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Full text of "Documents relating to the colonial, Revolutionary and post-Revolutionary history of the State of New Jersey"



OF THE 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



FIRST SERIES 
Vol. XXVII. 







{This volume jwas <prepa,red and -/editedHpy authority 
of -the State 'of New Jersey, at me request of the 
New Jersey Historical Society, and under the direc- 
tion of the following Committee of the Society : 

WILLIAM NELSON, 
GARRE'T D.i W. VROOM, 
AUSTIN SCOTT, 
T" FRANCIS; B: LEE, 

ERNEST C RICHARDSON. 




DOCUMENTS 



RELATING TO THE 



COLONIAL HISTORY 



OF THE 






STATE OF NEW JERSEY 



EDITED BY 



WILLIAM NELSON, 



VOLUME XXVII, 



EXTRACTS FROM AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS, RELATING TO 

NEW JERSEY. 



VOL. VIII. 177O-1771 




PATERSON, N. J. : 

THE PRESS PRINTING AND PUBLISHING Co., 26g MAIN STREET. 

1905. 



N 







F 



31 




PREFACE 



Much more space than usual is devoted in this volume 
to discussions of the political and economic questions of 
the day as contained in the American newspapers for 1770 
-1771, and v^hich had already figured in the public prints 
of the preceding two years, as shown in Volume XXVI 
of the New Jersey archives. The threat to buy no goods 
imported from Great Britain, which had been so effective 
in alarmirg the English merchants, and causing them to 
use their influence with the British Ministry to secure the 
repeal of the Stamp Act, led to the Non-Importation Agree- 
ment, as it was called, whereby the people of the various 
colonies pledged themselves not to import nor to use any 
goods of English manufacture, until such time as the Par- 
liament should repeal the acts imposing duties on tea and 
sugar, ind the Ministry removed the punitive restrictions 
which ;hey had inflicted upon Boston Port for its con- 
tumacy This agreement, as is shown in the following 
pages, is still upheld by the adoption of resolutions by 
the freeholders, merchants and traders of Elizabethtown, 
of New Brunswick, of Essex County, of the students of 
Nassau Hall, of Sussex County, of Somerset County, of 
Burlirgton County, etc. These declarations uniformly 
pledge! undying allegiance to King George III, but pro- 
tested igainst the ''ministerial physicians,' 1 as they were 
called, vho caused the Parliament to enact oppressive laws 
for the taxation of the colonies, and who interfered with 
their locil government. When New York receded from the 
Non-Imprtation Agreement, the people of that city were 



VI PREFACE. 

roundly denounced by various meetings. Sussex County 
threatened to send all her trade down the Delaware River 
to Trenton and Philadelphia, which must have caused the 
merchants of New York great dismay. The people of the 
colonies were by no means unanimous in their resistance 
to the British measures, especially by so drastic a scheme 
as the Non-Importation Agreement, and the non-purchase 
of English manufactures. Several Woodbridge people pro- 
tested that their names were used in that connection with- 
out their consent. A long argument against non-importa- 
tion is given on page 280. 

A correspondent of one of the newspapers of the da 
proposes to incorporate * ' The United Company of New Jer- 
sey, ' designed to embrace the traders and merchants of 
the whole colony, and evidently looking to the organization 
of united action against the ministerial schemes. 

The people were urged by many correspondents to use 
American manufactures. The senior students at Princeton 
in 1770 graduated in suits of American cloth. This dispos- 
ition to use American clothing stimulated the sheep in- 
dustry. It was estimated that Hunterdon County in 1768 
had ten thousand sheep, and figures were offered to show 
the immense profit possible to farmers raising sheep. 

The lawless measures that were resorted to by some too 
ardent patriots were deprecated by the more conservative 
citizens. Thus, Woodbridge gave notice that she "kept a 
supply of tar and feathers for ready application to those 
violating the Non-Importation Agreement,' said 3utfit 
being stored in the center of the town near "Execution 
Dock," and in the neighborhood of "Liberty Oat/ the 
significance of those terms being obvious to everybody. 
In the same town some recalcitrant importers w3re said 
to have been ducked in a convenient pond. 

A "Jersey Farmer' deplores the degeneracy of the 
times; though "it is impossible to bear the pariiimentary 
Impositions, ' at the same time the people were ' encojir- 






PREFACE. vii 

aging and promoting every Species of Luxury, Dissipation 
and Excess, almost, that is practiced in our Mother Coun- 
try. The same News Paper shall contains Pieces wrote to 
Demonstrate our Poverty, and Advertisements of Stage 
Plays, Horse Races &c., whereby vast Sums of Money are 
thrown away for no useful Purpose of Life.' He was 
especially bitter against fox hunting as a sport destruct- 
ive to fences and crops. "An Aged Farmer,' a 
'Native of East New Jersey,' replied indignantly that 
it 'made his Blood run cold' .to read such an 
article ; that the people who indulged in fox, hunting 
were usually good livers, and created a generous demand 
for the garden truck of the Jersey farmers sold in Phila- 
delphia. He pertinently asks how the farmers would dis- 
pose of their "Watermelons if it was not for the Assist- 
ance of Luxury?' 

Relief in cases of financial distress was sought by the 
act for the benefit of insolvent debtors, and the act to 
authorize the issue of one hundred thousand pounds in 
bills of credit. Unfortunately both bills were disallowed by 
the King, provoking a bitter feeling on the part of the peo- 
ple of the colony, which was voiced in an address presented 
by the Assembly to the Governor, expressing a deep disap- 
pointment at the disallowance of the latter act, which was 
calculated to stimulate trade in the colony, and commerce 
with New York and Philadelphia. Many unfortunate bus- 
iness men took advantage of the former act during a period 
of fifteen months which elapsed until the act was nega- 
tived by the King. 

The popular antipathy to the lawyers still ran high. The 
mob prevented the holding of courts in Monmouth County, 
and the Council addressed the Governor on the subject of 
the excessive costs of the legal fraternity. 

Another ebullition of the popular discontent was the dis- 
pute over the ' ' Horseneck Purchase, ' ' commonly called the 
"Indian Purchase,' in the upper .part of Essex County. 



viii PREFACE. 

The attempt of the East Jersey Proprietors to enforce their 
claims to these lands provoked very serious riots in Es- 
sex county, and filled the jail in Newark. Rioting and 
arson were indulged in for a while, until some of the of- 
fenders were rounded up and smartly fined or imprisoned. 

The Governor sent a message to the Legislature on the 
subject of the Monmouth and Essex riots, and replies were 
addressed to him by the Council and Assembly on the 
same theme. The statements of some of the parties and 
of counsel on the Horseneck litigation are perhaps the 
fullest exposition of the history of this dispute which have 
yet been made. They fairly educate the questions at issue, 
and ought to settle any lingering doubt there may be in the 
minds of those interested as to the validity of the respect- 
ive titles of the East Jersey Proprietors, and of those 
claiming under the 'Indian Purchase.' 

A far-sighted correspondent remarked upon the import- 
ance of improving the navigation of the Delaware river, 
and opening inland navigation to the "back inhabitants.' 

Premiums were offered for raising silk cocoons, as high 
as 20 pounds. 

The northern boundary, which had been a standing 
grievance for many years to the people of Sussex county 
and Orange county, was established by a law of New York, 
soon concurred in by a similar act of the New Jersey Leg- 
islature. 

The pleasant relations usually existing between the 
British troops quartered in the barracks at Elizabeth, Perth 
Amboy, New Brunswick and Trenton, are indicated by 
complimentary speeches exchanged by the authorities of 
New Brunswick and Perth Amboy and the officers of the 
29th Regiment, on the occasion of the regiment being trans- 
ferred to the West Indies. 

The advertisements of stages are another indication of 
the activity of traffic and trade between Philadelphia and 
New York, and between various towns in the province. A 



PREFACE. ix 

stage ran from Powles Hook to Philadelphia in two days, 
the fare being 20 s., or $2.50, each way, or 3d. (three cents) 
per mile. In the spring of 1771 a stage ran from Burling- 
ton to Amboy, a boat leaving Philadelphia every Saturday, 
and the passengers embarking on Monday at Burlington 
in a wagon, by which they were conveyed the same day to 
Amboy, whence a boat conveyed them to New York. A 
new "flying machine' set out from Powles Hook Ferry 
every Tuesday morning, arriving at Philadelphia the next 
day at twelve o'clock noon. Another stage ran between 
Newark and Powles Hook twice a day, Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday. 

The famous George Whitefield made one of his whirlwind 
trips through the Province, preaching to immense throngs 
of people on the way from Philadelphia to New York. 

The death of James Parker, the first New Jersey print- 
er, a man of distinguished excellence as a citizen and in the 
art ' preservative of all arts, " is briefly announced in 1770, 
with the summary that "he left a fair character on which 
we have neither time nor room to enlarge.' Isaac Collins 
announces the removal of his printing office from Phila- 
delphia to Burlington to take over the business of James 
Parker at the latter place. 

A carpenter deplores the "conduct of many unmarried 
people of every class as so far from rendering a union de- 
sirable. ' Nevertheless, people went on giving and being 
given in marriage just the same as they have always done 
from the beginning of the world, and from the marriage 
announcements the brides seem to have been peculiarly at- 
tractive. "A young Lady eminently qualified of render- 
ing the nuptial estate agreeable,' was married at 
Mount Holly. "A Lady of serious and well disposed mind 
and endowed with every qualification to render the mar- 
riage state happy,' was another bride. The daughter of 
Chief Justice Allen, of Pennsylvania, at her marriage was 



described as "a beautiful young Lady in Possession of 
every intellectual virtue.' 

The Trustees of Queens College were notified to meet at 
ilackensack on the first Tuesday in May, 1771, to decide 
where the College should be located. 

Timothy Edwards advertises his house and land for sale 
at Elizabethtown. He was an uncle of Aaron Burr, who 
lived here with his sister for some time after the death of 
his parents. At the Princeton Commencement, in 1771, 
Aaron Burr, of the Junior Class, carried off the first pre- 
mium "for reading the English language with propriety, 
and answering questions in orthography,' wherein many 
of his successors have not been equally fortunate. He was 
also awarded the second premium for "reading the Latin 



and Greek languages with propriety.' 

Newark quarry stone was advertised in April, 1771. 

Horse racing offered popular attractions at Powles 
Hook and at Newark. 

Inoculation was practiced by Dr. Pew, of Elizabeth. 

The famous Orrery of Bittenhouse was almost finished 
in April, 1770, and the college at Princeton was anxiously 
awaiting the arrival of that remarkable invention. 

There was much discussion over the proposed exten- 
sion of the jurisdiction of justices of the peace in civil suits 
to ten pounds, and many correspondents figured out to 
their own satisfaction how the costs of litigation would 
be increased, while others proved just how much would be 
saved by the proposed act. 

Quack doctors were advertising their nostrums and 
miraculous cures to such an extent as to call forth action 
by the New Jersey Medical Society to prevent the same. 
The "royal balsam and pelius polychristum' seems to 
have been a popular cure-all. A 'Studens Medicenae' 
points out some of the harm done by these empiricists. 

A grisly sight was presented in the woods between Long* 
Pond and Charlottesburg, in the present Passaic county, 



PREFACE. xi 

of a ' ' man lying on his back with his head cut off and laid 
on one of his arms. '' 

Patrick Brainey quite naturally resents a statement ac- 
cusing him of feloniously taking certain goods, ' ' as perhaps 
may be something prejudicial to his character.' 

As usual, a good deal of light is thrown upon the social 
conditions of the times by the advertisements of runaway 
servants and slaves. A negro man "had on an iron collar 
around his neck,' an evidence of the debasing influence 
of slavery. A man who was committed to the Burlington 
jail on suspicion of being a runaway servant, says, "When 
he left his master, he had an iron collar on his neck, but 
soon got it off.' Other descriptions of these unfaithful 
servants and absconding slaves tell of a rollicking Irishman 
who had 'fair Hair tied behind, had on a red Hat, with a 
blue half-worn surtout coat with brass buttons on the side, 
and a double cape.' Another was a chunky well set 
black fellow, very talkative, and pretends to be very re- 
ligious.' 'A carpenter's apprentice, knock-kneed, with a 
dark complexion, down look, dark eyes, dark hair, wears a 
tie.' Another wore a "gray colored coat and Jacket with 
horn buttons, new leather breeches, with black horn but- 
tons, Russia shirt, black worn stockings, new shoes ; also a 
caster hat, wears it cocked.' An indented servant man 
who ran away from Shrewsbury "keeps his mouth much 
open.' Another, it is said, "will drink to excess, and then ' 
is noisy, likes to sing songs.' A negro lad "of yellow cast 
and by trade a chimney sweep.'' A runaway servant was 
'much given to liquor and chews tobacco, when in liquor 
noisy and quarrelsome.' 

We have this picturesque description of the uniform of an 
Irish fifer who deserted from the 29th Regiment of Foot 
at Perth Amboy : ' ' He was born in the regiment, and had 
on when he went away a short yellow Coat, vest Red, red 
Fluting down the Collar, red Wings and linings, his Coat 
laced with drummer's Lace, white Linen waistcoat and 



xii PREFACE. 

breeches, Black cape bound with white Tape. The Num- 
ber of the Regiment in the front and Scarlet Worsted 
feather around the upper part of the front. ' 

The descriptions of the many houses, mills, mines, farms 
and orchards advertised for sale are full of interest and 
instruction. 

It is to be hoped that the biographical and other notes 
may be helpful, while special pains have been taken to 
make the index a complete key to the contents of the vol- 
ume. 
JULY 25, 1907. 



Newspaper Extracts. 



Improving the navigation of Delaware and Schuyl- 
kill are objects really worthy of public attention ; 
not only because improvements should first begin at 
home, and those which may be made at the lowest 
expence, and are most immediately necessary, should 
be first essayed- -but for the following reasons : The 
former of those rivers leading from Philadelphia far 
beyond the northern bounds of the province, into 
the Mohocks country, when made navigable, will not 
only induce our own farmers above the mountains, 
in Northampton, to bring the produce of their labour 
to the city of Philadelphia, which they now constant- 
ly send to sEsopus and New- York, but command all 
the inland trade of West New-Jersey above and of 
the new settlements in York government, to the 
northward. 

Clear the Delaware from obstructions, which 
is all that is necessary to a good navigation, the 
waters of the river being plentiful and constant, 
and we shall not only secure our own trade above 
the North Mountain, but command the inland trade 
of West New-Jersey and a considerable part of New- 
York. 

Whether, therefore, we intend by improving our 
inland navigation, to enable the back inhabitants to 



2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

raise and bring their produce to our own market ; or 
to induce the people of Jersey and the back parts of 
New-York to furnish our merchants with commodi- 
ties for exportation, or take into our design, the se- 
curity of the skin and fur trade with the natives, all 
of them point out the Delaware and Schuylkill as ob- 
jects most worthy of our attention. . . PATRius. 1 

November 3Oth died at Burlington, in the fifty- 
sixth Year of his Age, PETER BARD, Esq ; formerly 
a Merchant in this City. His Death was very soon 
followed by that of his Son, SAMUEL BARD, Esq ; At- 
torney at Law, who died at Bristol, on the i4th of 
December, in the twenty-ninth Year of his Age. 2 - 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 156, January 1-8, 
1770. 

New Jersey, ) BY Order of the Hon. 

> ss. 

Monmouth County, ) John Anderson, John Tay- 

lor and James Lawrence, Esquires, Three of the 

1 The article is nearly four columns long. 

2 Peter Bard, 2d, was Jhe second son of Peter Bard, a Huguenot who settled in 
Burlington early in the eighteenth century, and who died in 1734. The son was 
born in Mt. Holly in 1714. and was a merchant in Philadelphia as early as 1746. In 
1752 Peter Bard and Company were the owners of the Mt. Holly iron works, which 
they offered for sale in 1758. In 1751 he was appointed administrator of an estate 
in Mt. Holly, from which it has been inferred that he was then living there. In 
1754 he took up, an the right of his deceased elder brother Bennet Bard, four tracts, 
of 528 acres, near Mt. Holly, which he sold, June 22, 1764, probably on account of 
failing health. He died at Bridgetown (Mt. Holly) , Burlington county, November 
30, 1769. His son, Peter Bard, junior, "a youth of uncommon merit," died at Bur- 
lington June 12. 1769. Another son, Samuel Bard, who was licensed as a counsel- 
lor at law of New Jersey. November 3, 1761. and who practiced at Bristol, Bucks 
county, Penna., died at that place on December 14, 1769, in his twenty-ninth year. 
His will, dated November 27, 1768, proved December 20, 1769, directs his executors 
to sell all his lands and property, consisting of a brick house at Mt. Holly, and a 
tract adjoining the iron works, which he bought of his father; the proceeds, after 
payment of debts, to go to his wife, Mary Bard. Executors his father, Peter 
Bard, and Zachariah Rossell. N. J. Archives, XII., 667, note; XIX., 180, 539; XX., 
184; Proceedings West Jersey Surveym^s' Association, 110; West Jersey Wills, Liber 
No. 14, folio 135. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 

Judges of the Court of Common Pleas for said 
County, that Michael Henderson, John Dennis, 
Lewis Dennis, Rice Fielder, Benjamin Kallim, 
Thomas Van Kirk, Aaron Decamp, William Preston, 
Benjamin Parker, jun., John Parker, William Hank- 
inson, jun., Andrew Mains, John West, James 
Magee, Lawrence Taylor, John Hanson, jun., 
Charles Lucas, Margaret Lucas, his Wife, William 
Van Kirk, jun., and Obadiah Worthley, all Prisoners 
for Debt in said Goal, were this 28th Day of Decem- 
ber, qualified to their Schedules of their Effects, pur- 
suant to a late Act of Assembly entitled, " An Act 
for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors ;" made this 
present Tenth Year of his Majesty's Reign, &C. 1 
Now 7 these are to give Notice to the Creditors of 
said Debtors, that they be together at the Court 
House of said County, on the 25th Day of January 
next, to shew Cause, if any they have, why the 
said Debtors Estates should not be assigned for the 
Use of their Creditors, and their Bodies discharged 
from Goal, pursuant to said Act. 

i The relief of insolvent debtors, particularly those imprisoned for debt, was 
the subject of constant legislation from at least as early as August 16, 1733. Usu- 
ally, the acts were for limited terms, and were then revived or extended. The act 
of Nov. 17, 1743, was revived by act of June 6, 1751, limited to Sept. 2, 1752. An act 
of June 8, 1753, applied to those in prison Sept. 1, 1754, and was extended to August 
1. 1755. An act of October 22, 1757, applied to those actually in prison Sept. 22, 
1757. An act of December 5, 1760, applied to those actually in prison November 
25. 1760. It was revived by act passed December 4, 1761, and again by act passed 
December 7. 1763, applying to those in prison October 1, 1763, and extending to Ju- 
ly 1, 1764. The act was revived June 20, 1765, by an act which was limited to ten 
years, but was repealed June 28(?). 1766. It was again revived May 10. 1768, apply- 
ing to those in prison April 12, 1768. Another act was passed December 6, 1769, and 
still another on March 27, 1770, which was disallowed by the King, June 7, 1771. 
The prisoners were allowed, on giving bail, to have "the liberty of the prison lim- 
ts," which under later acts were defined by the boards of justices and freehold- 
ers, and were usually an area within a mile or two of the county jail. 



4 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To BE SOLD, OR LET. 

A Very fine Plantation, agreeably situated within 
one Mile (and in Sight) of Princetown College, 
containing 116 Acres, 25 of which is excellent 
Meadow, 1 1 Acres of Woodland, the Remainder 
arable, and the Whole in the best Repair : On which 
is a neat well-finished new Stone House, two Stories 
high, with a framed Building, and Stone Kitchen ad- 
joining the same : The Buildings together being 70 
Feet in Front. There is a Well of good Water by 
the Door, a large well built Barn : 40 by 45 Feet, 
compleatly finished, with good Stables for Horses, 
and Stalls for a Number of Cattle : Also an Orchard, 
of the best Fruit Trees, a good Garden, and a Spring- 
House, built of Brick, with a never-failing Spring in 
it, within 50 Yards of the House. And as said Plan- 
tation is situated at a small Distance from Princetown 
and several Merchant Mills, there is always a good 
Market, and the highest Price given for every Kind 
of Produce. The Subscriber has also to dispose of 
a Negro Wench, about 23 Years of Age, with a Male 
Child of one Year old : The Wench is very handy, 
and understands all Kinds of Country Business. 
Likewise one Dozen Milk Cows, one Dozen Sheep, 
and two fine Breeding Mares. Any Person inclining 
to purchase, by paying one Third of the Purchase 
Money down, may have Time for the Payment of the 
Remainder, by paying Interest, and giving Security 
if required. The above Plantation may be entered 
upon the first of April next, therefore should it be 
agreeable to any Person to purchase or rent said 
Plantation, they may be fully informed of the Terms, 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 5 

by directing a Line, or personally applying to the 
Subscriber, living on the Premises. 

Decem. 20, 1769. WILLIAM COAT. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1409, 
January i, 1770. 

The Ship from the Granades that was drove 
ashore near Sandy-Hook, is entirely lost, but the 
Cargo, all saved. 

To be Sold, at Public Vendue, 
On the first Day of March next, upon the Premises. 

A Valuable Plantation, the Property of the late 
James Williams, deceased: situated in the 
South Ward of the City of Perth-Amboy, at about 
three Miles Distance from the Cheesquack's Land- 
ing, containing Two Hundred Acres, about forty 
Acres already cleared, of which there are between 
twelve and fifteen Acres of good improved Meadow, 
and much more can be made at a small Expence : 
The Soil of the Upland is well adapted to produce 
both Rye and Indian Corn ; On it there are two 
Houses, a Dutch Barn, and a bearing Orchard, the 
Wood Land extremely well timber'd ; easy Payments 
will be given. Any Person inclining to become a 
private Purchaser before the Day of Sale may know 
the Conditions, by applying to William Burnet, or 
John Johnston, at Perth-Amboy, or to John L. John- 
ston, in the above mentioned South Ward. 
Perth-Amboy, Dec. 23, 1769. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1409, January 4, 1770. 



6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

NEW- YORK. 

Jan. i. The Brig Jupiter, Capt. Byers, mentioned 
in our last to have run on the East Bank, was 
brought into the harbour last Friday night, with great 
difficulty : Most of the cargo of flax-seed is damaged, 
but the vessel may be repaired again 

Trenton Goal, December 28, 1769. 
THIS is to give notice, there was committed to my 
custody, by William Clayton, Esq ; as a runaway ap- 
prentice on the 24th day of October last, THOMAS 
SANDAMAN, this is to inform his master or sheriff that 
he run away from, that they come and pay charges 
and take him away, or he will be sold to pay cost and 
charges, on Saturday the 2Oth day of January, 1770, 

by me 

PETER HANKISON, Goaler. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1413, Janu- 
ary 4, 1770. 



w 



/HEREAS the General Assembly of the Province 
of New-Jersey, have passed an Act for the Re- 
lief of Insolvent Debtors, at their last Sessions : We 
the Debtors now Prisoners in the County of Middle- 
sex, intend to take the Benefit of said Act and by 
Order of Jonathan Frazee, and Stephen Skinner, 
Esqrs., two of the Judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas, of the said County, do hereby desire all our 
Creditors to take Notice accordingly, and appear at 
the House of Elijah Dunham, in Perth Amboy, on 
Tuesday the 3Oth Day of January Inst. at 3 o'Clock 
in the Afternoon, to shew Cause (if any they have) 
before the said Stephen Skinner, and Jonathan Fra- 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 7 

zee, Esqrs, why the said Prisoners Estate should not 
be assigned to Assignees to be then appointed, for 
the Benefit of their Creditors, and the Prisoners dis- 
charged from their Confinement, agreeable to said 
Act. Dated Perth- Amboy, January 8, 1770. 

Obediah King, 
Andrew Herriot, 
Nathaniel Higgins, 
Joseph Drake, jun., 
Samuel Drake. 

Albany, December 29, 1769. 
Five Pounds Reward. 

STOLEN in the Night preceding the 28th Instant, 
from Col. Bradstreet, a strong well made black 
HORSE, fifteen hands high, with a good Saddle and 
Bridle, and supposed to be taken by a dark Mulatto 
or Negro Man, who made his Escape out of the Goal 
a Day or two before, where he was confined for run- 
ning away from his Master Mr. Nathaniel Richards, 
of Newark, in New Jersey. Said Mulatto or Negro, 
is about 5 Feet 10 Inches high, thin made, large flat 
Nose, with curled Hair down each Cheek, had on a 
long grey Surtout Coat. Whoever takes up said 
Horse, with or without the Negro, shall have the 
above Reward, with reasonable Charges, on bring- 
ing him to Col. Bradstreet, or securing him, and send- 
ing Word thereof, and if the Negro is taken it is re- 
quested that he be secured in some Goal, and Infor- 
mation thereof, given to Col. Bradstreet. His Name 
is said to be BEN, and that he has changed it to BON 
or BOND. 



8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

N. B. An Irishman commonly called TOBY QUIT, 
absconded the same Night from Albany, and perhaps 
might have taken the Horse. He is about 5 Feet 9 
Inches high, fair short Hair, tied behind, had on an 
old Hat, with a blue half worn Soutout Coat, with 
brass Buttons on each Side, and a double Cape.- 
New York Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1410, 
January 8, 1770. 

New York, January 1 1 . In the hard Weather we 
had last Monday Sennight, we are apprehensive 
much Damage has been done on our Coast ; we have 
already heard that Capt Ryker, in a Sloop from the 
West-Indies for this Port, is ashore at Squan Beach, 
the Crew and Cargo will be saved, and the Vessel 
may be got off again.- -A'. Y. Journal or General 
Advertiser, No. 1410, January IT, 1770. 

Gloucester County, January 3, 1770. 
BY virtue of a writ to me directed, on Monday, the 
29th instant, at the house of Benjamin Rambo, Inn- 
keeper, in Woodbury, at i o'clock, in the afternoon, 
will be exposed to sale, by public vendue, a planta- 
tion and tract of land thereunto belonging, contain- 
ing 250 acres, be it more or less, situate on the 
North Branch of Great Timber Creek, in the town- 
ship of Gloucester ; on which is a dwelling-house, a 
very good barn, a large and thriving orchard, about 
50 acres of upland cleared, and nearly the same 
quantity of excellent meadow, now in timothy and 
clover. There is also on the said tract, a valuable 
saw-mill, on a never failing stream of water, within 5 
miles of a landing on Timber Creek aforesaid. Also, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 9 

at the same time, will be sold, near rooo acres of 
pine land and cedar swamp, very convenient to the 
said mill ; the whole being late the real estate of An- 
drew Newman ; seized in execution, and to be sold 

by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, late Sheriff. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 
On the first Day of February next, 

FIFTY Acres of excellent good Land, abounding 
with Hickory and Oak, and a Quantity of good Ship- 
Timber, with a constant Stream of Water running 
through Part of said Land, and within about Half a 
Mile of a good Landing, lying in Newtown Town- 
ship, Gloucester County, New-Jersey, about five 
Miles from Philadelphia. Any Person inclining to 
purchase the same, may know the Conditions by ap- 
plying to ISAAC BURROUGH, living upon Newtown 
Creek, within about Half a Mile of Gloucester. Also, 
a likely Country bred bay Gelding, rising 3 Years 
old, and is upwards of 14 Hands and a Half high, 
well gated, promises well for either Saddle or Car- 
riage. 

Salem Goal, January 3, 1770 

The subscribers hereof give this public notice, 
agreeable to an Act of Assembly of the Province of 
New Jersey, lately made, to all their creditors, to 
meet them before two of his Majesty's judges, for 
the county of Salem, at Salem, on the last day of 
this instant January, and then shew cause, if any they 
have, why they should not be discharged from their 
present confinement, as the said act directs. EDWARD 



10 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

TONKINS, WOODMAN RAWSEY, ABRAHAM LORD, JOHN 
WALTER. 

WHEREAS a certain JOSEPH HIXSON, as he called 
himself, obtained a BOND of me, for the sum of Ten 
Pounds, West-Jersey currency, bearing date the 27th 
of November, 1769, for a HORSE; and it hath ap- 
peared since, that the horse was stolen, at the time 
of my purchase, out of Pennsylvania, and the said 
Hixson hath left these parts ; I desire that no per- 
son, or persons, may take any assignment on said 
bond, for I will not pay any part of it. 

VALENTINE ARNETT. 

STOLEN out of the stable, the 3oth of December 
last, from the Subscriber, living in Mannington, in 
Salem county, West New -Jersey, a black HORSE, 
about 14 hands and a half high, between 8 and 9 
years old, neither brand nor ear-mark, has remarka- 
ble long hair, a star in his forehead, trimmed at the 
head-stall, a short mane and tail, shod before, he 
paces and trots very well, and has some white upon 
one of his hind feet. Whoever brings said horse, 
and secures the thief, shall receive EIGHT DOLLARS 
reward, and for the horse alone Three Dollars, and 

reasonable charges, paid by 

SAMUEL SMITH. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2142, Janua- 
ry n, 1770. 

New-York January 15. We hear from Bound- 
Brook that one William Daniels, near that Place, 
having beat his Wife some Time last Week, which 
he had frequently done before, she left him, and went 



I7/O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. II 

to reside with a Daughter she had at some Distance, 
and on Monday Night last a Number of Persons, 
who are term'd there Regulators, went to Daniels, 
and taking him out of his Bed, whipp'd him very se- 
verely ; they then left him to himself, and the next 
Morning he was found dead in his Bed. 

Monday Night last, a dreadful Fire happened at 
Newark, when the Barn, Stables, and some Out- 
Buildings, belonging to the Hon. David Ogden, 
Esq ; were entirely destroyed, with every Thing that 
was therein : They were thought to have been set 
on Fire by some evil-minded Persons. 

Perth- Amboy, December 23, 1769. 
WHEREAS by Virtue of several Writs of Fieri 
Facias, issued out of the Supreme Court of this 
Province directed to James Brooks, Esq ; late Sher- 
iff of the County of Middlesex, against the Goods 
and Chattels, Lands and Tenements, of Thomas 
Leonard, jun. deceased, whereby he levied on, and 
sold several Lots of said Leonard's Lands : And 
whereas by Virtue of an Act of Assembly, passed 
the last Sessions at Burlington, to vacate the Sale of 
the Lands sold by James Brooks, as aforesaid : And 
also by Virtue of a Writ of Venditiona Exponas, to 
me directed, I shall expose to Sale, at the Suit of 
Thomas Watson, Esq ; the Tract of Land called the 
Neck, situate and being in the South Ward of Perth- 
Amboy. lying between Deep-Run and Tenant's 
Creek, supposed to contain 300 Acres, be the same 
more or less. And also a certain Tract of Land ly-' 
ing on the West-side of said Deep Run, opposite to 



12 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Lands of Peter Buckalew's, supposed to contain One 
Hundred Acres (be the same more or less) on Wed- 
nesday the 28th Day of February next, at the House 
of the Widow Lott, in said South-Ward, where the 

Conditions will be made known. 

ISAAC BONNELL, Sheriff. 




Perth- Amboy, December 22, 1769. 
New Jersey, ^ THIS is to give Notice, 

Middlesex County, I that the Lands of Henry 

Longfield, which was advertised for Sale the i8th of 
December Instant, is adjourned to Monday the 26th 
Day of February next, on the Premises. But as 
most People are unwilling to bid for said Lands, not 
knowing what Incumbrances may be thereon ; it is 
requested of all the Creditors of said Longfield, that 
they meet on the said Premises, or inform me, at or 
before the Day of Sale, what Demands they have on 
said Lands, the better to enable me to ascertain the 
Incumbrances, and the Creditors to recover their 

Debts. 

ISAAC BONNELL, Sheriff. 

N. Y. Gazetteer Weekly Post Boy, No. 1411, 
January 15, 1770. 

, 

Arrivals at Dominica. Snow Endicut, Ward from 
Salem. 

Captain Darby in a ship from Salem, for Granada, 
touch'd at Dominica about the nth of December. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1415. January 18, 
1770. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 13 

PROPOSALS 
For publishing by SUBSCRIPTION, All the POETICAL 

WRITINGS and some other PIECES, of 

The Reverend NATHANIEL EVANS, A. M. 1 

Late Missionary in Gloucester County, New Jersey. 

The Papers which are to compose this small Vol- 
ume, were committed to the Care of myself, and a 
Lady (to whom several of them are addressed) soon 
after the Death of Mr. EVANS, agreeable to some of 
his own last Directions ; and so sacred is the Trust 
consigned by a deceased Friend, that I scarce know 
how to excuse my long Delay in offering them to the 
World. Want of leisure to review the different 
Papers, hath contributed partly to this Delay ; but 
the main Cause, was a desire first to secure a suffi- 
cient Countenance to the Undertaking, and especial- 
ly from the Clergy. ...Brethren of the Deceased. ...at 
their late Meeting in this Place. 

To those who were acquainted with Mr. Evans, and 
have read such of his Pieces as have appeared in 
Print, it will be needless to give any Recommenda- 
tion of his Writings. Those who knew him not, 
may form some Idea, how high and rapturous were 
his Conceptions of true POETIC GENIUS, from the fol- 
lowing PREFACE, intended for his Pieces and un- 
doubtedly written by him in the short interval be- 
tween his dangerous Illness, and that fatal Relapse, 
which put an End to his Life. This PREFACE I shall 
give literally as he left it, for here the least Varia- 
tion would be criminal. 

The Profits of the Work (if any) after defraying 



i For a notice of the Rev. Nathaniel Evans, see N. J. Archives, XXV., 121. 



14 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the Expence of the Publication, is to be for the Use 
of his disconsolate Parents ; who, in him, have lost 
the Prop and Comfort of their Old Age. ...their ONLY 
SON AND CHILD. 

The Work will be published in a neat Octavo, 
Price FIVE SHILLINGS bound ; one Half to be paid at 
Subscription, and the other on Delivery of the Book. 
The Subscribers Names to be prefixed. 

WILLIAM SMITH. 

N. B. Subscriptions to be taken in by all the 
EPISCOPAL CLERGY in Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, 
New-York and Maryland, and by the different PUB- 
LISHERS of the NEWS-PAPERS in the said Provinces. 

On the i ith Instant, were interred, in the Quakers 
Burial place, in Evesham, Burlington County, New- 
Jersey, the Remains of JOSIAH FOSTER, who died at 
that Place two Days before, in the Eighty-eighth Year 
of his Age. Till the Springs of Action wore out by 
Decay of Time, he was always an industrious Man, 
studying for Quiet, and minding his own Business, 
and, with the Blessing of Providence, provided care- 
fully for his Family. He was religiously uniform, 
and very unexceptionable in his Conduct. ...Such the 
Regularity of his Life, and Temperance, that he 
never took a Vomit or Purge, nor was ever overcome 
by strong Drink. ...Such his Humanity, that he never 
sued any Person at law, nor was ever sued himself. 

BENJAMIN RANDOLPH 

TAKES this method to inform his customers, and 
the public in general, That he has for sale, at his 
ware room of carving and cabinet work &c. at the 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 15 

Sign of the Golden Eagle, in Chestnut-street, a quan- 
tity of wooden BUTTONS of various sorts, and intends, 
if encouraged, to keep a general assortment of 

them 

The people of New-Jersey (in general) wear no 
other kind of buttons, and say they are the best and 
cheapest can be bought, both for strength and 
beauty, and he doubts not but that they will soon 
recommend themselves to the public in general. 

ON Third day, the 2Oth of February, will be ex- 
posed to sale, by way of public vendue, a plantation, 
containing 450 acres, about 100 acres whereof is 
cleared land and meadow, with a dwelling-house, a 
good new barn, and a young bearing orchard, situ- 
ate, lying and being, on the south branch of Raccoon- 
Creek, near Jacob Spicer's, in Woolwich township, 
Gloucester county, where attendance will be given 
by JOSHUA LIPPINCOTT and JOHN TEST. 

Made his escape from the subscriber, living in 
Cecil county, in the province of Maryland, at Bristol 
in Bucks county, in the province of Pennsylvania, on 
the 2^th of October last, as he was bringing him home, 
from Somerset county goal, in East New Jersey, a 
Negro man, named Pen, but had changed his name, 
by a forged pass, and called his name James Pember- 
ton, it is likely he may pass by the same name ; he is 
about 25 years old, a chunky and well set black fellow, 
very talkative, and pretends to be very religious ; he 
had on, when he made his escape, a brown jacket, with 
a blue cape, blue cloth trowsers, white yarn stockings, 



1 6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

old shoes and buckles, and an old beaver hat, cocked on 
two sides. 

Whoever takes up Pen, and secures him in any goal, 
or brings him home shall have Fijty Shillings, and 
reasonable charges, paid by me 

THOMAS SAVIN. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are hereby forbid to 
harbour or take them on board, at their peril. 




The Piece signed A Jersey Farmer, will be 
in our next. The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2143, 
January 18, 1770. 

We hear from Mount-Holly, that on Thursday last, 
Mr. ISAAC WOOD, son of Henry Wood, Esq ; was 
married to Miss POLLY ROSSELL, Daughter of Zacha- 
riah Rossell, Esq ; a young Lady eminently quali- 
fied to render the Nuptial State agreeable. The 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 159, January 22-29, 
1770. 

New-Jersey, ) By Order of Stephen Skin- 

Midctlesex County \ ner, Jonathan Frazee, and 
James Parker, Esqrs ; three of the Judges of the 
Court of Common Pleas for said County, the follow- 
ing Persons, viz. Christopher Derrick, James Job, 
Richard Job, Alexander Black, Daniel Marford, 
Samuel Bunnell, Abraham Rikorn, John Collins, 
John Smith, Samuel Walker, and Thomas Anton, all 
Prisoners for Debt in the Goal of Perth-Amboy, in 
said County of Middlesex, do hereby give Notice to 
the Creditors of said Debtors, that they be together 
at the House of Elijah Dunham, in Amboy, on 
Thursday, the i5th Day of February next, to shew 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 17 

Cause, if any they have, why an Assignment of the 
said Debtors Estate should not be made, pursuant 
to a late Act of Assembly, entitled, " An Act for the 
Relief of Insolvent Debtors," passed this present 
Tenth Year of his .Majesty's Reign ; and their Bodies 
be discharged from Goal, pursuant to said Act. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN-AWAY on Friday the i2th Inst. from the Sub- 
scriber at Hunterdon County, in New-Jersey, an Ap- 
prentice, named DAVID'COX, about Twenty Years of 
Age, a Carpenter and Joiner by Trade, but its likely 
he may pass for a Mill-Wright, as he has two Broth- 
ers of that Trade, that works near Albany. He is 
about 5 Feet 10 Inches high, large ben'd, knock 
knee'd, of a dark Complexion, down Look, black 
Eyes, black Ha'ir, and wears it tied. Had on when 
he went away, a grey coloured Coat and Jacket, 
pretty much worn, with Horn Buttons on them, new 
Leather Breeches, with black Horn Buttons, Russia 
Shirt, black Yarn Stockings, new Shoes, also a rusty 
Castor Hat, wears it cock'd : It is also suspected he 
has stole his Indentures, and will very likely show 
them for a Pass, as he is near of Age. Whoever ap- 
prehends said Apprentice, and secures him in any 
Goal, so that his Master may have Notice thereof, 
shall have the above Reward, paid by me. 

JAMES TAYLOR. 

N. B. Perhaps he may change his Cloaths, that 
he may not be discovered. The N. Y. Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, No. 1412, January 22, 1770. 

* 

New-York, January 25. We hear from Piscata- 

2 



1 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

qua, in New-Jersey, That about 10 Days since, three 
Men that lived near Bound Brook, named Harris, 
Buskirk, and Howell, who called themselves Regu- 
lators, took the Liberty of flaggellating a certain 
William M' Donald, who lived near that Place, for 
having some Words with his Wife, to such a Degree, 
that he died in less than 24 Hours after. Howell, 
we hear has fled, but Harris and Buskirk surren- 
dered themselves to Justice, and are now confined in 
Brunswick Gaol. 

New Jersey, November 24, 1769. 
RuN-away the 22d September, from the Subscriber, 
living in Monmouth County, in the Township of 
Shrewsbury, in the Province of East New-Jersey; an 
indented Servant Man, named Walter Clark, born in 
the Jerseys, about Twenty-four Years of Age, a 
Black-Smith by trade, and understands farming Busi- 
ness ; he is about six Feet high, has black curl'd Hair, 
and keeps his Mouth much open : He took several 
Suits of Apparel with him, all of a brownish Colour, 
some Broad-Cloth, and some thin Stuff; also one 
striped double breasted Jacket. Whoever takes up 
the above said Servant and delivers him to me the 
Subscriber, shall have Three Pounds Reward, and 
reasonable Charges paid, by me. 

BENJAMIN JACKSON. 

The N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser , 
No. 1412, January 25, 1770. 

December 26, 1769. 
TEN DOLLARS -Reward. 
STOLEN, this morning, ut of Aaron Stathem's 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 19 

pilot boat, lying at Penrose's wharf, Southwark : A 
small worked POCKET BOOK, which contained about 
Twelve pounds in cash, among which were, two half 
Johannes's, two twenty-shilling bills, two ten shilling 
bills, and the remainder small money, the particulars 
forgot. Likewise a plain bond for Seventy-six 
pounds, from Garret Houlskemp to Aron Stathem. 
The above pocket book, money, bond, &c. was stolen 
by one JAMES BRYAN, a lad about eighteen years of 
age, born in Dublin, fair complexion, and a little 
pock-marked : He is about five feet two or three 
inches high, and wore, while on board the boat, a half 
worn English castor hat, a check shirt, almost new, 
a blue double-breasted jacket, about half-worn, with 
horn buttons, a pair of white buckskin breeches, re- 
markably long, a pair of new dark grey yarn stock- 
ings, a pair of new neats leather shoes, with double 
soals, and a pair of carv'd white metal buckles. 
Whoever takes up and secures said lad in any of his 
Majesty's gaols, so that he may be brought to jus- 
tice, and the articles recovered, shall have the above 
reward, or if the thief alone, FIVE DOLLARS, and reas- 
onable charges, paid by AARON STATHEM, in Cohan- 
sie, or ARCHIBALD ERSKIN, ship joiner, in Front-street, 
Philadelphia. 

N. B. All masters of vessels, and others, are 
hereby forwarned not to harbour or carry off said 
BRYAN, at their peril. 

NEW- YORK, January 15. 

We hear from Bound-Brook, that one William 
Daniels, near that place, having beat his wife some 
time last week, which he had frequently done before, 



20 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

she left him, and went to reside with a daughter she 
had at some distance ; and on Monday night last a 
number of persons, who are termed there Regula- 
tors, went to Daniels, and taking him out of bed, 
whipped him very severely ; and then left him to 
himself, and the next morning he was found dead in 
bed. 

NEW YORK, January 15. 

Monday night last, a dreadful fire happened at 
Newark, when the barn, stables, and some out-build- 
ings, belonging to the Hon. David Ogden, Esq; were 
entirely destroyed, with every thing that was there- 
in: They were thought to have been set on fire by 
some evft minded persons. 

Capt. Dorrel, arrived at New- York, the iith In- 
stant, off our capes spoke the brig Parragon, Capt. 
Featherston, from Barbados for this port ; who had 
lost his boom, foretop mast, & was in want of pro- 
visions. Capt. Dorrel could not spare him any, and 
left him standing in for our capes. 

The ship Generous Friends, Capt. Ross, belong- 
ing to London, from Antigua for this port, in ballast, 
having arrived within our capes, and finding our 
river full of ice, was proceeding for New-York, when 
she unhappily ran ashore on Great Egg Harbour, the 
vessel is lost, but the people and materials are 
saved. The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1416, Janu- 
ary 25, 1770. 

PHILADELPHIA, January 25. 

The Ship Generous Friends, Captain George Ross, 
from Antigua, for this Port, arrived lately in our Bay, 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 21 

and being prevented from getting up, by the Ice, was 
proceeding to New York, but unhappily run ashore 
near Great Egg Harbour, where it is feared she will 
be lost.- -The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2144, Janu- 
ary 25, 1770. 

v 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS. 

Please to insert the following Piece in your enter- 
taining Paper, which will very much oblige many of 
your Country Readers. Yours, &c. 

A JERSEY FARMER. 

WHILE America, with the most laudable Ardour, 
is endeavouring to preserve her Freedom, I am sorry 
to see so many of her Sons, like the foolish Woman, 
pulling down, with her Hands, the House the Wise 
have built, exclaiming : We are so poor, it is impos- 
sible to bear the parliamentary Impositions, and, at 
the same time encouraging and promoting every 
Species of Luxury, Dissipation and Excess almost, 
that is practiced in our Mother Country. The same 
News Paper shall contain Pieces wrote to demon- 
strate our Poverty, and Advertisements of Stage 
Plays, Horse Races, &c. whereby* vast Sums of 
Money are thrown away for no useful Purpose of 
Life ; and these are the People, that tho' they can 
spare so much to gratify their depraved Appetites 
would persuade their Superiors over the Water, that 
they are very poor, &c. How absurd, and at the 
same time injurious such Things are to the great 
Cause of Liberty we are engaged in, and how far it 
is in their Power to discourage such prevailing and 
corrupting Practices, I leave to the Consideration of 



22 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

the Judicious, while I address my Brethren Farmers, 
and request their Attention to a particular Species of,< 
Luxury that more immediately concerns us ; I mean 
Fox-Hunting, which is got to such a surprising Head 
within these few Years, that it is become dangerous, 
in some Places, for a Man to think himself so much 
Master of his own Land, as to attempt to hinder 
those Freebooters from ravaging every Part of it at 
their pleasure. Is it not very necessary then, to 
think seriously of a Practice which is likely, in a short 
Time, to become as rampant here as in England, 
where a Man shall see a Score of Horsemen with 
Hounds, driving over his Improvements, laying open 
his Enclosures, tearing up his Grain and Pasture, 
and dare not ask them why they do so?. ...For why? 
They are called Gentlemen. Many will say, we dis- 
like the Practice extremely, and should be glad to 
have a Stop put to it, but it is not in our Power, they 
are countenanced by Authority, and it is in vain to at- 
tempt it. I answer, nothing is more easy, especially 
in the Jerseys, where it is as unlawful to hunt on my 
Ground, without Leave, under my Hand, as to rob 
my House, and were a few substantial Men in a 
Neighbourhood to join, with a becoming Resolution 
to see themselves regarded, they would soon see 
those haughty Gentry, that now think it beneath them 
to ask Leave, very careful to keep off their Land, and 
to exert ourselves effectually in this Matter, before 
the Evil becomes too formidable for Opposition, is, I 
think, a Duty we owe to ourselves and to our Pos- 
terity. 

In order to shew the Freeholders of New Jersey 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 23 

their Authority in this Case, here follows the third 
Section of their Hunting Law. "And be it further 
" enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That if any Per- 
" son or Persons (native Indians excepted) after the 
" Publication of this Act, shall presume to carry a 
" Gun, or hunt or watch for Deer, or set in any Dog 
" or Dogs to drive Deer, or any other Game, on any 
" Lands not his own, and for which the Owner pays 
" Taxes, unless he have License or Permission, in 
" Writing, from the Owner or Owners of such Lands, 
" or such Person who hath the Possession or Care 
"thereof; such Person or Persons so offending, and 
" shall be thereof convicted, either upon the View of 
"any Justice of the Peace within this Province, or by 
" the Oath or Affirmation of one or more Witnesses, 
" before any Justice of the Peace, he shall, for every 
" such Offence, forfeit and pay the sum of Forty Shil- 
lings with Cost of Suit." 

As the Law is thus explicit, what have we to blame 
but our own Inattention and Supineness, for suffer- 
ing our Laws to be thus publicly and daily, insulted 
and trampled upon, and ourselves treated like Vas- 
sals by .Fox Hunters. Nor let any be deterred 
from shewing their Dislike to this domineering Sport, 
from a Fear of being ridiculed and sneered at ; for 
be assured you will have the Applause of the Virtu- 
ous, the Wise, and the Prudent, and the Sneers of 
them who are galloping merrily on in the Highway 
to Destruction, are not worth a Thought. Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2144, January 25, 1770. 



24 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To BE SOLD. 

i 

A House and lot of ground in New-Barbados, (or 
Hackinsack) in the county of Bergen and prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, together with a grist-mill, newly 
erected, and outhouses properly situated : There are 
about three acres of very fine land, the back part 
thereof surrounded by a very pretty stream of water, 
on which the mill stands, it fronts on one side the 
plain or green, on the other side it faces the street ; 
the whole most beautifully situated, and capable of 
being made, at a small expence, a most agreeable 
seat for a gentleman ; plenty of small fish are to be 
caught in the brook, in the proper season, and is a 
very convenient situation for a shop-keeper or trades- 
man of any kind. The house is large, built of stone, 
and may easily be made a genteel dwelling. The 
land is at present enclosed in a very handsome pole 
fence ; fronting the plain is a very neat house, fit for 
an office or a store : The mill house is large, and a 
boat of eight burthen may come up to the dock, 
along side the mill-house ; a few young trees, also 
are on the premises, of the best kinds of apples, 
peaches and plumbs ; and is universally allowed to 
be the finest place (for the bigness) in this country. 
There will be sold with the above said premises, 
about twenty acres of wood land, at the distance of 
one mile and a half. Any person inclining to pur- 
chase, may apply to SAMUEL B. LEYDECKER, on the 
premises, who will give a good title for the same. 
January 31, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1413, February /, 1770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 25 

New-York, January 22. 

The person advertised in the Mercury of the 22d 
inst. by the name of Schuyler or Cuyler, and that 
run away with a horse from Mr. Munson Jarvis, of 
Stanford, in Connecticut, seems to be a knowing 
hand and to have a thorough knowledge of the coun- 
try ; for on the igth Instant, he made his appearance 
at the house of Mr. William Crook, at Rariton where 
he spent 4 or 5 days, passed there by the name of 
Harmanus Ten Eyck, son of Jacob H. Ten Eyck, 
Esq ; member for the county of Albany ; that he 
himself kept a store in Albany, that his clerk had 
robbed him of a sum of money, and that he was go- 
ing to Philadelphia in pursuit of him ; that being 
scarce of cash, borrowed ,9.15.0, from Mr. Crook, a 
pair of saddle bags, and some clean linen, and gave 
a draft on Mr. Ten Eyck, of this city for the same, 
who, he said was his cousin, and then took leave. 
He had the sorrel horse with him mentioned in the 
advertisement, and is certainly the same person. 
His real name is imagined to be Bratt, and the very 
man that was punished in this city for robbing Mr. 
Bennet, the jeweller. 

We hear that one Cadry Leacy, who was adver- 
tised in our Paper of the i8th instant, as a Runaway 
from Richard Lemon, of New-Ark, New Castle 
county, was committed to Gloucester goal last week 
for murder : He passed through the country as a 
dumb man, and about two weeks ago stopped at a 
house on the Egg Harbour road, the lower end of 
Gloucester county, where he made signs that he was 
hungry, when the good woman gave him food; the 



26 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

woman's husband being at work in the Cedar 
Swamps, it is said, that Leacy wanted to go to bed 
to her, but she refusing, he killed her with a Pitch 
Fork ; then beat the children, left the oldest of them 
for dead, who has since recovered, and then made off. 
He being pursued, was taken and committed as 
above. 

Captain Moore, in a brig from Ireland, is arrived at 
our Capes. 

The brig Dove, Gamble ; and brig Nancy Adam- 
son ; were drove out to sea, by the ice, from our 
capes, with the loss of an anchor each ; but are since 
returned, when Captain Gamble got his anchor 
again. 

The brig Susannah, Sloan, was also drove out of 
our Capes, being obliged to leave her boat behind : 
On her return, still finding great quantities of ice in 
our river, she proceeded to New- York, where she 
arrived last Saturday. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1417, February i, 1770. 

East New- Jersey, January 27, 1770. 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS. 
GENTLEMEN, 

Please to publish the Inclosed in your next Paper, 
and oblige, Your humble Servant, 

AN AGED FARMER. 



I AM a Native of East New Jersey, and an aged 
Man, who have enjoyed much good Living in my 
Time, for which I acknowledge myself indebted to 
the Philadelphia Market, for enabling me to procure, 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 27 

not as a Purchaser, but as a Seller. Being a 
Farmer, I generally carried my Truck there, and dis- 
posed of it for Cash, without paying either Toll for 
having the Liberty of selling it, or contributing, in any 
Degree, to the Payment of their Taxes ; which In- 
dulgence I now most gratefully acknowledge, as 
should also my Countrymen, who are mostly under 
the same Obligations. 

But when I reflect on this, it makes my Blood run 
cold, that any Jersey Farmer should have been so 
weak, and shewn himself such an Ingrate, as to have 
published a Piece in the News-Paper against the 
Amusement of Fox-hunting ; begrudging the young 
Men of that City the Use of this Diversion in our 
Woods. Little has this Man considered that this 
Exercise, by creating them a Stomach to eat plen- 
tifully of the Provisions they allow us to supply them 
with, is of any Advantage ; while he obliges me to 
tell him, that it will do more than pay for all the lit- 
tle Injuries that they may do by Accident, in Pursuit 
of those noxious Animals. What surprises me also 
is the Oddity of this Man ; he calls Fox-hunting 
Luxury, and then rails on these good Friends of 
ours, when it is the Business of every Jersey Farmer 
to encourage it. 

To make this appear, and to shew his wrong head- 
edness, let me ask him how we should dispose of 
our Water Melons, if it was not for the Assistance of 
Luxury. He certainly must know, that they are of 
no Kind of Use as Food, and must also know, that of 
this Article these Citizens consume, I cannot say in 



28 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I" 1 ?/ 

Value, but what they pay us some Thousand Pounds 
a Year for. 

Wherefore then should he be so silly, as to be an- 
gry with our Customers and Neighbours, and en- 
deavour to make them pay what the Law may exact 
for using Diversions, which must yield us a Profit in 
the End. This is somewhat like copying after the 
People of England, who are for levying Taxes upon 
us Americans, because we help to consume their 
Manufactures, when it may be demonstrated, that 
they would get more by letting us go on consuming 
them, than they possibly can get by taxing us. 

But perhaps it will be in vain for me, who do not 
pretend to understand Politics, or good Policy, how- 
ever great my Experience may be from Years, to 
expostulate more with this unreasonable Man. Yet 
it may be necessary to tell him, that it no more be- 
comes him, at a Time when we should be united, to 
represent us to our Mother Country, as a People that 
complain heavily of Poverty, and yet are enjoying 
Luxury, than it becomes him to be a bad Neighbour 
to a Province that has indulged us. 

But to conclude ; if this Man should still persist in 
being foolish, and others should be such Dupes as 
to be led by him to resent supposed injuries, they 
ought to be treated with Contempt, and despised, 
for making false Representations of Things from 
their own weak Prejudices ; while the Consequence 
may be fatal, by exciting good People to contrive 
Taxes for us, who have long been indulged in more 
than equal % Privileges with themselves, without pay- 
ing any Thing to the Support of their Government. 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 29 

List of Letters remaining in the POST OFFICE, Phila- 
delphia, January 5, 1770. 

K. Joseph Kutnell, West Jersey. 

L. Gasham Lee, Amwell. 

M. Michael M'Daniel, New-Jersey. 

P. George Parrot, Salem. 

R. Dr. Ananias Randal, Alloways Creek ; Dr. 
Alexander Ross, Mountholly ; John Reynolds, Cran- 
berry. 

W. Thomas White, Pilesgrove. 

To be SOLD at private SALE. 

By the subscribers, pursuant to the last will and tes- 
tament of JAMES EDDY, deceased, viz. 
A Valuable lot of ground, situate between Second 

and Front streets, on the south side of Spruce-street, 

* 

Likewise about 14 acres of land, in the township 
of Amwell, and county of Hunterdon, West New 
Jersey, fronting the high-way, leading from Rariton 
to Trenton, distance about 45 miles from Philadel- 
phia, bounded by lands of Christopher Marshall, 
the heirs of William Morris, deceased, Thomas 
Lowry, and Gresham Lea. All persons inclining 
to purchase, may view the land, by applying to 
Thomas Lowry, near the premises. 

The conditions of sale will be made easy to the 
purchasers, which may be known, by applying to The 
Executors-. 

MARY EDDY, Executrix, ABRAHAM USHER, Execu- 
tor to said estate. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2145, 
February i, 1770. 



30 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/7O 

NEW YORK, January 22. 

We hear from Piscataqua, in New Jersey, That 

about 10 Days since three Men, that lived near 

Bound-Brook, named Harris, Buskirk and HowelL, 

who called themselves Regulators, took the Liberty of 

flagellating a certain William M' Donald, who lived 

near that Place, for having some Words with his 

Wife, to such a Degree, that he died in less than 24 

Hours after. Howell, we hear, has fled, but Harris 

and Buskirk surrendered to Justice, and are now 

confined in Brunswick Goal. 

Burlington, January 24, 1770. 

BY virtue of his Majesty's writs of Fieri Facias, to 
me directed, will be exposed to sale, at public 
vendue, on Saturday, the 24th day of March next, 
between the hours of 12 and 5 in the afternoon of 
said day, at the house of Thomas Shinn, in Mount- 
Holly, three undivided quarter parts of all and sin- 
gular the buildings, lands and tenements, commonly 
called and known by the name of Mount-Holly Iron- 
works, and the appurtenances ; late the property of 
Peter Bard, deceased ; seized and taken in execu- 
tion, at the suit of Henry Paxson, Esq ; and Edward 
Tonkin, deceased by 

JOSEPH IMLAY, late Sheriff. 

All Persons indebted to the Estates of James 
Child, of Child and Stiles, late of this City, Mer- 
chants, are once more desired to make speedy Pay- 
ment, .... 

To be SOLD, as Part of the said Child's Estate, 
three several Tracts of Land, situate at Egg-Har~ 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 31 

hour, being chiefly Pine Land ; and one other Tract, 
about 150 Acres, in the County of Gloucester, called 
Maple Swamp, and Warrant for 600 Acres of Land, 
to be surveyed and laid out, in one of the Branches 
of Juniata ; all which Lands will be sold very reason- 
ably by the Assignees of the said Estate. 

FRANCIS RICHARDSON, 

one of the Assignees in Trust. 

On Monday, the igth day of March next, pursu- 
ant to the last will and testament of Cornelius Cor- 
neliuson, deceased, by public vendue, will be sold, on 
the premises, in Upper Penn's Neck, in the county of 
Salem, A valuable PLANTATION, containing, by esti- 
mation, near 300 acres of LAND and MEADOW, joining 
on a creek, called Game Creek, on which is a dwell- 
ing-house, out-houses, orchard* garden, and about 
20 acres of good meadow, and a conveniency of mak- 
ing a great deal more extraordinary good, about 30 
acres of the land are cleared, the rest well timbered ; 
the land in general is very good, and lies convenient 
to landings, both on Delaware river and Salem creek. 
The title is supposed to be good, and will be shewn 
to those who incline to purchase, at the time and 
place aforesaid, by 

GEORGE TRENCHARD, Executor. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2145, February i, 
1 770. 

To be sold, 'or let, and entered upon immediately ; 
HPHE ESTATE whereon Ezekiel Forman formerly 

1 lived, called New-Market, being near two Miles 
from Princeton, in the Jerseys, and one of the best 



32 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [j77O 

stands in the government for a merchant's shop, hav- 
ing every advantage that could be wished for to carry 
on that branch of business ; and a merchant mill, in 
high repute, at the door. There is on the premises, 
a dwelling-house, forty feet square, in good repair, a 
well-finished kitchen adjoining, a large and commo- 
dious ware-house, forty feet by twenty-six, a good 
barn and barrack, both covered with cedar, a good 
garden spot, and long in use, paled in with cedar, 
and many other conveniences. There is in the 
whole about fifty acres of land, eighteen of which is 
meadow ground. Any person inclining to purchase, 
may have it a great bargain, and an indisputable 
title. Any reasonable time will be given for the 
payment of the purchase money, with interest. For 
further particulars apply to EZEKIEL FORMAN, at 
Princeton, in the Jerseys. Pennsylvania Journal, 
No. 161, February 5-12, 1770. 

New-York, February 5. We hear from New- 
Brunswick, that in the great and sudden Thaw we 
had on Monday and Tuesday last, the fine Bridge 
lately built across Rariton River, near Bound-Brook, 
was carried away by the Ice falling against it, with 
the Rapidity of the Current. 

From Freehold, in Monmouth County, in New- 
Jersey, we learn, that the Inhabitants of that County, 
are so irritated at the Lawyers there, that on Tues- 
day the 23d of January, being the Time appointed 
for holding Courts of Pleas and General Sessions of 
the Peace there, a great Number of them assembled 
in a tumultuous and riotous Manner, and absolutely 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 33 

refused to permit one Lawyer to come ; and the 
Magistrates were so intimidated that no Courts were 
opened or held there that Time. 



New-Jersey, 
Essex County, I 



^Y 

LJ 



Order of John Ogden, and 
Daniel Pearson, Esqrs ; two of 



the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas in and for 
the County of Essex : Notice is hereby given, unto 
all the Creditors of Joshua Marsh and Samuel Rob- 
ertson, that they may be and appear at the Court 
House in Newark, on Thursday, the 22d of Febru- 
ary, at two o'Clock in the Afternoon, to shew Cause, 
if any they have, unto the said Judges, why the said 
Insolvent Debtors, may not be discharged from their 
Confinement, by an Act of the General Assembly, 
made for Insolvent Debtors. January 30, 1770. 

To be sold at Publick Vendue, on the Premises, 
the ist Tuesday in April next, or at private Sale any 
Time before, 

A Farm or Plantation, situated on Bound-Brook, 
5 Miles from Brunswick Landing, and one Mile and 
a Half from the Town of Bound-Brook, in Somerset 
County, East New-Jersey, formerly in Possession of 
William Clawson, containing about r 50 Acres of very 
good Land, the greatest Part Meadow, yielding from 
70 to 80 Tons of Hay a Year. For further Particu- 
lars, inquire of Mr. Tobias Van Orden, at Bound- 
Brook, or Ludlow and Hoffman in New- York 

TWELVE POUNDS Proclamation Reward. 

WHEREAS by the Inquisition of John Gillman, Esq ; 
Coroner of the County of Middlesex, in the Prov- 



34 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ince of New-Jersey, it was found, that Daniel How- 
ell, and others, in the Evening of the Ninth Day of 
January last past, went to the House of William 
Daniels, in Piscataway, and seized the said Daniels, 
flung him down, tore his Cloaths, and with Sticks or 
Whips, then and there did beat and bruise the afore- 
said William Daniels, by Means whereof, he died be- 
fore the next Morning: The said Howell, is about 
the Age of Forty-five or Fifty, fair Complexion, short 
black Hair, and about six Feet high, had on a blue 
Great Coat, brown Homespun Coat and Jacket, and 
Buckskin Breeches, had also with him, a large Bay 
Mare. Whoever apprehends the above-named Dan- 
iel Howell, and secures him in any of his Majesty's 
Goals, so that -he may be brought to Justice, shall be 
entitled to the above Reward, paid by me, 

JAMES HARRIS, sen. 
Perth-Amboy, Jan. 29, 1770. 

N> Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1414, 
February^, 1770. 

New-Jersey, Monmouth, ) BY Order of the Hon. John 
January 25, 1770. I Anderson, John Taylor, 
and James Lawrence Esqrs, three of the Judges of 
the Court of Common Pleas for said County ; That 
Ebenezer Applegate, Benjamin Sutphen, Levy Hart, 
John Tilton, James Dorset, Thomas Ryan, Giles Wil- 
liams, Thomas Evingame, Henry Worth, Joseph 
Taylor, and William Hankinson, jun. all Prisoners 
for Debt in said Gaol ; were on the 28th Day of Jan- 
uary 1770, qualified to their Schedules of Effects, 
Pursuant to a late Act of Assembly entitled, an Act 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 35 

for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors, made this pres- 
ent Tenth Year of his Majesty's Reign, &c. 

Now these are to give Notice to the Creditors of 
said Debtors, that they be together at the Court 
House of said County, on the 2;th of February next, 
(to shew Cause if any they have) why the said Debt- 
ors' hstate, should not be assigned for the Use of 
their Creditors, and their Bodies discharged from 
Gaol. Pursuant to said Act. N. Y. Journal or 
General Advertiser, No. 1414, February 8, 1770. 

The brig mentioned in our last to be arrived at our 
Capes from Ireland, is the brig Richard Penn, Moore, 
from Dingle de Couch, 

The brig James, Johnson, mentioned in our last to 
be ashore at our Capes, is since got off. Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1418, February 8, 1770. 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS. 

Be pleased to insert the following Piece, in your next 
Gazette, and oblige a great Number of your feaders, 
particularly, Yours &c. 

A Fox HUNTER. 

CONSCIOUS of my Inability to attack such a noble 
spirited Piece, as appeared in the Gazette of the 25th 
ult. signed A Jersey Far t mer, I presume the Readers 
will excuse my being actuated by a Spirit of Liberty, 
to make a faint Attempt in Vindication of my Breth- 
ren the Fox Hunters ; and in the first Place, will pro- 
pose to the Farmer, a Quere, which (if he is not too 
busy cutting his Fire-wood) I leave to his candid De- 
termination....! would beg Leave to ask, if the Fox- 



36 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



Hunters are meant to " Gallop on the High-way to 
Destruction?' If so, the Farmer may be assured, 
we don't always take one Course, for the Fox often 
doubles, and we return to our former State ; thus no 
transient Farmer can judge whether a Fox Hunter 
goes backward or forward in that great Journey. ...Do 
we "haughty Gentry," in any respect, think it "be- 
neath us ' to ask the Liberty of a Farmer, to hunt 
on his Lands? Has our Conduct ever shown us in 
such a Light? No. ...but our Accuser takes that for 
granted and publishes it, requiring another Reason.... 
We sometimes go through his Land, it is true, 
when we are in full Chase, or in too great a Hurry 
to ask at that Time, but are willing and desirous 
to make him ample Satisfaction for the Damage we 
do him.... otherwise, we think we do him Service (by 
destroying those Enemies to his Poultry) adequate, 
if not superior, to the Damage he receives. 

It is therefore desired, that a single " Farmer 
will never pretend to publish the Conduct of Fox 
Huntews erroneously ; ...we are a numerous Body, 
and shall get so " Rampant", that none of his Fields 
will contain us. We can, however, assure him, that 
a great Number of Jersey Farmers have invited us 
to hunt in their Neighborhood, and that the Gen- 
erality of them are free hearted People, who love 
the Sound of the Horn, and respect our whole So- 
ciety. 

The Captains William and Shroudy, are arrived 
at the Capes from Lisbon. 



I77O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 37 

To BE SOLD, 

EITHER the one half, or the whole, of a valuable 
plantation, situate and being in the township of 
Northampton, in the county of Bwrlington, in the 
Forks of Rancocus Creek, about 3 miles from 
Mount Holly, and 16 from Philadelphia, containing 
500 acres of land, near 1 30 of which is good meadow 
and marsh on the tide, about 90 acres whereof is 
within an excellent good bank, well sanded, and a 
considerable part into good timothy and green grass, 
100 acres of the upland cleared, and within good 
fence, 1 5 acres of which are planted with a good 
young orchard, chiefly grafted fruit, with a large 
and convenient dwelling house thereon, well finished, 
and pleasantly situated, commanding a very fine and 
extensive prospect, a very good cheese and milch- 
house, with a pump, spouts and copper therein, a 
commodious barn 30 by 40 feet, a waggon and chair- 
house, a large granary and hay-house, with stables 
round it, and other out-houses, all in good repain 
Any person inclining to purchase, may enquire of 
John Bispham, or John Hatkinson, in Mount Holly, 
or the subscriber, at the New Ferry- House, Philadel- 
phia. 

THOMAS BISPHAM. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living near Morris- 
Town, in New-Jersey, on Christmas-day last, a ser- 
vant man, named Thomas Clay, a Cooper by trade, 
near 50 years of age, about 5 feet to inches high, 
brown curled hair, will drink to excess, and then is 
noisy, likes to sing songs; had on, when he went 



38 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

away, a blue great coat, and jacket of the same, 
leather breeches, and felt hat. Whoever takes up 
and secures said servant, so that his master may 
have him again, shall have Three Pounds reward, and 
reasonable charges, paid by 

DANIEL GERARD, junior. 

^-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 214.6, February 8, 
1770. 

Perth- Amboy, February 9. The General Assem- 
bly of the Province of New-Jersey are summoned to 
meet at Burlington, on Wednesday the I4th of next 
Month. 

To BE SOLD. 

i 

A Very good FARM, situate at Shrewsbury, in the 
County of Monmouth, and Province of New- 
Jersey, belonging to the Estate of John Eatton, de- 
ceased, being the Place whereon he formerly lived, 
containing One Hundred and Thirty-seven Acres of 
extraordinary good Land, adjoining to the Head of 
Shrewsbury South-River, about One Hundred Acres 
whereof being Upland, cleared and fit for the Plow, 
and the Residue Salt and Fresh Meadow and very 
rich Swamp ; the Whole being in good Fence, and 
has a very large good Dwelling House, Barn, Chaise- 
House, Waggon-House, Orchard and other Improve- 
ments thereon ; and there is about One Hundred 
Acres of good Wood-Land, belonging to the said 
Farm, about one Mile distant from the same. The 
Whole of the Premises is to be sold together at pri- 
vate Sale, by Richard Tole, living near the same ; 
the Rev. Elihu Spencer, at Trenton, or John Berrien 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 39 

of Rocky Hill, at any Time before Tuesday the Thir 
teenth Day of March next, in Case a Purchaser ap- 
pears ; otherways the same will be exposed to Sale 
by Way of public Vendue, at Two of the "Clock on 
that Day, when the Conditions of Sale will be pub- 
lished by the said 

RICHARD TOLE, 

ELIHU SPENCER, and 

JOHN BERRIEN. 
Feb. 12, 1770. 

New-Jersey, Middlesex County, Feb. 5, 1770; 
BY Order of Stephen Skinner and Jonathan Fra- 
zee, Esqrs. Samuel Drake and Joseph Drake are to 
be discharged the 28th February, 1770, at the House 
of Elijah Dunham in the City of Perth-Amboy. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN-AWAY the 8th Instant, and was seen at Powles 
Hook, the Afternoon of that Day, 

A VILLAIN, 

JOHN CUNNINGHAM, about 5 Feet 10 Inches high, 
black hair, fresh Complexion, and good Counte 
nance : Had on a dark brown Coat, a Pair of new 
Buckskin Breeches, and took with him a Fuzee. 
Whomsoever apprehends him, and will have him se- 
cured in any of his Majesty's Goals, so that he might 
be brought to Justice, shall have of the Printer here- 
of FIVE POUNDS Reward, and all reasonable Charges 
paid. 

As this Fellow has been guilty of a notorious 
Breach of Trust, it is hoped that every honest Man, 
who have it in their Power, will assist in apprehend- 



40 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS* [ 1 

ing him in order to his being brought to Punish- 
ment N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1415, February 12, 1770. 

To BE SOLD. 

THE noted Grist-Mills on Cranberry Brook, in the 
County of Middlesex, Province of New-Jersey, all 
in good working order, has two Pair of stones, three 
good bolts which go by water, the stream is good, a 
framed house, stable, lot of three acres of good Eng- 
lish meadow adjoining : Also 212 acres of good land, 
a good framed dwelling house and Barn thereon two 
miles from said mills, and 19 acres of meadow lying 
along Penolipin Brook ; they lie in a pleasant and 
healthy country, the estate of Michael Reynolds, de- 
ceas'd, the mills are well situated for a Country store, 
lying on the stage road ten miles from South-River 
landing, and 18 miles from Abbot's landing on Dela- 
ware, so that the purchaser may send his produce, or 
receive goods from either New-York or Philadelphia, 
at a very reasonable rate : The mills to be sold sep- 
arate, if required. For further particulars, enquire 
of us, on the premises, who will give a good tittle. 

Grace Reynolds, 
John Reynolds. 

February 10, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1415, February 15, 1770.. 

PHILADELPHIA, February 15. 

We hear his Excellency, GOVERNOR FRANKLIN, has 
ordered the GENERAL ASSEMBLY of New-Jersey to be 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS, 41 

summoned to meet at Burlington, on the Fourteenth 
of next Month. 

Our Navigation is now so clear, that the Vessels, 
which have been at the Capes for some Time, are 
come up to Town. 

RUN away from his BAIL, living in Piles-Grove, 
Salem county, West Jersey, a certain JAMES GIPSON, 
a Weaver by Trade, of a small stature, thin visage, 
wears his own hair, of a lightish colour ; had on, a 
claret coloured broadcloth coat, blue calimancoe 
jacket, leather breeches, and a new felt hat ; has re- 
markable long upper teeth. Whoever takes up, and 
secures the said James Gipson, in any of his Majes- 
ty's goals, in America, shall be intitled to a reward 
of THREE POUNDS, and reasonable charges, paid by 

DANIEL MARKER, Constable. 

To be SOLD, a very good Farm, situate at Shrews- 
bury, in the County of Monmouth, and Province of 
New-Jersey, belonging to the Estate of John Eatton, 
deceased ; being the Place whereon he formerly lived, 
containing 137 Acres of extraordinary good Land, 
adjoining to the Head of Shrewsbury South River, 
about 100 Acres whereof being Up-land, cleared and 
fit for the Plough, and the Residue salt and fresh 
Meadow, and very good Swamp ; the whole being in 
good Fence, and has a very large good Dwelling- 
house, Barn, Chaise-house, Waggon-house, Orchard, 
and other Improvements thereon. And there is 
about 100 Acres of good Wood Land belonging to 
the said Farm, about i Mile distant from the same. 
The whole of the Premises are to be sold together at 



42 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

private Sale, by Richard Tole, living near the same, 
the Rev. Elihu Spencer of Trenton, or John Berrien, 
at Rockey-Hill, at any Time before Tuesday, the 
1 3th Day of March next, in case a Purchaser ap- 
pears ; otherwise the same will be exposed to Sale 
by Way of public Vendue, at 2 o'clock on that Day, 
when the Conditions of Sale will be published by the 
said RICHARD TOLE, ELIHU SPENCER and JOHN BER- 
RIEN. 

Salem Goal, February 5, 1770. 

PURSUANT to an act of the General Assembly of 
the province of New-Jersey, lately passed, intided, an 
act for the relief of insolvent debtors, we, the sub- 
scribers, being confined in Salem goal, and having 
petitioned Grant Gibbons, Andrew Synickson, and 
George Trenchard, Esquires, Judges of the Inferior 
Court of Common Pleas for the county of Salem, for 
the benefit of said act ; do hereby give notice to all 
our creditors to appear, and shew cause, if any they 
have, on the 6th day of March next, at 2 o'clock in 
the afternoon, before said Judges, at the house of 
Joseph Burroughs, Esq ; Innholder, in the town of 
Salem, why we should not be discharged from our 
confinement, agreeable to the directions of said act. 

EDWARD TONKIN, MICHAEL M'COSKER, WOODEY 
RAWLEY, JAMES M'NiGHT,. ABRAHAM LORD.- -Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2147, February 15, 1770. 

All persons indebted to tke estate 
of SAMUEL BARD, Attorney at Law, late of Mount- 
Holly, deceased, are desired to make speedy payment to 
ZACHARIAH ROSSELL, his Executor, and such who have 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS, 43 

any demands against said estate, are requested to pro- 
duce the same, that they may be adjusted and paid. 

N. B. The Law affairs and papers, which were un- 
der care of the said SAMUEL BARD, at his desire were 
put into the hands of SAMUEL ALLINSON, Attorney at 
Law, in Burlington, to prevent any delay to the clients, 
to him therefore they will please to apply, and give 
their directions. 

ZACHARIAH ROSSELL, Executor. 
-^Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 163, February 
19-26, 1770. 

NEW- JERSEY 

An ACT the more effectually to regulate FERRY-MEN, 
and FERRIES, within this Colony. 

Sect. I. BE IT ENACTED by the Governor, Council, 
and General Assembly of this Colony, and it is here- 
by Enacted by the Authority of the same, That the 
Ferry-Men owning, possessing, or employed in all or 
any of the Boats, Flats, Wherries, or other Vessels, 
for carrying Passengers to and from any Place or 
Places within this Colony, or to and from the Col- 
onies of New-York and Pennsylvania, and the Lower 
Counties on Delaware, or any of them, shall, and are 
hereby required, to give constant and diligent At- 
tendance, and to keep their Boats, and other Craft, 
at all Times in Order, with sufficient and able Hands 
to attend the same, and not to deny, or unnecessar- 
ily delay, the speedy carrying over any Passenger or 
Passengers, applying for that Purpose, singly or to- 
gether, with Horse or Carriage, or with any other 
Creature, or any Creature or Creatures, singly or to- 



44 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

gether, or any Thing else whatsoever, that may 
be lawfully carried over, upon the Penalty of forfeit- 
ing, for every such Denial, Neglect, or Delay, the 
Sum of Twenty Shillings, and the Damages such 
Person or Persons may have sustained by any such 
Denial, Neglect, or Delay. And they are also here- 
by further enjoined and commanded, upon the Pen- 
alty aforesaid, not to exact or take any unaccus- 
tomed or unreasonable Ferriage, which said Penal- 
ties and Damages respectively, shall be recovered, 
upon due Conviction of such Offender or Offenders, 
before any neighboring Justice of the Peace, and ap- 
plied one Half to the Person who shall complain and 
prosecute the same to Effect, the other Half to the 
Overseers of the Highways, of the Township where 
such Ferry is situate, to be applied towards repairing 
the public Roads and Bridges of the said Township. 
2. AND Whereas it is necessary that a General 
Table of the Rates of Ferriages throughout this Col- 
ony should be ascertained and established : BE IT 
ENACTED by the Authority aforesaid, That Richard 
Smith, Esq ; one of the Clerks of the Assembly of 
this Colony, shall cause this Act to be published in 
the Gazettes of New- York and Pennsylvania, and 
"also in detached printed Copies, to be fixed up to 
public View at every Ferry in this Colony, by the 
Owner or Possessor of such Ferry, on or before the 
first Day of May next, as well that no Person or Per- 
sons whatsoever, may plead Ignorance of the Penal- 
ties hereby imposed, as that the respective Owners 
and Possessors of Ferries throughout this Colony, 
may be regularly informed, that such Rates will come 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 45 

under the Consideration of the Legislature, at the next 
Sitting of General Assembly, in order that the same 
may be ascertained and established, and that such 
Owners and Possessors of Ferries may then attend, 
if they think proper. And the said Richard Smith, 
shall lay his Account of the Expences that shall ac- 
crue in performing the Duties enjoined him by this 
Act, before the next General Assembly. 

The above Act was passed the sixth of December, 
1769. 

THE Votes of the late Session of Assembly of 
New Jersey, held at Burlington, are in the Press, and 
will be printed with all possible Expedition ; but as 
that Session has been larger than usual, it will con- 
sequently take the longer Time to do them. 

IN Pursuance of an Order made by Philip Van 
Horn, Peter Schenck and Job Stockton, Esqrs. 
Judges of the Court of Common Pleas for the Coun- 
ty of Somerset, and Province of East New-Jersey ; 
upon the Petition of John Rue, and John Denton, 
Insolvent Debtors, now confined in the said County : 
Notice is hereby given by the said Petitioners to all 
their Creditors, to shew Cause (if any they have) be- 
fore the said Judges at Somerset Court-House, on 
the 1 4th Day of March next at Ten o'clock in the 
Morning of said Day, being the Day and Place ap- 
pointed by the said Judges for that Purpose ; why an 
Assignment of the said Petitioners Estates, should 
not be made to Persons to be nominated agreeable 
to said Act ; and the said Petitioners thereupon be 
discharged, according to the Directions of an Act of 



46 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7?O 

the Governor, Council, and General Assembly of the 
Province of New-Jersey, made and passed the last 
Session at Burlington, in the Tenth Year of his pres- 
ent Majesty's Reign, entitled, " An Act for the Re- 
lief of Insolvent Debtors." Dated the i6th Day of 
February, 1770. 

RUN away the i 7th of September last, from Na- 
thaniel Richards of Newark in New Jersey, a dark 
Mulatto or Negro Man named Ben, who appears to 
have been taken up at Albany, and committed to 
Goal there, and to have escaped out of the Goal, the 
Night of the 27th of December, and is supposed to 
have stole a Horse, Saddle and Bridle, from Col. 
Bradstreet ; for which he has been advertised by the 
Colonel: He is about 5 Feet 10 Inches high, thin 
made, a large flat Nose, with curld Hair down each 
Cheek, and had on a long grey Surtout Coat. Who- 
ever shall take up said Mulatto, and secure him, so 
that his Master may have him again, shall have FIVE 
POUNDS Reward, and all reasonable Charges. 

N. B. An Irishman commonly called TOBY QUIT, 
absconded the same Night from Albany, and appears 
to be the same Person who went off with him from 
Newark, and perhaps might have taken the Horse. 
He is about 5 Feet 9 Inches high, fair short Hair, 
tied behind, had on an old Hat, with blue half-worn 
Surtout Coat, with brass Buttons on each Side, and a 
double Cape. 

New-Jersey ) BY Qrder of Stephen Skinner, 

Middlesex County J and Jonathan Frazee, Esqrs. 

two of the Judges of the Inferior Court of Common 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 47 

Pleas for said County: Notice is hereby given to all 
the Creditors of William Carlisle, and Thomas 
Davis, Insolvent Debtors, in the County of Middle- 
sex : that they shew Cause, if any they have, before 
the said Judges, at the House of Elijah Dunham, Inn- 
holder, in the City of Perth-Amboy, in the County of 
Middlesex aforesaid, on Thursday the 8th Day of 
March next, why an Assignment of the said Debtors 
Estate should not be made, pursuant to a late Act of 
Assembly, entitled, <( An Act for the Relief of Insolv- 
ent Debtors," passed this present Tenth Year of his 
Majestys Reign, and their Bodies be discharged from 
Gaol, pursuant to said Act. 

To BE LET OR SOLD. 

A HOUSE and Lot, situate in Elizabeth-Town, in 
the Province of New-Jersey, late the Property of Mr. 
Joseph Woodruff, jun. deceased, and now in the Pos- 
session of Mr. Oliver Spencer. This is a convenient 
well finished House, and very near the publick 
Landing, therefore fit for almost any Kind of Busi- 
ness. Also, a Lot of Ground, (adjoining to Elliot 
Cresy's House) on which are two small Tenements 
and a new Wharf. Also to be Let, the House and 
Lot formerly the Widow Hunloke's, now in the Pos- 
session of Mr. Isaac Arnett: This House is pleas- 
antly situated on Elizabeth-River, in the Centre of 
the Town, and also very convenient for Business. 

Enquire of the Subscribers in Elizabeth-Town. 

WILLIAM P. SMITH, 
ISAAC WOODRUFF, 
ELIAS BOUDENOT. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1416, 
February 19, 1770. 



48 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I" 1 77 

To be SOLD, 

BY the subscriber, living in the township of Piles- 
grove, in the county of Salem and western divis- 
ion of the province of New-Jersey ; the one half of 
a forge, with four fires and two hammers, with coal 
houses and a convenient dwelling house, the whole 
built with stone, and in good repair, not more than 
three years old, with a smiths shop, and a number of 
workmens houses, sufficient to accommodate the 
workmen, together with the half part of a stone grist 
mill, two years old, and in good repair, on a never 
failing stream of water, constantly supplied with 
springs ; the mill overshot with one pair of stones, 
bolting tackling all goes by water, within half a mile 
of the above said forge. Also the one half part of 
the mine, within a quarter of a mile of said forge, 
containing a sufficiency of good iron ore to supply 
any number of works, which has been proved both 
in blooming and refining, and is of a superior qual- 
ity to any iron, made in the province. Also one 
other forge with three fires and one hammer, with 
sufficiency of room to erect another hammer, and 
fire in the same house : A good saw mill on the same 
dam, the whole in good repair and new, with a fur- 
nace, casting and bridge horses, and other conven- 
iences suitable for the same, on the said forge dam, 
with a cole house, sufficient to contain fifteen hun- 
dred loads of coal ; a smiths shop, tan yard, curry 
shop, shoemakers shop, and a bark mill ; also a good 
dwelling house and kitchen, with a good spring of 
water near the door ; store house, stables and work- 
mens houses : the whole within a mile of the grist 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 49 

mill, and a mile and half of the first mentioned 
forge, and a mile from the mine hole; with about 
thirty acres of good improved meadow, within a mile 
of the furnace, and about four hundred acres^ of rich 
swamp adjoining, within the same distance, with two 
good farms within a mile, sufficient to put in a hun- 
dred acres of grain a year, with sufficient quantity 
of fine timber land, to accommodate the furnace and 
two forges for any time. The greatest distance to 
cart coal will not exceed three miles in twenty years. 
The "purchaser may have with the works, 600 loads 
of coal, and two thousand cords of wood within a 
mile of the furnace, the greatest part set in pits. The 
whole is situated in a fine country for trade, where 
there is plenty of all sorts of country produce. To 
be sold reasonably, and on a good stream of water, 
called the Wallkill-river, in the county of Sussex, in 
east Jersey, forty miles from New- Windsor; where 
is good navigation to New- York, and thirty miles 
from a landing on the river Delaware : From which 
place, iron may be transported to Philadelphia, reas- 
onably. Any person inclining to purchase all, or 
part, may apply to the subscriber, at his house, or to 

Abia Brown, living at said works. 

JOSEPH SHARP. 
1 5 th February, \ 770 

BY Order of Nathaniel Pettit and Thomas Van 
Horne, Esqrs. two of his Majesty's Judges of the In- 
ferior Court of Common Pleas for the County of 
Sussex : Public Notice is hereby given, that Thurs- 
day the 22d of March, is appointed by said Judges 
to meet, at the Court House in said County, in order 



50 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

to discharge John Allen, he having complied with the 
Conditions of the late Act of Insolvency. 
February Qth, 1770. 

New- Jersey, ) BY Order of the honorable John 
Monmouth. \ Anderson, John Taylor, and John 
Wardle, Esqrs, three of the Judges of the court of 
common pleas for said county : That William 
Thompson, petitioner for debt, in said gaol, was this 
tenth day of February, i 770, qualified to his sched- 
ule of his effects, pursuant to a late act of assembly, 
an act, entitled, an act for the relief of insolvent 
debtors, made this present tenth year of his Majes- 
ty's reign. Now these are to give notice, to the 
creditors of said debtor, that they be together at the 
court house of said county, on the 2oth day of March 
next, to shew cause if any they have, why the said 
debtor's estate should not be assigned for the use ot 
his creditors, and his body discharged from gaol, pur- 
suant to said act. A^. Y. Journal or General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1416, February 22, 1770. 

STOLEN, from the subscriber, living in Salem coun- 
ty, West New-Jersey, a sorrel HORSE, about 13 hands 
and an inch high, low in flesh, not trimmed, shod all 
round, a star on the forehead, and a natural pacer. 
Supposed to be stolen by one SAMUEL KING, an Irish- 
man, by trade a laborer, a short thick well-set fellow, 
grey-headed, ragged in cloaths, and wears his hair 
tied ; is thought said King has two confederates, viz. 
JOHN SMITH and his WIFE, who cross'd Cooper's 
Ferry last Sunday to this city, and are perhaps lurk- 
ing about town. Whoever takes up said Horse and 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 51 

Thief, shall, if convicted, receive THREE POUNDS, or 
THIRTY SHILLINGS reward, for each, and reasonable 
charges paid by 

ELISHA ALLEN. 

-Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1420, February 22, 
1770. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia, CLEARE'D. 

Sloop Honest Endeavorer, R. Savory, Amboy. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2148, February 22, 
1 770. 

New-York, March i. 

We hear from Newark, that at a court held there 
on Friday last, for the trial of sundry persons con- 
cerned in some late riotous proceedings, on account 
of a dispute between the provincial proprietors, and 
a number of inhabitants, claiming under the pur- 
chase of Indian titles ; when one of the rioters was 
fined one hundred pounds, and several others in 
lesser sums. 

Gloucester County, March i, 1770. 
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, that I the sub- 
scriber intend to apply to the General Assembly of 
New-Jersey, at their next sessions, to be held at Bur- 
lington, on the 1 4th of this inst. for a further indulg- 
ence of a supplement to that part of the act which 
respects me, passed at the last session, entitled, An 
Act for the relief of insolvent debtors. If any per- 
son has any objection to its being granted, they are 
requested to appear, and make their objections. 

William Gerrard. 



52 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

BY order of Nathaniel Pettit, and Thomas Van- 
horne, Esqrs, two of his Majesty's judges of the in- 
ferior court of common pleas for the county of Sus- 
sex, in the province of New-Jersey, Notice is hereby 
given to all the Creditors of CORNELIUS VANOVER, an 
insolvent debtor, who has petitioned for relief, and 
complied with the conditions of the late act of assem- 
bly, to appear on Wednesday, the twenty-second of 
March next, at two o'clock on the said day, at the 
court-house, to shew cause, if any they have, why he 
should not be discharged, agreeable to the said Act. 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 164., February 26- 
March 5, 1770. 

Elizabeth-Town, New-Jersey, January 15, 1770. 
To the Printers of the New-York News Papers. 

aving been great part of last week at Newark, 
amidst the many confusions and riots there, I 
made it my business to get acquainted with the 
same, and of the causes thereof, as well as I could ; 
which pray communicate to the public through your 
papers, that they may not be deceived by false rep- 
resentations. , 

I found there had long subsisted a dispute between 
several persons claiming title to certain lands under 
the crown of England, and others claiming under 
Indian purchases ; that many years past, an amica- 
ble suit at law was agreed on by both parties, to de^ 
termine the- same ; and an impartial jury was struck 
in a foreign county, and brought to the supreme 
court to try the same : To prevent which trial, the 
Indian purchasers obtained an injunction from the 



I77O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS, 53 



court of chancery ; stopped the suit of law, and filed 
their bill in the same court ; which after some time,- 
was answered, and the council for the Indian pur- 
chasers advised their clients, on examining the bill 
answer and proofs that they had no title, and recom- 
mended to them to endeavour to have the dispute 
submitted to arbitration, which was done at the re- 
quest of the Indian purchasers and their council, and 
the dispute was submitted to three gentlemen living 
on Long-Island, in the government of New-York, al- 
together disinterested ; who, after a full hearing of 
several days, unanimously agreed and awarded, that 
the title to those lands was vested in those holding 
under the crown of England, and not in the Indian 
purchasers, and that each party should pay their own 
costs. That the said Indian purchasers, instead of 
abiding by the award, renewed their suit in chancery, 
and on a full hearing before the chancellor, a decree 
was given against them, and their bill dismissed, with 
costs accrued since the award. The Indian purchas- 
ers refusing to comply with the solemn determination 
against them by the court of equity, and by arbitra- 
tors of their own choosing, now bid defiance to the 
laws, government, and constitution of the country, 
and have with many others about twenty days past, 
erected on the lands in dispute a strong hold, or goal, 
and published laws of their own making : That the 
proprietors, the magistrates, sheriff and other officers 
coming on the lands to disturb them in the possess- 
ion of those lands, or to serve any writs or warrants 
relating to said lands, should be put into their goal and 
confined therein, with an iron yoke about their necks 



54 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. f 



to be made for that purpose ; with many other threats 
against his Majesty's subjects ; and did then publish 
and declare, who had, and who had not a right to 
cut timber on the disputed lands, and that every 
trespasser contrary to their edict, should be confined 
in their goal. 

The magistrates of Newark being informed of the 
building of the said goal, and the many threats made 
use of, issued warrants against some of the builders, 
who were apprehended and brought before them, 
and on examining into the facts, were ordered to give 
security for their appearance at the next court to be 
held for the county ; which they refusing to do, were 
committed to the common goal of the said county, 
and lay there until the night of the next day, when 
they were released from goal on bail, but remained 
in town all that night; about 10 of the clock the 
next day, there came to town about one hundred and 
fifty men, armed with clubs, (a great part of them 
not concerned in the disputed lands) with an intent 
to compel the magistrates to take the prisoners out 
of goal, make them ride the wooden horse, and pull 
one of their houses down ; but finding that the pris- 
oners were out of goal on bail, they departed the 
town without doing any other Injury than frightening 
many women by their tumultuous assembly : Soon 
after, advertisements were set up in several parts of 
this and adjacent counties for the liberty boys to 
meet at a tavern near the courthouse in Newark, on 
the ninth instant, to do business ; which was the 
first day of the county court ; they gave out in 
speeches, that the business they were to do on that 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 55 

day was to prevent the lawyers going into court, and 
what further should be found necessary ; and most 
injuriously boasted that they should be joined by 
the sons of liberty from New- York, whose principles 
are well known to be the reverse of those rioters, - - 
not to subvert, but support the laws and constitution 
of the country ; and also that there would come ma- 
ny from the adjacent counties ; wherein they were 
disappointed, as not one came from either of those 
places. In the morning of the day appointed, about 
one hundred came into Newark with colours, on 
which was inscribed "Liberty and Property": The 
greatest mockery ever known of those most valua- 
ble and dear privileges, as they then came to de- 
prive others of the same by force and violence. The 
mob halted when they came to the court-house doors, 
and when going to erect their colours there, two of 
the under sheriffs seeing two among them against 
whom they had writs (being their chiefs) went un- 
armed, with one assistant, into the midst of them, and 
told the two that they had writs against them, and 
walked towards them, who retreated to a fence with 
their clubs, where they swore they would defend 
themselves ; the high sheriff hearing of the situation 
of his under sheriffs, commanded assistance, and ran 
to them ; which the under sheriffs perceiving, broke 
in upon the two men, and immediately a battle in- 
sued, by the spirited behaviour of the high sheriff, his 
under sheriffs, other officers, some of the grand jury, 
and many others assembled to support the authority, 
the rioters were in a few minutes overpowered, their 
colours taken from them, and five of them put into 



56 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

goal. The number of rioters increased in the after- 
noon to about 150, when the sheriff with the assist- 
ance he had, without much resistance, seized from 
among the midst of them and carried to goal, one 
who had struck him in the forenoon in the execution 
of his office. The rioters dispersed after demanding 
of the court, by message, for leave to lay their griev- 
ances before the court, which the court refused to 
receive from such an unlawful assembly, and 
told them that if they would another day, let their 
grievances be known by two or three persons only, 
they should be heard, and not otherwise, which they 
agreed to, and nothing farther happened until two of 
the clock the next morning, when the town w^s 
allarmed with the firing of two out barns and a chair 
house, of David Ogden, Esq.; which were burnt 
down, and several other buildings greatly endangered, 
which were by the most surprizing activity of the in- 
habitants of the town, and others present, preserved 
from the flames. 

The grievance complained of was a false and ma- 
licious charge as it appeared in the court, against the 
lawyers both in New-York, and New-Jersey, who 
had been concerned for the Indian purchasers, ex- 
cept one in this town, affirming that altho' the attor 
nies had received large sums of money from them, 
they had taken bribes on the other side, and desert- 
ed their cause. The charge not being supported, 
but proved false, the complaint was dismissed, and 
the person who offered the same, the most notorious 
W m C e, was reprimanded by the court. 

On examining many, to find out the persons set- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 57 

ting the fire, it appeared that several threats had 
been made the day of the riot, that the Court-House 
should be burnt down that night, and the whole town 
in flames, as the inhabitants of the town in general 
had opposed them ; whereupon the Justices ordered 
a watch of ten or twelve men to patrole the streets, 
and guard the goal, and private property at night, 
which watch is still kept up. 

During the term, several of the rioters were ap- 
prehended, many were indicted, and two of them, 
the chief actors confessed their indictments, and 
were fined, who afterwards made a full confession, 
and discovered their advisers, being persons not liv- 
ing on the lands in controversy, who since declare 
they intend to stand their trials, and not submit to 
the authority, and are endeavouring to strengthen 
their party in gaining others to join them, in oppos- 
ing the King's authority, his government, and the 
constitution of the county, which it is every honest 
man's business to support. 

Having thus related the true state of the northern 
parts of the county of Essex, I am persuaded that 
every man, who has any loyalty to his Majesty, or 
regard for the laws, peace and safety of his Majesty's 
subjects, and is not an enemy to his country, and to 
the constitution he lives in, will use his most faithful 
and honest endeavours to bring said transgressors 
to justice. I am, &c. 

-New- York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 952, for Monday, January 22, 1770. 



58 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

County of Essex and Province of New Jersey. 
Mr. PARKER, 

Your inserting the following in your next, will 
oblige many of your constant Readers ; and 
it is hoped will not fail of being acceptable 
to all the Friends to Truth and Soberness, 
who may see fit to honour it with their 
Perusal. 

OBSERVING in Mr. Gaine's Paper, of the i5th 
of January last, a very grievous as well as false and 
malicious Charge drawn up, and levelled against a 
great Number of the peaceable and well minded In- 
habitants of this County ; I looked upon it as an in- 
dispensable Obligation incumbent on me, as a loyal 
Subject of his Majesty, and Friend to Truth, to enter 
the List, and bear a publick Testimony against an 
Accusation so false in itself, and so dangerous in its 
Consequences ; especially, since after so long a 
Time, none has appeared for them. 

This Writer seems very solicitous for the " Public, 
lest it should be deceived by false Representations." 
How sincere he is in this, will, I trust, appear from 
the following Remarks, in which it was determined 
that nothing shall be asserted for Truth, but what 
can be supported by incontestable Authority. 

This inquisitive Gentleman, amongst other impor- 
tant Discoveries which he made during his Residence 
for "the greatest Part of a Week at Newark, found 
that there had long subsisted a Dispute between Per- 
sons claiming Title to certain Lands under the 
Crown of England, and others claiming under In- 
dian Purchases." This Discovery, however much 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS, 

Time it might have cost its Author, is not just ; for 
there are no Persons within this County, that I know 
of, who pretend to hold and claim Lands by Indian 
Purchase, in Opposition to Crown Title. They pre- 
tend, and think they can prove, that they had a 
Crown Grant, as well as a Title by Indian Purchase. 
It is true " that many Years past, a Suit at Law was 
agreed upon between the Parties, to determine the 
same," and that the Purchasers chose it should be 
determined by the Court of Equity, and accordingly 
filed a Bill in Chancery : But that it was taken out of 
Chancery, and submitted to Arbitrators at the Re- 
quest of the Purchasers, is absolutely false. 

And here I think the Public has a Right to know 
how, and by what Means the Purchasers were com- 
pelled to submit the above Dispute to Referees. 
The Dispute lay in Chancery many Years : The 
Purchasers wanted to obtain a Decree, that if it 
should be against them, they might have proper 
Foundation for an Appeal, and therefore urged Mat- 
ters for an Issue. The Proprietors, perceiving this, 
proposed to leave the Dispute to Arbitrators, which 
was positively refused by the Purchasers. All this 
Time, the Attorney, in Behalf of the Purchasers, 

E B , (a Man who will appear in the Light 

of Truth, more notorious for something else, than 
W m C- e for his Steadiness and Resolu- 
tion), gave his Clients, from Time to Time, the most 
promising hopes of gaining the Cause ; and that too 
after he had the Bill, respective Evidences and An- 
swers, a long Time before him. At length (a very 
short Time before) he left his Clients known their 



6O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Cause was to be tried ; but then told them Matters 
were not ready, their Cause difficult, &c. and refused 
to do any Thing more for them, unless they would 
give him a Deed of 1300 or 1400 Acres of Land, in x 
Consideration of ^40, which, at last, was granted. 
He then told them their Cause was doubtful, &c. and 
advised them to submit it to Referees ; but they re- 
fused. He then declared he would not do any Thing 
for them, unless they would comply with his last Pro- 
posal also, and this too, when his Fees, tho' for trif- 
fling Services, amounted near to ^150 Proc. Thus, 
being deserted by their perfidious Attorney, in a most 
critical Juncture, they were constrained, by an un- 
happy Necessity, to submit the Dispute to Arbitra- 
tion. This is a true Relation of the Matter, which 
can be supported by unexceptional Evidence. Upon 
what Principles, and from what Motives this Attorney 
thus acted, is submitted to the Public to Judge. How 
he can reconcile it with his Character as a Lawyer, 
and his Profession as a Christian, I am utterly at a 
Loss ; and how he can answer therefor at GOD'S Tri- 
bunal, it becomes him seriously to consider. 

Again he asserts, that the Arbitrators who were to 
decide the above Dispute were "of their own choos- 
ing." This is absolutely false. The Truth is direct- 
ly the reverse. The Public may Judge, the following 
Relation being attended to. After the Indian Pur- 
chasers were prevailed upon by the Means above 
mentioned, to submit their Dispute to Arbitrators, 
there were a Number of Gentlemen nominated by 
the Persons impowered to act in Behalf of the Par- 
ties ; out of which Number it was proposed that they 



1 7/0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6 1 

should alternately elect four, and as the Number of 
Arbitrators agreed on was three, it was proposed 
that the Names of the four Gentlemen thus elected, 
should be written, each upon a separate Piece of Pa- 
per, and that these 'four Pieces of Paper should be 
put into a Hat, and then shufled well together, one 
Paper of the four, should be by some indifferent Hand 
drawn out, the Person whose Name it contained, 
should be dismissed, and the remaining three were 
to be admitted as properly chosen by the Parties. 
This Method being proposed by the Proprietors, and 
submitted to by the Purchasers (or by their respect- 
ive Representatives) it was put in Execution, and it 
happened that one of the Men chosen by the Propri- 
etors was drawn ; consequently the two chosen by 
the Purchasers were left, which when the Proprietors 
Representative found, he began to object against one 
of the Gentlemen, and importuned earnestly that he 
should be set aside, and a Person constituted in his 
Stead, whom he would appoint, which was refused, 
as an unreasonable Proposal : He at length consent- 
ed that this disputed Gentleman should stand as he 
was chosen. It was also agreed, that one of the 
Committee of the Purchasers, should notify these 
Gentlemen, and engage them to serve as Referees ; 
which after he had performed and obtained their Con- 
sent, and after he had taken much Pains, and been at 
much Cost in giving intelligence thereof to the Pro- 
prietors, a little before the Time for the expected 
Trial came, the Proprietors utterly refused to submit 
the Matter to the above disputed Gentleman, but 
nominated another to serve in his Stead ; which, if 



62 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7?O 

the Purchasers refused to submit to, the Suit should 
be immediately brought on in Chancery, and Judg- 
ment go against them on Default. The Purchasers 
confiding in the Justness of their Cause, and their 
Attorney refusing his Assistance before the Chan- 
cellor ; at length, with much Reluctance, submitted 
the Matter to the Award and Decision of the Men 
thus nominated and chosen by the Proprietors. 
Another most shocking Misrepresentation which this 
intolerably abusive Fellow has imposed on the Pub- 
lic, in order to vilify the Purchasers, is as follows ; 
he says, that "The Indian Purchasers, instead of abid- 
ing by the Award, renewed their Suit in Chancery, 
and upon zfull hearing before the Chancellor, a De- 
cree was given against them," &c. Now every one 
would understand by this, that the Merits of the 
Cause was fully heard before the Chancellor, and a 
Decree thereupon given against the Purchasers ; 
than which nothing can be more false. The Merits 
of the Cause never was yet tried in the Court of Eq- 
uity, nor ever any Decree from thence against them ; 
unless over-ruling their Demurrer in the Award, dis- 
missing the Bill, &c. may be called a Decree. 

Newark, Feb. 15, 1770. 

Now the Public may Judge how groundless his 
malicious Charge against these People is, as "refus- 
ing to comply with the solemn Determination of the 
Court of Equity against them, 'and by Arbitrators of 
their own choosing." It is most manifest that the 
whole design of this cruel, merciless Fellow, was to 
serve his Party; and therefore determine to sacrifice 
Truth and every Thing to blacken the Characters of 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 63 

the much injured Purchasers, and make the distressed 
and oppressed appear detestable in the eyes of the 
Public. 

The next Accusation that he brings against the 
poor Indian Purchasers is, that " they bid Defiance to 
the Laws, Government and Constitution of the 
Country, and have, with many others, about Twenty 
Days past, erected on the Lands in Dispute, a strong 
Hold or Gaol, and published Laws of their own 
making, that the Proprietors, Magistrates, Sheriffs 
and other Officers, coming on the Lands, to disturb 
them in their peaceable Possession of those Lands, 
or to serve any Writs or Warrants relating to said 
Lands, should be put into their Gaol and confined 
therein, with many other Threats against his Majes- 
ty's Subjects ; and did then publish and declare, who 
had, and who had not a Right to -cut Timber on the 
disputed Lands, and that every Transgressor, con- 
trary to their Hdict, should be confined in Gaol." A 
heavy Accusation this ! And if true, must indeed 
render the Purchasers odious in the Eyes of every 
loyal Subject of his Majesty and Friend to the Con- 
stitution. But this also is as false and groundless, 
as I trust it will soon appear inflamatory and spite- 
ful. "The strong Hold or Gaol," as he is pleased 
to call it, (which, by the Way, was not the Name 
given by its Builders) so formidable to this intrepid 
Scribbler and his Party, and which he says, was 
erected " by the Indian Purchasers and many others," 
was nothing more than a few rough Logs thrown to- 
gether by a Number of merry Fellows ; nor was it 
designed for a Gaol, as would have been manifest to 



64 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

any Person from first View, even from its Construc- 
tion : Nor can I believe the ''Magistrates of New- 
ark ' would have been so weak as to have taken any 
Notice of it, had they gone and seen it themselves, 
instead of trusting to the bare Report of their malic- 
ious Informer, I have good Reason to believe, that 
the Whole of it was but humorous : Besides he rep- 
resents it, as tho' the Purchasers built it as a Body, 
"with the Assistance of many others," whereas I 
am confident that not one fourth of them knew any 
Thing of it, till some Time after it was erected. Nor 
was one of the Committee concerned either in the 
Scheme or Performance, as I am credibly informed ; 
and as to " publishing Laws of their own making," or 
"threatening Magistrates, Sheriffs, or others of his 
Majesty's Officers," in the legal Discharge of their 
respective Offices, or as to determining " who had, 
or who had not a Right to cut Timber on the dis- 
puted Lands," according to the best Information I 
can get, were not so much as publickly mentioned at 
that Time. I say, not publickly mentioned, because it 
is not possible to ascertain every Word that might 
be spoken by every Individual, especially as they 
were a great Part of the Time, dispersed in collect- 
ing Materials for this important Structure : Indeed I 
have been informed by two Persons who were there, 
that they heard something said in Contempt of the 
Proprietors, as such, but not a single Word in Con- 
tempt or Defiance of the Magistry, or any of his 
Majesty's Officers of the Peace, or any " Threats ex- 
hibited against any others of his Majestys Subjects." 
These therefore must be Bugbears of his own Brain, 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 65 

begotten by the Suggestions of his own jealous and 
malignant Heart, and here made Use of as a Mean 
or % Medium, thro' which, to vent his Spleen and 
Malice. 



The Magistrates of Newark, having received a 
false and very aggravated Representation of the 
Design of the above Building, and the Conduct of 
the Builders, ''issued out Warrants to apprehend 
two of them," who after being examined, would 
doubtless have been acquitted and dismissed, had it 
not been to gratify some Proprietors who were then 
present: But being required to give "Security for 
their Appearance at the next Court to oe held for 
the County ;" and they refusing to comply there- 
with, were (as this Writer for once truly asserts) 
" committed to the common Gaol for said County." 
Had he been as true in relating the Method by which 
these Men came out of Gaol, as he kappened to be 
in this, he would have saved me the Trouble of the 
following Contradiction ; but as he is a Stranger to 
Truth, it cannot be expected that he should long fol- 
low its Dictates. These Men were not " the Night 
of the next Day," nor any other Time, on the above 
Account, " released from Gaol on Bail :" Nor did 
they so much as pledge their Promise to appear at 
the next County Court, as the Condition of their Re- 
lease, as can be easily proved if required. 

He then undertakes, on his old Principles, to tell 
a most lamentable Story of the next Day's Proceed- 
ings : " About Ten o'Clock the next Day, (says he) 
there came to Town about 150 Men, armed with 
Clubs, and with an intent to compel the Magistrates 

5 



66 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

%. 

to take the Prisoners out of Gaol, make them ride 
the Wooden Horse, and pull one of their Houses 
down." This is all an intolerable, manifest Misrep- 
resentation, since they all knew that the Prisoners 
were released before they entered the Town, and all 
the while they were there they behaved themselves 
very orderly, nor offered the least Violence to any 
one ; and as to compelling- the Magistrates to ride 
the Wooden Horse, or pulling one of their Houses 
down, were Things not then mentioned, designed, 
or perhaps thought of, and therefore not to be laid to 
their Charge, by any Person but this Sen of Slander. 
This Writer is false also in the Account he has 
given to the Public of the Transactions of the first 
Day of Court. The Men who appeared in Town 
that Day, were on a laudable Design, altogether 
consistent with the noble Principles of the Liberty 
Boys of New-York, and as a Token hereof, they car- 
ried with them Colours erected on a Pole, on which 
was wrote " Liberty and Property" Their Design 
was, in a peaceable Manner, to lay before the Court 
an Account of some Oppressions and Grievances 
which they had long laboured under, and for Redress 
of which, they embraced this Opportunity, and took 
this Method to Petition the Ministers of Justice : 
But that their Design was not riotous, I think is very 
evident to every considerate, impartial Mind, from 
this Consideration ; that had they entertained a De- 
sign to oppose the Authority, they would not have 
opened and given Way to the Under Sheriffs, when 
they advanced to take two of their Company ; nor 
would these Men, especially if they had been Chiefs 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 67 



in the Riot, as he represents them to be, retreated at 
their Approach. No, they would have doubtless 
stood their Ground against the approaching Officers, 
and called upon their Companions for their promised 
Assistance in this Emergency : But in this, the Men 
retreated back, and the rest of the Company gave 
Room to the approaching Officers ; nor was there a 
single Request for Assistance made by, or the least 
Relief offered to the Men thus attacked ;. but the 
High Sheriff precipitately advancing, armed with a 
Pistol in one Hand and a Club in the other, present- 
ed the former at one of the above Men's Breast, 
(swearing if he offered to resist, he would blast him 
thro') and with the latter gave him a very heavy Blow 
on his Head, which 50 stunned him, that it gave an 
Opportunity to the Sheriff to take him. This Occur- 
rence making a considerable Noise in the Street, nat- 
urally excited the Curiosity of the People to draw 
near to see the Fray, who, without discovering any 
Design to reprieve the Men, were treated in the 
most abusive Manner by the Sheriff and his Assist- 
ants ; which rough Treatment towards themselves, 
and barbarous Treatment towards the Person now a 
Prisoner, so exasperated many of the more resolute 
and spirited, that they too had Recourse to Clubs, in 
their Turn, which introduced the Battle he mentions, 
and which never would have happened, had not Mat- 
ters been conducted by the Sheriffs and their Assist- 
ants, in such an illegal, tyrannical Manner. 

" The Grievance complained of was, (says he) a 
false and malicious Charge against the Lawyers both 
of New York and New-Jersey, which (he adds) was 



68 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I" 1 /? 

' 

proved false, and the Person who offered it, was rep- 
rimanded by the Court. Here again he acts in 
Character. The Charge contained in the Complaint 
referred to, was not levelled " against the Lawyers of 
New- York," and only against two in New-Jersey, viz, 
the puissant and honourable David Ogden, Esq ; and 
the no less learned, popular and eloquent Elias Bou- 
dinot: And the Accusation then laid against them, 
in a few Words, was that they had both received 
Fees on the Part and Behalf of the Purchasers, and 
have since, without ever obtaining a Dismission from 
them, u deserted their Cause," and engaged in 
favour of the opposite Side. This Charge, however 
false it may be characterised by this dirty Scribbler, 
can, I trust, be supported by unexceptionable Evi- 
dence. Nor was the Person who exhibited this 
Charge " reprimanded by the Court," as he asserts, 
unless a single aberrations, prevaricating, magisterial 
Attorney, composes and makes a Court, as this was 
all the Court that reprimanded the patriotic Gentle- 
man who offered the above Complaint. 

Thus I have, with much Brevity, given the Public 
a true and impartial Representation of the State and 
Conduct of Affairs, so very falsely represented by 
this Slanderer ; it only now remains for the respecta- 
ble Public to judge, what Principles or Motives actu- 
ated this Fellow, thus to endeavour to calumniate 
and vilify his Majesty's dutiful Subjects. 

TOBIAS FREEMAN. 

February 20, 1770. 

. Y. Gazetteer Weekly Post Boy, No. 141; r - 
1 8, February 26, and March 5, 1770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 69 

IN pursuance of an Order made by Peter Schenck, 
and Job Stockton, Esqrs. two of the Judges of the 
Court of Common Pleas for the County of Somerset, 
and Province of East New-Jersey, upon the Petition 
of Daniel Leonard, and John Totten, Insolvent Debt- 
ors, now confined in the said County : Notice is 
hereby given, by the said Petitioners, to all their 
Creditors, to shew Cause, if any they have, before 
any two Judges of the said County, at Somerset 
Court House, on the 2yth Day of March next, at 10 
of the Clock in the Morning of said Day, being the 
Place appointed by the said Judges, for that Purpose, 
why an Assignment of the said Petitioners Estates 
should not be made to Persons then and there to be 
nominated, for the Use of their Creditors, and the 
Petitioners be thereupon discharged, according to 
the Directions of an Act of the Governor, Council 
and General Assembly of the Province of New-Jer- 
sey, made and past the last Sessions, at Burlington, 
in the Tenth Year of his Majesty's Reign, entitled, 
" An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors." 

February 19, 1770. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1417, 
February 26, 1770. 

I The subscriber having spent near sixty years of 
life, in the most unwearied industry, (the latter part 
of which has been singularly unfortunate) and being 
willing and desirous, so far as in my power to do jus- 
tice to all men, and to deliver up all my effects to 
the use and benefit of my creditors ; do give this pub- 
lic notice, to all whom it may concern, that I shall ap- 



/O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ply to the governor, council, and general assembly, 
of the province of New-Jersey, at their ensuing meet- 
ing in general assembly, at Burlington, on the fif- 
teenth day of March next ; for a law of said prov- 
ince to be passed, to save and prevent my person 
from imprisonment for any debts heretofore by me 
contracted ; any estate that I may hereafter acquire, 
to be nevertheless subject to be taken and seized, 

for the use of* my creditors. 

UZAL OGDEN. 
Newark, Feb. 24th, 1770. 

New-York, March r. We hear from Newark, that 
at a Court held there on Friday last for the Trial of 
sundry Persons concern'd in some late riotous Pro- 
ceedings, on Account of a dispute between the Pro- 
vincial Proprietors, and a Number of Inhabitants, 
claiming under the Purchase of Indian Titles; when 
one of the Rioters was fined One Hundred Pounds, 
and several others in lesser Sums.- -N. Y. Journal 
or General Advertiser, No. 1417, March i, 1770. 

This is to give Notice, to those whom it may con- 
cern, That the Subscribers intend to petition the As- 
sembly of New-Jersey, at their next Sessions, to pass 
an Act, for making the Bridge over Crosswick's 
Creek, below Richard Brown's Mill, a County 

Charge. 

SAMUEL ROGERS, 

Allen Town, in New-Jersey, ISAAC ROGERS, 
February 12, 1770. RICHARD BROWN. 

To BE SOLD, 
SUNDRY LOTS of BANKED MEADOW, from 5 to 10 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 7! 

acres, lying contiguous to Mr. John Brown's ground 
on Great Mantua Creek, below the bridge, on the 
great Salem Road. A number of years, if required, 
will be allowed for the payment of part, or the whole 
of the purchase money. Any person inclining to 
purchase, may know further particulars, by applying 
to Tench Francis. 

Philad. Feb. 21, 1770. 

/ 

To be SOLD, 

A LOT OF LAND containing about 16 acres, situa 
ted in Houghton, Springfield township, and county o 
Burlington, on which is a neat dwelling-house, lately 
finished and painted, with a new paled garden, sta- 
bles and good orchard. Also on the same lot one 
other dwelling-house, lately fitted up for a store, with 
a good pork-house, smoak-hduse, and other out- 
houses, conveniently situated for trade, or would suit 
a gentleman, inclining to a retir'd life, its situation 
being pleasant, healthy, and in a good neighbour- 
hood. Also in view of, and nearly contiguous to the 
abovementioned lot, a plantation, containing about 
75 acres of land, about 50 whereof are cleared, 12 of 
which are good meadow, the rest pasture and arable 
land, with a dwelling house, barn, and young orchard 
thereon. For terms enquire of WILLIAM DILLWYN, 
on the premises. 

Burlington, February 23, 1770. 
On Monday Last departed this Life, after a short, 
but severe illness, in the Fourteenth Year of her 
Age, Miss JANE CAMPBELL, Daughter of the late Rev- 
erend Mr. COLIN CAMPBELL. 



72 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 

A VALUABLE tract of 200 acres of land in Man- 
ington, in the county of Salem, West-Jersey, about 2 
miles from the town of Salem, and half a mile from a 
good landing, situate on the great road leading to said 
town of Salem, and is convenient for either shop keep- 
ing or tavern, about jo acres of said land cleared, and 
in good fence, the remainder well timbered, a good 
dwelling-house, kitchen, and frame barn and stable, jo 
acres of good dry meadow, made out of tide marsh. 

Also, to be lett by the subscriber, in the county of 
Sussex, in the province aforesaid, his iron works, con- 
sisting of one small furnace, a new stone forge, with 2 
fires and a hammer, a large coal-house, and buildings 
for workmen to live in. The tenant shall have it on 
such a lay, that he may build larger works, and make 
larger improvements, with about 1200 acres of land, 
about 60 acres of good timothy meadow, about the like 
quantity of cleared upland, together with sundry good 
dwelling-houses, stores, work-shops, stables, half of a 
good grist-mill, with sundry other buildings and con- 
veniences, and as there is discovered by a long trial, a 
proper fluxing for the oar, now think it will work to 
great profit in the jurnace ; a great stock of wood, 
coal, teams, and stock of cattle ; smith's tools, and sun- 
dry other useful things, the tenant will have an oppor- 
tunity to purchase. For terms apply to said works or 
the owner, in the county and province aforesaid. 

ISAAC SHARP. 1 



i Isaac Sharp was a son of Isaac, son of Anthony Sharp, born about 1630, of a 
family holding a large estate in Tillbury, near Bristol, England. In the time of 
Cromwell he removed to Ireland, where he purchased a large country seat called 
Koundwood, in Queens county, and carried on an extensive mercantile business in 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 73 

* 

Penri s Neck, Salem County, February 16, 1770. 
NOTICE is hereby given to all persons whom it may 
concern, that we, the subscribers, intend to petition 
the Assembly, at their next sitting, for an act to be 
passed for draining the meadows on Salem creek, 
and the river Delaware ; the bank to begin at Eph- 
raim Lloyd's fast land, on Salem creek ; down the 
said creek to the river Delaware ; then along said 
river to Fin's Point, to join the bank of Thomas New- 
ark. Michael Pedrick, Thomas Newark, Peter Bild- 
erback, Ephraim Lloyd, Isabel Redstreak, Mary Tufft, 
William Adams, Thomas Wright. 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS, 

The giving the following Piece a Place in one of your 
future Papers, will oblige many of your Customers. 

Their pious Sires, a bitter Lesson taught, 
Chaste their Delights, and innocent in Thought. 

To the FARMERS of NEW JERSEY. 



GENTLEMEN, 

It afforded me sensible Pleasure to find that my 
former Address, respecting Fox-Hunting, in No. 2144 
of this Paper was so well received and approved of 
by you ; and this Pleasure was greatly increased, on 
reading one of the Acts of Assembly passed at the 

Dublin. On the 22d of the 4th mo., 1681, he bought one- tenth of a one-hundredth 
share of West Jersey, and by several later purchases he acquired further inter- 
ests in West Jersey and East Jersey. Isaac Sharp, his grandson, came to Ameri- 
ca about 1730, and settled at Blessington, now Sharpstown, Salem county. He 
brought the frame of his house with him. He was appointed a Judge of Salem 
county in 1739 and again in "1741 and 1767. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends. He established the " Sharpsborough Iron Works" about a mile south 
of Hamburgh, perhaps about 1765, which proved a losing venture. He was elected 
to the Assembly in 1769, dying in office. He died about 1770 Shourds's History 
and Genealogy of Fenwicte's Colony, 244-6; N". J. Archives, XV.. 97; Ibid.. XVII., 
455; First Sussex Centennary, 21; N. J. Hist. Soe. Proceedings, 1st Series, V., 32. 



74 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

late Sessions at Burlington, to discover that my Sen- 
timents were so similar with those of the Legislative 
Body, who, perceiving our old Hunting Law was too 
lax, to remedy those Grievances so loudly complained 
of by the Farmers in different Parts of the Province, 
took it into Consideration, and by a new Law have 
provided one so well adapted for the Purpose, that 
unless the Officers and Grand-Juries, are extremely 
defective in Duty, this jolly Fraternity must quickly 
give up the Ghost in the Jerseys. And as many of 
you may not have seen this Law, I presume the fol- 
lowing Extruct will be agreeable. 

After re-enacting the Section inserted in my former 
Piece, it is added. . . . " And if such Offender or 
"Offenders, are Non-residents of this Colony, he or 
" they shall forfeit and pay Five Pounds, &c. And 
"if any Justice of the Peace, or other Officer, within 
" this Colony, coming to the Knowledge of any 
" Offence against this Act, and doth not prosecute 
"the same to Effect within two Months, shall forfeit 
"and pay the Sum or Sums to which such Offender 
" was liable; and the Justices, at every Sessions, 
" shall give the Substance of this Law in Charge to the 

"Grand Jury, who shall make particular Inquiry, and 
^^L 

" present all Persons offending against the same, 

" whose Fines have not already been paid, and on 
"Conviction, said Justices shall set and impose the 
" Fines aforesaid, with Costs of Suit." 

