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Full text of "Documents relative to the colonial history of the state of New York"

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1136152 



^m^AL,OCY COLLEcf]^ 



J COUNTY PUBLIC I 



3 1833 01150 7685 



GENERAL I N" D E X 



D O C U M E N T S 



COLONIAL HISTORY 



STATE OF NEW YORK, 



rUBLISHED UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF AN ACT OF THE LEGISLATURE ENTITLED AN ACT TO AMEND " AN ACT 

TO AMEND AN ACT ENTITLED ' AN ACT IN RELATION TO THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF THE STATE 

AND THE PUBLICATION AND DISTRIBUTION THEREOF,' PASSED APRIL 12, 1856," 

PASSED APRIL 13, 1857 ; PASSED APRIL 2, 1858. 




E. B. O'CALLAGHAN, M, D., LL. D. 



Tlie labour and the patience, the judgment and the penetration, which are required to make a good Index, is only known 
to those who liave gone through this most painful, but least-praised part of a publication. But laborious as it is, I think 
it indispensably necessary, to manifest the treasures of any multifarious collection, facilitate the knowledge to those who 
seek it, and invite them to make application thereof. Oldys. 



G- 



e n e i" c^- 



Xn ^( ex 



ALBANY: 

WEED, PAKSONS AND COMPANY, PRINTERS. 
1S61. 



Volumes III., IV., V., VI., Vli. and IX. of this work were published under the direction of the 
Governor, Secretary or State and Cojipteoller of the State of New York ; and the publication 
has been completed under the authority of the Regents or the Uniteesity, in virtue of the Acts of 
the Legislature to that effect, passed April 12, 1850, and April 2, 1858. 

The Documents in Dutch and French were translated by E. B. O'Callagiian, M. D., LL. D., who 
was employed for that purpose ; to prepare the Index and to superintend the publication generally. 



1136152 



GENEEAL INDEX. 



A. 



Aa, Van der. (See Van der Aa.) 

Aanliaax, a Seneca chief, murdei'ed, III., 445. 

Aaron, a Mohawk sacliem, VI., 295. 

Aaron, a negro, gives false evidence in regard to tlie burning 
of the Gasp«, VIII., 390. 

Aasdom-reght, explanation of the Dutch law of descent, 
Called, I., 620. 

d'Abadie de St. Germain, Mr., assists major Loftus, VII., 
619 ; sends an account of the campaign of 1757 in 
America, X., 640; governor of Louisiana, letters of 
M. de St. Ange to, 1157 ; his conference with the 
Indians, 1159, 1160 ; biographical notice of, 1161. 

Abadiens, a religious sect, in the city of New York, IX., 549. 

d'Abancour, Mary, IX., 668. 

Abbot, , killed near fort Massachusetts, X., 177. 

[Abbot, George,] archbishop of Canterbury, III., 1, 2, 4, 5, 
11, 12. 

Abbots Roding, reverend Thomas Thurloe, rector of, I., 557. 

Abbott, Mordecai, one of the proprietors of West Jersey, 
III., 839. 

Abdie, sir Robert, member of the council of trade. III., 31. 

Abeel, Catalina, marries Vincent Mathews, VIII., 449. 

Abeel, Cornet, IV., 16. 

Abeel, David, arrives at Albany from Canada, VI., 526; 
empowered to effect an exchange of prisoners, 527. 

Abeel, James, captain of rangers, VIII., 603. 

Abeel, John, alderman. III., 840, IV., 902, 903, 904, 911; 
mayor of Albany, 90; one of the principal in- 
habitants of Albany, 754 ; a merchant, 849 ; recorder 
of Albany, 984, 983 (bis), 985, 990, 992, 994, 995, 996, 
998 ; receives money for materials for the fort at 
Alb-any, 1097 ; commissioner for Indian affairs, V., 85. 

Abeel, John, a prisoner in Canada, VI., 492 ; kept in prison, 
495 ; his release demanded, ibid ; has a Seneca child, 
546; an Indian trader, VII., 101; returns from tho 
• Senecas, 172, 173. 
1 



captain, arrives at' Quebec from Bourdeaux, X., 65 ; 
sent to cape Chat, 159 ; recalled, 175 ; returns to Que- 
bec, 178. 

, an Abenaki, gained over by the English, IX., 942. 

Abercorn (Albercorne) [James Hamilton 7th] earl of, mem- 
ber of the privy council, VI., 136. 

Ahercrombie, James, captain in the 42d highlanders, bio- 
graphical notice of, VII., 160; major, X., 1105. 

Abercromby (Abber Kombick, Ahercrombie, Albercrombie, 
Albercrombick, Albert Combey, Alberkombick, Al- 
berkombiz, Alber Kombrick), major-general James, at 
Albany, VII., 119, 343; proposes a junction of the 
British troops with the Provincials, 122 ; news of the 
peace with the Delawares, &c., sent to, 160; cannon 
sent to Albany at the request of, 164; ordered to 
furnish a guard for the protection of property in 
Livingston manor, 207; his conduct approved, 344; 
recalled, 345 ; biographical notice of, ibid ; returns 
to England, 389, X., 947; the 42d highlanders 
serve at lake George, under, VII., 786, VIII., 688; 
commands an expedition against Ticonderoga, 228, 
X., 739; major WoodhuU serves under, VIII., 
295 ; appoints major Robertson deputy quarter- 
master-general, 706; colonel of the 44th foot, X., 
682 ; the correspondence between him and the French 
of Canada transmitted to France, 711, 712, 771, 776, 
877 ; his correspondence vrith governor de Vaudreuil, 
713, 714, 772, 830, 878, 879; defeated, 741, 779; 
French speak favorably of, 747: authorizes colonel 
Schuyler to negotiate an exchang.; of pri.=onei'S, 773 ; 
corresponds with M. de Montcalm, 774, S22 ; number 
of Indians attached to his army, 802; examines a 
French oficer sent to him, ibid ; force under his com- 
mand, 809 ; false report regarding, 817 ; loses his bag- 
gage and music, 818 ; at the head of a powerful army, 
828 ; news of his defeat received in France, 833 ; his let- 
ters to governor Vaudreuil forwarded, 841 ; detains 
governor Vaudreuil's messenger, 847 ; despatches 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Abe- 



Abcrcrombif, major-general — fo«'»"«'''- 

from the Fr..n<;li general and governor conveyed to, 
851, 892 ; coiiimunicates the fall of Louisbourg to the 
French general, 853; at the head of lake George, 
855; retires into winter quarters, 884; burns the 
barracks and storehouses at lake George, 888. 

Aberdeenshire, lord Adam Gordon represents, VII., 767. 

Abergaveny, lady, marries lord Delawarr, VI., 163. 

Abert, Johannes, IV., 940. 

Abingdon [Montagu Bertie 2d] earl of, member of the 
privy council, IV., 961, 1127. 

Abitibis river, where, IX., 286. 

Abjuration. (See Oat/i.) 

Aborigines, I., 388. (See Indians.) 

Abraliam, a Mohawk chief, attends a conference held with 
governor Clinton, VI., 295 ; reports news from Canada, 
589 ; brother of king Hendrick, 869, 998 ; his speech 
at the congress at Albany, 870 ; declares the council 
fire at Albany extinguished, 871 ; of the upper Mo- 
hawk castle, 982 ; VII., 136; governor Shirley endea- 
vors to detach him from general Johnson, VI., 998 ; 
thanks sir William Johnson for having fortified Cana- 
joharie, VII., 53 ; his speech to sir William Johnson, 
71 ; announces the intention of the Mohawks to adopt 
some River Indians, 96 ; accompanies a party of Mo- 
hawks to fort Johnson, 104 ; dissuades sir William 
Johnson from going to Onondaga, 107 ; advises sir 
William Johnson to attend the meeting at Onondaga, 
115 ; sings the song of condolence at Onondaga, 134, 
and the war song, 143 ; expresses Ms determination 
to protect sir William Johnson at the expense of his 
life, 146 ; attends a conference at Lancaster, 255 ; at- 
tends the treaty at fort Stanwix, VIII., 113, 114, 119 ; 
his Indian name, 137 ; chief manager for sir William 
Johnson, 232 ; speeches of, 235, 239 ; thanks governor 
Tryon for his speech, 309 ; attends a conference at 
Guy park, 518 ; attends a conference with the com- 
missioners from the continental congress, 607, 610 ; 
his speeches to them, 621, 630. 

Abraham, junior (Little Abraham), a sachem of the lower 
Mohawk ca.stle, VII., 115 ; sets off on an expedi- 
tion to Canada, 199 ; attends a conference at fort 
Johnson, 263, 265 ; complains of the injiistice the 
Mohawks have experienced in regard to their lands, 
435. 

Abraham (.\bram), captain, III,, 117, 132. (See StaAs.) 

Abraham, Mr., IV., 343. (See Schuyler.) 

Abraliam the Fin, a deserter from Delaware, II , 89. 

Abraham, the plains of, general Wolfe on, VII., 357; the 
English scale the heights of, X., 1003, 1010, 1038 ; the 
French defeated on, 1039, 1052 ; whence called, 1081. 

Abrahamzen, Isaac, III., 74. 

Abramse, Cornells, II., 578. 

Abramse, Jacob, II., 700. 

Abrever.tc, a vessel arrives at Quebec from, X., 124. 

Abstract of the remonstrance of New Netherland, I., 331 ; of 
proposals made by the Onondaga and Cayuga sachems, 
III., 347; of Mr. Santen's charges against governor 



Dongan, and of the latter's answer, 493 ; of acts of the 
New York committee of safety, 630 ; of the evidence 
in the books of the lords of trade, relating to New 
York, VI., 639 ; of the proceedings of the society for 
propagating the gospel in foreign parts, not made up 
correctly, VII., 538 ; of letters from Canada, IX., 196 ; 
of M. de Callieres' project, 411 ; of the Canadian 
despatches of 1695, in reference to the Iroquois, 
English, &c., 633, 634; of M. de Vaudreuil's letters, 
845, 947 ; of letters from M. de Vaudreuil and father 
de la Chasse on the subject New England troubles 
with the Abenaquis, 945 ; of letters of Messrs. de 
Vaudreuil and Begon, 949, 955 ; of the correspon- 
dence upon the subject of the forts at Niagara and 
Oswego, 999 ; of letters of Messrs. de Beauharnois 
and d'Aigremont, 1010; of letters of Messrs. de 
Beauharnois and Hocquart, 1014 ; of M. de Beau- 
harnois' despatches relative to Crown Point, 1021 ; 
of despatches concerning Louisbourg, X., 31 ; of Ca- 
nadian despatches of 1746, 76 ; of despatches of M. 
de la Gallissouiere, 132 ; of despatches from Canada 
of 1747,8, 179 ; of correspondence between M. de la 
Galissoniere and others respecting an exchange of 
prisoners, 190 ; of Canadian despatches of 1749, 199 ; 
of despatches from M. de Vaudreuil, governor of 
Louisiana, 219 ; of M. de la Jonquiere's despatches, 
240, 242 ; of M. de Vaudreuil's despatches from Ca- 
nada, 381, 407, 518 ; of occurrences in Canada in 
1755 and 1756, 397 ; of despatches from fort Du- 
quesne, 423 ; of despatches from Canada of 1756, 
475 ; of despatches, complaining of M. de Vaudreuil, 
857 ; of despatches from Canada in 1759, 906, 972 ; 
of a plan to excite a rebellion in Canada, 1155. 

Abuses attendant on free trade with the Indians in New 
NetherlaBd, I., 150. 

Academy, none in New Netherland, I., 424. (See College.) 

Academy, French, of arcliitecture, founded, II., 348 ; of in- 
scriptions, erected, ibid ; of sciences, erected, ibid ; 
M. de Bougainville contributes to, X., 492. 

Acadia (Acadie), III., 122, 126, 127, 450; M. la Bourne, gover- 
nor of, 241 ; memorial on the part of the French con- 
cerning New York and, 506 ; Massachusetts encroaches 
on, ibid ; chevalier Grandfontaine, governor of, 513, 
IX., 87, 265 ; M. de Menev.al, governor of, III., 571, 
IX., 428 ; pirates plunder several places in, III., 571; an 
expedition fitted out in Massachusetts against, 704 ; 
M. Perrot, governor of, 720, IX., 272; Mr. Nelson's 
memorial respecting, IV., 207 ; New York claims a part 
of, 282 ; abounds in copper, 311 ; notice of the peace 
sent to the Indians of, 343 ; a Jesuit arrives at Que- 
bec from, 350 ; Indians of, attack Hatfield, 403 ; M 
de Villebon, governor of, 426, IX., ,240, 526, 570 
French of, encroach on New England, IV., 453 
the French obtain, 536 ; included within the M.assa- 
chusetts patent, V., 596 ; peninsula of, hardly one 
third of Nova Scotia, 624 ; the English requested not 
to make any alteration in matters of religion in, VI., 
479 ; the French about to erect a fort in, 583 ; other- 



-Ace] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



3 



Acadia — continued. 

wise called Nova Scotia, 886, IX., 895, X., 529 ; limits 
of, according to governor Shirley, VI., 959; M. laSaul- 
saye sent to, IX., 3 ; part of New France, 4 ; extent of, 
ibid, 788, 895, 916 ; a dependency on Canada, 45 ; pro- 
gress of, 74 ; granted to sir Tliomas Temple, 75 ; re- 
stored to France, ibid, 268, 787, 913 ; M. de Chambly, 
governor of, 87 ; M. de Marson, commandant of, 128 ; 
population of, in 1679, 136 ; the French neglect, 153 ; 
M. de la Valliere, governor of, 157, 168 ; memoir of M. 
Duchesneau on, 160 ; condition of, in 1681, 166 ; the 
English occupy part of, 168 ; Huguenots not to be 
suffered in, 199 ; claimed to extend to the Kennebec 
river, 265; the French settle, 267, 782; abounds 
with fish, 285 ; the English encroach on, 346, 800, 917, 
918, 920 ; disputes respecting, 371 ; right of the 
French to, 377 ; early history of, 379 ; Denis' history 
of, mentioned, 380 ; in danger of being destroyed, 
401, 444 ; western boundary of, 433 ; the Canibas to 
continue hostilities towards, 453 ; an expedition sent 
from Quebec against the English settlements towards , 
464 ; reverend Louis Petit, missionary in, 475 ; count 
de Frontenao assists the Indians of, 498 ; seized by 
the English, 499 ; chevalier de Villebon on his way 
to, 506 ; report on the affairs of, 527 ; M. la Mothe 
Cadillac's information respecting, 546 ; extended me- 
moirs on, exist, 549 ; news from, 630, 635 ; M. la 
Mothe Cadillac resides in, 671 ; early governors of, 
702, 782, 783 ; the English capture -several fishing 
smacks belonging to, 738 ; hostilities resumed in, 
748 ; convenience of the coast of, 758 ; baron de Lery 
forms a settlement in, 781 ; M. de Subercasse, gover- 
nor of, 803, 809 ; preparations making by the English 
to attack, 845 ; baron St. Castin appointed commander 
of the French in, 854 ; the English ill treat the inha- 
bitants of, 858; ceded to the English, 871, 894, 914, 
931 ; conflicting claims respecting, 879 ; English ex- 
peditions in, 924, 925, 927 ; M. Begon and reverend 
father Aubry draw up a memoir on, 931 ; the French re- 
fuse to swear allegiance to the English government in, 
932 ; differences as to what is, 933, 981 ; views of the 
French regarding, 986, 987 ; a great number of catho- 
lics in, 995 ; no Recollect missionary in, 1003 ; the 
French meditate an attack on, 1107 ; its conquest 
suggested, X., 1 ; inhabited almost exclusively by 
French, 4 ; French project against, 9 ; M. de la Lou- 
tre, vicar-general of, 11 ; number of Micmacs in, 15 ; 
news from, 39, 47, 61, 380, 416, 427; a French expe- 
dition against, 42 ; duke d'Anville expected in, 71 ; 
its security to be looked to, 164 ; the French alarmed 
at the pretensions of the English to, 220 ; one of 
the most serious losses experienced by the French, 
225 ; a gulf of expense, 263 ; differences regarding, 
290 ; military operations in, 299 ; the English capture 
two French forts in, 340 ; state of affairs in, 358 ; M. 
de Montcalm recommends an expedition against, 492 ; 
its reduction proposed to the court of France, 495 ; 
the EngUsh seize a considerable number of French 



families, and banish them from, 518 ( sea Acadians) ; 
policy of ceding it to Holland, 935 ; M. de Silhouette 
one of the commissioners to settle the boundaries of, 
943 ; separated by the bay of Fundy from the Maine, 
1064; abb6 Maniac's conduct in, 1133. (See Anna- 
polis, N. S.; Cape Breton ; Halifax; Louhbourg ; Nova 
Scotia.) 

Aoadians, the, expelled from Nova Scotia, VI., 954, X.,282, 
518 ; their subsequent fate, VII., 125 ; character of, 
X., 5 ; cause of their ruin, 11 ; advance money to the 
government, 15 ; mild measures of the English to- 
wards, 17 ; M. Miniac a missionary to, 48 ; forced to 
furnish supplies to French troops, 63 ; several out- 
lawed, 155 ; warned to behave themselves properly, 
164 ; reverend M. la Loutre endeavors to persuada 
them to leave Nova Scotia, 216 ; a proclamation 
issued against, 265 ; expatriated, 282 ; inveigled 
and taken prisoners, 358 ; used by the English cru- 
elly, 380 ; seize a vessel in which they are trans- 
ported, and return to their country, 427, 528 ; mea- 
sures adopted by the governor of Canada in their 
behalf, 440 ; removed to the English plantations, 496 ; 
sent to the Windward islands, 519 ; escape from Caro- 
lina, 540 ; dying of hunger, 547 ; force the coromand- 
ant of fort Beausejour to capitulate, 671 ; sufferings 
of; 973 ; provisions in the treaty of Montreal in regard 
to, 1116, 1117. 

Acansa, V., 622. 

Aocaron, Mr., X., 1067; letter of M. de Bourlamaque to, 
1139. 

Accomacq (Virginia), news respecting the Indian war re- 
ceived at, II., 90 ; the Dutch accused of inciting the 
Indians to massacre the English at, 98. 

Account, an, of New Netherland, I., 149, 179 ; of New 
Netherland lost in the Princess, 262 ; of the South 
river and of the unseemly conduct of the Swedes 
there, 587 ; of the situation and discovery of New 
Netherland, and of the encroachment of the English 
on it, II., 133; of the taking of New York by the 
Dutch, III., 199, 200 ; of the general concerns of New 
York, 254 ; of the assistance rendered by New York 
to New England, 264 ; of the first settlers on the 
Delaware, 342 ; of what passed between governor 
Andros and the five nations, 657 ; of M. de la Salle's 
last expedition and discoveries in North America, 
published, 580 ; of the proceedings at New York, 
printed at Boston in 1689, 629 ; of the proceedings of 
Joost StoU, 632 ; of Thomas Clarke's interview with sir 
William Phips, IV., 8 ; of the five nations, by Levinus 
Van Schaick, 168 ; of major Wessels' negotiations with 
the five nations, 372 ; printed, of governor Fletcher's 
exploits, a romance, 426 ; of the negotiations of 
Messrs. Schuyler, Livingston and Hansen at Onon- 
daga, 654 ; of the illegal prosecution and trial of 
colonel Nicholas Bayard for supposed high treason, 
printed in New York, 972 ; of the maladministration 
in the various departments in the government of New 
York, by chief justice Mompesson, V., 406 ; of Ger- 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Ace — 



AocouDt — ron uniifd. 

man families remaining in the proriuceof NewTork, 
515 ; of the Freneli forts, settlements, routes and In- 
dian nations between Quebec and the Mississippi, 
620 ; of tlie trade of New York, 685 ; of gorernor 
Clinton's conduct in regard to the Canada expedition, 
VI., 399 ; of the campaign against the western Indi- 
ans, transmitted to England, VII., 686 ; of the state of 
the province of New York, 795 ; of nine Iroquois 
tribes, IX., 47 ; of M. de Courcelle's voyage to lake 
Ontario, 75 ; of M. de Frontenac's voyage to lake 
Ontario, 95 ; of the meeting held at Quebec, respect- 
ing the Indians, 194 ; of the expedition of M. de 
Denonville, 331 ; of occurrences in Canada in Octo- 
ber, 1690, 455; in 1689, 1690, 462; in 1690, 1691, 
613; in 1691, 1692, 534; of occurrences in Canada in 
relation to the war with the English and the Indians, 
550 ; of occurrences in Canada in 1692, 1693, 555 ; in 
1694, 1695, 594; in 1695, 1696, 640; in 1696, 1697, 
664 ; in 1697, 1698, 678 ; of an expedition against fort 
Clinton, N. Y., X., 79; of an incursion of a partj 
of English, Dutch and Indians into the island of 
Montreal, 81 ; of the battle at the Monongahela, 303 ; 
of occurrences in Canada, 381, 397, 401 ; of the losses 
of the French array at Port Mahon, 430 ; of the siege 
of Oswego, 457 ; of an attack on fort William Henry, 
544 ; of tlie embassy of the five nations to Montreal, 
655 ; of two expeditions against the English, 569 ; of 
the campaign in North America in 1757, 640; of the 
capture of fort William Henry, &c., 645 ; of the ex- 
pedition against the German Flatts, 672 ; of the battle 
of Ticonderoga, 734, 741, 747, 788 ; of major Grant's 
defeat near fort Duquesne, 902 ; of the French cam- 
paigns in North America from 1755 to 1758, 912 ; of 
the expedition against Quebec under general Wolfe, 
1001, 1016; under chevalier de Levis, 1077. 
Accounts, report on the aflairs of New Netherland, by the 
general board of, I., 149 ; of moneys borrowed and 
disbursed for the city's colonie In New Netherland, 
II., 48, 186; ordered to be audited, 336; audited, 
340; of powder, 452; of governor Lovelace, ordered 
to be settled, 720, 721 ; public, to be transmitted half 
yearly to England, III., 686 ; of the revenue of New 
York, IV., 173, 756 ; state of governor Fletcher's, 
421 ; of military stores at Schenectady in 1696, 431 ; 
governor Fletcher's, purloined, 522; of imports and 
exports at New York from 1724 to 1725, V., 774; 
of negro slaves imported into New York from 1700 to 
1726, 814; of imports and exports at New York 
from 1723 to 1728, 897 ; of the number of inhabitants 
in the province of New York, 929 (see Ctnsm) ; of iron 
made at Anoram in the manor of Livingston, from 
1750 to 1757, VII., 336 ; of quit rents, 901; books of, 
belonging to tlie French, fall into the hawds of sirWU- 
liam Jolmson on the reduction of Niagara, VIII., 362. 
Achaonalena, a Saguina chief, X., 184. 

Aehinnhars, an Oneida chief. III., 121, 126; ambassador to 
Quebec, IX., 46. 



Achiro, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 986. 

Achoabraet, an Indian chief near Michilimakinac, X., 

168, 170. 
Achrireho, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 910. 
Achter Col (AghterKol, Arthur cull, Authnr Cnll), Hacking- 
sack otherwise called, I., 183 ; altogether ruined, 190 ; 
called New Jarsey, order on petitions from, II.', 576,577; 
order to recommend persons to be magistrates of the 
several towns at, 579 ; commission of the sheriff and 
secretary of, 595 ; names of the towns of, 595, 622 ; 
captain Knyff sent to administer the oath of allegi- 
ance to the inhabitants of, 598 ; Robert Lapriere ar- 
rested by the sheriff of, 603 ; Jonathan Singletary 
placed under surveillance at, 606 ; population of, in 
1673, 607; mentioned, 657; order on the petition of 
the sheriff of, 682, 683 ; order on the petition of 
Thomas Johnson of, 694 ; an appeal allowed to the 
district court of, 714 ; order on an application from 
• the court of, 722, 723 ; order on a petition from Eliza- 
bethtown in, 728; taken by the Dutch, III., 203, 213. 
(See New Jersey.) 
Achtieuhoven, Michael Pauw, lord of, I., 70. 
Ackehoorn, an Indian sachem on the Delaware river, I., 599 ; 

mark of, 600. 
Ackkonepak, a Pennocook Indian, IV., 996. 
Acklawaugh creek, VIII., 32. 

Acora, the Dutch form a commercial treaty with, I, 34. 
Acossen, the Indian name of M. Lemoine, IX., 185, 186. 
Acosta, Joseph d', II., 35, 40. 
Acouiresheche, a Mohawk, IX., 1110. 
Acoutache, notifies the Iroquois that the French are about 

to attack them, IX., 274. 
Acrelius, reverend Israel, notice of, VII., 168. 
Actanaweei, an Oneida sachem, IV., 728. 
Act of possession by the French, of forts and places among 

the Iroquois, III., 135. 
Acts of grace begin with the King, IV., 699. 
Acts (Barbadoes), making bank bills a legal tender, passed 
and vetoed, IV., 1188. 
( British.) To increase the trade and navigation of England, 
(See Tra.de Mts.) 
Of the Duke of York imposing duties on goods imported 
into New York, HI., 217; continued for three years 
246; nullified, 289. 
For reversing the attainder of Jacob Leisler, Milburn 
and others, governor Fletcher attempts to defeat the, 
IV., 322; legalizes Leisler's assumption of the gov- 
ernment, 400 ; governor Fletcher refuses to obey, 401 ; 
burned, ibid ; title of, 1018 ; lord Cornbury's obser- 
vations on, ibid. 
For the suppression of piracy extended to the planta- 
tions, IV., 666, v., 47; amended, VI., 278. 
Regulating the cutting of timber in America, the Earl 

of Bellomont's suggestions respecting an, IV., 675. 
For punishing mutiny and desertion, annual, IV., 782. 
For prohibiting all trade with France, ordered to be pub- 
lished in Lord Cornbury's governments, IV., 1140 ; 
published in New York, 1167. 



-Act] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Acts (British) — coniinv.ed. 

For preventing all traitorous correspondence with her 
majesty's enemies, ordered to be published in New 
York and New Jersey, IV., 1140 ; published, 1167. 

For the incouraging the importation of naval stores into 
Great Britain, transmitted to the colonies, IV., 1140. 

Of toleration, the reverend Mr. Maokemie pleads the, 
IV., 1187; Lord Cornbury of opinion that it does not 
authorize strolling preachers. Ibid. 

For ascertaining the rates of foreign coin in the planta- 
tions, passed, V., fi7 ; disregarded in America, 83. 

For raising recruits for the land forces and marines, a 
clause of, V., 152. 

For preventing frauds and regulating abuses in his ma- 
jesty's customs, provisions of, V., 235. 

For preventing frauds and regulating abuses in the plan- 
tation trade, v., 235. 

For encouraging trade to America, moneys levied by 
virtue of, how applied, V., 251. 

For the more effectual securing and encouraging the 
trade of his majesty's British subjects to America, 
VI., 179. 

To encourage the importation of pig and bar iron from 
the American colonies, and to prevent the erection of 
any mill or other engine for slitting or rolling iron, or 
any plating forge with a tilt hammer, or any furnace 
for making steel in said colonies, passed, VI., 604. 

To impose duties on stamped paper in America (see 
Stamp Act) ; repealed, VII., 823. 

To prevent the issuing of paper money in America, 
introduced, VI., 643 ; the New York assembly opposed 
to it, ibid. 

For restraining the governor, council and assembly of 
New York from passing any laws until they provide 
necessaries for the king's troops, passed, VII., 945, 
980, Vin., 63 ; report of the committee of the privy 
council on the action of the New York legislature 
subsequent to the passage of the, 89 ; declared by 
the New York assembly unconstitutional, &c., 195. 

For securing the dependency of the colonies on the 
mother country, passed, VII., 823. 

For the indemnity of such persons as have incurred the 
penalties imposed by the stamp act, passed, VII., 823. 

For securing the church of England as by law estab- 
lished, passed, VII., 944. 

For granting certain duties in the British colonies and 
plantations, passed, Vll., 980; action of the New 
York assembly in consequence, VIII., 194. 

To prevent paper bills of credit being declared a legal 
tender in any of the colonies, passed, VIII., 195. 

To enable the governor, council and assembly of his 
majesty's colony of New York to pass an act for 
creating and issuing, upon loan, paper bills of credit 
to a certain amount, and to make the same a legal 
tender in payments into the loan offices and treasury 
of the said colony, passed, VIII., 215, 245. 
- Permitting the East India company to export tea to the 
colonies, passed, VIII., 400. 



For shiitting up the port of Boston, passed, VIII., 433. 

To prohibit all trade with the revolted American colo- 
nies, passed, VIII., 668. 
(Coloni.al.) Copies of, to be transmitted to England for 
approval. III., 332, 370, 378, 538, 544, 624, 687, 819, 
820, 828, 856 ; transmitted accordingly, 340, 363, 790, 
792, 795,814,836, IV., 36, 999,1114, V., 778; part of 
one only, vetoed. III., 370; lost on board the bark 
Bristol, 836; to be transmitted under seal, IV., 226 ; 
instructions thereupon, 667 ; of the provinces under 
the earl of BeUomont's government, reported on by 
the lords of trade, 698 ; none, except those immedi- 
g,tely necessary, to be passed in the colonies, in case 
of the governor's death, 774 ; certain, referred to lord 
Cornbury to report, 1041 ; vetoed, ordered to be taken 
out and destroyed, 1044 ; destruction of such as are 
vetoed, disapproved of, 1066 ; passed in the adminis- 
tration of the earl of Bellomont and captain Nanfan 
still under consideration, 1079, 1081 ; lord Cornbury's 
report on certain, 1111 ; passed and vetoed, not 
destroyed, 1114; to be engrossed on paper, V., 517; 
discriminating, passed, 775, 778, 781 ; printed copies 
of, sent to England, 874 ; abstract of revenue, previ- 
ous to 1735, VI., 37-39; printed are, when sealed 
and- certified by the governor, as good as engrossed 
copies, 309 ; instruction respecting the repeal of, VIII., 
138; not assented to, titles of, 356, 356, 369, 370, 
398, 484, 564. (See Laws.) 
(Conn.), for completing and perfecting the dividing line 
between New York and Connecticut, governor Bur- 
nett's observations on, V., 699. 
(Dutch), fixing the boundary of New Netherland, ap- 
pUed for, II., 225; to be issued, 227; copy of the, 
228 ; permitting the erection of a colonie in America, 
upon the conditions offered by the West India com- 
pany, III., 37. 
(Mass.), perpetual, against deserters, passed, IV., 636. 

To incorporate a society for propagating christian 
knowledge amongst the Indians of North America, 
passed, VII, 507 ; archbishop Seeker hopes to stop it, 
508 ; a report against it prevented by a change of 
ministry, 518. 
(New Jersey), for raising three thousand pounds for the 
expedition against Canada, passed, V. , 84 ; explained, 
205. 

For inforcing the currency of bills of credit for £3,000, 
passed, V., 84. 

For the encouragement of volunteers, passed, V., 84, 
305. 

For settling the militia, objections to, V., 155. 

For uniting and quieting the minds of all her majesty's 
subjects, objections to, V., 155. 

For regulating the election of representatives, V., 155 ; 
recommended to be amended, ibid. 

For regulating negro, Indian and mulatto slaves, vetoed, 
v., 157. 

For support of her majesty's government of Nova Cse- 
sarea, defective, V., 161 ; explained and rendered 



6 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[ Acr — 



Acts(XfW Jersey)— continued. 

more effectual, 20G, 508; explanatory act vetoed, 
ibid ; governor Hunter's observations thereon, ibid. 
For ascertaining the place of the sitting of the repre- 
senUtiveB to meet in general assembly, passed, V., 
187 ; governor Hunter's observations thereon, 207 ; 
confirmed, 252, 262. 
For the support of her majesty's government, passed, 

v., 205. 
Reviving the militia act, passed, V., 206. 
Reviving aud continuing the courts of common pleas 

in the county of Gloucester, passed, V., 206, 208. 
For enabling the owners of meadows and marshes 
adjoining to aud on both sides of the creek that 
surrounds the islands of Burlington to stop out the 
tide from overflowing them, passed, V., 206. 
For building and repairing gaol houses, passed, V., 

207. 
For the better qualifying representatives, why passed, 

v., 207. 
For dividing and ascertaining the boundaries of all the 

counties of the province, why passed, V., 207. 
For ascertaining representatives' fees, explanation of, 

v., 207. 
For regulating fences, passed, V., 207; objections to, 

208. 
For amending an act for preventing swine running at 

large, explained, V., 208. 
For regulating of stone horses or stallions that run at 

large, passed, V., 208. 
For the currency of bills of credit, passed, V., 305. 
To enable Thomas Gordon, treasurer, to pay a certain 
sum for the support of the government, lord Claren- 
don's objections to, V., 398. 
For sliortening of law suits and regulating the practice 

of the law, passed, V., 461. 
For confirming the ordinance for establishing fees, V., 

461. 
Fixing the session of assembly to the town of Burling- 
ton, approved, V.', 461 ; its injustice, and danger, 
508. 
Passed in lord Lovelace's time, lost, V., 508. 
For an additional support of government, passed, V., 
700 ; why passed, 705 ; explained, 767 ; its beneficial 
efftcts, 821 ; reconunended to be confirmed, 832. 
For the support of the government of New Jersey for 
five years, ending the 23d day of September, 1730, 
passed, V., 767. 
To lay a duty on wheat, meal and staves, and heading 
of all sorts, and bolts whereof staves and heading 
may or can be made, passed, and explained, V., 767, 
To ascertain the size of casks, and the standard of 
weights and measures, and to impower the justices 
of the peace at their quarter sessions to appoint 
packers for packing provisions at the most convenient 
landings in each respective county within this pro- 
vince, why passed, V., 767. 
For the better regulation of elections, and laying i 



penalty on all officers and other persons whatsoever 
that shall by indirect practices endeavor to obtain 
any election contrary to the rights, liberties and 
privileges of the people, and the true intent and 
meaning of this act, why passed, V., 767. 

Concerning the appointment of commissioners of the 
loan office, and concerning the sinking of four thou- 
sand pounds of bills of credit, passed, V., 767; why, 
768 ; recommended to be confirmed, 832. 

Prescribing the forms of declaration of fidelity, abjura- 
tion and affirmation instead of the forms heretofore 
required in such cases, passed, V., 768 ; relates to 
Quakers only, ibid ; its confirmation recommended to 
be postponed, 872. 

The six last mentioned acts transmitted to England, V. , 
768, 778. 

For preventing prosecutions by information, in force, 
v., 847. 

For appropriating a part of the interest money on bills 
of credit to the charges of government, observations 
of the lords of trade on, V., 870 ; governor Montgo- 
merie's observations thereon, 889 ; recommended to 
be vetoed, 923. 

For frequent calling of assemblies, governor Montgom- 
erie recommends that its confirmation be postponed,' 
v., 871; assented to, 874. 

For creating £20,000 of bills of credit, V, 923. 

For running and ascertaining the line of partition be- 
twixt this province and New York, opinion of the 
board of trade on, VI., 773 ; recommended to be ve- 
toed, 952. 

To prevent the exportation of provisions and warlike 
stores, passed, VII., 117. 
(New York. ) To appoint an agent to procure transcripts of 
documents in Europe relating to the colonial history 
of New York, I., xvi. 

To provide for the publication of certain documents re- 
lating to the colonial history of this state, I. , xliii. 

In relation to the colonial history of the state, and the 
publication and distribution thereof, I. , sli v. 

To defray the country charges, referred to. III., 304. 

Charter of liberties and privileges for the province of 
New York, passed and received in England, III., 341 ; 
amendments proposed thereto, ibid ; under considera- 
tion, 348 ; not yet perfected, 354; in the office of the 
secretary of state at Albany, N. Y., 355 ; observations 
on, 357 ; vetoed, 357, 370, 678 ; part of it confirmed, 
notwithstanding, 370 ; extracts from, 677, 682. 

Of settlement, passed and sent to England, III., 355. 

For defraying the public charges of each city, town and 
county, passed. III., 355. 

For the due regulation of proceedings in executions, &o., 
passed, III., 355. 

For repealing former laws about country rates, passed, 

III., 355. 
To prevent willful perjury, passed. III., 355. 
To divide the province into shires and counties, passed, 



-Act] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Acts (New York)— continued. 

For a present to governor Dongan, passed, III, 355. 

For allowanr.e to representatives, passed, III., 355, IV., 
1168, v., 683, 739, 895 ; history of the acts for pay- 
ing representatives, 179, 186. 

To settle courts of justice, passed, III., 355. 

To prevent damages by swine, passed, III, 355, V., 683, 
739, 782, 872, 873, 908, 909, 927, VI., 39, 87, 119, 
144. 

For rewarding those who destroy wolves, passed. III., 
355, IV., 1004, v., 419, 480, 813, 872, 956, VI., 
119, 185, 221. 

Of naturalization (general), passed, III., 355, V., 416 ; 
the latter act submitted to the law officer of the crown 
470 ; his opinion, 495 ; provisions of the former, 496, 
(special), for naturalizing persons therein named, 
passed, v., 701, 739, 783, 847, 872, 873, 895, 908, 956, 
VI., 29, 39, 118, VII., 469; governors of colonies 
prohibited from passing, 564. (See Naturalization.) 

To prevent frauds, passed. III., 355 ; collector Santen 
accused of violating, 497. 

For defraying the requisite charges of the government, 
passed. III., 355; duties imposed by, 400; collector 
Santen charged with violating, 496, 499 ; proceeds of, 
directed to be applied to defraying the charges of the 
fortifications, 575 ; declared in force by Leisler, 676 ; 
preamble of, 677 ; disallowed, 678. 

For raising one penny per pound for the support of gov- 
ernment, passed. III., 476 ; referred to, 566 ; amount 
thereof remaining unpaid in 1695, IV., 133. 

For raising one half-penny in the pound for the support 
of government, passed. III., 477; referred to, 566. 

To levy three pence in the pound, passed. III., 717, 753. 

Establishing a revenue for two years, passed, III., 789, 
795 ; continued for five years, IV., 57; for six years, 
528 ; to continue the additional revenue for two years, 
passed, 958, 999; further continued, 1004; set- 
tled for five years, V., 416 ; objections to, 435 ; a new 
act recommended, 501 ; amended, 518, 519 ; contin- 
ued, 576. 

Quieting and settling the late public disorders, and recog- 
nizing their majesties' right to the province, passed, 
III., 795 ; the last clause of, repealed, IV., 1114. 

For raising one hundred and fifty men to reinforce 
Albany, passed. III., 813. 

Granting a rate of one penny in the pound to their 
majesties to be raised on all real and personal estates, 
confirmed, IV., 73. 

To defray the extraordinary charges of the government, 
passed, IV., 119. 

For paying the public debts, passed, IV., 133, 202,958, 
999 ; for paying and discharging the public debts, 
and issuing bills of credit, passed V., 379 ; its con- 
firmation urged, 389, 390 ; lord Clarendon's objec- 
tions to it, 398 ; an act passed explaining it, 402, 471 ; 
answer to the objections to, 405 ; confirmed, 412, 470 ; 
its confirmation received in New York, 447 ; explana- 
tory act called for by, and sent to the board of trade. 



480 ; for paying the remainder of the public debts, 
passed, 499 ; the justice thereof, 500 ; a caveat lodged 
against its confirmation, 503 ; governor Hunter's ob- 
servations on it, 504; report of the lords of trade on 
it, 522 ; recommended for confirmation, 526 ; other 
acts for paying the public debts, VI., 702, VII., 200. 

For encouraging a post office, passed, IV., 200; anew 
bill introduced and postponed, 510 ; continued, 1167 ; 
necessity of, urged, 1168. 

Called the boulting act, passed by force of money, IV., 
223, 322. 

Declaring what are the rights, &c., of the people of the 
province of New York, passed IV., 263 ; the board of 
trade recommend its repeal, 264. 

For punishing privateers and pirates, IV., 510 ; repealed, 
VI., 47, VII., 455. 

For the qualification of jurors, passed, IV. , 510 ; revived, 
v., 181, 185, 812. 

For vacating certain extravagant grants of land, passed, 
IV., 510, v., 915; the earl of Bellomont very unpopu- 
lar by the passage of, IV., 528 ; particulars respecting 
the passage of, 529 ; efforts made to withhold the royal 
approval from, 533 ; passed by the Leisler party, 713 ; 
not yet approved, 714, 725 ; unaccountable delay in 
approving, 815 ; some of the objections to, answered, 
822 ; necessity of approving, 824 ; the lords of trade 
engaged in a report on, 844; repealed, 1112, V., 25 
rexiort of the board of trade, recommending the con- 
firmation of, 21 ; confirmed, 48, 472 ; captain Evans' 
petition for indemnity in consequence of, 283 ; his- 
tory of the, 651 ; another recommended to be passed, 
654. 

Of indemnity, passed, IV., 524 ; recommended to be 
confirmed, 820, 1111. 

For preventing vexatious suits, &c., passed, IV., 524; 
the earl of Bellomont transmits information on, 820; 
repealed, V., 25. 

Repealing an act for regulating damages during the late 
disorders, recommended for confirmation, IV., 820. 

To appoint commissioners to examine the public accounts 
passed, IV., 713; another enacted, 1004; amended, 
1065 ; re-enacted, VI., 624, 681. 

Against Jesuits and popish priests, passed, IV., 713. 

For the better securing the five nations, passed, IV., 
713; repealed, 723. 

Granting two thousand pounds to the king, its approval 
suspended, IV., 713 ; its postponement cited as a 
proof of the earl of Bellomont's disgrace, 714. 

For building a fort at Onondaga, passed, IV., 723; to 
oblige persons to pay their arrears of the tax for 
erecting a fort at Onondaga, passed, 1064; explained, 
1114; reason for explaining, 1115. 

To punish and prevent mutiny and desertion, passed, 
IV., 781, 782, v., 701, 812, 895, VI., 30, 624. 

Outlawing Philip French and Thomas Wenham, passed, 
IV., 958 ; a most unjust act, 999. 

Augmenting the number of representatives in the assem- 
bly, passed, IV., 958; for regulating elections of 



8 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Act — 



Acta (Now York)— con/inu^d. 

r«'j)n'8futotivei!, patised.V., 25 ; reiK-aled, ibid ; to regu- 
late the eli-ctiou in the manor of Courtland, VI., 28 ; 
for tboir frequent election, passed, 113, 130 ; board of 
trade opposes it, 129, 130 ; it is vetoed, 136, 142 ; for the 
more legular proceedings in tlie elections of represent- 
atives in the several cities and counties, passed, 927 ; 
why enacted, ibid ; to explain an act for regulating 
elections of representatives, passed, VIII., 167 ; to 
regulate elections in Albany, 565 ; why passed, ibid. 
For regulating the election of aldermen in the city 

New York, passed, IV., 958. 
For levying il,800 to pay fuzileers and scouts, passed, 

IV., 1004, 1183. 
Enabling the city of New York to supply vacancies 

among its officers, passed, IV., 1004. 
Granting her majesty ^2,000, passed, IV., 1004; cou- 

nrmed, 1039, 1183. 
For settling and regulating the militia, passed, IV., 
1004, 1065 ; revived, V., 181, 185, 299, 583, 631, 
738, 872, 903, 927, VI., 30, 38, 87, 118, 160, 185, 221, 
616, 624, 642, 680, 940, VII., 918, VIII., 341, 565. 
For regulating slaves, passed, IV., 1004 ; revived, 1168 ; 
for preventing the running away of negro slaves, 
passed, ibid; for preventing, suppressing and punish- 
ing the conspiracy of negroes, passed, V., 356 ; the act 
to prevent them running away, revived and continued, 
418 ; the negro act recommended to be modified, 461, 
471 ; act regulating them, continued, 782 ; for the 
more effectual preventing and punishing conspiracy 
of, passed, 905. 
To prevent doubts and mistakes and for continuing judi- 
cial proceedings, its confirmation urged, I V. , 1004. 
For repealing several acts of assembly, passed, IV., 

1004, VI., 24, 25 ; vetoed, 48. 
For the encouragement of a grammar free school, passed, 
IV., 1004 ; for the fm-ther encouragement of a public 
school in New York, VI., 118. 
For the bett-'r maintenance of the poor of the city of 
New York, IV., 1004; of Dutchess county, VI., 185 ; 
of Suffolk county, 625. 
To enable the mayor, &c., of New York to raise money, 

IV., 1004, v., 909. 
Declaring Eastchester a distinct parish, disallowed, IV., 

1038. 
For raising fifteen hundred pounds towards erecting bat- 
teries at the Narrows, passed, IV., 1064. 
Eeversing the judgments against colonel Nicholas Bay- 
ard and John Hutchins, passed, IV., 1064; attorney 
general Northey's opinion thereupon, 1118; report 
of the lords of trade thereon, 1123 ; ordered to be 
amended, 1140; another act passed accordingly, 1168 ; 
sent to the lords of trade, unsigned and not dated 
1173. ' 

To enable the justices to build a gaol in Albany, passed 
IV., 1064 ; to enable the justices of the peace of Al- 
bany to repair the gaol and city hall, 1168 ; to build 
a new court house and gaol there, VI., 185, 226. 



For difrariiig the pulilic and necessary charge of the 
government, passed, IV., 1064, V., 367, 581; ex- 
plained and amended, IV., 1064; provisions of, V., 
681 ; when allowed to expire, ibid. 
To prevent the distilling of rum and bui-ning oyster 

shells in the city of New York, passed, IV., 1064. 
For the better maintenance of the minister of the city 
of New Y'ork, IV., 1064; granting sundi-y privileges 
aud powers to the rector, &c., of Trinity church. New 
York, passed, 1114; reasons for passing it, 1115. 
To regulate weights and measures, passed, IV., 1064 : 

nature of it, 1065. 
To enable the ministers and elders of the French church 

to build a larger church, passed, IV., 1064. 
For laying out and regulating liighways, IV., 1064, 1114, 
1168, v., 583, 632, 683,701, 739, 782, 812, 813, 847, 
872, 873, 895, 904,905, VI., 39, 87,88, 118, 160,221, 
VIII., 355. 
For charging the several cities and counties with the 
expense of fitting up a room for the general assembly, 
passed, IV., 1114; reason for passing, 1115. 
For settling a ministry, passed, IV., 1167, VI., 2 ; an- 
other act passed to explain, IV., 1167; the confirma- 
tion of the latter recommended, 1168 ; date of the 
passage of the original act, V., 328 ; controversy 
respecting, 334, 336 ; VI., 1. ( See Senderson ; JPoyer.) 
For the preservation of deer, IV., 1168 ; V., 782. 
For aji allowance to the burgess of Westchester, IV., 

1168. 
To enable William Bradford to sell the real estate of the 

late John Dewsbury, passed, IV., 1168. 
For the defense of the frontiers, passed, IV., 1183, V., 

344, VI., 623, 684. 
For regulating and preventing the corruption of the cur- 
rent coin, passed, V., 66 ; report of the lords of trade 
on, 67; vetoed, 71. 
Forregulatingfees,passed,V.,82, 230; vetoed, 143,157. 
To relieve the colony from divers extortions, vetoed, V., 

143, 157. 
To enable the mayor, &c., of New York to raise the sum 

of £600, vetoed, V., 158. 
For laying an excise, passed, V., 178, 185, 378 ; con- 
firmed, 412. 
For laying a duty on goods sold by auction, passed, V., 

178, 417, 418. 
To repeal a clause in an act against counterfeiting and 

clipping foreign coin, passed, V., 181, 185. 
For the better settlement and assuring of lands, passed, 
v., 181, 185; objections to, 503; governor Hunter 
desires its repeal, 480. 
To repeal an act to oblige Mr. Robert Livingston to ac- 
count, passed, V., 181. 
To prevent the burning of woods, passed, V., 185, 210. 
To repair the blockhouses, &c., in Albany and Schenec- 
tady, passed, V., 185, 210. 
To collect arrears of taxes, passed, V., 185, 210. 
To enable Islip to elect assessors, collector, constable 
aud supervisor, passed, V., 185, 210. 



— Act] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Acts (New York) — continued. 

Relating to bills of credit, passed, V., 185, 210, 523, 524, 
583, 631, 682, 683, 700, 735, 738, 773, 782, 812, 872, 

895, 904, VI., 27, 38, 39, 116, 160, 185, 316, 624, 653, 
680, 681,941, VII., 37, 121,204, 217, 395, VIII., 198, 
200; reportof the lords of trade on, 202; vetoed, 205, 
210 ; lieutenant-governor Golden in favor of, 210 ; re- 
pealed, 214. (See Currencij.) 

To authorize the surviving commissioners to act for the 
expedition to reduce Canada, passed, V., 299. 

To prevent the impairing the fortifications, passed, V., 
299. 

For raising two thousand eight hundred and fifty-five 
ounces of plate, passed, V., 299. 

For the treasurer's paying three thousand seven hundred 
and fifty ounces of plate to the governor, passed, V., 
299. 

For reviving an act to prevent the selling or giving of 
rum or other strong liquors to the Indians in the 
county of Albany, passed, V., 299, 344. 

To oblige the manors in the county of Westchester to 
pay their arrears of taxes, passed, V., 299. 

For paying the British officers, passed, V., 344. 

For paying the arrears due to the forces late raised in 
the county of Suffolk for the expedition against Can- 
ada in the year 1709, passed, V., 344. 

Prohibiting all but John Parmiter to make lampblack 
for five years, passed, V., ,344; for continuing the 
privilege to his widow, 739. 

For paying sundry sums of money therein mentioned, 
v., 378, 390. 

To empower Dutchess county to elect a supervisor, 
passed, V., 378. 

For levying and paying the several duties therein men- 
tioned for the use of the colony, passed, V., 378. 

For licensing hawkers and pedlars, passed, V., 379, 

896, VI., 118, 161, VII., 907. 

For collecting and paying to the county treasurer the 

arrears of taxes in the county of Richmond, passed, 

v., 379. 
For the support of government, passed, V., 379, 576, 

582, 904, VI., 117, 160, 184, 221, 466, 615, 616, 625, 

640, 642, 647, 658, 680, 691, 702, VII., 203, 342, 

907; report of the board of trade on, 505, 918. 
For the treasurer's paying a sum of money for presents 

to the Indians, and for his excellency's expenses in 

going to Albany, passed, V., 379. 
For the treasurer's paying the arrears due to the clerk 

and doorkeeper of the assembly, passed, V., 390. 
To entitle Gerrard du Grau and his assigns to the fishery 

of porpoises, passed, V., 390. 
For shortening law suits and regulating the practice of 

the law, passed, V., 390; the judges disapprove of, 

461 ; a new act recommended to be passed, 501 ; no 

harm in having it disallowed, 509. 
Forpreventing the multiplicity of law suits, V., 390; the 

judges of the supreme court remonstrate against, 461. 
To let to farm the excise, passed, V., 390; continued, 

2 



418, 480, 5S3, G83, 701, 772, 846 ; amended, 873 ; 
amended act continued, 895, 904, 928, VI., 30, 38, 
87, lis, 160, 185, 221, 624, 647, 680, VII., 204. 

For regulating fences, passed, V., 390, 632, 873, 904; 
explained, 812, VI., 160. 

For the encouragement of the Indian trade at Albany, 
l^assed, V. , 390, and prohibiting selling Indian goods to 
the French, 577 ; for the further and more effectual pro- 
hibiting the selling of Indian goods to the French, 682 ; 
report of the lords of trade on, 707 ; its good effects, 
709; continued, 738; report ofthe commissioners of In- 
dian affairs in favor of, 740 ; proceedings of the lords 
of trade on the act, 745 ; titles of the several acts, 746 ; 
reasons for repealing the continuing act, 748 ; argu- 
ments in support of it, 751 ; report of the lords of 
trade thereon, 760; objectionable points in, 763 ; ought 
to be repealed, ibid ; abandoned, 778 ; no action 
as yet on the report of the lords of trade on, 779 ; 
to lay different duties on the goods therein mentioned 
and for regulating the Indian trade, &c., passed, 
781; explained by another act, 611; to regulate and 
secure the Indian trade west of Albany, 812 ; titles of 
the several acts, 898 ; for continuing the different du- 
ties on Indian goods, &c., 899. 

For the better repairing the fortifications of Schenectady, 
and providing their military watch with firewood, 
passed, v., 418. 

For appointing an agent at the coirrt of Great Britain, 
v., 418 ; governor Hunter's observations thereon, 420 ; 
continued, 480, 812. 

For the easier partition of lands in joint tenancy, con- 
tinued, v., 418 ; revived, 527 ; report of the lords of 
trade thereon, ibid; reviving act, vetoed, 529; veto 
never signified to the government of New York, 644 ; 
governor Burnet refuses his assent to an act, ibid ; 
report of the lords of trade thereon, 650 ; another act 
passed in 1726, 805 ; memorial of Cadwallader Golden 
against it, 807 ; less objectionable than former acts, 
812 ; its confirmation requested, 832 ; report of the 
lords of trade against, 843 ; vetoed, 875, 876. 

For the partition of certain lands in Dutchess county, 
granted to Sampson Broughton and others, passed, 
VI., 29. 

Regulating the payment of quit rents and for the parti- 
tion of lands, passed, VI., 215 ; under consideration, 
220; Mr. Walpole's objections to, 273; lieutenant 
governor Delancy censured for assenting to it, VII., 
369 ; re-enacted, 486 ; referred to the lords of the 
treasury, 504. 

For the treasurer's paying several persons therein named, 
and for paying the excise in arrear to the treasurer, 
passed, V., 418. 

To relieve Robert Lurting, vendue master, of the pro- 
vince of New York, from divers penalties in an act 
for laying a duty on goods sold by public vendue or 
outcry, passed, V., 418. 

For building a county house and prison in Dutchess 
county, passed, V., 418. 



10 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Act — 



Acta (New York)— condnurd. 

For relieving lUo inhabitants of South Carolina from the 
duties laid and paid in this colony of New York, for 
Buch goods, glares and merchandise as they shall 
import into this colony during the time of six months, 
passed, V., 418. 

To oblige the inhabitants of each particular ward within 
the city of New York, to make good their respective 
quotas of all public taxes, passed, V., 418, VI., 226. 

Relating to the fortifications of Albany, V., 418, 480, 
631, 738, 927, VI., 221, 61G, 640, 642. 

For repairing the county house and prison in the county 
of Ulster, passed, V., 419 ; to build a court house and 
gaol in tliat county, explained, &c., VI., 29 ; to defray 
the charges for building and to furnish the same, 118. 

For declaring John Sloss free from the duty of tonnage, 
passed, v., 419. 

To exempt Hana Martin, doctor Christopher Cooper 
and Mr. George Smith from the pajonent of the tax 
for twelve negroes imported from South Carolina, 
passed, V., 419. 

To enable Sarah Crego, the widow of Richard Crego, to 
sell a lot of land in the city of New Y^ork, passed, 
v., 419. 

For discharging captain Peter Van Brugli and Hendrick 
Hansen, Esq., for and concerning the provisions, 
ammunitions and other stores of war formerly in 
their hands, belonging to this colony, passed, V., 419. 

For discharging Kilian Van Ranslaer, major Dirick 
Weasels, &c., for and concerning provisions, ammu- 
nition and stores of war formerly in their hands, 
passed, V., 480. 

For the treasurer's paying to his excellency one thousand 
and twenty-five ounces of plate, passed, V., 480. 

For obliging all vessels trading into this colony, except 
such aa are therein excepted, to pay a certain duty, 
passed, V., 480. 

To lay a duty of two per cent on the prime cost of all 
European goods imported into this colony, passed, 
v., 576 ; observations on, 581 ; its confirmation urged, 
582, 634, 685 ; opposed by the merchants in Eng- 
land, 643; recommended for the royal approbation, 
647; vetoed, 706, 707. 

To regulate the public vendue, passed, V., 583, VIII., 
167. 

To raise the value of Lyon dollars, passed, V., 583. 

To encourage whalo fishing, passed, V., 583 ; continued, 

' 782, VI., 160. 

For collecting the arrears of taxes for the two expedi- 
tions to Canada, V., 631. 
For enabling such persons as the governor shall appoint 
to receive and collect the duties due and payable in 
the county of Suffolk, V., 631. 
For raising the sum of five Imndred pounds for securing 
the Indiana in his majesty's interest, passed, V., 631. 
To oblige the treasurer to pay for the stockadoes provi- 
ded for the fortificatioas of Albany and Schenectady, 
passed, v., 631. 



For the more equal and impartial assessing the minis- 
ter's and poor's rates, &c., passed, V., 631. 

To continue the common road or the king's highway 
from the ferry towards the town of Brooklaud, pa.ssed, 
v., 631. 

To prevent lotteries, passed, V., 632, VI., 624; to 
authorize one, for the purpose of raising funds to 
found a college in the city of New York, passed, 379, 
625, 685; part thereof repealed, VII., 217; to raise 
money by lottery to finish the new jail in New York, 
342. 

For making more effectual an act for a supply to be 
granted to his majesty's government in the province 
of New York, passed, V., 682. 

For the more speedy and effectual recovery of arrears 
due and payable for duties laid within this colony, 
passed, V., 682. 

For raising the sum of five hundred pounds to encour- 
age and promote a trade with the remote nations of 
Indians and for securing the five nations in his majes- 
ty's interest ; also the sum of three hundred and 
twenty pounds tliree shillings and two pence farthing 
advanced by several persons, therein named for repair- 
ing the fortifications on the frontiers, passed, V., 683. 

To increase the number of supervisors in the county of 
Westobester, and that no wages of supervisors shall 
be any part of said county rate for the future, passed, 
v., 683. 

For paying Gerrit van Horn, Jacobus Kip, David Pro- 
voost and Johannes Jansen, Esqrs., for serving in 
general assembly, passed, V., 683, 739. 

For paying Ebenezer Wilson, John Van Horn, Abraham 
Gouverneur and Sarah the widow and relict of Johan- 
nes Hardenbroeck, deceased, for serving in general 
assembly, passed, V., 683. 

For running and ascertaining the lines of partition and 
division betwixt this colony and the colony of Con- 
necticut, v., 698; Connecticut endeavors to prevent 
its confirmation, 699 ; confirmed, 707 ; why confirmed, 
VI., 776. 

For raising and levying the quantity of five thousand 
three hundred and fifty ounces of plate for the uses 
therein mentioned, and for striking and making bills 
of credit for that value, passed, V., 700. 

For paying the charges and expenses of the wooden 
houses or sheds built near the city of Albany for the 
accommodation of the Indians trading at Albany, and 
for keeping them in good repair, passed, V., 701. 

To determine and take off the reward allowed by former 
acts for killing and destroying wild cats and foxes, 
passed, V., 701; to encourage their destruction, 813, 
VI., 161. 

To revive an act to authorize the justices of the peace to 
build and repair gaols and court houses in the severa' 
counties in this province so far as it relates to Queens 
county, passed, V., 701 ; to enable the justices to fin 
ish the same, 739. 

To revive an act encouraging navigation, V., 701, 872. 



-Act] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



11 



Acts (New York) — continued. 

To enable Thomas Dongan and Walter Dongau , two sur- 
vivingkinsmen of Thomas, late earl of Limerick, to sell 
some part of their estate for payment of their debts, &c. , 
passed, V., 701 ; for disposing of their estate, 782. 
For raising and levying the sum of six thousand six hun- 
dred and thirty pounds, for the supplying the defi- 
ciencies of his majesty's revenue, &c., passed, V., 735. 
To prevent tenants to make waste, &c., passed, V., 738. 
To oblige the collector of Richmond county to collect, 

&o., the annual rate, &o., passed, V., 739. 
To prevent boats from being molested, passed, V., 739. 
For the discharging of a certain recognizance entered 
into by Goosen van Schaick, late of the city of Albany, 
merchant, deceased, passed, V., 773. 
Granting to his majesty the duties and taxes therein 
mentioned for supporting his government of New 
York from July 1st, 1726, to July 1st, 1729, passed, V., 
781 ; parts of it repealed, and other parts of it enforced 
by another act, 872 ; this last act further explained, 
927 ; repealed, and objections to the repealing act, VI., 
32 ; recommended to be amended, 33 ; duties imposed 
by the original act, 37 ; title of the repealing act, 38 ; 
the act known as the duty act, passed, VII., 907, 
918 ; an annual act, 919. 
For discharging a debt to the late agents of this colony 
at the court of Great Britain, for finishing and com- 
pleting the building of fort George, for borrowing cer- 
tain sums for these purposes and for laying a tax to 
make good such parts thereof as stand appropriated 
to particular uses, passed, V., 782. 
To enable the mayor, &c., of the city of Albany to pay for 
the materials and workmanship of two blockhouses, 
passed, V., 782. 
For reviving an act to prevent small stallions running 
at large and to geld all horses under the size therein 
mentioned, and for continuing an act to prevent ten- 
ants and others from trespassing on lands, and from 
doing other enormities hurtful to the growing planta- 
tions of Orange and Ulster, and for laying out and 
maintaining a high road within the same, passed, V., 
782; VI., 28. 
To enable the justices of the peace of Schenectady to 
build stocks and pounds and for defraying some extra- 
ordinary charges during the time therein mentioned, 
passed, V., 782. 
To prevent setting on fire or burning old grass on the 

Hempstead jjlains, passed, V., 782 ; VI., 160. 
To provide able pilots at Sandy hook for the port of New 
York, passed, V., 782, 927, VI., 118; for regulating 
pilots, passed, VII., 218 ; revived, 465. 
For reviving an act for encouraging the returning of neat 

cattle and sheep to their owners, passed, V., 782. 
For reviving an act for regulating the ferry betwixt the 
city of New York and the island Nassau, passed, V., 
782; continued, 847. 
To enable Thomas Hicks to sell an entailed estate, 
passed, V., 783. 



To grant to Louis Hector De Langloiserie the sole fishery 
of porpoises for ten years, passed, V., 783. 

To amend the practice of the law, passed, V., 832, 873, 
904, VI., 118, Vni., 355. 

To prevent prosecutions by information, passed, V., 
844 ; why, 847 ; vetoed, 871 ; revived in another form, 
VI., 17; to prevent malicious informations in the 
supreme court of the colony, passed, 929 ; attorney- 
general Kempe will oppose its confirmation, ibid. 

To empower the justices of Schenectady to regulat* 
streets, &c., in that town, V., 812; continued, 895; 
to enforce part of an act affecting that town, VI., 87 ; 
to raise a sum to pay for fortifying the old church, 
160. 

For defraying the charges of the trading house and vic- 
tualing troops at Oswego, V., 846, 873, 896, 905 ; dis- 
allowed, 906 ; to support the troops, and regulate tho 
trade there, 926, 956, VI., 38, 39, 117, 184, 221, 467, 
658, 692. 

To enable the justices of the peace in the county of Suf- 
folk to build a county house and prison, passed, V., 
847. 

To repair the county house and to amend and enlargs 
the jail and prison in the county of Orange, passed, 
v., 847. 

To repeal an act prohibiting all persons but Robert Let- 
tice Hooper and his assigns to refine sugar during the 
time therein mentioned, passed, V., 847. 

To lay a duty on empty casks, passed, V., 872, VI., 
30 ; provisions of, 38. 

To revive an act for mending and keeping in repair the 
post road from New York to King's bridge, passed, V., 
872, VI., 87. 

To empower the treasurer to deliver up a bond entered 
into by Gilbert Livingston, &c., passed, V., 872. 

To enable the justice of Richmond to build a county 
house and new jail, passed, V., 873. 

For raising the sum of one hundred sixty-eight pounds, 
sixteen shillings and five pence half penny in the city 
and county of New York for discharge of the debts 
and demands therein mentioned, passed, V., 873. 

For raising two hundred pounds for repairing the bar- 
racks in the fort at New York, passed, V., 874. 

To ascertain the allowance to the representatives for ths 
county of Suffolk and for other purposes therein men- 
tioned, passed, v., 895. 

For the effectual recovery of the arrears of the several 
taxes and of the excise therein mentioned, and for 
securing the duties on slaves not imported into the 
city of New York, and for impowering the treasurer 
for these purposes, passed, V., 895. 

For raising and levying the sum of seven hundred and 
thirty pounds for the uses therein mentioned, passed, 
v., 896. 
Forthereliefof insolvent debtors, passed, v., 904; an- 
other act passed, VIII., 545 ; observations thereon, ibid. 
For the better preservation of oysters, passed, V., 905 ; 
revived, VI., 118, 119. 



12 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[ACT- 



Actjs (NVw York)— fon(i.iiierf. 

To prevent llio taking or levying on species more than 
the principal, interest and cost of suit, and other pur- 
poses therein montionod, passed, V., 905. 

For paying Richard Bradley and Henry Btekman certain 
Bums of money, V., 908. 

To prevent the destruction of sheep by dogs, V., 909, 
956, VI., 160. 

To empower Samuel Baker and others to employ proper 
persons for the service of this colony at the court or 
parliament of Great Britain, passed, V., 926. 

To enlarge and release Andrew Law, junior, upon sur- 
rendering his estate in the manner and for the use 
therein mentioned, passed, V., 928. 

For confirming unto the city of New York its rights and 
privileges, passed, V., 956, VI., 17 ; the board of trade 
calls for a copy of the city charter, 17; sent, 24. 

To emi)Ower the vestry of Jamaica, L. I., to dispose of 
sixty pounds, V., 973 ; the society for the propagation 
of the gospel in foreign parts ask tor its disapproval, 
VI., 3. 

To regulate costs, attorney-general Bradley's objections 
to, VI., 17. 

To lay a duty of tonnage on vessels, and for the time 
therein mentioned, passed, VI., 27; prolonged, ibid; 
provisions of, 38 ; Bermuda petitions against, 130, 
,135 ; another tonnage act, passed, VIII., 907. 

For fortifying the city of Albany and Schenectady and 
other places in the county of Alb-iny, passed, VI., 
27, 640. 

To lay a duty on the goods and tax on the slaves therein 
mentioned during the time and for the uses mentioned 
in the same, passed, VI., 27; provisions of, 38 ; part 
of, repealed, 185. 

To empower commissioners for erecting fortiflcations in 
this colony at the several places therein mentioned, 
passed, VI., 27; for completing and repairing the 
same, 160, 203, 616, 641, 644, 940. 

For granting the people called Quakers the same privile- 
ges, benefits and indulgences as by the laws and statutes 
now remaining in force in that part of Great Britain 
called England, the people of that denomination are 
entitled unto within these dominions, passed, VI., 
28. 

For regulating the ruts of wagons in Dutchess county, 
passed, VI., 28. 

For regulating the rates to be taken for ships and other 
vessels using the wharf called Burnet's key, in the 
city of New York, passed, VI., 29. 

For discharging a certain obligation entered into by 
Cornelius Cuyler of the city of Albany, merchant, to 
the treasurer, passed, VI., 29. 

To revive an act for tho speedy punishing and releasing 
persona imprisoned for criminal offences, passed, VI., 
87, 88. 

To pay sixty pounds to Mr. Barclay, passed, VI., 88. 

To enable the justices of Orange county to build a now 
jail, passed, VI., 88 ; and court house, 118, 160, 185. 



To facilitate and explain the duty of loan officers, passed, 
VI., 117, Vlll., 199; disallowed, 210. 

To prevent the further importation of copper money, 
passed, VI., 117. 

For lowering the interest of money, passed, VI., 117. 

To establish courts for trying causes of forty shillings and 
under, passed VI., 117; to empower justices of tho 
peace to try causes from forty shillings to fire pounds, 
929, VII., 342 ; the board of trade disapproves tliereof, 
406 ; to empower mayors, recorders and aldermen 
to try causes to the value of five pounds and under, 
426 ; referred to the counsel of the board of trade, 
437; revived and continued, 979; objections to it, 
ibid. 

To restrain tavern keepers, &c., from selling strong 
liquors to servants and apprentices, passed, VI., 117. 

To divide Dutchess county into precincts, passed, VI., 
118. 

To defray the public charge of the manor of Cortland, 
passed, VI., 118. 

For confirming an agreement and exchange of lands, 
made between Samson Hawks and Jolui Pratt, passed, 
VI., 118. 

To enable the corporation of New Y'ork to raise a certain 
sum of money, passed, VI., 119. 

For the better extinguishing of fires in the city of New 
York, passed, VI., 119. 

For laying a duty on wine, passed, VI., 144. 

To prevent penning and folding sheep, &c., on Hemp- 
stead plains, passed, VI., 160, 221. 

To enable the inhabitants of Brookhaven to choose two 
constables, passed, VI., 161. 

To prevent abuses in re-packing beef and pork, passed, 
VI., 185. 

For victualing and transporting troops for the expedi- 
tion ag.ainst the Spaniards, passed, VI., 185, 215. 

To pay reverend Mr. Malcom a certain sum, noticed, VI., 
186. 

For more equal keeping military watches in the city of 
New York, passed, VI. , 203. 

For applying a certain sum for the repau- of fort George, 
passed, VI., 215. 

To supply the garrison of New ITork with fire and cau- 
dles, passed, VI., 226. 

For securing his majesty's government of New Y'ork, 
passed, VI., 279; the Moravians complain thereof, 
ibid ; governor Clinton transmits a report thereon, 311. 

To prevent the exportation of provisions and warlike 
stores, passed, VI., 316, 653, VII., 81, 117; for the 
more effectual preventing the exportation of provi- 
sions and warlike stores, VI., 316. 

To impose a tax on real estates and personal property, 
passed, VI., 316. 

To encourage the enlistment of volunteers, passed, VI., 
316. 

To detach men from Albany on the intended expedition, 
passed, VI., 317, 654. 



—Ada] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



13 



Acts (New York) — continued. 

To impress ship carpenters, &c., passed, VI., 317, 654. 

To revive and continue tlie several actions, &c., com- 
menced in Westolxester county, passed, VI., 317. 

For tlie payment of the forces on the northern frontiers, 
passed, VI., 466, 691. 

For raising a certain sum to put tlie province in a pos- 
ture of defense, passed, VI., 616, 642. 

For payment of the salaries, &c., therein mentioned, 
passed, VI., 615, 616, 640, 642, 647, 658, 684, 692, 702, 
VII., 342. 

To continue an act for establishing a military watch in 
Albany, passed, VI., 625. 

For paying .£5,000 towards the expedition against Cape 
Breton, passed, VI., 644; to restrain sending provi- 
sions there, 941. 

For paying £1,511 for the service of the colony, passed, 
VI., 645. 

For further victualing the troops raised for the Canada 
expedition, passed, VI., 658, 680. 

To prevent buying or exchanging arms, kmj0ioxa or 
with the Indians, passed, VI., 687. 

To defray the contingencies of the government, passed, 
VI., 692. 

To enable the reformed Dutch church of the city of New 
York to sell some of their real estate, recommended 
for confirmation, VI., 819. 

For submitting the controversy between New York and 
New Jersey relating to the partition line, to the 
final determination of his majesty, passed, VI., 952 ; 
report of the lords of trade against, ibid ; repealed, 
1021. 

Paying and subsisting one thousand seven hundred and 
fifteen men for an expedition against Crownpoint, 
passed, VII., 201 ; for the speedy recruiting of the 
forces, 218 ; for raising two thousand six hundred and 
eighty men to invade Canada, 343 ; for raising one 
thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven men to 
secure his majesty's conquests, 465 ; for providing for 
one hundred and seventy-three volunteers, 469. 

For erecting and establishing a stamp ofiice in the colony, 
and laying a duty on vellum, parchment, paper, &c., 
passed, VII., 202; why passed, 217. 

Layingan excise on tea, passed, VII., 202 ; why passed, 
217. 

Called the loan act, passed, VII., 204; governor Hardy's 
observations on, ibid. 

For billeting Ms majesty's forces, passed, VII., 204; 
only temporary, 217. 

For paying and clothing the forces, passed, VII. , 204, 217, 
218. 

To enable the corporation of New York to build bar- 
racks, &c., passed, VII., 342. 

To levy fifty pounds for the coroner of New York, passed, 
VII., 342. 

For the better government and regulation of 
the merchant's service, passed, VII., 465. 



For making process in courts of equity effectual against 
absconding mortgagors, passed, VII., 465. 

To prevent frauds in the sale of damaged goods, p.issed, 
VII., 469. 

To determine the disputes respecting the New York and. 
Massachusetts boundaries, p.issed, VII., 676. 

For vesting the property of the stone wall on the north 
side of the city of Albany in the corporation of said 
city, VII., 814. 

For erecting certain lands lying on the west side of Con- 
necticut river, into a separate county to be called 
Cumberland, and for enabling the freeholders and 
inhabitants thereof to erect and build a court house 
and gaol in the said county, passed, VII., 918 ; objec- 
tions thereto, 919. 

For furnishing necessaries for the king's troops, passed, 
VII., 949 ; report of the lords of trade thereon, VIII., 
63, 90 ; another act passed for the same purpose, 198, 
200 ; excitement in consequence, 199, 208. 

To extend several acts of parliament to the plantations, 
passed, VIII., 14. 

Vesting Abraham de Peyster's estate in trustees for the 
payment of his debts, passed, VIII., 14. 

For making gold and silver coin a legal tender, passed, 
VIII., 169. 

Declaring certain persons incapable of being members of 
the general assembly, passed, VIII., 207 ; report of the 
board of trade against, 209 ; approved by the lieu- 
tenant-governor, 210 ; vetoed, 215 ; veto of, received 
in New York, 245. 

To enable his majesty's subjects, either by birth or natu- 
ralization, to inherit and hold real estate notwithstand- 
ing any defect of purchase made before the n.ituraliza- 
tion within this colony, passed, VIII., 207. 

For appointing commissioners to regulate the Indian 
trade, passed, VIII., 207 ; the secretary of state ques- 
tions the proxjriety of encouraging such a congress, 
211. 

For giving relief on promissory notes, passed, VIII., 355. 

For defraying a moiety of the expenses accrued on set- 
tling the boundaries between Cheescocks and Kakiate 
patents, disallowed, VIII., 484. 

For empowering the magistrates of Albany and New 
York to raise money for the purposes therein men- 
tioned, passed, VIII., 544; observations of the lords 
of trade thereupon, ibid. 

To prevent the abatement of suits, passed, VIII., 544; 
observations of the lords of trade thereupon, ibid, 
545. 

For the general quiet of his majesty's subjects in this 
colony, passed, VIII., 565. 

To authorize persons to take an oath by holding up 
their right hand, passed, VIII., 565. 
(Pennsylvania). Against pirates, declared to be insuffi- 
cient, IV., 543. (See Laws.) 
Adaggeras, a Mohawk, sent with a message from the fiva 
nations to Canada, IV., 91. 



14 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Ar 



Adam, Bpeakcr for the Susquehanna Indians, VII., 51. 

Adam, lieutenant, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 731. 

Adams, reverend Eliphalet, minister at Little Compton, IV., 
755. 

Adams, Jacob, IV., 935, 1006. 

Adams, Johannes, I., 005 ; John, II., 4G9. 

Adams, John, liis description of the feeling excited in New 
England by the proposal to establish bishops in 
America, VI., 907; authorized to make peace with 
Great BriUin, VIII., 807. 

Adams, Samuel, excepted from the general pardon, VIII., 
247. 

Adams, Thomas, in the engagement at Sabbath Day point, 
X., 593. 

Adams, , Indians destroy the house of, IX., 614. 

Adams, town of, the French burn fort Massachusetts in the, 
X., 65. 

Adamse (Adamsen), Jan, I., 605, II., 468, III., 74. 

Adamzen, Abraham, III., 74. 

Adandidaglikoa, a christian Mohawk, examination of. III., 
433. 

Adasiclitoe, an Oneida chief, IV., 342. 

Adawakto, a Canada Indian, IV., 124. 

Addely, William, IV., 1006. 

Adderly, Henry, merchant, IV., 605 ; letters of Messrs. Bay- 
ard to, 944, 946 ; mentioned, 948 ; memorial of, on 
behalf of colonel Bayard and others, 949. 

Adderly, Thomas, a Loudon merchant, IV., 605. 

Addington, Isaac, notice of, IV., 426; secretary of Massa- 
chusetts, 600, 601, 607, 771, 786, V., 257, 258 ; reports 
on the mode of procedure in the courts of Massachu- 
setts, IV., 827. 

Addison, Joseph, secretary of state. III., ix, V., 498; under 
secretary, III., xi ; one of the lords of trade, xvi, 
v., 472; a copy of the address of the assembly of 
New York transmitted to, 502 ; governor Hunter trans- 
mits his opinion on the subject of Louisiana to, 508. 

Address of sir Dudley Carleton to the states general in 
favor of sir Thomas Dale, I., 16 ; of the deputies at 
Hempstead to the duke of York, III., 91 ; of the mayor 
and common council of New York to king James, 424 ; 
of the militia of New York to king William and queen 
Mary, 583 ; of the merchants of New York, complain- 
ing of Leisler's proceedings, 748 ; referred to governor 
Sloughtcr, 750 ; his report thereon, 762 ; of the com- 
mander-in-chief, &c., of New York to the king, 796 ; of 
the mayor and common council of Alb.any to governor 
Fletcher, IV., 19 ; of the principal inhabitants of 
Albany to lord Bellomont, 752; of the principal 
inhabitants of New York to lord Cornbury, 1005 ; of 
the chiefest inhabitants of Ulster county to lord Corn- 
bury, 1009 ; of the New York merchaijts to governor 
Hunter, V., 306 ; of the clergy of the province of New 
York to governor Hunter, 325 ; of governor Hunter to 
the grand jury of N.iw York, 363 ; of the Canajoharie 
Indiana to sir William Johnson, VII., 434 ; the Iiouse 
of commons vote an, for a return of the several manu- 



factures set up in America, 847, VIII., 10; to the 
betrayed inhabitants of the city of New York, Alex- 
ander McDougal the author of, 213 ; James Parker 
arrested for printing it, 221 ; of congress to the in- 
habitants of Quebec, published, 512 ; of the com- 
mittee of New Y'ork to lieutenant-governor Coklen, 
583; of the mayor, &c., of New York to governor 
Tryon, 593. 

Adems, lieutenant, in the expedition to lake George, VI., 
1001. 

Adems, Robert, deputy secretary of Indian affairs, VII., 74; 
at fort Johnson, 257, 262, 263, 265 ; attends a confer- 
ence at Canajoharie, 380 ; witnesses the treaties with 
the Ohio Indians, 755 ; attends a conference at John- 
son hall, VIII., 38; coroner of Tryon county, 497; a 
doctor, 499 ; attends a conference at Guy park, 518. 

Adgecantehook, near Sorel, Canada, number of Indians at, 

Adiadaronque, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 898. 

Adiadoroonde, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 658. 

Adiaglnii^poron (Adioghkonoran), an Oneida chief, VIII., 
504; alias Thomas, 549, 555. 

Adiego river, called by the French, Ohio, V., 789. 

Adiejagthaa, a Canada Indian, IV., 120. 

Adigie, on the Ohio, some Shawanese and Delawares killed 
at, Vni., 557. 

Adigo, Pennsylvania, Vll., 728, 735. 

Adissas, a Seneca sachem, IV., 729. 

Adjechne, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 728, 738. 

"Administration of the Colonies," Thomas Pownall author 
of, VI., 1009. 

Administration of estates of intestates, the attorney-general's 
opinion on the law respecting, V., 2. 

Administration of justice in New Netherland must be equal 
and impartiiil, I., Ill ; the council invested with the, 
152; details of, 298, 305, 310, 312, 316, II., 683, 
684, 687, 689, 691, 693, 695, 698, 703, 719, 720, 721, 
722, 723, 724, 729 ; courts to be established for the, 
I., 390, 555; must not be altered, 392; provision 
for the, II., 620, 621, 678; a fugitive to be sum- 
moned by the tolling of the bell, 724 ; singular illus- 
trations of, III., 149, 159 ; in New York, complained 
of, IV., 594 ; report of the lords of trade on, in New 
York, 598 ; provided for, at Oswego, on the complaint 
of the Indians, V., 812 ; in criminal cases, titles of 
acts passed for the speedy, VI., 87, 88 ; Indian evi- 
dence recommended to be admitted in certain cases, 
VII., 663, 668; in the Indian country, plan for, 976, 
977. (See Appeals ; Courts; Judgment.) 

Admiral of France, the duke de Beaufort appointed, II., 351. 

Admiral, the lord high, reported sick, I., 109; the earl of 
Warwick appointed, 130 ; half of all the treasures 
recovered from wrecks belong to. III., 491. 

Admiralty, British board of, order a Dutch ship to be ^eized 
on lier return from New Netherland, I., 49; earl of 
Dorset one of the lords of the, 133; sir Edward 
Nicholas, secretary of, II., 118 ; prince Rupert, first 



-Afr] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



15 



Admiralty (British) — continued. 

lord of the, 275 ; condemn and afterwards release two 
Brandenbiirgh ships, 359 ; fix a day for the sailing of 
a fleet to America, IV., 140; recommended to send 
two frigates to the colonies to prevent smuggling, 302 ; 
letters of the earl of Belmont to the, 311, 358, 664, 
697, 710, 779 ; he is illfteated by the, 522 ; duke of 
Bedford first lord of the, VI., 713 ; order rear admiral 
Hardy to Halifax, VII., 222, 

Admiralty, Dutch board of, report that the ships destined to 
look for a northern passage to China are nearly ready 
to sail, I., 3 ; application of the company trading to 
New Netherland for two ships of war, referred to the 
deputies from the, 22 ; report thereon, 23 ; applica- 
tion to send a ship to New Virginia referred to the 
Zealand, 26 ; secretary Kooke complains of the Maeze, 
48 ; at Harlingen, require ships from New Sweden to 
pay duty, 159 ; news of the war between Holland and 
England to be sent to the West Indies and New Neth- 
erland by the Zealand, 481, 482 ; supplies to be dis- 
patohed to admiral de Ruyter's fleet by the, II., 288 ; 
ordered to give notice of the war between Holland and 
England, 306 ; called on for particulars of the Dutch 
victory in the Virginias, 519, 520, 521, 522 ; report 
the reduction of New York, 527 ; New Netherland 
placed under the superintendence of the, 530 ; their 
opinion on several points respecting New Netherland, 
536 ; letters of the corporation of New Orange referred 
to the, 538 ; their recommendation in favor of the in- 
habitants of New Netherland, 539 ; letter to them, in 
behalf of the people of New Netherland, 541 ; instructed 
to give orders for the restoration of New Netherland 
to the English, 545, 546, 547; do not know to what 
person New Netherland is to be surrendered, 566 
Jacob Benckes in the service of the Amsterdam, 612 
Cornells Evertze in the service of the Zealand, ibid 
governor Colve sends despatches to the, 677 ; notified 
that orders have been issued for the surrender of New 
Netherland, 731 ; claim duties on imports from New 
Netherland, 735-738, 746-751. (See Court.) 

Adoenoketta, a Mohawk warrior, III., 802. 

Adogeow, the great Oneida, IV., 120. 

Adolf, Pieter, III., 750. 

Adondaraheerha, a Seneca chief. III., 444. 

Adondareicha, a Seneca chief. III., 322. 

Adono, an Oneida sachem, III., 774. 

Adonquat, an Indian chief, VIII., 550, 555. 

Adoondaraglihirha, elected sachem by the Oneidas, VII. , 723. 

Adriaensen, Gerrit, II., 627. 

Adriaensen, Jan, of Duyvelant, II., 459, 466. 

Adriaensen, Maryn, and others reqiiest permission to attack 
the Indians at Pavonia and Corlaer's hook, I., 151, 
193; makes an attempt on director Kieft's life, 184, 
413 ; sent to Holland, 185 ; commissioned to attack 
the Indians, 194, 416 ; further reference to, 197, 199, 
200, 411, 412, 415. 

Adriaensen, Pieter, I., 192, II., 183. 



Adriaensen, Willem, I., 192, 193. 

Adultery, secretary Van Tieuhoven guilty of, I., 516, 517; 
application for a divorce on the ground of, II., 730; 
how punished among the Miamis, IX., 891. 

Advertisements encouraging emigration to New Netherland, 
III., 38. 

Advice of the deputies of Holland on the afl^airs of the West 
India company, I., 228 ; of the twelve men to director 
Kieft, 415. 

Advocate-fiscal to have a seat in the council, I., 390. (See 
Fiscal.) 

Advocate-general in the northern colonies, the attorney-gen- 
eral of New York to act as, IV., 599. 

Aelbertss, Hans, I., 606. 

Aenjeweerat, a Cayuga sachem, V., 799 ; a party to the deed 
of trust to governor Burnet, 800, 801. 

Aenruchtse, a Mohawk sachem, IV., 728. 

Aernouts, Isaac, II., 657. {See Arnold.) 

Aersen, Jan, IV., 1006. 

Aerssen, C, secretary to the states general, I., 6, 18, 19, 22. 

Aerssen, Francis van, ambassador from the states general to 
England, I., 33, 34. 

Aerssen, Gerrit, IV., 941. 

Aert, an Indian, III., 561. 

Aertsbergen (Aershergen, Heraertsbergen) , [Alexander van 
der Capelle], lord of, I., 347, 349, 359, 377, 380, 381, 
382, 383, 385, 387, 393, 395, 396, 397, 400, 418, 421, 
433, 434, 440, 448, 465, 473, 474. 

Aertsen, Cornelis, II., 183. 

Aertsen, Dirck, II., 193. 

Affidavits of Andrew Hume and otliers, to the effect thattha 
Dutch drove the English from Hudson's river, I., 
72-81 ; in support of the charge of seduction against 
Cornelis van Tienhoven, 514-517 ; and letters respect- 
ing the violent proceedings of captain Scott and the 
English on Long Island, II., 403 ; of W. Hayes, con- 
cerning the taking of New York by the Dutch, III., 
213 ; concerning the agreement of sir E. Andros with 
certain Indians to attack New York, 659 ; of John 
Groesbeck and Dirck Schuyler, respecting the Indian 
trade at New York, V., 743; of George Montgomery 
and others, relative to the swamp in New York, 916 ; 
of John Grigg, relating to Spanish privateers, VI., 
243 ; of Solomon Boyle, concerning land riots in New 
Jersey, 346 ; of John H. Lydius and wife respecting 
the title of the English to Indian lands, 569 ; of Daniel 
Horsmanden, denying that he endeavored to super- 
sede attorney-general Bradly, 600 ; of Stephen Coffin, 
who had been taken prisoner by the French, 835. 

d'Affry, lieutenant general Francois, killed at the battle of 
Guastala, X., 657. 

d'Affry, count Louis Auguste Augustin, notice of, X., 657. 

Africa, a Dutch company to trade to America and, proposed, 
I., 6, 7, 8 ; report on the state of affairs in, 34 ; quan- 
tity of goods shipped by the Dutch to, 63 ; Dutch 
trade to, trifling, 67; trade to, regulated, 223 ; articles 
procured on the coast of, 242 ; several Dutch ships 



16 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Afe- 



Africa — conlinued. 

Ukcn off tlie coast of, II., 243 ; several English ships 
taken on the coast of, 299 ; the Dutch send a consid- 
erable force to, 303 ; the English claim the exclusive 
right to trade on the coast of, 319 ; the duke de Beau- 
fort sails for, 351 ; the English summon the Dutch 
forts on the coast of, 413 ; the West India company 
authorized to plant colonies in, 510 ; New York not to 
trade to cei-tain parts of, III., 374, 690 ; New England 
not to trade to certain parts of, 547 ; number of ves- 
sels cleared in 1714-1717, from Great Britain for, V., 
615 ; value of the British imports and exports of, 
616 ; slaves imported into New Jersey from, 927, 928 ; 
duty on slaves imported into New York from, VI., 
32, 33, 37 ; imports into New York from, 393, 510. 

Agayandres (Agiandres, Agoiandres), or sachems of the five 
nations, IV., 95, IX., 1077. 

Aged, the inhabitants of New Netherland never contributed 
towards the erection of an asylum for the, I., 423. (See 
Asylum.) 

Agent, memorial of the New York historical society praying 
for the appointment of an, to procure transcripts of doc- 
uments in Europe relating to the liistory of the state 
of New York, I., xi. ; report on said memorial, xiii. ; 
an act to appoint an, xvi. ; instructions to the, xviii. ; 
final report of the, sxii. ; report thereon, xxxvi. ; 
considers it inexpedient to have transcripts made of 
the proceedings of the states general in regard to the 
erection of a Dutch West India company, 27 ; Adri- 
aen Van der Donck sent to Holland as, 258, 319, 441 ; 
John Lewen sent to New York as the duke of 
York's, III., 279 ; judge Palmer sent by governor 
Dongan to England as, 428, 478 ; Joost StoU sent 
to England by captain Leisler as, 614, 616, 617, 653 ; 
Charles Lodwickto act as, IV., 31, V., 300 ; Chidley 
Brook and William Nicol sent to England as, IV., 
149, 150, 199, 216, 254, 255, 258 ; Thomas Weaver 
appointed, 326, 357, 358,422; the council of New 
York refuse to concur in a bill for appointing an, V., 
300, 344, substance of that bill, 350; the New York 
assembly address the crown for leave to appoint an, 
351 ; John Champante appointed, 418 ; an, required in 
Great Britain from each of the American provinces, 
473; an act passedfor appointing an, fortheprovinceof 
New York, 41 8, 480, 812 ; secretary Popple requested to 
instruct the New Jersey, 482 ; governor Hunter receives 
copy of complaints against him from the, 483 ; an- 
swer to Mr. Mulford's complaints transmitted to the, 
498 ; New Jersey will not establish in London an, 
621 ; Mr. Leheup acts as, for the province of New 
York, 745 ; Mr. Drummond, governor Montgomerie's, 
909 ; order in council refusing to acknowledge Lewis 
Morris in the capacity of, VI., 51 ; Mr. Guerin, gover- 
nor Cosby's, 61 ; differences between the council and 
assembly of New York respecting the appointment of 
an, 113; president Clarke to become the assembly's, 
ibid ; Mr. Charles appointed, 420, 425, 430 ; the New 



York assembly appoints an, 456 ; John Catherwood, 
governor Clinton's, 768, 770 ; Mr. Charles attends the 
board of trade on the part of the province of New 
York as, 929, 952 ; and Mr. Paris for New Jersey, 952 ; 
salary of the provincial, VII., 908 ; irregularity in the 
appointmentof the, YMl-, 108 ; EdmundBurke attends 
the board of trade on the part of New York as, 320. 

Aghetagherege, the head of the Hurons, VIII., 556. 

Aghquissasne, below La Gallette, a seat of a mission, VII., 
582. (See St. Regis.) 

Aghshinhare, an Oneida chief, VIIL, 690. 

Agneaux, M. d', builds a trading house at the head of the 
bay of Quinte, V., 589. 

Agosennenha, an Iroquois, IV., 597. 

Agouareche, an Indian-, X., 212. 

Agreement, an, respecting the boundary between New Neth- 
erland and Connecticut, not known in England, I., 
560 ; the boundary recommended to be settled accord- 
ing to the Hartford, 563 ; violated by the English, 
566 ; of the West India company and the city of 
Amsterdam respecting a colonic in New Netherland, 
629 ; ratified by the states general, 637 ; entered into 
between commissary Jacob van Curler and the chiefs 
of the Sickenames, II., 139 ; of certain Englishmen 
to abandon New Netherland, 150 ; at Hartford re- 
ferred to, 380, 609 ; .abstract of the Hartford, 384 ; at 
Hartford declared a nullity by Connecticut, 383 ; 
entered into with capt.ain Scott, 400, 406 ; between 
Easthampton, L. I., and Connecticut, III., 27; re- 
specting the New York and Connecticut boundary, 
never confirmed by the duke of York, 235, 236. 

Agriculture neglected in New Netherland, I., 181, 263, 389 ; 
recommended to be encouraged and promoted, 221 ; 
crops on new land, 367 ; a superintendent of, recom- 
mended to be sent to New Netherland, 390 ; imple- 
ments of, sent to New Netherland, 528, 571 ; imple- 
ments of, required at the colonie on the Delaware river, 
II., 11,184; the colonic on the Delaware planted solely 
for the promotion of, 62 ; impeded at the Delaware, 
113 ; the lands on the Delaware adapted for, 211 ; slaves 
imported for the benefit solely of, 222 ; in New Neth- 
erland, state of, in 1664, 504; of the English !ind 
Dutch entirely different. III., 164; failure of crops in 
western New York, VIII., 183 ; grains grown in the col- 
ony of New York, 449 ; Canada well adapted for, IX. , 30. 

d'Aguesseau, M., minister of justice and chancellor of France, 
X., V. 

Aguiotta, .an Oneida sachem, VI., 982 ; at the battle of lako 
George, 1011. 

Aguitton, Cadet, taken prisoner, X., 357. 

Ahanhiige, where, III., 434. 

Ahasimus (Achassemes, Ahasymus), the West India com- 
pany reserve, I., 96 ; decree in a suit respecting, II., 
716 ; opposite New York, III., 411. 

Ahesener, John, exchanged, X., 881. 

Ahruminne (Aharommuny, Harommuny), an Island in the 
Schuylkil, I., 594, 595. 



— Alb] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



17 



d'Aigi-emont, Clerambaut, instructions to, IX., 805, 826 
mentioned, 812 ; his report on the western posts, 819 
his views on the subject of the Indian trade, 852 
promises to render the fort at Oswego useless, 1010. 

d'Aiguebelle, captain, X., 671; commanded the grenadiers 
at the battle of Sillery, 1084. 

Ailesbury [Robert Bruce, 1st], earl of, member of the privy 
council on the accession of James II., III., 360. 

Aislabie, Mary, VI., 844. 

Aix, admiral Knowles attacks, X., 31. 

Aix la Chapelle, governor Hunter hopes for no benefit except 
from, v., 521 ; preliminaries of peace signed at, VI., 
453, 552 ; sir Thomas Robinson one of the plenipo- 
tentiaries at the peace of, 844. (See Treaty.) 

Ajae, chevalier de Levis born at, X., 1128. 

Ajadis, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 898. 

Ajeechwayhta (Ajewachta), an Onondaga sachem, V., 567 ; 
speaker for the six nations, 786. 

Ajeriage, a Cayuga sachem, IV., 986. 

Akenside, Mark, M. D., Jeremiah Dyson allows an annuity to, 
VII., 763. 

Akikamingue, an Ottawa chief, IX., 1072. 

Akonwarage (Agonwarage), a Shawanese town, VIII., 426. 

Akonyoda, an Oneida sachem, astonished at the despair of 
the English, VII., 193. 

Akouehen, a Mohawk chief. III., 126; ambassador to Que- 
bec, IX., 46. 

Akus, an Indian interpreter. III., 440, 560, 565 ; his son sent 
on a scout to lake Champlain, 815. (See Viele.) 

Alabama (Albaraas), early French settlements in, V., 611, 
IX., 671; Indians of, X., 219. 

Alabama (Alibamont) river, the boundary of the Choctaw 
cbuntry, VIII., 25, 31. 

Alain, , suspected of being connected with the English, 

IX., 810. 

Alainville, aFrenchseiguory on lake George and lake Cham- 
plain, VII., 642, VIII., 577; south of Crown Point, 
678 ; M. de Lotbiniere not entitled to any indemnity 
for the loss of, 669. 

Alamance, Mr. Fanning at the battle of, VIII., 327. 

Alamatahame river, called by the French the river May, V., 
611. 

Albagata-Waroongan, John, sent to procure the release of 
prisoners taken at Groton, &c., IX., 614. 

Albanel, reverend Charles, S. J., sent to Hudson's Bay, IX., 
72, 790; resirlt of his mission, 791. 

Albania, the country west of the Hudson's river named. III., 
105. 

Albantzeene and other Indian sachems sell their lands to the 
agent of Kiliaen v.an Renselaer, I., 44. 

Albany (Eeverwyck ; Fort Orange ; Fort Orania ; Nassou ; 
Orange ; Willemstadt). Hans Jorissen Houten, vice- 
director at fort Orange, I., 75, 81; the English 
trade near, 76, 80 ; reserved by the West India com- 
pany, 96; situation of, 107, 181, 284, III., 834; date 
of its erection, I., 149, 542,564, II., 133; experienced 
no trouble during the war with the Indians, I., 151 ; 

3 



the Mahicauders dwell below, 184; the Wappingers 
plunder a boat on its way from, 185 ; J-Qost Teunissen 
accused of having sent ammunition and guns to be 
sold to the Indians at, 326 ; guns allowed to be sold 
by the commissary at, 427, 501 ; case of Jacob Scher- 
merhooru, a resident of, 428 ; the boundary line 
agreed to at Hartford, expected to place the English 
in the neighborhood of, 460; the first minister in, 
496 ; jurisdiction and limits of, defined, 522 ; Bever- 
wyck planted and a court of justice erected in, 523 ; 
Johannes Dyckman commissary at, 524; those of 
Renselaerwyck attempt to deprive the West India 
company of, 525; a Spanish slave sent to, II., 31; 
provision in the articles of capitulation regarding 
fort Orange, 252 ; the Dutch over fifty years in pos- 
session of, 325 ; director Stuyvesant applies for assist- 
ance to, 366, 370 ; Indians destroy property and lives 
near, 371, 372; unable to assist New Amsterdam, 
373; the Dutch occupied the North river by fort 
Orange, 409 ; date of the first settlement at, 412 ; di- 
rector Stuyvesant returns from, 433, 474 ; soldiers 
sent to, 440, 460, 468 ; an Indian sent with letters to, 
461, 467 ; director Stuyvesant sets out for, 462, 469 ; 
claimed to be within the territory of Boston, 485 ; a 
massacre committed near, 495 ; a large quantity of 
powder in the hands of the merchants of, 496 ; 
director Stuyvesant's visit to, needless, 497; colonel 
Cartwright sent to, 502 ; Mr. Van Rensselaer declared 
the owner of, 549, 558, 560 ; fort Orange called, 550, 
560, 599 ; called Willemstadt, 560 ; cannon required 
for, 594 ; magistrates ordered to be named for, 595 ; 
Lutherans allowed "freedom of worship in, 617 ; in- 
structions for the commandant of, 618 ; magistrates 
of, 627 ; Lodewyck Cobes, notary and attorney at 
651 ; jurisdiction of the court of, 653 ; offenses com- 
mitted in Schaneghtade to be tried in, 654; com- 
plaints against those of Schaneghtade made from, 
* 675 ; order respecting the estate of Thomas Lavall 
at, 676 ; order restricting the number of sloops going 
to, 695 ; an appeal froin the judgment of the court 
of, 707 ; French prisoners sent to New Orange from, 
70S ; referred to, by the name of Nassou, 712 ; Mo- 
hawk chiefs to be conveyed, free of expense, from 
New Orange to, 713 ; peace renewed with the five 
nations at, ibid ; Mohawks request permission to lodge 
at, 717 ; governor Andros concludes a treaty with the 
Indians at, 742, III., 254; Bastian Jansen Crol 
director of fort Orange, II., 764, IV., 352; the Mohi- 
cans commit a murder near, II., 766 ; articles agreed 
to between colonel Cartwright and the Indians at, III., 
67 ; differences between the soldiers and townsmen 
in, 94; governor Nicolls' letter to the commissaries 
at, 117 ; governor Courcelles' wounded men sent to, 
119 ; strength of the garrison of, ibid ; the garrison 
at, strengthened, 121 ; the French in the vicinity of, 
126; M. d'Hinse, surgeon at, 127, 128; reverend 



18 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Alb^ 



Albany — eonlinutd. 

fatlier Becli»fer sent to, 127, 129 ; Iptters of goTPrnor 
dc Tracy to tliu commissaries of, 129, 131, 150; tlie 
minister of, referred to, 132 ; governor Nicolls at, 
133 ; letter to governor de Tracy from the commissa- 
ries of, 134 ; intelligence of tlie approach of the 
French, sent to New England from, 138 ; claimed as a 
])art of the colony of Rensselaorwyck, 143 ; names of 
tlie commissaries of, ibid ; governor Nicolls provides 
for the protection of, 144 ; Gerard Swart, sheriff of, 
145 ; the commissaries of, instructed respecting the 
terms of a peace between the Mohawks and French, 
140 ; governor Nicolls does not think the French will 
trouble, 147, 148 ; M. Cousture sent by governor Tracy 
to, 153 ; a Dutch town, 174, 764; surrendered to the 
Dutch, 205 ; the council of trade recommend that the 
Dutch be removed from New Yoik to, 212 ; care to be 
taken of the fort at, 216 ; reverend Nicolas Van 
Rensselaer recommended for minister of, 225 ; Boston- 
ers allowed to trade at, 238 ; the Maquaes to be used 
kindly at, 249 ; a fort built at, 255 ; colonel Conrsey 
concludes a treaty with the Indians at, 256 ; the New 
England Indians said to he supplied with ammunition 
from, 257, 259; latitude and longitude of, 260, VI., 
124,V1II.,435; courts in, III., 260, 389 ; chief place for 
the Indian trade, 261, V., 549; the eastern In- 
dians defeated within forty miles of. III., 265 ; ac- 
quitted by the king in council of having supplied 
king Philip with ammunition, 267; declared to 
have been part of the colony of Rensselaerwyck, 
269 ; rate of taxation in, 303 ; excise at, 305 ; no 
account kept of goods imported into, 307 ; town 
clerk in 1682 of, 315 ; conferences held with Indians 
at, 321, 417, 438, 483, 557, 712, 731, 771, 805, 840, 
IV., 20, 38, 85, 248, 279, 341, 407, 408, 567, 727, 
896, 978, v., 217, 265, 382, 437, 657, 713, 723, 963, 
VI., 98, 172, 216, 262, 289, 317, 383, 441, 447, 717, 
781, VII., 160, VIII., 608; the fort at, to be re- 
paired, III., 353; governor Dongan returns from, 
385, IX., 261; description of the fort at. III., 391; 
no talk to be held with the five nations except at, 
393 ; Serachtague, forty miles above, 394 ; the Farr 
Indians three months' journey from, 395 ; one of 
the principal towns in New York, 397; Robert 
Livingston collector at, 401 ; sittled by the Ransiaers, 
410 ; incorporated, 411 ; governor Dongan requested 
by the commissaries of, to furnish the Indians 
with English priests, 418 ; captain Brockholes re- 
quired at, 420 ; governor Dongan at, 426, 455, 475, 
512, 716, IX., 296; fort at, rebuilt. III., 429; an 
expedition proceeds to lake Huron from, 436, IX., 
403 ; Nauning llarmentse and others escape from 
Quebec and return to. III., 437; the Mohawks and 
Oneidag, neighbors of, 448, 451 ; governor Dongan has 
an interview with some Senecas at, 449 ; distance of 
fort St. Louis from, 451 ; the Indians in the vicinity 
of, at peace with the French, 452 ; the governor of 



Virginia at, 4.")4 ; the Indians always traded to, 460 ; 
trade permitted from, with the remotest Indians, 463 ; 
governor Dongan invites the five nations to, 472 ; In- 
dians with pipes through their noses trade at, 473 ; 
the Ottawawas desire to come to, 476 ; apprehends 
an attack from the French, 477, 692, 695, 761, IV., 
173, 1120, IX., 655; the mayor of, referred to. III., 
480, 561 ; names of the city authorities of, in 1687, 
485, 771, 772, 773 ; the Neghkereages visit, 489 ; one 
Shaw appointed surveyor of, 494 ; fees of the collec- 
tor at, 498 ; rum sent to, 499 ; the five nations sup- 
plied with arms at, 506, 508 ; date of its first settle- 
ment, 510 ; the last treaty of peace infringed at, 512 ; 
governor Dongan defends the inhabitants of, from the 
charges of governor Denouville, 514 ; the governor of 
Canada invited to send delegates to, 515 ; delegates 
sent from Canada, 518, IX., 762, 842, 843 ; negotia- 
tions with the French at. III., 521-532; Ottowawa liis 
northwest of, 522 ; sir Edmund Andros "propo-ses to 
visit, 553, 554, 568 ; Peter Schuyler, mayor of, 564, 
771, 772, 773, IV., 194, V., 76, IX., 579 ; distance 
of Skachkooke from. III., 565 ; amount expended by- 
governor Dongan at, 567, 579 ; uneasiness respecting 
the Indians at, 575 ; the people of the east end of Long 
Island march against, 577 ; the five nations trade to, 
579 ; governor Andros returns to Boston from, 581 ; 
the people of Kinderhook, Kattskill, &c., said to have 
fled to, 592 ; colonel Bayard retires to, 59G, 598, 604, 
609, 617, 620, 642, 645 ^ poor condition of, 599 ; op- 
posed to governor Leisler, 609, 620, 655 ; Stephen Van 
Cortland retires to, 612 ; fortifications of, recom- 
mended to be enlarged, 622 ; Jacob MUborn visits, 
646, 675 ; his proceedings there, 647, 728 ; Stephen 
Van Cortland victuals the garrison of, 650 ; the mart 
of the beaver trade, 653 ; colonel Bayard writes to 
the officers of the New York trainbands from, 658 ; 
governor Sloughter authorized to fortify, 689 ; memo- 
rial to the government of Connecticut from, 692 ; 
the principal bulwark against the French, 694, IV., 
1050; memorial to Massachusetts from. III., 695; a 
Mohawk baptized at, 696 ; lieutenant-governor Leys- 
ler threatens, ibid ; and appoints commissioners to 
superintend afi'airs at, 702 ; orders for the reduction 
of, 703 ; water communication to Canada from, 706 ; 
Connecticut reinforces, 707, 708, IV., 84, IX., 462; 
fort at, surrendered to the Leislerians, III., 708, 727 ; 
furnishes men against the French, 709 ; reverend 
Godfrey Dellius, minister at, 715, IV., 93-96, 366, 
391, 488, 528, 783; most of the women remove to 
New York from. III., 717; in danger from factions, 
721 ; sir Edmund Andros visits, 722 ; lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Lcisler's soldiers die like rotten sheep at, 727 ; 
sickness and mortality at, 730, X., 93, 98; chevalier 
D'Eau sent a prisoner to. III., 732 ; great distractions 
among the forces at, 733 ; Jacob Milborne called to, 
751 ; major-general Winthrop arrives at, 752, and 
returns from lake Champlain to, 753 ; governor 



— Ale] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



19 



Albany — continued. 

Sloughter about to visit, 7G8 ; an expedition fitted out 
against Canada at, 781, 783, 785, 800; Canada In- 
dians infest the vicinity of, 7S4, IV., 64, G5, 118, 151, 
181, v., 281, IX.,'478, 535, 552, 600, 618, X., 159 ; 
account of the Indians and fortifications at, III., 792 
trade of, what, 797 ; many Indians converted at, 799 ; 
a force raised for the protection of, 813 ; condition of, 
, 814, IX., 406; preparations to resist the enemy at. III., 
816 ; the fortifications of, to be extended, 822 ; next to 
New York in importance, 836 ; garrisoned by two hun- 
dred men, 837 ; aldermen of, in 1692, 840 ; in a good 
posture of defense, 845 ; tlie public wearied with tlie 
support of, 846 ; governor Fletcher about to visit, 
854, IV., 32, 84, 192, 198 ; the neighboring colonies to 
contribute to tlie security of. III., 856 ; mentioned, 67, 
130, 247, 250, 277, 279, 301, 328, 433, 461, 466, 472, 
473, 486, 530, 562, 569, 593, 610, 611, 633, 701, 746, 
747, 855 ; Martin's Vineyard contributes to the de- 
fense of, IV., 2 ; news of the invasion of the Mohawk 
country received at, 6 ; provisions sent to Schenec- 
tady from, 7 ; governor Fletcher sets out for, 7, 8, 14 ; 
distance of, from New York, 14, 831 ; votes an address 
to governor Fletcher, 15 ; address to governor Fletcher 
from the mayor and common council of, 19 ; officers of 
customs at, 25, 26 ; magistrates of, 26, 539 ; militia 
of, in 1693, 29 ; governor Fletcher concludes a treaty 
with tlie Indians at, 36 ; a stone fort required at, 37, 
67, 73, 75, 184, 254, 410, 513, 611, 701 ; his majesty's 
ketch Albrougli at, 43 ; intelligence from, 47, 124 ; 
the Oneydes send a belt of wampum to, 49 ; the 
Showannos visit, 51, 96 ; a great burden, 53 ; its se- 
curity provided for, 55 ; aid sent from New Jersey to, 
56, VI., 327; the fort at, out of repair, IV., 56; 
rumor of a design of the French against, 57, 119 ; 
Massachusetts refuses aid to, 58, 67; Dirck Wessels 
sent to Onondaga from, 59 ; prisoners brought from 
Canada to, 66,- X., 186; Indians propose that gover- 
nor Fletcher meet them at Onondaga instead of at, 
IV., 76; styled New Albany, 78, 92, 181, 295; the 
minister of, writes to father Dablon, 80 ; the five 
nations postpone their visit to, 81;' agreed upon as 
the place of meeting for the five nations, 88, IX., 
572 ; the French to have a pass, should they accom- 
pany the five nations to, IV., 89 ; the New England 
Indians boast of their valor against the people of, 
113; a stone mount constructed at, 114; Messrs. 
Pawling and Smith come by land from Quebec to, 
117 ; offices filled by Robert Livingston in, 130, 135, 
203 ; governor Dongan reinforces, 133 ; major Howell 
sent to, 143 ; a reward offered for killing Frenchmen or 
Indians in the neighborhood of, 150 ; force necessary 
for protecting, 151 ; Connecticut asked to send men 
to, 152, 189 ; Connecticut ofi'ers to send a force to, 
153; the five nations live west of, 168; minute of 
the council held by governor Fletcher at, 175 ; the 
Oneidas and Mohawks take refuge in, 176 ; condition 



of, 183, 409 ; soldiers desert from, 189 ; Connecticut 
declines sending men to, 190 ; journal of major-gene- 
ral Winthrop's march to Wood creek from, 193 ; 
small pox at, 196, IX., 129, X., 580 ; Robert Living- 
ston advances money for the subsistence of the forces 
at, IV., 202; Indian hunters called bushloopers at, 
209 ; time occupied by the passage between New 
York and, 222, 717, VI., 525 ; expedient of governor 
Fletcher to.obtain a present from, IV., 223 ; a detach- 
ment from Canada defeated near, 233, 234 ; governor 
Fletcher winters at, 234, 243, 275 ; journal of his 
visit in 1696 to, 235 ; examination of three French 
prisoners at, 241 ; governor Fletcher writes from, 246 ; 
date of the closing of the river at, in 1696, 247; 
Dirck Wessels, mayor of, 248, 249, 366, 370, 407 ; 
the French threaten to invade, 249, IX., 53, 424, 464, 
466, 669, 824 ; the assembly vote a fund to recruit 
companies at, IV., 273; fortifications of, in 1697, 
283 ; instructions respecting a fort at, 289 ; tlie master 
and crew of a vessel taken by the French arrive from 
Canada at, 293 ; the earl of Bellomont about to visit, 
305, 315, 684 ; colonel Romar sent to, 328 ; an impor- 
tant post, 329 ; J. Jans. Bleecker and Ryer Schermer- 
horn representatives of, 330 ; population of the 
county of, in 1689 and 1698, 337, 420 ; French Indi- 
ans on their way to trade at, 347 ; Fort Orange Nas- 
saw, the ancient name of, 352 ; the earl of Bellomont 
visits, 362 ; land at Scaticook purchased by, 367, V., 
388; the first name of, IV., 368; lieutenant-governor 
Nanfan ordered to, 369 ; no communication in winter 
between New York and, 377 ; complains of exorbi- 
tant grants of land, 393, 514 ; falling oIT in the popu- 
lation of, 394 ; John Janse Bleecker recorder of, 407, 
408, 491, 539, 579 ; Hendrick Hanson, mayor of, 
408, 491, 539, 579 ; a fort required at, 411 ; a list of the 
inhabitants of, sent to England, 418 ; a meeting of 
the five nations at Onondaga attended by the mayor 
of, 436 ; the fort at, of wood, 440, IX., 15 ; newly 
stockaded, IV., 449 ; estimated expense of erecting a 
stone fort at, 487 ; reverend Mr. Dellius threatens to 
excommunicate the mayor of, 489 ; aldermen of, 494, 
495, 579, 693, 695 ; J. Groeuendyke sheriff of, in 
1699, 495 ; the ancient place of treaty with the five 
nations, 496, 903 ; a great number of pines in the 
vicinity of, 502, 702, VI., 121 ; the lords of trade 
approve of the erection of afort at, IV., 522; colonel 
Bayard endeavored to prevent tlie proclamation of 
king William and queen Mary at, 525 ; the reverend 
Mr. Dellius deprived of his church at, 529 ; discords 
in, 533; trade between Canada and 556, 792, IX., 
91, 145, 909 ; a message from Onondaga to, IV., 559 ; 
Johannes Glen and Arnout Cornelius Viele return 
from Onondaga to, 560; the five nations promise to 
come to, 562; a general meeting of the five nations 
proposed to be held at, 565; three Frenchmen arrive 
at, 572; horses exported to Canada from, 574, 623, 
647 ; municipal officers of, in 1699, 579 ; a French 



20 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[ Alb- 



Albany — conlinutd. 

femalB prisoner seduced at, 582 ; message from the 
five nations received at, 597 ; father Bruyas at, 607 ; 
the fort at, like a pound, COS; allowed an additional 
representative in the assembly, G21 ; four justices of, 
suspended from office, 623 ; the great fall above, 633 
(see Cahoot) ; Schakkook Indians located north of, 
637 ; condition of the fort at, G40, 663, 867, 878, 968, 
J035, 1053, 1128; the carl of Bellomont to hold a 
conference with the five nations at, 641, 660, 713 ; 
water communication almost all the way to Cadaraqui 
from, 644; the earl of Bellomont recommends that 
the major of the English troops be governor of, 646, 
702; character of the people of, 646; distance of 
Detroit from, 650 ; delegates sent to Onondaga from, 
654, 802, 889 ; the clothing is rotten that the Indians 
get at, 658 ; Highland Indians visit, 663 ; map of, 
with iilans of a fort at, sent to England, 676 ; colonel 
RomJ>r prepares a plan for fortifying, 681 ; the soldiers 
so deficient of clothing at, tliat women are obliged to 
.shut their eyes when passing them, 687; an Indian 
woman killed in, 689; Peter Van Bnigh, mayor of, 
690, 693, 695, 798, V., 661, 662, VI., 60; proposals 
made by Canada Indians at, IV., 692 ; municipal offi- 
trers of, in 1700, 693, 695, 755 ; the e.irl of Bellomont 
endeavors to draw the western trade to, 715 ; two 
companies of soldiers at, 716, 1150 ; in case a fort be 
not built the inhabitants threaten to quit, 718 ; con- 
dition of the people of, ibid ; the Indians request 
that they be instructed by a minister of, 734 ; the 
Indian trade to be confined to, 741 ; the five nations 
a barrier to, 748 ; address to the earl of Bellomont 
from the citizens of, 752 ; sum required for the Dutch 
ministers at Schenectady and, 767 ; falling off in the 
excise of, 776 ; the earl of Bellomont's Indian policy 
thwarted at, 782, 783; wild grapes very abundant 
above, 787 ; is in the center of the grant to Mr. Van 
Rensselaer, 791 ; strength of the militia of, 807; offi- 
cers of the militia of, 811; views of the lords. of 
trade in regard to the fort of, 819 ; a grant made for 
fortifying, 832 ; the erection of a fort at, authorized, 
842; names of some of the freeholders of, recom- 
mended for seats in the council, 849 ; lieutenant- 
governor Nan fan ordered to report on the progress of 
building a fort at, 865 ; a Jesuit returns to Canada 
from the Mississippi by way of, 872 ; distance of the 
farthest western settlement in 1700, from, 873 ; opposed 
to the settlement of the interior of the country, 874 ; 
garrison proposed for, 879 ; a stone fort commenced 
at, 889, 970, 1019; the five nations invited to, 890; 
names of the municipal ofiicers of, in 1701, 896 ; the 
five nations live to the northwest of, 908 ; they sign 
the deed of their beaver hunting ground in the high 
street of, 910; .stone sent from New York to build 
forts at Schenectady and, 915 ; the stockadoes of, 
ordered repaired, 916 ; a part of the money raised for 
the fort at Onondaga appropriated for the fort at, 
921 , 1057, 1064, 1097 ; names of the principal tree- 



holder.s in, 939 ; the five nations to meet lord Corn- 
bury at, 977 ; the Indians to be instructed by minister 
of, 983 ; municipal officers of, in 1702, 984, 983 (bis), 
985, 990, 994, 995,998, 999 ; Mr. Lydius, minister at, 
988 ; names of the principal inhabitants of, in 1 702, 
1007 ; a jail authorized to be built in, 1064 ; necessity 
of securing the frontiers at, 1068; the reverend 
Thoroughgood Moor baffled by the traders of, 1077 ; 
members of the council resident in, 1137; Robert 
Livingston clerk of, 1158 ; Indians skulk around, 1162 ; 
act passed for repairing the city hall of, 1168 ; reverend 
Mr. Dellius suspended from the exercise of the min- 
istry in, v., 7 ; why, 8 ; lord Cornbury invited to, 
61 ; his lordship visits, 64 ; the far nations trade at, 
65, 584, 587, 684, 687, 693, 708, 709, IX., 670, 763; 
Montreal ordered to be attacked from, V., 73 ; gover- 
nor Dongan invites the Ottawawas to, 76; opposed to 
the expedition against Canada, 81, VI., 371 ; an 
express sent to Deerfleld from, with notice of an in- 
tended attack on that place, V. , 86 ; extravagant charge 
for a passage from New York to. 111, 407 ; grant for 
rebuilding the fort at, 138, 435 ; repair of the fort at, 
urged, 140 ; the five nations invited to meet governor 
Hunter at, 168 ; acts passed to repair the fortifica- 
tions of, 185, 210, 418, 480, 631, 738, VI., 27, 221, 
640 ; Robert Livingston, Jr., recorder of, V., 219, 223 ; 
reverend Mr. Lydius of, dead, 225 ; a military de- 
tachment sent from, to coerce the Palatines, 239 ; col- 
onel Scliuyler sets out for Onondaga from, 245 ; all 
the five nations' warriors summoned to, 253 ; forces 
mustered at, for the Canada expedition, 254 ; an ex- 
press to run tp Boston from, 260 ; the army on their 
march to Montreal from, 262, 263 ; the Indians urge 
the fortifying of, 278 ; .population of the city and 
county of, in 1703, 339 ; an appropriation made 
to secure the frontiers of, 344; commissioners set 
out for Onondaga from, 372; a meeting of the five 
nations called at, 379 ; an act passed to encourage 
the Indian trade at, 390 ; governor Hunter about 
to meet the Indians at, 418, 420 ; governor Hun- 
ter's opinion of the traders of, 436 ; always tke 
place for conferring with the five nations, 441, 492, 
671, 717; the Senecas furnished by way of Canada, 
with goods from, 486 ; intelligence that the French 
are building a fort at Niagara brought to, 528 ; 
officers in garrison at, 532 ; the mayor of, when ap- 
pointed, 537 ; commissioners set out for the Seneca 
country from, 542; time spen't in a journey to the 
Senecas' castle from, ibid; colonel Schuyler calls a 
meeting of the Indians at, 558 ; Canada furnished 
with goods from, 559 ; remonstrance from, on the 
discouraging state of Indian affairs, 570 ; fortifications 
of, decayed, 577 ; Montreal subsists by its trade with, 
577, 762 ; Onondaga midway between Niagara and, 
580 ; reverend father Durant arrives at, 590 ; governor 
Burnet visits, 632 ; governor Spotswood of Virginia 
concludes a treaty with the five nations at, 669, VI., 
138 ; an act passed to jiay th'^ representatives from, V., 



-Alb] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



21 



Albany — continued. 

683 ; houses erected for the accommodation of Indians 
at, 701 ; population of, in 1723, 702 ; goods easily 
conveyed from New York to, 729 ; distance and route 
to Montreal and lake Ontario from, ibid, IX., 282 ; its 
advantages over Montreal, V., 730 ; rise of the trade be- 
tween Montreal and, 732 ; Myndert Schuyler member 
for, 750 ; strength of the garrison of, 775 ; the Indian 
trade acts abandoned iu consequence of the opposition 
of the people at, 778, 781 ; two block-houses built at, 
782 ; names of the recorder and aldermen of, in 1726, 
791 ; a clandestine trade long carried on at, 811 ; pe- 
titions against the act for the regulation of the Indian 
trade, 906 ; a new fort proposed to be built at, 923, 
924, 927 ; the French settle within three days' march 
of, 926, 933 ; census of, iu 1731, 929 ; illegality of 
governor Cosby's proceedings in regard to the Indian 
deed to, 957 ; the mayor of, obliged to surrender 
the deed of land at Fort Hunter, 960, 977; the 
Indian deed belonging to, destroyed, 957, 977 ; the 
charter to, supposed to be void, 961 ; governor Cosby 
holds an Indian conference at, 963 ; governor Cosby 
justifies his destroying the Indian deed belonging 
to, VI., 6; chief justice Morris' behavior at, 9; 
the lords of trade demand information respecting 
the land deeded by the Indians to, 17, 42 ; an act 
passed relating to public highways in, 39 ; letter tq 
president Clark from the mayor, &c., of, 57; Philip 
Livingston born at, 60 ; Mr. Van Dam's authority not 
recognized at, 86 ; reverend Henry Barclay a native 
of, 88 ; president Clarke about to visit, 95 ; he meets 
the Indians at, 98, 172, 216 ; cajjtaiu William Dick 
dies at, 110 ; the Hudson river navigable from New 
York to, 113, VII.,. 598; a stone fort at, VI., 120; 
John de Peyster, recorder of, 132 ; population of tlie 
county of, in 1737, 133 ; number of tlie militia, 134 ; 
Massachusetts lays out townships within sixteen 
miles of, 143 ; an anti-leislerian convention held at, 
153 ; distance of Crownpoint from, 184, 28.6 ; pro- 
vision made to finish the court house and jail in, 226 ; 
minutes of the proceedings of the commissioners of 
Indian afi'airs at, 238 ; governor Clinton about to visit, 
255 ; declaration of war against the French published 
at, 259, 260, VII., 122 ; commissioners from Massa- 
chusetts at, VI., 267; Jeremiah Rensselaer one of the 
richest and most influential gentlemen of, 271, 273; 
the people all Dutch at, 286 ; reinforcements sent to, 
288 ; utility of the lieutenant-governor'of New York 
residing at, 313 ; the people of, refuse to serve in an 
expedition against Canada, 317 ; colonel William 
Johnson visits, 389 ; census of the county of, not 
taken on account of the war, 392 ; refuses to provide 
quarters for soldiers, 397 ; colonel Roberts command- 
ing ofiicer .at, 416 ; several members of the council 
refuse to accompany governor Clinton to, 428 ; gov- 
ernor Shirley at, 447, 994 ; population of the county 
of, in 1749, 550 ; Jacob C. Ten Eyck, mayor of, 569 ; 
proceedings in, towards the expedition against 



Canada, 656, 657 ; John Lindesay, sheriff of, 707 ; 
governor Clinton renews the covenant chain with the 
Indians at, 714, 715, 717 ; distance of colonel John- 
son's residence from, 740 ; Peter Wraxall and Hamie 
Gansevoort appointed clerk of, 768 ; report of tho 
lords of trade in favor of Peter Wraxall as clerk of, 
769 ; king Hendrik's opinion of the people of, 788 ; 
Conrad Weiser confers with the commissioners for 
Indian affairs at, 795 ; reverend Mr. Ogilvie, episcopal 
minister at, 799, VII., 43 ; a general congress of the 
colonies recommended to be held at, VI., 846 ; lieu- 
tenant-governor De Lancey holds a conference witli 
the Indians at, 850 ; proceedings of the colonial con- 
gress at, 853 ; the council fire at, burnt out, 871, VII., 
20, 574 ; Indian account of the first settlement of, 
VI., 881 ; report of the board of trade on the congress 
at, 916j»no fort north of, 922; strength of the gar- 
rison of, in 1754, 924 ; governor Shirley's objections 
to the plan of a colonial union agreed at, 930 ; the 
Indian council-fire removed to Mount Johnson from, 
965 ; the Indians pleased that the council fire is ex- 
tinguished at, 967 ; a road made to Lake George from, 
997 ; Sir Charles Hardy at, 1016, VII., 4, 160 ; rein- 
forcements sent to fort Edward from, 2, 274 ; beaver 
sold cheaper at Montreal than at, 6 ; the management 
of Indian aflfairs always at, 15 ; some account of tho 
trade between Canada and, 16 ; Indian traders 
divided into two parties in, ibid ; neutral in time of 
war, 17 ; a garrison recommended to be stationed in, 
27 ; the Cacnawagies not to trade at, 77 ; English 
troops, at, 89, VIII., 312, X., 422, 8S5-; major-gene- 
ral Abercrombie at, VII., 119, 160 ; lord Loudon at, 
122, 176, 187, X., 519 ; Pennsylvania purchases large 
tracts of land from the Indians at, VII., 130, 305, 332 ; 
sir William Johnson at, 160 ; cannon sent to, 164 ; 
young men of, go on a war excursion to Canada, 173, 
174 ; captain Williams under arrest in, 173 ; the sheriff 
of, resisted in the execution of his duty, 206 ; a Mo- 
hegan shot near, 248 ; two Indians confined at, oh a 
charge of murder, 250 ; their liberation demanded, 
251, 253 ; brigadier Stanwix at, 280 ; difiloulties con- 
Sequent on the purchase of land by the authorities of 
Pennsylvania at, 329 ; the rendezvous for the forces 
ordered to invade Canada, 340, 420; Pennsylvania 
surrenders the lands purchased from the Indians at, 
388 ; the merchants of, remonstrate against a grant of 
land at Niagara to captain Rutherford and others, 488 ; 
report of the board of trade thereupon, 502 ; general 
Amherst's answer to the petition from the merchants 
at, 508 ; news of the siege of Detroit received at, 524 ; 
claims land at fort Hunter, 562 ; the Indians insist 
that colonel Johnson be invited to the congress at, 574 ; 
means whereby it secured a deed of the Mohawk 
flats, 577 ; the communication between it and Oswego 
kept open by provincials, 610 ; the merchants of, 
petition for leave to sell rum to the Indians, 613 ; 
names of the merchants of, in 1764, 614, 615 ; Mr. 
Marsh, clerk of, dead, 694 ; Stephen De Lancey ap- 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Alb- 



Albany — conlinued. 

pointod clerk of, 703 ; Indian affairs formerly man- 
aged by a bull feast and a little rum at, 713 ; riots 
against the stamp act at, 812 ; the stone wall removed 
from the north side of, 815 ; a quay built in, ibid; 
anti-rent riots in the county of, 849 ; order re-estab- 
lished in the county of, 867 ; colonel John Bradstreet 
a resident of, 928 ; trades to Oswego, 953 ; the first 
presbyterian clergyman in, VIII., 51; proposed di- 
vision of the county of, 79, 147; approved, 100; a 
flourishing town, 304 ; Mohawks complain of frauds 
committed by, 30C; objections to an act to regulate 
elections in, 354 ; strength of the militia of, in 1773, 
377; much of the county wild, 441; distance of, 
from the sea, 442; population of, in 1771, 457; citi- 
zens imprisoned for celebrating the king's birthday 
at, 460 ; a continental force ordered to, 597 ; the council 
fire of the six nations to be rekindled at, 605 ; the treaty 
with the six nations opened in the Dutch church at, 
610 ; the bell-man sent around to invite the inhabi- 
tants to attend a conference with the six nations, 
611 ; the ancient council-fire relighted at, 614 ; the 
commissioners of Indian affairs meet in the presbj'- 
terian meeting house at, 627 ; brigadier-general Hand 
in command at, 712 ; colonel Hazen recruiting at, 
777; threatened by sir John Johnson, 793; policy of 
securing it for the French, IX., 60, 66, 445 ; sir Thomas 
Temple visits, 75 ; a town of New England, 137 ; 
French plan for seizing, 405 ; a magistrate of, killed 
near Sorel, 474 ; count Frontenac authorized to make 
an attack on, 531 ; utterly defenceless, 549, 1040, 
1046 ; people of, desire peace, 596, 745 ; the French 
march over the snow to, 786 ; reverend father de 
Mareuil retires to, 829 ; forts between lake St. Sacra- 
ment and, 840, X., 405 ; governor de Vaudreuil 
sends for information to, IX., 857; the Indians supplied 
at, 920 ; the patroon of, visits Montreal, 1045 ; in 
1744, 1109 ; Cornelius Cuyler, mayor of, X., 19 ; 
prisoners and scalps carried to Canada from the neigh- 
borhood of, 32 ; an army designed to operate against 
Crownpoint arrive at, 55 ; five thousand men encamp- 
ed near, 305 ; baron de Dieskau removed to, 344 ; ba- 
ron de Dieskau arrives at, 355 ; baron de Dieskau said 
to have been sent to Boston from, 401 ; topography of 
the country between Oswego and, 674 ; description 
of, 678 ; the wounded sent from Ticonderoga to, 727 ; 
colonel Howe interred at, 735 ; the defeat of general 
Abercrombie causes a panic at, 849. (See Fuyck, the ) 
Albemarle [George Monck, 3d], duke of, joint commander of 
the English fleet against the Dutch, II., 275 ; member 
for the council for trade, III., 31 ; of the privy coun- 
cil, 44, 177; appointed high constable of England, 
162; Carolina granted to, and others, 532. 
Albemarle [Cliristopher Monk, 4th], duke of, member of the 
committee of trade and plantations, HI., 370; mem- 
ber of the privy council, 388 ; fits out Mr. Phipps for 
a voyage, 720. 



