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Full text of "Documents relating to the colonial, Revolutionary and post-Revolutionary history of the State of New Jersey"

ARCHIVES 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY 



FIRST SERI ES 
Vol. XXV. 



This volume was prepared and edited by authority of 
the State of New Jersey, at the request of the New Jersey 
Historical Society, and under the direction of the follow- 
ing Committee of the Society : 

WILLIAM NELSON, 
GARRET D. W. VROOM, 
AUSTIN SCOTT, 
FRANCIS B. LEE, 
ERNEST C. RICHARDSON 



DOCUMENTS 



RELATING TO THE 



COLONIAL HISTORY 



OF THE 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY, 



EDITED BY 



WILLIAM NELSON. 



VOLUME XXV. 



EXTRACTS FROM AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS, RELATING TO 
NEW JERSEY. 

VOL. VI. 1T66-1T6T. 




PATERSON, N. J.: 
THE CALL PRINTING AND PUBLISHING Co. 

1903. 






F 
13) 



PREFACE. 



In the opening pages of the present volume are chronicled the 
final struggles for the repeal of the Stamp Act, which was carried 
through the House of Commons in March, 1766, by a majority of one 
hundred and eight. The "Sons of Liberty" mean time kept up their 
agitation, holding meetings in the principal centers of population, 
whereat they adopted resolutions avowing their unalterable loyalty 
to the king, but their independence of parliament; denouncing the 
Stamp Act, and demanding and compelling the resignation of the 
stamp distributors. Men suspected of a willingness to render obedi- 
ence to the law were not only ostracised, but openly threatened as 
public enemies. A creditor who tried to enforce the collection of a 
debt by due process of law quickly had the tables turned on him by 
his debtor denouncing him as one w r ho favored the obnoxious act. 
inasmuch as the execution must needs have the tabooed stamps af- 
fixed. At Elizabethtown hanging was voted to anyone taking out 
stamps. The lawyers and magistrates of the Province quite generally 
ignored the law, and transacted legal business without stamps. The 
thoughtful reader will herein discern in many ways signs of the irre- 
sistible onward movement destined to culminate within ten years in 
the assertion of total independence of the mother country. The reso- 
lutions to use no British importations were so generally observed 
throughout the Colonies that soon the ministry found themselves 
vigorously attacked in the rear, by the London merchants engaged in 
American trade, who publicly protested against any legislation by 
parliament that would anger the Americans and cause them to with- 
draw their trade from England ; and with no uncertain sound these 
merchants demanded the repeal of the Stamp Act, in order to save 
their commerce. Governor Franklin's acquiescence in the measure, 
lukewarm though it was, angered the people of the Province, and 
was perhaps the origin of the assertion that his father Benjamin 
Franklin was the author, or at least the suggester, of the hated 
legislation, this story being given out in explanation of the Governor's 
attitude. William Franklin's manly denial of the report in 1766 
ought to have satisfied every fair-minded man that there was no 
foundation for the slander. But nevertheless it survived for scores 
of years. When the Stamp Act was finally repealed, the popular 
exultation was tempered by a feeling of exasperation that such a 
measure should ever have been enacted, by apprehension at what 
might be attempted next by the angered ministry, and by a grim 



vi PREFACE. 

realization of the indomitable power of a united American people. 

Moreover, the discussion over the law just repealed had led men 
to a study of the broader subject of the rights of the Colonists 
generally. The first Book of Blackstone's Commentaries, issued in 
November, 1765, was finding its way into American libraries, and 
thoughtful men, stirred by the pending danger of further parliamen- 
tary legislation for the Colonies, took a new inspiration from that 
pregnant definition of the civil rights of British subjects : "The right 
of personal security consists in a person's legal and uninterrupted 
enjoyment of his life, his limbs, his body, his health, his reputa- 
tion." True, it was but a broader assertion of the principles contain- 
ed in the Bill of Rights asserted by the liberty-loving subjects of 
Charles I. a century and a quarter before ; but the idea fell upon new 
soil, under newly-fructifying influences, and within a decade was to 
be crystalized into the famous Declaration : "That all men are cre- 
ated equal ; that they are endowed by their Creator, with certain un- 
alienable rights ; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
happiness." An article asserting the dependence of the Colonies on 
the mother country, their obligations to her, and need of her protect- 
ing care, led to an able reply in the London Chronicle, in 1767, here- 
in reproduced. Richard Stockton, of New Jersey, was in England or 
Scotland about the time this reply appeared, and there are some 
internal evidences that he was the author, rather than Benjamin 
Franklin. 

Hardly were the passions of the Colonists allayed by the repeal of 
the Stamp Act, than their apprehensions were once more aroused by 
the untimely sermon of the Bishop of Landaff, deploring the "heath- 
enism" of the Americans, and urging the appointment of American 
Bishops to supervise their assumed spiritual needs. William Living- 
ston, of New York, and the Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy, of Boston, 
leaped to the defence of America, and attacked the Bishop, in whose 
suggestion they professed to discern a new and most insidious design 
on the liberties of the people. The Rev. Dr. Thomas Bradbury 
Chandler, of Elizabethtown, replied with his "Appear to the Public 
in behalf of the Church of England," advertised in the newspapers 
of November 23, 1767, which instead of allaying but increased the 
popular alarm. 

While the Americans were gradually winning their way toward 
greater political and religious liberty they were likewise steadily 
progressing toward economical and industrial freedom. Especially 
in New Jersey was there a marvelous development of the iron indus- 
try, particularly in the northern counties, where new mines were 
opened on every hand, and new forges and furnaces set up. The bog 
iron in the more central and southern counties still supplied material 
to the furnaces in those regions. The repeated references to iron 



PREFACE. 



Vll 



works indicate the great strides the industry was making in the 
Province. Even Newark, remote as it was from the sources of sup- 
ply of the raw material, had its iron furnace, and by way of London 
we are informed of the successful manufacture of steel at Perth 
Amboy in 1767, news not otherwise confirmed, however. Under the 
circumstances, the restrictions imposed on American manufactures 
by the British ministry, and their inquisitions concerning the indus- 
tries in Morris, Sussex, Warren and the upper part of the present 
Passaic counties, were deeply resented, provoking annoyance and 
fears. 

The copper mines near New Brunswick and Rocky Hill are oc- 
casionally mentioned in these pages, their operations appearing to be 
rather sporadic. 

Other evidences of industrial activity are the inventions herein 
referred to : as of an iron furnace that by the use of a current of hot 
air was to run the ore directly into pig metal or castings, provided 
just a little more capital were forthcoming to perfect the scheme. 
Was this an anticipation of the Bessemer process? A "Metalline 
conductor" Franklin's lightning rod on the Sandy Hook light- 
house was believed to have saved the building from destruction when 
struck by lightning, in 1766. Henry Guest, a tanner and currier, of 
New Brunswick, naturally believing there was "nothing like leather," 
proposed to roof houses, churches and other public buildings with 
sole-leather, which he was confident would last a hundred years, and 
be impervious to fire and water. And so far back as 1767 we have a 
description of that perennial contrivance, which has never come into 
use, for detaching runaway horses from a carriage. 

We learn that in 1767 the population of New Jersey was estimated 
at 90,000. 

A curious view the English had of America in that year is given 
us in an extract from a London newspaper, which describes the 
Colonies as occupying a low and narrow strip of unfertile land, 
stretching a short distance from the ocean to the Alleghany mountains, 
beyond which was a still more unattractive region inhabited only by 
hostile savages. 

Meanwhile this "narrow strip" was developing prodigiously. In 
New Jersey the agricultural resources of the Province were advanc- 
ing by leaps and bounds. The farms and orchards were increasing 
in value. There was "dollar wheat" in 1766. Hemp and flax were 
more generally cultivated, under the double stimulus of the bounty 
offered by the Legislature in 1765, and the increased demand for 
household consumption. The silk culture was also attracting some 
attention. "Burlington pork" had a name in the public markets, and 
a hog weighing 850 pounds, raised in New Jersey, spread abroad the 
fame of her farmers. Fish, oysters, clams and wild fowl of all 



viii PREFACE. 

sorts were among the valued features of a farm offered for sale at 
Middletown. "Trenton sturgeon" were still a prized delicacy of the 
Philadelphia markets. Attention was called to the possibilities of 
the culture of the carrot, which had "been found growing wild for a 
hundred years in an old Indian field." Much interest was manifested 
in the improvement of the breed of horses, to which end, perhaps, 
horse races are announced to be held at Powles Hook, Newark, 
Elizabethtown, Woodbridge and New Brunswick. The value of the 
forests is recognized in the advertisements of oak, bilstead, poplar, 
ash and nut trees. 

Gratifying is the evidence to be found in this volume of the pro- 
gress of education in the Province. The College of New Jersey, at 
Princeton, is increasing its number of students, despite the criticisms 
of the irascible steward by a dissatisfied butcher purveyor. The 
College mourns the death of President Samuel Finley, whose effects 
are advertised to be sold, "among them two negro women, a negro 
man, and three negro children, household furniture, horses, English 
cattle .... a choice collection of books, religious, moral and 
historical." The friends of the College are cheered by the news that 
Richard Stockton, its emissary to Edinburgh, has succeeded in per- 
suading the Rev. John Witherspoon to accept the vacant Presidency. 
The commencements of 1766 and 1767 are described at length, with 
the names of the participants and of the graduates. Here we have, 
also, the story of the beginning of Queen's College, in our day 
anchored firmly in New Brunswick, and known as Rutgers. These 
colleges undoubtedly gave an impetus to the growth of secondary 
schools, which were now multiplying. Among the advertisements we 
notice that a Latin school is to be opened at Princeton. The gram- 
mar school at New Bridge, near Hackensack, for the teaching of 
Latin, etc., finds a rival in a new school opened in the village of 
Hackensack, by Dr. Peter Wilson, afterwards a distinguished member 
of the faculty of Columbia College, in New York. The grammar 
school at Elizabethtown is to be opened "upon a more enlarged plan." 
The Rev. Samuel Kennedy's school at Baskinridge is steadily improv- 
ing in fame and influence. We are informed that for pupils attending 
the grammar school in Lower Freehold, "the whole Expense of 
Board and Tuition will not exceed Twenty Pounds," or about fifty 
dollars per annum. The "Mattisonia grammar school," at Freehold, 
is continued. The boarding school at Burlington, in 1767, is said to 
have been the first co-educational school in America. 

The character of the schoolmasters employed appears to be im- 
proving. Most of these grammar schools are under the tuition of 
Princeton graduates. The ordinary schools were not so fortunate in 
the character of their teachers. We find that one former schoolmas- 
ter had also been in his Majesty's army, and afterwards in service, 



PREFACE. IX 

apparently as a redemptioner, from which he ran away. He must 
have been quite a presentable figure in his "blue broad Cloth Coat, 
blue spotted swanskin Jacket and blue Breeches." Another instruc- 
tor of youth, who was advertised as being "abroad," in the literal 
sense, had broken open and robbed a store near Salem. Still another 
was one Thomas Gordon, who broke out of Elizabeth goal ; he had 
"frequently taught school, but nevertheless was a notorious felon." 
The public are informed that an English servant who ran away from 
Change Water Forge "might perhaps say he has been a clerk or 
schoolmaster, as he writes well and talks good English." 

The Trenton Library Association was holding meetings in 1766. 

The New Jersey Medical Society was engaged in the occupation 
of trying to suppress quackery. A surgical operation for lithotomy, 
performed at Newark, naturally attracted wide attention from 
the physicians and surgeons of the day, it being perhaps the first 
operation of the kind ever performed in the province. 

The chalybeate spring, near Gloucester, was proving to be such a 
favorite resort for invalids, that a boarding house was established 
near by for their acco.mmodation. 

New Jersey loses in 1767 her most promising poetic genius, in 
the person of the Rev. Nathaniel Evans, whose untimely death is 
mourned by a far wider circle than his little congregation at 
Gloucester. 

The intelligent population of New Jersey presents an attractive 
field for newspaper publishers, and the rivals of James Parker's "New 
York Gazette and Weekly Post Boy" naturally resent his exercise 
of his authority as comptroller of the post offices of America, to 
obstruct their circulation, to the advantage of his own paper. 

Other evidences of improvement are the efforts made to afford in- 
creased facilities for travel. Newark at last rejoices in a stage line 
once every day to Powles Hook, which is made possible by the com- 
pletion of the new road across the meadows. Salem and Cooper's 
Ferry (now Camden), have a stage line communication once a week 
in 1767. "Flying Machines" must have made the passengers between 
Philadelphia and New York dizzy, by the rapidity of their journey, 
the time being now reduced to two days, between April and Novem- 
ber, and three days, during the rest of the year, starting from each 
end of the journey at sunrise, and charging twenty shillings for the 
whole journey, or three pence per mile for any shorter distance. The 
fare has not been so greatly reduced in the last one hundred and forty 
years, but instead of two or three days, it now takes only as many 
hours, the cost of five or six meals on the road has been eliminated, 
and there is considerable difference between traveling in those 
old fashioned stage coaches over precarious dirt roads, and riding in 
a luxurious railroad car over level steel rails. Even the swift rate 



x PREFACE. 

of travel in 1767, between New York and Philadelphia, was not en- 
tirely satisfactory in those days, and a lottery was set up for shorten- 
ing and improving roads between those places. The drainage of the 
meadows along the upper waters of the Passaic river was still occupy- 
ing the attention of the property owners in that region, as it has more 
or less ever since. The example of the Burlington county authorities, 
who set out mile stones for a distance of seventeen miles from Mount 
Holly, is noted favorably in the newspapers of the day, and com- 
mended to the people of other localities in the province. Wrecks on 
the low Atlantic beaches of New Jersey are reported from time to 
time, with occasional accounts of plundering by local land pirates. 

The letters sent home to England from settlers in the new 
country naturally gave glowing accounts of the great prosperity and 
good fortune of the writers, as well as of the rapid growth of the new 
country in wealth, and these in turn as . naturally gave rise to a 
yearning on the part of many in the mother country to lay claim to 
a share of this wealth through traditionary accounts of vast estates 
in the Colonies which had belonged to their ancestors. So we are 
not surprised to see it reported that certain credulous people 
are coming over from England to America "to claim land given to 
their ancestors almost a century ago, including the City of Elizabeth." 

Contrary to all these reports of prosperity are the advertisements 
of something like eighty debtors claiming the benefit of the insolvent 
act of 1765. Occasionally these debtors were able to settle, and so 
we find Samuel Allinson, the famous Burlington lawyer, advertising 
for a client, or his representative, for whom he had unexpectedly re- 
covered a debt of long standing. It is reasonable to supose that all 
the other lawyers of New Jersey in that day as in this were 
equally honest, and would have gladly advertised for missing clients 
to whom to pay over moneys unexpectedly recovered, under similiar 
circumstances. 

The barbarous character of the penal and slave laws of the day 
are indicated by many of these newspaper extracts. A negro slave 
who ran away from his master in Trenton, had an iron collar about 
his neck. Two horse thieves were sentenced to be hanged, and, no 
doubt, the sentence was carried out. Two Indian women were 
murdered near Moorestown, under circumstances of peculiar atrocity, 
and their murderers speedily paid the penalty of the law. The 
promptness of Jersey justice in 1766, in Sussex county, was striking- 
ly exemplified in the trial of a white man for the murder of an 
Indian; he was arrested and arraigned on the i8th; tried and con- 
victed on the ipth ; sentenced on the morning of the 20th, and hanged 
the same afternoon. Grand larceny was punished by burning in the 
hand. A negro suspected of having murdered his master, near Hack- 
ensack, was compelled by the coroner to touch the corpse, in com- 



PREFACE. XI 

pliance with an ancient superstition, the truth of which was verified 
to the satisfaction of all beholders when blood immediately issued 
from the dead body, thereby establishing beyond peradventure the 
guilt of the accused, who, accordingly, was promptly tried by a jus- 
tice of the peace and three freeholders, convicted and sentenced to be 
burned alive, the sentence being carried into effect forthwith. A 
negro who killed his master at Hopewell escaped this torture by 
hanging himself, but the savagery of the people of the neighborhood 
was only sated by having his dead body cut down and burnt the day 
after. A foot traveler was murdered on the road between New York 
and Philadelphia, apparently from the "back settlements," and his 
murderers seem to have escaped. 

The paper money of the province was so badly printed as to in- 
vite counterfeiting, which appears to have been quite generally prac- 
ticed. This, perhaps, is the foundation for the presumption which 
was subsequently acted upon by the State, immediately after the 
Revolution, that all outstanding paper notes were counterfeits, and,, 
therefore, were not a valid claim against the treasury. 

As in former volumes, the advertisements of runaway servants are 
not only instructive as throwing light upon the character of service 
and of slavery in those days, but are diverting from the descriptions 
of persons and clothing of the runaways, some of whom for example 
were clad in a "light colored sagathy coat;" "a gray and red jacket, 
brown breeches and ribbed blue stockings ;" "buckskin breeches, blue 
yarn stockings, checked shirt, beaver hat, black silk handkerchief 
about his neck ;" "light colored plush breeches, silver buckles in his 
shoes ;" "hair tied behind and blue Surtout red Jacket lapelled, light 
colored Cloth breeches ;" "on examining his Head close you will find 
a soft Place on the Top occasioned by a Blow;" "he can counterfeit 
the Voice of Cats and Dogs ;" "he wore blue broad cloth coat and 
breeches, and a red vest;" "a Felt Hat with a narrow brim; red 
Jacket made of an old regimental Coat, with a Piece put in down 
the Back, and half worn Oznabrigs shirts, Petty-Coat Trousers, blue 
Yarn Stockings and Old Shoes." A German who ran away from the 
iron works in East Jersey "had been engaged by contract for three 
years and four months, and had been brought to this country from 
Europe at a very great expense." A "Dutch" runaway servant man 
could "talk the German, French, Spanish and Portuguese languages, 
had on and took with him a reddish brown Cloth Coat, double 
breasted, without Lining, with white Metal flat Buttons, a blue and 
white striped Linen Jacket, without Sleeves, a pair of Kersey Breech- 
es, Sheep's natural black and white, and a pair of linen Ditto white, 
two Linen Homespun Shirts, a half worn Felt Hat, two Pair of white 
Yarn Stockings, a pair of strong Shoes, half worn, both run crooked 
to the left Side, with strings to them." A Mosquito shore Indian 



xii PREFACE. 

who ran away from his master at Whitehall, in Burlington county, 
perhaps resented the published assertion that he "took with him 
a fiddle, but plays badly on it." Another runaway servant carried a 
"hogskin knapsack, with the hair on." A man who escaped from his 
bail wore a "blue Broadcloth Coat, with a black Velvet Collar, Claret 
colored Velvet Jacket and Breeches, plain Silver Shoe and Knee 
Buckles." 

What a fine old seignorial mansion must have been the stately 
residence of Robert Lettice Hooper, at Trenton, with "a handsome 
orchard of English cherry trees" leading up to it. 

The thoughtful reader, glancing through these pages, with their 
infinite variety of news items, advertisements, controversies and 
speculation, will find the society and the events of the day depicted 
with marvelous fidelity, and will receive new and indelible impres- 
sions of the actual state of New Jersey and its people in 1766 and 
1767, as he could from no other source. 

By way of correction it should be remarked that the foot-notes 
on page 277, identifying the captain of a merchant vessel at New 
York in 1767 with Horatio Nelson, England's greatest admiral, are 
obviously incorrect, as Nelson was then but eight years old. 
FEBRUARY 10, 1906. 



Newspaper Extracts. 



To BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Farm, containing 260 Acres of Land, situ- 
ate in Hunterdon County, West Jersey, about 150 Acres 
thereof cleared, and in good Fence; it is excellent Wheat 
Land, and a sufficient Quantity of Meadow, in good 
Grass; there are on the Premises, a large new Brick 
House, two Stories high, genteelly finished, with other 
convenient Buildings and Out-houses of Brick; a large 
Frame Barn, with Barracks, Cow-houses &c. all in good 
Repair ; a large Stone-Grist mill, with two Pair of Stones, 
on a never-failing Stream of Water, in a plentiful Wheat 
Country conveniently situated for Philadelphia or New 
York Markets. 

Also 500 Acres of Land in Sussex County, near Dela- 
ware River, whereon are two Improvements; it is good 
Wheat Land, and has a considerable Quantity of Meadow 
cleared thereon. 

Likewise 240 Acres of good Wheat Land, situate in the 
County of Sussex aforesaid, within a few Miles of Dela- 
ware River, with considerable Improvements thereon. 
And 300 Acres of Land, situate in the County of Morris, 
near Black River, near 100 Acres of good natural Mead- 
ow, capable of producing Hemp or Flax, with some Im- 
provements made thereon. 

And also One Fourth Part of an Iron Forge, situate 
on Musconetcung River, in the County of Sussex afore- 
said, with about 2000 Acres of Woodland ; well timbered. 

For further Particulars, apply to HENRY BURNET, 
Conveyancer, on the West Side of Third-street, the first 
Door above Market-street. Philadelphia. 



2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Hunterdon County, ss. Trenton, December 21, 1765. 

PURSUANT to an Act of General Assembly of the Prov- 
ince of New- Jersey, lately passed, intituled "An Act for 
the Re 1 ief of insolvent Debtors," Philip Atkinson and 
John Erwin, now confined in Trenton, in the County of 
Hunterdon, hereby give Notice to all their Creditors, that 
they intend to take the Benefit of the said Act, and that the 
Judges of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, for the 
County aforesaid, have appointed Tuesday the I4th Day 
of January next, for the Creditors of the aforesaid Debt- 
ors to meet at Trenton, at 10 o' Clock in the Forenoon, to 
shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of the 
said Debtors Estates should not be made, and the said 
Philip Atkinson and John Erwin discharged, according to 
the Form and Effect of the said Act of General Assembly. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscribers, living at Brown's 
Mills, in Nottingham Township, Burlington County, 
West New-Jersey, a Mulettoe Servant Man, named John 
Johnston, but it is likely he will change his Name; he is 
about 25 or 26 Years of Age, about 5 Feet 8 or 10 Inches 
high, has a Lump on his Lip, thought to be his under one, 
and has a down Look : Had on, when he went away, a 
half worn Castor Hat, a light coloured Broadcloth Coat 
and Vest, half worn, ribbed Worsted Stockings, new 
Shoes, and has with him a Pair of double-soled Ditto, also 
a large Buckskin Jacket lined with white Flannel, a red 
half worn Great Coat, Leather Breeches, and sundry 
other Things. He is a very talkative Fellow, given to 
Drink, and lived some Time ago with Jos. Biddle, then 
with James Smith of Burlington, afterwards with Richard 
Brown, and lastly with the Subscribers. Whoever takes 
up said Servant, and secures him in any of his Majesty's 
Goals on the Continent, so as his Masters may have him 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



again, shall have the above Reward and reasonable 
Charges, paid by us, 

ABIA BROWN, Jos. CLAYTON. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1932, January 2, 
1766. 

On the First of November last, Mr. John Allen, of 
Trenton, contracted a Debt with me the Subscriber, of 
Twenty Pounds, for Security whereof he pledged with 
me a brown bay Stallion, and engaged to pay the Money 
and redeem the Horse by the 27th of November last; 
which Engagement Mr Allen has not yet performed, and 
the Horse now, and ever since his being pledged as afore- 
said, has been at the Inn of Charles Jenkins, in Market- 
street, on Expences ; and as it is possible an Accident may 
happen to the Horse, I take this Method to acquaint Mr. 
Allen, that unless he comes before the i8th Instant, and 
pays me my Debt aforesaid, with the Expences of keeping 
the Horse, the same Horse on that Day will be publickly 
sold, for Payment of the same. This Method I would 
have avoided, had Mr. Allen been complaisant enough to 
have answered my Request to him by Letter, for the Pur- 
pose aforesaid. 

JOSEPH MITCHELL 

Trenton, December 30, 1765 

THERE is now in our Possession four Kegs, without 
any Direction, that were delivered on board one of our 
Boats at Philadelphia, about nine Months ago; therefore 
any Person that proves their Property to said Kegs and 
pays the Charges, may have them again. 

FURMA^AND HUNT. 2 

1 Moore Furman. 

2 Abraham Hunt, b. 1740; d. Oct. 27, 1821. He was appointed Post- 
master of Trenton, Jan. 10, 1764, for three years, and again, Oct. 13, 
1775, for a like term. It was at his house that the Hessian Colonel 
Rail spent Christmas night, 1776, in such hilarious festivities as to 
make him neglectful of Washington's approach. 



4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

City of Burlington, 26th I2th Month Dec. 1765. 

WHEREAS, in the Year 1761, I was applied to by Hugh 
Doran, of Baltimore County, in Maryland, to recover a 
sum of Money, due to him from a Person then resident in 
the City of Burlington, in New-Jersey, and in pursuance 
thereof, I commenced an Action, but finding very soon 
that the Debtor was incapable of Payment, I desisted from 
further proceeding, and, by Letter, informed my Client 
thereof. About the Beginning of the Year 1764, I dis- 
covered that the Debtor's Circumstances had changed, and 
apprehending a Recovery possible, I resumed the Prosecu- 
tion. The Effect was, by giving some Time for Payment, 
I obtained Security for the Money, which I since received ; 
and having wrote several Letters to my Client without 
Effect, I have lately been informed he is dead ; I therefore 
take this Method of communicating the Matter to his Rep- 
resentatives, as I am ignorant who they are, and where 
or how I shall direct for them, hereby informing all con- 
cerned, that I am ready to pay the Money on Demand, to 
any one who shall appear legally authorized to receive it. 

SAMUEL ALLINSON. 

And whereas the following Deeds or Conveyances have 
been lately left in my Hands by Rebecca Scattergood, 
Widow and Executrix of Joseph Scattergood, late of the 
City of Burlington, Esq; deceased, many of them being 
for valuable Tracts of Land, and other real Estates, which 
the Possessors may now, or in future, be in Danger of 
losing, for want of a compleat Chain of Conveyance, and 
without those Conveyances mentioned (many, or most of 
which are not recorded) they may be utterly unable to 
make out such Chain, and their Titles consequently will 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 5 

prove defective; the Owners are therefore hereby in- 
formed that I shall be glad to deliver the said Deeds, 
which for the Security of their Estates, I think expedient 
for them to call upon me and receive. 

Conveyance from Thomas Gardner to John Hugg, 
junior. Ditto from Richard Haines to John Wetherill. 
Ditto from William Barnet to Thomas Stevenson. Ditto 
from Thomas Stevenson to Hugh Huddy. Ditto from 
Robert Ridgway to William Haw. Ditto from John Van- 
sciver to Charles Read. Ditto from Thomas Middleton 
and Samuel Stokes, Executors of Mary Eves to Isaac 
Kay. Ditto from Anthony Elton to Lawrence Morris. 
Ditto from John Beaumont to John Prickett. Ditto from 
Thomas Moore and his Wife to Samuel Wickward. Dit- 
to from Revell Elton (the Father) to Revell Elton (the 
Son). Ditto from John Clarke to John Horner. Ditto 
from Lemuel Oldale and his Wife to William Hess. 
Ditto from William Hyes to John Vansciver. Ditto from 
John Burr to- Benjamin Springer. Ditto from William 
Murrel to John Woolston. Ditto from Martha Huddy to 
William Patterson. Ditto from John Wetherill to Joseph 
Wetherill. Ditto from Thomas Raper to George Willis. 
Ditto from Joshua Humphries to Lawrence Morris. 
Ditto from Hugh Sharp to Peter Bard. Ditto from Rob- 
ert Ridgway to John Vansciver. Ditto from John An- 
trum to William Pancoast. Ditto from Joseph Richards 
to Job Lippincott. Ditto from Samuel Morris to John 
Wetherill. Ditto from William Purdy to Richard Bor- 
den. Ditto from John Pancoast to William Pancoast. 
Ditto from William Biddle and Wife, and William Bid- 
die, jun. to Joseph Shreve. Ditto from Martha Dummer 
to William Bustill and Isaac De Cow. Ditto from Aaron 



6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Beswick to Benjamin Moore, jun. Ditto from Paul Wat- 
kins and his Wife to Benjamin Lucas. 

SAMUEL ALLINSON * 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1933, January 9, 
1766. 

To the PRINTER, 

Sir, You are desired by a Number of your New-Jersey 
Customers, to give the following Account, a Place in your 
next Paper, which will oblige them, and particularly your 

humble Servant 

D. S. L. 

Woodbridge, in New-Jersey, 31 December, 1765. On 
Saturday last, the 28th Instant, the Sons of Liberty of this 
Place and the Parts adjacent, had a Meeting here, and not 
being sufficiently assured that Mr. Coxe, of Philadelphia, 
who was appointed Distributor of Stamps for New-Jer- 

i Samuel Allinson was a member of the Society of Friends. He was 
licensed as an attorney and counsellor-at-law of New Jersey, No- 
vember 9, 1760, and was commissioned one of the Surrogates of New 
Jersey, March 22, 1762. In 17o9 numerous petitions were presented to 
the Legislature, complaining of many lawyers, for exacting extor- 
tionate fees. Among those accused was Samuel Allinson, but he 
produced certificates, signed by the Justices of the Supreme Court, 
and three of the most distinguished members of the New Jersey bar 
Messrs. Richard Stockton, James Kinsey and John Lawrence to the 
effect that they had carefully inspected the bills of costs complained 
of, and found them to be in every particular correct. The Assembly 
thereupon dismissed the complaint. On October 25, 1769, James Kinsey 
and Samuel Allinson were permitted to appear before the Assembly 
and address that body in behalf of their fellow members of the bar, 
who had been so generally accused, and with so little justice. In 1773 
he was designated by the Legislature to prepare a new edition of 
the laws of New Jersey, which he completed and submitted to the in- 
spection of that body in January, 1775. and it was printed in 1776 by 
Isaac Collins, at Burlington, in a handsome folio. Samuel Allinson 
was Clerk of the Burlington Preparative Meeting in 1779, and was by 
that meeting in that year appointed one of the first trustees of the 
Friends' School in Burlington. He married, 1st, Elizabeth, dau. of 
Robert Smith, junior, of Burlington, and 2d, Martha, daughter of 
David Cooper, of Woodbury. She died in 1788. He died 6 mo. 2d, 1791. 
He left him surviving his second wife and two children by his first 
wife, and seven by his second wife four sons and three daughters. 
Seven of his nine children lived to be seventy-five years of age: by 
his first wife William, 75; Elizabeth (blind from birth), 81; by his 
second wife David, 84; Mary, 91; James, 33; Sibyl, 70; Margaret, 76; 
Samuel, 75; John Cooper, 26. James was the father of Samuel Allin- 
son, the distinguished philanthropist, b. Dec. 20, 1808; d. at Yardville, 
N. J.. Dec. 5, 1883. Supreme Conn Records, passim; N. J. Archives, IX., 
359; XVIII., 395, 482; Friends in Burlington; Fie Id's Provincial Courts, 167-8; 
2 N. J. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, VIII., 72; Penna. Magazine of Hist, and 

oy., X., 33; XVI., 467; The Burlington Smiths, 115. 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 7 

sey, had resigned that Office, they deputed and instructed 
two of their Number to wait on Mr. Coxe, with a Letter, 
praying a satisfactory Account of his Resignation. In- 
structions were fortwith made out and delivered to the 
Deputies, together with a Letter to Mr. Coxe, which were 
as follows, viz. 

Instructions given by the SONS OF LIBERTY, to their 
deputies to Mr. Coxe, who is appointed distributor o<f 
stamps, for the province of New-Jersey. 

First WE command and strictly enjoin it upon you, 
upon pain of our high displeasure, that you do immedi- 
ately, with the greatest expedition possible, repair to the 
house of Mr. Coxe, our stamp distributor, in Philadelphia, 
or elsewhere, and into his hands deliver our letter, praying 
his resignation, according to the tenor of said letter, &c. 
which if he comply with, you are to bear the same to us, 
and in the name of every Son of Liberty in the province 
o>f New-Jersey, to return him your thanks therefor. 

Second Upon said Mr. Coxe's refusal, we command 
you to return immediately,and make report to us of the 
same. 

Third We command and strictly enjoin it upon you, 
that whether said Mr. Coxe, resign his commission, &c. 
or not, you do treat him with that complaisance and deco- 
rum, becoming a gentleman of honour. 

Copy of a letter to Mr. Coxe. ,' 

Woodbridge, East New- Jersey, December 28, 1765. 
SIR, 

WHEREAS you have been appointed to the most odious 
and detestable office of Distributor of Stamps for the gov- 
ernment of New-Jersey; and whereas the former resig- 
nation, (said to be yours) is no way satisfactory to the 
inhabitants of the same : We the SONS OF LIBERTY in 
said Government, hereby desire your resignation, in as 



8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ample form and manner as possible; expressing and sol- 
emnly declaring, upon the veracity of a gentleman and 
man of honour, that you will never, directly or indirectly, 
yourself or by deputies under you, ever distribute said 
stamps, or be any ways accessary in putting said Act in 
Force, in the government aforesaid; whereby you will 
not only endear yourself to the inhabitants, but prevent 
such methods as may be taken through necessity, to oblige 
you to the same. And whereas it is publicly reported, and 
generally believed, that you have already nominated and 
appointed deputies under you, to distribute Stamp Papers 
in said government, whereby we are, and shall continue 
to be in the utmost danger, by reason of said declared 
enemies to their country, notwithstanding your said resig- 
nation. Now, Sir, we desire and insist, that you, without 
reserve, aqnaint us, of all such deputies, (if any there be) 
that they may be dealt with in a proper manner. It is ex- 
pected that you do, in the presence o<f our deputies, com- 
ply with every of our aforesaid requests, and deliver the 
same (signed by yourself) to them, to be brought to us. 
If Sir, you refuse our very reasonable request, it will put 
us to the trouble of waiting upon you, in such a way and 
manner, as perhaps will be disagreeable both to yourself 
and us ; which we hereby notify you, we shall do', on Sat- 
urday the 4th of January next; and it is expected you 
will be then ready to answer us. 

SONS OF LIBERTY, in East-New-Jersey. 
This Day, the 3ist of December, the Deputies returned 
and reported, That they had waited on Mr. Coxe, at his 
House in Philadelphia, and delivered him the Letter afore- 
said : That after reading it, and being informed of their 
Business, they were treated with the utmost Civility and 
Respect both by him and his Lady, and he delivered them 
in Writing the following Copy of his genteel and ample 
Resignation, viz. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 9 

I Po hereby resign into the hands of the right honour- 
able the lords commissioners of his majesty's treasury, the 
office of distributor of stamps for the province of New- 
Jersey. Witness my hand and seal, this third day of Sep- 
tember, in the year of our Lord 1765. 

WILLIAM COXE. (Seal) 
Sealed and delivered in the presence of 
WILLIAM HUMPHREYS 
TENCH TILGHMAN. 

Philadelphia, December 30, 1765. 

HAVING received information, that my resignation of 
the office of distributor of the stamps, for the province of 
New-Jersey, not having been fully inserted in the public 
papers, is a matter of uneasiness to the minds of the good 
people of that province, I do hereby certify and declare 
upon my honour and veracity the above to be a true copy 
of my resignation of that office, which I sent to England 
on the 3d of September last : I also do hereby further de- 
clare, that on receiving the commission for the said office 
of distributor of stamps for New-Jersey, on or about the 
first of this instant, December, I returned the said com- 
mission to England the seventh inst. I do further declare 
upon my honour, that I have not appointed any officer or 
officers for the distribution of stamps in the said province, 
nor done any other acts towards carrying the stamp act 
into execution, and I do upon my honor, assure the gen- 
tlemen of New- Jersey, that they may depend, I never will 
accept of any office whatsoever under the stamp act, nor 
will I directly or indirectly, be accessary to carrying the 
same into execution. 

WILLIAM COXE 

That they the Deputies, being entirely satisfied by these 



IO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1/66 

Papers and Mr. Coxe's Declaration, addressed him as fol- 
lows: 

SIR, 

WE being appointed to wait upon you, by the Sons of 
Liberty of New-Jersey, for a more satisfactory resigna- 
tion of your office of distributor of stamps in said prov- 
ince, are fully satisfied of your early resignation by the 
copy which you have favoured us with, as also your pres- 
ent chearfulness in farther fully satisfying us We do in 
the name of every Son of Liberty of New-Jersey, return 
you our hearty thanks, hoping your example may influ- 
ence those to do the like, who yet hold that detestable 
office. 

The Deputies further reported, That on their Return 
Home, they were met by the Gentlemen of New-Bruns- 
wick, who gave them their hearty Thanks, which also 
was given them in Piscataway, and Woodbridge, where 
long Life and Prosperity were drank to His Majesty, and 
also to Mr. Coxe; and Confusion to every American 
Stamp-Master, unless he resign his abhorred and detest- 
able Office. * 

Whereas the one Moiety or equal undivided Half Part 
of the Grist-Mill, Fulling-Mill, Stamping-Mill, Dwelling- 
House and other out Houses, together with one Moiety 
of an equal undivided Half Part of about Fifty Acres of 
Land, situate at Rocky-Hill in the County of Somerset, 
in New T -Jersey, late the Property of Nicholas Veghte, de- 
ceased, were advertised to have been on this Day, by Vir- 
tue of several Executions, issued out of Somerset Inferior 
Court, and no bidders appearing, I do therefore adjourn 
the Sale until Friday the 24th of January next, between 
the Hours of Twelve and Five in the Afternoon, on the 

iThe same account was published in the Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1204, January 2, 1766. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. II 

Premises, when and where Attendance will be given, by 

JOB STOCKTON, Sheriff. 
Rocky Hill, 3ist Dec. 1765. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1 20 1, January 9, 1766. 

NEW-YORK, January 2. 

The Stamps, we hear, are by a military Power forced 
upon the inhabitants of Canada, Nova Scotia; and the 
new conquered Settlements in America, as also upon the 
Islands where a sufficient Military force is maintained to 
enslave the Inhabitants, viz. Jamaica, the Grenades, Bar- 
bados and Antigua; and by the same Means it may be 
enforced upon all America, when the Military Power be- 
comes superior to that of the united Colonies of New- 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode-Island, Connecticut, 
New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, North and South Carolina, and Georgia, as well as 
several of the Islands, which will never submit to it so 
long as they have the Power of Resistance. 

Where will the money come from to maintain Forces 
to enslave so great a Part of the British Nation ! 

IN Pursuance of an act of general assembly of the 
province of New-Jersey, and by an appointment of Alex- 
ander Randall, and Samuel Harrison, Esqrs; two of the 
judges of the inferior court for the county of Gloucester, 
NOTICE is hereby given to the creditors of Francis Red- 
cap, an insolvent debtor in the common goal of said 
county, that they meet at the house of John Camron, at 1 1 
o'clock, on the third day of February next, to shew cause, 
if any they have, why the said Francis Redcap should not 
be discharged, according to the above recited act. The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1205, January 9, 1766. 



12 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

New- Jersey, / 
Middlesex County j ss PURSUANT to an Order of 

Thomas Gach, and Stephen Skinner, Esquires, Judges of 
the court of common pleas for said county, upon the peti- 
tion of Justus Walker, an insolvent debtor, and the major 
part in value of his creditors, now in the gaol of the said 
county; notice is hereby given to all the creditors of the 
above petitioner, to shew cause (if any they have) before 
said judges, at the house of Elijah Dunham, inn-keeper 
in Perth- Amboy, on Tuesday the 2ist day of January in- 
stant, at 12 o'clock of said day why an assignment of said 
petitioners estate, should not be made to assignees then to 
be appointed for that purpose, and he thereupon be dis- 
charged of his debts agreeable to the directions of an act 
of the governor, council and general assembly of the 
province of New-Jersey, made in the fifth year of his pres- 
ent majesty's reign, entitled, "an act for the relief o<f in- 
solvent debtors." 

Perth-Amboy, January 3, 1766 

Mr. James Ramsay, 

WHO came from the County of Armagh in the North 
of Ireland, to this Country, Ten or Twelve Years since, 
and settled at Little-Britain, in Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, where he usually had his Letters directed to the 
Care of Samuel Scott, Esq ; a Magistrate for said County, 
from which Place the said Ramsey removed to some Part 
of the Jersey's about a Year ago ; Will hear of something 
much to his Advantage by applying personally to Mr. 
William Gilliland, Merchant in New-York, the sooner he 
applies, the better for him. New-York, 7th. Jan. 1766. 

East-New-Jersey, Monmouth County, October 

Term, 1765. 
WHEREAS Nehemiah Smith, Corbitt Smith, and Mat- 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 13 

thew Anderson, did make application to said court, and 
Thomas Neelson, did also make application to John An- 
derson, and Robert Montgomery, Esqrs. two of his maj- 
esty's judges of said court, for the benefit of the late in- 
solvent act (made for the benefit of insolvent debtors) did 
take the oath, and file their schedules according to said 
act, these are to> give notice to> the creditors of said debt- 
ors that they meet together at the court-house of said 
county, on Tuesday the 4th day of February next, to 
shew cause, (if any there be) why the said debtors estates 
should not be assigned, and their bodies discharged from 
their now confinement, pursuant to said act, of which this 
is the public notice given. 

Salem County, January 13, 1766 
PURSUANT to an Order of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Salem, Notice is hereby 
given to all the Creditors of Mary Lock, that on the Peti- 
tion of the said Mary Lock, with the major Part in Value 
of her Creditors, to the Judges aforesaid, the 8th Day of 
February is appointed for the Creditors of the said Mary 
Lock to meet at the Court-House in Salem, to shew 
Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment o<f the said 
Debtor's Estate should not be made, and the Debtor dis- 
charged, agreeable to the late Act of Assembly, made and 
provided for that Purpose. 

Hunterdon County, ss. January 3, 1766. 

Pursuant to an Act of General Assembly, lately passed 
intituled "An Act for the Relief of insolvent Debtors," 
James M'Adams, an insolvent Debtor, hereby gives No- 
tice, that he intends to take the Benefit of the said Act, 
and the Judges of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, 
for the County aforesaid, have appointed Saturday, the 
8th Day of February next, for the Creditors of the above 



14 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

insolvent Debtor to meet at the Court House in Trenton, 
to shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of 
the said Debtor's Estate should* not be made, and the said 
Debtor discharged, according to the Form and Effect of 
the said Act. 

JAMES M'ADAMS. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1934, January 16, 
1766. 

Trenton, January i, 1766. 

Whereas Hugh M'Can, late of Tewksbury, in the 
County of Hunterdon, Merchant, an insolvent Debtor, did 
on the 27th Day of November last, make an Assignment 
of all his real and personal Estate, both in Law and 
Equity unto us the Subscribers, for the Benefit of his 
Creditors : And on the same 27th of November the Hon. 
Frederick Smyth, Esq; Chief Justice and the Hon. John 
Berrien Esq; third Justice of the Supreme Court of the 
Province of New-Jersey, did confirm us the Subscribers, 
Assignees of the said Insolvent's Estate; in Consequence 
of which, we desire all Persons that are any Ways in- 
debted thereto, on Bill, Bond, Book Account, otherwise 
howsoever, to discharge their respective Debts to us at 
Trenton, on or before the first Day of March next ensu- 
ing, as Actions will be commenced against all those that 
delay a Compliance after that Date, by SAMUEL TUCKER, 
SAMUEL HENRY, and JOSEPH PHILIPS, Assignees. 

Trenton, January i, 1766 

WHEREAS Robert Rutherford, of Trenton, in the 
County of Hunterdon, Innholder, an insolvent Debtor, 
did on the 27th Day of November last, make an Assign- 
ment of all his real and personal Estate, both in Law and 
Equity, unto us the Subscribers, for the Benefit of his 
Creditors : And on the same 27th Day of November the 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 5 

Hon. Frederick Smyth, Esq; Chief Justice, and the Hon. 
John Berrien, Esq; third Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the Province of New Jersey, did confirm us the Subscrib- 
ers, Assignees of the said Insolvent's Estates; in Conse- 
quence of which, we desire all Persons that are any Ways 
indebted thereton, on Bill, Bond, Book Account, or other- 
wise howsoever to discharge their respective Debts to< us 
at Trenton, on or before the first Day of March next en- 
suing, as Actions will be commenced against all those that 
neglect a Compliance after that Time. 

SAMUEL TUCKER, ISAAC ALLEN, SAMUEL HENRY, 
NATHANIEL PARKER, Assignees. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Plantation, situate in Amwell, in the 
County of Hunterdon, and Province of West Jersey, con- 
taining 85 Acres of Land, adjoining the Lands of Nicho- 
las Signe, Asher Morgan, and the Road leading to How- 
ell's Ferry, on which is a good Stone Dwelling-house, well 
finished, a good Barn, and two overshot Grist-mills, one 
Pair of Stones in each Mill, two Boulting Mills that go 
by Water, one other Boulting Mill for the Country, that 
goes by Hand; also a Saw-mill on the same Dam, which 
is supplied with constant Water from living Springs, 
about 10 Acres of watered Meadow, which produces the 
best of English Hay, a good young Orchard that produces 
Plenty of the best Fruit, with a Number of Peach, Cherry 
and Pear Trees; also a Cooper's Shop. The above 
Buildings are almost new, and in good Repair, and are 
near the Center of one of the best Townships in the Prov- 
ince for raising of Wheat. Whoever inclines to* purchase, 
may have easy Terms of Payment, by applying to< SAM- 
UEL KETCHIM living on the Premises, or SAMUEL TUCK- 
ER, Esq; in Trenton. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
1935, January 23, 1766. 



1 6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Essex County, ) PURSUANT to an Order of Daniel 

New-Jersey ) * Pearson, and Jonathan Hampton, 
Esquires, Two of the Judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the County of Essex, upon the Petition of 
Joshua Petit, an insolvent Debtor, and the Majority of 
his Creditors, Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors 
of said Joshua Petit, to shew Cause, (if any they have) 
before the said Judges, on Monday the Tenth of Febru- 
ary next, at 9 o'Clock of the said Day, at the House of 
Mrs. Johnston, Innkeeper in Elizabeth-ToAvn, why any 
Assignment of the Estate of said Joshua Petit should not 
be made according to the Prayer of the said Petition to 
such Persons as shall be appointed, and the said Debtor 
discharged, pursuant to an Act of Assembly, made this 
present year, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." Dated January the I5th, 1766. The New 
York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1204, January 23, 
1766. 

Borough of Elizabeth, December 23, 1765. 
BY virtue of a writ of Fieri Facias to me directed, 
against the goods and chattels, lands and tenements, of 
Henry Lane, at the suit of Jonathan Higgins, I have 
taken and seized a lot of land, containing about six and 
a half acres, lying and being within the said Borough, 
near Raway Meeting House, on which the said Lane now 
lives : On the Premises are the following improvements, 
to wit, a good new dwelling house, with four rooms on a 
floor, and a fire place in each, a cellar under one half of it, 
a genteel court yard, with a good pal'd garden, a good 
well and a small barn, all well finished, and in good order. 
It is within half a mile of a good landing, a quarter o*f a 
mile of a good mill, on the post road from Elizabeth Town 
to Woodbridge, and all which makes it very convenient 
for a merchant, tavern-keeper, or a tradesman. There- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. I/ 

fore this is to give notice, that the said house and prem- 
ises taken as aforesaid, will be exposed to sale at publick 
vendue, on Monday the 24th day of February next on the 
premises, between the hours of twelve and five of the clock 
in the afternoon of the same day. At the time and place 
of sale the conditions of the vendue will be made known, 
by me 

MOSES OGDEN, Sheriff. 

Perth- Amboy, January 6th, 1766. 
New-Jersey, ss. BY virtue of several writs of fieri 
facias, to me directed, issued out of the county court of 
Middlesex, against the goods and chattels, lands and ten- 
ements of James Johnston, at the suit of Stephen Skinner, 
and others; 1 have taken and seized a tract of good land, 
within seven miles of New-Brunswick, and five from 
South-River landing, containing four hundred and fifty 
acres; some part of it good meadow, and more may be 
made, as there is a fine stream runs through the land ; the 
upland is good for producing of wheat, and part of it is 
good wood land: There is on said premises a framed 
house and kitchen, a large new barn, and other out houses, 
an orchard, and a good garden, There will also be sold at 
the same time, a lot of salt meadow lying at the Round- 
Abouts, containing about ten acres. Now these are to 
give notice, that I shall expose the aforesaid lands and 
premises to sale, at public vendue, on Friday the seventh 
day of March next, on the premises, between the hours of 
twelve and five in the afternoon : At which time and 
place, the terms and conditions of sale will be declared 
and made known, by me, 

JAMES BROOKS, Sheriff 

N. B. If the purchaser will pay one third of the money 
next May, he shall have a reasonable time for the remain- 
der. The creditors of said James Johnston, are particu- 



1 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

larly requested to be present, with the demands that each 
of them may have against him, in order that they may be 
delivered in to the assignees. 

New-Jersey, Perth- Amboy, Jan. 7th, 1766. 
NOTICE is hereby given, that the vendue for the sale of 
the commodious, pleasant, and well-situated stone house, 
in Perth-Amboy, late the property of Samuel Isletine, is 
adjourned until Saturday, the first day of March next; 
and to be held at the house of Elijah Dunham, Inn-keeper 
in Perth Amboy : The said vendue to begin at two o'clock 
in the afternoon of the same day, where attendance will 

be given, by 

JAMES BROOKS, Sheriff. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1204, January 30, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an order of Abraham Van Campen, and 
Richard Gardner, Esqrs; Two of the judges of the in- 
ferior court of common pleas, held in and for the county 
of Sussex, Upon the petition of Robert Clement, Gersham 
Mott, James Hyndshaw and Daniel Sherror, insolvent 
debtors, confined in Sussex County Goal in New-Jersey, 
for debt, together with the Major part of their creditors, 
Notice is hereby given to all their creditors to shew cause, 
if any they have, before the said judges on the I7th day 
of February next at the court house in the county of Sus- 
sex why an assignment of the several estates of the said 
debtors, should not be made to assignees, then and there 
to be appointed, for the use of their creditors and the said 
insolvents thereupon discharged according to an act of 
assembly intitled, an act for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

Hunterdon | Pursuant to an act of General Assem- 

County \ bly of the province of New Jersey, 

made in the fifth year of his Majesty's reign, entitled, 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 9 

"An Act for the relief of insolvent debtors;" Christopher 
Traxellor, of the county aforesaid, together with the 
greater part of his creditors, having petitioned the judges 
of the inferior court of the said county to be admitted to 
the benefit of the aforesaid act, hereby give notice to his 
creditors, that the said judges have appointed Saturday 
the fifteenth day of February next, for the creditors of 
the aforesaid Christopher Traxellor, to meet at Trenton, 
at ten o'clock in the forenoon, to shew cause (if any they 
have) why an assignment of the said debtor's estate 
should not be made, and the said debtor be admitted to 
the benefit of the said act. Trenton, January 23. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1208, January 30, 
1766. 

THIRTY DOLLARS Reward 

Broke out of the Goal of the County of Hunterdon, in 
the Province of New Jersey, and made their Escape, on 
the Night of the 2ist Instant, Samuel Pelton, and John 
Moore, committed upon an Accusation of Felony; Sam- 
uel Pelton is a Joiner by Trade, about 30 Years old, 5 
Feet 6 or 7 Inches high, well built, much Pock-marked, 
black Eyes, black short curled Hair, has lost some of his 
upper Fore-teeth, and has a bold impudent Countenance; 
had on a mixed blue homespun Coat, red Jacket, light Col- 
oured Great Coat and Buckskin Breeches. . . . John 
Moore is about 25 Years old, 5 Feet 5 or 6 Inches high, 
smooth Face, black Hair tied behind, and sandy coloured 
Whiskers; had on a blue Surtout, red Jacket lappelled, 
and light coloured Cloth Breeches. Whoever shall appre- 
hend the said Samuel Felton and John Moore, and secure 
them in any of his Majesty's Goals upon the Continent, 
will be paid the above Reward, or Fifteen Dollars for 
either of them. The above Pelton and Moore being two 
Persons of infamous Character, and Disturbers of the 



2O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Peace in general, it is hoped that all his Majesty's liege 
Subjects will be aiding and assisting in bringing them to 
Justice. 

SAMUEL TUCKER, Sheriff of said County. 

LETTERS remaining in the Post-Office, Philadelphia. 
Henry Couper, Gloucester County. John Johnson, Al- 
lenstown. George French, Salem. 

To be LETT for a Term of Years, 
A Plantation and Tract of Land containing 187 Acres, 
with a Frame House thereon, an Orchard of good Fruit, 
about 12 Acres of Meadow in good Order, and about 14 
Acres cleared, and ready for sowing with Grass seed, sit- 
uate within the Town Bounds of Gloucester, in the Prov- 
ince of New Jersey;, the said Plantation is very conve- 
niently situated to attend the Philadelphia Market from, 
especially since the Bridge is built over Newtown Creek, 
the Distance being but between 3 and 4 Miles from said 
Plantation to Cooper's Ferry. The Place may be entered 
on immediately. For further Particulars apply to the 
Subscriber, living in Front-street, Philadelphia. 
1" ?s, 6d. THOMAS WHARTON. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1936, January 30, 
1766. 

RUN away on the 2ist of November last, from the Sub- 
scriber living in Trenton, a Negroe Man, named Toney, 
about 36 Years of Age, five Feet four Inches high, has 
lost the first Joint of one of his Thumbs, and speaks pretty 
good English; had on when he went away, a light col- 
oured Kersey Coat, a Flannel Shirt, Plad Jacket and 
Breeches, white Yarn Stockings, and old Shoes, and had 
an Iron Collar about his Neck. Whoever takes up said 
Negroe, and secures him so as his Master may have him 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 21 

again, shall have Thirty Shillings Reward and reasonable 

Charges, paid by 

Elijah Bond. 

To BE LETT, 

The noted Tavern at Black Point, in Shrewsbury, 
Monmouth County, in East Jersey, and may be entered 
on in March next. EOT further Particulars, enquire of 
John Saltar, at Pool's Pr^ge, Philadelphia, Hugh Harts- 
horne, Esq; at Bristol, Joseph Saltar, near Trenton, or to 
John Hartshorne, near the Premises. 

Sussex Court-house, January 23, 1766. 
James Anderson, an insolvent Debtor, confined in Sus- 
sex County, New- Jersey, desires his Creditors to shew 
Cause, if any they have, before the Judges, on the I7th 
Day o>f February next, at the Court-house of Sussex, why 
an Assignment of the Estate of the said insolvent Debtor 
should not be made to' the Assignees, then and there to be 
appointed, for the Use of his Creditors, and the said In- 
solvent thereupon be discharged, according to an Act of 
Assembly intituled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." 

JAMES ANDERSON 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1937, February 6, 
1766. 

To BE SOLD 

A very convenient, profitable and agreeable Farm, ly- 
ing along Rariton River, about two Miles from New 
Brunswick, in New-Jersey, containing 236 Acres, on 
which is a good dwelling House, out Houses, a Barn, 120 
Acres cleared Land, and 15 Acres of English Meadow. 
It is plentifully supplied with Water in the driest Sea- 
sons, and affords a very convenient Place for a Grist Mill. 



22 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Any, Person inclining to purchase, may apply to Jaques 
Vantine, on the Farm, or to John Vantine at Rariton 
Landing. 

This is to give publick Notice to all Persons, that there 
is to be Sold at private Sale. 

A Plantation situate lying, and being in Middletown 
East New-Jersey, Monmouth County, containing be- 
tween Two and Three Hundred Acres, about One Hun- 
dred and Sixty cleared, and the rest Timbered, with the 
best of Timber of all Sorts; such as Oak, Bilsted, Poplar, 
Ash, Nut, and all other Sorts of Timber, with some 
Meadow, and Forty Acres more may be made, of the 
very best : On the same is a very good Dwelling-House, 
with Three Fire Places; the one as yet not finished. Also 
a large Dutch Barn stood about Twelve Years, Forty odd 
by Fifty odd Feet; on the land is a very good young 
bearing Orchard of all Sorts of Fruit whatsoever, of the 
very best, and bears plentifully; the Place being exceed- 
ing well watered with Brooks and living Springs has 
never, failed yet. It lies about 3 Miles from the publick 
Landing; where are to be had Fish, Oysters, and Clams; 
plenting of fowling of all sorts of Fowls, it lies about i 
Mile from a very good Grist Mill, and 3 more within 3 
Miles. A Saw-Mill joining, formerly belonging to the 
same. Any Person having a Mind to purchase the same, 
may apply to* CORNELIUS SWART, in Freehold County 
aforesaid, shall have it on very reasonable Term, and Pos- 
session shall be given immediately if required. 

FORTY SHILLINGS REWARD. 

RUN- A WAY on Wednesday the 25th day of December 
1765, from us the subscribers, living in Freehold and 
county of Monmouth, in East New-Jersey, an indented 
Negro man named Benjamin Moore, about forty years of 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 23 

Age, five feet six inches high, a likely spry fellow. He 
took with him a grey and a red jacket, i pair of brown 
breeches, i pair ribb'd blue stockings, and a good hat. He 
has taken with him sundry other clothes, and it is sup- 
posed he will change his dress. He was formerly an in- 
dented servant to Job Throckmorton and George Rhea, 
at Freehold and has taken those old indentures of said 
Throckmorton and Rhea with him, and shows them for 
a pass, pretending to be a free Negro. Whoever takes up 
said Negro and secures him, so that his master can have 
him again, shall have the above reward, and all reasonable 
charges paid by us, 

Henry and Joseph Robinson. 

N. B. All masters of Vessels and other persons are 
forewarned not to harbour, conceal, or carry off the said 
Negro*, at their peril. 

Pursuant to two Writs of Fieri Facias, to me directed, 
on a Judgment obtained by Matthew Van Alstyne, and 
others, against the Goods and Chattels, Lands and Tene- 
ments of Adrian Bennet, at Griggs Town, in Somerset 
County, New- Jersey, I have levied on a Tract of Land, 
lying at Griggs Town aforesaid, containing 125 Acres, 
bounded westerly on Millstone River; also* the Grist Mill, 
Shop, and Dwelling House, a good Barn, two very good 
Orchards, plenty of Timber Land, and a good Quantity 
of Meadow belonging to the same; It is a very good 
Place for a Store Keeper, in a fine Wheat Country, within 
1 2. Miles of New-Brunswick. The Buildings are extra- 
ordinary good and convenient. Two Months Credit will 
be given on certain Conditions, which will be made known 
at the Day of Sale, which will be at publick Vendue, on 
the Premises, on Monday the 3d Day of March next, be- 



24 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

tween Twelve and Five in the Afternoon; of which all 
Persons concerned, are desired to take Notice. 

28th October, 1765. JOB STOCKTON, Sheriff. 

CAVELIER JOUET, 
Of ELIZABETH-TOWN, 

INTENDING to improve a larger landed Interest else- 
where, will sell or let the House in which he now lives, 
with some Land, and other Accommodations. The House 
is built of Brick and Stone; and is about forty seven Feet 
front and thirty six deep, with two handsome Wings ad- 
joining; the one a Kitchen, the other an Office or Study. 
Each about twenty eight Feet front, and twenty deep. 
Said House is so well known for its Conveniency, Situa- 
tion, and handsome Appearance, that it needs not any 
Recommendation. 

There is about twenty, or twenty two Acres of the 
Land of a good Soil, with an old Orchard of fifty odd 
Trees; and also one which just begins to bear, of an hun- 
dred. The Land fit for ploughing or Grass. The Terms 
of Sale or Renting, may be known by inquiring of the 
Owner; or of Mr. Bernard Lintot, of the City of New- 
York. 

To BE SOLD OR LET 

A large house, lot and stables, pleasantly situated in 
the city of Perth- Arnboy, with a good garden well stored 
with the choicest collection of fruit trees. The person 
inclining to purchase or hire the said house and lot, may 
be accommodated with seven acres of extreme good mow- 
ing ground. For further particulars enquire of Mr. 
James Thompson, Merchant in New- York, or David 
Johnston, at Greenwich. The New York Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, No. 1205, February 6, 1766. 









1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 25 

New- York, January 30. 

Saturday last sailed out of Sandy-Hook, captains Allen 
and Montgomery, for Belfast; captains Semple and Wal- 
lace for Dublin; capt. Dorset, for Lisbon; capt. Jauncey, 
for Pensacola; capt. Deal, for South Carolina; capt. 
Johnson, for Coracoa; and the capts. Lash and Young 
for the West Indies. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1209, February 6, 1766. 

NEW- YORK, February 10. 

A frigate that sailed from Portsmouth, for this place, 
in November, with some dispatches, is put into South- 
Carolina, having been off the Hook many days, but could 
not get in, and was obliged to bear away. 

This is to give NOTICE to the PUBLIC, 

THAT the Stage Waggon kept by JOHN BARNHILL, in 
Elm-street, near Vine street, Philadelphia, and JOHN 
M ASH ERE w, at the Blazing star, near New- York, intend 
to perform the Journey from Philadelphia to New-York 
in two days, and from there to Philadelphia in two days 
also, commencing the 1 4th day of April next, and to con- 
tinue seven months, viz to the I4th of November; and 
the remaining five months of the year in three days, (the 
waggon-seats to be set on springs. ) They purpose to set 
off from Philadelphia and New- York on Mondays and 
Thursdays as they now do, punctually at sun-rise, and 
change their Passengers at Prince Town, and return to 
Philadelphia and New- York the following days: The 
price each Passenger Ten Shillings to Prince-town, ten 
shillings to Powle's Hook, opposite New- York, Ferriage 
free; and three pence each mile any distance between. 
Gentlemen and Ladies who are pleased to favor us with 



26 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

their custom, may depend on due attendance and civil 

usage, 

By their Humble Servants 

JOHN BARNHILL, 
and 

JOHN MESHEREW. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1210, February 
13, 1766. 

NEW- YORK, February 3. 

The Publick are cautioned to beware O'f false Jersey 
Money now passing in this City, viz. Bills of 3!. April 23, 
1761, Thirty Shilling Bills of April 8, 1762, and April 
1 6, 1764. 

PHILADELPHIA, February 13. 

l^lPThe Public are cautioned to beware of Counterfeit 
New Jersey Thirty Shilling and Three Pound Bills ; there 
are three Emissions of them, two of Thirty Shillings, 
dated in 1762, and 1764; the first are badly done, and 
may be discovered from the whole Face of the Bill, the 
printing Letters running into the Escutcheon; but those 
of 1764 are so well done, that they are very difficult to be 
discovered; the only sure Mark is, that on the Back, at 
the Stem o<f the Sage Leaf, in the true Bills, is 305. but 
the false Bills have only the s. 30 is left out. . . . The 
Counterfeit Three Pound Bills are dated in 1761, and not 
so well printed as the true Ones ; the Impression is deeper 
in the Paper, and in the Word Plate the P is right over 
the A of April, in the false Bills, which is not so in the 
true Ones. . . . It is supposed these Counterfeit Bills 
came to New York in one of the last Vessels from Eng- 
land, and that a large Sum is already passed there. . . . 
One of the Accomplices, we hear, is in New York Goal, 
and another of them, one Michael Smith, is said to be 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2/ 

gone into New Jersey, with a large Sum of false Money, 
to purchase Cattle. . . . The above Description is the 
best we can give at present, from the Information we have 
received, not having seen any of the Counterfeit Bills. 

Hunterdon County, New Jersey, ss. February 3, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Hunterdon aforesaid, 
Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of William 
Foue, 1 an insolvent Debtor, now confined in the Goal of 
Trenton, that on the Petition o<f the said William Foue, 
with the major Part in 'Value of his Creditors, the Judges 
aforesaid have appointed Tuesday, the 25th Day of Feb- 
ruary inst. for the Creditors of the said William Foue, to 
meet at Trenton, to shew Cause, if any they have, why 
an Assignment of the said insolvent Debtor's Estate 
should not be made, and the Debtor discharged, agreeable 
to the late Act of General Assembly, made and provided 
for that Purpose. 

Hunterdon, ss. Trenton, February 8, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Act of General Assembly of the 
Province of New- Jersey, lately passed, intituled, "An Act 
for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors," Joseph Arbour and 
John Calvin now confined in Trenton, in the County of 
Hunterdon, upon their Petition, and a Majority in Value 
of their Creditors, that they intend to take the Benefit of 
the said Act, and that the Judges of the Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas for the County aforesaid, have appointed 
Friday, the 28th Day of February Instant, for the Cred- 
itors of the aforesaid Debtors to meet at Trenton, at 
Three o' Clock in the Afternoon, to shew Cause, if any 

i In the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1939, for Feb. 20, 1766, this name 
is given as William Force. 



28 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

they have, why an Assignment of the said Debtors Es- 
.tates should not be made, and the said Debtors discharged, 
according to the Form and Effect of the said Act of Gen- 
eral Assembly. 

To be SOLD, in the City of Burlington, a little above the 

Court-house. 

A Large commodious Brick House and Kitchen, with 
a Pump in the Yard, and one Acre and a Half of very 
good Land, 20 Fruit Trees thereon, several Stables, and 
a Shed, 40 Feet long, very suitable for an Inn-keeper, or 
any Person inclining to live a private Life. Whoever in- 
clines to purchase, may apply to EDWARD BROOKS, living 
on the Premises, or to JOHN MILNOR, Cooper, near the 
Bank Meeting-house, Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania 
Gazette, No. 1938, February 13, 1766. 

MATHEMATICAL QUESTION. 

SUPPOSE in an Oblique Angled Triangle, whose Base 
and one Side is unknown, the Length of the other Side 
25, the Angle included by the known Side, and Base 41 
Degrees, and the Area 275 ; thence to find all the unknown 
Parts, without reducing it to two right angled Triangles. 
The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1206, 
February 13, 1766. 

To BE LET. 

THE noted Tavern at Black-Point, in Shrewsbury, 
Monmouth County, East New- Jersey; for further Par- 
ticulars, inquire of John Hartshorne, near the Premises. 

To be sold at Public Vendue, on Monday and Tuesday 

the Third and Fourth Days of March next. 
Two Plantations belonging to the Estate of James 
Abraham,, deceased, in South Amboy : The First contain- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2p 

ing about 270 Acres, the greatest Part whereof is clear'd, 
and near the one Half of the clear Land mowable Mead- 
ow, mostly good Clover Grass, and therefore is famous 
for Stock : Having also an excellent Range and Outlet 
for the same. The said Plantation is well water'd, and 
very convenient to Church, Meeting, Mill and Market; 
also a good bearing Orchard, and extraordinary Build- 
ings of every Sort, necessary for a Farmer, &c. The 
Second Farm lies adjoining to Lewis Johnston, Esq; on 
Matchepenex, containing by Estimation 400 Acres or up- 
wards, 200 of which is cleared, and Part of that will af- 
ford near 40 Loads of good Hay yearly; the cleared 
Land in good Order, and well fenced, and Water in every 
Field; a large young Orchard of good Fruit, a large 
dwelling House quite new, a good Kitchen, and a large 
convenient Barn, and every other necessary Building; 
advantageously situated for fencing, two thirds being well 
secured by Brooks and Creeks, &c. The Conditions will 
be made known on the Day of Sale, by 

John Combs } 

and > Executors 

Nicholas Everson ) 

February 13, 1766. 

Essex County ( PURSUANT to an Order made by 

New-Jersey ] S Samuel Woodruff and Stephen 
Crane, Esq; two of the Judges of the inferior Court of 
common Pleas for the County of Essex, upon the Petition 
of John Graham, an insolvent Debtor, now confined in 
the common Gaol of the said Borough of Elizabeth, and 
sundry of his Creditors : Notice is hereby given by the 
said Petitioners to all the Creditors of the said John Gra- 
ham, to shew Cause (if any they have) before the said 
Samuel Woodruff and Stephen Crane, at the dwelling 
House of Mrs. Johnston, on Thursday the Thirteenth 



3O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Day of March next, why an Assignment of the Estates of 
the said John Graham should not be made to Edward 
Thomas and Nehemiah Wade, Assignees appointed by the 
said Creditors, for the Use and Benefit of all the said 
Creditors, pursuant to the Prayer of the said Petition, and 
the said John Graham discharged from all his Debts, and 
from his Imprisonment, according to an Act of the Gov- 
ernor, Council, and General Assembly, passed in the Fifth 
Year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled, "An Act 
for the Relief of insolvent Debtors." 
Dated February, 1766. 

THREE POUNDS REWARD, 
and all reasonable Charges. 

RUN-AWAY from Samuel Henry, of Trenton, in West 
'New-Jersey, the 2Qth of January last, a Negro Man 
named TOM, aged about 24 Years, 5 Foot 5 Inches high, 
had on when he went away, a short brown Coat, the 
Sleeves of which of a lighter Colour, with flat metal But- 
tons; Buckskin Breeches, blue yarn Stockings, check 
Shirt, an old Beaver Hat, and a black Silk Handkerchief 
about his Neck. It is supposed he made for New- York, 
as he formerly belonged to Mr. Gerardus Beekman, late 
of that City, and has his Mother living there. If appre- 
hended, it is desired he may be secured in any Gaol, and 
Notice given to his Master, at Trenton, or Mr. John 
Beekman, of New-York, either of whom will pay the Re- 
ward. The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, 
No. 1207, February 20, 1766. 

We hear from New-Jersey, that the gentlemen of the 
law in that province, met last Thursday, at New Bruns- 
wick, to consider of the propriety of resuming their prac- 
tice, which they have discontinued since the ist of No- 
vember, where they were waited upon by a deputation of 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 31 

the Sons of Liberty, who* expressed their uneasiness at the 
suspension of law proceedings, and it was determined by 
a majority of the lawyers then convened, "That they 
would resume their practice the ist day of April next, 
whatever accounts may be received from England, or 
sooner if earlier intelligence arrives of the determination 
of Parliament respecting the Stamp Act;" . . . which 
being communicated to' the deputies who then attended, 
they appeared to be satisfied therewith. And 

At the same time deputies from the Sons of Liberty of 
the county of Hunterdon, waited on Mr. White, prothon- 
otary of that county, with a request that he would open 
his office to transact business as usual, who received them 
politely; and they received assurances that the office 
should be opened the first day of April. 

We likewise hear from the same quarter, that a certain 
person being duned for a debt, he gave his creditor to un- 
derstand, that as there was no law, he would not pay him, 
whereupon the creditor seized him by the shoulder, and 
called out here is a man that wants stamps! he was in a 
little time surrounded by a number of people, who would 
make a sacrifice of him, who dar'd to take the advantage 
of the distressing situation of his country, had he not im- 
mediately paid the money, and made an acknowledgement 
o<f his fault. 

To be sold by the subscriber, living in the town of 
Dover, in the County of Kent, upon Delaware, A tract of 
land, situate in Salem county, in the province of West 
Jersey, adjoining to the town of Salem, extending two 
miles o-n a navigable creek, that ebbs and flows near 6 feet 
perpendicular, having several landings belonging to the 
premises on the said creek, and does not exceed thirty 
miles from thence to Philadelphia by land, and 36 by 
water, as generally computed from whence the markets 



32 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

at Philadelphia may be conveniently attended, and about 
5 miles to a glass house, 1 where are settled many German 
families. The title is indisputable. The said tract doth 
consist of sundry sorts of land, and has many valuable 
improvements thereon, to wit, 295 acres of upland, excej- 
lent for farming, and very natural to English grass, large 
quantities of hay being cut therefrom annually, having 
thereon a large brick house, two stories high, two brick 
kitchens, a large framed barn covered in with cedar, and 
sundry other outhouses &c. One hundred and seventy 
acres of banked meadow, most part proper for hemp, the 
whole producing fine grass for mowing. One hundred 
and seventy-six acres of marsh, having a fall of five or 
six feet, which may be banked and drained at a small ex- 
pence, and converted into meadow. And one thousand 
two hundred and eighty four acres of very valuable wood 
land, well timbered, including a white oak swamp contain- 
ing 60 acres, or thereabouts, not more remarkable for the 
fine timber of several sorts, such as white oak, ash, maple, 
&c. which it produces, than for the excessive richness of 
the soil. The whole contains 1925 acres, and will make 
two, three or four fine farms for cultivation or grazing, 
with a sufficient quantity of meadow and wood-land to 
each farm. Any person or number of persons inclining 
to purchase the whole may have the payments made as 
easy as can be reasonably desired, upon securing the same, 
and paying interest. The premises may be entered upon 
the 25th of March next. For further particulars enquire 
of Benjamin Wynkoop, merchant, in Philadelphia, or the 
subscriber. 

JOHN VINING. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1211, February 
20, 1766. 



i Established about 1738 by Caspar Wistar, a German from the Pal 
atinate. See N. J. Archives, VI., 9S; VII., 108-9; X., 29-31. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 33 

PHILADELPHIA, February 20. 

In our last we cautioned the Public to beware of Coun- 
terfeit New Jersey Three Pound Bills, dated in 1761; 
and Thirty Shilling Bills, dated 1762 and 1764; since 
which we have seen the following Counterfeits of that 
Money, viz. Three Pound Bills, two different Sorts of 
Twelve Shilling Bills, and a Six Shilling Bill. They are 
all badly done on Copperplate, the Letters being very ir- 
regular, and standing much out of Line; whereas the true 
Bills are neatly and regularly done, in the common print- 
ing Manner. In the first Line of the Face of the Coun- 
terfeit Three Pound Bills, the O in POUNDS is shorter and 
thicker than the other Letters in that Word; and in the 
third Line the last E in JERSEY is not like a Printing E, 
but is made in the Manner commonly used in Writing. 
. . . The Twelve Shilling Bills are both dated April 12, 
1760; one Sort may be discovered by having a black Line 
about the Flowers which are round the T, in the Word 
THIS; also in the Arms the lower Part of the Unicorn's 
Body appears naked, and the Words in the Garter, and 
of the Motto, are p^iner than in the true Bills; and at 
the Back, instead oi the Printer's Name, Parker, it is 
made Parke. . . . The other Sort is printed on Writ- 
ing Paper; in the third Line, after the Word Ounce, in- 
stead of [ ] Fifteen, is made s] Fifteen. . . . 
The Six Shilling Bills are dated December 31, 1763; in 
the Escutcheon, in the Word JERSEY, the J is made bottom 
upwards; in the third Line the S in JERSEY is smaller 
than the other Letters of that Word; and in the next 
Line, after Grains, is os, which should be of. . . . The 
above Counterfeits are all printed on three Folds of 
Paper, pasted together (except the last of the Twelve Shil- 
ling Bills) but the true Bills are only on two Folds. In 
short, they are all so ill executed, that we think, after this 



34 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Notice, no Body can be imposed on by them. The Three 
Pound Bills are dated April 8, 1762. 

There have likewise appeared some New-Jersey Three 
Shilling Bills altered to Twelve, by having the Word 
Twelve pasted over the Place where Three should be, 
which may be discovered by its looking fresher than the 
other Part of the Bill. 

New- Jersey, Hunterdon County ss. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris and William 
Clayton, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Hunterdon aforesaid, 
Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of David Cock, 
jun. and Tobias Nevies, insolvent Debtors, now confined 
in Goal, that on the Petitions of the aforesaid David Cock 
and Tobias Nevies, with the major Part in Value of their 
Creditors/the Judges aforesaid have appointed Monday, 
the tenth Day of March, for the Creditors of the aforesaid 
David Cock and Tobias Nevies, to meet at Trenton, to 
shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of the 
said Debtors Estates should not be made, and the Debtors 
discharged, agreeable to the late Act of General Assem- 
bly, made and provided for that Purpose. 

To BE SOLD 

A Valuable Plantation, situate in Penn's Neck, in 
Salem County, West New-Jersey containing by Estima- 
tion, 294 Acres, 20 Acres thereof good Meadow Ground, 
7 Acres cleared, and has been mowed several Years. Also 
near 40 Acres more of a Mill Pond, 20 Acres thereof 
cleared, and has been mowed sundry Times, and 10 Acres 
more almost cleared. As this Meadow Ground lies on 
the Head of the Tide, it will never require Dung, and a 
few small Drains will keep it in Order. One Half of the 
Mill Pond may be kept in Meadow, and the other Half 






1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 35 

will afford a very advantageous Mill Seat, as no Mill can 
be built near it; and as this Place has been long accus- 
tomed to a Mill, one is much wanted. There is also 70 
Acres of Upland cleared, three Orchards, a good Dwell- 
ing-house, Barn, and Stables, two paled Gardens, and 
three other Tenements, with Tenants in them; and as 
this Place lies in the Middle of the Parish, and two public 
Roads through it; the one a Landing Road to Delaware 
River, distant from said Landing 4 Miles, and 30 Miles 
Water Carriage to- Philadelphia makes it suitable for a 
Store and Tavern, besides the Mill; and neither so near, 
as the one to hurt the other. The Purchasers, paying one 
Half, may have Time for the other, giving Security, if 
required. For further Particulars, enquire of the Sub- 
scriber, on the Premises. 

WILLIAM MILLER. 

N. B. There is Plenty of good White Oak Timber to 
be had reasonable, which would be profitable for a Saw- 
mill. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1939, February 
20, 1766. 

\VI-IEREAS BROUGHTON REYNOLDS, of Elizabeth-Town, 
in New-Jersey is desirous of corresponding with one 
WILLIAM FROMSTONE, who came from North Wales 
some Years ago, supposed to be settled in the Province of 
Pennsylvania, or some Place adjacent, if the said William 
Fromstone will be so good as to favour the said Reynolds 
with a Line, to inform him of the Place of his Residence, 
it will be esteemed a particular Favour. 

Hunterdon County, New- Jersey, ss. 

Trenton, February 18, 1766. 

Pursuant to an Order of William Morris and William 
Clayton, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Hunterdon aforesaid, 



36 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of John Rob- 
erts, an insolvent Debtor, now confined in Trenton, that 
on the Petition of the said John Roberts, with the major 
Part in Value of his Creditors, the Judges aforesaid have 
appointed Monday, the I7th Day of March next, for the 
Creditors of the said John Roberts to meet at Trenton, to 
shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of the 
said insolvent Debtor's Estate should not be made, and 
the Debtor discharged, agreeable to the late Act of Gen- 
eral Assembly made and provided for that Purpose. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1940, February 27, 1766. 

New York, February 27. A large Gallows was erected 
in Elizabeth-Town, last Week with a Rope ready fixed 
thereto, and the Inhabitants there vow and declare, that 
the first Person that either distributes and takes out a 
Stamped Paper, shall be hung thereon without Judge or 
Jury. 

We have certain Intelligence from Elizabeth-Town, in 
New-Jersey, that the Magistrates and Lawyers carry on 
their Business in the Law as usual without Stamps. 

We have received Solutions of the Mathematical Ques- 
tion in our 2 last Papers, from 4 different Persons; but 
as we have no Algebraical Figures, and the angled Fig- 
ures could not be had without considerable Expence we 
hope such Matters will not be expected to appear in our 
Paper, unless the Persons who send them will procure the 
Mathematical Figures, and send Money to pay for their 
Insertion, as the Gentlemen did who proposed the Ques- 
tion. We shall however for this Once, insert, gratis, One 
O'f the Answers, which is more easily expressed than the 
rest viz. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 37 

Elizabeth-Town, Feb. 24, 1766. 
To the PRINTER. 

The Mathematical Question proposed in your two last 
Papers, is to be perform'd as follows. 

1. As the Radius is to the given Side, so is the Side of 
the given Angle, to the Perpendicular. 

2. Divide the Area by half the Perpendicular, gives 
the Base. The Question will then be reduced to the 4th 
and 5th Cases of oblique Triangles in Trigonometry; 
having two Sides and their included Angle given, from 
which the others are easily found. 

A. C. 

[This Gentleman (and some of the rest) in their Turn 
propose Questions in Mathematicks, which if they please 
shall be inserted.] 

To BE SOLD. 

By the Subscribers, Executors to William Covenhoven, 

deceased, 

A Valuable Plantation on Penn's Neck, in the Town- 
ship of Windsor, and County of Middlesex, New- Jersey, 
within two Miles of Princeton; containing 250 Acres of 
good Wheat Land, on which is a good new. Dwelling 
House, 30 Feet square, well finished, and a good Cellar 
under the Whole; a large Dutch Barn, 50 Feet by 38; a 
large Waggon House, and other out-Houses; 15 Acres 
of good Meadow, and about 20 Acres of Swamp to clear : 
A good Orchard that will make 100 Barrels of Cyder. 
Also, a wood Lot of 1 50 Acres, and a white Oak Swamp, 
containing 60 Acres, contiguous to the Plantation : Easy 
Payment and a good Title will be given to the Purchaser, 
by 

Jacob Schenck } 

and > Executors. 

John Covenhoven ) 



38 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Perth-Amboy, February 12, 1766. 
To be let to any gentleman for a term of years, A very 
convenient House in Amboy, on Rariton River, opposite 
to Mr. Stevens's Ferry, with a large garden, stored with 
a variety of fruit, and many kinds of useful vegetables, a 
small orchard, convenient stables, and as much pasture 
land and mowing ground as will be thought necessary. 
To be enter'd upon the first of May or sooner : For fur- 
ther particulars apply to John L. Johnston, on the prem- 
ises. 

To BE LET, 

And enter'd on the ist of April next. 
A HOUSE and Lot of Land, situate in Woodbridge, in 
New -Jersey, opposite to Capt. Nathaniel Heard' s, being 
the House where the Widow Heard formerly kept a Tav- 
ern, which is now kept by Mrs. Elves. There is about 
80 Acres of Land in the Lot, with a good Orchard, Gar- 
den, Out-houses, Barns, Stables, &c. The House has six 
Fire Places, and every Convenience necessary for a Pub- 
lic House, and is well situated for that, a Merchant, or 
almost any other Branch of Business. For Particulars, 
inquire of Capt. Ephraim Terrill, near Elizabeth-Town, 
or Capt. Nathaniel Heard, near the Premises. 

City of | PURSUANT to an Order by Will- 

New-Brunswick \ iam Ouke and James Neilson, 

Esq; two of the Judges of the Mayor's Court of Common 
Pleas for the said City : Notice is hereby given unto all 
the Creditors of George Young, an insolvent Debtor, con- 
fined in the Gaol of the said City, that they appear before 
the said Judges, on the I2th Day of March, at Two 
o'Clock in the Afternoon, at the Court-House in the said 
City, to shew Cause (if any they have) why an assign- 
ment of the said Debtor's Estate should not be made to 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 39 

such Persons as shall be appointed, and the said Debtor 
discharged, pursuant to an Act of Assembly made at Bur- 
lington the last Session, entitled "An Act for the Relief 
of insolvent Debtors." Dated February 22, 1766. 

ALL Persons who have any demands against the estate 
of John West, of Elizabeth-Town, an insolvent debtor, 
are desired to attend at the house of Miss Mary Johnson, 
in Elizabeth-Town, the third Tuesday in April next, in 
order to prove their accounts ; that the Assignees may be 
enabled to make a dividend of the said insolvent's estate 
amongst his Creditors, and all persons who are indebted 
to said estate, are desired to make immediate payment to 
prevent trouble. 

Robert O^den, and ) A . 

Elias Dayton \ Assl g" ees 

New- York, February 26. 

' The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1208, February 27, 1766. 

BOSTON, Feb. 13. 

Extract of a Letter from London, dated Dec. 22, 1765. 

"I am now at the Court End of the Town, and have 
the pleasure to inform you, that the city and country are 
all in your Favour: I make no doubt the Stamp-Act will 
be repealed." 

On the i $th of December a Deputation from the Mer- 
chants of London, trading to North- America, waited on 
the Ministry, to request their Countenance and Support, 
in the intended Application to Parliament, for the Relief 

of the Colonies, and of the trade to these parts 

A List of the deputation is as follows. For Canada, Mr. 
John Strettel; Mr. Anthony Vialars, Junior . . . New- 
foundland, Mr. Grey Olive; Mr. John Merry . . . 
New-Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode-Island and Con- 



40 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

necticut, Messieurs Bernard,, Debert, Hayley, Lane, Har- 
rison and Trecotheck . . . for New- York and New- 
Jersey, Messieurs Neale, Neave, Harris, Chambers and 
Ray . . . for Pennsylvania, Messrs. Barclay and Mil- 
drid . . . Maryland, Messrs. Buchanan and Stewart 
. . . Virginia, Messrs. Athawes and H anbury . . . 
North Carolina, Messrs. Franklyn and Brigen . . . S. 
Carolina, Messrs. Greenwood and Crokatt . . . Geor- 
gia, Mr. Charles Ogilvie and Mr. Clark . . . Florida, 
Mr. Alexander flanney. 

We hear from Cumberland county, West New-Jersey, 
that the courts there were open, and all business went on 
without regard to stamps. 

We are assured that the Court of Sussex county, in 
New-Jersey, was opened last week, and business trans- 
acted as usual, without regard to stamps. The Pennsyl- 
vania Journal, No. 1212, February 27, 1766. 

Saturday last, in a violent gale of wind, the brig Nancy, 
capt. York from Jamaica for this port, was drove ashore 
at Great Egg Harbour, the sails, rigging, and most of her 
cargo will be saved. 

When Capt. York went ashore, he saw a ship close in 
with the surff, which he thinks must have gone ashore; 
and it is reported that a schooner is ashore at Barnagat. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1213, March 6, 1766. 

NEW-YORK, February 27. 

We have certain Intelligence from Elizabeth-Town, in 
New-Jersey, that the Magistrates and Lawyers carry on 
their Business in the Law as usual without Stamps. The 
same is done in many other Places, viz. in some Parts of 
Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 41 

and the Massachusetts, in which last Place, New- Jersey, 
&c. they intend, whether the Stamp- Act is repealed or not, 
in a few Weeks, to proceed in all Kinds of Business, with- 
out regard to any unconstitutional Acts; and in the Gov- 
ernments of New-Hampshire, Rhode-Island, St. Chris- 
tophers, Antigua, &c all Kind of Business in Courts, &c. 
is already got into its usual Course, without Stamped 
paper. 



To be Lett or Sold, in the Borough of Bristol, in the 
County of Bucks, a commodious Dwelling-house, with a 
Kitchen and Shoemaker's Shop adjoining thereto, and a 
good Pump by the Door. Likewise three Acres of mow- 
ing Ground, on which is a fine bearing Orchard; also a 
Tanyard. The above Tenement is advantageously situ- 
ated for public Business, and may suit a Shoemaker, Tan- 
ner or Shopkeeper. Whoever inclines to rent or purchase, 
may know the Terms, by applying to> the Subscriber, liv- 
ing at Burlington, in West New- Jersey. 

REBECCAH ALLEN. 



To BE SOLD, 

A Large Lot of Land in Philadelphia, situate on the 
North Side of Chestnut-street, and on a Street running 
East and W r est through the Square, on each of which 
Streets it hath a Front o<f 237 Feet. There is a good 
Dwelling house, and convenient Stables, and other Out- 
houses thereon. It is now under a Lease to Dr. Thomas 
Graeme, three Years of which, from the first of Sixth 
Month (June) next, will be unexpired. For Terms of 
Sale and Payment, enquire of said DR. GRAEME, or of 
JOHN SMITH, in Burlington. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 1941, March 6, 1766. 






42 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

To the PRINTER. 
Sir, 

Please to insert the following Resolves in your next 
Paper. 

AT a Meeting of the SONS OF LIBERTY, of Woodbridge, 
in New-Jersey, they have come unto the following RE- 
SOLVES. 

I. RESOLVED, That we yield hearty and unfeigned 
Obedience to His Majesty King GEORGE the Third. 

II. RESOLV'D, That we maintain and abide by all and 
singular the Constitutional Laws of our Mother Country ; 
but no other Laws or Impositions whatsoever. 

III. RESOLV'D. That as we are of the unanimous 
Opinion of our Countrymen, that the STAMP ACT is un- 
constitutional, we will pay no Sort of Regard to it; but 
are resolv'd to oppose it to the utmost, with our Lives 
and Fortunes, if the glorious Cause of Liberty requires it. 

IV. RESOLV'D, That a Committee of five Persons be 
immediately chosen, to act in Conjunction with the several 
Committees of our neighbouring Townships in the 
County of Middlesex, in Order that the respective Com- 
mittees of the several Townships may form a Committee 
out of their own Body, to act in Conjunction with the sev- 
eral Committees of the neighbouring Counties in the 
Province of New-Jersey, that we may be in actual Readi- 
ness on any Emergency. 

V. RESOLV'D, That our Committee are hereby author- 
ized to transact all Affairs relating to the Stamp Act, any 
Three of which acting, shall be decisive. 

VI. RESOLV'D. That we commit these Resolves to the 
Press, without any Design to Dictate to our neighbouring 
Towns or Counties, but only to communicate our Senti- 
ments, for them to improve upon ; and shall be ever ready 
to hear other Proposals that they shall think more con- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 43 

ducive to the public End aim'd at, namely, the Union of 
the Provinces throughout the Continent. 

P. S. We have taken the above Measures, in Conse- 
quence of a Letter from a Committee of the Sons of Lib- 
erty of the City of New- York, recommending such a Step 
as a necessary Precaution against the Stamp Act. 

Woodbridge, February 26, 1766. 

New- Jersey, February 18, 1766. 

Somerset ) PURSUANT to an Order of Benjamin 

County j Thomson and Philip Van Horn, Esqrs. 

two of the Judges of the inferior Court o<f Common Pleas, 
held at Millstone, in and for the County of Somerset 
aforesaid, upon the Petition of Thomas Sanders, an insol- 
vent Debtor, and the Majority of his Creditors. Notice 
is hereby given to the Creditors of Thomas Sanders, an 
insolvent Debtor aforesaid, that they be and appear at the 
Court House at Millstone aforesaid, on the fourth Tues- 
day in April next, at two of the Clock in the Afternoon 
of the same Day, to shew Cause (if any they have) why 
an Assignment of the said Debtor's Estate shall not be 
made, and the said Debtor be discharged pursuant to an 
Act of the General Assembly of the Province, aforesaid, 
in such case made and provided. 

WHEREAS a Petition was presented to the House of 
General Assembly, for the Province of New-Jersey, at 
their Sessions in the Month o-f May last, by a Number of 
the Inhabitants of Essex and Morris Counties, praying a 
Law to> enable them to' alter the present Course of the 
River Pasaick. by cutting a strait course for the River 
to run in through Horseneck, in the County of Essex; 
And whereas Leave was given to said Petitioners, to 
bring in a Bill for that Purpose, at the next Session 
of said House, in the Words following, to wit. ''Ordered, 



44 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

That the Petitioners have Leave to bring in a Bill for that 
Purpose, at the next Session, provided notice of their Ap- 
plication and this Order be inserted in the New-York 
Gazette, and affixed at three adjoining Churches, at least 
six Weeks before said Sessions, and no reasonable Objec- 
tions shall then appear against the same. . . . Notice 
is hereby given to all Persons concerned, that a Bill will 
be presented accordingly at the next Sessions of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the Province of New- Jersey for the Pur- 
pose aforesaid. Dated this 5th March, 1766. 

STOLEN out of the Stable of MAHLON WRIGHT, of 
Windsor, in the County of Middlesex, and Province of 
New-Jersey, on Thursday the 2Oth of February at Night, 
a brown Mare, with a Saddle and Bridle, about fourteen 
Hands high, four Years old, a Blaze in her Face, one 
walled Eye, three white Feet, three Curls on her Fore- 
head, paces a Travel, and natural to a Trot. Supposed to 
be taken by Jabez Clarke, a young Man, about 20 Years 
of Age, five Feet eight Inches high, well sett, round Vis- 
ag'd, full fac'd, dark Complection, sundry black Moles in 
his Face; had on a brown cloth Coat and Vest, both 
double breasted, bound with black, black Breeches, pitch'd 
on the Knees with blue, a Pair of blue ribb'd Stockings, 
new Pumps, and an old Hat. Whoever takes up and se- 
cures said Mare, Saddle and Bridle, and Thief, so that he 
may be brought to Justice, and the Owner have his Mare 
again, shall have Forty Shillings Reward for both, or for 
the Mare, Saddle and Bridle only, and all reasonable 
Charges, paid by 

MAHLON WRIGHT. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, 
No. 1209, March 6, 1766. 

New-York, March 13. Saturday, the first Instant, the 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 45 

Ship Ellis, from London, bound for Philadelphia, was 
cast away on Absequon Beach; and one Mr. Wilson 
(lately appointed Comptroller of the Custom-House at 
Amboy) and one of the Seamen, were drowned. As soon 
as the Vessel struck, great part of the Cargo was thrown 
over board to lighten her, most of which drove ashore: 
The Ship with Part of the Cargo, will be lost. 



New-Jersey ! ss. 



Perth Amboy, I2th of March, 1766. 
WHEREAS, pursuant to the Orders of 
the Judges of the several Courts in 
the Province of New-Jersey, the Persons herein after 
named, were appointed Assignees of the following insol- 
vent Debtors, and have accordingly received Assignments 
of their several Estates, viz 

By Order of the Judges of the Supreme Court, 
Charles Rhodes, j 

and > Assignees of Robert Johnson. 

Thomas Skinner, ) 

By Order of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 
for the County of Middlesex, 

Charles Rhodes, / 

Elijah Dunham, ] Assi ^es of Peter Ten Eick 

Charles Rhodes, ) James Patten, 

David Goslins, ) * Patrick O Hanlon, 
Charles Rhodes, ) George Davison, 

Richard Carnes, Jun ) c t Jonathan Shepherd, 

Charles Rhodes ) 

John Griggs, [ of William Callender, 

David Gosling, do of John Cowlay, 

Therefore we the said Assignees give this public Notice 
of our Appointment, and desire all Persons indebted to 
the said Insolvents, to come and settle with us, at the 
House of Charles Rhodes, in Perth-Amboy, on Monday 
the 7th of April next, that we may be enabled to make a 



46 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Dividend of the Estates of the said Insolvents among 
their Creditors, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of 
the Governor, Council, and General Assembly, of this 
Province, for the Relief of insolvent Debtors 

Charles Rhodes, &c. 

To be Sold, by Public Vendue, on Tuesday, the I5th of 
April next, at Ten o' Clock in the Forenoon. 

THAT Valuable Estate in Kingwood, in the County of 
Hunterdon, New Jersey, late the Property of CHARLES 
HOFF, Esq. 

ist. The Mansion House, an Overshot Grist-Mill, 
Barn, Orchard, &c. with 97 and a half Acres of Land. 

2d. A New Stone House, a Grist-Mill, a Saw-Mill, 
Barn, Orchard, &c. with 36 Acres of Land. 

3d. A House with 67 Acres and three quarters of 
Land in working Order, which may conveniently be 
joined to' Lot No. 2. 

4th. A Stone House, Fulling-Mill, Dye-House, &c. 
with 1 5 Acres of Land. 

' 5th. A Wood Lot, containing about 22 Acres and lies 
convenient to either of the above Lots. 

The above Buildings, are all within the Compass of 
about one Quarter of a Mile, in a pleasant healthy Situ- 
ation, about 30 Miles distant from Trentown, and the 
same from New-Brunswick, in the midst of a fine Wheat 
Country and is a good Place for Trade. 

Credit will be given to the Buyer giving Security. The 
Purchase Money divided into three Payments ; One Third 
Part, to be paid in six Months, One Third, in twelve 
Months, and the other Third, in eighteen Months, with 
interest from the Day of Sale. Attendance will be given 
by JOSEPH REED, THOMAS WHARTON, and MOORE FUR- 
MAN. Vendue to be held on the Premises. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 47 . 

Will be Sold Reasonable, to raise Money by the 
Subscriber : 

A Valuable Farm, containing about 260 Acres of Land, 
situate in the Township of Amwell, County of Hunter- 
don, West New-Jersey, about 150 Acres thereof cleared, 
and in good fence and repair, the remainder well tim- 
bered, is excellent kind land for wheat, with a sufficient 
quantity of good natural meadow in clover and spear 
grass; great part of which with a small expence might 
be westward. The farm is well watered, there being con- 
stant running streams in every field. There is on the 
premises several bearing orchards, consisting of a large 
selection of the best sorts of fruit: Also a large brick 
house 48 by 33 feet, two stories high, genteely finished in 
a fashionable manner; there are four rooms on a floor, 
below, a fire place in each, with a large entry through the 
house, and in the same form in the second story, a cellar 
under the whole, conveniently partitioned off. A brick 
kitchen and store room joining the house, wash house &c. 
joining the kitchen, and a good well of water by the door; 
and within a few rods of the house is a brick shop, compt- 
ing room &c. Also a good frame barn 46 by 36 feet, 
cover'd with cedar, cow house, barracks for wheat, hay, 
&c. mostly new and in good repair. There are also on 
the premises, a stone grist mill 50 by 40 feet (the stones 
laid in lime and sand) with two pair of stones, in good 
repair, bolts, hoisting jack &c. all goes by water. It 
stands on the south branch of Rariton River, a never fail- 
ing stream of water, in the midst of a plentiful wheat 
country, where any quantity of wheat, may be bought at 
a reasonable price. It is situate within 25 miles of New- 
Brunswick, and the same distance from Trenton, and an 
excellent waggon road to' each place; so that it is equally 
situated to answer New York and Philadelphia markets. 



48 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

It is a good place for trade, there having been a store kept 
for a number of years past. There is near the mill a good 
frame house, with two rooms on a floor, for a miller, a 
house for a carter, coopers shop c. The house is as 
pleasantly situated for a Gentleman's country seat, com- 
manding an agreeable extensive prospect, as most in the 
province. If it should suit the purchaser, the mill will be 
sold separate from the farm, and accommodated with 
meadow, upland, timber, &c. 

Also near 500 acres of land in Oxford township, Sus- 
sex county, within a mile of Delaware river, on a creek 
commonly called Beaver-dam creek, at a well known place 
called Manungachung; it is kind land for grain: There 
is about 30 acres of excellent bottom or meadow ground 
along the said creek, great part of it cleared, and in tim- 
othy and spear grass, and produces a large quantity of 
hay yearly. It is divided into two convenient farms, and 
considerable improvements made on each. 

Also, 224 acres of land, lying at a place commonly 
called Scots Mountain, in the township of Greenwich, in 
said county of Sussex. It is good land for wheat, and 
some meadow might be made thereon, there is a good 
part of the land cleared, and considerable improvements 
made thereon. 

Also one. equal undivided half part o*f 600 acres of land, 
situate at the head of what is called the Little Pond, which 
is the head of the South Branch of Rariton River, being 
in the county of Morris. There is about 200 acres of nat- 
ural meadow and cripple swamp, the soil is as deep and 
good as any of the kind in the county, being very natural 
for hemp and flax. There is a number of acres thereof 
improved and in good grass. There are two settlements 
on the premises, part of the upland cleared, and produces 
good wheat, Indian corn &c. 

Also one undivided fourth part of a forge situate on 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 49 

Musconnetcung River, in the county of Sussex aforesaid, 
with about 2000 acres of wood land well timbered ; being 
the same forge which was advertised sometime ago in the 
Pennsylvania Gazette. 

It is expected that one third part 'of the purchase money 
will be paid down, one third part at a year, and the re- 
maining third part at the end of two years from the time 
of purchasing. For farther information apply to Theo- 
dorus Van Wyck, Esq ; near Coenties Market, New- York, 
or the subscriber living on the first mentioned premises, 
who will give an indisputable title to all, or any of the 
above described premises. 

GEORGE READING 

The Ne^v York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1 2 10, March 13, 1766. 

The Ship Ellis, Capt. Egdon, from London, for this 
port, with dry goods, was drove ashore on Abescomb * 
Beach, in a hard gale o>f wind, on the first instant. Soon 
after her masts were carried away, and she fast aground; 
the Captain, Charles Willson, Esq; appointed Collector 
of his Majesty's Customs at Amboy, and a sailor of the 
name of Willson, got into the boat to try for the shore, 
but the fast breaking from the ship, the boat soon overset, 
the two Willson's were drowned, and the Captain with 
much difficulty got on shore ; the remainder of the people 
stayed on board that night, and in the morning, the tide 
being very low, they easily got ashore : The vessel is en- 
tirely lost, the goods all damaged, and some of them lost, 
being thrown overboard to lighten the vessel. 

Last Saturday night, one of the sailors of the above 
ship was stopped at the Ferry opposite the City, with a 
waggon load of the goods, which he had plundered, and 

i Absecom. 



50 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Avas bringing- to this city. He has since been provided 
with a secure lodging, and storeage for his goods. 

We hear that a sloop, said to be from Teneriff, and a 
Schooner unknown, are ashore, near Egg-Harbour. 

Friday Night last, a flat loaded with staves and fire- 
wood, coming up the river, was overset near Gloucester, 
by a squall of wind, by which accident four men, (one 
of them named James M'Gill) were drowned. The flat 
drove on the Jersey-shore, in which was found the bodies 
of two o>f them, said to be the owners of the wood, &c. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia, Cleared. Schooner Su- 
sanna, R. Alberson to New-Jersey. 

By His EXCELLENCY 
WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esquire, 
Captain General and Governor in Chief in and over his 
Majesty's Province of New- Jersey, Chancellor and 
Vice-Admiral in the same, &c. 

A PROCLAMATION, 

WHEREAS it is represented to me by Mr. RICHARD 
FOOTMAN of the city of Philadelphia, Merchant, that the 
ship called the Ellis, whereof Samuel Richardson Egdon 
was master, did lately in a violent storm drive ashore on 
Abescomb Beach, in the county of Gloucester in this prov- 
ince, whereby the vessel was lost; that some part of the 
cargo by the care and vigilance of the master is landed, 
and that the owners of said vessel have suffered damage 
from some evil and wickedly disposed persons plundering 
and secreting part of the said cargo. AND WHEREAS such 
practices are highly criminal and tend to reflect dishonour 
on his Majesty's government of this province, THESE ARE 
therefore in his Majesty's name to charge and command 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 51 

all Justices of the peace, Sheriffs, and all other civil and 
military Officers within this government, that on this or 
any like future occasion, they do* to the utmost of their 
power assist and protect all persons under the misfortune 
of shipwreck in saving and securing the goods and mer- 
chandizes in such wreck contained, and that the said civil 
officers do apprehend and commit (or cause the same to be 
done) to the goal of the respective counties, all and every 
person or persons who> shall be found plundering o>r steal- 
ing any of the effects belonging to such vessels or cargoes, 
and to search any places which shall be proved to> be sus- 
picious, for any goods or effects so* plundered or stolen, 
as they will answer the contrary at their peril. 
GIVEN under my hand and seal at arms at the City 01 

Burlington the eighth day of March, in the sixth year 

of his Majesty's reign, one thousand seven hundred & 

sixty six. 
By his Excellency's command 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. 

CHARLES READ, Secretary. 

Burlington, New- Jersey, March 13. 
RUN- AW AY last night, from Doctor Thomas Ware, in 
Burlington, an Irish servant girl named JOHANNA DUNA- 
GAN, aged about 20 years middle stature, brown complex- 
ion, grey eyes, and a down look, short black curled hair, 
much like that of a molatto, pretty much pock marked, has 
a very short walk, and is given to liquor; had on and took 
with her, an old camblet and two callicoe gowns, one 
marked with spade and club, a quilt petticoat, one side 
callimancoe, the other linsey woolsey, a pair of shoes that 
has been cap'd and scaled, white worsted and other stock- 
ings, a white straw bonnet, with a green ribbon round the 
edge and crown, a short red cloth cardinal much worn, 
also a black silk short cloak, two coarse and one fine shifts, 



52 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

a black silk handkerchief. She has several other things 
out of the house. Whoever takes up said servant, and 
secures her so that she may be had again, shall have FIVE 
POUNDS reward, and reasonable charges paid by 

THOMAS WARE. 

N. B. It is suspected she is gone off with some sol- 
diers. 

FIVE POUNDS, Reward. 
Made his escape from the Subscriber, constable, of the 

town of Gloucester. 

A CERTAIN John Holland, an Irishman, about 5 feet, 9 
or 10 inches high, well set, wears his own black hair 
curled, he is of a ruddy complexion very low spoken, Had 
on when he went away, a brownish nap't jacket, with a 
cuff to it, a red under jacket double breasted, a check 
shirt, light coloured, plush breeches, light yarn or worsted 
stockings, and old shoes with silver buckles: he mostly 
wears a silver watch. It is very likely he may change his 
cloaths, as he has sundry other good cloaths. Any person 
that will take up and secure said prisoner, shall have the 
above reward paid by 

JOHN CRAWFORD, Constable. 

To cover MARES the ensuing Season, 
At Mr. ROBERT RHEA'S, in Freehold, near Monmouth 
Court-House, East-New-Jersey, at THREE POUNDS Jer- 
sey proclamation for each mare; 

The famous black HORSE called 

FREDERICK. 

Imported two years ago from ENGLAND. 

HE is full fifteen hands high, and is allowed by good 

judges to be the most compleat made horse in America. 

. . . . He was got by a son of Hobgoblin's, out of 

Lord Godolphin's golden-lock mare. His dam was the 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 53 

famous Fire tail mare, belonging to Mr. William Croffts, 
of Suffolk. Good pasture for mares, and proper care 
taken of them, at one shilling and six pence per week. 

N. B. As sundry persons in Pennsylvania have ex- 
pressed a desire of sending mares to- said horse, if they 
could have convenient opportunity; these are to* inform 
them or any others that will bring their mares to Phila- 
delphia by the first day of May, that they shall be sent 
down to the horse without any expence to them, more 
than the ferriage and grain upon the road, and when they 
have done with the horse, shall be returned to Philadel- 
phia again in the same manner, accidents excepted, by 
applying to JOHN RHEA in Market-street, opposite the 
Indian King tavern. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, will be exposed to 
sale on the fifth day of April next, between the hours of 
twelve and five o'clock on the premises; a plantation, sit- 
uate in the township of Waterford, bounded on Cooper's 
creek, about four miles from Philadelphia, containing 
three hundred and fifty acres, be the same more or less, 
twenty acres of which are meadow, and a large quantity 
mo<re may be made with ease, as the whole are included 
by a very short bank, likewise a good dwelling house, 
kitchen, barn, outhouses, a good orchard and other im- 
provements on the same, it is very convenient to attend 
Philadelphia market, & the soil extream for producing 
market truck. The whole late the property of Charles 
Day, deceased, taken in execution by me. 

ROBERT F. PRICE, Sheriff. 

To BE SOLD, 

By the subscriber living in Princeton, New- Jersey; 
A Commodious and well finished GRIST MILL, standing 
on the river Millstone, about two miles and a half or three 



54 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

miles from Princeton, and within a quarter of a mile of 
Kingstown on the New- York road, with two pair of 
stones, merchant and country bolts all new; a convenient 
small dwelling house, two rooms, a cellar, and a store 
room shelved, and ready to receive goods. There will be 
sold with the said mill and house, about twenty acres of 
land, sixteen or eighteen of which is improved meadow, 
and very good ; the stream on which the mill stands never 
wants water in the driest season; the country round 
about very good for wheat, and a very good stand for a 
shop of goods. The title is indisputable. 

EZEKIEL FORMAN. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1214, March 13, 
1766. 

West New-Jersey, Gloucester County, ss. 

Whereas on the sixth Day of March instant, a certain 
Negroe Man, named Cato, was taken out of the Custody 
of one Theophilus Kellum, of this County, and brought 
before me the Subscriber, one of his Majesty's Justices of 
the Peace for the said County, on Suspicion that said Kel- 
lum had illegally taken him from the proper Owner; and 
on Examination the said Negroe says, that he was pur- 
chased by the Widow Plowman, some Time this Winter, 
from one William Baker, both of South-Carolina, about 
100 Miles from Charlestown, towards the Indian Settle- 
ment ; that the said Theophilus Kellum, who* then passed 
by the Name of John Rhoads, was a Manageer or Over- 
seer for the Widow Plowman, when she purchased him, 
and that some Time after, by Consent of his Mistress to 
look out a young Negroe Wench, for a Wife for the said 
Cato, Kellum and he set out for Charlestown, but instead 
of going there, they made for this Province, where Kel- 
lunrs Family lives, and brought the Negroe with him, 
who refuses to live with him, and is desirous of returning 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 55 

to his Mistress. This is therefore to notify the said Wid- 
ow Plowman, or whoever has a Property in the said Ne- 
groe Cato, that he is now in the Custody of Richard West- 
cote, on Little Egg-Harbour River, in this County, and 
that they are desired to make their Claim known as soon 
as possible. 

JOHN HINCHMAN. 

N. B. The said Kellum has a Bill of Sale for the Ne- 
groe, made to him by William Baker, in the Name of John 
Rhoads. 

To be SOLD, by Way of Bargain, 
A Plantation, situate in Evesham Township, Burling- 
ton County, about two Miles from a navigable Landing, 
on Rancocus Creek, about 12 Miles from Philadelphia, 
containing 160 Acres o<f exceeding good Wheat Land, 
about 100 Acres cleared, and divided into convenient 
Fields; the whole under good Fence, Part of which is 
Cedar; all the rough Land is well timbered, with a good 
Dwelling-house, a large Kitchen, and new Barn, a well 
of good Water near the Door, a young bearing Orchard 
of exceeding good Fruit; there may be about 8 Acres of 
good Meadow made near the House. Also to be sold with 
the Premises, about 6 Acres of drained Meadow, within 
good Bank, within two Miles of said Plantation!. Any 
Person inclining to purchase may know the Terms, by ap- 
plying to 1 the Subscriber, living on the adjoining Planta- 
tion, or to John Coxe, in Moore's Town. 

JAMES BORDEN. 

WHEREAS the Sale of Joseph Borden's Plantation, in 
Pilesgrove, Salem County, has been several Times ad- 
journed; now this is to give Notice, that the said Planta- 
tion, containing 300 Acres of good Land, situate in a fine 
Wheat Country, with a good Dwelling-house, Barn and 



56 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Orchard thereon, will be sold in the Town of Salem, on 
the first of April next, between the Hours of 12 and 5 in 
the Afternoon. Any Persons having Mortgages on the 
same are desired to send an Account thereof at the Day, 
where Attendance will be given by me. 

EDWARD TEST, Sheriff. 

Burlington, February 28, 1766. 

THIS Day was committed to the Goal of this City, a 
certain Lad, who goes by the Name of John Gallahan, 
alias M'Daniel, alias Read; he says he belongs to one 
Daniel Gass, who lives on the Forks of Brandywine, and 
that his Master is a Tanner by Trade. Said Servant is 
about 1 8 or 19 Years of Age, has on a light homespun 
Jacket, with round Cuffs, and Metal Buttons, old Leather 
Breeches, with Brass Buttons at the Knees, old blue 
Stockings, and old Shoes, with Pieces o-f Leather on the 
Out-sides of the Quarters. Whoever owns said Servant, 
is desired to come and pay Charges, and take him away, 
otherwise he will be sold out for the same by me. 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1942, March 13, 
1766. 

Trenton, March 15, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, Judges of the Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas for the County of Hunterdon, upon the 
Petition of Charles Hoff, of said County, and the major 
Part in Value of his Creditors, Notice is hereby given to 
all the Creditors of the said Charles Hoff, that Monday, 
the 1 4th Day of April next, is appointed by the said 
Judges for the said Creditors to meet at the Court-House 
in Trenton, at 3 o' Clock in the Afternoon, to shew Cause, 
if any they have, why the said Charles Hoff should not 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 57 

assign over all his Estate and Effects, and be admitted to 
the Benefit of an Act of this Province of New-Jersey, 
lately passed at Burlington, intituled "An Act for the Re- 
lief of insolvent Debtors." 

Trenton, March 10, 1766. 

WHEREAS William Morris and William Clayton, Es- 
quires, two of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace, for the 
County of Hunterdo<n, and Judges of the inferior Court of 
Common Pleas for the said County, have granted the Re- 
quest of a Petition and Recommendation of Robert Tay- 
lor, jun. and Samuel Smith, and the major Part in Value 
of the Creditors of the said Robert Taylor, jun. and Sam- 
uel Smith; this is to give Notice, that the said Judges 
have appointed Wednesday, the 2d Day of April next, for 
the Creditors of the said Robert Taylor, and Samuel 
Smith, to appear at Trenton, at 10 o'Clock in the Fore- 
noon of the said 2d of April, and shew Cause, if any they 
have, why the said Debtors Estates should not be as- 
signed, and they discharged, according to Law. 

County of Salem, March 7, 1766. 
The Subscriber hereby gives Notice, that he intends to 
make Application to the General Assembly of the Prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, at their next Sessions, for an Act for 
the more effectual keeping up, supporting and maintain- 
ing the Tide Banks, Dams and Sluices, belonging to the 
Meadows lying on the South Side of Alloway's Creek, 
between the Lands of the Subscriber and Stretch's Land, 
to include all the said Meadows, as far up as the Bank 
that goes from the Land of William Adams to Richard 
Moore's Point, called Wolf-Pit Point, including the said 
Bank. 

WILLIAM HANCOCK. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1943, March 20, 
1766. 



58 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

New-York, March 20. At a Meeting of the Society 
for promoting ARTS, &c. held at the Exchange the 3d of 

March, 1766 A Letter was communicated to 

the Society, by Mr. Bayard, from John Berrien, Esq; of 
New-Jersey; and the several different Samples of home 
manufactured Stuffs produced with it, were look'd upon 
by the Society, as a considerable Improvement in that 
Branch, which deserves to be enco-uraged. 

) PURSUANT to an Order of the Hon. 

New- Jersey j- ss. Frede rick Smyth, Esq; Chief Jus- 
tice, and the Hon. John Berrien, third Judge of the Su- 
preme Court of Judicature, for the Province of New- 
Jersey, upon the Petition of Thomas Leonard, an insol- 
vent Debtor in the Gaol of the County of Somerset : No- 
tice is hereby given by the said Petitioner to all his Cred- 
itors, to shew Cause (if any they have) before the said 
Judges, on Thursday the tenth Day of April next, at the 
City of Perth Amboy, at Nine o' Clock in the Forenoon 
of said Day, why an Assignment of the Estate of the said 
Thomas Leonard, should not be made to Persons then and 
there to be nominated by the said Judges, pursuant to the 
said Petition, and the said Thomas Leonard be thereupon 
discharged from his said Confinement, agreeable to the 
Directions of an Act of the Governor, Council and Gen- 
eral Assembly of the said Province of New- Jersey, made 
in the Fifth Year of his present Majesty's Reign, entitled 
"An Act for the Relief of insolvent Debtors." Dated the 
1 3th of March, 1766. The New York Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No. 121 1, March 20, 1766. 

TO BE SOLD Or LET, 

by the subscriber, 

A Fine grist mill, with two pair of stones, fit for coun- 
try or merchant work, together with sixty acres of ex.- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 59 

ceeding good rich lands (the greatest part of which may 
be mowed) a dwelling house, kitchen, barn and stable, 
orchard, &c. with the advantage of having an opportunity 
of purchasing a fine improved tract of land adjoining the 
same, and may be entered upon immediately, situate in 
Hunterdon county, New Jersey, on Stony brook, a branch 
of Millstone which empties into Raritan river, being about 
12 miles from Trentown, three miles from Pennington, 
and 20 miles from Brunswick, lying in a good and plenti- 
ful wheat country, convenient for either the New-York 
or Philadelphia markets For further particu- 
lars apply to Henry Woolsey, Esq; at Pennington, Abra- 
ham Cotnam, Esq ; at Trenton, or to John, Peter, or Isaac 
Wikoff in Philadelphia. 

New-Jersey, Gloucester, ss. March 20. 
PURSUANT to an order of Alexander Randall and Sam- 
uel Harrison, Esqrs; two of the judges of the court of 
Common Pleas, for the county O'f Gloucester aforesaid; 
.Notice is hereby given, to all the creditors of FRANCIS 
REDCAP, an insolvent debtor now confined in Gloucester 
goal, that on the petition of the said Francis Redcap, with 
the major part in value o<f his creditors, the judges afore- 
said have appointed Friday the 4th day of April next, for 
the creditors of the said Francis Redcap to meet at the 
Court-house in the town of Gloucester, to shew cause, if 
any they have, why an assignment of the said insolvent 
debtor's estate should not be made, and the debtor dis- 
charg'd, agreeable to the late act of General Assembly 
made for that purpose. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1215, March 20, 1766. 

LOST ON Tuesday the 25th Inst. a large silk wrought 
Pocket-Book, ty'd with a Black Ribbon, and has the 
Owners Name wrought on it; in the Book there were 



60 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Three Six Pound Bills, One Three Pound, One Fifteen 
Shillings, and One Six Shilling Bills, all Jersey Money, 
and several Notes of Hand and other valuable Papers, of 
no Use to any but the Owner. Any Person that has 
found the above Book, and will leave it at the Printing- 
Office, at the Exchange, with the Papers, shall have what 
Cash was therein, and no Questions ask'd. 

On the seventh Day of April next, will be sold on the 
Premises at publick Vendue, or at private Sale 

any Time before. 

A Plantation belonging to' the Estate o>f William Mel- 
van, of the southern Ward of the City of Perth- Amboy, 
deceased, containing about four hundred Acres, of which 
sixty Acres is good salt Meadow, joining the said Planta- 
tion; and about seventy Acres of Upland cleared and in 
Fence. A good dwelling House, two Rooms on a Floor, 
a Fire Place in each, Lentoes, and a Cellar under; a young 
bearing Orchard, well watered, a large quantity of Tim- 
ber on the Land; convenient to Landings for Transpor- 
tation to Amboy or New- York. Title good, the Payments 
may be made easy, as several o>f the Legatees are very 
young. For further Particulars, inquire of the Subscrib- 
ers, living on and near the Premises, which joins the 
Creek of Chesequakes and the Plantation of Nicholas 
Everton, Esq; the Vendue to begin at 10 o' Clock. 
South Ward of Perth- Amboy, 
the 1 8th Day of March, 1766. 

Nicholas Everton, ) ^ 
James Melvan. 

WHEREAS John Ashton, an insolvent Debtor, and the 
major Part in Value of his Creditors, have presented their 
Petition to John Anderson and Robert Montgomerie, two 
of his Majesty's Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6 1 

for the County of Monmouth, praying that the Estate of 
the said John Ashton be assigned to such Persons as such 
Petitioners shall appoint, to dispose of the same for the 
Benefit of said Creditors, pursuant to an Act o>f the Gen- 
eral Assembly, &c. of the Province of New-Jersey, en- 
titled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent Debtors." 
These are therefore to give Notice to all Persons that have 
any Demands on him, the said John Ashton to appear at 
the Court House in said County of Monmouth, the 22d 
Day of April next, to shew cause, (if any there be) why 
the said John Ashton, may not be discharged according 
to the above recited Act. John Anderson, 

Robert Montgomerie. 

Essex County. ) PURSUANT to an Order made by 

New-Jersey, ) ss ' Jonathan Hampton and Daniel 
Preston, Esquires, two of the Judges of the inferior Court 
of Common Pleas for the said County, upon the Petition 
of David Frazee, of Ash-Swamp, in the said County, an 
insolvent Debtor, now confined in the Gaol oi the said 
County, and the Majority of his Creditors, Notice is 
hereby given to all the Creditors of the said David Frazee, 
that they appear at the Court-House of the said County, 
on Friday, the nth Day of April next, at 2 o'clock in the 
Afternoon, before the said Judges, to show Cause if any 
they have, why an Assignment of the Estate of the said 
David Frazee should not be made to Trustees to be then 
appointed for that Purpose, and the said David be there- 
upon discharged from his Confinement according to Law. 
Dated March 18, 1766. 

To BE SOLD 
At public Vendue, the ninth Day of April next, on the 

Premises. 
THE whole Estate, real and personal, of Hendrick 



62 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Voorhees, late of Monmouth County in New- Jersey, de- 
ceased, except 50 Acres given to his Son William, and 
about 60 Acres now in Law with the Craigs : The Re- 
mainder of the Tract of Land, containing by Estimation 
370 Acres, situate in the County and Province aforesaid, 
2 Miles from Freehold Court-House, and 10 from the 
Landing, where Boats go and come to and from New- 
York. There is on the said Tract upwards of 200 Acres, 
clear'd, and in good Fence, with a sufficient Quantity of 
Meadow, clear'd and much more may be easily made; two 
very good Orchards, a good House, a Barn, and other out 
Houses; the Rest of the Tract well timbered, and the 
Whole well watered, as there are several Brooks running 
through it: Also a Lot of Salt Meadow, and Upland, 
situate at Barnegat, containing 30 Acres. The personal 
Estate to be sold, consists of Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs, 
Waggons, farming Utensils, Household Goods, and about 
70 Acres of green Grain on the Ground. ALSO 

To BE SOLD 

The 1 5th Day of April next, on the Premises, 
Another Tract of Land in the said County, 2 Miles 
from Cranbury Mills, containing 200 Acres; of which 
1 20 Acres are cleared, and in good Fence, some clear'd 
Meadow, and 20 Acres more may be made. There is a 
good Orchard and a new House on the said Tract, and 
the Remainder O'f it is well timber'd. The goodness of 
the Whole, which may be seen, is such as to make any 
other Recommendation unnecessary. 

The Conditions of Sale will be published at the Time, 
and a good and indisputable Title given to the Purchas- 
ers, by us, 

Peter Voorhees, ) 

David Williamson, V Exctrs. 

Dirick Zutphin, ) 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 63 

N. B. One Negro Woman and Child, to be sold at 
private sale. 

If the above Tracts of Land should not be sold, they 
will be let for i Year. The Nezv York Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No. 1 2 12, March 27, 1766. 

At a Meeting of the SONS OF LIBERTY of the Town- 
ship of Piscataway, in the County of Middlesex, and 
Province of East New- Jersey, the nth of March, 1766. 
It was unanimously Resolved. 

I. THAT we will cheerfully to the utmost of our 
Power, defend all our just Rights and Privileges, as they 
have always been heretofore allowed us. 

II. That we will oppose all Attempts to deprive us of 
our Rights and Privileges as Englishmen, and therefore 
will at all Events oppose the Operation of that detestable 
Thing called the Stamp Act in this Colony. 

III. That we will in all Cases behave ourselves peace- 
ably, and as far as our Influence extends will preserve 
the publick Peace, so far as that may be done, without 
suffering any Imposition on our just Rights and Liber- 
ties. 

IV. That we will by all Means in our Power, assist 
and protect all the Officers of Government in this Colony, 
who act consistent with their Duty and the Good of the 
Public. 

V. That we will always hold ourselves in Readiness, 
and with the utmost Cheerfulness assist any of the neigh- 
bouring Provinces, in Opposing every Attempt that may 
be made to deprive them and us of any of those Rights 
and Privileges we have heretofore enjoyed as English- 
men, and therefore do hold most sacred. 

And lastly, that we do bear true Allegiance to his most 
sacred Majesty King George the Third, acknowledge him 
as our rightful Sovereign, and will at all Times faithfully 



64 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

adhere to his Royal Person, and just Government, and 
heartily oppose every Attempt to injure his Person, 
Crown, or Dignity. Supplement to the New York 
Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, March 27, 1766. 

NEW-YORK 

March 24. A certain Gentleman, who goes by the 
Name of John Davis, alias Joseph Daniels, and lately 
brought into this Government a large Quantity of New- 
Jersey Bills of Credit, printed in England, was, a few 
Days ago, apprehended in Orange County, and commit- 
ted to Tappan Goal; and upon searching, it was found 
he had about him not less than 3500 1. of that Cash, all 
signed by himself, but he declared he never passed any of 
it. 

PHILADELPHIA, March 27. 

Saturday last Captain Campbell arrived here from 
Providence in 20 Days; he met with very hard Gales on 
our Coast, and on the i8th Instant, about 12 Leagues 
from our Capes, fell in with Mr. Cornelius Bowne, one 
of our Pilots, who had been blown off, and had sprung a 
Leak; Captain Campbell took him in Tow, and brought 
him into Cape-May; but was afterwards himself blown 
off, with his Anchor ahead, he was then obliged to take 
the People (five in Number) out of the Pilot Boat, and 
cut her adrift, as there was no Probability of keeping her 
above Water. 

At a Meeting of the SONS OF LIBERTY of Hunterdon 
County, in West Jersey, held at the House of John Ringo, 
in Amwell, on Tuesday, the i8th of March, 1766, it was 
unanimously declared, 

ist. THAT we profess ourselves to be influenced by 
Sentiments of the greatest Loyalty and Affection to His 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 65 

sacred Majesty King GEORGE the Third, and him will de- 
fend to the utmost of our Power, in his just and legal 
Rights of Government. 