After such particular Pains taken by the Legisla- 
ture to provide an effectual Remedy for our Griev- 
ances, surely not a Farmer in the Province will be 
so wanting to himself,, as to refuse his Influence 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 75 

towards obtaining the End desired, or suffer the su- 
percilious Sneers he may meet with, to retard his 
Duty ; for the good Man, conscious that his Views 
are laudable, smiles on his Defamers, nor deigns 
them further Notice, than his Pity, Diversion or Con- 
tempt ; and the Pleasure the generous Mind receives 
in succouring Innocence, and Merit, and annoying 
their Opposites, is such, that when but a Boy, I would 
step my Foot out of the Way to avoid hurting the 
laborious Ant, and carefully brush the useful Bee off 
the Rose in my Hand ; but the noxious Hornets, be- 
ing a Nusance in the Creation, and withal very saucy 
and quarrelsome, was sure to receive a stone, when- 
ever they fell in my Way, and often have I been 
diverted, after disturbing their Kennel, to behold the 
Rage and Uproar of the puny Creatures. 

THE JERSEY FARMER. 
New Jersey, Feb. 17, 1770. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2149, March i, 
1770. 

To be sold in fee, or let for ten years, at a low 
rent, and may be entered up immediately, 

A Tract of land, and meadow ground, situate on 
the upper side of Prince Maurice's river, in the coun- 
ty of Cumberland, in New-Jersey, now in possession 
of Joshua Humphries and Thomas Ellis ; containing 
about 190 acres, near 60 whereof is upland, the rest 
(on compleating a bank already begun) will make 
the choicest meadow ; the upland is thin and light, 
but with the rich mud .from the marsh, may be made 
exceeding good. A moderate side bank will effec- 



76 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/7O 

tually secure against the tide. Such parts of the 
marsh as have been drained, disinterested persons 
say will produce, in common, from 50 to 70 bushels 
of Indian corn per acre, and after 5 or 6 years tillage 
to subdue the luxuriancy of the soil, affords the best 
grass in large burthens ; there is a pretty good 
dwelling house and other buildings on the premises. 
Any industrious man may here find an advantageous 
settlement. The payment will be made easy, and a 
clear title given, by SAMUEL ALLISON, in Burlington, 
of whom, or MARK REEVE, near Greenwich, the terms 
may be known. 

To be sold, by public vendue, on Thursday the 22d day 
of this inst. March ; 

A good two story brick house, kitchen, and cellars 
under them ; with two lots of land, containing about 
four acres and an half, situate and being in Bor den- 
Town. There is on one of the lots, a good tan-yard, 
tan-house, and currying-shop, shoe-maker's shop, barn 
and stables, with utensils for carrying on the tanning 
-and currying business. Also one other lot, within one 
mile of Bor den-Town, containing twenty acres, part 
thereof cleared, the other good wood land. Also cows 
and horses, with sundry j arming utensils, sundry beds 
and bedding, with almost all sorts of household goods ; 
the estate of SAFTEY MEGHEE, late of Bor den-Town, de- 
ceased. The vendue to begin at 10 c clock in^ the fore- 
noon, where attendance will be given by 

WILLIAM POTTS, ) ^ 

(^ r* r Executors. 

CALEB CARMAN, j 

N. B. There is a quantity <?/~BARK to be sold. 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 77 

To be sold, by virtue of the last will and testament of 
Clement Hall, late of Elsinborough, in the county 
of Salem, and province of New- Jersey, deceased, 
viz. 

A lot of land containing upwards of 30 acres, pleas- 
antly situated in the town of Salem, and adjoining the 
old wharf. A lot of woodland, near said town, about 
four acres of land at the upper end of said town 
Sixty acres of marsh and swamp, within a good bank, 
in Elsinborough, adjoining William Goodwin s land > 
A large tract of land on the head of Morris s river, 
called Broad Neck, on which there are good pines, 
cedar swamps, and maple swamps, that will make good 
meadow ; there are good streams of water thereon, 
fitting for saw mills. The different tracts will be sold 
whole, or divided, as it may suit the purchaser. 

Any person inclining to purchase, may apply to Ed- 
ward Hall, in Mannington, Margaret Hall, Execu- 
trix, in Elsinborough, Salem county, or John Mason, 
Executor, living near Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 165, March 5-12, 1770. 

Mr. PARKER, 

SOME Time since, Mr. Gaine, communicated to the 
Public through the Channel of his Paper, a Let- 
ter from a Person at Elizabeth-Town, which gave a 
particular Account of the Riot that had been in the 
County of Essex, and of the Proceedings at the 
Court of General Quarter Sessions for that County, 
and as the Public may be desirous to know the final 
Issue of an Insurrection, in the Event of which they 
are so much interested, I beg you will give a Place 



;8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

in your next Paper, the following short Narrative of 
the Proceedings of a special Court of Oyer and Ter- 
miner, that was this Week held for the Trial of sev- 
eral of the Rioters, who were indicted at the Court 
of Quarter Sessions. 

A Number of them that were indicted, on being 
arraigned on their Indictments, plead Guilty and sub- 

o * 

mitted themselves, and as they shewed strong Marks 
of Contrition, they were only fined in trifling Sums, 
but three others (to wit,) John Dodd, David Dodd 
and Lewis Crane, plead Not Guilty, and took their 
Trial, in which they were allowed Council. The 
Jury was composed of some of the most respectable 
Freeholders in the County, (who having heard the 
Evidence on the Part of the Crown, which was so 
fully pointed, that the Defendants instructed their 
Council to make no other Defence than only exam- 
ining one Evidence,) when the Jury without going 
from the Bar, found them all Guilty ; and the Court 
punished them in the following Manner to wit, John 
Dodd, to pay a Fine of . 100, and to be imprisoned 
for Four Months, David Dodd to pay a fine of ^.60, 
and to be imprisoned for Three Months, and Lewis 
Crane, as some Circumstances appeared in his 
Favour, was only fined ^.30. 

After which the Grand Jury found Bills of Indict- 
ment against a Number of them, and presented the 
following Address to the Court. 

To the Honourable FREDERICK SMYTH, Esq ; Chief 
Justice and his Associates, the Justices of the 
Court of Oyer and Terminer and General 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 79 

Gaol Delivery, now sitting at Newark, in and 
for the County of Essex. 

WE the Grand Inquest for the Body of the Coun- 
ty of Essex, beg Leave to address your Honours on 
the present alarming Occasion, which hath rendered 
a Court at this Time, absolutely necessary. 

In discharge of our Duty, we can assure the 
Court, that we have made every Enquiry in our 
Power, and presented ever)" Person that appeared to 
us, in any Manner guilty of the late riotous and 
tumultuous Disorders. 

At the same Time, that we have endeavored to do 
our Duty in presenting Offenders, we cannot but 
think it incumbent on us to declare our Detestation 
and Abhorrence of all such Crimes, and, in the 
Name of the Freeholders of the County of Essex, to 
give your Honours the strongest Assurances, that we 
will steadily oppose every Attempt to disturb the 
publick Peace, every Insult to the Magistrates, and 
every Kind of Contempt to the Authority of Courts 
of Justice. 

Duly sensible that our Liberties and Properties are 
protected by the Laws, and that every Measure that 
has the least Tendency to disturb that Order and 
Tranquility, so essential to the Happiness of Society, 
ought to be steadily opposed : We beg Leave to de- 
clare to your Honours, our Resolution to support 
and protect every Branch of Government and by 
every Means in our Power, to curb that licentious 
Spirit, which has lately dared to raise its Head in 
this Country. 

It gives us great Satisfaction, and we doubt not 



80 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

your Honours will heartily join us in reflecting, that 
however vainly these mistaken People have boasted 
of their Numbers and Power, it has eventually ap- 
peared, that the Inhabitants of the County of Essex, 
have exerted sufficient Spirit to oppose the enemies 
of Peace and good Order, to support the Dignity 
and Authority of the Laws, and to bring the daring 
Invaders of their Liberties to condign Punishment. 

Among the Persons presented by us we are sensi- 
ble that many seem to merit the Mercy of the Court, 
and as the Persons principally concerned in the late 
Disorders have been prosecuted and Justly punished 
for their Offences : We request the Court that those 
men indicted, who appear to have been ruled by de- 
signing Men, may have such Favour extended to 
them as shall be consistent with public Justice, and 
the Dignity of this Court. 

By Order of the Grand Jury, 

ISAAC WOODRUFF, Foreman. 

Newark, February 23, 1770. 

Mr. PARKER, 

As a Friend to the People of New-Jersey, much 
distressed, it is hoped by many of your Custom- 
qrs, that you will publish the inclosed in your 
Paper as soon as possible. 

Shrewsbury, Feb. 24, 1770. 

A LETTER from a Gentleman in Hunter don 
County, to his Friend in Monmouth County. 

SIR, 

IT is with the greatest Concern that I behold 
the late and present Disturbances in your County, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 8 1 

as well as those in some other Parts of the Prov- 
ince ; for whatever be the Grievances which the 
People complain of, whether they be true or false, 
well or ill founded, it is certain they have pursued 
unjustifiable Measures, such as must not be suffered 
with Impunity in any Government; indeed, there is 
an End of Government, when private Men take upon 
them to shut up the Courts of Law, by their own 
Authority, Anarchy and Confusion must ensue ; and 
this, I believe is what some few desperate Wretches, 
who are foremost in the Cry of Liberty ; are wish- 
ing 1 to bring about ; they can lose nothing, in the 
Confusion they are in hopes of getting something ; 
but I am far from believing, that this is the Case with 
the Majority of even those who have appeared in 
those Tumults ; it cannot be the Case with those who 
have any Property to lose, unless we suppose they 
have lost their Senses ; their Case I apprehend to be 
what is the Case of two Thirds of the People of this 
Province, and that of every Degree, more or less ; 
they are in Want of Money ; they are in Debt ; and 
do not know how to extricate themselves ; they are 
hard pressed by their Creditors, and cannot pay ; 
they are sued, Judgments are obtained against them, 
they try to borrow, offer good Security for the Mon- 
ey, but all in vain, there is no Money, nor Money 
lenders ; Execution issues against them, a heavy Bill 
of Cost arises, the Sheriff levies, advertises and sells 
the Effects for one fourth or fifth part of their Value, 
not because the Effects are not wanted, but because 
there are really no Buyers who can furnish the Mon- 
ey ; hence a Man possessed of an Estate worth 

6 



82 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

^5000, will have it torn from him, tho' all his Debts 
amount to but ^rooo ; a Situation which will natur- 
ally make a Man feel desperate ; 'tis this has made 
many even of the better Sort of People wink at, and 
secretly encourage the illegal Steps that have been 
taken ; and it is really an alarming Situation for a 
Province to be in ! every proper legal Remedy ought 
to be sought and applied ; but the Measures those 
desperate People have lately gone into, will by no 
Means prove a Remedy ; on the Contrary, it must 
make our Situation infinitely worse ; In their Dis- 
tress they naturally catched at any Thing that had 
the Appearance of Relief, and joined the Cry against 
the Lawyers, without examining whether or not they 
were the real Cause of their Distress, whether the 
Suppression of the Lawyers would be a real Relief 
to them, or whether the Measures pursued by them 
have not a direct Tendency to put an End to all Law 
and Government in the Province. When they come 
seriously to consider the Matter, they will find that 
it was not the Lawyers who have brought this gener- 
al Distress upon them ; that in bringing a Suit for a 
Debt against a Man, they are no more than mere 

f 

Agents to the Creditors ; they are to follow the com- 
mon regular Steps prescribed by Law, for the Receiv- 
ing of the Debt, and when they have done so, their 
Bills of Costs are regulated by Law, and these Bills 
are taxed by the Judges ; if any of them exceed in 
their Charge what is allowed by Law, they are open 
to a Prosecution or Complaint to the Court, in which 
Case, I doubt not they will meet with proper Chas- 
tisement : In some Instances they may have been 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 83 

faulty and extravagant ; but I am convinced, it is by 
no Means so general, as has been complained of, or 
to have amounted to a public grievance ; this is evi- 
dent, from what happened at Burlington last Fall, 
during a Session of near two Months, Half of the 
Time of the Assembly, was employed in Enquiries 
into this pretended Grievance, and that by some, who 
would willingly have exposed the Lawyers in the 
worst Light: But after enquiring into all Complaints 
and charges made against them, they found one Gen- 
tleman guilty of having charged 3 s. 6 for the Copy 
of a Paper not allowed in the Ordinance, and 2 s. 2 
for Parchment. 1 

I was much prejudiced against the Practices of 
Lawyers, but this Enquiry opened my Eyes, and I 
think it much to the Honour of the Profession in this 
Province, that they have stood the Test so well. 

But yet the People are distressed, and how shall 
they be relieved? The Legislature of this Province 
at their last Meeting were sensible of this Distress, 
they had been convinced of it long before ; they 
sought a Remedy, and considering that the immedi- 
ate Cause of the Distress, was owing to the Want of 
Money ; they hit upon the only Remedy, that with 
Justice could be adequate to the Evil ; they deter- 
mined to supply them with Money, to strike 
,.100,000 Currency, in Paper Bills, to lend this to 
the People, at the moderate Interest of Five per 
Cent, on their giving double the Value in Land as a 
Security; and in order that every Part of the Prov- 

i For an account of this popular uprising against the lawyers of New Jersey, 
see Field's Provincial Courts of New Jersey, 164-173. 



84 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ince may equally partake of the Benefit, a propor- 
tionable Part of it is to be distributed to each Coun- 
ty, and not above . 100, to be lent to one Man ; and 
to make the Payment the more easy, the Borrowers 
are allowed to pay in Fi've per Cent, of the principal 
yearly, which will reduce the whole in Twenty Years 
Easier Terms could not be desired, nor could a 
wiser Remedy have been applied to the Distresses of 
this Province. This Act of the Legislature is gone 
Home for the Royal Assent, and I have no doubt, 
but that in a few Months, we shall be enabled to carry 
it into Execution, and thereby put an End to the 
Grievances so generally complained of. But, says 
the Man whose Estate is levied on by the Sheriff, of 
which there are a very great Number, what shall I 
do in the mean Time ? must I see my Estate torn 
from me, and sold for a Song, when Help is so near 
at Hand : Cannot I be permitted to enjoy the Bene- 
fit of Part of that Relief, which the Legislature in- 
tended should extend to every Part of the Province ; 
that very Relief which the Legislature provided for 
me and others, now in the like Situation ; Or, is an 
Accident to the Packet, an Adjournment of the Privy 
Council, a Delay in a Secretary of State's Office, or 
any other Retardment of the Intelligence of the 
Royal Assent to the Act, to defeat the principal De- 
sign of the Act ; for undoubtedly the Cases of those 
who were distressed at the Time of passing the Act, 
were the Objects which the Legislature chiefly had 
in View : The Case is hard the Legislature have it 
in their Power to extend the Remedy to you, --but it 
is exerting their Power to a dangerous Length. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 85 

However, in extraordinary Cases, that Power may, 
and ought to be exerted ; they can by an Act sus- 
pend all Sales by the Sheriff, until the beforemen- 
tioned Act obtains the Royal Assent, and is carried 
into Execution in this Province ; this it seems to be 
reasonable they should do, and is the only Remedy 
which the Legislature can provide for your unhappy 
Situation. Wherefore, I would advise my Country- 
men, to join in Petitions from every County, to the 
Assembly, to pass a Bill for this Purpose, and to 
lower the Lawyers Fees in such Articles as are now 
too high ; and in the mean Time, that they discoun- 
tenance and discourage every Thing that is Riotous, 
or is in any Shape repugnant to the Laws and good 
Order of the Community. 

A. B. 

New-York, March 5. We hear from Freehold in 
Monmouth County, in New-Jersey, that on Tuesday 
last, a special Court of Oyer and Terminer was held 
there ; that in the Forepart of the Day, a great 
Number of People met at the Court House, in order 
to prevent the Courts being held, or rather to pre- 
vent any Lawyers coming there ; but on some Gen- 
tlemen's coolly reasoning with them, and represent- 
ing the evil Consequences that must attend such ille- 
gal Measures, they all dispersed and suffered Busi- 
ness to go on as usual. 

WHEREAS, the Subscriber, living in Hopewell, 
County of Hunterdon, in New-Jersey, having agreed 
for a certain Piece of Land, in the Township of Am- 
well, (late the Property of Grover Stout, assigned to 



86 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

him by his Father Joseph Stout of the same Place) 
sold by George Brown and James Perall, Assignees 
of said Grover Stout. And as I am apprehensive 
there may be other Demands on the said Estate, 
take this Method to advertise all those who have any 
Demands on the same, to come and prove their 
Property in the same, between this and the First Day 
of May next, otherwise they will be debarr'd, as the 
Money will then be paid by 

NATHANIEL STOUT. 
February 17, 1770. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1418, 
March 5, 1770. 

New-Jersey. 1 ~R Y Order r of Nathaniel p eit, and 

j UThomas Van Horn, Esqrs, Judges 

of the inferior Court of Common Pleas, for the Coun- 
ty of Sussex : Public Notice is hereby given to the 
Creditors of Sarah Leonard, Edward Pigott, Corne- 
lius Cole and John Allen, insolvent Debtors, and long 
confined in the common Goal of said County, that 
Thursday, the Twenty Second Day of March next, 
is appointed by said Judges, to meet at the Court- 
House of the said County, to shew Cause, if any they 
have, why said Insolvents may not be discharged 
agreeable to the Directions of the late Act of Gen- 
eral Assembly, for the Relief of insolvent Debtors. 
Feb. 20, 1770. 

N". Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1418, March 8, 1770. 

WHEREAS the subscriber living in Hopewell, Hun- 
terdon county, New-Jersey, having agreed for a cer- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 87 

tain piece of land in the township of Amwell (late 
the property of Grover Stout, assigned to him by his 
father Joseph Stout of the same place) sold by 
George Brown and James Perall, assignees of said 
Grover Stout. And as I am apprehensive there may 
be other demands on the said estate, take this meth- 
od to advertise all those who have any demands on 
the same to come and prove their property in the 
same, between this and the first day of May next, 
otherwise they will be debarred, as the money will 
then be paid by NATHANIEL STOUT. 

Capt. Creighton from Lisbon, the 5th of February, 
the next day [the igth], 85 leagues S. E. 
by S. from our Capes, spoke the Sloop Polly, Jona- 
than Robeson, from Wilmington on Christeen for 
Jamaica, out 2 days all well.- -Pennsylvania Journal, 
No. 1422, March 8, 1770. 

Cumberland County Goal, March i, 1770. 
PURSUANT to an act of the General Assembly of the 
Province of New-Jersey, lately passed, intitled, an act 
for the relief of insolvent Debtors, /, the subscriber, be- 
ing confined in Cumberland Goal, and having peti- 
tioned Alexander Moore, and Ephraim Seeley, Es- 
quires, Judges of the Court of Common Pleas for the 
county of Cumberland, for the benefit of said act, do 
hereby give notice to all my creditors to appear, and 
shew cause, if any they have, on the ^oth day of this 
instant March, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon ; before the 
said Judges, at the house of Richard Gayford, Inn- 
holder, in Bridge-tozvn, why I should not be discharged 
from my confinement, agreeable to the Directions of 
said act. JOSEPH MORTON. 



88 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

This is to give notice to all persons, that the sub- 
scriber, now living in the Jerseys, has a quantity of 
GARDEN SEEDS to dispose of, viz - Charlton dwarf 
pease, dwarf marrowfat, the common dwarf, the early 
horspur, the Spanish marat, the green oston, the 
white and brown sugar pea, the rich marrowfat, the 
bush pea, and Windsor beans : and all sorts of kid- 
ney beans ; with all other sorts of garden seeds, the 
best of their kind. The customers may be supplied, 
at a covered stall, at the upper end of the Jersey 
Market, north side ; or at Caleb Hewes's, Hatter, a 
few doors from the New Printing Office, where cus- 
tomers may depend upon good usage, by 

RICHARD COLLINGS, Gardiner. 

N. B. Any person that has a boy that inclines to 
learn the art and mystery of a Gardiner, may apply 
as above. 

Philadelphia, February 27, 1770. 

There is now in the goal of this city, three runaway 

servants . . . There is also a certain James Gipson, 

in said goal, who absconded from his bail, Daniel 

Harker, Constable of Pilesgrove, Salem county, West 

Jersey &c. 

JEHU JONES, Goaler. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2150, March 8, 
1 770. 

Mr. PARKER : 

As a Talent for Falsehood and Defamation, seems 
natural to some unhappy Beings, it may appear 
strange to such, that I should have been surprized at 
a Publication in Your Paper signed at Newark, Feb. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 89 

[15] 25, 1770, in which (I can justly say) there is but 
one single Fact, (the Manner of balloting for the 
Referees) truly represented. 

However it may be expected that I should answer 
this pitiable Scribler, on Account of the respectable 
Public, whose good Opinion every honest Man 
would wish to preserve, yet even in doing this, I can 
by no Means descend so low, as to take any partic- 
ular Notice of the Author of this wicked and malic- 
ious Performance. 

I shall content myself with barely stating the 
Facts, simply and without Comment, as I am no fur- 
ther concerned, having neither seen or heard of the 
Publication of the 1 5th January, (referred to in this 
Paper) till it came out in print. 

Some Time in the Year 1761, I was applied to by 
a Committee of the Complainants in two Bills in the 
Chancery of this Province : They declared the De- 
sign of their Application, to be the expediting a 
Hearing in these Causes, not wanting any Opinion 
on the Validity of their Title. On this Principle 
alone, I became their Solicitor and Council, without 
either reading their Bills (containing near 400 
Sheets) or examining into the Merits of their Dis- 
pute. 

Considering these People as entitled to a Hear- 
ing, I served them for several Years in such Manner 
as to give them the utmost Satisfaction ; so that it 
was said by some, that I might have done my Duty 
to them as my Clients, without interesting myself as 
their Friend. These Causes having been of many 
Years standing, some of the Parties dead, and from 



90 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

several other accidental Circumstances, it became 
necessary to file a new Bill, which I undertook and 
perfected at their earnest Request. In order to per- 
form this Service it became necessary that I .should 
be Master of the Controversy, and therefore applied 
myself to examine the Merits of the Cause, which re- 
quired Time and Attention. It was then that I first 
became acquainted with the true Nature of the Dis- 
pute, having never before had the necessary Means 
for understanding the Cause, nor had I been request- 
ed to examine it. As soon as the Bill was finished, 
I informed the Committee, that I was afraid they 
were not able to prove the several Matters they had 
set forth in it. I was repeatedly assured, " they 
could obtain sufficient Proof of every material Fact, 
and that the Defendants in their Answer, must con- 
fess many of them." To this Bill an Answer was 
soon filed, in which every essential Fact was posi- 
tively denied on the Oaths of all the Defendants. I 
acquainted the Committee of this, and advised them 
by no Means to proceed farther without a full Exam- 
ination into their Proofs, by all the Council con- 
cerned, as this was a Cause of more than common 
Consequence. The Committee were convinced of 
the Necessity of proceeding with Caution, and there- 
fore prevailed on me to attend a Meeting of their 
Council at New-York, for that Purpose. 

I attended accordingly, and it appeared that the 
Council there, had taken unusual Pains to digest this 
Bill and Answer, and to understand the Controversy 
well. It could not have been expected that Council 
would have done more, than to have given their 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 91 

Opinions under their Hands for or against their 
Clients ; but, this being an extraordinary Case, in 
which so many Families were eventually concerned, 
we agreed to depart from the usual Practice, and 
take every Measure in our Power to secure Success 
or retreat in Time. We were soon convinced of the 
Impossibility of supporting the Cause from a Discov- 
ery of several essential Facts directly against us, as 
well as almost a total Defect in Point of Proof. On 
this we agreed not to give our Opinions at once 
against our Clients, but by opening the Nature of 
the Dispute, and the Necessity of Proof to the Com- 
mittee, warn them of the Danger they were in, and 
convince their own Judgments. The eldest Gentle- 
men concerned, took the lead, and when we all met 
together, the whole Matter was so candidly and fair- 
ly opened to them, and the Point necessary to be 
proved so justly stated, that two of the Committee 
soon acknowledged their Conviction of the Want of 
almost every necessary Proof, and that they verily 
believed some of the Facts set forth in their Bill, were 
false. The Chief of them (a certain William Crane) 
still persisted in having the Matter brought to Issue 
at all Events, but after some Time being informed 
that it was inconsistent with our Character as Law- 
yers and honest Men, to lead them on, in so expen- 
sive a Suit, which we were well convinced could not 
but be determined against them, he also gave the 
Matter up, and they all unanimously agreed, that it 
was best to proceed no farther in the Law. 

They then lamented their unhappy Situation, as 
they must not only loose their Lands, but be ruined 



92 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. \_ 1 77 

by the accumulated Costs attending the Discontinu- 
ance of their Suits. In order to remedy this Evil, we 
proposed a Reference or Arbitration, as the most 
likely Method to get clear of the Charge, supposing 
that the Arbitrators in pity to their Circumstances, 
would at least make each Party pay their own Costs. 
To this they eagerly consented, and made it their 
particular Request, that we would all endeavor to 
bring about an Arbitration without Delay. To make 
short of this Matter, we proposed it to the Defend- 
ants, and they agreed to it. Before the Men were 
chosen, I had great Reason to suspect that the Com- 
mittee had not reported our Proceedings and Opin- 
ion truly to their Constituents, but that one of them 
had represented the Arbitration as a Matter that in- 
sured Success. The first Time I had an Opportu- 
nity, I recapitulated the whole to William Crane, be- 
fore four or five of his Constituents in my own 
Office ; at which they appeared greatly surprized, and 
Mr. Crane as much provoked. He immediately an- 
swered in an angry Tone, "That it was no wonder 
I had given that Opinion, as I had long* been feed 
against them." I was much surprized at a Speech so 
diametrically opposite to the Truth, and their whole 
former Behaviour ; I demanded therefore a Repeti- 
tion of this Sentiment, he repeatedly avowed it, on 
which I immediately ordered him out of my Office, or 
that I would make my Clerk turn him out without 
Ceremony. He went off, and from that Time to this, 
I have never done any Business for these People. 
This is a plain and simple Narrative of the Facts 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 93 

thus far. And here I should have stopped, was it 
not for a Charge of a more serious Nature. 

During the Course of these Proceedings, and after 
the Agreement about the Arbitration, one of the 
Defendants (who had purchased Rights to about 
1 200 Acres 'of Land under each Party, and wanted 
them located on one Spot, but was refused by the 
Complainants) applied to me, begging that I would 
recommend it to my Clients to settle with him, as he 
was a fair Purchaser and sick of a Controversy, that 
could be no Ways beneficial to him ; and in order to 
satisfy them fully, he would give them 40 . towards 
bearing the Expences of their Suit. Soon after, on 
their complaining of the Difficulty they had in rais- 
ing Money to pay the Bills that were against them, 
I acquainted them of the above Offer, and advised 
them to accept of it, as they had no Expectation of 
a Recovery, especially against him who had both 
Rights. The only Objection that was made, was, 
that it would look too much like a Compromise with 
a Proprietor, and might create a Jealousy amongst 
their Constituents. To obviate this, I proposed that 
they should release the Lands to me, and I would 
convey it over. To this they assented, and I con- 
veyed it accordingly. In the Deed I received from 
the Committee this whole Transaction is expressly 
set forth, and for what Purpose it was made. I gave 
them a Receipt for the Consideration on Account 
and credited them with it. A few Weeks afterwards, 
Mr. Crane expressed great Uneasiness lest some of 
his Constituents should blame them for this Com- 
promise, and that he heartily repented his joining in 



94 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I" 1 77 

the Deed. I then applied to the Gentleman, who on 
hearing the Matter, returned the Release to Mr. 
Crane (not thinking it worth contending about) and 
he returned my Receipt. This is the only Transac- 
tion relating to any Deed that ever passed between 
us. 

At the Meeting in New-York, my Bill for Services 
done, was settled with the Committee, and about one 
Year after I had declined their Business, Mr. Crane 
desired that the Bill might be subject to the Taxa- 
tion of two indifferent Gentlemen who were chosen 
by himself: I assented to it, promising to repay with 
Interest, all that should be deducted from my Bill. 
On this Occasion those Gentlemen can bear Testi- 
mony to his extraordinary Conduct. At last a Meet- 
ing was had, and the Gentlemen declared that the 
Bill was far less than the Ordinance allowed, and 
that Mr. Crane ought to pay it with Thanks, as they 
themselves had often been Witness of my faithful 
Services. I was Solicitor in the above three Causes 
near four Years. I drew the last Bill containing 
about 200 Sheets. Attended three or four formal 
Agreements in Chancery. Three Times with Coun- 
cil at New-York, four and five Days at a Time. 
Argued two or three Causes on Appeals. And my 
Bill I think, including Chancellors, Registers and 
Clerks Fees, amounted to ,.100.4, or thereabouts. 
As to the other Facts relating to me in this extraor- 
dinary Publication, there is not the least Shadow of 
Truth in them. 

I have only to add, that the Event proved to the 
Complainants (a set of poor deluded People who are 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 95 

to be Sufferers in the End) how grosly they have 
been imposed upon by him, on whom they chiefly de- 
pended : For after the Award given against them by 
the Arbitrators, he again applied to Council in Penn- 
sylvania, and having renewed the Dispute in Chan- 
cery, it was brought to a hearing, and a Decree for 
the Dismission of their Bill passed. Judgments are 
had on the Arbitration Bonds as well as on the Eject- 
ments brought against them, so that they will not 
only be turned off the Lands, but exposed to very 
heavy Costs, which had they been properly informed, 
they might have avoided. How far these poor inno- 
cent People, will be liable to reimburse these Costs, is 
not now my Province to determine. 

On the whole, if ever I have valued one Action of 
my Life above another, I always considered my great 
Attention to the real Interests of their Clients, par- 
ticularly in advising an amicable Settlement of this 
Suit, at a Time when it was in its most lucrative 
State for the Sollicitor, as somewhat meritorious, lit- 
tle suspecting that my Reward, from the very Per- 
sons, who ought ever to have acknowledged it with 
Gratitude, would have been Abuse, aggravated by 
Scandal and Falsehood. And if I am so happy, as 
finally to be able, equally to " to reconcile every other 
act of my Life, to my Character as a Lawyer, and my 
Profession as a Christian" (both of which I hope 
ever to entertain the highest Respect and Venera- 
tion for) this inconsiderate Writer need not to be dis- 
tressed about the " Manner in which I shall answer 
at that august Tribunal ' (where perhaps to his Sor- 
row) Falsehood and Hypocrisy, however artifully 



96 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

veiled, will be altogether stripped of its Disguise. 

ELIAS BOUDINOT. 
March 3d, 1770. 

WE think ourselves bound in Justice to declare 
that Mr. Bondinot's Conduct in the Suits mentioned 
in the above Narrative, appeared to us not only to 
be fair and candid, but very friendly to his and our 
Clients. The Conference at New- York, at which we 
gave our Opinion on the Merits of the Controversy, 
is, to the best of our Recollection, truly stated. We 
well remember, that after deliberately examining the 
Merits, and the Proof which could be offered, we 
were clearly of Opinion, that our Bills must be dis- 
missed, and that a Reference was the best Expedi- 
ent for the Complainants, as Compassion to their 
Circumstances might excite a more favourable De- 
termination, than could be expected in a Court of 
Justice. This they not only consented to and ap- 
proved, but requested our good Offices to affect. 

JAMES DUANE and 
BENJAMIN KISSAM. 

To BE SOLD. 

A Valuable Tract of Land, on the West Side of 
Matchaponix River, in the South Ward of the City 
of Perth-Amboy, containing Six Hundred and Sixty- 
six Acres, about Two Hundred and Fifty Acres of 
rich arable Land, and Thirty Acres of Meadow 
cleared, and in good Fence, and rich Swamp to af- 
ford as much more. On it there is a convenient 
House, Barn and a young bearing Orchard fronting 
the River, about two Miles on the East, with a con- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 97 

siderable Quantity of fine Interval, and bounded on 
the West, by Barrens ; with it may be purchased 
about Thirty five Acres of boggy Meadow, very con- 
veniently situated for the Tract, which affords early 
Feed for Cattle. For further Particulars apply to 
Doctor Johnston at Amboy, or to John Johnston ad- 
joining the Premises. 

ALSO To BE LET, 

A very convenient House in Amboy, near Rariton 
River, opposite to Mr. Steven's Ferry, with a large 
Garden, well stored with useful Vegitables, and 
many Kinds of choice Fruit, a Barn, Stable and 
Orchard ; as much arable Land and Meadow, (not 
exceeding one Hundred Acres) may be hired with 
the House, as shall be thought necessary. The 
Shore before the House abounds in Shell Fish : 
There are several Places very convenient for fishing 
and bathing near the House. For the Particulars 
apply to Doctor Johnston. 

New-Jersey J BY Order of Stephen Skinner, 
Middlesex County j and Jonathan Frazee, Esqrs, two 
of the Judges of the Inferior Court of Common 
Pleas for said County : Notice is hereby given to all 
the Creditors of William Carlisle, and Thomas Davis, 
Insolvent Debtors, in the County of Middlesex, that 
they shew Cause, if any they have, before the said 
Judges, at the House of Elijah Dunham, Innholder, 
in the City of Perth Amboy, in the County of Mid- 
dlesex aforesaid, on Tuesday the 3d Day of April, at 
9 o'Clock, why an Assignment of the said Debtors 
Estate should not be made, pursuant to a late Act of 

7 



98 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Assembly, entitled, " An Act for the Relief of In- 
solvent Debtors, passed this present Tenth Year 
of his Majesty's Reign, and their Bodies be dis- 
charged from Gaol, pursuant to said Act. 
Dated March 10, 1770. 

To be let and entered upon the first Day of May 
next, the Ferry over Rariton River, with the Dwell- 
ing House, Stable, Garden, &c. now in the Posses- 
sion of Thomas Rattoon, in Perth-Amboy. For Par- 
ticulars apply to Stephen Skinner and John Smith in 
Amboy, who will agree for the same.--A^. Y. Gazette 
or Weekly Post Boy, No 1419, March 12, 1770. 

March 5, 1770. 

New-Jersey, Feb. 27, 1770. 

NOTICE is hereby given, to all whom it may con- 
cern, that Joseph Sacket, jun. 1 late of the City of 
New- York, Surgeon, intends to make Application to 
the General Assembly of the Province of New-Jer- 
sey, at their next Session, to be discharged from his 
Creditors, in Consequence of an Assignment made 
in New-York, of his Estate in October 1769. 

To BE SOLD, 

Two Hundred Acres of choice Land, at the Creek 
that leads up to Middletown Point. 

ALSO, 

Another Plantation, with a House, Barn, and 
Kitchen, (formerly occupied by Abraham Hendricks) 
and a Quantity of Mowing Ground, within five Miles 
of Middletown Point. Inquire of Abraham Hen- 

i For a sketch of Dr. Joseph Sacket, see N. J. Archives, XX., 578, 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 99 

dricks, at Middletown Point, East New-Jersey. N. 
Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1419, March 
15, 1770. 

All Persons indebted to the Estate of Jacob Spicer 
late of the County of Gloucester, in the Western Divis- 
ion of the Province of New-Jersey, deceased, are re- 
quired to make immediate Payment of such of their 
respective Debts, or they wi/l be proceeded against ac- 
cording to Laiv ; And those who have any Demands 
against the said Estate, are desired to bring in their 
Accompts to 

SAMUEL SPICER, Administrator. 

The GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the Province of New- 
Jersey is now sitting at Burlington. 

NOTICE is hereby given to the Gentlemen and 
Ladies, that the Subscribers intend to kill a STEER, 
which was raised in Springfield, New-Jersey, the like 
never before killed in America ; it may be seen, 
gratis, at George Wolpper's in Race-street, a few 
Doors above Fourth street, on the 2Oth Instant ; and 
notwithstanding there have been several fine Cattle 
killed heretofore, yet none of them were like this, 
either for Largeness or Fatness. 

Notice will be given when he will be killed and 
weighed ; those who are pleased to favour us with 
their Custom, it shall be gratefully acknowledged, by 
their humble Servants, GEORGE ANd BENJAMIN WOLP- 
PER, standing at No. 45. 



100 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

New-Jersey, March 12, 1770. 
Messieurs HALL and SELLERS 

Be pleased to insert the following in your next Gazette, 
and oblige your constant Reader, &c. &c. 

The celebrated Jersey Farmer expresses himself 
highly delighted with the imaginary Notion of having 
given general Satisfaction by his Piece in your Paper, 
No. 2144, against the Diversion of Fox-hunting; I 
am very sorry public Applause should be so wanting 
of Facts, as to omit seconding this Self-opinion, in- 
tirely risen from patriotic Motives. 

It is not without inexpressible Concern that I am 
obliged, in Vindication of my Brethren, to attack (a 
second Time) so innocent a Being as my Antagon- 
ist, who, when but a Boy, would step his Foot out of 
the Way, to avoid hurting the laborious Ant, and care- 
fully Brush the useful Bee off the Rose in his Hand ; 
but the Noxious Hornets, being a Nuisance in the 
Creation, and withal very saucy and quarrelsome were 
sure to receive a Stone, whenever they fell in his Way. 
What a Consistency is here ! 'Tis almost incredible, 
that a Man of such great Piety, and boundless Vir- 
tue, should exist in the present Age, when such 
trifling Accomplishments are so little esteemed. 
But with what Composure does this good Man vio- 
late that excellent Precept, Do as you would be done 
unto ; how can he answer to his Conscience, for dis- 
turbing even a Kennel of Hornets, to behold the 
Rage and Uproar of those puny Creatures? One 
would imagine, by some of his Expressions, that he 
has formerly been a Sportsman, and devoted Part of 
his Time to the Chace ; if so, he was an unworthy 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. lOt 

Member, because our Spirits are more exalted, than 
to be delighted at the Rage of Hornets. In my last, 
I took Occasion to mention the Folly of a single 
Farmer's appearing in the Public Papers, against so 
innocent a Diversion as Fox-hunting, unless he was 
seconded, and could convince our Fraternity, that 
there is one besides himself, in the whole Province, 
displeased with such harmless Amusements. I say 
harmless ; because such Sport can, in itself, have no 
bad Tendency. At same time I confess, that we 
should be under some Regulations, particularly, to 
abolish the foolish Custom of excessive Drinking, 
thereby destroying, instead of preserving, the health 
of each Individual. 

.A Fox HUNTER. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2151, March 15, 
1 770. 

To be sold by the Subscriber, living in the town- 
ship of Pilesgrove, in the county of Salem, in the 
province of West-New-Jersey, the one half of a 
forge, with 4 fires, and a hammer, with coal houses, 
and a convenient dwelling-house, the whole built 
with stone, and in good repair, not more than 3 years 
old, with a smith's shop, and a number of workmens 
houses, sufficient to accommodate the workmen ; to- 
gether with the half part of a stone grist-mill, two 
years old, and in good repair, on a never failing 
stream of water, constantly supplied with springs, 
the mill overshot, with one pair of stones, boulting 
tackling, all go by water, within half a mile of the 
abovesaid forge. Also the half part of the mine, 



102 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

within a quarter of a mile of said forge, containing a 
sufficient quantity of good iron ore to supply any 
number of works, which has been proved both in 
blooming and refining, and is of a superior quality to 
any made in the province. Also one other forge, 
with three fires, and one hammer, with sufficient 
room to erect another hammer and fire in the same 
house, a good saw mill on the same dam, the whole 
in good repair, and new, with a furnace, casting and 
bridge houses, and other conveniences, suitable for 
the same on the aforesaid dam, with a good new coal 
house, sufficient to contain 1500 loads of coal, with a 
smith's shop, tanyard, curry-shop and shoemaker's 
shop and bark mill, also a good dwelling house and 
fcitchen, with a good spring of water near the door, 
stone-houses, stables and workmens-houses, the 
whole within a mile of the grist-mill, and within a 
mile and a half of the first mentioned forge, and a 
mile from the mine-hole, with about 30 acres of good 
improved meadow, within a mile of the furnace, and 
about 400 acres of rich swamp adjoining, within the 
same distance, with two good farms within a mile, 
sufficient to put in 100 acres per year of grain, with 
a sufficient quantity of timber land to accommodate 
the work for any time ; the greatest distance to cart 
coal will not exceed 3 miles in 20 years. The pur- 
chaser may have with the works 600 loads of coal, 
and 2000 cords of wood, within a mile of the fur- 
nace, the greatest part set in pitts ; the Whole is sit- 
uated in a fine country for trade, where there is 
plenty of all sorts of country produce to be sold rea- 
sonable, and on a good stream of water, called the 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 103 

Wallkill River, in the county of Sussex, in the prov- 
ince of East New Jersey, 40 miles from New Wind- 
sor, where is good navigation to New-York, and 30 
miles from a landing on Delaware River, from which 
place iron may be transported to Philadelphia rea- 
sonable. Any person inclining to purchase all or 
part, may apply to the subscriber at his house, or to 
Alva Brown, living at said works. 

An indisputable title will be given. 

JOSEPH SHARP. 

N. B. The said iron has been tried in a steel fur- 
nace in Philadelphia, by Whitehead Humphreys, who 
says it is the best he has tried in this country for that 
use.- -Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2151, March 15, 
1770. 

Saturday Afternoon one of the Ferry-Boats over- 
set in the Delaware, as she was crossing from the 
New Ferry Wharf to the Jersey Side, whereby two 
Negro Ferrymen were drowned. Two Passengers, 
a white Man and a Negro, were taken up by a Boat 
from the Shore. 

To be sold by the subscribers, by Public Vendue, on 

the 1 2th day of April next, on the premises, 
A LOT of land, lying in Chesterfield, in the County 
of Burlington, West New Jersey, within half a mile 
of Bordentown ; containing 45 acres, whereon is 
erected a good sawmill, 2 dwelling houses, an excel- 
lent situation for a grist mill, being a constant stream 
of water, with eight feet ahead, and all flour may be 
transported from the mill tail to Philadelphia, situate 



104 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

in a good part of the country for buying wheat, for 
merchant work. A good title will be given by the 
subscribers. The vendue to begin at 7 o'clock, 
where the terms of sale will be made known, and due 
attendance given. 

Likewise will be exposed to sale at the same time, 
one pair of wooden forge bellows and a large scale- 
beam, and weights, suitable for weighing iron. 

MARMADUKE WATSON, 
ANNE CURTIS, 
AARON WATSON. 
March 20, 1770. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 167, March 19- 
26, 1770. 

From Northampton, in Burlington County, we 
learn, that on the 5th Instant, Jane the Wife of John 
Mullen, of that Place, was delivered of three Female 
Children, at one Birth, and all likely to do well. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2152, March 22, 1770. 

Extract of a Letter from New-York, February 24, 
1770. 

You have at least some Colour for supposing that 
the Violence against Capt. M'Dougall, 1 is the Effect 
of conscious Guilt 

He is now about 38 Years of Age, has three Chil- 
dren, two of whom are Sons. The eldest of them 

i Alexander McDougall. born in Scotland in 1731, came to New York in 1755 
with his father, and was one of the foremost members of the " Sons of Liberty." 
organized in New York to resist the enforcement of the Stamp Act, in 1765. In 
the early part of 1770 he was imprisoned, having refused to give bail, for twenty- 
three weeks, on a charge of criminal libel, for publishing a placard attacking the 
Royalist government. In 1756-7 he was captain of privateers preying on the 
French commerce. He died in New York in 1786. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 05 

has lately finished his Education at the Jersey Col- 
lege, and is now engaged in the Study of the Law. 1 

It is a pitty, for the Singularity of the Instance, 
that the Lad is not yet so forward in his Profession, 
as to begin his public Labours in the Quality of Ad- 
vocate for his Father. 

This State Prisoner, the first Son of Liberty in 
Bonds for that glorious Cause in America, possesses 
great Presence of Mind, is methodical and connected 
in the Arrangement of his Ideas, writes well, speaks 
(though with some Impediment) yet with tolerable 
Ease. 

P. S. Extraordinary to Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2152, March 22, 1770. 

THE MEMBERS of the New-Jersey Medical Society 
are desired to take notice, that the next General 
Meeting is appointed to be held at the house of Mr. 
Michael Duff, in New-Brunswick, on Tuesday the 
first day of May next. The several Members are 
particularly requested not to fail attending, as there 
will be business of singular importance to be trans- 
acted at that time. The Society will be opened pre- 
cisely at 10 o'clock, A. M. if a sufficient number of 
Members arrive before. All other Gentlemen of the 
Faculty in the Province, are cordially invited to join 
the Society as soon as may be convenient. 

NATHANIEL SCUDDER, Secr'y. 
March 29, 1770. 

March 28, 1770. 
PURSUANT to an Act of General Assembly of the 

i John Alexander McDougalL of the Class of 1769. 



IO6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

province of New-Jersey, lately passed intituled, " An 
Act for the relief of insolvent debtors," I the sub- 
scriber being now confined in the gaol of the county 
of Hunterdon, have petitioned to the Judges of the 
Court aforesaid, for the benefit of said act, and filed 
a schedule of my effects, do give notice to all my 
creditors to appear and shew cause, if any they have, 
on Wednesday the iSth of April next, at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon of the same day, before the Judges 
of said Court, at the dwelling-house of Samuel Hunt, 
in Trenton, why I should not be discharged agree- 
able to the directions of said act- 

JAMES WILSON. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 168, March 26- 
April 2, 1770. 

[For Speech of Gov. Franklin and Address of Rep- 
resentatives, see N. J. Archives, Vol. X, pp. 
172, 1 80.] 

To his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq ; Cap- 
tain General, Governor and Commander in Chief 
in and over his Majesty's Provinces of New- 
Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in 
America, Chancellor and Vice-Admiral in the 
same, &c. 

The Humble Address of his Majesty's Council for 
the said Province. 

May it please your Excellency, 

To receive our hearty Thanks for calling this 
Meeting of the Legislature, which appears at this 
Time, to be highly necessary, to concert proper 
Measures for the due Support of the Dignity of Gov- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 1 07 

ernment, and the Maintenance of the Laws and Con- 
stitution of this Colony. The spirited and prudent 
Steps taken by your Excellency, to suppress the tu- 
multuous and dangerous Attempts of a Number of 
infatuated People, in Obstruction of the due Admin- 
istration of Justice, must afford a sensible Pleasure 
to every Well-wisher of the Peace of the Province. 

It will be admitted that some Individual of the 
Community, had been oppressed by the unnecessary 
and excessive Costs, charged by some of the Pro- 
fessors of the Law ; yet surely that cannot be 
deemed a sufficient Justification for raising a Clam- 
our against the whole of that Profession ; much less 
can it possibly excuse such riotous Proceedings, as 
have been lately manifested, to the endangering of 
the public Peace, Credit and Happiness of the Col- 
ony. Yet such have been frequently the Effects of 
a foolish Credulity, raised and promoted by artful and 
mischievous Men, who, under specious Pretences of 
the best Designs, and of promoting the most amia- 
ble and glorious Cause, have deceived the Thought- 
less into those very Follies and Crimes, which at 
first, they might have intended to oppose and defeat. 
History abundantly confirms the Truth of this Ob- 
servation, and the present Subject of our Delibera- 
tions, affords a very striking additional Proof. A 
Number ot Men (some of whom perhaps meant well 
at first) with their Passions raised by a popular cry 
of Grievances, instead of taking the legal and con- 
stitutional Measures enumerated by your Excellency, 
have entered into Combinations, (under Pretence of 
redressing those Grievances) which, from their very 



to8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. L J 77 

Nature and Tendency, must produce Effects infinite- 
ly more pernicious and destructive than the Dis- 
tresses they complain of. Designing Men of desper- 
ate Fortunes, made so, perhaps, by their own Folly 
and Extravagance, have doubtless taken the Advan- 
tage of the too general Prejudices, to inflame the 
Spirit of Contention and Disorder, that they might 
thereby the better screen themselves, and obtain De- 
lays of Justice, in Confusions of their own making. 
These, we hope, will be discovered and treated ac- 
cording to their just Demerits. 

The several important Matters recommended in 
your Excellency's Speech, to prevent future Offences 
of the like Kind, and for supporting- the Dignity of 
Government, are under our most serious Considera- 
tion ; and we assure your Excellency, that we shall 
pursue every Measure in our Power, that shall ap- 
pear most likely to answer these valuable Ends. We 
also join with your Excellency in declaring that we 
will most heartily unite in any Expedient necessary 
for the Removal of every real Grievance of the Peo- 
ple, and at the same Time, that we will give our ut- 
most Assistance in Support of the Laws, and the reg- 
ular Administration of Justice. 

By Order of the House, 

STIRLING/ Speaker. 
Council- Chamber 

March 20, 1770. 

His Excellency's Answer. 
" Gentlemen, 

YOUR Address contains such Sentiments as 

i William Alexander, of Baskingridge, N. J., claiming to be the Larl of Stir- 
ling. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 109 

cannot fail of meeting with my Thanks and Appro- 
bation. I have not the least Doubt but that you will, 
as you have always hitherto done, afford me every 
Assistance which may be in your Power, in promot- 
ing the Welfare, Security, and Happiness of the good 
People of this Province." 

His Excellency's ANSWER [to the Address of the 
Representatives, the address printed in N. J. 
Archives, Vol. X, p. 180]. 
" Gentlemen, 

THE Assurances you give me of discounte- 
nancing riotous Proceedings, and of joining in all ne- 
cessary Measures to bring Offenders to Justice, can- 
not but afford me sensible Pleasure, and must, if fol- 
lowed by a suitable Conduct on your Part, effectual- 
ly prevent such dangerous Disorders in future." 

To COVER 

This ensuing Season, at NATHANIEL HEARD'S, at 
Woodbridge, New Jersey, the noted Horse, called 

TRUE BRITON, 

AT Three Pounds, Proc. for the Season, or Twenty 
Shillings, Proc. the single Leap. The Money to 
be paid when the Mares are taken away. Good 
Grass for Mares. 

NATHANIEL HEARD. 

* 

AMBOY RACES. 

To be RUN for on Tuesday the first Day of May 
next, at the City of Perth Amboy, 

A PURSE OF FIFTY DOLLARS, 
free for any Horse, Mare or Gelding, not being more 



110 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

than half Blood, or more than three Years old, carry- 
rying eight Stone, the best of three Heats, one Mile 
and a half each Heat. Also on Wednesday the sec- 
ond Day of May, a SADDLE will be run for, by com- 
mon Horses, that has never won a Prise to the Value 
of Forty Shillings, and on Thursday the 3d Day of 
May, the Beaten Horses that started for the Purse, 
to run for the Entrance Money. The Horses to be 
entered with Elijah Dunham, or William Wright, on 
or before the Twenty eight Day of April next, pay- 
ing Twenty Shillings Entrance or Double at the 
Post : Certificates to be produced under the Hands 
of the Breeder, of the Blood and Age of each Horse : 
All Disputes to be determined by proper Judges to 
be appointed for that Purpose. 
March 24, 1770. 

BY Order of Jonathan Frazee, and Stephen Skin- 
ner, Esqrs. two of his Majesty's Judges of the Infe- 
rior Court of Common Pleas for the County of Mid- 
dlesex : Public Notice is hereby given, that Monday 
the 1 6th of April next, is appointed by the said 
Judges, to meet at the House of Elijah Dunham, in 
Perth-Amboy, to discharge Anthony Hansell, and 
John Green, Insolvent Debtors, they having com- 
plied with the late Act of Insolvency. 

March 24, 1770. 

To the PURLIC. 

THE Author of the two Pieces published in Mr. 
Parker's Paper, of the 26th of February last, and con- 
tinued in his the 5th Instant, in Vindication of the 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. Ill 

i 

Purchasers of Newark, is extremely sorry, that he 
should be guilty of suggesting to the Public, that 
"the Magistrates of Newark' should deviate so far 
from the Principles of Justice, as to imprison any 
Persons " to gratify the Proprietors." This he con- 
fesses was a very rash and inadvertant Slip of the 
Pen, especially in one who has ever maintained the 
highest Veneration both for the Laws of his Coun- 
try, and the Officers of Justice. He esteems the one 
as the grand Diaphragma of our Lives and Liber- 
ties ; and the other, as important Guardians of our 
Land and Nation. He would therefore beg Leave, 
in this public Manner, humbly to supplicate these 
honourable Gentlemen's Pardon, for an Abuse, 



which he is conscious justly deserves their Resent- 
ment. 

The Author will eagerly embrace the first Oppor- 
tunity to make a Recantation of the Category against 
the two Gentlemen, whose Names he ventured to 
make free with, in the last of the above Pieces, when- 
ever he is sufficiently convinced of their Innocency. 

Newark, March 22, 1770. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1421, 
March 26, 1770. 

To be SOLD, 

BY the subscriber living on the premises, at public 
vendue, on Saturday the 28th day of April next, if 
not sold by private sale before, a valuable lot of land 
in Perth-Amboy, containing four acres; bounding on 
the river, together with a good dwelling-house, a 
currying shop, a shoe maker's shop, bark-house, a 



JI2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

beam-house, and tan-yard, all new and in good re- 
pair, said tanyard is very valuable as there is a good 
spring, and no other tan-yard within several miles, 
nor any other spring in the town convenient for that 
purpose: A good title will be given by the sub- 
scriber 

JOHN CROW 
N. Y. Joiirnal or General Advertiser, No. 

1421, March 29, 1770. 

/ 

CHARLESTOWN, South Carolina. 

March 9. The Rev. Hezekiah Smith, with a col- 
lection of about ^.300 sterling, for the intended col- 
lege in Rhode Island ; and the Rev. James Caldwell, 
with ^.700 more for that at Prince Town in New- 
Jersey, are set out on their return to their respective 
homes. 

FOUR POUNDS Reward. 

BROKE out of Trenton goal, the twenty-first instant, 
at night, an Irish servant man, named DANIEL CARR, 
about 5 feet 9 inches high, round faced, fresh colour d, 
broad shoulders, a well sett man, yellow or brownish 
hair, commonly wears a false cue. Had on when he 
went off, a new beaver hat, blue coat, red jacket, leather 
breeches ; he has been a foot pedlar of late. Whoever 
fakes up said CARR, and brings him to Trenton goal, 
or secures him in any other of his Majesty s goals, so 
that he may be had again, shall have the above reward, 
and all reasonabh charges, paid by 

PETER HANKINSON, goaler. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1425, March 29, 
1770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 113 

\ 

BURLINGTON. 

The SPEECH of his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, 
Esq ; Captain General, etc. etc. 

Gentlemen of the Council and Gentlemen of the 
General Assembly^ 

I AM much concerned that there should be any 
Occasion for calling a Meeting of the Legislature 
so soon after the late Session. But however incon- 
venient it may be to your private affairs, or expen- 
sive to the Province, you will find, by the Papers 
which will be laid before you, that it is a Measure 
made absolutely necessary by the late tumultuous 
and riotous proceedings in the County of Mon- 
mouth. 1 

Besides these Riots in Monmouth, there was one 
of a similar Nature in Essex, on the Qth of last 
January ; but by the virtuous and spirited Conduct 
of the Sheriff, Magistrates, and a number of the 
well disposed Inhabitants of the County, the Rioters 
were suppressed, and many of them bound over to 
answer to the next Court. .... 

Such being the Case, our chief Attention, at this 
Time ought to be engaged in providing for the due 
Support of the Laws, and Authority of Government. 
This indeed, must, at all Events be done, and with . 
your Assistance, Gentlemen, may be easily effected. 
For so desirable a Purpose, I think it my Duty to 
recommend to you the Passing, 

i. An Act for reviving and continuing the Militia 
Law, which expired at the last Session. 

i This speech is given in full in N. J. Archives, X., 172. 
8 



114 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

2. An Act for the better preventing Tumults, and 
riotous Assemblies, .... 

3. An Act to compel the Reparation and Strength- 
ening of Prisons, .... 

4. An Act to provide a Fund (some limited Sum) 
for answering such contingent and extraordinary Ex- 
pences as may happen on Emergencies, for the Ser- 
vice of this Province, .... 

These, Gentlemen, are the principal Matters I have 
to recommend to your Consideration at this Time, 



Council Chamber, March 16, 1770. 

* 

To his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN Esq ; 
Captain General, Governor and Commander in 
Chief in and over His Majesty's Province of New- 
Jersey, and Territories thereon depending in 
America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the 
same, &c. 

The humble ADDRESS of His Majesty's COUNCIL 

for the said Province. 

May it please your EXCELLENCY, 

To receive our hearty Thanks, for calling this 
Meeting of the Legislature, which appears, at this 
Time, to be highly necessary, to concert proper 
Measures for the due Support of the Dignity of Gov- 
ernment, and the Maintenance of the Laws and Con- 
stitution of this Colony. The spirited and prudent 
Steps taken by your Excellency to suppress the 
tumultuous and dangerous Attempts of a Number of 
infatuated People, in Obstruction of the due Admin- 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 115 

istration of Justice, must afford a sensible Pleasure 
to every Well-wisher of the Peace of the Province. 

If it be admitted, that some Individuals of the 
Community had been oppressed by unnecessary and 
excessive Costs, charged by some of the Professors 
of the Law ; yet surely that cannot be deemed a suf- 
ficient Justification for raising a Clamour against the 
whole of that Profession ; much less can it possibly 
excuse such riotous Proceedings as have been lately 
manifested, to the endangering of the public Peace, 
Credit, and Happiness of the Colony. Yet such 
have been frequently the Effects of a foolish Credul- 
ity, raised and promoted by artful and mischievous 
Men, who under specious Pretences of the best De- 
signs, and of promoting the most amiable and glori- 
ous Cause, have deceived the Thoughtless into those 
very Follies and Crimes, which, at first, they might 
have intended to oppose and defeat. History 
abundantly confirms the Truth of this Observation, 
and the present Subject of our Deliberations, affords 
a very striking additional Proof. A Number of Men 
(some of whom perhaps meant well at first) with 
their Passions raised by a popular Cry of Griev- 
ances, instead of taking the legal and constitutional 
Measures enumerated by your Excellency, have en- 
tered into Combinations, under Pretence of redress- 
ing those Grievances, which, from their very Nature 
and Tendency, must produce Effects infinitely more 
pernicious and destructive than the Distresses they 
complain of. Designing Men, of desperate For- 
tunes, made so, perhaps, by their own Folly and Ex- 
travagance, have doubtless, taken the Advantage of 



I 16 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the too general Prejudices, to enflame this Spirit of 
Contention and Disorder ; that they might thereby 
the better screen themselves, and obtain Delays of 

Justice, in Confusions of their own making 

These, we hope, will be discovered, and treated ac- 
cording to their just Demerits. 

The several important Matters recommended in 
your Excellency's Speech, to prevent future Offences 
of the like Kind, and for supporting the Dignity of 
Government, are under our most serious Considera- 
tion ; and we assure your Excellency, that we shall 

* 

pursue every Measure, in our Power, that shall ap- 
pear most likely to answer those desirable Ends. 
We also join with your Excellency, in declaring that 
we will most heartily unite in any Expedient neces- 
sary for the Removal of any real Grievances of the 
People ; and, at the same time, that we will give our 
utmost Assistance in Support of the Laws, and the 
regular Administration of Justice. 

By Order of the House, 

Council Chamber, STIRLING, Speaker. 

March 20, 1770. 

His EXCELLENCY'S Answer. 

GENTLEMEN, 

YOUR Address contains such Sentiments, as cannot 
fail of meeting with my Thanks and Approbation. I 
have not the least Doubt but that you will, as you have 
always hitherto done, afford me every Assistance which 
may be in your Power, in promoting the Welfare, Se- 
curity and Happiness, of the good People of this Prov- 
ince. 



I 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. Ii; 

After Governor FRANKLIN'S Speech, and the COUN- 
CIL'S Address, &c. were put to Press, the Address 
of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY of New -Jersey came to 
hand, and is as follows. 

To his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq ; 
Captain General, Governor and Commander in 
Chief in and over the Colony of Nova-Caesarea, 
or New-Jersey, and Territories thereon depending 
in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the 
same, &c. 

The humble ADDRESS of the REPRESENTATIVES of 
the said Colony, in General Assembly convened. 

May it please your EXCELLENCY. 

HEARTILY grieved at the Occasion of our Meet- 
ing at this Time, we cannot sufficiently express the 
Concern we feel, That there should be Persons in 
this Government so lost to a Sense of their inestima- 
ble Privileges, as not to distinguish between the Use 
and Abuse of them : And that because some may 
have been, and others imagined themselves severely 
treated and oppressed by a particular Sett of Men, 
that therefore they would deprive both themselves 
and others, who never offended them, of one of the 
greatest Bulwarks of English Liberty, a free Court, 
wherein all Persons whatever have, and ought to 
have, an undoubted Right 'to appear, according to 
the Mode of our excellent Constitution, to hear and 
be heard, make known their Complaints, and have 

them redressed. There are, or have been, 

Abuses in most or all Professions ; if these were to 
operate against their Use, what would be the Conse- 



I I 8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

quence but a total Deprivation of all the Benefits at- 
tending the due Execution of them? Where the 
Law and Constitution have provided Remedies in 
any Case, these, and these only, ought to be pur- 
sued. With respect to any Abuses or Oppression 
from the Practitioners of the Law, the legal Modes 
of Redress are justly pointed out by your Excel- 
lency, plain and easy to the meanest Capacity, and 
to which in general we know of but one Objection ; 
that the People oppressed are sometimes not of suf- 
ficient Ability to prosecute their Complaints ; but this 
can have no Existence, when it is considered, that 
there are none so poor, but may make known their 
Distresses by Petition to the Assembly, or to the 
Members thereof, who live in their County ; and 
from the past Conduct of this House, it must be evi- 
dent, that, as the grand Inquest of the Province, At- 
tention will be always paid to the Complaints of the 

People. There are few but what have, or may 

have, in future, a lawful and honourable, and, we 
think, the best Remedy, in their own Hands against 
any Abuses from the Practitioners of the Law ; an 
honest Care to fulfil Contracts, and a patriotic Spirit 
of Frugality and Industry, would soon make this evi- 
dent We are, however, and shall be, at all Times 
ready to hear, and, as far as may be in our Power, 
redress every real Grievance, that may come to our 
Knowledge. 

We could not, through Concern for these deluded 
People, but thus far lament their unhappy Mistake. 
Government must be supported, and the Laws duly 
executed. From the strictest Attention to these 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 119 

Points we can never vary. Our Regard for good 
Order, and the Peace of the Province, calls loudly 
upon us to thank your Excellency for the Care you 
have taken, that the public Tranquility might be pre- 
served ; at the same Time we are well assured, it is 
necessary there should be a Regulation in the Prac- 
tice of the Law, which we believe would greatly con- 
tribute to quiet the Minds of the People, if not total- 
ly prevent such tumultuous Proceedings in future ; 
and we hope, if any Remedy can be provided, so that 
the heavy Expence sometimes attending Law Suits 
may be regulated and lessened, it will have your 
Concurrence. 

And we cannot but express the great Satisfaction 
we feel at the virtuous Conduct and Spirit shown by 
the Magistrates, Sheriff, and People of the County 
of Essex, in suppressing the first Appearance of 
Riot in that County. Had a like Spirit been exerted 
in Monmouth, it probably had prevented the Dis- 
turbances since. 

We, on our Part, do assure your Excellency, we 
shall ever discountenance such riotous Proceedings, 
and will heartily join in all necessary Measures to 
bring every offender to condign Punishment, and 
for ensuring Obedience to the Laws : For this salu- 
tary Purpose, we shall give due Consideration to 
what your Excellency hath recommended. 

As the Persons accused of the late Riots have 
been, and are, in a Way of Trial, according to Law, 
we cannot think ic necessary, at present, to alter the 
Constitutional and established Mode of Trial, to an- 
other County, nor will it be necessary, at this Time, 



120 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

to make any Provision for Expences, that may here- 
after arise. As the Assembly of this Colony have al- 
ways honourably paid the extraordinary Exigences 
of Government, so your Excellency may be assured, 
should the like Disorders occasion it, we shall not be 
wanting in our Duty to defray the Expences. 

We must take Notice to your Excellency, that the 
Meeting of the Assembly, at this Time, ought to have 
been at Amboy, according to established Custom ; 
and however the Necessity of the Business now to 
be done, may excuse our going into it, we desire it 
may not be drawn into Precedent. 

By Order of the House, 
March 20, 1770. CORTLAND SKINNER, Speaker. 

To which His EXCELLENCY was pleased to return 

the following ANSWER. 
GENTLEMEN, 

THE Assurances you give me of discountenancing 
riotous Proceedings, and of joining in all necessary 
Measures to bring Offenders to condign Punishment \ 
cannot but afford me sensible Pleasure, and must, if 
followed by a suitable Conduct on your Part, effectual- 
ly prevent such dangerous Disorders in future.- 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2153, March 29, 1770. 



%* This Morning the large Steer, raised by John 
Tonkin of Springfield, in Burlington County, New- 
Jersey, was killed by George and Benjamin Wilport ; 
and on Saturday Morning the same will be weighed 
and sold at their Stall, No. 45, in the Market, where 
they will be glad to see their Friends and Cus- 
tomers. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 121 

CUSTOM HOUSE, Philadelphia, OUTWARDS. 
Sloop Hetty, J. Burnam, Salem. 

To be SOLD, by public Vendue, on the premises, 

On Thursday, the twenty-sixth day of April next, 
A VALUABLE plantation, and Tract of land, situate in 
the township of Northampton, in the county of Bur- 
lington, in West-Jersey, containing about 270 acres of 
land, "jo or 80 acres whereof is good meadow, and 
more may be made, a dwelling-house, barn, stables, and 
other convenient buildings thereon, a good well of water 
near the door, with a pump in it, a good bearing 
orchard, the woodland is well timbered, it is situate 
about 3 miles from Mount-holly, and the same distance 
from the new mills, and about 2 1 miles from Philadel- 
phia.... There will be likewise sold, at the same time and 
place, 1 50 acres of woodland, nearly adjoining the 
above ; as also 60 acres of cedar swamp, within 5 miles, 
thereof. Any person inclining to purchase, may apply 
to William Wells, at the Old Ferry, in Philadelphia ; 
or John West, living on the premises, at any time be- 
fore the day of sale, and be shewn the premises. The 
sale to begin at 10 d clock in the forenoon of said day y 
when the title and terms will be made known, and at- 
tendance given, by 

WILLIAM WELLS. 

March 13, 1770. 

-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2153, March 29, 
1770. 

From a Correspondent. 

"When I perceived in a late CHRONICLE, the 
Proposals for printing by Subscription the Poetical 



122 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

Works of the late Reverend Mr. NATHANIEL 
EVANS, it gave me a sincere Pleasure. I was re- 
joiced to see that so valuable, so virtuous, and so 
sensible a Person's Name should be had in Remem- 
brance, and that his great Abilities and good Name 
would not be suffered to die with his Body. His 
sweet amiable Disposition, his Honesty of Heart, 
his sincere Friendship and true genuine (but not 
noisy) Piety, rendered him agreeable and dear to all 
that were so happy as to have an Acquaintance with 
him. 

" Every one I will dare to say that shall subscribe 
to his Works will, when they come to read his 
Poems, be highly delighted, and will think their 
SMALL SUM well laid out. It is to be hoped that 
every one now who have professed a Friendship 
for the deceased GENTLEMAN, will delay no longer, 
but immediately give in their Names to Mr. Brad- 
ford, at the London Coffee House. 

"As soon as a sufficient Number of Subscriptions 
are obtained to defray the Expence of Printing, &c. 
they will be put in the Press. The Price of the Book 
will be FIVE SHILLINGS, one Half to be paid at the 
Time of subscribing, and the other on the Delivery 
of the Book." Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 169, 
April 2-9, 1770. 

Philadelphia, March 26. Saturday Afternoon one 
of the Ferry-Boats overset in the Delaware, as she 
was crossing from the New Ferry Wharf to the Jer- 
sey Side, whereby two Negro-Ferrymen were 
drowned. Two Passengers, a white Man and a Ne- 
gro, were taken up by a Boat from the Shore. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 123 



i 



New-York, April 2. The following Resolutions 
were passed by the General Assembly of the. Province 
of New- Jersey, on the tgth of March last : 

1 . Resolved, That the House always have, and ever 
will readily hear, and do all in their Power to redress 
any real Grievances in this Colony. 

2. Resolved, That the late Riots in the Counties of 
Monmouth and Essex, are of the most dangerous and 
alarming Tendency, and a most audacious Insult to 
Government. 

3. Resolved, That this House will steadily oppose 
all Riots and Insults to Government. 

4. Resolved, That every Attack made upon private 
Property, more especially in the Night, is of the most 
alarming Nature ; and therefore, that the setting Fire 
to the Stables and Out Houses of the Honourable 
David Ogden, Esq ; in January last, is a most dar- 
ing Outrage, a notorious Insult to the Laws, and of 
the most dangerous Consequence to the .public 
Peace. 

5. Resolved, That his Excellency be addressed to 
issue his Proclamation, offering a Reward not ex- 
ceeding the Sum of ^25, for the Discovery and 
bringing to condign Punishment, the Perpetrators of 
so barbarous an Act. 

6. Resolved, That this House do approve of and 
highly commend the Magistrates, Sheriff, Peace 
Officers and Inhabitants of the County of Essex, for 
their resolute and spirited Conduct in apprehending 
and bringing to Punishment, the Authors of the late 
Riots in their County. 

And on the 27th his Excellency was pleased to 



124 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

give his Assent to the following Bills, enacting the 
same, viz. 

1. An Act to revive and amend an Act, entitled, 
An Act for the better settling and regulating the 
Militia of this Colony of New-Jersey, for the repell- 
ing Invasions, and suppressing Insurrections and Re- 
bellions. 

2. An Act for preventing dangerous Tumults an 
riotous Assemblies, and for the more speedy and 
effectual punishing the Rioters. 

3. An Act to revive and continue the Process and 
Proceedings lately depending in the Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas, and Court of General Quarter Ses- 
sions of the Peace, for the County of Monmouth. 

4. An Act to provide a more effectual Remedy 
against excessive Costs in the Recovery of Debts 
under Fifty Pounds, in this Colony, and for other 
Purposes therein mentioned. 

5. An Act for defraying Incidental Charges. 

6. An Act to explain and amend an Act of the 
General Assembly, passed in the Ninth Year of his 
Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for the Relief of 
Insolvent Debtors, and for other Purposes therein 
mentioned. 

7. An Act to revive an Act, entitled, An Act to 
prevent Waste from being committed upon the Com- 
mon Land allotted to the Patent of Secaucus, in the 
Corporation of Bergen. 

8. An Act to enable the Owners and Possessors of 
certain Meadows and Marshes, bounding on Dela- 
ware River, and Salem Creek, in Lower Penn's 




I//0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 125 

Neck, in the County of Salem, to stop out the Tide, 
from overflowing the same. 

And then his Excellency was pleased to make a 
Speech to both Houses, in these Words, viz. 

Gentlemen of the Council and Gentlemen of the 

General Assembly. 

" I CANNOT but applaud the Spirit, Prudence, and 
Dispatch you have manifested in the Business of this 
Session, and which will, I hope, be productive of the 
good Effects intended. 

Let me recommend it to you, on your Return to 
your several Counties, to exert your best Endeav- 
ours in your respective Stations, to inculcate and pro- 
mote such Principles and Dispositions in the People, 
as may best tend to preserve the Peace and Quiet of 
the Province. 

By Virtue of the Powers and Authorities to me 
given, I do prorogue the General Assembly, to meet 
at Amboy, on Tuesday the first Day of May next, 
and you are accordingly prorogued. 

An Act to revive an Act entitled, Act to prevent 
Waste from being committed on the common 
Land allotted to the Patent ^/"Secaucus, in the 
Corporation <?/ Bergen. 

i. WHEREAS in the Fifth Year of the Reign of his 
present Majesty King GEORGE the Third, an Act, en- 
titled, An Act to prevent Waste from being commit- 
ted upon the Common Land allotted to the Patent . of 
Secaucus, in the Corporation of Bergen, was passed 
by the Legislature of this Colony ; which is expired : 
And the said Act having been found very advan- 



126 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

tageous for the Purposes therein mentioned, and the 
Reasons for passing it still subsisting, 

2. Be it therefore Enacted, by the Governor Coun- 
cil, and General Assembly, of this Colony of New- 
Jersey, and it is hereby enacted by the Authority of 
the same, That the said Act, entitled, An Act to pre- 
vent Waste from being committed upon the Common 
Land allotted to the Patent of Secaucus, in the Cor- 
poration of Bergen, and every Article, Clause, and 
Thing therein contained, shall be, and is hereby re- 
vived, and declared to be in full Force, from and 
after the First Day of April next, for and during the 
Term of one whole Year, and no longer, unless the 
Property of said Lands shall be sooner determined 
by a due Course of Law, or otherwise ; and from 
thence to the End of the next Session of the Gen- 
eral Assembly thereafter. 

3. And be it further Enacted by the Authority 
aforesaid, That this Action on or before the First Day 
of April next, shall be published; and the Cost at- 
tending the same, be defrayed as in and by the third 
Section of the said recited Act is directed Passed 
March 27, 17/0. 

THIS serves to give Notice, That the House and 
Ferry Lot of Jacob Van Der Hoof, lying in New- 
Barbados, in Bergen County, at a Place call'd Pen- 
ungum, is to be SOLD at private Sale. The said 
House and Ferry is now in excellent good Order, 
and hath a great Run of Business. Any Person 
having a Mind to purchase the same, may apply to 
Jacob Van Der Hoof, living on the Premises, who 
will give a good Title for the same, 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 127 



Somerset County, 
New-Jersey. 



/ Order of Philip Van 
Horn, Peter Schenck, and 



Job Stockton, Esqrs, three of the Judges of said 
County : Notice is hereby given, to all the Creditors 
of James Sanders, and William Teple, now in Goal, 
that they appear at Somerset Court House, on 
Thursday the 26th of April next at 10 o'Clock in the 
Forenoon of said Day, to shew Cause, if any they 
have, before said Judges or others, why said Debt- 
ors should not be discharged, pursuant to an Act of 
Assembly of said Province of New-Jersey, for the 
Relief of Insolvent Debtors. 
March 28, 1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THE Subscriber begs Leave to inform the Public 
in general, his Friends and Customers in particular, 
that he is removed from the House where he kept 
Tavern, near the Lower Market Stalls, in the City of 
Burlington, to the House lately kept by David Clay- 
ton, near the Court House, in said City, where he is 
provided with good Stabling, and other Conven- 
iences suitable for carrying on said Business ; and 
hopes to give general Satisfaction to those who shall 
please to favour him with their Custom. He returns 
his hearty Thanks to his Customers for their 
ours past, and hopes a Continuance of them in 
ture, which will be gratefully acknowledg'd, and 
thankfully remembered by their obliged Friend and 
humble Servant, 

JOHN SHAW. 



128 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. |j77O 

To BE SOLD. 

At public Vendue on Monday the \ 6tk Day of April 

next. 

A PLANTATION lying along Shrewsbury Road, four 
Miles from Allen-Town, in the Township of Up- 
per-Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, and 
Province of East New-Jersey ; containing Two Hun- 
dred and Eighty six Acres of Land, about Thirty or 
Eorty Acres of good English Meadow, and as much 
more may be made with little Improvement. The 
Upland is very good for Wheat or other Grain ; the 
w 7 hole well watered and timbered. A two Story 
House and Kitchen, and a good Well of Water 
near the Door ; a Barn and other Out-Houses ; two 
good bearing Orchards, never misses bearing plenty 
of Fruit every Year. The House standing exceed- 
ing pleasant; a Prospect of the Meadows from the 
Door ; likewise about a Mile from a Mill, and three 
more Mills, within four Miles, nine Mile to a Land- 
ing ; likewise very convenient to Meeting, a Quak- 
ers Meeting House adjoining the Place, and a Bap- 
tist Meeting about two Miles distance, and a Church 
and Presbyterian, not exceeding four Miles; it being 
a Plantation that belonged to John Clarke, late of 
Stony Brook, deceased. Any Person inclining to 
purchase at private Sale, may apply to the under 
Subscriber, living on the Premises, where the Con- 
ditions of Sale may be made known by me 

WILLIAM CLARKE. 

N. Y. Gazetteer Weekly Post Boy, No. 1422, 
April 2, 1770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. I2Q 

New-Jersey, ) BY Order of the Honourable John 
Monmouth. j Anderson, John Taylor, John War- 
dell, James Lawrence, Esqrs. four of the Judges of 
the Court of Common pleas for said County, that 
James Everingham, Prisoner for Debt in said Goal, 
was this twenty-first Day of March, 1770, qualified 
to his Schedule of his Estate, pursuant to a late act 
of Assembly, an Act Entitled an Act for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors, made this present Tenth Year 
of his Majesty's Reign, &c. Now this is to give 
Notice to the Creditors of said Debtor, that they be 
together at the Court-House of said County, on the 
25th Day of April next, to shew Cause, if any they 
have, why the said Debtor's Estate should not be 
Assigned, for the Use of his Creditors, and his Body 
discharged from his confinement, pursuant to said 
Act. 

Monmouth Goal, March 2ist, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1422, April 5, 1770. 

Burlington, March 28, 1770. 

The Subscriber begs Leave to inform the PUBLIC in 
general, his Friends in particular, That he has re- 
moved from the House, where he lately kept TAVERN 
opposite the Lower Market, to the House lately kept by 
David Clayton, near the Court-house, in the City of 
Burlington, where he is provided with every Conven- 
ience necessary for carrying on said Business, and 
hopes to give general Satisfaction to those, who may 
please to favour hiw with their Custom. He returns 
his hearty Thanks to his Customers for their Favours 



130 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

past, and hopes a Continuance of them in futnre, which 
will be gratefully acknowledged by Their obliged 
Friend, and humble Servant, 

JOHN SHAW. 

Province of New-Jersey, March 26, 1770. 
WHEREAS a number of the inhabitants of Chester, 
in the county of Burlington, and also of the township 
of Waterford, in the county of Gloucester, intend to 
petition the General Assembly of the said province, 
at their next session, for a law of the said province, 
for stopping the tide out of the south branch of Pen- 
sawking creek, by a dam to be erected across the 
said creek, from the lower corner of William Wal- 
lace's land, on the west side, to land of William Rud- 
row's, on the east side of said creek ; if therefore any 
of the owners of marsh or meadow on the said creek, 
above the said William Wallace's lower corner, and 
to Samuel Burrow's grist-mill, have any objection to 
the same, they are desired to take notice accord- 
ingly. 

Circuit Courts in New-Jersey are appointed to be 
held as follows, viz. in the County of Gloucester, 
April 12; Salem, April 26; Cumberland, April 30, 
and in Cape-May County, on the 4th of May. 

On Saturday Morning the Steer, mentioned in our 
last to be killed by Geroe and Benjamin Wolper, 
was weighed at the Stall No. 45, in our Market, as 
follows, viz. the four Quarters 1394 Ib. rough Tallow 
225 Ib. and the Hide 126 Ib. in all 1745 fib. 



I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 131 

Whereas Mary, the Wife of Samuel Thomas, of 
Waterford township, Gloucester county, hath eloped 
from her said husband ; this therefore is to forewarn 
all persons from trusting her on my account, as I 
will pay no debts of her contracting from the date 
hereof. Witness my hand this third day of April, 
1770. 

SAMUEL THOMAS. 

Gloucester Goal, March 28, 1770. 
The Subscribers hereof give this public Notice, 
agreeable to an Act of Assembly of the Province of 
New Jersey, lately made, to all their Creditors to 
meet them before Robert Friend Price and Samuel 
Harrison, Esquires, two of his Majesty's Judges for 
the County of Gloucester, at Gloucester, on the i8th 
Day of April next, and then shew Cause, if any they 
have, why they should not be discharged from their 
present Confinement, as the said Act directs. 

JAMES SIMPSON, 
JOSEPH THOMAS, 
ALEXANDER BENNET. 

To be SOLD or LETT, for a Term of Years. 

A VALUABLE tract of LAND, in Morris county, at 
Rockaway, consisting of about 350 acres, 280 where- 
of is meadow land, 180 acres of the meadow- land is 
well ditched and fenced, about 50 acres well cleared, 
and 30 thereof well in with timothy grass, and yields 
about 40 tons of hay. Also about 40 acres of said 
tract is well cleared, fenced and fit for the plow. 
There are also on the premises, a good dwelling- 



132 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

house, barn, garden, and good grist-mill, and 250 
bearing apple trees, of choice fruit. It is a fine situ- 
ation for raising a stock, for grazing, &c. and has a 
great advantage of wood range. The meadow can 
be well recommended for hemp, corn or almost any 
other kinds of grain. Any person inclining to pur- 
chase, or rent, may apply to MOSES TUTTLE, on the 
premises, who will give a good title for the same. 

To BE SOLD, 

A Plantation in Morris county, New Jersey, about 
12 Miles from Morris-Town, containing 700 acres of 
land, whereof 400 acres are meadow land, TOO acres 
of said meadow are well cleared, and Jit for use, found 
by several years experience to be extraordinary good 
for hemp or grass ; equal in culture for hemp to the 
Maidenhead meadows, or perhaps any others whatso- 
ever, yielding from 6 to 800 weight per acre ; the chief 
part of the whole meadow land is well ditched and 
drained, and may easily be made Jit for the plow, or 
any other use. There is likewise on said premises, 
about 130 acres of cleared upland in good order, one 
good dwelling-house, a store-house, overseer s house, 
blacksmith s shop, corn-house and granary, two good 
barns, one good new grist mill, a flax or hemp mill 
(which is capable of dressing 1 200 weight of hemp per 
day, in a better manner than it is possible to do it in 
the common way by hand] together with sundry out- 
houses, one iron mine, the neat proceeds whereof is 
ioo./ per annum, about 600 apple trees, of the choicest 
fruit. The whole plantation is well calculated for 
grazing largely, having a great advantage of wood 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 133 

range. Also, may be had with the premises, 50 or 60 
head of horned cattle, and farming utensils of every 
kind. Any person inclining to purchase, may apply 
to JACOB FORD, junior, 1 on the premises, who will give a 
good title for the same, and any reasonable payment, as 
the money is not wanted, and perhaps may not be for a 
number of years. 

To be SOLD, at public VENDUE, on the i6th day of 
this instant April, or leased for a term of years. 
The noted and well accustomed Tavern kept for 
many years by the subscriber, pleasantly situated, in 
the center of Shrewsbury town, East New-Jersey^ 
very near the English Church, Friends and Presby- 
terian meeting houses, two miles from a public land- 
ing, where there is a great commerce carried on from 
thence to New-York. The house is very commodi- 
ous, two stories high, and 4 fire places ; a good dry 
cellar, large kitchen, and a pantry or milk room ; 
with many other out-houses and sheds, and stable 
room enough for 40 horses, a good stone well ; a 
large garden, newly paled, including near half an acre 
of very rich land ; a good bearing orchard, that 
affords from 30 to 100 barrels of cyder, per year, as 
the season proves, all in good repair. Also 10 acres 
of exceeding good meadow, well improved and 
manured in the best manner, near adjoining thereto. 
An indisputable title will be given for the whole, and 
the conditions made known at the day of sale, by 

JOSIAH HALSTEAD. 

-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2154, April 5, 
1770. 

i For notices of Jacob Ford, junior, see N. J. Archives, XII. , 665, and N. J. 
Archives, Second Series, I., 121. 



134 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To BE SOLD, OR LET. 

A VERY valuable Farm, in New-Jersey, now in. the 
Possession of Lemuel Bowers, Esq ; in Morris 
County, containing about One Hundred -and Sixty 
Acres, of which Forty Acres is fine English Meadow, 
and Twenty more may be easily made : The Re- 
mainder is good Upland, fit to Produce Wheat or 
other Grain : There is now on it, a new two Story 
House, with Brick Chimnies and sash'd Windows, a 
Kitchen, Barn, and a Store House, under which 
there is a Cellar. For further Particulars enquire of 
Abraham Lott, Esq ; Treasurer of the Colony of 
New York, or Mr. Thomas Milledge and Patrick 
Darcy in Morris County, near the Premises. 

April 9, 1770. 



THE Members of the New-Jersey MEDICAL SOCI- 
ETY, are desired to take Notice, that the next gen- 
eral Meeting will be held at the House of Mr. 
Michael Duff, in New-Brunswick, on Tuesday the 
first Day of May next. The several Members are 
particularly requested not to fail attending, as there 
are some Matters of singular Importance to be at- 
tended to at that Time. The Society will be opened 
precisely at Ten o'Clock A. M. if a sufficient Num- 
ber of Members are arrived. All other Gentlemen 
of the Faculty, in the Province, are cordially invited 
to join the Society as soon as may be convenient. 

NATHANIEL SCUDDER, Secretary. 

March 26. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1423, 
April 9, 1770. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 135 

New York, April 12. We hear from Bergen, that 
on Tuesday Night last, about 10 or 1 1 o'Clock, the 
House and Barn of Mr. John Vanhouter, 1 of that 
Place, by some Accident took Fire, and were entire- 
ly destroyed : We have not heard the Particulars, 
nor whether any Thing was saved from the Dwelling 
House or not ; but it is said every Thing in th^ Barn 
was destroyed, among which were about a Dozen 
Cattle and Horses, and 1 5 or 20 Sheep. 

PURSUANT to an Order of the Honourable Joseph 
Kitchel and Robert Gould, Esqrs, two of the Judges 
of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas of the Coun- 
ty of Morris. Notice is hereby given, to the respec- 
tive Creditors of Nathaniel Wilkison, an Insolvent 
Debtor in the Goal of the County of Morris, that 
they be and appear at the Court-House in Morris- 
Town, in the County of Morris aforesaid, on Thurs- 
day the 26th Day of April Instant, at Nine o'Clock 
in the Forenoon, to shew Cause, if any they have, 
why Assignees should not be appointed to the Es- 
tate of him the said Nathan, and he discharged from 
his Imprisonment, agreeable to a late Act of the Gov- 
ernor, Council, and General Assembly of this Prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, entitled, " An Act for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors." 

Morris-Town, April 4, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1423, April 12, 1770. 

Capt. Le Cocqe on Sunday the 25th of March, 
spoke with the ship Nesbit, Capt. Green, for Lisbon, 



i Van Houten. 



136 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

all well ; he had left the Capes the day before, which 
then bore N W by W, about 30 leagues, had the 
wind about N N W, and moderate weather. 

The SPRING FAIR at Princeton, will be held on 
Wednesday and Thursday, the i8th and iQth of 
April instant. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1427, 
April 12, 1770. 



To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER 

Living in Burlington, New-Jersey, 
A PLANTATION in Plumstead township, Bucks coun- 
ty, (.3 miles from Reeder's Tavern, in the Durham 
road, about 30 miles from Philadelphia, containing 
123 acres, on which are a tolerable good house, barn 
and large orchard, 10 or 12 acres of meadow, and 
near as much more may be made, at a small 
expence ; now rented to Peter Vickers. A tract ad- 
joining the same of 123 acres. . . . Also a tract in 
Tinicum township, near Tohiccon creek (3 miles east 
of the above described land), containing 100 acres. 
. . . The terms are 4!. per acre, and the buyers, on 
giving good security, with interest, may have 7 years 
to complete the purchase, paying one seventh of the 
money every year. 

RICHARD WELLS. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2155, April 12, 
1770. 

Extract from a Letter To the INHABITANTS of the 

Province / MARYLAND. 

The inhabitants of the West Jersey (whose magis- 
trates heretofore had power to determine all matters 






NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 137 

of debt under six pounds) have lately petitioned for 
and obtained a law, to impower their magistrates 
(out of court) to hear and determine all matters of 
debt under ten pounds. Those people, I apprehend, 
found no ill consequence arising from the largnessof 
their magistrates jurisdiction, or surely they never 
would have petitioned to have it enlarged. . . . 

[signed] A. MARYLANDER. 

WHEREAS the stage from Burlington to Amboy, 
has for some time past been dropt, and the sub- 
scriber (finding it inconvenient to numbers of people 
who travel to and from New York, &c. to go the 
other stages, by reason of their being attended with 
greater expence, and the travelling more tedious) 
has again set up a complete stage from Burlington to 
Amboy, where the best attendance will be given by 
the waggoner, and the best of entertainment for 
travellers kept by the subscriber, at the old stage- 
house, who will be obliged to all gentlemen and 
ladies travelling to and from New-York, Philadel- 
phia, &c. to favour him with their custom, as they 
may depend upon being used in the best manner, 
and conveyed to their journey's end with the great- 
est safety and dispatch. 

The boat sets off from the Crooked-Billet Wharf 
in Philadelphia, on Saturday the 28th instant, (when 
the stage is to begin) and the passengers embark in 
the waggon the Monday following, and they are con- 
veyed to Amboy the same day, where there is a boat 
ready to receive them to carry them to New^York. 
The waggon returns again on Tuesday to Burling- 



138 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ 

ton, where the boat receives them and carries them 
to Philadelphia : The boat again sets off from Phila- 
delphia on Wednesday, and the waggon on Thurs- 
day, and so to continue. The best attendance will be 
given by the Burlington stage boatmen, whose boats 
have excellent accommodations, and the people ex- 
tremely careful. 

The reason this stage is more commodious and 
shorter than any other is this, let the wind be in what 
corner it will, the distance by water is so short, you 
are always sure of getting to Burlington in one tide. 

JOSEPH HAIGHT. 

Burlington, April 21, 1770. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 171, April 16-23, 
1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

I The Subscriber, being the Author of a Publica- 
tion in Mr. Parker's Paper of the 5th of March last, 
signed TOBIAS FREEMAN, think myself obliged, both 
by the Principles of Justice and my own Promise, to 
inform the Public, that upon a Re examination of 
those Allegations against the Honourable DAVID 
OGDEN, Esq ; find that I was basely imposed on, by 
a very false and partial Information ; and am now 
fully convinced, that I have highly injured him, by 
affirming, ''That he was accused before the Court of 
taking Fees on both Sides of the same Cause," and 
insinuating that it could be proved ; and by some 
other Abuses in that Piece, for which I am extremely 
sorry, and am heartily willing to do all in my Power 
to make Reparation : Therefore as an Enemy to 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 139 

i 

Slander and Falsehood, gladly embrace this Oppor- 
tunity to make \h\s public, humble and voluntary Re- 
cantation ; and humbly hope, as I was not wilful in 
writing that, or any other Mistake there may be in 
that Piece ; and as I am now sincere in this Confes- 
sion, that I may obtain Forgiveness, both from him 
and the respectable Publick ; especially as I look 
upon it an Honour and Duty, to confess when I am 
sensibly in the Wrong. 
Newark, April 6, 1770. 

ISAAC MORRISON. 

Newark, April 12, 1770. 
To THE PUBLIC. 

THE STAGE- WAGGONS from Newark to Powles- 
Hook, will begin on Thursday the i2th of April, and 
make two Trips a Day, every Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday ; will set off from Powles- 
Hook, and from Mr. James Banks, at Newark, two 
Hours after Sun-rise, meet at Hackinsack-River, ex- 
change Passengers, and return to the Places, they set 
off from. In the Afternoon they will set off two 
Hours before Sun-set, from the above mentioned 
Places, and perform their Stages as in the Morning. 
The Price for Passengers as usual, at Eighteen 
Pence each. 

The Waggons may be had at any Time, that will 
not interfere with the stated Hours, on proper No- 
tice, so that one Driver may acquaint the other. 
N. Y. Gazetteer Weekly Post Boy, No. 1424, April 
1 6, 1770. 

New York, April 19. The Public are hereby no- 



140 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. L ! 77 

tified, that there are now passing amongst us, a Num- 
ber of Counterfeit Jersey Twelve Shilling Bills, dated 
December 31, 1763, signed Johnston, Smith, and 
Skinner. They are printed with common Types, but 
so badly executed, as to be easily discovered on 
close Inspection. Twelve Shilling Bills made out of 
Three Shilling Bills have also appeared in this City 
lately. N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1424, ;4//77 19, 1770. 

RUNAWAY, 

About four weeks since, from the subscriber, living 

in Vine street ; 

A Negro Lad, about the age of seventeen years, 
named SILAS, he is of a yellow cast, and by trade a 
chimney sweep ; he is well set, about five feet high, 
was lately seen loitering about the streets of the city 
of Burlington, in company with several negro lads, 
also chimney sweeps : He had on a homespun 
jacket, a pair of blue trowsers with his blanket, and 
is an oily tongu'd chap, very apt to drink. Who- 
ever will secure the said fellow, and send him to me, 
shall receive a reward of FIFTEEN SHILLINGS, and all 

reasonable charges. 

ISAAC COATS, Brickmaker. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1428, April 19, 
1770. 

NEW-YORK, April 16. 

About 10 o'Clock last Tuesday Night, the Barn of 
Mr. John Vanhouter, at Bergen, near Powles-Hook, 
in New-Jersey, was burnt down to the Ground, with- 
out the Knowledge of any Person in the Neighbour- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 14! 

hood ; by which Accident 8 Horses, i i Cows and 
about 30 Sheep were lost. The Flames soon 
reached Mr. Van Houter's Dwelling-house, which 
gave the first Alarm, and in a very short Time it was 
also consumed, and every Thing, except what was 
below Stairs, entirely burnt. It is imagined, the 
Barn was set on Fire by Means of some careless 
Negroes, that went to feed the Cattle wilh their 
Pipes in their Mouths, which is too commonly prac- 
tised in many Parts of this Country. 

PHILADELPHIA, April 19. 

Friday last Cadry Lacy was tried at the Supreme 
Court held at Gloucester, in New-Jersey, for the 
Murder of a Woman in that County, of which he 
was convicted, and received Sentence of Death. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2156, April 19, 1770. 

Mr. PARKER, 

IT must afford real Pleasure to the Friends of good 
Order and regular Government, to be informed, that 
the riotous Disposition which lately shewed itself in 
some of the People in the County of Essex, is not 
only suppressed, but there is Reason to believe, 
totally extinguished ; and that some of the principal 
Leaders of the late Disturbers of the Peace in that 
County, are brought to a due Sense of their Folly, 
and look back with Horror on their late imprudent 
Conduct. I have obtained a Copy of a Petition to 
Government, from two of them, which I herewith 
send you to be published in your Paper, as I think it 
does Honour to the Petitioners, and may be an use- 
ful Hint to some Persons in a neighbouring County, 



142 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

whose Conduct has been at least equally obnoxious 
to civil Society. 

Yours, S. 
New- Jersey, April 10. 

To his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq ; Gov- 
ernor and Commander in Chief of his Majesty's 
Province of New-Jersey, Chancellor and Vice 
Admiral of the same, &c. 

The Petition of JOHN DOD, and DAVID DOD. 
HUMBLY SHEWETH, 

your Petitioners, now Prisoners in the Goal 
for the County of Essex, have been convicted in 
a late Court of Oyer and Terminer, held for said 
County, in the Town of Newark, of being Parties aid- 
ing in a riotous Manner, to erect a certain Building 
of Logs called a Strong Hold or Goal, at a Place 
called Horse Neck. For this Crime, besides being 
fined, one a Hundred, and the other Sixty Pounds, 
your Petitioners are condemned to Imprisonment, 
one of us four and the other three Months. We are 
duly sensible of our Faults, that we have conducted 
ourselves in .a very wrong and illegal Manner, con- 
trary to the Duty we owe to our Civil Magistrates, 
and the good Government under which we are. We 
were not apprehensive of the heinous Nature of our 
Misdemeanour, when we were practising in the dis- 
orderly and riotous Manner ; but now we are con- 
vinced, and hope humbled for our foolish and illegal 
Conduct. We your Petitioners have large young 
Families, the one of us five, and the other six Chil- 
dren, the most of them small and unable to take 




NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 143 

Care of themselves ; they being five Miles from \is, 
who must suffer greatly in our Absence from them, 
by so long a Confinement : Wherefore we are en- 
couraged to make Application to your Excellency, 
to extend of the Royal Clemency to us your Peti- 
tioners, in remitting us our Imprisonment, so that we 
may return to our Families, that our innocent Chil- 
dren may not be ruined by us the unhappy Parents. 
We are sincerely sorry for our Mis conduct and ille- 
gal Proceedings, and we solemnly promise to con- 
duct ourselves for the future as orderly Members of 
the Community, in obedient Observation of the Law, 
in Duty to our Civil Magistrates, and in Loyalty to 
our most gracious and rightful Sovereign. If now it 
may please your Excellency to look upon us as 
proper Objects of the Royal Clemency, and will in 
your great Favour grant us a Reprieve from our Im- 
prisonment, to whose Wisdom in the most humble 
and respectful Manner, we submit our Case. Your 
Petitioners as in Duty bound, will ever pray. 

JOHN DOD, 
DAVID DOD. 
Newark-Goal, March 20, 1770. 

N. B. His Excellency has been pleased to pardon 
the Petitioners so far as relates to the Imprisonment. 1 

To BE SOLD. 

A Plantation, in the Township of Middletown, 
whereon is the noted Watering Place, on the 
Highlands of Navesinks ; It contains about 
One Hundred Acres, the greatest Part Wood 

i For the pardon in full, see N. J. Archives, X., 187. 



144 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

Land : There is on said Plantation, a good Dwelling 
House, with a good Stone Cellar under the same, a 
good Kitchen, and an Out-House, a young bearing 
Orchard of good Fruit, likewise a considerable Num- 
ber of other Fruit Trees, such as Peaches, Plumbs 
and Cherries ; the Land is tolerably good for Grain, 
and Plenty of Fish and Clams, to be had in the Sea- 
son, within a small Distance from the Door. It is 
commodiously situated for a Tavern, as a great 
Number of Watermen resort there in the Summer 
Season. Whoever inclines to purchase, for further 
Particulars, may apply to JOHN STOUT, living on the 
Premises, by whom a good Title will be given, to any 
Purchaser. 

Middletown, April 12, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1425, April 26, 1770. 

Philadelphia, April 26. 

Last Saturday Cadry Lacy was executed at Glou- 
cester, pursuant to his Sentence, and his Body was 
sent, by Order of the Chief Justice, to Dr. Ship pen s 
anatomical Theatre for Dissection. 

PHILADELPHIA, April 26. 

It is with Pleasure we inform the Public, that the 
Orrery, of which the American Philosophical Society 
formerly published an Account, projected and exe- 
cuted by Mr. DAVID RITTEN HOUSE, in this Province, 
is now almost finished. As this is an American Pro- 
duction, and much more complete than any Thing of 
the Kind ever made in Europe, it must give great 
Pleasure to every Lover of his Country, to see her 



I //O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 145 

rising to Fame in the sublimest Sciences, as well as 
every Improvement in the Arts. Dr. Witherspoon, 
accompanied by some Gentlemen, went on Saturday 
last, to see and converse with the ingenious Artist, 
and being convinced of the superior Advantages that 
must arise from this new invented Orrery, in the 
Study of Natural Philosophy, and desirous to en- 
courage so truly great a Genius, purchased it for the 
Use of the College of New -Jersey}- 

NEW YORK, April 23. 

We are told, that the Act of Assembly of New- 
York, for emitting Bills of Credit, has been rejected 
at Home, and it is feared, that of New-Jersey will 
have the same Fate. 2 

TEN DOLLARS Reward: 

Philadelphia, April 18, 1770. 

RUN away from the Subscriber's Glass house, in 
Salem County, West Jersey, a Dutch Servant Man, 
named Adrian Brust, about 27 Years of Age, 5 Feet 
7 or 8 Inches high, of a pale Complexion, has short 
light Hair, two Moles on his left Cheek, and on 
his right Temple a Scar, also on one of his Feet, 
near his Ancle, which is but lately healed, and the 
Shoe mended where the Cut was. Had on when he 
went away, an old Felt Hat, a lightish coloured Upper 
Jacket, with Brass Buttons, this Country make, 
about half worn, with a Patch on one of the hind 

1 For some account of the circumstances attending the purchase of this orrery 
for Princeton, see History of the College of New Jersey, by John Maclean, Phila- 
delphia, 1877, II., 22-23. 

2 Notwithstanding a letter of Gov. Franklin, of Feb. 12. 1770, strongly advo- 
cating this bill, it was disallowed by the King in Council, June 6, 1770. N. J. 
Archives, X., 150, 196. 

10 



146 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Flaps, where there was a Hole burnt, an under one 
with flat Metal Buttons, both of frilled Linsey, 
Leather Breeches, grey Yarn Stockings, good Shoes 
with Brass Buckles, a good Shirt, and generally 
wears the Bosom Part behind. He has been a Sol- 
dier in Portugal, and came last Fall from Lisbon. 
Whoever takes up said Servant, and brings him to 
his Master, or secures him in any of his Majesty's 
Goals, so that his Master may have him again, shall 
have TEN DOLLARS ; if taken in this Province, or Jer- 
sey, and SIXTEEN if in any other Province. It is sup- 
posed, he is lurking about this City, as he crossed 
the River at Gloucester Ferry early this Morning. If 
he be enlisted for a Soldier, and any Person will 
make Proof thereof, shall receive Six DOLLARS Re- 
ward. He can speak but little English. 

RICHARD WISTAR. 

Philadelphia, April 23, 1770. 

To be SOLD by public Vendue, on Saturday, the 
\ith Day of May next, that Messuage and Tract of 
Land, containing 1 30 Acres, be the same more or less, 
situate on Delaware River, five Miles from Philadel- 
phia, in the Township of Waterford, and County of 
Gloucester, in the Province of West New-Jersey, for- 
merly the Property of Jacob Burrows, now in the 
Tenure of Thomas Parsons. The Vendue to begin at 
10 o Clock, where Attendance will be given, and the 
Conditions made known , by HENRY WOODROW, and 
DAVIS BASSET, Trustees to Jacob Burrows aforesaid. 
Any Person inclining to be a Purchaser, is desired to 
view the Premises before the Day of Sale. 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 147 

EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away last Thursday night, from the subscriber, 
living in Waterford township, in the county of Glou- 
cester, in New Jersey, an English*servant man, named 
John Williams, speaks broad, about 40 years of age, 
about 5 feet 5 inches high, sandy coloured hair ; had 
on, when he went away, a good brownish coloured cloth 
jacket, a good green coat, nearly of the same colour, 
blue cloth trowsers, greyish stockings, soaled shoes, and 
a small fell hat, bound with yellow tape ; took with 
him a sack full of clothes, and it is supposed he took 
with him a half-^vorn beaver hat ; he talks much of an 
estate, he says he is entitled to in Carolina ; he talks 
grave and artful. Whoever takes up the said seruvnt 
shall have the above reward, and reasonable charges, 
paid by 

SAMUEL BURROUGH. 

April 2 r, i 770. 

-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2157, April 26, 
1770. 

Gloucester, May 2, 1770. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, will be exposed 
to public sale, on Wednesday, the i4th day of July 
next, on the premises, all that valuable messuage, 
plantation, and tract of 130 acres of land, be the 
same more or less, with a stone house thereon, sit- 
uate in the township of Waterford, and is bounded 
by the river Delaware, and within five miles of Phil- 
adelphia ; the whole late the property of Joseph 
Burroughs, seized in execution, and to be sold by 

JOSEPH HUGG, Sheriff. 



148 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

PURSUANT to an act of Assembly of the Province of 
New-Jersey, lately passed, intituled, an act for the 
relief of insolvent debtors, I the subscriber being now 
confined in the gaol of the county of Hunterdon, 
have petitioned the Judges of the court of said coun- 
ty of Hunterdon, for the benefit of said act, and filed 
a schedule of my effects, do give notice to all my 
creditors, to appear and shew cause, if any they 
have, on Friday the eleventh of May, inst. at 10 
o'clock in the forenoon of the same day, before the 
Judges of the said court, at the dwelling-house of 
Samuel Hunt, tavern-keeper, at Trenton, why I 
should not be discharged, agreeable to the directions 
of said act. 

WILLIAM MILLER. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 173, April 30- 
May 7, 1770. 

BY Order of Stephen Skinner and Jonathan 
Frazee, Esqrs. two of his Majesty's Judges of the In- 
ferior Court of Common Pleas for the County of 
Middlesex : Public Notice is hereby given, that 
Wednesday the i6th of May next, is appointed by 
the said Judges to meet at the house of Elijah Dun- 
ham, in Perth -Amboy, to discharge Timothy Frazee, 
an Insolvent Debtor ; he having complied with the 
late Act of Insolvency. 

April 20, 1770. 

WHEREAS I the Subscriber, and Ann, my Wife, 
have this Day mutually consented and agreed to part 
from each other, and live separate ; and in order the 
better to enable her my said Wife to maintain her- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 149 

self and two Children, I have allowed her and them 
a separate Maintenance. The'se are therefore to no- 
tify all Persons not to credit her my said Wife'on my 
Account, as I shall not pay any Debts of her con- 
tracting after the Day of the Date hereof. 

BENJAMIN HETFIELD. 
Elizabeth Toivn, April 23, 1770. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1426, 
April 30, 1770. 

New-Jersey, May ist, 1770. 

THE Subscriber begs Leave to inform the respecta- 
ble PUBLIC, That he hath, at much Expense, con. 
structed a large elegant, and commodious House at 
Passaick Falls, for the Entertainment of Travellers 
in general, and Parties of Pleasure in Particular ; 
where they may depend on being served with every 
Thing in the best Taste that his rural Situation will 
admit of, which for Variety of curious and entertain- 
ing Objects, is equalled by no other Place in any of 
the neighbouring Provinces. And in Order to facil- 
itate the Enjoyment of such a great Number of the 
most exquisitely delightful Curiosities, he hath erect- 
ed a convenient Stage, with a careful and obliging 
Driver, who will set out at 9 o'Clock in the Morn- 
ing, on Monday the 2ist Instant for Powles-Hook, 
where he will arrive about 4 in the Afternoon, and 
return on the next Day. He will set out again on 
the Friday following, and return on Saturday, at the 
same Hours. This Service he will continue to dis- 
charge with the utmost Fidelity during the Summer 
Season. The Price to Passengers is 35. for going, 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

the same for returning, and for those that are taken 
up or dropped by the Way, 2 Pence each Mile. 

Whatever Encouragement this undertaking re- 
ceives, the Public may be assured, that it will be 
gratefully acknowledged by its 

Very humble Servant, 

CORNELIUS NEEFIE. 

N. B. A good Cook, Man or Woman, may meet 
with Employment, by applying to the Subscriber. 
N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1426, May 3, 1770. 

PHILADELPHIA, May 3. 

Captain Hood from Bristol on the 2ist ult, about 
30 Leagues from our Capes, spoke a Ship from this 
Port for Barbadoes, two Days out, all well. 

List of LETTERS remaining in the Post Office, Phila- 

adelphia. 

D. Thomas Done, Timber Creek. J. John John- 
ston, Timber Creek. L. Daniel Lithgow, Salem. N. 
Patt. Nixon, New-Jersey. P. Thomas Prennis, New- 
Jersey. 

S. Leonard Snowden, Burlington. 

To BE SOLD, 

A PLANTATION and Tract of 500 Acres of the best 
Wheat Land, equal in Quality to any in the Province 
of New-Jersey, situate on the South Branch of Rari- 
ton in Somerset County, now in the Occupation of 
Peter Tenicke, within 20 Miles of New Brunswick, 
and 4 Miles of Amwell, about 200 Acres cleared, and 
the Residue filled with the best Timber. Also two 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 151 

other Plantations and Tracts of Land, containing the 
same Quantity, and of the same Quality, adjoining 
the above Tract, in the Occupation of Cornelius 
Peterson ..... Reasonable Credit will be given to the 
Purchaser, for the Payment of the Money, in giving 
Security, if required, and paying Interest. For 
other Terms, apply to MARY MASTERS in Philadel- 
phia.- -Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2158, J/#jy 3, 1770. 



Elsinborough, April 30, 1770. 

A FERRY BOAT, belonging to the subscriber, living 
in Elsinborough, with one James Canaday on board, 
it is said, set out from Port Penn, to come home to 
Elsinborough, the Qth instant, about sunset, and was 
seen to cross over as far as the upper end of Reedy- 
Island, the wind blowing very fresh at Northwest, has 
never been heard of since, as we know of ; the boat 
would carry about four or five horses, rigged sloop 
fashion, with a poplar mast, and decked before the 
mast Whoever takes up and secures said boat, so 
that the owner may have her again, shall have Forty 
Shillings reward, or Three Pounds if brought home, 
and reasonable charges, paid by 

BENJAMIN HOLME. 

Postscript Extraordinary to Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2158, May 3, 1770. 

To BE SOLD by the subscriber, the /arm whereon he 
now dwells, containing 220 acres, one mile distant 
from Trenton, situate upon the river Delaware ; about 
170 acres of which is cleared land, 30 acres whereof 
excellent meadow ground, the tillable part of a very 
kind warm soil, free from stone to interrupt the culti- 



152 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

vation : That which remains wood-land remarkably 
well timbered ; the whole watered with living streams 
plentifully. The agreeable and extensive prospect both 
up and down the Delaware, fitly adapts this place for 
a gentleman s seal, and the goodness of the soil Jor the 
farmer. A neat well built dwelling-house completely 
finished from the bottom to the top ; a good kitchen, 
new barn, stables and other conveniences thereon. A 
very good collection of the best kinds of apples, pears, 
peaches, cherries and plums, &c. For terms of sale 
apply to 

BEN BILES. 
Hermitage, May 3, 1770. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 174, May 7-14, 
1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS there was published in Mr. Parker's 
. 
Paper of February the 26th, a Piece signed 
Tobias Freeman, containing heavy charges 
against, and very injurious Reflections on the Char- 
acter of Elias Boudinot, Esq ; And whereas through 
Misinformation, and strong Prejudices in Favour of 
an unhappy distressed People, with whom I am near- 
ly connected, I was prevailed on to correct said Piece 
for the Press, and so far I was accessory to its Pub- 
lication, and the great Injury done thereby to that 
Gentleman's Character, for which I am truly sorry, 
and as upon a Re-examination into those Facts, I am 
convinced said Charges are false, and those Reflec- 
tions bitter. and unchristian, I think it my Duty in jus- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 153 

tice to Mr. Boudinot's Character, to make this pub- 
lic Recantation, and ask him Forgiveness. 

JEDIDIAH CHAPMAN. 1 
Essex County, April 26, 1770. 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1427, 
May 7, 1770. 

PURSUANT to an act of general assembly of the 
province of New-Jersey lately passed, intituled, an 
act for the relief of insolvent debtors, I the sub- 
scriber being now confined in the gaol of the county 
of Sussex, have petitioned to the Judges of the court 
aforesaid, for the benefit of said act and filed a sched- 
ule of my effects, do give notice to all my creditors, 
to appear and shew cause, if any they have, on 
Thursday the 24th of May next, at 10 o'clock in the 
forenoon of the same day before the Judges of said 
court, at the house of JOHN PETTIT, in Newtown. why 
I should not be discharged agreeable to the direc- 
tions of said act. 

JOHN WOLF LITZELL. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1431, May 10, 
1770. 

BOSTON, May 10. 

We hear the 2Qth regiment, now quartered at the 
barracks on Castle-Island, have received orders to 
march for Providence, the first division of which is 
to set off in a day or two. Transports are to be 
ready at Providence to carry them to New-York, 



* Minister of the church of the Mountain Society, now the First Presbyterian 
church of Orange, N. J. 



154 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. L T 77 

' 

from thence they are to proceed to Amboy in New- 
Jersey where it is said they are to be quartered. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. .175, May 14-21,- 
1770. 

Elizabeth-Town-Raway, May 4, 1770. 

RUN-AWAY from William Denniston, in Elizabeth- 
Town Raway, in the County of Essex, on the 2gth 
of April, an Apprentice Lad named JOHN BLACK, 
about 5 Feet 6 Inches high, this Country born, fair 
Complexion, fair Hair, aged 19 Years, large blue 
Eyes, thick set, a Fuller by Trade. Had on when he 
went away, a blue Jacket, Linsey-woolsey Waist coat, 
blue Breeches, a Castor Hat, with two Patches on it 
where it had been burnt, with a Check shirt. His 
Father lives at Middletown, and it is supposed that 
he is gone there, or to New-England. It is thought 
that one Kelsey, another Apprentice went with him, 
as they both went off at one Time: Whoever takes 
up and secures the said JOHN BLACK, so that his Mas- 
ter may have him again, shall have TWENTY SHIL- 
LINGS Reward, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 
me. 

WILLIAM DENNISTON. 

All Masters of Vessels are forbid carrying said 
Apprentice off, at their Peril ; and his Master informs 
any Person that takes up said Apprentice, to have a 
close Watch of him, for he is not too honest, nor 
quite honest enough, if he has but the Opportunity 
to be a Rogue. N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, 
No 1428, May 14, 1-770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 155 

List of Letters remaining in the General Post-Office 

New-York, April 1770, not before advertised. 

***** 

Thomas Dalphire, Ringwood, James 

Prichard, Ringwood, 2 N. Y. Journal or 

General Advertiser, No. 1428, May 17, 1770. 

Captain Bennet, arrived at Wilmington from Lis- 
bon, the i ith instant. 70 leagues E. by S. from our 
Capes, spoke Capt. York, in a brig from this port for 
Lisbon, all well. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1432, 
May 17, 1770. 

PHILADELPHIA, May 17. 

Captain Ord, from Lisbon on the 6th - spoke 

with Captain Allibone, about 13 Leagues from our 
Capes, bound to the Grenades from this Place, all 
well.- -Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2160, May 17, 
1 770. 

NEW YORK, May 21. 

Thursday last the 26th regiment of his Majesty's 
forces, which has been quartered in the Jersies, ar- 
rived in this city, where they are placed in the room 
of the 1 6th, lately gone to Pensacola. We hear one 
of the regiments from Boston, are daily expected to 
replace these in New-Jersey. x 

RAN away from William Cleayton, in Trenton, on 
the 1 3th of April, 1770, a negro man, named Robin, 
about 36 years of age, 5 feet 2 inches high, he was 
brought up at Owen Owen's, in Philadelphia, he is 
talkative, and rather fond of strong drink. He is a 
very handy fellow ; understands farming, milking, 



156 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ I 77 

coopering, and can do house business very well. 
Had on, when he went away, a raccoon hat, a Ger- 
mantown cotton cap, a linsey jacket, with an under 
jacket of the same stuff, old leather breeches, and 
yarn stockings. Whoever takes up said negro, and 
secures him, so that his master may get him again, 
shall have Twenty Shillings reward from 

W. CLEAYTON. 



TEN DOLLARS REWARD. 

RAN away from the subscriber, living in Evesham, 
Burlington county, New-Jersey, on the 25th instant, 
(Ma)') an English servant man, named Thomas 
Haines, about 20 years of age, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches 
high, stoops in his walk, of a dark complexion : Had 
on and took with him an half-worn beaver hat, a drab 
coloured homespun bearskin jacket, an old ozenbrigs 
shirt, tow trowsers, a pair of knit breeches, blue yarn 
stockings, and old shoes. It is likely he will pretend 
to know something of the butcher's business, as he 
served some time to it in England. Whoever se- 
cures said servant in any of his Majesty's gaols, so 
that his master may have him again, shall have the 
above reward and reasonable charges paid by me. 

JOSIAH FOSTER. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 176, May 21-28, 
1770. 

City of NEW ) Pursuant to an Order of the Court for 
BRUNSWICK, ) said City, We the Subscribers being 
appointed Auditors, to audit and adjust the lawful 
Demands of all the Creditors of Benjamin Dunham, 
an absconding Debtor; who by Virtue of a Writ of 




NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 157 

Attachment, depending- in said Court, is attached in 
his Lands and Tenements, Goods and Chattels, 
Rights and Credits, according to an Act of Assem- 
bly made and provided in such Case : We do here- 
by give public Notice to all the Creditors of the said 
Dunham, that they bring in their Accounts to us by 
the tenth Day of July next ensuing, that we may as- 
certain the Whole of the Demands of all the Cred- 
itors of the said Dunham, and also to make Report 
of the same at the next August Term. 

RICHARD GIBB, 
JOHN SCHUURMAN, 
WILLIAM V. DEURSEN. 
May 15, 1770. 

Twenty-Four DOLLARS REWARD. 

RUN away from their Master, living in the South 
Ward of the City of New-Brunswick, in East New- 
Jersey, two Servant Men, one named Habbakkuk. 
Eastwood, is remarkable in having a crooked Leg by 
being broke, has a Scar on his Cheek, and sometimes 
has an Impediment in his Speech, is middle sized, 
has grey Eyes, and brown curled Hair ; he had with 
him a mixed grey Coat, with light coloured Lining, 
and another Coat with green Lining and gilt But 
tons, a Flannel Vest and Leather Breeches, he 
served an Apprenticeship to a Weaver near Bur- 
lington, and has many Friends who may help him to 
a Pass and Money. The other named John Nicolls, 
a short well set Man, grey ey'd broad faced, of a 
sandy Complexion, and has reddish brown Hair and 
Beard, speaks low, and seemingly through his Nose; 



158 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

had on a blue Coat, with pale Binding and green 
Lining, red Jacket and Leather Sheepskin Breeches, 
and says he has been seven Years in this Country : 
It is supposed he will be assisted by his Friends in 
Pennsylvania. Any Person apprehending either, and 
securing them in any Goal, so as their Master may 
get them, shall have TWELVE DOLLARS for each, and 

reasonable Charges paid by 

ROBERT MAGHEE. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1429, 
May 21, 1770. 

To be sold by the Subscriber, at PUBLIC VENDUE, 
on Tuesday, the iQth Day of June next, on the 
Premises. THAT valuable Stand for a Merchant's 
Shop, known by the Name of New-Market; about 
the Distance of 2 Miles from Princetown, in the Jer- 
seys, and equally convenient for the Transportation 
of Goods from Trenton or Brunswick, on which is 
a commodious Dwelling-house, 40 Feet square, 
finished, a good Kitchen, Ware-house, Barn, Bar- 
rack, btables, Garden, &c. all in good Repair. The 
Improvements will be sold with two Acres of Land, 
on which they stand, or with fifty Acres of Land, ad- 
joining the said two Acres, near twenty thereof 
Meadow Ground, 'as may best suit the Purchaser. 
Bonds on Interest, well secured, will be accepted for 
the Purchase Money, and an indisputable Title 
given by 

EZEKIEL FORMAN. 



TO BE SOLD, 

At public vendue, on Tuesday, the third day of July 



I/7J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 159 

next at the house of Pontus Stelle, 
THE noted patent ferry called TRENTON FERRY, in 
the county of Burlington, and province of New-Jer- 
sey, with the boats, flats, &c. thereto belonging, to- 
gether with 442 acres of land adjoining ; the house 
at the ferry is large, commodious, and well finished, 
good barn, stables, coach house, store houses, and 
other useful and necessary out-houses, and an excel- 
lent garden. On another part of said tract are two 
good dwelling houses and a stable, a large apple or- 
chard, and variety of other fruit trees. The whole 
tract is a kind, fertile soil, 40 acres whereof are low 
land, and with little expence may be made into ex- 
traordinary meadow, great part thereof yearly 
mowed, 200 acres wood land, whereon is a great 
quantity of excellent timber. This tract of land ex- 
tends down the river Delaware, including the fishery 
called Lamberton, now in the tenure of Mr. William 
Richards ; the situation as fine as any on the river, 
being at the head of the tide way, from whence shal- 
lops constantly ply to and from Philadelphia. Fish 
are in abundance to be taken in their several sea- 
sons, either with seine or hook, and plenty of water 
fowl. One fourth part of the purchase money will 
be required to be paid at the executing of the deeds, 
and for the remainder the purchaser may have rea- 
sonable time of payment given upon interest and 
good security, if required. 

R. L. HOOPER. 

WHEREAS the subscriber has three houses and lots 
in Princeton, he has a mind to sell one or two of 



160 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77Q 

them ; one contains three acres of choice good land, 
whereon is a good dwelling-house, near 40 feet long, 
with a lean to all along one side ; there are five 
rooms below, besides a good merchants shop ready 
fitted, there are six fire places, a good kitchen, and 
two cellars, a good new smoake house, a good bolt- 
ing house, a good box, and a cloath allowed to be as 
good as any in the province, a good barn and two 
stables, a good new hay house, a neat garden with 
seventy good apple trees, now in their prime, which 
bear sufficient fruit to make 30 barrels of good cyder 
a year, besides a quantity of good winter apples. 
There have been nine tuns of English hay mowed 
off the lott in a year, it is still kept for mowing ; the 
other lots, laying near, may be viewed at the same 
time. Any person inclining to purchase the whole, 
or part, may be supplied by applying to the sub- 
scriber, about 3 miles from Princeton, at Stony- 
brook, on as reasonable terms as they can desire, 
only paying ^100 by the first of September next, 
without interest. They may have a number of years 
to pay the remainder, just as they can agree. It will 
be exposed to sale, at public vendue, on Thursday 
the 1 4th of June, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, unless 
It is sold by private sale before that time. The title 
is clear and indisputable. 

JOSEPH MERSHON. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 177, May 28- 
June 4, 1770. 

New-York, May 28. We are informed from 
Brunswick, that a little before the Troops (now ar- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. l6l 

rived here) left that Place, several Gentlemen waited 
on the Commanding Officer, and paid their Compli- 
ments to him in the following Address. 

The ADDRESS of sundry of the Magistrates, Free- 
holders, and Inhabitants of the City of New- 
Brunswick, in the Province of New- Jersey, to 

CHARLES PRESTON, Esq., 

Major of the 16 tk Regiment, and Commander in 
Chief of the Forces stationed in the Barracks 
of this Place. 
SIR, 

PROMPTED by a pleasing Reflection on the Tran- 
quility we have enjoyed from the Harmony that has 
uniformly subsisted between the Inhabitants, and the 
Troops quartered in the Barracks here under your 
immediate Command, for now near three Years, we 
wait upon you in Order to express our unfeigned 
Satisfaction. We look upon it as our Duty, and we 
are confident we speak the Sentiments of the whole 
Inhabitants of this Place and Neighborhood, when we 
return you our most cordial thanks for the Humanity 
and Benevolence which have been manifest in every 
Part of your Conduct, as well as the laudable Dispo- 
sition you have constantly shewn to encourage that 
Harmony which has been productive of the utmost 
Peace and good Order, without the least Infringe- 
ment on our Rights and Privileges. Thus impressed, 
permit us, Sir, with our most sincere Wishes for your 
Honour and Happiness in future Life, to offer you 
this public Acknowledgment of our Regard and your 
Merit. 

