s»8 Main al . Little Falls. N. Y 



1. Y 



Ap 09 



Sumeriiki. Claude Irviog,. . .. 11 Plymouth » . Rochester. N. 

Surdam. Arthur Eugene . Jo Ellison at . Rocbeater. N. Y 

Sutheim. Preienc . 109 W ,oth «t . N Y C. J« 

Sutton, Charles Ruh.naon. Walker road. Perry. Wyoming co.N. Y Ap ., 

Sutton. Robert Wdliam Ma.n »t . AiH.eon. NY Ap 00 

Swan, Charles A „ llo ; . Vn.,1 NY.... . . Ja 09 

Swan.jobnA. Chestnut it . FreokJinvUle. N. Y. Ja aa 

Swan, Thomas Washington Prankliovlle. Cattaraugus co„ N. Y Ap of 

Swart, Charles George 9> Genesee at .Auburn. NY D si 

Swart. Fred belaud 119 Ceneaee at . Auburn. NY D a> 

Sweeney. Jamee V.nceot . . . . .0.1 jd a. . N. V. C Ap o* 

Sweet, Lewie O } S Main it Liberty. N Y Ja « 

Sweeting. Ralph Ernest . on Chamber ot Commerce bldg.. Rochester, 



Sweuy. Asber Jerome 11 South av , Rochester. N. Y 



N Y. Ja 09 

Rochester. N. Y... Ap 09 

N Y.C D ot 

Syrcber. Ernest Victor 10 HoUan I pi Bufiats N Y J» 09 

Tardy. Joseph S 90 Stale it . Lowmlle. NY Ap 09 

Taylor, Pranris Eugene ..... Bolivar. N. Y Ap 0* 

Taylor. Cerrge H 1079 Lexington av , N Y C Ap 09 

Taylor, lames Edward . ij6 Main st . BuSaJo. N Y Ap 09 

Taylor. jamei 3 11s Court it . Waanown N. Y Ja 09 

Taubman. Henry .... iSui: Si [ohotruJe, N. Y .Ja oe 

Taylor. Norman C Weedsport. N. Y D 0* 

Teodorinl. Osmond. ui« ,n< av.. Brooklyn. N, Y .... Ap 09 

Terry, Herbert Lewis ... Sayville. L 1 , N Y An 09 

TerwillUe- >mea 19 id at . NewSunth. N. Y Ja 09 

Tiach, Nathan £0 W. ,,,..... fi. y. c la 09 

Thai. Norrr.an.. e8ij «th av BmoUm. N. Y P ol 



L Brooklyn, I 

Thomas. Clarence Edgar. Skaneo'iei'ea'. N." Y " '.'.'.. '.'.'.'.'..'. Isi" ea 

Thomas. Homer Hugh Cloveravdle. N Y D el 

Thompaon. Avery Jay Cherry Valley. N. Y D oS 

Thompson. Avery W.j. Cherry Valley. N. Y .. D el 

Thompson. Ernest Henry . lis Monroe st . Brooklyn, N. Y D 0* 

Thompaon. r.eorge Waihiogtoo... .r RailroaH av WhiU Plaiia. N Y Ap do 

Thompson. Leicester M 416 Grant av., Richmond HuJ. N. Y D 08 



r, Charfes Talman. .' '.'. w o Cran.t* bldg.. Kocbester. N Y." '.'. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. Ja 
. fedmeston.N Y Ap 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 4^3 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. i, 190*- 

Jnly 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 

ch. 49) (confinued) 



Thorp*. Chat'.es A 

Thorps. WL-liam Henry .... 

Thrasher. Fletcher M 

Tole. tobn B 

Tomnlrjes. Prank PresUm.. 
Tomplons. Herbert Philip. . 

Torres. Isaac, ..... 

Townsend. Leils Wood . 
Tnty. drome Herbert . . . . . 



WsHtw.r.h. Uurtoo £. . 
WaeJde. Chsc'es Hmry.. 
Waelrte. DeWut Charles. 
Wagner. Arlington R 



Ci.ytu... S. Y D 

... North st . Rochester. M. Y. la 

<o( U P.vf.-t st . Dtka. N. Y. . Ap 

Loxsackie NY D 

3 , F. Marie! «.. Coming. N, Y U 

ji> Kx:. re-en a' . Brooklyn. N. Y Ap 

Jone>« . M»ueaw»n N. Y... Ap 



..NY.. . r .. 

. Sauger*.iei. N. Y Ap ■ 

.t . Syracuse. N. Y . la t 

'• MUM. N. Y D - 

- ('«««. X, Y.. 



i 11 Cedar « . Syracuse. N. Y. 

o N M«n>i . port Chester. M, Y Ja 

SJ9 jthov. N. Y.C. .. Ap 

SHo feay »«.. 8ta|.:e-.OD. N. V Ja 

580 Day si.. Stafiatop, N. Y Ja 

(.1 l'f^i»c- p . lirooklyn. N. Y ... Ap 

-., ITwi ;.. BntHyn, N. Y.. . . 11 

no M..n»i . Buffalo. N. V. Ja 

" ■'}.«.•* M 



S W. ii6Ib"»t.. N. Y. C.. 

joj Broadway Brooklyn N. Y.. 



1 . ^uokirk, •/. Y 

. .: t :'-* N Y 

...N Y. C 

Brooklyn. N. Y 

.10 st . flaven>tra.r. N. Y . 

n .Amsterdam. N. Y 

.at . Syracuse, N ; Y.. 



:::::: 4°: 
V: 



J~il Y. 



Divi.ion st . (Vit/es.V.1. fc, Y Ap 

usK twist .N. Y C Ja 

Kutord . V Y Ap 

Ply Creek. UtseM, 00.. N. Y Ap 

Port Jerv.s. tTV. D 

Port Jervia. N. Y D 



:». 



olcott. rf. Y . 