2cl. At the same Time we conceive it the indubitable 
Right of British Subjects, to be taxed only by their own 
Representatives, and of Trials by Juries : We are there- 
fore of Opinion, that the Stamp Act is an arbitrary and 
tyrranical Imposition, that robs us of those inherent and 
darling Privileges, and as such, we are determined, in 
Conjunction with the Rest of the free born Subjects in 
America, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, to give 
effectual Opposition to its Intrusion. 

3d. We will likewise endeavour to support all Persons 
that proceed in Business as usual, without paying any 
Regard to said detestable Act. 

Trenton, March n, 1766. 
Hunterdon, ss. 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Hon. Frederick Smyth, 
Esq; and the Hon. Charles Read, Esq; Second Justice of 
the Province of New-Jersey, Notice is hereby given to all 
the Creditors of Joseph Burwell, an insolvent Debtor, that 
on the Petition of the said Joseph Burwell, with the major 
Part in Value of his* Creditors, the Judges aforesaid have 
appointed Wednesday, the i6th Day of April next, for 
the Creditors of the said Joseph Burwell to meet at the 
City of Perth- Amboy, at Ten of the Clock in the Fore- 
noon, to shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assign- 
ment o>f the said insolvent Debtor's Estates should not be 
made, and the said Debtor discharged, agreeable to the 
late Act of General Assembly, made and provided for 
that Purpose. 

To be SOLD, by way of public Vendue, on the Qth Day 
of April next, at 2 o' Clock in the Afternoon, 

A House and Lot of Land, containing 3 Acres, lying in 



66 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Mansfield, Burlington County, in West Jersey, adjoining 
and containing the Landing of English's Creek; the 
House new and finished, the Land fresh and very rich, 
and under good Fence, except about three Parts of an 
Acre, which is pretty sapling Timber; also a Garden, 
made with Chestnut Posts and Cedar Boards, and a never 
failing Spring, within a few Perches from the Door. It 
is a pretty Situation for a Gentleman's Country Seat, 
lying high, healthful and pleasant; or it may suit a 
Waterman or Storekeeper, being a Landing much used 
by both Land and Water, and is very convenient for tend- 
ing the Market, or almost any public Trade or Calling. 
It lies between 20 and 30 Miles from Philadelphia, 6 from 
Burlington, and 4 from Bordentown. The Title indis- 
putable. Any Person inclining to view the Premises be- 
fore the Day of Sale, may apply to JOSEPH ELLISON, 
near the same. 

N. B. The said Plantation will not be sold till the Day 
appointed. The Conditions of Sale shall be made known 
on said Day, and Attendance given by 

JAMES ELLISON. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that William Morris and 
William Clayton, Esquires, two of the Judges of the in- 
ferior Court of Common Pleas, for the County of Hunter- 
don, have appointed Tuesday, the 8th Day of April, for 
the Creditors of Samuel Ketcham, of Hopewell, in the 
County aforesaid, to appear at Trenton, in the said 
County, and then and there shew Cause, at 10 o' Clock of 
same Day, why the Petition of the said Samuel Ketcham, 
and the major Part in Value of his Creditors shall not be 
complied with, and he discharged according to Law. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1944, March 27, 1766. 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6/ 

To be SOLD by public Vendue, on the ist Day of May 
next, at 2 o' Clock in the Afternoon, on the Premises, 

A Lot of Land in Burlington, about Half a Mile below 
the main Street, containing near three Acres, with the 
burnt Buildings thereon (where Governor Belcher for- 
merly lived) pleasantly situated on Delaware, and com- 
mands an extensive View up and down the River. The 
Foundation of the Building is uncommonly good, and 
great Part of the Walls may be saved in rebuilding; there 
is a good Well and Milk-house in the Yard, and a Coach 
house, and other Buildings adjoining. 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, held in and for the County of Sussex, 
upon the Petitions of James Anderson, Richard Lanning 
and Jacobus Brink, insolvent Debtors, confined in Sussex 
County Goal, in New- Jersey, for Debt, together with the 
major Part of their Creditors, Notice is hereby given to 
all their Creditors, to shew Cause, if any they have, be- 
fore the said Judges, on the nth Day of April inst. at the 
Court-house, in Sussex, why an Assignment of the sev- 
eral Estates of the said Debtors should not be made to 
Assignees then and there to be appointed, for the Use of 
their Creditors, and the said Insolvents thereupon be dis- 
charged, according to an Act of Assembly intituled, "An 
Act for the Relief of insolvent Debtors." 

For COVERING this Season 
The HORSE ROEBECK, 

To be kept by the Subscriber, at Mountholly, in Bur- 
lington County, New Jersey, at Fifteen Shillings the 
Season, Twenty-five Shillings a Colt, or Five Shillings a 
single Leap; he is a famous well-made Horse, a good 
Sorrel, with Blaze and Snip, three white Feet, about fif- 



68 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

teen Hands high, rises eight Years old this Spring, an 
excellent Trotter, and came of a good Country Breed. 

GEORGE WEST. 

The Owners and Possessors of the Meadows, on the 
South Branch of Stoe Creek, the Division Line between 
Salem and Cumberland Counties, in the Province of West 
New- Jersey, intend to Petition the General Assembly of 
said Province, the next Sitting, to pass an Act for the 
maintaining and supporting the Sluices, Dams and Banks, 
on the said Creek. Bradway Keasbey, David Long, Re- 
becca Daniel, Jeremiah Bacon, David Briggs, Thomas 
Padgett. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1945, April 3, 
1766. 

Middlesex ( WHEREAS Justus Walker, an insol- 

County \ ss ' vent Debtor and the major Part in 
Value of his Creditors, did some Time ago Petition 
Stephen Skinner and Thomas Gach, Esquires, two of the 
Judges of the Court of Common Pleas of said County, 
for the Benefit of the insolvent Act, and at the Day ap- 
pointed for his Discharge, one of the said Judges did not 
attend, and in Consequence thereof, the said Insolvent 
could not be discharged. 

Now these are to give Notice to all the Creditors of the 
said Insolvent, to shew Cause, (if any they have) before 
the said Judges, or any two Judges of the Court afore- 
said, at the House of Elijah Dunham, in Perth- Amboy, 
on Saturday the Nineteenth of April next, why an As- 
signment of the said Insolvent's Estate should not be 
made to Assignees, agreeable to the Prayer of the afore- 
said Petition, and he thereupon discharged accordingly. 

March 14, 1766. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that there will 'be exposed to 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 69 

Sale, by Way of public Vendue, on Tuesday the I5th Day 
of April next: The Plantation of William Hamton, an 
insolvent Debtor, lying in the County of Monmouth, 
within about 5 Miles of Middletown Point, containing 
about 500 Acres, about 100 Acres thereof cleared, a con- 
siderable Quantity of good Meadow, and a vast deal more 
may be cleared, and an extraordinary good Outlet for 
Cattle. There is also* on said Plantation, a very good 
Grist-Mill and Saw-Mill, and other good Buildings. The 
said Plantation is to be sold altogether or in Lots, at the 
Choice of the Bidders, as it is a very suitable Place for 
Trade and Tradesmen. The Vendue to be held o>n the 
Premises, and to begin at Ten- o' Clock, at which Time 
and Place the Conditions of Sale will be published, by 

us, 

John Van Cleaf ) 

and > Assignees. 

Samuel Forman ) 
Freehold, 29th March, 1766. 

THIS will inform the Public, that it is the Design of 
the Subscriber to open a GRAMMAR SCHOOL, on the 2Oth 
Day of April, at Hackensack, under the Inspection and 
Direction of the Rev. Mr. Goetschius. All Gentlemen 
who are disposed to have their Sons instructed in the 
learned Languages, as being very necessary and useful 
to a farther Progress in the liberal Arts and Sciences, 
may depend upon a constant Attendance, a strict and ac- 
curate Instruction, by their humble Servant, 

STEPHANUS VOORHEES, A. M. 1 

N. B. The Terms of Admission, will be as moderate 
as in any Latin School perhaps to be found, viz. Twenty 
Shillings entrance, and Twenty Shillings per Quarter. 

1 For a sketch of the Rev. Stephen Voorhees, see N. J. Archives, 
XXIII., . 



7O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

It is supposed by Gentlemen who are well acquainted in 
the Place, that Board and Tuition, will not exceed 
Twenty Pounds per Annum. The agreeable Situation 
of the Place, together with many other Conveniences, I 
hope will be a considerable Motive to engage the Atten- 
tion of such Gentlemen as are disposed to have their Sons 
educated. 

To BE SOLD, 

At public Vendue, on Saturday the iQth Day of this 
Instant April, at the House of David Williamson, Inn- 
holder, on the York Road, between Cranbury and Amboy 
Ferry. 

A Certain Tract of Land and Plantation containing- 
about 260 Acres, situate and lying on the East Side of 
the said York and the Stage Road, and within the Cor- 
poration of New-Brunswick, opposite said Williamsons. 
There is about 50 Acres cleared, and within Fence, the 
Rest well wooded, and is about 7 Miles from Brunswick, 
and 5 from South River Landing, to which there is an 
excellent Road for carting Wood for the York Market, 
which frequently sells at three Pounds or more a Cord. 
Its Situation on so Public a Road, makes it very conve- 
nient for a Tavern, Store, &c. besides the Advantage, of 
having a good Farm. The purchaser may have Time 
given him for Payment of the purchase Money, and an 
indisputable Title. 

JURY AH VANARSDALEN 

NEW-JERSEY 

To BE RUN FOR, 

At the City of Perth-Amboy, on Thursday the ist Day 
of May next, being the Day appointed by the Charter for 
holding the Fair: 

A PURSE of TWENTY POUNDS, free for any Horse, 
Mare, or Gelding, not more than half Blood, carrying 9 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 7 I 

Stone, the best of 3 Heats, 2 Miles to each Heat; the 
Horses to be entered with Elijah Dunham, or William 
Wright, on or before Saturday the 26th of April, paying 
2 Dollars Entrance, or 4 at the Post, to run according to 
the usual Articles. The Entrance Money will be run for 
on Friday the 2d May. Not less than four Horses will be 
allowed to start for the Purse. 
Perth-Amboy, March 24, 1766. 

Middlesex County. ) PURSUANT to an Order of 

New- Jersey, ) Thomas Gach, and James Par- 

ker, Esqrs. two of the Judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas, for the County of Middlesex, upon the Petitions 
of Arthur Denniston, and John Voorhise, insolvent Debt- 
ors, and the majority of their Creditors, in value; Notice 
is hereby given by the Petitioners, to all the Creditors of 
said Arthur Denniston and John Voorhise, to shew 
Cause, if any they have, before the said Judges, on Sat- 
urday the 26th Day of April next, at 2 o'clock of the 
same Day, at the House of Thomas Gach, in Woodbridge, 
in the County of Middlesex aforesaid, why an Assign- 
ment of the Estate of the said Arthur and John, should 
not be made, -thus to be appointed, and the said Dennis- 
ton and John Voorhise be thereupon discharged, agree- 
able to the Directions of an Act of the Governor, Council, 
and General Assembly of this Province, made in the Year 
of our Lord 1765, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of in- 
solvent Debtors." Dated the 26th day of March 1766. 
The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1213, 
April 3, 1766. 

New- Jersey, April 3. At a Meeting of the Sons of 
Liberty of the Township of Freehold, in the County of 
Monmouth, and Province of East New-Jersey, this 2d 
Day of April, 1766. Animated with Zeal and Love for 



72 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

the Good of our Country, at the same Time paying- due 
Obeyance to, and having the highest Esteem for, the 
Honour of the British Parliament, &c. In Order to shew 
our public Disapprobation to the late Act of Parliament, 
to wit, The STAMP ACT; therefore, We, the Sons of Lib- 
erty, do unanimously enter into the following Resolves : 

I. WE acknowledge King George the Third, to be 
our rightful and only Sovereign, and we will, to the ut- 
most of our Power, support, maintain and defend, all his 
just and legal Rights of Government. 

2d. That we will to the utmost of our Powers, sup- 
port, maintain and defend, all our Rights and Privileges, 
as English Subjects. 

3dly. That the Act, called the Stamp Act, is by us 
deemed unconstitutional, and destructive to our sacred 
Rights and Privileges ; and that we are resolved to oppose 
it to the utmost of our Powers, if the glorious Cause of 
Liberty requires it. 

4thly. That we will, with all our Might, join with the 
several Towns and Counties, in this, and the several 
neighbouring Provinces, and all others, who are the true 
Sons of Liberty, to uphold, and ever maintain that near 
and dear Friend Liberty, as far as our Might, Influence, 
and Power extends. 

5thly. That a Committee be appointed to correspond 
with the Committees of this, and the neighbouring Prov- 
inces, to consult on the properest Measures, to prevent the 
said Stamp Act from taking Place; and that these our 
Resolves be made Public. 

6thly. That we will from Time to Time, as much as 
in our Power lies, keep and maintain his Majesty's Peace 
and good Order in our respective Stations. 

7thly, and lastly. That w r e do hereby proclaim our 
selves the true Sons of Liberty, and firmly join our selves 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 73 

in the solemn Union with the Rest of our Brethern in this 
and the neighbouring Provinces, to hold and maintain our 
dear Friend, Liberty. 

New-York, April 10. We hear from New- Jersey, that 
on the 25th of March last, a barbarous Murder was com- 
mitted there on the Road between Woodbridge and Pis- 
cataway, upon a Man who was travelling on Foot from 
New- York to Philadelphia, and by a Paper found in his 
Pocket, appeared to have been one of the back Settlers 
whose Habitation and Effects were destroyed by the Indi- 
ans, on which Account he had been recommended to the 
charitable Assistance of the Public. 

It appeared that he had changed or shewn 4 or 5 seven 
Pound Bills upon the Road, and that 2 Men dressed like 
Sailors, who were likewise travelling on Foot the same 
Way, sometimes before and sometimes behind him, had 
often joined his Company, and from Woodbridge, at J:heir 
Request travelled with him. That they called at several 
Taverns, and went from the last in the Night. He seemed 
inclined to stay there all Night, but was persuaded by the 
Sailors to go on to Brunswick. It is supposed they mur- 
dered him soon after. A considerable Quantity of Blood 
was found in the Road, and a bloody Stick near it : The 
same Night these two Sailors called up the Ferryman at 
Brunswick, and crossed the Ferry, and as they went over, 
were quarreling together about the Division of some 
Money. The Body of the murdered Man was dragged 
out of the Road, over a Fence, and covered with Leaves, 
&c. where it lay a Week, and was discovered by a Man 
who accidentally crossing the Fence at the same Place, 
jumped upon the Body. The Murderers are not yet taken 
up. 

Monmouth County, in New- Jersey. 

THIS is to give Notice to the Creditors of William 



74 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Lawrence, an Insolvent that they show Reasons, if any 
they have to offer, why his Estate, real and personal, may 
not be assigned for the Use of his Creditors, according 
to the Directions of the late insolvent Act, and he be dis- 
charged, by the Honourable John Anderson and Robert 
Montgomerie, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of 
said County Court, for holding of Pleas, on Thursday the 
ist Day of May next. 

March 17, 1766. William Lawrence. 

FOR SALE, 

AN Estate in New-Jersey, in Morris County, and 
Township of Mendham, known by the Name of Hercules 
Yeng's; containing Two hundred and Twenty-seven 
Acres, 80 of which (if not more) are good cleared Land 
in Fence; the Rest good Timber Land, with a large 
Brook through the Middle of the same, a good spring 
Well 20 Yards from the Dwelling House, which never 
freezes, a good Dwelling House with a good Cellar under 
it, 3 Rooms on a Floor, with 2 Fire Places, a good Kitch- 
en and Barn, a Garden, an Orchard, a great many Cherry 
and Peach Trees, a good Iron Mine, the best Outlet for 
Cattle in the Jersies, on Suckesana Plains; the public 
Road runs past the Door that leads up to Sussex County 
and Court House, it is a Mile from a Meeting House, and 
12 Miles from Morris Town and Court House: If not 
sold soon, it will be let for six or seven Years, as it may 
suit; or bartered for any Place in New- York. A Third 
of the Purchase Money will be required, with Security, 
&c. Inquire o*f Joseph French, at Mr. Christopher 
Sweedland's, at White Hall, New- York. 

N. B. There is a Market for every Thing at the Door, 
as the County abounds with Iron Works, and is thick 
settled. 

April 4, 1766. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 75 

To BE LET, 

THE noted Tavern in Elizabeth Town, known by the 
Name of the White House 1 (lately belonging to Col. Peter 
Schuyler). There are 8 good Rooms besides a Kitchen, 
good arched Cellars, a fine large Garden, well laid out, 
and stored with Peaches, Pears, Rasberries, Currants, and 
a fine large Bed of Asparagus, with a Barn and Stable, a 
good Wharf, that Craft of 20 Ton may come to. Any 
Person that Rents the above, may have a good Pasture, 
the other Side of the Street, on easy Terms. 

Likewise there is to be sold in the Center of said Town 
opposite said White House, sundry Lots of Land, very 
suitable for building upon, and a large Tract of salt 
Meadow in Raway Meadows, near said Town; also the 
said White House and Premises. Any Time of Payment 
required, will be given, having Interest yearly paid, and 
an indisputable Title given for the same, by 

Jonathan Hampton 
Elias Dayton 

Elizabeth Town, March 5, 1766 

To BE SOLD OR LET, 

A Large House, Lot and Stables, pleasantly situated 
in the City of Perth-Amboy, with a good Garden well 
stored with the choicest Collection of Fruit-Trees. The 
Person inclining to purchase or hire the said House and 
Lot, may be accommodated with seven Acres of extreme 
good mowing Ground. For further Particulars, inquire 
of Mr. James Thompson, Merchant in New York, or 
David Johnston, at Greenwich. 

i Supposed by Hatfield to have been the first Government House in 
East Jersey. See Hatfield' s Elizabeth, 212, note. But see paper by 
Ernest L. Meyer, on "The Site of the First Government House in East 
Jersey," in 3 N. J. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, III., 52. 



76 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

FIVE POUNDS REWARD. 

ON Wednesday Night last, was stolen from the Town 
Dock at Newark, a Petti-Augre, about 30 Feet long, and 
5 Feet wide, 2 Masts, Booms, Sails, Lee-Boards, Rudder 
and Tiller, with all necessary Rigging and Furniture: 
Had on Board in the Forcastle, a Fowling Piece, Brass- 
mounted, mark'd on the Lock thus I J U, a Pair of Ticken 
Trowsers, a Basket of Eggs, i Basket of Provision, a Bag 
fill'd with Hay, and some loose Hay in the Forecastle, and 
a Barrel of fresh Water. 

The Forecastle is pretty long, painted with Spanish 
Brown, the Rudder has a Piece nail'd on the Head, to 
strengthen it, the Masts cased with Leather, where they 
enter the Deck. Five Dollars Reward for the Craft, &c. 
and Three Pounds besides if the Villains are taken, will 
be paid by Jqseph Riggs, Esq; at Newark, John Ute, or 
the Printer in New- York. The New York Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, No. 1214, April 10, 1766. 

NEW YORK, April 7. 

Last Tuesday was found, a few yards from the road, 
between Woodbridge and Brunswick, in New- Jersey, the 
body of a man covered over with a little earth, and some 
leaves; and upon examination, it was found that he had 
been murdered but a few days before, by receiving many 
violent blows on the skull, by sticks or stones : 'Tis sup- 
posed to be a poor man that lived in Philadelphia; was 
formerly in his majesty's service; had been to the north- 
ward among his friends for a little assistance, and return- 
ing home about ten days since, was seen in company with 
two sailors, \vithin a mile of the place where the body was 
found, at a tavern, where he unfortunately pulled out 
some of the cash his friends had supplied him with. 

On Sunday night an express arrived here, dispatched 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 77 

by the Sons of Liberty of Baltimore in Maryland, to the 
Sons of Liberty here, with the following glorious news. 

Baltimore, April 3, 1766, 8 o'clock at night. 
"About a quarter of an hour ago Mr. Ploughman came 
here from Lower Marlborough and brings a letter from 
Mr. George Maxwell, of Benedict, on Patuxent river, to 
Mr. Charles Graham, of Marlborough, advising him of 
the arrival of Capt. Brook from London, and his receiv- 
ing by him a letter from Messrs. R. and J. Day, merchants 
in London, dated the 8th of February, in which they say, 
"We congratulate you on the repeal of the Stamp Act, 
"which, thanks to God, is just now resolved here by a 
"very great majority in parliament." On which I sin- 
cerely congratulate you and all lovers of Liberty." . . . . 
This account, it is thought, there is great reason to be- 
lieve, as all the gentlemen mentioned in it are persons of 

the highest credit And what seems to strengthen 

the above intelligence is, that a gentleman o<f this place, 
ten day's ago, met another from Virginia, in the Jersies, 
who told him, that he left York Town the 27th of March, 
that the day before a vessel arrived there from London, 
in 43 days passage, which brought letters to the tenth of 
February, one of which to Colonel Ayres, and which the 
gentleman saw, wherein the writer tells him the Stamp 
Act was REPEALED, whereof he gave him joy. 

By an express arrived yesterday from Cape-May, we 
have the following 

Letter from Cape-May, dated April 7th, 1766. 

"I am persuaded the following lines will relate distress 
and sadness to you : However I am bound to< rehearse 
and to tell you, that on the 6th day of this instant, on 
Hereford Bar, which is about 4 leagues N. E. of the pitch 
of the Cape of Cape May, the poor unfortunate snow 
Nancy, Capt. Carr, from Bristol, was, by a violent gale 



78 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

of wind at E. N. E. forced on shore and is become a for- 
lorn wreck, which proved a watry coffin to all, except four 
persons, who only escaped out of a crew of 27 in number, 
the captain and mate are of the drowned, and some others 
of note and distinction : many of their dead bodies are 
drifted on shore, and some goods also. 

''Humanity would teach me to exert myself, and use 
the utmost of my care, which I purpose to do without any 
other licence 'till I receive further orders, or see some of 
you; by all means let some interested person or persons 
come down immediately on sight hereof, with the bearer; 
the dead I shall keep till the bearer returns, and not suf- 
fer to be cramed in the sand I saw them, poor 

hearts, in the height of their distress, where wind and sea 
had no pity, but could do no more than regret and sym- 
pathize with my fellow mortals, while overwhelm'd with 
calamities in the raging waves." 

Yesterday arrived Captain Whitemarsh from Boston, 
who informs us, that at 4 o'clock P. M. on Sunday last, 
he saw a ship or snow ashore on Turtle-Gut Bar, 7 miles 
east of Cape-May; her masts and bowsprit were gone, 
and nothing but her ensign staff, with a waiff in the en- 
sign, as a signal of distress, was standing; he could see 
the surf break over her, but the w r eather being thick, and 
the wind blowing hard, he could not venture near enough 
to learn further particulars : To the leeward of the 
wreck, at the same time, he saw floating a great quantity 
of pipe and hogshead staves, a Windsor chair, and a trunk, 

supposed to have come from her About two miles 

from the above vessel, he saw a small vessel, bottom up- 
wards, which he took to be a pilot boat. 

[We suppose the above vessel to be the snow Nancy, 
Captain Carr.] 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 79 

/ 

A certain Richard Richards alias Richardson, who 
came passenger in the ship Ellis, capt. Egdon from Lon- 
don (lately cast away on Absecom Beach in New -Jersey) 
did when in England, as likewise since his arrival in this 
city, put o>n and assume the dress and appearance of one 
of the people called Quakers, and so far succeeded as to 
impose on several humane, benevolent persons in London, 
for which end he there took, as is supposed, a false affir- 
mation, and by many notorious falshoods and artful 
stories prevented his being detected. 

These are therefore to inform the public, in order to 
prevent his imposing on them in future, that the said 
Richard Richards or Richardson, is a young man about 
twenty one years of age, remarkably small, smooth 
tongue'd, and very insinuating address, had on a suit of 
plain drab coloured cloaths, wears his own hair, and a 
plain hat. At present he is fled or secrets himself to pre- 
vent his being taken and brought to justice. 

The Sloop Squirrel, Capt. Taylor, from Antigua, for 
this port, was cast away, in the storm, on Sunday last, 
near Egg harbour; The People and greatest part of the 
cargo are saved. 

PURSUANT to an order, of Robert Smith and Thomas 
Rodman, Esqrs; judges of the court of common Pleas, 
for the county of Burlington, aforesaid, upon the Petition 
of John Burr, Junior, of said county, with the major part 
in value of his creditors, Notice is hereby given to all the 
creditors of the said John Burr, that the second Day of 
May, next, (being the sixth day of the week) is appointed 
by the said judges, for the said creditors to meet at the 
house, of Lambert Barns, in the city of Burlington, at 
two o'clock, in the afternoon, to shew cause, if any they 
have, why the said John Burr, should not assigne over, 



8O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

all his estates to the use of all his creditors, and be admit- 
ted to the benefit, of the late act, of assembly, of this prov- 
ince, of New Jersey, for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

TEN POUNDS Reward, 

RUN away from the subscribers, living in Mansfield, 
Burlington county, on the 2Qth of this inst. in the even- 
ing, two Irish servant men, who came into this country 
last Fall, in a ship consigned to> Baynton and Wharton : 
the one named Francis Flood, about 5 feet 7 inches high, 
well made, fresh coloured, remarkable red hair, tied be- 
hind, dark eyes : had on when he went away, an old blue 
sailor's jacket, bound with white, with horn buttons, a 
red under jacket without sleeves lined with white, good 
buckskin breeches, yarn stockings, and a pair of strong 
shoes, lately soaled, with brass buckles in them. The 
other named James Nayland, about 5 feet 7 inches high, 
of a pale complexion, smooth faced, has a very flat nose, 
wide mouth, m> beard, light long hair, tied behind, and 
very knock knee'd : had on when he went away, a light- 
ish coloured bearskin jacket lined with white flannel, brass 
buttons, a striped camblet under jacket, good buckskin 
breeches, white yarn stockings, and a pair of pumps, too 
large for him ; each of them had felt hats about half worn. 
They took with them a dark coloured broad cloth jacket, 
an old bearskin great-coat, a pair of check trowsers, and 
a short musquet mounted with brass. Whoever takes up 
and secures the said servants, so that their masters may 
have them again, shall have Five Pounds reward for each, 
and reasonable charges paid by 

MOSES IVINS, and WILLIAM SHREVE. 

N. B. Said James Nayland stole a pass from Israel 
Bunton, which was signed by magistrates of Burlington 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 8 1 

and Philadelphia to Maryland; and stole several things 
from his said master William Shreve. 1 

All masters of vessels are forbid to carry them off, at 
their peril. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1218, April 
10, 1766. 

LETTERS remaining in the Post-Office, Philadelphia. 
B. Thomas Benny, Elizabeth Bates, Greenwich Town- 
ship. H. John Hasset, Alexander Hamilton, John Hat- 
ton, West Jersey. 

NEW-YORK, April 7 

Last Week a Sloop from Egg Harbour, brought up to 
Town, a small Bundle of stamped Paper, that had been 
found in the Wreck of the Ship Ellis, lately cast away on 
her Voyage from London for Philadelphia, at Absecom 
Beach, as mentioned in a former Paper : As soon as it 
was known, they were seized by the Sons of Liberty, and 
purified at the Coffee-house last Friday, before a Thou- 
sand Spectators. 

On the First Instant, the Body of a Man was found 
murdered, at a small Distance from the Post Road, in 
Piscataway, New-Jersey, about three Miles from New- 
Brunswick. By some Papers found about him, it is 
thought his Name was Stanley, tho' it is said he was called 
Fisher, had been begging about the Country, and was 
seen a few Days before he was found, in Company with 
two other Men, who had the Appearance of Sailors, and 
were going to Philadelphia ; and that at a Tavern he had 
shewn some Money which it is conjectured brought him 
to his deplorable End. The Marks of Violence were con- 
spicuous on him, and the Coroner's Jury brought in their 
Verdict, wilful Murder by Persons unknown. 



i The same advertisement appears in the New York Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, April 17, 1766, No. 1215, where the name of the second 
servant is given as Nallon, instead of Nayland. 



82 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Trenton, April 7, 1766. 

The Members of the TRENTON LIBRARY COMPANY are 
desired to meet at the House of Isaac Yard, in Trenton, 
on the 1 4th Day of this instant April, at Two o' Clock in 
the Afternoon, to choose a Treasurer and Directors, and 
make their Sixteenth Annual Payment, agreeable to their 
Articles. And as it is expected the Company will order 
the Shares of the Delinquents to be disposed of, the Mem- 
bers are requested generally to attend. 

Per Order, STACY POTTS, Secretary. 

West New- Jersey, April i, 1766. 
The Horse SWAN Covers Mares this Season. He is a 
jet black, with one white Foot, a small Star, and a Snip, 
full fifteen Hands high, an exceeding gay, bold Carriaged 
Horse, a fine Trotter, and swift Pacer, full half blooded, 
and very handsome. The Price Twenty Shillings the 
Season each Mare, to be paid to the Subscriber, living in 
Wood's Town, Salem County. 

JECHONIAS WOOD 

RUN away from Benjamin Hegeman, of Somerset 
County, in New Jersey, the 25th of March last, an Irish 
Servant Man, named James M'Grady, of a short Stature, 
fair Complexion, and has brown curled Hair; Had on 
when he went away, a light brown Jacket, the Sleeves of 
another Cloth, an old homespun Linen Shirt, Leather 
Breeches, made of Sheepskin, blue Yarn Stockings, has 
near three Years to serve, and has been Servant before in 
Pennsylvania, near Lancaster. Whoever takes up said 
Servant and brings him to his said Master, shall receive 
Fifty Shillings Reward; if secured in any Goal, and No- 
tice given thereof to his said Master, shall have Thirty 
Shillings Reward, paid by 

BENJAMIN HEGEMAN. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 83 

New Jersey, Sussex County, ss. 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Honourable Frederick 
Smith and John Berrien, Esquires, Justices of the Su- 
preme Court of the Province of New-Jersey, upon the 
Petition of Robert Patterson, an insolvent Debtor, and 
the Major Part in Value of his Creditors, Notice is hereby 
given, by the said Petitioners, to all the Creditors of the 
said Robert Patterson, to shew Cause, if any they have, 
before the Justices aforesaid, at the Dwelling-house of 
Lambert Barnes, Innholder at Burlington, on Wednesday, 
the 1 4th Day of May next (being the Time and Place 
appointed by the Justices for that Purpose) why an As- 
signment of the Estate of the said Robert Patterson 
should not be made to such Persons as shall be appointed, 
for the Use of all the Creditors of the said Robert Patter- 
son, pursuant to the said Petition, and the said Robert 
Patterson be discharged from all his Debts, according to 
an Act of the Governor, Council, and General Assembly, 
passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of his present Maj- 
esty, George the Third, intituled "An Act for the Relief 
of insolvent Debtors." The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
1946, April 10, 1766. 

Hunterdon, ss. Trenton, March 2, 1766. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that William Morris', and 
William Clayton, Esquires, have assented to the Petition 
of William Reynolds, an insolvent Debtor, in Trenton 
Goal, and the Majority in Value of his Creditors, by ap- 
pointing Friday, the 25th Instant, for the Creditors of 
the said William Reynolds, to appear at Trenton, at n 
o'Clock, and shew Cause, if any they have, why the said 
Debtor shall not be discharged according to Law. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1946, April 10, 1766. 



84 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Piscataway, April i, 1766. 
SIR, 

I Send you a true Copy of the Petition of the North- 
American Merchants to the British Parliament, which 
was inclosed to me by Messieurs Stewart and Campbell. 
I dare say you will give it to the Public, through the 
Channel of your Paper, as soon as you can. I am, SIR, 

Your most humble Servant, 

WM. RUSSELL. 

To the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament 

assembled. 

The PETITION of the Merchants of London, Trading in North America. 
Humbly Sheweth, 

THAT your Petitioners have long been concerned in carrying on the 
Trade between this Country and the British Colonies on the Continent of 
North America. 

THAT they have annually exported very large Quantities of British 
Manufactures, consisting of Woollen Goods of all Kinds, Cottons, Linens, 
Hard ware, Shoes, Household Furniture, and almost, without Exception, 
every Species of Goods manufactured in these Kingdoms, beside other 
Articles imported from abroad, chiefly purchased with our Manufactures, 
and with tne Produce of our colonies ; by all which many Thousand Man- 
ufacturers, Seamen and Labourers, have been employed, to the very great 
and increasing Benefit of this Nation. 

THAT, in return of these Exports, your Petitioners have received from 
the Colonies, Rice, Indigo, Tobacco, Naval Stores, Oil, Whale Fins, Furs, 
and lately Pot-Ash, with other Commodities, besides Remittances by 
Bills of Exchange and Bullion, obtained by the Colonists in Payment for 
Articles of their Produce not required for the British Market, and there- 
fore exported to other Places. 

THAT from the Nature of this Trade, consisting of British Manufac- 
tures exported, and of tha Import of raw Materials from America, many 
of them used in our Manufactures, and all of them tending to lessen our 
Dependance on neighbouring States, it must be deemed of the highest 
Importance in the commercial System of this Nation. 

THAT this Commerce, so beneficial to the State, and so necessary for 
the Support of Multitudes, now lies under such Difficulties and Discour- 
agements, that nothing less than its utter Ruin is apprehended, without 
immediate Interposition of Parliament. 

THAT in Consequence of the Trade between the Colonies and the Mother 
Country, as established, and as permitted for many Years, and of the 
Experience which your Petitioners have had of the Readiness of the 
Americans to make their just Remittances to the utmost of their real 
Ability, they have been induced to make and venture such large Expor- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 85 

tations of British Manufactures, as to leave the Colonies indebted to the 
Merchants of Great- Britain in the Sum of several Millions Sterling. 

THAT at this time the Colonists, when pressed for Payment, appeal for 
past Experience in Proof of their Willingness, but declare it is not in 
their Power at present to make good their Engagements ; alledging that 
the Taxes and Restrictions laid upon them, and the Extension of the 
Jurisdiction of Vice Admiralty Courts, established by some late Acts of 
Parliament, particularly by an Act passed in the 4th Year of his present 
Majesty's Reign, intituled, An Act for granting certain Duties in the 
British Colonies and Plantations in America ; and by an Act passed in the 
Fifth Year of his present Majesty's Reign, intituled, An Act for grant- 
ing and applying certain Stamp-Duties, and other Duties, in the British 
Colonies and Plantations in America, with several Regulations and 
Restraints, which, if founded on Acts of Parliament for denned Purposes, 
are represented to have been extended in such a Manner as to disturb 
legal Commerce, and harrass the fair Trader, has so far interrupted the 
usual and former most fruitful Branches of their Commerce, restrained 
the Sale of their Produce, thrown the State of the several Provinces into 
Confusion, and brought on so great a Number of actual Bankruptcies, 
that the former Opportunities and Means of Remittances and Payments, 
are utterly lost and taken from them. 

THAT your Petitioners are, by these unhappy Events, reduced to the 
Necessity of applying to this Honourable House, in order to secure them- 
selves and their Families from impending Ruin to prevent a Multitude 
of Manufacturers from becoming a Burden to the Community, or else 
seeking their Bread in other Countries, to the irretrievable Loss of this 
Kingdom to preserve the Strength of this Nation entire, its Commerce 
flourishing the Revenues increasing our Navigation, the Bulwark of 
the Kingdom, in a State of Growth and Extension, and the Colonies, 
from Inclination, Duty and Interest, firmly attached to the Mother-Coun- 
try. 

Your Petitioners therefore humbly pray the Consideration of the 
Premises, intreating such Relief as to the Wisdom of this Honourable 
House shall deem expedient. And your Petitioners shall for ever pray. 



To BE SOLD 

A Valuable Plantation, situate in Newtown Township, 
Gloucester County, on a Branch of Newtown Creek, con- 
taining 112 Acres, 40 of which are cleared, and under 
good Fence, 14 Acres of good Meadow, and more may 
be made, the Remainder well timbered; a good Frame 
House and Kitchen on the Premises. It is very conve- 
nient to Market, being but 2 Miles from Cooper's Ferry. 



86 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

For Terms, enquire of the Subscriber, on the Premises, 
or of Aaron Oakford, in Philadelphia. 

HANNAH HAINES. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1947, April 17, 
1766. 

WHEREAS James Magee and John Limming, jun. two 
insolvent Debtors, and the Majority of their Creditors in 
Value of their Debts, having presented their Petition to 
John Anderson and Robert Montgomery, two of his Maj- 
esty's Justices, Judges of the Inferior Court of Common 
Pleas for the county of Monmouth, and also their sched- 
ule of all the Debts owing and the Debts due, with the 
goods and chattels of the said Debtors and has qualified 
to the same: These are therefore to give notice to the 
creditors of the said James Magee and John Limming, to 
appear the twenty third day of April next, at the court 
house in said county, to shew cause, if any they have, why 
the estate of the said debtors shall not be assigned to per- 
sons by said petitioners to be appointed to be disposed of 
for the benefit of their creditors, and that they may be 
discharged, pursuant to an act of the General Assembly 
of the province of New- Jersey, made in the fifth year of 
the reign of our sovereign Lord King George the third, 
entitled, "an act for the Relief of insolvent debtors." 

James Magee, 
John Limming, jun. 

The following account, received since our last. 
NEW JERSEY. 

Piscataway, April 3, 1766. 

ON the first instant the body of a man was discovered 
laid under leaves and some old wood by a fence, on the 
side of the great road leading through this place to New- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 8/ 

Brunswick; upon the Coroner's being sent for, and the 
body uncovered, it appeared to be the body of one Charles 
Fisher, who had frequently been seen in the province beg- 
ging from place to place. His head was broken in a 
shocking manner, and it appeared that he had been bar- 
barously murdered eight days before. On the 25th of 
March in the evening, it appeared by evidence, the de- 
ceased went into the house kept by Ebenezer Ford, with 
two men dressed like sailors, one of them tall, the other 
a short man ; the tallest was frequently called Dick by the 
other : Here they had liquor, and the deceased shewed a 
good deal of money, and drank freely, as did the tall 
sailor until checked by the other, saying, "Dick, you know 
what you have to do to night." 

The sailors had on both lightish colour'd jackets, lined 
with white, the tallest had a sailors cap, the smallest, a 
hat. From this tavern they proceeded to Ross's, on their 
way to New-Brunswick, here they drank freely, and the 
deceased shewed a considerable quantity of silver, and 
offered to give silver for a six pound bill : Here the little 
sailor was called Johnson; and the tallest talking of his 
writing, took a pen and writ on clean paper, these words, 
"Evil communications corrupts good manners," and 
signed his name, Richard Clark. He was observed to 
have remarkable short ringers; and soon after, about 10 
o'clock in the night, they went on their way to New- 
Brunswick. The tall sailor appearing a little flushed with 
liquor, and the deceased so* much in drink, that the tavern 
keeper told him he thought it was too 1 late for him to go. 
It appeared that they traveled on about a mile and a half, 
and there committed the murder, and hid the body as 
above related; and it is thought the discovery must have 
been made the next day, had not the great fall of snow 
the next morning prevented it by covering the ground, so 



88 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

as to hide the blood, as it appeared very plain light after 
on two stones that were certainly made use of in destroy- 
ing the unhappy man; altho' the villains had also taken 
the precaution to throw sand from the road on the place 
where the most blood was ; but this would have led to the 
discovery, had not the snow fallen. At a little distance 
from the corps, in a field adjoining, were found the de- 
ceased's wallet, which was known by and sworn to, by 
the tavern keeper. It appeared to have been rifled, and 
that the villains had shifted themselves, leaving in the 
field, one shirt, and sailor's frock, both bloody; two* pair 
of trowsers, one bloody, and two small marling spikes. 
Their tracts from the deceased to this place were plain, 
and from thence easterly out of the field ; from whence it 
was judged that they returned immediately with their 
booty towards New- York, especially as no intelligence 
can be had of them at any of the ferries to the westward. 
As this murder is the most barbarous and daring, that has 
ever been known here, being committed on the public 
road, in an open place, and clear night, within three hun- 
dred yards of two farm houses. It is hoped that all per- 
sons will be industrious in discovering and apprehending 
them, especially as they are said to be known at New- 
York, towards which they certainly went after the mur- 
der. As they are strangers, no further or more particular 
description can be given, only that the tallest had on at 
Ross's, a red watch coat; the other a brown one, half 
worn; their jackets both of a lightish colour, and lined 
with white. Supplement to the New York Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, April 17, 1766. 

A murder and robbery was lately committed near Min- 
isink, New-Jersey, on the body and effects of an Oneida 
Indian, who had come to trade there, supposed, by one 
Robert Simonds or Seamon, who was taken up and con- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 89 

fined in Sussex goal, but was rescued, and has since fled. 
Governor Franklin has issued a proclamation, offering a 
reward of One Hundred dollars for apprehending said 
Sinionds. 

The snow Nancy, Walter Kerr, master, mentioned in 
our last, left Bristol the i/th of January, and King Road 
the 3d of February following, bound for this port : About 
the beginning of March they fell in with the sloop Ann, 
John Jones, master, of and from Rhode Island, bound for 
Jamaica, but being in great distress, Captain Kerr took 
said Jones and his people on board the snow, and pro- 
ceeded on his voyage untill the 5th inst. when he got 
soundings in 25 fathom water at 6 o'clock in the evening, 
and by observation had that day he was to the southward 
of Cape-Hinlopen, and stood a N. N. West course untill 
12 o'clock, when he laid the snow too in 15 fathom water. 
. . . . At four o'clock in the morning she struck on 
Hereford Barr, about seventeen miles to the northward 
of Cape-May, being carried thither, as is supposed, by a 
strong current, for the captain and others on board judged 
they were on the Overfalls in the mouth of our Bay, and 
endeavoured, by filling the sails, to press her over, but 
soon found their mistake by feeling the land very near to 
them. On this some of the people, contrary to the cap- 
tain's orders, cut away the masts, and others got into the 
boats, cut the gripes and the sea soon washed them over- 
board, then cutting or slipping the fasts drove to the shore, 
where four men landed, viz Hutchinson the car- 
penter, Magnus Sinclair, John Gowens, and John Stans- 
bury, which were all that were saved out of twenty eight 
persons, for the wind blowing a violent hard gale by this 
time, at N. E. and N. E. and by N. no assistance could be 
given them from the shore, the vessel unfortunately heeled 
off towards the sea, which broke over her 30 feet high, 



90 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

and the distressed people obliged to continue on her deck 
untill 4 o'clock in the Afternoon, hanging by the quarter 
deck, rails, and upper gunnel, &c. as she lay on her beam 
ends; but at low water they made a raft, and, as is sup- 
posed, all got on it, expecting the tide of flood to drive 
them on shore, the raft came there well secured; and a 
hen koop lashed to the upper part, with their cloaths 
stuffed in it, coming ashore underneath the raft, shewed 
it had overset, and the people all perished; twelve of their 
bodies have since been found, and decently buried. The 
persons drowned by this unfortunate wreck are, Captain 
Walter Kerr, John Oliver, his mate, .... Fortescue, 
an apprentice, and five others of the ship's crew. John 
Jones, master, Andrew Mason, mate, John Brown, David 
Muttony, and Peleg Wood, all of the sloop Ann, taken up 
at sea. Captain William Willson, his wife and child, Cap- 
tain John Corser, Mr. Robert Smith (a young lad brother 
to the Revd. Doctor Smith of this place). The Revd. Mr. 
Willson, The Revd. Mr. Giles of New- York, Mr. Mott, 
a tanner of Connecticut, and the master and two mates of 
a Rhode-Island brig, that was sold in Bristol, names for- 
got. No letters or papers have been found, and very little 
of the vessel or cargo saved ; upon the whole, the circum- 
stances of this affair make it one of the most melancholy 
losses that ever happened on this coast. 

The sloop John and Jane, Captain Giles, from Antigua 
for this port, was drove ashore about twelve miles to the 
southward of our Capes, in the gale of wind on Sunday 
the 6th instant; the people, rigging, and all the cargo are 
saved. 

The schooner Phoenix, Captain Gardiner, of and from 
Boston, who ran ashore on Peck's Beach, near Egg-Har- 
bour, in a gale of wind on the 9th of March is got off 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 9 1 

without any damage to the vessel, and arrived here last 
Tuesday. 

The Circuit Courts in the Western Division of New- 
Jersey, will be held as follows : 

For the County of Cape May, on Tuesday the 22d of 
April Instant. 

For the County of Cumberland, on Tuesday the 2Qth 
Instant. 

For the County of Salem, on Thursday the ist of May 
next. 

For the County of Gloucester, on Tuesday the 6th of 
May next. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1219, April 
17, 1766. 

STRAED AWAY from Peel Hall, about the 5th of this 
inst. a dark brown horse, has no white on his feet, his 
sides chaffed a little with the harness; he was bought at 
the London Coffee-House about a fortnight ago, and 
came from Salem. Whoever will bring the said horse to 
John Lukins, at the sign of the George, shall receive 
Thirty Shillings for their trouble 

WILLIAM DOWELL. 

TO BE SOLD, 
By way of public vendue, on the 25th day of April next 

o<n the premises, 

A Valuable plantation situate in Evesham, in the 
county of Burlington, in the province of West New- Jer- 
sey, containing 330 acres of land, 80 whereof good clover 
meadow, and about 40 acres more may be made, about 
100 acres of upland cleared, the remainder well timbered; 
the meadow and upland divided into convenient fields and 
lotts, with a stream of running water in each meadow lot 
and field; the most part of the upland is exceeding good 



92 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

for any sort of grain; whereon is a frame two' story 
dwelling house, with a cellar under it, a large frame 
kitchen, a well of water near the door, a large barn thirty 
by forty feet square, with stables, stalls and sheds for 
feeding cattle, a stream of water running through the 
barn-yard, a small orchard of old apple trees, and a large 
orchard of young thriving trees. The said plantation is 
situate about ten miles from Philadelphia, and about three 
miles from an English church, and near the same distance 
from a quaker's meeting-house; about one mile and a 
half from a good grist-mill, and is a convenient situation 
for a gentleman's country seat, for a dairy, or grassing 
cattle. Any person inclining to purchase, may apply to 
the subscriber on the premisses, or to John Cox in 
Moore's town, who will shew the lines, &c. The condi- 
tions will be made known at the time and place of sale, 
where attendance will be given by 

DANIEL HOPEWELL. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1219, April 17, 
1766. 

Last week was committed to the goal of this city one 
David Duncan, of Marcus Hook, for counterfeiting New- 
Jersey, and altering Pennsylvania bills of credit. 

BY HIS EXCELLENCY 
William Franklin, Esquire, 

Captain General and Governor in Chief in and over His 
Majesty's Province of New- Jersey and Territories 
thereon depending in America, Councellor and Vice- 
Admiral in the same, &c. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

WHEREAS I have received Information from one of 
principal Officers of the County of Sussex, that a most 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 93 

inhuman Murder and Robbery has been lately committed 
near Minisink, on the Body and Effects of an Indian of 
the Oneida nation, who had come there to trade, and had 
behaved himself soberly and discreetly; and that one 
ROBERT SIMONDS, alias SEAMONS, had been charged with 
the same, and was on the second day of April Instant com- 
mitted to the common Goal of the County aforesaid, from 
whence he was rescued in the Night of the same Day, 
about ten o'clock, by an armed Mob of twenty-five Men. 
And whereas it is the indispensible Duty, and for the 
Honour of every Government, to punish the Perpetrators 
of such atrocious Crimes, committed against the Laws of 
God and Man, and in manifest Violation of the solemn 
Treaties subsisting between his Majesty and the Indians, 
which have hitherto been inviolably kept by them, with 
respect to the people of this Colony. And as the Murder 
and Robbery aforesaid may greatly endanger the Peace 
and Security of the Frontiers, and introduce all the Hor- 
rors and Calamities of an Indian War, I DO therefore, 
hereby strictly charge and command all Officers, civil and 
military, within this Colony, (particularly those residing 
within the County of Sussex) to use their utmost En- 
deavours to take, and in goal secure, the said SIMONDS 
alias SEAMON, and such other Person or Persons whom 
they have sufficient Reason to suspect guilty of the afore- 
said Murder and Robbery, or of the Rescue of the said 
SIMONDS alias SEAMON, from Goal, and on their Com- 
mitment, to raise and keep up a sufficient Guard, to secure 
the Goal from being broke open, or the Prisoners rescued. 
And in order to encourage his Majesty's liege Subjects 
to exert themselves in the Pursuit and apprehending the 
said SIMONDS alias SEAMON, and every Person or Persons 
concerned in the Murder and Robbery aforesaid, I DO 
promise, that the Person or Persons who shall, after the 
Date hereof, apprehend the said Robert SIMONDS alias 



94 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

SEAMON, or any Person guilty of the Murder and Rob- 
bery aforesaid, shall, upon conviction of the Offender, 
receive from the Treasury of this Province, ONE HUN- 
DRED DOLLARS Reward. And I DO likewise in the most 
earnest Manner recommend it to the Inhabitants of this 
colony, to behave with Kindness, Humanity and Justice, 
to such Indians who shall visit the Frontiers in a friendly 
Manner, as such a Conduct will have a tendency to per- 
petuate the Blessings and Advantages of Peace. 

GIVEN under my Hand and Seal at Arms, at the City 
of Burlington, in said Province, the fifteenth of 
April, in the sixth year of his Majesty's Reign, Anno 
Domini One Thousand Seven Hundred and sixty 
Six, 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN. 
By his Excellency's Command, 

CHARLES READ, Secretary. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1220, April 24, 
1766. 

CAME to the plantation of the subscriber, living in 
Hopewell township, Cumberland county, about the 25th 
day of October last, a bay MARE, about 13 hands high, 
paces and trots, about 7 years old, branded on the near 
buttock R, a star in her forehead, and shod before. The 
owner is desired to come and prove his property, pay 
charges, and take her away. 

JOHN M'CLEAN. 

To COVER this Season, 

The HORSE RAVEN, 

To be kept by the subscriber, at the Black horse Tavern 
in Burlington county, New-Jersy, about eight miles from 
the city of Burlington, the same from Mount holly, seven 
from Crosswix, the same from Recklesstown, at a pistole 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 95 

a Leap, forty shillings leap and Tryal, and half a crown 
to the groom, his character is so well known there needs 
no further apology. 

ABRAHAM CHATTIN. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1220, April 24, 
1766. 

NEW-YORK, April 14 

Last Week, Capt. Smith, bound to St. Kitts from this 
Port, was drove on the Point of Sandy Hook, and 'tis 
feared will not be got off. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation, in the Township of Upper Penn's Neck, 
in Salem County, containing about 120 Acres, near a 
convenient Landing on Delaware River, well timbered, 
and a Conveniency for making good Meadows ; late Part 
of the Estate of Cornelius Corneliuson, deceased. For 
Terms of Sale, apply to the Subscriber, in the Town of 
Salem, or to George Trenchard, junior, in Lower Penn's 
Neck, to either of whom every Person and Persons, hav- 
ing Mortgage or other Demands against the said De- 
ceased's Estate, are desired to give Notice. 

Salem, April n, 1766. 

GEORGE TRENCHARD, Execut. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1948, April 24, 
1766. 

London, February 8. On Thursday last the University 
of Oxford, in full convocation, conferred the following 
degrees by diploma, viz. The degree of Doctor of Divin- 
ity on the Rev. Mr. Thomas Bradbury Chandler, Mission- 
ary of Elizabeth Town, in New-Jersey 



96 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

To BE SOLD, 

By Way of Public Vendue, on Thursday the 22d Day of 

May next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, on 

the Premises: 

A Large genteel well finished House and Lot of 
ground, lying and being in Elizabeth Town, in New- 
Jersey, on the Main Street leading from the Bridge to the 
Church, and directly fronting the Road that leads from 
the Point, being the House in which Barnaby Shute, lately 
lived : The House is two Stories high, with four large 
Rooms on a Floor, and a spacious Entry. The Lot con- 
tains about one Acre and an Half of Land, on which is a 
new Barn, Stables, and Out houses, with a good Garden 
well fenced in; the Whole very convenient for a private 
Gentleman, Trader or Tavern-keeper. 

Also, on the same Day, will be likewise sold, 

The noted Grist Mill, and Appurtenances, situate at 
the Foot of the Bridge in Eliabeth Town aforesaid, 
known by the Name of the Town Mills, late the Property 
of said Barnaby Shute. Any Persons willing to purchase 
before the Day of Sale, may know the Terms, by apply- 
ing to the Subscribers, who will give an indisputable Title 

for the same. 

WILLIAM HARRIMAN 
JOSEPH WOODRUFF, jun. and 
SILAS HALSEY. 

RUN- A WAY from his Employers, the I2th Instant, one 
WILLIAM SERELS, of a small Stature, black curl'd Hair; 
had on when he went away, a blue Broad Cloth Coat, has 
been newly turned; a blue spotted Swanskin Jacket and 
blue Breeches : He has taken off Things that was not his 
own. He has taught a School, and has formerly been in 
His Majesty's Service. Whoever takes up said Series, 
so that he may be brought to Justice, shall have FORTY 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 97 

SHILLINGS Reward, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 

us, 

WILLIAM SPARLING, 
DAVID WILLIAMSON. 

New-Brunswick, Middlesex 
County, New-Jersey, April 12, 1766. 

1 PURSUANT to an Order of the Hon. 

New-Jersey | s Frederick Smith( Esq . Chief Jus . 

tice, and the Hon. John Berrien, Third Judge of the Su- 
preme Court of Judicature, for the Province of New- 
Jersey, upon the Petition of Thomas Leonard, an insol- 
vent Debtor in the Gaol of the County of Somerset : No- 
tice is hereby given by the said Petitioner to all his Cred- 
itors, to shew Cause, (if any they have) before the said 
Judges, on Tuesday the twentieth Day of May next, at 
Princetown, in the said Province, at Nine o'Clock in the 
Forenoon of said Day, why an Assignment of the Estate 
of the said Thomas Leonard, should not be made to 1 per- 
sons then and there to be nominated by the said Judges 
pursuant to the said Petition, and the said Thomas Leon- 
ard be thereupon discharged from his said Confinement, 
agreeable to the Directions of an Act of the Governor, 
Council and General Assembly of the said Province of 
New- Jersey made in the Fifth Year of his present Maj- 
esty's Reign, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." 

Dated the I3th of March, 1766. 

Philadelphia, April 24. On Thursday last, one David 
Duncan was taken up here, and committed to Goal, there 
being found upon him a Number of the Bills of Credit of 
New-Jersey, and Pennsylvania, altered from lesser to 
higher Denominations. 



98 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Nezv-York, May i. Extract of a Letter from an Amer- 
ican Gentleman in London, to his Friend in New-Jersey. 

London, Feb. 25, 1766. 

"I most joyfully congratulate you on so unex- 
pected a delivery from slavery and civil dissention by a 
repeal of the Stamp Act; which was carried in the Com- 
mons the 2 ist instant, by a Majority of 108 Votes, and as 
a supply bill must pass the Lords of course. The provi- 
dential change of the M y, from the most abandoned 

and execrable, to a set of as honest, upwright, and amiable 
Personages as were to be found in the Nation, seemed to 
be the foundation for our deliverance. But their power 
would have proved unequal to the task, had not our glori- 
ous HERO, our former deliverer, stood forth; and almost 
alone, supported our feeble unfashionable dying Cause. 
He struck at the Root; he openly denied the right of Par- 
liament to impose internal taxations on the Colonies. 
With the eloquence of a Demosthenes, with the cool rea- 
soning of a Hambden, with the warmth of an American 
enthusiast, did this Great Man plead our desperate cause, 
and that of Liberty, in defiance of R 1 favour, popu- 
larity, friends, relations, dangers and disease. For hours 
could I expatiate, in heaping encomiums upon this 
Saviour of our Country; but you will hear them from all 
quarters. 

Tho' private friendship would be a sufficient induce- 
ment for me to address you at present; yet I have now 
another Motive, which is, and ever ought to be esteemed 
the greatest, I mean, the good of my Country. Know 
thejn, that we have been sacrificed and sold by our 

Ag s. If there be an exception, I believe yours is the 

Man: But he has not power to do it, and therefore de- 
serves no thanks. It is beyond description (to me as well 
as to many others astonishing) that the Colonies should, 
as they have hitherto done, trust their most important 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 99 

interests with such Persons. Do you imagine the People 
of England possessed with a .spirit of divination or intu- 
ition, so as to discern truth from Falshood, by hearing 
only one side; which is, and always will be the case, so 

long as the M y can silence the Ag ts, while our 

enemies roar against us at leisure, and represent us in 
such colours, as their interests or malice suggests. I say 
nothing but what falls infinitely short of what might be 
said, perfectly consistent with truth. It is certainly the 
duty of every leading man in the Colonies, to use his ut- 
most influence, for the appointment of able persons, who 
have natural attachments and connections in the Colonies ; 
and that they be sent as such men ought to be, INDE- 
PENDENT by allowances sufficient to make them so" 
Let not the object vanish from your sight. 
Remember, 'tis your country's safety. 

VOLTAIRE. 

FORTY SHILLINGS REWARD, 

RUN-AWAY from the Subscriber, on Monday the 2ist 
of April last, a yellowish Negro Fellow, named Bill, for- 
merly belonging to Mr. Cornelius Clopper, at Rariton 
Landing, in New-Jersey, appears to be about 20 or 22 
Years of Age, about 5 Feet 6 Inches in Height, speaks 
good English and Low Dutch fluently, had on when he 
went away, an old red Cloth Jacket, a Pair of old Home- 
spun Trowsers, and an Iron Collar; which last it is sup- 
posed he has found Assistance to get taken off. Who- 
ever takes up and returns, or secures him so* that I may 
get him again shall have FORTY SHILLINGS Reward for 
their Trouble, besides all necessary Expences. All Mas- 
ters of Vessels and other Persons, are warned not to carry 
off, conceal or harbour the said Run-away, as they would 
avoid a Prosecution in the Law. 

New York, May i, 1766. JOHN KLEIN. 



IOO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

WHEREAS John Ashton, Jases Hanes, and Moses 
Brown insolvent Debtors, and the major Part in Value 
of their Creditors, have presented their Petitions to John 
Anderson and Robert Montgomerie, Esquires, two of his 
Majesty's Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, for the 
County of Monmouth, praying, that the Estates of the 
said John Ashton, Jases Hanes, and Moses Brown, be 
assigned to such Persons as such Petitioners shall appoint, 
to dispose of the same for the Benefit of their Creditors, 
pursuant to an Act of the Governor, Council and General 
Assembly of the Province of New- Jersey, entitled, "An 
Act for the Relief of insolvent Debtors." These are 
therefore to give Notice to all Persons that have any De- 
mands on them, the said John Ashton, Jases Hanes, and 
Moses Brown, to appear at the Court House in said 
County of Monmouth, on Monday the 24th Instant, to 
shew Cause, (if any there be) why the said John Ashton, 
Jases Hanes, and Moses Brown, should not be discharged 
according to above recited Act. 

John Anderson, 
Robert Montgomery. 

) PURSUANT to an Order of the Hon. 

New-Jersey | ss. Frederick Smyth> Esq . chief Jus _ 

tice, and the Hon. John Berrien, Esq; third Judge of the 
Supreme Court of the Province of New-Jersey, upon the 
several Petitions of Henry Crusee, an insolvent Debtor, 
in the Gaol of the County of Somerset, James Leonard 
and John May, both insolvent Debtors, in the Gaol of the 
County of Middlesex, Samuel Romine, an insolvent 
Debtor in the Gaol of the County of Monmouth, and 
George Rhea, of the County of Monmouth, an insolvent 
Debtor, together with the majo>r Part in Value of his 
Creditors : Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of 
the said Henry Crusee, to meet at the House of Thomas 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. IOI 

Leonard, at Princetown, on Tuesday the Twentieth Day 
Instant May, at Ten o' Clock in the Forenoon of said Day; 
and to all the Creditors of the said James Leonard, John 
May, Samuel Romine and George Rhea, to meet at the 
House of Samuel Horner, of Princetown, on the same 
Twentieth Day o-f May, at Eleven o' Clock in the Fore- 
noon of the said Day, to shew Cause (if any they have) 
before the said Judges, why an Assignment of the Estates 
of the said Henry Crusee, James Leonard, John May, 
Samuel Romine, and George Rhea, should not be made to 
Persons then and there to be appointed, pursuant to the 
said Petitions, and the said Henry Crusee, James Leon- 
ard, John May, Samuel Romine and George Rhea, be dis- 
charged from Confinement, and be admitted to the Bene- 
fit of an Act of the General Assembly of this Province of 
New- Jersey, made in the Fifth Year of his present Maj- 
esty's Reign, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." 

N. B. The abovesaid James Leonard, by Reason of his 
becoming Security for several Persons, for large Sums 
of Money, which Persons have since broke, by which 
Means said James Leonard has had sundry Writs served 
upon him, for such Debts, and is obliged to take this 
method to disengage himself from his present encum- 
brances, and particularly from those Debts that he has 
made himself liable to pay for other Person of which he 
has no Benefit. 

To be sold at Public Vendue, on the Premises, on Tuesday 

the 1 7th Day of June next : 

THE noted Mills of Andrew Leake, at Bromely, in 
New- Jersey, with a commodious house, store-house, barn 
and other out-houses, and about 300 acres of exceeding 
good land thereto adjoining, which will be sold together, 
or in parcels, as may best suit the purchaser. The situa- 



102 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

tion is in the heart of the best wheat country in the prov- 
ince, healthy and agreeable. The mills may be kept con- 
stantly employed, as they never want water in the driest 
season ; for trade none better, surrounded with "wealthy 
farmers, very thickly settled. 

Likewise a tract of Land lately belonging to said 
Leake, near the Falls of Lamaton, together with a house 
and lot at New Germantown. The conditions of payment 
very easy, one-third in ready money, one-third in a year, 
and the other third in two years. At the same time and 
place will be sold, a quantity of dry goods, plate, house- 
hold furniture, farm utensils, waggons, Negroes, horses, 
horn'd cattle, sheep, hogs, &c. Good title will be given by 
the assignees, the Subscribers; and as they are deter- 
mined to collect all debts due to the said Andrew Leake, 
as soon as possible, they desire all Persons so> indebted, 
to make payment to them, who will attend for that pur- 
pose on the aforesaid I7th Day of June next, or on fail- 
ure thereof, they may depend on being sued. 

WILLIAM AXTILL, ] 
JOHN TAYLOR, A . 

JAMES M'EVERS Ass.gnees. 

CORNELIUS Low, Jun. j 
New- York, April 26, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1217, May i, 1766. 

The following are copies of the several Petitions agreed 
on and transmitted from the late General Congress at 
New- York, to the King's most excellent Majesty, and 
to both houses of Parliament,, agreeable to the instruc- 
tions given the commissioners from the several colonies. 
To the KING'S most excellent MAJESTY. 

The petition of the freeholders and other inhabitants of 
the Massachusetts-Bay, Rhode-Island and Providence 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 103 

plantations, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the govern- 
ment of the counties of New-Castle, Kent and Sussex 
upon Delaware, province of Maryland, &c 
[The petition is omitted, as it can be found in the his- 
tories of the Stamp Act Congress. It is signed in behalf 
of New Jersey by Hendrick Fisher and Joseph Borden, 
Commissioners from this Province. Similar petitions to 
the House of Lords, and to the House of Commons, were 
similarly signed.] 

N. B. The commissioners from Connecticut; Eliphalet 
Dyer, David Rowland and William Samuel Johnson 
Esqrs. From New- York, Robert R. Livingstone, John 
Cruger, Philip Livingston, William Bayard and Leonard 
Lispenard, Esqrs. From South-Carolina, Thomas Lynch, 
Christopher Gadson and John Rutledge, Esqrs. were not 
empowered to sign at the congress, and therefore reported 
to their respective assemblies, who have since each nearly 
by a unanimous vote approved of the proceedings, and 
seasonably transmitted their petitions in the same words, 
under the hands of their several speakers. Some of the 
other provinces, particularly New-Hampshire, have done 
the same. Robert Ogden, Esq; from New- Jersey, and the 
Hon. Timothy Ruggles, Esq; from Massachusetts, for 
reasons best known to themselves, if they had any, refused 
to sign, and abruptly left the congress before the business 
was compleated. John Dickinson Esq; was necessarily 
called home a few days before the congress finished, but 
there was no doubt in the minds of any but he was a sin- 
cere friend to his country. His province have the highest 
opinion of him, as all who knew him must. To avoid all 
disputes about precedency, and promote harmony, it was 
agreed in voting, and in the proceedings, to begin at one 
end of the continent and go through, only as Massachu- 
setts first proposed the measure, the compliment was 
paid them by the gentlemen of the other colonies, of plac- 



104 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ing them first; but it was merely a compliment, and it is 
to be hoped that on all future ocasions as on this, the col- 
onies will consider themselves as on the same footing, 
without the least claim of pre-eminence one over the other. 
(The- Resolves we inserted the 3d of April last.) The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1221, May i, 1766. 

Salem, April 20, 1766. 
THREE POUNDS Reward. 

MADE his Escape, last Night, from Salem Goal, a cer- 
tain John Vernon, a Cooper by Trade, about 5 Feet 10 
Inches high ; took with him when he went away, a light- 
ish coloured Saggathy .Coat, Bearskin Waistcoat, and 
lightish coloured Knit Breeches. Whoever takes up said 
Vernon, and secures him in any Goal, so that the Sub- 
scriber may have him again, shall have the above Reward, 
and reasonable Charges, paid by 

EDWARD TEST, Sheriff. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to carry him 
off at their Peril. 

Trenton Goal, April 28, 1766 

PURSUANT to an Order of Frederick Smith, Esq; Chief 
Justice of the Province of New Jersey, the Creditors of 
George Bright are to attend at Trenton, at the House of 
Joseph Yard, on Saturday, the Tenth of May next, and 
then and there shew Cause, (if any they have) why the 
said George Bright, shall not be discharged, according to 
Law. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation, in Greenwich Township, Sussex County, 
West New-Jersey, consisting of 178 Acres of very good 
Land; there is a living Stream of Water, with a good 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. IO5 

Grist-mill, on the Place, and Plenty of Business. There 
is a Log Dwelling-house, and good Log Barn, and about 
90 Acres of the Land cleared, and all within good Fence ; 
about 100 bearing Apple Trees. The Title is indisputable. 
Any Person inclining to purchase, may apply to EDWARD 
MARSHALL, on the Premises, or JOHN HUGHES, in Phila- 
delphia, where they will be informed of the Terms of 
Sale. 

Hunterdon, ss. April 22, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of the 
County of Hunterdon, upon the Petition of Christopher 
Liverton, an insolvent Debtor; Notice is hereby given 'to 
the Creditors of the said Insolvent, that Tuesday, the 
2oth Day of May next, is appointed for the said Creditors 
to shew Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of 
the said Debtor's Estate should not be made, and the said 
Debtor discharged, agreeable to an Act of Assembly, 
lately made for that Purpose, intituled, "An Act for the 
Relief of insolvent Debtors." 

Trenton, April 19, 1766. 

AGREEABLE to Adjournment, will be exposed to< Sale 
at public Vendue, to the highest Bidder, on Wednesday, 
the 2 ist of May next, between the Hours of Twelve and 
Five of the Clock in the Afternoon, on the Premises, the 
noted Tavern House, and about 40 Acres of Land, be it 
more or less, situate in Amwell, and now in the Possession 
of Samuel Fleming, bounded by Lands of Richard Lan- 
ing, Thomas Lowrey, Gershom Lee, William Norcross, 
and the King's Highway; there is also a good Barn, a 
good bearing Orchard, and some excellent Meadow on 
the above Lot, also one Frame House, Blacksmith's Shop, 
and about three Acres of Land, be it more or less, in the 
Corner of two Roads, adjoining the above, and nearly 



106 NEW 'JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

opposite to Mr. Thomas Lowrey's. Also to be sold the 
same Day, to begin at Twelve of the Clock, Horses, Cows, 
Calves, Hogs, one Iron bound Waggon and Gears, one 
Plough, one Harrow, sundry Houshold Furniture, such 
as Feather Beds and Bedding, one Clock, Tables, Chairs, 
Writing Desk, Pewter, Iron Pots with sundry other 
Things too tedious to mention here; late the Property of 
Samuel Fleming, seized and taken in Execution at the 
Suit of Alexander Ray, John Smith, and others, and to 

be sold by 

SAMUEL TUCKER, Sheriff. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1949, May i, 
1766. 

On Tuesday, the 2Oth of this instant May, will be sold 
by the Subscriber, at public Vendue, 

A FARM, containing 120 Acres of extraordinary Wheat 
Land, two Thirds of it cleared, on which is a good Dwell- 
ing-house, pleasantly situated in the Township of Amwell, 
and County of Hunterdon, West New-Jersey, about 20 
Miles distant from Trenton, and 3 Miles from the River 
Delaware. Also a Lot adjoining the above, containing 
about 38 Acres of Land, mostly of the best Meadow, well 
watered, whereon is a large commodious Stone Dwelling- 
house, four Rooms on a Floor, two Stories high, a good 
Barn, Stable and Cow-house. Any Person desirous of 
purchasing before the Day of Sale, may be informed of 
the Terms, by applying to 

RICHARD READING. 

Cumberland, April 24, 1766 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, held in and for the County of Cumber- 
land, Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of Henry 
Carll, an insolvent Debtor, that on the Petition of the 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. IO/ 

said Henry Carll, with the major Part in Value of his 
Creditors, the Judges have appointed Monday the iQth 
Day of May next, for the Creditors of the said Henry 
Carll, to meet, at the Court-house of said County, at One 
o'Clock in the Afternoon, to show Cause, if any they have, 
why an Assignment of the said Insolvent's Estate should 
not be made, and the said Debtor discharged, agreeable 
to the late Act of General Assembly, made and provided 
for that Purpose. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Gloucester 
County, West Jersey, on the 25th Day of March last, an 
Irish Servant Man, named Matthew Morrison, but sup- 
posed he will change his Name; he is about 5 Feet 5 In- 
ches high; had on, when he went away, a half-worn Cas- 
tor Hat. a white Vest, with black Spots in it, Woollen 
Trousers, half worn Shoes or Pumps, with square Silver 
Buckles in them ; took with him a Frock made of Ticken, 
an old blue Coat, with large Metal Buttons; he is very 
talkative, and forward in Company, and on examining 
his Head close, you will find a soft Place on the Top, oc- 
casioned by a Blow; he can counterfeit his Voice to Cats 
and Dogs, and served his Time in Chester County, Penn- 
sylvania. Whoever takes up said Servant, and secures 
him in any Goal, so that his Master may have him again, 
shall have the above Reward paid by 

JOHN RAMBO. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Lot of Land, situate on the Great Road, adjoining 
Mantua Creek Bridge, Gloucester County, containing 30 
Acres, 4 whereof is Tide Meadow, banked in, and fit for 
the Scythe, a Dwelling-house, with a good Stone Cellar 
under it, a Pump at the Door, a young Orchard, contain- 



108 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ing about 100 bearing Trees, a Conveniency of fishing 
with a Sean for Shad, and its lying on a fine navigable 
Creek, renders it very suitable for a Merchant or Shop- 
keeper, as a Vessel that draws 7 or 8 Feet Water, may 
pass to and from the same to the River. 

Also a Plantation, situate on Oldman's Creek, in 
Penn's Neck, Salem County, about three Miles from the 
River, containing 124 Acres, between 40 and 50 thereof 
Tide Marsh, all banked in, with about 25 Rods of Bank, 
20 or 30 Acres thereof cleared, and 12 of Upland, a 
Dwelling-house, with a Spring of excellent Water, handy 
to the Door, a young Orchard of good bearing Trees, &c. 
Any Person inclining to purchase, may apply to the Sub- 
scriber, living on the last mentioned Premises, or to 
Thomas Rambo; or John Brown, living near the first 
mentioned, and be informed of the Title and Terms of 
Sale. 

DAVID ALDRIDGE. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1950, May 8, 
1766. 

At a Meeting of near 1000 of the Sons of Liberty, at 
the Court House in the County of Sussex, and Province 
of New- Jersey, on Tuesday the ist of April 1766. 

It was Unanimously Resolved, 

I. THAT we yield unfeigned Obedience to his Maj- 
esty King George the Third, we acknowledge him our 
lawful Sovereign, and will protect and maintain him in all 
his just Rights of Government. 

II. That we will Support and abide by the Constitu- 
tional Laws of our Mother Country, to which we have an 
undoubted, and indefeasable Title. 

III. That the Stamp-Act is Unconstitutional, and 
Arbitrary, and deem'd by us destructive to our Civil Lib- 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 109 

erties, and as such, will oppose the same to the utmost of 
our Power. 

IV. That we were born a free People, and had from 
our Ancestors the advantage of English Liberty handed 
down to us; which we will by all lawful Ways and Means, 
endeavour to transmit to our Posterity. 

V. That disposing of our Properties, without our 
Consent, in an unconstitutional Way, is in Reality, claim- 
ing a Right to deprive us at Pleasure of all Property. 

VI. That it would be the highest injustice to poster- 
ity, should we neglect the Means divine Providence has 
put in our Power, of preserving inviolate, our just Rights 
and Privileges. 

VII. That a Committee be appointed, who shall make 
these Resolutions publick, that we are steadfastly deter- 
mined to stand in defence of our Liberties and Properties, 
at the risk of our Lives and Fortunes, if the glorious 
Cause requires it. 

VIII. That the Committee do correspond with the 
Committees of the Sons of Liberty in the different Coun- 
ties of the Province, or elsewhere, whereby we should 
have immediate Notice of what they conclude on, that we 
may be in readiness when call'd upon to give our Assist- 
ance in opposing the illegal Proceeding that have been 
taken against us. 

IX. That the Magistrates of this County, do proceed 
in Business as usual without Stamp Papers, and that we 
will bear them harmless in execution of their Office. 

At a Meeting of the Sons of Liberty of the Township 
of Upper Freehold, in the County of Monmouth and 
Eastern Division, of the Province of New-Jersey, assem- 
bled at Imley's Town, this Twenty-Eighth Day of April, 
One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-Six. 

We the Subscribers who deem ourselves Sons of 



110 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Liberty, being free and natural born Subjects of GEORGE 
the Third, true and lawful King of Great-Britain, 
and all its Dependencies, (whom God preserve) being 
animated with Zeal and Love for the good of our Coun- 
try, and at the same Time paying due Obedience to, and 
having the highest Esteem for their aforesaid rightful 
and lawful Sovereign King GEORGE the Third, and all 
the illustrious House of Hanover; with Pleasure acknow- 
ledge, and Glory in our Loyalty and Fidelity to the best 
of Kings; whose Sacred Person, Crown and Dignity, we 
are ready and willing, at the Expence of our Lives and 
Fortunes to defend Being fully convinced of the Op- 
pressive and Arbitrary Tendency of a late Act of Parlia- 
ment, imposing Stamp-Duties on this and the neighbour- 
ing Provinces, fundamentally subversive of the Liberties 
and Charters of North- America; truly sensible of the ines- 
timable Blessings of a free Constitution, gloriously handed 
down to us by our brave Fore-Fathers, detesting Rebel- 
lion, yet preferring Death to Slavery, well knowing that 
one Day, nay one Hour, of virtuous sacred Liberty, is 
worth Ten Thousand Years of abject Slavery and painful 
Bondage, do with all Loyalty to our most gracious Sov- 
ereign, with all deference to the just Laws of our Coun- 
try, and with a proper and necessary Regard to ourselves 
and Posterity, hereby mutually and solemnly plight our 
Faith and Honour; 

That we will at any Risque whatever, when called upon, 
unite ourselves, truly and faithfully assist this and the 
neighbouring Provinces in opposing all Attempts that 
hath arisen, or shall or may arise, to deprive us of our 
Rights and Privileges, as by Charter have been handed 
down unto us, and will at all Events oppose the Oppres- 
sion of that most unreasonable, most unconstitutional, 
most horrid and detestable Thing, call'd the Stamp Act, 
within this, and the neighbouring Colonies. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. Ill 

SECONDLY. We do Resolve, that we will by all Means 
in our Power assist all the Officers of Government in this 
Colony, in shewing their Loyalty to our Sovereign, by the 
executive Part of their Office; on the other Hand, those 
that will not do their Duty as by Law required, meet with 
our Disapprobation; and we account them as Men who 
have not Minds capable of receiving the exalted Ideas of 
Liberty. 

THIRDLY. That we will in all Cases behave ourselves 
peaceably, and far as our Influence extends, will preserve 
his Majesty's Peace and good Order, as far as that may 
be done without suffering any Infringement or Imposi- 
tion on our just Rights and Liberties. 

FOURTHLY. That we will do all in our Power to aug- 
ment the present happy Union now subsisting between the 
American Provinces, and more especially the universal 
Harmony that flourisheth in this Colony, and that those 
that act upon sinister or selfish Motives, shall be treated 
with Contempt." 

Neiv York, May 8. Last Saturday, a Poor Man who 
had been seen about the Bowery for ten Days before, was 
put in a Cart at the Request of the People of that Neigh- 
borhood, in Order to be sent to a Magistrate for Relief, 
he appearing very Sick; but the Driver of the Cart being 
a Boy, who did not find the Magistrate, to whom he had 
been ordered to apply, at home he tipt up his Cart, near 
the Fresh-Water threw the Man out, and drove off. The 
Neighbours coming up, found the unhappy Man, who was 
Dead, and having stopt the Boy, they made him carry the 
Corpse to the Work-House, where it was buried. The 
Coroner's Verdict was natural Death. The Deceased's 
Name could not be known; all we can learn of him is, that 
he said he came from the Jersies, where he left a Wife and 



112 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

nine Children, and that he was going to Boston, where his 
Brother lived, in very good Circumstances. 

New Jersey ) PURSUANT to an Order made by 

Essex County J ss * Daniel Pierson and Jonathan 
Hampton, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas, for the County of Essex, upon 
the Petition of David Frazee, an insolvent Debtor of 
said County, and sundry of his Creditors : Notice is 
hereby given by the said Petitioners to all the Creditors 
of the said David Frazee, to shew Cause (if any they 
have) before the said Judges, at the Court-House at New- 
ark, in the said County of Essex, on Monday the second 
Day of June next, at two o' Clock in the Afternoon of the 
same Day, why an Assignment of the Estate of the said 
David Frazee, should not be made to the Assignees then 
and there to be appointed by the said Creditors, for the 
Use and Benefit of all the said David Frazee's Creditors, 
pursuant to the Prayer of the said Petition, and the said 
David Frazee discharged from all his Debts, according to 
an Act of the Governor, Council and General Assembly, 
passed in the fifth Year of his present Majesty's Reign, 
entitled, "An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors. 
Dated May 6, 1766. 

ALL persons indebted to the Estate of William Thom- 
son, 1 of Millstone, in the County of Sommerset, and Prov- 
ince of East New Jersey, Attorney at Law, deceased; 
either in Bills, Bonds, Notes, Bills of Costs, or otherwise, 
are desired to pay the same on, or before the first Day of 



i William Thomson was admitted as an attorney and counsellor of 
New Jersey, May 11, 1758. His will is dated September 14, 1765. In it he 
speaks of his wife Margaret, and children, whom he does not name. He 
devises real and personal estate, and names as executors his father, 
Benjamin Thomson, and his brother-in-law, Edmund Leslie, and Peter 
Schank. The will is witnessed by James Leslie, William Millan and 
Hugh Thomson. It was proved October 2, 1765. E. J. Wills, Liber H, 
page 551. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 113 

June next, to the Subscribers, Executors of the last Will 
and Testament of William Thomson, Esq, deceased, in 
order to prevent their being sued; and those Persons that 
have any demands against the said Estate, are desired to 
bring them in, properly attested to 

BENJAMIN THOMPSON, j 

PETER SCHENCK, > Executors. 

EDWARD LESLIE, ) 

April 25, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1218, May &th, 1766. 

On Wednesday, the 2ist of this inst. May, will be sold by 
public vendne, at the London Coffee House in this city, 
to be struck off at 7 o'clock in the evening, 
THE wreck of the Snow Nancy, as it now lies on Here- 
ford Bar, near Cape May, where the said snow was cast 
away; and as it is believed the said wreck may be got off 
by those, who can attend to it in warm weather, the pur- 
chaser will probably find himself possessed of a very good 
bargain. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1222, May 8, 
1766. 

New-Jersey, ) PURSUANT to an Order of Reune 
Middlesex County, ) ss * Runyon and Jonathan Frazee, 
Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Middlesex, upon the 
Petitions of Justus Walker and John Sparling, insolvent 
Debtors, and the Majority of their Creditors in Value: 
Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of the said Jus- 
tus Walker and John Sparling, to shew Cause (if any they 
have) before the said judges, on the Seventh Day of June 
next, at two o'Clock in the Afternoon, at the House of 
John Ross, Inn-Keeper, in Woodbridge, why an Assign- 



114 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ment of the Estates of said Justus Walker and John Spar- 
ling, should not be made according to the Prayers of the 
said Petitioners, to such Persons as shall be appointed, 
and the said Debtors discharged, pursuant to an Act of 
Assembly of this Province, entitled "An Act for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors." 

Dated May the I2th, 1766. 

WHEREAS Samuel Little, an insolvent debtor, and the 
major part, in value of his creditors, have presented their 
petition to us, Daniel Pierson and Jonathan Hampton, 
Esqrs, two of the judges of the inferior court of common 
pleas, for the county of Essex, praying that the estate of 
the said Samuel Little, may be assigned to such persons 
as shall be appointed, by said petitioners to dispose of the 
same for the benefit of said creditors, &c pursuant to an 
act of the governor, council and general assembly, of the 
province of New-Jersey, entitled "An Act for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors." These are therefore to give notice 
to all persons, that have any demands on him the said 
Samuel Little, to appear at the court-house at Newark in 
said county of Essex, on Monday the 9th day of June next, 
at three o'clock in the afternoon of the same day, (to shew 
cause if any they have) why the said Samuel Little, 
should not be admitted to the benefit of the said act, and 
thereupon discharged according to the directions thereof. 

Dated May the I2th, 1766. 

DANIEL PIERSON, 
JONATHAN HAMPTON. 

THESE are to give Notice, that Simon Lamberson, a 
Prisoner now in the Goal or Prison of the City of Perth 
Amboy, in the County of Middlesex, and Province of 
New-Jersey, hath applied unto Thomas Gach and Stephen 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 115 

Skinner, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas of the said County of Middlesex, 
by his petition, in Conjunction with the major Part of his 
Creditors in Value, for the benefit of the Act of Assembly 
of said Province of New-Jersey, lately made, entitled "An 
Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors," and hath taken 
the Oath by the said Act prescribed : Therefore his Cred- 
itors, and all Persons concerned, are hereby appointed to 
attend at the House of Elijah Dunham, Tavern-Keeper, 
in Perth-Amboy, on the fifth day of June next, to shew 
Cause (if any they have) why an Assignment of the Es- 
tate of the said Simon Lamberson, should not be made, 
and the said Simon Lamberson discharged, pursuant to 
the said Act. 

Perth-Amboy, May 10, 1766. 

New- Jersey, ) PURSUANT to an Order of Ben- 

Somerset County, j ss * jamin Thomson, and Philip 
Van Horn, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Somerset, upon the Pe- 
tition of Joseph Hussey, an insolvent Debtor, and the Ma- 
jority of his Creditors : Notice is hereby given to all 
the Creditors of said Joseph Hussey, to shew Cause (if 
any they have) before the said Judges, on Thursday, the 
Fifth Day of June next, at Two o'clock in the Afternoon 
of said Day, at the House of William Mellen, at Somerset 
Court House, why an Assignment should not be made to 
such Persons as shall be appointed, and the said Debtor 
discharged, pursuant to an Act of Assembly made in the 
Year of our Lord 1765, entitled "An Act for the Relief of 
Insolvent Debtors.'"' 

Millstone, April 30, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1219, May 15, 1766. 



Il6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Hunterdon, ss. Trenton, May 6, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris and William 
Clayton, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of the 
County of Hunterdon, upon the Petition of George 
Erwin, now confined in Trenton Goal, Notice is hereby 
given to the Creditors of said Erwin, that Saturday, the 
7th Day of June next, is appointed for the said Creditors 
to meet' at the House of Richard Coxe, Innholder, in 
Trenton, to show Cause (if any they have) why an As- 
signment of said Debtor's Estate should not be made, and 
the said Debtor discharged, agreeable to an Act lately 
made for that Purpose, intituled, "An Act for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors." The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
1957, May 15, 1766. 

MR. BRADFORD, 

That duty incumbent upon every honest man, to vindi- 
cate his character (when maliciously and unjustly as- 
persed) obliges me to beg you will take the trouble of giv- 
ing the annexed, a place in your next paper. 

LAST Monday, while a horse of mine was standing at 
Mr. John Moody's shop, (which I had sent there to be 
shod) Mr. Samuel Garrick coming along, stopped and 
asked whose horse it was, Mr. Moody answered, the horse 
belonged to me, upon which Mr. Garrick told him, that 
some time ago, I had taken up a very fine horse, which I 
wanted to conceal; he said it was true I had advertised 
him, but that I had pasted the advertisements on the tops 
of trees, with design they should not be seen. At this 
time one of my servants was standing by (unknown to 
Mr. Garrick) who said it was not so; that I had adver- 
tised him at the Robin Hood tavern, and also in the public 
papers. Ay, Ay, replied Mr. Garrick, he did advertise 
him in the public papers, but it was by a false colour, upon 
which my servant said it was a damned lie; Mr. Garrick 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 117 

replied poh, poh, I know better; and immediately left Mr. 
Moody's shop. As soon as my servant came home, he in- 
formed me what had passed. Early next morning I went 
to town, to be more fully informed about this affair, and 
found what my servant related, to be strictly true. I was 
really surprised to find a person entirely unknown to me 
(for till this moment I never saw him) taking so much 
pains to injure me. As soon as my business permitted, 
I sent him the following letter, which this great man 
(now grown proud by an office he unworthily holds) has 
not condescended to answer. 1 

"Extract of a Letter from an American gentleman in 
London, to his friend in New-Jersey. 

London, February 25, 1766. 

- I most joyfully congratulate you on so unexpect- 
ed a delivery from slavery and civil dissention by the 
repeal of the stamp act; which was carried in the com- 
mons the 2 ist inst. by a majority of 108 votes, and as a 
supply bill must pass the lords of course. The providen- 
tial change of the M y, from the most abandoned and 

execrable, to a set of as honest, upright, and amiable per- 
sonages as were to be found in. the nation, seemed to be 
the foundation for our deliverance. But their power 
would have proved equal to the task, had nc t our glorious 
HERO, our former deliverer, stood forth; and almost 
alone, supported our feeble unfashionable dying cause. 
He struck at the root; he openly denied the right of par- 
liament to impose internal taxations on the colonies. 
With the eloquence of a Demosthenes, . . . with the 
cool reasoning of a Hambden, . . . with the warmth 
of an American enthusiast, did this Great Man plead our 
desperate cause, and that of liberty, in defiance of R 1 

iHere follows the letter, signed John McPherson, and nearly a col- 
umn besides on the subject. 



Il8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

favour, popularity, friends, relations, dangers and disease. 
For hours could I expatiate, in heaping encomiums upon 
this saviour of our country; but you will hear them from 
all quarters. 

"Tho' private friendship would be a sufficient induce- 
ment for me to address you at present; yet I have now 
another motive, which is, and ever ought to be esteemed 
the greatest, I mean, .... the good of my country. 
Know then, that we have been SACRIFICED AND 

SOLD by our Ac T'S. If there be an exception, I 

believe yours is the man : But he has not power to do it, 
and therefore deserves no thanks. It is beyond descrip- 
tion (to me as well as to many others astonishing) that 
the colonies should, as they have hitherto done, trust their 

mOSt IMPORTANT INTERESTS With SUCH PERSONS. Do 

you imagine the people of England possessed with a 
spirit of divination or intuition, so as to discern truth 
from falsehood, by hearing only one side; which is, and 

always will be the case, so long as the M y can silence 

the Ag ts, while our enemies roar against us at leisure, 

and represent us in such colours, as their interest or mal- 
ice suggests, I say nothing but what falls infinitely short 
of what might be said, 'perfectly consistent with truth. 
It is certainly the duty of every leading man in the col- 
onies to use his utmost influence, for the appointment of 
able persons, who have natural attachments and connec- 
tions in the colonies; and that they may be sent as such 
men ought to be, . . . INDEPENDENT, ... by 
allowances sufficient to make them so." 

Let not the object vanish from your sight, . . 
Remember, 'tis your country's safety. 

VOLTAIRE. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1223, May 17, 
1766. 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. I IQ 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

LAST THURSDAY NIGHT was stolen out of Charles Gand- 
owen's shallop, at the Crooked Billet wharf, a small 
bale directed to Mr. James Sterling in Burlington, con- 
taining the following parcels and pieces of dry goods, 
viz. 

SEVEN and a quarter yards of double purple calico, 8 
yards of ditto, 13 yards of single purple ditto, I piece of 
double purple ditto, 5 and 3-4 yards of double purple cot- 
ton, 8 yards of ditto, 4 pair of men's brown thread hose, 
20 yards of white half yard persian, 3 Ib. of coloured 
thread, 2 Ib. of white ditto, No. 8, i Ib. of ditto, No. 12, 
I piece of brown quadruple Silesias, No. 31, i piece of 
ditto, No. 32, i piece of yard wide lawn, No. 1813, i piece 
of ditto, No. 281, i piece of long lawn, No. 141, i dozen 
of Kenting handkerchiefs, i dozen of chip hats, and i 
piece of Irish dowlas containing 43 yards. 

Whoever will apprehend the thief or thieves, so> that he 
or they may be brought to Justice, shall have the above 
reward of FIVE POUNDS or THREE POUNDS for the goods 
only, by applying to JOHN LAWRENCE, Esq; of Burling- 
ton, or to JOSEPH WHARTON, Junior, of this City. 

To BE SOLD, 

By public vendue, at the London coffee house, on Satur- 
day the 3ist of this instant, May, at six o'clock in the 
evening. 

THE wreck of the ship Ellis as she now lies on Abse- 
comb Beach, near Egg Harbour; And as it is .believed 
that sundry things of value belonging to said wreck, may 
yet be saved, especially at this moderate season; it is 
hoped that those who are acquainted with her situation, 
will give their attendance. 



120 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Mr. Garrigues's answer to Captain M'Pherson's piece 
in our last, is come to hand, but, for want of room, must 
be deferred till our next. The Pennsylvania Journal, 
No. 1224, May 22, 1766. 

Burlington, May 17. Yesterday our Chief Justice pas- 
sed Sentence of Death upon 2 Criminals, one a Girl for 
the Murder of her Bastard Child, the other a Fellow for 
Horse Stealing. 

New-Jersey ) -PURSUANT to an Order of the 



Somerset County f " Hon. Frederick Smyth and John 
Berrien, Esq; two of the Judges of the Supreme Court 
of Judicature, for the Province of New-Jersey, upon the 
several Petitions of George Remar and James Willson,, 
insolvent Debtors in the County of Somerset: Notice is 
hereby given by said Petitioners to all their Creditors, to 
shew Cause (if any they have) before the Judges afore- 
said, on Thursday the twelfth Day of June next, at Ten 
o'Clock in the Forenoon of said Day, at the Dwelling 
House of William Wright, Innholder at the Sign of the 
King's Arms at Perth-Amboy, why an Assignment of 
the Estates of the said George Remar and James Willson, 
should not be made to Persons then and there to be nom- 
inated by the said Judges, and the said George Remar and 
James Willson be thereupon discharged from their Con- 
finement, agreeable to the Directions of an Act of the 
Governor, Council and General Assembly of this Pro- 
vince, made and passed in the fifth Year of his present 
Majesty's Reign, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of in- 
solvent Debtors." 

Dated May 20, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1220, May 22, 1766. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 121 

PHILADELPHIA, May 22 

The Right Honourable Lord Viscount KILLMOREY 
has appointed the Reverend NATHANIEL EVANS, 1 
M. A. Missionary for Gloucester County, in New Jersey, 
his Lordship's Chaplain. 

Captain Wainwright, from Turk's Island, on the Tenth 
Instant, in Lat. 36, Long. 73 :/j.o, parted with Captain 
Wood, who sailed in Company with him, bound to Vir- 
ginia. . . . On Wednesday, the Fourteenth Instant, 
about twelve at Night, a little below Marcus Hook, Cap- 
tain Wainwright took the Owner (Mr. Hough) another 
Man, a Boy, three Women, and a Girl, out of a Shallop 
then lying at Anchor, from Port Penn, loaded with Tim- 
ber, that had been run down by a Schooner going down 
the River, by which she received so much Damage, that 
she could not be kept above Water. Just after he got 
them on board, a very heavy Squall of Wind and Rain 
came on, and next Morning the Shallop was drove on a 
Bank on the Jersey Shore. 

Philadelphia, May igth, 1766. 

WAS passed, last Saturday, in the Market, a THREE 
POUND Jersey Bill, for a THREE SHILLING one. Who- 
ever has passed the same, by applying to SAMUEL GAR- 
RIGUES, Clerk of the Market, proving their Property, 
and paying Charges, may have it again. 

i Nathaniel Evans was born in Philadelphia, June 8, 1742, and having 
graduated from the College in that city May 4, 1765, went to England, 
where he was ordained to the ministry, and where he received a com- 
mission from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts, to serve the people of Gloucester, New Jersey, as missionary. 
He labored there with great acceptance for two years, dying at Glou- 
cester, October 29, 1767. He is principally known for his Poems, which 
were published at Philadelphia in 1772, in a volume of about two hun- 
dred pages. Prefixed is a list of six hundred subscribers, in America 
and England, including many of the most prominent men of the day 
in literature, the church and in public life, among them Oliver Gold- 
smith, Esq., of London. Booksellers and printers took about two hun- 
dred copies more, so that an edition of upwards of eight hundred copies 
was taken up before publication. Some of the poems are quite meritor- 
ious, and gave promise of marked ability had the poet reached ma- 
turer years. 



122 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Owners and Possessors 
of the Meadows, adjoining on the Creeks, known by the 
Names of Hanby's Creek, and the Bout Creek, and on 
Delaware, in Penn's Neck, in the County of Salem, intend 
to petition the House of General Assembly of the Prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, at their next Sitting, to pass an 
Act for the Banking and Draining the said Meadows, 
and for the Maintaining and Supporting the Sluices, 
Dams and Banks, on the said Creeks and Meadows. 

THOMAS CARNEY, one of the Managers. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1952, May 22, 
1766. 

On Saturday last, on Account of the glorious News of 
the Repeal of the Stamp-Act, an elegant Entertainment 
was prepared in the City of Burlington, at which his Ex- 
cellency the GOVERNOR, and the principal Inhabitants of 
the Place were present; when the following Toasts were 
drank, viz. The KING, The QUEEN, and ROYAL FAMILY. 
The Parliament of Great Britain. The present worthy 
Ministry. The Governor and Province. The glorious 
Mr. Pitt. Lord Cambden. The Marquis of Rocking- 
ham. General Comray. Lord Dartmouth. General 
Howard. Colonel Barre. Doctor Franklin. Trecothic 
and Hanbury. Friends to America, on this and the 
other Side of the Atlantic. May the Stamp Act be bur- 
ied in Oblivion. Increase to the Manufactures of Britain, , 
and Prosperity to the Agriculture of America. 

The city was handsomely illuminated; Bonfires were 
lighted, and other Demonstrations of Joy shewn; and 
every thing conducted with the greatest Order and 
Decorum. 

On Tuesday Evening, the 2Oth Instant, the House of 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 123 

James Dilkes, Farmer, of Mantua Creek, Gloucester 
County, was struck by Lightning, when his Wife was 
instantaneously killed, and three of his Children badly 
hurt; a Dog which was lying at the Children's Feet, was 
burnt to Death. The Lightning came down the Chimney, 
the Top of which it shattered to Pieces, and tore the End 
of the House asunder. 

Philadelphia, May 26, 1766. 

THOSE Gentlemen in Burlington, and Burlington 
County, New- Jersey, who are indebted to the late Part- 
nership of FRANKLIN and HALL, for the Pennsylvania 
Gazette, are hereby requested to pay their respective Bal- 
ances to DANIEL ELLIS, Esq; of Burlington, who is now 
furnished with the different Accounts, and properly im- 
powered to receive the Money, and give Discharges for 
the same. 

Philadelphia, May 26, 1766. 

RUN away, last night, from the subscriber, living in 
Burlington, New-Jersey, a servant man, named George 
Dailey, Englishman born, 30 years of age, about 5 feet 
6 or 7 inches high, long black straight hair, swarthy com- 
plexion, marked with small-pox, remarkable large mouth, 
and crooked shins; had on when he went away, a short 
grey coat, a pair of blue duffil trowsers, an ozenbrigs shirt, 
an old felt hat, and an old pair of shoes; has been a sol- 
dier about three years ago, and it is supposed will strive 
to enlist himself again. Whoever takes up said servant 
and brings him to his master, or secures him in any gaol, 
so as his master may have him again, shall receive Forty 
Shillings reward, and reasonable charges, paid by 

JOSEPH HEIGHT. 

N. B. This is to forewarn all masters of vessels, and 
officers of the army, not to harbour said servant. 



124 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

JAMES STERLING, 

Of the City of Burlington, has removed from the Place 
where he lately kept Shop, to the Corner House, where 
Elizabeth Johnston lately dwelt, near the Court-House, in 
said City, and continues to carry on Business as usual. 

HE has a general assortment of Goods, and will sell at 
the lowest Prices for Cash. All Persons indebted to said 
Sterling (particularly those whose Accounts have been 
long standing) are requested to make speedy Payment, 
and those who have any Demands against him are desired 
to send in their Accounts. 

Mansfield, Burlington County, May 15, 1766. 
WHEREAS Hester, the Wife of me the Subscriber, hath 
eloped from me, and, for a considerable Time past, hath 
behaved in a very undutiful and indiscreet Manner; this 
is to forewarn all Persons trusting her on my account 
from the Date hereof, as I am determined to pay no Debts 
of her contracting. 

DAVID WRIGHT. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1953, May 29, 
1766. 

On Tuesday, the 2Oth instant, the public COMMENCE- 
MENT was held in the COLLEGE of this city before a very 
numerous and splendid audience. . . . 

3. The Degree of Master of Arts was conferred on 
Mr. Henry Waddel of New- York, and Mr. Abraham 
Ogden of New-Jersey, who had formerly taken their 
Bachelor's degree here. 

4. The honorary degree of Master of Arts was at the 
same time conferred on Joseph Reed, Esq; of Trenton 
and Mr. James Wilson, one of the Tutors in this college, 
in regard to their particular learning and merit. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 12 5 

THE flying machine, kept by John Barnhill, in Elmn 
street near Vine street Philadelphia, and John Masherew, 
at the Blazing Star, does perform the journey from Phila- 
delphia to New- York in two days, and from thence to 
Philadelphia in two days also; a circumstance greatly to 
the advantage of the traveller, as there is no water car- 
riage, and consequently nothing to impede the journey. 
It has already been performed to the general satisfaction 
of many genteel people. They set off from Philadelphia 
and New-York on Mondays and Thursdays, punctually 
at sun rise, and change their passengers at Prince-Town 
and return to Philadelphia and New- York the following 
days, each passenger paying ten shillings to Prince-Town, 
and ten shillings to Powle's hook opposite New- York, 
ferriage free, and three pence each mile any distance be- 
tween. Gentlemen and ladies who are pleased to favour 
us with custom, may depend on due attendance and civil 
usage, 

By their humble servants, , 

JOHN BARNHILL, 
and JOHN MASHEREW. 

MR. BRADFORD, 

In the midst of a profound peace, it is a little surprising 
that from the craggs of Mount-Pleasant, a war should be 
declared against me, and I should receive a full broadside 
from a terrible privateer, expect no quarter, and pyrati- 
cally be threatened to be sunk, unless I immediately strike, 
give up all my enemy should ask, and submit to his lawless 
mercy. 

I have never been privateering, am unacquainted with 
the rules of war, or the profits arising from it : I shall 
therefore content myself on shore, defend my property 
from privateers, and my character from the attacks of 
privateering men. 



126 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/66 

I have seen a piece signed by John M'Pherson printed 
in your Journal of No. 1223, which I apprehend had a 
malicious design to asperse my reputation, I scarcely 
thought it worthy my answer, and should have treated it 
with the same disregard as I did his unparralleled letter 
to me. If the hero had confined his calumniation to the 
people of this province only, where I was brought up, and 
my true character known, I should have rested contented. 
But he has endeavored to stigmatize me in the Jerseys 
also, where I have some connections which may injure 
me if I do not vindicate myself; and I am apprehensive 
he may 'ere long scatter his grape-shot across the Atlan- 
tick, I should not have given the public and myself this 
trouble. 

I know the freedom of the press is one of the greatest 
bulwarks of British liberty. I hope therefore for an equal 
indulgence with others, and that should room be wanting 
in your next Journal, you will be pleased to print this on 
a separate half sheet, and send the copies of it with your 
papers to each of your correspondents in this province, 
in the Jerseys, and if you please in New-York and Mary- 
land. 

Yours, S. G. 

To the PUBLIC. 

JOHN M'PHERSON hath charged me with saying that 
he had "taken up a fine horse which he wanted to con- 
ceal" .... 

I saw a horse at John Moody's smiths shop, which I 
knew (-without asking any questions) to have been sold 
at vendue at the London Coffee-house to Mr. MTherson. 
Upon this occasion I inadvertently, without any bad de- 
sign, or the least malice, mentioned some part only of 
what I had heard in relation to another horse, which will 
appear by the following affirmation. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

City of Philadelphia, ss. BE it remembered, that 

on the 1 7th day of 

May, 1766, Before me Jacob Duche, one of the justices of 
Philadelphia, Aquila Richards, of the county of Philadel- 
phia, yeoman, cometh, (and being one of the people called 
Quakers) on his solemn affirmation saith .... 

[Signed] AQUILA RICHARDS. 
Affirmed the same day 

and year before 
JACOB DUCHE. 
Thus it must appear that I was not the first inventor 

of this story 

I shall now take my leave of the hauty gentleman, and 
let him know if he chooses to write any more, I shall treat 
him and his scrawl with the contempt they may justly 
deserve. 1 The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1225, May 29, 
1766. 

To the PUBLIC. 

May 20, 1766. 

I HAVE this instant seen a most extraordinary perform- 
ance of Mr. Garrigues's, to be published gainst me, from 
what he asserts and what I have published, it is now very 
evident, that 'he or I must be a notorious villain. I hopei 
the public will suspend their judgment, 'till I have made a 
reply; and then, if I do not fully vindicate myself, and*, 
shew him in his proper colours, may I be detested by all 
honest men; may my children never think of their father, 
nor hear him named, without bitterly cursing the infam- 
ous wretch, from whom they sprung.' 1 

JOHN M'PHERSON. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1225, May 29, 
1766. 

1 There are three columns of this matter in No. 1223 and No. 1225. 

2 This answer three and one-half columns in length, appears in No. 
1226. 



128 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Extract from a Letter from Burlington, in New-Jersey, 
May 27, 1766. A certain George Barley, of this City, on 
Friday the 23d of this Instant, went to Bed well, and 
never awoke till Tuesday the 27th, so he slept 4 Nights 
and 3 Days, and awoke in a perfect State of Health, and 
said he was neither hungry nor thirsty. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. i [1221], May 29, 
1766. 

New York, June 3, 1766. 

TEN POUNDS REWARD. 

RAN away from the Subscriber, in Passacak, in Morris 
County, New-Jersey, in March, 1765, a Mulatto Man 
Slave named TOM, but now goes by the name of JACOB, 
about 5 Feet 6 Inches high, with long bushy Hair, and has 
a small Scar on his Forehead. About ten Days ago he 
was taken up at New-York, on Suspicion of being a Run- 
away, but as they could not discover that he was such, he 
was discharged, and it is supposed that he is now in this 
City. Whoever takes up said Slave, and secures him in 
any of his Majesty's Gaols so that I may have him again, 
shall have the above Reward, from 

JOHN VANDORN. 

New York, June 3, 1766. 

SIX POUNDS REWARD. 

RAN away from the Subscriber, in Shrewsbury, the 
two following Negroes, viz. Pompey, a lusty Fellow, 
about 35 Years of Age, 5 Feet 8 or 9 Inches high. Had 
on red Duffel Trowsers, and Waistcoat, speaks pretty 
good English. NERO, a slender young Fellow, about 25 
years old, speaks very bad English; had on a red Duffel 
Waistcoat, and brown Broadcloth Breeches. They went 
away in a small Boat, 16 Feet Keel, a black Bottom, and 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 29 

her Wales painted with Spanish-Brown, had 4 Oars on 
board. Whoever brings the said Negroes to their Master, 
or secures them in any of his Majesty's Gaols, so that he 
may have them again, shall receive the above Reward, be- 
sides all reasonable Charges, from 

JOHN MORRIS. 

RUN AWAY from Ringwood Iron Works, in East- 
Jersey, the 29th of May, at Night, the following Miners, 
Carl Bruderlin, about 6 feet high, pock-pitted, and sandy- 
hair'd, dark complexion, and 38 years old. Joseph Lan- 
wieder, about 5 feet 7, bandy-legg'd, 36 years old. Mat- 
thias Ortman, about 5 feet 6, yellowish hair, and about 24 
years old. Bartholemew Baum, much the same size, with 
black hair. Simon Denck, only one eye, short hair, about 
25 years old. Peter Hutschlar, about 5 feet 6, thin and 
yellowish air. John Durck, short and pock-pitted. 

They are all Germans, and talk very little English, had 
on when they went away soldiers jackets, and carried with 
them, their miner's clothes turn'd up with red, likewise 
guns and hammers. 

As these men are still engaged by contract for 3 years 
and 4 months, and have been brought into this country 
from Europe at a very great expense, all gentlemen, well- 
wishers to their country, are respectfully desired not to 
engage these people in their service, but to get them se- 
cured in any of his Majesty's gaols. Five pounds reward 
is offered for any one so secured, and if sent back to the 
works, all charges besides. 

PETER HASENECLEVER. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1222, June 5, 1766. 

TO BE SOLD. 

A House and lot of ground, situate in Kingsbury, in 



I3O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

the township of Nottingham, and county of Burlington, 
on the public road between Trenton bridge and the ferry, 
containing in breadth 60 feet, and in depth 181 feet : The 
house is almost new, and neatly finish'd, and the lot in- 
closed with a good board fence, having a pleasant garden, 
there is a well in the yard and on the lot adjoining a good 
new stable and coach-house to be sold with the above. 
The purchaser may have a lease of the lot on which the 
stable &c. stands, paying Thirty Shillings per annum. 
Any one inclining to purchase, may know the terms, by 
applying to Doctor Ralph Asheton, in Philadelphia, or 
Mr. John Barns, near Trenton bridge. The Pennsylva- 
nia Journal, No. 1226, June 5, 1766. 

Hunterdon, New -Jersey, ss. Trenton, May 28, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of the 
Court of Common Pleas, for the County of Hunterdon, 
upon the petition of Benjamin Smalley, and the greater 
Part of his Creditors; Notice is hereby given to- the Cred- 
itors of said Smalley, that Saturday, the 2ist Day of June 
next, is appointed by the said Judges for the Creditors of 
the said Smalley to meet at the House of Robert Ruther- 
ford, Innholder, in Trenton, to shew Cause (if any they 
have) why an Assignment of the said Debtor's Estate 
should not be made, and the said Debtor discharged, 
agreeable to an Act, lately made for that Purpose, inti- 
tuled, an act for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

Windsor, in Middlesex County, East N. Jersey, 

May 12, 1766. 

WHEREAS my Wife hath eloped from me, and run me 
in Debt; this serves to forbid all Persons from trusting 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 13 x 

her on my Account, as I will pay no Debts of her contract- 
ing from the Date hereof. 

CORNELIUS SWAIN. 



WHEREAS a Petition was presented to the Honourable 
House of Assembly of the Province of New-Jersey, at 
their Sessions in May, 1765, by Robert Pearson and 
others, of the Township of Nottingham, and County of 
Burlington, for leave to bring in a Bill to make that Part 
of Delaware River between Duck Island and the Jersey 
Shore, and up Watson's Creek as far as Saltas's Bank, a 
good and lawful Fence; now these are to inform those 
whom it may concern, that they make their Objections (if 
any they have) why the same should not pass into a Law, 
at the next Sessions of Assembly, for the Province afore- 
said. 

WAS stolen, on the 7th of May last, from Francis 
Quick's Bleach-yard, of Am well Township, Hunterdon 
County, in West New- Jersey, sundry Lots of Goods, viz. 
three homespun Shifts, one Pair of homespun Sheets, 
three Pillow Cases, a long Calico double Gown, purple 
and white, the Figure on one Side much smaller than the 
other, one striped Linsey Petticoat, with a deep and pale 
blue, the white is Cotton, and bound round with blue Cal- 
icoe ; six Womens Caps, one of them remarkable, the Bor- 
der Lawn Needle-worked, and four Check Handkerchiefs. 
Said Goods are supposed to be stolen by a Woman, who 
pretends to be a Fortune-teller ; she stoops in her walking ; 
her Habit as near as can be remembered is a black and 
blue striped Linsey short Gown, a Linsey Petticoat, and a 
Leaden coloured Stuff Bonnet. Whoever secures said 
Goods, so that they may be had again, or the Thief or 
Thieves, that Justice may be executed upon them, shall re- 



132 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ceive Forty Shillings Reward, paid by the above men- 
tioned FRANCIS QUICK, or MOSES VANCRUST, in More- 
land Township, Philadelphia County. 

N. B. It is supposed the Person who holds the Goods 
went toward Trenton, as a Horse was taken, and seen on 
the Road coming from that Way. The Pennsylvania 
Gazette, No. 1954, June 5, 1766. 

Province of New Jersey, ^ PURSUANT to an Order of 
Essex County, seal. ) Daniel Pierson, and Jonathaa 
Hampton, Esqrs, two of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for the County aforesaid; Notice is hereby 
given, that Josiah Davis, Jun, an insolvent Debtor, living 
in the said County, and the major Part in Value, of his 
Creditors, have petitioned that he the said Josiah Davis, 
may be admitted to the Benefit of an Act of the Assembly 
of New- Jersey aforesaid, made in the Year of our Lord 
1765, entitled an act for the relief of insolvent debtors, 
and that he the said Davis intends to take the Benefit of 
the said Act, on Thursday, the third Day of July next, at 
three o'Clock in the Afternoon, before the said Judges, at 
the House of Broughton Reynolds, in Elizabeth-Town, 
in the County aforesaid, where any Person that has any 
Objection to make, may be heard. 

WHEREAS Margaret Grime, 

W^ife of Robert Grime, Hatter, (who has a Residence 
in the City of Philadelphia) has behaved herself in a very 
extravagant and turbulent and indecent Manner; there- 
fore, I the said Robert Grime, desire that no Person or 
Persons, in any Place whatsoever, will entertain or trust 
the said Margaret Grime, on my Account, for that I will 
pay no Debt of her contracting. 

New-Brunswick, March 20, 1766. 

ROBERT GRIME. 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 133 

Middlesex County, East N. Jersey, June n, 1766. 
These are to forewarn all Persons from taking a Note 
from the Executors of JOHN Ross, late of Woodbridge, 
deceased, signed by PRUDENCE GEDESS, or with her Mark, 
as she is determined not to pay any such Note, which shall 
be produced against her, without she is compelled to it by 

a due Course of Law. 

PRUDENCE GEDESS. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, 
No. 1223, June 12, 1766. 

To be sold, a plantation of about 200 acres, situate in 
the Jersies opposite Point no Point, about 4 miles from 
Philadelphia; about 17 acres of good meadow ground, 
two frame houses. For further particulars apply to 
Michael Hullings, near the Battery. 

May 27th, 1766. 

WHEREAS Margaret, the wife of JaniS M'Farlin, of 
Hopewell Township, in Cumberland county, hath eloped 
from her said husband, and behaved in an unbecoming 
manner, and as he thinks she will run him in debt, to< the 
prejudice of himself and family, he takes this method to 
forewarn all or any person or persons from trusting her 
on his account, as he will pay no debts of her contracting 
after this date, until she returns to her duty. 

TO BE SOLD, BY 
DANIEL RUNDLE, 

At his store in Front street, near the corner of Walnut 
street, very cheap for ready money or credit. 

A Variety of European and India goods suitable to* the 
season. 

N. B. Three or four industrious men, with their fam- 
ilies, will meet with suitable encouragement, and be set- 



134 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

tied by the subscriber on a tract of land containing about 
1400 acres, situate in Salem county, West New- Jersey, 30 
miles from Philadelphia. Likewise mechanics, husband- 
men, &c. inclinable to embark for St. Augustine, in East- 
Florida, may receive information of that colony by ap- 
plying to 

DANIEL RUNDEL. 

He has to let on ground rent, a lot of ground (18 feet 
front) on Third-street, nearly opposite St. Paul's church. 
Also to dispose of church lottery tickets.- 

RUN away from Ringwood iron works, in East-Jersey 
the 2pth o*f May, at night, the following Miners. 

Carl Bruderiein, about 6 feet high, pock-pitted and 
sandy hair. Henry Schaeffer, about 5 feet 6 inches high, 
black hair, dark complexion, and 38 years old. Joseph 
Langwieder, about 5 feet 6 inches high, bandy legg'd, 
about 36 years old. Matthias Ortman, about 5 feet 6 
inches high, yellowish hair and 24 years old. Bartholo- 
mew Baum, much the same size, but black hair. Wilholm 
Konig, about the same size, and whitish hair. Simon 
Denck, with one eye only, short hair and 25 years old. 
Peter Hutschlar, about 5 feet 6 inches high, thin and yel- 
lowish hair. John Durck, short and pock pitted. They 
are all Germans and talk very little English, had on when 
they went away soldiers jackets, and carried with them 
their miners cloaths, black with red cuffs, also guns and 
hangers. As these men are still engaged by contract to 
serve three months 1 and 4 months, and have been brought 
into this country from Europe at a very great expense, all 
gentlemen, well wishers to their country, are respectfully 
desired, not to engage these people in their service, but 
to get them secured in any of his Majesty's goals. FIVE 

1 An error for "years." 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 135 

POUNDS reward is offered, for any one so secured, and if 
sent back to the works, all charges will be paid besides, 
by applying to John Ross, merchant, in Philadelphia, or 
to the subscriber at Ringwood. 1 

PETER HASEN CLEVER. 2 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1227, June I2> 
1776. 

Burlington, Sixth Month Qth, 1766. 
THE Subscriber having removed from Philadelphia, re- 
quests such as are indebted to him to make Payment to 
Samuel Pleasants, Merchant, in Second-street, between 
Market and Chestnut-streets, who is authorised to receive 
my Debts, and give Discharges for all Sums paid him on 

Account of 

BENJAMIN SWETT, jun. 

Philadelphia, June 12, 1766. 

ALL persons who have any Demands against the Estate 
of William Rea, of Kingwood, in New Jersey, Bankrupt, 
are requested to send in their Accounts to Samuel Purvi- 
ance, senior, James Eddy and Randle Mitchell, Assignees, 
within a Month from this Date, to enable them to strike 
a Dividend of what Money is received. They are desired 
to leave their Accounts at RANDLE MITCHELL'S store, in 
Water-street. 

FORTY SHILLINGS Reward. 

RUN away, in the' Night of the 3d of this Instant, from 
the Subscriber, living in Deptford Township, Gloucester 
County, West New-Jersey, An Irish Servant Lad, named 
Richard Thetford, about 17 Years of Age, and about 5 
Feet 5 or 6 Inches high, of a fair Complexion, marked 

lit will be noticed that two additional runaways are here described, 
besides those mentioned in the advertisement on page 129, ante. 
2 For sketch of Peter Hasenclever, see N. J. Archives, IX., 585. 



136 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

a little with the Small-Pox, has brown Hair, cut close 
upon the Top, and short behind, he is a smart looking Fel- 
low and very talkative; has been in this Country about 
two Years and a Half : Had on when he went away, an 
old Castor Hat, lightish-coloured Homespun Woollen 
Jacket, coarse Ozenbrigs Shirt, coarse Tow Trowsers, a 
Pair of grey Yarn Stockings, darned at the Heels, new 
Calf-skin Shoes, and a Pair of large Pinchbeck Buckles. 
Whoever takes up said Servant, and secures him in any 
Gaol, so that his Master may have him again, shall have 
the above-mentioned Reward, or if brought home, reason- 
able Charges, paid by 

JOSHUA LORD. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to carry him 
away, or any other Person to harbour or conceal him, 
otherwise they must answer it at their Peril. 'Tis sup- 
posed he will make towards New- York. 

Hunterdon County, New- Jersey, ss. June 4, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris and Will- 
iam Clayton, two of his Majesty's Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, for the County of Hunterdon, upon the 
Petition of Alexander Kirkpatrick, an insolvent Debtor, 
and the major Part in Value of his Creditors, Notice is 
hereby given to the Creditors of the said Alexander Kirk- 
patrick, to shew Cause (if any they have) before the said 
Judges, en Saturday, the Fifth Day of July next, at the 
House of Richard Coxe, in Trenton, why an Assignment 
of the Estate of said Alexander Kirkpatrick should not 
be made, according to the Prayer of the said Petitioners, 
to such Persons as shall be appointed, and the said Debtor 
discharged, pursuant to an Act of Assembly, of this Prov- 
ince, intituled, an act for the relief of insolvent debtors. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1955, June 12, 1766. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 137 

RUN away, on the 24th Day of April past, from the 
Sheriff of Cape May County, West New-Jersey, one John 
Buck, about Fifty Years of Age; he was in Custody on 
three Indictments, found against him by the Grand In- 
quest, he is a lusty Man, took his Wife and Child with 
him, and went over Delaware Bay, it is supposed, in a 
Boat, to Lewes-Town. Whoever takes up the said John 
Buck, and brings him to the Subscriber, shall have THREE 
POUNDS Reward, paid by 

SYLVANUS TOWNSEND, Sheriff. 

Burlington, June 19, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of Robert Smith and Thomas 
Rodman, Esquires, Judges of the Court of Common Pleas 
for the County of Burlington aforesaid, upon the Petition 
of John Wright, Carpenter, of the said County, zvith the 
major Part in Value of his Creditors, Notice is hereby 
given to all the Creditors of the said John Wright, that 
the fourth -Day of July next, being the sixth Day of the*. 
Week, is appointed, by the said Judges, for the said Cred- 
itors to meet, at the House of Lambert Barnes, in the City 
of Burlington, at Two o' Clock in the Afternoon, to shew 
Cause, if any they have, why the said John Wright 
should not assign over all his Estate to the Use of all his 
Creditors, and be admitted to the Benefit of the late Act of 
Assembly of this Province of New-Jersey, for the Relief 
of insolvent Debtors. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in the City of 
Burlington, a Mulatto Servant Man, named Lezvis, about 
5 Feet TO Inches high, stoops in his Walk, round Shins, 
the Calves of his Legs very high up to his Hams, long 
Visaged, grey Eyes, very much freckled: Had on when 
he went away, a Homespun Cloth Coat, of a reddish 



138 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

brown Colour, black Jacket and Breeches, nezv Pumps 
with large Silver Buckles in them; it is supposed he ^vent 
off with one John Sidenham, lately enlisted in one of the 
Royal American Battalions. Whoever takes up said Ser- 
vant, and secures him in any of his Majesty's Goals, so 
that his Master may have him again, shall receive the 
above Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by me, 

SAMUEL How. 

N. B. The above Servant is so zvhite, that he hardly 
would be taken for a Midattoe, only by his Hair. 

TWENTY DOLLARS Reward. 

Millstone, June n, 1766. 

MADE his escape from the Goal of the County of Som- 
erset, and Province of New- Jersey, a certain Doctor An- 
anias Randall, aged about Twenty-five Years, born upon 
Long-Island, about Five Feet 6 Inches high, dark brown 
Hair, commonly wears it cued, fair Skin, black Eyes; took 
with him a Stuff Coat, Buckskin Breeches, generally 
wears Ruffles. Whoever takes up the aforesaid Person, 
and brings him to the Subscriber at Millstone, shall re- 
ceive the above Reward, and all reasonable Charges, 
paid by 

JOB STOCKTON, High Sheriff, or 
CORNELIUS LOTT, Sub-Sheriff. 

Likewise made his Escape from the Goal of Somerset 
County aforesaid, one Robert Mouston, a Taylor by 
Trade, born in Scotland, about Five Feet Six Inches high, 
black Hair, fair Skin, wore a blue Broadcloth Coat and 
Breeches, and a red Vest. Whoever takes up the afore- 
said Person, and brings him to the Subscriber, at Mill- 
stone, shall receive TEN DOLLARS Reward, and all reason- 
able Charges, paid by 

SAMUEL BREWER, Goaler. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 139 

Hunterdon County, ss. Trenton, June 7, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris,, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of 
the County of Hunterdon, upon the Petition of James Os- 
bourn, and Frederick Knabe, now confined in Trenton 
Goal, Notice is hereby given to the Creditors of the said 
Osbourn and Knabe, that Saturday, the 28th Instant, is 
appointed for the said Creditors to meet at the House of 
Joseph Yard, Innholder in Trenton, to shew Cause ( if any 
they have) why an Assignment of the said Debtors Es- 
tates should not be made, and the said Debtors discharged, 
agreeable to an Act lately made for that Purpose, inti- 
tuled, an act for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

Hunterdon County, ss. Trenton, June n, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges of 
the County of Hunterdon, upon the Petition of Mark 
Hann, now confined in Goal, Notice is hereby given to the 
Creditors of the said Mark Hann, that Saturday, the 28th 
Instant, is appointed for the said Creditors to meet at the 
House of Joseph Yard, Innholder in Trenton, to shew 
Cause (if any they have) why an Assignment of the said 
Debtor's Estate should not be made, and the said Debtor 
discharged, agreeable to an Act lately made for that pur- 
pose, intituled, an act' for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

Hunterdon County, ss. June 10, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, Judges of the inferior Court of 
Common Pleas for the County of Hunterdon, upon the 
Petition of Abraham Smith, of Amwell, in said County, 
and the major Part in Value of his Creditors; Notice is 
hereby given to all the Creditors of said Abraham Smith, 
that Monday, the 3Oth Day of this Instant, is appointed 



140 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

by the said Judges for the Creditors to meet at the Court 
House in Trenton, at Three o' Clock in the Afternoon, to 
shew Cause (if any they have) why the said Abraham 
Smith should not assign over his Estate and Effects, and 
be admitted to the Benefit of an Act of the Province of 
New-Jersey, passed in the Fifth Year of his Majesty's 
Reign, intituled an act for the relief of insolvent debtors. 

Hunter don County, ss. Trenton, June 9, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of William Morris, and Will- 
iam Clayton, Esquires, tzvo of his Majesty's Judges of the 
Court of Common Pleas for the County of Hunterdon, 
upon the petition of Abraham Marlatt, and the major Part 
in Value of his Creditors; Notice is hereby given to the\ 
Creditors of the said Abraham Marlatt, that Saturday, 
the Fifth Day of July next, is appointed by the said 
Judges, for the creditors of the said Marlatt, to meeit at 
the House of Richard Cox, Innholder, in Trenton, to shew 
Cause (if any they have) why an Assignment of the said 
Debtor's Estate should not be made, and the said Debtor 
discharged, agreeable to an Act of Assembly, lately made 
for that Purpose, intituled, "An Act for the Relief of in- 
solvent Debtors." 

Cumberland County, West New-Jersey, June 12, 1766 
Pursuant to an order of Ephraim Seely, and Alexander 
Moore, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for the county aforesaid, Notice is hereby 
given to all the creditors of Edward Wilson, an insolvent 
debtor, now confined in Bridgeton, that on the petition of 
the said Edward Wilson, with the major part in value of 
his Creditors, the judges aforesaid have appointed Mon- 
day, the 1 4th day of July next, for the creditors of the 
said Edward Wilson, to meet at Cohansey-bridge, to shew 
cause, if any they have, why an assignment of the said 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 14! 

insolvent debtor's estate should not be made, and the 
debtor discharged, agreeable to the late act of General 
Assembly, made and provided for that purpose. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1956, June 19, 1766. 