Albemarle [William Anne Keppel, 12th], earl of, furnishes 
the French government with abstract of letters rela- 
tive to the surrender of prisoners in America, X., 
189 ; complains of the French in America, 216 ; bio- 
gi-aphical notice of, 217 ; answer of the French minis- 
ter to, 218 ; three men taken prisoners by the Frg nch 
on the Ohio and sent prisoners to France, apply for 
protection to, 241 ; deceased, 389. 

Albert, the trumpeter, II., 161. 

Albert, captain, in command of fort Charles, IX., 702. 

Albertse, Jan, II., 644. 

Albertzen, Egbert, III., 74. 

Alborough, John, member of sir Edmund Anrlros' council, 
III., 543. 

Albrough (Alborougb), John, of New York, gives evidence 
against governor Fletcher, IV., 128, 144, 179. 

Albyn, Benjamin, member of the board of trade, III., 176. 

Alcmaer, Pieter Jans Schagen, a magistrate of, I., 35. 

Alden (Aldem), John, furnishes information respecting the 
eastern bounds of the English plantations, IV., 677; 
a Boston merchant, IX., 527; endeavors to inveigle 
Mr. Villebon on board his ship, 532. 

Alden, , junior, a -Boston merchant, IX., 527 ; sent pri- 
soner to Quebec, 532 ; and to France, 533. 

Alder, , X., 592. 

Aldernag, I., 606. 

Alderney, granted to sir Edmund and lady Andros, II., 741. 

Aldrick, captain, commandant at St. Johns, Newfoundland, 
VI., 957. 

Aldricks. (See Alrichs.) 

Aldringa, Mr., I., 117. 

Aldworth, Richard"Nevill, under secretary of state, III., xi ; 
communicates to the lords of trade the wish of the 
lords justices for a report-on the state of the province 
of New York, VI., 586. 

Aleriata (.\toriat,a), Louis, an Indian orator, IX., 480; god- 
son of Louis XIV., 518. 

Alexander VII., pope, Hugues de Lionue effects the ek-ctign 
of, II., 349 ; appoints a bishop for Canada, IX., 13. 

Alexander, Alexander, IX., 981. 

Alexander, Elijah, VII., 905. 

Alexander, James, recommended for a seat in the council of 
New York, V., 579, 584, 647 ; deputy secretary of New 
York, 579 ; member of the council of New York, 635, 
VI., 804, 839 ; attends conferences with the Indians, V., 
635, 657, 658, 66], 662, VI., 717, 724, 781, 783, 784, 
785 ; recommended for a seat in the council of New Jer- 
sey, v., 698 ; his answer to statements of Mr. Rochead 
respecting- land claims, 758 ; governor Cosby asks 
for his removal from the council, 939, 940, 942, VL, 
22, 24 ; his excellency treated with disrespect through, 
v., 949 ; is a party in drawing up charges against gov- 
ernor Cosby, 974; absent from the council that de- 
manded Rip Van Dam's removal, 975 ; biographical 
skclcli of, 982 ; one of Mr. Van Dam's advisers, VI., 
6 ; one of the council of New Jersey, ibid, 839 ; Mr. 
Van Dam managed by, 7, 54,. 81 ; complaint of gov- 
ernor Cosby against, 21 ; his antecedents 22 ; ceases 



— All] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



23 



Alexander, James — continued. 

to attend the council of New Jersey, 23 ; further rep- 
resentations against, 25 ; report of the lords of trade 
against, 34 ; they recommend that he be removed from 
the council, 35, 36, 43, 47; governor Cosby's com- 
plaints against, alluded to, 40 ; liis coarse on the 
death of governor Cosby, 46, 53 ; president Clarke 
calls for his removal from the council, 48, 49, 50 ; 
publishes a notice that he never consented to Mr. 
Clarke's assuming the government, 50 ; does not 
attend the council of New York, 55, 73 ; his dismissal 
from the council expected, 63 ; necessity of his dis- 
missal, 64, 65, 77 ; treads very near treason, 76 ; acts 
as member of Mr. Van Dam's council, 77, 79 ; ought 
to be sent to England, 80; works the people to the 
verge of rebellion, 82 ; kept in the dark as regards the 
royal instruction to president Clarke, 86 ; his restora- 
tion to the council recommended, 312, 406, 407, 465 ; 
he and Lewis Morris report on the state of the pro- 
vince of New Jersey, 326-328 ; certifies the receipt of 
a letter, 345 ; lords of trade in favor of restoring, 578, 
587; writes to lieutenant-governor de Lancey on the 
subject of the New Jersey boundary, 843 ; a vacancy 
in the New York council in consequence of the death 
of, VII., 205. 

Alexander, William, sou of James Alexander, V., 983 ; mar- 
ries a daughter of Philip Livingston, VI., 60, 880; 
minute of his attendance on the congress at Albany, 
880 ; connected with the publication of a pamphlet in 
favor of governor Shirley, 959 ; secretary to genera! 
Shirley, 1025, 1027, VII., 10 ; styles himself earl of 
Stirling, 763 ; member of the council of New York, 
ibid ; resigns bis seatin the council, VIII., 101 ; James 
de Lancey succeeds, 109 ; contributes to the New York 
Reflector, 221. (See Stirling, lord.) 

Alexander, sir William, principal secretary of state for Scot- 
land, interested in the trade of America, III., 15 ; 
Nova Scotia granted to, IV., 475 ; bounds of Nova 
Scotia as granted to, V., 592; first proprietor of Nova 
Scotia, 624; biographical notice of, IX., 981. (See 
Stirling, 1st earl of.) 

Alexandre, lieutenant, wounded, X., 431. 

Alexandria, plan of operations concluded at, VI., 954 ; gov- 
ernor Shirley at, 957 ; governor Shirley's expenses in 
gomg to and coming from, 958 ; major-general John- 
son visits, 961 ; VII., 21 ; lieutenant governor Delaucey 
at, VI., 990, 993 ; the council of, concur in the com- 
mission to general Johnson, VII., 11 ; general Johnson 
meets general Braddock at, 228 ; i)romise of governor 
Dinwiddle to general Braddock at, 270. 

Algerines, rear admiral Tromp recovers a number of chris- 
tians from the, II., 265 ; sir Thomas Allen serves with 
credit against the, 274 ; a source of annoyance to the 
Italians, V., 613. 

Algiers, the dey of, declares his resolution to exact passes 
from all English vessels, IV., 666. 

Aliens, the law respecting lands purchased by, V., 497 ; a 
bill introduced into the New York legislature to con- 



firm estates claimed by or under, VIII., 169; an act 
passed to confirm estates claimed by or under, 207 ; 
not to be naturalized in the colonies, 402. (See Acts, 
New York; Naturalization.) 

d'Aligny, captain, resigns his commission, X., 372. 

d'Aligre, Etienne, minister of justice and chancellor of France, 
X., V. 

Alimahoue, a Miami captain, IX., 181, 182. 

d'Alincourt, marquis, II., 348. 

Alkorne, Alxsandier, IV., 936, 1008. 

Allaer, Alexander, IV., 1135. 

Allartszeir, Hendrick, I., 26. 

Allaz, lieutenant James, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 731 ; 
notice of, ibid. 

Allegations which ought to. have been inserted in the solici- 
tor general's rejiort in relation to the act for vacating 
the extravagant grants, V., 15. 

Allegany (New York), the Indians of, in favor of a peace, 
VII., 721, 723 ; Indian towns in, 723 ; X., 581. 

Alleghany (Aliganai, Aleghenny) mountains ought to be the 
bounds of certain of the colonies, VI. , 888 ; the pro- 
prietors of Pennsylvania recede to the Indians lands 
west of, VII., 305 ; no purchase made of lands be- 
tween lake Erie and, 332 ; a boundary line between 
the whites and Indians run over the, 928 ; the English 
build a fort at the foot of the, X., 365. 

Alleghany river. III., 125 ; several of the six nations settled 
on the, VI., 742 ; colonel Croghan settles on the, VII., 
982; mentioned, X., 255. 

Allegiance, Indians aware of the prinoii)le, that protection 
follows, IV., 565. (See Oath.) 

Allegory, an, illustrating to the Indians the cause of the 
quarrel between Great Britain and America, VIII., 617. 

Allen, captain (R. N.), recovers Hudson's bay, IV., 258. 

Allen, Ethan, taken prisoner, VIII., 637, 662 ; Peter Johnson 
captured, 664. 

Allen, reverend James, notice of. III., 582. 

Allen, Martha, marries caiitain De Lancy, VII., 402. 

Allen, Samuel, governor of New Hampshire, III., 365 ; his 
doings there, IV., 439, 548.; his title to New Hamp- 
shire questioned, 673 ; the earl of Bellomont recom- 
mends the vacating of the grant to, 674, 679 ; the 
lords of trade propose reporting on the title of, 699 ; 
suit depending between the province of New Hamp- 
shire and, 722 ; his claim a fraud, 776 ; claims all the 
lands and woods of New Hampshire, 785 ; necessity 
of destroying his pretension, 794 ; refused an appeal 
to the king in council, 796 ; his claim reported on, 856 ; 
claims the lands on the Piscattaway river, V., 112 ; Mr. 
Mason sells the lands of New Hampshire to, 595. 

Allen, Samuel, a prisoner in Canada, X., 153. 



Allen, Thomas, a gur 






York, bribed to return 



to England, VIII., 647. 
Allen, Thomas, member of the committee of correspondence 

of Pittsfield, Mass., VIII., 653. . 
Allen, sir Thomas, knight, notice of, II., 274 ; attacks the 

Dutch fleet in the bay of Cadiz, 329 ; leaves the ship 

Crown, at Gibraltar, 342. 



24 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[All- 



AllcMi, William, member of the council for trade aud planta- 
tions, III., 31. 
Allen, William, chief justice of Pennsylvania, VII., 402. 
AUerton (Aldertou), Isaac, one of the eight men of New 
AmsU'rdam, I., 140, 191, 192 ; active in obtaining sig- 
natures against director Kieft, 204', 207 ; signs a letter 
to the chamber at Amsterdam, 213 ; witness to a sale 
of lands by the Indians on the Delaware, 597, 599. 
Ailing, Jno., IV., 936, 1008. 

Allington [William, 2d], lord, member of the council for for- 
eign plantation.?. III., xiii, 191, 192. 
Allison, Mr., required at the Delaware, III., 74. 
Allison (Alinson), Robert, dragged prisoner to the fort by 
order of lieutenant-governor Leisler, III., 673; assaults 
lieutenant-governor Leisler, 740, 741 ; makes a demon- 
stration for rescuing the prisoners at the fort, 742, 744 ; 
signs a petition to king William, IV., 935 ; and an 
address to lord Cornbury, 1007. 
AUouez, reverend Claude, S. J., visits the Mascoutins, IX., 
92 ; calls the Dahcotahs the Iroquois of the west, 153 ; 
at the falls of St. Mary, 804. 
Alloway, captain, wrecked. III., 836. 
All Saints, bay of. (See Bahia, Bay of All Saints.) 
AUumettcs, Les, M. de Coulange winters at, IX., 594. 
AUyn (.•VUen), John, deputy to the general court at Hartford, 
appointed to treat with the delegates from "New Neth- 
erland, II., 387 ; demands the annexation of West- 
chester, 391 ; secret.ary of Connecticut, 585, 652, 656, 
III., 86, 707, 787, IV., 100, 188, 190, 192, 193, 628 ; one 
of the commissioners of the United Colonies, III., 
273, 274 ; member of sir Edmund Andres' council, 
.543, 591 ; succeeded as secretary by Eleazer Kimberly, 
IV., 153. 
Allyn, Mathew, member of the general court of Counecti- 
cnt, one of a committee to treat with commissioners 
from New Netherland, II., 387; his speech on the 
annCKation of the English towns on Long Island to 
Connecticut, 388. 
Almanac, New York, for 1758, referred to, X., 756. 
Aimer. (See Helmer.) 

Almey [Christopher], heard before the attorney and solicitor 
generals on the part of Rhode Island, IV., 105 ; pre- 
sents a memorial to lord BcUomont, 678. 
Almshouse, boys and girls recommended to be sent to New 
l^therland from the, I., 364; children sent to New 
Netherland from the, 556, II., 52. 
Alner, James, captain of The Bold Foresters, VIII., 602. 
d'Alogny, marquis, serves in Canada, IX., 859, 860. 
Alphonse, Jean. (See Sainlonge.) 

Alrichs, Jacob, vice-director of New Amstel, siiils from the 
Texel, II., 4; is shipwrecked on Long Island, 5; 
arrives at the Manhattans, 6 ; requests that a cler£g-- 
man bo sent out, 7 ; arrives at New Amstel, 8, 10 ; 
describes the Delaware river, 11 ; and enumerates his 
necessities, 12 ; continues his reports, 13, 49 ; pre- 
pares a map of New Amstel, 14 ; and plans of other 
places, 15 ; describes the progress of settlement, 16, 
18 ; recommends the settloraout of the Whorekill, 19 ; 



mentioned, 21, 56, 187 ; urges the sending out of more 
colonists, 51 ; announces the arrival of children from 
the almshouse, 52 ; describes the Swedish settlements, 
53 ; receives some law books, 54 ; the commissioners 
of the colonie write to, 60 ; the opening of the trade 
announced to, 61 ; not to tolerate apy but the reformed 
religion, ibid ; nor to allow an appeal from judgments 
below a certain amount, 62 ; to search for minerals 
and a gold mine, 63 ; applies to the governor of Mary- 
land to send back some runaways, 64 ; governor Fen- 
dall refuses to acknowledge the authority of, 67 ; and 
orders him to depart from the Delaware, ibid ; the 
history and progi-ess of the colony described by, 68, 
69 ; reports that lord Baltimore lays claim to the Dela- 
ware, 70 ; commences the settlement of the Whorekill, 
71 ; protests against colonel Utie, 73 ; reports the 
proceedings of governor Fendall, 75 ; also the num- 
ber of houses at New Amstel, 76 ; and the troubles 
with the Indians, 78 ; receives a letter from Maryland, 
94 ; sheriff Van Sweringen complains of, 106, 107, 
108 ; Mr. d'Hinojossa writes against, 110 ; reports the 
state of his colony, 112 ; sick, 113 ; reports the death 
of reverend Mr. Welius, 114 ; blamed for the back- 
ward state of the colony, 115 ; deceased, 196. 

Alrichs (Aldrickx, Alrigh, Alrigs, Alzicx), Peter, nephew of 
. Jacob Alrichs, II., Ill ; commissary at the South 
river, 430 ; purchases cattle in New England, 433, 
496 ; wliich are captui-ed by the English, 434 ; at- 
tempts to send a lot of negroes overland to the South 
river, ibid ; sloop employed by, captured, 438 ; com- 
mandant and sheriff of the South river, 605, 614, 
622 ; authorized to enlist men, 617 ; Instruction to, 
618, 632 ; .authorized to seize captain Carr's estate, 
659 ; authorized to receive millstones lying at the 
Whorekill, 663 ; a proclamation sent to, 678 ; swears 
fidelity to the English, III., 74 ; ensign Stock to have 
a grant of the land belonging to, 115. 

Alsace, marquis de Maillebois, governor of, X., 372. 

Alsop, John, elected to congress, VIII., 470; member of the 
general committee of New York, 600. 

Alsop [Richard], judgment reversed in the case of the widow 
W.T.nd.T,l and, IV., 511 ; appeals, 550 ; wi-it of appeal 
refused to, 556 ; lieutenant-governor Nanfan censured 
for refusing an appeal to, 634 ; reversal of the judg- 
ment in favor of, not agreeable to the practice In the 
colonies, 635 ; e.^planation of the error in reversing 
the judgment in favor of, 768. 

Alston, John, a pirate, arrested and sent to New Y'ork, IV., 
333. 

Alstyn, Isaacq, IV., 939. 

Altamaha (Alatamaha) river, VIII., 32, 33 ; how formed, X., 
951. 

Altarbaenhoot, a Connecticut sachem, II., 140. 

Altewaky, an Ottawa chief, visits Detroit, VII., 784. 

Altingh, Mr., accountant of the West India comp.any, I., 217. 

Altona, fort Christina called, II., 15; a vice-director to be 
sent to, 19 ; William Boeckman, vice-director of, 49, 
76 : mentioned, 178. 



— Amb] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



25 



Alzouet, captaia, X., 51, 74. 

Amacoica, IX., 783. 

Amarascoggin. (See Androscoggin.) 

.Amattehoorn and other sachems couliira the sale of their 
lands on tlie Schuylkill to the Dutch, I., 593 ; resi- 
dence of, 598 ; and other sachems convey lands on 
the west side of the South river to the Dutcli, 599, 
600. (See Mattehoorn.) " 

Amazon river, Dutch vessels fitted out for the, I., 35 ; Gui- 
ana bounded by, 66 ; trade regulated to the, 223 ; the 
South bay and river compared to the, 290 ; within the 
viceroyalty of the duke de Ventadour, IX., 783. 

.Ambassador (the Dutch), to England, writes to their high 
mightinesses on the subject of Sir Thomas Dale's 
petition, I., 17; instnictions to the, considered, 29 ; 
to France, letter of their high mightinesses to the, 
respecting the proposed union of the several We.st 
India companies, 33 ; to England, journal of the, 
ibid ; informs their high mightinesses that Sir Ferdi- 
nand Georges wishes a commission for his son who 
is in New England, 34 ; their high mightinesses write 
to the, on the subject of the capture of the ship 
Eendracht, 46; transmits an account of an interview 
with the king about the Eendracht, 48 ; instructed to 
use all possible means to obtain the release of that 
ship, 52, 53 ; address king Charles L respecting her 
capture, 55 ; answer of the English government to 
the, 57; informs their high miglitinesses of the re- 
lease of the Eendracht, 60 ; coinraunicatos to their 
high mightinesses a complaint of some English mer- 
chants against the officers of the West India company 
in New Netherland, 71 ; calls the attention of their 
high mightinesses to the fisheries at Terra Nova, 102; 
reports to their high mightinesses the progress of 
affairs in England, 108, 129 ; calls the attention of 
their high mightinesses to complaints from New 
England against the Dutch in New Netherland, 129 ; 
reports the progress of the civil war in England, 133, 
134 ; the ships which conveyed the, to Prussia ex- 
empt from inspection, 147 ; to England, recommended 
to obtain freedom of trade to Virginia and the Carib- 
bean islands, 437 ; Mr. Schaep going to England as, 
459 ; Willem Van Nieuport appointed, to England, 
475 ; despatch relating to the boundary of New 
Netherland received from, 559 ; recommends that the 
settlement of the boundary be referred to the Dutch 
and English authorities in America, 560; memoran- 
dum of a proposition respecting the boundarj' sub- 
mitted by the, 661; resolution of their high mighti- 
nesses on the letter and memorandum of the, 562; 
their high mightinesses resolve to send copies of 
certain documents to the, 568, 569 ; the chamber at 
Amsterdam request their high mightinesses again to 
recommend the boundary question to the attention 
of the, 573; letter of their high mightinesses there- 
upon to the, 574, 575; reports to their high mighti- 
nesses the expulsion of the Swedes from New Neth- 
arland, 578 ; reports the return of governor Jlising 



and tlie progi-ess of affairs in England, 5S2; the 
memoir of the Assembly of the XIX., transmitted to, 
II., 164; states general advised of various occur- 
rences in England by, 523 ; Mr. van de Lier appointed, 
545, 547 ; communicates to the Icing of England the 
orders for the restoration of New Netherland, 548 ; 
instructed to assist the proprietors of Rensselaers- 
wyck in obtaining a confirmation of their patent, 
561 ; particulars of the public entry and reception in 
England of, 562; directed to inquire what person is 
authorized to receive New Netherland, 566; further 
commanication from, 567; the orders of the states gene- 
ral for the surrender of New Netherland transmitted 
to, 732; advises the states general that " Mr. Andrew " 
is commissioned to receive New Netherland, 733 ; in- 
structed to secure a favoi'able hearing for the Dutch 
burghers of New Vork, 744; reports the state of 
affairs at the court of England, 745. 

(The English), the states general resolve to grant Leave of 
absence to captain Tiionias Dale, on the applicatiion 
of, I., 2 ; address of, to the states general, recommend- 
ing the petition of captain Thomas Dale, 16 ; resolutions 
of the states general in relation to the recommendation 
of, respecting Virginia, 27, 28 ; his report on the 
attempts of the Dutch to commence plantations in Vir- 
ginia, 58, 59 ; quits the Hague, II., 418 {see Downing); 
Henry Coventry sent to Sweden as, 664; sir Dudley 
Carleton at the Hague as. III., 6, 7 ; sir Willian^ Tem- 
ple, to Holland, 178 ; lord Preston in Prance as, 579, 
(see Albemarle, earl of ; Waldcgrave; Wulpole) ; Mr. 
Whitworth sent to the court of Muscovy as, V., 333. 

(The French), arrives in England, I., 60 ; takes leave of 
king Charles, 133 ; act as mediators between the 
Dutch and English, II., 336, 340, 343, 345 ; return 
home, 418 ; complains of captain Argall, III., 1 ; re- 
called from London and Hanover, X., 314 ; the mar- 
quis de Mirepoix sent to London as, 388 ; and to 
Vienna, 433 ; tlie duke of Belleisle sent to Frankfort 
as, 527 ; M. de Paulmy sent to Switzerland and Poland 
as, 635 ; to Holland (see Affry, count d'] ; to Spain 
(see d^Aubcterre ,• NoailleSj marshal de.) 

(The Russian), lands in England, II., 294. 

(The Spanish), endeavors to excite animosities between 
England and the states general, I., 72 ; demands the 
arrest of Sebastian de Raeff and other alleged pirates 
in New Netherland, 576, 580 ; resolution of the states 
general upon the memorial of, 581 ; count de Molina 
at the court of London as, IL, 343, 345. 

(The Swedish), complains of^he exaction in Holland 
of duties on ships coming from New Sweden, I., 143, 
145, 159 ; letter to the assembly of the XIX. on the 

' complaint of, 156 ; complains of the West India com- 
pany's officers in New Netherland for dispossessing 
the Swedes of the South river, 615. 
Ambassadors from New Netherland to Maryland, II., 86; jour- 
nal of, 88 ; from New England land at New Amsterdam, 
469. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Amb- 



Ambor, brought into Hollaiui bv the Dut*-li West Iiului coiu- 

jjiuiy, I., 42. 
d'Amblcmont (Oiubleinoiit), M., arrives at Quebec, IX., 324, 

34), 359 ; commander of the Arc en ciel, 332. 
Amboina, tlie Duteh complain of the publieation in England 
of a book on the events at, I., 47; the English East 
India company greatly dissatisjied because it did 
not roeeive any redress for the affair at, 48 ; the 
Dutch ambassadors at the eourt of England decline 
meeting the English eomraissianers on the subject of, 
49 ; and report i>rogress on the affair at, 54 ; question 
agitated, CO ; the Dutch proniirse to pay for tlie inhu- 
manity at, II., 355. 
Amboy (Amboyue ; Perth Amboy), opposite Statcn jsland, 
II., 643; Thomas Rudyard's daughter dies at, III., 
351 ; ships bound for, enter at New York, 354, 41C ; 
affords facilities for smuggling, 356 ; inconvenience of 
making it a port of entry, 392 ; Scotch immigrants 
arrive at, 395 ; a custom house officer stabbed at, 
493 •, the king proclaimed at, 617 ; the lords of trade 
report agiiinst making it a port of entry, IV., 298; 
a free port, 305 ; a proclamation issued against its be- 
ing free, 314 ; proclaimed by the governor of East 
Jersey to be a free port, 318 ; colonel Bass asserts 
the right as a port of entry of, 332 ; progress of the 
controversy respecting the making it a free port, 3S0 ; 
erected into a town and settled, 382 ; "reasons against 
its being a free port, 383 ; a port under New York, 
ibid ; the ship Ilester cleared at, 438 ; its right to be a 
port tested at Westminister hall, 439 ; the case of, 
before the board of trade, 455 ; the privileges of New 
York to be maintained against, 509 ; the duke of 
Y'ork opposed to the pretensions of, 521 ; state of the 
claim of, to be a port, 546 ; the ship Hester seized at, 
691, 777 ; particulars of the seizure, 605 ; Westminster 
hall decides in favor of, 719 ; soundings between Eliz- 
abethtown and, 837 ; wliy the ship Hester was allowed 
to be taken from, 875 ; the chief town of East Jersey, 
961 ; lordCornbury at, 1136, 1190; the legislature to 
meet at, 1149 ; the legislature meets at, 1170, 1190, V., 
32; a Scotch ship at, IV., 1185; lieutenant-governor In- 
goldsby at, V., 84 ; efforts to procure alternate sessions 
of the legislature at Burlington and, 171 ; the sessions 
of the legislature ordered to be held alternately at Bur- 
lington and, 207, 4C1 ; Thomas Fanner collector at, 231 ; 
Mr. Swift succeeds him, ibid ; Mr. Birchfield turns out 
the collector at, 264; a Darien ship brought to, 335 ; 
reverend Mr. Haliday, missionary at, 354 ; attorney- 
general Griffith di^ at, 401 ; Thomas Gordon, repre- 
sentative of, 421 ; the legislature of New Jersey desire 
to meet at, 481 ; governor Burnet publishes his com- 
mission at, 573 ; his excellency at, 802 ; the merchants 
of, in favor of applying the interest on bills of credit 
to tlie payment of public expenses, 810 ; a return of 
negroes entered at, 814; the naval officer's accounts 
gent from, 822; George II. proclaimed at, 825, 827; 
governor Moutgomerie's commission published at. 



b55 ; governor Cosliy sworn in as go\'eruGr of New 
Jeiscv at, 949 ; the New Jersey legislature sits occasion- 
ally at, 983 ; troops to emhark for the Carthagena 
expedition at, VI., 170; a polite place and the seat 
of government, 910 ; reverend Solomon Palmer, ap- 
pointed missionary to, 910, VII., 497; trade carried 
on with the West Indies from, 226 ; governor Frank- 
lin holds a eonfi-rence'with governor Try on at, Vlll., 
349. 

Amelant, ships belonging to, captured, II., 359. 

Amelin, , mortally wounded at the battle of Sillery, X., 

1086. 

Araelot de Chaillou, M., the British ambassador has an 
interview with, IX., 1001 ; minister of foreign affair.s, 
X.,v. 

America, a Dutch company to trade in Africa and, proposed, 
I., 6, 7, 8; situation of New Netherland in, 10, 12, 
13, 27, 275 ; new lands discovered in, 11 ; bound- 
aries of the Dutch colonies in, 40 ; large luautities of 
goods shipped by the Dutch to, 63 ; the Dutch possess 
the most convenient portion of, G4 ; Hutson's river 
in, 75 ; Jacoh Elkins sought to persuade the king ot 
Great Britain that New Netherland was a part of his 
majesty's domain in, 94; order of the West India 
company in 1645 for the regulation of trade to, 223 ; 
duties on imports from, 225 ; ships sailing to the 
north part of, obliged to take passengers to New 
Netherland, 391 ; the English the first planters in 
North, 486 ; division of the boundary between the 
Dutch and English in, 539 ; limits claimed by the 
Dutch in North, 546 ; names given by the Dutch and 
English to their respective parts of, 549 ; estimated 
number of English, in 1641, in, 567, II., 150; the 
South river the finest in all North, I., 588; chevalier 
de Poincy, hereditary governor in the islands of, 
II., 24, 32, 33 ; the Dutch claim title fi-om the king of 
Spain to their possessions in, 80 ; the king of Spain 
the first finder of, 91 ; who conveyed to the Dutch all his 
lands in, 93 ; the Dutch, had as much right as any 
other nation to take possession of lands in, 94, 97 ; 
lord Baltimore petitions for an unsettled tract iu', 96, 
138 ; latitude ef New Netherland in, 133 ; the people 
of New England endeavor to drive the West India 
company from, 135 ; date of the French discoveries 
in, 139 ; the English encroach on the Dutch posses- 
sions in, 216, 229 ; limits of the commercial monopoly 
of the Dutch West India company in, 228 ; Mr. Appel- 
boom complains that the Swedes have been expelled 
from, 240 ; right of the Swedish cro%vn to Nova Suecia 
in, 241 ; demand for the restitution of the Swedish col- 
ony on the South river of Florida, in, referred, 247 ; the 
Dutch West India company demand the restitution of 
the places captured from them in, 255 ; possession taken 
by the Dutch West India company of the South river 
in, 258 ; description of the places granted to the duke 
of York in, 295 ; count d'Estrades viceroy of, 349 ; 
vindication of the title of tlie Dutch to their posses- 



-AlIEJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



27 



America — ■continued. I 

sions in, 380 ; estimated Englisli popalatien, in 1664, 
in North, 381 ; Connecticut obtains a grant of land i 
in, 389 ; orders given to the Dutch to obsei-Te the ! 
articles of peace ill, 399; the English claim the whole 1 
•of, from Virginia to Boston, 403, 481 ; colonel Nicolls t 
sent to reduce all foreigners who have settled in any I 
of the king of England's donaains in, 410 ; director i 
■Stuyvesant denies the right of the king of England 
to all parts of, 411 ; colonel Nicolls insists that the 
king of England's title is indisputable to the Dutch 
possessions in, 412; George Downing accompanies 
ills parents to, 415 ; the Dutch West India company 
granted a cliarter to plant oolonies in, 510; places 
taken from the Dntch in, 511; danger to be appre- 
hended from the English holding the entire northern 
.part of, 513; advantagestoEnglaiid of possessing, 52lj; 
lirst miuister of the reformed Dutch church in, 759 ; 
petition respecting the north parts of Virginia in. III,, 
2 ; a Dutch ship seized which is about sailing to, 12 ; 
William Clayborne licensed to trade in, 15, 16; James 
Farret, lord Sterling's agent in, 22; a committee ap- 
pointed for tJie afiiiirs of the plantations in, 30 ; privi- 
leges offered by the Dutch to settlers in, 37 ; the French 
and Dutch trade to the English plantations in, 40 ; 
latitude of New England in, 42 ; New England in, 
granted, ibid ; instructions to commissioners sent to, 
^1, 57; mentioned, 61; colonel Nicolls governor for 
the duke of York in, 67 ; New York the best of all 
the towns in, 106 ; the French march into the duke of 
York's territories in, 118, 119 ; the king of England 
grasps all, 119 ; M. de Tracy, lieutenant-general in, 122, 
126, 127, 134, 135, IX., 17; colonel Nicolls obliged to 
remainin. III., 136 ; M. de Tracy, viceroy of the islands 
of, 154; map of the northern department of, men- 
tioned, 156; colonef Lovelace arrives in, 174; John 
Evelyn appointed one of the council for the affairs of, 
192.; petition respecting whaling in, 197 ; advantages 
of New York in, 211 ; major Andros appointed a gov- 
ernor in, 215 ; foot coHipanies sent to, 219, 220, 691 ; 
the duke of York proprietor in, 221 ; appoints a col- 
lector for his territories in, 222; and conveys away 
East Jersey in, 223 ; the Eenselaers claim privileges 
in, 225 ; sir E. Andros governor in, 258,259, 266, 267, 
308, 536, 537, 543 ; the Maquaes the most warlike 
Indians of all Nortli, 260; difficulty with the Indians 
in, 275 ; John Lewen sent as the duke of York's agent 
to, 279 ; William Penn about to repair to, 290; lands 
granted to the duke of York, in, 300 ; Thomas Don- 
gan a.governor in, 328, 330, 331, 337, 369, 377; order 
to proclaim James II,, in, 360 ; accounts of all matters, 
civil and eeelesiastical, to be transmitted from, 375, 
376; a treaty of neutrality in, agreed to, 388, 505, 
506, etseq., VI., 62fl, IX., 313; pirates infest. III., 
490; treasure-trove cai-ried to, 491; M;if hew Plowman 
appointed a collector in, 501 ; order for the cessation 
of hostilities in, 504, 505 ; commissioners appointed 
to settle the boundaries between the French and 



English in, 505, 549, IV., 453, VIH., 578; their nego- 
tiations, III., 506 ; address to William and Mary from, 
583, 748 ; order to proclaim William and Mary in, 
605 ; the earl of Sterling sells his right to Long Island 
in, 606; Henry Sloughter a governor in, '623, 
petition of merchants trading to, 651 ; New York the 
centre of all the English plantations in Nortli, 652 
narrative of oppressions in, 665; a treaty concluded 
with Spain for establishing peace in, 690, IV., 290 
Jacob Leisler, lieutenant-governor of New" York in 
IIL, 737, 825 ; the memory of the French ought to be 
rooted out of, 785; occurrences in New York in, 809 
Benjamin Fletclier a governor in, 818, 827, 856, 861 
IV., 2ft, 29, 38; New York the frontier between 
the French and all parts of, 54; courts of admi' 
ralty held iii several provinces of, 112; a paper re 
lating to the jiorthern parts of, laid before the board 
of trade, 166; the French form a design against the 
English colonies in, 167, 170 ; the best mode of secur 
ing the English dominions in, 183; quota of the colo- 
nies- in {in 1695), 189; governor Hamilton points out 
the only way to root the French out of, 201 ; John 
Wilson's report on the colonies in, 206 ; the reduction 
of Canada would make the king of England emperor 
of, 224 ; reports to be made to the board of trade Ijy 
governors of the plantations in, 225 ; report of the 
lords of trade on the northern colonies in, 227 ; memo- 
rial for the defense of New York in, 244 ; four com- 
panies the only standing force in the pay of the king 
of England in, 265 ; officers of the admiralty and 
customs to be commissioned for the plantations in, 
292; William Penn's plan for a union of the colonies 
in, 296 ; information required by the board of trade 
respecting the production of naval stores in, 298 ; 
pirates encouraged and protected in, 299, 583 ; French 
encroachments in, 311, 478, 578 ; New York of great 
importance to the plantations in, 385 ; Mr. Randolph, 
surveyor-general of the customs in, 3S0 ; commission- 
ers appointed for improving the trade of the planta- 
tions in, 424; views of the lords of trade on the 
fisheries and boundaries in, 475 ; a desert country, 
covered with woods, 505; instructions concerning 
patent offices, ships of war and pirates in, 530 ; bounds 
of the English possessions in, 578 ; pirates seized in, 
to be sent for trial to England, 585, 603 ; colonel Ham- 
ilton's plan for maintaining troops in, 679 ; informal 
tion respecting the western parts of, 749 ; colonel 
Romer, chief en-gineer in, 750 ; one standard of coin 
necessary for, 757; character of the ministers whq 
come to, 766 ; lord Bacon of opinion that England can 
be furnished with naval stores from, 787 ; not bound 
by laws made in England, 930 ; orders issued for the 
security of the British plantations in, 965; regular 
packets proposed to be established between England 
and, 1030, 1031 ; attempts to regulate the currency of 
the colonies in, 1131 ; observations of the bishop of 
London regarding a suffragan bishop in, V., 29 ; the 
assemblies of, will, if not prevented, furnisli plenty 



28 



GENERAL INDEX, 



[AsrB — 



Anjcrica — cowlinued. 

of work for the board of tr»Ie, 33 ; impudent conduct 
of the governors greatly prejudicial to the public 
uervice in, 37 ^ several palatines petition to be sent to, 
44 ; secretary St. John suggests the putting all North, 
under one government, 253 ; the British parliament 
passes an a«t ait'Cting, 283 ; a bill introduced into 
parliament to raise and appropriate a revenue in one 
ef the colonies in, 285 ; the French and English can- 
not inhabit in peace the continent of, 430 ; queen 
Anne's death frnstrates the scheme of sending bish- 
»ps to, 473 -r M. de Lisle's map ef Korth, referred to, 
a 77, VI., 122; sUtc of the British plantations in 
1721, in, v., 591 ; extent of the French territories in, 
ibid ; considerations for securing and enlarging the 
English possessions in, 023 ; George Clarke desirous 
ef obtaining the appointment of stamp commissioner 
in, VI., 2G8 ^ a bil 1 introduecd into parliaaient to pre- 
vent paper inoney in, C43 ; names of the governors of 
the British colonies in, 75f!, 761 ; foundation of the Eng- 
lish title to, 885 ; troops ordered to, 915, X., 275, 728, 
925; govcmorShirley advises the imposition of duties 
en stamps in, VI. , 959 ; what number of troops is neces- 
Bary to be kept in, VII., 3, 6 ^ thoughts on the Indian 
interest of Bi'itish North, 15 ; the earl of Loudon ap- 
pointed comn&nder-in-chief in, 36 ; two battalions to 
■be sent to, and four regiments to be raised in, 40 ; ma- 
jor-general Amherst appointed commander-in-chief in , 
345 ; James I. makes grants in, 360 ; the oath of suprem- 
acy to be taken by all persons going to, 361 ; no bishop 
in England lias jurisdiction ui, 363 ; clergymen iu, on 
whom Oxford has conferred degrees, 451 ; a gentle- 
man goes to England witli design to be made first 
bishop of, 497 ; what new colonies ought to be estab- 
Kshed in, 520 ; a plan reported for the regulation of 
the new acquisitions in, 539; considerable trade car- 
ried on from Holland with, 585 : North, proposed to 
be divided into two Indian departments, 635 ; James 
Napier director-general of hospitals in North, 931 ; 
parliament passes an act imposing duties in the planta- 
tions in, 980 ; objects of colonizing the continent of, 
VIII., 27; no gunpowder to be exported from Great 
Britain to, 509 ; a naval fs>rce ordered to, 587 ; will 
never receive parliamentary taxation, 589 ; in arms 
Against Great Britain, 591 ; packet boats to, discon- 
tinued, 635 ; list of British regiments in, in 1775, 6, 
649 ; expected to return to her allegiance, 755 ; dis- 
coveries in, IX., 1, 72, 168, 266, 303-305, 701 ; extent 
of the English territory in, 165 ; encroachments of 
the English in, 265, 917; all differences to be settled 
between the French and English in, 314 ; memoir on 
the French limits in North, 377 ; French viceroys of, 
782, 783, 784, 803 ; eariy voyages to, 913, 915 ; France' 
cedes to the English all her possessions south of the 
Kennebec, in, 915 ; prospect of the French possessing 
no establishment in, X., 4; abstract of letters relating 
to exchange of prisoners in, 189 ; royal orders for the 
exchange of priBoners iji, 197, 199 ; the English ambas- 



sador :it tlie court of France complains of the French, in 
216 ; memoir on the French colonies in, 220 ; English 
designs in, 239 J commencement of the seven years' 
war in, 302", general Braddcck commander-in-chief 
in, 304 ;■ the French accused of encroaching on terri- 
tory belonging to the English in, 340 > militia not well 
disciplined in , 344 ? correspondence between the courts 
of London and Paris on the differences concerning, 
378, 387 ; France and England send troops to, 390 , 
French intelligence from, 475 ; the English min- 
istry determined to concentrate all tbeii- force in, 526 , 
almost constiuit bad faith of the English in, 632; au, 
account of the campaign of 1757, in, 640 ; British 
regiments in 1758, in, 682,756; French campaigns, 
1754-1758, in, 912 ^ number of English troops in 1768- 
in, 925 ; position of the Frensh and English in, 926 ; 
France and England struggle for the preponderance in, 
941. (See Acts, British ; United States.) 
America Septentrionalis Pars, map, I., faces title. 
American independence declared, VIII. , 682, 684. 
American manufactures encouraged, VII., 888. 
American navy. (See Navy.) 
American patriots wear only American manufactures, VII., 

888. 
" American Querist," the, Dr. Myles Cooper author of, VIII. , 

297 ; burnt by the hands of the hangman, ibid. 
American revolution, commencement of the, VIII., 571. 
Americans purchase large quantities of arms and ammu- 
nition, VIII., 510 ; will hazard everything rather thaa 
submit to parliamentary taxation, 598 ; their services 
in the French war, 616 ; are becoming soldiers, -633 ; 
defeated before Quebec, 663. 
American trade, powerful iuilueuce of merchants engaged 

in the, X., 526. 
Amerong (Amerongen), Godart Van Reederlord of, I., 117;- 

memoir of, II., 308. 
Amerongen, Godart Adriaen Van Reede, lord of, II., 516. 
Amersfoort (Amersfort ; Amesfoort , Aniesfordt ; Amesvoort), 
a Dutch village on the west end of Long island, I., 
285, 360, 476, 498, 544, 553, 565, II., 134, 136, 229, 
374, 407, 443, 463, 479, 480, 488, 573, 589, 620, 643, 
659, 673, 696 ; names of the magistrates of, 375, 
482, 577; has a fine church, 404; riotous conduct 
of captain Scott at, ibid ; number of English quar- 
tered at, 501, 502; magistrates of, sworn in, 580; 
ordered to assist in fortifying. New Orange, 586 ; popu- 
lation in 1673 of, 596 ; militia officers of, 646 ; depu- 
ties from, 702 ; names of the officers of the foot 
company of, IV., 809. (See Flatlands.) 
Amherst island, X., 350. 
Amherst, Jeffery, senior, VII., 548. 

Amherst, sir Jeffery, captain Abercrombie aid-de-camp to, 
VII. , 160 ; appointed commander-in-chief in America, 
345 ; an embargo to be declared on the requisition of, 
346, 356 ; brings reinforcements to America, 349 ; his 
instructions for the campaign of 1759, 355; colonel 
Gridley serves under, 357; informed of the disaffec- 
tion of the Senecas, 376 ; the Indiacas notified of the 



-Ams] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Amherst, sir Jeffery — continued. 

appointment of, 389 ; lieutenant-governor De Lancey 
transmits to the board of trade copy of a letter from, 
395 ; at Ticonderoga, 399 ; letters to lieutenant-gov- 
ernor De Lancey from, ibid, 400, 403 ; takes Crown- 
point, 401 ; closes the campaign, 405, 406 ; secretary 
Pitt recommends increased energy to, 417; plan of 
the next campaign transmitted to, 422 ; enjoined to 
protect the Hotel Dieu at Quebec, 425 ; agrees to the 
appointment of Mr. Shuckburgh to be secretary of In- 
dian affairs, 433 ; transmits petitions for lands, 437 ; the 
lands vaguely described in the memorials to, 445 ; Can- 
ada wholly reduced by , 447 ; in New York, 450, X.,947; 
calls for additional troops, VII., 453, 458, 461, 469; 
reduces fort Levis, 455 ; the six nations steady and 
intrepid in the expedition under, 473 ; grants, a large 
tract of land at Niagara to a trading company, 488 ; 
declares the Mohawk country perfectly secure, 491 ; 
requests that the exportation of provisions from New 
York be prohibited, 499 ; report of the board of 
trade on his grant at Niagara, 502 ; his explanation of 
that matter, 508 ; issues licenses to every one to trade 
with the Indians, 510; letters of Sir William' Johnson 
to, 510, 522, 524, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 541, 542, 
550 ; his letter on the Canestio murders, 515 ; in- 
structed to pay for damages done by the troops to the 
episcopal church at Slaten island, 518 ; dispatches 
troops to the relief of Detroit, 526 ; letter to the earl 
of Egremont from, 529 ; allowed to return to England, 
538 ; letters of, to Sir William Johnson, 545, 546, 568 ; 
thi-eatens to annihilate the Indians, 545 ; biographical 
notice of, 548 ; authorized to call out the provincials 
against the Indians, 570 ; the secretary of state com- 
municates his views on Indian affairs to, 571 ; prom- 
ises to indemnify the Indians for land occupied by 
the military, 577 ; authorizes Sir William Johnson to 
employ additional deputies, 579 ; returns to England, 
687 ; designs to establish a new colony between 
, Crownpoint and the Connecticut river, 615 ; the min- 
istry referred to, in case vigorous measures be required 
for the colonies, 774; the forty-second highlanders 
serve under, 786 ; well acquainted with New York and 
the disposition of the people, 794 , governor of Virginia, 
946 ; recommends additional new governments on 
the Mississippi, 982 ; the French abandon Crownpoint 
on the approach of, VIII., 345 ; member of the privy 
council, 417; reserves lands around Crownpoint and 
Ticonderoga for the use of those posts, 468 ; major 
Eobertson deputy quarter-master-general under, 706 ; 
governor Eobertson writes to, 790; Guy Johnson 
accompanies the expedition of, 813 ; the French 
endeavor to impede his progress, X., 833; colonel Mon- 
tresor chief engineer to, 911 ; inclined to take the field 
early, 958, 966 ; general Wolf expected to be joined 
by, 1024; offers peace to the Indians of St. Francis, 
1033 ; surprised at the weakness of Ticonderoga, 1034; 
confines his operations to lake Champlain, 1035 ; about 
to form a junction with general Mui-ray, 1064, 1102 ; 



retires from lake Champlain, 1078 ; force under the 
command of, 1090 ; letter of, to M. de Vaudreuil, 
1105; capitulation agreed to at Montreal by, 1107; 
descended the St. Lawrence to Montreal, 1121 ; cheva- 
lier de Levis declines to visit, 1123. 
Amherst, colonel William, sent with despatches from New 

York to England, VII., 399. 
Amherst [William Pitt Amherst, 2d] lord, obtains an 

annuity from the crown, VII., 548. 
I'Ami des hommes, its maxims towards colonial officers 

recommended, X., 962. 
Amircankanne, IX., 904. 
Amireaijeau, IX., 571. 

Amnesty, an, offered by M. de Vaudreuil to military desert- 
ers, X., 1074. 
d'Amoncourt. (See Barillon.) 
d'Amours, Mr. (See D' amours.) 
Ampamit, a Mohegan speaker, V., 663. 

Amsterdam (Holland), I., 4, 6, 11, 12, 15, 21, 2T, 28, 29, 30, 
38, 45, 46, 79, 83, 91, 100, 101, 102, 104, 125, 136, 
137, 138, 142, 144, 148, 157, 159, 162, 174, 217, 218, 
227, 228, 232, 237, 345, 859, 432, 434, 455, 459, 467, 
468, 514, 562, 5G7, 572, III., 7, 12, 151; two com- 
panies of merchants of, begin to trade within the 
limits of Virginia, I., 58 ; measure, ell and weight of, 
to be established in New Netherland, 154; the duties 
imposed on trade unpalatable to, 375 ; Cornelius van 
Tienhoven seduces a young woman in, 453 ; letter of 
the delegates from New Amsterdam to the burgo- 
masters of, 549 ; boys and girls sent to New Nether- 
land from the alms house of, 556 ; a pirate released 
by a magistrate of, 576, 577, 580 ; a monument erected 
to admiral de Ruyter at, 582; appoints a committee 
to inquire into the best means of improving the trade 
of New Netherland, 609 ; the West India company 
proposes to cede land on the South river to, 612 ; re- 
solves to purchase land in New Netherland, 613, 614 ; 
subscribes for the relief of the Waldenses, 617, .618 ; 
plan for the colonization of New Netherland submitted 
to the common council of, 618 ; conditions offered 
to emigrants to New Netherland by, 619,630; agree- 
ment entered into by it with the West India company 
for the establishment of a colonie in New Netherland 
referred to the assembly of the XIX., 626, 627 ; terms 
of such agreement, 629 ; agreement ratified, 637 ; fort 
Casimir conveyed to, 642 ; resolves to send farmers to 
the South river, ibid ; authorizes loans for the promo- 
tion of its colonie on the South river, 645, II., 56, 100, 
164, 165, 176, 206 ; commissions Martin Krygier to 
be captain and Alexander d'Hinojossa to be lieutenant 
of a company of soldiers in its colonie aforesaid, I., 
646 ; resolutions in regard to its colonie on the Dela- 
ware river, II., 21, 22, 56, 59, 78, 100, 116, 164, 165, 
167, 176, 200, 205, 212, 215, 245, 336, 354 ; Jan Gail- 
lardo brings to New Netherland reeommendatiqns 
from, 24, 26 ; Geurt Tyssen a prisoner at, 35 ; the 
conditions for the colonie on the Delaware modified 
by, 57 ; permits the colonists on tlie Delaware to trade? 



30 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Amstordam (HoHanil)— coji/ini/ed. 

to foreign countries, 00 ; resolves to surrender the 
colonic on tlie Delaware, 78 ; owns the colouie on the 
Delaware river, 95, 131, HI., 344 ; map of Virginia en- 
graved at, II., 93 ; account of moneys borrowed for its 
colonie on the Delaware river, lOl'; invites subscrip- 
tions to the stock of that colonie, 171 ; assists a num- 
ber of Mennonists, 176 ; the whole of Uie Delaware river 
to be surrendered to, 198, 202, 220 ; propriety of ex- 
tending the colonie on the Delaware river, referred to 
a committee of the common council of, 200 ; sends 
another sliip to the Delaware, 212 ; resolves to share 
with others the profits and risks of the trade to the 
Delaware, 215 ; is a partner in the slave trade, 222 ; 
ships sent from, to reduce New Sweden, 242; the 
burgomasters of, requested to obtain the contingent 
of Holland for the West India company and to pre- 
serve New Netherlaud, 244; resolutions of the com- 
mon council of, on apijlication for assistance against 
the English, 245 ; William Boreel first pensionary of, 
261 ; the common council of, vote the freedom of the 
city to such as have been burghers of the colonie on 
the Delaware river, 354 ; the English attempt to cap- 
ture some negroes belonging to, 411 ; the burgomas- 
ters of, to be applied to in behalf of New Netherland, 
431 ; Nicasius de Sille, the elder, moves to, 440 ; 
powder sent back to, 449 ; Jacob Benckes in the ser- 
vice of the admiralty of, 612 ; weights and measures 
of, only to be used in New Orange, G88 ; ship Jacob 
arrives from New York at, 735, 736; the loss of the 
Delaware falls on. III., 69 ; the land on the east and 
west sides of the Delaware river recovered from, 114 
assists in driving the Swedes from the Delaware, 343 
loss experienced by it on the reduction of the Dela- 
ware, 345 ; Joost StoU a native of, 632 ; price of fusils 
at, IV., 126; what Mr. Pilsworth heard concerning 
New York at, 167-171 ; a vessel arrives at New York 
_ from, 419 ; proposals for the encouragement of immi- 
gration to New York sent to, VI., 61, 90; gun 
jiowder exported to the British colonies from, VIII. 
487. 

Amsterdam, the classis of, make a representation to the as- 
sembly of the XIX. respecting the state of religion in 
New Netherland, II., 72 ; complain of the earl of 
Bellomont, IV., 490 ; the reverend Mr. Dellius pro- 
poses to interest them in his- behalf, 534. 

Amsterdam, on the island Manhattans, I., 542. (See New 
Amsterdam.) 

Amsterdam (Montgomery county, New York), IV. ,391. 

Amsterdam fajr, I., 451. 

Amyand, Claudius, under secretary of state. III., xi. 

Anabaptists, religious freedom in Rhode Island granted to, 
II., 409, 505 ; in New York, III., 262, 415, IX., 549 ; 
reverend Mr. Milborne minister to the. III., 621 ; num- 
ber of, in Pennsylvania, in 1759, VII., 407. 

Anadakariask, an Oneida chief, IV., 985. 

Anagance river (New Brunswick), X., 358. 

Anajj-aranie, an Oneida chief, IV., 897. 



[Amb— 



authorized 



quateeko, chief of the six nations, VII., 31 
to carry belts to the sis nations, 319. 
Anawacka, an Indian chief, death of, VIII., 290. 
Anaweed, a Seneca chief. III., 67. 

Ancaster [Peregrine Bertie, 3d] duke of, mfember of the 
privy council, VIII., 417. 

Ancosse, , of river Ouelle, Canada, IX., 908. 

Ancram (New York), a return of iron manufactured at, VII., 

336. 
Ancram (Scotland), Robert Livingston a native of, III., 401. 
Andaraque, a Mohawk fort. III., 135. 
Andastes, river of the, IX., 665. (See SKsquchanna.) 
Andastogue, Pennsylvania referred to under the name of, 

IX., 803. 
Audere, Peter, IV., 935, 1006. 
Anderson, Edward, IV., 936. 
Anderson, George, in the engagement at Sabbath Day point, 

X., 592. 
Anderson, Isaac, IV., 936, 1006. 

Anderson, John, recommended for a seat in the council of 
New Jersey, V., 205 ; his antecedents, 335 ; appointed 
to the council, 361. 
Anderson, John, taken prisoner at Charlestown, New Hamp- 
shire, X., 147; wounded, 155. 
Anderson, Robert, IV., 934, 1006. 

Anderson, William, one of the vestry of Trinity church, 

New York, IV., 528 ; mentioned, 624, 935, 1007, 

1138 ; sheriff of New York, recommended to governor 

Hunter, V., 406. 

d'Andigny, Hector, III., 135. 

Andover (England), honorable James Brudenell, member of 

parliament from, VI., 97. 
Andover (Massachusetts), the governor of Louisbourg a pri- 
soner at, X., 833. 
Andran, reverend father, S. J., missionary to the Abenakis, 

at the battle of lake George, X., 322. 
Andr6, major John, brigadier-general Starke member of the 

court martial on, VIII., 806. 
Andi(S, reverend father Louis, S. J., at the falls of St. M^ry, 

IX., 804. 
Andr6, Mr., lieutenant-general of the prevot^ of Quebec, 

dead, X., 153. 
Andrfie, Mr., I., 216. 

Andrews, Isabel, released from captivity, X., 882. 
Andrews, John, II., 740. 
Andrews, Mr., IV., 1114. 
Andrews, Samuel, and others, forbid to purchase lands at 

Mattinekock, II., 718. 
Andrews, reverend William, missionary to the Mohawks, 

v., 358 ; his reception by them, ibid. 
Andrews, William, a candidate for holy orders, VII., 439 ; 
missionary at Schenectady, VIII., 282; missionary to 
the Mohawks, 816. 
Andrewse, John, IV., 942. 

Andriesen (Andriesz), Jan, I., 597, 599, II., 180. 
Andriesen, Jno., IV., 940. 
Andriesen, Volkert, IV., 940. 
Andriessen, Andries, II., 179, 180, 181. 



-And] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Andriessen, Loureiis, II., 576, 720. 

Andriessen, Liiycas, II., 655, 700. 

Andriezen, Ariuan, III., 74. 

Andriezen, Lucas, III., 74. 

Andriezen, Paulus, III., 74. 

Andringa, Joris, to be commissioned governor of New Ne- 
therland, II., 531, 537. 

Andrizen, Andries, III., 74. 

Androins, M. de.s (See Desandrouins.) 

Andros, Amice, II., 740. 

Andros, Charles, II., 740, 742. 

Andros, Edmnnd, Charles II. requests that New York may 
be surrendered to, II., 544 ; the states-general order ac- 
cordingly, 545, 546, 547, 731 ; deposes governor Car- 
terett, 607 ; governor of New York, 739, III., 215, 
IX., 137 ; the Dutch burghers complain of, II., 739, 
III., 233 ; petition of the Dutch burghers of New 
York to, II., 740 ; memoir of, ibid ; complaints against, 
transmitted to the Dutch ambassadors at London, 744, 
745 ; order to pay one thousand three hundred pounds 
to. III., 214; his commissions, 215, 537; instructions 
for, 216, 543, IV., 392 ; captain of a company of foot, 
III., 219, 220, 221 ; ordered to investigate the title 
to Renselaerwyck, 225 ; to seize colonel Lovelace's 
estate, 226 ; confirms the rights and properties of 
the people of New York, 227; called on for his 
opinion of the New Y'ork tariff, 228 ; letters of the 
duke of York to, 230, 235 ; sir John Werden com- 
municates the views of the duke of York on divers 
matters to, 232, 236, 238, 245, 246 ; has a conference 
with the Mahakes at Albany, 233 ; claims all the land 
on the west side of the Connecticut river for the duke 
of York, 235 ; is instructed to use gentleness, 237 ; 
allows Bostoners to trade to Esopus and Albany, 238 ; 
forbids the sale of powder to any Indians except Mo- 
hawks, ibid ; offers to engage the Mohawks against 
king Philip, 242; permitted to return to England, 
246 ; history of his administration from 167'H677, 
254; announces his intention of going to England, 
256 ; sails from Sandyhook, 257; knighted, ibid ; his 
Information respecting New York and New England, 
ibid ; petitions the king for an investigation of the ac- 
cusations of Massachusetts against Albany, 258 ; order 
on the petition of, 259 ; answers of, respecting New Y'ork 
260 ; report of, on New England, 262, 264 ; answer of 
the agents of Massachusetts to the petition of, 266 ; or- 
der in council thereupon, 267 ; warrant to pay him one 
thousand one hundred pounds, ibid ; authorized to ap- 
pointajudge,register, &c., of admiralty, 268 ; to issue a 
patent to Rensselaerwyck, 269 ; returns to New Y'ork, 
271 ; writes to Mr. Blathwayt, 272 ; requested to prevent 
the Mohawks attacking the Connecticut Indians, 273, 
274, 275 ; his suspension of captain Billop approved, 
276 ; procures the release of some Virginia and Mary- 
land captives, 277 ; ordered to return to England, 283 ; 
to vindicate his government, 284 ; in England, 286, 
710 ; instructed to facilitate Mr. Penn's taking pos- 
session of his patent, 290 ; ordered to convey colonel 



Lovelace's garden-house to Mrs. Ogle, 291 ; case of Ja- 
cob Milborne against, 300 ; report of Mr. Lewhi on the 
government of, 302 ; answer to Mr. Lewin's report by, 
308 ; charges brought by Mr. Lewin against, 314 ; 
acquitted of those charges, 315 ; governor Dongan in- 
structed to aid in the collecting of debts due to, 341 ; 
a farm in New York leased to, 356 ; Joseph Dudley one 
of the coancil of, 364 ; Sa.muel Slirimpton, member of 
the council of, 365 ; sends some of the five nations to 
the assistance of New England, 393 ; employs captain 
Magregorie against the Indians, 395 ; quit-rents incon- 
siderable under, 401 ; obliged captain Dyer to pay in 
the receipts from the revenue weekly, 4o;i ; lollntor's 
salary in the time of, 405, 497; instrii.'lH,! (,, |,iit the 
Ranslaers in ijossessiou of Albany, 410 ; ciiibavors to 
have Connecticut annexed to New York, 415 ; gives 
orders not to suffer the French to trade at Onnyagaro, 
442 ; governor of New York, New England and the Jer- 
seys, 536, 579, IV., 213, 263, IX., 404, 415 ; governor 
Dongan ordered to resign his government to. III., 550 ; 
visits Penobscot, 551 ; regulates the government of 
New Jersey, and holds a conference with the five 
nations, 553, 554; letters to the board of trade from, 
554 ; letters to governor Denonville from, 555, 557, 
566 ; minutes of the conference with the five nations, 
557-561 ; visits Tionondoge, 559 ; the first governor 
that was called Corlaer, ibid ; letter of colonel Dongan 
to, 566 ; governor Dongan surrenders the government 
of New York to, 567, IX. , 427 ; returns overland to Bos- 
ton, III., 569 ; to be recalled, 573 ; imprisoned, 574, 578, 
610, 636, 724, IV., 200, 1152 ; Indians excited against, 
III., 575 ; the lieutenant-governor and council of New 
York write to, 576 ; takes possession of the govern- 
ment of New York, 580 ; sir William Phips declares 
him a rogue and opens his despatches, 583 ; com- 
plaints from New York against, 584, 629 ; sir William 
Phips conspires against, 587, 588 ; particulars of the 
revolution at New York transmitted to, 590 ; the lieu- 
tenant-governor and council of New Y'ork request the 
magistrates of Boston to send him' to them, 592 ; 
evil consequences of his deposition, 608 ; escapes 
from prison, but is retaken, 614, 615, 617 ; reason 
why appointed in governor Dongan's place, 621 ; 
returns to England, 633, 634, 724 ; letter of colonel 
Bayard to, 635 ; the government of New York devolved 
on lieutenant-governor Nicholson after^ 639, IV., 359 ; 
letters of Mr. Van Cortlant to, III., 649, 715 ; purcha- 
ses a lot of ground in New York, 650 ; Peter Reverdy, 
author of memoirs concerning, 651; provisions of the 
commission granted to, 654; active ccft-respondence 
between the friends of, 655 ; major Brockholes, mem- 
ber of the council under, 657 ; the military of New 
Y'ork called on to obey the officers appointed by, 
658; depositions showing that he had tamjered 
with the Indians 659 ; lieutenant-governor Leisler 
attempts to bribe a servant of, 661 ; George Fare- 
well, attorney to, 663 ; Jacob Milborne recovers dam- 
ages from, 680; Daniel Whitehead, a magistrate 



32 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[A. 



Andros, Edmund — continued. 

under, CS2 ; Albany adiieres to, 702 ; letter of Rob- 
ert Livingston to, 708; Robert Livingston applies 
for repayment of a loan to, 710; report of his 
administration, 722; conspiracy against, 723; uom- 
missions issued by, revoked, 739 ; Connecticut sub- 
mitted to, 849, 831 ; mentioned, 304, 306, 307, 351, 
41fi, 494, 581, «54, 656, 726, 769 ; offers a ransom for 
an English girl, IV., 50; sends a commissioner to con- 
sult with governor Fletcher, 56 ; sends pecuniary aid 
to New York, 73 150, 157 ; orders certain moneys to 
be paid Robert Livingston, 132 ; governor of Virginia, 
142, 190, 300 ; surrenders the fort at Boston, 211 ; 
expels M. de St. Castine from Pemaquid, 282, 47G, 
IX., 265, 380, 396, 422; the quit-rents in New York 
to be conformable to the instructions to, IV., 396; 
requested to abdicate in Boston, 426 ; sends despatches 
by way of Virginia and Barb.idoes, 432 ; grants a lease 
of the king's farm in New York, 448 ; reason why he 
lost the government of Virginia, 490; very civil to 
the Jesuit missionaries, 607 ; traveled at the king's 
charge, 796 ; Jamos Graham, attorney-general of, 847 ; 
establishes an Indian settlement at Skaelitcook, 991, 
v., 388 ; called no assembly, IV., 1155, V., 58 ; con- 
ditions attached by liim to grants of land, 369 ; con- 
firms all grants made hy his predecessors in New 
York, 496 ; alluded to, IX., 128 ; intriguing with the 
Iroquois, 129 ; governor Frontenac's complaints of, 
only a pretoxt to cover his own trade with the Indians, 
131 ; resides at Manatte, 132 ; count de Frontenac cor- 
responds with, 200; sends deputies to the governor 
of Canada, 393 ; forbids the Iroquois making peace 
with the French, 394 ; indisposed towards the French, 
397 ; breaks off negotiations between the French and 
the Iroquois, 402, 415 ; a native of the island of Jer- 
sey, 403; Edward Tyng, one of the council under, 
527-; endeavors to open a trade with the Outaouas, 
795 ; excites the Iroquois against the Canibas, 796. 

Andros, Edward, a soldier, deserts, IV., 162. 

Andros, Elizabeth, II., 742. 

Andros, John, II., 740, 742. 

Andros, Lady, II., 741; death and burial of, 742; at New 
York, III., 247 ; alluded to, IX., 1.39. 

Andros, Thomas, II., 740. 

Androscoggin (Amarascoggin) river, IX., 475 ; proclamation 
of lientenant-govemor Stonghton against the Indians 
of, 613 ; ravages committed by the Indians of, 614 ; 
falls into the Kennebec, 904. 

Androus, , wounded, X., 155. 

Anerigio, a Seneca chief, IV., 342. 

Ange gtirdicn, revefend Mr. Montignie, pastor of, IX., 684; 
the English land at, X., 997; and fortify, 998 999' 
1029, 10.30 ; evacuated, 1035. 

Angelran (Angleran ; Enjalran), reverend Jean, S. J., su- 
perior of the missions around Missilimakinac ' IX 
2S4, 293, 294, 324; wounded, 338; his character' 
ibid. ' 

d'AngerviUiers, M., minister of war, X., vu. 



Anglesey [Arthur Annesley, 3d], earl of, president of the 
council, III., 49 ; member of the privy council, 166. 
(See Annisley.) 

Anglionby, William, under-secretary of state. III., xi. 

Angola, the Dutch vice-admiral sails to, I., 34 ; slops des- 
tined for, 35 ; unprovided with what it requires for 
trade, 142 ; negroes introduced into Brazil from, 157; 
three ships to be sent to, 158 ; names of the Dutch 
vessels employed on the coast of, 164 ; private inhabi- 
tants of New Netherland allowed to trade to, 215 ; 
returns expected from, 217 ; trade to, temporarily 
thrown open, 220; duties on goods imported into 
Brazil from, 230 ; the decline of the West India com- 
pany's affairs owing to bad management in Brazil 
and, 235 ; the Portuguese unite with the Blackamoors 
to drive the Dutch from, 236 ; opening of the slave 
trade at, recommended, 244; mentioned, II., 442, 504. 

Angoulesme, IV., 210. 

Auholt, island of, vice-admiral Gerritseu wrecked on the, 
IL, 236. 

Anian (Angan ; -A.ins), straits of, II., 22S, IX., 789. 

Anias, a Mohawk, gets drunk with a son of Johannes Lydius, 
VII., 174. 

Animals in New Netherland, I., 14, 180; names of, 277, 
278; around lake Ontario, IX., 218 ; domestic, at fort 
Duquesne, X., 300. 

Anindamoaken (Anindamooky), a Delaware chief, left as a 
hostage with Sir William Johnsoa, VII., 725 ; signs 
a treaty of peace with the whites, 741. (See Long 
Coat.) 

Anioton, a Huron chief, X., 150. 

Anistaringquist, an Onondaga Indian, IV., 695. 

Anitsoondi, an Oneida sachem, IV., 728. 

Anjou, Philip duke of, goes to Madrid, X., 941. 

Anmen, Jeremiah, X., 881. 

Annadagarriax, the Indian name of lieutenant-governor 
Nicholson, V., 269, 270, 272, 278. (See Indian 
language.) 

Annaddion, a Seneca sachem, III., 774. 

Annagogar, an Onondaga chief, IV., 342. 

Aunandale [William Johnstone, 1st], marquis of, one of the 
privy council, V., 412. 

Annanhac (Annehac), a Seneca chief killed at MissOimaki- 
nac, IX., 176, 177, 179, 180, 186 ; his death acciden- 
tal, 188. 

Annapolis (Maryland), governor Nicholson sworn in at, IV., 
300 ; a large magazine at, V., 606 ; colonel Spottswood 
ill at, VI., 162 ; governor Shirley about to meet gene- 
ral Braddock at, 942 ; news of major Grant's defeat 
near fort Duquesne received at, X., 902. 

Annapolis (Nova Scotia), formerly Port Royal, IV., 211 ; the 
name of Port Royal changed to, V., 244; colonel Vetch 
governor of, 257, IX. , 858, 859 ; sir Charles Hobby, to 
be deputy-governor of, V., 257; only two or three 
English families in Nova Scotia exclusive of the garri- 
son of, 592 ; the only fortified place in Nova Scotia, 594 ; 
strength of the garrison of, 623 ; mentioned, 958, 962 ; 
the French driven from, VI., 318; lieutenant-governor 
Mascarene writes to the governor of Canada from, 479 ; 



-Aks] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Annapolis (Nova Scotia) — continued. 

the Indians called on to make their submission at, 480 ; 
jjeace made with the Indians at, 481 ; a number of 
English surprised and killed outside, 482; colonel 
Mascarene, governor of, 540; X., 190 ; the French ex- 
tend their limits to, yi., 825, 945 ; quantity of arms 
at, 957 ; lieutenant-colonel Monckton, lieutenant- 
governor of, VIII., 250; Edward Tyng, governor of, 
IX., 527; the French meditate an attack on, 1107; 
reverend Mr. de la Loutre heads an attack against, 
X., 11 ; church at, rebuilt, 17; captain Rous at, 60 ; 
the garrison of Grandpre sent to, 78 ; colonel Gorham 
stationed at, 90 ; commodore Knowles at, 114. (See 
Port Royal, N. S.) 

Annaqxiaris, a Seneca sachem, IV., 898. 

Anne of Denmark, II., 741. 

Anne, queen, accession of, II., 562, 564; confers the govern- 
ment of Guernsey on sir Edmund Andros, 742 ; the 
duke of Queensbury, secretary of state to, III., v ; 
secretaries of state under, viii ; members of the board 
of trade under, xv ; to be proclaimed in the colonies, 
IV., 948 ; proclaimed in New York, 960 ; and in New 
Jersey, 961 ; her accession announced to the five na- 
tions, 982, 984 (it's), who congratulate lord Cornbury 
on her accession, 986 ; the legislature of New York 
vote addresses to, 1005 ; at liberty to grant away the 
three lower counties on the Delaware, 1165 ; a salute 
flred in New York on the anniversary of the accession 
of, 1166 ; petition of the reverend Mr. Kocherthal to, 
v., 62; her letter directing an expedition against 
Canada, 70 ; sends medals to the five nations, 222, 
225 ; death of, 380 ; appoints Robert Hunter governor 
of New York, 391 ; the Indians condole the death of, 
438, 440 ; her death frustrates the scheme of sending 
bishops to America, 473 ; NewYork neutral in the war 
of, 732; VI., 207, 371, 399, 438; Zenger, the printer, 
one of the Palatines sent to New York by, 80 ; lord 
Cornbury, governor of New York under, 460 ; Incorpo- 
rates the society for propagating christian knowledge, 
VII., 566; Kayaderosseras purchased in the reign 
of, 576 ; the French change their policy towards the 
five nations of Indians in the time of, 714 ; not recog- 
nized by France, IX., 809, 811; obtains supplies for 
the Canada expedition, 835 ; Iroquois ambassadors visit, 
983, 1030 ; the French ridicule that embassy, 983. 

Annehac. (See Annanhac.) 

Annesley, Arthur, member of the council for foreign planta- 
tions, III., xiu, 31, 33, 37; and of the privy coun- 
cil, 30. (See Anglesey.) 

Anneville, fief of, II., 742. 

Annexation, of divers colonies to New York, recommended, 
III., 391, 392,420,422, 423, 429, IV., 20 9, 261 ; of 
New York and New Jersey to New England, III., 537 ; 
of Massachusetts and New York, reasons in favor 
of, IV., 715 ; a report made to the house of commons 
thereon, 854 ; early plan of colonial, 874 ; of New Jer- 
sey to New York, rumored, 914 ; of North Carolina 
to Virginia, suggested, V., 609 ; of the country be- 

5 



tween lake Champlain and Connecticut river to New- 
York, alluded to, VII., 807. 

Annis, Wm., IV., 941. 

Anniversaries observed in New York, IV., 515, 1166. 

Annonhouaraton, an Onondaga chief, III., 121. 

Annsbury (Annsberry ), a palatine town, V., 212, 213 ; num- 
ber of palatines in, 515. 

Annual elections, in New England the bridle of their great 
men, L, 266; inconveniences arising from, VII., 
225 ; parliaments, motion for, neg.itived, 868. 

Anobskaheiks, a Seneca chief. III,, 322. 

Anoetsendie, a Mohawk warrior. III., 802. 

Anondareerha, a Seneca chief, III., 774. 

Anont, the island of, II., 236. 

Anooware, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 660. 

Anowarre, an Oneida Indian, III., 532. 

Anse aux barraques, X., 455. 

Anse aux cabanes, where, X., 441, 459. 

Anse aux feuilles, on lake Erie, colonel Bradstreet treats 
with Indians at, VII., 686, 687. 

Anse des meres, the English land at, X., 1003, 1010, 1132; 
a French man-of-war wrecked at, 1129. 

Anson, admiral, X., 147. 

Anstach, John Conrad Weiser a magistrate of, V,, 575. 

Anstruther [Robert], colonel of the 58th foot, X., 682. 

Anstruther, captain William, notice of, VIII., 311. 

Answer of the English government, denying the validity of 
the Dutch title to New Netherland, I., 57; of the 
West India company to the claims of the patroons of 
New Netherland, 89 ; of Cornelis van Tienhoven to 
the appeal of Cornelis Melyn, 325 ; to the remon- 
strance from New Netherland, 388, 422 ; to the pro- 
posal submitted to the people by director Kieft, 415 ; 
of Juan Gaillardo to the resolution of the director 
and council of New Netherland, II., 29 ; of the West 
India company to lord Baltimore's protest, 120 ; of 
the king of England to the memorial presented by 
the Dutch ambassador (points of), 261 ; to the me- 
morial of sir George Downing, reported, 307 ; ap- 
proved and sent to the Dutch ambassadors at foreign 
courts, 308 ; printed, 309 ; of the king of England to 
the French mediators, respecting the diff'erences be- 
tween England and the United Provinces, 346, 355 ; 
of ex-director Stuyvesant to the observations of the 
West India company, 427 ; to the petition from New- 
England, III., 90; to several queries relating to the 
territories of the duke of York, in America, 188 ; of 
sir Edmund Andros to'the inquiries respecting New 
York and New England, 260, 262 ; of Massachusetts 
to the petition of sir E. Andros, 266 ; ' of governor 
Andros to the complaint of Jacob Milborn, 300 ; of 
governor Dongan to the heads of inquiry about New 
York, 389 ; of governor Dongan to memorial of Mr. 
Santen, 493 ; of Mr. Santen to articles against him, 
495 ; to the memorial presented by captain Benjamin 
Blagge, 763 ; of governor Fletcher to the complaints 
against him, IV., 178, 443 ; of the five nations to the 
comraissioners for Indian affairs. 



of Mr. Atwood 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[ Ans- 



Answer — conlintied. 

to lord Cornbury's reasons for suspending him, 1022! 
of Mr. Champaul(5 to Mr. Montague's memorial against 
Tacating the extravagant grants, V., 7; of trigadier 
Hunter to certain queries relating to New York, ad- 
dressed to the lords of trade, 555 ; of president Clarke 
to queries of tlia board of trade, VI., 120 ; of snrveyor- 
general Coldcu to those queries, 121 ; of the com- 
missioners of Indian affairs to the same, 126 ; of tlie 
collector of the port of New York to those queries, 
127, 393 ; of Mr. Colden to the representation of the 
council against him, 331 ; to the representation of 
the assembly of New York, presented to governor 
Clinton, 3G5 ; of governor Clinton to queries of the 
board of trade, 507 ; of lieutenant-governor Colden 
to the committee of New Y'ork, VIII., 586; of gov- 
ernor Tryou to the address from the corporation of 
New York, 595 ; of M. de Longueuil to the message 
of the White River Indians, IX., 707 ; of the French 
to the memoir of his Britannic majesty, respec-ting 
fort Niagara, 980; to the earl of Waldegrave's note, 
1062; of M. de Beauharnois to the Indians, 1073, 
1079, 1082, 1088, 1091 ; of M. de Vaudreuil to the 
five nations, X., 361 ; of M. de Vaudreuil to M. de 
Montcalm's memoir on Carillon, 873. 

Antelby, William, III., 652. 

Anthony, AUard, refuses to collate papers in Cornells 
Melyn'scase, I.,454; notice of, II., 43; burgomaster, 
152; signs the remonstrance of New Netherland, 
249 ; sent to Holland to request assistance against the 
English, 435 ; mentioned, 464 ; admitted attorney and 
notary, G71 ; his oath of office, 677 ; swears allegiance 
to the English, III., 74. 

Anthony, the Frenchman, III., 480. (See Lespinard.) 

Anthony, John, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601. 

Anthony, Nicolaes, I., 527. 

Anthony, Theophilus, member of the general committee of 
New York, VIII., 601. 

Anthonys (Antonis), Christian, II., 480, 4S1. 

Anthony's nose (lake George), X., 601. 

Antichrist, Canada alluded to as, and its downfall prognos- 
ticated, III., 698. 

Anticosti (Antecosta), island of, in possession of the 
French, IV., 790; two frigates seen off, IX., 622; 
granted to Louis Joliet, 668 ; a ship wrecked on, X., 
121. 

Antigua (Antego, Antegoa), the Dutch sell horses at, I., 455, 
503; John Bunckley, governor of, III., 45; referred 
to, 573, IV., 552, 1145 ; imports into New Y'ork from, 
V , 57, 686 ; number of vessels cleared, 1714-1717, 
from Great Britain for, C15 ; value of imports and 
exports of, 616 ; a slaver bound to New York touches 
at, 927; church of England established in, VII., 
365, 367; the French reduce, IX., 167; reinforce- 
ments sent to Cape Breton from, X., 4; belongs to 
the English, 6; admiral Townsend at, 46; commo- 
dore Lee returns from, 104. 



Anti-leislerians hold a convention in Albany, VI., 153; Rip 
Van Dam joins the, ibid. 

Antill, Edward, gives information in support of charges 
against sir Edmund Andros, III., 314, 315 ; governor 
Dongan denies being in copartnership with, 407, 408, 
493 ; sues Mr. Santen for slander, 413 ; a lawyer, 
IV., 556, 812. 

Antill, John, marries Margaret Colden, VIII., 221. 

Antilles, M. de Tracy sent to Canada from the, IX., 25. 
(See West Indies.) 

Anti-rent riots, early, VII., 206, 833, 838, 849. 

Anti-sabbatarians in New York, III., 415. 

Antonio, a Spanish negro, sold in New Netherland, II., 31. 

Antonio, Nicolas, IV., 27. 

Autonisen, Claes, II., 105, 179, 180. 

Antwerp, Cornells Melyn, a native of, I., 349 ; customs of, 
alluded to, II., 55 ; referred to, 180 

Anuchrakechty, chief at Caghnawaga, New York, VI., 796. 

d'Anville, M., erects a trading post at the head of lake On- 
tario, v., 589. 

d'Anville (Enville), N. de la Rochefoucauld, duke, his 
squadron scattered, VI., 887; sent to Nova Scotia, 
944; arrangements for the troops in the fleet of, X., 
27 ; the English not in a position to resist, 31 ; sails 
from France, 64; expected in Acadia, 71, 72; bio- 
graphical notice of, 73; arrives at Chibouctou, 74 ; 
some of his fleet captured, 94 ; several of his ships 
return to France, 107 ; the marquis de la Jonquifire 
accompanies, 250; his fleet unfortunate, 387. 

Aontgesachton, a Seneca chief. III., 774. 

Aorage (a place), IV., 1164. 

Aothdarises, a Seneca chief, IV., 342. 

Aouischik, a Nipissing chief, accidentally kills the French 
engineer at the siege of Oswego, X., 560. 

Apalachies (Apalachy, Apalatch^, Apalichian), mountains, 
where, IV., 1089, VI., 122; the Cherokees inhabit 
the, v., 611 ; referred to, VI., 888, 955 ; proposed as 
a boundary between the French and the English colo- 
nies, X., 1138. 

Apalachicolas (Palachakolas), on the Savannah river, the 
French formerly settled at, V., 625. 

Apaquois, meaning of, IX., 887; the Illinois cover their 
cabins with, 890. 

Apell, John, IV., 26. 

Aplin [John], treated with contempt by Dr. Mayhew, VII., 
537; Dr. Seeker knows nothing of, 566; a lawyer, 
591 ; his pamphlet sent to Dr. Seeker, ibid. 

Apolatche, bay of, V., 625. 

Apontigoumy, an Outawa village, attacked by Senecas, IX., 

Appeals, lie to the director and council of New Netherland 
from the courts of the patroons, I., 87, 122, 404; 
allowed to Messrs. Cuyter and Melyn, 249; mandamus 
in a case of, 250, 351 ; in what cases provided in New 
England, 266 ; cannot lie from a judgment of the 
director and council of New Netherland, 306, 334, 
423 ; director Stuyvesant threatens to put to death 
any one who should sue out, 310 ; director Stuyvesant 



—Apt] 



G-ENERAL INDEX. 



85 



Appeals — continued. 

served with a writ of, 353 ; answer to tlie writ of, 
354; returns to the writ of, 355, 356, 357; in what 
eases allowed, 391 ; allowed from a judgment of the 
director and council of New Netherland, 417; pro- 
hibited in certain cases in Rensselaerwyck, 427, 525 ; 
demanded from a judgment pronounced in New Neth- 
erland, 527 ; granted, 528 ; from judgments pro- 
nounced in New Netherland, declared illegal, 534, 
535 ; further proceedings on the subject of, 536, 537, 
670 ; from the court at the South river, allowed, 621, 
632; at the Delaware, limits of, II., 62; modification 
of, suggested, 166 ; from the Delaware to New Am- 
sterdam considered onerous, 167; extension of, 168, 
174, 202, 203, 204, 205; further proposals on the 
subject of, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210 ; right of, preserved 
by the grant to the duke of York, 296 ; cannot be 
allowed from a judgment pronounced in New Nether- 
land, 515, 517 ; from the courts of patroons provided 
for, 556 ; in New Netherland, provided for, 620, 621 ; 
when allowed from judgments of the courts of Wil- 
lemstadt, Rensselaerswyck and Schaneghtade, 653, 
€54; from the court of Huntington, in what cases 
allowed, 661 ; from the court of New Orange, lie to 
the governor-general and council of New Netherland, 
679 ; a writ of, 686 ; from town courts lie to district 
courts, 704 ; granted, 707, 714, 724, 726 ; Massachu- 
setts opposed to, III., 87; the king's commissioners 
aot as a court of, 107 ; which is considered a breach 
of the privileges of Massachusetts, 111 ; provisions for, 
260, 379, 389, 539, 625, 688, 829, 857, IV., 269, V., 
137; from the plantations lie to the king in council, 
III., 301; from the mayor's court of New York to the 
king in council, 366; in New York, in 1696, IV., 
186 ; from a judgment of the governor and council of 
New York to England, refused, 550, 556 ; grounds for 
the refusal, 550 ; from the governor and council of a 
colony lies only to the king, 622, 636 ; this rule vio- 
lated by the earl of Bellomont, 623 ; lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Nanfan censured for refusing, 634 ; Mr. Penn's 
suggestions regarding, 757; refused in New Hamp- 
shire, 796; and in Massachusetts, ibid, 854; compo- 
sition of the New York court of, 828 ; mode of 
proceedings in, ibid ; order of the queen in council ad- 
mitting colonel Bayard's, 961 ; of the Mohegan Indi- 
ans against the colony of Connecticut, order thereon 
1176 ; the society for propagating the gospel ask an 
alteration in the law of, in cases wherein the church 
of England is concerned, V., 345; order in council 
thereupon, 352; Mr. Mulford's case before the lords 
for hearing, 503 ; instruction in regard to, 816 ; issu- 
ing of execution to be suspended imtil the final de^ 
termination of, 817; provided for clergymen of the 
church of England in the colonies, 852 ; not alio 
from judgments of justices of the peace in small 
causes, VII., 406 ; the first instance of, from the com- 
mon law courts In New York, 676 ; why New York 
lawyers are opposed to, 677 ; controversy in New York 



in regard to, 679, 681, 695, 701, 703; resolution of 
the council respecting, 696 ; further information on 
the subject of, 706 ; a pamphlet published in New 
York on the question of, 710 ; report of the board of 
trade whereby cases of error only are open to, 762 ; 
instructions relative to, 764 ; from a verdict of a 
jury declared to be a ruinous innovation, 793; diifer- 
ences on the subject of, 797, 833 ; lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Ck)lden vindicates his course in regard to, 803 ; 
controversy regarding, terminated, 814 ; report of 
the attorney and solicitor-generals of England on, 
815. 

, Harold, Swedish ambassador at the Hague, 
complains of the expulsion of the Swedes from the 
South river of Florida, I., 615 ; memorial of, referred, 
616 ; resolution of the states of Holland on the me- 
morial of, ibid ; a communication on the subject of 
the elucidation of the treaty of Elbing from, 11., 238 ; 
resolution thereon, 239 ; demands restitution of New 
Sweden and satisfaction for the damages sufl'ered by 
the Swedish company, 240, 241 ; memorial of, re- 
ferred, 242, 246, 247; the West India company 
answers the complaints of, 258 ; resident at the 
Hague, 260. 
Appelgadt, Bartholemew, allowed to purchase lands from 
the Nevesing Indians, II., 694; a caveat entered 
against, 706. 
Appelgadt (Appelgate), Thomas, 11., 694, 706. 
Appell, Arien, III., 74. 

Appleby, lieutenant-general Stanwix member of parliament 

for, VII., 280 ; John Robinson represents, VIII., 432. 

Apples in large quantities near Detroit, IX., 886. (See Fruit.) 

Appleton, captain, expelled the legislature of Massachusetts, 

III., 160. 
Appletown, New York, VIII., 786. 
Appletreewick, II., 741. 
Appomatox (Apomatock), III., 193, 197. 
Appoqniminy (Apoquemans, Apoquenamin 
nink), Andreas Hudde dies at, I., 81; 
Maryland to, II., 211 ; mentioned, 605 
Henderson missionary at, V., 321; 
Reading missionary at, VII., 413. 
Appropriations for the support of the government of New 
York, a bill granting, lost, V., 184; annual, 368, 379, 
460, 466 ; controlled by the assembly, 546 ; powers 
assumed by the New York assembly in regard to the 
bill for granting, VI., 141 ; period for which granted, 
615. {See Acts, New York.) 
Ajjpy, John, judge advocate in America, VIII., 189 ; secre- 
tary of general Abercromby, X., 773 ; and of general 
Amherst, 1120. 
Apsley, sir Allen, treasurer to the duke of York, III., 214, 

246, 267, 268, 291, 292. 
Apsley, sir Peter, III., 267, 268. 
Apthorp, Charles, a merchant of Boston, VII., 375. 
Apthorp, Charles Ward, appointed member of the council 
of New York, VII., 623 ; lieutenant-governor Coldeu 
refuses to admit him to a seat, 628 ; one of governor 



113B152 



is, Apoquimi- 
distance from 

; reverend Mr. 
reverend Mr. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Aft- 



Apthorp, Charles Ward — continued. 

Moore's couucil, 7G3 ; membor of governor Tryon's 
council, VIII., 685 ; to make his case known to sir 
Henry Clinton, 765. 

Apthorp, reverend East, recommended to the archbishop of 
Canterbury, VII., 374; biogi-aphical sketch of, 375; 
treated with respect at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
404 ; uuffilling to leave Cambridge, 425 ; opinion 
entertained by the bishop of Norwich of, 518 ; Dr. 
Johnson's opinion of, 536; declines answering Dr. 
Mayhew, 591. 

Apnleiau mountains, journal of a new discovery behind the, 
III., 193. 

Aquahoorn, a Delaware suchem, I., 596. 

Aquarage, a place near Niagara, III., 442. 

Aquedagoe, a Mohawk sachem, IV., 728. 

Aqueeudera (Aquadarando, Aquadarondes, Aqueenderande, 
Aqueendere, Aqueendero, Aqueenderonde, Kaqueeu- 
daronda), chief sachem of Onoudage, IV., 62, 86, 569, 
597, 657, 658, 660, 693, 695, 696 ; condoled on the 
occasion of his son's death, 571 ; his son poisoned, 
689 ; obliged to fly from Onondaga to Albany, ibid. ; 
alias Sadegenohty, speaker of the five nations, 716 ; 
or Sadegenaktie, 729 ; asks for a protestant minister, 
730. (See Sadaganachtie.) 

Arabian gold current in New York, IV., 469, 480; value of 
a piece of, 469. (See Gold.) 

Arackkonickko, an Oneida sachem, IV., 897. 

Aradgi, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 658, 660, 661, 998; a 
great favorite of the French, 694. 

Aragiske, the Indian name of Virginia, III., 417. 

Arajungas, a Seneca, delivered up to sir WUliam Johnson 
as a hostage, VII., 622. 

Arasick, the West India company proposes to reserve, I., 96. 

Arbitrators on the boundary between New Netherland and 
New England, decision of the, I., 460. 

Arbour, , a resident of Gasp6, X., 104. 

Arbre croche, what Indians are settled at, VII., 561, IX., 
1098 ; where, 1072. 

Arbres mataches (Lake George), X., 601. 

Arbuthnot, admiral Harriot, on the North American station, 
VIII., 766 ; requested to give encouragement to priva- 
teers, 772 ; biographical notice of, 773 ; encoui-ages 
privateers, 778 ; mentioned, 791 ; at New York, 811. 

Archer, John, surrenders the right to nominate magistrates 
in Fordham, II., 625 ; estate of, ordered to be seized, 
708 ; demands the Fordliam town books, 721 ; pro- 
prietor of Fordham, III., 303 ; quit-rents of, accounted 
for, 309. 

Archipelago (Archeppela), the, where, I., 415, 545. (See Nor- 
walk Islands.) 

Architecture, the academy of, founded, II., 348. 

Archives. (See Records.) 

d'Arenes, lieutenant, distinguishes himself, X., 693 ; wound- 
ed, 723, 846; his arm amputated, 751, 799. 

Arenoc, IX., 783. (See Oronoco.) 

Arensen, Cornells, I., 194. 

Arensius, reverend Bernardus, III., 415. 



Arents, Fredrick, II., 249, III., 74. 

Arentsp, Claes, II., 578, 702, 729. 

Arentse, Cornells, cuts out two English ships, II., 733, 734, 

Arentsen, Isaac, III., 744. 

Arentsz, Lucas, I., 159. 

Arepesfe, captain, killed at Ticonderoga, X , 751. 

Aresum, Thomas, IV., 1006. 

Arforder, Thomas, e.xchanged, X., 881. 

Argal, sir Samuel, and others, remonstrate against the set- 
tlement of the Dutch in New Netherland, I., 58; 
complained of by the French ambassador. III., 1; 
order in council on complaints against, ibid ; answer 
of the council of Virginia thereto, 2 ; preparing to 
settle on Mauhata river, 17 ; formerly governor of 
Virginia, ibid. 

d'Argenson, Marc PieiTe de Voyer, count, minis-ter of war, 
X., vii ; the reduction of Louisbourg announced to, 
2 ; biographical notice of, 29 ; extract from his des- 
patch, 30 ; informed of the expedition against Crown 
Point, 313 ; the defeat of baron de Dieskau com- 
municated to, 316, 353, 355 ; report from the army in 
Canada sent to, 347, 368 ; return of the French loss 
at Lake George sent to, 360 ; further reports of 
Braddock and Dieskau's defeats sent to, 365 ; marquis 
de Vaudreuil writes to, 375 ; baron de Dieskau sends 
his aid de camp to, 387 ; notifies M. de Vaudreuil of 
the appointment of a successor to M. de Dieskau, 392 ; 
announces the appointment of major-general Montcalm 
to command the army in Canada, 393 ; promises to 
recommend chevalier de Montreuil, 394 ; sends M. 
de Montcalm his commission, 395 ; M. de Montcalm 
reports his arrival in Canada to, 399 ; letter of the 
marquis de Vaudreuil to, 411 ; the state of the army 
In Canada, and its operations reported to, 413, 420, 
421, 432, 487, 488, 490, 547, 550, 563, 565, 567 ; let- 
ters of baron de Dieskau to, 422, 537 ; the reduction 
of Oswego reported to, 461, 471 ; appoints his nephew 
commissary-general, 535 ; his resignation accepted, 
536 ; a friend of the marquis de Montcalm, 698 ; M. 
de Montcalm attached to, 638 ; mentioned, 652 ; pro- 
mised to appoint M. de Levis mareclial des camps, 
689 ; furnished M. Doreil with a cypher, 768 ; selected 
M. Doreil to be commissary-general to the army in 
Canada, 828. 

d'Argenson, MarcR6n6 de Voyer de Paulmy, marquis, min- 
ister of justice, X., v; controller-general, vii. 

d'Argenson, Pierre de Voyer, viscount, governor of Canada, 
IX., vii, 783 ; baron d'Avaugour succeeds, 17 ; sends 
reverend father Dablon to Hudson's bay, 268. 

d'Argenson, Voyer de Paulmy, marquis, minister of foreign 
affairs, X., vi. 

I'Argenterie, captain, dead, X., 73. 

d'Argenteuil, lieutenant, IX., 562; sent to Micliilimakinac, 
569, 648, 676 ; subject to the orders of the commandant 
of Miehilimakinak, 625 ; several Frenchmen accom- 



pany him from the west against the Ononda 



gas. 



brother-in-law of M. de Ramezay, 847; arrives at 
Montreal, 848 ; dead, 855. 



— Arm] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



37 



Arguments of council foi- and against the New York acts 
regulating the Indian trade, V., 746-756. 

Argyle [Archibald Campbell, 9th earl of], unfortunate in his 
invasion of Scotland, III., 408. 

Argyle, John, 4th duke of, VIIL, 174. 

Argyleshire, men of, serve against the rebels in Scotland, 
VII., 630; lord William Campbell elected to repre- 
sent, VIIL, 174. 

Argyn, I., 158, 243. 

Aria, a Mohawk captain, on a war excursion to Virginia, V., 
493 ; a party to the deed for the Mohawk flatts, VI. , 15, 
16 ; burns the deed for lands at fort Hunter, VIIL, 306. 

Arianism, in New England, VI., 913. 

Arianzen, Jan, III., 74. 

Arickwawaga, the Indian name of Mr. William Bull, com- 
missioner from South Carolina, VI., 719, 724. (See 
Indian Language.) 

Arigera, a Cayuga sachem, IV., 986. 

Arighwadaga, a Seneca chief, delivered as a hostage to the 
English, VII., 652. 

Aringhtatchade, a Huron chief, VII., 651. 

Arissen, Cornelis, declaration of, as to a conversation with 
director Eieft, I., 195. 

Arissmith, Edmond, IV., 942. 

Arissmith, John, IV., 942. 

Aristides lays down the necessity of mutual concession, I., 
208. 

Arlington [Henry Bennett, 1st], earl of, memoir of, II., 346 ; 
invites Mr. Van Gogh to Salisbury, 357 ; Mr. Van 
G-ogh has an audience with, 359 ; promises to furnish 
the name of the person who is to receive New Nether- 
land, 567; principal secretary of state, III., vii, 138, 
156, 168, 175, 193, 203, 204, 211 ; governor NicoUs 
reports the condition of his government to, 103, 113, 
115, 167; Mr. Maverick's petition stolen from the 
ofice of, 136 ; letters of governor Winthi-op to, 137, 
154 ; Mr. Maverick's letter to the lord chancellor to 
be delivered to, 161 ; letter of Mr. Maverick to, 173 ; 
indisposed, 174 ; member of the privy council, 177, 
320, 360 ; advised of the incursion of the Dutch into 
James river, 204, and of the loss of New York, 205 ; 
member of the council of trade, 213. (See Bennet, sir 
Henry.) 

d'ArmenonvUle, Fleurieau, minister of justice, X., v; of 
foreign affairs, ibid ; of marine and colonies, vi ; min- 
ister of war, ibid. 

Armenverius, a district on the Schuylkil, I., 593. 

Armer, Anne, released from captivity, X., 882. 

Armonck, I., 366. 

Arms, Daniel, VII., 903. 

Arms, Eliakim, VII., 903. 

Arms, John, VII., 903. 

Arms, Susamiah, VII., 903. 

Arms, William, VII., 903. 

Arms, heraldic, of the Andros family, II., 740. 

of the duke of York set up in the castles of the five 
nations. III., 363 ; set up at St. George's river, IX., 
878, 895. 



Arms of England, set up in the Iroquois country, V., 248, 
275, 314, 367, 382; the meaning of such proceed- 
ing, 249 ; cannot defend the five nations, against 
the French, 275 ; a sign of sovereignty, 276. 
of France, set up in the Indian country, IX., 67, 
784, 785, 787, 790, 791, 795 ; the Iroquois pull 
them down, 67 ; set up at the Hudson's bay, 304 ; 
and at the falls of St. Mary, 304, 804 ; the Akau- 
sas otfer sacrifice to the, 799 ; set up at St. George's 
river, 878, 895. 
Armstrong, colonel [John], VII., 280 ; at Shippensburgh, 281. 
Armstrong, Elizabeth, taken prisoner, VIL, 382. 
Armstrong, Mr. (royal engineers), his report on the state 
of the fortifications of New York transmitted to Eng- 
land, VL, 552; his neglect complained of, 553. 
Armstrong, Robert, naval officer of New Hamirshire, IV.,* 

664, 794. 
Armstrong, Robert, captain in Shirley's regiment, X., 282. 
Army (American), two thousand five iiundred men encamped 
at Greenwich, Connecticut, VIIL, 582; George Wash- 
ington appointed commander-in-chief of the, 589 ; why 
ordered to New York, 590 ; Philip Schuyler, major- 
general in, ibid; Mr. Lee, major-general in, ibid, 
729 ; Horatio Gates, adjutant-general of, 590 ; rein- 
forcements sent to Boston to the, 597; strength of 
the, on lakes George and Champlain, ibid ; invades 
Canada, 636 ; defeated before Quebec, 663, 679 ; gen- 
eral Lee of, taken prisoner, 677 ; three companies 
raised in Suffolk county for the, 693 ; carries off the 
Hessian brigade at Trenton, 694; a large party of 
the, at Kingsbridge, 696 ; defeated at Oriskany, 721 ; 
Virginia raises six battalions for, 729 ; description of 
men composing the, 730 ; strength of the, at various 
dates, 730, 782, 787, 793, 800, 805, 811 ; old-country- 
men, the main stay of, 756; defeated at Savannah, 780; 
distribution of, in 1780, 782 ; discontent in the, 784 ; 
in Sullivan's campaign against the New York Indians, 
785 ; sufters from desertion, ibid ; major-general Rob- 
ertson pays a compliment to the, 794 ; composition of 
the, 805 ; names of the northern brigades of the, 806 ; 
Ebenezer Learned, James Clinton and John Starke, 
brigadier-generals in, ibid ; New Jersey brigade of, 
revolts, 810 ; congress satisfies it and the Pennsylva- 
nia line, ibid. 
Regiments, continental: 

The Canadian battalion incorporated, VIIL, 662. 
2d Canadian, or the Congress' Own, Moses Hazen colo- 
nel of, VIIL, 777. 
Connecticut, plunder the ordnance stores in New York, 
Via., 600. 
Huntington's brigade, VIIL, 806. 
Parson's brigade, VIIL, 806. 
Waterbury's, escort general Lee, VIIL, 667. 
Maryland rifles, march to Boston, VIIL, 597. 
Massachusetts, Crane's artillery, VIIL, 785, 7S6. 
Glover's brigade, VIIL, 806. 
Learned's brigade, VIIL, 806. 
Nixon's brigade, VHI., 806. 



88 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Akm- 



Army (American) — continued. 
Regiments, continental : 

New Hampshire, Poor's brigade, VIII., 806. 
New Jersey, Maxwell's, VIII., 730 ; services of his brig- 
ade, 784, 7S5 ; attacked, 793 ; the colonel resigns on 
account of the mutinous spirit of his officers, 807. 
Dayton's brigade, VIII., 806. 
New York, Lamb's artillery, VIII., 785 ; mainly Yorkers, 
786 ; captain Wool commands a company in, ibid. 
1st New York, Alexander McDougal, colonel of, VIII., 
213 ; marches to Albany, 604 ; ordered to Ticonde- 
roga, 605. 
3d New York, James Clinton, colonel of, VIII., 806. 
Clinton's brigade, its services, VIII., 785, 806. 
Pennsylvania, Crawford's, services of, VIII., 464. 
Hand's rifles, services of, VIII., 712. 
Muhlenburg's, raised, VIII., 730. 
Pennsvlvania line, congress satisfies the, VIII., 810. 
1st, or Proctor's regiment of artillery, VIII., 784. 
Thompson's rifles, march to Boston, VIII., 597; au- 
thorized to be raised, 677. 
Rhode Island, Green's brigade, VIII., 806. 
Virginia, Frcy's, VIII., 730. 
Harrison's artillery, VIII., 785. 
1st Virginia, George Weeden colonel of, VIII., 730. 
3d Virginia, colonel Charles Scott commands, VIII., 

730. 
8th Virginia, services of, VIII., 731, 733. 
12th Virginia, colonel James Wood commands, VIII., 

729. 
13th Vii-ginia, in Pennsylvania, VIII., 732. 
Smith's, marches against the western Indians, VIII., 

728, 729. 
Stephen's, raised, VIII., 730. 
Bowyer's rifles, service of, VIII., 729. 
Dark's rifles, services of, VIII., 731, 732, 733. 
Morgan's rifles, harass the forces under general Howe, 
VIII., 731. 
(Provincials), assist at the reduction of New Netherland, 
III., 372, 445; to serve in the Canada expedition of 
1711, v., 257 ; serve in the expedition against Port 
Royal, 259 ; called to serve in the Carthagena expedi- 
tion, VI., 162; their pay, 164, 165 ; serve against Car- 
thagena, 166, 170, 171, 185, 187, 197, 212; their 
officers appointed in the colonies, 183 ; proposed to 
be raised for service on the lakes, 184 ; successful at 
Carthagena, 188 ; recruits sent to the West Indies 
from New Y'ork, 212, 215 ; called on to enlist m an 
expedition against Canada, 314, 316, 317, 340, 652, 
678; mutiny at Albany among the, 343, 351; gov- 
ernor Shirley's and general Phillips' regiments to be 
completed from the, 385 ; ordered to be disbanded, 
396, 414, 418 ; orders respecting the new levies near 
Albany, 397; Maryland and Virginia troops sent to 
Albany, 655 ; number of, raised in 1746 for the ex- 
pedition against Crownpoint, 657 ; called out at the 
commencement of the French war, 915 ; to assist in 



recovering Nova Scotia, 921 ; number of, with general 
Braddock, 943 ; number of, sent against Crown Point, 
955, 989, X., 366 ; New England regiments proceed to 
Nova Scotia, VI., 956, 958 ; coloneljohnson appointed 
major-general in tlie, 963 ; additional troops raised to 
reinforce general Johnson, 1003; names of the regi- 
ments in the battle of lake George, 1006, 1007 ; regi- 
ments of, ordered raised, VII., 36, 40, 76, 216, 340, 
351, 452, 481, 483 ; number of, at fort William Henry 
in 1756, 122; ordered on the expedition against 
Canada, 357; Richard Gridley, colonel iu the, ibid; 
Louisbourgh to be garrisoned by, 358 ; at the siege of 
Niagara, 395, 402, VIII., 702; the oflicers of, propose 
to settle the wild lands, VII., 428; decision thereupon, 
429 ; on their march to Albany, 430 ; the colonels of 
the, apply for lands near lake Champlain, 445, 510 
voted by New Y'ork to continue the war, 461, 462, 465 
lands petitioned for, by oflicers and men of, 491, 609 
colonel Stephen advances to the frontiers with a body 
of Virginia, 546 ; general Amherst authorized to call 
them out against the Indians, 570 ; raised for service 
against the Indians, 586, 627; New York companies 
posted in the Mohawk country, 610 ; at the German 
flats, 611 ; in the expedition against Havana, X., 333. 
Regiments, provincial : 
Carolina, in major Grant's expedition against fort Du- 

quesne, X., 902. 
Connecticut, raised for the expedition against Ticou- 
deroga, VII., 343; ordered to proceed to Otter 
creek, X., 909. 
1st (or Lyman's) at the battle of lake George, VI. , 1006. 
2d (or Whiting's) in the Canada expedition of 1711, 
v., 254; ordered to march, 259; at the battle of 
lake George, VI., 1007. 
Fitch's, ordered to Albany, IV., 193; loss in, at the 
battle of lake George, VI., 1007; names of officers 
killed or wounded at Ticonderoga, belonging to, X., 
732. 
Johnson's, ordered to Albany, IV., 193. 
Worster's, names of the officers killed or wounded at 
Ticonderoga, belonging to, X., 732. 
Maine, Pepperell's Y'ork, John Bradstreet, lieutenant- 
colonel of, VIII., 379. 
Waldo's, at the siege of Louisbourg, X., 92. 
Maryland, in major Grant's expedition against fort Du- 

quesne, X., 902; in garrison at Pittsbui-g, 905. 
Massachusetts, raised for the expedition against Ticon- 
deroga, VII., 343; four at the reduction of Port 
Roj-al, IX., 928; one surrenders at fort William 
Henry, X., 622. 
1st (or Ruggles') its loss at the battle of lake George, 

VL, 1006. 
2d (or Titcomb's) its loss at the battle of lake George, 

VI., 1006. 
3d (or Williams') its loss at the battle of lake George, 
VI. , 1006 ; in the expedition against fort Fronteuao, 
X., 827. 



— ^Arm] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



39 



Army (American) — continued. 
Regiments, provincial : 
Mas 



Bagley's, names of the officers killed or wounded at 
Ticonderoga, belonging to, X., 732. 

Gridley's, in the expedition against Crown Point, 
VII., 49, 357. 

Nalton's, major George Lee appointed lieutenant-colo- 
nel in, for the Canada expedition of 1711, V., 2.58. 

Partridge's, names of the officers killed and wounded 
at Ticonderoga, belonging to, X., 732. 

Preble's, names of the officers killed or wounded at 
Ticonderoga, belonging to, X., 731. 

Eoberton's, in the Canada expedition of 1711, V., 259. 

Whitcomb's, at the surrender of Montreal, X., 713. 

Willard's, in the campaigns of 1759-1760, X., 713, 
732. 
New Hampshire, one of the regiments belonging to, 
taken prisoners at fort William Henry, X., 625. 

Blanchard's, raised, VI. , 1000, 1001, 1003 ; at the battle 
of lake George, 1007, 1008. 

Goife's, in the expedition against Montreal, X., 713. 

Rangers ordered to Number four, X., 909. 
New Jersey, Parker's, a detachment of, defeated at Sab- 
bath Day point, X., 591, 647, 734; names of the 
killed and missing belonging to, 592; surrenders 
at fort William Henry, 624. 

Schuyler's, VI., 349, X., 776, 882; raised for the 
expedition against Crown Point, VI., 954; ordered 
against Niagara, 955 ; arrives at Schenectady, 956 ; 
surrenders at Oswego, VII., 127, X., 443, 479, 917; 
its colors hung up in a church in Canada, 461, 
918 ; at the siege of Niagara, 984. 

Johnston's, names of officers killed or wounded at 
Ticonderoga belonging to, X. , 732 ; at the north end 
of lake George, 734 ; in the expedition against fort 
Frontenac, 827. 
New York, ordered to accompany governor Fletcher 
to the frontier, IV., 14; a troop of horse raised 
in, 1058 ; forces raised for the Carthagena ex- 
pedition, VI., 166, 170, 185, 187; for the Canada 
expedition, 314 ; colonel Roberts commander of 
the levies of, 314, 334 ; additional companies or- 
dered to be raised, 650, 677, 680, 989 ; William 
Johnson, appointed colonel of the levies of, 686 ; 
officers of, killed at the battle of Lake George, 1005 ; 
a regiment raised for the expedition against Crown 
Point, VII., 203, 343; where posted, 204; at the 
siege of Niagara, 395, 402, VIII., 295, 702, X., 
984; governor Tryon reviews three of the, VIII., 
303 ; at Annapolis, Nova Scotia, IX., 929 ; in the 
affair at Sabbath Day point, X., 593 ; at the surren- 
der of fort William Henry, 624 ; land at the outlet 
of lake George, 734. 

City, accompanies governor Fletcher to Albany, IV., 
14; organized, VIII., 342; names of the companies 
and their officers, 601. {See Trainbands.) 



De Lancey's, organized, VII., 343; names of the 
officers killed and wounded at Ticonderoga belong- 
ing to, X., 731 ; in the expedition against fort Fron- 
tenac, 827. 
Douty's, in the expedition against fort Frontenac, 

X., 827. 
Fusileers, in garrison at Schenectady and the Half- 
moon, III., 784 ; additional men raised, 813 ; guard 
the frontiers, IV., 119 ; provision made for their 
maintenance, 1004, 1061. (See Ads, Neiv Tork.) 
Lashier's, organized, VIII., 342; names of the officers 

of, 601. 
Schuyler's, in the Canada expedition of 1711, V., 254. 
WoodhuU's, or 3d New York, at the reduction of 
Montreal, VIII., 295. 
Pennsylvania, mutinies at Albany, VI., 375; names 
of the captains of, 376. 
Clapham's, VII., 196; garrison Pittsburg, X., 905. 
Rhode Island, Babcock's, names of the officers killed 
or wounded at Ticonderoga belonging to, X., 731 ; 
in the expedition against fort Frontenac, 827. 
Cranston's, in the Canada expedition of 1711, V., 258, 

260. 
Harris', at the battle of lake George, VI., 1007; in 
the expedition against Montreal, X., 713. 
Rangers, captain Staats commands a company of, VI., 
365 ; New York assembly makes provision for a 
corps of, 622, 623, 669 ; commissions ordered for 
officers of, 650 ; additional companies authorized, 
VII., 275, 336, 357, 423; John Starke, captain of, 
806; qualification and pay of, VIII., 722; in fort 
William Henry, at its surrender, X., 624; ordered 
to Otter creek, 909. 
Goreham's, in Nova Scotia, VI., 458. 
McCurdie's, at the reduction of Louisbourg, VIII., 

777. 
Rogers', in the expedition against Montreal, X., 713. 

(See Rogers, Robert.) 
Stephen's, at the battle of Monongahela, VIII., 730. 
Virginia, defeat the Indians at the Kanhawa, VIII., 
209; in the expedition against fort Duquesne, X., 
902; garrison Pittsburg, 905. 
Frey's, serve under colonel Washington, VIII., 730. 
Stephen's, serve against the western Indians, VII., 
646, VIII., 730. 
Army (British), strength of the force sent to reduce New Neth- 
erland, II., 372 ; the men called red coats. III., 708, IV., 
875 ; two companies ofgrenadiers arrive at Boston, 119; 
governor Fletcher vetoes a bill to prevent the desertion 
of soldiers, 426 ; pay of private soldiers in America, 437, 
502, 588, 783, 928 ; grants of land in America recom- 
mended to be made to officers and soldiers, 504, 553, 
704 ; the New York companies paid from debentures 
on the forfeited estates in Ireland, 631, 772; colonel 
Hamilton's plan for supporting soldiers in America, 
679 ; recruits arrive in New York, 760 ; thirty per 



40 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Arji- 



Army (British) — continued. 

ct-nt struck off tlii- pay of the military in the colonics, 
ibid ; regulars not conversant with bush lighting, 875 ; 
suggestions respecting the reinforcing the troops in 
the colonies, 1069 ; four companies in New York, 
1137, 1139, 1150 (see New York Independent Compa- 
niet, infra.) ; five regiments ordered to reduce Quebec, 
v., 73, IX., 833; force destined against Canada, V., 
73, 254, 258, IX., 835, 838; names of the regiments 
wrecked in that e.\pedition, V., 277 ; tliirty sergeants 
commissioned as lieutenants and sent to New York, 
451, 455 ; four regiments recommended to be sent 
to Nova Scotia, 593, 621; four regiments recom- 
mended to be sent to Carolina, 611, 625 ; an expe- 
dition organized against the Spaniards, VI., 162; 
two regiments ordered to America, 915, 921, X., 275, 
278, 280 ; artillery in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia 
placed at the disposal of general Braddock, VI., 922; 
a regiment required for New York, 925 ; in America 
to be increased, 934 ; number of men under general 
Braddock, 953, X., 381; marches for Wills creek, 
VI., 954; defeated under general Braddock, 992, X., 
304, 382 ; number of troops necessary to be kept in 
America, VII., 6 ; a regiment recommended to be 
raised for gaiTisoning certain forts in the province of 
New Y'ork, 27 ; additional forces ordered for America, 
36, 40, 75, 216, VIII., 260, X., 526, 885; a bill 
passed in the New York assembly for providing 
quarters for, VII., 163 ; strength of the, in America, 
in 1758, 355, X., 682, 697, 756, 761, 824, 925 ; in 
1759, 960, 995; officers and soldiers obtain grants of 
land in the province of New York, VII., 588 ; strength 
of, in the southern colonies in 1764, 618 ; the frontier 
men of Pennsylvania attack a party of regular troops, 
746 ; an act passed for quartering troops in the colo- 
nies, 758 ; the assembly of New Y'ork vote money for 
the support of his majesty's troops, VIII., 198 ; ex- 
citement in consequence, 199 ; collisions between the 
citizens of New York and the troops, 208 ; not to be 
called out in aid of the civil power except in cases of 
absolute necessity, 399 ; four battalions ordered to 
New York, 588, 590; regiments in America in 1775, 
1776, 649 ; number of regulars in the province of New 
York in 1734, IX., 1040 ; number of troops embarked, 
in 1746, for Lonisbourg, X., 31; two thousand regu- 
lars said to have arrived at New York, 42 ; regulars 
sent from Gibraltar to Lonisbourg, 57 ; strength of the, 
under the command of lord Loudon, 479 ; lord Ligo- 
nier commander-in-chief of, 705 ; list of officers killed 
and wounded at Ticonderoga, 728 ; number of men in 
the expedition against Ticonderoga, 735, 757, 761, 
789, 800, 809, 814; strength of the detachment sent 
against fort Frontenac, 827 ; force sent to reduce fort 
Duquesne, 818 ; force sent against Louisbourg, 834 ; 
force sent against Quebec, 995. 
Convention, governor Robertson communicates to lord 

George Germain some correspondence respecting 

the, VIII., 788. 



Regiments, British : 
Regiment of horse, princess Anne of Denmark's, sir 

Edmund Andros, colonel of, II., 741. 
1st troop of life guards, lord Delaware serves in, VI., 

163 ; lord Dover, colonel of, VIII., 406. 
2d life guards, lord Amherst, colonel of, VII., 548. 
Horse guards (blue), lieutenant-colonel Robert, for- 
merly a cornet in, VI., 314 ; the duke of Richmond, 

colonel of, VII., 868 ; sir John Ligonier, colonel of, 

X., 705. 
3d carabineers, lord George Sackville, colonel of, 

VIII., 648. 
4th horse, sir John Mordaunt, colonel of, X., 705. 
1st dragoon guards, lord Lincoln, captain in, VIII., 

795. 
2d dragoon guards, lord George Sackville, colonel of, 

VIII., 648 ; sir John Ligonier, colonel of, X., 705. 
5th dragoons, general York, colonel of, VIII., 406. 
6th dragoons, serve in Germany, VIII., 742. 
9th dragoons, sir William Erskine, captain in, VIII., 

713. 
2d light dragoons, sir Jolm Mordaunt, colonel of, X., 

705. 
7th light dragoons, sir Henry Clinton, colonel of, 

VIII., 717. 
10th light di'agoons, sir John Mordaunt, colonel of, X., 

705. 
12th light dragoons,- lord George Sackville, colonel of, 

VIII., 648. 
14th light dragoons, lieutenant-general Webb, colonel 

of, X., 574. 
15th light dragoons serve in Germany, VIII., 713. 
16th light dragoons, in America, VIII., 649. 
17th light dragoons, general Gage, colonel of, VIII., 

247 ; on Long Island, 295 ; in America, 649 ; lord 

Lincoln, colonel of, 795. 
18th light dragoons, John Hale, lieutenant-colonel of, 
■ VIII., 590. 
19th light dragoons, sir William Howe, colonel of, 

VIII., 751. 
1st foot guards, Joseph York, lieiitenant in, VIII., 

405; Henry Clinton, captain in, 717; governor 

Tryon desires to sell his company in, 734; lord 

Lincoln, captain in, 795 ; William Tryon, captain in, 

798 ; lord Ligonier, colonel of, X., 705 ; William 

Hervey, captain in, 989. 
2d (Coldstream) guards, Robert Orme, lieutenant in, 

VI., 990; Joseph Y'orke enters the, VIII., 405; 

Henry Clinton, lieutenant in, 717 ; Edward Mathew, 

ensign in, 799 ; the earl of Albemarle, captain in, 

X., 217, and colonel of, ibid ; Edward Braddock, 

ensign in, 304 ; Daniel Webb, ensign in, 574. 
3d foot guards, earl of Loudon, colonel of, VII., 36; 

John Prideaux, captain in, 399 ; lord Adam Gordon, 

captain in, 767. 
1st royals, James Abercrombie, lieutenant-colonel of, 

VII., 345; James Dalyell, captain in, 547; lord 



-AemJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



41 



Army (British) — continued. 
Regiments — 

Adam Gordon, colonel of, 767; Adolpli Benzel, 
lieutenant in, VIII., 140 ; serves in America, 755, 
X., 682; in the expedition against Montreal, 713. 

3d buffs, Ralph Burton, colonel of, VII., 93 ; sir 
JefTery Amherst, colonel of, 548. 

4th foot, in the Canada expedition of 1711, V., 277 ; 
Josiah Martin, ensign in, VIII., 279; in Amer- 
ica, 649 ; Harry Blunt, lieutenant-colonel of, 684. 

5th foot, in America, VIII., 649 ; lord Rawdon, lieu- 
tenant in, 734. 

6th foot, In America, VIII., 649. 

7th fusileers, John Caldwell, captain in, VIII., 509 ; 
in America, 649 ; in Canada, 659 ; Richard Prescott, 
lieutenant-colonel of, ibid. 

8th foot, lieutenant-general Stanwix, colonel of, VII., 
280; at Niagara, VIII., 496, 649, 724; its services 
in America of, 509, 720; lieutenant-general Webb, 
colonel of, X., 574. 

9th foot, Richard Worge, lieutenant-colonel of, VII., 
622; Joseph Yorke, colonel of, VIII., 406 ; serves 
in America, 724; Alexander Baillie, captain in, X., 
731. 

10th foot, in America, VIII., 415, 649, X., 729. 

11th foot, James Grant, colonel of, X., 903. 

12th foot, Henry Clinton, colonel of, VIII., 717; lord 
Lincoln, ensign in, 795 ; lord Cornwallis, lieuten- 
ant-colonel of, 808 ; major-general Napier, colonel 
of, X., 312. 

13th foot, general Murray, colonel of, X., 1075. 

14th foot in America, VIII., 649 ; Edward Braddock, 
colonel of, X., 304. 

15th foot, Jeffery Amherst, colonel of, VII., 548; 
serves in America, VIII., 598, 649 ; in the Martinique 
expedition, 706 ; lord Rawdon, ensign in, 734 ; 
Robert Stobo, captain in, X., 1025 ; honorable James 
Murray, lieutenant-colonel of, 1075. 

16th foot, Andrew Hamilton, lieutenant in, VIII., 51 ; 
liberty pole in New York cut down by some soldiers 
of, 219 ; in America, 649, 706. 

17th foot, James Forbes, colonel of, VII., 344; ensign 
Harrison of, killed, 401 ; number of effectives in 
New York, 526 ; Thomas Morris, captain in, 660 ; 
in the expedition against the western Indians, ibid; 
honorable John Vaughan, captain in, 749 ; serves 
In America, 863; VIII., 649, 665, X., 682, 713; 
a detachment of, stationed at Michilimakinac, VII., 
872; Richard Shuckburgh, surgeon of, VIII., 244; 
Robert Monckton, colonel of, 250; major-gener.il 
Montgomery, originally an officer in, 665 ; John 
Campbell, major of, X., 728 ; William Ridge,. captain 
in, 731. 

18th foot, Thomas Dunbar, colonel of, VI., 915 ; Mr. 
Hopkins of, enters the French service, VII., 994; 
John Wilkins, lieutenant-colonel of, VIII., 185 ; 
Benjamin Chapman obtains a commission in, 482 ; 
stationed in New York, 482, 511, 544, 572 ; many 

6 



of the men desert, 582, 683 ; In' America, 712 ; sir 
John Mordaunt, colonel of, X., 705. 

19th foot, Robert Farmer, captain in, VII., 816 ; David 
Grame, colonel of, 890; services of, VIII., 705. 

20th foot, lord Fitzmaurice an officer in, VIII., 73; 
lord George Sackville, colonel of, 648. 

21st foot, in America, VIII., 588 ; Alexander Baillie, 
lieutenant in, X., 731 ; general Murray, colonel of, 
1075. 

22d foot, James Abercrombie, lieutenant-colonel of, 
VII., 160 ; at New Orleans on its way to the Illinois, 
619; Thomas Gage, colonel of, VIII., 247; in 
America, 649. 

23d foot, in America, VIII., 649, 733; services of, 
684 ; honorable William Howe, colonel of the, 751. 

24th foot, Thomas Wenthworth, colonel of, VI., 182. 

26th foot, lord Adam Gordon, colonel of the, VII., 
767 ; taken prisoners during the American revolu- 
tion, VIII., 311; in America, 649; besieged at St. 
Johns, 661 ; sir William Erskine, colonel of, 713. 