Sterling pi.. Brooklyn. S Y 

Vinthmpit,. Rochester. N. Y 

Washington • ■ Glendala. L, I . . 



:i" 3 



Wagoner. Hetben A Norwieb. N Y 

WaTlvoael.tbarlea .../.. — _. «...■ 

Walker. Frank D 



nry... 



Wal.««, 1 
Watob. Ja, . 

Walab, James R 

Waller. B. Prank 

Walter, Gnatave. 

Waller. Gwiava Alfred . . 
Waits. E L £st*:la... 
Ward. Charles Crooiwei; 
Ward. Cbatles Prentice.. 
Ward. Samnt) Phillips ... 

Warren. Arthur 



1011 IThamner ( 

K. Y 

Webster. N. Y., 

i,i B loothst. N Y.C. 

x. Crovest.. Brooklyn. N. Y 

... r-..« v. . Bingham-.™, N. Y 

. N Y.C 

Lane.N Y.C 

"ay. N. Y C. 

• Morgan st. Buffalo, NY 

Main st.. Yookera. N. Y 



: M 



Ap 00 

:i* 3 



Wanchauer. Julllaa . .. . ... 1 19 B. tojtb st , N YC 

Warsnaw. Morns L j B. t iota St.. N. Y.C. 



:S 3 

. Ap 00 



424 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. x, 1908- 
Jnly 3i r igog under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) (continued) 

Date of 

NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Wart ell, Isaac 515 E. Tremont av., N. Y. C Je 09 

Wartell, Morris Aaron 21 r 5 Amsterdam av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Waterman, Charles O Atkins block. Main St., Worcester, N. Y Ap 09 

Watson, Joseph Calhoun 265 W. 153d St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Watts, Herbert C azo S. Warren St.. Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Weber, William 361 E. 138th St., N. Y. C Ap 



09 
09 

Weidman, Edward George 150 Main St., Dansville, N. Y t) 08 

Weiner, Alphonse «8a73d av.. N. Y. C Ap 

Weinert, Paul Richard Frits 369 Ef. iSStn st., N. Y. C Ap 



Weeks, William James 142 Glenwood_av., Buffalo, N. Y Ja, 09 



09 

t _ , - __. .. . . .--_-. 09 

Weinstein, Abraham 777 Wendover av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Weinstein, Mortimer 77 E. 96th St., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Weisberg, Samuel xm Almond St., Syracuse, N. Y Ap 09 

Weiss, Max 1168 ad av., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Weiss man, Louis 308 Broome St., N. Y. C Je 09 

Wells, Prank L Sackets Harbor, N. Y Ap 09 

Wemett. Ployd J Livonia, N. Y Ja 09 

Wendell, Charles * Grant block, Oswego, N. Y Je 09 

Wendell. James Gilbert Cor. West Bridge & zst St.. Oswego, N. Y Ap 09 

Wenzel, Alfred William 143 Pulton St., N. Y. C D 08 

Weasels, Alfred D 178 Clinton av., Albany, N. Y D 08 

West. Charles Henry 76 E. Main St., Amsterdam, N. Y Ap 09 

West. Grant M 75 Lake St., Owego, N. Y Ap 09 

Wcstby, Frederick Joseph 163 a Main St., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Wetherby, William Henry Seward. Clyde. N. Y D 08 

Wet ton, Charles Tames 68 Central av., Albany, N. Y Je 09 

Wheeler, Edward Luther Mannsville, N. Y D 08 

Wheeler, George Alfred Mai one. N. Y Ja 09 

White, William H 53a Mam St.. Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Whiting. Archie C 524 Wolf St., Syracuse, N. Y Ja 09 

Whitney. Dennis Abner Holland, Erie 00.. N. Y Ap 09 

Whitney, Harry D Union, N. Y <. Ja 09 

Wholton. George 558 Swan St., Buffalo, N. Y Ap 09 

Wicksman, Julius 29 Jamaica av., Brooklyn, N Y Ap 09 

Wideman, Otto Michael z Carl St., Rochester, N . Y Ap 09 



WidrovitZj Semil 17$ Palisade av., Yonkers, N. Y Ap 09 

Man 

,, Batavia, N. Y Ja 00 

Wilcox, Edwin aa S. Pirst St., Fulton, N. Y D 08 



Wiggins, J. DUlaye Mamst., Trumansburg, N. Y Ap 09 

>x, De 



Wilcox, Dey E aoo E. Main st., Batavia, N. Y Ja o 

Wilcox, Edwin aa S. Pirst St., Fulton, N. Y D o 

Wilcox, Frederick B Hunter, N. Y Ap o 



wacox, rredencic a nunter, im. y Ap 09 

Wilcox, Hiram Bogardus 380 Main St., Catskill, N. Y D 08 

Wilday, John Henry The Berlin Dep't Store, Broadway, Brooklyn, 



N. Y Ap 09 

Wilderman, Pauline 35 Broome St., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Wildman, Joseph Melvin 483 Main st., Buffalo, N. Y .a 09 

Willenbucher, William Center Moriches, L. I., N. Y Ap 09 

Williams, Prank J 3 Main st., Adams, N. Y Ja 09 

Williams, Henry A 1 19 N. James st. , Rome, N. Y , a 09 

Williams, James Henry 137 Remsen St., Cohoes, N. Y , a 09 

Williams. Roger P 455 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y , a 09 

Wilson. Prank G 101 E. State St.. Ithaca, N. Y .a 09 

Wilson, John Whiting Morris, N. Y Ap 09 

Wilson, Silas P Saranac, N. Y Ap 09 

Wilson, William B 30 N. Terrace av., Mt Vernon, N. Y M 09 

Wimpelberg, Benjamin 255 W. 39th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Winchester, Leroy E 30 w. Main st., Fredonia. N. Y Ap 09 