Three Pounds Reward, 

RUN away from the Subscriber, on Monday the 2ist of 
April last, a yellowish Negro Fellow, named Bill, former- 
ly belonging to Mr. Cornelius Clopper, at Rariton Land- 
ing, in New-Jersey, appears to be about 20 or 22 years of 
Age, about 5 Feet 6 Inches in Height, speaks good Eng- 
lish and Low Dutch fluently, has a Scar across the Bridge 
of his Nose. He is a Baker by Trade, and understands 
his Business very well. Had on when he went away, an 
old red Cloth Jacket, a Pair of old Homespun Trowsers, 
and an Iron Collar; which last it is supposed he has found 
Assistance to get taken off. Whoever takes up and re- 
turns, or secures him so that I may get him again, shall 
have THREE POUNDS Reward for their Trouble, if taken 
in this City, and FOUR POUNDS if taken out of it, besides 
all necessary Expenses. All Masters of Vessels and 
other Persons, are warned not to carry off, conceal or har- 
bour the said Run-away, as they would avoid a Prosecu- 
tion in the Law. John Klein, 

New York, May i, 1766. 

N. B. No higher Reward will be given. 

1 IN Pursuance of an Order made by 

^' \ ss ' Benjamin Thompson, and Philip Van 
Home, Esqrs. Two of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for the County of Somerset, and Province of 
East New-Jersey, upon the Petition o>f John Mullison, 
an insolvent Debtor; Notice is hereby given, by the said 
Petitioner, to all the Creditors of the said John Mullison, 
to shew Cause, if any they have, before the said Judges 



I4 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

at Somerset Conrt-House, on Monday the seventh Day 
of July next, at two of the Clock on said Day, being the 
Day and Place appointed by the said Judges for that 
Purpose, why an Assignment of the said John Mullison's 
Estate should not be made to Persons then and there to 
be nominated, and the said Petitioner be thereupon dis- 
charged, according to an Act of the Governor, Council, 
and General Assembly of the Province aforesaid, made 
and passed at Burlington, in the fifth Year of His Majes- 
ty's Reign, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." Dated June 10, 1766. 

New-Jersey, ) PURSUANT to an order of Daniel 

Essex-County ) Pierson, and Jonathan Hampton, 

Esqrs; two of the judges of the court of common pleas 
for the county of Essex, upon the petition of Joseph 
Smith, an insolvent debtor, and the major part of his 
creditors, in value, praying that said insolvent's estate 
may be assigned to persons appointed by said creditors, to 
be disposed of for the benefit of his creditors ; pursuant to 
an act of the governor, council and general assembly of 
the province of New-Jersey, entitled, "An act for the re- 
lief of insolvent debtors." These are therefore to give 
notice to all persons that have any demands against the 
said Joseph Smith, that they appear at the court-house in 
Newark, in said county of Essex, on Monday the 2ist 
day of July next, by four of the clock, afternoon, to shew 
cause, if any they have, why the said Joseph Smith, may 
not be discharged agreeable to the directions of said act. 
Newark, June 18, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of Benjamin Thompson, and 
Philip Van Home, Esqrs : two of the Judges of the Court 
of Common Pleas, for the County of Somerset, upon the 
Petition of Garrit Brewer, an insolvent Debtor, and the 



'1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 143 

Majority of his Creditors : Notice is hereby given to all 
the Creditors of said Garrit Brewer, to shew Cause (if 
any they have) before the said Judges at Milstone, on 
Monday the I4th Day of July, at 2 o' Clock in the After- 
noon of the said Day, why an Assignment of the said 
Debtor's Estate, should not be made to such Persons as 
shall be appointed, and said Debtor discharged, pursuant 
to an Act of Assembly, made in the Fifth Year of his pre- 
sent Majesty's Reign, entitled, "An Act for the Relief of 
insolvent Debtors." 

Dated this ifth of June 1766. 

New- Jersey ) PURSUANT to an order of Thorn- 
Middlesex County J S as Gach, and Stephen Skinner, 
Esqrs; two of the judges of the court of Common pleas, 
for the county of Middlesex, upon the petition of the 
majority in value O'f the creditors of Rensselaer Will- 
iams, an insolvent debtor; notice is hereby given to all 
the creditors of the said Rensselaer Williams, to shew 
cause (if any they have) before the said judges, on the 
4th day of July next, at two o'clock in the afternoon 
of said day, at the house of Elijah Dunham, innkeeper 
in the city of Perth-Amboy, why an assignment of the 
estate of the said Rensselaer Williams, according to the 
prayer of said petitioners, should not be made to such 
persons as shall be appointed, and the said debtor dis- 
charged; pursuant to an act of assembly of this prov- 
ince made in the year of our Lord 1765, entitled, "An act 
for the relief of insolvent debtors." June I4th, 1766. 
The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1224, 
June 19, 1766. 

Woodbridge, (East-New-Jersey) June 5, 1766. 
Mr. PRINTER. 
YESTERDAY being the Birth-Day of our most gracious 



144 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Sovereign, George the third, the Sons of Liberty belong- 
ing to this Town, assembled at the Liberty Oak, on the 
Square, making a Company of many Hundreds, to cele- 
brate the same, and publicly to testify their Joy at the 
Justice and Equity of the British Legislature, in repealing 
the American Stamp Act. The Morning was ushered in 
with the Beat of Drum, and Sound of Trumpet, by which 
the Sons of Liberty were soon assembled. A large Ox 
was roasted whole, and Liquor of different Kinds in great 
Plenty provided for the Company. His Majesty's Col- 
ours were displayed in different Parts of the Square, and 
Liberty Oak was handsomely decorated. The Ladies 
likewise, genteely dressed, graced the Entertainments of 
the Day, dined principally upon Plumb Puddings in Hon- 
our to the Queen, and afterwards regaled themselves with 
Plumb Cake, Tea, &c. In the Evening the Town was 
illuminated, and a large Bonfire made as near Liberty 
Oak as the Safety of that ancient Tree would admit of; 
when the following toasts were drank: i. George the 
third. 2. The Queen. 3. The Royal Family. 4. To 
the Memory of the Duke of Cumberland. 5. The pres- 
ent Honest Ministry. 6. The House of Lords. 7. The 
Parliament. 8. Pitt and Freedom. 9. Lord Cambden. 
10. All those who distinguished themselves to obtain a 
Repeal of the Stamp Act. n. America's Friends in 
Great Britain. 12. America's Friends in Ireland. 13. 
The Sons of Liberty in America. 14. The noble Asser- 
tors of Liberty in St. Christophers and Nevis. 15. The 
Liberty of the Press. 16. May the Gentlemen of the 
Law prosecute their Business with Moderation. 17. 
Peace and Happiness to those who treat their Debtors 
with Lenity. 18. Prosperity to the Jerseys. The whole 
Rejoicings were conducted with the utmost Regularity 
and Decorum, not the least Accident happening; and we 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 45 

flatter ourselves his Majesty has no loyaler Subjects, 
either in Europe or America, as the most firm Loyalty 
seemed to glow in every Breast, and each endeavored to 
excel in honouring the Day. Supplement to the Nezv 
York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1224, June 19, 
1766. 

Chester Town, Maryland, June 5. 
TWO PISTOLES Reward, 

RUN away from the subscriber, on Monday the 5th of 
May, a Negro man, named Hannaball, a likely black fel- 
low, has a pert look, and when talking is always either 
laughing or smiling, he is about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, 
he walks proper and straight and without limping, but if 
examined will find one of his feet stiff and scarce able to 
bend it from his ankle to his toes, his apparell not well 
known but such as is common for slaves, his over jacket 
was light coloured fearnot, it is supposed he has travelled 
towards Duck-Creek and from thence either to Philadel- 
phia or the Jerseys, and may endeavour to pass for a free 
man and sailor, as he has been used to go by water. 
Whoever takes up the said fellow and secures him so that 
the owner may have him again, shall have the above re- 
ward and reasonable charges if brought home paid by 

EMORY FUETTER. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia, entered In. 
Sloop Polly, W. Bartlet from Salem. 

Hunterdon | PURSUANT to an order of William 

County, \ Morris and William Clayton, Esqrs; 

two of his Majesty's judges of the county of Hunterdon, 
upon the Petition of Gershom Palmer now confined in 
Trenton Goal : Notice is hereby given to the creditors of 
the said Gershom Palmer, that Saturday the 5th day of 

10 



146 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

July next, is appointed for the said creditors to meet at 
the house of Philip Palmer, innholder in Trentown, to 
shew cause if any they have, why an assignment of the 
said debtor's estate, should not be made, and the said 
Debtor discharged agreeable to an act lately made for 
that purpose, intituled, an act for the relief of insolvent 
debtors. 

GERSHOM PALMER. 

N. B. The major part of the creditors are willing to 
sign. 

THE gentlemen sportsmen, and lovers of the turf, 
whether of Virginia, Maryland, New- York, the Jerseys, 
or any of the other provinces, are hereby informed that 
the gentlemen of Philadelphia intend to raise a purse of at 
least ONE HUNDRED PISTOLES, to be run for in the ensu- 
ing October, provided they can be made acquainted by 
those who have running horses, on or before the twenty 
fifth of July, that four good race horses will be entered 
for the purse. 

It has been judged proper to take this method to gain 
intelligence of the number of horses that may offer to 
run, that the public may be encouraged to subscribe, and 
not disappointed of diversion. Those gentlemen there- 
fore who will give assurance of starting any horse, mare, 
or gelding for such a purse, are desired to signify the 
same by letter directed to HUGH JAMES, Esq; at the Lon- 
don Coffee-house in Philadelphia, when in return all 
letters, post paid, on this subject will be punctually 
answered; and as soon as intelligence is gained to answer 
the intent of this publication, the terms of the race will 
be set forth in this paper. 

WHEREAS EDWARD BROADFIELD has carried on the 
manufacture of STURGEON for fourteen years, and given 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 47 

a general satisfaction, having the year before last the 
honour of receiving from the honourable society of arts, 
manufactures and commerce, the first bounty of Fifty 
Pounds sterling for the best Sturgeon cured in America ; 
and judged to be in every degree equal to that of the 
Baltick. But the last year I was obliged, through losses 
and misfortunes, to be concerned in partnership : My 
partner, on the sixteenth of July, 1765, having a mind to 
suplant me, refused sending me any supplies, without I 
would leave my wife, to carry on; imagining he had 
knowledge sufficient, if he could get me out of the way, 
and offered me money to support myself, and on my re- 
fusal I should put no more fish at Lamberton. At which 
time, being under a cloud, I threw all my labour into his 
hands, which was one half of every thing cured or put 
up on the premises, in order to pay my just debts; and, 
for fear of wanting supplies in the time of my greatest 
season, suffered myself to be drove from the place. On 
my journey to the Half-Moon, above Albany, before I 
reached New- York, he took up in his boat a French 
Indian and his wife, to supplant my wife in my absence, 
and told scandalous reports about me to my wife, and 
offered her fifteen pounds, besides paying her passage to 
England, if she would quit the place. He obtained his 
desire, though he never paid the fifteen pounds. By this 
means I lost my season; which rendered me incapable of 
discharging my just debts. My wife left on the place 
several cags branded with my brand, filled by the above 
Indian and his wife, also a great deal of Sturgeon was by 
them put up at Lamberton, sold and shipped, under 
colour of partnership with me. Therefore, to prevent 
any further imposition, I take this method to inform the 
publick, That I am not this year any ways concerned at 
Lamberton, but carry on the manufacture at Kensington, 



148 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

and shall be obliged to all gentlemen and others that will 
favour me with their orders, as they may depend on hav- 
ing no worse fish than that which did me and the country 
so much honour. Whoever shall buy any of the said 
fish, are desired to observe the method of opening the cag; 
draw the pickle off in some clean dry pan, then put the 
cork in tight, take out the head that is numbered, drive 
down the hoops again, and pour the pickle on, putting a 
coarse cloth on the cag, and the head upon that, with a 
small weight thereon, to keep the air out; and you may 
keep it a whole year or two. Let all the fish be taken out 
with a fork, not with hands. 

N. B. The said fish is to be sold by me EDWARD 
BROADFIELD, at Kensington, and by Mr. JEREMIAH 
BAKER, near the Crooked Billet, in Water Street, and by 
no other persons. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1228, 
June 19, 1766. 

Trenton, June 16, 1766. 
, T T PURSUANT to an order of 

William Morris, and Will- 
Hunterdon County, ss. . , 

lam Clayton, Esquires, two 

of his Majesty's justices of the court of common pleas for 
the county of Hunterdon, upon the petition of Tunis 
Low, and the greater part of his creditors ; Notice is here- 
by given to the creditors of said Tunis Low, that on Sat- 
urday the fifth day of July next, is appointed by the said 
judges for the creditors of said Low to meet at the house 
of Robert Rutherford, innholder in Trenton, to show 
cause, if any they have, why an assignment of the said 
debtors estate should not be made, and the said debtor 
discharged, agreeable to an act lately made for that pur- 
pose, intitled, "An act for the relief of insolvent debtors." 

TUNIS Low. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 149 

BRIDGE-TOWN, Barbados, May 24, 1776. 
Extract of an act to prevent extortion, by ascertaining'- 
the rents of houses, prices of provision, lumber, and 
other commodities for a limited time. 
A List of Provisions, Lumber, and other Commodities, 
and the Prices thereof, which are not to be exceeded 
by such Persons who shall sell by Wholesale. 
BURLINGTON, New York, and Connecticut Pork, at 4 1. 
10 s. per Barrel. Deal Joist, at 61. per Thousand. Deal 
Plank, at 12!. per ditto. Deal Boards, at 61. per Ditto. 
Carolina and Egg-Harbour Shingles, at 2!. 53. per Ditto. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1229, June 26, 1766. 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, held in and for the County of Burlington, 
upon the petition of Terence Quigley, an insolvent Deb- 
tor, confined in Burlington County Goal, in New Jersey, 
for Debt, Notice is hereby given to all his Creditors, to 
show Cause, if any they have, before the said Judges, on 
the Fourth Day of July next, at the house of Lambert 
Barnes, in Burlington, at Two o' Clock in the Afternoon, 
why an Assignment of the Estate of the said Debtor 
should not be made to an Assignee, then and there to be 
appointed, for the Use of his Creditors, and the said In- 
solvent thereupon to be discharged according to an Act of 
Assembly, intituled, "An Act for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors." 

June 21, 1766. 

WHEREAS Margaret the Wife of William Oakford, of 
Alloway's Creek, Salem County, New- Jersey, has eloped 
from him, and run him in Debt; these are therefore to 
forewarn all Persons from trusting her on his Account, 
as he is determined to pay no Debts of her contracting, 
from the Date hereof. 

WILLIAM OAKFORD. 



150 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/66 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Gloucester 
County, West New Jersey, at the Ferry, opposite Phila- 
delphia, on the 7th Instant, a Negro Alan, named Jacob, 
is about 22 Years of Age, 5 Feet 8 Inches high, has sharp 
filed Teeth, and is apt to stammer when he talks fast ; had 
on, and took away with him, a Tan Shirt and Trousers, 
Cloth coloured Jacket, lined with green, a striped Linen 
Shirt and Trousers, half worn Shoes, with Brass Buck- 
les, and an old Beaver Hat, with a Brass Button. Who- 
ever takes up, and secures said Negro, so that his Master 
may have him again, shall have the above Reward, and 
reasonable Charges, paid by 

WILLIAM COOPER. 

N. B. All Persons are desired not to harbour or con- 
ceal said Negro, or they may expect to be prosecuted as 
the Law directs. 

To BE SOLD. 

A Likely Negro Lad, about 16 Years of Age, this 
Country born, and has had the Small-pox and Measles. 
Also a Negro Girl, about 13 Years of Age, has likewise 
had the Small-pox and Measles, is this Country born, 
and fit for Town or Country Business. The Lad has 
been used both to Land and Water Service. A new 
Ferry Boat to be disposed of. All late the Property of 
Benjamin Howell, deceased. Enquire of REBECCAII 
HOWELL, in the Jerseys, at the Old Ferry House, oppos- 
site Marcus Hook. 

To BE SOLD. 

A Valuable Plantation, containing 254 Acres of Land. 
Marsh and Sivamp, Part of the Swamp cleared, likennse 
60 Acres of said Land cleared, the rest ivell timbered and 
, 7c*///i a large good two Story House and Kitchen, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. I5 r 

a very good Barn and Stable and fine Garden; pleasantly 
situated, open to the Sea, in the lower Precinct of the 
County of Cape May, and within One Mile and a Half 
of the Sea Shore; where Numbers resort for Health > 
and bathing in the Water; and this Place would be very 
convenient for taking in such People. For Terms of 
Sale, apply to the Subscriber, living on the Premises. 

ROBERT PARSONS. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

Stolen out of the Fulling mill of Ephraim Seely, Full- 
er, in Cumberland County, West New-Jersey, on the 
Tenth of May last, three Pieces of Cloth, viz. one of blue 
Flannel, containing about nine or ten Yards, scowered 
out, fit for fulling; another of a grey Colour, in the 
Grease, seven or eight Yards ; and the Third a fine white 
Flannel, nineteen Yards, not certainly known whether it 
was Part dressed or not, nor whether it was taken at the 
same Time with the other two. It is supposed they were 
taken by Michael Hulings, John Beck, and James Mears, 
who came in a Vessel to Cohansy Bridge, in order to get 
a freight to Philadelphia, or some of them, they being 
seen several Times at the said Mill, by a Man tending a 
Saw-mill at the other End of the Dam. The pieces were 
all marked in one Corner with Thread, viz. the white 
Piece 47, the blue 92, and the grey 99 ; but it is likely the 
Mark may be picked out. If any such Cloth should be 
brought to any Fuller to be dressed, he is requested to 
stop it ; and whoever secures said Cloth, with the Thief or 
Thieves so that he, or they, may be brought to Justice, 
shall have the above Reward, or Thirty Shillings for the 
Cloth, paid by me. 

EPHRAIM SEELY. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1957, June 26, 
1766. 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

New York June 26. We hear from New-Jersey, that 
the Insolvent Act having been found by Experience to 
give Occasion to innumerable Frauds, the Legislature of 
that Province have totally repealed it; but that in cases 
where Assignees have been appointed and actually sworn, 
the late Law shall take its Effect, all Proceedings short of 
this, are to be void. 

To BE SOLD, by Way of PUBLIC VENDUE, on 
THURSDAY the Tenth Day of JULY next, at Ten 
of the Clock in the Forenoon, on the Premises. 
A Large genteel well-finished House, and Lot of 
Ground, lying and being in Elizabeth-Town, in New-Jer- 
sey, on the main Street leading from the Bridge to the 
Church, and directly fronting the Road that leads from 
the Point, being the House in which Barneby Shute lately 
lived; the House is two Stories high, with four large 
Rooms on a Floor, and a spacious Entry : the Lot contains 
about one Acre and a half of Land, on which is a new 
Barn, Stables, and out-Houses, with a good Garden, well 
fenced in; the whole very convenient for a private Gentle- 
man, Trader or Tavern-Keeper. Also, on the same Day 
will be likewise sold, the noted Tavern now the Sign of 
the Marquis of Granby; likewise, will be sold, the noted 
Grist-Mill and Appurtenances, situate at the foot of the 
Bridge in Elizabeth-Town aforesaid, known by the Name 
of the Town-Mills, late the Property of saicl Barneby 
Shute. Any Person willing to purchase before the Day 
of Sale, may know the Terms, by applying to the Sub- 
scribers, who will give an indisputable Title for the same. 

W T ILLIAM HARRIMAN 
JOSEPH WOODRUFF 
SILAS HALLSEY 

Five Pounds Reward. 
RAN AWAY about the I2th of August, 1764, from the 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 153 

Subscriber in Morris-County, Roxbury Township, New- 
Jersey, a Negro Man named JOE, but has called himself, 
and is since known by the Name of LEWIS, a sprightly 
nimble Fellow, about 20 Years of Age; 5 Feet 8 or 10 
Inches high, of a yellowish Complexion, and has a Scar in 
his Forehead; was born in New- Jersey, speaks good Eng- 
lish, and plays on the fiddle. Soon after his running 
away, he came to New-York, and hired himself as a free 
Man to a Butcher, in whose Service he stayed that Win- 
ter; he then hired himself to one Mr. Oakley, in West- 
Chester to take him up; but he getting Notice of it, went 
off; and is probably lurking or concealed in the Neigh- 
bourhood of that Place, Long-Island or New-York. Who- 
ever takes up the said Negro, and brings him to me in 
Roxbury, or to Mr. Hugh Gaine, in New-York, or se- 
cures him in any of His Majesty's Goals, giving due 
Notice, shall receive Five Pounds New-York Money Re- 
ward, and all reasonable Charges. 

AUGUSTIN REID. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels and others are hereby 
warned, not to carry off, conceal or harbor the said Ne- 
gro, as they will answer the contrary at their Peril. 

New- York, 24th June, 1766. 

Forty Shillings Reward. 

June 4, 1766. 

RAN Away last Night from the Subscriber, living in 
Gloucester County, Deptford Township, West-New-Jer- 
sey; An Irish Servant Lad, named Richard Thetford, 
about 17 Years of Age, and about 5 Feet 5 or 6 Inches 
high, of a fair Complexion, marked a little with the 
Small-Pox, has brown Hair, cut close upon the Top, and 
short behind; he's a smart looking Fellow, and very talk- 
ative; has been in this Country about Two Years and a 



154 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Half : Had on when he went away, an old Castor Hat, 
lightish -colour'd Home-spun Woolen Jacket, coarse Oz- 
nabrigs Shirt, coarse Tow Trowsers, a Pair of grey Yarn 
Stockings, darned at the Heels, new Calf-skin Shoes, 
and a Pair of large Pinchbeck Buckles. Whoever takes 
up said Servant, and secures him in any Gaol, so that his 
Master may have him again, shall have the above-men- 
tioned Reward, or if brought home, reasonable Charges 
paid, by 

JOSHUA LORD. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to carry him 
away or any other Person to harbour or conceal him, 
otherwise they must answer it at their Peril. 

Tis suppos'd he'll make towards New- York. The 
New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1225, June 
26, 1766. 

Woodbridge, July i, 1766. 
RAN away from the Subscriber. 

On Sunday the I5th of Tune last, a Negro Man, named 
Cuff, about 5 feet 9 Inches high, and about 22 Years of 
Age, has a Scar on his right great Toe and the Ends of 
several other of his Toes are cut off. Whoever takes up, 
and secures said Negro, so that his Master may have him 
again, shall have Four Dollars Reward, and all reasonable 
Charges paid, by 

JONATHAN CLAWSON. 

N. B. All Persons are hereby forewarned from har- 
bouring, concealing or carrying off said Negro, as they 
will answer it at their Peril. 'Tis supposed he has got a 
Pass with him. The New York Gazette or Weekly Post 
Boy, No. 1226, July 3, 1766. 

A Computation of the Number of Inhabitants in each 
Colony and a Proportion of Duties which might be raised 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 155 

in each, as an Equivalent in lieu of the Stamp Duties. 

[A total of 1,860,000 inhabitants, and 62,000 propor- 
tion, of which the following is of the] 

Inhabitants. Proportion. 
Jerseys 90,000 3,000 

Divided by the total Number of Inhabitants, makes 8d 
each per annum. Supplement to the New York Gazette 
or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1226, July 3, 1766. 

Salem, June 13, 1766. 

MADE his escape from the Subscriber, a certain Joseph 
Beesley, about 25 Years of Age, has black Hair fair Com- 
plexion, and is a pretty tall slim Man. Whoever takes up 
said Beesley, and brings him to the Subscriber, shall have 
Five Pounds Reward, paid by CHRISTOPHER SMITH, 
Constable. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1957, June 
26, 1766. 

New York. 

June 30. The 26th inst. the Light-house at Sandy- 
Hook was struck by lightning, and twenty panes of the 
glass lanthorn broke to pieces; the chimney and peach 
belonging to the Kitchen, was broke down, and some peo- 
ple that were in the house received a little hurt, but are 
since recovered. 'Tis said the gust was attended with a 
heavy shower O'f hail. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1230, July 3, 1766. 

The ADDRESS of the COUNCIL to his Excellency, WIL- 
LIAM FRANKLIN, Esq; Captain General, and Commander 
in Chief of the Province of New Jersey, &c. 
May it please your Excellency, 

WE His Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the 
Council of the Province of New Jersey, beg leave to re- 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

turn your Excellency our Thanks for your Speech at the 
Opening of this Session. 

We most sincerely rejoice with your Excellency on the 
Repeal of the Act for granting certain Stamp Duties in 
America ; an Event, as it so greatly conduces to the Peace 
and Happiness of His Majesty's American Dominions, 
cannot but excite in us the utmost Gratitude and Thank- 
fulness for this fresh Instance of His Majesty's Royal 
Favour, and of the Wisdom and Justice of the British 
Parliament. 

An Indemnification to those Persons who have in- 
curred the Penalties of the late Stamp-Act must be con- 
sidered as a further Mark of Lenity and Indulgence of 
our Sovereign. And every new Measure that may be re- 
solved on to increase the commercial Interest of Great 
Britain and her Colonies, will further evince the Ad- 
vantages which must ever redound to a People from the 
Advice of a Ministry, who have Judgment to discern, and 
Inclination to promote, the true Interest, Happiness and 
Prosperity of the Nation. 

It affords us great Satisfaction, that the wise Measures 
pursued by your Excellency, during the late alarming- 
Period, were attended with the good Effects of preserv- 
ing the public Peace of the Colony: And it reflects 
Credit on the Inhabitants, that their prudent and orderly 
Behaviour has been obvious to your Excellency; and their 
Thanks are due to you for such favourable Representa- 
tions as you have been pleased to make of them to His 
Majesty's Ministers. 

Your Excellency's Approbation of our Conduct, is a 
farther Satisfaction to us. Respect to the Authority of 
Government, the Preservation of Peace and good Order 
in this Colony, will ever be Objects of our strict Atten- 
tion; and it is with Pleasure we have observed, in the 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 157 

Conduct of the Chief Justice, and many Magistrates and 
others of this Province, that they have been actuated by 
the same Sentiments. 

The Tenderness, Lenity and Condescensions of His 
Majesty, and the Wisdom and Justice of the British Par- 
liament, in removing the Danger that lately threatened 
the Colonies, cannot but excite in all His American Sub- 
jects the strongest Sentiments of Loyalty, and will neces- 
sarily contribute to advance the general Interest and 
Happiness of the British Empire, which we shall ever 
strenuously endeavour to promote. 

By Order of the House, 

PETER KEMBLE, Speaker. 
Council-Chamber, June 2Oth, 1766. 

To His Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq; Cap- 
tain-General and Commander-in Chief in and over 
the Province of New-Jersey, and Territories 
thereon depending in America, Chancellor and 
Vice Admiral in the same, &c. 
May it please your Excellency, 

WE his Majesty's dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Rep- 
resentatives of the Colony of New- Jersey, in General As- 
sembly convened, highly sensible of the Benefits that must 
attend a Repeal of the Act granting certain Stamp Duties 
in America, are glad of the Opportunity to return your 
Excellency our sincere Congratulations on the happy 
Termination of this most important Affair. 

With the gratefulest Sense of His Majesty's indul- 
gent Disposition towards us, and the Justice of the 
British Parliament, we have taken the earliest Oppor- 
tunity of presenting our most sincere and hearty Thanks 
to His Majesty, for the Kindness shown these Colonies. 
At the same time we reflect, with Pleasure, that the 



158 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Conduct of the People of this Province, has not disturbed 
your Excellency's Administration, nor been productive 
of any Act of Outrage or Violence; and as they have de- 
served, so we thank your Excellency for the Justice you 
have done them, in making their Conduct known to His 
Majesty's Ministers. 

The Gentlemen who have distinguished themselves by 
Steadiness and Spirit, in promoting Peace and good Or- 
der in this Colony, undoubtedly deserve your Excellency's 
Commendations, and the Acknowledgments of this 
House. 

As the Storm that threatened the future Welfare of 
Britain and her Colonies, is now happily subsided, and as 
it is our earnest Wish, so we hope, and will contribute 
every Thing in our Stations, that an indissoluble Union 
shall henceforth cement His Majesty's Subjects in the 
Mother Country and the Colonies. 

Signed by Order of the House, 

CORTLAND SKINNER, Speaker. 

House of Assembly, June 20, 1766. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1958, July 3, 1766. 

Burlington, in New- Jersey, July 3, 1766. 
A HORRID Murder was last Week committed near 
Moore's Town, in the County of Burlington, on the 
Bodies of two well known Indian Women of that Neigh- 
borhood, supposed from strong Circumstances, to have 
been perpetrated by two Men travelling to New York. 
One of the Persons is apprehended, and confesses he was 
present at the Murder, and gives the following Descrip- 
tion of his Companion; That he is a Scotchman, about 
1 8 or 20 Years of Age, wears his own Hair, light col- 
oured, has no Beard, but a white Down on his Chin; one 
Leg sore, and thereby is lame, a Pair of whitish Stock- 
ings, one of which was stained with the Blood of the In- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 59 

dians, a whitish short Coat or Jacket, old Leather 
Breeches, old Shoes, too large for him, of Calf-skin, with 
the Grain out, and remarkable high Quarters. He says 
that his Name is James M'Kinsey, and that he was a 
Servant to a Scotch Officer, killed at Pittsburgh, and that 
he was travelling to New- York to his Master's Widow. 
And as some of the Inhabitants have seen the Person now 
confined in Company with such a Man, and they travelled 
very slow, it is to be hoped that the Person above de- 
scribed may be apprehended, and for the doing of which 
the Government will make suitable Satisfaction. The 
Inhabitants of this and the neighbouring Provinces are re- 
quested to use their utmost Endeavours to apprehend a 
Person suspected of having committed a Murder, at- 
tended with many Marks of Cruelty and Barbarity. 

Since our last we have had very great Falls of Rain, 
by which we hear, great Quantities of Hay are destroyed ; 
and that all the Bridges and Mill Dams, on the Amboy 
Road, and all the Mill Dams on Reckless's Stream, and 
many others in different Parts, are carried away; but we 
have not heard of much Damage done to the Grain. 

RUN away on the 3Oth of last month, from Joseph 
Johnston, senior, living at Great Egg Harbour, a Negro 
Man, named Cato, about 5 feet 2 or 3 inches high, and 
about 22 or 23 years of age; had on, when he went away, 
an old felt hat, blue broad-cloth coat, a light coloured 
laced jacket, check flannel trowsers, shoes and stockings, 
the feet pretty much worn, and also had two coarse shirts. 
Whoever takes up and secures said Negro, so that his 
master may have him again, shall have THREE 
POUNDS Reward, paid by JOSEPH JOHNSTON. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1959, July 10, 
1766. 



160 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Burlington, in (N. Jersey,) July 2, 1766. Two In- 
dian Women were barbarously murdered a few Days ago, 
at Morristown, in this County, by two Scotch-Irish stroll- 
ers. One of the Murderers, named James Anin, was 
committed to our Gaol, the Night before last, the other, 
named James M'Kensie, is not yet taken. 

Nezv York, July 10. We hear from New Jersey, that 
Abundance of Damage has been done there by the great 
Rains which fell on Thursday Night, Friday and Satur- 
day last. It is said the Cloud from whence the heavy Rain 
fell, did not extend further to the N. than Bound Brook. 
But in other Parts, about Spotswood, Second River, &c. 
the Floods there have been very great, and swept away 
all before them, not a Bridge or Mill for many Miles was 
left standing. We have already heard of the Loss of be- 
tween 20 and 30 Mills. 

Trenton, July 4, 1766. 

Now in the Custody of the Subscriber, the following 
Persons, taken up as Runaways, being advertised as such 
by Peter Hasenclever, in the Pennsylvania and New- 
York Gazettes, viz. Carl Bruderlein, Henry Schaeffer, 
Joseph Langweider, Bartholomew Bauni and Simon 
Denk. Said Peter Hasenclever, or any other Person 
claiming the said Men, are desired to come and prove 
their property, pay Charges, and take them away; other- 
wise they will be sold to pay their Charges, within five 
Weeks from the Date hereof, by 

GEORGE BROWN, Goaler. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1227, July 10, 1766. 

New York, July 17. At the Session of the General 
Assembly of the Province of New- Jersey, held at Perth- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



161 



Amboy, began the I2th of June, and continued to the 
28th, the following Laws were passed, viz. 

1. AN Act for the Support of Government, of his 
Majesty's Colony of New- Jersey, to commence the 
twenty-first Day of May, 1766, and to end the twenty- 
first Day of May, 1767, and to Discharge the public 
Debts, and contingent Charges thereof. 

2. An Act, to Repeal an Act, entitled, An Act for the 
Relief of Insolvent Debtors. 

3. An Act for the building a Court House and Gaol in 
the County of Middlesex. 

4. An Act, empowering the Justices and Freeholders 
of the County of Burlington, to purchase a Lot of 
Ground, to build a New Gaol, and other necessary Build- 
ings thereon. 

5. An Act for the more effectually preventing the 
counterfeiting the Bills of Credit of the neighbouring 
Governments, or uttering the same in this Colony, know- 
ing them to be so counterfeit. 

6. An Act explaining the Right of voting at Town 
Meetings ; and the Elections of Township Officers. 

7. An Act, to amend and further continue an Act, en- 
titled, An Act for the better settling and regulating the 
Militia of this Colony of New-Jersey, for the repelling 
Invasions and suppressing Insurrections and Rebellions. 

8. An Act appointing Commissioners for supplying 
the several Barracks erected in this Colony, with Furni- 
ture, and other Necessaries for accommodating the King's 
Troops in, or marching through this Colony, and for de- 
fraying other incidental Charges. 

9. An Act for laying out, and establishing a Road 
from Bergen Point along up Newark Bay, and from 
thence to Paulus Hook on Hudson's River. 

10. A Supplementary Act, to an Act, entitled, An Act 

11 



1 62 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

for laying out a Road from Newark, in the County of 
Essex, to the public Road, leading from Bergen Point to 
Paulus Hook, on Hudson's River, in the County of Ber- 
gen, and for erecting and establishing Ferries, across the 
Rivers Passaic and Hackensack. 

11. An Act to empower the Justices and Freeholders 
of the Counties of Essex and Bergen, to build a Bridge 
over Passaic River, near the Dutch Church, at Acquack- 
anock. 

12. An Act to repair the public Roads in the Town- 
ship of Hanover, in the County of Morris, by a Tax on 
the Inhabitants of the same. 

13. An Act to extend certain Acts of Parliament of 
Great Britain, passed in the Twelfth Year of her late 
Majesty Queen Anne, and the fourth Year of his late 
Majesty, King George the First, for the preserving, all 
such Ships and Goods thereof, which shall happen to be 
forced on shore, or stranded. 

14. An Act to prohibit the setting of Nets, Seins, and 
other Devices, in the River Raritan and South River, to 
obstruct the Fish going up in the proper Seasons of the 
Year, and to preserve the Fry, and young Brood of Fish 
from being destroyed in said Rivers. 

15. An Act to lay out a Road on the Southerly Side of 
Cohansey Creek, in the County of Cumberland, and to es- 
tablish a Ferry across the said Creek, from the Town of 
Greenwich to the said Road. 

1 6. An Act for the Improvement of the Navigation of 
the Southwest Branch of Ancocas Creek. 

17. An Act for building and maintaining a Bridge 
over the North Branch of Great Timber Creek, in the 
County of Gloucester, at Abraham Roe's Landing. 

1 8. An Act to enable the Owners and Possessors of a 
certain Body of Meadow and Marsh, lying on the West- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 163 

erly Side of Raccoon Creek, in the County of Gloucester, 
to keep up and maintain the Banks and other Water 
Works around the same, and to constitute all Ten Foot 
Ditches thereon, lawful fences. 

19. An Act to enable the Owners and Possessors of 
the Meadows and Swamps, lying on a small Branch of 
Alloway's Creek, in the County of Salem, to keep up and 
maintain the Dams, Banks, and other Water Works, on 
the said Meadow, and to keep the Water Course thereof, 
open and clear. 

20. An Act to enable the Owners and Possessors of 
the Marsh and Swamp, lying on the South Branch of 
Stow Creek, to maintain the Bank, Dam and other Water 
Works across the said Creek, to prevent the Tide from 
overflowing the same. 

21. An Act to enable the Owners and Possessors of the 
Meadows and Marshes, bounding on Delaware River, 
between Long Point and Kilk's Hook, in Lower Penn's 
Neck, in the County of Salem, to stop out the Tide from 
overflowing the same. 

22. An Act to naturalize Jacob Hertel, and John Jacob 
Faish. 1 

The barbarous Murder of the two Indian Women 
(inserted in our last under the Burlington Head) was 
committed near a Place called Moore's Town, and not 
Morristown as mentioned by Mistake. 

To BE SOLD. 

A plantation in the bounds of Middletown, containing 
177 acres, and three fourths of an acre, bounded southerly 
on Mattawan Creek, facing the bay. It is good land and 
well timbered : There is on it 23 acres of good salt 

i John Jacob Faesch was a great iron-master in the northern part of 
New Jersey. 



164 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

meadow, and a large orchard of the best grafted apple 
trees, some rich swamps, and a considerable quantity of 
low wood land, which if it were cleared would make good 
fresh meadow ; it is generally good wheat land : There 
is on it a handsome convenient house almost as good as 
new, two stories high, and three rooms on a floor, and a 
large entry, two fire places below and two above; the 
lower story is handsomely finished, a good stone cellar 
under the whole house, and a convenient kitchen ad- 
joining; the whole house is shingled with cedar, part of 
the land has been cleared, and the chief part of the whole 
place is within good fence. It lies very handy and pleas- 
ant; and convenient for oysters, clams and fishing: 
There is a convenient place for a wharf, for sloops or 
smaller vessels to lie within two chains of the door. It is 
suitable for a farmer or a gentleman. Any person inclin- 
ing to purchase the same, may apply to ANNA BOWNE, 
executrix to Obadiah Bowne, deceased, at Mattawan, 
who lives within half a mile of the premises, who will 
give an indisputable title for the same. 

Middletown, July 3, 1766. ANNA BOWNE. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1228, July 17, 1766. 

Salem, July 6, 1766. 

WHEREAS two notes of hand were given by the sub- 
scriber, living in the town of Salem, the middle of last 
month; one for Five Pounds, payable to Barnaby Mul- 
holland, the other for Three Pounds, to Philip Campbell, 
both due the first of August next; this is to caution all 
persons from taking an assignment of the said notes, as 
they were fraudulently obtained, and will not be paid by 
me. DAVID FERGUSON. 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

Extract of a Letter from Cumberland County, in New- 
Jersey, dated July 4, 1766. 

"We have had the greatest Rains, and the most con- 
stant, for ten or twelve Days past, that has ever been 
known in my Memory, and which still continues. I 
am informed that fourteen Mill-Dams in this and Salem 
County, are carried away by the Freshes. The Wetness 
of the Season gives us a melancholy Prospect with respect 
to the Harvest, already begun, which before was very 
promising." 

On Thusday last James M'Kinsey, the Person men- 
tioned in our Gazette of the Tenth Instant, as being sus- 
pected of the Murder and Robbery of two Indian Women 
near Moore's Town, in the Jerseys, was taken up here, 
and examined before the Mayor of the City; and tho' he 
did not confess that he was guilty of the horrid Deed, yet 
as he said it was done by James Annin, who was in Com- 
pany with him, and now in Custody, as one of the Mur- 
derers (and who, we hear, told exactly the same Story, 
with respect to him, M'Kinsey) he was immediately sent 
to Burlington Goal. 

RUN away, on the loth Instant at Night, from the 
Subscriber, living in Northampton Township, Burlington 
County, a Negro Man, named Jemmy, about 35 Years of 
Age, and about six feet high, a well-limbed Fellow, stam- 
mers much in his Speech, which is bad English : Had on 
when he went away, an old brown Coat, the Lining 
chiefly torn out, an Ozenbrigs Shirt and Trowsers, and 
an old Castor Hat, patches on the Crown, and cocked up, 
the rest of his Clothing unknown. Whoever takes up 
said Negro, and secures him, so that his Master may have 
him again, shall have Forty Shillings Reward, and rea- 
sonable Charges, paid by JOHN HILLIER. 



1 66 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

N. B. He has a new worked Pocket-book, and may 
have a Sort of a Pass, as some such Papers have been 
found since he went away. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 1960, July 17, 1766. 

Cumberland County, New Jersey. 
TAKEN up and committed to his Majesty's Gaol in said 
County, on the 2Qth Day of June last, a certain Negro 
Man, supposed to be about 30 Years of Age, he speaks 
good English, and is of middle Stature; he says that he 
came out of Queen Ann's County, in Maryland, and that 
his Master's Name is William Coosey, living near Queen 
Ann's Town. The Owner of said Negro is desired to pay 
Charges, and take him away. 

THEOPILUS ELMER, Sheriff. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1961, July 24. 
1766. 

New York, July 24. We are informed on the I7th 
Current, died at Philadelphia, after a long and painful 
Illness, the Reverend SAMUEL FINLEY, D. D. President 
of the New- Jersey College; a Gentleman of superior 
Merit and Character, for extensive Learning and genuine 
Christian Virtue; peculiarly eminent for the most en- 
dearing Meekness, Prudence and Diligence, which ren- 
dered him uncommonly useful and beloved in every part 
of his public Conduct, as well as in every Part of private 
Life. 

RAN AWAY from Alexander Adams, of Maiden-Head 
Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, a certain in- 
dentured Servant Man named Edward Richard; about 
five feet four Inches high, about 26 Years of Age, born 
in Chester in England, had on when he went away a Felt 
Hat, with a narrow brim, red Jacket made of an old regi- 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

mental Coat, with a Piece put in down the Back, a half 
worn Oznabrigs Shirt, Petty-Coat Trowsers, blue Yarn 
Stockings and Old Shoes. Whoever takes up said Ser- 
vant, and secures him in any of his Majesty's Goals, so 
that his Master may have him again (or brings him 
home) shall have FORTY SHILLINGS Reward, and all rea- 
sonable charges paid, by me. 

July 21, 1766. ALEXANDER ADAMS. 

Taken up, two or three weeks ago, between Perth- Am- 
boy and Sandy-Hook, a very good Ship's Long Boat, 
about 1 6 Feet Keel and very burthensome. The Owner 
may have her on Application to the Subscriber, at Wood- 
bridge, and paying Charges. SAMUEL PARKERS 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1229, July 24, 1766. 

On Thursday morning last, departed this life, in this 
city, the Rev. Dr. Samuel Finley, President of the College 
of New Jersey, in the fifty-first year of his age, and was 
interred in a plain manner, pursuant to his own request, 
the morning following, in the new Presbyterian Church, 
where a sermon suitable to the occasion was preached by 
the Rev. Mr. Richard Treat. 

To attempt to do justice to the character of this truly 
great and good man, would require more time and reflec- 
tion than the present mournful circumstances of his death 
would admit. There are few virtues which adorn the 
teacher, the divine, the gentleman, and the Christian, but 
what were united in him. To a strong manly genius he 
had added great improvements in almost all the various 
branches of learning which he taught, with a degree of 
ease and precision that did honor to himself, and greatly 
advanced the reputation of the Seminary over which he 
presided. Those great acquirements, joined with the 



1 68 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

truely polite, easy behaviour, endeared him to all around 
him, and rendered him one of the most accomplished 
scholars in America. 

His character as a divine, was eminent. His sermons 
were always filled with the most important truths, and 
were delivered with an energy of spirit that demon- 
strated how deeply his mind was impressed with what he 
spoke. His many animated and judicious publications, 
upon some of the most important and controverted points 
in religion, will always remain as living witnesses of his 
singular knowledge and penetration. 

He was a strict example of every Christian virtue, and 
a striking proof to what a pitch of excellence religion ex- 
alts the human nature. His devotion was rational and 
uniform. He was sincere and steady in his friendships, 
tender and faithful in every domestic relation, and mani- 
fested that his faith worked by love by his defusive ben- 
evolence which he evinced in all his deportment toward 
his fellow creatures. 

His whole life was a continued scene of unremitted 
labours in promoting the interests of religion and learn- 
ing. He taught a flourishing Academy, and was Pastor 
of a Presbyterian Church, near seventeen years, in Not- 
tingham in Pennsylvania, and was removed from thence 
in the year 1761, to succeed the Rev. Mr. Samuel Davies 
as President of the College of New-Jersey. He entered 
upon, and discharged the duties of this important station 
with a dignity that did honor to the Institution. The 
many promising young gentlemen that have been edu- 
cated by him, some of whom are now filling the most use- 
ful spheres in life, and his bereaved pupils who mourn 
the loss of one common friend and father, will all attest, 
how well he was qualified for the difficult office of a Pre- 
ceptor. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 169 

After all that can be said in his favour, those who knew 
him best will ever entertain the highest sense of his 
worth. 

During a long and painful illness, he discovered the ut- 
most resignation to the Divine Will, and met the ap- 
proaches of death with a composure and triumph that did 
honour to his character as a Christian. 

In a word, when we view his useful and exalted sta- 
tion, and consider how great the loss, and how mysterious 
the providence is, to the world, the church, and more es- 
pecially to the college already afflicted with many former 
bereavements in a close succession, we cannot help adopt- 
ing the language of the royal mourner, upon a different 
occasion, and saying, how is the mighty fallen! and the 
beauty of Israel slain on her high places! 

STRAYED away on Saturday the iQth inst. a large 
sorrel roan horse, above 1 5 hands high, 8 or 9 years old, 
but looks older, having a number of grey hairs about his 
head; he is of the New England breed, full chested and 
hollow in the flank ; he has a switch tail, his mane is thin 
and hangs on both sides of his neck; he paces and trots, 
is shod all around, and was lately trimmed under the 
bridle and about his ears : He was purchased last spring 
of one Andreas Teniack, inholder, at Brunswick landing, 
and was bred somewhere near Amboy. It is imagined he 
may be gone that way. Whoever takes up the said horse, 
and brings him to the subscriber in Market street, near 
the Indian Queen, shall receive four dollars reward and 
reasonable charges paid by me 

CHARLES THOMPSON. 

SIX POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away on the 8th inst. from Grubb's forge in Lan- 
caster county, a certain John Johnson, about twenty-four 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

or five years of age, thick well-set man, about 5 foot 7 or 
8 inches high, full faced, pock mark'd, dark brown hair; 
had on when he went away a blue half worn out broad 
cloth coat, striped gingham jacket, white shirt, buckskin 
breeches, thread stockings : and a pair of calf skin shoes : 
Said Johnson is gone off, for enlarging an order of three 
pounds to one of thirty and receiving sundry pedler 
goods of William M'Cord in Lancaster, to the amount of 
said thirty pounds. Whoever takes up and secures said 
John Johnson in any of his majesty's goals so that he 
may be brought to justice, shall receive the above reward 
and reasonable charges paid by Mr. GRUBB or WILLIAM 

M'CORD. 

N. B. Its likely he will go towards the Jerseys, as he 
lived some time at the Union iron works. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A COMMODIOUS Plantation, in the lower part of Am- 
well in the county of Hunterdon, about twelve miles 
above Trentown, and three miles to eastward of Correal's 
ferry, on Delaware, containing about four hundred acres 
of good land, and is remarkably good for graising, 
whereon is a good dwelling house, and a good large barn 
with two good out houses, one completely finished in the 
lower part for a dairy, and the upper part for a spinning 
room, a good bearing orchard and a large young one 
coming on, thirty acres of good meadow, the plantation 
in very good fence and very well timbered : also to be sold 
a stout young negro man without any fault. Any person 
inclining to purchase may apply to JOHN STEVENSON, on 
the Premises who will agree on reasonable terms and 
give a good title for the same. The Pennsylvania Jour- 
nal, No. 1233, July 24, 1766. 

RUN-AWAY on the 2Oth instant, July, from Thomas 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

Fry, of Gloucester county, new Jersey, a Dutch servant 
man, named Charles Chrismon, aged about 26, but looks 
older, about 5 feet eight inches high, dark complection, 
short sandy curled hair, big and clumsey made; talks 
broken English, had on when he went away, a soldiers 
red coat, short skirts and no cuffs to the sleeves, no jacket, 
oznabrigs shirt, long narrow tow trowsers, no stockings, 
thick clumsey half worn shoes tied with strings, an old 
felt hat cocked up. He has a mother living on Schuyl- 
kill, about 5 miles above Philadelphia, who lives with 
John Lethermon, and a brother in Lancaster, and is sup- 
posed to be gone towards Lancaster. Whoever takes up 
said servant and secures him in Philadelphia goal, shaJl 
have FOUR POUNDS reward, and reasonable charges paid 
by Thomas Fry, or John West at the Old Ferry House in 
Philadelphia. 

To BE SOLD, 

At public vendue on the I9th of August next, at the pres- 
idents house in Princeton, all the personal estate of the 
late Revd. Dr. SAMUEL FINLEY, consisting of, 
Two Negro women, a negro man, and three 1 Negro 
children, household furniture, horses and neat cattle, a 
light waggon, a new chaise, a sleigh, some hay and grain, 
together with a variety of farming utensils. Also a choice 
collection of books, religious, moral and historical, con- 
taining the complete library of the deceased. The Ne- 
groes will be disposed of at private sale previous, to the 
day appointed for the vendue, should a suitable price be 
offered for them. The Negro woman understands all 
kinds of housework, and the Negro man is well fitted for 
the business of farming in all its branches. The condi- 
tions of the vendue will be made known on the day of sale. 
All those that are indebted to the said estate by bond, 



172 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

note, or book debts, are desired to make immediate pay- 
ment to the subscribers, and such as have any demands 
against the estate are desired to send in their accounts 
properly attested to. 

JONATHAN SEARGEANT, jun. 

in Princeton or 
SAMUEL BREESE, Executor, 

in New- York. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1234, July 31, 
1766. 

Was committed to Gloucester County Goal, a runaway 
Servant, named William Firth, belonging to Colonel 
William Fitzhugh, of Rousby-Hall, on Patuxent River, 
Maryland, agreeable to his Advertisement, bearing Date 
June 30, 1766 

Philadelphia, July 29, 1766. 
THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Second-street, 
near Vine-street, an English servant man, named Joseph 
Hewes, about 20 years old, born in Freehold Township, 
Monmouth County, in the eastern division of New Jersey, 
about 5 feet 6 inches high, and well set, is smooth faced, 
and has brown short hair, by trade a taylor; had on and 
carried with him from sundry persons, a blue cloth coat, 
with light blue binding, lined with blue flannel, is trimmed 
on the sleeves and pocket flaps with plain yellow regi- 
mental buttons, a blue cloth jacket, with lappels, and yel- 
low buttons, the form of basket buttons, and a light col- 
oured flowered cotton velvet jacket, a pair of olive col- 
oured velvet breeches, a pair of black ribbed, and a pair 
of blue and white speckled stockings, a pair of pumps, 
with square steel buckles in them; also a white stock, 
with a plain silver buckle, and a thirty shilling hat, turned, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 173 

without a button; the chiefest part of said apparel he took 
from other persons. Whoever takes up the said servant, 
and secures him in any of his Majesty's goals, and gives 
his master due notice, so that he may have him again ; or 
whoever will bring him to his master, shall have the above 
reward, and all reasonable charges, paid by 

CHRISTOPHER HANSMAN. 

N. B. He absconded himself here before, and was 
taken up at the place of his nativity above mentioned, but 
it is supposed he will go to sea now; therefore this is to 
give notice to all masters of vessels, and others, not to 
harbour or carry him off, at their peril. 

RUN away from Joab Hilman, the 4th inst July, an 
Irish Servant Lad, named Bryan Maquod, about 20 Years 
of Age, about 5 Feet 2 Inches high, has a Defect in his 
Left Eye, and black curled Hair; had on when he went 
away, Ozenbrigs Shirt and Trowsers, Brass Buckles in 
his Shoes, an "old Felt Hat, and an old green Jacket. 
Whoever takes up and secures said Lad in any Goal, so 
that the Owner may have him again, shall receive Forty 
Shillings Reward, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 
JOAB HILMAN, living in Newtown, Gloucester County, 
New Jersey, about 7 Miles from Cooper's Ferry. 

Philadelphia, July 22, 1766. 

There were committed to the Work-house of this City, 
the 7th Day of June last, two Servant Men, named John 
Quin, and James Norton, belonging to David Ferguson 
and Samuel Nickison, both of Salem County, in New- 
Jersey, and their Masters have had Notice; this is once 
more to inform them, that if they do not come, pay 
Charges, and take out said Servants, in three Weeks from 
the above Date, they will be sold out for the same, by the 
Keeper of said Work-house. 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

By virtue of a writ of Fieri Facias to me directed, will 
be exposed to sale, at. public vendue to the highest bidder, 
on Wednesday, the loth day of September next, on the 
premises .... Also to be sold the same day, be- 
tween the hours of twelve and five of the clock, a lot of 
land containing 8 acres, more or less, on which there is a 
convenient place for a fulling mill, in a fine country for 
that business. About three acres of the above mentioned 
lot is excellent meadow, late the property of Jacob Arn- 
wine. Also to be sold .... late the property, and 
now in possession of Joseph Howell ; seized and taken in 
execution at the suit of Thomas Pryor, junior, the execu- 
tors of Ebenezer Large deceased, and others, and are to 
be sold again, by reason the first purchasers cannot com- 
ply with the conditions of the vendue by 

SAMUEL TUCKER, late Sheriff. 

Trenton, July 4, 1766 

By virtue of several writs of fieri facias to me directed, 
will be exposed to sale at public vendue, to the highest 
bidder, on Monday, the i8th day of August next, between 
the hours of twelve and five of the -clock in the afternoon, 
on the premises, the noted tavern house, and about 40 
acres of land, be it more or less, situate in Amwell, now 
in the possession of Samuel Fleming; bounded by lands 
of Richard Laning, Thomas Lowrey, Gershom Lee, Will- 
iam Norcross, and the King's highway; there is also a 
good barn, bearing orchard, and some excellent meadow 
in the above lot. Also one frame house, blacksmith's 
shop, and about three acres of land, be it more or less, in 
the corner of the two roads, adjoining the above, and 
nearly opposite to Mr. Thomas Lowrey: Likewise to 
be sold the same day, to begin at twelve of the clock, 2 
horses, 7 horned cattle, 4 calves, 6 hogs, an iron bound 
waggon, and geers; one plough, and harrow, sundry 









1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 175 

household furniture, such as feather beds and furniture, 
one clock, tables, chairs, writing desk, pewter, iron pots, 
with sundry other things, too tedious to mention here, 
late the property of Samuel Fleming, seized and taken in 
execution at the suit of Alexander Ray, John Smith, The- 
ophilus Severnes, and to be sold; and whereas the above 
lands and chattels have been adjourned three times, for 
want of buyers, the publick may be assured of a sale being 
made, if any purchasers attend on the aforesaid i8th day 
of August, by 

SAMUEL TUCKER, late Sheriff. 

BY virtue of his Majesty's writ of Fieri Facias to me 
directed, will be exposed to sale, at public vendue, at the 
house of Henry Ringo, in Amwell, on Monday, the 8th 
day of September next, between the hours of twelve and 
five o'clock in the afternoon, a valuable plantation, con- 
taining 220 acres, be it more or less, bounded by lands of 
Richard Reed, George Corwine, Joseph Hickson, Henry 
Wambough, Jacob Snyder, Moses Reed, and the King's 
highway, about 14 miles from Trenton, on which is a 
good stone dwelling-house, barn, large orchard, and ex- 
cellent meadows, which may be watered by living springs 
'running thro' the farm. Also to be sold the same day, 
horses, mares, colts, cows, young cattle, hogs, sheep, 
feather beds and furniture, tables, chairs, clothes-press, 
iron pots, pewter platters, wheat and rye, in sheaf, with 
sundry farming utensils, and houshold furniture, too 
tedious to mention; late the property, and now in the 
possession of Henry Ringo; seized and taken in execu- 
tion at the suit of William Cubberly and John Barbrie, 
and to be sold by 

SAMUEL TUCKER, late Sheriff. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1962, July 31, 
1766. 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Perth- Amboy, June 19, 1766. 

New Jersey. BY Virtue of several Writs of Fieri 
Facias to me directed, will be sold at public Vendue on 
Thursday the 2ist Day of August next, between the 
Hours of twelve and five of the same Day, at the House 
of Samuel Horrier, in Princetown, a Lot of Land contain- 
ing about three fourths of an Acre, situate and lying near 
the College, late the Estate of George Campbell, seized 
and taken in Execution, at the Suit of Malcom Campbell, 
and others, by 

JAMES BROOKS, late Sheriff. 

To be sold, or exchanged for a Farm, the old well- 
known Tavern in Kingston, in Middlesex County, New- 
Jersey, known by the Sign of the Mermaid, now in the 
Possession of William Vantilburgh; the House has four 
Fire Places on the lower Floor, with a Cellar under it, a 
good Kitchen, good Garden, and a well near the Door, 
a good large Stable and Barrack, and a convenient Lot of 
one Acre. The Purchaser may have three Acres more, 
very convenient, if wanted. Any Person or Persons in- 
clining to buy, or swap for the aforesaid Premises, may 
apply to the Subscriber at Perth- Amboy. 

JAMES BROOKS 

Mr. HOLT, 
SIR. 

HAVING lately seen in one of the public Papers (but 
forgot which) an Account of the Light-House being 
struck by Lightning, I was induced to inquire after the 
particular Circumstances of that Affair, especially, as I 
knew it to have had a Metalline Conductor, and that if it 
really was so, there would not be wanting those, who, 
from the Prejudice of Education, and their Non-Knowl- 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 177 

edge of the Efficacy of conducting Wires, would be ready 
to infer, and propagate the Inutility of them, for the Pres- 
ervation of Edifices, &c. You will oblige the Public, and 
one of your constant Readers, by assuring them, that the 
Light-House at Sandy-Hook, has not been struck, so as 
to exhibit any Appearance, or Signs thereof whatsoever, 
and that the Veracity of the Informant is indisputable, as 
well as his Knowledge of the Premises, which he derives 
from his Proximity thereto. I am, &c 

New-Jersey, Middlesex County. 

To BE SOLD, at PUBLIC VENDUE, on Wednesday the 24th 
Day of September next, on the Premises : 

THE Plantation lately belonging to Samuel Crow, de- 
ceased, lying on the Road from Perth-Amboy to Piscata- 
way and Brunswick, about a Mile from Amboy; contain- 
ing about eighty-five Acres of Land, whereon is a good 
Dwelling-House, Barn, and out Houses, some mowing 
Ground, &c. the Land is good, and pleasantly situated, 
and convenient for a Gentleman, Tradesman, or Farmer. 
There will also then Be sold, a Lot, or Piece of Salt 
Meadow, lying on Rariton Meadows, belonging to said 
Estate, which Land, Meadow, and Premises, is taken in 
Execution, and will be sold by Virtue of a Writ of Fieri 
Facias, issuing out of the Supreme Court oi this Prov- 

;ince, at the Suit of James Orem, against the Estate of said 
Samuel Crow, deceased : The Terms and Conditions of 
Sale at said Vendtie, will be made known and declared at 
the Day and Place aforesaid, by 
John Moores, Sheriff 
Perth-Amboy, July 21, 1766 
12 



178 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

To the PRINTER : 
SIR, 

Please to give the following a Place in your next 
Thursday's Paper. Yours, &c. 

HE liberty of the press is by all allowed 
to be the great banner of our liberties 
for should the liberty of complaining 

T$T through this channel be taken away, no 
j|g branch of liberty can be said to be safe. 
^ Many instances might be given where in- 
justice, and other grievances, by being 
exposed and made known, have been re- 
dressed. In King William's reign, Sir 
John Hawles, wrote remarks on several, trials before the 
highest courts of judicature, in which he charged those 
courts of justice with doing injustice the consequence 
was, that the legislature on deliberating upon this matter, 
reversed several judgments and attainder no doubt he 
did what was right, but it must be considered this right 
would never have been done, if complaints had been held 
criminal, or not allowed of. 

The same arguments hold good against hard and op- 
pressive acts of parliament, which we have experienced 
are no sooner pointed out and made known to a good and 
wise legislature, but they offered redress of this, we 
have a recent instance in an important matter, wherein 
indeed all the colonies in America were concern'd; but 
suppose one colony only, had been injured and oppressed 
in the seat of reason, this must have had the same force 
and weight in proportion. 

Analogous to this, the county of Middlesex, in New- 
Jersey, has just reason to complain against the act lately 
made, entitled, "An act for building a court house and 
gaol in the county of Middlesex." 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 179 

Because, by this act, as a county, part, a member, of 
the government, she can't but think herself greatly in- 
jured and aggrieved; for the truth of this, she may with 
freedom appeal to the public. To set this matter in a 
true light, I shall observe the following particulars. It 
must be remembered, that the freeholders for the several 
precincts in said county, with the justices, having met at 
Amboy on the i5th and 29th days of November 1764, to 
consider of ways and means to build a court-house for 
the county, instead of that burnt down, could not well 
agree about it; nor did they think it practicable, by the 
laws in being, to levy money for that purpose; therefore, 
as a proper expedient, they petitioned the assembly then 
next to meet at Burlington, for a law to enable them to 
build a house in such place as should be most agreeable 
and satisfactory to the inhabitants : Another petition was 
also presented to the house, signed by a great number of 
the principal freeholders and inhabitants of the county, 
praying for a law to enable the county to purchase a lot, 
and to build a court-house, to be determined by the voice 
of the freeholders; a liberty they hoped would not only 
be granted, but thought themselves entitled to, as the 
money must come from themselves, but which was never 
denied, and always had been granted before to other coun- 
ties; which prayer they endeavored to enforce by sundry 
arguments : Among other things, they mentioned the 
hardships they had laboured under for many years, of 
building and repairing the court-house at the sole expence 
of the county, though the same had been jointly used by 
the corporation of Amboy, for holding their mayor's 
courts, and other purposes, and the supreme courts, sub- 
ject to every accident that might happen on that account, 
and from prisoners committed there from both. 

And though these petitions were zealously opposed by 



ISO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

two other petitions presented to the assembly at the same 
time, yet the two former preponderated with the house, 
as being more just and reasonable. 

This appears from a vote of the 3ist of May, 1765, 
when the question was; "Whether the house would fix 
the place themselves where the court-house should be 
built, or not. Which was carried in the negative." 

Pursuant to this vote, on the nth o>f June, the en- 
grossed bill for vesting a power in the freeholders to raise 
money to build a court-house and gaols in such place as 
they should think most convenient, passed the house by a 
vote of 12 against 6, and the same day was carried to the 
council for their concurrence; the council on the I4th sent 
back the bill with their amendment; but the house dis- 
agreed thereto, and resolved to adhere to their bill, which 
resolution, together with the bill, was again sent to the 
council, with whom it seems the bill dropt: After this, 
we hear no more of this matter till the assembly's answer 
to the governor's message, just before he was pleased to 
put an end to the session, wherein they express their dis- 
inclinations to recede from the principles of their said bill 
already preferred. 

Hence we behold with satisfaction, the house influenced 
by a true spirit of patriotism, and, as faithful guardians, 
act with a watchful eye over the rights and privileges of 
the people intrusted with them : And from such declara- 
tion and resolves might reasonably expect a firm attach- 
ment to these noble principles would have continued : But 
at present we observe, with concern and surprise, meas- 
ures quite opposite to these principles have been adopted 
and pursued, with respect to this matter; for by this act, 
the place where the court-house shall be built is not only 
fixed, but an exclusive tax is directed to be levied on the 
inhabitants of Middlesex only, to pay for it, though mani- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. l8l 

festly expressed and declared by the act to be for uses far 
more extensive than for a court-house to serve her own 
purposes. 

The cause of this surprising alternative is indeed too 
mysterious to be explained, but the consequences are too 
obvious not to be understood, and the burthen thereof will 
be too great not to be felt. 

Tn support, however, of this measure, it is said, some 
stress has been laid upon the proprietors terms formerly 
proposed to the crown to surrender the government. Con- 
cerning this matter there were sevefal memorials drawn 
up at different times t.o the ministry, but that which prop- 
erly contains these terms, as I apprehend, was the I2th of 
August 1701, part of the loth article touching this mat- 
ter, sets forth: "That all the necessary officers and 
courts, for administration of justice, of cases criminal and 
civil, be established, and that the supreme courts may be 
held for both provinces twice in every year at Perth-Am- 
boy, in East- Jersey, and Burlington in West- Jersey, alter- 
natively." But, in the deed of surrender itself, the I2th 
of August, 1702, not a word is to be seen where the su- 
preme court shall be established, nor in the Queen's com- 
mission appointing Lord Cornbury, the first governor, in 
consequence of the surrender, nor in his lordship's in- 
structions : But grant, that agreeable to the prevailing 
opinion, the supreme court must be held at Amboy; does 
it therefore follow, that the county court must follow with 
it? the contrary is clear from the recited article itself 
where no courts are desired or requested to be limited 
but the supreme court only; hence the county court might 
be held in any other place. It is also evident from several 
acts of assembly, under the proprietary government, that 
the county courts of Middlesex, were always held by rota- 
tion in different places of the county, no doubt calculated 



1 82 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

for the ease of the people. And what is remarkable, this 
was both before and after Perth-Amboy had engaged the 
attention of the government, in order to make it a city and 
seaport, and doubtless had formed strong notions of its 
becoming a place of consequence : And notwithstanding 
the legislature in that day had the advancement o<f Perth- 
Amboy much at heart, and for that reason passed an act 
to remove the supreme court from Elizabeth-Town to 
Amboy, yet did not think fit to deprive the inhabitants 
from enjoying their rights and liberties with respect to 
holding the county courts. 

If in that infant time this was thought reasonable, how 
much more so now, because then the county had scarce a 
settlement beyond the Raritan, and every one knows it 
now stretches 30 miles beyond it, and is full of inhabi- 
tants, and, within a trifle, pays one half of the taxes. 

Was it frankly acknowledged, as the truth is, that to 
remove certain advantages from it, which it has enjoyed 
for many years, I readily agree, and without prejudice or 
attachment to places, declare, if by any just and reason- 
able means Amboy could be made great and flourishing, 
I should rejoice to see it put in execution, and no doubt 
every friend to his country would. But no one will hence 
infer, that Amboy has a right to have the county court 
fixed there. 

If it is then a favour, tho' a public inconvenience, that 
this preference is given to it, the expence ought, at least, 
to be made as near as may be equal, and in proportion. 

But can it be thought just and reasonable to impose a 
tax on the county only, to erect, uphold, and maintain a 
sumptuous building, accommodated to hold the supreme 
court of the province, and for the sitting of the council 
and assembly, as well as her own courts, but four times 
in the year; nay, for the city of Amboy, 12 courts, &c. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 183 

which has not paid more than 10 3~4ths in the pound of 
the taxes. 

Here then lies the weight of Middlesex grievance, and 
the essence of her complaint to be compelled to- build 
and perpetually sustain, without the least mitigation, a 
matter of such public concern, against all accidents what- 
soever, except indeed a gift of two lots from the cor- 
poration, with the addition of a small boon Q'f . 200, to be 
issued out of the treasury A matter in itself so inade- 
quate and trifling, in comparison of the excessive burden 
thrown upon the county, as is scarce worth naming; yet, 
small as it is, is made to depend upon the arbitrary will 
and pleasure of certain persons appointed to draw for it, 
and a certain prescribed 'plan to be executed conformable 
to their opinion'. 

A matter, therefore, which claims the attention of the 
legislature, from whose wisdom and goodness relief can 
only be hoped for and expected from this oppressive act. 

AMERICUS JUSTITIA 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1231, August 7, 1766. 

To BE SOLD by 

WILLIAM SMITH, 

At his store the north side of Market-street wharf, .... 
Sadler's and shoemaker's leather, tann'd by John Lang- 
dale of Haddenfield. Home made cloths, woolens and 
linnens; the linnen is esteemed to be equal, at the price, 

to those imported 

At a court of Oyer and Terminer, held at Burlington 
on Wednesday the thirtieth day of July last, came on the 
trial of James Anen, ag'ed 54 years, and James M'Kenzy, 
aged 19 years, on an indictment for the murder of two 
Indian women, named Hannah Catherine, who had 



184 NEW JIiRSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

long resided in the neighborhood of the place where the 
murder was committed. It appeared by their own exam- 
inations, and by the testimony of credible witnesses, that 
they had been on the western frontier of Pennsylvania 
and Virginia; but that their first acquaintance began in 
Philadelphia. That they came to Moorestown in the 
county of Burlington, on Thursday the 26th of June last, 
about noon, begged for charity and obtained relief That 
while they were eating their dinners the two Indians who 
were murdered came to the place where they were; and 
that the youngest of the men gave them abusive language. 
That the Indians went off and rested in a wood near the 
side of the road. That one of them was possessed of a 
clean shift, & the other of a new piece linen, which they 
had that day got. That about two o'clock on the same 
day James Anen sold the shift, and James M'Kenzy the 
piece of new linen and a blanket about two miles from 
Moores-town. That they were parted by accident, and 
that many people had seen the Indians laying in view of 
the road, and supposed them to be asleep, till Sunday the 
29th of June, when two persons perceived a stench, and 
on going near the bodies found they were dead : where- 
upon the coroner was called, whose inquest found them 
to be murdered by persons unknown. On this alarm the 
two criminals were suspected and pursued. James Anen 
was apprehended and committed to the goal at Burling- 
ton, and the other advertised from the description given 
by Anen, and in a few days taken up by the order of the 
Mayor of the city of Philadelphia, and sent to Burlington. 
The examinations of the prisoners, taken before they had 
an opportunity of seeing each other, was read, and by each 
examination it appeared that they went to the Indians 
with intent to ravish them, if they should refuse their of- 
fers : each acknowledged that he was present at the mur 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 185 

der, but charged the giving the stroke on the other, and 
also acknowledged the taking of the goods; in this they 
persisted at the bar. The jury soon found them guilty, 
and they received sentence of death. 

On Friday noon they were hanged at the gallows. They 
continued in denying the fact, and charging it on each 
other. The elder declared he thought it a duty to extir- 
pate the heathen, and just before they were turned off 
M'Kenzy, the younger of the men, acknowledged that one 
of the Indians, on receiving the blow from Anen, strug- 
gled violently, and that he, to put her out of pain, sunk 
the hatchet in her head, but that they were both knocked 
down by Anen. The youngest of the squaws was near 
the time of delivery, and had marks of shocking treatment 
which the most savage nations on earth could not have 
surpassed. 

A few of the principal Indians of Jersey were desired 
to attend the trial and execution, which they did, and be- 
haved with remarkable sobriety. The Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1235, August 7, 1766. 

Perth- Amboy, New- Jersey, June 16, 1766. 
By Virtue of several Writs of Fieri Facias to me di- 
rected, will be sold, by public V endue, on Tuesday, the 
iqth Day of August next, between the Hours of Tzvelve 
and Five of the same Day, at the House of the Widow 
Lott, A Tract of Land, containing, by Estimation, about 
poo Acres, lying at South-River. Also about 60 Acres 
of salt Meadow, at the Round Abouts; late the Property 
of Thomas Leonard, seised and taken in Execution at the 
suit of Thomas Watson, and others, by 

JAMES BROOKS, late Sheriff. 

New-Brunswick, in New-Jersey, July 28, 1766 
WHEREAS it appears, from an Advertisement in the 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Pennsylvania Gazette, of the 24th Instant, a Reward of 
Three P'ouncls is offered, for committing to Goal one Pat- 
rick Doyle, who ran away from Messer Brown, of East 
Nottingham, Chester County; These are to notify the 
said Messer Brown, or whom else it may concern, that 
the said Patrick Doyle was this Day, by a Warrant for 
that Purpose, committed to the Goal of this City, under 
the Name of John M'Lauchlan, but soon afterwards, upon 
searching for, and discovering an Indenture of Transpor- 
tation, under the Hand of the Lord Mayor of Dublin, con- 
fessed himself to be the Man advertised. His Master is 
therefore desired to come and pay the above Reward, with 
the other Charges, and take said Servant away. 

JACOB WEISER, Goaler. 

Philadelphia, August 2, 1766. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, at Mount Clement, 
between East and West Jersey, on Monday last,' a likely 
Negroe Man, named Prince, about 5 Feet 10 Inches high; 
had on a white Waistcoat, without Sleeves, Ozenbrigs 
Shirt and Trowsers, and a sharp cocked Hat. He talks 
good English, is Country-born, remarkably black, and a 
little pitted with the Small-pox. Whoever takes up and 
secures said Negroe. so that his Master may have him 
again, shall receive Thirty Shillings Reward, and all rea- 
sonable Charges, paid by me 

THOMAS PLUMSTED. 

Salem, July 30, 1766 

RUN away, on the Tenth Day of June last, from his 
Bail, a certain Edward Ashton, born in Ireland, by Trade 
a Taylor, served his Time in Bristol, in Pennsylvania, 
about 5 Eeet 6 Inches high, of a sandy Complexion; had 
on a new Fustian Coat, with gilt Buttons, old blue Ever- 
lasting Breeches, white Thread Stockings, good Shoes, 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. lS/ 

and a Pair of Silver Buckles, marked S. W. He was seen 
at Bristol the 28th Instant, with a blue Coat and Jacket, 
and a Pair of striped Holland Trowsers on. Whoever 
takes tip, and secures said Runaway in any Goal, if in the 
Province of Pennsylvania, shall receive Eight Dollars 
Reward; and if in the Province of New- Jersey, Ten Dol- 
lars and reasonable Charges, paid by 

JOHN BREEDING. 

RUN away from William Murray, late of Haddonfield, 
in Gloucester County, on the 2Qth of July last, an Irish 
Servant Man, named Charles Valany, about 5 Feet 8 
Inches high, about 21 or 22 Years of Age, of a dark Com- 
plexion, with black curled Hair; had on, when he went 
aAvay, a new Check Shirt, striped Trowsers, a brown lap- 
pelled Jacket, without Sleeves, old Shoes, with Buckles, 
and has no Stockings. It is supposed he has other Cloaths 
with him, and may change his Habit. Whoever takes up 
the said Servant, and secures him in any Goal, shall have 
Forty Shillings Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by 

JACOB CLEMENT. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1963, August 7, 
1766. 

To be SOLD by public vendue, on Monday, the first day 
of September next, on the premises, 

THE plantation of Richard Allison, late of Hopewell, 
deceased, containing 54 acres of land, with two dwelling- 
houses, a barn, and stable, with other out-houses, a bear- 
ing orchard, a good piece of watered meadow before the 
door, a good new convenient tanyard, all in excellent 
order, with leather in the vatts, which may be sold with 
or without the place, as may best suit the purchaser. The 
place is remarkably pleasant, situate on the great road 



1 88 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

leading through the country to Racket's, from whence a 
great quantity of hides may be had yearly; it is about 
seven miles from Trenton, and one from Pennington. 

Likewise will be sold, on Thursday following, the fifth 
day of September, by way of public vendue, on the prem- 
ises, a brick dwelling-house, two stories high, with a 
kitchen back, a good shop, will suit any tradesman, a good 
hay-house and stable, a yard and large garden, a well at 
the door, it being pleasantly situate in Bordentown, about 
half way along the main street. 

Likewise a lot of land, lying on Bank-street, containing 
one quarter of an acre, with a young bearing orchard on 
the same, being also the property of the said Richard 
Allison, deceased, on which days the conditions may be 
seen, and attendance given by 

SAFETY MEGHEE, Executrix. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1964, August 14, 
1766. 

ARRIVALS. 

Schooner Phoebe, Provost, from Perth Amboy at St 
Kitts. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1235, August 7, 
1766. 

On Saturday last died after a short illness, the Revd. 
Mr. Colin Campbell, 1 many years missionary at Burling- 
ton, in New-Jersey, and on Sunday last he was interred 
in Burlington church, his remains being attended to the 
grave by a great number of people of different persua- 
sions, assembled from various parts of the country to 
testify their regard to his memory. A suitable sermon 
was preached by the Revd. Dr. Smith of Philadelphia, 
who having introduced a short and just character of the 
deceased in the following paragraph, a copy of it was 
requested to be here inserted, viz. 

iFor sketch of the Rev. Colin Campbell, see N. J. Archives, XX. 



1 7 66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



189 



"Methinks, according to the usual mode, you now ex- 
"pect an application of this subject, in a long and circum- 
"stantial account of him, whose dust we have just con- 
"signecl to its kindred dust. But I knew my worthy de- 
parted friend so well .... such was his abhorrence 
"of the too frequent prostitutions of truth and justice in 
''many of our modern characters of the dead .... that 
"were he now alive, and to speak for himself, he would 
"suffer no more to be said of him, but that .... He 
"endeavoured to be (what you will all allow he was) a 
"man of strict and severe honesty; faithful in the dis- 
"charge of every trust, & particularly of his most sacred 
"trust, as a minister of the gospel of JESUS. He was a 
"lover of peace and rather willing to bear any tolerable 
"wrong, than ruffle the serenity of his own temper. His 
"loss to you is great, but to his worthy bereaved wife and 
"children irreparable." 



City of New-Brunswick, August 3, 1766. 

TAKEN up and committed to goal in this city, on the 
3d inst. a person who says his name is Thomas Cox, says 
he was borne at Jamaica, served his time to the sea out 
of Liverpool, has been two years in Alexander Millar's 
employ, as a shallop man from New-Port to Philadelphia, 
married and lived 18 months in said Millars house: he 
is a person about five feet 8 inches high, very strait, of a 
sandy countenance, short flaxen or sandy hair, red beard, 
long visaged, a Roman nose, his middle finger nail on his 
left hand, has been split and forms a ridge, he has only 
one speckled shirt, a pair of check trowsers, a wool hat, 
a pair of shoes and brass buckles. Altho' he has lived at 
New-Port and Philadelphia for two years, yet he has no 
acquaintance at either place, that can testify that he is an 
honest or a free man, he has been detected in many gros:> 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

untruths, and from every circumstance, he is some persons 
servant, or one of the wretched gang of robbers adver- 
tised. Any person that has any right to, or can give any 
account of the said 1 homas Cox (as he calls himself) are 
desired to make their claim, or to give what information 
of him they can, to their hum. servant, 

JOHN DOWNEY. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1236, August 14, 
1766. 



PROPOSALS : 

For printing by Subscription, from the Author's Man- 
uscripts. 

A Select Collection of practical Discourses, on a Variety 
of important Subjects; together with some Pieces already 
published, By the Reverend and learned 
SAMUEL FINLEY, D. D. 

Late President of the College of New-Jersey : To 
which will be prefixed, some Account of the Life and 
Character of the Author. 



CONDITIONS. 

I. The Work shall be printed on a new Letter, and a 
good Paper, and will be contained in two Volumes, Duo- 
decimo, neatly bound and lettered. 

II. The Price to Subscribers shall not exceed twelve 
Shillings New- York Currency, a Set : Six Shillings to 
be paid at the Time of subscribing, and the Remainder 
on the Delivery of the Books. 

III. Those who subscribe for twelve Sets, shall have 
one Set gratis. 

IV. It will be sent to the Press as soon as a sufficient 
Number of Subscriptions can be obtained. 

Subscriptions are taken in by Mr. Samuel Breese, Mer- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. IQI 

chant, and Mr. Ebenezer Hazard, at Mr. Garrat Noel's, 
next Door to the Coffee- House, in New-York : By Mr. 
Joseph Periam, at Princetown, and Mr. William Brad- 
ford, Mr. Thomas Bradford, and Mr. Isaac Snowden, in 
Philadelphia: Of whom printed Proposals may be had 
by those who are disposed to forward so useful an Under- 
taking. 

To be sold at Public Vendue, on the Premises, on Tues- 
day the 2ist Day of October next : 
A valuable Plantation, lately the Property of Dolley 
Hegeman, deceased; situate at Ten-Mile Run, in the 
County of Middlesex, and Province of New-Jersey : Con- 
taining about 200 Acres of Land, whereof are about 130 
Acres cleared and 15 Acres of good Meadow; the Rest 
is good Timber Land, several very good Springs of 
Water on said Land; a good large Dwelling-House and 
Kitchen, also a good Barn and Stables, and a good bear- 
ing Orchard; the said Plantation adjoins the great Road 
that leads from Trenton to New-Brunswick, and is about 
9 Miles fro-m New-Brunswick, the Land is very good for 
Wheat and Pasture, &c. Whoever inclines to purchase 
before the Day of Sale,. may be further informed by ap- 
plying to the Subscriber : The Title is indisputable, the 
Sale to begin at 12 o'Clock of said Day, where attendance 
will be given and the Terms of Sale made known by 

DENICE HEGEMAN, "] 
DOLLEY HEGEMAN, 
ADRIAN HEGEMAN, f Executors. 
JACOBUS HEGEMAN. J 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1234, August 28, 1766. 

FORTY SHILLINGS Reward 
RTJN away on Friday, the I5th of this inst. August, 



IQ2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

from the Subscriber, living in Greenwich Township, 
Gloucester County, an Apprentice, named Joseph Jones, 
17 Years old, 5 Feet 6 or 7 Inches high, lightish coloured 
Kair; had on, when he went away, an Ozenbrigs Shirt. 
Tow Trowsers, a Felt Hat, and a greyish Jacket, with 
Cuffs to it, all about Half worn, new double soaled Shoes, 
too big for him. It is supposed that he will go to Alex- 
ander Bryant's, about 14 Miles from Reading Town. 
Whoever takes up the said Apprentice, and secures him, 
so that the Subscriber may get him again, shall have the 
above Reward, and- reasonable Charges, paid by 

BURROUGHS ABIT. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1966, August 28, 
1766. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in South - 
Amboy Township, Middlesex County, an Irish Sen-ant 
Man, named James Morrow, about 5 Feet 4 Inches high, 
black Hair, cut off on the Top of his Head, and the short 
Hair mixed with grey, and pretty long behind; he has 
something of a down look, very much addicted to drink; 
had on, and took with him. an old brown Broadcloth 
Coat, patched on the Elbows, with other coloured Cloth, 
a Buff coloured Thickset Jacket, with green Lining, 
broken about the Pockets, an old Ozenbrigs Shirt, all 
patched on the Back; he took with him a pair of Shoes, 
lately soaled, and a Pair of half worn Pumps, two Pair of 
Buckles, one Pair Pinchbeck, the other square Brass, with 
sharp Corners, a Pair of Breeches Trowsers, halfworn, 
of striped Cotton, but can hardly be discurned. Whoever 
takes up and secures him, so as his Master may have him 
again, shall have Forty Shillings Reward, if in East Jer- 
sey, and Three Pounds if taken in Pennsylvania, and 

reasonable Charges, paid by 

THOMAS M'CAGHRY. 



i;66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



193 



WAS committed to Gloucester County Goal, a runaway 
Servant, named William Firth, belonging to Colonel 
William Fitzhugh, of Rousby-Hall, on Patuxent River, 
Maryland, agreeable to his Advertisement, bearing Date 
June 30, 1766. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1966, 
August 28, 1766. 

TAKEN up, and put into Trenton goal, upon suspicion 
of being run aivay servants., on the i/'th and ipth of Au- 
gust. On the i/'th, John Edmiston, who says he is ser- 
vant to Thomas M'Neil, late of Philadelphia; his said 
Master, if any he has, is desired to come before tJie i$th 
of September, pay his charges, and take him avvay, other- 
wise he will that day be sold out for his fees, and other 
charges, &c. The other named John Johnson, who was 
on board the Tyger, and came ashore on or about the last 
of July, says he has no master; if any person claims any 
right to the said Johnson, he is desired to come before the 
time above mentioned, else he will be sold out for his 
charges, by me 

GEORGE BROWN, goal-keeper. 

To be Sold, by private Sale, on the Premises, by the 
Subscriber, 

A Valuable Plantation, containing 200 Acres of good 
Land, or more, if it suits the Purchaser, of which there 
are 80 Acres cleared, and in good Fence; there is about 
15 Acres of good Meadow, and more may be made, the 
rest is all well timbered and watered, situate in Waterford 
Township, Gloucester County, and Province of West 
New-Jersey, about 6 Miles from Cooper's Ferry, 3 from 
Haddonfield, One and an Half from a public Landing, 
and one Mile from Cole's Church; the whole Premises is 
well watered, as there is a Run of good Water thro' the 
whole Plantation; there is on the Premises a good Apple 



13 



IQ4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Orchard, and Peach Orchard, on which there is a good 
Frame House, and a Well of very good Water close by 
the Kitchen Door, a good Milk Cellar, and Barn, Stables, 
Cow-houses, Smoak-house, Hen-house, and good Frame 
Corn Crib. The Premises lie on a public Road, leading 
from Cole's Town to Cooper's Ferry, there is a very ex- 
tensive Outlet for Cattle or Hogs. Any Person that in- 
clines to purchase the said Premises, may apply to the 
Subscriber, on the Premises. The Purchaser may enter 
on the same about the 27th of November next. 

SAMUEL BURROUGH, junior. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1967, September 
4, 



Ne-w-York, September 4. We hear, that on Tuesday 
last, Mr. Abner Hetfield, of Elizabeth-Town, and another 
Man, being out a Fishing discovered a Whale swimming 
about, near Coney Island, on which soon after it ran 
ashore, and before it could get off, they came up, and 
killed it with a rusty sword, that happened to be on board 
the Vessel We are told Mr. Coffler, at the Ferry, oppo- 
site to this City, on Long-Island, has bought it for f . 30, 
and that it is now brought up to that Place. It is said to 
be forty-five Feet in Length, and that if cut up, it would 
produce about seventy Barrels of Oyl. 

Perth- Amboy, July the I5th, 1766. 
New-Jersey. ) BY Virtue of a Writ of Fieri Facias, to 
me directed, will be sold at public Vendue, on Wednesday 
the 1 7th Day of September next, between the Hours of 
Twelve and Five of the same Day, a Lot of Land contain- 
ing about 30 Acres, with a good Grist-Mill and Saw-Mill 
thereon; situate in Woodbridge Township, and about 
two Miles from Piscataway Town, late the Property of 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 195 

Robert Martin, seized and taken in Execution at the Suit 
of Walter Rutherford, by 

JAMES BROOKS, late Sheriff. 

THE Assignees to the Estate of William Whitehead, 
will attend at the House of Thomas Leonard in Prince- 
town, on Tuesday the gih Day of December next, from 
One, 'till Five o'Clock in the Afternoon; and desire the 
Creditors of said Estate, then and there to produce their 
Accounts, properly attested, that so an exact Dividend 
may be made of the Monies which shall then be received. 

ROBERT STOCKTON, ) . . 
JOSEPH STOCKTON, J J 

Princeton, September i, 1766. 

RUN away on Saturday the 23d of August last, from 
Nathaniel Richards, at Newark, a negro Man named BEN, 
about 5 feet 8 or 9 Inches high, aged 28, slim made, thin 
Visage, yellow Complexion, a likely lively cunning Fel- 
low, speaks good English, and can speak Low Dutch. He 
formerly belonged to Thomas Budde, at Morris-Town in 
New-Jersey, w r ho two or three Months ago sold him to 
the Widow Mrs. Elizabeth Finn, at Prakenas in the 
County of Bergen, from whom he run away soon after, 
and being advertised, was taken and brought Home to 
his Mistress, by whom he was soon after sold to the Sub- 
scriber. When he went away he pretended he was going 
to Swim, and as he never return' d, and next Day his 
Clothes were found near the Shore, he was supposed to 
be drown'd, till his Character was known, which gives 
Reason to suppose he took that Method to deceive his 
Master and prevent a Search. It is not known whether 
he had any Clothes with him or not. Whoever returns 
him to his Master, or secures him in any Gaol, shall re- 



196 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ceive Eight Dollars Reward, and all reasonable Charges. 

NATHANIEL RICHARDS. 

RUN AWAY from the Subscriber hereof, Collier at the 
Manolapon Forge, in Middlesex County, and Province of 
East New-Jersey, an Irish Servant Man, named JAMES 
MORROW, about 5 Feet 4 Inches high, black short Hair, 
talks broad, has something of a down look, freckled in the 
Face, addicted to Drink, has work'd at the said Forge at 
the Coaling Business this Summer, had on and took away 
with him when he went away, an old colour'd brown 
Broad cloth Coat, patched on the Elbows with Cloth of 
another Colour, a buff, coloured Thickset Jacket, lined 
with green Shaloon, much worn about the Pockets, an 
old Oznabrigs Shirt, two Pair of Shoes, two Pair of Shoe 
Buckles, one Pinchbeck and the other Pair large Brass, 
and one Pair of long stripped Cotton Trousers. Who- 
ever takes up and secures the said Servant, so that his 
Master may have him again, shall have FORTY SHILLINGS 
Reward if taken in N. Jersey, and THREE POUNDS if 
taken in any other Province, and reasonable Charges paid 
by me 

THOMAS M'CAGHERTY. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
I2 35> September 4, 1766. 

Messrs. W. and T. Bradford, 

The following copies of letters lately received from Lon- 
don, being very interesting to the public, we beg the 
favour, that they may be made public through your 
free and impartial paper, which will oblige no small 
number of your readers. 

A letter from John HiKjhes, Esq.; to the Commissioners of the Stamp 

office in London. 

GENTLEMEN, Philadelphia, October 12, 1765. 

HAVING been confined to my bed twenty-five days past, with a violent. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 97 

disorder, that was expected would have proved mortal, -but thank God 
am now able to sit up in bed, I shall attempt to give you a sketch of not 
only my own conduct, but also that of the Presbyterians and proprie- 
tary party here, relative to the Stamp office. 

I am now to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from the Secretary of 
the Stamp-office, and also a bill of lading for 3 cases and 7 packs of Stamps 
for this province, exclusive of tnose for New-.Iersey and Maryland, but 
there is neither invoice nor Mil of parcels, nor any account of the 

prices the Stamped paper or parchment is to be sold at 

[Signed] JOHN HUGHES. 

Extract of letters from John Hughes, Esq.; appointed Distributor of 
Stamps for Pennsylvania, to Benjamin Franklin, Esq. ; agent for 
said province, and by him laid before the Parliament. 

Philadelphia, September, 1765. 

You are now, from letter to letter, to suppose each may be the last that 
you will receive from your old friend, as the spirit or flame of REBELLION 

IS GOT TO A HIGH PITCH AMONGST THE NORTH AMERICANS 

By Governor Franklin's letters, and by my last, you will see that 
Mr. Cox has resigned the Stamp Office for ISTew Jersey; and there is 
scarce a day goes over my head, but many people call upon me to resign, 
and say I am an enemy to North-America, if I do not ; but since I am 
now DIPT, and must abide by consequences, BE THEY WHAT THEY WILL, 
I shall be exceedingly obliged to you, if it is consistent with your judg- 
ment to recommend my son Hugh for Mr. Cox's successor. My son is 
married and settled in New Jersey, has a good estate, both real and per- 
sonal, and can give any security that may be required. I am the more 
induced to ask this favour, as I think there will be no difficulty in put- 
ting the act in execution in that province : and if my property, and 
perhaps my life, may be lost in this province, my son, I hope, will be the 
better for the office in that province, which may be some compensation 
for what property may be lost out of the family * 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1239, September 
4, 1766. 

SALEM, September 7th. 
TWENTY DOLLARS Reward. 

BROKE out of Salem goal, last night, a certain Andrew 
King, born in Scotland, about 5 feet 5 inches high, of a 
fair complexion ; had on when he went away, an old dirty 
check shirt, an old pair of cloth breeches he is bare legged 
and bare footed : Whoever takes up said King and 

i These are the only paragraphs relating- to New Jersey in these let- 
ters, which occupy six columns (two pages) of the Journal. 



198 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

brings him to Salem, shall have the above reward and 
reasonable charges paid by 

EDWARD TEST, Sheriff. 

N. B. Tis said he has broke open Nathan Boys's house 
on Salem road, and stole a good check shirt, a good fawn 
skin jacket dressed with the hair out, and a good beaver 
hat, and two silk handkerchiefs.. The Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1240, September u, 1766. 

On the 1 5th day of November next, being the 7th day 
of the week, at 4 o'clock P. M. will be sold by public 
vendue, at the London Coffee-house, the following tracts 
of land, situate in West New-Jersey. 

No. i. A tract or parcel of land, in the township of 
Great Egg Harbour, in the county of Gloucester, begin- 
ning at a pine tree, by the side of a run that leads to James 
Sommers's, or Price's mill-pond; from thence west 250 
perches to a marked pine; from thence north 50 perches 
to another marked tree, &c. containing in the whole 474 
acres, with allowance for roads. 

No. 2. One other tract, in the county and township 
aforesaid, near Ingersol's branch, which puts out of Abse- 
com ; from thence west 75 perches to a pine marked with 
12 notches; from thence south 250 perches to a pine 
marked 12 notches; and from thence north 34 degrees 
west, 305 perches, to the place of beginning, containing 
247 acres, with allowance for roads. 

No. 3. One other tract of land, beginning at a pine 
tree near Richard Risley's cedar swamp, which lies on 
the main branch of Absecom, and running from thence 
west 1 20 perches to a pine tree marked with 12 notches; 
and from thence across the swamp north 100 perches, &c 
containing 71 acres. 

No. 4. One other tract, beginning at a pine tree of 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 99 

John Conovcr's, back of Richard Risley's land, and run- 
ning- from thence north 50 degrees west, 40 perches, to 
a red oak marked, and from thence west 80 perches, to 
a pine marked with 12 notches, and from thence north 
65 .perches, then north 30 degrees east 60 perches, to a 
white oak, and then north 50 degrees east 80 perches; 
then north 75 degrees east 40 perches, to a pine; then 
east 40 perches to Richard Risley's land, near the head 
of the marsh; and from thence south 16 degrees west 
2icS perches, to the place of beginning, containing 128 
acres. 

No. 5, One other tract, situate in the township and 
county of Gloucester, on a branch of Great Egg-Harbour 
river, about a mile from the blue anchor, beginning at a 
pine tree marked 4 blazes, 12 notches, and the letters 1C, 
standing on the north side of a large maple swamp; thence 
north 20 degrees west 10 perches, to a post by a run: 
thence north 31 degrees west 30 perches, crossing a small 
branch to a pine tree, marked as aforesaid; thence south 
75 degrees west 20 perches, crossing the swamp to a' 
maple marked 4 blazes, 12 notches; thence south 25 de- 
grees east 73 perches, to a post; thence north 55 degrees 
east 25 perches, crossing the swamp to the tree first 
named, containing 151 acres. 

No. 6. One other tract, in the township of Great Egg- 
harbour, and in the county of Gloucester, on the north- 
east side of Great Egg-harbour river, at the head of Miry 
run, beginning at the pine tree corner to John Ireland's 
land, marked I. on the west side, and 1C on the east side, 
standing on the road that leads from Little Meadows to 
the head of Gravelly Run, being 9 perches from the road, 
containing, within the several courses thereof, 355 acres. 

No. 7. One other tract, in the township and county 
aforesaid, on a branch of Gravelly Run, beginning at a 



2OO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



corner tree of Andrew Blackman's cedar swamp, for- 
merly marked with the letters AB, and now with 4 blazes, 
and the letters 1C, standing on the south side of the east 
branch of Gravelly Run, and, in the several courses there- 
of, containing 128 acres. 

No. 8. One other tract, in the township and county 
aforesaid, on the north side of Scull's Thoroughfare, be- 
ginning at a stake at the mouth of a small creek, where it 
puts out of the Thoroughfare, the stake bearing south 
40 east from John Scull's dwelling-house; thence north 
35 perches; thence east 30 perches; thence south 35 
perches; thence west 30 perches, to the place of begin- 
ning, containing TOO acres. 

No. 9. One other tract, in the county and township 
aforesaid, beginning at a pine tree, marked 4 blazes, 12 
notches, and the letters 1C, a corner of 515 acres, sur- 
veyed to Elijah Clark, being the westernmost corner of 
the said tract, standing about two miles above Westcott's 
causeway; thence west 50 perches, to a pine marked as 
aforesaid; thence south 80 perches, to a white oak, 
marked as above; thence north 61 degrees, and 30 min- 
utes east, 77 perches to a pine marked as the above corner 
to Elijah Clark's land; thence north 23 degrees west, 47 
perches, by Clark's line, to the place of beginning, con- 
taining 360 acres, with usual allowance; the whole late 
the property of James Child, deceased. A plan of the 
said lands will be shewn at the time of sale, and any fur- 
ther information may be had from the subscribers. 

All persons indebted to the estate of John Child, de- 
ceased, or to Child and Stiles, are desired to make pay- 
ment before the first of October, or their accounts will be 
put into attorneys hands. SAMUEL NEAVE, FRANCIS 
RICHARDSON, JEREMIAH WARDER, assignees. 



i;66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



201 



August 23, 1766. 

There will be exposed to sale, by public vendue, on 
Wednesday, the ist day of October next, a valuable plan- 
tation, in the township of Amwell, County of Hunterdon, 
New- Jersey, containing 100 and odd acres, late the estate 
of Samuel Barber, deceased, where one John Barber now 
lives. There is on the said place a good frame house and 
barn, a young bearing orchard, 5 acres of good meadow, 
about 20 acres o<f woodland, the rest good for grain; 
there is water in all the fields, and a well at the house. 
The conditions will be made known the day of sale, where 
.attendance will be given by us 

ELIADA BARBER and JOHN BARBER, Executors. 

To BE LETT, 

The noted tavern at Princetown, where Samuel Horner 
now dwells, being as well situated for business as any be- 
tween Philadelphia and New York. For terms apply to 

JOHN REYNELL. 

WHEREAS the Assignees for the Creditors of William 
Rea, of Kingwood, New-Jersey, Samuel Purviance, 
senior, James Eddy, and Randle Mitchell, did advertise 
last June, desiring all the Creditors to bring in their Ac- 
counts against said Rea, to enable the Assignees to strike 
a Dividend of what Money has been received, to which 
no Regard has been paid; now they are again requested 
to bring in all their Accounts before the first Day of Oc- 
tober next, and leave them at Randle Mitchell's Store in 
Water-street, near Walnut-street, and any Time after the 
first of October the said Creditors may call, and receive 
their respective Dividends. 

Burlington, September 2, 1766. 
WAS committed to this goal, a certain John Gordon, 



202 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

about 5 feet 6 inches high, about 18 years of age, says he 
belongs to one Samuel Sharp, in Cecil county, Maryland; 
this is to inform said Sharp, or any other person it may 
concern, that except they come, pay charges, and take 
him away, he will be sold out in a little time for the same, 

by me 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, goaler. 

To be SOLD, 

A VERY valuable plantation, in Hunterdon county, 
pleasantly situated on the river Delaware, between Cor- 
ryell's and Horn's ferries, containing about 340 acres of 
land, 42 of which is very rich intervale, the remainder 
good wheat and grass land; about 170 acres is cleared, 
and in good fence ; the other part well timbered. On the 
premises is a good stone house and barn, a very good or- 
chard;- lately occupied by Francis King. For terms of 
sale, enquire of John Imlay, in Bordentown, or George 
Ely, near the premises. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
1968, September n, 1766. 

AT PRINCETON, 

ON Friday the iQth Instant will be sold at public Ven- 
due, an Assortment of Dry Goods, Beds, Household Fur- 
niture, Saddles, &c. The Conditions will be made known 
at the Time and Place of Sale. 
September nth, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No* 
1236, September n, 1766. 

New- York, September 6. 
To the PRINTER, 
SIR, 

If you Please you may in your next rectify a few Mis- 
takes in the Account about the Whale, published in your 
Paper of Thursday last, viz. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 203 

T. IT was Mr. Holman of Elizabeth-Town, five other 
Men and two Boys, that discovered and killed the Whale, 
Mr. Hetfield was not one of the Number. 

TI. It happen'd, not on Tuesday, but Monday last. 

III. The length was not 45 but 49 Feet. 

IV. It could not reasonably be supposed that it would 
produce 70 Barrels of Oyl, nor more than twenty. 

V. It was not sold for . 30, nor more than 20 or 
25. 

VI. It was not bought by Captain Koffler, but Mr. 
Waldron at the Ferry. 

To be sold, a convenient farm, containing between sev- 
enty and eighty acres of choice land, situated, lying and 
being in the county of Bergen, about four miles from the 
town of Hackinsack, and three miles from the river, 
where there is a good convenient landing place, and on 
the public country road that leads to Ringwood and Ster- 
ling iron works ; there is on said plantation, a new stone 
dwelling-house, with four rooms on a floor, an entry 
through the whole, a kitchen and milk room, all under 
one roof; a flour bent barn, with cedar cover, a young 
orchard, two grist mills and a saw mill, all in good repair, 
standing about three rods from the dwelling-house, on the 
noted stream call'd saddle-river, and in the heart of a fine 
country for all sorts of grain; the said mills having a 
convenient run of business, and never fails for want of 
water in the driest seasons ; the King's road runs between 
the mills and the dwelling-house. It is conveniently situ- 
ated for a gentleman, or merchant, or any sort of public 
business, a store having been kept there these several 
years past; the said farm is well watered and timbered, 
with exceeding good swamps, some of which are brought 
to great perfection, being fit for hay, or any sort of grain. 



2O4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Any person inclining to purchase may apply to William 
Bayard, Esq; at New- York, or to me the subscriber, liv- 
ing on the premises, who will give an indisputable title 
for the same. 

ABRAHAM GOUVERNEUR 

Supplement to The New York Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No. 1236, September 6 (n ?), 1766. 

Elizabeth-Town, September 17, 1766. 
Benjamin & Matthias Halsted, 
GOLD and SILVER-SMITHS. 

TAKE this method to acquaint the public, that they have 
now set up, their business in Elizabeth-Town (nearly op- 
posite to Mr. Josqih Jelf s merchant) where they propose 
to carry it on in all its branches, as the said Benjamin 
Halsted, has followed the business some time in New- 
York, to the satisfaction of his employers, he hopes his 
former customers there and in the country will not forget 
him. as he will now obey all orders for work from them 
and other gentlemen and ladies of the city or country, at 
the shortest notice and most reasonable prices, with the 
greatest care and exactness to their entire satisfaction; 
as we propose to make work of all qualities (prices ac- 
cordingly) we hope our employers will not expect the 
best of work for the meanest prices. 

Any orders for work being left at Mr. Thomas Star 
TredwelFs, at Burling's-slip, New- York, will come safe 
to hand; or any gentlemen or ladies wanting work done, 
that are desirous to see one of us to deliver their orders 
to, if they will please to leave word at the above Mr. 
Tredwell's, one or the other will wait on them at a very 
short notice. 

Said Matthias Halsted has for sale, a few silver-smith's 
tools, which he will sell cheap, for cash, viz. Forging; 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

planishing, hollowing and bouge hammers, piercing, rif- 
fling and common files, fine Turkey oil stone slips, and 
Bohemia polishing stones, double aqua fortis, corn, half- 
corn and flour emery, borax and sandever. The above 
tools, &c. may be had of the above Mr. Tredwell, and 
likewise a few best steel top thimbles. 

To BE SOLD, by way of public vendue, on Thursday 
the 1 6th day of October next, at the late dwelling of Will- 
iam Thomson, attorney at law, late of Millstone in the 
county of Somerset and province of New-Jersey, de- 
ceased; all the estate of the said William Thomson both 
real and personal : The real estate, consisting of a lot of 
land, containing about 4 acres with a new dwelling-house 
nearly finished, two stories high and four rooms on a 
floor. Also a large kitchen joining the said house : It is 
well improved with out-houses, gardens, &c. The per- 
sonal estate consists of houshold furniture, some law 
books, and some other valuable books, one negro man, 
one negro boy about 14 years old, one negro girl about 
TO years old, Horses, cattle, farming utensils and sundry 
other things : The conditions of sale will be published 
at the time and place abovementioned by 

BENJAMIN THOMSON ~] 

PETER SCHENCK }~ Executors. 

EDMUND LESLIE J 

The Nezv York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1237, September 18, 1766. 

Messrs. BRADFORD, 

Please to insert the following in your paper, and you 
will greatly oblige, Yours, &c. 

An ESSAY, 

Tozvards discovering the Authors and Promoters of 
The memorable STAMP ACT. 



2O6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

In a Letter from a Gentleman in London, to his friend 
in PHILADELPHIA. 

You may be certain that it is difficult, perhaps impos- 
sible, to fix precisely upon the persons, who besides 
George Grenville, were concerned in projecting and for- 
warding the Stamp Act. But as you request that I should 
tell you what people on this side of the water think upon 
that subject, I have accordingly made very diligent en- 
quiry, and am sorry that I must inform you, that your 
own agent, Dr. B nF kl - - n is generally be- 
lieved to have had a principal hand in promoting the 
Stamp Act. The reasons for our judgment I shall give 
you in general as they occur. 

You will receive along with this a copy of four letters ; 

Secondly. We do not affirm, that he [Dr. Franklin] 
was the very person who proposed the act to G - - le; 
yet we can even give the strongest proofs of this fact, 
that the nature of the thing can admit of. The act was 
doubtless formed and projected under the joint influence 

of Lord Bute and G e G le; and Dr. F n's 

chief interest at court is with Lord Bute. F n's 

friends in Philadelphia boasted of his interest with the 

late ministry; and when Mr. H s 1 told Mr. F n 

that his want of interest at court w r as objected as an argu- 
ment against his appointment as agent : F - - n forgot 
his usual reserve, and swore by his Maker, that it was 
false, that he had interest with Lord Bute, and asserted 

that he thought he had also some interest with G e 

G le. His Lordship, being a great philosopher, es- 
teems the Dr. on account of his electrical improvements; 
hence Dr. Pringle found no difficulty in persuading Lord 
Bute to nominate F n's son for Governor of the Jer- 



i Hughes. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 07 

sies. Nor is it at all improbable, that the Stamp Act was 

projected before F n left England 

When we consider the strict friendship and intercourse 

there is between Dr. F n, Governor F n, J--n 

H - - - s 1 and J - - - s G - 11 - - y 2 it would be absurd to sup- 
pose these four gentlemen did not understand one an- 
others sentiments, so as to assist one another, especially 
in a matter of such importance to each of their interests, 
as the Stamp-Act and Change of Government. Accord- 
ingly we actually find that they play into one anothers 

hands, and all into the hands of the late Ministry. F n 

recommends H s for Stamp Distributor. H s 

as directed maintains his ground. Cox resigns in the 

Jersies. Immediately Governor F n gives H s 

private notice that he had informed his father of Cox's 
resignation, in order that H - - s might apply for his 

son, (and by the way F n had also recommended Cox, 

but he did not serve him well). . . . It is very absurd 

not to suppose that Governor F n knew his father's 

sentiments of the Act and knew that they agreed with 
his own. . . . And you are all certain that the Gov- 
ernor desired to see the Act in forced, Witness his con- 
duct towards the Assembly of New-Jersey. Witness also 
his writing to the General for a number of soldiers, to 
assist him in putting the Act in execution, and his resolu- 
tion with a small council to carry the matter thro', let 
the consequences be what they would, until the whole 
scheme was overset by Ch - - s R d, 3 one of his Coun- 
cil. Thus you see that the Governor was in hopes that 
the law could easily be inforced, at least in the Jersies, 

and encourages H s to apply for his son. For thus 

II s writes to F n "there will be no difficulty in 

iJohn Hughes. 
2James Galloway, 
a Charles Read. 



208 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

putting the Act in execution in that province, viz. the 
Jersies." I say the Governor encouraged H s to ap- 
ply for a commission for his son, and wrote to his father 
on the same occasion, whom he knew to be a friend to the 
Act. For what other reason did he write his father that 
Cox had resigned ; or for what reason did he tell J - - n 

H s that he had wrote to his father; for it is plain 

that H s knew what was in the Governor's letters. 

Thus H s writes to Dr. F n, "By Governor 

Franklin's letter you will see that Cox has resigned the 
Stamp-Office for New- Jersey." On this he applies for 
the place to his own son. Thus far they wrought to- 
gether 

In this situation matters lay on the i6th of January, 
when letters from the Colonies were laid before the Par- 
liament. Among the rest, Dr. F n very obligingly 

produced the letters which he had received from H- - s 
and Ga ay. The questions in general to be deter- 
mined by the letters then laid before the Parliament, were 
these : Whether the Americans were in such open rebel- 
lion as to require punishment? And, Whether it would 
be practicable to force them to submit to the Stamp Act, 
if the measure should be attempted ? In answer to these 
questions, nothing could be more direct than the two pri- 
vate letters which Dr. F n produced. Both H s 

and Ga ay paint the colonists in open rebellion, and 

in great need of punishment. And they agree in proving 
that it would be easy to inforce it with his own troops, 

without the aid of regulars; and H s is confident 

that these troops, with the assistance of 3 or 4 magis- 
trates, could inforce it in Pennsylvania, and that it would 
be easier still in the Jersies. Might not the Parliament 
easily see from all this, that they need only send over 2 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 209 

or 3000 soldiers to America, and the Stamp Act would 

be swallowed without more trouble 

The sum of what I have endeavored to prove, is that 
Dr. F n not only thought of, but approved and com- 
mended the Stamp Act, as a measure that should be 
taken with the Americans, several years ago; 
That being closely connected with Lord Bute and the late 
Ministry, it is probable they consulted him on the subject 

of a Stamp Act : . . . . That Governor F n, 

knowing his father's approbation of the Act, wrote to 

his father, and desired H s to write to him in favour 

of his son; . . . That he did everything in his power 
to inforce it in his own Government, and was resolved 
upon attempting it by the aid of some regular troops, 
procured from the General for that purpose : . . . . 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1241, September 18, 1766. 

Gloucester, August n, 1766. 

By Virtue of a Writ to me directed, on Monday, the 
1 3th Day of October next about 2 o' Clock in the After- 
noon, at the House of Thomas Thomson, Innkeeper, in 
the Township of Greenwich, in the County of Gloucester, 
will be exposed to Sale, by public Vendue, an individual 
Moiety of all that Island, called Little Tinicum, situate 
in the River Delaware, opposite Great Tinicum, and the 
Place of Sale, and a little above the Town of Chester, said 
to contain upwards of 100 Acres, being late the Property 
of William Wrath, deceased; seized and taken in Execu- 
tion, at the suit of James MTlhenay, and to be sold by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

To be run for at the city of New-Brunswick, on Mon- 
day, the 3d day of November next, free for any horse, 
mare or gelding not being of the whole blood (Smoaker 
excepted) a purse of 20 pistoles, the best in 3 heats, at 2 

14 



210 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

miles each heat; the horses to be entered with Mr. Henry 
Birker, at 4 dollars each horse. Any entered on the day 
of starting to pay double entrance. Proper judges will 
be appointed to determine any disputes that may arise, 
and each horse is to carry 9 stone; and so in proportion. 
The entrance money will be run for on the next day by 
any except the winning horse 

ON the 1 6th of August came to the House of Isaac 
Stratton, Innkeeper, in Evesham, Burlington County, 
West New- Jersey, a young Man, who calls himself Reu- 
ben Whitlock, and sometimes Richard; he brought with 
him a likely Horse, and left him with me, having been 
gone himself two or three Weeks. The Owner of said 
Horse may have him again, on proving his Property, and 
paying Charges. 

August 4, 1766. 

ABSCONDED from his bail, an Irishman, named Samuel 
Evans, a weaver by trade, about 22 years of age, 5 feet 9 
or 10 inches high, somewhat slender built, fresh coloured, 
a little freckled on the hands and face, pock-marked, red- 
ish hair, and speaks on the Scotch Irish order; had on, 
when he went away, a beaver hat, blue cloth coat, mole 
coloured velvet jacket and breeches. Whoever takes up 
and secures said Evans in any of his Majesty's goals, so 
as he may be brought to justice, and gives notice to Dan- 
iel Ellis, Esq; at Burlington, or the Subscriber, at Mount 
Holly, shall have Five Pounds reward, and reasonable 
charges, paid by 

JOHN FORKER. 

N. B. He rid a small black gelding. All masters of 
vessels, and others, are forbid to carry him off. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1969, September 18, 1766. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 211 

To be sold at public Vendue, on the Premises, at Eliz- 
abeth Town, on Friday the 7th Day of. November next, 
at ii o'Clock in the Forenoon. 

A large genteel well built Dwelling House, with a Gar- 
den, Stable and other conveniences; situate near the 
Court-House in said Town : Also the House, Out-Houses 
and Stables with the Appurtenances, being the noted Tav- 
ern, known by the Sign of the Marquis of Granby, and 
the Town-Mills with the Appurtenances, joining the 
Premises abovementioned ; all lately the Property of Mr. 
Barnaby Shute. The Conditions of the Vendue will be 
made known, as well as the Title at the Time of Sale, by 

MATTHIAS WILLIAMSON 

Elizabeth -Town, September 15, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy,, No. 
1238, September 25, 1766. 

To the Printers, &c. 

I Have perused in your late Journals, a piece said to 
be "An extract of a letter from me to Dr. Franklin," an- 
other signed "Americus" and a third, called, "An essay 
towards discovering the authors and promoters of the 
memorable Stamp-Act." 

The proprietary party have likewise made it their con- 
stant practice, in their party papers, to asperse and vilify 
the reputation of the Governor of New-Jersey, for no 
other reason, that I can discover, but that he is the son 
of Dr. Franklin, and my friend. To my knowledge, he 
has never interfered in our disputes further than they 
related to the affairs of his province or the vindication of 
his own character made necessary. On this occasion, 
however, I find he is determined not to take any public 
notice of what respects him in the above-mentioned publi- 
cation, unless some person of credit will put his name to 



212 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

the performance. But as I have been favoured with a 
copy of two notes, which passed between him and the 
secretary of that province, concerning this matter; I 
think it a piece of justice due to those gentlemen to com- 
municate them to the public, and have therefore subjoined 
them. 

JOSEPH GALLOWAY. 

The following is a copy of a note from the honourable 
Charles Read, Esq; to his excellency Governor Franklin. 

Mr. Read's duty to the governor. He sends a most 
extraordinary letter said to come from London. As men- 
tion is made of me in it, if any refutation is necessary, so 
far as it respects our province, I shall very willingly con- 
tradict an assertion made without the least foundation 
of truth. Mr. Read would wait on the governor, but has 
not been well these two days. 

Burlington, iQth Sept. 1766. 

Governor Franklin's Answer. 

The Governor's compliments to Mr. Read. He had 
just before received, by the post, Bradford's supplement, 
containing the most extraordinary letter, as Mr. Read 
terms it, but which the Governor, thinks would have been 
far more extraordinary, (considering from what fountain 
it springs) had it contained 2 single word of truth. He 
was amusing himself with counting those falsehoods in 
this fictitious letter from London, which he could prove 
to be such, and had actually got as far as the I93d when 
he received Mr. Read's note. As to what respects this 
province, the Governor does not at present think any ref- 
utation necessary, as the principal part of the charge was 
before published, by the proprietary party, in the paper 
read in the Lodge in Philadelphia about this time last 
year, and was then fully refuted to every honest man's 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 213 

satisfaction, by a publication under the governor's own 
hand; tho' it is now impudently repeated without the 
least notice being taken of that refutation. Besides every 
gentleman of the council, and indeed every person in the 
province acquainted with our public affairs, know, that 
the whole of it is an infamous falshood: But if any are 
so absurd as still to give credit to suggestions, which 
even the authors, miscreants as they are, dare not pub- 
lickly avow, the Governor is very far from desiring to 
undeceive them. He don't perceive that it contains any 
charge respecting himself, that has not been either be- 
fore fully obviated, or is well known to be groundless, 
unless it be, that the "Governor encouraged Hughes to 
apply for a commission to his son, &c." In answer to 
which, and to what else relates to that affair, the Gover- 
nor can safely declare on oath, that he never sent Mr. 
Hughes any intelligence of Mr. Cox's resignation, nor 
was it necessary, even if he had intended to befriend Mr. 
Hughes as above-mentioned, for it was publicly known 
in Philadelphia two or three days before the Governor 
received Mr. Cox's notice, and the next day after it was 
published in the papers : That Mr. Hughes never gave 
the Governor the least intimation that he had any incli- 
nation to have his son appointed stamp master of this 
province. And if Mr. Hughes did write to the Gover- 
nor's father to make such application it was entirely with- 
out the concurence or knowledge of the Governor. The 
Governor would only add, that as to what respects the 
affairs of Pennsylvania, he shall not any ways concern 
himself, tho' he could easily prove it to be as false and 
malicious as what relates to New- Jersey. The gentlemen 
affected, if they think it necessary to take notice of an 
anonymous attack from men who seem to have set all 
truth and honour at defiance, are very capable of answer- 



214 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

ing for themselves, and to clear themselves from every 
imputation in the Proprietary Romance of yesterday. 
Friday, Sept. 19, 1766. 

Trenton, September 19, 1766. 
FIVE POUNDS Reward, 

RUN AWAY from the subscriber in Trenton, on Friday 
the 1 2th of September inst. an Irish servant man named 
John Moor, about 5 feet 9 inches high, with long dark 
brown hair, tied behind, marked a little with the small 
pox; had on and took with him a short brown coat, with 
small sleeves and metal buttons, two jackets, the one 
green camblet, the other red, a pair of blue breeches much 
daubed with paint; he understands something of the car- 
penter's, wheelwright's, and painter's business; he is 
much addicted to drinking and swearing, is about 22 
years of age. Whoever takes up and secures said ser- 
vant, so as his master may have him again, if out of this 
province shall have the above reward, and if so secured 
in this province, THREE POUNDS reward, paid by 

SAMUEL HENRY. 

N. B. It is thought a young woman, servant to Jona- 
than Hutchinson, went off with him. 

ALL persons indebted to Richard Reading, or to the 
partnership of Reading and Prall, by bond, bill, note, or 
book debt, are hereby desired to pay their respective debts 
by the twentieth day of October next, to Joseph Reed, 
jun. of Trentown, who is empowered to receive them. 
Those who neglect this notice, must expect to be sued for 
the same immediately after that time. 

JOHN Cox Jun. ) Assi 
THOMAS SMITH j 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1242, September 
25, 1766. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 215 

Pilesgrove, Salem County, West New-Jersey. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from his Bail on the igth of 'September last, 
one David Davis, about 28 Years of Age, 5 Feet 9 Inches 
high, Pock-marked, a thick well set Fellow, wears his 
Hair tied behind, a talkative Fellow, apt to tell of what 
he has done and seen, pretends to be a House Carpenter; 
had on, when he went away, a light coloured Broadcloth 
Coat, full trimmed, marked with Spanish Brown, a black 
cut Velvet Jacket, and black Plush Breeches; he took 
away with him a Silver Watch. Whoever takes up and 
secures the said David Davis in any of his Majesty' s 
Goals, so that he may be had again, shall receive the above 
Reward, paid by MICHAEL POWER, ROBERT WOOD, 
WILLIAM HAMPTON. 

Great Egg-Harbour, September 24, 1766. 

DELIVERED into the Hands of Edward Doughty, Esq; 
of Great Egg-Harbour, in the County of Gloucester, by 
John Delong of the same Place, a certain Watch, sup- 
posed to be Gold or Pinchbeck, which said John Delong 
hath declared upon Oath, he found washed up by the 
Surff about the 2Oth of last March, inclosed in a small 
wooden Box. Any Person describing said Watch, and 
proving Property, may have the same, by paying Charges, 
and applying to said Edward Doughty, within two 
Months from the date hereof, otherwise said Watch will 
be delivered up to said John Delong. 

To be sold at public Vendue, on Tuesday, the 2ist of 
October inst, or any Time before, at private Sale. 

A Valuable Farm containing about 320 Acres of Land, 
situate in Amwell Township, Hunterdon County, West 
New- Jersey, about 180 Acres cleared, and in good Fence, 



2l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

the Remainder well timbered; it is kind good Land for 
Grain, a sufficient Quantity of Meadow cleared, and in 
Clover, Timothy and Spear-grass, and more may be 
made, great Part of which might be readily watered; on 
said Premises is pleasantly situated a good Brick House, 
genteelly finished, two Stories high, 48 Feet long, 33 Feet 
wide, Cellars under the whole, four Rooms on a Floor 
below, with Fire-places in each, a good Entry, and the 
same above, a Brick Kitchen and Store-room adjoining, 
&c. a new Brick Shop a few Rods from the House, with 
a Counting-room, Cellar, &c. a large Frame Barn cov- 
ered with Cedar, Barracks, Cow-houses, &c. mostly new, 
and in good Repair, with several good bearing Orchards, 
consisting of a large Collection of the best of grafted 
Fruit ; a Stone Grist-mill, laid in Lime and Sand, 50 Feet 
long, and 40 Feet wide, with two Pair of Stones, in good 
Order for Country or Merchant Work, Bolts, Hoisting 
Jack, &c. all go by Water; it stands on the South Branch 
of Rariton River, a never failing Stream, in the Center 
of a plentiful Wheat Country, where any Quantity might 
be bought reasonable; it is 25 Miles from Trenton, the 
same Distance from New-Brunswick, and 12 Miles from 
Delaware River, which is navigable great Part of the 
Year to Philadelphia; it being conveniently situated for 
New York or Philadelphia Markets, and a good Place 
for Trade; there having been a Store kept for a Number 
of Years past; there are near the Mills several conve- 
nient Houses, for the Miller, Cooper, &c. The Mills will 
be sold separate from the Farm if required, with a suf- 
ficiency of Meadow, Timber Land, &c. to accommodate 
it, as might suit the Purchaser. At the same Time will 
be sold, a four Horse Team, Waggon, Gears, &c. 

On Monday following, it being the 27th, will be sold 
on the Premises, near 500 Acres of Land, situate in Sus- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 \J 

sex County, near a well known Place on Delaware-river, 
called Manungachung-hill, about a Mile from said River, 
on a Brook called Beaver-dam Brook; it is kind good 
Land for Grain, between 30 and 40 Acres of excellent 
Bottom Land along said Brook, the greatest Part of it 
cleared, and in good Grass, a great Quantity of Hay being 
yearly cut thereon, it is divided into two convenient 
Farms, and considerable Improvements made on each. 

On Wednesday following, it being the 29th, will be 
sold on the Premises, a Tract of Land, surveyed for 220 
Acres, situate at a Place called Scott's Mountain, in said 
County of Sussex, kind good Land for Grain, and some 
good meadow might be made; there are considerable 
Improvements made thereon. 

And on Friday following, it being the 3ist, will be 
sold on the Premises, one Moiety or undivided Half Part 
of a Tract of Land, surveyed for 600 Acres, situate at 
the Head of the Little Pond, in the County of Morris, a 
large Quantity of it excellent Meadow Bottom, equal in 
Goodness for Corn, Flax and Hemp, to any in said 
County; it is divided into two Farms, Meadow cleared, 
and considerable other Improvements made on each, it 
is about two Miles from Andover Forge, and 6 from a 
new Iron-works, erecting by Garret Raplejes of New 
York, so that there will be a ready Market for any Prod- 
uce raised. 

It is expected the Purchaser of any of the above Prem- 
ises will pay one Third of the Purchase Money, on the 
executing of the Conveyance, another Third one Year 
after, and the remaining Third at two Years, or might 
have any reasonable Time to make the two last Pay- 
ments, paying Interest, and giving Security, if required. 

Any Person inclining to purchase any of the above re- 
cited Premises before the Days appointed for Sale, may 



2l8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/66 

apply to the Subscriber, living on the first mentioned 
Farm, who will give an indisputable Title for the same, 
or any Part thereof, 

GEORGE READING 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1971, October 2, 
1766. 