27th foot, sir William Blakeney, colonel of, VI., 170, 
X., 682; JohnBeckwith, lieutenant-colonel of, VII., 
58; serves in America, VIII., 415, 649, X., 682; 
the earl of Moira, colonel of, VIII., 734; sir John 
Dalling, major of, 794 ; two officers of, surrender 
themselves prisoners of war, X., 697, 838 ; William 
Haviland, lieutenant-colonel of, 713 ; march on 
Montreal, ibid ; names of the officers of, killed at 
the battle of Ticonderoga, 728 ; at Ticonderoga, 789. 

28th foot, at Louisbourg, VII., 355 ; Philip Bragg, colo- 
nel of, ibid; ordered to Quebec, 358 ; called out to 
quell land riots in the province of New York, 833, 
845, 910; services of, 846; misunderstandings be- 
tween the citizens of New York and the, 867 ; New- 
York repays advances made by the officers of , 1006 ; a 
liberty pole in New York cut down by some soldiers 
of, VIII., 219; in America, 649, X., 682; Barry 
St. Leger, ensign in, VIII., 714. 

29th foot, William Try on, colonel of, VIII., 796 ; the 
earl of Albemarle, colonel of, X., 217. 

30th foot, earl of Loudon, colonel of, VII., 36. 

31st foot, in New York, VIII., 221 ; returns to Europe, 
755. 

32d foot, Isaac Barrfi, lieutenant in, X., 1027. 

33d foot, the duke of Richmond, lieutenant-colonel of, 
VII., 868; in America, VIII., 649; Richard Pres- 
cott, major of, 659 ; lord Cornwallis, colonel of, 808. 

34th foot, in the expedition against Havana and in 
Louisiana, VII., 816; serves in America, VIII., 
714 ; in the expedition against fort Stanwix, 720. 

35th foot, Robert Orme, ensign in, VI., 990; Roger 
Morris purchases a majority in, VIII., 590 ; quar- 
tered at Halifax, Nova Scotia, ibid ; in America, 
649, X., 682; George Monroe, lieutenant-colonel of, 
603 ; strength of, at the surrender of fort William 
Henry, 621; captain Andrew Simpson exchanges 
into, 730 ; William Forbes, major of, ibid ; formerly 
Otway'B, 782. 



42 



GENERAL IXDEX. 



[Aem- 



Army {BrH\ih}—c<mlinued. 
Regimeuts — 

30th fool, Staats Long Morris, cajitain in, VIII., 1S7 ; 
iu Jamaica, 795. 

37tli foot, in America, VIII., 649. 

38th foot, in America, VIII., 9C, G49. 

40th foot (or general Phillips'), to be completed out of 
American levies, VI., 3S5 ; in America, VIII., 649, 
X., 682 ; James Grant, lieutenant-colonel of, 903. 

42d royal highlanders, James Abercrombie, captain 
in, VII., 160 ; at Ticonderoga, 236 ; Gordon Gra- 
)iam, lieutenant-colonel of, ibid ; to be stationed at 
Detroit, .547; George Campbell, lieutenant in, 630; 
ft detachment of, takes possession of fort Chartres, 
786 ; its services, ibid, VIII., 312, 588, 649, 682 ; 
Norman MacLeod commissioned in, VII., 854, VIII., 
228; James Eddington, an officer in, VII., 904; 
land granted to soldiers in, 905 ; Richard N. Col- 
den receives a commission in, VIII., 511 ; stationed 
in Pennsylvania, ibid ; John Small receives a com- 
mission in, 588 ; Patrick (afterwards lieutenant- 
general) Sinolah- enters the, 598 ; serves at Gauda- 
loupe, ibid, and in America, 649, X.,682; at Albany, 
566 ; names of the officers who were killed or 
wounded at Ticonderoga, 728 ; at fort Stanwix, 827. 

43d foot, land granted to soldiers of, VII., 904; in 
America, VIII., 649, X., 682; at the siege of Ha- 
vana, VIII., 794; in the battle of Long Island, X., 
730. 

44th foot, ordered to America, VI., 915 ; an Irish regi- 
ment, 942 ; arrives in Virginia, 950 ; on their march 
to Wills creek, 954; John Beckwith, c.iptain in, 
VII., 58; James Pottiuger, lieutenant in, ibid; 
Charles Lee and Quinton Kennedy, officers of, ibid ; 
an Indian killed at Schenectady by the officers and 
soldiers of, 178, 278 ; James Abercromby succeeds 
colonel Ellison as colonel of, 345, X., 773; at the 
siege of Niagara, VII., 395, 402, VIII., 702, X., 984 ; 
William Eyre, lieutenant-colonel of, VII., 647 X. 
545, 729 ; land granted to soldiers of, VII., 904 ; iu 
the expedition under general Braddock, VIII., 247 
X., 366, 729, 989 ; in America, VIII., 649, X.,'682i 
Moses Hazen, lieutenant in, VIII., 777; at Albany, 
X., 506; at the battle of Ticonderoga, 726, 989; 
names of the officers who were killed or wounded 
at Ticonderoga, 729 ; William Ridge, captain in, 731. 

45th foot, in America, VIII., C49, X., 682; William 
Haviland, colonel of, 714 ; John TuUikins, lieuten- 
ant-colonel of, 730. 

46th foot, at the siege of Niagara, VII. ,395, 402, VIII., 
702; stationed at Niagara, VII., 547; William 
Browning, lieutenant-colonel of, 653; honorable 
John Vaughan, colonel of, 749 ; served in the West 
Indies, ibid ; difficulties occur between the citizens 
of New York and, 867; suppresses riots in tiie 
county of Albany, 910 ; New York votes money to 
repay the officers of, 1006; Francis Legge, major 
of, VUI., 4Q1 ; in America, 649, X., 682 ; honora^ 



ble William Howe, colonel of, VIII., 751 ; John 
Young, lieutenant-colonel of, X., 614; names of 
the officers who were killed or wounded at Ticon- 
deroga, 730; at Ticonderog.T, 789. 

47th foot, all the clothing and baggage of, taken by a 
French privateer, VII., 352 ; John Cruikshanks, en- 
sign in, VIII., 206 ; at the siege of Quebec, ibid ; 
at New York, 379 ; Roger Morris, lieutenant-colonel 
of, 590; in America, 649, X., 682; sir John Mor- 
daunt, colonel of, 705 ; John Spital, lieutenant-colo- 
nel of, 741 ; Mr. Nesbitt succeeds lieutenant-colonel 
Spital in, ibid. 

48th foot, ordered to America, VI., 915 ; an Irish re- 
giment, 942 ; arrives iu Virginia, 950 ; on their 
march to Will's creek, 954 ; John Dunbar, lieuten- 
ant iir, VII., 58; Ralph Burton, lieutenant-colonel 
of, 93; John Montresor, lieutenant in, 533; James 
Campbell, lieutenant iu the, 631 ; land granted to 
a soldier of, 902; Henry Gladwin, lieutenant in, 
9G1; Roger Morris, captain in, VIII., 590; at the 
siege of Louisbovirg, 714 ; Patrick Tonj'n, colonel 
of, 742; at fort Edward, X., 566; brigadier-general 
Webb, commands, 574; in America, 682. 

49th foot, lieutenant-general Stanwix, colonel of, VII., 
280 ; commanded by colonel Grsern-^^ 890 ; Thomas 
Etherington, an officer in, 904; in America, VIII., 
649. 

50th foot (or Shirley's), to be completed from American 
levies, VI., 385 ; ordered to be raised, 915 ; detailed 
for service against Niagara, 942, 954 ; all raw troops, 
943; on the march, 956; a great number of Irish 
papists in, VII., 87; French deserters received in, 
123 ; information furnished by some Frenchmen he- 
longing to, 126; notice of, X., 282; names of 
officers on the half pay of, ibid ; strength of, 366 ; 
prisoners of war at Oswego, 443, 461, 479, 917; 
colors of, hung up in a church in Canada, 461, 918. 

50th foot (re-established), James Abercromby, colonel 
of, VII., 345; Richard Prescott, lieutenant-colonel 
of, VIII., 659 ; John Dalling, lieutenant-colonel of, 
795. 

51st foot (or Pepperell's), ordered to be embodied, 
VI., 915 ; raw troops, 943; ordered to the Niagara 
frontier, 954 ; on the march, 956 ; French Indians 
capture men belonging to, VII., 74; Irish papists 
in, 87 ; French deserters received in, 123 ; Andrew 
de la Cour, lieutenant in, 127 ; notice of captain 
Williams of, 151 ; strength of, X., 366 ; prisoners of 
war at Oswego, 443, 461, 479, 917; its colors hung 
up in a church in Canada, 461, 918. 

51st foot (reorganized), lord Colville serves in, VII., 
806 ; generiil Napier, colonel of, 312 ; in Minorca, 
714, 730. 

52d foot, in America, VIII., 649. 

54th foot, iu Am&ica, VIII., 649. 

55th foot, John Priileaux, colonel of, VII., 399; sta- 
tioned in western New York, 533 ; at Detroit, 547 ; 
land granted to a soldier of, 903; John Wilkins, 



— AasiJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Army {British)— continued. 
Regiments — 

•appointed captain In, VIII., 1S5 ; in America, 649, 
X., G82; James Robertson, lieutenant-colonel of, 
VIII., 706; William Eyre, lieutenant-colonel of, 
X., 545, 729 ; names of tbe officers wlio were killed 
or wounded at Ticonderoga, 730 ; lord Howe, 
•colonel of, 735.; at Ticonderoga, 789; James Grant, 
-colonel of, 903; in the revolutionary war in 
America, ibid. 

56th foot, Henry Pringlo, major of, X., 714. 

■57th foot, in America, VIII., 649 ; John C.ampbell, 
colonel of, X., 728. 

■5Sth foot, serves in America, VIII., 751, X., 682; at 
Gibraltar, 730. 

-30th foot (royal Amei-ioans}, earl of Loudoun, colonel 
of, VII., 36; quartered in New York, 204; John 
Rutherford, major in, 205 ; James Stanwix, colonel 
commandant of the first battalion of, 280 ; James 
Abercrombj', colonel of, 345 ; Henry Bouqiiet, lieu- 
tenant-colonel of, 352 ; a part of, in the expedition 
against Niagara, 395 ; Frederick Haldimand, colonel 
commandant of, ibid ; fifty foreign officers commis- 
sioned in, 463; lieutenant Dow of, wounded at 
Bushy run, 546 ; James Dalyell, lieutenant in, 547 ; 
Jefl'ery Amherst, colonel of, 548 ; three companies 
of, in Carolina and Georgia, 619, VIII., 33 ; Donald 
Campbell, an officer in, VII., 630, 963; Bernard 
Ratzer, lieutenant in, stationed at Niagara, 653 ; a 
company of, ordered from Crownpoint to New 
York, 759 ; land granted to an officer and soldiers 
of, 903, 905; a portion of, at Michilimakinac, 992; 
in the West Indies, ibid, VIII., 795 ; Fransis P.istei , 
lieutenant in, at Johnson Hall, 51; John Wilkius, 
appointed major in, 185; Robert Monckton, colonel 
in, 250; John Bradstreet, captain in, 379; at the 
siege of Quebec, 466, X., 1001; noti-ee of captain 
Nordberg of, VIII., 597; two companies of, at the 
siege of Niagara, 702, X., 979, 984; James Robert- 
son, colonel commanding, VIII., 706 ; John Dalling, 
colonel commandant of the third battalion of, 795 ; 
Daniel Glaus, captain in, 815 ; Charles Laurence, 
colonel commandant of, X., 282,954; at the siege 
of Lonisbonrg, 614 ; a detachment of, taken prison- 
ers at fort William Henry, 624 ; in America, 682 ; 
William Haviland, colonel of the fourth battalion 
of, 714 ; at the battle of Ticonderoga, 726, 730, 789 ; 
names of the officers of, killed or wounded at Ticon- 
deroga, 730, 731 ; viscount Howe commands, 735 ; a 
detachment of, at Fort Stanwix, 827 ; James Prevost, 
colonel commandant of the second battalion of, 
897; some of the, in major Grant's expedition 
against fort Duquesne, 902 ; honorable James Mur- 
ray, colonel commandant of the first battalion of, 
1075. 
61st foot, Andrew de la Gour, lieutenant-colonel of, 
VII., 127 ; Staats Long Morris, colonel of, VIII., 187. 



62d (or Montgomery's) highlanders, organized, VIII.., 
563; its number changed, ibid; serves in Americi, 
X., 682. (See llth.] 

62d foot, general Mathew, colonel of, VIII., 799; 
serves in the revolutionary war, ibid. 

63d (or B'razer's) highlanders, in America, X., 682. 
(See 78(A.) 

63d foot, in America, VIII., 649-; lord Rawdon, a 
captain in, 734. 

64th foot, in America, VIIT., 149, 649. 

65th foot, in" America, VIII., 649. 

66th fool, lord Adam Gordon, colonel of, VIJ., 767. 

69th foot, Gavin Cochrane, major of, X., 730. 

70th foot, governor Tryon, colonel of, VIII., 746, 751. 

71st highlanders, Tliomas Stirling commands, VII., 
786; services in America of, 854; on Long island, 
VIIL, 295. 

72d foot, services of, VII., 868. 

75th foot, lord Lincoln, colonel of, VIII., 795. 

76th foot, John Wrightson, major of, X., 728. 

77th (late 62d) highlanders, in the battle of Bushy run, 
VII., 546 ; land granted to soldiers of, 903, 904, 905 ; 
services of, VIIL, 563, X., 902, 903, 906. (See 62d.) 

77th foot, .Tames Marsh, colonel of, X., 730. 

78th (or Fraser's) highlanders, James Abercrombie, 
major of, VII., 160 ; at the siege of Quebec, X., 997. 
(See 63rf.) 

80th light armed foot, at Detroit, VII., 547; the In- 
dians defeat two companies of, 562, VIII., 703; 
land granted to soldiers of, VII., 902; in the Pon- 
tiac war, 961 ; Norman MacLeod, captain in, VIIL, 
228; Thomas Gage, colonel of, 247; in America, 
423, X., 682; captain Treby, attached to, 730; 
names of the officers of, killed or wounded at Ticon- 
deroga, 731. 

80th royal Edinburgh volunteers, sir William Erskine, 
colonel of, VIII., 713. 

82d foot, sent to Halifax, Nova Scotia, VIIL, 791. 

84th royal Highland emigrants, raised in America, 
VIIL, 563 ; services of the second battalion of, 588 ; 
Patrick Sinclair, captain in the first battalion of, 
598; sir Henry Clinton, colonel of, 717. 

86th foot, Richard Worge, colonel of, VII., 522; dis- 
banded, ibid. 

87th foot, lieutenant-colonel Reid, on the half pay of, 
VHL, 312. 

88th or Connaught rangers, general Reid, colonel of, 
VIIL, 312. 

89th highlanders, sorae .account of the, VIIL, 187. 

95th foot, Ralph Burton, colonel of, VII., 93; John 
Reid, colonel of, VIIL, 312; Barry St Leger, major 
of, 714. 

97th foot, organized, VIIL, 791. 

100th foot, major Campbell of, dismissed the service, 
for killing captain Macharg, VIIL, 250. 

103d foot (or volunteer hunters), Charles Lee, major 
in, VII., 58, X., 729 ; Josiah Mai ten, major of, VIIL, 
279. 



44 



GENERAL INDEX, 



[Aem- 



Army (British)— con/inu<d. 
Regiments — 

104th foot, Patrick Tonyn, lientenant-colonel of, 
Vm., 742. 

105th foot, David Grsme, colonel of, VII., 890 ; the 
volunteers of Ireland, numbered the, VIII., 734. 
(See f^oJunteeis of Ireland, in Regiments, Loyalist.) 

106th foot (or Iilack musquoteers), lieutenant-colonel 
Barrfi, command.'!, X., 1027. 

114th foot, Alan Maclean, major of, VIII., 562; re- 
duced, ibid. 

Royal artillery, sent to' America, VII., 75; George 
Williamson, colonel commandant of, 35G ; land 
granU'd in New York to officers of, 588 ; biographi- 
cal sketch of Thomas James, colonel commandant 
of, 800; John Dover, captain in, 821; some of the, 
stationed at Oswego, 854 ; land granted to soldif rs 
of, 904, 905 {see Artillery Patei.l); Philip Martin, 
captain of, quartered in New York, VIII., 64 ; Ed- 
ward Foy, an officer in, 323 ; the fourth battalion 
serves in America, 529, 649 ; number of, in garrison 
at fort William Henry on its surrender, X., 624 ; 
Louis Martin, captain-lieutenant of, a prisoner, 713. 

Royal invalids, stationed in the island of Jersey, 
VIII., 311. 

Marines, James Stanwix, major of, VII., 280. 

The duke of Bedford's foot, raised, V., 713. 

Clayton's foot, several companies of, drowned in the 
Canada expedition, V., 277. 

Sir Charles Hara's, IV., 882. 

Ingoldesby's, in the Canada expedition of 1711, IV., 
174, v., 254. 

Kane's foot, several companies of, di-owned in the 
Canada expedition, V., 277. 

Nicholson's, X., 775. 

Oglethorpe's, lieutenant Hyde Clark desires to he 
transferred to, VI., 253 ; governor Clinton receives 
a letter from the commanding officer of, 276, 281. 

Seymour's (Seamours) foot, several companies of, 
drowned in the Canada expedition, V., 277. (See 

m/oot.) 

Windness's foot, several companies of, drowned in the 
Canada expedition, V., 277. (See 31th foot.) 

New York independent companies, sent to reduce New 
Netherland, 11., 444 ; sent back to England, III., 214 ; 
a foot company sent to New York, 219 ; its strength, 
220; its officers, ibid, 221 ; two companies ordered 
raised, 619 ; warrant for the pay of certain officers of, 
691 ; arrive in New York, 757, 759 ; reduce Leisler, 
766; four companies demanded, IV., 54; two grena- 
dier companies arrive at Boston, 119 ; four, in New 
York, 149, 150, 247,265,293, 600, 1126, 1137, 1139, 
1150; their strength, 158,325; desertions from, 160, 
161, 274, 862, 882 ; some of the men shot, 162, 781 ; 
names of officers of the, 174, 716, 967, V., 984, 
VII., 707; recruited, IV., 231, 234; state of the, 
283 ; miserable condition of the, 485, 612, 687, 701 ; 



vacincies in, 536; reduced, 545, 631; character of 
the, 553, 761, 770 ; omitted from the army esti- 
mates, 609; reinforcements required for, 611, 640, 
644, 702 ; where quartered, 611 ; reinforced, 642, 
704, 760; recommended to he employed at the 
manufacture of tar, 645; additional companies 
proposed, 707; Robert Livingston pinches an 
estate out of tlie bellies of the, 720 ; attempt to 
mutiny, 723 ; some of the officers are tavern keep- 
ers, 761 ; mutiny, 770 ; paid out of the Irish 
forfeited estates, 772; their strength in 1702-3, 
967, 1035, 1068; governor Hunter calls for an 
increase of the, V., 456, 457, 459 ; where stationed, 
468, 602, VI., 223, 463, 619 ; caijtain Holland com- 
mands one of the, V., 646; promotions in, 775 ; 
recommended to be regimented, VI., 275; captain 
Wraxall recommended for a commission in, 377 ; 
two of the companies ordered to Virginia, 834, 843 ; 
John Rutherford, captain in, VII., 205; Horatio 
Gates, captain in, VIII., 244 ; Guy Johnson, lieu- 
tenant in, 472 ; Henry Clinton, captain-lieutenant 
in, 717 ; at fort William Henry, X., 622. 

Queen's indejjendent company, captain Hopkins com- 
mands, VII., 994 ; Francis Pfister on the half pay 
of, VIIL, 51. 

South Carolina independent company, disbanded, 
VII., 619 ; John Stuart and Raymond Demer^, cap- 
tains in, VIII., 159. 
(Loyalist), governor Try on urges the embodying of, 
VIII., 598, 650 ; to be on the same footing as pro- 
vincial troops, 680; governor Tryon asks the com- 
mand of, 698 ; governor Tryon draws up a plan for 
the establishment of, 705 ; governor Tryon com- 
mands, 706, 708, 715, 769 ; Mr. Bayard's two sons 
in the, 717 ; march to the east end of Long island, 
750 ; Beverly Robinson, colonel of a, 806. 

Associated refugees. (See Farming's Battalion.) 

Axtel guards, Fredeuck de Peyster, commands, VIII., 
755. 

De Lancey's brigade, about to be raised, VIII., 687, 
788. 

3d Delancey battalion, Gabriel G. Ludlow, colonel of, 
VIII., 696. 

Donkin's royal garrison battalion, William Anstru- 
ther, major in, VIII., 311. 

Fanning's battalion (afterwards the Associated refu- 
gees or king's American foot), Edmund Fanning, 
colonel of, VIII., 284; authorized to be raised, 694; 
King's county contributes generously to defray the 
expense of raising, 704, 711. 

King's American foot. (See Fanning's Battalion.) 

Loyal Americans, Beverley Robinson, colonel of, 
VIII., 806. 

New Jersey volunteers, VIII., 790; brigadier Skinner, 
commands, 803. 

New York volunteers, lieutenant-colonel Turnbull, 
commands, VIII., 755 ; Frederick de Peyster, cap- 
tain in, ibid. 



-Arm] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



45 



Army (British) — continued. 
Regiments — 

Queen's rangers, John Pell, ensign in, VIII., 783. 
Rangers (Butler's), authorized to be raised, VIII., 

723 ; burn Wyoming, 75-t. 
Royal greens, attached to St. Leger's army, VIII., 

719 ; loss in, at the battle of Oriskany, 721, 727. 
Staten island, a corps formed at, Vlll., 681. 
Volunteers of Ireland, lord Rawdon raises, VIII., 

734 ; one-half the men destroyed at the battle of 

Camden, ibid ; numbered the 105th regiment, ibid. 

(See 105th foot.) 
Westchester light horse, organized, VIII., 717; James 

de Lancey, captain of, 718. 
(French.) Estimated number of soldiers in Canada in 1699, 
IV., 574 ; number of regiments in Canada in 1745, 
VI., 276 ; soldiers recommended to be sent to Canada, 
IX., 14; sent there, 25,232, 637; number of troops 
in Canada in 1709, 725 ; in 1709, 833 ; six regiments 
sent to Canada, X., 276, 278, 285; journals of the 
operations in Canada of the, 337, 721, 835, 1016 ; 
operations under Dieskan, 383 ; the marquis de Mont- 
calm and other officers sent to Canada to command, 
393, 395 ; in Canada, its strength in 1756, 417, 424, 
482 ; return of the names of the French officers, and 
of the nvxmber of men killed at the siege of fort St. 
PhDip, 430 ; strength of the army in Canada in 1757, 
523 ; strength of the forces sent against fort William 
Henry, 600, 601, 606, 609, 620, 625 ; pay of a captain 
in, 672, 687; live on horse-flesh, 692, 696 ; several of 
the soldiers punished, 699 ; strength of the, in Can- 
ada in 1758, 702, 761 ; list of the killed and wounded 
in the battle of Ticonderoga, 750, 798 ; in Canada, 
why not paid in specie, 808 ; number of, in the battle 
of Ticonderoga, 815 ; strength of, in Canada, in 1759, 
926, 932, 962; strength of the garrison of fort Niag- 
ara in 1759, 977 ; defeated and abandon Quebec, 1015 ; 
strength of the, before Quebec, 1017 ; conduct of the 
officers of, after the battle before Quebec, 1040 ; want 
of discipline in, 1044 ; panic stricken on Abraham's 
plains, 1052; strength of, after the fall of Quebec, 
1070 ; return of the killed and wounded at the battle 
of Sillery, 1084 ; number of men returned from Can- 
ada to France, 1125, 1127. 
Regiments (Frenqji) : 
Artillery, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431. 
Royal carabineers, count de Gizors, colonel of, X., 696. 
Cavalry of strangers, commanded by M. de Tracy's 

son in Flanders, III., 154. 
Sase's cavalry, baronDieskau, lieut.-colonel of, X. , 340. 
Bodyguards, the duke de Mirepoix, captain of, X., 433. 
Swiss guards, lieutenant-general d'Affry commands 

the, X., 657. 
L'AUier's, M. Berthier, captain in, IX., 43. 
Artois', ordered to Louisbourg, X., 297; strength 

of, 299, 399, 417 ; at Louisbourg, 302, 912 ; colonel 

St. Julieu, commander of, 356, 369 ; cut off, 767. 



Auxerre, M. de Montcalm, colonel of, X., 400. 

Beam, .sent to Canada, X., 299, 912; ordered to fort 
Frontenac, 312, 313, 366 ; colonel Ilurault de I'Hopi- 
tal commands, 325, 375, 464; journal of its move- 
ments, 347, 835 ; strength of, 354, 399 ; M. Malartic, 
adjutant of, 372; M. d'Aubrespy, captain in, 373; 
at Niagara, 403, 440 ; favorable report of, 411 ; state 
of, in 1756, 417; about to be ordered against Oswego, 
433 ; marches against Oswego, 441 ; its services 
there, 462; ordered to Carillon, 464; at Carillon, 
469, 490 ; .condition of, 492; at the siege of fort 
William Henry, 606 ; receives a set of colors, 636 ; 
state of, in 1758, 702 ; at Ticondeioga, 721, 723, 814, 
844, 921 ; its loss in the battle there, 751, 799, 800; 
at the battle of Quebec, 1041 ; at the battle of Sil- 
lery, 1083 ; its loss there, 10S5, 1089 ; embarks for 
France, 1127. 

Berri, sent to Quebec, X., 572; arrives at Quebec, 
599 ; an epidemic carries off a great many of the 
soldiers, 616; M. de Trevis, commands the second 
battalion, 671 ; strength of, in 1 758, 702 ; second bat- 
talion, at Ticonderoga, 721, 814, 844, 970; its loss 
in the battle there, 751, 799 ; serves at Carillon, 
1054; at the battle of Sillery, 10S3 ; embarks for 
France, 1127. 

Black musqueteers, M. de Bougainville enrolls him- 
self in, X., 1124. 

Brequeville, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430. 

Brittany, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431. 

Burgundy, a part ordered to Canada and a part to 
Louisbom-g, X., 297; at Louisbourg, 302, 912; 
strength of, 299, 399, 415 ; cut off, 767. 

Cambis, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431 ; M. 
Doreil claims some of the soldiers of, 746 ; at Louis- 
bourg, 755, 767, 841. 

Cariguan, III., 128, 135 ; sent to Canada, IX., 25, 
28, 32, 86 ; inclined to settle there, 43 ; baron St. 
Castine, an officer of, 265. 

Champagne, count de Gizors, colonel of, X., 696. 

Dauphine volunteers, brigadier Gantes, colonel of, 
X., 361. 

Fischer's corps recommended to be sent to Canada, X., 
526 ; high character of, ibid. 

Fontenay le Compte, accompanies the duke d'An- 
ville to America, X., 27. 

Guieune, sent to Canada, X., 299 ; at fort Frontenac, 
312, 313, 350, 366, 403; M. de Foubonne, com- 
mander of, 325 ; disembarks at Quebec, 347 ; or- 
dered to Niagara, 351, 368 ; strength of, 354, 399; 
colonel de Roquemaure, commands, 369 ; M. de la 
'Pause, adjutant of, 372 ; captain de St. Vincent, retires 
from, ibid ; at Niagara, 391 ; favorable report of, 
411 ; ordered against Oswego, 433, 441 ; ordered to 
Carillon, 464, 469; at Carillon, 490; condition of, 
492 ; at St. Therese, 553 ; in the expedition against 
fort William Henry, 595, 606, 621 ; receives a set of 
colors, 636; state of, m 1756, 417; its strength in 
1758, 606, 702; at the battle of Ticonderoga, 721, 



46 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Aem — 



Army (French) — conlinurd. 
ttegimeiits — 

723, 814, 844, 921; its loss there, 751, 799, 800; 
at the battle of Quebec, 105 1 ; embarks for France, 
1127. 

Uainauf, M. de Montcalm, serves in, X., 400 ; at the 
siege of Port Mahon, 430, 432. 

Irish brigade, the, at tlie siege of Oswego, VII., 127 ; 
battalion, recommended to be sent to Canada, X., 
370. 

Languedoc, sent to Canada, X., 299; accompanies 
baron Dieskau to fort St. Frederic, 312, 313, 228, 
338; its movement and defeat, 317; arrives at 
Quebec, 348 ; at fort St. Frederic, 351 ; strength of, 
354 ; at tlie battle of lake George, 355 ; number of 
killed and wounded in, 360 ; ordered to fort Fre- 
deric, 3CC ; colonel Pnvat, commands, 375 ; at Ti- 
conderoga, 398, 403, 440, 721, 814, 844 ; its strength, 
399, 702; favorable report of, 411; state of, in 
1756, 417; its condition, 492; quits Carillon, 546; 
in the expedition against fort William Henry, 599, 
606, 620; its loss in the battle there, 750, 751, 
799 ; at St. Johns, 836 ; at the battle of Quebec, 
1052 ; at the battle of Sillery, 1083 ; embarks for 
France, 1127. 

La Marche, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 432. 

Marine, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 431 ; its 
strength in Canada, 606 ; its loss at the battle of 
Ticonderoga, 799 ; serves at Carillou, 1054. 

Medoc, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431. 

Nice, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 432. 

Picardy, M. de Bougainville, adjutant of, X., 1124. 

Ponthieu, accompanies the duke d'Anville to America, 
X., 27. 

La Reine, sent to Cauada, X., 299 ; accompanies ba- 
ron Dieskau to fort St. Frederic, 312, 313, 328, 338 ; 
its defeat, 317; M. de Roquem.iure, colonel of, 337, 
375 ; arrives at Quebec, 347 ; strength of, 354, 399 ; 
at the battle of lake George, 355 ; number of Idlled 
and wounded, 360 ; ordered to fort St. Frederic, 366 ; 
a number of the soldiers taken prisoners on their pas- 
sage to Canada, 375 ; at fort Carillon, 398, 403, 440 , 
goveiuor Vaudreuil bears testimony to the good con- 
duct of, 411 ; in the expedition against fort William 
Henry, COl, 606, 620; at the battle of Ticonderoga, 
721, 723, 814, 844, 921 ; its loss in that b.ittle, 750, 
751, 798; ordered from Quebec to St. John, 813; 
marches to Ticonderoga, 814; at Chambly, 841 ; on 
the Ticonderoga frontier, 1054; at the battle of Sil- 
lery, 1083 ; embarks for France, 1127. 

Rochefort, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431. 

Royal Comtois, at the siege of Port Mahon, X. , 430, 431. 

Royal Italian, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 431. 

Royal Rousillon, destined for Carillou, X., 398, 403; 
its strength, 399, 806 ; sent to fort Frederic, 405 ; 
suffers from sickness, 414; sent to lake George, 
440 ; its condition, 492 ; quits Carillon, 546 ; at the 
Eiege of fort WUliam Henry, 601, 621 ; strength of, 



in 1757, 606; in 1758, 702; at Ticonderoga, 721, 
723, 814, 844; its loss in the b.ittle there, 750, 751, 
799 ; at the battle of Quebec, 1052; at the battle of 
Sillery, 1083 ; embarks for France, 1127. 

La Sarre, about to march to Cataracoui, X., 398; its 
strength, 399 ; arrives at Quebec, ibid, 412 ; many 
of the men sick, 414 ; furnishes a detachment for 
Carillon, 403, 490; sent to Frontenac, 420, 440; 
marches against Oswego, 433, 441 ; condition of, 
492 ; at St. Johns, 5.^3 ; in the expedition against 
fort William Henry, 599, 601, 606, 621 ; a soldier 
of, ordereil to be hung, 633 ; streugtli of, in 1758, 
702; at the battle of Ticonderoga, 721, 723,814; its 
loss in the b.attle there, 750, 751, 798, 800, 844 ; at 
St. Johns, 836 ; at the battle of Quebec, 1052 ; at the 
battle of Sillery, 1083 ; embarks for France, 1127. 

Saumur, accompanies ihe duke of d'Anville to Amer- 
ica, X., 27. 

Soisson, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 432. 

Talaru, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 431. 

Touraiue, M. de Maillebois, colonel of, X., 372. 

Trainel, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 431. 

Vermandois, at the siege of Port Mahon, X., 430, 431. 

Foreign volunteers, arrive at Louisbourg, X., 841. 
Canadian, Courtemanche's brigade, at the expedition 
against fort William Henry, X., 601, 606, 610, 611, 
621. 

Gasp6 brigade, at the siege of fort William Henry, X., 
601, 606, 610, 611. 

La Corne's brigade, at the siege of fort William Henry, 
X., 606, 609, 611, 620. 

Repentigny's, at the siege of fort William Henry, X., 
606, 610, 611, 620. 

St. Ours' brigade, at the siege of fort William Henry, 
X., 601, 606, 610, 611, 621. 

Vassau's, at the siege of fort WiUi.am Henry, X., 606, 
609, 611, 620. 

Villiers' volunteers, at the siege of fort William 
Henry, X., 606, 610, 611, 620, 647, 648. 
Colonial, its loss at Ticonderoga, X., 750; embark for 
France, 1127. 
Arnaud (Arnold, Daruaud), Mr., visits Michilimakin.ac, IX., 

696 ; Mr. de Lotbiuiere's son-in-law, 777, 807 ; carries 

on trade at Michilimakin.ac, 807 ; commands a party 

against the Ouitanons, 1050; commandant at fort 

Frontenac, 1087. * 

Arnault, a soldier in Canada, *1X., 234. 
Arnhem, Mr. (See Van Arnhem.) 
Arnhem, in the province of Gelderland, I., 370. 
Arnold, Beuedict, flies from West Point, VIII., 213 ; threat- 
ens Quebec, 563; defeated before Quebec, 663; 

wounded, 664 ; superceded, 677 ; in the Mohawk 

country, 721; brings charges against colonel Hazen, 

777; commands in the Highlands, 806 ; destroys the 

stores and takes the public archives .at Richmond, 811. 
Arnold (Aernold, Aernouts, Arundel), Isaac, deputy from 

Southold, II., 584; sheriff of the east end of Long 

Island, 601, 602, 622, 639 ; resigns that office, 657 ; 



-Asc] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



47 



Arnold ( Isaac ) — continued. 

collector of taxes, III., 402 ; judge, IV., 27; colonel 
of militia, SOS. 
Arnold, Mr., v., 770. 
Arnold, Richard, member of governor Andros' council, III., 

543. 
Arnold river; IX., 477. 
Amou, Mr., a specimen of copper sent from Canada to, IX., 

344. 
Arnout (Arneut, Arnot), Mr., carries a letter from father 
Laniberville to governor Dongan, III., 4.53 ; figures in 
an Indian picture, 4S1 ; t.iken prisoner, 483 ; a French 
prisoner delivered to the family of, ibid ; the inter- 
preter, IV., 17, 90; on his way to Albany with Sho- 
wanoes, 90 ; returns to Albany, 195. (See Vide.) 
d'Arnouville. (See Maihault.) 

Arnoux, surgeon major, X., 418, 671; accompanies M. de 
Montcalm to Carillon, 432 ; arranging lield-hospitals, 
702 ; appears to have returned to France, 1124. 
Arnyock, Johannes, VI., 392. 
Aroghiadecka, a Mohawk chief, VIII., 113. 
Aron, a Mohawk chief, VII., 174. {See Aaron, Asaragehty.) 
Aronoca, IV., 1085. 

Arosa, otherwise Silver heels.VII., 108; a Seneca warrior, 113. 
Arouseut,au Indian, sent to Montreal with intelligence as to 

the mo%-ements of the English, IX., 833, 834. 
Arowin, Luke, an Indian trader arrested on Lake Erie, VI., 

733. 
Arran [James Hamilton], 5th earl of, notice of, I., 109. 
Arran, Richard Butler, earl of, notice of, II., 5G2; men- 
tioned, 5B3. 
Arras, a Mohawk chief, VI., 15. 

Arras, chevalier de Levis, dies at, X., 1128 ; the populace de- 
stroy his monument and the church at, ibid. 
Arratio, an Onondaga sachem, IX., G7S, 679; a hostage at 

Quebec, 685. 
Arrentlen (Arentsen), Isaac, lieutenant of a New York com- 
pany. III., 648. {See Arentsen.) 
Arrest, the king cannot issue a warrant of, V., 410. 
Arrowsick (Arrowchick, Rouseck), where, IV., 831, IX, 904, 

905; garrisoned, V., 598. 
d'Artaguiete, M., governor of Louisiana, IX., 925. 
Arter. (See Herter.) 
Arthur, Mr., VII., 718, 722. 

Articles necessary for the supply of farmers coming to New 
Netlierland, I., 265 ; ftu-nished to a tenant of a farm 
in New Netherland, 369, 371. 
Articles, for the colonization and trade of New Netherland 
proposed, I., 110; disapproved of, 115 ; instruction to 
the Dutch ambassador respecting the thirty-sis, 475 ; 
proposed to the West India Company by reverend Hugh 
Peters, 567; concluded between the Dutch and Eng- 
lish, at Hartford, in 1650, Gil ; on the reduction of 
New Netherland, II., 250; of war, extract from the 
Dutch, 623; of union between East Hampton and 
Connecticut, III., 27 ; between the Indians and colonel 
Ca,rtwright, 67 ; between sir Robert Carr and the 



Dutch and Swedes on Delaware bay, 71 ; on the reduc- 
tion of New Netherland, their confirmation demand- 
ed, 163; of peace concluded with the New England 
Indians, 244; preferred against Mr. Santen, and his 
answer, 495 ; presented by colonel Bayard against 
Leisler, 642 ; against the New York committee of safety, 
644 ; respecting a boundary line between New York 
and Connecticut, IV., 628 ; between the earl of Bello- 
mont and R. Livingston, 762; of surrender of New 
Amsterdam referred to, V., 495 ; exhibited by Rip 
Van Dam against governor Cosby, 975 ; observations 
of the council of New York thereon, 979 ; presented by 
Rip Van Dam against governor Cosby, printed in pam- 
phlet form, VI., 26 ; of peace with the Indians, terms 
submitted by sir Wm. Johnson as a basis for, VII., 
600 ; agreed upon, 621 ; with the Hurons, 650 ; with 
the Genesee Indians, 652 ; with the Delawares, 738 ; 
grairted by the French to the English at Grand Pre, 
Nova Scotia, X., 78; on the surrender of Oswego, 
444, 474 ; on the surrender of fort William Henry, 
604, 617 ; on surrendering fort Frontenac, 825 ; on 
the surrender of Niagara, 990 ; on the surrender of 
Quebec, 1004, 1011, and of Canada, 1107. 
Articles, thirty-nine, books of the, to be kept and used in 
the Episcopal churches of the province of New York, 
IIL, 372. 
Artillery, patent, Washington county, N. Y., granted, VII., 

588. (See Walton, captain Joseph.) 
d'Artois, count, purchases the marquis de Paulmy's library, 

X., 535. 
Artois, province of, chevalier de Levis governor of, X., 1128. 
Arts, the, M. Colbert a patron of, II., 348. 
Aruba, the settlement of, to be considered, I., 136; Peter 
. Stuyvesant, director of, 178; trade to, regulated, 223; 
plan for the trade and colonization of, 362, 363 ; 
horses sent to Antigua from, 455 ; a dependency of 
New Netherland, 492. 
Arundel [Thomas Howard 19th], earl of, his eldest son 
marries a daughter of the duke of Lenox, I., 55; 
and others remonstrate against the settlement of the 
Dutch in New Netherland, 58, III., 17; member of 
the privy council, 3, 4, 7. 
Arundel of Wardour [Henry Arundel 3d] lord, Cecil, lord 
Baltimore marries a daughter of, II., 74 ; member of the 
privy council, III., 388 ; keeper of the privy seal, 427, 
428. 
Arvas, siege of, II., 351. 
Asanhage, III., 434. 
Asaragehty, Aaron, an 

Aaron, Aron.) 
Asaras, a Mohawk chief, VI., 15, 16. 
Asaregoa. (See Assaragoa.) 

Asaregoanne, a Mohawk chief,' III., 12G; ambassador from 
the Oneidas to Quebec, IX., 46. (See Indian language.) 
Asaregouenioton, a Mohawk chief. III., 126. 
Ascalon, biographical notice of the reverend M. Valet, bishop 
of, IX., 890. 



Indian speaker, VI., 293. (See 



48 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Asc- 



Ascen, Jan, III., 74. 

Aschanoondah, a Seneca chief, III., 67. (See Indian lan- 
guage.) 

Aserotus, sir John and Guy Johnson rendezvous at, VIII., 
779.- 

Asfort, II., 400. 

Ash, sir Josepli, member of the council for trade. III., 31. 

Ash, Samuel, IV., 93C, 1008. 

Ash, island of, III., 574. 

Ashburnham, Mr., II., 599. 

Ashe, Benjamin, sijns a petition against lord Bellomont, 
IV., 934. (See Aske.) 

Ashe, Edward, one of the lords of trade, III., xvi, V., 561, 
583, 584, 585, 630, 645, 648, 707, 709, 745, 749, 763, 
815, 844, 846, 877, 919, 931, 932, 936, 950, VI., 139, 
157, 220. 

Ashes, pot and pearl, manufactured in New Netherland, I., 
370. 

Ashfield, Christopher, VII., 905. 

Ashfield, Mr., tho earl of Bellomont objects to his appoint- 
ment to a place in the customs at New York, IV., 778. 

Ashfield, Richard, appointed sheriif of New York, VI., 79. 

Ashfield, reverend Thomas Thurlow rector of, VIII., 256. 

Ashley [Anthony Ashley Cooper], lord, member of the 
council for foreign plantations, III., 47, 48, 49 ; of the 
board of trade, 176 ; of the privy council, 177. 

Ashley, lieutenant colonel, sent to the king of Sweden, I., 
55. 

Ashley, major Noah, accompanies the expedition to lake 
. George, VI., 1000, 1002; killed, 1006. 

Ashman, Robert, II., 591. 

Ashufclot (Echiouelet) river, the French make a descent on, 
X., 43, 44. 

Ashurst, Henry, father of sir Henry Ashurst, IV., 771. 

Ashorst, sir Henry, appoints a surveyor of woods for New 
Hampshire, IV., 314; applied to for means to instruct 
the five nations, 455,521 ; agent for Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire, 586 ; informs the earl of Bellomont 
that the corporation for evangelizing the Indians is 
willing to pay ministers for the five nations, 766 ; 
biographical notice of, 771 ; gets Mr. Partridge ap- 
pointed lieutenant-governor of New Hampshire, 795 ; 
agent for Connecticut, 1177. 

Ashurst, sir William, one of the governors of the corpora- 
tion for the conversion of infidels, IV., 334, 521; 
applies on behalf of the earl of Bellomont for the pay 
of the forces in New York, 437 ; advises the earl of 
Bellomont respecting the arrears of pay due the New 
Y'ork companies, 601, 602, G09 ; resigns the agency of 
the New York companies, 688; furnishes Mr. Weaver 
■with funds, 816 ; communicates proposals from the 
corporation for evangelizing the Indians, 844; ob- 
servations on his accounts, 1096 ; is referred to for the 
names of propar persons to be of the council of New 
York, v., 81. 

Aske, Benjamin, gives evidence in governor Fletcher's case, 
IV., 468,470; merchant in New York, 624,1135; signs 



1 address 



a petition against lord Bellomont, 934, and a; 
to lord Cornbury, 1008 ; interested in land in Bush- 
wick, v., Ill, 407. 

Askener, Anne, released from captivity, X., 8S2. 

Askue, Mr., VI., 798. 

Aspenot, a Skaticook captain, V., 228. 

Assanpink river, Trenton, New Jersey, situate on the, V., 
705. 

Assaragoa (Asaregoa), the name given by the five nations to 
the governor of Virginia, its origin and signification, 
III., 4.^4, IX., 706; mentioned, V., 670, 675, 
VIII., 119; speaker of the Caghnawagas, VII., 555. 
(See Indian language.) 

Assemblies, American, if not prevented will furnish plenty 
of work to the board of trade, V., 32. 

Assembly of the Ten of the West India company, II., 749, 
750. 

Assembly of the XIX., the, recpiested to consider the pro- 
priety of a union between the West India companies 
of Holland, France and England, I., 29 ; complain to 
the states general of an infringement of the charter 
granted to the West India company, 30 ; advised that 
a ship is fitting out at Hoorn for the Virginias, under 
a French commission, 31 ; letter of the states general 
to the, recommending the cultivation of friendship 
with the subjects of the neighboring powers, 32 ; 
declaration of, on the proposed union of the West 
India companies of Holland, France and England, to 
be waited for, ibid ; Peter Janss Schageu appointed a 
deputy to the, 37 ; complain that the English of New 
Plymouth threaten to expel the Dutch from New 
Netherland, 38; inform the states general that the 
West India company is opposed to a truce with Spain, 
39 ; called on to declare whether the authorities in 
New Netherland ought to be empowered to adjudicate 
on prizes carried into that country, 61 ; authorized to 
determine the differences with the proprietors of col- 
onies in New Netherland, 68 ; invested with the entire 
management of the affairs of the West India company, 
83 ; called on to consider a claim of Jacob Elkins, for 
damages incurred in New Netherland, 91 ; instructed 
to explain the difficulties between the Dutch and En- 
glish in New Netherland, 92 ; complain of Elkins' 
encroachments in New Netherland, 93 ; called on to 
resume the consideration of the affairs of New Nether- 
land, 100, 102, 105, 110, 115, 125, 132, 135, 136, 138, 
163 ; petition of Lubbert van Dincklagen referred to 
the, 103 ; recommended to encourage the reformed 
religion and the education of youth in Brazil, and the 
colonization of New Netherland, 106 ; further peti- 
tions of Lubbert van Dincklagen referred to the, 117, 
126 ; recommended to grant the vassals of the count 
of Solms free access to New Netherland, 118 ; request- 
ed to take care that no acts of hostility arise between 
the inhabitants of New England and New Netherland, 
137 ; advices received from New Netherland referred 
to the, 144 ; affairs in New Netherland brought before 
the, 148 ; war waged in New Netherland without the 



— Ass] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



49 



Assembly (of the XIX.)— continued. 

autlioiity of the, 152 ; instructed to allow two ships 
from New Sweden to be discharged, 156 ; report on 
the proceedings of the, respecting the colonial pos- 
sessions of the West India company in 1645, 157; the 
eight men write from New Netherland to the, 208, 
209 ; no money to be borrowed on the West India 
company's account, except with the consent of the, 
232 ; the commonalty of New Netherland complain 
of director Kieft to the, 250; petition of the guardians 
of Johan Van Renselaer referred to the, 321 ; resolve 
that New Netherland, Curacao, &c., be under the su- 
perintendence of the chambers of the West India 
company in common, 362; points referred to the con- 
sideration of the, 400 ; instructions to colonists about 
to proceed to New Netherland to be submitted to the, 
403; the patroon of Rensselaerwyck complained to the, 
521 ; called on to report on the boundary of New 
Netherland, 556 ; proposal respecting Brazil submitted 
by the, 613 ; agreement relating to the colonie pro- 
posed to be erected by the city of Amsterdam, in New 
Netherland, referred to the, 626 ; the chamber of 
Amsterdam objects to such reference, 627 ; again 
written to on the subject, 628 ; approves of the agree- 
ment, 629 ; letter of, referred, 636 ; report on the 
letter of, 637 ; representation on the state of religion 
in New Netherland, to the, II., 72; controversy be- 
tween lord Baltimore, and the, 116 ; proceedings of, 
approved by the states general, 123 ; lay before the 
states general the difficulties between the English and 
Dutch in America, 131-; resolution on the memoir 
presented on the boundary of New Netherland by the, 
164 ; publish freedoms for such as will plant colonies 
in New Netherland, 549, 560; to establish a rule of 
government for New Netherland, 554. 

Connecticut, letter ofRobert Livingston to. III., 728, 730. 

Massachusetts, unusually short session of, IV., 636 ; 
dissolved, 637 ; meets, 647 ; votes an address to king 
William, 771 ; representation of the lords of trade on 
the acts of, transmitted to the earl of Bellomont, 773 ; 
number of acts passed at a session of the, in 1700, 
786 ; number of the members in the, V., 596 ; mem- 
bers of, to be residents of their towns, 597; call a 
congress to oppose the stamp act, VII., 760. 

New England, the, meets four times a year, I., 365. 

New Hampshire, pass an act to pay the debts of the 
province, IV., 601 ; the lords of trade transmit repre- 
sentations on the acts passed by, 773 ; number of 
members composiug the, V., 595. 

New Jersey, early proceedings of the, III., 293 ; how 
composed, 299 ; pass an act embarrassing the trade of 
New York, IV., 114 ; lord Corubury adjourns, 1120 ; 
difficulties experienced by his lordship in getting a 
meeting of, 1149 ; their proceedings in 1705, 1170, 
1171; colonel Quary complains of, V., 32; qualifi- 
cations of members of, 34, 46 ; the first to appropriate 
moneys for the supijort of the government, 83 ; vote 
money for the Canada expedition, 84, 253 ; observa- 
7 



tions of the board of trade on the remonstrance of, 
156 ; called together, 170 ; governor Hunter adjourns 
the, 182 ; Burlington fixed as the place of meeting of 
the, ibid ; provisions for the sitting of the, 461 ; about 
to meet at Burlington, 481 ; injustice of the act for 
fixing the sitting of, at Burlington, 508 ; number of 
members comprising, 602; chief justice Trent, speaker 
of the, 702 ; governor Burnet reports the proceedings 
of, 767 ; governor Burnet issues writs for a new, 842; 
method pursued in convoking, VI., 23. 

New Netherland, declared illegal, I., 550, 553; of dele- 
gates holden, II., 224; join in a memorial to the states 
general, 225 ; report and resolution on the memorial 
of the, 227; alluded to, 371. 

New York, rate for public charges in the province of 
New York agreed upon in an. III., 188 ; the people of 
New York desirous of an, 230 ; governor Andros to 
discountenance any movement for a general, ibid ; of 
dangerous consequence, 235 ; the colony about to 
be allowed the privilege of choosing an, 317; gover- 
nor Dongan ordered to call an, 331 ; number of 
members in the, 331, IV., 395, 509, 621, V., 600, 906, 
VI., 140 ; titles of -acts passed in New York by the first, 
III., 355 ; abolished, 370 ; establishes a tariff of fees, 
411 ; imposes a duty on Indian goods, 499 ; the gov- 
ernor to call an, 623, 624, 828 ; elected for the first 
time in New York, 677; endeavor to secure the birth- 
right of freeborn men, ibid ; conditions to be append- 
ed to grants of money by the, 686 ; lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Leisler orders an election of members of, 702, 
717, IV., 213 ; William NicoUs, speaker of the. III., 
709 ; William Pinhorne, speaker of, 716 ; meet at 
Robert Walter's house, 717; lieutenant-governor 
Leisler obtains a rate from the, 717, 727, 753 ; people 
refuse to pay taxes imposed by, 732 ; convened by 
governor Sloughter, 756, 761; meets, 768, 794; au- 
thorizes the enlisting of fusileers for the defense of 
the frontier, 784; establishes a revenue, 785, 797; 
James Graham, speaker of, 789 ; laws passed by, sent 
to England for the king's approval, 790, 792, 795, 
814, IV., 113, 199 ; vote men and sirpplies for Albany 
and the frontier. III., 813, 834, IV., 55, 84, 234, 245, 
266, 430, 464, 1061 ; letter of Messrs. Van Schaick 
and Wessels to the speaker of. III., 817 ; copies of 
the journals of, to be sent to England, 820 ; acts of, 
lost in the Bristol, 836 ; governor Fletcher dissolves 
the, 846, IV., 37; powers of the, III., 856; the pay 
of the oflicers of, IV., 26; Leisler's adherents not 
allowed to be elected to, 54 ; refuse to vote a revenue 
for their majesties' lives, 57; vote governor Fletcher 
a present, 73 ; some of Leisler's partizans elected to, 83 ; 
Leisler's adherents offer opposition to governor Fletch- 
er in, 113 ; grant money for rebuilding the chapel in 
the fort at New York, 114 ; pass an act to defray 
the extraordinary charges of the government, 119 ; 
governor Fletcher endeavors to influence the elec- 
tion of persons to, 127 ; call on governor Fletcher to 
account for public moneys, and are in consequence 



50 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Ass- 



Assembly (New York) — continued. 

dissolved, 123, 129, 144; pass an act to pay the 
public debts, 133 ; particulars respecting an elec- 
tion in New York for members of, 143 ; governor 
Fletcher calls a new, 197; governor Fletcher is 
accnsed of packing the, 212; demand Leisler's 
execution, 215 ; vote a present to new govern- 
ors, 221 ; insolent behavior of governor Fletcher 
towards, 223; sign the association, 234; qualifi- 
cations of members of, 267 ; the earl of Bellomont 
caUs a new, 303, 507, 621; in session, 316, 1044; 
money paid for getting an act passed through, 320, 
322; dissolved by lord Bellomont, 322; fraudulent 
returns to, 323 ; Philip French, speaker of, 3S9, 396 ; 
a bill passed by the, rejected by the governor, 426 ; 
intend to drive reverend Mr. Dellius out of the pro- 
vince, 489 ; their instructions to the delegates to the 
five nations, 498 ; the election of members to, hotly 
contested, 508 ; comparative strength of parties in, 
509 ; vote an address to king William, 510 ; pass an 
act depriving a clergyman of his ministerial functions, 
ibid ; why it refused to pass a bill to facilitate the 
conversion of negroes, ibid ; Abraham Gouverneur, 
speaker of, 511, C21, V., 103; pass an act to erect 
courts of justice, IV., 515 ; character of the clerk of, 
520 ; governor Fletcher's accounts stolen from the, 
522 ; vote an address to the earl of Bellomont, 526 ; 
prorogued, 528, 553, 921 ; vote his lordship and his 
lieutenant-governor a present, 535, 611 ; not inclined 
to break any more extravagant grants, 553 ; complain 
of the administration of justice, and ask that judges 
be sent from England, 595 ; vote governor Dongan a 
present, 611 ; ill treated by the earl of Bellomont, 
620; the British parliament to provide against any re- 
fractoriness of, 634 ; the earl of Bellomont convenes, 
686 ; discontented with his lordship, 713 ; repeal an 
act for building a fort at Onondaga, 723 ; vote a land 
tax, 767, and money for a fort at Onondaga, ibid, 782 ; 
appoint a commissioner to examine the public ac- 
counts, 775 ; their view regarding the presidency of 
the council on the death of a governor, 777 ; appoint 
a treasurer, ibid ; the earl of Bellomont borrows some 
of the money voted for the fort at Onondaga, by, 785 ; 
vote an address on the subject of the boundary 
between East Jersey and New York, 786 ; the erection 
of forts at Albauy and Schenectady referred to, 820 ; 
Cortland manor and two other grants allowed to send 
representatives to, 823; James Graham, speaker of, 
847 ; doubts as to whether it be not dissolved by the 
governor's death, 858; vote that the government is 
vested in a majority of the council, 8G1 ; lieutenant- 
governor Nanfan dissolves the old and calls a new, 
881 ; their journal to be printed, 915 ; several of the 
members of, expelled, 925 ; the acts passed by, sent 
to England, 928; also the journals of, 928, V., 39; 
violent proceedings of, IV., 950; lord Coruburv dis- 
solves, 955 ; an act passed to increase tlie number of 
members of, 958 ; members of, paid by theix respective 



counties, 1000, 1149, V., 540, 895, VIII., 65 ; meet at 
Jamaica, on Long island, IV., 1004, VI., 807 ; titles of 
acts passed in 1702 by, IV., 1004 ; vote an address to 
queen Anne, 1005, 1062 ; make an appropriation to 
fortify the Narrows, 1058 ; attempt to encroach on the 
royal prerogative, 1060 ; an act passed to furnish a 
room for, 1114; meet in a tavern, 1115; fancy they 
have the same powers and privileges as the house of 
commons, 1121, V., 256; exist purely by the grace 
and favor of the crown, IV., 1122, 1155; insist on 
nominating a treasurer, 1145, 1153 ; an account of the 
rise and progress of, 1152; continued misunderstand- 
ing between lord Cornbury and, 1165, 1169 ; learn, 
with surprise, that the council amends a money bill, 
1170; views of the lords of trade as to its exclusive 
right to frame money bills, 1171 ; ought not to pre- 
tend to all the privileges of the house of commons, 1172, 
VI., 676; may be allowed to name its own treasurer, 
IV., 1172; present articles against Godfrey Dellius, 
Evert Banker, and William Pinhorne, V., 9 ; none in 
sir Edmund Audros' time, 58 ; dissolved because ad- 
journed by proclamation signed in New Jersey, 61 ; 
commence to appropriate the moneys for the support 
of government, 83 ; oaths to be taken by the members 
of, 93, 393, VI., 191 ; summary of their proceedings in 
the session of 1710, V., 170; governor Hunter com- 
plains of the, 177, 183, 340, 348, 350, 356 ; expel colo- 
nel Morris, 178 ; notice »f the laws providing for the pay 
of members of, 179, 186 (see Acts, New York) ; will 
not admit of any amendment by the council to money 
bills, 183, 263, 293, 359 ; report of the lords of trade 
on the differences between governor Hunter and, 191 ; 
threatened with an act of parliament in case they insist 
on providing a revenue, 192, 197; rate of pay to 
members of, 192, 547, 904; governor Hunter dissolves, 
209, 356 ; propose a table of fees, 216 ; an election 
for a new, ordered, 237 ; vote men and money for the 
expedition against Canada, 253 ; sit only by virtue of 
the governor's commission, 285 ; the council complain 
of the course pursued by, 292; attempt to appropriate 
the public money to the several services of govern- " 
ment, 294 ; resolve that the erection of a court of 
chancery, without their consent, is contrary to law, 
295, 298, 330, 359 ; and declare that the establishing 
of fees, independent of them, is illegal, 296, 298, 
359 ; pass a bill appointing an agent at ihe court of 
Great Britain, 300, 403, 812 ; claim to sit and vote 
money by virtue of the free choice and election of the 
people, 329, 359 ; the lords of trade ask that the 
queen express her displeasure of the undutiful pro- 
ceedings of, 330 ; their pretensions to dispose of the 
public money, without the consent of the council, 
groundless, 333; titles of acts passed by, in 1712, 
344 ; complaints against, laid before the secretary of 
state, 359 ; vote an appropriation for one year, 366 ; 
titles of acts passed in 1713, 1714, by, 378 ; pass bills 
for general naturalization, 403, 416 ; their memorial 
respecting the act for paying the public debts, 405 ; 



—Ass] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



51 



Assembly, (New York) — continued. 

Mr. Mulford expelled, 416, 499 ; vote a revenue for 
five years, 416; the members of, are paid from the 
general revenue, ibid :; copy of their address to gover- 
nor Hunter, communicated to the lords of trade, 502; 
order the arrest of the grand jury of New York, 515 ; 
the expenses of, paid out of the public treasury, 524; 
brigadier Hunter requests that orders be sent to colonel 
Schuyler not to dissolve the, 534, 535 ; history of their 
struggle for the control of the public revenue, 545 ; 
resolve that the provincial treasurer be accountable 
only to the governor, council, and general assembly, 
■548 ; provision for the payment of the members of, 
552 ; pay of the members of, authorized by law, 55S ; 
governor Burnet reports the result of the session of 
1720, 576; Rol)ert Livingston, speaker of, 580, 585; 
an act passed to pay certain members of, 6S3, 739 ; 
Adolph Philipse, speaker of, 768, 973, VI,, 55 ; differ- 
•ences between governor Burnettand, V., 769 ; the chief 
justice a member of, ibid-; independence exhibited by 
some of the members of, ibid; titles of acts passed in 
1725 by, 772; vote a supply for three years, 778, 781; 
governor Burnet dissolves, 783; existed eleven years, 
dbid ; Cadwallader Colden's observation on the^ 805; 
salaries of the public officers paid without regard to 
the, 813 ; governor Burnet engages in a contest with, 
ibid ; provide for the erection of a fort at Oswego, 
819, 8204 who are to be deemed members of, 836 ; 
governor Burnet calls a new, 842; endeavor to make 
public officers wholly dependent on them, and to 
weaken the principal courts, 844 ; controversy re- 
specting the court of chancery, between governor 
Burnet and, 847; governor Montgomerie dissolves, 
856 ; UUes of the acts passed in 1728 by, 872 ; a bill 
introduced for frequent holding of, 874; referred to 
Mr. Fane, king's council, 876; enter in their votes 
items to be paid out of the public revenue, 878 ; 
instruct the governor to issue warrants only according 
to such votes, 879 ; governor Burnet disregards these 
instructions, ibid; letter of Lewis Morris, junior, on 
the encroachments of, 882 ; resolve that its members 
■are responsible to no other authority than that of the, 
884, 902; titles of the acts passed in 1729 and 1730 
by, 895, 903 ■; attorney-general Bradley asks that their 
power to pass laws be limited, 900; charged with 
aiming at independence, 901 ; a commissioner on the 
part of the crown should be present at the sittings of, 
903 ; Mr. Van Dam's reasons for convoking the, 923; 
vote the court of chancery to be illegal, 946 ; make a 
present to governor Cosby in order to stop the pas- 
sage of the sugar bill through parliament, 954 ; James 
Alexander, a member of, 982; pass an act for settling 
a ministry, VI., 1; amends that act, 2; governor 
Cosby transmits to England a copy of his speech to 
4; changes the salaries of the judges, 10; censures 
attorney-general Bradley, 17 ; Quakers allowed to vote 
for members of, 28 ; the manor of Cortland allowed a 
representative in the, 29 ; the governor has an abso- 



lute negative on all bills passed by the council and, 
40, 41 ; difficulties in the, on governor Cosby's 
death, 52 ; decline to transact business, 54 ; Jews 
cannot vote for members of, 56; form of adjourning, 
57; adjourned by president Clarke, 74; meets for 
transaction of business, 81, 86; prorogued by presi- 
dent Clarke, 87; dissolved, 94; a new, called, 95; 
Lewis Morris, junior, speaker of, 96 ; complaints made 
of the long continuance of the, 112 ; pass a triennial 
act, 113; appoint president Clarke their agent, ibid ; 
turn their attention to the encouragement of iron 
manufactures, 116; meet at Greenwich, 140 ; what they 
mean by "appropriation," 141; provide for fortifying 
the province, 151 ; more than ever determined to vote 
the supplies only annually, 209 ; governor Clinton dis- 
solves the, 278, 414, 578, 751 ; vote money for the ex- 
pedition against Cape Breton, 282, 283, 285, 643; 
governor Clinton's character of the, 287, 305 ; adjourn 
through fear of the small pox, 288 ; governor Clinton 
complains of the, 307, 764; their remonstrance to 
governor Clinton sent to the secretary of state, 350 ; 
appoint a keeper of the provincial gunpowder, 353; 
answer to the remonstrance presented to governor 
Clinton by, 365 ; governor Clinton quarrels with the, 
378, 394, 400, 472, 474 ; publicly avow neutrality in 
time of war, 409, 411 ; appoint an agent of the pro- 
vince without the knowledge or consent of the gov- 
ernor, 420, 425, 430, 456 ; rise and progress of the 
encroachments on the prerogative by, 433, 460, 522; 
report of the lords of trade on governor Clinton's 
differences with the, 614 ; remonstrance presented to 
governor Clinton by the, 617; David Jones, siieaker 
of the, 626; evidence in support of the differences 
between governor Clinton and, 639 ; offer a reward 
for scalps, 647, 684 ; their measures in support of the 
expedition against Canada, 651 ; character of the 
majority of the, 671 ; order their door locked and the 
key to be laid on the table, 674; governor Clinton 
refuses to receive a remonstrance from, 675 ; the 
public printer forbid to publish the remonstrance 
of the, 677; vindicate the liberty of the press, 
ibid ; dissolved, 681 ; proceedings of the session of 
1748,682; appointcommissioners for various services, 
684 ; tie up their own hands by a singular disqualifying 
clause regarding members of, 685 ; assume privileges 
greater than those of the house of commons, 691 ; 
resolve that they are not obliged to furnish the gover- 
nor with a copy of their address, 694 ; refuse to vote 
supplies except in a particular form,702 ; further en- 
croachments of, 764; submit to several dissolutions 
rather than vote supplies other than annually, 820 ; 
vote one thousand pounds to provision two companies 
ordered to Virginia, 834; their conduct censured, 848, 
948 ; orders in council rejecting an address of the, 899 ; 
proceedings of, in 1755, 940 ; plan against Crown Point 
laid before, 950; provide for raising forces against 
Crown Point, 989, VII., 37, 201, 343 ; decline to re- 
fund colonel Johnson tlie money he had advanced 



52 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[AsSr- 



AssemUy (New York) — continued. 

for tlie public service, 20 ; refuse to grant a perma- 
nent revenue, 32 ; abstract of their proceedings in 
1756, 163; refuse to impose a tax on negroes, 217; 
vote one thousand men for the French war, 218 ; meet 
in the out ward of New York, on account of the small 
pox, 341; their proceedings printed, 342; demand the 
re-imbursement of certain expenses incurred for the 
war, 353; elected for seven years, 353, VIII., 444; 
make provision for the troops on the frontier. Til., 
405 ; the case of the sufferers by the fire in Boston 
recommended to the, 429 ; vote a salary to president 
Colden, 450 ; dissolved by the death of the king, 453, 
458, 461 ; an act continuing it six months after 
the demise of the crown, declared unnecessary, 
480 ; censured for insisting that the judges be com- 
missioned during good behavior, 503 ; report of the 
board of trade on the conduct of the, 505 ; appoint 
their own clerk, 584 ; insinuate misconduct in the 
management of Indian affairs, 587 ; vote an addi- 
tional number of men for the protection of the west- 
ern frontier, 627 ; to be called on to vacate the Kaya- 
derosseras and other patents, 633 ; present an address 
to lieutenant-governor Colden, 653 ; declared unduti- 
ful and indecent, 654 ; causes of their address, 655 ; 
petition the king against parliament taxing the people 
of America, 676 ; avow the same dangerous opinions 
as that of Massachusetts, 678 ; a judge of the supreme 
court, a member of, 794, VIII., 5 ; lieutenant-governor 
Colden points out a mode of destroying the influ- 
ence of, VII., 797; indemnify major James, 800; 
complain of lieutenant-governor Colden, 803; de- 
mand the removal of the restriction on paper money, 
820; provide barracks, &c., for troops, 831 ; refuse 
to indemnify lieutenant-governor Colden, 832, 887; 
major James' indemnity voted by one majority, 833 ; 
pay of the clerk of, 908 ; the patronage of each county 
in the hands of its members in, 979 ; take action on 
a pamphlet entitled " The Conduct of Cadwallader 
Colden," 995 ; request the governor to assent to a 
bill authorizing the issue of additional paper money, 
VIII., 1 ; institute proceedings against the author 
and publisher of a certain pamphlet, 5 ; dissolved, 14; 
the members of the city of New York control the, 61 ; 
restrained from passing any laws until it provide 
necessaries for the king's troops, 63 ; description of 
persons elected to, 68 ; new counties allowed by royal 
favor, not by law, representatives in, 100; reasons 
which led governor Moore to dissolve, 143 ; comments 
of the earl of Hillsborough on the violent resolutions 
of, 155 ; deny the authority of parliament over the 
colonies, 156 ; the king disapproves of the petition of, 
ibid ; no increase of members to be authorized, ibid ; 
proceedings of the new, 157, 167 ; members of, must 
reside in the district for which they are elected, 167, 
168 ; vote thanks to the merchants for agreeing to the 
non-importation association, 176; judges excluded 
from seats in, 177, 192, 319 ; adopt the resolutions of 



tlie Virginia assembly, 191 ; report of the board of 
trade on the non-importation resolutions of, and the 
exclusion of judges from, 194 ; title of the act render- 
ing judges incapable of sitting in, 207 ; reasons for 
excluding judges from seats in, 215 ; Isaac Sears a 
member of, 220; persist in excluding judges, 265, 
269 ; offer a salary to governor Tryon, 299 ; also to 
the earl of Dunmore, 300 ; judge Livingston complains 
of, 319 ; what places send members to, 443, 444 ; offi- 
cers of, in 1774, 456 ; Philip Livingston, speaker of, 
470 ; refuse to take into consideration the proceedings 
of congress, 532, and to appoint delegates thereto, 543, 
566 ; an act passed to regulate the election of repre- 
sentatives to the, 565 ; the sentiments of the secretary 
of state on their petitions to the king, lords and com- 
mons, 574; John Watts, member of, 590 ; dissolved, 
676 ; governor Robertson recommends the calling of 
a loyal, 810. 
Nova Scotia, the first session of the, opened, VI., 954. 
Pennsylvania, copies of their journals about to be trans- 
mitted to England, IV., 32; vote money for the sup- 
port of the government, 109 ; governor Fletcher 
quarrels with the, 223 ; difiereaces between Mr. Penn 
and the, V., 17; pa.ss an insolent act, 18; commit 
the reverend doctor Smith to jail, VII,, 416. 
Rhode Island, pass a strange sort of an act, IV., 601. 
South Carolina, vote a gratuity to captain John Stuart, 

VIIL, 159. 
Virginia, composition of the. III., 25 ; governor Nichol- 
son meets the, IV., 1120 ; number of burgesses in the, 
v., 606; its resolutions adopted by other colonies, 
VIIL, 176. 
, a Mohawk castle. III., 250. 

Assessment, an, ordered to be imposed in New Orange, II., 
685 ; further orders respecting, 688, 697; roll, 699. 

Assichqua, a Seneca sachem, IV., 658. 

Assinar^, an Oneida Indian, settled among the Nepissenin- 
iens, IX., 599. 

Assiniboins river, M. de la Veranderie ascends the, IX., 1060. 

Assises, M. de la Grive des. (See De la Grive.) 

Assizes, court of, alterations in the laws of New York made 
by. III., 104. (See Court.) 

Association, the, signed in New York, IV., 258 ; proclama- 
tion issued for signing the test and, 440 ; for mutual 
defense formed on the frontiers, VII., 618 ; formed in 
the colonies against importing any English goods or 
manufactures into America, VIIL, 69, 80, 176 ; form 
for organizing loyalist, 564; to take up arms, ordered 
to be signed throughout the province of New York, 
582 ; address to lieutenant-governor Colden from 
the committee of the New York, 583 ; lieutenant- 
governor Colden's answer, 586 ; Peter Van Schaick 
refuses to sign the, 652. 

Assongoisa, an Ottawa chief, IX., 181. 

Asstetten, reverend Mr., 11. , 72. 

Assuerus, Hendrick, II., 104, III., 74. 

Assumption, a town on the Mississippi, VII., 777. (See 
Fort V Assomption ; Memphis.) 



-Att] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



53 



Ast6, Jolm, exchanged, X., 881. 

Astley, Sir Jacob, baronet, one of the lords of trade, III., 
xvi, v., 422, 435. 

Astronomy, knowledge among the Indians of, I., 282. 

Asylum for orphans and old men, none in New Netherland, 
J., 300; recommended, 317; the inhabitants of New 
Netherland never contributed towards the erection of 
an, 423 ; the people of New Netherland would com- 
plain were aid demanded for the erection of an, 431. 

Ataweetsera, the Delaware king, to be given up to the Eng- 
lish, VII., 652. 

Atchatickpe, VIII., 31. 

Atchinnara, an Oneida chief. III., 489. 

Aterll, Edward, IV., 937, 1008. 

Atharea. (See Tarhea.) 

Athens, Pennsylvania, Indian name of, VII., 110. 

Atherton, , a partisan of major Rogers at Miehilimack- 

inac, VII., 992. 

Athlone [Godert de Ginkell, first] earl of, colonel Fletcher 
served under, IV., 362. 

Athol [James Murray, second] duke of, member of the 
privy council, VI., 757. 

Atkin (Atkins, Atkyn), Edmund, superintendent of Indian 
affairs in tlie southern colonies, reports his proceed- 
ings, VII., 208; attends a conference with the six 
nations, ibid, 211, 232; his antecedents, 211 ; his 
Indian name, 214 ; introduced to the six nations, 234; 
sick, ibid, 235 ; his speech to the six nations, 236, 
241 ; reply of the Indians to, 242; agrees on a signal 
to be used by the six nations when going to the south, 
243 ; sir William Johnson in communication with, 
277 ; displeased with the governments of Pennsylva- 
nia and Maryland, 281 ; examines ensign Belestre, 282. 

Atkins, , a settler near Savannah river, VIII., 33. 

Atkinson, Theodore, commissioner to the colonial congress 
at Albany, VI., 853, 858, 864, 871, 878, 882; one of 
the committee to prepare articles for a union of the 
colonies, 860 ; one of the committee to confer with 
the Indians of Canajohary castle, 880 ; a delegate from 
Massachusetts to Canada, IX., 941. 

Atigue (Attique) river, where, IX., 1035 ; an English fort on, 
X., 901, 956. (See Loyal Hannon.) 

Atinon, chief of the Nepissings, IX., 1070. 

Atiwaneto, an Abenaki chief, X., 252. 

Attainder, of lieutenant-governor Leisler and others, revers- 
ed, IV., 198, 215, 400 ; title of the act passed for the 
reversal of Leisler's, 1018. 

AttakallkuUa, king, ransoms captain John Stuart, VIII., 159. 

Attoniat, Pennsylvania, the French threaten to build a fort 
at, VI., 796. 

Attorney, Lodewyck Cobes admitted an, II., 651 ; Allard 
Anthony admitted an, 671; oath of office in New 
Netherland of an, 677 ; John Tuder and James Emot 
practice as, III., 679. 

Attorney -general of England, sir Robert Sawyer, III., 362; 
and solicitor-general, their report on the power of the 
colonies over their militia, IV., 101, 104 ; on the peti- 
tion of "William Penn, 108 ; counsel against colonel 



Fletcher, 466, 471; sir Edward Northey, 954; his 
opinion regarding the New York court of chancery, 
v., 946 ; and solicitor-general, their opinion that the 
governor of New York ought not to sit and vote as a 
member, of the council when acting in a legislative 
Cili)acity, VI., 41 ; his opinion as to the proper mode 
to prevent the government falling into the hands of 
Mr. James De Lancey, 612 ; report on the appointment 
of chief justice De Lancey by the solicitor and, 792 ; 
honorable Charles Yorke greatly affected on. resigning 
the office of, VIII., 202. 

for the Leeward islands, Thomas Weaver served as, 
IV., 326. 

of New Jersey, suspended, V., 399 ; Thomas Gordon 
appointed, 400. 

of New York, Thomas Rudyard fills the office of. III., 
351 ; James Graham fills the office of, ibid, 412, 721, 
767, 840, IV., 25, 129, 145, 186, 308, 345, 347, 381, 
392, 425, 580, 821 ; allowance of, too small, III., 406 ; 
George Farewell serves as, 663, IV., 847; governor 
Sloughter ordered to nominate an. III., 687; William 
NicoUs appointed, 709 ; Thomas Newton fills the 
office of, 721, 768, IV., 847; allowed a salary, 25', 206, 
253, VIII., 62; makes a report on the manner in 
which lands are granted, IV., 334 ; responsible for the 
loose manner in which the patents for the extravagant 
grants were drawn, 448 ; acted according to orders, 
463 ; an, recommended to be sent from England, 514, 
518, 520, 529, 532, 551, 594, 595, 598, 611, 647; 
salary of, 599 ; an^ to be sent from England, 633 ; the 
earl of Bellomont in want of an honest and capable, 
644 ; Sampson Shelton Broughton appointed, 667, 
683, 700 ; Mr. Broughton arrives from England as, 
913 ; he is presented by the grand jury and ordered 
indicted, 956, 957; is restored to the office of, 1017, 
1018 ; succeeded by May Bickley as, 1186 ; John 
Rayner asks to be appointed, V., 49 ; obtains leave to 
return to England, 84; John Rayner acts as, 101, 161, 
163 ; Mr. Bickley acts as, 357 ; makes use of trifling 
pretenses to bring himself business in a mean and 
sordid manner, 847 ; Richard Bradley acts as, 899, 
VI., 17, 153, 514, 583, 600 ; James Alexander acts as, 
v., 982; David- Jamison formerly, VI., 9; a bill in 
chancery against a patent for land granted by gover- 
nor Montgomery, filed by the, 30 ; William Smith 
recommended for the office of, 514; appointed, 737, 
VII., 909 ; William Kempe fills the office of, VI., 
766, 929 ; John Tabor Kempe appointed, YII., 399 ; 
men of no standing in the law fill the office of, 487 ; 
not one in the colony fit for the office of, 702 ; deterred 
from prosecuting publishers of seditious papers, 760. 

of Pennsylvania, David Lloyd, IV., 301. 
Attrowaney (Adrawanah, Atrawana, Attrawaneh, Ottra- 
wana, Ottrawanee), a Cayuga chief, VI., 387, 390 ; 
visits Oswego, 706 ; negotiates a treaty with the Messa- 
sages, 729 ; information furnished by, VII., 239 ; at 
fort Johnson, 255 ; mentioned, VIII., 113; attends a 
conference at Johnstown, 497. 



54 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Atw — 



Atwood, William, appointed chief justice of New York, IV., 
667 ; his memoml to the lords of trade, 683 ; expe- 
riences difficulty .It the treasury, 700 ; expected at 
New York, 719 ; succeeds Ahram de Peyster, 777 ; a 
letter of iutroduction furnished to, 852 ; arrives at 
New York, 88.5 ; reports the grounds of one of his 

• ■ decisions, 923 ; publishes his commission at Burling- 
ton, N. J., 924 ; reports his progress in introducing 
the law of England and enforcing the trade acts in 
the colonies, 929 ; publicly contends against the prin- 
ciple that people in the colonies are not bound by 
laws made in England, 930 ; one of the council of 
Kew York, 943 ; partisan acts of, 946 ; encour.-iges the 
factions, 949 ; the assembly vote money to, 950, 958 ; 
differences between attorney-general Broughton and, 
956 ; his proceedings in the case of colonel Bayard, 
857 ; forces a jury to change their verdict, ibid ; sus- 
pended from the council, 959 ; the people of New 
York suffered great h-irdships from, 960 ; lord Corn- 
bury writes to the lords of trade in relation to, 966 ; 
great complaints against, 971 ; refuses permission to 
report the trial of colonel Bayard and captain 
' Hutchins, 972 ; his ruling as to what was high trea- 
son, 974; judge of the court of admiralty, 1000; 
absconds, 1003 ; reasons for suspending, 1010 ; some 
people in New York bewitched by, 1017; proposes 
the suspension of attorney-general Broughton, 1020 ; 
his answer to the reasons for his own suspension, 1022 ; 
about to present articles against lord Cornbury and 
attorney-general Broughton,* 1023 ; heard before the 
privy council in the case of colonel Bayard and alder- 
man Hutchins, 1024 ; order removing him from his 
seat in the council, ibid, 1025 ; ordered to be arrested, 
1039 ; his removal confirmed, 1044 ; rumored that his 
proceedings are approved in England, 1071 ; attorney- 
general Broughton complains of, 1108, 1110; Mr. I 
Newton deputy to, 1116; William Smith succeeds, 
1137 ; his salary as chief justice, 1142 ; misconstrues 
a New York act, 1150 ; lays a report of certain matters 
relating to the province of New York before the lords 
of trade, V , 103 ; his defense for his course on the bench 
whilst chief justice of New York, 105-108 ; prays to be 
restored to that office, 109 ; governor Cosby trans- 
mits a copy of his commission to the lords of trade, 
TI., 6 ; condemns vessels belonging to Rip Van Dam, 
153. 

Atwood, , junior, retained as counsel for Bayard and 

Hutchins, IV., 946; mentioned, 1104. 

Auberiviere, Francis Louis de Pourroy de 1', fifth bishop of 
Quebec, VI., 483; biographical notice of, IX., 1063; 
the Indians condole his death, 1066. 

Aubert, captain, captures an English vessel, IX., 670, 677; 
commands le Loup Marin, X., 46, 72; stationed at 
Cape Dcsroziers, 93, 104, 116, 117, 118, 121,159; 
returns to Quebec, 130, 178; announces the approach 
of the English fleet to Quebec, 995. 

Auberville, lieutenant, sent against the Iroquois, IX., 641. 

Aubeterre, M. d', French ambassador to Spain, X., 945. 



An Boeuf river, (Aux boeufs, Bave river, Boeff, Riviere de 
Boeuf, River of Bceff ), mentioned, VL, 832, 923, 925 ; 
a French detachment sent to, 836 ; a fort at, 837, 
VII., 269, X., 259 ; the fall of fort Niagara would cut 
off the French from their fort at, VII., 6; forces 
drawn to the relief of Niagara from, 401 ; abandoned, 
424; Delawares on, 752; course of trade on, VIII., 
26 ; other names for, IX., 886 ; Shawanese settled on, 
1035 ; the English settled on, X., 255 ; the portage at, 
an obstacle to the passage of troops, 256 ; canoes to 
be provided for the navigation of, 279 ; route from 
lake Erie to the fort on, 300 ; nature of the land on, 
301 ; M. de la Chauvignerie commands at, 436 ; the 
Englisli approaching, 819. 

Aubrespy, captain d', stationed at Niagara, X., 373; votes 
for the surrender of Quebec, 1008 ; communicates the 
capitulation of that city to M. de Vaudreuil, 1041. 

Aubry, captain, disavows the outrages perpetrated by the 
western Indians on the English, VIII., 109 ; defeats 
the English, X., 900; biographical notice of, 901; 
conducts a reinforcement from the Illinois to Niagara, 
986, 987 ; defeated, 989 ; commander of the province 
of Louisiana, 1161. 

Aubry, chevalier, at fort Frontenac, IX., 235. 

Aubry (Aubery), reverend Joseph, S. J., notice of, IX., 880; 
recommends the establishment of a post in the direc- 
tion of Pentagouet, 881 ; his memoir ou the bounda- 
ries of New France, 894 ; missionary at St. Francis, 
931, 990, 991, 994. 

Auburn (Ouburne), near Boston, captain Nicholson visits, 
IIL, 551. 

An Castor, Nova Scotia, a French ship arrives at, X., 70. 

Auchmuty, reverend Samuel, VII., 538 ; rector of Trinity 
church. New York, 940. 

Auckland [William Eden 1st] lord, biographical notice of, 
VIII., 763. 

Auction, an act passed in New York to regulate the sale of 
goods at public, VIII., 167. 

Auctioneer, for the Dutch towns on Long Island appointed, 
II., 675; of Long Island allowed to collect outstand- 
ing debts, 683 ; privileges of an, 690 ; Nicolaes Bay- 
ard an, 695 ; great increase of, in New York, VIII., 
167. 

Aucsbrebis, Hans, II., 724. 

Auditor of New York, Stephen Van Cortland recommended 
for deputy. III., 429 ; Abraham Depeyster deputy, IV., 
777. 

Auditor-general of the duke of York, his property in New 
Netherland confiscated, II., 611. 

Auditor-general of the plantations, Mr. Blathwayt holds the 
commission of. III., 719 ; the assembly of New York 
refuse to pay the, VI., 94 ; Mr. Walpole acts as, 163, 
461 ; reverend Robert Cholmondeley appointed, VIII., 
454. 

Aug«, , a trader at Green Bay, killed, X., 37. 

Auge, , wounded at the battle of Sillery, X., 1086. 

Aughnanawis, a Seneca chief, VII., 623. 

Aughquagey. (See Oghquaga.) 



-BacJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



55 



Aughstagliregi , chief of all the Hurons, dead, VII., 854. 

Aughwick (Aukwick), the six nations send a message to 
the Indians at, VI., 1008; Conrad Weiser holds a 
meeting with Indians at, VII., 331 ; colonel Croghan 
returns to, 982. 

Au Glaize (Le Glaize), on the Miami river, modern name of, 
IX., 891. 

Augsburgh, the Swedes and Fins on the South river allowed 
freedom of religion according to the confession of, I., 
608 (see Lutherans) ; honorable Thomas Robinson, sec- 
retary to the English embassy at the congress of , VII. , 
899. 

Auguillon, duchess d', founds the Hotel Dieu at' Quebec, 
VII., 425. 

Augusta, princess, marries the prince of Wales, VI., 163. 

Augusta, Georgia, III., 193; reverend Mr. Frink appointed 
to, VII., 567; treaty concluded with the Indians at, 
VIII., 32. 

Augusta, Maine, garrisoned, V., 598, VI., 959; ancient fort 
at, IX., 905. 

Augusta, Virginia, northern Indians make an incxirsion 
into, VI., 230 ; colonel Lewis settles at, VIII., 517. 

Augustin. (See St. Augustine.) 

Augustines, II., 31. (See Herman.) 

Augustus, lord, V., 937. (See Fitzroy.) 

Aurange, the river and country of Manahata called. III., 16. 
(See Orange; Fort Orange.) 

Aureillan, captain d', X., 1007; votes for the surrender of 
Quebec, 1008. 

Australian company. (See Company, Australian.) 

Australian countries (Australis terra), a Dutch company pro- 
posed to trade to, I., 8 ; the West India company 
obtains the exclusive right to trade to, II., 228. 

Austria, designs of, against France, X., 259 ; defeated, 705, 
885. 

Authority to reverend Hugh Peters, to negotiate certain mat- 
ters with the West India company, I., 568. 

Autrechaux, M. d', king's lieutenant at Port Louis, X., 1062. 

Auvergnats, , Indian traders, IX., 214. 

Auvergne, count d'Estaing a native of, X., 1167. 

Aux Canards river, X., 62, 78, 92. 

Aux Cannes river, an English fort on, X., 974. 

Aux Ecureuils, English vessels ascend beyond, X., 1031. 

Auxerre, marshal Turenne at, IX., 32. 

Aux Sables river, Michigan, outrages committed by the 
Indians of, X., 140. 

Aux Sables river. New York, X., 102 ; the French army halts 
at, 455 ; near Oswego, 674. 

Avaugour, Pierre du Bois, viscount d', governor of Canada, 
IX., vii, 783; M. Gaudais ordered to report on his 
administration, 12 ; the Jesuits complain of, 13, 25 ; 
his report on Canada, 13, 20 ; recalled, 22, 784; sends 
a party to Hudson's bay, 268, 304. 

Avein, battle of, II., 351. 

Averdy, Clement Charles Francois d', controller-general, 
X., vii. 

Averin, Richard, IV., 1006. 

Avertseu, Joris, III., 747. 



Avery, doctor, the chief correspondent in England of the 
American dissenters, VII., 371. 

Avery, James, IV., 613. 

Avery, Thomas, IV., 194. 

Avis, captain. III., 160. 

Avrey, captain, carries despatches from New York to England, 
v., 533. 

Awandae creek, Pennsylvania, VIII., 127. 

Awand.arissachtoen, a Cayuga Indian, III., 532. 

Awanie (Awanay), a Mohawk sachem, IV., 728, 985, 988. 
(See Indian language.) 

Awenano (Awanano), a Seneca sachem, IV., 658; his entire 
family killed, 694. 

Awenes, John, IV., 1007. 

Awetharink, a Seneca chief. III., 774. 

Awitharoa, a Seneca chief. III., 444. 

Axe-belt, an, sent by the French to the six nations, VIII., 507. 

Axtell, William, of the council of New York, VIII., 269, 685 ; 
notice of, 269 ; governor Tryon retires to the resi- 
dence of, 638, 686 ; colonel of the Kings county mili- 
tia, 696, 755. 

Aylesburj', Welbore Ellis, member for, VII., 704. 

Aylesford [Heneage Finch, first] earl of, member of the privy 
council, v., 412. 

Ayonontouns (Ayonontout), three Englishmen taken pri- 
soners at, VI., 733, X., 240. 

Ayres, Moses, VI., 347. 

Ayrshire, the earl of Loudon dies at his castle in, VII., 36. 

Ayscough, captain, R. N., commander of his majesty's sloop 
Swan, to protect the tea ships in New York, VIII., 403. 

Ayscough, sir George, high reputation of, II., 274. 

Azores, II., 677; latitude computed from the, V., 555 ; ex- 
ports from New York to the, VI., 127, 393, 511. 



B. 



Baaker, Nicholas, IV., 942. 

Babcock, colonel Heniy, biographical notice of, X., 731. 

Babeer, M., commands a French detachment sent to lake 
Erie, VI., 835 ; builds a fort, 836. 

Bacalio islands, or Cape Breton, V., 592. 

Bachom's country, a gold mine reported to be in, II., 63. 

Bachoren, Peter, X., 881. 

Backatanne river, VIII., 31. 

Backer, Claes Janse, II., 250, 672, III., 74. 

Backer, Hendrick Janzen, III., 76. 

Backer, Hendrick Willemse, II., 699, 721. 

Backer, Jacob, II., 249, III., 75; visits Holland, II., 473; 
schepen of New Amsterdam, 475 ; gives testimony 
about the surrender of New Netherland, 476 ; brother- 
in-law of director Stuyvesant, 499. 

Backer, Joost de, case of, I., 428. (See Tcunissen.) 

Backer, Joris, II., 215. 

Backer, Reynier Willemse, II., 700, III., 74. 

Backerus, reverend Johannes, minister at New Amsterdam, 
I., 308 ; returns to Europe, 317 ; how long in New 
Netherland, 431 ; leaves New Amsterdam, 496. 



56 



genj:ral index. 



[Bac- 



Bacon, Edward, a lord of trade, III., xvii, xviii, VII., 429, 
438, 4C0, 4G4, 472, 478, 481, 485, 503, 504, 506, 567, 
078, 708, 709, 745. 

Bacon, lord, liis essay on Plantations quoted, IV., 787. 

Bacon, Nathaniel, none of the accomplices in the rebellion 
of, to be admitted into New York, III., 245 ; his rebel- 
lion in Virginia very expensive, V., 902. 

Badclard, assistant surgeon, behaves ill, X., 702. ■ 

Badcock, Thomas, IV., 936, 1006. 

Badgely, , lieutenant of the New Jersey rioters, VI., 347. 

Badsie, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 805. 

Bad women not to be sent to Canada unless applied for, X., 
232. 

Baeck, Justus, I., 437. 

Bagge, Brat, IV., 939. 

Bagley, Jonathan, lieuteuant-colouel in the expedition to 
Lake George, VI., 1000, 1002; commands a provin- 
cial regiment at Ticonderoga, X., 732. 

Bagley (Bayley), Timothy, licensed to manufacture oil from 
drift whales, V., 984 ; appointed ranger, ibid ; lieu- 
tenant of one of the New York companies, ibid. 

Bagsantara, an Iroquois chief, IV., 94. 

Bahamas, treasure found near the. III., 720 ; captain Webb 
governor of, IV., 301; his excellency is robbed by 
pirates, 585 ; governor Haskett seized and banished 
by the people of, 929, 932; ordered to prepare the 
public defenses, 965; complaints presented against 
the proprietors of, 1176; mentioned, VI., 754; John 
Tinker governor of, 756, 761 ; William Shirley gover- 
nor of, 959, VII., 946 ; reverend Mr. Garter missionary 
at, 413; tenure of judges' commissions in, 479; 
heads of inquiry relative to, VIII, 388 ; loyalists of 
the southern states to be sent to, 804. 

Bahia, the, laid waste, I., 63; the West India company's 
ships dispatched to, 67 ; the chief seat of the war in 
Brazil, 236. (See Bay of all Saints.) 

Bale dame marie, present name of. III., 248. 

Bale Francaise, IX., 4. (See Fundy, bay of.) 

Bailey, ensign Alexander, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 731. 

Bailey, captain Richard, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 729. 

Bailleul, cadet, fitted out for an expedition, X., 165 ; sent to 
Beaubassin, 169 ; reported to have been repulsed, 
173 ; returns, 174 ; expected at Beaubassin, 175 ; his 
arrival, 176. 

Baillie, George, member of the board of trade, III., xvi, V., 
187, 188, 190, 197, 198, 252, 283, 286, 288, 802, 304, 
330, 331, 332, 334. 

Baillie, lieutenant William, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 728. 

Bainbridge, Edmund, letter of, VI., 344; one of the Newark 
committee, 345. 

Bainbridge (Bambridge), John, recommended for a seat In 
the council of New Jersey, V., 420 ; not fit, 521. 

Bainfield, Mr., V., 482. 

Baird, reverend Patrick, VII., 316. 

Baird, Peter, recommended for a seat in the council of New 
Jersey, V., 521; appointed, 541; deceased, VI., 24; 
his successor in the council of New Jersey, 36. 

Baker, James, death of, V., 368. 



Baker, captain John, commandant at Albany, III., 117, 119, 
137 ; opens governor Nicolls' letters to the commis- 
saries, 143 ; governor Nicolls communicates Ms views 
respecting the peace between the French and Mohawks 
to, 148. 

Baker, John, deputy from New Jersey to the Dutch com- 
manders, II., 571. 

Baker, Joseph, IV., 1008. 

Baker, Remembrance, killed, VIII., 636 ; his head carried to 
St. Johns, 660. 

Baker, Roger, lieutenant of militia of the city of New York, 
IV., 810; indicted for saying the king was made a 
nose of wax, 957. 

Baker, Samuel, opposes the confirmation of the New York 
money bills, V., 514 ; and others, complain of the New 
York act for the encouragement of the Indian trade, 
760 ; and others, empowered to employ persons in Eng- 
land to oppose the sugar bills, 926 ; a merchant at 
London, VI., 148. 

Baker, Thomas, deputy from Easthampton, III., 27. 

Baker, William, a merchant at London, VI., 148 ; sir Wil- 
liam, acts in certain cases as agent for the province 
of New York, VII., 607. 

Baker, , captain Greathouse and followers assemble at 

the house of, VIII., 464. 

Balagnier, , under-secretary of state. III., xi. 

Bald Eagle creek (Pennsylvania), VIII., 125. 

Bald Mountain (Lake George), X., 566, 601, 738; major 
Rogers defeated at, 838. 

Baldridge, Adam, submUs a proposal for the settlement of 
the island of St. Mary, IV., 333 ; a chief manager 
in the trade with pirates, 413 ; the earl of Bellomont 
cannot prosecute, 518 ; clears at New York for one 
place and goes to another, 552 ; a license of marriage 
granted to, 766. 

Baldwin, Richard, IV., 222. 

Ball, captain. III., 730. (See Bull, captain.) 

Ballendalloch, biogiaphical notice of major Grant of, X., 903. 

Balnevis, lieutenant Patrick, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 
729 ; notice of, ibid. 

Balthazar, a Spanish negro, sold in New Netherland, 11., 31. 

Baltic, the king of Denmark exacts toll from those who fre- 
quent the, L, 109. 

Baltimore, baron, sir George Calvert created, III., vii ; secre- 
tary of state, 17 ; reported death of a son of, 161, 162. 
(See Calvert, George.) 

Baltimore [Benedict Leonard Calvert 5th], lord, conforms to 
the church of England, V., 605. 

Baltimore (Baltamoor, Baltamore, Baltemore, Balthamoer, 
Balthamoor, Balthamor, Balthamore, Balthasar More, 
Balthemor, Balthimore, Balthus Moor, Baltimoor), 
Cecil Calvert 2d lord, proprietor of the province 
of Maryland, II., 67, 70 ; Delaware claimed by, 73, 81, 
131, 138, III., 186; memoir of, IL, 74; Josias Feudal, 
lieutenant of, 75 ; controversy between the Dutch 
and, 82, 84, 85, 86, 91, 92, 96, 97, 98, 99, 116 ; extract 
from the patent of, 84 ; Messrs. Heermans and Wal- 
dron's observations on the patent of, 85; uninhabited 



-Bar] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



57 



Baltimore (Cecil Calvert) — continued. 

lands only granted to, 86 ; date of the patent of, 91 ; 
the Dutch iu possession of New Netherland long before 
a patent had been obtained by, 92 ; arguments against 
the validity of the grant to, 96; colonel Clabborn 
obliged to beg his life from, 97 ; inquires of the 
authorities in Maryland what they had done with the 
Dutch on the Delaware, 98 ; Mr. Heennans suggests 
that some of the directors of the West India company 
see and arrange matters with, 99 ; Charles I. grants Ma- 
rj-land to, 117, 137, III., 24, V., G05 ; governor Feudal 
excites a faction against, II., 118; instructs captain 
Neale to demand the surrender of New Amstel, 119 ; 
answer of the West India compauy thereto, 120 ; the 
Dutch ambassador to England to be requested to 
attend to the controversy with, 121 ; mentioned, 138 ; 
patent of, sought to be annulled. III., 23 ; obstructs 
the trade of Virginia, 25 ; his patent an intrusion, 27 ; 
expected to apply for the Delaware, 70 ; has no right 
ix) the Delaware, 113 ; protests against the Dutch, 
344. 

Baltimore, [Charles Calvert 3d] lord, governor of Maryland, 
II., 73 ; his negotiations with the five nations. III., 
321, 322, 323, 326 ; requests to be heard before the 
council on his claims to the Delaware, 339. 

Balveren, Mr., II., 352. 

Bampfield, Mr., V., 532. 

Bams, John, X., 883. 

Banagero. (See Kanagero.) 

Banchaud (Eanchot), Mr., III., 130, 147. 

Bancker (Banckert), captain, II., 267; takes an English ves- 
sel, 268 ; the vessel restored which was taken by, 
323. 

Bancker, captain Evert, resident commissary among the 
v., 797 ; summoned to retire from Oswego, 



Bancker, Gerard, assistant elerk of the New York assembly, 
VIII., 456. 

Bancroft, Edward, answers William Knox, VIII., 803. 

Bancroft, George, his character of General Wentworth, VI., 
182 ; communicates a letter of reverend doctor John- 
son, VII., 438. 

Banditti, transported from Sweden to the South river, I., 588. 

Bandoliers, what, II., 623. 

Bangor, doctor Herring, bishop of, VI., 849 ; doctor Sher- 
lock, bishop of, 910. 

Banishment from New Netherland, sentences of, I., 213, 349. 

Bank of issue, an act passed in Barbadoes to establish some- 
thing like a, IV., 1188. 

Banke river, VIII., 31. 

Banker, Christopher, captain of rangers, VIII., 602. 

Banker, Evert, an alderman of Albany, III., 771, 772, 773, 
IV., 20," v., 572; attends conferences with the In- 
dians, III., 805, 840, IV., 90, 279, 281, V., 271, 715, 
720 ; attends a council held by governor Fletcher, 
IV., 175; submits views on Indian affairs, 176; 
obtains a fraudulent grant of land, 330, 391, 783, 785 ; 
the Indians complain of, 345, 346, 363, 743 ; signs a 



petition to William III., 940; the grant to, ought to 
he repealed, 1112 ; the assembly of New York present 
articles ag.ainst, V., 9 ; commissioner for Indian affairs, 
85, 217, 219, 223, 226, 228, 229, 635, 638, 657, 658, 
661, 662, 664, 667, 679, 693, 694, 696, 742, 786, 791, 
794; resident commissary among the Senecas, 797; 
summoned to retire from fort Oswego, 829. 

Banker, Evert, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601. (See BancTcer.) 

Banker, John, a merchant of New York, IV., 1135. 

Bankes, John, sent messenger from Connecticut to governor 
Colve, II., 652 ; reported confined at New Orange, 
660. 

Banks, James, lieutenant of fusileers, V., 646. 

Banks, ensign John (46th foot), at Oswego, VII., 854. 

Bann.asitoron, an Oneida chief, IV., 93. 

Banning, Jan, II., 187. 

Bante, D., I., 466, 570, 629. 

Banyar, Goldsborow, deputy clerk of tlie council of New 
York, VI., 494, 505, 527, 545, 591, 594, 596, 606, 
705, 707, 708, 710, 711, 712, 779, 780, 781, 815, 841, 
866, 1003, VII., 679 ; communicates proposals for 
an exchange of prisoners, VI., 500; deputy secre- 
tary of the province of New York, 863, VIII., 
310; deputy auditor-general, VII., 359 ; clerk of the 
supreme court, 684 ; sued by J. Morin Scott, ibid ; 
lieutenant-governor Golden bears testimony in favor 
of, 793, 794 ; fees on grants of land taken by, 923 ; 
biographical notice of, VIII., 188 ; an active friend of 
government, 248 ; deprived of the office of surrogate, 
&c., 284; shares the profits of his office with David 
Golden, 323 ; attends the funeral of sir William John- 
son, 480 ; assists at an Indian conference, 482 ; resi- 
dent in New York, 599. 

Banyar, Mrs., death of, VIII., 189. 

Baptism, a New England missionary refuses Indian children, 
VIII., 541. 

Baptisms and buri.-ils, governor Burnet ordered to transmit 
a return of, V.f 777 ; number of, in Canada in 1671, 
IX., 73 ; in 1672, 89 ; in 1679, 143. 

Baptist, , in garrison at fort Frontenac, IX., 236. 

Baptiste (Baptist), captain, a privateer in prison at Boston, 
IV., 343, IX., 691; a French pilot, conversant with 
the New England coast, 576 ; takes a prize off cape 
Cod, 617; a privateer of Acadia, infiicts considerable 
damage on the English, 636 ; lived a long time at 
Boston, 661. 

Baptists. (See Anabaptists.) 

Barachois, what, IX., 924. 

Barantte, captain, mortally wounded, X., 1089. 

Barbadoes, horses exported from New Netherland to, I., 
385, 386, 387, 397, 399, 455 ; importance of the trade 
to, 547; New Netherland trades in tobacco from, II., 
234 ; rule observed by English traders on arriving at, 
256 ; admiral de Ruyter ordered to proceed against, 
289 ; negroes sent from Guinea to, 338 ; ships arrive 
in England from, 340 ; reverend George Downing 
visits, 416 ; captured by the Dutch, 518, 522 ; the 



58 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bae- 



Barliadoes — continued. 

heirs of Constant Silvester and Thomas Middle- 
towne reside at, 588 ; Richard Morris retires to, 
595 ; Lewis Morris removes to New York from, 619 ; 
in the Carribbees, 050 ; a certain Englishman forges a 
marriage certificate and retires to, G91 ; major Andros 
commander of the forces in, 741 ; lord Willoughby 
governor of, III., 45; he acts tyrannically in, 142; 
complaints in relation to the trade to, 175, 176 ; nature 
of the trade with, 182 ; provisions sent from Boston 
to the fleet at, 183 ; many of the inhabitants propose 
removing to Boston from, 184; New York sends pro- 
visions to, 212 ; negi-oes sold in, may be removed 
elsewhere, 245 ; persons not in orders sent to exer- 
cise the ministerial function at, 253 ; slaves brought 
to New York from, 261 ; a vessel with provisions 
plundered on her way to, 364 ; Mr. Rudyard goes to, 
412 ; news of the revolution in England received from, 
583, 085 ; a vessel arrives at New York from, 599 ; 
captain George McKenzie about going to, 614 ; Casper 
Hermans about escaping to, 636 ; in danger of being 
lost to the English, 651 ; supplied from the northern 
colonies with provisions, 652, 653 ; New Y'ork imports 
sugar and rum from, IV., 186 ; a frigate sent as a con- 
voy with ships bound to, 257; the earl of Bellomont 
at, 296, 299, 302, 339, IX., 690; a ketch enters at 
New Jersey from, IV., 382 ; ships arrive every month 
in winter at New York from, 432; captain Glover 
sails from New York to, 446 ; difference in the price 
of New Y'ork and Pennsylvania flour in, 461 ; a part of 
captain Kidd's cargo sold at, 584 ; sugar, rum and 
molasses very scarce at, 600, 602 ; duplicate des- 
patches from England to be sent by way of, 601 ; 
draws provisions from the American colonies, 725 ; 
Boston exports horses and its refuse codfish to, 790 ; 
mentioned, 817; Mr. Weaver about visiting, 827 ; the 
lieutenant-governor of New York absent at, 857; Mr. 
Weaver flies to, 862 ; certain duties to be applied to 
the pay of soldiers in, 965 ; an act to supply the 
want of cash, and to establish a credit for owners 
of real estate in, vetoed, 1188 ; frequent opportunities 
of writing from New York to England by way of, V., 
2 ; trade from New England to, 31 ; imports into New 
York from, 57 ; a ship bound to Philadelphia from, 
is taken by a French privateer, 61 ; Benjamin Furzer 
dies at, 175 ; number of ships cleared from Great 
Britain 1714-1717 for, 615 ; value of the imports and 
exports of, 616 ; trade between New York and, 686 ; 
court of exchequer in, founded on an ordinance, VI. 
6; Henry Grenville, governor of, 756 ; church of Eng- 
land established in, VII., 365, 366; instruction re- 
specting the tenure of judges' Commissions in, 479 ; 
William Spry, governor of, 946 ; John Moore settles 
at, VIII., 197; heads of inquiry relative to, 388; vis- 
count Howe, governor of, 751 ; governor Andros sends 
Frenchmen from New York to, IX., 129. 

Barbara, a Spanish Degress, sold in New Netherland II 
31. 



Barbaric (Barbarr, Barbary, Barberie), John, a merchant of 
New York, III., C81, 749, IV., 849, 934, 1135; 
appointed to examine lord Bellomont's accounts, 
1090 ; appointed member of the council of New 
York, 1137; his appointment approved, 1156; a 
commissioner in the case of the Mohegan Indians 
against the colony of Connecticut, 1178; admitted 
illegally to the council, 1180 ; a Frenchman, V., 106 ; 
member of governor Hunter's council, 124, 296, 
458 ; attends a conference held with the Indians at 
Albany, 657, 658, 661, 662, 664, 667; dead, 856, 
870. 

Barber, Benjamin, captain in Shirley's regiment, X., 282. 

Barber, Francis, III., 409, 494. 

Barber, Luke, member of the Maryland council, II., 94. 

Barberie, Peter, V., 793, 794. 

Barberie. {See St. Contest.) 

Barbesieux, Louis Francois Marie le Tellier, marquis de, 
minister of war, X., vi. 

Barcelona, marquis de la JonquiJre taken prisoner near, S., 
250. ' 

Barclay, reverend Henry, notice of, VI., 88 ; rector of Trin- 
ity church, New York, 314 ; complaint of the Mo- 
hawks against, 315, 851 ; the Mohawks threaten to 
drive him ofl' their land, 783 ; acquainted with Mr. 
Smith of Philadelphia, 912 ; writes remarks on Smith's 
History of New Y'ork, VII., 371 ; archbishop Seeker 
commends the remarks written by, 395 ; Dr. Johnson's 
character of, 397 ; application made for a degree for, 
441, 451 ; his remarks a basis for Dr. Smith's Vindi- 
cation, 448 ; antecedents of, 451 ; degree of doctor of 
divinity conferred on, 454 ; his defense again.st Smith, 
mentioned, 536, 566 ; his testimony in regard to reve- 
rend Myles Cooper, 538 ; had few Indians under him, 
591 ; his defense against Smith sent to the society for 
propagating the gospel in foreign parts, 592 ; superin- 
tends the publication of the Book of Common Prayer 
in Mohawk, VIII., 816. 

Barclay, James, VI., 346. 

Barclay, Robert, owns a tract of land on the Passaic river, 
VI., 346. 

Barclay (Barkly), reverend Thomas, allowance from England 
to, v., 466; first episcopal minister of Albany, VI., 

Bardineau, Jean, IX., 236. 

Barege, springs of, IX., 498. 

Barelle, Jan de, 11., 104. 

Barens, Josuah, II., 601. 

Barens, Lyntie, II., 104, 105. 

Barent, Goert, sells public property, I., 428. 

Barents (Barentsen), Jan, II., 54, 171, 180, 181, 182. 

Barents (Barentzen), Meyndert, II., 249, III., 74. 

Barentse (Barentzen), Symon, II., 637, III., 74. 

Barentse, Tys, magistrate of Staten island, II., 58S. 

Barentsen, Harmen, II., 189, 463. 

Barentsen, Mathys, ensign at Swaenenburg, II., 627. 

Barentz, Rynier, IV., 20. 

Barford, captain, abandons fort Ontario, VII., 126. 



-Bar] 



GENERAL INDEX 



59 



Barillon d'Amoncourt, M. de, French ambassador at the court 
of London, III., 505, 506, 507, 508, V., 620, IX., 
198 (see Brauges) ; treaty of neutrality drawn- up by 
chancellor Jefferies and, IV., 210; information re- 
specting Hudson's bay sent to, IX., 209 ; instructed 
to request the court of England to order that no arms 
be furnished the Iroquois, 226, 234 ; ordered to com- 
plain of governor Dongan, 269, 313, 322, 345 ; com- 
missioner under the treaty of neutrality, 330. 

Barker, , III., 34, 65, 228, 382. 

Barker, Thomas, IV., 34. 

Barker, William, IV., 27. 

Barkley, Mr , a friend of William" Penn, III., 290. 

Barkstead, John, one of the judges of Charles I., arrested in 
Holland and sent to England, II., 417. 

Barley, samples of, sent from New Netherland to Holland, 
I., 37-; duty in Holland on, 572. 

Barnard, Joseph, VII., 903. 

Barnard, Richard, aifidavit of, I., 75. 

Barnegat, III., 223. 

Barnes, Abraham, commissioner from Marylan'd to the con- 
gress at Albany, VI., 853, 860, 871, 879. 

Barnes, William, IV., 27, 938, 1007. 

Barnesley, lieutenant Thomas, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 
731. 

Bamham, lieutenant Thomas, killed at Lake George, VI., 
1007. 

Barns, captain, VIII., 735, 

BaroUon, Mademoiselle, X., 826. 

Barometer, range of, in New York, V., 691, VI., 123.. 

Baron, The, chief of the Hurons, visits Montreal, IX., 478, 
480; his intrigues, 604, 607, 067; his speech, 605; 
his son makes peace with the Iroquois, 619 ; deceives 
the French, 620;. settles among the Miamis, 672; 
invites the Iroquois to destroy the Miamis, 674. 

Barons, Benjamin, secretary to governor Hardy, VII., 39, 
85, 220. * 

Barotte, captain de, marries at Montreal, X., 417. 

Barrameda, St. Lucar de, I., 577. (See St. Lucar.) 

Barrfi, Isaac, biographical notice of, X., 1027; adjutant-gene- 
ral to general Wolf, 1028. 

Barre, Johan de la, and other merchants of London, com- 
plain of the Dutch West India company, I., 71-81 ; 
mentioned, 82, 108. 

Barre, Le Febure de la, is dissuaded from hostilities against 
the five nations. III., 396, V., 76; governor Dongan 
transmits to England his correspondence with. III., 
430 ; makes peace with the Senecas, 445 ; correspon- 
dence between governor Dongan and, 447, 448, 449, 
450, 452 ; his instructions to M. de Salvaye, 450 ; 
governor Dongan expresses his surprise that governor 
Denonville should follow in the steps of, 455 ; M. de 
Nonville justifies, 456 ; very much addicted to great 
words, 460; desires governor Dongan's cooperation 
against the Indians, 472; mentioned, 515, 519 ; sends 
M. de Tonti to the Illinois, 580 ; proceeds against the 
five nations, V., 75; governor of Canada, IX., vii ; 
M. Bourdon, agent of, 24; liis instructions, 167; 



notice of, ibid ; holds a conference on the subject of 
the Iroquois, 194 ; about to march against the Iroquois, 
196 ; does not think much of M. de la Salle's disco- 
very, 198; letter of commander Brockholls to, 199; 
ordered to prevent the English establishing themselves 
at Hudson's bay, 200 ; reports the causes of the war 
with the Iroquois, 201 ; misrepresents M. de la Salle, 
204 ; services of his son, 210 ; engaged in the Indian 
trade, 211 ; M. de la Salle remonstrates against the 
seizure of fort Frontenac by, 213 ; dispossesses M. 
de la Salle of fort Frontenac, 214; seizes M. de la 
Salle's property at fort Louis, 215 ; maladministration 
of, 221, 223 ; empowered to make war on the Iroquois, 
222; ordered' to restore fort Frontenac to M. de la 
Salle, 223 ; letters of reverend father de Lamberville 
to, 226, 252-260 ; engaged iu making fools of the 
public, 231 ; sets out against the Iroquois, 232 ; at war 
with the Iroquois, 234 ; treaty concluded by, 236 ; 
his proceedings with the five nations, 239 ; cares little 
for his army, 248; memoir of, addressed to Louis 
XIV., 250 ; deserves the title of liberator, 261 ; in- 
forms the marquis de Seignelay of the extravagant pre- 
tensions of governor Dongan, 263 ; requests governor 
Dongan to observe neutrality, 265 ; superseded, 269, 
270 ; reasons for the recall of, 271 ; governor Dongan 
complains of, 292 ; ill consequences of his expedition, 
309, and of his course, 320; builds a vessel on lake 
Ontario, 358 ; father Milet joins, 665 ; the cause of 
the protracted war against the Iroquois, 678 ; the Iro- 
quois offer satisfaction to, 702; serves in Cayenne, 
784 ; extracts from his letters, 798. 

Barre, M , organizes a guard at cape Desroziers, X., 104, 
116, 117. 

Barrington [William Wildman, 2d] viscount, member of 
the privy council, VIII., 88, 417 ; biographical notice 
of, X., 537; advances money to baron de Dieskau, 806. 

Barrington (Nova Scotia), formerly called Port la Tour, X., 
10. 

Barrington, Great. (See Great Barrington.) 

Barrels, M., secretary of count de Frontenac, IX., 131; 
countersigns an order for the release of a coureur de 
bois, 132. 

Barrow, deputy paymaster, retires on board the Duchess 
of Gordon, VIII., 643. 

Barry, , IV., 11. 

Bartels, Henry, II., 187. 

Bartels (Bartelzen), Jonas, II., 249, 700, III., 74. ' 

Barthe, captain John, X., 17. 

Bartman, captain, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 729. 

Bartolett, Guyl, I., 437. 

Barton, Benjamin Smith, VII., 166. 

Barton, reverend Thomas, VII., 165 ; notice of, 1136. 

Barton, William, author of memoirs of David Rittenhouse, 
VII., 166. 

Barton, lieutenant-colonel William, takes brigadier-general 
Prescott prisoner, VHL, 659. 

Bartouille, lieutenant, recommended to the notice of th« 
minister of war, X., 1056. 



60 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bae— 



Bartow, reverend John, signs an address to governor Hunter, 
v., 326; censnres reverend Mr. Henderson, 354; 
episcopal minister at Westchester, VI., 1018. 
Bartwyck (Bartwic), captain, obstructed in his voyage by the 
Dutch, II., 2C2; the Dutch ask for proofs of the fact, 
270. 
Baschy, count de, X., 905. 
Basford, John, IV., 934, lOOG. 
Basket's edition of the Laws of New York, anomalies in, VII., 

455. 
Basse (Bass), Jeremiah, issues a proclamation asserting the 
right of New Jersey to a port of entry, IV., 332, 380 ; 
governor of the Jerseys, 380, 542, 60G ; his papers 
sent to England, 381 ; clears a ship at Perth Amboy, 
438 ; some particulars respecting, 439, 777 ; the 
earl of Bellomont reports the disputes he has with, 
547; arrests pirates, 551; petitions the house of 
commons against the earl of Bellomont, 605 ; reco- 
vers damages for the seizure of the ship Hester, 777 ; 
his character, 778, 817, V., 205; it was not in the 
power of the lords of trade to hinder his proceedings 
in the case of the Hester, IV., 856; recommended for 
a seat in the council of New Jersey, 965 ; objections 
to his appointment, 966; bears testimony to reverend 
Mr. Moor's good character, 1077; antecedents of, V., 
34 ; secretary of the province of New Jersey, 47, 155, 
205; his removal demanded, 256; intrusts the records 
of New Jersey to Peter Sonmans, 348 ; surveyor of the 
customs at Burlington, 349 ; resumes possession of 
the records, ibid ; one of the reverend Mr. Talbot's 
main props, 401. 
Basserode (Bassenrok), chevalier de, recommended for the 
cross of St. Louis, X., 375; commandant at Carillon, 
546; wounded, 554, 751, 799 ; defeats a party of Eng- 
lish, 565, 570, 646. 
Basset, Peter, naturalized, IV., COO. 

Basset, captain, bearer of despatches from colouel Bouquet 
to general Amherst, VII., 546; present in the battle 
of Bushy run,. ibid. 
Bassett, Francis, member of the general committee of New 

York, VIII., 601. 
Bastelaer, Goris, I., 193. 

Bastiaen, a Spanish negro, sold in New Netherland, II., 31. 
Bastiaensen, Jan, II., 456. 

Bastiaenssen, Martin, a privateer or pirate in New Nether- 
land, I., 577, II., U, 33. (See Raef.) 
Bastien, -^, IX., 236. 

Bastile, a New England man in the, IV., 210, 211. 
Bastyaenssen, Michiel, II., 638. 

Batavia, (East Indies,) Isaac Sears dies at, VIII., 220. 
Bateman,Mr.,Il.,84,85,90; Messrs. Heermans and Waldron 
have an audience with the governor and council of 
Maryland at the house of, 94. 
Batesmans gut. III., 719. 

IJfth [John Granville first], earl of, member of the com- 
mittee for trade and foreign plantations. III., xiv ; 
member of the priVy council, 177, 360, 428, IV., 
103. 



Bath (England), brigadier Hunter and family visit, V., 555; 
governor Pownall dies at, VI., 1009 ; baron de Dies- 
kau at, X., 682, 806. 
Bathurst, sir Benjamin, knight, advises governor Dongan of 
the ill char.acter of one of the officers of customs at Nevv 
York, III., 403, 410; governor Dongan reports col- 
lector Santen's imprudence to, 405 ; governor Don- 
gan reimburses, 406 ; writes to governor Dongan 
in relation to the king's farm, 413 ; governor Dongan 
refers to, 414, 492 ; advised of the shipment of certain 
goods to England, 496. 
Batilly, ensign de, IX., 669. 

Batiskan, IX , 235 ; provisions sent to Quebec from; X., 1030 ; 
fears entertained that the- English will land at, 
1035. 
Batt, Henry, III., 193. 
Batteau cove, X., 349. 

Batten kill, IV., 391, VIII., 206; fort Clinton near, X., 19. 
Battery, a, recommended to be erected on the point of New 

York, III., 87. 
Battle, of Bradook, Scaltash, Launceston, Stratton and Mod- 
bury mentioned, II., 599. 
of Brandy wine. (See Brandywine.) 
of the Bioocque, where fought, X., 370,, 926, 
of Bushy run. (See Bushy run.) 
off cape Finistcre, referred to, X., 121, 
of Crevelt, count de Gizors mortally wounded at, X., 696'. 
of Detroit, major Gladwin distinguishes himself in, 

VII., 961; captain Dalyell killed in the, 962. 
of J)ettingen. (See Dettingen.) 
between the Dutch and Indians of Westchester county, 

I., 187. 
between the French and Seneoas, rumors of a, III., 426 ; 

description of the, 432, 446, 479, IX., 338, 365. 
between French and English Indians near lake Cham- 
plain, III., 815, 817. 
between major Schuyler's detachment and the French 

and their Indians, IV., 18. 
between some of the five nations and the Flat heads, 

VI., 390. 
of Germantown, major-general Grant in, X., 903. 
of lake George, particulars respecting, VI., 390, 1003; 
killed and wounded at, 1006 ; returns of the killed 
and wounded sent to sir Charles Hardy, 1013 ; French 
account of, X., 322, 335, 339, 342, 343, 366, 367, 
383,384, 913 ; French loss at, 360, 380, 913; number 
of French regulars killed at, 417, 418. 
of J^prairie, III., 804, IX., 521, 522. 
of Long island, major-general Grant in, X., 903. 
of Minas, X., 91. 
of the Monongahela, an account of, X., 303, 366, 382 ; 

sent to France, 310. 
of Quebec, X., 1039. 
of Sillery, an account of, X., 1075, 1077, 1082 ; list of the 

French officers Idlled and wounded at, 1084. 
of Ticonderoga, particulars of, X., 723, 727, 735, 737, 741, 
744, 747, 748, 752, 788, 809, 814, 847, 895, 922 ; killed 
and wounded at, 727, 728, 750, 798 ; French loss u. 



-Bat] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



61 



Battle— continued. 

732; the first fought by the French in America, without 
Indians, 750. 
naval, between tlie Dutch and Frencli fleets, II., 572; 
between the Dutch and English fleets, 733, 734; 
between an English frigate and a pirate ship, IV., 552 ; 
between the Triton prize and a French privateer,V., 21. 
Batts, Thomas, III., 193, 195. 

Baudin (Dodin), lieutenant, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 750, 
798. 

Baudoin, captain, arrives at Quebec from Martinico, X., 50. 

Baudot, M., wounded, X., 430. 

Baugh, captain Thomas, transmits information of hostilities 
on the frontiers of Virginia, VII., 542. 

Baugy, chevalier de, alluded to, III., 447; repels a party of 
the five nations at fort St. Louis, 451, IX., 239, 264; 
lieutenant of governor de la Barre's guards, 203 ; sent 
to M. de la Salle, 204 ; in the western country, 214 ; 
sent to seize fort St. Louis, 215 ; at fort St. Louis, 248 ; 
about to return to Quebec, 2G4. 

Baume, lieutenant-colonel, major Skene accompanies, VIII., 
416 ; colonel Starke defeats, 806. 

Bavea, Lewis, ensign, IV., 810. 

Bave river.' (See Riviere au Breuff.) 

Bawden (Bauden), John, III., 366. 

Baxter, , X., 592. 

Baxter (Backster), George, commands a party against the 
Indians, I., 186; assists in removing vice-director Van 
Dincklagen by force from the council, 456 ; arbitrator 
on the part of the Dutch in the differences with the 
English, 459, 460 ; sends a letter to governor Codding- 
ton, 497; a great friend of secretary Van Tienhoven, 
498; mentioned, 550, 552, 555, 597, 599, 612; pro- 
claims the Republic of England, II., 136, 152; a 
niagistrate of Gravesend, 154, 156, 159 ; ordered to 
draw up representations ag.ainst the Dutch, III., 46. 

Baxter, Jerv.is, carries despatches to England, III., 351; 
member of governor Dongan's council, 369, 416 ; 
going to England, 417; recommended to the king, 
423 ; letter of Mr. Brucy to, 455 ; one of sir Edmund 
Andi-os' council, 543 ; resigns Ms command at Albany, 
693 ; a catholic, 640 ; mentioned, 410, 420, 426, 494, 718. 

Baxter, Morgan, IV., 936, 1008. 

Bay of all Saints, the Dutch convey tlie viceroy, his son and 
the Jesuits prisoners from the, I., 34. 

Bay of Apalachee, why so called, IV., 1089. 

Bay of Bombeaoure. (See NiaourS.) 

Bay of the Cayugas, IX., 838, 951 ; the French build a fort 
at, 969 ; description of, 1012 ; a trading post pro- 
posed at, 1013. 

Bay of Fundy, IX., 4, X., 60. 

Bay of Ganaouske. (See Ganaouske.) 

Bay of Islands (Newfoundland), X., 60. 

Bay of Mexico. (See Mexico.) 

Bay of New York, the, is a free place, II., 404, 482; the 
English arrive in, 410, 474, 487. (See Gravesend; 
Nayack ; Ncio Utrecht.) 

Bay du Nord called Hudson's bay, IX., 781. 



Bay des Ouynes. (See Miramicht.) 

Bay des Pu.ans, Iroquois name for, V., 791 ; a good Indian 
post, Vll., 658; some merchants of Canada purchase 
a fort and an extensive tract of land at, 817 ; news 
received in Quebec from, IX., 202. (See Green Bay.) 

Bay St. Paul, IX., 490. 

Bay of the Senecas river, IX., 761. 

Bay Verte, necessity of a fort between Beaubassin and, VI., 
477 ; the French war party at, recalled, 478 ; an In- 
dian trading post proposed at, VII., 635 ; confounded 
with Green b.ay, 658 ; a portage at, IX., 895 ; entrance 
to, X., 42 ; the French fort at captured, 315. 

Bayard, Balthazar, II., 574, 587, 604, 651, 691, 711, 111., 425, 
743, 749, IV., 1008. 

Bayard, Mr., captain of the John and Mary, V., 419. 