Winkelman, William Ely 51a W. 148th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Winkelstein, Jacob L 738 Harrison St., Syracuse, N, Y D 08 

Winkelstein, Levi 340 S. Salina st., Syracuse, N. Y D 08 

Winters, William C 31 Chestnut St., Lockport, N. Y Ap 09 

Winterstein, Bernard John z 16 W. z z z th St., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Wiseman, Eugene Gilbert 617 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y Ja 09 

Wock, Charles Gremes Main St., Dolgcville, K. Y Ap 09 

Wolfert, Emily E 6th av. ft 33d st., N. Y. C, care Enrich Bros. . . Ap 09 

Wolk, Lasar z 7 z6 Pitkin av., Brooklyn, N. Y Je 09 

Woll, Frederic Albert 1013 Home st., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Wollner, Barney Raymond 23 2 E. 8ad st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Wood, Harold G 163 Warburton av., Yonkers, N. Y Ja 09 

Wood, Ralph Leonard Ionia, N. Y D 08 

Woodruff, Alvin Le Roy Port Henry, N. Y D 08 

Woodruff, Joseph Kenneth 1006 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Wood worth, Fred LodLSeneca co., N. Y Ja oo 

Wolff. Max Herman 203 W 125th st., N. Y. C D 08 

Woolt, Daniel 2$ Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Woolf, Michael 95 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ja. 09 

Wooster, James B Greenville, N. Y Ap 09 



09 

09 
09 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 425 

Certificates to practise optometry were issued to the following Aug. 1, 1908- 
Jnly 31, 1909 under laws 1908, chapter 460 (Public Health Law 1909, 
ch. 49) {concluded) 

Date of 

OCT- 

NAME ADDRESS tificate 

Word en, Charles William 114 Peterboro ft., Canastota, N. Y Ap 09 

Worden, William B N. Hornell St., Canitteo, N. V Ja 09 

Woronov, Harry J 797 Grand St., Brooklyn, N. Y Jl 

Worth, Joseph R Sea Cliff, Long Island. N. Y Ap 

Wortia, Harry 949 Grand St., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 

Wray, Garrett Francis West Granville Corners. N. Y Je 09 

Wright, Harrie Mason Patterson, Putnam co., N. Y Ta 09 

Wright, Olin Hanford 307 E. State St.. Ithaca. N. Y D 08 

Wright, William Gordon Patterson, Putnam co., N. Y Ap 09 

Wrisley, Arthur R 12 Pike st.. Port Jervis, N. Y Ap 09 

Wronker, Louis J 399 Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Yanss, Richard 88 Cornelia St., Brooklyn, N. Y., care O. P. 

Rentel Ap 09 

Yanss, William Fred 307 4th av., N. Y. C Ta 09 

Yarrow-Arthur Radwell 37 Hausman St., Brooklyn, N. Y D 08 

Yates, William Main St.. Cold Spring. N. Y Ap 09 

York, Richard M 95 Main st., Gouverneur, St Lawrence co., N. Y. Ta 09 

Young, Walter Stanley 18 Genesee st v Jamestown, N. Y M 09 

Yoxafi, Frank 1 x 44 3d av., N. Y. C Ta 09 

Yoxall, Thomas x 144 3d av., N. Y. C Ja 09 

Zadek, Felix 51 Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Zadek, Max < x Maiden Lane, N. Y. C Ap 09 

Zeigler, Charles T Main & Cuyler st.. Palmyra, N. Y D 08 

Zeitlin. Benjamin *8x Flatbush av., Brooklyn N. Y Ap 09 

Zeitlin, Martin 15 5 Hamilton av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Zeitlin, Samuel a 81 Flatbush av., Brooklyn, N. Y Ap 09 

Zilliox. Albert 413 William st., Buffalo, N Y Ap 09 

Zimmei, William John 45 Orchard st., Tarrytown. N. Y Ap 09 

Zimmermann, William 237 Mortimer st.. Buffalo, N. Y Je 00 

Zimmet, Emanuel 133 Avenue D. N. Y. C D 08 

Zimmet. Millie x$9 B. Broadway. N. Y. C, care Mendelson Mr 09 

Zinner, Martin 1x9 B. 197th st., N. Y. C Ap 09 

Zornaw, Charles 33 Lefferts pi., Brooklyn, N. Y. .. /. D 08 

Business credentials 

Binghamton High School 

State stenographers certificate 

Hifler. Ina E. 

Christian Brothers Academic School, Syracuse 

Stat* stenographers certificate 

Kotz. Leonard C. A. 

Franklin Academy, Malone 
State business dtploma 
Donohoe, Leslie J. Nort bridge, Harry T. 

Meeker, Jay B. 

Heffley School, Brooklyn 
State business certificate 
Ball. William B. 

Lowell School of Business, Binghamton 

State business diploma 

Howard, Frank G. 

State business certificate 
Cornell, Clyde M. 

Mount Vernon Commercial School 
State stenographers certificate 
Neale, Annie Ida Sommer, Brwin Clarence 

New York city 

State business certificate 

Greendlinger, Leo 

State stenographers certificate 
Duffy, Francis J. Hovorka, John 

Blias, Louis J. Park. Archibald S. 

Furniss, Clinton C. . Uswald, Sarah 

Niagara Falls High School 
State business diploma 
Davis. Edward A. Switzer, Isabel L. 

Elsheimer, Ruth E. Wylie, Mary Boyd 

Simons, Isabel Helen 

8t Joseph's Academy, Albany 
State stenographers diploma - 
Conway, Helen 

State stenographers certificate 
CahiH, John M. Sammon, Michael L. 

Cant well, John B. Sheridan, James 

Giblin, Joseph 



426 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



Business credentials {concluded) 

8t Joseph's Academy, Troy 
Stats stenographers certificate 
Hoi den, Alice C. O'Connor, Anna 

St Joseph's Commercial, Academy, Brooklyn 

State business certificate 

Bryan, Kathryn V. Huntington, Catherine E. 