Princeton, (in New- Jersey) Sept. 24, 1766. 
THIS Day the Trustees of the College of New-Jersey 
attended on the Commencement. As the Presidents Chair 
was no\v vacant by the Death of the late Dr. FINLEY, the 
Rev. Mr. ELIHU SPENCER, presided agreeable to a Vote 
of the Board at their last Meeting : The young Gentle- 
men in general performed the several Parts assigned 
them, in such a Manner, as to do Honour to themselves, 
and give Pleasure to their Audience. The Exercises were 
diversified with Disputations, in the Syllogistic and foren- 
sic Methods, succeeding each other alternately; as has 
been usual on these public Occasions, in which the Can- 
didates, gave an agreeable Specimen of their Acquaint- 
ance with some of the most important and entertaining^ 
Subjects in the Circle of Literature. In the Course of 
the Disputation, the Thesis among others, was defended 
and opposed with great Spirit and Judgment, viz. Civil 
Liberty is necessary to give Birth to the Arts and Sci- 
ences. This furnished the Disputants with an Oppor- 
tunity of displaying the importance of Liberty in a new 
and striking Light. The Orators also exerted them- 
selves much to the Satisfaction and Entertainment of the 
Auditors; Mr. A very introduced the Business of the 
Day, with an elegant Latin Funeral Oration on the Death 
of the late President : After the discussion of some Ques- 
tions, Mr. Jones in the Forenoon pronounced a very ani- 
mated Harangue on Oratory, and beautifully exemplified 
his Subject with all the Graces of Elocution and Action, 



1^66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2IQ 

which very agreeably relaxed the Attention of the As-. 
sembly, which might otherwise have been fatigued by 
unmixed Disputation alone. Mr. Mac Pherson began the 
Exercises of the Afternoon by very judiciously pointing 
out the Difference bctivcen ancient and modern Learning, 
in an elegant and well pronounced Discourse on the Sub- 
ject; and Mr. Haley closed the Exercises of the Batch- 
elors with a very spirited nervous Harangue on Liberty, 
towards the Close of which he also paid the just Tribute 
of Gratitude to the Memory of our late worthy Presi- 
dent : Just before the Degrees were given, Mr. Jauncey 
entertained the Audience with a Discourse on the Advan- 
tages of a liberal Education, and the Business of the Day 
was finished by an excellent Oration on Patriotism, pro- 
nounced by Mr. Patterson, in which Elegance of Compo- 
sition, and Grace and Force of Action were equally con- 
spicuous. And we cannot but do the young Gentlemen 
the Justice to observe a Circumstance, which is much to 
their Honour; that though they must be supposed to 
have laboured under great Disadvantages by the Death 
of so eminent and learned an Instructor as D. FINLEY, 
yet they have so well retrieved the Loss sustained there- 
by, by superiour Application, that their Appearance both 
at the public Examination and Commencement, was not 
inferiour to that of their Predecessors. The Degree of 
Batchelor of Arts, was conferred on the following young 
Gentlemen, 1 Waightstill A very, Hezekiah James Balch, 

iThe following- notices of the Class of 1766 are condensed from the 
sketches in Alexander's "Princeton College in the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury," except where otherwise noted: 

Waightstill Avery was a native of Norwich, Conn. After graduating, 
he removed to Maryland, and thence to North Carolina, where he was 
admitted to the bar in 1769. He was one of the leading spirits that 
sent forth the Mecklenberg Resolutions. He served many times in the 
Legislature of his State, and in 1777 he was appointed the first Attor- 
ney-General of the State. He died in 1821. 

Hezekiah Balch was born in Maryland, but removed, while a child, 
with his father's family, to North Carolina. For some time after hi<3 
graduation he taught a school in Fauquier County, Virginia. Mr. 
Balch was licensed to preach, in 1768, and ordained in 1770. He per- 
formed missionary work in Virginia, and for one year he preached in 



220 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Hezekiah Balch, Joseph Burt, Caleb Chase, Jonathan 
Cheever, Daniel Cunyngham Clymer, Ebenezer Cowel, 
Samuel Edmiston, Oliver Elsworth, John Haley, Joseph 
Hasbrouck, Moses Heslet, David Howell, Daniel Jones, 



York, Pennsylvania. In 1784 he removed to Tennessee, where he was 
closely associated with the Rev. Samuel Doak, another graduate of 
Princeton, in organizing churches. About 1793 Mr. Balch conceived 
the plan of Greenville College, and obtained a charter for the same in 
1794. His exertions in behalf of education gave an impulse to the cause 
through the whole southwestern region. He died in April, 1810. 

Hezekiah James Balch, a native of Deer Creek, Hartford County, 
Maryland, was licensed by the Presbytery of Donegal in 1768, soon 
alter which he removed to North Carolina, where he was one of the 
leaders in the Mecklenberg Convention. He was the pastor of two 
churches, Rocky River and Poplar Tent, but died young, in 1776. 

The Cowell family of Trenton came from Dorchester, Mass., where 
was born the Rev. David Cowell, first pastor of the Presbyterian 
church of Trenton, 1736-60. In his will, dated Nov. 29, 1760, proved Jan- 
uary 24, 1761, the Rev. David Cowell makes his brother, Ebenezer Cow- 
ell, of New England, his residuary legatee. Ebenezer probably re- 
moved to Trenton soon after this. Between 1765 and 1775 he acquired 
extensive tracts of land in West Jersey, including a share in a Propri- 
ety of that Division, most of which lands he disposed of in the same 
period. He was a Deputy Surveyor of West Jersey in 1774 and in 1782- 
1784 (Council?) was of the Committee of the West Jersey Proprietors. 
He is designated in the conveyances as a "yeoman," or "surveyor." 
From other circumstances he appears to have been a smith, working 
principally on guns, swords, locks and perhaps surveyors' instruments. 
In 1777 he advertised lor gunsmiths, and offered to instruct others in 
the art of repairing guns for the American army. He was engaged 
in this work during the American occupancy of Trenton and vicinity, 
and employed many helpers, whom he paid out of his own pocket, 
often waiting many months before being reimbursed for his outlays, 
but did it gladly, for his love for the American cause. The British 
showed their resentment by ransacking his house when they entered 
Trenton after the famous battle at that place, December 26, 1776. In 
1791 he was living in Philadelphia. He returned to Trenton, where he 
died May 4, 1799, his will, daXBH paAOJd Supq '66AI '! A'jBn.iqaji pa} 
11, 1799. His children were: 

i. David, graduated from Princeton in 1763; studied medicine in 
Philadelphia, and settled in Trenton, where he practised 
until his death, of quinsy. Dec. 18, 1783. In his will, dated 
Dec. 17, 1783, proved December 30, 1783, he mentions child- 
ren of his brother Joseph, and his sister Sally. He gives 
100 to Congress, if they will settle at L.ambe'rton (a 
suburb of Trenton), 100 to the College of New Jersey, 
and 100 to the Grammar School in Trenton. He was 
evidently unmarried, 
ii. Ebenezer, of whom hereafter. 

iii. John, studied medicine, and served as a Surgeon of Militia in 
1779. On the death of his brother David he advertised in 
the New Jersey Gazette "that he had been prevailed upon 
by the friends of his deceased brother to establish him- 
self as a physician in Trenton." He died January 30, 
1789, in his 30th year, according to his tombstone, as cited 
by Dr. Hall, but his will, not dated, was proved January 
28, 1789, or two days before his death. The date on the 
tombstone is evidently incorrect. In the will he names 
wife Mary, and children John and Mary, both under age, 
These children are also mentioned in the will of their 
grandfather, Ebenezer Cowell, in 1799. 

iv. Joseph, married Catherine Case, marriage license dated Jan- 
uary 19, 1769; died at Trenton, Sept. 30, 1808, aged 63 years, 
v. Robert, died at Trenton, July 5, 1808. 

vi. Eunice, died at Broadway, Warren county, N. J., July 30, 
1829, "at an advanced age," unmarried. In her father's 
will she was named as sole executrix. 



i;66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 221 



Solomon Kellogg, Peter Van Burgh Livingston, Josiah 
Lewis, Daniel M'Cally, John Mac Pherson, Luther Mar- 
tin, Nathaniel Niles, James Power, Isaac Skilman, Sam- 
uel Smith, William Smith, Benjamin Stelle, Micah Town- 

vii. Sarah, married a Bowlsby, doubtless a relative of John 
Bowlsby, of Sussex county, who by deed dated July 12, 
1765, conveyed to Ebenezer Cowell the right to 500 acres 
of unappropriated land in West Jersey. 

Ebenezer Cowell, 2d, having graduated from Princeton College in 
1766, studied law, probably with Abraham Cottnam, of Trenton, and 
was licensed as an attorney November 30, 1769. The notices of him in 
the records are scanty. On July 18, 1776, he presented a petition to the 
Provincial Congress, complaining that John Barnes, Sheriff of Hunter- 
don county, had refused to receive and execute two writs issued under 
the authority of the people of the State of New Jersey. Barnes admit- 
ted that he was unwilling to recognize the validity of the new gov- 
ernment and was superseded. In -joint meeting the Legislature on 
September 7, 1776, appointed young Cowell clerk of Hunterdon county. 
He died in Trenton, on the night of February 14-15, 1817. The following 
notice of his death, in the Trenton Federalist, of Feb. 17, 1817, suggests 
a sad ending of a once promising career: 

"Died. In this city on the night of the 14th inst. Ebenezer Cowell 
Esq. formerly clerk of the pleas of Hunterdon Co. On the morning of 
the 15th he was found dead in the house, where he resided, and prob- 
ably perished in consequence of the severity of the weather." 

He was probably about seventy years of age. As he died intestate, 
Samuel Bowlby and Abner Parke were appointed administrators of his 
estate. Their inventory and appraisement, taken March 5, 1817, indi- 
cates that Cowell had not prospered greatly in this world's goods. 
The following is the list and valuation of his personal property: 
one Chest with Sundry Books and papers, 20 00 

Six Iron Dots and Cittles, 3 00 

Three Jugs, 20 

Two Pails and 1 Saddle, 50 

Three Chairs, 1 00 

Two Tables and 2 Boxes, 50 

one Survayers Chain, 2 00 

a Lot of oald Tin and Iron, 50 

Half Barrel and Kug, 50 

Two pairs of Saddle Bags and 1 Bed Stid, 1 00 

Eight Volumes of the Statu of great Britain, 50 00 

77 10 

The inventory actually foots UP $79.20. No record' has been found of 
the marriage of Mr. Cowell. 

Wr.st Jersey Wills, Liber 10, p. 589; IMd., No. 27, p. 490; IMd., No. 32, p. 
8; IMd., No. 33, p. 455; Conveyances in Secretary of State's Office, Trenton; 
Hall's Hist. Pres. Church of Trenton, passim; Wickes'sflis*. of Medical 
Men of N. J., 219, 220; 2 N. J. Archives, I., 543; Cowell MSS., unpublished; 
Minutes Provincial Congress, 513. 

Samuel Edmiston, after leaving college, studied medicine, and prac- 
ticed at Fagg's Manor, Pennsylvania, where he married a daughter 
of Rev. Samuel Blair. Four other graduates of Princeton married 
daughters of Dr. Blair: George Duffield, of the Class of 1752; David 
Rice, of the Class of 1761; John Carmichael. of the Class of 1759, and 
William Foster, of the Class of 1764, all of them distinguished clergy- 
men. 

Oliver Ellsworth was born in Windsor, Connecticut, April 29, 1745. 
Soon after graduation he began teaching and the study of theology, 
but soon relinquished both for the law, and was admitted to the bar in 
1771. About 1775, he removed to Hartford, and soon after was appointed 
Attorney-General of the State. He was in the Legislature which as- 
sembled a few days after the battle of Lexington. In 1777 he was 
chosen a delegate to the Continental Congress, but did not take his 
seat until October, 1778. In 1780 he was a member of the Council of 
Connecticut, and continued a member of that body till 1784, when 



222 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

send, John Woodhull, Joseph Woodman. Also David 
M'Kay, was admitted to the Honorary Degree of Batch- 
el or of Arts. The following commenced Masters of Arts : 
John Close, David Cowel, Samuel Eakin, James Jauncey, 

he was appointed a Judge of the Superior Court. In 1787 he was a 
member of the convention which framed the Constitution of the United 
States. In 1789 he was chosen a United States Senator, which place 
he filled till 1796, when he was appointed Chief Justice of the United 
States. In 1799 he was appointed, by President Adams, Envoy Extra- 
ordinary to France. With much reluctance he accepted this appoint- 
ment. While abroad, his failing health induced him to resign his 
office of Chief Justice. He died in 1807. 

Joseph Hasbrouck, of Huguenot descent, was born in the village of 
Kingston, New York. He was an ardent patriot, and entered the Rev- 
olutionary army, in which he became a Colonel of Militia, and saw 
some service. He afterwards became a General in the State service. 
He died February 26, 1808. 

David Howell, a native of New Jersey, removed to Providence, 
Rhode Island, and was for three years a tutor in the College of Rhode 
Island (Brown University) ; for nine years he was Professor of Natural 
Philosophy; for thirty years Professor of Law; for fifty- two years a 
member of the Board of Fellows, and for many years Secretary of the 
Corporation. He represented Rhode Island in the Continental Con- 
gress from 1782 to 1785. In 1812 he was appointed United States Judge 
lor the District of Rhode Island, and this office he held until his death, 
July 9, 1824. 

Daniel Jones was licensed to preach, by the Presbytery of New 
Castle, in 1769, and ordained in 1781. 

Josiah Lewis was licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle in 1769, 
and ordained in 1771. In the autumn of 1771 he was preaching as a 
missionary in North and South Carolina. 

Peter Van Brugh Livingston was probably the fifth child of Philip 
Livingston, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. After grad- 
uating, he removed to Jamaica, in the West Indies, where he probably 
died. 

Daniel McCalla was born in Neshaminy, Pennsylvania. On leaving 
college he took charge of an academy in Philadelphia, and in 1774 was 
ordained by the First Presbytery of Philadelphia and installed as pas- 
tor of the churches at New Providence and Charleston, Pennsylvania. 
At the commencement of the war, he was appointed by Congress a 
Chaplain (the only one they ever appointed) of General Thompson's 
Corps, under orders for Canada. Soon after his arrival he was taken 
prisoner and confined for some months in a loathsome prison ship, 
and subjected to brutal treatment. At length he was released on 
parole, and returned to his congregation in 1776. Subsequently he 
removed to Virginia, where he established an academy in Hanover 
County, and became pastor of the congregation made vacant by the 
removal of the Rev. Samuel Davies to Princeton. In 1788 he removed 
to South Carolina, where he became pastor of an Independent Church 
at Wappetaw. He remained pastor of this church until the close of 
his life, in May, 1809. 

John MacPherson was a native of Philadelphia. After leaving 
Princeton, he read law in Philadelphia with John Dickinson, author 
of the celebrated "Farmer's Letters." When the war for independence 
began, he joined the army, and was an aide-de-camp of General Mont- 
gomery at the siege of Quebec, and fell at the same discharge of 
grape-shot by which his commander was killed, December 31, 1775. 

Luther Martin entered Princeton College from New Jersey. After 
his graduation he removed to Maryland, where he taught school until 
1771, when he was admitted to the bar. Removing to Virginia, he 
practiced his profession in Accomac and Northampton Counties. He 
was soon regarded as one of the ablest lawyers at the bar. He threw 
his whole strength on the side of American independence, and by his 
bold speech and writings animated the friends of the country. On 
the llth of April, 177S, he was appointed Attorney-General of the State 



i;66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 223 



William Patterson, Tappan Reeve, John Simpson, James 
Watt, and Simon Williams. 1 

. 
To be sold on the Premises, on the i/th Day of Octo- 

of Maryland. In 1804 he was employed in the defense of Judge Chase, 
of the Supreme Court of the United States. In 1807 he was one of the 
counsel to defend Aaron Burr, who was his personal friend. In 1814 
he was appointed Chief Judge of the Court of Oyer and Terminer for 
the City and County of Baltimore. In 1818 he was again appointed 
Attorney-General of Maryland. He died in New York, July 10, 1826. 
Luther Martin was undoubtedly one of the ablest lawyers which our 
country has produced. 

Nathaniel Niles, a son of Samuel Niles, of Braintree, Massachusetts, 
was born in South Kingston, Rhode Island, April 3, 1741. After his 
graduation he devoted some time to the study of medicine. He was 
also for a while a student of law; and was at one time a teacher in 
the city of New York, and later studied theology, and was licensed to 
preach, but through want of health he was never ordained. He took 
up his residence in Norwich, Connecticut, where he was several times 
elected a member of the Legislature of Connecticut. After the close 
of the Revolutionary war he removed to Vermont, and in 1784 he was 
Speaker of the House of Representatives; and for many years Judge 
of the Supreme Court. From 1791 to 1795 he represented Vermont in 
Congress. As a metaphysician and intellectual philosopher he had 
probably few superiors, and was one of the ablest and most vigorous 
writers of his day. He wrote the "American Hero," a celebrated 
sapphic ode, which was set to music and was the war song 01 the 
Revolution, and was the author of various religious works. He died 
October 31, 1828. 

James Power was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1746. He 
was licensed by the Presbytery of New Castle, June 24, 1772. The next 
year he travelled, and preached in Virginia. In 1776 he was ordained, 
and removed permanently to western Pennsylvania, and after supply- 
ing various churches was installed pastor of Mount Pleasant and 
Sewickly churches in 1779. In 1787 his connection with the Sewickly 
church was dissolved, and from that time until April, 1817, he devoted 
himself to the Mount Pleasant church, when, on account of age and 
infirmity, he gave up his charge. He died in 1830. 

Isaac Skillman was a native of New Jersey, and was probably a 
near relative of Thomas Skillman, senior, of Somerset county, whose 
son Thomas died in 1796. Isaac was born in 1740, and studied in the 
Rev. Isaac Eaton's school at Hopewell, the first Baptist school in 
America for the education of young men for the ministry. Having 
graduated at Princeton in 1766 he pursued his theological studies for 
some time, and in 1773 was chosen pastor of the Second Baptist Church 
in Boston, succeeding the Rev. John Davis. Here he remained until 
1787, when he returned to New Jersey. In that year the Salem Bap- 
tists erected a new church edifice, and it is probable that Mr. Skillman 
preached for that congregation from that time, but he was not for- 
mally installed as pastor until September 18, 1790, succeeding the Rev. 
Peter P. Vanhorn. He continued in that charge until his death, June 7, 
1799. Rhode Island College conferred upon him the degree of A. M. in 
1774, and of D. D. in 1798. He died intestate, and administration on 
his estate was granted, September 18, 1799, to Abraham and Cornelius 
Skillman. Sprague's Annals of the American Pulpit (Baptist), 453; Bene- 
dict's Hist, of the Baptists in America, ed. 1848, p. 587; Johnson's Hist, of 
Salem, p. 88; West Jersey Wills, Liber No. 35, p. 526; Ibid., Liber No. 38, 
p. 412; Edivard's Hist. N. J. Baptists, 82. 

Samuel Smith and "William Smith were probably related to Samuel 
Smith, of Burlington, New Jersey, who, in 1765, published his History 
of New Jersey. 

Alpheus Spring was born in Massachusetts. He became a Congre- 
gational minister, and settled at Eliot, Massachusetts, June 29, 1768. 
Mr. Spring died suddenly, June 14, 1791. 

ir rhis account also appears in the Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1244, 
October 9, 1766. 



224 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

her next, in Elizabeth Town in New- Jersey, to begin after 
two o'Clock in the Afternoon. 

A large Dwelling-House, Garden, Stable, and other 
suitable Out-Houses, and four Acres of Land, chiefly Or- 
chard, joining the public Landing in Elizabeth-Town, 
half a Mile from the Court-House. Also a new well built 
and finished House, with a Yard and Garden joining to 
said Landing : Also four Acres of Land half a Mile from 
the others, joining Cavalier Jouet: Also half an Acre 
of Land joining to the last, being late the Property of 
Mr. David Smith. They will be sold all together for 
ready Money only, the Title is good and will be shewn 
on the Day of Sale, by 

JONATHAN HAMPTON 

Elizabeth-Town, Sept. 29th, 1766. 

The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1239, October 2, 1766. 

THE Subscriber, lately a Tutor of the College of New- 
Benjamin Stelle was a son of the Rev. Isaac Stelle, pastor of the 
Baptist church at Piscataway, New Jersey. Through the influence of 
President Manning, of Brown University, he went to Providence, 
Rhode Island, after leaving college, and established a Latin school. 
Here he met with encouraging success, giving great satisfaction to 
his patrons, and being highly esteemed throughout the community. 
In 1774 Mr. Stelle was admitted to a Master's degree at Rhode Island 
College. 

Micah Townsend came to college from Vermont, to which state he 
returned after his graduation, and soon became active in public af- 
fairs. In 1781 he was appointed Secretary of State, of Vermont, and in 
1785 was elected one of the Council of Censors. In 1786 he was again 
Secretary of State. 

John Woodhull was born in Suffolk County, Long Island. He studied 
theology with the Rev. John Blair, and was licensed by the Presbytery 
of New Castle in 1768. He settled at Leacock, Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was installed, August 1, 1770. Mr. Woodhull was a 
strenuous Whig, and while in this charge advocated the cause so elo- 
quently from the pulpit that he succeeded in enlisting as soldiers every 
male member of his congregation capable of bearing arms, he going 
with them as chaplain. In 1778 he succeeded the Rev. William Ten- 
nent at Freehold, New Jersey. During many years of his ministry he 
conducted a grammar school, and superintended the studies of young 
men preparing for the ministry. He was a Trustee of Princeton Col- 
lege for forty-four years. Mr. Woodhull received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Divinity from Yale in 1798. He died Nov. 22, 1824. Hist, of Old 
Tcnnent Church, by Rev. F. R. Symmes, 1897; Funeral Sermon. 

Joseph Woodman became a Congregational minister, and settled at 
Sanborn Town, New Hampshire, in 1771. He was released from his 
charge November 13, 1806, and died in Sanborn Town, April 28, 1807. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 22 5 

Jersey, proposes to teach a very few Boys the Latin Lan- 
guage. The Number of Students will not exceed Six. 

JOSEPH PERIAM. 

Custom-House, New- York. Imvard Entries. Lyell, 
from Perth-Amboy. 

The Extract of a Letter from New- Jersey, was 
set to be inserted in this Paper, but on Consideration, it 
was thought improper to be publish'd without knowing 
from whom it came. The New York Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No. 1240, October 9, 1766. 

Burlington, September 26. 

Now in the custody of the subscriber, the two follow- 
ing persons, who were committed as runaway servants 
Peter Degnar, who says he belongs to Mr. Anthony 
Woodcock, of Philadelphia; the other named Abraham 
Courly, the son of Richard Courley, who lives in Phila- 
delphia. Their masters or father are desired to come, 
pay charges and take them away, otherwise I shall do as 
the law directs. 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

CHARLES RUBY, who came from Dublin, in capt. 
Macky, about 4 years ago, and was sold as a servant to 
James Eacrit of Piles Grove, Salem county, New-Jersey, 
will enquire of the printers of this paper, or to Mr. Dan- 
iel Weister, merchant, in Market-street, will hear of some- 
thing to his advantage. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1244, October 9, 1766. 

Hunterdon County, ss. 

By Virtue of a Writ of Fieri Facias, to me directed, 
will be exposed to Sale, at public Vendue, on Saturday, 

15 



226 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

the First Day of November next, on the Premises, be- 
tween the Hours of Twelve and Five of the Clock in the 
Afternoon, that convenient and well accustomed House 
and Ferry, known by the Name of Coryell's Ferry, with 
about 70 Acres of excellent low Land, bounded by Lands 
of George Cory ell on the North, East by the King's 
Highway, and West by the River Delaware, with a fine 
bearing Orchard thereon; the House is built of Stone, 
very convenient for a Tavern, and has long been a noted 
and well accustomed House; with a good Barn, Stables, 
and other Out-houses thereon now in the Possession of 
Robert Grant; late the Property of Abraham Coryell; 
seized and taken in Execution at the suit of George Ely, 
and to be sold by 

MICAJAH How, Sheriff. 

Choice PICKLED STURGEON; cured in the Baltick Man- 
ner, at Trenton Falls, by 

YARD and RICHMOND, 

Who, by their great Care and Experience in putting 
up none but the choicest Parts of the Fish, which has not 
been the Practice of others in the Business, warranted 
good in any Climate, by observing the following Direc- 
tions; first take out the Cork or Bung, and draw off the 
Pickle in a clean Pan or Vessel, then knock off the Hoops, 
and open the Head, then harden on the Hoops again, and 
pour in the Pickle; get a Cloth doubled, and put over the 
Head, and put a Weight on to keep out the Air; if at 
any time the Fish is not covered with Pickle, add good 
Vinegar, till it is covered. To be sold by THOMAS MUL- 
LAN, at the old Tun Tavern, in Water-street, Philadel- 
phia. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 19/2, October 9, 
1766. 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 22 / 

LONDON. 

August 12. Saturday's Gazette contains the Addresses 
of Thanks to his Majesty, on the repeal of the American 
stamp-act, of the Governor and Council of Pennsylvania, 
and counties of Newcastle, Kent and Sussex, on Dela- 
ware ; of the Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsyl- 
vania; of his Majesty's Council of the Province of Mass- 
achusetts Bay; of the Representatives of the Colony of 
New-Jersey; and of the Members of the Council of that 
Province; which were presented to the King by the Earl 
of Shelburne, and very graciously received by his Maj- 
esty. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1973, October 16, 
1766. 

LAST Night broke out of the Common Goal, and made 
his Escape, a Negro Man named TONY, the Servant of 
John Van Dor in, who lately Burnt his Master's House: 
Said Negro is about 5 Feet 6 Inches high, pretty well 
proportioned, is a likely smart Fellow. Had on when he 
went away, a grey Jacket, Leather Breeches, no Shoes 
nor Stockings. Whoever takes up and returns the said 
Prisoner, to me or my Gaol-keeper at Morris-Town, shall 
be paid TEN DOLLARS Reward, and all reasonable 
Charges by 

JACOB FORD, jun. Sheriff. 

New- Jersey, Morris County, October 7, 1766. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THE Grammar School which hath some Time past 
been taught at Elizabeth-Town, to universal Acceptance 
by Mr. T. Reeve, is proposed to be kept for the future 
upon a more enlarged Plan; Mr. Reeve being now joined 
for that Purpose by Mr. Pemberton, late Master of the 
Grammar School in New- Jersey College. A commodious 



228 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

House is provided in the Centre of the Town, for the 
Accommodation of a large School : Gentlemen who in- 
cline to send their Sons, may depend upon their united 
diligent Care in instructing them in the Latin and Greek 
Languages, to qualify for Admission into any of our 
American Colleges. 

As the Art of Reading and pronouncing the English 
Tongue with Propriety, is too much neglected in the first 
Rudiments of Education, they will devote Part of their 
Attention to this essential Object. Doctor Sheridan, ob- 
serves, "that the Principles of Elocution cannot be too 
soon instilled." That Children ought to be trained in 
them from the very first Rudiments, when the pliant Or- 
gans are easily formed to any Sounds, and before Preju- 
dice or evil Habit shall have taken Root." To advance 
this useful Part of Learning, it is proposed that generally 
once in a Month, during the Spring and Summer Seasons, 
the Lads shall publicly recite some select Pieces, com- 
mitted to Memory from our best English Writers. This, 
it is imagined will excite a laudable Emulation to excel in 
the Art of Delivery. 

The Terms of Admission into the School are, Five 
Pounds per Annum, and Twenty Shillings Entrance light 
Money. 

If any Gentleman choose to have their Sons improved 
in their Writing and Arithmetic, at an Additional Dollar 
per Quarter, they will set apart one Hour each Day for 
that Purpose. 

Boarding in the Town may be easily obtained upon 
reasonable Terms. 

The Public are hereby informed, that the Subscriber 
has just opened, a genteel house of entertainment in the 
City of New-Brunswick, at the Sign of the Tree of Lib- 
erty; where Travellers and others may be well accommo- 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 29 

dated with every Thing necessary for their comfort and 
subsistence. He hopes from his Endeavours to merit the 
Esteem of the Public, he may be gratified with a reason- 
able Share of their Custom. 

HENRY BICKER. 

N. B. He still carries on the Business of a Hatter, 
where Persons may be always supplied with Hats of 
every Sort and Quality, such as the best Beavers and 
Castors. 

To BE SOLD, BY ' 

Nicholas Hoffman, and Stephen Forman, 
AN extraordinary FARM, containing about 145 Acres, 
lying in New-Jersey, near Qibble-Town, it being only 
seven Miles from New-Brunswick Landing; the one Half 
being extraordinary good Meadow, the whole of it may be 
brought with little Labour into mowing Ground; on it 
is a tolerable good House, Barn, &c. a very good Orchard, 
many other Advantages will appear by applying at the 
Premises, or to TOBIAS VAN ORDER, at Bound-Brook; 
Likewise to be sold about 5 Acres of Land lying near 
Cranbury, with a small House on it. For further Partic- 
ulars apply to WILLIAM CLAWSON at Cranbury. The 
New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1241, Oc- 
tober 1 6, 1766. * 

Proposals for teaching the Latin language, so that the 
student may save three-Fourths of his time and above 
half of his money. 

THE Subscriber, lately a tutor of the college of New- 
Jersey, proposes to teach a very few boys the Latin lan- 
guage. .... The number of students will not exceed 

six The mode of teaching will be somewhat 

new, and perhaps, has never been before practised, in 

1 The name of New York G-azcttc changed to the above title. 



230 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

America at least. Rut tho' I make no secret of the mode, 
yet, the public are not so much concerned in knowing 
that as my terms. 

If I teach the Latin language, in one year, so that at 
the years end, (sickness and unforseen accidents excepr- 
ed) the student appears, on examination, to be well ac- 
quainted with it; not only as well as most in any college 
on the continent are at their commencing Batchelors of 
arts, but be able with propriety and facility to translate 
Latin into English and English into Latin and under- 
stand the grammatical construction; then, I shall expect 
40 Proc. but, if I fail in the attempt, then I shall expect 
no compensation. 

To be taught thus, would be far the cheapest for the 
student; which may appear from the following consider- 
ations. 

'Tis well known, that, at the rate Youth are generally 
taught, one of an indifferent or middling genius, would 
require at least 4 years to obtain a competent knowledge 
of the Latin language; such a knowledge I mean, as has 
been just now mentioned. 

In each of these 4 years, suppose the student to expend 
for tuition . 4, for board . 26, for Apparel and other 
expences . 30 in all . 60 per Annum, which in 4 years 
amounts to . 240. This then is the whole expence of the 
student while learning the Latin language, after the usual 
rate of teaching. 

Again supposing a student learns the Latin language 
in one year, according to the proposal above mentioned. 
In this year, suppose the student to expend for tuition 
. 40, for board, . 26, for apparel, and other expences 
. 30, in all . 96. This then is the whole expence of the 
student, while learning the Latin language after the rate 
proposed. 



i;66] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



231 



Thus we see that above . 140 is saved, besides 3 years 
of precious time. 

If, besides saving his time and money, he should learn 
the Language, not only without that wearisome. groping 
which disgusts almost every youth, and in marty, fixes a 
Casting aversion to study; but should even contract every 
day, a greater fondness and relish for study, which fond- 
ness 'tis highly probable he would retain all his life after; 
then I refer to all who have ever thought of the precious- 
ness of time, o'f the painful fatigue which grammar-school 
boys generally undergo, and of the valuableness of a rel- 
ish for study; whether it would not be a good and cheap 
bargain; for a youth to pay not only . 40, but even a 
hundred pounds to be thus taught. If I cannot infuse into 
the mind of the student such a love for learning, and 
make his business his pleasure and delight; I am sure I 
shall loose my fee and (what is of incomparable greater 
value) the pleasure of doing good. 

I propose to make elocution a part of the student's 
diversion; so that, I hope, at the year's end, he will be 
able to speak with considerable Grace and energy. 

The subscriber at present resides at Princeton, and 
designs to open his school there. 

The school will be opened on the tenth of November, 
after which time none my 1 expect admission except those 
who have already been encouraged. 

No abatement or allowance will be made for such as 
have spent any time at the Latin : The subscriber would 
prefer such as never have. 

He would choose that all his scholars lodge in the same 
house with himself, and he will be careful to choose for 
himself and them the best lodgings that can be had. 

The subscriber trusts, that the good of the public has 



imay 



232 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

incited him to hazard a proposal, from which the public 
can receive no injury, but will (if the attempt succeed^ 
evidently receive a great advantage. 

With_ respect to the success I shall only say thus much. 
Tho' I have in my power to produce the authorities of 
great men, and arguments which to them appeared con- 
vincing, and what is more than all this, tho' I might cite 
even fact itself, to prove that we may hope the success 
will be extraordinary; yet I choose to wave all these 
things, not doubting but (if God spare my health) we 
may soon see, with our own eyes, the success evinced by 
resistless facts. 

Tis hoped, the public will interpret this proposal in a 
most charitable sense, and not consider the author as 
renouncing modesty in pretending to teach with so un- 
common success. The excellency of the mode (not the 
teacher) and the advantageous circumstances of the stu- 
dents, are the sources from whence the subscriber derives 
all his encouragement. 

JOSEPH PERIAM. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1245, October 16, 
1766. 

TO BE SOLD, 

ONE third part of a forge and saw mill, with fifty acres 
of land in Greenwich township, West New- Jersey, with- 
in two miles of Delaware river; the forge and saw-mill 
are situate on Muskonecong river, as constant and fine 
a stream as any in the province, in the forge are two 
fineries and a chaffery; there is likewise a good coal- 
house and houses for the workmen, with a good stone 
house for the owner or manager. Likewise will be sold 
511 acres of good land adjoining the said fifty acres, has 
near a mile front on the Delaware, on which there is a 
small improvement, the rest wood land : Any persons 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 233 

inclined to purchase may know the terms which will be 
very reasonable, by applying to Samuel Flower, Esq; in 
Philadelphia, or the subscriber at Easton. On payment 
of one-fourth part of the purchase money, any reasonable 
time will be given for the remainder, giving security and 
paying interest, and an indisputable title made to the 
whole. 

GEORGE TAYLOR. 

N. PI The forge is not more than four miles distant 
from Durham furnace in Bucks-county, where a constant 
supply of pigg iron may be always had. 

LIST of LETTERS remaining in the POST-OFFICE, Phil- 
adelphia. 

A. John Asheron, Salem County 

B. John Begwell and Daniel Boyde, Sussex County. 
D. William Drummond, Cumberland County. 

T. Thomas Thompson (2) Salem County, West 
New-Jersey. 

STOLEN out of the Pasture of the Subscriber, on the 
nth Instant, living in Penn's Neck, East New-Jersey, a 
dark bay Marc, about 15 Hands high, without any arti- 
ficial Marks, but has a Blase down her Face, and has a 
high heavy Neck, the Mane hanging on both Sides; she 
has a remarkable grey Ring round her Body, ivhere the 
Girth goes round, two hind Feet white, one white above 
the Foot Lock, trots and paces. Whoever takes up said 
Mare, and Thief, shall receive Four Pounds Ten Shil- 
lings, or Thirty Shillings for the Mare, and all reasonable 
Charges, paid by 

COORT VOORHEERS. 

JOHN KLEINBEHL, of Dornheim, in the Marquisate of 
Hess-Durmstadt, in Germany, Baker, Son of Daniel 



234 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Kleinbehl, of the same Place, deceased, about the Year of 
our Lord, 1754, arrived in the City of Philadelphia, and 
at the Age of about 20 Years, was bound to a certain 
Obadiah Robin, of Cumberland County, in the Province 
of West New-Jersey. His Relations in Germany would 
be glad to hear of him : If therefore the said John Klein- 
behl is living, and will apply to Mr. Peter Miller, Notary 
Public, in Second-street, near Race-street, in Philadel- 
phia, aforesaid, may hear of something to his advantage; 
and if he shall happen to be dead, and any Person will be 
kind enough to give Information thereof as soon as pos- 
sible, to the said Peter Miller, it will be acknowledged as 
a great Favour, as Philip Sansfelder, a Relative of said 
John Kleinbehl, is going with Captain Smith to Germany. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, on Tuesday, the 
4th day of November next, will be exposed to sale, by 
public vendue, on the premises, a plantation and tract of 
land, containing about 170 acres, on which there is a 
good brick dwelling-house and kitchen, a large and com- 
modious barn, a very good orchard, about 50 acres of 
cleared upland, and 40 acres of exceeding good drained 
meadow, situate in the township of Newtown, in the 
county of Gloucester, on Newtown Creek, near the mouth 
thereof, about a mile from the town of Gloucester, 3 
miles by water from Philadelphia, and the same distance 
by land from William Cooper's ferry. Also, at the same 
time and place aforesaid, will be exposed to sale, an un- 
divided share of 40 acres of cedar swamp, lying on a 
branch of Little Egg-harbour river, about 20 miles from 
the above premises; and 16 acres of unappropriated land 
in the western division of New-Jersey; being all late the 
property of John Buzby, deceased; seized and taken in 

execution by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, sheriff. 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 235 

LONDON 

To BARLOW TRECOTHICK, Esq; and the Committee of 
Merchants, trading to North America. 

New-Brunswick, in New- Jersey, June 18, 1766. 

This acknowledges the receipt of your much esteemed 
favours of the 28th of February, and i8th o>f March, 
which severally afforded us the highest pleasure; the for- 
mer as presaging, and the latter confirming the repeal of 
the unhappy stamp act. 

As that act, had it been inforced, must have necessarily 
deprived his Majesty's subjects in North America, of 
their most invaluable privileges; at the same time that 
it imposed burdens grievous, and, as we apprehend, un- 
constitutional : Thence the account of its being repealed 
could not fail of diffusing universal joy throughout the 
continent; but, in our expressions of it, we have, and 
believe people generally have, been attentive to those pru- 
dent monitions which you were so kind as to suggest. 

The various difficulties, and that relentless opposition 
which the friends of liberty had to encounter, in bringing 
about this happy event, fill our minds with a high sense 
of their eminent, inflexible virtues. 

In regard to the riots or tumults which have appeared, 
at times, in some particular places among the colonies, 
they were the sallies of less considerate men. History 
furnishes proof, that even the best regulated states have 
not been, at all times, able to restrain such ; far less could 
it be expected in an infant country; hence we are in- 
clined to think, that these would not have preponderated 
so much in England, had they not been greatly exagger- 
ated, and, probably, misrepresented there by mercenary, 
or otherwise ill-affected persons; for, we hope, the con- 
duct of the more thinking men among us stood unexcep- 
tionable. 



236 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

We conceived the imposition to be unconstitutional and 
the distresses on our trade to be highly impolitick. We 
saw the co-operation of these measures, if persisted in, 
must inevitably issue in the ruin of the colonies, and that 
England would sensibly feel the direful effects. 

The then administration seemed regardless of ever} 7 
remonstrance from that quarter, whence we were left to 
pour out our complaints to private friends on your side, 
and urge their aid, in warding off the impending evil. 

The resolution of our merchants was a natural meas- 
ure, to rouze the efforts of the mercantile interest in Eng- 
land; and it was a prudent measure to restrain the in- 
crease of our debts, while the distresses on trade disabled 
us even from discharging the arrears. 

Had not a repeal of the stamp act (accompanied with 
a prospect of the extension of trade) taken place, com- 
merce must have ceased here, agriculture, manufacture 
and economy become the sole object of the attention and 
pursuit of these colonies. 

We can safely aver, that his Majesty has no subjects 
more loyal than those in North- America ; and we con- 
ceive, that upon the most obvious principles of true pol- 
icy, the numerous inhabitants of these colonies may be 
rendered easy and happy, while at the same time, their 
commerce and industry may be led in such a channel, as 
to become a grand source of wealth to the mother coun- 
try. 

We flatter ourselves, that the discussion of that impor- 
tant point before the parliament, has thrown in such a 
light upon the minds of the people of Great Britain, that 
men in power will see, and be persuaded, that fettering 
the trade of America, and over burthening its inhabitants, 
is, in fact, cropping the flowers, and distressing the bees 
of their own hive; that, on the other hand, keeping up 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 237 

an attention to the prosperity of the colonies, and the 
extension of their commerce, as it is the most natural, 
must prove the most efficacious means of promoting the 
best interest of Great Britain. 

We cannot take our leave, without expressing our 
most affectionate loyalty to his present Majesty, our 
gratitude to his ministers, to the majority of parliament, 
to Mr. Pitt, that eminent friend of liberty, and to you, 
gentlemen, the committee of North-American merchants, 
for your unwearied endeavours on this important occa- 
sion. And we trust that the behaviour of the colonies 
will always fully justify what you were so kind as to 
assert in their behalf. 

(Signed by fourteen principal merchants) 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1974, October 23, 
1766. 

New-York, October 30. Last Week was held at New- 
ark, for the County of Essex in the Province of New- 
Jersey, before the Honourable Frederick Smyth, Esq; 
a Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Deliv- 
ery, when two Persons were convicted of Horse-stealing, 
and received Sentence of Death, viz. 

James M'Carthy, a Native of Ireland, about 21 Years 
old; says his Mother lived in Philadelphia; that he some 
time lived in New-Haven, from whence he came last 
March, and passing through Elizabeth-Town, took a 
Horse, Saddle and Bridle, was followed, and apprehended 
at the Indian-Queen, in Philadelphia, with the Horse, 
Saddle and Bridle. 

John Morris, also a Native of Ireland, aged 49 Years, 
took a Horse at Springfield, near Elizabeth-Town, in 
August last; was apprehended in Morris County, with 
the Horse. 



238 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

They both denied the Stealing the Horses, and said, 
that they purchased them from Persons travelling on the 
Road, to them unknown. They are to be executed on 
Friday the 3ist Instant October. 

To the Public, especially the Inhabitants of the Province 
of New-Jersey. 

Gentlemen, 

WHEREAS I last Week, and not before, discover'd that 
Mr. Parker, Printer, Comptroller of the Post Office, has 
for some Weeks past, arbitrarily prevented the Post from 
carrying my news Papers for New-Jersey, and as he could 
from the Direction of my Papers, (left at the Ferry House 
for the Post) get a List of my Customers, has instead of 
my Papers, most unjustly sent them his own. And as 
his Paper is printed in the same Form, and under the 
same Title that mine used to be, it is probable many of 
my Customers may not have attended to the Difference 
of the Printer's Name. The Meanness and Dishonesty 
of this Proceeding, I shall leave to the Resentment of my 
Customers, who will determine, whether to encourage 
such a Man, by accepting his Papers, or whether to ad- 
here to the Printer, they voluntarily thought fit to employ. 
As to my self, tho' my Customers are not equally affected 
in their immediate Interest by the Change, as I am, yet 
I believe their Regard to Justice will influence them to 
resent the Injury that has been done me. And with re- 
gard to themselves, they will determine, whether they will 
submit to the double Force of droping their Intercourse 
with the Man they chose to employ, and of employing 
another without their own Consent. 

But as to hindering the Post from carrying any public 
Papers, - - That is a Matter in which the Public in gen- 
eral are concern' d, It is a stretch of arbitrary Power, that 
I believe was never ventured in England where even the 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 239 

Papers that treat the Ministry with the greatest Freedom, 
are allowed free Passage by the Post. And if Mr. Par- 
ker, as a public Officer, can be so influenced by private 
Considerations and of so base a Kind what would such 
a one do if prompted by ambitious Views, in Compliance 
with Measures of a corrupt Ministry? Would he not 
stop all Papers from going by the Post or all but his 
own? How dangerous it is to trust such a Man with a 
public Post of Importance, I leave every Man to judge. 

If Mr. Parker persists in stopping the Papers by the 
Post, the Gentlemen will please to agree upon some other 
Method of Conveyance. During the Summer Season, 
they may be sent to most Places as far as Brunswick, gen- 
erally as soon, and sometimes sooner than by the Post. I 
am, Gentlemen, 

Your Most Humble Servant, 

JOHN HOLT 

To BE SOLD, 

A Choice Plantation at Ancocus Brook (or a Place 
called Peramos) in the County of Bergen, and Eastern 
Division of the Province of New- Jersey; containing 
about 100 Acres of good arable Land, Part whereof is 
cleared, the Remainder well wooded; there is on the same 
a good new Stone Dwelling-House, 40 Feet front, and 
27 Feet back, the Front is all of hewn Stone, a Cellar 
under the Whole, and a Well of good Water before the 
Door; the W^alls are near two Feet thick, and good Sash 
Windows to the House; there is also a good Kitchen 23 
Feet one Way, and 20 Feet the other Way, and a good 
fire place therein : The House contains four Fire-places, 
and is two story high, is pleasantly situated between two 
Main-Roads, and has an Entry through the House; all 
very beautifully contrived : There is also< on the said 
Tract a small barn, a good Gristmill, and a good Sawmill, 



240 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

all in good Order, and has not wanted for Water in the 
driest Times; there is likewise a thriving young Orchard 
on the same; 'tis as public a Place as is in the Country, 
fit either for a Merchant, or any other Business. Also a 
Dwelling House and Lot of Ground in the City of New- 
York, adjoining to Mr. Mersier's Ground by the North- 
River; the Lot is 170 Feet long, and 25 Feet broad; the 
House is well finished, has four Fire-places, and is hand- 
somely glazed, a good Pump before the Door, and is in- 
tirely new: There is a Grant belonging to the said Lot 
for docking out 200 Feet in the River (Part of which is 
already dock'd.) Any Persons inclined to purchase the 
Whole or either of the said Premises, may apply to ELIZ- 
ABETH LANE, at the Hcuse of Mr. William Rousby, near 
the Oswego Market, and agree upon reasonable Terms. 
An indisputable Title will be given. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1243, October 30, 
1766. 

New- York, Oct. 23. 

By capt. Richards we also hear, that capt. Jaquess in a 
sloop belonging to Raway, in the Jersies, sailed from the 
Grenades the loth of August last, which was four days 
before the violent hurricane happened at Martinico, and 
as we have not heard of capt. Jaquess since, his friends 
here are in great pain for him. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia, Cleared. Sloop Sally 
and Polly, J. Hampton to Egg Harbour. The Pennsyl- 
vania Journal, No. 1247, October 30, 1766. 

To BE SOLD, 

A plantation, containing 220 Acres of Land, situate on 
Cross wick's Creek, about 2 Miles from Bordentown, and 
the same Distance from Crosswick Meeting-House; about 






1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 24! 

170 Acres of which is clear Land, very good for Wheat 
and Grass, 30 Acres of which is rich low Land, the Re- 
mainder well timbered. On the Premises are a good 
House and Kitchen, Barn and sundry other Out-houses, 
a very neat Garden, good Orchard; the whole Plantation 
in good Fence. For Particulars, enquire of John Imlay, 
at Bo<rdentown. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation, situate in Pilesgrove, Salem County, 
West-Jersey, containing 350 Acres, be the same more or 
less, 200 acres of cleared Land, 25 of which is cleared 
Meadow, and 25 more may be made, with two large 
Apple Orchards of good Fruit, and a large Peach 
Orchard, a Dwelling House thereon, a Story and a Half 
high, with four Rooms on the lower Floor. Any Person 
inclining to purchase the same, may know the Terms, by 
applying to 

JOSEPH VAN METER. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1975, October 30, 
1766. 

ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of Thomas Red- 
man, late of Haddonfield, in the County of Gloucester, 
New-Jersey, Shop-keeper, deceased, are hereby desired 
to make speedy Payment to the Subscribers, to enable 
them to discharge the just Demands against said Estate, 
and otherwise comply with the Injunctions laid upon 
them, by the last Will and Testament of said Deceased. 
MARY REDMAN, THOMAS REDMAN and JOHN REDMAN, 
Execut. 

N. B. The Business of Shop-keeping is now carried 
on, at the late Dwelling house of my Father, by me, 

THOMAS REDMAN. 

16 



242 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Burlington, October 27, 1766. 

BY virtue of his Majesty's writ of venditioni exponas, 
to us directed, on Tuesday, the 2d of December next, be- 
tween the hours of 12 and 5 o'clock in the afternoon, will 
be exposed to sale, by public vendue, on the premises, a 
plantation and tract of land, containing 330 acres, on 
which there are a frame two story dwelling-house and 
kitchen, a large and commodious barn, about 60 acres of 
upland cleared, and 80 acres of exceeding good meadow 
made, and 20 acres more may be made, situate in the 
township of Evesham, in the county of Burlington; the 
said plantation is exceedingly well watered, having 
springs, or runs, in each meadow and field, that never 
fail in the driest seasons, a fine run running through the 
barn yard, where there is a number of stalls for feeding 
cattle; also will be sold, at the same time and place, 
horses, cows, hogs, sheep, waggons, ploughs, gears, In- 
dian corn, hay, feather-beds, bedding and bedsteads, 
looking-glasses, tables, chairs, pewter pots, kettles and 
several other sorts of houshold furniture, all late the 
property of Daniel Hopewell, seized and taken in execu- 
tion, at the suit of Joseph Butterworth, Hudson Middle- 
ton, and others, by DANIEL ELLIS, late Sheriff, and 
JOSEPH IMLAY, Sheriff 

N. B. As the sale of the above plantation has been put 
off several times, these are to acquaint the public that it 
will be sold on that day, without further postponing. 

MADE their escape out of Trenton goal, on the 3Oth of 
October last, at night, two men, one of them a servant 
man, named James M'Daniel, about 23 years of age; 
had on, when he went away, a short coat, of a greyish 
colour, lined with striped flannel, a striped jacket, one 
check shirt, and a coarse white ditto, grey stockings, blue 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 243 

breeches, and pretty good shoes; has short brown curled 
hair, much pock-marked, lately came into the country, 
and speaks very low. The other named Richard Warren, 
confined for debt, about 5 feet 3 inches high, and about 
26 years of age; had on, when he went away, a white 
shirt, leather breeches, white and black ribbed stockings, 
a short cut coat, of a lightish colour, pretty much torn, 
and a castor hat ; has light brown curled hair, is a pretty 
likely fellow, but has a pale look, pretends to shew the 
slight of hand, and has been in the army. They are both 
fond of liquor, and have taken with them a gun, ammu- 
nition, and an axe. Whoever takes up the said runaways, 
and secures them in any of his Majesty's goals, shall have 
Five Pounds Reward, and, if delivered to me, all reason- 
able charges paid by 

GEORGE BROWN, Goaler. 

ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of John Hacket, 
Esq; late of Andover Iron-works, in the County of Sus- 
sex, and Province of New-Jersey, deceased, are desired 
to make immediate Payment; and those who have any 
Demands against said Estate, are requested to send in 
their Accounts to ELIZABETH HACKET, ARCHIBALD 
STUART, of the Union Iron-works, and JOSEPH REED, 
jun, of Trenton, Administrators. The Pennsylvania 
Gazette, No. 1976, November 6, 1766. 

Perth- Amboy, September 24, 1766 
New-Jersey, ss. BY virtue of several writs of fieri 
facias, to me directed, issued out of the county court of 
Middlesex, against the goods and chattels, lands and ten- 
ements of James Johnson, at the suit of Stephen Skinner, 
and others; I have taken and seized a tract of good land, 
within seven miles of New-Brunswick, and five from 
South-River landing, containing four hundred and fifty 



244- NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

acres; some part is good meadow, and more may be 
made, as there is a fine stream runs through the land; 
the upland is good for producing of wheat, and part of 
it is good woodland : There is on said premises a framed 
house and kitchen, a large new barn, and other out 
houses, an orchard, and a good garden. There will also 
be sold at the same time, a lot of salt meadow, lying at 
the Round-Abouts, containing about ten acres. Now 
these are to give notice, that I shall expose the aforesaid 
lands and premises to sale, at public vendue on Wednes- 
day the 26th of November Inst. on the premises, between 
the hours of twelve and five in the afternoon : At which 
time and place, the terms and conditions of sale will be 
declared and made known, by me 

JAMES BROOKS, Sheriff 

N. B. If the purchaser will pay one third of the money 
next May, he shall have a reasonable time for the re- 
mainder. The creditors of said James Johnson, are par- 
ticularly requested to be present, with the demands that 
each of them may have against him, in order that they 
may be delivered in to the assignees. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1244, November 6. 
1766. 

LONDON, Sept. 16. 

Divers Gentlemen have lately gone over to New- York, 
and other provinces in North-America, to claim lands 
given their predecessors almost a century ago. On the 
estate of one gentleman, 'tis said, Elizabeth-Town is 
built, which will now turn out of great value to him. It 
is probable this may give the American lawyers some 
business. 

NEW- YORK, November 3. 

Capt. Cunningham, from Santa Croix, arrived off 
Sandy-Hook in fourteen days, where he took a pilot on 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 24$ 

board; and then by the hard North East winds we had 
was beat off eight days longer : He got into the Hook 
last Sunday week, and came up here the next morning. 

The Brig Polly, Capt. John Hull, from Monto Christi, 
for Rhode-Island, was spoke with the ist. inst. off our 
Capes, he had but one of his anchors, off Cape-May. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1248, November 6, 1766. 

FIVE: POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from his bail, living in Westnantmil town- 
ship, Chester county, in Pennsylvania, on the 3Oth of 
October last, one Peter Miller, a mason by trade, about 
six feet high, wears his own black hair tied with a black 
ribbon, is a well discoursed, well faced man, blind of his 
left eye : took with him, a roan coloured grey horse, a 
good saddle with green plush housing, was seen on the 
road to New- York near Prince-town. Whoever takes up 
the said Miller, and secures him in any goal so that he 
may be brought to justice, shall have the above reward, 
with reasonable charges paid by 

WILLIAM and ALEXANDER GOULD. 
N. B. He is very fond of liquor, and to quarrel when 
drunk. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1249, November 
13, 1766. 

To be LETT, 

A VERY large and convenient House, with a Lot of 
Land, containing 12 Acres, including an Orchard of good 
Fruit, the whole situated in Allen's Town, New- Jersey; 
it has been a noted Inn for a Number of Years, being on 
the main Road to New York, Amboy and Shrewsbury, 
and has very good Conveniency for Travellers. Enquire 
of Elizabeth Stennard, Abel James, William Wishart, or 



246 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Thomas Wishart, in Philadelphia; or Dr. James Newell, 
in Allen's Town. 

NEW-YORK, November 6 

Friday last John Morris was executed at Newark, pur- 
suant to his sentence, for horse-stealing; but John M'Car- 
ty, the other man condemned at the same time, was re- 
prieved by the Governor of New-Jersey. 

Burlington, Nov. 10, 1766. 

Now in the custody of the subscriber, a certain Negroe 
man, who is advertised in last week's papers by the name 
of Jack, and says he belongs to Peter Wentz, of Worces- 
ter Township, and county of Philadelphia ; this is to give 
notice, that except his master comes and pays the charges, 
and takes him away, he will be sold out for the same, by 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, goaler. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 13. 

On Sunday, a Man, who calls himself David Smith, 
was brought to Town from New- York, being concerned 
in committing divers Robberies in this City some time 
ago; it seems he had taken a Store, and resided for some 
Time in Reckless Town, New-Jersey, where he conveyed 
the stolen Goods, from time to time; but being suspected, 
from his not knowing how to sell them, he thought proper 
to move off; he was, however, pursued to New- York, 
where he was taken up, with a great Quantity of Goods, 
which are brought back, and most of them have been 
owned by the different People from whom they were 
taken; he was examined on Monday before the Chief 
Justice, and committed to our Goal; among the Goods 
there were two worked Pocket Books, one with Silver 
Clasps, marked W. B. and William Burns worked at 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 247 

large thereon. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1977, 
November 13, 1766. 

TEN POUNDS Reward 

Made his Escape out of the Goal of the County of 
Gloucester, on the I5th inst. November, a certain James 
Abit, about 40 Years of Age, is 5 Feet 6 Inches high, of 
a pale Complexion, marked with the Small-Pox, had on, 
while in my Custody, a half trimmed light coloured 
Broadcloth Coat, and a grey cut Wig. Whoever takes 
up and secures the aforesaid Abit in the said Goal, shall 
receive the above Reward, together with reasonable 
Charges, paid by SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

N. B. He is a House Carpenter by Trade. 

Salem, October 10, 1766 

By Virtue of His Majesty's Writ of Venditioni Expo- 
nas to me directed, will be exposed to Sale, on Saturday, 
the 30th of December next, on the Premises, a valuable 
Plantation, situate in Haynes's Neck, Salem County, con- 
taining 300 Acres and upwards; late the Property of 
Joshua Huddy; seized and taken in Execution, and sold 

by 

EDWARD TEST, Sheriff. 

On the 25th Day of February next, will be sold, by 
public Vendue, at the W r idow Rosley's, in Great Egg- 
Harbour Township, Gloucester County, the following 
Tracts or Parcels of Land, lying in Great Egg-Harbour 
Township. 

No, i. Beginning at a Pine Tree, standing near the 
Head of the North Branch of Absecomb Creek, and from 
thence it extends South 69 Degrees West, 140 Chains, to 
a Black oak Tree, for a Corner; thence North 21 De- 
grees West, 84 Chains, to a Pine Tree, for a Corner; 



248 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

thence North 69 Degrees East, 140 Chains, to a Post; 
thence South 21 Degrees East, 84 Chains, to the Pine 
Tree first named, containing 1133 Acres, with the usual 
Allowance. 

No. 2. One other Tract, beginning at a Post standing 
on the South East Side of a small Island, by the Channel, 
that comes from Absecomb Inlet, and runs into the Bay; 
and from thence it is bounded by the said Channel North- 
westwardly to the Bay; thence bounding by the Edge of 
the Bay to the Mouth of a Thoroughfare; then bounding 
by the said Thoroughfare, to the Post first named, con- 
taining 93 Acres, and the usual Allowance. 

No. 3. One other Tract, beginning at a Pine Tree by 
the Head of Tanner's Run, and runs North 15 Chains, to 
a Black oak Sapling; thence North 74 Degrees East, 14 
Chains, to a Black-oak Sapling; thence South 24 De- 
grees East, 23 Chains, to a Pine Tree, by the said Tan- 
ner's Run; thence up the said Run the several Courses 
thereof, and bounding therewith, to the Place of begin- 
ning, containing 37 Acres, with the usual Allowance. 

No. 4. One other Tract beginning at a White oak, 
about 20 Perches from the Bridge on Beaver Run, and 
on the North Side of said Run; thence North 13 De- 
grees West, 32 Chains, to a Pine Tree; thence West 57 
Chains, to a Black-oak; thence South 13 Degrees East, 
43 Chains, to a stake near a White-oak, marked on four 
Sides; thence North 85 Degrees East, 46 Chains, to a 
Black-oak Sapling; thence North 48 Degrees East, n 
Chains, to the Place of beginning, containing 223 Acres, 
with the usual Allowance. 

No. 5. One other Tract, beginning at a White-oak, 
on the South Side of a Branch of Little Egg-Harbour 
River, and runs thence North 55 Degrees West, 20 
Chains, to a White-oak; thence South, 56 Degrees West, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 249 

29 Chains, to a Stake; thence South 20 Degrees East, 
14 Chains, to a White-oak Sapling; thence North 66 
Degrees East, 20 Chains, to a Stake; thence North 61 
Degrees East, 20 Chains, to the Place of beginning, con- 
taining 54 Acres, with the usual Allowance. 

No. 6. One other Tract, containing 126 Acres; all 
lying in Egg Harbour Township. The original Pur- 
chaser was Thomas Simpson of London, and now to be 
sold by Joseph Mitchell, of Blockley, in the County of 
Philadelphia, who will make an indisputable Title. Any 
Person or Persons that may be inclinable to purchase all 
or any Part of the above Lands before the Day o<f Sale, 
may know the Terms, and Quality of the Land, by apply- 
ing to WILLIAM ALLEN, Esq; of Philadelphia; JOHN 
LADD, Esq; who surveyed Part of the above Lands, or 
JOSEPH MITCHELL. 

Said Mitchell has some French Burr Millstones, lately 
arrived, which will be sold very reasonable. Enquire of 
Mr. Daniel Williams, Merchant in Philadelphia. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1978, November 20, 1766. 

Memorandum from the late Papers 
August 12. Addresses of Thanks had been presented 
to his Majesty on the Repeal of the Stamp-Act, from the 
Governments of Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, Massachu- 
setts-Bay, New-York, South-Carolina, &c. which were 
graciously received. The Neiv York Journal or General 
Advertiser- No. 1245, November 13, 1766. 

Now in the custody of the subscriber, near Union Iron 
works in New-Jersey; a black mare about eight years old. 
and fourteen hands high: Likewise a roan ditto, three 
years old, and fourteen hands high, both of which was 
taken from one William Waddle, (who made his escape) 
and is supposed to have stolen them out of Chester countv, 



250 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

in Pennsylvania, the owner is desired to come and pay 
charges and take them away. DAVID VAN DEARIN. 

N. B. The same William Waddle was advertised by 
one William Joans in Goshen township, Chester county, 
for stealing a grey gelding, five years old, fourteen hands 
high, the 3d instant, advertised by said Joans. 



N-azt'oy from the subscriber, living at Cohansey 
Bridge, Cumberland County, West-Jersey, A Negro man 
named Glasco, a well set fellow, about eighteen years of 
age, has a scar on his left cheek, speaks good English, 
had on and took with him, a light grey home-spun coat 
very large and lined with striped lincey, a dark brown 
waistcoat with white metal buttons and lined with the 
same cloth of his coat, buck-skin breeches mended in the 
seat, a narrow brim'd felt hat, 2 pair of grey stockings. 
one ditto worsted, and a pair of half zvorn shoes with 
brass buckles. Whoever takes up and secures said Negro. 
so that his master may have him again shall have FOUR 
DOLLARS reward, and reasonable charges paid by Stephen 
Reeves, Silver-smith, at the corner of Black horse alley, 
in Second street, or by 

ALEXANDER MOORE. 

A r . B. All masters of vessels arc forbid to carry him 
off, at their peril. 

To BE SOLD, by public Vendue only, 
On the premises on Tuesday the second day of Decem- 
ber next, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 

A Valuable plantation or tract of land, containing 372 
acres, situated on the north branch of Timber-Creek, 
Gloucester county, formerly the estate of Daniel Kings- 
ton, deceased, now occupied by Richard Tyse: About 
sixty acres of upland is cleared, and about 15 or 20 acres 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 251 

of meadow, and about 30 acres more may be made, the 
rest all well timber'd. There is on said plantation a good 
frame dwelling-house kitchen, barn and orchard : It may 
be entered on immediately, and an indisputable title will 
be given. The conditions of sale will be made known, 
at the time and place above mentioned. The Pennsyl- 
vania Journal, No. 1250, November 20, 1766. 

RUN away from Peter Imlay, of Imlay's Town, in the 
Township of Upper Freehold, Monmouth county, New- 
Jersey, a servant lad, named Matthias Walker, about 20 
years of age, a likely slim fellow, about 5 feet 9 inches 
high; had on when he went away, a brown coat, a linen 
jacket, and blue breeches, and a felt hat. Whoever takes 
him up, and secures him in any goal, shall have FORTY 
SHILLINGS reward, paid by me 

PETER IMLAY. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1979, November 
27, 1766. 



Tinicum, September 27, 1766 

WHEREAS I Robert Ramsey, of Tinicum, in Bucks 
.County, gave a Promissory Note to Robert Patterson, of 
Oxford Township, 'in Sussex County, West Jersey, for 
the Sum of Fifteen Pounds, bearing Date on the i6th 
Day of October 1765, and payable on the 27th Day of 
May now last past, for which Note I have not received the 
Value, but have been imposed upon by the Insincerity of 
said Robert Patterson. These are therefore to forbid all 
Persons to take any Assignment, &c. of said Note, for I 
do not intend to pay it, unless I shall receive of the said 
Robert Patterson the Value for which I gave said Note. 

ROBERT RAMSEY. 



252 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

These are to forewarn all Persons not to take an As- 
signment of a Bond from Henry Dennis, Shipwright, of 
Philadelphia, to Peter Jones, of Cumberland County, 
West-Jersey, dated in February 1763, for Sixty Pounds, 
in Consideration of a Piece of Cedar Swamp sold to said 
Dennis, about Forty Pounds of which Bond is paid : The 
said Peter Jones became bound to me, in the Penalty of 
Two Hundred Pounds, in a Bond of the same Date, to 
make or secure to me a Title for said Cedar Swamp, and 
as he has not performed, I do not intend to pay a Farthing 
more, until said Jones makes me a Title, agreeable to his 
Obligation. 

HENRY DENNIS. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1980, December 
4, 1766. 

New-York, December i. On Monday Evening, the 
24th tilt, escaped out of the Gaol of Morris-Town, - 
Conner, who was found dead the second Day after, in a 
By-path about two Miles from the Gaol. The Coroner's 
Verdict was, that he died of Cold ; after which the Corpse 
was carried back to Gaol. 

On Tuesday Evening, Nov. 25, about Ten o'Clock, 
Thomas Bates, of Hanover, was found lying on the Road 
near Hanover Church, groaning as in great Agony, but 
Speechless, was carried into the nearest House (from 
which he had rode off, after Eight o'Clock the same Even- 
ing) where after tossing in Pain for some Time, he ex- 
pired. The Coroner returned a Verdict, that "he died 
by a Fall from his Horse, having received a mortal Con- 
tusion on one of his Temples." 

Last Night about nine o'Clock, on board a Sloop from 
Egg-Harbour, loaded with Shingles, one Davis, Master, 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 253 

lying without the Great-Dock, a Fire kindled, it is sup- 
posed under the Hearth, in the Cabbin, burst out, and 
was got to a considerable Height before discovered. It 
is said most of the Things in the Cabbin were destroyed, 
and the Vessel with several others, and their Cargoes, 
were in great Danger, but by timely Assistance, and scut- 
ling the Vessel, the Fire was extinguished, after having 
done, it was supposed, about 50 Damage. 

New-Jersey, Morris County, 22d Nov. 1766. 

IN the evening of Tuesday last, Tony, the negro man 

of John Van Dorn, made his escape from the county gaol 

of this county, to which he was committed for setting fire 

to, and burning has master's house. He is a likely fellow, 

appears to be 21 or 22 years of age, about five feet ten 

inches high, has no hat, and very ragged brownish clothes. 

Three Pounds and all reasonable expences will be paid 

to any person, who will deliver the above described Tony 

to me, or to my gaol-keeper, at Morris Town. 

By JACOB FORD, jun. Sheriff 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1248, December 4, 1766. 

TEN POUNDS Reward. 

RUN-AWAY from the subscriber, living in Berks county, 
about two miles from Reading; a Dutch servant man, 
named John Weibel, a Black-smith by trade, aged about 
24 years, and about five feet high, well sett, and has black 
hair: He has been gone about a year and a half, it has 
been reported that he was seen in the Jerseys. Whoever 
takes up the said servant and brings him to his master, 
shall have the above reward, and all reasonable charges 
paid by. 

JOHN WOLFF. 



254 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS John Dorsey, of Philadelphia, having erect- 
ed an air furnace at Mount-Holly, in New-Jersey, for the 
purpose of riming iron ore into pig metal or castings, and 
having found from an experiment of the same, that the 
ore will flux in the said furnace, and that barr iron may 
be made from it as evidently appeared upon trial ; but the 
furnace not being built on such a construction as to an- 
swer effectually, the effect of which is supposed to be 
owing to its smallness and want of strength, and as it 
would be a hardship upon a few individuals, to bear the 
whole expence of an experiment, which, if brought to per- 
fection, will be of such general advantage: Therefore 
this method is taken to advertise those that are willing to 
promote so useful an undertaking and contribute to the 
expence thereof, that they pay to Abraham Mitchell of 
Philadelphia, Peter Bard of Mount Holly, Daniel Ellis 
of Burlington, and Dr. Denormandie of Bristol, such 
sums of money as they think fit, which shall be faithfully 
applied to the perfecting the said furnace, and if a suffi- 
cient sum is collected, it is intended it shall be forwarded 
in the Spring or as soon as the season will admitt, and 
the money returned if the furnace is not built. The sum 
requisite to build it, tis thought, will not exceed one hun- 
dred and fifty pounds. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1252, December 4, 1766. 

To be Sold, by Way of public Vendue, on Monday, the 
22d Day of December, or any Time before, at private 
Sale, a Plantation, containing 1 1 1 and an Half Acres of 
Land, 50 Acres of Plow Land clear, and 10 Acres of clear 
Meadow, the most Part good Land; a new House, partly 
finished, 41 Feet front, 25 Feet back, a Cellar under the 
whole, five Fire-Places, three Rooms below and three 
above, an Entry through the House, with a Kitchen, 15 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 255 

Feet square, and a Fire-Place; a Barn, 20 Feet front, and 
30 Feet back; a good Stone Well, Garden, and a young 
Orchard. There has been a Tavern kept there these 7 
Years past, being a Mile and a Half from Trenton, on 
the Post Road that leads from Philadelphia to New-York. 
For Conditions of Sale, apply to PETER HANKINSON, on 
said Premises. 

N. B. All Persons indebted to said Peter Hankinson, 
are hereby requested to come and pay the same, so that 
he may be the better able to pay his just Debts, otherwise 
they may expect to be used as the Law directs. 

Philadelphia, December 10, 1766. 

All Persons indebted to the Estate of Francis Murray, 
late of Gloucester, New-Jersey, Waterman, deceased, in 
Bonds, Notes or Book-Debts, are hereby desired to pay 
such respective Debts, within three Months from the above 
Date, to prevent further Trouble: And all those who have 
any just Demands against the said Estate, are likewise 
hereby desired to bring in their Accounts duly proved, to 
me 

THOMAS PUGH, Executor. 

N. B. Went adrift, on the 20th of October last, a Cedar 
Baitoe, her Stem broke off, with an Iron Chain, and a 
Piece of Pig-iron bound round with Iron Strap, branded 
on the Stern and Thawts WILLIAM HUGG. Whoever 
takes up the said Baitoe, and delivers her to William 
Hugg, at Gloucester, shall have a Dollar Reward, paid by 
said WILLIAM HUGG or THOMAS PUGH. The Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 1981, December n, 1766. 

Custom-House, New- York. Cleared for Departure. 
Gray, West- Jersey. The Neiv York Journal or General 
Advertiser, No. 1249, December n, 1766. 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Province of New-Jersey, December 3, 1766. 

w HERE AS a Law was passed in New- Jersey the 2Oth of 
June 1765, appointing Commissioners to run out straight 
public Roads through said Province, between New- York 
and Philadelphia, and empowering them to raise a Sum 
of Money by a public Lottery, not exceeding . 500, to- 
wards defraying the Charge thereof; accordingly a Lot- 
tery was thereupon soon after set on Foot, but from the 
troubled State of Affairs at that Time, occasioned by the 
Stamp Act, the Proceedings of the said Lottery were de- 
layed; but as it is apprehended that the salutary Purpose 
might now be effected, the Managers therein appointed 
have thought fit for that End, to revive the following 
Scheme of a Lottery, to consist of 2222 Tickets, at 4 
Dollars each ; 662 of which are to be fortunate as follows : 

i Prize of . 750 is . 750 

i 500 500 

I 250 250 

i 200 200 

3 100 300 

6 50 300 

12 4O 480 

20 30 600 

30 2O 6OO 

IOO IO IOOO 

485 8 3880 

first Drawn 14 14 

last Draivn. 14 14 

662 Prizes. 
1560 Blanks. 



2222 Tickets, at 4 Dollars each, are 8888 . 3333 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 57 

From which a Deduction of 15 per Cent, is 499, 19, o, 
and is proposed to be drawn on the first Tuesday in April 
next, at Perth- Amboy, or sooner if full : The fortunate 
Numbers are to be printed in the New-York and Penn- 
sylvania Papers, as soon as possible after the Drawing, 
which will be directed by John Stevens, James Parker of 
Perth -Amboy; John Wetherill of the Township of New- 
Brunswick; Daniel Ellis of Burlington, and John Ed- 
wards of Bordentown, who are appointed Managers and 
Commissioners for the Road leading from the Ferry- 
house, opposite Perth- Amboy, to Burlington; and John 
Berrien, of Rocky-hill ; Daniel Coxe, of Trentown ; Aza- 
riah Dunham, of New-Brunswick; Ephraim Terrill, and 
Abraham Clark, jun. of Elizabeth-Town; who are like-- 
wise appointed Managers, and Commissioners for the 
Road leading from Newark and Elizabeth-Town, to Tren- 
ton and Borden Town, agreeable to said Act; and are to 
be under oath for the due and impartial Performance of 
their Duties. 

The 'shortening and improving the public Roads 
through this Province, will be a great Advantage to the 
commercial Interest and general Convenience of the In- 
habitants thereof, as well as a very general Advantage to 
the Neighbouring Provinces, particularly to Pennsylva- 
nia and New-York, and as it is the first Thing of the Kind 
that has been attempted on the Continent, it is not doubted 
but every public spirited Person in this, as well as the 
Neighbouring Provinces, will generously contribute to an 
Undertaking, tending so greatly to the Advantage and 
Ease of Men of Business and Pleasure; as it is judged 
the Distance between New- York and Philadelphia will be 
shortened 12 or 15 Miles, and the Roads all made more 
passable and convenient for Travellers in the Winter Sea- 
son than the Present. 

IT 



258 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1766 

Tickets are to be had of Daniel Ellis of Burlington, 
Daniel Coxe of Trenton, James Parker of Perth- Amboy, 
and Abraham Clark, jun. of Elizabeth-Town, and of all 
the other Managers in Jersey, at their respective Dwell- 
ings. 

To BE SOLD 

A Farm or Tract of Land lying at the Fresh-Ponds, in 
the Corporation of New-Brunswick, in the Province of 
New- Jersey, now in the Possession of James Johnston, 
containing 457 Acres; about 180 Acres of which are 
cleared and the Remainder very well timber'd; there is 
on the said Farm, a framed House, and a large new Barn 
and Orchard: It is situate about six Miles, on a very 
good Road, from New-Brunswick, and about three Miles 
from Spottswood Mills, and Iron Works; both which 
afford good Markets for all Kinds of Produce, and five 
Miles from South-River Landing; the-clear'd Land, as 
well as that in Wood, is very good Wheat Land, and 
easily til I'd, being clear of Stones. Whoever inclines to 
purchase, may apply to James Parker or Samuel Sarjant, 
in Perth-Amboy, or Bernardus Lagrange, at New-Bruns- 
wick. The Land will be shown either by Mr. Johnston 
or James Bennet, who live adjoining the Premises. The 
New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1250, De- 
cember 1 8, 1766. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia. Cleared. Sloop Sally 
and Polly, J. Hampton to Amboy. The Pennsylvania 
Journal, No, 1254, December 18, 1766. 

December 17. 

BROKE out of the goal of this city, last night, the fol- 
lowing persons, viz. 

DAVID SMITH, aged 36 years, about 5 feet 5 inches 



1/66] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 59 

high, dark thin visage, his hair lately cut off; had on 
a light brown coat, red jacket, and black stockings. He 
lately kept store at Reckless town, New-Jersey. 

Last Tuesday, about 9 o'clock in the evening, the Turn- 
key of the goal, in this city, going to put a man in one of 
the rooms upstairs, the prisoners being twelve in number, 
six of which had been in irons, but had got them off, rose 
on the turnkey, knocked him down, and demanded the 
Keys or his life, on which he gave them the Keys; they 
then pushed the other man down stairs and made their 
escape out of the door. Two of them returned the next 
morning, the others, which are as follows, are not yet 
taken. .... 

David Smith, Shipwright, The Person on whom the 
goods was found that was taken from several of the in- 
habitants of this town last Summer 

TEN POUNDS for David Smith, FIVE POUNDS for Fran- 
cis Consiglio, and FORTY SHILLINGS for each of the oth- 
ers, and reasonable charges, will be paid by 

WILLIAM PARR, Sheriff. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1254, December 
1 8, 1766. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from his Bail, living in Penn's Neck, Salem 
County, on or about the 2Oth of November, a certain 
Daniel Edwards, about 5 Feet 3 or 4 Inches high, pretty 
well set, wears his own short lightish Hair: Had on, 
when he went away, a blue Broad-cloth Coat, with a black 
Velvet Collar, Claret coloured Velvet Jacket and Breeches, 
plain Silver Shoe and Knee Buckles; he also took with 
him sundry other Clothes unknown; likewise two Horses, 
one a sorrel, with some white in his Face, the other of a 



260 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/66 

brownish Colour, with a Saddle. He also took with him 
two Silver Watches, which it is likely he will part with, 
as he is much given to Jockeying. The said Edwards is 
about 20 Years of Age, of a sandy Complexion. Who- 
ever takes him up, and secures him, so that the Subscriber 
may have him again, shall have the above Reward, and 
all reasonable Charges, paid by 

JACOB TOWNSEND. 

WHEREAS Elizabeth Murrie, the Wife of Elias Van- 
clelip, hath at sundry Times, both in Philadelphia and the 
Jerseys, run me in Debt; these are to forewarn all Per- 
sons not to trust her on my Account, as I will pay no 
Debts of her contracting from the Date hereof. 

ELIAS VANDELIP. 
December 8, 1766. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1982, December 
1 8, 1766." 

Charles -Town, November i. On Wednesday returned 
here, in the Snow Penn, Capt. John Harkies, from New- 
Jersey, the right hon. Charles Lord Hope, accompanied 
by the hon. Capt. Mark Napier, who embarked again on 
Friday, for Philadelphia, to go to Virginia. Lord Hope 
intends, we hear, to spend the winter here. 

This Day is published, 

******* 

By GARRAT NOEL, 

In Three Volumes Octavo, Price Three Dollars, 
Sermons on the most useful and important Subjects, 
adapted to the Family and Closet, 

By the Rev. SAMUEL DAVIES, A. M. 
Late President of the College at Princeton, New -Jersey. 
To which are prefixed, a Funeral Sermon, on the Death 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 26 1 

of Mr. Davies, by Samuel Finley, D. D. and another on 
the same Occasion, together with an elegiac Poem. 

By THOMAS GIBBONS, D. D 

The Subscribers for these Sermons are desired to call 
for their Books. 

THESE are to give Notice, to all Person indebted to the 
Estate of James Anderson, late of the County of Somer- 
set, Attorney at Law, deceased, 1 to make immediate Pay- 
ment unto the Subscribers. 



Anderson, ) Administrators. 
John Anderson, ) 

Monmouth, December the loth, 1766. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THERE is lately opened a Grammar School in Lower 
Freehold, Monmouth County, East New- Jersey, known 
by the Name of Mattisonia Grammar School, where the 
learned Languages are taught, and Youth qualified to 
enter any of the American Colleges; or fitted for any 
public Business; as the Arts and Sciences, and especially 
the several Branches of the Mathematics will be also 
taught with Accuracy and Care. The School to be under 
the Patronage and Inspection of the Rev. Messrs. William 
Tennent, and Charles M' Knight, and Dr. Nathaniel Scud- 
der, who will be careful that it be always furnished with 

i No record has been found of the license of James Anderson as 
an attorney at law. He is mentioned in the records as early as 
April 19, 1763, when Altia Durlandt, widow of John Durlandt, of Mil- 
stone, Somerset county, appoints James Anderson, of the same place, 
her attorney. East Jersey Deeds, A 3, page 56. Two years later he ap- 
pears to have been of Sussex county. On September 11, 1765, James 
Anderson, attorney at law, of Sussex county, is appointed adminis- 
trator of Anna Reed, of Milstone. East Jersey Wills, Liber H, page 
530. By deed dated October 28, 1765, Samuel Ford, of Morris Town, 
Morris county, and his wife Grace, convey to James Anderson, of New- 
ton township, Sussex county, attorney at law, several tracts of land 
In Pequanack township, Morris county, about a mile and a half above 
John Johnson's iron works. East Jersey Deeds, D 3, page 42. He seems 
to have returned to Somerset county soon after this, for on September 
24, 1766, administration was granted on the estate of James Anderson, 
of Somerset county, to John Anderson and Kenneth Anderson, father 
and brother of the deceased. East Jersey Wills, Liber I, page 5. 



262 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/66 

an able Teacher, and engage frequently to visit, and ex- 
amine the Members as to their literary Improvement. 

All Gentlemen who will favour the Undertaking, may 
depend on having Justice done their Children. 

The House for the School, finished in a genteel Man- 
ner, is situated in a very healthy Place, and good Neigh- 
bourhood, where the Morals of Youth will be in no Dan- 
ger of being corrupted, and the whole Expence of Board- 
ing and Tuition will not exceed Twenty Pounds. 

N. B. The above School is in Mr. Tennent's Parish. 
The Neiv York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1251, 
December 24, 1766. 

All the villains mentioned in our last to have broke goal, 
are since taken up, except David Smith, and lodged in a 

proper place The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 

1255, December 25, 1766. 

In the account of our last, (under the New- York head) 
relating to the apprehending the two ruffians, at St. Eusta- 
tia, a mistake was made in the names, it being Nicholaus 
Johnson who was apprehended there, tried, and con- 
demned to the Rack, for the murder of Capt. Duryea, and 
Joseph Andrews, who went off for Casco-Bay, on board 
of one Captain Strickney : He shipped himself it seems 
by the name of Joseph Saunders; and the second of this 
instant a proclamation was issued by his Excellency Gov- 
ernor Bernard, for the apprehending of him; Casco-Bay 
being in the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts-Bay : And 
it is not doubted but if he ever arrives there, he will be 
taken up, and receive his just demerits. Nicholas John- 
son confessed, that he was the man who murdered the 
Captain of a small French vessel, and afterwards turned 
his wife and children adrift in a canoe at sea, near upon 
two years ago; and it is thought with some shew of rea- 



1766] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 263 

son, that he was the man who murdered a traveller about 
a year ago, between Woodbridge and New-Brunswick. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1255, December 25, 1766. 

NEW- YORK 

Dec. 1 8. We are well assured from New-Jersey, that 
upon the news of the several ships coming from England 
to load wheat, and its raising the price to a dollar a bushel, 
that one single farmer at Rariton, brought to market there 
one thousand bushels: - - - This proves there might 
be plenty of Wheat in this Country, if we had but farmers 
enough. - - And notwithstanding the dearness of 
provisions in general here, it sheivs only money is wanting 
to procure them: For several of those ships are already 
loaded and sailed with wheat, both from this place and 
Philadelphia, and it has been brought to market since in 
such plenty, that the price has fell considerably. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1983, December 25, 1766. 

New-York, January i. Thursday last died of a Quin- 
sey, in the 2Qth Year of her Age, at SECOND-RIVER, in 
New- Jersey, Mrs. Catharine Kennedy, Wife to Archibald 
Kenned}', Esq; Commander of his Majesty's Ship the 
Coventry, now on this Station. 

Saturday Noon, in a hard Squall, an Elizabeth-Town 
Boat in going up the Kills, took in such a Quantity of 
Water of a sudden, that a Woman and two Children, 
said to be Germans lately arrived, were drowned in the 
Cabbin, before any Assistance could get to them; The 
Husband with another Child, the Boatman and Capt. 
Lawrence with Difficulty saved their Lives. 

*** The Piece relating to the College in New-Jersey, 
came to Hand too late for this Weeks Paper, but will 



264 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

certain be inserted in our next. The New York Journal 
or General Advertiser, No. 1252, January i, 1767. 

WHEREAS Catherine the Wife of Matthias Fow, of 
Gloucester County, Yeoman, hath eloped from her said 
Husband; these are to forewarn all Persons from trust- 
ing her on my Account, as I am determined to pay no 
Debts of her contracting from the Date hereof, 

MATTHIAS Fow. 
December 27, 1766 

To be Sold or Lett, by the Subscriber, a Plantation, or 
two Tracts of Land, lying in the County of Burlington, 
about a Mile and a Half from Burlington Market-house; 
130 Acres thereof is very pleasantly situated, adjoining 
the River Delaware, to which belongs a good Fishery; 
about 90 Acres thereof cleared, the rest good Timber 
Land, with a good House, and a bearing Orchard. The 
other contains 28 Acres of Woodland, lying about a Mile 
from the first mentioned Plantation. The two Tracts will 
be sold together, or separate, as may best suit the Pur- 
chaser. Any Person inclining to buy, may view the said 
Plantation and know the Terms, by applying to the 
Owner, living in Lower Dublin, Philadelphia County. 

SIMON CORNELL. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1984, January i, 
1767. 

Extract of a letter from the county of Sussex, in New- 
Jersey, dated 22d December, 1766. 

"The expectation I had of meeting with people I had 
business with, made it necessary for me to attend here 
from the i8th to the 2ist instant, and gave me an oppor- 
tunity of gratifying my curiosity, in observing the course 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 265 

of criminal proceedings in this new country. On the 
1 8th Mr. Justice Read came to the Court-House, attended 
by the proper officers, and published his Majesty's com- 
mission of Over and Terminer for that county. The 
Grand jury were qualified and charged, and Mr. Attorney 
General having prepared several bills of indictment, he 
preferred them to the Grand Jury, who came into Court 
about four o'clock in the afternoon, and delivered two 
bills, one against one Robert Seamor, for the murder of 
an Indian man, and another against one David Ray, for 
man slaughter. The prisoners were sett to the barr and 
arraigned, and pleaded not guilty. The Court enquired 
of them, if they had any witnesses in their favour, and 
offered them the aid of the Court to oblige them to attend 
the next day, at which time, they were informed their 
trials would be brought on; a guard of two constables 
and twelve men were ordered to secure the goal, and to 
be relieved from time to time" by a like number. On the 
i Qth, about ten o'clock in the morning the Court met, and 
the prisoners were set to the barr, when Ray retracted 
his plea, and was burnt in the hand. Then the Court 
proceeded to the trial of Seamor, which lasted about three 
hours; the prisoner behaved with great boldness, and 
challenged several of the jury, who were set aside. The 
evidence against the prisoner was as follows; from his 
behaviour to the Indian before their going from the 
house together; Seamor's being possessed of the Indian's 
gun and goods; proof of his breaking the back and legs 
of the dead body, and burying of him, were presumptions 
very violent; and some witnesses were also produced that 
Seamor had confessed to them the murder, and declared 
he would destroy any Indian that came in his way. The 
evidence was produced by the Attorney General very ju- 
diciously, and the Court took much pains to explain to 



266 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

the Jury, with great clearness, the nature of this kind of 
evidence, and to shew the absolute certainty, arising from 
the facts, which were proved by undeniable evidence, and 
the prisoner acknowledged at the bar that he had the 
plunder, but said he had bought them of a sailor, who 
went to Philadelphia. The Jury agreed on their verdict, 
and brought Seamor in guilty. The Court-House was 
exceedingly crowded, and the prisoner remanded to 
prison; he behaved with great insolence, and denied the 
fact; this night twenty-five militia took post at the goal. 
On Saturday morning the Court met, and passed sentence 
on the prisoner, and ordered his execution between three 
and four o'clock in the afternoon. The Judge in his ad- 
dress to the prisoner, seemed to calculate his discourse 
pretty much to the audience, by painting the heinousness 
of the crime, the terrible effect it might have had on the 
frontiers, if the Indians had been possessed by the same 
spirit of revenge with the prisoner. The ingratitude of 
it, as it was well known that the Oneida nation, to which 
the murdered Indian belonged, had during the whole 
course of the last war, co-operated with his Majesty's 
troops. The prisoner persisted in denying the fact, and 
seemed to expect a rescue, but I did not observe a murmer 
among the people, and the most sensible were fully con- 
vinced of the justice of his sentence. An Indian of note, 
I suppose, as he was of a good aspect, and wore a plume 
of feathers on his head, attended the trial and execution, 
and the Court appeared sollicitous for his protection from 
insult, nor did any thing of the kind happen. I under- 
stood great pains had been taken to procure him to at- 
tend. At the time appointed the Sheriff brought the pris- 
oner out, and then for the first time he seemed dismayed, 
for he was encircled by a strong detachment from the 
adjacent companies of militia. At the gallows he made 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 267 

a short prayer, and declared that he had lived a dissolute 
and wicked life, and was guilty of the fact for which he 
was to suffer, and then he was executed. 

"The people behaved very orderly, and I heard the In- 
dian, who attended the trial and saw the execution, say, 
that he should pass through several of the Indian towns 
in his way to Sir William Johnson, and would report the 
justice of his brethren the English on this occasion. The 
Indian was delivered to a guard, who set off with him 
immediately, and engaged to see him safe from the fron- 
tiers. Through the whole I saw great good order and 
regularity.'' The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1256, Jan- 
uary i, 1767. 

RQN-away the 3d ultimo, from the subscriber, living 
in Morris County, and Province of New- Jersey, a 
Mulatto Slave named Perro Smith, about 35 years old, a 
handsome well-looking fellow, 5 feet 8 inches high, has 
short curl'd hair, well-made, can play, on the violin, and 
sings at the same time, is a sensible fellow, can read, 
write and cypher, and no* doubt will write himself a pass; 
he plays with his left hand, and is much addicted to 
liquor: His master was correcting him when he went 
off, and had no other clothes on, than his breeches, trow- 
sers, and stockings, but was supplied with more a few 
miles from his Master's; he was bred and born near Bos- 
ton, and very likely will bend his course that way. Who- 
ever takes up and secures said Fellow, so that he may be 
had again, shall receive Forty shillings reward, and 'all 

reasonable charges paid, by 

GEORGE ARMSTRONG 



T 



To be Lett, for a Term of Years, 
HE Plouse, Farm, and Ferry, called Wehaken, in 
the Township of Bergen, opposite to Greenwich, 



268 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

within three Miles of the City of New-York, from whence 
a constant Ferry is kept. Any Person inclining to hire 
the same, may apply to William Bayard, the Owner 
thereof, who will agree for the same. The Possession to 
be given the 2ist of March next. 

To be sold at publick Vendue, on Monday the 27th Day 

of April next, at one o'Clock in the Afternoon, 

on the Premises, 

A Good Dwel ling-House and Lot of Ground, situate 
at Pennington, in the County of Huntington, 1 and 
Province of West New-Jersey : The Lot contains half 
an Acre, with a good Smith's Shop and a Stable, very 
well situated either for a Tradesman or a Merchant. For 
further Particulars enquire of Samuel Tucker, in Tren- 
ton, or the Subscriber, in Morris-Town, who will give 
an indisputable Title for the same. 

PHILLIPS TUCKER. 

To be Sold by the SUBSCRIBER, 

SEVERAL very excellent FARMS adjacent to each other 
situate in the County of Somerset, Township of 
Bedminster and Province of East-New-Jersey, upon the 
North Branch of Rariton-River, adjoining Leake's Mills : 
There are no better Lands for all kinds of Produce and 
Pasturage. They are Part of a Tract formerly belonging 
to Mr. Axtell, and are only 18 Miles from New-Bruns- 
wick, in a very populous and pleasant Part of the Coun- 
try; are exceedingly well-watered and timbered, and 
capable to any Degree of Improvement. The Purchaser 
may have Time, on giving good Bonds, upon Interest, 
with Security, if required. Enquire on the Premises, of 

JOHN CAREY. 

i Hunterdon. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 269 

To be sold at Publick Vendue, 

On Thursday the Eighth of January next, between the 
Hours of Twelve and One, at the Merchant's 
CofTee-House. 

THE House and Lot of Ground in which William 
Weyman, Printer, now lives, situate in Broad- 
street, opposite the Jew Alley. The House is three stories 
high, hath a good Yard, Pump, and Cistern, a Cellar 
throughout the Whole, and a large Garret. Whoever is 
inclined to purchase before the Day of sale, may apply to 
James Duane, Esq; Attorney at Law in New- York or to 
David Jameson, at New-Market, in East New- Jersey by 
whom an indisputable Title will be given. The New 
York Mercury, No. 792, January 5, 1767. 

To the PRINTER 

SIR, 

The inclosed Lines, and Money to pay for their Inser- 
tion in your next Paper, are sent by your constant Reader. 

A Real friend to the interest of New-Jersey College, 
(who can't patiently sit by and see its reputation for oecon- 
omy intirely blasted, without offering his feeble assistance 
to support it) would beg leave just to observe; that he 
takes it for granted, one inducement, amongst many other 
valuable ones, that gentlemen at a distance have to edu- 
cating their children at New-Jersey College, is (or has 
been) the cheapness of their living, which to far the great ^ 
est number who send their children here, is of great im- 
portance; formerly indeed those gentlemen had their ex- 
pectations fully answered, but latterly quite otherwise, 
not at all to be attributed to any alteration in the prices 
of provisions, which would appear to be inconsiderable, 
was it strictly attended to : The ceconomy of the kitchen 
is greatly neglected, where I am afraid unfaithful ser- 
vants (who have nothing at heart but the promotion of 



27O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

their own interest) have various methods of wasting and 
destroying, which greatly enhances the quarterly charge 
against the students. The steward whose immediate busi- 
ness it is to examine all such matters, I doubt not from 
his character, is a very honest man, I am also willing to 
believe, very easily imposed on, from his natural temper 
and disposition. 

The country people who supply the College with their 
daily necessaries, Instead of gladly accepting the stew- 
ard's prices for the sake of READY MONEY, seldom get 
their pay for any thing; and therefore impose their own 
extravagante prices, which indeed is the only inducement 
for parting with their goods upon an uncertainty of the 
time when they shall be paid for them : This, finally be- 
comes the loss of the student, and tends to raise each 
quarterly bill, beyond what it might be, if properly at- 
tended to. Many other impositions does our College 
labour under, one instance amongst many, may be just 
hinted; a person of this very town, who had contracted 
with the steward to supply the College with meat, carried 
in at one time between three and four hundred weight, 
agreeable to his own charge; some contention and indeed 
suspicion arose amongst persons (who as it happened had 
nothing to do with the affair, except their concern for the 
general good) and the next morning the meat was 
weighed by sundry reputable persons, and found to fall 
short of the weight charged to the College, between fifty 
and sixty pounds. This indeed was a large stretch, and 
there is I doubt, many of the same nature, but conducted 
with a greater degree of decency. 

These observations will I think fully prove the neces- 
sity of two things, viz. 'ist. that the steward of the Col- 
lege ought to be constantly provided with cash, to pur- 
chase every necessary, by which method he would be sure 



1767] . NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2/1 

to be well served, the students would have no occasion to 
complain of their commons, and provisions would be 
brought in so plentifully, that the steward might make his 
own, or in other words, reasonable prices fo<r everything; 
2d, the steward of New- Jersey College, should not (in 
my humble opinion) be a man engaged in various other 
branches of business; but one who had nothing to attend 
to but the interest of the College and students, which are 
connected, he could then carefully attend to the weighing 
and purchase of meat, and all other necessaries; which 
would be well worth while in so large a family, and would 
make I dare say, hundreds difference in a year. 

PUBLICOLA. 

New-York, January 8. On the ipth of December, at 
the Court of Oyer and Terminer, in Sussex County, New- 
Jersey, Robert Ray was burnt in the Hand for Man- 
slaughter, and Robert Seamor was tried for the Murder 
of an Indian Man of the Oneida Nation. The Evidence 
against him was His Behaviour to the Indian before 
they went together from the House, his being possessed 
of the Indian's Gun and Goods, Proof that he broke the 
back and Legs of the dead Body, and buried it, that he 
confessed the Murder to some Witnesses and declared 
he would destroy any Indian that came in his Way. He 
challenged several of the Jury, denied the Fact, and said 
he bought the Goods found on him, of a Sailor The 
Jury brought him in guilty He appear'd undaunted and 
seem'd to expect a Rescue, but there was not the least 
appearance that any was intended; the Audience which 
was very numerous, seem'd unanimously to approve the 
Verdict. He was remanded to Prison, which was guard- 
ed that Night with 25 of the Militia. Next Morning he 
was brought to the Bar, and sentenced to be executed 



272 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1/5^ 

between three and four that Afternoon, at which Time 
he was accordingly brought out, strongly guarded by 
Detachments from the adjacent Companies of Militia- 
He appear ? d dismayed at the Gallows, made a short 
Prayer, declared he had lived a very wicked Life, and 
was guilty of the Fact for which he was to suffer : He 
was then executed. 

An Indian of Note, of the Oneida Nation, had with 
some Difficulty been prevail'd upon to attend the Trial, 
from first to last he was respectfully treated, and ap- 
peared highly satisfied with the Justice of the Proceeding, 
which he said should represent to his Brethern. The 
New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1253, Jan- 
uary 8, 1767. 

WANTED by the Subscriber, living in the Township of 
Upper Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, East New- 
Jersey, 

A Person who understands the Business of Fulling and 
Dying Cloth, that can be well recommended, to be em- 
ployed by the Month, Year or on Shares, which may be 
agreed on by the Parties when met; the Fulling-mill, and 
all Implements suitable to carry on the Business, is now 
in good Repair, and has a constant Stream of Water. For 
further Particulars, enquire of RICHARD BROWN, on the 
Premises, or JOHN WEST, at the Old Ferry, Philadelphia. 

Burlington, January 2, 1767 

Now in the Goal of the City and County of Burlington, 
a certain Negroe Man, who calls himself Charles Cornish, 
and can read and write; had on when committed, a black 
Broadcloth Coat, and says he belongs to Richard Keene, 
at Ennall's Ferry, in Dorchester County, Maryland. He 
was advertised in this Paper the 2pth of November last. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2/3 

His Master, if any he has, is desired immediately to come 
and pay Charges, and take -him away, otherwise he will 
be sold out for the same, by me 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living at Cohansy 
Bridge, Cumberland county, West-Jersey, a Negroe man, 
named Glasgow, a well set fellow, about 18 years of age, 
has a scar on his left cheek, speaks good English; had on, 
and took with him, a light-grey homespun coat, very 
large, and lined with striped linsey, a dark brown waist- 
coat, with white metal buttons, and lined with the same 
cloth of his coat, buckskin breeches, mended in the Seat, 
a narrow brimmed felt hat, two pair of grey stockings, 
one pair worsted, and a pair of half worn shoes, with brass 
buckles. Whoever takes up and secures said Negroe, so 
that his Master may have him again shall have Eight- 
Dollars reward, and reasonable charges paid by Stephen 
Reeves, Silver-smith, at the corner of Black-Horse Alley, 
in Second-street, or by 

Alexander Moore. 

N. B. All Masters of vessels are forbid to carry him 
off at their peril. 

Philadelphia, December 10, 1766. 

All Persons indebted to the Estate of Francis Murray, 
late of Gloucester, New- Jersey, Waterman, deceased, in 
Bonds, Notes or Book-Debts, are hereby desired to pay 
such respective Debts, within three Months from the 
above Date, to prevent further trouble: And all those who 
have any just Demands against the said Estate, are like- 
wise hereby desired to bring in their Accounts, dnl\ 
proved to me 

THOMAS PUGH, Executor. 

18 



274 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

N. B. Went adrift, on the 2Oth of October last, a 
Cedar Battoc, her Stem broke off , with an Iron Chain, 
and a piece of Pig-Iron bound round with Iron Strap, 
branded on the Stern and TJiawes WILLIAM HUGG. 
Whoever takes up the said Battoc, and delivers her to 
William Hugg, at Gloucester, shall have a Dollar Reward, 
paid by said WILLIAM HUGG, or THOMAS PUGH. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1985, January 8, 
1767. 

September 4. 
PROPOSALS, 

For printing by SUBSCRIPTION, 
From the Author's Manuscripts, 

A select collection of practical discourses, on a variety of 
important subjects; together with some pieces 

already published 
uy the Reverend and learned 
SAMUEL FINLEY, D. D. 
Late President of the College of New Jersey: 

To which will be prefixed, 
Some account of the Life and Character of the Author. 

CONDITIONS. 
The work shall be printed on a new letter, and a good 

paper, 
and will be contained in two volumes, duodecimo, neatly 

bound and lettered. 

IT. The price to subscribers shall not exceed twelve shil- 
lings New York currency, a set : Six shillings to be 
paid at the time of subscribing, and the remainder on 
the delivery if the books. 

III. Those who subscribe for twelve sets, shall have ONE 
SET gratis. 

IV. It will be sent to the press as soon as a sufficient num- 
ber of subscriptions can be obtained. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2/5 

Subscriptions are taken in by Mr. Samuel Breese, 
Merchant, and Mr. Ebenezer Hagard, at Mr. Garret 
Noel's, next door to the Coffee house, in New York : By 
Mr. Jo<seph Periam, at Princeton, and Mr. William Brad- 
ford, Mr. Thomas Bradford, and Mr. Isaac Snowden, in 
Philadelphia : Of whom printed proposals may be had by 
those who are disposed to forward so useful an under- 
taking. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1257, January 
8, 1767- 

THE Assignees of John West, an insolvent debtor, 
in Elizabeth-Town, once more, desire all persons 
that have any demands upon the estate of the said John 
West, to make them appear to the satisfaction of the As- 
signees, as the law directs, before the loth day of April 
next, as they are determined to make a dividend upon 
that clay; and all who do not prove their accounts, may 
depend upon being excluded having any share in the 
above Insolvent's estate. 

Robert Ogden ) Assi s 
Ehas Dayton ) 
Elizabeth-Town, 
January 7, 1767. 

The New York Mercury, No. 793, January 12, 

1767. 



To be Let and Sold the following Lots of Ground, viz. 

To BE LET. A Farm of two Hundred and thirty-three 
Acres, whereof seventy is Wood-Land, situate in the 
Province of New-Jersey, about 2 Miles from Prince- 
Town; there are on it a good Dwelling-House, Barn and 
Orchard. 

To BE SOLD OR LET. A Dwelling-House and Lot of 
Ground, lying in Prince-Town, opposite the College, very 
convenient for a Tradesman or Shop-Keeper. 



276 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To BE LET FOR A TERM OF YEARS. Ten Lots of 
Land, each Lot containing two Hundred Acres, being in 
the County of Albany, on the East Side of Hudson's- 
River, and about ten Miles from Fort Edward. For 
further Particulars inquire of Mr. Joseph Ogden, at 
Prince-Town; the Rev. Mr. H. Munro, at Philipsburgh, 
or John Jay, in the City of New- York. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1254, January 15, 
1767. 

Gloucester, December i, 1766 

BY Virtue of a Writ to me directed, on the second Day 
of February next, will be exposed to Sale, by publick 
Vendue, between the Hours of Twelve and Five in the 
Afternoon of said Day, on the Premises, a Plantation and 
Tract of about 200 Acres of Land, 40 or 50 whereof 
cleared, and under Fence, about 30 Acres of Tide Marsh, 
a good Orchard, and two convenient Tenements thereon, 
very pleasantly situated on the Northerly Side of Rac- 
coon Creek, in the County aforesaid, about a Mile below 
the Bridge and Town of Swedesborough ; late the Estate 
of John Reynolds, seized and taken in Execution by me 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

LIST of LETTERS remaining in the POST-OFFICE, Phil- 
adelphia. 

B. Abraham Bennit, Cape May; Hugh Boyd, Cape 
May County. J. Philip Jenny, Cohansey. 

L. John Lindon, West-Jersey; Thomas Lackey, Jer- 
sey. 

January 8, 1767. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Nottingham 
Township, Burlington County, an Irish Servant Lad, 
named John M'Cullough, of a fair Complexion, 18 Years 
of Age, about 5 Feet 6 Inches high, with a Scar on his 
Left Eye-brow, and another on his Nose, has lost one of 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 277 

his fore Teeth; had on, when he went away, a Sheeps 
grey Jacket, with a Spot of Tar on the Back, a striped 
under Jacket, Buckskin Breeches, deep blue Stockings, 
and good Shoes, his Hair short, inclining to red. Who- 
ever takes up said Servant, and secures him, so as his 
Master may have him again, shall have Forty Shillings 
Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by 

HUGH NEWELL. 

Whereas a little Boy, named James Newell, about 12 
Years of Age, came into this Country in a Vessel called 
the Rose, from Belfast, and was bred a Sailor; if any 
Person can give said Hugh Newell any Account o>f him, 
he shall be well rewarded for his Trouble; he may be 
wrote to, by directing to the Care of Mr. Josq>h Borden, 
in Bordentown. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1986, 
January 15, 1767. 

NEW- YORK, January 5. 

By capt. Nelson, 1 who arrived here last Monday morn- 
ing from Nevis, 2 in 29 days, we have the pleasure to hear 
there is like to be very good crops in most of the Islands; 
the hurricane and storm not having done the great dam- 
ages to the sugar canes that was at first apprehended. 
Capt. Nelson met with pretty hard weather, especially on 
the 27th ult. when being close up with the Light-house, 
the wind was so violent, that it tore a new mainsail out 
of the bolt-rope, and beat him off, but he happily got in 
the next day. One of our pilot-boats laying off the Hook 
at anchor the same day, was obliged to cut her cables, or 
be forced under water. 

Cumberland County, New-Jersey, December 22. 
ESCAPED from the subscriber, one William Hawkins, 
a prisoner for debt, in said county, he is of about a middle 

1 Horatio Nelson, afterwards Great Britain's greatest Admiral. 

2 Capt. Nelson got his wife here. 



278 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l?-'/ 

age and stature, wears his natural hair, which is dark 
coloured and ties behind, he commonly appears in a good 
habit, and was of late an Inn-keeper in the city of Phila- 
delphia. Any person that will take up said prisoner, and 
bring him to the goal of said county, shall have TWENTY 
DOLLARS reward, paid by 

THEOPHILUS ELMER, Sheriff. 

New-York, January 12. 

On Friday the 2d inst. a sloop, belonging to this place 
loaded with oysters, from Blue-Point, between Plumb 
and Coney island, three miles from shore, about sun-set 
sprung a leak. . . . The people, to save their lives, 
made for the nearest land; but the wind being fresh, at 
N. and a strong Tide of Ebb, it was between twelve and 
one before they could reach it. The weather being severe- 
ly cold, the men were frost-bitten, and half leg deep in 
water in the cabbin, when the vessel struck the shore, 
which she did at last, between the false and true Hook. 
. . . The people with great difficulty got to land, in 
their skiff, and to the Light-house; but the vessel soon 
beat to pieces, end every thing entirely lost. . . . There 
were three men on board, Henry Minck, Master, to whom 
the vessel belonged, John Hancock, and Henry Steel, all 
belonging to this city, who have lost all their effects. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1258, January 15, 1767. 

O be sold, on Monday the 23d 
of Feb. next, at public vendue 
on the premises, or at private sale, a 
farm, containing between 70 and 80 
acres of choice land, situated, lying 
and being, in the county of Bergin, 
about 4 miles from the town of Hack- 
ensack, and 3 miles from the river, 
where there is a good convenient landing place, and on 




T 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 79 

the publick country road, which leads to Ringwood and 
Sterling iron-works; there is on the said plantation a 
new stone dwelling-house, with 4 rooms on a floor, an 
entry through the whole, a kitchen, a milk room, all un- 
der one roof; a four bent barn with a cedar cover, a 
young orchard, two grist-mills and a saw-mill, all in good 
repair, standing about 3 rods from the dwelling-house, 
on the noted stream, called Saddle-river and in the heart 
of a fine country for all sorts of grain; the said mills 
having a continual run of business, and never fails for 
want of water, in the driest season ; the king's road runs 
between the mills and the dwelling-house; it is conve- 
niently situated for a gentleman or merchant, or any sort 
of publick business, a store having been kept there, these 
several years past ; the said farm is well watered and tim- 
bered, with exceeding good swamps, some of which is 
brought to great perfection, being fit for hay, or any sort 
of grain : any person inclining to purchase the same, be- 
fore the clay of sale may apply to Mr. WILLIAM BAYARD, 
in the City of New- York, who will give an indisputable 
title for the same The New York Mercury, No. 794, 
January 19, 1767. 

To be SOLD, 

A handsome well finished Brick House, two Stories 
high, four Rooms on each Floor, besides Garrets, a large 
dry Cellar under the whole House, properly divided; the 
Rooms above and below Stairs are genteelly papered, a 
convenient Kitchen adjoining, with Chambers for Ser- 
vants, situate in King's Street, in Trenton, not far from 
the Falls of Delaware; the Lot contains about Three 
Quarters of an Acre? and extends through to Queen- 
street on which are placed the Stables. Also several five 
Acre Lots of Meadow, Orchard, and Pasture Lands, each 



28O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/6/ 

good of their Kind, near and convenient to the Town; as 
also a good House, and new large framed Barn, with 17 
Acres of excellent Land, 8 Acres of which is Garden, 
Meadow and Orchard; the Remainder good Woodland, 
situate in Trenton, and seems well calculated for a Shop- 
keeper, or Tradesman, &c. The Purchaser may have any 
reasonable Time given him for Payment of the Purchase 
Money, with Interest. 

WILLIAM PIDGEON 

WHEREAS Joseph Pledger, ship- joiner, left the town 
of Salem, West New- Jersey, some time in the month of 
June or July, in the year 1765, and has not been heard of 
since; if the said Pledger be living, and will return, he 
may hear of something greatly to his advantage, by ap- 
plying to the subscriber, living in the said town, 

ROBERT JOHNSON. 

THREE POUNDS Reward 

RUN away from George Spence, living in Northampton 
township, Burlington County, in the Jerseys, a servant 
lad, between 18 and 19 years of age, named Joshua 
Shreave, about 5 feet 8 or 10 inches high, of a fresh com- 
plexion, dark curled hair; had on, when he went away, a 
half worn felt hat, a homespun cloth coloured coat, which 
was turned, a bluish mixed coloured jacket, an ozenbrigs 
shirt, a brown silk handkerchief, a pair of buckskin 
breeches, a pair of blue stockings, a pair of thick shoes, 
with hob nails in them, took with him a gun. Whoever 
takes up and secures said servant lad, so that his master 
may have him again, shall have the above reward, and 
all reasonable charges, paid by the subscribers, 

GEORGE SPENCE or GARRET WINTER 



J76?] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 28 I 

N. B. The said servant lad is this country born, speaks 
good Dutch. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1987, Jan- 
uary 22, 1767. 

New- York, January 22. 

RuN-away on Friday the 26th of last month, from his 
master, the subscriber, an indented Irish servant boy, 
called Isaac Beatie, about 14 years of age, likely, and of 
a fair complexion, with dark coloured hair, about 4 feet 
n, or 5 feet high: had on when he left his master a 
superfine blue cloth coat, much wore, a red flannel waist- 
coat, blue plush breeches, and a large beaver hat. He 
was seen at Newark in the province of New- Jersey about 
a fortnight ago, and is supposed on his way to Philadel- 
phia. Whoever takes up the above described servant and 
brings him to his master at New-York, shall have THREE 
POUNDS reward, or if secured in any of his Majesty's 
goals in the provinces of New- York, Jersey, or Pennsyl- 
vania, notice thereof being sent to his master, FORTY 
SHILLINGS reward, and all reasonable charges paid by 

PHILIP J. LIVINGSTON. 

FORTY SHILLINGS Reward. 

RuN-away from the subscriber between the i8th and 
1 9th of this instant, an apprentice lad, named John Lup- 
ton, by trade a Shoemaker, about 17 years of age, about 
5 feet 3 or 4 inches high, well set, born at Cape May, in 
the Jersies, dark complexion, black eyes, much pitted 
with the small-pox, wears his own dark hair; had on 
and took with him a blue broad cloth coat, newly turned, 
a pair of black knit breeches, a pair of clarret coloured 
ditto, a white dimity jacket, a red flowered plush ditto, a 
callico ditto with large flowers, a check shirt, a felt hat, 
a black silk handkerchief, a pair of milled stockings light 



282 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

coloured. Whoever takes up and secures said appren- 
tice, in any goal, so that his master may have him again, 
shall have the above reward, and all reasonable charges 

paid by me 

ALEXANDER RUTHERFORD. 

N. B. It is imagined he is gone by water, as he took 
with him a sheet, which may serve as a sail. All masters 
of vessels are forbid to carry him off at their peril. The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1259, January 22, 1767. 

Custom-House, New York, Outwards. Shearer for 
Perth-Amboy and Philadelphia. Ellis for ditto. The 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. i, January 26, 1767. 

To BE SOLD 
In the Township of Bedminster, County of Somerset and 

Province of New Jersey; , 

A Lot of Land, lately the Property of Jeremiah Bright, 
containing about 210 Acres, 70 or 80 of which are already 
cleared fit for Tillage, 20 or 30 Acres are improved 
Meadow, and as many more may be made : The Remain- 
der of the Tract is good Timber Land. On the Farm is 
a good Stone House of two Stories, a Barn, and other 
out-Houses, and a bearing Orchard of 150 Apple Trees; 
it is all in good Fence, and a fine lively Stream runs thro' 
the whole: Inquire of John Barberie, Stephen Skinner, 
or John Johnston, at Perth-Amboy, who will give an in- 
disputable Title for the same, with easy Terms of Pay- 
ment, in which good Bonds will be taken. The New 
York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1257, February 
5, 1767- 

%*MR. SMITH'S HISTORY of NEW-JERSEY is 
now ready to be delivered by D. HALL, at the New Print- 
ing Office in Market-street, Philadelphia. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 283 

To BE SOLD 

A Valuable plantation, situate in Greenwich Town- 
ship, Gloucester County, New-Jersey, bounding on Old- 
man's Creek, containing- about 350 acres of land, about 
28 acres thereof excellent dry swamp, about 70 acres of 
marsh, and about 45 acres of cleared land; the wood land 
chiefly well timbered. On the premises is a good dwell- 
ing-house and orchard; it is distant from Philadelphia 
market about 21 miles. For terms of sale, enquire of 
JACOB STILLE, on the premises, or of JOHN STILLE, in 
Philadelphia. 

To be sold by public Vendue, on the 25th Day of March 
next, 

A Saw-mill, and a good new Grist-mill, with two Pair 
of Stones, two Water Wheels, and boults by Water, 10 
Acres of Land thereunto belonging, a good Dwelling- 
house, and a large Stable on the Premises; is situated on 
a very good Stream called Upper Bare Brook, in Windsor 
Township, Middlesex County, New-Jersey; is handy to 
both Philadelphia and New-York Markets. Also a Tract 
of Land, containing 174 Acres, joining the Mills, with a 
new Dwelling-house, a good Log Kitchen, a large Barn, 
a good large young Orchard, containing near 200 Apple 
Trees, and 20 or 30 Acres of Meadow may be made. 
Likewise another Tract of Land, containing upwards of 
300 Acres, with a Cedar Log-house, and a young Or- 
chard, about 10 Acres of Meadow cleared fit fo>r the 
Scythe, and 100 more may be made; it lies in Notting- 
ham Township, Burlington County, and Province afore- 
said. The Vendue to begin at 10 o'Clock at said Mills. 
Tlic Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1989, February 5, 1767. 

New- York, January 29 
Tuesday .evening the ship Thomas and Waddel, capt. 



284 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Castles came into this harbour from Bristol : She had 
lain within the hook ever since Saturday last, but the 
bad weather prevented her getting up sooner. The Penn- 
sylvania Journal, No. 1261, February 5, 1767. 

TO BE SOLD, OR LET, 

A Plantation, in Greenwich 

Township, in the County of Gloucester, and Province of 
West New- Jersey, situate on both Sides of the great Road 
leading from Philadelphia to Salem, within sixteen Miles 
of said City, in a healthy pleasant Part of the Country, 
and adapted as well for a Farmer to raise Produce for 
supplying the Philadelphia Market weekly, as for a Store, 
being in a Neighbourhood where a Store-Keeper would 
meet with Encouragement; containing 100 Acres of 
Land, about 75 Acres cleared, including about 20 Acres 
of Meadow and a good Orchard, consisting of very large 
Trees of the best Fruit, early and late; the Timber chiefly 
young but thriving; the whole Tract finely watered by 
constant Streams; with a handsome wellfmished new 
vStone House, two Stories high, two Rooms below, three 
on the second Floor, two good ceiled Garrets and a dry 
Cellar under the whole House; a convenient Stone 
Kitchen adjoining, with a Chamber over it; a Well of 
excellent Water by the Kitchen Door; two Gardens 
neatly pailed, one on each Side the House; the front and 
back Yards also pailed; a small Barn, Stables, &c. Any 
person inclining to purchase, may have it on easy Terms 
of Payment. For Particulars, apply to James Biddle, 
Esq; in Front Street, near the London Coffee House, to 
Mr. John Hart, Merchant in Southwark, or to the Sub- 
scriber living on the Premises. 

WILLIAM SCULL. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 28$ 

Philadelphia, February 7, 1767. 
LIST of IRISH LETTERS remaining in the POST-OFFICE, 

PHILADELPHIA. 

F. James Forster, Cohansey. The Pennsylvania 
Chronicle, No. 3, February 9, 1767. 

PUBLICK Notice is hereby given, to all the Creditors 
of Abraham Clarke, Tertius, late of Elizabeth- 
Town, insolvent, that they be and appear at the House 
of Barnaby Shute, Tavern-keeper, in Elizabeth-Town, on 
Thursday the second of April next, in order to examine, 
ascertain, and settle, all the Debts due to the said Cred- 
itors, from said Insolvent, with the Assignees, who will 
then attend for that Purpose. Likewise Notice is hereby 
given, to the abovesaid Creditors, That they may be and 
appear at said House of Barnaby Shute, on Tuesday the 
5th Day of May next, at 12 o' Clock of said Day, in order 
that a Dividend may be made to said Creditors, of all the 
Money in the Hands of the Assignees, who will likewise 
give their Attendance. RECOMPENCE STANBURY, and 
NOAH MARSH, Assignees. The New York Mercury, 
No. 797, February 9, 1767. 

New-York, February 12. Mr. Baldwin's Vindication 
of himself, as Steward of the College at Prince Tozm, 
New-Jersey, with an Affidavit relating thereto, against 
the Representation of Piiblicola, lately published in this 
Paper, came to Hand too- late for this Week, but will be 
inserted in our next. The New York Journal or General 
Advertiser, No. 1258, February 12, 1767. 

To be SOLD, 

A VALUABLE Lot or Tract of unimproved Land, situate 
in the County of Sussex, New-Jersey, about 3 Miles from 



286 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Andover Furnace, bounded as follows. Beginning at a 
White Oak, in Briarley's Line, marked G. G. being Rich- 
ard Green's Corner; thence S. W. 46 Chains to a Stone, 
for a Corner in Briarley's Line; thence 46 Chains S. E. 
along the Line that crosses the Tract, to a Stone for a 
Corner; thence N. E. 46 Chains, to a Spanish Oak, it 
being a Corner of the whole Tract, whereof this was a 
Part; and thence N. W. 46 Chains, to the first mentioned 
Corner; containing upwards of 200 Acres. The Soil is 
good, Meadow Ground plenty, and the Timber, of which 
there is great Plenty, must be very valuable, being so 
nigh to a Furnace. The Title is indisputable. For Terms 
apply to Mr. Jonathan Furman, at Amwell, Josq^h Reed, 
junior, Esq; at Trenton, or Moore Furman, Merchant at 
Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia, February 7, 1767. 

To be Sold, pursuant to the last Will and Testament of 
Samuel Hopper, deceased, at public Vendue, to the high- 
est Bidder, on the 3Oth Day of March next, on the Prem- 
ises, a Tract of Land, pleasantly situated near the Mouth 
of Raccoon Creek, in Greenwich Township, Gloucester 
County, West New- Jersey, containing 133 Acres, with 
a new Frame Dwelling house, having two* Rooms on a 
Floor, a Kitchen, and other Out buildings and a good 
Orchard; the Fields well fenced, and the Woodland 
chiefly well timbered, being about a Mile from a good 
Landing on Raccoon Creek. Also a Lot of good drained 
Meadow, free for ever from maintaining Bank or Sluice, 
lying about one Mile distant from said Plantation, near 
Delaware. Likewise 25 Acres of Cedar Swamp, about a 
Mile and an Half from said Plantation; the whole con- 
taining 163 Acres. The Sale to begin at Ten o'Clock. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 287 

Where due Attendance will be given, and the Conditions 

made known, by 

JAMES HINCHMAN, Executor. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1990, February 
12, 1767. 

NOTICE is hereby given to the Creditors of William 
Stevenson, of South-Amboy, an insolvent Debtor, 
to meet us the Assignees, at the House of James Morgan, 
Inn-keeper, in South-Amboy, on the first Day of April 
next, in order to prove their Accounts, to enable the 
Assignees to make a Dividend ; and likewise to meet the 
Assignees on the first Day of May next, to> receive their 
Dividend of the said Insolvent's Estate, at the House 
above mentioned. 

SAMUEL ELLISON, ) A . 
JOHN PORTER, ( Assignees. 

South-Amboy. 
Feb. 9, 1767. 

The New York Mercury, No. 798, February 16, 
1767. 

Prince-Town, (New-Jersey) February 3, 1767. 
Mr. HOLT 

Regard to truth, and my own character, 
induces me to offer to the public a few 
strictures on a piece signed Publicola, 

Ae published in your paper of January the 
$ 8th; by an unlucky mistake, the packet 
^ for this town, did not arrive at its usual 
time, so that it was but a few days ago, 
I was able to procure a sight of your pa- 
per : This I hope will sufficiently excuse 
my silence hitherto. 

I am sensible, Sir, that accusations are generally heard 



288 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

with pleasure, especially if introduced with specious pro- 
fessions of public spirit, and if those which this friend and 
neighbour of mine, has published to the world are be- 
lieved, they may be of no small prejudice to the institu- 
tion, with which, at present I happen to be connected. I 
therefore sincerely wish, that he had applied to me for a 
solution of his doubts (if he had any) before he had 
alarmed the public with his reflections, on facts with 
which he appears to be so little acquainted. In this letter 
of his, he insinuates, that I am not constantly provided 
wtth cash to purchase every necessary; and therefore I 
am obliged to pay extravagant prices for what I purchase 
from the country people, on whom I depend for a supply 
of provisions. 

As to the first of these, I would observe, that to a man 
so well acquainted with the wants of READY MONEY, or 
so imbarrassed with its consequences as myself, to be 
always furnished with it, would be indeed a very desirable 
circumstance; but if this has not been the case, it has been 
owing, either to those parents who encourage the institu- 
tion by educating their sons here; (to many of whom it 
is to be ascribed, that we have not been better supplied 
with that commodity) or, to those gentlemen, who direct 
the government of the college; who hitherto permitted 
students to reside here without advancing quarterly the 
price of their board, or depositing security for the whole. 
Suffice it to observe, in my own vindication, that the out 
standing debts, due from former members, are consider- 
ably diminished, and the debts from the college, conse- 
quently, much lighter than in times past. Notwithstand- 
ing the poorness of our pay, I always have paid READY 
CASH for most of the smaller articles we consume; and 
therefore, purchase them at as low rates as if it was my 
practice to buy every thing in this manner. I have always 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 289 

maintained my credit, so that (whatever this author has 
been pleased to insinuate) I do not find any of the neigh- 
bouring traders or farmers, but who are as willing to deal 
with me as I desire : All these facts I am ready to prove 
to the satisfaction of Public ola, or any other gentleman, 
equally suspicious, whenever he, or they, are pleased to 
favour me with a visit. 

He further insinuates, that I am engaged in such a vari- 
ety of businesses, as is inconsistent with the duties of my 
office. To refute this, it is not necessary to trouble the 
public with a minute detail of the branches of business, 
in which I have been, or now am engaged, I would only 
observe, that I never have been, neither am I now, en- 
gaged in any business, distinct from my office as steward 
of the college, which engrosses any considerable share of 
my attention, but what is o<f such a nature, that I can 
easily make it appear to the satisfaction of any impartial 
man of judgment, that it is calculated to forward, rather 
than impede the public interest; that I am able thereby 
to discharge my office to more advantage, than I could 
otherwise do, if I was to employ my whole time in it. 
Neither is the oeconomy of our kitchen greatly neglected, 
nor are unfaithful servants suffered to exercise their vari- 
ous methods of ivasting and destroying, as this friend of 
mine (with what evidence is best known to himself) has 
been pleased roundly to> assert to the world. I am not 
afraid to submit this affair to the strictest examination, 
of any, who thro' concern for the public good, or for other 
reasons, may have the like suspicions about it. I omit 
no methods to prevent waste, that appears to me practi- 
cable. If Publicola will inform of any more likely to an- 
swer that end, than those I have tried, and am trying,, he 
shall have my sincerest thanks. But he is willing to be- 
lieve 1 am very easily imposed upon from my natural tem- 

19 



2QO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

per and disposition. If he is willing to believe this; I 
know not how to convince him, nor the world to the con- 
trary, any other wise than by applying to fact. My ac- 
counts have often been examined by the board of trustees 
(which is composed of gentlemen well known to the world 
for their capacity and integrity, and many of them well 
acquainted with business in its various branches) and as 
often approved; nor have my bargains ever been cen- 
sured as injudicious, or discovering any symptoms of 
what liableness to imposition, which Publicola is willing 
the world should believe is so remarkable in me. 

I am sensible, what I have been saying, has too much 
the disagreeable air of boasting, but I hope the necessity 
I am under to vindicate my own character, so cruelly 
attacked in this base unmannerly way, by an author under 
a feigned name, will sufficiently apologize for a piece of 
conduct to which I am conscious I have no Inclination. 
But this author attempts to support his conjectures by a 
particular fact. The representation he has given of it, is 
founded on an absolute mistake, I will not call it a mali- 
cious falshood; tho' the affair was sufficiently examined 
in the time of it, and a report spread abroad concerning 
it, refuted, to the satisfaction of all, who had any thing 
to do with it, on any account whatever. 