New- Brunswick^ May 14, 1770. 
11 



162 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To which the Major returned the following 

ANSWER. 
" Gentlemen, 

I RETURN you my most sincere Thanks for the 
Honour you have done me, by your kind and oblig- 
ing Address and receive with the greatest Pleasure 
this public Testimony of your Approbation of my 
Conduct, and of the Behaviour of the Troops under 
my Command. Permit me to assure you, that the 
general good Disposition of the Inhabitants of this 
Place, has rendered any Efforts of my Part, to pre- 
serve a Friendship and Harmony between them and 
the Troops, entirely unnecessary, and will always 
claim my Gratitude and best Wishes for their Pros- 
perity. 

Afterwards the Major, together with other Officers 
quartered in this Place, at the Request of the Gen- 
tlemen who presented the Address, dined with them 
at the White-hall Tavern, where a genteel Entertain- 
ment was provided. 

It is very remarkable (says our Correspondent) 
that since the Arrival of the Troops in this Place, 
now within two Months of three Years, only two 
Men out of one Hundred and Sixty of which they 
consisted have died, one a natural Death, and an- 
other by Accident ; and that during that Time up- 
wards of fifty Children have been born in the Bar- 
racks. 

Friday last a Number of Transports, with the 2Qth 
Regiment on board, arrived here from Providence, 
and the next Day they sailed for the Jersies, where 



I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 163 

\ 

they are to be quartered, in the Room of the 26th 
Regiment lately arrived here from that Colony. 

THIS is to give Notice to all Manner of Persons 
indebted to the Estate of Dr. GILBERT TENNENT, * of 
Monmouth County, in New-Jersey, deceased ; tfiat 
they speedily settle and pay off their Accounts to 
Capt. John Covenhoven of Middletown in the Coun- 
ty aforesaid, to prevent Trouble : And all those to 
whom the above Estate is indebted, either by Bond, 
Bill or Book, are requested to bring in their Ac- 
counts (properly attested) to Mr. Covenhoven afore- 
said, that they may be settled, and that before the 
First Day of October next ensuing the Date hereof, 
as after that Time no Accounts will be received. 

WILLIAM TENNENT, Administ. 

May 28, 1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THE Subscriber having provided himself with a 
good neat covered WAGGON, and Horses suitable, 
purposes to begin a Stage 'from Powles-Hook for 
Philadelphia, on Tuesday the 5th of June next : He 
proposes to set off from Powles-Hook every Tues- 
day Morning, and to go through Newark, Elizabeth- 
Town, Woodbridge, Brunswick, Princetown, Trenton 
and Bristol, and will go quite through to Philadel- 
phia in two Days, at the Price of TWENTY SHILLINGS 
each Passenger, or THREE PENCE a Mile to any Dis- 

1 Gilbert Tennent, youngest son of the Rev. William Tennent, was b. April, 
1742, at Freehold, N. J., and d. March 6, 1770. His tombstone, at Freehold, says 
that " in the practice of Physick he was successful and beloved; young, gay, and 
in the highest bloom of life, Death found him hopefully in the Lord." 



1 64 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

tance between. He keeps two Setts of Horses, but 
drives all the Way himself, and sets out from Phila- 
delphia every 'Friday Morning, comes to Powles- 
Hook on Saturday Evening. And in order to go 
through with Dispatch, he would never chuseto carry 
above eight Passengers at a Time, though there 
might be Room for one or two more on Occasion. 
Goods will be carried proportionably to their Weight 
and Bulk. Those who incline to take Passage with 
him, should be over at Powles-Hook the Evening be- 
fore, as he purposes always to set out early. 

The Public may depend on civil Usage from their 
very humble Servant, 

ABRAHAM SKILMAN. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1 430, 
May 28, 1770. 

New-Jersey, ) BY Order of the Hon. Judges, John 
Monmouth. } Anderson, and James Lawrence, 
Esqrs. two of the Judges of the Court of 
Com Pleas for the said County ; that Sam- 
uel Leonard, jun. a Prisoner for Debt in said 
Gaol, was this 26th Day of April, 1770, quali- 
fied to his Schedule of his Effects, pursuant to a 
late Act of the Assembly ; entitled an Act for the 
Relief of insolvent Debtors, made this present tenth 
year of his Majesty's Reign, &c. 

Now this is to give Notice, to all the Creditors of 
said Debtor, that they be together at the Court 
House of said County, on the i8th Day of June next, 
to shew Cause, if any they have, why the said Debt- 
or's Estate should not be assigned for the Use of his 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 165 

Creditors, and his Body discharged from Gaol, pur- 
suant to said Act. 

Monmoiith Gaol, April 26th, 1770. 

FIVE POUNDS REWARD. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Evesham, 
Burlington County, New-Jersey, on the 25th Instant 
May ; an English Servant Man, named Thomas 
Haines, about 20 Year, of Age, 5 Feet 8 or 9 
Inches high, stoops in his Walk, has a down Look, 
wears his own straight brown Hair, little Eyes, is 
slender built : Had on and took with him, a half 
worn Beaver Hat, a drab coloured homespun Bear- 
skin Jacket, an old Oznaburgs Shirt, Tow Trowsers 
very long, a Pair of knit Breeches, of a Dove Col- 
our, with brown Knee Garters, blue Yarn Stockings, 
and old Shoes. It is likely he will pretend to know 
something of the butchering Business, as he served 
some Time to it in England. Whoever secures the 
said Servant, so that his Master may have htm 
again, shall have the above Reward, if taken up in 
New-York Government, and Ten Dollars, if taken in 
New-Jersey, with all reasonable Charges, paid by 

JOSIAH FOSTER. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1430, May 31, 1770. 


WHEREAS I, the subscriber, agreed to purchase the 

Mount-Holly iron-works, by articles of agreement, 
dated 26th of the Second Month, 1768, in which 
agreement, Peter and Samuel Bard were bound, to 
grant and convey to me in fee simple, a good and 



1 66 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

sufficient title in law, but as they have not complied 
with their agreement, and I have laid out a consid- 
erable sum of money in the repairs &c. besides pay- 
ing part of the purchase money ; and as the prem- 
ises have since been advertised for sale, by Joseph 
Emly, late Sheriff, for the payment of some mort- 
gages thereof, made by said Bard. Now this is to 
give notice to the public, that I have purchased a 
mortgage on the said iron-works, prior to those for 
the payment of which they have been advertised to 
be sold, under which, and the possession and right 
by virtue of the said agreement, I do claim, and in- 
tend to hold the premises, until their agreement be 
made good, or my claims satisfied, for the monies I 
have laid out ; which, according to the opinion of 
some of the best counsels in Pennsylvania and the 

Jerseys, I can well support. 

DANIEL OFFLEY. 

IF PETER DAM (who for some Years past resided 
sometimes in Philadelphia, and sometimes in New- 
Jersey ; but went out to Sea this last Spring was 1 2 
Months) would leave a Letter with the Printers 
hereof directed to his Brother ANDREW DAM, he will 
hear some agreeable News. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2162, May 31, 

1770. 


From the VIRGINIA GAZETTE, April 26, 1770. 

To the PRINTER, 

The following list of American Agents, with the 
Notes, I believe every well-wisher to America will be 
obliged to you for publishing in your paper. They 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 167 

are only plain facts, and it is left to the clear-sighted 
Americans themselves to make the proper comments 

thereon. 

A. S. 

[Extracts.] 

New-Jersey, Mr. Wilmot, No. 8 

Pennsylvania ( Richard Jackson, Esq ; 9 

I Dr. Franklin, extraordinary Agent, 10 

NOTES. 

No. 8. Mr. Wilmot private Secretary to the Lord 
Chancellor. 

No. 9. Richard Jackson, Esq ; see No. 5. 

No. 10. Dr. Benjamin Franklin, L. L. D. extra- 
ordinary Agent, Deputy Post-master in America dur- 
ing pleasure ; his son is also Governor of New-Jer- 
sey, appointed under the administration of Lord 
Bute. 

-Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 178, June 411, 

1770- 

THIRTY DOLLARS Reward. 

RUNAWAY from Etna Furnace, last Night, three 
Servant Men, the one a German, who has been long 
in the Country, named PHILIP NOTT, about 5 Feet 6 
Inches high, square sett, swarthy Complexion, black 
Hair, a Hair Mould on his Cheek, sometimes pre- 
tends to walk lame; about 35 Years old. 

Another named PHILIP JONES, a Welchman, aged 
about 24 Years, fair Complexion, thin Visage, speaks 
hoarse, grey Eyes, and lightish Hair; about 5 Feet 
6 Inches high. 



1 63 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Another named ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, aged about 
22 Years, sharp thin Visage, small Eyes, fair Com- 
plexion, lightish coloured Hair, much given to Liquor, 
and chews Tobacco, in his Liquor noisy and quarrel- 
some ; has work'd at a Forge Fire: He writes a 
good Hand, and may forge Passes. Whoever se- 
cures any of the said Servants, so that they may be 
had again shall receive Six POUNDS for the First, 
THREE POUNDS for the Second, and Two POUNDS for 

Third, paid by 

CHARLES READ. 
Burlington, May 21, 1770. 

To BE SOLD, by the subscriber, at public vendue, on 
Tuesday the iQth day of June Inst. on the prem- 
ises. 

THAT valuable stand for a merchant's shop, known 
by the name of New-Market, about the distance of 
two miles from Princeton, in the Jersies, and equally 
convenient for the transportation of goods from 
Trenton or Brunswick ; on which is a commodious 
dwelling-house, 40 feet square, finished, a good 
kitchen, ware house, barn, barrack, stables, garden, 
&c. all in good repair. The improvements will be 
sold with two acres of land on which they stand, or 
with fifty acres of land adjoining the said two acres 
(near twenty whereof are meadow ground) as may 
best suit the purchaser. Bonds on interest well se- 
cured, will be accepted for the purchase money, and 
an indisputable title given, by 

EZEKIEL FORMAN. 

N. Y. Gazette, or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1431, 
June 4, 1770. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 169 

NEW-JERSEY. 

At a Meeting of the Freeholders, Merchants," and 
Traders of the County of Essex, at Elizabeth- 
Town, on J^uesday the ^th of June, 1770. 

WHEREAS the present critical State of public 
Affairs, loudly calls on every Member of the 
Community to use his utmost Influence in or- 
der to support the invaluable Liberties, handed down 
to him by his Ancestors : The Merchants, Traders 
and Freeholders, of the County of Essex, having se- 
riously considered the disinterested Efforts of the 
Merchants and Traders of the neighbouring Colon- 
ies, to save their sinking Country, by entering into 
an Agreement, not to import Goods from Great Brit- 
ain, until the Acts of Parliament, passed for the ex- 
press Purpose of raising a Revenue in the Colon- 
ies, should be totally repealed, which if continued, 
appears the most probable Means of accomplishing 
the valuable End so nobly designed. And it being 
represented to us, that some few Individuals in sev- 
eral of the neighbouring Colonies, from Motives in- 
consistent with, and injurious to the Common Cause 
of Liberty, in order to raise their own private For- 
tune, are using their Influence to break thro' this 
laudable and patriotic Agreement ; and which if vio- 
lated or broken thro', would forever hereafter dis- 
courage their Friends in Great Britain and else- 
where, from exerting themselves in our Behalf, or 
putting any Confidence in our most solemn Assur- 
ances : By which Means we shall be always consid- 
ered as a wavering, disunited people, and fit Sub- 



I/O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

jects for every Imposition. And as by this impor- 
tant Agreement of the Merchants only, they have 
themselves, plighted their Faith to the Public, that 
they would invariably adhere to the same, which has 
hitherto prevented other Branches of the Commun- 
ity from adopting Measures for the like salutary 
Purposes. Therefore as we now think it incumbent 
on every Individual to exert himself in supporting 
the Common Cause, have unanimously entered into 
the following Resolutions : 

Tst. That the said Non-Importation Agreement 
appears to be founded on the truest Policy, and is a 
legal and constitutional Method of discovering our 
Sense of the several Acts of the British Parliament, 
passed for the express Purpose of raising a Reve- 
nue in the Colonies as aforesaid ; and that those ad- 
hering thereto, are entitled to the Approbation and 
Thanks of every Freeholder in the Colonies. 

2dly. Res. That as it appears that the Enemies of 
our happy Constitution in Great Britain, have pre- 
vented the full Effect of the said patriotic Agree- 
ment, by industriously propagating a mistaken Opin- 
ion of a Disunion in the Colonies, with Respect to 
the said Agreement ; and an Incapacity, as well as 
want of Firmness in supporting so self-denying a 
Scheme, and having prevailed on the Manufacturing 
Towns to withhold their Interest, and suspend their 
Clamours, assuring them, that in Case those Impo- 
sitions could be continued another Year, that we 
should be obliged to discontinue this necessary Meas- 
ure, and thereby be ever afterwards exposed to their 
unreasonable Restrictions and Impositions. We do 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 171 

therefore unanimously agree to make known our 
Sentiments, that the said Agreement should be firm- 
ly adhered to, until the said Acts of Parliament be 
totally repealed. 

3dly. Res. That we will do every Thing in our 
Power to carry into farther Execution so generous a 
Plan. 

4th. Res. That we will not ourselves or by others, 
receive, purchase, sell or otherwise use, any of the 
Manufactures or Merchandize imported from Great 
Britain, contrary to said Agreement ; and that we 
will not trade or have any commercial Intercourse 
with such Persons, who shall import Goods, or Cause 
them to be imported or with any Person who shall 
purchase Goods or other Merchandize so imported, 
but that we will use every lawful Means in our 
Power, to hinder the Sale of such Goods in any Way 
whatsoever. 

5th. Res. That we are determined, that we will at 
all Times, be ready to join in any Measures that 
shall be entered into by the Colonies in general, to 
carry the Design of said Agreement into the fullest 
Execution ; or if necessary to render the Inconven- 
iences occasioned thereby to Individuals, more equal 
and tolerable. 

6th, Res. That we do highly approve and applaud 
the spirited Behaviour of our Boston, New York and 
Philadelphia Brethren, in renouncing all Commerce 
and Intercourse with the Traders and Inhabitants of 
Newport in Rhode-Island, who have so perfidiously 
deserted them in this glorious Struggle : And we do 
agree to observe the same Rules of Conduct, they 



1/2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

have so properly adopted, with respect to the said 
Traders and Inhabitants of Newport. 

7th. Res. That we are well convinced that these 
are the general Sentiments of all the Freeholders 
and Inhabitants of this Province ; and we will read- 
ily concur with them in any farther Measures they 
may propose, for the Support of an Agreement, upon 
which the Preservation of the Liberties of America 
so essentially depend. 

8th. Res. And lastly, that we will at all Times, do 
every Thing in our Power to preserve good Order 
and Decorum in this Province, and to strengthen the 
Hands of Government, agreeable to our invaluable 
Constitution. 

London, April \> . List of American Agents. * * * 
* * New-Jersey, Mr. Wilmot, Private Secretary to 
the Lord Chancellor. 

New-York, June 7. On Tuesday Evening, the 
29th Ultimo, the Ship Edward, Capt. Kemble, from 
London, (who left the Downs the i8th of April) un- 
fortunately ran ashore on Barnegat Beach, where its 
feared the Vessel will be lost, but all the People, and 
it is said the Cargo will be saved. The Occasion of 
this melancholy Accident is variously reported, but 
it is generally said, the Pilot on board mistook the 
Land for the Nevesinks, near the Hook ; however, 
we have not been able to obtain a particular Ac- 
count from any of the Persons on board, at the 
Time, or any directly informed of it by them. N. 
Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1 43 1 , June 
7, 1770. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 173 

BOSTON, May 28. [Extracts.] 

In consequence of a letter from the committee of 
merchants in Philadelphia, to the committee of mer- 
chants in this town, brought by express last Tues- 
day evening, desiring to know the sense of our mer- 
chants, traders, &c. respecting the non importation 
agreement, a meeting was called the ( day 

following at Faneuil Hall, and after full and fair 
debates upon the subject matter of said let- 
ter it was VOTED almost unanimously, That 
we would still strigtly adhere to the non-impor- 
tation agreement, entered into the iQth of October 
last, not to import goods from Great Britain, till the 
act laying duties on tea. paper, glass, colours, &c. is 

totally repealed 

VOTED, as the sense of this body, that the conduct 
of said persons betrays a contempt of all the senti- 
ments of faith, truth, sincerity and honour ; as well 
as a total insensibility to the interest and liberties of 

their country and posterity.- And we rely 

upon the public spirit and virtue of the inhabitants of 
Salem, Nantucket, and other trading and fishing 
towns in this province ; as also of the provinces and 
colonies of Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersies, 
Philadelphia, Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, &c. 
that they will heartily concur with us in this resolu- 
tion, . . . Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1435, June 
7, 1770. 

CHOICE PICKLED STURGEON, cured in the Baltick 
manner, by JONATHAN RICHMOND, at Trenton Falls ; 
WHO, by his experience these seven years in the 



J74 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

business, and not trusting to hired servants or slaves, 
who often spoil, by not putting up the proper part of 
the fish, as many so curing neglect. By observing 
the following directions etc. [same as in previous 
advertisements.] 

N. B. Said fish to be sold at Messieurs Coxe and 
Furman's store, on Arch-street wharff. 

Salem County, May 26, 1770. 

NOTICE is hereby given to all masters of vessels, 
and others, that want LIVE STOCK, such as sheep, 
hogs, ducks and geese, and all sorts of poultry. 
Any person favouring us with their custom, may de- 
pend on our doing our best endeavours to oblige 
them ; by sending a letter to either of us, by the 
Salem Stage, may expect to be supplied at the -time 
when wanted by the subscribers, living at or near 
Salem Creek Mouth. Richard Hacket, Ephraim 
Lloyd, and Aaron Silver, Stage-driver.- -Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2163, June 7, 1770. 



New-York, June i i. On Tuesday Night, the 
Ult., about 10 o'Clock, the Ship Edward, Capt. Kem- 
ble, from London, for this Port, unfortunately ran 
ashore at a Place called Brigantine Inlet, near Little 
Egg-Harbour, where it is said she lies buried in the 
Sand ; but all the People, and most of her Cargo, 
are saved. 

To the PUBLIC. 

As the Author of the two Publications in Mr. 
Parker's Papers of the 26th of February and 5th of 
March last, in Vindication of the Purchasers of 



17/0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 175 

Newark, is now convinced, that he has in said Pub- 
lications, highly injured the Reputation of Elias 
Boudinot, Esq ; he looks upon it as his indispensa- 
ble Duty to make this public voluntary Acknowledg- 
ment thereof, and humbly solicits Forgiveness of that 
Gentleman, and of the respectable Public; which he 
humbly hopes he may obtain, as he is determined to 
use the utmost of his Endeavours to make Repara- 
tion. 

[The Author's Name of the above Piece is in the 
Original, which may be seen at the Printing Office.] 
-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1432, 
June 1 1, 1770. 

To BE SOLD, 

And entered upon the first Day of April next. 

THE Dwelling House where the late Robert Hun- 
ter Morris lived, with the Out-Houses, and One Hun- 
dred and Eighty-seven and a Half Acres of Land, 
situate on Shrewsbury River. Inquire of 

ROBERT HARTSHORNE. 
Portland- Point, June 11,17 70. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1432, June 14, 1770. 

From Monmouth County, in New-Jersey, we learn, 
that a Number of Persons, who were indicted for be- 
ing concerned in the Disturbances at Freehold, in 
January last, were lately tried for the same, and ac- 
quitted by the Jury. 

-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2164, June 14, 
1770. 



176 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Philadelphia, June 8, 1770. 

To THE PUBLIC. 

The Managers elected by the Contributors for 
promoting the Culture of Silk, hereby give Notice, 
that they will be ready to purchase, and receive, at 
the Filature in Seventh street, between Market and 
Arch streets, all Cocoons of this Years Growth, that 
may be brought to them before the first of Septem- 
ber next, at the following Prices, viz. 

For sound and merchantable Cocoons, of the best 
Quality, from the Italian or foreign Silk Worm, Four 
Shillings per Pound ; and for sound Cocoons of the 
Native, or Americaa Worm, Twenty-five Shillings 
per Thousand ; and proportionably for Cocoons of 
an inferior Quality. And as a further Encourage- 
ment to the Inhabitants of this Province, the Man- 
agers will pay them a Bounty of Twenty-five per 
Cent, on the Value of the Cocoons that may be pur- 
chased of them, over and above the Price proposed 
as aforesaid 



The following PREMIUMS will also be given, viz 

I. To that Person in Pennsylvania, or in the Three 
Lower Counties on Delaware, or in the jersies, or 
Maryland, who shall, on or before the first Day of 
September next, raise within his or her Family, and 
sell at the Filature the greatest Quantity of sound 
Cocoons, not less than Thirty Thousand, the Pre- 
mium of FIFTEEN POUNDS. 

II. To that Person, in either of the said Provinces, 
or Counties, who shall raise and sell as aforesaid, the 
next greatest Quantity, not less than Twenty Thou- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 177 

sand y the Premium of TEN POUNDS. Both these 
Premiums exclusive of the Price as aforesaid. 

It will be required of every Person that may claim 
either of the two aforesaid Premiums, that he or she 
produce to the Managers a satisfactory Certifi- 
cdte, ... 

Such Persons as may not be disposed to sell their 
Cocoons, but to have them reeled for their own Use, 
may have that Service performed for them at the 
Filature in the best Manner, and at the most reason- 
able Rates possible ; . . . 

Cadwalader Evans, Benjamin Morgan, Israel 
Pemberton, Moses Bartram, Francis Alison, William 
Smith, John Rhea, Samuel Rhoads, Thomas Fisher, 
Owen Biddle, Henry Drinker, Robert Strettell Jones, 
Managers. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living on the Sea 
Shore, near Metetekunk, in the County of Mon- 
mouth, Township of Dover, and Province of East 
New Jersey, a Negro Man, named Prince, 5 Feet 8 
or 10 Inches high. Had on, when he went away, an 
Iron Collar round his Neck, a Wool Hat, with a green 
Binding, Ozenbrigs Shirt and Trowsers, a brown 
Waistcoat, without Sleeves, and shoes, without 
Stockings. Whoever takes up said Negroe, and se- 
cures him in any of his Majesty's Goals, or brings 
him to his Master, shall have Twenty Shillings Re- 
ward, and reasonable Charges, paid by me. 

JOSEPH ALLEN. 

June 8, 1770. 

ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of John 
12 



1 78 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I" 1 77 

Kaighn, late of Newtown, in the County of Glouces- 
ter, and Western Division of the Province of New- 
Jersey, Practitioner in Physic, deceased, 1 are required 
to make immediate Payment of such their respective 
Debts, or they may depend on being proceeded 
against according to Law ; and those who have any 
Demands against the said Estate, are desired to 
bring in their Accounts, properly attested, to JOSEPH 
KAIGHN, Execut. 

To BE LETT, 

And may be entered on immediately, either on 
Shares, or at an annual Rent, for a Year, or longer 
Term, A FULLING-MILL, with the Utensils proper for 
carrying on the Business, situate in the County of 
Gloucester, and Province of New-Jersey, about 8 
Miles from the Town of Gloucester, and at the Head 
of Timber Creek. The Business of Fulling and 
Dying have been carried on at said Mill, for 40 
Years past, and is therefore well accustomed, being 
in a thick settled Part of the Country. Enquire of 
RANDALL MARSHALL, on the Premises. Pennsylvania 
Gazette, No. 2164, June\^ 17/0. 

i The Kaighn family of Old Gloucester are descended from John Kaighn, who 
came from the Isle of Man, and in 1694 was a resident of By berry, Bucks county, 
Pa. He was a carpenter by trade. In 1693 he married Ann Albertson, widow of 
Walter Forrest; she d. July 6, 1694, and in 1696 he m. Sarah Dole, wid. of Andrew 
Griscom. In the latter year Kaighn bought a tract of 455 acres in Newton town- 
ship, Old Gloucester, and resided thereon thenceforth; he m. 3d, Elizabeth Hill. 
of Burlington, in 1710. He d. in 1724, leaving two sons, by his second wife: 

I. John, b. Dec. 30, 1700; m. Abigail Hinchman, dau. of John Hinchman, in 1732. 
He was a blacksmith at Haddonfleld. He d. in 1749, leaving issue: 1. Sarah, b. 
1733; 2. Elizabeth, b. 1736; 3. Samuel, b. 1737; 4. John, b. 1740; 5. Ann, b. 1744. 

II. Joseph, b. Dec. 4, 1702; m. Mary Estaugh, of Philadelphia, dau. of James 
and niece of John Estaugh, of Haddonfleld. He d. 1749, leaving issue: 1. Joseph, 
m. Prudence Butcher, a widow; 2. John, a physician, who d. in 1770, unmarried, 
aged about 40 years; 3. Isaac, d. under age ; 4. James, m. Hanna Mason; 5. Eliz- 
abeth, m. Arthur Donaldson, Clement's First Settlers of Newton, 149-157. 



I 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 179 

STOLEN, on the evening of Saturday, the igth of 
May last, from the pasture of the subscriber, in 
Princetown, New Jersey, a black HORSE, 10 years 
old, about 13 hands high, has a switch tail, not shod 
when taken, branded on the near thigh with the let- 
ter D, a natural trotter, supposed to be stolen by a 
certain William Nimmons, of middle stature, who 
absconded from this province, and was advertised ; 
if the horse is secured for the owner, a reward of 
Thirty Shillings will be paid ; if thief and horse se- 
cured, so as the thief may be brought to justice, a 
reward of Three Pounds, with reasonable charges, 

will be paid by 

WILLIAM NORRIS. 

-Sup p. to Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2164, 
June 14, 1770. 

NEW-YORK. 

June 21. The inhabitants of Maryland, Pennsyl- 
vania, New-Jersey, Stratford, New Haven and the 
towns on Connecticut river in Connecticut, Boston 
and Salem, have excluded the people of Rhode- 
Island, from trading with them, and have sent back 
their vessels, till they shall fully come into the non- 
importation agreement subsisting in the other colon- 
ies, and have made satisfaction for their late scandal- 
ous defection.- -Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 180, 
June 18-25, 1770. 

To BE LET, 

And entered immediately. 

THE large convenient and well-situated Dwelling- 
House of Col. Jacob De Hart, in Elizabeth-Town, 



180 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

with the Gardens, Outhouses, and a very good Or- 
chard adjoining the same. Enquire of the Owner. 

New- Jersey, June 12, 1770. 

RUNAWAY from the Subscriber living in Wood- 
bridge, East New -Jersey, in the Night of the 2d In- 
stant, a Negro Man called DICK, about five Feet 
eight Inches high, about 28 Years of Age, speaks 
very good English, is a well-looking well-built Fel- 
low, somewhat on the Yellow ; takes uncommon 
Pains with his short wooly Hair, which he wears cut 
on the fore Part of his Head : He took with him a 
blue Coat, a black Velvet Jacket and Breeches, with 
sundry other very good Cloathes. It is likely he 
may change his Name, and have a Pass : He has 
been seen in New-York a few Days ago. Whoever 
takes up and secures the said Fellow so that his 
Master may have him again, shall receive Five 
Pounds New-York Currency, and all reasonable 

Charges paid by me. 

DAVID EDGAR. 

N. B. As he took with him a Silk Cap, it is likely 

he may cut off his Hair. All Masters of Vessels 

and others, are hereby forewarned of harboring or 

carrying him off at their- Peril. N. Y. Gazette or 

Weekly Post Boy, No. 1433, June 18, 1770. 

INOCULATION. 

EORGE PuGH 1 Surgeon, lately arrived from Jamaica, 
T acquaints the Public, that he was the first Person 
who introduced the Suttonian Method of Inocu- 

i Dr. Pugh was elected a member of the New Jersey Medical Society in 1770. 
He seems to have taken up his permanent residence at Elizabethtowu, as in his 
will, proved December 26, 1785, he describes himself as of that town. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. l8l 

lation for the Small-Pox in that Part of the West- 
Indies, where he has been instrumental in almost 
eradicating that most loathsome Disease. He now 
proposes carrying on that Branch of his Profession, 
every Spring and Fall, in Elizabeth Town, New-Jer- 
sey, where he has opened a Commodious House for 
the Reception of Patients. Any Person, Family or 
Company desirous of being Inoculated by him at 
New-York, Philadelphia or elsewhere, may depend 
upon his strictest Care and Attendance to conduct 
them through the Small-Pox, and upon Terms agree- 
able to their Circumstances, and what may justly be 
added, with very little Loss of Time or Hindrance. 
And that all Persons may have it in their Power to 
satisfy themselves of the Utility of his Practice, he 
has inserted a few of the Estates that were inocu- 
lated by him, without the loss of a Patient, in the 
Parish of Westmoreland, Jamaica, each Estate hav- 
ing not less than 400 Slaves upon an Average. 
Dorcas Valley, William Wittes, Esq ; Angleasea, 
Samuel Houghton ; Paradise, John Cape ; Egypt, 
Ditto ; Prospect, H. Brickets ; Amity, William Bos- 
ley ; South-Field, William Blake ; Williamsfield, 
Crawl, Roaring River, Hertford Beckford, Esq ; 
Mount Pleasant, Jacob Ferris ; Sweet-River, Friend- 
ship, Greenwich, Tho. Vassall. 

With many more Estates and white People 
throughout the Island, too numerous to be inserted 
in this Advertisement. 

N. B. The Poor, properly recommended, will be 
inoculated gratis. N. Y. Journal or General Ad- 
vertiser ', No. i433> June 21, 1770. 



1 82 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

On Wednesday evening, the I3th inst. the Revd. 
Mr. GEORGE WHITEFIELD returned from his tour to 
Reading, Lancaster^ &c. having preached several 
times at different places : On Thursday he preached 
at the Arch-street Presbyterian Church, and on Fri- 
day afternoon he sat out on his way to New-York, 
Boston, &c. on Saturday he preached at Burlington, 
on Sunday at seven o'clock in the morning he 
preached at Princeton, to the students of the college 
there, at three in the afternoon, and on Monday 
morning to the inhabitants ; and then set out, and 
proposed preaching on Tuesday last at Freehold, on 
Wednesday at Woodbridge, this day at Elizabeth- 
Town, tomorrow at Newark, and on Saturday he pro- 
posed reaching New-York. 

The Public are desired to take Notice, that the 
Time appointed for holding the Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas, and of General Quarter Sessions of 
the Peace, in the County of Burlington, is changed 
for the Summer Quarter, and -the said Courts are 
hereafter to be held on the Second Tuesday in 
August. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1437, June 21, 
1770. 

PHILADELPHIA, June 21. 

Captain Rankin, from Barbadoes, on the i3th In- 
stant, about 50 Leagues from our Capes, spoke with 
Captain Bedlow, for St. Croix ; and the next Day, 
about 30 Leagues from the Capes, he spoke a Sloop, 
for St. Eustatia, both from this Port. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia, CLEARED. 
Sloop Honest Endeavour, R. Savery, N. Jersey. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 183 

Sloop Endeavour, L. Whitridge, Salem. 

FORTY OR FIFTY FAMILIES, 

Inclining to settle on good land, situated in the 
county of Albany, and province of New York, on 
the head of the east branch of Susquehanna ; which 
is navigable for small craft to Harris' ferry, may be 
supplied on very advantageous terms out of several 
large adjoining tracts. . . . 

For further information apply to 

Samuel Preston Moore, Joseph Fox, Henry Hill in 
Philadelphia. 

George Brown, in the City of New York. 

John Smith, Richard Wells, Richard Smith, Sam- 
uel Allinson, James Verree, John Hoskins, in Burling- 
ton, New Jersey. 

Joseph Smith, at Morris-Town ; William Lovet 
Smith, William Dellivyn, in Springfield, in Burling- 
ton county. 

BROKE out of the goal of Cumberland county, in 
West New Jersey, on Saturday night, the i6th in- 
stant, John Clark, alias Walker, by trade a skinner, 
he is about 19 years of age, a stout well set fellow, 
long black hair, stoops in his walk ; had on a mouse 
coloured cloth coat and jacket, buckskin breeches, a 
fine white shirt, one coarse ditto, a white silk handker- 
chief round his neck, and grey ribbed stockings. 
Whoever takes up and secures said runaway shall 
have Thirty Shillings reward, paid by 

THOMAS MARSHALL, Sheriff. 

RUN away from his bail, living at Egg Harbour, a 



1 84 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



young man, named RICHARD WOOD, about 6 feet 
high, well set, and of a swarthy complexion ; had on, 
when he went away, a brownish coloured lapelled 
coat, of thick cloth, his other clothes unknown; his 
dark brown hair, pretty long, and commonly tied be- 
hind. Whoever takes up said Richard Wood, and 
secures him in any goal, where he may be had, shall 
have EIGHT DOLLARS reward, and reasonable 
charges, paid by me 

JAMES CARUTHERS. 

To be LETT, 

A HOUSE in Lodge Alley, now tenanted by Mr. 
James Logan ; said House may be entered on the 
first of August. Also a PLANTATION, to be sold or 
lett, in the Township of Amwell, and County of 
Hunterdon, New-Jersey. Enquire of THOMAS GOR- 
DON, in Oxford Township, Philadelphia County. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2165, June 21, 1770. 

STRAYED out of a Pasture, in Princeton, New-Jer- 
sey, on the 1 8th of May last, a small Virginia 
Bay Horse, a natural Pacer, three white Feet, 
and white Face. Whoever takes up said Horse, and 
will bring him to Mr. Jonathan Baldwin, at Prince- 
ton, or to Mr. Brook Farmer at Brunswick, or to 
William P. Smith, at Elizabeth-Town, shall receive 
THREE DOLLARS Reward. 

Burlington, April 21, 1770. 

WHEREAS the STAGE from Burlington to Amboy, 
has for some Time past been dropt, and the 
Subscriber (finding it inconvenient to Num- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 185 

bers of People who travel to and from New-York, 
&c. to go the other Stages by Reason of their being 
attended with greater Expences, and the Travelling 
more tedious) has again set up a complete Stage 
from Burlington to Amboy ; where the best Attend- 
ance will be given by the Waggoner, and the best 
Entertainment for Travellers Kept by the Subscrib- 
er, at the old Stage-House ; who will be obliged to 
all Gentlemen and Ladies travelling to and from 
New-York, Philadelphia, &c. to favour him with 
their Custom, as they may depend upon being used 
in the best Manner, and conveyed to their Journey's 
End, with the greatest Safety and Dispatch. 

The Boat sets off from the Crooked-Billet Wharf 
in Philadelphia, on Saturday the 28th Instant, and 
the Passengers embark in the Waggon the Monday 
following, and they are conveyed to Amboy that 
same Day, where there is a Boat ready to receive 
them to carry them to New- York. The Waggon re- 
turns again on Tuesday to Burlington, where the 
Boat receives them and carries them to Philadel- 
phia : The Boat again sets off from Philadelphia on 
Wednesday, and the Waggon on Thursday, and so 
to continue. The best Attendance will be given by 
the Burlington Stage Boatmen, whose Boats have 
excellent Accommodations, and the People extreme- 
ly careful. 

The Reason this Stage is more commodious and 
shorter than any other is this, let the Wind be in 
what Corner it will, the Distance by Water is so 
short, you are always sure of getting to Burlington 



1 86 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

in one Tide. 

JOSEPH HAIGHT. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1434, 
June 25, i 770. 

At a Meeting of the Freeholders, Merchants 
and Traders of the City of New-Brunswick, 
on Thursday the i4th June, 1770. 
The following Letter signed by 18 Merchants 
in the City of New York, was laid before the 
Meeting. 
GENTLEMEN 

express Bearer hereof is dispatched to Phila- 
delphia with a Request from this Place, to col- 
lect as soon as possible the Sentiments of their 
People, whether to abide by their present Agree- 
ment, or whether to import every Thing except the 
Articles which are Subject to Duty, for the Purpose 
of raising a Revenue in America, and that they 
would afterwards appoint Deputies of six Persons, 
to meet the same Number from this City, Boston, 
Connecticut, and such other Places as may choose to 
send any, the i8th Instant, at Norwalk in Connecti- 
cut. The Deputies to be empowered by their dif- 
ferent Constituents to communicate without Reserve 
their respective Sentiments on so Important a Sub- 
ject, and to adopt one general solid System for the 
Benefit of the Whole, that no one Colony may be 
liable to the Censure or Reproaches of another, but 
all share equally the same Fate. If you approve of 
the proposed Plan, your Deputies will appear at the 
Time and Place we have taken the Liberty to ap- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 187 

point for Meeting the other Deputies from the 
Places above mentioned. And we shall be obliged 
to you for your Sentiments as soon as possible on. 
the Measures now proposed, &c. 

To the Merchants and Traders 

in New Jersey. 
The following Answer which was drawn up, was 
likewise Read, unanimously agreed to, and 
signed by 6 of the Members present ; viz. 
GENTLEMEN, 

YOUR Letters by the Express of the 2d Instant not 
being answered sooner, we hope will be ex- 
cused, as the Contents through Mistake, did not 
reach the Knowledge of the most of us until the 
1 2th in the Afternoon. 

We cannot but honour and revere the noble Spirit 
that yet glows and animates the Breasts of the Mer- 
chants in general of the British Colonies, to oppose 
the Enemies of the Liberties of America, in adher- 
ing to the laudable Non-Importation Agreement, and 
by keeping a watchful Eye upon every Encroach- 
ment or Attempt to dissolve it. Since therefore 
from every Account and Circumstance it appears to 
be the real Intention of the Majority of Men in 
Power, by every Artifice to break this Union in or- 
der to complete our Ruin. We must be of Opinion, 
not one Inch of Ground should be yielded to our 
Enemies in a Matter of such high Importance, on 
which the very Essence of our Liberties both Civil 
and Political depends. And that consequently it is 
necessary the present general Non-Importation 



1 88 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Agreement should stand firm and be persevered in, 
until the Act for imposing a Duty for the purpose 
of raising a Revenue in America be totally repealed. 
Such Gentlemen are our Sentiments, and the collec- 
tive Sentiments of the Body of People in this Place, 
upon this important Subject ; and as it is somewhat 
Impracticable to send Deputies from this Place, any 
System that may be formed by the Deputies from the 
great trading Cities, agreeable thereto shall be 
adopted and adhered to by us. 

Then the following Resolves were also unani- 
mously agreed to, only one or two Persons had some 
Exceptions to the Fifth. 

i st. Resolved, That this Meeting do adopt and 
agree to the 'Non-Importation Agreement in the 
above Letter referred to, in the fullest extent. 

2d. Resolved, That in the present critical Situation 
of publick Affairs, it appears to this Meeting, that 
the Continuance of the Non-Importation Agreement 
whole and entire, be strictly adhered to, without the 
least Infringement, until the total Repeal of the Act 
of Parliament imposing a Duty on Paper, Glass, 
Painters Colours and Tea, is of absolute necessity. 

3d Resolved, That we will by every legal Means 
in our Power endeavour to Co-operate with our 
Neighbours, in this Colony to preserve the said 
Agreement whole and entire against all Attempts 
that may be made to violate the same, and that we 
will not buy any Goods from any Person or Persons 
who shall act or do any thing contrary to that salu- 
tary Compact ; and also, that we will use our influ- 



I7/O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 189 

ence to prevent others from buying any Goods from 
them. 

4th. Resolved, That all Persons that may be guilty 
of violating the said Agreement, shall be considered 
by us as Enemies to the Rights and Liberties of their 
Country, and shall be treated by us as such, accord- 
ingly. ^ 

5th. Resolved, It appears to this Meeting that the 
Merchants of Newport in Rhode Island have been 
guilty of Violating the Non-Importation Agreement, 
and consequently have acted as Enemies to the Lib- 
erties of North-America; and that for the future we 
will have no Commerce or Dealings with them un- 
til they do return to their strict adherence to their 
solemn Agreement of Non-Importation. 

New- York, June 27. 

AN away on Sunday the 24th instant from the 
subscriber, an indented servant boy, named 
Belcher Preston, born in the province of New- 
Jersey, about seventeen years of age, five feet seven 
inches high, well set, fair complexion, brown short 
hair, greyish eyes, his upper teeth projecting ; had 
on when he went away, a blue jacket and waistcoat, 
leather breeches lately cleaned, with a patch be- 
tween the legs, white thread stockings new, a pair 
shoes almost new, and a pair plain metal buckles, 
supposed to be gone into Chester county or Phila- 
delphia. Whoever apprehends or secures the said 
indented servant boy in any of his Majesty's gaols, 
or otherwise give notice to the printer hereof, shall 
receive Five Dollars reward and all reasonable ex- 



190 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

penses paid. 

by RICHARD BOLTON. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forewarned car- 
rying- him away at their peril. N. Y. Journal or 
General Advertiser, No. 1434, June 28, 1770. 

To be SOLD, by PUBLIC VEN.DUE, 
On TUESDAY the 24th of July next, at five o'clock in 

the afternoon, on the Premises. 
A HOUSE and LOT of GROUND, situated in Kings- 
bury, on the road from Trenton-Ferry, to Trenton, 
commonly called Broad street, containing in breadth 
on said street sixty four feet, and extending in depth 
on the South West of said street, one hundred and 
eighty one feet and an half, free of Ground rent. 
Also, a LEASE, of which four Years are unexpired, of 
a Lot adjoining the above of the same dimensions, 
paying Thirty Shillings per annum, on which are a 
very good Chaise House and Stable. Any person 
inclining to purchase before the day of Sale, may 
know the terms, by applying to Doctor RALPH ASHE- 
TON, or STEPHEN WATTS Esq, in Philadelphia, or Mr. 
JOHN CLUN, living on the premises. 

JUST PUBLISHED, and TO BE SOLD by 
WILLIAM & THOMAS BRADFORD, 

At their BOOK STORE, in Market-street, adjoining the 

London Coffee house, 

PRACTICAL DISCOURSES, 

On the Leading Truths of the GOSPEL ; 

By JOHN WITHERSPOON, D. D. 

PRESIDENT of the College of New-Jersey. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1438, June 28, 
1770. 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. IQI 

RUN away, the 24th of this instant June, from the 
Subscriber, living in Woolwich Township, Gloucester 
County, West Jersey, opposite to Marcus- Hook, a 
Negro Man, Country born, named MINGO, 22 Years 
old, about 5 Feet 5 Inches high, well set, smooth 
faced and likely. Had on a Half-worn Felt Hat, 
light coloured Cloth Jacket, with white Metal But- 
tons, a white Linen Jacket, without Sleeves, Buck- 
skin Breeches, Tow Linen Trowsers, Worsted 
mixed Stockings, Calfskin Pumps, with large carved 
Silver Buckles. He is supposed to be gone off with 
a white Woman, named FANNY. Whoever takes up 
the said Negroe, and secures him in any Goal, so 
that his Master may get him again, shall, receive 
TWENTY SHILLINGS Reward, and reasonable Charges, 

paid by 

SAMUEL HEWES, or 

CALEB HEWES, in Philadelphia. 

Germantown, June 11, 1770, 

TAKEN up last Saturday, the gth Instant, a brown 
Gelding, and a Saddle without Housings (found in 
the Possession of one Nicholas Fitzgerald, a lusty 
Irish Fellow, who says he ran away the Tuesday be- 
fore, from his Master, Samuel Henry, in Trenton ; 
but the Horse, he says, belongs to a Tavern-keeper, 
up along Schuylkill, somewhere above the Swedes 
Ford, and thinks his Name is Thompson) said Horse 
is between 13 and 14 Hands high, has no Brand, but 
a Collar Mark, a bob Tail, and seems newly shod be- 
fore. The Owner of said Horse, or Servant may 
hear of either of them, by applying to the Sub- 



IQ2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

scriber, 

JACOB EYE, Constable, in Germantown. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2166, June 28, 
1770. 

NEW- YORK, July 2. 

Extract of a letter from a Gentleman in Connecticut, 
whv is one of the largest traders in dry goods in 
that colony. 

" There is nothing in life that gives a clearer dem- 
onstration of the instability of human affairs, than the 
conduct of New-York, they have sunk their credit 
by their late conduct, as far as I can learn, with this 
and all the other New-England governments ; you 
have had meeting after meeting, cabal after cabal, - 
dictated to your neighbours in a haughty strain, - 
value yourselves high on the honour you have to be 
New-Yorkers, the only people who have stood to 
the non-importation agreement, all this this week,- 
the next convinces the world of the reverse ; for my 
part, I am sorry for New-York, a place I value so 
highly ; if they import before the other governments, 
they will lose the trade of this government, for 
altho' non importation is no virtue in us, (as we im- 
port none of any value at any time,) yet we value 
our rights as high as any others ; and as you have 
of late, got all our trade, we look upon you as our 
wall of defence, respecting the non-importation, as 
far as it relates to the preservation of our liberties. 
There are several letters in town from New Jersey 
and other places of the same import, 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 193 

NEW-YORK, July 2. 

We hear that answers to the proposals from this 
city for altering the non-importation agreement, and 
opening the trade to Great-Britain, except for tea or 
other articles, on which a duty is exacted, have been 
received from Boston, Philadelphia, &c. And that 
they have unanimously and absolutely rejected the 
said proposal, --being resolutely determined firmly 
to adhere to the non-importation agreement as it 
stands, and that the people of Connecticut aud New- 
Jersey have determined to have no further dealings 
with this place, unless the said agreement is strictly 
maintained, . . . Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 182, 
July 2-9, 1770. 

New-York, July 2. A Copy of a Letter from 
the Merchants and Traders in the County of 
Essex, New-Jersey, to the Committee of Mer- 
chants in New York, in Answer to their Let- 
ter, desiring a Congress of Merchants to meet 
at Norwalk. 

Elizabeth-Town, June 8, 1770. 
" GENTLEMEN, 

YOUR Favour of the 2d Instant, we have received 
and considered ; before the Receipt of which, 
the Merchants, Traders, and Freeholders of 
this County, being called together by public Adver- 
tisements, unanimously resolved to support the Non- 
Importation Agreement to the utmost of their 
Power, a Copy of which Resolution, signed by us 
and many others, is here inclosed, which sufficiently 

discovers their and our Sentiments. As to the Mat- 
13 



194 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ter of sending Deputies to Norwalk, we are sorry 
such a Proposal should have been made. Had these 
Colonies never entered into any Resolutions, a Pro- 
posal for Deputies to concert a general Plan, might 
have been very proper ; but now as our Honour and 
Faith is pledged to each other, shall we leave the 
noble spirited Inhabitants of Charles-Town, and the 
other faithful Colonies, to stand or fall by them- 
selves ? Should you have invited the whole Conti- 
nent to the Congress, and should they resolve to 
break their Agreement, yet this would not have been 
justifiable. Our Friends on the other Side the 
Water have a Right to be consulted. Tis not our 
Cause only but theirs also, which is now depending 
upon keeping or braking our Agreement. Our 
Friends in England relying upon our Honour and 
Faith, have engaged in the Cause, and acted upon 
our Agreement. They have pledged their Honour 
for us, and shall we now meet to consult whether we 
will deceive and leave them the Scorn of their Ene- 
mies, who are also the Enemies of Liberty and Jus- 
tice ? Shall we meet to consult whether we have 
Honour or Faith, or public Virtue? We cannot 
agree to it If you had proposed a Meeting for 
strengthening, and for further securing the Virtue 
and Resolutions of the Colonies, we should have 
joined you, but to meet and consult whether we will 
be faithful, would be a Reproach to us. We flatter 
ourselves that if you will be pleased to re-consider 
the Matter, you will see the Absurdity, and lay aside 
the Proposal, which is the earnest Desire of, 

Gentlemen, 

Your very humble Servants. 



I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 

We have Authority to assure the Publick, that in 
the Borough of Elizabeth, in the County of Essex, 
East New-Jersey, upwards of One Hundred Thou- 
sand Yards of Linnen and Woollen Cloth, has been 
manufactured there during the last year. N. Y. 
Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1435, July 2 , 
1770. 

New-York, July 5. On Monday Morning last, at 
the House of Mr. Hollingshead in Burlington, New- 
Jersey, departed this Life, in the 56th Year of his 
Age, JAMES PARKER, Esq, late of this City Printer, 
Comptroller and Secretary of the Post Office for the 
northern District of the British Colonies. Till of 
late he usually resided at his House in Woodbridge, 
New-Jersey, where he was a Magistrate and Captain 
of a Troop of Horse. His Remains were attended 
for 5 Miles out of Burlington by a considerable 
Number of Gentlemen of that Place, and at Amboy 
on Tuesday, met by a like Number, who attended 
the Corps to Woodbridge, where a numerous Con- 
gregation assembled at his House, and about 6 
o'Clock he was interred near his Parents in the 
Meeting-House Yard. The Service was performed 
by the Reverend Mr. Preston, Minister of the Church 
at Amboy. 

Mr. PARKER has carried on the Printing Business, 
chiefly in New-York, and some Time in New Jersey, 
for about 30 Years, and was eminent in his Profes- 
sion. He possessed a sound Judgment, & extensive 
Knowledge : He was industrious in Business, up- 
right in his Dealings, charitable to the Distressed, 



196 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

\ 

and has left a fair Character, on which we have 
neither Time nor Room to enlarge. 

To be sold, at Vendue, on the second Day of Octo- 
ber next ensuing, (or at private Sale any Time 
before.) 

A Farm or plantation in Middletown, in the county 
of Monmouth, pleasantly situated on Sandy- 
hook bay, it contains about i 20 or 1 30 acres, 
near 10 acres of which is salt meadow: There is a 
dwelling house, barn and orchard on said place, there 
is part of it wood land, and an excellent spring of 
water close by the door : It is naturally fenced on 
two sides, one side by the bay, the other side by the 
creek ; there is a great quantity of sea weed yearly 
drives on shore, which makes good manure ; there is 
plenty of fish to be caught in the season, either with 
hook or net, as also clams and other shell-fish. 
Whoever inclines to purchase, may apply to SAMUEL 
BOWNE, living on the premises. *N. Y. Journal or 
General Advertiser, No. 1435, July 5, 1770. 
June 29th, 1770. 

RUNAWAY yesterday morning from the subscriber, 
living in Mount-holly, Burlington county, an Irish ser- 
vant lad, named JAMES GRAY, about seventeen years 
of age, about five feet high, of a dark complexion, 
strait black hair, and a sour ill-looking fellow ; Had 
on when he went away, a felt hat, striped linen jacket, 
check shirt, ticken trowsers, with broad stripes, and 
a pair of half worn shoes. Whoever takes up and 
secures said servant, so that his master may have 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 197 

him again, shall have THIRTY SHILLINGS reward, 
paid by 

JOHN BISPHAM. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forbid to carry 
him off at their peril. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1439, July 5, 1770. 

[Extracts.] 

But what if New-York wants Faith, generous 

Sentiments and Honour ; must therefore all the 
American Colonies drop these Virtues and sink into 
Slavery, quit their Spirit and Virtue, and lament like 
Children in Despair, we are betrayed and undone 
by New-York, and can't help ourselves? Not so, 
my Countrymen, New-York indeed wants Virtue, 
Faith, natural Affection to their Offspring, Humanity 
and Public-Spirit ; but, thank Heaven, they want 
Numbers, Riches, and Independence too A narrow' 
Strip of Land, not 25 Miles wide, between Connec- 
ticut and New-Jersey, makes the fairest and most 
considerable Part of their Province, and were their 
Neighbours of Connecticut and Jersey to withdraw 
their Connexions they would sink into a .Char- 
acter as little respectable for Merchandize or Me- 
chanic Arts, as for Faith and Honour indeed the 
abandoned Perfidy of New-York, gives the two Col- 
onies of Connecticut and New-Jersey an Opportu- 
nity of displaying those Virtues, which indeed they 
always had the Happiness and Honour of possess- 
ing, but never of exercising in an effectual Manner 
till now.- -There are Times, critical Periods, in which 
single Persons, Cities, Provinces, Kingdoms have an 



198 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. |j770 

Opportunity to exhibit their Virtues to the utmost 
Advantage, and perpetuate their Honours to the 
latest Posterity, and the wickedest and most aban- 
doned Characters often furnish these Opportuni- 
ties, . . . 

Such an Opportunity have the Colonies of Con- 
necticut and New-Jersey at this Time, arising from 
the unexampled Baseness of New-York. Those 
Colonies have no Capital trading or manufacturing 
Towns, in which their Virtues and Weight can be 
collected and illustrated equal to their Merits, but 
have perhaps as much public Spirit, Truth and gen- 
uine Love of their Country, diffused thro' their scat- 
tered Settlements, as can or ever could be boasted 
of either in the more populous Towns of America, or 
even in antient Greece or Rome. They have now 
an Opportunity by general Consent, to exhibit all 
these Virtues in full Blaze to the Public, and in their 
full Efficacy too ; . . . Pennsylvania Chronicle, 
No. 183, July 9-16, 1770. 

UN-AWAY the ist of July, from ANDREW MYER, liv- 
ing at Raritan Landing, near New-Brunswick, 
v an Apprentice Lad, named ISAAC WILSON, a 
Blacksmith by Trade, has an Impediment in his 
Speech, is tall and raw-boned, has dark Hair, and 
a remarkable Spot of grey Hairs on his Forehead, 
near as large as a Copper : He had on when he went 
away, a brown Cloth Coat, whitish Fustian Jacket 
and blue Breeches, white Thread Stockings and a 
Wool Hat with white Lining. There was one LISSES 
BETEAU went off in Company with the above Appren- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 199 

tice, from ANDREW MANNING ; he is short, of a 
brown Complection, somewhat freckled, and wore a 
red under Jacket. Whoever takes up said Run- 
aways, and secures them, so that their Masters may 
get them again, shall have FORTY SHILLINGS Reward 
for each, and all reasonable Charges, paid by 

ANDREW MYER, and 
ANDREW MANNING. 

July i, 1770. ;. , 

-N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1436, July 9, 1770. ' . 

New-York, July 12. On Tuesday the 3d July, 
the Court of Commissioners for settling the Line be- 
tween the Colonies of New-York and New-Jersey, 
met at the Chamber of Commerce in this City, but 
only one Commissioner attending, the Court ad- 
journed to the first Tuesday in May next, to meet at 
the same Place. N. Y. Journal or General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1436, July 12, 1770. 

NEW- YORK, July 5. 

A Copy of a Letter from the Merchants and Trad- 
ers in the County of Essex, New-Jersey, to the Com- 
mittee of Merchants in New -York, in Answer to their 
Letter, desiring a Congress of Merchants to meet at 
Norwalk. 

Elizabeth-Town, June 8, 1770. 

GENTLEMEN, 

YOUR Favour of the 2d Instant, we have re- 
ceived and considered ; before the Receipt of which, 
the Merchants, Traders and Freeholders of this 



200 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

County, being called together by publick Advertise- 
ments, unanimously resolved to support the Non- 
importation Agreement to the utmost of their 
Power ; a Copy of which Resolution signed by us, 
and many others is here inclosed, which sufficiently 

discovers their and our Sentiments 

As to the Matter of sending Deputies to Norwalk, 
we are sorry such a Proposal should have been 
made. Had these Colonies never entered into any 
Resolutions, a Proposal for Deputies to concert a 
general Plan, might have been very proper; but now 
as our Honour and Faith is pledged to each other, 
shall we leave the noble spirited Inhabitants of 
Charles-Town, and the other faithful Colonies, to 
stand or fall by themselves ? Should you have in- 
vited the whole Continent to the Congress, and 
should they resolve to break their Agreement, yet 
this would not have been justifiable. Our Friends 
on the other Side the Water have a Right to be con- 
sulted. 'Tis not our Cause only, but theirs also, 
which is now depending upon keeping or breaking 
our Agreement. Our Friends in England, relying 
upon our Honour and Faith, have engaged in the 
Cause, and acted upon our Agreement. They have 
pledged their Honour for us, and shall we now meet 
to consult whether we will deceive and leave them 
the Scorn of their Enemies, who are also the Ene- 
mies of Liberty and Justice ?.... Shall we meet to con- 
sult whether we have Honour or Faith, or public 
Virtue ? We cannot agree to it. If you had pro- 
posed a Meeting for strengthening, and further se- 
curing the Virtue and Resolutions of the Colonies, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2Ot 

we should have joined you, but to meet and consult 
whether we will be faithful, would be a Reproach to 
us. We flatter ourselves, that if you will be 
pleased to reconsider the Matter, you will see the 
Absurdity, and lay aside the Proposal, which is the 
earnest Desire of, Gentlemen, 

Your very humble Servants. 

THE Public are desired to observe, that the follow- 
ing medicines are all collected from my own experi- 
ence and observation, in the compass of 32 years' 
practice of physic and surgery, 9 years whereof I 
practised in New-England, 13 years in West New- 
Jersey, 10 years in Philadelphia, 7 years and a quar- 
ter of which time I spent in the Pennsylvania Hos- 
pital, where I had the greatest opportunity to see all 
sorts of disorders this country is subject to. ... 

The Royal Balsam- [Uses given.] 

A powder and syrup to cure the bloody flux. . . 

A bitter Tincture [and others.] 

These are prepared and sold by GEORGE WEED, 
late Apothecary to the Pennsylvania Hospital, but 
now lives in Front-street, a little above Arch-street, 
at the Green-porch. 

NEW-YORK, July 9. 

On Monday Morning last, at the House of Mr. 
H oiling s head, in Burlington, New -Jersey, departed 
this Life, in the $6tk Year of his Age, JAMES PARKER, 
Esq ; late of this City Printer, Comptroller and Sec- 
retary of the Post- Office for the northern District of 
the British Colonies. Till of late he usually resided 
at his House in Woodbridge, New-Jersey, where he 



202 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

was a Magistrate and Captain of a Troop of Horse. 
His Remains were attended for 5 Miles out of Bur- 
lington by a considerable Number of Gentlemen of 
that Place, and at Amboy on Tuesday, met by a like 
Number, who attended the Corps to Woodbridge, 
where a numerous Congregation assembled at his 
House, and about 6 o Clock he was interred near his 
Parents in the Meeting- House Yard. The Service 
was performed by the Reverend Mr. Preston, Minis- 
ter of the Church at Amboy. 

Mr. PARKER has carried on the Printing Business^ 
chiefiy in New-York, and some Time in Neiv- Jersey, 
for about 30 Years, and was eminent in his Profes- 
sion. He possessed a sound Judgment, and extensive 
Knowledge: He was industrious in Business, upright 
in his Dealings, charitable to the Distressed, and has 
left a fair Character. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
2168, July 12, 1770. 

New-York, July 19. 

We hear that the people in New-Jersey and Con- 
necticut, in general, and all over those governments, 
are in motion to form resolutions similar to those of 
Philadelphia ; and it is apprehended every govern- 
ment where we have any connexions, will act in the 
like manner. 

Burlington Gaol, July, 1770. 

PURSUANT to an act of General Assembly of the 
province of New-Jersey, lately passed, intituled, "An 
act for the relief of insolvent debtors ;" I the sub- 
scriber being confined in Burlington gaol, and hav- 
ing petitioned Robert Smith, and Daniel Ellis, Esqrs, 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 203 

judges of the court of Common Pleas, for the county 
of Burlington, for the benefit of said act, do hereby 
give notice to all my creditors, to appear and shew 
cause (if any they have) on the i4th day of August 
next, at two o'clock in the afternoon, before the said 
judges, at the house of John Shaw, innholder in Bur- 
lington, why I should not be discharged from my 
confinement, agreeable to the directions of said act. 

JOB FIELDS. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 184, July 16-23, 
1770. 

Neit- York, July \ 6. Extract of a Letter from 

Princeton, July 13. 

" This Afternoon the Students at Nassau Hall, 
fired with a just Indignation on reading the infamous 
Letter from the Merchants in New-York, to the 
Committee of Merchants in Philadelphia, informing 
them of their Resolutions, to send Home Orders for 
Goods contrary to their Non-Importation Agree- 
ment, at the tolling of the College Bell, went in Pro- 
cession to a Place fronting the College, and burnt 
the Letter by the Hands of a Hangman, hired for 
the Purpose, with hearty Wishes, that the Names of 
all Promoters of such a daring Breach of Faith, may 
be blasted in the Eyes of every Lover of Liberty, 
and their Names handed down to Posterity, as Be- 
trayers of their Country." 



New-Jersey, 
Middlesex County 



3 

J_J 



{ Order of Jonathan Frazee, 
and Stephen Skinner, Es- 



quires, two of the Judges ot the Inferior Court of 
Common Pleas, for the said County : Notice is here- 



204 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

by given to the Creditors of Henry Lott, of Cran- 
burry, an Insolvent Debtor, in said County of Mid- 
dlesex that they meet at the House of Elijah Dun- 
ham, in Perth-Amboy, on Tuesday the 3^1 st Day of 
July Instant, at Two o'Clock in the Afternoon, to 
shew Cause, if any they have, before the said 
Judges, why an Assignment of the said Debtor's 
Estate should not be made, for the Benefit of his 
Creditors, pursuant to the Directions of a late Act of 
the Governor, Council, and General Assembly of the 
Province of New-Jersey, entitled, "An Act for the 
Relief of Insolvent Debtors," passed in the Tenth 
Year of his Majesty's Reign; and the said Henry 
Lott, be discharged. 

Dated the i6th Day of July, 1770. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1437, 
July 1 6, 1770. 

The inhabitants of the borough of Elizabeth, in 
New-Jersey, being greatly shocked at the conduct of 
the New-Yorkers, issued a very spirited advertise- 
ment, to call a meeting of the whole borough at the 
Town-Hall, in Elizabeth Town on Monday last, when 
it is not doubted they did express their sentiments 
freely with regard to their neighbours. It is expect- 
ed that their example will be followed by every other 
town and county in N. Jersey, . . . Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1441, July 19, 1770. 

New-York, July 23. We hear the Inhabitants of 
the Borough of Elizabeth, in New-Jersey, being 
greatly dissatisfied at the Conduct of this City, issued 
a spirited Advertisement, to call a Meeting of the 



I 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 205 

whole Borough, at the Town-Hall on Monday last, 
when it is said, they came into Resolutions similar to 
those of the Philadelphians. 

ALL Persons having any Demands on the Estate 
of JAMES PARKER, late of the City of New-York, 
Printer, deceased, are desired to bring in their Ac- 
counts properly attested to the Subscriber, that they 
may [be] settled as soon as possible : And all those 
any wise indebted to the said Estate, are requested 
to discharge the same with all convenient Speed. 

MARY PARKER, Executrix. 
New-York, July 23, 1770. 

Newtown, Sussex County, New-Jersey, 

July 23, 1770. 

OTICE is hereby given to all the Creditors of 
James Burns, late of the City of New- York, 
Baker: That in pursuance of an Act of the General 
Assembly ojf the Province aforesaid, lately made, 
entitled, " An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debt- 
ors." That Tuesday the i4th Day of August next, 
is appointed by Nathaniel Pettit and Thomas Van 
Home, Esqrs. two of the Judges of the Session and 
Common Pleas of the said County of Sussex, to meet 
at the Court House at Newtown aforesaid, at one of 
the Clock of the same Day, in order to discharge 
him the said James Burns, agreeable to the Direc- 
tions of said Act, unless any of his Creditors shall 
then and there appear and shew Cause to the con- 
trary. 



2O6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Newtown, Sussex County, New-Jersey, 

July 23, 1770. 

PUBLIC Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors 
JL of Ephraim Darby, that in Pursuance of an Act 
of the General Assembly of said Province, lately 
made, entitled, " An Act for the P.elief of Insolvent 
Debtors." That Tuesday the Fourteenth Day of 
August next, is appointed by Nathaniel Pettit, and 
Thomas Van Home, Esqrs. two of the Judges of 
said County, to meet at the Court House, at one 
o'Clock on said Day, to discharge him the said Eph- 
raim Darby, agreeable to the Directions of said Act, 
unless any of his Creditors shall then and there 
shew Cause to the contrary. V. Y. Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, No. 1438, July 23, 1770. 

Elizabeth-Town, July 19, 1770. 
Mr. HOLT, 

By publishing the enclosed in your next Journal 
you will oblige your Friends in New-Jersey in gen- 
eral, but those in this Town in particular. 

AT a Meeting of a Number of respectable Free- 
men and Freeholders of the County of Essex, 
convened by Advertisements, at Elizabeth -Town, on 
the 1 6th of July, 1770, they entered the following 
Resolutions. 

Whereas the Merchants and Traders of the City 
of New-York, have lately thought proper, contrary 
to their own Agreement, and in Violation of their 
public Faith, to break through the only Measure that 
could have obtained a Redress of the Grievances 
complained of, as subversive of the Liberties of 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2O/ 

North-America : We, the Inhabitants and Freehold- 
ers of the County of Essex, in the Province of New- 
Jersey, Do RESOLVE. 

i st. That it is our unanimous Opinion, that the 
several Signers to the late Importation Agreement 
in New-York, have basely and perfidiously betrayed 
the common Cause, deserted their Countrymen in 
their united Struggles for a Removal of Ministerial 
Oppressions, and violated their Faith, so often 
plighted to the Friends of constitutional Liberty, 
both in Great-Britain and her Colonies. 

2d. That every Person, who, contrary to the Non- 
Importation Agreement, hath or shall import, ought 
by the Friends of their Country, to be treated, not 
only in like Manner as they themselves set the Ex- 
ample, in the late Case of the Merchants and Trad- 
ers of Newport, in the Colony of Rhode-Island, but 
be held in the utmost Contempt, by all the Friends 
of Liberty, and treated as Enemies to their Country. 

3d. That we will strictly adhere to our Resolutions 
of the 5th of June last ; as far as they relate to pur- 
chasing Goods imported from Great-Britain. 

They then proceeded to appoint a Committee of 
Correspondence ; who are also to do, every other 
Act necessary for promoting and supporting the 
above resolutions. 

New-York, July 26. We are informed that a 
Cause of a very singular Nature is coming on to be 
tried in the Supreme Court of New-Jersey, wherein 
a young Woman is Plaintiff, and a Gentleman of 
Fortune Defendant ; for Breach of a Promise of 



208 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Marriage made in Writing to the Plaintiff by the De- 
fendant, in the Life Time of his Wife, since de- 
ceased, to be contracted with the Plaintiff after the 
Death of the Wife, provided she would continue in 
her single State, until such Contingency might hap- 
pen : Which the Plaintiff in her Declaration sets 
forth she hath done, pursuant to, and in Virtue of the 
Defendant's Promise and Assumption as aforesaid ; 
and by Reason thereof hath lost her Marriage. The 
Action is laid for ^".3000 Proc. Money. N. Y. 
Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1438, July 26, 
1770. 

[Extract.] 

To ISAAC Low, Esq ; Chairman of the Committee of 

Merchants, in NewYork. 

New York, i8th July, 1770. 

I SEND you herewith, an account of the proceed- 
ings at Philadelphia, upon hearing of our infatuation 
in the late infamous step we have taken ; and a let- 
ter from New-London in Connecticut, upon the ten- 
dency of our proceeding, before it had arrived to 
maturity, and brought forth the baneful fruit it has 
since produced. These papers a great number of 
your readers as well as myself desire you will pub- 
lish in your next paper, as also the sentiments of the 
People of Boston, the Students of the College in 
New-Jersey, . . which may have a tendency to 
awaken the People here, to some sense of the con- 
sequences of what they have done, of the sentiments 
all our sister colonies have and will have of our con- 
duct and enable us to see ourselves in the light in 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2OQ 

which we appear to them, and shall undoubtedly ap- 
pear to the People of Great Britain, and to all the 
World. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1442, July 26, 
1770. 

WHEREAS CORRYELL'S FERRY, on the New-Jersey 
side, has been kept very irregular for some time 
past; Captain DONALD M' DONALD begs leave to ac- 
quaint the public that he now keeps the said ferry in 
a regular manner, and proper and speedy attendance 
will always be given to all travellers, &c. and good 
entertainment for man and horse. 

DONALD M' DONALD. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle \ No. 186, July 30 
Aug. 6, 1770. 

Extract of a Letter from New -Brunswick, dated 

July 24. 

" We are credibly informed from Princeton, "That 
the senior Class at Nassau-Hall, have unanimously 
agreed to appear at their ensuing Commencement, 
dressed in American Manufactures." How happy 
ought we to esteem ourselves, when we see some of 
our Youth, who will probably fill some of the high- 
est Stations in their Country, when their Fathers 
have fallen asleep, so early declaring their Love to 
their Country ; and we hope this will meet with that 
Esteem which is their Due, and that many at this 
critical Juncture, will follow their laudable Example, 
in encouraging our own Manufactures." 

Y Order of Stephen Skinner and Jonathan 
Frazee, Esquires, two of the Judges of the Infe- 

14 






210 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

rior Court of Common Pleas for the County of Mid- 
dlesex : Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors 
of Nicholas Moores, an Insolvent Debtor, in the 
Gaol of said County, that they meet at the House of 
Elijah Dunham, in Perth-Amboy, on Tuesday the 
2ist Day of August next, at Two o'Clock in the 
Afternoon, to shew Cause, if any they have, before 
the said Judges, why an Assignment of the said 
Debtor's Estate should not be made for the Benefit 
of the Creditors, and he the said Nicholas Moores be 
discharged from his Confinement agreeable to a late 
Act of Insolvency. 

Dated this 24th Day of July 1770. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1439, 
July 30, 1770. 

New- Jersey, July 18, 1770. 
Mr. PRINTER, 

The world would be glad to be informed in the fol- 
lowing particulars. 

ist. TT THY those gentlemen in New-York, who 
V V were opposed to the late adopted meas 
ures, did send their orders for goods, so suddenly, as 
not even to wait the sentiments of the neighbouring 
colonies, what steps should be taken in consequence 
of the perfidy of the New-Yoik faction ? A piece of 
conduct that renders it difficult for us to distinguish 
those who were for importing from those who were 
against it. 

2d. Whether self-interest may not have so great 
influence over the mind, as to make even those who 
now oppose the measure, espouse it when the goods 
do actually arrive ? 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 21 1 

3d. Whether their importing is not as really detri- 
mental to the public cause, as the same thing done 
by the other part)' ? 

4th. Whether the minority, by still adhering to 
the non-importation agreement, would suffer more 
now, especially when almost every public spirited 
person would give them the preference, than they 
would have done, had the majority, as they are 
called, continued their adherence? 

5th. Whether the minority, by importing, do not 
weaken the hands, and counteract the public spirit of 
the neighbouring provinces in their endeavours to re- 
duce the delinquents to a sense of their duty, and 
hereby even make themselves partizans against the 
other colonies. 

6th. Whether it is not highly reasonable that the 
minority in New-York, should at least equal other 
people, in trying to bring their deluded brethern to 
reason ? 

And yth. If upon a reconsideration of the matter it 
should appear to have been too hasty, whether then 
it would not be highly proper for them to counter- 
mand their orders, moreover directing their corres- 
pondents in Britain, to have no commercial dealings 
with the betrayers of their country, under penalty of 
never hereafter purchasing goods from such British 
merchants ? 

These matters the world are anxious to see ex- 
plained ; as the conduct of the minority seems some- 
what mysterious, especially when viewed in conjunc- 
tion with that of the neighbouring provinces. The 
Union, prosperity and freedom of America is the sin- 



212 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

cere prayer of every inhabitants of 



I 



New-Jersey. 

To the PRINTER. 

T cannot be denied but that the Xon-Importation 
Agreement, which was entered into by the Mer- 
chants in the several Colonies on this Continent has 
been much applauded by the most judicious and fast 
Friends of America, on both Sides of the Water, as 
the only Expedient to obtain a Repeal of the odious 
Act of Parliament, imposing a Duty on Goods im- 
ported, for the Purpose of raising a Revenue in 
America. 

That a steady Perseverance in attending to the 
same, has likewise been strongly recommended by 
all her best and most knowing Friends ; notwith- 
standing a partial Repeal of that Act which is not to 
take Place till December next (for in this lies the al- 
luring bait) is equally True. The same is further 
urged by this just observation, that if the Merchants 
or Importers do not persist in a strict observance of 
the Non-Importation Scheme, until a total Repeal of 
that Act, we cannot promise or flatter ourselves on 
any future Trial the least prospect of Success. 

However the self denial, or great the hardships 
may be in this Matter on the Part of the Merchants 
in particular, It is certain the Cause for which it is 
suffered, is infinitely greater ; for no less than our 
civil Rights and Privileges, both for ourselves and 
Posterity, are apparently at Stake in this Contest, 
and the same will undoubtedly be infringed upon, 
and finally taken from us if a bad Ministry may have 
their Ends, 



177] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 13 

Hence how must it grieve the Hearts of all true 
unassembled Friends of America, to be told the 
Merchants in New-York, even the Committee or De- 
positories of that salutary Measure, have violated 
and broke their plighted Faith in this Matter, and 
thereby have given our inveterate Enemies Cause to 
exult and rejoice. Shocking! To see New-York 
before this, so high in Esteem and Reputation, who 
had the Eyes of the Sister Colonies fixed on her, as 
a strong Pillar in this important Struggle, just when 
brought to a Crisis, fall through and desert her 
Cause. How can you N. Yorkers, who were for- 
merly renowned for asserting and supporting the 
Cause of Freedom, answer for this Conduct to God, 
your Country and Posterity? Alas, the love of 
Mammon has been too prevalent with you to this 
Idol, you have prostituted your Honour and stained 
your Character. I will not compare your Guilt to 

that of J s I 1, but the Wound you have 

given to the common Cause of America, is indeed 
dangerous, yet I would hope not Desperate (whilst 
some honest Sons among you, yet remain) the best 
you can now do, is, to do as St. Peter did when he 
had denied his Master. Return instantly from 
whence you have so shamefully revolted, that your 
Crime may be remitted. 

A JERSEY MAN. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1439, August 2, 1770. 

RUNAWAY from* Trenton Forge in the county of 
Burlington, New-Jersey, a SERVANT LAD, named Alex- 



214 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ander Campbell, about 24 years of age, short in stat- 
ure, thin visage, sharp nose, grey eyes, fair skin, 
light brown hair which he usually clubs ; he chews 
tobacco, is very fond of rum, and quarrelsome in his 
cups, has been about ten days ago seen at North 
East Works in Maryland. Whoever takes up the 
said servant and secures him in the gaol of Cecil 
county in Maryland, or in the gaols of New-Castle or 
Sussex, shall have THREE POUNDS Reward, or his 
time, which is supposed to be two years and a half, 
will be sold for Twenty Pounds. He writes toler- 
ably well, and may forge a pass or a discharge. 

CHARLES READ. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1443, Aug. 2, 
1770. 

A LIST of LETTERS remaining in the POST-OFFICE 
PHILADELPHIA, July 5, 1770. 

B. John Booth (2), Manington. 

E. William Egan, Bordentown. 

F. Michael Fisher, Gloucester ; Daniel Fenelly, 
Cumberland ? Co. 



R. William Roach, Egg-harbour. 

FIVE DOLLARS Reward. 

STOLEN from the subscriber, living in Piscataway, 
Middlesex county, New Jersey, on Saturday night, 
the 2 ist of July 1770, by a certain William Mur- 
phew, a light brown surtout coat, basket buttons, 2 
beaver hats, about half worn, 4 white linen shirts, 
middling fine, 2 or 3 pair of stockings, one pair of 
blue cloth trousers, aiid sundry other things ; he is 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS., 215 

about 6 feet high, a well set fellow, wears his own 
black hair, has a scar on the right side of his neck, 
which he got by the cut of a sword, as he said. 
Whoever takes up the thief, and secures him in goal, 
so that he may be brought to justice, shall have the 
reward, paid by me. 

NATHANIEL FITZ RANDOLPH. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2171, Aug. 2, 
1770. 

WANTED to hire for twelve months, a single man 
that understands the farming business in its different 
branches ; to be employed in New-Jersey, twenty miles 
from Philadelphia. Any person properly, and well 
recommended (and none else need apply) may hear of 
reasonable encouragement, by inquiring oj the Prin- 
ter of this paper. Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 187, 
Aug. 6-13, 1770. " v ' \ ' V 

WOODBRIDGE, (in New-Jersey,) July 23. 

WHEREAS several Merchants of the City of New- 
York have, contrary to their own most sol- 
emn Engagement, most shamefully and perfidiously 
broke thro' the general Non-Importation Agreement 
to the Encouragement of a corrupt Ministry, as well 
as in Violation of the sacred Rights of every true 
born British Subject of North-America. 

WHEREFORE, we the Freeholders and Freemen of 
the Township of Woodbridge, in New-Jersey, have, 
at a General Meeting, convened for that Purpose, 
unanimously come into the following Resolves, viz. 

i. RESOLVED, That we owe and maintain all due 
Allegiance to our rightful Sovereign GEORGE the 



2l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Third, King of Great-Britain, France and Ireland, 
&c. 

2. RESOLVED, That we, as free-born Subjects of 
the Dominion of Great-Britain, claim an undoubted 
Right to all the natural Privileges of our happy Con- 
stitution, and that any of the least ministerial In- 
fringement thereon, is manifest Injustice and Oppres- 
sion. 

3. RESOLVED, That altho' the Duties may be whol- 
ly taken off of every Article whereon they were im- 
posed, we will not, unless they make ample Confes- 
sion of their Crime, directly or indirectly, hold any 
Kind of mercantile Connection with any of those Im- 
porters, so violating the said general Non-Importa- 
tion Agreement, nor with any Person that may 
purchase Goods of any of them, in order to carry 
on a retail Trade among us. 

4. RESOLVED, That we will treat every such Im- 
porter who shall in Case pass through our Town, 
with the utmost Contempt and Disdain, and stigma- 
tize him in whatever Company he may happen 
among us, with the opprobrious Name of the Enemy 
and Betrayer of his Country. 

5. RESOLVED, That all and every of these Reasons 
be strictly adhered to, and remain in Force until the 
same shall be duly altered by a general Town-Meet- 
ing-, of the Freeholders and Freemen, to be called for 

o' 

that Purpose. 

6. And lastly, RESOLVED, That we do hereby ap- 
point Jonathan Frazee, Samuel Barrow, David 
Alston, George Brown and Nathaniel Heard, Esqrs. 
Joseph Shotwell, Axford Burt, William Edgar, 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2 1/ 

George Everson, John Ross, Jeremiah Manning and 
John Thorp, jun. Merchants ; Reuben Evans, Rob- 
ert Clarkson, Henry Force, Ebenezer Foster, David 
Edgar, Mathias Baker, John Moores, Moses Bloom- 
field, Richard Wright, Esek Fitz Randolph, Daniel 
Shotwell and William Smith, Farmers, to be standing 
Committee to correspond with the several Commit- 
tees of this and the neighbouring Provinces, as Oc- 
casion may require, by a Majority of those who shall 
from Time to Time, meet on proper Notice by Ad- 
vertisement, to be exhibited by at least three of our 
said Committee for that Purpose. 

Dennis Combes, Barnaby Kearney, Ezek Fitz Kandolph, 

Charles Jackson, Joseph Shotwell, jun. John Moores, 

John Dobbs, Jackson Bunn, George Brown, 

Daniel Donham, Kobt. Fitz Kandolph, Nathaniel Heard, 

Thomas F Randolph, Lewis Evans, Moses Bloomfield, M. D. 

Ebenezer Foster, Samuel Bloomfield, Nathl. Fitzrandolph, 

Samuel Stone, Thomas Brown, Reuben Evans, 

Ichabod Bunn. John Brown, Joseph Bloomfield, 

Stephen Chandler, Isaac Tappen. 

We conclude the above Signers sufficient to be 
inserted, tho' we would inform our Friends, that we 
expect Copies to be signed universally by our Inhab- 
itants. 

ADVERTISEMENT. 

WE hear from ours and the Country's Friends in 
Woodbridge, that they Keep in Readiness in 
some convenient Place near the Centre of the Town 

f 

(to wit, near Execution Dock, and not far from Lib- 
erty Oak,) a sufficient Quantity of Tar and Feathers, 

in order to ply those atrocious V s, those vile 

Miscreants, who have violated their so often plighted 
Faith, and through the avaricious Humour of raising 



2l8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/O 

a private fortune on the Ruins of the Public, have 
perfidiously broke through the general and salutary 
Non-Importation Agreement. It is said ducking in 
Execution Dock will be added as Occasion may re- 
quire. N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1440, Aug. 6, 1770. 

NEW-BRUNSWICK. 

On this August, 1770, a respectable Number of the 
Freeholders, Freemen, Merchants aud Traders 
of this City, met at the Court- House of this City, 
and after having considered the present danger- 
ous and Critical State of public Affairs in Amer- 
ica, unanimously agreed to the following Resolu- 
tions. 

i st. H^HAT the Non-Importation Agreement, 
JL which was generously and uniformly en- 
tered into by the Merchants and Traders in the sev- 
eral Colonies, is the best and most reasonable 
Scheme that could have been fallen on, to prevent 
the direful Effects of the Act of Parliament of the 
7th Geo. Hid, imposing Duties on Tea, Paper, Glass, 
&c. calculated to enslave this Country. 

2d. That preserving said Union and Agreement 
without the least Infraction or Violation, is of the 
highest Consequence to secure our Liberties from 
Ministerial Invasion, notwithstanding the partial Re- 
peal of that Act, which seems not to carry the Ap- 
pearance of a real Intention to remove the Griev- 
ances complained of, and to continue to us the free 
Enjoyment of our natural Rights and Privileges. 

3d. That notwithstanding our hopes center'd with 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2IQ 

the New-Yorkers, to make a noble Stand in this 
grand Concern, They have treacherously broke 
their Non-Importation Contract, and for their Part 
have dissolved this Union, whereby they have not 
only given a dangerous Wound to the common 
Cause of their Country, but have administered Joy, 
Comfort and Strength to the grand Enemies of our 
Liberties. 

4th. That as a Testimony of our Abhorrence of 
this detestable Breach of Faith, by a Party in New- 
York, We as an Individual do agree to break off all 
commercial Intercourse with them, when the Inhab- 
itants of East-Jersey in general, shall have adopted 
and agreed to this Measure, which, in Conjunction 
with our Brethern, we shall endeavour by every 
Means in our Power, to promote and execute. 

5thly and lastly. We do further agree and resolve, 
that if any Scheme or Plan already proposed, or 
hereafter to be formed, properly calculated for our 
common Safety or commercial Interest, shall be duly 
attended to ; And with Respect to the proposed Plan 
published in Gaine's Paper of the 3Oth July, and in 
the Philadelphia Chronicle of the same Day, for ren- 
dering Perth-Amboy a Place of Trade, has our par- 
ticular Suffrage, tho' at present partly Ideal, or seem- 
ingly at a Distance, depending upon the Suffrage 
and Aid of other Colonies, yet when put in Practice, 
we shall join Heart and Hand to promote the same, 
not only by our Example and Persuasion, but by 
every other act in our Power. 

DIRCK VAN VEGHTE, Chairman. 



220 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. fl770 

New-York, August^. Last week Mr. Applegate 
and Mr. Abrahams, of this City, went to the City of 
Brunswick, in New-Jersey, having with them for Sale, 
a Quantity of Pine Apples, Limes, &c. The People 
of Brunswick finding them to be Subscribers for Im- 
portation, treated them so roughly, that they judged 
it not Safe to appear publickly, and being unable to 
sell their Fruit, a great Part of it spoil'd upon their 
Hands ; they were glad to get off privately to avoid 
the Effects of the People's Resentment, which Mr. 
Abrahams was not so luckly to escape at Wood- 
bridge, on his Return, where he was much insulted, 
and duck'd in a Creek, and was likely to have been 
much worse used if he had -not made his Escape. 
We hear that two Merchants of this City, Subscrib- 
ers for Importation, who a few Days ago set out on 
a Journey to Philadelphia, at Woodbridge were both 
heartily duck'd, but the Particulars we have not 
heard. N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1440, Aug. 9, 1770. 

We hear that one of the New- Yorkers, who had 
signed for Importation, passing through New- Jersey, 
was stopped in his career at Woodbridge, and was 
there genteelly ducked to cool his courage : On his re- 
turn to New-York he made a most piteous story, 
which, we hear, so sensibly touched the humane and 
generous hearted Importers, ^vho would sell their coun- 
try for gold, that on this lamentable occasion they 
had some thoughts of raising a subscription for to en- 
able their brother to prosecute ----- perhaps the 
whole country') 



I 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 22 T 

ALL PERSONS indebted to JOSEPH REED, Esq ; of 
Trenton in New-Jersey, lately gone to England, are 
requested to make speedy payment to JOHN Cox, jun- 
ior, merchant in Philadelphia, or CHARLES PETTIT, at- 
torney at law in Burlington, who are duly authorized 
to receive and give discharges for such debts. 

Such of Mr. REED'S clients who may have occasion 
to give any directions about their suits, are desired 
to apply to CHARLES PETTIT, who is, by rule of court, 
appointed in the room of Mr. REED, to prosecute 
and defend all actions in the courts of New-Jersey, 
in which Mr. REED was attorney. Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1444, Aug. 9, 1770. 

Burlington, August 10, 1770. 
To the PUBLIC. 

THE Subscriber, having met with great Encour- 
agement, from a Number of the most respectable 
GENTLEMEN in New-Jersey, has removed his PRINT- 
ING-OFFICE from Philadelphia to Burlington, where 
he has set up his Business. ...He has furnished him- 
self with a new and elegant ASSORTMENT of PRINTING 
MATERIALS, at a considerable Expence, and hopes 
his Friends in other Places, whose Countenance he 
gratefully acknowledges, will still continue their 
Favours, as he flatters himself that he will perform 
PRINTING in as correct, expeditious and reasonable a 
Manner, as those of his Profession in the adjacent 
Colonies. ...He will not presume to expatiate upon 
the Utility of the ART of PRINTING, nor willingly tire 
the Patience of the PUBLIC, with a long Detail (as is 
usual upon such Occasions) of what he can or will 



222 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

do,. ...and only venture to say, that no Care or Pains 
shall be wanting to give Satisfaction, and, to the 
utmost of his Abilities, will endeavour to merit the 
Approbation of those who may please to favour him 
with their Commands. 

ISAAC COLLINS. 

%.* A small Assortment of Books and Stationery 
may be purchased on reasonable Terms, at the 
above Printing-Office. 

Now compiling, and speedily will be published, 
The BURLINGTON ALMANACK, for the Year 1771 ; con- 
taining besides the usual Calculations, &c. a Variety 
of useful and entertaining Matter, in Prose and 
Verse. 

RUN away, on the 5th Instant, from the Subscriber, 
living in Evesham, in the County of Burlington, a 
Dutch Servant Lad, named Peter Mennel, about 18 
Years of Age, of a swarthy Complexion, black Hair, 
about 5 Feet 2 Inches high ; had on, when he went 
away, a blue and white striped Jacket, Ozenbrigs 
Shirt, Tow Trowsers, and a half worn Beaver Hat, 
with a white Band, and white Loops ; had the first 
Joint; of the fourth Finger of his Left Hand cut off, 
and it is supposed he went towards Philadelphia. 
Whoever secures said Servant, so that his /Master 
may have him again, shall receive THREE POUNDS Re- 
ward and reasonable Charges, paid by 

DANIEL LIPPINCOTT, junior. 

RUN away, the 2d clay of this instant Aitgust,from 
the subscriber, living in Elsinborough, in the county 
of Salem, West New -Jersey, an English servant man, 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 223 

named WALTER LINDY, about 26 years of age, about 5 
feet 9 or 10 inches high, a thick well set fellow, of a 
dark complexion, marked with the small pox, speaks 
somewhat on the west country dialect, has strait black 
hair: had on, and took with him, an old homespun 
jacket, very much ivorn, of a light colour, lined with 
flannel, a good homespun skirt, two pair of trowsers, 
one pair of tow cloth, the other striped linen, old shoes, 
with buckles, and a good felt hat ; he is an ungrate- 
ful fellow, this being the qth or \oth time he has run 
away, so I desire any person or persons that have 
an opportunity, to secure him in any of his Majesty s 
goals, so as his master may have him again, and if in 
this county, shall hive Twenty Shillings, if out of the 
county Thirty Shillings, if out of the province Forty 
Shillings, for their trouble, and reasonable charges, 
paid by 

JOHN FIRTH. 

Cumberland County, August 3, 1770. 
WHEREAS Thomas Maskill, Esq ; High Sheriff of 
the County of Cumberland, in New Jersey, by Vir- 
tue, and under Pretence of having- an Execution, at 
the Suit of one Richard Mills, of the County afore- 
said, against the Goods and Chattels, Lands and 

o 

Tenements, of John Jarman, of the same County, 
hath presumed to levy the said Execution, not only 
on two Negroes, legally our Property, but also on 
a Tract of Land, situate in Hopewell Township, in 
the County aforesaid, now in the Possession of, and 
belonging to us the Subscribers ; for which said 
Land, we have, severally, good and sufficient Deeds 




224 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

of Conveyance, in Fee Simple. This is therefore to 
forewarn all Persons whatsoever, not to purchase the 
Premises, or any Part thereof, from the said Sheriff, 
as we are determined to defend our Right and Title 
to the utmost, by every legal Method in our Power. 

REUBEN JARMAN 
BERIAH JARMAN. 

EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away, on Sunday, the 2Qth of July, 1770, from 
the subscriber, of Lower Penn's Neck, Salem county, 
and Western Division of New-Jersey, an Irish ser- 
vant man, named William Karragan, about 21 years 
of age, has redish hair, and is of a sandy complex- 
ion ; he is marked with the small-pox, a well made 
fellow, about 5 feet, 5 or 6 inches high, stoop-shoul- 
dered, by trade a smith, speaks on the brogue; had 
on, when he went away, an old felt hat, a waistcoat, 
without sleeves, the fore parts of it whitish broad- 
cloth, and the back parts fustian, of the same colour, 
an old patched tow shirt, and narrow tow trowsers ; 
he went away barefooted. Whoever takes up said 
servant, and secures him, so that his master may 
have him again, shall have the above reward, and 
reasonable charges, paid by 

ANDREW M'CULLAM. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forbid to carry 
him off at their peril. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 
2172, Aug. 9, 1770. 

New-York, August 13. A few Days since died at 
his House in Perth-Amboy, John Barberie, Esq ; 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 225 

Collector of that Port ; a Gentleman well respected 
in that Office. 

We hear that Stephen Skinner, Esq ; Treasurer of 
the Eastern Division of the Province of New-Jersey, 
is appointed one of his Majesty's Council for said 
Province. 

Last Week two New-York Importers, in crossing 
a Brook in New-Jersey, on their Way to Philadel- 
phia, the Bridge sunk under them, and they both 
were handsomely ducked. How enormous must be 
the Guilt of those who would betray the Liberties of 
the Public, to advance their private Fortunes, when 
even a public Bridge is not able to support the 
Weight of their Eniquities ? May this be the Fate 
of every Wretch who would sell his Country for a 
Mess of Pottage. 

New-York, July 13, 1770. 
FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

SATURDAY last was lost, between Waters's Ferry and 
Powles-Hook, a Pair of set STONE SHOE BUCKLES, 
wrapped up in a coloured Silk Handkerchief: Who- 
ever finds them, and will bring them to the Printers 
hereof, shall receive the above Reward. N. Y. 
Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1441, August 



Mr. HOLT, 

Be pleased to insert the following in your next. 

THE public is desired to take Notice, that tho' the 
Brunswick Resolves, inserted in your Number 
1440, were agreed to without a negative Voice, yet 

15 



226 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Direk Van Veghte, Chairman was inadvertently add- 
ed without his Knowledge, for which the Transcriber 
begs Pardon. 

[Mr. Applegate denies that he was insulted or 
obliged to conceal himself in Brunswick, and by that 
Means hinder'd from doincr his Business, as men- 

o 

tioned in our last.l 

J 



is to desire all Persons indebted to the late 
JL Partnership of John Hamersley, &c. by Bond, 
Note or Book Debt, to discharge the same by 
the first October next without fail, to the subscriber, 
who has a pretty Assortment of Goods on Hand, 
which will be sold very reasonably for Cash or short 
Credit. The Business carried on as usual, by 

ANN HAMERSLEY. 

Also to be SOLD, 

A New House and Lot of Ground, with a good 
Barn, about 5 Miles from Middletown-Point, 
very convenient for a Shop-Keeper or Tavern, now 
in the Tenure of Mr. Cornelius Swart. The Lot 
contains eight Acres, of which one Acre is in a good 
Garden, in which are some of the best Fruit Trees, 
the remaining seven Acres are in good Wood Land, 
of which none has been permitted to be cut for three 
Years past. For further Particulars apply to the 
Subscriber, who will give an indisputable Title for 
the same. 

ANN HAMERSLEY. 

N+ Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1441, August 1 6, 1770. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 227 

To BE SOLD, by the SUBSCRIBER, 

A VALUABLE plantation and tract of land, situate in 
Lebanon, in the county of Hunterdon, in West Jer- 
sey ; containing 615 acres ; there is a good grist-mill 
and saw-mill erected thereon ; the grist-mill is large, 
and well built ; has two pairs of stones ; the boult- 
ing reels, and hoistings, go by water ; there is a 
good frame dwelling-house, with four rooms on the 
lower floor; it is a convenient place for a store, be- 
ing a good wheat country, and thick settled ; there is 
a large barn and a hay-house, a large quantity of 
good watered meadow, and more may be made at a 
small expense, upwards of 100 acres of cleared plow 
land, and a young orchard on the premises. The 
said tract of land may be divided into two planta- 
tions, and leave a sufficient quantity of land and 
meadow to accommodate the mill ; it will be sold in 
parts or altogether, as may best suit the purchasers. 
Any person or persons inclining to purchase the 
whole, or any part thereof, by applying to the sub- 
scriber, living in Bucks county, near the Falls Ferry ; 
or to David M'Kenny, on the premises, may be in- 
formed respecting the title and terms of sale. 

MAHLON KIRKBRIDE. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THE Business of this Printing-Office having de- 
volved by the Death of JAMES PARKER (the late 
Proprietor of this Paper) on his Son SAMUEL F. 
PARKER, who finding the Prosecution of it at present 
inconvenient, has leased the Office for a Term of 
Years to the Subscribers, who propose to carry on 



228 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/O 

the Business in as extensive a Manner as it has hith- 
erto been done 

The Public's humble Servants 

SAMUEL INSLEE, 
ANTHONY CAR. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1442, August 20, 1770. 




Custom- house, Entered In, 

Schooner Happy Return, N. Stilwell from Egg- 
Harbour. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1446, August 
23, 1770. 

Allen's-Town, in New-Jersey, August 15, 1770. 

THIS is to give Notice, to those whom it may con- 
cern, That the Subscribers intend to petition the As- 
sembly of New-Jersey, at their next Sessions, to 
pass an Act for making the Bridge over Crosswick's 
Creek, below Richard Brown's Mill, a County 
Charge. 

SAMUEL ROGERS, 
ISAAC ROGERS, 
RICHARD BROWN. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2174, August 23, 
1770. 

WHEREAS there is a large quantity of swamp, or 
tide marsh, lying and being on the creek commonly 
called and known by the name of English's Creek, in 
the township of Mansfield, in the county of Burling- 
ton, which now lies useless for want of banking, 
which, to all appearance, if banked, would be of 
great value to the proprietors, and a benefit to the 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 229 

neighbourhood in general.- This is to give notice 
to the public, and all whom it may concern, that we 
the subscribers, intend petitioning the Governor, 
Council and Assembly the next sessions, which is to 
sit at Amboy, in order to obtain an Act for that 
purpose. Thomas English, Joseph English, Jo- 
seph English, jun. Samuel English, John Suttan, 
Abraham English. 

Mansfield, August 31, 1770. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 190, Aug. 27- 
Sept. 3, 1770. 

New-Jersey, August 24. 

~^HE Inhabitants of the Town of Seacaucus, in East- 
._ New-Jersey, hereby give Notice, That a Meet- 
ing of the Commissioners by Law appointed for 
finally settling and determining the Rights of the 
Common Lands in the Patent of said Seacaucus, is 
desired to be held at the House of Abraham Dem- 
arest, in Hackinsack, on Thursday the 27th of Sep- 
tember next, in order that the same may be finally 
settled. 

^JCH^The Commissioners are Stephen Crane, 
John Smyth of Amboy, George Trenchard of Salem, 
John Taylor of Middletown, Daniel Ellis and Wil- 
liam Hewlings of Burlington, Samuel Tuthill of 
Morris, John Imley of Bordentown, and Azariah 
Hunt of Hunterdon.- -N. Y. Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No 1443, August 27, 1770. 

New-York, August 30. We hear from Hackin- 
sack that last Tuesday, Abraham Ackerman, of that 
Place, went out in order to shoot Pidgeons ; but not 



230 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7?O 

coming home as soon as expected, search was made 
for him, and in a little Time, he was found in a field 
not far from his House, shot thro' the Head. 

To be sold at Public Vendue, at Perth-Amboy, dur- 
ing the Supreme Court, in the Term of September 
next, 

The LIBRARY of LAW BOOKS, 

T^ELONGING to the Estate of the late Honourable 
JD Lewis Morris Ashfield, Esq ; by 

V. Pearse Ashfield, Administrator. 
Aug. 20th, 1770. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1443, August 30, 1770. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia OUTWARDS. 
Sloop Centurion, E. Gray, Amboy. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the. subscriber, living in the town- 
ship of Deptford, in the county of Gloucester, in the 
Jerseys, on the \&h of August, 1770, an English ser- 
vant man, named Edward demons, about 23 years of 
age, Af feet 4 inches high, middle stature, a good deal 
knock-kneed, sandy complexion, straight hair, sour 
look, and calls himself a pin-maker by trade ; had on, 
when he went away, an ozenbrigs shirt, low trowsers, 
new felt hat, brown coat, istith horn buttons, a white 
flannel jacket and new shoes ; as he has lately run 
away twice, once he was put in Chester goal, next he 
got to Burlington county, he had a horse lock on his 
leg, under his trowsers, tied up to the calf of his leg, 
but may have got it of. Whoever takes up and secures 
I 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 231 

the said servant, so that his master may have him 
again, shall have the above reward and reasonable 
charges, paid by 

JAMES HINCHMAN. 

Hunter don county, New -Jersey, April 18, 1770. 

WHEREAS the subscriber has been concerned in 
trade, and carrying on iron-works, for a number of 
years past, by which, meeting with many losses, 
and, by the hardness of the times, is unable to pro- 
cure money to pay the debts contracted at said 
works, whefeby they, and the lands belonging to 
them, which cost several Thousand Pounds, have 
been sold, by execution, for only as many Hundreds, 
as also a large estate besides, sold nearly in the 
same proportion to its value ; I am therefore under 
the disagreeable necessity of giving my creditors no- 
tice, that in order to free my body from confinement, 
I intend to petition the legislature of the province of 
New-Jersey, at their next sessions, for relief in the 
premises. 

THOMAS READING. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2175, Aug. 30, 

1770- ;*, 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS. 

By inserting the inclosed Piece in your next Gazette, 
you will much oblige 

Your FRIEND and CUSTOMER. 

[Extracts] 

Our Inclinations are different as our Faces ; mine 
have led me to the Care of Sheep, . . . 



232 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1770 



The Public is certainly much interested in the 
fleecy Flock. ...Legislatures have thought Sheep an 
Object worthy their Notice. . . . 

The Assembly of New-Jersey enacted several 
Laws for their Preservation, but those Laws being 
only temporary, are now expired. By the last Act 
of that Province, among other Things, a Tax of one 
Shilling was laid on the first Dog kept in- any Fam- 
ily, and Two Shillings on every other ; this Fund 
was appropriated to make good the Damages done 
by Dogs killing Sheep. . . . 

[Signed] 

AMINTOR. 
-^-Supplement to Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 

2I75- 

LIST of LETTERS remaining in the GENERAL POST- 
OFFICE, 

NEW- YORK, July 6, 1770, not advertised before. 

Michael Beck, Ringwood. Ste- 
phen Thompson, 2, Ringwood Baltus Want 

Lake, East Jersey. 

Woodbridge, %th Month, 28, 1770 

WHEREAS some of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Woodbridge, met on the 23d Ultimo, and 
came into Resolves relative to such as imported 
Goods contrary to the Non-Importation Agreement, 
and have appointed us, with some others, for a Com- 
mittee to correspond with other Committees as Oc- 
casion might require. The Public are hereby re- 
quested to take Notice, that the above Appointment 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 233 

was without our Knowledge, Consent or Approba- 
tion, nor were we concerned in said Resolves. 
JONATHAN FRAZEE, Esq ; JOSEPH SHOTWELL, 

SAMUEL BARRON, Esq ; AXFORD BURT, 

DAVID ALSTON, Esq ; JOHN THORP. 

Newark, August 30, 1770. 
To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS the STAGE-WAGGON from NEWARK to 
Powles-Hook, has for some Time been stopt, 
for the Want of a proper Person to drive the Wag- 
gon through Bergen : The many Complaints of the 
Public, for the Want of such a Conveyance from 
NEWARK to NEW YORK, induces the Subscriber again 
to endeavour to accommodate them, for which Pur- 
pose he proposes to drive through from NEWARK to 
POWLES-HOOK, once a Day, every Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday ; will set off from Mr. JAMES 
BANKS'S at NEWARK, two Hours after Sunrise, for 
POWLES-HOOK, and in the Afternoon sets out from 
POWLES-HOOK for NEWARK, two Hours before Sunset, 
on the above-mentioned Days. Those who are 
pleased to encourage this Undertaking may depend 
on the constant Attendance of their 

Humble Servant, 

MATTHIAS WARD. 

POWLES HOOK RACES. 
A PURSE of FIFTY POUNDS, 

IS intended to be run for over the Course lately 
made at Powles Hook, some Day in October 
next, free for any Horse, Mare or Gelding, not 



234 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. L T 77 

more than Four Years old, full Bloods excepted, car- 
rying Weight for Age and Blood. N. Y. Gazette or 
Weekly Post Boy, No. 1444, September 3, 1770. 

By his EXCELLENCY 
WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq ; 

Captain General, Governor and Commander in 
Chief, in and over his Majesty's Province of 
New-Jersey, and Territories thereon depending 
in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral in the 
same, &c. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

WHEREAS his Majesty by his Order in Council on 
the sixth Day of June, in the present Year of 
his Reign, was pleased with the Advice of his 
privy Council, to declare his Disallowance of an Act 
of the Governor, Council and General Assembly of 
this Province, passed at Burlington in the Year of 
our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty 
Nine, entituled, 

" A Supplementary Act to an Act entituled, an Act 
appointing Commissioners for finally settling and de- 
termining the several Rights, Titles and Claims to the 
Common Lands, of the Township of Bergen, and for 
~ making Partition thereof in just and equitable Pro- 
portions, amongst those who shall be adjudged by the 
said Commissioners to be entifuled to the same!' 

And pursuant to his Majesty's Royal Pleasure 
thereupon expressed, the said Act is thereby disal- 
lowed, declared void and of none Effect. 

I have therefore thought fit, with the Advice of his 
Majesty's Council, to issue this Proclamation, hereby 



17/0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 235 

notifying his Majesty's disallowance and Repeal of 
the said Act, that all Persons whom it may concern 
may take Notice thereof, and govern themselves ac- 
cordingly. 

Given 'under my Hand and Seal at Arms, in the 
City of Burlington, the Twenty Second Day of 
August, in the Tenth Year of the Reign of his 
Majesty King George the Third, Anno Domini, 

i77- 

WM. FRANKLIN. 

By his Excellency's Command, 

Cha. Pettit, D. Seer. 
GOD save the KING. 

New-York, September 6. About a Fortnight since, 
was found in the Woods between Long Pond and 
Charlottesburgh, in New-Jersey, a man lying on his 
Back, with his Head cut off and laid on one of his 
Arms. He had no other Clothes on than a Shirt 
and Trowsers, was about 5 Feet 7 or 8 Inches high, 
and to Appearances must have been murdered some 
Months before. 

Extract of a Letter from New-Jersey, dated 

August 29. 

"The inhabitants of Burlington County, have 
shewn a Spirit of Freedom, they have signed Arti- 
cles not to purchase Goods of any who shall import 
until it shall become a general affair; and have ap- 
pointed a committee in several Towns, to keep a 
look out if any traders should misbehave. It having 

been reported that J n J y of Bordentown, 

had wrote for goods in conjunction with his son at 



236 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

New-York, the neighbouring inhabitants waited on 
him, let him know they did not like his conduct, in- 
sisted on his countermanding his orders, he excused 
himself as well as he could, by laying the blame on 
his son, and said he was not interested in the goods, 
was only surety for his son, but would, the first op- 
portunity countermand his orders, and if that arrived 
too late, he would order his son to store them on 
pain of his high displeasure." N. Y. Journal or 
General Advertiser, No. 1444, September 6, 1770. 

Burlington, in New-Jersey, Sept. 6. 
To ALL whom it may CONCERN. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that I the subscriber, be- 
ing a prisoner in the gaol of the county of Burlington 
for debt, do intend to petition the Governor, Coun- 
cil and General Assembly of this province at their 
next meeting for an act to discharge me from the 
said imprisonment, and to free any person from ar- 
rests in future, for any debts heretofore contracted. 

JOSEPH YARD. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1448, Sept. 6, 
1770. 

The GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the Province of New- 
Jersey, are summoned to meet at Perth-Amboy, on 
Wednesday, the 26th Instant. 

Saturday the 25th ult. a Dutch Boy, about 16 
Years of Age, Servant to Mr. Lippincott, near Had- 
donfield, enticed his Master's Daughter (a little Girl, 
about 9 Years old) from Home, under Pretence of 
gathering Grapes, when he ravished and murdered 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 237 

her, and then buried her in a Swamp, where she was 
found. He is since taken up, and committed to 
Gloucester Goal. 

Burlington, August 30, 1770. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that several of the Own- 
ers and Proprietors of a certain Beach, or Tract of 
Land, situate in the Township of Statford, and Coun- 
ty of Monmouth, commonly known by the Name of 
the Barnigat Beach, intend to apply at the next Ses- 
sion of Assembly, to be held for the Province of 
New-Jersey, at the City of Perth-Amboy, on the 26th 
Day of September next, in order to obtain a Law 
for ascertaining and limiting the Right of Common- 
age, and other Regulations, for the Benefit of the 
said Proprietors. 

Perth Amboy, New-Jersey, Sept. 6, 1770. 
T"\ESERTED from the 2Qth Regiment of Foot, WIL- 
\J LIAM SIMPSON, Fifer, aged 19 Years, 5 Feet, 8 
Inches high, born in the Regiment, straight and well 
made, fair Complexion, thin Face, long Visage, large 
Nose, large Limbs, short brown Hair, blue Eyes, 
speaks short, and pretty much of the Irish Accent, a 
large Hole or Hollow on the top Part of his Scull, 
occasioned by a Fracture received at Castle Island ; 
no Hair growing on it ; plays well on the Flute and 
Fife, and plays little on the Violin and French Horn. 
Had on when he went away, a short yellow Coat, 
fac'd Red, red Fall-down Collar, red Wings and Lin- 
ing, the Coat lac'd with Drummers Lace, white Lin- 
nen Waistcoat and Breeches, a black Cap, bound 
with white Tape, the Number of the Regiment in 



238 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the Front, and a Scarlet Worsted Feather round the 
upper Part of the Front. Whoever apprehends and 
secures the above Deserter so that he may be deliv- 
ered over to the abovesaid Regiment at Perth-Am- 
boy, or to the Commanding Officer of the 26th Regi- 
ment at New- York, shall receive TEN DOLLARS Re- 
ward, on Application to either Commanding Offi- 
cers. 

N. B. It is supposed the above Deserter is gone 
towards Boston or Halifax, having a Brother in the 
64th Regiment at Halifax. 

QOME Time ago there was left by the Stage Wag- 
O gon, at the House of BROOK FARMER, in New- 
Brunswick, a SPY GLASS. The Owner may have it 
again, by describing the Glass and paying Charges. 
N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1445, 
September 10, 1770 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 

In the County of Cape May, and Province of NEW- 
JERSEY, A Number of fat CATTLE, consisting chiefly of 
OXEN and STEERS, fit for Slaughter. 

JEREMIAH LEAMING. 

N. B. There may be a large Parcel of Grassfed 
CATTLE bought in the said County, of different Peo- 
ple, besides him. 

WE, the subscribers, auditors appointed by a rule 
of the Supreme Court of the province of New Jer- 
sey, to settle and adjust the accounts, and make sale 
of the estate of James Alexander, late of Trenton ; 



I77 G J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 239 

who has absconded from his creditors, do hereby 
give notice, that on Friday, the 28th day of Septem- 
ber inst. will be exposed to sale at public vendue to 
the highest bidder, at the Court-house in Trenton, be- 
tween the hours of 12 and 5 of the clock in the after- 
noon, a house and lot of land, containing 2 acres, be 
the same more or less, situate in Trenton, now in 
the possession of the Widow Merseilus ; the house 
is two stories high, with a leanto adjoining, a good 
well, a young orchard, and garden paled in, fronting 
the Hopewell road ; late the estate of the said James 
Alexander, attached at the suit of the Executors of 
John Porter, deceased, and to be sold by SAMUEL 
TUCKER, JOSEPH HIGBEE, and ABRAHAM HUNT, Audi- 
tors. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2176, September 6, 
1770. . , (,; ' . ., - '. 

Ninth Month 3, 1770. 
Friends HALL and SELLERS. 

By inserting the following Lines in your useful 
Paper, you will much oblige your Friend and Cus- 
tomer. 

}. L. 

IN reading the Supplement to the Pennsylvania 
Gazette No. 2175, I met with a Piece, signed Amin- 
ter, which is so agreeable to my Mind that I could 
not but rejoice when I read it, and should be glad if 
it might be a Means of making some Provision for 
the Safety of our Flocks in the Jerseys. I must con- 
fess I was sorry when I heard that so useful a Law 
as that which laid a Tax on Dogs, was expired, and 
come to an End. Is not taking the Tax off Dogs, an 



240 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Encouragement for many People to raise and keep 
more than are really necessary ? And Dogs, when 
they get several of them together, are more apt to 
do Mischief, than where there is but one by himself. 

It is not three Days since I was discoursing with a 
Friend of mine on the same Subject (before I saw 
that Piece, signed Aminter] he seemed very sorry so 
useful a law should be dropt, and told me, he would 
willingly pay Tax for his Dog, if that Law might be 
suffered to continue in Force, and I doubt not but it 
is the Case with many more, if not the greatest Part 
of the Farmers in New-Jersey. 

One Objection I have heard against the Dog Tax 
is, that it amounted to a great deal for the Hunters, 
who keep Hounds, to pay ; but may we not say with 
Aminter, to tax the mischievous Pleasures of Man- 
kind, cannot be thought unjust or impolitic? 

A JERSEY MAN. 

Philadelphia, September 4, 1770. 
ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of John Cow- 
perthwait, junior, late of Chester, in the County of 
Burlington, and Western Division of the Province of 
New-Jersey, deceased, are required to make imme- 
diate Payment ; and all those who have any De- 
mands against said Estate, are desired to bring in 
their Accounts, properly attested, so that they may 
be settled and paid, by 

JOSEPH COWPERTHWAIT, Administrator. 

Gloucester County, September 4, 1770. 
PUBLIC Notice is hereby given to all whom it may 
concern, that the subscriber hereof, in behalf of him- 



17/0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 241 

self, and divers others, inhabitants of the townships 
of Greenwich and Deptford, in the said county, in- 
tends to apply at the next session of General Assem- 
bly, to be held for the province of New Jersey, at the 
city of Perth-Amboy, t>n the 26th Day of this instant 
September, in order to obtain a law to build a bridge 
and causeway over Great Mantua Creek, from the 
subscriber's land to the land of Jeffery Chew, of 
which all persons concerned, are desired to take no- 
tice, and make objections thereto, if any they have. 

ARCHIBALD MAFFETT. 

Huntetdon county, September 3, 1770. 
WHEREAS I, the subscriber, by unwearied dili- 
gence, for upwards of fifty years past, had acquired 
a large estate, and having, for some years past, been 
unfortunately concerned in trade and iron-works, by 
which means large debts were contracted, and, 
through the scarcity of money, was obliged to mort- 
gage the greatest part of my lands ; the rest seized 
by execution, and, by the hardness of the times, they 
will not sell for half price, and actions still going on 
against me ; I therefore hereby give my creditors no- 
tice, that I am obliged, and under a necessity of peti- 
tioning the Legislature of the province of New-Jer- 
sey, at their next Session, for relief in the premises. 

MARTIN RYERSON. 

THREE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from Andover Iron-works, in the coun- 
ty of Sussex, New-Jersey, on Saturday, the 4th day 
of August last, an English servant lad, named JOHN 
COLLINS, about 19 or 20 years of age, 5 feet 5 or 6 

16 



242 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

inches high, round shouldered, full faced, a little 
freckled, has short straight brown hair, slow in 
speech, a little dull in hearing, stoops and rocks 
much when he walks ; had on, when he went away, a 
drab coloured coarse cloth jacket, with sleeves, one 
blue double breasted under ditto, without sleeves or 
lining, metal buttons on both, an ozenbrigs shirt, and 
pair of trowsers, an old felt hat, shoes half worn, 
with buckles not fellows. Whoever takes up and 
secures said servant, so that the subscriber may 
have him again, shall have the above reward, and 
reasonable charges, paid by JOSEPH TURNER, Esq ; in 
Philadelphia ; or at said Works, by 

ARCHIBALD STEWART. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2177, Sept. 17, 
1770. 

Bordentown, in New -Jersey, Sept. 17, 1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS an extract of a letter, dated New- Jersey, 
August i^th, hath been published in the New- York 
and Philadelphia News-Papers, as is apprehended, 
with a view to injure the character and reputation of 
John Imlay, Esq ; of this place, and his son William, 

of New-York. We the subscribers, members of the 

committees for inspecting into the trade of these parts, 
being present at the time said Imlay laid, by his re- 
quest, a state of his conduct, respecting the importation 
of merchandize from Great Britain, before said com- 
mittees, do certify that the aforesaid extract, contains 
a false and unfair representation of the matter, and 
which was published contrary to the knowledge and 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 243 

intention of said committees. Witness our hands, 
Peter Tallman, Robert Emley, Able Middleton, Isaac 
Pearson. 

We, the subscribers, being present as spectators, at 
the aforesaid time, do corroborate the above certificate. 
John Wood, Anthony Taylor, John Van Emburgh, 
Daniel Hendrickson, James Newill, Richard Cox, 
Alexander Moore, John Pope. 

Absconded, or ran away from the township of Piles- 
grove, in the county of Salem, a certain John Harts- 
horn, about 40 years of age, a thin spare looking man, 
had on a or se teed coat without pockets, a half worn cas- 
tor hat and trowsers. He stole a bay horse with a 
black mane and tale, paces and gallops ivell, a good 
English hunting saddle, with a blue cloth under the 
same, the property of the subscriber. Whoever will 
apprehend the said Hartshorn and bring him back to 
the aforesaid township shall receive Twenty Shillings 
reward, and fore the horse and saddle Forty Shillings, 

from 

PHEBE BASSETT. 

Burlington, September 24, 1770. 
THIS DAY is PUBLISHED, and to be sold by 

ISAAC COLLINS, 

At his Printing Office, 

The Burlington Almanack, 

For the Year of our Lord 1771 ; 

CONTAINING, besides the usual calculations, sev- 
eral ORIGINAL PIECES, and other useful and entertain- 
ing matter, in prose and verse. Pennsylvania Chron- 
icle, No. 193, Sept. 17-24, 1770. 



244 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To the PRINTER. 

New-York, 3 Sept. 1770. 
SIR, 

A Farmer in New Jersey gives the following genu- 
ine Account of the Profit he made on his Sheep 
in one Year, which please to communicate to the 
public, as it may induce others to follow his Ex- 
ample. 

In the Fall 1769 he had 46 Sheep, the 
common Rate in that Season is 8s. per 
Head. 18 8 

In May 1770, he had 136 1. of Wool, \ 
which he used or sold at 2s. j 13. 12 

He has sold or used in his Family 8 ) 
Weathers at 155. is (6 

Ditto, 4 Ewes, at 8s. 112 

His Stock now remains 56, value at 8s. ) 
as above. I 22. 8 



43 12 

Which gives a Profit of ^.25 4 in one Year, on 
8 1 8s. 1 The Winter was uncommonly open, so that 
they required very little Fodder, hardly any besides 
the Corn Stalks, in February and March to the 
heavy Ewes ; and in Summer a Fallow of about 45 
Acres, kept them till the first of Sept. except about 
three Weeks. 

Another Farmer in his Neighbourhood who kept 
60 Sheep last Winter, sold this Summer 14 Weath- 
ers for ^.15 15 so that his profit must have been 
greater, but have not the particulars. 

We might expect that Self-Interest would be a 

I An error for 18, 8s. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 245 

* 

sufficient motive to Farmers to increase their Stock 
of Sheep, as they are indisputably more advantage- 
ous than any other Article they can go upon, and 
much less Trouble. It is also of the highest con- 
cern to the Public, for it is not doubted that if we 
had double the Quantity of Wooll, that it would be 
all manufactured, now every Pound of Wooll of 2s. 
value, manufactured ; may be worth 8s. Therefore 
a Farmer that increases his Stock of Sheep, besides 
the great gain to himself, will highly benefit the 
Country, for reckoning each Sheep, will yield 2^ 1. 
when made up will be worth 205. of which 155. will 
be clear gain to the Colony. 

The County of Hunterdon in 1768, had in all near- 
ly 20,000 Sheep, suppose them to be doubled, which 
might very well be if they kept fewer useless Horses, 
and plowed fewer worn out Fields, this would yield 
50,000 1. of Wooll, and would be worth ,.15,000 be- 
sides paying for the Wooll, for all the Expences of 
Spinning, Weaving and dressing is our own Labour, 
except a little dying stuff. But suppose we reckon 
the County of Hunterdon together with the twelve 
other Counties should each increase their Sheep only 
5,000, this would make an Addition of 65,000 in the 
Colony, the Wooll made up would be worth ^.43,- 
750, besides paying the Farmer. What a large an- 
nual Sum, would this be saved or gained to the Col- 
ony, and how worthy the Attention of the Public? 

The Farmer who gives the above Account has al- 
ready increas'd his Stock of Sheep to above 100, and 
tho' four Times as many as used to be kept on his 
Farm, he further intends to add to the Number. 



246 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

In this Backsliding Age, the only effectual Rem- 
edy against Importation, that Bane of our Country, 
would be for the Northern Colonies to increase their 
Number of Sheep, which together with raising flax, 
will put the Materials in our Hands of being a Rich 
and powerful People; for if we take to Manufactur- 
ing, it will keep our Wealth at Home, and our Peo- 
ple together, who are now scattering over this wide 
extended Continent to remote Wildernesses, where 
they live slothful indigent Lives, and are lost to the 
Community, how much better might they live by im- 
proving the old Lands, settling Towns, and increas- 
ing our Manufactures ; this would be establishing 
more solid Wealth than Mines of Gold or Silver, or 
an extensive foreign Trade; Are not Spain and Por- 
tugal poor, tho,' they are Masters of the Richest 
Mines in the World ? And what advantage is Trade 
to us, while we export Provisions or raw materials, 
and import superfluities? 

I am yours, &c. 

New-York September 20. On Monday last died of 
a lingering Illness at Amboy, where he had retired 
for the Benefit of his Health, Mr. HENRY CUYLER, of 
this City, a Gentleman of a very respectable Family, 
large Fortune, and Fair Character, whose Death is 
much lamented. Next Evening at his House in 
Town his Funeral was attended by a great number 
of his Friends apd Acquaintance, and his Remains 
interred in the New Dutch Church Yard. 

On Friday last as a Negro Woman belonging to 
Mr. M' Myers, was passing from this City to New- 




I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 24? 

ark, in Mr. Congar's Boat, being somewhat disor- 
der'd in her Senses, she suddenly sprung overboard, 
and notwithstanding the utmost Endeavours of the 
People on board to save her, and tho' she was a 
considerable Time in the Water before she sunk, the 
Wind being high and unfavourable, they were un- 
able to recover her, and she was drown'd. 

OTICE is hereby given, that application will be 
made to the Governor, Council, and General 
Assembly of the colony of New-Jersey, at their next 
session at Perth-Amboy, which is to commence on 
the 26th inst. for a law to confirm a certain agree- 
ment lately made between the agents of the colony 
of New-York, and the colony of New-Jersey, re- 
specting the line lately decreed by his Majesty's com- 
missioners, 1 and the claim of the settlers near the 
same, being bona fide purchasers of the lands they 
possess under either of the said colonies. 
Perth-Amboy, Sept. i2th, 1770. 

To BE SOLD, 

THAT valuable tract of land, known by the name 
of Peppecotten, situate in the township of New- 
Town, in the county of Sussex, in the eastern divis- 
ion of the province of New-Jersey, containing near 
two thousand acres, whereon are several good farms 
already improved, the greatest quantity whereof is 
fine rich swamp, equal to any in the province ; it is 
in a fine country, within about TO miles of the court 
house of the said county, and about the same dis- 
tance from several iron works ; where is a very good 

i The northern boundary of New Jersey. 



248 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. fl/70 

market for most sorts of country produce. It will be 
sold either together or in part, as may best suit the 
purchaser or purchasers, the terms will be made easy. 
For further particulars inquire of JOSEPH SHARP, at 
his iron-works, near the premises, or of ELIZABETH 
SHARP, of Pilesgrove in the county of Salem. 

N. B. Also to be sold, several valuable tracts of 
land, in the county of Monmouth : For particulars 
thereof inquire of John Williams, in Freehold, near 
the premises. 

To be sold at public Vendue, at the House of Lewis 
Morris Ashfield, Esq ; deceased, at Tanton in 
Shrewsberry, New-Jersey, on Wednesday the 
\Qth Day of October next. 