Cassidy, Josephine C. McCormack. Elizabeth C. 

Clarke, Mary Veronica J. McEachern, Mary C. G. 

Concah, Nora V. O'Donncll, Josephine A. 

Creighton, Dolores J. Shannon, Sarah E. 

Donjon, Elizabeth Toomey, Nora E. 
Flanagan, Margaret A. 

State stenographers certificate 

Campbell, Margaret McCormack, Elizabeth C. 

Dalton, Kathryn R. McGivney, Catharine 

Flanagan, Margaret A. McQuade. Elizabeth L. 

Hynes, Julia F. Sheeran, Jane Rita 



McAllister, Mary C. 



St Mary's Academy, Glens Falls 
State business diploma 



Conlin, Henry J. Skiddy, Lawrence J. 

Mulroy, John K. 

State stenographers diploma 
Foley, Lawrence C. 

St Patrick's Academy. CatskiU 

State stenographers diploma 
Seel, Julia E. , 

St Peter's Academy* Troy 
State stenographers certificate 
Gilligan, S. Pauline Madigan, Irene 

Tonkers High School 
State stenographers certificate 
Dick, Frederick Christian Ott, Elsie Elizabeth 

Nelson, Minnie Sophie Varian, Elsie 

Young Men's Christian Association, Brooklyn 

State business certificate 

Kretzer, Carl Louis 

DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 

During the year syllabuses on higher education have been revised 
or were in process of preparation. 

It may not be out of place at this point to formally record the 
purpose and historical growth of the syllabuses which are an edu- 
cational feature of the American system. 

Syllabus. The meaning of the word syllabus needs to be more 
clearly understood. The dictionaries make the word a synonym of 
compendium, abstract, epitome, brief. It is more than this. It is a 
concise statement of a scheme of study prepared to indicate the 
general scope and character of the instruction to be given by the 
teacher and the work to be done by the students. It outlines the 
essentials of each subject, the approved principles of teaching to 
be observed and minimizes the embarrassment of students in exami- 
nations arising from defective instruction, discursive study or the 
use of inferior textbooks. The scheme is sufficiently detailed to act 
as a guide for the teacher in giving proper instruction in the various 
subjects and to the board of examiners in testing the same. In 
short, the plan and scope of the syllabus contemplates an outline that 
shall serve as a rational ground for instruction in the schools and 
shall afford permanent and scientific tests for admission to profes- 
sional practice. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 427 

The first suggestions of a syllabus for elementary and secondary 
schools in the State of New York appeared in Regents actions as 
early as 1828. In 1880, it is " a summary of requirements." The 
syllabus of 1891 affected 504 secondary schools of the State with 
50,000 students, passed through 10 editions and established the five 
year syllabus period. 

The Course of Study and Syllabus for the College Graduate Pro- 
fessional Certificate and for the Renewal of the College Graduate 
Certificate Limited, prepared for the Education Department under 
the advice and cooperation of a committee appointed at a conference 
of the colleges and universities of the State, was reprinted as 
Department Bulletin 444. The course of study prescribed under the 
authority of special statute for teachers training departments in col- 
leges and universities and the successful completion of the course 
entitle a student to a college graduate professional certificate. The 
course is based on the condition that the student shall be in good 
and regular standing for the B.A., B.S. or Ph.B. degree. 

The syllabus is made to assist students in meeting the requirements 
for two grades of certificates [see Bulletin 444, p. 4]. 

The Course of Study and Syllabus for Guidance of Nurse 
Training Schools in preparing their students for examination before 
the State board was revised and reprinted as Department Bulle- 
tin 441. This syllabus, intended for the guidance of nurse training 
schools in the preparation of students for Regents examinations as 
provided in the nurse practice act of 1903, was issued in 1905. It 
attained a very wide influence throughout the United States in the 
developing and systematizing of the nurse training schools. The 
revision was made by the Advisory Council of Nurse Training 
Schools, the State Board of Nurse Examiners and the Department. 

The Pharmaceutical Syllabus, begun by a committee representing 
the State Board of Pharmacy, the Pharmacy Council and the De- 
partment in 1906, is practically completed and will probably be 
recommended to the State board for adoption at its January meeting. 
The work of this committee, soon after its inception, took on a 
national character and marked in this particular another step of 
educational advancement. For the first time, a syllabus takes on 
national character to become operative in professional schools of the 
United States. 

The State Board of Medical Examiners is engaged in a revision 
of the Medical Syllabus and a representative of the State is co- 
operating with a committee of the American Association of Medical 
Colleges in an effort to perfect a syllabus of national character. 



4^8 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

XVBPEOTXOire 

The Education Law and the Regents Revised Rules adopted in 
conformity with it and other professional education laws provide for 
the visitation, examination and inspection of the condition and 
operation of every institution and department in the University. 
For refusal or continued neglect on the part of any institution in 
the University to make the required annual report or for violation 
of any law, the Regents may suspend the charter or any of the 
rights and privileges of such institution. Individuals, associations 
or corporations may not confer degrees or transact business under 
or in any way assume the name of university or college. No person 
shall buy, sell, or fraudulently or illegally make or alter, give, issue 
or obtain any diploma, certificate or other instrument purporting to 
confer any literary, scientific, professional or other degree, or to 
constitute any license, or to certify to the completion in whole or in 
part of any course of study in any university, college, academy or 
other educational institution. This protection of the higher edu- 
cational institutions, accredited colleges, diplomas and degrees calls 
for and imposes a task on the Inspections Division, which is shown 
by the report of one inspector during the year who devoted about 
85 days work to such investigations in New York city alone. As a 
result of investigations, eight arrests were made, six professional 
certificates were revoked, and action is pending in five other cases. 
As a result of the arrests, four convictions were obtained, one case 
is pending and another has been appealed. The fines imposed were 
from $50 to $500. One, who pleaded guilty in the court, was sen- 
tenced to a year in the penitentiary. These offenses have comprised 
two lines of frauds — impersonation in the examinations and indirec- 
tion connected with papers written by candidates in examinations. 