The fact, as supported by the annexed affidavit, is this, 
the butcher I lately employed, was applied to for the de- 
cision of a bowl of punch, which had been laid about the 
weight of eight sheep, which he had just killed for the 
use of the college; when (agreeable to a practice he had 
too long indulged, by his own account) he wrote on a 
small piece of paper, eight sheep weight 400 Ib. when in 
fact, he had charged them only 369 Ib. One of the per- 
sons concerned in the wager, went over to the college, 
and was allowed by the servants to weigh the mutton, and 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2QI 

upon his reporting the weight to be much less, than the 
aforesaid 400, it was weighed again in the presence of 
himself, and Job Stockton, Esq; of this Place. From 
weighing the meat, which remained, (for part of it was 
consumed) and comparing every circumstance, no prob- 
ability of a fraud appeared at that time : Hence I think 
it is sufficiently evident, that Public ola is either too easily 
imposed upon himself, or is wilfully attempting to impose 
upon the world; he may choose which part of the alterna- 
tive he pleases. I will not compare the credit, which an 
account so well attested as this, deserves, with that, which 
ought to be given to an idle report, whose author is un- 
known, but would conclude with observing, that tho' I 
have been employed ten years in buying and providing for 
the college, this is the first instance, in which I have been 
charged with this surprising facility, in being imposed 
upon in my bargains. 

JONATHAN BALDWIN. 



New-Jersey ) BE it remembered, that on the 

cc 

Somerset County. ) twenty third day of January, 

A. Dom. 1767, Job Stockton, Esq; personally appeared 
before me Robert Stockton, Esq; one of his Majesty's 
justices of the peace for Somerset County; and being 
duly sworn, declared, that being told of a dispute having 
arisen about the weight of some mutton, which had been 
delivered for the use o>f the college at Princeton; and being 
desired to be present whilst it was weighed over again, he 
accordingly examined the butcher's charge, and attended 
with others whilst the meat was re-weighed ; that expect- 
ing to hear no more of the matter, he did not charge his 
memory with the particular weight, but well remembers 
that from examining all circumstances, and making prop- 



2Q2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

er allowance for the loss of weight by drying, there ap- 
peared no fraud in the butcher. 

Sworn before me JOB STOCKTON 

ROBERT STOCKTON. 

New -Jersey, Monmouth County, February 7, 1767. 

WHEREAS by virtue of a Warrant in his Majesty's 
Name; to me directed, I did this Day arrest a certain 
Henry Killigrove, on suspicion of Felony, and also did 
take said Killigrove. at the suit of Robert and Esek Harts 
home, in an Action of Debt and Damage for Six Pounds, 
Proc. 

And whereas said Killigrove was rescued from me, in 
a violent and riotous Manner, by Thomas Kirk, and 
Thomas More, (alias IVilkies Tom) all belonging to the 
Liberty and Cluster Pilot Boats. Therefore any Person 
who apprehends the said Henry Killigrove, Thomas Kirk, 
and Thomas More, and them delivers to me at Middle- 
town, in the County aforesaid, for any Two of them, the 
Sum of Eight Pounds, or for any one of them the Sum of 
Five Pounds, Money aforesaid. Witness my Hand. 

SAFETY BOWNE 
One of the Constables for said Township. 

To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS there has been a Grammar School kept at 
Hackensack this Year past; in which the learned Lan- 
guages are taught with Accuracy and Care, and Youth 
qualified to enter any of the American Colleges : And as 
several Gentlemen of New-York, and other Places, have 
hitherto entrusted me with the Education of their Sons; 
and as I hope my Instructions will afford general Satisfac- 
tion, I intend to continue the School at the Place afore- 
said; and also to supply myself with an able Assistant^ 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 293 

in order to encourage all such Gentlemen as are disposed 
to favour the Undertaking of me the Subscriber. 

A constant and faithful Attendance shall be given; the 
best Method of Instruction attended to; good Discipline 
exercised, and nothing neglected that will be advanta- 
geous to the Youth, either as to their Morals or Educa- 
tion. 

The Place is well situated and very healthy; the Neigh- 
bourhood very commodious for accommodating Lodgers; 
and particular Care will be taken to provide all Things 
necessary and comfortable for them. The Expence of 
Boarding and Tuition, will be as cheap as can be desired. 

All Persons inclining to send their Sons, may depend 
upon having Justice done them, by the Public's 

Most humble, and most obliged Servant, 

STEPHANUS VOORHEES. 

N. B. Every Gentleman of Education shall be welcome 
to examine the Youths, and inspect the Method of In- 
struction. 

New-Jersey, Middlesex-County, Feb. 7, 1767. 
To be sold, the following plantations and a lot of land; 
the one lying in Matchaponix, containing about 100 acres 
of good wheat land, about 40 or 50 acres cleared, the rest 
good timber land, a fine young orchard of the best sort of 
grafted fruit trees; about 5 acres of meadow fit for the 
sithe, and as much more may be cleared, very commodi- 
ous for a tanner and shoe-maker, having a living spring, 
whereby the water is conveyed into 8 or 9 tan vats, with 
a good house, shop, barn, stables, bark house and bark 
mill, all well finished and covered with cedar: The lot 
of land lying in the city of New-Brunswick, facing to the 
English meeting-house, 60 feet in front and 100 in rear; 
the other plantation lying on George's road, about 2 or 3 



2Q4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

miles from Cranbury town, near to Capt. John Wether- 
ills, containing 400 acres, about 200 acres of cleared land. 
Good wheat and corn land, a considerable quantity of 
meadow land well cleared, and much more may be cleared, 
of the best kind of swamp; two fine bearing orchards, a 
complete house and kitchen, a fine large Dutch barn and 
stables completely finished. Any person inclining to pur- 
chase either of the aforesaid farms or lot, may apply to 
the subscriber living on the premises on George's road, 
will agree on reasonable terms and give an indisputable 
title for either of the above mentioned premises. 

N. B. Both the above plantations are in exceeding 
good fence. 

DANIEL FERINE. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation belonging to the Estate of the late Mr. 
HENRY DUMONT, deceased, lying on Rariton, near the 
public Road from Brunswick to Philadelphia; adjoining 
a Place now the Property of Mr. JOHN STAATS, on the 
one Side, and to Mr. JACOB VAN DUVEER'S, on the other; 
containing in all 288 Acres of very excellent Land, 100 
Acres of which is cleared, the Remainder well wooded, 
and the whole well watered, all in good Fence, with a 
young growing Orchard; also 14 Acres of extraordinary 
fresh Meadow, lying on Rariton River, nearly opposite 
Mr. DIRCK VAN VEGHTEN'S : Any Person inclining to 
purchase the same, may hear of further Particulars by ap- 
plying to PETER DUMONT, at the North Branch of Rari- 
ton, or to JOHANNIS ALLSTINE, in New- York; Executors 
to said Estate, who will give an indisputable Title for the 
same. The Nczv York Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1259, February 19, 1767. 

New-York, February 19. A Stable at Woodbridge 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 295 

with a Quantity of Hay, a Chair, &c. were on Monday 
last set on Fire by a Candle, and consumed. Supplement 
Extraordinary to the New York Journal or General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1259, February 19, 1767. 

To be SOLD, 

A PLANTATION in Gloucester County, West-Jersey, 
adjoining Raccoon Creek, about a Mile above the Bridge, 
on Salem Road, containing above 150 Acres of Land, 
about 30 of which tillable and under good Fence; also 
about 7 Acres of mowable Meadow, and about as much 
more may be made; all exceeding good, and ever free 
from Banking; the Remainder Woodland, and great 
Part well timbered. There is on the Place, a square Log 
House and Kitchen, with a good Stone Chimney in each, 
a good Spring within three or four Perches of the Door; 
about 40 bearing Apple Trees of good Fruit; and a val- 
uable Stone Quarry. Any Person inclining to purchase, 
may know the Terms, by applying to JAMES ELLISON, on 
the Premises. 

N. B. The Title is clear and indisputable. And said 
Ellison proposes also to sell several Lots of rough Land, 
containing one, two or three Acres a Piece, adjoining 
Salem Road, about a Mile to the Northward of the 
Bridge aforesaid, very suitable for public Business. 

To the PRINTERS. 

Tho' I believe the Character of ELIZABETH MORRIS, 
inserted in the last Gazette, to be just, yet I think the fol- 
lowing Particulars (perhaps unknown to the Essayist of 
that Account) are worth preserving. . . . 

"She was born at Elizabeth Town, in New-Jersey; 
married to ANTHONY MORRIS in 1700; lived with him 
above Twenty Years, and survived him above Forty-six 



296 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Years; and her Conduct, in every Station cf Life, was 
truly honourable. Her Husband was a noted Preacher 
among Friends; one of the first Settlers, and held con- 
siderable Offices in the Government of this City and Prov- 
ince; and some of his Descendants (by preceding Wives) 
of the Fifth Generation, followed the Corpse of his Wid- 
ow to the Place of Interment 

A. B." 1 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation, on Great Timber Creek, it is now rented 
to Thomas Done, containing 200 acres, near 100 of which 
is wood land, and the rest is cleared, 22 of which is good 
meadow, and the rest is good for rye or Indian corn ; there 
is a dwelling-house, milk-house, smoke-house, and a well 
of good water at the door; there is a large barn, stable 
and corn cribs, with a young bearing orchard, the fruit 
makes good cyder; it is about 8 miles and a half from 
William Cooper's Ferry, so that it is convenient for those 
that have a mind to tend our market. The purchaser, 
paying one third of the purchase money down, may have 
time to pay the rest, giving security, if required, and pay-- 
ing interest. The place may be entered on the 25th of 
next month. For further particulars, enquire of DANIEL 
COOPER or CHARLES WEST. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 1991, February 19, 1767. 

TO BE SOLD, 

By public vendue, at the London Coffee House, in Phila- 
delphia, on Wednesday the 25th of March, at 1 1 o'clock 
in the forenoon. 
A FORGE, on Monolopan river, commonly called South 

river, not above four miles from the landing on said river. 

1 Probably Anthony Benezet. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 297 

where boats go to New- York, and is the nearest but one 
to a landing, of any forge in the provinces of New York 
or New-Jersey, so that all the land carriage is but four 
miles; the forge has three fires, and is capable to make 
1 20 tons of barr-iron per annum; with as good a stream 
as most any in the country. On the premises are also one 
GRIST MILL, of one pair of stones, in the heart o>f a coun- 
try where they can purchase sufficiency of wheat and other 
grain to grind; and a very good SAW-MILL, lying near 
the post road, about eight miles eastward of Cranbury. 
On part of the premises are 100 acres of land, which, by 
being properly ditched, can be made as good meadow 
ground as any in the government of New- Jersey; and 
whatever lands are wanting for the use of the iron works, 
can be easily obtained from the proprietors of Jersey, who 
have lands contiguous or adjoining the premises. The 
only reason for disposing of the works, is, that the owners 
Hive at some distance and cannot well attend the overlook- 
ing the works. Pigs may be had at New- York at the 
market price, and will not cost above 6 or 75. per ton for 
transportation, till within four miles of the works; or if 
the purchasers should be inclinable to turn the works into 
.a blomary, oar of a good quality is at hand in great quan- 
tities, and to be had on very reasonable terms. There is 
a sufficient quantity of coals on hand to make 40 or 50 
tons of barr-iron, and 1000 cord of wood ready cut to 
carry on the coaling business in the spring. 

Any person inclinable to purchase the premises before 
the day of sale, can apply to John Wilday, merchant, at 
Philadelphia; Derick Brinckerholf and Co. at New- York; 
David Williamson, at the Fresh Ponds; or to Robert 
Smylee on the premises, who will agree an very reason- 
able terms. 

N. B. If money cannot be paid down, bonds with good 



298 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

personal security will be taken. Teams of oxen, carriages,, 
and other utensils, will be sold at first cost. The Pennysl- 
yania Journal, No. 1263, February 19, 1767. 

Mr. GODDARD. 

UPON reading the History of Nezv-Jersey, lately pub- 
lished, I observed in the Summary of the first Laws made 
in the Eastern Division of that Province, one very singu- 
lar Article, 'That Fornication should be punished at the 
"Discretion of the Court, by Marriage, Fine or Corporal 
"Punishment.'' I called this singular, but upon Recolec- 
tion, I have been told, that there was a Law of the same 
Import in the early Times of Pennsylvania. Whether 
Records of the Proceedings of any Court, under either of 
those Laws, are now to be found, I do not know ; but fear 
if they are. that the worthy Judges who presided, may 
have omitted entering the Reasons on which they founded 
their discretionary Judgment. If Minutes properly en- 
tered and kept of this Kind, could be exhibited to the 
Public, I fancy they would be esteemed as great Curiosi- 
ties in the Literary Way, as any Thing found in Hercu- 

laneum. 

A. B. 1 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 5, February 23,. 
1767. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation very well improved, containing 312 acres 
of good land, deem' d to be some of the' best in the parts, 
well watered, timbered and fenced; lying at a place called 
Squancom, in the township of Shrewsbury, and the county 
of Monmouth, New- Jersey; the up lands afford good 
pasturage, as well as grain of all sorts peculiar to the 
clime; the meadows abound with grass of all the kinds 

1 This was evidently not Anthony Benezet. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 299 

for fodder, and in season may be cut thereon enough to 
winter o-ne hundred head of cattle, whilst more may be 
improved to the same advantage; (to this may be added 
the benefit of thousands of acres of land, and meadows 
for summer range, which it is likely will not be improved 
in one century. ) On it is a saw mill with two saws, seated 
on one of the best and most plentiful streams in the prov- 
ince, which never fails in the greatest drought, to which 
may be easily added, a grist or fulling mill, or both, as 
there is plenty of water, in a growing part of the country, 
which increases its inhabitants; lands daily rising in 
value, and huntsman's toil paid with the best of venison, 
wild turkies and other game. It is conveniently seated 
for a shop-keeper, as there is none within 10 miles to sup- 
ply a thick settled and growing part of the country. On 
the same is two tenements, besides a mill house for the 
sawyer, a good large barn, a bearing young orchard yield- 
ing 50 barrels of cyder from the best of grafted fruit, 
with a variety o<f other fruit trees. For further particulars 
enquire of Doctor Richard Stillwell in Middletown, or 
Obediah Worthley, living on the premises, by whom a 
good and indisputable title will be given or made to any 
purchaser. 

OBDTAH WORTHLEY 
Shrewsbury, Feb. i, 1767. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1260, February 26, 1767. 

BASSETERRE, in St. Christophers, Jan. 28. 
The Schooner Union, Jonathan Mason, commander, 
arrived at St. Eustatius on Monday last, from Monte 
Christi, bound for Salem, who meeting with a hard gale 
of wind on the coast the 2Qth ult. received so much dam- 
age as obliged him to make for the first port. He was 
then in lat. 42, 21, N. long. 28, 25 W. 



3OO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

NEW- YORK, February 19. 

^Ye hear from Woodbridge, that last Monday evening 
a chair-house and chair, with a stable, and a good quan- 
tity of hay, were destroyed by fire, by the inadvertence of 
a boy's going into the stable with a candle. The Penn- 
sylvania Journal, No. 1264, February 26, 1767. 

New-York, February 26. 

Last Tuesday se'ennight, a Tanner's Bark-House at 
Lyons Farms, in Elizabeth-Town, having made a small 
Fire made in it to warm the People at Work, in the Even- 
ing the Master put it out himself, as he thought, with 
Snow, but when he got up in the Morning, he found the 
Bark-House, with a good Quantity of Bark, and upwards 
of 30 Hides in it, all reduced to Ashes, and neither he nor 
any of his Neighbours saw or heard any Thing of the 
Fire. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 6, March 2, 
1767. 

Mr. GAINE, 

A Number of the Practitioners of Physic and Surgery 
in East-Jersey having form'd themselves into a So- 
ciety, for their mutual Improvement in their Profession, 
and other good Purposes; and as their Meetings may 
occasion some speculation among the Inhabitants where 
they reside, they have thought proper to insert in your 
Paper the Laws and Constitutions by which their Society 
is governed, as well to obviate any Misrepresentations 
which may arise from Prejudice or Mistake, as to con- 
vince their Employers that their Scheme is design'd to 
be of Pnblick Utility. 

NARRATIVE of the RISE and ESTABLISHMENT of the 
NEW JERSEY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

THE low State of Medicine in New Jersej 7 , and the many Diffi- 
culties and Discouragements, alike injurious to the People and 
the Physician, under which it has laboured, and which still continue to 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3OI 

oppose its Improvement in Utility to the Public, and its Advancement to 
its native Dignity, having for several Years passed engrossed the Atten- 
tion of some Gentlemen of the Profession, aud occasionally been the Sub- 
ject of their Conversation, it was earlv last Winter, determ ned to at- 
tempt some Measure for rescuing the Art from that abject Condition 
(not to say worse) into which it seemed t >o fast to decline. 

To this End a Legislative Interposition appeared in the first Place 
greatly to be desired; and an Application for that Favour was proposed; 
but in this it was necessai-y to have the Concurrence of the principal 
Practitioners, and as many other Persons of Weight and Influence as 
possible; a voluntary Association therefore of such Gentlemen of the Fac- 
ulty, as might approve <>f the Design, was next projected; a Society of 
this Kind, it was thought, besides considering of a proper Application to 
the Legislature, aud promoting it most effectually, could in the mean 
Time take such Measures as were of immediate Importance, and from 
such voluntary Regulations, as would greatly conduce to the Usefulness 
and Honour of Medicine, and should the Legislature in their wisdom 
think it not expedient to interfere, might in a great Degree answer the 
Purposes of a more authoritative Establishment; not to mention that 
whether under a Law, or otherwise, a Medical Society well conducted, 
would naturally derive 1 Credit on the Profession, and ever be of the high- 
est Advantage, both to the Public, and to the several Members. With 
these go >d Views the annexed Alvertisement was inserted in the 
Mercury. 8 

N. B. The next General Meeting of the Society is to 
be held at Perth Amboy, the first Tuesday in May next. 

Whereas Peter Schenck, Assignee to the Estates of 
Benjamin Beears, John Boultinghouse, David 
Griffis, Nicholas Vandervoort, Thomas Potter, Micajah 
Ketcham, Robert White, Daniel Tilton, Thomas Will- 
iams, John Davison, Samuel Lay ton, Sen. James Kelly, 
Mathias Van Home, Humphrey Mount, Mathew Rob- 
erts, James Vanhoyse, Corbitt Smith, Mathew Anderson,. 
Samuel Romine and Joseph Harbour, insolvent Debtors; 
and 1 homas Thompson and Isaac Covenhoven Assignees, 
to the Estate of John Shepherd insolvent Debtor; and 
John Vancleaff Assignee to the Estate of John Hunt, in- 
solvent Debtor; and John Vancleaff and James Wilson, 
Assignees to the Estate of John Astin, insolvent Debtor: 

1 Confer. 

2 See Wickes's History of Medicine in New Jersey, and of its Medical. 
Men, for advertisement and Association and Constitution, page 44. 



3O2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

having respectively disposed of said Estates and collected 
the out-standing Debts, as far as may be; pursuant to a 
late Act of Assembly, made for the Relief of insolvent 
Debtors : Now these are to give Notice, to the Creditors 
of said Debtors, That they or their Attornies meet to- 
gether, at the House of Peter Schenck, Inn-keeper, in 
Freehold, on the third Tuesday of April next, then and 
there to receive the first Dividend of said Estates; and 
to consult on Measures to be taken pursuant to said Act. 

PETER SCHENCK, 
THOMAS THOMPSON, 
ISAAC COVEN HOVEN, 

Freehold, Monmouth County, JOHN VANCLEAFF, 
East-Jersey, March 2, 1767. JAMES WILLSON. 

WHEREAS a Law was passed, by the Governor, Coun- 
cil, and General Assembly, of the Province of 
New-Jersey, in the Year of our Lord 1763, to appoint 
Commissioners to make a division, and sub-division, of 
the Common Land belonging to the Township and Pre- 
cinct of Bergen; accordingly Commissioners were ap- 
pointed, and they the said Commissioners laid out or 
allotted a certain Piece or Parcel of Wood Land and 
Meadow belonging to the said Common Lands of Bergen. 
and allotted the same to the Patent of Seecaucus, and to 
be sub-divided by them to such of the Freeholders as they 
should adjudge intitled to the same; but the aforesaid 
Commissioners have left the same undivided : These are 
therefore to give Notice to all Persons interested in said 
Patent of Seecaukus, that a Petition will be presented by 
the Freeholders of the aforesaid Patent, to the Governor, 
Council, and General Assembly, at their next sitting, pray- 
ing that a Law may be passed, and Commissioners ap- 
pointed to sub divide the aforesaid Land, among such of 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 303 

the Freeholders as they shall adjudge to have the best 
Right thereto. 

Seecaukus, March 2, 1767. 

To be sold at publick Vendue, 

ON the first Day of April next, or at private sale any 
time before, the noted forge or iron works, called, 
Beeman's Forge, in the county of Morris, in New- Jersey, 
situate upon the main stream of Rocaway river: said 
forge has two fires, and water at all seasons plenty; there 
is good oar, within three miles of the forge. Also to be 
sold at same time, a good new grist-mill, and saw-mill, 
adjoining the above forge. Also a very good new house, 
with four rooms upon a floor, with a fire place in each, a 
good orchard &c. A good New Barn, also one hundred 
and twenty acres of exceeding good meadow Land, about 
forty acres of it cleared, and fit for the schythe. The above 
premises are all together, and within a Quarter of 'a mile 
of Rocaway meeting-house, the situation very convenient 
for any publick Business, as the Hibernia furnace is with- 
in four miles; the said forge may with ease be made :i 
refinery. 

DAVID BEEMAN 

The New York Mercury, No. 800, March 2, 1767. 

To BE SOLD, by the SUBSCRIBER, 

A Good Plantation containing 350 Acres of Land, sit- 
uate in Perquanock, in Morris County, East New-Jersey, 
by Rockaway-River, in a public Road, about 4 Miles be- 
low Hibernia Furnace; (where there is a good Market 
for all Country Produce) well situated for a Tavern, and 
Store, with about 100 Acres of Plough Land cleared, and 
more may be cleared, with a good Log-House, Stone and 
Lime Stone provided for a Stone House, a fram'd Barn 



304 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

and Barracks, a Tan- Yard; and also a young bearing- 
Orchard, and about Twenty-five Acres of cleared 
Meadow, which affords between 45 and 50 Loads of Hay 
in a Year, and as much more may be made, all in good 
Fence, the whole well timbered and watered : Any Per- 
son inclining to Buy, may apply to the Subscriber on the 
Premises. 

ADAM MILLER. 

N. B. There is also, about Twenty-five Acres of Wheat 
and Rye in the Ground, may be purchased with the Prem- 
ises; and also a sufficient Quantity of Shingles and 
Boards to build a House, and also Twelve Head of Cat- 
tle. 

To BE SOLD, 

At public vendue, at the house of Johannes Dedrix, 
Tavern-keeper, in the town-ship of Bergen, at 2 o'clock 
in the afternoon, on the 2ist day of April next. 

Two lots of 22 acres each; situate in the said town- 
ship: the one exceeding good wood-land, within one 
mile of Weehock landing, the other fine meadow ground, 
and joining Capt. Brown's ferry, on the Hackinsock 
creek. Any person inclining to purchase the same, at 
private sale, before the 2ist of April, may apply to John 
Debow, in Stone-street, New- York, who will agree on 
reasonable terms, and give an indisputable title. 

JOHN DEBOW 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1261, March 5, 1767. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that there is a plantation to be 
sold, lying and being in Maidenhead, 1 on the post road, 
three miles from Trenton, in West-Jersey, containing 120 
acres of land, 20 acres whereof is good meadow, lying on 



Now Lawrenceville. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 305 

Shabicunk Creek, 70 acres of cleared land, 30 acres of 
wood land, well timbered, having thereon a good dwell- 
ing-house, barn and stable, with a good orchard, and a 
good well at the door; this plantation is well watered, and 
lies very pleasantly on the aforesaid road, and might be 
a pleasant seat for a gentleman. Whoever inclines to pur- 
chase the said estate, may treat with the owner, on the 
said place. 

JOHN EVERAT. 

ARRIVALS 

At Barbadoes. Morgan from Salem. 
At Antigua. Captain Provost from Perth- Amboy. 
At Jamaica. Captain Williams from Salem. 
At South Carolina. Archer from Salem. 

To be SOLD or LETT, 

A PLANTATION, situate in Waterford township, Glou- 
cester County, and province of New-Jersey, adjoining the 
river Delaware, five miles from Philadelphia, containing 
140 acres of land, about 8 acres of meadow, and 16 more 
may be made, a good bearing orchard, a stone d^velling- 
house and kitchen, a ivell of water at the door, a frame 
raised for a barn, and a log stable. Any person inclining 
to purchase the above plantation, may- have time given 
for payment of the money, zvith giving security, and pay- 
ing interest; and whoever inclines to rent or purchase, 
may apply to JACOB BURROUGHS, HENRY WOODROW, or 
DAVIS BASSETT, in Philadelphia, and know the terms. 

WHEREAS John Worloiv, of Gloucester County, has 
obtained of William Wattson, Flatman, a bond of Fifteen 
Pounds, and a note of Three Pounds One Shilling, for i 
fiat: This is to forewarn all persons not to take an as- 
signment on either bond or note, as I will pay neither of 
them. WILLIAM WATTSON. 



306 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

The Subscriber hereof forewarns all Persons whatso- 
ever, from taking an Assignment of a Bond, bearing Date 
the first Day of August, in the Year of our Lord, 1753, 
in the Penalty of Sixty Pounds Money of West- Jersey, 
conditioned to pay the Sum o>f Thirty Pounds; which 
Bond was given by him to JAMES JAGARD, of the County 
of Gloucester, in New-Jersey, he being determined not 
to pay the same, unless compelled by Law. 

WILLIAM LENARD. 



To be SOLD by the Subscriber, living on Timber Creek, 
Gloucester Township, Gloucester County, 100 Acres of 
very good Land, or more, very well timbered, and extra- 
ordinary well watered, one Mile and a Half from a very 
good Landing, a Mile from a good Grist and Saw-mill. 
The Land joins Jacob Matlock's, and is the Property of 
JOHN HUNSINGER, living near the Place. Any Person 
inclining to purchase, for further Particulars, may en- 
quire of said JOHN HUNSINGER, near Captain JOHN 
HIDER'S, on Timber Creek. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 1993, March 5, 1767. 

To be LETT, 
In ELIZABETH-TOWN, 

THE House and Lot in Possession of JOHN GILL, 
Esq; remarkable for the Pleasantness of its Situa- 
tion. The House and Lot adjoining Mr. GILL'S, in Pos- 
session of WILLIAM GREY, and the Pasture Lot in Pos- 
session of Mr. THOMAS. For further Particulars enquire 
of Mr. SAMUEL WOODRUFF, jun. in Elizabeth-Town, or 
Mr. WILLIAM KELLY, in New-York, who has for Sale, a 
Parcel of Fine FRENCH INDIGO. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 37 

To be SOLD at publick Vendue, on Wednesday the 8th of 
April, or at private sale any time before; 

THE noted farm at Springfield, near Elizabeth-Town, 
whereon David Ball now lives : It contains about 
160 acres, great part of which is excellent meadow; 
There is a good house, barn and orchard, on the prem- 
ises, with as good a saw-mill as any in America, that sel- 
dom or ever wants water; and as the said farm has been 
advertised several times before, a farther description at 
present is thought needless. Whoever inclines to pur- 
chase the same at private sale, may agree on reasonable 
terms, by applying to Doctor Jonathan Dayton, or 
Thomas Ball. The Neiv York Mercury, No. 801, March 
9, 1767. 



Nezv-Yorkj March 12. (5^"" Publicola's Reply to Mr. 
Baldwin's Piece came to Hand too late for this Week's 
Paper, and as the Writer mentions his having wrote in 
haste, if he will let the Printer know how to direct a Let- 
ter that may get to his Hand, a Passage would be pointed 
out to him, that it is supposed he would choose to alter 
before it goes to the Press. 

To be sold by the subscriber, on reasonable Terms. 

A Plantation, lying on the great Road from Bound- 
Brook to Baskin-Ridge, and about 2 Miles from Bound- 
Brook, containing, besides the usual Allowance for high 
Ways, 103 Acres of Land, whereon is a good Logg- 
House, a living Spring at the Door, and about 30 Acres 
of cleared Land : Whoever inclines to purchase the said 
Place, may apply to CORNELIUS BOGART, on Rariton, in 
the Township of Bridgewater; who will give an indis- 
putable Title for the same. 



308 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

To be Sold at public vendue, on Tuesday the 3ist in- 
stant, March, (or at any time before at private sale) a 
valuable farm, containing about 320 acres of land, situ- 
ate in the Township of Amwell, in the county o<f Hun- 
terdon, West-New-Jersey, about 200 acres thereof 
cleared, and in good fence, the remainder well timbered; 
it is good kind land for wheat, a sufficient quantity of 
meadow cleared, and in clover, timothy and spear grass, 
and more might be made, great part of which might read- 
ily be watered with little expence, on said premises is 
pleasantly situated a good brick house, genteely finished, 
two stories high, 48 feet long, and 33 feet wide, cellars 
under the whole, four rooms on a floor, a fire place in 
each, with a large entry, and the same above, a good brick 
kitchen and store room adjoining, with a well of constant 
good water by the door; a new brick shop, a few rods 
from the house, with a counting-room, cellar, &c. a large 
frame barn, covered with cedar shingles, barracks, cow- 
house, &c. mostly new, and in good repair; several good 
bearing orchards, consisting of a large collection of the 
best grafted fruit; a stone grist mill laid in lime and sand, 
50 feet long, and 40 feet wide, with two pair of stones, in 
good order, boults, hoists, &c. by water; it stands on the 
south-branch of Rari ton-River, a never failing- stream of 
water, in the centre of a beautiful wheat country, where 
any quantity might be bought reasonably; it is 25 miles 
from Trenton, and the same distance from Brunswick, 
12 miles from Delaware River, which is navigable great 
part of the year to Philadelphia, it being conveniently 
situated for New- York or Philadelphia markets, and a 
good place for trade, there having been a store kept for a 
number of years past; there is near the mill several con- 
venient buildings for a miller, cooper, &c. The mill will 
be sold separate from the farm, if required, with a suffi- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 39 

ciency of meadow, pasture, timber land, &c. to accommo- 
date it, as might suit the purchaser. At the same time 
will be sold with the above farm, a lot of wood land, con- 
taining between 60 and 70 acres, well timbered, about 3 
quarters of a mile distant, with good level ground for a 
road to the same. 

It is expected the purchaser will pay one-third of the 
purchase money on the executing of the deed, one-third 
a year after, and the remaining third at two years, or 
might have any reasonable time to make the two last pay- 
ments, paying interest, and giving security if required. 
If it should suit the purchaser, they can have the stock 
on the farm at a very reasonable price, consisting of 
horses, cattle, sheep, hogs, and all sorts of farmer's uten- 
sils, &c. also about 60 acres of green wheat and rye in the 
ground. An indisputable title will be given for the prem- 
ises, by me. 

GEORGE READING 

To BE SOLD 

A Plantation within the Bounds of Middletown, in East 
New-Jersey, containing two or three Hundred Acres, 
more or less, as may best suit the Purchaser, lying within 
one Mile and a half of Middletown Point, within 2 Mile 
of a Grist-Mill, and half a Mile of a Saw-Mill; also about 
two Miles from Singerora-Bay, where is great plenty ot 
Fish, Oysters, and Clams; there is on the Land, a good 
Dwelling-House and Orchard, about sixty Acres of Up- 
land and Meadow cleared, all in good Fence; on the 
Wood-Land is good Timber for sawing, together with 
fencing Timber, and Cord Wood : The Tract is bounded 
Southerly and Northerly by two clear Brooks, and West- 
erly by Lands of James Kearny: Whoever inclines to 
purchase may apply to said JAMES KEARNEY, near the 
Premises, who will give an indisputable Title for the same. 



310 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [176? 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1262, March 12, 1767. 

STOLEN out of the stable of PHILIP ANTHONY, in Leb- 
anon, near the Old Union Furnace, in the Jerseys, on the 
1 6th of January last, a strawberry roan horse, with a 
blaze in his face, branded P A on the near thigh, betwixt 
4 and 5 years old, 14 hands high, a natural pacer, and 
paces very fast. Whoever takes up said horse, and brings 
him to the owner, shall have Four Dollars reward; and 
if horse and thief Three Pounds, and reasonable charges, 
paid by PHILIP ANTHONY 

PHELADELPHLV, March 12. We are informed, by one 
of our Pilots from Cape May, that last Monday se'nnight, 
a Brig from Sea got into the Road, but a very hard North- 
Wester coming on, it was imagined she parted her Cables, 
as the next Morning, she was seen lying to, under Cape 
May, and afterwards drove away to the Southward. 

On the Fourth Instant, at Xight, Peter Dalbo, and an- 
other Man, in a Wood Flat, with an antient Woman, of 
the Name of Kerr, as Passenger, set off for Philadelphia 
from Raccoon Creek: but the Wind blowing very hard, 
they put back again into the Creek, when the Stern of 
the Vessel touching the Ground, she swang round, filled 
and sunk; by which Dalbo and the Woman were 
drowned; but the other Man was saved by sticking to 
the Shrouds, till some People came to his Assistance. The 
Woman was found in the Cabbin; the Man on the Shore, 
near the Vessel. 

The same Night, we hear, two Negroe Men, who had 
been to Mill at Brandywine, in an open Boat, attempting 
to get home again, were blown out of Christine Creek, 
and drove over to the Jersey Side, near Kearney's Land- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. $11 

ing, where they were both drowned, and their Bodies 
found on the Shore. 

To be SOLD, by way of public vendue, on Wednesday, 
the first day of April, a Plantation, containing 1 1 1 acres 
and a half of land, 50 acres of clear plow land; a new 
house, partly finished, 41 feet front, 25 feet deep, a cellar 
under the whole; there are five fire-places, three rooms 
below, and three above, an entry through the house, a 
kitchen 15 feet square, a barn 20 feet front, and 30 feet 
deep, a good stone well, garden and young orchard. 
There has been a tavern kept there these 7 years; it lies 
in Maidenhead, one mile and a half from Trenton, on the 
post road leading from Philadelphia to New- York. The 
plantation to be paid for in three yearly payments, though 
the buyer may have longer time, on paying Interest, and 
giving good security. There will likewise* be sold two 
horses, beds and bedding, many other kinds of houshold 
furniture, and farming utensils, and the winter crop in 
the ground. If the plantation is not sold, it will be lett on 
the aforesaid day, when due attendance will be given, by 

JAMES HANKINSON, and KENNETH HANKINSON. 

Just published, in one Volume Octavo, and to be sold 
by D. HALL, at the New Printing-office, in Market-street, 
Philadelphia. Price, bound in Calf I2s. 6d. in Sheep I2s. 

THE HISTORY of the COLONY of NOVA CESA- 
REA. or XEW-JERSEY. Containing, An Account of 
its FIRST SETTLEMENT; progressive IMPROVEMENTS; 
the Original and Present CONSTITUTION, and other 
EVENTS to the Year 1721. With some Particulars since, 
and, A short View of its PRESENT STATE. 
By SAMUEL SMITH. 



312 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

To BE SOLD, 

ABOUT 500 acres of. land, known by the name of the 
COLD SPRING LAND, situate in the township of Oxford, 
in the county of Sussex, 1 New-Jersey, about two miles 
from Delaware, and three or four from Oxford furnace, 
in the neighbourhood of several other iron- works and 
mills, and in a country, of late years, very much improved ; 
adjoins land formerly surveyed to Samuel Atkinson, 
Joseph Hull, John Reading and others. There is a log 
dwelling-house, and other buildings, on the said land, a 
considerable part of it cleared, and in fence, some meadow 
made, and more may be added. The tract is part of a 
survey made to Thomas Boulby, in the year 1729, and 
part of the estate of Paul Watkins, of Burlington, some 
years since deceased, for the use of whose heirs in Eng- 
land it is directed to be sold. For terms of sale, or infor- 
mation respecting the title, please to apply to the sub- 
scribers, in the city of Burlington, or if inclined to view 
the lines, to JAMES HAYES, living on Scott's Mountain, 
near the premises. 

JOHN HOSKINS, DANIEL SMITH, junior. 

WHEREAS MARY HARRIS, the wife of John Harris, in 
Burlington, hath eloped from her said husband; these 
are to forewarn all persons from trusting her on my ac- 
count, as I will pay no debts of her contracting from the 
date hereof. 

JOHN HARRIS. 

To BE SOLD, 

A VALUABLE plantation, containing 340 acres of land, 
situate on the river Delaware, in Gloucester county, in 
the province of West New-Jersey, within 20 miles of 

iNow in Warren County. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 ! 3 

Philadelphia, and directly opposite to Marcus Hook, hav- 
ing thereon a good dwelling-house, barn, stables, out- 
houses, and a good orchard, 125 acres cleared, and mostly 
under good fence, 75 acres of which is marsh meadow, 
in good order, well ditched and drained, and 45 acres 
more (already within bank) may easily be made, the up- 
land may be manured with mud from the marsh, with 
great ease. 

Four acres of good cedar swamp, well covered with 
timber, situate about 3 miles from the above described 
tract. 

One third part of Oldman's Creek Island, containing 
149 acres. 

Three two story brick houses (each 14 feet front) sit- 
uate in Philadelphia, on the south side of Vine-street, be- 
tween Front and Second-streets. Any person inclining 
to purchase, may know the terms of sale, by applying to 
WILLIAM BROWN, living on the first above described 
premises, or to WHITEHEAD JONES, at the upper end of 
Market-street, in Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania Ga- 
zette, No. 1994, March 12, 1/67. 

AMERICANUS, 

*This little Nagg who always was a willing titt, is the 
identical little animal that ran in consort with George 
Grenville's STAMP-ACT against the noted old steed 
LIBERTY, who was rode by the famous WILL PITT 

TO BE SOLD, 

By the subscriber, now living on the premises, A PLAN- 
TATION, containing 200 acres of land, it is accommodated 
with a genteel brick dwelling house, 40 by 48 feet, two 
story high, four rooms on a floor, with a large handsome 
stair case and entry, with cellars under the whole building, 



3H NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

and a court yard on each front of the house, one fronting 
down the river Delaware to the ferry, thro 5 a large hand- 
some avenue of English cherry trees, the other fronting 
up the river to Trenton, with a large brick kitchen 30 by 
20 feet, two story high, with a well in it, and four hand- 
some appartments above for servants, also a good barn 
40 by 38 feet, with a plank floor and stables for ten horses ; 
also a good stone smoak-house, chaise house, poultry- 
house and all other useful buildings, to accommodate the 
same with a fine piece of meadow that yearly produces 
from 20 to 25 loads of good clover and timothy hay, with 
an orchard of about 350 bearing apple trees of good fruit, 
there is also a fine collection of other fruits, viz. peaches, 
damsens, cherrys, quinces, English walnuts, grapes, ras- 
berrys, &c. and a handsome large garden well boarded in. 
The above premises lying in the county of Burlington, 
West-New-Jersey, and pleasantly situated on the river 
Delaware at the head of the navigation, and opposite the 
falls thereof between Trenton and the ferry; there is a 
great variety of fish that may be caught in the river by 
trolling and angleing, and plenty of duck and other water 
fowl in the fall and winter season. The whole premises 
are in good fence and repair. Also one handsome brick 
house, lately the property of Robert Rutherford, and 
allowed the best stand for a tavern or a gentleman in any 
part of Trenton, the house is two storys high, four rooms 
on a floor, and cellers under the whole house, with a large 
kitchen, wash-house, and a well of good water, four hand- 
some rooms above, two large stables that will hold from 
20 to 25 horses, a good coach house, a handsome large 
lot and garden well fenced in, by a brick wall at the front, 
and large folding gates to enter the yard, the stair way 
and three of the rooms of the house are handsomely 
papered, the whole in good order. Also one other house 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3*5 

in Trenton, two storys high, three rooms on a floor, and 
a good cellar, with a large garden of near half an acre of 
ground well fenced in and fronting King's street, and at 
the rear of the lot Queen-street. Also one other hand- 
some house near Trenton mills in Kingsbury in the town- 
ship of Nottingham and county of Burlington, one story 
and an half high, four rooms on the lower floor, and two 
on the upper floor, with two other rooms for servants, 
and a cellar under the whole house, a good well, a large 
garden welt boarded in, a barn, stable, chaise-house, 
poultry-house, all in good repair and painted in the best 
manner. Any person inclining to purchase the whole or 
any one part o<f the premises, by paying the one third of 
the purchase money down, may have any reasonable time 
for the payment of the remainder, with interest. For fur- 
ther particulars inquire of the subscriber 

R. L. HOOPER. 

N. B. The gentleman that purchases the plantation 
may be supplied with three negro men and a wench that 
understands all manner of farming and was born and bred 
in the family, cattle horses, a four wheeled chaise, furni- 
ture, farming utensils, twenty acres of wheat, six acres of 
rye and may enter on any part of the premises in three 
weeks after agreement. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1266, March 12, 



SIR, 

EVERY Person whose heart is warmed with a love of 
his country, cannot fail of being sensibly concerned at any 
measure which he may conceive to be injurious, in it? 
consequences, to the common weal ; and where a heart so 
disposed, should have apprehensions that are ill-founded, 
it cannot be construed evilly if that person should declare 
his opinion publicly, in such manner that his reasonings 

i Also in the New York Mercury, No. 805, April 6, 1767. 



3l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

may be fairly canvassed, and, if formed on false prin- 
ciples, or not fairly deduced, that they may be obviated, 
and his mind truly informed; therefore I hope the fol- 
lowing- dissertation on the inexpediency of laying- any 
additional incumbrance on the trade of the New-England- 
men, will not be offensive to any who may dissent from 
me in opinion; .... 

. . . . New England (it is well known) is a country 
unfavourable to the culture of wheat, and that bar iron, 
such as is ductile, is not to be had there. These are two 
grand staples of Pennsylvania, New- Jersey, the three 
Lower Counties on Delaware, and part of Maryland and 
Virginia, the working of which affords employment for 
a great part of their inhabitants. If it was not for those 
two articles, we should be driven to some other business, 
such as would be the most favourable to us; so it is with 
New-England; their fishery being bountifully provided 
for them all along their coast, invites them out to reap 

the benefit of it 

The principal inducement for those people to resort 
here to trade, hath been to supply themselves with flour 
and iron, and not to dispose of their fish or other com- 
modities; a worse market for them can hardly be found, 
as there is but few cities so populous as this, where less 
salt fish is consumed thank God we are better provided 
for. But as flour and iron is not peculiar to Pennsylva- 
nia, for the neighbouring governments of Delaware, New- 
Jersey, Maryland and Virginia, participate of them with 
us, we should be exceeding jealous of their vicinity, and 
cautious not to drive, by ill-placed imposts, any foreign- 
ers there, who supply themselves at this market. 1 .... 

[Signed] MERCATOR. 

1 The article is two columns in length. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 1 / 

To the PRINTER of the PENNSYLVANIA CHRONICLE, &c. 
IT would certainly afford a Field for Speculation, and 
probably be applied to some valuable Purposes, if an exact 
Account of the Number of Places of Worship, of all So- 
cieties, on this Continent, could be obtained. I have long 
wished for it, but found so many Difficulties in the Way, 
that I despaired of accomplishing it, until upon reading 
the History of New-Jersey, I observed the Author had 
fallen upon a Method, which, as far as relates to that Col- 
ony, is fully sufficient for the above Purpose. It would 
give me, and, I dare say, many others, Pleasure, if some 
Gentleman in each of the other Provinces, would take 
the Pains to furnish either their own Printers, or the 
Printer of this CHRONICLE, with an accurate List of the 
respective Worship Houses in his own Province, and 
then the whole may be easily collected together. In the 
above History, the Numbers of such Houses, in each 
County, are particularly reckoned, and the whole for that 
Province stands thus; Presbyterians forty-six; Quakers 
Thirty-eight; Episcopalians Twenty-one; Dutch-Calvin- 
is ts Twenty-one; Baptists Nineteen; Dutch Lutherans 
Seven; Seventh-day Baptists Two; Moravian One. 

EUSEBIUS. 

A Fire Engine, with a Suc- 
tion Pipe, made by NUTTALL, of LONDON, that will 
discharge 170 Gallons in a Minute, the Distance O'f 50 
Yards, and may be worked either by the Suction Pipe, 
when near a River or Pond, or by the Cistern in the usual 
Way; lately imported, and TO BE SOLD, on no other Ac- 
count, than its being too large for the Use of Burlington, 
but would suit Philadelphia, or any other populous Place. 
For Terms apply to DANIEL ELLIS, Esquire, RICHARD 
WELLS, or WILLIAM DILLWYN, in Burlington. 

N. B. They would take a smaller one in Exchange, if 



3l8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

nearly new, and in good Order. Proposals, either to pur- 
chase or exchange, will be duly answered. 

To BE SOLD, 

One Moiety or half Part of 

three thousand two hundred Acres of salt Marsh, situate 
in Cumberland County, West N civ- Jersey, bounded by 
Delaware Bay on the West, by the Dividing Creek on the 
East, and on the North by Great Oyster Creek; on which 
is a valuable Beach of white Sand, such as is used for 
House Floors, which zvill be let at a low Rent, if not sold 
with the marsh. 

A Lot of Ground to be let on a Lease forever, 16 Feet 
Front on Penn-street, extending 70 Feet East to a new 
Street to be laid out, with the Privilege of a 7 Foot Alley 
the whole Length of the Lot, that may be built over. For 
Title and Terms apply to ROBERT TOWERS, in Philadel- 
phia. 

Three Pounds Reward. 

Run away from his Bail on Sunday the Fifteenth Day 
of February last, a certain Anthony Born, alias Bourns, 
a Taylor by Trade, about five feet six or seven Inches 
high, fair Complexion, brown Hair, which he commonly 
ties with a Ribband; his Cloaths are uncertain, but are 
believed to be chiefly blue, has been a Soldier in the Royal 
Scots, and has a Discharge with him, is a thick well-set 
Fellow. Whoever secures the said Anthony Born, and 
brings him to his Bail in Salem, in West New-Jersey, 
shall have the above Reward, and reasonable Charges 
paid by us, SAMUEL DICK, 

JACOB HOLLINSHEAD, 
SAMUEL THOMPSON. 
Salem. March 2, 1767. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 8, March 16. 
1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3*9 

To be sold at publick Vendue, 

ON Wednesday the 8th Day of April next, a very 
convenient Dwelling-House, with a compleat Full- 
ing-Mill, in good Order, and well furnished with all neces- 
sary Tools, with a Saw-Mill, that wants repairing, and a 
very convenient Place for a Grist-Mill, it being an extra- 
ordinary Stream, on the main Branch of Raway-River, 
in the Province of New-Jersey: The Lands belonging 
to the said Premises, is 9 Acres, 7 of which is excellent 
Meadow-ground, the whole adjoining the Country Road 
leading to Newark and Elizabeth-Town, and distant from 
each of them only seven Miles, it being a delightful and 
healthy Part of the Country, within half a Mile of 'a 
Meeting-House and the Town of Springfield. More Land 
may be bought adjoining the Premises, if wanted. A 
reasonable Time of Payment will be given, if the Money 
be secured, by 

JOHN RANGE. 

The New York Mercury, No. 802, March 16, 
1767. 

To be sold by the subscriber on the Premises, at Ten 
o'Clock on Monday the 2Oth of April next, 

At PUBLIC VENDUE 

Or at PRIVATE SALE, any Time before: 
A Very valuable Plantation, situate in Freehold, in the 
County of Monrnouth, East New- Jersey, containing about 
One Hundred and TAventy or Thirty Acres of Land, on 
which is a large convenient House, Stable, Shed, Barn, 
and other out-Houses, fit for a Tavern. One having been 
kept there many Years in constant and full Business, be- 
ing an extraordinary good Place for that Purpose, on the 
public Road from Burlington to Shrewsbury: About 
80 Acres of the Land are cleared and in good Fence, 30 



320 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Acres whereof are good English Meadow, and more may 
be made; it is well water'd, and has on it an extraordi- 
nary Spa Spring, which vents a considerable Quantity of 
Water, and has been found very beneficial in many dif- 
ferent Disorders : A Brook which works a Saw-Mill not 
far distant, runs thro' the Land passing near the House, 
and waters each Field with a running Stream : There is 
a good Out-let to common Lands for Cattle, so that large 
Stocks may be raised with little Trouble. At the same 
Time and Place will be sold, a Variety of farming Uten- 
sils, Houshold Goods, and Furniture; such as Beds, Bed- 
ding, and Abundance of very valuable Goods, which it 
would be tedious to mention, together with a large Num- 
ber of Cattle and Horses. And, 

ALSO 

A Lot of Land in Prince-Town, near the College, on 
which is a large Dwelling House very well finished, fine 
lodging Rooms, an Entry thro' it, a Stone Cellar under 
the whole, a Kitchen adjoining, a Stone Well of excellent 
Water at the Door, all very good. Any Person inclining 
to purchase either of the above Places, or any of the Par- 
ticulars mention'd, by applying to me, on the Plantation 
first mention'd, in Freehold, may know the Conditions. 

CHARLES LUCAS 

N. B. The Vendue to begin at Ten o'Clock, and con- 
tinue from Day to Day, till all are sold. The Nezv York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1263, March 19, 1767. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER 

A VALUABLE grist mill, with two pair of stones, and 
three boulting cloths, and a turning lathe, hoisting all by 
water, with a good two story dwelling house, 4 rooms on 
a floor, a cellar under the whole, with two kitchens, and 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 321 

a well of good water at the door; a good barn, stables, 
store-house, and smoak-house, with a good landing, and 
store-house at the same, sufficient to contain 300 barrels 
of flour, where a shallop may load at the door, that can 
carry 200 barrels of flour; also a small dwelling-house 
for the miller, and spring-house, and cooper's shop, with 
about 100 acres of land, one half of the same meadow, 
and the remainder fit for the plough, and in fence, it is 
pleasantly situated on the great road that leads from 
Trenton to Crosswicks and Allen-town, and on the road 
that leads from Princetown to the above landing, on a 
constant stream cf water, the whole in good repair, and 
in a public place for the business of keeping store, where 
there may be plenty of wheat had, it being two miles from 
Crosswicks, 6 from Trenton, 12 from Princetown, 6 from 
Allentown, and 3 from Bordentown. Any person inclin- 
ing to purchase the same, may apply to JOSEPH SCHOLEY, 
living near the said premises, or to the subscriber, living 
at Sharp's iron-works, in Sussex County, New-Jersey. 

ABIA BROWN. 

N. B. There is a good young bearing apple orchard 
on the premises. The title is indisputable. The Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 1995, March 19, 1767. 

Monday last arrived here the brig Patty, capt. Long 
from Barbados, on the nth inst. about 30 miles to the 
southward of our Capes he fell in \\ ith the brig Philadel- 
phia Packet, capt. Harrison, from Charles-Town, South 
Carolina, for this port, who, in the night of the 3d inst. 
parted his cables near the Cross Ledge in our Bay, and 
was forced to put to sea ; and has not as yet got in. Capt. 
Long spared him an anchor and cable. The Pennsylva- 
nia Journal, No. 1267, March 19, 1767. 



322 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

New- York, March 26. 

On Saturday se'nnight, in the morning, Henry Moore, 
Esq; of Cranbury, supposed to have fallen from his horse, 
was found speechless, and soon after expired. 

We hear from Burlington, that on Tuesday last the 
New Road from thence to William Cooper's Ferry, oppo- 
site this City, was measured by the Surveyor General, and 
Mile-Stones, at the expence of a few Subscribers, erected 
thereon, the Distance being 17 Miles from Burlington 
Court-House to the East End of Cooper's Lane. The 
Stones are numbered from i to 17, and wrote at length, 



MILES 

TO 

BUff- 
LIN6JON 



We should be glad to see Mile-Stones on every public 
Road through the two Provinces, the Expence of which 
would be very trifling to the Inhabitants, being only about 
173. per Stone. 

[The Example in this Province was set by the Direc- 
tors of the Fire Insurance Office of this City, who gen- 
erously paid for and affixed 29 Stones on the York Road 
from Philadelphia to Trenton Ferry, and 20 Stones on 
the Road leading from this City to Maryland and Vir- 
ginia, which sufficiently informs the Traveller of the sev- 
eral Distances within this Province, on those Sides of it.] 
The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 10, March 30, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 2 3 

To BE RUN FOR 

AT the Fair at Perth-Amboy, on Friday the First Day 
of May next, a PURSE of TWENTY POUNDS, Proclamation 
Money: free for any Horse, Mare, or Gelding, not full 
Blood, of Five Years old or under, carrying Weight for 
Age, to be enter'd the Monday before the Race, with 
Thomas Skinner, or James Reed, paying THREE DOL- 
LARS Entrance, or Double at the Day of Running: To 
Run Three Heats, Two Miles to each Heat, any Horse 
winning Two Heats, to be entitled to the PURSE. The 
Entrance Money, will be Run for the Day following, the 
winning Horse and those distanced, excepted. The same 
Day a Saddle and Whip, will be Run for by any common 
Horses. All Disputes arising to be determined by 
Judges appointed for that Purpose; no less than Four 
Running Horses, will be allowed to Start for the Purse. 

Pcrth-Amboy, March 18, 1767. 

To be sold at Vendue, on Monday the first Day of June 
next, at the House hereafter mentioned, or by private 
Sale at the same place, any Time before, 

A LOT containing two Acres and a Quarter of Land. 
situate by the Grist-Mill, lately belonging to Mrs. Van 
Kirk, now to John Craigue, in Freehold, Monmouth 
County, East-New-Jersey; with a new House, on the 
said Lot, Twenty-eight Feet wide, and Thirty long, Four 
Rooms on the lower Floor, with Three Fire-Places, a 
good large Kitchen, and Stone Cellar, together with a 
Stable and Garden. 

It being a very public Place, is convenient for a Store, 
(one having been kept there for some Years past) or for 
any Tradesman whatever. 

Also, to be sold at the same Time and Place, Two Lots 
of Land situate on Middletown Point : Anv Person ir 



324 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

dining- to Purchase the said Places, or either of then;, 
may know the Terms by applying to either of the Sub- 
scribers. JOHN ANDERSON, 

JOHN HENDERSON, 
March 23, 1767. AARON MATTISON. 

Newark Mountains, Essex-County, New- Jersey, March 

26, 1767. 

WHEREAS MARY BROOKS, Wife of the Subscriber, hath 
eloped from him : All Persons are hereby strictly forbid 
to entertain or trust her on his Account, as he will pay 
no Debt of her contracting since her Elopement. 

PETER BROOKS. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Very valuable PLANTATION, situate in the Township 
of Upper-Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, and 
Province of East- New- Jersey; containing 262 Acres and 
a half, of exceeding good Land, either for Grass, Wheat, 
or any other Grain ; about 200 Acres of which is cleared, 
and about 20 Acres of Meadow, and more may be made; 
with two Houses, a Barn, and an Orchard : Said Planta- 
tion lies very convenient to an Out-let, where Cattle may 
be turned out, and shift for themselves by the first of 
April, and some Seasons sooner: This Plantation is al- 
lowed to be as good as any Lands in the County of Mon- 
mouth, lying between the Plantations of JOSEPH HOLMES, 
and JOHN COWARD, deceased, the Title indisputable. Any 
Person who inclines to Purchase, may know the Terms 
by applying to the Owner and Subscriber near the Prem- 
ises. JOHN LAWRENCE. 
The Nezv York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1264, March 26, 1767. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 32$ 

To BE SOLD, OR LET, 

THE House and Ferry on Bergen Point, together with 
three House Lots, on the Kill Van Coll. Any Person 
inclining to purchase, may apply to any of the Subscrib- 
ers, 

JACOB VAN HORNE, 
GEORGE CODMES, 
ABRAHAM VANTILE 

At Bergen 
JOHN MERSEREAU 
RICHARD LAWRENCE, 

Staten Island. 

Supplement Extraordinary to the New York Jour- 
nal or General Advertiser, No. 1264, March 26, 
1767. 

WHEREAS Isaac Andrews, Biddle Reves, Thomas Wil- 
son, and others, intend to present a Petition to the House 
of General Assembly, of the Province of New Jersey, at 
their next Sitting, for a Law to oblige the Owners and 
Possessors of the Meadow and Swamp, lying on Ram- 
boe's Run. in the County of Gloucester, to contribute their 
proportionable Share in repairing and maintaining the 
Dam, Banks, &c. so that it may be kept dry; this there- 
fore is to desire all Persons who have any Objections 
thereto, that they appear at the said General Assembly, 
then and there to produce their Reasons for such Objec- 
tions. 

To be SOLD, 

A VALUABLE PLANTATION and Tract of Land, pleas- 
antly situated on the River Delaware, in the Township of 
Chester, Burlington County, West New- Jersey, about 10 
Miles from Philadelphia by Land, and 8 by Water, about 
five Miles from Quaker's Meeting, and seven to an Eng- 



326 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

lish Church; the said Plantation contains about 250 
Acres of Land, about 50 Acres thereof good Meadow 
Ground, about 20 Acres cleared, and under good Grass, 
Part of which Meadow lieth on a small Tide Creek on 
one Side the said Plantation, well secured by a good 
Dam and Floodgates, established by an Act of Assembly; 
the other Part of the said Meadow lieth fronting the said 
River Delaware; about 80 Acres of cleared Land, divided 
into convenient Fields, with good Fence, the Remainder 
Wood-land; there is on the said Premises a good new 
framed Dwelling-house two Stories high, 30 by 20 feet 
Square, a good Cellar under the whole, with a good 
Kitchen, and sundry Out-houses, a Well of good Water 
near the Door, a small Orchard of Apple Trees, and sun- 
dry other Fruit Trees ; also another good Dwelling-house 
on the back Part of the said Land, one Story high, two 
Rooms on a Floor, with two good Fire Places. The Title 
is indisputable. For Terms of Sale enquire of the Sub- 
scriber, living on the Premises, where they may be fully 
informed, by 

ISAAC ROGERS. 

To be SOLD, a PLANTATION, containing 262 and a half 
acres of exceeding good land, about 200 acres cleared, 
and 20 of extraordinary good meadow ; upon which there 
are two dwelling-houses, a good barn, and orchard; sit- 
uated in the township of Upper Freehold, in the county 
of Monmouth, East Jersey; lately belonging to the es- 
tate of Thomas Smith, deceased. The title indisputable. 
To know the terms, enquire of the owner, near the prem- 
ises. 

JOHN LAWRENCE, Surveyor. 

New-Jersey, ss. Trenton, March 15, 1767. 

To be sold, at public Vendue, on Monday, the 2Oth of 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 2 7 

April next, at 2 o'Clock in the Afternoon, at the House 
of John Throckmorton, Tavern-keeper in Amwell, or at 
private Sale any Time before, the following Houses, and 
Plantations, late the Estate of William Mullen, deceased, 
viz. one Plantation, situate in Amwell, Hunterdon Coun- 
ty, containing 172 Acres, adjoining the Lands of Barnet 
Bellows, Henry Woolever, William Dawliss, and the 
King's Highway, on which is a House, Barn and good 
Orchard, late in the Tenure of Jonathan Reid; one small 
Tenement, and two Acres of Land, fronting the Road 
will suit a Tradesman, also in Amwell. Likewise one 
other large House, Store-house, Smoke-house and 
Stables, with about 60 Acres of Land, on which is a good 
bearing Orchard, and some good Meadow, now in Pos- 
session of Mr. Joseph Reid, Merchant; it will suit a 
Trader, as it has long been a well accustomed Place. The 
Tavern House, with about 10 Acres of Up-land, and 5 
Acres of Meadow, and large Stone Stable, now in the 
Possession of John Throckmorton, fronting the Road 
leading to the Union Iron Works, and adjoining the last 
mentioned Place. And 219 Acres of Wood Land besides 
Allowance for Highways, situate in the County of Sus- 
sex, near Paulin's Kiln, adjoining Land laid out for the 
London Company. 1 Also one other Tract, situate near the 
last mentioned Tract, containing 55 Acres, besides Allow- 
ance for Ways, chiefly Bottom, fit to make Meadow, ad- 
joining the London Company's Land. And one other 
Tract, containing 160 Acres, besides Allowance for Ways, 
adjoining Lands laid out for Henry Kitchen, near Paul- 
in's Kiln aforesaid. Any Person inclining to purchase any 
of the above described Lands before the Day of Sale, may 
apply to the Subscriber, sole Executor of the last Will 
and Testament of William Mullen, deceased, who will 



iA number of English investors, principally of London, who took 
over most of the iron mines in Northern New Jersey, about 1765. 



328 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

agree on reasonable Terms, as one Half the Purchase 
Money may remain on Interest for several Years. At- 
tendance will be given, and the Conditions made known, 
on the Day of Sale, by 

SAMUEL TUCKER, Executor. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1996, March 26, 
1767. 

Perth Amboy March 26. 
TO BE SOLD 

By the executors of the late Andrew Johnston, Esq; 
deceased, 

A Large new brick house two stories high, situated on 
the highest and pleasantest spot in Perth- Amboy, on the 
lot of about seven acres of good land, on which there is 
a large garden with a good collection of fruit trees, and 
a fine young orchard of best grafted apples : The house 
consists of four large rooms on a floor, the upper one and 
garrets not finished. 

A small lot near to the above mentioned, 22 feet front 
and 100 feet back, both on High street. 

A small pasture lot of near two acres, a little out of 
town. 

A lott of good woodland of about 80 acres, about two 
miles from Sprowles's ferry, and joins to the stage road. 

A lot of near 400 acres lying at Matcheponix, adjoin- 
ing the farm late Andrew Johnston's, is capable of being 
made a fine farm, the wood on it will readily sell to the 
neighbouring forges, but three miles distant from it. 

A small farm or lot of about 100 acres, in Monmouth 
county. 

Twenty farms in the society 1 tract in Hunterdon 
county, all improved tenanted, and under lease for one 



iThe West Jersey Society, which acquired from Daniel Coxe and 
others extensive tracts of land in West Jersey. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

year only; these farms will be shewn to any one by Mr. 
John Emly, living on the society tract. 

Several farms at Plumbrook, under lease for four years 
to come, the farm late Thomas Moore's, at Peek's Kill, 
and a lot of about thirty acres in the manor of Courtland, 
New- York province. 

Also by Lewis Johnston, Esq; and the above executors. 
Several tracts at the fresh ponds, and the rear of south 
river lots, at Spotswood, all well wooded; and several 
small lots to be laid out at Spotswood ; also the lot called 
the burnt meadows, of about 80 acres, laying at the head 
of Cornee's mill pond. 

A tract of about 500 acres in Monmouth county, near 
Gawin Watson's, on which there is a house, barn and 
other improvements. 

Several farms at Pepack, in Somerset county, and 
seven or eight hundred acres in Essex county. 

For further particulars enquire of John Barberie, John 
and Stephen Johnston, and Stephen Skinner in Amboy. 

TO BE SOLD, 

At PUBLIC VENDUE, on WEDNESDAY the Fifteenth Day 
of April next, 

A PLANTATION lately belonging to RICHARD STOCK- 
TON, in Somerset County, about one mile from Prince- 
town, on the main road to New-Brunswick, containing 
one hundred and four and a half acres of land, on which 
is a dwelling house, barn, Orchard and twenty acres of 
good Meadow. The land is well watered, and allowed 
to be exceeding good. And the day following, to- be sold, 
at publick vendue, another plantation, the property of 
said Stockton, in Sommerset County, about two miles 
and a half from Princeton, on the road that leads from 
Pennington, to New-Brunswick, containing about 250 



33O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

acres, on which is a dwelling house, Barn, orchard and 
some Meadow, and is well timbered and watered. The 
conditions to be known at the time of sale, and an indis- 
putable title to be made by 

JOSEPH STOCKTON and 
RICHARD STOCKTON. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A FARM, containing an hundred acres, ten of which is 
good meadow, and more may be made; thirty acres of 
it good wood land, and the remainder well cleared and 
under good fence, and is parted into fourteen divisions; 
on it is a small convenient house, a well of excellent water 
before the door, a new barn and stables, a pretty large 
cyder orchard that bears every year. It is pleasantly sit- 
uated upon Delaware, about half a mile from Trenton, 
very suitable for a gentleman's country seat, a fish pond 
may be made at a very trifling expence, adjoining the 
river, where may be erected to great advantage, a fishery 
for shad, herrings, and sturgeon; there is also very fine 
angling and trolling for perch and rockfish. On the above 
premises, is an excellent quarry for stone, either for pav- 
ing or building, which may be easily transported to Phil- 
adelphia, as it is water carriage all the way. 

Any person inclining to purchase the same, at private 
sale, may know the terms by applying to the subscriber 
on the premises, any time before the 23d of April, at 
which time, it will be disposed of at public vendue, if not 
sold before. JOSEPH HIGBY. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1268, March 26, 
1767. 

New-York, March 30. We hear from Cranbury in 
New-Jersey, that about ten Days ago, Mr. Henry Moore, 
of that Place, formerly a noted School-Master in this 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 33 * 

City, in returning home from Spotswood, in the Evening, 
as is supposed, fell off his Horse; the next Morning he 
being found speechless, on the Road, and his Horse at a 
small Distance from the Place where he fell; had some 
appearance of Life in him when found; but expired in a 
short Time after. 

THIS is to give Notice, That there will be sold on the 
first Day of April next, in the Town of Newark, 
County of Essex, and Province of East-New-Jersey, by 
SAMUEL HUNTINGTON, Senior; A large, stately, Stone 
Dwelling-House, with five Fire-Plaees, a very large Cel- 
lar, and a smaller One, very convenient for a Gentleman, 
being on the Main-Road, and within less than half a Mile 
of Newark Church, and has a good Well and Brook be- 
fore the Door that never freezes; there is a large Barn 
and good Stone Distill-House, a neat Apple Orchard, 
Peach Orchard, and a variety of other Fruit Trees; also 
a 6 Acre Lot o<f good mowing Ground. It is very con- 
venient for Distiller, as there is a Dam already made on 
the Brook, with a gentle Descent so as to fill his Cisterns 
without the Help of a Pump; there is likewise 14 Acres 
of good English mowing Ground within a quarter of a 
Mile of the House, with 60 Apple Trees on the same. 
Whoever inclines to purchase the same before the Day of 
Sale, may know the Conditions, by applying to said HUN- 
TINGTON. The Neiv York Mercury, No. 804, March 30, 
1767. 

NOTICE is hereby given by the Subscribers, to the Cred- 
itors of Daniel Robins, an insolvent Debtor, of the Prov- 
ince of New- Jersey, County of Monmouth, and Township 
of Upper-Freeho'ld; to meet, to settle their Accounts, at 
the House of Benjamin Morris, of the same Place, on the 
29th Day of April, and also to meet at the same Place, on 



33 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

the 29th Day of June, to receive their Dividend of the 
insolvent's Estate. JOHN ANDREWS, 

March 26, 1767. ABYAL COOK. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Plantation, containing 300 Acres, situated 
in the County of Middlesex, and Province of New-Jersey, 
on the Post Road, about 10 Miles from New-Brunswick, 
and 5 from Princetown; 180 Acres whereof are cleared, 
30 Acres of good Meadow, and more may be made, the 
rest good Wood-Land, the whole well watered; a fine 
large Brook running thro' it from one End to the other. 
the whole in good Fence : There is upon it a good Dwell- 
ing House, with four Rooms on a Floor, and a Fire-place 
in each Room, a good Cellar and Cellar Kitchen; a good 
Barn, Cyder Mill, Waggon-House, and Smoke-House, a 
Well of good Water, pailed Garden, three bearing Or- 
chards, sufficient to make 100 Barrels of Cyder, if a fruit- 
ful Year : Also a Peach Orchard, and Nursery of Apple 
and Pear Trees. The said Place is very pleasantly situ- 
ated, and would be suitable for either a Merchant or Tav- 
ern; as a Tavern has been formerly kept at said House 
for many Years. 

Any Person inclining to Purchase said Plantation, may 
apply to the Subscriber living on the Premises, who will 
agree on reasonable Terms, and give an indisputable Title 
for the same. 

BENJAMIN EMENS 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1265, April 2, 1767. 

To be SOLD, 

By public V endue, at Trenton, on Monday, the first 
Day of June next, all the real Estate, late the Property of 
Andrew Reed, Esq; 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 333 

1. A LARGE convenient Brick House, neatly finished, 
with a Wooden House adjoining, pleasantly situated at 
the Corner near the Market House, in Trenton. 

2. A lot opposite to Daniel Coxe, Esq; on which is 
erected a large Stable, Chaise-house, &c. 

3. A Stone House, with a Cooper's Shop, near the 
Stone Bridge, in King-street. 

4. A Lot of Land, containing about one Acre and three 
Quarters, having 100 Feet front on King-street. 

5. A Lot, about a Quarter of a Mile from Trenton, 
containing about 18 Acres, Part of which is good Meadow 
Ground. 

6. A Tract of Land in Sussex County, New-Jersey, 
near Pahaqualong Mountain, containing 151 Acres. 

7. One equal undivided Half Part of about 600 Acres 
of Land, in Orange County, in the Province of New- 
York. 

The Sale will begin at 2 o'Clock in the Afternoon. One 
Half the Purchase Money to be paid in three Months, the 
other Half in twelve from the Day of Sale, paying Inter- 
est. The Titles are indisputable. For further Particu- 
lars, enquire of JOSEPH REED in Trenton, THOMAS 
WHARTON, or MOORE FURMAN, in Philadelphia. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1997, April 2, 1767. 

1 hree Pounds Reward. 

WHEREAS the Subscriber's Desk was broke open on 
the Night of the I3th of March last, and Money stolen 
out of it, (the sum not exactly known) and by several 
concurring Circumstances, said Subscriber has Reason 
to believe, that the following described Persons, or one 
of them committed the Fact. I hereby promise the 
above Reward, or Twenty Shillings for each of them, to 
any Person that secures them, in any of his Majesty's 
Goals, so that they may be brought to Justice. 



334 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

James D alt on, upwards of 40 Years old, fair Complex- 
ion, large grey Eyes, thin visag'd, wears his own black 
Hair, tied behind : Had on a light colour' d Cloth Coat, 
his other Dress unknown, only that he and the others (a 
little before they went off) bought each a Pair of light- 
colourd worsted Stockings, and two Yards of Plaid, for 
an under- Jacket; he is about 5 Feet 8 Inches high. 

Philip M'Dermoit, upwards of 30 Years old, dark 
Complexion, round faced, wears his own black Hair, 
curled : Had on a brown Coat, his other Dress un- 
known, he is about 5 Feet 8 or 9 Inches high. 

Morris M' Donald, upwards of 30 Years of Age, about 
5 Feet 7 Inches high, fresh Complexion, dark brown Hair, 
curled: Had on a blue Pea-jacket; his other Dress un- 
known. They pretend to understand Ditching, and work- 
ing in a Quarry. All three are much mark'd with the 
Small-Pox. ABNER PHILLIPS. 

Princeton, April 4, 1767. 

N. B. 'Tis supposed one William M'Dermoit is along 
with them ; they went with the Stage from Hide's Town 
towards Bordcn-toum. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 
12, April 13, 1767. 

Will be lett, to cover Mares, for 
the ensuing Season, at Connec- 
ticut Farms, in the Borough of 
Elizabeth, New-Jersey, within 

CUT OF HORSE. \ four Miles of the town ' 1)v 

Jecamiah Smith, the fine Bay 

Horse 

HERO, 

RED by John Holme, Esq; 
'of Carlisle, in Old England. 
The Hero was got by Young Sterling, his dam by Slipby, 



B 



[767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 335 

which was own Brother to Saup's Dam, his Grandam by 
Partner, his Great Grandam by Greyhound; her Dam by 
Wastle Turk, her Grandam by Old Hautboy, her Great 
Grandam by Place's White Turk, her Dam by Dods worth, 
and out of a Layton Barb Mare. Young Sterling was got 
by Old Sterling, out of Matchien's Dam, Matchien won 
the Whip at New-Market; his Pedigree is certified by the 
Breeder. 

Terms of Covering as follows, Four Pounds, Proc. at 
the first Covering, the Mare to have the Benefit of the 
Season ; or, Seven Pounds, to warrant the Mare in Foal. 
For which Purpose I have provided Pasture for Mares at 
a Distance, and will take proper Care of those that are 
sent to be covered, for Two shillings, Proc. per Week. 
Hero is Fifteen Hands and about an Half high, well 
shaped, and by good Judges, allowed to be the most com- 
pleat Horse they ever saw in America. 

JECAMIAH SMITH. 

Said Smith still carries on his Business of Ax making. 

To be sold at public Vendue, at the dwelling house of 
James Banks, on Saturday the 2d of May next. Two lots 
of land lying in the town of Newark; adjoining to each 
other, and containing about nine acres of excellent land, 
on which is a good orchard of bearing apple trees : The 
whole is now in order for cutting grass this season, these 
lots are situated in the most pleasant part of the town, 
and are bounded by the river on one end, and on the pub- 
lic road leading through the town on the other end; this 
situation is extremely convenient for a merchant, or gen- 
tleman's country seat, as it commands a most beautiful 
prospect of the river, for miles up and down the same, 
and by the new road now made to New- York the distance 
less than eight miles : These lots are equally divided and 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

will be sold separately or together, as may suit the pur- 
chaser, and an indisputable title will be given for the 
same, by 

Margaret Farrand, Administratrix, of 
Daniel Farrand, deceas'd. 
Newark, March 30, 1767. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1266, April 9, 1767. 

THOMAS POWELL, 

Master of the Boarding School at Burlington, New- 
Jersey. BEING returned to the same House he formerly 
resided in, begs leave to assure such of his Friends as 
shall think him worthy their Favours, that they may de- 
pend upon the utmost Exertion of his Abilities, for the 
Improvement of Youth, whose Education he may be en- 
trusted with : And that due Regard will be had to their 
Morals, Diet, &c. 

N. B. The Price for Board and Instruction is Twenty- 
six Pounds per Annum. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, the third or fourth 
Instant, an Apprentice Lad, named John Lupton, by 
Trade a Shoemaker, about 5 Feet 3 or 4 Inches high, aged 
about 1 8 Years, of dark Complexion, very much pitted 
with the Small-pox, round shouldered, wears his own 
short Hair; had on and took with him, a brown thickset 
Coat and Jacket, a pair of Buckskin Breeches, one pair of 
carved Silver, and one pair of Steel Shoe Buckles, like- 
wise a pair of round Silver Buckles, marked I. D. G, two 
red and white spotted Cotton Handkerchiefs, and a new 
Felt Hat. Whoever takes up and secures said Appren- 
tice, so as his Master may have him again, shall have 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 337 

Forty Shillings Reward, and reasonable charges, paid by 

ALEXANDER RUTHERFORD. 

N. B. The said Boy was born near Cape May, in New 
Jersey; all Masters of Vessels are forbid to harbour or 
carry him off at their peril. 1 

RUN away, on Monday last, from the Subscriber, liv- 
ing in Pilesgrove, Salem County, an Irish Servant Man, 
named William Dolton, about 20 Years of Age, about 5 
Feet 5 Inches high, pretty well set, has a long red Scar on 
the Left Side of his Face, dark Hair, is a little swelled 
with the Dropsy, and has had a Fit of the Fever and 
Ague: Had en, when he went away, a light coloured 
Homespun Jacket, patched on the Sleeves with dark col- 
oured Homespun, the fore Parts lined with Shaloon, the 
Back with striped Homespun, a red Flannel under Jacket, 
blue Halfthick Trowsers, Homespun grey Worsted 
Stockings, Shoes not Fellows, and a Wool Hat. Who- 
ever takes up and secures said Servant in any Goal, so 
that his Master may have him again, shall have THIRTY 
SHILLINGS Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by 

WILLIAM BASSET. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1998, April 9, 
1767. 

Tuesday, Capt. Wright in a Ship of this Port, from the 
Bay, touch'd at Sandy-Hook, for a little Refreshment, in 
her way for Europe. 

Elisabeth-Town, March 29, 1767. 
TO BE LETT, 

And entered upon the First Day of May next, 
A LARGE well-built Dwelling-House, late the Property 

iSee pp. 281-282, ante. 



33 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

of Mr. Shute, now in the Possession of Mrs. Johnston, 
situate next to the Court-House, in Elizabeth-Town. The 
Situation of said House makes it valuable for any Kind 
of Business, it being in one of the most publick Parts of 
the Town. Whoever inclines to rent the same, may agree 
on Terms, by applying to 

MATTHIAS WILLIAMSON. 

Woodbridge, Feb. 18, 1767. 
TO BE SOLD 

THE one Half of a good Boat, of the Burthen of about 
twelve Tons, fit for the coasting Business. She has a good 
new Suit of Sails, and is sold for no Fault, but was taken 
for Debt: Any Person inclining to buy the said Boat, by 
applying to the Subscriber, may perhaps suit themselves 
with such a one. The Person that owns the other Half 
will settle anywhere the Purchaser of the above Half shall 
think proper. 

ISAAC DONHAM. 

To be Run For, 
On Thursday the 2ist Day of May next, round the Square 

near Capt. Nathaniel Heard' s } in Woodbridge. 
A Purse of Twenty Pounds, free for any Horse, Mare 
or Gelding, (paying Twenty Shillings Entrance) not ex- 
ceeding Three Years old, nor more than half blooded ; to 
carry Eight Stone each, the best of three Heats. The 
Money to be paid to the Winner, immediately upon the 
Determination of the Judges appointed. The Entrance 
Money to be paid on the Monday before the Race, (or 
double at the Starting Post) to Capt. Nathaniel Heard, at 
the Place aforesaid. The Entrance Money to be run for 
by any but the winning or distanced Horses, the next Day. 






1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 339 

N. B. If one Horse gets the two first Heats, it is de- 
termined not to start for the third. 

New Jersey, March 1 1, 1767. 



WHEREAS by Virtue of sundry Writs of Fieri Facias, 
issued out of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, for the 
County of Middlesex, at the Suits of Thomas Stephens, 
Joseph Skelton, and Robert James, against the Goods and 
Chattels, Lands and Tenements, of John Le Count, I have 
levied on a Tract of Land, lying in Windsor, containing 
280 Acres; there is a good fram'd House on said Land, 
three Rooms on a Floor, with a good Brick Well : And 
also on his Estate for Life, in a Tract belonging to his 
Wife, joining thereunto, and containing about 300 Acres. 
The above Lands lies on a laid-out Road that leads from 
York Road to Princetown, in a well settled Country: 
Now this is to give Notice, that the same will be sold at 
Publick Vendue on the seventh Day of May next, on the 
Premises, pursuant to the Direction of the Act of General 
Assembly, to begin at one o'clock; at which Time and 
Place the Terms and Conditions of Sale will be declared 
and made known, by 

JOHN MOORES, Sheriff. 

Perth- Amboy, March 2, 1767. 

-The New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1267, April 1 6, 1767. 

A Plantation belonging to the Estate of the late Henry 
Dumond, deceased, lying on Rariton, near the piiblick 
Road from Brunswick to Philadelphia, adjoining a Place 
nozt< the Property of Mr. John Staats, on the one Side, 
and to Mr. Jacob Van der Veer's on the other; containing 



34 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

in all 288 Acres of very excellent Land, 100 Acres of 
which is cleared, the Remainder well wooded, and the 
Whole well water' d; all in good Fence, with a young 
growing Orchard. Also 14 Acres of extraordinary fresh 
Meadow, lying on Raritan River, nearly opposite to Mr, 
Dirck Van Veghten's. Any Person inclining to purchase 
the same, may hear of farther Particulars, by applying to 
Peter Dumond, at the North Branch of Raritan, or to 
Johannes Allstine, in New- York, Executors to said Estate, 
who will give an indisputable Title for the same. The 
New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1267, April 
1 6, 1767. 

To the PUBLICK. 

Ax a Time when agreeable Advices are few, and when 
Appearances of Distress are visible, by Scarceness of both 
Money and the Necessaries of Life, it is hoped whatever 
may be offered with a good Design will not be unaccept- 
able, even tho'' it should not effect the Thing designed : 
With this View, the Printer of this Paper proposes to 
offer to the Publick the whole Contents of a Book, some 
Time since published in England, said to be designed for 
the Use of the Colonies, called, Memoirs of the Culture 
of Silk ; which book being printed large, and comes dear, 
has not or can have an Opportunity of falling into many 
People's Hand's, the Price being more than One Year's 
News-Papers, whereas it will all go in this Paper in less 
than Six Months, without interfering or hindering the 
common Occurrences thereof .... 

. . . . The Legislature of New-Jersey, about 18 
Months age, had such a good Opinion of it, that they 
passed a Law for the Encouragement of the Planting 
Mulberry Trees; for it is a known Maxim, that wherever 
Mulberry Trees will thrive, there Silk may be raised. . . 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 341 

By the Philadelphia Papers of last Thursday, we learn, 
that the Navigation of their River was then stopt by the 
Ice: The extreme Cold about that Time, hinder' d the 
Posts from performing their Stages; the Rivers of 
Hackinsack and Newark, were both shut up, but not so 
hard as to permit Horses to cross, and even a Footman in 
going over Hackinsack River, broke through, and nar- 
rowly escaped being lost. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Owners and Pro- 
prietors of the Salt-Meadow, called, the Elisabeth-Town 
great Meadows, or the major part of them, will make 
Application to the Legislature of the Colony of New-Jer- 
sey, at the next Session of Assembly, at Burlington, for 
a Law to prevent Neat Cattle, Horses, and other Crea- 
tures, from feeding said Meadows; of which all Per- 
sons concern'd are desired to take Notice, and make their 
Objections, if any they have. Elizabeth-Town, December 
29, 1766. The New York Gazette or Weekly Post-Boy, 
No. 1253, January 9, 1767. 

WAS taken up on the I2th of January last, by the sub- 
scriber on Dunks's Barr in the river Delaware, a Drift 
WHERRY, appears about half wore, chiefly built with mul- 
berry timbers, and about 14 feet long. Had a long painter 
and a stone for an anchor; her rudder lying in her when 
found. Any person claiming said boat, may have her 
again, on proving their property, and paying reasonable 
salvage to the subscriber, living in Greenwich township, 
Cumberland county, in New-Jersey. 

AARON STATHEM. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1270, April 9, 
1767. 



NEW JERSEY COIjOXIAL I> IS. | 

The FLYING MACHINE. 
This is to give XOTICE to the PUBLIC. 

THAT the FLYIXG MACHIXE, kept by JOHX BARXHJLL, 
in FTm street, near Vine street Philadelphia: and JOHX 
MASHEREW. at the Blazing star . . . - 1 

The Pennsylvania Journal, - ~ April 9, 

1767. 

The CIRCUIT COURTS in Nevr-Jersey are to be hdd; 
At Gloucester, on Wednesday the soth of April. 
At Salem f on Monday the fourth Day of May: 
At Cumberland, the seventh Day of May next 

Philadelphia, April 20, 177 - 

All Persons indebted 

to the Estate of \jthaaiel Chamless f late of the Town- 
ship of AUoway's Creek, County of Salem, and Province 
of W . Xe^v-Jersey f deceased, are desired to make Pay- 
ment to the Subscribers* who will give their Attendance 
for that Purpose, at the House of Joseph Burroughs, Inn- 
holder in Salem aforesaid, on Second-Day, the fourth of 
next Month (May) ; and all those that have Demands 
against said Estate, are desired to bring them in to 

TOHX HABT 

JOHXWHARTC 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle. No. 13, April 20. 
1767. 




NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 4 5 

TO be sold at private Sale, A Lot 
of Land near Motmtpleasant, con- 
taining fire and a Half Acres, one 
Half good fresh Meadow, with a 
Dwelling-House and Barn on it. 
The said Lot is partly fenced: 
situated on a Road to a public 
Landing, about a Mile from Middletown-Point; conve- 
nient for any Tradesman. Whoever inclines to purchase 
may apply for further Particulars, to the Subscriber, at 
Middletown-Point, any Time between this and the middle 
of May. DUNCAN ROBERTSON. 

Bergen County, the 4th Day of April, 1767. 
WHEREAS a Number of Dutch Reformed Ministers and 
Elders, have taken into their serious Consideration, the 
many dangerous Inconveniences and Abuses which have 
crept into their Churches, whereby the Progress of true 
Christianity, in Knowledge and Practice is obstructed, 
and \vith which they have grievously been afflicted these 
many Years. And being desirous to rectify them and 
restore their Church to its ancient Prosperity, Lustre and 
Dignity: After solemn Humiliations, Fastings, and 
Prayers, before the Throne of Grace, with all those among 
their People, who thought proper to join them ; they have 
agreed at last, and judged it the only remaining Remedy, 
to erect a Seminary or College, in which the American 
Youth might be regularly educated after the Manner, and 
Custom of the L T nited Provinces, and other Protestant 
Reformed European Churches, where from their Ances- 
tors proceeded ; and to dedicate the most pious and capa- 
ble to the weighty Gospel Function, whereby the Good- 
ness, and Happiness of the numerous Body of the Dutch 
People, might be completed, in respect of their Loyalty, 
Industry and Christian Religion. It also pleased the King 
of Kings, in whose Hands the Hearts of Kings are, and 



344 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 



who promised that their Kings should be nursing Fathers, 
and their Queens nursing Mothers, to the Church, to 
Favour the humble Address of the Ministers and Elders, 
to his Excellency William Franklin, Esq; Governor and 
Commander in Chief, in and over his Majesty's Province 
of New- Jersey, &c. whereby they have obtained by his 
Majesty's Letters Patent, and Charter or Royal Grant, 
bearing Date the loth Day of November, 1766, to erect 
a College called Queen's College in the Province of New- 
Jersey; and a Corporation, or Body Politic, together with 
all the Privileges, Powers, Authorities, and Rights be- 
longing thereunto, as is customary and lawful in any Col- 
lege, in his Majesty's Realm of Great-Britain. The sacred 
Trust of which is committed to the Care and Integrity of 
the following eminent and worthy Gentlemen, together 
with a sufficient Number of Ministers of the Gospel, re- 
siding in this and the two adjacent Governments, created, 
and constituted Governors and Trustees of said Queens 
College. 



Of the City of New-York. 
Simon Johnson, Esqr. 
Philip Livingston, Esqr. 
Theod. Van Wyck, Esqr. 
Abraham Lott, Esqr. 
Of other Parts of the 

Province. 

Sir William Johnson, Bart. 
Robert Livingston, Esqr. 
Col. Johannes Hardenberg. 
Col. Abraham Hasbrock. 
Levi Paaling, Esqr. 
Col. James Brinkerhoff. 
Col. Nicholas Stillwell. 



Col. Matthias Hoffman. 

Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Esqr. 

Col. Abraham Herring. 

Isaac Vrooman, Esqr. 

Bernardus Ryder. 

The Rev. Verbrykek, Min- 
ister at Tappan. 

The Revd. Barent Vroo- 
man, at Schenectady. 

The Rev. Eliardus West- 
erts, 1 at Albany. 

The Rev. John Schenem- 
eral, at Katskill. 

The Rev. M. Goetschius, at 
N. Palts. 



Westerlo. 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



345 



Of the Province of New-Jersey. 

His Excellency the GOVERNOR 
The Piesident of the Council. 
The Honourable the Chief Justice. 
The Attorney General. 

Peter Hassenclever, Esqr. 
Hendrick Fisher, Esqr. 
Philip French. 
Jan. Van Meteren 
Peter Schenck 
Peter Zabriskie. Esqr. 
Tennis Dye, Esqr. 
Hendrick Kuyper, Esqr. 
The Revd. J. H. Goetschius, 

Minister at Hackinsack. 
The Rev. John Lyt, of 

Brunswick 



For the Time being. 



The Revd. David Marenes, 
of Achquegkenah. 

The Revd. Martinus Van 
Harlengen, and 

The Revd. Jacob Rutse 
Hardenberg of Rariton. 

The Revd. William Jack- 
son, of Bergen. 

The Revd. Philip Wybery, 
Minister at Philadelphia. 

The Rev. Jonathan Du Bois, 
Minister in the County o*f 
Buck, in Pennsylvania. 



It is also ordered and directed in the same Royal Pat- 
ent, that the first Meeting of said Trustees shall be held, 
at or near the Country House 1 of New-Barbadoes, or 
Hackensack Town, in Bergen County, on the second 
Tuesday of May next; where, and when, said Trustees 
are to be properly and duly qualified, by any one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Courts, or Judges of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas of the Colony of New-Jersey, 
before they proceed to any business. 8 
. I therefore the Subscriber, with the Advice of others, 
do by these Presents, give public Notice of the said Meet- 
ing, and with all due Submission and Respect, to the above 
named Gentlemen, I invite them and humbly crave their 

1 County or Court House. 

* This was under the first charter (1766) for Queen's (now Rutgers) 
College. The organization was not perfected until 1771, under a new 
charter, granted in 1770. 



346 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Presence, and Countenance, to such a necessary and sal- 
utary, though laborious Task, putting them in Remem- 
berance of the Words of the Holy Paul to the Hebrews, 
Chapter vi. x. Verse, for God is not unrighteous, to for- 
get your Work and Labour of Love, which ye have 
strewed towards his Name, in that you have ministered to 
the Saints, and do minister. 

J. H. GOETSCHIUS. 

To COVER, 

At Morris-don, in the County of Monmouth, New-Jer- 
sey, at Five Pounds (Proclamation Money) each Mare 

for the Season. 

FERDINAND 

A noble dark Bay STALLION, 
RISING Seven, superior in Size, 
Strength, and Beauty, to any 
ever landed on this Continent: 
He is the Son of a Spanish 
Horse, purchased by Marshal 
Keith, and presented to his 
Brother in Britain, out of an ex- 
cellent English Mare, 17 Hands high, with Bone, Sinew, 
and all other Points proportionate to his great H eighth. 

No Horse ever appeared in America, more capable of 
getting large useful Stock for Coach or Waggon, and 
from slight genteel Mares, the best Hunters or Road 
Horses. He was brought from Fngland last Summer, 
and is the Property of MICHAEL KEARNEY. 

Good Pasture for Mares, and great Care taken of them 
at two Shillings and Six Pence per Week. 

To the PUBLICK. 

WHEREAS it hath been publickly reported, and is gen- 
erally believed in this, and the neighbouring Province of 




1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 347 

New-Jersey, that one GEORGE SPENCER, who formerly 
resided in this City, hath lately obtained Episcopal Or- 
ders in England, with an Intention to return to* these 
Parts in the Character of a Clergyman : And as it may 
be imagined by some, that the Clergy of the Church of 
England in this Country, have, in some Measure, been 
instrumental, by Recommendations, or otherwise, in pro- 
curing the aforesaid Orders to be conferred on the said 
Spencer; we, the Clergy of New-York, and New-Jersey, 
now met in voluntary Convention, think it our Duty thus 
publickly to testify, That we have not either directly or 
indirectly, been concerned in procuring the above-men- 
tioned Ordination. And that, from the general Character 
of the said Spencer, (or, until such Time we may be con- 
vinced that his Conduct has been misrepresented,) we 
will not hold any Correspondence with him, nor give him 
any Countenance or Encouragement. 1 

Signed by Order of the Convention, 

Samuel Seabury, Secr'y. 
New- York, April 9, 1767. 

To the PUBLIC. 

FOR the Advancement of Education and Virtue, a pub- 
lic School is to be erected at Hackensack, on the first Day 
of May next, ensuing; where the Languages will be 
taught with Accuracy and Care, and Youth qualified for 
Admission into any of our American Colleges : And in 
Order to make the Plan as extensive as possible, one 

iThe ordination of Spencer in England was said to have been rec- 
ommended by Benjamin Franklin, and was adduced as an argument 
in favor of the establishment of an American episcopacy, which would 
be more familiar with the character of candidates. Spencer was de- 
nounced in correspondence of the time as "an infamous fellow from 
New York," "an odious creature devoid of either virtue or learning,'' 
who was "publickly carted thro' New York & was otherwise of very 
bad character," whose ordination caused "prodigious astonishment" 
on the part of the American clergy, and it was declared "No Church 
on this Continent will receive him." Historical Collections Relating to 
the American Colonial Chureh. Pennsylvania. Edited by William Stev- 
ens Ferry, D. D., Philadelphia, 1871, pp. 416, 421-423. 



34^ NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Master will be employed solely in teaching Reading, 
Writing, and Cyphering, which may be attained by those, 
who learn the Languages, at their vacant Hours, when 
they are disengaged from their other Studies, or they will 
be taught separately to those, whom their Parents choose 
to have instructed in these Branches alone 

Those who are intended for the College, will also be 
initiated into the Mathematics, that they may be enabled 
to enter on their College Education with Ease, and pur- 
sue it with Pleasure. 

Accommodations for Boarders will be very convenient, 
and Board and Tuition will be as cheap as can reasonably 
be expected. 

The Trustees appointed for the Management of the 
School, have chosen Mr. Peter Wilson, 1 who has for some 
Time past taught in the Exchange, in New- York, to in- 
struct the Children in Latin, &c. and will give good En- 
couragement to any Person, who will undertake to teach 
Reading, Writing, Cyphering, and Merchant's Accounts, 
till which Time Mr. Wilson will officiate for both. 

The Terms may be known, by applying to the Trustees, 
living in Hackensack, or to Mr. Wilson, at the Exchange, 
in New- York. The New York Journal or General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1267, April 1 6, 1767. 

TO BE SOLD BY 

PUBLIC VENDUE, 

(If not sold before by private sale) on the 4th day of 
May next, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, at the London 
Coffee House sundry lands and tenements, late the estate 
of BENJAMIN KOSTER, deceased, as follows 

1 Peter Wilson married in Hackensack, and lived there several years. 
He devised a plot of ground for a public school, on Main street, known 
as the Union School. After leaving Hackensack he conducted the 
Erasmus Academy, at Jamaica, Long Island. Later, he was for many 
years professor of Greek in Columbia College, New York. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 349 

A CERTAIN two story messuage, or tenement, and lot 
or piece of ground thereunto belonging, now in the ten- 
ure of Adam Eve, situate on the East side of Second 
street, in the city of Philadelphia 

Also, a tract of upland and meadow ground, situate 
near New Brunswick in the county of Middlesex, and 
province of New Jersey, containing 37 acres, 10 of which 
are meadow, being a moiety of a tract of 74 acres, the 
other moiety of which will be so'ld at the same time, if it 
suits the purchaser to take both. 

Also all that twenty eighth part of the lease and leases 
of the copper mine, stamping mill or mills, situate in New 
Brunswick, 1 in the province of New-Jersey, with all the 
utensils, thereto belonging; the conditions and situations 
may be known by applying to Thomas Say. 

Also all the right and share, supposed to be I96th part, 
be it more or less, of the copper mine called Peter Ten 
Kick's mine in the province of New-Jersey, with the lands 
thereunto belonging. 2 

Also, the one and twentieth part of 100 acres of land, 
situate on Pequea creek, in the county of Lancaster, in the 
province of Pennsylvania, 

THOMAS SAY and HENRY CASDORP. 

All persons that have any demands against the said 
estate of Benjamin Koster, deceased, are desired to bring 
in their accounts properly proved, to the subscriber, and 
those that- stand indebted to the said estate, are desired 
to pay forthwith to 

THOMAS SAY, Executor. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1271, April 16, 
1767. 

iFor an account of the discovery of this mine, see N. J. Archives, 
XX., 626, note. 

2 This was advertised for sale in 1769. See N. J. Archives, XX., 382. 
400. 



35 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/6/ 



T 



O be sold at publick Vendue, on 
Wednesday the i/th Day of June 

VIEW OF HOUSE ) next, by the Revd. SAMUEL KEN- 
> NEDY/ of Bernard's-Town, in the 
AND TREES. ) County of Somerset, and Province 
of New-Jersey; his Plantation on 

which he now lives, containing 300 Acres of Land, more 
or less, well watered and timbered, bounded on one Side 
by Dead-River, & on the other by the River Passaick, hav- 
ing the publick Road that leads to the City of Perth-Am- 
boy going through it; it is 20 Miles from said City, 8 
from Bound-Brook, 5 from New-Brunswick, 3 from Lord 
Sterling's Buildings, not quite four along a publick Road 
to Baskinridge Meeting-House, and about i Mile and a 
half of Mr. Solomon Boyle's Mill, on which Plantation 
there is a Dwelling-House with three Rooms and two fire- 
places on the lower floor, situate at a small Distance from 
the Brink of said Passaick-River, and a good Quarry for 



iThe Rev. Samuel Kennedy was born in Scotland in 1720, and came 
to this country in early life, settling in New Jersey. By advice of the 
Presbytery of New Brunswick he began studying for the ministry, and 
on December 6, 1749, was received under their care. He was licensed 
to preach the gospel, May 18, 1750, and on June 25, 1751, was ordained, 
and installed as pastor of the Presbyterian church at Baskinridge, 
where he remained for thirty-six years. He conducted a Latin school 
for some years at the same place, and also practiced medicine, at least 
in his own congregation, his skill and judgment in this profession being 
regarded as uncommonly sound and correct. He was a remarkably 
evangelical preacher, and under his ministrations his congregation 
experienced several notable revivals. Although his ministerial breth- 
ren from Scotland and the North of Ireland were sticklers for a high 
grade of education among the candidates for the ministry, he favored 
a more liberal policy, and allied himself to what was known as the 
New Side wing of the Church, as distinguished from the more conser- 
vative, or Old Side, wing. He died at Baskinridge, August 31, 1787. 
Memoirs of the Rev. Robert Finley, by the Rev. Isaac V. Brown. New 
Brunswick, 1819, 183-188." He was admitted to the New Jersey Medical 
Society* in 1768. Transactions, reprinted in 1866. In announcing his 
death, The Brunswick Gazette, and Weekly Monitor, of Tuesday, September 
4, 1787, remarked: "This was a faithful servant of Jesus Christ, and 
has for a great number of years preached the gospel with success; he 
also followed the practice of physic, and was one of the Trustees of 
Princeton College. It is but too common to ascribe merit to persons 
after their decease which they do not deserve: we shall only say that 
Mr. Kennedy was a truly pious, honest, upright, and zealous man; 
and in him the people have lost an excellent teacher, his wife an affec- 
tionate husband, his children an indulgent father, and his servants a 
kind and benevolent master." The statement that he was a Trustee 
of Princeton College is not borne out by the General Catalogue. 1746- 
1896, of that institution. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 35 l 

building may be opened at the Distance of a few Poles 
from said House : There is also o>n the said Plantation, 
a good Barn, and a Stable at each End of it, and an Or- 
chard containing 57 old Apple Trees, and 136 young 
Ones, some of which are grafted; there is about 72 Acres 
of plough Land cleared, and in good Fence, and about 27 
Acres cf Meadow cleared, 12 and half of which have been 
mowed for a considerable Number of Years, and about 2 
Acres of it has been mowed for two Years past, and about 
ii Acres sowed with Timothy Seed, together with one 
and half Acre more, are expected to be mowed this Sum- 
mer, 100 Acres more cf good Meadow may be made on 
a very rich Bottom, being the Plantation whereon Mr. 
Moses Doty formerly lived. On said Day Samuel Ken- 
ledy proposes to sell Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Utensils 
of Husbandry, &c &c. when good Attendance will be 
given, and the Conditions of Sale made known. The 
New York Mercury, No. 807, April 20, 1767. 

The Times appointed by the Judges for holding the 
Circuit Courts, in the Western Division of the Province 
of New- Jersey, are as follows, viz. 

For the County of Gloucester, at Gloucester, on Wed- 
nesday the 2p of April Instant. 

. For the County of Salem, at Salem, on Monday the $th 
of May next. 

For the County of Cumberland, at Cohansie Bridge, on 
Thursday the ?th of May next. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Plantation, situate in Cumberland County, 
in the Province of W. New-Jersey, known by the name 



35 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l?6/ 

of Brick's Mills, 1 containing 1200 Acres, or upwards; 100 
Acres of which are cleared Land, on which is a Grist and 
Saw-Mill, constantly supplied with a good Stream of Wa- 
ter; a good Dwelling-House, Barn, Out-House, &c. a 
large Apple Orchard, and a good deal of Swamp, suitable 
for Meadow. For further Particulars inquire of EPHRAIM 
LLOYD, living en the Premises, or of JOHN HART, Mer- 
chant, in Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 
14, April 27, 1767. 

ALL Persons that have any just Demands against the 
Estate of HENDRICK ScHENK, 2 late of Millstone, the 
County of Somerset and Province of New-Jersey, Mer- 
chant, deceased ; are desired to bring in the same to the 
Subscriber, and they shall be paid, and those Persons who 
are indebted to the said Estate, are desired to pay the 
same, or else give their Bonds and Security, some Time 
in May next; cr else they may expect to be prosecuted. 

PETER SCHENK, Executor. 
Millstone, April 17, 1767. 

The Neiv York Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1268, April 23, 1767. 

To be SOLD, by public Vendue, at MOUNT HOLLY, on the 

First of May next. 

THE BRIGANTINE NANCY, EDWARD YORKE, late 
Master, as she now lies on Absecom Beach, near Egg- 

1 Formerly "Wood's Mill." "Wood's Mill was for a long time owned 
by John Brick, the tradition being that he also owned large tracts in 
Lower Pittsgrove, and that through his influence the line between 
Cumberland and Salem was so run as to leave them in the latter 
county." Elmer's Cumberland County, 18, 77. About 1795 his son, Joshua 
Brick', went to Maurice River, and in 1807 laid out the town called 
Bricksborough, and sold lots there. Ibid, 77. 

2 Hendrick Schenck. born July 15, 1717, was a son of Johannes 
Schenck (b. April 30, 1691; d. April 1, 1729) and Maria Lott, and was 
a grandson of Johannes Schenck, b. Sept. 19, 1656, came to America In 
1683, settling in New York, and d. at Bushwick, L. I., Feb. 5. 1748. 
Hendrick Schenck m. Magdalena Van Liew, of Middlebush, and lived 
at Millstone, where he had a store or mill. He d. early in 1767. Our 
Home, 551-2. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 353 

Harbour, with some of her Spars, and a good Moses built 
Boat. Attendance will be given at the Time, and the Con- 
dition of the Sale made known. 

N. B. She is a strong built Vessel. , , .. . 

To BE SOLD, 

IN pursuance of the last Will and Testament of SAM- 
UEL BON NELL, late of the City of Philadelphia, Black- 
smith, deceased, a certain Tract of Land, situate in the 
Township of Waterford, in the County of Gloucester, in 
the Western Division of the Province of New-Jersey, 
containing 300 Acres, now in the Tenure of Benjamin 
Archer, with a good Frame Dwelling-house and Barn 
erected thereon, pleasantly situated on Cooper's Creek, 
and within 4 Miles of the City of Philadelphia, where 
Garden Truck may be raised in great Plenty, and brought 
to Philadelphia Market by Water; there are about 20 
Acres of choice Tide Meadow, under good Bank, and a 
Quantity of other Low-land Meadow on the Premises, 
the Upland is good and fertile, and it abounds with choice 
Ship Building Timber, and is otherwise well timbered and 
watered. Any Person inclining to purchase, may know 
the Title and Terms, by applying to us the Subscribers in 
Philadelphia, SARAH BONNELL, THOMAS BONNELL. 
PETER THOMSON, Executors. 

All Persons that have any Demands against the Estate 
cf the said Samuel Bonnell deceased, are desired to bring 
in their Accounts, properly proved, to us the Subscribers ; 
and those that stand indebted to the said Estate by Bond, 
Bill, Note or Book Debt, are desired to make speedy Pay- 
ment to Sarah Bonnell, Thomas Bonnell, and Peter 
Thomson, Executors. 

As the Subscribers intend to continue and carry on the 
Blacksmith's Business for Shipping and House-Building, 
those that will be pleased to favour them with their Cus- 



354 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

torn, may depend on the greatest Care and Dispatch, by 
their Friends, SARAH BONNELL, THOMAS BONNELL. 

To be LETT, in Gloucester, in the Jerseys, 
A HOUSE and LOT, in the street that leads from the 
Court-house to Cooper's ferry; the house 30 by 16, with 
a good cellar under it, a shoemaker's shop in the cellar 
12 by 1 6, and a fire place in it; the house has two rooms 
on a floor, and a chimney in each. The lot is 200 feet 
deep, and 157 feet front, and is well dunged, fit for any 
garden truck. There is an out-house on said lot, and a 
good well at the door, it is very suitable for a shoemaker 
or shopkeeper, as both are wanted, there being none nearer 
than Haddonfield or Woodberry. It is a very public 
place, there being no other way for the lower county peo- 
ple to ccme to market but by Gloucester. If any person 
has a mind to take the said house for a year, or term of 
years, he may enquire of JEFFERY CLARK, living near the 
Swedes church, in Philadelphia, or of TIMOTHY CLARK, 
in the Jerseys, one mile from the said place. The Penn- 
sylvania Gazette, No. 2000, April 23, 1767. 

STOLEN from the stable of the subscriber in Amwell 
township Hunterdon county, in the province of West 
New-Jersey, a chestnut brown HORSE, about fourteen 
hands high, trots and paces fast, a short curled tail very 
remarkable, has a few white hairs in his forehead, but 
cannot be perceived without notice being taken; he has 
no brand nor ear mark. 

Whoever will bring the said horse to CoryeH's ferry on 
the York road, shall have FIFTY SHILLINGS for the horse, 
and FIVE POUNDS for the thief and horse, and all reason- 
able charges paid by WILLIAM HOUSHILL. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1272, April 23, 
1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 355 

We hear from Salem, in New-Jersey, that on the night 
of the 1 2th inst. a person who had undertaken to officiate 
as a school master near that place, and was to have opened 
his school the next day, as a specimen of his learning and 
ability, broke open the store of Messrs. Test and John- 
ston, and stole from thence about icol. in cash. This cap- 
ital performance being discovered, he was conducted to 
proper lodgings, and will receive his trial at the next as- 
sizes, when no doubt his merit will be properly considered. 
This may serve as a caution against admitting persons to 
form the morals of our youth, without having a true 
knowledge of their principals and character. 

WHEREAS Philip George Steigleman, a Dutch lad 
about twelve years old, son of John Steigleman, was 
bound to some person in the Jerseys about two years ago, 
which his father cannot now find out; this is therefore to 
request the master of said lad to send word to his father, 
who lives with George Swope, about five miles this side 
of Lancaster. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1273, 
April 30, 1767. 

STEPHANUS VOORHEES, 

ACQUAINTS the Public, that he has supplied himself 
with an able Assistant, that he may be enabled the better 
to serve all such Gentlemen, as are disposed to Favour 
his useful Designs : The School will be kept at the Place 
where it was first erected in Hackensack, at the New- 
Bridge. The common Price o-f Board and Tuition, will 
not exceed . 20 per Year : The best Method of Instruc- 
tion will be attended to, and all possible Care to afford 
the utmost Satisfaction. An English Teacher is also pro- 
vided to oblige the Public, who is a complete Pen-Man; 
and will Teach the Latin Scholars, Writing, and Arith- 



356 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

metic two Hours a Day, for a small Addition per Quar- 
ter. 

We shall be much obliged to the Public for Encourage- 
ment, who are devoted to serve them to the utmost of our 
Power. The New York Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1269, April 30, 1767. 

WHEREAS Lydia the wife of James Mitton, of Eves- 
ham township, Burlington county, has of late greatly mis- 
behaved herself, left my bed, not chusing to live with me, 
and run me in debt ; for which, and other reasons, I here- 
by forewarn all persons from trusting her on my account, 
for I will pay no debts of her contracting from the date 
hereof. 

April 24, 1767. JAMES MITTON. 

On Friday, the I7th Instant, a Fire broke out in a new 
Log House, at Pilesgrove, is Salem County, while the 
Family were absent, which entirely consumed the same, 
together with all the Furniture, Wearing Apparel, &c. 
therein. 

LETTERS remaining at the Post-Office, Philadelphia. . . 

E. Walter Ewing, Jersey. R. John Redstreak, Sa- 
lem. W. William Williams, Union Iron Works, West 
New-Jersey. Y. Philip Young, Cohansey. The Penn- 
sylvania Gazette, No. 2001, April 30, 1767. 

On Wednesday, the 6th Inst. at the Court of Oyer and 
Terminer and General Goal Delivery, held at Salem, be- 
fore the Honourable FREDERICK SMYTH, Esq; Chief Jus- 
tice of the Province of New Jersey, Bills of Indictment 
were found against the following Persons, viz. Daniel 
Rice, for Manslaughter, who was acquitted. Joseph 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 357 

Haynes, an Englishman, for a Misdemeanor, who con- 
fessed his Indictment, and was sentenced to receive 39 
Lashes at the common Whipping-Post, which was exe- 
cuted the next Morning. Haynes and one Andrew Ring 
(who since broke Goal, and escaped) were committed 
about the 6th of June last, for breaking the Shop Win- 
dow of Jacob Hollingshead, Watchmaker, in Salem, and 
stealing three Watches. They with several others, were 
a few Days before, taken out of the Work-house, in Phil- 
adelphia, and carried into the Jerseys, to be sold as Ser- 
vants newly imported. James Weldon, an Irishman, for 
Grand Larceny, who confessed his Indictment, and was 
sentenced to be burnt in the Hand, which was executed 
accordingly. Weldon is the same Person who broke open 
the Store of Messrs. Test and Johnson, and stole upwards 
of . 100 in Cash. 'Tis supposed he has been guilty of 
several Crimes before. 

A Negro Woman, belonging to Mr. Clement Hall, of 
El senbo rough, in the County of Salem, New- Jersey, lately 
died there, aged upwards of 120 Years. 

Arrivals. 
At Barbados. Bowdich, from Salem. 

Philadelphia, May n, 1767. 

ALL Persons, indebted to the Estate of Nathaniel 
Chambers, late of the Township of Allowey's Creek, 
County of Salem, and Province of West Nezv- Jersey, de- 
ceased, are desired to make Payment to the Subscribers, 
who will give their Attendance for that Purpose at the 
House cf Joseph Burroughs, Inn-holder, in Salem afore- 
said, on Second-Day, the eighth of next Month (June) 



35 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

and all those that have Demands against said Estate, are 
desired to bring them in, to 

JOHN HART, and 
JOHN WHARTON, 

Executors. 

N. B. Those that do not attend, will be treated ac- 
cordingly. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 16, May 
n, 1767. 

RuN-away, from the subscriber, the 24th Instant, 
living at Canoe-Brook, in Essex-County, and Prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, a servant man, named James McDon- 
agh, 19 years old, black hair, full-faced, and much given 
to traficking. Had on when he went away, a short Coat 
of whiteish homespun, and a jacket of the same, with the 
backs of black ratteen, and 'tis imagined is gone towards 
some of the Iron- Works. Whoever takes up and secures 
the said Run-away, so that he may be had again, shall 
receive Forty shillings reward, and all reasonable charges 
paid, by DARBY DOYLE. 

The New York Mercury, No. 809, May 4, 1767. 



W 



A BOAT to be sold, 

'ILL carry upwards of One 
Thousand Bushels of 

( _ Wheat in her Hold, and draws 

\ FIGURE OF BOAT / 

J J. about 4 and a half Feet Water 

j UNDER SAIL. \ w hen loaded; her Frame, red 
Cedar, and a great Part of her 
Bottom new planked last Fall. 

Her Sails and Rigging a good deal worn. For further 
Particulars inquire of Mr. Cornelius Low, at Rariton 
Landing, or of his Son Isaac Low, in New- York. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1270, May 7, 1767. 






1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 359 

A List of LETTERS remaining in the Post-Office at 
Trenton. 

Robert Bain, Freehold; Mrs. Bromley; John Baker, 
John Burroughs. 

C. Ezekiel Coal, Reading Town; Luke Cunniff (2) 
Molly Cook, Somerset County; Patt. Connelly; Charles 
Clark, Bucks County; James Campbell. 

D. John Dolick, Hunterdon County; John Dorrell, 
near Trenton Ferry. 

F. Jacob Ford, Esq; Morris Town. 

G. Samuel Grandine, Esq; Morris County. 

H. Samuel Humphreys; Hannah Hogeland, Pen- 
quest. 

I. William Imlay and John Taylor, Bordentown; 
Samuel Irvin, Durham Furnace; John Jones, Chester- 
field; James Jackson, Bordentown. 

K. Richard Kowasafer, Amwell. 

L. Mrs. Lockart, Freehold. 

M. Samuel M'Kardy; John Moore, at Mr. Henry's; 
David M'Kee, near Trenton; Samuel Mitchell, Cumber- 
land County; Joseph Milnor, near Trenton Ferry; Doctor 
William M'Kinsley. 

P. Philip Price, Morris Township; Robert Price, 
Sussex County; William Pugh, Union Iron-Works (3) 
Simeon Phillips, Penington. 

Q. John Quim, Taylor. 

R. Robert Roos, or Jeremiah Thatcher, Kingwood; 
Richard Rounsavell, Hunterdon County. 

S. Daniel Stevenson, Middletown; Isaac Sexton, Am- 
well; John Sickles, Princetown. 

T. Rev. William Tennent; James Torbert, Bucks 
County. 

V. Peter Vickers, Bucks County. 



360 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

W. William Williams, Union Iron Works; Samuel 
White, near the Falls Meeting-House. 

Philadelphia, April 29, 1767. 

IF EDWARD DUFFLE be living (who has been absent 
from Philadelphia between 12 and 13 years) by applying 
to ELIZABETH DUFFLE, in Burlington, New Jersey, may 
hear of something greatly to his advantage. 

The CHALYBEATE WATERS, 

NEAR Gloucester, having acquired great esteem, and 
having been much frequented, many persons, who gave 
them a regular trial, have found very singular and salu- 
tary effects from them; it is expected, as the excellent vir- 
tues of these springs become more known, many will be 
desirous to be convenient, where they can have frequent 
and easy access to them, every morning and evening, 
which will be necessary, as the waters drank at the spring 
are found to be much the more efficacious. And as many 
were prevented from attending them regularly the last 
season, from the difficulty of getting good and convenient 
lodgings, the subscriber takes this method to inform the 
ladies and gentlemen, that he has taken a large convenient 
house in Gloucester, very pleasantly situate, with six good 
lodging rooms on the first floor, and will entertain those 
who are pleased to favour him, on very low and reason- 
able terms. 

HUGH JONES. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2002, May 7, 1767. 

To Messrs. BRADFORDS, 

Gentlemen, 

/ must once more request the favour of a place in your 
paper, that I may offer to the public an address, which I 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 36 1 

sincerely wish may be the last to which I shall be under a 
necessity of soliciting their attention. 

THE author of Lex Talionis has at length favoured me, 
in the last Chronicle with a very elegant and elaborate 
apology which he has thought proper to introduce, by de- 
claring, in the words of Swift, "That he is wiser today 
than he was yesterday." .... 

April 27, 1766. [sic] 

[Signed] WM. HICKS. 

To his Ex y G- r F***n. 

SIR: 

To this Hour I have waited in expectation of receiving from the author 
of Lex Talionis, tnat acknowledgement to which I was so justly enti- 
tled. Two numbers of the Chronicle have now been published since I 
offered to the world a vindication of my character; and the apology 
which your excellency gave me some reason to expect has not appeared ; 
I am therefore under a necessity of putting your Excellency in mind of a 
promise which you were pleased to make me, when I had the honour of 
waiting upon you. I don't doubt, Sir, but you will recollect the purport 

of your voluntary engagement that if, upon my denying in a public 

manner, the infamous insinuation, urged in the piece signed Lex Tali- 
onis, the author did not either make good his charge or off er me som pub- 
lic apology, your Excellency would make me acquainted with him; adding 
that you would not be concerned with any party which would refuse to 
do justice, 'tho' the gentlemen in the proprietary interest had never 
acted with the same generosity to yourself, for when ever they had 
rudely thrown any dirt, they had never offered to wipe it off, even after 
they were convinced that it was unjustly applyed 

I am led to repeat, in this particular manner, the very words which 
your excellency used, upon being informed that some busy impertinents 
have taken the liberty to assert, that your Excellency never made me 
such a promise. Of this your Excellency may very probably have been 
inform'd, as well as of the insolence with which I have been treated by 
the printer of the Chronicle. 1 I only mention these circumstances, to 
convince your Excellency that I am under a necessity of urging a per- 
formance of your Excellency's engagement; and I cannot but flatter 
myself, that your Excellency will not hesitate a moment to do this justice 
to 

Your most obedient humble Servant W. H. 

To W**m H*s, Esquire, 
SIR, 

You greatly misapprehended me, if you understood that I engaged to 

1 William Goddard was the editor at this time of the Pennsylvania 
Chronicle. 



362 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

acquaint you with the name of the author of Lex Talionis, in case he 
did not make you some acknowledgement, on your denying the charge 
you mention. I very well remember the whole of what passed between 
us on that point, and to prevent further mistakes, I think it necessary to 

repeat it On your complaining of the particular hardships you were 

laid under by the accusation, I told you that, if it was false, you ought 
rather to rejoice than be displeased, as it would give you a better oppor- 
tunity of clearing your character, of what had been long reported to your 
disadvantage, than you would otherwise have had, and besides be a 
means of bringing a disgrace on those who raised and propogated the 
report. Then L advised you to do as I had always done on the like occa- 
sion, when I thought the matter of consequence to my reputation ; which 
was to publish a few lines under your hand, declaring the report was 
absolutely false, and that you thereby called upon the author or authors 
either to make good the charge, or to do you the justice to acknowledge 
they had used you wrongfully, &c. &c. &c. 

As to what has passed between you and the Printer of the Chronicle, I 
was sorry to see it, and heartily wish for your own sake, that you had 
not necessarily lugged him into the qnarrei. I am, Sir, your most hum- 
Burlington, Friday. ble Servant W. F. 

P. S. I write in a great hurry, having people on business waiting in 
my office; and some interruptions have occasioned my detaining your 
servant longer than I could have wished. 

To his E y G r F**n. 

SIR, , 

I AM extremely unhappy to find myself under a necessity of assuring 
your excellency, that I am surpriz'd beyond measure at being told, that 
I must have misapprehended you when I understood that you engaged 
to give me the name of the author of Lex Talionis, if he refused to do me 
justice.... 

I shall now only beg your Excellency's pardon for having already taken 
up so much of your time in tedious detail. I do not, by any means, 
expect, Sir, that you will take any further notice of this incorrect scrawl, 
than just to tell me, in as few words as possible; whether your Ex- 
cellency will make me acquainted with the author of Lex Talionis, or 
give me an assurance, that he is not known to you. This your Excellency 
cannot consider as a very unreasonable alternative, since every moment, 

in which you continue silent, is a declaration, ''that it has not yet 

fallen in your way to Know the author." 

The politeness with which your Excellency has hitherto treated me, 
demands my grateful acknowledgements, and I can, with great sincerity 
assure you, Sir, that whatever determination you may think proper to 
make in this affair, I shall, with great reluctance, assume any other 
character than that of 

Your Excellency's 

Bristol, most obedient humble Servant, 

Saturday Morning. W. H. 

To W** H*, Esquire, 
SIR, 
I AM now so hurried in writing my letters to England, which are to go 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

tomorrow from Philadelphia, that I have it not in my power, if I thought 
it necessary, to give a particular answer to your letter of this morning. 
Only this much I must observe, that what I wrote you yesterday is 
strictly true, and though it may not be all that passed between us in our 
discourse on that point, yet I said nothing any ways contradictory to it, 
&c, &c. 

As to your now requiring me "to make you acquainted with the author 
"of Lex Talonis, or give you an assurance that he is not known to me," 
"I am at a loss to conceive what right you have to make such a requisi- 
tion to me, who are no ways interested in the disputes in Pennsylvania; 
"and 'till you do shew me that you have such a right, I shall not gratify 
"you with an answer, though your threats were as real as they are 
"implied. I am, Sir, 

Burlington, Your most humble servant 

Saturday Morning. W. F. 

TohisE....yG....rF**n. 
SIR, 

As to the requisition which I made to your Excellency, it was not 
founded upon any supposed right of urging a demand of this nature. I 
only meant to support it by a positive engagement from your Excellen- 
cy .. an engagement which I have published, and which I shall be ever 

ready to maintain at the risque of more than life 

This is a disagreeable conduct, which I shall consider as my duty to 
pursue, unless your Excellency may think proper to appoint some time 
and place where we may discuss this matter properly. If these measures 
may be censured as rash and percipitate, be pleased, sir, to consider 
what provocation I had, and, at the same time, do me the justice to be- 
lieve, that a sense of honor, without the least mixture "of malicious 
resentment, influences the behaviour of 

Your Excellency's 
Bristol, Saturday most obedient humble servant, 

Evening W. H. 

P. S. I am this moment going off for Philadelphia, where I shall wait 
your Excellency's commands till Tuesday next. 

To W** H* Esquire. 
SIB, 

I HAVE this moment received your letter, in reply of mine of this morn- 
ing; and have only to add, that whenever pleasure or business may call 
me out of my province, I shall not postpone going on account of your 
menace, and that I am not at all concerned at any thing you may have to 

say to me, when we may happen to meet I have in this whole affair 

acted as honourable a part by you, and given you as candid advice, as I 
could have done to a brother in such circumstances; I can therefore have 
no objection to your making my conduct as public as you please, if you 
confine yourself to truth. 

Saturday, I am, Sir, 

3 o'clock P. M. your humble Servant W. F. 1 

iThis is but a small portion of this correspondence, which fills four 
columns In this one number of the Journal. Mr. Hicks also had a news- 
paper quarrel with William Goddard. 



364 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

LONDON. 

Edinburgh, Feb. 26. A few days ago, one of the gov- 
ernors of the college of New-Jersey 1 in America, arrived 
here from London, and has brought with him, we are in- 
formed an authenticated copy of the election of the Revd. 
Dr. John Whetherspoon 2 of Paisly, near Glasgow, to the 
Presidentship of that college, in room of the Revd. Dr. 
Samuel Finley, lately deceased. 

TO BE SOLD, 

At PUBLIC VENDUE, 
On TUESDAY, the second day of June next, at two o'clock 

in the afternoon, 

A Well finished BRICK HOUSE, in Pennington, with 
four rooms on a floor, and a kitchen adjoining, conve- 
niently situated for a tavern, or store, with a garden and 
about eight acres of land adjoining. Also a let of pasture 
land near said house, containing about six acres. The 
vendue to.be held on the premises, and reasonable credit 
will be given. 

SAMUEL HUNT. 

THE creditors of JOSEPH YARD, late of Princetown, are 
requested to send in their accounts to the subscribers by 
the twentieth of June next, or they will be excluded from 
a dividend of his estate. 

JOHN WICKOFF, 

MOORE FURMAN. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1274, May 7, 1767. 

On Thursday last Mr. John Sawyer, of this Place, who 
had been missing about a Fortnight, was found drowned 
on the Jersey Shore, whither he had drove out of the 

Richard Stockton, of Princeton. 
2 Witherspoon. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. $65 

River Schuylkill. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 17, 
May 1 8, 1767. 

Stolen out of the Stable of William 

Crawford, Innkeeper, near Pequea Church, in West Calan 
Township, Chester County, in the Night between the pth 
and loth Days of May inst. a bay Mare, about 14 Hands 
high, with a small Star in her Forehead, a little lame in 
the fore Shoulder, and has a Lump, as big as a Hen's Egg, 
under the Collar, shod before, trots all, and is about 14 
Years old. Whoever takes up said Mare and Thief, shall 
have Fifty Shillings Reward, and reasonable Charges; 
and if the Mare only, Twenty Shillings, paid by 

PETER ECKLEY of 
WILLIAM CRAWFORD. 

N. B. The Mare belongs to said Eckley, from West- 
Jersey, and it is supposed she will be taken to Maryland. 

To BE SOLD, 

A VALUABLE plantation, containing about 340 acres of 
land, situate on the river Delaware, in Gloucester county, 
in the province of West New-Jersey, within 20 miles of 
Philadelphia, by water, and directly opposite Marcus 
Hook, having thereon a good dwelling house, barn, stable, 
out-house, and a good orchard; 125 acres cleared, and 
mostly under good fence, 75 acres of which is valuable 
drain meadow, in good order, well ditched and drained; 
and 45 acres more, already within good bank, may be 
made ; the upland may readily be manured with mud. 