Bayard (Beyart), Nicholas, clerk of the counting-house, II., 
373 ; sent to New England for supplies, ibid, 473 ; 
clerk of the council, 445 ; certifies as to the eflbrts 
made by director Stuyvesaut to obtain provisions 
from New England, 474 ; secretary to the council of 
war, 571, 573, 575, 578, 586, 589, 602, 629, 632, 648, 
658, 659, 661, 664, 665, 666, 667, 668, 673, 680, 688, 692, 
696, 697, 709, 711 ; the records of New Jersey to be 
deposited with, 606 ; secretary to governor Colve, 
612; receiver-general of New Netherland, 613 ; lieu- 
tenant of militia, 670 ; member of governor Colve's 
council, 687, 689, 694, 698, 701, 703, 704, 712^ 714, 
717, 720, 723, 727 ; signs a petition to governor An- 
dros, 743; swears allegiance to the English, 111., 74; 
petitions against taking the oath of allegiance to the 
English, 233 ; an .alderman of New York, 339 ; mem- 
ber of the council of New York, 417, 420, 543, 576, 
586, 685, 793, 796, 800, 814, 818, IV., 25, 33, 175, 
176, 204, 235, 238, 239, 245, 284 ; mayor of New York, 
III., 417, 436, 437, 487; certificate of the minister of 
the Dutcli church in favor of, 588 ; appointed to pro- 
vide materials for fortifying the city of New York, 
592 ; captain Nicholson sends for, 594 ; his letters 
publicly read in the fort, 595 ; commissioner of the 
revenue, 596, 608, 609 ; retires to Albany, 596, 610, 615, 
645 ; letters of, to lieutenant-governor Nicholson, 598, 
611, 613 ; transmits captain Nicholson, a journal of 
the revolution in New York, 598; abstract from the 
journal of, 599 ; a popish dog, 601 ; captain Leisler 
threatens to imprison a brother of, 604 ; suggests the 
reduction of Canada, 612 ; narrowly escapes with his 
life, 617 ; extract of a letter from, 620 ; letter of, to 
the earl of Shrewsbury, 634 ; letter of, to sir E. An- 
dres, 635 ; narrative of occurrences in New York in 
1689, by, 636; endeavors to quell the rebellion at 
New York, ^37 ; returns to New York, 646 ; behavior 
of, 655 ; one of his letters intercepted, 657, 715 ; 
orders the captains and soldiers at New York not to 
acknowledge lieutenant-governor Leisler's authority, 
658 ; desires to purchase the oiSce of collector of the . 
port of New Y'ork, 661 ; an ai-med force sent to arrest, 
683; committed to tlie fort, 684; William Nicolls, 
counsel for, 709 ; in prison and in irons, ibid, 716 ; 



62 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bat— 



Bayard, Nicholas — continued. 

exhibited in irons to terrify the people, 721 ; governor 
Sloughter demands the release of, 7(50 ; draws up an 
answer to lieutenant-governor Leisler's letter to the 
king, 766 ; accompanies governor Fletcher to the fron- 
tiers, IV., 14, 16; attends a meeting of the Indians at 
Albany, 38, 237 ; broker in obtaining protection for 
pirates, 308, 387, 457, 481 ; advises the printing of a 
malicious pamplilet, 31.5 ; his statement in support of 
the right of the English over the five nations, 353 ; a 
clerk in the secretary's office under the Dutch, ibid ; 
a Jacobite,.380; extent of the extravagant grant to, 
391, 780, v., 22, 651; quit-rent received on his 
extravagant grant, IV., 392 ; evil consequences of the 
grant to, 394 ; susjiended from the council, 395, 398, 
. 411, 424, 620'; reasons for his suspension, 399, 401 ; 
absents himself from church through dislike of the 
earl of Bellomont, 416; further complaints against, 
419 ; ordered to make a survey of the fort at New 
York, 421; goes to England, 427, 508; the earl of 
Bellomont's inveterate enemy, 428 ; his lordship will 
not reply to the answer of, 439 ; is liable to be tried 
for his life, 440 ; before the lords of trade, 467 ; length 
of time in New York, 469 ; in public employment 
under the Dutch and English government, ibid ; his 
evidence in Fletcher's case, 469,472, 483; the attor- 
ney-general drew the patent of, 472; is surprised 
at the dissatisfaction of the Indians with governor Flet- 
cher, 473 ; denies that governor Fletcher influenced 
the council, 480 ; his complaints against the earl of 
Bellomont favorably received, 490 ; an electioneering 
pamphlet transcribed by a son of, 509 ; extravagant 
grant to, vacated, 510, 528, 714 ; the earl of Bello- 
mont determined to break the extravagant grant to, 
514 ; Demyre of Ulster county brother-in-law of, 
519; one of governor Fletcher's sycophant council- 
lors, 523 ; disturbed at the taking up of Leisler's 
bones, ibid ; money raised in New York to be sent 
to, 524 ; endeavored to hinder the proclamation of 
their majesties at Albany, 525 ; the Mohawks com- 
plain of, 566; his extravagant grant proposed to be 
distributed among the soldiers, 588 ; gets up a petition 
against the earl of Bellomont, 612 ; a merchant of New 
York, 624 ; Abraham de Peyster, one of the judges of, 
777 ; amount paid by, to governor Fletcher for his 
grant, 785 ; reports the condition of the fort at New 
York, 796 ; colonel Smith opposes the breaking of the 
grant to, 813 ; part of the Mohawks' land included in 
the extravagant grant to, 822 ; brother-in-law of widow 
Cortland, 846 ; letter of, to sirPliilip Meadows report- 
ing the death of the earl of Bellomont, 848 ; at the head 
of a conspiracy, 942, 943 ; committed on a charge of 
high treason, 945 ; his letter giving an account of his 
persecution by the Leislerians, 946 ; memorial of 
Messrs. Adderly and Lodowick in behalf of, 949 ; 
particulars of the proceedings of the government 
against himself, his son and captain Hutchins, 950, 
957 ; letter of, to the lords of trade, 951 ; sentenced 



to death, 953, 955, 959, 972, 974, V., 106; opinion of 
the attornej'-geueral of England on the validity of 
the warrant against, IV., 954; reprieved, 956; attor- 
ney-general Broughton indicted for not prosecuting, 
957 ; admitted to appeal from the proceedings in New 
York against him, 961, 962; order of the queen in 
council admitting the appeal of, 961 ; lord Cornbury 
ordered to report on the case of, 963 ; has his trial 
printed, 972 ; lord Cornbury reports the irregularities 
in the case of, 974 ; his prosecution one of the articles 
of complaint against chief-justice Atwood and Thomas 
Weaver, 1011, 1013; several papers received from 
England relating to, 1017 ; order reversing the sen- 
tence on Hutchins and, 1023, 1025 ; cannot sue either 
judge or jury for what they did on his trial, 1032 ; 
brings an action against the jury that found him 
guilty, 1044, 1066 ; an act passed to reverse the 
judgment against, 1064, 1168 ; the opinion of the 
attorney-general on the actions brought by, received 
in New York, 1071 ; the grant to, ought to be 
repealed, 1112 ; attorney-general Northey's opinion 
of the act declaring the illegality of the proceedings 
against, 1118 ; report of the lords of trade on the 
act declaring the illegality of the proceedings against, 
1123; the bill declaring the illegality of those pro- 
ceedings ordered to be amended, 1140; why sen- 
tenced to death, 1150; lord Cornbury transmits to 
England the act touching the ease of, 1166 ; particu- 
lars of the purchase of his extravagant grant, V., 10 ; 
why it was considered extravagant, 16 ; proves the 
constant dependence of the five nations on the gov- 
ernment of New York, 74 ; the Dutch head of the 
English party in New York, 103 ; foremost in de- 
manding the execution of Jacob Leisler, 104 ; dead, 
105 ; petitions for the liberation of alderman Hutch- 
ins, ibid ; Messrs. Attwood and Weaver called on to 
answer the petition of Hutchins and, 107 ; Skohare, 
the extravagant grant to, 167; one of the committee 
of the council on fees, 216. 

Bayard, Pr., IV., 938. 

Bayard, Samuel, signs a petition to king William, IV., 935 ; 
under bail to answer certain charges, 950, 957; signs 
an address to lord Cornbury, 1007. 

Bayard, Samuel, junior, deputy secretary of New York, 
VIII., 760, 761 ; mentioned, 802. 

Bayard, Samuel Vetch, appointed surveyor and searcher of 
the port of New York, VIII., 716. 

Bayard, Stephen, recommended for a seat in the council of 
New York, VI., 261, 278, 288 ; member of the coun- 
cil, 330; suspended, 404, 407, 408, 411, 413, 414, 
427, 465, 679. 

Bayard, William, member of tJie council. III., 813, 837. 

Bayde, George, exchanged, X., 881. 

Bayeul, M. de, at the siege of fort Necessity, X., 262. 

Bayeux, Thomas, VIII., 455. 

Bayles, John, II., 601. 

Bayly, , justice of the peace at Westchester, New York, 

VI., 8. 



-Cea] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Bayly, lientenant-colonel. (See Bagley.) 

Bayly [Anselm, LL. D.], author of an introduction to lan- 
guages, literary and philosophical, VII., 426 ; reasons 
for not sending him to King's college, New York, 448. 

Bayly, Samuel, justice for Queens county, V., 328. 

Bayonet (Bagonette), introduced into the English service, 
II., 741. 

Bayonne, recommended as a proper place for fitting out a 
fleet for America, X., 16 ; vessels arrive at Quebec 
from, 129, 171 ; despatches from Louisbourg received 
at, 314 ; several vessels from, missing, 718. 

Bazin (Barin), Mr., X., 42, 45 ; at cape Chat, 65 ; returns to 
Quebec, 74. 

Bazire, Mr., IX., 118, 216. 

Beach, reverend Jolui, recommended by doctor Johnson to 
bishop Sherlock, VI., 910; publishes an answer to 
Mr. Hobart, 914 ; charged with preaching false doc- 
trines, VII., 346; reverend doctor Johnson writes a 
preface to a book published by, 370 ; much offense 
taken at a sermon of, 371 ; author of a Vindication, 
&c., of the professors of the church of England, 394 ; 
retracts what he had published, 404 ; preaches in 
defense of the Trinity, 439 ; his conduct approved, 
448 ; preparing an answer to a pamphlet published 
against the church of England, 516 517, 519 ; reve- 
rend doctor Jolinson's opinion of his answer to The 
real advantages enjoyed by conforming to the church 
of England, 536 ; doctor Seeker has not received his 
book, 566 ; a copy of his book sent to doctor Seeker, 
591. 

Beachy Head, engagement between the Dutch and French 
fleets off, II., 572. 

Beadle, Jacob, makes a claim under the Elizabethtown right 
in New Jersey, VI., 348. 

Beado, Francis, sentenced to be branded, and to be banished 
from New Netherland, II., 665. 

Beaman (Bemant), John, taken prisoner at Northfield, X., 51. 

Bear, , a soldier in the New Jersey company, X., 592. 

E.ear, a tribe of the five nations so called, IV., 736, VI., 15. 

Bearch, Thomas, of Boston taken by the Dutch, II., 663, 
664. 

Bearcroft, reverend Philip, D. D., calls attention to a plan 
for educating indian children, VII., 167; mentioned, 
395 ; dead, 496. 

Beard, , Indiahs destroy the house of, IX., 614. 

Beam, Mr., X., 810. . 

Bearskins, duty in Holland on, I., 572. 

Beaubassin, Hertel de, is sent back to Canada from Albany, 
VI., 526 ; sent to New York and Boston to treat for 
an exchange of prisoners, 564, 565; X., 209; will 
not be allowed to go among the New York Indians, 
VI., 567; reports on the state of fort Anne, IX., 
1101; reconnoitres fort Saratoga, X., 148; leads a 
war party to the neighborhood of Albany, 159 ; ac- 
companies chevalier de Niverville on a war party, 
172 ; in command on lake Superior, 424, 482. 

Beaubassin, La ValliSre, accompanies an expedition against 
the Iroquois, IX., 535, 602; serves on board la 



643 ; lays waste a large section of New 
England, 745, 756, 762; Abenaki Indians attacked 
since the return of, 758. 

, necessity of a fort on the isthmus near, VI., 
477; the French war part j' withdrawn from, 478; a 
fort at, 835; pillaged, IX., 664; settled, 854; north- 
ern limit of Acadia, 895 ; one of the most populous 
places in Acadia, X., 4 ; in -the hands of the French, 
9 ; news of the invasion of England reaches, 17 ; news 
brought to Quebec from, 40, 56, 57, 164; reinforce- 
ments sent to, 43, 45, 166, 169; reverend Mr. Ger- 
main at, 47, 48, 49, 50, 54, 118, 127 ; M. de Ram- 
ezay at, 53, 68, 89, 106 ; reverend Mr. Germain 
to remain at, 64 ; a privateer expected at, 66 ; reve- 
rend Mr. Germain leaves, 71 ; orders for the expul- 
sion of the English from Minas sent to, 91 ; and 
news of their expulsion received from, ibid ; Mr. 
Howe lulled near, 92 ; reverend Mr. Germain arrives 
at Quebec from, 124 ; supplies sent to, 126 ; English 
deserters arrive at, 156 ; reinforcements arrive at, 176 ; 
burnt, 216; the English erect a fort at, 291. (See 
Fort Beaubassin ; Fort Lawrence.) 

(Beauclair), captain de, wounded at Ticonderoga, 
X., 750, 799, 1084. 

Beaucourt (Beaucour, Beaucours, Brancour), Dubois Berte- 
lot de, employed in fortifying Three Rivers, IX., 519 ; 
commands au expedition against the Iroquois, 534 ; 
acts with much prudence, 535 ; engaged in fortifying 
Quebec, 561, 858, 860 ; serves against the Onondagas, 
650 ; a party of Indians become panic stricken under, 
764 ; Quebec fortified according to the plan of, 871 ; 
governor of Montreal, 1063, 1065 ; forwards news 
from Albany to Quebec, 1109, 1110; X., 98; sends a 
delegation of Senecas to Quebec, 25 ; sends a detach- 
ment in pursuit of a party of Iroquois, 81, 102 ; 
prisoners surrendered to, 82 ; adopts measures for 
the defense of the frontiers, 94; sends reinforcements 
to Crown Point, 101 ; transmits news from the west, 
103 ; reports the settlement of Indians at St. Regis, 
105 ; and an attack near St. Anne, 108 ; further re- 
ports from, 109, 114, 116, 121, 122; requests leave to 
furnish some western Indians with an escort, 149. 

Beaudicourt, M., commandant at the lake of Two Moun- 
tains, X., 87. 

Beaufort [Francois de Vendome], duke de, memoir of, II., 
351. 

Beaufort [Henry Somerset, 2d], duke of, member of the 
privy council. III., 357, 360, 362. 

Beaufremont, M., commander of the West India fleet, arrives 
at Louisboug, X., 572. 

Beauharnais, chevalier de, arrives at Quebec, X., 75. 

Beauharnois, Charles, marquis de, governor of Canada, V., 
827, VI., 90, 91 ; IX, vii ; remonstrates against the 
erection of fort Oswego, V., 827, IX., 996 ; summons 
that place, V., 828 ; complains of the commandant at 
Oswego, VI., 90, 91, 94; correspondence between 
president Clarke and, 92, 93 ; Tierondequat about to 
be made over to, 131 ; endeavors to recover English 



64 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bea- 



Beauharnoirt, Charles — continued. 

prisoners from the Indians, 488; empowered to grant 
licenses for the Indian trade, IX., 954; instructions 
to, 956, 964 ; his letters to count de Maurepas, 
1018, 1019, 1026, 1029, 1030, 1031, 1035, 1038, 1068, 
1069, 1095, 1101, 1102, 1103, 1109, 1111, X., 1, 3, 19, 
27, 3fl ; to the governor of New York from, IX., I 
from the governor of New York to, 970 ; instructed 
to sustain the Abenaquis, 989, 1002 ; requested to stay 
the attacks of the English, 990 ; abstract of his lett( 
on the subject of Oswego, 999 ; liis further intentions 
regarding Oswego, 1010 ; abstract of his despatches, 
ibid, 1014 ; banishes John Lidius from Canada, 1019 ; 
recommends the erection of a fort at Crown Point, 
1021, 1022; ordered to erect a fort at Crown Point, 
1025 ; calls for additional troops, 1027 ; opens a cor- 
respondence with governor Jlontgomerie of New York, 
1029 •; asks permission to send Indians to the court of 
France, 1030 ; reports that fugitives from justice are 
protected in religious houses, 1031 ; settles the Shaw- 
nese on the Ohio, 1033, 1035 ; his vigilance approved, 
1037; agreesonneutrality with New York, 1040; holds 
a conference with Onondagas, 1041, 1086; reports the 
state of the public defenses, 1044 ; ordered to attend to 
the defense of the upper part of the colony, 1047 ; re- 
ports the condition of things at forts Froutenac and 
Niagara, 1049 ; recommends the building a sloop on 
lake Charaplain, 1050 ; ordered to have a survey made 
of that lake, 1059 ; his answer to the address of the 
fiv£ nations, 1065 ; reports the state of his government, 
1069 ; honored with a new grade, ibid ; his address 
to the Indians of Michilimakinac, 1072 ; his answer 
to an address of the Indians of Sault St. Louis, 1073, 
1074 ; message of the Senecas to, 1075 ; sends a mes- 
sage to the Indians of the lake of the Two Mountains, 
1076 ; answers of Indians to his messages, 1079, 1080, 
1081, 1082; Us Indian name, 1082; his answer to 
the message of the Senecas, 1083 ; discountenances 
an expedition against Oswego, 1085 ; explains some 
misunderstanding between the Indians of the Sault 
and of the Two Mountains, 1095 ; reports the state of 
Indian affairs, 1097, 1099; transmits news from 
Crown Point, 1101 ; his recommendations in regard to 
the public defenses, 1103 ; reports news from Albany, 
1109 ; and from Detroit and Niagara, 1111 ; advised 
of the projects of the English, X., 11; proposes an 
exchange of prisoners, 19 ; holds a conference with 
some of the five nations, 22 ; sends reinforcements 
to Crown Point, 52 ; prevails on the Indians to take 
up the hatchet, 77 ; prisoners delivered to, 83 ; ap- 
points M. de Rigaud to Crown Point, 99 ; an exchange 
of prisoners proposed to, 114 ; commodore Knowles 
promises him to send the French prisoners to France, 
125 ; orders lenient measures to be used towards the 
Indians, 182 ; sends M. de St. Pierre to Michilimakinac 
183. ' 

Beauhamois (Beauharnais), Franjois de, appointed intend- 
ant of Canada, IX., 736 ; unable to furnish canoes, ) 



739 ; his letter to the secretary of state, 740 ; Louis 
XIV. writes to, 742; prevails on the Indians to attack 
the English in the direction of Boston, 743 ; presides 
at a general meeting on the subject of Detroit, 744; 
attracts the Abenakis to Canada, 759 ; joint letter 
to the minister from governor de Vaudreuil add, 761 ; 
Sieur Begon advises, in relation to a prisoner who is 
be provided for, 912. 
Beaujeu, Daniel Lifinard de, assists at a conference with 
Indians held at Quebec, X., 187, 188 ; arrives at fort 
Duquesne, 300 ; sent against general Braddock, 303, 
310 ; killed, 304, 338, 382, 528, 914 ; notice of, 366 ; 
M. Dumas succeeds, 410. 
Beaujeu de Villemonde, Louis Lienard de, sent with des- 
patches for the duke d' Anville, X., 75 ; returns to 
Quebec, 108. 
Beaujeu, M; de, at Michilimakinac, X., 853. 
Beaujon, M., commandant at Niagara, VI., 592. 
Beaulac, lieutenant de, stationed at Chambly, X., 36. 
Beaulieu, lieutenant de, IX., 236. 
. (See Duclos.) 
captain, wounded, X., 431. 
Beaumont, captain de, IX., 236. 

Beaumont, ensign, serves on board la Bouffonne, IX., 643. 
Beaumont, Sibastin, captain of German fuzileers, VIII., 

602 ; major in the United States army, 786. 
Beaumont (Canada), the English land at, X., 995, 1019 ; 
general Wolfe's proclamation affixed to the church at, 
996. 
Beauuny, M. de, a prisoner in the Boston government, IX., 

857. 
Beauport, population of, in 1666, IX., 57; sir William 
Phipps' troops land near, 457 ; Canadian militia sta- 
tioned at, X., 993 ; the English expected to land' at, 
996 ; the troops march to the heights of Abraham from, 
1003 ; camp formed at, 1020 ; engagement at, 1029 ; 
camp at, abandoned, 1041 ; the Montreal militia sta- 
tioned at, 1061. 
Beaupri, population of, in 1666, IX., 57 ; captain du Taiy 
commands the militia of, 235 ; M. de Courtemanche 
effects a retreat by way of, X., 995 ; the English land 
at, 997 ; and burn, 1000, 1033, 1058. 
Beausadel, lieutenant, killed, X., 1085.' 
Beausejour, the French fort at, to be destroyed, VL, 921, 
922, X., 296, 416; erected, 263, 291 ; captured, 314, 
315, 358, 365, 381, 493; English force at, 359; 
a burden, 496 ; the English strengthen, 547 ; capitula- 
tion of, violated, 632 ; necessity of retaking, 691. 

captain, commands the frigate Heros, X., 416 ; 
sails from Quebec, 476. 
Beausoleil. (See Brosard.) 

Beautiful river, the English expelled from the, VI., 532; 
the Indians on, dependent on Pennsylvania, 545 ; 
reception of captain Celoron at, 548 ; the Ohio called 
the, 610 ; taken possession of by the French, 732 ; 
captain Contrecoeur commandant on the, 841 ; the 
French claim the lands on the, 842. (See Belle riviere ; 
Ohio river.) 



-Bee] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



65 



Beauvais, captain (of Basticaii), IX., 235. 

Beauvais (Beauvaire), Le Gardeur do, accompanies a party of 
Indians, IX., 473, 650 ; the Abenaquis demand priso- 
ners taken in tlie expedition of, 476 ; sent to Sorel, 
563; commandant at fort Frontenac, 1049. 

Beauvilliers, duke de, IX., 271. 

Beaver (Beever), lieutenant-colonel Samuel, killed at Ticou- 
deroga, X., 730. 

Beaver exported from New Netlierland, I., 37, 107, 437, II., 
221 ; on board the ship Eendracht, seized by the 
English at Plymouth, I., 50; the English trade in 
Hudson's river for, 73, 74, 75, 76, 79 ; price of, at 
various times, 78, IV., 789, V., 733, IX., 155, 160, 
X., 200; exported from New Sweden, I., 159; duty 
on, 189, 212, 429, 572, 635, II., 150, 199, 204, 210, 
555, III., 217, 262, 305 ; duties paid in, I., 343; the. 
currency of New Netherland, 386 ; those of Rens- 
selaerswyck attempt to impose a duty on, 525 ; bought 
in thousands at the Schuylkill, 588; vice-director 
Alrichs sends to Holland a, II., 16 ; value of a, 49, 218 ; 
duty on, to be increased, 220 ; to be sent to Holland in 
return for a cargo of slaves, 222; powder to be paid 
for in, 457 ; beef and pork to be paid for in, 474 ; the 
forced loan made payable in, 697; tines payable in, 
€98, 703 ; early exportation of, from New Neth.>rland, 
III., 17; the French design to engross the whole of 
the trade in, 146, 147 ; exchanged for European 
goods, 164 ; season for the exportation of, 292 ; large 
quantities of, brought down the Schuylkill, 416 ; 
great falling off in the export of, 476, IV., 789 ; 
where the five nations hunt for. III., 536 ; proposals 
of the Indians for the encouragement of the trade in 
IV., 572; the removal of all duties on, suggested 
■ 834; cheaxjer at Montreal than at Albany, VII., 6; 
exported from Canada to France, return of, 287. (See 
Furs; Trade.) 

Beaver creek, Indians on, VII., 286 ; plunder the French 
commander at, 287. 

Beaver harbor. Nova Scotia, X., 70, 72. 

Beaver hunting ground of the five nations, conveyed to the 
king of England, IV., 905, 90S; where, VI., 736. 

Beavers' path, in the city of New York, the, I., 413; the 
ship Arent saluted on going to the, II., 460. 

Bebert, colonel, reported killed, X., 848. 

Beoancourt (Bekancourt), baron de, chevalier de Villebon, 

son of, IX., 240; M. de Portneuf, son of, 265, 472. 
Becanconrt (Becancour ; Bekancourt), Hosack burnt by a 
party of Indians from, VI., 909 ; governor Duquesne 
apologises for their conduct, 936 ; an Indian village, 
IX., 849, 934, 939 ; number of Indians in, 1052 ; pri- 
soners taken at Saratoga ransomed at, X., 39 ; census 
of Indians at, ordered, 42 ; menaced from New Eng- 
land, 44; the Indians of, bring in a prisoner, 95, and 
visit M. de la Galissoniere, 127 ; Indians sent to Crown 
Point from, 150 ; parties invade New England from, 
160 ; the English attacked by a party from, 218. 
Becard. (See Fouville.) 



Bechefer (Beschefer, Beschefet), reverend Thiery, S. J., 
sent to the Mohawks, III., 127, 156, 157; sent to 
Albany, 129 ; recalled, 131 ; mentioned, 156 ; notice 
of, IX., 169 ; makes suggestions as to the policy to 
be pursued towards the Iroquois, ibid, 170 ; attends 
a conference called by governor de la Barre, 194 ; 
opposed to a peace with the Iroquois, 248. 

Becker, Frederick, naturalized, VI., 29. 
Becker (Beeker), Jan, an alderman of Albany, lit., 771,772, 
773; signs a petition to the king, IV., 941. 

Beckford. (See Bickford.) 

Beckley, Mr., III., 597. 

Beckwith, captain John, attends a meeting of the six nations, 
VII., 54, 61 ; notice of, 58. 

deBecourt. (See d'Hcbecourt.) 

Bedford [John Russell, 7th], duke of, secretary of state. III., 
ix; letters of governor Clinton to, VI., 428, 455, 464, 
474, 484, 513, 514, 528, 533, 543, 550, 552, 556, 558, 
570, 571, 574, 575, 578, 602, 606, 712, 715, 726, 727, 
736 ; of governor Shirley to, 457, 477 ; of Cadwallader 
Golden to, 469 ; calls for a return of the New York bills 
of credit issued, 535 ; letter of, to governor Clinton, 
543 ; signs an order for an exchange of Indian pri- 
soners, 545 ; the treasurer of New York neglects 
orders signified by, 555 ; letter of the lords of trade 
to, laid before the lords justices, 586 ; letter of the 
lords of trade to, 597 ; biographical sketch of, 713 ; 
expected to transmit instructions for the reduction of 
the New York assembly to obedience, 751; tlie earl 
of Holdernesse succeeds, 757; his dismissal of the 
earl of Halifax, VII., 745 ; extracts of letters from 
America to, X., 190 ; orders an exchange of prisoners, 
197, 198 ; infonned that the French occupy a part of 
Nova Scotia, 216. 

Bedford [William Russel, 4th], duke of, particulars respect- 
ing, I., 127; of the council. III., 572. 

Bedford (New York), revolts to Connecticut, IV., 276, 517; 
report on the right of government over, 627, 630 ; 
governor Jay dies at, VIII., 469. 

Bedford (Pennsylvania), VI., 284; George Croghan sets out 
for, VII., 569 ; settlements abandoned between fort 
Pitt and, VIII., 186. 

Bedford (Virginia), a body of militia sent to, VII., 546. 

Bedfordshire, sir Danvers Osborn from, VI., 788. 

Bedgood, captain, a pilot to Quebec, V., 260. 

Bedlow(Bedloo), Isaac, II., 249; III., 74; factor to governor 
Lovelace, II., 651; deceased, ibid, 690. 

Bedlow's island, the Americans burn the hospital at, VIII., 
675. 

Bedwell, J., IV., 935, 1008. 

Beeckman, , contracts to supply masts, IV., 785 ; em- 
ployed to purchase the woods in the Mohawk country, 
833. 

Beeckman (Beckman), Gerardus, an adherent of lieutenant- 
governor Leisler, III., 616 ; a justice, 659 ; member 
of lieutenant-governor Leister's council, 733, 750, IV., 
220 ; imprisoned. III., 811 ; mentioned, IV., 4 ; under 
sentence of death, 55 ; refuses to ask pardon, 83 ; 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Be 



Beeckman, Gerardus — continued. 

who, 212; banished, 217; major, 218; lieutenant- 
colortel of militia, 809; member of lord Combury's 
council, 1137, 1180 ; a commissioner in the case of 
the Mohegans against Connecticut, 1178 ; member of 
governor Hunter's council, V., 124, 296, 458; dead, 
713, 734, 745. 

Beeckman, Jacob Jacob, merchant at Albany, VII., 489. 

Beeckman, Jochim, II., 249, III., 74. 

Beeckman (Beckman), Johannes, of New York, III., 740. 

Beeckman, Johannes, of Albany, merchant, IV., 754. 

Beeckman, John Jacob, VII., 615. 

Beeckman, Marte, VII., 615. 

Beeckman, Martin, notary public at the Hague, I., 214, 398, 
457, 461, 515, 516, 517, 570; presents a petition on 
behalf of Harmau Van Zuylen, 435 ; attorney for Cor- 
nelius Melyu, 473. 

Beeckman (Beakman), William, threatened by the Indians, 
I., 497; one of the selectmen, 499 ; mentioned, 511, 
552, II., 31, 75, 453, 458, 600, 670, 700, 743; vice- 
director of fort Altona, 49, 76, 112 ; reports on the 
alarm created by the Indians on the Delaware, 178 ; 
commissary at the South river, 463 ; schepen of New 
Orange, 532, 574, 575 ; takes the oath of allegiance, 
III., 74 ; attends a public meeting held at New York, 
233 ; deputy mayor of New Y'ork, 339 ; never owned 
a vessel, 407 ; goes to Nevis and captures a Dutch 
dogger, 408 ; certifies in favor of governor Dongan, 
493 ; deacon Kip imprisoned for preferences shown 
to, 716; declines a seat in the assembly, 717. 

Beekman, Ann, marries Frederick de Peyster, VIII., 755. 

Beekman, David, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601. 

Beekman, Gerard G., VIII., 755. 

Beekman, lieutenant-colonel Henry, a justice in Ulster coun- 
ty, IV., 27 ; in command of the militia of the counties 
of Ulster and Dutchess, 29 ; requested to send rein- 
forcements to Albany-, 64, 81 ; owner of an extravagant 
grant of land, 327, 514, 535, V., 651 ; its extent, IV., 
391, and value, 392 ; one of the charges against 
governor Fletcher proved by the oath of, 461 ; threat- 
ened by the earl of Bellomont, 467 ; circumstances 
under which he made his deposition, 468 ; no tenants 
on the grant of, 823 ; recommended for a seat in the 
council, 849 ; signs the petition against the earl of 
Bellomont and lieutenant-governor Nanfan, 938, 941 ; 
signs an address to lord Cornbury, 1006. 

Beekman (Beckman), colonel Henry, originally of Ulster 
county, IV., 941; sheriff of New York, V., 90S; cen- 
sus of the city of New York taken by, 929 ; of Rhine- 
beck, VI., 650; member of assembly, 686; judge 
Livingston marries a daughter of, VIII., 192. 

Beekman, James, member of the general committee of New 
Y'ork, VIII., 601 ; second lieutenant of the sportsman 
company, 602. 
Beekman (Beeckman), John, commissioner of Indian affairs, 

VI., 821, 856, 857; merchant, VII, 489. 
Beekman, Margaret, marries judge Livingston, VIII., 192. 



Beekman, Theophilus, marries a daughter of Vincent 
Mathews, VIII., 449 ; third lieutenant of the sports- 
man company, 602. 

Beeltsnyder, GiUUiam, IL, 193. 

Beeltsnyder, Wygert, II., 191. 

Beer, excise in New Netherland on, I., 189, 212, 424, 429, 
499 (see Excise) ; exported from Holland to New Neth- 
erland, 436 ; price of, II., 20; not brewed in Mary- 
land, 211. 

Beeregat, Seger Theunisse, murdered by the Indians at, 



Beeren (Beren) island, the cannon on, seized, I., 524; set- 
tled by the Dutch, IV., 353. 

Beesby, Michael, VI., 244. 

Beeston, sir William, governor of Jamaica, IV., 274. 

Beeve river. (See Au bauf.) 

Beggars, proposed to be sent from Holland to New Nether- 
land, I., 99 ; none in the province of New York, IV., 
511 ; recommended to be sent to New France, X., 
232. 

Begon, chevalier, summons the English to abandon Oswego, 
v., 829, IX., 968, 996, 1000; his summons, 973; 
speech of the Iroquois to, 975 ; reports that Mr. 
Gaulin had prevailed on the Indians to make peace 
with the English, 989; endeavors to prevail on the 
Indians of St. Francis to guard their village, X., 105 ; 
death of, 159. 

Begon, Michel, sends a messenger to the Senecas, V., 588 ; 
a letter received at Fort Frontenac from, 590 ; in- 
tendantof Canada, IX., 336, 386, 388; intendant at 
Rochelle, ordered to prepare for the iuvasion of New 
York, 423; bad quality of the goods sent to Canada, 
reported to, 740 ; ordered to keep watch of one Alain, 
810 ; advises the erection of a stone fort at Niagara, 
874, 976 ; urges the settlement of the boundaries, 880; 
wishes to involve the Abenalds in a war with the 
English, 881; his views on the subject of furnishing 
Indians with brandy, 883; ordered to prevent all 
foreign trade with Canada, 892 ; his report on Nia- 
gara, 897 ; writes on the subject of the difficulties be- 
tween the English and the Abenakis, 903, 909, 955 ; 
transmits a list of soldiers in Canada entitled to half 
pay, 908 ; to ascertain what goods are brought from, 
and what furs are sent to, Albany, 909 ; writes to M. 
Beauharnais, 912; transmits a memoir on the boun- 
daries between the French and English in America, 
930, 931 ; abstract of despatches from, 933, 955 ; or- 
dered to foment difiiculties between the Abenaquis 
and English, 936 ; approves of certain measures to 
secure the attachment of the Abenaquies, 940 ; his 
letter to count de Maurepas, 941 ; examines into the 
measures for the defense of Niagara, 950 ; sends me- 
chanics to build two vessels on lake Ontario, 951 ; 
abstract of his letters on Oswego and Niagara, 952, 
961, 962; succeeded by M. Dupuy, 957; mentioned 
in mistake for Bigot, X., 249. 
Bekancourt. (See Becancovrt.) 



GENERAL INDEX. 



67 



Belcher (Bellsharr), Andrew, master of the ship Swan, pur- 
chases hides, &c, from pirates, III., 552; commis- 
sioner to treat for a peace witli the Indians, 621 ; 
the earl of Bellomont writes to, IV., 722; commis- 
sary for the expedition against Canada, V., 257; to 
provide pilots, 258 ; makes a return of stores to be 
had in Boston, 259. ' 

Belcher, Jonathan, governor of Massachusetts, writes to the 
lieutenant-governor of New York on the subject of 
boundaries, VI., 143; governor Clarke writes on the 
same subject to, 159 ; orders for an exchange of In- 
dian prisoners sent to, 543, X., 197, 198 ; governor 
of New Jersey, VI., 756, 761; instructed to have 
commissioners appointed to join in the conference 
with the six nations, 802; lieutenant-governor De 
Lancey proposes a boundary line to, 839 ; Mr. Pownall 
designed as successor to, 1009 ; notified of an illegal 
trade carried on in New Jersey, VII., 226, 272. 

Bebourt, reverend G., composes a Chippeway grammar, IX., 
161. 

Beldt, the, II., 564. 

Belgarde, captain, wounded, X., 431. 

Belin, J., IV., 624. 

Belisle, M. de, of Pentagonet, IX., 933. 

Bell (Bells), for the church at New Amstel, II., 61 ; a fugitive 
from justice to be summoned to appear by the toll- 
ing of the, 724 ; sent from England to the fort at New 
York, IV., 256; of the church at New York, cast 
into cannon, VIII., 686. 

Bell, John, commissioner for settling the boundary line be- 
tween New York and Connecticut, IV., 630; men- 
tioned, 938. 

Bell, Robert, under-secretary of state. III., sii. 

Bellau, captain, married, X., 699. 

Bellcombe, captain, wounded, X., 431 ; major of fort Wil- 
liam Henry, 605. 

Belle famine, !a, near Niagara, X., 979, 982, 984, 986, 987. 

Bellefeuille, Lefevre, about to visit France, X., 15 ; transmits 
intelligence to Quebec, 39. 

Bellefond, M. de^ his son killed, IX., 476. 

Belleisle, Louis Charles Auguste Fouquet de, minister of 
war, X., vii., 691, 692; notifies the ministry of Mr. 
Pitt's measures in America, 526 ; recommends that 
four thousand men be sent to Canada, 527 ; biograph- 
ical notice of, ibid; captain Pouchot transmits a report 
on the frontiers of Canada to, 694 ; letters of the mar- 
quis de Montcalm to, 696, 732, 737, 761, 831, 860, 
900, 970, 971 ; letters of commissary Doreil to, 701, 
717, 752, 767, 818 ; necessities of Canada reported to, 
704 ; plan of fort Carillon sent to, 706 ; movements 
of the army iu Canada reported to, 719 ; commissary 
Doreil requests to be recommended to, 765 ; M. de 
Cremilles adjoined to, 768 ; letter of baron de Dies- 
kau to, 806; letters to the marquis de Montcalm 
from, 807, 943, 960 ; battle of Ticonderoga reported to, 
813 ; commissary Doreil known to, 829 ; the fall of 
fort Frontenac reported to, 831 ; congratulates M. de 
Vaudreuil and M. de Montcalm on the victory at 



Ticonderoga, 832 ; news from fort Duquesne sent to, 
834, 884; M. de Montcalm served under, 857; his 
opinion of captain de Lotbiniere, 889 ; the niarquis 
de Montcalm reports the progress of events in Canada 
to, 900, 970; notifies M. de Montcalm of his, and 
other promotions, 943; advised of the danger th.at 
the country is in, 960 ; informed of the approach 
of the English to Quebec, 971 ; and of the deplorable 
result of the campaign of 1759 iu Canada, 1009 ; and 
of the foil of Quebec, 1013, 1014 ; report of the ope- 
rations before Quebec transmitted to, 1051 ; brigadier 
Bourlamaque reports his movements to, 1054 ; com- 
municates the king's orders to chevalier de Levis, 
1068 ; declares that Quebec has been too hastily sur- 
rendered, 1069 ; operations in Canada reported to, 
1099, 1100, 1101; movements of the English on 
Montreal reported to, 1102, 1103 ; the reduction of 
Canada reported to, 1122. 

Belleisle, straits of, discoyered, IX., 3 ; ship I'Heureux 
wrecked in, X., 72; nearly iu the same latitude as 
the Baltic, 927. 

Belle RiviJre, VI., 545 ; the French send an army to, 548, 
779. (See Okio.) 

Belletre (Bellestre), ensign de, accompanies an expedition 
against the Mohawks, IX., 669. 

Belletre, cadet, taken prisoner, VII., 281 ; his examination, 
282; his exchange applied for, X., 777. 

Belletre (Beleslre, Belhetre, Bellaitre), Picot6 de, passes 
Oswego, VI., 730; surrenders Detroit, VII., 959 ; sent 
to bay Verte, X., 49 ; at Beaubassin, 51 ; returns to 
Quebec, 69, 162; sent to the river St. Joseph, 85, 
145, 151 ; his character, ibid ; conducts father de la 
Richardie to Detroit, 88 ; sent to the upper country, 
90; returns to Montreal, 115,116 ; appointed comman- 
dant at the river St. Joseph, 118 ; his departure retard- 
ed, 120 ; starts from Montreal, 121, 124 ; the Indian 
chief dies who came from Detroit with, 123 ; arrives 
at Detroit, 142 ; brave conduct of, 182 ; his voyage to 
the Miamis referred to, 245 ; commands a number of 
Miamis, 424, 482 ; makes an incursion into Carolina 
and is wounded, 486 ; sent with a party to th* Mo- 
hawks' country, 670 ; destroys the German flats', 672, 
673, 678, 687, C97, 836, 923 : his route, 675 ; his ex- 
pedition greatly exaggerated, 705 ; retires to Detroit 
from Niagara, 992 ; preparing to receive the English 
at Detroit, 1094. 

Belleval, Fournier de, appointed ensign, IX., 714. 

Bellinger, Margaret, X., 882. 

Bellinger, Peter, X, 881. 

Bellingham, Richard, elected governor of Massachusetts, 
III., 160 ; reelected, 173. 

Bellinzany, M., IX., 142, 143. 

Bellomont [Richard Coote] earl of, favors the Leislerians, 
III., 709, IV., 515, 620; appointed governor of New- 
York and Massachusetts, 261, 262; his memorial 
to the board of trade and its answer, 265 ; commission 
of, 266 ; captain John Nanfan lieutenant-governor 
under, 277 ; instructions to, 284, 292, 361, 415, 424, 



68 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bel- 



Bellomont [Richard Coote] earl of— continued. 

530, v., (iOO; expected at New York, IV., 293, IX., 
681 ; letters to the hoard of trade from, IV., 296, 302, 
306, 313, 320, 331, 332, 362, 377, 397, 409, 417, 421, 
425, 438, 441, 487, 501, 507, 512, 515, 518, 528, 531, 
649, 587, 599, 606, 636, 643, 668, 684, 686, 712, 766, , 
768, 770, 781, 820, 833, 845 ; letters of the lords of 
trade to, 297, 299, 412, 452, 474, 530, 544, 630, 642, 
666, 698, 771, 819, 840, 852; titles of, 297, 299, 412, | 
452, 474, 530, 544, 603, 630, 642, 666, 698, 727, 752, 
771, 819, 838, 840; ohiiged to put into Barbadoes, 
296, 339, v., 175; arrives in New York, IV., 302; 
calls a new assembly, and endeavors to enforce the 
trade acts, 303 ; sends news of the peace and a num- 
ber of prisoners to Canada, 305, 333, 338, IX., 682; 
transmits a printed collection of the laws of New Y'ork 
to England, IV., 306 ; exposes the encouragement af- 
forded to pirates in New Y''ork, 307 ; suspends William 
Nicoll from the council, 309 ; discovers commissions, 
&c., issued to pirates, 310 ; letters of, to the lords of the 
admiralty, 311, 358, 664, 697, 710, 779 ; takes mea- 
sures for furnishing naval stores for the royal navy, 
314; writes to secretary Popple, 316, 326,415,432, 
437, 586, 766, 811, 814; letters to the lords of the 
treasury from, 317, 354, 537, 538, 665, 775, 829; 
complains of collector Brooke, 317, 355 ; appoints 
Thomas Palmer naval officer, and will not allow pro- 
clamations of the governor of New Jersey to be 
printed, 318 ; writes to the commissioners of the cus- 
toms, 319, 663, 778 ; brings charges against William 
Nicoll, 320, 322 ; suspends several members of the 
council, 321, 354, 363, 386, 389, 395, 398, 411, 424, 
440, v., 103, and the collector of New York, IV., 
321 ; dissolves the assembly, 322 ; vindicates Jacob 
Leisler, 325 ; appoints Thomas Weaver agent for the 
province of New Y'ork, 326 ; calls the attention of 
government to extravagant grants of land made by 
governor Fletcher, 327, 335, 506, V., 651 ; his instruc- 
tions to colonel Romar, IV., 328; colonel Romar's 
letters to, ibid, 329 ; his report on Mr. Livingston's 
case, 331 ; recommends that missionaries be sent 
among the five nations, 334, 717 ; suspends the sheriff 
of New Y'ork, 336 ; correspondence between the 
government of Canada and, 338, 339,343, 344, 367, 369, 
402, IX., 690, 694; his instructions to Messrs. Schuy- 
ler and Dellius, IV., 340 ; demands the restoration of 
English prisoners in Canada, 341 ; deposition as to 
fraudulent purchases of land from Indians taken 
before, 345 ; Messrs. Schuyler and Delliiis report 
their negotiations in Canada to, 347 ; collects evidence 
of the English right over the five nations, 352, 353 ; 
appoints Duce Hungerford collector at New York, 
357 ; not commissioned as vice-admiral, 358 ; report 
on a certain clause of the commission of, 359 ; em- 
powered to suspend members of the council and offi- 
cers of the government, 361 ; visits Albany and con- 
fers with the five nations, 362, 714, 727 ; sends mayor 
Weagola to Onondaga, 366, 370 ; complains of reve- 



rend Mr. Dellius, 366 ; threatens to pat the laws 
of England in force against Jesuits, 368, IX., 713 ; 
orders lieutenant-governor Nanfan to reVnforce the 
five nations, 369 ; message of, to the five nations at 
Onondaga, 370 ; his instructions to captain John 
Schuyler, 371 ; finds seeds of strife and dissension 
existing on his arrival at New Y'ork, 374; sufiTering 
from the gout, 375, 528, 531, 599, 603, 697 ; articles 
of complaint transmitted against, 376 ; the New York 
merchants endeavor to procure the recall of, 378, 515, 
623, 545, 604 ; complains of the French in New York, 
379 ; reports a Jacobite club in New York, 380 ; his 
administration approved, 395 ; appoints new mem- 
bers of the council, 399 ; complains of David Jami- 
son, 400, v., 471 ; and removes him from office, IV., 
400 ; orders the remains of Leisler and Milborne to 
be interred in the Dutch church, ibid, 623 ; captain 
Schuyler makes a report of his journey to Canada to, 
404; authorized to vacate. the esti;^vagant grants of 
land, 411, 425, 514, 529, 533 ; proclaims a day of 
fast and humiliation, 415, 637 ; exposes the intrigues 
of his enemies, 416 ; sends a map of the province of 
New Y'ork to England, 429, 622; apprehends that 
the governor of Canada will attack the five nations, 
435 ; advances money for the pay of the soldiers, 
437 ; orders the seizure of a vessel cleared at Perth 
Amboy, 439 ; invited to Massachusetts, ibid ; dispa- 
rages the lawyers of New Y'ork, 442 ; calls on the 
government to send out judges and crown lawyers 
from England, ibid, 514, 616, 518, 520, 529, 532, 550, 
594, 644 ; transmits information respecting collector 
Brooks, 452 ; refuses a bribe from pirates, 458 ; cause 
of the opposition to, 460, 462 ; colonel Bayard com- 
plains to the lords of trade of, 467 ; concerned with 
captain Kidd, 470 ; turns his attention to a trade with 
the western Indians, 488 ; petitions against, 490, 523, 
604, 605 ; Robert Livingston presents his views on a 
trade with the western Indians to, 500; his report 
on the progress of the manufacture of naval stores, 
501, 587, 643 ; proposes that free grants of land be 
given to soldiers, 604, 553 ; recommends the erection 
of forts on lake Champlain, 505, and in the Onon- 
dagas' country, 505, V., 140, 435 ; recommends the 
importation of negroes into New Y'ork, IV., 506 ; pro- 
poses to reserve to the crown the right of cutting 
timber on the lands of private individuals, 507 ; state 
of parties in the time of, 508, 509 ; procures the pas- 
sage of a law vacating governor Fletcher's extrava- 
gant grants, 610, V., 284, 472, 953 ; which is passed 
in the council by the casting vote of, IV., 510 ; calls 
James Graham to the council, 511 ; and reverses a 
judgment of governor Fletcher, ibid, 650 ; reports 
the seizure of several pirates, 512 ; and the state of 
the fortifications, 513 ; enumerates Fletcher's extra- 
vagant grants, 514; complains of smuggling, 516; 
recommends new counselors, 517, 518 ; complains of 
captain Evans, 518 ; sends colonel Romar to inspect 



-Bel] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



69 



Bellomont [Richard. Coote] earl of — continued. 

the eastern forts, 519 ; forbid to grant letters of deni- 
zation, 520, v., 211 ; transmits rumors respecting cap- 
tain Kidd, IV., 521 ; cannot procure a correct edition 
of the laws of New York, 522 ; perquisites of, ibid ; 
his salary, 523 ; a most arbitrary governor, 525 ; the 
vestry of Trinity church, New York, complain of, 
527 ; arrives in Boston, 528 ; rendered very unpopu- 
lar by the vacating of the extravagant grants, ibid, 
533 ; proposes to vacate the remaining large grants, 
529 ; reports the arrival of pirates on the east end of 
Long Island, 532, 591 ; quarrels with reverend Mr. 
Vesey, 534 ; transmits to England the names of large 
landed proprietors in New York, 535 ; asks for a new 
provincial secretary, 536 ; complains of Mr. Clarkson, 
537 ; directed to inquire into the irregularities in the 
government of Rhode Island, 546 ; transmits further 
intelligence respecting pirates, 551 ; calls for the inter- 
vention of parliament in the affairs of New Y'ork, 553 ; 
reports the arrival at New York of ships from the 
Scotch settlement at Darien, 556, 591 ; his instruc- 
tions to lieutenant-governor Nanfan, 557 ; Messrs. 
Schuyler and Bleeker report their conferences at On- 
ondaga to, 562; answer of the five nations to the 
message from, 564; complains of the reverend Mr. 
Vesey, 580, 766 ; report of the lords of trade on his 
proceedings against pirates, 583 ; appoints Mr. Cham- 
pante agent for New York, 586 ; reports collector 
Hungerford, 602 ; ordered to send pirates to England 
for trial, 603 ; reports a general conspiracy among the 
Indians, 606 ; anxious to have Jesuits surrendered to 
him, 610 ; letter of governor Winthrop to, 612 ; of 
colonel Pynchon to, 616 ; of lieutenant-governor 
Partridge to, 617 ; of colonel Schuyler to, 618 ; heads 
of accusation against, 620 ; letters of the king to, 627, 
838, 839 ; authorized to meet the governors of the other 
colonies, 632 ; his reversal of a judgment pronounced 
by governor Fletcher disapproved of, 635 ; convokes 
the assembly of Massachusetts, 636 ; transmits reports 
of delegates sent by him to Onondaga, 644 ; letter 
and report of Robert Livingston to, 647, 648 ; report 
of Messrs. Schuyler, Livingston and Hansen's negoti- 
ations at Onondaga to, 653, 654 ; letters of lieutenant- 
governor Nanfan to, 663, 686 ; dismisses collector 
Hungerford, 664 ; is from Worcestershire, 665 ; five 
hundred pounds sent "him to build a fort at Onondaga, 
666, v., 468; informed that Messrs. Atwood and 
Broughton have been appointed chief justice and 
attorney-general of New York, IV., 667; considers 
colonel Allen's title to New Hampshire defective, 673 ; 
transmits charts of several harbors in New England 
and plans of forts in New Y'ork, 676 ; forbids the 
exportation of timber to Portugal, 678 ; report of 
colonel Romer on fortifying the frontiers of New York 
to, 681; returns to New York, 686; letters of, to 
secretary Vernon, 697, 759, 815; petitions to the 
house of commons got up against, 698 ; sends timber 
to the royal dook yards from New York, 710, 722, 



1004; meets the assembly of New York, 712; and 
reports their transactions, 713 ; endeavors to bring 
the eastern Indians to settle near Albany, 715 ; eight 
days returning from Albany to New York, 717; dis- 
misses the chaplain of the New I'ork garrison, 719, 
766 ; calls for the erection of a court of chancer}', 721 ; 
keeps a journal, 723 ; receives a visit from the gov- 
ernor of Virginia and Mr. Penn, 724; asks for an 
augmentation of salary, 724, 726 ; opposes the sepa- 
ration of New York from Massachusetts, 725 ; his 
name brought before the house of commons in con- 
nection with that of Kidd, ibid ; sustained great losses 
by the rebellion in Ireland, ibid ; articles are exhi- 
bited to the house of commons against, 726 ; report 
on the state of Canada furnished to, 747 ; and on the 
western Indians, 748 ; his instructions to colonel 
Romer on setting out for Onondaga, 750 ; his instruc- 
tions to the commissioners for Indian affairs, 751; 
address of the citizens of Albany to, 752 ; mentioned, 
755, 808, 964, 973 ; transmits to secretary Vernon all 
writings between himself and captain Kidd, 759 ; asks 
an indemnity for the loss of a pension , 760 ; is anxious 
to have a fort built in the Onondagas' country, 761, V. , 
140, 435 ; agreement between Robert Livingston, cap- 
tain Kidd and, IV., 762; excuses his reversal of the 
judgment pronounced by his predecessor, 768; reports 
a mutiny at New York, 770, 781 ; remonstrates against 
the continued absence of the collectors of New York 
and Boston, 775, 778 ; is of opinion that wine can be 
manufactured in the colonies, 787; and recommends 
that the production of raw silk be encouraged there, 
788 ; reports on the trade of his governments, 790, 
792 ; and on the large tracts of land owned by private 
persons in the province of New Y'ork, 791 ; complains 
of Mr. Graham, 811 ; whom he deprives of the place 
of recorder of New York, 813 ; allows lieutenant- 
governor Nanfan to visit Barbadoes, 816, 879, 880 ; 
rumors of his being recalled, 817; account of his 
expenses in visiting Rhode Island, 818 ; answers 
objections to the act vacating the extravagant grants, 
822 ; purchases the timber on the Mohawk lands, 
833 ; letter of the reverend Mr. Freeman to, 835 ; of 
captain John Schuyler to, ibid ; ordered not to print 
his conferences with the Indians, 842; requested 
to have a map of the Indian country prepared, 843 ; 
seizes the books belonging to the late Stephen Van 
Cortland, 846 ; re-urges the confirmation of the act for 
vacating the extravagant grants, 847 ; appoints Mr. 
Weaver to the council, ibid; death of, 848, 850, 857, 
1100 ; memoir of, 851 ; news of his death received in 
England, 864; the five nations return no answer to 
his proposal for building a fort in their country, 873 ; 
his death announced to the Indians, 896 ; who con- 
dole his loss, 898, 902, 904; asks the five nations to 
receive ministers, 919 ; receives proofs of governor 
Fletcher having taken bribes from pirates, 926 ; tlie 
protestants of the proi?ince of New York petition 
against, 933 ; news received at New York that lord 



70 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bel— 



Bellomont [Richard Coote] earl o!— continued. 

Cornbury is to succeed, 952 ; parties indicted for say- 
ing that Lord Conibury is to succeed, 957; captain 
Nanfan to be guided by the instructions to, 963 ; adds 
a magazine to tlie fort at New York, 967, 1053 ; never 
saw the New York militia under arms, 968 ; lord Corn- 
bury's report on the timber procured by, 975 ; the 
Indians informed that lord Cornbury succeeds, 982, 
984 (4i'») ; court of admiralty in the time of, 1000 ; 
certain acts passed in his administration referred to 
lord Cornbury to report, 1026 ; his lady obliged to give 
security before leaving New York, 1027; colonel 
Quary's report on the government of, 1052 ; no report 
on the acts passed during the administration of, 1079 ; 
lord Cornbury reports on the accounts of, 1090 ; Mr. 
Taylor private secretary of, 1104; leases the king's 
farm, 1112 ; removes governor Fletcher's suspension 
of Robert Livingston from the office of secretary of 
Indian affairs, 1124 ; his project to supply masts, &c., 
prejudicial to New York, 1150 ; brief account of his 
administration, 1152; the magistrates of Albany com- 
plain to, of certain extravagant grants of land, V., 
8 ; represents the case to the board of trade, 9 ; sum- 
mary of his proceedings in relation to governor Flet- 
cher's extravagant grants, 22 ; the assembly of New 
York repeals sundry laws passed during the adminis- 
tration of, 24 ; his proceedings with the governor of 
Canada on the subject of the five nations, 76, 77 ; evil 
consequences of his death, 104 ; revives the common 
law courts, 409 ; endeavored to have a boundary 
arranged between New York and Canada, 531 ; cap- 
tain John Evans' land resumed under, 535 ; intended 
to build a fort near Oswego, 818 ; amount allowed for 
Indiiin presents to, VI., 156 ; holds an Indian confer- 
ence at Albany, IX., 685 ; captain John Schuyler arrives 
in Quebec with dispatches from, 687 ; the Iroquois 
refuse to deUver French prisoners to, 688 ; prevents 
the Iroquois concluding peace with the French, 696 ; 
ordered todisarm the Iroquois, 698, 699; the gov- 
ernor of Canada sends a delegation to, 704. 

Bellomont, lady, oaptain Kidd sends jewels to, IV., 583; 
a present of one thousand pounds designed for, 
584 ; attends an Indian conference at Albany, 743 ; 
called "mother" by the Indians, 744; a large sum 
of public money in hands of, 876 ; embarks on board 
ship Advice, 1003 ; petition of, to queen Anne, 1027 ; 
order thereupon, 1028, 1029, 1030; her accounts re- 
ferred to lord Cornbury, 1038 ; report on the accounts 
of, 1039, 1090 ; further petition of, 1042, 1081 ; pays 
over five hundred pounds to lord Cornbury, 1057 ; copy 
of her petition sent to lord Cornbury, 1066 ; lord Corn- 
bury lays her accounts before the council, 1071 ; re- 
marks on her accounts, 1072, 1073 ; further corres- 
pondence respecting them, 1080 ; retires to Kings coun- 
ty, 1104; sails from New York, 1105 ; returns to Eng- 
land, 1148 ; marries Samuel Pytts, V., 645 ; governor 
Burnet's proceedings on claim of, 649, 697 ; an account 
current of her affairs transmitted to England, 702. 



Bellomont's bay (Maine), IV., 830. 

Bellon, captain, wounded, X., 431. 

Bellot, captain, wounded, X., 1085. 

Bellshar, Andrew. (See Belcher.) 

Belmont (Bellemont), reverend Francois Vachon de, at Mon- 
treal, IX., 281 ; biographical notice of, 720; superior 
of the seminary of Montreal, 829 ; reverend Mr. Nor- 
raaut succeeds, 1080. 

Belrive. (See St. Ange.) 

Belt of Wampum, a Seneca chief, Vll., 197; George Cro- 
ghan has an interview with, 268 ; at fort Johnson, 
325 ; delivers a message to the Cherokees, 328 ; gives 
in the adhesion of the Chenussio Indians to the war 
against the French, 391. 

Belts, emblematical, in possession of the Shawauese, VIII., 
291. (See Wampum.) 

Belvidere, Allegany county, New York, Indian name of, 
VII., 723. 

Bemineo, otherwise Killbuck, a Delaware chief, VII., 741. 

Bemoyn, Christopher, lieutenant of the militia at Gravesend, 
IV., 809. 

Benaat, Garrit, III., 74. 

Benavissica, chief of the Shawanese, speech of, to sir Wil- 
liam Johnson, VII., 751, 756 ; signs the treaty of 
peace with the English, 755 ; mentioned, VIII., 113. 

Benbow, rear admiral John, conveys pirates to England, IV., 
646, 697 ; at Boston, 665 ; mentioned, 672. 

Bench (French), John, IV., 936. (See French.) 

Benokes (Bencas, Binckes, Binkes,Bincques), Jacob, reduces 
New York, II., 526, 738, III., 203, 206, IV., 1151 ; 
dispatches a vessel to Holland with the news, II., 527 ; 
the English capture the vessel sent by, ibid, 528, 529 ; 
the states general recommend the further employment 
of the ships under the command of, 530 ; his letters 
laid before the Amsterdam board of admiralty, 535 ; 
grants the colonie of Renselaerswyck its ancient privi- 
leges for one year, 550, 559, 560, 561 ; minutes of 
council during the administration of commanders 
Evertsen and, 569 ; attends a council of war, 571, 572, 
573, 574, 575, 576, 578, 579, 580, 581, 582, 586, 587, 
588, 589, 590, 591, 592, 596, 597, 598, 600, 601, 603, 
604, 605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 610, 611, 612, 613, 614 ; 
memoir of, 579 ; governor Lovelace applies for leave 
to go to Europe in the ship of, 603 ; guarantees the 
repayment of expenses to be incurred by the ships of 
war left at New Orange, 612 ; issues a proclamation 
for seizing all English goods, 629 ; Ephraim Herr- 
mans petitions, 694 ; proclamation of commander 
Evertsen and. III., 202; destroys a number of ves- 
sels in Virginia, 204. 

Benefices, ecclesiastical, in New York, the governor only can 
collate to. III., 372, 379, IV., 288, V., 838, VII., 
830. 

Benfield, John, IV., 936. 

Beng.al, lord Cornwallis, governor of, VIII., 808. 

Benham, John, exchanged, X., 881 ; remains in Canada, 883. 

Benin, ships (}estined for, I., 35. 



— BeeJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Bennett, doctor David, father of lieutenant-governor Phipps, 

X., 43. 
Bennett (Bennits), sir Henry, secretary of state, II., 119, III., 
vii, 48, 54, 56, 61, 86, 89, 97, 102, 136 ; member of 
the privy council, 44, 46 ; colonel Cartwright reports 
the impediments he experiences to, S3, 84, 89 ; the 
royal commissioners to New England report progress 
to, 96, 101 ; created earl of Arlington, 103. (See 
Arlington, earl of.) 

Bennett, J.,.V., 917. 

Bennett, revere)|^ Mr., VII., 537. 

Bennett, Spencer, originally the name of lieutenant-governor 
. Phipps, X., 43. 

Bennington (Vermont), complaints against governor Moore of 
New York transmitted to England from, VII., 917; 
settled, 931 ; nothing but a military force can prevent 
lettlers pouring into, VIII., 310; governor Tryon 
writes to the people of, 311 ; difficulties between 
colonel Eeid's tenants and the people of, 312 ; a spirit 
of riot prevails at, 346 ; a military grant made in, 376 ; 
seeds of civil war growing in, 403 ; a road opened from 
Skenesborough to, 415 ; lieutenant-colonel Baume 
defeated at, 416 ; the secretary of state declines author- 
izing the king's troops to be called out against the 
people of, 5 14 ; further outrages committed by the 
rioters of, 566 ; forts Tieonderoga and Crown Point 
taken by the mob of, 581 ; the Mohawks join general 
Burgoyne after the affair of, 727. 

Benoit (Benoist), lieutenant, sent to the island of St. John, 
X., 176; commandant at Presque isle, 302; com- 
mandant at La Presentation, 953. 

Bensio (Benjor), Mr., merchant at Amsterdam, a ship belong- 
ing to, is cut out of New Haven, I., 337, 345. 

Benson, Christopher, first lieutenant of rangers, VIII., 602. 

Benson, right reverend Martin, the reverend Mr. Seeker 
marries a sister of, VI., 906. 

Benson, Robert, secretary of the New York provincial con- 
gress, VIII., 594; a member of the general commit- 
tee of New York, 601. 

Bensyne, Mathys, I., 606. 

Bentheim, X., 549, 693. 

Bentick [William], privy counselor, III., 572. 

Bentin (Boutin), , captain of a Rhode Island sloop, ar- 
rested, VII., 226. 

Bentyn, Jacques, one of the twelve men at New Amsterdam, 
I., 415. 

Benzel (Bentzell), Adolphus, draws up a plan of a town to 
be established at Crown Point, VIII., 140 ; notice of, 
ibid ; surveyor of woods, 454 ; obtains a grant of the 
military reserve at Crown Point, 488. 

Benzel, archbishop, VIII., 140. 

Berail, lieutenant, wounded, X., 431. 

Berckenrode, Mr., I., 10. 

Beresford [Christopher?], III., 94, 

Beresford, Mr., lays a representation before the board of 
trade respecting tlie passage from the St. Lawrence to 
the Mississippi, V., 502 ; corroborated by governor 
Hunter, 508. 



Berg, inhabitants of, recommended as emigrants to New 
Netherland, I., 370 ; reverend Johannes Megapolensis 
in charge of a congregation in Schoorel and at, 496. 
Bergen, Jan Dircksen, II., 189. 

Bergen (Berge) (New Jersey), II., 463, 464, 479, 622, 696, 
701, 707, 726, III., 591, IV., 98, 99 ; the Indians kill 
two Christians on their way from, II., 466; ordered 
■to surrender to the Dutch, 571 ; John Berry, magis- 
trate of, 576 ; magistrates of, in 1673, 578 ; sworn in, 
580 ; ordered to assist in fortifying New Orange, 586 ; 
population of, in 1673, 587 ; militia officers of, 597 ; 
ordinances of, approved, 643 ; letter of governor 
Colve to the magistrates of, 672 ; order for the sup- 
port of the precentor and schoolmaster of, ibid, 673, 
714, 730 ; militia of, ordered to muster at New Orange, 
673 ; deputies from, 702 ; an appeal allowed from the 
court of, 714; order in a suit from, 720; difficulties 
about the support of the schoolmaster at, ibid ; order 
for the payment of arrears due Messrs. Megapolensis 
from, 722; concerned in Leisler's rebellion. III., 
646 ; supports Jacob Leisler, 647 ; population of the 
county of, in 1726, V., 819. 
Bergen (Norway), lord Rochester distinguishes himself at, 

II., 358 ; mentioned, 470, 471. 
Bergen op Zoom, lieutenant Maclean taken prisoner at, 

VIIL, 563. 
Berger, captain, arrives at Rochelle from Acadia, IX., 800 ; 

mentioned, 918. 
Berger, Jean Baptiste, taken prisoner on the Ohio and car- 
ried to London, X., 352. 
Berian, Jonathan, lieutenant of the militia of Newtown, 

IV., 808. 
Berkel, Jolian, receiver-general of Holland, I., 617, 618. 
Berkeley, George, bishop of Cloyne, VI., 908 ; his son and 
doctor Johnson of New York correspond, 914 ; reve- 
rend Mr. Johnson procures a donation for Yale col- 
lege from, VII., 372. 
Berkeley (Bercklay), George, first earl of, notice of, II., 562. 
Berkeley (Berkley) [James 3d], earl of, member of the 

privy council, V., 539. 
Berkeley, John Symes, VIIL, 260. 
Berkeley, sir Maurice, II., 599. 

Berkeley (Berkley), vice-admiral sir William, knight, notice 
of, II., 274; member of the hoard for foreign planta- 
tions, III., 33, 44. 
Berkeley, sir William, governor of Virginia, III., 45, 196, 

VII., 361. 
Berkeley (Barclay, Barkelay), of Stratton, John first lord, 
memoir of, II., 599 ; member of tlie council for trade, 
III., 31; and of the council for foreign plantations, 
33, 36, 46, 47, 48 ; member of the privy council, 44, 
166, 177, 229, 388 ; all the land west of Hudson's 
river granted to Sir George Carteret and, 105, IV., 
1155; east side of the Delaware granted to, III., 
113 ; both sides of the Delaware recommended to 
be granted to, 114; extent of the tract of land 
granted to, 174, 796, IV., 382; one of the pro- 



72 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bee- 



Berkeley, of Strattoii, John l-^t lori— continued. 

prietors of West Jersey, III., 284; sells his right 
thereto, ibid, 285, 293, 294, 295, 296 ; referred to in 
support of the earl Stirling's claim to Long island, 
607 ; the agent of New Jersey allowed a copy of the 
grant to, VII., 339. 

Berkeley of Stratton [John 5th], lord, member of the 
privy council, VI., 757. 

Berkeley of Stratton [William 4th], lord, one of the lords 
of trade, III., xvi, V., 391. 

Berks county (Pennsylvania), palatines settle In, V., 575; 
Conrad Weiser a resident of, VI., 795. 

Berks (Berkshire) [Thomas Howard, 1st], earl of, member 
of the privy council. III., 30, 166. 

Berlin (Connecticut), reverend John Norton a native of, 
X.,67. 

Bermudas (Barmodas; Barmudas ; Burmudoes), the trade 
to the, thrown open to the inhabitants of the United 
Netherlands, I., 162, 173, 501; the ship St. Peter 
touches at, on her voyage from Holland to New 
Netherland, and is confiscated, 174 ; the Indians cap- 
tured in New Netherland sent as a present to the | 
governor of, 210 ; the Nieuw Netherlantsche Indiaeu | 
arrives at New Amsterdam from the, II., 462 ; referred j 
to, 763, III., 184, 609 ; an extreme drought in, 161, j 
162 ; governor Sloughter lands at, 766 ; Edward Ran- 
dolph going to, IV., 301 ; captain Tew commissioned 
by the governor of, 446 ; number of vessels cleared 
from Great Britain, 1714-1717 for, V., 615 ; value 
of the imports and exports of, 616 ; petitions against 
the New York tonnage act, VI., 135, 136; instruc- 
tions sent to the governor of, 754 ; WUliam Popple, 
governor of, 756, 761 ;_tenure of judges' commissions 
in, VII., 479 ; George S. Bruere governor of, 946; the 
earl of Dunmore, governor of, VIII., 209 ; heads of 
inquiry relative to, 388. 

Bernaerd, Nicolas, examination of, II., 41, 42. 

Bernantz, Henrice, I., 407. 

Bernard, captain de, in command near Ticonderoga, X., 
721, 738 ; services of, 722, 723, 724, 739, 740, 742, 
745, 748, 749, 752, 790, 793, 795, 815 ; wounded at 
SiUery, 1086. 

Bernard, lieutenant, missing at Ticonderoga, X., 750 ; taken 
prisoner, 774, 800. 

Bernard (Barnard, Benard), Francis, governor of Massa- 
chusetts, VII., 676; transmits proceedings of the 
representatives of Massachusetts [against parliament- 
ary taxation] to England, 678 ; recommended to 
promote the settlement of the boundary between 
Massachusetts and New York, 879 ; interposes in be- 
half of refugees from New York, 911 ; governor 
Moore corresponds with, VIII., 2. 

Bernard, Joseph, IV.,«16. 

Bernardstown (Massachusetts), X., 67. 

Bernetier, captain, sails from Quebec for Martiuico, X., 176. 

Bernefz (Bernet, Bernets, Bernier), lieutenant-colonel de, at 
the siege of fort William Henry, X., 604, 605; his 
command, 621 ; required to give his opinion on the 



state of Quebec, 1007; votes to capitulate and re- 
turns to France, 1009 ; distinguishes himself at the 
siege of Quebec, 1010 ; the minister of war confers 
on the state of Canada with, 1068. 

Bemets (Bernes, Berni) river, near Ticonderoga, X., 738, 
814. 

Bernier, Mr., recommended to be governor of Montreal, IX., 
207. 

Bernier (Bernies), lieutenant, aid-de-camp to Baron de Dies- 
kau, taken prisoner, VI., 1004, X., 318; reported 
killed, 340, 354, 356, 357, 360 ; taken^jp Albany, 384 ; 
sent to England, 387, 422; his effects sold, 564; ap- 
pointed assistant-commissary, 692 ; returns to Canada, 
746; assistant to M. Doreil, 765; sick at Quebec, 
829 ; succeeds M. Doreil, 861, 959 ; transmits a return 
of prices in Canada, 965 ; reports the state of his 
department, 968 ; reports the deplorable result of the 
campaign of 1759, 1009 ; the military hospitals placed 
under, 1054 ; reports the capitulation of Canada, 1120 ; 
superintends the embarkation of the French troops, 
1123 ; returns to France, 1124. 

Berniferes, reverend Henri de, notice of, IX., 93. 

Bernis, De Pierre, cardinal de, minister of foreign affairs, X., 
vi. 

Bernitz, count de, requested to procure the recall of the 
marquis de Montcalm, X., 758, 802. 

Bernon, Gabriel, his calculations respecting the manufacture 
of naval stores, IV., 502, 605, 506 ; proposed as super- 
intendent of naval stores in New York, 503 ; men- 
tioned, 535, 668. 

Berrien, John, member of the general committee of New 
Y'ork, VIII., 601 ; third lieutenant of the Corsicans, 
602. 

Berry, John, delegates from New Jersey opposed to, II., 571 ; 
notice of, 576 ; mentioned, 602, 605, 658 ; allowed to 
appeal from the court of Bergen, 714, 726 ; deputy 
governor, 72S ; fined, 729 ; captain, III., 201. 

Berry, sir John, sent to reduce Virginia, III., 245. 

Berry, Thomas, commissioner on the part of Massachusetts, 
to concert measures of mutual defense, VI., 267. 

Berryer (Berrier), Nicolas Ren6, minister of justice, X., v; 
minister of the colonies, vi ; notice of, 936 ; letter of, 
to Mr. Bigot, 937 ; forwards supplies to Canada, 944 ; 
events in that country reported to, 945, 948, 950, 966, 
1089, 1091, 1092, 1093, 1095 ; informed of the fall of 
Quebec, 1010 ; articles of capitulation sent to, 1011 ; 
M. Bigot submits suggestions regarding certain offices 
in Canada to, 1048 ; ignorance of the Canadian pilots 
reported to, 1050 ; a plan for the defense of Canada 
submitted to, 1062 ; orders supplies to be sent to Can- 
ada, 1068 ; battle of Sillery reported to, 1075 ; his 
supplies delayed, 1100 ; the marquis de Vaudreuil 
reports his arrival in Prance to, 1128. 

BerrjTuan, Thomas, III., 600, 601. 

Bert, Pieter, I., 437. 

Bertet (Berthet), M., complains that deserters from Louisiana 
are received at Detroit, X., 37; commandant at the 
Illinois, 135, 137; at Caskasquias, 142; extracts of 



-Big] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



73 



Bertet, U. — continued. 

letters from, 142, 152 ; aid ordered sent to, 149 ; an- 
nonnces a general conspiracy among the Indians, 156 ; 
instructions sent to, 161 ; letters received from, 170. 

Berthelot, M., IX., 70. 

Berthier (Bertier), captain, IX., 43 ; attends a conference 
called by governor de la Barre, 194 ; serves against 
the Senecas, 340, 359. 

Berthier (Canada), a detachment attends count Frontenac 
from, IX., 113. 

Berlin, Henri Leonard Jean Baptiste, comptroller-general of 
France, X., vii. 

Berval, M. de, dead, X., 434. 

Berwick, James Fitzjames, duke of, IX., 1034. 

Berwick, marshal, serves in Germany, X., 941. 

Berwick, sir John Vaughan, K. B., governor of, VII., 749 ; 
general Monckton, governor of, VIII., 250; lord 
Howe, governor of, 751 ; sir John Mordaunt, gov- 
ernor of, X., 705. 

Berwick (New Hampshire), particulars of the French attack 
on, IX., 471. 

Bes, Pieter Cornelissen, II., 456. 

Beschryvinger van Nieu Nederlant, Adriaen Vander Donck 
submits to the chamber at Amsterdam his book en- 
titled, I., 530 ; states general call for a copy of the, 
531; which is transmitted, 532; copyright granted 
for, 533. 

Beskrifning om de Svenska forsamlingars Forna och Nar- 
warande Tilstand, utded sa kallade Nya Sverige, rev- 
erend Mr. Acrelius author of, VII., 168. 

Besley, Oliver, captain of militia for New Rochelle, IV., 810. 

de Besne, count du Chaffault. (See Dtt Chaffault.) 

Bessels, Adam, his widow complains of the guardians of 
Kiliaen van Rensselaer's minor son, I., 255. 

Bestevaer, Jan Jansen, skipper, II., 39, 452, 454, 458. 

Bethlehem (Bathleem) (Pennsylvania), Moravians live at, 
VI., 345; the Indians cheated out of, VII., 331; a 
man carried prisoner to Niagara from, X., 588. 

Betts, Richard, II., 592, 723, 728. 

Beumos, a settler near Wood creek (Washington county, 
New York), VII., 615. 

Beversreede, fort, seven leagues from fort Christina, I., 361 ; 
built on tlie Schuylkill, 542, 588, II., 137 ; the Swedes 
forbid any plantations to be made between fort Els- 
borgh and, I., 589 ; sale of the lands on the Schuyl- 
kill signed at, 593 ; Adriaen Van Tienhoven commis- 
sary at, 594 ; names of inhabitants at, 595. 

Beverly, commissioners from the parliament attend the king 
at, I., 1.30. 

Bevert, Hendrick, II., 44. 

Bevesier, an English vessel recaptured from the Dutch off, 
II., 527. 

Beveys, Claude, IV., 1007. 

Beyn, Harmsen, II., 475. 

Beys, reverend Henricus, signs an address to governor Hun- 
ter, v., 326; censures reverend Mr. Henderson, 354. 

Bianco, Elie, IV., 935. 

Bibiribe river, I., 155. 

10 



Bible, the, reverend Mr. Leverich leaves at his death a com- 
mentary on the Old Testament, II., 160 ; director Stuy . 
vesant calls for twenty English, 508 ; David Jamison 
condemned to be hanged for burning the, IV., 400, 
429, 442, 823 ; proposed to be translated into Iro- 
quois, 734 ; another man condemned to be hanged 
for burning the, 823 ; Charles Thomson translates 
the Septuagint, VII., 294; parts thereof translated 
into the Mohawk language, VIII., 816. 

Bibliothfeque, Melanges d'un grande, published, X., 535 ; 
universelle de Romans, M. de Paulmy publishes a 
plan for, ibid. 

Bic, island of, a post recommended to be established at, 
IX., 15 ; an English fleet discovered off, 832, X., 972 ; 
a French frigate at, 50. 

Bicker, Cornells, I., 38, 137. 

Bicker, Gerrit, commandant of fort Casimier, I., 591; sur- 
renders fort Casimier, 601 ; takes the oath of alle- 
giance to the Swedes, 602; declines to defend fort 
Casimier, 603, 604, 605. 

Bicker, Roeloff, II., 48, 101. 

Bicker, Victor, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601. 

Bickford (Beckford), lieutenant Abraham, pursues and ar- 
rests deserters, IV., 161; charge against the deserters 
presented by, 162; served in the Irish war, 174. 

Bickford, William, dies of his wounds, X., 170. 

Bickford, , Indians fail in an attack on his garrison at 

Oyster river (New Hampshire), IX., 614. 

Bickley, May, attorney-general of New York, IV., 1186, 
v., 341; his character, 357. 

Bickley, William, IV., 936; merchant of New York, 1135. 

Bicoque. (See Baltic.) 

Bidaud, Franfois, IX., 804. 

Biddle, captain Nicliolas, commands the United States brig, 
Andrew Doria, VIII., 676. 

Bienville, Francois le Moyne de, accompanies the expedition 
against Schenectady, IX., 466 ; commands an Indian 
detachment, 517; killed, 518. 

Bienville, Jean Bajitiste le Moyne de, reports hostile feelings 
of the English of Carolina towards the French, IX., 
925 ; assists Mobile, 926 ; governor of Louisiana, 
1025 ; referred to, 1067. 

Bienville de Celeron. (See Celoron.) 

Biesman, Mr., member of the states general, I., 10. 

Bigamy, Ralph Doxy accused of, II., 691 ; David Jamison 
accused of, IV., 400, 429; instances of, in Canada, 
IX., 68. 

Big Beaver river, general Parsons drowned in, VIII., 736. 

Big Canoe, a Cayuga sachem. (See Skahyonisio.) 

Big Cove creek, VII., 281. 

Bigeau, Arnaud, outlawed, X., 155;- returns to Acadia, 168. 

Bigelow, Timothy, taken prisoner, VIII., 664. 

Big Fish, a Moliawk chief, killed, X., 122. 

Big Head, an Ottawa chief, his speech, IX., 606. 

Bigot, Francois, IX., 335, 906, 973, 975, X., 552, 555, 564; 
intendant of Cape Breton, 1, 8; sends copy of the 
capitulation of Louisbonrg to count d' Argenson, 3 ; 



74 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bi 



Bigot, Francois — continued. 

explains tlie cause of tlie loss of Louisbourg, 15 ; in- 
tendant of the duke d' Anville's fleet, arrives at Che- 
liouctou, 72 ; his relationship towards M. de P6an, 
85, 86; arrives at Quebec, 177; transmits a journal 
of occurrences in Canada, &c., 179 ; to report the ex- 
pense of the new road to La Prairie, 380 ; assists at a 
.conference with the Indians, 186, 188, 345, 445, 500; 
endeavors to secure the beaver trade for Canada, 199, 
200, 202 ; in favor of the proposed settlement at Os- 
wegatchie, 204 ; letter of, to M. Rouille, 218 ; the sur- 
render of fort Necessity announced to, 260 ; about to 
return to Canada, 276, 277, 278, 280 ; M. Varin to act 
until the arrival of, 279 ; actively engaged in Canada, 
305 ; at Montreal, 309, 310; sends supplies to Louis- 
bourg, 315 ; forwards some of general Braddock's 
papers to M. Machault, 364; M. Provost of Cape 
Breton refuses to obey, 371 ; does not meddle with 
military matters, 373 ; confides in M. Doreil, 394 ; 
apprehends a scarcity of provisions, 416 ; victuals the 
expedition for Oswego, 411 ; makes advances for that 
expedition, 464; ordered to restrict officers and pri- 
vates to the simple ration, 489, 493; complains of 
want of provisions, 491 ; obliged to mix oats in bread, 
497; encourages gambling, 551,685; opposed to the 
continuance of hostilities, 631 ; preparing his re- 
quisitions, 651, 652; reports the expenses incurred 
in Canada, 666; commended, 671, 1079; cousin of 
the marquis de Puiseux, 685 ; promises to vindicate 
the marquis de Montcalm, 686 ; advances money to 
M. de Montcalm, 687 ; endeavors to restore good un- 
derstanding between M. de Vaudreuil and M. de 
Montcalm, 810, 858 ; writes to the minister on that- 
subject, 812 ; a copy of the New York Gazette sent 
to, 830; increases the allowance to the military 
officers, 886, 902; letters received in France from, 
906 ; sends despatches to France, 923 ; letter of M. 
Berryer, minister of the colonies, to, 937; stories 
circulated in France to the discredit of, 939 ; no con- 
fidence placed in, 960; appears occupied only in 
amassing wealth, ibid ; seeks to shift responsibility, 
961 ; his connections, 962, 965 ; letter to M. Berryer 
from, 966 ; reports the estimated expenses for the 
year, 1759, 967 ; his efforts on the approach of the 
English, 972, 993 ; requisitions made by, 973 ; visits 
the camp at Beauport, 996 ; required to vote on the 
question of capitulating, 1007 ; votes in favor of thai 
measure, 1008 ; votes to attack the English, 1022, 
1040 ; his good fortune and character, 1045 ; submits 
suggestions in regard to certain offices in Canada, 
1048 ; reports the ignorance of the pilots, 1050 ; re- 
ports operations before Quebec, 1051 ; in want of 
supplies, 1067 ; holds out hopes that his bills will he 
paid in France, 1099 ; chevalier de Levis satisfied 
with, 1101 ; reports the approach of the English on 
Montreal, 1103 ; allowed to remain in Montreal after 
its capitulation, 1109 ; allowed a vessel to convey 



himself and suit to France, 1110; and liberty to re- 
move his papers, 1118; sails for France, 1126; 
biographical notice of, ibid ; name of the vessel he 
sailed in, 1127. 
Bigot, reverend father, missionary at Sillery, IX., 354; to 

the Abenakis, 615 ; to Acadia, 630, 676. 
Bigot, reverend Jacques, S. J., IX., 440. 
Bigot, Louise, marries count de Sillery, X., 685 ; mother of 

the marquis de Puisieux, ibid. 
Bigot, reverend Vincent, S. J., IS., 440. 
Bigs, Thomas, II., 706. 
Bilboa (Bilboe), news of the peace, received from, III., 162; 

codfish exported from Boston to, IV., 790. 
Bilder, Pieter, II., 193. 

Biljou (Billjouw), Peter, schout of Staten island, II., 586, 
694 ; ordered to give notice of any arriving vessels, 
629 ; a commission appointed to investigate com- 
plaints against, 681. 
Billerika, the Indians attack, IV., 192. 
Billiard, reverend Robert Jean Baptiste, S. J., notice of, 

X., 301. 
Billingsly, May, II., 91. 

Billop (Bellop), Christopher, lieutenant of foot. III., 221 j 
desires to give up his commission, 239 ; captain, 240 ; 
dismissed the service, 276 ; angry with Sir Edmund 
Andros, 284 ; about to sell his plantation, 350 ; his 
plantation opposite Amboy, 356; petition of, to the 
king, 365 ; order thereupon, 366. 
Billop's point. III., 395. 
Bills of credit. (See Currency.) 
Bimant. (See Seaman.) 
Bineteau (Binneteau), reverend Juliun, notice of, IX., 567; 

missionary to the Abenaquis, 570. 
Bingen, Thomas, II., 180. 
Binghamton, Chugnut opposite, VII., 50 ; Indian name 

of, 67. 
Binkhurst, admiral, III., 213. (See Binckes.) 
Binnewitz, commander. (See Minuit.) 
Binyem, John, X., 883. 
Biogiaphical notices : 

Abbadie, M. d', X., 1161. 

Abercrombie, lieutenant-colonel James, VII., 160. 

Abercromby, general James, VII., 345. 

Acrelius, reverend Isaac, VII., 168. 

Addington, Isaac, IV., 426. 

Affry, Louis Auguste Augustin d', X., 657. 

Albemarle, William Anne Keppel, earl of, X., 217. 

Alexander, James, V., 982. 

Alexander, William, IX., 981. 

AUaz, James, X., 731. 

Allen, reverend .James, III., 582. 

Allen, sir Thomas, II., 274. 

Amherst, sir Jefi'ery, VII., 548. 

Andros, sir Edmund, knight, II., 740. 

Anstruther, William, VIII., 311. 

Anthony, Allard, II., 43. 

Anville, N. de la Rochefoucauld, duke d', X., 73. 

AptUorp, Charles Ward, VIII., 765. 



—Bio] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



75 



Biographical notices — continued. 

Apthorp, rererend East, VII., 375. 

Arbuthnot, Mariot, VIII., 773. 

Argenson, Pierre Marc de Voyer, count d', X., 29. 

Arlington, Henry Bennet, earl of, II., 346. 

Arran, Richard Butler, earl of, II.,' 562. 

Ashurst, sir Henry, IV., 771. 

Avaugour, Dubois, baron d', IX., 17. 

Auberi, reverend, Joseph, IX., 880. 

Auberiviere, right reverend Fran90is Louis de Pourroy 

de r, IX., 1063. 
Aubry, captain, X., 901. 

Auckland, William Eden, 1st lord, VIII., 763. 
Axtell, William, VIII., 269. 
Babcock, Henry, X., 731. 
Bailie, Alexander, X., 731. 
Balneaves, Patrick, X., 729. 
Baltimore, Cecilius Calvert, 2d lord, II., 74. 
Banyar, Goldsbrow, VIII., 188. 
Barclay, reverend Henry, VI., 88. 
Barusley, Thomas, X., 731. 
Barrfi, Isaac, X., 1027. 
Barre, Lefebvre de la, IX., 167. 

Barrington, William Wildman, 2d viscount, X., 537. 
Barton, reverend Thomas, VII., 166. 
Beaufort, Francois de Vendome, duke de, II., 351. 
Beauharnois, Charles, marquis de, IX., 956. 
Beaiijen, Daniel Lienard de, X., 366. 
Bechefer, reverend Thierry, IX., 169. 
Beckwith, John, VII., 58. 
Bedford, John Russell, 7th duke of, VI., 713. 
Bedford, William Russell, 4th duke of, I., 127. 
Belleisle, Charles Louis Auguste Fouquet, duke de, X., 

527. 
Bellomont, Richard Coote, earl of, IV., 851. 
Belmont, reverend, Francois Vachon de, IX., 720. 
Benckes, Jacob, II., 579. 
•Benzel, Adolphus, VIII., 140. 
Berkeley, lord George, II., 562. 
Berkeley, lord John, II., 599. 
Berkeley, Norbonne, VIII., 260. 
Berkeley, sir William, II., 274. 
Berniferes, reverend Henri de, IX., 93. 
Berry, John, II., 576. ' 

Berryer, Nicholas R6u6 de, X., 936. 
Bigot, Fraufois, X., 1126. 

Billiard, reverend Robert Jean Baptists, X., 301. 
Bineteau, Julien, IX., 567. 
Bird, John, VIII., 705. 
Blaauw, Johannes, II., 200. 
Blake, Nathan, X., 43. 
Blake, Robert, I., 579. 
Blakeney, William, lord, VI., 170. 
Blathwayt, William, V., 507. 
Block, Simon, II., 267. 
Blunt, Harry, VIII., 684. 
Bolton, Mason, VIII., 724. 



Boreel, William, II , 261. 

Bougainville, Louis Antoine de, X., 1124. 

Bouquet, Henry, VII., 352. 

Bourdon, Sieur, IX., 24. 

Braddock, Edward, X., 304. 

Bradley, Richard, VI., 17. 

Bradstreet, John, VIII., 379. 

Bragg, Philip, Vn., 355. 

Brattle, James, VIII., 645. 

Bridge, Christopher, IV., 582. 

Bridger, John, V., 175. 

Broughton, Thomas, VI., 91. 

Brown, lieutenant John, X., 1097. 

Browne, honorable Arthur, VII., 846. 

Browne, reverend Arthur, VII., 537. 

Browning, William, X., 730. 

Brudenell, honorable James, VI., 97. 

Bruyas, reverend Jacques, IX., 720. 

Buell, reverend Samuel, VIII., 693. 

Bullit, Thomas, VIII., 395. 

Burrington, George, V., 935. 

Burton, Ralph, VII., 93. 

Butler, James. (See Ormond.) 

Butler, Richard. (See .4r)-an.) 

Byllinge, Edward, III., 285. 

Caldwell, John, VIII., 509. 

Calvert, Philip, II., 73. 

Campbell, Donald, VII., 9S3. 

Campbell, Duncan, X., 728. 

Campbell, John, of Duneaves, X., 728. 

Campbell, John, of Strachur, X., 728. 

Campbell, lord Neil, III., 408. 

Campbell, lord William, VIIL, 174. 

Carheil, reverend Etienne de, IX., 227. 

Carteret, sir George, II., 410. 

Carteret, Philip, II., 607. 

Cathcart, Charles, 8th lord, VI., 186. 

Cats, Jacob, I., 541. 

Cavendish, lord William, II., 562. 

Chapman, Benjamin, VIII., 482. 

Chevert, lieutenant-general Fraufois de, X., 577. 

Cholraondeley, honorable Robert, VIII., 454. 

Clare, Robert Nugent, 1st viscount, VII., 899. 

Clarke, George, IV., 1*169. 

Claus, Daniel, VIII., 815. 

Clinton, admiral George, VI., 475. 

Clinton, sir Henry, VIII., 717. 

Clinton, general James, VIII., 806. 

Cochrane, Gavin, X., 730. 

Colbert, Jean Baptiste, II., 348. (See Seignday.) 

Golden, Alexander, VIII., 221. 

Golden, David, VIII., 323. 

Colden, Richard Nicholls, VIII., 511. 

Colgan, reverend Thomas, V., 973. 

Colville, David, lord, VII., 806. 

Conway, major-general Thomas, VIII., 730. 

Cooke, William, X., 723. 



76 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bio- 



Biograpliical notices — coitinucd. 

Cooper, reverend Myles, D. D., VIII., 297. 

Corubury, lady Katlierine, IV., 11«3. 

Coruwallis, Charles, 1st marquis of, VIII., 808. 

Courtin, Antoine, II., 336. 

Coventry, Henry, II., 564. 

Coxe, Daniel, V., 204. 

Crawford, William, VIII., 464. 

Cremilles, Louis Hyacinthe Bayerode, X., 768. 

Cresap, Michael, VIII., 459. 

Creville, George, VIII., 321. 

Crisasy (Crisafy), Chevalier de, IX., 642. 

Croghan, George, VII., 982. 

Crosby, Aaron, VIII., 551. 

Croy Sohre, Emmanuel, piince de, X., 527. 

Crozat, Antoine, V., 508. 

Cruger, Henry, VII., 843. 

Cruikshanks, John, VIII., 206. 

Cunningham, Henry, VI., 51. 

Cutler, Timothy, D. D., VI., 908. 

Dablon, reverend Claude, IX., 97. 

Dagworthy, Eli, X., 730. 

DaUlie, reverend Peter, III., 651. 

DaUing, sir John, VIII., 794. 

Dalyell, James, VII., 547. 

Dayton, Elias, VIII., 6S2. 

Deat, reverend Antoine, IX., 1021. 

De Graeff, Cornells, II., 56. 

De la Cour, Andrew, VII., 127. 

De Lancey, captain James, VII., 402. 

De Lancey, colonel James, VIII., 718. 

De Lancey, Oliver, VIII., 788. 

De Lancey, Peter, VI., 469. 

De Lancey, Stephen, VIII., 480. 

Delawar, John West, 7th lord, VL, 163. 

Delawar, Thomas West, 3d lord, II., 93. 

Denny, William, X., 69G. 

Depeyster, Abraham, IV., 777. 

De Peyster, Abraham, junior, VIII., 14. 

De Peyster, Frederick, VIII., 755. 

De Peyster, John, VI., 132. 

Derby, James Stanley, 7th earl of, I., 134. 

De Ruyter, Michael Adriaensz duke de, I., 582. 

Deschambault, reverend Lou^ Honor^ Fleury, IX., 676. 

Desenclaves, reverend Jean Baptiste, X., 107. 

Desmarets, Jean Baptiste Francois, X., 372. 

Desmaretz, Yves Marie, X., 577. 

De Witt, John, 1 , 559. 

Dieskau, baron, X., 340. 

DoUier de Casson, reverend Francois, IX., 138. 

Dorset, Edward Sackville, 4th earl of, I., 133. 

Dosquet, right reverend Pierre Hermant, IX., 1032. 

Dover, Joseph Yorke, baron, VIII., 405. 

Downing, sir George, II., 415. 

Downing, William, X., 773. 

Drnmmond, Robert, X., 730. 

Du Ohaffault de Besne, count, X., 767. 



Duchf, reverend Jacob, VII., 411. 

Dudley, Joseph, III., 364. 

Dudley, William, IX., 941. 

Dunbar, Thomas, VI., 915, X., 566. 

Duncan, Alexander, VII., 533. 

Dunmore, John Miuray, 4th earl of, VIII., 209. 

Dupplin, Thomas Hay, lord viscount, VI., 762. 

Durantaye, Oliver Morel de la, IX., 203. 

Durell, admiral Philip, X., 994. 

Dyson, Jeremiah, VII., 763. 

Eaton, Theophilus, I., 428. 

Egremont, Charles Wyndham, 2d earl of, VII., 541. 

Elliot, Andrew, VIII., 96. 

Elliot, John, X., 728. 

Erskine, .sir William, VIII., 713. 

Essex, Robert Devereux, 3d earl of, I., 127. 

Estaing, Charles Hector d', X , 1167. 

Estrades, Godefroy, count d', II., .349. 

Estrees, Louis Cffisar Letellier, marshal d', X., 962, 

Evans, John, IV., 1082. 

Evertsen, Cornelis, II., 572. 

Eyre, William, X., 545, 729. 

Fagel, Gaspard, II., 529. 

Falconer, Thomas, X., 729. 

Fanning, Edmiuid, VIII., 2S4. 

Faradon, Louis Normant du, IX., 108O. 

Farewell, George, III., 663. 

Farmar, David, VII., 816. 

Fauquier, Francis, VII., 511. 

Fendall, Josias, II., 67. 

Fenelon, reverend Francois de Salignac, IX., 112. 

Finch, sir Heneage, II., 534. 

Fisher, John, VIII., 739. 

Fitch, Thomas, VII., 820. 

Fitzherbert, William, VIL, 763. 

Fleury, cardinal de, IX., 959. 

Forbes, John, VIL, 344. 

Forbes, JVilUam, X., 730. 

Forster, William, V., 978. 

Foucault, M., X., 1161. 

Foy, Edward, VIII., 323. 

Franklin, William, VIL, 837. 

FrC'miQ, reverend Jacques, IX., 130. 

French, Philip, IV., 396. 

Gage, Thomas, VIII., 247. 

Galissonifere, Roland Michel Barrin, marquis de la, VI.. 

532. 
Galloway, Joseph, VIL, 291. 
Garlics, John Stewart, lord, VIIL, 322. 
Garnier, reverend Julien, IX., 171. 
Gascoyne, Bamber, VII., 643. 
Geelvinck, Cornelis, II., 564. 
Germain, reverend Charles, X., 548. 
Gerrish, Sarah, IX., 489. 
Gisors, count de, X., 696. 
Gibson, bishop, VIL, 363. 
Gladwin, Henry, VIL, 961. 



-Bio] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



77 



Biographical notices — continued. 
Godeneau, Giles, III., 716. 
Gordon, Lord Adam, VII., 767. 
Gordon, Archibald, X., 728. 
Gordon, Thomas, V., 421. 
Gorham, John, X., 90. 
Grieme, David, VII., 890. 

Grafton, Augustus Henry Fitzroy, 3d duke of, VIII., 75. 
Graham, Gordon, X., 728. 
Graham, James, IV., 847. 
Graham, John, X., 729. 
Graham, Thomas, X., 728. 

Grand Fontaine, Hubert d'Andigny de, IX., 87. 
Grandison, George Villiers, 4th viscount, II., 563. 
Grant, James, X., 729, 903. 
Grant, William, X., 729. 
Grantham. (See Robinson.) 
Granville, Antoine Perrenot, cardinal de, I., 491. 
Grasse, Francois Joseph Paul, coixnt de, X., 573. 
Gray, Robert, X., 729. 
Greenfield, Francis, X., 730. 
GrevQle, Charles Francis, VIII., 545. 
Gridley, Richard, VH., 357. 
Grilfith, Alexander, V., 401. 
•Groselliers, Medard Chouart des, IX., 797. 
Guignas, reverend Pierre Michel, IX., 1051. 
Haldimand, sir Frederick, VII., 395. 
Halifax, George Montague Dixnk, 5th earl of, VII., 745. 
Halifax, George Saville, 1st marquis of, II., 523. 
Halkett, sir Peter, VI., 915. 
Hamilton, Andrew, IV., 200. 
Hamilton, Archibald, VIII., 755. 
Hamilton, Isaac, VIII., 572. 
Hamilton, James, 1st duke of, I., 109. 
Hand, Edward, VHL, 712. 
Hardy, sir Charles, VI., 1021. 
Harris, John, VII., 246. 

Hastings, Francis Rawdon, 1st marquis of, VIII., 734. 
Haviland, WOliam, X., 713. 
Hawley, reverend Gideon, VII., 49. 
Haynes, John, I., 568. 
Hazen, Moses, VIII., 777. 
Heinsius, Nicolaes, 11., 239. 
Herkimer, Hanjost, VIII., 233. 
Herkimer, Nicholas, VIII., 720. 
Hen-ing, Thomas, D. D., VI., 849. 
Hertford, William Seymoirr, 11th earl and 1st marquis 

of, I., 134. 
Hervey, general William, X., 989. 
Hicks, Whitehead, VIII., 594. 
Hillsborough, Wills Km, 1st earl of, VIII., 73. 
Holdernesse, Robert Darcy, 4th earl of, VI., 757. 
Holland, Henry Richard, 1st earl of, I., 132. 
Hooper, Robert Lettice, VI., 24. 
Hopkins, Edward, I., 428. 
Horsmanden, Daniel, VII., 528. 
Howard, Thomas, VIU., 322. 



Howard, William, VII., 872. 

Howe, Edward, X., 92. 

Howe, George Augustus, 3d viscount, X., 735. 

Howe, William, 5th viscount, VIII., 751. 

Huybert, Peter de, II., 529. 

Izard, Ralph, VIII., 804. 

Jackson, Richard, VHL, 762. 

James, Thomas, VII., 800. 

Jay, sir James, VII., 498. 

Jay, John, VIII., 469. 

Jenney, reverend Robert, VII., 407. 

Jermyn, Henry, II., 563. 

Johnson, Guy, VIII., 813. 

Johnson, reverend Samuel, VI., 914. 

Johnston, John, V., 34. 

Jolliet, Louis, IX., 669. 

Jones, Thomas, VIII., 685. 

Jonquifere, Jacques Pierre de Taffanel, marquis de la^ 

X., 250. 
Josselyn, Henry, III., 249. 
Kempe, John Tabor, VII., 926. 
Kennedy, Archibald, VII., 822. 
Kennedy, David, X., 1033. 
Kerlerec, Mr., X., 281. 
Kirkland, reverend Samuel, VIII., 631. 
Knowles, sir Charles, X., 31. 
Knox, William, VIII., 803. 
Knyphausen, baron, VIII., 753. 
La Chasse, reverend Pierre Joseph de, IX., 1014. 
Lacorne, reverend Mr., X., 17. 
Laet, Johannes de, I., 634. 
Lafitau, reverend Joseph Francois, IX., 882. 
Lamberville, reverend Jacques de, IX., 838. 
Lamberville, reverend Jean de, IX., 171. 
Lapriere, Robert, II., COO. 
Larned, Ebenezer, VIII., 806. 
Lauzon, reverend Francois Louis, IX., 1018. 
Laval-Montmorency, right reverend Francois Xavier de, 

IX., 13. 
Lawrence, Charles, VI., 954, X., 282. 
Lawson, sir John, II., 274. 
Lee, Charles, VII., 58, X., 729. 
Legge, honorable Edward, X., 131. 
Legge, Francis, VHL, 401. 
Le Hunte, George, X., 730. 

Leicester, Robert Sidney, 2d [13th] earl of, I., 132. 
Lescoat, reverend Jean Gabriel le Pappe du, IX., 1021. 
Leverich, reverend William, II., 160. 
Levis, Francois, chevalier, afterwards duke de, X., 

1128. 
Lewis, Charles, VIII., 517. 
Ligonier, John, 1st earl of, X., 705. 
Lincoln, Thomas Pelham Clinton, 10th earl of, VIII., 

795. 
Lindesay, John, VI., 707. 
Lionne, Hugues de, II., 349. 
Lisburne, Wilmot Vaughan, 1st earl of, VIIL, 196. 



78 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bio— 



Biographical notices — continued. 

Lisle, Philip Sydney, lord, I , 487. 

Littlehales, John, VII., 126. 

Livingston, James, VIII., 662. 

Livingston, Philip, VI., 60. 

Livingston, Philip, junior, VIII., 470. 

Livingston, Robert, III., 401. 

Livingston, Robert R., VIII., 192. 

Lokenius, reverend Lawrence Charles, III., 343. 

Longueuil, Paul Joseph de, X., 564. 

Lett, Abraham, VIII., 456. 

Loudoun, John Campbell, 4th earl of, VII., 36. 

Loutre, reverend Louis Joseph de la, X., 11. 

Lovelace, Francis, II., 580. 

Low, Isaac, VIII., 470. 

Ludlow, Gabriel G., VIIL, 696. 

Ludlow, George Duncan, VIII., 248. 

Lusignan, Paul Louis Dazemard de, X., 546. 

Lyman, Phineas, X., 333. 

Lyons, reverend James, VII., 397. 

MacClennaghan, reverend William, VII., 415. 

McDougall, Alexander, VIII., 213. 

Machault, Jean Baptiste, X., 262. 

Mcintosh, Alexander, X., 729. 

McKemie, reverend Francis, IV., 1187. 

MacLean, Alan, VIII., 563. 

McLean, Francis, VIII., 791. 

McLeod, Norman, VIII., 228. 

Magregorie, Patrick, III., 395. 

Maillard, reverend Antoine Simon, X., 17. 

Maillebois, Yves Marie Desmaretz, count de, X., 577. 

Manchester, Edward Montagu, 2d earl of, II., 292. 

Mareuil, reverend Pierre de, IX., 836. 

Marmet, reverend Jacques, IX., 931. 

Marsh, James, X., 730. 

Martin, Josiah, VIII., 279. 

Martin, Philip, VIII., 64. 

Martin, admiral William, X., 61. 

Mascarene, John Paul, VI., 4S2. 

Mason, John, VIII., 353. 

Mathevet, reverend Jean Claude, X., 607. 

Mathew, Edward, VIII., 799. 

Mathews, Vincent, VIII., 449. 

Matthews, Thomas, X., 44. 

Maurepas, Jean Frederick Philippeaux, count de, IX., 

941. 
Maxwell, William, VIIL, 730. 
Meerman, Johannes, II , 524. 
Megapolensis, reverend Johannes, I., 496. 
Meigs, John, VIII., 338. 
Mendip, Welbore Ellis, baron, VII., 704. 
Mezy, Augustin de Saffray, IX., 8. 
Milet, reverend Pierre, IX., 665. 
Mill, David, X., 729. 
Miller, reverend John, IV., 182. 
Mings, sir Christopher, II., 341. 
Mirepoix, Charles Pierre Gaston, duko de, X., 433 



Mitchell, John, VIIL, 437. 

Mol6, Mathieu Francois, X., 758. 

Mompesson, Roger, V., 423. 

Monckton, Robert, VIIL, 250. 

Monson, Jolm, lord, VI., 98. 

Montcalm de Saint Veran, Louis Joseph, X., 400. 

Montgomery, Richard, VIIL, 665. 

Montigny, reverend Francois JoUiette de, IX., 684. 

Montresor, James, X., 911. 

Montresor, Jolm, VII , 533. 

Moody, reverend Joshua, III., 582. 

Moor, Thoroughgood, IV., 1077. 

Moore, sir Henry, VIII., 197. 

Moore, James, IV., 1088. 

Moras, M., X., 527. 

Mordaunt, sir John, X., 705. 

Morris, Lewis, II., 619. 

Morris, Lewis, junior, V., 955. 

Morris, Richard, IL, 595. 

Morris, Roger, VIII., 5S0. 

Morris, Staats Long, VIIL, 187. 

Morris, Thomas, VII., 863. 

Mothe-Cadillac, Antoine de la, IX., 671. 

Mott, reverend Edmund, LV., 1182. 

Muhlenburg, Peter, VIII., 730. 

Munroe, George, X , 603. 

Munster, Herbert de, X., 730. 

Murray, James, X., 1075. 

Napier, Robert, X., 312. 

Nederborst, Gerard van Reede, lord of, II., 516. 

Needham, captain, X., 775. 

Nelson, John, IV., 211. 

Neville, John, VIII, 464. 

Newcastle, Thomas Pelham Clinton, 3d duke of, VIIL, 

795. 
Nicholas, sir Edward, II., 118. 
Nicolls, William, III., 709. 
Nieupoort, William, II., 47. 
Noailles, Adrien Maurice de, X., 941. 
Noble, Arthur, X., 92. 
Nordberg, John, VIIL, 597. 
Norton, reverend John, X., 67. 
Nott, Edward, IV., 1173. 
Obdam, Jacob Van Wassenaar, baron, II., 279. 
Ogden, David, VIII., 782. 
Oliver, Andrew, VIIL, 329. 
Ord, Thomas, VIIL, 529. 
Orme, Robert, VI., 990. 
Ormond, James Butler, duke of, IL, 562. 
Orwell, Francis Vernon, lord, VIL, 536. 
Osborne, sir Danvers, VI., 833. 
Ouchterlony, David, X., 1001. 
Paats, Adrian, IL, 535. 
Palmer, reverend Solomon, VL, 910. 
Palmerston, Henry Temple, 2d viscount, VIL, 843. 
Parker, sir Hyde, VIIL, 674. 
Parker, James, VIIL, 221. 



—Bio] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



79 



Biograpliical notices — continued. 

Parsons, Samnel Holden, VIII., 736. 

Pattison, James, VIII., 790. 

Paulmy, Antoine Ren6 de Voyer d'Argenson, marquis 

de, X., 535. 
Pean, Hugues, X., 85. 
Pecaudy, Pierre Claude de, X., 382. 
Penhallow, Samuel, IX., 905. 
Pennington, George, X., 730. 
Perier du Salvert, governor, IX., 1025, X., 387. 
Perrot, governor, III., 720. 
Perrot, Nicolas, IX., 626. 
Pertliuis, reverend Simon Louis, X., 81. 
Peters, reverend Hugh, I., 567. 
Peters, reverend Richard, VII., 316. 
Petit, reverend Louis, IX., 475. 
Petree. {See Laval.) 
Petrie, Johan Jost, X., 673. 
Pfister, Francis, VIII., 51. 
Philipse, Aldolphus, VI., 56. 
Phillips, William, VIII., 790. 
Phipps, Spencer, X., 43. 
Phipps, sir William, III., 720. 
Picquet, reverend Fran(;ois, VI., 589. 
Pinhorne, William, III., 716. 
Poiufy, chevalier de Lonvillers, II., 24. 
Polhemus, reverend Johaimes Theodorus, II., 72. 
Pont Briand, right reverend Henri Marie du Breil de, 

VL, 483. 
Pontchartrain, Jerome, count de, IX., 736. 
Pontchartraiu, Louis Phelypeaus, count de, IX., 503. 
Pothier, reverend Louis Antoine, X., 115. 
Pottinger, James, VII., 58. 
Pouchot captain, X., 668. 
Pownall, Thomas, VL, 1009. 
Poyer, reverend Thomas, V., 973. 
Prat, Benjamin, VII., 502. 
Prescott, Richard, VIII., 659. 
Prevost, commissary, X., 371. 
Prevost, James, X., 897. 
Prideaux, John, VII., 399. 
Pringle, Henry, X., 714. 
Puisieux, Louis Philogene Brulart de Sillery, marquis 

de, X., 685. 
Qnary, Robert, V., 199. 
Quaylus, reverend Gabriel de, IX., 62. 
Bawson, reverend Grindal, IV., 684. 
Reade, Joseph, VIH., 267. 
Reid, John, VIII., 312. 
Rice, George, VII., 536. 
Richai-die, reverend Justinian de la, X., 88. 
Richards, Paul, VI., 119. 
Richer, reverend Pierre Daniel, IX., 1070. 
Richmond, Charles Lenox, 3d duke of, VII., 868. 
Ridge, William, X., 731. 
Rivington, James, VIIL, 568. 
Robertson, James, VIIL, 706. 



Robinson, Beverly, VIIL, 806. 

Robinson, honorable Thomas, VII., 899. 

Robinson, sir Thomas, VI., 844. 

Roche, Boyle, X., 714. 

Rochester, Jolm Wilmot, 2d earl of, II., 358. 

Rochford, William Henry Nassau de Zulestein, 4th earl 

of, VIIL, 337. 
Rouille, Antoine Louis, X , 199. 
Rouse, John, X., 59. 
Rud^'ard, Thomas, IIL, 351. 
Rupert, prince, II., 275. 
Rutherford, John, VII., 205. 
Sackville, lord George, VIIL, 648. 
Saint Castin, baron Vincent, IX., 265. 
St. Clair, Arthur, VIII., 466. 
Saint Contest, marquis de, X., 242. 
St. Denis, Nicholas Juchereau de, IX., 487. 
St. Leger, Brigadier, Barry, VHI., 714. 
Salvert. (See Perrier.) 

Sandwich, Edward Montague, 1st earl of, II., 274. 
Sandys, Samuel, VII., 504. 
Savile, honorable Henry, II., 563. 
Saville, George, (See Halifax, marquis of.) 
Say and Sele, William Fiennes, viscount, I., 127. 
Schlosser, John Joseph, X., 731. 
Schuyler, Joannes, IV., 406. 
Schuyler, Peter, X., 776. 
Scott, Charles, VIIL, 730. 
Sears, Isaac, VIIL, 219. 
Seeker, most reverend Thomas, VI., 906. 
Seignelay, Jean Baptiste Colbert, marquis de, IX., 411. 
Selyns, reverend Henricus, IIL, 646. 
Sharp, reverend John, V., 315. 
Shelburne, William Fitzmauriee Petty, 2d earl of, VIIL, 

73. 
Shirley, William, VL, 959. 
Shorne, Oliver, X , 882. 
ShrLmpton, Samuel, IIL, 365. 
Shuckburgh, Richard, VIIL, 244. 
Shuldham, Molineux, lord, VIIL, 681. 
Skene, Philip, VIIL, 415. 
Silhouette, Etienne de, X., 943. 
Sille, Nicasius de, II., 440. 
Simpson, Andrew, X., 730. 
Sinclair, Patrick, VIIL, 598. 
Small, John, VIIL, 588. 
Smith, sir Jeremy, II., 344. 
Smith, William (Tangier), IV., 1137. 
Smith, judge William, VII., 909. 
Smith, William, junior, VII., 909. 
smith, reverend William, VIL, 416. 
Smyth, Frederick, VIIL, 112. 
Spiesmaclier, Frederick Christopher, VII., 992. 
Spital, John, X., 741. 
Spotswood, sir Alex.ander, VI. , 138. 
Standard, Thomas, VL, 1018. 
Stanwix, John, VIL, 280. 



80 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bio- 



Biograpbical notices — continued. 
Starke, John, VIII., 806. 
Stephen, Adam, VIII., 730. 
Stevens, Phineas, X., 97. 
Stewart, James, X., 729. 
Stiles, reverend Ezra, VII., 498. 
Stirling, sir Thomas, VII., 786. 
Stobo, Robert, X., 1025. 
Stone, Andrew, VI., 753. 
Stoughton, William, IX., 682. 
Stuart, John, VIII., 159. 
Sullivan, John, VIII., 677, 
Swinton, Isaac, III., 407. 
Talbot, reverend John, V., 473. 
Tassemaker, reverend Peter, IX., 46S. 
Temple, sir Thomas, IX , 75. 
Ternay, Charles Louis, VIII., 805. 
Thomas, John, VII., 497. 
Thompson, William, VIII., 677. 
Thomson, Charles, VII., 294. 
Thurloe, John, I., 557. 
Thurlow, Edward, lord, VIII., 256. 
Thury, reverend Louis Pierre, IX. , 630. 
Tonneman, Peter, II., 34. 
Tonti, Henry, III., 580. 
Tonyn, Patrick, VIII., 742. 
Tournois, reverend Jean Baptiste, X., 267. 
Townsend, admiral Isaac, X., 31. 
Treby, John, X., 730. 
Trent, William, V., 705. 
Tromp, admiral Cornelius, II., 264. 
Trumbull, Jonathan, VIII., 371. 
Try on, William, VIII., 798. 
Tufton, Robert, III., 568. 
TuUikins, John, X., 730. 
Tulp, Nieolaes, IL, 21. 
Turnbull, George, X., 731. 
Tyng, Edward, IX., 527. 
Underhill, John, I., 186. 
Urfe, reverend Lascaris d', IX., 102. 
Usher, John, III., 365. 

Vaillant de Guesles, reverend Fraufois, IX., 762. 
Van Beuningen, Koenraad, II., .350. 
Van Boverningk, Jerome, I., 561. 
Van Cortland, Philip, VI., 407, 
Van Curler, Arent, III., 156. 
Van Dam, Rip, VI., 153. 
Van de Poll, Jan, II , 245. 
Vaudeput, George, VIII., 597. 
Van der Capelle, Hendrick, II., 517. 
Van der Donck, Adriaen, I., 532. 
Van der Grift, P.aulus Leendertzen, II., 43. 
Van Gogh, Michael, II., 254. 
Van Haren, William, II , 564. 
Van Loon, Nieolaes, II., 56. 
VanReede, Frederick, II., 515. 
Van Reede, Gerard, II., 516. 



Van Reede, Godart, II., 308. 

Van Reede, John, II., 516. 

Van Rensselaer, Jeremiah, IX., 1039. 

Van Rensselaer, Johannes, VII., 911. 

Van Schaack, Peter, VIII., 652. 

Varin, Francois Victor, X., 261. 

Varlet, reverend Dominique Marie, IX., 890. 

Vauclain, Mr., X., 1003. 

Vaudreuil, Louis Philip Rigaud, marquis de, X , 385. 

Vaudreuil, Philip de Rigaud, marquis de, IX., 952. 

Vaudreuil-Cavagnal, Pierre de Rigaud, marquis de, X., 

1123. 
Vaughan, sir John, VII., 749, 
Vaughan, William, X., 45. 
Verauderie, M. de la, IX., 1060. 
Verueuil, Henry de Bourbon, duke de, II., 336. 
Vesey, reverend William, IV., 534. 
Ville, reverend Louis Marie de, IX., 931. 
Villeroi, Nicholas de'Neufville, duke de, II., 318. 
Waldegrave, James, 1st earl of, IX., 1034. 
Walker, sir Hovenden, X., 12. 
Walker, Thomas, VIIL, 113. 
Walker, reverend Zachariah, II., 399. 
Wanton, Joseph, VIIL, 351. 
Walsingham, William de Grey, lord, VIIL, 256. 
Warren, sir Peter, X., 46. 
Warwick, Robert Richard, 2d earl of, I., 130. 
Watts, John, VIIL, 590. 
Watts, Stephen, VIIL, 721. 
Webb, Daniel, X , 574. 
Weeden, George, VIIL, 730. 
Weiser, John Conriid, V., 575. 
Wendel, Jacob, VI., 541. 
Wentworth, Thomas, VI., 182. 
West, John, III., 657. 
Wharton, Richard, IIL, 365. 
Whately, Thomas, VIIL, 277. 
White, Henry, VIIL, 149. 
Whiting, John, X., 731. 
Wliiting, William, IL, 143. 
Wilkins, John, VIIL, 185. 
Willard, Abijah, X., 732. 
Willard, reverend Samuel, III., 582 
Willet, Thomas, I., 496. 
Williams, Joseph, X., 530. 
Williams, William, VII. , 150. 
Williamson, George, VIL, 356. 
Williamson, Jonathan, X., 95. 

Winchester, John Powlet, 5th marquis of, II., 523. 
Winthrop, John, L, 568. 
Wiuwood, sir Ralph, L, 18. 
Witzen, Cornells Jans, II., 21. 
Wood, James, VIIL, 729. 
WoodhuU, N.athaniel, VIIL, 295. 
Wooster, David, VIIL, 666. 
Worge, Richard, VIL, 522. 
Wrightson, John, X., 728. 



-Bla] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



81 



Biographical notices — continued. 
Yorke, Charles, VIII., 202. 
Young, John, X., 614. 
Youngs, John, III., 416. 
Zenger, John Peter, VI., 80. 

Bionneau, captain, X., 40, 74. 

Birch, doctor, publishes secretary Thurloe's papers, I., 557. 

Birch, John, member of the board of trade. III., 176. 

Birch, John, of New York, IV , lOOS. 

Birchfield, Maurice, surveyor of the customs, governor Hun- 
ter complains of, v., 229, 264; remonstrates against 
certain orders received from governor Hunter, 234; 
governor Hunter's letter to, ibid. 

Bird, lieutenant-colonel, John, biographical notice of, VIII., 
705. 

Birds of New Netherland, I., 141, 278; in Illinois, IX., 890. 

Birds' islands, where, X., 1064. 

Birth day, tioops parade in New York on the king's, IV., 
515 ; salute fired in New York on the queen's, 1166 ; 
customs observed in New York on the king's, VIII., 
17. 

Births, no registry of, kept in the province of New York, 
v., 340. 

Bisestre, , IX., 236. 

Bishop, John, II., 60S. 

Bishops, about to be installed in New England, II., 235, 408, 
432 ; report not believed, 409, 432, 505 ; two in Que- 
bec in 1698, IV., 351 ; one arrives in Canada, IX., 13 ; 
military honors paid to, X , 417. (See Episcopate.) 

Bisse, , VI., 195. 

Bisse and Bray, V., 841, 854. 

Bisson, captain, X., 124. 

Bissot, Clara Frances, wife of Louis Jolliet, IX., 668. 

Bite, Mr., sent to the Ohio, VI., 836. , 

Biville (Bivelle), lieutenant de, wounded, X., 360; killed, 
469, 480, 487, 488, 489, 490. 

Bizard, Mr., major of Montreal, IX., 132, 194; ordered to 
pursue a family running away to New York, 206; a 
Swiss, ibid. 

Blachford, Benjamin, exchanged, X., 214. 

Blackall, John, IV., 605. 

Blaokall, lieutenant, bearer of governor Hunter's instruc- 
tions'V., 475. 

Blackamoors, the, supply the Dutch with slaves, I., 244. 

Blaokburne, Lancelot, archbishop of York, V., 852, 853, 
VI, 849. 

Black creek (Florida), Vlll., 32. 

Blackford, Osborn, X., 593. 

Blackinstein (Blanckenstein, Blankinstein), William, sent 
with a message from Maryland to governor Sloughter, 
III., 788 ; furnishes information of the designs of the 
French on the colonies, IV., 168, 171. 

Black James, an Indian, IV., 606; furnishes information re- 
specting the rumored rising of the Indians, 615. 

Black Kettle, defeated, IV., 580. 

Black point (Maine), III., 255, 256, 265, 272. 

Black river country, description of. (See Famine river.) 
11 



Black Rock cove, where, X, 84^. 

Blacks, articles brought from the interior of Africa by the, 
I., 242; at New Amsterdam claimed by Juan Gail- 
lardo, II., 31 ; to be furnished by the West India 
company, 557. (See Negroes.) 

Blacksmith, a, to accomjiany farmers emigrating to New 
Netherland, I., 361. 

Blacon, John, IV., 413. 

Bladen, Martin, member of the board of trade. III., xvi, 
xvii, v., 503, 526, 527, 535, 536, 538, 541, 548, 551, 
558, 561, 570, 583, 584, 585, 630, 645, 654, 698, 707, 
709, 745, 749, 757, 763, 780, 815, 823, 824, 844, 846, 
899, 919, 923, 931, 932, 933, 934, 935, 936, VI., 17, 
41, 70, 83, 89, 97, 98, 130, 138, 139, 168, 169, 188, 
189, 200, 201, 214, 220, 221, 246, 254, 278, 279 ; pre- 
sident Clarke writes to, 78. 

Blaeuw (Blaeu, Blau), Joannes, notice of, II., 200; men- 
tioned, 215; maps of, referred to, VIII., 344. 

Blagg, E , IV., 1135. 

Blagg, Mr., overseer of Palatines, V., 212. 

Blagge, captain Benjamin, member of Leisler's council. III., 
657, 660, 683, 703 ; sent by lieutenant-governor Leis- 
ler to England, 733, 751, 753 ; his petition to the king, 
737; memorial of, referred to governor Sloughter, 
750; answer to the petition and memorial of, 763. 

Blagge, John, clerk of Tryon county, VIII , 362. 

Blainville, captain, asks permission to return to France, IX., 
744 ; twenty years in Canada, ibid. 

Blainville, ensign. (See Celoron de Blainville.) 

Blair, reverend doctor, sir E. Andros quarrels with, IV., 490. 

Blair, John, president of the council of Virginia, VIII., 113, 
114. 

Blair, W., clerk of the privy council, VII., 459. 

Blake, Edward, IV., 937, 1007. 

Blake [Joseph], governor of South Carolina, IV., 1088. 

Blake (Bleke), Nathan, taken prisoner to Canada, X., 43; 
returned, 153. 

Blake, admiral Robert, notice of, I., 579 ; to command the 
Naseby,582; mentioned, II., 274, 275. 

Blakeney (Blakouey, Bleknis), colonel William, expected at 
New York, VI., 162; in New York, 164; engaged in 
the expedition against Carthagena, 165, 167 ; biogra- 
phical notice of, 170 ; sails from New York, 171 ; 
colonel of the 27th Inniskillings, X., 682, 697. 

Blakiston, Nehemiah, president of the council of Maryland, 
HI., 789; governor of Maryland, IV., 488, 584, 1084; 
to encourage the planting of tobacco in preference of 
everytliing else, 632; sends pirates' treasure to Eng- 
land, 647 ; taken ill on his way to New York, 724 ; 
brings despatches from England to lord Cornbury, 
960. 

Blanchan, Mathew, II., 718, 719. 

Blanchard, colonel, commands a New Hampshire regiment, 
VI., 1000. 

Blanchard, lieutenant, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 751. 

Blanck, Juriaen, I., 593, II., 249, IH., 74. 

Blanck, Simon, II., 631, 634. 

Blancmesnil. (See La Moignon.) 



GENERAL INDEX, 



[Bla— 



Blandenbnrgh, Benjamin, IV., 935, 1007. 
Blank, Aeit, IV., 942. 
Blank, Nichola-s IV., 809. 
Blankerts, Leysbert, III., 178. 

Blankets, duty on, I., 634 ; the Indians demand that they be 
made of beaver wool, IV., 572. 

Blasphemy, miliUiry punishment for, II., 623 ; David Jami- 
son said to hare been found guilty of, IV., 400, 429, 
442, 823. 
Blassia, an Onondaga, marries a French woman, IX., 685. 

Blatliwayt, William, member of the board of trade, III., xv, 
IV., 146, 2:i2, 246, 258, 262, 298, 300, 418, 436, 456, 
466, 471, 475, 478, 486, 599, 626, 635, 641, 643, 667, 
709, 770, 773, 819, 820, 833, 845, 852, 857, 865, 885, 
926, 949, 963, 964, 1026, 1030, 1031, 1032, 1037, 1039, 
1042, 1080, 1081, Ills, 1124, 1140, 1141, 1157, 1173, 
1175, 1176, 1179, v., 2; letters of governor Audros to, 
III , 271, 272, 277; letter of lord Baltimore to, 339 ; 
governor Dongan communicates the state of aflairs in 
New York to, 363 ; auditor-general of the plantations, 
404, 421, 424, 497, 498, 502, 092, 718, 71'J, IV , 26, 
186, v., 197; clerk of the council. III., 428, 605, IV., 
171, v., 71, 193; an account of the revenue to be 
transmitted to. III.. 429, 502 ; letter of Messrs. Phil- 
lips and Van Cortland to, 608; Mr. Van Cortland 
desires the friendship of, 610, 650; governor Slough- 
ter writes to, 768; colonel Smith and William NicoUs [ 
revise a letter of governor Slough ter to, 791 ; laws of , 
New York sent to, 792 ; letter of the commander-in- j 
chief and council of New Y'ork to, 813, 836 ; of gov- I 
emor I-'letcher to, 846, 848, IV., 13, 31, 37, 54, 157, 
165, 204, 243; who sends despatches to, 57, 72, 226, ! 
255 ; communicates orders from the lords of trade to I 
the attorney and solicitor-generals respecting the colo- 
nies, 104; furnishes estimates of the military resources 
of Connecticut and Rhode Island, 105 ; letter of James , 
Graham to, 374 ; extract of a letter received from, I 
767; captain Nanfan's accounts referred to, 1130; 
death of, V., 507; Horace Walpole succeeds him as 
auditor of the plantation accounts, ibid, 547 ; resolu- 
tion of the board of trade on the bishop of London's 
letter to, VII., 363. 