It should be said that the policy of the Regents and the Depart- 
ment has been consistent for many years in declining to give pub- 
licity to the methods of fraud attempted that have come to their 
attention. No lists of the known diploma mills have been published. 
The attention of the public has not been drawn to fraudulent degrees 
on the theory that such information would appeal to immature minds 
and result in more harm than good. 

National educational literature shows a continuation of the 
discussion of the importance of the personal inspection of higher 
institutions of learning, and several states are following New 
York's lead as shown above. Inspections of institutions apply- 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 429 

ing for incorporation and for registration have gone forward 
steadily in the State and inspections of higher institutions have 
been made as occasion demanded. 

REGISTRATION 

In harmony with their revised rules the Regents have dur- 
ing the year registered on the recommendation of the Depart- 
ment, under section 401, 5 colleges or universities as approved 
institutions conforming to the definition of a college contained 
in section 24, the number registered now being 50; 

Under section 402, 5 approved colleges, maintaining a satisfac- 
tory standing for one full year of medicine, the whole number 
registered being 6; 

Under section 403, 23 colleges or universities as meeting the 
order of the Court of Appeals for the admission of attorneys 
and counselors at law, the number registered at present being 

130; 

Under section 404, 4 institutions maintaining lower require- 
ments than those enumerated in section 401, and not coming 
under the meaning of section 402 and 403, the entire number 
registered being 4 ; 

Under section 406, 1 school of theology, the number now regis- 
tered being 8; 

Under section 407, 1 school of law, the whole number regis- 
tered being 26; 

Under section 408, 4 schools of education, as maintaining ap- 
proved course in education or extension courses leading to de- 
grees in pedagogy, or in teachers training courses, the present 
number registered being 25; 

Under section 409, 9 schools of medicine as maintaining 
proper medical standard and as legally incorporated, the num- 
ber registered being 92; 

Under section 410, 3 schools of dentistry as maintaining the 
proper educational standard and legally incorporated, the num- 
ber registered being 27; 

Under section 411, no schools of pharmacy, the number regis- 
tered remaining at 33; 

Under section 412, 1 school of veterinary medicine or college 
maintaining a satisfactory standing for one or more full years 
of veterinary medicine, the number registered now being 8; 



430 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Under chapter XII, 25 training schools for nurses, the num- 
ber registered being 266; 

Under section 413, 3 schools of optometry, the number regis- 
tered being 3. 

The Board rescinded the registration of 1 school of medicine 
and 1 school of dentistry. 

The Department accredited schools of medicine, dentistry, 
pharmacy, veterinary medicine and nurse training for one or 
more years of professional work for admission on advanced 
standing in registered schools, when the applicant met the gen- 
eral preliminary education required by the New York statutes. 

These lists of registered and accredited schools appear in the 
several professional handbooks issued by the Department for 
the convenience of students applying for admission to the pro- 
fessional schools of the State and to lighten the task of corre- 
spondence imposed en the Department by the professional 
statutes. 

The year's record brought together for convenience in hand- 
book form will be found in the Regents record under other title. 
A new handbook giving the list of the colleges and universities 
registered by the Regents under sections 401 and 404 is in process 
of preparation. 

EXAMINATIONS 

In connection with the professional examinations conducted 
by the Department there was some discussion in educational 
journals touching " the possibilities for fraud that have so fre- 
quently been exposed in connection with Regents examinations." 
As readers of such articles may not have discriminated between 
Regents examinations which are (a) academic — testing the 
scholarship of secondary students in the interest of higher in- 
stitutions and (6) professional — testing the scholarship of 
higher students in the interest of the general public; the latter 
giving the right to enter on professional practice, e.g. medicine ; 
the former to enter a professional school, e.g. law, it may not 
be out of place to call attention to the possibilities of fraud in 
connection with Regents examinations and the assumption of 
their frequency. Reference has been made under " Inspection " 
to certain cases of fraud exposed in connection with the pro- 
fessional examinations. 

Academic examinations in one year were held in 2147 places 
in this State; involved 291,000 different question papers; tested 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 43I 

the ability of 77,700 secondary students and called for 233,000 
answer papers, but these numbers do not increase the possibility 
of fraud, they lessen it by creating a trained, experienced and 
permanent force of examiners and by more accurate rules safe- 
guarding admission, proctoring and making returns. 

It should be said that the exposures have come from within, 
not from without; that such provisions as establishing the 
identity of candidates by photograph and signature have grown 
out of the experience of the Department; that the statutes and 
the rules make counterfeiting etc. a felony and false impersona- 
tion a misdemeanor. The Regents experience in prosecutions 
for violations under the University Law is a most interesting 
chapter which is closed to publication under the Department 
policy, but the entire force of the Inspections Division is avail- 
able in the safeguarding of Regents academic or professional 
examinations. 

Under statutes governing the professions the Department in con- 
formity with Regents rules passed on the academic standing of stu- 
dents applying for admission to the professional schools of the 
State and to the professional licensing examinations which are 
generally accepted by the professional schools as sufficient for 
admission though in some cases higher local requirements are 
exacted. The evidence of such academic education as is re- 
quired by law or Regents rule for admission to the professional 
and technical schools and to the examinations for certified pub- 
lic accountant appears in a certificate called a qualifying cer- 
tificate. Under this rule the Department issued during the year 
856 qualifying certificates for admission to law schools; 868 for 
admission to medical schools; 266 for admission to dental schools; 
435 f° r admission to pharmacy schools; 58 for admission to 
schools of veterinary medicine; 4 for admission to optometry 
schools; 2 for admission to nurse training schools; 423 for ad- 
mission to the certified public accountant examinations and for 
other general purposes; 36 business credentials (16 diplomas, 
20 certificates). 