Four acres of good cedar swamp, well covered with 
timber, situate about three miles from the above tract; 
one third part of Old Man's Creek Island, containing 140 
acres; also three two story brick houses, each 14 feet 
front, situate in Philadelphia, on the south side of Vine 



366 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

street, between Front and Second street. Any persons 
inclining to purchase, may knew the terms of sale, by ap- 
plying to William Brown, living on the first above de- 
scribed tract, or to Whitehead Jones, living at the upper 
end of Market-street, Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania 
Chronicle, No. 17, May 18, 1767. 

WHEREAS a certain Godfrey, absconded from the 
house of the subscriber, at Piscataqua, in New- 
Jersey, the 8th instant, in the night; and 'tis strongly 
conjectured, took with him, cash not his own Property, 
to the amount of . 16. He is about 19 years old, of a 
dark complexion, dark brown hair, and speaks good Eng- 
lish : Had on when he went off, a claret coloured coat 
with silk and hair buttons of the same colour, and a brown 
persian jacket. Whoever takes up the said Edward God- 
frey, and brings him to the subscriber, shall have FIVE 
POUNDS Reward, and reasonable charges paid, by 

JACOB MARTIN. 
The New York Mercury, No. 810, May n, 1767. 

THE House and lots of land, for- 
merly belonging to the French 
Dr. John Devausnee. now the prop- 

( ) erty of Dr. Abiather Millard, situate 

HOUSE { \ 
( ) m Aquacanack, on the west side of 

Passaick-River; A house with three 
rooms on a floor, and fire places in 
each ; a good garden, well, barn, and chair-house, together 
with a convenient wharf, nigh the door, for any boat of 20 
tons or under, to come to : The above lot of land contains 
about half an acre. An indisputable title to said premises, 
will be given; for further particulars inquire of Mr. Ga- 
briel H. Ludlow, merchant in New- York, or John Lud- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 367 

low, merchant near the premises. The New York Jour- 
nal or General Advertiser, No. 1271, May 14, 1767. 

The several Owners and Possessors of the Salt Marsh, 
called the Back Marsh, situate and lying in Alloway's 
Creek Township, Salem County, West-New-Jersey, have 
thought proper to advertise their Intention of laying be- 
fore the General Assembly of New- Jersey, their humble 
Petition, to make, keep up, and maintain a certain Bank, 
and other Water Works around the same, and to consti- 
tute all ten Feet Ditches therein lawful Fences; which 
Bank is to begin at the lower End of John Stretch's Point, 
called Eagle Point; from thence to Eagle Island; from 
the said Island to Deep Creek; up the same the several 
Courses to Little Creek; over the said Creek, along the 
several Courses of the Thoroughfare Creek, until opposite 
Ragged Island; then over the said Creek to the said 
Island; and from the said Island unto Home Island ; and 
from Home Island to the Fast Land, where Morris Bees- 
ly now lives, which is the lower End of Alloway's Creek 
Neck. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2003, May 14, 
1767. 



R 



UN -a way, from the Subsriber, 
the 24th of March last, living at 
Middletown Point in New-Jersey, a 
NEGRO MAN, named JOE, 6 Feet high, 
- long-visaged, with large Eyes, "a 



FIGURE OF A 

MAN RUN- 
NING, WITH 

STICK IN HIS smoct h-tongued Fellow, 'tis likely will 

HAND. , i XT j 3 v 

change his Name, and is about 30 
Years old : Had on when he went away, a grey home- 
spun Jacket, and a red one under it, an Ozenbrigs Shirt, a 
Pair of light-coloured Broad-cloth Breeches, patched in 
many Places, grey Woolen Stockings, and new Shoes. 



368 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Whoever takes up and secures the said Fellow, so that he 
may be had again, shall receive FIVE DOLLARS Reward, 
paid by 

WILLIAM HENDRICKSON. 

BROKE open, and escaped cut of the Goal in the Bor- 
ough of Elizabeth, in the Night of the nth In- 
stant, two Prisoners, namely, JOHN HARDY, and THOMAS 
GORDON : Hardy is this Country born, aged about 26 
Years, a short but well-set Man, of a fresh Complexion, 
somewhat Roman nosed, has a short Neck and dark col- 
our'd Hair; he calls himself a Fuller by Trade, is well 
clcthed, having one Coat of light-coloured Sagathee or 
Camblet, and a blue Cloth Coat, with divers other Cloath- 
ing. Gordon is about 40 Years of Age, was born in Scot- 
land, is near six Feet high; is spare, raw-boned, and long 
visag'd, his Hair of a light or sandy colour, braided : He 
has frequently taught School. Had on a brown Coat lap- 
pell'd, and a red Jacket; is a noted Fellon, and both of 
them notorious Villains; will likely change their Names 
and Apparel ; they carried off a Fusee and Ammunition, 
and are supposed to be otherwise armed, and intend to 
stand upon their Defence. Whoever will apprehend and 
secure in any of his Majesty's Goals the said Prisoners, 
or either of them, shall have FIVE POUNDS Reward for 
each secured, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 

ABRAHAM CLARK, Sheriff. 

N. B. The said GORDON, in some written Advertise- 
ments, is said to have no Coat, and a brown Jacket, which 
was a Mistake : It was one CHARLES GARRET was dressed 
in that Manner, who escaped at the same Time, for appre- 
hending whom Forty Shillings and all reasonable Char- 
ges will be paid. The New York Mercury, No. 81 1, May 
18, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 369 

A few Days ago his Excellency William Franklin, Esq; 
Governor of New Jersey, and his Lady, arrived in Town 
from Burlington; as did also the Lady and Daughter of 
his Excellency Sir Henry Moore, Bart, from New York. 
The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 18, May 25, 1767. 

To be sold at Public Vendue, 
At the Merchant's Coffee-House, on Tuesday the 28th 

July next; 

THE whole of the real Estate of Henry Cuyler, de- 
ceased, consisting of the following Houses and Lots of 
Land, viz. . . . 

A small Lot of Land in the Town of Hackensack. . . 
. . The Nezv York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1272, May 21, 1767. 

Somerset County, near Prince-Town, N. Jersey, May 
9, 1767. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward, 

RUN away from the Subscriber, about the 23d of April 
last, a Negroe Man, named Linden, about 33 Years old, 
about 5 Feet 9 or 10 Inches high, yellow Complexion, has 
had the Small-Pox, his fore Finger stiff, his Coat and 
Jacket of new homespun brown Broadcloth, good Leather 
Breeches, good Stockings, and good Hat; it is supposed 
he has obtained a Pass, and will try to pass for a free 
Negroe; he is addicted to strong Liquor, and when drunk 
troublesome. He pretends to be a Doctor. Whoever 
takes up said Slave, and secures him in any Goal, so that 
his Master may get him again, shall be intitled to the 
above Reward. Any Person who takes up said Negroe, 
is cautioned to be particularly careful that he does not 
make his Escape; he is remarkably stout, and a cunning 
artful Fellow. GIZEBERT LANE. 

24 



370 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

His Excellency the Governor of New -Jersey has, by 
Advice of Council, appointed the General Assembly of 
that Province to meet at Burlington, on Tuesday the 9th 
Day of June next, for the Dispatch of Business, and cir- 
cular Letters are issued to notify the same. 

The Three Brothers, Captain Bennet, from St. Chris- 
topher's to Wilmington, is ashore on Hereford Bar, to 
the Northward of Cape May, where it is feared she will 
be lost, but the Cargoe saved. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2004, May 21, 1767. 

RUN away from CHANGE WATER FORGE, in Sussex 
county, W T est New-Jersey, an English servant man, 
named William Williams, or perhaps may change his 
name to William Soubrian, about 45 years of age, 5 feet 
6 inches high, wears short black coloured hair; had on, 
when he went away, a blue surtout coat, an old blue under 
coat, with red lining, and no sleeves, long ozenbrigs trow- 
sers, made breeches fashion, coarse leather shoes, no 
stockings, and eld beaver hat; he talks in very high flown 
words when in drink, and may perhaps say he has been a 
clerk or schoolmaster, as he writes well, and talks good 
English. Any person or persons securing said servant, 
so as his master may have him again, shall be intitled to a 
reward of Thirty Shillings, and reasonable charges, paid 
by me 

JACOB STARN. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward 

RUN away, on the I3th instant, from the subscriber, 
living in Amwell, in New-Jersey, an Irish servant lad, 
named Thomas Wilkinson, about 19 years of age, small 
sized, of a fair complexion, straight hair, has two large 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 37 J 

scars on the insides of his thighs, near his private parts : 
Had on. when he went away, an old felt hat, two jackets, 
the under- jacket of a moss colour, and the upper one of 
light drugget, an old white shirt, petticoat trowsers, a 
pair of new strong shoes, tied with strings and a smith's 
apron. Whoever takes up the said servant, and secures 
him, so that his master may have him again, shall have 
the above reward of Four Dollars, and reasonable charges, 
paid by 

ISAAC RETTINGHOUSEN. 

N. B. If he is put into Philadelphia goal, apply to 
Jacob Bright, in Front-street, in said city. The Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2004, May 21, 1767. 

STOLEN, 

OUT of the house of Kendal Coles, in Gloucester coun- 
ty, in the night between the nth and I2th of this instant, 
a SILVER WATCH maker's name Charlton, London, No. 
2079, nas a China face, with a leather string, and key, but 
without any seal. If the said watch should be offered to 
be pawned or sold to any person, they are desired to stop 
both thief and watch : And as a reward for both, they 
shall have FIVE POUNDS, and FORTY SHILLINGS for the 
watch only, paid by 

KENDAL COLES. 

THE subscriber hereof unfortunately, in the month of 
May, 1765, being concerned in the Lamberton fishery, 
with Mr. Thomas Riche, has suffered greatly in person 
and trade; and to prevent any further impositions in the 
manufacturing or sale of the subscriber's Sturgeon, he 
takes this method to inform the public, that there was 
no fish cured or put up at the said Lamberton, by the 
subscriber or wife, since the latter end of July following; 



372 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

being then dispossessed by the said Mr. Riche. In the 
Pennsylvania Journal, dated June 2Oth, 1765, there was 
advertised, "Choice pickled Sturgeon, cured in the best 
manner, &c. by Edward Broadfield, and sold at the said 
Thomas Riche's store, &c." setting forth the conveniences 
for curing the said Sturgeon, and that the work had cost 
a large sum to compleat them, and then concluded, saying 
very cunningly, "this fish received the first premium from 
the society of arts and commerce in London, last year." 
This manner of advertising was without consent or knowl- 
edge of the subscriber, so that it appears by that adver- 
tisement, the subscriber was his servant or hireling, and 
that Lamberton fish got the bounty. The subscriber there- 
fore in justice to himself, is obliged to certify to the pub- 
lic, that the fish which received the Fifty Pounds sterling, 
as a bounty or premium, was not the Lamberton fish, but 
the Sturgeon cured at Gloucester, in the year 1764, by 
the subscriber only, and no other person concerned with 
him, and that no other person concerned with him since, 
was ever made acquainted with his method of manufac- 
turing the said fish, any more than the servile labour at- 
tending it. The subscriber carries on the curing of Stur- 
geon in Kensington, and will be obliged to all persons 
that will favour him with their orders, and may depend 
on having such Sturgeon as shall give credit to the place 
where cured, and an universal applause wherever it shall 
or may be sent. 

N. B. Observe when you open the kegg, first take out 
the cork, and draw of the pickle into some dry bowl or 
pan, then put in the cork tight, and take cut that head 
which is not branded, drive on the hoops again, and pour 
on the pickle you drew off, then put a cloth over the cask, 
and the head on that cloth, with a small weight thereon 
to keep out the air, and you may keep it the year round : 



T/67] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 373 

If the pickle should fall below the fish, add as much neat 
vinegar as will cover it. Said fish is to be sold by the 
subscriber, EDWARD BROADFIELD, and by no other person. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1276, May 21, 1767. 

Since our last their Excellencies the Governors of New- 
Jersey and New-Hampshire, left this City for their re- 
spective Governments. The Lady and Daughter of Sir 
Henry Moore, also set out for New- York. 

To be SOLD, 

A Valuable WATER LOT and WHARF thereon, situate in 
the district of South-work f containing 60 feet front on the 
river Delaware, very convenient whereon to erect a Ferry 
(for which it is nozv used) it being opposite the ferry 

lately erected in New-Jersey Apply at the ferry 

aforesaid, to 

ARTHUR DONALDSON. 

All persons indebted to the estate of James Donaldson, 

HANNAH DONALDSON, Executrix. 
ARTHUR DONALDSON, Executor. 
The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 19, June I, 1767. 

New-York, May 25. Thursday last four 3 Year old 
Coalts started at Woodbridge in New- Jersey, for a Plate 
of 20, which was won by one belonging to Mr. Farmat. 
The Neiv York Mercury, No. 812, May 25, 1767. 

Philadelphia, May 21. A few Days ago' his Excellency 
William Franklin, Esq; Governor of New-Jersey, and his 
Lady, arrived in Town from Burlington. 

WHEREAS I Joseph Sackett. jun. late of Somerset- 
County, in the province of New-Jersey, Physician, by a 



3/4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. f 1767 

certain Letter of Attorney under my Hand and Seal, bear- 
ing Date about 7 or 8 Months ago, did make, Ordain, Con- 
stitute and Appoint, Edmond Leslie of the same Place, 
Gentleman, my lawful Attorney, to dispose of Lands, and 
to Transact other Business in my behalf, in the said 
County and Province. I do hereby give Notice, that I 
have for divers good Causes and Considerations me there- 
unto moving, revoked and by these Presents, do utterly 
revoke, disannul and make void, said Letter of Attorney, 
and all Power and Authority, to him the said Edmond 
Leslie, therein given. Witness my Hand in Jamaica, Nas- 
sau Island, 1 25th May, 1767. 

JOSEPH SACKETT, jun. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1273, May 28, 1767. 

WANTED, 

A MAN that has been brought up a butcher, and hath 
judgment in buying cattle, &c. Any such person, well 
recommended for sobriety, honesty and industry, may 
meet with good encouragement, by applying to STACY 
POTTS, at Trenton. 

BY Virtue of several Writs of Venditioni Exponas to 
me directed, on Thursday, the nth Day of June next, 
between the Hours of 12 and 5 in the Afternoon of said 
Day, will be exposed to Sale by public Vendue, at the 
House of William Hugg, Innkeeper, in the Town of Glou- 
cester, all that valuable Lot of Wood-land and Meadow, 
called Mattson's Grove, situate in the Township of Dept- 
ford, bounded on the North by Delaware River, on the 
West by Little Mantua Creek, and on the South and East 
by Lands of Isaac Andrews, Moses Coxe, Biddle Reeves, 

1 Long Island, N. T. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 375 

&c. said to contain 46 Acres, one Half of which is im- 
proved Meadow, well secured from the Overflowing of 
the Tide, and the Residue exceeding well timbered : late 
the Estate of Peter Mattson; seized and taken in Execu- 
tion by 

SAMUEL BLACK WOOD, Sheriff. 

Run away on the I7th of this instant May, from the 
Subscriber, living at the Head of Alloway's Creek, in the 
County of Salem, and Province of West New- Jersey, a 
Dutch Servant Man, named John Erhard Schlagel, about 
30 Years of Age, and about 5 Feet 7 Inches high, stoop 
shouldered, dark Complexion, dark brown Hair, middling 
long, grey Eyes, and hath a large Scar on the right Side 
of his Face, from near the Corner of his Eye to near the 
Corner of his Mouth, occasioned by a Cut, he talks very 
poor English, says he can talk the German, French, Span- 
ish and Portuguese Languages: had on and took with 
him, a redish brown Cloth Coat, double breasted, without 
Lining, with white Metal flat Buttons, a blue and white 
striped Linen Jacket, without Sleeves, a Pair of Kersey 
Breeches, Sheep's natural black and white, and a Pair of 
linen Ditto white, two Linen Homespun Shirts, a half 
worn Felt Hat, two Pair of white Yarn Stockings, a Pair 
of strong Shoes, half worn, both run crooked to the left 
Side, with Strings in them. Whoever takes up and se- 
cures said Servant, so as his Master may have him again, 
shall have Thirty Shillings Reward, and reasonable Char- 
ges, paid by 

WILLIAM OAKFORD. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to carry him 
off at their Peril. 

Burlington, May n, 1767. 
This is to give public notice, that a certain lad, who 



376 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

calls himself Thomas Coyn, on the gth day of April last, 
was committed to the goal of the city of Burlington, on 
suspicion of being a runaway. He says he was bound to 
one Robert Seton, of Dublin, and that he came to Phila- 
delphia some time ago with one Alexander Seton, and 
then left his captain. This therefore is to desire his mas- 
ter or captain, if any he has to come and pay charges, and 
take him away, otherwise he will be sold out in three 
weeks from the date hereof, by 

EPHRAIM PHILIPS, Goaler. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2005, May 28, 
1767. 

TO BE SOLD 

In pursuance of the last will and testament of William 
Cooper, late of the city of Philadelphia, deceased, 

A CERTAIN MESSUAGE and LOT of ground thereunto be- 
longing, situate on the bank of the river Delaware, be- 
tween Front-street and Water-street, opposite the Old 

Ferry, in the city of Philadelphia The whole 

rented for 100 1. per annum. 

Also a certain Yearly RENT CHARGE of FIVE POUNDS 
issuing and payable out of a lot of ground situate on the 
East-side of Second-street (nearly opposite to the Bap- 
tist-meeting house) in the city of Philadelphia, new in 
the occupation of Nathan Cook. For further particulars, 
apply to JACOB COOPER, in Philadelphia, or WILLIAM. 
COOPER, at Cooper's P'erry in Gloucester county, New- 
Jersey. 

ALL PERSONS that are indebted to the estate of WILL- 
IAM COOPER, late of the city of Philadelphia, deceased, by 
bond, note or book debt, are requested to make speedy 
payment, and those that have any just demands against 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 377 

the said estate are desired to bring in their accounts, in 
order to have them settled and paid by 

JACOB COOPER and WILLIAM COOPER, Executors, 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1277, May 28, 
1767. 

TO be sold, in East-New-Jersey, in the county of 
Somerset, on Passaick-River, within two miles of 
Baskinriclge Meeting house, a farm or tract of land, con- 
taining about 150 Acres, either the whole or part thereof, 
as may best suit the purchaser; there is on it twoi good 
dwelling houses, and two good orchards, within 300 yards 
of each other, with several other fruit trees; great part 
of which is good plowland and meadow ; its well situated 
for a merchant or shop-keeper, as there is now a store 
kept on it; it may likewise suit a tavern-keeper or any 
tradesman; within half a quarter of a mile of a good 
grist-mill and saw-mill; it lies within 20 miles of Eliza- 
beth-Town-Point, and 1 6 of New-Brunswick; the whole 
will be sold very reasonable. Whoever inclines to pur- 
chase, may apply to the subscriber, living on the premises, 
who will give an indisputable title for the same, and dis- 
pose of it as soon as an opportunity presents. 

JOHN BOYLE. 
The New York Mercury, No. 813, June i, 1767: 

Edinburgh, March 10. On Saturday last Richard 
Stockton, Esq; an eminent American Lawyer, who has 
been in this City for about a Fortnight past, set out on 
his return to London. The Day before he left us, the 
Lord Provost, sent him with several of his Friends, an 
Invitation to a public Dinner; after which the Dean of 
Guild, by his Lordship's Command, presented him with 



37 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the Freedom of the City : On which Occasion Mr. Stock- 
ton, made the following Address. 

"My Lord Provost. The unexpected Honour which 
your Lordship, as the Head of the Magistracy and Town 
Council, of this ancient and respectable City, has been 
pleased to bestow upon me, demands my most grateful 
Acknowledgments ; and altho' I cannot natter myself 
with having merited this distinction, yet I shall always 
retain the highest Sense of your Lordship's Favour: and 
beg Leave to assure your Lordship of the great Esteem 1 
have for the Lord Provost, Magistracy, and Town Coun- 
cil of Edinburgh, and of my constant Wishes for the 
Prosperity of this Metropolis of N. Britain." 

New-York, June 4. A few Days ago, the extraordi- 
nary Size of a Calf of 3 Days old, belonging to Mr. Jos- 
eph Van Martyr, of Middletcwn, in New- Jersey, induced 
him to weigh it, when he found the weight to be 98 ft>. 

Publicola's Piece, if he pleases may yet be inserted, but 
would hardly be sufficiently intelligible without further 
Explanation. 

STOLEN or stray'd last Wednesday, 

May the 2/th Ult. from Sea-Corkes, 

TFiGURE OF A 1 at Commissary Lake's Farm, * 

[ dark Bay Gelding, about 14 Hands 
[HORSE RUNNING] high; bmnded with the Letters R 

G. on his near Shoulder; a piece of 
Lead platted in his Mane, and fall- 
ing on the near Side, and has some white Hair in his Tail. 
Whoever brings the said Gelding, to Powles Hook Ferry, 
or from whence he stray'd, shall have Twenty Shillings 
Reward. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 379 

Mr. HOLT, 

Please to give the following a Place in your next Thurs- 
day's Paper. 

Bergen Commons, New-Jersey. 

THESE Lands have been in Dispute a great many Years, 
and much Money has been expended by the Parties. The 
Legislature of this Province, at last, appointed seven Gen- 
tlemen as Commissioners, finally to> determine the Prop- 
erty of the Commons, six of them acted, and their general 
Plan was, to allow a proportionate Share of Commons to 
such as were in Possession of the patented Lands, unless 
the Conveyances mentioned a Reservation, I am in- 
formed they allowed a Partition of Commons to some in 
Bergen, who could produce no other Title for their pat- 
ented Lots, than a Record in the Town Book of such Lots 
being sold at Vendue, without any mention of Commons : 
And this Conduct seems to be agreeable to the Spirit of 
the Charter. They found Sekakus within the limits of 
the Charter, and appointed a Part of the Commons to Se- 
kakus. Mr. Bayard now claiming the Commons of Se- 
kakus ; seme Pains were taken to the prove to the Com- 
missioners the Impropriety of this Claim; and five of Six 
voted against his Claim, the other (tho' he made use of 
Arguments against it) did not give his Voice. There was 
no Occasion for it, as a Majority determined the Matter. 

Mr. Bayard still continues his Claim, ridiculous as it 
is, but I cannot see any Propriety in his endeavouring to 
obstruct the finally settling the other Claim.. Therefore 
hope the Legislature will, for the East and Benefit of the 
true Owners, make some Provision at their next Session, 
for the fixing of Property, and not Regard the Claim of 
him who ought to have been convinced of the Impropriety 
of it long ago. But even supposing (tho' far from grant- 
ing) his Claim to be founded on the Appearance of Jus- 



380 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

tice, can any reasonable Man believe, that if Mr. Bayard 
supposed himself in the Right he would want the Decision 
put oiff to some future Day ? 

To convince one of the Unjustness of his Claim to a 
Thing, is not always sufficient to cause him to give it up. 

The bare Power of keeping People out of the Posses- 
sion of their Property has sometimes been a sufficient 
Reason for the doing it. 

Jos. SACKETT, jun. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1274, June 4, 1767. 

The middle colonies, New-York, New- Jersey and Penn- 
sylvania, have never suffered by any rise of exchange, it 
having ever been a constant rule there to consider British 
debts as payable in Britain, and not to be discharged but 
by as much paper (whatever might be the rate of ex- 
change) as would purchase a bill for the full sterling sum. 
On the contrary, the merchants have been great gainers 
by the use of paper money in those colonies ; as it enabled 
them to vend much greater quantities of goods, and the 
purchasers to pay more punctually for them. And the 
people there make no complaint of any injury done them 
by paper money with a legal tender; they are sensible of 
its benefits, and petition to have it so allowed. [Extract 
from an article headed] REMARKS on the REPORT pub- 
lished in our last Paper. By B. F. Esquire [and begin- 
ning] In the report of the Board of Trade, dated Febru- 
ary 9, 1764, the following reasons are given for restrain- 
ing the emission of paper bills of credit in America, as a 
legal tender 

I. That it carries the gold and silver out of the prov- 
ince, and so ruins the country, as experience has shewn 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

in every colony, where it has been practised in any great 
degree. 

2. That the merchants trading to America have suf- 
fered and lost by it 

New-York and New Jersey have also increased and im- 
proved greatly during the same period (since 1723) with 
the use of paper money, so that it does not appear to be 
of the ruinous nature ascribed to it. 

FROM Fairfield, in Cumberland County, New-Jersey, 
we learn, that last Thursday Se'nnight, as a Lad was plow- 
ing in a Field, a Thunder-gust came on, when a sharp 
Flash of Lightning killed five Oxen out of six that were 
in the Plow; the Lad was likewise struck down at the 
same time, but happily recovered again soon afterwards. 

Haddonfield, 6th month ist, 1767. 
IF there be any persons that have any just demands 
against the estate of Thomas Redman, late of Haddon- 
field, shopkeeper, deceased, they are desired to send their 
accompts to the subscribers, that they may be paid. And 
all persons indebted to said estate, are again requested to 
discharge their respective accompts, or give bond to the 
legatees, to enable the executors to make a settlement of 
said estate. Such as do not comply as aforesaid, must 
excuse us in taking methods to compel them thereto, with- 
out further notice from MARY REDMAN, THOMAS RED- 
MAN, and JOHN REDMAN, Execut. 

To be sold, by way of public vendue, in Woodberry, on 
Monday, the 22d of this instant June, a lot of land, con- 
taining 15 acres, on which there is a good dwelling-house 
and orchard, and a draw-well of very good water ; one 
half of said land will make good pasture of meadow, part 
of which is cleared and fit for mowing, Also a lot of 



382 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

woodland, containing four acres, near the aforesaid land. 
The titles indisputable. The purchaser may have a 
twelvemonth, for the payment of One Hundred Pounds, 
on paying interest, and giving security if required. The 
vendue to begin at 10 o'clock in the morning, on the prem- 
ises, where attendance will be given by 

JOHN SHARP. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2006, June 4, 1767. 

From the London Chronicle, April nth, 1767. 
THE propriety of taxing America by laws made here 
is frequently handled in public papers and pamphlets by 
writers, who seem not well acquainted with the circum- 
stances of that country, or with the points in dispute. 
Will you give me leave, through your paper, to offer some 
information, that may be of use to them in their future 
discussions. The following positions are generally taken 
for granted. 

1. That the colonies were settled at the expence of 
parliament. 

2. That they received their constitutions from parlia- 
ment, which could not be supposed to give away its own 
powers of taxing them. 

3. That they have been constantly protected from the 
Indians, at the expence of money granted by parliament. 

4. That the two last wars were entered into for their 
protection. 

5. That they refused to contribute towards the ex- 
pence of those wars. 

6. That they are great gainers by the event of the last 
war. 

7. That they pay no taxes. 

8. That they contend the parliament of Great-Britain 
has no authority over them. 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



Upon these positions assumed as facts, there has been 
much declamation, on the unreasonableness, selfishness, 
ingratitude of the Colonists, (some have even used the 
word rebellion) and government is urged to proceed 
against them by force of arms. Let us coolly consider 
these positions, one by one. 

1. That the colonies ivere settled at the expence of par- 
liament. If we examine our records, the journals of 
parliament, we shall not find that a farthing was ever 
granted for the settling any colonies before the last reign, 
and then only for Georgia and Nova Scotia, which are 
still of little value. But the colonies of New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New- York, (as 
far as the English were concerned in it) New- Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North and South Car- 
olina, &c., were settled at the private expence of the ad- 
venturers. 

2. That they received their constitutions from parlia- 
ment, which could not be supposed to give away its own 
power of taxing them.- The charters themselves shew 
that they were granted by the king ; and the truth is, that 
parliament had no participation in these grants, and was 
not so much as consulted upon them. The right to the 
territory in America, was supposed to be in the King, that 
is, so far as to exclude the claim of any other European 
Prince ; but in reality was in the tribes of Indians who 
inhabited it, and from whom the settlers were obliged to 
purchase or conquer it at their own expence, without any 
expence to parliament. But they settled there with the 
King's leave, promising him their allegiance, which they 
hold faithfully to this day. 

3. That they have been constantly protected from the 
Indians at the expence of parliament. No grants for that 
purpose appear on our records, and the fact is, that they 



384 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

protected themselves at their own expence, for near 150 
years after the first settlement, and never thought of apply- 
ing to parliament for any aid against the Indians. 

4. That the two last wars ivere entered into for their 
protection. The truth is, that the war with Spain, 1739, 
was occasioned by the Spaniards interrupting with their 
guarda costas the British trade, carried on indeed in the 
American seas, but in the British ships chiefly, and wholly 
with British manufacturers. It was therefore, a war for 
the protection of our commerce, and not for the protection 
of the people of America. 1 

(signed) BENEVOLUS 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1278, June 4, 
1767. 

From a late London Paper. 
To the PRINTER. 

If any man doubts of the evils that arise to a state from 
granting vast tracts of lands to individuals, let him only 
think of Russia and Poland, where the people having no 
property in the lands are absolutely slaves ; or of Germany, 
France and Denmark 

But in the very next colony to these, (Boston, Connec- 
ticut and Rhode Island) I mean New York, the case is 
very different; for there many enormous grants were made 
by the Crown to individuals, of 20 miles square. These 
are not one fourth part settled at this time, and such 
people, who are seated on those lands, are all tenants at 
will. New- Jersey w r as disposed of much in the same man- 
ner, and therefore occasion endless perplexities and law- 

i The foregoing Is the flrst part of an article two and one-third col- 
umns in length. Query: Was It written by Richard Stockton, of New 
Jersey? 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 8 5 

suits. As to Pennsylvania, it is, perhaps, the most enor- 
mous grant that was ever made to a subject. 1 

(signed) MARCUS AURELIUS. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 21, June 8-15, 
1767. 

Just published at the New-Printing-Office, in 
Beaver-Street; 2 

The History of the Colony of 
Nova-Caesaria, or NEW-JERSEY. 

Containing an Account of its first settlement, Progressive 
improvements, the original and present Constitution, 
and other Events, to the year 1721. With some Par- 
ticulars since; and a short View of its present State. 
By SAMUEL SMITH. 

THIS is to give Notice to all persons that have any 
Demands on the estate of WILLIAM CLAWSON, of 
Cranbury, Middlesex County, New- Jersey, are desired to 
deliver in their Accounts properly attested, to the As- 
signees of said Estate, by the first of September next, oth- 
erwise they will be excluded from a Dividend. All Per- 
sons indebted to said Estate are requested to discharge the 
same by the loth of July next, otherwise they may expect 
Trouble, without further notice from said Assignees. 

NICHOLAS HOFFMAN, 
STEPHEN FORM AN. 
The New York Mercury, No. 814, June 8, 1767. 

Philadelphia, June 2, 1767. 

RUN-AWAY Yesterday, from John Roberts, and Richard 
Hacket, of Mannington Township, Salem County, New- 
Jersey, two Irish Servant Men; one named Patrick Hus- 



1 The article is three-fourths of a column In length. 

2 The printing office of James Parker, who printed the History at 
Burlington, N. J. 

25 



386 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

sey, a lusty Man, about 21 Years of Age, about 5 Feet 10 
Inches high, a little Pock-marked, and has black Hair; 
had on a new Felt Hat, Homespun grey Jacket and 
Breeches, with Stockings and Shoes. The other named 
Richard Hannaly, a short chunky Fellow, 20 Years of 
Age, has long fair Hair, and of a fair Complexion; when 
he looks into a Person's face is apt to Wink or close one 
of his Eyes; had on a new Felt Hat, a lightish coloured 
Homespun Cloth Jacket, two Pair of Trowsers, and took 
with him a Pair of double soaled Shoes, and a Pair of 
Pumps, the Shoes with Strings. Whoever takes up and 
secures said Servants in any Gaol, so as their Masters may 
have them again, shall have Four Pounds Reward for 
both, and reasonable Charges; or Forty Shillings for 
each, with Charges, paid by 

JOHN ROBERTS, AND 
RICHARD HACKET. 

N. B. The first mentioned (Hussey) has likewise with 
him a blue grey Jacket, without Sleeves. The New York, 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1275, June n, 1767. 

Boston, June 4. By a Letter from a Gentleman in Edin- 
burgh to another in this Town, dated March 25th we are 
informed. That the Rev'd Doctor WITHERSPOON, has 
'embraced the invitation of the Trustees of New-Jersey 
College, to the President's Chair, which for some Time 
past has been vacant by the Death of the Rev'd Doctor 
PINLEY: That he is a Gentleman of superior Genius, 
-Learning and Piety, and in most respects eminently qual- 
ified for the important Office to which he is elected : That 
he was then engaged in forwarding a new Collection of 
Books for the Library of that College; and it was sup- 
posed would embark for America about the first of June. 1 

i Also published in the Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1279, June 11, 1767 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 387 

Philadelphia, June 8. We hear that Maurice Morgan, 
Esq; Secretary of the Province of New-Jersey, has ap- 
pointed Joseph Reed, Esq; of Trenton, Deputy Secretary 
of the Said Province. And that Jacob Kollock, jun. Esq., 
is appointed Collector of His Majesty's Customs at Lewis- 
town, on Delaware. Supplement to the New York Jour- 
nal or General Advertiser, No. 1275, June n, 1767. 

RUN away from the subscriber in the township of Am- 
well, in the county of Hunterdon and province of New- 
Jersey, on the 3Oth day of May last, an Irish servant lad, 
named Arthur Sennet, about 19 years of age, about 5 feet 
4 or 5 inches high, darkish coloured hair, fair skin, marked 
with small pox, apt to get in liquor, and when so, talks 
much in the sea-faring way, as he has been on board sev- 
eral vessels; had on, when he went away, a blue broadcloth 
coat, lately turned; with yellow metal buttons, a striped 
blue and white ticken jacket, an old pair of nankeen 
breeches, blue woollen stockings and a pair of almost new 
pumps, with yellow metal buckles. It is thought he will 
endeavour to get to New- York or Philadelphia, and get on 
board of some vessel. Whoever secures said servant in 
any goal, so that his master may have him again, shall have 
FORTY SHILLINGS reward, and reasonable charges, paid by 

THOMAS READING. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2007, June IT, 
1767. 

NEW- YORK, June 8. 

Last Wednesday Capt. Elder arrived here in 8 weeks 
from London, but brings nothing later than we have al- 
ready. Sunday he spoke with Capt. Goodridge in the 
Packet bound home, and the next day with Capt. Lyell 



388 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

from Amboy for Madeira, about 50 leagues off. The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1279, June n, 1767. 

Arrived at Jamaica, Captain Ward from Salem. The 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 22, June 15-22, 1767. 

Just published and to be sold at the Printing-Office near 

the Exchange : 

SERMONS 

ON THE 

Most USEFUL and IMPORTANT 

SUBJECTS. 

ADAPTED TO THE 

FAMILY AND CLOSET. 

By the Rev. SAMUEL DAVIES, A. M. 

Late President of the College at Princeton, in New-Jersey. 

IN THREE VOLUMES. 

To which are prefixed, 

A SERMON on the Death of Mr. DAVIES, 

By SAMUEL FINLEY, D. D. 

AND 

Another DISCOURSE on the same Occasion, 

together with an ELEGIAC POEM 

to the memory of Mr. DAVIES, 

By THOMAS GIBBONS, D. D. 

Gloucester County, June 9, 1767. 
To be sold by Way of public Vendue, on the Premises, 
on Monday, the 29th Instant, a good Saw-mill, in good 
Repair, situate on Miry Run, in Great Egg-harbour Town- 
ship, and Gloucester aforesaid, together with 1670 Acres 
of Pine and Oak Land thereunto belonging ; there is by 
the Mill a good Frame Dwelling-house, Barn, and other 
Out-houses; also about 50 Acres of mowable Meadow, or 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 389 

Salt-marsh, within about three Quarters of a Mile from 
said Mill ; likewise, a commodious Landing, where Vessels 
of 90 Tons burthen may come to and load, being about 
Half a Mile from the said Mill, on Great Egg-harbour 
River. The whole is extremely well situate to suit a Mer- 
chant. The Conditions of Sale will be made known at 
the Time and Place of Sale, where proper Attendance will 
be given by JACOB LYCAN, THOMAS COLLET. 

N. B. The Sale to begin at One o* Clock on said Day.: 



R 



FIGURE OF 



A SLAVE 



RUNNING. 



New- York, June 13, 1767. 
AN-away, the 8th inst. June, from 
the Subscriber, at Ramapough, a 
Negro Man named Hack, about 30 
Years of Age, 5 Feet 4 Inches high, 
well set, had on a white Broadcloth 
Coat, a bla~ck Calimanco Waistcoat, 
yellow Breeches and black Stockings ; 
Whoever takes up the said Negro, and 
returns or secures him, so that his 
Masters shall get him again, shall have Forty Shillings 
New- York Money Reward; and all Persons are hereby 
warned not to entertain, conceal, or remove him away, 
as they will answer it at their Peril : Note, he is suspected 
to be now in New- York. He speaks Dutch and English 
well. 

LAWRENCE JACOBUS VAN BUSKIRCK. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1276, June 1 8, 1767. 

BURLINGTON,, June TO, 1767. 

The SPEECH of Plis Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, 
Esq ; Captain General and Governor in Chief in and over 
His Majesty's Province of New- Jersey, and Territories 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

thereon depending in America, Chancellor, and Vice-Ad- 
miral in the same, &c. 

Gentlemen of the Council, and Gentlemen of the General 

Assembly. 

Having nothing in Command from the Crown, which 
required your immediate Attention, I deferred meeting 
you till this Time, in Hopes of having it in my Power, to 
acquaint you with the Resolutions of Parliament respect- 
ing a Paper Currency in America, A Matter, I have 
Reason to believe, you have much at Heart, and of which 
it would therefore have afforded me great Pleasure to have 
been enabled to give you some satisfactory Intelligence. 
When the last Advices left England it was under Consid- 
eration, and probably before you rise we may learn the 
Event. 

Agreeable to your Requests at the last Sessions, I trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State your respective Addresses 
to His Majesty; and have now the Happiness of commun- 
icating to you a Letter I have since received from the 
Right Honourable the Earl of Shelburne, signifying His 
Majesty's most gracious Reception of those Addresses, 
and Approbation of the Behaviour of the Colony during 
the late Disturbances in America. To have our Conduct 
so happily approved by the best of Sovereigns, cannot fail 
of animating us in our future Endeavours to merit the 
Royal Favour. 

Gentlemen of the General Assembly. 

The Provision made at the last Sessions, for supplying 
such of the King's Troops as might come within this 
Colony, with Necessaries, has proved considerably defi- 
cient : I must therefore recommend it to you to discharge 
the Sums which have been advanced by the Treasurers 
and Barrack-Masters, on this Account; and to make Pro- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 39 l 

vision for the further Support of those Troops, in the 
Manner His Majesty expects. You will probably think 
it necessary, for the future, to place a greater Confidence, 
on these Occasions, in the proper Officers of Government 
(who have always manifested their Frugality and Oecon- 
omy with Regard to the Public) and not put them under 
the disagreeable Necessity of advancing Money at the 
Risque of their private Fortunes, or of applying for a 
Meeting of the Assembly on every new or unforseen Ap- 
plication from the General. 

I must likewise recommend it to you, Gentlemen, to 
reward the Persons who were most active in apprehending 
the Villains lately executed for the Murder of the Oneida 
Indian in Sussex and the two Delaware Squaws in the 
County of Burlington. You will find by a Letter from Sir 
William Johnston, which I shall order to be laid before 
you, that these Instances of the Justice of our Province, 
are likely to be productive of the most beneficial Effects 
to the British Interest with the several Indian Nations on 
the Frontiers of this and the neighbouring Colonies. 

Gentlemen of the Council and Gentlemen of the General 
Assembly. 

Though the Season of the Year is somewhat advanced 
beyond the usual Time of your doing Business, yet I 
doubt not but a Continuance of that Harmony, which has 
subsisted among us, will enable you to dispatch, without 
Inconvenience to yourselves, all Matters of Importance 
which may come under your Consideration at this Meet- 
ing. 

Council Chamber, W. FRANKLIN. 

Burlington, June 10, 1767. 

A Copy of a Letter from the Right Honourable the 
Earl of SHELBURNE, one of His Majesty's Principal Sec- 



3Q2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

retaries of State, to His Excellency Governor FRANKLIN, 
referred to in the foregoing Speech. 

SIR, Whitehall, 13th September, 1766. 

I HAVE laid before the King your Letter of the 19th of June, together 
with the addresses therein inclosed, from the Council, and from the As- 
sembly of New- Jersey, on Occasion of the Repeal of the late Stamp Act, 
which could not fail of being very agreeable to His Majesty His Majesty 
is greatly pleased with the dutiful and prudent Behaviour of His loyal 
Colony of New- Jersey, during the late Disturbances in America: And 
I have the Pleasure to acquaint you, Sir, of His Majesty's gracious Ap- 
probation of your Conduct. 

The Ease and Honour of His Majesty's Government in America, will 
greatly depend on the Temper and Wisdom of those who are intrusted 
with the Administration there. A Conduct regulated by just and liberal 
Principles, suffering no Encroachment on the one Hand, on His Majesty's 
just and Lawful Prerogative, and, on the other, beholding, with Pleasure, 
the prudent and decent Exercise of that Freedom, which belongs to the 
People, cannot fail of engaging the Hearts of His Majesty's American 
Subjects, and of continuing in New-Jersey that dutiful Disposition" 
towards His Majesty, and Confidence in Government, which you repre- 
sent, so much to its Honour, to have prevailed there. 
I am, with Truth and Regard, 

Sir, your most obedient humble servant, 

SHKLBURNE. 

The Subscriber begs leave to inform the Public, that 
he has removed from Burlington to the City of Philadel- 
phia, in Almond-street, a few Doors from the Blue Bell, 
on Society-Hill, where he proposes to practice all Branches 
of Physic and Surgery. He undertakes particularly to 
cure, with small Expense and Pain to the Patient, Cancers 
and Wens, without cutting them, the King's Evil, venereal 
Disorders, without Sallivation; Rupture, Strangury and 
Stone; and as he has had great Experience and Success in 
all the above Diseases, he hopes, by the divine Blessing, to 
be able to give Relief to any distressed Persons, afflicted 
with them, that shall apply to him. He takes Patients 
into his House, and boards and lodges them, if desired. 

THOMAS WIRE. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2008, June 18, 
1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 393 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

STOLEN out of the pasture of the subscriber, living in 
Hanover Township, Burlington County, West New-Jer- 
sey, on the night of the twelfth inst. June, a valuable mare, 
five years old last spring, about 14 hands and a half high, 
of a black colour, with a considerable number of white 
hairs about her head and tail, trots and hand gallops well, 
part blooded, neither brand nor ear mark. Likewise two 
saddles taken at the same time, one almost new,, with 
green plush housings, and surcingle, the other something 
more worn, with blue plush housings, and a shot-hole 
through the near skirt. Whoever secures the said Mare, 
so that the subscriber may have her again, shall have 
THREE POUNDS reward; and if the thief is taken and 
brought to Justice, FORTY SHILLINGS more, and all reason- 
able charges, paid by 

SAMUEL WRIGHT. 

RUN-AWAY from the subscriber on the loth inst. a Mus- 
quitto Shore Indian, named Jack, about five feet six or 
seven inches high, thick set, about twenty one years old. 
with long black hair, which he generally wears tied behind, 
took with him a fiddle, plays badly on it. Had on a half 
worn felt hat, a lightish coloured stuff coat, a blue broad- 
cloth waistcoat, oznabrigs' shirts and trousers, a pair of 
old shoes with brass buckles, he also took with him- a fine 
shirt. Whoever takes up said slave, secures him in any 
goal on the continent so that he may be had again, or 
brings him to the subscriber, at Whitehill, in Burlington 
county, West Jersey, shall have THREE POUNDS reward, 
and reasonable charges paid by ROBERT FIELD. 

N. B. All persons are forwarned harbouring him, and 
all masters of vessels taking him off at their peril. The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1280, June 18, 1767. 



394 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Arrivals. 
At Barbados. Hosier, from Burlington. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Piscataway, 
near E. Jersey, an Irish Servant Man named EDWARD 
GODFREY; he is a slim Fellow, about 5 feet high, of a 
yellow Complexion, thin visag'd, wears his own brown 
Hair, aged about 20 years. Had on when he went away, 
a Claret Coloured Coat, and striped Holland long Trow- 
sers, blue worsted Stockings, old Shoes, with Pinchbeck 
Buckles in them, a nett 1 Beaver Hat, and had also a white 
Castor Hat with him. He went off on the 2ist Inst. 
Whoever takes up and secures the above described Ser- 
vant, so that his Master may have him again, shall have 
THREE POUNDS Reward, paid by me 

JACOB MARTIN. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 23, June 22-29, 
1767. 

New-York, June 25. We hear from Ringwood, Iron- 
Works, in New-Jersey, that last Week, a Fray happened 
among some of the Workmen of that Work, which con- 
tinued some Time, by which one Man lost his Life, and 
several were badly wounded. 

Last Saturday the Body of a Man was found buried 
(scarcely covered) in a Field, about a Mile from Eliza- 
beth-Town, which occasions some Speculation in the 
Neighborhood. 

Last Sunday, a Man was knocked overboard from a 
Pettiaugre, by the Boom, near Elizabeth-Town, and swan 
some Time: Endeavors were used by the People on 
board to save him from drowning, but without effect; we 
hear his Name w r as Powers, of Springfield, near Elizabeth- 
Town. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 395 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RuN-away from the Subscriber, living in New- Jersey, 
near Prince-Town, the 3ist of May last, an Irish Servant 
Man named Francis Matthews, but is thought to have 
changed his Name to that of Richard Brown, aged about 
20 years, about 5 Feet 8 Inches high ; he is a Weaver by 
Trade, of a fair Complexion, somewhat freckled, gray 
Eyes, short black Hair, little or no Board, and has a down 
cast look when he speaks to Strangers; had on when he 
went away an old half worn Felt Hat, a new brown col- 
oured homespun Coat, with white Metal Buttons down the 
Breast, and none on the Hips, bin'd with Flannel of a 
lightish colour, a white Flannel Jacket, with Sleeves and 
no Pockets, a Tow Shirt, Oznaburg Trowsers, pale blue 
yarn Stockings, with Brass Buckles in his Shoes; he also 
took away a Needle work'd Pocket Book, mark'd John 
Hill, with between Forty and Fifty Shillings in Money, 
and Writings to a considerable Value. Whoever takes 
up and secures said Servant in any of His Majesty's Goals, 
so that his Master may have him again, shall have the 
above Reward, paid by me 

BENJAMIN CLARKE. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels and others, are forbid 
harbouring or carrying him off at their Peril. 

(Price 55, besides Postage) 1 

Gloucester, June 22, 1767. 

BY Virtue of Several Writs of Venditioni Exponas, to 
me directed, will be exposed to Sale, by public Vendue, on 
the Premises, on Monday, the 6th Day of July next, be- 
tween the Hours of 12 and 5 in the Afternoon of said Day, 
a good Frame Messuage or Tenement, and Tract of Land 
and Plantation, thereunto belonging, containing 200 

i This undoubtedly refers to the price of the advertisement. 



396 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Acres, more or less, situate in the Township of Gloucester, 
on the Northerly Side of the North Branch of Great Tim - 
her Creek, on which there is a good Barn, Orchard, and 
some Meadow, now in the Tenure of James Boggs. Also 
at the same Time will be sold, a Messuage and Tenement, 
and Lot or Tract of Land thereunto belonging, containing 
60 Acres, situate on the Southerly Side of said Creek, 
opposite the above, in the Tenure of Thomas Bishop, being 
all the late Estate of Gabriel Davis; seized and taken in 
Execution by SAMUEL BLACK WOOD, Sheriff. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2009, June 25, 
1767. 

New York, June 22. 

Monday last Captain Munds, in a brig of this port, 
bound from the Bay of Honduras for Holland, put into 
Sandy Hook, in order to procure a few necessaries, to 
enable him the better to proceed on his voyage. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN. A WAY from the subscriber, the i3th instant, June, 
a negro man, named Richard, or Dick, aged about 25 
years, about five feet nine inches high, of a yellowish com- 
plexion and grave countenance, very stout and well sett, 
walks a little stooping, is a good farmer; and had on when 
he went away a good nap coat dark coloured, with mohair 
buttons, oznabrigs shirt and trowsers, a pair of new shoes, 
and a good felt hat. Whoever takes up said fellow, se- 
cures him in any jail on the continent, so that he may be 
had again, or brings him to his master at Whitehill, Bur- 
lington county, West Jersey, shall have the above reward, 
and reasonable charges paid by ROBERT FIELD. 

N. B. It is probable he will get in company with my 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 397 

Indian slave Jack, advertised run-away the loth instant, 
Three Pounds reward for taking him up. All masters of 
vessels and others are forwarned not to employ or secret 
them on their peril. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1281, June 2$, 1767. 



f 

A 



To BE RUN FOR, 

At Nezvark, in New- Jersey, on Wednesday the Ninth Day 
September next. 

Purse of THIRTY POUNDS, free 
for any Horse, Mare or Geld- 
ing-, not more than three years old 
J FIGURE OF A 1 pas t 7 rising four, not more than half 

[HORSE RUNNING! Blood; three Heats > one Mile and a 
Quarter at a Heat, carrying Eight 

Stone Weight Each. Proper Judges 
will be appointed to decide all Dis- 
putes and Differences that may arise in said Race : And 
the Proof of the Horses Blood to be made before them : 
Each Horse, &c. is to be enter'd on the Monday before 
the Day of starting, with James Banks, at Four Dollars 
each, or Six Dollars at the Post. Not less than four 
Horses to start : And the Entrance Money to be run for 
on Thursday, by all, except the winning and the distanced 
Horses. 

N. B. A fine Saddle of Five Pounds Value, and a good 
Beaver Hat, to be run for at the same Time, by common 
Horses. 
Newark, June 22, 1767. 

FOUND, about 6 weeks ago, near AQUAKANACK, in 
NEW- JERSEY, A GOLD WATCH. Whoever has lost 
the same, by applying to WILLIAM NIXON, in NEW- YORK, 
may have it again, proving their Property, and paying a 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Reward, and Charges. The Nezv York Mercury, No. 
817, June 29, 1767. 

NEW- YORK, June 29. 

On Sunday last, was perform'd at Newark, the opera- 
tion of Lithotomy, on a youth of about eight years of age, 
before several very eminent gentlemen in the practice of 
physick and surgery, by Mr. John Jones, one of the prin- 
cipal surgeons of this city. The largeness of the stone, 
and dexterity with which it was extracted, was sufficient 
indications of his judgment in manual operation, and met 
with the cordial approbation of all the Gentlemen present. 
The symptoms are as favorable towards a recovery, as can 
be expected from the severity of so dangerous an opera- 
tion. 

We hear from Crosswicks, in New Jersey, that on Tues- 
day Evening, the 3Oth Ult. two Horses, belonging to Mr. 
Abel Middleton. of that Place, were struck dead by a 
Flash of Lightning, as they were standing under a Tree, 
in his Pasture. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 24, 
June 29- July 6, 1767. 

New York, Jufy 2. The Pennsylvania Chronicle of 
Monday last, contains very complaisant and respectful 
Addresses (which we have not now Time to insert) from 
the Council and the House of Representatives of New- 
Jersey to the Governor, wherein they express great Satis- 
faction and Gratitude that their Conduct has met with his 
Majesty's Approbation, and that their Addresses have 
been favourably received; for his Care in transmitting 
which, and for his Speech, they thank the Governor. 
They approve his Conduct, and have made Provision by 
Law according to his Recommendations, particularly. For 
discharging the Arrearages due to Barrack-Masters, and 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 399 

for supplying the King's Troops quartered in that Colony 
with Necessaries, in a Manner that would not be liable to 
the Inconveniences mention' d by his Excellency; and for 
rewarding the Persons who were Active in apprehending 
the Murderers of the Indians, &c. 

His Excellency made obliging Answers to these Ad- 
dresses, after which, the Governor having given his As- 
sent to 12 Acts passed during the Session, the Assembly 
was prorogued. The New York Journal or General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1278, July 2, 1767. 

To be sold by public Vendue, to the highest Bidder on 
the Premises, on the nth Day of July Instant, a valuable 
Plantation, situate in Waterford Township, Gloucester 
County, about five Miles from Philadelphia, bounded on 
the River Delaware, containing 140 Acres, be the same 
more or less; 7 or 8 Acres of Meadow cleared, and 12 or 
14 more may be made, it is all banked in; there is in said 
Place, a Stone House, and a Frame for a Barn raised, but 
not inclosed, with a good Orchard, being the Estate of 
Jacob Burrough. The Vendue to begin at Ten o' Clock, 
where Attendance will be given; Part of the Money may 
lie for two or three Years, on giving Security, and paying 
Interest. HENRY WOODROW, and DAVID BASSET, As- 
signees to said Burrough. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 20 1 o, July 2, 1767. 

PROPOSALS, 

For printing by SUBSCRIPTION 

From the Author's manuscrips, 

A select collection of practical discourses, on a variety of 
important subjects; together with some pieces already 
published, by the Reverend and learned 
SAMUEL FINLEY, D. D. 



4OO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Late President of the College of New- Jersey: 
To which will be prefixed, 

Some account of the life and character of the Author. 
CONDITIONS. 

I. The work shall be printed on a new letter, and a 
good paper, and will be contained in two volumes, duo- 
decimo, neatly bound and lettered. 

IT. The price to subscribers shall not exceed twelve 
shillings, New-York currency a sett : six shillings to be 
paid at the time of the subscribing, and the remainder on 
the delivery of the books. 

JIT. Those who subscribe for twelve sets, shall have 
ONE SET gratis. 

TV. It will be sent to the press as soon as a sufficient 
number of subscriptions can be obtained. 

Subscriptions are taken in by Mr. Samuel Breese, mer- 
chant, and Mr. Ebenezer Hazard, at Mr. Garret Noel's, 
next door to the Coffee-House, in New- York : by Mr. 
Joseph Periam, at Princetown : and Mr. William Brad- 
ford, Mr. Thomas Bradford, and Mr. Isaac Snowden, in 
Philadelphia : of whom printed proposals may be had by 
those who are disposed to forward so useful an under- 
taking. The Pennsytoania Journal, No. 1282, July 2, 
1767. 

Friend GODDARD, 

As the Times of holding many of the New Jersey 
Courts have been long erroneously published in the Al- 
manacks, and by a late general Ordinance of the Governor 
and Council of this Province, most of them are altered, 
thy inserting in the CHRONICLE the following Abstract, 
will acquaint the Public therewith, and perhaps be a means 



I 7 6 7 ] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



401 



of rectifying the Almanacks in future, as well as oblige 
many of thy Readers. P. 

From and after the loth Day of August, 1767, the 
Supreme Courts are to be held, 

At the City of PERTH-AM- At the CITY OF BURLING- 

BOY, on the TON, 

ist Tuesday in April. 2d Tuesday in May. 

ist in Sept. 2d in Nov. 



COUNTY COURTS. 



MIDDLESEX. 



3d Tuesday in Jan. 4th 

ist in April HUNTERDON. 

3d in July ist Tuesday 

2d in Octo. ist 

ESSEX. ist 

2d Tuesday in Jan. 4th 

2d in April. 

4th in June. 

3d in Sept. 

BERGEN. 

4th Tuesday in Mar. 

2d in June. 

4th in Octo. 

4th in Jan. 

SOMERSET. 

3d Tuesday in April. 

3d in June. 

ist in Octo. 

ist in Jan. 

MONMOUTH. 

4th Tuesday in Jan. 

4th in April. CUMBERLAND. 



in Aug. 
in Nov. 



in Feb. 
in May. 
in Aug. 
in Octo. 
BURLINGTON. 

3d Tuesday in May. 

2d in July. 

ist in Nov. 

2d in Feb. 

GLOUCESTER. 

2d Tuesday in April. 

3d in June. 

2d in Sept. 

2d in Dec. 

SALEM. 

2d Tuesday in June. 

3d in Sept. 

ist in Dec. 

ist in Mar. 



402 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



[1767 



4th 


in July. 


ist Tuesday 


in June. 


3d 


in Oct. 


4th 


in Sept. 


MORRIS. 




Last 


in Nov. 


ist Tuesday 


in July. 


Last 


in Feb. 


4th 


in Sept. 


CAPE 


MAY. 


3d 


in Dec. 


4th Tuesday 


in May. 


3d 


in Mar. 


ist 


in Aug. 


SUSSEX. 




4th 


in Octo. 


3d Tuesday 


in Feb. 


ist 


in Feb. 


4th 


in May. 







Circuit Courts are to be held at such Times and Places 
in the respective Counties, as the Justices of the Supreme 
Court for the Time being, or any of them, shall direct and 
appoint. 

Burlington, 4th of 7th Month, 1767. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 25, July 6-13, 
1767. 

New York, July 6. By the Post we hear, that one Wil- 
liam Justis, was struck dead by a flash of lightning at 
Trenton, on Tuesday Evening last. 

To His Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq; Captain- 
General, Governor, and Commander in Chief, in and 
over the Province of New Jersey, and Territories 
thereon depending in America, Chancellor and Vice- 
Admiral in the same. 

The humble ADDRESS of His Majesty's Council of the 
said Province. 

IV /T AY it please your Excellency to accept the Thanks 

1VJL of the Council of His Majesty's Province of New 

Jersey, for your Speech at the Opening of this Session, 

which cannot but be highly agreeable to us, as it contains 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 43 

such Sentiments of Zeal and Regard for the Interest, 
Honour and Welfare of this Colony. 

As it will ever be our most ardent Wish to approve 
ourselves faithful and loyal Subjects, every Mark of Ap- 
probation of our Conduct from our most excellent Sover- 
eign, must excite in us the most lively Sensations of Joy 
and Gratitude. Our Thanks therefore are due to you, 
Sir, for transmitting our Address to His Majesty, and 
our most respectful Acknowledgments to the Right Hon- 
ourable the Earl of Shelburne, for his Services in our Be- 
half. 

It would have afforded us the highest Satisfaction to 
hear from your Excellency, that our Hopes on the Subject 
of a Paper Currency, in America, will be gratified by the 
British Parliament; as we humbly conceive from the long 
Experience we have had of the Utility of that Measure, 
and from our peculiar Situation and Circumstances, num- 
berless Advantages must necessarily result thereby to the 
Inhabitants of this Colony. 

We highly applaud your Excellency's Prudence and 
Justice in recommending a Reward for the Persons by 
whose Activity and Resolution the Murderers of the In- 
dians in this Province were apprehended. We and every 
Inhabitant of this Colony, have Reason to rejoice that 
Justice has been executed on such abandon'd Villains. To 
excite, by proper Rewards, a Willingness in the People 
to exert their Endeavours to a speedy Detection of such 
atrocious Offenders and a resolute Administration of Jus- 
tice in the Punishment of the Guilty, whilst it adds Lustre 
to the Authority of Laws, and Dignity to Government, 
will be the surest Means to maintain Order, Peace, and 
Security to the Province in general. 

By Order of the House, 

PETER KEMBLE, Speaker. 



404 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

His Excellency's ANSWER. 
Gentlemen, 

MY hearty Thanks are due to you for this obliging 
Address. 

It is but doing Justice to acknowledge, that your Ex- 
pressions of Zeal and Duty to His Majesty, are entirely 
conformable to your Conduct on every Occasion. 

Your Sentiments respecting the Advantages which must 

result to the Public from a due Administration of Justice, 

are truly pleasing to me; and I am very happy to find that 

my Endeavours to bring the Murderers of the Indians to 

condign Punishment, are so much to your Satisfaction." 

To His Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq; Captain 

General, Governor, and Commander in Chief, in and 

over the Colony of New Jersey, and Territories 

thereon depending in America, Chancellor and Vice- 

Admiral in the same. 

The humble ADDRESS of the Representatives of the said 
Colony, in General Assembly convened. 

May it please your Excellency, 

WE His Majesty's dutiful and loyal Subjects, 
Representatives of the Colony of New- Jersey, in 
General Assembly met, return your Excellency our sin- 
cere Thanks for your Excellency's favourable Speech at 
the Opening of this Session, and assure your Excellency 
it would have been extremely grateful to have received 
satisfactory Intelligence of the Resolutions of the British 
Parliament with Regard to a Paper Currency in America, 
as their Result in this Matter, will most nearly affect the 
future Prosperity and Happiness of this Colony. We 
anxiously wait the Event, which if favourable, will put 
it in our Power to alleviate the Distresses and grievous 
Complaints of our Constituents, for Want of circulating 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 405 

Cash, set forth in Petitions, from many Parts of the Pro- 
vince now before us. 

His Majesty's gracious Reception of our Addresses, 
and Approbation of the Behaviour of this Colony, signi- 
fied in the Right Honourable the Earl of Shelburne's Let- 
ter, is truly agreeable to this House, and cannot fail in- 
spiring the Inhabitants of this Colony with Resolutions 
to improve every Opportunity of meriting it from the best 
of Sovereigns. 

We have made Provision by Law, for discharging the 
Arrearages due to the Barrack-Masters, and for supplying 
the King's Troops quartered in this Colony with Neces- 
saries, that will not be liable to the Inconveniences men- 
tioned by your Excellency; and have also provided a 
Reward to the Persons active in apprehending the Indian 
Murderers, as an Encouragement to the like Vigilance on 
future Occasions. 

The Wisdom and Justice of Government in bringing 
to exemplary Punishment, Men, who, in Defiance of all 
Ties divine and human, in cold Blood could perpetrate 
such horrid Murders, and thereby kindle the Resentment 
of the Natives against us, cannot fail of producing good 
Effects ; more especially when made use of in the prudent 
Manner proposed by Sir William Johnson. 

Nothing shall be wanting on our part, consistent with 
Duty to our Constituents, to improve the Harmony sub- 
sisting between the several Branches of the Legislature, 
which is ever productive of the most salutary Effects, and 
we hope will, at this Time, enable us to give a quick Dis- 
patch to such Parts of the public Business as will not admit 
of being postponed; but the advanced season will by no 
Means allow going through all that calls for our Attention 
at this time. By Order of the House. 

June, 22, 1767. CORTLAND SKINNER, Speaker. 



406 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

His EXCELLENCY'S ANSWER. 
Gentlemen," 

' ' T Thank you for this Address. Your Readiness in 
L granting the necessary Supplies, for the King's 
Troops, as it evinces the Reality of those dutiful and loyal 
Sentiments you express, will doubtless recommend you to 
His Majesty's Favour. Your Approbation of the Mea- 
sures taken by Government for bringing the Murderers of 
the Indians to Justice, and the Disposition you have shown 
to promote Harmony, cannot but afford me particular 
Pleasure." The New York Mercury, No. 818, July 6, 
1767. 

On Monday last, the Amity's Production, Captain 
Thomas Noble, with 99 Soldiers on board, under the 
Command of Capt. Marsden. They left the Cove of 
Cork, the 2Oth of May, in Company with 5 other Trans- 
port Ships for this Place, and 3 for Philadelphia, under the 
Command of Agent Henry Francis Evans, which Capt. 
Noble parted from in the Night, Lat. 37. 27 Lon. 68. 12, 
but the next Day all the other 5 that were bound here 
arrived, viz. 

The Hanover, Capt. Hunter, Scarborough, Capt. Tate; 
The Amity's Production, Captain Noble; having on board 
the 1 6th Regiment, under the Command of Col. Gabbit. 
The Amity's Assistance, Capt. Knowles; The Lyde, Capt. 
Watson; The Eagle, Capt. Slightholm; having the 26th 
Regiment, under the Command of Major T*emplar. 

The 26th Regiment we hear, is station'd at Perth-Am- 
boy, and other Towns in New- Jersey, for which Place the 
3 Ships were to sail again Yesterday. 

The Ships for Philadelphia are, the Amity's Benedic- 
tion; The Liberty, Captain Cornforth; The Amity Ad- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 407 

monition, Capt. . The New York Journal or 

General Advertiser, No. 1278, July 9, 1767. 

The 12 Acts passed in the last Session of Assembly in 
New- Jersey, mentioned in our last, are entitled as follows. 

1. An Act for the Support of Government of His 
Majesty's Colony of New-Jersey, to commence the 
Twenty First Day of May, One Thousand Seven Hundred 
and Sixty Seven; and to end the Twenty First Day of May 
One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty Eight; and to 
discharge the public Debts and contingent Charges there- 
of. 

2. An Act appointing Commissioners for supplying 
the several Barracks erected in the Colony of New- Jersey, 
with Furniture and other Necessaries for accommodating 
the King's Troops in or marching through the same, for 
supplying Deficiencies, and defraying other incidental 
Charges. 

3. An Act to restrain the bringing Certioraries, and to 
alter the Mode of determining Appeals in small Causes. 

4. An Act for laying a Duty on the Purchasers of 
Slaves imported into this Colony. 

5. , An Act to regulate Carriages of Burthen within 
this Colony. 

tv An Act to prevent the Pasturing the Elizabeth- 
Town Great Meadows in Common. 

7. An Act to divide the Town of Shrewsbury, and 
annex Parts thereof to the Towns of Freehold and Upper- 
Freehold. 

8. An Act to empower the Inhabitants of the Town- 
ships of Greenwich, Deptford, and Woolwich, in the 
County of Gloucester, to repair their public Highways by 
Hire, and raise Money for that Purpose. 

9. An Act for investing a Fee in the Toll-Bridge lately 



408 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

erected over Newtown Creek, in William Gerrard, his 
Heirs and Assigns; and to empower the said William 
Gerrard to build a House within the Bounds of the Road, 
for the more convenient receiving the Toll of said Bridge. 

10. An Act for the Relief of James Brooks, Esq; late 
Sheriff of Middlesex, with respect to certain escapes. 

11. An Act for barring the Estate Tail, in certain 
Lands and Tenements in the Province of New-Jersey, 
lately belonging to Anthony Sharp, the Elder, deceased; 
and also for vesting the same in Isaac Sharp and Joseph 
Sharp, his Grandsons, their Heirs and Assigns, pursuant 
to an Agreement made with the Tenant in Tail. 

12. An Act to revive an Act, entitled, an Act to pre- 
vent Waste from being committed upon the common Land 
allotted to the Patent of Seacaucus, in the Corporation of 
Bergen. Supplement to the New York Journal or Gen- 
eral Advertiser, No. 1279, July 9, 1767. 

PHILADELPHIA, July 9. 

By a Gentleman from Trenton we learn, that on Tues- 
day, the 3Oth ult. in the Evening, Mr. William Justis of 
that Place, was struck dead by a Flash of Lightning. 
Mr. Yard, of the same Place, who was standing very near 
him, was struck backwards at the same time, but happily 
recovered soon afterwards; the Lightning made four 
Spots on his Breast, of a green and yellowish Colour, but 
without the least Pain. 

He also favoured us with the following Account of a 
most remarkable Increase in a Gentleman's Garden there, 
viz. a single Grain of RYE produced 169 Ears, which con- 
tained upwards of 4800 Grains. 

SIXTEEN DOLLARS Reward. 
RUN away on the 5th instant from the SUBSCRIBER, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 49 

living at the Glass-house, in Alloway's Creek, precinct 
and county of Salem, a Dutch servant-man, named 
Charles Geisinger, about 27 years of age, 5 feet 4 inches 
high, dark complexion, marked with the small-pox about 
his mouth, has short brown hair, and grey eyes; had on 
when he went away, an old felt hat, brown linsey jacket, 
and an under jacket, the fore parts of which are of the 
same as the other, but the back parts red, a coarse shirt, 
new striped trowsers, and new shoes, speaks little or no 
English, but can talk French, and perhaps Portuguese, as 
he came from Lisbon last fall, and was there a soldier. 
Whoever takes up said servant, and brings him to his 
master, or to Richard Wistar, in Market-street, Philadel- 
phia, or secures him so that his master may have him 
again, shall have the above reward of Sixteen Dollars, 
and reasonable charges, paid by me 

MARTIN HALTER. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2011, July 9, 1767. 

Mr. GODDARD, 

In giving a place in your CHRONICLE to the following 
extract from the works of a late worthy Divine of the 
Church of England, you'll greatly oblige yours, &c. 

BURLINGTON, July 14, 1767. 

PHILEULABES. 

" As no vice is more mischievous in its own nature, 
more destructive of the peace and happiness of mankind, 
than strife and contention," 1 .... 

Burlington, July 6, 1767. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Plantation, lying within the Limits of the 
City of Burlington, containing no Acres of exceeding 

iThe article is a column and a half in length. 



410 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

good rich fertile Land, about 20 Acres of which is good 
English Grass Meadow, about 40 Acres of exceeding good 
Wheat Land, with a good Barn and Orchard on the same ; 
the rest of the Tract, being about 50 Acres, is as good 
well timbered Land as most in the Parts ; the whole of the 
above Tract is well watered. Also to be sold, a very 
good valuable Grist Mill, together with two Acres of 
Land belonging to the same, with a good Dwelling House, 
Mill House, and all lying within the Limits of the City of 
Burlington. Any Person inclining to purchase all or any 
Part of the above described Lands, Mill, and Premises, 
may apply to the Owner living on the same. 

JOSEPH PEARSON. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 26, July 13-20, 
1767. 

Philadelphia, July 9. We hear from Crosswicks, in 
New-Jersey, that on Tuesday Evening, the 3Oth Ult. two 
Horses, belonging to Mr. Abel Middleton, of that Place, 
were struck dead by a Flash of Lightning, as they were 
standing under a Tree, in his Pasture. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1280, July 16, 1767. 

TO be sold by the Subscribers, by Public Vendue, 
on Monday the 3d Day of August next, on the 
Premis, and to begin at 9 o' Clock in the Forenoon, all the 
Estate of the late EBENEZER MUCH MORE, deceased, con- 
taining over 400 Acres of very good Land, situate in the 
upper Part of Piscataway, in Middlesex County, and Pro- 
vince of New-Jersey, whereon is a good Dwelling-House, 
Kitchen, Barn, and other good Conveniences : The whole 
Farm is in good Repair, and constant Water in every field. 
The whole may be sold altogether, or in different Pieces, 
as may best suit the Purchasers. Also will be sold at the 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4 11 

same Time, 100 Acres of Land in Sussex County; as also 
all his personal Estate, consisting of a Variety of good 
Household Furniture, Horses, Cattle, and many things too 
tedious herein to mention; and to continue from Day to 
Day until all is sold, at which Time Attendance will be 
given by 

LUCY MUCH MORE, Executrix 

MICAIAH DUNN, 

JOSEPH FITZRANDOLPH 

Executors. 
The Nezv York Mercury, No. 819, July 13, 1767. 

LETTERS remaining in the Post-office, Philadelphia. 

F. Michael Fisher, Gloucester County. 

G. Rev. Mr. Greenman, Pilesgrove. 
M. John M'Euin, Alloway's Creek. 
P. John Picket, Woodberry. 

S. Silvester Sullivan, (2) Middletown. 

NEW- YORK, July 13. 

The 26th regiment, we hear, is stationed at Perth Am- 
boy, and other towns in New- Jersey, for which place the 
3 ships [The Amity's Assistance, Captain Knowles; the 
Lyde, Captain Watson; the Eagle, Captain Sligholm] 
sailed last Thursday. 

Captain Haight spoke on the 5th instant, with Cap- 
tain Dennis, from the port of Madeira, 78 leagues to the 
eastward of Sandy Hook, all well on board. 

In our last Week's Paper, in the Article relating to the 
Increase from a Grain of Rye, for 169 Ears, read 69 Ears. 

TWENTY DOLLARS Reward 
RUN away, on the 5 instant from the subscriber, living 



412 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

in Allo way's Creek precinct, and county of Salem, two 
Dutch servant men, one named Charles Geisinger, about 
27 years of age, 5 feet 4 inches high, dark complexion, 
grey eyes, marked with the small-pox about his mouth, 
short brown hair; had on, when he went away, an old felt 
hat, brown linsey jacket, with an under jacket, the fore 
parts the same as the other, the back parts of red cloth, tow 
shirt, striped trowsers, and new shoes, speaks no English 
at all. The other named John Michael Rider, about 5 
feet 7 inches high, 25 years of age, well set, brownish hair, 
which he wears tied behind, red beard, whitish eye brows, 
large curled locks on each temple, and a large scar on 
the sole of one of his feet ; had on, and took with him, two 
new tow shirts, a pair of tow trowsers, a pair of home 
made bearskin breeches, lined with tow cloth, a jacket of 
the same, with three flowered metal buttons on each sleeve, 
a red broadcloth jacket, half worn, blue flowered metal 
buttons on each sleeve, a red broadcloth jacket, half worn, 
blue flowered damask ditto, without sleeves, and another 
blue ditto, bound round the arm-holes with linen; also a 
blue broadcloth coat, lined with red, with button-holes on 
each side, chiefly false holes, a pair of old leather breeches, 
patched with new leather, a large felt hat, with a brass 
button, two pair of light coloured' yarn stockings, old 
shoes, a pair of boots, grain side out, a large Dutch pil- 
low case of stamped linen, a piece of white linen for 
shirts, a silk handkerchief, a stamped linen ditto, and a 
hogskin knapsack, with the hair on; he speaks broken 
English, but is a great talker, smokes much, takes snuff, 
plays on the fiddle and pretends to be a conjurer. They 
have two fiddles with them, and one of them has plenty 
of money; they have both been soldiers, and came last 
fall from Lisbon, can talk Dutch, French and perhaps 
Portuguese. It is supposed they will change their clothes. 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



They crossed the river at New-Castle, and came up to- 
wards Chester, where they were seen, and it is thought 
they are gone towards Lancaster or Maryland. Who- 
ever apprehends or secures the said servants, or either of 
them, in any of his Majesty's goals, so that their masters 
may have them again, or brings them to their respective 
masters, or to Richard Wister, in Philadelphia, shall have 
Sixteen Dollars for the first mentioned, and Four Dollars 
for the last, besides reasonable charges, paid by us 
MARTIN HALTER, HUGH BLACKWOOD, RICHARD WISTER. 
July n, 1767. 

RUN away from Samuel Harker, of Oldman's creek, 
Gloucester county, on the 7th instant, at night, a Negroe 
lad, named Charles, about 15 years of age, of middle 
stature, and talks good English : Had on, when he went 
away, a red half thick jacket, good shirt and trowsers, a 
halfworn felt hat and worsted cap. He was lame in his 
right leg, by the bite of a boar; and has a scar in his fore- 
head from the kick of a horse. Whoever takes up said 
Negroe, and secures him, so that his master may have him 
again, shall have Twenty Shillings reward, and reasonable 
charges, paid by SAMUEL HARKER. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2012, July 16, 
1767. 

From the Public Ledger, published in London, May 8, 

1767. 

To the PRINTER. 

As government appears greatly distrest how to pay off 
the national burdens, a good subject cannot do his country 
a more essential service than to point out the most likely 
method of effecting this salutary end; .... 'Tis 
impossible to strike a line of composition, and absurd to 



414 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

talk of despotism by halves. On these accounts, I am 
for reminding our ministers that we conquered Ireland, 
and planted the Colonies, with a design of promoting our 
own happiness, and not with any view of consulting theirs ; 
my scheme I hope therefore, will meet with their approba- 
tion at this period, particularly when the diminution of the 
land-tax has put them to much inconvenience for the 
common supplies. I greatly dread the independence of 
America, and it would be a lamentable affair if our poster- 
ity should find it their interest, in a century or so, to quit 
the fogs of Great Britain for the delightful skies of Jersey 
or New York. This is now the time to prevent so im- 
minent a danger, and shake off the enormous load of 
debt, which is crushing poor old England, to destruc- 
tion; 1 .... 

(signed) D. 

July 20, 1767. 

WHEREAS the Wife of Thomas Ellett Marsh, of the 
Township of Deptford, County of Gloucester, and Pro- 
vince of West New-Jersey, has at sundry Times, and in 
divers Places sold and bought Goods, &c. contrary to my 
Knowledge, and to my great Damage. - - This is 
therefore to forewarn all Persons not to contract any Deal- 
ings with her, for it shall not be paid by me. 

THOMAS ELLETT MARSH. 

Mr. JOSEPH PEARSON'S Plantation, Mill, &c. at BUR- 
LINGTON, advertised for Sale, in the last Page, will be put 
up at Vendue on the 2oth of August next, if not sold at 
private Sale before that Time. 

ARRIVALS. 

At Kingston. Capt Mansfield from Salem. The 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 27, July 20-27, 1767. 

i The article Is more than a column In length. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4*5 

London, May 18. The Rev. and learned Dr. John 
Witherspoon, one of the ministers of Paisly, who was in 
the later end of the year 1766, unanimously elected Presi- 
dent of the College of New-Jersey, in America, has lately 
wrote a letter to the Governors of said College, declining 
to accept of that high and important trust. 

New-York, July 23. Capt. Sinclair left Portland Road 
the 4th of June, in Company with Capt. Jeffries, for Phila- 
delphia, and has brought over 39 Passengers, among 
whom are Richard Stockton, Esq; of the Province of New- 
Jersey; and the Revd. Mr. Jonathan Odell, appointed to 
the Mission of Burlington; as also Jenkin Williams, Esq; 
Attorney at Law. 

RuN-away on Tuesday the I5th Instant July, from 
John Hutchinson, of Windsor Township, and County of 
Middlesex, in New-Jersey, an Irish Servant Man, named 
William Rankin, a Shoe-maker by Trade, a short well set 
Man, aged about twenty years, fair Skin, sandy coloured 
Hair, a whiteish Look out of his Eyes, marked with the 
Small-Pox : Had on when he went away, a coarse Shirt 
and Trowsers, an old brown Coat, and a very thick coarse 
Felt Hat. Whoever takes up and secures said Servant, 
so that his Master may have him again, shall have Three 
Pounds Reward, and all reasonable Charges paid by me 

JOHN HUTCHINSON. 

All Masters of Vessels and others are desired not to 
harbour, conceal or carry him away, as they will answer 
it at their Peril. 

THE Public is hereby informed. That Mattisonia Gram- 
mar School, in Freehold and County of Monmouth, for- 
merly advertised in this Paper, is continued on the same 



416 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Plan first made known, and the Patrons, and Gentlemen 
concerned, are determined to give Assistance and Coun- 
tenance to the Undertaking, and support it as long as En- 
couragement is given. Gentlemen that design to give 
their Sons an Education, are requested to join us, there 
yet being Room for several Scholars, and the Classes un- 
filled. 

Boarding and Tuition 20 per Annum. The New 
York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1281, July 23, 
1767. 

TAKEN up and brought to Trenton goal, in the county 
of Hunterdon, New-Jersey, a Negroe Man, named Swa- 
carnockhum, alias Jack, speaks very bad English, appears 
to be between 40 and 50 years old, is 5 feet 8 inches high, 
stout built, has a down look; had on, when he was com- 
mitted, a light coloured coat, with striped linsey lining, 
and brass buttons, an old blue jacket, light coloured great 
coat, with some worsted, and some metal buttons thereon, 
old tow shirt and trowsers, but neither shoes, stockings or 
hat. The owner is desired to pay the charges, and take 
him away, otherwise he will be sold out for said charges 
on Thursday, the sixth of August next, by 

GEORGE BROWN, Goaler. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2013, July 23, 
1767. 

BROKE goal, last thursday night, the 24th inst. out 
of Morris county goal, Alexander M'Cormick, an 
Irish man, about 40 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, 
with short black curled hair, has much of the Broague, 
on his tongue: had on when he went away an old blue 
cloth coat, a green jacket, blue everlasting breeches, grey 
yarn stockings, pumps, and pretends to play on the bag- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4 1 7 

pipes; and is supposed to be gone towards New- York, as 
his wife is there. Whoever shall take up the said M'Cor- 
mick, a Prisoner for debt, and him secure, in any of his 
Majesty's goals, shall have 10 Dollars reward, paid by 
Daniel Cooper, sheriff. The New York Mercury, No. 
821, July 27, 1767. 

New- York, July 30. The I7th and 46th Regiments are 
now embarked on board the Transports destined for Eng- 
land; and the 28th embarks at Amboy. They have been 
more than 10 Years in America. The Vessels fell down 
yesterday. The New York Journal or General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1282, July 30, 1767. 

Gloucester, July 4, 1767. 

By virtue of a writ to me directed, on Saturday, the 
5th day of September next, at the house of Henry Sparks, 
innkeeper in Woodberry, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon of 
said day, will be exposed to sale by public vendue, a certain 
messuage and two tracts of land, and plantation thereunto 
belonging, containing in both 220 acres, 50 whereof is 
cleared, and under good fence, a good orchard, and sundry 
out houses, situate in the township of Woolwich, on the 
great road leading from Gloucester to Cohockin, and has 
been used for several years past as a public house of enter- 
tainment. Also a tract of 150 acres of woodland, near 
the above, late the property of William Lindsey; seized 
and taken in execution by 

Samuel Blackwood, sheriff. 

June 17, 1767. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, on Monday, the I7th 
day of August next, will be exposed to sale by public ven- 
due, between the hours of 12 and 5 in the afternoon of said 

27 



41 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

day, on the premises, a good frame messuage, tenement 
and tract of land, and plantation thereunto belonging, con- 
taining 133 acres and one third, on which there is a good 
barn, orchard, and other improvements, situate in the 
township of Great Egg Harhour. Also a tract of cedar 
swamp in said township, a few miles from the above ; late 
the estate of Jeremiah Steelman; seized and taken in 
execution by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

N. B. By consent of the plaintiff in the above suit, the 
premises will be sold on the following conditions, viz. the 
purchaser to pay one fourth part of the purchase money 
at the signing the deed, and the remainder in three years 
from the day of sale, in equal yearly payments, with giv- 
ing security, and paying interest. 

Gloucester, July 2, 1767. 

BY Virtue of a Writ to me directed, on the 2d Day of 
September next, at 4 o' Clock in the Afternoon of said 
Day, at the House of Thomas James, Innkeeper in the 
Township of Woolwich, will be exposed to Sale by public 
Vendue, a Messuage, Tenement, Plantation and Tract of 
Land thereunto belonging, containing 280 Acres, be the 
same more or less, with an Orchard, some Meadow, and 
other Improvements thereon, situate in the Township of 
Woolwich aforesaid, on the Southerly Side of Raccoon 
Creek, about a Mile from Swedesborough. At the same 
Time will be exposed to Sale, a Tract of Marsh, containing 
25 Acres, situate on the North Side of Oldman's Creek, 
in the Township aforesaid ; being all late the Estate of 
Thomas Mullen; seized and taken in Execution by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

N. B. The Plantation above mentioned is subject to a 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4 J 9 

Mortgage for the Sum of 404!. 73. which is not due until 
the 6th of May, 1773, and the Purchaser on paying the 
yearly Interest, may have that time to pay the Purchase 

Money. 

Chester, July 4, 1767. 

Now in my custody, committed as run-aways, the three 
following persons, viz. Patrick Mullan, who says he is a 
servant to Samuel Sharp, in London Grove township. 
Nicholas Hart, a lad, about 14 years of age, and says he 
belongs to Michael Stites, at the head of North-East. 
Also a Negroe man, named Charles, who says he belongs 
to Samuel Harker, of Oldman's creek, Gloucester county. 
Their masters are desired to come and pay charges, and 
take them away, by 

JOSEPH THOMAS, Goaler. 

To be SOLD by the subscriber, a large plantation, situate 
in the lower part of Penn's Neck, on one of the branches of 
Salem Creek, in the province of West New- Jersey; the 
said place is well watered, and a large quantity of fine 
timber land, with a quantity of fine meadow, a very good 
bearing orchard, and the clear land under good fence; 
there is on said place, a good dwelling-house, with 3 
rooms, and as many fire places, a good new barn, a good 
stable, and a very convenient hay-house, the meadows on 
said place joins close upon the house. There is also a 
good new smoak-house on said place, with almost every 
conveniency suitable on a plantation; and there is on said 
place two more dwelling-houses, a distance from the other 
house. The subscriber will not hurry the purchaser for 
any money for some years, only paying interest for the 
same. 

N. B. Any person having an inclination to purchase 



420 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

the same, may apply to the subscriber, on the premises, 
as soon as possible, for he will part with it as soon as he 
conveniently can; where the terms of sale will be made 
known by me 

JOHN GILLJOHNSON. 

Middlesex County, New- Jersey, July 14, 1767. 
RUN away from JOHN HUTCHINSON, of Windsor town- 
ship, an Irish servant man, but calls himself a Scotchman, 
aged about 20 years, has sandy coloured hair, fair skin. 
red complexion, dark eyes, but shows the white of them 
pretty much; he is short, but well set, a shoemaker by 
trade, can do little else, pretty thick marked with the small- 
pox ; had on when he went away, a coarse shirt and trow- 
sers, an old brown cloth coat, a thick felt hat, no shoes nor 
stockings, says his name is William Rankin. Whoever 
takes up and secures the said servant, so that his master 
may get him again, shall have Three Pounds reward, and 
all reasonable charges, paid by 

JOHN HUTCHINSON. 

Philadelphia, July 22, 1767. 

ON Monday, the 7th day of September next, will be 
sold, by way of public vendue, by the subscriber in Eves- 
ham, in the county of Burlington, sundry lots or parcels of 
land, being part of the several surveys of land on which 
he now dwells, divided into sundry lots, as follows, viz. 
Lot No. 2, containing 317 acres, consisting mostly of 
good wheat land, for which there are 60 acres of good 
swamp for meadow, well, stored with timber, fit for the 
saw-mill use, and has on it a small tenement, with about 
15 acres, that rents for 5 pounds per year; likewise about 
30 acres more of improved upland and meadow. Lot No. 
3, adjoining, contains 86 acres, one half good timber 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4 2 1 

swamp and meadow. Lot. No. 4, contains 118 acres, the 
upland good, and above 30 acres of choice timber swamp, 
that will make good meadow. Lot No. 5, contains 56 
acres of land, 20 thereof will make good meadow. Lot 
No. 6, contains 70 acres, and fronts 60 chain on Hewling's 
creek, whereon will be made good meadow, and is well 
stored with timber. Lot No. 7 contains 100 acres of good 
upland and swamp, lying on the great road leading to 
Philadelphia, and to the iron works. Lot No. 9 contains 
50 acres, is one half good timber swamp, and will make 
good meadow. All these lots are well watered, and will 
have the benefit of an ever uninterrupted range, which 
will keep milch cows until the second crop of grass is cut; 
they He within a mile of a good saw-mill, that never 
wants water, where the stuff is floated to market from 
the mill, about the same distance from a good grist mill, 
which never t fails for water, within 2 miles of Col. Read's 
iron works, which affords a good market, and 18 mil^s 
from Philadelphia; the timber cut from off it, if not fit 
for the saw-mill, will be used by the iron-works, which 
will greatly ease the expence of clearing. Also about 3000 
acres of pine land, adjoining Col. Read's iron- works, on 
the east side of Rancocus Creek, nearly adjoining the lots 
aforesaid, and attended with excellent conveniences for 
erecting an iron forge, about one mile and a half below 
the said forge, and about a mile and a half distant from 
the head of the navigation on said creek, where pigs or 
iron may be easily transported to or from Philadelphia. 
Whoever inclines to purchase any of the said lots, are 
invited to view them before the day of sale. The pay- 
ment will be made easy, one third to be paid on executing 
the deed, one third a year after, and one third in two years 
after the date of the sale, with interest, and giving secur- 
ity, if required. The title is indisputably good. The 



422 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

vendue to begin at 10 o'clock, where good attendance will 

be given by me, 

DAVID OLIPHANT. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2014, July 30, 
1767. 

NEW-YORK, July 27. 

The 1 7th and 46th regiments are now embarked on 
board the transport destined for England; and the 28th 
embarks at Amboy; They have been more than 10 years 
in America; and the I7th carries home no more than 90 
men, out of 750, that came to America in it. The Penn- 
sylvania Journal, No. 1286, July 30, 1767. 

ARRIVALS. 

At Dominica, Capt. Carroll and Capt. Goodhue, from 
Salem. 

Four Dollars Reward. 

STOLEN from the Subscriber, living in Oxford Town- 
ship, the 24th of July, the following bills, viz. Out of a 
desk, which was broken open, a 50 shilling bill, and one of 
20 shillings; out of a chest, broke open also, 3 bills of 5 
shillings, 2 of 3 shillings, one 5 pound bill, one Maryland 
dollar bill, and 15 shillings in silver. A woman then in 
the house, is suspected, having since absented herself. 
She is about 30 years old, of a middle stature, slender per- 
son, thin visage, and brown complexion; she was seen in 
the Trenton stage waggon. Had on and took with her, 
a chintz, calico, and dark striped Persian gowns, a red 
quilt, black calimanco skirt, two pair of stays, one white, 
the other yellow, and a black whalebone bonnet. While, 
in the neighborhood she called herself Margaret Pearson, 
but has been known to change her name. Whoever se- 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



423 



cures said person, shall have the above Reward, and rea- 
sonable charges, paid by 

ARTHUR NESMYTH. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 29, Aug. 3-10, 
1767. 

List of Letters remaining in the Post Office, New- York, 

not before advertised. 

. . . . Jeremiah Steleman, Little Egg-Harbour ; 
Gamage Saddler, Shrewsbury 

TO be sold at public vendue, on thursday the 2Oth 
of August inst. on the premises, a small Plantation 
in the town and county of Morris, and province of East 
New-Jersey, containing 33 acres of excellent land, situate 
on the road leading from Elizabeth-Town to Morris- 
Town, and within less than one mile from the Revd. Mr. 
Horton's meeting-house: There is on the premises a 
good house, barn and orchard, also an excellent spring of 
water close by the door : and the land is well timbered. A 
good title will be given for the same by 

THOMAS DAY. 
The New York Mercury, No. 822, August 3, 1767. 

Elizabeth-Town, (New- Jersey) July 28, 1767. 

This town was last night alarmed by a riot committed 
by several of the officers of the 28th regiment (late from 
Montreal) the particulars of which are as follows, viz. 

The officers being under arms to march with the troops 
quartered here, by 4 o'clock this morning, to join their 
regiments at Amboy, in order to embark for Europe. Be- 
tween 12 and i o'clock at night they assembled in a body, 
and marched through the several parts of the town, with 
drums and fifes. As the inhabitants had used them so 
very ungenteely as to make them pay their debts, which 



424 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

they had generally been obliged to do according to law; 
the officers seemed determined upon revenge. They first 
broke a window in the meeting-house, afterwards attacked 
the court house and goal, by breaking the windows and 
endeavouring to break open the doors, swearing vengeance 
against the goaler, who was under-sheriff and constable, 
and had frequently been obliged to do his duty upon them. 
As they attacked the house in this manner, the goaler got 
up, and desired them to desist, which they refused, he 
then, to deter them, pointed out of the window a fusee 
loaded with small shot, the end of which was seized, and 
endeavoured to be wrestted from him; upon which he 
fired among them, and wounded one of the rioters in both 
legs, as afterwards appeared. The goaler then released 
the prisoners, for his assistance, and rung the bell; the 
officers then marched off, but soon returned with a body of 
soldiers, some with bayonets fixed. The Inhabitants by 
this time alarmed began to assemble. The goaler finding 
some assistance had come, opened the doors for their re- 
ception, when the officers and some of the soldiers entered 
with them, and a fray ensued, but happily no lives were 
lost. The inhabitants continuing to collect, the officers 
thought fit to abscond, and it being by this, near the time 
for their departing, they joined their companies, which 
began their march a little after four. Some of the magis- 
trates however assembled, before they left town, and de- 
manded the assistance of the commanding officer, Capt. 
Johnson, then present, at the head of his men, but were 
refused. The Col. Sir John St. Clair, happily being at 
Amboy, the magistrates then proceeded thither, leaving 
the soldiers and their officers on their march behind them, 
the magistrates in expectation of their arriving soon after 
at Amboy, applied to the chief justice, for his warrant to 
apprehend the rioters. But were surprised to hear that 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 425 

they had deserted their men upon the road, and had in a 
private manner conveyed themselves on board one of the 
transports. Upon which the chief justice then applied to 
the commanding officer at Amboy, who immediately or- 
dered them on shore, and being brought before the chief 
justice and magistrates of this town, it was thought proper, 
as they were then bound home, to accept of their humble 
submission and acknowledgment, and satisfying the per- 
sons particularly injured, with submission, which was 
made in a public humble manner. The said rioters after 
paying the damages at 25, and asking pardon of the goal- 
keeper, were again set at liberty, and embarked for their 
voyage, tho' many thought the punishment not adequate 
to the atrociousness of the transaction that brought it on, 
yet it is a pity, that men, who call themselves men of hon- 
our, should leave a place with such an odious name behind 
them. The other part of the regiment who were quar- 
tered at Amboy, embarked on board the transports the 
same day, and to their honour be it said, that during their 
continuance there, they have in general behaved with 
honour and integrity. 1 

To BE SOLD. 

A NECK of Land, lying in Shrewsbury, in Monmouth 
County, and in the Province of East New- Jersey, contain- 
ing about One Thousand Acres, about Three Hundred of 
which is Salt Meadow : It is bounded between Musquito 
Creek and Kettle- Creek, a Fence of about three Quarters 
of a Mile, will fence in the whole. There may be kept on 
the Neck, at least Three Hundred Head of Cattle, Winter 
and Summer, and at least five or six Hundred Sheep, with 
little or no Fodder; and as many hogs. It will be sold 

i The Mercury for Aug. 3d has the following additional: 

N. B. The above named Capt. Johnson, appears to have been one 
of the principal rioters. Messrs. Graham and Carlton are excepted." 



426 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

either in Lots, or the Whole; if it is not sold by the twenty- 
first of September next, then it will be sold at public Ven- 
due, at the House of Mr. John Williams, at Teteconk- 
Briclge. Whoever has a Mind to purchase the Whole or 
Part, may apply to Abraham Probasco, in Monmouth 
County, Peter Remsen, in New- York, or Abraham 
Schenck, on Long-Island. 
New- York, August 5, 1767. 

To be sold at public Vendue, on Thursday, the 3d Day 
of September next, at Mr. Stephen Skinner's Store House, 
in Perth-z\mboy 

AN Assortment of Ironmongery and Cuttlery; a few 
Pieces of Ducapes and Lutestrings, and several other Ar- 
ticles, suitable for Retailers and Country Store-Keepers: 
The Vendue to begin at 10 o* Clock, and to continue from 
Day to Day till all are sold. The Conditions of Sale to 
be Known at the Time and Place aforesaid. 

Perth- Amboy, August $d, 1767. 

THIS is to Notify the Creditors of JOSHUA PETTIT, an 
insolvent debtor, to meet at the House of Mr. Jonathan 
Osborne, at the Scotch-Plains, in the Borough of Eliza- 
beth, East New- Jersey, on Thursday the 2Oth of August, 
Instant; when and where, the Assignees of said PETTIT. 
will attend to settle with said Creditors. 

Scotch-Plains, Borough of Elisabeth, East N. Jersey. 
The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1283, August 6, 1767. 

To be SOLD by public Vendue 
On Tuesday, the first of September next, at the house of 

John Shaw, in the city of Burlington. 

ALL the household furniture of the said John Shaw, 

consisting of good feather beds, bedding and curtains, an 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 427 

extraordinary eight day clock, looking-glasses, some plate, 
walnut tables, a parcel of pictures, china, glass, pewter, 
chairs, a Negroe wench, and several other things too 
tedious to mention. Also will be sold at the same time, 
the house, and lot of ground wherein the said Shaw now 
lives, being a large and commodious house fronting High 
street and Pearl-street, in the said city, very suitable for 
a public house, there having been one kept there several 
years past. Also a lot, with the stables thereon erected, 
lying contiguous to the same, and fronting the said Pearl- 
street. Also a lot of land, containing 9 acres, lying within 
the limits of the said city, 2 acres whereof is cleared, and 
has been mowed for these tw r o years past. The conditions 
of the said sale will be made known at the day and place 
aforesaid, by 

ABRAHAM HEWLINGS, and DANIEL ELLIS, Trustees. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Upper Free- 
hold, Monmouth county, near Imley's town, on the 22d of 
last month, a servant Negroe man half Indian named 
Charles, but probably will alter his name, about 28 years 
of age, about 6 feet two inches high, well set, something 
knock-kneed, large feet, a scar on one of his cheeks, near 
his temple, a yellow complexion, long hair, very much 
curled, and thin on the top of his head ; had on, when he 
went away, a light grey homespun coat, streaked lining, 
about half worn, his jacket of a darker colour, and more 
worn, tow shirt and trowsers and felt hat, and it is likely 
he may change his clothes. Whoever secures said servant, 
so that his master may have him again, shall have THREE 
POUNDS reward, and reasonable charges, paid by 

RICHARD JAMES. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2015, Aug. 6, 
1767. 



428 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

In order to save the Trouble which might attend Appli- 
cations for the CHRONICLE, by Persons living at a Dis- 
tance, or out of the Post Roads, subscriptions will be re- 
ceived by the following Gentlemen and Ladies, viz. 

New- Jersey. 

Elizabeth- Town, Mr. Reynolds, Postmaster. Wood- 
bridge, Mr. Samuel Parker, at the Post-Office. Bruns- 
wick, Mr. Brook Farmer, and Mr. Duff, Postmaster. 
Princeton, Mr. Plumb, Postmaster; and Mr. William 
Hick. Burlington, Mr. Haight, Postmaster. Mansfield, 
Mr. John Pope. Springfield, Mr. Solomon Ridgeway. 
Moore's Town, Mr. John Cox. Mount Holly, Mr. Daniel 
Jones. Bordentown, Joseph Borden, Esq ; and Mr. John 
Taylor. Salem, George Trenchard, Esq; Lower Penn's 
Neck, Mr. George Trenchard, jun. Greenwich, Mr. John 
Sheppard. Cohansey, Mr. Josiah Miller. 1 

A few Days ago, one Nicholas Hert, a Cooper, of this 
City fell out of a Canoe which he was paddling, near 
Gloucester, and was drowned. He has left a Widow and 
five Children. 

Princeton, August 10, 1767. 

THE SUBSCRIBER having taken the TAVERN at Prince- 
ton, nearly opposite to, and at the sign of, the NEW-JER- 
SEY COLLEGE, all Gentlemen, and others, may depend on 
being treated by him with the greatest Respect, and good 
Accommodations for themselves and their Horses. And 
as Mr. BARN HILL'S Machine uses the Subscriber's House, 
any Gentleman having Goods or small Parcels to send to, 
or in the Neighborhood of, Princeton, may depend upon 

This list includes names at Quebec, Halifax, New Hampshire, Bos- 
ton, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maryland, South Carolina, Pennsylva- 
nia and the Lower Counties. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 429 

the utmost Care in delivering or forwarding them by the 
earliest Conveyance, agreeable to directions, by 

WILLIAM HICK. 

WHEREAS Elisabeth Perkins, Wife to me the Sub- 
scriber, of the Tozvnship of Willingburg and County of 
Burlington, hath not only eloped from my Bed and Board, 
but otherwise behaves in a very unbecoming Manner to- 
wards me; and as I am apprehensive, from what I have 
already experienced, she may endeavour to run me in Debt, 
I am obliged to take this public Method to forewarn all 
Persons from trusting her on my Account, as I am deter- 
mined I will not pay a single Farthing of her contracting 
from the Date hereof. And I hope no Person will en- 
courage her on such Occasions, as it may be a Prejudice 
to me, and will render them liable to a Prosecution. 

August 17, 1767. JOSEPH PERKINS. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 30, Aug. 10-17, 
1767. 

RuN-away, on Tuesday, the 4th of August inst. 
from the subscriber, Shoemaker, at Princeton, in 
New- Jersey, an apprentice lad, named SIMON ROGERS, 19 
years of age, about 5 feet 3 inches high, has short straight 
black hair, and large black eyes and dark complexioned : 
Had on, or took with him, a light brown sagathee 
coat, too large for him, and a cloth waistcoat of the same 
colour, a pair of dirty leather breeches, white thread 
stockings, and new shoes, speaks little, and looks very 
grave. Also an English servant girl, named Elizabeth 
Louisa Wilson, about 25 years of age, middle sized, fair 
complexion, light hair and eyes, and has a remarkable mole 
on her face, and a very sour look. She had on, or took 
with her, when she went away, a white linen short 



43 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

gown, and a long and short calico gown, and black cali- 
manco shoes. They went away in company with an ap- 
prentice of John Denton's, named Isaiah; thick set, about 
5 feet 8 inches high, 2 1 years of age, short black hair, and 
of a dark complexion : Had on a light brown coat, and 
dirty leather breeches, both apprentices; took with them 
a set of shoemaker s tools. Whoever may apprehend the 
said Simon Rogers, and servant girl, and returns them to 
me, or secures them in goal, so that I may have them 
again, shall have Four Dollars reward for the apprentice, 
and Three Dollars for the servant girl, and all reasonable 
charges, paid by 

JACOB TAYLOR. 

N. B. All masters of vessels, and others, are forbid to 
harbour or carry them off. 

RUN-AWAY from the Subscriber, living in Upper 
Freehold, Monmouth County, near Imley's-town, 
on the 22d ult. A Mulattow Slave, half Indian, named 
Charles Quite; it's likely he will alter his Name: He 
is about 28 Years of Age, and about 6 Feet 2 Inches high, 
well-set, something knock-kneed, large feet, and of a yel- 
low Complexion, with a Scar on one of his Cheeks near his 
Temple, long Hair, very much curled, and thin on the 
Top of his Head : Had on when he went away, a light- 
grey home-spun Coat, with streaked Lining, about half- 
worn, his Jacket is of a more darker colour, and more 
worn, Tow Shirt and Trowsers, and a Felt Hat : Who- 
ever secures said Slave, so that his Master may have him 
again, shall have Three Pounds Reward, and reasonable 

charges paid, by 

RICHARD JAMES. 

The New York Mercury, No. 823, August 10, 
1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 43 l 

New-York, August 13. We hear from the Jerseys, 
that a Girl about 12 Years of Age, was sent last Monday 
sen' night, to look for a Cow and a Calf, and that she has 
not been heard of since. The Neighbors have been for a 
Week in quest of her, but to no Purpose; they suppose 
they have found her Track, about 7 Miles off in the 
Woods, and that she had eat Huckle Berries, which it 
appear'd she had vomited up again. It is thought the 
information either from thyself or any Person disordered, 
are sufficient of themselves, to have put an End to her 
Life. 

THE Daucus or Wild Carrot, that is found on my farm, 
grows in a moist, loomy rich Soil, that hath been in Tillage 
once in three or 4 years, for these Hundred Years past, 
having been an old Indian Field. 

If any Thing is here omitted, that may be judged neces- 
sary for the more ready finding the desired Plant, upon 
information either from thyself or any Person discovered, 
shall readily give any further Description that may be de- 
sired. And am 

Thy Friend, 

ROBERT HARTSHORNE. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1284, August 13, 1767. 

To BE SOLD. 

A Tract of Land, late the Property of Stephen Wanton, 
of Newport, in Rhode Island, lying in the County of 
Gloucester, in the Westerly Division of the Province of 
New- Jersey, near Great Egg Harbour, on the N. E. Side 
of Great Egg Harbour River; situate on a Branch of said 
River, called Miry Run, containing 500 Acres of Land, 
well timbered with Pine, has an allowance for High ways, 
and is near several Saw-mills. 



432 . NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

A Tract of Land, late the Property of the said Stephen 
Wanton, situate in the County of Gloucester, and Pro- 
vince of New- Jersey, adjoining to Lands taken up by 
Samuel Smith, Samuel Powell, John Lad and Clarke Rod- 
man; containing 100 Acres of Good Land, which has 
Plenty of Black Oak Timber, with Allowance for High- 
ways. Any Persons inclining to purchase the above- 
mentioned Lands, may be informed of the Terms, by ap- 
plying to THOMAS RICHARDSON, in Philadelphia, who is 
impowered to make a sufficient Title for the same. 

RUN away, the 26th of July last, from the Subscriber, 
living in Newton Township, Gloucester County, West 
New- Jersey, an Apprentice Boy, named SIMEON KEY, be- 
tween 14 and 15 Years of Age, this Country born, fair 
Complexion, is well grown, and has curled flaxen Hair; 
had on, when he went away, a striped Holland Jacket, 
striped Linen Trowsers, Felt Hat, and white Linen Shirt. 
It was supposed he is gone towards Lancaster. Who- 
ever takes up said Apprentice, and secures him. so as 
his Master gets him again, shall receive Twenty Shillings 
Reward, paid by 

RICHARD COLLINGS. 

N. B. All Persons are forbid to Harbour him, and all 
Masters of Vessels to carry him off at their Peril. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2016, Aug. 13, 1767. 

RuN-away, on the nth day of September last, from the 
subscriber at Princeton, New- Jersey, An Irish servant 
girl named Mary Croane, about 26 years of age, a middle 
sized woman, was supposed to be secreted by Robert 
Nemins at Princeton, and by him conveyed to his son Wil- 
liam Nemins living at Brandywine Rocks near Christeen 
Ferry, and there it's said passed for said William's servant, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 433 

was challenged by James Saunders the forepart of April 
last, at the house of Henry Bracken, about five miles from 
New-Port in New Castle County, but he, the said Saun- 
ders, being detained by said Bracken and his sons till said 
Mary made her escape. Whoever takes up said servant 
and secures her in any of his Majesty's goals, so that her 
master may have her again, shall have THIRTY SHILLINGS 
reward and all reasonable charges paid by Daniel Balis 
at the Head of Elk, or 

WILLIAM MOUNTEER. 

The Pennsylvania Journal,, No. 1288, Aug. 13, 
1767. 

NEW- YORK, Aug. 20. 

We hear from the county of Somerset, and province of 
New- Jersey, that on the 2Oth ultimo Samuel Brewer, Esq; 
was elected a representative for that county, in the room 
of John Hooglandt, Esq; deceased. 

JOSEPH PERKINS, of the township of Willingborough, 
and county of Burlington, my graceless husband, having 
maliciously advertised to the world, that I have eloped 
from his bed and board, run him in debt, and otherwise 
behaved in an unbecoming manner towards him, I am 
obliged to take this method solemnly to declare, that those 
charges against me have not the least foundation in truth, 
which can be easily made to appear; and were entirely 
occasioned by my refusing to assign over to him the little 
interest I have, that he might squander it away in disor- 
derly company, as he hath done the greatest part of his 
own, and my declining to entertain and encourage the 
infamous guests he frequently brought to his house, 
where, amidst the most notorious scenes and disorder, I 
often met with treatment, which would have shocked a 

28 



434 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

savage of the Ohio, which at last obliged me to fly to my 
mother's house in this city, which I unfortunately left, as 
the only sanctuary I could expect to find from his persecu- 
tions. There being a greater probability of his running 
me in debt, than my injuring him in that manner, I desire 
that no person may trust him from any expectation that 
I will pay his debts, for I have determined never to pay a 
farthing of his contracting from the date hereof. 
.Philadelphia, Aug. 22,1767. ELIZABETH PERKINS. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 31, August 17- 
24, 1767. 

New-York, August 17. Two Companies of Soldiers 
arrived at Elizabeth-Town from Amboy and Brunswick 
on Monday and Tuesday last. 

RuN-away from the subscriber, living in Kildair, 
in Freehold, New- Jersey, on the gth ult. a servant 
man named Garret Harbour, about 5 feet 8 inches high. 
a low squat well set fellow, very much mark'd with the 
small pox, with black curled Hair: Had on when he 
went away, a good blue cloth coat and vest, a white shirt, 
with long tow trowsers, yarn stockings, and large brass 
buckles, and an old felt hat, it is supposed he will endeavor 
to ship himself for Ireland, so that all masters of vessels 
are forwarned from carrying him off. Whoever takes 
up the said runaway, so that his master may have him 
again, shall have 4 DOLLARS reward, paid by SAMUEL 

FORMAN. 

To be SOLD. 

A Plantation, at Hanover, in the County of MORRIS, 

/Vand Province of EAST-NEW-JERSEY, about 12 

Miles from NEWARK. It contains between 4 or 500 

Acres, of which near 300 is excellent Bog Meadow 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 435 

Ground, and very good for raising Hemp, &c. It joins 
the Lands of Mr. WILLIAM KELLY. There is on the 
Premises, a small House, and a good Orchard; the whole 
pretty well timbered, and a fine Stream runs around three 
fourths of the Farm. A reasonable Time will be given 
for the Payment of the Purchase Money, on giving good 
Security. Whoever inclines to purchase the same, may 
apply to Doctor THOMAS BUDD., in Hanover, or AUGUS- 
TINE MOORE, Esq; Attorney at Law, in Morris Town, 
who will agree for the same on reasonable Terms. Time 
will be given for the Payment of the Money on giving 
Security. The New York Mercury, No. 824, August 17, 
1767. 

To BE SOLD. 

By public Vendue, at Perth-Amboy, on Thursday, the 
Third Day of September next. 

A Convenient Brick House, with 8 
Fire-Places, very pleasantly situated 
on the Bank, (with a good Water 
AND BARN WITH Y Lot) a Stable and Barn, and a large 
TREES Garden, which contains a Variety 

of the best Fruits : Likewise sun- 
dry household Furniture, two ted- 
ious to mention, but will be made know r n on the Day of 
Sale, or any Time before, by 

WILLIAM BRYANT. 

N. B. At the same Time will be sold, a good Milch 
Cow. The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1 28$, August 20, 1767. 

NEW- YORK, August 17. 

Monday last his Majesty's ship Garland, Captain St. 
John, sailed out of the North-River to the Hook, but 



436 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

having the misfortune to spring her mizen-mast, she re- 
turned again on Friday last. 

PHILADELPHIA August 20. 

Friday last the Body of Matthew Robeson, who was 
drowned out of a Flat at Hay Creek, was taken up at the 
Fort. - - - - The next Day Daniel Hicks, who was 
drowned out of a Flat in Pennypack Creek, was found at 
Point-no-Point. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia. OUTWARDS. Brig Two 
Brothers, J. Duncan, Amboy. The Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2017, August 20, 1767. 

ARRIVALS. 
Captain Blackler, from Salem, is arrived at Barbados. 

Perth- Amboy, August 24, 1767. 

TAKEN up and committed to the Goal of this City, 
one Margaret Pearson, alias Margaret Burges, on sus- 
picion of being the Person who stole the Money from 
Arthur Nesmyth, on the 24th of July last, as advertised 
in the PENNSYLVANIA CHRONICLE, of the I7th Instant 
She answers the Description, and every Particular of the 
Clothing is found on her, as mentioned in the said Adver- 
tisement this public Notice is therefore given, that the 
said Nesmyth may appear and prosecute otherwise the 
said Margaret will be discharged. 

RICHARD CARNES, Goaler. 

On Thursday the 24th day of September next, will be 
sold at PUBLIC VENDUE, at the house of RICHARD 
READING, in the township of Amwell, county of Hun- 
terdon, and province of West-New-Jersey; all his, 
the said Richard Reading's, estate, both real and per- 
sonal, viz. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 437 

THE PLANTATION whereon he now lives, being pleasant- 
ly situated on the River Delaware, on which it has a front 
of near a mile, about 21 miles from Trenton, and 32 from 
Philadelphia, and within a mile of Howel's ferry; it con- 
tains 456 acres of as good wheat land as any in the county, 
of which about one third part is cleared and in fence, and 
has on it a good stone dwelling-house, four rooms on a 
floor, with a kitchen under the whole; a convenient stone 
store, a frame barn, a well of excellent water, and a fine 
thriving young orchard of the best fruit. The situation 
of the house is high and healthy, and affords a most agree- 
able prospect of the River Delaware and Pennsylvania. 

ALSO, One undivided sixth part of 616 acres of land, 
lying on Scot's mountain, in the township of Oxford, 
county of Sussex, and province aforesaid to the south-- 
east of the Vanettas farms, adjoining the southerly side 
of lands surveyed to Thomas Boulsby. 

ALSO, One equal undivided sixth part of 100 acres in 
the said township of Oxford, including a very fine stream 
of water, suitable for any kind of water- works; adjoin- 
ing the lands now or lately Governor Penn's. 

ALSO, One undivided sixth part of 20 acres, in the afore- 
said township, on the south-westerly side of the last men- 
tioned tract, and bounded on all other sides by lands be- 
longing to the Vanettas. 

ALSO, One equal undivided moiety or half part of 160 
acres in Newtown, in the county of Sussex, and province 
of aforesaid, at the foot of the Slate mountain; bounded 
by Joseph Hull to the north-west, and by the division line 
between East and West- Jersey to the northeast. 

ALSO, One equal undivided moiety or half part of 422 
acres of very valuable land, mostly rich meadow ground, 
lying in the township and county aforesaid, on a branch of 
the River Paquaess beginning at the corner of Thomas 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Pettit's land, surveyed to Richard Green, now Joshua 
Opdike's. 

ALSO, One equal undivided moiety or half part of 303 
acres, in the township of Greenwich, in the county of 
Sussex, bounded on the south-east by land of Clark Rod- 
man, and on the south-west by land surveyed to Joseph 
Kirkbride. 

ALSO, all the said Richard Reading's share of a certain 
copper mine, at Wallpack, with the lands thereunto be- 
longing. 

ALSO, One equal undivided fourth part of a forge and 
135 acres of land, in the township of Solebury, county of 
Bucks, and province of Pennsylvania, near Coryell's 
Ferry. 

ALSO, Horses, cows, a variety of shop-goods and farm- 
ing utensils. The vendue to begin precisely at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon, where attendance will be given by 
JAMES JAUNCY, 
JOHN Cox, jun. 

THOMAS PRYOR, jun. 

Assignees. 

N. B. The purchasers paying one third of the purchase 
money down, may have time for the remainder, paying 
interest and giving security. 

Morris County, New- Jersey, July 20, 1767. 
RUN-AWAY from Jacob Ford, jun. of Morris-Town, 
an indented Irish servant man, about 38 or 40 years of age, 
about 6 feet high, well built, and looks like a strong, 
hearty, good-humour'd fellow, has a wen as large as a 
walnut over one Eye, and has lost one (or more) of his 
fore-teeth, generally wears a worsted cap, and is in poor 
habit ; calls his name Daniel Fagan, and is a ditcher by 
trade, though sometimes used to cut wood for forges. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 439 

Whoever secures said servant in any of his Majesty's goals 
in America, shall receive TWELVE DOLLARS Reward, and 
all reasonable expenses ; and if delivered in Morris county 
goal, shall receive the above reward, and all reasonable 
charges of 

JACOB FORD, jun. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 32, August 24- 
31, 1767. 

New-York, August 27. The Harriot Packet, men- 
tioned in our last, had we hear, been within 200 Leagues 
of Sandy-Hook, 50 Days before she arrived. In her came 
Passenger, Peter Hassenclever, Esq. 

On Tuesday last arrived at Amboy, the Schooner Sally, 
Capt. Lyal from Madeira. The New York Journal or 
General Advertiser, No. 1286, August 27, 1767. 

To be SOLD, by way of public vendue on Friday, the 
4th of September next, on the premises (unless sold before 
by private sale) a valuable plantation, containing about 
300 acres of good land, situate in the township of Wil- 
lingborough, in the county of Burlington, butting on 
Rancocus Creek. There is on said farm a good dwelling- 
house, large barn, stables, a good bearing orchard, a 
valuable fishery, about 80 acres cleared land, with 1 1 acres 
of choice bank meadow, lying on the point of Rancocus 
Creek. The said farm is conveniently situated for attend- 
ing Philadelphia market, lying about a mile and a quarter 
from the mouth of said creek. Also will be sold at the 
same time, 25 acres of good cedar swamp, lying contig- 
uous to a branch of said creek, from whence they may 
float the rails to said farm at a small expence. The con- 
ditions will be made known at the time and place aforesaid, 



440 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

by DANIEL ELLIS, WILLIAM SMITH, JOSEPH FENIMORE, 
Assignees. 

N. B. The said assignees have 100 acres of good 
wood land to sell, lying in the township of Chester, about 
two miles from the said Rancocus Creek. 

New- York, August 18, 1767. 

The assignees to the estate of William Clawson, of 
Cranbury, Middlesex county, New- Jersey, will attend at 
the house of Bo! ton and Sigell, in the City of New York, 
on Tuesday, the first day of December next, from 10 
o'clock in the morning to 5 o'clock in the afternoon; and 
desire the creditors of said estate, then and there to pro- 
duce their accounts, properly attested, that an exact divi- 
dend may be made of the monies, which shall then be 
received. 

NICHOLAS HOFFMAN, STEPHEN FORMAN, Assignees. 

Philadelphia CUSTOM-HOUSE, Cleared. 

Brig Two Brothers, J. Duncan, Amboy. The Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2081, Aug. 27, 1767. 

NEW-YORK, August 24. 

The public are desired to be cautious in receiving Six 
Shilling New- Jersey bills, dated December 31, 1763, 
signed Smith, Johnston, and Skinner: They are done 
from a copper-plate, and so badly executed, that the}' 
may be easily discovered ; in the word December, there is 
an n for an m, & most of the s's in the bill appear like 
f's. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1290. Aug. 27, 
1767. 

New-York, August 31. It was Abraham Vanness, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 44 l 

Esq; and not Samuel Brewer, that was elected a Repre- 
sentative for the County of Somerset, and Province of 
New- Jersey, in the Room of John Hooglandt, deceased, 
as mentioned in the Mercury of the I7th Instant, the 
Account being sent to the Printer as authentic, and was 
inserted as such, but he is since informed it was done with 
a view to cast an Odium on Mr. Vanness, who has always 
supported a fair and unblemished Character. 

To BE RUN FOR. 

At the Course, in Elizabeth-Town, the first Tuesday in 
October next, by any Horse, Mare or Gelding, that 
never won a Match, Plate or Purse, Value 10, 
carrying Weight for Age, the best of three two Mile 
Heats ; 

A Purse of Thirty Pounds : Three 
years old to carry 8 Stone; 4 

FIGURE OF 1 ^ ears old > 8 Stone 7 Pounds; 5 years 
old, 9 Stone; 6 years old, 9 Stone 7 
RUNNING j- Pounds . an d aged Horses, 10 Stone. 



HORSE. 



The Cattle to be entered with Mr. 



Broughton Reynolds, any Time before 
the Day of Running, paying 4 Dollars 
entrance, or double at the Post, which Entrance Money 
to be rim for the next Day, by all, but the winning and the 
distanced Horses. All Disputes to be decided by proper 
Judges chosen by a Majority of the Subscribers. 

N. B. 'Tis to be hoped no Gentleman in possession of 
a full-blooded Horse will spoil Sport for the Value of 30. 

To BE RUN FOR. 

At the City of NEW-BRUNSWICK, on Monday the 2d Day 
of November next, free for any Horse, Mare, or 
Gelding, not Full-blooded. 



44 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



A 



Purse of THIRTY PISTOLES, the 
.best of three 4 Mile Heats, car- 
FIGURE OF A ] r y in g Weight for Age as follows, viz. 
Three years old to carry 7 Stone and a 
Half; 4 years old, 8 Stone; 5 years 
RUNNING. J old, 8 Stone 10 Pounds; 6 years old, 
9 Stone 6 Pounds and aged Cattle, 10 
Stone. The Horses to be entered with 
Mr. MICHAEL DUFF, at 6 Dollars each, or double on the 
Day of Starting. Proper judges will be appointed to 
determine any Disputes that may arise. The next Day 
will be RUN FOR, by common Horses, a compleat SADDLE, 
BRIDLE, and WHIP. And on the Day after the EN- 
TRANCE MONEY will be RUN FOR, by any but the winning, 
or distanced Horses. The Proof of the Horses Blood and 
Age will be upon the Owners respectively. 'Tis to be 
noted, that not less than three reputed running Horses are 
to start for the PISTOLES. The New York Mercury, No. 
826, August 31, 1767. 



New- York, September 3. On Monday Night, at the 
Albany Dock, the Cabin of a Sloop belonging to Egg 
Harbour, Levi Hosier, Master, who with two other Men 
was asleep in it, was robbed of his Chest, which was car- 
ried out upon the Dock, broke open, and plundered of his 
clothes and 150 New- York Currency. 

He suspected one of his ow r n People, named Norton, 
who being committed to goal confessed being concerned in 
the Fact, discovered the place where he had concealed the 
Money, and where it was all found, and named a Seaman 
belonging to a Vessel lying close by, as an Accomplice, 
who he said had taken Possession of the Clothes, the man 
was immediately taken up and committed to Goal, where 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 443 

both he and Norton now remain. The New York Jour- 
nal or General Advertiser, No. 1287, September 3, 1767. 

To be LETT by the SUBSCRIBER, for a number of years, 
either on shares, or by the year, a fulling mill, with all the 
utensils for fulling, dyeing, shearing or pressing, being 
situated in the township of Upper Freehold, in the county 
of Monmouth, East New-Jersey, in a very good part for 
business, if carried on by a workman, and has a constant 
stream of water, and all other conveniences suitable for 
carrying on the clothing business. For further particu- 
lars, enquire of JOHN WEST,, at the Old Ferry, in Phila- 
delphia, or the subscriber on the premises. 

RICHARD BROWN. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

STOLEN from the pasture of Asher Morgan, of Amwell 
Township, Hunterdon County, West New- Jersey, a bay 
Horse, about 14 Hands 3 Inches high, has a white Streak 
round one of his hind Legs, above the Gambrel, a natural 
Pacer, about 8 or 9 Years old, and was taken away in the 
Night between the 26th and 27th of August last. Who- 
ever apprehends the said Thief, so that he may be brought 
to Justice, and the Owner have his Horse again, shall have 
the above Reward, or Fifty Shillings for the Horse only 
with reasonable Charges, paid by 

ASHER MORGAN. 

N. B. A half worn Saddle, with green Plush Housing, 
and double reined Bridle, was taken from a near Neigh- 
bour the same Night, supposed to be taken by the same 
Hand. 

To BE SOLD, 

By public vendue, on Monday, the 2ist of September in- 
stant A Valuable GRIST-MILL, with two water wheels, and 



444 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/6'7 

two pair of stones, three boulting cloths, hoisting jack and 
turning lathe all go by water; the mill is in good repair, 
and is situated in a good place for country or merchant 
work. Also a tract of land . . . .- 1 The vendue to 
begin at 10 o'clock where attendance will be given, and 
the conditions made known, by me 

ABIA BROWN. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2019, Sept. 3, 
1767. 

NEW- YORK, September 3. 

Monday last, an Egg-Harbour sloop, one Hosier, Mas- 
ter, as she lay along side of the wharfT, near the Albany 
pier, was robbed; the master's chest, wherein was about 
150 in cash, besides his clothes, being taken out of the 
cabin, while he and another lay asleep in it, and carried 
on to the wharff, to a small distance from the vessel, 
where the chest was found the next morning broke open, 
and every thing taken out of it: Great search and en- 
quiry was made all the next day to no purpose. The next 
afternoon, a man at work on board a vessel lying near the 
Egg-Harbour-Man, missed some money out of his pocket, 
and his suspicions fell upon one Norton, a hand belonging 
to Hosier, whereupon he had him apprehended, and exam- 
ined, and finding his suspicions too much confirmed, he 
had Norton committed to Goal ; On Wednesday morning 
Norton offered to confess; whereupon being brought be- 
fore a magistrate again, he owned the robbing of the 
sloop, and said he had hid the money in one of the wharffs, 
but had thrown the clothes into the river; upon which the 
wharff being searched in the place where he said he had 
hid it, the money was happily found, but nothing of the 
clothes to be seen: Norton then impeached another as 

i As advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 1995, March 19, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 44 S 

an accomplice, and said the clothes were hid also, but on 
searching the place, none could be found; whereupon 
both he and the accomplice were committed to goal. 

ARRIVALS 

From Salem. Captain Driver, at Jamaica. 
The COMMISSIONERS appointed by Act of ASSEMBLY 
of the Province of Pennsylvania, for building a Light- 
house at Cape-Henlopen, and fixing Buoys in the Bay of 
Delaware, having now compleated this Service, think 
proper to make public the Situation of the said Buoys, in 
Hopes that the Directions following may prove useful to 
the Shipping bound up or down this Bay. 

Directions for sailing into Whorekiln Road. 