Blauvelt (Blacuw, Blaeuwvelt), captain of the sloop La Garse, 
I., 397, 399 ; captures sundry prizes, 398, 507. 

Blauw, Gerrit Dircksen, makes a declaration respecting a con- 
versation with director Kiett, I., 194, 195 ; the Indians 
kill a stepson of, ibid ; one of the Tivelve men, 415. 

Blawbeck (Blew bek), chief sachem of the Senecas, V., 387, 
660 ; arrives at Oneida, 661. 

Bleecker, Anthony, VII., 614. 

Bleecker, Hendrick, VII., 614. 

Bleecker, Henry, VII., 614. 

Bleecker, Henry, junior, VII , 614. 

Bleecker, Jacob, a merchant at Albany, VII., 615, VIIL, 610. 

Bleecker, Jacobus, an Indian interpreter, sent to Onondaga, 
VI., 233; returns and submits his report, 239; an- 
nounces the arrival of several hundred Iroquois at i 
Albany, 289. 



Bleecker (Bleycker), Jan Janse, an Indian interpreter, II.,- 
712; a magistrate at Albany, III., 747; commissioner 
of Indian affairs, 805 ; an alderman of Albany, IV., 
90 ; representative of Albany in the assembly, 330, 
331 ; recorder of Albany, 407, 408, 491. 492, 539, 567, 
569, 572, 575, 579, 597, 693, 695, 727; mayor of 
Albany, 896, 899, 902, 904, 907, 911. 
Bleecker (Blaquerd), Jan (John), a prisoner in Canada, III., 
513; alderman of Albany, 771, 773, 840; the Indians 
friendly to, 775. 
Bleecker (Bleaker), Johannes, interpreter, IV., 34], 541, V , 
217; sent a delegate to Onondaga, IV., 498, 560, V., 
242, 245, 372, 370 ; his report of his negotiations there, 
IV , 502, 563 ; answer of the five nations to, 564 ;. 
the Indians make propositions to, 568 ; recorder of 
Albany, 896, 899, 904, 911; assistant aldeiman of 
Albany, 755 ; journal of his visit to Onondaga, SSil, 
917 ; at Oneida, 894, V., 267 ; mayor of Albany, IV., 
984, 983 (bis), 985, 990, 995, 998, 999; commissioner 
for Indian affairs, V., C35, 638, 657, 661, 662, 664, 
667, 675, 679, 693, 694, 696. 
Bleecker, John J., merchant of Albany, VII., 614. 
Bleecker, John R., merchant of Albany, VII., 489, 614. 
Bleecker, Nicolas, journal of his negotiations at Onondaga, 
IV., 558; commissioner of Indian affairs, V., 910^ 
VI., 59, 107, 108, 132, 232, 233, 235, 241, 251; ac- 
cused of spreading evil reports among the five nations, 
294. 
Bleecker, Rutger, recorder of Albany, V., 791, 794; com- 
missioner for Indian aflairs, 910, VI., 59, 132, 232 
233, 238, 241. 
Blein, F., IX., 418. 
Blenac. (See Centre.) 
Blendricssen, Mr., I., 31. 
Blenheim, public th»nks ordered for the vietory at, IV., 

1157. 
Bleury (Blurry), ensign de, conducts Mr. Stoddart to Crown 
Point, X., 210, 215; commands a party of Indians, 
566; sent to Carillon, 836, 850; reports the state of 
fort Froutenac, 854. (See Sabrevois.) 
Blew Stocking, captain, III., 433, 435. 
Blickhuysen, Michiel, It , 180. 
Blidenbourgh (Blydenburgh), Benjamin, deposes against 

governor Fletcher, IV., 129, 145, ISO. ' 
Block, Aedriaen, I., 11. 

Block, Hans, gunner at New Amstel, IL, 171, 182, III., 71. 
Block, captain Simon, killed in an engagement with the 

English fleet, II, 267. 
Blockhouse, a, sent from New York to Pemaquid, III., 248 , 

description of a, VII., 101, 185. 
Block island (Black island, Blocx island), the English take 
possession of, I., 565, II., 134; and capture some 
vessels off, 662 ; not in the duke of Y'ork's patent, 
III., 170; the French despoil, 752; a pirate sunk off, 
IV., 512; mentioned, 697 ; cruisers fitted out at New 
Y'ork to sail between the capes of Delaware and, 
1148; included in the patent to Rhode Island, V., 
599 ; several West India traders ofl', VII., 226. 



— Boij 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Blom, reverend Harmanus, II,, 223. 

Blomniaert (Bloemert, Blommert), Adriaen, a trader to 
New Netherland, I., 445; sent to Antigua with 
horses, 455 ; skipper of the Hope, II., 452. 

Blommanrt (Blomaert), Samuel, a colonie granted in New 
Netherland to Samuel Godin and, I., 43 ; one of the 
patroons of New Netherland, 70, 88, 89, 90; member 
of the board of accounts of the West India company, 
217, 248 ; and others, petition against the guardians of 
Kiliaen Van Rensselaer's minor son, 255 ; answer to 
and reply of, presented, 256 ; order on the petition of, 
257 ; resolutions of the states general in the case of the 
guardians of Johan Van Rensselaer against, 320 ; judg- 
ment ordered in the case of Van Rensselaer and, 330 ; 
judgment in tlie court of Holland in the case of Van 
Rensselaer and, 406 ; a partner in the colonie of Rens- 
selaerwyck, 407; dead, 480, 518, 519, 521, 527. 

Blonde.iu, , IX., 234. 

Blondeau, Mr , commands a war i^arty, X., 172. 

Blood, Edmund, a nephew of under-secretary DelaFay, V., 
703 ; appointed to one of the New York companies, 
704 ; receives a French packet from Kadeiachque, 
910; stationed at Albany, VI., 374, 375. 

Bloodgood (Bloetgoet, Bloetgoot), Francis, II., 103 ; magis- 
trate of Flushing, 591 ; appointed chief officer in 
certain towns on Long island, 701 ; deputy to New 
Orange, 702. 

Bloody run, Pontiac defeats the British at, VII., 547. 

Bloom, Edward, brings despatches to governor Burnet, 
v., 772. 

Blot, Madame de, dead, X , 434. 

Blount, Henry, member of the board of trade. III., 176. 

Blue mountains (Blow hills), where, VI., 121, VIII., 34; 
the bounds of the Iroquois country, VII., 573. 

Blue point, where, III., 255. 

Blundel, Christopher, VIII., 456, 642. 

Blunt, lieutenant-colonel Harry, biographical notice of, 
VIII., 684. 

Bo, Jan Peterse, III., 744. 

Boake, Joseph de, IV., 241, 242. 

Board of refugees established in New York, VIII., 782. 

Board of trade. (See Trade.) 

Boavista, island of, taken by the English, II., 267, 282, 
326 ; proposition for the restoration of, 306, 339 ; 
when captured, 315, 326 ; admiral de Ruyter did not 
attempt to retake, 329, 383 ; proposed to be ceded to 
the English, 342, 343, 347, 350, 352, 353, 356, 419. 

Bob6, reverend M , his memoir on the boundaries of New 
France, IX., 913. 

Bobin, Isaac, deputy secretary of New Y'ork, V., 801. 

Bochart, Jean. (See Champigny, M. de.) 

Bock, Arien Pietersz, I., 515. 

Bocx, Mr , II , 114. 

Boddens, Isaac, II., 191. 

Bodel, Nyenhuis, J. J., II., 759. 

Boeckhoven, I., 525. 

Boelens, A., I., 437. 

Boelisen, Andries, II., 48, 101. 



Boes, Nicolaes, member of the council of war of New 
Netherland, II., 571, 572, 574, 575, 576. 

Bogaert, Joris Gysbertsen II., 37.5. 

Bogaert, Theuuis Gysbertse, II., 577, 702. 

Bogamot, Peter, X., 213. 

Bogard, Gysbert, quarter-master of the troop of horse in 
Kings county, IV.. 809. 

Bogardus, Cornelius, HI., 132, IV., 754, 940. 

Bogardus, reverend Everardus, statement of Arent van Cur- 
ler at the house of, I., 206 ; subscription for the church, 
at the house of, 299 ; attends the council, 345 ; men- 
tioned, 417, II., 144. 

Bogardus, Evert, lieutenant of the militia of Ulster and 
Dutchess, IV., 810. 

Bogardus, Peter, II., 627, IV., 90. 

Bogardus, Willem, II., 459, III., 74. 

Bogart (Bogaert), .lacob, IV., 7.54, 940. 

Bogart, Nicholas, lieutenant of artillery, VIII , 603. 

Bogert, Nich'ls, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIU , 601. 

Bohemia, sir Edward Sackville sent with forces to assist the 
king of, I., 133 ; the prince elector Palatine sometimes 
styled king of, II., 275 ; George Downing offdnds the 
queen of, 416 ; the queen of, mentioned, 740 ; Ed- 
mond Andros in the service of the queen of, 741 ; 
service in Canada more severe than in, X. 400; 
marshal de Belleisle serves in, 527 ; marshal d'EstrSes 
serves in, 963. 

Bohemia islands, IV., 278. 

Boiceau, reverend M., about to sail for Virginia, lU., 650. 

Boileau, , informs barou de Dieskau that the English 

are building fort Edward, X., 316. 

Boisblanc island, its distance from Detroit, IX., SS6 ; reve- 
rend father Potier retires to Detroit from, X., 115; 
inhabited by Hurons, 138; Indians captured at, 157; 
project of removing the settlement at Detroit to, 163. 

Boisbriant, Dugu6 de, governor of Louisiana, IX., 1025. 

Boisbriantf ensign, sent on an expedition towards Albany, 
IX., 600. 

Bois de la Mothe. (See La Mothe.) 

Charles Deschamps de, IX., 90S ; commandant 
at Detroit, 1036; sent to fort Ann, 1101; his report 
on the expedition against fort Clinton, X., 80; his 
report on the state of Indian aH'airs, 83 ; at fort L'As- 
somption, Mississippi, 85 ; commands at the river St. 
John, 264 ; in Acadia, 283 ; defeats a party of English, 
299, 358, 381 ; burns his fort on the river St. John, 

358, 381 ; ordered to rem.ain on the river St. John, 

359, and to maintain his ground to the last extremity, 
409 ; collects a nirmber of Acadians and harasses the 
English, 416, 466, 518 ; burns an Englisli vessel, 427; 
assists Acadian families to escape from the English, 
518, 528; winters at Miramichi, 547; ordered to 
Louisbourg 552,838; expected at Louisbourg, .573 ; on 
his way to that place, 692, 698; the Indians abandon, 
S52 ; retires to Miramichi, 854 ; returns to Quebec, 924 ; 
ordered to remove the Acadians to Canada, 956, 975 ; 
brings a number of Acadians to Quebec, 999. 



84 



GENERAL INDEX, 



[Boi— 



Boisjolly, , rX., 234. 

Boisseau, M., IX., 141 ; insults intendant Duchesneau, 157; 
complaints against, 159, 160. 

Boissier, M. de, arrives with a fleet at Louisbonrg, X., 706. 

Boissonneau, captain, arrives at Quebec from Martinico, X., 
173. 

Boivinet, M., IX., 139, 212. 

Bol. Jan Claessen, I., 350. 

Bolebrooke, baron, lord George Germain created, VIII., 648. 

Bolingbroke, viscount, Henry St. John created, III., viii ; 
governor Hunter receives a letter from, V., 390. 

BoUen (Bullen), .Tames, commissary of ammunition at New 
York, II., 470; ordered to deliver up the records of 
New Jersey, GOO ; announces that the land on the 
west side of Hudson's river had been granted to lord 
Berkeley and sir George Carterett, III., 105; men- 
tioned, 293, 300 ; captures some French vessels, 752. 

Bollens, captain, of New York, trades between Curasao and 
New Haven, V., 160. 

Bolting act. New York deprived of the monopoly of manu- 
facturing flour by the, IV., 461. (See Acts, Netc 
ro,k.) 

Bolton [Charles Pawlett, 1st], duke of, II., 523 ; member 
of the privy council. III., 605, IV., 103; letter of 
governor Sloughter to. III., 768; incorrectly called 
John, 769 ; letter of Richard Ingoldesby to, 833, 845. 

Bolton [Charles Pawlett, 2d], duke of, member of the privy 
council, IV., 628, V., 539. 

Bolton, dukedom of, extinct, II., 523. 

Bolton, Henry, employed by captain Kidd, IV., 584. 

Bolton, lieutenant-colonel Mason, biographical sketch of, 
VIII., 724; writes to sir William Howe, 740; his let- 
ter, 741. 

Bolton, earl of Derby beheaded at, I., 134. 

Bolwell, John, IV., 1005. 

Boman, Nicholas, II., 587. 

Bompar, M. de, governor of the Windward island, X., 280, 
281. 

Bonafoy, , IV., 942. 

Bonaire (Bonayro), the settlement of, to be considered, I., 
136; mentioned, 362, 363; a vessel sent from New 
Netherland to the salt pans at, II., 45 ; Peter Stuyve- 
sant governor of, 411. 

Bonando, IV., 94. 

Bonane, Symon, IV., 512. 

Bonat (Bouat), cadet, X., 153; attacks several ports in New 
England, 158. 

Bonaventure, a vessel wrecked off, X., 121. 

Bonchamp, captain, wounded, X., 1085. 

Bond (Bonds), for nine thousand guilders borrowed for 
the colonie on the Delaware river, II., 12 ; of Robert 
Livingston and of captain Kidd, IV., 765; an act 
.passed to prevent levying lAore than the principal and 
interest due on, V., 905. 

Bond, captain, arrives at New York, IV., 944, 945, 947; 
his ship captured, 1113. 

Bond, captain, certifies to an account of military stores at 
Now York, VI.. 148. 



Bond, Robert, magistrate of Newark, II., 582; mentioned, 
VI., 349. 

Bonden, Thomas, IV., 1008. 

Bondet, reverend Daniel, signs an address to governor Hun- 
ter, v., 326 ; censures reverend Mr. Henderson, 354. 

Bondonr, Mr., a merchant at Montreal, IV., 747. 

Bonfield, John, IV., 1008. 

Bonnafoux (Bonafour, Bonafous, Bonnnaffous), lieutenant 
de, X., 779, 936 ; commands the artillery at the siege 
of Niagara, 977, 980, 983, 988 ; wounded, 985 ; called 
on to describe the condition of the fort, 989 ; signs 
the capitulation, 992. 

Bonnaventure, captain, takes John Nelson prisoner, IV., 
211; returns from Hudson's bay, IX., 487; ordered 
on a cruise, 505 ; commands the ship Soleil d'Afrique, 
519 ; sails from Quebec, 525; captures a vessel, 526 ; 
commands I'Ennuyeux, 538 ; wastes his time, 544 ; 
recommended to command an expedition against 
Peniaquid, 576 ; Indian presents to be selected in 
Paris by, 577; brings dispatches from France for 
count de Frontenac, 612 ; arrives at Pentagouet, ibid, 
617; fights an English frigate, 630, and captures 
another, 658 ; recommended to serve on an expedition 
against New York and Boston, 661 ; appointed cap- 
tain of a frigate, 664; brings news of the peace to 
Pentagouet, 685 ; reports the capitulation of Port 
Royal, 927; formerly commandant at the island of 
St. John, X., 264. 

Bonne. (See De Bonne.) 

Bonneau, captain, X., 747, 751, 774, 775, 800. 

Bonne chere, river, course of, IX., 594. 

Bonner, bishop, III., 681. 

Bonnevielle, lieutenant, wounded, X., 1085. 

Bonnin (Bonjein), Gouss6, IV., 935, 1007. 

Bonnot, lieutenant, wounded, X., 432. 

Bonrepos, lieutenant de, one of the party sent from Montreal 
against Schenectady, IX., 466. 

Bonrepos, lieutenant, wounded, X., 432. 

Bonrepos, M. de, ambassador from France, IX, 330 ; ordered 
to complain of governor Dongan, 345 ; remonstrates 
against the seizure of Pentagouet, 396. 

Bont, I., 595. (See Mourisen, Cornells.) 

Bontemantel, Hans, II., 116, 117, 119, 120, 122, 197, 525, 
558. 

Bontemantel, J., I., 584, 587, 609 ; II., 738. 

Bontius, Jochim, II., 187. 

Bonumtown (New Jersey), the British march to, VIII., 731. 

Book, on the events at Amboina, the Dutch complain of the 
publication in England of a, I., 47, 56, 58 ; commis- 
sioners appointed to confer with the Dutch ambassa- 
dors respecting its publication, 49 ; the Little, treat- 
ing of the war with the Indians of New Netherland 
said to contain as many lies as lines, 204 ; contained 
nonsense, 206 ; its production called for, ibid ; sent 
by director Kieft with various pictures on the subject 
of the Indian war, 212; on New Netherland, titles of, 
272, 496, 530, 532, 533, 534; not to be printed in 
New York without a Ucense, III., 375, 691, 824, IV., 



-Bos] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



85 



Book — continued. 

291, v., 142; relating to America, titles of, III., 580, 
629, 639, 651, 665, IV., 182, 222, 315, 367, 972, 1062, 
1088, 1187, v., 204, 784, 791 ; printed in New York, 
"HHIf" of, IV., 426; a, published to justify the execu- 
tion of Leisler and Milborn, 523 ; in tlie Indian lan- 
guages, titles of, 684 ; written by the reverend Mr. 
McKemie, titles of, 1187 ; a, printed at New York on 
the fur trade, mentioned, V., 760; relating to the 
controversy between governor Cosby and his oppo- 
nents, titles of, VI., 5, 26 ; relating to the controversy 
between Mr. Clarke and Mr. Van Dam, &c., titles of, 50, 
55 ; written by the reverend Samuel Johnson, D. D., 
of New York, titles of, 914; relating to, and written 
by governor Shirley, 959 ; by Thomas Powu.ill, Esq., 
1009 ; reverend Dr. Johnson writes a preface to the 
reverend Mr. Beach's, VII., 370 ; a history of New 
York is written by one Smith, 371 ; reverend Dr. 
Johnson's adimadversions on it, ibid ; London Cases, 
Archbishop Potter on Church Government, Hooker's 
Ecclesiastioal Polity, Hoadly against Calamy, 372 ; 
reverend Mr. Beach's, noticed, 536 ; a, printed in Bos- 
ton and reprinted in London, laid before the king, 
VIIL, 678. (See Otis, James; Pamphlet.) 
Book of Common Prayer, the use of the, to be allowed in 
Massachusetts, III., 54; recommended to be read, 58; 
some in the colonies over zealous for the, 59 ; ordered 
to be read in New York, 372, 688, 821, IV., 287, V., 
135, VII., 362; in Mohawk, reverend Mr. Barclay 
engaged in the translation of the, VI., 88 ; in Mohawk, 
printed, VII., 580 ; translators of it into Mohawk, VIII., 
815. 
Boomtjes hook (Bombay hook, Bomtges hooke, Boomtiens 
hook), the Indians sell the Dutch all the land from 
fort Christina to, I., 590, II., 18 ; the country between 
cape Hinlopen and, to be annexed to New Amstel, 51 ; 
the court at New Amstel to be resorted to by the peo- 
ple on the Kristina kill as far as, 605 ; the Dutch 
anchor at. III., 342. 
Boon, Francis, II., 475, III., 74. 

Boone, Christopher, one of the council of trade. III., 31. 
Boone, Daniel, VIIL, 113. 
Boone, Mr., III., 186. 
Boone, Thomas, governor of South Carolina, VII., 571, VIIL, 

32. 
Boot, Adriaen, II., 749. 

Booth, John, ensign of the militia of Southhold, IV., 808, 
Boots made of Indians' skins, VIIL, 785. 
Bootsma, Mr., II., 353. 

Boquet, , sent to Onondaga with letters for the mission- 
ary there, IX., 192. 
Bordeaux (Bourdeaux), II., 349, 733, 734, VI., 504 ; reverend 
father Lafitau, a native of, IX., 882; vessels arrive at 
Quebec from, X., 41, 44, 65, 768, 841, 843 ; despatches 
sent to Canada by a vessel from, 270 ; sever.al ships 
missing which sailed from, 718; news of the approach 
of the English to Quebec, brought by ships from, 
993. . 



Bordentown, New Jersey, Indian name of the creek at, I., 
292 ; a stage boat runs from Philadelphia to, VI., 795. 

" Border ruffians," outrages committed by, VII., 746. 

Bordingh, Claes, II., 699. 

Boreel, Jacob van, II., 261. 

Boreel, Joh., II., 524. 

Boreel, William, ambassador from the states general to the 
court of France, memoir of, II., 261 ; intercedes with 
the king of France in behalf of the poor protestants 
of Piedmont, 270; mentioned, 276, 277; answer of 
the states general-to the English manifesto transmitted 



to, 308. 
Borle-Guillot, M., commandant at Wisconsin, IX., 418. 
Borland, Mr., agent at Boston for the contingent charges on 

the Canada expedition, V., 261. 
Borled, Hendrick, III., 741. 
Borrow, John, IV., 1135. 
Bos, Cornells, I., 130. 
Bos, Hendrick, III., 74. 
Boscal, midshipman de Real, announces the approach of M. 

de la Jonqui6re, X., 111. 
Boscaweu (Boscaven), admiral Edward, sent against the 
French, VI., 990 ; captures some French men of war, 
X., 298, 379; reported misunderstanding between the 
commander of the land forces at Louisbourg and, 
756, 767; sends intelligence of the fall of Louisbourg 
to England, 833. 
Boscawen (Boscowen), Mr., member of the board of trade, 

III., 710; of the privy council, IV., 103. 
Boscawen (New Hampshire), a party of Canada Indians de- 
feated at, X., 33 ; Canada Indians make a descent on, 
45. 
Bosch (Both), Albert, III., 630, 637. 
Bosch, Hendrick, II., 249. 
Boschatel, adjutant, killed, X., 1089. 
Boschieter, Claes Pietersen, 11. , 116, 119, 120, 122, 123. 
Boshuil, Mr. (See Boswell.) 
Boshuysen, captain John, lands the Russian ambassador in 

England, II., 294. 
Boss, Jacob, naturalized, VI., 29. 
Boss, meaning of the word, IV., 82. 
Bostock, captain, R. N., commander of his majesty's frigate 

Swift, IV., 301. 
Boston (Massachusetts), captain Forester reported to have 
returned to, I., 286; information received from, re- 
garding the ill effects of confiscation, 313 ; university 
at, 365 ; director Stuyvesant sells arms and ammuni- 
tion to the people of, 442; William Coddington a 
merchant at, 497 ; the English of, encroach on the 
possessions of the Dutch, 544 ; reverend Hugh Peters 
officiates at, 567 ; Indian n;ime of, 568 ; James Grover 
sails for England from, II., 136; eight miles from 
Lynn, 146, 147, 148, 149 ; reverend Mr. Leverich 
comes to, 160; director Stuyvesant unsuccessful in 
his visit to, 221 ; he attends a meeting of the United 
Colonies at, 224, 484 ; deputies sent from New Nether- 
land to the commissioners of the United Colonies 
at, 385 ; patent, quotation from the, 389 (see Massa- 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bos- 



)n (Massachnsftts) — continued, 
chusetts) ; Massachusetts referred to under the name 
of, 389, III., 751, IV., 106; reverend Zacbariah 
Walker a native of, II., 399; the English claim all 
America from Virginia to, 402, 403, 481 ; news of the 
impending rupture between Holland and England 
received at, 407, 431, 493, 504 ; conference with the 
general assembly at, of no use, 409 ; negotiations 
respecting boundaries at, 413 ; news of the design of 
the English against New Netherland received at, 438 ; 
commissioners arrive at New Amsterdam from, 444 ; 
director Stuyvesant proceeds to Fort Orange with 
delegates from, 462 ; director Stuyvesant goes to, 466 ; 
extent of territory claimed by, 485 ; time occupied by 
director Stuyvesant in his visit to, 495 ; Luycas 
Andriessen commands a ship from, 655 ; a Dutch 
vessel carried into, 662 ; the Dutch take vessels 
belonging to, 662, 663, 715 ; the governor and coun- 
cil of Massachusetts reside at, 668, III., 67; lady 
Andros dies at, II., 742 ; governor Endicott requests 
director Stuyvesant to send fugitives back to, III., 
41, 42 ; a prize taken into, 65 ; colonel Cartwright at> 
83, 94; colonel Nicolls at, 84, 97, 107; Mr. Winder 
cast in a suit at, 87 ; the royal commission not liked 
at, 92; governor Nicolls urged to join the other com- 
missioners at, 93 ; declaration of the general court at, 
95 ; is published in the market place of, 96 ; deputies 
from the several towns summoned to, 100 ; the royal 
commissioners write to secretary Bennet from, 102 ; 
the Massachusetts commissioners return from Maine 
to, 108 ; its condition in 1663, 112 ; guns taken from 
a French fort left at, 113, 711 ; governor Nicolls 
transmits to England papers connected with the pro- 
ceedings of the king's commissioners at, 114; des- 
patches sent from England to, 116 ; M. Hertel returns 
to Canada from, 132 ; captain Scott delivers papers 
to the governor and council at, 136 ; sir Thomas 
Temple in, 137, 138; French soldiers proceed to 
Canada by way of, 147 ; a French ship captured in 
the gulf of St. Lawrence by a vessel from, 154 ; 
the port town of Massachusetts, ibid ; mentioned, 
156, 162, 182, 198, 200, 205, 206, 254, 255, 256, 257, 
355, 506, 513, 593, 600, 609, 649," 655, 662, 682, 698, 
732, 775, 786, 790, 855, IV., 296, 527, 529, VI., 183; 
the royal commissioners proceed to. III., 159 ; the 
grandees of, too proud, 167 ; letter of general Nicolls 
to the court at, 172 ; masts and timber sent to the 
royal dockyards from, 183, IV., 795 ; Mr. Davenport 
makes a rent in the church at, III., 1S4; another 
great church building at, ibid ; great sickness and 
mortality in, 185 ; a ship from England bound to, 
230 ; collector Dyre arrests a ship from, 233 ; trades to 
Acadia, 241 ; goods from, not admitted into New York 
without a certificate, 242 ; captain Tom, an Indian chief, 
hanged at, 243 ; peace concluded with the Indians at, 
244 ; a fort on an islaud outside of, 263 ; the Indians 
commit great devastation east of, 265, 716 ; sir E. 
Andros visits, 302 ; lord Culpepper at, 308 ; governor 



Dongan proposes to settle a post-house at, 356 ; gov- 
ernor Dongan's character of the people of, 364 ; Ed- 
ward Randolph and J. Dudley arrive at, 368 ; a pirate 
plunders some vessels belonging to, 387 ; people on 
the east end of Long island trade to, 4tB^ folly of 
annexing any part of Connecticut to, 429 ; New York 
the bulwark of, 511 ; governor Denonville complains 
of the commandant of, 513 ; captain Francis Nichol- 
son at, 550; pirates imprisoned at, 552; sir Edmund 
Andros returns to, 566, 567, 569, 581, and is im- 
prisoned at, 574, 578, 582, 592, IV., 1152; a recep- 
tacle for pirates. III., 582; clergymen of, active 
against governor Andros, ibid ; Mr. Randolph in jail 
in, 583 ; Philip Fi-ench arrested at New York on his 
return from, 587 ; news received in New York of the 
revolution at, 591 ; colonel Dongan reported to be a 
prisoner at, 614 ; sir Edmund Andros escapes from, 
ibid, 017 ; Samuel Green printer at, 629 ; records of 
New York taken to, 650 ; John West accompanies 
governor Andros to, 657; an expedition fitting out 
at, for the invasion of Canada, 694,'lV., 194, IX., 737, 
835, X., 52, 125, and another fitting out against Port 
Royal at, III., 699, 706, 719 ; sends a company to 
Albany, 717 ; news from, 720 ; governor Dongan at, 
721 ; the first episcopal church at, 722 ; the French 
ravage the coasts of, 735 ; furnishes no men for the 
expedition to Canada, 752 ; governor Sloughter about 
to send for New York records to, 761 ; regarded in 
Canada no more than a barking dog, 783 ; injurious 
eifects of annexing New Y'ork to, 792, 814; Joseph 
Dudley removes to, 848 ; Abraham Gouverneur at, 
IV., 3, 4, 5 ; colonel Dudley and governor Usher at, 
8 ; captain Thomas Clarke arrives at, 9 ; governor 
Fletcher sends despatches by way of, 13, 165; and sends 
a messenger to, 38 ; prisoners sent back from Canada 
to, 50, X., 100, 118, 186 ; sir Francis Wheeler at, 
IV., 55, 356; Chidley Brook reports the result of his 
visit to, 58 ; John Reaux sinks his vessel on a voyage 
to, 68 ; the governor of Canada visited from, 78 ; 
English troops arrive at, 119, V., 221, 224, 252 ; James 
Graham imprisoned at, IV., 186; John Nelson of, in 
the bastile, 210, 211 ; and New Y'ork always rivals in 
trade, 260 ; the earl of Bellomont receives a letter by 
way of, 313 ; the assembly sitting at, 314 ; a post 
between New York and, 317, 1017, V., 55 ; Abenakis 
and other Indians prisoners at, IV., 343, VI., 542, 563, 
564, 566 ; the Deptford man of war to sail from, IV., 
410 ; danger of the navigation between New York and, 
432 ; the earl of Bellomont going to, 502, 511, 520, 
577 ; his lordship's scheme to undersell, 506 ; a num- 
ber of pirates taken at, 512; colonel Romar ordered 
to inspect the island which commands the harbor at, 
519 ; the earl of Bellomont arrives at, 528, 544; rev- 
erend Mr. Vesey's father pilloried in, 581; names of 
the clergymen attached in 1699 to king's chapel in, 
582; pirates escape from the jail at, 584; the jailer 
of, to be punished for the escape of Bradish the 
pirate, 585 ; iutelUgence received at, of an intended 



-Bos] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



87 



(Massachusetts) — continued. 
risiug of tlie Indians, 607 ; corporation at, for evangel- 
izing the Indians, 631 ; a new fort to be built at Castle 
island near, 647 ; Mr. Brenton collector at, 664, 778 ; 
rear admiral Benbow at, 665 ; large quantities of pitch 
and tar sent from Carolina to, 668 ; number of mer- 
chants who traded in 1700 to Carolina from, 669; the 
passage from England to, shorter than from England 
to New York, 685 ; earl of Bellomont goes to New 
York from, 697 ; ship Fidelia seized at, 721 ; captain 
Belcher of, 722; the earl of Bellomont proceeds to 
Piscattaway from, 723 ; value of a piece of eight in, 
757; letter received by the lords of trade from, 771 ; 
expenses of the earl of Bellomont in his journey to 
Ehode Island from, 776 ; the deputy collector at, a 
merchant, 779, 792 ; salt manufactured at, 7S8 ; num- 
ber of vessels belonging to, in 1700, 790 ; owns more 
vessels than all Scotland and Ireland, ibid ; value of 
its imports from England in 1700, 791 ; has twice the 
trade of New York, ibid ; carries on illegal trade with 
Spain and Portugal, ibid, and with Newfoundland, 
Canada and otiier places, 792 ; a petition is presented 
to the earl of Bellomont from the minister, &c., of 
the church of England at, 793 ; captain Kidd brought 
to, 816 ; the coast surveyed from St. Georges to, 830; 
possesses greater convenience for careening vessels 
than New York, 862 ; how fortified, 877 ; an admiralty 
court at, 885 ; chief justice Atwood about to visit, 
924 ; the court of admiralty treated with contempt at, 
930 ; one of the clergy of, maintains that the people 
are not bound by the laws of England, ibid ; letters 
sent by post to Philadelphia from, 1113 ; lord Corn- 
bury contemplates extending tlie post to North Caro- 
lina from, 1120 ; day on which the post sets out from 
New York for, 1131 ; the proclamation for regulating 
the currency disregarded in, 1132; its trade to Eng- 
land greater than that of New York, 1180; clips 
foreign coin, ibid ; colonel Quary's report on the 
trade and government of, V., 31 ; complaints against 
the neutrality of the five nations sent from, 42 ; the 
mast fleet sails from, 61 ; the fleet for the reduction 
of Canada to touch at, 73 ; colonel Nicholson expected 
at, 166; arrives at, 168, 252; an express ordered to 
run between Albany and, 260 ; the ships of war on 
the New York station to be victualed and cleaned in, 
300 ; order for a cessation of hostilities sent to, 347 ; 
the Hazard sloop of war lost near, 390 ; a chaplain of 
a man of war minister of, 466 ; colonel Nicholson 
sends clothmg to New Y'ovk from, 469 ; reverend John 
Talbot arrives at, 473 ; the palatine delegates put 
into, 575 ; annual charge of fort William, 598 ; num- 
ber of ships cleared 1714^1717 from, 618 ; trade be- 
tween New Y'ork and, 686 ; some Scaticook Indians 
imprisoned at, 723 ; the eastern Indians refuse to 
receive proposiils from the five nations at, 724 ; the 
spirit of the people of, begins to spread among the 
other provinces, 937, 946 ; the reasonable authority 
of the king opposed by the people of, VI., 13; a 



scandalous pamihlet against governor Cosby ptib 
lished at, 26 ; Mrs. Cosby embarks for England at, 
65 ; Lewis Morris arrives at, 85 ; the New York tri- 
ennial act sent to England by way of, 113 ; latitude 
of, 124; five companies join the Carthagena expedi- 
tion from, 171 ; aid voted by New Y'ork towards the 
expedition against Cape Breton from, 285 ; deputies 
from tlie five nations arrive at, 300 ; tlie conference 
with the five nations at Albany attended by several 
gentlemen from, 450 ; a St. John Indian goes to, 480 ; 
news of peace between France and England received 
at, 481 ; lieutenant-governor Mascarene retires to, 
482 ; war against the eastern Indians declared at, 
483 ; Mr. Wendell, colonel of the regiment of, 540, 
563 ; governor Shirley sends for a Mr. Smith to, 826 ; 
reverend Timothy Cutler, rector of Christ church in, 
908 ; lieutenaut-colonels Ellison and Mercer on their 
way to, 935 ; governor Shirley about to set out from, 
to confer with general Braddock, 942 ; a regiment at 
lake George from, 1003 ; news of the battle of lake 
George sent to, 1004; governor Pownal returns to, 
1009 ; reverend Gideon Hawley in, VII., 49 ; the 
Indians told that the king's son is arrived with a 
great army at, 110 ; colonel Gridley a native of, 357; 
the episcopal clergy of, write to the reverend doctor 
Johnson in favor of Mr. Apthorp, 374 ; reverend Mr, 
Apthorp a native of, 375 ; character of the episcopal 
clergy of, 397 ; reverend Mr. McClennaghan intrigues 
at, 409, and conforms to the church of England at, 
415 ; constant communication between Halifax and, 
427 ; the case of the sufierers by fire in, recommended 
to the New York assembly, 429 ; reverend doctor 
Cutler of, paralyzed, 451 ; a congratulatory address 
presented to George III. from the episcopal clergy of, 
496; John Cutler, M. D., of, dead, ibid; Benjamin 
Pratt at the head of the legal profession in, 506 ; 
society for the propagation of the gospel established 
in, 566 ; the Indian trade east of, in whose hands, 
669 ; the board of trade lay before the king a book 
printed at, 678 (see Otis, James) ; stamp act riots in, 
759, 761 ; takes the lead in spreading seditious prin- 
ciples throughout the colonies, 98(^; non-importation 
associations formed in, VIII., 68 ; invites the coope- 
ration of the other colonies, 80 ; tumults in, 97 ; the 
Virginia resolutions favorably entertained at, 176 ; a 
merchant of, burnt in efligy for having imported 
goods from Great Britain, 214 ; Isaac Sears moves to, 
220 ; the head-quarters of general Gage, 247 ; Andrew 
Oliver one of the representatives of, 329 ; he dies at, 
330 ; tea destroyed at, 408 ; influence of that proceed- 
ing, 413 ; the port of, shut by act of parliament, 433 ; 
general Wasliington at, 459 ; an order received in New 
York for articles for tlie army at, 493 ; the Indians 
alarmed at hearing that a large body of troops are at, 
520 ; an armament sent to, 539 ; admiral Graves at, 544 ; 
collision between the king's troops and the people 
near, 571 ; no vessel allowed to clear from New Y'ork 
for, 572; lieutenaut-colonel McLean embarks for, 583 



88 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bos- 



Boston (Massachusetts) — continued. 

the New York committee protest against the blockade 
of, 584 ; general Washington, major-general Lee and 
adjutant-general Gates proceed to, 589 ; reinforce- 
ments march to the camp at, 597 ; the British army 
exercise no influence beyond, 599 ; general Gage finds 
it diflicult to obtain provisions in, 604 ; four British 
regiments gone to, 645 ; sir H. Clinton quits, 674 ; 
evacuated by the British, 675 ; their fleet and army 
sail for Halifax from, 676 ; reasons given to the 
Indians for evacuating, 689 ; major-general Robertson 
a great plunderer at, 706 ; New York judges paid out 
of the revenue at, 708 ; sir Henry Clinton arrives in, 
717 ; Indians in the American camp near, 741 ; major 
general Howe arrives at, 751 ; marquis de la Fayette 
lands at, 792 ; trade proposed to be established be- 
tween Quebec and, IX , 5, 70 ; has but few regular 
troops, 53 ; attracts the beaver trade, 65 ; the govern- 
ment of, more republican than monarchical, 71 ; trade 
carried on overland between Canada and, ibid ; sir 
Thomas Temple at, 75 ; M. de Grandfontaine plenipo- 
tentiary at, 87 ; buccaneers assisted at, 119, 793 ; count 
de Frontenac writes to the governor of, 120; description 
of, in 1679, 137 ; does not acknowledge the duke of 
York, 165 ; solid men in 1681 of, 166 ; Huguenots 
arrive at, 309, 312 ; Champlain traded on the site of, 
378 ; Acadia restored by a treaty made at, 379 ; sir 
Edmund Andros governor of, 380 ; Acadia does not 
increase as fast as, 401 ; suspected of an intention to 
seize Port Royal, Nova Scotia, 429 ; urges the Indians 
to make war against the French, 438 ; not palisaded, 
446 ; the king of France called on to punish the old 
parliamentarians at, 461 ; an expedition organized in 
Canada for an attack between Orange and, 464 ; ves- 
sels seen bound to Port Royal from, 474 ; the gar- 
rison of Port Royal carried to, 475 ; French cap- 
ture vessels belonging to, 493, 568, X., 61 ; Indians 
lay waste the country around, IX., 495 ; chevalier 
d'Eau at, 499, 501 ; sir William Phipps' ships return 
to, 500 ; the French government urged to attack, 
505 ; Canada can very well dispense with, 506 ; des- 
cription of,th 1691, 507 ; the garrison of Port Royal 
detained at, 530 ; the Abenaquis at war with, 537 ; 
intelligence from Quebec sent to, 544 ; negroes in, 
549 ; plan for an expedition against, 659, 727 ; French 
prisoners ill-treated at, 691 ; a principal town in 
New England, 725; description of, in 1701, 726; its 
capture preferable to that of New York, 728 ; the 
most easterly part of New England, 729 ; route from 
Quebec to, 733 ; M de Iberville's plan for an expe- 
dition against, lost, 735 ; a fleet arrives at, 849, 859 ; 
Messrs. de Rouville and Dupuis return to Canada 
from, 857; vessels resort to Acadia from, 917; an 
expedition sent against Port Royal from, 928 ; a pro- 
clamation preparatory to the expedition against Canada 
printed at, 930; Abenakis visit, 966; their doings 
there, 967 ; privateers about to sail for cape Breton 
•from, X., 1 ; distance from Louisbourg, 4 ; French 



cruisers recommended to be employed ofl', 10 ; num- 
ber of men that accompanied admiral Walker's 
expedition, from, 12 ; French spies at, 15 ; defenses 
of, 16 ; Canada Indians make incursions in the direc- 
tion of, 32, 33 ; two regiments to be sent to Cape 
Breton from, 42 ; preparations for war making at, 43 ; 
commodore Warren at, 46 ; a French fleet expected 
at, 48 ; number of ships of war at, 55, 73 ; an English 
fleet expected at, 62 ; required to send reinforcements 
to Nova Scotia, 63 ; commodore Warren sails from, 
94 ; prices at, 100 ; famine at, reported, 106 ; news 
of the return of part of the duke d' Anville's fleet to 
France, received at, 107 ; notice of the siege of Louis- 
bourg sent to admiral Knowles from, 112 ; commodore 
Snowies at, 144 ; no more French prisoners at, 153 ; 
the French take prisoners near, 164 ; governor Shir- 
ley writes to the duke of Bedford from, 190 ; its 
distance from Albany and New Y'ork, 679 ; count 
d'Estaing issues a proclamation to the Canadians 
from the harbor of, 1167. 

Bostoners (Bastoniens), allowed to trade at Esopus and Al- 
bany, III., 238 ; mentioned, 268, 272; secure sir Ed- 
mund Andros and disband his army, 608. 

Bostwicke, captain, R. N., fitter for bedlam than a queen's 
ship, IV., 1056. 

Boswell, William, succeeds sir Dudley Carleton near the 
states general, I., 50, 95 ; complains of reverend Hugh 
Peters, 567. 

Botetourt [Norborne Berkeley, 3d,] baron, governor of Vir- 
ginia, VIII., 209 ; biographical notice of, 260. 

Botta, captain, wounded, X. 431. 

Botta, marquis, appointed imperial commissioner in Italy, 
X., 260. 

Bottle bay (lake Champlain), X., 843. 

Boubert, ensign de, imprisoned in Quebec, X., 718. 

Bouchard, M., X., 41. 

Boucheine, Mathew, I., 606. 

Boucher, Pierre, IX., 194; his descendants, X., 149. 

Boucherat [Louis], chancellor of France, X., v. 

Bouoherville, captain, commands L'Emerillon, X., 46 ; sent 
to Newfoundland, 117; returns to Quebec, 125. 

Bouoherville, lieutenant [Francois Pierre] de, at Crown 
Point, X., 36; whence descended, 149; captain, at- 
tends an Indian conference, 445. 

Boucherville, ensign [R6n6 Antoine], de, wounded at Sillery, 
X., 1086. 

Boucherville, le Borgne de. (See Le Borgne.) 

Boucherville, an Iroquois burnt at, IX., 518; Indians kill a 
man at, 622 ; a party of Iroquois defeated near, 629. 

Bouder (Bonder), M. de, IX., 696, 780, 810. 

Boudinot (Bodinot, Boudeuott, Boudienot, Boudinote, Bou- 
dinott), Elias, aflronts lieutenant-governor Leisler, 
III., 743; a merchant at New York, 749, IV., 624, 
1135; signs a petition to king William, 935; and 
an address to lord Cornbury, 1006, 1008; obtains 
land in Newton (Long Island), in payment of part of 
the expenses attending lady Cornbury's funeral, V., 
Ill, 407. 



-Bou] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Boudrot, Abraham, makes a report on the English defenses 
at fort Pomiiquid, IX., 574. 

Bougainville (Bougaimville, Bouyainville), Louis Antoine 
de, at the siege of Oswego, X., 443 ; serves as a hos- 
tage, "^78 ; at Ticonderpga, 488, 803 ; sent to gain 
information of the enemy's position, 490 ; desires to 
be appointed royal geometrician, 492 ; prepares a 
memoir on Canada, 576 ; transmits it to the minister 
of the colonies, 577 ; sent to Quebec with the news of 
the fall of fort William Henry, 596, 598, 663; first 
aid-de-camp de M. de Jlontcalm, 603 ; his report of 
the siege and capitulation of fort William Henry, 605 ; 
his report transmitted to the minister, 630 ; destroys 
all the intoxicating liquors in fort William Henry, 
632 ; wounded, 744, 750, 798 ; assistant quarter-mas- 
ter-general, 750, 861 ; embarks for Montreal, 851 ; 
returns to fort William Henry, ibid ; bets that Lonis- 
bourg is not taken, 852; returns to Carillon, 853; 
sent to France to report the condition of Canada, 856 ; 
employed in bringing about a reconciliation between 
M. de Vaudreuil and M. de Montcalm, 858; reports 
the progress of affairs in Canada, 887 ; about to sail 
for France, 889 ; sails for France, 900 ; appointed 
colonel, 943 ; at tlie siege of Quebec, 1001 ; where 
posted, 1003, 1013, 1031, 1051 ; in command of the 
61ite, 1010 ; the marquis de Montcalm attacks the 
English without waiting for, 1014 ; answers lieutenant- 
colonel Barr6's letter, 1028 ; receives reinforcements, 
1032, 1036 ; marches to Deschambault, 1033 ; ignorant 
of the English gaining the heights of Abraham, 1038 ; 
no orders sent to, 1039 ; unjustly blamed, 1040 ; 
jealousy entertained against, ibid ; number of men 
under, 1052, 1061 ; superseded as assistant quarter- 
master general, 1069 ; sent to the frontier, 1079 ; com- 
mands at Isle aux Noix, 1101, 1102 ; evacuates that 
island, 1104 ; superintends the embarkation of the 
French troops at Quebec, 1123 ; biographical notice 
of, 1124. 

Boulascry, ensign de, X., 30. 

Boulau (Bouleau), captain, arrives from Martinico, X., 110; 
brings a cargo of salt to Quebec, 165 ; sails for Mar- 



173 



BouUongne (BuUogne), Jean IS^icolas de, comptroller-general 
of France, X., vii, 899. 

Boult, Moreshall, IV., 936, 1006. 

Boulter, John, IV., 1008. 

Bounckcr, Henry, one of the lords of trade. III., xiii. 

Boundaries, of the Dutch possessions in North America, I., 
40 ; of Messrs. Godyn and Blommaert's colonic on 
Delaware bay, 43; of New England, 5], III., 3; of 
New Netherland, I., 51, 65, 107, 275, 283, 542, 544, 
564, II., 80, 133, 609 ; disputes about, got up in Eng- 
land for the purpose of disturbing the Dutch in pos- 
session of New Netherland, I., 72; settlement of, recom- 
mended, 95, 152, 153, 161, 260, 268, 295, 318, 394, 
474, II., 125, 132, 150, 231, 234, 255, 368, 377, 406, 
408, 464, 477, 486, 506 ; towards the South river, 289 ; 
observations on, 359; no difference between the Dutch 

12 



and Virginia about, 361 ; the director of New Nether- 
land to be empowered to enter into a provisional 
agreement with the English respecting the, 364; the 
authorities of Holland accused of neglecting the settle- 
ment of the, 3S7, and deny all knowledge of any pro- 
posals having been made respecting the, 394 ; Adriaeu 
Van der Donck required to make a drawing of the 
old, 443 ; agreed to at Hartford, ibid, 546, 547, 548, 
566, 611, II., 121, 325, 384; director Stuyvesant 
negotiates with the English on the subject of the, I., 
451, 458, 459 ; Adriaen Van der Douck's memoir on 
the, 457; particulars of the negotiations respecting, 
460, 496, 548 ; the treaty respecting the, to be sub- 
mitted to the authorities in Holland and England, 
461 ; director Stuyvesant recalled to give information 
respecting the, 471, 472 ; the settlement of the, post- 
poned, 475 ; the Dutch propose the settlement of the, 
486 ; the English decline their proposal, 487, II., 216 ; 
instruction to director Stuyvesant respecting the, I., 
496 ; of Rensselaerwyck, director Stuyvesant demands 
the defining of the, 524 ; of New Netherland, sundry 
papers submitted to the states general relating to the, 
537 et seq.; director Stuyvesant proposes new, 544, 
545; a description of, laid before the states general, 
549, 556 ; disposition of papers on the, 549, 557, 576, 
II., 164, 217; the states general call for further infor- 
mation on the, I., 556 ; proceedings in England on the 
subject of the, 559 ; agreement at Hartford respecting 
the, not known in England, 5G0; memorandum of 
what the Dutch ambassadors at London propose to 
submit to the English on the subject of the, 561, 562; 
ambassador Van Beverninck's despatch on the, refer- 
red, 563 ; answer of the West India Company there- 
upon, ibid ; posts erected to mark the, 565 ; the 
director empowered to settle, ibid ; reverend Hugh 
Peters urges the settlement of the, 567 ; the Dutch am- 
bassador in England instructed to obtain a ratification 
of the agreement at Hartford respecting the, 569, II., 
219 ; recommendation of the Zealand chamber of the 
West India Company respecting the, I., 570 ; the 
chamber at Amsterdam urges the settlement of the, 
573, 574, 575, II., 47 ; of Indian lands on the South 
river, conveyed to the Dutch, I., 590, 596 ; the states 
general requested to ratify the Hartford agreement 
respecting the, 610 ; ratification thereof by their high 
mightinesses, 611, II., 228; efforts to settle the, with 
Maryland, 83, 138 ; of lord Baltimore's patent, 84 ; as 
claimed by Maryland, 92; maps produced to show 
the Maryland, 93 ; deduction on the, 127 ; the gover- 
nors of New England request the Dutch West India 
Company to settle the, 150 ; the settlement of the. 
expected, 161 ; of the colonie on the Delaware, never 
defined, 202, 209, 210; the states general requested to 
issue a declaratory act on the subject of the, 222, 
225, 226; the Dutch ambassador to England to 
insist on the settlement of the, 227 ; declaratory act 
respecting the, 228 ; the English encroach on New 
Netherland notwithstanding the agreement respecting 



90 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bor — 



Boundaries — eonlinued. 

the, 229 ; the authorities in HoIIaud recommend the 
maintenance of the, as agreed npon at Hartford, 234 ; 
prospect of settling the, 236, 367, 431, 441; the 
Dutch expelled from New IN^etherland regardless of 
the treaty settling the, 267 ; of the grant to the duke 
of York, 295, 296, III., 215, 328 ; of New Netherland, 
bad effects of the non-settlement of the, II., 365, 366 ; 
continual remonstrances from New Netherland for the 
settlement of the, 370 ; delegates from Long Island 
complain of the non-settlement of the, 375 ; would 
have been ratified by the English had it not been for 
new insolences of the Dutch, 380 ; vindication of the 
treaty settling the, 381 ; causes which led to the set- 
tlement of the, 382 ; thi-ee of the New England colo- 
nies acknowledged the binding force of the treaty set- 
tling the, 385 ; agreement respecting the, declared a 
nullity, 388, 390 ; counter propositions respecting, 
391 ; captain Scott's course, a violation of the treaty 
settling the, 396 ; New Netherland and New England 
dispute now and again about, 413 ; director Stuyve- 
sant expects that an agreement has been made by the 
king of England and the states general respecting the, 
414 ; Thomas Willet reports that commissioners have 
been appointed to settle the, 432 ; failure of the efforts 
to settle the, 484 ; inutility of settling the, 485 ; no- 
thing known in New Netherland of what has been 
done in Europe on the subject of the, 487 ; instruc- 
tions to the royal commissioners for settling the New 
England, III., 55, 62; they are engaged in arranging 
. the New England, 93 ; northern, of Massachusetts 
fixed, 99, 101 ; between New York and Connecticut 
settled, 106, 230, 356; of Massachusetts, 112, 240; 
of East Jersey, 223, 797; between New York and 
Connecticut, 231, 2-35 ; the agreement of 1664 respect- 
ing the, never confirmed, 235, 236 ; the duke of 
York's territories have Canada for their northern, 
237 ; between New York and Connecticut, nothing 
further to be done in the matter of the, 247 ; of New 
York, disputed by Connecticut, 257 ; of the province 
of New York, 260, 785, 796, V., 555, 600, VI., 12, 508, 
VIII., 436 ; of the New England colonies in dispute, 
262; defective, to be settled, 272; Pennsylvania 



has the Delaware for one of 



governor 



Dongan to agree on the New York and Connecticut, 
333 ; of New Jersey, propriety of running the, 356 ; 
of Pennsylvania, modification of, proposed, 394; run 
between New York and New Jersey, 406 ; John Young 
one of the commissioners for running the New York 
and Connecticut, 416; the country should be well 
explored before any agreement be made with the 
French respecting, 477 ; commissioners appointed to 
determine the French and English, in America, 504, 
505, 549, IV., 402, 404, 453, 580, VI., 959, VIII.' 578^ 
IX., 677, 892; their negotiations. III., 509; of sir 
Edmund Andres' government, 537 ; between the Eng- 
lish and French, settlement of, expected, 551 ; the 
agreement of certain articles between the French and 



I English for the settlement of, recommended, IV. , 311 ; 

between the French and English, views of the lords- 
of trade on the, 475, 477; of the English possessions 
in America, 578 ; of New York and Connecticut,.report 
of the lords of trade on the, 623 ; order in council: 
thereupon, 626 ; William III. confirms the agreement 
respecting the Connecticut, 627, 630 ; articles of agree- 
ment between governor Dongan and governor Treat 
therenpour 628 ; survey of the Connecticut line, 629 ; 
report on the, laid before the lords of trade, 631 ; con- 
firmation of the agreement of 1683 to be transmitted' 
to the earl of Bellomont and ConnectiCTit, 035 ; trans- 
mitted, 636 ; Robert Livingston's opinion respecting; 
the French and English, in America, 651 ; captain; 
Alden furnishes information respecting the eastern, 
677 ; the five nations request a settlement of the French 
and English, 741; Mr. Penu's idea respecting the- 
French and English, 757; the English claim the river 
St. Croi.x as their eastern, 771 ; between East Jersey 
and New Y''ork, the assembly vote an address on the- 
subject of the, 786 ; little prospect for the settlement 
of the, between the French and English, 842 ; infor- 
mation called for on the subject of the New York and 
New Jersey, 854 ; of the beaver hunting gi-ound of th& 
five nations, 908, 909, VI., 569, VII., 488, 573 ; claim- 
ed by the province of New Y'ork on the north, V., 
531 ; Allane Jarret appointed to run the line between 
the province of New Y'ork and New Jersey, 532 ; the 
French house at Niagara to be considered, on settling 
the French and English, 549 ; of Nova Scotia as 
granted to sir W. Alexander, 592 ; of New Hampshire, 
594; of Massachusetts, 596, VIL, 597; of Rhode Is- 
land, v., 599 ; of Connecticut, 600; of New Jersey, 
602; of Pennsylvania, 603, VI., 748; of Maryland, 
v., 605; of Carolina, 608; of North Carolina, 609; 
of the Hudson's bay company, commissioners ap- 
pointed to confer respecting the, 620 ; between the 
five nations and Virginia, 637, 639, 670 ; misunder- 
standing between New York and Connecticut on the 
subject of, 698 ; an act for running the New York and 
Connecticut, recommended for confirmation, 707 ; of 
the country belonging to the Senecas, Cayugas and 
Onondagas, 800; of the swamp in New Y'ork, 914; 
president Van Dam urges the settlement of the, be- 
tween the French and English in America, 928 ; 
between New Y'ork and New Jersej-, projected by Mr. 
James Alexander, 982 ; between New York and Con- 
necticut, commissioners appointed to run, VI., 56; 
between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, Philip 
Livingston president of the commission to run, 60 ; 
of land on the Mohawk river granted to John Collins 
and company, 62 ; governor Belcher writes to the 
government of New York on the subject of the, 143 ; 
under the consideration of the board of trade, 149 ; 
lieutenant-governor Clarke requests governor Belcher 
to appoint commissioners to run the, 159 ; names of 
the commissioners for settling the Massachusetts and 
Rhode Island, 167, 168 ; neutrality line between New 



— Bou] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



91 



ouudaries — cenliiiued. 

¥oi-k and Canada in queen Anne's war, 371 ; Kenne- 
bec river fixed on as the New England, 478; exact 
■account called for of the New York, 560, 587; opin- 
ions of the lords of trade on New York and New Jer- 
sey, 773; steps taken for running the Connecticut 
■and New York, 776; lieutenant-governor Delancey's 
■observations on the New York and New Jersey, 838 ; 
ffefcoittmendation el the lords of trade in regard to the 
New York and New Jersey, 846, 952 ; instruction to 
.governor Hardy on tlie subject of the New York and 
New Jersey, 960; between New York and New Jer- 
sey, and between New York and Massachusetts, diffi- 
xjulties in the way of settling, VII., 38, 121; the New 
York assembly refuses to provide for the expenses of 
a commission to determine certain. 79 ; between New 
Hampshire and Massachusetts settled, 80, 45fi; the 
attention of the New York legislature a,bout to be 
called to the, 163 ; between New York and New Jei-- 
aey, its settlement postponed, 204; between New York 
and Massachusetts, difficulties experienced in the set- 
tlement of, 207 ; papers transmitted to the board of 
trade respecting, 208; the board of trade censure the 
manner the dispute is carried en about, 221 ; recom- 
mendation of the board of trade on, 223 ; riots in con- 
.^equence of disputed, 273 ; governor Pownall and 
lieutenant-governor De Lancey differ on the subject 
of, 333 ; opinion of the board of trad<3 on the New 
York and Massachusetts, submitted to the king, 335 ; 
the board of trade decline allowing any alteration in 
the proposition for settling the New York and Massa- 
chusetts, 336 ; Mr. Charles animadverts on the report 
of the board of trade on the New York, New Jersey 
and Massachusetts, 337; demands copy of a letter of 
president Schuyler on, 338 ; with the Indians, peace 
can be preserved only by settling the, 560 ; the council 
of New York address the board of trade on the sub- 
ject of, 562; Cadwallader Colden's remarks on that 
address, 563; proposed between the whites and In- 
dians, 578, 725, 726, 727; state of the controversy 
between New York and New Hampshire respecting, 
695 ; between New York and Connecticut, 596 ; be- 
tween New York and Massachusetts unsettled, ibid ; 
between the whites and Indians, submitted to the 
board of trade, 603 ; advantages of a line with the 
Indians, 604; between the English and French in 
America, 605 ; between New York and New Hamp- 
shire, the Connecticut river declared, 642, 930; be- 
tween New York and New Jersey about being settled, 
642 ; between the whites and Indians, description of, 
658, 661, 728, 1005 ; an act passed to determine the 
Massachusetts and New York, 676 ; between whites 
and Indians, sir William Johnson urges the settle- 
ment of, 838, VIII., 87; between the provinces of 
New York and Quebec fixed, VII., 850, 873, 874, 875, 
1003, VIII., 3 ; between Massachusetts and New York, 
the earl of Shelburne recommends the settlement of, 



VII., 879; between New York and Canada, requested 
to be confirmed, 8S5 ; between New York and Massa- 
chusetts, commissioners appointed to agree on, 909, 
994, VIII., 71 ; between the whites and Indians nego- 
tiated, VII., 928; George Croghan sent to England to 
urge the settlement of the Indian, 982 ; letter of the 
board of trade to tlie secretary of state on the subject of 
the Indian, 1004; sir William Johnson ordered to com- 
plete tiiat between the whites and Indians, VIII., 2, ll'j 
commissioners fail to agree on the New York and Mas- 
sachusetts, 2 ; with the Indians, progress in the negotia- 
tion of, 22; between the southern Indians and the 
whites, 31, 32, 33, 34 ; between New York and' Quebec 
approved by the secretary of state, 35 ; between New 
York and Quebec confirmed, 87, 88, 103; between the 
whites and Indians, further instructions respecting, 
102", authorities in support of the claims of New York 
to its northern, 107 ; between the Indians and whites 
agreed on, 110; continuation thereof, 121; modifica- 
tions proposed by the Indians, 123 ; deed of the, 
between the whites and Indians, 135 ; map of the 
Indian, 136 ; between New York and the six nations, 
150; report of the board of trade thereon, 158; with 
the Indians approved, 166 ; sir William Johnson's 
further explanation thereof, 179; between New York 
and Massachusetts, judge Livingston commissioner 
for running, 192 ; between Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire determined, 331 ; between New York and 
New Jersey, further measures for the settlement of, 
349 ; between New York and Massachusetts agreed 
on, 371 ; about to be surveyed, 397 ; with the Indians, 
utterly disregarded by the whites, 476 ; with the In- 
dians, includes several Seneca villages, 548; of the 
French po.ssessions in North America, IX., 377; of 
Canada, 781 ; of Acadia, conflicting opinions in regard 
to, 878, 879; of New Fi-ance, memoir on, 894; ofAcadia, 
895 ; of Canada, memoir of M. Bobe on, 913; of the 
country of flie Abenakis, 943 ; between New York and 
Canada, papers relating to, 960; between the English and 
French colonies, proposed, X., 227 ; of Canada, neces- 
sity of fixing, 251 ; of New England, French views of, 
293; of Canada, M. de Montcalm's views on, 691; 
the French must not be particular about, 820 ; pro- 
posed for Canada, 935; memoir on, 1134. 

Boundbrook, the American army at, VIII., 730. 

Bounis, Willem, II., 464. 

Bouukley, William, one of the council for trade, III., 31. 

Bounty, a, for the exportation of naval stores from the plan- 
tations, reason of the failure of the act offering, V., 
196 {see Acts, British) ; to those enlisting in America, 
VII., 75, 499. 

Bouquet (Boquet), Henry, biographical notice of, VII., 352; 
arrives at fort Pitt, 545, 550, 656 ; defeats the Indians 
at Bushy run, 546 ; news of his success communicated 
to the six nations, 553 ; the king expresses his appro- 
bation of the conduct of, 570; commands the troops 
in the southern district of the colonies, 618 ; prepar- 
ing to march against the western Indians, 649 ; aware 



92 



GENERAL INDEX, 



[BOIT- 



Bonqnet, Ht-nrr — continued. 

of the trenchtry of the Indians, 656; colonel Brad- 
street coBperates with, 660 ; result of his expedition 
against the western Indians, 686 ; hostages deliyered 
to, make their escape, 694 ; has performed everything 
expected of him, 703 ; ohliges the Ohio Indians to 
sne for peace, 711 ; the Delawares agree to a peace in 
consequence of terms offered hr, 730 ; and fulfill their 
engagement to, 750; attacked by Indians, 962; com- 
mands an expedition against the Muskingum Indians, 
VIII., 312; at Loyal Hannon, in western Pennsylva- 
nia, X., 924. 

Boorboii, Henri de. (See Verneuil, duke de.) 

Bourbon, M., sent by governor de la Barre to governor Don- 
gan, III., 450, IX., 240, 246. 

BouTbon-Cond6, duke de, prime minister of France, IX., 
959. 

Bourbon river (Hudson's hay), the Frencli expelled from, 
IX., 266, 268 ; fur trade diverted to, 444. 

Bonrdeaux, M. de, French ambassador to England, IX., 783. 

Bourdon, Jean, attorney-general of Canada, some particu- 
lars of, IX., 24; M. de Mezy sends him to France, 
25 ; takes possession of Hudson's bay, 263 ; explores 
Labrador, 304, 783. 

Bourdon, M., an officer of cape Breton, X., 178. 

Bourdon, surgeon, accompanies M. de la Barre to Quebec, 
IX., 207. 

Bonrgeoys [Marguerite], founds tlie Congregation nunnery at 
Montreal, IX., 112. 

Bourgmont, M. de, commandant of fort Detroit, IX., 806; 
censured, 809. 

Bourke, Thomas, taken prisoner at Sandusky, VI., 733 ; sent 
to France, X., 241. 

Bourke, William, captain Kidd sells a part of liis cargo to, 
IV., 584. 

Bourlamarque (Bourlamaque, Boiirlamar, Bonrlamarc), colo- 
nel, ordered to Canada, X. , 393 ; with M. de Montcalm, 
395; arrives at Quebec, 399 ; his destination, 406; at 
Montreal, 41 2 ; ordered to fort Frontenac, 415, 416, 418, 
420, 421, 467, 475, 477 ; military honors paid to, 417 ; 
fortifies fort Frontenac, 440 ; prepares for the expedi- 
tion against Oswego, 441 ; accompanies that expedi- 
tion, 442, 454, 531 ; commandant of the forts at Os- 
wego, 443, 460, 478 ; acts as engineer, 455 ; wounded 
461, 473, 476, 532, 733, 740, 809, 847, 897, 918 ; the 
marquis de Montcalm unfriendly to, 491 ; sent to 
Quebec, 547 ; a favorite with the troops, 551 ; ordered 
to Carillon, 553, 564 ; applies for the command of a 
party sent against the English fort at lake George, 
555 ; in command at Carillon (or Ticonderoga), 565 
567, 568, 573, 721, 784; sends in pursuit of a party 
of English, 566 ; prisoners brought to, 569 ; com- 
mended, 574, 577, 651, 694, 696, 770, 798, 813; 
makes preparations for the expedition against fort 
William Henry, 585, 599 ; at tlie siege of that fort, 
598, 601, 602, 604, 611; 615, 642, 648, 919 ; governor of 
fort William Henry, 605 ; on the marquis de Mont- 
calm's staff, 606, 620; his services, 608, 610, 661; en- 



deavors to save the Engli.-ih from being plundered, 616, 
633,643; recommended for promotion, 639; and for 
an increase of pay, 685 ; his necessities, 702 ; re- 
turns to Carillon, 717 ; his services there, 723, 737,' 
738, 739, 743, 747, 748, 749, 787, 789, 921 ; covers 
himself with laurels, 744; his shoulder blade frac- 
tured, 745, 753; dangerously wounded, 750, 764, 766, 
798 ; movements of, 790, 791, 792, 794, 807, 814, 815, 
835, 836, 842, 844, 845, 846, 894, 895, 896 ; much in- 
commoded by his wound, 857 ; advises M. de Vaudreuil 
of movements of the enemy, 858 ; his character as an 
officer, 861 ; forwards M. de Vaudreuil's despatches 
to general Abercrombie, 892 ; reconnoitres the ground 
near Ticonderoga, 893 ; rescues a number of English 
prisoners from the Indians, 920 ; appointed brigadier, 
943 ; nearly recovered from his wound, 958 ; proposed 
for the command of fort Duquesne, 960 ; his zeal to be 
relied on, 962 ; resumes the command of Carillon, 970, 
971 ; entrusted with the defense of that place, 993, 
1002 ; prepares to retire from that post, 1024 j at Isle 
aux Noix, 1035 ; endeavors to capture major Rogers, 
1042 ; threatened by the army under Amherst, 1043 ; 
reports his operations to the minister of war, 1054 ; 
recommended to be employed to prevent the descent 
of the English on Montreal, 1065 ; at the battle of 
Sillery, 1076, 1081 ; wounded and his horse killed, 
1077, 1082, 1084 ; left a garrison at Isle aux Noix, 
1078 ; employed in harassing the English, 1079 ; of 
great assistance to chevalier de Levis, 1101 ; stationed 
at Longueuil, 1105 ; embarks for France, 1124, 1126, 
1127 ; his memoir on Canada, 1139. 

Bourn, Mr., merchant of Boston, IV., 788. 

Bourne, rear admiral, I., 582. 

Bourse, commissary, communicates intelligence to the states 
general of a great victory obtained over the English 
at the Virginias, II., 518, 519. 

Bouse, James, X., 592. 

Bout, Adriaen de, II., 193. 

Bout (Boudt), Jan Evertse, one of the eight men, I., 140, 
191, 193, 213 ; declaration of, as to a conversation 
with director Kieft, 194; a party sent against the 
Indians who lay at the bouwery belonging to, 199 ; 
delegate to Holland from the people of i^ew Nether- 
land, 258, 261, 270, 318, 319, 431 ; delivers in an 
abstract of the remonstrance from New Netherland, 
331 ; one of the founders of Breuckelen, 340, 341 ; 
and others enter into a contract to convey emigrants 
to New Netherland, 379 ; owns a bouwerie at Pavonia, 
411, 412; returns to New Netherland, 420, 447, 448; 
particulars respecting, 432 ; one of the selectmen of 
New Amsterdam, 441 ; the heirs of, apply for leave 
to reenter into possession of certain property, II., 672. 

Bouteveant, Stephen, IV., 1135. 

Bouteillier, Jean, III., 420. 

Boutin, , an Acadian, X., 10. 

Boutler, William, member of the board of ordnance, IV., 642. 

Boutteroue, M., intendant in Canada, IX., 62; M. Talon 
succeeds, 787. 



-Bea] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Bouvel, count de, taken piisoner, X., 385. 

Bouweries, terms on ivliich the West India Comp.iny leased, 
I., 371 ; a number unoccupied in New Netlierland in 
consequence of the war, 386. 

Bowden, ThiJmas, IV., 938. 

Bowell, Richard, IV., 1007. 

Bowen, John, IV., 936, 1008. 

Bowles, Mr., III., 94. 

Bowne (Boun, Bound), John, 11., G-t7 ; and others enter a 
caveat against a grant of land to Bartholemew Appel- 
gadt and otliers, 706 ; speaker of the New Jersey 
assembly. III., 293, 295, 299 ; colonel Dongan at the 
house of, 593, 595 ; employed in collecting money 
in New Jersey for lord Cornbury, V., 35 ; expelled 
the assembly, ibid. 

Bowyer, Michael, captain of a company of Virginia riflemen, 
VIII., 729. 

Boyd, George, X., 593. 

Boyd, James, X., 592. 

Boyer, Sander, Indian interpreter, I., 597, 599. 

Boyle, Henry, secretary of state. III., viii; member of the 
privy council, IV., 1127 ; refers the petition of sundry 
palatines to the board of trade, V., 44 ; report of the 
board of trade thereupon, 53 ; letter of colonel Vetch 
to, 78. 

Boyle, Jolin, III., 652. 

Boyle, Mr., of New York, VI., 24. 

Boyle, Robert, member of the council for foreign plantations, 
III., 33, 36, 47, 48, 49, 50. 

Boyle, Solomon, affidavit of, VI., 346 ; protected against the 
New Jersey rioters, 349. 

Boylston, Mr., VI., 542. 

Boyse, Mr., of Boston, death of, III., 185. 

Brabander, Claes de. III., 783; some men killed on the 
Island of, 784. 

Bracton [Henry], prerogatives of the crown according to, 
III., 850. 

Braddock (Bradoc, Brandolk), major-general Edward, secret 
instructions to, VI., 920; the governors in America 
to receive orders from, 934 ; invites governor Shirley 
to a conference at Annapolis, 941 ; enterprises set on 
foot in New England before the arrival of, 945 ; his 
arrival communicated to the New York assembly, 
950 ; his opinion required as to the best manner of 
defending the frontiers, 961 ; appoints mtijor-general 
Johnson sole superintendent of the six nations, 961, 
965, 1025, VII., 3, 7, 11, 30, 573, 715 ; the six nations 
decline assisting, VI., 963, VII., 19 ; his arrival an- 
nounced to the six nations, VI., 964 ; sends a speech 
to these Indians, 966 ; reasons for postponing the 
delivery of his speech, 969 ; six nations invited to 
join, 973 ; his speech to the six nations, 974 ; the war 
belt thrown down in the name of the, 975 ; lieutenant- 
governor Delancey visits, 989 ; killed, 990, 995, X., 
338, 382, 398, 401, 914; reinforces Oswego, VI., 992; 
major-general Johnson's declaration to, 996 ; governor 
Shirley succeeds, 1024 ; why the six nations declined 
aiding, VII., 22 ; considered by the Indians to be gov- 



ernor of Virginia, 23 ; not surprising that the six 
nations did not join, 25 ; names of officers who served 
under, .'i8, 205, VIll., 247, 517, 529, 590, 730, X., 
566, 729, 730, 989 ; consequences of his defeat, VII., 
86,87, 169, 493, X., 380, 402, 524; reverend Mr. 
Smith's letter on the defeat of, printed, VII , 166; 
would not have beeu defeated had Indian intelligence 
been attended to, 170 ; nothing known of the remains 
of the army of, 220 ; state of tlie English interest 
among the Indians on thi; arrival of, 227 ; summary of 
Indian transactions until the defeat of, 266; Ohio 
Indians hold a confi^rence with, 270 ; disappointed by 
the Indians, ibid ; the French use against Oswego the 
artillery taken from, 282, X., 484; employs George 
Croghan, VII., 982 ; orders captain Bradstreet to 
Oswego, 379; biographical notice of, X., 304; his 
papers fall into the hands of the* French, 312, 364, 
366, 380, 382, 492, 102.5 ; news of his defeat received 
in England and France, 314, 315, 353; strength 
of his army, 337, 365, 381 ; date of his orders, 379 ; 
disparity between the French force and that under, 
390 ; despised colonists, 400 ; Shawanese engaged in 
the battle against, 437; defeat of, alluded to, 465 ; 
styled admiral, 481, 484; would have reduced fort 
Duquesne had he got near it, 493 ; the five nations 
reminded of his defeat, 509 ; general Johnson bliimes, 
529 ; defeated within three leagues of fort Duquesne, 
583 ; the English recover the cannon taken from, 

Braddock ford, VIII.', 464. 

Braddock's road, a force marching against fort Duquesne 
by, X., 819. 

Bradenham, Robert, surgeon to captain Kidd, IV., 646. 

Bradford, Elizabeth, marries Charles Whiting, X., 731. 

Bradford [Francis Newport, 1st], earl of, member of the 
privy council, IV., 1127. 

Bradford, William, governor of New Plymouth, II., 761 ; 
his gr.inddaughter marries Cliarles Whiting, X., 731. 

Bradford, William, member of governor Andros' council, 
III., 543. 

[Bradford, William], his excuse for printing the laws of 
New York incorrectly, IV., 522 ; printer of New 
York, 1168; John Peter Zenger, apprentice to, VI., 
80 ; James Parker apprentice to, VIII., 221. 

Bradford's Gazette. (See Newspapers.) 

Bradfort, ensign. III., 600, 601. 

Bradish, Joseph, turns pirate and is taken, IV., 512 ; leaves 
money and jewels in lieutenant-colonel Pierson's 
hands, ibid ; several sums of money taken with him, 
531 ; escapes from jail at Boston, 584 ; the j.ailer 
of Boston to be prosecuted for the escape of, 585; 
some of his men taken in Connecticut, 594 ; the earl 
of Bellomont commended for his activity against, 
633 ; runs away with money belonging to Mr. Heath- 
cot, 817. 

Bradley, Nath.tn, killed, X., 127. 

Bradley, Richard, attorney-general of New York, asks for 
the repeal of certain acts relating to Oswego, V., 



94 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bra- 



Kradlcy, Richard — rontitiiied. 

899 ; and tliat the assembly be limited in their power 
to enact laws, 900 ; represents the colonial assemblies 
as aiming at independence, 901 ; a law passed to pay 
him a certain sum of money, 908 ; when appointed 
attorney-general of New York, 982; biographical 
notice of, VI., 17; recommended for a seat in the 
council, 119, 153; Mr. Smith recommended for the 
place of, 514; his letter on the arrest of James Parks 
on a charge of murder, 583 ; required to demand 
Parks' release, 584; Mr. Horsmanden denies that he 
applied for the office of, 600 ; dead, 73fi ; Jlr. Smith 
succeeds, 737, VII., 900. 

Bradley, Samuel, testifies respecting the manufacture of 
votes preparatory to an election iu JN'ew York, IV., 
128, 144, 179. 

Bradshaw, colonel, takes papers from the state paper office, 

III., XX. 

Bradshaw, George, sheriff' of Albany, III., 805, 816. 

Bradstreet (Bradchiet, Broadstreet, Broastrekk), John, at 
Albany, VII., 39 ; notifies sir William Johnson of the 
siege of Oswego, 104 ; his Indian name, 185 ; the 
French waiting for, 191 ; commands an expedition 
against the western Indians, 618, 863 ; arrives at 
Niagara, 648 ; marches to lake Erie, 649 ; imposed on 
by Pontiac's Indians, 656 ; on his way to Detroit, 
ibid, X., 1157; at Sandusky, VII., 660; sendscaptain 
Morris to the Illinois, 660, 863, X., 1158 ; concludes 
a treaty at Detroit, VII., 674 ; result of the expedi- 
tion under, 686 ; thoughts on Indian affairs by, 690 ; 
invites the western tribes to a conference at Detroit, 
781; presents a memorial to the lords of the trea- 
sury, 912; sued by his soldiers for their pay, 913; 
resident of Albany, 928 : his claim postponed, 942 ; 
petitions for a grant of part of the great Hardenberg 
patent, VIII., 268 ; opinion of the secretary of state 
on the application of, 272 ; mentioned, 285 ; purchases 
land at Popaghtuuk, 287 ; governor Tryon explains 
his action in the case of, 289 ; his claim referred to 
the privy council, 295 ; commands an expedition 
against fort Frontenac, 295, X., 823, 825, 826, 878, 879, 
883 ; the secretary of state expresses good will towards 
VIII., 347; extract of the secretary of state's des- 
patch regarding the Hardenburgh patent communi- 
cated to, 370; report of the board of trade on his 
petition for a confirmation of certain lands purchased 
from the Indians, 378 ; biographical notice of, 379 ; 
the board of trade bear testimony to the public ser- 
vices of, 380 ; in the expedition against Ticonderoga, 
X., 726 ; the French acknowledge the generosity 
of, 880 ; returns to fort Bull, 8SS ; at Oswego, 
1091. 

Bradstreet [Broadstreet], Simon, signs the treaty of Hart- 
ford, I., 612; a relative of Emanuel Downing, II. 
415 ; the lieutenant-governor and council of New 
York write to, III., 576 ; governor of Massachusetts, 
579 ; letter of, to the earl of Nottingham, 769. 

Braems, Geertruyt, II., 55. 



Brafort, lieutenant, killed at fort Grandville, Pennsylvania, 
X., 490. 

Brag, Philip, colonel of the 28th regiment, VII., 355, X., 680. 

Braggs, lieutenant, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 732. 

Braile, H. V., IV., 1135. 

Braiutree (Massachusetts), reverend Mr. Winslow oiFered the 
episcopal mission at, VII., 567; he visits, 592 ; pilots 
to Boston furnished at, X., 16. 

Bramston, doctor, V., 27. 

Brancas, marquis de, X., 463. 

Brancour. (See Beaucour.) 

Brand^-nburg, two ships belonging to, condemned, II., 359. 

Brandiho, goes to Canada on a war excursion, IV., 125. 

Brandt, Martin Jansz, bookseller, II., 551. 

Brandy, distilled on Staten island, I., 358 ; imported from 
Holland into New Netherland, 436; duty on, 635, 
III., 217; price of, in 1665, IX., 36; in 1683, 220; 
in 1690, 513; its mischievous effects on Indians, 
883 ; called milk, 1089. 

Brandywine, general Sullivan at the battle of the, VIII., 
677; major-general Stephen at the battle of the, 730; 
general Washington encamps at, 733; major-general 
Grant at the battle of, X., 903. 

Branford (Connecticut), VII., 439. 

Brank, Philip, junior, VI., 392. 

Branon, Sara, X., 882. 

Brant (Brandt), a Mohawk, persuaded to abandon his design 
of removing from New York to Canada, IV., 731; 
proposed to be sent to Canada to effect an exchange 
of prisoners, 994 : sir William Johnson fixes his quar- 
ters in Canajoharie, at the house of, VII., 378. 

Brant (Brandt), Joseph (Tayendanegah), attends the Indian 
congress at Onondaga, and reports its proceedings in 
writing by order of sir William Johnson, VIII., 519 ; 
Indian interpreter, 534 ; allusion to his being in Eng- 
land, 657, 815 ; his speech to lord George Germain, 
670, 678 ; about to return to America, 678 ; at Sta- 
ten island, 683; sent to stir up the Indians, 687; 
writes to Guy Johnson, 713 ; at Oswego, 719 ; com- 
plains of colonel John Butler, 719 ; declares for the 
king, 720 ; indefatigable in brigadier St. Leger's expe- 
dition, 724 ; destroys Schoharie, 752 ; operations of, 
758 ; on his march to Oswego, 779 ; translates the 
gospel of St. Mark into Mohawk, 817. 

Brant, Molly, sends intelligence of the approach of American 
relief to fort Stanwix, VIII., 721 ; driven out of 
her house and plundered, 725 ; Hies to Onondaga, 
ibid. 

Brant, Thomas, sent with a message to Onondaga, VII., 108 ; 
his report, 113 ; called wide-mouthed, sets off on an 
expedition to Canada, 199. 

Brants, Evert, flies from New Amstel to Maryland, II., 64. 

Brarate, Thomas, X., 882. 

Bras de fer. (See ChasUaufort.) 

Brasher (Brasier, Brazeer, Brazier), Abraham, one of captain 
Leisler's adherents. III., 683, 740, 743, 765, 811 ; un- 
der sentence of death, IV., 55; mentioned, 83, 212, 



-Bke] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



95 



Brasher (Brashier), Abraham, member of the general com- 
mittee of New York, VIII. , 601 ; lieutenant of a grena- 
dier company, ibid. 

Brashier, Philip, adjutant of a battalion of independent foot 
comjianies in New York, VIII., 601. 

Brass, Mr., land and tide waiter, VI., 435. 

Brasser, Govert, ambassador from the states general to Eng- 
land, I., 46, 47, 52, 53, 55, 59, 60, 82. 

Brasster, Simon. (See Brewster.) 

Brat, Anthony, IV., 754, 940, VI., 58. 

Brat, Barent, IV., 939. 

Brat, Daniel, IV., 755, 940. 

Brat, Dirk, IV., 940. 

Brat, Garrit, alderman at Albany, VI., 58. 

Bratt (Breat), Johannis, IV., 9.39; murdered, V., 281, 563. 

Brattle, James, a spy for governor Tryon, some of his acts, 
VIII., 645. 

Brattleborough (Vermont), governor Wentworth claims five 
hundred acres of land in, VII., 937; north of Massa- 
chusetts line, VIII., 381. 

Braty, John, IV., 941. 

Bran, Mr., IX., 995. 

Brauges, Barillon d'Amoncoiirt, marquis de. III., 505. (See 
Barillon.) 

Brazil, state of afifairs in, I., 34, 157 ; the West India Com- 
pany acquainted with the condition of, 37 ; the 
Dutch reduce the city of San Salvador in, 42 ; 
the king of Spain forced to send fleets to, 63 ; the 
Dutch possess the most important points in, 64; 
extent of, 66 ; settled by the Portuguese, ibid ; will be 
profitable to the Dutch if a stronger force be sent 
thither, 67 ; cannot be abandoned without loss of 
credit, 68; the interest of the Dutch endangered in, 
92; church discipline and schools neglected in, 106 ; 
trade to, proposed to be opened to the inhabitants of 
New Netherland, 136, 155 ; New Netherland capable 
of furnishing provisions to, 140, 152, 206 ; unpro- 
vided with requisites for trade, 142 ; negroes to he 
introduced into New Netherland from, 154; articles 
which New Netherland can send to and import from, 
155; improved by the introduction of negroes, 157; 
four councilors appointed for, ibid ; ships to be sent 
to, 158 ; clergymen to be allowed for, 163 ; names of 
Dutch vessels employed in, 164; differences of opin- 
ion respecting the opening of the trade to, 215 ; in- 
habitants of New Netherland allowed to export their 
produce to Angola and, ibid, 216 ; the expenditure 
and income of, for the year 1647, 217; a favorable 
point from which to attack the Spanish possessions 
in the West Indies and South sea, ibid ; a large force 
sent from Holland for the recovery of, 218 ; plan for 
the reduction of the expenses at, 219 ; and for defray- 
ing the expenses of the war in, 220; in 1643, the 
receipts exceeded the expenses in, ibid; trade to, 
opened, 222, 3G3 ; the West India Company reserved 
to itself in 1645 the trade to, 223 ; the duties received 
from imports appropriated to the payment of the mili- 
tary in, 230 ; the decline of the West India Company's 



affairs is owing to bad management in, 235, 246 ; 
means for the recovery of, 236 ; a large number of 
■slaves required on the recovery of, 243 ; suggestions 
regarding the slave trade to, 244 ; divers suggestions 
respecting, 245 ; amount of salaries paid monthly m, 
247 ; Mr. Melyn reports the imprisonment of the 
supreme council of, 322; the authorities to be en- 
couraged to defend, 378 ; the chamber at Groningen 
requests permission to send beef to, 381 ; trade to be 
encouraged between New Netherland and, 389 ; prizes 
may be carried to, 404; mentioned, 440 ; suggestions 
respecting trade to, 464 ; coasts of, how to be secured, 
482 ; memoir of the West India Company respecting, 
483; referred, 485, 487; admiral de Ruyter makes 
several voyages to, 582; the assembly of the XIX. 
makes certain proposals respecting, 613 ; Alexander 
Hinojossa formerly served in, 642 ; reverend Mr. Pol- 
hemns a minister in, II., 72; retained by Portugal, 
80; the Portuguese i-uin the Dutch in, 225 ; New Ne- 
therland expected to share the same fate as, ibid, 442 ; 
director Stuyvesant endeavors to justify himself by 
the example of, 504 ; the Dutch excluded from the 
trade between Portugal and, 511 ; reverend Mr. Mi- 
chselius a minister in, 763. 

Brazil-fashion, debts in New Nethei'land attempted to be 
paid, I, 429. 

Brazil wood, I., 63. 

Bread, not to be had in New Netherland except for beaver or 
coin, I., 386; riot at Montreal, X., 684. 

Breaking on the wheel, an instance of, in New York, V., 
341. 

Br6ard, M., forwards intendant Bigot's despatches to France, 
X., 309; returns to France, 310; comptroller of the 
navy at Quebec, convicted of malversation, 1126. 

Breasted, William, concerned in a riot in New Jersey, VI., 
346, 347. 

Brfiboeuf, M. de, resigns his commission, IX., 745. 

Brecknock, James Butler [12th], earl of, II., 562. 

Breda, Adriaen Van der Donck a native of, 1., 470; his 
grandfather one of the owners of the celebrated turf- 
boat of, 477 ; count d' Estrades, commissioner at 
the treaty of, II , 349 ; instruction to the Dutch 
plenipotentiaries at, 516 ; treaty of, mentioned, 529, 
III., 233, 450,451; peace of, II., 564; Nova Scotia sur- 
rendered to the French by the treaty of, IV., 476. 
(See Treaty.) 

Bredenbent, William, magistrate of Brooklyn, II., 375, 483. 

Bredieu, M. de, fights a'duel with count d' Estrades, II., 349. 

Bredin, captain Alexander, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 
730. 

Breedou (Bredin, Bredon), Thomas, his information res- 
pecting New England, III., 39, 40, 270; of Dublin, 
41 ; informed of the arrival of part of the English fleet 
at Piscattaway, 65 ; witness to an Indian treaty at 
Albany, 68 ; colonel Cartwright at the house of, 83, 
85, 88, 89, 94; forwards letters to New York, 84; 
mentioned, 160, 161. 

Breed's Hill, colonel Gridley lays out the works at, VII., 357. 



98 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bee- 



Bregiion, capttihi df, gallant oxiiloit of, X., 767. 

Brehen, Martha, IV., 764, 70.5. 

Breme, captain de la, killed at Tieonderoga, X., 7.t1, 799. 

Bremen, Mr. Van Beuningen sent envoy to, II., 350. 

Bremncr, George, VII., 905. 

Brenck, Jan, VI., 392. 

Brenck, Jan, junior, VI., 392. 

Brent, Mr., solicitor to the agents from Massachusetts, III., 
578. 

Brentnal, ensign Joseph, killed at lake George, VI., 1006. 

Brenton, Mr., collector at Boston, IV , 664, 775 ; the earl of 
Bellomont nrges the return to America of, 664, 685, 
776; absent in England, 776, 778, 792 ; his deputy a 
merchant, 779 ; empowered to act by deputy, 827 ; 
necessity for abolishing that clause in his commission, 
ibid; about to return to England, V., 32. 

Breslay, M. de., obtains a grant of laud near Montreal, IX., 

Bresle, reverend father, missionary to the Nepissings, IX., 
939 ; receives a pension, ibid. 

Bressen, Bruyn, IV., 941. 

Brest, William NicoU and Chidley Brook prisoners at, IV., 
509 ; a French squadron arrives in the West Indies 
from, VI., 181; the fleet from, defeated, VII., 427; 
a fleet for America recommended to be sent from, X., 
16; ships arrive in Canada from, 42, 50, 65, 171, 
380, 972; tiie French fleet blockaded in, 63; baron 
de Dieskau to embark at, 286 ; a vessel sails with des- 
patches from Quebec for, 310, 381 ; count de Bouvel 
taken prisoner on his way to, 385 ; the marquis de 
Vaudreuil arrives from Canada at, 1128. 

Bresteds, John, III., 743. 

Bret, Claus, brings intelligence to England of the reduction 
of Long Island by the English, II., 253 

Breteuil, Francois Vict. le Tonnelier, marquis de, minister of 
war, X., vii, 20. 

Breton, island of. (See Cape Breton) 

Breton, Mr., an officer of Annapolis (Xova Scotia), IX., 932. 

Bretonniere, lieutenant de la, IX , 235. 

Bretons, e.-vrly voyages of, IX., 913. 

Brett, Simon, IV., 1006. 

Brett, Timothy, IV., 936. 

Breuckelen, Adriaen van Tienhoven a native of, I , 602. 

Brevoort, Charlotte, marries Whitehead Hicks, VIII., 594. 

Brevoort, Hendrick, ensign of militia in New York, IV., 810. 

Brevoort, John, Whitehead Hicks marries a daughter of, 
VIII , 594. 

Brevoost, Hendrick Jansen van. III., 740. 

Brewers in New Netherland obliged to pay excise, I,, 212. 

Brewerton, George, clerk to lieutenant-governor Nicholson, 
III., 660. 

Brewerton, George, alderman of New York, VIII., 599. 

Brewster, George, custom-house officer. III., 609. 

Brewster, Nathaniel, II., 641. 

Brewster (Brasster), Simon, I., 461. 

Briandt, Antony, II., 105, 106. 

Briant, Francois, a settler on the island of St. John, X., 47; 
an Acadian, 127. 



Briar creek (South Carolina), VIII., 33. 

Bribery, legislative, early instance of, IV., 322. 

Brick, required from Holland, II., 18; makers, required on 
the Delaware, 21 ; manufactured in New Netherland, 
769 ; price of, in 1689, IV., 422. 

Brickley, William, IV , 1008. 

Bridge, reverend Christopher, some particulars respecting, 
IV., 582; refuses to sign a representation against 
governor Hunter, V., 316 ; signs an address to gov- 
ernor Hunter, 326 ; censures reverend Mr. Henderson, 



Bridgeman, sir Orlando, baronet, member of the board of 
trade, III., xvii, V., 823, 824, 834, 844, 846, 871, 
919, 931, 932, 934, 935, 936, 950, VI., 41, 70. 

Bridgeman, William, under-secretary of state. III., x, 362. 

Bridger, John, governor of Hudson's bay, conveyed to Ca- 
nada, IX., 797; returns to Hu'dson's bay, 801. 

Bridger (Bridges, Bridgier), John, surveyor of woods in 
America, IV., 314, V., 88, 188; at Piscataqua, IV., 
507; his opinion as to the expense of naval stores 
procured in New Hampshire, 531 ; freights a ship 
with timber from Piscattaway (New Hampshire), 593 ; 
manufactures tar in New Hampshire, 668 ; agent from 
the navy board, 671, 703 ; a ship builder by trade, 
671, 672 ; opposed in New Hampshire, 674, 678 ; his 
representation respecting the waste of timber in New 
Hampshh-e, 675 ; his opinion as to the quantity of 
tar a man is capable of making in a day, 70S ; sends 
specimens of timber to the dock yards in England, 
710, 722; he estimates for ship timber, 779, 785, 786, 
824 ; competent to superintend the manufacture of 
naval stores, V., 114; attends governor Hunter, 167; 
approves of the location chosen for the Palatines, 171 ; 
notice of, 175 ; applies for au increase of salary, 176 ; 
governor Hunter recommends that he be allowed 
an increase of salary, 181 ; the board of trade receive 
a report respecting tbe Palatines from, 188; his 
salary, 189 ; a farther allowance made to, 190 ; be- 
stows more attention to his private profit than to the 
public service, 211 ; declines coming to New York to 
instruct the Palatines, 241, 263, 449 ; governor Hun- 
ter ordered to investigate charges against, 264 ; ill 
character of, 301 ; further information required con- 
cerning, 334 ; governor Hunter complains of, 343 ; 
deserts his post, 347, 479. 

Bridges, in New England, a public charge, I., 364, 424. 
dges, Charles. (See Van Brugge, Carll.) 
.dges, Jolm, chief justice of New York, IV., 1119, 1136 ; 
succeeds William Smith, 1137; date of his ap- 
pointment, 1142; dead, V., 34; receives presents for 
lord Cornbury, 35 ; Roger Mompesson succeeds, 69, 
423 ; lord Cornbury procures bis appointment, 107 ; 
the warrant for his appointment signed before chief 
justice Attwood's removal, ibid; a large tract of land 
granted to, 110 ; interested in a patent of land in 
Bushwyck, 111, 407; a patentee in' all the valuable 
grants of land in New York, 406. 



— BroJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



97 



Bridges, widow, applies for the salary due her husband, 
IV., 1142; her case referred to the lord high treasu- 
rer, 1156; interested in land in Bushwick, V., 407, 
Bridgetown (Barbadoes), the seat of colonel Lewis Morris, 

II., 619. 
Bridgewater [John Egerton, 3d] earl of, member of tlie 

privy council. III., 166, 229, 230, 257, 357, 360. 
Bridgewater [John Egerton, 4th] earl of, member of the 
board of trade. III., xv, IV., 101, 146, 167, 246, 258, 
261, 262, 264, 283, 298, 300, 360, 414, 436, 456, 466, 
471, 475, 478, 486 ; member of the privy council, 103. 
Bridgman's fort, where, X., 51. 

Brief deduction of the advantages conferred on the United 
Netherlands by the West India Company, I., 62; an- 
swer to some of the points contained in the remon- 
strance from New Netherland, 422. 
Brief history (a) of the Pequot war, by John Mason, men- 
tioned, VIII., 353. 
Brief state (a) of the province of Pennsylvania, reverend doc- 
tor Smith author of, VII., 416. 
Brief view (a) of the conduct of Pennsylvania, reverend doc- 
tor Smith author of, VII., 416. 
Briel, generals Veer and Conway governor and lieutenant- 
governor of, I., 3. 
Briell (Bryel), Toussein, II., 250, III., 74. 
Brienen, Mr., member of the states general, I., 10. 
Bries, Anthony, IV., 754, 940. 
Brillant, Fran9ois, X., 68. 

Brindamour, , scalped and his wife killed, X., 98. 

Brinkerhoff, Abraham, member of the general committee of 

New York, VIII., 601. 
Brisac, reverend Mr., IV., 1182. 
Brisbren, William, IV., 938. 
Brissel, John, IV., 1008. 
Brisson, Pierre, a French pilot in the English service, X 

47; taken prisoner, 57; sent to Quebec, 58. 
Bristol [George William Hervey, 2d] earl of, his brother at 
the siege of Niagara, X., 989. (See Hervey, honorable 
William'.) 
Bristol (England), Dutch ships ordered to be sold at, II., 
338; sir Ferdinand Gorges at. III., 18; sir Robert Carr 
dies at, 161 ; vessels bound to Virginia from, 210 ; 
the French capture an English vessel off, IV., 1063 ; 
the Elizabeth galley sails from New York for, V., 64; 
the ship Don Carlos sails from New York for, 888 ; 
mentioned, VI., 504; Thomas Seeker. bishop of, 906; 
John Robinson bishop of, VII., 363 ; Mr. Cruger 
represents, 843; lord Clare represents, 899. 
Bristol (Pennsylvania), a church begun at, IV., 1077. 
Bristol (Rhode Island), IV., 615. 
Bristow, doctor, a room fitted in King's college. New York 

for the library of, VII., 441. 
Bristow, John, IV., 53. 
Bristow, William, IV., 1008. 

Britache, captain le, wounded at Tieonderoga, X., 751, 799. 
Britannia, Camden's, referred to, IV., 503. 
British regiments. (See Army.) 
Brittain, Nathaniel, junior, IV., 942. 

13 



Brittain, William, IV., 942. 
Brittan, Nathaniel, IV., 942. 

Brittany, bishop Pont Briand a native of, VI., 483 ; Louia 
Phelypeaux president of the parliament of, IX., 503; 
ship Arethuse captured off the coast of, X., 385. 
Britten, Benjamin, IV., 942. 
Broadbay (Maine), burnt, X., 48. 
Broadey (Brody), John, IV., 936, 1006. 
Broadhead, Daniel, III., 68, 150 ; suspended from office, 149. 
Broadhelp, captain Benjamin, VIII., 487. 
Broadhurst, Jonathan, sheriff of Albany, IV., 896, 899, 903, 

904, 911. 
Broehet, le, an Ottawa chief, IX., 780. 

Brockholes (Breakholes, Broekhells, Brockholst, Brockles, 
BrohoUs, Brokholes), lieutenant Anthony, III., 219, 
220 ; sent to Pemaquid, 248 ; to succeed governor 
Andros, 283; appointed receiver-general, 289 ; the duke 
of York writes to, 291 ; letter of the duke of York to, 
292 ; captain, 304, 352 ; purchases the tiles of the hos- 
pital, 307, and stockadoes for the fort, 311 ; purchases 
a lot of ground in New York, 312 ; advised of the duke 
of York's intention to grant New York an assembly, 
317 ; advised of the appointment of colonel Dongan to 
be governor of New York, 330 ; of governor Dongau's 
council, 369, 416 ; major, 407, 410, 618, 721 ; quar- 
rels with collector Santen, 414 ; necessity of his being 
at Albany, 420 ; accompanies governor Dongan to 
Albany, 475 ; trades to Newfoundland, 493 ; of sir 
Edmund Andros' council, 543 ; returns to New York 
from Boston, 600 ; visits lieutenant-governor Nichol- 
son at Neversineks, 601 ; one of his company joins 
captain Leisler, 609 ; a profest papist, 657 ; letter of 
Edward Randolph to, 664; not allowed to vote in 
New York, being a papist, 674 ; forced to quit New 
York, 716, 721 ; Mr. Van Cortland makes advances 
to the soldiers of, 718 ; returned as one of the Roman 
catholics residing in New Y'ork, IV., 166 ; letter of, 
to governor de la Barre, IX., 199. 
Brockhols, Mrs., III., 587. 
Brockville (Canada West), X., 349. 
Brodhead, Charles, IV., 938, 1006, 1010. 
Brodhead, John R. {See Agent ; Introduction.) 
Brodhead, Richard, IV., 941, 1010. 
Brodie, doctor James, IV., 389. (See Broadey.) 
Broen, Bonaventure, I., 492. 
Broers (Broersen), Jan, II., 180, 627. 
Broglio, count de, V., 920; French ambassador at London, 

IX., 1029. 
Bromadge, captain R. N., commands his majesty's sloop 

Savage, VIII., 675. 
Bromley, William, secretary of state, III., viii. 
Bronck, John P., VL, 392. 
Bronck, John T., VI., 392. 

Bronck, Jonas, peace made with the Wicquaesgeckers at the 
house of, I., 199, 410. 

Bronckhorst, sir , offers to raise a regiment at his own 

expense for the Dutch, I., 50. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[t{Et>~ 



Broncksland, Lewis Morris settles at, 11., 619 ; mentioaed, 
664. 

Bronk, Jan, IV., 939. 

Bronk, Jenas, VI., 392. 

Bronk, Peter, IV., 940. 

Brook (Brooke, Brooks), Chidley, member of gorernor 
Sloughter's council, III., 085 ; arrives in New York, 
757; one of the council of New York, 793, 800, 813, 
814, 818, 837, IV., 33, 100, 284; captain Thomas 
Clarke makes an affidavit before, 12 ; collector of New 
York, 25, 173, 305,, 519; sent to Boston, 38 ; report 
of his mission to Boston, 58 ; agent for the province 
of New York, 149, 150, 199, 216, 255, 258, 509 ; taken 
by the French, 159, 171 ; despatches sent by, 165 ; 
presents a memorial on the state of the province of 
New York, 166; memorials of, 171, 172, 244, 254; 
a witness for governor Fletcher, 179,180,468,480; 
representation of the state of Indian allairs in New 
York by William KicoU and, 181 ; plan of, for secur- 
ing New York, 183 ; proceeding of the lords of trade 
thereupon, 185 ; one of lieutenant-governor Leisler's 
judges, 198, 325 ; sent to summon the fort at New 
Yoik, 214; cannot give any information respecting 
the amount of stores in New York, 231 ; letter of gov- 
ernor Fletcher to, 246, 249 ; in England, 253 ; receiver- 
general, 254 ; the earl of Bellomont accuses, 303, 317, 
319 ; acts as naval officer, 304 ; suspended from the 
council and from office, 321, 354, 620, 623 ; further 
particulars of, 322 ; commissioners appointed to exe- 
cute the office of, 324; charges against, 355, 356, 357 ; 
returns to England, 377 ; agent of the discontented in 
New York, 378; cognizant of smuggling, 381, 397; 
constrained with difficulty to act against pirates, 389 ; 
the earl of Bellomont commended for suspending, 
395 ; reasons for the su.spension of, 399 ; suspension 
of, confirmed, 411, 424 ; the earl of Bellomont exposes 
a scheme of, 416 ; accused of being corrupt, 417, 418, 
537,538; balance against, 423 ; deeply involved, 438; 
the earl of Bellomont transmits to the lords of the 
treasury infonnation respecting, 452 ; Indians return- 
ed from England under the care of, 455, 521 ; gives 
an aceount of the trade of New York, 471 ; admits 
that no pirates were prosecuted in the time of gover- 



nor Fletcher, 481 ; one of gov 



Fletche 



syc 



phants, 523 ; sent to England with money to procure 
an order to the earl of Bellomont to pass a bill of 
indemnity, 524 ; predicts the carl of Bellomont's dis 
grace, 525 ; his antecedents, ibid ; the earl of Bello 
mont prepares charges against, 526 ; amount of reve 
nue collected yearly by, 721 ; expected to be brought 
in debt to the king, 829 ; one of the committee 
fees, V.,21G. 

Brooke [Fulke Greville, 1st] lord, member of the privy 
council. III., 5. 

Brooke (Brook) [Robert Greville, 2d] lord, killed at Litch- 
field, I., 127. 

Brooke and Warwick [Francis Greville, 1st] earl of, VIII., 
321. 



Brookes (Broekes),- Abraham,, IV., 937, 1007. 

Brookes, reverend Mr., flies from Elizabethtown and is 
drowned, IV., 1077. 

Brookfield (Brockfil) (Massachusetts), Indian name of, IV., 
616 ; mentioned, 617; cut off by the French, X., 35. 

Brookliaven (Long island), formerly called Asfort, II., 400 ; 
deputies to Jamaica from, 534; militia officers of, 
IV., 808 ; William Smith removes to, 1137; empow- 
ered to elect two constables, VI., 161; reverend 
Thomas Standard, first episcopal minister at, 1018 ; 
reverend Mr. Lyons, minister of, VII., 397, 454; 
governor Try on reviews the militia at, VIII., 693. 

Brooklyn (Brenckelen, Breuekle, Breukelen, Broockine, 
Brookland, Brouc-kland), a Dutch village on Long 
island, I., 285, 360, 544, 565, II., 134, 136 ; founders of 
the town of, I., 340 ; unites in sending Vander Donck, 
to Holland, 476; Flatbush between Amersfort and, 
498 ; joins in a remonstrance to director Stuyvesant, 
553 ; not represented in the meeting of delegates at 
Middleborg, II., 159; names of magistrates of, 375, 
4S2, 483, 577 ; riotous conduct of captain Scott and 
his men at, 404 ; the English flag hoisted at, ibid j 
a salute fired for director Stuyvesant at, 460 ; powder 
issued to, 463 ; reduced by the Dutch, 573 ; the 
magistrates of, sworn, 580 ; ordered to assist in forti- 
fying New Orange, 586 ; the oath of allegiance to be 
administered to the people of, 589 ; population in 
1673 of, 596 ; the magistrates of, take the oath of alle- 
giance, 643 ; militia officers of, 646 ; deputies from, 
702; mentioned, 229, 374, 401, 407, 443, 472, 479, 
488, 620, 659, 673, 696, 709, III., 597; Henricus 
Selys, minister at, 646 ; an act passed for a road from 
the ferry towards, V., 631 ; the 42d regiment in the 
battle of, VII., 786; colonel Hand leaves a graphic 
account of the retreat from, VIII., 712 ; lord Rawdon 
at the battle of, 734 ; a large fort built at, 792. (See 
Ferry, The.) 

Brooks (Broukx), Baker, member of the council of Mary- 
land, II., 94. 

Broom, .Tolm, member of the general committee of New- 
York, VIII., 600. 

Broom, Samuel, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601 ; captain of the Union comjiany, 
602 ; enters New York with an armed force from 
Connecticut, 646. 

Broome county ^New York), early missions in, VII.. 
Indian village in, 50. 

Broose, John, IV., 163. 

Brosard, Joseph, outlawed, X., 155. 

Broterton, Anne, X., 882. 

Broughton, Sampson, report of the lords of trade oi 

c.ise of, v., 49 ; a barrister of the Middle Temple, 
50 ; ought to have been admitted to the office of 
attorney-goner.il of New York, 51 ; an act passed to 
divide L-ind of, VI., 29. 
Broughton, Sampson Shelton, appointed attorney-general of 
New York, IV., 667 ; his memorial to the lords of trade, 
683 ; experiences some difficulties at the treasury, 700 ; 



49; 



the 



— l&&u] 



G^ENERAL INBEX. 



Breugliton, Sampson Slielton — contimicd. 

letter of introduction furnished to, on his departure 
for New York, 852; arrives there, 913; applies for 
the place of surveyor-general for his eldest son, 914 ; 
'lieutenant-gevernor Nanfan complains of, 944; called 
to the council, 9j5 ; chief justice Atwood complains 
of, 956; presented by the grand jury, ibid; restored 
■to his office, 963 ; orders received to restore, 1017 ; 
was net suspended but threatened with suspension, 
1018, 1020 ; requests a renewal of his commission, 
1021 ; inactive in the service of the crown, 1022 ; Mr. 
Atwood proposes to present articles against, 1023 ; 
complains of governor Dudley, 1108 ; and of collector 
Byerly, 1109 ; dead, 1136 ; dies in office, V., 43 ; a 
barrister of the Middle Temjile, 51. 

Broughtou, Thomas, governor of South Carolina, nctice of, 
VI., 91. 

Brouillan (Brouillant, Brouillon), M., governor of Port 
Royal, dead, V., 43, IX, 803; despatches a vessel 
from the river St. John to France, 735 ; complained 
of, 738; commeuces hostilities in Acadia, 748; abstract 
of his despatches, 922, 923. 

Brouillant, St. Ovide de. (See St. Ovidc.) 

Brouncker, Henry, member of the council for foreign plan- 
tations, III., 191, 192. 

Brouriker, William (2d] viscount, member of the -council 
for trade, III., 31. 

Brouwer, Jan, 11., 249. 

Brouwer, Peter Clemeutsen, I., 11, 

Brouwershaveii, I., 541. 

Brower, Jacob, murdered, IX., 1019. 

Browford, carpenter, X., 881. 

Brown, captain, lieutenant-governor Nicholson sojourning 
with, III., 601 ; commands a company in New York, 
602. (See Dc Bruyn.) 

Brown, Hugh, X., 593. 

Brown, reverend Isaac, minister of Brookhaven, VII., 397. 

Brown, James, married Governor Markham's daughter, IV., 
301, 646. 

Brown, John, esclianged, X., 883. 

Brown, lieutenant John, at Quebec, X., 1097 ; notice of, ibid. 

Bi'own, lieutenant Robert, attends a conference at Canajo- 
harie, VII., 380 ; captiiin, in command at fort Niagara, 
VIII., 300. 

Brown, reverend Mr., minister at Newark, New Jersey, 
VII., 410. 

Brown, Nicies, II., 608. 

Brown, Richard, ensign of the militia of Southold, IV., 808. 

Brown, Thomas, exch.inged, X., 881. 

Brown, Timothy, carried prisoner to Canada, X., 44. 

Brown, William, junior, member of governor Andros' coun- 
cil, III., 543. 

Brown, , a bookseller in Philadelpliia, VIII., 568. 

Browne, honorable Arthur, biographical notice of, VII., 846 ; 
colonel, VIII., 766. 

Browne, reverend Arthur, minister of Portsmouth, N. H., 
publishes a pamphlet in answer to Jonathan Mayhew's 
reflections on the church of England, VII., 537. 



Browne, doctor, vice-chancellor of Oxford university, asked 
to confer a degree on reverend Henry Barclay, of New- 
York, VII., 451. 

Browne, George, III., 600, 601, 602. 

Browne, John, I., 461. 

Browne, Josiah, killed, 111., 765. 

Browne, Mr., of Maryland, II., 90, SI. 

Browne, Nicholas, IV., 938, 1008. 

Browne, Richard, farmer of the customs, III., 181. 

Browne, William, magistrate of Graveseiid, Long island, 
II., 156. 

Browne, William, deputy register of the court of admii-alty, 
v., 429. 

Browning, lieutenant-colonel William, commandant at Nia- 
gara, VII., 653; wounded at Ticonderoga, X , 730. 

Brewnists, the, I., 431. 

Bronx river, the Americans defeated at, VIII., 717. 

Bruokel (Holland), I., 467, 468. 

Brucy (Brussy), major, letter of, to major Baxter, III., 455; 
accompanies count Frontenac to lake Ontario, IX., 
112, 113; attends a council at Quebec, 194. 

Brudenell, Francis, lord, VI., 97. 

Brudenell, honorable James, member of the board of trade, 
III., xvii, v., 919, 923, 931, 932, 933, 934, 935, 950, 
VI., 33, 35, 41, 97, 129, 130, 157, 169, 200, 201, 214, 
220, 254, 279 ; notice of, 97. 

Bruere, George S., governor of Bermuda, VII., 948. 

Brueya, Claude, IV., 935, 

Bruininx, M., I., 216. 

Briilart. (See Puisiemx.) 

Bruler, Barberry, X., 883. 

Brundige, , interpreter to the Stookbridgo Indians, soms 

partici"Jars respecting, VII., 886. 

Brunet, Mr., IX., 278. 

Brunswick, prince Ferdinand of, passes the Rhine, VII., 345. 

Brunswick, prince Lewis of, delivers a declaration in favor 
of peace to the ministers of the several powers at the 
Hague, VII., 418. 

Brunswick (Maine), fort George at, V., 59S, IX., 905. 

Brush-field, Mr., goes to England, V., 256. 

Brusie (Bruises), Hendrick, riot in serving a writ of eject- 
ment on, VII., 206. 

Brussels, II., 535, 599. 

Bruyas (Brias, Brouas, Brouyas, Bruas, Bruy), reverend 
Jacques, S. J., an intercepted letter from father de 
Lamberville to, III., 488; promised to be sent to 
Oneida, IV., 498 ; sent with the king's letter to the 
earl of Bellomont, 607, 788, IX., 704 ; applies for 
leave to go among the five nations, IV., 607; sir 
Edmund Andros very civil to, ibid ; a Jesuit, 618 ; 
suspected of being a spy, 645 ; proposes to live at 
Onondaga, 659 ; visits Onondaga, 689, 730, 739, 888, 
891, 897 ; speaks the Indian language as well as he 
does French, 689 ; the earl of Bellomont too nimble 
for, 714 ; sojourns at Albany, 715 ; a message con- 
veyed to Onondaga by, 737 ; what he said at Onon- 
daga, 741, 742 ; says the governor of New York keeps 
the five nations in tho dark, 743; his return from 



100 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bkij— 



Bmjas, reTerend Jacques, 3. 3. — continued. 

Onondaga expected, 748 ; risits the five nations, 749 ; 
the five nations wamed against, 897; superior of 
Saiilt St. Lonis, IX., 239, 495 ; spokesman for the 
French at La Famine, 243; well acquainted with 
Arnold Cornells Viele,257; informs count de Fronte- 
nac that the ilohawks are disposed to peace, 515 ; 
invited back by the Iroquois, 709 ; allowed to go to 
the Iroquois, 711 ; reports his success, ibid ; informs 
gOTernor Galliferes of the earl of Bellomont's opposi- 
tion to the Jesuits, 713 ; returns with deputies from 
the Iroquois, 715 ; opposed by English agents at 
Onondaga, 71G; well treated by the Iroquois, 717; 
biographical notice of, 720 ; assures the Iroquois that 
the peace is general, 747 ; governor Vaudreuil con- 
firms the assurance of, 748 ; missionary to the Mo- 
hawks, 762; extract of a letter from, 792; father 
Lafitan succeeds hira at Sault St. Louis, 882. 

Bruyn, Abraham Jansen, II., 191. (See De Bruyn.) 

Bmynings, Christina, II., 187, 189, 193. 

Bmyns, Jan Hendricksen, II., 617. 

Bryan, Mr., a merchant of Milford (Counecticnt), II., 385 ; 
accompanies the Dutch commissioners to Hartford, 
386. 

Bryant, captain, about going to England, VI., 151 ; a con- 
stant trader from New York, 158. 

Bryaxe, reverend father, his statement respecting the influ- 
ence of the Jesuits in China, III., 474. 

Buccaneers capture Pentagouet, IX., 119; plunder fort St. 
Jolm, 793; sheltered in Boston, ibid. 

Buchanan, captain John, defeats a party of Indians, VI., 
230, 236. 

Buchanan, Moses, surgeon, V., 916 ; practised in New York, 
917. 

Buchanan, Thomas, member of the general committee of 
New York, Vni., 601. 

Buckingham, George ViUiers 1st duke of, murdered, II., 
118 ; one of the grantees of New England, III., 42. 

Buckingham, George [VUliers 2d] duke of, member of the 
council for foreign plantations. III., sir, 190, 191, 
192; member of the privy council, 166, 177; master 
of the horse, 190. 

Buckingham [George GrenviUe 1st] marquis of, VII., 899. 

Buckinghamshire [John Hobart 1st] earl of, member of the 
privy council, VL, 757. 

Buck island (lake Ontario), VIII., 719. 

Bnckmaster, Edward, a tavern keeper in New York, III., 
586, 600 ; committed to the fort by captain Leisler, 
673 ; participates in resistance to Leisler, 740, 743 ; 
accompanies captain Kidd to Madagascar, IV., 551; 
revolts, and is imprisoned at New York, ibid ; escapes 
and flies to New Jersey, 766. 

Bnckmaster, Mrs., a bigamist, IV., 760. 

Bnckmaster, Nathaniel, III., 600. 

Buckwheat, samples of, sent from New Netherland to Hol- 
land, I., 37. 

Budge, Richard, the board of trade make a report on his 
complaint against lord Combury, V., 26 ; his case, 27. 



Budget, The, Thomas Whately author of, VIII., 277. . 

Budmond, ensign, requests his discharge, IX., 745. 

Bnell, reverend Samuel, biographical notice of, VIII., 693. 

Euenaire, Peter Stuyvesant director of, I., 178; trade to, 
regulated, 223 ; a dependency of New Netherland, 492. 
(See Bonaire ) 

Bueno, Joseph, IV., 1135 ; a Jew of New York, 1144. 

Buenos Ayres, the English expelled from the Falkland 
islands by the government of, VIII., 246. 

Buffalo river, present name of, IX., 886. 

Buffaloes, on the south shore of lake Erie, IX., 885 ; in Illi- 
nois, 890 ; frequent the Miamis river, 891 ; advan- 
tages from domesticating, X., 230. 

Buffe, Robert, IV., 936. 

Bugeaude, Am.and, the English burn the house of, VI., 478. 

Buisset, reverend Luke, 0. S. F., IX., 236. 

Bulkely (Bulkley), reverend Gershom (Greshem), his objec- 
tions against the government of Connecticut, III., 849 ; 
a letter of, referred to, IV., 56; his standing, 72; 
I author of "TlieOoom, or Miseries of Connecticut," 

1062. 

Bvilkley (Buckley), John, deposes in colonel Fletcher's case, 
IV., 463 ; bad character of, 473, 485 ; second lieuten- 
ant in the earl of Bellomont's company, 761 ; his 
exchange urged, 816 ; countermanded, 818. 

Bulkley (Buckley), Peter, agent for Massachusetts, III., 266, 
267 ; member of governor Andros's council, 543. 

Bull, captain, makes peace with the Indians, III., 621; in 
command at Albany, 693, 705 ; the government of 
Connecticut requested not to recall, ibid, 696 ; re- 
called, 701. 

Bull, David, constable of Saybrook, III., 3S6. 

Bull, Joseph, member of the general committee of New York, 
VIII., 601. 

Bull, lieutenant, commands fort Bull, X., 403 ; refuses to 
surrender and is killed, 404. 

Bull, William, notice of, VI., 210; lieutenant-governor of 
South Carolina, VIII., 33; removes intruders off the 
Indian lands, 34. 

Bull, William, junior, commissioner to a meeting of the five 
nations, VI., 717; Indian name of, 719 ; his confer- 
ence with those Indians, 721, 724. 

Bullet, Thomas, biographical notice of, VIll., 395 ; his 
bravery near fort Duquesne, X., 903. 

Bulletin of the most important operations in Canada, X., 
697. 

Bullmar (BuUman), James, IV., 936, 1008. 

Bullock, family of, referred to, VII., 403. 

Bullogne. (See BouUongne.) 

Bulls, English, their sale in New Netherland to be forbidden, 
I., 203; necessary in New Netherland, 368. 

Bulsing, Curlis, IIL, 743. 

Bunckley, John, governor of Antegoa, III., 45. 

Bunker, , Indians repulsed in an attack on the house of, 

IX., 614. 

Bunker hill, lieutenant-colonel Abercrombie killed at, VII., 
160; an action at, VIII., 598; the 23d British regi- 
ment at the battle of, 684 ; sir Henry Clinton at the 



-BtJE] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



101 



Bunker hill — continued. 

battle of, 717 ; lord Kawiion at the battle of, 734 ; 
major-general Howe commands at, 751 ; colonel John 
Starke at the battle of, 806. 

Bunt (Bandt), The, an Onondaga sachem, VII., 91, 234; 
goes to Canada, 234 ; attends the congress at Canajo- 
harie, 378 ; welcomes lieutenant Johnson to Onon- 
daga, 512 ; alias Teiwarunt, attends the conference at 
Ontario, 859, 861 ; assists at the treaty of fort Stan- 
wix, VIII., 113; attends the congress at the German 
flatts, 228 ; attends a conference at Johnstown, 496, 
497; advanced in age, 506. 

Buoys proposed to be laid in Delaware bay, II., 50. 

Burbien, , a public messenger, VI., 421. 

Burch, Albertus Conrad, a partner in the colonic of Rens- 
selaerswyck, I., 407. 

Burch, Mr., member of congress, VIII., 789. 

Burchett (liarchett), J., secretary of the admiralty, lord Corn- 
bury complains of captain Miles to, IV., 1184; pro- 
mises to investigate the charges against captain Miles, 
1188; orders captain Miles to obey lord Cornbury's 
orders, 1189 ; a copy of his letter to captain Miles 
sent to lord Cornbury, V., 1 ; advises secretary Top- 
ple that lord Cornbury has no right to appoint officers 
to command his majesty's ships on the New York 
station, 4 ; receipt of his letter acknowledged, 7 ; in- 
forms the secretary of the board of trade that the 
lord high admiral has no objection to the colors pro- 
posed for privateers, 40 ; his answer to lord Cornbury's 
letters not received, 60 ; reports the action of the 
admiralty on the memorial of William Polhampton, 
198 ; mentioned, 262. 

Burdoin, John, IV., 942. 

Burger, Elias, III., 742. 

Burger, George, III., 600. 

Burger, John, III., 678. 

Burgesse, Samuel, a pirate, recommended for a pardon, IV., 
307,360; pardoned, 412; makes a deposition in the 
case against colonel Fletcher, 456, 467, 479 ; engaged 
in the Madagascar trade, 542 ; the earl of Bellomont, 
writes to captain Kidd by, 815, 816. 

Burgh, Albert Kounraat, I., 89, 618, II., 21, 119, 120, 122, 
123, 189, 195. 

Burgomasters and Schepens, the municipal government of 
New Amsterdam to consist of a sheriff and, I., 391 ; 
to be appointed over the colonie on the South river, 
621, 632. 

Burgoyne, lieutenant-general John, major Skene accom- 
panies, VIII., 416 ; sir John Johnson joins, 682, 725 ; 
at Ticonderoga, 714; sir Henry Clinton attempts to 
form a junction with, 717 ; his Indians fitted out at 
Montreal, 718 ; the Canadian Indians sent with, 719 ; 
orders brigadier St. Leger to join him, 722 ; the 
Indians abandon, 725; the Mohawks join, 727; his 
cannon at Farmington, 784 ; major-general Phillips 
accompanies, 790. 

Burgundy [Louis de Bourbon], duke of, commands the 
French army in Germany, X., 941. 



Burgundy, the dairymen of, formerly gave trouble to their 
prince, IX., 226. 

Burhans, Jan, II., 626, IV., 941, 1010. 

Burials, no registry, of, kept in tlie province of New York, 
v., 340 ; and christenings, a return of, ordered, 777. 

Burke, Edmund, attends tlie board of trade as agent of New 
York, VIII., 320 ; M. Lotbiniire notified of the action 
of, 321 ; informs the secretary of the board of trade 
of the points on which he wishes to be heard by 
counsel before tiieir lordships, 378 ; his salary as 
agent of the province of New York, 456; the petition 
of the New York assembly to the king delivered to 
the earl of Dartmoirth by, 574; ]iublishes observa- 
tioirs on a late state of the nation, 803. 

Burke, Richard, V., 832. 

Burke, "William, under-secretary of state. 111., xii. 

Burleigh, lord, sir William Cecil created. III., vi. 

Burling, Edward, IV., 93.% 1006. 

Burling, Lancaster, member of the genei-al committee of 
New York, VIII., 601. 

Burlington [Charles Boyle 2d] earl of, member of the 
privy council, IV., 961. 

Burlington (New Jersey), III., 223, 567, 716, IV., 200; a free 
port, 305, 318; in West Jersey, 314; goveruOE Bass 
■writes from, 542; pirates in jail at, 551 ; queen Anne 
proclaimed at, 960, 901 ; the assembly to sit at, 1075, 
1083, v., 481, 872; reverend John Talbot, minister 
of, IV., 1077, 1182, v., 315, 473; lord Cornbur-y 
intends going to meet the assembly at, IV., 1090; 
his lordship prevented from meeting the assembly at, 
1120; lieuterrant-governor Ingoldsby at, 1131, 1163; 
difficirlty of having a meeting of the assembly at, 
1148, 1149, 1170 ; name of the ejjiscopal church at, 
1155 ; distance of, from New York, 1162 ; lord Corn- 
bury at, 11C4, V , 61 ; lieutenant-governor Ingoldesby 
ordered to, IV., IIO.'); articles taken in execution 
from quakei-s fill a house at, V., 36 ; the assembly of 
New Jersey meet at, 164 : acts passed providing for 
the meeting of the legislatiii-e at, 170, 171, 182, 461 ; 
an act passed relating to the marshes near, 206 ; the 
sessions of the legislature ordered to be held alter- 
nately at Amboy and, 207 ; governor Hunter at, 235 ; 
reverend Jacob "Henderson missionary at, 315, 335; 
a house and land purchased in, for the society for 
propagating the gospel, 316; provided with a jail, 
319 ; the people of, refu.se to hear reverend Mr. Hen-^ 
derson, 337; Messrs. Cox and Huddy give bad' 
examples to, 338.; Mr. Bass, surveyor of the customs 
at, 349 ; the pirblic record.s of New Jersey seized at, 
420; foundation of St. Mary's church at, laid, 473; 
injirstice of fixing the sessions of the legislatirre at, 
508; governor Burnet meets the assembly of New 
Jersey at, 584; William Trenton member of assembly 
from, 705 ; misconduct of the sheriff of, 767 ; popu- 
lation of the county of, in 1726, 819 ; a printing press 
set trp at, VIII., 221. 
Burlington (Vermont), IV., 575. 

I Burman, lieutenant, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 732. 



102 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Bur— 



Barman, Robert, III., 323, 323. 