These certificates were based on records made in Regents ex- 
aminations in recognized secondary or higher institutions, or on 
both examinations and attendance. 

Formal written examinations of candidates applying for ad- 
mission to the professional practice in the State were held four 
times during the year at convenient places. 



432 



NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



The State Board of Law Examiners examined for admission 
to the bar and the State Board of Pharmacy for the druggist 
and pharmacist licenses; the Education Department for teach* 
ing, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, osteopathy, op- 
tometry, and certified public accountancy, and for the certificate 
of registered nurse. Examinations were held in the State Li- 
brary School as a basis for degrees in library science which are 
conferred by the Regents. 

The following table gives the number of examinations held, 
and the number of candidates examined, passed, rejected or 
honored, as far as statistics are available. 

The abbreviation "par." refers to the number of candidates 
taking the partial medical examinations which are included in 
the following item. In the library column " jr" refers to junior 
and " sr *' to senior students. 



•* m • < 


1 examinations of the academic year 


1909 






5 


S 


3 


3 


1 


1 

• 


Nune 

trainins 


• 


• 

3 


1 

• 






2 

101 
58 


4 

283 par. 
000 

254 par. 
817 

20 par. 
143 

11 


4 

180 

146 

36 

8 


15 

468 
300 
102 


4 

32 

30 

2 


2 

028 

501 

07 

26 


3 

20 

21 

8 

• • • ■ 


13 jr 
10 sr 

24 jr 

Oar 

22 jr 

3 8T 

2Jr 

lsr 

4Cjr 

38 ar 


2 


No. of candidates ex- 


1 500 
084 
670 


112 




4* 




04 




1 















Professional students Aug. x, xgo8-Aug. x, 2909 



Per cent 
issued 



on exams. 

Law student certificates issued 850 

M on examination 855 

M on equivalents 270 

M on partial equivalents 222 

41.4 

Per cent law student certificates issued on equivalents 32 . 6 

" on partial equivalents 25.0 

General qualifying (academic equivalent) certificates issued 428 

* on exams. ... 02 
M on equiv 181 

* on part, equiv. 150 

21.7 

Per cent academic equivalent certificates issued on equivalents 42. 7 

" on partial equivalents. . . 35 . 4 

Medical student certificates Issued 867 

• on examination 243 

M on equivalents 436 

" on partial equivalents 188 



60.3 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 433 

Professional students Aug. x, ipoS-Aug x, i9og(concluded) 

Per csnt 

issued 

on exams. 

Per cent medical student certificates issued on equivalents 52 

- on partial equivalents 21.6 

Dental student certificates issued 266 

M on examination 119 

" on equivalents 65 

" on partial equivalents 82 

44 7 

Per cent dental student certificates issued on equivalents 24 . 4 

M on partial equivalents 30.8 

Veterinary student certificates issued 58 

" on examination 35 

" on equivalents 18 

" on partial equivalents 5 

Per cent veterinary student certificates issued on equivalents 31 

_. " on partial equivalents 8.6 

Pharmacy student certificates issued 435 

* on examination 249 

" on equivalents 157 

* on partial equivalents 29 

Per cent pharmacy student certificates issued on examination 57 . 2 

" on equivalents 36 

. " on partial equivalents 6.6 

State stenographers diplomas issued 3 

" on examination 3 

" on partial equivalents 

State business diplomas issued 12 

" on examination 12 

State stenographers certificates issued 32 

" on examination 32 

State business certificates issued 17 

M on examination 17 

Nurse student certificates issued 1 

" on examination 1 

Optometry student certificates issued 4 

M on examination 2 

" on equivalents 2 

Total certificates issued 2 974 

. * on examination 1 160 

1 * on equivalents 1 138 

" on partial equivalents 676 

Per cent certificates issued on examination 39 

* on equivalents 38.2 

* on partial equivalents 22 . 7 

BEP0&T8 FROM HIGHER XnTXTTTTXOVS 

Excluding special schools 

In 1909 the teaching force employed in the higher institutions 
of the State, excluding special schools, numbered 4231 as against 
4175 last year, being a decrease of 2 men and an increase of 58 
women. 

In 1909 there were 36,287 students in these institutions in- 
cluding those unclassified and those pursuing graduate courses, 
an increase of 15 14 over 1908. In the undergraduate depart- 
ments there was an increase of 1334 over last year. Of this in- 
crease 837 were men and 497 women. The number enrolled in 
graduate courses was 3164, an increase of 298 over the number 
reported for the preceding year. 

First degrees conferred in course during the year numbered 
4194 of which 3072 were on men and 1122 women. For the 
preceding year the number was 2908 for men and 1029 for 



434 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

women, a total of 3937. Of the 4194 degrees conferred in 1909, 
1637 were given by professional schools divided as follows: 
theology 54; law 626; education 161; medicine 430; dentistry 
130; pharmacy 206; veterinary medicine 30. The honorary de- 
grees conferred this year numbered 123 as against 94 in 1908, and 
100 in 1907. 

The total amount of property including investments reported 
by higher institutions is $122,067,009, an increase of $5472,822 
over that reported for 1908. Their receipts were $19,178,377, an 
increase of $5,730,716 over the preceding year; their expendi- 
tures were $16,456,213, an increase of $4,162,767 over the pre- 
ceding year. 

The salary list for higher institutions excluding special schools 
is $4,817,676, an increase of $764,773 over the amount expended 
last year. 

The statistics of foreign institutions chartered by the Regents 
were given in full in the last annual report for a five year period 
and are omitted from this year's report. 