1. A red Buoy is stationed on the SE. Point of the 
Shears in Four Fathom Water. The Light-house bears 
from this Buoy S. by E. and the outer Point of the Cape 
S. by E. half E. The Course from the Cape is NW. by 
W. and from the Buoy SSW. until the Cape bears SE. by 
E. the Buoy NNE. and Lewes-Town SW. then there is 
Anchorage in Four Fathom Water, good Ground. 

2. A large black Buoy is stationed on the Lower Part 
of the Brown, in Three and a Quarter Fathom Water, 
which is to be left on the Larboard Hand when bound up 
the Bay. The Light-house bears from this Buoy S. Three 
Quarters E. Cape May bears E. One Quarter S. and the 
Buoy on the Lower Part of the Brandywine N. One Quar- 
ter W. 

3. A Buoy on the Lower Part of the Brandywine, in 
Four Fathom Water; the Body of this Buoy is painted 
black, with a white Rim, and black Head. Cape May 
bears from this Buoy ESE. One Quarter E. the Buoy on 
the Brown S. One Quarter E. Muspilion W. the Buoy on 



446 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1/67 

the Upper Part of the Brandywine NNW. One Quarter 
W. From this Buoy, in coming up, the Course is NW. 
by N. as high as the Breakers, which lie about Midway 
between the two Buoys, and it is steep too; when you are 
abreast of the Breakers at the Distance of a Cable's Length 
from them, the Course is NNW. some time, then N. will 
bring you to the upper Buoy on the Brandywine, which 
lies in Five Fathom Water. 

4. A large Buoy in the upper Part of the Brandywine, 
in Five Fathom Water, painted the white next the Water, 
the middle Part red, with a black Rim, the Head a black 
Ground, with four white Squares. Cape May bears from 
this Buoy SE. by E. Muspilion W. by S. Three Quarters 
W. The Lower Buoy on the Brandywine SSE. One 
Quarter E. And the Breakers, on the Height of the Shoal 
SSE. Half E. 

5. A large white Buoy, on the Lower End of the Cross 
Ledge, in Three and a Half Fathom Water, Egg-Island 
bears from this Buoy E. Half N. Fortescue's Island NE. 
by N. One Quarter E. The Lower Part of Bombay Hook 
NW. A remarkable Tree in the Motherkiln SW. Half 
W. And the Buoy on the Upper Middle NW. Half N. 

6. A black Buoy on the Upper Middle, in Seventeen 
Feet Water. The Lower Part of Bombay Hook, inter- 
secting the Uppermost of the Thrum Caps, bears from 
this Buoy NW. Half W. The Thrum Caps NW. by W. 
Fortescue's Island E. by N. Three Quarters N. And the 
Buoy on the Cross Ledge SE. Half S. This Buoy lies on 
the Height of the Shoal, in Seventeen Feet Water, at low 
Tide, and Vessels of 14 or 15 Feet may go over any time 
of Tide. 

N. B. The Soundings of the Buoys are taken at Low 
Water. 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



447 



BEST FLOUR of MUSTARD, in pound and half pound 
bottles; a quantity of good flax; muscovado and loaf 
sugar; rice, coffee, chocolate and tea; raisins in keggs; 
pepper, nutmegs and allspice; allom, copperas, brimstone, 
redwood and logwood, iron pots, kettles, skillets, bake- 
irons, tea kettles and sad irons, knives and forks, best 
double worm gimlets, crumb creek scythe stones, a few 
barrels of BURLINGTON PORK, and sundry other things, 
to be sold by BENEDICT DORSEY, in Third-street, nearly 
opposite to the Work-house. 

READY MONEY may be had for clearing and putting 
into Grass, about 25 Acres of Marsh, on Oldman's Creek, 
in Gloucester County, which is already banked in. Any 
Person willing to undertake the above, may hear of Terms, 
by applying to the Subscriber, in Market-street, Philadel- 
phia 

Also to be sold, a good Plantation, on Little Egg-Har- 
bour (late Jeremiah Steelman's) about one Half of which 
is as good Meadow as any on the Shore, and Part of the 
Upland well dunged, and bears as large a Crop of Corn 
as almost any Land in the Jerseys, has on it a new two 
Story House, with a Barn, &c. Credit will be given for 
Chief of the Money, on giving Security, and paying Inter- 
est. For Price, enquire of 

WILLIAM SITGREAVES. 

N. B. Said Sitgreaves holds a Vendue every Friday 
and Saturday, as usual, for the public Sale of all Sorts of 
Goods, &c. Those who please to favour him with the 
Sales of any Goods in that Way, may depend on his En- 
deavours to render Satisfaction. 

He wants a sober honest Lad, who can write a tolerable 
Hand, and understands something of Arithmetic, as an 



44 S NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Apprentice. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2020, Sep- 
tember 10, 1767. 

LONDON. 

The Work intituled, "The present State of Great-Brit- 
ain and North-America" having much engaged the public 
attention, the following extract from the second part of 
that performance will, we hope, prove agreeable to our 
readers. 

After shelving what their real wants are in this island, 
the Author proceeds as follows, viz. 

THUS Britain is a country of manufactures without ma- 
terials a trading nation without commodities to trade 
upon and a maritime power without naval stores or ma- 
terials for ship building They ["the colonies 

in North America"] are limited both on the north and 
west by chains of barren mountains, one beyond another, 
which confine them to a very narrow slip of land along the 
sea-coast. Within these bounds all our colonies make but 
three different and distinct countries, and those of no great 
extent. The four northern colonies are exactly such an- 
other country as Scotland, and of the same dimensions; 
the soil is as poor, and the climate much worse. The two 
tobacco colonies, Virginia and Maryland, adjacent to 
these, are about as large as one half of England, and not 
so large as Ireland. The southern, or rice colonies, North 
and South Carolina, are a little larger than England, but 
as barren and unhealthful as this is the reverse of both. 1 

Thus the British plantations in N orth- America make 

three different countries, the northern, the middle, and 
southern colonies, which may be compared to the three 

i Other English works about this time published accounts of America 
which gave the impression that the Colonies comprised a narrow strip 
of marsh along the ocean, with very little upland and a chain of moun- 
tains beyond. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 449 

British kingdoms at home, and are about as large. Of 
this it is but a very small spot that produces any thing for 

Britain 

[Extract from foot-note: "New Jersey and the inhab- 
ited parts of Pennsylvania, below the mountains, which 
are likewise one and the same country, make two degrees 
of latitude, and two of longitude, or about 11,000 square 
miles; this makes 27,000 square miles for the four north- 
ern colonies; and Scotland by Templeman's survey con- 
tains 27,794."] The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 35, 
September 14-21, 1767. 

New-York, September 14. A Person from Newark, 
in New-Jersey, gives us the following odd Intelligence; 
that one Sears, some four or five Years ago, having will- 
fully shot, and desperately wounded one of the Conserva- 
tors of the Peace in the Borough of Elizabeth, had been 
committed to Newark Gaol ; Before his Trial came on, he 
assign'd over what Estate he had to some near Relation; 
on his Trial he was found guilty, and among other Arti- 
cles of his Sentence, he was to find Security for his good 
Behaviour during Life; but he being of a very fractious 
and obstinate Temper, he could never get such Security : 
For some Time his Relations supported him in Gaol, when 
finding it too chargeable in their Imagination, they witheld 
their Support : For some Time longer he was supported 
by the Charity of the Town, but they thinking it was not 
their Duty to do it, stopt their Hand also a few Months 
ago. Upon his being told, those who had hitherto supplied 
him with Provisions would do so no longer, he voluntarily 
determined to fast FORTY DAYS without Food, or die; He 
persisted in the Resolution, and in all the Time he only 
took two coppersworth of Rum, and neither eat nor drank 
any thing else for FORTY DAYS, in which Time he was re- 



45 " NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

duced to a perfect Skeleton, and continued in a great Meas- 
ure like a mere Lunatick. At the Expiration of the Time, 
which was but about a Fortnight ago, he was prevailed 
with to take some Nourishment, but for the first Day or 
two, every Thing he took came up again, his Belly having 
grown almost fast to his Back : However, by the Help of 
some Medicines of lenitive Food, he is at last like to re- 
cover again after his long obstinate Fast, though he is 
very poor and low. 

To be sold at public sale at vendue, at the Merchants Cof- 
fee-House, on friday the 26th inst. by order of ROGER 
MAGRAH, and JOSEPH GRISWOLD; 

A Small plantation, situated be- 
tween Middletown point, and 
Mount Pleasant; containing about 
J View of portion! 60 acres, 10 of which is in good fence, 
of a farm. j the rest full of good wood, of various 
kinds, and full of living springs in the 
driest seasons, and lies within f of a mile of 5 good 
wharfs, stores, and landings, where there is sufficient 
water for any common sloop ; there is on said land, a large 
and commodious house 36 feet by 22 ; said land is bound- 
ed on one side, by a large mill-pond, formerly Joseph For- 
man's, and on the back by the Amboy road, and on the 
front by the main road leading from the point to Freehold, 
Shrewsbury, Philadelphia, and all the adjacent country; 
whose vast produce is chiefly exported to New- York mar- 
ket, and must come by carriage close by said house, which 
is likewise within f of a mile of 3 grist-mills; there is a 
large Presbyterian meeting and a publick school close by 
said house, which renders it the more convenient for any 
public business : The title is indisputable. 

Said MAGRATH, intends to follow the taylor's trade 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 45 1 

again, and will be obliged to his former customers, either 
to send or recommend their acquaintance, who will be well 
used; or if any should chuse to employ him in their own 
houses, he will wait on them, and shall serve them to his 
utmost. 

ROGER MAGRAH 

The New York Mercury, No. 828, September 14, 
1767. 

New-York, September 17. We hear from Shrewsbury, 
in New- Jersey, that upwards of Forty Horses have lately 
died in that Township very suddenly, of a Disorder not 
before known there. They are seized with a trembling in 
their hind Legs, and die almost immediately. It was ob- 
served that the Dews in those Parts have been very copi- 
ous, and the Grass in a Morning would be almost covered 
with Spider's Webs, and it was supposed that some per- 
nicious Quality in the Dew, or those Webs, and small 
Spider's taken in with their Food, might have occasion'd 
this Mortality. But five exceeding fine Horses, belonging 
to Mr. Allen of Philadelphia, who was lately at Shrews- 
bury, tho' they were kept in a Stable, and not put to Grass 
at all, were all seized with the Disorder, four of them died 
and the fifth is not yet recovered. Some of them were 
opened and their Livers were found to be much swell'd 
and inflamed. No certain Method of Cure had been dis- 
covered : But it was tho't some had received Benefit from 
Bleeding, and spreading Tar upon their Breasts and about 
their Nostrils, and keeping some in their Mouths, spread 
upon Rags or Tow tied round the Bitts of their Bridles. 

To be sold the 2Oth of October next, at public Vendue, or 
at private Sale any Time before, on the Premises; 
A Very good House and Lot of Ground, very pleasantly 



45 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

situated, in the Town of Shrewsbury, East New-Jersey, 
being about a Mile and a Quarter distant from the Church 
and Meeting Houses,. four Miles from the Sea, and half a 
Mile from the River, which affords Fish of all Kinds in 
great Plenty. The House is esteemed one of the best in 
the Township, and has many good Conveniences, for n 
Store or private Family. The Conditions of Sale may be 
known by applying to 

JOSEPH LEONARD. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1289, September 17, 1767. 

Sussex County, on Delaware, Three Run Mills, September 

22, 1767. 

TEN POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, on the i.3th instant, a 
Mulatto slave, named HARRY, about 40 years of age, 5 
feet 6 inches high, and well-set: Had on when he went 
away, a brown cloth coat, white linen jacket, and brown 
breeches: he was bred a miller, and understands very 
well how to manufacture flour, and can invoice the. same; 
is much given to strong drink, and playing on the violin; 
understands the carpenter's and mill wright's business 
middling well: was removed from East-New-Jersey in 
the year 1762, by one Nicholas Veight, who lived ii 
Rocky-Hill, and kept a mill; and the said fellow has a 

free Mulatto wife, named Peg, and two children. 1 

expect they will endeavour to get together (though they 
did not run away at one time) . . . it is expected they 
will endeavour to get to the Province of East- New- Jersey: 
it is imagined said Mulatto has a pass. 

Any person or persons that takes up and secures the 
said Mulatto, and delivers him to CHARLES WHARTON, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 453 

Merchant, in Philadelphia, or to the subscriber, shall have 
the above reward of Ten Pounds, if taken in the province 
of New- Jersey, and Six Pounds if in the province of Penn- 
sylvania, paid by 

LEVIN CRAPPER. 

N. B. The said Mulatto woman named Peg, has run 
away from her bail, at Lewis Court, in Sussex county. 
The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 36, September 28, 1767. 

PUBLIC Notice is hereby given, that all those who have 
any just Demands on the Estate of Robert Sproull, of 
South-Amboy. deceased; are desired to send them to Eliz- 
abeth Sproull, Administratrix, in New- York, to receive 
Satisfaction for the same; and all Persons who stand in- 
debted to said Estate, either by Bond, Book Debt, or oth- 
erwise, are desired to make immediate Payment to the 
aforesaid Elizabeth Sproull, or they may depend their ac- 
counts will be put into the Hands of an Attorney. 

The aforesaid Elizabeth Sproull, expects to be in Am- 
boy on the 1 5th of October next, where she will reside for 
three or four days. 

PROPOSALS, 

For publishing by Subscription, A PERFORMANCE, en- 
titled, A COMPANION 
For the young People of North-America. 
Pertinently recommended to those within the three Prov- 
inces of New-York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 
Divided into Chapters, adapted to every intelligent Capac- 
ity, and calculated for the Promotion, and furtherance 
of Christian Decorum among Families; principally de- 
signed to excite a laudable and Christian Emulation 
among young People, to pursue the Paths which lead 
to real Religion : By attempting to discover the Beau - 



454 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

ties of a virtuous Life, and remove all Objections young 
Persons have to being early Religious. 

By Ahimaaz Harker, Candidate for the Ministry. 

CONTENTS. 
CHAPTER,, 

I. Contains an Address to Parents of every Denomina- 
tion, Masters and Mistresses, and all to whom the Charge 
and Education of Children are committed. 

II. An earnest Persuasive to all young Persons, of 
what Age, Profession, Circumstance or Rank soever, early 
to dedicate themselves to the Service of the Lord. 

III. Contains an Address to those who are employed 
in learning- and study, and have Time and Opportunity 
indulged them by their Parents for the Purpose. 

IV. To those who may be anxiously desirous of a lib- 
eral Education, and use many Efforts to acquire it, yet 
adverse Fortune will not allow them to succeed. 

V. To those who may be so far divested of filial Affec- 
tion, as to treat their Parents with Disrespect. 

VI. To those who have fulfilled the Time of Non-Age, 
and set out to join the Stage of manly Action, under the 
Direction of their own Judgment, &c. 

There are sundry other Chapters not yet completed, 
which the Author hopes to have finished by the Time a 
promising Number of Subscriptions be made. 

It will be printed on a good Paper and Letter. 

The Price of the Books will be adjusted after they come 
from the Press, and as reasonable as can be afforded. They 
will not exceed Five Shillings. 

Any who may be disposed to encourage its Publication, 
by purchasing a Book or Books, will be pleased to send in 
their Names, which shall be published in the List annexed 
to the Work, or not, as they shall be pleased to direct. 



i;6 7 ] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



455 



Subscriptions are now lodged in the Hands of the fol- 
lowing Gentlemen, viz. Obadiah Ayres, at Musconet- 
kung, in Sussex. William Griffing, Nathaniel Drake, and 
Dr. Jonathan Horton, at Roxbury. Mr. Thompson, at 
Mendum. Samuel Kennedy, jun. at Basking-Ridge. John 
Younglove, at Bound-Brook. Isaiah Younglove, School- 
master, at Milstone. Dr. Joseph Caldwell, at Lamberton. 
Dr. Jacob Harris, at New-Market. Daniel Hendrickson, 
at Middletown. Elias Woodruff, at Elizabeth-Town. At 
the Printing-Office near the Exchange, New-York, and 
Hugh Gaine's, in Hanover-Square, &c. The New York 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1290, September 24, 
1767. 

NEW-YORK, September 17. 

The Eagle, Markham, with the Artillery Troops on 
board, had a Pilot put on board her Saturday Evening 
last, off Sandy-Hook. 

Cumberland county, New- Jersey, Sept. 14, 1767. 
NOTICE is hereby given to all persons whom it may con- 
cern, that the subscribers intend to petition the assembly, 
at their next sitting, for an act to be past for draining their 
meadows on Caesarea river, to join the bank called 
Holmes's Bank, at the Line Creek, where it now joins, and 
the said Holmes's Bank, not to extend any further through 
Loyd's marsh, and each party to maintain their own bank, 
as far as it extends through their own meadows, at their 
own expence. 

EPHRAIM LOYD, JONATHAN WHATON. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2022, September 
24, 1767. 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

BOSTON, 

Sept. 24. Thursday last arrived here, the brigantine 
Hannah, Capt. Robert Jar vis, from London, in whom 
came passengers, the Rev. Mr. Moses Badger, and the 
Rev. Mr, Beach; who some time since went to England 
for episcopal ordination, the former an itinerant mission- 
ary in the province of New-Hampshire, the latter for New- 
Brunswick in New Jersey. 

NEW YORK, September 28. 

Last week, three travelling gentlemen were taken up 
for uttering false 13^. bills at a tavern in Morris County, 
New- Jersey ; they are altered, we hear, from i.y. Bills. 

We are desired to acquaint the PUBLIC, that a FAIR, 
for the Sale of Horses, neat Cattle, Sheep, &c. will be held 
at PRINCETON, in NEW-JERSEY, on WEDNESDAY the 2ist 
Instant. 

To be Sold, by public vendue, on the ipth day of October 
next, on the premises, in Darby Town, Chester county, 
A large lot of ground, a good stone dwelling house, full- 
ing mill, and appurtenances thereon, conveniently situated 
to carry on the clothier's business, to as great advantage 
as any in the province, having been well accustomed from 
the Jerseys, and situated to take in work at Philadelphia, 

being about seven miles distant. Likewise to be sold, 

on the same day, one other lot of about -fifteen or sixteen 
acres, chiefly woodland, within a mile of the above. Any 
person, inclining to purchase, may apply the day of sale to 
us on the premises, ELIZABETH PHILLIPS, 

LEWIS DAVIS, 
WILLIAM LAWRANCE. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 37, September 
2&-Octobcr 5, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 457 



T 



To be Lett, and entered upon immediately, 

HE farm and mills at Grigstown, 
county of Somerset, and prov- 
ince of West New- Jersey; " whereon 
Mr. John Standall, deceased, lately 
j View of part | ii ve d, very pleasantly situated on Mill- 
1 of a farm. ( stone river, about half a mile below 
Rocky-Hill mines, and contains 125 
acres of excellent land, all in good 
fence; there is on the premises, a large well built two story 
stone house ; a good barn and two excellent orchards, and 
is well situated in the heart of a plentiful wheat country, 
where a store now is, and has been kept many Years; and 
no place in the province more suitable for one : There is 
plenty of wood and mowing ground on the farm : The 
mills have 2 pair of stones, and never in want of water in 
the driest season; and are now in good order. Whoever 
inclines to hire the same may apply to Mr. THOMAS WAL- 
TON, in New-York, who will agree on reasonable Terms. 
The New York Mercury, No. 830, September 28, 1767. 

New-York. October i. The following extraordinary 
Attestation of the Coroner of Bergen County, was com- 
municated, by a Gentleman of such Credit, as leaves not 
the least Doubt of its being genuine. 

ON the Twenty-Second Day of September, in the Year 
of our Lord, 1767; I JOHANNES DEMAREST, Coroner of 
the County of Bergen and Province of New-Jersey, was 
present at a View of the Body of one Nicholas Teurs, then 
lying dead, together with the Jury, which I summoned to 
inquire of the Death of the said Nicholas Teurs. At that 
Time a Negro Man, named Harry, belonging to Hendrick 
Christians Zabriskie, was suspected of having murdered 
the said Teurs, but there was no Proof of it, and the Negro 



458 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

denied it; I asked him if he was not afraid to touch Tuers ? 
He said No, he had not hurt him, and immediately came 
up to the Corpse then lying in the Coffin; and then Staats 
Storm, one of the Jurors, said, "I am not afraid of him, 
and stroked the dead Man's Face, with his Hand," which 
made no Alteration in the dead Person, and (as I did not 
put any Faith in any of those Trials) my Back was turned 
towards the dead Body, when the Jury ordered the Negro 
to touch the dead Man's Face with his Hand, and then I 
heard a Cry in the Room of the People, saying, "He is the 
Man," and I was desired to come to the dead Body; and 
was told that the said, Negro Harry, had put his Hand on 
Tuer's Face, and that the Blood immediately ran out at 
the Nose of the dead Man Tuers. I saw the Blood on his 
Face, and ordered the Negro to rub his Hand again on 
Tuer's Face, he did so, and immediately the Blood again 
ran out of said Tuer's Nose at both Nostrils, near a com- 
mon Table Spoonful at each Nostril, as well as I could 
judge. Whereupon the People all charged him with being 
the Murderer, but he denied it for a few Minutes, and then 
confessed that he had murdered the said Nicholas Tuers, 
by first striking him on the Head with an Ax, and then 
driving a Wooden Pin in his Ear; tho' afterwards he said 
he struck a second Time with his Ax, and then held him 
fast till he had done struggling, when that was done, he 
awaked some of the Family and said Tuers was dying, (he 
believed.) 1 

JOHANNES DEMAREST, Cor. 
Township of Hackensack, N. Barbadoes, Sept. 28. 



iThis extraordinary narrative was reDublished at the time in the 
Gentleman's Magazine, England, whence it found a wide circulation, and 
has been repeatedly reprinted. Some account of the murder will be 
found in "Description of the Public Records of the Board of Chosen 
Freeholders of Bergen County," in Proceedings of the N. J. Historical 
Society, 1876. The negro murderer was duly tried according to law 
and sentenced to be burnt alive, which sentence was carried into effect. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 459 

In the Night of the nth Instant, a Labourer, named 
Lawrence Towrs, was murdered at a House in Hackin- 
sack, New-Jersey, by a Negro Man that lodged in the same 
House : He knocked out his Brains first with the Rung ot 
a Cart, and afterwards drove a small Plug of Wood in one 
of his Ears. The Fellow was taken up next Morning, and 
confessed the Whole; and said the Reason he committed 
the Murder was, that he formerly had lived at that House, 
and thought if he could dispatch poor Towrs, he would get 
his old Birth, which it seems he liked better than the one 
he then had : He is now in close Confinement. The New 
York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1291, October i, 
1767. 

EDWARD BROADFIELD takes this method of informing 
the public, that he is now removed to Mr. Bond's FISHERY, 
near Trenton, which is the compleatest on the continent, 
on which fishery there is a pond near a quarter of a mile 
long, and, at low water, contains 5 or 6 feet in depth, and 
a constant supply every tide from the river, which is their 
own element, and not spring water, so that it is now in his 
power to put up fish most part of the winter, and with 
more credit than ever any yet put up; as he intends the 
fish to go all through his own hands, not trusting to ser- 
vants, so that he hopes to give a more general satisfaction 
than ever, as no struck or bruised fish will be put up by 
the subscriber, whose fish it was, cured by himself, when 
he lived at Gloucester, that received the bounty of Fifty 
Pounds sterling, for the best fish cured in North America, 
from the Society of Arts and Commerce in London, and 
not the Lamberton fish, so artfully mentioned in Mr. Brad- 
ford's paper some time ago : The following is an experi- 
enced method to keep the subscriber's fish in the hottest 
climate two years; take out the cork, pour out the pickle 



460 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

into some dry bowl or pan, take out the numbered head, 
put the cork in tight, harden on the hoops, pouring the 
pickle on the fish, then cut a piece of board, so as to go 
within the keg, putting a weight thereon, sufficient to keep 
the pickle above the board, so that if any mould or scum 
should arise, it might be taken off with a spoon, and pre- 
vent its being intermixed with the fish; if there should 
not be pickle sufficient, add as much neat vinegar, then put 
a cloth over the keg, and the head upon that, you may keep 
it during pleasure. 

N. B. The subscriber, as soon as he can discharge his 
debts with honour, intends immediately for England, in 
the mean time he is obliged to all persons who have, or 
shall encourage the said manufacture. All orders will be 
punctually answered by their humble servant, 

EDWARD BROADFIELD. 

***The said fish is sold by Thomas Mullan, at the Old 
Tun tavern, in Water-street, and no other person. 

NEW-YORK, September 24 

On Tuesday came up from the Hook, where she arrived 
on Saturday last, the igth instant, the ship Eagle, Captain 
Markham, having on board two companies of the Royal 
Train of Artillery, which we hear are to relieve some of 
those who have been for some time on this station, who 
are expected to go home in the same vessel in about 3 
weeks. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2023, October i, 
1767. 

In the night of the I2th instant, a labourer, named Law- 
rence Towrs; was murdered at a house in Hackinsack, . 
New Jersey, by a Negro man that lodged in the same 
house : He knocked out his brains first with the rung of 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 461 

a cart, and afterwards drove a small plug of wood into 
one of his ears. The fellow was taken up next morning, 
and confessed the whole; and said the reason he commit- 
ted the murder was, that he formerly had lived at that 
house, and thought if he could dispatch poor Towrs, he 
would get his old birth, which it seems he liked better than 
the one he then had : He is now in close confinement. 

To be Sold. 

A Valuable tract of LAND, in Great Egg-Harbour town- 
ship, Gloucester county, containing 75 acres, most part 
bears a large burthen of fresh grass, and has been mowed 
many years, lying on Great Egg-Harbour river, has a fine 
stream for a furnace; there is on said land, a large quan- 
tity of iron ore, near three quarters of a mile long, and 
between 30 and 40 rod wide, but how deep unknown, hav- 
ing dug a considerable depth, without coming to the bot- 
tom; the ore has been tried, and found to be as rich and 
good as any in the Jerseys. It is a very convenient place 
for a tavern, as it lies on the road from Philadelphia to 
Egg-Harbour. Any person inclining to purchase said 
land, by applying to the subscriber, living in said town- 
ship, may be informed of the terms of sale'. 

Evi BELLANGEE. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2023, October i, 
1767. 

NEW- YORK, October 8. 

At Elizabeth-Town Races on Tuesday last, 6 Horses 
started for the Thirty Pound Purse, which was won with 
the greatest Ease by Mr. Heard's bay Mare Lady Legs 

3 Years old. 



462 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

To be SOLD or LET by the Subscriber, 

Two good dwelling-houses, one of which is pleasantly 
situated- on King-street, near the middle of Trenton, being 
a large two story building, with four good rooms on a 
floor, and convenient fire places therein; there is a kitchen 
adjoining to it, and very good cellars under the house; 
there is likewise a one story building adjoining to it, con- 
taining two good rooms, with fire-places in each, and may 
be used as a separate tenement, or would make a very large 
convenient store for merchandise; the lot is sixty-six feet 
in front, and one hundred and sixty-four feet in depth, on 
which is a good garden and yard, in which is a stable and 
well. The other house is situated on the same street, and 
is a one story building, with four rooms on the lower, and 
two on the upper -floor, with fire places in three of them, 
and a good cellar under the house, the lot is sixty feet 
front, and about a hundred in depth, with a good well and 
stable thereon. Any person purchasing, and paying one 
third of the purchase money, may have a considerable time 
given for the remainder, on paying interest and giving 
good security. For further particulars inquire of Thomas 
Barnes, in Trenton, or the subscriber, living in Hopewell, 

THOMAS MOORE. 

FOUR DOLLARS REWARD. 

RUN away, some Time in August last, from the Sub- 
scriber, living at Greenwich Forge, West New-Jersey, an 
Irish Servant Man, named JOHN NEIL, about 5 Feet 10 
Inches high, has dark Hair, and is much marked with the 
small Pox; had on and took with him a blue Cloth Coat, 
black Cloth Jacket, and Leather Breeches, new Hat, be- 
sides sundry coarse Clothes; he also took with him, a re- 
markable large black and white Dog : Whoever takes up 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

and secures said Servant, so that his Master may have him 
again, shall receive the above Reward, by applying to 
JOHN HUGHES, in Philadelphia, or JOHN HUGHES, at said 
Forge. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 38, October 5- 
12, 1767. 

New-York, October 8. We hear JOSEPH READ, Esq; 
is appointed Deputy- Secretary, Clerk of the Council, Clerk 
of the Supreme Court, Surrogate-General and Register of 
the Province of New-Jersey. 

The Ellen, Capt. Clark, arrived here Thursday last, in 
58 Days from Bristol. He has brought about 50 Artificers 
in the Iron Way, which we hear are all to be employed at 
Mr. Hasencliver's different Works. 



Figure of a 
slave standing 
with stick over 
his shoulder, 
and bundle. 



Middletown- Point, October 5, 1767. 
RUN away from the subscriber, the 
5th Instant, a Negro Man, named 
Cato, a short thick Fellow : He had on 
when he went away, a white hat, a 
brown Jacket, and a long red do. with 
short Skirts behind, black Breeches, 



with long Trowsers over them, brown 
Stockings with white Feet. Whoever takes up said Negro, 
so that I may get him again, shall have Thirty Shillings 
Reward and all reasonable Charges paid by 

JOHN HENDRICKS. 
New York, September 25, 1767. 

TAKEN up without the Narrows, a Sloop's Long-Boat, 
marked C. No. 145 : The Owner may have her again by 
applying to JOHN ANDREWS, at Middletown, and paying 
Charges. The New York Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1292, October^, 1767. 



464 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Extract of a Letter from Cohansey, in New- Jersey, dated 
September 28, 1767 

"We have had the dreadfulest Havock among our 
Horses with the Distemper, that was ever heard of; by 
the most reasonable Computation, I do not think Two 
Thousand Pounds would repair the Loss to this one Coun- 
ty; it has taken off all our best Horses and Colts, and left 
nothing but Hackneys behind." 

RUN away from Change-water-forge, in Sussex county, 
West New-Jersey, in May last, James Morris or Morri- 
son, about 35 years of age, short blackish hair, brown com- 
plexion, about 5 feet 6 inches high, thick and well made; 
he has a pearl on one of his eyes, and a remarkable long 
nose, speaks good English, but seems always as if he had 
a cold. Had on, when he went away, a white French coat, 
with blue cuffs, blue under jacket, ozenbrigs trowsers, blue 
stockings, and new shoes, tied with strings; he wore a. 
calfskin cap, and no hat. Whoever secures said runaway, 
so as he may be had again, shall have Thirty Shillings re- 
ward, and reasonable charges, paid by me 

JACOB STARN. 

MADE his escape from the Sheriff of Sussex county. 
West New-Jersey, in January last, Edward Doughty, by 
trade a carpenter, about 40 years of age, redish hair, fair 
complexion, about 5 feet 9 inches high, well built; he 
lived formerly near Walpack, on Delaware, and is very 
much given to drink strong liquor. Any person, or per- 
sons, securing said Doughty, so as he may be brought to 
justice, shall be entitled to a reward of FIVE POUNDS proa 
and reasonable charges, paid by me 

JACOB STARN, Sheriff. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 465 

BY virtue of several writs of Venditioni Exponas to me 
directed, on the 28th day of October next, at 2 o'clock in 
the afternoon, will be exposed to sale, by public vendue, on 
the premises, a commodious brick messuage, tenement, 
plantation and tract of land thereunto belonging, contain- 
ing 300 acres, more or less, 40 of which is good meadow, 
about 80 acres of tillable land, a barn, stable, a brick kitch- 
en, and other out-houses; also a very good orchard. The 
whole under good fence, situate in the township of Dept- 
ford, on the northerly side of Woodberry Creek, near the 
town of Woodberry; late the estate of James Ward; 
seized and taken in execution by 

Aug. 28, 1767. SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, Sheriff. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 

A Valuable plantation, containing 120 acres of land, 
lying in the township of Chester, and county of Burling- 
ton, within nine miles of Cooper 's-ferry, handy to mill 
and market, whereon is about 20 acres of good meadow, 
and more may be made, and well divided with post and 
cedar rails, with between 60 and 70 acres of upland 
cleared, well divided with ditches, and privy hedge there- 
on; with a good dwelling-house and kitchen, a well of 
good water at the door, a good barn and stables, corn crib 
and waggon-house, with other out-houses ; a large bearing 
orchard of 300 apple trees, and other fruit trees ; the up- 
land natural to English grass or wheat; the remainder 
part well timbered and watered. Any person inclining to 
purchase the same, may know the terms by applying to 
SAMUEL STOAKS, or EPHRAIM HAINES, living near the 
premises, or to the subscriber, living on the north branch 
of Newtown Creek, Gloucester county. JOB HAINES 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2024, October 8, 
1767. 

30 



466 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. 

STOLEN from Daniel Barrocloue, at Ten Mile Run, be- 
twixt Princeton and New-Brunswick; a dark brown 
HORSE, with a saddle and cloth on, almost new; six years 
old, very straight limbed, with a round body, a short thick 
head, thick neck, fourteen hands and an half high, a small 
scar scarcely discoverable, his mane and foretop being very 
thin, a little sore on his weather, with a Dutch collar rub- 
bed or dropped off; a short switch tail, he trots, paces, 
and hand-gallops, of a dull carriage in riding but better in 
gears. The person supposed to have taken him, is a short 
thick man, with a grim countenance, and black curled hair; 
had on a blue coat, red jacket, red breeches, with some 
things tied up in a red silk handkerchief. Whoever takes 
up the aforesaid horse, (with the saddle if they can get it) 
and brings him to Mr. Barrocloue, as above, or to Garret 
Vaghte's near the same place, shall receive the above re- 
ward, with all reasonable charges, paid by 

GARRET VAGHTE. 

Cumberland County Sept. 26, 1767. 
LAST night broke out of the goal of this county, New- 
Jersey, one Frederick Otto, a slender person, thin faced 
and much marked with the small pox, wears his own hair 
very long and tied behind : Had on when he went away, 
a light coloured sagathy coat, red flowered velvet or plush 
vest, a pair of black knit breeches and ruffled shirt. He 
has for some time past practised physic in said county. 
Whoever takes up said prisoner, and brings him to the 
goal from whence he escaped, shall have FIVE POUNDS re- 
ward, and if confined in any other goal, so that the sub- 
scriber may have him again, shall have THREE POUNDS 

reward, paid by 

THEO. ELMER, Sheriff. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

All masters of vessels are forbid to carry him off at their 
peril. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1296, October 8, 
1767. 

Brunswick, East-New-Jersey, Sep. 28, 1767. 
Mr GAINE, 

If you think the following will be agreeable to your 
Readers, you will, no doubt, publish it, after dressing 
it suitable to the usual Correctness of your Press. 
Soon after the Establishment of the Society of Arts, 
&c. in New- York, there appeared in your Mercury a gen- 
eral Invitation from said Society, for improving Hints 
that might be useful to Mankind, which induced me to 
write the following Letter to a Gentleman, a Member for 
Arts, viz. 

SIB, 

T Read with Pleasure, your Secrety's Proposal contain'd in the New- 
I York Mercury the 6th Instant, and am of Opinon, it will be attend- 
I ed with many good Consequences to the Publick: And as you have 
-1 given a general Invitation to Arts, let me as a Mechanick, presume 
to lay before you, a Matter that, I think, may be of particular Use to the 
Publick, and especially to your City. You are now building a spacious 
Church, which I am informed the Gentlemen Trustees would cover with 
Copper: But as the Metal has a considerable Attraction with the Light- 
ning, they are affraid of ill Consequenses attending it; and that they are 
convinced, from Experience, that Slate, or Tiles, is too heavy for large 
and extended Roofs. I some few Days ago, proposed to Mr. Willis, the 
Undertaker of the Stone- Work, an Expedient that I conceive would an- 
swer the end, both to make a tight, light, lasting, and I might have ad- 
ded, a handsome Roof, that would have no more Attraction than Shingles 
and at the same Time it would be as secure from Fire as Copper. The 
Materials I proposed was Sole Leather ; but as I have more maturely con- 
sidered this Matter, I believe it would be best, to have it dressed in a 
Manner that I think myself Master of Your City-Hall is covered with 
Copper, which must have been very expensive, and the whole Amount 
remitted to England; now if Leather properly managed, would resist the 
Rain, and Fire that might happen near it, which I conceive it would, it 
must of Consequence, have saved much Cash at home; It is true, a 
Leather Roof would be expensive, but then it will last many Centuries. 
Was I a Man of Fortune, I would venture to cover it with Leather, and 
leave the Trial to the Experience of an Hundred Years, before my Heirs 
should be intitled to the Principal or Interest of the Amount of the 
Leather. Had I been acquainted with any of the Gentlemen Trustees for 
the Church, I would have laid this Matter before them, however I make 



468 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

no doubt, if you think it worthy the Notice of your Honourable Society, 
and lay it before them, it may answer the same End. 

I am, <fcc., 

HENRY GUEST. 

This Letter was accordingly laid before the Society, and as I have not 
been favoured with any Objections to this Scheme, I cannot yet lay it 
aside, especially, as I have since been informed that Leather is an Non- 
electric; if so, it adds much Weight in my Opinion, to the Utility of a 
Leather Roof, Perhaps it may be thought, that using so much Leather 
may make it scarce, and raise the Price of Shoes, which might rather be 
against the Interest of the Publick: But that is an Objection, that I 
think I can shew will have no weight, especially to America; on the con_ 
trary, if it is thought necessary, I think I can demonstrate, that, with 
proper Management, we can reduce the Price of Leather to the Advan- 
tage of the Publick in general, and the Farmer in particular. Hut sup- 
pose the Experiment was made, with only covering the Steeples of 
Churches with Leather, as the Lightning generally strikes that Part of 
the Building that is most extended, the Cost will not be much; indeed in 
the End it will be cheaper than Shingles. I have observed in your Papers 
within a few Years past, many Churches in Europe and America have 
been damaged, and lately in France several People killed and almost the 
whole Congregation, with tne Priest, struck senseless by Lightning I 
am far even from thinking Almighty Omnipotence cannot pierce his 
Lightning through Leather as easy as Copper, Tiles, Slate, Shingles, &c 
But at the same Time, he has given the Knowledge of the Nature of 
Lightning very much to our Understanding by the Effects of Electricity; 
and it is found, there is some Qualities in particular Bodies that Electric- 
ity has no Effect on ; Why then should we not embrace the Gifts that 
Heaven has graciously enlightened us with for our Preservation. Sure 
we don't live in an Age of blind Superstition, or if we did, we would not 
act in many Cases so, that in Centuries past would have been thought 
presurntuous: And that I may be as useful as the Extent of your Paper, 
shall give my Opinion how Leather should be managed; at the same Time, 
am willing to stand corrected by any Brother Tanner that contrives a 
better Method to preserve Leather when exposed to the Weather: It 
must be dead, and, or in other Words, it must have no Remains of Horn 
in it, well sowered, the Grain lightly taken off, as the Grain will crack 
when long exposed to the Sun; let it be almost Wind-dry, dip it in warm 
Tallow and Bees- Wax, let it lay until all the Pores are filled, after which 
dry it, and stone it smooth: The Method to lay it on will be in the .Man- 
ner of Sheets of Copper, then paint it, and if it is kept painted. I am of 
Opinion it will last a Thousand Years, or more. 

I am, Sir, Your very Humble Servant, 

HENRY GUEST. 

P S. I beg leave to add a few Words, to apologize for my printing the 
Letter I addressed to the Honourable Society in New- York; when I assure 
them, that I am ready to abide by their Judgement, as to this Leather- 
Proof; now 1 have opened what before I had left in the Dark; and that 
my Motive is, that the Publick in general may reap Benefit, if they 
should judge it convenient to try this Experiment. H. G. 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



PRINCE-TOWN, October i, 1767. 

Yesterday the annual Commencement of the College 
of New-Jersey, was held in this Town, in the usual 
Manner, when the following young Gentlemen were ad- 
mitted to the Degree of Batchelor of Arts : Francis Bar- 
ber, Samuel Cunningham, Francis Curtis, Richard Dev- 
ens, Jacob Hasbrouck, Elias Jones, Nathaniel Ramsey, 
William Schenck, Samuel Stockton, Josias Stoddard, and 
Hugh Vance. 1 And several young Gentlemen were ad- 
mitted to the Degree of Master of Arts. 



iThe following sketches are from Alexander's "Princeton in the 
Eighteenth Century:" 

Francis Barber, a native of Princeton, New Jersey, after graduating, 
took charge of an Academy at Elizabethtown, New Jersey. The school 
soon became distinguished. Alexander Hamilton was prepared for 
college under Mr. Barber. At the commencement of the Revolution 
he offered his services to the country, and on the 9th of February, 
1776, he was appointed, by the Legislature, Major of the Third Bat- 
talion, JSiew Jersey troops, and on November 8th was promoted to the 
rank of Lieu tenant- Colonel of the Third Regiment, and on January 
1st, 1777, he received his commission from Congress. Soon after this 
ho was appointed Assistant Inspector-General under Baron Steuben. 
Colonel Barber was in constant service during the whole war. Although 
a strict and rigid disciplinarian, always scrupulously performing his 
own duty, and requiring it from all under his command, yet so bland 
were his manners, and his whole conduct so tempered with justice and 
strict propriety, that he was the favorite of all the officers and men, 
and highly valued by Washington. He served in the Northern army 
under General Schuyler; was at the battles of Trenton, Princeton, 
Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth, and in the latter was se- 
verely wounded. In 1779 he served as Adjutant- General with General 
Sullivan in his memorable expedition against the Indians, where he 
distinguished himself and was again wounded. In 1780 he was con- 
spicuously engaged with the army in New Jersey, and was at the battle 
of Springfield. In 1781 he accompanied the Jersey Line to Virginia, 
and was at the investment and capture of the British at Torktown. 
The dav on which the Commander-in-Chief intended to communicate 
the intelligence of peace to the army, a number of the officers, with 
their families, were invited to dme with him, and among others Colonel 
Barber and his wife. He was acting at the time as officer of the day 
in place of a friend. While on duty, and passing by the edge of a 
wood where some soldiers were cutting down a tree, it fell on him, 
and both rider and horse were instantly crushed to death. 

Richard Devens was born at Charlestown. At his graduation at 
Princeton, in 1767, he stood at the head of his class. For three years 
he was engaged in teaching in various schools in New York and New 
Jersey. In 1770 he was appointed tutor in the College, where he re- 
mained until 1774, when in consequence of too close and intense appli- 
cation to his studies he became insane, and so far as known he never 
recovered his reason. 

Nathaniel Ramsay, a brother of David Ramsay, the historian, after 
graduating, studied law and became eminent in his profession. When 
the war of the Revolution began, he joined the Maryland Line as a 
Major, and soon rose to the rank of Colonel. At the battle of Mon- 
mouth he particularly distinguished himself. From 1785 to 1787 Colonel 
Ramsay represented Maryland in the Continental Congress. He re- 
sumed and continued his practice of law in Baltimore until his death, 
which occurred October 25th, 1817. 

William Schenck was a native of Allentown, New Jersey. He was 
licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick in 1771 and ordained in 



4/O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

The Trustees, sensible of the many Advantages arising 
from the Constitution of a Faculty consisting of learned 
Professors in the several Branches of Science, chose the 
following Gentlemen for this Purpose; the Rev. Mr. Sam- 
uel Blair, of Boston, President and Professor of Rhetoric 
and Metaphysicks ; The Rev. Mr. John Blair, of Fog's 
Manor, Pennsylvania, Professor of Divinity and moral 
Philosophy; Doctor Hugh Williamson, of Philadelphia, 
Professor of Mathematicks and natural Philosophy, and 
Mr. Jonathan Edwards, 1 Professor of Languages and Log- 
ick. 

These are all the Professors that the low State of the 
College Funds will admit of at present, but it is proposed 
to increase their Number as soon as their Finances shall 
enable the Trustees to support them. And it is to be hoped 
that so judicious an Appointment will, with the Divine 
Blessing, increase the Utility of this important Institu- 
tion, and render it a still more extensive Blessing to Man- 
kind. 

THE Members of the New-Jersey Medical Society, 
and those Gentlemen who stand Candidates for Ad- 
mission, are hereby notified, that their next stated General 

1772. After preaching at various places in New York and New Jersey, 
he was finally settled, in 1780, at Pittsgrove and Cape May, where he 
remained until 1787, when he removed to Ballston, New York. Toward 
the close of 1793 he removed to Huntingdon, Long Island, and was in- 
stalled pastor of the Presbyterian Church, December 27th of that year. 
In 1817 he left Huntingdon and removed to Franklin, Ohio, where he 
was pastor for several years, and died September 1, 1822. Mr. Schenck 
was the grandfather of the Hon. Robert C. Schenck, Minister to Great 
Britain. 

Samuel Witham Stockton was a brother of the elder Richard Stock- 
ton. In 1774 he went to Europe as Secretary of the American Commis- 
sion to the Courts of Austria and Prussia. While abroad he negotiated 
a treaty with Holland. He returned to New Jersey in 1779, where he 
held various public offices. In 1794 he was Secretary of State of New 
Jersey. Mr. Stockton lost his life by being thrown from a carriage in 
the streets of Trenton, June 27th, 1795. 

Hugh Vance received his license to preach from Donegal Presbytery 
about 1771, and in 1772 was ordained and settled as pastor of Tusca- 
rora and Back Creek Churches in Virginia, where he died December 
31st, 1791. 

1 Son of Jonathan Edwards. President of the College of New Jersey, 
1757-58. For a notice of Dr. Edwards, see N. J. Archives, XXIV., 634. 

2 Published also in the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2025, October 15, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4/1 

Meeting, will be on Tuesday the loth of November fol- 
lowing, at the House of Mr. William Hicks, in Prince 
Town, when and where all concern'd are desired to give 
their Attendance. 

The Society beg Leave to inform the Gentlemen Prac- 
titioners in the Western Division of this Government, that 
it was through mistake, the former Advertisements, re- 
specting the forming, &c. said Society, were confin'd to 
the Eastern Division, it ever being the true intent and 
Meaning of the first Proposers thereof, as well as the So- 
ciety's, after formed, that the same should be general, and 
include the whole Government. 

MOSES BLOOMFIELD, Secry. 
Woodbridge, East New- 
Jersey, October 4, 1767. 

The New York Mercury, No. 832, October 12, 
1767. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Plantation, containing about 150 Acres, of 
which upwards of 40 are of the best and richest drained 
or banked Meadow, mostly well brought into Timothy 
and other English Grass, of which it bears a large Burthen 
yearly; near 50 Acres of the upland cleared, on which are 
a good Dwelling-house, Barn and Orchards of excellent 
Fruit, such as Apples, Peaches, and Cherries, sufficient for 
the Use of the Plantation; it is situated in Hopewell, 
Cumberland County, New-Jersey. The House stands 
open to Csesarea River, alias Cohansey Creek, on which 
the Meadow lies, and being on a rising Ground, com- 
mands a very fine Prospect, is about three Miles from the 
Courthouse, and convenient to Mill, and several Meet- 
ings, 45 Miles distant from Philadelphia. For further 



4/2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

Particulars, enquire of the Subscriber, living on the Prem- 
ises. 

NATHANIEL HARRIS, junior. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2025, October 15, 
1767. 

NEW- YORK. 

Oct. 22. We hear, the worthy Rev. Mr. M'Kean, Mis- 
sionary for Amboy, departed this Life on Saturday last, 
at the Seat of his Father-in-Law Edward Antill, Esq; at 
Rariton Landing}- The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 40, 
October 26, 1767. 

iThe Rev. Robert McKean was b. July 13, 1732, the son of William 
McCain and Letitia Fmney, his wife. William McCain was b. in Ire- 
land in 1707, and coming to America in early life with his mother, 
Susan McCain, settled with her at Chatham, New London, Chester 
county, Penn., where he kept tavern until 1741, thereafter for four 
years at Londongrove, and later at Londonderry, in the same region. 
He d. Nov. 18, 1769. 

Robert McKean (as he wrote his name) studied for the ministry, 
probably under the Rev. Francis Allison. D. D., and having been or- 
dained in England, in 1757 was appointed by the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts to be a missionery of the 
Church of England, at New Brunswick, his labors, however, often 
extending so far afield as Piscataway, Spotswood, Woodbridge, and 
more distant settlements in Central New Jersey. On taking charge 
of his mission he wrote home to the Society, January 8, 1758, that he 
"arrived at New Brunswick on the 16th of Dec., and was kindly re- 
ceived by his congregation, and had officiated regularly to them from 
that time." Writing again from New Brunswick, Feb. 5, 1758, to the 
Rev. Dr. Peter Bearcroft, Secretary of the Society, he says: "Since 
my arrival here I have wrote to you by two different Conveyances, 
one by the Pacquet, and another by means of a friend via Ireland. In 
them I have troubled you with a particular account of my Voyage and 
other proper occurrences, as also the kind reception I have met with 
and the happy prospect I have as yet in my mission." Young as he 
was, his indefatigable zeal and marked ability were speedily recog- 
nized. The College in Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsyl- 
vania) conferred upon him the honorary degree of A. M., in 1760. 
When Gov. Thomas Boone arrived in New Jersey, in July, 1760, the 
clergy of the Church of England waited upon him with an address, 
presented by a committee of three, of whom Mr. McKean was one. 
He served on a similar committee to address Gov. Josiah Hardy in 
November, 1761. He was regular and faithful in his attendance upon 
the convention of clergy which met in Philadelphia, April 30-May 5, 
1760, to discuss the affairs of the church in Pennsylvania and the 
Lower Counties; he and Mr. Samuel Cook, "two of the Society's 
worthy Missionaries of New Jersey, [attending] with the kind inten- 
tion of giving their best advice and assistance in promoting the de- 
signs of the Convention." When the pulpit of St. Peter's church at 
Perth Amboy became vacant, in 1761, the people of that congregation 
"had so much their hearts set on Mr. McKean" that they were "ut- 
terly averse" to the Society's selection, and were correspondingly 
glad when the appointee declined to leave Litchfield, Conn., and in 
the course of a year Mr. McKean was transferred to Perth Amboy, 
where he arrived in February, 1763, with a notification of his appoint- 
ment as Missionary, his services being restricted to that parish ex- 
clusively, at the request of the vestry. In 1764 Woodbridge was placed 
in his care, he visiting it once every three weeks. In these charges 



1767] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 473 



STOLEN, out of a Pasture, (on Wednesday Night, 
the I4th of this Instant, October) near Davis's 
Mills, upon the North Branch of Raritan, a likely bay 
Horse, with a black Mane and Tail; the Mane hangs 
parted, a small Star upon his Forehead, about 15 Hands 
high, paces, trots and gallops well ; 7 Years old ; a Horse 
of great Courage, and very lively, being part blooded : 
there are upon his Back some few white Hairs under the 



he labored with indefatigable zeal and assiduity, and manifestly had 
the confidence of the older clergy. His own experience of the hard- 
ship laid upon young Americans who were obliged to go to England 
for ordination made him an ardent and perhaps intemperate advocate 
of the plan of appointing American Bishops a cause so ably urged 
by Dr. Chandler. Mr. McKean studied medicine, and was a successful 
practitioner in that profession, and so much esteemed among his fel- 
low medical men that he was one of the seventeen who organized the 
New Jersey Medical Society, in July, 1766, and was elected its first 
President. His parishioners did not object to his practicing, but they 
at least some of them did find fault when he sent in his bills. He 
also seems to have taught school at Perth Amboy. 

Mr. McKean m. Isabel Graham Antill, Feb. 19, 1766, at Christ 
church, Shrewsbury. She was a dau. of Edward Antill, 2d, of New 
Brunswick, and Anne Morris, his wife, dau. of Gov. Lewis Morris. 
She is said to have been "a young lady of very gay and independent 
spirit, not calculated to enhance the domestic happiness of the mis- 
sionary." In his will, dated Sept. 13, 1767, he describes himself as 
"Clerk, Missionary from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts, at Perth Amboy." He mentions his wife, but no 
children. He died at Raritan Landing, near New Brunswick, at the 
residence of his father-in-law, Edward Antill, 2d, October 17, 1767, 
after a long and wasting illness. Writing to the Society, October 12, 
1767, the Rev. Dr. Thomas Bradbury Chandler, of Elizabethtown, says: 
"Wasted away with a tedious disorder, the worthy, the eminently 
useful and amiable Mr. McKean is judged by his physicians to be at 
present at the point of death." He adds: "A better man was never 
in the Society's service." The lamented young clergyman was buried 
in St. Peter's churchyard, Perth Amboy, where a monument erected 
by his brother, Thomas McKean a Signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, Chief Justice and afterwards Governor of Pennsylvania 
bears this inscription: "In Memory of The Rev. Robert McKean, 
M. A., Practitioner in Physic, &c., and Missionary from the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, to the City of 
Perth Amboy: who was born July 13th, 1732, N. S., and died Oct. 
17th, 1767, An unshaken Friend, an agreeable Companion, a rational 
Divine, a skillful Physician, and in every relation in life a truly ben- 
evolent and honest man, Fraternal love hath erected this monument." 
Genealogy of the McKean Family, by Roberdeau Buchanan, Lancaster, 
Pa:, 1890, 8-9, 13; A Record of Christ Church, New Brunswick, by the 
Rev. Alfred Stubbs, New York, 1850, 9: Historical Collections relating 
to the American Colonial Church, edited by William Stevens Perry, D. D., 
Volume II., Pennsylvania, 1871, 270-273, 295-305, 380, 381, 410; History 
of St. John's Church, Elizabeth Town, by Samuel A. Clark, Philadelphia, 
1867, 85, 96, 110, 118-119; Contributions to the Early History of Perth 
Amboy, by William A. Whitehead, New York, 1856, 225, 228-9, 291, 391, 
392, 409; N. J. Archives, 1st Series, IXf, 338, 340; XX., 262, 434, 468, 
636; XXIV., 457; XXV., 472-3; N. Y. Colonial Documents, VI., 610; VII., 
497; Woodbridge and Vicinity, by Rev. Joseph W. Dally, New Bruns- 
wick, 1873, 130-132; A Collection of American Epitaphs, by Rev. Timothy 
Alden. A. M., New York. 1814. No. 1045; Historical Collections of the 
State of New Jersey, by John .W. Barber and Henry Howe, Newark 
[1844], 309; Edward Antill and His Descendants, by William Nelson, 1899. 
24-25; History of Medicine in New Jersey, and of Its Medical Men, by 
Stephen Wickes, A. M., M. D.. Newark, 1879, 329-330; Transactions of 
the New Jersey Medical Society, 1766-1800, Newark, 1866. passim. 



474 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Saddle, and some whitish Hairs on his Flanks : He is a 
round bodied Horse, handsome Neck, Head rather large, 
the Hollows above the Eyes pretty deep: Five Pounds 
Reward will be given for taking up the Horse, and Five 
Pounds more, if the Thief is secured, and all reasonable 
Charges paid by the Subscriber. 

ANDREW LEAKE. 

The New York Mercury, No. 833, October 19, 
1767. 

New-York, October 22. On Tuesday, his Excellency 
General GAGE, with his Aid-de-Camps, set out for the Jer- 
sey's and Philadelphia, to view the Regiments quartered 
in those parts. 

APPLICATION having been made to me by a Number of 
the Proprietors of the Eastern Division of New- Jersey, 
to summon a Council to meet as soon as conveniently may 
be, on an especial Occasion : Wednesday the i8th of No- 
vember next, is appointed for the said Proprietors of the 
Eastern Division of New- Jersey, to meet in Council at this 
Place; of which all Persons concerned are desired to take 
due Notice. 

JAMES PARKER, President 
Perth- Amboy, October 15, 1767. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1294, October 22, 1767. 

On Monday, the I2th Instant, a Negroe Fellow, named 
Cuff, belonging to Mr. Daniel Hart, of Hopewell, in Hun- 
terdon County, New- Jersey, attacked his Master with a 
Knife and Axe, when he cut his Scull open, and gave him 
many other wounds on his Back and Arms, of which he 
expired the same Day. Mr. Hart's Son going to assist 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 475 

his Father, the Negroe made a Pass at him with the Knife, 
and wounded him in the Face, then made his Escape, tak- 
ing the weapons with him. A Number of People im- 
mediately went out in Pursuit of him, but we have not 
heard of his being taken. 

LETTERS remaining in the Post-Office, Philadelphia 

B. Robert Bevers, E. Jersey. 

C. Hugh Creighton, Haddonfield; Owen Coney, Jer- 
sey 

H. Sarah Handcock, Haddonfield; Richard Hacket, 
Salem' County, New- Jersey. 

I. Thomas Johnson, West Jersey; Isaac Inskeep, 
Timber Creek, Jersey. 

S. Samuel Shivers, New- Jersey. 

W. Major Edward Ward, Cumberland; (?) John 
Whatmore, Edward Wood, New-Jersey. The Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2026, October 22, 1767. 

Arrivals. At Barbados, Edgar, from Salem The 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 40, October 28, 1767. 

On Thursday last departed this Life, in the 2$th Year 
of his Age, the Reverend NATHANIEL EVANS M. A. Mis- 
sionary from the Society to the Churches of Gloucester 
and Cole's-Town, in Neiv-Jersey, and Chaplain to the 
Right Hon. Lord ***** 

His Remains were brought from Haddonfield to this 
City on Saturday last, and, agreeable to his Desire, in- 
terred in Christ Church. His Pall was supported by the 
Clergy of different Denominations, and a Sermon suitable 
to the Mournful Occasion, preached by the Rev. Mr. 
PETERS, Rector of Christ Church, &c. from Numbers 
xxiii; 10. 



476 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

The Death of this amiable young Gentleman cannot but 
be sincerely lamented by all zvho had the Happiness of his 
Acquaintance. It is a public as well as a private Loss. 
His aged Parents have been hereby deprived of an only 
Child, the best and most dutiful of Sons: His Friends, of 
one whose Conversation could seldom fail of entertaining 
and improving them: His Congregations of a faithful 
and affectionate Pastor, to whom they were united by the 
most solemn and endearing Ties; and the Church in gen- 
eral, of a Minister, whose early Piety, added to a most re- 
markable Sprightliness of Genius, Quickness of Appre- 
hension, and animated Turn of Expression, was a sure 
Presage of his future Usefulness in the Exercise of that 
sacred Office, to which lie ^vas called. 

During his Sickness, he was attended with much Bodily 
Pain and Anguish, he behaved with such Meekness, Pa- 
tience, and Resignation, as zvere sure Evidences of inter- 
nal Peace and Tranquility, and were sufficient to convince 
his surrounding Friends, that he had given himself up to 
the immediate and sole Direction of that blessed Spirit, 
whose Presence alone can speak Peace to the Tumults of 
Nature, and enable the expiring Christian to cry out, with 
an holy Confidence, in his departing Moments, Father, in- 
to thy Hands I commend my Spirit. 1 

Extract of a Letter from a Correspondent at Princeton, 
October 28, 1767. 

''The Distemper, which has been so prevalent among 
the Horses in the neighbouring Parts, begins also to rage 
here, tho' I do not hear that it has yet proved fatal to any; 
the people are however under some Uneasiness lest it 
should prove as mortal as it has been in many other Parts 
of this and the adjacent Provinces. 

i See also extract from the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2028, November 
6, 1767. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 477 

'The Negro advertised in your Chronicle, No. 39, to 
have killed his Master Mr. Daniel Hart, at Hopewell, was 
found on Wednesday last. It seems he took a Rope from 
off one of his Master's Horses the Night after he commit- 
ted the Murder, by which he was found hanging. His 
dead Body was burnt the Day after." 

New-Brunswick, October 27, 1767. 
RUN-AWAY, on Tuesday the 27th inst. from John Den- 
nis, of the city of New-Brunswick, an apprentice lad, 
about 19 years old, named William Cresy, a hatter by 
trade, he is well set, of a fresh countenance, smooth and 
full faced, a long hair mold on the right cheek, a very 
down look, and subject to drink hard, at every oppor- 
tunity; had on when he went away, a new castor hat, 
light coloured short hair, a white shirt, a very good brown 
homespun cloath coat, a nanking vest, a pair of leather 
breeches, new yarn stockings, good shoes, and brass 
buckles. Whoever takes up, and returns the apprentice to 
his master, aforesaid, shall have Ten Pounds, light money, 
for his or their service and reward. All masters of vessels, 
as well as other persons, are hereby forbid, to secret, en- 
tertain, detain, or employ the said apprentice on any ac- 
count; if they do, they shall be prosecuted as the law di- 
rects, by me, 

JOHN DENNIS, 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 41, November 2, 
1767. 

New-York, October 29. Last Thursday Week, the 
Negro that murdered Teurs, was burnt at Hackinsack, 
agreeable to his Sentence. 

From Hunterdon County in New- Jersey, we learn, that 
Mr. Daniel Hart, of that Place, was cruelly murdered by 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

his own Negro, on Monday Morning the I2th Instant, in 
the following Manner, viz. Mr. Hart, called the Negro 
up to his Work, as usual, which he refused, for which he 
intended to chastise him, but as soon as Mr. Hart entered 
the Negro's Room, the Fellow stab'd him in several Places 
with his Knife. Mr. Hart, not expecting, nor being pre- 
pared for such cruel Treatment, with difficulty got down 
Stairs, but was followed by the Negro, where the Villain 
got an Ax, and dispatched him by a cruel Wound on the 
Shoulder, and some other Parts of the Body. The Cries 
of the Father being heard by his Son, a young Man, who 
was but a little Way from the House, coming up to see 
what was the Matter, received a terrible Wound on the 
Cheek from the Negro, who would have dispatched the 
Son as well as the Father, had he not saved his Life by 
Flight. The Negro then went into his Master's House, 
and finding his Mistress had absconded, who, we make no 
Doubt he intended to dispatch, he armed himself, with his 
Ax and Knife, and took to the Woods, and we have not 
yet heard whether or no he has been taken. 

On the 1 7th Inst. died after a tedious Illness, in the 
35th Year of his Age, to the unspeakable Grief of his 
Friends, and the great Loss of the Public, the Revd. Rob- 
ert M'Kean, M. A. Rector of Perth- Amboy, and Mission- 
ary from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel; 
an unshaken Friend, an agreeable Companion, a rational 
Divine, a skilful Physician, and in every Relation of Life, 
a truly benevolent and honest Man. 

Barracks, Perth- Amboy, Oct. 20, 1767. 
RUN away from the Subscriber, on Friday the 2d In- 
stant, a white Boy, Apprentice, named WILLIAM WALSH : 
Had on when he went away, a Flannel Jacket, blue Waist- 
coat, check'd Shirt, a Pair of Canvas Trowsers, and a plain 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 479 

Hat; has short reddish Hair, freckl'd Face, and pale, is 
about 17 Years of Age: He is an Irish Boy. 

Whoever apprehends said Boy, and brings him to me 
shall have Twenty Shillings Reward, and all reasonable 
Charges paid by me 

JOHN TURNER 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1295, October 29, 1767. 

NEW- YORK, November 5. 

Monday Evening his Majesty's Sloop of War Beaver, 
arrived at Sandy-Hook from London, but last from Hali- 
fax: We hear the Hon. Col. Dalrymple is come Passen- 
ger; and 'tis reported she brings Orders for the Garland 
and Coventry Men of War, now here, to return Home. 

Twelve Dollars Reward. 

Run away, on the Second of this Instant, from the 
Glass-House in Salem County, West New-Jersey, a Dutch- 
man, named PHILIP JACOBS, about Five Feet Six or Seven 
Inches high, light grey Eyes, sandy Hair, thick Lips, 
speaks but little English; had on, when he went away, a 
blue Cloth Coat with Metal Buttons, red Plush Jacket, 
striped Ticken Trowsers, good Shoes, with large Brass 
Buckles, and a Castor Hat about half worn; took sundry 
other Things with him, also a Fiddle, upon which he is 
much addicted to play; both his Legs are sore. Whoever 
brings the said PHILIP JACOBS to the Subscriber, at the 
Glass-House aforesaid, shall have the above Reward. 

Wistarburgh, Nov. 6, 1767. 

RICHARD WISTAR. 

N. B. He served his Time in some Part of Maryland, 
about Canawaka, and it is supposed he is gone that Way 
again. He is a Stone Mason by Trade. 



480 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

To be sold by the Subscriber, the following tracts of land, 
lying in the county and township of Gloucester, West- 
New-Jersey; and may be entered on the first of next 
March: 

Chestnut-Grove, being a plantation containing 200 
acres of land, situated in the forks of Great-Timber-Creek, 
within three quarters of a mile of a good landing, whereon 
is a dwelling house, barn, stables and other out-houses; 
about 80 acres of cleard'd land in good fence, 20 whereof 
is meadow, with a constant stream of water running 
through the same; 8 acres of a young bearing orchard. 
The land is fresh and good, having lately been cleared, 
about a mile from a good grist mill, and about the same 
distance from a Presbyterian Meeting-house, 9 or 10 
miles from Philadelphia. Likewise, A tract of wood- 
land, within 2 miles of the aforesaid plantation, about 2 
miles from a landing, containing 275 acres, about half a 

mile from 2 saw-mills. Also, About 5 or 6 acres of 

Cedar-Swamp, between 9 or 10 miles from the aforesaid 

plantation. Likewise, A lot of ground in Philadelphia, 

in Fifth-street, between Arch and Race streets, being 14 
feet front, and 50 feet deep, wherein is a two-story brick- 
house. Also, A lot of ground, adjoining the same, 14 
feet front, and 50 feet deep. For terms of sale, apply to 
Lazarus Pine, senior ; living on the aforementioned plan- 
tation, or to Lazarus Pine, junior, in Fifth-street, Phila- 
delphia. 

N. B. Likewise, A young healthy negro wench, 18 
years old, has had the small-pox, and measles, and is fit 
for town or country. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 
42, November 9, 1767. 

Neiv-York, November 2. Monday Morning last ar- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 481 

rived here from Jamaica, Capt. Joseph Jauncey, in 25 
Days. 

Captain Provoost, in a Schooner belonging to Newark, 
sailed from Jamaica five days before Captain Jauncey. 

ARRIVALS 

New-Jersey, Captain Lawrence, at Bristol, from Ely- 
Town. 

STOLEN, a Sorrel Horse, with a 
Bridle and Saddle, 14 Hands 

fFlGURE OF A^ hi h > P aCeS and tr tS > haS a White 

Slip from his Fore Head to his Nose, 
has a black Spot on the left Buttock, 






[ RUNNING. J about the Bigness of a Dollar. Who- 
ever takes up the said Horse, and 
brings or sends him to the Subscriber, 
shall have five DOLLARS Reward, and all reasonable Char- 
ges paid, and four DOLLARS for the Man if taken, by me, 

Stephen Hinds, jun. 

Elizabeth-Town, East-New-Jersey, November 2, 1767. 
The New York Mercury, No. 835, November 2, 
1767. 

WAS committed to Jail upon Suspicion of being a Runa- 
way, in the County of Monmouth, and Province of New- 
Jersey, on the 8th of September last; a Lad who calls 
himself John Conger, aged 19 Years, 5 Feet 8 Inches high, 
of a light Complexion, and says he was born in the Jer- 
seys, &c. His Master, if any he has, is desired to take 
him away, otherwise he will be sold out to pay the Char- 
ges. WILLIAM COLE, 

November 2, 1767. Under Sheriff. 

The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1296, November 5, 1767. 

31 



482 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

PHILADELPHIA, November 5. 

Friday last his Excellency General GAGE set out for his 
Excellency Governor FRAN KLIN'S at Burlington, and is 
to proceed, we hear, accompanied by the Governor, and 
other Gentlemen of Distinction, to review his Majesty's 
Troops quartered at Brunszvick. 

On Thursday last died, in his 25th Year, the Reverend 
NATHANIEL EVANS, M. A. Missionary to the Society for 
Gloucester County, in New- Jersey; the only and most 
dutiful Child of his aged and affectionate Parents; a 
Gentleman, who, in his early Youth, had given such 
Specimens of an amiable Disposition, fervent Piety, ex- 
alted Genius, quick Apprehension, warm imagination, and 
animated Turn of Expression, that there was the utmost 
Reason to hope he would have become an Ornament to his 
sacred Profession, had it pleased God to spare him to a 
longer Date. 1 

i The best sketch of the Rev. Nathaniel Evans is that by the Rev. 
William Smith, afterwards Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and which is prefixed to the talented young missionary's poems: 

"The author of the following poems was born in the city of Phila- 
delphia, June 8th, 1742 ; and was sent to the Academy there, soon after 
it was first opened, and before the Collegiate part of the Institution 
was begun. Having spent about six years in Grammar Learning, his 
parents, who were reputable citizens, designing him for Merchandize, 
put him Apprentice; but not finding either his genius or inclination 
leading him much to that profession, he devoted more of his time to 
the service of the Muses, than to the business of the Counting-House. 
Soon after the expiration of his apprenticeship, he accordingly returned 
to the College, and applied himself, with great diligence, to the study 
of Philosophy and the Sciences, till the Commencement, May 30th, 
1765; when, on account of his great merit and promising genius, he 
was, by special Mandate of the Trustees, upon the recommendation of 
the Provost and Faculty of Professors, complimented with a Diploma 
for the degree of Master of Arts; although he had not taken the pre- 
vious degree of Bachelor of Arts, on account, of the interruption in his 
course of studies, during the term of his apprenticeship. Immediately 
after the Commencement he embarked for England, carrying with him 
recommendations to the Society for propagating the Gospel in foreign 
parts, as a fit person to supply the new Mission, then proposed to be 
opened for Gloucester county, in New-Jersey. Upon the Society's nom- 
ination, he was admitted into holy orders by the present Lord Bishop 
of London, Dr. Terrick, who expressed great satisfaction in his exam- 
ination, and particularly in the perusal of an elegant English piece 
which he composed in a few minutes, upon a Theological question, 
which he was desired to give his sentiments upon. He returned from 
England, and landed at Philadelphia. December 26th, 1765; having 
had for his fellow-passenger (among others) the worthy and ingenious 
Lady, to whom many of his pieces are addressed. Upon his arrival, he 
entered immediately upon the business of his Mission; and alas! but 
Just lived long enough to shew, by the goodness of his temper, the 
purity of his morals, the cheerfulness and affability of his conversation, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 4 8 3 

His Remains, attended by a respectable Number of his 
sorrowful Parishioners, were attended from Haddonfield, 
the Place of his Residence, to this City, on Saturday last, 
and, agreeable to his Desire, interred in Christ Church. 
His Pall was supported by the Clergy of different Denom- 
inations, and a Sermon, suitable to the mournful Occa- 
sion, preached by the Rev. Mr. PETERS, Rector of Christ 
Church, &c from Numbers xxiii, 10. 

To BE SOLD, 

A LOT of Ground, with the Brewhouse, (in which are 
two Coppers) and the Mill and Malt-house thereon erect- 
ed, in Burlington, with the Implements for carrying on 
both Malting and Brewing. It is in a good Stand for 
Business, but it being particularly inconvenient to the 
present Possessor to give it the necessary Attendance, is 
the Reason for his offering it to Sale. For Terms, enquire 
of WILLIAM DILLWYN, in Burlington. 

the sublimity and soundness of his doctrines, and the warmth of his 
Pulpit Compositions, how well he was qualified for the sacred office, 
to which he had now wholly devoted himself. He died October 29th, 
1767, lamented by all that knew him; and by none more earnestly and 
affectionately, than by his own Congregations, whom he had not yet 
served two years." 

Mr. Evans is said to have attended a Moravian boarding school at 
Germantown, which was opened in 1746. While in London he seems to 
have formed a lasting friendship with William Strahan, the bookseller, 
who, writing April 7, 1766, to David Hall, the Philadelphia printer, 
sends his "best compliments to Mr. N. Evans." "Tell him I received 
his letter from Dr. F. for which I thank him, and shall take his advice." 
Penn. Mag. of Hist, and Biog., X., 99; XIX., 140. The present writer 
has found no record of Mr. Evans's baptism or parentage. His poems 
were published with this title and imprint: Poems | on | several occa- 
sions, with j some other compositions.^ | By Nathaniel Evans, A. M. 
| Late Missionary (appointed 
Gospel) for Gloucester County, 
Lord Vis- | count Kilmorey, of 
! Printed by John Dunlap, in Market-street. | |M.DCC.LXII. | " 8vo. 
Pp. xxviii, 160, 24. Size of type-page, 3^4x6 inches. Title, 1 leaf. 
Prefatory sketch, [iii]-x. List of Subscribers, [xi] -xxviii. Poems, 1- 
160. The Love of the World incompatible with the Love of God: a 
Discourse on 1 John II., 15, 16, 17. Title, 1 leaf; To the Members of 
the Congregation of Gloucester, dated Haddonfield, April 18, 1766, pp. 
5-6; Discourse, 7-24. It was probably printed separately, with a half 
title (pp. 1-2). The list of subscribers foots up 970 copies subscribed 
for, of which 461 were taken by booksellers, 150 going to two dealers 
in Charleston, S. C., indicating some special influence thereabouts, to 
secure so large a sale in advance of publication. The list of individual 
subscribers includes a very large number of prominent people in New 
York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, as well as many in the remoter 
Colonies, so far north as Quebec and Nova Scotia, and south to Bar- 
badoes, and a goodly number abroad, among 1 the latter being Oliver 
Goldsmith, Esq; London. 




484 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, in Salem County, West 
New- Jersey, on Friday, the 3Oth of October last, an Irish 
Servant Girl, about 17 or 18 Years of Age, named Mary 
Ann O'Bryan, but commonly calls herself Mary Bryan, 
short and thick, of a fair Complexion, has light brown 
Hair; had on, and took with her, one striped Camblet 
Skirt, two Linsey Petticoats, one striped with red, blue 
and white, and one black, blue and white, a homespun 
blue and white striped short Gown, blue Yarn Stockings, 
new Shoes, and old Pinchbeck Buckles. She is much given 
to drink, and very impudent when so. Whoever takes up 
said Servant, and delivers her to her Master, shall have 
the above Reward, or Forty Shillings, if confined in any 
of His Majesty's Goals, paid by 

JOHN FIRTH. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2028, November 5, 
1767. 

We hear that a schooner is ashore on Egg Harbour, but 
we cannot learn who she is. 

A whaling sloop which put into our Capes to refit, re- 
ported, that he saw, after the gale, a vessel bottom up- 
wards, she had a white bottom, and was either a sloop or 
schooner. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1300, No- 
vember 5, 1767. 



LONDON. 



Sept. 19. They zvrite from New-York, that a very ex- 
tensive steel manufactory is now carried on at Perth Am- 
boy, under the direction of a gentleman from Sheffield, 
who had been engaged, on great encouragement, to super- 
intend the undertaking. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 48$ 

Extract of a Letter from Princeton, Nov. 14, 1767. 

"On Wednesday last, the Medical Society met here, and 
were joined by some Gentlemen of the Faculty, from the 
Western Division. Doct. William Burnet, of Newark, 
was chosen President, in the Room of the late worthy Doc- 
tor M'Kean. The Society have again fixed their next 
General Meeting, to be held the -first Tuesday in May next, 
at the House of William Hick, in this Place." 

We have received an Elegiac Piece, to the Memory 
of the late Rev. Mr. EVANS, from one of our favourite 
Correspondents; but a few faulty Lines, introduced 
thro' the Grief of the Writer, occasions its Omission, until 
they shall have received that Correction which several 
beautiful Strokes, interspersed throughout the Poem, con- 
vince us that he wants neither Sentiment nor Ingenuity 
to perform For as Mr. Tickell, in his elegantly pa- 
thetic Language has it, 

What Mourner ever felt poetic Fires, 

Slow comes the Verse, which real Woe inspires, 

Grief unaffected suits but ill with Art, 

Or flowing Numbers with a bleeding Heart. 

Princeton, November 9, 1767. 

THE SUBSCRIBER having taken the Tavern at PRINCE- 
TON, at the Sign of the COLLEGE, all Gentlemen Travel- 
lers, and others, may depend on being treated by him with 
the greatest Respect; also, with good Accommodations 
for themselves and their Horses. 

He likewise takes this opportunity of returning his 
sincere Thanks to all those that have been so obliging as 
to favour him with their Company, and hopes for a Con- 



486 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

tinuance of their Favours, which will always be grate- 
fully acknowledged, by 

WILLIAM HICK. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 43, November 
1 6, 1767. 

New-York, November 9. The Negro that killed Mr. 
Daniel Hart, his Master, at Hopewell, in New- Jersey, was 
found hanging on a Tree in the Woods, on Wednesday the 
2 ist of October. It seems he took a Rope from off one of 
his Master's Horses the Night after he committed the 
Murder, and hung himself therewith. His dead Body 
was burnt the Day after. 

The bay Horse that Andrew Leake, of New- Jersey, 
advertised in this Mercury, the igth ultimo, to be 
stole from him, is taken up in the Back Part of Connecti- 
cut, and now in the Possession of Mr. John Van Ness, at 
Rynbeck, in Dutchess County, and Province of New- 
York: He was sold in Connecticut, by one John Cam- 
eron, who is now in Goal; and has sold another Horse to 
one Joel Herrey, of Sharon, which is supposed to be 
stolen also; he is black, about 14 Hands and -J high, is a 
heavy Horse, trots and paces. Mr. Leake is desired to 
send for his Horse, and pay the Reward, and all other 
Charges, and by proving his Property, he may have him 
again, by applying to 

JOHN VAN NESS 

The Nezv York Mercury, No. 836, November 9, 
1767. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 12. The Brig Francis, Cap- 
tain Sampson, of this Port, from New Orleans, was drove 
from her Anchors, on the Second Instant, in a violent Gale 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 487 

of Wind, a little to the Southward of our Capes, when the 
Vessel went ashore, and was beat to Pieces, and the great- 
est Part of her Cargoe lost. 

To be SOLD, by public Vendue, 

On the 27th Day of this instant November, if not sold 
before at private Sale, at Bridgetown, commonly called 
Mount-holly, New-Jersey, 

A HOUSE and Lot of Ground in said Town; the House 
is 36 Feet Front on an open Street, and 20 Feet in Depth, 
three Rooms on the first Floor, Cellars under two of the 
Rooms, and two Rooms on the second Floor, a Lean to 
Kitchen, a Work Shop adjoining the House, about 26 
Feet Front, and 18 Feet in Depth, and a Garden back of 
both House and Shop. A Lot of Ground near the House, 
containing about one Acre and 56 Perches, through which 
there is a constant Stream of Water, which renders it 
suitable for divers Businesses; the House is situated on 
high Ground, and in pretty good Repair, and in a Town 
where Trade is more lively than in most small Towns. 
Any Person inclinable to purchase the Premises, by pay- 
ing Twenty-five Pounds, may have some Years allowed 
for paying the Remainder, giving Security, if required, 
and paying Interest. For further Information, apply to 
JOHN SMITH, in Burlington, JOHN SHINN, or HENRY 
PAXSON, in Mount-holly, who will shew the Premises, or 
JOHN PEMBERTON, in Philadelphia. The Pennsylvania 
Gazette, No. 2029, November 12, 1767. 

The Snow Julius Caesar, Capt. Dickenson from the Bay 
of Honduras for New York has put into our Capes in dis- 
tress. 

RUN AWAY from the subscriber, living in Reckless 
town, Burlington county, West Jersey, on Saturday the 



488 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

7th day of this instant, in the evening, the two following 
apprentices, viz. PETER BARKER, a tall slim young man, 
aged about 20 years, by trade a taylor, wears his own long 
hair, tied behind, he has a large scar of a scald on his left 
arm under his wristband, and another on the outside of his 
left leg, lately cured, had on and took with him when he 
went away, one brown home-spun broad cloth coat, with 
wooden buttons, one double breasted striped jacket, one 
outside jacket of a lightish colour, one fine shirt and one 
oznabrugs, one pair of thread stockings and one of yarn, 
a new pair of shoes, an old castor hat with redish binding. 
The other named JOHN JONES, wore his own short hair, 
of a paleish complexion, by trade a shoemaker, about 17 
or 1 8 years of age, had on and took with him, one home- 
spun worsted coat, snuff coloured, one striped damascus 
jacket, one camblet, one outside ditto of a lightish colour, 
leather breeches, a pair of coarse thread stockings, one 
fine shirt, and one coarse ditto, an old felt hat and newish 
pumps. They both carried with them their tools to pre- 
vent being suspected as run aways. Whoever takes up 
and secures said run aways so as their masters may have 
them again, shall have EIGHT DOLLARS reward for both, or 
FOUR DOLLARS for each, and all reasonable charges paid 
by JOHN HOLLO WAY and 

ISAAC HOLLOWAY. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1301, November 
12, 1767. 

List of Letters remaining in the General Post-Office, New- 
York, October 10, 1767 

.... David Connor, Shrewsbury; .... John 
Morris, Shrewsbury; .... Rufus White, Egg-Har- 
bour 

New-York, November 16. This Morning the Snow 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 489 

Jersey, Captain Lawrence arrived here from Bristol, in 8 
Weeks. He took up at Sea, and has brought in with him 
the Crew of the Ketch Mercury, Captain Kennedy, of and 
from this Port for the West-Indies; which Vessel went 
all to Pieces in a Gale of Wind, about 6 Weeks since, being 
then only 7 Days from this Port. 

MATTHIAS Ward, of Newark, acquaints the Publick, 
that he still continues his Stage from Newark to Powle's- 
Hook, as usual, except that after the 2Oth of November, 
he will return from Powle's-Hook, at Eleven o' Clock, for 
this Winter. The New York Mercury, No. 837, Novem- 
ber 1 6, 1767. 

Potts-Grove, October 22, 1767. 
Three Pounds Reward. 

RUN away on the I4th of this Inst. October, from the 
Subscriber, living at Potts-Grove, Philadelphia County, 
an Irish Servant Man, named JAMES FULLERTON, about 
26 years of Age, about 5 Feet 4 Inches high, is thick set, 
stoops in his Shoulders, dark sandy coloured Hair, and is 
much given to strong Drink : Had on when he went away, 
a spotted Swanskin under Jacket, with an old light-col- 
oured one over it, Oznabrigs Trowsers, old Shoes, and no 
Stockings. Whoever takes up said Servant, and secures 
him in any Goal, so that his Master may have him again, 
shall have the above Reward, and reasonable Charges, 
paid by 

WILLIAM DEWEES, jun. 

N. B. It is supposed said Servant is gone towards the 
Jerseys, as he has been working down about Raccoon and 
Oldman's Creek all the latter Part of this Summer. 



49 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Just published and to be sold by the Printer hereof, 

Price 2s. 3d. 
An Appeal to the Public, 

In behalf of the Church of England, in AMERICA. By 
THOMAS BRADBURY CHANDLER, D. D. Rector of St. ' 
John's Church, in Elizabeth-Town, New- Jersey, and Mis- 
sionary from the Society for the Propagation of the Gos- 
pel, &c. 

"We desire a fair Trial if we are guilty, punish us; 

"if we are innocent, protect us" 

Justin Martyr. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 44, November 
23, 1767- 

Monmouth County, New-Jersey, Nov. 9, 1767. 
WHEREAS on Thursday, the 22d of October last, was 
lost in Princetown Fair, a red Leather Pocket Book, with 
a Silver Lock, containing a Number of Bonds, Bills and 
Notes; also a large Number of Monmouth, Morris and 
Sussex County Bills of Cost. As those Papers are of 
great Consequence to the Person who lost them, and it is 
presumed can be of little or no Value to any Person into 
whose Hands they may fall; it is hoped whoever has 
found the same, will return it, either to the Printer hereof, 
or to Messieurs JOHN and DAVID RHEA, Merchants in 
Philadelphia, or to Mr. ABNER PHILIPS, Tavern-keeper 
in Princetown, who shall receive THREE POUNDS Reward 
of either of the above-mentioned Persons to whom deliv- 
ered, and no Questions asked. 



BOSTON, November 5. 

We hear the subscription paper for encreasing our own 
manufactures, and laying aside certain enumeriated arti- 
cles, fills up surprisingly; and that said measure is so well 






1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 49 l 

approved of in the country, that town meetings are now 
calling, in order to agree upon similar measures. - - The 
public papers and private advices acquaint us, That Rhode- 
Island, Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersey, &c, &c, are 
steadily pursuing measures for lessening their foreign im- 
ports, by encouraging frugality, and their own manufac- 
tures. --It cannot be disputed that the colonies are greatly 
in debt, so that whatever is drazvn from us by way of duty, 
must be those monies which would go to Britain, as pay, 
and to procure more goods. A Necessity is laid upon us, 
to be industrious and frugal, and Woe be unto us, if we 
are extravagant. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 19. 

We hear from Burlington, that the new constructed 
light travelling Waggon, contrived by RICHARD WELLS, 
Esq; on a full Trial last Week, was found to answer its 
Design, to great Exactness. Among other Improvements, 
his invention to discharge the Horses, in case of their run- 
ning away, is particularly worth Attention. This is done, 
at the Expence of about a Pistole, by the Riders (in the 
Inside of the Carriage) only pulling a String, when the 
Horses go off, and leave the Carriage standing. An In- 
vention that bids fair to be of great Use and Safety to 
those who ride in close Carriages. 

To be SOLD, by public vendue, on the 3d day of Decem- 
ber next, at the dwelling-house of Gabriel Davis, in the 
township and county of Gloucester, at 10 o'clock in the 
forenoon of said day, horses, cows and hogs, waggons, 
plows, harrows, sundry feather beds, chest of drawers, and 
divers other articles of houshold goods, too tedious to 
mention. Also, at the same time, will be sold, the follow- 
ing tracts of Land, viz. 



492 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1767 

No. I. Contains 178 acres of land, on which is a good 
brick dwelling-house, two stories high, with four rooms 
on each floor, a good barn and orchard, 40 acres of land 
cleared, the rest well timbered, and is good strong land; 
also about 15 acres of meadow. 

No. 2. Contains 200 acres, with a frame dwelling- 
house, barn and orchard, about 40 acres of land cleared, 
the rest well timbered, and 20 acres of meadow; both 
situate on the north side of the north branch of Great 
Timber Creek, and adjoin each other. 

No. 3. Contains 60 acres, with a good dwelling-house 
thereon, about 10 acres of land cleared, and 5 acres of 
meadow; all situate on the Great Road leading from 
Gloucester to Great Egg Harbour, about 5 miles from the 
town of Gloucester. 

No. 4. Contains 5 acres of cedar swamp, a few miles 
from the above premises ; being all late the real and per- 
sonal estate of the said Gabriel Davis. The conditions 
will be made known at the day of sale by 

SAMUEL CLEMENT, assignee. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2030, November 
19, 1767. 

Just published, and to be sold by Isaac Snowden, Phila- 
delphia; Garret Noel, bookseller in New York; and 
Joseph Mershon, in Princeton: 

A new and neat Edition of 
URANIA : 

Or, A choice collection of psalm-tunes, anthems and 
hymns, from the most approved Authors : With some 
entirely new. In two, three and four parts. The whole 
peculiarly adapted to the use of churches and private fam- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 493 

ilies. To which are prefixed, the plainest and most neces- 
sary rules of psalmody. 

By JAMES LYON, A. M. 

Price Ten Shillings. Great allowance will be made to 
those that take a number and pay cash. 

N. B. Said ISAAC SNOWDEN has to lett, a good two 
story house, stables, &c. with two or three acres of up 
land, in prime order, near the Bettering-house. The 
Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1302, November 19, 1767. 

Captain Cook, in the Ship London Packet, arrived here 
from Barbados, informs . . . That on Thursday last, 
about eight Leagues from our Capes, he fell in with the 
Sloop John, Ralph Meredith, Master, from Virginia, in 
Distress, having been drove out of Delaware Bay in the 
aforesaid Gale, in which she lost her Rudder, Anchors and 
Cables, and suffered other Damage. The Pennsylvania 
Chronicle, No. 45, November 30, 1767. 

To BE SOLD, 

THREE PLANTATIONS, viz, one containing upwards of 
200 Acres, with a Dwelling-house, Frame Barn, good Or- 
chard, and about 30 or 40 Acres of good Meadow, all 
within Bank; another of them contains about 150 Acres, 
with a Dwelling-house, good Orchard, and exceeding good 
Meadows, all within Bank; both the above Plantations 
have public Landings, adjoin each other, and are situate 
on Oldman's Creek, in a public Place for Business. The 
other Plantation contains about 200 Acres, of choice good 
Woodland, distant from the former about 3 Miles. Also 
15 Acres of Land adjoining the last mentioned Place, of 
which about 8 Acres good Upland; the whole lying in 
Penn's Neck, Salem County. For further Particulars, 



494 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

apply to the Subscriber, living on the first mentioned 

Premises. 

GEORGE LAWRENCE. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 26. 

Yesterday Se'nnight, about Eight o' Clock at Night, as 
James Bright was coming up to Town from Raccoon- 
Creek, in a Wood Flat, the Wind blowing very hard, he 
was obliged to come to Anchor on the Jersey Side, about 
three Miles above Chester, and soon afterwards his Flat 
filled and overset, by which unhappy Accident two Men 
were drowned; Mr. Bright got on her Side, where he 
continued till next Morning, when he was taken off by a 
Boat from the Shore. The Persons drowned were James 
Cole and John Connor. 

WHEREAS JOHN HATTON, Esq; Collector of His Maj- 
esty's Customs, of the Port of Salem, in New- Jersey, did 
obtain from me the Subscriber, a Bond, dated on or about 
the 3 ist Day of October last, for Payment of Fifty-five 
Pounds, which said Bond was given for a certain Negroe 
Boy, which said Hatton asserted to be healthy and sound, 
and not subject to Fits, but after being taken to my House 
hath had several Fits; upon which I took him back to 
said Hatton with the Bill of Sale, and said Hatton ac- 
cepted him and the Bill of Sale, and promised to deliver 
up the Bond, but now refuses to comply with his Agree- 
ment; therefore I take this Method to forewarn all Per- 
sons from taking an Assignment of said Bond, as I am 

determined not to pay it. 

JACOB SCOGGIN. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2031, November 
26, 1767. 

TAKEN up, a seven inch cable almost new, also an an- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 495 

chor, of about 200 weight. Any person claiming the 
same, may have it again, by sending or applying at the 
house of ISAAC STATHEM, in Greenwich, Cumberland 
county. The Pennsylvania Journal, No, 1303, Novem- 
ber 26, 1767. 

New-York. 

Some time last week arrived at Sandy Hook his Maj- 
esty's sloop Viger. A report prevails, that she is stationed 
there for the Winter. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1303, November 26, 1767. 

WHEREAS the two Lots of Land, with the Buildings 
and Improvements thereon, which were John Vantine's, 
situate at Rariton Landing, were set to Sale at Publick 
Vendue the 6th of Novem. Inst. but the Bidders being 
apprehensive they were mortgaged to some Gentleman in 
New- York, or elsewhere, the Vendue was adjourned to 
the 29th of December next, on the Premises; therefore 
it is desired if any person hath any lawful Claim to the 
said Lands or Tenements, by Mortgage, or otherways, 
they would make it appear before or at the Day of Sale, 
that I proceed with Justice to all concerned. 

JOHN MOORES, Sheriff. 

Perth Amboy, Nov. 23, 1767. 

The New York Mercury, No. 839, November 30, 
1767. 

Mr. GODDARD, 

OBSERVING that you devote a Corner of your entertain- 
ing CHRONICLE to the Muses, I requested an ingenious 
young Gentleman of my Acquaintance, who sometimes 
pays his Devoirs at their Shrine, to furnish you with some 
of his poetical Performances, not doubting they would 



49 6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

prove as agreeable to many of your Readers as they had 
done to such of his Friends as had been favoured with the 
Perusal of them in private. He has great Diffidence of 
his Talents for Versification, and it was therefore not 
without some Reluctance that he consented to the Publi- 
cation of the Piece I send you enclosed. This must plead 
his Excuse, if any should be thought necessary; but I 
am inclined to think that those who are best acquainted 
with the Works of Anacreon, will find this Translation of 
bis third Ode no ways deficient in that happy Ease and 
Sprightliness which so remarkably characterise the Orig- 
inal. 

/ am, Sir, yours, &c. 

WEST-NEW-JERSEY, F. w. 

Nov. 30, 1767. 

A TRANSLATION of the third ODE of ANACREON. 

When sable Night, slow-wending, 

Had gain'd the middle Sleep, 
And Silent, all-befriending, 

Had lull'd Mankind asleep; 
\\ hen Love alone was waking, 

A Knocking shook my Gate : 
I starting cry'd, what raking 

Mad Fellow calls so late ? 

"Pray tarry not an Instant, 

"Nor fear to let me in; 
"I am a helpless Infant, 

"Wet dripping to the Skin. 
"The Night so dark and chilly ! 

"It never will be Day! 
"And I, so young and silly, 

"Alas, have lost my Way!" 

In Haste, to light a Candle 

And let him in, I rose, 
With Pity prompt to dandle 

And lull him to Repose. 
I open'd, and admitted 

A Boy indeed, but lo ! 

found the Urchin fitted 

With Quiver, Wings and Bow. 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 497 

But what Alarm of Danger 

Cou'd such an Elf inspire ? 
I plac'd the little Stranger 

Before a blazing Fire; 
And, near the Fairy seated, 

With hospitable Care 
His Hands in mine 1 heated, 

And wrung his dripping Hair. 

But he no sooner found him 

Recover'd from the Cold. 
Than, looking slily round him, 

"Kind Sir, I'll be so bold 
"To make a Trial whether 

"(Alas I fear to know!) 
"This dismal rainy Weather 

"Has hurt my little Bow ?" 

He said, and shot an Arrow, 

With such unerring Aim, 
That through my very Marrow 

Its Venom spread a Flame. 
The Traitor, who had acted 

So well the harmless Boy, 
Now laugh'd like one distracted, 

And cried, "O give me Joy ! 

"My Bow retains a Fitness 

"An Arrow still to dart; 
"You'll find the Wound a Witness 

"That rankles at your Heart." 



One Day last Week a Hog that weighs upwards of 850 
Ib. was brought to Town, alive, from New- Jersey. Those 
who have seen him think he is the largest Creature of the 
Kind ever raised in America. It is said he will be sold, 
next Market Day, for the Gratification of the true Lovers 
of fat Pork. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 47, De- 
cember 2-7, 1767. 

PHILADELPHIA, December 3. 

Saturday last the Ship London Packet, Captain Cook, 
arrived here from Barbadoes; . ... on the 26th, 
about 10 Leagues from the Capes, he met with Captain 
Meredith, in a Sloop belonging to York in Virginia, who, 

32 



49 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

the Sunday before, had been up our Bay as far as the 
Brandy wine, and come to Anchor, but a hard North- 
wester coming on, his Vessel struck several Times, beat 
off her Rudder, stove in the Counter, and after losing her 
Boat, and both Anchors, was drove out to Sea full of 
Water, but being loaded with Cedar, it kept her from sink- 
ing. Captain Cook took the People on board, with her 

Provisions, Water &c. and towed the Sloop several Hours, 
till he put a Pilot on board her, together with the People, 
and the Weather being moderate, he left them a few Miles 
from Cape-May, standing in for a Harbour. 

Captain Callender, from St. Kitts, on the 2Oth ult. 
about 40 Leagues from our Capes, spoke the Snow King 
George, Captain Potts, of and from this Port for Alex- 
andria, out 24 Hours, all well. On the 22d Captain Cal- 
lender came to Anchor on the lower Part of the Brown, 
when a hard Gale of Wind came on at N. W. in which the 
Vessel drove till she was between three and four Leagues 
without the Cape, where she brought up, and rid out the 
Gale, without any Damage. 

Captain Bulkley, in 7 Weeks from Lisbon, . ... on 
the 2$th about 15 Leagues from our Capes, saw a Ship 
and a Snow, lying to, which he imagined were bound in 
here. 

RUN away from the Subscribers, living in Trenton, in 
the Province of New- Jersey, on Saturday the 2Oth of No- 
vember last, the two following Servant Men, viz. Henry 
Simms, a Taylor by Trade, is about 5 Feet 6 Inches high, 
of a yellow Complexion, has short curled Hair, much like 
a Mulatto; had on, when he went away, a turned Serge 
Coat, with Button-holes on both Sides, an Olive coloured 
Velvet Jacket half worn, Snuff coloured Breeches, a Pair 
of new double scaled Shoes, and took with him one Shirt, 









1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 499 

one Pair of Stockings, &c. The other named James Gill- 
creace, a Shoemaker, about 5 Feet 4 Inches high, has short 
black Hair, is much pock-marked, very talkative, and 
stoops much in his walk; had on, a Felt Hat, a new light 
coloured Frize Coat, lapelled, with round Metal Buttons, 
a blue Jacket; took with him two Shirts, and two Pair of 
Breeches, one Pair Leather, and the other black Everlast- 
ing, Yarn Stockings, and a Pair of half worn Shoes. They 
are both native Irish. Whoever takes up and secures said 
Runaways, so as their Masters may have them again, shall 
have EIGHT DOLLARS Reward for both, or Four Dollars 
for each, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 

CONRAD KOTTS, RICHARD BORDEN. 

RUN away on the 26th of November, from the Sub- 
scriber, living at Gloucester, a Mulattoe Man, named Cor- 
nelius Gallahon, about 24 Years of Age; had on, when 
he went away, a white spotted Jacket, new Leather 
Breeches, with Strings, white Yarn Stockings, and old 
Shoes. Whoever takes up and secures said Mulattoe, so 
as his Master may have him again, shall have THIRTY 
SHILLINGS Reward, and reasonable Charges, paid by 

WILLIAM HUGG. 

Philadelphia, November 25, 1767. 
SALEM STAGE WAGGON. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that AARON SILVER'S Stage 
Waggon sets out from Salem of a Third Day (or Tues- 
day) at 6 o'Clock in the Morning, the I5th Day of De- 
cember next, and drives the same Day to William Coop- 
er's Ferry, and stays there till Fifth Day, and then sets 
out at 6 o'Clock, and drives the same Day to Salem again, 
and so continues to do the same every Week. 



5OO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

He carries Passengers, Goods, Wares and Lumbers, at 
the Rates following viz. 

Each Person that rides in the Stage Waggon, to pay 
Three Halfpence a Mile, and Goods, Wares and Lumbers, 
carried through, at Four Shillings and Three Pence a 
Hundred Weight, and so in Proportion to the Distance 
carried. 

And all such Things, as Chests, Trunks, Boxes, Bales, 
Bags or Budgets, shall be carried according to their 
Weight and Lumber. 

AARON SILVER 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2032, December 3, 
1767. 

To be let on a Lease, 

A plantation or tract of land situate in the township of 
Waterford, and county of Gloucester, in West-New-Jer- 
sey, about ten miles from Philadelphia; containing near 
three acres of land, about seventy acres of which are 
cleared, and the tenant will be permitted to clear more. 
There is a dwelling-house, barn, and orchard on the 
premises, likewise some meadow already cleared, and 
more may be improved. 

The land is very fertile, the unimproved part produces 

great plenty of good pasture. Any person inclining to 

rent the same, may treat with the subscriber at Burlington, 
or with Richard Blackham, in Philadelphia, who also 
have to let a lot of ground in Kensington, near the city 
of Philadelphia, containing about two hundred and fifty 
feet front on Shakamacon-street, and about one hundred 
and fifty feet in depth, on which are erected two tene- 
ments, one a two story brick, and the other a frame build- 
ing, which place is advantageously situated for a gardener, 
it being improved, with some of the best English grape 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 5OI 

vines, asparagus beds, rasberry, and strawberry vines, 
apple and peach trees. 

BENJAMIN SWETT, jun. 

WHEREAS Mr. Jacob Scroggin, of Alloway's Creek, 
Nezv-Jersey, hath endeavoured, in the CHRONICLE, No. 
44, by a Misrepresentation of Facts and false Assertions, 
to injure my Character, Justice to myself demands this 
public Reply. 

I sold Mr. Scroggin a Negro Boy, for .55, and agreed 
to take his Bond for the Money. But hearing that he 
was a contentious Man, I determined to have the Bargain 
made in a Manner the most authentic and unexception- 
able. Accordingly on the 3ist of October, when he came 
to receive the Boy, and execute the Bond, I desired him 
to step with me to the House of Mr. Roger Sherron, in 
Salem, and took the Boy along with us. When there, 
calling Mr. Sherron to witness, I said, / sell you this Boy 

as I bought him There he is, examine him; and if you 

have any Objection to him, you may now refuse him; for 
if you now take him, I will never more be answerable for 
any Thing that may happen to him; I sell him with all his 
Faults. Scroggin then said, Are his Legs sound? My 
Answer was, / know nothing to the contrary: Whereupon 
he stript down the Boy's Stockings, and said, I like the 

Boy and will have him. The Bill of Sale and Bond 

were then executed, and Scroggin took the Boy away. Of 

this Mr. Sherron is ready to make Affidavit. Seven 

Days after, Scroggin complained the Boy had Fits, and 

said he would return him. In order to relieve the Boy 

from an inhuman Master, to whom I had ignorantly sold 
him, I offered to take him back and cancel the Bond, on 
Condition he would compensate to me the Loss I must in- 
evitably sustain in a second Sale, by his being returned 



502 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

with such a Character, for which I did not believe there 
was any Foundation. And though he rejected this equi- 
table Proposition, and knew I would accept of the Boy on 
no other Terms, he sent him to my House the following 
Evening, about Nine o' Clock, when he knew I was from 
Home, by a Person unknown to any of my Family, who 
left the Boy, and immediately went away. And as the 
said Scroggin did neither come with the said Boy, nor has 
since been at my House, he is hereby informed, that unless 
he either takes the Boy away, or complies with my reason- 
able Proposal, he may depend upon having his Bond put 
in Suit as the Law directs. 

JOHN HATTON. 

N. B. Mr. Hartly, from whom I purchased the Boy, 
is ready to declare that he was not subject to Fits during 
the two Years he kept him ; and since he was in my Pos- 
session, which is five Months, he has not to my Knowl- 
edge been troubled with Fits. The only Reason I can 
assign for Scroggin' s wanting to return the Boy is, that 
he is more awkward and less cleanly than he expected. 

Philad. Dec. 12, 1767. J. H. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 48, December 
7-14, 1767. 

New-York, December 7. We hear a small Sloop be- 
longing to Amboy, John Hampton, Master, was overset 
in the Storm on the I7th of October last, off Chingoteague 
in Virginia, the Mast, Sails and Rigging, all carried away, 
and one Man drowned. The Rest continued on the Wreck 
a considerable Time, till she drove ashore, in Accomack 
County; the Master has since returned home, and it is 
doubtful whether the Vessel will be ever got off. 

We hear from Elizabeth-Town, that the Hon. Col. Sir 
John St. Clair, Bart, died there last Thursday Week, and 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 53 

was buried on Saturday Evening following, with all Mil- 
itary Honours. 

Two Lads being left together at a House in the Town, 
during the Time of the Funeral, one of them got a Gun 
which was loaded, and shot the other dead. 

Nezv-York, December 10. On Wednesday the 23d of 
November, at his House in Elizabeth-Town, New- Jersey, 
died Sir JOHN ST. CLAIR, Baronet, Col. of his Majestys 

Regiment, and Quarter-Master-General of the 

Army in North-America, in which Station he has acted 
for 13 Years, with great Honour and Integrity. His 
Death was occasioned by a Wound he received thro* the 
Lungs, on the Banks of the Monongahala, in July 1755, 
at Braddock's unfortunate Defeat, of which Wound he 
never recovered. He was between 50 and 60 Years of 
Age, and has been near 40 Years in his Majesty's Service. 
He acted on all Occasions with a firmness of Spirit, Resig- 
nation and Dignity becoming his Profession and Charac- 
ter. His Remains were enter'd on Saturday the 26th, 
with all Military Honours. His Excellency General Gage, 
accompanied by the Gentlemen of his Suite from Head- 
Quarters, and the Officers from the adjacent Garrisons in 
New- York and New- Jersey, attended the Solemnity. 

His only Son, now Sir John St. Clair, succeeds to his 
Title and Estate. 1 

JUST PUBLISHED 

And sold at the PRINTING-OFFICE, at the EXCHANGE, 

at 35. 6d. per Dozen, or at 6d. single. 

FREEMAN'S New-York 

ALMANACK 



i For a full and very interesting sketch of Colonel Sir John St. Clair, 
Bart., by Charles R. Hildeburn, accompanied by etched portrait and 
book plate, see Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, XI., 



504 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

For the Year 1768 
CONTAINING. 



12 Hour of the Moon's Rising or Setting 

Southing, and High- Water, at New- York, Elizabeth- 
Town Point 

19. Facing December. Corrected Account of the New- 
Jersey Courts 

26. List of the Council and Assembly, of New-Jersey. 

27. A complete Table of the Post Roads throughout 
his Majesty's American Dominions, with the Postage to 
each Place, and the Distances summed up; also most of 
the public Roads in all other Parts of the said Dominions. 
The New York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1301, December 10, 1767. 

PHILADELPHIA, December 10. 

We hear from Princetown, that Yesterday Se'nnight, 
as the New-York Stage Waggon was crossing Waters's 
Ferry at Staten Island, the Flat having a Sail set, and the 
Wind and Tide being against each other, the Sea raised 
the Side of the Flat, so that the Wind took her Bottom, 
and overset her, by which Accident Mrs. Morris, Wife to 
Mr. Morris, the Player, with her Maid Servant, were 
drowned; the other Passengers, together with the Driver 
and Boatman, were, with great Difficulty, saved. . . . 
Two Horses were also lost. 

Last W^eek was brought to Town from New- Jersey, a 
live Hog, which weighed upwards of 850 Pounds, thought 
to be the largest ever raised in America. 

To be LETT 

And entered upon immediately, nearly opposite the 
Meeting-House, in the City of Burlington, West- Jersey, 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 55 

A COMMODIOUS new House, with a large Shop, neatly 
fitted up, suitable for any Business. For further Partic- 
ulars,' enquire of ANNE HUME, who has for sale, at her 
House in York-street, Burlington, a Variety of China, 
Glass, Delph and Stone Ware; also Powder, Shot. Ozen- 
brigs, Checks, Linens, and various other Articles. The 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2033, December 10, 1767. 

WAS committed to the goal of Burlington, a certain 
Negroe man, who says he belongs to William Coursey, 
near Queen's Town, in Queen Ann's county, Maryland; 
said Negroe is about 32 years of age, says his name is 
Jack Hamman; had on, when committed, a white woolen 
coat, with broad metal buttons, and a jacket of the same, 
and as he has been here some time in confinement, this 
is to give his master or mistress notice to come, pay char- 
ges and take him away, otherwise he will be sold out for 
the same by 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2033, December 10, 
1767. 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS, 
GENTLEMEN, 

/ am convinced both of your Impartiality and best Care 
and Endeavours to afford the utmost Satisfaction to the 
Public; and I doubt not you zvill readily insert the follow- 
ing, by which that respectable Body will not only have an 
Opportunity of judging for themselves, but also may be 
enabled thereby to distinguish, with Justice and Propriety, 
the Person to whom the real Merit of that Ingenuity hon- 
estly belongs: Applause may then follozv Judgment. 
Your Compliance must of Course be an Obligation on the 



506 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

Public in general, and you may rely, it will be esteemed a 
particular One on 

Your assured Friend, L. M. 

JVo, you are out abundantly! 
Nothing truer, lake my Word for that! 
GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE. HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. 

Saturday, August 2, 1766. 

THE Hon. Sir Francis BlaTie Delaval, Knight of the Bath, tried an 
Experiment with his new invented Phaeton, upon Westminster Bridge, 
by putting his Horses in full Gallop; and in a Moment, by pulling a 
String, the Horses galloped off, and left the Carriage standing still, to 
the Surprise of many who saw it The Utility of this Invention is ap- 
parent, from the untimely Death of Mr. Wilson, who lately lost his Life 
by the Horses running away with the Carriage. 

that I could have ingeniously decked an American with this 
Honour! 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2033, December 
10, 1767. 

New-York, December 17. We are informed that the 
Rev. Mr. Samuel Blair, having declined the Presidency 
of the College of New- Jersey, the Trustees met on Wed- 
nesday the Qth Instant, at Nassau Hall; and unanimously 
re-elected the Revd. and learned Dr. JOHN WITHER- 
SPOON, an eminent Divine of the Church of Scotland to 
that office; on satisfactory Intelligence being received, 
that the Obstructions which stood in the Way of the Doc- 
tor's Acceptance, of the Chair when offer' d him last Year, 
were now removed, and that in Case it was still vacant, 
and he should be re-elected, he would accept it. 

Is now in the PRESS, 

At the Printing-Office, opposite the Exchange, and will 
be publish'd next Week. Price, bound in Marble Paper, 
45. New- York Currency; in Leather, 55. if letter'd and 
gilt, 55. 6d. 

A Performance, entitled, A COMPANION FOR THE 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 57 

YOUNG PEOPLE of NORTH AMERICA ; particularly recom- 
mended to those within the three Provinces of New- York, 
New- Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Divided into Chapters, 
adapted to every intelligent Capacity, and calculated for 
the Promotion and Furtherance of Christian Decorum 
among Families ; principally designed to excite a laudable 
and Christian Emulation among young People to pursue 
the Paths which lead to real Religion : By attempting 
to discover the BEAUTIES OF A VIRTUOUS LIFE, and re- 
move all Objections young Persons can have to being early 
religious. 

By AHIMAAZ HARKER 

CANDIDATE FOR THE MINISTRY. 

This Book is printed on a good Paper and Letter, and 
contains Three Hundred Pages. In which are considered 
all the most essential Duties that interest young People, 
pointing out those Requisites that will render them honest, 
wise, sociable, and virtuous in Life; and happy at Death. 
The whole expressed in such a Stile, as the Author hopes 
will delight the most accomplished Readers, and improve 
the most indifferent. 

The Books will be conveyed into different Parts of the 
Country, as soon as the Book-binder shall make them 
ready; so that the Subscribers will be at no Difficulty in 
getting them. 

To be sold at public vendue, on Tuesday the 5th Day 
of January next, at Ten o' Clock in the Forenoon of the 
same Day, at the House of William Wright, Innholder, 
in Perth- Amboy; a Tract of Wood Land, containing 
about 146 Acres, belonging to the Estate of the late James 
Neilson, deceased, and lies in the South- Ward of the said 
City, about a Mile and an Half from the Ferry. The Con- 
ditions will be made known at Day of Sale. The New 



508 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

York Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1302, December 
17, 1767. 

For the PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE. 

As it has ever been my Study to pass silently through 
Life, it is doing the utmost Violence to my Nature to ap- 
pear in this public Manner; and nothing less than the De- 
fence of my Reputation could have induced me to it. 

In the PENNSYLVANIA CHRONICLE of November 16, 
and in the GAZETTE of November 19, it is inserted, that 
I have invented a Method of suddenly disengaging the 
Horses from my Carriage, by pulling a String; which 
Publication I was totally ignorant of, not having the least 

Desire to arrogate any Merit on the Occasion on the 

contrary. I was extremely disgusted, and had I thought 
it a Matter of Importance enough for public Attention, I 
should then have declared my Disapprobation of it : But 
finding that I have been ungenerously accused of a Con- 
duct which reflects both Knavery and Vanity on my Char- 
acter, I can no longer be silent. - - First, I am taxed with 
being privy to the Publication; Charges which, if true, 
would very justly render me the Object of Ridicule : But 
I hope ever to preserve more Honesty, than to put such a 
Deception on the World; and had the Person who signs 
L. M. in the last Gazette, been so genteel as to have fav- 
oured me with a Line or Message, I should very candidly 
have given him the Information I now give to the Public. 

That many Years before Sir Francis Blake Delaval's 

Experiment was tried, I heard from a Gentleman of Vir- 
ginia, that such a scheme had been executed in England; 
and, in the Year, 1760, I had Directions from a Gentleman 
in Philadelphia to have a Chariot built on that Plan; but 
could not find a Coach-maker in London who knew any 
Thing of the Matter - - this first gave me the Thought; 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 59 

and I soon after projected the Plan I lately executed; be- 
ing confirmed in my Design by the Account I read of the 
Experiment tried on Westminster Bridge; But I never 
saw any Thing of the Kind, or even heard a Description 
of it; and my Method may very probably be as different 
from Sir Francis's, as his is from that of which the Vir- 
ginia Gentleman spoke - - indeed the Thing is of so sim- 
ple a Nature, and may be effected so many different Ways, 
that any Person who will give himself the Trouble of 
thinking on the Subject, may readily succeed in the At- 
tempt. - - I sought no Applause on the Occasion, and Sir 
Francis Blake Delaval, L. M. - - or any other, is heartily 

welcome to my Share, if any there is The Safety of 

my Family was what I had principally in View. But the 
Satisfaction I reaped from succeeding in my Projection, 
is considerably abated, by being thus obliged to present 
a State of the Case to the Public, who I hope will indulge 
me with a Pardon for this Intrusion. 

RICHARD WELLS. 
Burlington, Dec. n, 1767. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2034, December 
17, 1767. 

TO BE LET, 

Two valuable and well situated plantations, being at 
Nantuxet, in Fairfield township, Cumberland county, and 
province of West-New-Jersey. - - The one containing 
about two hundred acres of land, sixty acres of the upland 
whereof are cleared, being very good land for corn or any 
sort of grain, and under good fence; there are about sev- 
enty acres of wood land, which is very well timbered ; the 
remaining part thereof is excellent good upland, marsh, 
and salt ditto. There is a dwelling-house on said planta- 
tion, with other conveniencies for plantation business. 



510 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS [1767 

The other is a valuable plantation, situated in the town- 
ship and county aforesaid, being about half a mile distant 
from the aforesaid plantation, containing about two hun- 
dred acres of land, eighty acres of the upland thereof are 
cleared, being under fence, and excellent good land either 
for corn, grain, or upland meadow ; there are about sixty 
acres of wood land well timbered; the remaining part 
thereof is very good upland, marsh, and salt ditto, being 
the best for seeding or mowing in that or the adjacent 
townships. There are on said plantation two dwelling- 
houses, with other conveniencies for the plantation busi- 
ness. 

The above plantations have excellent good wells of 
water before the houses, and likewise good ponds of water 
in the fields, and have an unlimited right of common. 
Each plantation has near one hundred apple trees of ex- 
cellent good fruit, and many peach and pear trees, and dif- 
ferent sorts of fruit, walnuts, &c. in perfection. 

In the creek, whereon the plantations are situated, is 
great plenty of different sorts of fish, and oysters and wild 
fowl in the season. The plantations are contiguous to the 
river Delaware, being as near as the marsh will admit. 
There are tide creeks that put through each plantation, 
near to the houses, where there are four or five shallops 
always attending from said creeks to Philadelphia, when 
weather will permit. The said plantations are distant from 
Cumberland Court-house twelve miles, and from Philadel- 
phia fifty, by land. 

The above plantations may be entered on the first day 
of April next, or sooner, if required. There are on said 
plantations stock of all sorts to be disposed of, likewise 
all sorts of utensils for plantation business. 

Likewise to be disposed of a servant girl's time, who 
has about three vears and a half to serve, understands 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 511 

country and town business well, and not sold for any 
fault, it being only inconvenience to keep her, as her mas- 
ter has left off the plantation business. For further par- 
ticulars inquire of JOSEPH OGDEN, at the Cross Keys, in 
Philadelphia, WILLIAM HEWLINGS, Esq; in Burlington, 
who will shew plans of the land, or of JACOB HEWLINGS, 
on said plantation, who will shew the premises. 

THREE POUNDS REWARD. 

STOLE out of the Box of Peter Neil, in Mount-Holly 
Township, West-New- Jersey, on the i6th Instant, TWEN- 
TY POUNDS, Part in Silver and Part in Paper Money. 

A Woman, who lived in the Neighbourhood, having since 
absconded, is supposed to have taken it. She goes by the 
Name of Margaret Burgess, alias Neil, (having a Certifi- 
cate with her, agreeing with the latter Name.) She is 

a small Woman, about 30 Years of Age, pitted with the 
Small Pox, has long black Hair, and a remarkable Scar 
upon one of her Arms, near the Elbow; had on a striped 
red and white silk Gown, pink coloured Petticoat, white 
Broadcloth Cloak, a whitish Hat with a Ribbon round the 
Crown, Gauze Cap, black Silk Handkerchief, light blue 
Stockings, Leather Shoes, Silver plated Buckles with 
Brass Tongues and Anchors; but as she took sundry 
Cloaths with her, it is supposed she will alter her Dress; 
she was seen to cross the Ferry to Philadelphia, and it is 
thought she is now somewhere in the City. Whoever se- 
cures said Woman, and Money, so that they may be had 
again, shall have the above Reward, paid by 

PETER NEIL. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 50, December 
21-28, 1767. 



512 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

The PUBLIC 

ARE hereby notified, That the Grammar- School, which 
hath hitherto been taught in Elizabeth-Town, is still con- 
tinued; and that, for the better Accommodation of the 
Students, a more commodious Edifice is erected. And in 
order to instruct Youth in the several Branches of the 
Mathematicks, both theoretical and practical, without Det- 
riment to the Students in the Languages, the Masters are 
now joined by Mr. RICHARD DEVENS, late of New- Jersey 
College. The School will be frequently visited by Gentle- 
men of Education in the Town, from whom its Character 
may be known. 

The Terms of Admission are Twenty Shillings En- 
trance, and Five Pounds light Money per Annum. 

Boarding may be had in reputable Families, at Twenty 
Pounds New- York Currency per Annum. Supplement 
to the New York Mercury, No. 842, December 21, 1767. 

To be SOLD, by public VENDUE, 

On the eleventh day of January next, at the dwelling- 
house of William Brown, in Woolwich township, in the 
county of Gloucester, West New-Jersey, at ten of the 
clock in the forenoon, ' 

SUNDRY horses, cows and young cattle, a pair of fat 
oxen, hogs and sheep, a large quantity of good hay, 
rye and indian corn, green rye growing in the ground, a 
variety of farming utensils, such as carts, plows, harrows, 
axes, hoes &c. The remainder of the time of two young 
servant boys and one girl, a wherry with two sails, a large 
quantity of flax and cyder. Also, a variety of very genteel 
houshold furniture. 

And on the same day will be exposed to sale by public 
vendue, a plantation, and tract of land, containing 340 
acres, situate in the township aforesaid, on the river Del- 



1767] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 5 J 3 

aware, opposite Marcus-Hook, about 24 miles from Phil- 
adelphia, very convenient for attending that market, on 
which there is a good dwelling-house, barn and orchard, 
about 50 acres of cleared upland, 70 acres of as good 
meadow, and in as good order, as any in the said county, 
and 40 acres more may be made, being now under good 
bank; the upland may be easily manured with mud. Also, 
one third part of Oldman's creek-island, containing 140 
acres, lying about half a mile from the above, being a very 
convenient range for swine. And 4 acres of cedar swamp, 
full of timber, on the east side of Raccoon-creek, about 3 
miles from the above plantation, being all late the personal 
and real estate of the said William Brown. The condi- 
tions of sale will be made known, at the time and place 
aforesaid, by SAMUEL BILES, JOHN HINCHMAN, and 
SAMUEL BLACK WOOD, Assignees. 

To be sold by private sale, 3 two story brick houses, each 

14 feet front, situate on the south side of Vine-street, be- 
tween Front and Second-street, in the city of Philadelphia, 
which now rent for 50!. per annum. Any person inclining 
to purchase, may know the terms of sale, by applying to 
any of the above assignees, or to Whitehead Jones, at the 
upper end of Market-street, in Philadelphia. 

N. B. The creditors of the said William Brown are 
desired to attend, at his dwelling-house in Woolwich afore- 
said, on the said eleventh day of January next, with their 
several demands against him, that they may be then set- 
tled. 

STRAYED away, the gth instant, a light bay horse, about 

15 and a half hands high, has a bald face, 4 white feet, 
was shod all round, about 6 years old, bred in East Jer- 
sey, near Trenton, and it is supposed will go that way. 
Whoever takes up said horse, and brings him to the sub- 

33 



514 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

scriber, living in Southwark, near the city of Philadel- 
phia, shall have TWENTY SHILLINGS reward, and reason- 
able charges, paid by 

JAMES PENROSE. 

Burlington County, New- Jersey, Dec. 20, 1767. 
RUN away, last Night, from the Subscriber, a Servant 
Lad, named JACOB FOSTER, about 18 Years of Age, of a 
middle Size, with light Hair; had on, and took with him, 
an English Hat, a Claret coloured Coat, newly mended 
under the Arms, a light coloured Drugget Ditto, a striped 
Linen Jacket, a Pair of Leather Breeches, and a Pair of 
Claret coloured Cloth Ditto, a Pair of black, and a Pair of 
grey Stockings, and a good Pair of Pumps. Whoever 
takes up and secures said Servant, so that his Master may 
have him again, shall have Twenty Shillings Reward, paid 
by JOB RIDGWAY 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2035, December 
24, 1767. 

The sloop Peggy, Capt. Stewart for this port from New- 
York, was forced, by the ice, to come to at Marcus-Hook, 
from whence the Captain came by land to town, and in- 
forms, that on the I7th inst. about 20 leagues from our 
Capes, he spoke the brig Charming Sally, Capt. Farrel, 
from New- York, for this Port, all well; and as he came 
up the river, near Reedy Island, he saw a brig and a sloop 
aground, but could not tell who they were. The Pennsyl- 
vania Journal, No. 1307, December 24, 1767. 

ANECDOTE from SMITH'S History of NEW-JERSEY. 

FOUR miles from hence, [Burlington] a recluse person 
who came a stranger has existed alone, near twelve years 
in a thick wood, through all the extremeties of the seasons, 



I 7 6 7 ] 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. $ X 5 



under cover of a few leaves, supported by the side of an 
old log, and put together in the form of a small oven, not 
high or long enough to stand upright or lie extended; he 
talks Dutch, 1 but unintelligibly, either through design, or 
from defect in his intellects, 'tis hard to tell which ; whence 
he came or what he is, no body about him can find out; he 
has no contrivance to keep fire, nor uses any; in very cold 
weather he lies naked, stops the hole he creeps in and out 
at with leaves; he mostly keeps in his hut, but sometimes 



'.i 



i The Pennsylvania Evening Post, of January 31, 1778, announces the 
death, on the 19th of that month, of this singular character, "Francis 
Furgler, the hermit," in his 66th year, who had existed alone twenty- 
five years in a thick wood, about four miles from Burlington, "in a 
cell made by the side of an old log in the form of a small oven, not 
high or long enough to stand upright in or lie extended." It was 
thought he meant by living his secluded life "to do penance for crimes 
committed in his own country, for he was a man subject to violent pas- 
sions." From whence he came or who he was nobody could find out, 
but he appeared to be by his dialect a German, yet he spoke that lan- 
guage imperfectly, either through design or from a defect in his intel- 
lects He was found dead in his cell, with a crucifix and a brass 

fish by his side; and on the 20th he was decently interred in Friends 
burying place at Mountholly." In 1811 there was published a small 
volume, 12mo in form, the type-page only 2 1 / 4x3% inches size, and 
bound in boards, with this title-page: THE HERMIT, \ or an account 
of Francis Adam Joseph Phyle, \ a native of Switzerland, | Who lived 
without the use of fire for upwards | of twenty -two years, in a small 
cave, in the I midst of a wood, near Mount-Holly, in | Burlington 
county, New Jersey; and was found | dead therein, in the year 1780. 
In a series of letters, | from 1 Batlus Hiltzhimer to Melchoir Miller. 
Interspersed with some I Observations of the Author, and Senti- \ ments 
celebrated men. \ NEW JERSEY: I Published by John Atkinson j Print 1 
ed by John Bioren, No. 88, Chestnut- | Street, Philadelphia. | 1811. | 
Pp. 102. A second edition appeared in the same year, with precisely 
the same title-page, except that the name "Batlus" was corrected to 
"Baltus," and the imprint was divided thus: "Printed by John Bioren, 
No. 88, Chestnut-Street, | Philadelphia," and the line "Second Edition." 
was inserted above "New Jersey" in the imprint. The two editions are 
identical down to page 60; beginning with that page the second edition 
has twenty-one lines to the page, instead of twenty, as in the first edi- 
tion, but the lines are identical, the same type having been used. The 
first edition ends with Letter VIII, November, 1780, on p. 102. In the 
second edition this letter ends on p. 99, and there is added a Letter IX, 
December 25th, 1780, pp. 100-108. The writer states that in the spring 
of 1756 Francis appeared in the neighborhood of Mt. Holly, wearing 
the uniform of a French soldier, and totally ignorant of the English 
language. He had dug out a hole under a large white oak, prostrated 
by the storm, in a wood belonging to Joseph Burr, on the road to Bur- 
lington, about four miles from the latter place, and two miles from Mt. 
Holly. This hole or cave was barely large enough for him to stretch 
himself in it. Six or eight weeks after he settled here he told Col. 
Charles Read, through an interpreter, that his name was Francis Adam 
Joseph Phyle; that he was a native of the Canton of Lucern in Switz- 
erland, which he had left on account of some disagreeable circum- 
stances, and went to France; that he came with the French troops to 
Canada, and soon after, becoming disgusted with the life of a soldier, 
left them and came to New Jersey. He seemed to be under great dis- 
tress of mind, occasioned, he said, by a sense of his sins, which ap- 
peared to overwhelm him, and there was some hint of his having killed 
an adversary in a duel. He never used fire, and lived entirely on the 
charity of the neighbors, until his death, in 1778, and nothing more was 
ever learned of his history than above related. 