Euriiet, Gilb.Tt, l.islio|. of S:inim, confession of lord Roch- 
ester to, 11., 358; lueiilioued, III., 654, 700. (See 
SarumA 

Eumet, WillUim, closes reverend Mr. Talbot's clinrth, V., 
473; apjjointcd governor of New York and New Jer- 
sey, 53e, 537; drafts of his commission prepared, 
538 ; a draft of his instructions submitted, 541 ; 
about to sail for New York, 548 ; presents a memo- 
rial to the board of trade on the settlement of a reve- 
nue in New York and New Jersey, 551 ; the case of 
the Palatines referred to, 570, 60] ; arrives in New 
York, 572, and publishes his commission, 573 ; re- 
ports the result of the legislative session of 1720, 576 ; 
his plan for securing the western trade, 577 ; quarrels 
with Peter Schuyler, 578 ; recommends Messrs. Col- 
den and Alexander for seats in the council, 579 ; pur- 
poses visiting the Indian couutry as far as Niagara, 
ibid ; copy of tlie petition of the Palatines transmitted 
to, 581, and also of brigadier Hunter's and lieutenant- 
governor Spotswood's letters, 582 ; dissolves the New 
Jersey assembly, 585 ; transmits a journal of a French 
priest to the lords of trade, 586 ; the revenue voted 
for five years under, 601, 878, VI., 433, 640 ; forms a 
plan for building a fort at the falls of Niagara, V., 
62.5 ; transmits a list of acts passed by the New York 
legislature in 1721, 630 ; encourages a settlement at 
Tirandaquat, 632 ; builds a block iiouse at the carry- 
ing place to Canada, 633 ; allows Palatines to settle 
near Little Falls, 634 ; marries Miss van Home of New 
Y'ork, 640 ; transmits information respecting the rev- 
enue acts of New York, 643, and calls for two addi- 
tional companies of soldiers, 644; recommended to 
obtain payment of the arrears due to the late earl 
of Bellomont, 645 ; recommends changes in the coun- 
cil of New York, 649 ; transmits a draft of the par- 
tition act, with the surveyor-general's observations, 
to the board of trade, 650 ; the board of trade recom- 
mend that he be instructed to obtain the passage 
of an act vacating certain extravagant grants of land 
in New Y'ork, 653 ; transmits minutes of his con- 
ference with the Indians, 655 ; his efforts to secure 
the western trade for New York, 656 ; minutes of 
conferences held with the Indians, 657, 713, 786 ; 
transmits accounts of vessels cleared at New York, 
681 ; reports acts passed by the New York assembly 
in 1722, 682 ; reports his success in settling a tiade 
■with the far Indian.*, 684 ; projjoses to build a fort in 
western New York, 685; calls the attention of the 
board of trade to a misunderstanding respecting the 
boundary between Connecticut and New York, 698 ; 
transmits titles of acts passed in New Y'ork in 1723, 
700 ; persuades the five nations to wage war against 
the eastern Indians, 704 ; reports the progress of the 
Indian trade, 710; reports particulars respecting In- 
dians sent to the Weat Indies, 711 ; obtains permission 
from the Indians to build a trading house at the 
mouth of the Ououdaga river, 712, 734; transmits 



Cadwallader Colden's history of the fur trade and 
other papers to the government in England, 725, 
726 ; hi.s ideas on the subject of paper money, 736 ; 
refers the petition of the London merchants on the 
subject of the Indian trade to the commissioners for 
Indian affairs at Albany, 740 ; complained of for 
]ninting certain papers on the Indian trade, 745 ; 
excuses himself for having done so, 756 ; the board 
of trade receive a letter from, in answer to the com- 
plaint of certain merchants about the Indian trade, 
760 ; called on for certain returns, 763 ; writes to the 
duke of Newcastle on the subject of the petition 
against the Indian trade acts, 764 ; and on Mr. Wal- 
pole's complaints, 765 ; writes to the lords of trade 
on the petition of the London merchants, 766 ; 
transmits an account of the principal acts passed in 
1725 by the legislature of New Jersey, 767, 768 ; 
difficulties between the assembly of New Y'ork and, 
769 ; uuder-secretary de la Fay recommends him to 
promote Mr. Walpole's wishes, 771 ; reports the 
New York acts passed in 1725, 772 ; requests the 
duke of Newcastle to oblige certain military officers 
to rej'air t^ their posts, 775 ; transmits information 
already demanded respecting certain returns, 776, 
777, 778 ; the lords of trade call on liim for a return of 
negroes imported into New Y'ork and New Jersey, 779 ; 
secretary Popple calls his attention to some discrep- 
ancies in the accounts of furs, 780 ; reports New York 
acts passed in 1726, 781, 782, 811, 812, 813; and his 
conference with the Indians, 783 ; calls attention to 
the construction put by the French on the fifteenth 
article of the treaty of Utrecht, 785 ; proposes to erect 
a fort at the mouth of the Onondaga river, ibid ; ob- 
tains a deed of trust from the five nations of their 
lands, 800, VII., 16; correspondence between the 
government of Canada and, V., 802, 827-832, VI., 
492, VII., 16, IX., 899, 900, 969-975, 999 ; complains 
to the duke of Newcastle of the French fort at Nia- 
gara, v., 803, IX., 963 ; requests instructions on the 
subject of supposed silver mines in New Jersey, V., 
809 ; recommends the appointment of Mr. Cornelius 
Van Horn to the council of that province, 810 ; en- 
gages in a contest with the assembly of New Y'ork, 
813 ; instruction to him on the subject of appeals, 
816 ; cannot be a party in suits which are to come 
before him as judge, 817; erects a stone house at 
Oswego, 818, 820, 821, 845, IX., 959, 988, 996 ; orders 
sheriffs to render an account of fines, &c., V., 821; 
John Montgomerie appointed to succeed, 823, 824; 
proclaims George II., 824, 825, 841 ; called on to 
demolish the fort at Oswego, 825, 826 ; his commis- 
sion revoked, 835 ; calls a new assembly and trans- 
mits addresses to George II., 842; transmits to the 
lords of trade a draft of a bill tor the easier partition 
of lands, 843 ; his letters on the French fort at Nia- 
gara laid before the duke of Newcastle, 845 ; transmits 
a list of the New Y'ork acts passed in 1727, 846 ; 
publishes an answer to the resolutions of the New 



-But] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



103 



Burnet, William — continued. 

York assembly against the court of chancery, 847 ; 
the assembly called by, disaolvod, 855 ; leaves New 
York, 858 ; writes to the lords of trade on the afl'aiis 
of New Jersey, ibid ; censured for having ajjproved 
an act appropriating some interest money, 870 ; 
assents to the New Jersey triennial act, 873 ; consti- 
tutionality of the governor acting as sole judge argued 
before, 874 ; disputes with the government of New 
England, 913 ; dismisses chief justice Jamison of New 
York, 949 ; recommends James Alexander for a seat 
in the council, 982; a wharf in New York called 
after, VI., 29 ; a general partition act passed in the 
time of, ibid; sum allowed for Indian presents to, 
157; the lords of trade referred to his papers on 
Indian tr.ade, 509 ; claims the land on the south side 
of the St. Lawrence for New York, 569 ; the New 
York assembly endeavors to obtain the control of the 
public money in the time of, 767 ; powerless to des- 
troy the trade between Albany and Canada, VII., 17 ; 
an alleged interpolation in his instructions, 476 ; 
proved unfounded, 485 ; informs Mr. Golden thereof, 
499 ; experienced considerable opposition in regulating 
the Indian trade, 977; speeches of, to the New York 
assembly referred to, VIII., 345. 

Burnet's field, where, VI., 3SS ; a murder committed at, ibid ; 
an incursion made on, 6C8 ; or the German tlatts, VIII, 
233 ; governor Tryon reviews a regiment at, 303. 

Burnett's hills (Pennsylvania), Vlll., 125. 

Eurnham, , resolute difense of his house, IX., G14. 

Burning at the stake in New York, instances of, V., 39, 341. 

Burning the woods, a barbarous custom, IV., 554. 

Burnt camp, the (Ticonderoga), X., 600, 601, 610 ; M. de 
Contrecoeur occupied, 894. 

Burnt Tongue, a Huron chief, IX., 181. 

Burr, Aaron, president of New Jersey college, VIII., 221. 

Burrington, Oeorge, governor of North Carolina, murdered, 
v., 935. 

Burroughs, Thomas, one of the vestry of Trinity church, 
New York, IV., 528 ; signs a petition to the king, 
937, and an address to lord Cornbury, 1008. 

Burroughs, Thomas, junior, IV., 936. 

Barrows (Burrous), Thomas, merchant at New York, IV., 
849 ; signs a petition to the king, 935 ; signs an ad- 
dress to lord Cornbury, 1008. 

Burrows, , master of the sloop Happy, VI., 114; a 

Bermudian, ibid ; his case, 158. 

Burt, Samuel, farmer of the excise on Long Island, IV., 418 ; 
committed by the legislature, 821 ; such proceedings 
declared extra judicial, ibid ; mentioned, 935, 1007. 

Burton, Bartholomew, VI., 97. 

Burton, captain. III., 232. 

Burton, reverend Daniel, D. D., succeeds Dr. Bearcroft as 
secretary of ilie society for propagating tlie gospel, 
VII., 496 ; about to write to reverend Dr. Johnson on 
the subject of American missions, 518; writes to 
reverend Dr. Johnson of New York, 536. 

Burton, James, killed VII., 273 ; an inquest held on, 274. 



Burton, nwjor-general Ralph, biographical notice of, VII., 
93 ; his report on Canada communicated to the board 
of trade, 520. 

Burton, lieutenajit-colonel Robert, VII., 39, ICO. 

Burton, Susan, marries lionoraHe James Brudenell, VI., 97. 

Bury Saint Edmunds, major Hervey represents, X., 989. 

Bufh fighting, the Indians resort only to, IV., 638; soldiers 
from Europe ignorant of, 875. 

Bushloopers, what, IV., 209. 

Bushnell, ensign, IV., 614. 

Bushwick (Boswyck), II., 229, 374, 375, 407, 463, 464, 479, 
480,488,573, 589, 620,643, 659, G73, 696; magis- 
trates of, in 1673, 577; sworn in, 680; ordered to 
assist in fortifying New Orange, 586 ; poijulation of, 
in 1673, 596; deputies from, 702; militia oflicers of, 
IV., 809; lady Cornbury's funeral expenses defrayed 
in part by grants of land in, V., Ill, 407. 

Bushy run, battle of, VII., 545 ; the Indians defeated at, 
546, VIII., 312 ; captain Graham wounded at the bat- 
tle'of, X., 728, 729. 

Busset, John, II., 582. 

Bussey (Bustey), .lames, IV., 937, 1000. 

Bute [John Stuart, 3d] earl of, succeeds the earl of Holder- 
ness as secretary of state, lU., ix, VI., 757; a patron 
of William Franklin, VII., 837; Gilbert Elliot, con- 
fidant and counselor of, VIII., 96; is recommended 
to create a colonial aristocracy, and to give the colo- 
nies a representation in parliament, 803. 

Butler, David, H., 191. 

Butler, James, duke of Ormond, notice of, II., 5G2. 

Butler, John, IV., 937, 1007. 

Butler, captain John, attends an Indian conference at Mount 
Johnson, VI., 964, 966; attends a council of war at 
the great carrying place, 1000, 1001 ; Indian inter- 
preter, VII., 30, 722, VIII., 38, 228, 233, 282, 518, 
534 ; attends Indian conferences at fort Johnson, VII., 
54, 55, 63, 65, 178, 211, 232, 327, 718, 750; ordered 
to escort m.ijor-general Webb to Oswego, 184; Onei- 
das accompany, 185 ; the French waiting for, 191 ; 
visits Onondaga, 255, 258, 260 ; attends a conference 
at Can.ajoluarie, 380, 386, 391 ; witness to the treaty 
with the Delawares, 740 ; attends an Indian confer- 
ence at Ontario, 8-54; at the treaty of fort Stanwix, 
VIII., 112; attends an Indian conference at Johns- 
town, 496, 497, 499 ; the Indians ask that he be con- 
tinued as interpreter, 500 ; continued in service, 503 ; 
his opinion of the minister who refused to baptize 
Indian children, 552; the Indians hold a meeting with, 
688 ; encourages them to join the British, 689 ; sends 
Indians in search of Guy Johnson, 690; deputy to 
Guy Johnson, 718 ; to furnish the Indians with sup- 
plies, 719 ; complained of, 720 ; accompanies the ex- 
pedition under brigadier St. Leger, ibid ; at the battle 
of Oriskany, 721; sent to Montreal, 722; authorized 
to raise a regiment of rangers, ibid ; money ad- 
vanced to, 723; dislikes Joseph Brant, 724; at Ni- 
agara, 741,779; destroys Wyoming, 752; operations 
of, 758 ; threatens the frontiers of Pennsylvania, 793. 



104 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[But— 



Butler, Lois, VII., 905. 

Biitler, Richard, eail of Arr.-in, notice of, II., 562. 

Butler, lieutenant Tlioraas, tran.sniit.s information from Os- 
wego, VI., 591 ; returns from that place, 592 ; captain, 
stationed at fort Stanwix, VII., S81, 382. 

Butler, Walter, appointed lieutenant of fusileers, V., 775 ; 
appointed lieutenant of captain Holland's company, 
855 ; witness to an Indian deed, VI., 16 ; commands 
a party of Indians sent against Crown Point, 343 ; at- 
tends a conference at Johnstown, VIII., 499 ; ensign 
in the 8th regiment, seized as a spy, 721. 

Butler, an Indian, killed, VII , 546. 

Butter, rent partly paid in, I., 371 ; not to be had in New 
Netherland e.\cei)t for beaver and silver coin, 386 ; 
high price of, in New York, IV., 419. 

Butter-oak, I., 276. (See Timber.) 

Button, sir R , vs. Howell and others, case of, cited, V., 410, 

Button, Thomas, IV., 937, 1007. 

Button, [sir Thomas], discovers Hudson's bay, IX., 268. 

Butts, Daniel, IV., 937, 1009. 

Buyssen, Francis, II., 703. 

Buytenhuys, Jan, II., G36. 

Byam, colonel William, governor of Surinam, III., 45. 

Byerly, Thomas, arrives in New York, IV., 1066; collector 
of New York, 1105, V., 232, 233; seizes the Eagle 
galley, IV., 1106; complains of lord Cornbury, 1107, 
v., 28 ; attorney-general Bronghton complains of, IV., 
1109; lord Cornbury complains of, 1142; suspended, 
1143, v., 56, 264, 335; charges against, IV., 1144; 
restored to his office, 1175, V., 112; refuses to 
obey orders from lord Cornbury dated at Burlington, 
New Jersey, 61 ; complains of the treatment he 
receives from lieutenant-governor Ingoldsby, SO ; 
takes a salary for an office filled by another. 111 ; 
recommended for the council of New Jersey, 205, 361 ; 
to be allowed his salary during the time of his sus- 
pension from office, 264 ; reports his suspension, 265 ; 
one of governor Hunter's council, 296, 458; evil 
results from the apj ointment of Mr. Fauconier to the 
office of, 408 ; attends a conference with the Indians, 
437, 439, 443, 445 ; superseded in the council of New 
Jersey, 698 ; dead, 768, 777, 779. 

Byfield, Nathaniel, appointed judge of the court of admiralty, 
IV., 1116. 

Byllinge (Billing), Edward, notice of, HI., 285 ; mentioned, 
329. 

Bylvelt, Peter, member of the council of New Netherland, 
I., 43, 44. 

Eyng, sir George, defeats the Spanish fleet, V., 519; sent 
againstthe French, X., 68; defeated, 262; the French 
ship I'Esperance captured by part of the fleet of, 385. 

Bynring, J., III., 754. 

Byram river, I., 366 ; the boundary between New Y'ork and 
Connecticut, IV., 628, 629. 

Byrne, Michael, commissary of Indian affairs, VIII., 38; 
captain, 228, 233. 

Byron [sir John, 1st] lord, tutor to the duke of Y'ork, II., 



Byron [George Gordon, 6th] lord, VI., 757. 

Byron, captain John, the duchess of Leeds elopes with, VI. 

757; count d'Estaing defeats, X., 1167. 
Byvauck, Evert, captain of militia of the city of New York, 

IV., 810; merchant, 1135. 
Byvank, Petrus, member of the general committee of New 
York, VIII., 601. 



[Look under K for words not found under C ] 
Cabanac (Cabanas), M. de, IX., 488; commandant at Three 

Rivers, 829 ; at fort Frontenac, X., 36, 86, 153, 154 ; 

corroborates a report respecting Oswego, 155 ; recalled, 

163. 
Cabbage planting expedition, the, notice of, VII., 36. 
Cabo Corse. (See Cape Corse.) 
Cabot, Philip, admiral of France, IX., 266. 
Cabot, Sebastian, the English title to America founded on 

the discovery by, VI.,' 885 ; his voyage of discovery 

towards Labrador unsuccessful, IX., 3, 305 ; sails in 

search of the northwest passage, 702. 
Caby, lieutenant, wounded, X., 432. 
Caby, Thomas, IV., 1008. 
Cacapehon (Cacapon) river, the French attack a fort on, X., 

423. 
Cachekacheki, where, X., 949. (See Kiishiskees.) 
Cachnarundy, an Oneida Indian, III., 532. 
Cachointioni, an Onondaga chief, proclaims that Indians hold 

their lands only of heaven, X., 187. 
Cadenaret, a famous Abenaki chief, killed, X., 34. 
Cadet, Mr., a Canadian contractor, his character, X., 963. 
Cadiz (Cadis), II., 44 ; captain Allen attacks the Dutch fleet 

in the bay of, 329 ; the Dutch drive an English ship 

into, 342 ; admiral Evertsen returns to, 572 ; a ship 

arrives at Boston from, IV., 67 ; the English make an 

attempt on, X., 6 ; blockaded, 31. 
Cadogau [William 1st] earl of, commander-in-chief, V., 

759. 
Cadranganhie, III., 433. 
Cadwallader, general John, fights a duel with major-general 

Conway, VIII., 731. 
Caen, Emeric de, establishes a company to trade to Canada, 

IX., 304. 
Caen, II., 600 ; M. de Mezy, major of, IX., 8, 25. 
Caer, Mr., first lord of the bed chamber to the prince of 

Wales, I., 33, 34. 
Caerlessen, Claes, L, 192. 

Caffiniere, M. de la, commands the ships of war for the in- 
vasion of New York, IX., 423; instructions to, 424, 

426 ; to make war against the English, 426 ; returns 

to France, 432. 
Cage, Tliomas, IV., 605. 
Cagenquaricliton, chief sachem of the Senecas, IV., 597. 

(See Kajnquiractiton.) 
Caghnarageyade, a Mohawk Indian, IV., 77. 



-Cal] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



105 



Caghnawaga (Cachanuage, Caclienuage, Cachneuage, Cagh- 
nuage, Cagnawage, Cagnewage, Caughnawaga, Cooh- 
nawagali, Coghnawagey, Coguawagey, Cohuawagey, 
Kaclianuage, Kachnuge, Kaghnawaga, Kagnawage), an 
Indian praying castle in Canada, III., 782, IV., 87, 
803 ; proposals made at Onondaga by Indians from, 
120 ; proposals made at Albany by In(lians from, 692 ; 
mentioned, 695, 696, 745 ;. number of Indians at, in 
1700, 747; the praying Indians at, agree to a peace 
with the five nations, 805 ; some of the five nations 
prisoners at, 895 ; the Indians of, willing to accept of 
colonel Schuyler's propositions, 1163 ; spies from 
Albany arrive at, V. , 85 ; an Indian chief comes to 
Oneida from, 246 ; a delegation from the six nations 
visit, 714 ; some Indians of the five nations settle at, 
742 ; description of, in 1750, VI., 582; captain Clans 
holds an Indian congress at, VII., 542 ; sir William 
Johnson holds a conference with the Indians from, 
553 ; deputies from, attend the conference at the Ger- 
man flats, 559 ; a seat of a mission, 582 ; Indians from, 
attend a conference at Johnson hall, VIII., 38 ; a 
Frenchman creates disturbance at, 238 ; the six nation 
confederacy extends to, 607, 612 ; messengers sent by 
the Oneida Indians to, 690 ; otherwise called Sault St. 
Louis, S., 301. 

Caghnawagah (Cachanuage, Cahaniaga, Caughnawaga, Kagh- 
enewagfi, Kaghnuwage), a Mohawk town, II., 712 ; 
description of. III., 250 ; the Mohegans attack, ibid ; 
the great Mohawk removes to Canada from, IX., 474. 

Caghnawage creek (Cocknawaga, Kaghnawage creek) (New 
York), highways to be laid out to the Christian settle- 
ment from, v., 813 ; or Can.ada creek, VI., 866. 

Caghniagarota, one of the chiefs of the six nations, colonel 
Jolmson condoles the death of, VI., 810, 812. 

Caghswughtioni. ^See Kagkswughtoni.) 

Cahanock, I., 426. 

Cahaquaragha (Cahaquaraghe), where, V., 800, IX., 999. 

Cahon, an Indian, III., 733. 

Cahoos (Kahoos), I , 284, IV., 184, 633 ; description of the 
great fall of the, 589, 875; height of, V., 290; the 
river above, called the Mohawk, VIII., 442. 

Cahouet, captain de, IX., 234, 236; returns to Montreal, 
243. 

Cahuga, VI., 706. 

Caientolon, IX., 804. (See Manitoualin.) 

Callus, M. de, the authorities in Canada write to, X., 18, 19. 

Caina, II., 303. (See Guiana.) 

Caino, Pateriel, IV., 1006. 

Cajeharai, a Cayuga sachem. III., 774. 

Cajenhood, an Oneida, IV., 121. 

Cajocka (Ohio), VI., 779. 

Cajuheta, an Oneida chief, VIII., 113. 

Cakare (Cakary), a prisoner in New York, III., 530 ; killed, 
815. 

Calais, privateers fitted out at, II., 548; codfish exported 
fronf Boston to, IV., 790. 

Calamy, Edmund, bishop Hoadley writes against, VII., 372. 

Calatogne, Mr., IX., 518. 

14 



Calcraft, Mr., agent, VI., 768. 

Caldwall, captain William, R. N., commander of the Advice 
frigate, IV., 717, 862, 960; arrives at New York, 717; 
receives the countess of Bellomont as a passenger 
contrary to lord Cornbury's orders, 1003, 1104; 
behaves well on the New York station, 1190. 

Caldwell, lieutenant-colonel John, at Niagara, VIII., 496; 
his letter to Guy Johnson, 507 ; his negotiations with 
the Indians at Niagara, ibid ; biographical notice of, 
509 ; arrives in England with despatches from Quebec, 
680 ; commandant at Niagara, his Indian name, 689. 

Caldwell (Rockland county. New York), II., 516. 

Caledonia settlement, the, two armed ships arrive at New 
York from, IV., 556, 591 ; provisions sent from New 
York to, 592 ; quite deserted, and the Scotch from, 
very insolent at New York, 595 ; wreck of two vessels 
belonging to the expedition to, 760. 

Cales, captain, taken prisoner and sent from Canada to 
Albany, IV., 293. 

Calhoun, town of, IV., 391. 

California, IX., 67 ; the Mississippi supposed to fall into the 
gulf of, 92 ; why called the Vermilion sea, 121 ; 
supposed communication between Canada and, 793. 

Callcutt, Jeremiah, IV., 936, 1006. 

Callendar, Mr., an Indian trader, VIII., 186. 

CalUferes-Bonnevue, Louis Hector de, governor of Montreal, 
IV., 241, 317, 404, IX., 222 ; writes to the earl of 
Bellomont, IV., 333 ; intelligence of the peace sent 
from New York to, 338, IX., 680 ; letter of the earl of 
Bellomont to, IV., 339 ; the earl of Bellomont desires 
to hold correspondence with, 340 ; letter of, to the earl 
of Bellomont, 344, 345 ; sends Indians towards Albany 
to take prisoners, 348; governor of Canada, 491, IX., 
vii, 699, 803 ; liberates those of the five nations who 
were prisoners in Canada, IV. , 532 ; the earl of Bello- 
mont transmits a despatch from the French king to, 
556 ; expects the five nations at Montreal, 574 ; letterof 
lieutenant-governor Nanfan to, 577 ; lieutenant gov- 
ernor Nanfan threatens to complain of, 578 ; sends 
back two Iroquois prisoners, 580 ; advises the earl of 
Bellomont of his accession to the government of 
Canada, 607 ; a return of the Indians of Kachanuage 
brought to, 747 ; going to Quebec, 748 ; claims the 
five nations, 749 ; holds a conference between the 
sachems of the five nations, 798, 803 ; requested td 
recall father de Lamberville from France, IX., 171; 
his letter to M. de Seignelay, 249 ; asks to be em- 
ployed in the war against the Iroquois, 250 ; length 
of his services, ibid ; his memoir on the encroach- 
ments of the English in America, 265, 918 ; his power 
enlarged, 276 ; governor Denonville desires to be ac- 
companied by, 307 ; arrests a man who attempts to per- 
suade others to withdraw to the English colonies, 310, 
315 ; recommended to be appointed second in command 
in the expedition against the Senecas, 316 ; recom- 
mended to be appointed lieutenant-general of Canada, 
322 ; character of, 327 ; accompanies the expedition 
against the Senecas, 334, 359; at Niagara, 335, 336; 



106 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cat.- 



Calliferes-BonnevTie, Louis Hector de — conli 
his ccmduct commended, 340, 354 ; 
the state of Canada, 369, 401, 428; recommends 
the acquisition of the province of New York, 370 ; 
continued in liis command, 374 ; visits France, 393 ; 
sent there hy governor Denonville, 394 ; papers 
relating to his proposed expedition against New York, 
411, 412, 419, 420, 659, 660 ; his plan for invading 
New York approved, 422 ; returns to Canada, 423, 
429 ; to have command of the expedition against 
New Y'ork, 426 ; to be appointed governor of that 
province, ibid ; reports an action between a party of 
French and of Iroquois, 431 ; best qualified to com- 
mand an expedition against New Y'ork, 445 ; ordered 
to Quebec, 455, 459, 483, 667; arrives at Quebec, 
457, 676 ; receives an embassy from Onondaga, 465 ; 
demands supplies for Canada, 492 ; urges the inva- 
sion of New York, 493 ; ordered to protract his nego- 
tiations with the Iroquois, 496 ; reinforces Sault St. 
Louis, 499 ; petitions for an increase of pay, 507 ; 
sick, 521 ; sends aid to M. de Valrenne, 523 ; sends 
parties in pursuit of Iroquois, 536 ; sends provisions 
to the troops returning from the Mohawks, 552 ; 
notified of the approach of a large party of Iroquois, 
554 ; returns to Montreal, 56S ; sends Iroquois depu- 
ties' to Quebec, 578; exerts himself for the relief of 
the Grey nuns, 595 ; obtains information from an 
Indian of the movements of the English, 596, 597 ; 
sends a convoy to the Ottawa country, 601 ; and a 
force in pursuit of Iroquois, 602 ; attends a conference 
with the Poutouatamis, 622; very useful to count 
Frontenac, 640 ; commands his vanguard, 649 ; his 
progress, 651, 653 ; sends troops to winter in the 
district of Quebec and Three Rivers, 665 ; dispatches 
a party to fort Frontenac, 666 ; sends Indian parties 
into the province of New York, 669 ; count de Fron- 
tenac receives letters from, 670 ; orders respecting the 
Iroquois sent to, 698 ; sends delegates to the governor 
of New York, 704 ; holds a conference with the Iro- 
quois, 708 ; advises M. de Pontchartrain of the affairs 
of his government, 711, 736, 739 ; concludes a treaty 
of peace with the Iroquois, 712, 722 ; conference 
between the Iroquois and, 715 ; letters of the king to, 
721, 735, 742 ; urges the fortifying of Quebec, 740 ; 
death of, 743 ; Indians bewail the death of, 747, 748, 
750, 753, 754, 768 ; did not perceive the consequences 
of part of his treaty with the Iroquois, 766 ; governor 
Vaudreuil announces his intention to observe the 
peace made by, 860 ; allusion to his treaty with the 
five nations, X., 22, 364. 

Callior. (See Callicres.) 

Callolet, an Indian, brings a message from the Sehakkook 
Indians, IV., 575. 

Calumets, the, IX,, 940. 

Calvert, Charles, governor of Maryland, II., 73. 

Calvert, sir George, knight, II., 84 ; secretary of state, III., vii, 
3, 4, 5, 6 ; member of the privy council, 7 ; informs sir 
Dudley Carleton that the application of the Walloons 



has been granted, 10 (see Walloons) ; informed that 
sir Dudley Carleton has not yet received any answer 
from the states general to his memorial, 11. (See Balti- 
more, lord.) 

Calvert, Philip, notice of, II., 73 ,- secretary of Maryland, 81, 
87 ; Messrs. Heermans and Waldron pay their respects 
to, 92 ; entertains them at dinner, 93 ; invites them 
to an interview with the governor and council of 
Maryland, 94 ; lord Baltimore's half-brother, 98 ; gov- 
ernor of Maryland, III., 45; mentioned, 344 ; chan- 
cellor of Maryland, 346. 

Calvinists, in New York, III., 415, IX., 549. 

Calway, William, IV., 1008. 

Camaire, , condemned to the galleys, and enters tlie 

English service, IX., 926. 

Camanistigoya, where, X., 130. 

Cambel, Mr., IV., 816. 

Cambray, captain, wounded, X., 1085. 

Cambray (Cambrai), M. de Fenelon archbishop of, IX , 112 ; 
congress of, 940; cardinal Dubois archbishop of, X., v. 

Cambri-dge (Massachusetts), colonels Whalley and Goff so- 
journ at. III., Ill ; Joseph Bradish, the pirate, a native 
of, IV., 512; the seat of learning in Massachusetts, 
VII. , 374 ; episcopalians desire to establish a church 
at, 375 ; reverend East Apthorp missionary at, ibid, 
394. 

Camden [Charles Pratt, 1st], lord, the great seal taken from, 
VIIL,202. 

Camden (New Jersey), the volunteers of L-eland nearly 
destroyed at the battle of, VIII., 734. 

Camden's Brittania referred to, IV., 503. 

Camelford, Samuel Martin member for, VIII., 279. 

Camerleng, IL, 187. 

Cameron, Alexander, commissary of Indian affairs, VIII., 33, 
766. 

Cameron, Donald (grandson of sir Eugenius C), lands in New 
Jersey, conveyed to, V., 758. 

Cameron, sir Eugenius (Ewen), baronet, proprietor of lands 
in New Jersey, V., 758. 

Cameron, John, son of sir Eugenius, attainted and his pro- 
perty forfeited, V , 758. 

Camp, reverend Ichabod, moves from Connecticut to North 
Carolina, VII-, 439 ; and settles in Virginia, 496. 

Camp, Nathaniel, one of the Newark committee, VI.,, 344, 345. 

Campanius, I., 607. (See Holm.) 

Campbell, lieutenant Alexander, wounded at Ticonderoga, 
X., 729. 

Campbell,lieutenaait Archibald, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 
729. 

Campbell, captain, enlists men at New York, VIII., 677j 
mentioned, 685 ;. his company behaves gallantly in 
action, 687. 

Campbell, major Colin, dismissed the service, VIII., 250 ; 

prefers charges against general Monckton, 251. 
Camjibell, Daniel, judge of common pleas, VIII., 282; assists 

at an Indian conference at Johnson hall, ibid, 480. 
Campbell, captain Donald, biographical notice of, VII.,96SJ. 



-Can] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



107 



Campbell, lieutenant Donald, wounded at Busliy run, VII., 
546 ; memorial of, 629 ; applies for 100,000 acres of 
land in N-sw York, 631. 

Campbell, Duncan, carries a letter from the earl of Bello- 
mont to captain Kidd, IV., 583 ; attends a conference 
held by the earl of Bellomont with the Indians at 
Albany, 727, 740 ; concerned in the embezzlement of 
captain Kidd's cargo, 869 ; testifies iu favor of Robert 
Livingston, 883. 

Campbell, lieutenant Duncan, wounded at Bushy run, VII., 
546 ; notice of, ibid. 

Campbell of Inveraw, major Duncan, wounded at Ticon- 
deroga, and dies of his wounds, X., 728. 

Campbell, captain John, applies for land at Claverack, VII., 
743, 

Campbell of Duneaves, captain John, killed, X., 728; 
notice of, ibid. 

Campbell of Straehur, lieutenant-colonel John, iu command 
at fort Stanwix, VII., 543, 552; at Detroit, 781, 784; 
treats with the Indians, 782, 785, 786 ; brigadier-gene- 
ral, VHI., 766; wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 728; 
notice of, ibid. 

Campbell, lieutenant John, junior, wounded at Ticonderoga, 
X., 729; notice of, ibid. 

Campbell of Isla, captain Lauchliu, case of, VII., 629, 630. 

Campbell, lieutenant, killed at Niagara, VII., 562. 

Campbell, major, superintendent of Indian aifairs in Canada, 
VIII., 657, 661, 662, 726 ; colonel, 776. 

Campbell, lord Neill, notice of. III., 408 ; mentioned, 49-3 ; 
Andrew Hamilton succeeds, IV., 200. 

Campbell, lord William, governor of Nova Scotia, VII., 946 ; 
biographical notice of, VIII., 174 ; instructions to, 288 ; 
conveyed to New York, 684. 

Campden, captain de, wounded, X., 431. 

Campe, Johannes de, IV., 942. 

Campe, Larrens de, IV., 942. 

Campeachy (Campeechy), I., 223, II., 29, 30; several ships 
belonging to the colonies taken in the bay of IV., 
513; a ship arrives-in New York from, V., 27; ves- 
sels sent from New York for logwood to, 686. 

Campell, Hamilton, X., 593. 

Campell, lieutenant, of the New York forces, killed, X., 593 

Campen, Coert Tysen, II., 4 ; captures a Spanish ship and 
carries her into New Amsterdam, 27. (See Tysen; 
Van Campen.) 

Campen, Jan. (See Van Campen.) 

Campen, lord Fitzmaurice distinguishes himself in the battle 
of, VIII., 73. 

Canackomie, a chief of the five nations, V., 219. 

Canada (Cauida, Cannada), the Mohawks make war against 
their enemies in, I., 182; New Netherland bounded 
on the north by the river of, 275, II., 80 ; the French 
retain, 80 ; the inability of the French to hold, fore- 
told, 513; occupied by the French, 598, IV., 352; 
orders issued to stop all correspondence with, II., 
659, 662; captain Argall commits outrages on the 
coast of. III., 1 ; an account of the expedition of the 



governor of, against the Mohawks, 118 ; governor 
NicoUs invites Massachusetts to join in an expedition 
against, 120 ; Daniel de Courcelles, governor, and 
Jean Talon, intendant of, 122, 126, 720, IX., 22; 
orders sent to the colonies to reduce, III., 137; the 
adthorities of New England report against its fea- 
sibility, 138 ; horsemen sent from New England to 
discover a way to, ibid ; a considerable number of 
soldiers arrive in, 141 ; an expedition marches to 
Albany in winter, from, ibid ; governor NicoUs writes 
to the viceroy at, 147 ; news of the conquest of New 
Netherland received in, 152 ; a considerable number 
of veteran soldiers in, 155 ; apprehensions that the 
beaver trade will be diverted to, 164; measures 
adopted by governor Nicolls to jirevent incursions 
from, 167 ; encroachments on New York from, 190 ; 
the northern bounds of New York, 237, 247, 260, 796 ; 
governor Andros endeavors to prevent all intercourse 
between the eastern Indians and, 265 ; a garrison to 
be sent to some place on the lakes, from, 278 ; French- 
men bo be encouraged to settle in New York from, 
341 ; governor Dongan's actions with the Indians to- 
wards, approved, 351 ; the Jesuits do their best to 
draw the five nations to, 394; measures recommended 
by governor Dongan to oblige the i'rench priests to 
retire to, 395 ; the five nations menace, 396 ; an expe- 
dition against Hudson's bay from, ibid ; ijopulation 
of, in 1686, ibid ; Albany a frontier to, 410 ; governor 
Dongau sends to England a map of, 423 ; one of the 
men that accompanied major McGregorie, hanged by 
the governor of, 430 ; particulars of the expedition 
from, against the Senecas, 431-436, 444-447; war 
between the five nations and, 439, 444, 464, 483, 514, 
645, 776, IV., 169, 240, V., 730, 731, IX., 353; the 
governor of, complains of governor Dongan, III., 
441 ; the Indians instructed to plunder all persons 
found trading to Albany from, 442, 444 ; the Hnrons 
belonged originally to, 443; the governor of, makes 
peace with the Senecas, 445 ; strange eff&ct of the air 
of, on all governors, 472 ; governor Dongan receives 
intelligence of the movements in, 475 ; forts built in, 
476; time consumed in atrip from Albany to, 478; 
governor Dongan endeavors to make peace between the 
Senecas and the Indians of, ibid ; Jean Rosie's account 
of what he heard in, ibid, 479 ; news from the Indians 
in, 482 ; the governor of, angry with governor Don- 
gan, 486; preparations making for war in, ibid ; in- 
formation brought by Anthony Lespenard from, 487 ; 
governor Dongan instructed to demand the liberation 
of the king's subjects, prisoners in, 503 ; governor 
Dongan ordered to resist all invasions from, 504 ; the 
English government demands the release of the 
English prisoners in, 509 ; a delegation sent to Albany 
from, 510 ; a party of Mohawks make a foray iu, 512 ; 
governor Denonville detains sever.il New Yorkers in, 
513; why the Mohawks make war against, 514; gov- 
ernor Dongan requires the return of those who are 



108 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Can- 



Canada — continued. 

prisoners in, 519 ; negotiations between governor 
Dongan and the agents from, 520-532 ; governor Don- 
gan reclaims some prisoners taken by the five nations 
in, 517, and sends them to, 520 ; demands made by 
governor Dongan on the governor of, 533 ;' the six 
nations subdued whole tribes of hidians in, 534 ; they 
distrust the governor of, 536 ; governor Andros in- 
structed to demand the release of certain prisoners in, 
548 ; the governor of, proceeds against the Senecas, 
553 ; the governor of, informed by governor Andros 
that the five nations are subjects of England, 555 ; a 
pai-ty of Mohegans and Mohawks make an incursion 
into, 556 ; people killed on the Connecticut river by 
Indians from, 557,561,568, 580, IV., 45; interview 
between messengers from New York and the governor 
of. III., 563; news of the truce brought from New 
York to, 564; spies visit Schenectady from, 565; 
measures recommended for opposing the French of' 
573 ; the governor of, suspected of intriguing among 
the five nations, 575 ; the Jesuits allure many of the 
five nations to, 580 ; the Indians to be prevented going 
to, 592 ; those who had been plundered by the French 
apply for leave to go on an expedition against, 593 ; 
a party of the five nations march against, 599, 608, 
610, 611 ; the English colonies will never be safe 
until the reduction of, 612 ; governor Dongan acquaints 
lord Effingham with great rav.iges committed by the 
five nations in, 621 ; measures recommended to pro- 
tect New York against, 622 ; application for a com- 
mission to take, 631 ; an attack upon Albany expected 
from, 692 ; the invasion of, recommended, 693 ; Mas- 
sachusetts only capable of subduing, 695 ; the capture 
of Quebec is the only way to take, 697 ; referred to 
under the name of antichi-ist, 698 ; Connecticut urged 
to furnish a force against, 705 ; water communication 
from Albany to, 706 ; necessity of reducing, 709 ; 
Schaghticoke Indians move to, 713 ; principal passa- 
ges to, 714 ; Axent Schuyler goes on an expedition to, 
717 ; demands of sir Edmund Andros on the governor 
of, 722; colonel Winthrop to command the forces 
against, 727, 728 ; Senecas making peace in, 728 ; 
Jacob Milbome selected to command the troops against, 
730 ; vessels fitted out in New York for, 732 ; instruc- 
tions to chevalier d' Eau from the governor of, 733 ; 
the expedition against, in danger, ibid ; quotas to be 
furnished in 1690, by the English colonies against, 
751 ; failure of the expedition from New York against, 
753 ; evil consequences of the late expedition against, 
761 ; the governor of, proposes to make peace with 
the five nations, 777 ; the Oneidas are determined to 
wage war against, 780 ; an expedition sets out from 
Albany for, 781, 785, 790, 795 ; an expedition against 
the five nations preparing in, 782 ; recruits arrive in, 
785 ; trade of Albany extends to the lakes of, 797 ; 
many Indians drawn from New York to, 799 ; journal 
of major Schuyler's expedition to, 800; a party of 



Onondagas meditate an attack against, 814 ; a paity of 
Mohawks cut off on their return from, 815, 817 ; pre- 
cautions against an invasion from, 822 ; Dirck Wessels 
gent on the public service to, 824 ; the five nations bor- 
der on, 836 ; expedition from Albany to, successful, 
840 ; M. de Frontenac, governor of, 847, IV., 49, 317, 
IX., 85 ; reinforcements received in, III., 847, IX., 331 ; 
war with, very burdensome to New York, III. , 848 ; 
governor Fletcher transmits news from, 854 ; contem- 
plated invasion of, IV., 6 ; a fleet sent from England 
to invade, 12 ; governor Fletcher's journal of the ex- 
pedition against the French and Indians of, 14 ; inva- 
sion of the Mohawk country from, 19, 22 ; the Indians 
urge the necessity of attacking by sea and land, 23 ; 
one of the five nations offers to make a treaty with, 
32 ; the five nations are inclined to make peace with, 
33, 84, 172 ; no fleets proceed against, 36 ; news 
from, 37 ; a fleet designed for the reduction of, 40, 
43 ; a party of Mohawks return from, 41 ; father 
Milet and chevalier d' Eau, whilst prisoners, corres- 
pond with, 42 ; letters of father Milet to and from, to 
be intercepted, 44, 94 ; the river Indians join the five 
nations against, 46 ; a messenger arrives at Oneida 
with letters to father Milet from, 47 ; the five nations 
■ to be encouraged to make war against, 48 ; father 
Milet avows that he is known as a servant to the 
English, both in France and in, 50 ; messages sent 
to the five nations from, 51, 76, 77, 85, 86, 120, 123, 
558, 696, 918, 993 ; reinforced, 55, 61, 69, 73, 245 ; 
necessity of reducing, 57, 183, 977, 1068, X., 52; 
several Mohawks run off to, IV., 59 ; the five nations 
reject the peace belt sent from, 62 ; prisoners brought 
to Albany from, 66 ; governor Fletcher urges the 
taking of, 75 ; the five nations send a message to the 
governor of, 78 ; interpretation thereof, 79 ; the Oney- 
des send a message to, 85 ; message of the five nations 
to the praying Indians of, 92 ; Peter Schuyler prevents 
father Milet's return to, 97 ; the New England Indians 
visit, 113; Indian news from, 115, 1163; examination 
of two persons returned to New York from, 116 ; the 
five nations break off negotiations with the governor 
of, 118 ; the French prisoners in the hands of the five 
nations demanded by the governor of, 120 ; answer 
of the five nations to the message of the governor of, 
121; the governor of, designs to attack Albany, 124; 
the five nations send spies to, 125 ; Indian prisoners 
escape from, 126 ; a party of Mohawks about to in- 
vade, 151 ; governor Fletcher sends two Frenchmen 
to England lest they should correspond with, 159 ; 
a considerable number of the five nations drawn to, 
168 ; the French interest easily destroyed in, 171 ; 
the governor of, invades the Indian country, 173 ; 
number of soldiers in 1696 in, 181 ; the reverend Mr. 
Miller's plan for reducing, 182 ; advantages to accrue 
from the reduction of, 184, 224 ; plan for attacking, 
185; major-general Winthrop commissioned to com- 
mand the troops against, 193 ; the fleet ready to sail 



—Can] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



109 



Canada — continued. 

against, 194 ; failure of the expedition of major-gene- 
ral Winthrop against, 196 ; the five nations attacked 
from, 204 ; Albany menaced by, 205 ; John Nelson's 
representation on, 207 ; several Indian chiefs sent to 
France to soUcit aid for, 208 ; miserable state of, 210 ; 
Indians arrive in France from, ibid ; strength of, in 
1692, 222 ; enough of English in the colonies to defend 
them against, 227, 228 ; an Indian map of, sent to 
England, 232, 231 ; a party from, defeated near 
Albany, 233, 234, 243 ; an Indian map of the river 
and cliief places of, to be sent to England, 237 ; the 
five nations call on the king of England to destroy, 
238 ; means to be adopted in New York to prevent 
incursions from, 289 ; a vessel bound for New York 
taken and carried to, 293 ; articles of peace sent from 
New York to, 305, 338, 436 ; the earl of Bellomout 
receives letters from, 333 ; governor Fletcher omits to 
■write about the peace to the governor of, 339, 434, 
486 ; instructions to Messrs. Schuyler and Dellius in 
their negotiations with the governor of, 340 ; report 
of negotiations in, 347; population of, in 1698, 351, 
406 ; the Onondagas threatened by the governor of, 
369 ; captain John Schuyler sent with despatches to, 
371 ; returns to New York from, 397 ; report of his 
journey to, 404 ; he makes a report on the English 
prisoners in, 438 ; progress of the French since their 
possession of, 477 ; death of count de Frontenac, 
governor of, 487, 491 ; reverend Mr. Dellius of Albany, 
corresponds with the Jesuits of, 489 ; the five nations 
arenotto have any communication with, 496 ; progress 
of the negotiation of the five nations with the governor 
of, 497 ; a small spot compared with the English colo- 
nies, 504; distance of the Dowaganhas from, 605; 
New York contiguous to, 537; large quantities of silks 
brought to Albany from, 556 ; the path from the five 
nations to, stopped, 569 ; Indians sent from Albany 
on a political mission to, pretend to be traders, 570 ; 
the Dionondadees ordered to come to, 571 ; informa- 
tion respecting, 574, 662, 748, 749 ; the Schakkook 
Indians talk of moving to, 576 ; instructions to mes- 
sengers proposed to be sent from New York to, 578 ; 
Onondaga threatened with an invasion from, 579 ; 
number of men under pay in, 588, 701 ; the earl of 
Bellomont advised of M. de Calli^re's accession to the 
government of, 607 ; the governor of, fortifies Mon- 
treal, 611 ; the Mohawk country invaded from, 614 ; 
orders issued against sending horses from New York 
to, 618 ; the Indians iustigated against the English by 
the governor of, 619, 637 ; horses sent from Albany 
to, 623, 647 ; nearly two-thirds of the Mohawk nation 
gone to, 648 ; no peace between the five nations and, 
655 ; the governor of, has but a handful of Indians, 
656 ; the governor of, charges the five nations not to 
hearken to the governor of New York, 657; what 
passed between the Senecas and the governor of, 658 ; 
salary and perquisites of the governor, intendant and 



judge of, 676 ; the earl of Bellomont blames Charles 
I. for parting with, 677 ; chevalier d' Iberville a native 
of, 686; some of the five nations go to treat with the 
governor of, 61)0, 694 ; proposals of a party of Indians 
who visit Albany from, 692 ; propositions to some of 
the five nations from the governor of, 695 ; the lords 
of trade recommend that representations be made to 
the court of B'rauce concerning certain unfair prac- 
tices in, 709 ; a message sent to the Dowaganhas, from, 
715 ; estimated stiength of the French in, 718 ; many 
of the river Indians debauched to, 745 ; draft of a 
message from the five nations to the Indians of, 746 ; 
David Schuyler transmits intelligence from, 747; 
peace concluded wiih the Iroquois by the governor of, 
767 ; the manufacture of wine forbidden in, 788 ; 
trade carried on between Albany, Boston and, 792 ; 
relation of what the Senecas, Cayouges and Ononda- 
gas did in, 798 ; report of the delegates from the five 
nations on their return from, 803 ; proposals of the 
governor of, 804 ; runaways from, to be arrested, 
836 ; the eastern Indians reported to have renounced 
their dependence on, 842 ; a Jesuit returns from the 
Mississippi, by way of New York and Albany, to, 
872; climate of, 876; whence supplied with provi- 
sions, 877 ; reception of Decanissore, the Onondaga 
sachem, by the governor of, 890 ; his speech to the 
governor of, 891; answer of the governor of, 892; 
the river Indians promise that none of their people 
shall go to, 992 ; delegates from the five nations invited 
to, ibid ; the Pennecook Indians invited to, 996 ; lord 
Cornbury's plan for an attack on, referred to, 1038 ; 
the French of, design securing the inland parts of the 
continent, 1048 ; colonel Quary urges the reduction 
of, 1054 ; plan therefor, 1055 ; great mortality in, 
1061 ; lord Cornbury's plan for reducing, laid before 
queen Anne, 1079 ; of much greater advantage to 
England than Guadaloupe, 1121 ; the New York 
Indians will not be steady until the reduction of, 
1123 ; the legislature of New York passes an act to 
prevent slaves running away to, 1168, V., 418 ; num- 
ber of French in 1708, in, 32, 65 ; trade between New 
York and, continued during queen Anne's war, 42; 
state of, in 1708, 65 ; letter of queen Anne, directing 
an expedition against, 70 ; an expedition fitting out 
for the reduction of, 72 ; strength of the force to be 
sent against, 73 ; the earl of Bellomont's proceedings 
on the subject of the five nations, with the governor 
of, 74 ; neutrality between the Indians of New York 
and, 75 ; M. de la Barre, governor of, ibid, IX., 167; 
M. de Denonville, governor of, V., 76, VI., 852, IX., 
269 ; colonel Vetch requests to be appointed com- 
mander-in-chief of, v., 79 ; progress of the expedi- 
tion against, 81, 253 ; New Jersey votes money for the 
expedition against, 84; spies sent from Albany to, 
85, 86; failure of the expedition against, 116, 277; 
amount raised by the province of New York for the 
expedition against, 164; consequence to New York of 



no 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Can- 



Canada — continued. 

the expedition against, 178, 191; the assembly of 
New York pass a bill to dispose of certain stores for 
the expedition against, 184; bills of credit struck 
in New Jersey for the expedition against, 205 ; con- 
quest of, expected, 214 ; the expedition against, to be 
renewed, 218; Jesuits of, employed to detach the fire 
nations from the English, 221; instructions for an 
expedition against, received at New York, 252 ; min- 
utes of the congress held in New London, preparatory 
to the expedition against, 257 ; quotas of men to be 
furnished by the northern colonies for the expedition 
against, ibid; number of men engaged in the expedi- 
tion against, 262 ; the five nations agree to join the 
expedition against, 269; wreck of her majesty's ship, 
Feversham, and several transports belonging to the 
expedition against, 284 ; the council and assembly of 
New York demand a renewal of the expedition against, 
296 ; news received from, that the English intend to 
cut off the Indians, 373 ; news of the peace sent from 
New Y'ork to, 374, 375 ; a line of posts making to the 
Mississippi from, 433 ; the Indians return the hatchet 
on the failure of the expedition against, 437, and will 
not wage war against, 438 ; the board of trade medi- 
tate obstructing of the trade between the Missis- 
sippi and, 471 ; goods from Albany sent to the Seue- 
cas by way of, 486 ; a passage found between 
Louisiana and, 502 ; the boundaries between New 
Y'ork and, undetermined, 530 ; the French settled 
from the Mississippi to, 532 ; annual value of the 
trade between New Y'ork and, in 1720, 552 ; the Pala- 
tines serve in the expedition against, 554 ; furnished 
with goods from Albany, 559 ; a stoji to be put to 
Indian goods going from Albany to, 560 ; the Senecas 
prevented going to Albany by bad news from, 569 ; 
the communication between the Mississippi and, kept 
open by the French blockhouse at Niagara, 577, VI., 
465 ; M. de Lisle's map of, referred to, V., 577, a 
Recollect priest flies to New Y'ork from, 586 ; the com- 
munication between the Mississippi and, a late dis- 
covery, 620 ; governor Burnet remonstrates against 
the erection of a fort at Niagara by the governor of, 
633 ; the five nations hold a conference with the gov- 
ernor of, 660 ; main cause of the increased trade and 
power of the French in, 682 ; beaver exported into 
New York from, 687; the Jesuits, chief proprietors 
of the soil of, 703 ; Scatikook Indians remove to, 
722, 799, 970; its advantages for securing the western 
trade, 726 ; its disadvantages, 728 ; price of a license 
in, to trade with the Indians, 729 ; Indian prisoners 
burnt alive by the governor of, 732 ; fur trade a mo- 
nopoly in, 733 ; M. de Longueuil governor of, 783, IX., 
vii; Philip Livingston sent with a letter from New 
York to, v., 790 ; the governor of, protects against the 
building of fort Oswego, 824, 825, 845 ; the marqu 
de Beauharnois governor of, 827, VI., 90, 91 ; has of 
late years risen to great bulk, V., 908 ; the governor 



of New York forwards despatches from, 920 ; a son of 
chief justice Morris not allowed to remain in, 958 ; 
Massachusetts sends delegates to procure an exchange 
of prisoners from, VI., 60 ; the province of New Y'ork 
lies to the south of, 121 ; Quebec the capital of, 124 ; 
estimated population of, in 1737, 126 ; an Indian party 
m.Trcli against the Cherokees from, 148 ; despatches 
for France transmitted from New York to the secre- 
tary of state at London, 181 ; governor Clarke's 
thoughts on, 182 ; plan for reducing, 183, 184 ; the 
neutrality established with New Y'ork interrupted by 
the expedition against, 207; the French policy to- 
wards the Indians between the Mississippi and, 214 ; 
route from the Mississippi to, 227 ; a force sent from, 
to surprise. an English settlement, 276, 281; several 
of the six nations have an interview with the governor 
of, 296; orders sent to the colonies for an expedition 
against, 310 ; a faction in New York opposes the expe- 
dition against, 312, 313 ; a tax imposed in New York 
to defray the expenses of the expedition against, 316 ; 
sundry acts passed to promote the expedition against, 
317 ; the five nationsinformed of the intended attack on, 
319 ; aid voted by New Jersey towards the expedition 
against, 327 ; a mutiny breaks out among the forces 
designed against, 341 ; the people of New York in 
favor of the expedition against, 354; provided the 
crown bear the expenses, 355 ; the English gain over 
some Indian tribes between the Mississippi and, 358, 
3<)4; Oswego well situated for sending out parties 
against, 361 ; the governor of, sends to Onondaga to 
condole the death of some Indians, 362 ; the governor 
of New York in expectation of orders respecting the 
expedition against, 365 ; New York neutral in the 
war against, 371 ; Albany opposed to the expedition 
against, 372, 376 ; captain Wraxal raises a company 
for the expedition against, 377 ; the New York assem- 
bly refuse to contribute towards the expedition against, 
378; expedition against, laid aside, 379, 384, 402; 
cut off from all communication with the west, 386 ; 
forces against, disbanded, 409, 678 ; chief justice De 
Lancey opposed to the expedition against, 416 ; letters 
of governor Shirley to the governor of, 452, 482 ; the 
last bishop of, under the French, 483 ; the prisoners 
in, refused their liberty, 484 ; correspondence between 
the governor of New York and the governor of, 488, 
491, 494, 496, 502, 711, 731, 911, 936 ; population of, 
in 1749, 510 ; Phineas Stevens, prisoner in, 519, X., 
97 ; captain Stoddart's account of different places in, 
VI., 580; estimated population of, in 1750, 583; 
orders received in New York for an expedition against, 
651; measures adopted accordingly, ibid; governor 
Clinton complains to the governor of, of the seizure 
of English traders on the Ohio, 704 ; governor Clin- 
ton's notes on the letter of the governor of, 734 ; an 
army sent to the Ohio from, 779 ; colonel Johnson 
dissuades the five nations .against going to, 811 ; pri- 
soners sent from the Ohio to, 825 ; report on, 826 ; 
tjje French meditate a junction of Louisiana and, 893 ; 



-Can] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Ill 



Canada — continued. 

tlie English, policy to separate Louisiana from, 894 ; 
the government of, military, ibid ; the New York 
frontier defenseless against, 922 ; M. du Quesne, gene- 
ral of, 935 ; diflFerent modes of operating against, 991 ; 
troops moving on Crown Point from, 1001 ; some 
account of the trade between Albany and, VII., 16 ; 
the decline of the English interest among the Indians 
owing mainly to the failure of the expeditions against, 
18, 19 ; preparations for attacking the British colonies 
making in, 38 ; supplied indirectly by the Dutch with 
provisions, 82 ; message from the Oneidas to the gov- 
ernor of, 132 ; sir William Johnson sends war parties 
to, 173, 186 ; delegates from the six nations sent to, 
198, 230 ; expeditions fitted out at fort Johnson 
against, 199 ; the most vigorous measures about to be 
adopted against, 216 ; their proceedings there, 233 ; 
the Senecas and Delawares invited to, 262 ; to be 
invaded by way of Crown Point, 339, 340, 350 ; colonel 
Schuyler advances money to prisoners in, 344 ; lake 
Champlain called by the Indians, the gates of, 349 ; 
renewed efforts to .subjugate, 350 ; secretary Pitt's 
orders for the reduction of, 355, 418, 420 ; message 
to the Oneidas from the governor of, 385 ; sir Frede- 
rick Haldimand appointed governor of, 395 ; public 
thanksgiving ordered for the defeat of the French 
army in, 426 ; wholly reduced, 447 ; conduct of the 
six nations in the campaign against, 473 ; submits 
to the English, 491; sundry reports on, communi- 
cated to the board of trade, 620 ; queries respecting 
the fisheries of, 521 ; no change to be made in the 
troops in, 529 ; the priests of, to be watched and, if in 
favor of French connection, to be removed, 540 ; cap- 
tain Claus holds an Indian congress in, 542 ; message 
to the western Indians from, 544 ; the French of, 
become English subjects, 545 ; sir Jeffery Amherst, 
governor-general of, 548 ; nearly reduced by the five 
nations, 573 ; proposed Indian department for, 579 ; 
ceded to Great Britain, 588 ; the western Indians 
incited by the French of, 590 ; a bishop who under- 
stands French, necessary in, 591 ; benefits to accrue 
from the appointment of a protestant bishop to, 593 ; 
recommendation to endow a protestant bishop and 
clergy out of the Jesuit estates in, 600, 609 ; the In- 
dian policy changed by the reduction of, 603 ; effects 
resulting to the Indian trade from the reduction of, 
613, 999, VIII., 83 ; colonel Bradstreet's expedition 
to Detroit accompanied by Indians from, VII., 656; 
merchants of, complain of the purchase of a fort and 
extensive tract of land at Green bay, 817 ; settlement 
of the boundaries between New York and, 874, 875 ; 
licenses to trade with Indians obtained by New York 
merchants from, 877 ; governors Moore and Carleton 
request the confirmation of the boundary lines between 
New York and, 885 ; William Smith, chief justice of, 
909, VIII., 594; state of the Indian trade in, VII., 
954 ; proceedings for the settlement of the boundary 
between New Y'ork and, VIII., 3 ; i^ants made on lake 



Champlain by the governor of, invalid, 12; treaty of 
peace concluded betiveen the Cherokees and the In- 
dians of, 50; William Smitli writes a history of, 62; 
boundary confirmed between New York and, 87, 88 ; 
proposal for facilitating the communication between 
New York and, 139 ; New York sets up a claim to all 
the lands south of the St. Lawrence, 338 ; numerical 
strength of the Indians of, 452 ; Arthur St. Clair in 
the expedition against, 466 ; colonel Allan Maclean 
raises a regiment in, 563; about to be invaded by 
Americans, 605, 777 ; successes of the Americans in, 
647 ; measures adopted by general Carlton for the 
punishment of rebels in, 663 ; the Americans evacu- 
ate, 664 ; American reinforcements sent to, ibid, 677 ; 
the six nations offer to prevent the invasion of, 678 ; 
colonel Guy Johnson makes a treaty with the Indians 
of, 687, 740 ; news received from, of the readiness of 
the Indians to join the English in an expedition against 
Albany, 695 ; the Indians assemble in great numbers 
in, 699 ; the late sir William Johnson holds Indian 
congresses at Niagara and Detroit after the reduction 
of, 701 ; designs of the French to establish forts from 
Louisiana to, 702 ; colonel Guy Johnson proposes 
going to, 707, 726, 758 ; he receives letters by a mes- 
senger from, 711 ; major-general Starke goes to, 806 ; 
the Mohawks remove to, 816 ; names of the French 
governors of, IX., vii, 783, 784, 785, 791, 797, 803; 
instructions to Mr. Gaudais, royal commissioner to, 9 ; 
reports of baron d'Avaugour on, 13, 20 ; a bishop sent to, 
13 ; the finest and greatest state in the world, 14 ; re- 
commended to be divided into ten provinces, 15 ; map 
of, sent to France, ibid ; an earthquake in, 16 ; troops 
sent to, 25, 43, 52, 232, 373, X., 276, 278, 285 ; forts to 
be built in, IX., 26 ; manufactures and education to 
be encouraged in, 28 ; its northern limits unknown, 30 ; 
people seldom sick in, ibid; the right of trading 
denied the inhabitants of, 31 ; the soldiers of the 
Carignan regiment settle in, 32 ; ships can be built 
in, 35 ; France must not be depopulated in favor of, 
39 ; privileges granted the inhabitants of, 40 ; capa- 
ble of producing all the necessaries of life, 41 ; 
importance of introducing mechanics in, 42; M. 
de Callifere governor of, 45, 699 ; measures to be 
adopted for the security of, 53 ; reports of Mr. Talon 
on, 55, 71, 74; census of, in 1666, 1667, 1668, 57, 
61 ; trade with, opened, 61 ; girls sent from France 
to, 62, 64, 67 ; search for iron and copper mines 
ordered, 63 ; exploring expeditions fitted out in, 64 ; 
coins authorized to be struck in, 70 ; in great need of 
saw mills, 72 ; progress of population in, 73, 89 ; 
originally belonged to the Algonquins, 78 ; exposed 
condition of, 80 ; the Jesuits first carried the faith to, 
88 ; tobacco not to be planted in, 89 ; a ship begun 
to be built in, ibid ; scarcity of women in, 90 ; a 
meeting of the clergy, noblesse, judiciary and third 
estate held in, 94 ; population of, in 1673, 115 ; count 
de Frontenac reports on, 116 ; change in the land 



112 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Can— 



Canada — continued. 

granting department of, 119 ; rop^l'it'on of> i" ^^"^^ > 
136, 142 ; news of tlie war between France and Eng- 
land received in, 137 ; contradicted, 139 ; vanity of 
land proprietors in, 151 ; extent of the Indian trade 
carried on from, 153; the first Jesuit ordained in, 
171 ; state of aflairs in, when count de Frontenac left 
that country, 190 ; abstract of letters from, 196 ; 
Huguenots prohibited settling in, 199 ; trade to be 
encouraged between the West Indies and, 201 ; M. 
Franquelin engaged on a map of, 205 ; efforts making 
to establish parishes in, 207; population of, in 1683, 
210; the English of New York begin to trade to, 
212; M. de Meulles intendant of, 214; amount of 
appropriations for the year 1684 for, 222; foreigners 
excluded from the fur trade in, 223 ; emigration 
from, to the English colonies forbidden, ibid, 224 ; 
abuses in, 229, X., 180, 181, 937, 960, 961, 963; 
character of the youth of, IX., 276 ; of the noblesse 
of, 277 ; bad state of morals in, 278, 279 ; state of, in 
1685, 280; return of beaver exported from, 287; 
.first discovered by the French, 303 ; granted to a 
trading company, 304 ; no protestants in, 312 ; num- 
ber of troops in 1686 in, 314 ; population of, in 1686, 
316 ; many gentlemen in want of bread in, 317 ; 
cause of tlieir misery, 318 ; memoir on, 319 ; diffi- 
culties experienced in forming villages in, 342 ; state 
of, in 1687, 346 ; severe sickness in, 354, 743 ; early 
discoveries in, 378 ; and grants in, 379 ; progress of 
the Indian war in, 388 ; slavery authorized in, 398 ; 
inroads of the Iroquois into, 402 ; invasion of New 
York from, urged, 419 ; count de Frontenac ordered 
to embark for, 423 ; further reports on, 428, 430, 440, 
527; infested by Iroquois, 431, 503; the settlements 
in, to be concentrated, 432 ; summary of intelligence 
from, 434 ; character of the clergy of, 442 ; plan for 
the defense of, 447 ; invaded, 455 ; occurrences during 

1689, 1690 in, 462 ; three expeditions against New 
England and New York organized in, 464; paper 
money issued in, 497 ; low condition of, 503 ; state 
of, in 1691, 508 ; population of, 509 ; measures recom- 
mended for the defense of, 510 ; occurrences during 

1690, 1691 in, 513 ; suffers from famine, 519 ; a 
number of wolves in, 531 ; military operations in 

1691, 1692 in, 534; menaced, 540, 543, 667; an 
expedition against the Mohawk villages from, 550 ; 
occurrences in 1692, 1693 in, 550, 555 ; occuri'enees 
in 1694 in, 577; occurrences in 1694, 1695 in, 594; 
abstract of despatches from, 633, 634 ; occurrences 
during 1695, 1696 in, 640; causes which may lead to the 
loss of, 044 ; occurrences during 1696, 1697 in, 664 ; 
occurrences dui-ing 1697, 1698 in, 678 ; number of com- 
panies of infantry in, 725 ; plan for the invasion of 
New England from, 730 ; M. de Beauharnois appointed 
intendant of, 736 ; M. de Vaudreuil governor of, 742, 
758 ; the English about to invade, 743, 817 ; letters of 
marque issued in, 744; liostilities always commenced 
by the French of, 755 ; roads to be opened in, 756 ; 



population and trade of, in 1703, 757 ; proposed 
treaty of neutrality between New England and, 770 ; 
approved, 779 ; all trade forbidden between , the 
English colonies and, ibid, 1029 ; title of the French 
to, 781 ; reannexed to the crown, 784 ; M. de Bou- 
terouii intendant of, 787 ; expeditions to discover the 
South sea sent from, 789 ; discoveries made from, 
790, 791, 793 ; efforts to negotiate a treaty of neu- 
trality between New England and, 809 ; despotism 
in, 810; an expedition on foot against, 831, 835, 859 ; 
population of, in 1709, 833 ; its condition in 1709, 
840 ; the invasion of, abandoned, 842 ; escapes inva- 
sion by the wreck of the English fleet, 862 ; military 
force of, in 1716, 868 ; ginseng discovered in, 882 ; 
census of, in 1719, 896; La 1720, 898; in 1721, 907; 
strength of the expedition against, 930, X., 12; sup- 
ports the Abenakis in their war with the English, IX., 
937, 945 ; report on the affairs of, 952 ; instructions 
to M. de Beauharnois, governor of, 956 ; papers relat- 
ing to the boundary between New York and, 960 ; 
strangers to be forbidden to remain or reside in, 985 ; 
ship-bmlding encouraged in, 1025 ; number of troops 
in 1734 in, 1040 ; census of, in 1734, 1046 ; military 
force of, in 1740, 1068 ; its preservation depends on 
the conquest of Acadia, X., 4; cause of the failure of 
the expedition in 1711 against, 10 ; additional troops 
required for, 13 ; census of, in 1744 sent to France, 
17 ; regiments sent to defend, 27 ; military operations 
in 1745, 1746 in, 32, 38 ; new levies for Beaubassin 
raised in, 41 ; munitions of war arrive in, 43 ; prepa- 
rations for the invasion of, 54 ; journal of occurrences 
in 1746, 1747, 89 ; threatened, 93 ; journal of captain 
Phineas Stevens' visitto (noticed), 97 ; gener.al Shirley's 
plans against, 100 ; continued incursions of Indians 
into, 102 ; a fleet sent from France to, 110 ; the move- 
ments of the Pretender cause the abandonment of the 
invasion of, 122 ; foreign negroes to be sent to the 
West Indies from, 131 ; occurrences in, during 
1747, 1748, 137 ; runaway slaves sent to the West 
Indies from, 138 ; return of artillery in, 195 ; convicts 
from the galleys recommended to be sent to, 204 ; the 
English design cuttbig off the communication between 
Louisiana and, 220 ; objections to preserving, 221 ; 
importance of preserving, 222 ; always a burden to 
France, 223 ; a rampart to Louisiana and Mexico, 
224 ; and the granary of the tropics, ibid ; necessity 
of free communication between it and the Mississippi, 
229 ; a great many people ought to be sent to, 232 ; 
class of persons to be sent to, ibid ; instructions to 
M. Duquesne, governor of, 242 ; news of the reduction 
of fort Necessity received in, 260 ; capitation list of, 
271; population of, in 1754, 275; courts in (see 
Courts) ; the English unceasing in their usurpations 
on, 291 ; journal of M. de Vaudreuil's voyage to, 
297; an account of what occurred in 1755 in, 381; 
M. de Montcalm appointed to the command of the 
army in, 393; occurrences in from 1755 to 1756, 397, 
401 ; abstract of despatches from, 407, 423 ; small 



—Can] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



U3 



- continued. 

pox in, 408 ; no snow in January in, ibid ; rumored 
expeditions against, 409 ; fabulous account of tlie 
siege and capture of Manton, the capital of, 429 ; 
campaign of 175G in, 466; scarcity in, 497; military 
force ill 1757 in, 523; the duke de Belleisle recom- 
mends tluit additional troops be sent to, 527 ; reverend 
fatlier Cocquard's narrative of occurrences in, 528; 
severe winter in, 549 ; marriages in, 550 ; new year's 
custom in, 563 ; account of the campaign in 1757 in, 
640, 645 ; paper money in, 652 ; famine and an epi- 
demic prevail in, 653 ; expenses incurred in 1756, 1757 
in, 666 ; inconveniences in the organization of, 680 ; 
law against gambling in, 685 ; great scarcity of pro- 
visions in, 692, 701 ; captain Pouchot's observations 
on the frontiers of, 695 ; people reduced to eat horse- 
flesh, 696, 704; prices in 1758 in, 711; its critical 
situation, 761 ; its approaching fall foretold, 769 ; 
governed by oficers of the marine, 770 ; colonel 
Schuyler sent prisoner to, 776 ; its loss imminent, 
819, 829 ; number of men that can be furnished by, 
820 ; the English announce their intended invasion 
of, 835 ; occurrences in, from October, 1757, to Octo- 
ber, 1758, ibid ; prices of necessaries in 1758 in, 865 ; 
measures to be adopted for the defense of, 874 ; con- 
dition of, in 1758, 890 ; great scarcity in, 891, 898, 
973 ; memoir of M. P6an in, 897 ; many die of 
hunger in, 898, 973 ; an unusually early frost in, 900, 
901 ; a sick man and a desperate case, 926 ; measures 
for the preservation of, 927, 933 ; memoir on the 
policy of preserving, 930 ; memoir on the campaign 
of 1759 in, 935 ; immense fortunes made from abuses 
in, 938; amount of paper money in, ibid; minute 
providing, in case of M. de Vaudreuil's death, for 
the government of, 939 ; memoir of M. de Silhouette 
on, 940 ; about to be attacked from different points, 
944 ; supplies sent from Spain to, 945 ; plan of ope- 
rations for 1759 in, 952 ; severe winter in, 957, 969 ; 
tlie war has changed its character iu, 959 ; M. de 
Montcalm prophesies its fall, 960; population of, in 
1759, 962 ; the expenses of, 966, 972, 973 ; invaded, 
972; English plan of attack on, 974; Germans arrive 
in, 989 ; the English spare the churches in, 1000 ; 
campaign of 1759 in, 1001 ; bishop Pontbriand's des- 
cription of the misery of, 1057 ; bishop Pontbriand's 
opinion on the military operations in, 1059 ; plan to 
preserve what remains of, 1063 ; chevalier le Mercier's 
memoir on, 1065 ; excesses committed by the English 
army in, 1105 ; capitulation for the surrender of, 
1107 ; observations on peculations in, 1129 ; M. Du- 
mas' memoirs on the boundaries of, 1134 ; M. de 
Bourlamaque's memoirs on, 1139 ; causes of the fall 
of, 1141 ; proposed government for, 1145 ; plan to 
excite a rebellion in, 1155 ; count d'Estaing's procla- 
mation to the people of, 1165. 
Canada creek. Palatines purchase lands on, V., 656; men- 
tioned, VI., 62, 68 ; Indian name for, 866 ; no vacant 

15 



lands between Canajohary and, VII., 742 ; sir William 
Johnson obtains lands near, ibid ; the Indian boun- 
dary extended to, VIII., 110, 125, 127; the Imiiana 
resolved on keeping possession of their lands as far 
as, 124. 

Canada creek. West, IV., 391. 

Canada river. (See St. Lawrence.) 

Canadacta, an Onondaga Indian, sent with a message to the 
Messasagas, VII., 92. 

Canadagaia (Canadagara, Canadagaya, Canadagaye, Kanada- 
kayon, Kanadgaya), chief sachem of lower Mohawks, 
VI., 796, 797; his speech to the Albany congress, 865 
his report of the intrigues of governor Shirley, VII, 
29 ; employed by sir William Johnson as his speakei 
51; mentioned, 113; his address to governor Hardy, 
160 ; attends an Indian meeting at Onondaga, 512 
returns thanks to sir William Johnson, 735 ; assists 
at the treaty of fort Stanwix, VIII., 113. 

Canadagariaz (Canadagariesk), an Oneide chief, IV., 907, 
910. (See Anadakariask.) 

Canadague, a Seneca village, VIII., 526. 

Canadasaggo (Canadisega, Canidisego, Kanadasegey, Kana- 
daseegy), a Seneca castle, VII., 550; friendly to the 
English, 556, 576 ; to be excepted from any attack by 
the English, 568; framed houses at, VIII., 786. 

Canaderagey (Canadaraggo, Kanadaraygo, Kanaderagey), a 
Seneca castle, VII., 556, 568 ; friendly to the English, 
576, 582. 

Canadgegai, an Onondaga sachem. III., 535, 774. 

Canadian regiments. (See Army.) 

Canadians, none prisoners in Massachusetts, VI., 454 ; mus- 
tering for an enterprise, 547 ; called his majesty's 
new subjects, VII., 520, 614, X., 1099 ; a number of, 
join the Americans, VIII., 637, 662; many retaken 
and hanged, 664 ; efforts of their clergy to turn them 
against the Americans, 665 ; brave and well disci- 
plined, IX., 725 ; the governor of New York detains 
several, X., 177; reduce fort Necessity, 260; number 
of, accompanying the baron de Dieskau, 319 ; why 
not at the battle of lake George, 322 ; taken on the 
Ohio and sent to London, their statement, 352 ; num- 
ber of, killed at the battle of lake George, 361 ; jealousies 
between the French and, 419 ; M. de Montreuil's 
character of, ibid ; believe themselves the first nation 
in the world, 463 ; not friendly to Frenchmen, ibid ; 
treated with harshness by the French regulars, 538 ; 
four hundred of them sent to fort Duquesne, 553 ; 
their sacrifices for support of the war, 585 ; tlie mar- 
quis de Montcalm defends himself against a charge of 
harshness towards, 686 ; their conduct at the battle 
of Ticonderoga, 749, 754, 815 ; French estimation of, 
770 ; commendable patience of, 780 ; ill-treated by 
M. de Montcalm and his ofBcers, 781 ; a great deal of 
patience necessary in commanding, 783 ; a party of, 
sent from Ticonderoga on a scout, 801 ; a number of, 
killed at Green Bay, 840 ; garrison fort Duquesne, 
843 ; sent to defend Niagara, 975 ; their demeanor at 



114 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Can— 



Canadians — continued. 

the siege, 986, 987; how armed there, 989; their 
bravery at the siege of Quebec, 1001, 1039 ; (of Que- 
bec), swear not to bear arms against the king of Eng- 
land, 1015; not adapted for pitched battle, 1040; 
general Wolfe's proclamation to, 1046, 1047 ; save the 
French army on the heights of Abraham, 1052 ; diffi- 
cult position of, 1070, 1072; M. de Vaudrenil's 
address to, 1073 ; distinguish themselves in the battle 
of Sillery, 1076, 1083; panic stricken, 1102. 

Canadock, an Onondaga Indian, his speech to sir William 
Johnson, VII., 91. 

Canadsochere, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 728. 

Canagariarchio, the beaver hunting ground of the five nations, 
IV., 909. 

Canagaroh (Canagora), a Seneca town, III., 251, 252. 

Canaghquayeson (Canachquayesa, Canaghquayesa, Canagh- 
quiesa, Canaghquieso, Canaghquieson, Conaghquiesa, 
Conoghqnieson, Ganaghquiesa, Ganaquieson, Gono- 
quiesa, Kanaghquiesa, Kanquiesee), an Oneida sachem, 
VII., 45, 52, 109, 134; his speech to sir William John- 
son, 68, 556, VIII., 43; answer of the latter to, 
VII., 112 ; invites the six nations to a treaty at Mon- 
treal, 133 ; attends the council at Onondaga, 137 ; 
visits fort Johnson, 183, 232; explains how Indians 
began first to be paid for their services, 185 ; musters 
a number of Indians at the German flatts, 187; warns 
the Indians to look to lake George, 189 ; sir William 
Johnson expresses dissatisfaction to, 190 ; his speech 
to the superintendent of the affairs of the southern 
department, 213 ; sends a message to the Cherokees, 
326 ; presents two sachems for sir William Johnson's 
approval, 723 ; claims for the Oneidas the lands west 
of the German flatts, 729 ; his speech to the Delawares 
on then- requesting the removal of cue of their chiefs, 
736 ; his speech to the Cherokee deputies, VXII., 44; 
assists at the treaty of fort Stanwix, 113, 123, 137 ; his 
speech to the commissioners of the twelve united 
colonies, 606, 609. 

Canaghsaragy, a road to be opened from the German flatts 
to, VII., 143 ; a Tuscarora village, 512. 

Canagiechuie, ensign Douville sent to burn the English ma- 
gazines at, X., 396, 

Canagora, a Mohawk town, III., 250. (See Kanagaro.) 

Canahoge. (See Cayouage.) 

Canahogue, on lake Erie, V., = 0, VII., 4SS, IX., 999. 

Canajanawe, a Cayuga sachem, III., 774. 

Canajoharie (Canadsiohare, Canaedsishore, Canajohare, Ca- 
najoharee, Canajohary, Canajorha, Cannatchocary, 
Canojoharrie, Canojohary, Chonoghoheere, Conaiyo- 
haree, Conajaree, Conajohare, Conajoharee, Conajo- 
hary, Conijoharie, Connojohary, Conojohary), a Mo- 
hawk village, description of, III., 250, X., 676, 677; 
the second castle of the Mohawks, IV. 802 V. 245 • 
mentioned, 372; the Mohawks of, petition 'the'legis- 
lature to be reinstated in their lands, VI., 16; the 
farmers of, complain of the Indians, 302 ; petition of 



the Indians of, against certain land patents, 315 ; 
necessity of stopping the sale of liquor at, 361 ; com- 
plaints lodged against George Clock of, 362; the In- 
dians at, complain of sundry individuals lor purloin- 
ing their lands, 784 ; Abraham Canusta, chief of, 796 ; 
the Indians of, pleased that the governor of New York 
is a native of the country, 821 ; the upper castle of 
the Mohawks, 850 ; a church required for, ibid, 877, 
880, 883 ; complaints against the Indians at, 857 ; the 
Oswego traders plundered at, ibid, 858 ; king Hen- 
drick, one of the Mohawks of, 867 ; diff'erences with 
the Indians of, partially settled, 879 ; the Indians 
greatly displeased at the patent of, 962, VII., 18; an 
investigation into the patent of, ordered, VI., 1017 ; 
a fort built at, VII., 5, 53; the death of the great 
Hendrick condoled at, 52 ; warriors of, killed at the 
battle of lake George, 55 ; interview of sir William 
Johnson with the Indians of, 71, 103, VIII., 304; 
the patent of, recommended to be annulled, VII., 77, 
78 ; report of a mission to Oghquage from, 104 ; 
Abraham, chief sachem of, 115 ; sir William Johnson 
holds a conference at, 378 ; a resurvey of their lands 
demanded by the Indians of, 434 ; news of French 
designs brought to, 524 ; the Mohawks ill-treated in 
regard to their lands at, 527 ; Mr. Livingston and 
others claim the hunting grounds at, 562; efforts to 
compromise the dilfieulties about the lands at, 577 ; a 
tract of land presented to sir William Johnson by the 
Indians of, 659, 742, 809, 840; provisions for the In- 
dians sent to, 738 ; no vacant lands between Canada 
creek and, 742; governor Moore visits, VIII., 93; 
some Indians go to England from, 405 ; number of 
Indians at, 452 ; attemx^ts made to deprive the Indians 
of their lands at, 522 ; claimed by George Klock and 
others, 671; burnt, 806; inhabited by Germans, X , 
677. 

Canajoharie (Conojehary) creek, VII., 708. 

Canal, of Languedoc completed, II., 348 ; at Little Falls 
suggested, VIII., 93 ; from Wood creek to the Mo- 
hawk river, commissioners appointed to report on a, 
189 ; across the carrying place at fort Stanwix sug- 
gested, 442 ; and between fort Edward and lake Cham- 
plain, ibid. 

Canale, John, IV., 1008. 

Canandaigua. (See Canaderagey.) 

Canante-Chiariron, chief of the White river Indians, IX., 708. 

Cananville, M. de, IX., 483. 

Canaqualho, a Mohawk sachem, IV., 124. 

Canaragayatia (Canaragayte), an Iroquois chief sent to the 
Ohio, VIII., 501 ; fails in his mission, 503. 

Canard river, where, X., 62. 

Canaresse, Eoomtjes hook called, by the Indians, I., 599. 

Canary Islands (Canaries, Canaria), staves exported from 
New England to the, L, 370; mentioned, 398, 455; 
codfish exported from Boston to, IV., 790 ; imports 
into New York from, VI., 127. 

Canary seed, samples of, sent from New Netherland to Hol- 
land, I., 37. 



-Can] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



115 



Canassadaga (Canesedage, Camiusadogo, Canosedagui, Con- 
uossedage, Conosodage, Ganestague, Kanossadge), a 
castle of French praying Indians, IV., 120, 493 ; near 
Montreal, 799; the Indians of, agree to the peace, 
805; at the lake of the Two Mountains, 1163, IX., 
1079, lOSO; two different tribes at, VI., 582; conve- 
nient for the Indiaa trade, VII., 614; the Ottawa 
Indians under the supervision of those of, VIII., 240. 
Canassatego (Cannassatego), an Onondaga sachem, VI., 293; 
death of, 70S ; his speech at the treaty at Lancaster, 
VIII., 614; his brother meets the commissioners of 
the continental congress, 621. 
Canastagione (Canassigioene, Canastagiowne, Canastaguyone, 
Canestigione, Canestigogione, Canuestagione, Cenes- 
tigaona, Conestageoni, Ganestagayune, Kanestigionne, 
Kanestigiorma, Kanestiguione, Kenestigaione, Nasta- 
gione, Nustigione, Quiinestigoane, Queuestigfeane, 
Quenestigione) ; the French Indians kill several per- 
sons at, III., 716, 727, 783, 801^ a prisoner taken by 
the French at, 805 ; proposed to be garrisoned, 841, 
IV., 251, 879; scouts sent to, 65 1 where, 184; recom- 
mended to be fortified, ibid ; a fort to be built at, 254, 
560, 573, 1068 ; must be fortified in war, 411, 969 ; 
abandoned, 425, 430, 464 ; the Indians anxious that 
a fort be built at, 573; map of, sent to England, 676 ; 
colonel Romer submits a plan of the proposed fort 
at, 681 ; the Mohawks give away some islands near, 
906 ; a stockadoed fort at, 968 ; condition of the 
fortification at, 1035, 1128 ; a fort built at, 1057; the 
Indians kill cattle at, V., 566; three companies of 
soldiers posted at, VI., 660. 
Caiiastoga (Canestogoe, Canistage, Canistoge, Conastogy, 
Constoga), V., 373, 675 ; Pennsylvania lies next to, 
485 ; lies on the Susquehanna river, 486 ; the small 
pox sent among the five nations from, 487; a deputa- 
tion from the five nations visit, 678 ; Delawares 
murder the English between the Esopus and, VII., 
110 ; final payment to the Indians for the lands at, 
VIII., 133. 
Canatsyagaye, an Onondaga sachem, VII., 254. 
Canawanegoe, sent as a spy to Canada, V., 85. 
Canawaroghare (Canawagore, Canawaroghere, Canowarig- 
hare, Onawaraghliare), situation of, VII., 101, 611 ; 
a new village of the Oueidas, 512; the Montauk In- 
dians to be settled at, VIII., 476 ; the Indians com- 
plaiu of the clergyman at, 535, 536; excitement at, 
541 ; mentioned 550. 
Cancall bay, the British land at, VII., 345. 
Cancelli, lieutenant, wounded, X., 431. 
Candia, the duke de Beaufort killed at, II., 351. 
" Candid (a), and impartial state of the case between the 
Newtonians and Hutchinsonians," Mr. Home author 
of, VII., 425. 
" Candid examination (a), of the mutual claims of Great 
Britain and the colonies," Joseph Galloway publishes, 
VIII., 544. 
Caneadwario, an Oneida sachem, III., 774. 



Caneenda. (See Kaneenda.) 
Canella, brought to New Amsterdam, II., 29. 
Caner, reverend Henry, author of " Candid Examination," 
VI., 914; excels as a preacher, VII, 397; his testi- 
monial to Mr. McCleunaghan, 410, 411 ; transmits 
an act of the Massachusetts assembly to archbishop 
Seeker, 507; reports particulars respecting the society, 
517; recommends Mr. Frink to the society for propa- 
gating the gospel, 567 ; answers doctor Mayhew, 591 ; 
ought to have a doctor's degree, 592. 
Canerghka, a Huron chief, hostile to the English, VII., 862. 
Canestio (Kanestio), a murder committed by the Indians of, 
VII., 511, 962; the murderers demanded, 513, 621, 
652 ; where, 514 ; a village composed of stragglers, 
516; burned, 625; description of, 628. 
Canestio river, X., 588, 589 ; width of, 590 ; course of, 695. 
Caniahaga, the far Indians at, acknowledge the king of Great 

Britain, VI., 720 ; a stockade fort built at, ibid. 
Caniochkouie, an Oneida sachem, IV., 985. 
Canisore. (See Dckanissorc.) 
Canniaghkennie, an Oneida captain, returns from the south, 

IV., 918. 
Canniengeera, a Seneca, sent with a message to Canada, IV., 

570. 
Cannockhere, a Mohawk deserter, IV., 85. 
Camion, Abraham, IV., 27. 
Cannon, Andrew, IV., 29, 942. 
Cannon, of fort William Hendrick (New York), mortgaged, 

II., 710; cast at Three Rivers, Canada, VI., 581. 
Cannowa Eocquaes, a Delaware chief, I., 600. 
Canoehaqwne, an Oneida chief, IV., 342. 
Canoenada, a Seneca town, III., 251, 252. 
Canoes, how constructed, I., 282; of moose skins, IX., 34; 
described, 77 ; called shoes iu Indian parlance, 1065. 
Canoestoery, an Indian chief, IV., 563. 
Canoghsa, a sachem of Geneseo, VII., 254. 
Canogrodon, an Onondaga chief, IV., 898. 
Canohogo, a Mohawk village, IV., 807. 

Canon (Kanou), captain of the frigate La Valeur, X., 755; 
carries the news of the victory at Ticonderoga to 
France, ibid, 771 ; why his departure was delayed, 
782; to convoy supplies to Canada, 899; number of 
men under his command, 900; convoys ships to 
Quebec, 993. 
Canondaghkira, a Mohawk sachem, IV., 491. 
Canosedagui, captain Evert Bancker, Indian commissary, to 

reside at, V., 797. 
Canossadero, reverend father Milet's master, IV. , 60. 
Canossione, or the five nations, IV., 295. (See Indian lan- 
guage.) 
Canowaloa, where, VII., 101. 

Canso (Canceau, Cancer, Canseau), gut of, III., 553; the 
French claim the islands in the, VI., 945 ; the eastern 
boundary of Acadia, IX., 4 ; the English take a num- 
ber of Micmacs at, 912 ; the English required to aban- 
don the islands in the, 985. 
Canso (Campseaux), island of, pirates plunder, III., 571; 
English fishermen murdered at, V., 592, VL, 875; 



116 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Can— 



Canso, island of — continued. 

the fisheries of, Tery valnable, V., 593 ; ought to be 
fortified, 594 ; men-of-war necessary for the protec- 
tion of, 962 ; destroyed, YI., 297 ; the English have 
a depot at, X., 4; importance of, 5 ; a blockhouse 
erected at, 18; abandoned, 53. 

Cant, Mr., member of the states general, II., 353. 

Cantalupe, viscount, lord Delawarr created, TI., 163. 

Cantelbergh, I., 51. 

Canterbury, [George Abbot] archbishop of, member of the 
privy council. III., 1, 2, 4; [William Laud] arch- 
bishop of, member of the privy council, 19 ; [GUbert 
Sheldon] archbishop of, member of the privy council, 
166; [WiUiam Sancroft] archbishop of, member of 
the privy council, 360 ; clergymen of the church of 
England in New York to have certificates from the 
archbishop of, 372; Thomas [Tenison] archbishop 
of, IV., 148, 273, 277, 2&4, 292, 415, 628, 961, 1075 ; 
his attention called to the want of ministers among 
the five nations, 769, 772 ; has the right to gi-ant let- 
ters of administration in certain cases, T., 3 ; the 
five nations receive a letter from the archbishop of, 
271 ; the Mohawks send a letter to the archbishop of, 
279 ; [William Wake] archbishop of, member of the 
privy council, v., 539 ; mentioned, 852,853; [John 
Potter] archbishop of, one of the lords justices, VI. 
163 ; chief justice de Laneey presumes on the jwrsonal 
interest he has with him, 465 ; letters of the reverend 
Samuel Johnson to Thomas Herring, archbishop of, 
777, 819 ; bisliop Seeker succeeds doctor 'Hutton in 
the see of, 907 (see Seeker) ; doctor Herring, arch- 
bishop of, lOlS. 

CantweU, captain, UI., 233; high sheriff of Delaware, 304. 

Canundageh (Ohio), VIII., 556, 558. 

Canworha, a Seneca chief, UI., 774. 

Capawack island, V., 596. 

Cape Anawagon (Anewagon, Manawagan, Nawagen), where, 
m., 218 ; a fort formerly at, IV., 831. 

Cape Aim (cape St. Ann), colonel Allen claims as far west 
as, IV., 674 ; goods unloaded at, 792. 

Cape Breton (cape Bretagne, Briton), in possession of the 
French, lY., 790 ; several vessels of the Canada expe- 
dition wrecked on the coast of, V., 284 ; or Bacalio 
islands, granted to sir William Alexander, 592 ; the 
fisheries of Nova Scotia engrossed by the French of, 
594; a vessel from, arrives in New York in quest of 
provisions, 959, 961; no crops raised in, 962; the 
governor of, writes to governor Cosby for leave to 
purchase supplies at New York, 970 ; Louisbourg at, 
strongly fortified, VI., 183 ; lieutenant-governor Clarke 
suggests taking, 184; must be taken before Canada 
229 ; four French men-of-war arrive at, 259, 261 ; the 
assembly of New York assists the expedition against 
282, 283, 306, 645 ; New York cannon contributed 
greatly to the reduction of, 284 ; New TToik applied 
to for aid to maintain, 287 ; the five nations informed 
of the reduction of, 297, 318 ; the board of trade 
express their satisfaction at the aid rendered by the 



New York expedition against, 309 ; the French de- 
stroy a small place near, 318 ; Massachusetts incurs 
heavy taxes by her zeal for the reduction of, 355 ; 
Chebucto more important than, 583 ; Oswego not to 
be disturbed out of consideration for, 780 ; Massachu- 
setts sustains great loss in the expedition against, 823 ; 
English scalps carried to, 875 ; the English title to, 
not plain, 885 ; owned by the English, 887 ; force 
furnished by Massachusetts against, 939 ; an act 
passed in New York to prevent the exportation of 
provisions to, 941 ; value of, to the French, 944 ; 
governor Shirley planned the expedition against, 959 ; 
reduced, VII., 349, 389, X., 724, 847; the expedition 
against Quebec to rendezvous at, VII., 355 ; the Eng- 
lish wish to restrict the French to, IX., 1 ; of no con- 
sideration, 14 ; ceded to France, 75 ; the French pro- 
cure coal at, 332; discovered, 701; convenience of 
the coast of, 758 ; the French take possession of, 781 ; 
a part of Acadia, 788 ; called Isle Royale, 868, 895, X., 
357; the English visit, IX., 917; various names for, 
953 ; commodore Knowles, governor of,X., 31 ; colonel 
Gorham at the taking of, 90 ; to be restored to the 
French, 175; intelligence from, 572; Abijah Wil- 
lard at the taking of, 732 ; captain (afterwards ad- 
miral) Durell at the siege of, 994. (See Isle Koy- 
aU.) 

Cape Canseau (Campseau), VI., 825, IX., 917. 

Cape Charies, II., 85. 

Cape Chat, a look-out established at, X.,42, 159; M. Bazin 
recalled from, 65 ; M. Bazin leaves, 74 ; the videttes 
recalled from, 124, 175. 

Cape Cod, the English commence a settlement behind, I., 
51 ; the Dutch set up the arms of the states general 
on, 284; and call it New Holland, ibid, 458, 564, II., 
133; the Dutch make discoveries east of, I., 287; 
number of villages established between Stamford and, 
288 ; the Dutch took prior possession of the country 
from cape Hinlopen to, 347 ; the English fiist come 
around, 458 ; called Staten hook, ibid ; distance of 
Greenwich from, ibid ; the Dutch claim the country 
lying between the Fresh river and, 460 ; the east limit 
of New Netherland, 544, II., 228 ; proposition to leave 
to the English the country between the Pequatoos 
river and, I., 545 ; the Dutch give names to the seve- 
ral parts of the coast on both sides of, 564, II., 133, 
III., 17; the river Pequatosfocket and Narikausick 
situate behind, 134 ; reverend Mr. Leverich, minister 
at, 160 ; the eastern boundary of New Netherland, 
228; Long Island situate to the west of, 296, VII., 
430 ; the Dutch trade between Delaware bay and. III., 
16 ; mentioned, 170, 215, 248, 328 ; no codfish west 
of, IV., 790 ; Khode Island the most important place 
southwest of, 831 ; the lords of trade require a draft 
of the coast from St. Croix to, 843 ; one of the bounds 
of Massachusetts, V., 596; Mr. Smith writes to gov- 
ernor Shirley from, VI., 825 ; Indians m the vicinity 
of, IX., 4; the puritans land near, 267. 

Cape Corientes, VII.; 219. 



— Cae] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



117 



Cape Cornelius, four leagues north of cape Hinlopen, I., 
289 ; the most southerly point of Delaware bay, 290. 

Cape Corse (cabo Corso, cape Cors), divers English ships 
prevented toiiching at, II., 264 ; ambassador Van 
Gogh complains of the seizure of, 277, 301, III., 78, 
80; its capture avowed and justified, II., 278, 282; 
vindication of the English title to, 302 ; proposition 
for the restoration of, 306, 339 ; order for the capture 
of, when issued, 315 ; date of its reduction, ibid, 320 ; 
said to have been originally purchased by the Eng- 
lish, 321; that assertion refuted, 322; Charles II. 
denies having given orders for the taking of, 334 ; the 
fort at, proposed to be razed, 352 ; restitution of, 
doubtful, 357; a plan for surrendering, submitted, 
360 ; mentioned, 511 ; ambassador Van Gogh receives 
a letter and papers in relation to the taking of, III., 78. 

Cape Desrosiers, a look-out established at, X., 42, 90, 159 ; 
reports from, 60 ; a French vessel burnt at, 03, 64 ; 
privateers appear off, 116; provisions sent to, 117; 
Mr. Aubert commands at, 121 ; a look-out recalled 
from, 124, 175. 

Cape Diamond, IX., 484, 487. 

Cape Elizabeth, III., 249. 

Cape Fear, deserted, III., 161; the south limits of North 
Carolina, V., 609; north bounds of South Carolina, 
610 ; Spanish cruisers off, VI., 198. 

Cape Finisterre, loss of the French in the battle off, X., 121 ; 
engagement off, 384. 

Cape Florida, the west bounds of the English in America, 
IV., 578 ; mentioned, VI., 893. 

Cape Fourchu, IX., 917. 

Cape Franjois, VII., 219. 

Cape Good Hope, II., 228; the English claim the exclusive 
trade on the coast of Africa from cape Verd to the, 
319. 

Cape Henriette Marie, in the country of the Assiniboius, IX., 
166. 

Cape Hinlopen (cape Hindlopen), I., 43 ; the southern 
boundary of New Netherland, 289, 544, 545 ; the 
Dutch took prior possession from cape Cod to, 347 ; 
Swanendael not far from, 542 ; two leagues from the 
Whorekill, II., 19; the country from Boomtiens hook 
to, about to be annexed to New Amstel, 51 ; fugitives 
from Virginia stranded at, 54 ; the south boundary of 
New Netherland south of, 228, 609 ; one court of jus- 
tice for the inhabitants of the Whorekill and those on 
both sides of, 605. 

Cape Island, IX., 953. 

Cape Lauzon, IX., 20. 

Cape Lopez Gons.<ilvo, I., 242. 

Cape de la Magdelaine, IX., 97 ; the Jesuits retire from, 120. 

Cape Malabar, one of the bounds of Massachusetts, V., 596. 

Cape May, the northerly cape of the South river, I., 290; 
mentioned. III., 170, 223; pirates land at, IV., 542; 
New Jersey extends to, 1155, VI., 838; population of, 
in 1726, v., 819. 

Cape Morante, II., 26, 27. 

Cape Komaiue, II., 5. 



Cape Sable, III., 132, 551 ; one of the bounds of sir William 
Alexander's grant, V., 592 ; the fisheries of, very val- 
uable, 593 ; the French claim from cape Canseau to, 
VI., 825; the English have possessions near, 945; 
seized by the English, IX., 783. 

Cape St. Anthony, II., 29. 

Cape St. Augustine, I., 484. 

Cape St. Ignace, English packets not to pass, X., 158. 

Cape St. Mary, the English make a descent on, IX., 927. 

Cape St. Michel, three settlers carried off from, IX., 622. 

Cape St. Vincent, a Dutch squadron proposed to be stationed 
oft", II., 529. 

Cape Torment, where, IX., 489. 

Cape TourmentLue (Nova Scotia), X., 70. 

Cape Verde (cabo Verde), I., 35, 100, 102, 105, 110, 115, 158, 
II., 121 ; the places between cape Lopes Gonsalvo and, 
afford simply trade to the Dutch, I., 242 ; recom- 
mendation for the regulation of the trade to, 243 ; 
seized, II., 243, 268, 329 ; captain Holmes had no com- 
mission to take, 262 ; complaint of the capture of, 
already answered, 278 ; comments of sir George Down- 
ing on the proceedings of the Dutch for the recovery 
of, 303 ; proposition of the states general for the res- 
toration of, 306, 339 ; an English squadron arrive at, 
319 ; restored, 413 ; recovered by the Dutch, 511. 

Capel, sir Henry, member of the privy council. III., 572. 

Capital punishment not to be inflicted in New Netherland 
until approved by the governor and council, II., 653 ; 
a soldier ordered to be hung in Canada, X., 638. (See 
Negroes; Torture.) 

Capito, Matthys, commissary at the South river, II., 105. 

Capitulation of the Swedes on the South river, terms of the, 
I., 582; of forts Casimir and Christina, 607; of New 
Netherland, insisted on by the inhabitants, II., 248 ; 
articles of, 250 ; ratification of, exchanged, 414 ; of 
Port Royal (Nova Scotia), violated, IX., 530 ; at Minas, 
abstract of, X., 92; of Oswego, articles of, 444, 474; 
of fort William Henry, 604, 617, 642, 665 ; motive of 
the French for consenting to it, 631 ; declared null 
and void, 772 ; of fort Frontenac, terms of, 825 ; of 
fort Niagara, 990 ; of Quebec, articles of, 1004, 1011 ; 
for the surrender of Canada, 1107. (See Articles.) 

Capon, Mr., commissary at Port Royal, IX., 932. 

Capon island, where, X., 843. 

Cappes, reverend Felix, missionary in Acadia, IX., 858, 859. 

Capriole, lieutenant de, wounded, X., 431. 

Cap Rouge (Capeau-rouge), IX., 235 ; a French brig captured 
off, 929. 

Cap Rouge river, a fort built at, IX., 266. 

Captain Bull, a Delaware chief, captured, VII., 611, VIIL, 
341, and sent to New York, VII., 625. 

Captain Daniel, a Mohawk chief, VIIL, 555. 

Caquaquinny, an Oneida sachem, V., 64. 

Caqueendara, an Onondaga chief, IV., 123. 

Car, John, IV., 754, 940. 

Carachkinde, an Onondaga sachem. III., 774. 

Caraoos, I., 507. 

Carameda, II., 2, 3. (See St Lucar.) 



118 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cae- 



Caraf uck (Caratuke), IV., 651 ; river.^or gullet, north bounds 
of Carolina, V., 608. 

Carbasius, doctor, and partners allowed to send a ship to 
Virginia, I., 26. 

Carber,v, [Richard Vaughan 2d] earl of, member of the 
privy council. III., 44, 46, 166, 177, 229. 

Carbonell, ensign Thomas, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 730. 

Cardale, Thomas, arrests reverend Messrs. McKemie and 
Hampton, IV., 1186. 

Garden, John, captain in Shirley's regiment, X., 282. 

Cardiflf, colonel Daniel Glaus, dies at, VIII., 815. 

Cardigan, [George Brudenell 3d] earl of, VI., 97. 

Cardonel, Mr., IV., 1035. 

Carelant, Nathaniel, II., 150. (See Cartelyn.) 

Carelzen, Joost, III., 75. 

Carery, lieutenant, killed, X., 1085. 

Carew, George, lord, II., 740; member of the privy council, 
III., 4, 11. 

Carey, Walter, member of the board of trade. III., xvii, V., 
823, 824, 834, 844, 846, 871, 899. 

Carheil (Careill, Carel), reverend Etiennede, S. J., biograph- 
ical notice of, IX, 227; ill treated by the Cayugas, 
360 ; missionary to the Outawas, sends a letter to the 
governor of Canada, informing him of the disaffection 
of the Hurons and Outawas, 463 ; missionary at Mis- 
silimakinak, 587. 

Carhoharen, an Onondaga Indian, III., 532. 

Caribbean islands (Caribbe islands, Charibba islands,^Chari- 
bee islands, Charibby islands), encouragement of the 
Dutch trade to, recommended, I., 219; the people 
of New Netheriand desire that peace may be preserved 
with the, 269 ; provisions exported from New England 
to the, 370 ; the Dutch forbid to trade to the, 436 ; 
exports from the, 437 ; the Dutch propose that the 
trade be free to the, ibid ; letters from New Nether- 
land sent by way of the, 454 ; information of the war 
between Holland and England sent to the, 481, 482 ; 
open to attack from New Netheriand, 484 ; the English 
reject the proposal of the Dutch for free trade to the, 
486 ; paper indorsed. Instruction to the Dutch am- 
bassadors in England respecting the affairs of the, 
548; ships arrive in England from the, II., 340; the 
restitution of, to be demanded, 516 ; a prize taken in, 
627; mentioned. III., 40; New England required to 
assist the, 155 ; dependant on the northern plantations 
for provisions, 212 ; governor Denonville threatens 
to send the prisoners from New York to the, 487 ; 
importance of, 573 ; a fleet to sail against Canada 
from, IV., 12. (See West Indies.) 

Carignan, M. de Villeroi at the battle of, II., 348. 

Carik, Suzanne, X., 882. 

Carillon, reverend M., chaplain to the duchess of Orleans, 
III., 463. 

Carillon, the marquis du Quesne recommends the erection 
of a fort near, X., 301 ; baron de Dieskau leaves part 
of his army at, 320 ; his defeated troops return to, 
323 ; a fort built at, 325, 356, 361, 409, 425, 441, 
470, 914 ; a flying camp to be left at, 330 ; the French 



occupy, 338, 341, 355, 380,567; its distance from 
Crown Point, 366, 383, 470 ; engineer Lotbiniere .at, 
366; he projects a fort there, 368; barns burnt at, 
401 ; the English infest, 402 ; progress of the works 
at, 410 ; description of the fort at, 414 ; the marquis 
de Montcalm visits, 432, 483, 487, 844 ; general Lou- 
doun about to march against, 437 ; sis French regi- 
ments arrive at, 480 ; the safetj' of New England de- 
pends on the capture of, 481 ; the French apprehend 
an attack on, 486 ; report of M. de Lotbinifere on the 
fort at, 493; skirmifhes in the neighborhood of, 566, 
579 ; occurrences at, 569 ; captain d' Hebecourt com- 
mands at, 670, 688, 693 ; a party sent in pursuit of 
major Rogers from, 693, 703 ; news from, 710 ; mili- 
tary operations in 1758 at, 721 ; the English show 
themselves at, 836, 837 ; major Rogers sticks a letter 
on the horns of some cattle for the commandant of, 
837 ; the French concentrate their forces at, 893 ; 
work at the fortifications continued, 945 ; a party of 
workmen cut off at, 946, 957; measures adopted for 
the defense of, 954; thi-eatened, 957, 961; M. de 
Bourlamaque in command at, 970, 971, 993,1002; 
about to be abandoned, 1024; precipitate retreat 
from, 1031. (See Ticonderoga.) 

Carillon, a post on the Ottawa river, sir William Johnson 
makes an establishment for, VII., 658 ; an Indian 
post recommended to be established at, 661, 872 ; 
troops sent to, 952. 

Carion, captain de, liis ship taken by the English, IX., 923. 

Carionjahdadhe, a Seneca oliief, III., 774. 

Caristasie, a Mohawk warrior killed. III., 815 ; chief sachem 
of Trenondoge, 817. 

Carlan, adjutant, killed, X., 751, 799. 

Carle, Anne, married to admiral Clinton, VI., 475. 

Carle, general, admiral Clinton marries a daughter of, VI., 
475. 

Carle, Jacob, VI., 347. 

Carleton, sir Dudley, knight, recommends captain Dale to the 
states general, I., 16, 17, 18, 19 ; the states general 
resolved to pay captain Dale half his wages during 
his absence, out of respect for the strong recom- 
mendation of, 20; captain Dale ordered to be paid 
bis full wages on the recommend.ation of, 21 ; asks 
the states general to dispose of his communication on 
the subject of Virginia, 27, 28 ; mentioned, 48 ; 
succeeded by Mr. Boswell at the Hague, 50 ; secre- 
tary of state, III., vii; instructed to stay the sailing 
of Dutch ships for New England, 6 ; his answer, 7 ; 
memorial of, to the states general, 8 ; some Walloons 
and others apply for permission to settle in Virginia, 
to, 9 ; secretary Calvert informs him that the applica- 
tion of the Walloons has been granted, 10 ; reports 
that lie has had no answer to his complaint, to the 
states general, 11. (See Dorchester, viscount.) 

Carleton, earl of, Henry Boyle created. III., viii. 

Carleton, sir Guj-, K. B., governor of the province of Quebec, 
VII., 395; visits lake Champlain and fixes the boundary 
between New York and Canada, 874, VIII., 35, 87; 



— Cae] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



119 



Carleton, sir Guy — continued. 

requests the coufirmation thereof, VII., 885; sends 
troops to the Ottawa river, 952 ; recommends that 
forts on lake Champlain be kept in good repair, 984 ; 
chief justice Hay goes to Canada with, 992 ; arrives 
in Canada as lieutenant-governor, VIII., 3; welcomed 
to Canada, 71; the first to settle a boundary line 
between Canada and New York, 103 ; sails for Eng- 
land, 238; his commission, instructions, &c., for- 
warded from New York to Quebec, 529 ; the Ameri- 
cans check, 581 ; will not ullow the Indians to leave 
the limits of the province, 636, 659 ; about to relieve 
St. Johns, 644; holds a conference with the Indians, 
661 ; defeats the Americans, 663 ; succeeds sir Henry 
Clinton in the command in America, 717 ; holds a 
levee at Montreal, 718 ; colonel Butler reports the 
condition of fort Stanwis to, 719 ; at St. Johns, 722 ; 
refuses to pay colonel Claus' disbursements, 723 ; not 
pleased with Colonel Glaus' appointment, 725 ; his 
residence whilst in New York, X., 777. (See Dor- 
chester, lord) 

Carleton, Colonel Thomas, VIII., 776. 

Carleton island, IX., 651. 

Carlisle, James Hay, 1st earl of, claims the Island of St. 
Martin, I., 45, 47 ; the English lay claim to all the 
West India islands, by virtue of a grant to, 66. 

Carlisle, [Charles Howard, 4th] earl of, member of the 
privy council. III., 44, 166, 176, 177, 229, 230, 257. 

Carlisle, [Charles Howard, 6th] earl of, one of the privy 
council, v., 412. 

Carlisle, [Frederick Howard, 8th] earl of, member of the 
board of trade. III., six; commissioner to negotiate 
with the American congress, VIII., 763. 

Carlisle (England), lieutenant colonel Stanwix, governor of, 
VII., 280. 

Carlisle (Pennsylvania), George Croghan at, VII., 280 ; colo- 
nel Stanwix's head quarters at, 284, 285 ; troops sent 
from Pittsburg to, X., 906. 

Carmarthen, [Thomas Osborne, 1st] marquis of, president of 
the council. III., 605, 750; governor Fletcher writes 
to, IV., 72. (Sen Leeds, duke of .) 

Carmarthen, Francis Godolphin [Osborne] marquis of, mar- 
ries lady Amelia D'Arcy, VI., 757. 

Carmarthenshire, George Rice represents, VII., 536. 

Carmer, Henry, III., 630. 

Carmon, Andrew, captain of the Richmond county militia, 
IV., 809. 

Carney, James, X., 593. 

Carolana (New York), VII., 926. 

Carolina, granted to Lord Berkeley and others, II., 599 ; 
Edward Rause dies in, 688 ; major Andros, a land- 
gi-ave of, 741 ; the possession of New York by the 
Dutch ruinous to. III., 207; post houses to be set up 
from Nova Scotia to, 349 ; a pirate plunders a vessel 
of, 387 ; the French make discoveries to the back of, 
396 ; the five nations at war with the Indians behind, 
475 ; grounds of the title of the French to, 529 ; 
Messrs. LaudoniSre and Ribault begin a settlement in, 



530; whence named, 532, IX., 267, 702, 914; the at- 
tention of the government called to. III., 574; Mr. 
Tonti sets up a fort back of, 580 ; a number of Hugue- 
nots remove to New York from, 650 ; the French lie 
to the back of all the colonies from New England to, 
IV., 208; an English colony, 296; pirates go from 
Pliiladelphia to, 301 ; extent of the coast from New 
England to, 302 ; colonel Carteret attempts to clear a 
sloop at East Jersey for, 382; the boundaries of all 
the English plantations from New England to, recom- 
mended to be adjusted, 477; more convenient than 
New York for a trade with the western Indians, 488 ; 
the earl of Bellomont asks for two vessels to ijrotect 
the coast from Pescataqua to, 552; expense of the 
manufacture of tar in, 5SS ; ought to open a trade 
with the western Indians, 590 ; the Indians that live 
behind, expected to come and trade with the English 
of New York, 651; sends large quantities of pitch 
and tar to Boston, 668 ; difference between sterling 
and the currency of, 669 ; Connecticut pitch and tar 
dearer than that from, 671 ; large quantities of tar 
made in, 703 ; quota of North and South in 1700, 706 ; 
cheapness of tar in, confirmed, 708 ; Scotchmen from 
Darien arrive at, 711 ; value of a piece of eight in, 
757 ; the ships Rising Sun and Duke of Hamilton 
wrecked at, 760 ; very good wine manufactured in, 
788 ; North and South, under proprietors, 832 ; the 
proprietors obliged to defend, 833 ; silk produced in, 
855 ; proposal to annex Virginia and Maryland to, 
874; the Indians behind, inclined to peace, 918; 
ordered to look to the public defenses, 965 ; necessity 
of its being brought under the crown, 1059 ; Lyon 
dollars very general from Pennsylvania to, 1134 ; the 
house of lords address the queen on complaints 
against the proprietors of, 1176 ; the Ottawas live back 
of, v., 76 ; Daniel Coxe, author of a description of, 
204 ; a message brought to Onondaga from the soutli 
of, 376 ; governor Hunter requested to mediate with 
the governor of, in favor of the Tuscaroras,- ibid ; the 
five nations at war with the Flatheads of, 386; an 
Indian war in, 415 ; governor Hunter calls on the five 
nations to put a stop to the war in, 417, 418, 420, 442, 
443 ; in a deplorable condition from the insurrection 
of the Indians, 422, 431 ; the French at the bottom of 
the war in, 430 ; reputed number of the Indians 
under arms in, 432; reasons for the Indian outbreak 
in, 433 ; governor Hunter points out the only way to 
terminate the war in, 436 ; the Indians of, called Flat- 
heads, 437, 440, 441 ; the five nations incapable of con- 
ciliating the Indians of, 444 ; the cause of the Indian 
war in, ibid ; the five nations ask for arms to fight the 
Indians of, 447 ; they will put an end to the war in, 
450; governor Hunter expects to -put an end to the 
war in, 458 ; the Susquehanna Indians at war with 
those of, 464 ; the five nations engaged to march to 
the relief of, 468; they attack the Indians of, 475, 
476, 483 ; the five nations hear that they are to be 
attacked by, 486 ; price of specie in, 509 ; peace con- 



120 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Car— 



Carolina — continued. 

eluded between the Indians and, 549 ; included by 
M. de Lisle in Lonisiana, 577; one of tbe British 
colonies, 591; report of the lords of trade on, 608; 
divided into North and South, 609 ; number of ships 
cleared 1714-1717, from Great Britain for, 615 ; value 
of its imports and exports, 616, 617 ; number of In- 
dians in the English alliance north of, 623 ; four regi- 
ments required for the defense of, 625 ; Indians sent 
to the West Indies from, 711 ; paper money at a dis- 
count in, 736; benefit derived from paper money by, 
738; Georgia a strong barrier to, VI., 72; the Span- 
iards threaten, 90; report contradicted, 91; people 
remove from New York to, 112 ; the Apalachy moun- 
tains stretch behind, 122 ; an embargo laid on vessels 
bound from New York to, 128; lieutenant-governor 
Clarke's conduct respecting, approved, 129, 136; 
names of the Indian tribes west of, 137, 149 ; New 
York pork superior to that of, 185 ; a delegate sent to 
the Catawbas and Cherokees from, 210 ; Catawba 
prisoners among the sis nations, to be sent to, 211 ; 
approves of the treaty concluded by lieutenant-gover- 
nor Clarke with the sis nations, 214; the French 
entice some of the five nations to join in an attack on 
Indians of, 227; the Spaniards preparing to attack, 
242 ; meetings with the Indians of, if held in Virginia, 
more convenient for, 708 ; has more Indians than any 
other colony, 710 ; must take care not to olfend the 
five nations, 714 ; the commissioner from, attends a 
conference with the five nations, 719 ; Canada Indians 
destroy a family towards, 842 ; not represented at the 
congress at Albany, 861 ; the southern Indians con- 
nected chiefly with, VII., 3; the Delawares and 
Shawanese at war with, 214 ; part of the royal Amer- 
ican regiment in, 619 ; a party of Indians cut off in, 
746 ; desirous of a peace between the northern and 
southern Indians, 778 ; Daniel Cose surrenders his 
claim to, 926; the Nanticokes originally from, VIII., 
243; the French found, IX., 2, 379, 702, 913; the 
western Indians excited to wage war against, 704 ; the 
English seize, 914 ; visits to the Chicachas and Tchi- 
actas from, 925 ; makes efforts to attract the southern 
Indians, 931 ; traders at the head waters of the Wa- 
bash from, 953 ; a party of Onondagas defeated in, 
1098 ; sir Hovenden Walker retires to, X., 12 ; the 
governor of, expected to visit Albany, 18 ; Detroit In- 
dians march to, 20 ; large levies made in, 54 ; Louis- 
iana exposed to incursions from, 229 ; the French 
ravage the frontiers of, 423 ; the English endeavor to 
remove Acadians to, 427; a French party burns a 
village in, 486 ; Acadians sent to, 518 ; laid waste, 
528 ; Acadians sent back from, 540 ; the French re- 
commended to make a diversion towards, 930 ; advan- 
tages of carrying the war into, 974; overrun by In- 
dians, 1094. (See North Carolina, South Carolina.) 

Caroline, queen, guardian of Great Britain, and the king's 
lieutenant, VI., 34, 71 ; news of her death received at 



New York, 115 ; why the principal people of New 
Y'ork did not go in mourning for, ibid. 

Caroline, queen of George III., gives birth to a princess, 
VIII., 108, 109. 

Caron, , kills Bigfish, a Mohawk cliief, X , 122. 

Caron (Carronne), Noel de, Dutch ambassador to the court 
of England, writes to the states general in favor of sir 
Thomas Dale, I., 17 ; mentioned, III., 17. 

Carondowanne, an Oneida sachem, IV., 492, 494. 

Carounghyatsigoas, reported dead, VII., 866. 

Carpenter, a Recollect lay brother, flies from Montreal to 
Quebec, IX., 1031. 

Carpenter, Hope, captain of militia in Jamaica, IV., 808. 

Carpenter, John, II., 591. 

Carpenter, lieutenant, at camp Frontenac, X., 357. 

Carpenter, Mr., III., 159. 

Carpenter, Samuel, captain of militia in Jamaica, IV., 808. 

Carpiole, lieutenant, mortally wounded, X., 431. 

Carp river, IX., 1072. 

Carqueville, M. de, accompanies an Indian war party to the 
province of New York, X., 34 ; conducts a prisoner to 
Montreal, 51 ; in the expedition against fort Clinton, 
79, 80. 

Carr, John, permitted to settle in New Netherland, II., 597 ; 
his estate at the Delaware ordered seized, 659 ; storms 
the Dutch fort on the Delaware, III., 69 ; mentioned, 
73 ; son of sir R. Carr, 109 ; captain, recommended for 
a grant of land on the Delaware, 115 ; flies from 
New York, 203. 

Carr, Michael, X., 882. 

Carr, Petronella, II., 597. 

Carr (Carre), sir Robert, knight, signs the capitulation of New 
Netherland, II., 253 ; commands a company in the 
expedition against New Netherland, 445 ; strength of 
the company of, 501, 502; mentioned. III., 51, 55, 
57, 64, 66, 68, 95, 96, 97, 98, 100, 101, 102, 106, 110, 
158, 159 ; governor NicoUs complains of, 69 ; his 
commission, 70 ; agreement of, with the Dutch and 
Swedes at the Delaware, 71 ; grants a tract of land 
on the Delaware, 72 ; reports his proceedings there, 
73 ; cannot be persuaded to leave the Delaware, 
83 ; nothing can be done in New England with- 
out, 84 ; at Boston, 87, 89 ; urges governor NicoUs to 
go thither, 88; censured by lord Clarendon, 92; re- 
ported that he keeps a naughty woman, 94 ; leaves 
the Delaware, 103 ; in the eastern parts of New Eng- 
land, 107 ; opposes Massachusetts in Maine, 108 ; 
applies to be appointed governor of one of the east- 
ern colonies, 109 ; in New York, 114 ; governor Ni- 
coUs recommends that Mr. Hinnoyossa's island be 
given to, 115 ; sick, 160 ; dies, 161 ; despatches 
received in Boston addressed to, 173 ; reduced the 
Dutch on the Delaware, 345, 346 ; sent against the 
Dutch, VII., 431. 

Carre, Louis, IV., 624, 935, 1008. 

Carreman, Michel, II., 104, 111. 
I Carrickfergus, II., 562. 



—Car] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



121 



Carrying place, definition of tlie term, V., 621. 

Carrying place, between Cobequit and Tagmagouche, X., 14. 

Carrying place, between the Hudson river and lake Cham- 
plain, length of the. III., 706, V., 729, IX, 1022; 
called the great, IV., 194, 196 ; governor Hunter 
proposes that a fort be erected at, V., 479; called 
fort Nicholson, ibid ; the board of trade inquire 
if any forts have been built near, 500 ; a guard pro- 
posed to be placed at, 560; a block house built at, 
633 ; iised as a hunting ground by French Indians, 
910; forts necessary at, VI., 367, 746; forces ordered 
from Albany to, 400 ; the reduction of Crown Point 
■will render unnecessary a fort at, 421 ; forts to be buOt 
at, 463, 646, 648, 659, 661, 852, 1021, VII., 4; Indians 
propose killing some Englishmen at, VI., 564; M. 
Beaubassin to set oat from, 565 ; a fortified camp at, 
660 ; no authority given for the erection of two forts 
at, 662 ; major general Johnson holds a council of 
war at, 1000 ; the French make an attack near, 1003 ; 
number of killed and wounded at, 1007; baron de 
Dleskau meditates an attack on, 1013 ; French prison- 
ers sent to, 1015 ; the French propose erecting a 
breastwork at, IX., 406 ; modern name of, 1101 ; the 
French propose establishing a flying camp at, X., 410. 

Carying place, at Jonasky, near the Ohio, VI., 796. 

Carrying place, called Kasanotiayogo, a French fort to be 
built at, VI., 779. 

Carrying place, between lakes Erie and Chadakoin, VI., 837. 

Carrying place, the little, distance from Alb.iny of, IV., 650; 
one of the Mohawk fishing places, 654 ; French emi- 
saries at, 989, Cornelius Cuyler purchases land at, 
VI., 784; governor Moore projects a canal at, VIII., 
93. (See Little Falls.) 

Carrying place, the little (fort Miller), IV., 194, X., 96. 

Carrying place, of lake George, prisoners to be exchanged to, 
X., 210. 

Carrying place, at Niagara, the French settle above the, V. , 75 ; 
ceded, VII., 621, 632, 647; length of, IX., 121; a 
French post, X., 240 ; description of the, 694. 

Carrying place, on Onondaga river (Oswego), IV., 650. 

Carrying place (Rome), between Albany and Cadaraqui, IV., 
644 ; distance from Albany to, 650 ; mentioned, 802 ; 
colonel Romer examines the, 807 ; necessity of mark- 
ing the path across the, 979 ; the path to be marked 
across, 981; repaired, V., 717; length of, 729, X., 
405 ; the Oneidas insist on performing all transporta- 
tion over the, VI., 858; forces at, 956 ; time occupied 
in crossing, 990 ; the Indians dissatisfied on account 
of the patent for the, VII., 18 ; the patent of, recom- 
mended to be annulled, 77 ; fort Bull cut off at the, 
82, 97, 137; sir William Johnson visits, 84; the 
Indians warn the English beforehand of the intended 
attack on the, 89 ; complaints against the command- 
ing officer at, 151 ; captain Williams posted at, 172 ; 
the French design to attack, 187 ; George Croghan 
sent to reinforce the, 188 ; evil consequences of aban- 
doning, 228 ; fort Stanwix situated at, 985 ; the In- 
dians wish to reserve, VIII., 124; price paid the 

16 



Oneidas for the use of the, 125 ; Wood creek at the 
end of, 127 ; a junction of Wood creek with the Mo- 
hawk river at, suggested, 442 ; the expedition against 
fort Bull arrives at, X.,403; a strong fort building 
at, 476 ; description of, 675. (See Rome.) 

Carrying place, Susquehanna lake, VI., 295. 

Carrying place, the eight mile (Pennsylvania), VIII., 121. 

Carrying place, at Toronto, length of the, IX., 889. 

Carrying places, on the Hudson river, III., 800, 802 ; a small 
fort ought to be built at each of the, IV., 651 ; on the 
Mohawk river, colonel Romer to report on the two, 
750. (See Little Falls; Rome.) 

Carstengh. (See Karstengh.) 

Carstersen, Claes, I., 193. 

Carte des Frontifires Francoises et Angloises dans le Canada, 
X., 694. 

Cartelyn (Cartelant), Nathaniel, examination of, II., 148, 
149 ; promises to quit Long island, 150. 

Cartelyn, Philip, examination of, II., 148 ; promises to quit 
Long island, 150. 

Carter, Barne, X., 593. 

Carter, Mr., comptroller of the customs, New York, V., 233. 

Carter, reverend Mr., missionary at the Bahamas, VII., 413 ; 
visits Philadelphia, ibid. 

Carteret, Amice de, II., 740. 

Carteret, Elizabeth de, II., 740. 

Carteret, sir George, baronet, memoir of, II. , 410 ; New Jersey 
granted to lord Berkeley and, 599, III., 104, 113, IV., 
1155 ; his brother governor of New Jersey, II., 607 ; 
vice-chamberlain. III., 31, 33, 36, 329; governor 
NiooUs recommends that the land on the west and 
east side of the Delaware be granted to lord Berkeley 
and, 114; extent of the grant to, 174, 796, IV., 382; 
member of the council of trade. III., 213 ; warrant to 
prepare a grant of East Jersey for, 223 ; nothing done 
to arrange the pretensions to New Jersey set up by, 
229 ; proprietor of New Jersey, 240, 284 ; deceased, 
285 ; concessions granted to New Jersey by lord Berke- 
ley and, to be construed literally, 293 ; date of those 
concessions, 294, 295, 296 ; Staten island purchased 
in the time of, 354 ; his right to Staten island 
questioned, 352 ; the duke of York had a right to 
grant lands to, VI., 838. 