COLLEGES A1TD tTHXYEBSITXES 

Perhaps the most noteworthy item of interest to colleges and 
universities for the past year was the conference of representa- 
tives of various associations of colleges and preparatory schools 
and other similar bodies held in New York at the office of the 
Carnegie Foundation which resulted in a permanent organiza- 
tion with officers and constitution. Its name is The National Con- 
ference Committee on Standards of Colleges and Secondary Schools: 
its object, to consider standards of admission, matters of common 
interest to universities, colleges and secondary schools and such 
other questions as may be referred to it. The committee is com- 
posed of delegates from the following organizations: The New 
England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools, The 
New England College Entrance Certificate Board, The Association 
of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle States and Mary- 
land, The College Entrance Examination Board, The North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, The Association of 
Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Southern States, The 
National Association of State Universities, The Carnegie Founda- 
tion for the Advancement of Teaching and such other organizations 
as may be elected to membership. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 435 

A most interesting article was discussed at the second session of 
the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools, November 2j, 
entitled " Some Famous English Schools " by Dr James H. Canfield, 
Columbia University. 

At the fourth session a report of the committee on college entrance 
certificate board was presented and adopted which definitely estab- 
lishes a college entrance certificate board for the Middle States and 
Maryland. A committee on college entrance requirements presented 
four resolutions which were adopted and the committee continued 
to complete its work. 

1 The amount of work that may be demanded for admission to 
college is measured by what can be done in an efficient four year 
high school course. 

2 Better results would be secured in preparation for college if the 
same amount of work was concentrated upon fewer subjects. 

3 The minor differences now existing between colleges in the 
matter of entrance requirements are detrimental to the best interests 
of education and should be eliminated. 

4 Criticisms on special subjects are serious enough to call for the 
careful reconsideration of such requirements by properly constituted 
committees. 

The Official report of the 23d annual meeting of the New 
England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools held at 
Boston, Mass., October 9-10, 1908 contains important discussions 
on college entrance requirements and the report of the members 
of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
The extent of the influence of this association is shown by the list 
of institutions in its membership to say nothing of its 53 individual 
members. In 1908 its list of members included 27 secondary and 
higher institutions of Ohio; 9 of Michigan; 9 of Indiana; 41 of 
Illinois; 10 of Wisconsin; 5 of Minnesota; 10 of Iowa; 10 of 
Missouri ; 2 of Nebraska ; 3 of Kansas ; 3 of Colorado ; 1 of Okla- 
homa; 4 of South Dakota; 1 of North Dakota; a total of 135. 
Further reference to the work of this important association appears 
under the title of " Professional schools." 

The activities of the State appear in the proceedings of the 24th 
annual meeting of the Associated Academic Principals, the 63d 
annual meeting of the New York State Teachers Association, includ- 
ing the 4th annual meeting of the Classical Teachers Association, 
all held in Syracuse, N. Y., December 28-30, 1908. 



43^ NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The report of the Special Committee on Present Courses of Study 
states that " it is generally agreed that our high school course is 
overloaded and that this condition is due more to the college entrance 
requirements than anything else. We have been compelled to include 
rather more than there is time for and our work has suffered in 
quality." The committee believed that the revision of the elementary 
course to cover six instead of eight years and the consequent 
rearrangement of the work of the seventh and eighth years will 
afford the needed opportunity to lighten the burden now borne by 
the high school pupil. " The average student should be able to earn 
an academic diploma without undue strain after 12 years in school. 
It is doubted if he can do this under the present plan. 1 ' 

A committee on syllabus revision for the syllabus period 1910-15 
was appointed to take into consideration for recommendation to 
the Department any desired changes in the syllabus. 

New Colleges of the State. Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
was granted a provisional charter in June 1908 and the first college 
year began with the fall of 1909. D'Youville College, Buffalo, 
N. Y. was opened for instruction in the fall of 1908. 

Reference has already been made to the Conference of Presidents 
of Colleges and Universities which met for the purpose of discussing 
the combined course for the B.A. and M.D. degrees. 

College entrance certificates. The Regents at their meeting 
October 1907 determined upon the issuance of a certificate based 
upon high standards in their academic examinations which would 
be adequate for admission to college and university. This became 
practically necessary by reason of the numbers going from the 
public academies and high schools to the colleges who were 
dependent for admission upon an examination held by voluntary 
association of the colleges and universities. The success of this 
movement depended upon the number of colleges and universities 
that would accept the college entrance certificates. The responses 
from the colleges and universities were extremely cordial and the 
Commissioner reported to the Regents at the June meeting, 1909 
that 39 colleges and universities had expressed their willingness to 
accept these credentials for admission. A list of the institutions 
is given in the Journal of the Regents. 

Summaries. In 1909 there were in New York State 4508 stu- 
dents in colleges for men; 2901 in colleges for women; 3450 in 
colleges for men and women ; and 1607 in graduate departments. 

In 1908 the 30 colleges of liberal arts and three graduate depart- 
ments employed (including duplicates) 1627 officers of instruction 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 437 

for 11,726 students; in 1909 the 32 colleges*of liberal arts and three 
graduate departments employed (including duplicates) 1677 officers 
of instruction for 12,466 students. In 1908 first degrees were con- 
ferred on 1556 persons, higher degrees from graduate departments 
on 391. In 1909 first degrees were conferred on 1790 persons, 
higher degrees from graduate departments on 420. 

In comparison with 1908 the liberal arts colleges and graduate 
departments of the State show 2 more institutions, 50 more 
officers of instruction, 740 more students, 234 more first degrees 
conferred and 29 more higher degrees from graduate departments. 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

Possibly the most striking movement in professional education 
was the entrance of the Carnegie Foundation on the field of study 
presented by the problems of the medical schools. In an article 
entitled " Standards of Medical Education" President Pritchett says, 
" The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has 
undertaken to make a detailed study of the present status of medical 
education. In order to accomplish this it is inspecting with care 
every medical school in this country and in Canada." Why so many 
different interests are attempting to solve these problems is a matter 
of wonder unless the marked activity of this profession and the 
rapid advance of professional requirements in the United States 
provoke them. 