5l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS 

walks before it, lies on the ground, and cannot be per- 
suaded to work much, nor obliged without violence to for- 
sake this habit, which he appears to delight in, and to en- 
joy full health; when the woods and orchard's affords 
him no nuts, apples, or other relief as to food, he applies 
now and then for bread to the neighbourhood, and with 
this is quite satisfied; he refuses money, but has been fre- 
quently cloathed by charity; he seems to be upwards of 
forty years of age; as to person rather under the middle 
size; calls himself Francis. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, 
No. 51, December 28, 1767- January 4, 1768. 

New-York, December 28. It is said, that the Merchants 
of this Town, trading to the West-Indies, are about ap- 
plying to the Corporation, to pass a BYE-LAW, that no 
White-Oak Hogshead Staves shall be deemed merchant- 
able by the Cullers, but such as are 3-4 of an inch thick on 
the Heart Edge, and four broad, clear of Sap, which we 

hope will restore the Credit of our Lumber 

Indeed the Thing most likely to hurt its Credit is, the 
permitting the Stave-Getters from New- Jersey, and other 
Parts (who have been used to get very ordinary Lumber) 
to work our good Timber. The New York Mercury, No. 
843, December 28, 1767. 

Capt. Kidd informs that the sloop - -, Captain 

Splane, of and for this port, sailed from Georgia about 
three months ago, and it is feared she will never be heard 
of. Captain Kidd, in soundings off our Capes, spoke Cap- 
tain Thornton, in a Sloop from Rhode-Island, for Vir- 
ginia, all well. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1308, De- 
cember 31, 1767. 



INDEX 



INDEX 



Abit, James, carpenter, escaped 

custody, 247. 
Abraham, James, deceased, estate 

of, for sale, 28. 
Absecom, 198. 

beach, brigantine Nancy for 
sale as she now lies on, 352; 
ship Ellis cast away on, 45, 
49, 79, 81: wreck of, for sale, 
119. 

creek, 247. 
inlet. 248. 
Accidents: 

cedar battoe went adrift, 255, 
274. 

died of cold, 252. 

Dilkes, James, children of, 
badly hurt by lightning, 123 ; 
wife of, killed by lightning, 
123. 

drowned, 45, 49, 50, 64, 79, 90, 
263, 310, 364, 365, 394, 428, 
435, 436, 494, 502, 504. 

fatal fall, 111, 252, 322, 330. 

fire, 253; at Woodbridge, 204, 
295; at Lyons Farms, 300; 
at Pilesgrove, 356. 

horses struck by lightning, 
410. 

house struck by lightning, 123. 

killed by horses running away, 
506. 

lighthouse struck by lightning, 
176. 

mill dams carried away. 159. 

sloop loaded with oysters 
sprung a leak in New York, 
278. 

sloop overset, 502. 

sprung mizzen mast. 436. 

stage wagon upset, 504. 

struck by lightning, 381. 

struck dead by lightning, 402, 
408. 

two horses struck dead by 

lightning, 398. 
Accomac county. Va., 222. 
Achquegkenah, 345. 
Acts of the General Assembly 
for the relief of insolvent 
debtors. 11. 13, 16. 19, 21, 
27, 30, 39, 57, 58, 61. 67, 71, 
83, 86. 97, 100, 101, 105, 112, 
114, 115, 120, 140, 142, 143, 
148, 149; to prevent extor- 
tion, by ascertaining the 
rents of houses, prices of 
provision, lumber, and oth- 
er commodities for a lim- 
ited time, 149; appointing 



commissioners for supplying 
the several barracks erected 
in this colony with furniture 
and other necessaries, 161; 
empowering the Justices 
and Freeholders of the 
county of Burlington to pur- 
chase a lot o'f ground, to 
build a new gaol and other 
necessary buildings thereon, 
161; explaining the right of 
voting at town meeting, and 
the elections of township 
officers, 161; for building a 
court house and gaol in the 
county of Middlesex, 161; 
remonstrance against, 178; 
for building and maintaining 
a bridge over the north 
branch of Great Timber 
creek, in the county of 
Gloucester, at Abraham 
Roe's landing, 161; for lay- 
ing out and establishing a 
road from Bergen Point along 
up Newark Bay, and from 
thence to Paulus Hook on 
Hudson's river, 161; for the 
support of government of 
his Majesty's Colony of New 
Jersey, to discharge the 
public debts and contingent 
charges thereof, 161; pre- 
venting the counterfeiting 
of bills of credit, or uttering 
the same knowing them to 
be so counterfeited, 161; to 
amend and further continue 
an act entitled An act for 
the better settling and reg- 
ulating the mflitia of this 
Colony of New-Jersey, for 
the repelling invasions and 
suppressing insurrections and 
rebellions, 161; to repeal an 
act entitled An act for the 
relief of insolvent debtors, 
161; supplementary to an 
act entitled An act for lay- 
ing out a road from Newark, 
in the county of Essex, to 
the public road leading from 
Bergen Point to Paulus 
Hook, on Hudson's river, in 
the county of Bergen, and 
for erecting and establishing 
ferries across the rivers 
Passaic and Hackensack, 
162; for the improvement of 
the navigation of the south- 



520 



INDEX. 



west branch of Ancocas 
creek, 162; to empower the 
Justices and Freeholders of 
the counties of Essex and 
Berg-en to build a bridge 
over Passaic river, near the 
Dutch church, at Acquack- 
anock, 162; to extend cer- 
tain acts of Parliament of 
Great Britain, for the pre- 
serving- all such ships and 
goods thereof which shall 
happen to be forced on 
shore or stranded, 162; to 
lay out a road on the south- 
erly side of Cohansey creek, 
in the county of Cumber- 
land, and to establish a 
ferry across the said creek, 
from the town of Greenwich 
to the said road, 162; to 
prohibit the setting of nets, 
seines and other devices to 
obstruct fish from going up 
in the proper seasons of the 
year, 162; to repair the pub- 
lic roads in the township of 
Hanover, in the county of 
Morris, by a tax on the in- 
habitants of the same, 162; 
to enable the owners and 
possessors of the meadows 
and marshes bounding on 
Delaware river, between 
Long Point and Kilk's 
Hook, in Lower Penn's 
Neck, in the county of 
Salem, to stop out the tide 
from overflowing the same, 
163; to enable the owners 
and possessors of a certain 
body of meadow and marsh, 
lying on the westerly side 
of Raccoon creek, to keep 
up and maintain the banks 
and other water works 
around the same, and to 
constitute all ten foot ditch- 
es thereon lawful fences, 
163; to enable the owners 
and possessors of the marsh 
and swamp lying on the 
south branch of Stow creek 
to maintain the bank, dam 
and other water works 
across the said creek, to 
prevent the tide from over- 
flowing the same, 163; to 
naturalize Jacob Hertel and 
John Jacob Paish, 163; ap- 
pointing commissioners to 
run out straight public 
roads through the Province 
of New Jersey, between 
New York and Philadelphia, 
and empowering them to 
raise a sum of money by a 
public lottery, 256; to ap- 
point commissioners to make 
a division and subdivision of 
the common land belonging 
to the township and precinct 
of Bergen, 302; for dis- 
charging the arrearages due 
to barrack masters, and for 
supplying the King's troops 



quartered in the colony with 
necessaries, 398, 399, 405; 
for investing a fee in the 
toll bridge lately erected 
over Newtown creek, in 
William Gerrard, his heirs 
and assigns, and to em- 
power the said William Ger- 
rard to build a house within 
the bounds of the road, for 
the more convenient receiv- 
ing the toll of said bridge, 
407; for laying a duty on 
the purchasers of slaves im- 
ported into this colony, 407; 
for the support of govern- 
ment of the Colony of New 
Jersey, and to discharge the 
public debts and contingent 
charges thereof, 407; to 
appoint commissioners for 
supplying the several bar- 
racks erected in New Jersey 
with furniture, etc., for ac- 
commodating the King's 
troops in or marching 
through the same, for sup- 
plying deficiencies, etc., 407; 
to empower the inhabitants 
of the townships of Green- 
wich, Deptford and Wool- 
wich, in the county of Glou- 
cester, to repair their pub- 
lic highways by hire, and 
raise money for that pur- 
pose, 407; to divide the 
town of Shrewsbury and an- 
nex parts thereof to the 
towns of Freehold and Up- 
per-Freehold, 407; to pre- 
vent the pasturing the Eliz- 
abeth-Town great meadows 
in common. 407; to restrain 
the bringing certioraries, and 
to alter the mode of deter- 
mining appeals in small 
causes, 407; for barring the 
estate tail in certain lands 
and tenements in the Prov- 
ince of New -Jersey, lately 
belonging to Anthony Sharp, 
the elder, deceased, and also 
for vesting the same in Isaac 
Sharp and Joseph Sharp, his 
grandsons, their heirs and 
assigns, pursuant to an 
agreement made with the 
tenant in tail. 408; for the 
relief of James Brooks. Esq., 
late sheriff of Middlesex, 
with respect to certain es- 
capes, 408; to revive an act 
entitled An act to prevent 
waste from being committed 
upon the common land al- 
lotted to the patent of Sea- 
caucus, in the corporation of 
Bergen, 408. 

Adams, Alexander, servant run 

away from, 166. 
President, appointed Oliver 
Ellsworth Envoy Extraordi- 
nary to France, 222. 
William, lands of, 57. 

Addresses of thanks presented on 



INDEX. 



52J 



the repeal of the Stamp Act, 
249. 
Air furnace for the purpose of 

running iron ore into pig 

metal or castings, 254. 
Albany, 147, 344. 

county of, land to let in the, 
276. 

dock, robbery at, 442. 
Alberson, Captain R., 50. 
Aldbridge, David, land for sale by, 

108. 

Alden, Rev. Timothy, "A Collec- 
tion of American Epitaphs," 
by, 473. 

Alexander, S. W., "Princeton in 
the Eighteenth Century," 
by, 469. 

Allen, Captain, sailed for Belfast, 
25. 

Isaac, assignment to, 15. 

John, debt contracted by, 3. 

Mr., horses belonging to, death 
of, 451. 

Rebeccah, land for sale by, 41. 

William, land for sale by, 249. 
Allen's Town, Allentown, 20, 245, 
246, 469; land for sale near, 
321; land for sale, lying on 
the great road leading from 
Trenton to, 321. 
Allinson, David, 6. 

Elizabeth, 6. 

James, 6. 

Margaret, 6. 

Mary, 6. 

Samuel, Surrogate of New 
Jersey, 6; accused of exact- 
ing extortionate fees, 6; ap- 
plied to by Hugh Doran to 
collect a sum of money, 4; 
attorney and counsellor at 
law, 6; deeds and convey- 
ances left in the hands of, 6. 

Sibyl, 6. 

William, 6. 

Allison, Rev. Francis, D. D., Rob- 
ert McKean studied for the 
ministry under, 472. 

Richard, land of, for sale, 187. 
Alloway's creek, 149, 367, 375, 409, 
411. 

precinct, 412. 

township of, 342, 357. 
Allstine. Johannes, executor 294; 

land for sale by, 294, 340. 
Amboy. 38, 60, 179, 182, 258, 329, 
388, 436, 440; custom house 
at, 45; collector of his maj- 
esty's customs at, 49; bridges 
and mill dams carried away 
by rainfall 159; land near, 
for sale, 177; 28th regiment 
embarks at, 422; regiments 
at, 423; Col. Sir John St. 
Clair at, 424; commanding 
officer at, application to, 425; 
part of regiment quartered 
at, 425; arrival of two com- 
panies of Elizabeth-Town 
from, 434; arrival at, 439; 
road, 245, 450; sloop belong- 
ing to, overset, 502. 
America, 52. 121, 145, 230, 236, 352, 
380, 390, 422, 448, 468, 472; 



agriculture of, 122; friends 
to. 122; friends of. in Great 
Britain, 144; friends in Ire- 
land. 144; sturgeon cured in, 
147; College of New Jersey 
in, 363; merchants trading 
to, 381; propriety of taxing, 
382; people of, 384; Rev. 
Doctor Withe rspoon to em- 
bark for, 386; paper cur- 
rency in, 390, 404; distur- 
bances in, 392; government 
of, 392; independence of, 
414; largest hog ever raised 
in, 504. 

"Americanus," ran in consort with 
George Grenville's "Stamp 
Act," 313. 

American bishops, plan of ap- 
pointing, 473. 

American clergy, 347. 

American lawyers, 244. 

American Stamp-Act, repeal of, 
227. 

Amwell, 64, 139, 174, 286, 327, 359, 
370; land in, for sale, 15, 
105, 170, 175, 327. 
township of, 131, 387; horse 
stolen in, 354; land in, for 
sale, 47, 106, 201, 215, 308, 
436. 

Anacreon, a translation of the 
third ode of, 496, 497. 

Ancocus Brook, land for sale at, 
239. 

Anderson, James, insolvent debt- 
or, 21; confined in Sussex 
county goal, 67. 
James, attorney at law, sketch 
of, 261; notice to persons 
indebted to the estate of, 
261. 

John, administrator, 261. 
John, Judge of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas for 
the countv of Monmouth, 
16, 60 61, 74, 86, 100. 
John, land for sale by, 324. 
Kenneth, administrator, 261. 
Matthew, insolvent debtor, 12, 
301. 

Andover Furnace, 243; land for 
sale near, 286. 

Andrew, Joseph, condemned for 
murder, 262. 

Andrews, Isaac, land for sale 
bounded by land of, 374; in- 
tends to present a petition 
to the House of General As- 
sembly of the Province of 
New Jersey for a law to 
oblige the owners and pos- 
sessors of the meadow and 
swamp lying on Ramboe's 
Run to contribute their pro- 
portionable share in repair- 
ing and maintaining a dam, 
banks, etc., 325. 
John, notice given by, 332; 
sloop's long boat taken up 
by. 463. 

Anen, Anin, Annin, James, hanged 
for murdering two Indian 
women. 160, 165, 183-5. 

Ann. sloop, 89. 



522 



INDEX. 



Anthony, Philip, horse stolen out 
of the stable of, 310. 

Antigua, stamps forced upon the 
inhabitants of, 11; govern- 
ment of, 41; sloop from, 79; 
sloop John and Jane from, 
90; arrivals at, 305. 

Antill, Edward, 473; daughter of, 
473; Rev. Mr. McKean de- 
parted this life at the resi- 
dence of his father-in-law, 
472. 

Isabel Graham, wife of Robert 
McKean, 473. 

Antrum, John, conveyance from, 
5. 

Aquacanack, Aquakanack, land 
for sale situate in, 366; gold 
watch found near, 397. 

Arbour, Joseph, insolvent debtor, 
27. 

Archer, , arrived at South 

Carolina from Salem, 305. 
Benjamin, land for sale now 
in the tenure of, 353. 

Armagh, county of, Ireland, 12. 

Armstrong George, mulatto run 
away from, 267. 

Arnwine, Jacob, fulling mill of, 
for sale, 174; land of, for 
sale, 174. 

Asheron, John, 233. 

Asheton, Ralph, Dr., land for sale 

by, 130. 

John, estate of, 61, 100; in- 
solvent debtor, petition of, 
60, 100. 

Ashton, Edward, runaway bail, 
186. 



Ash -Swamp, 61. 

Assembly of New Jersey, petition 
to be presented to, for an 
act to be passed for draining 
the meadows on Caesarea 
river, 455; petition to, for 
straightening the Passaic 
river, 43; addresses of, to 
Governor Franklin, 158, 404; 
acts passed by, in 1766, 161; 
in 1767, 407; Governor Frank- 
lin's conduct toward, in ref- 
erence to the Stamp Act, 
207; petition to, to make 
part of Delaware river a 
lawful fence, 131. 

Astin, John, insolvent debtor, 301. 

Athawes, Mr., a London merchant, 
40. 

Atkinson, John, title page of book 
published by, entitled "The 
Hermit," etc., 515. 
Philip, 2. 

Samuel, land for sale formerly 
surveyed to, 312. 

"Aurelius, Marcus," article by, 
385. 

Avery, Waightstill, delivers Latin 
oration on late President 
Finley, 218; graduates from 
Princeton College, 219. 

Axtell, Mr., land for sale formerly 
of, 268. 

Axtill William, assignee, land for 
sale by, 102. 

Ayres, Colonel, 77. 

Obadiah, to receive subscrip- 
tions for a new book, 455. 



Back Marsh, Alloway's Creek 
township, petition for main- 
taining a certain bank along 
the, 367. 

Bacon, Jeremiah, one of the own- 
ers of the meadows on Stoe 
Creek. 68. 

Badger, Rev. Moses, missionary 
in the Province of New- 
Hampshire, arrival of, 456. 

Bain, Robert, 358. 

Baker, Jeremiah, fish for sale by, 

148. 

John, 359. 

William, negro purchased 
from, 54. 

Balch, Hezekiah. 219; degree of 
Bachelor of Arts conferred 
upon, 219; conceived plan 
of Greenville College, 220. 
Hezekiah James, degree of 
Bachelor of Arts conferred 
upon, 220. 

Baldwin. Jonathan, steward of 
Prince-ton College, strictures 
on a piece signed "Publi- 
cola," by, 291; "Publicola's" 
reply to, 285, 307. 

Balis, Daniel, 433. 

Ball. David, land for sale on which 

he lives. 307. 
Thomas, land for sale by, 307. 

Ballston, New York, 470. 



Baltick manner, sturgeon cured in, 
226. 

Baltimore county, Md., 4. 

Baltimore, Sons of Liberty of, 77. 
Nathaniel Ramsay practiced 
law in, 469. 

Bank meeting house, Philadelphia, 
28. 

Banks, James, land for sale at the 
house of, 335; horses for 
Newark races to be entered 
with, 397. 

Baptists, nineteen places of wor- 
ship of the, in New Jersey, 
317. 

Baptist church at Piscataway, 224. 

Baptist meeting house in Phila- 
delphia, land for sale nearly 
opposite the, 376. 

Baptist school at Hopewell, the 
first in America for the edu- 
cation of young: men for the 
Baptist ministry, 223. 

Barbados, Barbadoes, 149, 483; ar- 
rivals at, 305, 394, 436; 
stamps forced upon the in- 
habitants of, 11; Bowdich 
arrived at, 357; arrival of 
Edgar at. 475; arrival of 
ship London Packet from, 
493, 497; arrival of Captain 
Cook from, 497. 



INDEX. 



523 



Barber. Colonel Francis, sketch 

of, 469. 
Eliada, executor, land for sale 

by, 201. 
John, executor, land for sale 

by, 201. 

John W., "Historical Collec- 
tions of the State of New 

Jersey," by, 473. 
Samuel, deceased, land of, for 

sale, 201. 
Barberie, John, land for sale by. 

282, 329. 
Barbrie, John, property taken in 

execution at the suit of, for 

sale, 175. 
Barclay, Mr., a London merchant, 

40. 

Bard, Peter, 254; conveyance to, 5. 
Barker, Peter, taylor, runaway 

apprentice, 488. 
Barnagat, Barnegat, 62; schooner 

ashore at. 40. 

Barnhill, John, 125; flying ma- 
chine of, 125, 342, 428; stage 

waggon of, 25, 26. 
Barnes, John, Sheriff of Hunter- 
don county, superseded, 221. 
Lambert, creditors to meet at. 

the house of, 79, 83, 137; land 

for sale by, 130. 
Thomas, land for sale by, 462. 
Barnet, William, conveyance from, 

5. 

Barracks, Perth Amboy, 478. 
Barre, Colonel, 122. 
Barrocloue, Daniel, horse stolen 

from, 466. 

Bartlet, Captain W., 145. 
Basking-Ridge, Baskinridge, 455; 

meeting-house road, land for 

sale near the, 350; meeting 

house, land for sale near, 

377; land for sale lying on 

the. 307. 
Basset, David, assignee, land for 

sale by, 399. 
William, servant ran away 

from, 337. 
Bassett. Davis, land for sale by, 

305. 

Basseterre, West Indies, 299. 
Bates, Elizabeth, 81. 

Thomas, fell from his horse, 

252. 

Battery, Philadelphia, 133. 
Baum, Bartholomew, runaway 

miner, 129, 134; in custody, 

160. 
Baynton, , ship consigned to, 

80. 
Bayard. Mr., claim of, 379; letter 

communicated to the Society 

for Promoting Arts, &c., by, 

58. 
William, commissioner to the 

Stamp Act Congress, 103. 
William, farm to let by, 268; 

land for sale by. 204, 279. 
Beach, Rev. Mr., missionary for 

New Brunswick, arrival of, 

at Boston, 456. 
Bearcroft. Rev. Dr. Peter, letter 

written to, 472. 



Beatie, Isaac, runaway servant, 

281. 
Beaumont, John, conveyance from, 

Beaver- dam brook, land for sale 
situate on, 217. 

Beaver- dam creek, land on, for 
sale, 48. 

Beaver Run, bridge on, 248. 

Beaver, sloop of war, arrived at 
Sandy Hook, 479. 

Beck, John, alleged thief, 151. 

Bedminster, township of, land for 
sale in, 268. 

Beears, Benjamin, insolvent debt- 
or, 301. 

Beekman, Gerardus, 30. 
John, 30. 

Beeman, David, forge for sale by, 
303. 

Beesley, Joseph, escaped custody, 

j Beesly, Morris, 367. 

Begwell, John, 233. 

Belcher, Governor, site of his for- 
mer residence at Burlington 
for sale, 67. 

Belfast, Ireland, 277; sailed for, 
25. 

Bellangee, EVi, land for sale by, 
461. 

Bellows, Barnet, land for sale ad- 
joining the lands of, 327. 

Ben, runaway negro, 195. 

Benedict, Md., 77. 

"Benevolus," article by, 384. 

Benezet, Anthony, letter by, 298. 

Bennet, Adrian, judgment against 

goods and chattels of, 23. 
Captain, 370. 
James, land for sale by, 258. 

Bennit, Abraham, 276. 

Benny, Thomas, 81. 

Bergen, 325; common lands of, 

302, 379; in dispute, 379. 
county, 195, 239, 345; land for 
sale in, 203, 278; courts, 
holding of, 401; attestation 
of the Coroner of, 457. 
township, 267, 304. 

Bergen Point ferry to let, 325; for 
sale, 325. 

Berks county, Pa., 253. 

Bernard, Governor, proclamation 

issued by. 262. 
Mr., a London merchant, 40. 

Bernard's Town, 350. 

Berrien John, lottery commission- 
er, 257; letter from, com- 
municated to the Society for 
Promoting Arts, &c., 58. 
Hon. John, third Justice of 
the Supreme Court of the 
Province of New Jersey, 14, 
15; orders of, 58, 83, 97, 100. 

Beswick, Aaron, conveyance from, 
5. 

Bettering-house. Philadelphia, 
house to let near the, 493. 

Bevers, Robert, 475. 

Bicker, Henry, hatter, 229; house 
of entertainment opened by, 
228. 229. 

Biddle. James, land for sale by. 
284. 



5 2 4 



INDEX. 



Joseph, 2. 

William, jun., conveyance 
from, 5. 

William, and wife, conveyance 

from, 5. 
Biles, Samuel, assignee, land for 

sale by, 513. 

Bill, runaway negro, 99, 141. 
Bills of credit as legal tender, ob- 
jections to, 380. 

Biographical and Genealogical 
Notes: 

Allinson, Samuel, 6. 

Anderson, John, 261. 

Avery, Waightstill, 219. 

Barber, Francis, 469. 

Balch, Hezekiah, 219. 

Balch, Hezekiah James, 220. 

Benezet, Anthony, 296. 

Campbell, Rev. Colin, 188. 

Cowell family, of Trenton, 220. 

Devens, Richard, 469. 

Edmiston, Samuel, 221. 

Ellsworth, Oliver, 221. 

Evans, Rev. Nathaniel, 121, 

Faesch, John Jacob, 163. 

Goddard William, 361, 363 

Hasbrouck, Joseph, 222. 

Hasenclever, Peter, 135. 

Howell. David, 222. 

Jones, Daniel. 223. 

Kennedy, Samuel, 350. 

Lewis, Josiah, 222. 

Livingston, Peter Van Brugh, 
222. 

Martin, Luther, 222. 

MacPherson, John, 222. 

McCalla, Daniel, 222. 

McKean, Rev. Robert, 472. 

Niles, Nathaniel, 223. 

Power, James, 223. 

Ramsay, Nathaniel, 469. 

Schenck, Hendrick, 352. 

Schenck, William, 469. 

Skillman, Isaac, 223. 

Smith, Samuel, 223. 

Smith, William, 223. 

Spencer, George, 347. 

Spring, Alpheus. 223. 

Stockton, Samuel Witham 470 

Stelle, Benjamin, 224. 

Samuel, William, 470. 

Thomson, William, 112. 

Townsend, Micah 224 

Vance, Hugh, 470. 

Van Cleaf, John, 470. 

Wilson, Peter, 348. 

Woodhull, John, 224. 

Woodman, Joseph, 224. 
Bioren, John, printer, book print- 
ed by, 515. 

Birker, Henry, horses to be en- 
tered with, for New Bruns- 
wick races, 210. 

Bishop, Thomas, land for sale near 
Great Timber creek, in the 
tenure of, 396. 
Blackham, Richard, land to let by, 

500. 

Blackler, Captain, arrival of, 436. ! 
Blackman, Andrew, land for sale 

near cedar swamp of, 200. 
Black Point, tavern at, 21. 



Black River 1. 

Blacksmith, 253, 353. 

Blackwood, Hugh, servant ran 

away from, 413. 
Samuel, assignee, land for sale 

by, 513. 

Samuel, Sheriff, 247; land for 
sale by, 209, 234, 276, 375, 396, 
417, 418, 465. 

Blair, Rev. John, John Woodhull 
studied theology with, 224; 
Professor of Divinity and 
Moral Philosophy, 470. 
Rev. Dr. Samuel, 221; President 
and Professor of Rhetoric 
and Metaphysics, 470; de- 
clines Presidency of the Col- 
lege of New Jersey, 506. 
Blazing Star, tavern, 342. 
Blockley, Penn., 249. 
Bloomfield, Moses, Secretary, no- 
tice of the meeting of the 
members of the New Jersey 
Medical Society given by, 

Blue-Point, sloop from, sprung a 

leak, 278. 
Boat for sale, 358; one-half of, 

Bolton and Sigell, assignees of the 
estate of William Clawson to 
meet at the house of, 440. 

Bombay Hook, 446. 

Bond, Elijah, negro ran away 
from, 21. 

Bond's fishery, removal of Edward 
BroadHeld to, 459. 

Bonnell, Samuel, blacksmith, de- 
ceased, 353; notice to cred- 
itors of, 353; land for sale 
in pursuance of the last will 
and testament of, 353. 
Sarah, 354; executrix, land 

for sale by, 353. 
Thomas, 354; executor, 353. 

Books printed, 6, 190, 260, 282, 311, 
385, 399, 454, 490, 492, 503, 
506, 515. 

Borden. James, land for sale by, 

55. 

Joseph, plantation of, in Piles- 
grove, for sale, 55; member 
of the Stamp Act Congress, 
103; Hugh Newell in care of, 
277; subscriptions for the 
Pennsylvania Chronicle re- 
ceived by, 428. 

Richard,- conveyance to, 5; ser- 
vant ran away from, 499. 

Bordentown, 202, 257, 277, 334, 359. 
428; house in, for sale, 188; 
land for sale near, 66, 240, 
321; land for sale at, 241; 
road, 257. 

Born, Anthony, runaway servant, 

318. 
Robert, taylor, 318. 

Boston, 39, 78, 384, 386, 428, 456, 
470, 490; schooner Phoenix 
from, 90; Second Baptist 
church in, 223. 

Boulby. Thomas, part of the sur- 
vey made to, for sale, 312; 
land for sale adjoining the 
lands surveyed to, 437. 



INDEX. 



525 



Boultinghouse, John, estate of, 
301. 

Boulting mills, 15. 

Bound Brook, 160, 229; land for 
sale near, 307, 350. 

Bourns, Anthony, runaway ser- 
vant, 318. 
Robert, taylor, 318. 

Bout creek, meadows adjoining 
the, 122. 

Bowdich. - , arrived at Bar- 
badoes from Salem, 357. 

Bowlby, Bowlsby, John, 221. 
Samuel, 221. 

Bowne, Anna, executrix, land for 

sale by, 164. 
Cornelius, pilot, 64. 
Obadiah, deceased, land of, for 

sale, 164. 

Safety, constable, man arrest- 
ed by, 292. 

Boyd, Hugh, 276. 

Boyde, Daniel, 233. 

Boyle, John, land for sale by, 377. 
Solomon, mill of, land for sale 
near, 35. 

Boys, Nathan, house of, broken 
open. 198. 

Bracken, Henry, runaway servant 
challenged at the house of, 
433. 

Braddock, defeat of, 503. 

Bradford, Messrs., essay to be 
printed by, 205; letter to, 
360. 

Mr., 116; letter to, 125. 
W. and T., letters sent to, to 
be printed in their paper, 
196. 

William, subscriptions taken 
in by, 191, 400. 

Bradford's supplement, 212. 

Braintree, Massachusetts, 223. 

Brandy wine, buoy on the, 446; 
forks of, 56; lower buoy on 
the, 446; lower part of the, 
445; negro men at the mill 
at, 310; rocks, 432; sloop 
up as far as, 498; upper part 
of the, 446. 

Breeding, John, bail ran away 
from, 187. 

Breese. Samuel, executor, negroes 

for sale by, 1. 

Samuel, merchant, subscrip- 
tions taken in by, 190, 275. 
400. 

Brewer, Garrit, insolvent debtor, 

petition of, 142. 
Samuel, goaler, 138. 
Samuel, elected a representa- 
tive for the county of Som- 
erset, 433; election of, con- 
tradicted, 441. 

Brewhouse for sale, 483. 

Briarley's line, 286. 

Brick, John, Wood's Mill long 

time owned by, 352. 
Joshua, 352. 

Brick's Mills, land for sale for- 
merly of, 352. 

Bricksborough, land sold at, 352. 

Bridge-Town, 149. 

Bridgetown, land for sale at. 487. 

Bridgewater, township of, 307. 



Brigen, Mr., a London merchant, 

40. 

Briggs, David, part owner of the 

meadows on Stoe Creek, 68. 

Bright, George, insolvent debtor, 

104. 
James, flat overset belonging 

to, 494. 
Jeremiah, land lately of, for 

sale, 282. 
Brinckerhoff and Co., Derick, 

forge for sale by, 297. 
Brink, Jacobus, insolvent debtor, 
confined in Sussex county 
goal, 67. 

Brinkerhoff, Col. James, 344. 
Bristol, 21, 77, 254, 362, 363; bor- 
ough of, land in, for sale, 41; 
snow Nancy left, 89; vessel 
Thomas and Waddel came to 
New York from, 284; arrival 
of the Ellen from, 463; ar- 
rival of Captain Lawrence 
at, 481; arrival of the snow 
Jersey from, 489. 
British debts, 380. 
British Parliament, 403. 
Broadfield, Edward, carrying on 
the manufacture of sturgeon, 
146; fish for sale by, 148, 
373; sturgeon cured by, 372; 
removal of, 459; orders an- 
swered by, 460. 

Broadway, Warren county, 220. 
Bromely, mills at, for sale, 101. 
Bromley, Mrs., 359. 
Brook. Captain, arrival of, from 

London with letter, 77. 
Brooks. Edward, land for sale by, 

28. 

James, Sheriff, land for sale 
by, 17, 18, 244; late Sheriff, 
land for sale by, 176, 185; 
property for sale by, 195; 
tavern for sale by, 176. 
Mary, eloped, 324. 
Peter, wife eloped from, 324. 
Brown, Abia, mulatto ran away 
from, 3; land for sale by, 
321; grist mill for sale by, 
444. 
Captain, ferry of, land for sale 

near, 304. 

George, goal-keeper, 193, 243, 
416; runaways in the cus- 
tody of, 160. 
John, drowned, 90. 
John, land for sale by, 108. 
Messer, servant ran away 

from, 186. 

Moses, estate of, 100; insol- 
vent debtor, petition of, 100. 
Richard, 2; person wanted 
who understands the busi- 
ness of fulling and dyeing 
cloth, by, 272; fulling mill 
to let by, 443. 
Richard, runaway servant, 

395. 

William, land for sale by, 313, 
366; land, horses, servants 
and cattle for sale at the 
dwelling house of, 512; cred- 
itors of, meeting of, at the 



526 



INDEX. 



dwelling house of, 513; land 

for sale belonging to, 513. 
Brown's mills, 2. 
Brown University, 222, 224. 
Bruderlein, Carl, runaway miner, 

129, 134; in custody. 160. 
Brunswick, 59, 73, 76, 239, 345, 428, 

467; land near, for sale, 70, 

308; land lying on the road 

to, for sale, 177; arrival of 

two companies at Elizabeth- 
Town from, 434. 
landing, 169. 
road, 294; land for sale on 

the, 339. 
Bryan, Mary, runaway servant, 

484. 

William, land for sale by, 435. 
Bryant's, Alexander, runaway ap- 
prentice it is supposed will 

go to, 192. 

Buchanan, Mr., a London mer- 
chant, 40. 
Roberdeau, "Genealogy of the 

McKean Family," by, 473. 
Buck, John, escaped custody, 137. 
Bucks county, 41, 233, 251, 359; 

minister in, 345; part of 

forge in, for sale, 438. 
Budd, Dr. Thomas, land for sale 

by, 435. 
Budde, Thomas, negro formerly 

belonging to, ran away, 195. 
Bulkley, Captain, from Lisbon, 

498. 
Bunton, Israel, pass stolen from, 

80. 

Burges, Burgess, Margaret, com- 
mitted to the goal of the city 

of Perth Amboy, for sus- 
pected theft, 436, 511. 
Burling's-slip, 204. 
Burlington, 2, 4, 6, 28, 41, 51, 56, 

83, 94, 119, 120, 122, 123, 135, 

137, 160, 163, 179, 184, 201, 

210, 212, 223, 225, 242, 246. 

254, 257, 258, 272, 312, 317, 

322, 360, 362, 363, 375, 376, 

389, 391, 392. 402, 409, 426, 

428, 483, 487, 491, 500, 504. 

505, 509, 511. 514; New Jer- 
sey laws printed at, 6; Pre- 
parative meeting, clerk of, 

6; land near, for sale, 66; 

land in, for sale, 67; pass 

signed by the magistrates 

of, 80; pork, 149; pork for 

sale. 447; murder committed i 

at. 158; court held at, 183; 

goal at, 184; missionary at. 

188; Market-house, land for 

sale near, 264; court house. ! 

322; boarding school at, 336; i 

William Franklin's arrival j 

from, 369; General Assem- j 

bly to meet at, 370; arrival 

C 
Cable and anchor taken up, 494. Calf, extraordinary, 378. 



of William Franklin in, 373; 
History of New Jersey print- 
ed at, 385; arrival from, 
394; Supreme Courts held 
at, 401; land for sale at, 
414; mission of, 415; stran- 
ger existing for twelve years 
alone in thick wood near, 
514; death of Francis Furg- 
ler, the hermit, near, 515; 
house to let opposite meet- 
ing house at, 504. 
county, 2, 55, 66, 67, 79, 80, 
91, 94, 124, 130, 131, 158, 165, 
210, 242, 276, 280, 283, 325, 
356, 359, 391, 393, 396. 420 
429, 487, 514; gentlemen in, 
123; court held in and for, 
149; land for sale lying in, 
264, 314, 439, 465; courts, 
holding of, 401; Indian 
squaws murdered in, 391; 
extraordinary sleeper at, 128. 
road, 257, 515; land for sale 
situate on the, 319. 

Burnes, William, pocket books 
stolen from, 246. 

Burnet, Henry, conveyancer, 1; 

land for sale by, 1. 
Dr. William, chosen President 
of the Medical Society in 
place of Dr. McKean, 485. 

Burnt meadows for sale, 329. 

Burr, Aaron, defended by Luther 

Martin, 223. 

John, conveyance from, 5. 
John, junior, insolvent debtor, 

79. 
Joseph, wood belonging to, 515. 

Burrough, Samuel, junior, land for 
sale by, 194. 

Burroughs, Abit, apprentice ran 

away from, 192. 
Jacob, land for sale by, 305; 
land for sale of the estate 
of, 399. 
John, 359. 

Joseph, innkeeper, creditors 
of Nathan Chamless (Cham- 
bers) to pay their debts at 
the house of. 342, 357. 

Burt, Joseph, degree of Bachelor 
of Arts conferred upon, 220. 

Burwell, Joseph, insolvent debtor, 
65. 

Bushwick, L. I., 352. 

Business carried on in New Jersey 
without stamps, 40. 

Bustill, William, conveyance to, 5. 

Butcher wanted, 374. 

Bute, Lord. 209; influence of, 206. 

Butterworth. Joseph, property for 
sale taken in execution at 
the suit of, 242. 

Buzby, John, deceased, property 
of, for sale, 234. 



495. 

Caesarea river, 455, 471. 
Caldwell, Dr. Joseph, to receive 

subscriptions for new book, 

455. 



Callender, Captain, from St. Kitts, 

498. 

William, insolvent debtor, 45. 
Calvin. John, insolvent debtor, 27. 
Cambden, Lord, 122, 144. 



INDEX. 



527 



Cameron, John, confined in goal, 
486; stolen horse sold by. 
486. 

Campbell, Captain, arrived at Phil- 
adelphia, 64. 

Colin, Rev. Colin, death of, 
188; interred in Burlington 
church, 188. 

George, land of, for sale, 176. 
James, 359. 

Malcolm, land taken in execu- 
tion at the suit of, for sale, 
176. 

Mr., petition of North Ameri- 
can merchants to Parlia- 
ment, for repeal of Stamp 
Act, enclosed by, 84. 
Philip, note given to, 164. 

Camron, John, meeting at the 
house of, 11. 

Canada, 39, 222; stamps forced 
upon the inhabitants of, 11; 
French troops to, 515. 

Canawaka, Md., runaway Dutch- 
man served his time in, 479. 

Canoe-brook, 358. 

Canton of Lucern, in Switzerland, 
native of, 515. 

Cape-Henlopen, light house to be 
built at, 445. 

Cape-Hinlopen, 89. 

Cape May, 77, 78, 113, 276, 370; 
letter from, 77; wreck near, 
89; brig Polly anchored off. 
245; runaway apprentice, 
born at, 281, 337; pilot from, 
310; William Schenck set- 
tled at, 470. 

county, 137, 151, 276; Circuit 
Court for, 91; Sheriff of, 
137; courts, holding of, 402. 

Carey, John, land for sale by, 268. 

Carlisle, England, 334. 

Carll, Henry, insolvent debtor, 
petition of, 106. 

Carmichael, John, married daugh- 
ter of Dr. Blair, 221. 

Carnes. Richard, goaler, 436. 

Richard, junior, assignee, 45. 

Carney, Thomas, manager, 122. 

Carolina, 40. 

Carolina shingles, 149. 

Carpenter, 137, 247. 

Carr, Captain, 77, 78. 

Carroll. Captain, 422. 

Casco-Bay, Me., 262. 

Casdorp, Henry, land for sale by, 

Case, Catherine 220. 

Castles. Captain, 283. 

Catherine, Indian woman, mur- 
dered, 183. 

Cato, negro man, 54, 55. 

Cato. runaway negro, 159, 463. 

Cattle for sale, 491, 512. 

Cedar battoe went adrift, 274. 

Cecil county, Md., 202. 

Chalybeate waters, near Glouces- 
ter, 360. 

Chambers, Mr., a London mer- 
chant. 40. 

Nathaniel, deceased, notice to 
persons indebted to the es- 
tate of, 357. 



Chamless, Nathaniel, deceased, 
notice to persons indebted 
to the estate of, 342. 

Chandler, Rev. Dr. Thomas Brad- 
bury, 473; degree of Doctor 
of Divinity conferred upon, 
at the University of Oxford, 
95; rector of St. John's 
church, in Elizabeth Town, 
"An Appeal to the Public in 
Behalf of the Church of 
England in America,' by, 
490 

Change Water forge, servant man 
ran away from, 370, 464. 

Charles, runaway negro, 413, 427; 
now in custody, 419. 

Charleston. Pa., church at, pastor 
of, 222. 

Charlestown, Mass., 469. 

Charles-Town, Charlestown, Char- 
leston, S. C., 54, 260, 321; 
Lord Hope to spend the win- 
ter at, 260; brig Philadel- 
phia Packet from, 321. 

Charlton, London, maker of stolen 
watch, 371. 

Chase, Caleb, degree of Bachelor 
Judge Samuel, 223. 

Chatham, New London, Pa., 472. 

Chattin, Abraham, horse Raven 
kept by, 94. 

Cheever, Jonathan, degree of 
Bachelor of Arts conferred 
upon, 220. 

Chesequakes creek, 60. 

Chester, Gloucester county, 209, 
419; flat overset near, 494. 

Chester, Pa., 413. 

county, Pa., 107, 186. 223, 245, 
250, 365, 472; horse stolen 
out of, 249; land for sale 
situate in, 456. 

township, 325; land for sale 
situate in, 440, 465. 

Chesterfield. 359. 

Chester Town, Md., 145. 

Chestnut grove for sale, 480. 

Child, James, deceased, land of, 
for sale, 200. 

Child and Stiles, persons indebted 
to, 200. 

Chrismon, Charles, runaway ser- 
vant, 171. 

Christ church, Philadelphia, Rev. 
Nathaniel Evans interred in, 
483; Robert McKean married 
at, 473. 

Christeen ferry, Del., 432. 

Christine creek, Del., negro men 
blown out of, 310. 

Chronicle, Pennsylvania, subscrip- 
tions received for, 428. 

Church lottery tickets, disposition 
of, 134. 

Churches and meeting houses in 
New Jersey, number of, 317. 

Circuit Courts, holding of, 91, 402. 

Clark, Abraham, Sheriff, 368. 

Clark, Abraham, jun., lottery 
commissioner, 257; lottery 
tickets to be had of, 258. 
Captain, 463. 
Charles. 359. 
Elijah, land of, for sale, 200. 



INDEX. 



Jeffery, house to be let by, 

354. 

Mr., a London merchant, 40. 
Richard, 87. 

Samuel A., "History of St. 
John's Church, Elizabeth 
Town," by, 473. 
Timothy, house to be let by, 
354. 

Clarke, Abraham, Tertius, insol- 
vent debtor, notice given to 
the creditors of, 285. 
Benjamin, servant ran away 

from, 395. 
Jabez, supoosed horse thief, 

44. 
John, conveyance from, 5. 

Clawson, Jonathan, negro ran 

away from, 154. 
William, assignees of the es- 
tate of, to meet at the house 
of Bolton and Sigell, 440; 
land for sale by, 229; per- 
sons having demands against 
the estate of, 385. 

Clayton, Joseph, mulatto ran 

away from, 3. 

William, Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas for the 
County of Hunterdon, orders 
of, 27, 34, 35, 56, 66, 105, 116. 
130, 136, 138, 140, 145, 148; 
petitions granted by, 57, 83. 

Clement, Jacob, charges paid by, 

187. 

Robert, insolvent debtor, pe- 
tition of, 18. 

Samuel, assignee, land for sale 
by, 492. 

Clopper, Cornelius, negro ran 
away from, 99; negro form- 
erly belonging to, ran away, 
141. 

Close, John, receives the degree of 
Master of Arts, 222. 

Cloth stolen, 151. 

Cloths for sale, 183. 

Clymer, Daniel Cunyngham, de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts 
conferred upon, 220. 

Coal, Ezekiel, 359. 

Cock, David, jun., insolvent debt- 
or, notice given to the cred- 
itors of, 34 

Codmes, George, land for sale by. 
325. 

Coenties market, New York, 49. 

Coffee House in New York, 191, 
275, 400. 

Coffler, Mr., bought a whale, 194. 

Cohansey, 276, 285, 356, 428; ex- 
tract of a letter from, 464. 
Bridge, 250, 273; creditors to 
meet at. 140; vessel to, 151; 
Circuit Courts for the county 
of Cumberland held at, 351. 
creek, 471. 

Cohockin road, 417. 

Cold Spring land for sale, 312. 

Cole, James, drowned, 494. 

William, Under Sheriff, sus- 
pected runaway committed 
to jail by, 481. 

Cole's Church, land near, for sale, 
193. 



Cole's Town, land in, for sale, 194. 

Coles, Kendal, watch stolen out of 
the house of, 371. 

Collet, Thomas, land for sale by, 
389. 

Ceilings, Richard, apprentice ran 
away from, 432. 

Collins, Isaac, new edition of the 
laws of New Jersey printed 
by, 6. 

Columbia College, New York, 348. 

Combs, John, executor, land for 
sale by, 29. 

"Companion for the Young People 
of North America," pros- 
pectus of, 454. 

Computation of the number of 
inhabitants in each colony 
and proportion of duties 
which might be raised in 
each, 154. 

Comray, General, 122. 

Coney Island, 278; whale swim- 
ming near, 194. 

Coney, Owen, 475. 

Conger, John, suspected runaway, 
committed to jail, 481. 

Congress, one hundred pounds 
bequeathed to, if they would 
settle at Lamberton, 220. 

Connecticut, 221, 223, 384, 428; 
colony of, 11, 383; tanner 
of, 90; commissioners from, 
103; pork, 149; council of, 
member of, 221; stolen horse 
sold in, 486; pursuing meas- 
ures for lessening their for- 
eign imports, 491. 

Connecticut Farms, horse to be 
let at, 334. 

Connelly, Patt. 359. 

Conner. , escaped custody, 

252. 

Connor, David, 488. 

John, drowned, 494. 

Conover's, John, land for sale 
near. 199. 

Consiglio. Francis, broke goal, 259. 

Continental Congress, 222; be- 
quest to, 220; delegate to, 
221. 

Cook, Aybal, notice given by, 332. 
Captain, 498; arrival of, 493, 

497. 

Molly, 359. 

Nathan, yearly rent charge 
now in the occupation of. 
for sale, 376. 
Samuel, missionary, 472. 

Cooper, 28, 104. 

Cooper, Daniel, land for sale by, 

296. 

Daniel, Sheriff, 417. 
David, 6. 
Jacob, executor, 377; land for 

sale bv, 376.. 
Jane, 32*2. 
John. 6. 
Martha, 6. 

William, negro run away from, 
150; land for sale by, 376; 
deceased, persons indebted 
to the estate of, requested 
to make speedy payment, 
376; deceased, land for sale 



INDEX. 



529 



in pursuance of the last will 

and testament of, 376. 
William, executor, 377. 
Cooper's creek, 53; land for sale 

situate on, 353. 
Cooper's ferry, 173, 194; land near, 

for sale, 20, 85, 193, 296, 465; 

house to let near, 354; stage 

waggon to, 499. 
Cooper's shop for sale, 15. 
Goosey, William, negro taken up 

belonging to, 166. 
Copper mines in New Brunswick, 

part of, for sale, 349; part 

of Peter Ten Eick's for sale, 

349; at Rocky Hill, 457; at 

Wallpack, for sale, 438. 
Corn, 217. 

Cornbury, Lord, 181. 
Cornee's mill pond, land for sale 

lying at the head of, 329. 
Corneliuson, Cornelius, part of the 

estate of, for sale, 95. 
Cornell, Simon, land for sale by, 

264. 

Cornforth, Captain, 406. 
Cornish, Charles, confined in the 

Burlington county goal, 272. 
Corser, John, Captain, drowned, 

90. 

Corwine, George, 175. 
Coryell, Abraham, propery late of, 

for sale, 226. 
George, 226. 
Coryell's ferry, for sale, 226; part 

of a forge for sale near, 438. 
Cottnam, Abraham, Ebenezer 

Cowell studied law with, 

221. 
Count, John, suit against the 

goods and chattels of, 339. 
Couper, Henry, 20. 
Courly, Abraham, runaway ser- 
vant now in custody, 225. 
Coursey, William, negro man be- 
longing to, committed to 

Burlington goal, 505. 
Court of Common Pleas for the 

County of Burlington, Judg- 
es of, 137-8. 
Court of Common Pleas for the 

County of Hunterdon, 27, 148; 

Judges of, 130, 136, 139, 140. 
Court of Common Pleas for the 

County of Middlesex, 68, 71, 

401. 
Court of Oyer and Terminer held 

at Newark. 237. 
Court house in Gloucester, house 

to let near, 354. 
in Elizabeth- Town, land for 

sale near the, 211, 234; house 

to let next to, 338. 
at Hackensack, trustees of 

Queen's College called to 

meet at, for organization, 

343. 
in Newark, creditors to meet 

at the, 142. 
in Trenton, creditors to meet 

a! the, 140. 
road. 74. 
Courtland. Manor of, land for sale 

in the, 329. 

34 



Covenhoven, Isaac, assignee, 301, 

302. 
John, executor, land for sale 

by, 37. 
William, deceased, land of, for 

sale, 37. 

Cow for sale, 435, 438. 
Coward, John, deceased, land for 
sale lying between the plan- 
tations of, 324. 
Cowell, David, 220, 222; sketch of, 

221 

David, Rev., 220. 
Ebenezer, 220; sketch of, 221. 
Eunice, 220. 
John, 220; Surgeon of Militia, 

220. 

Joseph, 220. 
Mary 220. 
Sally,' 220. 

Cox, John, land for sale by, 92; 
John, subscriptions for the 
Pennsylvania Chronicle re- 
ceived by, 428. 
John, juii., assignee, 214; land 

for sale by, 438. 
Richard, innholder, creditors 
to meet at the house of, 140. 
Thomas, 190; committed to 
goal at New Brunswick, 189. 
Coxe, Daniel, lottery manager, 
257; lottery tickets to be 
had of, 258; land acquired 
from, 328; land for sale op- 
posite to, 333. 
John, land for sale by, 55. 
Moses, land for sale bounded 

by lands of, 374. 
Richard, creditors to meet at 

the house of, 136. 
William, 7, 8; resigns as 
Stamp Distributor for New 
Jersey, 6, 9, 10, 197, 208, 213; 
letter to, 7. 
Coyn, Thomas, committed to goal, 

376. 
Craigue. John, land of, for sale, 

323. 

Cranbury, 229, 322, 385, 440; land 
for sale near, 229; saw mill 
for sale lying near, 297; fatal 
fall at, 330. 

mills, land near, for sale, 62. 
town, land for sale near, 294. 
Crane, Stephen, Judge of the Es- 
sex county Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas, 29. 
Crapper, Levin, slave run away 

from, 453. 

Crawford, John, Constable, Irish- 
man escaped from, 52. 
William, innkeeper, horse sto- 
len from, 365. 
Creighton, Hugh, 475. 
Cresy, William, hatter, runaway 

apprentice, 477. 
Crimes: 

broke goal, 19, 89, 104, 138, 
197, 227, 242, 258, 259 262 
357, 368, 416, 466. 
counterfeiting, 26, 27, 33, 64, 

92, 97. 121. 456. 
escaped bail. 215. 
escaped from custody, 52, 137, 



530 



INDEX. 



138, 155, 247, 252, 277, 440, 

464. 
escaped from custody, 52, 155, 

247, 252, 277, 440, 464. 
felony, suspected, 292. 
grand larceny, 357. 
homicide, 394. 
horses stolen, 44, 120, 233, 237, 

249, 250, 310, 354, 365, 378, 

393, 443, 466, 473, 481, 486. 
manslaughter, 265, 271, 356. 
misdemeanor, 357. 
murder, 73, 76, 81, 86, 88, 93, 

120, 158, 160, 163, 165, 183, 

262, 263", 265, 271, 391, 449, 

458, 459, 460, 474, 477, 478, 

486. 

petti-augre stolen, 76. 
rescue of prisoner, 292. 
robbery, 88, 92, 151, 185, 246, 

333, 355, 357, 422, 442, 444, 

511. 

suicide of a murderer, 477. 
theft, 80, 119, 151, 250, 334, 511. 
watches stolen, 260, 371. 
Croane, Mary, runaway servant, 

432, 433. 
Croffts, William, horse belonging 

to, 53. 
Crokatt Mr., a London merchant, 

40. 

Crooked Billet wharf, Philadel- 
phia, 119; fish for sale near, 

145. 

Cross Keys, Philadelphia, 511. 
Cross Ledge, Delaware bay, 446. 
Crosswicks, land for sale near, 



240, 321: horse struck by 
lightning at, 410. 
creek, land for sale on, 240. 

Crosswix, 94. 

Crow, Samuel, deceased, land of. 
for sale, 1"7. 

Cruger, John, commissioner to 
Stamp Act Congress, 103. 

Crusee, Henry, insolvent debtor, 
100. 

Oubberly, William, property taken 
in execution at the suit of, 
for sale, 175. 

Cuff, runaway negro, 154. 

Cuff, murders his master, 474, 477. 

Cumberland, Duke of, toast to 
memory of, 144. 

Cumberland county, 40, 94, 133, 
140, 151, 166, 233, 234, 260, 
273, 277, 341, 351, 352, 359. 
381, 455, 466, 475, 495; land 
for sale situate in, 318, 351, 
471; land to be let in, 509; 
courts, 40, 91, 342, 351; ex- 
tract of a letter from, 165; 
goal, broke out of, 466. 

Cunniff, Luke, 359. 

Cunningham, Captain, arrived off 

Sandy Hook, 244. 
Samuel, admitted to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, 
469. 

Curtis. Francis, admitted to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts, 
469. 

Cuyler, Henry, deceased, estate of, 
for sale, 369. 



Dailey, George, runaway servant, 
123. 

Dalbo, Peter, drowned, 310. 

Dally, Rev. Joseph W., "Wood- 
bridge and Vicinity," by, 
473. 

Dalrymple.' Hon. Colonel, arrival 
of, 479. 

Dalton, James, money stolen by, 
334. 

Damage by rains, 160. 

Daniel, Rebecca, part owner of 
Stoe Sreek meadows, 68. 

Daniels, Joseph, suspected coun- 
terfeiter, committed to Tap- 
pan goal, 64. 

Darby Town, Pa., land for sale 
situate in, 456. 

Darley, George, 128. 

Dartmouth, Lord, 122. 

Daucus or wild carrot, growth of, 
431. 

Davies. Rev. Samuel, funeral ser- 
mon on, 261; succeeded by 
the Rev. Dr. Samuel Finley, 
167; Sermons on the Most 
Useful and Important Sub- 
jects, adapted to the Family 
and Closet, by the, 260, 388. 

Davis. , master, 252. 

David, escaped bail, 215. 
Gabriel, land and cattle for 
sale at the house of. 291: 
land for sale late of the es- 



tate of, 396; real and per- 
sonal estate for sale lately 
belonging to, 492. 
John, suspected counterfeiter, 
committed to Tappan goal, 
64. 

John, Rev., pastor of the 

Second Baptist Church in 

Boston, succeeded by Isaac 

Skillman, 223. 

Josiah, jun., insolvent debtor, 

petition of, 132. 
Lewis, land for sale by, 456. 
Davis's mills, horse stolen near, 

473. 
Davison, George, insolvent debtor, 

45. 

John, insolvent debtor, 301. 
Dawiess, William, lan'd for sale 

adjoining the lands of, 327. 
Day, Charles, deceased, land of, 

for sale, 53. 
J., letter from, 77. 
R., letter from, 77. 
Thomas, land for sale by, 423. 
Dayton, Elias, assignee, 39". 275; 

tavern to be let by, 75. 
Jonathan, Doctor, land for 

sale by, 307. 
Dead-River, land for sale bounded 

by, 350. 
Deal, Captain, sailed for South 

Carolina. 25. 
Deal board, 149. 



INDEX. 



531 



Deal joist, 149. 

Deal plank, 149. 

Debert, Mr., a London merchant, 
40. 

Debow, John, land for sale by, 
304. 

De Cow, Isaac, conveyance to, 5. 

Dedrix, Johannes, tavern keeper, 
land for sale at the house 
of, 304. 

Deep creek, 367. 

Deer creek, Md., 220. 

Degnar, Peter, runaway servant, 
now in custody, 225. 

Delaval, Hon. Sir Francis Blake, 
Knight of the Bath, experi- 
ment with new phaeton, 
tried by, 506. 508. 

Delaware, 170, 227, 387, 464; gov- 
ernment of, 316. 
bay, 137; land for sale bound- 
ed by, 318; commissioners 
appointed to fix buoys in, 
445; sloop John drove out 
of, 493. 

county, petition of the gov- 
ernment of, 103. 
river, 1, 31, 131, 216, 217; drift 
wherry taken up in the, 341; 
landing, road to, 35; land 
near, for sale, 48, 106, 308; 
land situate on, for sale, 67, 
122, 202, 209, 226, 232, 305, 
312, 314, 325. 365, 374, 376, 
399, 436, 513; land for sale 
near landing on, 95. 

Delaware squaws in the county of 
Burlington, murder of, 160, 
165, 183-5, 391. 

Delong, John, watch delivered by. 
into the hands of Edward 
Doughty, 215. 

Demarest, Johannes, Coroner of 
the county of Bergen, extra- 
ordinary attestation of, 457, 
458. 

Denck, Simon, runaway miner, 
129. 134; in custody, 160. 

Dennis, Captain, 411. 

Henry, shipwright, will not 
pay a bond he has given, 
252. 

John, apprentice run away 
from, 477. 

Denniston, Arthur, insolvent debt- 
or, petition of. 71. 

Denormandie, Dr., to receive con- 
tributions toward new air 
furnace, 254. 

Denton, John, apprentice ran 
away from 430. 

Deptford township. 135, 153, 374, 
414; land for sale situate 
in, 465. 

Devausnee, Dr. John, land for sale 
formerly belonging to, 366. 

Devens. Richard, schools in New 
York and New Jersey taught 
by, 469; admitted to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts, 
469; graduated at Prince- 
ton, 469; schoolmaster, 512. 
Dewees, William, jun.. servant 

ran away from, 489. 
Dick, runaway negro, 396. 



Dick, Samuel, servant ran away 
from, 318. 

Dickenson, Captain, 487. 

Dickinson, John, 103; John Mac- 
Pherson read law with, 222; 
author of the celebrated 
"Farmer's Letters," 222. 

Dilkes, James, farmer, house of, 
struck by lightning, 123. 

Dillwyn, William, .engine for sale 
by, 317; land for sale by, 
483. 

Dividing creek, land for sale 
bounded by, 318. 

Doak, Rev. Samuel, 220. 

Dolick, John. 359. 

Dolton, William, runaway ser- 
vant, 337. 

Dominica, arrival of, 422. 

Donaldson, Arthur, executor, 373; 
water lot and wharf for sale 
by, 373. 

Hannah, executrix, 373. 
James r notice to persons in- 
debted to the estate of, 373. 

Donegal, Presbytery of, Hezekiah 
James Balch licensed by. 
220. 

Donham, Isaac, one-half of boat 
for sale by, 338. 

Doran, Hugh, 4. 

Dorchester, Mass., 220. 

Dorchester county, Md., 272. 

Dornheim, Germany, 233. 

Dorrell, John, 359. 

Dorset, Captain, sailed for Lisbon. 
25. 

Dorsey, Benedict, merchandise for 

sale by, 447. 

John, erected air furnace at 
Mount Holly. 254. 

Doty, Moses, land for sale for- 
merly lived upon by, 350. 

Doughty, Edward, watch deliv- 
ered into the hands of, 215. 
Edward, carpenter, escaped 
from the sheriff, 464. 

Dover. Del., 31. 

Dowell, William, horse strayed 
from, 91. 

Downey. John, 189. 

Doyle, Darby, servant ran away 

from. 358. 

Patrick, runaway, reward of- 
fered for committing to 
goal. 186. 

Drake. Nathaniel, to receive sub- 
scriptions for a new book, 
455. 

Driver, Captain, arrival of, 445. 

Drummond, William, 233. 

Dry goods for sale, 202. 

Duane, James, lawyer, land for 
sale by, 269. 

Dublin, Ireland, 186, 225, 376. 

Du Bqis, Rev. Jonathan, minister 
in Bucks county, Pa., 345. 

Duche, Jacob. Justice of Philadel- 
phia. 127. 

Duck creek. Md., 145. 

Duck Island, Pa., 131. 

Duff, Michael, horses to be en- 
tered with, for New Bruns- 
wick races, 442. 
Mr., postmaster, subscriptions 



532 



INDEX. 



for the Pennsylvania Chron- 
icle received by, 428. 

Duffield, George, married daugh- 
ter of Dr. Blair, 221. 

Duffle, Edward, 360. 
Elizabeth, 360. 
William, 360. 

Duke of Cumberland, toast to the 
memory of the, 144. 

Dummer, Martha, conveyance 
from, 5. 

Dumond, Henry, deceased, land 
for sale belonging to the ; 
late, 339. 

Peter, executor, land for sale 
by, 340. 

Dumont, Henry, deceased, land 
belonging to the estate of, 
for sale, 294. 

Peter, executor, 294; land for 
sale by, 294. 

Dunagan. Johanna, runaway ser- 
vant girl, 51. 

Duncan, David, committed to 
goal, 92 ; committed to goal 
in Philadelphia, 97. 
J., 436, 440. 

Dunham, Azariah, lottery com- 
missioner, 257. 



Elijah, house of, 12; innkeep- 
er, land for sale at the house 
of, 18; assignee of Peter 
Ten Eick, 45; horses to be 
entered with, for Perth Am- 
boy races, 71; creditors of 
insolvent debtors to meet at 
the house of, 68, 115, 143. 

Dunn, Micaiah, executor, land for 
sale by, 411. 

Durck, John, runaway miner, 129, 
134. 

Durham furnace, 233, 359. 

Durlandt, Altia, appoints James 
Anderson her attornev, 261. 
John, 261. 

Duryea, Captain, murder of, 262. 

Dutch Calvinists, twenty - one 
places of worship of the, in 
New Jersey, 317. 

Dutch Lutherans, seven places of 
worship of the, in New Jer- 
sey, 317. 

Dutchess county, 486. 

Dye, Teunis, 345. 

Dye house for sale, 46. 

Dyer, Eliphalet, commissioner 
from Connecticut to Stamp 
Act Congress, 103. 



Eacrit, James, servant sold to, 
225. 

Eagle, The, transport ship, 406, 
411. 455, 460. 

Eagle Island, 367. 

Eagle Point, meadow bank to be- j 
gin at, 367. 

Eakin, Samuel, receives the de- 
gree of Master of Arts, 222. i 

East Florida, 134. 

East New-Jersey, 12, 22, 52, 63, 
71, 130, 303", 319: horse bred 
in, strayed, 513; Proprietors 
of. 474. 

East Nottingham, 186. 

Easton, Pa., 233. 

Eaton, Rev. Isaac, school of, 223. 

Eckley, Peter, horse stolen be- 
longing to, 365. 

Eddy. James, assignee, 135, 201. 

Edgar, arrival of from Salem, 475. 

Edinburgh, 364, 377; letter from 
a gentleman in, 386; Rich- 
ard Stockton invited to din- 
ner by the Lord Provost of, 
377; the freedom of the 
city of, conferred on Rich- 
ard Stockton, 378. 

Edmiston, John, supposed runa- 
way servant, taken up and 
put in Trenton goal. 193. 
Samuel, degree of Bachelor of 
Arts conferred upon, 220. 

Edwards, Daniel, runaway ser- 
vant, 259. 

John, drawing of highway lot- 
tery to be conducted by, 257. 
Jonathan, President of the 
College of New Jersey, 470. 
Jonathan, junior, Professor of 
Languages and Logick, in 
the College of New Jersey, 
470. 



Egdon, Captain, 49, 79. 

Sampel Richardson, master, 
50. 

Egg Harbour, 240, 488; schooner 
ashore at, 50, 484; sloop cast 
away near, 79; schooner 
Phoenix ashore near, 90; 
shingles, 149; sloop from, 
252; brigantine Nancy for 
sale near, 353; cabin of a 
sloop belonging to, robbed, 
442; sloop, report of rob- 
bery of a, 444. 
road, land for sale lying on, 

township, land for sale lying 
in, 249. 

Egg Island, Delaware bay, 446. 

Elder, Captain, arrival of, 387. 

Eliot, Massachusetts. 223. 

Elizabeth. Borough of. 16, 334, 426. 
449: goal in. 368. 

Elizabeth-Town, 16. 24, 35. 37, 38, 
39, 40, 75. 132. 182, 194. 203. 
204, 211. 224. 237. 244. 258,275, 
285. 295. 306, 341, 394, 423. 
428, 455, 473. 481, 502, 503: 
land in, for sale, 96, 152; 
land for sale near, 307; post 
road from, 16; tavern to let 
in, 75; missionary of. 95: 
grist mill at the foot of. for 
sale. 152; grammar school 
at. 227; boat 263; fire at, 
300; house to be let in. 338; 

freat meadows of. 341; man 
nocked overboard near. 394; 
body of a man found near, 
394; two companies of sol- 
diers, arrival of, at. 434; 
races at. 461; academy at, 
conducted by Francis Bar- 
ber, 469; grammar school in, 



INDEX. 



533 



still continued, 512; Stamp 
Act disregarded in, 40; riot 
of officers of 28th Regiment 
at, 423. 
road, 257; land for sale lying 

on the, 423. 
country road, lands lying on 

the, for sale, 319. 
Point, land for sale near, 377. 

Elk river, Md., 433. 

Ellen, The, transport ship, 463. 

Elmer, Theophilus, Sheriff of 
Cumberland county, negro 
taken up by, 166; servant 
ran away from, 278; pris- 
oner escaped from, 466. 

Ellis, - , Captain, 282. 

Daniel, 123; land for sale by, 
242 ; to receive contributions 
toward air furnace, 254; 
manager of highway lottery, 
257; lottery tickets to be 
had of, 258; fire engine to 
be sold by, 317; trustee, 
land for sale by, 427; as- 
signee, land for sale by, 440. 

Ellis, ship, wrecked on Absecom 
beach, 45, 49, 50, 81, 119. 

Ellison, James, land for sale by, 

66, 295. 

Joseph, land for sale by, 66. 
Samuel, assignee, 287. 

Ellsworth, Oliver, graduates from 
Princeton College, 220; ap- 
pointed Envoy Extraordi- 
nary to France, 222. 

Elopements. 124. 130, 133, 149, 264, 
312, 324, 356, 429, 434. 

Elsenborough, 357. 

Elton, Anthony, conveyance from, 

5. 
Revell, conveyance to, 5. 

Elves, Mrs. tavern keeper at 
Woodbridge, 38. 

Ely, George, land for sale by, 202; 
property for sale taken in 
execution at the suit of, 226. 

Ely Town, arrival of Captain 
Lawrence from, 481. 

Emens. Benjamin, land for sale 
by, 332. 

Emly, John, land for sale by, 329. 

England. 31, 79. 99, 121, 235, 238, 
346, 347, 390, 414, 448; im- 
ported from, 52; book pub- 
lished in, 340; divine of the 
Church of, extracts from the 
works of, 409; 17th, 28th and 
46th regiments embarked 



on board transport destined 
for, 422; scheme similar to 
Sir Francis Blake Delaval's 
experiment executed in, 508. 

English church, Burlington, land 
for sale near, 92, 326. 

English's creek landing, 66. 

English grass, 32. 

English meeting house, New 
Brunswick, land for sale 
facing the, 293. 

Ennall's ferry, Md., 272. 

Episcopalians, twenty-one places 
of worship of the, in New 
Jersey, 317. 

Erasmus Academy, Jamaica, L. I., 
348. 

Erwin, John, 2. 

Essex county, 16, 29, 43, 61, 112, 
132, 142, 237, 324, 331, 358; 
inhabitants of, petition for 
straightening the Passaic 
river, 43; land for sale in, 
329; courts, 61, 401. 

Europe, 145, 337. 

"Eusebhis," article signed, sent to 
the nrinter of the Pennsyl- 
vania Chronicle, 317. 

Evans, Agent Henry Francis, 
ships under the command 
of, 406. 
Rev. Nathaniel, death of, 475, 

482; sketch of, 483. 
Samuel, absconded, 210. 

Eve, Adam, land for sale now in 
the tenure of, 349. 

Everat, John, land for sale by, 305. 

Everson, Nicholas, executor, land 
for sale by, 29. 

EVerton, Nicholas, plantation of, 
60; executor, land for sale 
by, 60. 

Eves, Mary, executors of, con- 
veyance from, 5. 

Evesham, 210; land in, for sale, 

91, 420. 

township, 356; land in, for 
sale, 54, 55, 242. 

Ewing, Walter, 356. 

Exchange, rise of, 380. 

Exchange, New York, 455; meet- 
ing held at, 58; Freeman's 
New York Almanack printed 
and published at the, 503; A 
Companion for the Young 
People of North America, 
printed and published at 
the printing office opposite 
the, 506, 507. 



Fagan, Daniel, runaway servant, 
438. 

Fagg's Manor, Pa., 221. 

Fairneld, 381; lad struck by light- 
ning at, 381; oxen killed by 
lightning at, 381; township, 
land to be let in, 509. 

Falls meeting house (Trenton), 
3GO. 

Farmat, Mr., race won by horse 
belonging to. 373. 

Farmer. Brook, subscriptions for 
the Pennsylvania Chronicle 



received by, 428. 
Farming utensils for sale, 438. 
Farms to let. 267. 275, 457. 
Farrel, Captain, 514. 
Fast Island, 367. 
Fast, extraordinary. 449. 
Fauquier county, Virginia, Heze- 

kiah Balch taught school in, 

219. 
Fenimore, Joseph, assignee, land 

for sale by, 440. 
Ferguson, David, notes given by, 

164; servant belonging to, 



534 



INDEX. 



committed to workhouse of 
the city of Philadelphia, 173. 

Ferries: 

Bergen Point, 325. 
Captain Brown's, 304. 
Christeen, 432. 
Cooper's, 20, 85, 193, 376. 
Cooper's. William, 234, 296, 

322, 499. 
Correal's, 170. 
Coryell's, 202, 226, 354. 
Horn's, 202. 
Howell's, 15; land for sale 

near, 437. 

Old, Philadelphia, 376. 
Sprowles's, 328. 
Trenton, 130. 322. 

Ferry for sale, 325. 

Ferry to let, 325. 

Ferry boat for sale, 150. 

Ferry house for sale, 226. 

Ferry house road, 257. 

Field, Robert, Indian ran away 
from, 393; negro ran away 
from, 396. 

Finley. Rev. Dr. Samuel, book by, 
190, 274; pastor of Presby- 
terian church in Nottingham 
in Pennsylvania, 168; per- 
sonal estate of, for sale, 171; 
deceased, President of the 
College of New Jersey, 166. 
167, 218, 219, 274, 386; John 
Witherspoon elected in the 
room of, 364; a Sermon on 
the Death of Mr. Davies, 
by, 388; funeral sermon 
preached by, 261; a select 
collection of practical dis- 
courses, on a variety of im- 
portant subjects, together 
with some pieces already 
published, by, 399; Latin 
oration on, 218. 

Finn, Mrs. Elizabeth, widow, ne- 
gro sold to, ran away, 195. 

Finney, Letitia, 472. 

Fire engine, with suction pipe, for 
sale, 317. 

Fire insurance office, example set 
by the directors of the, 322. 

Firth. John, servant ran away 

from, 484. 

William, runaway servant, 
committed to Gloucester 
county goal, 172, 193. 

Fish for sale, 148, 372, 373. 

Fish, method to keep for two 
years in the hottest climate, 
459. 

Fisher, Charles, murdered, 81, 87. 
Hendrick, signs petition of 
Stamp Act Congress to Par- 
liament, 103; trustee of 
Queen's College, 345. 
Michael. 411. 

Fitzhugh, Colonel William, servant 
belonging to. committed to 
goal. 172, 193. 

Fitzrandolph, Joseph, executor, 
land for sale by, 411. 

Flatman, 305. 

Flax, 217. 

Fleming. Samuel, land of, for sale, 
105; property of, for sale, 



106; land in the possession 

of, for sale, 174; tavern 

house in the possession of, 

for sale, 174; property late 

of, for sale, 175. 
Flood, Francis, runaway servant 

man, 80. 
Florida, 40. 

Flour of mustard for sale, 447. 
Flower, Samuel, land for sale by, 

233. 
Flying machine, 125; kept at 

Philadelphia and at the 

Blazing Star, 342. 
Footman, Richard, reported that 

ship Ellis was driven ashore 

on Absecomb Beach, 50. 
Ford, Ebenezer, 87; house kept 

by, 87. 

Grace, conveyance by, 261. 
Jacob, 359. 
Jacob, jun., servant ran away 

from. 438; Sheriff. 227, 253. 
Samuel, conveyance by. 261. 
Forges for sale, 232, 296, 303; part 

of, 438. 
Forker, John, Irishman absconded 

from, 210. 
Forman, Ezekiel, grist mill of, for 

sale, 54. 
Joseph, land for sale bounded 

by mill pond formerly of, 

450. 
Samuel, assignee, 69; servant 

ran away from, 434. 
Stephen, land for sale by, 229; 

assignee, 385, 440. 
Fornication, punishment of, in 

East Jersey, 298. 
Forster, James, 285. 
Fort, body of Matthew Robeson 

taken up at the, 436. 
Fort Edward, land to let near, 

275, 276. 
Fortescue, , apprentice, 

drowned. 90. 
Fortescue's Island, 446. 
Foster, Jacob, servant run away 

from, 514. 
William, married daughter of 

Dr. Blair, 221 
Foue, William, petition of, 27; 

creditors of, 27; insolvent 

debtor, confined in the goal 

of Trenton, 27; notice given 

to creditors of, 27. 
Found small bundle of paper, 81; 

gold watch, 397. 
Fow, Catherine, eloped 264. 

Matthias, yeoman, 264; wife 

of, eloped, 264. 
France, 515. 
Francis, a hermit, living in thick 

wood for twelve years, 516. 
Francis, brig, drove ashore, 486. 
Franklin, Ohio. 470. 
Franklin and Hall, notice to debt- 
ors of, 123. 
Franklin, Benjamin, 122, 209, 211, 

380; accused of proposing 

and promoting the Stamp 

Act, 206-209; ordination rec- 
ommended by, 347. 
William. Captain General, 

Governor and Commander- 

in-Chief of the Province of 



INDEX. 



535 



New Jersey, 51, 94, 209; 
proclamation by, 50, 92; let- 
ter of, 208; answer of, 212; 
copy of a note from Hon. 
Charles Read to, 212; con- 
troversy with William Hicks, 
361, 362, 363; General Gage 
sets out for house of, 482; 
address of the Assembly to, 
157; visits Philadelphia, 369, 
373; speech of, to the Leg- 
islature, 389; address by the 
Council to, 155, 402; answer 
to address by the Council 
of, 404; addresses of the 
Legislature to, 398; his re- 
ply, 399; ex-officio trustee 
of Queen's College, 345; let- 
ter of the Earl of Shelburne 
to. 382; address of the As- 
sembly to, 404. 

Pranklyn, Mr., a London mer- 
chant, 40. 

Frazee, Jonathan, Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas for 
the County of Middlesex, 
order of, 113. 

David, insolvent debtor, con- 
fined in Essex county goal, 
61 ; assignment of the estate 
of, 61; creditors of, notice 

fiven to, 61; petition of, 
12. 

Frederick, black horse, 52. 

Freehold, 22, 52, 69, 224, 302, 323, 

359, 434, 450; court house 

at, land for sale near, 62; 

Mattisonia grammar school 



in, 261, 415. 
township of, 71, 172. 
Freeman, New York Almanack 

by, 503. 
French, George, 20. 

Joseph, land for sale by, 74. 
Philip, 345. 
French burr millstones for sale, 

249. 

French indigo for sale, 306. 
Fresh Ponds, 297; land for sale 

lying at the, 258. 
Fresh-Water, New York city, man 

thrown out of cart near the, 

111. 

Friends' school in Burlington, 6. 
Friends' burying place at Mount- 
holly, body of Francis Furg- 

ler, the hermit, interred in, 

515. 

Fromstone, William, 35. 
Fry, Thomas, servant ran away 

from, 171. 
Fuetter, Emory, negro ran away 

from, 145. 
Fuller, 151. 368. 

Fullerton, James, runaway ser- 
vant, 489. 
Fulling mill, 10; for sale. 46, 174, 

299, 319; to let, 443; cloth 

stolen out of, 151. 
Furgler, Francis, the hermit, 515. 
Furman and Hunt, boats of, at 

Philadelphia, 3. 
Furman, Jonathan, land for sale 

by, 286. 
Moore, 3, 364; land for sale 

by, 46, 286, 333. 



G- 



Gabbit, Colonel, 16th Regiment 
under command of, 406. 

Gach, Thomas, Judge of the Court 
of Common Pleas for Mid- 
dlesex county, 12; petition 
of insolvent debtors to, 68; 
order of, 71; creditors to 
meet at the house of, 71; 
application to, 114. 

Gadson, Christopher, commission- 
er to Stamp Act Congress, 
103. 

Gage, General, with his aides-de- 
camp, sets out for New Jer- 
sey and Philadelphia, 474; 
sets out for Governor Frank- 
lin's, at Burlington, 482; 
attends funeral of Col. Sir 
John St. Clair, 503. 

Gaine. Hugh, negro ran away 
from, 153; to receive sub- 
scriptions for a book, 455; 
article sent to, to be pub- 
lished, 467. 

Gallahan, John, runaway servant, 
56. 

Gallahon, Cornelius, runaway mu- 
latto. 499. 

Galloway, James (Joseph), 207. 
Joseph. 212; an extract of a 
letter from, to Dr. Frank- 
lin, 211. 

Gallows erected in Elizabethtown, 
for the first oerson taking 
out stamped paper, 36. 



Gardiner, Captain, 90. 

Gardner, Richard, Judge of the 
Inferior Court of Common 
Pleas of Sussex County, or- 
der of, 18. 
Thomas, conveyance from, 5. 

Garret, Charles, broke goal, 368. 

Garrick, Samuel, 116. 

Garrigues, Samuel, clerk, 120, 121, 
127. 

Gass Daniel, runaway servant of, 
'56. 

Gedess. Prudence, repudiates note 
signed by her, 133. 

Geisinger, Charles, runaway ser- 
vant, 409, 412. 

Gentleman's Magazine, 506. 

George the Third, Sons of Liberty 
declare their loyalty to, 42, 
63, 65, 108; celebration of 
birthday of. 144; address of 
thanks to, 227. 

George's road, near Cranbury, 
land for sale lying on, 293, 
294. 

Georgia, 11, 40; settling- of, 383; 
sloop sailed from, 516. 

Germantown, Moravian boarding 
school at, 483. 

Germany, 233, 234. 

Gerrard, William, act vesting fee 
in toll-bridge in. 408. 

Gibbons, Thomas, D. D., poem by, 
261; discourse on the death 
of Mr. Davies, together with 



536 



INDEX. 



an elegiac poem to the 
memory of Mr. Davies, by, 
388. 

Giles, Captain, 90. 

Rev. Mr., drowned, 90. 

Gill, John, house in the possession 
of, to let, 306. 

Gillcrease, James, shoemaker, 
runaway servant, 499. 

GilHland, William, merchant, 12. 

Gilljohnson. John, land for sale 
by, 420. 

Girl lost, 431. 

Glasco, runaway negro, 250. 

Glasgow, Scotland, 364. 

Glasgow, runaway negro. 273. 

Glasshouse in Alloway's creek 
precinct, 409; servants ran 
away from, 459, 479. 

Gloucester, 52, 121, 209, 234, 255, 
276, 354, 360, 374, 388, 417, 
418, 459, 499; town bounds 
of, 20; flat overset near, 50; 
sturgeon cured at, 372; 
drowned near, 428; congre- 
gation of, 483; land for sale 
situate near, 492. 
county of, 20, 50, 54, 85, 107, 
123, 135, 150, 153, 171, 173, 
18/, 192, 193, 198, 199, 200, 
210, 215, 234, 247, 260, 283, 
284, 286, 305, 306, 312, 325, 
351, 353, 365, 371, 376, 388, 

399, 411, 413, 414, 432, 447, 
465, 512; land in, for sale, 
199. 295, 431, 461, 491; land 
to let in the, 500; courts of, 
91. 342, 351, 401. 

road, 417; land for sale situ- 
ate on, 492. 

township, 306, 491; land for 
sale situate in the, 199, 396. 
480, 491. 
Goddard, William, editor, 298, 361, 

400, 409, 495. 
Godolphin, Lord, 52. 

Godfrey, Edward, absconded, 366 
runaway servant, 394. 

Goetschius, Rev. J. H., minister at 
Hackensack, 345, 346; gram- 
mar school to be opened un- 
der the direction and inspec- 
tion of, 69. 

Rev. M., minister at N. Palts, 
344. 

Goldsmith. Oliver, 121, 483. 

Gold watch found, 397. 

Goodhue, Captain, 422. 

Goodridge, Captain, 387. 

Goods for sale. 133. 

Goods stolen, 131. 

Gordon, John, committed to Bur- 
lington goal, 201. 
Thomas, broke goal. 368. 

Gosling, David, assignee of John 
Cowlay, 45. 

Goslins, David, assignee of Pat- 
rick O'Hanlon, 45. 

Gould, Alexander, servant ran 

away from, 245. 
William, servant ran away 
from, 245. 

Gouverneur, Abraham, land for 
sale by, 204. 

Gowens, John, wrecked, 89. 



Graeme, Dr. Thomas, land for sale 
by, 41. 

Graham, Charles, letter to, 77. 
John, creditors of, 29; insol- 
vent debtor, confined in the 
common gaol of the borough 
of Elizabeth, 29; estate of, 
30. 

Grain, 171, 201, 217; destroyed by 
heavy .rainfall, 159. 

Grammar school, design to open 
one at Hackensack, 69; tui- 
tion and board for, 70. 

Grandine, Samuel, 359. 

Grant, Robert, land in the pos- 
session of, for sale, 226. 

Gravelly Run, Great Egg Harbour 
township, 200; road, 199. 

Gray, , Captain, West Jer- 
sey, 255. 

Great Britain, 236, 344; the Par- 
liament of 122, 382; fogs of, 
414. 

Great Egg Harbour, 215, brig 

Nancy drove ashore at, 40; 

land on a branch of, for 

sale, 199. 

river, 389; land on, for sale, 

199, 431, 461, 492. 
township, 388 land in, for sale, 
198, 199, 200, 247, 418, 461. 

Great Oyster creek, land for sale 
bounded by, 318. 

Great road, land on, for sale, 107, 
492. 

Great Timber creek, land for sale 
on, 296, 492; land for sale 
situate on the north branch 
of. 396; forks of, grove for 
sale situate in the, 480. 

Great Tinicum, 209. 

Green, Richard, land for sale near 
land surveyed to, 286, 438. 

Greenman, Rev. Mr., 411. 

Greenville College, plan of. con- 
ceived by Hezekiah Balch, 
220. 

Greenwich, 24, 75, 267, 428. 495, 
forge, run away from, 462. 
township of, 48, 81, 192, 210, 
286, 341; land for sale in, 
104, 232, 283, 284, 438. 

Greenwood, Mr., a London mer- 
chant, 40. 

Grenades, The, stamps forced up- 
on the inhabitants of, 11; 
sloop sailed from, 240. 

Grenville, George, concerned in 
projecting and forwarding 
the Stamp Act, 206. 

Grey, William, 306. 

Griffing, William, 455. 

Griffis, David, insolvent debtor, 
301. 

Griggs, John, assignee, 45. 

Griggs Town, 23. 

Grigstown, farm and mill to be 
let at. 457. 

Grime, Margaret, 132. 
Robert, hatter, 132. 

Grist mills. 1, 10, 15, 23, 306, 309, 
319, 323, 352, 410, 421. 450; 
for sale. 21. 22, 23. 45, 47, 
53 58, 69, 92, 96, 105, 152, 



INDEX. 



537 



194, 216, 239, 279, 283, 299, 
308, 320, 443; land for sale 
near a good, 480; to let, 58. 
Griswold, Joseph, land for sale by 
order of, 450. 



Grubb, Mr., servant ran away 

from, 170. 
Guest, Henry, article by, sent to 

Mr. Gaine to be published in 

his paper, 468. 



Hack, runaway negro, 389. 

Hackensack, land for sale near 
the town of, 278; land for 
sale in the town of, 369; pre- 
paratory schools at, 69, 292, 
347, 348, 355; first meeting 
of trustees of Queen's Col- 
lege to be held at, 345; mur- 
ders at, 457, 459, 460; mur- 
derer burnt at, 477. 

Hacket, Elizabeth, administrator, 

243. 

John, deceased, persons in- 
debted to the estate of, de- 
sired to make immediate 
payment, 243. 

Richard, 475; servant ran 
away from, 385, 386. 

Racket's, country leading to, 188. 

Hackinsack creek, land for sale 
near, 304. 

Hackinsack river, navigation on, 
stopped, 341; murder in 
house at, 459, 460. 

Haddonfield, 183, 187, 354, 381, 475; 
remains of Rev. Nathaniel 
Evans. M. A., brought from, 
475, 483. 

Hagard, Ebenezer, subscriptions 
for book received by, 275. 

Haight, Captain, 411. 

Haines, Ephraim, land for sale by, 

465. 

Hannah, land for sale by, 86. 
Job, land for sale by, 465. 
Richard, conveyance from, 5. 

Haight. Mr., postmaster, subscrip- 
tions for the Pennsylvania 
Chronicle received by, 428. 

Haley, John, degree of Bachelor 
of Arts conferred upon, 218, 
220. 

Half-Moon, above Albany, 147. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, 428; sloop 
of war Beaver arrives from, 
479. 

Hall and Sellers, printers, letter 
to, 505. 

Hall, Clement, death of negro wo- 
man belonging to. 357. 
David, Smith's History of 
New Jersey to be delivered 
by, 282, 311; letter to, 483. 
John, D. D., of Trenton, 220. 

Hallsey, Silas, tavern, grist mill 
and land for sale by, 152. 

Halsey. Silas, land for sa'le by, 96. 

Halsted, Benjamin, gold and sil- 
ver smith, 204. 

Matthias, gold and silver 
smith, 204. 

Halter, Martin. 409; servants ran 
away from, 413. 

Hamilton, Alexander, 81; pre- 
pared for college under 
Francis Barber, 469. 

Hamman, Jack, negro man, com- 



mitted to Burlington goal, 
505. 

Hammers, etc., for sale, 204. 

Hampton, Capt. J., 240, 258. 
John, master, 502. 
Jonathan, Judge of the Infer- 
ior Court of Common Pleas 
for the Countv of Essex, 
orders of, 16, 61, 112, 132, 
142; petition presented to, 
114; tavern to be let by, 75; 
land for sale by, 244. 
William, 215. 

Hamton, William, plantation of, 
for sale, 69. 

Hanbury, Mr., a London mer- 
chant, 40. 

Hanby's creek, meadows adjoin- 
ing the, 122. 

Hancock, John, 278. 

William, 57; intends making 
application to the General 
Assembly for an act for the 
more effectual keeping up, 
supporting and maintaining 
the tide banks, dams and 
sluices on the south side of 
Alloway's creek, 57. 

Handcock. Sarah, 475. 

Hanes, Jases, insolvent debtor, 
petition of, 100. 

Hanged for murder and theft, 185. 

Hankinson, James, land for sale 

by, 311. 

Kenneth, land for sale by, 311. 
Peter, land for sale by, 255; 
notice to persons indebted 
to. 255. 

Hann, Mark, insolvent debtor, 139. 

Hannaball, runaway negro, 145. 

Hannah, Indian woman, mur- 
dered. 183. 

Hannaly, Richard, runaway ser- 
vant. 386. 

Hanney, Alexander, 40. 

Hanover, Morris county, 252, 435; 

land for sale at, 434. 
Church road, 252. 
county Va., academy estab- 
lished in, 222. 

township, Burlington county, 
393. 

Hanover-Square, London, 455. 

Hansman, Christopher, servant 
ran away from. 173. 

Harbour, Garret, runaway ser- 
vant, 434. 
Joseph, estate of, 301. 

Hardenberg, Rev. Jacob Rutse, of 
Rariton, 345. 

Hardy, John, broke goal, 368. 
Gov. Josiah. address to. 472. 

Harker, Ahimaaz, "A Companion 
for the Young People of 
North America," by, 506. 
Samuel, negro ran away from, 



538 



INDEX. 



413; negro in custody be- 
longing to, 419. 

Harkies, Capt. John, 260. 

Harriman, William, land for sale 
by, 96; tavern, grist mill 
and land for sale by, 152. 

Harriot packet, The, near Sandy 
Hook, 439; Peter Hassen- 
clever, passenger on, 439. 

Harris, Dr. Jacob, subscriptions 

for book received by, 455. 
John, wife eloped from, 312. 
Mary, eloped, 312. 
Mr., a London merchant, 40. 
Nathaniel, junior, land for 
sale by, 472. 

Harrison, Captain, 321. 

Mr., a London merchant, 40. 
Samuel, Judge of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas for 
the County of Gloucester, 
11; order of, 59. 

Harry, runaway slave, 452; sus- 
pected murderer, 457. 

Hart, Daniel, murdered by his 
negro, who also attacks his 
master's son, and then com- 
mits suicide, 474. 
John, land for sale by, 284, 
352; executor, 342, 358; mer- 
chant, 284, 352. 

Nicholas, runaway servant, in 
custody, 419. 

Hartshorne, Esek, 292. 

Hugh, tavern to let by, 21. 
John, tavern to let by, 21, 28. 
Robert, 292, 431. 

Hartford, Conn., 221. 
county, Md., 220. 

Hasbrock. Col. Abraham, 344. 

Hasbrouck, Jacob, graduated from 

Princeton College, 469. 
Joseph, graduated from Prince- 
ton College. 220. 

Hasenclever, Peter, 345; miners 
ran away from, 129, 135; 
runaway servant of, in cus- 
tody, 160; men employed at 
works of, 463; passenger on 
the Harriot packet, 439. 

Hasset, John, 81. 

Hatton. John, 81; Collector of 
Customs, dispute over a cer- 
tain negro boy sold by, 494, 
502. 

Haw. William, conveyance to, 5. 

Hawkins, William, escaped pris- 
oner, 277. 

Hay, 15. 29, 47, 171; destroyed by 
rainfall, 159. 

Hay creek, drowned out of a flat 
at, 436. 

Hayes. James, land for sale by, 
312. 

Hay ley. Mr., a London merchant, 
40. 

Haynes, Joseph, indicted for mis- 
demeanor, sentenced to re- 
ceive 39 lashes. 357. 

Haynes's Neck, land for sale in, 
247. 

Hazard. Ebenezer. subscriptions 
for books received by, 191, 
275. 

Heard, Capt. Nathaniel, 38; house 



to be let by, 38; horse racing 
near, 338; race won by his 
bay horse, 461. 

Hegeman, Adrian, executor, land 

for sale by, 191. 
Benjamin, servant ran away 

from, 82. 
Denice, executor, land for sale 

by, 191. 
Dolley, deceased, property of, 

for sale, 191. 

Dolley. executor, land for sale 
by, 191. 

Height, Joseph, servant ran away 
from, 123. 

Hemp, 32, 217, 435. 

Henderson, John, land for sale by, 
324. 

Hendricks, John, negro ran away 
from. 463. 

Hendrickson, William, negro ran 
away from, 368. 

Henry, Samuel, assignment to, 14, 
15; negro ran away from, 
30; servant ran away from, 
214. 

Henry's, Mr., letter for John Moore 
at, 359. 

Hereford Bar, snow Nancy wreck- 
ed on, 77, 78, 89, 113; the 
Three Brothers ashore on, 
370. 

Hermit near Mt. Holly, death of, 
515. 

"Hero," horse, to be let, 334. 

Herrey, Joel, horse sold to, 486. 

Herring, Col. Abraham, 344. 

Hert, Nicholas, cooper, drowned, 
428. 

Heslet, Moses, graduates from 
Princeton College, 220. 

Hess-Durmstadt, 233. 

Hess, William, conveyance to, 5. 

Hetfield Abner, reported to have 
killed a whale, 194; report 
contradicted, 203. 

Hewes. Joseph, runaway servant, 
172. 

Hewling's creek, land for sale sit- 
uate on, 421. 

Hewlings, Abraham, trustee, land 

for sale by, 427. 
Jacob, land to be let by. 511. 
William land to be let by, 
511. 

Hibernia Furnace, land for sale 
near. 303. 

Hick, William, subscriptions for 
the Pennsylvania Chronicle 
received by, 428; tavern 
taken by. 429; meeting of 
the Medical Society to be 
held at the house of, 471, 
485; Sign of the College tav- 
ern taken by, 486; corre- 
spondence with Gov. Frank- 
lin, 361. 362, 363. 

Hicks, Daniel, drowned, body 
found at Point-no-Point, 
436. 

Hickson. Josenh 175. 

Hide's Town. 'William M'Dermott 
came from. 334. 

Hider, Captain John, land for 
sale near, 306. 



INDEX. 



539 



Higby, Joseph, land for sale by, 
330. 

Higgins, Jonathan, 16. 

Hildeburn, Charles R., sketch of 
Colonel Sir John St. Clair, 
Bart., by, 503. 

Hillier, John, negro ran away 
from, 165. 

Hilman, Joab, servant lad ran 
away from, 173. 

Hinchman, James, executor, land 

for sale by, 287. 
John, 55; assignee, land for 
sale by, 513. 

Hinds, Stephen, jun., horse stolen 
from, 481. 

Hinlopen, Cape, 89, 445. 

History of New Jersey, by Sam- 
uel Smith, 282, 298. 311. 

History of Medicine in New Jer- 
sey, and of Its Medical Men, 
by Dr. Stephen Wickes, 301. 

Hoff, Charles, land of, for sale, 
46; insolvent debtor. 56. 

Hoffman, Col. Matthias, 344. 

Nicholas, land for sale by, 
229; assignee, 385, 440. 

Hog, largest ever raised in Amer- 
ica. 497, 504. 

Hogeland, Hannah, 359. 

Holland, brig bound for, 396; 
treaty negotiated with, 470. 

Holland. John, escaped from cus- 
tody, 52. 

Hollingshead, Jacob, watchmaker, 
window of, broken, 357. 

Hollowan. Isaac, apprentice ran 

away from, 488. 
John, apprentice ran away 
from. 488. 

Holman. Mr., killed a whale, 203. 

Holme. John, horse to be let bred 
by, 334. 

Holmes, Joseph, land for sale ly- 
ing between the plantations 
of, 324. 

Holmes's bank, meadows to join, 
455. 

Holt, John, letter to inhabitants of 
the Province of New Jersey 
from. 239; letter to, 176; 
strictures on a piece signed 
"Publicola" sent to, 287; 
article sent to. to be printed 
in his paper, 379. 

Home Island. 367. 

Honduras, the snow Julius Caesar 
of. in distress. 487; Bay of, 
brig bound from the. 396. 

Hooglandt. John, representative 
for the county of Somerset, 
deceased, 433; representa- 
tive elected in the room of, 
441. 
Hooper. R. L., land for sale by, 

315. 

Hope. Lord Charles. 260. 
Hopewell, 66, 187, 223, 462; murder 
committed in. 474; land for 
sale situate in. 471. 
township. 94. 133. 
Hopewell, Daniel, land for sale by, 
92; property for sale late of, 
242. 

Hopper, Samuel, deceased, land 
to be sold pursuant to the 



last will and testament of, 
286. 

Homer, John, conveyance to, 5. 
Samuel, creditors to meet at 
the house of, 101; land for 
sale at the house of, 176; 
tavern to let occupied by, 
201. 

Horses drowned, 504; death of a 
number of, 451; for sale, 62, 
102, 106, 311, 438, 512; hav- 
oc among the, 464; stolen, 
513; contrivance for sud- 
denly detaching from a car- 
riage, 506, 508. 
Horses of pedigrees: 
"Dodsworth," 335. 
"Ferdinand," 346. 
"Fire-tail," mare, 52. 
"Frederick," 52. 
"Golden Lock," mare, 52. 
"Greyhound," 335. 
"Hero," 334. 
"Hobgoblin," 52. 
"Matchien," 335. 
"Old Hautboy," 335. 
"Old Sterling." 335. 
"Partner," 335. 
"Roebeck," 67. 
"Saup," 335. 
"Slipby," 334. 
"Young Sterling," 334, 335. 
"Wastle Turk." 335. 
"White Turk," 335. 
Horse breeding, 52, 67, 82, 94, 334, 

344, 346. 
Horse racing. 70. 146, 209, 323, 338, 

373. 397, 441, 442, 461. 
Horseneck, Essex county, 43. 
Horton, Dr. Jonathan, subscrip- 
tions for book received by, 
455. 
Rev. Mr., land for sale near 

meeting house of, 423. 
Hosier, , arrived at Barba- 
dos. 394. 
Levi. master. 442; robbed, 

444. 
Hoskins, John, land for sale by, 

312. 

Hough, Mr., 121. 

Houses for sale. 41, 75, 188, 275, 
279, 313, 314, 325, 435, 513; 
to let, 38, 41, 75, 245, 267, 
306. 325. 337, 354, 493, 504. 
House of Commons, petition to 
the, for repeal of Stamp Act, 
103. 

House of Lords, 144; petition to, 
for repeal of the Stamp Act, 
103. 

Household furniture for sale. 426. 
Houshill, "William, horse stolen 

from, 354. 
How, Micajah. Sheriff, land for 

sale by. 226. 
Samuel, mulatto servant man, 

ran away. 138. 
Howard, General, 122. 
Howe, Henry. "Historical Collec- 
tions of the State of New 
Jersey," by, 473. 

Howell Benjamin, deceased, ne- 
groes of, for sale, 150; ferry 
boat of, for sale, 150. 



540 



INDEX. 



David, graduated from Prince- 
ton College, 220. 
Joseph, land in the possession 

of, for sale, 174. 
Rebeccah, ferry boat for sale 
by, 150; negroes for sale by, 
150. 
Howell's ferry, road leading to, 

15. 

Huddy, Hugh, conveyance to, 5. 
Joshua, property for sale late 

of, 247. 

Martha, conveyance from, 5. 
Hudson's river, land to let near, 

276. 
Hugg, John, conveyance to, 5. 

William, 255, 274; cedar bat- ! 
toe of, went adrift, 255, 274; I 
innkeeper, land for sale at 
the house of, 374; mulatto 
ran away from, 499. 
Hughes, John, land for sale by, 
105; letter from, to be print- 
ed, 196; appointed Distribu- 
tor of Stamps for Pennsyl- 
vania, 197; extracts of letters | 
from, to Benjamin Franklin, ; 
agent for said province, 197; 
servant ran away from, 463; 
encouraged by Gov. Frank- 
lin to apply for a commis- j 
sion to his son, 213. 
Hulings, Michael, alleged thief, 

151. 
Hull, Capt. John, 245. 

Joseph, land for sale formerly 

surveyed to, 312; land for 

sale bounded by the lands 

belonging to, 437. 

Hullings, Michael, land for sale 

by, 133. 

Hume, Anne, house to let by, 505; 
various articles for sale by, 
505. 
Humphreys, Samuel, 359. 



William, witness to resigna- 
tion of William Coxe as 
Stamp Distributor, 9. 

Humphries, Joshua, conveyance 
from, 5. 

Hunsinger, John, land for sale by, 
306. 

Hunt, Abraham, 3. 

John, insolvent debtor, 301. 
Samuel, land for sale by, 364. 

Hunter, Captain, 406. 

Hunterdon county. 1, 2, 13, 15, 18, 
27, 34, 35, 46, 56, 64, 65, 66, 
83, 105 106, 116, 130, 131, 
136, 139, 140, 145, 148, 170, 
201, 202, 215, 225, 268, 308, 
327, 354, 359, 387, 416, 474, 
477; courts, 13, 27, 66, 401; 
goal of, 19; Justices of the 
Peace for, 57; grist mill in, 
for sale, 59; Judges of, 139; 
Clerk of, 221: Sheriff of, 
221; land for sale in, 328, 
436. 

Huntingdon, Long Island, 470. 

Huntington, Samuel, senior, land 
for sale by, 331. 

Hussey, Joseph, insolvent debtor, 
petition of, 115; creditors 
of, 115. 
Patrick, runaway servant, 386. 

Hutchinson, , carpenter of 

the brig Nancy, wrecked, 
89. 
John, servant ran away from, 

415, 420. 

Jonathan, servant belonging 
to, supposed to have run 
away, 214. 

Hutschlar, Peter, runaway miner, 
129. 134. 

Hyes, William, conveyance from, 
5. 

Hyndshaw, James, insolvent debt- 
or, petition of, 18. 



Imlay, John, land for sale by, 202, 

241. 
Peter, servant ran away from, 

251. 
Joseph. Sheriff, land for sale 

by, 242. 
William, 359. 

Imlay's Town, 251, 427, 430. 

Independent Church at Wappetaw, 
S. C., 222. 

Indian corn. 48; for sale, 296. 

"Indian field," 431. 

Indian man, murder of, 88, 265, 
271. 

Indian murderers, reward to the 
persons active in apprehend- 
ing the, 405. 

Indians, the Colonies protected 
from, at their own expense, 
383. 384. 

Indian Queen, tavern in Philadel- 
phia, 169, 237. 

Indian ran away, 393. 

Indian Settlement, S. C., 54. 

Indian women murdered, 163, 165, 
183-5. 391. 

Individual ownership of land, 384. 



Ingersol's branch, land for sale 
near, 198. 

Iron master, 163. 

Ironmongery and cutlery for sale, 
426. 

Iron ore at Great Egg Harbor, 
461. 

Iron mine, Suckesana, 74. 

Iron works Air furnace at Mount 
Holly, 254; Andover, 243, 
Andover forge. 217; Ando- 
ver furnace, 286; Beeman's 
forge, 303,359; Change Water 
forge, 370, 464; Durham fur- 
nace, 233; Greenwich forge, 
232, 462; Grubb's forge, 
169; Hibernia furnace. 303; 
John Johnston's. 261; Man- 
olapon forge, 196; Monplo- 
pan river forge. 296; iron 
forge on Musconetcung riv- 
er, 1 48, 49. 232. 258; Old 
Union furnace. 310; Oxford 
furnace. 312; Ringwood, 129, 
134, 135, 203, 279, 394; 
Rockaway. 303; Sharp's. 321; 
Spotswood, 258; Sterling, 



INDEX. 



541 



203, 279; Union, 170, 243, 
249, 327, 356, 359, 360; forge 
in Bucks county, 438; new, 
in Morris county, erecting 
by Garret Rapelje, 217. 
artificers imported for, 463. 

Inskeep, Isaac, 475. 

Insolvent Act repealed, 152. 

Ireland, 12, 237, 434, 472. 



Ireland's, John, land for sale near, 

199. 

Irvin, Samuel, 359. 
Isaiah, runaway apprentice, 430. 
Isletine, Samuel, land of, for sale, 

18. 
Ivins, Moses, servant man ran 

away from, 80. 



Jack, negro man, held in custody, 
246. 

Jack, negro, taken up, 416. 

Jack, runaway Indian, 393. 

Jack, Indian slave, ran away, 397; 
runaway negro in company 
with, 397. 

Jackson, James, 359. 

Rev. William, of Bergen, 345. 

Jacob, runaway mulatto, 128. 

Jacob, runaway negro, 150. 

Jacobs, Philip, runaway Dutch- 
man, 479. 

Jagard, James, bond given to, re- 
pudiated, 306. 

Jamaica, L. I., Erasmus Academy 
at, 348. 

Jamaica, West Indies. 189; arri^ 
vals at, 305, 445; stamps 
forced unon the inhabitants 
of, 11; brig Nancy from, 40; 
sloop Ann bound for, 89; 
Captain Ward arrives at, 
388; arrival of Capt. Joseph 
Jauncey from, 481. 

James, Abel, house to be let by, 

245. 

Hugh, 146. 

Richard, negro ran away from. 
427; slave ran away from, 
430. 

Robert, suit of. 339. 
Thomas, innkeeper, land for 
sale at the house of, 418. 

Jameson, David, land for sale by, 
269. 

Jaquess, Captain, 240. 

Jarvis. Cant. Robert, arrival of, 
456. 

Jauncey, Captain, sailed for Pen- 

sacola. 25. 

James, delivers an oration at 
Princeton College, 219; re- 
ceives the degree of Master 
of Arts. 222. 

Joseph, Captain, arrival of, 
from Jamaica, 481. 

Jauncy, James, assignee, land for 
sale by, 438. 

Jay. John, land to be let by, 276. 

Jeffries. Captain, 415. 

Jelf, Joseph, merchant, 204. 

Jemmy, runaway negro, 165. 

Jenkins, Charles, inn of, 3. 

Jenny. Philip, 276. 
Jew Alley. New York, land for 
sale opposite the, 269. 

Joans. William, horse stolen from, 
250. 

Joe, runaway negro, 153, 367. 
John and Jane, sloop, 90. 

Johnson, Captain, sailed for Cora- 
coa, 25. 



James, writs issued against 
the goods of, 243; creditors 
of, 244; land of, for sale, 
257. 

John, 20; supposed runaway, 
taken up and put in Trenton 
goal, 193; runaway, 169, 170. 

Mary, Miss, creditors of John 
West to meet at the house 
of, 39. 

Nicholas, confession of, 262; 
condemned to the rack for 
murder, 262. 

Robert, insolvent debtor, 45; 
inquiries as to William Pled- 
ger by, 280. 

Samuel William, commission- 
er to Stamp Act Congress, 
103. 

Simon, 344. 

Thomas. 475. 

Sir William, 267, 344; prudent 
manner for use of provisions 
proposed by, 405. 

Johnston, Andrew, land for sale 
adjoining the farm of the 
late, 328; deceased, land for 
sale by the executors of, 
328. 

David, land for sale by, 24, 
75. 

Elizabeth, house of, 124. 

James, land of, to be sold by 
the Sheriff, 17; land for sale 
by, 258. 

Joseph, senior, negro ran away 
from, 159. 

John, land for sale by, 282, 
329. 

John, runaway mulatto ser- 
vant man, 2. 

John L., house to let by, 38. 

Lewis, 29; land for sale by, 
329. 

Mrs., innkeeper, 16, 29; house 
to be let in the possession 
of, 338. 

Stephen land for sale by, 329. 

Sir William, letter from, 391. 
Johnston, Skinner and Smith, New 

Jersey bills signed by, 440. 
Jones, Daniel, degree of Bachelor 
of Arts conferred upon, 218, 
220. 

Daniel, of Mt. Holly, subscrip- 
tions for the Pennsylvania 
Chronicle received by. 428. 

Elias. admitted to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, 469. 

Hugh, takes a house in Glou- 
cester. 360. 

John. 359. 



542 



INDEX. 



John, master, 89; drowned, 
90. 

John, surgical operation per- 
formed by, 398. 

John, shoemaker, runaway ap- 
prentice, 488. 

Joseph, runaway apprentice, 
488. 

Peter, 252. 

Whitehead, land for sale by, 



313, 366; houses for sale by, 
513. 

Jouet, Cavelier, land for sale by, 
24. 

Julius Caesar, snow, put into 
Capes in distress, 487. 

Justis, William, struck by light- 
ning, 402, 408. 

"Justitia, Americus," sent piece 
to be inserted in paper, 183. 



Katskill, N. Y., 344. 

Kay, Isaac, conveyance to, 5. 

Kearney, James, land for sale by, 

309. 

Michael, horse belonging to, 
346. 

Kearney's Landing, negro men 
drove over to, 310. 

Keasbey, Bradway, one of the 
owners of the meadows on 
South Branch of Stoe Creek, 
68. 

Keene, Richard, man belonging to, 
confined in Burlington coun- 
ty goal, 272. 

Keith Marshal, horse purchased 
by, 346. 

Kellogg, Solomon, degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts conferred upon, 
221. 

Kellum, Theophilus, alias John 
Rhoads, negro taken out of 
the custody of, 54. 

Kelly, James, sen., insolvent debt- 
or. 301. 

William, house and lot to be 
let by, 306; French indigo 
for sale by, 306; land for sale 
adjoining lands of, 435. 

Kemble, Peter, Speaker of the 
Council, 157. 403. 

Kennedy, Archibald, Commander 
of the Coventry, 263; arrival 
of, 489. 

Catharine, Mrs., death of, 263. 
Samuel, horses, etc., for sale 

by, 350. 
Samuel, Jun., subscriptions 

for book received by. 455. 
Samuel, Rev., land of, for sale, 
350. 

Kensington, Pa., 147; curing of 
sturgeon carried on in, 372; 
land to let lying in, 500. 

Kent, county of. Del., 31, 227; pe- 
tition of the government of, 
103. 

Kerr. Mrs., drowned, 310. 

Walter, Captain, drowned, 89, 
90. 

Ketcham, Micajah, insolvent debt- 
or, 301. 

Samuel, insolvent debtor, 66; 
land for sale by, 15. 

Kettle-Creek, land for sale bound- 
ed by, 425. 



Key, Simon, runaway apprentice, 

432. 

Kidd, Captain. 516. 
Kildair, 434. 
Kill van Coll, land for sale on the, 

325. 
Killigrove, Henry, arrested on 

suspicion of felony, 292; 

rescued by Thomas Kirk and 

Thomas More, 292. 
Killmorey, the Right Honourable 

Viscount, 121. 

King, Andrew, broke goal, 197. 
Francis, land for sale lately 

occupied by, 202. 
King road, 89. 
King's highway, 105, 174, 175, 226; 

land for sale adjoining the, 

Kingsbury, land in, for sale, 129; 

house for sale in, 315. 
Kingston, tavern in, for sale, 176. 
Kingston, New York, 222. 
Kingston, West Indies, 414. 
Kingston, Daniel, deceased, land 

for sale formerly of, 250. 
Kingstown, grist mill near, for 

sale, 54. 
Kingwood, 135, 201, 359; land in, 

for sale, 46. 
Kinsey. James, member of New 

Jersey bar, 6. 
Kirk, Thomas. 292. 
Kirkbride, Joseph, land for sale 

bounded by land surveyed 

to, 438. 
Kirkpatrick, Alexander, insolvent 

debtor, petition of, 136. 
Klein, John, negro ran away from, 

99. 141. 
Kleinbehl, Daniel, 233. 

John, 233, 234. 
Knowlos, Captain, 406, 411. 
Koffler. Captain, 203. 
Kollock, Jacob, jun., appointed 

Collector of Customs at 

Lewistown, 387. 
Konig. Wilholm, runaway miner, 

134. 
Koster. Benjamin, deceased, land 

for sale late the estate of, 

348, 349. 
Kotts, Conrad, servant ran away 

from, 499. 

Kowasafer Richard, 359. 
Kuyper, Hendrick, 345. 



Lackey. Thomas. 276. 
Lad, John, land for sale adjoining 
the lands taken up by, 432. 
Ladd, John, land for sale by, 249. 



Lagrange, Bernardus, land for 

sale by, 258. 
Lake. Commissary, 378. 
Lamaton, Falls of, land at, for 



INDEX. 



543 



sale, 102. 

Lamberson, Simon, prisoner, con- 
fined in goal of the city of 
Perth Amboy, 114. 

Lamberton, 147, 455; fishery at, 
371, 372, 459. 

Lancaster, Pa., 82, 170, 355, 413. 
county, Pa., 12, 224, 349; 
Grubb's forge in, 169. 

Land for sale, 1, 15, 17, 18, .21, 22, 
23, 24, 28, 31, 34, 37, 41, 46, 
47, 49, 53, 54, 55, 59, 60, 61, 
62, 65, 67, 69, 70, 74, 75 85, 
91, 95, 96, 102, 104, 105, 106, 
107, 108, 129, 133, 150, 152, 
163, 170, 171, 174, 175, 176, 
177, 187, 191, 193, 194, 200, 
202, 203, 205, 209, 211, 215, 
216, 224, 225, 229, 232, 234, 
239, 240, 241, 242, 247, 248, 
249, 250. 254, 258, 264, 268, 
269, 275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 
283, 284, 285, 286, 293, 294, 
295, 296, 298, 303, 304, 305, 
306, 307, 308, 309, 311, 312 
313, 318, 319, 320, 321, 323, 

324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 330 
331, 332, 335, 339, 343, 348, 
349, 350, 351, 353, 364, 365 
366, 369. 373, 376, 377, 381, 
388, 395, 399, 409, 410, 411 
414, 417, 418, 419, 420, 423, 
425, 426, 431, 434, 435, 436, 
437, 438, 439, 440, 447, 450, 
451, 456, 461, 462, 465, 471, 
480, 483, 487, 491, 492, 493, 
495, 507, 512! 

Land to let, 20, 41, 75, 134, 276, 

325, 500, 509, 510. 

Lane, Elizabeth, land for sale bv 

240. 
Gozebert, negro ran away 

from, 369. 

Henry, land of, for sale, 16. 
Mr., a London merchant, 40. 
Langweider, Joseph, runaway 
miner, 134; in custody, 160. 
Laning, Richard, 105, 174. 
Lanning. Richard, insolvent debt- 
or, confined in Sussex coun- 
ty goal, 67. 

Lanweider, Joseph, runaway mi- 
ner, 129. 

Large, Ebenezer, deceased, land 
of, taken in execution, to 
be sold. 174. 
Lash, Captain, sailed for the West 

Indies, 25. 

Lawrence, Captain, arrival of, 
from Ely Town, at Bristol, 
481, 489. 

George, land for sale by, 494. 
John, lawyer, 6, 119. 
John, land for sale by, 324; 
Surveyor, land for sale by, 
326. 

Richard, land for sale by, 325. 

William, insolvent debtor, 74. 

William, land for sale by, 456. 

Lawrenceville, land for sale in, 

304. 
Lawyers, 30, 31, 36, 40, 261, 377, 

415. 
of America, urged to prosecute 



their business with modera- 
tion. 144; given promise of 
some lawsuits, 244. 
of Elizabethtown, agree to 
carry on business without 
stamps, 36, 40. 

of New Jersey, determine to 
transact business without 
stamps, 31. 

Layton, Samuel, insolvent debtor 
301. 

Leacock, Pa., 224. 

Leake, Andrew, mills of, for sale, 
101; horse stolen from, 474; 
horse stolen from, taken up, 
486. 

Leake's mill, land for sale adjoin- 
ing, 268. 

Leather for sale, 183. 

Leather roofs for buildings, ad- 
vantages of, 467. 

Lebanon, T?a., horse stolen in, 310. 

Lee, Gershom, 105, 174. 

Legal tender quality of paper 
money objected to, 380. 

Leonard, James, insolvent debtor, 
confined in the goal of the 
county of Middlesex, peti- 
tion of, 100. 

Joseph, land for sale by, 452. 
Thomas, insolvent debtor, con- 
fined in the gaol of the 
county of Somerset, petition 
of, 58, 97; creditors to meet 
at the house of, 100; prop- 
erty of, for sale, 185; as- 
signees to meet at the house 
of, 195. 

Lenard, William, repudiates bond 
given by him, 306. 

Leslie, Edmond, appointed attor- 
ney, 374. 
Edmund. 112; executor, land 

for sale by, 205. 
Edward, 113. 
James, 112. 

Lethermon. John, Mrs. Chrismon 
living with. 171. 

Lewes-Town, Del., 137. 445. 

Lewis, runaway mulatto servant 
man, 137. 

Lewis, runaway negro, 153. 

Lewis Court, Del., mulatto wo- 
man escaped bail at, 453. 

Lewis, Josiah, degree of Bachelor 
of Arts conferred upon, 221; 
licensed to preach by the 
Presbytery of New Castle 
222. 

Lewistown, Del., 387. 

"Lex Talionis," author of, 361 
362, 363. 

Lexington, battle of, 221. 

Liberty, transport ship, 406. 

'Liberty." rode by the famous 
Will Pitt, 313. 

Liberty of the Press, toast to the 
144. 

Liberty Oak, Sons of Liberty as- 
sembled at, 144. 

Lighthouse struck by lightning, 
176. 

Lighthouse to be built at Cape 
Henlopen, 445. 



544 



INDEX. 



Lightning, damage by, 176, 381, 
398, 410. 

Limming, John, jun., 86 ; insol- 
vent debtor, petition pre- | 
sented by, 86. 

Linden, runaway negro, 369. 

Lindon, John, 276. 

Lindsey, Williams, land for sale 
late the property of, 417. 

Lippincott, Job., conveyance to, 

Lintot, Bernard, land for sale by, 
24. 

Lisbon, Captain Bulkley from, 498. 

Lispenard. Leonard, commission- 
er to the Stamp Act Con- 
gress, 103. 

Lithotomy operation for, 398. 

Litchfield, 'Conn., 472. 

Little-Britain, settlers at, 12. 

Little Creek. 367. 

Little Egg-Harbour, 423; land for 

sale situate on, 447. 
river, 55; land on, for sale, 
234; branch of, 248. 

Little Meadows road, 199. 

Little Mantau creek, land for sale 
bounded by, 374. 

Little pond, land situate at the 
head of. for sale, 217. 

Little Tinicum for sale, 209. 

Little Samuel, insolvent debtor, 
petition presented by, 114. 

Liverpool, 189. 

Liverton, Christopher, insolvent 
debtor, petition of, 105. 

Livingston, Peter Van Brugh, de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts 
conferred upon, 221. 
Philip, 344; commissioner to 
Stamp Act Congress, 103; 
signer of the Declaration of 
Independence, 222. 
Philip J., servant ran away 

from 281. 
Robert, 344. 

Livingstone, Robert R., commis- 
sioner to Stamp Act Con- 
gress, 103. 

Llovd. Ephraim., land for sale by, 
" 352. 

Lock, Mary, insolvent debtor, 13. 

Lockart, Mrs., 359. 

Log house at Pilesgrove burned, { 
356. 

London, 79, 81, 95, 98, 117, 121, 212, 
227, 235, 244, 249, 384, 415, 
448, 483, 484; ship Ellis from, j 
44. 49; extract of a letter 
from, 39; merchants of, 
deputation from the, 39; ar- 
rival from, 77; American 
gentleman in. extract of a 
letter from, 117; letter from 
gentleman in, 206; fire en- 
gine made in, 317; article 
from Public Ledger pub- 
lished in, 413; arrival of 
brigantine Hannah from. 
456; sloop of war Beaver I 
arrived from, 479; coach- 
maker in, 508. 

London Coffee House. 113, 146. 
284; horse bought at, 91; , 



sale at, 119; horse sold at 
the, 126; land for sale at 
the, 198, 348; forg-e for sale 
at the, 296. 

London Company, land for sale 
adjoining- land laid out for 
the, ?.27; composed of Eng- 
lish investors, principally of 
London, who took over most 
of the iron mines in North- 
ern New Jersey, 327. 

Londonderry, Pa., 472. 

Londongrove, Pa., 472. 

London Grove township, Pa., 419. 

Long, Captain, 321. 

David, part owner of /the 
meadows on South Branch 
of Stoe Creek, 68. 

Long Island, 138, 153, 194, 224 348, 
374, 426, 470. 

Lord, Joshua, servant ran away 
from. 136 154. 

Lott. Abraham. 344. 

Cornelius. Sub-Sheriff, 138. 
Maria, 352. 

Widow, land for sale at the 
house of, 185. 

Lottery to raise a sum of money 
to run out straight public 
roads through the Province 
of New Jersey, between 
New York and Philadelphia, 
256. 

Low, Cornelius, boat for sale by, 

358. 
Cornelius, jun., assignee, land 

for sale by, 102. 
Isaac, boat for sale by, 358. 
Tunis, insolvent debtor, 148. 

Lower Dublin, Pa., 264. 

Lower Freehold, grammar school 
opened in, 261. 

Lower Marlborough, Md., 77. 

Lower Penn's Neck. 95, 428. 

Lower Pittsgrove, 352. 

Lowrey, Thomas, 105, 106. 174. 

Loyd, Ephraim, notice given by, 

Loyd's marsh, 45b. 

Lucas. Benjamin, conveyance to, 

6. 
Charles, land for sale by, 320. 

Ludlow. Gabriel H., merchant, 366; 

land for sale by, 366. 
John, merchant, land for sale 
by, 366. 

Lukins, John, horse strayed away 
from. 91. 

Lupton, John, shoemaker, 281, 
336; runaway apprentice, 
281. 336. 

Lyal, Captain, arrival of, 439. 

Lycan, Jacob, land for sale by, 
389; sawmill for sale by, 
389. 

Lyell, , entered in custom- 
house. 225. 
Captain, 387. 

Lynch, Thomas, commissioner to 
Stamp Act Congress, 103. 

Lyon, James, A. M., book, "Ura- 
nia," by, 493. 

Lyons Farms, fire at. 300. 

Lvt. Rev. John, of Brunswick, 
345. 



INDEX. 



545 



M 



M'Adams, James insolvent debt- 
or, 13, 14. 

M'Caghertj", Thomas, servant ran 
away from, 196. 

M'Caghry, Thomas, servant ran 
away from, 192. 

McCain, Susan, 472. 

William, 472; born in Ireland, 
472. 

McCalla, McCally, Daniel, gradu- 
ates from Princeton College, 
221; sketch of, 222. 

M'Can, Hugh, merchant, 14. 

M'Carthy, James, horse thief, 237. 

M'Carty, John, reprieved, 246. 

M'Clean, John, mare strayed to 
the plantation of, 94. 

M'Cord, William, peddler, 170. 

M'Cormick, Alexander, broke goal, 
416; prisoner for debt, 417. 

M'Cullough, John, runaway ser- 
vant, 276. 

M' Daniel, James, escaped goal, 

242. 
John, committed to goal, 56. 

M'Dermott. Philip, money stolen 
by, 334; came from Hide's 
Town, 334. 

McDonagh, James, runaway ser- 
vant, 358. 

M'Donald, Morris, money stolen 
by, S34. 

M'Euin. John, 411. 

M'Evers, James, assignee, land 
for sale by. 102. 

M'Farlin, James, wife eloped from, 

133. 
Margaret, eloped, 133. 

M'Gill, James, drowned, 50. 

M'Grady, James, runaway ser- 
vant, 82. 

M'llhenay, James, property for 
sale taken in execution at 
the suit of, 209. 

M'Kardy, Samuel, 359. 

M'Kay. David, honorary degree of 
Bachelor of Arts conferred 
upon, 222. 

M'Kean, Rev. Robert, sketch of, 

472, 478. 

Thomas, signer of the Decla- 
ration of Independence, 473. 

M'Kee, David, 359. 

M'Kensie, M'Kenzy, McKinsey, 
James, murderer, 160; trial 
of, 183; alleged thief, 184; 
hanged, 185. 

M'Kinsley, Dr. William, 359. 

M' Knight, Rev. Charles, school 
opened under the inspection 
of, at Freehold, 261. 

M'Laughlan, John runaway ser- 
vant, 186. 

M'Neil, Thomas, servant of, taken 
up and put in Trenton goal, 
193. 

M'Pherson, Captain John, contro- 
versy with, 120, 126. 

MacPherson, John, degree of 
Bachelor of Arts conferred 
upon, 221; read law with 
John Dickinson, 222; deliv- 
ers argument at commence- 

35 



ment at Princeton College, 
218. 

Macky, Captain, 225. 

Madeira, 388; port of, 411; arrival 
of schooner Sally from, 439. 

Magee, James, insolvent debtor, 
petition presented by, 86. 

Magrath, Roger, land fo