Carteret, sir George, baronet (heh- of sir George C), warrantto 
prepare a confirmatory patent for East Jersey for, III., 
285 ; consequence of the release to, 291. 

Carteret, Heller," deputy governor of the island of Jersey, 
II., 410; Philip, second son of, 607. 

Carteret (Cartwright), captain James, taken by Dutch and 
put ashore in Virginia, III., 200; mentioned, 214. 

Carteret (Cartaret), John, 2d lord, secretary of state, III., ix; 
requested to lay representations from the board of 
trade before the king, V., 584, 650; his attention 
called to the necessity of providing presents for the 
five nations, 647 ; requested to receive the king's 
orders for two additional companies for New York, 
648 ; a report on frauds in the land department of 
New York transmitted to, 650 ; governor Burnet in- 



122 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Car- 



Carteret, Jolxn, lord — continued. 

forms, that he is satisfied with the appointment of 
lieutenant Riggs, 703 ; the census and a map of New 
York transmitted to, 704 ; governor Burnet writes to, 
on the subject of silver mines in New Jersey, 809. 
(See Granville, earl of.) 

Carteret (Cartwright), Philip, departs for England, II., 576; 
an inventory to he taken of the estate of, 595 ; men- 
tioned, 600, III., 203 ; memoir of, II., 607; further 
orders respecting the estate of, 633 ; sub-commissioner 
of prizes, III., 67; arrives in New York, 103; in New 
Jersey, 147 ; governor of East Jersey, 205 ; objects to- 
. paying duties in New York, 240 ; sir Edmund An- 
dros visits, 257; tried for a riot, 315; his efforts 
to obtain a port of entry for New Jersey, IV., 382. 

Cartey, Daniel, in the affair at Sabbath day point, X., 593. 

Carthagena, I., 223, II., 29, 44; the French before, IV., 
277 ; admiral Neville goes to, 278 ; colonel Spotts- 
wood to command the colonial troops against, VI., 
138 ; colonel Blakeney, adjutant-general in the ex- 
pedition against, 170 ; admiral Vernon sails for, 
181 ; French men of war proceed to, 182 ; lord Cath- 
cart commander of the forces against, 187; general 
Wentworth meets with success at, 188 ; colonel 
Skene at the taldng of, VIII., 415 ; captain Knowles 
in the expedition against, X., 31. 

Cartier (Quartier), Jacques, discoveries of, IX., 3, 303, 378, 
702 ; sent on a voyage of discovery, and ascends the 
St. Lawrence, 266 ; takes possession of that river and 
its tributaries, 267 ; ascends to Montreal, 781. 

Cartier, M., employed to build fire rafts, X., 40 ; sent to 
isle aux Condres, 41, 159 ; his attention directed to 
the fire rafts, 52, and to the approach of foreign ships, 
56 ; ordered to put his fire rafts in a place of safety, 
6(^ ; to command the fire rafts below Quebec, 95 ; 
orders sent to, 110 ; recalled, 127, 175. 

CartUl, Daniel, IV., 936, 1007. 

Carting of goods, a patent for the exclusive, declared to be 
a monopoly and contrary to law, V., 156. 

Cartledge, John, V., 678. 

Cartridge river, IX., 801. 

Cartright, John, the five nations request the release of, V., 
678. 

Cartright, Mathew, II., 662. 

Carver, captain, sent to Aunapolis Roj'al, V., 257. 

Carver, Jonathan, on Wisconsin river, IX., 161. 

Carveth,Thomas, the first English notary in New York, II., 470. 

Cartwright (Cartret, Cartwricht, Garwrichs), George, signs the 
articles of capitulation for New Netherland, II., 
253 ; signs a proclamation to tlie Dutch, 410 ; com- 
mands a company on the expedition against New 
Netherland, 445 ; strength of his company, 501 . 
stationed at the ferry, 502 ; one of the king's com- 
missioners to New England, III., 51, 55, 57, 64, 95, 
96, 97, 98, 100, 101 ; recommended for major-general 
of the militia, 60 ; articles agreed to between the five 
nations and, 67, 68 ; reports the progress of affau's to 
the secretary of state, 83, 89 ; transmits to governor 



Nicolls the reports disseminated to the prejudice of 
the royal commissioners in New England, 84, 85, 87; 
lord Clarendon desires to be remembered to, 92 ; 
presses governor Nicolls to visit Boston, 93 ; reported 
to be a papist, 94 ; returns to England, 102 ; at sea, 
103 ; reported to have been taken by the Dutch, 104, 
106, 107 ; the declaration of Massachusetts proclaimed 
under the window of, 107 ; taken by a privateer, 109 ; 
landed in Spain, 114; his arrival in England, 116 ; 
aware of the influence of Massachusetts in the reduc- 
tion of the Manhatoes, 139; Mr. Maverick writes by, 
160, and regrets that governor Nicolls is not attended 
by, 185. 

Cartwright's, an Albany tavern, VIII., 609, 610. 

Cary, colonel, captain Moody, E. N., attempts the life of, 
IV., 1056. 

Cary (Kery), John, exchanged, X., 881. 

Cary, Mr , sent from Boston to Quebec to effect an exchange 
of prisoners, IX., 630 ; result of his mission, 631. 

Casal, M. de Villeroi in command at, II., 348. 

Cascades, the, a false alarm at, IX., 568 ; M. Lacorne St. Lue 
at, X., 81 ; a party of Mohawks defeated at, 88. 

Cascaghsagey, VI., 549. 

Cascais, the bay of, I., 578. 

Casco (Caske, Caskoe, Kaskab^, Kaske, Kaskehee), the 
Indians commit depredations at. III., 554, 566, 719; 
men sent from Boston to, 568; destroyed, 720,727; 
the gain at Port Royal surjjassed by the loss of, 721 ; 
a gieat number of Indians at, IV., 636 ; mentioned, 
676 ; Samuel York taken prisoner at, 748 ; descrip- 
tion of, 831 ; the French worsted at, 1070 ; a treaty of 
peace concluded at, VI., 563, 564 ; particulars of the 
French attack on, IX., 472; the French claim the 
mainland east of, 878; Indian explanation of the 
treaty at, 966 ; a party of Abenakis take some prison- 
ers near, X., 44, 127; a man taken prisoner at, re- 
fuses to leave Canada, 211. 

Case, a, regarding the legality of the governor sitting and 
voting in the legislative council, VI., 41 ; regarding 
chief justice De Lancey's commission, submitted to the 
attorney-general for his opinion, 951. 

Casewago, the Indian name of Waterford (Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania), X., 259. 

Cashiehtunk, where, VI., 124. 

Casimir (Cassimeirs), the Swedes treacherously seize on, II., 
97; so called by the Swedes,. III., 343. (See Fort 
Casimir. ) 

Casconchagon (Caskonchagon, Kaskonchagon), the Ononda- 
gas desire to sell the lands at, IX., 1085; meaning of 
the word, 1092 ; three Indian villages on the river, 
X.,326; M. Joncaire warned not to pass, ibid; the 
Indians of, in the French interest, 377. (See Geneset 

Caskaquias. (See Kaskaskias.) 

Casks, prices of, IV., 669, 702, 707. 

Caspapina, reverend doctor Duche, author of the letters of, 

VII., 411. 
Caspars, Abram, I., 614. 



—Cat] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



123 



Casper, Josepli, VII., 905. 

Casperse, Jan, IV., 539. 

Caspersen, Peter, I., 600. 

Casquinampo river, now the Tennessee, IX., 886, 891. 

Cassan, Messnier, IX., 236. 

Cassilis, [Archibald Kennedy, 11th] earl of, VIL, 822. 

Cassontaohegona river, where, X., 701. 

Cast, John, his reports on the conduct of the Palatines, V., 
212, 213 ; they demand his dismissal, 240. 

Castile, the king of, offensive operations authorized against 
the subjects of, I., 223, 

Castle island (Boston), I., 44, II., 549, 560; a new fort to be 
built on, IV., 647 ; colonel Romer famishes informa- 
tion respecting, 676 ; he proposes that the fort on it 
be enlarged, 831 ; number of guns in, 877 ; colonel 
Romer engaged in fortifying, 888; fortified, V., 598. 

Castle del Mina, I., 231 ; English sailors imprisoned by the 
Dutch in the dungeons of, II., 301. 

Castle Rising, Thomas Whately, member for, VIII., 277. 

Castle William, VI., 458. 

Castle William and Mary (New Hampsliire), condition of, in 
1721, v., 595. 

Castras, lieutenant-governor Mascarene a native of, VI., 482. 

Casway, William, IV., 936, 

Caswell, colonel, defeats the loyalists at Moore's ereek, VIII., 
279. 

Cat, The, an Ottawa Indian, narrow escape of, IX., 652. 

(Jatahooche (Catahoche, Chattahooche) river, a Spanish fort 
at the mouth of the, V., 612 ; an English fort required 
on, 625 ; question regarding the improvement of, VII. , 
521 ; mentioned, X., 951. 

Catalonia, France about to be invaded from, I., 48; M. de 
Villeroy served in, II., 348. 

Cataragarenre river, where, IX., 364. (See Cadranganhie.) 

Cataraqui (Cadarachqui, Gadarachquin, Cadarackque, Cada- 
racqui, Cadaracquy, Cadaraggue, Cadaraghie, Cada- 
raghqua, Cadaraghque, Cadaraghqui, Cadaragqua, 
Cadaragque, Cadaragquet, Cadarague, Cadarake, Cad- 
arakue, Cadaraqua, Cadaraqui, Cadaraquin, Cadara- 
quy, Cadarchqui, Cadarogque, Cadarokoui, Cadaruch- 
que, Caddaraque, Caderachqui, Caderacqui, Cadera- 
qui, Caderaquy, Cadraqua, Cadraqui, Catarachqua, 
Catarachqui, Cataracoui, Cataracouy, Cataracque, Ca- 
taracqui, Cataract, Cataracwa, Cataragque, Cataraque, 
Cataroque, Gattaraque, Ghadarachqui, Kadaraghie, 
Kadaraghkie, Kaderachque, Kadraghkie, Kalaroque, 
Quadarachqui, Quadraqui), III., 431, 432, 433, 435, 
437, 440, 445, 592, 621, 808, 814, 817, IV., 373, 464, 
v., 85, 243, 245 ; operations of governors La Barre 
and Denonville at, III., 396, IX., 273 ; stores thrown 
into, III., 455, 473 ; the governor of Canada's expla- 
nation respecting the victualing of, 458 ; the five na- 
tions invited to, 465, 470, IX., 322; the five nations 
prevented by governor Dongan from going to, III., 
467, 470 ; the governor of Canada proceeds with a 
large force to, 475 ; a fort built at, 476 ; the traders 
among the far Indians ordered to, 478 ; a party of the 
five nations burn houses and take a number of pri- 



soners at, 480, 481, 485 ; the five nations demand the 
demolition of the fort at, 510, 532; a woman cap- 
tured at, 517, 527; major Magregory and Mr. Rose- 
boom prisoners at, 520, 523 ; claimed to belong to 
the five nations, 529, IV., 987, VI., 736 ; the five na- 
tions deny tlie French title to. III., 534; miscliief to 
arise from a French fort_at, 535; the five nations 
demand the removal of the French from, 536 ; and 
endeavor to seize it, 621 ; one of the passes to Canada, 
714; Indians seized at, brought back from Prance, 
734; the far Indians arrive at, 781, 782; Senecas 
set out on an expedition to, 785, 790, 792, 795; a 
party of the five nations surprised at, 840, 841, VI., 
319 ; about to be reinforced, IV., 41 ; the uppermost 
French post on the lake, 45 ; conduct of the French 
towards the Indians at, referred to, 89, 121, 568 ; the 
French reSccupy, 118, 126, 171, 181, 1067, IX., 625 ; 
about to be garrisoned, IV., 120; stolen from the 
five nations, 122 ; they will not allow the French fires 
to burn again at, ibid; an expedition against the 
Onondagas arrives at, 123 ; an Indian prisoner reports 
that the English are preparing to destroy, 125 ; a 
French fort on one of the lakes, 169 ; the governor of 
New York unable to prevent the resettlement of, 172 ; 
the French on their match to, 191 ; distance from 
Albany to, 198, 644 ; pulled down by lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Leisler, ibid ; the five nations capture, 214 ; 
colonel Ingoldesby ordered to command an expedition 
.against, but countermanded, 283 ; the Indians dis- 
pleased because governor Fletcher neglected to demo- 
lish, 364, 434 ; reinforced, 406 ; the five nations intend 
going to Albany and not to, 407 ; the French attack 
some English Indians near, 426, IX, 535 ; why gov 
ernor Fletcher did not destroy, IV., 449 ; impossi- 
bility of capturing it, 473, 474, 486 ; a stone fort at, 
487, v., 75, 731 ; an instance of French perfidy, IV., 
496, 499 ; a terror to the five nations, 505 ; Indian 
prisoners in Canada allowed to go hunting as far as, 
572, 574; Indians invited by the governor of Canada 
to, sent prisoners to France, 579 ; M. Maricour ar- 
rives at, 598 ; supplied from Onondaga, 618 ; fortified, 
639, 640, IX., 358; built on the road to the Indian 
hunting grounds, IV., 651 ; three days' journey from 
Tolionade, 655 ; a fort ordered to be built at Onon- 
daga to protect the Indians against, 656 ; Diondori, 
an officer at, 657 ; the French invite the five nations 
to settle near, 658, 660 ; the Onondagas trade at, 661 ; 
a source of annoyance to the English, 701 ; the earl 
of Bellomont recommends the Indians to assist in 
building a fort for their protection against, 736 ; a 
smith sent to, 799, 803 ; goods sent for the Indian 
trade to, 804 ; the French about to build two forts on 
the river of, 836 ; the French have a regular fort at, 
873 ; some of the five nations at, 892 ; excuse of the 
French for building a fort at, 900, V , 75, 792, 908, 
VI., 736, 970; all communication between Niagara 
and, cut off, V., 76 : some Waganhaes commit murder 
at, 247 ; reverend Mr. Durant at, 588, 591 ; distance of 



124 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cat— 



Cataraqni — continued. 

Quinte from, 689; Indians go to war to Virginia 
from, 660 ; dangers of the voyage 'between Montreal 
and, 728 ; route from Albany to, 729 ; equi-distant 
from Montreal and Albany, 730 ; French Indians hunt 
at, 910; a strong fort at, VI., 126; munitions of war 
to be sent to, 276, 281 ; colonel Johnson in danger 
from, 423 ; belts sent to the six nations from, 424 ; 
captain Celeron invites some Indians to move to, 549 ; 
the five nations own the land between the Grand 
river and, 569; the French settle below, 589, 779, 
856 ; an army passes, 706 ; a party sets out for the 
Ohio from, 729 ; a ship building at, 730 ; the six na- 
tions invited to, 784, 787 ; news from, 968 ; condition 
of, in 1755, 969; beneficial effects of demolishing, 
VII., 28; a spy sent to, 95; a French force in the 
neighborhood of, 135 ; news of the French designs 
received from, 239 ; small- pox at, 240 ; naval arma- 
ments and stores destroyed at, 349 ; the French deter- 
mined to make a stand below, 383 ; Americans assisted 
in the reduction of, VIII., 616; count de Frontenac 
resolves to found an establishment at, IX. , 101 ; 
count de Frontenac arrives at, 102 ; a Recollect mis- 
sion at, 120 ; description of the fort at, 282 ; English 
traders found on lakes Erie and Ontario, to be sent 
to, 287; part of the garrison deserts, 290; captain 
Dorvilliers' company garrisons, 308 ; M. de la Salle 
benefited by the trade at, 310; abandoned, 432; ex- 
pense of repairing the fort at, 633 ; father Vaillant 
goes from Albany to, 672 ; Outaouais established at, 
816; the regiment of Beam at, X., 347; the five na- 
tions desire to be supplied at, 503 ; the English take, 
821 ; the English retire from, 853 ; force to be sent 
to, 907, 909. (See Fort Frontenac.) 

Catawba river, proposed as part of the boundary between the 
whites and Indians, VII., 658, 661. 

Catechism, political, specimen of an early. III., 683. 

Catelina, a Spanish slave, sold in New Netherland, II., 31. 

Catharine town (New York), VIII., 785. 

Cathcart, Allan, 7th lord, VI., 187. 

Cathcart, Charles, 8th lord, appointed commander of an 
expedition against the Spaniards, VI., 162, 167 ; notice 
of, 187. 

Cathcart, [William, 10th baron and 1st] earl of, marries Eli- 
zabeth Elliot, VIII., 96. 

Catherwood, doctor, VII., 178, 232. 

Catherwood, Mr., secretary to governor Clinton, VI., 312, 
464, 771 ; sent with despatches to England, 468 ; let- 
ter of governor Clinton to, 471 ; list of clearances sent 
to, 476 ; to furnish information to the secretary of 
state, 528, 530 ; Mr. Holland recommended for a seat in 
the council at the request of, 587 ; secretary of the 
province of New York, 645 ; applies for leave of ab- 
sence for governor Clinton, 726 ; agent for governor 
Clinton, 768, 770. 

Catholics, in Maryland in 1677, number of, III., 253 ; few in 
New York in 1686, 415 ; in commission in New York, 
640,641; encouraged by the quakers, 656; the first 



instance, in New York, of an objection being made to 
the vote of, 674 ; sent from New York to England, 
IV., 159 ; governor Fletcher transmits a list of the, in 
New York, 160 ; names of, in New York, 166, 310 ; a 
colony of, planted on the Ohio, VII., 165 ; in Penn- 
sylvania in 1759, number of, 407 ; the history of the 
negro plot, tinctured with hostility to, 528 ; in Canada 
allowed religious liberty, 540 ; in New York, if few, 
not to be disturbed by the French when that colony 
is invaded and taken, IX., 425; the English and 
Dutch opposed to the religion of, 440 ; in the city of 
New York, 549 ; who refuse to return to New Eng- 
land, naturalized in Canada, 700; assisted by the 
government in Canada, 741 ; a list of their names fur- 
nished to the intendant, ibid ; a great number of, in 
Acadia, 995. (See Papists.) 

Catling, Seth, VII., 903. 

Catnaret, , takes lieutenant Staats prisoner, IX., 838. 

Catosauk, a Skaticook sachem, V., 228. 

Cats, a great number of, on the west end of lake Erie, IX., 
886. (See Animals.) 

Cats, commander, ordered to watch the English Smyrna 
fleet, I , 482. 

Cats, Jacob, biographical sketch of, I., 541 ; mentioned, II., 
760. 

Catshathondatha, a Seneca chief. III., 774. 

Cattle, New Netherland adapted to the raising of, I., 246; 
domestic, of New Netherland, 277; necessary for a 
new farm, 367 ; required in New Netherland, 368 ; 
prices of, 369 ; not be exported from New Netherland, 
389, 419 ; encouragement held out in New Netherland 
for raising, 401 ; destroyed in the Indian war, 413 ; 
sent to New Netherland, 430 ; attempted to be sent to 
the South river, II., 421; captured by the English, 
433, 496; none sent to the South river, 434; agents 
sent to New England to purchase, 492 ; in Illinois, 
IX., 891; in Canada in 1719, 896; in 1720, 898; in 
1721, 907. (See Animals.) 

Cattskill (Caats Kill, Hattskill, Katskill), Adriaen Van der 
Donck attempts to purchase land at, I., 532; people 
fly to Albany from. III., 592; the authorities of Al- 
bany send for the Indians of, 816 ; Indians living at, 
rV., 902 ; the eastern boundary of the Iroquois country, 
VII., 573. 

Caubotera, La, a Spanish slave sold in New Netherland, II., 
31. 

Caughnegarighsey, Indian name of Mr. Atkins, VII., 241, 
242. 

Caumont, Legardeur, assists in the taking possession of the 
Upper Mississippi, IX., 418. 

Caumont, lieutenant de, wounded at the siege of fort St. 
Philip, X., 432. 

" Causes of the Present Rebellion in America," doctor Cooper 
preaches a sermon on the, VIII., 298. 

Cavagnale, M. de, third son of the Marquis de Vandreuil, 
visits Niagara, V., 589, 590. (See Vaudreuil-Cav- 
agnal.) 

I Cavalier, Louis le, an Indian interpreter, X., 187, 188. 



— Cen] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



125 



Cavaliers, the, wish parliament bad luck in the negotiations 
with the king, I., 131 ; engage the parliament army 
at Worcester, 134. 

Cavelier, John, IV., 166. 

Cavelier, M., brother of M. de la Salle, IX., 443. 

Cavelier, Robert. (See La Salle.) 

Cavelier (Cavillier), , an Indian interpreter, permitted 

to return to the Chaoanons, IX., 1014; brings depu- 
ties from them to Montreal, 1016. 

Cavelier (Cavalier), Toussaint le, assists at an Indian confe- 
rence, X., 328, 345, 445, 446, 448, 449, 450, 452, 453> 
500, 512. 

Caviar, to be exported from New Netherland to Brazil, I., 
155 ; whence made, 588. 

Caviller, Peter, IV., 166. 

Cawgatwo, a Nipmug Indian, IV., 615. 

Cawyugo, an Indian sachem. III., 68. 

Cayadanorong, a Tuscarora warrior, killed in tlie battle of 
lake George, VII., 55. 

Cayahagah (Cajahaga, Kyahagah), reception of Captain Cele- 
ron at, VI., 548 ; the English trade at, 706 ; names of 
the Indian tribes at, ibid. 

Cayahoga, now Cleveland (Ohio), VII., 423. 

Cayenne, reduced by the Dutch, II., 579 ; M. de la Barre, 
governor of, IX., 167. 

Cayenquiragoe (Kayenquiragoe), name given by the Indians 
to governor Fletcher, IV., 22, 24, 38, 39, 40, 42, 45, 
51, 60-63, 85-92, 115, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 
237, 238, 239, 240, 279, 280, 281, 282, 295 ; significa- 
tion of, 76 ; not used by any former governor of New 
York, 78 ; how governor Fletcher got the name, 222. 

Cayunghage. (See Cayouhage.) 

Cayler, Isaac, VI., 392. 

Cayler, Joacim, VI., 392. 

Caylus, M. de, communicates news from the West Indies, 
X., 46, 131. 

Caymanos, II., 25, 44. 

Cayouhage (Cajonhage, Canahoge, Cayhuhage, Cayunghage, 
Gainhouague, Kainhouage, Kayouhagu), east of Os- 
wego, III., 431; recommended to the English as the 
fittest place for a fort, 443, 559 ; a day's journey from 
Onondaga, 445 ; governor de la Barre comes with an 
army to, 473 ; and makes peace with the Indians at, 
475, IX., 259; governor Dongan recommended to 
build a fort at, III , 477 ; eastern bounds of the terri- 
tory of the Onondages, V., 800, VII., 486. (See Sal- 
mon creek.) 

Cayrac, M. des, IX., 330. 

Cayseuntenego, requests that a fort be built at Shamokin, 
VII., 332. 

Cayuga (Caiougo, Cajouge, Cayouge), III., 122, 480, 481, 
521, IV., 407, 650, 890; French invited to settle at, 
III., 123 ; father Raffeix's description of, 251 ; the 
Senecas retreat to, 446 ; Canada Indians prisoners at, 
IV., 498, 558 ; a party of Hurons visit, V., 267; the 
Indians request tl>at a smith may be stationed between 
the Seneca county and, 387 ; captain Banker visits, 797 ; 
the Senecas promise to move nearer, VI., 218; dis- 



tance of the Senecas from, VII., 582; the Indians re- 
solve to settle together at, 737 ; sir William Johnson 
visits, VIII., 183; reverend Julien Gamier, mission- 
ary at, IX., 171 ; reverend father de Carheil, mission- 
ary at, 227 ; a trading post proposed at, 1013. (See 
Indians.) 

Cazals (Cazale), Jean, IV., 1008, 1135. 

Cecil, Robert, one of tlie lords of trade. III., xv, IV., 954, 
963, 964, 1026, 1030, 1031, 1037, 1039, 1042, 1080, 
1081, 1127, 1140, 1173, 1175, 1179, V., 2. 

Cecil, sir Robert, secretary of state. III., vi, vii. 

Cecil, sir William, secretary of state. III., vi. 

Cedar island, X., 349. 

Cedars, the, an Indian post recommended to be established 
at, VII., 872; the uppermost settlement on the St. 
Lawrence, X., 86, 348 ; a party of Mohawks make au 
attack on, 86. 

Cell, John, IV., 1008. 

Celmaster, Thomas, IV., 937. 

Celoron, captain Bienville de, expels English traders from 
the Ohio, VI., 532, 732, X., 189 ; his speech to the 
Indians, VI., 533; his reception at Cayuhaga, 548, 
549 ; inscription on a leaden plate deposited near the 
Ohio river by, 610, 611 ; commandant at Detroit, 733, 
IX., 1099, X., 211 ; the Indians inquire the reason of 
his jjiooeedings on the Ohio, VII., 267; sent with a 
message to the Indians of Missilimakinac, IX., 1072, 
1073 ; writes to M. Beauharnais, 1100 ; commandant 
at Niagara, 1104 ; commandant at fort St. Frederic, 
his services, X., 84, 85 ; sends a detachment to Sara- 
toga, 109 ; recalled from fort St. Frederic, 137 ; sets 
out for Detroit, 161, 182; returns from Detroit, 178 ; 
the object of his mission to the Ohio, 208 ; witnesses 
proceedings in regard to an exchange of prisoners, 
211 ; blamed for the failure of the marquis de la 
Jonquifere's plans on the Ohio, 243 ; his ill success 
reported to the minister, 245 ; date of his departure 
for Detroit, ibid ; proceedings of, 246 ; captures some 
English traders, 248, 251; substance of reports from, 
249 ; major, detached to Ticonderoga falls, 383 ; chev- 
alier, returns to Montreal from fort Duquesne, 480, 487. 

Celoron de Blainville, ensign, at the taking of fort Massachu- 
setts, X., 88 ; commandant at the river St. Joseph, 
ibid ; killed, 435. 

Census of the towns on the west end of Long island, II., 
596. 
of Canada, IIL, 396, IX., 57, 61, 136, 896, 898, 907, X., 
962 ; taken annually, IX , 88 ; for 1744, sent to 
France, X., 17. 
of the Indians, III., 250, 815, VII., 582, IX., 1052. 
of East Jersey, II., 607. 
of New Jersey, superstitious objection against taking, V., 

777 ; of that province in 1726, 819. 
of the province of New York, ordered to be taken. III., 
398 ; in 1698, IV., 420 ; expected to be taken, 1079 ; 
transmitted by lord Cornbury, V., 56 ; in 1712, 339 ; 
the general sickness throughout New York attributed 
to the taking of the, ibid ; difficulty of obtaining a 



126 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cen- 



Census — continued. 

correct, 459 ; for 1723, 702; in 1731, 929; in 1737, 
VI., 133 ; iu 1746, 392 ; why delayed, 524 ; in 1749, 
550. 
of the North American colonies, VI., 993. (See Popu- 
lation. 

Cent Associfis, company of the. (See Company.) 

Centibouck river, VIII., 32. 

Ceremonies observed on the occasion of erecting a statue of 
George III. iu New York, VIII., 245. 

Certificate of the election of the eight men, I. , 192 ; of the 
service of a mandamus on director Stuy vesant, 352 ; 
that director Stuyvesant took the oath of office, 492 ; 
of his majesty's allowance for the garrison of New 
York, III., 278; of the clergy of New York in favor 
of Messrs. Cortland and Bayard, 588 ; of Frederick 
Flypse and Steven van Cortlaudt, that captain Leisler 
took a packet of despatches addressed to lieutenant- 
governor Nicholson, 649 ; of governor Fletcher, in 
favor of Depeyster and Livingston's claims, IV., 117 ; 
of colonel Dongan in favor of Mr. Livingston, 130 ; 
of attorney-general Nortliey, in relation to Sampson 
Shelton Broughton and his son, V., 51; of captain 
de Celeron that he had expelled the English traders 
from the Ohio, VI., 532 ; of governor Clinton, about 
rolling mills in New York, 604 ; of the Pittsfield com- 
mittee, against all proceedings at law for the collec- 
tion of debt, VIII., 652 ; that the New York records 
had been received on board the ship Duchess of Gor- 
don, 760 ; of the fidelity of tlie Indians of the Sault 
St. Louis, IX., 542. 

C4ry, captain, commands la petite Marguerite, X., 45 ; returns 
from Bay Verte to Quebec, 53 ; sent with supplies to 
Bay Verte, 56 ; bearer of despatches to the commander 
of the French fleet, 60 ; runs great risks, 61; in danger 
of being taken by the English, 63 ; burns his vessel, 
64 ; expected at Minas, 65. 

Cesar, Andries, II., 698. 

Cesar^e, a Recollect lay brother, accusations against, IX., 
1031, 1032. 

Cession of lands from the Cherokees to South Carolina, VIII., 

Chaamonaqui, a Delaware village, X., 589. 

Chabert. (See Joncaire.) 

Chaboisseau, captain, commands la petite Marguerite, X., 

41. 
Chacornales, lieutenant, IX., 714. 
Chadakoin, VI., 836 ; the French propose to build forts at, 

857. (See Lake Chadakoin.) 
Chadderton, William, IV., 27. 
Chagouamigon, M. le Sueur commands at, IX., 611; point, 

X., 119 ; Indians at the siege of fort William Henry, 

630. (See Point Chagouamigon.) 
ChaUly, captain de, IX., 194; accompanies governor de la 

Barre's expedition, 235 ; absconds from Canada, 290 ; 

where he amassed a large fortune, 291 ; governor de 

Denonville complains of his impunity, 326. 
Cb-iilly, ensign de, IX., 83. 



Chamberlayne, John, advises the lords of trade that the 
society for the propagation of the gospel in foreign 
parts, are about to send two missionaries to the five 
nations of Indians, IV., 1077 ; secretary to the society, 
1078 ; governor Hunter's letter to, regarding the 
episcopal clergy of New York, V., 312 ; letter of 
Lewis Morris to, in defense of governor Hunter, 318. 

Chamberlayne, sir Thomas, member of the council for 
trade. III., 31. 

Chambers, Abraham Gaesbeek, IV., 938, 1006, 1010. 

Chambers, captain, brings tea to New York, VIII., 431 ; tea 
brought by, destroyed, 488. 

Chambers, John, advises a Jew to compromise injuries re- 
ceived from Oliver de Lancey iu a riot, VI., 471 ; 
recommended for a seat in the New York council, 
728 ; second judge of the supreme court, 737, 804 ; 
member of the congress at Albany, 853, et seq. ; asks 
to be appointed chief justice, VII., 445 ; brother of 
admiral Chambers, ibid; resigns his seat on the 
bench, 528 ; death of, 675. 

Chambers, Thomas, III., 75. 

Chambers, admiral William, judge Chambers of New York, 
brother of, VII., 445. 

Chambers, , X., 592. 

Chamblain river, VI., 582. 

Chambly, M. de, governor of Acadia, IX., 87; the oldest 
officer in Canada, 98 ; accompanies count de Fronte- 
nac to lake Ontario, 100 ; taken by buccaneers, 119, 
793 ; ransomed, 120 ; governor of Martinique, 212. 

Chambly (Shamble, Shamblie), a fort built at. III., 440, 
476 ; Anthony Lispenard at, 487 ; impossible to 
close the passage at, 489 ; four children taken by 
the Indians at, 517; mentioned, 803, 804, 805, IV., 
351 ; captain Schuyler arrives at, 404, 405, 406 ; a 
party of Indians pass through, on their way to attack 
the English, 1164; condition of the fort at, V., 85; 
population of, in 1709, 86; a stone fort at, 168, 571, 
VI., 126, IX., 846 ; distance of Laprairie from, V., 729 ; 
taken by the Americans, VIII., 647; captain de St. 
Ours stationed at, IX., 130; those going to Albany to 
pass by, 145 ; a guard stationed at, 146 ; particulars 
respecting the seigniory of, 212 ; a fortified post to be 
established at, 315 ; to be inclosed, 343 ; a frontier 
post, 349 ; Iroquois besiege the fort at, 390 ; count de 
Frontenac requested to make smooth the path to, 
466 ; Mohawks make an incursion into the neighbor- 
hood of, 515, X., 102; revictualled, IX., 556; M. 
Desbergferes iu command at, 563; its distance from 
Albany, 726 ; a road to be opened to, 756 ; threatened, 
833; preparations to defend, 834; an encampment 
formed at, 842 ; a post of consequence, 851 ; lieute- 
nant de Rouville, commands at, X., 86 ; settlements 
near, abandoned, 103 ; the regiment of Beam arrives 
at, 843. (See Fort Chambly.) 

Chambredoude (Chamredon), captain, killed, X., 750, 798. 

Chamillart de Cany, M., minister of* war, X., vi. 

Chamillart, Michel, junior, minister of war, X., vi, con- 
troller general, vii. 



-Cha] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



127 



Chamindiway, an Ottawa chief, confers with colonel 

Croghan at Detroit, VII., 784. 
Chamot, M., killed by the Mohawks, IX., 52. 
Champagne, serjeaut, commanded the lirst batteau that 
ascended the St. Lawi-ence rapids, IX., 81; sent to 
fort Frontenac, 211 ; store keeper at fort Frontenac, 
230. 
Champante, sir John, his son appointed agent of the province 

of New York, IV., 586. 
Champante, John, appointed agent of the province of New 
York, IV., 586 ; his commission, 587; agent for New 
York, 631, 699, 842, 843, 844, 850, 887, 944 ; receives 
money to build a fort at Onondaga, 666 ; agent for 
the New York companies, 688 ; transmits to the earl 
of Bellomont some charges made against his lordship 
in the house of commons, 725 ; lends Mr. Weaver a 
part of the fiinds allowed to pay the soldiers, 775 ; 
indebted to the New Y^ork companies, 814; his mis- 
management, 816; New Y'ork merchants refuse to 
take bills on, 817 ; answers a memorial against cer- 
tain New York acts, 821 ; the lords of trade satisfied 
with, 841 ; ordered to apply for clothing for the 
soldiers at New York, 882 ; refuses to accept a bill of 
exchange drawn by colonel d'Peyster, 915 ; the 
lords of trade write to lieutenant-governor Nanfan 
respecting, 921 ; lieutenant-governor Nanfan writes 
to their lordships in behalf of, 928 ; agent to the 
assembly of New Y'ork, 958 ; sends clothing and 
accoutrements for the New York companies, 963, 1018; 
captain Nanfan informs him of the state of his aftairs, 
1002 ; mentioned, 1003 ; his memorial in behalf of 
captain Nanfan, 1027, 1075 ; his representation re- 
specting the clothing sent to the soldiers at New 
York, 1033; referred, 1039; discharged from the 
agency of the New York companies, 1043 ; lord Corn- 
bury promises to answer the memorial of, 1071 ; 
agent to the earl of Bellomont, 1072, 1092, 1094, 
1097, 1104; calls the attention of the lords of trade 
to the case of captain Nanfan, 1080; furnishes ac 
counts for clothing of the New York companies, 1101, 
1103 ; receives subsistence for the New York com- 
panies, 1130 ; his answer to a memorial against the 
act vacating the extravagant grants of land in New 
York, v., 7; his objections to the report of the 
solicitor-general on the said act, 14 ; and further alle- 
gations, 15 ; Ms further reply to the objections against 
the said act, 24 ; his salary as agent for the province 
of New Y'ork, 418 ; applies for presents for the Indians, 
456; and for additional troops for New York, 457; 
attends the attorney-general on the subject of the 
New York naturalization act, 496. 

Champell, . (See Campbell, Duncan.) 

Champernown, captain. III., 108. 

Champigny, Jean Bochart de, intendant of Canada, IV., 676, 
IX., 306, 322, 325, 336, 351, 920, 922, 923 ; forwards 
the militia on the expedition against the Senecas,324, 
331 ; goes to Cataracouy, 327, 360 ; makes a tour through 
the seigniories, 328 ; his title, 334 ; abstract of his 



letters, 393, 920, 922, 923; letter of Louis XIV. to 
governor de Denonville and, 416 ; reports that noth- 
ing has been done in Canada against the Iroquois, 431, 
434 ; opposed to an expedition against New York, 
439 ; recommended to attend the meeting of the 
northern company of Quebec, 444 j letter of Louis 
XIV. to, 452, 494, 704; liis lady ransoms and educates 
Sarah Gerrish, 489 ; lays the necessities of Canada 
before the minister, 497, 500, 503 ; renders an account 
of the public funds, 529 ; announces preparations for 
an attack on Albany, 531 ; reports military operations 
in Canada, 534-538 ; certifies to the fidelity of the 
Indians of the Sault St. Louis, 542 ; ordered to have 
vessels constructed for the defense of Canada, 549 ; 
recommended to cobpemte with count de Frontenac, 
589 ; opposed to the establishment of fort Frontenac, 
633, 635 ; recommended to reduce the public expen- 
ses, 663 ; count Frontenac censured for interfering 
with a judgment pronounced by, 677 ; reports the 
state of Indian affairs, 695 ; notified of the appoint- 
ment of M. de Calliiires to be governor of Canada, 
699 ; signs the treaty of peace with the Iroquois, 720 ; 
his views respecting the establishment of new posts, 
735, 736 ; M. de Beauharnais succeeds, 740, 741, 956 ; 
a French fishing smack retaken by the ship which 
conveyed him to Canada, 801. 
Champion, Mr., commissary in the continental army, VIII., 

807. 
Champlain, major, VI., 1008. 

Champlain, Samuel de, took possession of the countries 
of the five nations. III., 507, IX., 249 ; date of 
his death, vii ; geographer to the king, his paper on 
the discoveries in America, 1 ; his voyages printed, 
2; visits the Nepisings, 160; describes the coasts of 
New England, 267 ; discoveries by, 267, 303, 304, 378, 
702, 781, 783 ; title of his work on Canada, 377 ; 
governor of Quebec, 781, 782. 
Champlain, M. de la Touche seignior of, IX., 487. 
Chancellor, lord high, of England, sir Heneage Finch ap- 
pointed, II., 534; earl of Clarendon, III., 44, 46, 84, 
87, 92, 116, 139, 161 ; reported to have been com- 
mitted to the tower, 162; [lord Somers], IV., 628; 
[lord Cowper], V., 412; lord King, 852, 853; [lord 
Hardwicke], VI., 136; baron Camden ceases to be, 
VIII., 202. (See Thurlow.) 
Chancellors of France. (See Ministers of State.) 
Chancery. (See Court.) 
Chancy, Mr., chaplain to the forces under major-general 

Winthrop, IV., 194. 
Chandler, Elizabeth, VII,, 902. 
Chandler, John, delegate from Massachusetts to the congress 

at Albany, VI., 853, 859, 860, 861, 863, 864, 871. 
Chandler, John, one of the New Hampshire grantees, VII., 

902. 
Chandler, reverend doctor Samuel, is of opinion that the 
dissenters would not object to the appointment of a 
protestant bishop at Quebec, VII., 537. 
Chandler, Thomas, VII., 902. 



128 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cha- 



Chandler, Thomas, junior, VII., 902. 

Chandler, reverend Thomas Bradbury, sends bishop Seeker 
one of reverend doctor Johnson's publications, and 
writes a letter about bishops, VI., 912 ; reverend doc- 
tor Johnson not pleased with, ibid; writes a life of 
doctor Johnson, 914 ; mentioned, VII., 397; mission- 
ary in New Jersey, 410; a degree of D. D., reported 
to have been conferred on, 517; archbishop Seeker 
in favor of conferring a degree on, 518 ; recommended 
for a degree of D. D., 537; mode of proceeding re- 
commended for obtaining a degree for, 566 ; his 
character, 592; said to be the author of "A Friendly 
Address to all Reasonable Americans," VIII., 297 ; 
pensioned, 5G9. 

Changaroton, an Onondaga, nKives to the Mississippi, IX., 884 

Changouessi (Changouessy, Changouossy, Jangouessy), an 
Ottawa chief, IX., 606, 683, 723. 

Chanier, sir Anthony, under-secretary of state, III., xii. 

Chanjon, M., interested in the Indian trade, IX., 135. 

Chant, captain Edward, R. N., commander of the ketch 
Alborough, IV., 37. 

Chanut, M., French ambassador to Sweden, II., 336. 

Chaouenon river, IX., 892. 

Chapel, in New York, a catholic. III., 613 ; in the fort at 
New York, out of repair, IV., 13 ; governor Fletcher 
communicates to the assembly the king's letter for 
rebuilding the, 113 ; the assembly grant money for 
rebuilding the, in the fort, 114 ; a, in the fort at New 
York, 422 ; used alternately by the English and Dutch, 
526; the Mohawks have only a bark, 906; timber 
collected for a catholic, at Onondaga, destroyed, V., 
249; of the Mohawks, dimensions of the, 280; in the 
fort at New York, like a bear garden, 311 ; a service 
of plate and other furniture presented by queen Anne 
for, 315 ; the garrison of New York attends service 
in, 320 ; plate and furniture seut from England for a, 
at Onondaga, 818; in fort George, burnt, VI., 184; an 
address sent by the New York legislature to the king 
for aid towards the erection in the fort of a, 209 ; a, 
in the fort at Crown Point, 582 ; the lower Mohawks 
have a, 877 ; built by the French at Onondaga, VII., 
IG, IX., 738 ; Abraham Schuyler causes it to be burnt, 
829. 

Chapely, major. III., 249. (See Shapleigh.) 

Chapiu, John, III., 41. 

Chaplain, a, to accompany colonel Nicolls, III., 58 ; pay of 
a, 220, 691 ; in governor Dongan's time, 415 ; to the 
duchess of Orleans, 463 ; to the forces at Albany, IV., 
377 ; the earl of Bellomont lends money to his, 522 ; 
to the fort at New York, Symon Smith, 766 ; reverend 
Mr. Sharp and reverend Mr. Brisac, 1182; reverend 
Mr. Mott, at New York, dies, V., 473 ; reverend James 
Orem, 704; reverend Mr. Jenney, VII., 407; governor 
Tryon asks to be allowed a, VIII., 390; at fort Fron- 
tenac, provision in the capitulation respecting the,X., 
825. 

Chaplains, naval, Scotchmen preferred for, IV., 766. (See 
Clergymen.) 



Chapman, captain Benjamin, notice of, VIII., 482. 

Chapman, Rufus, X., 881. 

Chappy, Moses, X., 882. 

Characks (South Carolina), depredations committed at, V., 
793. 

Charest, captain, X., 179 ; sent to Point Levy to harrass the 
English, 995 ; returns to Quebec, 996 ; brings in one 
of general Wolf's proclamations, 1000. 

Charisius, Mr., resident at the Hague for the king of Den- 
mark, II., 260. 

Charitable institutions, none in New Netherland, I., 423. 

Charles I., interview between the Dutch ambassadors and, 
on the seizure of the ship Eeudracht at Plymouth, 
I., 48 ; a remonstrance against the seizure of the Een- 
dracht at Plymouth presented to, 55; answered, 57; 
the Dutch ambassador reports his interview with, 108 ; 
progress of the war between the parliament and, 127, 
130, 133, 134; the French ambassador takes leave of, 
133 ; reverend Hugh Peters takes a violent part 
against, 567 ; grants Maryland to lord Baltimore, II., 
117, 120, 131, 137, v., 605 ; grants the Dutch free 
access to English harbors, II., 132; grants a patent to 
Massachusetts, 137, III., 112, V., 596; too just to 
give away lands that were not his, II., 138; prince 
Rupert, nephew of, 275 ; lord Digby, secretary of 
state to, 346 ; sir George Downing procures the arrest 
in Holland of thi-ee of the judges of, 417 ; mentioned, 
534; marquis of Ormond faithful to, 562; Henry Jer- 
myn, treasurer to the household under, 563 ; lord 
Lovelace adheres to, 580 ; Lewis Morris served against, 
619 ; Amice Andros, master of the ceremonies to, 740 ; 
secretaries of state under. III., vli ; grants Long Is- 
land to the earl of Stirling, 42 ; the sachems of Nar- 
raganset submit to, 97; contemplated taking away 
the Massachusetts charter, 102 ; concedes Nova Scotia 
to France, IV., 475 ; and Acadia, 536 ; blamed for 
parting with Canada, 677; sir Charles Coote serves 
in Ireland in the reign of, 851 ; assumes the govern- 
ment of Virginia, V., 606; grants Carolina, &c., to 
sir Robert Heath, VII., 926; grants Nova Scotia to 
sir William Alexander, IX., 915. 

Charles II., Virginia declares for, I., 359; John Thurloe 
offers his services to, 557; openly sides with the 
prince of Orange, II., 47; notifies the governor of 
Virginia of the confirmation of lord Baltimore's patent, 
117 ; calls on the governors of New England to assist 
in reducing the Dutch, 237 ; confers a baronetcy on 
admiral Tromp, 265 ; ambassador Van Gogh com- 
plains of the capture of the Dutch forts on the coast 
of Africa and of the seizure of New Netherland, to, 
280, 281 ; declares that such had been done by Ms 
orders, 282 ; audience of ambassador Van Gogh with, 
283, 292, 293 ; grants New Netherland to the duke 
of York, 295, IIL, 796, IV., 1151, V., 495, VH., 431, 
VIII., 344; it is denied that New Netherland was 
taken by his orders, II., 334, 3S2; lord Rochester a 
licentious companion of, 358 ; proof that New Neth- 
erland was taken by order of, 382 ; captain Scott claims 



-Cha] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



129 



Charles II. — continued. 

all America for, 402, 481 ; sir George Downing attempts 
to prevent the English at the Hague praying for, 416 ; 
sir George Downing friendly to the New England colo- 
nies in their disputes with, 418 ; the states general 
offer to restore New Netherland to, 531, 535 ; re- 
quests them to order the surrender of New York, 
544; resolution of their high mightinesses there- 
upon, 545 ; answer of the states general to, 546 ; 
the duchess of Cleveland, mistress of, 563 ; Henry 
Coventry, secretary of state under, 564 ; pardons the 
inhabitants of Guernsey, 740 ; confers knighthood on 
major Andros, 741 ; secretaries of state under, III., vii, 
members of the board of trade under, xiii ; consti- 
tutes a council of trade, 30 ; a man apprehended in 
Massachusetts, and threatened to be sent to England, 
under suspicion of being, 39 ; orders a search in Ame- 
rica for the regicides, 41 ; letter of, to the governor and 
council of Massachusetts, 61 ; titles of, 64 ; orders the 
seizure of Dutch ships, 85 ; proclaimed on the banks 
of the Great Kanhawa, 1S6; allowance to New York 
from, 278 ; James II. succeeds, 359 ; called " the great 
sachem," 417, 418; grants Pennsylvania to William 
Penn, 797, IV., 108, V., 603; government of Con- 
necticut not warranted by the charter of, III., 851, 
852 ; the command of the forces both by sea and land 
vested in the crown by an act of, IV., 30 ; grants a 
charter to Connecticut, 102, 104; James Graham, 
attorney-general of New York in the reign of, 186 ; 
heads of the charter granted to Virginia by, 264; ex- 
tent of his grant to the duke of York, 382, 1165, VII., 
595 ; surrenders Nova Scotia to the French, IV., 476 ; 
appoints commissioners to settle the boundary be- 
tween New York and Connecticut, 625 ; did not con- 
firm the agreement respecting the boundary, 626 ; 
gives the eastern part of America in exchange for half 
of the island of St. Christophers, 677; compliments 
the French king with the draughts of his best ships, 
793 ; lord Cornbury's views on the grant made to the 
duke of York by, 1122 ; America alarmed respecting 
bishops in the reign of, V., 29 ; religious persecution 
in the reign of, 478 ; separates New Hampshire from 
Massachusetts, 594 ; grants a charter to Rhode Island, 
599, VII., 365 ; grants a part of Virginia to lord Coil- 
pepper, v., 607; grants Carolina to several lords pro- 
prietors, 60S ; the limits laid down in his grant to the 
duke of York, defective, VII., 224 ; charters Ehode Is- 
land, and grants toleration to dissenters, 365 ; extract of 
the charter to Pennsylvania from, 415, 416 ; lauds on the 
northern frontier of New York within the grant from, 
445 ; appoints commissioners to settle boundaries in 
America, 563; incorporates a company for propagat- 
ing the gospel among the heathens of New England, 
566; provision for appeals in the grant to the dnke 
of York from, 706 ; date of his grant to the duke of 
York, VIII., 107 ; extract of his grant to the duke of 
York, 436 ; appoints sir Thomas Temple governor of 
Nova Scotia, IX., 73 ; governor Dongan sends news 

17 



to Canada of the death of, 293 ; concludes a treaty of 
neutrality in America with the French, 914, 915. 
Charles V., cai^inal de Granvelle prime minister to, I., 491 ; 

war against, IX., 913. 
Charles VII., elected emperor, X., 527. 

Charles IX., authorizes Messrs. Laudonijre and Eibault to 
colonize America, III., 530, IX., 2, 378, 702; the 
French settle on the Savannah river in the time of, 
v., 625 ; a French colony planted in Florida in the 
reign of, IX., 266; Carolina called after, 267, 914; 
Florida taken possession in the name of, 379 ; his 
attention occupied by civil wars, 701 ; resolves to set- 
tle New France, 913. 
Charles, prince, sir William Alexander gentleman usher to, 

IX., 981. 
Charles Edward, prince, releases sir Peter Halkett on parol, 

VI., 915. 
Charles Gustavus X., of Sweden, succeeds queen Christina, 

I., 615 ; M. Courtiu in the service of, II., 336. 
Charles, Robert, agent for the province of New York, VI., 
420, 425 ; his appointment sanctioned by the board 
of trade, 427; sir Peter Warren's secretary, 430; 
appointed by act of assembly, 684 ; a representation 
from the New York assembly to the king sent to, 820 ; 
waits on the board of trade, 929, 952; proceedings of 
the board of trade on certain demands made by, VII., 
337, 338 ; agent of the assembly, but not of the gov- 
ernor and council of New York, 607; the secretary of 
state satisfied with the conduct of, VIII., 108 ; com- 
municates to the secretary of state the petition of the 
New York assembly to the king, 156. 
Charlesbourg, the French soldiers pillage, X., 1044. 
Charlesbourg royal, now called Cap Rouge, IX., 266. 
Charlesfort built, IX., 913. 

Charleston (Carleston, Charlestown), (South Carolina), two 
ships belonging to the Scotch expedition to Darien 
wrecked off, IV., 711, 760; mentioned, 1088; the 
people forced to take shelter from the Indians, in, V., 
431 ; the Spaniards send to purchase provisions at, 
VI., 70; exposed to an attack from the Spaniards, 
242 ; sir Henry Clinton commands an expedition 
against, VII., 786 ; Norman MacLeod wounded at, 
854; extract of a letter from, VIII., 34; sir Henry 
Clinton attacks, 174 ; sir Peter Parker arrives at, 279 ; 
Thomas King, the Indian chief, dies at, 290, 291; re- 
duced, 717, 793 ; brigadier general Scott taken pri- 
soner at, 730 ; lord Rawdon at the siege of, 734 ; ad- 
miral Arbuthnot commands the fleet sent against, 773 ; 
sir Henry Clinton in possession of, 781; governor 
Robertson transmits to England a plan of the environs 
of, 790 ; news of the surrender of, sent to England, 
795 ; begins to be fortified, X., 1092. 
Charleston island, IX., 344. 
Charlestown (Mass.), reverend doctor Cutler, anativeof, VI., 

08 ; a battery erected between Boston and, X., 16. 
Charlestown (New Hampshire), originally called Number 
Four, VI., 519 ; attacked by a party from Canada, X., 
42, 97, 147, 158. 



130 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cha- 



Charieton, Mr., III., 314. 

Charleville, Mr., killed, IX., 602. 

Charlevoix, reverend F. X., S. J., at Niagara,.V., 590; men- 
tioned, IX., 17 ; indebted to Nicolas Perrot, 626 ; his 
work on New France quoted, X., 930. 

Charlotte county (New York), militia not organized in, VIII., 
377; disturbances in, 400; unimproved, 441; not 
represented in the assembly, 444. 

Charlottetown (Prince Edward island). (See Port LajoU.) 

Charlton, John, member of the board of ordnance, IV., 
G42. 

Charlton, John, a merchant of New York, IV., 1135. 

Charlton, reverend Mr., minister on Staten island, VII., 508, 
518, 519 ; indemnified for damages done his church, 
537, 566. 

Charly, cadet, commands a war party, X., 153 ; takes a pri- 
soner, 159 ; reconnoitres fort William Henry, 571. 

Charmont, lieutenant de, killed at the siege of fort St. Philip, 
X., 430. 

Charmont, lieutenant de, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 751, 
799. 

Charnizay. (See V Aunay- Charnizay.) 

Charrier, Isaac, IV., 935, 1006. 

Chart of a newly discovered passage between the North and 
South sea, publication of, forbidden, I., 15 ; autho- 
ri2ed, 21 ; of Castle island, and other places in New 
England, prepared by colonel Romer, and sent to 
England IV., 676. {See Map.) 

Chartee, Francis, II., 719, 720. 

Charter, a general, for those who discover new countries, I., 
5 ; for a Dutch West India company, further con- 
sidered, 8 ; of exclusive trade to New Netherland, 11 ; 
the New Netherland company petition for an exclu- 
sive, 13; resolutions of the states general on their 
memorial, 14, 15, 21, 25 ; of the West India company 
infringed, 30 ; to trade to New Netherland, granted, 
51, 53, 149 ; to the Dutch West India company, date 
of, 83; of the West India company, its limits, II., 
228 ; petition from the city of New York for a new, 
III., 337 ; of liberties of the province of New York, 
the, several amendments proposed to, 341 ; imder 
consideration in England, 348, 351; deposited in the 
plantation oiSce, 354 ; vetoed, 357 ; repealed, 370 ; 
the power over the militia of the colonies where 
vested by their, IV., 101, 104; of Connecticut, some 
of its provisious recited, 104 ; granted to Virginia, 
heads of the, 264 ; to the Dutch church in New York, 
considered very extraordinary, 426 ; of New York 
•city, flaws in the, 812; how sealed, V., 369 ; granted 
by governor Montgomerie confirmed, 956. 
Chartier, Ren6 Louis. (See LotbinUrc.) 
Chartier, a Shawnee chief, his tribe attack some settlements 
on the river of the Cheraquis, X., 156; to be concili- 
ated, 161 ; some of his tribe move to the Illinois, 
1092. 
Chartier's creek, VIII., 464. 

Chartres, duke de, count d'Estrades appointed governor to 
the, II., 349. 



Chartres. (See Fort Chartres.) 

Charuell, Mr., intendant at Nancy, certifies governor Don- 
gan's account. III., 463. 

Chasricha, a Cayuga sachem, IV., 729. 

Chassaigne (Chassagne), M. de la, sent to New York with a 
protest against the erection of a fort at Oswego, V., 
828, 829, VI., 569, IX., 970, 996, 999; commands at 
Lachine, 478 ; sent to protect Chambly, 834 ; approves 
an expedition against the Foxes, 10S6. 

Chasse des Iroquois, where, V., 634. 

Chassignolle, captain, wounded, X., 1085. 

Chaste (Caste, Chastes), M. de, lieutenant-general of New 
France, IX., 2, 3, 266, 379. 

Chasteaufort, Marc Antoine de Bras de fer de, governor of 
Canada, IX., vii. 

Chastillon (Chatillon), admiral de, sends two ships to the 
coast of Florida, IX., 266; petitions Charles IX. to 
permit discoveries to be made in America, 702. (See 
Coligni.) 

Chatacouit, now Portland (New York), X., 255. 

Chataignier, captain, wounded, X., 431. 

Chatal, lieutenant de, wounded, X., 430. 

Chateau-Brilliant, captain de, arrives at Quebec, X., 124. 

Chateauguay (Chateaugu6), IX., 299, 441 ; Indians dance 
the war dance at, 359 ; Indians make an attack at, 
482; Iroquois canoes discovered at, X., 81, 82 ; the 
five nations frequently appear at, 86 ; Mohawks make 
an attack near, 98 ; Indians encamp near, 102, 108. 

Chateaugu6, Lemoyne de, in the northern expedition, IX., 
340. 

Chateauneuf, captain, wounded, X., 751 ; dead, 799. 

Chateauvieux, M., Indian interpreter, X., 607. 

Chatelain, captain, conducts an English prisoner to Quebec, 
X., 54. 

Chatham, earl of, William Pitt created. III., ix. (See Pitt.) 

Chation, captain de, commandant at St. Joseph, X., 406. 

Chats, les, a party of Iroquois attack a French detachment 
at, IX., 470; and are defeated, 471. 

Chatsworth castle, the property of the Devonshire family, 
II., 562. 

Chattacouen, a Seneca chief, at Niagara, X., 983. 

Chatte, M. de. (See Chaste.) 

Chaudifere noire (Black kettle), a prisoner ; his wife killed, 
IX., 556 ; himself killed, 681 ; the Onondagas bewail 
the death of, 684. 

Chaudifere river, advantages of a demonstration against 
Quebec by way of the, VI. , 945 ; the Indians at the, 
accompany the expedition against Casco bay, IX., 
472 ; Abenakis settled at, 477 ; course of, ibid ; M. 
d'lberville proposes to reach Quebec by way of, 731 ; 
route from Quebec to Boston by, 733. 

Chaumonot, reverend Joseph Marie, S. J., Indian name of, 
III., 125; a Jesuit priest, 126, 127; at Quebec, 152, 
IX., 44, 45, 46, 47. 

Chaumont, Alexander, in the expedition against the Mo- 
hawks, III., 135; captain of M. de Tracy's guards, 
IX., 35 ; aid-de-camp to M. de Tracy, 43 ; mentioned, 
67. 



-Che] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



131 



Chauncy, Charles, tlie best oriental scholar in New England, 
VI., 908. 

Chaussegros. (See Lery.) 

Chauveau, captain, commands La Marie Anne, X., 46 ; re- 
turns to Quebec, 73. 

ChauTelin, M. de, minister of justice and of foreign affairs, 
X., V. 

Chauvignerie (Chauvinierie), ensign de la, sent to Niagara, 
V. 589 ; proceeds to the Senecas, 590 ; sent to On- 
ondaga, VI., 362, IX., 850, 855, 864; his" Indian 
name, VI., 362 ; sent to fort Frontenac, IX., 666, 849 ; 
sent to the Outaouas, 767; well received there, 851; 
informs the Indians of the commencement of hostili- 
ties between France and England, 860 ; adopted by the 
Iroquois, 863, 961, X,, 450, 451 ; report of his visit 
to Oswego and Onondaga, IX., 1007; supposed to be 
the author of the details respecting the numbers and 
devices of the Indians, 1058; sent on a mission to 
the five nations, 1105 ; to be sent to the five nations, 
X., 2^ ; sent to the upper Iroquois, 91 ; his report, 
97, 98; Onondagas keep their promise to. 111; 
witnesses an exchange of prisoners, 211, 212, 213 ; 
sent to receive a deputation from the Onondagas, 
234 ; at the mouth of the river Au Boeuf, 436 ; sends 
Indians to fort Duquesne, 439 ; related to the five 
nations, 500, 503, 560; sends out a scouting party, 
588, 589 ; orders to, 590 ; commandant at fort Mach- 
ault, 713, 836. 

Chauvignerie, junior, Michel la, a prisoner, X., 713 ; sent 
out for scalps and loses his way in the woods, 836. 

Chauvigny, M. de la, IX., 1029 ; M. De Lancey advances 
money to, 1030. 

Chauviu , a blacksmith at Detroit, VII., 863. 

Chauvin (Chauven), captain, visits New France, IX., 3, 266, 
702. 

Chaville, Lauison, VIII., 3G8. 

Chazy river, IX., 560. 

Cheaole, Edward, marries a Huron woman and remains in 
Canada, X., 214. 

Chear Hall, Orange county (New York), lord Cornbury re- 
tires to, IV., 971. 

Cheai (Chate) river, lands taken upon, VII., 998; an Indian 
killed at, VIII., 225. 

Chedabouctou (Chebocotowe), plundered. III., 553, 571, IX., 
397, 918, 920, 930; surrendered to the English, 477; 
recommended as a rendezvous for a French fleet, 493. 
(See MUford Haven, Nova Scotia.) 

Cheescocks patent, government refuses to pay any part of 
the expense of running the line of, VIII., 484. 

Cheeseman, captain, killed, VIII., 664. 

Cheesquakes (New Jersey), reverend John Sharp, minister 
of, IV., 1182, v., 315. 

Cheignecto (Schiginnigtou), distance of, from the river St. 
John, IX., 547. 

Chekouarine, an Onondaga chief, attends a conference at 
Montreal, X., 445. 

Chelaouiskaouois, an Ottawa chief, IX., 1072. 



Chelsea (Massachusetts), reverend Mr. MacClenaghan, min- 
ister at, VII., 415. 

Chelsea hospital, none of the invalids belonging to the New 
York indi-'peudent companies admitted into, VI., 
223 ; John Wrightson, major of, X., 728. 

Chemung (Chemong), general Sullivan attacks the Indians 
near, VIII., 785 ; Guy Johnson at the battle of, 813. 

Chenaudas, three Englishmen killed at, X., 1094. 

Chenango, a delegation of Indians from, congratulate Guy 
Johnson on his .appointment, VIII., 560. 

Chenaux, les, what, X., 349. 

Chenighsoa, a Mingoe chief, signs a treaty with the English, 
VII., 755. 

Cheningu(S, modern name of, X., 249 ; smiths sent to, 255. 

Chenondac river, where, X., 978 ; Chabert de Joncaire 
retires to, 979 ; liis property at, plundered, 983 ; tha 
forces for the relief of Niagara to pass by, 986. 

Chenondoanah, on the Genesee river, VI., 899. 

Chenughiyata, chief of the Onondagas, VIII., 424, 506. 

Chenussio (Cenosio, Chenossio, Chinesse, Chinossia), Indiana 
visit sir William Johnson from, VII., 254; a Seneca 
castle, 264, 550 ; character of the Indians of, 376 ; 
the Indians from, attend a conference at Canajoharie, 
379 ; some western tribes promise to visit, 384 ; the 
Indians at, declare against the Frencli, 391 ; the road 
to, cleared by the Senecas, 523 ; a party sent on an 
expedition from, 542 ; the Onondagas send a delega- 
tion to, 554 ; the Senecas have two castles at, ibid ; 
engagement with a number of Sejiecas of, 562; its 
distance from Niagara, 582; the Delawares ask the 
mediation of those of, 648 ; articles of peace with the 
Indians of, 652 ; Delawares arrive at sir William 
Johnson's from, 718; the Indians at, suspected, VIII., 
280 ; death of Guastarax, chief of, 282 ; Seriohana, 
chief of, 367 ; general Sullivan marches to, 785 ; laid 
waste, 786. 

Chenvy, M. de, IX., 659, 661. 

Cheraw (South Carolina), whence named, V., 793. 

Cherbourg, expedition ag.ainst, VII., 868; lord Fitzmaurice, 
adjutant-general in the expedition against, VIII., 
73. 

Cherokee country, divisions of the, VIII., 41^ 

Cherokee mountains, a fort built at the other side of the, 
VII., 210. 

Cherokee (Cherakis, Cheraquis) river, proposed as a boun- 
dary between the whites and Indians, VII., 728, 735, 
1005 ; the si.x nations claim the lands as far as, VIII., 
110, 121 ; the boundary with the Indians begins at, 
125, 127, a fort proposed to be built at the mouth of 
the, X., 263. (See Tennessee river.) 

Cheroir, captain, arrives in France from Quebec, X., 41 ; re- 
turns to Canada, 45 ; sent with supplies to Acadia, 
70; at Beaubassin, 89. 

Cherry valley, biographical sketch of the founder of, VI., 
707 ; Indians supplied with provisions in, VII., 171 ; 
lake, 729 ; George Croghan obtains a tract of land at, 
983. 

Chertser, Michiel de Marco, surgeon, II., 191. 



132 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Che- 



Chesepeake (Chcsepeiacke, Cif apoa), I., 107 ; Maryland on 
the, II., 80; mentioned, 83, 84, 85, IV., 300; parti- 
cnlars of Messrs. Heermans and Waldron's journey 
down the, II., 89 ; Virginia owns the lower part of, 
92 ; 'William Clayhome commissioned to explore the, 
III., 14 ; the head of the hay of, not settled, 343 ; one 
of the houndaries of Marv-land, V., 605 ; the Susque- 
hanna river falls into, 625, VI., 122. 
Cheshire, George Clarke retires to, IV., 1069. 
Chesn^, M., Indian interpreter, X., 608. 
Chester, John, attends a conference with the six nations, VI., 

717. 
Chester creek, II., 168. 

Chesterfield, [Pliilip Dormer Stanhope, 4th] earl of, secre- 
tary of state. III., is ; succeeded by the duke of Bed- 
ford as secretary of state, VI., 713. 
Chester township (Vermont), erected, VII., 902. 
Chestnuts grow wild in New Netherland, I., 276. 
Chettery, V., 575. (See Swntara.) 
Chetwood, William, VI., 345. 

Chetwynd, , under-secretary of state, III., xi. 

Chetwynd, John, one of the lords of trade. III., xvi, V., 
402, 414, 422, 429, 435, 470, 472, 502, 503, 535, 536, 
541, 551, 584, 585, 630, 650, 654, 698, 709, 745, 757, 
815, 823, 824, 844, 846. 

ChoTalier , wounded, X., 1086. 

Chevert, lieutenant-general Francois de, biographical notice 

of, X., 577. 
Cherery, captain, X., 50. 
Chevignis, captain de, wounded, X., 431. 
Chevigny, cadet de, his services, X., 589 ; killed, ibid. 
Chevreuse, duchess of, at the court of Charles I., I., 109. 
ChevTOtifere, Francois de Chavigny de la, accompanies count 
Fronteuac to lake Ontario, IX., 113; at the falls of 
St. Mary, 804. 
ChevTOtifire, M. de la, appointed ensign, X., 824. 
Chew, Benjamin, attends a conference with the Indians at 

Easton, VII., 287, 291, 294. 
Chew, Joseph, imprisoned at Quebec, VI., 488; the French 
pay no regard to his commission as an officer, 493 ; 
recommended to be secretary of Indian affairs, VIII., 
424; his antecedents, ibid; appointed secretary of 
Indian affairs, 469 ; at sir "William Johnson's funeral, 
480; warrant lor his appointment received by Guy 
Johnson, 491 ; secretary of Indian affairs, 496, 497, 
499, 506, 518, 524, 527, 534, 555 ; introduced to the 
Indians, 501 ; his Indian name, ibid ; in England, 662, 
671 ; at New York, 690 ; taken prisoner, 712. 
Chibaouinani (Chihaoenani), Frenchmen murdered at, X., 

140; otherwise called La Cloche, 183. 
Chibenacadie, reverend M. de la Loutre, missionary at, X., 

11. (See Shubenacadie.) 
Chibonctou (Chebucta, Chc-bucto), the French chagrined at 
the English settling, VI., 583 ; mentioned, 835 ; now 
Halifax (Nova Scotia), 944; a French vessel captured 
in, IX., 930; capable of accommodating large ships, X., 
10 ; French propose to settle, 11 ; easily entered, 12; 
frigate I'Aurore arrives at, 50 ; French frigates, at, 53, 



58, 61 ; a detachment sent to guard prisoners at, 62 ; 
reverend M. le Loiitre at, 64 ; fears entertained that 
the English will take possession of, 69 ; measures 
adopted to prevent the English settling at, 70; a 
French fleet arrives at, 72 ; the duke d'Anville dies 
at, 73; supplies sent to, 74; the French fleet sails 
from, 90 ; French ships expected at, 96 ; English ves- 
sels at, 100, 106, 107, 296 ; called Halifax, 401 ; short 
of provisions, 481. (See Halifax, Nova Scotia.) 
Chicago (Chicagou, Chigagoe), IV., 908 ; fort Miamis at the 
mouth of the river, V., 622 ; route to the Mississippi 
from, ibid, IX., 889 ; the Indians of, sue for peace, 
VII., 785; English traders invited to, 788; Miamis 
settled at, IX,, 178, 619, 627; its distance from the 
river St. Joseph, 890. 
Chicheley, Thomas, III., 376. 

Chichester, honorable James Brudenell, member for, VI., 97. 
Chichester, lord, member privy council. III., 12. 
Chichicatato, chief of the Miamis, IX., 723. 
Chichikatia, Miami chief, IX , 625, 627. 
Chickianoce river, VIII., 31. 
Chickicoes, what, IX., 49, 887. 
Chicksands, sir Danvers Osborn of, VI., 788, 833. 
Chicot river, the French name of Wood creek, in Washing- 
ton county. New York, IX., 726; mentioned, 1022, 
(See Wood creek, Washington county.) 
Chicouanne, Jean, reports a privateer in the gulf of St. Law- 
rence, X., 104, 105. 
Chicoutimi (Chicoutinie), an Indian trading post, VII., 635, 

658, 661, 872, 973. 
Chievres, captain de, wounded, X., 430. 
Chiffinch, Mr., III.,48. 

Chignecto (Chegnitou, Chigniton), fort Lawrence built at the 
head of the bay of, VI., 954; pillaged, IX., 664; let- 
ter of the governor of Annapolis to the deputies of, 
X.,164; burned, 216, 282. 
Chiketah, an Oneida chief, dead, VIII., 549. 
CMld, John, III., 784. 

Child, sir Josiah, his work on trade quoted, IV., 792. 
Child, Thomas, IV., 935, 1006. 

Children, announced as being born in New Netherland, I., 
37 ; one year's exemption from tenths to be enjoyed for 
each of the, conveyed to, or born in New Netherland, 
401 ; sent to New Netherland from the alms house at 
Amsterdam, II., 52; posthumous, enable to inherit, 
VIIL, 356. 
Chili, a part of, unsettled, I., 66. 

Chimney point, St. Lawrence county (New York), IX., 101. 
Chimneys, taxed in New Netherland, II., 151 ; the assembly 
of New York pass a bill taxing, V., 178, 293 ; bill lost 
in the council, 183. 
China, Dutch ships destined to look for a northern passage 
to, nearly ready to sail, I., 3 ; Jesuits attend the king 
of, III., 474; distance of the countries discovered by 
the French in America, from, IX., 72; attempts to dis- 
cover a passage to, 787. 
Chinesse. (See Chenussio.) 



— Chu] 



GENERAL INDEX, 



133 



CMngoiiabe, chief of the Sauteurs, IX., 609; speech of 

count Fronfenac to, 611 ; his answer, 612. 
Chiningue, X., 582. 
Chinnery, George, VII., 905. 
Chinoniata, an Onondaga chief, X., .500. 
Chinry (Chenry), the marquis de, IV., 210, 211. 
Chippawa country, where, VII., 573. 
Chippewa creek (Canada), original name of, X., 978; three 

Englishmen killed at, 1094. 
Chipping Wycombe, lord Fitzmaurice member for, VIII., 

73; colonel Barrfi represents, X., 1027. 
Chippodi (Chipoudy), the French take possession of, X., 

217 ; burnt, 358. 
Chipussen, on the Delaware, granted to captains Hyde and 

Morley, III., 72. 
Chiques creek, VII., 268. 
Chisnall, William, IV., 938. 
Chiswall, William, IV., 1007. 
Chiswell, colonel, proprietor of mines in North Carolina, 

VIII., 34. 
Chivert, general, X., 1124. 
Chiverton, Richard, III., 31. 
Choate, John, commissioner from Massachusetts to the five 

nations, VI., 267, 445, 447, 450. 
Chodois, lieutenant, wounded, X., 431. 
Chohahagayton, a Huron chief, VII., 651. 
Chohahise, the chief place of the Hurons, IV., 908. 
Choiseul, duke de, his memorial contains a journal of the 

siege and reduction of fort Necessity, X., 262. 
Choiseul-Praslin, M. de, minister of foreign affairs, X., vi; 

of the marine, ibid. 
Choiseul-Stainville, M. de, minister of foreign affairs, X., vi ; 
of the marine, ibid ; of war, vii ; serves in Germany, 
1124. 
Cholenec. (See LeshoUncc.) 
Cholmoudely, [George, 3d] earl of, member of the privy 

council, VI., 136, 757. 
Cholmondely, [Hugh, 1st] earl of, one of the privy council, 

v., 412. 
Cholmondely, reverend Robert, auditor-general of the plan- 
tations, VII., 901 ; notice of, VIII., 454. 
Cholwell, John, IV., 934; a merchant of New York, 1090, 

1104, 1143, v., 232, 233. 
Chonedagan, a Seneca chief, VII., 623. 
Chota (Choety, Chotte), a Cherokee town, VI., 211 ; location 

of, VIII., 42. (See Echota.) 
Choueguen (Chouaghen, Chouaguen, Choueguin, Choyen, 

Ochoueguen, Te Choueguen). (See Oswego.) 
Christchurch (England), Thomas Robinson, member for, 

VII., 899. 
Christiago, a Mohawk warrior. III., 802. 
Christian, Michael, IV., 934. 
Christian!, count, X., 259 ; exposes the designs of the courts 

of Vienna and London, 260. 
Christianity, means to convert the heathen in New Nether- 
land to, I., 374. 
Christian knowledge society, incorporated, VII., 566. 



Christianna (Virginia), a party of the five nations make an 
attack on some Catawbas at, V., 490, 493; a fort 
erected at, 607. 
Christians murdered by Indians, I., 183, 185; treated in 
New Netherland almost like Indians, 297 ; admiral de 
Ruyter liberates some, from a Tunis vessel, 582; all, 
allowed liberty of conscience in New York, III., 359 
(see Toleration) ; an act passed in New York to 
naturalize all foreign, V., 496. 
Christie, ensign, murdered, VII., 529. 
Christie, James, arrested for sedition, II., 217; the Dutch 

accused of having illtreated, 397. 
Christina, queen, succeeded by Charles Gustavus, I., 615; 
signs deeds for land on the Delaware, II., 53; Mr. 
Boreel sent by the states general to congratulate, 261 ; 
M. Courtin a favorite of, 330 ; the Dutch endeavor to 
detach her from the English interest, 350. 
Christina (Christiana), creek, where, I., 291 ; Indian name 
of, 590, 596 ; bounds of the city's colonie, II., 18 ; 
Jean Paul Jacquet obtains a grant of land at, 62 ; 
mentioned, 605. (See Fort Christina.) 
Christman, Mr., clerk in the secretary's oflice at New Amster- 
dam, cohabited with a widow Lammertje, I., 510. 
Christmas day, a fine imposed in Massachusetts for observ- 
ing, III., 111. 
Christopher, a Spanish negro sold in New Netherland, II., 31. 
Christophes, Richard, IV., 613. 
Christy. (See Christie.) 
Chronology of New England by Mr. Prince, mentioned, VI., 

907. 
Chroutons, IX., 364. 

Chugnut (Chughnot), an Indian village on the Susquehanna, 
VII., 50; Indians visit sir William Johnson from, 
387 ; names of the tribes at, 393, VIII., 243. 
Church, George, X., 593. 
Church, Josiah, VII., 902. 
Church, captain Stephen, R. N., marries Miss Kempe, VII., 

926. 
Church (Catholic), the duke de Beaufort appointed gen- 
eralissimo of the troops of the, II., 351 ; built on tlie 
Kennebec, IV., 771; in Quebec in 1750, number of, 
VI., 580 ; number of, between Quebec and Montreal, 
581 ; a meeting of the clergy,^ noblesse, judiciary, 
&c., held at Quebec in the, IX., 94; stone, number 
of, in Canada in 1680, 151; wooden, not consecrated, 
152; of St. John the Baptist at Onondaga, 171; at 
Sault St. Louis, blown down, 209 ; building at Mon- 
treal, 281 ; at isle Perc6e desecrated, 477 ; in the lower 
town of Quebec, dedicated, 491 ; required on the river 
St. John, 871; in Canada, number of, in 1719, 896; 
in 1720, 898; in 1721, 907; at Isle aux Tourtes, 
939 ; at Norridgewalk, the sacred vessels of, pro- 
faned, 938, 980 ; burned, 938, 946 ; the English re- 
quired to make satisfaction for its destruction, 985 ; 
Louis XV. presents furniture to the Norridgewalk, 
1002; number of, in Canada in 1734, 1046; at Annapo- 
lis, Nova Scotia, rebuilt, X., 17 ; the first built at Hali- 
fax, ibid; at Scatari, 176; at Crown Point, 193; at 



134 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Chu- 



Church (Catholic) — continued. 

Niagara, 667 ; at fort Frontenac, its ornaments and 
sacred vessels preserved. 825 ; at Quebec, burnt, 999, 
1026, 1058 ; spared by the English in the rural dis- 
tricts of Canada, 1000 ; ten, in the district of Quebec 
after the siege, 1058 ; at St. Foy, burut, 1075, 1081 ; 
at Ancient Lorette fortified, 1078. 
(of England), the royal commissioners to Massachu- 
setts, to observe in their devotions the forms of the, 
III., 58 ; some in the colonies desirous to establish 
the, 59 ; privileges of members of the, 111 ; in the 
colonies, 253; in New York, 262; no place of wor- 
ship in New England according to the, 264 ; instruc- 
tions to the governor of New York in regard to, 372, 
688, 821, IV., 287, V., 135 ; not many in New York, j 
III., 415; opened in Boston, 722; only one minister 
in the colony of New York belonging to the, IV., 183 ; 
converted by governor Fletcher into a machine for 
sowing discoid, 325 ; Indian missionaries preferred 
who are of the, 702, 766 ; governor Fletcher makes j 
money by his pretended zeal for the, 826 ; those in '■ 
Pennsylvania of the, ofiended because quakers act as 
judges and jurors there, 1045 ; sundry privileges 
granted in New York to the, 1114 ; complains of some 
acts passed in the province of Pennsylvania, V., 
18 ; governor Hunter complains of the clergy of the, 
310, 312 ; would prosper more were no law passed in 
its favor, 323 ; in New York and New Jersey, state 
of the, 334, 336, 777 ; no laws in New Jersey in 
favor of the, 337 ; does not prosper among the In- 
dians, 626 ; government provided for the colonial, 
849 ; archbishop Seeker takes a lively interest in the 
colonial, VI., 907 ; the society for the propagation of 
the gospel in foreign parts was incorporated to en- 
courage a ministry in connection with the, VII., 
347; established in the plantations, 361, 362, 365, 
366 ; in Pennsylvania, state of the, 406, 407; in the 
colonies, state of the, 439, 496 ; the real advantages 
enjoyed by conforming to (title of a pamphlet), 
507 ; called the established church, 586 ; privileges 
and indulgencies confined to members of the, 
ibid ; the friends of government belong to the, 
VIII., 208. (See Church, Episcopal ; Episcopate.) 
(Episcopal), in New York city, money collected to 
ransom christians from slavery among the Turks, 
appropriated to build an. III., 717; the king's farm 
leased to, IV., 393,473; the anti-leislerians absent 
themselves from the, 416; why governor Fletcher 
leased the king's farm to, 448 ; how built, 463 ; the 
earl of Bellomont attempts to take the king's farm 
from, 490, 514; deprived of the king's farm, 510; 
complaints against the earl of Bellomont from the 
vestry of the, 526 ; governor Fletcher a patron of the, 
527; reverend Mr. Vesey minister of the, 534; lord 
Cornbury waited on by the minister of the, 1011 ; 
the first built in the province of New York, 1152 ; 
progress of, V., 83, 467; to whom indebted for a 



legal establishment, 479 ; obtains a grant of land in 
Vermont, VIII., 271; shut up, 684. 
(Christ's) (Boston), doctor Cutler rector of, VI., 90. 
(Christ's) (Philadelphia), VII., 316; notice of, 408. 
King's chapel (Boston), reverend S. Myles rector of, 
IV., 582 ; a petition to the earl of Bellomont, 793. 
at Rye, reverend Christopher Bridge rector of, IV., 

582. 
(St. Ann's) (Burlington, New Jersey), IV., 1155, V., 

473. 
(St. Peter's) (Philadelphia), reverend Richard Peters, 

rector of, VII., 316. 
(Trinity) (Schenectady), converted into a fortifica- 
tion, VI., 160; a new, built in Schenectady, ibid. 

(French), in New York, III., 630; ministers and elders 
of the, 749 ; contributes to the erection of the epis- 
copal church in New York, IV., 463; reverend M. 
Labourde, minister of, 684 ; an act passed to enlarge, 
1065. 

(Inlian), at Natick, III., 243; governor Dongan pro- 
poses to build an, 394 ; at Martha's Vineyard, IV., 755 ; 
Indians do not consider it decent to go in bear skins 
to, 893; the Canajohary Indians ask for a, VI., 850 ; 
endeavor to build a, 877, 8S0, 883 ; built at Oswe- 
gatchie, 887; built for the Mohawks, VIII., 237; at 
fort Hunter, X., 677. 

(Lutheran), freedom of worship allowed to the mem- 
bers of the, II., 617; on the Delaware, notice of the 
minister of the. III., 343 ; of New York, charter 
refused to, VII., 585, 642. 

(of Piedmont), the king of France is requested to inter- 
pose in behalf of the, II., 262, 270. 

(Pre.sbyterian), of New York, its petition referred to 
the board of trade, VII., 846 ; governor Moore ordered 
to report thereon, 847 ; report of the board of trade 
against the petition of, 943 ; difficulties in the way of 
incorporating the, VIII., 574; the commissioners of 
Indian affairs and the committee of safety meet at 
Albany in the, 627. 

(Reformed Dutch), in New Netherland, I., 110, 123; 
one to be built at Renselaerswyck, 299 ; in New Am- 
sterdam, scheme resorted to by director Kieft to build 
one, ibid ; no care taken of the property of the, 300 ; 
the only thing worth mentioning in director Kieft's 
time was the building of the, 301 ; director Stuyvesant 
repairs the, 302 ; director Kieft becomes negligent, 
after the erection of the, 303 ; particulars respect- 
ing the New Amsterdam, 331, 333 ; cost of the, 339 ; 
Jacob Couwenhoven one of the church-wardens of, 
340, 424; fines appropriated for the use of, 350, II., 
684, 692, 703, 728, III., 315; scene at New Amster- 
dam in the, I., 352 ; at New Amsterdam, built mainly 
from the funds of the West India company, 423 ; a 
collection in New Amsterdam for the erection of, 424, 
431 ; director Stuyvesant seizes on the selectmen's 
pew in the, 446, 449 ; a pasquinade against director 
Stuyvesant stuck In the poor-bos of the, 491 ; Jo- 
chem Pietersen Cuyter an elder of the, 500 ; the, at 



-Cla] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



135 



Church (Reformed Dutch) — continued. 

New Amstel, II., 61, 68, 69, 111, 115 ; proTision in 
the articles of capitulation in favor of, 251 ; at Ames- 
foort, 404, at New Amsterdam, located within the 
fort, 440, III., 415, 608, IX., 548 ; covered with shin- 
gles, II., 441, III., 311 ; Samuel Forman punished for 
creating a disturbance at New Orange in, II., 705; 
deed of confirmation granted to the, in New Orange, 
730 ; reverend Mr. Miohaijlius, the first minister in 
the United States of the, 759 ; first established in New 
Amsterdam, 764; in New Netherland, dependent on 
the synod of North Holland, 770 ; of New York, the 
minister's salary guaranteed. III., 189; the English 
garrison imprisoned iu the, 201 ; set on fire, 614 ; 
Johannes Kip, deacon of the, 716 ; Leisler opposed 
by the clergy of the, IV., 219 ; the remains of Messrs. 
Leisler and Milborne interred in the, 400, 620 ; gov- 
ernor Fletcher grants a charter to the, 426 ; church- 
masters in the, equivalent to church-wardens, 427 ; 
governor Fletcher obtains a present for incorporating, 
463 ; the mayor of Albany and others threatened with 
excommunication from the, 489 ; a, built in the city 
of New York, 526 ; peculiar practice on sacrament 
days in, 533 ; recommended to the lords of trade by 
lieutenant-governor De Lancey, VI., 819 ; incorporated, 
VII., 586; the administration in New Y'ork favored 
by the members of, VIII., 208 ; in New York, senti- 
ments of the secretary of state on the petition for a 
charter of incorporation for, 573, 574 ; reverend Peter 
Tassemaker, minister of the, IX., 468. 
(Schismatical), founded by a former Illinois missionary, 

IX., 890. 
at Hempstead, John Moore, minister, 11., 158. 
at Jamaica (Long Island), its beginning, V., 321. 

Churcher (Churchill), William, III., 586, 594, 597 ; a mason, 
598 ; arrests captain Brockholst, 600 ; one of Leisler's 
lieutenants, 609 ; forces lieutenant-governor Nichol- 
son to surrender the keys of the fort, 637, 669 ; lieu- 
tenant-governor Leisler's active agent, 638 ; proceeds 
with an armed force to Jamaica (Long Island), 681 ; 
sent in search of colonel Bayard, 683 ; arrests him, 
684; a brick-layer, IV., 212; arrested to prevent his 
voting, 218 ; signs a narrative of public grievances, 220 ; 
lieutenant of militia of the city of New York, 809. 

Churches, the West India company reserves the right of 
erecting, I., 123, 405 ; repairs of, a public charge in 
New England, 364 ; in New England, how supported, 
424 ; the West India company not bound to build, 
425 ; district courts in New Netherland empowered 
to provide for the erection of, II., G21 ; dissensions iu 
Boston in the, III., 184; in the plantations, the 
bishop of London's memorial on, 253 ; number of, in 
the province of New York, 262 ; fines imposed in New 
England on absentees from, 270 ; ministers of the 
Boston, 582; the governor of New Y'ork empowered 
to collate to, 625, 830, IV., 269, V., 95, 394, 838, VI., 
192 ; instructions to the governors of New York re- 



garding the building of. III., 688, 821, V., 135; in 
New York, in mourning for George II., VII , 453 ; iu 
New York, their bells sent off to be cast into cannon, 
VIII., 686; the British burn two, 731; converted 
into hospitals, 732. 

Churchill, Arabella, mistress of James II., IX., 1034. 

Churchill, sir John, solicitor-general to the duke of York, 
III., 224, 226, 285 ; reports on the colonic of Rense- 
laerswyck, 269 ; opinion of, on the charges against 
sir Edmund Andros and colonel Dyre, 314. 

Churchill, [John, 1st] lord, member of the privy council, III., 
572. (See Marlboro.) 

Chute, , III., 833. 

Cibola skins, M. de la Salle obtains the privilege of trading 
in, IX., 127. 

Cifapoa, I., 107. 

Cif^, reverend Auguste Melande de, notice of, IX., 132. 

Ciconifing, or the Whorekill, II., 197. 

Cimamus or Hare river, falls into the Chesapeake, II., 88. 

Cinamon, brought from Spanish America to New Amster- 
dam, II., 30. 

Cinquack, II., 85 ; near the mouth of the Potomac, V., 
605. 

Cinque ports, lord Zoiiche warden of the, II., 118. 

Civil list, parliament does not appropriate what is given for 
the, v., 184; of the province of New York, VII., 
908, VIIL, 453. 

Claeihoudt, Walraven, III., 75. 

Claes, the wheelwright, murder of, I., 211. (See Switz.) 

Claes, Treyntje, II., 480, 481. 

Claesen, Andries, III., 75. 

Claesen, Pieter, II., 187, 191, 375 ; schepen of Amesfoort, 
482. 

Claessen, Dierck, Hoboken leased to, I., 329; order on a 
petition of, II., 720. 

Claessen, Hans, I., 11, 27. 

Claessen, Jan, II., 180, 182. 

Claessen (Clace, Claese, Clase, Clausen), Lawrence, an In- 
dian interpreter, IV., 727, 798, BOO, 807, 895, 896, 
899, 904, 911, 985 ; the Mohawks give land to, 906, 
v., 488, 657, 658, 667, 669, 670,677, 679,693; re- 
ports occurrences at Onondaga, 217, 218, 243, 910 ; 
leaves there, 246 ; accompanies Mr. Hansen to Onon- 
daga, 372, 376 ; sets out for Onjagera, 545 ; journal of 
his negotiations there, 550 ; sent to Schenectady to 
meet some Senecas, 569 ; witnesses a trust deed from 
three of the five n.ations to governor Burnet, 801 ; 
the six nations invite him to Oswego, 866. 

Claessen, Sibout (Clasen, Sibert), I., 191, 327; complains of 
director Stuyvesant, 328 ; sells his house, 329 ; and 
purchases a place on the Manhattans, ibid ; petition 
of, referred, 330 ; takes the oath of allegiance to the 
English, III., 75. 

Claessen, Valentine, II., 638. 

Claessen, William, II., 663, IV., 939. 

Claims of the colonies to an exemption from internal taxes 
imposed by parliament, examined, William Kno:;^ 
author of, VIII., 803. 



136 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cla- 



Clairvill^, lieutenant do, loses an arm, X., C99, 704. 

Claland, Epham, X., 881. 

Clanearty, [Donogh M'Carthy, 3d] earl of, lord Delawarr 

marries a daughter of, VI., 163. 
Clapham, colonel, message sent to the six nations by, VII., 
196, 198 ; marches troops to Shamokin, 333 ; mur- 
dered, 546. 
Clapier, M., wounded, X., 570. 
Clapp, John, letter to the secretary of state from. III., 754 ; 

mentioned, IV., 1006. 
Clare, [.lohn Holies, 2d (11th)] earl of, member of the coun- 
cil for foreign plantations, III., xiii, 33, 36. 
Clare, [Robert Nugent, 1st] viscount, biographical notice of, 
VII., 899 ; first commissioner of trade and planta- 
tions, 920, 943, 944, 1005, VIII., 19, 31, 64. (See 
Nugent.) 

Clarendon, [Edward Hyde, 1st] earl of, referred to under 
the title of lord chancellor. III., 44, 46, 84, 87, 92, 
116, 139, 161, 162 ; letter of, to Samuel Maverick, 
92; advises governor Nicolls of the recall of the 
king's commissioners, 116 ; treats for the purchase of 
Long Island, 606 ; George Clarke marries a relative 
of, IV., 1069. 
Clarendon, [Edward Hyde, 3d] earl of, lord Cornbury be- 
comes, v., 154 (see Cornbury) ; his opinion on the 
scheme for employing the Palatines, 195 ; and of 
Robert Livingston's character, 196 ; his observations 
on governor Huuter's letters referred to the board of 
trade, 288 ; answers to his observations, 290 ; remarks 
of the board of trade on the observations of, 303 ; a 
representation against governor Hunter transmitted to, 
312 ; endeavors to prevent the pardon of negroes re- 
prieved by governor Hunter, 356 ; his objections against 
certain acts passed in New York and New Jersey, 
398 ; Alexander Griffith a tool of, 401 ; governor 
Hunter's answer to his objections against certain acts, 
402, 403 ; answer of the New York assembly to his 
objections, 405 ; thanks governor Hunter for his 
attention, 406 ; misapplied and squandered the pub- 
lic revenue when governor of New York, 581. 
Clarendon, [Henry Hyde, 2d] earl of, keeper of the privy 

seal, III., 360, 362. 
Claret, Narraganset wine as good as Bourdeaux, IV. 788. j 
Clarke, captain Christopher, sails from Boston, III., 154. 
Clarke, Daniel, secretary of Connecticut, III., 29. I 

Clarke, Daniel, lawyer of New Jersey, VI., 346. ! 

Clarke, Edward, a commissioner for Indian affairs, VI., 146. ; 
Clarke, Elizabeth, marries Edward T\'ng, IX., 527. 
Clarke, George, arrives in New York, IV., 1066 ; memoir of, 
1069 ; witness to an instrument, 1138 ; ordered to | 
record Mr. Lawrence's dismissal from the council, 
1181; interested in the Minisinck purchase, 1182; 
secretary of the province of New Y'ork, V., 20 ; clerk 
of the council, 102 ; attends a conference with the I 
Indians, 219, 220, 223, 859, 860, 862, 867, 868, 963, 
966, 969 ; letters of, to the board of trade, 237, 238, i 
249, 250, VI., 42, 49, 50, 52, 63, 66, 73, 75, 78, 82, 83,' \ 
85, 89, 94, 96, 109, 111, 115, 130, 135, 140, 141, 143, ; 



145, 147, 150, 152, 154, 158, 160, 168, 171, 184, 187, 
197, 199, 201, 206, 214, 220, 224, 251 ; the board of 
trade acknowledge the receipt of his letters, V. , 282 ; 
recommended for a seat in the council, 419, 420, 435, 
458 ; furnishes particulars respecting the reverend 
Mr. Vesey, 464 ; appointed to the council of New 
York, 471 ; deputy auditor of accounts, 514 ; reports 
the difficulties between governor Burnet and the 
assembly of New York, 768 ; suspected by Mr. Col- 
den, 845 ; deeply interested in large tracts of land, 
ibid ; prime minister of governor Cosby, 937 ; mem- 
ber of governor Cosby's council, 951, 985 ; James 
Alexander opposes his claim to the presidency of the 
council of New York, 982 ; the town of Westchester 
conveys half its undivided lands to chief justice Mor- 
ris and, VI., 8; letter of the mayor, &c., of Albany 
to, 14, 57; the administration of the government of 
New York devolves on, 43 ; hanged in a fictitious 
piece of history in one of the New York newspapers, 
44 ; correspondence between Rip Van Dam and, 44, 
45 ; letters of, to the duke of Newcastle, 46, 53, 62, 
65, 70, 71, 74, 76, 81, 84, 91, 110, 114, 128, 134, 140, 
142, 144, 147, 149, 157, 162, 164, 166, 170, 179, 181, 
182, 187, 188, 195, 200, 205, 212, 222, 245 ; letter to 
Mr. Walpole from, 47 ; Mr. Van Dam serves a protest 
on, 48 ; urges the removal of Messrs. Van Dam and 
Alexander from the council, 49, 50, 53, 66 ; letter of 
speaker Philipse to, 55 ; letter to secretary Popple 
from, 56, 59, 67, 77 ; of the commissioners of Indian 
afi'airs to, 58, 131, 146, 152, 232, 234, 240; of Mr. 
Golden to, 68 ; papers on the subject of the differences 
between Mr. Rip Van Dam and, laid before the privy 
council, 69 ; his commission as lieutenant-governor 
of New Y'ork, 71 ; his scheme to settle the Mohawk 
country, 72 ; recommends that Messrs. Alexander, 
Smith and other malcontents be sent prisoners to 
England, 76, 80 ; letters of the board of trade to, 83, 
89, 97, 129, 137, 139, 149, 169, 188, 199, 213, 245 ; 
receives his commission as lieutenant-governor, 84; 
correspondence between the governor of Canada and, 
92; letter to captain Congreve from, 93; informed 
that lord Delawarr has been appointed governor of 
New York and New Jersey, 97 ; his conferences with 
the Indians, 98, 172, 216 ; requested to act as agent 
for the province, 113; his answers to queries of the 
board of trade, 120 ; his son appointed to the council 
of New York, 129 ; designs to settle Scot cli highland- 
ers near Wood creek, 145 ; intrigues with Mrs. Cosby 
against Van Dam, 153 ; ofiers lord Delawarr one 
thousand guineas to resign his commission as gov- 
ernor of New York, 163 ; letter of major-general 
Spotswood to, 165 ; of admiral Vernon to, 181 ; his 
suggestions as to reducing Cape Breton and Canada, 
183, 229 ; letters of governor Oglethorpe to, 198, 211, 
242 ; endeavors to smooth the way for governor 
Clinton, 205, 212; transmits a report on the state of 
the province of New York, 206 ; instructed to give 



— Cla] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



137 



Clarke, George — continued. 

governor Clintou every information, 213 ; recommends 
that a fort be built at Tierondequat, 225 ; his thoughts 
ou the British provinces and the French who surround 
them, 226 ; letter of governor Gooch to, 230 ; to the 
commissioners of Indian affairs from, 231 ; to gover- 
nor Gooch from, 241; governor Oglethorpe applies 
for assistance to, 242; governor Clinton on good 
terms with, 248 ; declines to be qualified as council- 
lor, ibid, 270, 272 ; transfers the government to gov- 
ernor Clinton, 251; why he declined being of the 
council, 252; requests that his sou be attached to 
governor Oglethorpe's regiment, 253 ; governor Clin- 
ton indisposed towards, 261 ; proposes a stamp duty 
for America, 268 ; Jeremiah Van Reuselaer appointed 
councilor in the place of, 277 ; sets out for Boston, 
278 ; procured a revenue by humoring the assembly, 
352 ; assumptions of the assembly in the time of, 
353 ; Mr. de Lancey's schemes in the timeof, 356 ; the 
expression of his majesty's approbation of great use 
to, 410; governor Clinton accepts the supplies as 
voted in the time of, 429 ; commander-in-chief on the 
death of governor Cosby, 436 ; annual api5ropriations 
made since the time of, 460, 472, 474 ; Mr. Coldeu 
renders assistance to, 469 ; Tierondequat purchased 
in the time of, 541 ; governor Clinton promises to 
pass bills in the manner agreed to by, 602 ; makes a 
representation against annual supjjly bills, 615, 640, 
641 ; made large concessions to the assembly, 665 ; 
referred to, for the circumstances of Mr. Horsmanden, 
670 ; the plan of voting a support of government for 
five years, abandoned in the time of, 689 ; propriety 
of building a sloop on lake Ontario suggested by, 
745 ; accepts supplies annually from the assembly, 
820 ; lieutenant-governor De Lancey asks leave to 
accept supplies in the same manner as, 821 ; Tieron- 
dequat purchased in the time of, 852 ; Daniel Horse- 
manden a supporter of, VII. , 528 ; encourages captain 
Lauchlin Campbell to bring settlers to New York, 
C29, 630 ; one case carried by appeal to the privy 
council in the time of, 707 ; extract from a conference 
held by him with the Indians, IX., 1062; taken 
prisoner by the French, X., 40. 

Clarke, George, junior, member of the council of New York, 
VI., 129, 153, VII., 763 ; offers lord Delawarr, from his 
father, one thousand guineas for the government of 
New York, VI., 163; in England, 209; does not 
return to New York, VII., 205 ; twenty years absent 
from the province of New York, 675 ; about to return 
to New York, 843 ; secretary of New York, 901 ; 
resides in England, 916 ; patentee of the secretary's 
office of New York, 927 ; Goldsbrow Banyar, deputy 
to, VIII., 284; governor Tryou's answer to the peti- 
tion of, 322 ; number of offices held in New York by, 
326 ; report of the board of trade on his petition 
against governor Tryon, 413 ; order in council rein- 
stating him in his office of register of New York, 417; 

18 



his salary as secretary of the province of New York, 
454, 456. 

Clarke, Mrs. George, dies in New York, IV., 1069. 

Clarke, lieutenant Hyde, applies to be attached to governor 
Oglethorpe's regiment, VI., 253. 

Clarke, reverend Josias, chaplain to the fort at New York, 
III., 415, v., 478. 

Clarke, major, defeated by the Indians, III., 256. 

Clarke, lieutenant Thaddeus, commands a party at fort 
Loyal, IX., 472; killed, 473; mentioned, 527. 

Clarke, Thomas, commissioner from Massachusetts at the 
surrender of New Amsterdam, II., 253. 

Clarke, Thomas, testifies against governor Andros, III., 314; 
refuses to keep watch or ward in New York, 613 ; im- 
prisoned, 614, 617 ; liberated, 673 ; before the court 
of exchequer, 683 ; trader of New York, 749 ; carries 
a message from governor Fletcher to lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Phipps, IV., 5 ; an account of liis Interview 
with sir William Phipps, 8, 9 ; swears to the truth of 
his report, 12; coroner of New York, 130, 145, 400; 
ofl'ers to collect the arrears of quit rents, 519, but 
neglects to do so, 520 ; sent prisoner from Connecticut 
to New York, 595 ; offers to surrender all the treasure 
he recovered from captain Kidd, ibid ; imprisoned for 
going on board captain Kidd's vessel, 623; brings 
goods from captain Kidd's ship, 793 ; applies for a 
reprieve of certain negroes, V., 357; indicted, 477. 

Clark, captain Thomas, member of a court of inquiry at 
Albany, VI., 374, 375 ; commands a company of fnsi- 
leers, 707. 

Clark, Walter, one of governor Andros' council, III., 543, 
591 ; governor of Rhode Island, IV., 155, 156, 601. 

Clarke, William, IV., 936, 1007. 

Clarkson, David, member of assembly from New York, V., 
982 ; member of the general committee of New York, 
VIIL, 601. 

Clarkson, Matthew, sails from New York for England, 
III., 614; secretary of the province of New Y''ork, 
781, 783, 784, 786, 787, 789, 793, 796, 800, 805, 813, 
814, 816, 844, IV., 7, 19, 20, 22, 24, 28, 47, 48, 50, 51, 
63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 76, 77, 78, 80, 83, 92, 93, 94, 96, 97, 
98, 175, 235, 237, 238, 239, 241, 587, 727, 849, 911; 
his salary, 25 ; the earl of Bellomont recommends a 
person to be secretary of the province instead of, 536 ; 
assaults Mr. Parmiter, 537, 555; earl of Bellomont 
authorized to punish, 634 ; nobody in New York fit 
to fill his place, 796 ; threatened with suspension, 
958 ; farms the secretary's office to Mr. Jamison, V., 
478 ; the office of secretary of the province of New 
York first established in the time of, VIII., 324. 

Clasenius, Elizabeth, II , 189. 

Classis of Amsterdam, II., 72; complain of the earl of Bel- 
lomont, IV., 490. (See Amsterdam.) 

Clatie, Cornells, taken prisoner by the French, III., 805. 

Clattery, Thomas, IV., 162. 

Glaus (Claes, Claesse, Clause), Daniel, an Indian interpre. 
ter, VI., 964, VII., 30, 51, 105, 109, 112, 115, 136; 
reads general Johnson's speech to the Indians, VI., 



138 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Ci, 



Claus, Daniel — continued. 

974, 981 ; at lake George, 998 ; deputy secretary of 
Indian affairs, VII., 211, 230, 232, 236, 240 ; lieuten- 
ant in the Royal Americans, 246; at fort Johnson, 
249, 255, 256, 257, 262, 263, 265; accompanies sir 
William Johnson to Canajoharie, 378 ; attends an 
Indian conference, 386, 435 ; ordered to hold a con- 
ference with the Canada Indians, 530, 532 ; holds an 
Indian congress at Caghnawaga (Canada), 542 ; deputy 
Indian agent, 556, 558, 579, 718, 722; witnesses the 
treaty with the Delawares, 740 ; attends a conference 
of the western Indians, 854; Indian agent for Canada, 
VIII., 38, 45, 129, 282, 362, 424, 455, 474, 475, 480, 
518, 534, 556 ; assists at the treaty of fort Stanwix, 
112; attends a meeting for the ratification of the 
boundary between the whites and Indians, 227, 228, 
233 ; about to return to Canada, 238 ; the Indians re- 
quest that he be continued their agent, 500 ; sent to 
tranqiiilize the Caghnawaga Indians, 661 ; remarks of, 
on the management of the northern Indian nations, 
700 ; appointed to a command of Indians in Canada, 
714, 716 ; reports operations with the Indians, 718 ; 
and the failure of the expedition under St. Leger, 
722 ; complains of sir Guy Carleton, 723 ; his ap- 
pointment not pleasing to sir Guy Carleton, 725 ; at 
Quebec, 776; biographical notice of, 815. 
Claus, Mrs., dies in Canada, VIII., 815. 

Clause, , one of Every, the pLrate's men, lives in Phila- 
delphia, IV., 301. 
Claverack, III., 692, IV., 247 ; in the precincts of the manor 
of Renselaerwyck, V., 909 ; Johannes Van Renselaer's 
claim to lands at, contested, VII., 743 ; Johannes Van 
Renselaer, proprietor of, 911. 
Clayborne (Claborne, Claiborne, Cleborne), captain William, 
claims possession of the island of Kent, II., 97 ; com- 
missioned to explore the bay of Chesapeake and 
other parts of Virginia, III., 14; member of the 
council and secretary of Virginia, 15 ; commissioned 
to trade throughout America, ibid. 
Clayton, general, his regiment wrecked in the expedition 

against Canada, V., 277. 
Cleaton, Joseph, IV., 937. 
Cleator, Joseph, IV., 1008. 
Cleef, inhabitants of, recommended as emigrants to New 

Netherland, I., 370. 
Clement, captain, commands La Brunette, X., 50. 
Clement, Jacobus, an Indian interpreter, VI., 964, 976 ; sent 
to hasten the six nations, VII., 52; understands the 
Mohegan language, 96 ; at fort Johnson, 103, 105, 
169, 174, 176; at Albany, 160; attends sir William 
Johnson to the Germaullatts, 187, 191,193; at Cana- 
joharie, 380, 386, 391. 
Clement, Joseph, sells rum to Indians, V., 569, VI., 362. 
Clement, Mr., secretary to lord Bellomout, IV., 316 ; the 
earl of Bellomout complains of, 400 ; disappoints the 
earl of Bellomout, 429, 537 ; Mr. Parmiter recom- 
mended to the earl of Bellomout by, 664. 



Clerambault, M., IX., 304. 

Clerck, captain, II., 288. 

Clergy (Clergymen), not sent in sufficient numbers to Brazil, 
I., 106 ; the people in New Netherland to contribute 
to the support of, 112; number of Dutch in Brazil, 
Cura9ao, New Netherland and Loando, 163 ; wanted 
for New Netherland, II., 72, 223; discountenance the 
offering of any resistance to the English, 495; de- 
sirous of saving their houses, 499, 500 ; director 
Stuyvesant allows himself to be led frojn the ram- 
parts by two, 502; and allows himself to be rode 
over by, 503, 509 ; condition of the, in the planta- 
tions, III., 253; scarce in New York, 261, 262; 
provision for the support of, in New York, 359 ; 
names of, in New York in 1686, 415 ; of Boston, fore- 
most in the deposition of governor Andros, 582 ; 
about to sail for Virginia, 650 ; of the reformed Dutch 
church in New York oppose Leisler, 672 ; English, 
ought to reside among the Indians, IV., 254, 1067; 
provision to be made in New York, for the support 
of orthodox, 287 ; the five nations apply for protes- 
tant, 346, 368 ; names of, latinized in Holland, 489 ; 
the Indians are promised protestant, 563, 728 ; of 
the several churches in New York remonstrate against 
the public burial of Leisler and Milborne's remains, 
621 ; the English neglect sending any, among the five 
nations, 648 ; the Indians ought to be provided with, 
649, 663 ; about to be settled among the Indians, 656, 
661, 693 ; the earl of Bellomont regrets that he is 
not empowered to furnish the five nations with, 687 ; 
none to be found in America who will settle among 
the Indians, 690 ; may be of great use among the In- 
dians, 707 ; two required for the Indians, 717 ; paid 
for preaching to the Indians, too lazy to learn their 
language, 713 ; Suffolk and Queens counties petition 
for dissenting, 719 ; the earl of Bellomont opposed to 
the settlement of dissenting, ibid ; invited from Eng- 
land to instruct the Indians, 727 ; protestant, invited 
to settle at Onondaga, 730 ; unwilling to do so, 731 ; 
the Indians recommend that some be settled at 
Albany, 732 ; at Onondaga, to be accompanied by a 
smith, 741 ; the five nations go over daily to the 
French for want of, 748 ; character of those who 
come to America, 766 ; the archbishop of Canterbury 
and bishop of London informed that the Indians are 
in want of, 772 ; recommended for the instruction of 
ludians, 872, 875 ; of Albany and Schenectady to 
instruct the five nations, 983 ; in the colonies in 1620, 
number of, VII., 361. [See Jesuits ; Missionaries.) 
(Calvinist), accused of stirring up persecution in Ame- 
rica, VI., 269. 
(Canadian), number of, in Quebec in 1698, IV., 351 ; 
support the British government against the Americans, 
VIII., 665 ; tithes established for the support of the, 
IX., 28; character of, 442; circular of M. de Vau- 
dreuil to, X., 1072. 
(Episcopal), in New York to have a certificate from 
the archbishop of Canterbury, III., 372; not to be 



— Cli] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



139 



Clergy (Episcopal) — continued. 

preferred to any benefice in New York without a cer- 
tificate from the bishop of London, 688, IV., 288 ; 
in Albany, 183, 489 ; of the city of New York, salary 
of, 463, 510 ; the reverend Mr. Yesey, minister of the 
English church at New York, 527 ; of king's chapel, 
Boston, 582 ; of New York, an act passed to increase 
the salary of the, 1064; misunderstanding between 
governor Hunter and, V., 310 ; their address to him, 
325; to meet at Amboy, 354; convocation of, 355; 
of Pennsylvania, governor Hunter complains of some 
of the, 364 ; of New York and New Jersey, send a 
letter of congratulation to archbishop Seeker, VH., 
346 ; reverend doctor Johnson's report respecting the, 
397; called on to congratulate George III. on his ac- 
cession, 454; congratulatory addresses presented to 
George IH. from, 496; hold a convention, 538; 
reason why the Mohawks have none, 580. 

Clergyman, a, of Leyden, inclined to go, with several hun- 
dred English families, to New Netherland, I., 22 ; the 
patroons to maintain a schoolmaster and, 99, 557 ; 
the West India company postpones sending out a, 
126 ; salary of, 155 ; permission to leave New Nether- 
land, granted to the English, 311 (see Douthy); 
departure of the Dutch, 317; harsh treatment of the 
English, 331, 335 ; or a comforter of the sick, ought 
to accomi^any emigrants, 361, 370 ; only one, in New 
Netherland, 389, 392 ; patroons furnish means for 
the support of a, 405 ; Wilhelmus Grasmeer a, 599, 
600 ; the city of Amsterdam promises to provide a, 
for its colonie, 620 ; wanted for the South river, II., 4, 
7, 9, 13, 20 ; the Swedish, presumes to preach in the 
Dutch colonie on the Delaware, 61 ; required at New 
Amstel, 114 ; of Hartford, takes a load of hay belong- 
ing to the Dutch, 142; Oysterbay protests against 
maintaining a, not of the people's opinion, 581 ; re- 
quired for the Esopus, 592; the first in New Nether- 
land, 759 ; the governor of New Y'ork guarantees the 
salary of a, III., 189; induces governor Lovelace to 
trust himself to the Dutch, 205 ; of Schenectady 
applies to the governor of Canada for two runaway 
slaves, 458 ; of Albany, converts many Indians, 799 ; 
the, who presented the petition in favor of Jacob 
Leisler, imprisoned by governor Sloughter, 812 (see 
Selyns) ; instance of a, being deprived of his min- 
isterial functions by act of the legislature, IV., 510; 
allowances to the English and French, in New York, 
suspended, 622 ; Mohawks promise a tract of laud for 
the support of, 657 ; at Schenectady, to instruct the 
Indians, 729 ; the Indians are deprived of their, 
867; none sent in his stead, 868; the Oneidas com- 
plain of their, VIII., 536; recommends the Indians to 
burn a letter addressed to Guy Johnson, 538 ; con- 
cerns himself only with religion, 552; the charges 
against him at Oneida to be Inquired into, 554. 

Clerin (Clevin), adjutant, IX., 594; sent to arrest captain 
Louvigny, 714. 



Clerk, Cornells, II., 237. 

Clerk, Mathew, engineer in the expedition against Tioonde- 
roga, X., 726; killed, 727, 728. 

Clerke, , III., 542. 

Gierke, Nathaniel, one of governor Andros' council, III., 543. 

Clerk's island, IV., 831. 

Clermont, captain de, commander at Sorel, defeats a party 
of the enemy, IX., 474; discovers a party of the 
enemy on lake Champlain, 479 ; killed, 487 ; men- 
tioned, 715. 

Cleveland, duchess of, mistress of Charles the second, II., 
563. 

Cleveland, reverend Mr., minister at New Castle (Delaware), 
VIL, 168, 

Cleveland (Ohio), V., 801; Indian name of, VII., 423; colo- 
nel Croghan trades in the vicinity of, 982. 

Cleynsmit, Marten, II., 182. 

Cliff fort, lord Adam Gordon, governor of, VII., 767. 

Cliffs, The, on the Chesapeake, II., 91. 

Clifton, baroness, lady Cornbury becomes, IV., 1183. 

Clifton, captain, R. N., V., 168. 

CUmate, of New Netherland, 1 , 14, 40, 179, 275, 612, II., 
433, 512, 769 ; of New York, Mr. Colden's account of 
the, v., 690, VI., 123; governor Tryon on, VIII., 
435 ; troops and cannon pass over the frozen rivers 
around the city of New York, 781 ; of Canada, IX., 
30 ; of Illinois, 891, X., 230 ; a foot of snow at Ticon- 
deroga in April, 546 ; severe winter in Canada, 549 ; 
of Canada, healthy, 969. (See Seasons.) 

Clinch river (Kentucky), VIII., 113. 

Clincton, Peter, X., 214. 

Clingancourt, , creates disturbance at Caghnawaga, VIII., 

238. 

Clinton, a pirate, sent from PhUadelphia to Carolina, IV., 
301. 

Clinton, Charles, VIII., 806. 

Clinton, De Witt, his opinion respecting the location of the 
Seneca towns. III., 251 ; son of brigadier-general 
James Clinton, VIII., 806. 

Clinton, George, succeeds Mr. Clarke as governor of New 
Y'ork, IV., 1069 ; Paul Richards opposed to, VI., 119 ; 
appointed governor of New York, 187, 188 ; his com- 
mission, 189 ; a draft of his instructions prepared, 
200 ; news of his appointment received at New 
York, 202 ; lieutenant-governor Clarke endeavors 
to smooth the way for, 205 ; the assembly expects to 
be dissolved by, 206 ; lieutenant-governor Clarke in- 
structed to give every information to, 213 ; asks that 
presents be made to the sis nations, 224 ; points to 
certain allowances in sui)port of his application, 246; 
arrives in New York, 247 ; dissolves the assembly, 248, 
278, 281, 283, 414, 578, 751; adopts measures to pro- 
tect Oswego, 250 ; recommends Mr. Van Renselaer for 
a seat in the council, 254; sets out for Albany, 256 ; 
receives the declaration of war with France, 259, 260 ; 
minutes of his conference with the Indians, 262, 289, 
317, 383, 390, 441, 717, 781 ; opposes a stamp act for 



140 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cli- 



Clinton, George — continued. 

America, 268; receives tlie thanks of Massachusetts 
for aid rendered to the expedition against Cape Breton, 
284 ; sets a scheme on foot for the reduction of Crown 
Point, 286, 288 ; his character of the New York assem- 
bly, 287, 305, 306 ; the assembly retorts on, 307 ; the 
climate of New York fatal to one of his family, 309 ; 
offers to command the expedition against Cape Bre- 
ton, 310 ; his obserrations on certain proceedings in 
council in regard to the printed copy of his Indian 
treaty, 328; complains of colonel Schuyler of New 
Jersey, 349 ; New Y'ork assembly present a remon- 
strance to, 350; transmits a narratiye of the prin- 
cipal transactions of his government, 352; regrets 
granting a commission to chief justice De Lancey during 
good behavior, 356 ; returns from Albany, 357; colo- 
nel Johnson reports the good disposition of the five 
nations to, 361 ; reproves colonel Schiiyler, 363 ; re- 
marks on the remonstrance of the assembly to, 365 ; 
letter of the captains of the Pennsylvania companies 
to, 375 ; recommends captain Wraxal for a company 
in the army, 377 ; complains of the assembly, and 
asks for changes in the council, 378, 394 ; recommends 
colonel Johnson to the ministry, 379 ; his reasons for 
suspending Mr. Horsmanden from the council, 380 ; 
informed that the expedition against Canada is aban- 
doned, 384 ; governor Shirley recommends an expedi- 
tion against Crown Point to, 385 ; further reports of 
the disposition of the five nations sent by colonel 
Johnson to, 386, 387, 388, 389 ; letter of colonel Ro- 
berts to, 397; advised to support the Indian interest 
at the charge of the crown, 398, 421 ; a short account 
of his conduct since he received orders for the Ca- 
nada expedition, 399 ; suspends Stephen Bayard from 
the councO, 404; is about to exert his authority 
against the "horrid faction," 406 ; appoints a coun- 
cOor, and recommends other gentlemen for that 
office, 407 ; complains of chief justice De Lancey, 408, 
409, 411, 429, 4G4, 472, 475. 513, 751, 752; transmits 
names of "the faction," 413; disbands the troops 
raised for the expedition against Canada, 415 ; re- 
ceives leave of absence, 416 ; remonstrates against the 
appointment of James de Lancey to be lieutenant- 
governor of New York, 417; meets a new assembly, 
419 ; which contiDues to encroach on the prerogative, 
420 ; colonel Johnson transmits particulars of an 
Indian engagement to, 422 ; reports the proceedings 
of the assembly, 424, 425 ; moderation recommended 
to, 427 ; peace announced to, 428 ; exposes the chief 
justice's intrigues, 430; recommends Mr. Golden, 
431, 530, 753, 759 ; governor Shirley's report on the 
administration of, 432; report of a conference held 
with the Indians by governor Shirley and, 437 ; sends 
a flag of truce to Canada, 453 ; urges the settlement of 
the New Jersey boundary, 454 ; represents the state 
of Canada to the secretary of state, 455 ; explains how 
the assembly has absorbed so much power, 456; 
adopts a policy recommended by governor Shirley, 



459; "Tlie Present State of the Province of New 
York," by, 460; transmits the result of the session 
of the assembly, 466; defends Mr. Colden, 468; re- 
ports Oliver De Lancey, 471, 513, 515, 516; reite- 
rates his complaints against " the faction," 472, 474 ; 
biographical notice of, 475 ; resolves to suspend chief 
justice De Lancey, 476 ; reports that the governor of 
Canada refuses to liberate the prisoners belonging to 
New York, 484, 485 ; his correspondence with the 
governor of Canada, 488-505, 527, 539, 566, 711, 731 ; 
his report on the province of New York, 507 ; colonel 
Johnson reports the number of French prisoners in 
his hands to, 512 ; experiences contimied difficulties 
from the assembly, 521, 522; explains why he is 
unable to transmit a census, 524; resolves to continue 
in his government, and will not suspend chief justice 
De Lancey, 528 ; reports fresh schemes of encroach- 
ment on the part of the French, 529, 545 ; governor 
Hamilton sends an account of the proceedings of the 
French on the Ohio to, 531, 593, 708, 710; cannot 
procure a satisfactory account, of the bills of credit 
issued in New York, 534, 535 ; recommends the sup- 
pression of the office of provincial treasurer, 536 ; 
ordered to exchange Indian prisoners, 543, X., 197, 
198 ; details the progi-ess of the encroachments by the 
New York assembly on the royal prerogative, VI., 
551 ; answers the charge that he had converted con- 
siderable sums of public money to his own use, 554, 
556; reiterates his complaints against " the faction," 
558; instructs colonel Johnson to exchange Indian 
prisoners, 559 ; called on for a report of the bounda- 
ries of his government, 560, 587; represents the 
necessity of supporting the five nations, 561 ; and 
that the governor of Canada detains the prisoners 
belonging to New Y'ork, 570 ; reports a homicide by 
one of the officers of the man-of-war stationed at New 
York, 571 ; captain Roddam, R. N., marries a daugh- 
ter of, 574 ; his observations on chief justice De Lancey 's 
behavior, 575 ; his efforts to collect evidence on the 
boundary question, 577 ; dissolves the assembly, and 
recommends the restoration of Mr. Alexander to the 
council, 578; reports the progress made in the ex- 
change of prisoners, ibid; captain Stoddert reports 
the state of things in Canada to, 580 ; further French 
intrigues among the Indians reported to, 589, 592; 
the lords of trade call the attention of the secretary of 
state to the difficulties experienced by, 597 ; exposes 
his reasons for again meeting the assembly, 598, 602 ; 
colonel Johnson sends two young men who had been 
taken prisoners by the French on the Ohio, to, 599 ; 
his declaration in opposition to Mr. Horsmanden's 
affidavit, 601 ; transmits documents on the subject of 
the boundaries, 603 ; his certificate about iron-rolling 
mills, 604 ; invites governor Glen of South Carolina 
to meet the six nations at Albany, 605 ; applies for 
leave of absence, 606 ; reasons for assenting to certain 
New York bUls, 607 ; transmits to England copy of 
the inscription on a leaden plate found on the head 



— Clo] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



141 



Clinton, Goorge — continued. 

■waters of the Ohio, 608 ; asks that another lieutenant- 
governor he nominated in the place of Mr. De Lancey, 
612 ; report on the administration of, 614, 639 ; ab- 
stract of the representation presented hy the assembly 
to, 661 ; accused of favoring popish emissaries and 
selling prisoners of vrar, G62 ; substance of his answer 
to these charges, 664 ; invites the governors of the 
other colonies to attend the approaching conference 
■with the Indians, 703 ; answers to that invitation, 
705, 707, 708; notifies the government of his inten- 
tion to retui-n to England, 712 ; abstract of his pro- 
* ceedings with the Indians, 714, 715 ; renews his appli- 
cation for leave to return to England, 726 ; recom- 
mends Mr. Chambers for a seat in the council, 728; 
report of the French proceedings at Cataraqui sent 
to, 729 ; his notes on a letter from the governor of 
Canada, 734 ; announces the death of attorney-general 
Bradley, 736; appoints Mr. Smith attorney-general, 
737 ; Mr. Coldeu's report on Indian affairs to, 738 ; 
transmits a letter from the governor of Pennsylvania 
in regard to a grant of land on the northern line of that 
province, 747 ; reports the proceedings of the assem- 
bly in 1751, 749 ; further instructions to, 754, 755 ; 
determined to suspend lieutenant-governor De Lancey, 
759 ; why he remains in his government, 762 ; con- 
tinues his complaints of the assembly, 764 ; recom- 
mends Mr. Smith for a seat in the council, 766 ; Peter 
Wraxall complains of, 768 ; informed that it is his ma- 
jesty's pleasure that he remain in his government, 
770 ; instructed to send mutineers of Oswego to Hali- 
fax, 771 ; renews his application for leave to return 
to England, 778 ; sir Danvers Osborn appointed to 
succeed, 788, 791, 793; Conrsid Weiser goes to Flush- 
ing to call on, 795, 798; delivers to chief justice De 
Lancey a commission to be lieutenant-governor, 804, 
829 ; indisposed, 807 ; supplies voted annually under, 
820, 821 ; animosities and disagreements between the 
different branches of the legislature under, 831, 900 
the board of trade receive his letter transmitting the 
complaints made by the Mohawks, 854 ; recommended 
to meet the five nations at Onondaga, 855 ; promised 
to convey to the king a request for the reinstatement 
of colonel Johnson as superintendent of Indian affairs, 
871 ; Mr. Horsmanden's name omitted from the list 
of councilors in consequence of his sixspension by, 
947 ; the board of trade disapprove of the conduct of 
the council and assembly under, 948 ; commissions a 
chief justice to hold office during good behavior, 951 ; 
takes the management of Indian afi'airs out of the 
hands of commissioners, VII., 19 ; the Indians dis- 
satisfied because of the non-redress of their complaints 
made to, 20 ; commissioned judges during good beha- 
vior, 468 ; Daniel Horsmanden opposes, 528 ; cor- 
responds with the governor of New Hampshire on the 
subject of boundaries, 595 ; cajoled into granting 
commissions to judges during good behavior, 705, 
796 ; his son applies for arrears of salary due to. Till., 



432; demands the surrender of Mohawk prisoners 
in Canada, X., 185 ; claims the five nations as vassals 
of the crown, 187 ; extracts from his correspondence 
with the governor of Canada, 191, 193 ; extract of his 
letter to governor Shirley, 194; the marquis de la 
Jonquifere writes to, 210 ; sends captain Stoddert to 
Canada for prisoners, 211 ; demands the surrender of 
Indian traders seized by the French on the Ohio, 242. 
Clinton, Mrs. George, Oliver De Lancey's indecent language 
in reference to, VI., 471 ; a daughter of general Carle, 
475 ; in New York, 713. 
Clinton, sir Henry, commands the expedition against 
Charleston (South Carolina), VII., 786; attacks 
Charleston (South Carolina), VIII., 174; consults 
Goldsborow Banyar previous to the attack on Esopus, 
188 ; applies for indemnity for losses sustained by 
his father whilst governor of New York, 432 ; at New 
York, 588, 666 ; quits Boston, 674; takes general Lee, 
677 ; biographical notice of, 717 ; stations governor 
Tryon at Kingsbridge, 734 ; member of the commis- 
sion for restoring peace, 738 ; assumes the command 
of the army in America, 751, 752; advised of gover- 
nor Tryon's leave to return to England, 759 ; autho- 
rized to relieve the distresses of loyalists, 765 ; re- 
commended to embody the loyalists, 769 ; and to 
organize a board of inquiry, 771 ; successful in Caro- 
lina, 790 ; returns to New York, 793 ; lord Lincoln 
aid-de-camp to, 795 ; number of men required to 
complete the army under, 800 ; pays judge Ludlow's 
salary, 801 ; meditates great things, 802 ; not sus- 
pected to be the author of a letter to lord George 
Germain, recently published, 803 ; reports the revolt 
of the New Jersey brigade, 810 ; detaches general 
Robertson to Virginia, 812 ; his residence whilst in 
New York, X., 777. 