The American Academy of Medicine was earnestly discussing 
these problems and exerting a wide influence when the American 
Association of Medical Colleges entered on the task of securing 
concerted action and higher requirements for admission. 

Then the American Medical Association apparently aroused by the 
activity of one of its parts rushed into the field and with more 
enthusiasm than discretion favored requirements that none but the 
strongest institutions years hence, if ever, can meet. 

Other medical bodies assuming that the council's recommendations 
were facts, urged additional reforms till, if one might believe the 
catalogues, the requirements for entrance on the practice of medicine 
were at least two years of college and four years of medical 
preparation. 

If nothing more positive results from the Foundation's study its 
plea " that an honest enforcement of the standards adopted is a far 
greater contribution to medical education than the adoption of high 
standards which are not enforced," will justify its activity. " While 



438 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

the last 20 years have seen a great improvement in the standards of 
medical education there is still much to be desired in this matter in 
the medical schools of the United States. We have at the present 
time nearly as many medical schools in this country as exist in all 
the rest of the civilized world. Most of these institutions are com- 
mercial in character and are practically forced to keep low standards 
in order to live." 

Addressing the American Association of Medical Colleges, Presi- 
dent Pritchett says: 

Your association accepts at the present time as its standard 
for admission to the medical school the completion of a four 
year high school course. You will do far wiser and you will 
serve medical education far better if you will enforce this 
standard, than to adopt a higher standard which you can not 
enforce. I am equally well aware that most of the col- 

leges of your association do not strictly enforce your present 
requirements. . . Let me urge you, therefore, first to en- 
force strictly the standard now adopted before adopting on paper 
a standard which you will find for some years to come im- 
possible. To do any other thing is to cultivate insincerity and 
superficiality, of which we have already had too much. 

In this whole matter the colleges and the physicians and the 
officers of the law who are to deal with the legal requirements 
for admission to practice need to turn their faces toward com- 
mon honesty and sincerity and to further the real interests of 
medicine and the real interests of the public, and these lie along 
the same road. 

Professor Carpenter discussing the combined course before the 
same association claims that " men who follow the professions of 
medicine or of law . . . must have at this time, in this day 
and generation, a much more liberal and general training than is 
offered by the secondary school. That is an obsolete condition. It 
does not give us enough. . . It is too little to base your standard 
of professional education simply on graduation from a secondary 
school. . . The only other alternative then, if this is rejected, 
is to make all students who enter on the medical course necessarily 
graduates of a college or a scientific school with a baccalaureate de- 
gree. . . The baccalaureate degree of the American college 
as a general proposition does not mean anything at all. You can not 
possibly make a definition of the baccalaureate degree of the 
American college that will hold water. It would be an extremely 
good thing, if we had a baccalaureate degree that meant something 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 439 

every time it was bestowed that could be defined and understood 
. . . Very frequently the American bachelor's degree does not 
mean any more or possibly not as much as the entrance require- 
ments to the good colleges of the country/' 

Secretary Zapffe, in an article entitled "The present status of 
medical education " states, " We need more time for teaching because 
the future doctor must learn more than did his predecessors. Shall 
we require two years of college work for admission to the medical 
school and unload into these two years some of the work now done 
in the medical school ... or shall we adhere to the present high 
school requirement and lengthen the medical course and give either 
time or subject credit for certain work that may have been done in 
a recognized literary college?" 

In a leading article of the Bulletin of the American Academy of 
Medicine the editor discusses most interestingly " The unscientific 
use of the imagination," and applies his friendly criticism to some 
of the above quotations. 

The Commissioner of Education in his address before Convoca- 
tion, October 1909, .says : 

We have all the colleges, universities and professional schools 
that even our great population of nine millions of people needs. 
We have got in the way of making exactions, not only upon 
students who want to enter the universities, but also upon those 
who want to begin professional study, as well as upon those who 
have completed professional courses and apply for admission to 
the professions. We have a very complete scheme covering 
this whole matter, established in law and in practice. But it 
must be said that we have colleges, universities, and professional 
schools that connive with students to avoid the requirements. 
We are admitting far more candidates to the learned professions 
than is good for the students, the professions, or the people of 
the State. We do not need to advance requirements so much 
— although I suspect that the Court of Appeals might well give 
fresh consideration to the requirements for admission, and the 
details of the examinations for admission to the bar — as we 
need to see that we get what we assume to require. 

The agreement with the state of New Jersey referred to in former 
reports has remained in force during the year to the advantage of 
both states. The harmonious relations of former years have pre- 
vailed and greater confidence in the experiment has resulted during 
its progress. Under the terms of this agreement the New Jersey 
state educational authorities stand for the general preliminary educa- 



440 NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

tion requirements of students from the state of New Jersey for 
admission to the professional schools and professional licensing 
examinations of the state of New York. The Education Depart- 
ment of the state of New York certifies to the standing of New York 
students for admission to the professional schools and licensing 
examinations of New Jersey, the two states being in accord touching 
the credentials of students from all other states and countries. 
Licenses earned on examinations before the medical and dental 
boards of each state are indorsed without examinations as licenses 
to practise in the other state. The state teachers examinations of 
New Jersey and the Regents academic examination of New York 
are recognized toward the general preliminary education required 
by either state. 

The agreement to indorse the dental licenses of Pennsylvania 
ceased with the examinations of June 1908 inasmuch as the Penn- 
sylvania Dental Board decided that they could not exact the New 
York minimum requirement for admission. The agreement en- 
tered into with the deans of the