ALL the moveable estate of the said deceased, con- 
sisting of Negroes, horses, cattle, sheep, house- 
hold and kitchen furniture, waggons, sleighs, riding 
chairs and farming utensils. The conditions will be 
made known at the time and place of sale : All or 
any of the Negroes will be sold by private contract, 
before the sale. Should any incline to purchase, 
they may apply to the subscriber, at Tanton afore- 
said. And all persons who have demands against 
- the said estate, are desired to bring in their ac- 
counts ; and those indebted, either by bond, note, or 
for bills of cost; are desired to make immediate pay- 
ment, to prevent trouble. 

V. PEARSE ASHFIELD, Administrator. 

New-York, September 20. On the 9th Instant, 
ROBERT LIVINGSON, Esq ; eldest Son of the Honour- 
able Justice LIVINGSTON, was married to Miss 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 249 

STEVENS, only Daughter to the Honourable JOHN 
STEVENS, Esq ; at his Country Seat in Hunterdon, 
New-Jersey. 

To a young Lady on her Marriage, 
By a young Lady. 

T^vEAR POLLY, on your Bridal Day, 
_y Accept my Muse's first Essay; 
The Theme inspires me while I send 
The Warmest Wishes of a Friend. 
Kind Heaven to reward your Truth, 
Now smiles and sends the faithful Youth, 
Whose Heart and Constancy you'll prove, 
And find them perfect as his Love. 
In him, is ev'ry Virtue join'd, 
In you, each Charm of Face and Mind; 
Sure Cupid has obtain'd his Sight, 
Else how could he have aitn'd so Right? 
No more kind Fortune dost thou prove, 
" An unrelenting Foe to Love," 
For here too mutual Hands we find, 
Where Youth and gentleness are joined. 
Your Bliss, your Friends and Parents share, 
And joyful, hail the happy Pair 
May ev'ry Day like this be crown'd, 
And Love and Friendship still abound : 
And as each circling Year goes past, 
Still find you happy as the last. 

New- Jersey, gt/i Sept. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1446, September 20, 1770. 

Wilmington, September 20. 

ABSENTED herself from her Master's service in 
Wilmington, on the 8th day of August last, an ap- 



250 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/O 

prentice GIRL named MARY HAWKES, the daughter of 
Jane Hawks, of Penn's Neck, Salem county, West 
New-Jersey. The mother had on a short gown and 
petticoat of dark blue broad striped linsey, the 
daughter had a new shift, two tow ditto, linsey short 
gown and petticoat, is about nine years old, full face, 
black eyes, and large teeth. It is supposed she is 
with her mother in Philadelphia, as they were lately 
seen there. Any person taking up the said appren- 
tice, so that her master shall have her again, shall 
have TWENTY SHILLINGS Reward, and reasonable 
charges paid by 

JOHN GYLESE. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1450, Sept. 20, 
1770. 

j 

The COMMENCEMENT at PRINCETOWN, will be held 
on Wednesday, the 26th Instant. 

Kingwood township, Hunter don county, 

September 12, 1770. 

WHEREAS the subscriber hereof did, on the gth of 
September last, sign three obligations, to a certain 
Thomas Herbert, the one conditioned for the pay- 
ment of Fifty Pounds, on the first of May following ; 
the other two conditioned for the payment of Nine- 
ty-five Pounds each, one of them payable the first of 
May, 1771 ; the other, the first of May, 1772 ; and, 
as I am of opinion, that he designs to assign the 
abovementioned bonds to some other person, these 
are to inform the public that he the said Herbert, 
hath, since the executing of the above bonds, cov- 
enanted with me, under his hand and seal, for him- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 251 

self, and his assigns, to wait with me for the. money 
six years, from the 6th of October, 1769. 

JOHN JONES. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2178, Sept. 20, 

17/0. : 7 

\ 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

RAN away from the subscriber, living opposite to 
Philadelphia, in the Jerseys, on the 23d of September 
last, a lusty likely negro man, six feet high, named 
WILL, of the blackest cast, and about 30 years of 
age : had on, when he went away, a darkish coloured 
grey homespun jacket, without sleeves or lining, with 
pewter buttons, a pair of black breeches, red jacket, 
white tow shirt and trowsers, and a pair of new 
shoes ; it is supposed he is lurking about Philadel- 
phia. Whoever takes up said negro, and delivers 
him to the master of the work-house, shall have th 
above reward, and reasonable charges paid by 

DANIEL COOPER. 

N. B. His cloathing is uncertain, as he has ap- 
peared in divers sorts since he ran away. Pennsyl- 
vania Chronicle, No. 194, Sept. 2 4- Oct. i, 1770. 

Messieurs INSLEE and CAR, 

"QLEASE to acquaint the Public, that the Advertise- 
1 ment in your Paper of August 23d [6th] last, 
respecting the tarring and feathering, &c. the New- 
York Importers, and placed immediately under the 
Woodbridge Resolves, as if intended to intimate to 
the Public, that it was inserted by the Signers, or at 
least with their Approbation and Consent ; was, I 



252 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

have sufficient Reason to believe, the Production of 
a very few, if more than one Man only. The Public 
may, however, be assured that the respectable Free- 
holders and Freemen of Woodbridge (acting as a 
Body) never did, nor ever will do, or cause to be 
done, any Thing inconsistent with Law or Liberty ; 
and that they do highly disapprove of said Adver- 
tisement. Justice to the Sons of Liberty in Wood- 
bridge, requires this much to be said, in order to re- 
move any Prejudices against them, that might have 
been imbibed in Consequence of said Advertise- 
ment. 

I am your constant Reader, 

M. B. 1 
Woodbridge, Sept. 18, 1770. 

Messrs. PRINTERS. 

Please to give the following a Place in your 
Paper, and you will oblige many of your Cus- 
tomers in Sussex, Morris and Essex. 

NEW-JERSEY. 

At a Meeting of the Freeholders and Inhabitants 
of the County of Sussex, at the Court-House, 
on the 1 4th Day of August, 1770. 

IN order to shew to the World their Abhorrence 
and Detestation, of the shameful Defection of the 

N-w-Y s, unanimously agree with each other, 

and RESOLVED, THAT altho' our Connections with 
them, have hitherto led us to their Markets, by a 
long and tedious Land-Carriage, we will now turn 
our trade of Wheat, Iron, &c., by the more natural 

i Query: Moses Bloomfield. 



I770J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 253 

and easy Water Carnage down the River Delaware, 
to our Friends at Trenton and Philadelphia ; and 
that we will not deal with them, unless they give full 
Satisfaction to the Colonies for their base and un- 
worthy conduct. And should any of our Traders 
purchase of them any Goods, to retail in this Coun- 
ty, he may expect public Chastisement. 

They also appointed a Committee of Correspond- 
ence. 

* Delaware River runs the whole Length of this 
Colony ; on the N. W. and W. Side thereof, Sussex 
is the most Northermost County in the Colony, and 
joins New- York on the N. E. and Goods may and 
are carried down this River, from the North Station 
Point, with flat-bottom Boats, which will carry six or 
eight Hundred Bushels of Wheat, or twenty Tons of 
Iron, Staves, Heading, . . . 

\ 

New-Jersey, Somerset County, 

> . . Sept. 17, 1770. 

Copy of a Letter sent from a Number of sev- 
eral Committees met here, to the Freeholders 
and Inhabitants of the Colony of Connecticut. 

FRIENDS and BRETHERN 

CAN there be any Thing more surprising, than the 
Behaviour of all the New-York Merchants, after 
they have broke through their most solemn Engage- 
ments, and done every Thing in their Power to en- 
tail Slavery on us and our Posterity : Yet, not con- 
tent, they are daily abusing those who are honest 
enough to resolve against having Connections with 
the Enemies of their Country. Let them go on, and 



254 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. ' 

let us go on also with our Manufacturing and 
Oeconomy, and see whether they can better do with- 
out us, than we without them. We want nothing of 
them, as Needles are manufactured in Pennsylvania, 
every other Material we can readily make. And 
shall we be humbug'd out of our Liberty, and en- 
slaved only by a Sett of Traders? No sure; for 
depend upon it, from the opulent Merchant to the 
Pedler, are all interested against us, (except a few 
Country Patriots in Trade) Therefore let us beware 
of dealing with them. Let us struggle through the 
Winter by being charitable, and clothe the Naked 
with our Superfluity, if any there be in Want; and 
in another Year we can provide plentiful for the 
Winter Season. My Friends, beware of the ac- 
cursed Thing ; touch it not, as it will bring down 
upon us some Destruction. Let the Name of 

M 1, 1 therefore, (especially a N Y ) be 

dreadful in the Ears of our Children, and learn 
them that they may teach their Children to the last 

Generation that the N Y M 1 was the 

sole and only Cause of Slavery and Distress : 
Therefore let their Names st k wherever 'tis men- 
tioned : Stand firm to your Resolves, as we are de- 
termined to do, tho' the Yorkers say : " Have you 
not heard, that Connecticut and Jerseymen do Re- 
solve." N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1447, Sept. 24, 1770. 



Merchant. 



1 7/0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 255 

[ The following is inserted by particular Desire.'] 

Bordentown, August 23^, 1770. 
To Messrs. J. L. 

J. R. and 
J. L. 
GENTLEMEN, 

I Have every Day expected to hear the People in 
your Town was in Motion, in order to show the 
World and all honest Men, how much they detest 
the Judaising New- Yorkers, but I am surprised to 
here this Day you seem very indifferent about the 
Matter, can this be True ? Can you se a body of 
People enter into the most solemn Engagements, 
make use of all their Skill and Argument to induce 
other People to join in their Polocy, which when 
effected and the Union made compleat, all at once in 
an arbitrary Manner, and underhandedly take back 
their Words and leave the rest in the Lurch for the 
sake of some present gain to themselves ? I ask 
you can you se this with any tolerable degree of 
Patience? And will you not say such Men ought to 
be shunned, as Villians, Sharpers, even suppose the 
Consequence not to be worse than a Trick in Trade ? 
I am sure you will agree with me in this, but when 
you consider their Defection is like Adam, it involves 
us and our Posterity forever, at least its counterwork- 
ing the only Scheme that could posably be fell upon 
to gain our Freedom, but perhaps you will say the 
Tax upon Tea is all we complain of, and that is 
trifling to trouble ourselves about : I know some 
People have talked so that have not seen the Trick 
of the Ministry, but I am much Mistaken if you 



256 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

have not considered the Matter better ; you must be 
sensible the Tea is retained on purpose for a Test 
against the Americans, you will Remember they pasf. 
an Act to prevent our sliting Iron and making Steel, 
that made a little Noise for a while but past over, 
then when the thought us Ripe the Stamp-Act came, 
that they repealed because the Colonies was so much 
in Debt to England, now you se the present Act was 
nothing but for a Tryal, the Money arising will not 
half pay the collecting, you must se the Scheme is 
more for Posterity than for present Profit to the Min- 
istry so that we are to be taxed, our Lives but small, 
but our Children; not only Paint, Glass, &c. but 
their very Stock and block, even to their Heads. Thus 
we are to be tax'd by act of Parliament [blank] are 
to be tax'd by Acts of Assembly, so we are to have 
nothing left but a sufficient Subsistence to get more 
for next Year. 

My dear Friends, don't it make you Shuder and 
almost Outragious, when you read the Act of Par- 
liament, you know the Words are, the Parliament 
give and grant, to his Majesty, what is it? why not 
their own Estates, but the Estates of the Americans, 
and every Penny they put on us, is taken of them- 
selves. Do not hesitate my good Friends, but little 
is expected from you, only a few Days loss Time, 
and to put up with a few inconveniances for a little 
while, do not put it in the Power of your Children to 
Reflect on you, perhaps to curse you, and say you 
would not make one Strugle for them. Oh ! think 

seriously of the Matter. 

I am your Friend, 

Jos BORDON. 



I 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 257 

To Mr. JOSEPH BORDON. 

SIR, 

^"T is an old Observation, and I believe a true one, 
JL that many a Genius, like a rich Diamond, lies 
buried in Obscurity, and that Fortune, ever blind to 
Merit, has condemned many to drive a pair of 
Horses, who are well qualified to hold the Reins of 
Government, and instead of a Waggon^ direct the 
glorious Machine of well ordered Administration. 

Nothing Sir, but the most unpardonable Inatten- 
tion could have permitted the above Letter to have 
remained so long unknown ; and I am really 
amazed that the Gentlemen into whose Hands it fell, 
did not sooner communicate it to the World. The 
Elegance with which it is composed, the patriotic, 
generous Zeal that breaths in every Line, the Sagac- 
ity conspicuous in every Sentence and the Knowl- 
edge of American Politics which distinguishes the 
whole, deserve the greatest Encomiums and entitle 
the Author to the first Place among the New-Jersey 
Literati. Your Comments upon the Act for pre- 
venting the Erection of slitting Mills in the Colon- 
ies, are clear and judicious, the principles to which 
you impute the Repeal of the Stamp-Act are incon- 
testible, and the Consequences which you say will 
follow the Taxing the Lives and Heads, the Stock 
and Block as well as the Paint and Glass of our Pos- 
terity, are no less logical and didactic, than tremend- 
ous and alarming. 

When the all taxing Ministry of Great-Britain 
shall perceive their deep laid Schemes thus discov- 

i Referring to Borden's stage-waggon route from Bordentown to Amboy. 
17 



258 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



[1770 



ered, and that their evil Intentions cannot escape 
your Discernment, it is easy to foresee that no Stone 
will be left unturned to silence )our Pen. But my 
dear Sir ! Let me intreat you by the Regard you 
profess for the Rights of America. Let me conjure 
you by the Groans of our departing, dying, sinking 
Liberties, not to turn your back upon your Country 
nor leave us in the Lurch in this our Day of Trial. 
No, oh ! Prince of epistolary Diction, let neither the 
allurements of Gold, the splendor of a Government, 
or the charms of a Title divert your Attention from 
our Calamities, consider that thy Pen like the Rod 
of Moses, can discomfit the Judaising New-Yorkers, 
do not therefore put it in the Power of your Children, 
to Reflect on you, perhaps to Curse you, and say you 
would make but one Struggle for them. Oh ! think 
seriously of these Things ; let thy Heart be con- 
stantly inditing of a good Matter, go on writing Let- 
ters and the Lord prosper this thy handy Work. 

I am, 

Most learned Sir 

Your most obedient 
Humble Servant 

New-Jersey, Sept. 19, 1770. 

OTICE is hereby given, to all whom it may con- 
cern, that Joseph Sacket, jun. late of the City 
of New-York, Surgeon, intends to make Applica- 
tion to the General Assembly of the Province of 
New-Jersey, at their next Session, to be discharged 
from his Creditors, in Consequence of an Assign- 
ment made in New-York, of his Estate in October 
1769. 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 259 



Bordentown, New-Jersey, Sept. 17, 1770. 
To the PUBLIC. 

WHEREAS an Extract of a Letter dated New-Jer- 
sey, August 29th, hath been published in the 
New-York and Philadelphia News-Papers, as is ap- 
prehended, with a view to injure the Character and 
Reputation of John Imlay, Esq ; of this Place, and 
his Son William of New-York. We the Subscribers 
Members of the Committee for inspecting into the 
Trade of these Parts, being present at the Time said 
Imlay laid, by his Request, a State of his Conduct 
respecting the Importation of Merchandize from 
Great Britain, before said Committee ; do certify, 
that the aforesaid Extract contains a false and unfair 
representation of the Matter, and which was pub- 
lished contrary to the Knowledge and Intention of 
said Committees. Witness our Hands, 

Peter Tallman, Able Middleton, 

Robert Emley, Isaac Pearson. 

We the Subscribers being present as Spectators at 
the aforesaid Time, do Corroborate the above Cer- 
tificate. 

John Wood, Daniel Hendrickson, 

Anthony Taylor, James Newell, 

John Pope, Richard Cox, 

John Van Emburgh, Alexander Moore. 

Middlesex County, ss. 

Order of Stephen Skinner, and Jonathan Fra- 
zee, Esqrs. two of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas of said County : Notice is hereby 
given to all the Creditors of Andrew Bisset, an In- 



260 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

i 

solvent Debtor, to shew Cause if any they have, be- 
fore the said Judges on the Eighteenth Day of Octo- 
ber next at Two o'Clock of said Day, at the House 
of Elijah Dunham in Perth-Amboy, why an Assign- 
ment of said Insolvent Estate should not be made 
and he be discharged from his Confinement agree- 
able to a late Act of Assembly passed for the Relief 
of Insolvent Debtors.- -A 7 ! Y. Journal or General 
Advertiser, No. 1447, Sept- 2 7> : 77- 

Burlington County, in New-Jersey, 

September 8, 1/70. 

WHEREAS, the Merchants and Freeholders of the 
City of New- York have, very injudiciously, and in 
direct Violation of their public Faith, broke through 
the general Non-importation Agreement, to the 
great Encouragement of the Enemies to the Free- 
dom of America : We, the Committees of the Town- 
ships of Chesterfield, Mansfield, Hanover, Spring- 
field, and Nottingham in the County aforesaid, by 
Order of our respective Town meetings, convened 
in Mansfield aforesaid, being apprehensive of the 
fatal Consequences that may result from a general 
Importation of Merchandize from Great-Britain at 
this Juncture ; and lest our Silence on Such an Occa- 
sion might be considered as an Acquiescence in the 
Measure, do hand down to our Posterity the follow- 
ing Resolutions. 

I. That we owe and will maintain all due Alleg- 
iance to our rightful Sovereign GEORGE the Third, 
King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, &c. 

II. That we are as much the natural Subjects of 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. . 26 1 

the Dominion of Great-Britain, as any within the 
Realm ; and that as such we have an undoubted 
Right to all the Privileges of its happy Constitution. 

III. That one of the capital Privileges of the Brit- 
ish Constitution, is that of the Subject's being taxed 
by his Representative only, and that therefore the 
late Act of the British Parliament, imposing a Duty 
on Tea, Glass, &c. is unconstitutional, and oppres- 
sive. 

IV. That as a Testimony to the World of our Dis- 
approbation of the New-Yorkers Conduct, we will 
not purchase, nor suffer to be purchased by any un- 
der our Direction, any Goods or Merchandize from 
the Inhabitants of the Colony of New-York, nor of 
any Person or Persons that shall or may purchase, 
procure, or receive them, directly or indirectly from 
thence, until the aforesaid Act, imposing a Duty on 
Tea, Glass &c. is totally repealed, they return to a 
Sense of the Duty they owe their Fellow-subjects, 
or those Resolves be dissolved by the above Com- 
mittees. 

V. That we will not purchase, nor suffer to be 
purchased, by any under our Direction, any Goods 
or Merchandize (American Manufactures only ex- 
cepted) of any Pedlar or Petty-chapman whatever. 

VI. That any Person or Persons, who may be sus- 
pected of having in his, her or their Possession, any 
Goods or Merchandize imported in, brought from or 
through the Province of New- York, who shall re- 
fuse, when requested by any Person or Persons, ap- 
pointed for that Purpose, to give an Account in what 
Manner they came by such Goods, &c. shall be 



262 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

deemed guilty of a Violation of this Agreement, and 
his, her, or their Names published, in order that they 
may be handed down, with deserved Infamy, to Pos- 
terity. 

VII. That we will exert ourselves, by all legal and 
constitutional Means, to aid and assist those, who, 
by strictly adhering to the Non-importation Agree- 
ment, generously sacrifice their private Interest to 
serve the public Good. 

Ordered, That these Resolves be signed by the 
Clerk of these Committees, and published in the 
Philadelphia News-papers. 

ROBERT EMLEY, Clerk. 

Burlington County, September 18, 1770. 
Messieurs HALL and SELLERS, 

Please to insert the following Lines in your useful 
Paper, and you will oblige your constant Customer, 
and humble Servant, P. Q. 

I OBSERVED a Piece in the Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2175, signed Aminter, and likewise, in the same 
Paper, No. 2177, another Piece signed A Jersey 
Man, the Authors of both which seem absolutely 
ignorant of the Subject of which they treat upon ;.... 
for, by looking over the Laws of the Province of 
New-Jersey, I find, that the Law levying a Tax upon 
Dogs, passed at a Session of General Assembly, 
which began May 21, 1765, and continued till the 
2Oth of June following, and, in order to convince the 
Public that it is not yet expired, here follows the last 
Section of the said Law...." And be it enacted, that 
this Act shall continue in Force for the Space of five 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 263 

Years from the Publication thereof, and from thence 
to the End of the next Session of General Assem- 
bly. "....Now, I would ask Aminter, and the Jersey 
Man, if the last Session of the Assembly did not end 
the 27th of March, i 770. ...if they will give themselves 
the Trouble of examining the Votes, I am persuaded 
they will answer in the Affirmative ; consequently 
the Law will not expire till the End of the next Ses- 
sion of the Assembly. 

I agree with Aminter and the Jersey Man, that the 
Tax upon Dogs has been found beneficial in the 
Province of New-Jersey ; the only Objection I have 
to it is, that the Sums raised did not pay all the 
Damage done, but I doubt not our honourable As- 
sembly will not only revive the Dog tax at their next 
Session, but will also make the Tax Two Shillings a 

Dog, instead of One. 

A GRAZIER. 

To be SOLD by PULIC VENduE, on the premises, on 
the i ^th day- of October next, being the second day of 
the week. 

THE BREWERY in Burlington, now occupied by 
LEONARD SNOWDEN, consisting of a brewhouse, with 
two coppers, a mill-house, a malt house, with all the 
utensils, in order for business, and may be entered on 
immediately. Any person inclining to purchase, may 
apply to PETER WORRELL in Burlington, or WILLIAM 
DILLWYN, who will make the terms easy to the Pur- 
chaser. 

N. B. At the same time, if agreeable to the pur- 
chaser of the. brewery, will be sold, A two-story frame 
house and lot, situated very near it. 



264 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Elsing- 
borough, a servant man, named Thomas M'Mewee, 
an Irishman, about 23 or 24 years of age, about 5 
feet high, thick set, and short black hair ; had on, a 
brown home-spun jacket, with sleeves, and an under 
striped ditto, a blue pair of saggathy breeches, a fine 
shirt, grey worsted stockings, half worn pumps and 
old felt hat. Whoever takes up said servant, and 
secures him in any goal, so that his master may get 
him again, shall receive a reward of Forty Shillings, 
paid by the subscriber, in Elsingborough, or John 
Dickinson, in Salem. 

JOHN MOUNTAIN. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2179, September 27, 
1770. 

LOST, supposed to be taken by mistake, on 
Thursday the 27th of September last, out of the 
house of William Wells, at the Old Ferry, in Water- 
street, between Market and Arch streets, two small 
boxes, o;ze mahogany covered with paper, locked and 
corded ; the other pine, and cover nailed on, direct- 
ed to Mr. Thomas Cooper, at his plantation near 
Mount-Holly; under the direction was wrote S. 
Gale : Whoever took the said boxes, are desired to 
return them forthwith to the above Ferry-house, the 
owner being in great want of them. 

N. B. The contents can be but of little if any ser- 
vice to any person but the owner. Pennsylvania 
Chronicle, No. 195, Oct. 1-8, 1770. 

New-York, October 4. 

The SPEECH of his Excellency WILLIAM FRANK- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 265 

LIN, Esq ; Captain General Governor and 
Commander in Chief in and over the Colony 
New-Jersey, and Territories thereon depend- 
ing in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral 
in the same, &c. 

To the COUNCIL and GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the said 
Colony, in General Assembly convened at Perth- 
Amboy. 

Gentlemen of the Council, 

and Gentlemen of the General Assembly. 

OINCE the last Session, I have received his Majesty's 
O Royal Disallowance of the Act, for striking One 
Hundred Thousand Pounds in Bills of Credit. The 
Grounds of this Disallowance will be explained to 
you, by the Report of the Board of Trade upon that 
Law. If on Consideration you should be of opinion, 
that a new Act may be so framed, as to obviate 
those Objections, and yet answer those salutary 
Purposes intended by the other, you may be assured 
it will give me Pleasure to be able to afford it my 
Concurrence ; and that I will use all the Endeavours 
to obtain his Majesty's Confirmation of it, which may 
be in my Power. 

Gentlemen of the General Assembly. 
I HAVE only to request at present that you would 
make due Provisions for the Support of Government 
and for the Supply of his Majesty's Troops sta- 
tioned in this Province. 

Gentlemen of the Council, and Gentlemen of the Gen- 
eral Assembly ; 

The Experience I have had of your good Disposi- 
tions, renders it unnecessary to recommend to you a 



266 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Preservation of that Harmony and good Understand- 
ing, which is so beneficial to the Publick : I have 
therefore only to wish that our mutual Endeavours 
to promote his Majesty's Service, and the Welfare of 
his Subjects in this Province, may be attended with 
Success equal to our Intentions. 

Council-Chamber, | W. FRANKLIN. 

September 28, 1770. 




Wednesday September 26th, was held at Prince- 
ton, the public Anniversary Commencement of the 
College of Neiv-Jersey, when the following Gentle- 
men were admitted to the Degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, viz. 

Samuel Baldwin, Thomas M'Pherrin, John Taylor, 

John Blydenburgh, John Cosens Ogden, Stephen Tracy, 

John Campbell, Nathan Perkins, Caleb Wallace, 

Nathaniel Erwin, Caleb Kussell, Bedford Williams, 

Freder. Freliughuysen, Isaac Smith, Matthias Williamson, 

Joshua Hartt, George Smith, James Wilson, 

Azariah Horton, John Smith, James Witherspoon, 

Kobert Stewart, l 

The Degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon 
Francis Barber, Joseph Haasbrouck, Samuel Stock- 

i The following sketches of the class of 1770 are condensed from Alexander's 
"Princeton College in the Eighteenth Century:" 

Samuel Baldwin was a native of New Jersey. After graduating he emigrated 
to South Carolina, and opened a school in Charleston. But the Revolution com- 
* iog on, he took up arms during the attack of the British upon that city. After its 
capture he was a prisoner in the hands of the enemy. Refusing to take the oath 
of allegiance, he was obliged to retire into the country. After the war, Mr. Bald 
win returned to Newark, New Jersey, his native city, where he died at an ad- 
vanced age in 1850. 

Frederick Frelinghuysen was a son of the Rev. John F. Frelinghuysen of New 
Jersey. He was sent as a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey 
in 1775, when but twenty-one years of age. He resigned in 1777. He entered the 
Revolutionary army as captain of a corps of artillery, and was at the battles of 
Trenton and Monmouth. He was afterwards engaged actively as a colonel of the 
militia of his native state. He also served in the Western Expedition as Major- 
General of the New-Jersey and Pennsylvania troops. In 1793 he was elected to 
the Senate of the United States, and continued in that station until domestic be- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 267 

ton, and Josiah Stoddard, Alumni of that College, 
and also on the Rev. Messrs. Jacob R. Harden- 
burgh< John Martin, and John Joachim Zubly. 

The following Gentlemen received the Degree of 
Doctor in Divinity, viz. The Rev. Messrs. Robert 
Finlay, John Gillies, Archibald Ladley, George 
Muir, and Ebeneztr Pemberton. 

The Exercises both in the Forenoon and After- 
noon, were introduced and closed with vocal Music. 

After singing in the Morning Mr. Campbell pro- 
nounced an Oration on History. Then Mr. Wither- 

reavements, and the claims of his family, constrained him to resign in 1796. Gen- 
eral Frelinghuysen stood also among the first at the Bar of New Jersey. He was 
the father of the Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen. He died April 13, 1804. 

Joshua Hart received ordination from the Presbytery of Suffolk, L. I., April 2, 
1772; and was installed pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Smithtown, Long 
Island, April 13. 1774. In the time of the war, being an ardent patriot, he suffered 
much from imprisonment by the British in the City of New York. He was dis- 
missed from his charge September 6, 1787. Mr. Hart was never again settled, but 
continued to labor as he had opportunity until his death, which occurred October 
3, 1829, at the advanced age of 91. 

Azariah Horton was the son of Rev. Azariah Horton, of South Hanover (Mad- 
ison), New Jersey. After graduating. Mr. Horton entered the American army, 
and is said to have been killed in battle. 

Nathaniel Irwin, a native of Chester County, Pennsylvania, was licensed by 
the Presbytery of New Castle in 1773, and preached awhile in Neshaminy, Penn- 
sylvania. On November 3, 1774, he was ordained and installed as the pastor. 
Here he continued until his death, March 3, 1812. 

Thomas McPherrin received license to preach from the Presbytery of Donegal 
in 1773, and was ordained and settled as pastor of two churches in Pennsylvania 
in 1775. He remained in this charge until his death, February 4, 1802. 

John Cosins Ogden, a native of New Jersey, resided in New Haven for fifteen 
years after graduating. Having been ordained by Bishop Seabury, in 1786. he be- 
came Rector of an Episcopal Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where he 
remained until 1798. He died in Chestertown, Maryland, in 1800. 

Nathan Perkins was born in Norwich, Connecticut. After preaching in vari- 
ous places, he was installed as pastor at West Hartford, October 14, 1772. Here 
he laboured with great diligence and fidelity for sixty-six years, until his death, 
Jan. 18, 1838. 

Caleb Russell after graduating studied law, and was admitted an Attorney of 
the Supreme Court of New Jersey, at the September Term, 1784. He died in 1805. 

Isaac Smith studied theology, and settled as pastor of a Congregational 
Church at Gilmantown, New Hampshire, November 30, 1774. He died in 1817. 

John Smith was a native of Plainiield, Connecticut. He became a Congrega- 
tional minister, and on the 22d of April, 1772, was settled at Dighton, Massachu- 



268 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

spoon defended the following Thesis, Tenentur & 
obligantiir subdili, ex Lege naturcz, lit regi suo im- 
mani Socvitia grassanti, vel civ itatis jura eventenli, re- 
sistant & Liber tatem suam defendant. 

He was opposed in the Syllogistic Form by Mr. 
Blydenburgh. 

Then Mr. Ogden defended this Proposition. The 
Non- Importation Agreement reflects a Glory on the 
American Merchants, and was a noble Exertion of 
Self denial and public Spirit He was opposed by 
Mr. Horton, to whom Mr. John Smith replied. 

Next Mr. Williamson pronounced a Dissertation 
in support of this Position. Every religious Profes- 
sion, which does not by its Principles, disturb the pub- 
lic Peace, ought to be tolerated by a wise State. 

The next Proposition debated was the following, 
National Characters depend upon moral, not physical 

setts In 1802, he became a Missionary in the neighbourhood of Canandaigua, 
New York. Mr. Smith removed to Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, where he re- 
mained till 1812, when he removed to Nelson County, Kentucky, acting as a Mis- 
sionary in both places. He died in Kentucky in 1820. 

Stephen Tracy was a native of Norwich, Connecticut. He was ordained in 
April, 1773, and settled as pastor of the Congregational Church in Peru, Massa- 
chusetts, where he remained until October 8, 1815, when he was released from his 
charge. Mr. Tracy died May 14, 1825. 

Caleb Wallace was licensed by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, April 3. 
1774, and was ordained by the Presbytery of Hanover, and installed pastor of Cub 
Creek and Falling River Churches. Virginia. In 1779, he resigned his charge, and 
in 1T83 emigrated to Kentucky. He then entered the profession of the law, in 
which he was successful, and became Judge of the Supreme Court of Kentucky. 
Mr. Wallace was a native of Virginia. 

Mathias Williamson was a native of Elizabethtown, New Jersey. After grad- 
uating, he studied law, and was admitted to the Bar in November, 1774 ; but the 
war commencing, he became an officer in the Commissary department. He died 
in Elizabethtown in 1836, aged 84. 

James Wilson received his license to preach from the Presbytery of New Cas- 
tle in 1771, and was ordained in 1773. He probably died soon after, as his name 
disappears from the roll of Synod. 

James Witherspoon, a son of President Witherspoon, was a young man of 
great promise. He joined the American army as aid to General Nash and was 
killed at the battle of Germantown, October 4, 177T. 



I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 269 

Causes. Mr. Baldwin affirmed it, and was opposed 
by Mr. Taylor. 

Mr. Frelinghuysen next pronounced an Oration 
on the Utility of American Manufactures. 

In the Afternoon Mr. Wilson began with an Ora- 
tion on Commerce. Then Mr. M' Pherson supported 
this Thesis, Omnes Homines, Jure Natures, liberi 
sunt. He was opposed in the Syllogistic Form by 
Mr. John Smith. 

Next Mr. Blyctenburgh supported this Position. 
The different Professions, if maintained in their liber- 
ty, serve a State, by supplying the Place of a Censor 
Morum. Mr. Williams opposed him and was an- 
swered by Mr. Hartt. 

Then followed the Discussion of this Proposition. 
The Study of the dead Languages is for the Emolu- 
ment of Science, even in an 'Empire where every use- 
ful and ornamental Branch of Learning is copiously 
treated in the Language proper to that Empire. 

Mr. Russell asserted the Affirmative, Mr. George 
Smith answered him and Mr. Erwin replied. 

Mr. Stockton one of the Masters, then pronounced 
an Oration on Ambition. 

To this succeeded the conferring the Degrees, 
and then the Valedictory Oration on public Spirit, 
which was pronounced by Mr. Steuart. 

The whole was conducted with great Decorum, 
and to the general Satisfaction of a very numerous 
Audience. N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, 
No. 1448, October 4, 1770. 



270 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Woodbridge, New-Jersey, Sept 26, 1770. 
STOLEN last night out of the house of Capt. 
NATHANIEL HERD, of Woodbridge ; 

o 

A Stop Watch ; several silver Spoons ; Cash to 
the amount of .j ; one Jersey bill, 305 ; Pennsyl- 
vania do. 2os ; a few dollars and small silver ; and 
sundry other things. The Thief is supposed to be 
one JOHN BROWN, he says he was born in Mary- 
land and lately came from there, he is a short thick 
fellow, freckled, about 5 feet high, 20 years of age, 
his cloaths uncertain. Whoever will take up the 
Thief and secure the things stolen, shall have FIVE 
POUNDS reward, paid by 

NATHANIEL HERD. 

New-Jersey, Cape May County, Oct. 4, 1770. 
WHEREAS HANNAH, the wife of DANIEL HAND, 
Esq ; hath behaved herself in a very unbecoming 
manner and eloped from her said husband, on 
Thursday night last, without any provocation (sup- 
posed to have gone away with a certain Nathan 
Hand and Ezekiel Hand). These are to forewarn 
all persons not to trust her on his account, as he will 
pay no debts of her contracting from the date 

hereof. 

DANIEL HAND. 

Cr anbury, in East New-Jersey, Oct. 4. 
RUN AWAY from their master on the i^th of May, 

Two SERVANT MEN, one named HARBACKKUCK EAST T 

WOOD 

The other named JOHN NiCKLES 1 

i See Pennsylvania Gazette, May 24, 1770, No. 2161. 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 271 

Also RUN AWAY, on the 26th of August, an African 
SLAVE, named HAM ; he has thick lips and stutters 
sometimes, is pitted with the small pox, and has lost 
one joint of his little, finger, has a large scar on the 
back of his leg, and has had one of his knee pans 
broke, that it stands some distance from the other : He 
had on a tow shirt and trowsers, and a good hat. 
Whoever will scciire said slave to as his master may 
get him again shall have FOUR DOLLARS Reward and 
reasonable charges paid by 

ROBERT M'GHEE. 

All masters of vessels are desired not to take off the 
above servants. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1452, 
Oct. 4, 1770. 

To be LETT for a Term of YEARS. 

ANDOVER FURNACE, situate in the County of Sus- 
sex, in West New Jersey, on a Branch of Paquest 
River, together with an elegant Stone Dwelling- 
house, Stables, Smith's Shop, Spring-house, and a 
Number of Out-houses for Workmen ; a large Coal 
house, in which there is at least 7 Week's Stock of 
Coals for the next Blast; also 5,000 Acres of well 
timbered Land to accommodate the Furnace, on 
which are erected, a Saw-mill, and an excellent 
Grist-mill, which has a great Deal of Country Cus- 
tom. Scarcely a Mile from the Furnace is an inex- 
haustible Body of Ore, which may be raised at the 
easy Expence of 2s. per Ton, and makes Iron of a 
superior Quality to any other in America, particular- 
ly for the Manufacture of Steel. There is a large 
Farm on the said Tract, on which about 60 Acres 



272 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77O 

of Winter Grain is now growing, about 70 Acres of 
extraordinary good Meadow has been already made, 
and is now in good English Grass, and as much 
more may be cleared at a small Expence, it being 
already drained. The whole is under good Fence, 
and the Woodland adjoining affords excellent Range 
for a large Stock. Two Horse Teams, and 3 Ox 
Ditto, will be rented with the above Premises, if the 
Person leasing chuses it. For the Terms, apply to 
Mr. ARCHIBALD STEWART, who lives at the said Fur- 
nace, or to Messieurs ALLEN and TURNER, in Phila- 
delphia. 

To be LETT also, a large FORGE, in excellent 
Order, with 4 Fires, and 2 Hammers, in the County 
of Sussex, situate on Muscomising River, about 7 
Miles from Andover Furnace, and 35 Miles dis- 
tant from Brunswick and Elizabeth-town Landings. 
Five Thousand Acres of well-timbered Land, Part 
lying in the" County of Sussex, and Part in the 
County of Morris, very convenient to the Forge, will 
be rented with it ; also a Grist-mill, Saw-mill, com- 
modious Houses for a Manager and Forgeman, and 
70 Tons of Pig-metal on the Bank, with more than 
a Sufficiency of Coal to work it up ; likewise a good 
Farm, with about 50 Acres of Winter Grain in the 
Ground, and 25 Acres of Meadow in English 
Grass, and a Number of Teams, and every Neces- 
sary for carrying on the Business of the Forge and 
Farm. The Owners have six Negroe Slaves to hire 
out or sell, who are good Forgemen, and under- 
stand the making and drawing- of Iron well. Provis- 

o o 

ions of all Sorts may be laid in very cheap both at 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 273 

the Furnace and Forge, fat Cattle, in the Fall, being 
never higher than 2<d. per Pound, Beef, Hide and 
Tallow. For Terms, apply as above directed. 

N. B. ALLEN and TURNER will also lett, for a Term 
of Years, their SLITTING- MILL and FORGE, with, or 
without, a FURNACE, together with all the Imple- 
ments and Conveniences necessary for carrying on 
the IRON-BUSINESS ; being the noted Union Iron- 
work, in Hunterdon County, in West-Jersey, about 
30 Miles nearer Philadelphia than Andover Iron- 
work, and within that Distance from Brunswick, and 
equally convenient for the Philadelphia and New 
York Markets. , . 

To BE SOLD, 

A VALUABLE tract of land, containing 340 acres, 
situate in the township of Lebanon, in the county of 
Hunterdon, and province of West New-Jersey, 
whereon there is a log house, and other buildings, 50 
acres of plow land cleared, and 6 or 7 acres of 
meadow, and 40 or 50 acres more of meadow ground 
to clear, a young orchard planted out, the remainder 
of the land uncleared is generally well timbered and 
watered, and is within about a mile and a half of 
Squire's Point Forge, and two or three miles of Cho- 
ing 1 Water Forge, where there is a grist-mill and saw- 
mill. For further particulars and terms, enquire of 
JOHN SYKES, living in Bordentown, or ANTHONY 
SYKES, in Chesterfield, in the County of Burlington. 

To ALL, whom it may CONCERN, 
WHEREAS the subscriber JOHN HUTCHIN, late of 

i Probably Change Water Forge is meant, 
18 



274 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Mansfield, in the county of Burlington, by losses in 
trade, and other misfortunes, was under the neces- 
sity of calling his creditors together, and making an 
assignment of his estate to certain trustees, for the 

o 

benefit of all his creditors, which has been done with 
justice and truth : Notwithstanding some of his cred- 
itors have threatened, and others have commenced 
actions against him, which can terminate in no ad- 
vantage to them, but utter ruin to the subscriber, and 
his numerous family, as he has no property, but 
what he has assigned and held liable to his trustees, 
for the uses aforesaid ; therefore he is under the dis- 
agreeable necessity of applying to the Governor, 
Council and General Assembly of New-Jersey, at 
their session, now sitting at Perth-Amboy, for a law 
to exempt his person from confinement ; neverthe- 



less holding himself liable to the payment of his just 
debts, whenever in his power, which he shall indus- 
triously endeavour for. 

JOHN HUTCHIN. 

Burlington, Sept. 20, 1770. 

ANNA MARGARET WINSH who married John Usbeck 
or Reinbeck, and lives somewhere in New-Jersey, is 
desired to call on the Subscriber, living in Manor 
Township, Lancaster County, and receive a Sum of 
Money, left her by her Brother, Ulrick Winsh, de- 
ceased. 

CHRISTIAN BOUGHMAN. 

t 

Trenton Ferry, Tavern and premises, 

To be LETT, long remarkable as a fine stand for 
business, commanding, from its agreeable situation 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 275 

on the river Delaware, and near Trenton ; the great 
abundance of delicate fish in the summer season ; the 
resort of genteel company for this sport; and, as ly- 
ing on the high road between New-York and Phila- 
delphia (the latter only 30 miles distance) the most 
inviting prospect of business that any public place 
affords, exclusive of the Ferry, and many other ad- 
vantages, not necessary to enumerate. 

The proprietor has nearly compleated an entire 
new Wharff, for the accommodation of the Ferry, 
and intends immediately to put the Tavern-house 
and other buildings into full repair, so as to render 
the whole perfectly commodious and convenient. . . 
An advantageous lease will be given, and the prem- 
ises may be entered upon by the middle of Novem- 
ber next. 

Any active and obliging man, with a capital or in- 
terest, to command a neat stock .of liquors, &c. so as 
to keep up the Tavern with proper reputation and 
attention, will find it much to his interest to engage 
this lease. . . . No other need apply. . . . For fur- 
ther particulars and terms, enquire of the subscriber, 
proprietor of the estate, living in Trenton. 

DANIEL COXE. 
September 26, 1770. 

Pennsylvania y Gazette, No. 2 1 80, Oct. 4, 
1770. 

PRINCETON, September 28. 

On Wednesday, the 2.6th Instant, was held, in this 
Place, the anniversary Commencement of the Col- 
lege of New-Jersey. 

After the usual Procession from the College to the 



2/6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Church, the Business of the Day was introduced with 
Prayer by the President, and vocal Music by a select 
Company of the Students. 

The Salutatory Orator, Mr. Perkins, being- con- 
fined by Sickness, Mr. Campbell, first Intermediate, 
began the Exercises of the Candidates with an Eng- 
lish Oration on "The Utility of the Study of His- 
tory." 

To this succeeded a Latin syllogistic Dispute, on 
the following Thesis, "Tenentur & obligantur Sub- 
diti, ex Lege Naturae, ut Regi suo, immani Saevitia 
grassanti. vel Civitatis Jura evertenti, resistant, & 
Libertatem suam defendant." Mr. Witherspoon SKQ- 
ported it, and was opposed by Mr. Blydenburgh. 

This was followed by an English forensic Debate, 
in which Mr. Ogden defended this Proposition, "The 
non-importation Agreement reflects a Glory on the 
American Merchants, and was a noble Exertion of 
Self denial and Public Spirit." It was denied by Mr. 
Horton, to whose Arguments Mr. John Smith re- 
plied. 

Mr. Williamson then delivered an English Disser- 

o 

tation on this Subject, " Every religious Profession, 
which does not, by its Principles, disturb the Public 
Peace, ought to be tolerated by a wise State." 

An English forensic Disputation was then intro- 
duced. Mr. Baldwin asserted, " That National 
Characters depend not upon physical, but moral 
Causes." He was opposed by Mr. Taylor. 

The Exercises of the Forenoon concluded with an 
English Oration on " The Utility of American Man- 
ufactures," pronounced by Mr. Frelingkuysen. 



I//0] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 277 

After which the Students entertained the Assembly 
with Singing. 

In the Afternoon, after singing by the Students, 
Mr. Wilson addressed the Audience with an English 
Oration, on "The Advantages of Trade and Com- 
merce." 

Next followed a Latin syllogistic Debate on this 
Thesis, " Omnes Homines, Jura Naturae, liberti 
sunt." Mr. McPherrin espoused the Affirmative, 
and was opposed by Mr. John Smith. 

To this succeeded an English Dispute, in forensic 
Form, on the following Position, "The different re- 
ligious Professions, in any State, if maintained in 
their Liberty, serve it, by supplying the Place of a 
Censor Morem." Mr. Blydenburgh defended it ; 
Mr. Williams opposing him ; and Mr. Hartt replied. 

The Proposition was then controverted, " The 
Study of the dead Languages is for the Emolument 
of Science, even in a State where every useful and 
ornamental Branch of Learning is copiously treated 
in the Language proper to that State. Mr. Russel 
supported the Affirmative; Mr. George Smith ob- 
jected, and urged the Negative ; and Mr. Erwin re- 
plied to his Arguments. 

Mr. Stockton, one of the Candidates for the De- 
grees of Master of Arts, next delivered an English 
Oration on " Ambition ;" in which he took Occasion 
to introduce a particular complimentary Address to 
his Excellency Governor Franklin, who was pleased 
to honour the Commencement with his Presence. 

The following young Gentlemen were then ad- 
mitted to the Degree of Bachelor in the Arts. Sam- 



278 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

uel Baldwin, John Blydenburgh, John Gamble, Na- 
thaniel Erwin, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Joshua 
Hartt, Azariah H or ton, Thomas M' Pherrin, John 
Co sins Ogden, Nathan Perkins, Caleb Russell, Isaac 
Smith, John Smith, George Smith, Robert Stewart, 
John Taylor, Stephen Tracy, Caleb Wallace, Bedford 
Williams, Mathias Williamson, James Wilson and 
James Witherspoon. 

The following Gentlemen Alumni of this College, 
proceeded Masters in the Arts. Francis Barber, 
Joseph Hasbrouck, John M' Pherson, Samuel Stock- 
ton, and Josiah Stoddard. 

On the following Gentlemen, for their own liter- 
ary Merit, the Trustees of this College conferred the 
Degree of Master of Arts. 

The Rev. Jacob R. Hardenburgh, Minister at Rar- 
iton, in this Province. 

The Rev. John Martin, Minister of Christ-Church 
Parish in South Carolina. 

The Rev. John Joachin Lubley, Minister at Savan- 
nah, in Georgia. 

Mr. Joshua Maddox Wallace, Master of Arts, of 
Philadelphia College, was admitted ad eundem. 

The Degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred 
on the following Gentlemen. 

The Rev. Robert Finlay, of Glasgow, in North- 
Britain. 

The Rev. John Gillies, of Ditto, in Ditto. 

The Rev. Archibald Laidly, of New- York. 

The Rev. George Muir, of Paisly, in North- 
Britain. 

The Rev. Ebenezer Pemberlon, of Boston, in New- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 279 

England. 

The Degrees being conferred, Mr. Stewart pro- 
nounced a valedictory Oration on the Subject u of 
Public Spirit." 

After Prayer, by the President, the whole conclud- 
ed with vocal Music, performed by the Students. 

The obliging Attention of a numerous, polite, and 
respectable Audience, and the Satisfaction which 
they were pleased to express, do Honour to the sev- 
eral Speakers ; who were allowed to have executed 
their Parts with Ingenuity and Address. 

FORTY SHILLINGS REWARD. 

RAN away, on the 6th of this instant October, from 
the subscriber, living in Somerset county, East N. 
Jersey, a Negro man, named ARCH, about 5 feet 8 
inches high, and about 30 years of age, pretty black, 
walks very upright, and wears his hat right up : 
Had on when he went away, a brown coloured linsey 
coat, red vest, lined with white, buckskin breeches, 
and white stockings ; also took with him a grey ker- 
sey jacket, with the sleeves turned up. It is im- 
agined he is gone some back way to Albany, to meet 
some yellow free Negroes, which went by water 
about the same time, or else to try to get on board 
some vessel, as he attempted about 3 years ago be- 
low Philadelphia, but was taken up. It is supposed 
he has got a false pass ; he can read the bible very 
well. Whoever takes up said Negro, and secures 
him in any of his Majesty's goals, so that his master 
may have him again, shall be paid the above reward, 



280 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

and all reasonable charges, by 

REOLOF VANDIKE. 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 196, Oct. 8-15, 

1770. 



Messrs. PRINTERS. 

BEFORE the late War, the People of this Country 
were very little known or considered in Eng- 
land, nor indeed was our Importance fully un- 
derstood, either by our Fellow-Subjects or ourselves, 
before the ever memorable Period of the Stamp-Act. 
By the oppressive Acts of the British Legislature, we 
were then roused out of a supine Inattention to the 
common Interest and combined Strength of the Conti- 
nent, and led to form an Estimate of our Powers, to 
feel our own Consequences, and to impress a new, 
and that a very high Idea of our Importance to the 
Mother Country. We exerted ourselves with Vig- 
our and with Unanimity. The Effect was propor- 
tioned to our Wishes. 

The Means by which our Deliverance was sup- 
posed in a great Measure to be wrought, was a cor- 
dial Agreement to cease the Importation of British 
Goods. By this Means the Manufacturers, Mechan- 
ics and their Connections, who before this Time had 
scarcely ever extended their Views further than the 
Merchant who bought their Goods, finding their 
Employment at an End, thro' the Stoppage of Orders 
from this Country, were taught to revere our Inter- 
est, and conspired with the Merchants to forward a 
Repeal. 

Upon new Acts of Oppression, the same Means 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 28 1 

have been attempted, and we flattered ourselves that 
we might hope for the same Success. But alas ! a 
different Prospect is now presented. After more 
than three Years we seem as far from the Comple- 
tion of our Hopes, as when we set out ; and what 
is infinitely worse, we seem to have lost Sight of that 
friendly Union, which prevailed during our former 
Struggle. Instead of that unanimous Resolution 
and universal Concord of Sentiment, by which we 
were then united as one Man to oppose the Enemies 
of our Liberty, an Opposition of Measures, a Con- 
tradiction of Opinions, Party Spirit, mutual Ran- 
cour and Complaints, and every Mark of a divided 
People are gaining too much Ground. If these con- 
tinue we are undone. Divided among ourselves we 
shall be an easy Prey to the Enemies of our 
Freedom. 

As it has been with great Anxiety that I have ob- 
served this Temper, and as some Cause must have 
produced it, I should think myself happy if my At- 
tempts to point out and remove that Cause, should 
be crowned with Success. 

To what can it be owing that our Agreements are 
broken ? For I cannot account for it from any re- 
ligious Quarrel, as that seems to have subsided, nor 
from any Party Spirit, because it was but the other 
Day the common Principles, and indeed the Glory of 
every Party to adhere to them. The true Cause, I 
apprehend, is in the Agreement itself. From one 
Extreme we have pass'd to another ; from not re- 
garding to over-rating our own Importance. Flushed 
with the new acquired Idea of our Consequence, and 



282 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ 

elate with Victory, we supposed that the Parliament 
of Great-Britain might be brought to pur own 
Terms, by the same Means at all Times, without 
making any allowance for obstinate Perseverance or 
favourable Accidents on their Part. We entered 
Precipitately into a Non-Importation Agreement, so 
extensive, that it was calculated after some Time to 
defeat itself, unless speedy Redress was obtained. 
The Parliament has persevered, the English have 
found other Markets for their Goods : Accident 
have favoured them, and we are left to struggle with 
Impossibilities. It is vain to think that we can hold 
Breath always, and as vain to think that we can, 
not only turn the Course of our Trade, but annihi- 
late it altogether. The Notion is chimerical, and ac- 
cordingly our Agreements have come to nothing, 
and that merely from the Circumstances of their be- 
ing too extensive. I shall not enquire, whether the 
not obtaining Redress is owing to the Treachery of 
Boston. It is not obtained, and our Agreements 
cannot be persevered in. It is true, this could not 
be foreseen at first, and therefore the entering into 
them was not so imprudent as may be supposed by 
some Persons. It was not known that we should 
need to persevere so long ; and it is owing in a 
great Measure to unexpected Demands from other 
Parts of the World, that so long a Struggle has been 
necessary. Besides, the Experiment had but once 
been tried, and it had then succeeded. I could wish 
too that we had persevered a little longer ; that we 
had, if possible, tried one more Session of Parlia- 
ment, for we certainly derived Advantages from the 



I77 C J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 283 

Agreement, even in a commercial View, and it was 
rather early to give over, as soon as these commer- 
cial Advantages were at an End. But the Die is 
cast ; and we have only to chuse, whether to unite 
in maintaining an Agreement of a more restricted 
Nature, or to go on disputing about a Shadow, which 
cannot longer be realized It is indeed possible to 
drop all Trade with England, and it is possible for 
us to go naked too, but it cannot be expected. We 
may go on reproaching and complaining of each 
other, we may widen still more the Differences 
which already prevail amongst us, and we may per- 
haps forever destroy all Hopes of recovering that 
Union, on which our Safety depends ; but we cannot 
possibly maintain so extensive" an Agreement for any 
Length of Time. Is there not reason to hope that 
we might all unite once more, in maintaining an 
Agreement not to import dutiable Articles? Most 
People are of Opinion that it had been better to 
have made this Agreement at first ; but they would 
not seem to relax from their Resolutions : It would 
look as if all our Agreements would come to noth- 
ing. But surely it would be better to correct our 
Mistake, than to persevere, or rather to pretend to 
persevere, beyond what we are able. Whilst we are 
attempting something which is within the Verge of 
Possibility, we may be feared ; but when we offer to 
go beyond this, we shall really be despised, for our 
Enemies are sensible that we shall do nothing. 
What I fear, and I think I have Reason to fear it, is, 
that our intestine Divisions will grow so high, as to 
drive some through Party spirit to import even duti- 



284 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

able Articles ; and then adieu to Liberty ! We have 
not yet bowed our Neck to the Yoke, but the Instant 
we consent to pay these Duties, we submit to Slav- 
ery Because the Outworks have been deserted as 
untenable, let us be the more cautious, that we be 
not driven from the Fortress ; and let us be exceed- 
ingly careful to unite as one Man in its Defence. 

Yours, &c. 

CETHEGUS. 
New-Jersey, September 25, 1770. 

New-York, October 8. We hear that the Rev. 
General Convention of Delegates, from the conso- 
ciated Churches of Connecticut, and the Synod of 
New-York and Philadelphia, met at Elizabeth-Town, 
on Wednesday, the 3d of this Month, to consider 
the general State of the Churches under their Care. 
The Convention was opened with a Sermon by the 
Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Taylor, of New-Milford, from 
Ezek. xxxvn 9-11. 



Subscriber begs leave to return his 
JL hearty Thanks to those Gentlemen who 
were pleased to favor him with their Votes and In- 
terest at the present Session of General Assembly, 
now sitting at Perth-Amboy, for the Business of the 
Province, altho' it was not successful to him. 

NOTWITHSTANDING, it gives him singular Satisfac- 
tion to think, that by his losing that Business, it has 
preserved his Opponent from inevitable Ruin. 

SAMUEL F. PARKER. 
Woodbridge, October 6, 1770. 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 285 

Mrs. JOHNSON, 
(formerly Mrs. CHETWOOD) 

TNFORMS the Publick, that she keeps a House 
1 of Entertainment in the large and commo- 
dious House next adjoining the Court-House in 
Elizabeth-Town, (formerly Mr. Shute's) Also good 
Stabling for Horses, and Conveniences for Carria- 
ges. . ^ 

OTICE is hereby given, the Trustees of 
Queen's College in New Jersey, are -de- 
sired to meet at the House of the Rev. Mr. Harden- 
bergh, at the Raritan, on Wednesday the jrst Day 
of this Instant, October, by me, 

DAVID MARINUS, 

Officiating Clerk to the Trustees of said -College, 
for the Time being. 

HPnis is to give Notice to the Creditors of 
L John Mecom, Jeweller, who died on Sunday 
the 3Oth of September last, That Catherine Mecom, 
his Widow, declining the Administration is ready to 
deliver the Effects and Estate he died possessed of, 
to the Creditors, or to any one that shall administer 
on the same ; and that she would be glad to hear 

from them soon. 

CATHERINE MECOM. 

New -Brunswick, October 4, 1770. 

To be SOLD, 

A Large White-Wood PETTIAUGRE, 5 years old, 
now in good Order, with a new Suit of 
Sails. She is 32 Feet long and 7 wide, suitable for 




286 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

a Miller or Farmer. For Particulars enquire of 
John Van Winckle, in Bergen 

She now lies at Prior's Mill, in Bergen, where 
any Person may view her. N. Y. Gazette or Weekly 
Post Boy, No. 1449, October 8, 1770. 

TO BE SOLD, 

On reasonable terms by the Subscriber, 
ETNA FURNACE, 

IN Burlington county, 19 miles from Philadelphia, 
situated on a tract of near 9000 acres of well wood- 
ed land, in a plentiful and healthy country, furnished 
with all houses and buildings necessary, 7 miles from 
the present landing on Ancocas Creek, & one may 
be made at five miles distance, or the produce may 
be transported in a pontoon to carry six tons at two 
miles, whence boards are daily floated in rafts of 
2500 feet. The land carriage to New York market 
is 17 miles. Together with a small stamping mill 
and a grist mill close to the furnace, and convenien- 
ces therein to grind and polish iron ware by water ; 
there is in the furnace a variety of nice patterns and 
flasks for casting ware, for which as well as barr iron, 
the metal of this work is very fit, and is in very high 
esteem at foreign markets, as will appear by the ac- 
counts of sales. There is also on this tract a swift 
going saw-mill which for some years past & to come 
is under a rent of near ^200 per year, with a provis- 
ion for doing the owners work. There is plenty of 
ore at different distances, and the roads so remarka- 
bly good that the carriages will last many years with 
very little repair. 



1 77] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 287 

Also TANTON FORGE, two miles and a half nearer 
Philadelphia, on an extraordinary stream, and a com- 
petent quantity of wood, having all buildings neces- 
sary. The teams used about these works are chief- 
ly oxen, the maintenance of which costs very little 
during the coaling season, and they are wintered 
abroad at 285. per pair. The portage of the iron is 
i os. per ton to Philadelphia, and the advantages 
these works have in this respect, over the works far 
back, amounts to many hundred pounds a year. 

Also to be SOLD, ONE HALF of ATSION FORGE or 
BLOOMARY of four fires and two hammers, very large 
and commodious, on a large stream of water, having 
all necessary buildings erected, the wood and ore 
handy, the portage of its produce to Philadelphia 
175. per ton, and to New York 155. The loads at 
all these works is one ton and a half, and machines 
on the plainest construction are erected for weighing 
them if suspected. There are at the works several 
servants and negroes who understand different 
branches of the business, teams and carriages. One 
managers clerk, one carpenter, and one smith do the 
business of the furnace and Tanton forge with ease. 
The only reason for selling them is that it is neces- 
sary to have a person concerned in the works resi- 
dent at Philadelphia, and a man of activity at the 
furnace. The present owner is very infirm, and not 
able to stirr much. The premises will bear examin- 
ing. Any person or persons inclining to become 
purchasers of a part or the whole, are invited to 
view them and examine the calculations made for 
carrying them on, and to stay at the works a proper 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [j77O 

season to see the exactness of those calculations 
demonstrated. If the persons be strangers, introduc- 
tory letters will be expected. 

CHARLES READ. 

Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1453, Oct. IT, 
1770. 

NEW-YORK, October 3 

On Tuesday last, The Corporation for the Relief of 
Widows and Children of Clergymen in the Commun- 
ion of the Church of England in America, met in 
this City : And on Wednesday a well adapted Dis- 
course, warmly recommending the Charity, was 
preached in Trinity Church, to a very large and res- 
pectable Audience, by the Revd. Dr. AUCHMUTY, one 
of the Members of the Corporation, from 2 Kings 

-t- V A . ^ * 4 

As it is presumed that there are many charitably 
disposed Persons, who would be desirous to know in 
what Manner they may convey their Benefactions, 
we are desired to give Notice, that Donations to this 
laudable Charity will be thankfully received by Ja- 
cob Le Roy, Esq; of this City ; the Revd. Dr. Chand- 
ler, of Elizabeth-Town, and Francis Hopkinson, Esq; 
of Philadelphia, the Treasurers ; and, in general, by 
the Clergy and the other Members of the Corpora- 
tion, in each of the three Provinces. 

The Beginning of August last departed this Life, 
at Pilesgrove, in West New-Jersey, Mr. Mounce Keen, 
aged 105 Years and 8 Months. He was born of 
Swedish Parents at Chester, in Pennsylvania, and al- 
ways enjoyed his Health and Understanding well, till 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 289 

within the few last Years of his Life. About three 
Years before his Death, he rode alone three Miles, and 
Jwme again. 

o 

Elizabeth-Town^ East New Jersey, October 4, 1770. 

STRAYED or STOLEN, from the subscriber in Eliza- 
betJi Town, East New Jersey, last night, a brown 
horse, about 14 hands and an half high, has a star in 
his forehead, is well and strong made, has a brand on 
one thigh, but scarcely visible, about y or 10 years old, 
both trots and paces, but neither well. Likewise a 
strawberry roan horse, j years old last grass, about 14 
hands high, has a star in his forehead something like 
a half moon, natural to a trot. Whoever takes up the 
said horses, and returns them to the subscriber, or gives 
notice where they are, shall receive a reward of Twen- 
ty Shillings, if taken in the province, or Forty Shil- 
lings, if taken out of the province, and all reasonable 
charges paid ; if stolen, and the thief be stopped with 
them, so as to be brought to justice, double the above re- 
zvard will be paid by JOHN HALSTEAD. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2181, Oct. 11, 
1770. / ' " 

To BE SOLD, by public vendue, in Cranbury town, on 
Thursday, the first of November next, at eleven 
o clock in the forenoon, 

THE noted GRIST MILLS in said town, all newly 
repaired, with two pair of stones, and three boulting 
cloths in good order, a small frame house, stable, and 
a three acre lot of English meadow, adjoining said 
mills. 

Also about two hundred and twelve acres of good 

19 



290 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. % 

land two miles from the mills, on which are a good 
frame dwelling-house, barn, waggon house, and a 
large orchard, all in excellent repair, together with 
19 acres of meadow, lying along Pinotipine brook, 
late the estate of Michael Reynolds, deceased. 

The mills lie on a good stream, extremely well sit- 
uated for country or merchant work, and for a store, 
being on the stage road to New- York; in the county 
of Middlesex, and province of New-Jersey, within 20 
miles of Bordentown, and 1 1 of South River Land- 
ing, in a healthy country, and remarkable for produc- 
ing as good wheat as any part of the province. 
From the convenience of situation, the miller or 
merchant may send their produce to, and receive 
goods from Philadelphia, New-York, &c. at a very 
small expence. To be sold together or separate, as 
may best suit the purchaser or purchasers, to whom 
shall be made an indubitable title. Conditions to be 
made known at the time of sale. 

GRACE REYNOLDS, Administratrix. 

JOHN REYNOLDS, Administrator. 
Cr anbury, October 1 1 . 

BURLINGTON, September 24, 1770. 
THIS DAY IS PUBLISHED AND TO BE SOLD, by 

ISAAC COLLINS, 

At his printing-office in this city, the BURLINGTON AL- 
MANACK ; for the year of our Lord ////. Contain- 
ing, besides the usual astronomiccal observations, the 
following useful and entertaining matters, viz 
i. SOME hints, extracted from a late approved 

treatise on health. 2. The true history of the gold- 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 2QI 

en age ; a poem. 3. An essay on emulation. 4. 
Riches and poverty ; an Athenian allegory. 5. The 
female choice : A poem. 6. A point of law relative 
to wills explained. 7. The bachelor's supplication : 
A poem. 8. A list of his Majesty's council of New- 
Jersey. 9. A list of representatives of Assembly for 
New-Jersey. 10. A correct table for the more ready 
casting up coins in this province, and Pennsylvania, 
ii. A table shewing the interest due, from 5 shil- 
lings to 100 pounds, at 6 and 7 per cent. 12. A ta- 
ble of the value and weight of coins. 13. Quakers 
general meetings. 14. A method to take honey and 
preserve the bees. 15. A receipt for a sore throat. 
1 6. An infallible cure for the stone and gravel. 17. 
A cure for the bite of a rattle-snake. 18. Receipt 
for an asthma. 19. Several approved receipts for 
the cure of disorders incident to horses. 20. De- 
tached reflections. 21. Courts, fairs, roads, &c., 
&c. Where also may be had, wholesale and re- 
tail, a variety of books and stationary and the 
best price for clean linen rags. The above alma- 
nack may likewise be had of Jonathan Dane, jun. in 
Third-street, between Market and Arch-streets, the 
fifth door above Church-alley, and nearly opposite 
John Raser's tavern, Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 
Chronicle, No. 197, Oct. 15-22, 1770. 



w 



HEREAS on the 23d of August last, Sarah, 
Wife of Joseph Searing, of the Scots 
Plains, in the County of Essex, has without any 
Just Cause, eloped from her said Husband's Bed and 
Board ; These are therefore to forewarn all Persons 



292 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

' 

trusting her on his Account, as he will not pay any 
Debts of her contracting, after the said Date. 

JOSEPH SEARING. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 
1450, October 20, 1770. 

Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in Prince- 
town, to his Friend in Philadelphia. 

"In the last Week's Paper you have an Account 
of the Commencement annually held here, and al- 
though you are already acquainted with the Particu- 
lars, yet I cannot help adding, that the Grandeur and 
Decorum with which the whole was conducted, re- 
flects Honour on the Seminary from which they grad- 
uated. That truly noble and patriotic Spirit which 
inflames the Breasts of those who are real Lovers of 
their Country, seems already implanted in theirs.--! 
have the Pleasure to inform you, their united Efforts 
to appear in Cloth manufactured in America, suc- 
ceeded to their Wish.- -May I not then say with the 
young Gentlemen, that the gayest Butterfly in all the 
Assembly, in all its borrowed Plumes, did not appear 
more brilliant than his Classmates, who were that 
Day honored with their Attendance. What too san- 
guine Hopes can we then have of those Gentlemen, 
and such Principles so early instilled in them?" 

This is to give notice, That one EDWARD GODFREY, 
advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2180, for 
stealing a watch, and other things from Nicholas 
FAIRLAMB, of Middletown township, Chester county, 
is apprehended, and confesses the crime, and is now 
in Burlington goal, in New Jersey ; the said FAIR- 



I77J NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 293 

LAMB is desired to come and pay the reward, and 
charges, and he may have his watch, by applying to 
THOMAS FENIMORE, near Burlington aforesaid 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2182, October 18, 1770. 

BOSTON, October 1 8. 

At South-Carolina they are very warm against the 
New-York revolters, as they stile them, and it was 
proposed that their worthy committee write to Phil- 
adelphia, New-Jersey and Connecticut, exhorting 
them to withdraw their whole trade from New-York, 
particularly their flax-seed, the great staple of the 
Irish factors at New-York ; also to write to the land- 
holders farmers and mechanics of Albany and Long 
Island &c &c &c 

The Hon. JOHN FOXCROFT, Esq; one of the D. 
Postmasters General of the Northern Distrist of 
America, with his Lady, and JOSEPH READE, Esq; of 
Trenton, and his Lady (a Daughter of the late DEN- 
NYS DEBERDT, Esq; the worthy and faithful Agent of 
the Province of Massachusetts Bay) are safe arrived 
here, with Capt. Osborne, from London, to the great 
Joy of their numerous Friends. 

DEATHS. ', /; 

At Mansfield, New-Jersey, Mr. Henry Delatush. 

THREE POUNDS REWARD. 
RAN away from the subscriber, living in Mans- 
field, on the 25th of this instant, (October) in the 
evening, a certain Levi Eldridge. about 23 years of 
age, thin favoured, light hair ; had on when he went 
away a brown coat, striped jacket double breasted, a 




294 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

pair of ozenbrigs trowsers, old shoes with pinchbeck 
buckles in them, yarn stockings, an old castor hat ; 
but as he had other clothes in the neighbourhood, he 
may possibly change them. Whoever takes up the 
said Levi Eldridge, and secures him so that the sub- 
scriber may get him again, shall have the above re- 
ward, and reasonable charges, paid by 

SOLOMON IVINS, jun. Constable. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 198, Oct. 22- 
29, 1770. 

T HEREAS Elizebeth, the Wife of William 
Denniston, hath eloped from her Hus- 
band, and he is suspicious she will run him in Debt : 
This is to give Notice to all Persons not to trust her 
for any Thing, for I will not pay one Penny that she 
contracts from the first of October, 1770. 

WILLIAM DENNISTON. 
Raw ay, October 18, 1770. 

To be sold at public Vendue on the Premises, on 
Saturday the 2^.th Day of November next, at two 
o Clock in the Afternoon. 

n^HREE HUNDRED Acre.s of good LAND, .most of 
1 it cleared, and a Grist-Mill with two Pair of 
Stones, lying and being within two Miles of the City 
of New-Brunswick, the Property of Henry Longfield, 
deceased. The Conditions or Terms of Payment 
will be made known at the Time of Sale, by 

JAMES NEILSON, 

EXECUTOR OF HENRY LONGFIELD. 
October 15. 

N. Y. Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No 1451, 
October 22, 1770. 




1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 295 

\_The following piece which ive were desired to publish 
a week or two ago, was then omitted for want of 
room. But as the publisher of this paper makes it 
a point to give every one free and equal liberty to 
declare their sentiments, especially when the piiblic 
good is the end proposed, it is nozv inserted, though 
there is some alteration of circumstances, since it 
was written. 

New-Jersey, October 2, 1770. 
Mr. PRINTER, Please to insert the following. 

T this critical conjuncture when the liberties 
of America are at stake, every head should 
be thinking and every hand active for the public 
good. The greater part of the colonies are still 
united in adhering to the non-importation agreement, 
notwithstanding the Punic perfidy of many of the 
inhabitants of New-York, in spite of all their en- 
deavours to scatter the seeds of discord among their 
neighbours, by their repeated publications of letters 
said to be from England, but which carry evident 
marks of forgery with them, arid in spite of their 
idle accusations of the Bostonians, which they have 
so frequently and carefully retailed, from a pamphlet 
drawn up by those enemies of American freedom, 
the Commissioners, and published by their printer 
Mein, as inveterate and active an opposer to the 
agreement as there is perhaps on the continent. 
The Philadelphians. notwithstanding the short-lived 
triumph of the New-York importers, are adopting, 
in concert with Boston, the Maryland agreement, so 
that there will be but one member of the great con- 
tinental body that we could wish to see amputated. 



296 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Interest will operate upon those deserters of the pub- 
lic cause, tho' the cries and execrations of their coun- 
try may not : And I hope the few hints I shall pro- 
pose will be received with all the warmth of men 
glowing with the love of freedom, and improved and 
pursued with resolution and constancy, as containing 
the strongest proofs of our. abhorrence of the meas- 
ures of those men, and being the most likely to 
touch them in their tenderest part, their interest. 

Some weeks ago I read a piece in the New-York pa- 
pers, proposing some methods to improve Amboy as 
a place of trade. I was much pleased with the inven- 
tion, tho' I did not think the plan well laid, for how- 
ever advantageous the situation and harbour of that 

o 

city may be, which indeed justly deserved all the en- 
comiums passed on them yet it would be absurd to 
suppose that any considerable number of merchants 
could be prevailed on to remove thither, from New- 
York or any other place where they are well fixed, 
and begin the world anew, as it were, merely to man- 
ifest their disapprobation of the defection of the 
New- York majority, especially as they could have no 
security that the traders of that province would give 
them the preference for any considerable length of 
lime. Public spirit has often done wonders ; but a 
man's own interest is generally his most powerful 
motive to action. To make it the interest, therefore, 
of the inhabitants of New Jersey, and particularly 
the traders, will be the surest means for success in 
improving that city as a place of trade. I would 
therefore propose- -That a number of rules and ar- 
ticles for carrying on business be framed, by some 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 297 

able hand, in the name of a company, to be styled 
the united company of New-Jersey. That the assem- 
bly be petitioned to pass an act, or the governor be 
prayed to grant letters of incorporation to the said 
company ; not for an exclusive trade, but to enable 
them to sue and be sued in that capacity. That di- 
rectors and other officers be appointed, in the man- 
ner of the East-India company in England. That a 
subscription be opened, inviting all who wish well to 
the province and American freedom, especially the 
traders, to become adventurers. That no person 
shall subscribe less than ^"50 or ^"100. That the 
subscription be closed and the trade commence on 
a certain day, after which no subscriptions to be re- 
ceived, at least till after the expiration of one year. 
That a settlement be made annually, and the profits 
or losses arising from the trade be carried to the 
debit or credit of the adventurers, in proportion to 
the sums they respectively subscribe, and That at 
the end of 3, 5 or 7 years, when the joint stock 
grows more than sufficient to carry on the trade, 
dividends be made of so much per cent, as can be 
spared ; and, in short, That the whole be framed on 
the plan, and conducted on the principles of the 
East-India company, as near as may be, considering 
the different circumstances of the two companies. 
I am confident such a plan of trade would be attend- 
ed with success : for how could it fail when the ad- 
venturers themselves have it in their power, and 
would undoubtedly for their own interest use their 
influence to promote it? Such an united company 
would have a credit to trade far beyond their stock, 



298 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS.. 

and need not doubt of disposing of any quantity of 
goods, provided their assortments were laid in with 
proper care and judgment. This plan is attended 
with the greatest advantages to the country shop- 
keepers. As matters are now, the retailer in the 
country pays a very heavy tax to the New- York 
merchant, who besides the prime cost of his goods, 
charges the shop keepers with an advance of 20 or 
25 per cent., whereas by subscribing to this design, 
he becomes a double gainer ; for besides his ordina- 
ary profits, he not only saves, but has his proportion 
of the profit of that very advance, which formerly he 
used to pay to the New-York merchant. The sub- 
scribers being spread about the country, would have 
a mighty influence in diverting the course of trade 
from New-York to Amboy, particularly the traders, 
who by purchasing up the commodities of the coun- 
try, and selling them to the company for exportation, 
would greatly increase the stock, and consequently 
each subscriber's profit. In every view the plan is 
highly advantageous as well as public spirited, and 
would no doubt meet with the encouragement of the 
other provinces. This united company would en- 
courage merchants from different places to settle at 
Amboy ; for in a few years, it may well be supposed, 
the demand for goods would so far exceed what it 
does at present, that it would be impossible to sup- 
ply it out of one store, however large or well filled ; 
which will undoubtedly draw others to open stores 
there and give the united company occasion to en- 
large their trade still more. Would to heaven these 
few hints may excite some public spirited persons to 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 299 

push forward a scheme so profitable and patriotic, 
and convince the public, that by subscribing to it, 
they not only most eminently serve their country, 
but put their money out to the best interest. 

NEO CAESARIENSIS. 

New-York October 25. We hear from Elizabeth- 
Town, New Jersey, that on Saturday the T3th Instant, 
the following melancholy Accident happened near 
that Place, viz, A Boy of about 10 years of Age, Son 
of Mr. Richard Townley, being sent of an Errand, 
turned aside and stop'd at a Meadow on the Way, 
to look at another Boy who was mowing with a 
Sithe, a Business he was not used to, when he un- 
warily approached so near, that the other who struck 
irregularly, reached him with the Point of the Sithe, 
which penetrated the inside of the upper Part of his 
Thigh near the Groin, to the Bone, and beyond it, 
dividing the main Artery. Of this dreadful Wound, 
not withstanding all the Assistance that could be 
given him, he bled to Death in less than an Hour, 
and before a Surgeon could arrive. N. Y. Journal 
or General Advertiser, No. 1451, October 25, 1770. 

All those that have any demands against the es- 
tate of Thomas West, late of the township of Dept- 
ford, and county of Gloucester, deceased, are desired 
to bring in their accounts, properly proved, in order 
that they may be adjusted; and those that are indebt- 
ed to the estate, by bond, bill, book debt or other- 
wise, are desired to come and discharge the same. 
DEBORAH WEST, Executrix, JOSEPH WARNER, CHARLES 
WEST, Executors. 



300 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



Messieurs HALL and SELLERS, 

Please to put what follows in your next Paper, and 
you will oblige a Number of your Readers. 

Salem County t Western Division of New Jersey, 

Oct. 8, 1770. 

As there has been lately a Division from the Town- 
ship of Piles-Grove, and a new Township chartered; 
and as there are various Monuments erected to the 
everlasting Remembrance of the Name of that truly 
noble and venerable Patriot, Mr. PITT; out of a 
grateful Sense- -we, the Freeholders and other In- 
habitants of the new patented Township, did apply 
to Government for the Name, as well as the Patent, 
which Government, in its benign Goodness, did 
admit, and think we cannot immortalize that noble 
and venerable Patriot's Name, nor transmit it to Fu- 
turity better, than to apply it to the Township, there- 
fore the new Township is called PITT'S-GROVE, in 
Commemoration of that great and noble Friend of 
American Liberty, Sir WILLIAM PITT, now Earl of 
CHATHAM: 

Philadelphia, October 23, 1770 
To the PUBLIC 

The Commissioners, appointed by the Contribu- 
tors to removing the Obstructions in the River Del- 
aware, and for improving the Navigation thereof, did 
procure a compleat Survey of the said River, from 
the great Falls, at the head of the Tide Water, up to 
the Forks, near Easton, which was finished, and re- 
ported to, on the 2ist of August last. 

After this no Time was lost in providing Boats, 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3OI 

and other necessary Materials, and in employing 
Men, properly qualified, for carrying this useful Work 

into execution 

As some Alterations have been made in the 
Course of the Channel at the said Falls, it is thought 
necessary to give this public Information to All 
BOATMEN and RAFTMEN, using the River Delaware, 
that, at the Head or Entrance thereof, about 50 or 
60 Perches above the upper End of Yard's Island, a 
black Buoy is placed on the western or Pennsylvania 
Side of the new Channel. The best Passage for 
Boats or Rafts is about three Perches from this Buoy, 
nearer to the Jersey Shore- -from thence continuing 
a straight Course near Yard's Island to the lower 

o 

End thereof, opposite to which, on the Pennsylvania 
Side of the Channel another black Buoy is placed, 
which may be passed at the Distance of one or two 
Perches ; then steer towards the Jersey Shore, and 
keeping close in therewith, the Channel leads into 
Tide Water. The Width of this Channel, from the 
Entrance to the End thereof, is from ten to fifteen 
Perches. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2183, October 
25, 1770. v 

The MEMBERS of the NEW-JERSEY 
MEDICAL SOCIETY, 

ARE desired to take Notice, That their next 
general Meeting is appointed to be held at 
the House of Mr. Brook Farmer, in New Bruns- 
wick, on Tuesday, the ijth Day of November next. 
Itis hoped the Members will make a Point of attend- 
ing in general. The Society will be opened precise- 






302 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

t 

ly at Eleven o'Clock A. M. (if a sufficient Number 
of Members are arrived) and a Dissertation upon 
some Medical Subject, delivered by the President 
before Dinner. All other Gentlemen of the Facul- 
ty in the Province are invited to Join the Society. 

NATHANIEL SCUDDER, Secretary. 
October 10, 1770. 

N. B. The General Half-Yearly Meetings of the 
Society, are for the future ordered to be held on the 
second Tuesdays in November and May.- -TV. Y. 

Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1452, Octover 29, 
1770 

THREE DOLLARS Reward. 

") UN away from the subscriber, at Elizabeth- 
_Y Town, a young likely negro fellow, called 
John, his complexion for a black, is of the lightest 
sort, being much upon the tawney. Had on, a lin- 
sey woolsey striped jacket and breeches, and blue 
duffel great coat : Took with him a blue cloth coat 
with plain white metal buttons, and a pair of buck- 
skin breeches. It is thought he may probably be 
lurking about Pcmpton, where he was bred, in the 
family of the late Mr. Brockhurst. 1 Whoever takes 
up and secures the said negro, shall be entitled to 

the above reward from 

W. P. SMITH. 

N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1452, November i, 1770. 

i Henry Brockholst, son of Anthony Brockholst. 



I //O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 303 

LIST of LETTERS remaining in the Post- Office, Phil- 
adelphia. 

B. Thomas Budd, Salem. 

C. Samuel Clements, Haddonfield. 

D. Joseph and George Distion, Salem County. 
H. Joshua Hopper, Jersies. 

L. Jeremiah Ludlom, Cape-May ; John Ladd, 

Gloucester. 

M. Daniel M'Farland, Mount-holly. 
S. Thomas Scuder, Salem ; Daniel Shields, 

Mount-holly. 
W. Joseph Worth, Salem. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in the town- 
ship of Upper Freehold, county of Monmouth, and 
Province of East New-Jersey, the i5th of October 
last, a servant man, named JOSEPH LEMMON, country 
born, about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, sandy complex- 
ion, strait yellow hair, sandy beard, lightish yellow 
eyes, a learing, roguish look, knock-kneed, and mid- 
dling well set; had on, and took with him, a super- 
fine light coloured broadcloth coat, brown vest, a 
frize surtout, dark bearskin great coat, with carved 
brass and steel buttons, a half worn beaver hat, fine 
shirt, 4 ozenbrigs ditto, a silk handkerchief, a pair of 
old trowsers, i pair of striped ticken ditto, an old 
black neckcloth, old leather breeches, a pair of blue- 
grey yarn stockings, and half-worn pumps ; the 
cloaths are too large for him, as they are his mas- 
ter's : He stole a silver watch, with a silver chain, 
and ^4: 7:6 in cash. Whoever takes up the said 
servant, and secures him in any goal, so that his mas- 



304 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ter may have him again, shall have FIVE POUNDS re- 
ward, and reasonable charges, paid by me 

HUGH HUTCIIIN 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2184, November i, 
1770. 



A 



ITLICATION having been made to me by a 
number of the Proprietors of the Eastern 
Division of New-Jersey, to call a Council on an ex- 
traordinary Occasion : In Compliance herewith I do 
appoint Tuesday the 27th of this Instant November, 
as a Day of Meeting of the General Proprietors of 
the Eastern Division f New-Jersey, at this Place ; 
of which all Persons concerned are desired to take 
Notice. 

Perth-Amboy, JAMES PARKER, President 

Nov. 6, 1770. 

Gloucester County, October 29, 1770. 
EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away on the 28th Inst. from me the Sub- 
scriber, living in Gloucester County, West- 
Jersey, an English servant Lad, named WILLIAM 
COOK, about 20 Years of Age, short and thick set, 
Limps a little in his Walk, black curled hair ; had on 
a Beaver Hat, two Thirds worn, took with him a blue 
Coat with a small Cape, almost new ; two Broad- 
cloth Vests, half worn, of a brown Colour, two Shirts, 
one fine ditto, good Buckskin Breeches, one pair 
striped Trousers, two pair good Worsted Stockings, 
one pair Yarn ditto, all Grey Colour'd, one pair Calf- 
Skin Shoes, somewhat worn, new double soaled 
Neat's Leather ditto, with broad rim'd Brass Buck- 



I //O] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 305 

les, by Trade a Weaver, was born in Gloucestershire, 
is supposed to have a forged Pass, in the name of 
Patrick Grimes, by which Name it is likely he will 
call himself. Said Servant was seen about 30 Miles 
on the Road to New- York, where he is gone with an 
intent to take shipping for England. All Masters of 
Vessels are therefore desired not to take or harbour 
him. Whoever takes up and secures said Servant, 
so that his Master may have him again, shall have 

< 

the above Reward, and reasonable Charges paid, by 

DAVID COOPER. 

N. B. If taken up in New York, apply to White 
Matlock, Watch-Maker, the Corner of Peck's-Slip. 

-N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 1453, 
November 8, i 770. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 8. 

On Saturday the 27th of October last, the Sessions 
of General Assembly for the Province of New-Jersey 
ended, when the following Laws were passed. 

An Act to enable Persons, either by Birth or Nat- 
uralization, to hold Lands within this Colony. 

An Act to regulate the pasturing Lands on Bar- 
neygat Beach, &c. 

An Act to prevent Swine running at large in the 
Town of Haddonfield, in the County of Gloucester. 

An Act to vacate a certain Bond, given by Samuel 
Rogers, deceased, to Stevens and Lawrence. 

A supplementary Act to an Act, intituled, An Act 
for the- better enabling Creditors to recover their 
Debts from Persons who abscond themselves. 

An Act to raise a Fund for repairing Damages 

20 



306 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

done by Dogs, in the Counties of Somerset, Hun- 
terdon, Burlington, and Gloucester. 

An Act for the Support of Government. 

An Act for cleaning, amending and repairing the 
public Roads and Highways, in the Counties of Hun- 
terdon, Morris, Sussex and Somerset. 

A supplementary Act to an Act, intituled, An Act 
to settle the Quotas in the several Counties in this 
Colony, for levying Taxes. 

An Act for the Relief of Thomas Tindall and 
James Clark, and for other purposes therein men- 
tioned. 

A supplementary Act to an Act, intitled, An Act 
subjecting real Estates in the Province of New Jer- 
sey, to the Payment of Debts, and directing the 
Sheriff in his Proceedings thereon. 

An Act for making Provision for his Majesty's 
Troops, and other Purposes therein mentioned. 

Mr. ISAAC COLLINS, of the City of Burlington, is 
appointed Printer to the King's most excellent Maj- 
esty, for the Province of New-Jersey, in the Rocm of 
JAMES PARKER, Esq; deceased. 

Tuesday last Peter Mennel was executed at Glou- 
cester, pursuant to his Sentence, for the Murder of 
his Master's Daughter ; his Body was afterwards de- 
livered to the Surgeons to be anatomized. 

RUN away on the i5th of September last, from the 
subscriber, in Upper Freehold, Monmouth county, 
East New Jersey, an Irish servant man, named James 
Stewart, a short well set fellow, about 5 feet 7 inches 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 307 

high, full faced, has straight black hair, and speaks 
with the brogue ; had on, when he went away, an old 
blue outside jacket, and a brown under ditto, old felt 
hat, with shot holes in it, and a pair of new buckskin 
breeches, with straps for- knee-buckles, too large for 
him. Whoever secures said servant in any of his 
Majesty's goals, so that the subscriber may have 
him again shall have Thirty Shillings reward, besides 
what the law allows, paid by 

WILLIAM FERGUSON. 

N. B. He has found means to get his indentures, 
which, it is thought, he will make use of as a pass. 
All masters of vessels are forbid to carry him off, at 
their Peril. Pennsylvania Gazelle, No. 2185, Nov. 8, 

1770- . ' ,.., .,';> . " . 

EIGHT DOLLARS REWARD. 

RAN away, last night, from the subscriber, at Eve- 
sham, in Burlington county, an English servant man, 
named William Hopkins ; he is a bold spoken man, 
about 19 years of age, and also about 5 feet 7 or 8 
inches hioh ; he has a down look, is of a dark com- 

o 

plexion, has a red face, and is a little pitted with the 
small-pox ; he walks generally pretty fast, with one 
shoulder a little lower than the other, which occa- 
sions his head to hang : had on and took with him 
a beaver hat almost new. also a felt ditto, a new 
light coloured wollen double breasted jacket, lined 
with white flannel, a swanskin under jacket, with 
wooden buttons, two new osnabrigs shirts, two pair 
of trowsers, one of a dark stripe, the other tow- 
cloth, with a patch on each knee, three pair of stock- 



308 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ings, viz. one pair of light ribbed worsted, and two 
of blue yarn, one of which has been lately footed, a 
pair of thick calf-skin shoes, with odd buckles ; he 
had an ax with him, which it is supposed he has part- 
ed with. Whoever takes up said servant, and se- 
cures him in any goal, so that his master may get 
him again, shall have the above reward, and all reas- 
onable charges, paid by 

WILLIAM EVENS. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forbid -to carrv 

j 

him off at their peril. 

October 29, i 770. 

ALL persons indebted to the estate of JAMES CUM- 
MINS, late of Trenton, deceased, are desired to pay 
off their accounts by the first of February next, or 
they may depend upon being prosecuted without 
further notice ; and those that have any demands 
against said estate, are desired to bring in their ac : 
counts to 

Jane Cummins, Executrix. 

N. B. I still continue the shop keeping business. 
Trenton, Nov. 17, 1770. J. C. 

Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 201, Nov. 12-19, 
1770. 

New- York, November 1 2. 

To his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq, Cap- 
tain General Governor and Commander in Chief 
in and over the Colony of New-Jersey, and Ter- 
ritories thereon depending in America. Chan- 
cellor and Vice Admiral of the same, &c. 

The humble ADDRESS of the Representatives of 



I77j NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS, 309 

said Colony, in General Assembly convened. 
May it please your Excellency 

WE his Majesty's dutiful and loyal Subjects, 
the Representatives of New Jersey in 
General Assembly convened, cannot but be sensibly 
affected with what your Excellency has been pleased 
to declare respecting the Fate of the Paper Money 
Bill sent Home for his Majestys Approbation : The 
Assurances given your Excellency by the Ministry, 
of their Willingness to indulge this Colony with a 
Loan-Office Bill, under certain Restrictions, was what 
induced us to wave every essential consideration, in 
the framing of this Bill, because as it was not our In- 
tention to interfere with the Act of Parliament, so we 
carefully avoided every Thing that we apprehended 
might be construed to militate against it, but from 
the Reason given in the Report of the Board of 
Trade to the King, against this Law, communicated 
by your Excellency, we are discouraged at present 
from attempting another Bill, as we cannot see how 
it can be so framed as to obviate the Objection, and 
yet answer the Purposes of a Currency. We how- 
ever thank your Excellency for your Readiness to 
use all the Endeavours in your Power to obtain his 
Majesty's Assent, if a bill could be so framed, and 
yet answer the good Purposes intended: We have 
under Consideration, and shall pay all due Attention 
to the several Matters recommended by your Excel- 
lency, and hope for a Continuance of that Harmony 
and good Understanding in transacting the Business 
of this Session, which we have heretofore experienced 



310 NfiW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

to be productive of great Advantage to the Colony. 

By order of the House. 

STEPHEN CRANE, Speaker. 

OTOLEN from the Subscriber, two coats, one of 
O which is a Homespun Broadcloth, brown 
streight bodied, and the other a lightish coloured' 
Broadcloth, with Lead coloured Shelloon Lining ; al- 
so a red Broad-cloth Jacket, without Sleeves, one 
Homespun Shirt, one Pair of Leather Breeches, one 
black Barcelona Handkerchief, and a half worn Bea- 
ver Hat, without Loops, with two small holes in the 
Brim. The Thief is about five Feet eight or nine 
Inches high, sharp Vissage, about 25 Years of Age, 
has dark brown Hair, and has lost one of his upper 
Teeth, has not had the Small- Pox, speaks plain Eng- 
lish, West-Jersey born, calls himself JOHN HILL. 
Whoever apprehends the above Thief, and secures 
him in any of his Majesty's Goals, shall have a Re- 
ward of FIVE DOLLARS, on their giving the Subscrib- 
er Notice, and all Charges paid by me BENJAMIN 
WILLIAMS, in Essex County, East Jersey. N. Y. 
Gazette or Weekly Post Boy, No. 1454, November 
12, 1770. 

FREEMANS 

NEW-YORK ALMANACK 

For the YEAR 1771. 

Just Published, 

And SOLD, at the 

Printing-Office at the Exchange, 

Pnce 35-. 6d. per Dozen, or 6ct. each 



i?7\ NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 31 t 

CONTAINS Accounts of 



Table of Tides at New- York, Amboy, Hackensack . 
List of Officers in New-York and New-Jersey. 

Courts in New-York, New Jersey 

Rates of the Stages from New-York to Philadelphia. 
N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1455, November 15, 1770. 

To BE SOLD, on ground rent forever, sundry lots of 
ground in the Northern Liberties 

Likewise to be sold, or bartered for land near 
the city of Philadelphia, a pleasant situated farm, 
within the distance of one mile of Princeton, in New- 
Jersey ; said farm contains in quantity, 116 acres of 
good land, 25 of which is good meadow, 1 1 of wood- 
land ; the whole in good repair, with a large new 
stone well finished house, a very good barn forty 
feet square ; with every conveniency necessary, a 
spring house within 50 yards of the door, a good 
bearing orchard of the best of fruit. Any person in- 
clining to purchase, by paying one third of the mon- 
ey on the first of May next, may have their own 
time for the payment of the remainder, by giving se- 
curity and paying interest. Any person by applying 
to Mr. Joseph Horner, or Mr. George Norris, near 
the premises, may see the place, or know the terms, 
or at the subscriber's, at the upper end of Front 
street in Philadelphia. WILLIAM COATES. 

-Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 202, Nov. 19-26, 
1770. 



312 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



A 



LL persons having demands against the es- 
tate of Lewis Morris Ashfield, Esq., de- 
ceased, are hereby desired to bring their accounts 
properly authenticated, to the subscriber, at Tren- 
ton, near Shrewsbury, New-Jersey, and those any 
ways indebted to the said estate are desired to make 
payment at the same place, by the first day of March 
next, or they may expect to be sued without further 
notice. And as sundry bonds, bills and notes, were 
left in Mr. Ashfields hands in his life time, as an 
attorney, it is likewise requested that the owners 
may come and receive the same at the said place, and 
settle the costs that are due upon the actions 

V. Pearse Ashfield, Administrator. 
The said Ashfield has to sell cheap, a likely negro 
girl, that can be well recommended ; a negro woman 
that can do all kinds of house and dairy work. He will 
also sell a negro man and his wife, and would like to 
sell them together ; the man is an excellent house ser- 
vant, understands the management of horses, and can 
be recommended for his honesty. In short, he is an 
excellent servant for a genteel family. The woman 
can do all kinds of hoitse work. Enquire of Vincent 
Pearse Ashjield, at the Widow Farley s, 'in Hanover 
Square. N. Y. Journal or General Advertiser, No. 
1455, Nov. 22, 1770. 

On the 1 3th inst. departed this life, after a short ill- 
ness, in Salem county, the honourable JOHN VINING, 
Esq; Speaker of the House of Assembly and Chief 
Justice of the government of the counties of New- 
castle, Kent and Sussex on Delaware.- -His many 



V-5 



1770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 313 

virtues, in public and private life, deservedly gained 
him the love and esteem of all who knew him. His 
body was decently interred in the church of Salem, 
on Thursday last, attended by a great number of res- 
pectable inhabitants of that county. Pennsylvania 
Journal, No. 1459, Nov. 22, 1770. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN AWAY from the Subscriber living at 

Batsto Furnace ; 

A Servant LAD, named ANTHONY M'GARVEY, about 
1 8 or 20 years of age, 5 feet 7 inches high, has short 
hair, thick, well set fellow : Had on a coarse light 
coloured cloth jacket, lined with red, made sailor's 
fashion, check shirt, buckskin breeches, with wood 
buttons on jacket and breeches, old blue milled stock- 
ings, strong shoes with strings ; was lately taken out 
of Gloucester goal. Whoever apprehends said ser- 
vant so that his master may have him again, shall re- 
ceive the above reward, and if brought home, reason- 
able charges paid by 

WILLIAM DOUGHTEN. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forbid to carry 
him off at their peril. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1459, Nov. 22, 1770. 

Pitt's-Grove, Salem County, West-Jersey, 

Nov. 5, 1770. 

RUN away from his bail, a certain Benjamin Abit, 
junior, aged about 24 years, with long black hair, 
about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high, very much given 
to strong drink, and quarrelling when drunk ; had 



14 NfeW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

on, when he went away, a blue broadcloth coat, pret- 
ty much worn, and a red broadcloth jacket, one of 
the fore parts pieced with another colour, a pair of 
old leather breeches, black stockings, old shoes, and 
an old racoon hat. Whoever takes up the said Abit, 
and delivers him safe to the keeper of any of his 
Majesty's goals in this province, or elsewhere, so that 
his bail may have him again, shall receive Forty 
Shillings reward, and all reasonable charges paid by 
me. BURROUGHS ABIT. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2187, Nov. 22, 
1770. 

KENT, on DELAWARE, November 21, 1770. 
ON the 1 3th day of this Month, died near Salem, 
in West Jersey, the Honourable JOHN VINING, Esq; 
of Dover, Speaker of the House of Assembly of the 
Lower Counties on Delaware, Chief Judge of the Su- 
preme Court, and Prothonotary of Kent, in which he 
resided ; a gentleman greatly beloved both for his 
private &K& public Virtues -Although the character- 
izing deceased Persons, may have become generally 
suspected of Partiality, by Reason of the accumula- 
ted shining Epithets too often indiscriminately, and 
with fond profusion applied on such Occasions; yet 
in the present Instance, we are certain of keeping 
clear of this Disgrace, being resolved to draw rather 
with a sparing Hand, even where much higher Col- 
ouring would be no more than barely doing Justice. 
We shall only mark down the plain Language of all 
who were acquainted with Mr. VINING.- -Endued with 
intellectual Talents very respectable, he possessed a 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 31$ 

Disposition which gave them still an advantageous 
safe Direction. Having a full commanding Sense of 
moral and religious Obligation, he was careful to ob- 
serve each himself, and desirous of promoting their 
Influence and Operation in others. He was tem- 
perate, modest, prudent, just, sincere, patient, and 
benevolent. His Friendships were formed deliber- 
ately, and with Discretion : They were maintained 
with Firmness and a generous Warmth ; for no Man 
could have a Kinder Heart. In his Family, he was 
really, a Pattern of those good Qualities which nev- 
er fail to render the domestic State reputable and 
happy. His Temper, which at Times was calm and 
equal, expressed itself there in peculiar Mildness and 
Benignity. A tenderer, or more faithful Husband 
could not be ; nor a Father who loved his Children 
with a sweeter Affection, and watched over them 
with a more rational manly Solicitude : nor a Master 
who used his Servants with greater Gentleness and 
Humanity. In the several Offices he bore in the 
Government, his Conduct was fair, irreproachable 
and uniform. His Opinions, in Matters relative to 
Freedom, Property or Life, were plain, solid and de- 
cisive. He entertained a very high Regard for all 
the well determined Claims and Rights of 'Mankind, 
and while he paid a due Deference, even to the crit- 
ical and strictest Adjudications of Law, still his great- 
est Pleasure was in the more obvious Dictates of 
common Sense, and the milder Admonitions of Equity. 
Let it just be observed farther, that what gave him 
so distinguished a Place in the Esteem of the Peo- 
ple, and for which his Memory will long be dear to 



316 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/O 

them, was his constant Readiness to oblige and com- 
fort those who needed his Assistance ; so that he 
was often stiled among them, 'The Poor Matis 
FRIEND.' Such was the worthy Person whose .Death 
is much lamented by alj who knew him, --but inex- 
pressibly lamented by those who knew him best.- 
Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 203, Nov. 26- Dec. 3, 
1770. 

New-York November 26. We hear, that a Boat 

belonging to Shrewsbury, was Yesterday drove 

ashore on Long-Island, near the Ferry, where she 

beat to Pieces on the Rocks. --N. Y. Gazette or 

Weekly Post Boy, No. 1456, Nov. 26, 1770. 

* 

This day was published, and is now ready to be 
delivered to the subscribers and to all who now 
choose to become subscribers, for the other two vol- 
umes, The first volume, served in blue boards, price 
One Dollar, of the following celebrated work . . . 
praised . . . quoted . . . and recommended in the 
British House of Lords by the most illuminated and 
illuminating of all modern patriots, William Pitt, 
now Earl of Chatham The History of the Reign of 
CHARLES the Fifth, Emperor of Germany; and of all 
the Kingdoms and States in Europe, during his age 
. . . [Etc, etc] By William Robertson, D. D. 
Principal of the University of Edinburgh, and His- 
toriographer to his Majesty for Scotland, Author of 
the late elegant history of Scotland. [Etc, etc] 

Subscriptions for the subsequent volumes of this 
work are received by R. Bell and other Booksellers. 
Subscribers in the Jerseys may be supplied by Isaac 



I 7/0 I NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 3 I 

Collins, Printer, in Burlington. Pennsylvania Ga- 
zette, No. 2188, Nov. 29, 1770. 

Philadelphia Office of Intelligence. 
[Extract.] To BE DISPOSED OF, .... a piece 
of wood-land within one mile of Burlington, contain- 
ing 14 acres ; 

[Signed] WILLIAM IBISON, Broker. 

SUSSEX, {New Jersey), December 9, 1/70. 
Will be exposed to sale, by way of public vendue, on 
Saturday the i2th day of January next, at the 
house of ELIJAH ALLEN, tavern keeper, in New- 
town, in the county of SUSSEX, 
A TRACT of valuable land, containing ninety acres 
and three quarters of an acre, besides allowance for 
high ways, situate in Hardwick, in the county afore- 
said, adjoining lands of AMOS STRETTLE, Esq; and 
others, about two miles from said ALLEN'S, and the 
same distance from Andover Furnace, late the prop- 
erty of GEORGE RYERSON, an insolvent debtor, lately 
discharged from confinement, by virtue of an act of 
assembly of the province aforesaid. The vendue to 
begin at two o'clock in the afternoon ; where attend- 
ance will be given and conditions of sale made 

known, by 

AMOS PETTIT, and ) A . 

~r- A > Assignees. 

THOMAS ANDERSON, ) 

N. B. Will be sold, at the same time and place, 
the right and claim of said RYERSON, to 20 acres of 
land in possession of one Bookner, in said county of 
Sussex.- Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 204, Dec. 3 
10, 1770. 



3l8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. "]l77O 

EIGHT DOLLARS Reward, 

RUN away, this 4th day of December, 1770, from 
the subscriber, living in Evesham township, Burling- 
ton county, New-Jersey, a servant man, named JOHN 
LEONARD, about 5 feet 8 inches high, of a dark com- 
plexion, brown hair, and blind of the left eye ; had 
on, when he went away, two jackets of homespun 
light coloured bearskin cloth, with breeches of the 
same, blue yarn stockings, with hob nails in his 
shoes, a half worn felt hat. Whoever secures the 
said servant, so that his master may have him again, 
shall have the above reward, and reasonable charges, 
paid by me ROBERT BISHOP. 

STRAYED or STOLEN about the 2ist of October last, 
from the subscriber, living in Oxford township, in 
Sussex county, and Province of New-Jersey, a dark 
mouse coloured MARE, about 13 hands and a half 
high, 9 years old, brown about her mouth, a white 
spot above her right eye, neither brand nor ear-mark, 
a natural pacer ; also a last spring horse COLT, be- 
longing to said mare, near her own colour, a white 
face, and paces ; also a two years old horse COLT, of 
a light bay or sorrel colour, a star, and the right hind 
foot white, a natural trotter. Whoever takes up 
and secures said mare and colts, so that the owner 
gets them again, shall receive Fifty Shillings reward; 
if stolen, and the thief secured, so as he may be 
brought to justice, they shall receive FOUR POUNDS 
reward, and all reasonable charges, from me 

THOMAS KING. 

Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2189, December 6, 
1770. 



1/7] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 319 

[Extract from Dr. WEED'S advertisement of "royal 
balsam and pulius polychristum."] 

To the PUBLIC. 

FOR the good of those who may be afflicted with a 
like disorder as the following, I would inform them, 
I had a son seized with a disorder in all his limbs, 
with great pain, and a hard callous swelling about his 
joints, especially his knees and elbows and about his 
hips, that he tost the use of them, and one of his fin- 
gers swelled to such a degree that it bursted and be- 
came a running sore, and the bone was affected with 
it so much, that I was afraid it would have mortified, 
and he was brought so low and weak with the dis- 
order, that I despaired of his life, for he could have 
no rest day or night, by reason of the pain ; we used 
many means without success, or very little relief, un- 
til we applied Dr. WEED'S royal balsam and pulius 
polychristum, as he called it : by taking the powder 
twice a day, anointing the swellings about the joints 
with the balsam, dressing the sore with it. and by 
taking the balsam inwardly at the same time, it soon 
eased the .pains, abated the swellings, cleansed the 
sore, brought out the foul bones, healed it up, res- 
tored his strength and appetite, and thanks be to 
God, he is now in a good state of health and has the 
use of his limbs Certified by me 

JOHN GRIFFITH. 
West New- Jersey, Nov. 7, 1770. 

-Pennsylvania Chronicle, No 205, Dec. 1017, 
1770. 

NEW-LONDON, Nov. 30. 
Last Sunday morning one of the New-York pas- 



320 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

saee boats went out from the Hook to a vessel in 

o 

distress, when a gale of wind coming on they were 
drove out to sea, and in the greatest danger of being 
lost, but on Monday night they had the good fortune 
to get into Newport. Pennsylvania Journal, No. 
1462, Dec. 13, 1770. 



Burlington, December 3, 1770. 
THIS Day was committed to the Goal of this City, 
a certain Thomas Gearn, upon suspicion of being a 
runaway Servant, he says that he belongs to William 
Withers, living in Csecil County, Maryland, and that 
he left his said Master about 14 or 15 Weeks ago. 
Said Servant is about 20 Years of Age, and says 
when he left his Master he had an Iron Collar on his 
Neck, but soon got it off. Whoever owns the said 
Thomas Gearn, is desired to come or send, pay Char- 
ges immediately, and tike him away. 

EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

To be SOLD, by public YEN DUE, 

Allen- Town, East New-Jersey, on Thursday, the 
of I his instant, December, between the hours of 
Twelve and Four o' Clock in the Afternoon, 

ONE Lot of good Meadow Ground, about three Acres, 
whereon there is a good Dzvelling-house, and good 
Fulling-mill, which is well situated for Business, and 
furnished with all Necessaries for carrying on the 
Fulling Business. The Conditions will be made known 
at the Time and Place of Sale, by PETER BREWER and 
NATHAN ROBINS, Executors. Pennsylvania Gazette, 
No. 2190, Dec. 13, 1770. 



1 770] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 321 

PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 27. | ... A Sloop from 
New-York, and another from Amboy, touched at St. 
Eustatia a few Days before Capt. Brown sailed and 
went down to Leeward. . . . 

NEW-YORK, January 3. | At the Supreme Court 
held for the Province of New-Jersey, at Perth- 
Amboy, Joseph Reade, junior, 1 of this City, was quali- 
fied to practice as Attorney and Council 2 in the said 
Province. 

to be SOLD, 

At the Little Falls at Passaic River, any Time before 
the First Day of March next, 

A Plantation of two Hundred and Sixty Acres of 
Land, great Part of which is Meadow with a Forge 
of three Fires and a Hammer, a grist Mill and saw 
Mill. Any Person applying to James Gray, now on 
the Premises, may agree with him : If not sold before, 
then a Lease of ten Years will be given of the 
whole. 

December igth, 1770. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A Grist-Mill and Saw-Mill in good Repair, with 30 
Acres of Land and a House, lying on the Post-Road 
in Woodbridge : inquire of William Ford, who now 
occupies the Premises. 

Also a fine Farm near Cranbury, contains 200 
Acres, above half very fine Timber, a neat Farm 
House, large Barn, a good bearing Orchard, and a 

1 He was licensed August 31. 1770. 

2 Counsellor. 

21 



322 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. I 1 77 

pleasant healthy Situation, near the Stage-Road, and 
every Way a convenient profitable Farm. 

Also a Farm on the Stage-Road at Myth's Town, 1 
contains 100 Acres of good Land, convenient Build- 
ings and "suitable for a Tradesman. Inquire about 
these two Places of Luycas Schenck, near the Prem- 
ises. 

These Places will be sold at reasonable Rates, and 
if one Quarter of the Money is paid, the rest may 
continue at Interest: To be entered upon the ist of 
April next. Apply to JOHN SMYTH, Esq ; at Amboy, 
or WALTER RUTHERFURD, at New-York. 2Oth Dec.- 
N. Y. Journal, or The General Advertiser, No. 1462, 
Jan. 3, 1771. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, will be exposed 
to public sale, on the i^th day of February next, be- 
tween the hours of 12 and 5 in the afternoon, at the 
house of Thomas James, in Swedes-Borough, all that 
valuable plantation of 126 acres of excellent land, sit- 
uate in the township of Woolwich, adjoining the lands 
of Wolla Peterson and George Aviss. And also one 
lot of land, situate in Swedes-Borough, containing 
three-quarters of an acre, be the same more or less, 
with a good new frame dwelling-house thereon, now in 
the tenure of Robert Brown ; the whole late the prop- 
erty of James James, seized in execution, and to be 
sold by JOSEPH HUGO, Sheriff. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, will be exposed to 
public sale, on the 2ist day of February next, at the 

1 Rights town. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 323 

dwelling-house of Jeremiah Chew, a valuable planta- 
tion, and tract of 169 acres of excellent land, with a 
commodious new frame dwelling house thereon, situate 
on the North Branch of Timber -Creek, adjoining 
lands of John Hider, John Huntsingar, and others ; 
late the property of Richard Price, seized in execution, 
and to be sold by JOSEPH HUGG, Sheriff. 

N. B. Time will be given for the payment of the 
money. 

Chester County, December 31, 1770. 
THIS day was committed to my custody, a man 
who calls himself Joseph Lemmon, and is supposed to 
be the servant of Hugh Hutchin, of Upper Freehold, 
in Monmouth county, East-New-Jersey, advertised in 
the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2192, as he answers the 
description there given. His master is desired to come, 
pay charges, and take him away, by 

JOSEPH THOMAS, Goaler. 

RUN away on the i ith day of October, from the 
subscriber, living in Ogle-Town, a NEGRO man, 
named MOSES, about 22 years of age, a lusty -well 
made fellow ; his apparel not known, but took with him 
a pair of boots ; it is supposed he has got into the Jer- 
seys, or Baltimore county. Whoever takes up said 
Negroe and secures him, so that his master may have 
him again, shall receive Forty Shillings reward, paid 
by THOMAS OGLE. Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2193, 
January 3, 1771. 

NEW- YORK, January 7. | We hear from Eliza- 
beth Town, That Mr. Edward Vaughan Dong an, of 



324 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

that Place (Brother to the late Col. Thomas Dongan 
of Staten- Island) at the last Supreme- Court for the 
Province of New- Jersey, held at Burlington, was ad- 
mitted and sworn an Attorney of said Province} 

BY ORDER of the Honorable John An- 
New-Jersey, J 

M , derson, James Lawrence, John laylor 

and John Wardell, Esqrs, four of the 
Judges of the Court of Common Pleas for said Coun- 
ty of M on mouth, NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN, THAT 
THOMAS EVERINGH AM, Prisoner for Debt, in 
the Goal of said County, was, on the yth Day of last 
March, qualified to the Schedule of his Estate, pur- 
suant to a late Act of Assembly, entitled, An Act 
for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors, made, and as in 
former Advertisements set forth ; Now this is to give 
Notice to the Creditors of said Debtor, that they be 
together at the Court House of said County, on 
Tuesday the 22nd Day of January inst. to shew 
Cause (if any they have) why the said Debtor's 
Estate should not be assigned for the Use of his 
Creditors, and his Body discharged from Confine- 
ment pursuant to said Act. 

AS I intend to leave off publick-housekeeping 
soon, I will dispose of at private sale, the house and 
lot of ground whereon I now live ; it's advantageous 
situation for publick business, is well known to be as 
good as any between Powles Hook and Philadel- 
phia, being the county town ; a large house, conven- 
ient rooms, a good cellar, and a fine large stable in 

J November 15. 1770, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 325 

the yard, an excellent kitchen garden adjoining it ; is 
likewise suitable for a gentleman's seat, or for a mer- 
chant, being in the centre of the town. Whoever in- 
clines to purchase, may apply to me on the premises. 
Possession shall be delivered exactly at the time 
agreed on. An indisputable title will be given by 
me, 

JAMES BANKS. 

Newark, in Essex County, New-Jersey, Jan. *]th, 
1771. 

JASPER FARMER, | On George's Road, six 
Miles from New-Brunswick, | A Choice parcel of 
white oak posts, seven feet long, cut in prime sea- 
son. Any person inclining to purchase, may know 
the conditions, by directing to me, to the care of Mr. 
Brook Farmer, at New-Brunswick. 

~ 
THE Creditors of David Ball are desired to meet 

at the House of Jecamiah Smith, near Elizabeth- 
Town on Wednesday the 23rd of January, at 2 
o'Clock in the Afternoon, in order to settle with the 
Assignees Josiah Crane and Henry Bonnel. 

To be sold, 

THE farm of Capt. David Griffith, at Second- 
River, in the province of New-Jersey, containing in 
the whole about 200 acres, 15 acres of which are 
wood-land, about the same quantity fit for tillage, and 
as much meadow ground as produces yearly 100 
waggon load of English hay; and with this singular 
advantage attending it, that (as it may lay under wa- 
ter every tide) two crops of grass in a season are 



326 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

f always certain. There is on the farm a conven- 
ient store-dwelling-house, one story high, with a 
convenient kitchen adjoining it, a commodious barn, 
an orchard of about 70 full grown apple-trees, and as 
many young ones ; and the whole is enclosed in good 
fence. It is delightfully situated on the banks of the 
Passaick River, 19 miles from New York. The 
stock and farming utensils" will be disposed of with 
the farm or separately. The price and conditions of 
sale may be known, by applying to the owner on 
the premises, or by enquiring at Mrs. Colvill's, in 
Hanover Square, New- York. N. B. The title is in- 
disputable. The N. Y. Gazette, and the Weekly 
Mercury, No. 1002, Jan. 7, 1771. 

To BE LET, on ground rent forever, sundry lots of 
ground, situated on Second and Charlotte streets, in 
the Northern Liberties. The lots are pleasantly sit- 
uated, with the advantage of two fronts, and a con- 
sideiable depth. Likewise to be sold, or bartered 
for land near the city of Philadelphia, a pleasant sit- 
uated farm, within the distance of one mile of 
Princeton, in New Jersey ; said farm contains in 
quantity, 116 acres of good land, 25 of which is good 
meadow, 1 1 of woodland ; the whole in good repair, 
with a large new stone well-finished house, a very 
good barn forty feet square, with every conveniency 
necessary, a spring house within 50 yards of the 
door, a good bearing orchard of the best of fruit. 
Any person inclining to purchase, by paying one- 
third of the money on the first of May next, may 
have their own time for the payment of the remain- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 327 

der, by giving security and paying interest. Any 
person by applying to Mr. Joseph Horner, or Mr. 
George Norris, near the premises, may see the place, 
or know the terms, or at the subscriber's at the up- 
per end of Front-street in Philadelphia. 

WILLIAM COATS. 

N. B. The subscriber has two smith's shops to 
let, one upon Second and the other on Front-street. 
Any person qualified for shoeing horses and doing 
country work, will meet with good encouragement 
by applying as above. 

Raccoon creek, Gloucester county, Dec. 26. 

WHEREAS a certain man named John Dill, of a 
middle size, who had on a snuff coloured coat, an 
old great coat, and leather breeches much mended 
before, did on the 23d instant, hire a mare from 
the subscriber, promising to return her the next 
day, which he hath not done. I therefore hereby 
offer a reward of TWENTY SHILLINGS to any 
any one who will secure the said mare, so that I may 
get her again. She was a bay mare, with one white 
foot behind on the near side, had a small star in her 
forehead, about nine years old, and had on a new 
saddle and a half worn bridle. 

PETER KYER. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 208, Dec. 31, 
1770, to Jan. 7, 17/1. 

Philadelphia, January 14. | On Thursday Evening 
last Mr. ALEXANDER TOD, of this City, Mer- 
chant, was married to Miss POLLY SHARPE, of 



328 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

New Jersey. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 209, 
Jan. 7 to Jan. 14, 1771. 

STRAYED or stolen, in the Night of the 3d In- 
stant, from Isaac Pearson's, Esq ; near Trenton, a 
sorrel Mare, 12 Years old, near 14 hands high, 
neither Brand nor Ear-mark, has many white Hairs 
about her Head, is a remarkable heavy well made 
Mare, and has been used to the Gears ; she has a 
remarkable Lump, the Bigness of a Walnut, on the 
off Side of her Withers, occasioned by the Collar. 
Whoever takes up said Mare, and brings her to the 
Subscriber, shall have Fifteen Shillings Reward, and 
reasonable Charges. If stolen, and the Thief 
brought to Justice, shall have a Reward of Five 
Pounds, paid by ELISHA LAWRENCE, near Allen's- 
Town, in East New-Jersey. 

SIX DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away, on the 2d day of January, 1771, from 
the subscriber, in Philadelphia, a' certain JOHN WEBB, 
born in Amboy, served part of his time with Gilbert 
Ash, in New-York, and lately carried on the Joiner's 
business in this city ; he is fond of liqour [sic] danc- 
ing and gaming, addicted to lying, and by his miscon- 
duct is become a servant; he is about 5 feet 9 or 10 
inches high, 22 years of age, fair complexion, light 
curled hair, fresh coloured, full faced ; well set, like- 
ly fellow, lost one of his under fore teeth, a great 
boaster, talks much of his bringing up, and pre- 
tends he has something depending in Amboy ; had 
on and took with him, a new castor hat, a new 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 329 

brown broadcloth coat, a white swanskin jacket, with 
red spots, ticken breeches, white and check shirts, 
white neckcloths, marked J. B. It is supposed that 
he has changed his clothes, or borrowed others, as it 
was his practice when he was his own master ; he 
has been seen in different dresses in this city, since 
he went away. Whoever takes up said servant, and 
brings him to me, or secures him in any goal, so 
that his master may have him again, shall have 
the above reward, and reasonable charges paid by 

JOSEPH BOLTON. 

N. B. All masters of vessels, and others, are for- 
bid to carry him off, or harbour him, at their peril. 

Philadelphia, January i, 1771. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THE subscriber, having wrote to England for a 
quantity of the most elegant types, and established a 
correspondence in Great-Britain, Ireland, North 
America, and the West Indies, proposes to publish a 
News-Papef, upon a new and extensive plan ; an ac- 
count of which he begs leave to lay before the pub- 
lic, whose patronage and assistance, in so arduous 
an undertaking, he will use his utmost endeavours 



to deserve. 

To instruct, to amuse and to be useful, are, or ought 
to be, the principal objects of the printer of every 
paper : . . . 

First. This paper is entituled The Pennsylvania 
Evening Post and General Advertiser. . . . 

, B. The subscriber intends to furnish himself 



330 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

with the magazines and English prints of every kind, 
and will insert extracts from them in his paper, 

William Evitt. 

*^* Subscriptions are taken in by the printer, at his 
printing-office at the sign of the Bible-in heart, in 
Strawberry-alley; William Woodhouse, book binder 
and stationer, in Front-street, near Chestnut street; at 
the General Circulating Library, in Third-street, a 
few doors below Spruce street; Hugh Frazer, mer- 
chant, in Market street, next door to the Friends Meet- 
ing; Chester, at the Post-office; Wilmington, by 
Richard Humphries, goldsmith; at Darby, by Aaron 
Oakford, fuller; by Isaac Collins, printer, in Bur- 
lington; by yohn Pope\ near the said place, and David 
Potter, merchant, in Cohansey, New-Jersey. 

CHARLES and JOHN STARK, Brothers, and 
natives of Messerbacher Hoss, near Rogehausen, in 
the Elector Palatine's dominions, came into this coun- 
try six years ago, both at one season, but in differ- 
ent vessels ; now, the said Charles Stark having 
never since that time heard any thing of his brother 
John, he takes this public method to inform him, that 
he, the said Charles Stark, at present lives with An- 
der Anderson, at Encobus, 1 in Palatine county, in 
New-Jersey ; where his brother John may come to 
see him ; or, in case he should live at too great a dis- 
tance, may let him know, by a letter, the place of his 
abode. And if any other person can and will give 
information of the said John Stark, to his brother, at 



Ancocus'r 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 331 

the aforementioned place, the favour will be grate- 
fully acknowledged. 



THE Driver of the SALEM Stage -Wagon, find- 
ing it inconvenient to his passengers to stop at so 
many places as he has heretofore done, determines for 
the future to set off from the house of John Die ken- 
son, in Salem, every Third-day, exactly at sun-rise, and 
not to stop at any place afterwards in Salem, on any 
account, nor at any place on the road, till he arrives at 
Cooper s ferry, except the taverns, and at them no 
longer than necessity requires; and, on every Fifth- 
day, to leave said ferry, and proceed with the same 
dispatch to Salem, and always to perform his journey 
(accidents excepted] by day light', all those that please 
to favour him with their company, may depend on be- 
ing treated with the greatest respect, and all those that 
favour him with their orders, may depend on being 
punctually served, by their friend, 

AARON SILVER. 

N. B. The price for a passenger is in f2iture to be 
Five Shillings, up or down, and Twopence a mile for 
those taken in on the road. 



To be SOLD, at public SALE, on the premises, by 
virtue of the last will and testament of Jonathan 
Davis, deceased, late of the county of Cumber- 
land, in New Jersey, on the 1 4th day of January 
inst. in the afternoon, by the subscribers, 
A VALUABLE plantation, situate in the town- 
ship of Stow creek, in the county aforesaid, contain- 



332 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ing about 90 acres of land, bounded by the lands of 
Samuel Davis, John Bowen, Nathan Ayers, and El- 
nathan Davis; late in the tenure of Jeremiah Robins, 
and Jonathan Jarman ; the purchaser paying one 
third down, may have a good title, on giving secur- 
ity for the remainder, to be paid the half in one year, 
and the rest in two years, with interest. ESTHER 
DAVIS Executrix, and ELNATHAN DAVIS, Executor. 
Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2194, Jan. 10, 1771. 

THIRTY SHILLINGS Reward. | RUN-AWAY from 
the subscriber hereof, living on Rapaupa creek, 
Woolwich township, Gloucester county, West New 
Jersey, A SERVANT MAN, named WILLIAM EMLIN ; 
about five feet eight inches high, has black short 
curled hair, black eyes, and dark skin : Had on a 
half worn beaver hat, a blue outside jacket, and red 
double breasted under jacket, a new Russia duck 
shirt, a pair of blue woollen trowsers, the inside of 
one knee singed with fire, a pair of double soaled 
new shoes, one tied with a string, in the other a pew- 
ter carved buckle ; he stole a pair of gold sleeve but- 
tons marked M D and a chestnut canoe with a high 
head, and stern, with a chain, and pieces nailed across 
her bottom. Whoever takes up said Emlin, and 
brings him to me, or secures him in Gloucester gaol, 
shall have the above reward, and reasonable charges 
paid by 

WILLIAM RAWSON. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1466, Jan. 10, 



1/7*] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 333 

Continued from our Chronicle of November 19, 26, 

and December 3. 

To the Baptists in Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, and 

Provinces adjacent. 

IT is possible that you have seen a paragraph in 
the Chronicle of Monday, Dec. 10, 1770, which in- 
forms you that the Legislature of Boston had passed 
a law to exempt your brethren from ministerial 
rates, and to secure their property from becoming a 
prey to constables, and their persons from gaols ; in 
consequence of which, you may think that they have 
no occasion for your help, to send to England for 
redress of grievances. But the case is otherwise, 
which is the reason why you are addressed in this 
manner. This new law is so far from lessening that 
necessity, that it increases it, and strongly urges 
them to send. The Assembly passed it only to 
amuse and save appearance, (as they did the six pre- 
ceding laws) while they intend to continue the op- 
pression, and for which purpose, they have always 
left sufficient gaps. For, i. No provision is made 
in this law for restoring the 395 acres that were 
taken from the Baptists of Ashfield, about nine 
months ago ; nor for restoring to Mr. White the 
thirty pounds worth of shop-goods that were taken 
from him to build a Presbyterian Meeting-house in 
Haverhill \ nor for preventing the executions which 
the other Baptists of that town are liable to every 
day, for the same purpose ; nor for repairing the 
injury done to the Baptists of Douglas, Montague, 
&c. nor for any amends to the Baptists that were put 



334 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

in Worcester gaol last Winter, where they were cru- 
elly treated, in company with three Quakers, and 
where one soon became distracted as any in Bed- 
lam ; nor, in short, for any injury done to the Bap- 
tists under the reign of six laws, whose pretended 
design was to exempt them from injuries. 2. This 
new law saith, that no Baptists shall be exempted 
for the year 1771, but those whose names shall be 
found in the lists that ought to have existed five 
months before it was enacted. But no such lists 
were ever taken by the assessors. This was told 
to the Assembly. Yet they would rest the exemp- 
tion of the Baptists on non-entities, rather than on 
certificates which did really exist. In consequence 
of which, all the Baptists are taxable this year 
towards paying Ministers Salaries, and building and 
repairing Meeting-houses. 3. This law exempts no 
lands, or personal estates belonging to the Baptists, 
but those in their own hands, and under their own 
actual improvement: Hence, their lands in the 
hands of tenants, and their located but not im- 
proved lands, are left out for taxation. 4. The same 
injurious equivocation and test (complained of in 
the other laws) are retained in this. The equivocal 
expression is this, " are really belonging to the con- 
gregation ;" which belonging, has been sometimes 
interpreted, of being in the communion of the 
church; and, at other times, has been allowed to 
extend to all who are reputed Baptists, and stated- 
ly go among them to worship. But then, the sense 
is to be fixed by enemies, viz. Constables and As- 
sessors ; and if they should pin the expression to 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 335 

the first sense, they will cut off about half the con- 
gregations fiom the benefit intended. The test; 
complained is, That three principal men, and the 
Minister, must pledge their faith and consciences, 
for the faith and consciences of a whole congrega- 
tion ; this some Baptist Ministers consider as an im- 
proper requisition for any legislature to make, and 
unsafe for them to comply with ; and never could do 
it in the times of certificates under the former laws ; 
neither can they do it under this new law, which de- 
mands lists so attested. The consequence of which 
is, that none in those lists will be exempted from 
the tax. The Baptists proposed another test, which 
would have answered the end better ; but the Great 
and General Court had written what they had written. 
5. The remedy which this law provides for the non- 
entity of old lists, and the supposed defects of future 
lists looks like sport on the Assembly's part ; and 
is certainly an additional insult offered to the Bap- 
tists. " The town meetings, in that case, are to de- 
termine whether the Baptists shall be taxed or not." 
This is resigning Assembly legislature to a parish 
meeting ; and making a parish meeting judges and 
juries in their own cause. If they spare the Baptists 
they must burden themselves the more. It is put- 
ting the Baptists in the power of them who have 
watched all opportunities to do them despite ; and 
from whose bitterness and persecution they have so 
often petitioned the Assembly to deliver them. Be- 
sides the same law excludes from those meetings all 
Churchmen, Quakers, and Baptists, and leaves none 
in but right stanch Presbyterians. If this is not 



336 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

sporting with and insulting the Baptists, I know not 
what may be so called. It is cruel and tyrannical ! 
I know the Great and General Court have made a 
law to punish them that talk against them let them 
do what they will. But, thank God, their greatness 
and generality do not extend to London. 6. This 
law, like the rest, is of short duration. It continues 
for but three years ; and by a contrivance before 
mentioned, they have docked off one of the three. It 
is natural to wonder, why one law would not do ; 
and why that one law may not be let to live as 
long as it can, since nothing more is desired by the 
petitioners, nor any thing less intended by the legis- 
lature (as they say) than an exemption from ministe- 
rial rates ? But three ends are gained. First, Fre- 
quent lawless interims happen, that Constables and 
Assessors may fall with redoubled vengeance on the 
few who escaped it before. This has really been 
the case, and will be the case this year. Secondly, 
This contrivance requires frequent and expensive 
petitions. The present law cost two years petition- 
ing ; and though we have but seven laws, yet the ob- 
taining of them cost 39 petitions. And it is in- 
credible what time and money have been wasted to 
obtain laws, which when obtained were not worth a 
pumkin to most of the parties concerned. And 
lastly, by both the Baptists are harrassed and impov- 
erished. This is really the effect ; for though there 
be 37 congregations in Massachusetts, yet they are 
not able to set their hard usage before the King 
without the help which they solicited from their 
brethren to the Westward, which help I hope, will 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 337 

be given, as they are necessitated the more by this 
new law ; a copy of which, I will endeavour to lay 
before the persons I address, that they may see with 
their own eyes whether the above remarks are just 
or not. The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 210, Jan. 
1 4 to Jan. 21, 1771. 

NT ) This is to give Notice to all 

New-Jersey, . 

Morris County. ( whom lt: ma y concern, That 

J whereas I the Subscriber did peti- 
tion the General Assembly of this Province at their 
last Sessions, for a Law to compel the Owners of a 
certain boggy Swamp in Hanover Township, to 
scour, cleanse and keep open, at their own Expense, 
a certain great Ditch and other Line-Ditches run- 
ning through the same. All Persons concerned 
therein, are desired to attend at the next Sessions of 
said General Assembly, and shew Cause, if any they 
have, why said Law shall not pass. 

MOSES YOUNG. 

To be sold at public Vendue, on Thursday the 
seventh Day of February next, at 10 o' Clock in 
the Forenoon, or at private Sale any Time before ; 
A small but valuable Plantation, lying on the public 
Post Road between Newark and Elizabeth-Town, at 
a Place called Bound Creek ; said Plantation con- 
tains about 12 Acres, 10 of which is Orchard, the 
other Meadow ; the Orchard is well known to make 
as good Cyder as any in the Province, 300 Barrels 
has been made in a good bearing Year, the meadow 
bears a large Burthen twice a Year : There is on said 

o 

Plantation, a House, Barn and Shop, fit for any 

22 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Tradesman ; a Cyder-Mill and Press, and Still 
House, an excellent Well, a Number of Peach 
Trees, Cherry, Pear, &c. an excellent Garden, moist 
enough the dryest Season ; there is Manure enough 
joining to said Place, to always keep it in Heart, 
which may be got with very little Expense ; Vessels 
of six Cord may come loaded within 100 Yards of 
the Door : There is in said Creek plenty of Oysters, 
Fish and Fowl. Any Person inclining to purchase 
the same, or a Part thereof, may apply to ALEXANDER 
VANCE, living on the Premises, who will give an in- 
disputable Title for the Same. 

N. B. At the Same Time will be exposed to Sale 
at Vendue, the equal undivided Half of a large 
House and ten Acres of Land, Part of which is 
Orchard, and some Meadow; the said undivided 

Farm is to be sold during a Man's Life, who is now 

<> 

about 47 Years of Age : Likewise at the same 
Time, will be sold, Horses, Cows, Calves, Sheep, 
Hogs, Two Riding Chairs, a repeating Clock, Spin- 
ning Wheels both Linen and Woollen, a Quantity of 
Chairs of different Sorts, Looking Glasses, Pictures, 
Feather Beds, and a large Quantity of excellent 
Household Furniture, some Farming Utensils and 
Lumber. Any Person inclining to purchase, may 
apply as before to ALEXANDER VANCE. 

. 

To be SOLD, | At the Little Falls at Pass.iick 
River, any Time before | the first Day of March 
next ; | 

A Plantation of 260 Acres of Land, great Part of 
which is Meadow, with a Forge of three Fires, and 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 339 

a Hammer, a Grist-mill and Saw-mill. Any Person 
applying to JAMES GRAY, now on the Premises may 
agree with him : If not sold before, then a Lease of 
ten Years will be given of the whole. 

NEW-YORK, January 14. | . . . Capt. Lee . . . 
last Monday, about 10 Leagues from Sandy-Hook, 
spoke with the Captains Stout and Depeyster, from 
this Port for South America. 

Thirty Shillings Reward. 

RUN-away on the 2Qth of December 1770, a ser- 
vant lad named Abraham Stark, about eighteen 
years of age, about 5 feet 5 inches high, and has a 
large scar on his right thumb : Had on when he went 
away, a half-worn beaver hat, black and blue mix'd 
colour coat, with light colour'd jacket, both made of 
homespun ; a pair of leather breeches half-worn, flan- 
nel shirt, and new shoes of the natural colour of the 
leather, tied with strings. He is supposed to be in 
company with one Benjamin Dun, who went off the 
same time. Whoever takes up said lad and secures 
him so that his master may have him again, shall 
have the above reward paid by Robert Culver, liv- 
ing in Roxbury, Morris county. The N. Y. Gazette 
and the Weekly Mercury, N.o. 1003,^72 14, 1771. 



NEW-YORK, January 14. | Saturday last arrived 
here the Brig Friendship, John Lewis Master in 8 
weeks from Bristol :- ... on the i 2th in Lat. 40 ; 
Long. 74, spoke a Sloop from St. Eustatia, bound to 
Egg-Harbour, all well. 



340 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

RUNAWAY from the Subscriber, two Apprentice 
Lads, about 18 Years of Age, 5 Feet 9 Inches high, 
both Bloomers ; the Name of the one, is EPHRAIM 
CASSAMOUR, had on when he went away, a new 
Felt Hat, a short light coloured Coat, a check 
Woollen Shirt, and a Pair of Bearskin Trowsers, 
speaks quick, has short brown Hair. The other 
named JOHN PARKES, had on a good Castor Hat, 
a blew Coat, and a light coloured cut Velvet Jacket, 
a Bearskin, do. a Woollen check Shirt, a Pair of old 
Leather Breeches, grey Stockings, and Pinchbeck 
Buckles, black Eyes and Hair, moves slow, and 
speaks slow, supposed to be at some Iron Works. 
Whoever takes up the said Apprentices, and secures 
them in any Goal, and let their Master know where 
they are, shall have THREE POUNDS, and all 
reasonable Charges paid, by 

JONATHAN FORD. 

Hanover, Morris- County, December 31, 1770. 

To the PUBLIC. 

THAT the Stage Waggons, kept by John Barn- 
hill, in Elm-Street, in Philadelphia, and John Mercer- 
eau, at the New Blazing-Star, near New-York, con- 
tinues their Stages in two Days, from Powles Hook 
Ferry, opposite New-York, to Philadelphia ; returns 
from Philadelphia to Powles-Hook in two Days also: 
They will endeavour to oblige the Publick by keep- 
ing the best of Waggons and sober Drivers, and sets 
out from Powles-Hook and Philadelphia, on Mon- 
days and Thursdays, punctually at Sun-rise, and 
meet at Prince-Town the same Night, to exchange 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 341 

Passengers, and each return the Day after : those 
who are kind enough to encourage the Undertaking, 
are desired to cross Powles-Hook Ferry the Evening 
before, as they must set off early. The Price for 
each Passenger is Ten Shillings to Prince-Town, 
and from thence to Philadelphia, Ten Shillings 
more, Ferriage free. There will be but two Wag- 
gons, but four Setts of fresh Horses ; so it will be 
very safe for any Person to send Goods, as there are 
but two Drivers, they may exchange their Goods 
without any Mistake. Persons may now go from 
New-York to Philadelphia, and back again in five 
Days, and remain in Philadelphia two Nights and 
one Day to do their Business in. The Publick may 
be assured, that this Road is much the shortest, than 
any other to Philadelphia, and regular Stages will be 
kept by the Publick's obliged humble Servants. 

JOHN MERCEREAU, and 
JOHN BARNHILL. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or the Weekly Post-Boy, 
No. 1463, Jan. 14, 1771. ' - . , 

STRAYED or stolen from the meado\ys of the 
subscriber, near Gloucester Point, on the loth Janu- 
ary instant, a bay mare, about 14 hands high, 4 years 
old, a hog mane, and switch tail, remarkably long 
bodied, a natural trotter, shod before, has neither 
brand nor ear-mark, but supposed to be stolen, as 
there was a small brown horse, about 1 2 hands 
high, with a bob tail, and bald face, with a snip, 
left in the place. Whoever takes up the said mare, 
and brings her to the subscriber, living in Market 



342 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

street, nearly opposite the sign of the Indian King, 
shall have Forty Shillings reward, and reasonable 
charges. And whoever has lost the above described 
horse, by making application to me, and paying the 
charges, shall have him again. 

ANDREW BANKSON. 

EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living near the 
Head of Elk, in Caecil county Maryland, on the 
lothof October last, an Irish servant man, named 
PETER HUGHES, about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, 
straight black hair, was scalped before, but now 
grown about an inch long, with a small scar on his 
forehead, walks very smart, and speaks tolerable 
good English ; had on, when he went away, a small 
wool hat, bound with tape, a blue jacket, without 
sleeves, the back parts lighter than the fore parts, 
coarse tow breeches trowsers, two shirts, one check, 
the other white, old shoes, but no buckles ; he is 
very 'much addicted to steal, and may possibly have 
got more clothes ; he came into the country about 
the last of September, with Captain McCausland, in 
the Wallworth, and this is the second time he has 
run away ; he was seen in Philadelphia, and is sup- 
posed to be gone to New-Jersey ; he is very apt to 
get drunk, and, when drunk, very quarrelsome; he 
pretends to be a weaver by trade, but knows very lit- 
tle about that business ; he will probably change his 
name. Whoever secures said servant in any of his 
Majesty's goals, shall have the above reward, and 
reasonable charges paid by 

ANDREW FRAZSR. 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 343 

Gloucester New Jersey, Jan. 1 1, 1771. 
TAKEN up, and secured in Gloucester goal, a 
certain John Harrison, as he calls himself, but it is 
supposed his name is John Harris, and that he is a 
servant, belonging to John Moon, of Kent County, 
Maryland, as he answers the description in said Moon ' s 
advertisement ; says he was born in England, drinks 
hard, and swears much ; has had a sore leg, and has 
been about Woodberry about three years. This is 
to desire his master to come, pay cost, and take him 
away, otherwise he will be charged by 

RICHARD JOHNSTON, Coaler. 
-Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2195, Jan. 17, 1771. 

SEVEN POUNDS REWARD. ' '" 

RAN away from the subscribers, living near Coop- 
er's ferry, in the County of Gloucester, and province 
of New Jersey, on Sunday, the first of October, i 769, 
an Irish servant man named William Wilson, about 
30 years of age, had on when he went away a good 
fine hat, an old blue coat, an old light coloured jack- 
et, a check shirt, a pair of striped tickin trowsers with 
white patches on the knees, and a good pair of shoes 
with brass buckles in them. He is about 5 feet 4 or 6 
inches high, well set, sandy complexion, has very sandy 
yellow hair tied behind and has a very sandy beard, 
a very thick under lip, full face, a sour look, and gray 
eyes. He was advertised at the time he ran away, 
his right name is William M'Cullen, and perhaps his 
advertisement may not be worded like the other, I 
understand that he was seen last fair at Nopentown. 
Whoever takes up said servant, and secures him, so 



344 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

that I may get him again, shall have the above re 
ward, and reasonable charges if brought home. 

BENJAMIN 



v 



TO BE SOLD. 

On REASONABLE terms by the Subscribers, | 
ETNA FURNACE, | IN Burlington County, 19 
miles from Philadelphia, situate on a tract of near 
9,000 acres of well wooded land, in a plentiful and 
healthy country, furnished with all houses and build- 
ings necessary, 7 miles from the present landing on 
Ancocas Creek and one may be made at five miles 
distance, or the produce may be transported in a 
pontoon to carry six tons at two miles whence boards 
are daily floated in rafts of 2500 feet. The land 
carriage to New-York market is 17 miles. Togeth- 
er with a small stamping mill and a grist mill close 
to the furnace, and conveniences therein to grind 

/ 

and polish iron ware by water; there is in the fur- 
nace a variety of nice patterns and flasks for casting 
ware, for which, as well as barr iron and metal of this 
work is very fit, and is in very high esteem at foreign 
markets, as will appear, by the accounts of Sales. 
There is also on this tract a swift going saw mill which 
for some years past & to come is under a rent of 
near ^200 per year, with a provision for doing the 
owner's work. There is plenty of ore at different 
distances, and the roads so remarkably good that the 
carriages will last many years with very little repair. 
Also TANTON FORGE, two miles and a half nearer 

i The same advertisement, with some verbal charges, appears in the Pennsyl- 
vania Gazette, No. 2195, January 17,1771. It is there signed " Benjamin In- 
speck, living near Cooper's Ferry." The name was probably Inskeep. 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 345 

Philadelphia, on an extraordinary stream, and a com- 
petent quantity of wood, having all buildings neces- 
sary. The teams used about these works are chiefly 
oxen, the maintainance of which cost very little dur- 
ing the coaling season, and they are wintered abroad 
at 285. per pair. The portage of the iron is IDS. per 
ton to Philadelphia, and the advantages these works 
have in these respects, over the works far back, 
amounts to many hundred pounds a year. 

Also to be SOLD, ONE HALF of ATSION FORGE or 
Bloomary of four fires and two hammers, very large 
and commodious, on a large stream of water, having 
all necessary buildings erected, the wood and ore 
handy, the portage of its produce to Philadelphia i 75. 
per ton, and to New York 155. The loads at all 
these works is one ton and a half, and machines of 
the plainest construction are erected for weighing 
them if suspected. There are at the works several 
servants and negroes who understand different 
branches of the business, teams and carriages. One 
manager, one clerk, one carpenter, and one smith do 
the business of the furnace and Tanton forge with 
ease. The only reason for selling them is that it is 
necessary to have a person concerned in the works 
resident at Philadelphia, and a man of activity at the 
furnace, the present owner is very infirm, and not 
able to stir much. The premises will bear examin- 
ing. Any person or persons inclining to become 
purchasers of a part or the whole, are invited to view 
them and examine the calculations made for carrying 
them on, and to stay at the works a proper season 
to see the exactness of those calculations demon- 



346 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/I 

strated. If the persons be strangers introductory 
letters will be expected. 

CHARLES READ. ! 

The Pennsylvania Joiirnal, No. 1467, Jan. 17, 

1771. 

New- Jersey, ) BY order of the Honourable John 
Monmouth. ) Anderson and James Lawrence, two 
of the Judges of the court of common pleas for said 
county, Samuel Leonard, junr., a prisoner for debt in 
said goal, was on this 26th of April, 1770, qualified 
to a schedule of his effects, pursuant to a late act of 
assembly, an act, entitled, an act for the relief of in- 
solvent debtors, made this present tenth year of his 
Majesty's reign, &c. 

Now this is to give notice to the creditors of said 
debtor, that they be together, at the court house of 
said county, on the 25th day of January, 1771, to shew 
cause (if any they have) why the said debtor's estate 

* 

should not be assigned for the use of his creditors, 
and his body discharged from gaol pursuant to said 
act. 

Monmouth Gaol. 

The New- York Journal, or The General Adver- 

tiser, No. 1463, Jan. 17, 1771. 

THIS is to acquaint the Publick, That I the Sub- 
scriber, intends in the Spring to move over the River 
again, into Bergen County, on my plantation, oppo- 
site to Totaway Bridge, and intends to sell or let the 
House and Farm I now live on : It is a very cortveni- 

i For a comprehensive sketch of Charles Read, see "Members of the New Jer- 
sey Assembly in 1754," by William Nelson. Paterson, N. J., 1895. 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 347 

- 

ent Place for any sort of Business, either Store or 
Tavern, or any other Calling ; it is likewise a very 
pleasant Place for a Gentleman's Country Seat, as 
there is plenty of Gentleman's Exercise, as hunting 
and fishing ; there is on the Premises, a large Stone 
House, containing nine Rooms and nine Fire-places, 
Cellars through the whole House ; there is also a fine 
new Shingle Roof Barn on the Place, a fine Young 
Orchard, containing 150 Apple Trees; the Farm 
contains near a hundred Acres of Land half-cleared, 
can mow 35 Loads of English Hay every Year. 
Whoever inclines to buy or hire, may apply to the 
Subscriber, now living on the Premises, who will give 
an indisputable Title for the same. This Place lies 
at the Foot of a large Bridge, near Passaick Falls. 

ABRAHAM GODWIN. 

TO be sold at public Vendue, on Wednesday, the 
1 3th day of February next, at 10 o'clock. The 
Plantation belonging to me the Subscriber, contain- 
ing about 400 Acres, near one-third Part of it is ex- 
traordinary good Meadow, whereon is cut yearly, 
upwards of 100 Tons of good Hay, a good Part of it 
is English and Timothy ; and can, with a little Ex- 
pence, be cut as much more yearly ; there is near 40 
Acres of it the best sort of Bog Meadow, ready 
ditch'd, fit for raising Hemp or Corn ; the Upland is 
very good for all sorts of Grain, in good Fence, and 
near 400 bearing Apple Trees, and a large Number 
of other Fruit Trees ; well water'd and timber'd ; 
there is on the Premises, a good Dwelling House, 
four Rooms on a Floor, with four Fire-places, a good 



348 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Kitchen, Barn, and Barracks, and can easily be di- 
vided into two Farms ; the Title indisputable. There 
will also be sold on the Premises the same Day, a 
Negro Man and Boy, and a Negro Wench, if not 
sold at private Sale before said Day ; together with 
all sorts of farming Utensils, and Household Furni- 
ture, and Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Hogs ; and many 
other Things too tedious to mention : A reasonable 
Time of Payment will be given for the whole, and 
Conditions made known on the Day of Sale, by me, 

JOSEPH TUTTEL. 
New Jersey, Morris County, January n, 1771. 

JUST PUBLISHED, | And sold wholesale and 
retail, by S. INSLEE and | A. CARR, at their Print- 
ing Office in Beaver treet | [late Parker's] Price 35. 
6d. per Dozen, or 6d single, | A SECOND EDIT- 
ION of | ROGER MORE'S | AMERICAN | Coun- 
try Almanack, | For the YEAR of CHRISTIAN AC- 
COUNT, | 1771 : | And from the CREATION by 
SCRIPTURE, 5780. | Being the third after BISSEXTILE, 
or LEAP YEAR. | Calculated according to Art, and 

fitted to the Pro- | vince of NEW YORK, but may with- 
out any sensible | Error, serve all the Provinces ad- 
jacent. | 

WHEREIN IS CONTAINED, 

The Lunations, Judgment of the Weather, Planets Places in the 
Ecliptic, and mutual Aspects ; the Sun's and Moon's rising and setting, 
Seven Stars rising and setting, observable Days, Eclipses, &c. with many 
useful and instructing Pieces; the Particulars whereof are as follows : 

1. THE Times appointed for holding the Supreme Courts, and Courts of 

Sessions and Common Pleas in the Province of New York, New 
Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania. 

2. Quakers General Meetings the Days on which they are kept. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 349 

3. Reflections on Life. 

4. A curious Treatise on the Nature of Comets. 

5. An Account of Some Experiments, made by Mr. Miller of Cambridge, 

on the sowing of Wheat. 

6. A Method to preserve fresh meat in Summer. 

7. Professors Boerhave and Osterdyke's Regimen prescribed for the 

GOUT. 

8. A Receipt for the Gout. 

9. An excellent Remedy for Agues, which has been often tried with very 

great Success. 

10. A very good Medicine for the Bloody-Flux. 

11. A Receipt for the Cure of the Tooth-ache. 

12. to take off Freckles. 

13. to take out the Spots of the Small-Pox. 

14. how to make a Powder that has restored Sight when al- 
most lost. 

15. An excellent Remedy for the Gravel. 

16. A list of His Majesty's Council for the Province of N. York. 

17. the General Assembly for New York. 

18. members of His Majesty's Council for New Jersey. 

19. the Representatives of Assembly in New Jersey. 

20. A beautiful Poem on the Art of Printing. 

21. Tables of Interest, at 6 or 7 per cent, from 55. to lool. 

22. A Tide Table, showing the times of High-water at New York, Bos- 

ton, Philadelphia, Perth Amboy, &c. 

23. A Table of Expences, &c. 

24. Table of Roads from New York to most of the capital Places on the 

Continent. 

The New York Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1 464, January 21, 1771. 


RUN away from the subscribers hereof, on the 4th 

day of this instant January, a certain JOHN HALL, late 
of Pilesgrove, a Blacksmith by trade, a rough looking 
thick set fellow ; had on, when he went away, a 
claret coloured coat, and other clothes ; says that he 
was born near Pennypack, in Pennsylvania ; took 
with him sundry things not his own property, as also 
left his bail. Whoever takes up and secures the said 
John Hall, in any of his Majesty's goals, so that he 



350 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

may be had again, shall receive Forty Shillings re- 
ward, from 

PETER SOWDERBACK or THOMAS HAMILTON. 

Was FOUND the 2ist Day of January inst. in 
Cherry Alley, in PHILADELPHIA, 

A POCKET BOOK, full of papers, among which, 
an old Petition, to the Assembly of New Jersey, with 
several old Accounts ; it is marked, E. R. 1759. The 
owner, by applying to the Printers, proving his Prop- 
erty, and pay ing the Charge of this Advertisement, may 
have it again. 

Published, and to be SOLD by 
ISAAC COLLINS, 

At his Printing Office, in Burlington, 
THE LAWS and VOTES of last Sessions of the 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the Province of New Jersey ; 
by whom Printing is performed in a neat and correct 
Manner, and the best Price given for HOGS BRISTLES, 
and clean LINEN RAGS. 

Where also may be had, Writing and Wrapping 
Paper by the Ream, &c. with a Variety of School 
Books, &c. Stationary and Blanks, by Wholesale and 
Retail. Book and Pocket Almanacks for 1771, to 
be sold at the above Printing Office. 

To be LETTyfrr a term of Years, 

THAT commodious seat, in Moores Town in the 
county of Burlington, West New Jersey, where Joshua 
Bispham lately lived, consisting of a good stone house, 
four rooms on a floor, two kitchens, a good conveni- 
ent shop for dry goods, and another for wet ditto, a 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 351 

large convenient cellar, and store, convenient for the 
pork trade, where 900 barrels of pork have been 
manufactured in one year, good convenient stables, 
and other out houses. Also a good bearing orchard, 
and large garden, contiguous to said buildings, two 
lots of meadow, containing about 8 acres ; the prem- 
ises are in a healthy part of the country, on the great 
road leading from Philadelphia to Mount Holly, about 
10 miles from Cooper's ferries. For terms enquire 
of John Heustis, living in Moores Town. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2169, January 
24, 1771. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 
THE choice of two plantations, the one situate in 
the township of Northampton, in the County of Bur- 
lington, containing 232 acres of land, 100 acres of 
which will produce excellent wheat, 100 of woodland, 
40 acres of good meadow ground, and 50 more may 
be made, with a- good orchard, which produces variety 
of good fruits, a good dwelling house, with 3 fire 
places, 5 rooms upon the floor, with a good cellar, 
barn, and stable, within 4 miles of Burlington, 5 of 
Mount Holly, and i mile of the navigable river ; the 
said plantation is well watered in every field, winter 
or summer ; the joining fences are in good repair, 4 
partition fences divides the whole. 

The second plantation, situate within 4 miles of 
Mount Holly, and i mile from the river, containing 
1 60 acres of land, well watered in every field, winter 
or summer, 60 acres of which produces excellent 
wheat, 20 acres of good clear meadow ground, and 



352 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

i o acres more may be made ; a good orchard, a good 
dwelling, wood house, with a good cellar, and two 
fire places ; the same in good tenantable repair. 

Any person, inclinable to purchase the choice of 
said plantations, may know the terms by applying to 
ABRAHAM KELLY, in Northampton, in the County of 
Burlington ; or Thomas Elton, fronting the Barrack 
guard, Second Street, Philadelphia. 

January 24. 

THE great success which attended most of those 
who employed themselves in breeding silk worms 
raising Cocoons the last year, and the excellent quality 
of the Silk reeled at the Filature, having given the 
greatest reason to hope that the design set on foot 
for promoting the Culture of Silk in this part of 
America, will answer the most Sanguine expectations 
of those who have so generously subscribed thereto, 
and prove a valuable addition to our staple commod- 
ities ; the Managers of the Filature therefore now give 
notice, that in order further to encourage such as 
chuse to employ part of their time in this profitable 
and laudable undertaking, the following PREMIUMS are 
proposed for the ensuing season, viz. 

1. To that Person in either of the provinces of 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, or the three 
lower counties on Delaware, who shall raise within 
his or her family, and sell at the Filature at Philadel- 
phia, or bring to be reeled for his or her own use, the 
greatest quantity of sound Cocoons, not less than 
Fifty Thousand, the Premium of TWENTY POUNDS. 

2. To that Person in either of the said provinces 
or counties, who shall raise, sell, or bring to be reeled* 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 353 

as aforesaid, the next greatest quantity of sound -Co- 
coons, not less than Forty Thousand, the Premium of 
FIFTEEN POUNDS. 

3. To the Person in either of the said provinces or 
counties, who shall raise, sell or bring to be reeled, 
as aforesaid, the next greatest quantity of sound Co- 
coons, not less than Thirty Thousand, the Premium 
of TEN POUNDS. 

4. To that Person in either of the said provinces, 
who shall raise, sell, or bring to be reeled, as afore- 
said, the next greatest quantity of sound Cocoons, not 
less than Twenty Thousand, the Premium of Six 
POUNDS. 

5. To each of those five Persons, in the said pro- 
vinces or counties, who shall raise, sell, or bring to be 
reeled, as aforesaid, the next greatest quantity of 
sound Cocoons each, not less than Fifteen Thousand, 
the Premium of THREE POUNDS. 

The Cocoons for which any of the said Premiums 
may be claimed, must be brought to the Filature on 
or before the First Day of September next ; with 
satisfactory proof under the hand of one or more 
neighbouring Magistrate or Magistrates, that the Co- 
coons for which the Premium may be claimed, were 
actually and bona fide raised within the Claimant's 
own family. 

In one month after the delivery of the Cocoons and 
Certificates, as aforesaid, the Premiums will be ad- 
judged and paid to the Persons, who may be entitled 
to them, or to their order ; by the Managers. 

As a further encouragement, those Persons who 

intend to apply themselves to the breeding of worms 
33 



354 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the ensuing season, and may want a supply of eggs 
of good quality, may receive the same gratis, from an 
ounce to half a quarter of an ounce, (in proportion to 
their stock of mulberry trees) by applying to John 
Kaighn, (with whom the eggs are lodged) next door 
but one to the Church in Second street, or to any of 
the other Managers, viz. Cadwalader Evans, Benja- 
min Morgan, Francis Alison, William Smith, Robert 
Strettel Jones, Isaac Bartram, Charles Moore, Fred- 
erick Phile, Thomas Clifford, Joseph Pemberton, or 
Owen Biddle. 

N. B. Nicholas Garrison in Race street, near Mor- 
avian alley, has a quantity of the seeds of the Italian 
mulberry to dispose of at a very low price. He will 
also have a number of young mulberry trees of the 
true Italian kind to dispose of at the low price of two 
pence each, the ensuing spring in proper time to 
plant out. A number of the same trees may also be 
procured at Bethlehem. 

See, in Poor Richard 's almanack for this year, 
directions for cultivating the young Mulberry Trees. 

January 17. 

HISTORY. | THIS DAY was PUBLISHED, | THE SEC- 
OND VOLUME of that exalted Historical Work, entitled 
ROBERTSON'S HISTORY OF CHARLES THE FIFTH, &c. and 
is now ready to be delivered to the subscribers, and 
to all persons that now choose to encourage Ameri- 
can manufactures ; price only ONE DOLLAR, altho' the 
British edition cannot be imported for less than four 
dollars each volume. The third volume of this cele- 
brated history is now in the PRESS, and will soon be 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 355 

finished : Therefore, all persons that are persuaded 
one volume is an equivalent for one dollar, and are 
pleased to send their names as encouragers to ROB- 
ERT BELL, at the Union Library, in Third street, or to 
any other bookseller, may depend upon ebullitions of 
gratitude, from 

THE EDITOR. 

N. B. Subscribers in the Jerseys, may be supplied 
by Isaac Collins, Printer in Burlington ; and Mr. Dun- 
lap Adams, in Trenton. 

To the PUBLIC. | THE Subscriber, having wrote 
to England for a quantity of the most elegant types, 
and established a correspondence in Great Britain, 
Ireland, North America and the West Indies, pur- 
poses to publish a Newspaper upon a new and ex- 
tensive plan ; an account of which he begs leave to 
lay before the Public, whose patronage and assist- 
ance, in so arduous an undertaking, he will use his 
utmost endeavours to deserve. 

First. This paper is intitled The Pennsylvania Even- 
ing Post and General Advertiser. . . . 

Seventh. The first number will be printed as soon 
as a sufficient number of subscriptions are obtained 
to defray the expense. . . . 

[signed] WILLIAM EVITT/ 

l^gr* Subscriptions are taken in by the printer, 
at his printing office, ... by Isaac Collins, 
printer in Burlington ; by John Pope, near the said 
place ; and David Potter, merchant, in Cohansie, 
New Jersey. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No, 1468, Jan. 24, 
1771. 



356 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

PHILADELPHIA, January 17, | The sloop Ann, 
Capt. Robeson, from Halifax, for this port, was spoke 
with the 27th ult. above 100 leagues S. E. of our 
Capes, standing for Barbados, having lost the head 
of his rudder, and Short of provisions. Three of her 
passengers were landed at our Capes by a vessel 
bound to Virginia. 

The New York Journal, or The , General Ad- 

vertiser, No. 1464, Jan. 24, 1771. 

RAN away, from the subscriber, two apprentice 
lads, about 18 years of age, and about 5 feet 9 inches 
high, both bloomers, the name of the one is EPH- 
RAIM CASSAMOUR ; had on when he went away, 
a new felt hat, short light coloured coat, check wool- 
en shirt, and a pair of bearskin trowsers, speaks quick, 
has short brown hair. The other's name is JOHN 
PARKESS ; had on a good castor hat, a blue coat, 
and a light coloured cut velvet jacket, and one break- 
fast jacket, a woolen check shirt, a pair of old leather 
breeches, grey stockings, and pinchbeck buckles, 
black eyes and hair, moves slow, and speaks slow, 
supposed to be gone to some iron works. Whoever 
takes up the said apprentices, and secures them in 
any gaol and lets their master know where they are, 
shall have THREE POUNDS reward, and all reason- 
able charges paid by 

JONATHAN FORD. 

Hanover, Morris County, Dec. 31, 1770. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 212, Jan, 

28 to Feb. 4, i 771. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 357 

To SPRINTER ^///^PENNSYLVANIA CHRON- 
ICLE. 

Please to give the following lines a conveyance, 
through your impartial press, to the ingenious CLEORA. 

HOWEVER the conduct of some, and impiety 
of others, may have rendered the institution of marri- 
age a subject of ridicule to the licentious, the volatile 
and witty ; yet I have the assurance to appear, in this 
reformed age, so impolite, as to become an advocate 
for that happiness, which is confined within the bands 
of wedlock, and humbly conceive it, not only a pol- 
itical advantage, but when attended with prudence 
and discretion, a peculiar blessing to society in gen- 
eral ; and therefore should be pleased, if those who 
are capable of delivering their sentiments with spirit 
and accuracy, would endeavour to remove those dis- 
couragements which the imprtidencies of both sexes 
too justly occasion ; and teach mankind, that by giv- 
ing up part of the follies predominant in youth, con- 
descending to some of the failures inseparable from 
human nature, and uniting in a sincere de'sire of en- 
gaging each other's affections, the thorny path of life 
may be made much more delightful and that rest- 
less impatience, and peevish fretfulness, so obvious in 
the behaviour of antiquated Bachelors and Maidens 
prevented or removed. 

The conduct of too many unmarried people of every 
class, is so far from rendering a union desirable, that 
they are more justly obnoxious to the complaints and 
even detestation of the rational part of mankind, "is 
too evidently supported by the stubborn testimonies 
of truth to admit even of a doubt" as the Kensington 



358 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1771 

Bachelor expresses it, though he is so favourable to 
his own dear sex, as to pass over their faults without 
notice, even while he carefully cautions his fair read- 
ers, not "to arrogate" to themselves a merit, which 
in truth neither are justly intitled to. 

But while, with concern, the unprejudiced observe, 
and censure the foibles of the human species, without 
distinction of sexes; it appears far more noble, in my 
humble apprehension, to correct our own sex, either 
by keen satyre or gentle precept ; and then we might 
more reasonably hope, that the pliant and tendre 
minds of the fair, would receive instruction by ex- 
ample for however the delinquents may be con- 
vinced, by the powerful reasoning of the Bachelor 
and his fair opposer, of the justness of their com- 
plaints, yet those evil propensities seem rather irrit- 
ated by the profusion of acrimony, than healed by the 
emolient balsam of their compositions. 

And though my want of penetration, sufficient to 
enter into the merits of "the cause," may prevent 
that amiable reconciliation, which is agreeable to my 
anxious desires, as the amiable fair has sufficiently 
demonstrated, that with the superlative beauties of 
her mind, when (divested of that warmth of resent- 
ment, which is justly displayed with spirit and sensi- 
bility, against those savage monsters or in her more 
emphatical terms, "obdurate race of infidels," whose 
senseless stupidity occasions the long confinement 
of numbers, with herself, in those unjust and narrow 
bounds, which tyrant custom hath circumscribed for 
the purity of virgin innocence by being) happily 
united with a man of sentiment and discretion, she 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 359 

might contribute to the felicity of the present age, 
as well as increase the number and improve the minds 
of the succeeding generation. 

And notwithstanding the attention of the public 
may already have been too much "trespassed upon," 
unless there were more probability of their advant- 
age ; yet should those essays fail of administering to 
their entertainment or improvement, as examples are 
of greater weight and influence than the most excel- 
lent precepts, I would hope, that although the Ken- 
sington Bachelor s performance, has unhappily made 
very little impression in his favour, on the heart of 
the amiable Cleora, her breast may not be quite im- 
penetrable, to the more mild attempts of her humble 
admirer, 

SERENICUS. 
Trenton, January 15, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 211, January 
28, 1771. I -' 

ALL Persons having Demands against the Estate 
of Lewis Morris Ashfield, Esq., deceased, are hereby 
desired to bring in their Accounts, properly authenti- 
cated, to the Subscriber, at Tinton, near Shewsbury, 
New Jersey ; and those any ways indebted to the said 
Estate, are desired to make Payment at the same place, 
by the first Day of March next, or they may expect to 
be sued without further notice. And as sundry Bonds, 
Bills, and Notes, were left in Mr. Ashfield' s Hands in 
his Life Time, as an Attorney, it is likewise requested 
that the Owners may come and receive the same at the 






360 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

said Place, and settle the Costs that are due iipon the 
Actions. 

V. Pearse Ashfield, Administrator. 

\ 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and The Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1005, Jan. 28, 1771. 

January 29, 1771. 

RUN away, on the 2Oth Instant, from the Sub- 
scriber, living- at Shrewsbury, New Jersey, a Servant 
Man, named William Fanton, about 21 Years old, 
well set, 5 Feet 6 or 7 Inches high, dark Eyes, brown 
straight Hair ; had on, when he went away, a pale 
blue Camblet Coat, lapelled, brown under jacket, 
black Plush Breeches, blue Worsted Stockings, Shoes, 
with Pinchbeck Buckles, and an old Castor Hat ; he 
can read a little, but cannot write. Whoever takes 
up and secures said Servant, so as his Master may 
have him again, shall have Thirty Shillings Reward, 
and reasonable Charges paid by 

RYNIER PROBASCO. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to carry 
him off. 

TO be sold by JOHN BUFFIN, of Mansfield, in 
the County of Burlington, and province of New Jer- 
sey, the said Buffins Twelve sorts of Books. Like- 
wise Nebuchadnezar's Image tumbling down ; Ser- 
ious and comical, of Harvey's Repentance ; The Trial 
of Hopping Mad ; The Quarterly Meeting, calling the 
Monthly Meeting to an Account ; and the Trial of 
Peter Proud, &c. all of which he will sell very cheap 
by the Dozen to Chapman, or others. 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 361 

LIST #/" LETTERS in the POST OFFICE at TRENTON, 
January 14, 1771. 

B. 

WILLIAN BAKER, John Burrows, Pennsylvania. 
Thomas Brooks, Hackets-Town. John Burrows, 
Middletown Point. 

C. 

John Cook, Andover Iron-Works. Neal Camp- 
bell, Union Furnace. Joseph Caldwell, New German- 
town. James Corothey, English Town. William 
Cleayton and Isaac Smith, Esquires, Trenton. 

E. 

David Edmiston, near Salem. 

G. : , 

William Greir, Summerset County. William 
Gemmill, Pennsylvania. James Grantland, Salem 
County. James Gilchrist, Trenton. James Gra- 
hams, care of Archibald Stuart, Union Iron-Works. 

H. 

William Harkness, Pennsylvania. Thomas Hun- 
ter, Lebanon. Daniel Hendrickson, Middletown. 
Dr. John Hicks, Trenton. 

j. .".'. 

James James, Piles Grove. Dr. Richard Jacques, 
Middletown. 



John Etton LeConts, 1 Monmouth County. 

M. - 

Mary Murray, Somerset County. William 

M'Clean, Hunterdon County. John M'Chesneym, 



Le Conte. 



362 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

in the care of the Rev. William Tennent. Matthew 
Mills, Sussex County. Margaret Morrison, Quaker 
Town. Dr. Moland, Bucks County. William M'Clean. 
Hunterdon County. 1 

N. 
James Nephew, Somerset County. 

O, 

Johannah O'Conner, at Benj. Stout's, Hunterdon 
County. 

P. 

William Pearson, Trenton. William Pinkerton, 
to the care of Mr. Dolly Clark..- 

R. 

Dr. Alexander Ross, Mount Holly. 

S. 

Sarah Stevens, near Trenton. Benjamin Stevens, 
Maidenhead. Cornelius Skinner, Germantown. 
William Stewart, New Jersey. John Spangenberg, 
Sussex County. John Stewart, Middletown. 

T. 

* 

Nathaniel Toby, East New Jersey. Dr. Inthill, 
Morristown. 

W. 

John Wilson, Bethlehem. Mr. Wilely, Hanover 
Forge. Thomas Watson, Boidentown. Lion Wolf, 
Berkshire County. Thomas Wright, to the care of 
Archibald Stewart. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2197, January 



Evidently a repetition. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 363 

THOSE Gentlemen who have received subscriptions 
for publishing the POEMS of the Revd. NATHANIEL 
EVANS, M. A. late Missionary in Gloucester County, 
New Jersey, and Chaplain to the Lord Vicount Kill- 
morey ; and all those who intend becoming sub- 
scribers, agreeable to the advertisement formerly pub- 
lished, are requested to be speedy in sending in their 
names to Messrs. Hall and Sellers, or Messrs Will- 
iam and Thomas Bradford, Printers in Philadelphia, 
as the book is ready to be committed to the Press* 
and the Publisher desirous to ascertain the number 
of copies that are to be printed off. Subscriptions 
are taken in by the Episcopal Clergy, in Pennsyl- 
vania, and the neighbouring Provinces ; and also by 
John Laurence, Esq ; at Burlington ; Dr. Vanlear, 
at Haddonfield ; Robert Friend Price, Esq ; at Glou- 
cester ; Mr. William Lupton, in New York ; and Mr. 
Enoch Story, in Baltimore Town, Maryland. 

The Book will be published in a neat Octavo; Price 
Five Shillings, bound. One half to be paid at the 
time of subscribing, and the other at the delivery of 
the Book. The subscribers names to be printed. 

7 he Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1469, January 



TO BE SOLD, 

At PUBLIC VENDUE, on the Premises, on Friday 
the First Day of March at Two o'clock in the After- 
noon. 

THREE Hundred Acres of good Land, most of it 
cleared, and a Grist Mill, with two Pair of Stones, ly- 
ing and being within two miles of the City of New 



364 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Brunswick, the property of Henry Longfield, de- 
ceased. The Conditions or Terms of Payment, will 
be made known at the Time of Sale, by 

JAMES NEILSON, Executor of H. Longfield. 
February 4, 1771. 

TO BE SOLD, 

At PUBLIC VENDUE, on the Premises, the First Day 
of March next, by the Subscribers. 

THE Plantation on which JOHN ANDERSON, 
Esq ; now liveth, situate and being in Freehold, in 
the County of Monmouth, containing about 450 Acres. 
The said Plantation is so situate, that it will answer 
to divide, so as to make two good Plantations ; the 
one to contain 225 Acres, with a good House and 
Barn, with two Orchards, containing between three 
and four hundred trees, about 90 Acres of cleared Up- 
land, and about 20 Acres of Meadow (and more may 
be cleared. The other Part contains 225 Acres, near 
100 Acres cleared Upland, and about 25 Acres Mea- 
dow, with a young bearing Orchard, of about 70 or 
80 Trees, and a small House. Both tracts have 
plenty of Water and good Timber, and there will be 
a reasonable Time given for the Payment of the 

Money. 

James Jauncey, 
Hugh Wallace, 

Alexander Watson, }- Assignees. 
Peter Schenck, 
Peter Forman, 
Jan. 18, 1771. 

Burlington, April 21, 1770. 
WHEREAS the STAGE from Burlington to Am- 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 365 

boy, has for some time past been dropt, and the 
Subscriber (finding it inconvenient to numbers of 
People who travel to and from New-York, &c., to go 
the other Stages, by Reason of their being at- 
tended with greater expences, and the Travelling 
more tedious) has again set up a complete Stage 
from Burlington to Amboy ; where the best Attend- 
ance will be given by the waggoner, and the best 
Entertainment for Travellers kept by the Subscriber, 
at the old Stage House ; who will be obliged to all 
Gentlemen and Ladies travelling to and from New- 
York, Philadelphia, &c., to favour him with their Cus- 
tom, as they may depend upon being used in the 
best Manner, and conveyed to their Journey's End, 
with the greatest Safety and Dispatch. 

The Boat lets off from the Crooked-Billet Wharf 
in Philadelphia, on Saturday the 28th Instant, and the 
Passengers embark in the Waggon the Monday fol- 
lowing, and they are conveyed to Amboy that same 
Day, where there is a Boat ready to receive them to 
carry them to New-York. The Waggon returns 
again on Tuesday to Burlington, where the Boat re- 
ceives them and carries them to Philadelphia : The 
Boat again sets off from Philadelphia on Wednesday, 
and the Waggon on Thursday, and so to continue. 
The best Attendance will be given by the Burlington 
Stage Boatmen, whose Boats have excellent Accom- 
modations, and the People extremely careful. 

The reason the Stage is more commodious and 
shorter than any other is this, let the Wind be in 
what Corner it will, the Distance by Water is so 






366 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

short, you are always sure of getting to Burlington 
in one tide. 

JOSEPH HAIGHT. 

-The N. Y. Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1466, Feb. 4, 1771. 

To be LETT, or SOLD, 

(To be entered upon immediately.) 
THE noted HOUSE and GARDEN, STABLE, and 
COACH HOUSE, in Eliz. Town, wherein Sir JOHN SIN- 
CLAIR lived, but lately occupied by the Honourable 
Colonel TEMPLER. For further Particulars apply to 
Ezekiel Ball, at Newark Farms. 

N. B. Said BALL hath to dispose of a likely Half 
blooded HORSE, rising six Years old ; can be well 
recommended for the SADDLE or CARRIAGE, 15 Hands 
and an Inch high. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1006. Feb. 4, 1771. 

To be SOLD, or exchanged for improved LAND 
in Pennsylvania, within 20 or 30 miles of Philadelphia, 
or an interest in said city, of equal value, 

A TRACT of unimproved land, situate in the town- 
ship of Nottingham, Burlington County, West New 
Jersey, about 4 miles from the Falls Landing (on 
Delaware) and near the same distance from Trenton, 
containing about 300 acres of good land, about 100 
acres of said tract may be made good meadow, It be- 
ing well watered, and has plenty of good timber 
thereon. If sold, the payment will be made easy to 
the purchaser. The title is indisputable. For further 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 367 

f 

particulars, enquire of ANDREW EDGE, in Third street, 
between Market and Arch-streets, and opposite to 
Richard Hockley, Esquire. 

N. B. Said EDGE has a quantity of very good bo 
hea tea, and a variety of dry goods, to dispose of, 
very cheap, for cash. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Chester- 
field township, Burlington county, the 3ist of Jan- 
uary last, a Dutch servant man, named PETER JABIL, 
near 40 years of age, about 5 feet 7 inches high, dark 
complexion, black hair, and speaks bad English ; had 
on, when he went away, a light cloth-coloured coat, 
with wooden buttons, a blue vest, and buckskin 
breeches. Whoever takes up said servant, and se- 
cures him in any of his Majesty's goals, shall have 
TEN DOLLARS reward, if taken in the county, and 
if out of the county FIFTEEN DOLLARS reward, 
and reasonable charges, paid by 

ISRAEL WRIGHT. 

By virtue of a writ to me directed, will be expos- 
ed to public Sale, on the 26th day of March next, be- 
tween the hours of 12 in the forenoon and 5 in the 
evening, at the house of Martha Pinyard, on the Co- 
chawking road, the following tracts of land, viz, one 
tract of 300 acres of excellent land, bounded on the 
Cochawking road, with two small messuages thereon, 
an orchard of good apple trees, about 20 acres of 
cleared land, and about 10 or 12 acres of swamp, 
capable of making good meadow, the situation suit- 
able for any public business. Also another tract of 



368 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

60 acres of land, about 30 acres of which is very good 
swamp, part thereof cleared, capable of making- good 
meadow ; likewise one half of an excellent saw-mill ; 
late the property of JAMES BUDD, seized in execution, 
and to be sold by 

JOSEPH HUGO, Sheriff. 

N. B. There will be time given for part of the pay- 
ment. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2198, Feb. 7, 

1771. 

To be SOLD, at PUBLIC VENDUE. 

The Ferry-House at Elizabeth-Town Point, to- 
gether with all the Land to the Southwestward of the 
Road, containing about Fifty Acres partly fresh and 
Salt Meadow ; also to include the Barn and Ferry 
Stairs, with an exclusive Right to the Ferry to Staten 
Island, and to keep Passage Boats to New York. 
The Sale to be on the Premises, on Friday the 5th 
of March next : An indisputable Title will be given 
to the Purchaser. 

The N. Y. Gazette; and the Weekly Mercury, 

No. 1008, Feb. 1 8, 1771. 

To be sold, a neat Plantation situate in the South 
Ward of the City of Perth-Amboy, in the County of 
Middlesex and Province of New Jersey, containing 
190 and y^ Acres of very good fresh Land, about 
half of which is cleared and in Fence, with a large 
Portion of Meadow which afforded this Year 20 Loads 
of Clover and Timothy Grass Hay. There are on 
the Premises, a very good Dwelling House with two 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 369 

good Rooms below and two above, and a Kitchen and 
Milk House adjoining ; a new Dutch Barn 42 by 35, 
near which are two Barracks and a new Waggon 
House ; also a very clever young Orchard consisting 
of a large Number of Peach, Apple and other Trees, 
which bear very fine fruit. The Premises lie within 
two miles of a fine Grist Mill and a convenient Land- 
ing. Any Persons inclining to purchase, may apply 
to the Subscriber living thereon, who will agree on 
reasonable Terms, give Possession this Spring and 
make an indisputable Title. 

SAMUEL KER. 
South Amboy, \6th Jan. 1771. 

To be Sold, at public Vendue, between the Hours 
of one and two in the Afternoon, on Friday the first 
Day of March next, on the Premises, a Tract of Land 
containing 145 Acres, whereof about 100 Acres are 
cleared, on which are a good Dwelling House, with 
two Fire Places, three Rooms and an Entry on the 
lower Floor, and four Rooms up Stairs, with a good 
Garret, and a good Stone Cellar under the whole 
House, in which is a Milk Room, a Cellar, with a 
Kitchen that joins the House, a Fire Place in it, an 
Oven and Oven House, all well furnished, and a good 
Stone Well, close to the door, of very good Water 
in the driest time, with a good Garden that joins the 
Well and House ; also a Barn of 48 Feet by 36, cov- 
ered with Cedar, a Waggon House, Corn Crib, Hen- 
House, and Sheep-House, all under one Roof, covered 
with Cedar; also a young Orchard upwards of 200 
Apple Trees, Peach Trees and Plumb Trees. This 

24 



370 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Tract is good for Wheat and Corn, with Water in 
every Field, is in very good Fence, and joins to a 
good out let, and an extraordinary good Neighbour- 
hood. There can be cut about i 2 Waggon Load of 
Clover, Timothy, and Burding-grass in a Season, and 
a good deal more can be cut with very little Expense. 
The Plantation lies within two Miles of Monmouth 
Court House, within 12 Miles of Middletown Point, 
and 14 of Black Point, and joins the Burlington Road 
that leads from the said Court House to Black Point 
in Shrewsbury ; it is convenient to the Baptist Meet- 
ing House, Presbyterian, Dutch Church, and English 
Church, the farthest is not above five Miles : The 
Place is remarkable for a good Market. Any Per- 
son choosing to purchase before the Day of Sale, may 
apply to Edmund Harris, on the Premises, who will 
agree and give an indisputable Title for the same; 
or to Daniel Hendrickson, Jun. in Middletown ; or to 
Garret Vanderveer, in Freehold : The Conditions of 
the Vendue will be made known on the Day of Sale, 
by us 

Edmund Harris, 
. . Daniel Hendrickson, Jun. 

Garret Vanderveer. 

The New- York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 14.66, Feb. 7, 1771. 

Upper Freehold, February 3, 1770. [sic] 

NOTICE is hereby given to all the Creditors of 

John Parker, and Benjamin Parker, jun. of Upper 

Freehold, in the County of Monmouth, and Province 

of New Jersey, to attend at the House of Andrew 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 371 

Pierse, in Upper-Freehold aforesaid, on Monday the 
1 3th of May next, to settle and adjust their De- 
mands. At the Same Time and Place will be ex- 
posed to Sale at public Vendue, all the Estates of the 
aforesaid John Parker and Benjamin Parker, jun. 
when all Persons indebted to them, are requested to 
attend and make payment. 

ANDREW PIERSE, 1 

JOHN ESTELL, > Assignees. 

BENJ. PARKER, minor. J 

To be Sold at private Sale. 

A BOAT of about 20 Tons Burthen, suitable for 
carrying Wood or Hay, she having- been chiefly em- 
ployed in that Business. The Boat is in good 
Order, is well rigged, has a new Mainsail, with two 
good Anchors, and new Cables. 

For farther Particulars, inquire of HENRY FREE- 
MAN, in Woodbridge, East-New-Jersey. 

The New York Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1497, February 11, 1771. 

NEW YORK, February ;i. | Saturday last Capt. 
Stewart arrived here from Madeira, in 7 Weeks : He 
came to an Anchor last Friday Evening at Sandy 
Hook ; but lost both his Anchors and Cables on Sat- 
urday Morning. 

To be SOLD, 

A Convenient stone dwelling house, and lot, with 
a good shingle roof'd barn ; the lot contains about 
one acre, and the house has three good rooms on a 
floor, with two small back rooms, situated at the new 



3/2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

bridge, in Hackinsack, in the county of Bergen, 
bounded, upon Hackinsack River, and opposite to 
John Zabriskie, Esq ; very convenient for fishing and 
fowling. Also twenty five acres of good mowing 
ground and wooded land, within half a mile of the 
dwelling-house ; a very convenient situation for a 
shop or tavern-keeper, as there has been a tavern 
kept for many years ; and near to the latin school, 
very convenient to keep boarders. Any person in- 
clining to purchase, may have the whole, or the house 
and lot only ; For further particulars enquire of And- 
rew Van Buskirk, on the premises, or of John Earle, 
who will give a good title for the same. 

N. B. The house and lot will be sold very cheap, 
and easy payments given, as the owner has no use 
for it. 

To be LETT, on Cowfoot-Hill, 
A convenient House, last tenanted by Capt. Rose ; 
also two pleasantly situated Houses and Lots in 
Elizabeth-Town. For particulars, enquire of Abra- 
ham Lott, Esq ; Treasurer, or of Henry Kelly. 

To be SOLD, 

At public vendue on Tuesday, the iQth day of 
March, at the merchant's coffee-house, in New- York 
or at private sale any time before by the subscriber ; 

A Farm or plantation, lying in Piscataway, New- 
Jersey, about one mile and a half from Bound-Brook, 
two miles from Quibble-Town, and five miles from 
Rariton-Landing, containing about one hundred and 
fifty acres of excellent land, the greater part of it 
mowing ground, with a tolerable good house, and 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 373 

barn, and orchard, being formerly possessed by 
Thomas Clawson, deceased, and now by Burgen Cov- 
ert. For further particulars, enquire of Mrs. Tobias 

i 

Van Norden, at Bound Brook, or the Subscribers, in 
New-York. 

LUDLOW and HOFFMAN, 

LEWIS PINTARD. 

NEW JERSEY, 1 THIS is to give notice to all whom 
Morris County, j it may concern, that whereas I the 

subscriber, did petition the General Assembly of this 
province at their last sessions, for a law to compel the 
owners of a certain boggy swamp, known by the 
name of the Pinch Bogg Swamp, in Hanover town- 
ship, to scour, cleance, and keep open at their own 
expence, a certain great ditch, and other line ditches 
running thro' the said bogg swamp, so far as each 
person joins said ditches. Likewise I intend to peti- 
tion the Governor and Council and General Assembly^ 
at their next sessions, for a law to compel the owners 
and possessors of land benefitted by said ditch, to de- 
fray the expence formerly made by digging and 
cleaning the same, and all other line ditches in said 
'bogg swamp, leading into said great ditch ; to be dug 
five feet wide, and as deep as the said great ditch, 
and maintained at the expence of the owners and 
possessors adjoining the same. All persons con- 
cerned therein are desired to attend at the next ses- 
sions of said General Assembly, and shew cause, if 
any they have, why said law shall not pass. 

MOSES YOUNG. 

Likewise this is to give notice, That we the sub- 



374 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

scribers, inhabitants of the township of Hanover, in 
Morris County, intend to petition the Governor, 
Council, and General Assembly, of the province of 
New-Jersey, at their next sessions, for a law to com- 
pel the several owners and possessors of certain lots 
of swamp or meadow, adjoining Whiponong River, 
and Black Brook, and the Muddy Run, that runs from 
the mouth of the Great Pinch Ditch, through Flaggy 
Meadow, and Swamp, to said Black Brook, to dig a 
ditch sufficient for draining the same ; beginning at 
the mouth of said Pinch Ditch, thence a direct course 
through several lots of swamp, to said Black Brook ; 
then to clear out said brook, to said Whiponong 
River ; thence down the same to the south-west cor- 
ner of Col. Tuttle's land ; the several owners not to 
be at any charge any farther than they join said ditch, 
brook, or river, and so far each one to be at equal 
expence in making and maintaining said ditch, and 
cleansing the said brook and river, and so to continue 

c> 

from year to year, by cleaning out said brook and 
river, all the wood, logs, and brush that any ways ob- 
structs the passage of the water. 

BENJAMIN PRICE, JOHN TROUP, 
BENJAMIN GREEN, MOSES YOUNG. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1007, Feb. u, 1771. 

To be sold, in the Township of Bridgewater, in 
Somerset County, in New-Jersey, the following Tracts 
or Parcels of Land, viz. One Plantation containing 
about 1 60 Acres of Land, whereon is a good new 
Dwelling House, with a good Cellar, and four Fire 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 375 

Places, as also a good Barn, and a thriving young 
Orchard, of about 400 Apple Trees ; a considerable 
Quantity of the Land cleared, and in good Fence, pleas- 
antly situated on a public Country Road, about 9 Miles 
from New-Brunswick, and about two Miles above 
Bound Brook Town ; which Premises are so situated 
and supplied with Springs and other Water that it 
would admit of being divided into two small Farms: 
Also 1 2 Acres of Meadow Ground near the Same Pre- 
mises : Also another Plantation at a small Distance 
from the above, containing 102 Acres, whereon 
is a new framed House, plenty of good Meadow, and 
a young Orchard : As also, a small Tract of about 18 
Acres, whereon is a good Saw-Mill, situated in the 
Midst of a great Plenty of Timber, &c. All which Pre- 
mises were lately the Property of Isaiah Younglove : 
The Purchaser may have easy Terms of Payment, 
and enter on the Premises by the first Day of April 
next ; and an indisputable Title will be given, by 
Peter Schenck, Esq ; Matthew Ten Eyck } and 
John Van Derveer, Esq ; George Van Neste. 
Jan. 8, 1771. All of Somerset aforesaid. 

-N. Y. Journal, or The General Advertiser, No. 
1467, Feb. 14, 1771. 

To be SOLD, by the SUBSCRIBER, and entered 

on the 25th of March, 

A SMALL but valuable plantation, situate in Al- 
loway's-creek township, in the county of Salem, in 
West New-Jersey, adjoining a public road, leading 
from Salem to Cohansey Bridge, and two miles from 
a noted landing on said creek, called Ouinton's 



376 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Bridge, where abundance of staves and cord wood 
are transported to Philadelphia, and not above 5 
miles from Salem, 4 from a glass-house, and near 
several grist and saw-mills, and near sundry places 
of worship, and a school-house settled on one corner 
of the land, containing 86 acres of land, about 30 
whereof are cleared, and about 17 or 18 acres of 
good rich swamp meadow, the greatest part in good 
grass, and a great quantity more might, with a small 
expence be made, all in one entire body, and adjoin- 
ing the upland ; the improvements are, a good dwell- 
ing-house, almost new, 27 feet by 20, two rooms on 
a floor, with fire-places in each room, good stone cel- 
lar under the whole, kitchen, barn, apple and peach 
orchard, and an excellent well of water at the door, 
stoned up. For further information, and terms of 
sale, apply to LEWIS OWEN, Shop-joiner, in Salem. 
Feb. 5, 1771. 

HISTORY. | As the completion of the grand feast 
of historical entertainment, by the Publication of the 
Third Volume of Robertson's celebrated History of 
Charles the Fifth is near at hand, all Gentlemen that 
possess a sentimental taste, so as to wish for a Par- 
ticipation of this elegant XENOPHONTIC BAN- 
QUET, At the moderate price of Three Dollars 
(although the British edition cannot be imported for 
less than Fifteen Dollars) are requested to send their 
names as encouragers of it to any of the Booksell- 
ers in Boston, New-York, Philadelphia ; or to . . . 
Mr. Dunlap Adams, in Trenton Mr. Isaac Collins, 
in Burlington . . . 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 377 



N. B. The First and Second Volumes are already 
published, and may be had at the above mentioned 
places at One Dollar each Volume. The Pennsylva- 
nia Gazette, No. 2199, Febriiary 14, 1771. 



To BE LET, 

AND entered upon the ist of May next: 

The House and Lot of Ground in Beaver-Street, 
where Mr. James Parker, deceased, lately lived and 
kept his Printing-Office: The House contains on 
the first Floor 2 front Rooms, one conveniently fitted 
for a Shop, the other for a Bed-room or small sum- 
mer Parlour, a large handsome Parlour, and a small 
side Room, both with Fire Places ; on the second 
Floor, one large and three small Rooms, two of which 
have Fire Places ; and on the third Floor, a Bed 
Room and a large light Room with a Fire Place, 
where Mr. Parker kept his Printing Works. This 
Room is capable of being divided into two or four 
handsome Apartments. Under the House is a Cel- 
lar Kitchen, in the Yard a Store House, and adjoin- 
ing a Tenement fit for a small Family, which may be 
rented separately. For terms inquire of Mr. Pan- 
ton, in Broad-Street, or Mrs. Parker, at Wood- 
bridge. 

TO BE SOLD, 

At Publick Vendue, on Saturday, the second Day of 

March next ensuing, 

AT the Dwelling-House of Mr James Banks, 
Innholder in Newark, at Two o'Clock in the After- 
noon of the same Day, by us the Subscribers, As- 
signees of the Estate of John and Uzal Ogden, Es- 



378 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

quires, of Newark, in New Jersey, for the Benefit 
and Advantage of their Creditors : ALL the Estate, 
Right, and Title, which, the said John and Uzal Og- 
den have, in and to the Furnace, Casting-houses, 
Coal-houses, and other the Appurtenances ; and also 
in and to several Tracts or Parcels of Land, situate, 
lying and being in the Counties of Morris and Ber- 
gen, at and near Bloomendale ; which said Premises 
are subject to a Mortgage to Thomas and Ferdinand 
Pennington, of Bristol, in the Kingdom of Great 
Britain..' The Particulars whereof, and the Boun- 
daries of the said Lands, will be made known at the 
Time of the Sale ; of which all Persons concerned, 
and those inclining to purchase, are desired to take 
Notice. 

JOSEPH RIGGS, jun. 

Newark, in New- THOMAS LONGWORTH. 

Jersey, Feb. 10, 1771. 

-The N. Y. Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1498, Feb. 1 8, 1771. 

NOTICE is hereby given that the plantation of Mo- 
ses Conger is to be sold, by public sale, to the high- 
*est bidder, at vendue, on the 25th day of next March, 
afternoon, if not sold at private sale before. It is 
well situated for a gentleman, tradesman or farmer, 
allowed good land, lying in Woodbridge-Raway Neck, 
adjoining that pleasant river, which affords fish in 
plenty in the season, and is navigable for boats, 
sloops, &c. There is on it a tolerable good house 
and barn ; it is exceedingly well watered, some wood, 
a fine young orchard, and another considerable old. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 379 

It contains by estimation, between seventy and eighty 
acres of upland, near 15 acres of salt marsh, as 
handy and as good as any in that part. Any person 
wanting such a place, may apply to the subscriber 
before the day of sale, who will give a good title, 
and sell on reasonable terms. 

MOSES CONGER. 

N. B. Said place lies convenient, for a ferry to be 
erected across Raway river, to Elizabeth-Town. 

-The N. Y. Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1498, Feb. 1 8, 1771. 

New- Jersey, Essex County, Feb. 9, 1771. 
WHEREAS Sarah Druer, the wife of Timothy Druer, 
the Subscriber, hath behaved herself in a very dis- 
orderly and unbecoming manner ; therefore this is 
to forewarn all Persons whatsoever, from trusting or 
crediting her in my Name, on any Pretence what- 
ever, as I am determined to pa^no Debts of her con- 
tracting from the Date hereof. 

TIMOTHY DRUER. 

Elizabeth-Town, Feb. 5, 1771. 
TO be lett, and entered on the 25th of March 
next, the large, convenient, and well situated Dwell- 
ing-House of Col. Jacob Dehart, in Elizabeth-Town, 
suitable for a Gentleman, or any Business, with Out- 
houses, a good Orchard and Garden adjoining the 
same ; and also another House and Lot of Ground 
of the said Jacob Dehart, situated in a very pleasant 
Part of the Town, and suitable for any Kind of Busi- 
ness. Any Person inclining to take either of the 



380 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/7l 

above Tenements, will be pleased to apply to the 
Owner. 

JACOB DEHART. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1008. Feb. 1 8, 1771. 

DEATHS. ... At Woodbury, New Jersey, the 
Hon. John Ladd, Esq ; ! one of his Majesty's Council 
for that Province. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 214, February 
ii, to February 18, 1771. 

To be LETT, and may be entered immediately, 
A GOOD brick HOUSE, 3 rooms on the first 
floor, and two kitchens, and 7 on the next. 4 miles 
from Philadelphia, near Lancaster road ; . . . Any 
gentleman inclining to rent the same, may know the 
terms, by applying to the subscriber on the premises, 

JOSEPH MITCHELL. 

Also to be lett, The Ferry at Bordentown, with 
the boats thereunto belonging, and a good conveni- 
ent house, and garden, and two other lots. Any 
person inclining to rent the same, may know the 
terms, by applying as above. Rebecca Potts, who lives 
with Mr. Joseph B or den, in Bordentown, will show 
the house and lots. 

To the PUBLIC, 

WHEREAS the subscriber has been a few years 
since strenuously importuned by several of the most 
eminent gentlemen in the province of Pennsylvania, 
his friends, to reassume and continue the cultivation 

^^^__^_ * 

i For notices of John Ladd, see N. J. Archives, IX, 395; X, 224. 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 381 

of GARDEN SEEDS ; pursuant thereto he has at 
considerable expence for some years past, procured 
and reared as various and numerous a collection of 
garden seeds, best in kind, as any man resorting 
Philadelphia market whatsoever^ peas and beans of 
all kinds, and thinks he can supply any demands, 
for any kind of garden seeds, that can reasonably be 
expected in this part of America. And does hereby 
return his sincere thanks to such gentlemen and 
others as have favoured him with their custom, re- 
questing the continuation of the same, who may be 
supplied, in future, at the most reasonable rates, by 
applying on market days, at the covered stall, the 
north side of the Jersey market, at the upper end, or 
by applying to Mr. Caleb Hewes, Hatter, within a 
door or two of the Rising Sun, in Market-street, 
where he keeps his Seed Store ; and likewise at his 
seat in Newtown, Gloucester county, New-Jersey ; 
whose favours shall be gratefully acknowledged, by 
their very humble servant, RICHARD COLLINGS, Gardi- 
ner. 

Carlisle, February 11, 1771. 

WHEREAS a certain Caleb Sweesy, of Roxbury 
township, in the county of Morris, in West New-Jer- 
sey, obtained three bonds from the subscriber, each 
for ^115, dated May 24, 1769, and payable on the 
Tst of May, in the years 1771, 1772, 1773. And 
whereas said Sweesy has not made sufficient title to 
the subscriber, for the plantation or tract of land, for 
which such bonds were given ; these therefore are to 
forewarn all persons not to purchase, or take assign- 






382 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ments on said bonds, as I am determined to dispute 
the payment of them, until Sweesy shall make good 
his covenant. 

JOHN STEEL. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2200, Feb. 21, 

1771. 

NEW YORK, Feb. 21. By a Letter from Capt. 
John Hampton, dated St. Augustine, December 19, 
(who sailed from hence some time in November last, 
loaded with King's Stores, bound to New Provi- 
dence and St. Augustine) we learn, That the third 
Day after he left the Hook, he had a violent Storm, 
in which he lost his Boom, and everything off Deck, 
except his Boat and Cabouce, which obliged him to 
put in at St. Augustine before he could proceed to 
Providence. 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 

vertiser, No. 1468, Feb. 21, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, FEB. 14. | . . . Saturday last 
Capt. Stewart arrived here from Madeira,. in seven 
weeks : he came to anchor last Friday evening at 
Sandy- Hook ; but lost both his anchors and cables on 
Saturday morning. 

PHILADELPHIA. | The sloop Santa Maria, 
Capt. Bell, from South-Carolina, and the ship George, 
Capt. Gregory, from Jamaica, both for this port, came 
to anchor off Cape May, on Friday last, but on Sat- 
urday, the wind being high, the ship stood out to sea, 
and the sloop stood in, and got into Cohansy creek, 
where she lies safe. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 383 

The sloop- , Capt. Seabrook, belonging to 

and bound for Egg Harbour, from St. Eustatia, hav- 
ing been blown off this coast at two different times, 
put into Norfolk, Virginia, about the i4th of January 
last. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1472, Feb. 21, 

1771. 

MARRIED. ... At Chestnut-Grove, New-Jersey, 
Mr. Nathaniel Lewis, of Philadelphia, Merchant, to 
Miss Lucy Lawrence. 

Philadelphia, March 4. A Gentleman just arriv- 
ed here from New Yoik, informs, that the Packet, 
which had been beating some Time off Sandy Hook, 
was* safe arrived in Port. The Letters are hourly 
expected by the Post. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 216, Feb. 

25 to Mar. 4, 1771. 

New-Jersey, Hanover, Morris County, Feb. 18, 1771. 
PUBLIC notice is hereby given, that the sub- 
scribers, inhabitants in the township aforesaid, intend 
to petition the Governor, council, and general as- 
sembly of the province aforesaid, at their next ses- 
sions, for a law to compel the several owners and 
possessors, of certain low miery swamp and meadows, 
in the township aforesaid, laying each side of Black 
Brook, running the easterly side of Great Whapping 
meadows ; for each of the several owners or pos- 
sessors adjoining said brook, to clear out the same to 
such a depth and width, as shall be necessary for the 
effectual dreaning the aforesaid lands adjoining the 



384 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

same ; beginning where Muddy Run empties into 
said Black Brook, and from thence running up said 
brook as far as the same adjoins the southernmost 
part of the Hammock plantation. The several own- 
ers not to be at any charge further than they join 
said brook. So far each one to be at equal expense, 
according to the length they shall join or bound on 
the same, and to continue from year to year cleaning 
out and repairing the same, as occasion shall require. 

JOHN BURROUGH, EBENEZER SAYRE. 
BENJAMIN BURROUGH, EPHRAIM 

PRICE, SAMUEL FORD. 

7^he N. Y. Gazette ; and The Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1009, Feb. 25, 1771. 

NEW YORK, February 25. 

Saturday the 12th inst. his Excellency the Right 
Honourable, JOHN Earl of DUNMORE, gave his As- 
sent to the following Acts, passed this Session ; after 
which his Excellency recommended the Speaker to 
return to the Assembly Chamber, and adjourn the 
House till Monday the 25th Instant, and the House 
adjourned to that Time accordingly. 

An Act for establishing the Boundary or Partition 
Line between the Colonies of New York and Nova 
C&sarea, or New Jersey ; and for confirming Titles 
and Possessions. 

An Act to amend an Act, entitled, An Act for sub- 
mitting the Property of the Lands which are held or 
claimed by Grants under the Great Seal of this Col- 
ony, and are affected by the Controversy about the 
Boundary or Partition Line between this Colony and 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 385 

the Colony of New Jersey, to such a Method of De- 
cision, as his most Gracious Majesty shall think pro- 
per by his Royal Commission or otherwise to ap- 
point ; and for defraying the Expense to accrue on 
the Part of this Colony, on the final Settlement of the 
said Line. 

PHILADELPHIA, February 2 1 . Last Friday the sloop 
Santa Maria, Captain Bell, arrived at our Capes, from 
South-Carolina ; and the ship Minerva, Capt. Gregory^ 
from Jamaica ; the sloop is since got into Cohansey 
Creek, but the ship either weighed, or slipped her 
cable, and stood out to sea. 

NEW- YORK, February 25. | We hear that one of 
the Pilot Boats belonging to this Port, was sunk near 
Sandy-Hook last Week by the Ice, and it was with 
much Difficulty that the People on board escaped. 

To be LETT. | And entered on the first of May 
next, | THE House in Beaver-street, wherein the 
Printing-Office is now kept. Enquire of Mr. Francis 
Panton, in Broad-street, New-York, or Mrs. Mary 
Parker, at Woodbridge. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1499. Feb. 25, 1771. 



West New-Jersey, February 21, 
RUN away on the isl instant, from the subscriber, 
in Lower Penn s Neck, Salem county, an English ser- 
vant man, named THOMAS COLLARD, aboiit 21 years of 
age, and about 5 feet 7 inches high ; had on, and took 
with him, a new Russia shirt, green woolen trowsers^ 
tivo jackets, one of a yellow striped lincey, patched with 

25 



386 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

red, the other of home made cotton, with buttons of the 
same colour, grey stockings, new double scaled shoes, 
and a half worn felt hat. Whoever takes up said ser- 
vant, and commits him to goal, or sends him to the 
sub sc fiber, shall have FOUR DOLLARS reward, and all 
reasonable charges paid by me. 

JONAS REES. 

On Thursday last was married, at Chestnut-Grove, 
East-Jersey, Mr. NATHANIEL LEWIS, Merchant of this 
City [Philadelphia], to Miss LUCY LAWRENCE, Daught- 
er of ELISHA LAWRENCE, Esq ; a lady of a serious and 
well disposed Mind, and endowed with every Quali- 
fication to render the married State happy. 



PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 28. | The Snow Chance, 
Captain Brown, from Georgia for this Port, loaded 
with Live Oak Timber, parted her Cables, and drove 
ashore near Cape-May, in the Snow Storm, on Sun- 
day, the 1 7th Instant ; the Vessel is bilged, but the 
Sails and Rigging are saved. 

PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 28. | Our Navigation be- 
ing again clear, Yesterday a Brigantine, supposed to 
be the Polly, Captain Lockton, from St. Christophers, 
came up to Gloucester Point. 

The Brig Carpenter, Captain Smith, from Barbados; 
and the Brig Charming Peggy, Captain Conyngham, 
from Antigua, are arrived, at our Capes. 

Arrived at Barbados. ... . Captain Richards, 
from New-Jersey. 

TO BE SOLD, | A tract of land, in the county of 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 387 

Hunterdon, and province of New-Jersey, lying on 
Delaware river; it extends about 140 chains along 
the river, and contains about 960 acres, a consider- 
able quantity of which is low land, and capable of be- 
ing improved to great advantage ; the brook Nesha- 
sackaway, which runs through the tract, and empties 
itself into the Delaware, affords plenty of water for a 
mill, which may be advantageously built on the bank 
of the river. It is a very convenient place for a 
country store, (one having been kept there for sev- 
eral years) it being so situated, that it is the natural 
market for a great part of Hunterdon and Sussex 
counties, as well as Pennsylvania, it being without 
exception as good a landing, both for the farmer and 
merchant, as any on Delaware river, above Trenton. 
The road from the eastern parts of Jersey to Penn- 
sylvania runs through it, and a considerable ferry is 
kept on the premises, for which a patent was ob- 
tained some years ago ; it is very well calculated for 
a gentleman's country seat, the land being very fer- 
tile, and its pleasant situation on the river Delaware, 
affording the amusements of fishing, fowling, etc. in 
the greatest perfection. The premises will be shown 
by Mr. John Imley or Jeremiah Thatcher, who lives 
in the neighbourhood, and those who incline to pur- 
chase may apply to JAMES PARKER, at Perth-Amboy, 
for the terms and conditions of sale. 

N. B. There is a stone house, and three settled 
farms, on said tract. 

Perth-Amboy, February 16, 1771. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2201, February 
28, 1771. 



388 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

PHILADELPHIA. | ARRIVALS. Sloop Herring, Rich- 
ards from New-Jersey. 

TO BE SOLD or LET. On very reasonable 
terms, A DWELLING HOUSE and LOT of Ground in 
Princetown, New-Jersey, fronting the college, very 
convenient for a merchant or tavern-keeper. There 
are ten rooms in the house with fire places, besides 
a large Kitchen ; there is also on the premises, a 
large stable sufficient for thirty horses ; with a very 
convenient garden spot. Any person inclining to 
purchase or lease the same, may know the terms by 
applying to the subscriber, in Elizabeth-town, or to 
RICHARD STOCKTON, Esq ; at Princeton. 

ELIAS BOUDINOT. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1473, Feb. 28, 
1771. 

WHEREAS the plantation formerly possessed by 
Thomas Clawson, lying in Piscataway, in New -Jersey, 
is advertised for sale at public vendue, on Tuesday the 
iqth March instant, at the Merchant 's Coffee-House, 
New-York ; the proprietors of said plantation, for the 
convenience of such persons as may become purchasers, 
whose business may not permit them to come to New- 
York to attend the sale, have postponed the sale thereof 
to the first Tuesday in April next, when it will be sold 
at public vendue on the premises. Any person inclin- 
ing to purchase before the day of sale, may apply to 
Tobias Van Norden, at Bound Brook, or to the sub- 

scribers in New-York. 

LUDLOW and HOFFMAN, 

LEWIS PINTARD, 
ANN HAMERSLEV. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 389 

The sale of the lands of Walter Krwin, an ab- 
sconding- debtor, is adjourned till Wednesday the 
loth of March, then to be sold at public vendue, by 
the Auditors, at the house of Thomas Kenny, in 
Morris-Town, at twelve o'clock. 



NEW-YORK, March 7. | Capt. Goodridge sailed 
from Falmoutk in Company with the Lisbon, Carolina 
and West- India Packet, and had a Prospect of a short 
Passage, being up zuith Madeira in 8 Days, and was 
within 3 Leagues of Sandy- Hook, the ijth Ultimo, but 
was beat off in a violent Gale of Wind, and could not 
again come in with the Land before last Thursday. 

Capt. Kennedy from St. Eustatia, last Monday Week 
spoke with Capt. Alboy, about 75 Leagues from the 
Capes of Delaware, bound to this Port, from South- 
Carolina; he had been once near Sandy-Hook, but was 
beat off. 

Between twelve and one o clock of the Morning of 
the 28th Ult. a terrible Fire broke out in the Barn of 
John Dennis, Esq ; of New -Brunswick, in New- Jer- 
sey, occasioned by Water getting to a Hogshead of un- 
slacked Lime, that had accidentally been stored therein: 
The Barn was soon consumed, with every Thing it 
contained, notwithstanding the Activity of the Inhabit- 
ants, greatly assisted by his Majesty's Troops under 
the Command of Captain French. The Flames soon 
reached Mr. Dennis s Store, and also consumed that, 
with all his Goods therein , to the Amount of iipwards 
of a Thousand Pounds. 

' Tis hoped Mr. Dennis s Misfortune will be a Cau- 



390 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

lion to the Public in general to be careful where they 
deposit unslacked Lime. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 

No. 1010. March 4, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, March 4, | We hear from New- 
Brunswick, that about 12 o'Clock on Wednesday 
Night last, a Fire broke out there, in a Stable belong- 
ing to Mr. John Dennis, Hatter, The Fire had got 
to so great a height before it was discovered, that it 
communicated to an adjoining Store-House which is 
entirely consumed, together with a great Quantity of 
Furrs, Logwood, Salt, Sugar, &c. that was in the 
Store. It is imagined the Fire was occasioned by a 
Hogshead of unslacked Lime that lay in the Stable 
catching on Fire. The Loss is computed at about 
. roco. 

Woodbridge, February 28, 1771. 
To be LETT, 

THE NEW-BLAZING-STAR FERRY, with all 
the Appurtenances belonging thereto ; together with 
a good House, Barn, Shed, and Thirty-five Acres of 
good Land, all conveniently situated. The Sub- 
scriber will rent the Whole or Part, for one, two or 
three Years ; It is very convenient for a Tradesman. 
Any person it may suit, may agree with the Sub- 
scriber, living on the Premises. 

REUBEN FITZ RANDOLPH. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 

No. 1 500, March 4, 1771. 

BOSTON, February 1 8. | DIED. At East Windsor; 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 39 1 

Mrs. Esther Edwards, aged 99 years, mother of the 
late eminent and learned Jonathan Edwards, Presid- 
ent of New-Jersey College. 

SIX DOLLARS Reward. 

Sy (or Cyrus] a Negro slave, of a yellow or copper- 
coloured complexion, 16 years old, about 5 feel high, 
well-set, this country born, chews tobacco, and loves 
strong liquor, having been run away from the sub- 
scriber, his master, in Philadelphia, for about eight 
weeks past, part of which time he has been sweeping 
chimnies, or lurking about Burlington, and since in 
other places in the Jerseys, and was at Trenton about 
the qth or loth of February last, at the house of Rich- 
ard Tennant, innkeeper, from whence he proceeded on 
towards New- York, and said he would go to New- 
Brunswick, having with him a forged pass, setting 
forth his being free born, and consequently a free 
Negro : Therefore the above reward, with reasonable 
charges, shall be paid to any person or persons that 
will secure the said slave in any one of his Majesty s 
gaols, or otherwise send him to his master in Philadel- 
phia. 

All persons are forbid to harbour him; and masters 
of vessels and others are for warned not to carry him 
off at their peril. 

ISAAC COATS, BRICKMAKER, 

living in Vine-street, Philadelphia. 
March 6, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 217, March 4, 
1771. 

Custom-house, Philadelphia. Cleared. Sloop- 



392 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Hope, C. Alexander to Amboy. 

Jhe Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1474, March 7, 

1771- 

PHILADELPHIA, March 7. | From New-York 
we learn, that the Duke of Cumberland Packet, which 
arrived there last Friday Night, in 10 Weeks from 
Falmouth, was within a. few Hours Sail of the Hook 
on Tuesday, the i2th of last Month, when a hard 
Gale of Wind came on at Northwest, which drove her 
off; she has been beating on the Coast ever since, 
and suffered some Damage in her Sails and Rigging. 
We hear she is not to sail for England till the Re- 
turn of the next Post from this Place. 

PHILADELPHIA, 'March 7. \ On Tuesday Night, 
the 26th ult., the House of David Brailow, 1 Esq ; At- 
torney at Law, at Allentown in New-Jersey, was en- 
tirely consumed by Fire, together with all his Books 
and Furniture ; the Family with Difficulty escaped 
with their Lives. 

ON Saturday, the 6th day of April next, will be ex- 
posed to Sale, at public vendue, a tract of land, a 
little below the bounds of the city of Burlington, and 
nearly opposite the mouth of Neshaminey creek, late- 
ly conveyed by William Hewlings, the elder, in trust 
for the use of the creditors of his son William Hew- 
lings, late of Trenton, shopkeeper. The tract con- 
tains TOO acres, hath a fine front on the river Dela- 
ware, and an extensive prospect of the creek, about 

i David Brearly, junior, admitted to the New-Jersey Bar. May 15, 1767. Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court, 1773-1789. 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 393 

one half woodland. The creditors of William Hew- 
lings, junior, are requested to send in their accounts, 
properly attested, to Abraham Hewlings, of the city 
of Burlington, and are desired to attend the Sale, 
that they may fix on such terms as they may judge 
most conducive to their interest. 

NOTICE is hereby given to all persons that have 
any demands against the estate of DANIEL JONES, of 
Mount holly, in the county of Burlington, to make 
the same known unto us, the subscribers, trustees 
for the creditors of said Jones, on or before the i6th 
day of May neU, in order that a dividend may be 
made at that time, of such part of said estate as may 
be in our hands, amongst the creditors of said Jones, 
otherwise they will be excluded ; and all those that 
are indebted to said estate, are desired to discharge 
the same, without further notice. Attendance will 
be given by us, at the house of Thomas Shinn, in 
Mount-holly, on every Seventh-day in March inst- 
ant, in order to settle the accounts of said JONES, 
when all persons that are concerned are desired to 
give their attendance. HENRY PAXSON, JOHN CLARK, 
JOHN BISPHAM, Trustees.' 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2202, March 7, 
1771. 

ROBERT LIVINGSTON, | Will dispose of the 
following Tracts of Land very cheap, \for ready 
Money, if required, one half thereof, Bonds will be 
taken, viz. . . 

A Farm in Aimwell, in the County of Hunterdon, 
New-Jersey, formerly occupied by Martin Ryerson, 



394 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

containing 300 Acres of choice Land, about 20 or 30 
Acres of it fine Meadow Land, Woodland sufficient 
for the Farm ; a good fash'd House, 5 or 6 Rooms 
on the first Floor, Out-houses, a good Barn, very 
pleasantly situated. Enquire of James Hude, Esq ; 
in New Brunswick, Thomas Atkinson and Thomas 
Lowrey, in said Aim well, about 22 Miles from New- 
Brunswick 

All the above mentioned Premises, if not sold be- 
fore the first May next, then they will BE TO LET. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, No. 
1501, March 11, 1771. 

To be lett, and entered upon immediately, 

A Farm whereon the subscriber now lives, situate 
in Hanover, in Morris County, being well known to 
be equal to any in said county for hay, pasture, grain, 
&c. There is a good orchard ; great variety of Eng- 
lish and common cherries, plumbs, peaches, and Other 
fruit. It will be advantageous for any person who 
leases this farm to purchase the stock, as they have 
been used to the meadows, and will be sold very 
cheap; they may also have carts, plows, harrows, 
and other farming utensils ; it will be leased for three, 
four or five years. Also a farm situate near Budd's 
Valley, of about 300 acres, 100 of which is cleared 
and in good fence ; there is yearly mowed 20 or 30 
loads of good English hay ; there is a good young 
bearing orchard of about 100 trees. Also 100 acres 
on the west side of said valley, about 20 acres clear- 
ed. Also 200 acres on Schooly's Mountain, with 
several other small tracts ; the three last will be 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 395 

leased for a number of years. Any person choosing 
to lease any of the above farms, may have them on 
very advantageous terms, by applying to 

JOHN SCOTT. 

To be sold, at public Vendue, on Wednesday the loth 
of April next, on the Premises ; 

The farm of Capt. David Griffith, at Second-River, 
in the province of New-Jersey, containing in the 
whole about 200 acres, 75 acres of which are wood- 
land, about the same quantity fit for tillage, and as 
much meadow ground as produces yearly 100 wag- 
gon load of English hay ; and with this singular ad- 
vantage attending it, that (as it may be laid under 
water every tide) two crops of grass in a season are 
always certain. There is on the farm a convenient 
stone dwelling-house, one story high, with a conveni- 
ent kitchen adjoining it, a commodious barn, an or- 
chard of about 70 full grown apple-trees, and as 
many young ones ; and the whole is enclosed in a 
good fence. It is delightfully situated on the banks 
of Passaick River, 9 miles from New-York. One third 
of the purchase Money will be expected immediate- 
ly, and good Security with Interest will be taken for 
the remaining Sum. 

N. B. The title is indisputable. 

To be SOLD. 

A Lot of Land at Brooklyn Ferry, 100 Feet 
Square, with two Dwelling Houses thereon, belong- 
ing to the Estate of Christopher Emens, deceased : 
The Situation is very convenient for a Shop-keeper, 
one having been kept there for 30 Years past. Who- 



396 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ever inclines to purchase the same, may apply to 
Jane Emens, living on the Premises, Executrix ; or 
to Joachim Gulick, Executor, near Ten Mile Run, in 
New-Jersey. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. i o 1 1 , March 1 1 , 1771. 

Imlays Town, in Monmouth County, New Jersey, 

March 12, 1771. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 
Living on the premises, 

ONE half of the MILLS in said place, the mill- 
house large, and as commodious as any in the prov- 
ince, 2 pair of stones, the bolts all going by water, 
and in good repair, situated in a very good wheat 
country ; together with a neat dwelling-house, two 
stories high, a cellar under the whole, a kitchen ad- 
joining, also a merchant shop, 30 feet by 16, a good 
pork-house, smoke-house, cooper's shop, a new barn, 
with i o acres of very good cleared upland and mead- 
ow. The person owning the other half of said mills, 
will also sell his part, with about four acres of 
meadow. 

Also a plantation in Lower Freehold in said coun- 
ty, containing 250 acres, more or less, about the half 
of it good meadow ground, and as much of it cleared 
as will make 40 tons of good English hay the first 
crop, about 80 acres of the upland cleared, on which 
there is a good dwelling-house, barn, waggon-house, 
cooper's shop, framed corn crib, and barracks for 
hay, a good orchard, distant 5 miles from Middle- 
town Point, a public landing, where the produce of 
the country is carried to New York. 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 397 

Also two plantations, situate upon Middletown 
Point Creek, in said county, adjoining each other, 
containing 200 acres apiece, each having erected 
thereon a good dwelling house, barn, and other out- 
houses, all in good repair ; also a quantity of good 
clover and salt meadow upon each ; the upland good 
for raising wheat, and conveniently situated for oys- 
ters, clams and fish. For further particulars, enquire 
of JOHN HENDRICKS, at one of the two last mentioned 
places, or of the subscriber, at his house, 

ABRAHAM HENDRICKS. 

To be SOLD, or exchanged for Houses or Lands, 
in or near the City of Philadelphia. 

A CERTAIN TRACT of LAND in Gloucester 
County, West-Jersey, directly opposite Market and 
Chestnut streets, in Philadelphia, containing 100 
Acres, 70 whereof is Woodland; bounded northerly 
by a Street 100 Feet wide, southerly and easterly by 
Lands of Daniel and William Cooper, and westerly 
by the River Delaware, on the Front of which its 
Breadth is about 900 Feet ; which Tract, from its 
Situation, is capable of great Improvement, as it is a 
suitable Place for erecting another Ferry, and in all 
Probability may, in a few Years, be disposed of in 
Lots, to great Advantage, in erecting a Town, 1 as it 
will suit for many Persons to reside there, and carry 
on different Occupations, as in Philadelphia. Any 
Person inclining to purchase, or exchange, is desired 
to apply to the Subscriber, in Philadelphia. 

JACOB COOPER, 
i Now the city of Camden, with a population in 1900 of75,985. 



398 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

THIS is to give notice to the public, that there is 
now a man committed to Trenton goal, Hunter don 
county, by the name of Richard Gallaher, about 23 
years of age, $ feet 7 or 8 inches high, fair complexion, 
short fair hair, and a scar on his right cheek, wants a 
tooth under the said scar; the above said Gallaher has 
on a blue broadcloth coat and jacket, a short jacket, the 
fore parts snuff-coloured, and back parts winestone, 
black callimanco breeches, new shoes, and brass buckles* 
not fellows. He is thought to be the property of James 
Patterson. His master, if any, is requested to come and 
take said Gallaher out of confinement, otherwise he will 
be sold to pay cost and goal fees. 

PETER HANKINSON, Goaler. 
February 27, 1771. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, I advertised for 
sale, on the 2ist of February last past, a certain 
messuage, tenement, plantation, and tract of land 
thereunto belonging, situate on the north branch of 
Timber Creek, containing 169 acres of excellent 
land, under good cedar fence, partly cleared, and 
partly wood ; but as the inclemency of the weather 
prevented the Sale at that time, notice is hereby giv- 
en, that on the 28th of this instant March, the same 
will be exposed to sale, it was late the property of 
Richard Price, deceased, seized in execution by 

JOSEPH HUGG, Sheriff, 

N. B. Time will be given for the payment of the 
money. 

TO BE SOLD, | For CASH, or good BONDS on 

Interest, \ 

FIVE valuable tracts of valuable lands, on the 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 399 

branches of Little Caeapehon, in Hampshire county, in 
Virginia, containing in the whole 1250 acres, which 
being situated in a very thriving country, now sett- 
ling by great numbers of industrious farmers, from 
the Jerseys and other provinces, .... 
For terms, apply to JOHN Cox, junior, Merchant in 
Philadelphia ; SAMUEL PURVIANCE, junior, in Balti- 
more-Town ; or JOHN STEELE, Tavern keeper, at the 
red house, 12 miles from Watkin's ferry, on Patow- 
mack. Mr. Steele will shew the lands to any person 
disposed to purchase. Sept. 3, 1770. 

To be SOLD, by the SUBSCRIBER, 
And entered on the 25th of March, 
A SMALL but valuable plantation, situate in Al- 
loway's creek township, in the county of Salem, in 
West New-Jersey, adjoining a public road, leading 
from Salem to Cohansey Bridge, and two miles from 
a noted landing on said creek, called Quintan's 
Bridge, where abundance of staves and cord wood 
are transported to Philadelphia, and not above 5 
miles from Salem, 4 from a glass-house, and near 
several Grist and Saw-mills, and near sundry places 
of worship, and a school-house settled on one corner 
of the land, containing 86 acres of land, about 30 
whereof are cleared, and about 17 or 18 acres of 
good rich swamp meadow, the greatest part in good 
grass, and a great quantity more might, with small 
expence, be made, all in one entire body, and ad- 
joining the upland ; the improvements are, a good 
dwelling-house, almost new, 27 feet by 20, two rooms 
on a floor, with fire places in each room, good stone 




4OO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

cellar under the whole, kitchen, barn, apple and 
peach orchard, and an excellent well of water at the 
door, stoned up. For further information, and terms 
of sale, apply to LEWIS OWEN, Shop-joiner, in Salem. 

Feb. 5, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2203, March 14, 
1771. 

Mr. PRINTER. 

SIR, 

By inserting this in your next Paper, you '11 much 
oblige your constant Reader, 

STUDENS MEDICINE. 

THE impartial Public, will not, I dare say, expect that I would expa- 
tiate on the excellency of Physick, nor bestow Encomiums on those wor- 
thy Gentlemen of the Faculty who are of the greatest Utility to Society; 
abler Pens have better and more fully discussed this Subject than I can 
pretend to undertake to do, especially when I am contracted within the 
narrow Limits of a News-Paper. But I hope my injured fellow Citizens 
will not take it amiss when I expose to their view a few melancholy In- 
stances of the deadly Effects, that arise from the Application of the Sick, 
to illiterate, ignorant, boasting Pretenders. 

The Quack is not only culpable for adminislring without a prospect of 
Success, or even the Probability of mitigating the Disease, but is rendered 
altogether inexcusable by those deluding Promises, which prevents the 
betrayed Patients, from demanding Succour from those whose Knowledge 
supply them with Means, and whose benevolent Hands are always ready 
to administer the Balm of Health and Comfort. 

A young Woman, not long since experienced the fatal Consequences of 
a mercurial Antidote, exhibited by Dr. Van , who so artfully em- 
ployed the Bane, that it gave speedy Relief, reducing the Humours of this 
unhappy Patient, to a dissolved putrid State, which plunged her headlong 
to the gaping Grave. Admirable Presumptions ! Horrid Deed ! How 
dead must this insensible Monster be, to every Sense of Virtue and Hu- 
manity. Who can but Shudder at a bare Recollection of the dreadful 
Act. If his callous Heart was not obstinately fixed on his vile Purposes, 
he would have relinquished when an ingenuous Piece made its appearance 
in the New-York Chronicle, directed to this Empiric, by the Name of 
Blunderbuss, immediately after this dreadful breach of Humanity. 

A young Man who had a diseased Leg, the Bone of which had been 
for a considerable Time carious and scaly; able Surgeons who attended 



17/0 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 40 1 

him, after the nicest Examination, came into a Determination of amputa- 
ting the Limb, and declared it beyond the Power of Medicine to perform a 
Cure, without this manual Process; accordingly a Day was appointed for 
the Operation, but our boasting Van - - ensnared the unhappy Youth, 

(who was then like a drowning Man, willing to catch at a Straw) he prom- 
ised him that within a few Weeks, by the Application of an efficacious 
Poultice, he should be restored to perfect Health, and enjoy the free Ex- 
ercise of the diseased Member. But however, to the great Disappoint- 
ment of the Patient, after suffering this Empiric to tamper about half a 
Year, which instead of alleviating his Misfortunes, sunk him but the 
deeper in his Miseries, his Wound became intolerable, his body so ema- 
tiated, and his Blood and Humours so dried dissolved and Ichorous, that 
Death itself had nearly terminated the wretched Scene. Admidst this 
Sea of Confusion and Distress, the Sable Clouds shut up the Moon of 
Health, and scarcely a single known Star was left to guide his feeble 
Course; and while in the Billows of Death and Destruction dashed with 
Impetuosity against his shattered Bark, in vain he blindly sought the blest 
Harbour of Repose. The Impostor was at length cast off, and no sooner 
did the Man of Skill resume the Task, but the tumultuous Storm abated, 
Amputation after a proper Course of restorative Medicines, was per- 
formed, a pleasant Calm came on; the young Gentleman, by the Assist- 
ance of Art, is now in Health, and enabled to walk the Streets with little 
or no Inconveniency. 

About a Year ago, a young Gentleman about five Miles distant from 
Powles-Hook Ferry, had the Misfortune of fracturing a Leg, proper As- 
sistance being immediately given, the Limb was properly extended, the 
Splinters extracted, and other Circumstances so regulated as to promise 
Success. But the inhuman Father of the Youth, thro' an avaricious Mo- 
tive, discharged a Gentleman both Skillful and experienced, in Physick 
and Surgery, and put him under the unskillful Directions of two imposing 
Villains, who within the Space of three Days, so conducted Matters, that 
the unhappy Victim became a Prey to their ignorant Presumption, and a 
Waste to the hungry Jaws of Death. 

I shall not make any Observations on the above Cases, but leave those 
Gentlemen who have a tender Feeling for their fellow Creatures to judge 
of the great Danger that arises to Society from a Toleration of such igno- 
rant, knavish, lying and impudent Impostors. I would particularly beg 
of our Magistrates to take into Consideration the unhappy Condition of 
the poor Sick of this City; 'tis true we have a POOR-HOUSE, and we have 
a - - the former a laudable Institution, the latter a Scandal to the 

Community. 

The Robber who plies the Highway, gives the Traveller a Chance of 
defending himself, but the Blood-thirsty Monster, who forces himself into 

the Confidence of the Sick, and pours down in secret, his poisonous 
26 






402 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Draughts, gives the betrayed Patient no Room for Relief; and is as just 
an Object of Punishment. 

A List of some of these physical Pretenders, an exact Description of 
them, with a brief Summary of their murderous Exploits, will in a short 
Time be exhibited to public View. 

'Tis not for me to make particular Observation on the above Cases, 
but I shall leave the feeing tender Heart to judge, w^iat a rueful Train of 
Calamities must inevitably succeed The Father destroyed, leaves to per- 
ish the poor Widow, and a numerous Offspring of helpless Children; 
Mothers torn away from their tender Babes, and Children snatched from 
their distressed and mourning Parents, by the fraudulent Deception of the 
venomous Quack. 

Bed-Room Murders are become ( I hope, not} as common as Street Rob- 
beries. 

I hope our Poor-House is supplied with an able Physician, but I fear 

-I fear much 

STUDENS MEDICINE. 



To be LET, and may be entered upon the first 

Day of April next, 

A pleasant situated Farm on the South Side of 
Raritan River, over against Sandy-Point, and 
nearly opposite the City of Perth-Amboy, containing 
Seventy-four Acres of Salt Meadow, and Three Hun- 
dred Acres of Upland, whereon is a good new fram'd 
Dwelling House with three Rooms on a Floor, a Cel- 

o 

lar Kitchen and Pantry, a large Barn, an Orchard of 
four Hundred bearing Apple Trees, and a good 
Stock of Cattle ; also Seven Hundred Acres of Land, 
divided into three Farms, at the Roundabouts, with 
a sufficient Quantity of Meadow to each of them, 
and good tenantable Houses. Inquire of RAVAUD 
KEARNY, in Perth-Amboy. 

N. Y. Journal, or The General Advertiser, No. 
1471, March 14, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, March 18. I Capt. Moore, from 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 403 

Turks-Island, on Monday last, off Barnagat, spoke a 
Schooner from Coracoa, bound in here. 



On Tuesday Night the 26th Ult. the House of 
David Brallow, 1 Esq; Attorney at Law, at Allentown, 
in New-Jersey, was entirely consumed by Fire, to- 
gether with all his Books and Furniture : The Fami- 
ly with great Difficulty escaped with their Lives. 

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Trustees of 
Queen's College, in New-Jersey, are, desired to meet 
at Hackinsack, in the County of Bergen, on the first 
Tuesday in May next, who are desired to attend, as 
it is appointed that it then will be taken into Consid- 
eration where the said College shall be placed, with 
other important Affairs relating to the said Institu- 
tion. 

per DAVID MARINUS, Clerk. 
-The N. Y. Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1502, March 18, 1771. 

From the Pennsylvania Gazette, of Jan. 18, 1770. | 
PROPOSALS | For publishing by Subscription. 
All the Poetical | Writings, and some other Pieces, 
of | The Reverend NATHANIEL EVANS, A. M. | 
late Missionary in Gloucester County, New-Jersey, 
and | Chaplain to Lord Vincent Killmorey. 

The Papers, which are to compose this small vol- 
ume, were committed to the Care of myself, and a 
Lady (to whom several of them are addressed) soon 
after the Death of Mr. Evans, agreeable to some of 
his own last Directions ; and so sacred is the Trust 

i See page 393, ante, 



404 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

consigned by a deceased Friend, that I scarce know 
how to excuse my long Delay in offering them to the 
World. Want of Leisure to review the different pa- 
pers, hath contributed partly to this Delay ; but the 
main Cause, was a Desire first to secure a sufficient 
Countenance to the Undertaking, and especially from 
the Clergy Brethren of the Deceasedat their late 
meeting in this Place. 

To those who were acquainted with Mr. Evans, 
and have read such of his Pieces as have appeared 
in Print, it will be useless to give any Recommenda- 
tion of his Writings. Those who knew him not, may 
form some Idea, how high and rapturous were 
his Conceptions of true POETIC GENIUS, from the fol- 
lowing PREFACE, intended for his Pieces, and un- 
doubtedly written by him in the Short Interval be- 
tween his dangerous Illness, and the fatal Relapse, 
which put an End to his Life- This PREFACE I 

shall give literally as he left it, for here the least Va- 
riation would be criminal. 

PREFACE. 

"POETRY (says he) has. been accounted the most peculiar of all the 
"liberal Arts; and it is the ouly One in the Circle of Literature, which a 
"Man of common Capacity cannot by meer Dint of constant Application 
"become Master of. The most exalted Prose- Writers that ever graced the 
"learned World, have rendered themselves liable to Ridicule in their Ad- 
' ''dresses to the MUSES. . . . 

"The great CICERO, not less famous for the Elegance of his Style, than 
'for his universal Knowledge, was a remarkable Instance of the Truth of 
"this Observation. And the Wonder ceases, if what a celebrated Critic* 
"says, be true, to wit That to constitute a POET, is required, "an Eleva- 
"t ion of Soul, that depends not only on Art or Study, but must also BE 
"THE CITY OF HEAVEN" I say, if this be the Case, the Riddle is imme- 
"diately expounded, and .we are at no Loss to assign a Reason, why some 

*Rapin. 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 405 

"(comparatively speaking) illiterate Men, have been the sublirnest Poets 
"of the Age they lived in. . . . 

"It is not strange therefore, that those whom Nature has thus distin- 
guished, should be looked on as a Kind of Prodigies in the World. For, 
"according to Horace, it is not a trifling Power they are endowed with. . . 
". . . . meum qui Pectus inaniter angit, 
"frritat, mulcet, fains Terror ibus imp let. 
"Ut magus. . . . Lib. 2. Epist. I. 

"This is a pleasing Je no scay qnoi in the Productions of poetic Genius, 
"which is eisier felt than described. It is the Voice of Nature in the 
"POET operating like a Charm on the Soul of the Reader. It is the mar- 
"vellous Conception, the noble Wildness, the lofty Sentiment, the Fire and 
"Enthusiasm of Spirit, the living-Imagery, the exquisite Choice of Words, 
"the Variety, the Sweetness, the Majesty of Numbers, and the irresistable 
"Magic of Expression :* 

"The Prose-writer may, indeed, warm his Reader with a serene and 
"steady Fire; he may keep up his Attention with the energetic, the floiv- 
"ing Period. But the POET'S it is, to wrap him in a Jlame to dissolve 
him, as it were, in his own rapturous Blaze ! The POET'S it is, to hurry 
him out of himself i with the same Velocity, as tho'-he were really mount- 
ed on a winged Pegasus It is his, to lift him /> to Heaven, or plunge him 
'into the Gloom of Tartarus It is his, to unveil to him the Secrets of the 
Deep, or to exhibit to his Mind, all the Novelty of this varied World To 
carry him back into the Darkness of Antiquity, or waft him forwards into 
the vast Sea of Fidurity and finally to inspire him with the Patriotic 
Glow, or fire his Soul with the heavenly Ideas of MORAL BEAUTY, and 
"all the varied Passions of Love, Fear, Terror, Compassion, &c., &c. 

"Such is the genuine Poet, when improved by the Precepts of Art ; 
and the Works of such have been the continual Delight of Mankind, as 
they afford the Sublirnest intellectual Employment. With such, to tread 
\htflowery Fields of Imagination, and gather the rich Fruit of Knowl- 
edge, is HAPPINESS indeed ! . . . 

"But it is rare, that such natural Geniuses are seen to arrive at this 
"envied Height. Some black Obstacle still clogs their Wings, and retards 
their Progress. . . Frequently those to whom Nature has been so boun- 
tiful, have not Leisure to attend to the Cultivation of their Talents, - 
frequently, like the Rose in the Wilderness, they just bloom, and wither 
away in Obscurity; and sometimes, alas! the Iron- Hand of DEATH cuts 
them suddenly off, as their Beauties are just budding forth into Exis- 
tence, and leaves but the FAIR PROMISES of FUTURE EXCELLENCIES." . . . 

Further his Pen went not. What a dreadful Blank 
closes this Sentence, and how truly prophetic of his 

*This Sentence, is truly ric'a and poetic In itself, is a fine Instance of the Author's 
just Conception and Feeling cf true Poetic Genius ana Enthusiasm. 



1 1 



< t 



. . 



406 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77I 

own Fate ! He DIED in his TWENTY SIXTH Year. If 
I had not the Original, in his own Hand, to produce, 
I should be afraid to publish this Preface as his, lest 
it should be suspected to have been written after the 
event. 

How far his Poems will answer the Idea he has 
formed of poetic Eminence, must be left to the 
World to judge. Many of them are Fragments, and 
unfinished ; but all are sufficiently characteristic of 
his own correct Turn and native Genius. He was 
my PUPIL, and truly dear and affectionate to me in his 
whole Demeanor. The Task he has left me to per- 
form is a mournful one, but shall be executed with Fi- 
delity. 

The Work will be published in a neat Octavo. 

Price FIVE SHILLINGS bound ; one Half to be 
paid at Subscription, and the other on Delivery of the 
Book. The Subscribers Names to be prefixed. 

WILLIAM SMITH. 

N. B. Subscriptions to be taken in by all the EPIS- 
COPAL CLERGY in Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, New-York, 
and Maryland, and by the different Publishers of the 
News- Papers in the said Provinces ; also by Mr Wil- 
liam Lupton, Merchant, in New-York. 

THE Vendue for the Sale of the Plantation of Col. 
Joseph Tuttle, that was advertised to be sold on the 
1 3th Day of last February, is adjourned to the 27th 
Day of this Instant March, at 10 o'Clock, atwhich Time 
the said Farm will be exposed to Sale, at public Ven- 
due, and will be sold altogether, or in small Lots, as 
it best suits the Purchasers : It can be conveniently 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 407 

divided into small Farms. The Conditions to be made 
known on said Day. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Trustees 
of Queen's College, in New-Jersey, are desired to 
meet at Hackinsack, in the County of Bergen, on the 
first Tuesday in May next, who are desired to attend ; 
as it is appointed, that it then will be taken into Con- 
sideration where said COLLEGE shall be placed, with 
other important Affairs relating to said Institution. 

DAVID MARINUS, Clerk. 

TO BE SOLD, 

The pleasant situated Place or Farm of William 
Burnet, lying and being in the township of Hanover, 
and County of Morris, near the Road that leads from 
Elizabeth- Town to Morris-Town, about five Miles 
from Morris-Town Court-House, and three Miles 
from Passaick Bridge ; containing one hundred and 
Seventy Acres, a large Quantity of which is very 
good Mowing Ground, whereon may be cut 
about forty Tons of Hay, a living Brook running 
through the whole Farm, that may be conveyed 
through all the different Fields, a proportionable 
Quantity of Plow-Land, and the Rest well Timber'd ; 
a good Dwelling-House and Barn, and an Orchard 
of about three hundred Apple-Trees, the most Part 
grafted with various Kinds of the best Sorts of Fruits ; 
likewise about twenty-seven Acres that are not joined 
to the Farm, and situate but a small Distance off, about 
ten Acres of which good Meadow Ground, the Rest 
Plow-Land and Wood-Land. Any Person inclining 



408 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

to Purchase, may apply to said William Burnet, liv- 
ing on the Premises, (any Time before the I5th Day 
of April 1771) by whom an indisputable Title shall be 
given, and all reasonable Time of Payment. 

To be LET or SOLD, at Elizabeth-Town, 
THE House and Lot near the Landing, belonging 
to the Estate of Joseph Woodruff, deceased. Also 
TO BE LET, the House and Lot late of the Widow 
Hunloke. Enquire of William P. Smith, or Elias 
Boudenot, Esqs. at Elizabeth-Town. 

Pot-Ash KETTLES, | Of the best Construction, made 

at Newark Air Furnace ; and IRON GRATES, suitable 

for them, To be SOLD, by Edward & William Laight. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and The Weekly Mercury, 

No. 1012, March 18, 1771. 

To be sold, at Public Vendue, (if not sold before at 
private Sale) on Monday the third day of June next, 
at the house of ROBERT PRICE, Innholder on the 
premises : 

ALL that valuable Tract of Land in the county of 
Sussex, in the eastern division of the province of New- 
Jersey, known by the name of PEPPER-COTTON TRACT, 
containing two thousand acres or thereabouts, pleas- 
antly situated in a thick settled healthy part of the 
country, about 8 miles from the Court-House, 1 2 from 
Andover Iron Works, 23 from the river Delaware, 6 
from Sbarp'sborough Iron Works, and within 4 miles 
of Joseph Warren's, who lives on the public road. 

There are several improvements on this Tract of 
Land, the soil of which is as good as any in the prov- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 409 

ince, one half of it being choice meadow land, and a 
great part of the remainder is well adapted for farm- 
ing in general, but particularly for raising wheat and 
other grain. It abounds in excellent timber, and has 
a beautiful stream of water running through the whole. 

o o 

It will be set up for sale in lots of 2 or 300 acres 
each, if it shall appear to be most agreeable and ben- 
eficial to the purchasers, the conditions of which, with 
a view of the title, which is indisputable, will be made 
known, at the place of sale, by Joseph Sharp, who 
lives near Salem, or by Alexander Tod, of Philadel- 
phia, to whom any persons desirous of purchasing by 
private sale, may, in the mean time, apply for the nec- 
essary information. l 

TO RESOLD, 

A VALUABLE Tract of Land, situate in Manning- 
ton, in the county of Salem, in West New-Jersey, on 
the King's road from Gloucester to Salem, lying about 
half a mile from a good landing, and about two miles 
from Salem town, containing near 200 acres of as good 
wheat land as are in said county, about sixty acres 
thereof cleared and in good fence, and the rest well 
timbered ; there are a good dwelling-house, kitchen, 
a well of good water, a new frame barn and stable 
thereon ; it is well situated for a tavern or shop keep- 
ing, the former it was for many years, and known by 
the sign of the plough. Likewise thirty acres of good 
banked in meadow, lying about half a mile from the 
aforesaid plantation ; it produces timothy and other 

1 To the same advertisement in the same paper for April 15-22. 1771, there Is 
added : "Sharpsborough Iron Works to be let, Inquire of said Joseph Sharp. " 

In the issue for April 22-29, 1771, there is substituted : "Hibernia Iron Works 
to be let. Inquire of said Joseph Sharp, or of Alexander Tod. " 



4IO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

good grass ; the bank that keeps out the Tide from 
said meadows is of no great cost to the owner, as it 
is but about a hundred rods long, and takes in about 
500 acres of meadow ; the upland may be sold separ- 
ate, if it suits the pur^aser. Good time will be given 
for the payment of the purchase-money. As to title 
and terms on which said premises are to be disposed 
of, apply to ELIZABETH SHARP, near the premises, or to 
ALEXANDER TOD, in Water-street, Philadelphia. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 2 1 9, March T 8 
to March 25, 1771. 

This is to give PUBLIC NOTICE, That there is 
to be exposed to sale, by way of PUBLIC VENDUE, on 
the sixteenth day of April next, A GRIST MILL, with 
two water-wheels, two pair of stones, and bolts by 
water ; it is situate on a very pleasant stream called 
Upper Barebrook, in the township of Windsor, and 
County of Middlesex, in New-Jersey; also a Tract 
of Land, nearly adjoining the same, containing 174 
acres, with a. dwelling-house, kitchen and barn, and a 
young orchard of near two hundred trees. 

Likewise, will be sold, on the seventeenth of said 
month, A Tract of Land, lying in the township of 
Nottingham, county of Burlington, containing three 
hundred acres, about eleven acres swamp, which has 
been mowed some years, there is a house and orch- 
ard on the said premises, and lies handy to a grist- 
mill and saw-mill. 

The Vendue to begin at TEN o'clock, each day, and 
the conditions will be made known, by 

MAHLON WRIGHT. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 411 

MADE his ESCAPE last October, a certain NEGRO MAN, 
committed to my custody, by the name of BRISTOL, a 
short thick fellow, about 5 feet 4 inches high, had a 
remarkable large nose, apt to smile when spoken to; 
had on, when he ran away, a light coloured cloth 
homespun jacket, a white hat, blue trowsers, white 
yarn stockings, and good new shoes. Whoever 
takes up and secures said negro, so that his master 
may have him again, shall have FIVE POUNDS reward, 
and reasonable charges, paid by 

Joseph Burroughs, Sheriff. 
Salem, New-Jersey, March 12, 1771. 

Gloucester County, March 14, 1771. 

WHEREAS WILLIAM BURNETT of Great Egg-Harber 
Township in said County, agreeable to an act of 
assembly of the Province of New-Jersey, intitled an 
act for the relief of Insolvent Debtors ; assigned 
over all his rights and credits to me the subscriber, 
for the use of his Creditors. I do theiefore give this 
PUBLIC NOTICE, to the Creditors of said Burnett that 
they meet at the House of WILLIAM HUGG Innkeeper, 
in Gloucester, on the Twentieth day of June next by 
i 2 of the clock, to receive their respective shares or 
dividends by me received, & to consult in what man- 
ner to recover the Moneys which said Burnett says 
is due to him, in New-York and New-England gov- 
ernments, and all persons indebted to said BURNETT, 
are desired to make speedy payment to, 

THOMAS DENNY, Assignee. 

Baltimore-Town, February 20, 1771. 
TWENTY DOLLARS REWARD. 
RAN AWAY last night, from the subscriber, An 



412 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Irish servant man named WILLIAM M'CABE ; 
about twenty-one years of age, fair hair, a little sandy, 
and fresh complexioned : had on and took with him 
a good dark grey surtout coat, something too large, 
a little grey bearskin coat with yellow gilt buttons, 
one ditto with mohair buttons, and a bearskin double- 
breasted jacket, and a pair of old buckskin breeches. 
He went away in company with a certain GEORGE 
WILLIAMS, a Dutchman ; a short-set fellow, who 
has Hved some time in the Jerseys, to which place it 
is supposed they are gone : Williams probably may 
have a pass, as he is a freeman, and may have forged 
one for his companion, as they can both write. Who- 
ever secures said servant, so that his master may 
have him again, shall have TEN DOLLARS reward, 
and TEN DOLLARS for apprehending the said 
Williams, so that he may be brought to justice, paid 
by WILLIAM SMITH. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1476, March 21, 
1771. 

JUST PUBLISHED, and to be SOLD by 

ISAAC COLLINS, 

At his Printing-Office, in Burlington, 
A COMPENDIUM of SURVEYING; or the 
jfjL SURVEYOR'S POCKET COMPANION : Also to be 
sold by Thomas Moody, the Author, at Allentown. 

To be sold, on reasonable Terms, at the aforesaid 

Printing Office, 

The following PATENT MEDICINES, &c. 

Godfrey's cordial, Say's balsam, Turlington's bal- 
sam, Bateman's pectoral drops, Daffy's elixir, British 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 413 

oil, Anderson's Scots pills, Hooper's female pills, 
Lockyer's pills, camphire, cream of tartar, lavender 
compound, sal volat, court plaister, flour of brimstone, 
quicksilver ointment, glauber salts, epsom salts, &c. 
&c. Also a variety of Books and Stationary, by 
wholesale and retail. 

To be SOLD, at PUBLIC VENDUE, | on Thurs- 
day, the 4th of April, at the house of the Widow | 
Comron, about a mile from the PREMISES. 

A CERTAIN tract of LAND, now in the tenure of 
Dr. Otto, situate on Salem road, and on Repau- 
pa-creek in Greenwich township, in the county of Glou- 
cester, West New-Jersey, about two miles below Man- 
tua-creek bridge, and fifteen miles Jrom the city of 
Philadelphia, on ivhich is erected a neat stone dwelling- 
house, two stories high, thirty-five feet front, and twen- 
ty feet deep, and a stone kitchen eighteen feet by thir- 
teen, ivith a chamber over the kitchen : a ivell of excel- 
lent zuater by the house, a good orchard, about hventy 
acres of meadow are made, or may be made on said 
tract, and several constant streams running through 
the land, containing in the whole 100 acres, about thirty 
acres of which are thriving young timber, the rest 
cleared, and soil at least equal to any in the neighboiir- 
hood. It is an excellent situation for a store, being in 
a well settled part of the country, and but two miles 
from water carriage to the city of Philadelphia. The 
sale to begin at one d clock. Terms will be made 
known at the time and place appointed, when attend- 
ance will be given by the subscriber, 

WILLIAM SCULL. 
Philad. March 15, 1771. 



414 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Wilmington, March 12, 1771. 

WHEREAS a certain man, who called himself 
FELIX CUNNINGHAM, said he had taught school 
in East-Jersey, came to the house of the subscriber 
the beginning of April last, and left a bundle, con- 
sisting chiefly of wearing apparel, and his expences 
unpaid, said he was going toward Lancaster, and 
would return in a few Days, but hath not since been 
heard of; These are therefore to give notice, that if 
the said Felix Cunningham, or some other person, 
does not redeem the same within three weeks from 
this date, they will be sold to pay charges. 

JOSHUA LITTLER. 

TO be SOLD by way of public vendue, on Tues- 
day the 1 6th of April next, and an indisputable title 
given, a plantation, commanding a fine prospect, and 
pleasantly situated, containing 460 acres of land, be 
it more or less, lying in the township of Arnwell, 
county of Hunderdon, and western division of New- 
Jersey ; 260 acres of which is woodland, and chiefly 
well timbered, the remainder excellent for all sorts 
of grain, agreeable to the climate, with a large com- 
plement of meadow, which produces yearly a com- 
petible part of good timothy and English grass. 
The whole well watered, and enclosed with good 
fence. The said tract may be conveniently divided 
into 2 separate lots, as may best suit the purchaser, 
or purchasers ; as the buildings thereon are commo- 
diously adapted to each, consisting of one stone 
dwelling-house 2 stories high, with a cellar -under 
the whole, and a good log kitchen, also, a good stone. 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 415 

barn, compleatly finished, viz. 30 by 48 feet ; the oth- 
er being a snug frame building, not quite half a mile 
from the aforesaid mansion house. As also, good 
orchards of excellent fruit, both for quantity and 
quality, at each of said buildings, too tedious to be 
enumerated here. The whole being contiguous to 
sundry places of worship, and excellent fisheries, 
the river Delaware being within a mile of the prem- 
ises. As also grist and merchants mills, and com- 
pleat stores, where the best price is given for coun- 
try produce ; there runs adjoining a large run of 
fresh water where the curious or ingenious may im- 
prove thereon. The whole of the aforesaid will be 
warranted and defended by the Subscriber hereof. 
For further particulars, inquire of the subscriber, 
living on the premises, who will give proper attend- 
ance on the day of Sale, when the conditions will be 
made known. WILLIAM ALLEN. 

P 

N. B. The chief motive which induces the Sub- 
scriber to make sale of the aforesaid, is owing to a 
considerable purchase of lands that he made in Vir- 
ginia government, which requires his commanding 
eye towards the improvement of the same. 

Philadelphia, March p, 1771. 
THIS is to give notice to the public in 
general, and our friends in particular, that 
we intend to erect a stage from Bridge-Town, Cum- 
berland County, West New-Jersey, to Cooper's ferry, 
and, for the conveniency of Greenwich, intend to set 
off from Richard Cayford's, tavern keeper in said town, 
every Monday evening, to the Cross roads, where or- 




4l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ders will be taken in by Ananias Sayre, Esq ; and then 
proceed to John Bently's opposite Daniel Stretch's, 
where suitable accommodations may be had, and will 
perform the Journey by TO o'clock ; and where gen- 
tlemen and ladies may take there usual night's rest, 
and Daniel Stretch will set off Tuesday morning, 
exactly at sun-rise, and proceed to Cooper's Ferry; 
and on every Fifth-day to leave said ferry, at sun- 
rise, and proceed to Bridge-Town, and will perform 
the journey on said day, accidents excepted. All 
gentlemen and ladies that please to favour them with 
their company, may depend on being treated with 
the greatest respect ; and those that give them their 
orders, may depend on being punctually served. 
As Mr Shute declines the business, we intend to 
serve the country at his usual rates, and are their 
humble servants, 

RICHARD CAYFORD, DANIEL STRETCH. 

N. B. We intend to begin on Monday evening, 
the 1 8th instant, News Papers will be carried, and 
left for the owners, as usual. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2204, March 21, 
1771. 

TWENTY DOLLARS Reward. 
RUN away about 18 months since, from Spring- 
field, near Elizabeth-Town, New-Jersey, a certain 
Negro Man, named Brit: He is about 30 Years old, 
near 6 Feet high, stout and well made : He was ta- 
ken by Execution at the Suit of Elias Desbrosses, 
Esq., of New-York, and sold at Vendue by the Sher- 
iff of Essex County, and purchased by Jecamiah 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 417 

Smith. The said Fellow is supposed to be harboured 
at Wyoming, by his former Master, Nathaniel Sal- 
mon. All persons therefore are forbid to harbour or 
entertain said Negro, and any Person that will take 
him up, and bring him to the Subscriber, shall have 
the above Reward, or 10 Dollars if taken and sent 
to any Goal in the Province of Pennsylvania, New- 
Jersey or New- York, so that he may be had again. 

JECAMIAH SMITH. 

- The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1013, March 25, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, April i. | On the 26th ultimo 
departed this Life, at his House in Burlington, in the 
49th Year of his Age, the Honourable JOHN 
SMITH, one of his Majesty's Council for the Prov- 
ince of New-Jersey A Gentleman who eminently 

possessed every Virtue that dignifies the Christian, 
and whose Conduct through Life received the united 
Approbation of all who knew him His Door and his 
Heart were open to the Stranger aud the Indigent. 

"For every Mans Wants he had a Shilling, for every 
Man's Griefs he had a Tear. " As a Statesman his 
Loss will be severely felt by the whole Province of 
New-Jersey, but the little Band amidst whom he had 
retired, and to whom he stood as a common Father 
and Friend, will long, very long deplore their Misfor- 
tune, in the Death of this benevolent, this truly great 
and worthy Man ; in tracing whose amiable Character, 
'tis not within the extensive Bounds of Panegyrick, to 
exceed the Truth. --On the 2Qth, attended by his in- 
consolable Children, and numerous Friends, his Re- 

27 



418 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

mains were decently interred in the Burial Ground of 
the People called Quakers, of whose Society he was 
a useful and worthy Member. 1 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 220, March 25 
to April i, 1771. 

To be LETT for a Term of Years, the following 
Tracts of Land, lying in the County of Cape- May, and 
Province of New- Jersey, viz, 

One Tract, containing 100 Acres of very good Up- 
land, 20 of which are cleared, with a small Tenement 
erected thereon, and near 100 Acres of salt and sedge 
Marsh, with about 25 Acres of rich Bottom, which 
with a small Expence would make excellent banked 
meadow, and is very convenient to a public landing, 
there being a navigable Creek running along one 
Side of it the whole Length thereof. 

One other Tract, containing 200 Acres of good, 
tillable Land, 30 of which are cleared, with an Or- 
chard, and a small tenement thereon, adjoining to a 
large Quantity of sedge Marsh, and about 100 Acres 
of choice Swamp, the whole of which by a Bank 25 
Rods long might be drained, sufficient to make very 
good Meadow. 

Also one other Tract, containing 250 Acres of un- 
improved Hickory Land, with about 100 Acres sedge 
Marsh ; the least of which Tracts will keep 50 Cat- 
tle, and by Improvement would keep a Number 
more, which is the Use they are chiefly applied to at 
present. For further Particulars enquire of the Sub- 
scriber, near the Premises, THOMAS LEAMING. 



For a sketch of John Smith, see N. J. Archive.s. X.. 231. 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 419 

N. B. The aforesaid Tracts of Land will be let 
either for a proportionable Part of the Profits, or a 
Rent certain, as will best suit the Tenant ; and if 
agreeable, a Parcel of Cattle will be let therewith. 

PHILADELPHIA, March 28. | On Tuesday last, 
at Five in the Afternoon, died of a lingering Illness, 
at Burlington, the Honourable JOHN SMITH, one 
of His Majesty's Council for the Province of New- 
Jersey. He was a Gentleman of liberal Education, 
strong natural Abilities, and universal Principles ; 
zealous without Hypocrisy, and religious without Af- 
fectation ; equally free from Bigotry and Enthusiasm. 
In short, he was possessed' of all the Accomplish- 
ments which go to the making a Person honourable, 
and truly great, generally beloved, and universally 
lamented. 1 

THIS is to give notice to all persons concerned, 
that the several owners of the Salt Marsh, lying be- 
tween Stow and Alloway's Creeks, called the Back 
Marsh, in the county of Salem, intend to petition the 
General Assembly of this province, at the next ses- 
sions, for an act to enable them to run a tide bank 
from a point near John Stretch's, called Bear Point, 
to Eagle Island, and from Eagle Island to Deep 
Creek, up the several courses thereof to Little 
Creek ; and so up the creek called Thoroughfare 
Creek, until it comes opposite the lower end of Rag- 
ged Island ; and from the said Island to Home Island ; 
and from Home Island to the lower end of Alloway's 



For a sketch of John Smith, see N. J. Archives, X. ,231. 



420 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. L ! 77 r 

Creek Neck, where Samuel Smith now lives. 1 

P 

To be SOLD by private SALE, 
and entered on immediately, 

A VALUABLE plantation, situate in the town- 
ship of Pilesgrove, Salem county, containing 
266 acres of land, above 100 acres cleared, and some 
good meadow, and more may be made, a good two 
story dwelling-house, and a good apple orchard, 
within a quarter of a mile of a good grist-mill and 
saw-mill ; the whole well watered ; the house 
stands near a very public road, very convenient for 
a tavern or store, For terms of sale, apply to MAG- 
DALENE PATTERSON, near the premises. 

-The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2205, March 28, 
1771. 

Amwell, in Hunterdon county, Feb. 18, 1771. 
RUN AWAY from the subscriber, an apprentice boy 
named AMOS REED, about twenty years of age, thick 
set, about five feet seven inches high, black hair gen- 
erally tied behind, brown complexioned, lively spirit- 
ited, pretty much given to drink ; had on when he 
went away a redish brown coat lined with streaked 
lincey, plate buttons, a streaked lincey lapelled jack- 
et without lining, with buttons covered with the 
same, a pair of new buckskin breeches a little sullied 
with his working in them, he being a shoemaker by 
trade, a felt hat more than half worn, with a large 
metal button, blue and white stockings that has been 
footed, a pair of double scaled shoes, and a new 
home-spun shirt. Whoever brings home said serv- 

i See notices of a similar project in N. J. Archives, XXVI, 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 421 

ant, or secures him in any gaol, so that his master 
shall have him again, shall have TWENTY SHILLINGS 
reward per me BENJAMIN RUNYAN. 

TO BE SOLD, | Two tracts of Upland and 
Meadow Ground near Brunswick, in the county of 
Middlesex and province of New Jersey ; one of them 
containing forty nine acres and one third, thirteen 
acres and one third of which is meadow, on which is 
a house and a barrack for hay ; the other tract con- 
taining twenty four acres and two thirds, of which six 
acres and two thirds is meadow ground, (the two 
tracts join together) which will be sold together or 
apart, as will best suit the purchasers ; they, paying 
one half of the purchase money at the signing of the 
deed, may have one year to pay the remainder, pay 
interest and giving good security. 

THOMAS SAY, ' 
EVAN PETERS, 
HENRY CASDORP. 

A plan of the ground may be se"en at JOSEPH 
VICKERS, or at Az DUNHAM in Brunswick. 

Salem Town, West-New-Jersey, March 16, 1771. 

ABSCONDED from his bail on the i5th instant, a cer- 
tain GRIFFIN GRIFFIES about 5 feet 6 inches high, of 
a brown complexion, wears his own hair, which is 
black and very bushy, and is by trade a taylor : Had 
on when he went away, a claret coloured coat, red 
plush waistcoat, a remarkable high crown'd hat with 
a large brim, almost new, and old brown breeches, 
pieced behind with cloth of a reddish colour, and 
patch'd before. Whoever takes up said Griffin Grif- 



422 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

fies, and secures him in any of his Majesty's goals, 
or brings him to the subscribers in Salem, shall have 
FORTY SHILLINGS reward, and reasonable charges 
paid by 

ERASMUS KENT, jun. ISAAC HILDEBRAND. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1477, March 28, 
1771. 

To be sold at public VENDUE, I On the 2ist 
Day of May next, between the Hours of One and 
Five in the Afternoon, | 

ONE-third of a very good Farm and Dwelling- 
House, with the Mills, Bolting House, Bake-House, 
and Store-House, at Second River, joining Mr. Cort- 
land's Mills: The Farm consists of about 160 Acres 
of Land, whereof about 100 Acres are clear'd, the 
Remainder is good Wood Land : On it is a good 
Stone Dwelling-House 45 Feet long, and 24 Feet 
wide, having three Rooms on a Floor, a good Cellar, 
and Cellar Kitchen under it, and a good Barn, Gar- 
den, and Well near it. Opposite the House stands 
the Mill on Second River, a most pleantiful Stream 
in the driest Season : It is two Stories high, 63 Feet 
Mong, and 21 broad, and has three Pair of Stones in 
fine Order: The Bolting House adjoins it, which is 
two Stories high, 42 Feet long, and 2 1 Feet broad ; 
is convenient for the Bolting Business, and every 
Operation is carried on by Water ; near it is an ex- 
cellent Stone Bake-House two Stories high, 32 Feet 
long, and 26 Feet broad, which has two very fine 
Ovens in it. The Store-House Stands on the Bank 
of Passaick River, about a Quarter of a Mile from 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 423 

the Mills, it is two Stories and a Half high, 56 Feet 
long, and 28 wide, at its Door a large Boat may load 
and unload. No Mill in the Province is better situ- 
ated, nor has greater Conveniences for the Bolting 
and Baking Business than the above : And as its 
Distance from the City of New-York is only about 
nine Miles by Land, or thirty Miles by Water, it can 
never want Employment. 

NEW-YORK, April i. | The 21 of next month, 
there will be a Purse run for at Powlis-Hook. Value 
,.50, free for all horses, Mares and Geldings, not 
full-blooded. 

To be LETT, and entered upon immediately, in a 
public part of the town of Newark, a convenient 
well situated house, with three good rooms, with fire- 
places, good bed rooms and kitchen, a good garden 
spot, and four acres of good mowing-ground, being 
a very good orchard, bearing the best of fruit, and 
the necessary buildings adjoining the house all in 
good repair. Whoever inclines to hire such a place, 
being very suitable for a gentleman, or for any busi- 
ness, may apply to Samuel Huntington, senior, living 
near the premises, who will agree for the same. 

-The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1014. April i , 1 77 1 . 

The following piece \_c\ame accompanied with the Cash, 
has induced the Printers to insert it on their paper. 

Messrs. Inslee and Car, 

Be pleased to insert the two following Pieces in your 
Gazette, together with the remarks thereunto an- 



424 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

nexed ; which will certainly oblige the public, as 
well as some of your readers, but in particular 
your humble servant, 

RICHARD WRIGHT. 

Woodbridge, March 18, 1771. 

I Do insist upon your discharging me from the ob- 
ligation I now lay under for you in the Secretary's- 
Office, in Perth-Amboy, in regard to your being 
guardian to the daughter of John Wright deceased, 
who lives with you. 

I am, &c. 

THOMAS HADDEN, jun. 

I Do hereby certify that neither Thomas Hadden, 
sen. or Thomas Hadden, jun. are bound with Rich- 
ard Wright, in a certain bond, given by said Wright, 
to his Excellency Thomas Boon, Esq ; dated the 5th 
day of October, i 761, for the due performance of the 
office of guardian to Mary Wright, Witness my hand, 
this i Qth day of March, 1771. 

BOWES REED. 
Secretary's Office, Perth-Amboy. 

I would just observe, tho' the said T - s H - 
n, jun. the author of said letter, for sundry years 
past, has been a common nuisance to the public, as 
must partly appear by his letter, which he sent to me 
open and unsealed, through I know not how many 
hands, and I believe with an ill intend, as he was never 
well intended, in anything he ever did. He used 
many little low arts, and asserted ridiculous things of 
me, to try to bring me as near as possible upon a level 
with himself; and not only me, but even every mag- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 425 

istrate in the town, except one ; he has seemed to be 
angry at every thing except himself, ever since he 
has been discovered to be the person, who, in the 
dead of the night cut and destroyed all the rigging, 
or almost all of a new boat for William Smith, and 
since convicted by his own confession, and paid near 
two thirds of the damages ; which was to the amount 

of sixty pounds. This H n, jun. together 

with some of his accomplices, stands this moment in- 
dicted for h e st- ---g, for which some of his 
friends have paid the owner twelve pounds damages. 
His person and character st --- ks, and all his actions 

are ridiculous. I candidly say, that I am sorry 

thus to be reduced to the necessity of exposing any 
man's character, there is nothing less could have 
tempted me to it, but the justification of my own. 
I am at least every man's well-wisher, and the pub- 
lic's humble servant, 

RICHARD WRIGHT. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post-Boy, 
No. 1504, April i, 1771. 

These are to give notice that we the subscribers in 
Monmouth County, East New -Jersey ; intend to peti- 
tion the next General-Assembly of said Province, to 
have the bridge (over Cosweeks creek at Richard 
Brown s mill) supported by a public charge. 

SAMUEL ROGERS. 
ISAAC ROGERS. 
RICHARD BROWNE. 

To be SOLD. | TWO tracts of land in Middletown^ 
Monmouth County, East New-Jersey, one of which, ad- 



426 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. JJ77I 

joining to a good creek, contains, of upland and mead- 
ows, 160 acres, 16 of which are cleared, whereon is a 
good young orchard, a good dwelling house, convenient 
to an excellent spring of water, and plenty of fish, clams 
and oysters. The rest of the tract is ivoodland, con- 
taining great quantities of cord and- cole wood^ and 
very good maple fit for turners, all handy to be got ; 
and there is a very good range for cattle. 

The other tract, lying on the high way that leads 
from Middletown to M.ount Pleasant, contains 156 
acres, 10 of which are cleared, whereon there is a dwell- 
ing house well sitiiate for a merchant or tradesman, 
being about two short miles from a landing, and a mile 
from a grist-mill. All the rest of the tract is timber 
land. Whoever inclines to purchase either, or both the 
said tracts or plantations, may apply to the subscriber 
living near them, who will give a good title for the 
same. 

DANIEL HENDRICKSON. 

The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1474, April 4, 1771. 

Philadelphia. Mr. Rittenhouse's original Pennsyl- 
vania Orrery, which Doctor Witherspoon, President 
of the College of New Jersey, purchased for the use 
of said College, as mentioned in the public prints, 
(April 26, 1770) and for the construction of which the 
very ingenious inventor has been deservedly distin- 
guished by the Honourable Assembly of this Pro- 
vince with a premium, having been exhibited for some 
time in this City, is to be removed this day to Prince- 
ton to be placed in Nassau Hall, 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 427 

The CIRCUIT COURTS for the counties of Gloucester, 
Salem and Cumberland, in New-Jersey, will be held 
at Gloucester, Thursday, April i ith, at Salem, Tues- 
day, April 1 6th, at Cumberland, Friday, April igth. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia. Cleared. Sloop 
Charlotte, J. Lyle to Cape May. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1478, April 4, 
1771. 

To the PUBLIC. | Copy of a Certificate from John 
Lawrence, Esq ; at Burlington. THESE are to cert- 
ify all whom it may concern, that on the 2oth of March, 
Anno Domini 1771, I the subscriber called on Mary 
Roberts, late Mary Butler, in order to inquire into 
the legality of her marriage with a certain James 
Weldin Roberts, who declared and confessed that 
her maiden name was Mary Butler, that she is the 

daughter of Butler, in Hartford, New-England, 

and was about four years past lawfully married ac- 
cording to the custom of that place, to the aforesaid 
James Weldin Roberts, that they cohabited as man 
and wife in different places, one of which was at Potts- 
Grove where they lived, he as a school-master, she as 
a school-mistress, until a year and upward, when he 
left her, went to Philadelphia, and married Mary Full- 
er of said city, with whom the said Roberts has since 
chiefly resided. --And the aforesaid Mary Roberts 
being by me requested to produce her certificate of 
marriage or qualify to the above facts, refused, alledg- 
ing she had no certificate with her, and that she would 
not swear to her marriage, for fear it might endang- 



428 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

er her husband the said Roberts's life, or involve him 
in difficulty. JOHN LAWRENCE. 

Burlington, March 21, 1771. 

I the subscriber, having been greatly imposed upon 
by the above named James Weldin Roberts, as he came 
to me as a single man, which induced me to marry 
him ; but as it appears otherwise, these are to warn 
the public that they are not further imposed upon by 
him, as I disown any further connection with him, in- 
tending to take the most speedy method in law to 
recover from the said James Weldin Roberts, all 
such goods, chattels, money and effects which he, 
from time to time, has fraudulently taken from me. 
Philadelphia, April 4, 1771. MARY FULLER. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 220, March 25 

to April i , 1771. April 4, 1771. 

Will COVER, | This SEASON, | At the house of the 
subscriber ; | The famous HORSE | YORICK ; | 
WHO was imported last summer by John Foxcroft, 
Esq; He is a full-bred hunter; a very fine bay with 
a small star, and one white foot: he is fifteen hands 
and an inch high, made very strong and neat; his 
carriage and courage equal, if not superior, to any 
horse in America. The terms of covering is TWENTY 
SHILLINGS the single leap, FORTY SHILLINGS the sea- 
son, and HALF A DOLLAR to the groom. Mares will 
be kept by the subscriber at Great Timber Creek 
Bridge, at Two SHILLINGS and SIX-PENCE per week. 

Gloucester, March 26, 1771. JOSEPH HUGG. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1478, April 4, 

1771. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 429 

BURLINGTON, March 27, 1771. 

His Excellency Governor FRANKLIN has re- 
ceived His Majesty's Disallowance of an Act of As- 
sembly, passed in New Jersey in the Year 1765, in- 
tituled, 

"An Act for regulating the Practice of the Law, 
and other Purposes therein mentioned." l 

And His Majesty's Royal Approbation of an Act, 
passed in the Year 1768, intituled, 

"An Act for choosing Representatives in the Coun- 
ties of Morris, Cumberland, and Sussex, and direct- 
ing the Morris .County Taxes to be paid into the 
Eastern Treasury of this Colony." 

Circular Letters are issued for calling the General 
Assembly of New -Jersey to meet at Burlington, on 
the 1 7th of April. 

THESE are to give notice, that we the subscribers, 
in Monmouth county, East New Jersey, intend to pe- 
tition the next General Assembly of said province, to 
have the Bridge (over Crosswicks creek, at Richard 
Brown s mill] supported by a public charge. 

SAMUEL ROGERS, ISAAC ROGERS, RICHARD BROWN. 
March 30, 1771. 

WHEREAS DARBY DURIL, late of Chester, in the 
county of Burlington, and province of New-Jersey, 
deceased, not being invested of estate worth while 
administering on : This is to inform his ci editors that 
his widow is willing to give up all his effects to his 
several creditors, to make sale of, that every man 

l See N. J. Archives. X., 213, XVII., 435. For reasons for disallowance, see N. 
J. Archives, X., 199. 



430 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

may take his or their dividend, according to their 
several debts : All his creditors are therefore desired 
to appear at the house of said Darby Duril, in the 
place aforesaid, to settle the aforesaid affair, on the 
25th day of April next. 

LYDIA DURIL. March 30, 1771. 

Burlington county, West New-Jersey, 

March 29, 1771. 
TEN DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, on Wednesday even- 
ing last, an English servant lad, named Robert Smith, 
1 8 years of age, about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, of a 
fair complexion, light brown hair, thin visage, grey 
eyes, and is a lay I or by trade ; had on, when he went 
away, an old felt hat, a home made bearskin jacket, of a 
dark colour, a Russia Duck shirt, a pair of brown 
cloth breeches, and ozenbrigs trousers over them, grey 
yarn stockings, shoes with strings in them and have 
been newly soaled. He writes a good hand, and per- 
haps may forge a pass. Whoever takes up said serv- 
ant, and secures him in any goal, so that his master 
may get him again, shall have Ten Dollars, if taken 
out of Burlington county, and if taken within said 
county Five Dollars reward, and all reasonable charg- 
es, paid by JOSHUA BUNTING. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2206, April 4, 
1771. 



TO BE SOLD, | At PRIVATE SALE, | A Small 
FARM at Woodbridge, Raway, near the Landing, 
very commodiously situated and convenient for a 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 431 

store-keeper. It consists of between 40 and 50 acres 
of good land, and has on it a good dwelling house 
and cellar under it, a large store-house, a shop com- 
pleted with shelves, counter, &c. Separate from the 
dwelling-house, a barn, chair-house, a grist-mill with 
one pair of stones, a small tenement for a miller to 
live in, a good well and two good orchards. Any 
person inclining to purchase the same, for particulars 
may apply to Mr. Edward Edgar, at Woodbridge 
Raway, near the premises, or to Thomas Gallaudet, 
in New-York, who will give a good title for the same. 
N. B. If not soon sold, part of it is to be lett, with 
three rooms in the dwelling-house, the cellar, shop, 
store-house, chair house, and the privilege of the gar- 
den ; The said Thomas Gallaudet on the first of May 
next, will move into the house where he formerly 
lived, in Wall-Street, where he will carry on his for- 
mer business of Peruke making, &c. 

NEW YORK, April 8. | Tuesday last was mar- 
ried at Elizabeth-Town, PETER VAN BRUGH 
LIVINGSTON, Esq.; Merchant of this City, to Mrs. 
RICKETTS, Relict of the late William Ricketts, Esq; 
of that Place. 

To be sold at public VENDUE, (If not sold before 
at private Sale) on Monday the | third Day of June 
next, at the House of Robert Price, | Innholder, on 
the Premises : 

A LL that valuable Tract of Land in the County of 
L\ Sussex, in the Eastern Division of the Province 
of New Jersey, known by the Name of Pepper-Cot- 



432 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ton Tract, containing 2000 Acres, or thereabouts, 
pleasantly situated in a thick-settled healthy Part of 
the County, about eight miles from the Court-House, 
twelve from Andover Iron Works, twenty-three from 
the River Delaware, six from Sharpsborough Iron- 
Works, and within four miles of Joseph Wallen's, 
who lives on the public Road. There are several 
Improvements on this Tract of Land, the Soil of which 
is as good as any in the Province, one Half of it be- 
ing choice meadow land, and a great Part of the Re- 
mainder is well adapted to Farming in general, but 
particularly for raising of Wheat and other Grain. 

It abounds in excellent Timber, and has a beauti- 
ful Stream of Water lunning through the whole. It 
will be set up for Sale in Lots of 2 or 300 Acres each, 
if it shall appear to be most agreeable and beneficial 
to the purchasers ; the Conditions of which, with a 
View of the Title, which is indisputable, will be made 
known, at the Place of Sale, by Joseph Sharp, who 
lives near Salem, or by Alexander Tod, of Philadel- 
phia, to whom any Person desirous of purchasing by 
private Sale, may, in the mean Time, apply for the 
necessary Information. 

N. B. The produce of this Place will meet with a 
ready Sale at the Iron Works, contiguous. 

POWLIS HOOK RACES. 

ON Thursday 2tst of May, will be run for a Purse 

of FIFTY POUNDS, free for any Horse, Mare, or Gelding, 
not thorough bred, carrying Weight for Age and 

Blood; Fillies allowed 3 Pounds; three Years old, 
Quarter Blood, to carry 6 Stone 7 Pounds ; all that 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 433 

are above a Quarter, that is not Half, runs for a 
Quarter ; three Years old, Half Blood, 6 Stone eleven 
Pounds ; all that is above Half Blood, and not three 
Quarters, runs for Half Blood ; three Years old, three 
Quarters Blood, 7 Stone one Pound; all that is above 
three Quarters Blood, runs for three Quarters ; four 
Years, Quarter Blood, 7 Stone 7 Pounds ; four Years 
old, Half Blood, 7 Stone 11 Pounds; 4 Years, three 
Quarters Blood, 8 Stone i Pound ; 5 Years old, 
Quarter Blood, 8 Stone 7 Pounds ; 5 Years old, Half 
Blood, 8 Stone it Pounds; 5 Years old, three Quar- 
ter, 9 Stone i Pound ; 6 Years old, Quarter Blood, 9 
Stone 5 Pounds ; 6 Years old, Half Blood, 9 Stone 9 
Pounds ; 6 Years old, three Quarters Blood, 9 Stone 
13 Pounds; aged, Quarter Blood, 10 Stone; aged, 
Half Blood, ten Stone 3 Pounds ; aged three Quarters 
Blood, ten Stone 6 Pounds. The best two of three 
three Mile Heats. . , . Not less than three reputed 
running Horses to start ; Horses to be shewn and en- 
teredat the starting Post, between four and five in the 
Afternoon, the Day before running, paying 505. En- 
trance, or double at the Post. No Persons to be con- 
cerned in a Confederacy in running their Horses to- 
gether, or in dividing the Plate. Such Matters to be 
determined by the Judges. 

To be sold at public Vendue, on Thursday the 25th 
of | April inst. at the House late of Johannis Hen- 
nion. deceased, at Preakness, Bergen County; | 
THE Horses, Cattle, Farming Utensils, and House- 
hold Furniture ; also a Negro Wench, three Negro 

Boys, and two Negro Girls. All Persons who have 

Demands against, or are indebted to the Estate of 

28 



434 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the deceased Johannis Hennion, are desired to bring 
in their Claims, or make Payment to 

THEUNIS DEY 

AND y Executors. 

JOHANNIS VANHOUSTAN, 1 

THIS is to inform the Public, That Andrew Van- 
Buskirk, proposes to begin his Stage betwixt Hackin- 
sack Nnv- Bridge and Powles-Hook, on Tuesday the 
sixteenth Instant, and will set out from Hackensack 
precisely at 6 in the Morning, and at 2 in the After- 
noon, of the Same Day from Powles-Hook, and will con- 
tinue to set out at the Same Times from the Places 
above mentioned, every Tuesday and Saturday during 
the Season, and hopes for a Continuation of the Public s 
Favour, which will ever be his study to merit. 

WAS stolen last night out of the stable of the sub- 
scriber, in the township of Waterford, in the county 
of Gloucester, a likely bay mare, half blooded, slim 
made, 14 hands high, trots well, 4 years old, and car- 
ries lofty ; has some white hairs on her near side be- 
tween her shoulder and flank ; her mane is trim'd low 
down from her ears fora bridle. Whoever takes up 
the mare and thief, so that he may be brought to jus- 
tice, and the owner get his mare again, shall receive 
the sum of ^.3 and all reasonable charges, and 30$. 
for the mare only, paid by me. 

SAMUEL KAY 

7^ke N. Y. Gazette ; and The Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1015, Aprils, 1771. 



Van Houten. 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 435 

SIXTEEN DOLLARS REWARD. 

RAN away, on the 30 ult. from the subscriber, in 
upper Dublin township, Philadelphia county, an ap- 
prentice lad named JOHN GRIFFITHS, a taylor by 
trade, about 19 years old, 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high, 
dark complexion, wears his own black hair tied be- 
hind, a little pock mark'd. He took away with him 
sundry articles of wearing apparel, amongst which 
were one fine and one coarse shirt, a cotton and linen 
coat, wove diaper fashion, a new blue cloth surtout, 
with basket buttons, of the same colour, a brown cot- 
ton velvet jacket, and cloth ditto, a pair of brown 
cloth breeches, and a pair of brown stocking ditto, 
three pair of worsted stockings of different colours, 
three pair of new pumps, two hats, one castor and the 
other felt. He went off in Company with his brother 
William Griffiths, a joiner by trade, and it is supposed 
that they design for New-York, and from thence to 
the West-Indies They left Philadelphia on Sunday 
the 3 ist ult, and went to Burlington, and it is very 
probable may be now in New- York. Whoever takes 
up said apprentice and delivers him to the subscriber, 
or confines him in any of his Majesty's gaols in this 
or the neighbouring provinces, so that his master may 
get him again, shall receive the above reward, paid by 

EDWARD WALKER. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are hereby cautioned 
against carrying off said apprentice. Philad. April 

3. i77i- 

-7 he Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 222, April %-\$, 

1771. 



436 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

TO THE PUBLIC. | WHEREAS the subscribers 
have erected a STAGE, from the Roads Town in 
Cumberland County, West Jersey, to COOPER'S 
Ferry, and shall set off from the house of MALACHI 
LONG, Inn-keeper, where Mr. WILLIAM SHUTE form- 
erly lived, and perform the journey from the same 
hours and at the same, rates, as was usual, when Mr. 
SHUTE carried on the business. Any gentlemen and 
ladies, that shall favour them with their company, 
will be treated with the utmost respect, and the or- 
ders of any punctually obeyed, by their humble ser- 
vants, MICHAEL LEE, MALACHI LONG. 

N. B. The stage will be drove by us, for the first 
time, on the sixteenth instant. 

TEN DOLLARS Reward. | RUN-AWAY, from the 
Subscriber living in Upper Freehold, in the County 
of Monmouth & Province of New-Jersey, A Servant 
Man named Thomas Wells, about 23 years of age, 
about five feet eight inches high, a well built stout 
strong fellow, fresh colour, black curled hair & black 
eyes, is apt to get in a Frolick & drinks freely. Had 
on when he went away, a pair of red Plush breeches 
about half worn and a remarkable rent across the 
right knee, a Bearskin Jacket, with high top brass 
buttons & a new surtout coat of a dark grey colour, 
but it is likely he may change his clothes. Whoever 
takes up said servant & secures him in any of his 
Majesty's Goals so that his master may have him or 
brings him to me, shall receive the above reward and 
all reasonable charges paid by 

ABRAHAM BRITTAIN. 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 437 

Newton Township, Gloucester County, April*]. 
THREE POUNDS Reward. | WHEREAS, on this 
present day, or the night of the 6th Instant, there was 
feloniously taken, stolen, and carried away out of the 
Dwelling-House of ELIZABETH MIEKLE^in the 
said Township, by some Person or Persons unknown, 
one Eight-Day clock, Arch-faced, with a rais'd circu- 
lar Plate in the arch, and the maker's name ED- 
WARD DUFFIELD, engraved on said Plate: The 
clock was broken off from the case, and the Weights 

o 

and Key left. There was also taken at the same 
time, two Spanish Dollars, and four dull English shill- 
ings, two pair of blue yarn stockings, footed with 
white, also a small coarse table-cloth. Any person 

1 Archibald Mickle came from Lisburn, County Antrim, near Belfast, Ireland, 
and arrived at Philadelphia 6th mo. 2, 1682. He was a cooper by trade. In 1690 he 
bought from Robert Turner, a tract of 250 acres in Newton township, Old Glou- 
cester; and soon after removed thither from Philadelphia. In 1697 he bought a 
tract of 510 acres from Robert Turner, fronting on the Delaware river. From time 
to time he added other tracts to his possessions. His will, dated in 1706, devises 
his real estate to eight of his children, but provides that any one of them marry- 
ing without consent of Friends should be entitled to only half a share in his estate. 
After his death the property was conveyed to the widow, who in her will, in 1718, 
gave it to three of her sons Archibald, James and Joseph, who divided it in 1727. 
Joseph's share passed into the Kaighn family; Isaac Mickle. senior, in later years 
acquired the shares of Archibald and James. Archibald Mickle married Sarah 
Watts, in 1686. Issue: 

i. John, m. Hannah (dau. of William, Jr.) Cooper, in 1704. He was appointed a 
judge of the Gloucester courts, in 1733, and held other offices. He d. in 
1744, leaving children; 1 William, m. Sarah Wright, in 1732; 2 John, m 
Mary Stockdale, 1741, and d. in 1765; 3. Samuel, m. Letitia (dau. of Tim- 
othy) Matlack in 1742, and d. in 1750; 4. Hannah, m. John Ladd, in 1732. 
ii. Samuel, m. Elizabeth (dau. of Joseph) Cooper, in 1708. 
iii. Daniel, m. Hannah Dennis, in 1711. He d. in 1712, leaving a posthumous child, 

Daniel. 

iv. Archibald, m Mary Wright, in 1719. He d. s. p. in 1735. 
v. Isaac, m. Sarah (dau. of Samuel) Burrough. 
vi. Joseph, m. Elizabeth Eastlack, in 1723. 

vii. James, d. in 1736, leaving a widow and two children, Rachel and Jacob, 
viii. Sarah, m. Ezekiel Siddon, in 1708. 
ix. Mary, m. Arthur Powell. 
x. Rachel, m. Benjamin Cooper, in 1718. 

The Isaac Mickle (not Miekle) who signs the advertisement above, was doubt- 
less a grandson of Archibald Mickle, 1st. 



438 NEY* JF^SEY COLONIAL DO-IUMENTS. [ 1 77 1 

or persr:* , who \\\}\ apprehend and secure the Per- 
petr^tor or IVrpetrators of the Oilence aforesaid, so 
that he or they may ! t } roug'n to Jus ice, and secure 
the above articles, i-o that the ovvntr may receive 
them again, bhall have the above Reward paid by 

ISAAC MIEKLE. 

Monmouth County, April 11. 

DOVE will COVER this Season, at the house of 
the Subscriber, near the Court-house, at TWO GUIN- 
EAS a Mare the Season ; the money to be paid before 
the mares are taken away. 

DOVE is a fine grey, fifteen hands and an inch 
high, was bred by Mr. Thomas Jackson, sen. in the 
North of England, was got by young Cade, his dam 
by Teazer, his grandam by Seawing's Arabian and 
out of the Gardner mare that won six Royal Plates 
of one hundred guineas each. He run at New-Cas- 
tle, upon Tyne, at four years old, on the ist of Oct- 
ober, 1760, and distanced the Duke of Cleveland's 
roan filly Roxana ; beat the bay colt Swift, belonging 
to William Swinburn, Esq ; Charles Willson's bay 
colt Windless ; William Conforth's bay colt Mont- 
real, and Setleinton's bay filly Nameless. 

This Horse has covered in Maryland with great 
reputation his flock being remarkable, not only for 
size, strength and speed, but for great gaiety, spirit, 
and ease under the saddle. 

There is good Pasturage at Half-a- Crown per 
week, and proper care will be taken of the mares by 

JOHN VAN MATER. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1479, April 11, 
1771. 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 439 

NEWARK QUARRY STONE. 

WHEREAS many persons in New-York, who have 
had occasion for Newark Quarry Stone, 1 have met 
with difficulty and disappointment in being supplied, 
not knowing where or to whom properly to apply. 
The public have therefore this notice ; that I the sub- 
scriber, who have in my hands all the Quarries lately 
belonging to Samuel Medliss, deceased, and keep a 
number of workmen constantly employed therein, 
will endeavour speedily and punctually to supply all 
demands for such stone ; and that, for the greater 
conveniency of such Persons, who may want to be 
supplied, there are two boats constantly plying be- 
tween Newark and New-York, the masters of which, 
viz. Josiah Ward and James Wheeler, may be spok- 
en with or heard of almost every day at Mr. Dough- 
ty's near Whitehall or at Whitehall slip ; who will re- 
ceive and get punctually executed all orders for such 
stone ; or a line left at Mr. Doughty's in their ab- 
sence, directed to them or me will be duly noticed ; 
and all persons who apply as above may depend on 
being well served and at the usual .reasonable rates. 

UZAL WARD. 

N. B. To prevent disappointments in future, no 
other boats than the above mentioned will be em- 
ployed in this business. 

Newark, April ^th, 1771. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1015, April^, 1771. 



i Newark quarry stone a fine-grained, hard red sandstone, suitable for the fin- 
er building purposes had been known to the building trade for twenty miles or 
more, for perhaps half a century before this time. 



44O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

To be SOLD by the Subscriber, 

A Farm lying in Middletown, in the county of Mon- 
mouth and Province of East New-Jersey, 
pleasantly situated on the Bay, that leads from Sandy- 
Hook to Amboy and New- York ; being a neck, en- 
closed with one hundred and forty pannel of fence. 
It contains by estimation between three and four 
hundred acres of upland, and as much salt meadow 
and sedge, as will produce four score or a hundred 
tons of hay per year. The land is natural to grain, 
viz, wheat, rye, Indian corn, &c. It is also natural to 
grass, a considerable part of it will mow twenty, and 
sometimes thirty tons has been mowed in a year, 
chiefly of the best sort of hay ; there is thirty or forty 
acres of low land to clear, that will make good mead- 
ow ; it has plenty of wood and timber for fencing, 
and well-watered ; there is on it a convenient dwell- 
ing-house, kitchen, barn and sundry out-houses. Al- 
so a saw-mill lately built, and when timber fails it is 
very convenient for a grist-mill, either for the country 
or bolting ; there is on it between two and three 
hundred bearing apple trees ; also a good assortment 
of peach trees and sundry other sorts of fruits : It 
has a great advantage of manure, such as seaweed, 
sand, &c. which being experienced admits of no 
doubt. It is convenient for fishing, oystering and 
claming. Any person inclining to purchase the same, 
may apply to the subscriber on the Premises and be 

further informed. 

JOHN STEVENSON. 

Middletown, 4 Mo. ^th, 1771. 

N. B. The above farm is clear of incumbrances, to 
the knowledge of the subscriber. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 441 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 

vertiser, No. 1475, April 11, 1771. 

April ist, 1771. 

New-Jersey, Borough \ NOTICE is hereby given, 
of Elizabeth. \ to all the Creditors of Henry 

Clark, senior, an Insolvent Debtor of said Borough, 
to meet at the House of Jonathan Osborn, Innholder 
of said Borough, on Monday the first Day of July 
next,- at two o'Clock Afternoon, in order to receive 
their Dividend of the Money come to Hand. 

RECOMPENCE STANBURY, I . 
JONATHAN OSBORN. \ Assignees. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 

No. 1506, April 15, 1771. 

The farm of the subscriber will be sold at public 
vendue, on Friday the I7th of May, at the Merchant's 
Coffee-House in New- York: It contains in the 
whole, about 200 acres of good land, 20 whereof is 
excellent meadow, 82 acres of it is good wood land, 
and the remainder is arable ground, in gocd fence. 
There is a commodious stone house on the premises, 
with a convenient" kitchen adjoining it, a good barn, 
and an orchard of 70 full bearing apple trees, aiid as 
many young ones. The meadow ground has the 
singular advantage of being water'd every tide, and 
produces yearly too waggon loads of English hay. 
It is delightfully situated on the banks of the Passaick 
River, at Second River, in the province of New-Jer- 
sey, nine miles from New- York ; and an indisputable 
title for the same will be given by 

DAVID GRIFFITH. 



442 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

) 

N. B. One third part of the purchase money will 
be required immediately, and good security, with in- 
terest, will be taken for the remaining sum. 

THE sums of ^.500, and ^.200, to be lent on real 
security within the city or county of New- York. Ap- 
ply to Terence Kerin, attorney at law in Stone street 
in said city. Wanted, the sum of ^.500, upon an es- 
tate in the Jerseys, upon which there are many valu- 
able improvements, and subject to no incumbrance. 
Apply as above. 

NEW-YORK. April 15. | Tuesday the 9 th Instant, 
was married at Elizabeth-Town, PETER VAN 
BRUGH LIVINGSTON, Esq; 1 Merchant of this City 
to Mrs. RICKETTS, Relict of the late William Rick- 
etts, Esq ; of that Place. 

On the 28th of March died at Upper-Freehold, in 
New-Jersey, in 74th Year of her Age, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Lawrence, the amiable Consort of Robert Lawrence, 
Esq ; a Gentlewoman universally regretted by all 
who had the Pleasure of her Acquaintance. She was 
decently inter'd in the Quakers Burying-Ground, of 
which Society she made Profession, the Saturday fol- 
lowing, attended by a large Concourse of People. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1016, April 15, 1771. 

To be LETT, and entered upon immediately, 
THAT well known premises, lying in Penns 
Neck, in the county of Salem, near Oldman's Creek 

i A brother of Governor William Livingston, of New Jersey. His daughter 
Susan, by a former marriage, m. John Kean, Sept. 27, 1786; he d. in 1795. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 443 

upper Bridge, where Taylor and Gardiner kept store, 
with the houses, shop and several out-houses, and 
five acres of land, and a public landing, lying upon 
the said premises ; where shallops and wood-boats 
constantly frequent to load with staves, wood, and 
other lumber. For further particulars, enquire of 

EZEKIEL WRIGHT, near the premises. 

To be SOLD, or exchanged for improved 

LAND in Pennsylvania, within 20 or 30 miles 
of Philadelphia, or an interest in said city, of 
equal value, 

A TRACT of unimproved land, situate in the 
township of Nottingham, Burlington county, 
West New-Jersey, about 4 miles from the Falls Land- 
ing (on Delaware) and near the same distance from 
Trenton, containing about 300 acres of good land, 
above 100 of said tract may be made good meadow, 
it being well watered, and has plenty of good timber 
thereon. If sold, the payment will be made easy to 
the purchaser. The title is indisputable. For furth- 
er particulars, enquire of ANDREW EDGE, in Third- 
street, between Market and Arch-streets, and oppo- 
site to Richard Hockley, Esquire. 

N. B. Said EDGE has a quantity of very good Bo- 
hea tea, and a variety of dry goods, to dispose of, 
very cheap for cash. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2208, April 18, 
1771. 

To be SOLD, 

A Small Plantation situate and being in Middle- 
town, in the County of Monmouth, and east- 



444 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ern division of the province of New-Jersey ; contain- 
ing about 30 or 40 acres of upland, be the same more 
or less ; also two or three acres of salt meadow, with- 
in a quarter of a mile of the aforesaid land. The 
said land is situate on Sandy Hook bay, opposite the 
Light- House ; being a place much frequented by sea- 
men and others ; therefore a ready market for all 
sorts of poultry and other country produce : It might 
likewise suit any purchaser who was inclined to keep 
a publick-house or a small store. There is on said 
plantation, a good dwelling house, and an orchard, 
containing about 250 or 260 apple-trees, also a num- 
ber of other fruit trees, such as peaches, plumbs and 
cherries, and excellent water close by the door ; there 
is also excellent fishing on said place, either with 
hook or net, and a great advantage in manuring said 
land, by the great quantity of sea-weed that yearly 
comes on said shore. The land is naturally of a good 
quality and so pleasantly situated, that many gentle- 
men from Philadelphia and other places have much 
commended the same. There is also a boat to be 
sold that will carry (at a reasonable load) 4 cords of 
wood. Whoever inclines to purchase any of the 
aforesaid premises, may apply to William Wamsley 
living on the premises, by whom a good title will be 
given. 

WILLIAM WAMSLEY. 
Middletown, April the ^tk, 1771. 

LOST, | On Thdrsday Morning, - - - A red Mor- 
occo Pocket-Book, with a Silver Clasp, containing 
sunday Papers, and about Nine Pounds, in New-York 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 445 

and Jersey Bills. A handsome Reward will be given 
to the Person that brings it to Mr. Rivington, facing 
the Coffee-House Bridge. 

New Jersey, ) WHEREAS the subscriber hath, for 
Sussex County. \ some Time past, been a Prisoner 

for Debt in this County, and all his Estate both real 
and personal, sold by the proper Officers, at a sea- 
son* when they could not fetch above half their Value, 
which renders it impossible for him to discharge the 
Remainder ; He therefore finds it expedient to apply 
to the Legislature of this Province, at their next Sea- 
son at Burlington, for a Law to relieve him from- his 
Confinement ; of which his several Creditors are de- 
sired to take Notice. 

EPH. DARBY. 

THE Members of the New-Jersey Medical Society, 
are desired to remember, that their next stated gen- 
eral Meeting, will be on the second Tuesday in May 
next, at ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, at the House 
of the Widow Voorhes, in New-Brunswick, when the 
Society will be opened with a Discourse on some 
Medical Subject by the President ; after which, the 
Society will proceed upon business. Those Gentle- 
men of the Profession in the Province, who have not 
hitherto joined the Society, are invited to attend, at 
the Time and Place above mentioned. 

SAMUEL KENNEDY, 1 Secretary. 

The new Flying Machine. 
THIS is to inform the PUBLIC, that Abraham 



1 For a sketch of the Rev. Samuel Kennedy, who preached, taught school and 
practiced medicine at Baskenridge. see N. J. Archives. XXIV, 407. 



446 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l7/I 

Skillman, hath erected a Flying Machine, or Stage 
Waggon, to go once a Week, and return again, from 
the City of New- York to the City of Philadelphia ; to 
set out from Powles Hook Ferry, every Tuesday 
Morning, beginning the 3<Dth Instant, and drive 
through Newark, Elizabeth-town, Woodbridge, Bruns- 
wick Princeton, Trenton, and Bristol, so as to be at 
the City of Philadelphia the next Day, at 12 o'Clock 
at Noon, when the said Waggon is to remain at Mr. 
John Luken's, at the Sign of the George, in Second- 
street, at the Corner of Arch street, and there to re- 
main until Friday Morning, when the same is to re- 
turn through the aforementioned Places, so as to arrive 
at Powles-Hook Ferry at i 2 of the Clock, on Saturday 
Noon. The Price is Twenty -Shillings, Proclamation, 
Ferriage free for each Passenger, and in Proportion 
for a shorter Distance, and Goods at a reasonable 
Freight. He will make it his Study to oblige the 
Public ; to keep a good neat Waggon, sober Drivers, 
and able Horses to perform the Journey with Ease 
and Safety: And as no Mistake can happen in ex- 
changing the Goods, because but one Waggon and 
Driver : It's to be hoped it will meet with that En- 
couragement its Utility deserves. All those who 
please to avail themselves of the Convenience, are 
desired to cross Powles-Hook Ferry the Evening be- 
fore, as they must set out early in the Morning : The 
Public may be assured, this is the most pleasant and 
agreeable Road of any other 1 to Philadelphia. All 
Gentlemen and Ladies who will please to encourage 

1 Mr. Skillman was not an Irishman, but perhaps the author of this advertise- 
ment was. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 447 

this Undertaking, may depend on being used in the 
best Manner, and conveyed to their Journey's End, 
with the greatest Safety and Dispatch, by the Pub- 
lic's obliged, and most humble Servant, 

ABRAHAM SKILLMAN. 

The N. Y, Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1017, April 22 , 1771. 

NEW-YORK, April 22 | The Public are hereby 
informed, that on Tuesday the Qth Instant, were taken 
up and brought before Justice Zabriskie, at Hacken- 
sack, Charles Lee, alias Charles Thompson, alias 
Thompson Charles Lee, and Nicholas Brown and 
Wife (as they said) and Sebastian Needham on Sus- 
picion of having stolen from several People in this 
Part of the Country, by asking to change Dollars, 
etc., for small Silver, and helping to pick out the 
Pieces with something glutinous or sticky on the 
Palms of their Hands. On being separately exam- 
ined they differed much and contradicted each other 
and themselves in their Accounts. As it is suppos- 
ed they are Part of a Gang who have for some Time 
past been raising Contributions on the Inhabitants of 
New- York, Jersey and Philadelphia ; it is hoped that 
all who are desirous of having a Stop put to this Kind 
of Collections, will give Information of such of their 
Exploits as are not yet made known to the Magis- 
trates. The Men are committed to Prison, and the 
Woman dismissed, nothing appearing against her, and 
on Thursday went to New-York, where she says she 
has a Relation. 

Woodbridge, April 18, 1771. 
WHEREAS it has been industriously and malic- 



448 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

iously reported, that I the Subscriber, had some 
Weeks past, inclosed a certain Paper, sign'd "John 
Peace, etc.," to the Printers of the Weekly Post-Boy, 
and, at the same Time, promised in a Letter, to in- 
demnify the Printers thereof for the said Publication. 
These are to certify (and if Occasion should be re- 
quired, the Printers hereof, are willing to certify) that 
I never did write, or was accessary or knowing to 
any Letter indemnifying the Printers aforesaid, for 
inserting the Piece abovementioned, (to the best of 
their Knowledge or Remembrance) as it has been 
hitherto reported by many Persons in the Township 
of Woodbridge, etc. 

SAMUEL F. PARKER. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1477, April 22, 1771. 



To the CREDITORS 0/JOHN BUDD. 
GENTLEMEN, 

IN November 1769, I acquainted you 1 that I intend- 
ed to apply to the legislature of this province, for a 
law in my favour, to enable me to return to Salem, 
to take my affairs into my hands, and to exempt me 
from arrests for the term of five years ; in which time 
I made no doubt of being able to discharge all my 
debts. Your kind approbation obtained the act for 
three years. 2 As soon as I knew it had passed, I re- 
paired here ; but to my grief I found I had two or 
three of the leading men of the place to oppose me, 
either from views of interest, or friendship for a per- 

1 See N. J. Archives, XXVL 549. 

2 No record of such an Act of a special nature has been found. The reference is 
probably to a new Insolvent Act, passed Dec. 6, 1769. 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 449 

son in the same business I intended to follow, fear of 
their illegal proceedings being exposed, or for fear I 
might expect some return for my kindness to them 
when I was in affluent circumstances and they poor.. 
Every misconstruction to my prejudice was put upon 
the act made in my favour every art was used to 
blacken my character, to alienate my friends, and 
prevent my stay ; and had I not been better respect- 
ed in the county than they, I must have tried my 
fortune in a foreign country. So artfully did they 
evade the law made in my favour, that one year of 
the three was elapsed before I could get my prop- 
erty out of their hands, and have an uncoritested 
right to recover what was on my books, by which 
means the humane intention of the legislative body 
and my creditors was frustrated, and it will not be in 
my power to pay off my just debts within the time 
limited by law But the pleasing prospect of doing 
it in a few years gives me the greatest satisfaction. 
I do not consider my time as my own, but the prop- 
erty of my creditors ; and it is with pleasure I find 
the business I am now in will enable me to make a 
considerable payment annually, I therefore propose 
to petition, at the next setting of the assembly, for a 
law to continue the act in my favour as long as I can 
pay to any one or more of my creditors (that I was 
indebted to before the publication of the present act) 
the sum of ^.200 per annum; and I humbly beg 
your interest in obtaining said law. 1 I know-it will be 
opposed by a person that pretends to be a creditor, 
but is in reality indebted to me at least ^.2000, against 

2 Such Act was passed Dec. 21. 1771, 



450 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

whom I have now a suit depending for that sum. 
He has already petitioned the assembly for a repeal 
of the act in my favour, so far as it affected him, in 
hopes of intimidating me from prosecuting a just suit, 
for fear of being cast by some quirk, turn, or evasion 

of the law, and thrown into a prison for life But 

I make no doubt of being heard before the Hon. 
House of Assembly at the present sitting, and mak- 
ing his request appear unreasonable and unjust. I 
am Gentlemen, your much obliged and very humble 
servant, 

JOHN BUDD. 1 
New-Jersey, Salem, April 22, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 223, April 15, 
to April 22, 1771. 

WILLIAM LAWSON, 
(Shoemaker at the Sign of the Boot and Star, 

near Peck's Slip in New- York) 

'^TEREBY acquaints his Customers and others, 
1 JL that he makes and sells all sorts of women's 
silk and stuff shoes, which he proposes shall be 
equal in goodness and beauty to any of Hose's, as he 
has, in his employ, some of the best English work- 
men. The prices will be as low as possible accord- 
ing to the quality. . . . 

RUN AWAY from the said LAWSON, on the 
1 4th inst. April, an Apprentice Boy, named DAVID 
SAN FORD, about 16 years of age, of a brown com- 
plexion, 5 feet 6 inches high, had on, or took with him 
when he went away, a homespun blue and white 

3 For a notice of the Budd family, see N. J. Archives, XX, 208. 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 451 

Wilton coat, a blue callimanco jacket, leather breech- 
es, three checked shirts, a pair of blue and a pair of 
grey woolen stockings, a furr hat half worn, and a 
striped jacket and trowsers. It is supposed he is 
gone towards Newark. Whoever takes up and se- 
cures the said Run away, giving proper notice, so 
that his master may get him again, shall receive 
THREE DOLLARS Reward, besides all reasonable 
charges from me, WILLIAM LAWSON. 

N. B. All persons are hereby forwarned, not to 
employ, harbour, conceal, entertain, or carry away 
the said apprentice, as they will be prosecuted ac- 
cording to law. 

RUN-AWAY from the subscriber, living in South- 
Amboy in New-Jersey, on Monday the i5th Inst , an 
apprentice boy, named William Dowden, about 20 
years of age, five feet five inches high ; round should- 
ered, pale complexion, short strait hair. Had on 
when he went away a brown linsey frock coat, old 
buckskin breeches. Whoever takes up the said ap- 
prentice and confines him in any goal, so that his 
master may have him again, shall receive FOUR 
DOLLARS reward, and all reasonable charges paid 

DAVID GOSLING. 
South- Amboy, April 18, 1771. 

N. B. The said apprentice, went off in a boat be- 
longing to John Ross, of Bonham's Town in New- 
Jersey ; which place he left the i8th Inst. and went 
to a place called New-Windsor, up the North-River. 
The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1477, April 25, 1771. 



452 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l?7I 

ON THURSDAY the soth day of May, will be 
SOLD at Public Vendue, on the premises, in 
Allen Town, Monmouth County, East New-Jersey. 
The sale to begin at Ten o'clock. 

A Plantation containing thirty six acres, eighteen 
acres of which are fine meadow ground, and the re 
mainder is good arable land. There is upon the 
premises a compleat new grist mill, fifty two feet by for- 
ty feet, with three pair of stones, viz. one pair of French 
burrs, one pair of Colognes and one pair of country 
stones, with five boultingr cloths, four of which eoes 

o o 

by water, with large convenient granaries ; and ad- 
joining the grist mill is a fulling mill and dwelling 
house, with all the utensils necessary for the fulling 
business. The stream of water is large and a fine 
wheat country round about, sufficient to afford a con- 
stant supply for the mill ; there is also on the prem- 
ises, a large dwelling house, four rooms on a floor, a 
fine brick spring house, barn, waggon house, etc. 
Sixteen acres of wheat in the ground. 

There is a convenient landing on Delaware, six 
miles from the mills on Crosswicks creek and anoth- 
er at Bordentown, eight miles off, and with a little ex- 
pence, a landing may be made on Crosswicks creek 
within three miles of the mill. 

The whole expence of cartage and freight to deliv- 
er flour in Philadelphia, is but thirteen pence half- 
penny per barrel. 

One third of the-purchase money to be paid down, 
one third in six months, and the remainder in twelve 
months without interest, giving security if required. 

At the same time will be sold sundry farming 



I77I-] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 453 

utensils, as waggons, carts, ploughs, harrows, etc., al- 
so horses, cows and hogs, a negro man, an excellent 
farmer ; and a fine negro boy, about fourteen years 
old, and a variety of household furniture. 

A good title will be given by JOSEPH REED, 
JOHN GIBSON, JOHN M. NESBITT, ISAAC 
HAZLEHURST, and RICHARD WELLS. 

EIGHT DOLLARS REWARD. | RAN AWAY 
from the subscriber, living in Waterford township, 
Gloucester county, a servant man who calls himself 
WILLIAM WILSON, but his right name is WILL- 
IAM M'COLLUM, born in Ireland: He is about 
thirty years of age, five feet five or six inches high, 
of a sandy complexion, his hair almost red, tied be- 
hind, and is a well set, full faced, fresh coloured fel- 
low, with a large under lip, grey eyes, and of a sour 
look. Had on and took with him, a good felt hat ; 
a broadcloth jacket, of a blue-grey colour, without 
sleeves or lining ; two shirts, one oznabrig, the other 
sheeting ; old black knit breeches ; one pair of good 
blue stockings, and an old grey pair; a pair of neats 
leather shoes, half worn, with brass buckles. Who- 
ever takes up said servant, and secures him, so that 
his master may have him again, shall receive the 
above reward and reasonable charges paid by 

BENJAMIN INSKEEP. 

N. B. All masters of vessels are forbid to carry 
him off at their peril. 

-The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1481, April 25, 
1771. 



454 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [-177 1 



BURLINGTON. 

The SPEECH of his Excellency, WILLIAM 
FRANK- | LIN, Esq ; Captain General, Governor 
and Commander in Chief in and over the Colony of 
New- Jersey, and territories thereon depending in 
America, Chancellor and Vice- Admiral of the same, 
&c. to the General Assembly of the said Province, 
convened at Burlington. 1 

WANTED immediately, 

A SOBER MAN that understands tending a Ful- 
ling-Mill, and dressing Cloth in all the Branches of 
that Business, may be employed on good Terms, in 
Amwell, Hunterdon County, West New-Jersey, by 
applying to the Subscriber, at said Mill. 

SAMUEL KITCHEN. 

A List of LETTERS remaining in the Post- Office, 
Philadelphia. 

B . . . John Bright, West New-Jersey. 

C . . . Joseph Carnahan, Spiingfield, W. New- 
Jersey. 

I ... Benjamin Inskeep, Gloucester County. 

T. . . William Tatem, Gloucester; Frances Thomp- 
son, Salem County. 

V Mr. Van Emberg, Bordentown. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2209, April 25, 
1771, Supplement. 

NEW-YORK, April 29. | We hear from Wood- 
bridge, in East New- Jersey, that about Eleven o' Clock 

i For this speech, the reply of the Assembly and further documents relating to 
the controversy between the Governor and that body, see N. J. Archives, X., 238- 
268, 306, 334. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 455 

on Wednesday last, a Fire broke out in the Dwell- 
ing-House of Mr. Thomas Hadden, jun. which entire- 
ly consumed the same. 

- The New York Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1478 [1508], April 29, 1771. 

BROUGHTON REYNOLDS, 
Intends the first of May, to remove from Brook- 
lyn Ferry, at Long-Island, to the well known house 
at Elizabeth-Town Point, where he will do his utmost 
to serve all gentlemen, and others, that will be pleas- 
ed to call at his house. There is two good passage 
boats in excellent repair, with careful boatmen, that 
ply from the Point to New- York, where travellers 
may always expect to have ready and as quick pass- 
ages as the nature of the case will admit. Said Rey- 
nolds will take in horses by the month, and pasture 
them on both fresh and salt meadows, on very rea- 
sonable terms. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. i o 1 8, April 29, 1771. 

FORTY SHILLINGS Reward. ; 
RAN away, from the subscriber, living in North- 
ampton county, New-Jersey, between Mount-Holly 
and Burlington, one JOHN ALCUT, a flatman, about 
5 feet 10 inches high, a very likely portly looking 
man. Had on a grey bearskin surtout coat, a pair 
of leather breeches, and a good beaver hat. Went 
off with him, one MARGARET ELTON, the wife of 
THOMAS ELTON, a very likely round-favoured 
woman. She had on a black crape gown They are 
supposed to be gone to Baltimore in Maryland. 



456 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Whoever will apprehend and secure the said ALCUT, 
in any of his Majesty's gaols, so that I may obtain 
Justice, shall have the above reward, paid by 

RUEL ELTON. 

N. B. Said Aleut carried three flat loads of wood 
to Philadelphia, sold it, and is gone off with the mon- 
ey. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 223, April 15, 

to April 22, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, May 6. | On Monday last His 
Excellency Governor FRANKLIN prorogued the 
General Assembly of New-Jersey till the 28th Inst. 
then to meet at Burlington. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 225, April 29 
to May 6, 1771. 

In ELIZABETH TOWN, 
IS TO BE SOLD, 

THE convenient HOUSE, Out-houses, and fer- 
tile land adjoining, being about five and a half acres, 
belonging to Timothy Edwards. 1 The agreeableness 
and convenience of the situation, as well as the im 
provements, would accommodate a gentleman, either 
of leisure or business. 

For further particulars, apply to Robert Ogden, 
Esq ; or to said Timothy Edwards who will give a 
good title to the premises. 

Morrisden, April 26th, 1771. 

FERDINAND, | A famous large HORSE of 
the Spanish breed, will cover Mares this season, at 

i A son of President Jonathan Edwards, of Princeton College. Aaron Burr, his 
nephew, lived for some time during his childhood with Timothy Edwards. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 457 

Morrisden, in the township of Shrewsbury, Monmouth 
county, New-Jersey, for THREE POUNDS, Proc. each 
Mare, and if they don't prove with Foal this year, 
they may be brought and served next spring, for 
TWENTY SHILLINGS. Good pasturage for Mares, at a 
reasonable rate, by the Subscriber, 

MICHAEL KEARNEY. 

TO BE SOLD, | THE following Tracts of Land, 
in the great patent commonly called HARDENBERGH'S 
Patent, in Ulster county, in the province of New- York, 
viz. 

LOT No. Containing 



II, I OOOO 

25, 22876 

31, 4000 

53, 6000 

9497 2 
The above Lands are free of quit rent, and sup- 

posed to be out of dispute. Any person inclining to 
purchase, may apply to the Rev. Mr. Browne at 

Newark. 



April 29, 1771. 

The New York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1478, May 2, 1771. 

NOTICE is hereby given, to a certain AMOS ELL- 
ISON, of Squan, in East New-Jersey, who for some 
Time past has resided in or near Queen's County, 
North-Carolina, that his Father is dead, and he is de- 
sired to return home to Squan aforesaid, with all 



458 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

convenient Speed. If any Person knows where the 
said Amos Ellison is, and will inform him of this Ad- 
vertisement, the Favour will be gratemlly rewarded 

by 

THOMAS ELLISON. 
1771. 




To be LETT for a TERM of YEARS, 
and may be entered on immediately, 

A COMMODIOUS HOUSE and GARDEN, sit- 
uate in Moore's Town, in the county of Burling- 
ton, on the road leading from Cooper's Ferries, to 
Mount-holly and Burlington, about 10 miles from 
said Ferries, with a good bearing orchard, and about 
8 acres of meadow ; a good shop for merchants 
goods, a good cellar and store for manufacturing 
pork, good stables, and other convenient out-houses ; 
a store has been kept on said premises upwards of 
20 years, where 900 barrels of pork have been manu- 
factured in one year. For terms, enquire of JOHN 
HUESTIS, living in Moore's Town aforesaid. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A VERY valuable plantation, lying in West-Jer- 
sey, within 5 miles of Salem town, containing 
about 340 acres of good land, in which tract there are 
about 1 50 acres of meadow, and more may be made ; 
many of the lots are in green grass, clover, and 
timothy grass ; the upland brings good wheat, the 
upland that is not cleared is well timbered ; a land- 
ing within about 100 rods of the house, on Salem 
creek, a good dwelling-house, three rooms on the 
lower floor, and a kitchen, a draw-well at the door, 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 459 

and a cellar under the whole house ; there are two 
apple-orchards on said place ; the plantation belong- 
ed to Thomas Cowperthwaite, late deceased ; and it 
will be sold altogether, or in two parts, as may best 
suit the purchasers, and on paying one third of the 
purchase-money, they may have many years to pay 
the rest in, giving bonds on interest, and at the first 
payment, a good title will be made them, by HUGH 
COWPERTHWAITE, Executor, living near Moore's town, 
in the Jerseys, who is impowered by the will to sell 
said land. Foiirth-month 24, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2210, May 2, 
1771. 

Monmouth County, May 6, 1771. 
To be sold by the SUBSCRIBER, 
SUNDRY Lots of Land in said County, viz. The 
noted Tavern in Freehold, known by the Name of 
Campbell's Tavern, perhaps one of the best Stands 
in said County, with 100 acres of Land, has a com. 
modious House, with four Fire-places, and a good 
stable; also a good Orchard of 150 Apple-Trees of 
the best Sort, besides other Fruit-Trees ; a long 
rail'd Garden with a Prospect of five publick Roads, 
is situate within six Miles of Middle-town Point, and 
eleven of Amboy. Also another Plantation adjoin- 
ing the above (only separated by a large Market 
Road) with about 1 20 Acres of Land, 30 of which is 
good Meadow-Ground, chiefly fit for the Scythe, with 
a good House and Barn, and Orchard of 150 Apple- 
Trees, now in the Possession of the Subscriber ; it is 
deemed a fine Stand for a Country Store, being (as 
well as the Tavern) several Miles distant from any 



460 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

other in that Way. Also a House and Lot of 8 
Acres, adjoining two publick Roads adjacent, very 
suitable for any Branch the Country requires. Also 
sundry Lots of Land and Meadow, lying near New 
Forrest, about one Mile from the above Lots. Also 
a Farm of about 100 Acres of good Wheat-Land, 
with a good Orchard and other Improvements, the 
Buildings large, but somewhat out of Repair, situate 
near the Stage-Road, at Fresh-Pond, seven short 
Miles from Brunswick, and four from South-River- 
Landing ; for the other good Properties that attend 
its situation, the Purchaser can satisfy himself on see- 
ing the Place. The Tavern may be entered on im- 
mediately. An indisputable Title, with easy pay- 
ments, will be given by 

ROBERT CAMPBELL. 

The New York Gazette ; and The Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1019, May 6, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, May 9. | Extract from the Votes of 
the General Assembly of \ the Colony of New-Jersey. 
| House of Assembly, April 19, 1771. | 

MR. Stevens 1 and Mr. Parker, 2 Agents on the part 
of this Colony, laid before the House, a law of the 
Province of New- York, lately passed, entitled, 'An 
Act for establishing the Boundary or Partition Line 
between the Colonies of New- York and Nova Caes- 
area, or New-Jersey, and for confirming Titles and 
Possessions ; and prayed that a Law similar thereto 
may be passed here ; which Law of New- York was 

i For sketch of John Stevens, see N. J. Archives, IX., 335. 
a For sketch of James Parker, see N. J. Archives, IX., 446. 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 461 

read, and the further consideration of the Matter re- 
ferred till next Session of Assembly. 

Ordered, That the Members for Bergen, do pub- 
lish a Copy of this Minute, in one of the New-York 
News Papers, at least six Weeks before the next 
Sessions. 1 
RICHARD SIMITH, Clerk of the Assembly. 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1479, May 9, 1771. 

On the 3<3th ult. the General Assembly of New- 
Jersey was prorogued to Tuesday the 28th instant, 
then to meet at Burlington without further notice. 
-The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1483, May 9, 



BY virtue of a writ to me directed, on the 29th day 
of May inst. at the dwelling-house of Anne Ris- 
ley, Innkeeper, in the township of Great Egg harbour. 
will be sold by public vendue, without any farther 
adjournment. A very valuable plantation and tract 
of land, containing 530 acres, situate on the sea shore, 
in the township aforesaid, on which are a good fram- 
ed dwelling-house, barn, orchard and other improve- 
ments, about 60 acres of upland cleared, upwards of 
60 acres of mowable marsh, besides a large quantity 
of mars.h fit for pasture ; the whole is in excellent 
good order, and* is esteemed as good a plantation as 
any in the township. Also five acres of cedar swamp, 
near the premises. A good title will be made for 
the same to the purchaser, such as shall be approved 
of by the ablest counsel in the province. And as the 

1 See N. J. Archives, XXVI.. 587. note. 



462 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

said lands will surely be sold on that day, any person 
inclining to purchase is desired to view the premises 
before the day of sale, and may be informed of the 
title, by applying- to James Kinsey, Esq ; in Burling- 
ton. The whole being late the estate of Joseph 
Adams, deceased ; seized in execution, at the suit of 
William Allen, Esq ; and to be sold by 

SAMUEL BLACKWOOD, late Sheriff. 

* 

TO BE SOLD, 

In pursuance of the last will and testament of JOHN 
SMITH late of BURLINGTON, deceased. 

A LARGE, convenient and well finished dwelling- 
house, situate on the east side of Water-street, 
between Race and Arch-streets, in the city of Phila- 
delphia ; lately in the tenure of Henry Drinker, with 
the wharff, and valuable stores thereon lately erected. 
ALSO a tract of land, containing about 75 acres, 
part of which is good meadow, with a dwelling-house, 
barn, young orchard, and other improvements. And 
near to the same, a lot of land, containing about 14 
acres, on which is a neat dwelling house, lately finish- 
ed, a store and pork-house, and other out- houses, with 
a good garden and orchard ; pleasantly situated in a 
good neighbourhood, and convenient for trade, at 
Houghton, in the township of Springfield, and county 
of Burlington. For terms, apply to WILLIAM LOVET 
SMITH, JOSEPH SMITH or WILLIAM DILLWYN, Executors. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

TJ THERE AS MARGARET, the wife of the subscrib- 

V V er, hath eloped from her husband, with one 

John Allcott, a Flatman, and carried off sundry 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 463 

household goods, of a very considerable value, and 
the said John Allcot, being also greatly in debt to 
the said subscriber : These are therefore to caution 
all persons from crediting the said Margaret, as her 
husband will pay no debts of her contracting from 
this date : And any person who will secure the said 
John Allcott, and the said Margaret, in anyone of 
his Majesty's goals upon the continent, so that the 
subscriber may have an opportunity of getting his 
money and goods again, shall have the above reward, 
and all reasonable charges, paid by 

THOMAS ELTON, residing between Burlington 

and Mount-Holly, in New-Jersey. 
Burlington, May 2, 1771. 

The said Margaret answers the following des- 
cription ; she is a short thick body, has a round like- 
ly face, black hair, a little flat nose, her eyes stand at 
a greater distance from each other than commonly 
womens eyes do, her cheeks very rosy, she has a 
small scar under her right nostril, something re- 
sembling a cross, she has lost two of her fore teeth, 
talkative and very fond of singing ; about 22 years of 
age. The said John Allcott answers the following 
description ; he is a well set fellow, about 5 feet 10 
inches high, sandy complexion, with grey eyes, has a 
down look, large hooked nose, wears his hair tied. 

Philadelphia, May i, 1771. 
FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, in this place, a ser- 
vant man, belonging to Thomas Ludlam, of 
Cape- May, named WILLIAM POWELL, born in this 



464 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

country, and about jo years old ; he is 5 feet 4 inches 
high, of a thin visage, tawny complexion, and much 
given to strong drink ; had on when he went away, a 
cap, coarse shirt, and an old brown jacket, much patch- 
ed ; but as he took with him ,.9:18:8 of his master s 
money, it is expected he will change his -apparel. He 
also took with him an indenture, by which Thomas 
Harrison was indented to Andrew Armstrong, in 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania ; he is well acquaint- 
ed with this town, and was a soldier in the last war in 
the Jersey regiment. Whoever takes up the said ser- 
vant, and secures him, so that his master may have him 
again, shall receive the above reward, and reasonable 
charges, paid by 

THOMAS LUDLAM. 

Burlington county, New-Jersey, April 30, 1771. 

SIX DOLLARS Reward. 



UN away on the 27th instant, a Dutch servant 
lad, named JOHN MERK, about 19 years of 
age, wears his own straight dark-coloured hair, is 
about 5 feet 5 inches high, speaks bad English ; had 
on> when he went away, a good felt hat, homespun 
yellowish jacket, and a homespun striped ditto under 
it, a coarse check shirt, homespun trowsers, yarn 
stockings, and half-worn shoes, with nails in them ; 
he is remarkably bow-legged ; took with him two pair 
of homespun trowsers, and two good shirts. His 
father lives near Lancaster or Berks, and it is sup- 
posed he is gone that way. Whoever takes up and 
secures said servant, so that the owner may have him 
again, shall have the above reward, and reasonable 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 465 

charges, paid by MARY BLACK, or JONATHAN BARTON. 
or BENJAMIN DAVIDS, at the Sign of the George, in 
Philadelphia. 

CAME to RICHARD RENSHAW'S, at Greenwich-point- 
ferry, opposite Gloucester, about 3 weeks ago, 
a large white COW, 3 notches cut in her off ear, and 
with her black yearling HEIFER, white belly, the 
end of her tail white, and white feet ; also a black 
long tailed mare COLT, a small white blaze down 
her face, her near fore foot and off hind foot white. 
The owners are desired to come, prove their prop- 
erty, pay charges, and take them away. 



UN away from the subscriber, living at Billings- 
port, in Greenwich township, Gloucester county, 
a servant man, named GEORGE GARNER, this country 
born, 21 years of age, about 5 feet 7 inches high, a 
well set fellow, and has dark brown hair ; had on, and 
took with him, a new cloth-coloured ratteen coat and 
jacket, with broad metal buttons, a red jacket, old 
leather breeches, thick coarse shirts, yarn stockings, 
new pumps, and a pair of old shoes, a half- worn felt 
hat, and a leather apron. He went away with an or- 
dinary young woman, named Rachel Scott, also this 
country born, and it is supposed they will pass for 
man and wife ; she is a lusty strong hussey, and is 
apt to be light fingered. Whoever takes up said 
servant, and secures him, so that his master may 
have him again, shall have Forty Shillings Reward, 
and reasonable charges, paid by BENJAMIN LODGE. 

- The Pennsylvania Gazelle^ No. 2211, May 9, 
1771. 

30 



466 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

A PLAN OF UNION, | By admitting REPRESENT- 
ATIVES from the AMERI | CAN COLONIES, and from IRE- 
LAND into the | BRITISH Parliament. | AMERICA. | 

Massachusetts Bay 

Pennsylvania r 

IT-. . J . y each tour 20 

Virginia 

South-Carolina 

Jamaica 

New- York V each three 

Maryland 

Canada 




Connecticut 



each two 1 



E. and W. Jerseys 

The New York Gazette, No. 148 [1510], May 



Whereas the agreement made the i6th day of 
February, in the year of our Lord, one thousand sev- 
en hundred and sixty seven, between Richard Stev- 
ens, and the Assignees of his estate, hath not yet been 
complied with on their part : These are therefore to 
give notice to all his creditors whom it may concern, 
that he intends to apply to the General Assembly of 
New-Jersey, for relief in the premises, at their next 
meeting at Burlington, which commences the 27th 
day of this Instant. 2 May iith, 1771. 

This is to give Notice to all whom it may concern, 

1 Ever since 1754, when Franklin proposed a plan of Union for the Colonies, the 
idea had been frequently revived. The scheme above outlined is followed by a 
column of "Conditions," elaborating the plan. 

2 "An Act for the Relief of Richard Stevens with respect to the Imprisonment 
of his Person" was passed September 26, 1772. The propriety of such an act was 
questioned by the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, and was by 
them accordingly referred to their solicitor for his opinion, who advised them 
that he saw "no material objection in point of Law to the same." Alii nson's Laws, 
386; .V. J Archives, XVIII., 374; M., 701. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 467 

That a Petition has been presented to the General 
Assembly of the Province of New-Jersey, by a num- 
ber of the Inhabitants of the Townships of Shrews- 
bury and Middletown and the principal Owners of 
the Meadows on each side of the River which divides 
the said townships ; which Petition is likely to be ta- 
ken into Consideration at the meeting of the Gener- 
al Assembly the 28th Instant, praying, That a good 
and sufficient Dam may be made to keep out the 
Tides, with an Intent to benefit the aforesaid JVlead- 
ows, and for a more ready and easy Communication 
between the said Towns. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1 020, May 13, 1771. 

TO BE SOLD, ' 

A PARCEL of good MARSH, containing about 
2 i acres, situate on the north side, and near 
the mouth of Pensocken creek, in Burlington county, 
New-Jersey, adjoining meadow of Joseph Morgan, 
and 5 miles from Cooper's ferry. ... It is already 
banked on one side, and wants very little to put it in 
good order, greatest part of it having been formerly 
cleared. . . . Apply to LAMBERT CADWALADER, in 
Philadelphia, or PHILEMON DICKINSON/ near Trenton. 

^) UN away from the subscriber, living in Lower 
IV Penn's Neck, West New-Jersey, the loth of 
this instant May, a Mulattoe man SLAVE ; named 
JAMES, about 40 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches high; 

i For a sketch of Gen. Philemon Dickinson, the commanding officer of the 
New Jersey militia during the Revolution, see 2 N. J. Archives, I., p. 35. He 
married two sisters of L<ambert Cadwalader. 



468 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

he limps with his right knee, and loves strong drink ; 
had on, when he went away, a brown cloth short 
made coat, with white metal buttons, a light cloth 
jacket, without sleeves, striped holland trowsers, good 
shoes and stockings. Whoever takes up the said 
Mulattoe in Salem county, or secures him in any 
goal, so that his master may get him again, shall have 
FORTY SHILLINGS reward, paid by 

CHARLES GREEN. 

To be SOLD, at public VENDUE, 

. On Tuesday, the 4th day of June next, on the 

premises, 

A VALUABLE plantation or tract of land, situate 
in the township of Northampton, in the county 
of Burlington, about 24 miles from Philadelphia, ly- 
ing on the great road between Mount-holly and the 
new mills. The above tract of land contains 250 
acres, 80 whereof are improved good meadow ; the 
whole divided into small lots, and in good cedar fence, 
30 acres more may be made, all lying in one body; 
there are about 100 acres of upland cleared, and in 
good fence, bearing fine grain of all sorts ; there are 
on the above tract a good one story dwelling house, 
with 3 rooms on a floor, an extraordinary good barn, 
36 feet wide, and 60 feet long, with two bearing or- 
chards of good fruit, a pump of excellent good water 
at the door, the remainder of the land well timbered; 
the whole is in good order, chiefly in cedar fence. 
Any person inclining to view the premises, may be 
shown, by applying to JOHN WEST, living on the above 
place. Also will be sold at the same time 1 50 acres 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 469 

of woodland, lying within half a mile of said place, 
which will be very convenient for it ; likewise 50 
acres of cedar swamp, in small lots. The vendue 
to begin at 10 o'clock on said day, where the con- 
ditions will be made known, and attendance given by 

WILLIAM WILLS. 

Twenty-four ACRES of MARSH, 
TO be SOLD, situate on the North side of Cross- 
wicks Creek in Burlington County, * New-Jersey, and 
about four Miles from Trenton t It adjoins Meadow 
of Isaac and Robert Pearson. Enquire ^ELIZABETH 
BYLES, living in Ti enton, or LAMBERT CADWALADER/ in 
Philadelphia. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2212, May 16, 



RUN away from the subscriber , living in Elizabeth- 
Town, New -Jersey, on Sunday i2th inst. an indented 
English servant lad, about 18 or 20 years of age, nam- 
ed David Henry, and it is likely he may change his 
name; of a fair complexion, long light colour d hair; 
he can shave, dress hair, bleed and draw teeth: . . . 
Had on when he-went away, a light colour' d ^rtout 
coat, striped jacket, and green plush breeches, but may 

i Lambert Cadwalader was a son of Dr. Thomas Cadwalader, for some years a 
resident of Trenton, where he married Hannah Lambert. He was b. (prob. at Tren- 
ton) 1741; educated at the famous academy of the Rev. Dr. Francis Alison, in 
Philadelphia. On the breaking out of the Revolution he took an active part on 
the American side and was commissioned Jan. 4, 1776, colonel of the Third Penn- 
sylvania Battalion. He was made a prisoner at the capture of Fort Washington, 
by the British, Nov. 16, 1776, but was paroled, and retired to his estate at Trenton. 
He remained a prisoner of war on parole until he resigned. Jan. 22, 1779. He m. 
Mary, dau. of Archibald McCall and Judith, dau. of Peter Kemble, sometime Pre- 
sident of the Council of New Jersey. Col. Cadwalader represented New Jersey in 
the Continental Congress, 1784-1787, and in the Federal Congress, 1789-1791, 1793-. 
1795. He d. Sept. 13, 1823, and is buried in Friends' burying ground, Trenton. He 
left one child, Thomas Cadwalader. 



476 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

change his dress, as he carried some other cloaths along 
with him. . . . Whoever takes up and secures the 
said run away, so that he may be had again, shall re- 
ceive six dollars reward, and all reasonable charges 
paid by 

WILLIAM M. BARNET. 

THESE are to certify all whom it may concern, 
that my daughter, Helen Baker, 1 1 years of age, had 
the misfortune to be born deaf and dumb, hath re- 
ceived very considerable advantage in point of hear- 
ing, and now begins to speak several words, of which 
she has hitherto been altogether incapable, thro' the 
means which Dr. Graham, under God, has lately 
made use of in her behalf; as witness my hand, 

JACOB BAKER. 

Elizabeth-Town, May 16, 1771. 

In East New-Jersey, one hundred and seventy 
three persons hath been cured since the 6th of last 
January, of BLINDNESS, DEAFNESS, FEMALE COM- 
PLAINTS, &c. The Dr. intends to be at Brunswick 
about the middle of June next ensuing. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1 02 1, May 20, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, May 27th. | Married. ... Mr. 
ISAAC COLLINS, of Burlington, Printer, to Miss RACHEL 
BUDD, of this City. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 228, May 20, to 

May 27, 1771. 

Just PUBLISHED, and To BE SOLD by | WILLIAM 
AND THOMAS BRADFORD, I PRACTICAL DIS- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 471 

COURSES | ON THE | LEADING TRUTHS | OF 
THE | GOSPEL, | By JOHN WITHERSPOON, D. D. | 
President of the College of New Jersey. 

To BE SOLD | By way of PUBLIC VENDUE, at the 
London Coffee-house, | on Thursday the 6th of June 
next, at seven o'clock in the | evening ; | ALL that 
fine, rich and fertile price of Meadow Ground, con- 
taining 28 acres or thereabouts, laying and being in 
Greenwich-Island, about three miles from the Court- 
house in this city, and near Greenwich Point house, 
adjoining meadow grounds belonging to William 
Jones and Richard Renshaw, beautifully situate with 
an extensive front on the river Delaware, command- 
ing fine views of the vessels sailing up and down the 
river, Gloucester Point, Red Bank, &c., embanked 
and under good fence, with a fine crop of grass now 
standing. The whole divided in the most convenient 
and advantageous manner for the purchasers, with 
suitable cart-ways to each lot, and will be sold in 
parcels agreeable to the plan of division to be seen 
at the Coffee-house, and Richard Renshaw's Point- 
house, where a person will attend to shew the prem- 
ises. 

At the same time will be sold about three acres of 
excellent Meadow Ground, situate on the east side 
of Gloucester Point road, fronting the river Delaware, 
and adjoining the meadows of Stephen Paschall, Jos- 
eph Morris, and Henry Lisle. 

. . . For particulars and terms of sale, enquire of the 
subscriber at the corner of Market and Second-streets, 
where plans of the whole may be seen, and where a 



472 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1771 

variety of MERCHANDISE is to be sold very cheap 
for CASH. 

ENOCH STORY, Broker. 

ABRAHAM SKILLMAN, | BEGS leave to inform 
the Public, that he has erected a new STAGE WAGGON, 
to go from Philadelphia to New-York in one day and 
a half. All those who are pleased to oblige the in- 
ventor of said waggon with their company, may de- 
pend on being used in the best manner, and the jour- 
ney performed in the above mentioned time. The 
waggon sets out from BENJAMIN DAVIDS'S at 
the sign of the GEORGE, at the corner of Arch and 
Second-streets, Philadelphia, every Friday morning, 
precisely at Five o'clock ; and from New- York every 
Tuesday morning. The waggon goes through Bruns- 
wick, Elizabeth-Town, and Newark. 

N. B. Price for each passenger Twenty Shillings. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1485, May 23, 
1771. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A PLANTATION in Gloucester county, West 
New-Jersey, lying on Salem road, about 15 miles from 
Gloucester town, and one from Swedesborough, con- 
taining about 130 acres through which tract there is 
a never failing stream of water, with a considerable 
quantity of swamp, which may be made good 
meadow ; there is likewise on said plantation an or- 
chard of extraodinary fruit trees, with a dwelling- 
house, 2 stories high, of square logs, and an extraor- 
dinary well of water close to the door. There are 
about 30 acres cleared ; likewise 6 acres of good tide 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 473 

meadow, lying on Racoon Creek, banked in. Time 
will be given for the payment. For terms, apply to 
ELIAS BOYS, living in Newport, New-Castle county, 
or THOMAS DENNY, Esq ; near the premises^ 

N. B. Said plantation is well situate for any busi- 
ness, such as shopkeeping. or for any tradesman, as 
the main Salem road runs through it. 

o 

PHILADELPHIA, May 23. | The i4th of this Instant 
departed this Life, at his House in Mountholly, in 
the County of Burlington, JOHN HATKINSON ; he was 
a kind and loving Husband, a tender Parent over his 
Children, a kind Master, and a ready and good 
Neighbour ; a Man more in Substance than Shew of 
Religion. His Corpse was, on the i6th, attended 
to Friends Burying-ground, near the said Town, by a 
large Number of his Friends and acquaintance. He 
has left behind him a sorrowful Widow and Children, 
. yet not without Hope, that he is taken from many 
Troubles of this Life to enjoy a better ; and he, who 
gives this Character, has no small Share in the Loss 
of so intimate and agreeable a Friend, having been 
intimate with him, both at home and abroad, for sev- 
eral Years. W. C. 

We hear from Chesterfield, in New-Jersey, that on 
Tuesday, the I4th Instant, was suddenly summoned 
hence, in the i8th Year of his Age, by the accident- 
al discharge of a Gun (which it was supposed went 
off at Half Cock, by a Person's attempting to remove 
it from the Place it stood in) Mr. EDWARD PAGE, jun. 
only Son of Mr. EDWARD PAGE, of that place. - He 
was a young Man much esteemed, and whose un- 



474 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



fortunate Death is therefore greatly lamented by all 

who knew him. 

Ye Gay and Careless, on his Fate attend ! 
Captain M'Carty, from the Western Islands, on 
the 8th Instant, in Lat. 38, Long. 56, spoke a schoon- 
er, Captain Gardner, from Salem for St. Eustatia, 8 
Days out, all well. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2213, May 23, 

1771. 

NEW-YORK, May 27th. | Capt. Channel, in a 
Brig from Newfoundland, the i8th Instant, spoke 
with a Schooner from Philadelphia, for Piscataque, 
about 25 Leagues from Sandy-Hook. 

The New York Gazette ; and The Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 102 2, May 27, 1771. 

Mr. Goddard, 

In No. 223 of the Chronicle I observed an advertisement addressed to 
the creditors of John Budd, and subscribed with his name I could not 
pass over unnoticed the artful untruths contained in it. An imposition on 
individuals is culpable, on the public unpardonable ; every attempt of so 
flagrant a nature should be exposed, and the public have an opportunity 
of judging from matter of fact, which no evasion or artifice can contradict. 

In the year 1769, Mr. Budd did apply to the legislative body of this 
province for the act he mentioned, and being directed to give notice to his 
creditors of his application, he published an advertisement to that purpose 
in Bradfords paper, which he was sensible not one in ten would see, as it 
was not at that time taken in the town of Salem, or its neighbourhood, 
where most of his creditors, and particularly his securities for his office of 
sheriff, resided He was indebted to their ignorance, not their approb- 
ation of his application, for success. This artifice was subject of triumph 
to him, and on his return to Salem, he did not fail to bor.st of it. He then 
threw off the mask, and set his creditors at defiance; flushed with the suc- 
cess of an imposition (which any other man, however unfortunate, would 
have blushed to reveal) it is not surprising that he was treated with a re- 
serve and coolness, the indignation such an action justly excited, and for 
which he assigns such absurd reasons; reasons that the consciousness of 
fraud could only suggest; reasons, that nothing but unparalleled assur- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 475 

ance could publish. What could induce men of character to act upon 
those principles he insidiously advances as the motives of their conduct? 
What had they to fear from a review of their actions in a judicial capac- 
ity, when authorised by the laws of the province? What to fear from a 
man despicable and held in the utmost contempt by every man in the 
county who had a character to maintain? Memorandum (that was what 
he had not) What interested views, but a detestation of repeated frauds? 
What friendship for a person of the same profession, but such as naturally 
arises from a due regard to distinguish merit and abilities? And as to his 
expectations of returns to favours conferred in his affluence, he was never 
in such an independent state as to be enabled to grant them; but at the 
same time that he asserted such an untruth, he should have laid his hand 
to his breast, and reflected UPON what OBJECTS he lavished the substance 
of his creditors, and his blood would have felt a turn, tho' he has forgot 
what it is to blush. 

The act it is true was censured, not as being an act of the assembly, 
but as to the fraudulent methods used to obtain it; the legislature was not 
blamed, but it was natural to suspect and guard against every action of a 
man who had given such glaring proofs of his proficiency in dissimulation. 
This rendered him a dangerous, an unfit member of society, which cannot 
subsist where mutual confidence is not, and the opinion the people in gen- 
eral entertained of him was such, as prevented any encouragement from 
those, who regard other qualities in a man, than that of telling a plausible 
story. 

It is natural for most men who are subject to particular failings to 
judge partially of the rest of mankind. This unfortunately happens to be 
his case; subtle and and possessed of that species of low cunning which 
subjects a man to the contempt of the honest and ingenuous, he has with 
the utmost effrontery charged them with evasions, that are inconsistent 
and groundless. The real state of the affair is thus In his petition to 
the assembly for the act referred to, he offered as a reason to induce them 
to a compliance, that he would be aiding and assisting to the auditors ap- 
pointed in an attachment then depending against him, in settling and ad- 
justing his books which were in their hands, and which were so irregularly 
kept and posted, as to lay them under great difficulties, false entries and 
frequent omissions of settlement, made him liable to suspicion of careless- 
ness or something worse. 

At his. return, in order to elude the good intention of the act, on his 
discovering an error in the return of the attachment, he applied to the 
court, and obtained a rule to set it aside (the delay attending proceedings 
of such a nature is what he terms an artful evasion) by this means he be- 
came possessed of his books and monies which were in the auditor's hands, 
and has since then received other sums; but how has he disposed of them? 
Not agreeable to the intention of the act, but in partial distribution of 
small sums to one or two favourite creditors, without the least security to 
the rest of them, or the means to recover any part of their just debts. 



476 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Thus did he evade the humane intention of the legislature, but he 
could not any longer deceive his creditors, who are so fully convinced of 
his want of integrity, that they have this session presented a petition to 
the assembly, praying a repeal of that very act, which he obtained by 
their ignorance of his application, and which, with an uncommon share 
of assurance, he would endeavour to persuade the public was procured 
with their approbation. 

The very proposal which he makes to induce ^the world to think fav- 
ourably of him, by desiring a continuance of the act so long as he can pay 
.200 per annum to one or more of his creditors, exposes his artifice, and 
despicable exertion of that low cunning so natural to him. He is indebt- 
ed to one person .2000, to another .600, both of them very nearly con- 
nected with him by ties of blood, and by whose influence and privity alone* 
he says he obtained the act. No doubt "he feels the highest satisfaction 
in the pleasing prospect" not of paying his debts, but of enjoying his lib- 
erty in defiance of the rest of his creditors, and to the absolute loss of 
their property, and of being able for such a term of years as it will require 
to discharge those debts, to be accountable to none but his relations for 
the payment of any money, and who no doubt will receive as much annu- 
ally as the rest of his creditors have hitherto done, but then, paid or not 
paid, they are freed from the incumbrance of his family, and would much 
rather see him at liberty than have an addition to the losses they have 
already sustained. 

He very plausibly advances that he should consider his time as the 
property of his creditors. If that was really his intention, it was jusl, but 
the contrary is evident. His time should be employed in a manner the 
most advantageous for them, and every deviation from such conduct, is not 
only a new imposition, but a fraud. In Salem he proposes to pay .200 
per annum, to reduce his debts; but if he really intends to make such 
annual payment, he must be conscious, he does his creditors injustice by 
the offer of so small a dividend. By his own account, he might afford to 
pay them double that sum, and enjoy a sufficiency for the maintenance of 
his family; it is true he cannot, he says, do this in Salem, but in an ad- 
jacent colony "a person undertook to get .700 per ann. subscribed for 
him by about 200 families, which subscription was almost complete, and 
he doubted not of making much more." Where is then the equity of his 
proposal, or the stress that can be laid on what he has advanced? Is it 
not more probable that his payments will be confined to those two allied 
creditors for years, and that the rest must content themselves with expect- 
ations almost beyond a degree of probability? 

Perhaps he thinks he has resided rather too long in this part of the 
world, that he is too well known, his hypocrisy and want of candour detect- 
ed, but under the protection of this act, that he shall be enabled to make an 
excursion before the expiration of it, in better circumstances and better 
qualified by experience to dupe the unwary stranger, and erect his fortune 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 477 

on the basis of another's ruin. In short, he has deceived his creditors, 
abused the indulgence of the legislature, and if he could, would impose 
on the public. 

A LEADING MAN. 

Salem N. J., May /, ////. 

The Name of the Author of the foregoing Piece is 
left in the Hands of the Printer, to be communicated to 
Mr. BUDD when call } d for. 

-The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 229, May 27, 
to June 3, 1771. 

THOMAS MOODY, Philomathematicus, \ from 
HIBERNIA, | CRAVES the attention of all mathemati- 
cians and lovers of learning in America, while he in- 
forms them, that he has lately published and has now 
for sale, A NEW METAMORPHOSIS of the noble and gen- 
uine Science of surveying ; with a small table, shew- 
ing at one view, the whole arcana of symbolic compu- 
tation, and the scope of the whole performance in- 
geniously comprised in the following maxims, which 
he has cloathed in rhyme for the sake of the mem- 
ory. 

1. One and one addition make, 

2. Two and two their difference take, 

3. One and three take some of both, 

4. From sixteen points for angle's truth. 
The author likewise intends shortly to publish, by 

way of subscription, a piece entitled the SCHOOL- 
MAN'S COMPANION, in which he considers and refutes 
at large the fluctuating series of Martin, the vortexes 
of Descart, and Hobb's hypothesis on the monogony 
of the world, with a short appendix containing a cu- 
rious dissertation on Gordon's Trigonometrical ta- 



478 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

bles, and a new method to ascertain the sides of an 
irregular parallelogram. And farther the author 
hopes he will not be thought immoderately protuber- 
ant in his own praise, if he acquaints the public, that 
he has lately received a letter from a Briton, a very 
great mathematician, now in this country, highly ex- 
tolling his performance, and requesting him to send 
him three hundred copies of the afoiesaid Metamor- 
phosis of Trigonometry. 

N. B. The author would be willing to accept of a 
professorship in some seminary of learning, if he could 
meet with proper encouragement ; in which station 
he would give annually a course of Mathematical 
Lectures according to the Dublin plan. 

New-Jersey, May 3.0. 

NEW-YORK, May 27. \ In the John and Betsey, 
Capt. Durell, from London, came passengers, Mr. 
Stevens, Collector of Amboy, in New-Jersey, with 
his lady and family. 

TO be sold at public vendue, at the late dwelling- 
house of John Hatkinson, deceased, in Mount- 
holly, Burlington County, West New-Jersey, on the 
1 7th day of the sixth month, called June next, the 
well-known grist mill in the said town, on an excel- 
lent stream of water, with three pair of stones ; four 
boulting mills, for country use ; and two ditto, for 
merchant work, which go and hoist by water ; a sta- 
ble, that will hold ten horses, and other buildings, to 
go with the said mill : also a lot of meadow, about 
three acres, with a good new bake-house, and two 
ovens, all things in good order for carrying on the 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 479 

baking business, all adjoining the aforesaid mill : Al- 
so a plantation near the said town, of about 140 acres, 
50 of which is meadow, in good bank, with a fine 
Spaw spring, a good frame house and cellar, with 
large cow-houses and hay-house : Also f^ths of a 
saw- mill, near the aforesaid grist-mill ; several lots of 
land, in and near the said town, green corn in the 
ground ; a large fine breeding mare with foal, by the 
Arabian Belsize ; young horses; a pair of oxen; 
cows ; sheep ; hogs ; a riding waggon, and a cart ; 
timber wheels and screw ; farming utensils ; beds and 
bedding ; household goods ; and a great variety of 
shop goods. The vendue to begin at 10 o'clock in 
the forenoon, where due attendance will be given, and 
the conditions made known, by 

ELIZABETH HATKINSON, Executrix ; 

JOHN HINCHMAN, and 

PETER HARVEY, Executors. ' . , 

N. B. The vendue to continue from day to day, 
till the whole is sold. The purchaser of the said mill, 
by paying half of the money down, may have six 
months credit for the other half. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1486, May 30, 
1771. 

Sussex County, West New-Jersey, May 10, 1771. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

T T 7 HERE AS some time ago, I became security for 
V V one ANDREW M'CALLA, that he should answer 
to an action of Bastardy, at our Court of Quarter 
Sessions. And since the said M'Calla has run away, 
and as it is like to prove very detrimental to myself 



480 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

and family, it is to be hoped that all lovers of honesty 
and Justice will use their endeavours to apprehend 
him. He is a person about 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high, 
25 or 26 years old, thin-faced, assumes the character 
of a kind of a schoolmaster, but. is no great scholar ; he 
has been heard of on Long Island, and passes by the 
name of Steward, and it is very probable he may 
make towards Philadelphia, as he has a mother re- 
sides there, who keeps a dram-shop (as he says) and 
goes by the name of Rosanna Henderson. Any per- 
son taking up and securing him in any of his Majes- 
ty's goals on the continent, and giving notice thereof 
to Samuel Adams, of Philadelphia, or Joseph Braden, 
of Upper Dublin, or to me the subscriber, shall have 
the above reward, paid by ROBERT BRADEN. 

To be SOLD. 

A TRACT of LAND, containing 312 acres, lying 
in the county of Salem, bounding on Stow Creek, 
within a mile of the upper Bridge, where there is a 
good landing, and within a few rods of Wood's grist- 
mill ; there are 16 acres lately cleared, and under 
good fence ; the land is good and well timbered, it is 
supposed by good judges, that 70 or 80 thousand of 
Staves may be made on it. The purchaser may have 
4 or 5 years, or more, to pay the greatest part, or the 
whole of the money, on giving security, and paying 
interest. Any person inclining to see the land, may 
apply to JONATHAN WRIGHT, near the same ; for fur- 
ther particulars apply to JAMES COOPER, Hatter, in 
Philadelphia. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2214, May 30, 
1771. 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 481 

New- York, May 29th. 
SUTTONIAN INOCULATION. 

MR. LATHAM Surgeon to the King's (or 8th) 
Regiment of Foot, informs the Public, that he is the 
only Person who can appoint Practitioners to inocu- 
late after the Suttonian method, in any part of Amer- 
ica, North of Philadelphia ; while Doctor Shuttle- 
worth (Brother-in-Law to Mr. Sutton, is the only 
Person that can inoculate) except Mr. John Smith, sen. 
in Virginia, or can cause to be inoculated in the same 
Manner, South of Philadelphia. Mr. Latham assures 
the New-England People, that he will wait upon any 
Number, assembled together to be inoculated; and 
as his desire is to be of as much Service to Mankind 
as he possibly can, he will endeavour to bring the 
Suttonian System to as great Utility and Practice in 
America, as it is now in Great-Britain and Ireland ; 
where Mr. Sutton has several Partners. 

N. B. Mr. Thomas Outwater, Surgeon and Pract- 
itioner of Physick in Orange Town, is appointed for 
Practice of the Suttonian System, in said County, as 
also for that of Bergen County: And Mr. George 
Pugh, Surgeon and Practitioner of Physick in Eliza- 
beth-Town, is appointed for the said Practice, within 
the Eastern Part or the Province of New-Jersey, in- 
cluding Princetown. 

The New- York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1482, May 30, 1771. 

NEW-JERSEY, ) BE it remembered, that on this 

Essex County. ( SS * 23rd day of May, 1771, ELIAS 
BALDWIN, of lawful age, personally came before me 

31 



482 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

JOSEPH RIGGS, Esq ; one of the justices of our 
lord the King assign'd to keep the peace, and being 
duly sworn, on the holy evangelists of almighty God, 
deposeth and saith, that on the 22d Inst. May, he this 
deponent, set off from Powles-Hook about 1 1 o'clock 
in the evening to go to Newark, and when he had 
just got off the first causeway, two men stopt him, 
and presented each a pistol at his breast, and one or 
both of them, bid him deliver what he had, but as he 
made no motion to deliver them anything, one of 
them unbuttoned his breeches pocket and took out 
his .pocket book, which was a plain leather one, and 
had in it one dollar, one bill of five shillings, Pennsyl- 
vania money, and sundry pieces of small silver, which 
they carried away with them, and likewise searched 
his pockets afterwards ; they took also from him a 
pillow case that he carried before him, in said pil- 
low case was ten and a half yards of white linen, one 
pound of tea, half a pound of indigo, one pewter 2 
quart bason, 2 pair of white metal shoe buckles, 2 
shoe knives, one pair of wool cards, % of a pound of 
bay berry tallow, another pillow case marked with 
the letters I. B. or P. B. and an old bag. This de- 

o 

ponent further saith, the two robbers were of a 
middle stature, and spoke with the Irish accent, but 
being in the night, he cannot describe their dress. 
Further, that he this deponent was not disguised with 
strong drink, but in his right mind, and that the above 
is a true relation of facts, and further saith not. 

ELIAS BALDWIN. 
Sworn before me, the day 
and year first above written. 

JOSEPH RIGGS. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 483 

N. B. It is hoped that all lovers of justice will be 
diligent in discovering and apprehending the robbers. 

Was taken up and lodged in Newark Goal, on 
Sunday the second Instant, a Negro Man about 5 
feet 6 inches high, very black, and speaks good Eng- 
ligh : Had on a light coloured brown Camblet Coat, 
black Calimanco Vest, Buckskin Breeches, a white 
Tow Shirt, Felt Hat, and had with him in his Bundle, 
a fine light-colour'd Broad-cloth Coat, a blue do. 
bound on the edges, coarse homespun Jacket, with 
Pewter Buttons, had several Pair of Yarn Stockings 
with him, two Pair of Shoes, and two Shirts. The 
Owner may have the Negro again, paying Charges, 
by applying to the Coaler at Newark. 

-The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1023, June 3, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, June 10. | A Society lately in- 
corporated in North-Carolina, for founding, estab- 
lishing and endowing a College, by the Name of 
QUEEN'S COLLEGE, lately met at Charlotte, in Meck- 
lenburgh County, agreeable to an Act of Assembly, 
and unanimously elected Col. EDMUND FANNING, (a 
Native of the Colony of Connecticut, and who re- 
ceived his Education at Yale-College, in New-Haven) 
President of the College. The Rev. Jos. ALEXANDER, 
A. M. the Rev. H. J. BALCH, A. M. and T. BRAVARD, 
A. B. (educated at Nassau-Hall, New-Jersey) were 
at the same time chosen Tutors. 

Mr. GODDARD, 

Coming last Night from the Eastward to Burling- 



484 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ton, I found a Piece in your Paper signed A Leading 
Man. I have only Time to note upon it, that the 
whole Performance is replete with Falsehood One 
flagrant Untruth I beg Leave to point out, which is, 
that in my Petition, on which I obtained the Act, I 
proposed to assist the Auditors. Every Person poss- 
essed of the printed Votes may see, that the Purport 
of the Petition was to take my Affairs into my own 
Hands, and pay my Debts. Men who have effront- 
ery enough to assert such a Falsehood, so very ap- 
parent, may well on their bare Words assert any 
Thing. However, altho' I know it to be the Produc- 
tion of three Persons, shall call on you for the Name, 
and take Time to examine the public Records, and 
confute their whole Narrative. 

I am, | Your humble Servant, | JOHN BUDD. 
June 7, 1771. 

7^he Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 230, June 3, 
to June 10, 1771. 

TO BE LET, 

A Mill in the Piovince of New-Jersey, about a Mile 
above Brunswick, upon Rariton River, at a 
Place called the Landing. This Mill is situated in 
the Heart of a fine Wheat-Country, and is supplied 
with Water to grind in the driest of Times, and the 
Flour may be sent to New- York without any Land 
Carriage. 

Also to be let, sundry Houses, and Lots of Land, 
and a Store House at the Landing aforesaid ; and a 
House and Lot of Land in Prince-Town ; also a good 
House and two large Lots of Land at South-River. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 485 

All Persons in the Province aforesaid, indebted to 
the Estate of the Honourable Joseph Reade, late of 
this City, deceased, by Bond or otherwise, are de- 
sired to pay the Same to the Subscribers ; and any 
Person inclining to hire the said Mill, or either of the 
Houses, or said Lots of Land, are desired to apply 
to the Subscribers, who will agree for the same. 

ANN READE, Executrix. 
JOHN READE, Executor. 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1483, June 6, 1771. 

On TUESDAY, the twenty-fifth inst. at Allen 
Town, in Monmouth county, East New Jersey, by way 
of PUBLIC YEN DUE, will begin the SALE of a large 
assortment of DRY GOODS, &c. 

BEING the remaining stock in trade of THOMAS 
BULLM AN, and COMPANY, of said place ; at which 
time will be added, a variety of FRESH GOODS, 
suitable for the country. The Sales will begin at Nine 
o'clock in the morning, and be continued from day 
to day, until Thursday, the fourth of July : Three 
months credit will be allowed to all purchasers for 
upwards of forty shillings, giving security, if required. 
It is not doubted the country round about will wait a 
few weeks, for the extraordinary advantages they 
may derive, from supplying their families -with nriny 
necessaries at a very low rate. 

On the fourth day of the sales, which will be the 
twenty-eighth of June, will be sold a Negro Man and 
Negro Boy, a Waggon and Team of four good Hors- 
es : And on Tuesday, the second day of July, by ad- 



486 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

journment, will be sold the Allen-Town Grist-Mill 
and Fulling-Mill, with the plantation and improve- 
ments, as formerly advertised, for which the purchas- 
er will be allowed six months credit for the payment 
of one-third of the purchase money, twelve months for 
another third, and eighteen months for the remain- 
der, without interest, giving security for the same be- 
fore he is put into possession, if required. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1487, June 6, 
1771. 

Fifth-Month, 28, 17/1. 

T~) UN away the 2jth ultimo, from the subscriber, liv- 
X\ ing in Manington, in Salem county, an Irish 
servant man, named RICHARD HENELY, about 5 feet 4 
inches high, stoops as he walks, and has bad English, 
with long fair hair, and of a fair complexion; had on, 
when he went away, a felt hat, and a light coloured 
homespun old coat and jacket, and two under jackets, 
one flannel, the other striped, without sleeves, buckskin 
breeches, a pair of trousers, and old shoes, tied with 
strings. Whoever takes up said servant, and secures 
him in any goal, so that his master may have him 
again, shall have THREE POUNDS reward, and reason- 
able charges, paid by 

JOHN ROBERTS. 

T") UN away, on the I2th of May last, from the sub- 

\.\^scriber, living in Bedminster, Somerset county, New- 
Jersey, a servant man, named James Morrison, about 

22 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches high, slim built, thin 

face, has long straight black hair, cut short on the top 

of his head; had on, when he went away, a new brown 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 487 

broadcloth coat, with mohair buttons, lined with light 
coloured shaloon, a light coloured jacket lined with 
yellow, light coloured broadcloth breeches, thread stock- 
ings, and a pair of pumps. He formerly served his time 
to Jacob Vandevere, Esq; of said tozv us hip, from whom 
he has been free about 12 months, and it is thought has 
his old indentures with him, and that he ^vill go towards 
Virginia. Whoever takes up said servant, and se- 
cures him in any goal, so that his master may get him 
again, shall have Three Pounds proc. reward, and 
reasonable charges, paid by 

VALENTINE RINEHART. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2215, June 6, 

1771. . 

NEW-YORK, June 10. | Hfl^ 5 * Some Time in the 
Month of September next, will be run for at Powlis- 
Hook, a PURSE OF O\E HUNDRED POUNDS, 
free for any Horse, Mare or Gelding, also a PURSE 
OF FIFTY POUNDS; Weight for Age and Blood. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1024, June 10, 1771. 

Burlington, June 15, 1771. 
TO BE SOLD, by public vendue, on the premises, 

on | Thursday, the nth day of July next, the two 

following | TRACTS of LAND, or either of them, 

viz. 

THE first tract is situate in the township of North- 
ampton, in the County of Burlington, in New-Jersey, 
known by the name of ROCKSTAFF, Daniel Well's 
plantation, distance about 4 miles from Burlington, 
about 5 miles from Mountholly, and somewhat less 




488 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

than a mile from a branch of Ancocus Creek, alias 
Northampton river, containing in the whole about 232 
acres, well watered, with about 40 acres of good 
meadow, and 20 acres more may be made ; a good 
house and barn, with an orchard that affords all kind 
of fruit, and about 100 acres of good wheat land. 
The whole adjoining the plantations of Aaron Wills, 
Samuel Haines, the Widow Busby, and Jonathan 
Woolman. 

The second tract is about a mile distance, from the 
other, situated and having every conveniency as the 
other, according to the quantity of acres, which are 
about 1 60 ; one half the purchase money to be paid 
down, and good security for the other half. The 
sale to begin at three o'clock in the afternoon. At- 
tendance will be given by the owner of the land. 

THOMAS ELTON. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 231, June 10 
to June 17, 1771. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward 
STRAYED or STOLEN on the 5th of June, but 
supposed to be stolen, from pashtre, a sprightly, high 
spirited, black mare, 8 or 9 years old, a natural pacer, 
about 14 hands and a half high, with a star and blaze 
in her forehead, carries her head pretty high, and is 
apt to be frightened at logs or stumps in the road ; she 
is very impatient of being touched with a curry comb 
or brush on her fore legs, which are so much too long 
for her neck, that she can neither feed at pasture, nor 
drink out of a shallow brook, without bending them. 
At the same time was taken from a neighbouring sta- 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 489 

ble, a saddle and bridle, but little worn, the saddle cloth 
green, bound with yellow, and had a small rent on one 
side. Whoever will bring the mare to the subscriber, 
in Burlington, shall have the above reward, with all 
reasonable charges, and One Dollaryfrr the saddle and 
bridle. RICHARD WELLS. 

TO BE SOLD. 

A HOUSE, orchard and garden, situate in the 
town of Bristol, on Delaware, and now occu- 
pied by Mrs. Allen. The house is good, and built of 
brick, lately repaired, and fit for the reception of 
lodgers, pleasantly and commodiously situated for 
the Bath, being on the road leading to it, The or- 
chard bears fine fruit, and is exceeding good mowing 
ground. The garden is in good order. The terms 
of payment will be made easy to the purchaser. Ap- 
ply to Dr. Bryant, near Trenton. 

Road's Town, Cumberland County, New-Jersey. 

To the PUBLIC in general. 

WHEREAS a certain Person, not an Inhabitant 
of said Town, hath, in a late Advertisement, taken 
upon him to Alter the former proper Name of said 
Town, and gave it the Name of King' s Town ; These 
are therefore to inform the Public in general, that 
the Inhabitants of Said Town disown and disclaim 
the Name of King's Town for that Village, because 
it has long since been known by the Name of Road's 
Town, and Deeds and other Writings of Conse- 
quence, have been these several Years past executed 
in said Town by that name. And as there is one or 



490 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

more Towns in said Province, known already by the 
Name of King's Town, the Inhabitants of this Place 
do unitedly join in maintaining and vindicating it, by 
the Name of Road's Town, not doubting but the 
Public will ever hereafter know and. own it by that 
Name. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in King- 
wood, in Hunterdon county, West New-Jersey, on 
the 2Oth day of May last, a Mulattoe fellow, named 
JACK, about 30 years of age, about 5 feet 5 or 6 
inches high, well set, yellow complexion, curled black 
hair, broad shouldered, bowlegged, and walks wide 
in his knees ; it is supposed that some body has 
wrote him a pass ; had on when he went away a 
good castor hat, a greyish brown coat, lined with 
white home made flannel, with carved flat metal but- 
tons, a red broadcloth jacket, without sleeves, buck- 
skin breeches, about half worn ; he took 2 pair of 
stockings, one pair new woollen stockings, mixed, of 
a lightish blue, the other pair worsted, of a lighter 
blue, and neats leather shoes, with brass flat square 
buckles. Whoever takes up said Mulattoe, and se- 
cures him in any of his Majesty's goals, so as his 
master may get him again, shall have FORTY SHIL- 
LINGS reward ; and reasonable charges, if brought 
home, paid by me, WILLIAM ALLEN. 

N. B. All masters of vessels, or others, are forbid 
to carry him off at their peril. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2216, June 13, 
1771. 

NEW-YORK, June 17. | For the Safety of Ves- 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 49 1 

sels coming into and going to Sea from the Port of 
New York, the Master and Wardens of the said 
Port, did last Week place a large Can Buoy on the 
South West Spit of the East Bank, in Eighteen Feet 
Water at low Water, bearing from the Light-House 
on Sandy-Hook, N. W. and by W. half W. and from 
the Bluff of Staten Island, making the Narrows S. 
half East. Vessels going down must keep in five 
Fathom W T ater, till they open the Buoy with the 
Point of Sandy-Hook, which will clear them on the 
Spit.- -They find that the first of the Flood sets about 
S. W. and by W. for two Hours, and is apt to draw 
Vessels over upon the West Bank. 

The Day after placing the Buoy, a Boat going 
down, was seen to run directly upon it, supposed in- 
tentionally to destroy it. If any Person will discover 
the Boatman to the Master and Wardens, that was 
so wickedly bent, on injuring the Mark set to pre- 
vent Vessels running into Danger, so that he may be 
punished, will receive the Thanks of the said Master 
and Wardens. 



Last Thursday sailed for London, the Ship Earl 
of Dunmore, Capt. Effingham Lawrence, with whom 
went Passengers, the Hon, Frederick Smyth, Esq; 
Chief Justice of the Province of New Jersey, Capt. 
Jones, of the Royal Train of Artillery, besides 1 1 
other Cabbin Passengers and 40 Men, belonging to 
the Train of Artillery. 

The next Day the Ship New York, Capt. Haight, 
also sailed for London, with a Number of Soldiers 



492 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

on board, who were discharged from his Majesty's 
29th Regiment, 1 now quartered in New-Jersey. 

New-York, June 14, /7//. 

RUNAWAY from William Bayard ' s farm, Hoobock, 
opposite the City oj New- York, a molatto servant man, 
named charles, about 40 years of age, five feet seven 
or eight inches high, much pock broken, his head part- 
ly grey, wears a cap sometimes ; speaks good English, 
rather thin, understands all kinds of farming business, 
is a good coachman, and gardner, and tends well on a 
gentleman, has carried a number of cloathes with him, 
so that he cannot well be described, as to what he wears ; 
passes it is said for a freeman, and has a forged pass 
with him. All masters of vessels are forbid to carry 
him off, and all taverns and other houses from enter- 
taining him. Whoever will secure the said fellow, in 
the nearest goal where he is taken up, and give the 
earliest intelligence to his master, shall have TEN DOL- 
LARS reward, and all reasonable charges paid by 

WILLIAM BAYARD. 

The New York Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1485, June 17, 1771. 

WHEREAS Phcebe, the Wife of the Subscriber, liv- 
ing in Middletown, in New-Jersey, hath behaved in 
such a Manner, as lays me under the Necessity of 
forwarning any Person from trusting her on my Ac- 
count, as I will pay no Debts of her contracting from 
this Date. EZEKIEL LEWIS. 

GEORGE SCHEMP, | SADDLER, at Pluckemin in 

i The 29th Regiment of Foot was in America, 1766-1773. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 493 

NEW-JERSEY, | MAKES and sells all sorts of saddles 
and chairs; . . . likewise has for sale, large hunting 
horse whips, small hunting, do. large and small twig 
whips, half hunting and thong whips, ladies whips, 
all sorts of silver plated spurs, steel spring spurs, 
horse brushes and sponges, curry combs and chair 
whips. 

- The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1025, June 17, 1771. 

i 

NEW-YORK, June i 7. | Last week was commit- 
ted to Hackinsack gaol, in New-Jersey, Abraham 
Bush, for the murder of his brother-in-law, named 
Van Dycke, on Friday the 7th instant: They had 
been a claming, in company with another man, and 
on their return home, a dispute arose between the 
two brothers, when Bush almost strangled VanDycke, 
and threw him out of the canoe in which they were, 
into Passaick river, after which Bush finding his 
brother was drowned, swam ashore, and took to the 
woods, but was soon after apprehended, and com- 
mitted to gaol: 'Tis said they were all intoxicated 
with liquor at the time. 

To the CREDITORS of JOHN BUDD. 

GENTLEMEN, 

I Find myself, once more under the disagreeable necessity of ad- 
dressing you in a public manner, to confute a virulent performance insert- 
ed in the Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 229, signed a Leading Man. On 
applying to the Printer, I find he justly required the author's name to be 
left with him, on which the name of Edward 7*est was given him. Al- 
though that piece is far from being a masterly performance, it is the gen- 
eral opinion of his acquaintance he never wrote a line of it ; and before I 
have done, I shall offer some reasons that convince me he never read it 
but as he had the honour of conveying it to the press, and leaving his 



494 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

name, I must treat him as a partner in the cruel confederacy against me. 
I was some time ago informed such a piece was preparing for the press, 
and that it was the production of a gentleman of the law ; the man who 
is mentioned in it as a person of distinguish d merit and abilities, and the 
aforesaid Mr. Test. -I had afterwards some conversation with the law- 
yer, which convinced me my information was true. After this introduc- 
tion, let me proceed to examine this child of the three fathers, this pro- 
duction of a triumvirate. It says, "an imposition on individuals is culpa- 
ble, but on the public unpardonable" -Had they acted with the least 
degree of honour and honesty, on this reflection, the pen would have been 
thrown aside, and they would not have attempted to impose their false- 
hoods on the public. The first thing they charge me with is, concealing 

my intentions by advertising them in a news-paper! This is a species 

of .fraud never before attempted and they are happy in the discovery. 
When I resided here five years before my publishing that advertisement, 
Bradford's paper was taken in S alem, and I suppose was at that time taken 
there ; if it was not in the town, it was in the neighborhood, and is gen- 
erally taken in Cumberland, which is but eight miles from the town of Sa- 
lem, from whence there is a free intercourse to Philadelphia and Cumber- 
land What pretence can they have for this assertion ? But to prove 

the fact false, Mr. James James, who resides in the neighbourhood, and 
kept a large store, was then a creditor, and actually took the very paper at 

that time, as Mr. Bradford's book will show. But suppose all they say 

on the subject to be true, it will appear to be a deception to your advan- 
tage ; for since my return I have paid a part of what I was indebted to 
you, and to every creditor in this county, except Mr. Wiet\J\ ; and as they 
say most of my creditors resided here, it will appear I have paid a part to 
a majority of my creditors. I have received of the auditors, and a num- 
ber of persons appearing on my old books, about . 10, and have paid them 

near .200 Perhaps it may be asked, why an equal distribution was 

not made? I answer, the sums were so small, that it would not have been 
worth your while to come together to receive your dividends ; and had I 
retained the money in my hands till I had a sum worth your acceptance, a 
much greater clamour would have been raised against me by these Gentle- 
men, who assume to themselves the character of your guardians ; I there- 
fore thought it best to pay the money out in small sums as fast as I re- 
ceive it, and intend to do so, till all my just debts are paid. They ask 
"what could induce men of character to act upon such principles." I can 
tell what induced men of their character to act upon their principles. Two 
of them are in my debt, and if they can force me out of the province, they 
will not only save themselves the money they are indebted to me, but one 
of them will recover a bond, which I am informed he has unjustly taken 

from my securities in the sheriff's office The third, who stiles himself 

a person of distinguished merit and abilities, expects to regain the business 
I have deprived him of For till he discovered the invaluable secret, the 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 495 

world was quite ignorant of his superior merit and abilities ; and here I 
cannot help acknowledging the favour he has done mankind, for the pres- 
ent generation would have died in ignorance, and posterity would have 
had no traces of his superiority, had he not, under the name of a Leading 
Man, published it in a news-paper. They say, in my petition to the As- 
sembly, I offered as a reason to induce them to a compliance, that I would 

be aiding and assisting to the auditors appointed to settle my affairs. 

In March 1768, I gave in a petition to the Assembly at Amboy ; but as I 

had not advertised it in the public papers, no notice was taken of it 

What that petition contained, I cannot say; it was drawn in a hurry, so 
that I had not time to copy or correct it but that Assembly was dissolved, 
and a new one called, who never saw it, or, at least, could not in their 
then present legislative capacity take any notice of it ; but if that petition 
set forth my intention of assisting the auditors (which I really believe it 
did not) perhaps this was one reason why I, at that time, did not obtain 
the act I prayed for. In October 1769, I published an advertisement, 
which may be seen in Bradford's paper It sets forth, that I am sorry to 
acquaint you, that you are likely to receive no part of your debts from me, 
unless I am permitted to return to Salem, and take my affairs into my own 
hands, &c. &c.- -I gave in a petition, addressed to the legislative body 
of this province, which after a preamble, set forth in express terms That 
"I humbly requested the legislative body to pass an act, to authorize me 
to come and reside in the province, free from arrests for the term of five 
years ; to take my affairs into my hands ; to collect in the money due to 
me and pay my debts." These are the words of the petition. For the 
truth of this assertion, I humbly beg leave to appeal to all the honourable 
members of the Assembly, to the minutes of the house, a copy of which I 
have obtained, signed by the clerk, and the printed votes, which are in the 
hands of several hundred of the principal inhabitants of this province, and 
are in the following words, viz. 

" Tuesday, October 26, 1769. 

" A petition was presented to the house iromjokn Budd, formerly of Salem, setting 
forth the particular circumstances of his case, and praying the legislature w,ould grant 
him permission to come and reside in this province free from arrests, for the term of five 
years, in order to collect in his debts, and settle his affairs ; which was read and ordered 
a second reading." 

Nov. i, it is likewise mentioned in the same minutes, and to the same 

effect. Here I might with truth and justice retort upon them for their 

abuse of me, but it does not become a person in my unhappy situation. 
But, was it not using Mr. Test very ill to suffer him to leave his name to 
such a performance? Had he taken the trouble of reading it, I am sure 
be must have shuddered at the thoughts of asserting such flagrant untruths, 
that were liable to be contradicted by the public records of the province, 
and by such good authority; but whoever reads the reflection they cast on 
my books which they say were so irregularly kept and posted, will readily 
acquit him of all suspicion of knowing what the narrative contained, when 



496 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

they are informed, that this identical Edward 7'esf, either as my clerk, or 
partner, posted or revised them; and most of them now appear in his hand 
writing. 

At the last sitting of the Assembly at Amboy, Mr. Test, against whom 
I had a suit depending, petitioned for a repeal of the aforesaid act, so far 
as it affected him, but did not meet with the success he expected. Some 
time afterwards, I acquainted Mr. 7"est, that I intended to advertise my 
intention of petitioning the legislature to continue the act in my favour as 
long as I could pay .200 per annum; and that as difficulties would aitend 
a trial in court, I intended to remove the suit into chancery. To prevent 
an equitable determination of the matter, he thought it best to try to drive 
me out of the province, and accordingly went to a number of my creditors, 
and by false representations got some of them to sign a petition to repeal 
the act made in my favour. This was done in so secret a manner, that I 
had no notice of it till I came to Burlington. As I went up, I put the ad- 
vertisement in the Pennsylvania Chronicle, that gave my debtors and the 
person of distinguished merit and abilities such umbrage ; this appeared in 
the paper two days after Mr. Test's petition had been given into the 

house. Public business did not permit us to be heard that sitting. - 

On my return, I drew up a petition to the legislative body in the following 
words : 

" The humble Petition of the Creditors of JOHN BUDD, 
"Sheweth, 

" That your petitioners have seen an advertisement in one of the public papers, dated 
April 22, 1771, signed by John Budd, and pray that an act may pass in his favour for the 
term of seven years, agreeable to said advertisement ; provided Samuel Shivers is ex- 
cluded from receiving any part of the 200 mentioned in said advertisement and your 
petitioners, as in duty bound, shall ever pray," &c. 

This I have got signed by a great majority of my creditors in number 
and value. It is signed by Mr. Shivers and most of those that signed Mr. 

Test's petition I believe they would all have signed it, had it not been 

pretended by the junto, that it would appear double, to sign for and then 
against the same thing; but their signing cannot be conceived in that 
light ; it will appear by the petitions that they were dissatisfied with mat- 
ters as they then stood.- After signing Mr. Tesfs petition I made them 
an offer, with which they were contented. 

Mr. Shivers is the .2000 relation mentioned by them, who has signed 
away his right. I am just returned from waiting on Mr. Hampton, the 
.600 relation who refused to sign as a "creditor -Perhaps he thinks I 
may prefer my creditors that have used me with less severity to him ; but 
I believe, on farther consideration, he will prefer the possibility < f being 
last paid, to driving me from the province, and a certainty of losing his 
money. Thus I think, the objections of the two creditors, who are allied 
to me by marriage only, will cease. They intimate, by way of memoran- 
dum, that I have no character to lose- -They really have characters, but 
their characters are such that all their relations, and every friend to the 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 497 

rising generation, sincerely wish they would lose. As to what they say 

of the opinion the people generally entertained of me on my return, I 
was generally treated with respect, and generally employed, to their mor- 
tificationa proof of it is, my being able to make you an offer of .200 
per anmim. This seems an oblique reflection on most of the principal 
people in the county, that they have no regard for any quality but that of 
telling a plausible story. They say I never was in affluent circumstances. 
I leave that to those who formerly knew me, and those who are possessed 
of my late independent fortune, to answer ; tho' they seem to contradict 
their own assertions, when they bid me reflect on what objects I lavished 

money on So far as this affects the Gentleman of Superior merit and 

abilities, they are right, and I humbly beg your pardon, and the pardon of 
my country, for introducing into a higher sphere of life such an OBJECT as 
a schoolmaster in Penn's Neck ! I took him into my house, he eat at my 
table, had a horse to ride, and servants to attend him I suffered him to 
read my books, and tried to make him acquainted with my business, for 
which he did not give me, nor did I expect, any consideration ; only a 
promise that he would not set up in the same place with me. In about a 
year, he had an offer that pleased him better, and left me : After that, 
he went into the army, and on his discharge, he came immediately here, 
with an intention of taking the bread out of my mouth, for generously 
putting it into his. In my absence he took some of my effects into his 
hands, which had been taken in execution by one of my creditors. On 
my return, the creditor gave me an order for them, which he refused ans" 
wering, altho' solicited in the most humble manner, till I was forced to 
bring a suit against him, and obtained a judgment, on which he gave me 
a part of what was in being, and a trifling consideration for what he had 
used, which was not a tenth part of their value. I have reason to believe, 
had it not been for his care to prevent it, Mr. Test would have done me 
justice without a suit. Thus am I rewarded for the favours I have done 
him ; and had it not been for him, not a dog in Salem would have moved 
his tongue against me. As to the . 700 per annum they intimate I can 
make in a neighbouring government can I reside there free from arrests? 
Or would not that malice that persecutes me here, follow me there? Or 
will they openly avow that to drive me from this place, in order to serve 
themselves, is all they want? As to the construction they, at my return, 
put upon the act, and their groundless reflections on the legislative body, 
they will not bear a repetition. As to my boasting, and putting my credi- 
tors at defiance, I appeal to you, Gentlemen! whether ever I said or did 
a thing that can bear that construction ? My deportment has been res- 
pectful and civil to all mankind, humble and submissive to you My 

language has been, / cannot at this time pay you ; but when it is in my 
power, I will do it with pleasure ; and my actions have fully correspond- 
ed with my words.- -In their introduction they say, they could not pass 

over, unnoticed, the artful untruths contained in my advertisement 

32 



498 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77I 

What effects, except what I have enumerated could the advertisements 
have to injure you, as they call it? and induce them to run into such a flow 
of illiberal and unjust reflections. Oh stay ! they themselves account for 
it. They say "it is natural for most men who are subject to particular 
failings, to judge partially of the rest of mankind." This unfortunately 
happens to be their case. "Subtil and possessed of that species of low 
"cunning, which subjects men to the contempt of the honest and ingenu- 
"ous, they have, with the utmost effrontery, charged me with evasions 
"that are inconsistent and groundless." I hope I may be pardoned this 
language, as it is copied from their own letter, to shew that most of what 
they say is only sound instead of sense as the same language may suit to 
any other person, on almost any occasion, and really suits, addressed to 
them here. Most of it may be copied off, and kept either in the office or 
shop, under the title of REFINED BILLINGSGATE LANGUAGE, proper on any 
occasion. After proving almost every assertion in their piece false, by 
such incontestible evidence, you need not wonder, if I do not throw away 
my time and your money in answering any thing they may write in future. 
I think it my duty to acknowledge the kind reception I have met with 
from you, your goodness in employing me, a'nd giving me an opportunity 
of paying you ; and I hope the mutual confidence that has subsisted be- 
tween us, will not be interrupted by this designing junto. I shall wait on 
the rest of my creditors before the next sitting of the Assembly ; and 
make no doubt but I shall get their hands to the petition ; as most men 
obey the dictates of humanity, but never more readily than when it is 
their interest to do it. 

I am, Gentlemen, 

With the greatest respect, 
Your much obliged 

And very humble servant, 

Salem, June 12, 1771. JOHN BUDD. 

P. S. I have purposely avoided mentioning the state of the [Pcontro- 
versy] between me and Mr. Test, as it might be supposed I intended to 
prejudice the arbitrators we left our affairs to, against him ; and am 
sorry he has suffered his name to be put to a performance that obliges 
me to mention him with disrespect. J. B. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 232, June 17 
to June 24, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, JUNE 20. | Last Week was commit- 
ted to Hackensack Gaol, in New-Jersey, Abraham 
Bush, for the Murder of his Brother-in-Law, named 
Van Dycke, on Friday the 7th Instant : They had 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 499 

been a claming, in Company with another Man, and 
on their Return home, a Dispute arose between the 
two Brothers, when Bush almost strangled Van Dycke> 
and threw him out of the Canoe in which they were, 
into Passaick River, after which Bush finding his 
Brother was drowned, swam ashore, and took to the 
Woods, but was soon after apprehended, and com- 
mitted to Gaol : ' Tis said they were all intoxicated 
with Liquor at the Time. 

Doctor GRAHAM, 

TAKES this Method to thank the respectable In- 
habitants of Newark and Elizabeth-Town, in East 
New-Jersey, for the Opportunities .they have been 
pleased to favour him with, of shewing his Skill and 
Abilities. 

The Inhabitants of British America in general, may 
depend on his best Endeavours in their Behalf. Suc- 
cessful practice, low Charges, Moderation and Atten- 
tion, to even the poorest Individual ; added to his 
having had more Experience in the Disorders of the 
Eyes and Ears, than perhaps any Practioner on this 
vast Continent, induces him to hope for some Share 
of Favour of the Public ; who easily will distinguish 
true Merit, from pretended Knowledge. The Dr. 
intends to beat Brunswick the first of next Month. 

Staten-Island, 1 7th June, 1771. 

The New York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1485, June 20, 1771. 

To be SOLD, by private SALE, 
A LOT of GROUND, with two frame tenements 
thereon, situated on the west side of Strawberry Al- 




500 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ley, adjoining the house where John Lukens now 
dwells, the lot is 32 feet front on said alley, and in 
depth 82 feet, subject to a small ground-rent of Three 
Shillings sterling per annum ; one half of the purchase 
money to be paid on signing the deeds, the other 
half in one year, with interest, and giving security, if 
required. For terms, enquire of Sharp Delaney, in 
Philadelphia, or of the subscriber, in the town of Sa- 
lem, West New-Jersey. JOSEPH SMITH. 
N. B. The title is indisputable. 

T") UN away on the iith of this instant June, at 
JL\ night, from the subscribers, living in Mannington, 
in Salem county, two servant men, one named JAMES 
HOWARD, born in England, about 22 years of age, 
and about 5 feet 7 inches high, yellowish coloured 
hair, very talkative, and much inclined to drink ; had 
on, and took with him, a snuff coloured home made 
cloth coat, 3 jackets, i of white flannel, i of home- 
spun linsey, and the other nankeen, two shirts and 
trousers, old shoes, and a pair of worsted stockings. 
The other an Englishman, named JOHN SPENCE, 
sloop shouldered, with a hump on his back, about 27 
years of age, and about 6 feet 3 inches high, brown- 
ish hair and complexion ; took with him a large lapel- 
led grey coloured cloth jacket, lined with striped lin- 
sey, patched at the elbows with cloth of a different 
colour, two shirts, one fine, the other coarse linen, 
filled with tow, and trousers of the same, old shoes, 
patched with saddle leather, with a pair of narrow 
rimmed silver buckles, marked M. C. and an old 
striped silk handkerchief, with a hole in the middle ; 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. $Ol 

it is very probable he may wear a green coat, as there 
is one taken out of the house, and he is supposed to 
be the thief. Whoever takes up said servants, and 
secures them, so as their masters may have them 
again, shall have FOUR POUNDS reward, or FORTY 
SHILLINGS for each, and reasonable charges, paid by 

WILLIAM SMITH, and ADAM COOK. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2217, June 20, 
1771- 

NEW- YORK, June 1 7. | For the benefit of vessels 
coming into, and going to sea from, the port of New- 
York. The masters and wardens of the said port, 
did last week place a large Can Buoy on the South 
West Spit of the East Bank, in eighteen feet water 
at low water, bearing from the Light-house on Sandy 
Hook N. W. and by W. half W. and from the Bluff 
of Staten Island, making the Narrows S. half E. 
Vessels going down must keep in 5 fathom water, 
till they open the Buoy with the point of Sandy Hook, 
which will clear them of the Spit. They find that the 
first of the flood sets about S. W. and by W. for two 
hours, and is apt to draw vessels over upon the West- 
Bank. 

Burlington, June 20, 1771. 

The Creditors of WILLIAM HEWLINGS, jun. 
(late of Trenton, Shopkeeper,) are requested to meet 
at the house of JOSEPH FERGUSON, Inn Keeper, 
in this city, on SATURDAY the 3d of August next, 
in order that they may receive their dividends of the 
moneys, arising from the sale of lands granted by 
WILLIAM HEWLINGS the elder, for the use of 



502 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the Creditors of his Son William. As the Trustees 
have the Cash already by them, the Creditors are de- 
sired to take notice, that no other dividend will be 

made. 

ABRAHAM HEWLINGS, ) T 
JAMESKINSEY, j irustees. 

TO BE SOLD, | By the subscriber a Plantation in 
Lebanon, in the county of Hunterdon and province 
of West New-Jersey, near the Union Furnace, con- 
taining 203 acres of excellent good land, of which 
there are about 60 or 70 acres of upland clear, and 
1 5 or 20 acres of valuable meadow, all which he will 
sell very cheap, and give indisputable titles for them. 
Any person inclining to purchase any of the above 
described houses, lots, or plantations, by paying one 
half of the money down, may, if he pleases, have a 
term of years to pay the other half in, on paying in- 
terest, and giving security, if required 

PETER WIKOFF. 

The Pennsylvania^ Journal, No. 1489,^^^20, 
1771. 

To be SOLD, or LETT, immediately. 

A Small convenient neat House with a Barn, Sta- 
ble, Garden and about 2^ Acres of good Pas- 
ture, the Property and lately occupied by Doctor 
George Pugh, at Elizabeth-Town, New-Jersey. For 
further Particulars apply to Edward Agar, Druggist 
in New- York, or to Mr. Joseph Jelf, at Elizabeth- 
Town. 

TEN POUNDS REWARD. 
STOLEN out of the Stable of the subscriber, at New- 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 503 

ark, in New-Jersey, the last night, a certain sorrel 
horse, about or near 14 hands and an half high, either 
seven or eight years old : He has a white streak 
down his face, and one or more of his legs are white ; 
he is a short well-set horse and fat, and was branded, 
I think, on the near fore shoulder, with the letters 
H. M. or I. M. He can pace, trot, and gallop, has 
good spirits, but naturally carries his head low. 
Whoever takes up and secures the horse with the 
thief, so that he may be brought to Justice, shall have 
the above reward of .10, and for the horse or thief 
alone, the sum of ^.5, paid by the subscriber. 

WILLIAM BURNET. 

Newark, June 22d, 1771. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1026, June 24, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, June 24. | The uth inst. the Ship 
New-York, Capt. Height, sailed from hence for Lon- 
don, with a Number of Soldiers who had been dis- 
charged (as unfit for Service,) from his Majesty's 2Qth 
Regiment of Foot, now quartered in the Jerseys, (as 
was mentioned in our last,) but on the i8th, in Lat. 
29, 18, about 1 60 Miles to the Eastward, they had 
an excessive hard Gale of Wind at E. S. E. when 

* 

the Ship sprung a Leak, put them under the Necess- 
ity to scud under the Foresail for 14 Hours, the Sea 
running very high, and breaking over them continu- 
ally, obliged them to heave overboard all their Casks 
of Water in order to clear the Deck ; the Ship mak- 
ing eighteen inches Water every Hour, they keeping 
the Pumps continually going, till she arrived here on 



504 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Saturday last. The Day after the Gale (Wednes- 
day last) one of the Soldiers, named Donagan, (who 
it was imagined had been disordered in his Senses) 
came from below to the larboard Chains, and jump- 
ed overboard ; one of the Sailors hove a Rope to 
him, which he laid hold off, and was desired to hold 
fast, till they could give them some other Assistance, 
but he threw it from him with great Disdain, at the 
same Time endeavouring to put his Head under 
Water, and in a few Moments after he was drowned. 
'Tis said the Ship's Cargo must be unloaded be- 
fore she can proceed on her Voyage. 

The New York Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 

No. 1468, June 24, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA. | On Saturday afternoon last, sev- 
en people who were making hay in a meadow the 
plantation of Samuel Crips, about one mile from 
Mount Holley, New- Jersey, on the approach of a 
gust took shelter under a tree, when one of them 
named Stewart, being at a little distance from the 
rest, was struck with lightning ; the other six ran to 
him, thinking him dead, when by a second clap they 
were all knocked down, and four of them, viz. Isaac 

Bishop, John Parker, Stewart, brother to him 

that was first struck, and one other were killed on 
the spot ; the other three, viz. the first struck Stew- 
art, Norton, and one other, are likely to re- 
cover, tho' much hurt. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1490, June 27, 

1771. 

To be SOLD at PUBLIC VENDUE, 
on second Day, the 2Qth of the 7th Month (common- 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 505 

ly called July) at the late dwelling-house of John 
Hatkinson, deceased, in Mount-Holly, Burlington 
county, West-Jersey. 

THE well known GRIST-MILL in said Town. It 
is situated on a never failing stream of water, with 
three water wheels, and three pair of stones, six boult- 
ing-mills, two of which go and hoist by water, for mer- 
chant work. The said mill has a very large share of 
country work, and is well situated for merchant work, 
as it is navigable up to the town. Also a new bake- 
house, near said mill, with two ovens, and a large stable 
adjoining the mill, convenient for ten horses, and other 
buildings, with a lot of good meadow, containing about 
three acres, on which the said mill and buildings stand. 
Also 5-Sths of a saw-mill, near the said grist-mill. 
The two to be sold together. The purchaser, by pay- 
ing one half of the money on receiving a title, may have 
twelve months credit for the remainder, without inter- 
est. 

.At the same time and place will be sold a valuable 
lot of \^&N\5, fronting the mill-street, about 150 feet in 
front, very convenient for the purchaser to build on. 
Also a PLANTATION near the said town, containing 
about 140 acres, 50 of which are meadow, in good 
bank, and a good frame house, cellar and kitchen, with 

an excellent spaw spring besides other lots in and 

about said town. The conditions will be made known 
of the whole at the time of sale. ELIZABETH HATKIN- 
SON, Executrix, JOHN HINCHMAN, PETER HARVEY, Ex- 
ecutors. 

TO BE SOLD, 
THAT valuable plantation, well known by the name 



506 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/7l 

of Breeze Ridge, an exceeding pleasant and healthy 
situation for a country seat, being in the township of 
Northampton, and county of Burlington, about ij 
miles from Philadelphia, and j from the town of 
Mount-holly, lying in the forks of Rancocus-creek, ad- 
joining both, branches, and near the great road between 
Philadelphia and Mount-holly aforesaid ; containing 
about 500 acres of land, 80 whereof improved good 
meadow, under good bank, and about 20 acres more 
may be made ; 150 acres of upland cleared, and in 
fence ; a good large dwelling-house, neatly finished off, 
with two large kitchens, out- houses, milk- house, cheese- 
house, and every conveniency suitable for a dairy ; a 
pump of excellent good water at the door, with a large 
new barn, granary, stables, cow and waggon-houses, 
two bearing orchards of good fruit, and a large gar- 
den paled in. The said plantation will be sold togeth- 
er or in two parts, as may best suit the purchasers, the 
meadow and upland lying convenient to be divided 
into two parts. Any person inclining to purchase the 
same, may apply to Sarah Bispham, of the city of 
Philadelphia, near the New-ferry, John Hinchman, 
Esq ; of the county of Gloucester, or John Bispham, 
of the town of Mount-holly, near the premises afore- 
said, for further particulars, and conditions of sale. 
The above is part of the real estate of Thomas Bisp- 
ham, late deceased, and to be sold by SARAH BISPHAM, 
Executrix, JOHN HINCHMAN and JOHN BISPHAM, Ex- 
ecutors. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2218, June 27, 
1771. 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 507 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

STOLEN, on Friday night, the i4th instant, out 
of the pasture of Isaac Van Campen, Esq ; at the 
Head-quarters, near to Minasinks, a certain black 
HORSE, about 7 years old, between 14 and 15 hands 
high, with a bright star on his forehead ; his off hind 
foot is white to his pastern, his near hind hoof is 
white, and a few white hairs ; his hoofs are cracked 
or gouged, on account of his being hoof-bound ; he is 
a natural pacer, but has been learned to trot a slow 
travel, and is a little cat hammed, otherwise well 
built. Any person or persons apprehending said 
horse and thief, and securing the thief in any goal, 
so that he may be brought to justice, and bringing 
the horse to Duncan Leech in Spruce-street, between 
Fourth and Fifth-streets ; or to Francis M'Shane, 
near the Union Iron-works, West New-Jersey ; or to 
the above-mentioned Van Campen, shall have the 
above reward ; or Fifty Shillings for the horse only, 
paid by BAR. M'SHANE. 

N. B. Said thief is supposed to have gone towards 
Virginia. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2218, June 27, 
1771. 

ALL Persons indebted to the Estate of JAMES 
BRUCE, late of Perth-Amboy, deceased, are desired 
to come and settle their Accounts on or before the 
fifth Day of August next, at the House of Peter 
Smitzer, or they will be sued without further Notice. 
And all persons who have any Demands against the 
said JAMES BRUCE, are desired to bring in their 



508 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Accounts, that they may be adjusted. 

PETER SMITZER, Administrator. 
WINNAFRED BRUCE, Administratrix. 
Perth Amboy, June 26, 1771. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1469, July i, 1771. 

To be sold at private Sale. 

A Dwelling- House and small farm of about 55 acres, 
situate at Pacquanack in Morris County , former- 
ly belonging to Lewis Stewart, and now in his Possess- 
ion ; there is a good barn, Orchard, and a Quantity 
of Meadow-ground on the Premises, and more can be 
made at small Expence. It's situation is on a public 
Road, and very advantageous for a Tavern keeper, 
Merchant or tradesman. And also to be sold at pri- 
vate Sale, another Tract of valuable Wood-land, con- 
taining about jo Acres, within about two Miles of 
Morris- Town, that formerly belonged to the said Lew- 
is Stewart. These tracts will be sold together or sep- 
arately, as it may best suit the Purchaser, and an in- 
disputable Title given by the Subscribers. The Terms 
may be known by enquiring of Benjamin Kissam, Esq; 
Attorney at Law, at New- York, or the Subscribers at 
Stratford, in Connecticut. 

ELIZABETH VAN DYCK, 
HENRY VAN DYCK. 

A THEFT! | ON Saturday Evening the 2 id ul- 
timo, about 9 o Clock, was stolen from the House of 
James Browne, a Private in the XXVIth Regiment 
of Foot, commanded by Col. Templer. 

Two Jersey Bills of Six Pounds each, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 509 

One half Johannes, 

And about 140. small Silver. 

Also a small Beaver Hat, with a Sett Buckle. 
Whoever will make discovery of the Thief, or Thieves 
so that he or they may be brought to Jitstice, shall re- 
ceive Jive dollars Reward, by inquiring of the Printer 

for JAMES BROWNE. 

POWLES-HOOK RACES. ' 

To be run for on the NEW COURSE at Powles | 
Hook, on Tuesday, the 27th day oi" AUGUST, | 

A PURSE of One Hundred Pounds, \ Free for any 
horse, mare, or gelding carrying weight for age ; four 
years old to carry seven stone ten pounds ; five years 
old, eight stone eight pounds ; six years old, nine 
stone three pounds ; and full aged, nine stone ten 
pounds ; fillies allowed four pounds. N. B. If any 
person chuses to start a horse for the above purse, 
not full blood, shall have the usual allowance. 

And on WEDNESDAY, 

A PURSE OF FIFTY POUNDS, j Free for any 
horse, mare, or gelding, not thoroughbred, carrying 
weight for age and blood, fillies allowed three pounds; 
three years old, quarter blood, to carry 6 stone 4 
pounds, - all that are above a quarter, that is not 
half, runs for a quarter ; three years old, half blood, 6 
stone 8 pounds - - all that is above half blood, and not 
three quarters, runs for half blood ; three years old, 
three quarter blood, 6 stone 1 1 pounds, - - all that 
is above three quarters blood, runs for three quarters ; 
four years old, quarter blood, 7 stone 4 pounds ; four 
years old, half blood 7 stone 8 pounds ; four years 



510 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

old, three quarters blood, 7 stone i 2 pounds ; five 
years old, quarter blood, 8 stone 4 pound ; five years 
old, half blood, 8 stone 8 pounds ; five years old, 
three quarters, 8 stone i 2 pounds ; six years, quart- 
er blood, 9 stone 2 pounds ; six years old, half blood, 
9 stone 6 pounds ; six years old, three quarter blood, 
9 stone 10 pounds ; aged, quarter blood, 9 stone 1 1 
pounds; aged, half blood, 10 stone; aged, three 
quarters, 10 stone 5 pounds. The best two of three, 
three mile heats. Not less than three reputed run- 
ning horses to start ; horses to be enter'd the day 
before running, paying Five Pounds entrance money 
for the ^.100, or double at the post; and Fifty Shill- 
ings for the ^.50. No persons to be concerned in 
a confederacy in running their horses together, or in 
dividing the plate : 

Such matters to be determined by the judges. 

N. B. The day appointed, not being fair, then the 
next fair day following. 

Elisabeth-Town, June 17, 1771. 

WHEREAS I have been this Day compel' d by Dav- 
id Brant, to marry Catharine, his Daughter, in conse- 
quence of which, I shall allow her a separate Mainten- 
ance, in all Respects suitable to her Degree : I there- 
fore warn all Persons from crediting her on my Ac- 
count, as I am determined not to pay any Debts of her 
Contracting, of which all Persons are desired to take 
Notice. JOHN D. CAMP, jun. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1027, July i, 1771. 

RAN away from John Forman, of Freehold, in the 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 511 

county of Monmouth, in East New-Jersey, a servant 
man, named THOMAS BRUFT, a High Dutchman, about 
5 feet 6 inches high, middling well set, very much 
marked with the small-pox. Had on, when he went 
away, a brown homespun coat and jacket, a pair of 
buckskin breeches, a pair of blue and white mixed 
stockings, a pair of good shoes, and a large castor 
hat. Whoever takes up and brings the said servant- 
man to me, shall have FORTY SHILLINGS re- 
ward, and all reasonable charges, paid, by 

July 2, 1771. JOHN FORMAN. 

Philadelphia, July 8. | Last Saturday se'nnight 
seven Men and a Boy being at Work in a Field near 
Mount- Holly, a Flash of Lightning struck the Lad, 
and stunned him in such a Manner, that it was doubt- 
ful whether he would live ; the Men immediately car- 
ried him under a Tree at a little ) distance, and began 
to rub him, and tender him all the Assistance they 
could, when another Flash killed four of the Men out- 
right, and the other three were struck down, and very 
much hurt, but we hear they, with the Lad, are likely 
to recover. 

f 
I 

CUSTOM-HOUSE PHILADELPHIA, 
CLEARED. Sloop Sally, T. Albertson, Arnboy. 

To the CREDITORS of JOHN BUDD. 

GENTLEMEN, 

To silence the unnecessary clamour that is raised 
against me, by a set of interested artful designing 
men, and to convince you that my intentions are 
honest, if you will appoint a person to take my old 



512 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

books into his hands, I will account with him for what 
I have received on them, and make it appear that I 
have paid out a far greater sum than I have received, 
or will make up the deficiency in cash. I will also 
assign to them ^.300, on my new books, provided 
the accounts are not sued till they have been due one 
year and I will give my bond to pay . 100 annual- 
ly for seven years, and make good all deficiencies to 
my securities, which money may be equally divided 
among my creditors, except my father-in-law, Mr. 
Shivers, who consents to be excluded, if you will give 
me a discharge. This, Gentlemen, is not only giv- 
ing up my all, but binding myself to you for seven 
years or I will sign over my old book, and account 
for what I have received, as above, and comply with 
the advertisement in the paper of the 22d of April 
or any other terms you please to propose that is in 
my power. 

I am your very humble servant, 
Salem, June 30, 1771 JOHN BUDD. 

J*J In my last address to my creditors, in the Chron- 
icle, No. 232, thro' hurry, several errors escaped ob- 
servation and correction but I think it only necessary 
to mention the following, and leave the rest to the can- 
did reader In p. 88, col. i, / 48, instead of the 
words, appearing on my old books, read as appears 
by my old books. J. B. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 234, July i 
to July 8, 1771. 

Mr. PRINTER, 

FOR the Benefit of the Public, please to insert in 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 513 

your next Paper, the following Description of two 
Sorts of Counterfeit 16/3 Jersey Bills, viz. Dates of 
both are December 31, 1763, and signed Richard 
Smith, John Johnston, and S. Skinner. The one 
Sort can easily be discovered by the Letter i being 
left out of the Word Fifteen ; the other is extremely 
well done, both the Signing and Printing, and would 
easily deceive Persons that were not on their guard, 
there being no material odds except on the Back of 
the Bill, in the three Crowns at the bottom of the 
Sage Leaf.- -The middle Crown in the true ones is 
smaller than the other two, in the false ones the three 
Crowns are of one Size, and the Crotchets are the 
sixteenth Part of an Inch wider apart than the true 
ones, besides this there seems to have been Pains 
taken to srnoak and rub the Bills, so as to make them 
appear old, which makes the Signing appear fresher 
and blacker than it should do, and not of a Piece 
with the rest of the Bill. 

-The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1487, July 4, 1771. 

RUN away from sEtna Furnace, in the Jerseys, 
the 22d of June last, from the subscribers, two servant 
lads, one named WILLIAM HOPKINS, aged about 20 
years, about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high, of a dark com- 
plexion, and has a down look ; had on an iron collar, 
a check shirt, a pair of tarred trowsers, a brown 
double-breasted jacket, lined with homespun stripe, with 
brass buttons, an under jacket, without sleeves, much 
darned on the back, a new ozenbrigs frock, without 
buttons or holes, had neither hat nor shoes. The oth- 

33 



5 14 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

er, named JOHN, has lost the sight of one eye, aged 
about 21 years, about 5 feet 4 or 5 inches high, of a 
light complexion, pretty talkative ; his apparel is not 
known, for as it is thought he has changed his clothes. 
Whoever takes up the said servants, and seciires them 
in any of his Majesty's goals, so that their masters 
may have them again, shall have FIVE POUNDS, 
and all reasonable charges, paid by 

CHARLES READ, 

June 28, 1771 WILLIAM EVENS. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2219, July 4, 
1771. 

Perth-Amboy, July 4, 1771. 

FIFTEEN POUNDS REWARD. | Run-away 
from the subscriber, in the month of October, 1762, 
a Mulatto Woman Slave, named VIOLET, about 35 
years of age ; she is very active and rather tall, 
some time afterwards she was seen in company with 
one James Lock, somewhere on the Susquehanna, 
and by information was apprehended and committed 
to gaol, in the year 1764, in Fredericks-Town, in Ma- 
ryland, on suspicion of having runaway. From that 
gaol she was reported to have made an escape, and 
about two months ago, was discovered about fifteen 
miles from Ball-Fryer's-ferry, in Fredericks county, 
in Maryland aforesaid, where she had three children. 
Edward Bonnel, of Monmouth County, in the prov- 
ince of New-Jersey, was formerly her owner, and af- 
ter his decease she was sold by his executors to the 
subscriber. Any person who may take her up must 
secure her strictly, or she will certainly escape again, 
being remarkably artful. Whoever delivers her and 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 515 

her children to the subscriber, or THOMAS 
M'KEAN, Esq; in New Castle on Delaware, shall 
receive the above reward, or TEN POUNDS for the 
wench only, and reasonable charges from 

PHILIP KEARNEY. 

Tke Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1491 July 4, 

1771. 

New-York, June 14, 1771. 

RUN-AWAY from William Bayard's farm, Hoo- 
bock, opposite the city of New- York, a mulatto ser- 
vant man, named CHARLES, about 40 years of age, 5 
feet 7 or 8 inches high, much pock-broken, his head 
partly grey, wears a cap sometimes ; speaks good 
English, rather thin, understands all kinds of farming 
business, is a good coachman and gardner, and tends 
well on a Gentleman ; has carried a number of 
clothes with him, so that he cannot well be described, 
as to what he wears ; passes, it is said, for a free- 
man, and has a forged pass with him. All masters 
of vessels are forbid to carry him off, and all tav- 
erns, and other houses from entertaining him. Who- 
ever will secure the said fellow in the nearest goal 
where he is taken up, and give the earliest intelli- 
gence to his master, shall have TEN DOLLARS reward, 
and all reasonable charges, paid by 

WILLIAM BAYARD. 

The New York Gazette; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1028, July 8, 1771. 

LIST of LETTERS, remaining in the POST- OFFICE, 

New York, July 5, 1771. 
(B) Andrew Brannah, Middletown, Jerseys, 2. 






516 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

(G) Lemuel Gusten, Middletown, New-Jersey. 
(L) Richard Lawrence, Shrewsbury. 
(S) Robert Smith, Little-Egg-Harbour. 
(W) Mr. Wolley, Shrewsbury. 
(Y) Jeremiah Young, at Cohansey. 

RUN-away from the Subscriber, the seventeenth 
of last June, an Indian Servant Man named John 
Hickuen, about 5 Feet 5 or 6 Inches high, black 
Complexion, his Hair tied, and cut on the fore Part 
of his Head ; took with him when he went away, a 
new brown Cloth Coat, a green knap'd Waistcoat 
lapell'd, homespun Trowsers, white Shirt, speckled 
Stockings, an old Hat, and sundry Shirts and Trows- 
ers, &c. Whoever secures the said Servant, so that 
I may have him again, shall have Five Dollars Re- 
ward, and reasonable Charges paid by 

ROBERT R. CROWE, at South Amboy. 

N. B. All Masters of Vessels are forbid to take 
him off at their Peril. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1028, July 8, 1771. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, PHILADELPHIA, | INWARD 
ENTRIES. | Sloop Two Brothers, J. Allen, Salem. 

TWELVE DOLLARS Reward. 

RAN away from the subscribers, the 2d day of 
July instant, a Negro man slave, who calls himself 
by the several names of James, Gaul, Mingo, Mink, 
and Jem ; his real name is JEM ; he is about 5 feet 
6 inches high, thick set, and not very bl.ck; he has 
a scar in his face, and is about 35 years old ; he took 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 517 

with him two oznabrigs shirts and trowsers, a broad- 
cloth coat, a coating waistcoat, a felt hat, and a vio- 
lin. He is supposed to have gone off with a certain 
PATRICK JOHNSON, who was born in Ireland, about 5 
feet 10 inches high, and 30 years old ; he is thin in 
flesh, having been lately sick ; had on, and took with 
him, one new check and two new oznabrigs shirts 
and trowsers, a felt hat, narrow-brim'd, and bound 
with brown ferreting, an old fustian waistcoat with- 
out sleeves, fine short brown hair, and is much ad- 
dicted to strong liquors. They stole, and took with 
them, a large brown Horse, about 1 2 years old, near 
15 hands high, very strong made, paces and trots, 
and is branded, either on the shoulder or thigh, with 
some letters not remembered. Whoever takes up 
the said Negro and Horse, and delivers them to the 
subscribers at Newark, in New-Jersey, shall be enti- 
tled to the above reward, and well paid for extra 
charges, or Eight Dollars for the Negro, and Four 

Dollars for the Horse, 

ISAAC WILKINS, 
SAMUEL OGDEN. 
Newark, July 4, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 235, July 8 
to July 15, 1771. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia, OUTWARDS. 
Schooner Polly, T. Woodberry, Salem. 

Gloucester, June 22, 1771. 

BY virtue of a writ to me directed, will be ex- 
posed to public sale, on the 2Qth day of July next, 
between the hours of 12 and 5 o'clock, on the prem- 



518 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ises, the four following tracts of land, viz. one of 376 
acres of excellent land and swamp, with two good 
dwelling-houses thereon, and an excellent saw-mill, 
with a never-failing stream ; the second tract con- 
taining 181 acres of land and timber swamp, bound- 
ing on land late William Linseyand James Hughes's, 
and others, situate on the Coehawking road ; the 
third tract containing 376 acres of good land and 
swamp, bounded by lands of Samuel Shivers, and 
on the Coehawking road ; and also another piece or 
tract^ containing 67 acres, situate on Still-run. Great 
part of the above lands are capable of being made 
good meadow, and the situation suitable for any pub- 
lic business ; the whole late the property of James 
Budd ; seized in execution, by JOSEPH HUGG, Sheriff. 
The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2220 July u, 

1771- 

College of Philadelphia, June 28, 1771. 
This being the day appointed for the anniversary 
COMMENCEMENT in the College in this city, the Trus- 
tees at half an hour past nine o'clock, proceeded from 
the Apparatus Room to the PUBLIC HALL, followed 
by the Provost, Vice-Provost, and Professors, with the 
different Candidates in their gowns. . . . AFTER- 
NOON. | The following degrees were then con- 
ferred by the Provost, viz. . . . Messrs. JONATHAN 
ELMER, of New-Jersey, JONATHAN POTTS, of Potts- 
Grove, Pennsylvania, JAMES TILTON, of Dover, and 
NICHOLAS WAY, of Wilmington, then presented them- 
selves, agreeable to the rules of the College, to de- 
fend in Latin the dissertations printed for their de- 
gree of Doctor in Physic. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 519 

Mr. Elmer's piece "De caitsis et remediis sitis in 
febribus" was impugned by Dr. KUHN, professor of 
Botany and Materia Medica. . . . 

Each of these Candidates having judiciously an- 
swered the objections made to some parts of their 
dissertations, the Provost conferred upon them the 
degree of DOCTOR IN PHYSIC with particular solemn- 
ity, as the highest mark of literary honor which they 
could receive in their profession, . . . 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1492, July 11, 

1771. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE,PHILADELPHIA, I CLEARED. I 

* i i 

Sloop Endeavour, B. Goodhue, Salem. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 236, July 15, 

to July 22, 1771. 

WHEREAS John Parker of Upper-Freehold, in the 
County of Monmouth, and Province of New-Jersey, 
hath had his Estate made over unto Andrew Pierce, 
and Benjamin Parker, Minor, of said Township, for 
the Use of all his Creditors ; and Benjamin Parker, 
jun. of said Township, hath likewise assigned his 
Estate over unto us the said Andrew Pierce and 
John Estell : Therefore we the Assignees of the said 
insolvent Debtors, do hereby give Notice unto all 
their Creditors, to meet at the House of Thomas 
Atkinson, in the Township of Hanover, in the 
County of Burlington, near the said John Parker's, 
on the second Day of September next, to receive 
their Dividend of said insolvent Estate, pursuant to 
said Act of Assembly of said Province. 

BENJAMIN PARKER ] A . 

> Assignees. 

JOHN ESTELL. j 



52O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

To be SOLD, by the Subscriber, | The following 
Tracts of Lands and Mills, viz. | 

SQUIRE'S Point Forge, situate in the County of 
Sussex, in the Province of New-Jersey on Muskeni- 
tuing River, lately the Property of Ryerson Reading 1 
and Ebenezer Cowell, 2 which affords great Plenty of 
Water in the dryest Season : There is on the Prem- 
ises a large well built Forge, laid in Lime and Sand, 
consisting of three Fires and one Hammer, a good 
Grist-Mill and Saw-Mill joining one End of the Dam 
on which the Forge is built, two Coal-Houses, suffi- 
cient to contain several hundred Loads of Coal, a 
large Frame Dwelling House two Stories high, four 
Rooms and a large Entry on the upper Floor, com- 
pleatly finished, the lower Story built of Stone, with 
a Cellar Kitchen, Store, and other convenient Cel- 
lars, a good pailed Garden, and nine Houses for 
Workmen ; about 1800 Acres of Land, great Part of 
which is well timbered, lying convenient to the 
Works, three improved Farms thereon, in a thick in- 
habited Part of the Country, not far distant from sev- 
eral Furnaces. 

Also, the Farm in Hanover, in New-Jersey, where 
Mr. John Tuttle lived ; chiefly fine Meadow. 

Also, 114 Acres of Land adjoining one of the best 
of Farms, belonging to Col. Tuttle, on a Neck of 
Land near Hanover, chiefly the best Meadow Land, 
it commands a good Prospect ; not above twelve 
Miles from Newark. - - - Any Person inclining 
to purchase the whole, or any Part thereof, may 

1 A grandson of John Reading, 2d, President of the Governor's Council. 

2 For a sketch of Ebenezer Cowell, see 2 N. J. Archives, I., 544. 



1/70 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 521 

have easy Payments, and an indisputable Title. 
Also he has to dispose of 

A large Assortment of European and East India 
Goods, for Cash, or the usual Credit, with a Quan- 
tity of good Wool, Bar Iron, Steel, &c. &c. &c. 

GARRET RAPALIE. 

Wanted immediately. | A Single Man who under- 
stands the nailing Business, such a one may meet 
with good encouragement (if well recommended) by 
applying to Nicholas Hoffman, in New- York, or to 
Samuel Ogden at Boon-Town, in New- Jersey. 

- The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1029, July 15, 1771. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia, Entered In. 
Sloop Two Brothers, J. Allen from Salem, New 
Jersey. 

-The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1493, July 18, 
1771. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, Philadelphia, CLEARED. 
Schooner Polly, T. Woodberry, Salem. 

Gloucester County, July 15, 1771. 
TEN POUNDS Reward. 

BROKE out of Gloucester Goal last Night, a cer- 
tain JACOB MATTHEWS, by Trade a Carpenter, 
supposed to be either of French or Dutch Extrac- 
tion ; had on when committed, a red lappelled 
Jacket, without Sleeves, a half worn Beaver Hat, 
Ozenbrigs Shirt, a Pair of Ticken Breeches, Worsted 
Stockings, half worn Shoes, with Brass Buckles ; has 



522 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

black Hair, tied behind, is very talkative, and bold 
in Discourse, somewhat addicted to Drinking and 
Swearing, and is about 5 Feet 10 or n Inches high. 
After his Escape he went to his former Place of 
Abode, and took away with him, an old blue Jacket 
with Sleeves, fine Shirt, a Pair of Buckskin 
Breeches, black Yarn Stockings, a black Silk Hand- 
kerchief, and a new Beaver Hat. Whover takes up 
said Matthews, and secures him in any of his Majes- 
ty's Goals in said Province, or elsewhere, shall re- 
ceive the above Reward, and reasonable Charges, 
paid by RICHARD JOHNSON, Goaler. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Glouces- 
ter county, near Cooper s Creek, N. Jersey, an Irish 
servant man, who calls himself William Wilson, but 
whose right name is said to be M'Cullum, about jo 
years of age, near 5 feet and a half high, has been 
about 7 years in this country ; he has very sandy 
hair, tied behind, big under lip, grey eyes, and has a 
sour look ; had on, when he went away, a brownish 
broadcloth coat, a blue grey broadcloth jacket, leather 
breeches, almost new, pretty good hat, a hempen sheet- 
ing shirt, black yarn stockings, and half worn shoes : 
It is supposed he is now somewh ere in Maryland, hav- 
ing been twice advertised and taken ; the first time he 
was confined in Cczcil county goal, and the last in 
Chester. Whoever takes up and secures said servant 
in any of his Majesty s goals, or brings him home, 
shall have the above reward, paid by 

July 2, 1771. BENJAMIN INSKEEP. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2221, July 18, 
1771. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 523 

WANTED, | SOME Person who well under- 
stands Water rotting Hemp. Such a one, by apply- 
ing to Jacob Ford, Junior, at his Farm near Morris 
Town, in Morris County (about the First of August 
next) will meet with Encouragement well worth his 
Notice. 

ABRAHAM SKILLMAN who has drove the 
Stage Waggon from New-York to Philadelphia for 
three Years past, Sets out from Powles-Hook for 
Philadelphia, as usual, every Tuesday Morning by 
Sun rising, and proceeds through Newark, Eliza- 
beth-Town, and thence by the Post-Road, arriving in 
Philadelphia by Twelve o' Clock on Wednesday, 
which no other Stage does ; and is well known to be 
the best and pleasantest Road, and the safest Fer- 
ries, free for the Passengers. Fare for each Passen- 
ger Twenty Shillings through ; taken up Passengers 
on the Road, Fare in Proportion. 

From his well known Care, Skill and Attention to 
his Passengers, he humbly hopes for a Continuance 
of the Favour and Encouragement of the Public. 

N. B. As he drives through himself, he will with 
Pleasure transact any Business committed to his 
Care, with Fidelity and Exactness. 

LOST Betwixt the Hours of Twelve and Three, 
on Tuesday the i7th Instant, a Paper containing ten 
Jersey Fifteen Shilling Bills, to the best of the Pro- 
prietor's Recollection : On the inside of the Paper 
is a List of Gold, and Money amounting to Three 
Hundred Pounds, New-York Currency. Any Person 
who has found it, and will return it to Mr. James 



524 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Rivington, near the Coffee-House, shall receive one 
HALF JOHANNES for their Trouble. 

John & Joseph Shotwell, | Have just imported by 
the last Vessels from London, Bristol, \ and Liverpool 
the following Goods, which they will \ dispose of on 
reasonable Terms, (WHOLESALE ONLY) at their Store in 
Raway, East-Jersey ; 

Superfine and middling, blue, green and black worsted do. 

cloth colour, and scarlet, 6 and Wornens white branch'd backs, and 
7-4 broad-cloths, blackgrain lamb mitts, men's 

Mixed and blue German serges, black do. 

Sagothees, nankeens, B)ack peelong, 

Shalloons, callicoes, Rich black sattin, 

Chintzes, clouting diaper, Black alomode, rnantuas, 

Huccaback, Black and white cravats, 

Diaper tablecloths, Black, cloth colour, and white Barce- 

Flower'd lawns, lonas, 

7-8 and yd. wd. lawn and cambricks, White Cyprus gauze, 
Pistol lawn and Kenting handker- Sewing silk, 

chiefs Silk fringe, scarf twist, 

Fine printed linen do. 3 corded silk and hair 

Silk and cotton romalls, Sarsenet and Flower'd ribbons, gimp, 

India bandanoes Scotch and stitching thread, 

9-8 Irish sheeting, Colour'd do. Nuns do. 

^, f , and yd. wd. Irish linens, Basket and death-head buttons, tam_ 

11 nail, f, -, yd. wd. cotton and linen mies, 

checks, Callimancoes, durants, 

Dowlas, garlix, oznaburgs, Missionets, silverets, 

Ravens duck, muslin, Letter'd and scarlet garters, 

India and English taffeties, Coat bindings, 

Ginghams, Shoe and quality do. 

Black and red, wd. persians, Silk ferrets, Dutch lace, 

\ yd. black and white do. 6 and 7-4 bed bunts, 

Bristol shoes, buckram, Fustians and jeans, 

Spelling books, testaments, Chip hats, shirt buttons, 

Large 4to. bibles, Cap and apron tape, 

Mens worsted hose, Hair plush, 

Womens cotton do. Looking glasses, plain n?at sconces, 

Black and cloth colour'd breeches gilt edges with shells, dress- 

patterns, ing do. 

' Women's black and colour'd silk mitts Money scales and weights, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 



525 



White-chapel and common needles, Bath metal and glass links, 



4 fix and double caukin pins, 

Writing paper, wool cards, 

Ink powder, womens fans, 

Fine brass wire, 

Sad-irons, steel spades, 

Shod shovels, 

T. Crawley's steel. 

10 d. 12d. and 20d nails. 



Snuff boxes, 
Book-case escutcheons, 
Desk furniture, 
Brass nails, 
London pewter plates, 

dishes, 
Do. spoons, 
Hard metal oval dishes, 



basons and 



S. buck, bone and real buck knives Wafers, ivory combs, 



and forks, 
Burnt bone knives, 
Buck pistol capt, 
Cutteaus, sealed do. 
Buff and staa penknives, 
Womens scissars, 
Taylors shears, 
Knitting pins, 

Temple and Dutch spectacles, 
Lacquered buttons, 
Plate hard metal do. 
Awl blades and tacks, 
Carpenters compasses. 
Iron squares, plain irons, 
Hammers, solid joint rules, 
Hand-saw files, 

Large flat bastard and common do. 
Half round do. 3 corner do. 
Flat rasps, 

Table butts, chest hinges, 
Brass do. 

Brass table catches, 
Brass knob locks, 
Do. spring latches, 
Chest locks, cupboard do. 
Drawer do. prospect do. 
Spring stock locks, 



Brass kettles, 

Copper tea kettles, 

Wood screws, corks, 

Brass cocks, 

Sadlers twist straining webb, 

Diaper do. girth wooling do. 

Saddle cloth, 

Pellham bitts, colt bitts, 

Mens swivel'd stirrup irons, 

Large and small flat sets, 

2d. 3d. and 4d. clout nails, 

6, 8, 12, and 14 oz. tacks, 

Silver'd and tin'd staple nails, 

Painters colours powdered in kegs, 

White lead, Whitening, 

Red lead, yellow oker, 

Spanish brown, 

Prussian blue, powder do. 

Vermilion, verdigrease, 

Allum, 

7 by 9, 8 by 10, and 9 by 11 window 

glass, 

Jesuit's bark, British oil, 
Daffy's elixer, 
Turlington's balsam, 
Bateman's drops, 
Glauber's and Epsom salts, 



Box handle double wormed gimblets, Spanish liquorice, Aloes, 
Brass and steel thimbles, Eoll and flower brimstone, 

Steel knee buckles, Spices, nutmegs, cinnamon, 

Pinchbeck shoe do. Mace, cloves, shot, 

Bar lead, snuff, &c. &c. 

N. B. The Advertisers hereby inform the Traders 
in the Jersies, that they are determined to sell the 



526 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

above Goods, at as low Advance as they are gen- 
erally now sold at in New- York ; and those who are 
willing to be their Customers in West-Jersey, we 
doubt not will find a considerable Advantage thereby. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1030, July 22, 1771. 

WENT adrift from a little above Samuel Coop- 
er's Ferry, about three weeks ago, a large double 
Moses-built BOAT, almost new ; her bottom is paid 
with turpentine ; above and below with pitch ; her 
upper streak is painted black, with a yellow rim 
round the edge ; inside painted red ; has wooden 
fenders on her sides ; the head of her stem is very 
short, and cut flat upon the top. Whoever brings 
said Boat, or informs me where she may be got 
again, shall be handsomely rewarded, by BOYER 
BROOKE, Boat-builder. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 237, July 22, 

to July 29, 1771. 

WHEREAS Col. John Schuyler, by his late peti- 
tion to the legislature of the province of New-Jersey, 
prayed that a law might be passed, to compel the 
owners of the causeways, on those -parts of the Road 
leading from Newark to the Road leading from Ber- 
gen-Point to Poulas-Hook (to wit ;} the owners of 
the causeway lying to the west of and adjoining to 
Passaick-River, and the owners of that part of the 
causeway lying to the west of Hackinsack- River, and 
between that river and the causeway of the said peti- 
tioner to reimburse the said petitioner part of the 
expence he has been put to in making and repairing 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 527 

part of the said road, to the east of and adjoining 
said Passaick-River And Whereas the General As- 
sembly of the said province, by their order, made at 
their late sessions at Burlington, in April last, or- 
dered, " That the said petitioner have leave to bring 
" in a bill at the next session, upon giving the usual 
"notice, and no reasonable objection then appearing 

"against it." These are therefore to give notice, 

to all persons concerned, that a bill will be brought 
in the next session of the said General Assembly, 
agreeable to the said petition, and leave given by 
said order. 1 

Dated July 25th, 1771. 

BY virtue of sundry writs of Fieri Facias, to me 
directed and delivered, against the goods and chat- 
tels, land and tenements of Samuel B. Leydekker, in 
my Bailwick, I have seized and taken in execution, 
the goods and chattels, lands and tenements of the 
said Samuel B. Leydekker, consisting of one dwell- 
ing house and grist-mill, and lot of land, and other 
buildings thereupon, with the appurtenances there- 
unto belonging, situate near the court house, in 
New-Barbadoes, commonly called Hackensack, in 
the county of Bergen ; and also one lot of swamp, 
about two miles distant from the above-mentioned 
premises, And shall expose the same to sale, at 
public vendue, on Friday the second day of August 
next, at one of the clock in the afternoon of the 
same day, at or near the dwelling house of the said 
Samuel B. Leydekker, in New Barbados aforesaid. 

i The Legislature failed to enact such a law, at the next session, which began 
December 21, 1771. 



528 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

The terms of sale will be made known at the time 
and place of sale. 

Dated this thirty first day of May, annoque domini, 

1 771 . 

JOHN VAN BUS KERK. 

The New-York Joitrnal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1490, July 25, 1771. 

TWELVE DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, May 27, ////, liv- 
ing in Mannington township, Salem county, West 
New-Jersey, an Irish servant man, named RICHARD 
HANDLEY, about 20 years of age, wears his own fair 
hair ; 5 feet 4 or $ inches high, a likely well set fellow, 
stoops as he walks, speaks in the Irish dialect, and is 
remarkable for calling working cattle oxens ; had on 
and took with him, a felt hat, old homespun cloth 
jacket, of a lightish colour, one fine shirt, one tow cloth 
ditto, two pair of trowsers, one of c keck linen, a pair 
of buckskin breeches, shoes, tied with strings ; he may 
probably have a forged pass with him,. Whoever 
takes lip the said servant, and secures him, so that his 
master may have him again, shall receive the above 
reward, and all reasonable charges, paid by me 

JOHN ROBERTS. 

THIRTY SHILLINGS Reward. 

RUN away, on the i8th of July ins /. from the sub- 
scriber, living in Evesham, a Dutch servant lad 
named CHRISTOPHER RACER, about 19 years 
of age, about $feet j cr 4 inches high, of a sandy com- 
plexion, has thick bushy hair, and a very remarkable 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 529 

wrinkle across his forehead, which is very low ; had 
on, when he went away, a homespun cotton jacket, 
striped with red and black, the under side of the 
sleeves of a light colour, a half worn felt hat, Russia 
duck shirt, crocus trowsers, and single soaled shoes. 
Whoever takes up said servant, and brings him home 
to his master, or secures him in any of his Majesty's 
goals, so that his master may have him again, shall 
receive the above reward, and all reasonable charges, 
paid by 

JOSEPH EN OLE. 

Prince- Town, New-Jersey, July 15, 1771. 
THIRTY-TWO DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, about the 8th of 
April last, Samuel Robins, and John Everit, appren- 
tice boys, shoemakers by trade, both about 19 years 
of age ; Robins is about 5 feet 6 inches high, well 
set ; had on when he went away, a mixed coloured 
broadcloth coat, a blue camblet jacket, a striped 
linen ditto a pair of sheepskin breeches, castor hat, 
and fine shirt; he has brown curled hair, he is very 
remarkable for winking. Everit is somewhat taller 
and slimmer built ; had on, when he went away, a 
blue broadcloth jacket, sheepskin breeches, wool 
hat, long brown hair, and likely wears it clubbed, 
if it is not cut. They both listed in the 26th regi- 
ment last April, have lately been discharged, and 
when taken, likely will shew their discharge for their 
pass : It is uncertain whether they will have their 
own clothes, or have changed them, or have soldiers 
clothes. If taken in this province, and secured in any 

34 



530 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

goal of said province, so that I may have them again, 
Eight Dollars for each, but if taken in any other 
province, and secured in this province, Sixteen Dol- 
lars for each, with reasonable charges. Robins, I ex- 
pect, is about Pilesgrove, in the Jerseys. Everit, I 
expect, is at Christine, in Pennsylvania, or at Potts- 
grove, or from thence will go the other side of Fred- 
erick-Town, in Maryland, about 40 miles, as he has 
a brother-in-law living there, whose name is George 
Acres, a tinman by trade. 

JOHN DENTQN. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2222, July 25, 
1771. 

A LARGE PETTIAUGER was left at Perth 
Amboy some Time in March last, (in the Care of 
two young Men) by a person who said he was going 
back in the Country to cut as much Wood as would 
load her, and then should carry it to New- York ; 
but as he has not yet returned to demand the Pet- 
tianger, it is imagined she has been stolen ; especial- 
ly as the Man was about six Weeks ago on Staten- 
Island, opposite Amboy, and enquired of a Person 
there, if he knew whether any Owner had appeared 
for said Pettiauger. She has been painted blue, 
which is now chiefly worn off; her Sails and Rigging 
old, has Iron Mast Hoops, an Anchor almost new, 
has had a large Fire Place in her Forcastle, but it is 
now knock'd down, and has on board a Scoop 
Shovel, marked S. B. The Owner of said Pettiau- 
ger may have her again by applying to the Printers 
of this Paper, proving his Property, and paying 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 531 

Charges. 

-The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post-Boy, 
No. 1473, July 29, 1771. 

Salem County, New-Jersey, July 25, 1771. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN aivay from the subscriber, living in Maning- 
ton township, Salem county, West-Jersey, an Irish ser- 
vant lad named MICHAEL WHILAN, about 5 feet 
6 or 7 inches high, wears his own short brown hair, 
is fresh coloured, and has a down look, when spoke to ; 
had on, and took with him, three shirts, one check, the 
others white, four sailor jackets, two blue, the others 
striped or spotted, a new wool hat, two pair blue plush 
breeches, and two pair strong shoes, with brass buckles. 
Whoever takes up and secures said servant in any of 
his Majesty s goals, if taken in Salem county, shall 
have Four Dollars reward, if out of the county, Three 
Pounds, and if out of the Pi ovince, the above reward, 
and reasonable charges paid by 

WILLIAM YOUNG. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2223, August i, 



To be sold, one of the best farms on Rariton River, 

BEING thirteen miles from Rariton Landing, and 
fifteen from New-Brunswick, containing six hundred 
acres almost in a square, near one third whereof is 
low land, along the said river, as good as any on it ; 
another third in the centre is upland, compleatly 
cleared for the plough and scythe, on which is a 
young bearing orchard, of upwards of five hundred 



532 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Trees of the best grafted fruit, a tolerable good 
farm house on the great country road, and an excel- 
lent barn, fifty feet square, with a cedar roof and a 
board floor ; the other third in the rear of the farm, 
is good wood land. This farm already produces a 
great quantity of hay, there being about one hun- 
dred acres which is converted to no other use, and a 
good deal more might be made with little more pains 
than only leaving the land for that purpose. 

The payments may be made to suit the pur- 
chaser, provided satisfactory security with interest be 
given for the whole, or any part of the money ; the 
owner having no other reason for selling, than the 
important one of not being able to superintend it 
himself. 

For further particulars, enquire of Mr. Cornelius 
Low, at Rariton Landing, or of his son Isaac Low, 
in New- York. 

DESERTED from his Majesty s 2gth Regiment of 
Foot ; JAMES GORDON, labourer, aged 27 years ; he is 
6 feet high, of a swarthy complexion, dark brown hair, 
hazzle eyes, pitted with the small pox, round small vis- 
sage, straight and well made, born in Enniskillen, 
Ireland. And 

JOHN LOVELL, labourer, aged 27 years, 5 feet lo*/^ 
inches high, of a brown complexion, brown hair, light 
grey eyes, a little pitted with the small pox, long and 
full visage, a little stoop in the shoulders, stout made. 
Whoever secures either of the above deserters, and 
lodges them in any of his Majesty s goals shall receive 
Eight Dollars Reward, on applying to the Command- 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 533 

ing Officers of the 2Cjth regiment at Perth Amboy, 
Brunswick, or Elizabeth-Town, 2 ist regiment at Phil- 
adelphia, or 26th regiment at New York. 

N. B. The publick are cautioned not to harbour the 
above deserters, as they are of infamous characters. 

Gordon is an old deserter, and was in the Royal 
Americans. 

To be sold at public vendue, by the subscriber 
hereof, on the premises, the iith day of Sep- 
tember next, at one o'clock of said day, 
THE plantation whereon he now lives, in the 
township of Roxbury, in the county of Morris, in 
New-Jersey, adjoining the river called Black River, 
containing about 150 acres, and will be sold alto- 
gether or divided, as may best suit those that ap- 
pear to buy. There is on the same two houses, two 
barns, and two orchards, and may well be divided. 
It is well situated in a good wheat country, in a con- 
venient place for a trader that will buy wheat, grind, 
pack, &c., two grist mills adjoining the plantation ; 
there is on the same a good conveniency for a 
fulling mill, which is much wanted in that part of the 
country. It is well proportioned with clear'd plow- 
land, wood-land, and meadow. The owner being 
about to leave the province, will be willing to sell 
cheap. It is situated one mile and an half from 
Nathaniel Drake's tavern, in said township, on the 
road that leads from thence to Budd's Valley. 

JUSTUS KING. 

THE creditors of Francis Me. Meckin, an insolv- 
ent debtor, discharged from the goal of the county 



534 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

of Morris, in New-Jersey, are desired to send in 
their respective demands against the said insolvent, 
properly attested to, by the tenth day of September 
next, as at that time a dividend of his estate will be 
made amongst his creditors by 

v 

SAMUEL TUTIIILL, Esq ; ) A . 

A > Assignees. 

And JOSEPH WOOD. j 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1032, Aug. 5, 1771. 

NEW YORK. August 5. | We hear, that JAMES 
LATHIM, a Shoemaker, who escaped from John 
Robert Holliday, High Sheriff of Baltimore County, 
as has been advertised in our Paper for several 
Weeks past, has changed his Name to JAMES 
PENNINGTON, and left the Mare and Saddle at 
Trenton. 

Five Pounds Reward. \ Stolen out of my Pasture 
the T>d Instant, a black horse, a little inclining to a 
Brown, in good Order, six Years old, fifteen Hands 
high, commonly paces, and can trot a little ; has some 
hair rubbed off just under his Breast, a slint Head, 
short Ears, short Neck which he carries somewhat 
bowing, round Buttock, turns his Feet a little in when 
he paces, and his Hams something out ; his hind Hoofs 
rather longest the inside. Whoever takes up and se- 
cures said Horse without the Thief, so that the Owner 
may have him again, shall have the above Reward of 
Five Pounds, and together with the Thief, Seven 
Pounds Ten Shillings, York Money, and all reasona- 
ble Charges paid by me, PETER ROOME,/&;2. 

** At the same time ivas stolen from JACOB 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 535 

BERRY, supposed by the same Thief, a breasted Sad- 
dle and Bridle, about half ^u^rn ; the Saddle had no 
Housen, and had two brass Staples with Rings, and a 
brass Button under before : One of the Straps of the 
Crouper was broke. 

Pompton Plains, Morris County, ) 
East-New-Jersey, Aug. 5, 1771. ( 

- The New York Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1474, August 5, 1771. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Lower 
Penn's-Neck, in Salem county, West New-Jersey, 
on Wednesday, the 7th of this instant August, a 
Negro man, named TOM, about 5 feet 4 or 5 
inches high ; a thick well set fellow ; has a large 
scar on his right cheek: Had on, when he went 
away, a gray cloth jacket, tow shirt and trowsers, 
an old felt hat, and half worn shoes, with metal 
buckles.- -Whoever takes up the said Negro, and 
brings him to his master, or secures him in any of 
his Majesty's gaols, so that his master may have 
him again, shall have TWO DOLLARS reward, and 
reasonable charges, paid by me, 

HANCE LAMBSON. 

N. B. It is supposed he is gone towards Dover. 
-The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 239, August 5, 
to August 12, 1771. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away on the 3d instant, from the subscriber, 
living in Pittsgrove, Salem County, an Irish servant 
lad, named Robert Smith, about 18 years of age, a 
short well-set lad, has long black hair, tied behind, 



536 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, [1771 

has a mark on the left side of his head, about two 
inches long, and half an inch wide, without any 
hair, occasioned by a scald when he was a child ; he 
has blue eyes, a very thick upper lip, and is an im- 
pudent looking fellow ; had on when he went away, 
a tow shirt much patched, a halfworn felt hat, a pair 
of tow trowsers with striped waistbands, has two pair 
of breeches, one pair black knit worsted, the other 
brown cloth, two striped under jackets, a pair of 
thread stockings, and calfskin pumps, with carved 
buckles. Whoever takes up said servant, and se- 
cures him in any goal, so that his master may get 
him again, shall have the above reward, paid by 

SAMUEL GARRISON. 

N. B. It is supposed he is gone away with another 
man's wife, one Eleanor Butler, an Irish woman, 
about 35 years of age, small, pock marked, and 
speaks with the brogue, is fond of strong liquor ; 
and it is thought they will pass for man and wife. 

Pit Is Grove, in Salem County. 

WHEREAS ELEANOR, my Wife, hath eloped from her 
said Husband, without any just Cause of mine ; 
These are to forewarn all Persons from trusting her 
on my Account, as I will pay no Debts of her contract- 
ing after the Date hereof. Witness my Hand this 

Sixth Day of August, ////. 

JOHN BUTLER. 

To be SOLD, at a moderate Price, 
A GOOD convenient plantation, containing 300 
acres, or thereabouts, a high, wholesome and pleas- 
ant situation, a comfortable dwelling-house, a barn 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 537 

and other buildings, about 30 acres of bank 
meadow, and more may be made, 30 or 35 acres of 
timber swamp meadow, the upland kind for grain, an 
apple and peach orchard, cherry, and other growing 
fruit trees, the improved land within good fence, the 
woodland as well wooded as most, adjoining a nav- 
igable water, as it is bounded part by Mantua-creek, 
lying in the township of Deptford, in Gloucester 
county, and Western Division of the province of 
New-Jersey, near Mantua-creek Bridge, and the 
great road leading from Cohansey and Salem to 
Philadelphia, 13 miles from thence to Cooper's 
Ferry. 

Also to be sold, 50 acres of cedar swamp, well 
timbered, and the most convenient to get posts and 
rails for fencing the farms on each side the Dela- 
ware river of any I know of, it is situate in the 
township of Woolwich, in the county and province 
aforesaid, near opposite Chester, adjoining lands of 
Lynford Lardner and Samuel Tonkins, within a mile 
or two of good landings, one by Raccoonccreek, near 
the mouth, and one on the river shore ; the said 
swamp to be sold the whole together or in lots, as 
may best suit the purchaser or purchasers thereof. 

Any person inclining to purchase the plantation, 
or cedar swamp, may view the premises, and be in- 
formed of the conditions of sale, by applying to the 
subscriber, living on the aforesaid plantation. 

JAMES HINCHMAN. 

I FIND by an advertisement circulated in Phila- 
delphia, and signed John Barnhill and John Mer- 
cerow t that my stage is set up to oppose them, and 



538 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

that I shall drop it in winter. I therefore 

beg leave to represent to the public, that I intend 
to continue my stage once a week from New-York 
to Philadelphia, and back again to New-York, both 
winter and summer, the days I first advertised I 
shall continue, and cannot interfere with Barnhill 
and Mercerow s stages, as I set off from Powles- 
Hook, on the Tuesday, the morning after them, and 
go by Newark and Elizabeth-Town, through Wood- 
bridge, Brunswick, Prince-Town, Trenton and Bris- 
tol, and back again from Philadelphia, on the Friday 
morning, the same road ; it is the greatest folly im- 
aginable to attempt an imposition on the public, by 
the first mentioned false represented intention, and 
pretended opposition : This the public may depend 
upon, that, by GOD'S permission, I will drive my 
stage both ways through, and will make it my study 
to deserve the encouragement of the public ; whom 
I beg leave to thank for the favours I have already 
received. ABRAHAM SKiLLMAN. 1 

August 2, 1771. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2224, August 8, 

I77 1 - 

i The progenitor of the Skillman family of New York and New Jersey was 
Thomas Skillman, who, tradition says, emigrated in 1664. Thos Skillman was one 
of the inhahitants of Elizabeth Town or under its jurisdiction, who took the oath 
of allegiance and fidelity to the English, Feb. 19. 1665-66. In 1671 he is supposed 
to have resided in Brooklyn. He had two children Thomas. 2d, and Elsje. 
Thomas, 2d, is believed lo have resided in Brooklyn, where his children 
Peter and Elizabeth (twins) were bap. March 4, 1694. Among other chil- 
dren he had Isaac, who sold his farm in 1727 and is supposed to have 
removed to New Jersey. tf. J. Archives, I., 50; Bergen 1 s Early Settlers 
of Kings County, 263. There is a reference to Isaac Skillman, deceased, 
in 1765, in N. J. Archives, 24:539. A sketch of the Rev. Isaac Skillman, a 
Baptist clergyman, who graduated at Princeton College in 1769, is given in N. J. 
Archives. XXV., 223. Benjamin Skillman, of Griggs-Town. Somerset county, ad- 
vertised a horse stolen. Nov. 30, 1775. Ib., 2d Series, I., 23. Thomas Skillman, of 
Somerset county, took out a license Jan 23. 1777, to marry Elizabeth Striker; 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 539 

Cr anbury, New Jersey, August 2, 1771. 
STRAYED or STOLEN (but supposed stolen) 
from the pasture of the subscriber, in the night of 
the 3oth ultimo, a sorrel HORSE, near 14 hands 
high, a natural pacer, but can trot ; without shoes, 
his hoofs lately trimmed, 4 years old, no plain mark 
except one white hind foot Whoever secures the 
thief, with the horse, if stolen, shall have Three 
Pounds reward, or Thirty Shillings for the horse 
only, with reasonable charges, paid by 

AMOS 



To be SOLD, 

SEVERAL farms or tracts of land, situate in the 
county of Hunterdon, in the western division of 
New-Jersey, being part of a large tract of land 
known by the name of the Society's Great Tract ; 
the lots are distinguished and known by lots No. 45, 
whereon John Tenney now lives, containing 187 

John Skillman, of Somerset county, obtained a license Dec. 25, 1778, to marry 
Mary Stryker. Other marriage licenses were issued as follows: to James Hage- 
man and Anne Skillman, of Somerset. Aug. 13, 1778; Thomas Johnson and Eliza- 
beth Skillman, of Somerset, Sept. 17, 1778; Matthew Chum (or Chinn ?), of Hunt- 
erdon county, and Mary Skillman, April 2, 1768; Nathaniel Stout, of Hunterdon, 
and Sarah Skillman, June 4, 1764. A T . J. Archive*. XXII., 349, 375. Jane Sbillman 
was appointed administratrix, Feb. 6, 1793, of the estate of Gerardus Skillman, of 
Hunterdon county. Liber. Ao. 33 of Wills, p. 314. The will of Thomas Skillman. of 
Somerset county names wife Elizabeth; sons Henry. John, Thomas. Abraham; 
daughters Mary, Catherine and Elizabeth, and an expected child; and dis- 
poses of real and personal estate. Executors -father Thomas Skillman, wife 
Elizabeth and William Covenhoven. Witnesses Gerardus Beekman. Abraham 
Stryker and John van Zant. The will was proved at Pluckemin, October 11. 1796. 
Lit). No. 35 of Wills, p. 526. On October 4, 1796, Abraham Skfllman was appointed 
guardian of the person andestateof Andrew Hageman. Li&. No. 35 of Wills, p. 529- 
Abraham -and Cornelius Skillman made administrators of the estate of Isaac 
Skillman of SalemCo., Sept. 18, 1799. Lib. No. 38 of Wills, p. 412. 

i This Dey family of Monmouth county does not appear to have been related to 
the Dey family of Bergen county. The latter were Dutch, and the former evi- 
dently of English descent. Some genealogists believe the Monmouth family name 
was formerly Day. 



540 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

acres, situate within three miles of New-German- 
Town, where there is a good market of all kinds 
of produce ; about 80 acres cleared, very good 
wheat-land, and well timbered and watered. 

No. 46, adjoining No. 45, in possession of the 
aforesaid John Tenney, containing 2 1 8 acres, on which 
is a very good bearing orchard, and a quantity of 
very good meadow, and more may be made at a 
small expence : There is a sufficient quantity of the 
land cleared, the rest good timber-land, which is 
much wanted in the neighborhood. 

No. 52, now in possession of Mathias Cranmer, 
containing 287 acres, situate about one mile from 
New-German-Town, 150 acres cleared, which is ex- 
cellent wheat-land, and 10 acres of meadow in good 
English grass, and much more may be made with 
very little trouble. 

No. 80, in possession of Peter Bloome, contain- 
ing 209 and 75th parts of an acre, situate in the town- 
ship of Alexandria, about two miles from the River 
Delaware, and three from Alexandria; TOO acres 
cleared, which is good wheat-land; 10 acres of ex- 
traordinary good meadow, and more may be easily 
made. 

No. 83, in possession of Joseph Fishbough, con- 
taining 284 and 40 parts of an acre, adjoining Peter 
Bloom's farm; 100 acres cleared, which is good 
wheat-land, and a sufficient quantity of meadow in 
English grass. 

No. 139, in possession of Richard Reid, contain- 
ing 146 acres, situate in the township of Bethlehem, 
five miles from the Union iron -works, where there is 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 541 

a ready market for all kinds of produce ; 70 acres 
cleared, with 10 acres of meadow, and more may be 
made. 

The above tracts of land are in good repair, with 
sufficient tenantable houses, barns, and other con- 
veniences thereon. Any person inclinable to pur- 
chase may apply to John Srnyth, Esq ; at Perth-Arn- 
boy, to Henry Cuyler, and Barend R. Cuyler, at 
New- York, or John Emley, living near the premises. 
An indisputable title will be given. 

- The New York Gazette ; and The Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1033, August 12, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

On the loth Instant died at Stoney Brook, in 
New-Jersey, aged 77 Years, Mr. JAMES CLARK, a 
Man universally respected, and one of the first Set- 
tlers of these Parts. He was a kind and lov- 
ing Husband, a tender and indulgent Parent, a good 
Master, a useful and obliging Neighbour, and to 
crown the whole, a just and honest man. - 

A Wit's a Feather, and a Chief a Rod, 
An honest Mans the noblest Work of God. 

The next day his Remains were decently interred 
in Friends Burying Ground (of which Society he was 
a Member) attended by a numerous Concourse of 
People of all Denominations. 

On the 29th ult. died at Kingwood, West New- 
Jersey, Mrs. ELIZABETH THATCHER, (Widow 
of BARTHOLOMEW THATCHER, late of the 
same Place) aged 87 She had 17 Children, 



542 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

118 Grandchildren, 133 Great Grand-children, and 
one Great Great Grandchild. 

TO BE LETT, 

A HOUSE and LOT, conveniently accomplished 
for the keeping of a store, situate in Greenwich 
township, Gloucester county, and province of West 
New-Jersey, in the town of Berkley, lying on the 
great road leading from Cohansey and Salem to 
Philadelphia ; and near to navigable water, in a pop- 
ulous part of the country, and very convenient place 
for said business, 14 miles from thence to Cooper's 
ferry. 

Also to be LETT, a house and lot in said town, 
suitable and very convenient fora blacksmith. Any 
person or persons inclining to rent both or either of 
said premises, will meet with good encouragement, 
by applying to the subscriber for particulars, on said 

premises, 

JOSHUA PAUL. 

To be SOLD by public VENDUE, 

On the premises, on Friday, the 2;th of September 
ensuinor 

o ' 

A VALUABLE plantation, whereon John Debow 
now dwells, late the property of Frederick Debow, 
deceased, lying in Lower Freehold, about 5 (five) 
miles from Monmouth Court House and 2 (two) 
from John Creagh's (Creag's) mills, containing 300 
acres more o.r less, about 150 of which are cleared ; 
the land is esteemed excellent for grain ; a very good 
orchard, meadow, dwelling-house, frame-barn and 
other out-houses thereon : A good title will be made, 






I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 543 

and easy payments allowed to the purchasers. - 
Possession will be given on the ist (first) of March 
next. The terms will be published on the day of 
Sale, when due attendance will be given, by 

MATTHIAS MOUNT, Executor. 

-The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2225, Aug. 15, 
1771. 



This is to inform the PUBLIC, That we the sub- 
scribers, living on Cape May, having lately swept 
the Road within the said. Cape, have found 
therein several ANCHORS weighing from 600 Ibs. 
down to less than 100 Ibs. Any persons whatever, 
who may have lost any Anchors, near the aforesaid 
place, may have them again, on proving their prop- 
erty and paying the accustomed salvage, by apply- 
ing to ABRAHAM BENNET at Cape May ; or to 
NATHANIEL FORSTER, JEREDIAH MILLS, 
HENRY SCHILLENGER, JOSIAH CROW, 
DANIEL SCHILLINGER, NATHAN CHURCH. 

N. B. Two of the above Anchors have Cables to 
them. 

-The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1497, Aug. 15, 
1771. 

August 15, 1772. * 
TO BE SOLD, 

At public Vendue, on Tuesday the Tenth of Sep- 
tember next, on the Premises, by the Subscrib- 
ers : 

THE Plantation late of Solomon Boyle, deceased, 
containing about Six Hundred Acres, lying in the 

i 1771. 



544 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Township of Morris, and adjoins the River Passaick. 
There is on the said Plantation two good Dwell- 
ing Houses, two Barns, with Barracks and Out- 
Houses ; also three bearing Orchards. The Up- 
Land is deemed extraordinary for Grain. There is 
Meadow now in Order, on which may be cut in a 
seasonable Year Forty or Fifty Tons of Hay, most- 
ly English and Timothy, and more Meadow may be 
made : Also Timber and Wood growing on the 
Plantation sufficient for the Use of it.- -Will be sold 
also the same Day, the Grist- Mill and Saw-Mill of 
the said deceased, situate on the said River Passaick, 
adjoining the said Plantation : This Grist-Mill is ex- 
tremely well situated for Merchants and Country 
Work, being in a fine Wheat Country, and no Mill 
within several Miles of it. The above mentioned 
Plantation and Mills are about two Miles distant 
from Lord Sterling's Seat. 1 The Conditions to be 
made known at the Day of Sale, and a Deed will be 
executed to the Purchaser or Purchasers, by 

ISAAC WOODRUFF^ 



JOHN CHETWOOD, 



\- Executors. 



SOLOMON BOYLE, 

N. B. Reasonable Time of Credit will be given. 
The Vendue to beo<in at Eleven o'clock in the Fore- 

25 

noon. 

The Neiv York Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1476, Aiig. 19, 1771. 

1 At Baskinridge. For brief notices of William Alexander, who claimed the 
title of Earl of Stirling, see N. J. Archives, VIII., Part 2:214; 2d Series, 1., 182. For 
his Life and Letters, see N. J. Hist. Soc. Coll., II. 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 545 

To be sold at public vendue, on Wednesday the 
eleventh day of September next, at the house 
of WILLIAM WRIGHT, tavern keeper in Perth- 
Amboy, NEW JERSEY. 

THREE tenth parts of a proprietary or twenty 
fourth part of all the unlocated lands in the eastern 
division of the province of New-Jersey aforesaid, be- 
ing part of the share of the propriety of the late Dan- 
iel Donaldson Dunster, deceased, dyed seized of; 
together with three tenth parts of one twenty fourth 
part in common, of the valuable tract of land call'd 
Romopock, in Bergen county, and province afore- 
said, together also with a proportionable part of the 
proprietary house in Perth Amboy aforesaid. The 
title to the same may be seen at the proprietor's 
office in Perth Amboy aforesaid, kept by John 
Smyth, their register. 

The sale will begin at two o'clock in the after- 
noon, when tLa conditions will be made known. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1034, August 19, 1771. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE, PHILADELPHIA, | INWARD 
ENTRIES | . . . Schooner Polly, T. Woodbery, 
Salem. 

TEN POUNDS Reward. 

STOLEN, on the 22d of this instant August, out 
of the pasture of Catherine Covenhoven, in Blaw- 
enburg, Somerset county, near Rockey-Hill, New- 
Jersey, a black HORSE, with a large bald face, 
about 15 hands high, without brand or any mark, his 
two hind feet white about the hoofs, and trots alto- 

35 



546 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

gether. Whoever takes up said horse and thief, and 
secures them so that the horse may be had again, 
and the thief brought to justice, shall have the above 
Reward, or FIVE POUNDS for the horse, and all 
reasonable charges paid by me. 

DAVID COVENHOVEN. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 241, August 19, 
to August 26, 1771. 

TWENTY DOLLARS Reward. 

RUN away from the Subscriber, living in Eliza- 
beth-Town Point, in the County of Essex, in New 
Jersey, on Friday Evening the i6th inst. two servant 
men, one named CORNELIUS HURRY, born in or 
near Bristol in old England, about 23 years of age, 
5 feet 8 or 9 inches high, walks a little stooping, 
much addicted to drinking and swearing, of a light 
brown complexion, light brown hair, lately cut short 
on the top of his head ; carried with him a brown 
short cloth coat with large yellow metal buttons, a 
black calimanco jacket one light brown worsted shag 
ditto, with brown cloth back, one light coloured frize 
ditto, with sleeves, one old red duffil great coat, one 
old pair of buckskin breeches, one ditto of nankeen, 
two white linen shirts and one check ditto, old shoes 
with pinchbeck buckles, and had on tow trowsers and 
a frock made of coarse blue cloth, and a small bea- 
ver hat. The other named GEORGE ARIS, or 

ARISON, about 27 or 28 years of age, 5 feet 7 or 
8 inches high, born in Old England, a very red com- 
plexion, sandy hair, a down look and round shoul- 
dered, walks very dull and heavy ; Had on and 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 547 

took with him two frocks, two pair of trowsers, two 
check shirts, a wool hat, a pair of shoes and brass 
buckles. They likewise stole and took away, a small 
skiff newly trimmed and painted, her wale yellow, 
with white spots under her wale ; under the same a 
narrow streak of Spanish brown, her stern yellow, 
white spots and two bulls eyes forward, her inside 
payed with turpentine, seats and benches of Spanish 
brown, two oars, one a small skiff oar, the other a 
large scow ditto. HURRY had so many clothes that 
it is probable GEORGE may wear some of them, 
and they will likely change their names ; it is thought 
they are gone towards Pennsylvania or New Eng- 
land. Whoever takes up the above servants, and 
secures them, in any gaol, so that their Master may 
have them again, shall have the above reward of 
Twenty Dollars, or Ten Dollars for either of them, 
and Twenty Shillings for the skiff and oars, and all 
reasonable charges, paid by 

BROUGHTON REYNOLDS. 

[The following letter from a gentleman of Virginia, is thought a proper 
introduction, to the papers lately publish'd there concerning the introduc- 
tion of a Bishop to that colony ; which papers, we propose, as mention'd 
in our last, to lay before our readers, in a series of papers.] 

Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in 

. Virginia. 



This indifference and disregard to religion and the 
clergy, which I have endeavoured to account for, 
proceeded to no public indecencies of behaviour, ei- 
ther against religion itself, or the clergy in their pub- 
lic administrations The people regularly attended 



548 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

divine worship at church, and behaved there with 
propriety ; nor did it occasion any schism, on [sic] 
dissention in the church, which was one, throughout 
the colony, except a few of the people called Qua- 
kers, who had I believe been among the early settlers 
of the colony, who lived undisturbed, inoffensively, 
and socially among the church people. I have not 
heard of more than three of these meeting house in 
the colony, and their congregations were smalf. 
Thus matters continued 'till between 20 or 30 years 
ago, when many people came from Pennsylvania, 
and New-Jersey, also from Scotland and Ireland and 
settled in the back parts of the colony most of 
these people called themselves Scots Irish : and be- 
ing presbyterians by education, they were often vis- 
ited by ministers of their own persuasion from Penn- 
sylvania, New-Jersey, &c. At last it was agreed by 
the synods of some of those presbyterians, or con- 
gregational Societies, not only to settle ministers 
among them, but one or more in the old settlements 
in the country, where church of England ministers 
were already established; several of the people in 
those parts having heard and approved the ministers 
sent from the eastern governments, who on their vis- 
its to the Scots Irish, used sometimes to travel 
through and preach in the more populous parts of 

the country . . 

. To avoid giving offence, it was thought 
best to apply to the governor, council and general 
court, to lay their designs and pretensions before 
them, and proceed with their approbation, in erecting 
meeting houses and establishing rules and officers in 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 549 

their religious societies. Accordingly application was 
made by the minister (the late Mr. Davies, afterwards 
president of New-Jersey college) and his congrega- 
tion all they ask'd was presently granted, and those 
societies still subsist, but I have not heard that the 
number of meeting houses or of the people belong- 
ing to them, have increased since that time. 1 . . . 

[70 be continued^ 

The New York Journal, or The General Adver- 

tiser, No. 1494, August 22, 1771. 

Custom-House, Philadelphia Cleared. . . . 
Sloop Sally, T. Alberson to Amboy. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1498, Aug. 22, 



Gloucester County, Eighth Month 20, 1771, 
NOTICE is hereby given to all whom it may con- 
cern, that at the next Session of the General Assembly 
of the Province of New-Jersey, Application will be 
made for Liberty to erect a Dam across Newtown 
Creek, at or near where the Bridge now crosses the 
same ; when all persons who think themselves ag- 
grieved thereby, are requested to appear, and show 
Reasons (if any they have] why the Liberty abovemen- 
tioned may not be granted. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2226, Aug. 22, 
1771. 

To be sold at private SALE, 

CERTAIN parcels of land lying at the Wallkill, 
in Ulster county, which among other lands, were 
formerly patented to James Smith, Esq; late Secreta- 

i This article is two and a half columns long. 



550 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ry of the province of New-Jersey. Any person in- 
clinable to purchase, may apply to the Revd. Doctor 
Cooper, President of King's-College, or to Thomas 
Jones, Attorney at Law in New- York. If the lands 
are not sold at private sale, by the middle of Sep- 
tember, they will then be sold at public vendue. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1035, August 26, 1771. 

To the PUBLIC. 

The FLYING MACHINE, kept by John Merce- 
reau, at the New Blazing-Star Ferry near New- York, 
sets off from Powles-Hook every Monday, Wednes- 
day and Friday mornings, for Philadelphia, and per- 
forms the Journey in a Day and a half, for the Sum- 
mer Season, till the ist of November; from that 
Time to go twice a week till the first of May, when 
they again perform it three Times a Week. When 
the Stages go only twice a Week, they set off Mon- 
days and Thursdays. The Waggons in Philadelphia 
set out from the Sign of the George, in Second- 
street the same Morning. The Passengers are de- 
sired to cross the Ferry the Evening before, as the 
Stages must set off early the next Morning. The 
Price for each Passenger is Twenty Shillings, Proc. 
and goods as usual. Passengers going part of the 
Way to pay in Proportion. 

As the Proprietor has made such Improvements 
upon the Machines, one of which is in Imitation of a 
Coach, he hopes to merit the Favour of the Public. 

August 23, 1771. JOHN MERCEREAU. 

The N. Y. Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 

No. 1477, August 26, 1771. 



17/1] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 551 

NEW-YORK, August 26. | H^g^The RACES at 
Powles Hook comes on to-morrow. 

NEW-YORK, August 26. | Last Monday Even- 
ing was married, at Shrewsbury, in East N. Jersey, 
James DeLancey, Esq; one of the Representatives 
of this City in the General Assembly, and Son of the 
Hon. James DeLancey, Esq; late Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of this province, of beloved Memory, to Miss 
Allen, Daughter of the Hon. William Allen, Esq; 
Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, a beautiful young 
Lady, in Possession of every intellectual Virtue. 

-The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1035, Atigust 26, 1771. 



To be SOLD by | WILLIAM HULINGS, | in 
BURLINGTON, | BETWEEN Eleven and Twelve Hun- 
dred ACRES of WEST-JERSEY RIGHTS, Fourth Dividend. 

THE Qth of last month, a person unknown left a 
grey HORSE in my pasture in Gloucester; this is 
therefore to desire said person to come and take him 
away, otherwise he will be sold for the charges. 

W. HUGG. 

A HOUSE-KEEPER is wanted, to live in the 
country, in a family that consists of the master of the 
house, four other hands, and a servant girl, who can 
wash, iron, and do the drudgery, no other dairy is 
kept than what the family expends, a middle-aged- 
woman, that has been used to a country life would 
best suit : such a person, with good recommenda- 
tions (and any without need not offer) by applying 



552 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

to ROBERT LEWIS, in Philadelphia, or WILLIAM LEW- 
is at his Mill, near Croswicks, West-Jersey, may be 
further informed. 

STOLEN out of the pasture of the subscriber, 
living near Egg-Harbour road, in Waterford town- 
ship, Gloucester county, the 2ist of this instant Au- 
gust, at night, a likely chestnut sorrel MARE, with 
a blaze in her forehead, one of her fore feet white, 
paces a good travel, about 10 years old, about 14 
hands high, middling low in flesh, the hair a little 
chafed off her off side, no shoes on. Whoever takes 
up and secures the said mare, so that the owner may 
have her again, shall have Forty Shillings reward, 
and reasonable charges, paid by 

HENRY CRAWFORD. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2227, August 
29, 1771. 



be run for round the course on | Morris-Town 
L green, on Tuesday the fifth day of | Novem- 
ber next, a silver tankard of the value of | TWEN- 
TY POUNDS, | 

Free for any horse, mare or gelding, not exceeding 
three-quarters' blood, carrying weight for age and 
blood, three years old, half-blood to carry seven 
stone, the best of three two mile heats to win the 
plate. Two dollars and an half entrance, or double 
at the post. The entrance to be run for next day. 

") UN away from the subscribers, living at Spring- 
..\ field, near Elizabeth-Town, New-Jersey, two ap- 
prentice lads, one of them named Nathaniel Little, 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 553 



1 8 years old, 5 feet nine inches high, a weaver by 
trade, of a fair complexion, light hair, had pretty thick 
legs, and a down look : Had on a light blue cloth 
jacket, tow trowsers, and a white linen shirt. The 
other was named Ichabud Foster, a tailor by trade, 
1 8 years old, about 5 feet 9 inches high, darkish hair 
and complexion : Had on and took with him, three 
striped jackets, 2 pair of buckskin breeches, and a 
wool hat, and 'tis supposed are both gone towards 
Princetown. Whoever takes up and secures the said 
runaways, so that their master may have them again, 
shall receive Three Dollars reward for each, or six 
dollars for both, paid by JAMES BLACK, 

DANIEL PEARSON. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1036, September 2, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, September 2. 

Wednesday last the Powles-Hook Races began, 
when the Purse of ^100 was run for by Capt. Delan- 
cey's chestnut Colt, Sultan, Mr. Perkin's black Horse 
Steady, Mr. Dick's grey Horse, Vitriol, and Mr. Is- 
rael Waters's bay Mare, Nettle, which was won with 
great ease by the latter. And 

The Day following the purse of ^50 was run for 
by the following Horses, viz. Mr. Whitehead Cor- 
nell's Horse, Booby, Mr. Armstrong's Horse, Hero, 
Mr. Elsworth's grey Colt, Quicksilver, Mr. Butler's 
bay Horse, Bastard, Mr. Timothy Cornell's black 
Horse Richmond, Mr. Dick's grey Horse, Vitriol, Mr. 
Perkins's black Horse, Steady, Mr. Van Home's grey 
Mare, Caty Crow, and Mr. William Cornell's grey 



554 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Mare, Dove, which was won by Booby, after three 
Heats hard running. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2228, September 

5> 



Trenton, August 31, 1771. 

THERE is in the Store of the Subscribers, a large 
BOX, containing Garden Rakes, .Ropes, Tiaces, &c. 
Any Person proving their Property, and paying 
Charges, may have the same, by applying to 

FURMAN and HUNT. 

Burlington, September 2, 1771. 
THE Creditors of JOHN GOSLING, senior, de- 
ceased, are desired to attend at the House of the 
Widow Comron, Innkeeper, near Mantua Creek, in 
the County of Gloucester, or send their Accounts 
duly proved, on the 29th or 3Oth Days of November 
next, as the Trustees will then attend, in order to 
make a final Settlement of said Estate : and all those 
who are indebteded to said Estate, are requested to 
make Payment before the time aforesaid, to prevent 
Trouble. 

WILLIAM SMITH, JOHN LAWRENCE, Trustees. 

N 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. 
RUN away from the subscriber, the 22d of August 
last, near Trenton, a Mulattoe fellow, named HUM- 
PHREY, a lusty fellow, about 30 years of age, very 
near sighted ; had on, when he went away, a white 
shirt, a bearskin coat, with white metal buttons, brown 
jacket, white ticken breeches, worsted stockings, half- 
worn shoes, large brass buckles, took with him a tow 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 555 

shirt and trowsers. Whoever secures the said Mu- 
lattoe fellow, so that his master may have him again, 
shall have the above reward, and reasonable charges 
paid by me ELIJAH BOND. 

NEW- YORK, August 13, 1771. 
TO BE SOLD, 

SEVERAL Farms or Tracts of Land, situate in the 
County of Hunterdon, in the Western Division of New 
Jersey, being Part of a large Tract of Land known by 
the Name of the Society Great Tract : The Lots are 
distinguished and known by Lots No. 45, whereon 
John Tanney now lives, containing 187 Acres, situate 
within 3 Miles of New- German -Town, where there is 
a good Market for all kinds of Produce ; about 80 
Acres cleared, very good Wheat-land, and well tim- 
bered and watered. 

No. 46, adjoining No. 45, in Possession of the afore- 
~ said John Tanney, containing 218 Acres, on which is 
a good bearing Orchard, and a Quantity of very good 
Meadow, and more may be made at a small Expence : 
There is a sufficient Quantity of land cleared, the rest 
good Timber-land, which is much wanted in the Neigh- 
bourhood. 

No. 52, now in Possession #/ Matthias Camner, con- 
taining 287 Acres, situate about one Mile from New- 
German-Town, 750 Acres cleared, which is excellent 
Wheat land, and 10 Acres of Meadow in good Eng- 
lish Grass, and much more may be made with very 
little Trouble. 

No. 80, in Possession of Peter Bloome, containing 
209 and 75 Parts of an Acre, situated in the Town- 



556 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

ship of Alexandria, about 2 Miles from the River Del- 
aware, and 3 from A^xandria ; 100 Acres cleared, 
which is good Wheat lani, 10 Acres of extraordinary 
good Meadow, and more may easily be made. 

No. 83, in Possession ^/"Joseph Fishbough, contain- 
ing 284, and 40 Parts of an Acre adjoining 
Peter Bloomed Farm ; 100 Acres cleared, which is 
good Wheat land and a sufficient Quantity of Meadow 
in English Grass. 

No. 1 39, in Possession of Richard Reid, containing 
146 Acres, situate in the Township of Bethlehem, 5 
Miles from the Union Iron- Works, where there is ready 
Market for all Kinds of Produce ; jo Acres cleared, 
with 10 Acres of Meadow, and more may be made. 

The above Tracts of Land are in good Repair, with 
sufficient tenantable Houses, Barns, and other Convcn- 
iencies thereon. Any person inclinable to purchase, 
may apply to John Smyth, Esq; at Perth-Amboy,' to 
Henry Cuyler, and Barend R. Cuyler, at New- York, 
or John Emley, living near the Premises. An indis- 
putable Title will be given. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2228, September 

5, i77i. 
TO BE SOLD, | By PUBLIC VENDUE, by 

JOSEPH LEONARD, Sheriff at | Monmouth Court-house, 
in East-Jersey, on the twentieth | of September ; | 
A Certain TRACT of LAND in Barneygatt, lately 
occupied by JOHN HAYWOOD ; containing about 300 
acres of upland, and about 200 acres of salt and 
fresh meadow, with a good two-story house, almost a 
new barn, and a flourishing young orchard of about 
140 apple trees, with a good fence about it ; for which 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 557 

credit will be given for part of the money, the pur- 
chaser giving good security and paying interest for 
the Same. 

TWENTY DOLLARS Reward. | DESERTED 
from his Majesty's Twenty-ninth Regiment. | July 
29, 1771. | JAMES GORDON, labourer, aged 21 
years, 6 feet high, swarthy complexion, dark brown 
hair, hazzle eyes, pitted with the small-pox, round and 
small visage, straight and well made, born in Ennis- 
killen in Ireland. 

JOHN LOVELL, labourer, aged 57 years, 5 feet 
10 and y^ inches high, brown complexion, brown hair, 
light grey eyes, a little stoop Shouldered and well 
made. 

JOHN GIBBONS, carver and gilder, aged 27 
years, 5 feet 1 1 and ^ inches high, ruddy complex- 
ion, brown hair, light grey eyes, thin visage, and 
much carbuncled ; straight and light made. 

August 30, 1771. 

THOMAS JONES, cabinet-maker, aged 21 years, 
6 feet and *^ inch high, fresh complexion, dark brown 
hair, light grey eyes, long visage, a scar over the right 
eye, a large mole on the left cheek, heavy limbed, 
in kneed, turns in his toes when he walks, a little pit- 
ted with the small-pox, and well made ; was born in 
the town of Burrisakane, and county of Tipperary, 
in Ireland. 

JOHN HART, weaver, aged 22 years, 5 feet 10 
and y^ inches high, pale complexion, light brown hair 
inclined to curl, dark brown eyes, thin but round vis- 



558 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

age, straight and well made, born in the city of Lim- 
erick in Ireland. 

Whoever secures either the above deserters, and 
lodges them in any of his Majesty's gaols, shall re- 
ceive the above reward for each, by applying to the 
commanding officers of the 2Qth regiment at Perth 
Amboy, Brunswick, or Elizabeth-town; or to the com- 
manding officer of the 2ist regiment, at Philadelphia; 
or to the commanding officer of the 26th regiment at 
New-York. 

N. B. The public are cautioned not to harbour the 
above deserters, as they are of infamous characters, 
and have robbed their Captain, and their comrades 
of several valuables. 

GORDON is an old deserter, and was flogged out 
of the Royal Americans. 1 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1500, Septem- 
ber 5, 1771. 

Elizabeth-Town RACES. 

A Purse of FIFTY DOLLARS, to be run for on Tues- 
day, the first day of October next, free for any 
horse, mare or gelding, not thoroughbred, carrying 
weight for age and blood : Three years old, three 
quarters blood, 6 stone 11 pounds; four years old, 
quarter blood, 7 stone 4 pounds ; four years old, half 
blood, 7 stone 3 pounds ; four years old, three quar- 
ters blood, 8 stone 4 pounds ; five years old, half 
blood, 8 stone 8 pounds ; five years old, three quar- 
ters blood, 8 stone 12 pounds; six years old, quarter 
blood, 9 stone 2 pounds ; six years old, half blood, 9 

i This advertisement was repeated in The Pennsylvania Journal of January 9, 
1772. See N. J. Archives, XXVIII, 20. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 559 

stone 6 pounds ; 6 years old, three quarter's blood, 
9 stone 10 pounds; aged, quarter blood, 9 stone n 
pounds; aged, half blood, 10 stone; aged, three 
quarters blood, 10 stone 3 pounds : The two best of 
three two mile heats. Not less than three reputed 
running horses to start. Horses to be shown and 
entered the day before running, paying three dollars 
entrance, or double at the post. No person to be 
concerned in a confederacy in running their horses 
together, or in dividing the purse ; such matters to be 
determined by the judge's. 

N. B. The entrance to be run for the day follow- 
ing, by all but the winning and distance horses. 

- The New York Gazette ; and The Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1037, September 9, 1771. 

JUST PUBLISHED, and to be SOLD, Whole- 
.sale | and Retail, by ISAAC COLLINS, at his Print- 
ing | Office, in Burlington, 

THE BURLINGTON ALMANACK, for the Year of 
our Lord 1/72 : Containing, besides the usual astro- 
nomical Calculations, a Variety of useful and enter- 
taining Matter, both in Prose and Verse. 

THE MEMBERS of the CORPORATION for the Re- 
lief of the Widows and Children of Clergymen in the 
Communion of the Church of England in America, 
are requested to attend the Annual Meeting, which 
is to be held, according to adjournment, at the City 
of Perth-Amboy, in New-Jersey, on the Second Day 
of October next, being the first Wednesday after the 
Feast of St. Michael. 

JONATHAN ODELL, Secretary to the Corporation. 



560 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

Gloucester County, Ninth Month, 2, 1771. 
rPHERE will be exposed to Sale, by Way of pub- 
JL lie Vendue, on the 3Oth of this instant (Septem- 
ber) at the House of Hugh Creighton, Inkeeper, in 
Haddonfield, the two following Tracts of Land, situ- 
ate and being in the Township and County of Glou- 
cester. One Tract containing about 400 Acres, on 
which there is a Dwelling-house, Barn, and Apple 
Orchard ; also a Saw mill, commonly called, Tice's 
Big Mill, the Stream on which the Mill is erected is 
thought sufficient for a Grist-mill likewise, which 
might be advantageous to the Purchaser, as the Situ- 
ation is convenient for the black 1 Inhabitants, being 
near the landing Road, as well as to a number of 
Farmers in the Neighbourhood ; said Mill is about 5 
Miles from a public Landing. 

One other Tract of about 96 Acres, adjoining the 
above, on which there is a House and other Improve- 
ments, and is now in the tenure of John Bussell ; 
Any Person inclining to view the Premises, may apply 
to Richard Tice, living near the same. The Sale of 
said Lands to begin at One o'Clock in the Afternoon 
of said Day, at which Time the Conditions will be 
published, the whole being Part of the real Estate of 
said Tice, and assigned to us for the Benefit of his 
Creditors. 

ISAAC MICKLE, THOMAS REDMAN, Assignees. 

N. B. There are 7 or 800 Acres of Pine Land and 
Cedar Swamp, situate convenient to said Mill, the 
Property of said Tice, which may be purchased. 



back. 




NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 561 

/HEREAS MARGARET, the wife of THOMAS EL- 
TON, of Northampton, in the county of Burl- 
ington and Western Division of New-Jersey, hath by 
her extreme ill behaviour in times past, as well as at 
present, eloped from her husband, the first time in 
company with one John Alcott, a Flatman, and took 
with her goods to a considerable value, leaving her 
husband with one child not a year old ; and by virtue 
of an advertisement, with a reward of Five Pounds, 
it is supposed they parted, and she returned without 
goods or her cloaths, save what she had on, and still 
continues in a state of not being reconciled to her 
husband ; these are therefore to forwarn all persons 
not to harbour her, either by night or day, nor trust 
nor have any dealings whatsoever with her, at their 
peril, as I am resolved to prosecute whoever shall be 
found so doing; and any person or persons who 
have received the goods which are my property, 
and her cloaths, which I bought for her, are desired 
to return them to me at Mountholly, or Burlington, 
where I will receive them, and gratefully reward them, 
and will pay any debt that she has contracted upon 
them. And whereas the said John Alcott is not yet 
apprehended, I, the subscriber, do continue the above 
reward of Five Pounds and reasonable charges, to 
any person who shall secure him, in any of his Maj- 
esty's goals, so that he may be brought to justice. 
The said John Alcott is a well set fellow, about 5 feet 
10 inches high, a sandy complexion, grey eyes, has a 
down look, a large hooked nose, and wears his hair 
tied ; the said Margaret is a short thick body, a round 
likely face, black hair, flat nose, her eyes black, and 

36 



562 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

stand further apart than common from each other, 
rosey cheeks, has a small scar under her left nostril 
resembling a cross, she has lost two of her front 
teeth, talkative, and very much for singing ; she com- 
monly wears a large pair of silver buckles, the rims 
carved, and holes through the rims. 

August $o, 1771. THOMAS ELTON. 



September 5, 1771. 

To WILLIAM GOLDEN, 

Whereas a certain Patrick Braidy, alias Beatty, has 1 
advertised in the Gazette of July 4, 1771, by you, for 
feloniously taking certain Goods, not yet all known : 
And whereas the said Advertisement may be some- 
thing prejudicial to my Character, I take this Method 
to acquaint you and the Public, that my Place of 
Abode, or Residence, is in the Township of Water- 
ford, in the County of Gloucester, my Occupation is 
Flatting and going by Water, and am well known in 
Philadelphia, or up and down the River, and if you 
have any Demands upon me, I am ready and willing 
to answer you or any other Person that appears 
against me. PATRICK BRADY. 

Gloucester County Goal, September 12, 1771. 
rpAKEN up on suspicion, as a runaway servant, 
JL and now confined here, a young man about 5 
feet 6 inches high, marked with the small-pox, has on 
a blue coat, homespun shirt, and check trousers, says 
his name is Hugh M'Cage, and that he belongs to 
one William or John Miller, living near Lancaster. 
His master, if any he has, is desired to fetch him 



was 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 563 

away, and pay charges, otherwise he will be sold out 
in 3 weeks from the date hereof. 

Richard Johnson, Goaler. 

Gloucester County, New -Jersey, September 12, 1771. 
T BENJAMIN COLLINS, being under Confine- 
1 ment in the Goal of the said County, for Debt ; 
hereby give Notice to all my Creditors, that I intend 
to apply to the next Sessions of General Assembly 
of this Province for Relief, of which all Persons are 
hereby required to take due Notice. 

BENJAMIN COLLINS. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2229, Septem- 
ber 12, i 771. 

TO BE LETT, For a Term of Years, 

Not less than TEN YEARS, > ' 
The subscriber's third part of Sharpsborough fur- 
nace and forge : The forge has three fires, and one 
hammer, wooden bellows ; they are both on one dam, 
near together, with a good saw-mill, dwelling-house, 
kitchen, store, smith's shop, barn, stables, a large 
coal house, 62 by 64 feet, out houses, sufficient for 
the workmen ; the whole in good repair, been going 
three years. Also the third part of 4000 acres of 
land, to accommodate the works, whereon is cleared 
eighty acres of good meadow fit for the scythe, and 
ploughland sufficient to raise eight or nine hundred 
bushels of winter grain a year, all in good fence, and 
the farthest part not exceeding one mile and a half 
from the furnace ; the remainder part exceeding well 
timbered and very handy to the furnace, not exceed- 
ing three miles from the works to draw coal. Also 



564 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

the fourth part of a forge, with four fires and two 
hammers all built with stone, coal houses, stone dwell- 
ing-houses, and all out houses necessary, one mile 
and a half from the above furnace; also the fourth 
part of a good stone grist-mill, with one pair of stones 
overshott, on a constant spring, one mile from the fur- 
nace and half a mile from the last mentioned forge ; 
the mill and forge, last mentioned, have been built 4 
years. The worfcs are situated in a fine country for 
wheat, beef, pork, and all sorts of country produce, 
on a fine stream of water, called the Wall Kill, in the 
county of Sussex, in East New Jersey, 12 miles from 
the Court-House, 14 from Andover, 18 from Char- 
lotteburg Furnace. The tenant may have a suffici- 
ency of teams and carriages, and the privilege of car- 
rying on the remainder of the works during the lease, 
with the half privilege of the store, without any hin- 
drance or molestation whatsoever, during the sub 
scribers life, or ten years certain. Any person inclin- 
ing to lease may have them on reasonable terms, by 
applying to the subscriber on the premises, or to Mr. 
ALEXANDER TOD, merchant in Philadelphia, for 
particulars. ABIA BROWN. 

CUMBERLAND STAGE. 

THE subscriber returns his hearty thanks to his 
friends and kind customers, for the encouragement 
they have given to his Stage, and begs a continuance 
of their favours, as he has taken the house wherein 
Uriah Bacon formerly lived, which is a convenient 
house, and well situated for his business in the center 
of Roads town, he has likewise a good new waggon 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 565 

* 

compleatly fitted to carry twelve persons comfortably, 
the body of which riding on springs, from whence he 
sets out every Tuesday morning, and proceeds to 
William Cooper's ferry, and returns again on Thurs- 
days performing the stage on the same days and hours 
as usual. For the convenience of his customers in 
and about Greenwich, and of passengers going to and 
from thence, his stage will attend at Seth Bowen's in 
Greenwich every Monday evening and Friday morn- 
ing, those who please to favour him with their custom, 
may depend on the best usage from their 

Humble Servant, 
Roadstown, Sept. 12, Michael Lee. 

M. B. All letters, packets, and other things de- 
signed for his stage, are to be left at the Widow Aus- 
tin and Son's, at the new ferry-house Philadelphia. 1 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1501 Sept. 12, 
1771. 

IfCgf 3 * The Public are cautioned to beware of coun- 
terfeit New -Jersey Thirty Shilling Bills, dated April 
1 6, 1764; the Work badly executed, especially the 
Arms and the Border. The Bills appear fresh and 
clean, and are signed with the Names, John Johnson, 
Rich. Smith, and S. Smith, imperfectly resembling the 
Signing of the true Bills. 

-The New York Gazette, or the Weekly Post-Boy, 
No. 1480, September 16, 1771. 

i The Pennsylvania Gazette, No 2232, Oct. 3, 1771, has in addition to the fore- 
going advertisment the following : 

Whereas the Articles of Agreement between Michael Lee and Malachi Long, res- 
pecting the Cumberland Stage, being for no limited Time, and said Lee finding it. ex- 
tremely inconvenient for him to drive Jiis own Horses and Waggon twice a WeeTc to 
and from said Lung's House, he has therefore taken the House wherein Uriah Bacon 
formei'ly lived, which is a convenient House, and well situated for his Business, in 
the very Center of Road's Town. 

N. B. All Letters, Packets, or other Things designed, etc., etc. 



566 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 



TAKEN up adrift last Friday Morning, a Ship's 
Long-Boat. Any Person owning said Boat, and pay- 
ing Charges, may have her, by applying to the Sub- 
scriber, living near Sandy-Hook. 

Middletown, Sept. 9. ESEK HARTSHORNE. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1038, September 16, 1771. 

$^B^ The Piece signed a TRADESMAN OF NEW JER- 
SEY, will be inserted in our next. Also a Piece signed 
PHILOTHETOICUS. 

CUSTOM-HOUSE PHILADELPHIA, | CLEAR- 
ED. | ... Brig Unity, G. Ord, N. Jersey. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 245, Septem- 

ber 1 6 to September 23, 1771. 

- To be SOLD or LETT, 

THE House lately occupied by Mr. Nicholas Gouv- 
eneur, situated on Hunter's Quay : Is an excellent 
well built House, and very convenient, having four 
Rooms on a Floor, with Fire Places. 

Also, a large convenient Store House and Stable, 
in New-Street, proper for the Flaxseed Business, for 
which it was built, Bonds with good Security, will 
be taken in Payment. For further Particulars, en- 
quire of Nicholas Gouveneur, at his Place near New- 
ark, or Herman Gouveneur in New-York. 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 

vertiser, No. 1498, September 19, 1771. 



I 



Gloucester County, N. Jersey, Sept. 14, 1771. 
RICHARD DAVIS, being under Confine- 
ment in the Goal of the said County, for Debt 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 567 

hereby give Notice to all my Creditors, that I intend 
to apply to the next Sessions of General Assembly of 
this Province for Relief, of which all persons are here- 
by required to take due Notice. 

RICHARD DAVIS. 

NEW-YORK, September 16. | Yesterday Capt. 
Cobourn arrived here in a sloop from Philadelphia ; 
on Wednesday morning last, in a hard northwest 
wind, off Barnegat, he had the misfortune to loose 
his mast. Captain Cobourn saw a sloop on shore 
near the same Place, but could not discover who she 
was. 

-The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2230, Septem- 
ber 19, 1771. 

BY .HIS EXCELLENCY | WILLIAM 
FRANKLIN, Esq; | Captain General, Gov- 
ernor and Commander in Chief in and | over the 
Province of New-Jersey, and Territories thereon | 
depending in America, Chancellor and Vice Admiral 
in | the Same, &c. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

WHEREAS His Majesty, by two several orders 
in Council at St. James's, bearing date the Seventh 
day of June last, hath been pleased, with the advice 
of his Privy Council, to declare his disallowance of two 
Acts of the Legislature of this Province, one of which 
said Acts was passed in November, 1769, and is in- 
tituled, 'An Act to erect Courts in the several coun- 
" ties in this colony for the trial of causes of Ten 
" Pounds and under." The other is an Act passed 
in March, 1770, intituled, 'An Act, to explain and 



568 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l/7I 

"amend an Act of the General Assembly, passed in 
" the tenth year of his Majesty's reign, intituled, An 
" Act for the relief of insolvent debtors, and for other 
" purposes therein mentioned." And pursuant to his 
Majesty's royal pleasure thereupon expressed, the 
said Acts are thereby disallowed, declared void and 
of none effect. I HAVE THEREFORE thought fit 
to publish his Majesty's royal disallowance and repeal 
of the said two Acts by Proclamation, to the end that 
all his Majesty's subjects, whom it may concern, may 
take notice thereof, and govern themselves accord- 
ingly. 

GIVEN under my hand and seal at arms, at the 
city of Burlington, the thirteenth day of Septem- 
ber, in the eleventh year of the reign of our Sove- 
reign Lord King GEORGE the Third, Anno 
Domini \^\. , WILLIAM FRANKLIN. 
By his Excellency's Command, 

CHARLES PETTIT, D. Secretary. 
GOD SAVE THE KING. 

PRINCETON, September 17. 

The public anniversary of the Grammar School in 
New-Jersey College, will begin at nine o'clock in the 
forenoon, on Monday the 23d instant. 

On the next day, Tuesday the 24th, in the Public 
Library Room, a number of the College-students will 
contend in several branches of classical learning, for 
premiums each ot Three Pounds value. Any gentle- 
man of liberal education may be present, and give 
his vote in adjudging the premiums. The merit and 
preference of the several competitors to be deter- 



17/0 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 569 

mined by ballot. Public speaking, reading the Eng- 
lish, Latin, and Greek languages with propriety, 
written and extempore translation, will be among 
the exercises. The competition to begin at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon. 

The anniversary Commencement for conferring 
Degrees in the Arts, will be held in the Church here, 
on Wednesday, the. 25th instant. The exercises be- 
ginning punctually at ten o'clock in the forenoon. 

September 16, 1771. 
CUMBERLAND STAGES for BRIDGETOWN, 

GREEN | WICH and CAPE-MAY. | 
TA ANIEL STRETCH returns thanks to his former 
\_J customers, begs a continuance of their favours, 
and hopes to merit their esteem. Having two sets 
of horses and a good carriage, he intends to set off 
from Bridgetown on Tuesday Mornings as usual, and 
proceed to the cross roads, where William Shute 
formerly did dwell. And for the conveniency of 
Greenwich, MALACHIA LONG will drive down 
every Monday Evening for orders and passengers, 
and return back to meet Daniel Stretch's stage and 
proceed to William Cooper's ferry. And every fifth 
day set off from William Wells's at the Old Ferry ex- 
actly at sunrise (accidents excepted) and proceed to 
Cumberland county, where passengers will be taken 
to Greenwich by Malachia Long, and to the bridge 
by Daniel Stretch. And DANIEL TAYLOR has 
erected a New Stage to Cape May ; to set off from 
Bridgetown every Friday, and return every Monday 
following. All gentlemen and ladies that please to 



5/0 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

favour us with their custom, shall be properly attend- 
ed, and their orders punctually obeyed. We are the 
Publick's humble servants. 

DANIEL STRETCH, 
MALACHIA LONG, 
DANIEL TAYLOR. 
Cape-May stage will begin the i8th of October. 

The Pennsylvania Journal^ No. 1502, Septem- 

ber 19, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, September 30. | On Sunday 
se'nnight died at Princeton,, in New-Jersey, JOB STOCK- 
TON, Esq; one of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for the County of Somerset. 

7^ke Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 246, September 

23, to September 30, 1771. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBER, 
Altogether, or divided into 2 or 3 parts, to suit the 

purchasers, 

THE large and pleasant situated farm, called Corn- 
wall, on which he now lives, in the township of 
Alexandria, and county of Hunterdon, in the prov- 
ince of West New-Jersey, containing about 680 acres 
of land, about 400 of which are cleared, and laid into 
regular fields, the rest well timbered ; there is on 
said farm a handsome stone house, two stories high, 
with a piazza in front, and two wings, the one a kitch- 
en, the other lodging rooms; a well built shingled 
barn, two old orchards, and one large young orchard, 
of 400 apple trees, beginning to bear, chiefly grafted 
fruit, about 40 acres 'of English meadow, situated 
along the front of the house, great part of which is 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 571 

watered by several fine springs, about 15 or 20 acres 
more may be made ; the fields are all well watered 
by living springs, the house pleasantly situated on an 
eminence, nearly in the middle of the farm, and so 
conveniently, that the meadow, and all the fields, 
may be seen in one view from the door ; there is an 
English church at about a half a mile distance from, 
and in view of the house ; it also lies very conven- 
ient to several mills and stores, Pittstown being on 
one side, about one mile and a half distance, where 
there are two grist-mills, a fulling-mill and saw-mill, 
a large well assorted store ; and on the other side, 
about two miles distance, is another mill; it is also 
about 5 miles from the town of Alexandria, adjoining 
the river Delaware, which is about 42 miles from 
Philadelphia, from whence all goods and produce are 
conveniently brought and carried by water. On the 
whole, it is a well situated farm or seat, for any gen- 
tleman that inclines to purchase and live in that part 
of the country. Whoever wants to purchase Said 
farm, may apply to the subscriber, living on the 
premises, who will dispose of it on very easy terms 
of yearly payment, giving 4 or 5 years to pay the 

whole (if required) paying interest. There is a 

good stock of cattle, horses and sheep, with a com- 
pleat sett of farming utensils on said farm, which the 
purchaser may also have at a reasonable rate with 
the farm. 

He has also to sell, about 800 acres of good land 
on Paulinskill, in Sussex county, New-Jersey, divided 
into farms, now on rent ; this tract is some of the 
best land in the county, and exceedingly well calcu- 



5/2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

lated for the keeping of stock of all kinds, as there 
is a large quantity of meadow already brought into 
English grass, and convenient outlets to a fine range ; 
it is situated about 4 miles from the Court-house in 
that county, and 9 miles from the Andover Iron- 
works. The same easy terms of payment will be 
given to the purchaser of this tract, as mentioned for 
the aforesaid farm, and an indisputable title given to 
the purchasers of the whole by 

LEWIS STEVENS. 

WHEREAS HANNAH, the wife of the subscriber, 
did, on the i ith day of this instant September, 1771, 
without my consent, elope from me ; these are there- 
fore to forbid all persons to trust her on my account, 
for I will pay no debts of her contracting after this 
date ; and all persons are forbid paying to her any 
money that is now due to me, or shall hereafter be- 
come due for rent, or otherwise. 

SILVANUS TOWNSEND, junior, 

of Cape-May. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A VALUABLE plantation and tract of land, situate 
in the township of Greenwich, and county of 
Gloucester, in West New-Jersey, lying on the great 
road from Gloucester to Cape May, near a place 
called the Lake, late the estate of George Miller, de- 
ceased, and where he formerly kept a public house, 
containing about 487 acres, about one third part 
whereof is excellent meadow ground, the remainder 
good upland, well timbered, about 50 acres of which 
is cleared and within good fence ; whereon there is 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 573 

an orchard, and a goo'd dwelling house, with a well 
of good water near the same, a good barn, stables 
and other out-houses, all in good repair. The said 
plantation will be very suitable for any person that 
inclines to follow raising of cattle, and grazing, by 
reason of the great quantity of meadow that may be 
made thereon, and the vast outlet or range for cattle, 
which it affords, as it is but thinly settled thereabouts. 
Any person inclining to purchase tl.se said premises, 
may know the terms, by applying to JOSEPH MATHER, 
in Gerrnantown township, in the county of Philadel- 
phia ; WILLIAM HUGO, in Gloucester ; or JOHN BEAS- 
LEY, at Alloway's Creek, in Salem county, West New- 
Jersey. 

Gloucester county, New-Jersey, Sept. 16, 1771. 

JAMES MAFFETT, being under confinement in 
the goal of the said county for debt, hereby gives no- 
tice, that he gives up all his goods and chattels to his 
creditors, and has applied to the next session of 
General Assembly of the said piovince for relief, of 
which all persons are hereby to take due notice. 

JAMES MAFFETT. 

JUST PUBLISHED and to be SOLD, by ISAAC | 

COLLINS, at his Printing Office in Burlington, | 
rPHE BURLINGTON ALMANACK, for the Year of 
JL our Lord 1772: Containing, besides the usual 
astronomical calculations, the following useful and 
entertaining matter, both in prose and verse, viz. 
i. A Poem on the season ; 2. A short essay on ag- 
riculture ; 3. On the education of youth ; 4. On the 
pleasures and advantages of society with the fair sex ; 



574 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

. 

5. On drunkenness ; 6. On* gaming; 7. On integ- 
rity ; 8. On solitude; 9. On detraction; 10. On 
marriage ; n. Advice to the ladies ; 12. On a con- 
sultation of four physicians; 13. The triple plea; 
14. The honest confession ; 15. Approved maxims, 
and wise sayings; 16. A list of his Majesty's coun- 
cil of New-Jersey ; 17. A list of the Representatives 
of Assembly for New-Jersey; 18. The time of hold- 
ing the supreme and other courts in this and the ad- 
jacent provinces; 19. The stated times of meeting 
of the eastern and western councils of proprietors; 
20. Quakers general meetings; 21. A table of the 
value and weight of coins ; 22. A table of interest at 
6 and 7 per cent. 23. Time of holding fairs ; 24. 
Roads northeastward, &c. 25. Receipt to make an 
excellent diet drink for the Dropsy ; 26. To cure the 
gripes in children ; 27. For the hives in children ; 
28. For the worms ; 29. For the vertigo, or head- 
ach [sic] ; 30. For a sore throat; 31. For the 
Rheumatism; 32. For the gripes ; 33. For the piles ; 

34. To make a safe and universal purging potion ; 

35. For a wound made by a rusty nail, &c. 36. To 
make a very useful salve ; 37. For an ague ; 38. To 
backen a fellon ; 39. To cure a fellon ; 40. To stop 
vomiting; 41. For the yellow jaundice ; 42. To cure 
a swelling from a bruise ; 43. For hoarseness ; 44. 
A method to make the deaf hear ; 45. To make child- 
ren cut teeth easy; 46. To make an emplaster of 
white and red lead ; 47. To make soap without fire 
or sunshine ; 48. To cure the botts in horses ; 49. 
To cure the rot in sheep, &c. &c. 

Where also may be had, on very reasonable terms, 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 575 

a variety of books and stationary, drugs and medi- 
cines. 

CAME to Greenwich point Ferry, opposite Glou- 
cester, in June last, a bright sorrel MARE, white 
mane and tail, a blaze down her face, her fore and 
hind feet white, a natural trotter, and appeared to 
have been lately docked. The owner is desired to 
come, and prove his property, pay charges, and take 
her away. RICHARD RENSHAW. 

-The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2231, September 
26, 1771. 

To be Run for in Elizabeth-Town 
ON Tuesday the first day of October, A Purse of 
50 dollars, by horses agreeable to an advertisement 
in Mr. Game's paper of September 23. Horses to 
be entered by Capt. Samuel Smith, at the sign of the 
King's arms. 

Newbridge, Hackinsack. 

The Public are informed, that as Mr. Barber has 
declined his School : the Subscriber being liberally 
educated in New-Jersey Cbllege, is unanimously 
chosen to succeed him in the Care of the Youth. 
The same approved Method of Education will be 
continued, which hath heretofore been practised in 
this School. 

Boys will be fitted for College in the most accurate 
and expeditious manner, by 

The Public's most obedient 

And very humble Servant, 

JOHN WRIGHT. 



5/6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

N. B. All the Branches of an English Education 
will also be taught with the utmost Care and Atten- 
tion. 

The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1499, September 26, 1771. 

Mr. GODDARD, 

Please to let the following observations of a TRADES- 
MAN of New-Jersey, have a place in your useful paper, 
by which you will oblige many of your readers, besides 
your friend and constant customer. 

To the PRINTER: 
SIR, 

YOU must know I am a Tradesman of Ne%v- Jersey, and for many 
years have carried on considerable business in my way; by which 
I necessarily contracted many debts, which through the great scarcity of 
circulating cash, I was unable to pay in time: Actions of course were 
brought against me for small debts, but one of which exceeded Ten 
Potinds, in the courts of common pleas, which remained some time in 
court before I was able to discharge them; at last, having got some mon- 
ey, which I thought would be sufficient to pay my debts and costs, I wait- 
ed on the attorney concerned against me. The first debt was Eight 
Pounds Nineteen S hillings and S evenpence, light money, the costs S even 
Potinds Fifteen Shillings and Sixpence, proclamation ; the second was 
Seven Pounds Seventeen S hillings and Fourpence, the costs Six Pounds 
Nineteen S hillings and Sixpence ; the third was Nine Pounds Eleven S kil- 
lings and Sevenpence, light, the costs proc. Six Pounds Seventeen Shil- 
lings and Sixpence. These three actions took all my present cash to dis- 
charge them, and there yet remained a fourth debt of Fourteen Pounds 
Seventeen Shillings and Ninepence unpaid. I posted to my creditor, and, 
after much entreaty, prevailed with him to give me an order to his attor- 
ney to stay further proceedings for four months, with which I waited on 
the attorney, who received me with a good deal of civility I desired him 
to be so kind as to let me know what costs were then due, which he gave 
me in writing, Ten Pounds Seventeen Shillings and Sixpence, at the same 
time telling me, if I had not come, he should have given the sheriff an ex- 
ecution against me the next day. I then asked him, as he seemed a bet- 
ter natured man. than those I had been with before, how so much costs 
could be made on those small debts that I had paid, and shewed him the 
bills of costs ; he examined them, and said he believed they were right, 
according to the tables of fees, if the services charged were done, which he 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 577 

could not doubt, but, if I Ihought otherwise, I might get the bills of costs 
relaxed, &c. however I went home determined, if possible, to get money 
to pay him in the four months, which, with hard labour, and disposing of 
my horse and cow v I obtained ; on the day appointed, I went and paid 
the debt, interest and costs, amounting in the whole to Twenty-sevtn 
Pounds Eighteen Shillings and Sixpence, light. This was in Augtist, 
1769 I really thought myself very happy from what I had heard of oth- 
ers, when I thus got clear, for a short time must have taken all I had in 
costs however, I continued my business with all industry, and the next 

year was, notwithstanding, sued again before Justice B , for a debt 

of Eight Pounds Seventeen S hillings and Tenpence. I went to the justice, 
and told him the debt was justly due; he told me I was intitled to 
three months stay of execution as I was a freeholder I confessed a judg- 
ment, and some days before the time was up, I paid the justice the debt 
and interest. He told me there were Three Shillings and Threepence cost, 
which I chearfully paid him, and then informed him what costs I had paid 
the last year, and desired him to inform me the reason why all my credit- 
ors had not been so kind as to have let him sued instead of the lawyers. 
He informed me the Governor, Council and Assembly had passed an act 
in December 1769, impowering justices of the peace to recover all debts 
under Ten Pounds, which before that time could not be done ; that the 
costs, if he had given an execution against me, would have been but Six 
S hillings and Ninepence, and that if I had stood a trial, and did not like 
to trust his judgment, I might have had a jury of six men to have judged' 
the cause, and then the costs would have been, in Common, not above 
Eighteen Shillings. Finding the great advantage of this excellent Ten 
Potind\a.w, I begged the justice to lend it me, which he did. I took it 
home, and read it over twenty times ; the more I read it, the better I liked 
it ; it clearly appeared to me to be one of the best laws this province ever 
had, the whole tenor of it being consonant with reason, therefore consist- 
ent with all laws that small debts should be recovered with small fees, 
is so exceedingly reasonable, that it astonished me that so advantageous a 
law had not been passed almost as soon as the colony was settled. I re- 
turned the law to my good neighbour the justice, who asked me how I liked 
it ; I told him that I really thought there was not a man in the colony that 
could dislike it. He told me I was mistaken, for all the gentlemen law- 
yers disliked it. On recollecting myself, I told him I did not doubt that, 
because by this law the industrious poor tradesmen and others were taken 
entirely out of their hands, to the amount of all debts under Ten Pounds. 
I asked the justice what was the material objection that the lawyers had 
against this excellent poor man's law. He answered the attornies thought 
it too large a sum to trust a single magistrate with. I replied, that was 
really no objection at all, for 1 , by the law, either plaintiff or defendant 
could have a jury of six men of the neighbourhood, being freeholders, if 
they did not choose to trust to the justice's determination, and the verdict 
37 



5 78 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ 1 77 1 

of the jury must be the justice's judgment, so that their objection was at 
once removed I then asked the justice if all actions that came before 
him were litigated. His answer was, not above one in twenty, on an av- 
erage at most, and he believed not so many that generally the defendant 
acknowledged the debt, confessed judgment, took the benefit of the law, 
by staying execution three months, otherwise paid the debt and costs, if 
under Forty S hillings This put me upon considering the immense sav- 
ing this law must be to the industrious tradesmen and others in this colo- 
ny. You must know, Mr. Printer, that I thought myself so much inter- 
ested in the many excellent advantages that the common people had and 
daily did receive from this beneficial Ten Pound law, that I have made it 
my business to enquire of every magistrate, with whom I had the least ac- 
quaintance, what number of the actions that came before them were liti- 
gated ; the answer, by some, not one in thirty, and others not one in 
twenty, which induced me to conclude what an immense saving is this law 
to the colony ! And now let me intreat every freeholder and inhabitant 
in this province, to join unanimously with me, and heartily petition the 
Governor, Council and Assembly at their next session, to revive the afore- 
said law, for such further limitation of time as they, in their wisdom, shall 
see meet ; and in order to carry this matter with decency into execution, 
let a petition be draw^n and copied, and sent into every township in the 
colony ; arid let every well-wisher to so salutary a work make a business 
of getting every freeholder and inhabitant to sign ; Then let one person 
from each county collect and carry up the petitions of his own county to 
the General Assembly ; by which means the sentiments of the colony will 
be ascertained at the same time I could wish some abler pen would take 
up the matter that so beneficial a law may be constituted, is the sincere 
desire and prayer of 

A TRADESMAN OF NEW-JERSEY. 
New- Jersey, i^th August, 1771. 

*This excellent law expires by its own limitation, at the next session of the 
General Assembly. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 247, Septem- 
ber 30 to October 7, 1771. 

A Tract of land to be sold on Long-Island, con- 
taining about 500 acres together, with mead- 
ow adjoining Islip's line. Any person inclinable to 
purchase the same, may apply to Nicholas Vaghte, at 
Grig's Town, in Somerset, New-Jersey. 

RUN-AWAY from the subscribers, living in Mill- 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 579 

stone, near Somerset court-house, in the county of 
Somerset, in New-Jersey, on Saturday night the 2ist 
of September, two negroes, one named WILL ; he can 
read, write and cypher, and it is supposed he has 
wrote a pass : Had on when he went away, an half 
worn hat, linsey woollsey coat andjacket good leath- 
er breeches, black woollen stockings, and a pair of 
mens shoes ; he plays very well on the fiddle, and 
took one with him, and is about 5 feet 8 or 9 inches 
high. The other named Prym, is about 5 feet 9 inch- 
es high : Had on when he went away, one lent or 
stolen hat, linsey-woollsey coat, leather breeches and 
new shoes, pretty long hair, and one of his great toes 
cut off; he speaks very good English and Dutch, and 
we suppose they will stay together. Whoever takes 
up and secures them so that their masters may have 
them again, one is about 30 years oM, and the other 
about 25, shall have Six Dollars and all reasonable 
charges, paid by us, 

Captain STOFFEL PROBASCO, 

Or, HENDRICK PROBASCO. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1040, September 30, 1771. 

Shrewsbury, Sept. 26, 1771. 

On Monday the 23d Instant died, after a short Ill- 
ness, Mrs. Cooke, Wife of the Rev. Mr. Cooke, Mis- 
sionary at Shrewsbury. She was a Woman so truly 
amiable in her Temper and Disposition, and so ex- 
emplary in the Discharge of every Christian and rel- 
ative Duty, as justly endeared her to all that knew 
her, and renders her Death greatly and sincerely la- 



580 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

mented by all her surviving Relations, Friends and 
Acquaintance. 1 

77ie New York Gazette ; and The Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1041, October 7, 1771. 

New- Jersey, Gloucester County, 

September 29, 1771. 

FOUR DOLLARS Reward. | RUN away on 
the 29th instant, from the subscriber, a Negroe man, 
named KENT, about 24 years of age, a middle sized 
fellow, and pock-marked ; had on, when he went 
away, a white linen shirt, brown broadcloth coat, old 
black plush jack,et, new leather breeches, thread 
stockings, new shoes, with carved metal buckles, and 
a new felt hat. He has lived in Philadelphia, where 
he followed sweeping of chimnies, and it is very like- 
ly is lurking about town. Whoever takes up said 
Negroe and secures him in any goal, so that his mas- 
ter may get him again, shall have the above reward, 
and reasonable charges, paid by 

WILLIAM COOPER. 

N. B. All masters of vessels, and others, are forbid 
to harbour or conceal said Negroe at their peril. 

Penn s-Neck, Salem County, New-Jersey, 

Sept. 1 6, 1771. 

THIS may certify all whom it may concern, that 
we, the inhabitants of Lower Penn's-Neck, do intend 
to petition the Assembly of said province, at their 
next sitting, for a repeal of an act, passed in Novem- 

i Mrs. Cooke was Graham Kearny. dau. of Michael Kearny, of Perth Amboy, 
and granddaughter of Gov. Lewis Morris. For a notice of the Rev. Samuel 
Cooke, missionary at Shrewsbury, see N. J. Archives, 20: 636. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 581 

her, i 760, for laying a toll on the bridge and cause- 
way, from Stony Island, unto the land late belonging 
to Richard Woodnut, and likewise for liberty to 
have the same laid out four rod wide ; and also that 
the said inhabitants may be enabled to maintain the 
said bridge and causeway, as other public highways, 
&c. 

September 26, 1771. 

""1O be sold, in Mansfield, in Burlington county, 
.1 within a mile of Bordentown, a plantation con- 
taining 1 06 acres, 20 acres of meadow ground, with 
40 acres of good land, a young orchard, a good dwell- 
ing-house, and barn, with a well of good water by the 
door, and within half a mile of Lewis's and Foster's 
grist-mills, and two good landings within a mile of the 
same. For terms, enquire of MAHLON THORN, on 
the piemises, who will give a good title for the sam 



e. 



RUN away from the subscriber, in West-Nant- 
well township, Chester county, on the i8th of Sep- 
tember last, an indented servant boy, called John 
Mitchell, about 17 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches high, 
straight black hair, with a linen shirt, check trowsers, 
old hat, and shoes ; says he was bred near Trenton, 
in the Jerseys, writes a good hand ; it is supposed he 
will forge a pass ; said servant was brought out of 
Chester goal the day before he ran away. Whoever 
takes up said servant and secures him, so as his mas- 
ter may get him again, shall receive Four Dollars re- 
ward, and if brought home, reasonable charges, paid by 

MICHAEL GRAHAM. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2232, October 3, 
1771. 



582 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

PRINCETON, (New-Jersey,) Sept. 25. 
Yesterday was held, in the Public Library of the 
College in this place, before about twenty Gentlemen 
of liberal education, A COMPETITION for PREMIUMS, in 
the following branches of study. 

1. Reading the English language with propriety, 
and answering questions on the Orthography. On a 
decision by ballot, the first premium was adjudged 
to Aaron Burr, of the junior class ; the second to 
William Linn, of ditto ; the third to Belcher Peartree 
Smith, of the Sophomore class. 

2. Extempore exercises in the Latin language. 
The judges thought proper that the premium should 
be equally divided between Brockholst Livingston 
and David Witherspoon, both of the freshman class. 

3. Reading the Latin and Greek languages with 
propriety. The first premium was given to John 
Witherspoon, of the sophomore class; the second to 
Aaron Burr, of the junior; the third to Henry Lee, 
of the sophomore. 

4. Written translation of English into Latin. The 
Judges, on reading the several pieces, decided in fa- 
vour of Henry Lee, of the sophomore class. 

5. Public speaking. As the competitors were nu- 
merous, and the judges were highly pleased with each 
of the performances, it was very difficult to decide 
the pre-eminence. On a division the majority of 
votes adjudged the first premium to William Brad- 
ford, of the junior class ; the second to William Linn, 
of ditto ; the third to Hugh Hodge of the freshman 
class. 

This day the anniversary COMMENCEMENT of the 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 583 

College of New-Jersey was held in the Church here. 

After the usual procession, the business of the day 
was introduced with Prayer by the President, and a 
piece of vocal music performed by the Students. 

The exercises were conducted in the following or- 
der, 

1. Mr. Brackenridge delivered a Salutatory Latin 
Oration " De societate Hominum" 

2. The following Proposition, "Mendacium est 
semper illicitum" was defended by Mr. Williamson ; 
who was opposed in the syllogistic form by Messrs. 
McKnight and Taylor. 

3. Mr. Black supported this Thesis, " Moral qual- 
" ities are confessedly more excellent than natural ; yet 
" the latter are much more envied, in the possessor by 
" the generality of mankind : A sure sign of the cor- 
" rupt bias of human nature" Mr. Cheeseman op- 
posed him, and was answered by Mr. Taylor. 

4. Mr. Campbell pronounced an English Oration 
on "The advantages of an active life" : And the bus- 
iness of the fore-noon was concluded with an Anthem 
by the Students. 

5. At three o'clock the Audience again convened, 
and, after singing by the Students, Mr. Spring de- 
livered an English Oration on "The idea of a Patriot- 
King" 

6. An English forensic Debate on this question, 
" Does ancient Poetry excel the modern ?" Mr. Fren- 
eau the respondent, being necessarily absent, his ar- 
guments in favour of the ancients were read to the 
ass-:mbly: Mr. Williamson answered him and sup- 
ported the moderns ; and Mr. McKnight replied. 



584 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

7. A Poem, on "The rising glory of America" 1 was 
spoken by Mr. Brackenridge, and received with great 
applause by the Audience." 

8. Mr. Ross delivered an English Oration on 
" The Power of Eloquence." 

9. The Students sung an Anthem : After which 
the following- young Gentlemen were admitted to the 
first Degree in the Arts, viz : Gunning Bedford, John 
Black, Hugh Brackinridge, Donald Campbell, Ed- 
mund Cheeseman, Philip Freneau, Charles M'Knight, 
James Madison, Joseph Ross, Samuel Spring, James 
Taylor, and Jacob Williamson. 2 

1 In The New YorTf. Gazette and The Weekly Mercury, No. 1041, Oct. ?, 1771, the 
title is given as "The rising glory of the Western World." 

2 The following biographical sketches are principally from Alexander's 
"Princeton College in the Eighteenth Century:" 

GUNNING BEDFORD while a student in college married Jane B. Parker, one of 
the most elegant and accomplished women of her times, who brought her first- 
born child to Princeton, leaving it in the care of Mrs. President Witherspoon 
while she went to the church to hear her young husband's valedictory address at 
Commencement After graduating Mr Bedford became a lawyer, and rose to em- 
inence in Delaware, his native State In 1785 and 178o he was a member of the 
Continental Congress; and in 1787 was a member of the Convention which formed 
the Constitution of the United States. In 1796 he was elected Governor of Dela- 
ware, and soon after was the first appointee of Washington to the United States 
District Court of Delaware, which position he held with distinguished honor until 
his death in March, 1812. 

JOHN BL.AUK, a South Carolinian by birth, was licensed by Donegal Presby- 
tery. October 14, 1773, and was ordained and installed pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church of Upper Marsh Creek, York County. Pennsylvania. August 15. 1775. On 
April 10. 1794. he was released from his charge, but continued to preach in various 
places without any regular settlement Mr. Black possessed a high order of tal- 
ent, and was especially fond of philosophical disquisitions He died August 6, 1802. 

HUGH HENRY BRACKENRIDGE came to this country from Scotland when quite 
young. He supported himself while in the higher classes in college, by teaching 
the lower classes. In conjunction with his class-mate, Philip Freneau, he wrote 
a poem in dialogue, between Acasto and Eugenic, on the " Rising Glory of Amer- 
ica," which he delivered at commencement, and which was published the next 
year in Philadelphia. After graduation, he remained two years as a tutor, pur- 
suing at the same time the study of theology. Mr. Brackenridge was licensed to 
preach by the Presbytery of Philadelphia in 1777, but resigned his license a few 
months afterwards. For several years after leaving the college he taught school 
in Maryland, but in 1776 he went to Philadelphia, and supported himself by edit- 
ing the "United States Magazine." In 1781 he located at Pittsburg. from which 



J770 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 585 



The following Gentlemen, allumni of this College, 
proceeded Masters of Arts, viz Waightstill Avery, 

city he was sent to the legislature. He was closely associated with Albert Galla- 
tin during the Whisky Insurrection, and when the affair was over he published 
' Incidents of the Insurrection in the Western parts of Pennsylvania 1794." In 
1786 he published a political satire, "Modern Chivalry ; or, The Adventures of 
Captain Fa r rago and Tea^ue O' Reagan, his servant." After an interval of ten 
yjars he published the second part. The whole, with his last corrections, was 
published in Pittsbm-g in 1819. In 1789 he was appointed Judge of the Supreme 
Court of Pennsylvania. A few years before his death he removed to Carlisle, 
where he died June 25, 1816. 

DONALD CAMPBELL joined the American army from New York, and on July 
17, 1775, was commissioned Quartermaster General of the New York Department, 
with the rank of Colonel in the Continental Army, serving in that capacity until 
June 2, 1784. 

PHILIP FRENEAU was born in New York City. January 2, 1782, being descend- 
ed from a French Huguenot family. He began to write verses very early, and 
while residing in New York in 1774 and 1775, published a series of poetical satires 
on thr royalists and their cause, which speedily made him famous, tn 1776 he 
visited the Danish West Indies, where he wrote several of his best poems. Two 
years later he was at Bermuda, and in 1779 was in Philadelphia, superintending 
the publication of the "United States Magazine," In 1780 he sailed in the "Au- 
rora" for St. Eustatia, but, was captured in sight of Cape Henlopen by the British 
frigate Iris, and carried to New York and confined in a prison-ship, from which 
he eventually escaped. He subsequently became -a sea captain and made many 
voyages between 1784 and 1789, and 1798 and 1809. In 1790 he was editor of the 
"Daily Advertiser" in New York ; and in 1791 was appointed by M:. Jefferson 
" interpreter of the French language for the Department of Sta'te." In 1795, he set 
up his own press at Mount Pleasant. Monmouth county, New Jersey, and com- 
menced the publication of his "Jersey Chronicle," which he continued for 
one year. In 1797 he st'arted in New York "The Time Piece and Literary Com- 
panion," which was published three times a week, in a neat folio form. In 1798 
Freneau's name disappears from the paper. He perished in a snow-storm, on his 
way home on the night of December 18, 1832, in the eightieth year of his age. 

CHARLES MCKNIGHT, a son of the Rev. Charles McKnierht, was born in Cran- 
berry, New Jersey, October 10. 1750. After graduating, he studied medicine with 
Dr. William Shippen, of Philadelphia, of the class of 1754, and entered the army 
as Surgeon of the Pennsylvania Battalion of the Flying Camp, serving as such 
from June to December. 177<* ; he was appointed senior Surgeon of the Flying 
Hospital of the Middle Department, in April, 1777, and Surgeon General of the 
same, February 21, 1778. and Chief Hospital Physician. October 6, 1780. serving un- 
til January 3, 1782. He was with the main army in all its movements, and the du- 
ties of his office he performed with signal ability. At the close of the war he set- 
tled in New York city, and became Professor of Anatomy and Surgery in Colum- 
bia College, where he delivered lectures on these two branches of medical sci- 
ence, and where he enjoyed the reputation of being the most eminent surgeon of 
his day. Dr. McKnight died November 16, 1791. 

JAMES MADISON, President of the United States, 1809-1817, was born March 5, 
1751. Dr. Witherspoon remarked to Jefferson, in reference to Madison, that in 
his whole course in college, he had never known him to do or say an indiscreet 
thing. While in college he was a laborious student, during a part of the course 
allowing himself but three hours out of the twenty-four for sleep. The state of 



5 86 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ 1 77 I 

Richard Devens, William Charles 1 Houston, Thomas 
Reese, Thomas Smith, and Isaac Story. 

Samuel Wilson, Esq; of Maryland, for his known 
literary merit and reputation, was complimented with 
the Degree of Master of Arts. 

The Rev. William Jackson, of Bergen in New-Jer- 
sey, M. A. in Yale-College in Connecticut, and King's 
College in New-York, was admitted ad eundem. 

Messrs. John McClarren Breed, and Thomas 
Wooster, Masters of Arts in Yale College, were ad- 
mitted ad eundem. 

Jacob Bankson, M. A. in Philadelphia College, was 
admitted ad eundem in this College. 

Michael Joyce, Bachelor of Arts in Harvard Col- 
lege, was admitted ad eundem. 

10. A pathetic Valedictory Oration on Benevo- 



Churchill. 



opinioii in the college in regard to the oppression of the colonies by Great Brit- 
ain, may be learned from an extract of a letter from Madison to Thomas Martin, 
his former tutor, and himself a graduate of the class of 1762 : " We have no pub- 
lic news but the base conduct of the merchants of New York in breaking through 
their spirited resolution not to import. Their letter to the merchants in Phila- 
delphia, requesting their concurrence, was lately burned by the students of this 
place in the college yard, all of them appearing in their black gowns, and the bell 

tolling There are about an hundred and fifteen in 

the college and the grammar school, all of them in American cloth." After grad- 
uating, Mr. Madison spent about a year at Princeton studying Hebrew with Dr. 
Witherspoon. On his return to his home, he applied himself to the study of the- 
ology and kindred sciences. Mr. Madison entered upon public life in May, 1776, as 
a member of the Convention of Virginia which formed the first Constitution, and 
which instructed its delegates in Congress to prepare the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. His subsequent career is a part of the history of his country. 

SAMUEL, SPRING was born in Massachusetts. While in college he was called 
upon on a certain occasion to explain and defend the Copernican System in the 
presence of the class, when, after proceeding awhile, he became overwhelmed 
with a sense of the Divine majesty, and burst into tears, so that he was unable to 
proceed. In 1774 Mr. Spring was licensed to preach, and immediately joined the 
Continental Army as a chaplain, and was in the severe campaign to Canada under 
Arnold. At the close of the year 1776 he left the army and began preaching at 
Newburyport, Massachusetts, where he was ordained and installed August 6, 1777. 
He remained at Newburyport until his death, March 4, 1819. The honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him in 1806 by Princeton. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 587 

lence, by Mr. Bedford, concluded the exercises. 

The whole was conducted with the greatest pro- 
priety. The Speakers performed their several parts 
with spirit, ingenuity and address ; and met with the 
highest marks of approbation and applause from a 
numerous, polite and discerning audience. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1504, October 
3, 1771 ; The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2232, 
October 3, 1771 ; The Pennsylvania Chronicle ', 
No. 247, September 30, to October 7, 1771 ; 
The N. Y. .Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1483, October 7, 1771 ; The New York 
Journal, or, The General Advertiser, No. 1 500, 
October 3, 1771 ; The New York Gazette ; and 
the Weekly Mercury, No. 1041, October 7, 
1771. 

PHILADELPHIA. | We hear from Princeton, that 
on the 22d ult died there JOB STOCKTON, Esq; one of 
the Judges for Somerset county, New-Jersey. He 
was a gentleman of excellent capacity, and great ap- 
plication to business, and at the same time unblem- 
ished integrity and singular humanity, which makes 
his death at the age of 38 deeply and universally re- 
gretted. He has left by his will ^100, to the Col- 
lege of New-Jersey. 

TO BE SOLD.: -,. 

A Certain Trac^of Land, now in the tenure of DR. 
OTTO, situate on Salem road and on Repaupa 
creek, in Greenwich Township, in the county of 
Gloucester, West New-Jersey, about two miles be- 
low Mantua creek bridge, and 1 5 miles from the city 



588 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

of Philadelphia ; on which is erected a neat stone 
dwelling house, 2 stories high, 35 feet front and 20 
feet deep, and a stone kitchen, 18 feet by 13, with a 
chamber over the kitchen ; a well of excellent water 
by the house, a good orchard and about 20 acres of 
meadow are made or may be made on the said tract, 
and several constant streams running through the 
said land; containing in the whole 100 acres, about 
30 of which are thriving young timber, the rest 
cleared ; the soil at least equal to any in the neigh- 
bourhood : It is an excellent situation for a store, 
being in a well settled part of the country, and but 
two miles from water carriage to the city of Phila- 
delphia. For terms apply to JAMES BIDDLE, 
Esq; in Philadelphia ; or to JOHN SCULL, in Read- 
ing. 

TTTHEREAS it appears to the Managers of the 
V V Filature, that the following persons, viz. JOHN 
EDWIN of Bethlehem ; FREDERICK ANTES, Esq; of 
Philadelphia county ; JANE DAVIS of Chester county ; 
JOHN ASHBRIDGE of Lancaster ; and DANIEL LONG- 
STRETH of Bucks county, all of Pennsylvania. 
MARMADUKE WATSON of Chesterfield ; SARAH BISP- 
HAM of Burlington county; and JOSEPH MORGAN of 
Gloucester county, all of New-Jersey ; are claimants 
for some of the prizes for raising Cocoons for the 
year 1771, but have not yet sent the requisite certif- 
cates of the number by them raised within their res- 
pective families, and delivered at the Filature. They 
are therefore desired to send the said certificates to 
the Managers on or before the 25th day of October 



177*] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 589 

next, when the premiums will be finally adjudged. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1 504, October 



New-Jersey, Somerset County, Sept. 24, 1771. 
"^HESE are to give Notice, to all whom it may 
JL Concern, that we do intend to petition the Leg- 
islature of the Province of New Jersey, at the next 
sitting of General Assembly at Perth-Amboy, to at- 
tain an Act, to secure us in repairing an ancient Mill- 
dam across Rariton-River, which has been lately torn 
up by a number of People in an arbitrary manner. 

JOHN HART and 
JOHN POLHEMUS. 

TO be sold, 15,000 Stock Brick, fit for Furnaces 
and Forges. The Quality of these Bricks, 
which were manufactured by Isaac Conro, deceased, 
is so well known in regard to their Quality for stand- 
ing the most intense Heat, that it will be needless to 
say any thing more about them, than that they are 
well burnt, and to be sold by the Subscriber, who 
will send them to New-York, agreeable to Directions, 
or deliver them at the Kill, at Amboy. 

STEPHEN SKINNER. 

TO BE RUN FOR, 

ROUND the course at Morris-Town, and to be 
won by the best of three two-mile heats ; a SILVER 
TANKARD of TWENTY POUNDS value, on the fifth 
day of November next, free for any horse, mare, or 
gelding, not exceeding three-quarter blood, carry- 
ing weight for age and blood ; to wit. Half 






59O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

bloods, 3 years old, six stone four pounds ; four 
years old, 7 stone 4 pounds ; five years old, 8 stone ; 
six years old, S stone 9 pounds ; and aged horses 
nine stone. Three quarters blood, 3 years old, 7 
stone 4 pounds ; four years old, 8 stone ; five years 
old, 9 stone 2 pounds, six years old, 10 stone; and 
aged horses, ten stone 5 pounds. 

N. B. undoubted credentials of the horses blood 
will be required, and anything above half blood, will 
be adjudged three quarter blood. Four pounds al- 
lowance for fillies will be given. 

THIS is to give Notice to the Publick, That a 
young Lad, about 16 Years of Age, who calls him- 
self John Miller, and says his Master's Name is 
Edward Hill, was lately committed to Trenton Goal, 
Hunterdon County, and will be sold to pay Cost and 
Goal Fees, on Thursday, the 24th of October, In- 
stant, if no Owner appears before that Time. 

PETER HANKINSON Goaler. 

The N. Y. Gazette ; and the Weekly Mercury, 
No. 1041, October 7, 1771. 

TEN POUNDS Reward. 

WHEREAS the Swedish Church, called Trinity 
Church, in Wilmington in Newcastle county, was 
broke open in the night between the last day of Sep- 
tember and first of October, and robbed of the fol- 
lowing articles, viz. Two new large hangings 

belonging to the pulpit and the communion table ; a 
cushion, all of green broadcloth, garnished with 
strings ; a white fine diaper linen table-cloth, a pair 



I77l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 59 1 

of bellows, for the stove in the church, quite new. 
The church wardens and vestrymen of said church 
offer the above reward to any person or persons, 
who shall be able to discover this sacrilege, so that 
the villain or villains may be apprehended, con- 
victed, and for such an atrocious crime duly pun- 
ished. 

N. B. The person suspected is one who calleth 
himself WILLIAM DAVIS, came from Philadelphia 
last Friday, went to Newcastle on Sunday, and as it 
is very probable, committed the robbery in that 
church on Sunday night, came to Wilmington on 
Monday, was seen very early on Tuesday morning, 
walking with a pair of bellows in his hand, on board 
of Mr. George Gordon's shallop ; in which he, also 
had a man's and a woman's saddle, a calicoe pillow 
case and some other bundles supposed to contain 
stolen goods, as the saddles and some other things 
were stolen in Wilmington that night. He left Mr. 
Gordon's shallop in Philadelphia on Wednesday, 
taking the above mentioned goods along with him, 
in order to carry them on board the Burlington 
stage. This man then had on and wore, an old blue 
great coat, a lightish grey under coat, a striped cali- 
coe jacket, striped ticken trowsers ; was about 5 feet 
8 inches high, fair complexion, sandy hair, red locks, 
middling large, on each side of his face, and had one 
of his hands very much cut, as it is supposed, from 
breaking the window of the church. 

TEN POUNDS REWARD. | Stolen from the 
house of JOSEPH TUCKER, junior, in Spring- 



NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

field, in the borough of Elizabeth, East New-Jersey, 
on the 1 6th of September last viz. Two suits of 
cloaths, one of a li^ht purple colour, broad-cloth, the 
other blue ; two red waistcoats, one of everlasting, 
the other broadcloth ; two good beaver hats, one 
with a broad gold lace on ; one pair of white worsted 
stockings, one pair of blue yarn ditto ; one fine shirt ; 
a pair of silver knee-buckles, and a silver stock- 
buckle ; one pair of buckskin breeches, very little 
worn ; one striped bordered waistcoat ; one redish 
brown Barcelona handkerchief of a changeable col- 
our, and sundry other articles. The above cloaths 
were stolen by a person who goes by the name of 
THOMAS KENAUR or CONAR, who broke open 
the house of the said Tucker ; also a chest and cup- 
boarcl, in which the cloaths lay : He is about five feet 
six inches high, thick set, and has black hair, and 
very much addicted to lying. Whoever apprehends 
the above described thief, and secures him in any of 
his Majesty's gaols, so that he may be brought to 
merit his just reward, shall receive the above sum 
of TEN POUNDS by applying to the subscriber. 

JOSEPH TUCKER, Junior. 

N. B. It is thought he is gone towards Virginia, 
and it is probable he will wear some of the above 
cloaths. 

Cumberland County, New-Jersey, September 30, 1771. 

WHEREAS I the subscriber, being under confine- 
ment in the gaol of the said county for debt, hereby 
give notice to all my creditors, that I intend to apply 
to the next sessions of general assembly of this prov- 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 593 

ince for relief ; of which all persons are hereby re- 
quired to take due notice. JOHN SWINFEN. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1505, Oct. 10, 



NEW-YORK, October 10. | Friday evening the 
ship Lady Gage, Capt. Kemble, arrived here from 
London, in 9 weeks, with the following passengers, 
besides 34 privates for his Majesty's 29th regiment, 
now lying in New-Jersey, viz: Thomas Woldridge, 
Esq ; and Capt. Crozier of the 29th, with their 
Ladies ; Capt. Corantz, J. Gordon, Esq ; attorney 
general of East-Florida, Dr. Savage, of Virginia, 
Lieut. Farmer of the i8th, Lieut, Merr, Ensigns 
Beaumont, Maunsell, and Williams, Mr. Garbrand, 
Mr. Humphreys, Mr. Blunt, Mr Rhodes, &c. . v 

On Wednesday the 2d Instant was held, at Perth- 
Amboy, the annual Meeting of the Corporation for 
the Relief of the Widows and Children of Clergy- 
men in the Communion of the Church of England in 
America ; when a. Sermon, adapted to the Occasion, 
was preached by the Rev. Dr. Chandler} His Ex- 
cellency Governor FRANKLIN, and several Gentle- 
men of the first Rank among the Laity~ who are 

i A | SERMON | PREACHED BEFORE | THE | CORPORATION | For the 
Relief of the WIDOWS and CHILDREN of | CLERGYMEN, in the Communion of the 
CHURCH | of ENGLAND in AMERICA ; | AT | THEIR ANNIVERSARY MEETING 
ON | October 2d, 1771, at PERTH-AMBOY. | TO WHICH is ANNEXED | A BRIEF 
ABSTRACT | OF THEIR | PROCEEDINGS. | BY THOMAS B. CHANDLER, 

D. D. | Rector of St. John's- Church, Elizabeth Town, NEW- | JERSEY, and Mis- 
sionary from the Society for the \ propagation of tJie Gospel in foreign parts. \ SOLD 
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE FUND. | BURLINGTON, Printed by ISAAC COLLINS. | 
80 Title, and dedicationto Gov. Franklin, 2 leaves. Sermon, pp (l)-35. Sigs. (A)- 

E. Charter of the Society, Abstract of Proceedings, list of subscribers and sub- 
scriptions, &c., list of members and officers, and form of legacy, pp. 41-76 Sigs. 
F-I in 8s, K in 4s. The omission of pp. 37-40 is evidently an error. 

38 



594 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

members of the Corporation, were so kind as to at- 
tend ; and the largeness of the Collection made, in 
Church, for the Use of the laudable Institution, is 
greatly to the Honor of the Congregation that were 
present. 

The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1501, October 10, 1771. 

STOLEN out of the pasture of the subscriber, the 
8th inst. a dark brown gelding, rising four years old, 
supposed to be better than 14 hands high; he paces 
and trots, one of his hind feet is white, and the rest 
has a few specks of white also ; has a speck in his 
forehead, a long dock, is newly shod before, the fore 
part of his hind hoofs is pear'd off, and flat footed. 

Stolen also from the subscriber at the same 

time, a hunters saddle, newly mended before and be- 
hind, green cloth housen considerably worn. The 
above is supposed to be taken by a person who 
passed by the name of John Davis, a native of Ire 
land ; he was not explicit in his discourse, but spoke 
rather short ; a likely looking middle siz'd smooth 
skin'd fellow, about 22 years of age, and black 
curl'd hair; had on and took with him when he went 
off, a light colour'd sagothee coat, a blue pea jacket, 
a striped silk do. without sleeves, lappel'd, a pair of 
light coloured stocking breeches with black knee 
bands, besides a bundle of other cloaths, which can- 
not be particularly described, as he was a transient 
person. Whoever takes up and secures the said 
horse without the thief, so that the owners may have 
him again, shall have the reward of Five Pounds, and 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 595 

together with the thief Seven Pounds > paid by me 
WILLIAM SMITH of Elizabeth-Town, Rahway, 
County of Essex, East-New-Jersey. 

TO be run for on Thursday the 3ist inst. round 
the new course at Powles Hook, a match for Thirty 
Dollars, between Booby, Mug, Bastard, and Quick- 
silver, to run twice round to a heat ; to carry catch 
riders, and start precisely at two o'clock. 

THE Public are hereby notified, That the GRAM- 
MAR SCHOOL, in Hackinsack, is continued ; where the 
Languages, Book-keeping, and Mathematics, &c., 
are taught with Care and Fidelity. 

PETER WILSON. 

-The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 
cury, No. 1042, Oct. 14, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, October 21. | On the T 2th Inst. 1 
departed this Life, near Gloucester, in New-Jersey 
Mr. EDWARD EVANS (Father of the late Rever- 
end NATHANIEL EVANS) a Gentleman of exem- 
plary Piety and Virtue. His remains were brought 
to this City and decently interred in Friends' Bury- 
ing Ground. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 249, October 
\\to October 21, 1771. 

Messieurs HALL and SELLERS, 

Please to insert the following in your useful Paper, 
and you will oblige your constant Reader. 

I observe, inj:he Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2230, 

i See note on the Rev. Nathaniel^Evans, N. J..'Archives, 25:121, 482. 



596 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

that his Excellency WILLIAM FRANKLIN, Esq ; has is- 
sued a Proclamation, whereby we are informed of 
his Majesty's Royal Disallowance of two Acts of the 
Assembly of the Province of New-Jersey ; one of 
which Acts authorised Justices of the Peace, in the 
said Province to try and determine Actions of Debt, 
&c. of Ten Pounds and under. 1 As a Well-wisher to 
the Prosperity of the Province, I cannot but lament 
the Loss or so useful and beneficial a Law, which has 
been in Force near two Years, to the intire Sat- 
isfaction of the People (the Lawyers only excepted) 
particularly of those who it was executed upon, not 
one of whom, that I have heard of, has made the 
least Complaint against it. The small Cost that 
arises upon an Action before a Justice of the -Peace, 
which, if Execution was granted and served, is but 
Six Shillings and Nine-pence, or Seven Shillings and 
Three-pence, unless the Matter was contested, and 
even then rarely exceeded Twenty Shillings. The 
Advantage that Accrued to the Public from this use- 
ful Law, may be deduced from a Number of Facts ; 
Justices of the Peace being dispersed over the Prov- 
ince, consequently Suits were prosecuted at much 

i "An Act to Erect Courts in the several Counties in this Colony for the Trial 
of Causes of Ten Pounds and under," was passed by the Assembly and sent up to 
the Governor and Council for concurrence, November 16, 1769. It was passed by 
the Council, with amendments, November 24, and returned to the Assembly, who 
accepted two of the amendments and rejected the others, and so notified the 
Council, the same day. On the 28th the Council receded from the amendments re- 
jected by the Assembly, and the bill finally passed. The Governor gave his as- 
sent to the act, December 6, 1769. A'. J. Archives, XVIII., 69, 83-85, 89, 103. It was 
disallowed by the King in Council, in June, 1771. 70., 217, 219. The Legislature 
thereupon enacted a new measure, a supplement to "An Act for the speedy recov- 
ering Debts from Six Pounds to Ten Pounds in the Inferior Courts of Common 
Pleas of this Colony for small Fees," in order to meet the Royal objections, and 
this received the Governor's assent on September 26, 1772. 70., X., 333; XVIII., 
349. A new Act was passed in 1775. Allinson's Laws, 468. 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 597 

less Expence to the Parties, than if they had been 
brought into the County Courts, the Courts being 
held, in some Counties, Forty or Fifty Miles from the 
extreme Parts of the County ; the Loss of Time, and 
private Expences of the Parties are very consider- 
able ; the unreasonable private Fees that the Attor- 
nies too often demand, and the extravagant Bills of 
Costs which they charge, make every Cause that is 
brought into the County Courts, cost the poor Debt- 
or at least Three Pounds more, than if it had been 
determined before a Justice of the Peace, 

The Gentlemen of the Law say, that Disputes are 
not determined so well before a Justice of the Peace, 
as in the Upper Courts ; but as few Appeals were 
brought, I must conclude, that Matters were gener- 
ally settled according to Equity. In the County of 
Burlington there has not been one Appeal, that I 
have heard of, since this Law has been in Force, 
which proves, to a Demonstration, the usefulness of 
the Law ; for had the Parties been dissatisfied with 
the Justices Determinations of Disputes, they would 
undoubted have appealed. From the best Enquiry 
that I have made, there were between Eighty and 
One Hundred Actions brought before Justices of the 
Peace in the last Year, in the County of Burlington, 
where the Debt due, or Demand, has been from Six 
to Ten Pounds, and allowing Three Pounds saved to 
the Parties in each Action, which is below the Mat- 
ter, and reckoning Ninety Actions in the County 
yearly, makes a Saving of Two Hundred and Seventy 
Pounds in the Year ; and from the Proportion that 
Burlington County pays of the Sinking-fund Tax, 



598 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

there would be saved upwards of Two Thousand 
Pounds a Year in the Province, if this Law had con- 
tinued in Force ; a Sum nearly sufficient to support 
the Civil Government of the Province. This Calcu- 
lation is made in the most favourable Manner, as I am 
persuaded Burlington County has as little Suing in it ? 
for its Bigness, as any County in the Province, owing 
to its being one of the richest. I cannot find that 
there is any Law now in Force in the Province, that 
authorises Justices of the Peace to determine an 
Action of Debt of One Shilling, and how long the 
Public will be satisfied, in this Situation, is not what 
I shall undertake to determine. 

AN INDEPENDENT FREEHOLDER. 

Nottingham , September 23, 1771. 

LIST <?/" LETTERS remaining in the Post- Office, 

Philadelphia. 

A. Adam Allenson, Salem. 

B. John Booth, Salem County ; Joseph Branden, 

(4) Bordentown. 

C. David Collins, Woodbury ; Thomas Cooper, 

Mount-holly ; Rev. Nicholas Collean 1 , Raccoon. 

^ i The Rev. Nicholas Collin, of Upsal, Sweden, Theologiae Studiosus, was ap- 
pointed by the Swedish Consistory, Curate to the Swedish church, May 19, 1769, 
and was sent to America by the Swedish government, in 1770. In an account of 
the Swedish missions, entered by himself in the record of the ancient church at 
Swedesboro (formerly Racoon), New Jersey, he relates that he arrived here May 
12, 1770, as minister extraordinary, and officiated throughout the mission, but es- 
pecially at Racoon and Penn's Neck, until the departure of Mr. Wicsell, in the 
autumn of 1773. In 1775 Mr. Collin was Dean of the Swedish parishes in America. 
By letters to the Archbishop and Consistory of Upsal, dated July 8, 1778, he ur- 
gently solicited his recall. He had then officiated for above eight years in the 
mission, and was consequently entitled to preferment at home. Moreover, the dis- 
ordered state of affairs here owing to the war, made it seem imperative that he 
should leave, and he threatened to return home in the following spring, without 
waiting for a recall. (During the year 1777 he was regarded by the Americans as 
a spy, and was threatened with death. Penn. Mag., 15:482. And for his account of 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. > 599 

E. Robert Ewing, East Nottingham. 
H. Rev. James Hannah, 1 Pitts-town. 
I. Edward Irwin, Mount-holly. 
M. William M'Dowell, Haddonfield. 
R. David and Samuel Robinson, Hopewell. 
W. John Whitehill, Pequa; JeremiahWalton, Green- 
wich. 

events in 1778, see Penn. Mag . 14: 219.) Finally, the King of Sweden, on Novem- 
ber 22, 1782, granted his recall. By that time, however, affairs had improved, 
with the end of the war, and he concluded to remain a short time. He was rector 
of the churches named from 1773 until July, 1788. and for seven years provost of 
the mission. -Annals of the. Swedes on the Delaware, by the Rev. Jehu Curtis Clay, 
D. D., second edition, Philadelphia, 1S58, pp. 122-125 His narrative, as entered in 
the Swedesboro Church records, December 10, 1791. is published in full in the 
Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, 16: 349-358. "The Parish of 
Racoon," says the Rev. Israel Acrelius, writing in 1758, "lies upon the east side 
of the river Delaware, in the Province of New Jersey . . . Under the name of Ra- 
coon is understood the Swedish church and parish, which, extending the width of 
three Swedish miles, may be called the only one in the Province, with the excep- 
tion of Pennsneck. Racoon is also the name of the navigable stream which emp- 
ties into the Delaware, and upon which the church stands. The name comes from 
the river which the Indians called Memiraco and Naraticon ; but the Swedes in 
former times, Araratcung. Ratcung, and now, finally, Racoon ; in Swedish or- 
thography, Racuun. " Acrelius, Hist. New Sweden, 314. The site was bought for 
a church there, by deed dated September 1. 1703, and a church erected In 1704. 
It)., 318. "The congregation of Pennsneck is in the Province of West New Jersey, 
in the Government of Burlington, Salem county, in the Townships of Upper and 
Lower Pennsneck, Pilesgrove and Mannington, on the east side of the Delaware, 
and along its strand. " A site for a church was secured from Jean Jaquett. who 
gave two acres of land for the purpose, by deed dated January 8, 1715. in the middle 
of the Neck, on the highway. "The building of the church was immediately 
commenced, but it was not completed until March 31, 1717, when it was consecra- 
ted and called St. George's church. It is twenty-four feet square, built of logs. 
and weatherboarded. " Acrelius, op ctt., 322-323. On August 10, 1785, Mr. Collin 
was appointed by the King of Sweden rector of Wicaco and the churches in con- 
nection therewith. " The parish of Wicacoa, " writes Acrelius, in 1758, " is in the 
Province of Pennsylvania, and its members live partly in the city of Philadelphia, 
and partly in various surrounding districts Wicacoa, Moyamenzing, Passayungh, 
a district along the Schuylkill, Kingsess, Bond's Island, and Pennypack, in Phil- 
adelphia county : Kalkonhook, Amasland, and Matzong in Chester county. " A 
site was given for a church in 1697, and the church erected, being dedicated July 2, 
1700, as " Gloria Dei. "Hist. New Sweden, 202-207. During the ensuing vacancy at 
Racoon and Penn's Neck, Mr. Collin says : "I gave the congregations every at- 
tention consistent with my distant situation and multiplicity of business. At 
Swedesboro I performed divine service every third Sunday during the summer 
and autumn of 1786, and at longer intervals the two following years. I likewise 
visited some worthy members in their sickness, and preached some funeral ser- 

i Probably the Rev. John Hanna is meant, of whom a sketch by the late Dr. 
Henry Race appears in The Jerseyman, Flemington, 1895, III., 13. 



60O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

TO BE SOLD 

That most agreeably situated and valuable FARM, 
(late Mr. Saltar's) in New-Jersey, where the sub- 
scriber now lives, on the river Delaware, about two 
miles below Trenton Falls. The whole farm con- 
tains about 360 acres of land, 154 of which is excel- 
lent low meadow, in fine improvement, and divided 
into eight several fields, well fenced, and the whole 

mons. Besides, I made frequent journeys for settling the business of the new 
church. Penn's Neck could not possibly obtain the same share of service, yet I 
officiated a few times at that church, and also preached occasionally at houses on 
afternoons, after finishing the service at Racoon. " In the meantime besought to 
secure a settled minister to fill the vacancy. Ultimately (in 1790) the Rev. John 
Croes was engaged by the vestry, and continued to serve the church for many 
years. The church now ceased to be a mission, dependent on the bounty of the 
Swejdish King, and became affiliated with the Episcopal church in America. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Croes was elected the first Bishop of New Jersey. Clay's "Annals," 
129-130. "At the time Dr. Collin received his appointment as rector of these 
churches (at Wicaco, etc.) the Swedes began to feel the necessity, from the little 
knowledge of the Swedish language remaining among them, of having clergymen 
set over them, who had received their education in this country," and accordingly 
the vestry of the Wicaco church directed the wardens to notify the Archbishop 
of Upsal: " As the Rev. Mr. Collin has expressed a desire of returning to his na- 
tive country shortly; whenever his majesty of Sweden shall think it proper to 
grant his recall, the mission to these congregations will undoubtedly cease." The 
relation which was then expected to be so brief, extended over nearly half a cen- 
tury. Dr. Collin "presided over these churches for a period of forty-five years: 
in which time he married 3375 couple, averaging about eighty-four couple a year. 
Dr. Collin, during the whole period of his ministry, was held in high esteem by his 
congregations. He possessed considerable learning, particularly in an acquaint- 
ance with languages, . . . He was a member, and for some time one of the vice 
presidents, of the American Philosophical Society, and was also one of the found- 
ers of the 'Society lor the commemoration of the landing of William Penn.' " 
Clay's "Annals," as cited, pp. 126-127. In 1799 Dr. Collin translated a considerable 
portion of Acrelius's "History of the Swedes on the Delaware," for the use of 
the Rev. Dr. Samuel Miller, of Princeton, who was then engaged in preparing his 
"Church History." Dr. Miller appears to have turned this translation over to the 
American Philosophical Society, by whom it was transferred to the New York 
Historical Society (organized in 1804), which published the same in its Collections, 
New Series, 1841, Vol. I., pp 401-448. Dr. Collin's unabated interest in the Swedes- 
boro church, nearly twenty years after leaving it, is shown in an impassioned let- 
ter he wrote, April 30, 1804, to Dr. James Stratton, near Swedesboro, protesting 
against the proposed sale of a tract of land which had been devised to the old 
church. Penn. Mag., 14: 211. Dr. Collin died at Wicaco. October 10, 1831, in his 
87th year. His portrait, from a drawing evidently made in his extreme old age, 
by R. G. Morton, and engraved on stone by Neusam, is prefixed today's "Annals," 
quoted above, 1st ed., 1835, and is inserted in the 2d ed. opposite p. 118. His wife, 
Hannah, died of yellow fever, in Philadelphia, Sept. 29, 1797, aged 48 years, two 
months, and is buried in the old Gloria Dei churchyard, in South Second street. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6OI 



dry enough for any kind of grain or hemp, for which 
the soil is particularly adapted. The cleared upland 
contains about 1 20 acres, properly divided, and in 
good fence. The remainder is very good wood and 
timber land, a very fine outlet or range for cattle and 
horses, both above, and on the river below. The 
orchard is large, thrifty, and of the best grafted fruit, 
both for Cyder and housfc use. The garden is large, 
neat, well inclosed, and stored with a variety of the 
very best table fruit. The house, barn, stables, 
smoke-house, and other out-houses, are all in good 
repair. About 200 tons of hay, with about 50 acres 
of wheat and rye in the ground, will also be disposed 
of, if chose, together with sevejal farming Negroes, 
men, women and children, breeding mares, young 
and old horses, a large stock of cattle, hogs, sheep, 
and farming utensils of all kinds, &c., boats, net, &c. 
there being some valuable fisheries on the river, with- 
in the lines. The elegant situation of this place, 
and the noble prospect it commands, both for extent 
of view, as well as lawn and water scenes, must ever 
recommend it as a seat to any gentleman of taste, 
and for sport none excells, particularly for the gun 

and angling, in the different seasons, many other ad- 
vantages attend it both as a valuable and profitable 
farm, as well as a genteel seat, that are too numer- 
ous to be described here, and better understood on 
a view of the premises ; which, if not sold within six 
months from the date will then be leased for a term 
of years. If the purchase money be well secured, 
and interest regularly paid, the principal may remain 
8 or ten years, if agreeable, or more. 

WILLIAM PIDGEON. 
Bow Hill, October 10, 1771. 



602 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

THIRTY SHILLINGS REWARD. 

WAS lost, or stolen from the subscriber, living in 
Salem, New Jersey, on the loth of September last, 
a SILVER WATCH, with a China face and silver 
cock piece, maker's name Sol. Hughes, London, No. 
197, steel chain, two brass keys, and a silver seal. 
Any person who has or may find the same, shall re- 
ceive the above reward, upon delivery of the watch 
to Jacob Hollinshead, watch and clock maker, in 
Salem, or to the subscriber ; and it is hoped that if 
it should be offered for sale, information thereof will 
be given as above, for which the person informing 
shall receive the same reward, provided the watch is 
recovered for the owner, by 

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM. 

N. B. All Watch-makers are desired to stop her. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2234, October 17, 

1771. 

Princeton, New-Jersey, October i, 1777. 
TT 7 HERE AS Rebecca, the wife of the subscriber, 
V V has eloped from me, and behaved very bad; 
likewise defiled his bed : This is therefore to forbid 
all persons not to trust her upon my account, as I 
will pay no debts of her contracting since her elope- 
ment. JAMES RATSFORD. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1506, October 

17, 1771. 



Subscriber having been unanimously chosen 
1 to succeed Mr. Barbej, as master at the school 
at New-bridge, in Hackinsack, he will use his utmost 
endeavours to merit the approbation of all con- 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 603 

cern'd, by his care and attention in the Education of 
his pupils, whom he will instruct in all the necessary 
branches of English learning-, and fit for College in 
the most expeditious and accurate manner. 

The situation is remarkably healthy, and delight- 
ful, abounding with the best provisions. 

The Scholars may be boarded for 14. Pr. Ann. 
which is from 4 to 6 cheaper than at any of the 
neighboring schools. 

The school will be opened on monday next the 
1 4th of October, 1771, by the public's 

"most obedient humble Servant, 

JOHN WRIGHT. 

The New York Journal, or The General Ad- 
vertiser, No. 1502, October 17, 1771. 

List of Letters remaining in the General Post Office, 

New- York, October 10, 1771. 
(C.) Archibald Campbell, Hackinsack. 
(N.) Trever Newland, Stafford, New-Jersey. 

JAMES CONN | WRITING MASTER, at Elizabeth- 
Town, | BEGS leave to inform the Public in general, 
and his employers in particular, that he intends to 
open his School on Monday the 4th of November, 
and hopes to have the satisfaction of finding the In- 
habitants heartily engaged with respect to the Edu- 
cation of their children ; which (if that should happi- 
ly be the case) would conduce much to the Encour- 
agement of the Teacher. 

As the said CONN has engaged to teach Writing 
and Arithmetic in the Grammar School, wou'd fur- 



604 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [ I 77 I 

ther inform the Public that he professes to teach 
English Grammar, and Merchants Accompts, ac- 
cording to the Italian Method ; Geometry and Trig- 
onometry, Plain and Spherical ; Surveying, Naviga- 
tion, Gauging, Dialling, Algebra, &c. &c. 

As also, the most useful and most difficult Part of 
Geography, viz. Drawing Maps and Charts, either 
Plain, Mercator, Spherical, or Conical ; together with 
their Explanation, and the Reason why each Kind 
are drawn in the Manner they are. 

Furthermore, the said CONN, at leisure Hours, en- 
graves Shop Bills, Bills of Parcels, Bills'of Exchange 
or any Kind of Writing for the Rolling-Press, and in 
the neatest Manner. 

N. B. Any Gentlemen who shall please to favour 
him with their Commands, may depend on having 
them executed as compleat as in London. 

NEWARK RACES. 

A Purse of TWENTY-FIVE POUNDS to be run for on 
Tuesday the 2qth of this present Inst. October, 
(if a fair Day, if not the first fair Day] free for any 
Horse, Mare or Gelding, not more than ^ Blood, 
(Mr. Whitehead Cornell ' s Horse Steady, and Mr. 
Timothy Cornell's Horse Richmond, excepted] the 
Horses to carry Weight for Age and Blood, viz. 
Three Years old, ^ Blood, to carry 7 Stone 7 Ib. */ 
Blood, 6 Stone 7 Ib. y Blood, 6 Stone. Four Years 
old, y Blood, 8 Stone 7 Ib. % Blood, 7 Stone j Ib. 
y^ Blood, 6 Stone 10 Ib. Five Years old, y^ Blood, 9 
Stone 3 Ib. y 2 Blood, 7 Stone n Ib. y^ Blood, 7 Stone 
4 Ib. Six Years old, ^ Blood, 9 Stone 10 Ib. y 2 



I/7l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 60$ 

Blood, 8 Stone j Ib. y^ Blood, 7 Stone 10 Ib. Aged, 
y^ Blood, 10 Stone ; y 2 Blood, 8 Stone 7 Ib. y^ Blood, 
8 Stone. Not less than three reputed running Horses 
to start. Horses to be shewn and entered the Day be- 
fore running, with William Bott, paying 30 s. En- 
trance, or double at the Post. No one Person to run 
two Horses, nor be concerned in running their Horses 
in Partnership, or dividing the Purse. Proper Cer- 
tificates to be produced from under the Hand of the 
Breeder, or the Oivner put upon Oath, if disputed, to 
their Horses Blood and Age. To run two mile at a 
Heat ; the Horse that wins two Heats the first to have 
the Purse. Proper Judges will be appointed to deter- 
mine all Disputes that may arise. The Horses to start 
at 2 o Clock. 

N. B. The Entrance Money to be run for the Day 
following, by all but the winning and distanced 
Horses. 

To be sold at public Vendue, on the i3th day of 
No | vember next, at the House of WILLIAM 
WRIGHT, | Tavern-keeper, in Perth-Amboy, in 
New-Jersey. | 

Three-tenth Parts of a Propriety, or Twenty- 
fourth Part of all the unlocated Lands in the East- 
ern Division of the Province of New-Jersey, afore- 
said, being Part of the Share of Propriety of the late 
D. D. Dunstar, deceased, died seized of; together 
with three-tenth Parts of one Twenty fourth Part in 
common of the valuable Tract of Land called Romo- 
pock, 1 in Bergen County, and Province aforesaid ; 

i For a brief note on the Romopock (or Ramapo) tract, see N. J. Archives, 
XIX., 425. 



606 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

together also with a proportionable Part of the Pro- 
prietary House in Perth-Amboy aforesaid. The 
Title to the same may be seen at the Proprietor's 
Office in Perth-Amboy aforesaid, kept by John 
Smyth, their Register. The Sale will begin at two 
o'Clock in the Afternoon, when the Conditions will 
be made known. 

SAMUEL WOODWARD, and 
NATHANIEL WOODWARD. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1043, October 21, 1771. 

The Corporation for the Relief of the Widows and 
Children of Clergymen, in Communion of the Church 
of England, in America, at their last meeting held at 
Perth-Amboy, unanimously chose his Excellency our 
Governor a Member of that Corporation ; and have 
accordingly presented him with an Address on the Oc- 
casion, to which he was pleased to return an obliging 
answer. 

The New York Gazette, or, The Weekly Post- Boy, 

No. 1485, October 21, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, October 28. | Thursday last 
was married Dr. WILLIAM BARNET, jun. of Elizabeth- 
Town, to Miss BETSEY STOWE, of this City. 1 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No, 250, October 21 

to October 28, 1771. 

October 22, 1771. 
A CAUTION to the PUBLIC. 
About the 3d inst. a small young man, who call'd 

i For a sketch of Dr. Barnet, see N. J. Archives, 2d Series, I.. 452. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6o/ 

his Name Ward, (in Company with two others, who 
went by the Names of Thompson and Johnson) came 
to my Store in Fairfield and passed a Five Pound 
Bill, which proved to be a Counterfeit of the last 
Emission of New- York Money Bills ; and it is thought 
these Men had with them Counterfeit Money of all 
Sorts, of New-Jersey, and New- York Bills and Dol- 
lars. Ward is about 6 Feet 5 Inches high, had on a 
short brown lapelled Coat, a red double breasted 
Waistcoat, and black Breeches. Thompson, about 5 
Feet 10 Inches high, thin Visage, black Complexion 
and Hair ; had on a dark brown broad Cloth Coat, 
and a striped Waistcoat. Johnson about 5 Feet 1 1 
Inches high, fair Complection, light Hair, and 
had on a light blue Coat. Whoever detects and 
brings these Fellows to Justice, will do a Benefit to 
the Public. JOSEPH HAN FORD. 

To the PUBLIC. , ; , 

WHEREAS the Trustees of Queen's College, in New- 
Jersey, at their Meeting in May last (the Honoura- 
ble Frederick Smith, Esq; presiding) did fix said Col- 
lege at the City of New Brunswick, and at their last 
Meeting-, held according to appointment of the form- 
er, on the fifth of this Instant, at the Place aforesaid, 
(his Excellency William Franklin, Esq; presiding) it 
was unanimously agreecj, that in order to carry this 
Institution into immediate Execution, an able well 
qualified Person be elected and appointed Tutor, to 
instruct the Students who shall offer themselves, in 
the learned Languages, liberal Arts and Sciences, in 
order to prepare them for the usual Degrees ; and 



608 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1/75 

for that Purpose elected, constituted, and appointed, 
Mr. Frederick Frelinghousen, 1 who is also to teach 
the English Language grammatically. The Trustees 
have likewise ordeied that the Revd. Messieurs John 
Light, 2 Jacob R. Hardenberg, 3 and Johannis M. Van 
Harlingen 4 together with the Tutor aforesaid, do take 
upon them the Government and direction of the said 
Institution until a well qualified President can be 
procured. The Publick is therefore notified, that the 
said College will be opened on the second Tuesday 
of November next, at the Place appointed, where 
proper Attendance will be given. It is supposed 
that the Character of the Gentleman appointed 
Tutor is become so well known, by discovering 
his singular Genius in the Course of his studies at 
Nassau Hall, (where he had a liberal Education) 
that it needs no farther Recommendation from us. 
The Public may depend upon finding good and suffi- 
cient Board at private Houses at said Place, and as 
cheap (if not cheaper) than at any other Places 
where Colleges are erected. As said College is cal- 
culated to promote Learning in general for the good 

i For sketch of Frederick Frelinghuysen, see ante, pp. 266-267; and 2d Series. 
II., 279. 

u For sketch of the Rev. Johannes Leydt, see N. J. Archives, XIX.. 519. 

3 For sketch of the Rev. Jacob Rutsen Hardenberg, see N. J. Archives, 2d Ser- 
ies, II., 116. 

4 The Rev. Johannes Martinus Van Harlingen was b. near Millstone, in 1724. 
He is said to have entered the College of New Jersey as a student, but his name 
does not appear in the list of graduates. He went to Holland to study theology, 
and was licensed by the Classis of Amsterdam. April 6, 1761, and ordained by that 
classis May 4, 1761," as minister in the American churches. Returning to this 
country he was called to the Neshanic and Sourland churches, which he served 
from 1762 until his death in 1795, with zeal and fidelity. Until near the close of 
his life he preached exclusively in the Dutch language. He was a member of the 
first board of Trustees of Queen's College, and worked to secure its original en- 
dowment. He m. 1st, Sarah Stryker; 2d, Elizabeth Van Deursen. Corwin's 
Manual, 4th ed., 829; Centennial of New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 429. 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 609 

of the Community, therefore the Gentlemen Stu- 
dents may expect to be treated with becoming Can- 
dour, without any Discrimination with Respect to 
their Religious Sentiments ; and will also have Op- 
portunity to attend the divine Worship of different 
Denominations in said City The Students offering 
themselves to enter said College, shall be admitted 
into such of the Classes as they shaU be qualified 
for. 

By Order of the Trustees, 

JACOB R. HARDENBERG, Clerk. 
New-Brunswick, the loth Oct. 1771. 
The New York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1503, October 24, 1771. 

To be SOLD by the SUBSCRIBERS, 

A plantation, situate on Rancocas Creek (well 
known by the name of the Spaw) near Mount-holly, 
Burlington county, West New-Jersey, containing 
about 158 acres, be the same more or less, with a 
good frame house thereon, and stone cellar under 
the same, a good kitchen, and other outhouses ; 50 
acres whereof drained meadow, in good bank ; and 
an extraordinary spaw-spring near the house, none 
to exceed it perhaps in America. Also a lot of 
ground in Philadelphia, situate on the south side of 
Cedar-street, beginning at the corner of a lane on 
the side aforesaid, and extends along the said street 
about 225 feet, and back 300 feet, containing by 
computation 3 acres, with 2 tenements, and a good 
barrack stable thereon ; the one a brick house, 2 
stories high, with a well of good water at the door ; 

39 



6lO NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

is now occupied as a tavern ; the other a frame 
ditto, one story, all in good tenantable repair, and 
may be rented for 30!. per ann. part of the aforesaid 
lot is subject to a groundrent of 303. sterl. per an- 
num ; the whole being part of the real estate of John 
Hatkinson, late of Mount holly, deceased. Any per- 
son inclining to purchase the latter, may enquire 
concerning the premises, and know the terms of sale, 
by applying to James Bringhurst, or John Bispham, 
at Richard Parker's, in Philadelphia, or the Execu- 
tors ; or to view the plantation, may apply to Eliza- 
beth Hatkinson, in Mount- holly, and know the terms 
of sale, by applying to either Elizabeth Hatkinson, 
Executrix, or John Hinchman, Executor. 

To be SOLD by PUBLIC VENDUE. 

On Second Day, the 28th of this instant October, 
at the late dwelling-house of James Borden, 1 de- 
ceased, in the township of Evesham, in the county 
of Burlington, two large yoke of working oxen, one 
pair of working steers, milch cows, cows with calf, 
young cattle, 30 or 40 hogs, a likely parcel of sheep, 
several good horses, a large quantity of Indian 
corn, rye and wheat, green corn, two iron-bound 
waggons, ploughs, harrows, gears, chains, edge 
tools, of several sorts, and sundry other farming 
utensils and household goods. The vendue to be- 
gin at ten o'clock on said day, and continue from 

i For some account of the Borden family (which, however, relates more par- 
ticularly to the line of Col. Joseph Borden, and does not mention the James Bor- 
den above), see N. J. Archives, XXIV., 651-5, note. James Borden was probably 
the son of Francis^ (FrancisS Richard 1 ) Borden, and was b. 4th of Sth mo., 172:2. 
He advertised a farm for sale at Evesham, Burlington county, adjoining his own, 
in March. 1766. N. J. Archives, XXV., 55. 



I7/l] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6ll 

day to day till all is sold. Also at the same time 
and place, will be exposed to public sale, a valuable 
plantation and tract of 160 acres of good wheat 
land, adjoining to the above premises, situate in the 
township aforesaid, about 12 miles from Philadel- 
phia, and 7 miles from Burlington and Mount-holly ; 
about 1 20 acres whereof is cleared, and within fence, 
and the remainder woodland. There is on said 
premises, a good framed house, with a cellar under 
the whole, a well of excellent water near the door, 
and a young bearing orchard of good fruit. Like- 
wise, 21 acres of banked meadow, lying on the south 
side of Rancocas Creek, about a mile and a half from 
the premises, which will be sold in lots, or together, 
as may best suit the purchasers. The conditions of 
sale will be made known, at the time and place afore- 
said ; where attendance will be given. JANE BOR- 
DEN, Executrix, JOHN CLARK, and JOHN COXE, Exec- 
utors. 

** A servant lad to be disposed of, who has 4 
years to serve. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2235, October 
24, 1771. 

TO BE SOLD, or LETT. 

A Tract of LAND, situate on Manto's Creek, in 
the township of Deptford, in the county of 
Gloucester, containing 4439 acres well timbered ; 
with a new saw-mill, on an excellent stream, which 
affords a sufficiency of water to saw in the driest 
time ; with houses and all other conveniences, in ex- 
cellent order for carrying on the business of said 



6l2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

mill, and is one of the best situations in that part of 
the country, in a thick settled neighborhood, contig- 
uous to a good transportation, being five miles from 
a good landing on Timber-creek, and four miles from 
a landing on said Manto's creek, twelve miles from 
the town of Gloucester, and ten from Ladd's Cove. 

ALSO, TO BE SOLD, 

30 acres of cedar swamp ; on a run called Still- 
Run, part thereof extraordinary good, having never 
been work'd in ; also 84 acres of fine land well tim- 
ber'd, adjoining the same, and but four miles distant 
from the abovesaid mill. 

60 acres of cedar swamp that has not been work'd 
in, situate in the township of Deptford, on the main 
branch of Morris's river, called Scotland Branch, 
nearly adjoining Jacob Frease's saw-mill. 

104 acres and an half of cedar swamp in Deptford 
township, on a branch of Great Egg harbour river, 
called Faraway, it lies contiguous to a good trans- 
portation, being about three miles from said river ; it 
lies in three surveys, and may be divided to suit the 
purchasers. 

20 acres of tide meadow improved, of the richest 
and best quality all under good bank, and part of it 
fit for grass seed, at the mouth of Raccon creek, 
nearly opposite the town of Chester. 

1000 acres on Absecon beach, affording very good 
pasture ; and is an extraordinary place for raising 
and keeping cattle, horses, and sheep, and part there- 
of well timbered with red cedar. 

835 acres on Brigantine beach, having the like ad- 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 613 

vantage ; also a dwelling-house and other improve- 
ments. 

1500 acres of land and marsh, the greatest part 
thereof the best kind of salt marsh, lying on the west 
side of Great Egg harbour river, and on Gibson's 
creek, and is an excellent place for raising and keep- 
ing stock ; it lies in several surveys adjoining each 
other, and may be divided to suit several purchasers ; 
there is also on said place a dwelling house, with 
some improvements, and one of the best fishing 
places on Great Egg-harbour river, where is caught 
great quantities of Rock and Pearch, &c. 

Also a tract of very good land pleasantly situated 
on the river Delaware, in Sussex county, a little 
above Easton and Philipsburgh, and near the Marble 
Mountain, containing 185 acres, well timber'd, part 
thereof improved, and is the plantation where Mor- 
decai Winter lives ; bounded by lands now or late 
belonging to Isaac and Joseph de Cow, Thomas 
Wotherill, and Daniel Smith. 

6 acres on said Marble Mountain, some part 
thereof well timbered, and a large quantity of good 
marble therein, nearly opposite Easton ; bounded by 
lands late Daniel Coxe's and by Delaware river, and 
lies very convenient to transport marble down said 
river to Philadelphia. 

The purchasers paying part or the money down, 
may have time for the remainder, paying interest, 
and giving security, if required. Any persons inclin- 
ing to purchase, may depend on an indefeasible title, 
from HANNAH LADD, near Woodbury, in Glou- 



614 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

cester county, New-Jersey, of whom the terms of sale 
may be known. 

ALL persons having- any demands against the es- 
tate of JOHN LADD/Esq; late of said county, 
deceased, are desired to bring them in, to be adjust- 
ed : and such who are indebted to said estate, are 
requested to make speedy payment to the aforesaid 
HANNAH LADD, Executrix. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1507, October 
24, 1771. 

DR. GRAHAM, Oculist and Aurist, takes this 
method to acquaint the inhabitants of British 
America in general, that he may be consulted at his 
appartments at Mrs. Dugdale's in Arch street, be- 
tween Second and Third streets, in this city, in all the 
disorders of the eyes, and in every species of deaf- 
ness. 

The anatomy and diseases of the human body in 
general, has always been his favorite study ; but the 
structure and diseases of those tender and important 
organs to which nature has assigned the most useful 
offices of life, the eyes and ears, have for several 
years, particularly engaged his attention : from 
thence he hath deduced, on rational principles, 
methods of cure improved and confirmed by the 
nicest observations in the course of a most exten- 
sive practice. Were he to mention the great num- 
bers he has restored to, or otherwise assisted in their 
sight or hearing, (many of whom had been deemed 
incurable by other practitioners) it would far exceed 

i For a sketch of John Ladd, see N. J. Archives, X., 224. 



I77lj NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 615 

the limits of an advertisement ; successful practice, 
low charges, and the closest attention to his patients j 
he is assured, will recommend, and be a better tes- 
timony of his skill and abilities, than anything he 
might advance in his own behalf. All therefore that 
Dr. Graham chuses to say concerning his medical 
abilities, is, that after several years study at the just- 
ly celebrated university of Edinburgh, he has trav- 
elled and attended upon the hospitals and infirm- 
aries in London, Edinburgh, Dublin, &c as well as 
the lectures of the most eminent professors in sev- 
eral parts of Europe. 

Notwithstanding this city is at present supplied 
with practitioners in physic and surgery, gentlemen 
eminent in their profession, worthy and capable of 
the great, the important charge with which they are 
intrusted ; yet the above considerations, added to his 
having had more experience as an oculist and aurist, 
than, perhaps, any other physician or surgeon on 
this vast continent, the success which has attended 
his practice, the moderation and tenderness he shews 
to even the poorest individual, encourage him to 
hope for some share of the favour of the candid and 
respectable inhabitants of these parts of British 
America, who can readily distinguish true merit from 
pretended knowledge. 

Those patients who chuse it, or whose disorders 
require it, may be attended at their own houses. 
The POOR who apply, properly recommended, will be 
assisted GRATIS, with advice, medicines, or manual 
operations, as their respective cases may require ; 
and for that purpose he will appropriate every Sat- 



6l6 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

urday from eight o'clock in the morning till noon. 

To Dr. Graham. 

Elizabeth-Town, New-Jersey, 

Having been troubled for many years with a weakness and humour in my 
eyes and eyelids, I thus publickly declare the cure I have received through 
your means, after having applied to many doctors, and used a great variety 

of medicines in vain. 

JOHN MOORE. 

Elizabeth-Town, May 16, 1771. 

These are to certify all whom it may concern, that my daughter, Hester 
Baker, 11 years of age, had the misfortune to be born deaf and dumb, hath 
received very considerable advantage in point of hearing, and now begins to 
speak several words, of which she has hitherto been altogether incapable, 
thro' the means which Dr. Graham, under God, has lately made use of in 
her behalf; as witness my hand, JACOB BAKER. 

To Dr. Graham, 

Newark, East New-Jersey. 

SIR, 

In gratitude to you, and for the benefit of my fellow creatures, I thus 
freely acknowledge the cure I have received of a Fistula Lachrymalis of my 
left eye, and of a running accompanied with deaf u ess of my left ear, tho' of 

many [years ?] standing. 

DANIEL TURNER. 

Newark, East New-Jersey. 

After being afflicted with a severe and constant head [ache ?] and almost 
total blindness, (my case being of Gutta Se [ ? ] ) for about six years, I have 
thro' God's blessing, recovered my sight, and am perfectly cured of my head- 
ach, thro' the means that Dr. Graham has applied, for which I thus publick- 
ly present him my hearty thanks. 

THEOPHILUS PIERSON. 

To Dr. James Graham, 

Bound-Brook, New-Jersey, Sept. 15, 1771. 

I take this method to return you my hearty thanks for being the means, 
under God, of curing my son of a film over his right eye, occasioned by the 
small-pox, so that he has now recovered his sight perfectly. 

ADRIAN HOUGLAND. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1507, October 
24, 17/1. Supplement. 

NEW-YORK, October 28. | On Saturday last ended 
our Supreme Court, at which William Davidson 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6i; 

was convicted of Felony, and received Sentence to 
be hanged on the i5th of November next . . . 
Anthony Costigon indicted for General Larceny, but 
found Not Guilty ; and Samuel Mount, was tryed, 
but found Not Guilty on two Indictments ; the first 
for attempting to pass a counterfeit Bill of New-Jer- 
sey, and the second for altering two other Jersey 
Bills of Credit, and attempting to pass one of them. 

. T rv 1 By Order of Stephen Skin- 

New- Jersey, 

> ss. ner, and Jonathan Frazer, 
Middlesex County, IT-- r i 

Esquires, two of the 

Judges of the Court of Common Pleas of said Coun- 
ty; Notice is hereby given to all the Creditors of 
Samson Croker, and David Wright, Insolvent Debt- 
ors to shew Cause, if any they have, before the said 
Judges, on Friday the i5th of November next, at 
Two o'Clock, at the House of Elijah Dunham, in 
Perth Amboy, why an Assignment of the said Debt- 
ors Estates should not be made to Assignees, for the 
Use of their Creditors, and they be discharged from 
their Confinement, agreeable to an Act of the Gen- 
eral Assembly of said Province of New-Jersey, past 
for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors. 
October 24^, 1771. 

-The New York Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1486, October 28, 1771. 

PHILADELPHIA, October 28. | A few days ago, 
a small sail boat was overset, by a flaw of wind, on 
her passage from this city to Salem ; by which acci- 
dent Richard Hacket, Samuel Smith, and a lad were 
unfortunately drowned. Joshua Huddy, another 



6l8 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

passenger, after being in the water about three 
hours, got to shore in a small canoe. Hacket and 
the lad are sine 2 found. Both the deceased men 
were married and left a number of small children. 



Trenton, October 2^d, 1771. 

ALL Persons indebted to the Subscriber, by 
bond, bill, or book debt, are desired to make imme- 
diate payment. Any person that has any just de- 
mands against him, is requested to call and receive 
the same, as he intends speedily for England. 

ROBERT SPENCER. 
The Pennsylvania Packet, No. i, October 28, 

I77 1 - 

BOSTON, October 24. | Notice is given in the 
London Papers of the 3ist of August, that a fifth 
and final distribution of prize money to the officers 
and soldiers that were at the surrender of the 
Havanna the i2th of August 1762, will begin on the 
28th of October : Those belonging to Major Gor- 
ham's corps, the Connecticut, Rhode Island, New 
Jersey, New-York, &c. on the 28th of November. 
The shares not then demanded, will be ready to be 
paid on the first Thursday in every Month for 
three years to come, by Jonathan Gartan, in Great 
Russel Street, Bloomsbury. 

PHILADELPHIA, November 4. | Monday, the 
1 4th Ult. died in Bristol, the Rev. Mr. JONATHAN 
DOWNES, late a fellow of St John's College, in the 
University of Cambridge, and Rector of St. Peter's 
Parish, in the Island of Barbados. On the i5th, his 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 6lQ 

remains were interred in St. Mary's Church, Bur- 
lington. 1 

WHEREAS I the Subscriber made application to the 
House of Assembly, setting forth my misfortunes, 
and praying that the Honourable House would take 
the same into their consideration, and grant me re- 
.lief in the premises, and the benefit of the Insolvent 
Act at that time in agitation and by an act passed 
in the year 1769, the Honourable Assembly was 
pleased to exempt any person from arrests for any 
debts contracted before the publication thereof, but 
at the same time, subjected any future estate ac- 
quired (if any) to the demands of any creditor who 
would sue for the same ; And whereas having con- 
sidered the great disadvantages I should labour un- 
der, if I was deprived of the means of laying out for 
the benefit of my creditors and myself what I gained 
by my indefatigable industry, by being thus liable to 
any ill-natured creditor, I again applied to the Assem- 
bly, and set forth these unhappy circumstances, and 
my earnest wish and desire justly to discharge my 
debts, but that it would be totally impossible for me 
to do it without their further assistance, and prayed 
that they would exempt my goods and chattels from 
being taken in execution for the space or term of 
five years. The Assembly having taken into con- 
sideration my unhappy circumstances, were pleased 
to comply with my request by an act passed in 
March 1770, being the supplement to explain the act 

i He was. a brother of Mrs. Franklin, wife of Governor William Franklin. Ac- 
cording to the parish register the burial took place on Oct 14, not on Oct. 15. See 
Hills's Hist, of the Church in Burlington, 301. 



62O NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

for the relief of insolvent debtors passed in 1769, and 
for other purposes therein mentioned. 

Secured thus by the benevolent intentions of the 
Assembly, the subscriber applied himself steadily and 
with the utmost industry to make a proper use of the 
generous indulgence, and pleased himself with the 
hopes of clearing himself from his difficulties, by 
thus securely enjoying the fruits of his labour for a 
certain time, and having it in his power to make 
every legal advantage of his effects for the benefit of 
all his creditors ; but his Majesty in Council having 
been pleased in June last, to disallow of this supple- 
ment to the act, 1 the subscriber is at present deprived 
of the good intentions of the Assembly and his hard- 
ships still remain. The subscriber therefore again 
intends to apply to the Assembly, at the next ses- 
sions, for relief in the premises, as had been before 
granted to him, of an exemption of executions for the 
said term of five years, and hereby gives this public 
notice of such his intentions. Tho' oppressed by the 
iron hand of adversity, and covered with misfortunes, 
a consciousness of the rectitude of his thoughts and 
principles of honesty, enables him to bear up against 
the accumulated ills that oppress him ; and he hopes 
from the lenity of his creditors, that his dealing with 
them will entitle him to every favour in their power ; 
and as their interest is closely connected with his sit- 
uation in life, that they will promote every step which 
tends to secure their debts, at the same time, that it 
will afford them that most pleasing sensation of do- 

1 - 'A Supplementary Act to an Act entitled An Act for the better enabling of 
Creditors to recover their just Debts from Persons who abscond themselves," 
passed Oct. 27, 1770. See N. J. Archives, XVIII., 215. and X., 300. 



I 



1771] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 621 

ing good, and enabling a man in the evening of his 
day's to rest with quietness and easy competency, 
after the laborious struggle for many years against 
his misfortunes, and mostly brought on him by his 
too much confidence in the designing part of man- 
kind, and not the effects of his extravagance, luxury 
or dissipation. 

WILLIAM GERRARD. 
NEW-JERSEY, November 2, 1771. 
-The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 251, October 
28 to November 4, 1771. 

To the Public. 

However justifiable my resentment and indigna- 
tion might be against Mr. Moore Furman and Mr. 
Thomas Irwin, for the unfair steps they have taken 
to destroy my reputation, yet by the advice of my 
most judicious friends, I have delayed addressing the 
public, in answer to their virulent libels for some 
time, lest in the warmth of that resentment I should 
have transgressed the strict rules of decorum. 

They have published charges against me, which, if 
supported, would make me appear in a very bad 
light indeed ; but I hope to prove, their proceedings 
in this affair, has more of envy and malice than any 
foundation in truth ; that they have acted more from 
principles to injure me, than do themselves, or any 
one else justice. Therefore I must solicit the un- 
prejudiced ear and attention of the public to a fair 
hearing of a true state of facts as they really hap- 
pened ; wherein I shall endeavour, in as concise a 
manner as possible fo represent this whole matter in 



622 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

a just point of light. 1 . . . 

. . . Owing to his [Mr. Furman] gross and false 
representations, I was induced, not only from the 
principal law of nature (self defence) but in duty to 
myself and family, to write him the following letter, 
which with the answer, I beg leave here to insert. 

To Mr. Moore Furman, 
SIR, 

I waited on you last tuesday morning, and was informed you was gone 
out of town for some days, but seeing you are returned, 1 take this 

early opportunity of writing you. The injury you have done me is of such 
a nature as entitles me to some kind of satisfaction ; such as shall be satisfac- 
tory both to myself and the world. This I have an undoubted right to claim. 
My reasons for not calling on, you in this serious manner before, were, 
that I thought it most prudent first to endeavour to prove my innocence to the 
world, and to remove those prejudices they had imbibed, in consequence of what 
you had done icith respect to me; being conscious of having never injured you 
in my whole life; and at the vety time you committed that insult upon my hon- 
our and character, 1 esteemed you one of my best friends, the contrary of 
which 1 never knew for some months after. 

However innocent your intentions might have been in doing what you did, 
yet you see my reputation has suffered in consequence of it; therefore I think 
you, as a man of honour, and possessed of the common feelings of the human 
heart, will not refuse, in this case, making such concessions, as I ought to ac- 
cept. Should yoa deny me this piece ofjastice I Jiave an undoubted right to, 1 
desire that you will meet me to morrow morning at five o'clock, on Petty's 
Inland, with one friend only, where we may final'y settle this matter between 
us \ and may Providence determine in favour of the Innocent. Your answer 
is most earnestly requested in two /tours, by, Sir, your humble servant. 

ISAAC WIOKOFF. 

N. B. Should you have any objection to tlie time or place, you may chuse 
any other; which will be agreeable to 

Monday morning, July 22, 1771. Isaac Wikoff. 

To Mr. Isaac Wikoff, 
SIR, 

I RECEIVED yours of this morning, by which 1 find you have construed 
my forbearance to make any reply to the piece you have published (which 
was really omitted out of tenderness to you) as a token of my guilt. 'Tis 

i This article fills four pages of the paper, and was apparently written with the 
desire to vindicate the writer from charges made by certain parties in regard to 
the quality and measurement of rum sold by him. It is accompanied by certifi- 
cates from Moses David, of Freehold, Peter Sclaenck, of Somerset county, Heze- 
kiah Stout, of Somerset county, and others. 



I// 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 623 

true, you don't mention my name, but you now declare me, by your letter, to 
be the person who has injured you : I will therefore immediately set myself 
about collecting such proofs as is necessary to support what I have said, and as 
soon as convenient, lay them before the publick. If in any one point 2 find 
myself mistaken, I shall chearfuVy acknowledge it. 

As to your other proposal, 1 do not think it a proper way to settle the mat- 
ter. The loss of life will ony shew madness, and not establish or regain a 
character. Both you and 1 have families, whom we are under the most sol- 
emn obligations to support, as long as it's in our power. To face the world and 
do that, is true courage. If in a short time I should fail to give both you and 
the publick satisfaction, you will have an opportunity of seeing me hereafter, 
as frequently in every place where my business calls me, as you have had here- 
tofore. 

Sir, Your humble servant, 

Monday 12 o'clock. M. FURMAN. 

. . . The next day I met with him at the coffee- 
house, and told him I was surprised at his answer to 
my letter ; that I expected he would have had gen- 
erosity enough to make concessions for the injury he 
had done me, or had the honor to have met me at 
the time and place I desired. He made answer, that 
was not the way to settle the matter. I replied, 
since that was the case, I should treat him as a 
R- -1 as he deserved. He then raised his stick (I 
suppose with an intent to strike me) I quitted mine, 
and struck him with my fist. He fell. Others stept 
in between us, and there it ended. 

. , . He has also declared he never would have 
published any thing against me, had I not struck 
him : but here it appears too obvious to admit of the 
least doubt that this was totally false ; for he says, in 
answer to my letter, that he will " immediately set 
himself about collecting such proofs." Is here not 
an implication that, before that time, he had not set 
himself about (as he terms it) "collecting' those 
proofs. Mr. Verbrycti s certificate absolutely con- 



624 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

victs him of an untruth ; for that certificate is dated 
at Nashanack in New-Jersey, near sixty miles 
from Philadelphia, on the very day of our meeting 
at the coffee-house. Mr. Gordon s certificate bears 
date the next day, at Stony-Brook, in New-Jersey, 
forty miles distance: and Mr. Schenck had also 
been applied to long before this happened Is it 
not therefore manifest, that Mr. Furman had been 
busying himself before the receit of my letter, writ- 
ing his answer, or striking him, in collecting what he 
calls proofs ? . . . 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1508, Oct. 31, 
1771. 

The GENERAL ASSEMBLY of New-Jersey are 
to meet at Burlington on the 2Oth of November. 

fBSr^The Piece from New-Jersey, signed S. T. is 
come to hand, and will be inserted as soon as possi- 
ble. 

Burlington, October 21, 1771 

THIS is to give notice, that on the 2Oth day of 
September last, was committed to the goal of Bur- 
lington, a Mulattoe man, aged about 26 years, says 
he was born in New England, and brought up to the 
seas, he calls himself by the name of Jeremiah Clark, 
and says he is a servant to one Robert Robertson, 
in Brandywine Hundred, New- Castle county, about 
4 miles from Wilmington ; had on, when committed, 
a dark brown double breasted jacket, with brass and 
metal buttons; and says he left him in June last; 
his master, if any he has, is desired to come, or send, 
by the i 2th day of November next ; otherwise I shall 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 625 

apply to the court, to get him sold out for his 
charges. EPHRAIM PHILLIPS, Goaler. 

FIVE POUNDS Reward. 

RUN away from the subscriber, living in Donegall 
township, Lancaster county, on the i8th day of 
August last, a Negroe man, named NED, aged 
about 35 years, well set, but low, of a surly look, and 
hanging lip ; he kept a white woman, by whom he 
had a child near 3 months old, when he went 
away he took both with him ; she is a well set strong 
woman, pock-marked, named MARY WOODS, a 
bold-speaking woman, and it is probable that he will 
endeavour to pass for a free Negroe, having the 
woman and child with him ; he is not very black, 
much like a Mulattoe ; he was born in the Jerseys, 
can both read and write ; very likely he has procured 
a pass for them as man and wife. Whoever takes 
up the said Negroe, and woman, and secures them, 
so that the owner may have them again, shall have 
Five Pounds reward for the Negroe, and reasonable 

charges, paid by me 

ALEXANDER LOWREY. 

RUN away from the subscriber, on the i8th of 
October, a servant lad, who calls himself James Jack- 
son, about 19 years of age, says he was born in Lon- 
don, about 5 feet 6 inches high, of a fair complexion, 
stoops in his shoulders, of a thin visage, straight 
brown hair, cut off at top ; he says he served his 
time in Baltimore county, Maryland, and it is likely, 
as he can write a pretty good hand, that he will forge 
a pass ; had on, when he went away, a half worn cas- 

40 



626 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

tor hat, an old ozenbrigs shirt, a striped lincey waist- 
coat, the stripes go round him, a large blue sailor 
jacket, lined with white flannel, somewhat tarry, a 
pair of buckskin breeches, too large for him, a pair 
of home made blue and white yarn stockings, and 
half worn shoes, with carved Pinchbeck buckles. 
Whoever takes up said servant and brings him home 
to his said master, living in Woolwich township, 
Gloucester county, and province of West New-Jer- 
sey, or secures him in any goal, so as his master 
may get him again, shall receive THIRTY SHIL- 
LINGS reward, and reasonable charges paid by 

BENJAMIN THOMPSON. 

TO BE SOLD, 

A Valuable Tract of MARSH, situate in Lower 
\ Allo way's Creek, in the county of Salem, con- 
taining 140 acres, whereon is a !arge island contain- 
ing several acres of high woodland, known by the 
name of Round Island. The marsh is high, and as 
good as any of the kind in that part of the country. 
Any person inclining to purchase the same, may view 
the premises, and know the terms, by applying to the 
subscriber, who will make them an indisputable title 

to the same. 

CHRISTIANA MILLER. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2236, October 



The IMPARTIALIST, or UNIVERSAL REFORMER. 

No. XV. 


Mr. Impartialist. 

. In this point of view, this Province 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 627 

will be found possess'd of blessings superior to its 
Neighbours. It lies in the center of the British Plan- 
tations on the Continent, has the safest and readiest 
access to the Ocean, and is furnish'd with secure and 
ample Harbours for Shipping of any Burden. By 
means of its excellent Communication by water, it 
draws to itself most of the trade of Connecticut and 
N. Jersey, and has by far the most convenient access 
to the vast tracts of Land which border on the Lakes 
or interior Seas extending thro' the greatest part of 
North America. 



STOLEN 

ON Monday night last the 28th inst. October, from 
the stable of Mr. William Smith, in East New- 
Jersey, a large SORREL HORSE, with a bald face, 
one of his hind feet white, reaching above the foot- 
lock, the hair at the root of his tail having been worn 
off, is short, but will probably soon grow again to its 
full length ; is shod all round, with a strip of beaver 
hat between his hoofs and shoes, &c. 

Whoever takes up and brings the said horse to 
the subscriber, shall have FIVE POUNDS current 
Money of New- York, Reward, and all reasonable 
charges; and THREE POUNDS for the Thief, if 
taken up and brought to Justice, paid by 

JOSEPH OUTEN BOGART. 

NEWARK Races. 



A Purse of TWENTY-FIVE POUNDS to be run for on 
Wednesday next the 6th of November, (if a fair Day, 



628 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77l 

if not the first fair Day) free for any Horse, Mare or 
Gelding, not more than 3 4 Blood, (Mr. Whitehead 
Cornell's Horse Steady, and Mr. Timothy Cornell's 
Horse Richmond, excepted) the Horses to carry 
Weight for Age and Blood, viz. Three Years old, 
3-4 Blood, to carry 7 Stone 7 Ib. y* Blood, 6 Stone 
7 Ib. Four Years old, 3-4 Blood, 8 Stone 7 Ib. */ 
Blood, 7 Stone 3 Ib. % Blood, 6 Stone lolb. Five 
Years old, % Blood, 9 Stone 3 Ib. y 2 Blood, 7 
Stone 1 1 Ib. ^ Blood, 7 Stone 4 Ib. Six Years 
old, 24 Blood, 9 Stone 10 Ib. ^ Blood, 8 Stone 3 Ib. 
y Blood, 7 Stone 10 Ib. Aged, y^ Blood, 10 Stone ; 
y 2 Blood, 8 Stone, 7 Ib. _% Blood 8 Stone. Not 
less than three reputed running Horses to start. 
Horses to be shewn and entered the Day before run- 
ning, with William Bott, paying 305. Entrance, or 
double at the Post. No one Person to run two 
Horses, nor he concerned in running their Horses in 
Partnership ; or dividing the Purse. Proper Certifi- 
cates to be produced from under the Hand of the 
Breeder, or the Owner put upon Oath, if disputed, 
to their Horses Blood and Age : To run two Mile 
at a Heat ; the Horse that wins two Heats the first, 
to have the Purse. Proper Judges will be appointed 
to determine all Disputes that may arise. The 
Horses to start at 2 o' Clock. 

N. B. The Entrance Money to be run for the Day 
following, by all but the winning and distanced 
Horses. 

The New t York Journal, or The General Ad- 
vertiser, No. i 504, October 31, 1771. 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 629 

N E W - Y O R K , November 7. 

Thursday last five Transports sailed from hence 
for Amboy, to take on board his Majesty's 29th. 
Regiment for Augustine. 



The General Assembly of New-Jersey are to meet 
at Burlington on the 2Oth of November. 

The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1505, Nov. 7, 1771. 



Members of the New-Jersey Medical Soci- 
ciety, are desired to remember, that their next stated 
General-Meeting, will be on the Second Tuesday in 
November instant, at eleven o'Clock in the Fore- 
noon, at the House of Mr. Hicks, in Princeton, 
when the Society will be opened with a Discourse on 
some Medical Subject by the President ; after which 
the Society will proceed upon Business. Those 
Gentlemen of the Profession in the Province, who 
have not hitherto joined the Society, are invited to 
attend at the Time arid Place above mentioned. 

SAMUEL KENNEDY, Secretary. 

New-Jersey, I BY Order of the Honourable John 
Monmouth, j Anderson, and John Taylor, Esqs, 
two of the judges of the court of common-pleas, for 
said county, William Clark, Doctor ; Thomas Sell, 
Walter Kerr, William Cheney, prisoners for debt, in 
the goal of said county, having been duly sworn, and 
filed their Schedule, pursuant to the last act of As- 
sembly of said province, an Act, entituled, An Act 
for the relief of insolvent debtors, made in the tenth 
year of his Majesty's reign, and in the year of our 



630 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS, 

Lord, 1 769 ; Now these are to give notice to the 
creditors of said debtors, that they be together at the 
Court-house of said county, on the i8th day of No- 
vember, Anno. Dom. 1771, to show cause before the 
said judges, if any they have, why the said prisoners 
should not be discharged from their confinement, 
pursuant to the said act. 

NEW-YORK, Novem. 4. | * * Wednesday next, 
the 6th Inst. a Purse of ^.25, will be run for at New- 
ark, in New-Jersey. . . . 

* * Morris-Town Races is adjourned till the iQth 
Inst. and the Entrance the next Day, and not less 
than three reputed running Horses to start. 

The New York Gazette ; and the Weekly Mer- 

cury, No. 1045, Nov. 4, 1771. 

PROPOSALS | FOR PRINTING BY SUBSCRIP- 
TION, | THE | COMPLETE SURVEYOR. [ OR. 
| SURVEYING MADE PERFECTLY EASY, | IN SIX 
PARTS. | 

. . . Subscriptions are taken in by Mr. Bradford, 
at the London Coffee-house ; . . . Mr. Isaac Collins, 
in Burlington; Mr. Zachariah Rossell, in Mount- 
Holly /* . . . 

The Pennsylvania Packet, No. 2, November 4, 

1771. 

TO BE SOLD, by WILLIAM ROSCOW, at 

i Nearly a whole column is taken up with the above synopsis of the work, 
conditions, etc, No such title is listed by Hildeburn. Possibly the work in ques- 
tion was that entitled: A | Compendium | of | Surveying: | or the | Surveyors 
Pocket Companion. | [Sisteen lines.] By Thomas Moody. Philomathecus | Burl- 
ington, | Printed by Isaac Collins, for the Author. | MDCCLXXI. | 12 mo. Pp. 48. 



1770 NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 63 1 

LAMBERTON, near TRENTON FERRY, GOOD 
ST. MARTIN'S SALT, at 2od. per Bushel. 

A JOURNEYMAN FULLER, that understands 
Shearing, is very much wanted, is very much wanted. 
Such a Person, by applying to the Subscriber, near 
Trenton, in New-Jersey, may light of very good En- 
couragement, from 

ABRAHAM SKIRM. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

The General Assembly of New-Jersey are to meet 
at Burlington, on the 2oth of Novemher. 

-The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1509, Nov. 7, 
1771. 

LATELY PUBLISHED and to be sold, by HALL 
and SELLERS, and Joseph Cruckshank, in Philadel- 
phia, and | Isaac Collins, in Burlington, 

AN HISTORICAL ACCOUNT of GUINEA ; its situa- 
tion, produce, and the general disposition of its in- 
habitants ; with an enquiry into the rise and progress 
of the Slave Trade, its nature and effects. To 
which are added, The sentiments of several authors 
or note, on this interesting subject, by 

ANTHONY BENEZET. 



* * 
* 



In a late Piece, published in our Paper, No. 
2234, signed An Independent Freeholder, it is insin- 
uated, that there is not any Law now in Force in 
New-Jersey, authorising Justices of the Peace to take 
Cognizance of Actions of Debt to any Amount 
whatever. We are desired to assure the Public, that 



63 2 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [if ft 

the Writer of that Piece is mistaken ; for that by a 
Law, passed at Perth-Amboy in 1768, which is now 
in full Force, Justices of the Peace have Jurisdiction 
in Actions of Debt, &c. to the Amount of SIX 
POUNDS. 

The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2237, November 

7, 



PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 4. | Monday the i 4 th 
Ult. died at Bristol, the Rev. Mr. JONATHAN 
DOWNES, late a Fellow of St. John's College, in 
the University of Cambridge, and Rector of St. 
Peter's Parish, in the Island of Barbadoes. On the 
1 5th his Remains were interred in St. Mary's 
Church Burlington. 

WHEREAS the Agreement made the i5th Day 
of February, in the Year of our Lord One thousand 
seven hundred and sixty-seven, between Richard 
Stevens and the Assignees of his Estate, hath not 
yet been complied with on their Part. - These 

are therefore to give Notice to all his Creditors 
whom it may concern, that he intends to apply to 
the General Assembly of New-Jersey, for Relief in 
.the Premises, at their next Meeting, at Burlington, 
which commences the 26th day of this instant. 
November 4th, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, November n. | Last Tuesday was 
married at Islip, on Long-Island, Mr. GARRET KET- 
TELTAS, of this City, Merchant, to Miss CHARITY 
NICOLL, Daughter of WILLIAM MICOLL, Esq ; one of 
the Representatives of the County of Sussex ; a 



177 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 633 

young Lady endowed with all the Accomplishments 
requisite to render the Marriage State happy. 

, 

The General Assembly of New-Jersey are to meet 
at Burlington on the 2Oth of November, Instant. 
- The New York Gazette, or the Weekly Post- Boy, 
No. 1488, November n, 1771. 

CLEARED . . . Schooner Mary, J. Ross, New 
Jersey. . . . 

STOLEN from the subscriber, the 8th ult. a very 
valuable HORSE, a saddle, and sundry other things, 
by a person called JOHN DAVIS, alias JOHN LANE, &c. 
an Irishman, who, by information, run from his mas- 
ter at or near Lancaster county, in Pennsylvania ; he 
is not explicit in his discourse, talks thick, and clips 
his words, excessive awkward in business of every 
sort (except stealing), a likely looking, middle siz'd, 
well made and smooth'd skin'd fellow, about 22 
years of age, has short black curled hair, his eyes at 
particular times appears glaring, the whites of which 
being much to be seen. On the 22d ult. he stole 
from Joseph Tomlinson, of Stratford, in the govern- 
ment of Connecticut, a MARE, SADDLE, suit of 
clothes, and sundry other things : And, on the 28th, 
he stole another HORSE, likewise a SADDLE, 
and several other things. The last mentioned horse 
and saddle were taken near Delaware river, in Hun- 
terdon county. The thief has made his escape (as 
he has often done) travelled Eastward and cross'd 
Robinson's Ferry ; had on, and took with him, at 
that time, a new beaver hat, a dark crimson coat, a 



634 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

lappelled crimson jacket, Somewhat faded, a short 
blue ditto, lined with white, double breasted, and has 
Slash Sleeves, a short striped ditto, the fore part of 
which the stripes run round, and the back part up 
and down, a pair of leather breeches, grey kersey 
do. a pair of white cotton Stockings, with pumps, 
stitch'd round the upper part of the quarter, besides 
a bundle of other cloathing in a wallet. If the said 
thief is taken, and brought to justice, a reward of 
TEN DOLLARS will be given by WILLIAM 
SMITH of Elizabeth-Town, East New-Jersey. 

The Pennsylvania Chronicle, No. 253, Novem- 
ber ii to November 18, 1771. 

New- Jersey, \ BY order of Stephen Skin- 

OO. 



; 



Middlesex County, j ner, and Jonathan Frazee, 

Esqrs., two of the Judges of the court of common 
pleas of said county : Notice is hereby given to all 
the creditors of Samuel Fitz Randolph, and John 
Dunn, insolvent debtors, to shew cause if any they 
have, before the said judges, on the 7th day of De- 
cember next, at 2 o'clock P. M. at the house of Eli- 
jah Dunham, in Perth-Amboy, why an assignment of 
said debtors' estates should not be made to assignees 
for the use of their creditors, and they be discharged 
from their confinement, agreeable to an act of the 
general assembly of said province, entitled, "An act 
for the relief of insolvent debtors." 
Perth Amboy, >jtk Nov. 1771. 

THREE POUNDS REWARD. 

RUN-AWAY from the Subscriber the 27th August 
last, a Molatto Fellow named HUMPHREY, about 30 



t??l\ NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 635 

Years of Age, a well set Fellow about 5 Feet 1 1 
Inches high : Had on when he went away a Bearskin 
Coat with white Metal Buttons, brown Kersey Vest, 
Bearskin Breeches, Tow Shirt, Worsted Stockings, 
old Shoes, Brass Buckles. Whoever secures Said 
Fellow so that hi^ Master may have him again, shall 
have the above Reward, and reasonable Charges 
paid by me 

Burlington County ELIJAH BOND. 

Nottingham Township, Nov. 7, 1771. 

The New-York Journal, or The General Adver- 
tiser, No. 1506, November 14, 1771. 

To the PRINTEKS. 

It is an Observation I have frequently heard, and I believe it is founded 
on Truth, that the rendering Law-suits too cheap, is one of the greatest 
Causes of stirring up a Spirit of Litigation and Discord amongst the People. 
In one, if not more, of the New-England Governments, it is said that a Suit 
may be carried on to a Judgment for about Two Dollars, and I have been 
credibly informed, it is not uncommon to have from Two to Three Thousand 
Writs in a Term returned to one of their Courts ; f6r it is said to be a com- 
mon Practice with the Parties, to play a Rubber of Trials, and a Man must 
gain Two out of Three before his Adversary will submit. The Writer of a 
Piece published in the Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2234, signed, AN INDE- 
PENDENT .FREEHOLDER, and dated in Nottingham, has furnished me with a 
farther Evidence of the Truth of this Observation, arising in our own Prov- 
ince. It is a Truth generally known in this Province, that the Number of 
Actions for the Recovery of Debts, has been decreasing for at least five or 
six years past, and that the last Year has produced fewer Suits for Demands 
above Ten Pounds than any preceding Year (I believe I may safely say) for 
twenty Years past, excepting during the Time that all Law Proceedings were 
suspended by the Stamp-Act. The Independent Freeholder tells us, that 
"from the best Enquiry, there were between Eighty and One Hundred Ac- 
"tions brought before Justices of the Peace in the last Year, in the County of 
^Burlington, where the Debt or Demand was from Six to Ten Pounds." 
Now it will be found on Enquiry, that in the Year immediately preceding 
the Ten Pound Act, there were but about twenty Actions brought in the 
County of Burlington, on which any Proceedings were had, for demands be- 
tween Six and Ten Pounds ; so that by the Freeholder's own shewing, that 
Act has occasioned the bringing of Seventy Actions in a Year, more than 



636 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [1771 

there otherwise would have been, in this County of Burlington only; 
*' where" he says, " there is as little suing for its Bigness as in any County in 
the Province." If we allow the same Increase in the other twelve Counties, 
in some of which we may suppose there is more suing in Proportion to their 
Extent, the Increase of Suits occasioned by that Law Will be Nine Hundred 
and Ten in a Year ! It is not therefore to wondered at, if the Justices of the 
Peace, who have had the Profits of this Increase of Actions, should ' lament 
the Loss of so useful and beneficial a Law." 

The Gentleman, I imagine, did not advert to this great multiplicity of 
Suits, occasioned by his favourite Law, when he made his Calculation of sav- 
ing Two thousand Pounds a Year to the Province, or else, upon his own Prin- 
ciples, he would have found a considerable Ballance the other Way. 

For, reckoning Ninety Actions per Annum in each Coun- 
ty, for Demands from Six to Ten Pounds, for the 
thirteen Counties, there would be 1170 in a Year, 
which he rates at 20 s. each, 1170 

From which deduct 260, which would have been brought 

in the County Courts, which he rates at 4 each, 1040 



Ballance against the Justices Courts, in Costs only 130 

To which may be added, the great Loss of Time in at- 
tending the Justices Courts. I am told it is no un- 
common Thing to see near 100 men attending a Trial 
before a Justice; but I will at present suppose that, on 
an Average, there is a loss of the Labour of 10 Men, 
and their Horses; on each Trial, which, at 5 s. per 
day for each Man and Horse amounts to 2925 



Annual Loss to the Province by the Ten Pound Law, 3055 



A Sum quite "sufficient tb support the Civil Government of the Prov- 
ince!" But I am confident this Calculation is greatly below the Truth ; for 
the Costs on these small Actions, in the County Courts, do not amount to 
Four Pounds each, on an Average, and I have seen several Bills of Costs, for 
Trials before Justices, by Virtue of this Law, amounting from 40 s. to 60 s. 
each, and in Case of an Appeal to the Sessions, or the Cause being removed 
by Certiorari, to which a Party is frequently driven, to avoid Injustice, 
the Costs are oftentimes more than if the Cause had been originally prose- 
cuted in the County Court. 

Bat the Gentleman is pleased to say, that " but few Appeals have been 
" made from the Judgments of the Justices under this law, and none that he 
"has heard of, in the County of Burlington, which proves, to a Demonstra- 
"tion, the Usefulness of the Law." I must beg leave to tell him, that he is 
mistaken in these, as well as some other Facts, from which he draws his 
Conclusions. It may, for aught I know, be the peculiar Happiness of the 
good People of Nottingham, to hava such good Magistrates, as that no Ap- 



I/7 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 637 

peals from their Judgments have been thought necessary ; but there have 
been many Appeals in the Provinces, yea, even in the County of Burlington, 
from Judgments given by Virtue of this Act ; and there would have been a 
great Number more, had it not been that the Act itself prohibited an Appeal, 
where either Party chose a Trial by Jury, unless by Certiorari to the Su- 
preme Court, and in that Case the Reasons must have been filed in the Su- 
preme Court Office, within one Month after the Justices Judgment, or the 
Party was without Remedy ; and it has often happened, from the great Dis- 
tance the Parties resided from the Office, and other Difficulties and Expenses 
which attend the obtaining and prosecuting a Certiorari, that the Party in- 
jured has submitted to the first Loss, rather than to purchase Redress at so 
dear a Rate. 

The Independent Freeholder gives it as his Opinion, that there is not ' 'any 
"Law now in Force in the Province, that authorizes Justices of the Peace to 
"determine Actions of Debts of One Shilling." I believe this is an Opinion 
peculiar to himself ; at least, I am unwilling to suppose that any Magistrate 
in the Province is so ignorant of the Rules of Law, as not to know, that the 
Law, with respect to their Jurisdiction, stands exactly as it did before the 
Making of the Ten Pound Act ; the Law passed in 1768, giving Jurisdiction 
to the Justices, to the Amount of Six Pounds, being now in as full Force as 
ever it was. 

I believe there is no Government in the World, in which the People have 
the Making of their own Laws, where the Trial of Property is committed to 
the Decision of a single Magistrate, in a higher Degree than it is in this 
Province, by Virtue of the Six Pound Law. And, indeed, it would be dang- 
erous to the Liberties of the People, as well as to the Interests of Individu- 
als, that it should be higher here. The People of England, to whose Care 
and Vigilance we are indebted for our excellent Constitution, and who have 
formed their Laws upon the Experience of many Ages, have never trusted a 
single Magistrate with the Power of deciding the Matters of Property, to a 
higher Amount than Forty Shillings. Justices of the Peace are Officers ap- 
pointed by the Governor, and hold their Places during Pleasure, and the 
more .Power is annexed to their Offices, the more anxious will they be to ob- 
tain them, and, of course, they will be more obsiqueous when in Office, for 
Fear of being turned out. So that the undue Extension of their Power, may 
furnish Tools to a bad Governor, to oppress the People, and destroy their 
Liberties. It is true, we run no Risque of this Calamity during the Admin- 
istration of the present Governor. We have now the Happiness to be gov- 
erned by a Gentleman, who Conduct evinces an equal Regard for the just 
Prerogatives of the Crown, and the constitutional Privileges of the People, 
But he cannot continue with us for ever, and we know not who may be his 
Successor. Therefore let it be remembered, that whoever succeeds him, be 
he ever so bad a Man (and what Security have we that he will not be so ?) 
will be armed with the same Power that is now so confidently put into the 
Hands of a good One ! And he may increase that Power at his Pleasure, by 
adding what Numbers he pleases to the Commissions of the Peace. 



638 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

On the other Hand, let us consider the Interests of the Parties litigant. 
It is necessary that there should be an Uniformity in the Laws for the Reg- 
ulation of Property, by which People may square their Contracts and know 
by what Rules they are to be governed. And for this end the Law has wise- 
ly constituted Courts, composed of the ablest of the Magistrates, whose col- 
lective Opinion is to explain and direct the Operation of the Laws. But 
when this Power is distinctly vested in each of the Magistrates, of whom 
there are many in each County, differing in Degrees of Understanding, and 
Knowledge of the Law, there will be a diversity of Opinions, and what is as- 
serted to be Law by one, will be contradicted by another, so that no Man can 
know when his Property is safe, especially if he is to be Defendant in a Suit ; 
for the Plaintiff, having it in his Power to bring his Suit before what Magis- 
trate he pleases, will apply to one, whose Opinion he knows to be favourable 
to his Cause. And how far a Justice of the Peace may be influenced by a 
designing Man, who has more Art, and perhaps more Understanding than 
himself ; and how far he may exercise that Influence on a Jury by ordering 
the Constable to pick Men for the Purpose, and by restraining the proper, 
and suffering improper Evidence to be laid before them, I will not undertake 
to determine. Nor would I be understood to insinuate a Charge, or even a 
Suspicion of these evil Practices, against the Body of the Magistrates ; I 
know that many of them are Men of too much Sense and Integrity, to be 
either subject to the one, or capable of the other. But Laws should be so 
framed as that even bad Men cannot use them to do Evil. 

New Jersey, October 26, 1771. S. T. 

November 8, 1771 

WHEREAS the Agreement made the i6th Day 
of February, in the Year of our Lord, One Thou- 
sand Seven Hundred and Sixty-seven, between Rich- 
ard Stevens and the Assignees of his Estate, hath 
not yet been complied with on their Part : These are 
therefore to give Notice to all his Creditors whom it 
may concern, that he intends to apply to the Gener- 
al Assembly of New-Jersey, for Relief in the Prem- 
ises, at their next Meeting at Burlington, which com- 
mences on the 2oth Instant. 



Pilesgrove, Salem County, 

November 5, 1771. 
NO TICE is hereby given, that on the sec- 



CUT OF \r J 

STAGE JMovemoer 5, 1771. 



I77 1 ] NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 639 

ond Tuesday of this instant November, the Subscribers 
Stage Waggon will set out from the House of Jacob 
Paullin in Pilesgrove, not far from the Glass- House, 
and drive from thence, through Woods- Town to Wil- 
liam Cooper s Ferry, and return to the said Jacob 
Paullin s the Thursday following, and continue weekly 
to drive on the aforesaid Days : Price for Passengers, 
or Lumber per Hundred Weight, carried the whole 

Distance, Three Shillings and Nine-pence each. 

Those Gentlemen and Ladies who will please to favour 
us with their Custom, may depend on good Usage, and 
the utmost Care from their humble Servants 

WILLIAM SHUTE and JACOB PAULLIN. 
*%*Any Passengers from Philadelphia, or elsewhere, 
that are desirous to go to the Glass-house, or anywhere 
in that Neighbourhood, the Subscribers promise to con- 
vey them. 

-The Pennsylvania Gazette, No. 2238, .Novem- 
ber 14, 1771. 

To be SOLD, by public YEN DUE, 
On the premises, on second day, the i6th day of 

Dec. next, 

A valuable plantation and tract of 160 acres of 
good wheat land, situate in the township of 
Evesham, in the county of Burlington, West-Jersey, 
about 12 miles from Philadelphia, 7 miles from Burl- 
ington and Mountholly, about 4 miles from an Eng- 
lish Church, and two miles to a Friend's Meeting 
house in Moore's-town, about a mile and a half to a 
grist-mill and navigable landing on Ancokas Creek ; 
there is on said plantation a good one story framed 
house, with two rooms on a floor, a good cellar un- 



640 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. 

der the whole, a well of good water near the door, 
a young bearing orchard of good fruit, about 120 
acres cleared and within fence, the remainder good 
timber land. Also to be sold, at the same time, 2 1 
acres of banked meadow, lying on said Ancokas 
creek, about a mile and a half from the plantation, 
which will be divided into three lotts. The whole is 
part of the estate of JAMES BORDEN, deceased. 
Any person inclining to view the premises before the 
day of sale, may apply to JOHN COX, in Moore's- 
town. The conditions will be made known at the 
time and place aforesaid, when attendance will be 
given, by JOHN CLARK, John Cox, Executors. 
The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1501, Novem- 
ber 14, 1771. 

NEW-YORK, November 7. 
A Letter from JAMES PARKER, Esq; Mayor of the city 

of Perth Amboy. 

To Lieut. Colonel MAURICE CARR, of his Maj- 
esty's xxixth Regiment of Foot. 
SIR, 

A LTHO' it has been the Practice of other Towns 
jfjL in this Province to address the command- 
ing Officers of any of his Majesty's Troops that 
have been in them, on leaving their Quarters, the 
Corporation of this Place have always declined it, 
esteeming it a Compliment not in Character ; but as 
it has generally been done, and a Neglect of it (or 
something of the Kind) at this Time mighit be con- 
strued in a Light unfavourable to his Majesty's 2Qth 
Regiment, which you have had the Honour to Com- 
mand whilst quartered amongst us ; from a meer 



NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 64! 

Motive of Justice, the Corporation of this City have 
directed me, in this Way to declare to you, and the 
Gentlemen Officers of your Corps, their Sense of the 
great Harmony that has subsisted between them and 
the gentlemen of this Place, of the Peace and good 
Agreement that has been maintained between the 
whole Regiment and the Inhabitants, and of the Res- 
pect you have on all Occasions paid to the Civil 
Magistracy. 

These are the natural Consequences of a proper 
Discipline, which has been strictly observed in the 
Regiment under your Command; which has gained 
you so great an Esteem, that it is with the utmost 
Concern we find you are ordered to other Quarters. 
Give me Leave to assure you in Behalf of the Cor- 
poration, that whatever may be your Destination, the 
Honour of the Regiment and Prosperity of the Gen- 
tlemen Officers, will always be accompanied with 
their best Wishes. I have the Honour to be, SIR, 
your most obedient, humble servant, 

JAMES PARKER, Mayor. 

Perth Amboy, Nov. 2, 1771. 
Col. MAURICE CARR. 

We are informed from New-Brunswick, that the 
Mayor of that Place, with the Aldermen, Common 
Councilmen, and sundry other of the principal Gen- 
tlemen jointly presented an ADDRESS to Capt. 
FRENCH, Commanding Officer of the three Compa- 
nies of the 2Qth Regiment quartered there, in these 
Words following: 



642 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77I 

To JEREMIAH FRENCH, Esq: 
Captain and Commanding Officer of the three Com- 
panies of the 29th Regiment, quartered in the 

Barracks of this Place. 
SIR: 

rpHE just Sense we have of the Benefits and Sat- 
1 isfaction which the inhabitants of this Place 
have enjoyed from that mutual Correspondence, 
Peace and Harmony, which has subsisted between 
them and the Troops under your immediate Com- 
mand, during their being quartered in these Bar- 
racks, demands our Acknowledgment. 

We therefore beg Leave in this public Manner, to 
return you, and the other Officers quartered with you 
in this Place, our most sincere Thanks for the happy 
Effects of youi prudent and commendable Conduct, 
clearly manifested in that gentle humane Character 
which you and the other Gentlemen have supported 
during your Residence amongst us. And it is to 
this exemplary Conduct we chiefly ascribe that gen- 
erally sober and orderly Behaviour of the Men under 
your Command, which, to their Credit in general, ap- 
peared to be remarkably well. 

Be pleased, Sir, with this Testimony of our Re- 
gard, to accept of our best Wishes for your Health 
and Happiness ; and also that your Promotion may 
be speedy and adequate to your Merit. 

New- Brunswick, October 30, 1771. 

To which Capt. FRENCH was pleased to return the 
following Answer : 



I77lj NEWSPAPER EXTRACTS. 643 

GENTLEMEN 

I Return you my sincere Thanks for the Honour 
you have done me and the other Officers, by 
your very obliging Address. It gives me the great- 
est Pleasure to receive this public Testimony of your 
Approbation of my Conduct and theirs, and the so- 
ber orderly Behaviour of the Troops under my Com- 
mand. The Civilities I have received from the In- 
habitants of this Place, and in particular your good 
Wishes for my Health and Promotion, will always 
claim my Gratitude and best Wishes for their Pros- 
perity. 

New-Brtmswick, October 30, 1771. 

Afterwards the Officers were invited by the Gen- 
tlemen to an elegant Entertainment at the White- 
Hall Tavern. 

* . 

Cohansey, November 5, 1771. 

This day departed this life the Reverend WILL- 
IAM RAMSAY, M. A. after a tedious sickness of 
eight weeks, which he bore with Christian patience 
and resignation. It may be truly affirmed of him, 
that he was a kind husband, a tender parent, an af- 
fectionate chearful friend, a faithful evangelical min- 
ister, and a sincere Christian. His animated manner 
of preaching, and exemplary life, made him truly 
respectable and eminently useful. What he preached 
in the pulpit, his life preached out of it, being as it 
were a practical comment on that holy religion 
which he so warmly recommended. In sundry lucid 
intervals of his tedious sickness he earnestly recom- 
mended a life of strict piety to all around him, and 



644 NEW JERSEY COLONIAL DOCUMENTS. [l77l 

repeatedly declared his steady assurance, that through 
the merits of Christ, death natural would be his 
birth to lire eternal. Thus cheerfully resting his soul 
on those doctrines of grace, which he invariably 
preached, he expired without a sigh or a groan. 
See with what peace a Christian can die. 




Custom-House, Philadelphia. Cleared. 

Schooner Mary J. Ross to New-Jersey. 

The Pennsylvania Journal, No. 1510, Novem- 
ber 14, 1771. 

Morris-Town, November 3, 1771. 
WHEREAS the Shop of Hubert Burke, Taylor, 
was broke open on Thursday the 3istof October 
last, and the following Articles feloniously taken from 
thence, viz. About 8 or 9 Yards of Homespun 
mixed Cloth, white and Sheep's grey, 4 Yards of 
Coarse Blue Cloth, about 2 Yards Scarlet Cloth, 4 
Yards Durant same Colour, 4 Yards black Home- 
spun, y^ wide Cloth, 2 Yards blue Plush