Clinton, major-general James, notice of, VIII., 806. 

Clinton, [Hugh Fortescue] lord, governor Burnet receives a 
letter from, V , 817 ; governor Burnet has done all he 
can to serve, 818. 

Clinton (New York), reverend Samuel Kirkland interred ivt, 
VIII., 631. 

Cload, William, III., 742. 

Clobery, William, and others, complain of the Dutch for 
preventing them trading on Hudsons river, I., 71-81, 
82, 93, 108. 

Clock, Abraham, III., 75. 

Clock, Albert, III., 745. 

Clock, George. (See Ktock.) 

Clock (Clocq), Martin, III., 600, 648 ; captain of militia of 
the city of New York, IV., 810. 

Clocq, Pelgrom. (See Klock.) 

Cloeck (Clue), Godfried, I., 606. 

Cloeok, Peter, II., 215, 245. 

Cloet, John, IV., 939. 

Clogher, bishop of, patron of colonel BarrC', X., 10 27. 

Clomp, Abraham, III., 683. 

Cloppenburg, reverend Mr., II., 770. 



142 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Clo— 



Clopper, Cornells, 11., 249, 699. 

Clopper, Cornelius, member of the general committee of 
New York, VIII., 601. 

Cloth, imported from Holland into New Netherland, I., 436; 
duty on, 634 ; the people of New Netherland forbid- 
den to manufacture, II., 557 ; coarse, manufactured 
in New York, V., 59. 

Clotworthy, John, IV., 513. 

Cloud, Fergeson, IV., 938. 

Clovally, Robert Livingston writes from, IV., 1063. 

Clowes, Samuel, surveyor, IV., 911 ; a witness against colo- 
nel Bayard, &c., 945; mentioned, 1008; Us charac- 
ter, v., 314; counsel for reverend Mr. Foyer, 328. 

Cloyne, reverend doctor Cutler under obligation to doctor 
Berkely, bishop of, VI., 90S. 

Club, a Jacobite, in New York, IV., 3S0 ; leaders of the, ibid. 

Ciuet, John, junior, VII., 615. 

Coach and six, a, introduced for the first time in New York, 
IV., 221 ; some Indian chiefs take an airing ia the 
governor's, 275. 

Coal mines on Long island, V., 556; in Nova Scotia, VII., 
548, IX., 332, X., 7. 

Coas (Cohass), the French reported to have built a fort at, 
VI., 832; the French preparing to settle at, 886. 

Coast survey, early, IV., 830. 

Coates, Henry, IV., 935. 

Coates, James, represents Edinburgh in parliament, VIII., 
187. 

Coats, Edward, a pirate, presents his ship to governor 
Fletcher, IV., 223, 445 ; his ship abandoned on the 
east end of Long island, 274; commands Mason's 
ship, 307; his ship and crew permitted to come to 
New York, 308 ; commands the ship Jacob, 310, 386, 
433, 444, 479 ; governor Fletcher issues a protection 
to several of the men of, 384; amount that he paid 
governor Fletcher for a protection, 387, 433, 459, 481 ; 
goes security for another pirate, 388 ; James Graham 
draws up a memorial respecting, 413, 456, 457 ; 
William NicoU communicates to governor Fletcher 
the desire of the crew of, 468 ; introduces Arabian 
gold into New York, 469. 
Coats of mail, required for the soldiers in New Netherland, 
I., 151; parties going against the Indians ask to be 
furnished with, 415. 
Cobb, lieutenant Simon, killed at lake George, VI., 1006. 

Cobbert, Rogier, I., 31. 

Cobbet, George, II., 631, 634, 636, 716. 

Cobby, , ship of, confiscated. III., 413. 

Cobeguit (Nova Scotia), X., 14. 

Cobes, Lodewyk, appointed attorney and notary at Willem- 

stadt, II., 651. 
Cobham, [Richard Temple, 1st] viscount, member of the 

privy council, V., 539. 
Cobren, John, IV., 1006. 
Cobren, Thomas, IV., 935. 
Cobus, the runner. III., 117. 
Coby, John, IV., 936, 1008. 



Coby, Thomas, IV., 936. 

Cocagne (New Brunswick), X., Ill, 359. 

Cocheca (Cocheco), in the township of Dover (New Hamp- 
shire), IV., 617, 618; attacked by the French, IX., 
440. 

Cochectou (Cashigton), the Indians at, send a belt of wam- 
pum to the governor of New Y'ork, VI., 649. 

Cochineal brought into Holland, I., 42, 62. 

Cochrane, lady Catherine, daughter of the earl of Dundon- 
ald, marries the earl of Galloway, VIII., 322. 

Cochrane (Cockrane), captain Gavin, wounded, X., 730. 

Cock, John, IV., 938, 941, 1006, 1010. 

Cock (Cok), John, junior, IV., 941. 

Cock, Peter, commands a party against the Indians, I., 186, 
187. 

Cock, Thomas, IV., 941. 

Cockburn, captain, V., 258. 

Cockbume, John, one of the lords of trade. III., xvi, V., 
402, 414, 422, 429, 435, 469, 470, 472. 

Cockerill, Thomas, announces the death of lord Lovelace, 
v., 80, and the progress of the Canada expedition, 
81 ; paymaster of the forces in New York, 83 ; secre- 
tary to lord Lovelace, 90, 108 ; his observations on 
land granting and the revenue in New York, 110 ; 
dead, 202. 

Cockermouth, sir John Mordaunt represents, X., 705. 

Cockevier, John, III., 740. 

Cockroft, William, VI., 1000, 1002. 

Cockuyt, Joost, II., 646. 

Cocq, F. Banninck, I., 550. 

Cocquard, reverend Claude Godfrey, S. J., relation of affairs 
in Canada by, X., 528. 

Coddington, William, notice of, I., 497; offered assistance 
by the director of New Netherland, 498. 

Codfish, duty on dried, I., 225 ; caught in quantities outside 
Sandy hook, III., 183 ; none west of cape Cod, IV., 
790 ; the various descriptions of, in trade, ibid. 

Codfishery, the, open to the inhabitants of New Netherland, 
I., 404 ; Gardner's island lies very convenient for the, 
565 ; to be encouraged, II., 556 ; feasible in Canada, 
IX., 585. 

Codrington, colonel Christopher, IV., 130; governor of the 
Leeward islands, commits Mr. Weaver to prison, 862; 
denounced by lord Cornbury, 1147, 1154. 

Codrington, Thomas, IV., 550; recommended for a seat in 
the council of New York, 849 ; signs a petition to 
William HI., 934. 

Coe (Co, Koo), captain John, reduces the towns on the west 
end of Long island, II., 367; instigated by Connecti- 
cut, 388 ; complained of for his seditious conduct at 
Gravesend, 401. 
Coe, John, justice for Queens county, V., 314, 328, 329. 
Coe, Jonathan, ensign in the Newtown militia, IV., 808. 
Coe (Coo), Robert, I., 552; applies for a license of marriage, 

II., 688. 
Coe, Robert, captain of militia in Newtown, IV., 808. 

Coe, Samuel, church-warden in Jamaica (Long island), V., 
329. 



-Col] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



143 



Coedyck, I., 496. 

Coelen (Coele), Cornells Jansen, I., 593, 604. 

Coen, Adriaen Dirckseu, I., 600. 

Coenders (Condres), Mr., I., 110, 114, 115. 

Coerten, Albert, ensign of militia in Gravesend, IV., 809. 

Coerten, Barent, II., 699. 

Coerten, Gnert, threatened by the Indians, I., 497. 

Coerten, Harmen, II., 480,481. 

Coerten, Meyndert, III., 811. 

Coffe, captain, commander of the ship Britannia, VI., 603. 

Coffee, a negro slave, found gnilty of arson, V., 341 ; re- 
prieved, 342; recommended to be pardoned, 371. 

Coffen, Stephen, affidavit of, regarding the encroachment of 
the French on lake Erie, VI., 835, 837. 

Coffin, James, taken by the Dutch, II., 663. 

Coffin, Mr., representative from Nantucket, IV., 786. 

Coggeshall, James, VIII., 455. 

Coggswell, Miss, marries John Whiting, X., 731. 

Coghwel, Robert, notified not to settle on the Delaware river 
unless under the Dutch, II., 144. 

Cohonsiowanne, an Onondaga, IV., 492, 493, 494, 495 ; brings 
a lot of lies from Canada, 496, 

Coke (Cooke, Kooke), sir John, permits the publication in 
England of a book on the events at Amboina, I., 48 ; 
the states general recommended to make a present to, 
ibid ; further interview of the Dutch ambassadors 
with, 49, 53 ; the Dutch ambassadors object to receiv- 
ing an unsigned paper from, 60 ; has an audience 
■with the king, 108 ; secretary of state. III., vii, 12 ; 
captain Mason's letter to, 16. 

Coker, Thomas, III., 305, 306; surveyor of customs, 403; 
mentioned, 410, 494 ; condition of the house of, 413. 

Coker, William, ensign in Shirley's regiment, X., 282. 

Colbe, Timothy, X., 213, 214. 

Colbert, Jean Baptist, memoir of, II., 348; letter to M. 
Talon, intendant of Canada from, IX., 39 ; M. Talon 
sends reports on Canada to, 55, 67, 74; transmits 
orders respecting Canada to M. Talon, 58 ; M. Talon's 
answer to, 60 ; opens the trade with Canada, 61 ; 
letter of, to M. de Courcelles, 63; approves of the expe- 
dition of M. de La Salle, 70 ; offers a reward for the 
discovery of a passage to the South sea, 89 ; des- 
patches of count de Frontenac to, 90 ; opposed to 
meetings of the clergy, noblesse and thh-d estate in 
Canada, 95 ; his views in regard to new discoveries, 
115 ; count de Frontenac transmits a report on 
Canada to, 116 ; instructs count de Frontenac to 
address his letters in future to the king, 123 ; objects 
to being styled " my lord," ibid ; bestows fort Fron- 
tenac on M. de La Salle, 213 ; father of M. de Seigne- 
lay, 297; mentioned, 377; authorizes the establish- 
mentof Sault St. Louis, 541, and the taking possession 
of the extreme bounds of Canada, 785 ; extracts 
from his letters, 788, 791, 792; extract of a letter 
from M. de la Poipe to, 917 ; minister of Marine, 
X., vi ; controller-general, vii. 

Colbert Nicolas, II., 348. 



Colbert de Croissy. (See Croissy.) 

Colbert de Seignelay. (See Seignelay.) 

Colbert de Torcy. (See Torcy.) 

Colbert river, the Mississippi called, IX., 319. 

Colbry, James, IV., 1008. 

Cold, instance of excessive, III., 816. 

Golden, , obtains a patent for lands of the Mohawks 

which these Indians never sold, VIII., 306. 

Colden, Alexander, deputy postmaster at New York, VI., 
799, VIII., 511 ; recommended for a seat in the New 
York council, VII., 444, 445, 675; oldest son of 
Cadwallader Colden, 675 ; surveyor-general, ibid ; 
926 ; his report on the fees receiving by him, 926 ; 
informs the secretary to the postmaster-general why 
the New York packet has been detained, VIII., 218 ; 
biographical notice of, 221 ; Richard N., his son, 511. 

Colden, [Alice,] marries captain Hamilton, VIII., 221. 

Colden, Cadwallader, surveyor-general of the province of 
New York, V., 537; recommended for a seat in the 
council, 579, 584, 647; attends an Indian conference, 
635, 657, 658, 661, 662, 664, 667, VI., 317, 441, 443, 
445, 447, 450, 717, 724 ; objects to a bill proposed to 
be passed for the partition of lands in joint-tenancy, 
v., 644; his representation declared by the lords of 
trade deserving of particular attention, 648 ; further 
reference thereto, 650 ; reports sundry exorbitant 
grants of land, 653 ; an account of the Indian trade 
of New York by, 685 ; an account of the climate of 
New York by, 690 ; prepares a map of the province 
of New York, 704; his account of the fur trade, 
transmitted to the board of trade, 725 ; his memoir 
on the fur trade, 726 ; referred to, 753 ; and printed, 
760 ; ordered to prepare a map of New York, 777 ; 
calls attention of Mr. Popple to the assumptions of 
the New York assembly, 805, 844, and explains the 
reason why large tracts of land remain uncultivated 
in New York, 806 ; his memorial against the New 
York act for the partition of lands held in com- 
mon, 807 ; exposed to the resentment of the great 
landed proprietors of New York, 845 ; present at the 
council when chief justice Morris was dismissed, 
951 ; well acquainted with the state of the province, 
952 ; opposed the suspension of chief justice Morris, 
955 ; and James Alexander draw up an answer to the 
petition of the London merchants on the subject of 
the Indian trade, 982 ; governor Cosby complains of, 
VI., 27 ; member of the council, ibid, 152 ; furnishes 
a map of the Livingston tract on the Mohawk river, 
67 ; his letter on the same subject, 68 ; his answers 
to queries of the board of trade, 121 ; distance of his 
residence from New York, 153, 209 ; commissioner 
for settling the line between Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, 167; James Alexander ranked in the council 
next to, 312 ; recommended to be appointed lieute- 
nant-governor of New York, 313, 377; particularly 
conversant with Indian affairs, 314 ; represents gov- 
ernor Clinton at a conference with the five nations, 317 ; 



144 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Coi 



Colden, Cadwallader — continued. 

autliorizts the printing of governor Clinton's treaty 
witli the tivo nations, 328, 330 ; efforts to misrepresent 
him in England, 329 ; speaker of the legislative 
council, 330 ; author of a pamphlet entitled " A Treaty 
between his Excellency the Governor (Clinton) and 
the Six Nations," ibid; answer to the representation 
of the council against him, 331 ; not free from vanity, 
338, his services 395 ; engrosses governor Clinton's 
confidence, 405 ; governor Clinton requests answers to 
his letters respecting, 406 ; enters in the council 
minutes governor Clinton's reasons for not passing 
some bills, 413; supiJOrts governor Clinton, 416; 
recommended to succeed governor Clinton as presi- 
dent of the council, 417 ; very serviceable to governor 
Clinton, 420, 424; accompanies governor Clinton 
to Albany, 428, 687 ; scandalously libeled, 430 ; re- 
commended to the secretary of state, 431 ; explains 
the " extraordinary services " for which the assembly 
votes money, 434 ; present at the appointment of Mr. 
Brass, 435; governor Shirley advises governor Clinton 
to recall, 459 ; governor Clinton's adviser, ibid ; gover- 
nor Clinton influenced by, 468 ; complains of chief jus- 
tice De Lancey, 468 ; vindicates himself in a letter to 
the duke of Bedford, 469 ; his daughter marries Peter 
De Lancey, ibid ; insulted in council by chief justice 
De Lancey, 475 ; 476 ; raises money by subscription 
for public purposes, 524; governor CUntou could not 
have supijorted the king's authority without, 530 ; 
enters his reasons on the journals for dissenting from 
certain acts, 536 ; collects papers in support of the 
right of the English to lands claimed by the French, 
576, 603 ; better acquainted with American geography 
than any other person, 577 ; the assembly considers 
it a great misfortune that governor Clinton has fallen 
into the hands of, 618 ; threatens the commissioners 
for purchasing provisions for the expedition against 
Canada, 657; guilty thereby of a high misdemeanor, 
ibid ; governor Clinton justifies the conduct of, 658 ; 
proceedings in council against, 659 ; declared ob- 
noxious to the assembly, 662, 674; blamed for the 
suspension of Mr. Horsmauden, 672 ; moves to vest in 
the governor the disposition of provisions for the 
forces at Albany, 680 ; his reasons for dissenting from 
an act appointing commissioners to examine the pub- 
lic accounts, and other acts, 081 ; governor Shirley 
recommends, 691 ; recommended to the board of 
trade, 699 ; governor Clinton suggests that he be left 
in charge of the government, 726, 759 ; report on the 
state of Indian affairs by, 738, VII., 593; consents to 
take the government on himself, VI., 760; no com- 
plaint made to the lords of trade of, 770 ; surveys a 
tract of land for Arent Stevens, 783, 787 ; succeeds 
lieutenant-governor De Lancey, VII., 444; asks to be 
allowed to contmue sometime at the head of the admin- 
istration, 450 ; reports the result of the proceedings 
against tho master of the sliip Sampson on a charge 



of murder, 454 ; points out some contradictions in 
the instructions for granting land, 455 ; reports the 
proceedings of John Lydius in regard to lands about 
lake Champlain, 456; gives his views on the bound- 
ary between the province of New York and New 
Hampshire, 457; proclaims George III. and dissolves 
the assembly, 458 ; appointed lieutenant-governor, 
461 ; his efforts in favor of the prerog.ative, 462 ; let- 
ter of secretary Pownall to, ibid; transmits acts to 
the lords of trade, 465 ; objects to the bill for com- 
missioning judges during good behavior, 467, 468 ; 
why, 470 ; his letters considered by the lords of trade, 
472 ; selfish motives of lumself and council in the 
matter of land granting, 474 ; resumes the admmis- 
tration, 476 ; lays claim to all the perquisites and 
emoluments of his office, 477 ; instructions respecting 
granting of lands and the tenure of judges' commis- 
sions transmitted to, 480 ; letter of the secretary of 
state to, with a further call for troops, 481 ; vetoes 
bills for rendering judges independent of the crown, 
484; recommends the chief justice's salary to be paid 
out of the quit rents, ibid ; his remarks respecting 
large tracts of land granted by former governors, 486 ; 
reports that the judges' salaries have been voted con- 
ditionally, 489 ; and that Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire intrude on the province of New York, 490 ; 
protests that he is not interested in the purchase of any 
Indian lands, 491 ; reports frauds in granting lands, 
492 ; writes respecting salary, perquisites, enlist- 
ments, &c., 498, 499 ; blamed for assenting to an act 
for payment of salaries, 506 ; again succeeds governor 
Monckton, 527 ; a defender of governor Clinton's ad- 
ministration, 528 ; will do all in his power to sujjpress 
illegal trading, 548 ; his remarks on the address of 
the council, on the subject of boundaries, 562 ; calls 
attention to an illegal trade carried ou with the 
colonies, 584 ; refers the application of the Intherans 
to the board of trade, 585 ; reports the number of 
troops raised by New York for service against the 
Indians, 587 ; his observations on petitions for land 
near lake Champlain, 588 ; reports the state of the 
controversy with New Hampshire, 595, 608 ; offers 
his views on Indian affairs, 609 ; informed of the 
capture of a number of Delawares, 611 ; his remarks 
on the petition of New York merchants in regard to 
the colonial trade, 612 ; objects to admitting Mr. 
Apthorp to a seat in the council without the produc- 
tion of the original mandamus, 623 ; Ms majesty ap- 
proves of the zeal of, 627 ; communicates his reasons 
for declining to admit Mr. Apthorp to a seat in the 
council, 628 ; a plan for the management of Indian 
affairs transmitted for lus opinion to, 633 ; informed 
that the lords of trade have made a report on the 
difficulties between New York and New Hampshire, 
642 ; advised that the incorporation of the lutherau 
church of New York is inexpedient, ibid ; his obser- 
vations on the assembly's address against taxation by 



—Col] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



145 



n, Cadwallader — continued. 

the Bi-itisli parliament, 653 ; communicates some pai-- 
ticulars respecting smuggling, 666 ; his opinion on 
the plan for managing Indian affairs, 667 ; recom- 
mends changes in the council, 675 ; transmits to the 
lords of trade particulars of the first appeal from the 
courts of common law in New York, 676 ; calls atten- 
tion of the government to a pamphlet printed in New 
York containing chief justice Horsmanden's reasons 
for refusing to obey a writ of appeal, 679 ; his 
remarks on the chief justice's reasons, 683 ; reports 
the progress of the controversy respecting appeals, 
695 ; complains of the judges and attorney-general of 
New York, 701 ; calls attention of the government to 
the dangerous influence of lawyers in New York, 705 ; 
transmits further information on the subject of ap- 
peals, 706, 709 ; complaints of the earl of Ilchester 
and others communicated to, 707 ; informed that two 
Mohawk Indians on exhibition in London have been 
sent back to New York, 708 ; reports the progress of 
afl'airs in New York, 710; explains the claims put 
forth by the earl of Ilchester and others, 741 ; trans- 
mits particulars respecting an Indian grant to sir 
William Johnson, 713, 744 ; advises general Gage to 
throw a military force into New York, 758 ; reports 
the progress of the opposition to stamps, 760, 791 
792 ; the stamp distributor of New York resigns his 
office to, 761 ; the board of trade condemn his views in 
the matter of appeals, 762 ; reports the sitting of the 
colonial congress in New York, 767, and the landing 
the stamps, 768 ; burnt in effigy, 771, 792, 798 ; gives 
up the stamped papers to the mayor and corporation, 
773 ; calls forjudges and soldiers from England, 774; 
anonymous and threatening letter to, ibid; delivers up 
the government to sir Henry Moore, 793 ; his account 
of the state of the province of New York, 795 ; destroys 
the independence of the bench, 797 ; censured, 800; 
exposes the imprudence of major James, ibid ; vindi- 
cates his course on the appeal question, 803 ; demands 
indemnity for his losses, 804; his age, 805, 916; 
governor Moore complains of, 810 ; vindicates his 
course on the stamp excitement, 811; coolness be- 
tween governor Moore and, 813 ; furnishes an account 
of his losses, 832 ; is refused any indemnity for losses 
incurred by stamp act riots, 833, 886 ; asks a pen- 
sion out of the quit rent fund, 833 ; grants lands to 
reduced soldiers, 874 ; prints a narrative of his con- 
duct, 887 ; lives on Long island, 916 ; complains of 
continued persecutions, 994 ; action of the grand jury 
on the pamphlet of, 995 ; advises the secretary of 
state of the proceedings of the New York assem- 
bly for the discovery of the author and publisher of 
a certain pamphlet, VIII., 4 ; requests protection 
from his enemies, 6 ; his claims for compensation for 
losses sustained during the stamp act riots referred 
to the New York assembly, 13 ; the king is resolved 
to protect, 35 ; appeals to the earl of Hillsborough 
against "the faction," 60; proceedings against the 

19 



pamphlet written by, 61 ; his opinion of the New 
York judges, 62 ; governor Moore reports on the case 
of, 66 ; recommends that judges be sent from England 
to New York, 74 ; asks for a reward for his jjast ser- 
vices, 75, 330 ; governor Moore ordered to recommend 
to the assembly the case of, 81 ; complains of gov- 
ernor Moore, 146 ; succeeds to the administration of 
the province, 188, 329 ; letters of, to the earl of Hills- 
borough, 188, 189, 191, 193, 196, 199, 206, 212, 214, 
216, 218, 245, 248, 249 ; letters of the earl of HUls- 
borough to, 190, 193, 201, 205, 210, 215 ; letter of, to 
the lords of trade, 198 ; resigns the government to the 
earl of Dunmore, 249 ; is sued for half the salary, 
257; David Golden private secretary to, 323 ; grants 
warrants of survey for lands m the New Hampshire 
grants, 331, and issues patents therefor, 375 ; letters 
to lord Dartmouth from, 327, 431, 433, 485, 488, 491, 
492, 510, 512, 528, 530, 531, 543, 564, 566, 571, 579 
588 ; letters of lord Dartmouth to, 347, 487, 509, 514, 
529, 530, 547 ; the administration of the government 
devolves again on, 417, 431 ; reports the state of feel- 
ing in New York on the receipt of the Boston port 
bill, 433 ; informs the secretary of state of the death 
of sir William Johnson, 485, and of the approach- 
ing meeting of the American congress, ibid ; trans- 
mits a draft of a royal charter for King's college to 
governor Tryon, 486 ; ordered to report on the extent 
of the contraband trade, 487; reports the destruction 
of the tea in the port of New York, 488 ; calls on 
the military to put down the rioters in the New 
Hampshire grants, 491 ; gives an account of the ex- 
cited state of the public mmd, 493 ; recommends sir 
John Johnson for a seat in the council, 494 ; reports 
the doings of congress, 510 ; also the non-importa- 
tion agreement, 512 ; has had a visit from Mr. Galloway, 
513; reports the importation of arms and ammunition 
into New York, 528, and that the New York assembly 
refuse to consider the proceedings of congress, 532, 
or to appoint delegates to the congress, 543 ; trans- 
mits the New York acts to the secretary of state, 564 ; 
calls attention of the government again to the out- 
rages committed by the Bennington rioters, 566; 
reports the excitement caused by the news from 
Lexington, 571, 579, and the organization of the New 
York provincial congress, 580, and the capture of 
Ticonderoga, 581 ; address of the New York associa- 
tion to, 583; his answer to that address, 586; informs 
the minister that George Washington has been ap- 
pointed commander-in-chief of the American army, 
589 ; causes Queens county to resist the measures of 
congress, 646; death of, 685. 

Golden, Gadwallader, junior, commissary of musters, VI., 
342. 

Golden, Gadwallader, son of Richard N. Golden, VIII., 511. 

Golden, Cadwallader D., VIII., 323. 

Golden, David, biographical notice of, VIII., 323. 

Golden, Elizabeth, marries Peter De Lancey, VI., 469, VIII., 
718. 



146 



GENEEAL INDEX. 



[COL- 



Colden, [Mai-garet,] marries John Antill, VIII., 221. 

Golden, Miss, marries colonel Farrington, VIII., 221. 

Golden, Richard, VIII., 221. 

Golden, Richard Nicolls, VIII., 455 ; biographical notice of, 
511 ; death of, 71C. 

Goldenham, VIII., 221. 

Coldfoot, chief of the Miamis, X., 139; presents sent hy, 
161 ; and his son, die of the small pox. 246. 

Cole, , interested in a New Hampshire grant, VII., 935. 

Cole, Abram, IV., 942. 

Gole, Edward, IV., 936, 1007. 

Cole, Edward, VI., 1000, 1002 ; commands the Rhode Island 
regiment at lake George, 1007 ; killed, X., 593. 

Cole, Lenart, deputy secretary of New Netherland, I., 44. 

Coleman, Henry, IV., 934, 1006. 

Colendonck (Cokendonck), Adriaen Van der Donck patroou 
of, I., 470. (See Ncpcrhacm.) 

Coles, , a pilot of Piscatoque, III., 84. 

Coles, Nathan, junior, ensign of the militia of Oysterbay, 
IV., 809. 

Coles, Nathaniel, II., 592. 

Coles, Robert, captain of the militia of Oysterbay, IV., 809. 

Colet, Peter, I., 192; assaulted by the English at Hartford, 
U., 142, 143. 

Coley, James, IV. , 936. 

Coltecx, Ritchert, I., 192. 

Colgan, reverend Thomas, notice of, V., 973 ; representation 
on behalf of, VI., 1 ; succeeds Mr. Poyer at Jamaica 
(Long island), 2, 3. 

Colhonn (Colhnn), doctor Alexander, stabbed by Oliyer De 
Ltincey, VI., 513; deputy secretary of the commis- 
sioners for Indian affairs, 821 ; sends French deserters 
to New York, 832. 

Coligni, John count de, commands the French troops sent 
against the Turks, IX., 32. 

Coligni M. de, fights a duel with the duke de Guise, II., 
349. 

Coligny, Gaspard de, seigneur de Chatillon sur Loing. (See 
Chastillon.) 

Colin, sent with a message from Canada to the five nations, 
HI., 736; an Indian interpreter, IX., 236; particu- 
larly recommended by Orehaoue, 470. 

Colinge, Richard, III., 635, IV., 74. 

Colinge, Ruben, III., 652. 

CoOaert, admiral [Anthony], taken prisoner by the English, 
I,, 578. 

Collector of New York, William Dyre fills the office of. III. 
221, 222 ; Lucas Santen appointed, 335 ; instructions 
to, ibid ; salary of, 497 ; Mathew Plowman appointed, 
500 ; Peter de la Noy fiUs the office of, 596, 608 ; 
Mathew Plowman dismissed, 608, 672 ; Stephen Van 
Cortland an applicant for the place of, 650 ; colonel 
Bayard desires to purchase the office of, 661 ; Chidley 
Brooke acts as, IV., 305 ; he is suspended from the 
office of, 321, 354, 623; James Gr.iham fills the office 
of, 418 ; iVlr. "Weaver appointed, 586 ; Stephen Van 
Cortland acts as, 600, 602 ; claims a right to act by 
deputy, 827; objections to parts of the commission 



granted to Mr. Weaver as, 829 ; Mr. Byerly acts as, 
1105, v., 232; Peter Fauconier, IV., 1143 ; Archibald 
Kennedy, V., 952; Robert Temple appointed, VII., 
529 ; Andrew Elliot, 675. 
College, Aberdeen, reverend doctor Smith, a graduate of, 
VII., 416. 

Cambridge (England), sir George and lady Downing 
leave a bequest for a college at, II., 418; James De 
Lancey educated at, VI., 14; represented by lord 
Dupplin, 762; reverend East Apthorp, fellow of, VII., 
375 ; captain James De Lancey a graduate of, 402 ; 
reverend doctor Duch6 a graduate of, 411 ; graduates 
of, VIII., 256, 804. 

Dartmouth, confers a degree of D. D. on reverend Sam- 
uel Buell, VIII., 693. 

Hamilton, origin of, VIII., 631. 

Harvard, George Downing at, II., 415 ; mentioned. III., 
112, 264; reverend Mr. Vesey a graduate of, IV., 534; 
reverend Mr. Myles a graduate of, 582 ; missionaries 
to the five nations to be taken from, 766 ; the bo-ard 
of trade want a copy of the charter of, 771 ; they 
make a report on, 844; observations taken at, VI., 
124; Andrew Oliver a graduate of, VIII., 329 ; Joseph 
Wanton a graduate of, 351 ; Jonathan Trumbull a 
graduate of, 371 ; reverend Aaron Crosby a graduate 
of, 551 ; general Parsons a graduate of, 736 ; lieuten- 
ant-governor Stoughton a benefactor of, IX., 682; 
William Dudley a graduate of, 941. 

King's (New York), provision made for founding, VI., 
625, 685 ; to be a seminary for the episcopal church, 
777 ; opposed by the Independent Reflector, ibid ; 
bishop Sherlock thinks the church of England will 
be benefited by the establishment of, 910; about to 
be founded by the Episcopal church, 913 ; the presi- 
dent of, to be always a member of the church of 
England, ibid ; reverend doctor Samuel Johnson 
elected president of, 914 ; sundry clauses of the acts 
for building repealed, VII., 217; reverend doctor 
Johnson addresses bishop Seeker from, 370, 374, 438, 
494, 516 ; archbishop of Canterbury governor of, 394; 
the archbishop of Canterbury requested to procure a 
vice-president .and tutor for, 425 ; persons suggested 
for these offices, ibid, 426, 448 ; salary of the presi- 
dent of, 426 ; a commencement held at, 440 ; progress 
of, ibid ; description of, 441 ; duties of the president 
of, 495 ; a congratulatory address to George III., pre- 
sented from, 496 ; a collection to be made in England 
for, 498 ; reverend Myles Cooper on his way to, 507 ; 
progress of the collection in England for, ibid ; chief 
justice Horsmanden bequeathed £500 to, 528 ; a 
grammar school attached to, 538; reverend Mr. 
Cooper entertains good hopes of, 566 ; the edrrcation 
of Indian lads at, proposed, 591 ; application made 
for a gr.ant of land to, 643 ; alleged motives for the 
est.ablishment of, 644 ; amount collected in England 
for, ibid ; report of the board of trade on the appli- 
cation for a grant of land to, 645 ; applies to be 
erected into a university, VIII., 296; president 



—Col] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



147 



College, King's — continued. 

Cooper driven from, 297 ; consideration of the peti- 
tion of, postponed, 298 ; John Jay a graduate of, 469 ; 
demands special privileges in order to prevent the 
growth of republicanism, 486 ; proposed alteration in 
the charter of, laid before the privy council, 573 ; 
seems to demand a representative in the assembly, 
ibid ; Peter Van Schaick a graduate of, 652. 
of Mirania, reverend doctor Smith author of a general 

idea of the, VII., 416. 
of Philadelphia, reverend Thomas Barton an assistant 
teacher in, VII., 166 ; plan for educating some Indian 
children in, referred to, 167 ; two Indian children in, 
ibid ; divided into an academy and, 168 ; biographical 
notice of reverend William Smith, provost of, 416 ; 
charter of, abrogated, 417 ; doctor Smith goes to Eng- 
land to collect funds for, 498 ; progress of the collec- 
tion in England for, 507. 
Princeton (New Jersey), Mr. Milner a graduate of, VII., 
404 ; reverend Samuel Kirkland a graduate of, VIII. , 
631. 
Qviebec, the most magnificent of the public buildings in 
that city, VI., 580; its condition after the siege, X., 
1058. 
Trinity (Dublin), reverend Thomas Barton, a graduate of, 
VII., 166; reverend Arthur Browne • a graduate of, 
537; general Montgomery educated at, VIII., 665. 
William and Mary's (Virginia), governor A ndros lays the 
foundation of, II., 742; mentioned, IV., 921; the 
bishop of London contributes to, VII., 361 ; Mr, Gra- 
ham professor in, 448. 
Yale, reverend Henry Barclaj', a graduate of, VI., 88, 
VII., 451; notice of doctor Cutler, president of, VI., 
908 ; Solomon Palmer a graduate of, 910 ; will not allow 
pupils of the episcopal denomination to go to the epis- 
copal church, 913 ; reverend doctor Johnson a gradvi- 
ate of, 914; reverend Gideon Hawley a graduate of, 
VII., 49 ; bishop Berkeley makes a donation to, 372 ; 
punishes episcopalian students for going to their own 
churcli, 373 ; candidates for holy orders in the episco- 
pal church from, 439 ; doctor Stiles formerly tutor and 
afterwards president of, 498 ; governor Fitch a gradu- 
ate of, 820 ; William Smith, the historian, graduates 
at, 909; Staats Long Morris educated at, VIII., 187; 
laws of; printed, 221 ; Philip Livingston a graduate of, 
470 ; Samuel Buell a graduate of, 693 ; David Ogden 
a graduate of, 782 ; reverend John Norton a gradu- 
ate of, X., 67; major-general Lyman a graduate of, 
333 ; Henry Babcock a graduate of, 731. 

Collen, Gasparo van, I , 437. 

CoUen, Jeremia van, I., 437. 

Collier, Benjamin, III., 424; sheriff of Westchester county, 
IV., 27. 

Collier, sir George, knight, in command in America, VIII., 
772, 802. 

Collier, Richard, VII., 904. 

Collins, captain Edward, president Clarke writes to VII., 57 ; 
communicates the letter to the commissioners for In- 



dian affairs, 58; commissioner of Indian affairs, 59, 
232; locks up the block houses at Albany, 397 ; his 
brother-in-law offers to sell a copy of the articles of 
peace, 526. 

Collins, Henry, R. N., in command of the Nautilus, VIII., 
676. 

Collins, John, IV., 937, 1008 ; commissioner for Indian af- 
fairs, v., 635, 638, 657, 661, 662, 664, 667, 673, 675, 
67?, 679, 715, 717, 718, 720, 742, 786, 791; dead, 
855 ; bounds of the land on the Mohawk river 
granted to, VI., 62; surveyed the Mohawks' land, 
294, 295 ; purchases land at Canajohary, 784. 

Collins (Colens), Mathew, X., 882. 

Collins, Mr., why the Indians murdered, II., 151. 

CoUinson, Peter, VIII., 437. 

CoUiton, John, member of the council for trade and plan- 
tations, III., 31, 33, 36, 46, 47, 49, 50. 

Cologne, II., 533, 534, 535, 537; peace of, 564. 

Colombet, captain, killed, IX., 474, 478. 

Colombi6re, reverend Joseph S6re de la, signs the treaty 
•with the Iroquois, IX., 720. ■ 

Colombifire, M. de la, a colonial officer sent on a scout, X., 
402; cuts off an English detachment near lake 
George, 483. 

Colonie in New Netherland, conditions and privileges at- 
tached to a, I., 119, 402 ; similar to a county in 
England, II., 95. 

Colonies, or Plantations, causes which led the Dutch West 
India company to neglect the planting of, I., 67 ; the 
trade of the Swedish, English and French, thrown 
open to the inhabitants of the United Netherlands, 
162, 173, 501 ; foreigners forbid to trade with the Eng- 
lish, 436, 486 ; estimated population in 1641, and 1660, 
of the English, 567 ; the Dutch West Indian com- 
panv expressly empowered to plant, II., 379 ; order 
on the difference between the northern and southern, 
III., 4; order appointing a council for, 30, 32, 572; 
instructions for, 34 ; proceedings of the council for, 
36, 44, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50 ; frauds on the revenue in 
the, 44, 47, 48 ; revenue officers about to be sent to 
the, 49, 50 ; ships of war about to be sent from Hol- 
land against the English, 85 ; warrant for enlarging 
the council of, 190 ; a committee of the privy council 
appointed to superintend the affairs of, 229, who call 
for a report on the, 232 ; bishop of London's memo- 
rial on the churches in the, 253 ; the habeas corpus 
act does not extend to the, 357 ; attached for eccle- 
siastical purposes to the diocese of London, 388 ; order 
in council on the state of, 573; quotas of men to be 
furnished by the, IV., 101 ; Mr. Blathwait auditor of 
accounts for the, 186 ; a post office authorized to be es- 
tablished in the, 200 ; deputies proposed to be elected 
to a congi-ess in the, 246 ; Mr. Penn's plan for a union 
of the British American, 296 ; disadvantages arising 
from the great distance of England from the, 610 ; 
instance of the English parliament legislating for, 
666 ; estimated number of men in 1700 in, 680 ; Mr. 
Penn's suggestions respecting the, 757; prohibited 



148 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Col— 



Colonies — contimied. 

from importiug any of tlie productions of Europe 
except through England, 773; capable of employing 
a thousand ships and supplying England with ship 
timber, 787 ; means of assuring their firm dependence 
on England, 789 ; report on the forts in, 830 ; quota 
of expense for building forts to be paid by each of the, 
832, 839 ; a bill brought into the house of lords for 
reinvesting the crown with the government of pro- 
prietary and charter, 854 ; Robert Livingston's plan 
for the government of the, 874 ; order in council on 
the defense of, 964 ; governors of, forbidden to re- 
ceive presents from assemblies, 1040 ; exposed to 
danger by the communication between Canada and the 
Mississippi, 1068 ; ought to be kept dependent on 
England, 1151 ; the parliament of England encourages 
the importation of naval stores from the, 1169 ; at- 
tempts made to change the law regarding the adminis- 
tration of intestate estates in, V., 3; number of men 
in 1707, in the, 32 ; quantity of tar exported in 1707 
from the, 118; governor Hunter suggests that the 
British parliament impose excise, and import and ex- 
port duties on the, 180 ; capable of furnishing more 
naval stores than Great Britain can consume, 196 ; 
Daniel Coxe draws up a plan for the consideration of 
all the North American, 204 ; will wean themselves 
when they come of age, 256 ; necessity of uniformity 
in the government of, 297 ; missionaries from England 
make but few proselytes in, ibid ; warrants of arrest 
cannot be issued by governors of, 410; good policy of 
appointing colonists to offices in the, 429 ; their mista- 
ken course in king William's war, 431 ; state of the, 
in 1721, 591 ; annual value of exports from Great Brit- 
ain to, 614 ; proportion of British shipping emi>loyed 
in the trade with the, 616 ; value of exports to Great 
Britain from, 617; the parliament very sparing in its 
assistance to the, 621 ; bring in a great revenue to Great 
Britain, ibid ; the government of the, recommended 
to be vested in a lord lieutenant, 629, and council, 630 ; 
the bishop of London authorized to exercise ecclesias- 
tical jurisdiction in the, 849 ; aiming at independence, 
901 ; a royal commissioner should be present at the sit- 
tings of the assemblies of the, 903 ; the house of com- 
mons order an inquiry into the state of manufactures 
in the, 921 ; products of the VI., 19 ; the governors 
sit and vote in the councils of some, 40 ; governors 
ought not to sit and vote as members of the council 
in the, 41 ; troops raised for the Carthagena expedi- 
tion in the, 167, 170, 197 ; condition of the French 
with respect to the British, 226 ; war proclaimed in, 
260 ; proposals issued for imposing stamp duties in, 
268 ; a commander-in-chief proposed for all, ibid ; 
the reduction of Louisbourg, necessary for the interest 
ol the nortlieru, 280, 284; trooiJS for an expedition 
against Canada ordered to be raised in, 340, X. , 54 ; the 
alliance with the six nations of Indians, advantageous 
to the, VI. , 366 ; popular power on the increase in the, 
395 ; a duty on powder imposed in most of the, 435 ; 



an act passed against manufactures in, 604; French 
pretensions in the, 610 ; the French encroaching on 
the British, 704; order to revise the laws of the, 
755 ; order regarding the appointment of officers in 
the, 757 ; tea and gunpowder smuggled into the, 765 ; 
Holland and Hamburg trade with the, 766 ; plurali- 
ties in the, 768 ; orders to resist the encroachments of 
the French in the, 794 ; commencement of hostilities 
between the French and English in the, 840, 845 ; pro- 
ceedings of the congress held at Albany by the, 853 ; 
plan of a union of the several, 889 ; Mr. Pownal's 
consideration of a general plan of measures for the, 
893 ; report of the lords of trade on the proposed 
union of the, 901, 916; plan for a general coopera- 
tion of the, 903 ; regiments of regulars sent to, and 
ordered to be raised in the, 915, 934; governor Shir- 
ley's observations on the proposed union of the, 
930 ; plan of operations in the, 953 ; population in 
1755 of the British American, 993 ; estimate of the sum 
to be voted by parliament to the, VII., 1 ; parliament 
votes money to certain of the, 33 ; an embargo or- 
dered in, 162 ; an illegal trade carried on between 
Holland and, 271, 273, 335, 585, VIII., 511 ; Holland 
if not prevented will absorb the trade of the, VII., 
272 ; called on to raise troops for the invasion of 
Canada, 339 ; urged to increased vigor in the pro- 
secution of the war, 354; state of the episcopal 
church in, 360 ; church of England established in, 
361 ; number of clergymen in 1620, in, ibid ; bishop 
Gibson aiithorized to exercise certain ecclesiastical 
powers in the, 363 ; necessity for resident bishops in, 
364 ; objections to the settlement of bishops in the, 
366 ; letter of the reverend Doctor Johnson, on the 
union and government of the, 441 ; the apijointment 
of a viceroy suggested for the, 442 ; bishops required 
in the, 443 ; called on for new regiments, 452, 481 ; 
order in council respecting correspondence with the, 
459 ; instruction relating to the tenure of judges' 
commissions in the, 479 ; remarks on some of the 
episcopal clergy in the, 496 ; the connection with the 
mother country diminishing in the, 501 ; reasons 
against granting commissions during good behavior to 
judges in, 506; the ministry about to concert schemes 
for the settlement of the, 518 ; the secretary of state 
to the lords of trade on the subject of the, 519 ; que- 
ries respecting the, 520 ; major-general Gage suc- 
ceeds general Amherst as commander-in-chief in the, 
539 ; the board of trade report a plan for the regula- 
tion of the newly acquired, ibid ; illegal trade carried 
on in the, 548 ; sir William Johnson suggests that a 
frontier line be run back of the, 578 ; return of In- 
dians in the, 582, 641, IX., 1052; more profit derived 
from free than from slave, VII., 612 ; foreigners not al- 
lowed to trade with the French or Spanish, ibid ; pro- 
ject for the establishment on the east side of lake Cham- 
plain of new, 615 ; the house of commons resolve to 
impose stamp duties in the, 646 ; invited to unite 
against parliamentary taxation, 678 ; the lords of trade 



—Col] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



149 



Colouies — continued. 

lay before the king a book printed in Boston, on the 
rights of, ibid ; what tlie king cannot do in Eng- 
land, he cannot do in the, 683 ; Welbore Ellis, secre- 
tary of state for the, 704 ; the British parliament 
passes an act for quartering troops in the, 758 ; the 
authority of parliament over the, denied, 759 ; 
stamp duties imposed in the, ibid ; combined oppo- 
sition to the stamp act throughout the, 760 ; a con- 
gress meets at New York composed of deputies from 
the several, 767 ; opposition to stamps in the, 767, 
768, 770, 771, 773, 774, 791, 792, 811, 812, 822 ; a 
spirit of independence is daily gaining ground in 
the, 790 ; their dependence critical, 794; parliament 
proposes laying internal taxes in, 797; under the ne- 
cessity of establishing manufactures, 799 ; non-im- 
portation agreement entered into in the, 800 ; the ex- 
ecution of tlie stamp act suspended throughout the, 
807 ; the British parliament passes an act to secure 
the dependency of the, 823 ; the act repealed which 
granted stamp duties in, ibid ; parliament about to 
revise the laws regulating trade to, 824 ; report of 
the lords of trade on bills of credit in the, 827 ; re- 
solutions passed in the house of commons to indem- 
nify such as suffered losses by the late riots in, 832 ; 
the house of commons calls for a return of manu- 
factures in, 847; acts of the legislature of Great 
Britain must be obeyed in the, 848 ; order relating 
to the correspondence of governors of, ibid ; the sec- 
retary of state calls for an account of the annual 
charge of each of the, 880 ; servants imported from 
Europe to the, 889 ; order forbidding any alteration 
to be made m the number of members of assembly 
in, 946 ; parliament passes an act granting certain 
duties in the, 980 ; great quantities of goods smug- 
gled into, 995 ; the earl of Hillsborough appointed 
secretary of state for, VIII., 7 ; the military claims 
precedency over the civil power in the, 16 ; proprie- 
ty of establishing new, 20 ; opinion of the board on 
the erecting of new, 27 ; arguments in favor of es- 
tablishing new inland, 29 ; regulation of the Indian 
trade left to the respective, 55, 57; the Massachu- 
setts house of representatives address a letter to the 
assemblies of the several, 58 ; non-importation asso- 
ciations formed in, 69, 80, 176, 191 ; private persons 
in England receive news from, before the govern- 
ment, 82 ; sir William Johnson's review of the state 
of the, 84 ; despatches from the secretary of state to 
governors not to be communicated to the legislatures 
of the, 100 ; efforts making to create dissensions be- 
tween Great Britain and, 108 ; the New York assem- 
bly deny the authority of parliament to bind the co- 
lonies in all cases, 156 ; parliament insists again on 
its authority over the, 164 ; the breach widening be- 
tween Great Britain and, 171 ; the lords of trade dis- 
approve of the non-importation movement in the, 
194 ; opinion of the attorney and solicitor-generals 
on the power of the crown to proclaim an embargo in 



the, 255 ; recruiting ordered in the, 260 ; instruction 
in regard to suits against non-resident debtors in, 
288 ; no salary attached to the oflSce of lieutenant- 
governor in, 347; new, projected in the, 348, 369; 
prejudices against parliament entertained in the, 
349 ; many thorns in the paths of governors of, 350 ; 
order in council prohibiting grants of lands in the, 
357 ; heads of inquiry relative to the present state of 
the, 388 ; tea about to be shipped to the, 400 ; no acts 
of naturalization or divorce to be passed in, 402 ; the 
importation of tea excites a general alarm in the, 
407 ; government resolves to secure the dependence 
of the, 409 ; regulations for granting lands in, 410 ; 
deprrties to a general congress elected in the, 469, 
493 (see Congress, continental) ; no tea to be imported 
into the, 512 ; Mr. Galloway proposes a plan for the 
government of the, 513, 529 ; parliament determined 
to resist every attempt to impair its authority over 
the, 515, 542, 546 ; delegates presume to meet in 
Philadelphia from several of the, 527; the ggvernors 
to prevent the election of delegates in future from 
the, 528 ; expected to contribute to the common de- 
fense, 546 ; the king resolved to resist every attempt 
to encourage ideas of independence in, 547; war- 
rants issued for raising loyalist regiments in the, 
562; form for loyal associations in, 564; pensions 
granted to loyal printers and writers in, 568, 569 ; 
the first collision between the king's troops and the 
people in, 571, 579 ; an army raised in the, 580 ; 
some of the king's forts seized in, 581 ; force to be 
used to subjugate the, 585 ; his majesty firmly re- 
solved to compel obedience to the authority of par- 
liament, 587; rebellion in the, 587, 592; George 
Washington appointed commander-in-chief of the 
army in the, 589 ; the most vigorous measures adopt- 
ed to crush the rebellion in the, 591 ; the Indians to 
be called out against the, 596 ; more troops called 
to support tlie government in, 698 ; the European 
powers to be invited to guarantee the independence of, 
603 ; proceedings between the six nations and the 
commissioners from the united colonies, 605 ; have 
outgrown their former government, 633 ; packet boats 
discontinued to the, 635 ; the king and parliament re- 
iterate their determination to maintain their authority 
over the, 642 ; lord George Germaine principal secre- 
tary of state for the, 647 ; commissioners appointed 
to bring about a reconciliation with the, 649, 686 ; 
measures adopted to induce the Indians to declare 
against the, 658 ; parliament prohibits all trade with 
the revolted, 668 ; government pamphlets transmit- 
ted to the, 680 ; declare themselves Independent 
States, 682, 684 ; names of the, in the king's sub- 
jection in 1779, 765 ; war is contrary to the interest of 
all the, IX., 755 ; Canada forbid to trade with the 
English, 779 ; facilities possessed by the English, X., 
4 ; the French can never compete with the English, 
134; memoir on the French, 220; their usefulness, 



150 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Col— 



Colonies — continued. 

221 ; the Frencli send parties of Indians into the 
English, 412 ; number of men that could be furnish- 
ed by the English in 1758, 819. 

Colonists sent to New Netherland, I., 430; about to sail for 
the Delaware, II., 64, 68 ; expense of sending out one 
hundred, 65. (See Immigrants.) 

Colonnes, captain des, wounded, X., 432. 

Coloony, Richard Coote, baron of, IV., 851. 

Colors taken at Oswego, hung up in churches in Canada, X., 
461, 532, 918. 

Colson, Thomas, X., 213, 214. 

Colt, George, III., 73. 

Colterman, Jan, notary public, I., 377. 

Colubi (Kolouibi), cliief of the Sacs, his .speech, IX., G20, 
624. 

Columbia, formerly King's, college. New York. (See College, 
King's.) 

Colve, captain Anthony, II., 569; member of the council of 
war, 571, et seg.; the Zeehont frigate to be left in New 
Netherland, under the command of, 600; commis- 
sioned governor of New Netherland, 609, 610; Nico- 
las Bayard, secretary to, 612 ; appoints sundry piiblic 
officers, 614, 615 ; orders the oath of allegiance to 
be administered at Hempstead, 616, 628 ; grants 
freedom of worship to the lutherans, 617 ; orders a 
new election in Shrewsbury, and declares quakers un- 
fit to hold offi.ee, 619 ; sends to administer the oath 
of allegiance at the east end of Long island, 620, 626, 
645 ; appoints magistrates for Esopus, 626, and Wil- 
lem.stadt, 627 ; sends instructions to sheriff Lawrence, 
628 ; orders the collection of the excise at Swaenen- 
burgh, 629 ; requires the removal of houses in the 
vicinity of fort William Hendrick, 630, 635 ; orders 
Thomas Hunt, of Westchester, to quit New Nether- 
land, 632 ; sends instructions to sheriff Ogden, 633 ; 
report of the mission to the east end of Long island, 
submitted to, 642 ; appoints a sheriff for Esopus, 
644, and curators to vacant estates, 647, 667; his in- 
structions to the commissioners to the east end of 
Long island, 649, 650 ; court of Connecticut writes to, 
651, 652, 655, 656, 660; proclaims a day of thanks- 
giving, 658 ; sends back to New England the captains 
and crews of sundry vessels captured by his orders, 
663 ; prohibits unauthorized intercourse with New 
England, 666 ; correspondence between the governor 
of Massachusetts and, 667; appoints captain Knyff 
fiscal of New Netherland, 669 ; writes to sheriffs, 670, 
672, 673, 676 ; writes to the magistrates of Schenec- 
tade to answer certain complaints against them, 675 ; 
instructions to the officers at Esopus, 676 ; issues a 
proclamation in consequence of aggressions committed 
on the South river, by people from Maryland, 678 ; 
threatens the magistrates of New Orange, 680 ; visited 
by Indians, 682 ; order of, in the case of the town 
of Huntington, 690; proclamation of, 696; imposes 
a forced loan, 697 ; calls for a meeting of deputies, 
701 ; answers a petition from Willemstadt, 707 ; con- 



fiscates the property of inhabitants of the English 
colonies, 710; mortgages the cannon of fort William 
Hendrick, ibid ; receives news of peace, 711; address 
of Mohawks, and his answer thereto, 712, 716, 717 ; 
order of, in the case of certain towns at Aghter Coll, 
723 ; anniils the confiscation of the property of the 
inhabitants of New England, &c., 726; ordered to 
deliver up New Netherland, 730, 732 ; surrenders the 
same to major Audros, 739 ; appoints Samuel Hop- 
kins clerk of Elizabethtown, III., 213 ; his decisions 
whilst governor of New Netherland maintained, 234; 
governor Pownall obtains a copy of the commission 
of, VII., 333. 

Colville, Alexander, lord, relieved from the command of the 
North American station, X., 994. 

Colville, David, lord, in New York, VII., 806. 

Colvill's plantation (Florida), VIII. , 32. 

Coly, Jan, II., 700. 

Colyi), H., L, 437. 

Comani, the Dutch prevent divers English vessels toucliing 
. at, II., 264. 

Combe abbey, II., 741. 

Comforter of the sick, a, patroons boimd to send to their 
colonies, I., 99, 405, II., 557; to accompany immi- 
grants to New Netherland, I., 361; on the Delaware, 
II., 17; proposed salary of the, 169. 

Commencement, a, held in King's college (New York), VII., 
440. 

Comminges, M. de, one of the French mediators between 
Holland and England, II., 343. 

Commissaire-ordonnateur, functions of, IX., 1026. 

Commissary to the bishop of London, Mr. ^'esey appointed, 
IV., 534, v., 420, 465 ; ecclesiastical, to be appointed 
in the colonies, VII., 363; their powers, 364; first 
sent to the colonies, 368 ; recommended to hold con- 
ventions of the clergy, 374. 

Commission, a vessel fitted out at Hoorn for the Virginias 
under a French, I., 31 ; application to the states gene- 
ral to issue a, to Peter Stuyvesant as director of New 
Netherland, 175, 176 ; issued, 177 ; of Peter Stuyve- 
sant to be director-general of New Netherland, 178, 
492; of Maryn Adriaensen to attack the Indians at 
Corlear's hook, 194, 416 ; of Dirck van Schelluyne as 
notary in New Netherland, 384; of Lubbertus van 
Dinclage as deputy-governor of New Netherland, 493 ; 
of Henricus van Dyck as fiscal of New Netherland, 
494 ; of the commander of the island of Tobago, 639 ; 
to Martin Kryger to command a company on the South 
river, 646 ; of Alexander d'Hinojossa to be lieutenant 
of the same, ibid ; of Carsten Jeroensen as captain of 
the Haen, II., 44; and instructions to secretary Van 
Tienhoven, about to proceed against some foreigners 
and vagabonds who have landed on Long island, 144 ; 
to Messrs. Van Ruyven, Van Cortlant, Steeuwyck 
and Laurence, to treat with captains Scott and Young, 
396 ; director Stuyvesant exhibits to colonel NicoIIs' 
deputies his, 411, 412 ; of John Ogden to be sheriff, 
and Samuel Hopkins to be secretary of Aohter Col, 



— Com] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



151 



Commission — continued. 

695 ; of Anthony Colve to be governor-general of 
New Netherland, 609 ; of Cornells Steenwyck to be 
member of the council, 610 ; of Nicolas Bayard to be 
secretary, 612, and receiver-general, 613; of Peter 
Alrighs to be schout and commandant of the South 
river, 614 ; of Walter Wharton to be land surveyor 
at the South river, 615 ; of captain Knyff to adminis- 
ter the oath of allegiance at the cast end of Long 
island, 620 ; of councilor Steenwyck and others, to 
bring the towns on the east end of Long island to 
obedience, 645, 648 ; of Isaac Greveraet to be schout 
of Esopus, 649 ; of Balthazar Bayard to take posses- 
sion of two-thirds of the estate of the late Richard 
Morris, 650; of Olof Stevense van Cortlandt and 
others, to regulate the estate of the late governor 
Lovelace, 651 ; to captain John Wiutlirop and Samuel 
Willis to treat with the Dutch forces on Long island, 
656 ; to captain Ewoutsen to proceed to Nantucket to 
recover a vessel there, 658 ; to captain Willem Knyff 
to be fiscal of New Netherland, 668 ; of Cornelis Steen- 
wyck to be captain, Nicholas Bayard lieutenant, 
and Gabriel Minviele, ensign of a militia company, 
671; of Jacobus van do Water to be major, &c., of 
New Orange, 674 ; of Francis de Bruyu to be auc- 
tioneer to the Dutch towns on Long island, 675 ; of 
Martin Kregier, junior, to regulate the estate of Tho- 
mas de Laval, 676 ; of Martin Vonck to command the 
Hope, ibid; of Messrs. van Ruyven and Epestyn, to 
investigate certain complaints against the schont of 
Staten island, 681 ; of jaersons appointed to make a 
return of all estates in New Netherland exceeding one 
thousand guilders, 685 ; of Dirck van Clyff and Wal- 
ter Webly, authorizing them to regulate the estate of 
Richard Morris, 691 ; of Jacobus van de Water, to be 
book-keeper and receiver of the moneys furnished for 
the fortifications, 701 ; of John Laurence and others, 
to settle differences between the towns of Piscataway 
and Woodbridge, 723 ; to William Clayborne to make 
discoveries north of Virginia, III., 14, and to trade 
in the Dutch plantations, 15 ; for a council for foreign 
plantations, 32; to Richard NicoUs and others to 
be commissioners for New England, 64; to sir 
Robert Carr to reduce the Dutch on the Delaware 
bay, 70 ; to major Edmund Andros to be governor of 
the province of New York, 215, and captain of a 
company of foot in New York, 219 ; to Anthony 
Brocklioles to be first lieutenant of the company at 
New York, 220 ; of Christopher Billop to be a lieu- 
tenant of the company at New York, 221 ; to Caesar 
Knapton to be ensign of the company at New York, 
ibid ; of William Dyre to be collector at New York, 
ibid; to John Lewen to proceed to New York to 
inquire into its condition, 279 ; of colonel Thomas 
Dongan to be governor of New York, 328, 377 ; of 
Lucas Santen to be collector of New York, 335 ; of 
Mathew Plowman to be collector of New York, 500 ; 
of sir Edmund Andros, knight, to be governor of New 



England, New York and New Jersey, 537 ; of Henry 
Sloughter to be governor of New York, 623 ; of Jacob 
Milborne to superintend affairs at Albany, 702; of 
Benjamin Fletcher to be governor of New York, 
827, and of Pennsylvania, 856 ; to governor Fletcher 
to be commander-in-chief of Connecticut, IV., 29; 
revocation of governor Fletcher's Pennsylvania, 110 ; 
establishing a board of trade, 145 ; for the manage- 
ment of Indian afl'airs at Albany, 177 ; of lord Bello- 
mont as governor of New York, 266 ; of captain John 
Nanfan as lieutenant-governor of New York, 277 ; of 
John Champante to be agent of the province of New 
York, 587 ; for tlie trial of pirates in the plantations, 
issued, 845 ; of Richard Ingoldesby to be lieutenant- 
governor of New York, 1002 ; of lord Cbrnbury does 
not empower him to pardon treason and vTillful mur- 
der, v., 47; of lieutenant-governor Ingoldesby re- 
voked, 90, 91 ; of Robert Hunter to be governor, 92, 
391, and vice-admiral of New York, 424 ; of John 
Montgomery to be governor of New York, 834 ; of the 
bishop of Loudon to exercise ecclesiastical authority 
in the American plantations, 849 ; of George Clarke 
to be lieutenant-governor of New York, VI., 71; 
for trying pirates, lost, 142; to George Clinton as 
governor of New York, 189 ; of major-general John- 
son for the management of Indian affairs, 1025, VII., 
458 ; of New York judges, report on, 471 ; order 
in council against granting them during good beha- 
vior, 472 ; lieutenant-governor Golden refuses his 
assent to a bill granting, to judges during good beha- 
vior, 503 ; of Thomas Walker, esquire, to be commis- 
sioner from Virginia to the treaty of fort Stanwix, 
VIII., 113; of the reverend father Druillettes and 
M. Jean Godefroy as ambassadors to New England, 
IX., 6 ; to Sieur de Prouville de Tracy, to be lieute- 
nant-general in America, 17 ; of Sieur Talon to be 
intendant of justice, police and finance in Canada, 22 ; 
to M. de la Salle to take command in the regions that 
shall become subjected to France, west of Canada, 
225 ; of major McGregory to trade in the Ottawa 
country, 318; of baron de Dieskau, X., 285 ; of the 
marquis de Montcalm to command the troops in Ca- 
nada, 394. 
Commissioners, about to repair to New England, II., 235 
(see Bishops) ; from New Netherland to the general 
assembly at Hartford, journal of the, 385 ; appointed 
to confer with captain John Scott, 393, 397; their 
report, 394, 399 ; sent to the English fleet, 410, 414 ; 
their report, 411, and names, 413 ; motives of director 
Stuyvesant for sending them to colonel Nicolls, 443 ; 
accompany colonel Nicolls from New England, 444 ; 
land at New Amsterdam, and offer conditions to the 
Dutch, ibid; powder wasted at fort Amsterdam in 
saluting the English, 498 ; sent to New England, in- 
structions to. III., 51, 55, 57; their commission, 64; 
their progress, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 93 ; denounced 
by the general court of Massachusetts, 95 ; report 
their proceedings to the secretary of state, 96, 101, 



152 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[COM- 



Commissioners — rontinucd. 

106 ; further controversy between Massachusetts and, 
98, 99, 107 ; settle matters in Maine, 108 ; report of , 
the, on Massachusetts, 110 ; governor NiooUs trans- 
mits the papers connected with their transactions at 
Boston, 114; have neither money nor credit, 115; 
recalled, 116 ; governor Nicolls reports the course 
pursued by Massachusetts towards the, 136 ; defense 
of Massachusetts from the charges of the, 139 ; sent 
to inquire into the troubles at Esopus, instructions to 
the, 149 ; governor Nicolls explains some of the pro- 
ceedings of the, 158 ; Mr. Maverick's report on the 
actions of tlie, 173 ; settle the limits of the several 
colonies, 240 ; settlement approved, 241 ; lodge with 
captain Bredon, 270 ; from different colonies, about to 
meet at Rhode Island, to consider of the prosecu- 
ting the war against the French, 706 ; meet at New 
York, 732; agree on the subject of quotas, 751; 
invited to meet governor Sloughter, 785 ; called by 
governor Fletcher to New York, IV., 37, 56, 73, 74 ; 
refuse to attend, 873, 874 ; attend a congress at Al- 
bany, VI., 853, 860, 861, 863, 864, 871 ; to the treaty 
at fort Stanwis, VIII., 112. 
on boundaries between New Netherland and Maryland 
proposed, II., 83 ; between N"ew York and Connecticut 
appointed, 625, 629, 630; to settle the boundaries 
between the i^rench and English in America, III., 504, 
IV., 402, 404, 453, 546, 580, VIII., 578, IX., 314, 322, 
330, 667, X., 217; their names, III, 505; their corres- 
pondence, 506-510 ; subjects for their deliberation, 
IX., 371, 689 ; their labors cut short, 428 ; evidence to 
be submitted to, 694 ; all acts of hostility to be mean- 
while suspended, 697. (See Boundaries.) 
of duke of York's revenue, report of law officers to, on 
the charges against sir Edmund Andros and Mr. Dyre, 
III., 314; engaged in considering the affairs of New 
York, 317, 340 ; suggest amendments to certain New 
York acts, 341, 348; and transmit their opinion on 
other points concerning that province, 349-353. 
of forfeited estates (England), send an agent to inquire 
into the titles of certain lands in New Jersey, V., 758. 
of Indian affairs, appointed at Albany, IV., 177, 362 ; mes- 
sage to the five nations from the, 491 ; minutes of their 
proceedings, 567, 575, 597 ; sent to the five nations, re- 
port of the, 654 ; letter of the, to the lieutenant-gov- 
ernor of New York, 690 ; memorial of the five nations 
to, 691; propositions from the Canada praying In- 
dians to the, 692 ; from the five nations to the, 693 ; 
guilty of unfair practices, 716; instructions to the, 
751 ; send spies to Canada, V., 85 ; names of the, in 
1711, 220, 228, 229 ; transmit intelligence of French 
intrigues at Onondaga, 242 ; inform governor Hunter 
of an attack by French Indians in the neighborhood 
of Albany, 281; names of the, in 1715, 446; message 
of the five nations to the, 463 ; names of the, m 1719, 
528 ; address a letter to colonel Schuyler on the state 
of the Indian interests, 570; names of the, in 1720, 



572; in 1721, 635; their conference with western 
Indians, 693 ; their report on the petition of the Lon- 
don merchants on the subject of the Indian trade, 740 ; 
names of the, in 1724, 742, in 1726, 786, 791, 794; 
advise the government of the further encroachments of 
the French, 909 ; their letter to traders in the Seneca 
country, 911; report that the French have seized 
Crown Point, 928 ; their answer to queries of the 
board of trade, VI., 126 ; report the erection of a fort 
by the French at Crown Point, 131 ; inform the gov- 
ernment of the design of the French to settle at Wood 
creek, 144, 146 ; names of, in 1743, 232, 233, 235, 238, 
241, 251 ; all Indian traders, 439 ; refuse to act under 
governor Clinton, ibid ; complain of Mr. Lydius, 650 ; 
resume the superintendence of Indian matters, 821 ; 
their secretary ordered to attend the congress at 
Albany with their records, 854 ; interested in the trade 
to Canada, VII., 16; deprived of the management of 
Indian affairs, 19 ; restored, 20 ; how they managed 
Indian affairs, 713 ; misrepresent sir William Johnson, 
714; the Indians complain of, 715 ; fail to meet, VHI., 
288 ; sent by the continental congress to treat with 
the six nations, proceedings of, 605. 

from Massachusetts, attend a meeting of the five nations, 
VI., 267. 

of the united colonies of New England, referred to un- 
der the name of general court, I., 266 ; how composed, 
267 ; director Stuyvesant's negotiations with, 458, 
460 (see New England; Stuyvesant); their corres- 
pondence with governor Andros, III., 273, 274, 
275. 

from New York, appointed for collecting the revenue, 
III , 602, 608, 617, 641, 672, IV., 356 ; to superin- 
tend the building of a fort in the country of the Onou- 
dagas, 713, 783 ; appointed to examine the public 
accounts of the province of New York, 775, 1004 ; to 
execute the office of receiver-general, 973 ; appointed 
for the piirchase of provisions for the expedition against 
Canada, VI., 651 ; refuse to deliver provisions except at 
Albany, 655 ; the sheriff of Albany breaks open the 
stores of the, 656 ; Mr. Coldeu threatens the, 657 ; in- 
structions to, 664 ; refuse provisions to captain Stod- 
dert's company, 688 ; appointed for various services 
by the assembly of New York, VI., 684 ; of con 
spiracles appointed, VIII., 652. 

from Rhode Island, appointed to inquire into the irregu 
larities of that government, IV., 600; they report, 601 

Royal, for restoring peace to the colonies, their appoint- 
ment authorized, VIII., 649 ; in New York, 686, 747 
loyal addresses presented to, 692 ; numbers on Long 
island sign the declaration prescribed by, 694 ; 
structions to, 738. 

for Trade and plantations. (See Trade, Lords of.) 

of Customs. (See Customs.) 
Committee of safety in New York, III., 597, 598, 604, 608, 
609, 617, 643, 670; refitse to meet, 620; their repre- 
sentation to the secretary of state, 629 ; their journal 



—Con] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



153 



Committee of safety iu New York — continued. 

mentioned, 630; articles presented against, 644; 
order a general election, 674 ; changed into an execu- 
tive council by lieutenant-governor Leisler, 676. 
of pxiblic safety, Pierre Van Cortland, president of tlie, 
VI., 407; elected in New York, VIII., 433, 572, 653; 
proposes a general congress, 433 ; names of tlie mem- 
bers of, 600 ; assure governor Tryon that he is safe in 
New York, 640. 

Common law of England, the fundamental law of the pro- 
vince of New York, VIII., 444. 

Common prayer. (See Book of Common Prayer } 

Commons, house of, ijetitions against the earl of Bellomont 
presented to the, IV., 604, 605, 698, 725. 

Communipa. (See Gamoenapa.) 

Companies, Virginia, on what condition incorporated, I., 284, 
285; incorijorated. III., 23; James I., grants land to 
the, VII., 360, 361. 

Companise (Companiste), an Outaouas chief, attacks a party 
of Senecas, IX., 761 ; visits Quebec, 780. 

Company, a, formed in New York for settling a fishery. III., 
234 ; for the propagation of the gospel in New Eng- 
land, IV., 230; incorporated, VII., 566. 
of Acadia, send supplies to St. Johns, IX., 530. 
.African, the, send negroes to Barbadoes, II., 338; 
means to benefit, III., 115 ; claims the preemption of 
negroes in Guinea, 245 ; monopolizes the trade in 
Guinea, 365 ; New York not to trade within the char- 
ter of, 374, 690 ; notified of the shipment of elephants' 
teeth from New York, 496; to be encouraged, 547, 
823, IV., 290, v., 136 ; a return required of the num- 
ber of negroes aziniially sent to New York by the, 
779 ; has not imported negroes into New York for 
several years, 814. 
Australian (Dutch), to trade to Africa, Terra Aus- 
tralis and America, proposed, I., 6, 7, 8 ; obtains 
an injunction against printing the journal of the voy- 
age lately made on the part of the, 15 ; against the 
publication of a map in relation to the new strait be- 
tween the North and South seas, 16; permission 
granted to William Jansou to publish his chart of the 
new passage discovered by the, 21. 
des cent associfo, or, of New France, established, V., 
619, IX., 24, 782; called the old company, 39; the 
West India company succeeds, 40 ; surrender of their 
charter, 784. (See Company, West India, French.) 
Canada, the, monopolize the Indian trade, V., 744, 

747. 
East India (Dutch), New Netherland discovered by 
Hendrick Hudson, in the service of the, I., 94, 
564; separate register for the affairs of the, ordered, 
105 ; the stockholders of the West India company 
adopt an advantageous resolution with the, 141 ; 
charter of, extended, 158; difficulties between the 
West India company and the, II., 236 ; charges 
brought by the English against the, 264 ; required to 
report its opinion on the proposal to give up New 
Netherland, 348, 353, 356. 

20 



East India (English), the, much dissatisfied because it 

did not receive any satisfaction for the Amboina 

afiair, I., 48 ; anew, established in England, IV., 412. 

a fur, formed in Quebec, IX., 715. 

Greenland, New Netherland first visited by those of the, 

I., 149. 
Hudson's bay, seize the French posts at Port Nelson, 

IX., 800. 
united India, or Mississippi (French), great noise made 
in the world by the, V., 560; succeed M. Croisat, 619 ; 
resign Louisiana, &c., IX., 1025. 
of New France. (See des cent associis.) 
New Netherland, grant to, I., 10, 11 ; petition for an 
extension of their charter, 13, 21 ; permitted to send 
a ship to New Netherland, 22 ; recommend the colo- 
nization of New Netherland, 23, and ask to be assisted 
with'two ships of war, 24. 
Northern, Canada, drive the English from Hudson's 
bay, IX., 428 ; recommended to cooperate with M. 
d'lbervOle, 443; the intendant recommended to at- 
tend the meetings of the, 444 ; employ M. d'lberville 
to attack fort Nelson, 453. 
Ohio land, the, a cliief cause of disaffection among the 
Indians, VII , 18, 22 ; buUd a fort at Red Stone creek, 
269. 
Swedish, the Dutch West India company originally 
interested in the, I., 146 ; demands restitution of 
New Sweden, II., 242 ; resolution of the states 
general thereupon, 246 ; settles on the South river, 
259. 
West India (Dutch). (See West India Compamj.) 
West India (French), established, IX., 22, 785 ; Canada 
granted to, 25 ; succeeds the company of New France, 
40 ; extent of the grant to, 379 ; trade to lake St. John, 
791 ; dissolved, 793. 
Comporte, M. de, provost of Quebec, IX., 329. 
[Compton, Henry,] bishop of London, III., xiv, IV., 129 ; 
memorial of, on the churches in the plantations, III., 
253 ; of the privy council, 572 ; letter of the earl of 
Beilomout to, IV., 580; expresses an interest in the 
conversion of the Indians and regrets the banishment 
of the reverend Mr. Dellius, 774 ; governor Hunter's 
letter to, v., 311 ; notice of, VII., 363 ; commissioners 
in the colonies since the tune of, 368. 
Comyne, Lindert, VI., 392. 
Comyne, Philip, VI., 392. 

Conception, the village of the, among the Senecas, IX., 367. 
Conchehaugah, an Indian chief, III., 68. 
Conchling, Cornelius, ensign of the militia of East Hampton, 

IV., 80S. (See Koncklyne.) 
Concord (New Hampshire), the Penacooks inhabit, III., 482 ; 

a party of Canada Indians defeated near, X., 33. 
Concubin.ige, prosecutions for, II., 686. 
Conde, Henry de Bourbon prince of, succeeds count de 

Soissons as viceroy of America, IX., 782. 
Cond6, Henri Jules de Bourbon prince de, member of the 
king's council, IX., 8. 



151 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[CON- 



Conde, a Cayuga sachem, IV., 898. 

CondC- river, VI., 896. 

Condegrave, captain, sir Thomas Dale in his company, I 

Conditions on which New England and Virginia \ 

granted, I., 51 ; proposed by M. De Laet for the trade 
and settlement of New Netherland, 90, 110, 119, 401 ; 
on which a person may become a patroon, 402, II 
553 ; on which slaves were manumitted in New 
Netherland, I., 425 ; on which farms are granted in 
Renselaerswyck, 427; offered to immigrants to New 
Netherland, 619, 630 ; ratified by the states general, 
637 ; for the colonie on the Delaware river, modified, 
II., 57, 59, 60, 61, 173, 175, 198, 202; on which 
building lots were granted on the Delaware, 62. 
Conductor-generalis, Peter Van Schaick revises the, VIII., 

652. 
Conecocheague (Conegogee), creek, X., 437. 
Conell, Richard, IV., 937. 
Conewago creek, VII., 268. 
Coney creek, VII., 268. 

Coney island (Conuy island, Cunny island), in the North 
bay, I., 544; Gravesend obtains judgment in favor of 
its claim to, II., 221 ; mentioned. III , 586 ; lookouts 
ordered to be placed at, 591; French name of, IX., 
729. 
Confederation of the colonies, proposition towards a, IV., 
246 ; Mr. Perm's plan for a, 296 ; doctor Coxe draws 
up a plan for the, V., 204. 
Conference between captain Scott and the committee from 
the government of New Netherland, II., 234, 507; 
between the committee of the Connecticut assem- 
bly and the commissioners from New Netherland, 
387-391 ; of lord EfEngh.im and governor Dongau 
with the Onondagas and Cayugas, III., 417; of 
governor Dongan with the Indians, 438, 441, 533- 
536 ; of the Mohawks with the mayor and com- 
mon council of Albany, 483 ; of the Onondagas 
with the mayor and common council of Albany, 
485 ; of sir E. Andros with the five nations, 557 ; of 
lieutenant-governor Leister's commissioners with the 
five nations, 712 ; of governor Sloughter with the 
Indians, 771, 772, 773, 774, 777;, of the Senecas, 
Oneidas and Mohawks with Dirck Wessels, 805, IV., 
373; of major Ingoldesby with the five nations, III., 
840 ; between sir William Phips and captain Clarke 
at Boston, IV., 9 ; of governor Fletcher with the In- 
dians, 20, 38, 175, 248 ; of Peter Schuyler with the 
Indians, 85, 279, 492, V., 562 ; between the five nations 
and the earl of Bellomont, referred to, IV., 363, 364, 
365,366,367; of lieutenant-governor Nanfan with the 
five nations, 407 896 ; with the tive nations at Onondaga, 
minutes of, 561, 563, 564, 654; between the commis- 
sioners of Indian affairs and the Indians, 692, 693, V., 
693 ; between the earl of Bellomont and the five nations, 
IV., 727; between lord Cornbury and the Indians, 
978 ; of governor Hunter with the Indians, V., 217, 



265, 277, 382, 437, 484; of Messrs Hansen and 
Bleecker with the Indians at Onondaga, 372 ; of gov- 
ernor Burnet with the Indiiins, 635, 657, 713, 786 ; of 
governor Spotswood with the Indians, 669 ; of sir 
William Keith with the Indians, 677 ; of the Massa- 
chusetts commissioners with the six nations, 723 ; of 
governor Montgomerie with the Indians, 859 ; of 
governor Cosby with the Indians, 962; between lieu- 
tenant-governor Clarke and the Indians, VI., 98, 172, 
216; between lieutenant-governor Bull and the Cher- 
okee and Catawba Indians, 210 ; between governor 
Clinton and the Indians, 262, 317, 383, 390, 441, 717, 
781 ; between the commissioners of the colonies and 
the Indians, 289 ; of colonel William Johnson with 
the Indians, 358, 608, 808, 964, 1011 ; of governor 
Shirley with the Indians, 447; between sir William 
Johnson and the Indians, VII., 44, 91, 130, 171, 229, 
244, 254, 324, 378, 435, 553, 718; VIII., 38, 111, 
227, 282, 304, 362, 424, 474 ; between Edmund Atkin 
and the six nations, VII., 211; of captain Croghan 
with the Indians, 267, 280, 779 ; of lieutenant Guy 
Johnson with the Indians, 511 ; of colonel Guy John- 
son with the Indians, VIII., 496, 518, 534, 549 ; be- 
tween the six nations and their dependents, 524; be- 
tween count de Frontenac and the Indians, IX., 103, 
105, 176, 183; between governor de la Barre and th» 
Onondagas, 236 ; of M. de Longueuil with the Indi- 
ans, 704, 707 ; between M. de Calli^res and the Iro- 
quois deputies at Montreal, 708, 715 ; between M. de 
Vaudreuil and the Indians, 746, 767, 876 ; between 
delegates from Massachusetts and governor Vaudreuil, 
941 ; between delegates from Massachusetts and the 
Abenakis, 943 ; between M. de Beauharnois and the 
Indians, 1041, 1086, 1063, X., 22 ; between lieutenant- 
governor Clarke and the five nations, IX., 1062; be- 
tween M. de la Galissoniere and the deputies of the 
six nations, X., 186 ; between M. de la Jonquifere and 
the Indians, 205, 232, 237 ; between the Abenaquis and 
captain Phineas Stevens, 252 ; held at Montreal with 
the Indians, 267 ; between M. de Vaudreuil and a 
deputation of Iroquois, 345, 445, 499. 

Confession of faith, the New England, translated into the 
Indian language, IV., 684. 

Confirm.ation, by the earl of Sterling, of a release of lands 
on Long island. III., 22; of the acts for laying an 
excise and paying the public debts of New York, V., 
412. 

Confiscation, ships deterred from coming to New Nether- 
land by the dread of, L, 313,429; of what nature 
made, 425, 428; of smuggled powder, II., 452; of 
Shelter island, 588 ; of captain Lavall's ketch, 602 ; 
of all property in New Netherland belonging to the 
subjects of the kings of England and Fr.ince, 611, 
710 ; of sundry New England vessels, 664, 715. 

Conflans, vice-admiral, defeated, VII., 418. 



-Con] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



155 



Congregationalists, tlie reverend doctor Cutting renounces 
the communion of tlie, VI., 908 ; reverend Mr. Palmer 
abandons the, 910; reverend S. Johnson quits the, 
914. (See ChurcJi.) 

Congress, first proposals for the meeting of an American, 
IV., 296; proposed powers of the, 297; held at New 
London preparatory to the expedition against Canada, 
v., 253 ; minutes of the, 257 ; names of the members 
of the, 261 ; of American governors, governor Hun- 
ter recommended to call a, 430 ; cannot be called 
without orders from the crown, 434 ; governor Shirley 
recommends the meeting at New York of a, VI., 402 ; 
held, 421 ; a, recommended to be held at Albany, 
846 ; minutes of the Albany, 853 ; report of the board 
of trade on the proceedings of the Albany, 916 ; gov- 
ernor Shirley's observations on the proceedings of the 
Albany, 830 ; the six nations request that sir William 
Johnson be invited to the Albany, VII., 573 ; a, called 
to oppose the stamp act, 760; in session at New York, 
767 ; to petition for a redress of grievances proposed, 
VIII., 433. 

Congress, continental, Arthur St. Clair, president of, VIII., 
466; New York elects delegates to, 469; Philip Liv- 
ingston a member of, 470 ; to meet at Philadelphia, 
485 ; an address to the king, to be framed at, 486 ; 
views of the earl of Dartmouth, on learning of the 
intended meeting of, 487; to what extent the pro- 
vince of New York was represented in, 488 ; lieuten- 
ant governor Coldeu confers with one of the New York 
delegates to, 492 ; about to resolve on a non-impor- 
tation agreement, 493 ; their proceedings sent to the 
secretary of state, 510; vote an address to the inhabi- 
tants of Quebec, 512 ; reject Mr. Galloway's plan for 
the government of the colonies, 513; the governors 
of the several colonies ordered to prevent the elec- 
tion of delegates to the, 527 ; efforts making to obtain 
a public approval of the proceedings of, 530 ; the New 
York assembly refuses to consider the proceedings of, 
532 ; every other American assembly approves of the, 
ibid ; the New York assembly refuses to appoint dele- 
gates to the, 543; employ Messrs. Kirkland and Cros- 
by as Indian missionaries, 551 ; the proprietors of the 
manors of Livingston and Renselaerswyck, the warm- 
est supporters of, 565 ; efforts making in New York to 
send delegates to, 566 ; Rivington's Gazetteer attacks 
the, 568; raises money and an army and erects forts, 
680 ; informed of the capture of forts Ticonderoga and 
Crown Point, 581 ; appoints George Washington com- 
mander-in-chief of the American army, 589 ; the re- 
solution of parliament for accommodation referred to. 
Ibid; order troops to New York, 590; endeavor to 
secure the alliance or neutrality of the six nations, 
605 ; establish Indian departments, ibid ; their mes- 
sage to the six nations, 615 ; number of members 
composing, ibid ; recommend the New York provin- 
cial congress to seize the officers of the crown, 638 ; 
about to settle the quotas of the respective colonies, 



643 ; adopt a resolution in regard to persons who are 
dangerous by going at large, 645 ; order Guy John- 
son to desist from attempts to attach the Indians to 
the royal cause, 658 ; recommended to disarm the 
disaffected, 663 ; appoints Richard Montgomery, brig- 
adier-general, 665 ; general Sullivan, member of, 677 ; 
names of persons who renounced all authority of, 
transmitted to, 705 ; votes a monument to the me- 
mory of general Herkimer, 720 ; resolves to recruit 
the army, 729 ; general officers elected by, 730 ; ap- 
points Samuel Holden Parsons, a brigadier-general, 
736 ; permits captain Hamilton to reside at New 
Brunswick (N. J.), 755 ; governor Tryon recommends 
that a reward be offered for the arrest of members of, 
756 ; general Schuyler resigns an appointment made 
by, 788; Ralph Izard, member of, 804; satisfy the 
New Jersey and Pennsylvania troops, 810. 

Congress, New York provincial, colonel WoodhuU, presi- 
dent of, VIII., 295 ; fears felt that it will be con- 
vened, 528 ; efforts making to get up, 543 ; com- 
plains of James Rivington, the printer, 568 ; number 
of members in, 580 ; orders the association to be 
signed, 582; forbids the corporation of New York to 
au address to governor Tryon, 593 ; Robert 
secretary of, 594; authorize the restitution 
of boats of his majesty's ship Asia, 597 ; orders the 
arrest of captain Sinclair, 598 ; instructed to seize the 
crown officers, 638 ; several counties refuse to send 
delegates to, 646 ; Thomas Smith, member of, 653 ; 
recommend that the disaffected be disarmed, 663; 
Richard Montgomery, member of, 665 ; declaration 
of the freeholders of New York city against, 698. 

Congress, United States, Ralph Izard, member of the senate, 
Vni., 804. 

Congreve (Coneroue, Congrave), Charles, his report on the 
forts and garrisons in the province of New York, IV., 
1128 ; bearer of despatches to lord Cornbury, 1179 ; 
commandant at Oswego, VI., 93; the governor of 
Canada complains of, 94; settles at Cherry Valley, 
707. 

Coni, captain de, commands a division in an expedition 
against fort William Henry, X., 544. 

Coninck, Aldert (Konnick, AUard), II., 249, III., 75, 

Coninck, Thomas, III., 75. 

Conkeeherat, a Seneca chief. III., 67. 

Connageriwa, an Ohio sachem, VII., 330. 

Connay town, location of, VII., 268. 

Connecticut (Canedicott, Canetticut, Conecticot, Conectioote, 
Conectigus, Conittekock, Conitticot, Conitycot, Con- 
necticate, Connettieott, Connitte Cock), lord Say and 
Sele one of the original patentees of, I., 127; com- 
plaints against the Dutch by the people of, 128 ; pur- 
chased by Wouter Van Twiller, 542 ; situation of, 543 ; 
John Haynes, governor of, II., 142, 143, 150; reve- 
rend Mr. Leverich a freeman of, 160; insists on the 
annexation of the English towns on Long island, and 
declares the treaty of Hartford a nullity, 338 (see 
Hartford) ; declared to be in New England, 389 ; 



156 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Con— 



CoBnecticat — continued. 

boundary of, 390, V., 600 ; required to desist from its 
pretensions to Long island, II., 391 ; sends depu- 
ties to N(?w Orange to agree to a neutrality with the 
Dutch, 583 ; an emissary sent to Hempstead from, 
628 ; the goTornor, &c., of, remonstrate with governor 
Colve against ohliging the inhabitants of the east end 
of Long island to take the oath of allegiance, 651 ; 
answer of governor Colve to, 652 ; appoints captain 
J. WinUirop and Samuel Willis to meet the Dutch 
commissioners on Long island, 655, 656 ; correspond- 
ence between the governors of New Netherland and, 
660, 661 ; usurps some towns on the east end of 
Long island, 607 ; imion between Easthampton and, 
III., 27; application for the arrest of colonels Whal- 
ley and Goffe made to, 41 ; royal commissioners sent 
to, 55 ; complaints against John Scott sent from, 86 ; 
colonel Cartwright suggests that the commissioners 
h.id better begin with, 87; lays claim to the Narra- 
gansett country, 93 ; the king's commissioners visit, 
96 ; boundary between New York and, agreed on, 106, 
230; Massachusetts intrenches upon. 111; governor 
NicoUs cannot depend on, 115 ; invited to join in an 
expedition against Canada, 120 ; notice of the declara- 
tion of war against the French received in, 137 ; the 
king's letter received in, 154; measures adopted in, 
to prevent incm'sions from Canada, 167 ; John Win- 
throp, governor of, 203 ; boundaries between New 
York and, 231, VII., 563 ; entitled to all it possessed 
during the Dutch time. III., 236; losses of, by king 
Philip's war, 244 ; nothing further to be done in the 
matter of the boundaries of, 247 ; reception of gov- 
ernor Andros in, 254, 264; sends commissioners to 
New York, 255, 265 ; disputes the boundaries of New 
York, 257; produce of, 260; population of, in 1678, 
262 ; governor Andros receives letters from, 272 ; the 
Mohawks make an incursion into, 273 ; messengers 
to the Mohawks from, 274 ; correspondence between 
governor Andros and governor Leet of, 275, 276 ; 
governor Dougan desires establishing a post ol5ce in, 
356 ; a writ of quo warranto ordered against, 362, StiS ; 
Edward Kandolph arrives with a quo warranto against, 
368, 385 ; letter to governor Dongan from the gov- 
ernor of, 385 ; its annexation to New York proposed, 
391 ; population of, in 1686, 396 ; prefers the govern- 
ment of New York to that of Boston, 397 ; boundary 
run between New York and, 406 ; efforts of sir Ed- 
mund Andros to annex, 415 ; John Young moves to 
Long island from, 416; continued agitation of the 
subject of annexing it to New York, 420, 422, 423, 424 
425, 429, 476, 477, 492, 511, 622, 756, 790,' 795,' 798* 
799, 813 ; revolution in, 575 ; why annexed to Massa- 
chusetts, 579 ; delegates sent to captain Leisler from, 
589, 616, 671 ; memorial from Albany to, 692 ; Robert 
Treat, governor of, 696 ; rec.ills captain Bull and men 
from Albany, 701 ; lettJ,-rs of Robert Livingston to the 
government of, 703, 728, 730 ; requested to furnish a 
party against Canada, 705; grants two companies to 



Alb.->ny, 707, 708 ; in arms against the French and 
Indian.s, 719 ; annexed to sir Edmund Andros' gov- 
ernment, 722; quotas to be furnished by, 751, IV., 
101, 106, 186, 227, 706, 839, V., 139, 254, 262; origi- 
nally in the duke of Y'ork's patent. III., 761 ; in a 
bad condition, 768; declines to assist the province of 
New York against the French, 786, 790, 7'.i2, 795; 
will not allow men to be enlisted for Albany, 813 ; a 
part of, belongs to New York, 836 ; New York applies 
in vain for assistance to, 837 ; objections against the 
government of, 849 ; refuses to submit to sir William 
Phipps as commander-iu-chief, 853 ; report of the 
solicitor-general of England on the charter of, IV., 1 ; 
keeps up a commonwealth, 13 ; governor Fletcher to 
command the forces of, 29, 36, 67 ; the attorney- gene- 
ral ordered to look into the charter of, 31 ; ought to 
be annexed to New York, 33, 54, 114, 209 ; governor 
Fletcher asks for the absolute government of, 37, 
and receives his commission as commander of the 
militia of, 55 ; will not submit to governor Fletcher, 
50 ; governor Fletcher proceeds to, 57, 68 ; governor 
Phipps orders forces to march to New Y'ork from, 66 ; 
governor Fletcher's reception in, 69 ; is not bound by 
the laws of England, 71 ; further account of governor 
Fletcher's visit to, 72 ; assisted New York in Leisler's 
time, 84 ; taxes paid in produce in, 99 ; letter to gov- 
ernor Fletcher from the council of, 100 ; petition of, 
to the king, IT., 102; order in council thereupon, 
103 ; report of the law officers of the crown on the 
petition of, 104 ; letter of the queen respecting the 
quota to be furnished by, 106 ; governor Fletcher 
applies for assistance to, 150, 152 ; offers to send a 
party to Albany, 153 ; charged with evasion, ibid, 
159 ; vindicates her straightforwardness, 154 ; does 
not assist New York, 157, 174, 243, 1061, 1070 ; ad- 
vantages possessed over New York by, 159 ; deserters 
returned to New York from, 160 ; number of families 
in 1695 in, 183 ; strength of the militia in 1696 of, 
185 ; commissions major-general Winthrop to com- 
mand the troops against Canada, 193 ; and the other 
colonies in danger of being lost, 207 ; governor Flet- 
cher very often visits, 222; the command of the 
militia of, in whom vested, 228 ; sends men to Al- 
bany, 247, 425 ; a colony full of men, 250 ; the garri- 
son at the Half Moon a protection to, 251 ; objects to 
a military governor, 259 ; the earl of Bellomont cap- 
tain-general of, 261, 415; invades the town of Rye, 
276 ; letters transmitted through the earl of Bellomont 
for the government of, 298, 313, 414, 686, 717, V., 
593, 925 ; a ship from the Red seas seized in, IV., 301 ; 
unlawful trade carried on in, 319, 793, 1079, V., 58, 
VII., 271, 273 ; Albany covers, IV., 329, 440 ; pirates 
reported to be in, 333; envied in New York, 378; 
the duke of York's grant bounded by, 382 ; did not 
complain of governor Fletcher, 450 ; goods belonging 
to Kidd, the pirate, seized in, 555 ; pirates arrested 
in, 585, 594, 601 ; Thomas Clarke sent a prisoner to 
New York from, 595 ; names of the governor and 



—Con] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



157 



Connecticut — coatinucd. 

council of, in 1700, 613; report on the boundary 
between New York and, 625 ; order in council there- 
upon, 626 ; confirmation of the agreement of 1683, 
628 ; copy of the confirmation sent to, 635 ; exports 
pitcli and tar, 671 ; abounds with excellent ship tim- 
ber, 673 ; a vessel to cruise along the coast of, 697 ; 
its proportion of the expense for the building fortifi- 
cations at Albany and Schenectady, 832 ; a new pro- 
ject for its annexation to other colonies, 874 ; lord 
Cornbury to command the militia of, 884 ; lord Corn- 
bury asks for power to nominate the militia officers 
in, 912; chief justice Atwood about to visit, 924; to 
assist New York in case of invasion, 965 ; its roguery 
and villainy are enough to fill a volume, 1055 ; lord 
Cornbury complains of, 1058 ; a copy of the laws of, 
sent to England, 1062 ; The Doom and Miseries of 
mentioned, ibid ; a charge brought against the gov- 
ernment of, 1141 ; a woolen manufacture set up in, 
1151 ; emigration to Long island from, 1155 ; order 
on an appeal in the case of the Mohegan Indians and, 
1176; colonel Quary's report on, V., 30; no law of 
England to be in force in the colony till indorsed by 
an act of its own assembly, 31 ; refuses to receive any 
orders from lord Cornbury, 60 ; tirdered to assist the 
expedition against Canada, 71 ; the governor of, 
ordered to attend lord Lovelace at New York, 73 ; 
governor Hunter appointed commander-in-chief of 
the militia of, 98, 397; duke of Hamilton claims 
part of, 112 ; quota of money to be furnished for 
tlie defense of New Y'ork by, 138 ; orders respecting 
troops from, on the Canada 'expedition, 259, 261 ; 
would not assist New York during king William's war, 
432 ; price of specie in, 509 ; one of the British colo- 
nies, 591 ; Massachusetts to extend as far west as, 596, 
VII. , 564 ; very few Indians in, V. , 623 ; misunderstand- 
ing respecting boundary line between New York and, 
698 ; Mr. Talcot, governor of, 921 ; a volume of the laws 
of, transmitted to the board of trade, 931 ; commission 
appointed to determine the boundary between New 
York and, VI., 56 ; New York lies west of, 121, 508, 
VIII., 435 ; boundaries settled between New York and, 
VI., 125 ; furnishes men for the Carthagena expedition, 
171 ; the plantations on the north and west of, exposed 
to French Indians, 208 ; judge Horsmanden's report 
on the suit between the Mohegan Indians and, 256 ; 
commissioners from, treat with the five nations, 259, 
261, 263, 285, 287, 289, 646 ; names of the commis- 
sioners from, 290 ; cooperates in the expedition against 
cape Breton, 318, and against Canada, 319 ; endeavors 
to get up an expedition against Canada, 379, 396, 418, 
424; governor Shirley desires circular letters to be 
sent to, 382 ; consents to cooperate in carrying on the 
war only at the expense of all the colonies, 440 ; sends 
in bills against the crown for expenses on account of the 
Canada expedition, 458 ; agrees to a prosecution of the 
war, 673, 682 ; sends commissioners to concert 
to defeat the French, 715, 717 ; history of the 



ning a boundary between New York and, 776 ; Solomon 
Palmer recommended for holy orders by the episcopal 
clergymen of, 849 ; names of the commissioners who 
attended the congress at Albany from, 853 ; to extend 
to the South sea, 885 ; number of representatives to 
be allowed to, in the grand council of the United Colo- 
nies, 889 ; reverend Mr. Palmer a congregational min- 
ister ill, 910; reverend Samuel Johnson the only 
episcopal clergyman in, 914; ought to assist New 
Y'ork, 922, 923 ; estimated population of, in 1755, 993 ; 
raises a force against Crown Point, 999, 1003; losses 
in the battle of lake George by the regiments of, 1006, 
1007 ; estimate of the expense incurred in the expedi- 
tion against Crown Point by, VII., 2; share of the 
parliamentary grant allowed to, 34 ; circular letter of 
the secretary of state to, 75 ; c.illed on to raise troops, 
216, 340, 351, 453, 482; seizures of smuggled goods 
in, 272 ; advised of the king's intention to protect 
Noi'th America, 339 ; number of men voted for the 
campaign of 1758 by, 343 ; reimbursed expenses it 
incurred for the prosecution of the war, 353 ; number 
of episcopal churches in 1759 in, 372; state of the 
episcopal church in, 396, 439 ; episcopal ministers in, 
397 ; letter of secretary Pitt to, 420 ; religious dissen- 
sions in, 439; a commonwealth of hypocrites, 440; 
requested to desist from settling on the Susquehannah 
river, 522 ; called on to put down western Indians, 570 ; 
king William confirms an agreement respecting boun- 
daries between New York and, 595 ; New Hampshire 
grants hawked through, 616; raises men for the 
western army, 618 ; pursuits of the Indians of, 658 ; 
stamped paper arrives from England for, 769 ; gov- 
ernor Moore of New York claims to command the 
militia of, 818 ; letter on tlie subject from the gov- 
ernor of, 819 ; biographical notice of Thomas Fitch, 
governor of, 820 ; informed of the repeal of the stamp 
act, 824 ; rioters take refuge in, 849 ; commissioners 
for settling the boundary between Massachusetts and 
New York, meet in, VIII., 2; persons fly to the 
New Hampshire grants from, 65 ; governor Tryon 
visits, 371 ; heads of inquiry relative to, 388 ; fresh 
incursions into New York from, 643 ; all trade with, 
prohibited, 668 ; furnished two brigades to the conti- 
nental army, 806 ; discontents in, 807 ; reinforcements 
sent to lake George from, X., 333. 
Connecticut river, I., 107 ; no more than five or six Dutch on 
the, 128 ; two thousand English on the, ibid ; the Dutch 
live in a godless manner on the, 129 ; the English 
occupy the mouth of the, 152, 546; free naviga- 
tion of the, recommended, 545 ; called the fresh 
river, 567; the Dutch purchase a flat on the, II., 
140 ; difficulties between the Dutch and English on 
the, 141-144 ; the duke of York receives a grant of 
all the land between the Delaware and, 296 ; governor 
Andros claims all the land on the west side of. III., 
235 ; governor Andros to send a return of the town 
founded by Connecticut on the west side of the, 238 ; 



158 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[CoN- 



Connecticut river — continued. 

the east bounds of New York, 2G0, 796, VI., 508, 
VII., 457, 595, VIII., 4; movements of the Indians 
on, III., 550; date of the Dutch settlement on the, 
IV , 3.53 ; two Englishmen killed near, VI., 298 ; the 
French reported to have built a fort at the head of, 832, 
874, 886 ; Long island between Hudson's river and, 
VII., 430; New Hampshire makes grants of land to 
the west of, 564, 596, 608, VIII., 331; occupied hy 
Dutch long before the English, VII., 596 ; date of 
first English settlements west of, 597 ; a new colony 
proposed to be formed between Crown Point and, 
615 ; declared the boundary line between New York 
and New Hampshire, 642, 930 ; governor Moore or- 
dered to report on the lands west ol, 772 ; fugitives 
from justice fly to the west side of, VIII., 65 ; the 
duke of York's territory bounded by the Delaware 
and, 107 ; governor Moore proposes to visit the falls 
on, 179; distance of, from lake Champlain, 382; 
source of, 436; fort Bridgeman on, burnt, X., 144. 
(See Fresh River.) 

Conner, Francis, exchanged, X., 214. 

Connerai, reverend Julien Gamier, S. J., a native of, IX., 
171. 

Conningsby, [Thomas, 1st] lord, member of the privy coun- 
cil, IV., 103, 1127, v., 412, 530. 

Connochquisie, an Oneida sachem, his death announced, VI., 
968. 

Connoly, captain, commandant of the militia at Pittsburgh, 
VIII., 462, 465. 

Connor, Bryan, X., 592. 

Connor (Conner), James, reports the condition the French 
had left Oswego, VII., 194 ; mentioned, 207. 

Connor (Couuer), Thomas, X,, 592, 593. 

Connor, Timothy, VII., 207. 

Conoghquiuson (Canaghquieson, Couaghquieson, Conogh- 
quiesor, Conochquiesie), another Oneida sachem, his 
speech, VI., 979 ; delivers up several English prison- 
ers, VII., 381, 382 ; communicates a message sent 
by the governor of Canada to the Oueidas, 385 ; his 
speech to sir William Johnson, VIII., 40, 43; con- 
doles the death of a Mohawk chief, 45 ; gives his 
own name to the governor of New Jersey, 115 ; his 
speech, 116 ; attends tlie ratification treaty at the 
German flatts, 229 ; his address to governor Tryon, 
309; mentioned, 424; attends the last conference 
held by sir William Johnson with the Indians, 475 ; 
condoles the death of sir William Johnson, 480 ; 
complains of the missionary at Oneida, 541. 

Conoy creek, VII., 268. 

Conque, , IX., 820. 

Considerations, in regard to the truce with Spain, I., 40; 
offered by the general board of accounts of the West 
India company to the XIX., in regard to the number 
of ships, &c., to be employed by the compa- 
ny, 158; regarding the reform of that company, 
235 ; on the duties levied in New Netherlaud, 372 ; 



for securing and enlarging the English ; 
America, V., 623 ; towards a general plan of the 
measures of the English provinces, by Thomas 
Pownall, sent to the board of trade, VI., 852; at 
length, 893 ; title of, 1009 ; offered by bishop Sher- 
lock, on ecclesiastical governments in the colonies, 
VII., 360 ; on the institution and conduct of the so- 
ciety for propagating the gospel in foreign parts, re- 
verend East Apthorp author of the, 375 ; on the 
trade and finances of this kingdom, &c., Thomas 
Whately, author of, VIII., 277; on the state of Ire- 
land, William Knox, author of, 804, and on the uni- 
versality and uniformity of theocracy, ibid. 

Consistory of New Amsterdam, I., 310. 

Conspiracy, against William III. detected, IV., 149, 150; 
to defame the administration of New York, discover- 
ed, 942, 943 ; among the slaves in New York, an ac- 
count of, v., 341 (see Negro Plot); of the Hurons 
against Detroit, X., 83, 182; general, among the 
Indians against the French, 156. 

Constantin, reverend Nicholas Benoit, killed, IX., 810. 

Constichrohare river, or the Pidee, V., 793. 

Constitution, Nova Scotia has none, V., 592 ; of New Hamp- 
shire, 595; of Massachusetts, 596, VIII., 443; of 
Rhode Island, 599 ; of New York, 600 ; of New Jer- 
sey, v., 602; of Pennsylvania, 604; of Maryland, 
605 ; of Virginia, 606 ; of North Carolina, 609 ; of 
South Carolina, 610 ; it is doubtful whether dissen- 
ters can be put on an equality with those of the 
church of England, consistently with the English, 
VII., 586. 

Consumption. (See Diseases.) 

Cont, Francis, IV., 1008. 

Contest in America, The, doctor John Mitchel, author of, 
VIII., 437. 

Conti, prince de, a patron of M. de Tonti, III., 580. 

Conti (Conty), [Anne Marie Martinozzi] princess of, bene- 
factress of a nunnery in Montreal, IX., 69. 

Contoocook (Kakeconte) river, a party of Abenakis defeated 
on, X., 33; M. de Rigaud defeats the English on, 35. 

Contract, to convey emigrants to New Netherland, I., 379 ; 
between the partners of the colonic of Rensselaer- 
wyck, date of the, 407; to convey Mennonists to the 
Delaware, II., 176; to build fort Hunter, V., 279. 

Contr^, marquis de, bearer of despatches to count Frontenac, 
IX., 687. 

Contrecceur (Contrecour), Antoine de, accompanies M. de 
Tracy's expedition against the Mohawks, III., 135 ; 
dead, IX., 1010. 

Contrecceur, Francis Antoine Pecaudy de, seizes a canoe load 
of tin ware bronght from New York, IX., 1029. 

Contrecceur (Contreven), Pierre Claude Pecaudy de, com- 
mandant at the fort on the river Auboeuf, VI., 832; 
his summons to the British troops on the Mononga- 
hela, 841, 843; ensign, sent to Acadia, IX., 848; at 
Niagara, X., 36, 85, 152, 157; recalled, 163; sends a 
detachment under the command of M. de Jumonville, 



-Coo] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



159 



Contreooeur, Pierre Claude Pecaudy de — continued. 

270 ; captain, reports the condition of fort Duquesne, 
300 ; prepares to resist the Britisli under major-gene- 
ral Braddoek, 303, 382; biographical notice of, 387; 
commands a detachment on lake Champlain, 483 ; at- 
tends an Indian conference, 500 ; remarks of M. 
de Montcalm concerning, 638 ; at Ticonderoga, 790, 
894; marches to Lachine, 852; proceeds to Catara- 
couy, 854 ; falls back on La Presentation, 888. 

Contrecoeur, ensign, sou of Pierre Claude, at Niagara, VI., 
832. 

Contrecceur, a detachment attends count de Frontenac from, 
IX., 113 ; assailed by Indians, 391. 

Controversy between New York and New Jersey respecting 
ports of entry, IV., 382; between the episcopalians 
and dissenters, state of the, VII., 371; between New 
York and New Hampshire, 595, 608, 917 (see New 
Hampshire Grants) ; between Great Britain and her 
colonies reviewed, 'William Knox publishes, VIII., 
803. 

Convention at Albany, send agents to Connecticnt, III., 692; 
Mr. Milborn expected to proceed against the, 693 ; 
accused of vindicating the authority of king James' 
governors, 702; the episcopal clergy hold a, VII., 
538 ; reverend doctor Johnson preaches to, ibid. (See 
Convocation.) 

Convention army. (See Army, Convention.) 

Convers, sergeant, at Saratoga and fort Hunter, VI., 375. 

Conversion, of the heathen, the, recommended to the con- 
sideration of the states general, I., 261; the French 
and English have done their duty for the, 270; of 
adult Indians, impossible, 340 ; of Indians and 
negroes to be encouraged. III., 374; of negroes and 
Indians, the New York assembly refuse to pass a bill 
to facilitate the, IV., 510; of negro slaves, William 
Knox publishes three tracts on the instruction and, 
VIII., 804. 

Conveyance of Indian lands on the South river to the Dutch 
I., 593, 596 ; of Shelter island to Nathaniel Silvester 
II., 590 ; by the five nations, of their beaver hunting 
ground to the king of Great Britain, IV., 908. 

Convicts in Newgate to be sent to New York, IV., 31 ; trans- 
ported from Ireland to Maryland, V., 605 ; enlist in 
Shirley and Pepperell's regiments, VII., 87; trans- 
ported to America, recommended to be pardoned on 
condition that they enter the king's service, VIII , 
756. 

Convocation of the clergy of the episcopal church, held at 
New York, V., 312, 316, 355. (See Convention.) 

Conwaroghere, where, VIII., 504. 

Conway, Edward, lord, secretary of state. III., vii. 

Conway, sir Edward, secretary of state. III,, vii, 11, 12. 

Conway, Henry Seymour, secretary of state. III., v, x; op- 
position to the stamp act in the colonies reported to, 
VII., 759, 767, 768, 771, 773, 805; governor Moore 
reports his arrival in New York to, 789 ; an account of 



the state of the province of New York transmitted to, 
798 ; censures lieutenant-governor Golden, 801 ; in- 
formed of the inconveniences which have resulted 
from the stamp act, 802, 818; lieutenant-governor 
Golden applies for indemnity to, 804; governor 
Moore complains of lieutenant-governor Golden to, 
810; lieutenant-governor Golden vindicates himself 
to, 811, 813 ; the conduct of captain Kennedy, R. N., 
explained to, 821 ; announces the repeal of the stamp 
act, 823 ; riots in Dutchess and Westchester counties 
reported to, 825, 833, 867; despatches received in 
New York from, 829 ; informed that the New York 
assembly has provided barracks, &c., for the troops, 
831 ; sir William Johnson writes on the subject of 
the Indian department to, 834, 838; informed that 
the rioters have been put down in Dutchess county, 
845 ; recommends lieutenant-governor Colden's case 
to the governor of New York, VIII., 68. 

Conway, major-general Thomas, biographical notice of, VIII., 
730. 

Conway cabal, object of the, VIII., 731. 

Conyne, Peter, VI., 392. 

Coock, George, II., 693. 

Cook, doctor, IV., 607. 

Gook, sir John, V., 27. 

Cook, lieutenant William, wounded at Ticonderoga, X., 728. 

Gooke, sir Charles, one of the lords of trade. III., xvi, 
v., 391, 402, 414, 422, 429, 435, 469, 470, 472, 502, 
517, 526, 527, 535, 536, 538, 541, 548, 551, 558, 570. 

Cooke, John, under-secretary of state, III., x. 

Gooke, captain James, his voyage printed in New York, 
VIII., 568. 

Cooke (Nova Scotia), the French take possession of, X., 217. 

Cool (Kool), Barent Jacobs, II., 140, III., 76. 

Cool, Cornelis Lambertsen, I., 192. 

Cool, Jacob, IV., 941. 

Cool, Thomas, IV., 162, 164. 

Cooly, John, IV., 166. 

Cooper, , an inhabitant of New Amsterdam, II., 30. 

Cooper, sir Anthony Ashley, knight, one of the lords of 
trade. III., xiii, 30, 31, 33, 37. 

Cooper, Benjamin, IV., 942. 

Cooper, Caleb, IV., 1135. 

Cooper, doctor Christopher, removes from South Carolina to 
New York, V. 419. 

Cooper, justice Daniel, VI., 346, 347. 

Cooper, Jeffery, occupies a post at Half-way brook, between 
Fort Edward and lake George, VII., 509. 

Cooper, reverend Myles, LL. D., fellow of Queens college, 
Oxford, willing to be vice-president of King's college. 
New York, VII., 448; archbishop Seeker objects to 
sending him, 449 ; desirable that he were a little older, 
495 ; arrives in New York, 516 ; about to succeed 
reverend doctor Johnson, 518, 519; reverend doctor 
Johnson's favorable opinion of, 538 ; disappointed in 
regard to his income, 566 ; his salary increased, 592; 



160 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Coo- 



Cooper, rr-vereud ily\es — continued. 

in London, VIII., 290; biographical notice of, 297; 
the mob pays a visit to, 568; receives a pension, 569 ; 
retires to England, 581. 

Cooper, Nicholas, sheriff of Westchester county, tenders an 
oath to quakers, V., 977, 983, 984. 

Cooper, Richard, IV., 936, 1008. 

Cooper, Tliomas, III., 22. 

Cooper, William, founds Cooperstown (New York), VII., 983. 

Cooperstown, Otsego county. New York, founded, VII., 983. 

Coote, sir Cliarles, distinguished by his ferocity in Ireland, 
IV., 851. 

Coote, Nanlan, IV., 851. 

Coote, Richard, son of the earl of Bellomont, IV., 851. 

Cop, Henry Willemsen, commissary at Cape Verd, II., 319. 

Cop a groeu, reverend Mr., II., 72. 

Cope, Alexander, IV., 937, 1007. 

Cope, Henry, commissioner for running the line between 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, VI., 168. 

Cope, lieutenant-colonel, accompanies the expedition against 
the Spaniards, VI., 170. 

Cope, sir John, defeated, VI., 915. 

Copel, sir Henry, member of the board for trade and planta- 
tions, III., siv. 

Copenhagen, surprised by the Swedes, II., 350. 

Copequit, reverend Mr. Gerard, missionary at, X., 70. 

Coply (Copley), colonel, lieutenant-governor of Maryland, 
III., 837, IV., 56, 73 ; bills drawn by him protested, 
74, 84. 

Copper, discovered in New Netherland, I., 148, II., 63; 
taken aboard a Spanish prize brought to New Neth- 
erland, 29 ; in Acadia, IV., 311 ; exported from 
New York, V., 462; in large quantities near lake 
Superior, VIII., 141 ; sent from lake Superior to 
France, IX., 344. (See Mine.) 

Copperas, brought to New Amsterdam, II., 30. 

Copyright granted to Adriaen Van der Donck, I., 533. 

Coquart, , lieutenant-general of police, transmits an ac- 
count of occurrences in Canada, X., 527. 

Coraghkoo (Corachkoa), the Indian name for the king of 
England, IV., 896, ei seq., V., 800. 

Corbet, Edward, IV., 940. 

Corbet, Miles, one of the judges of Charles I. arrested in 
Holland, and sent for trial to England, II , 417. 

Corbett, Abraham, brought prisoner from New Hampshire to 
Boston, III., 108; imprisoned, 109. 

Corbett, John, III., 585, 593, 652. 

Corbie, the duke de Beaufort present .at the siege of, II., 351. 

Corbiere, , uuder-secretary of state. III., xi. 

Corbifire, lieutenant de, attacks an English fort, X.,530; 
defeats a party of English at Sabbath day point, 591, 
594, 606, 644, 647, 663; in command at fort Fronte- 
nac, 953 ; sent to scout, 975 ; wounded, 1086. 

Corbile (Carboyle, Carfbile,) doctor John, recommended for 
a seat in the council, IV., 396 ; appointed, 411, 424 ; 
a Dutch mountebank, 620; a graduate of Leyden, 726. 

Cordua, Don Gunsalva di, nature of his instructions, I., 48. 

Coreso (Nova Scotia), V., 680. 



Corhaer (Collier, Corlard, Corleir), the governor of New York 
called. III., 322, 395, 438, 445, 483, 484 ; governor 
Andros the first governor of New Y'ork who was 
called, 558, 559. (See Van Curler, Arent.) 

Corlaer's hook (Corlear's hook, Curler's hook), Maryn 
Adriaeusen commissioned to attack the Indians at, 
I., 194 ; Indians massacred at, 195, 196, 197, 200, 209 ; 
Govert Loockermans accompanied the party which 
attacked the Indians at, 345 ; order to Maryn Adriaeu- 
sen to attack the Indians at, 416 ; the Zeehond thrown 
ashore at, II., 654. 

Corlaire, B., IV., 754. 

Cormantyn (Cormantin), fort of, II., 270; Francis Selwin, 
English agent at, 318 ; proposed to be ceded by the 
English, 360, 419. 

Corn, hogs fed on, I., 368. (See Maize.) 

Cornbury, [Edward Hyde,] lord, IV., 396; considered by 
the New York assembly not trustworthy, 777, V., 37; 
appointed governor of New Y'ork, IV., 883, 884, 887; 
munitions to be sent with, 885 ; requests to be em- 
powered to appoint officers of militia in New Jersey 
and Connecticut, 912 ; about to sail for New York, 
913 ; news of his appointment received at New York, 
914, 915 ; the lords of trade remonstr.ate against his 
taking Daniel Honan to New York as secretary, 925 ; 
Informs their lordships that he will dismiss Honan, 
927 ; parties prosecuted in New York for getting up 
an address to, 945, 946, 947; ordered to proclaim 
queen Anne, 948 ; the leislerians report that he is not 
coming to New York, 950, 952 ; arrives in New York, 
955, 958 ; suspends the members of Bellomont's 
council, 959 ; proclaims queen Anne, 960 ; advised of 
the restoration of Mr. Bronghton to his office of attor- 
"ney-general of New Y'ork, 963, and ordered to report 
on the case of Bayard and Hutchins, ibid ; reports 
the state of the public defenses of his government, 
968-971, 1057, and the distracted state of his govern- 
ment, 971 ; holds a conference with the Indians, 974, 
977, 978, 981, 994, 996 ; his plan for expelling the 
French from Canada, 977; related to queen Anne, 
980 ; transmits to England acts passed in New York, 
999, 1064; reports the establishment of the court of 
admiralty in New Y'ork, 1000 ; orders the execution 
of negro slaves for murder, 1001, V., 39 ; capt.ain 
Nanfan complains of, IV., 1002, 1043 ; informs the lords 
of trade that the countess of Bellomont has left New 
York without giving security for any claims the gov- 
ernment may have against her late husband, 1003 ; 
addresses to, 1005, 1009 ; his reasons for suspending 
chief justice Atwood, 1010, and Mr. Weaver, 1012, and 
Messrs. Depeyster and Walters, 1014, and doctor Staats, 
1017 ; ordered to allay feuds of party iu New Y'ork, 
ibid ; his opinion respecting Jacob Leisler, 1018 ; 
sends a copy of Bayard's trial to England, ibid ; 
transmits information as to bills drawn on the trea- 
sury, 1019 ; reports recent events in New Jersey, 1021 ; 
Mr. Atwood's .answer to, 1022 ; Mr. Atwood proposes 
to present articles against, 1023 ; hia removal of Mr, 



-Coe] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



161 



Cornbury, lord — continued. 

Atwood, &o., from the council, confirmed, 1024, 1025 ; 
ordered to report on certain aots passed during the ] 
administrations of lord Bellomont and captain Nan- 
fen, 1026, 1081; advised that lady Bellomont has 
been allowed an extension of the time fixed for her 
appearance, 1028, 1029 ; ordered to discountenance 
retaliation of injuries under former governments, 
1030 ; his plan for taking Canada, referred to the sec- 
retary of state, 1038 ; reports on the progress of affairs 
at New York, 1044 ; governor Nicholson pays a visit 
to, 1050 ; lays the foundation of a stone fort at Albany, 
1053 ; difficulties between the officers of the royal 
navy and, 105 fi ; troubles experienced from the neigh- 
horing provinces by, 1058, 1061 ; complains of cap- 
tain Rogers, 10G2 ; is forbidden to destroy vetoed 
laws, 1066 ; George Clarke connected by marriage 
with, 1069 ; receives a commission as governor of 
New Jersey, ibid ; going to meet the five nations, 
1070; reports the incursions of the French into New 
England, ibid, and the state of lord and lady Bello- 
mont's accounts, 1072, 1090, 1103 ; assumes the gov- 
ernment of New Jersey, 1075 ; plan of, for conquer- 
ing Canada laid before queen Anne, 1079 ; his rejjort 
on lieutenant-governor Nanfan's accounts, 1100 ; diffi- 
culties between collector Byerly and, 1107 ; his report 
on certain acts passed by the assembly of New York, 
1111 ; appoints Roger Mompesson chief justice of 
New York, 1119, V., 69 ; contemplates extending 
post facilities to North Carolina, IV., 1120; called to 
Albany, ibid; the French take his despatches, 1121; 
his views of the rights and powers of colonial assem- 
blies, ibid ; quarrels with and dissolves the assembly 
of New York, 1122 ; reports effects of the proclama- 
tion for settling current rates of coins in the plantations, 
1131, 1132; the merchants of New York petition, to 
suspend proclamation regulating currency, 1133 ; sus- 
pends proclamation, ibid ; issues orders to sea captains 
to sink all public despatches in case of danger, 1136 ; 
appoints a day of thanksgiving for a victory gained 
by the duke of Marlborough, ibid; reports deaths of 
members of the council and appoints William Sloper 
his agent, 1136, 1137; instructed to amend the act 
declaring the illegality of the proceedings against 
colonel Bayard and alderman Hutchins, 1140 ; ordered 
to investigate a charge against Connecticut and Rhode 
Island, 1141 ; recommends the widow of chief justice 
Bridges to the lords of trade, 1142; suspends collec- 
tor Byerly, 1143, V., 264; continuation of his quar- 
rels with the New York assembly, IV., 1145, 1153, 
1165, 1169 ; transmits an account of New York and 
New Jersey, 1145, 1150 ; fits out cruizers, 1148 ; brief 
account of his administration, 1152; will not allow 
lieutenant-governor Ingoldesby to act, 1162, and refu- 
ses to give him any instructions, 1163 ; lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Ingoldesby opens a letter addressed to, 1164; 
orders lieutenant-governor Ingoldesby to Burlington 
(New Jersey), 1165 ; enumerates the titles of acts passed 

21 



by the legislature in 1705, 1167,1108 ; informs secretary 
Hedges of his difficulties with the assemblies of New 
York and New Jersey, 1169; ordered to permit the 
assembly to name its own treasurer, 1172, V., 546; 
ordered to break and return the old provincial seal of 
New York, IV., 1173; informed that collector Byerly 
is restored to office, 1175 ; reminded to sign acts 
passed by the legislature, 1176 ; appointed one of the 
commissioners to review the case of the Mohegan In- 
dians against the colony of Connecticut, 1177, 1178,' 
1179 ; explains the composition of the council of New 
York, 1180 ; transmits the names of the fittest per- 
sons to be members of the council, 1181 ; fortifies the 
city of New York, 1185 ; his difficulties with reverend 
Francis McKemie and John Hampton, presbyterian 
clergymen, 1186, 1187; instructed to reserve all acts 
of an extraordinary and unusual nature, 1188 ; the 
captains of her majesty's ships stationed at New York 
to obey the orders of, 1189 ; letters of the board of 
trade to, V., 1, 5 ; has no right to appoint officers to 
her majesty's ships on the New York station, 4; in- 
struction respecting the presidency of the council 
sent to, 5 ; in New Jersey, 17; reports the appearance 
of French privateers off the coast of America, 20, and 
particulars of an engagement with privateers, ibid, 
21 ; sundry acts repealed on his arrival in New York, 
24 ; the board of trade report on the complaint of Mr. 
Budge against, 26 ; particulars of that complaint, 
27 ; decision of the board adverse to, 28 ; collector 
Byerly complains of, ibid ; Lewis Morris complains of, 
33 ; accused of receiving bribes, 34, 35 ; dresses pub- 
licly in woman's clothes, 38 ; lords of trade transmit 
their opinion on divers points to, 46 ; orders the 
records of West Jersey to be delivered to the secre- 
tary of New Jersey, 47 ; empowered to pardon treason 
and murder, ibid ; never admitted Sampson Brough- 
ton to the office of attorney-general of New York, and 
appoints Mr. Bickley attorney-general, 49 ; orders to 
constitute Sampson Broughton attorney-general, 50 ; 
ought to have done so, 51 ; his report on his govern- 
ments, 55 ; transmitted census of New Y'ork to Eng- 
land, 56 ; adjourns the assembly of New York by 
proclamation signed in New Jersey, 61 ; reports tho 
result of his visit to Albany, 64, and the state of 
Canada, 65 ; transmits an act for preventing the cor- 
ruption of the current coin, 66, 67 ; acted contrary to 
his instructions in assenting to that act, 68 ; agrees to 
a neutrality between the Indians of New York and 
Canada, 74; infiuences lieutenant-governor Ingoldes- 
by , SO ; acts of assembly passed by, sent to England, 82 ; 
most virulent libels embodied in petitions to, 105 ; a 
deputation from New York to go to meet, 106 ; pro- 
nounces Leisler's proceedings a damned rebellion, 
ibid ; suspends members of the council and the chief 
justice and judges of the supreme court, 107 ; de- 
ludes [William Smith] by a brief restitution as o uef 
justice, and recommends doctor Bridges for that 
office, ibid ; suspended chief justice Atwood without 



162 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[COR- 



Cornbury, lord — continued. 

allowiug him to make anj- deft-use, 109 ; becomes earl 
of Clarendon, 154, 535 ; communicates to the assem- 
bly the opinion of the lords of trade in support 
of the right of the council to amend money bUls, 
183 ; consequences of the remonstrance of the New 
Jersey assembly in the time of, 199 ; the act vacating 
governor Fletcher's extravagant grants repealed under, 
284 ; the repealing act vetoed, ibid ; persecutes the 
reverend Thorogood Moore, 319 ; his violence towards 
the dissenters at Jamaica (Long island), 321 ; reve- 
rend Mr. Urquhart inducted into the church there by 
power from, 328; alterations In the terms of the 
courts made by, 409 ; reports the great increase of 
manufactures in New York, 413 ; reverend Mr. Vesey 
did not interfere with government in the time of, 467; 
did nothing towards erecting a fort in the Onondaga 
country, 468; requires those engaged in the whale 
fishing to take out licenses, 474 ; Mr. Fauconier re- 
ceiver-general under, 476 ; Mr. Mulford visits Eng- 
land respecting the whale fishing in the time of, 
510 ; duties ou British goods in his time, 512 ; the 
New York assembly vote an address on the currency 
in the time of, 514 ; Rip Van Dam, member of the 
council of, "VI., 153 ; charged with misapplication of 
the public money, 460. (See Clarendon, 3d Earl of.) 

Combury, lady, the Indians make a present to, IV., 992; re- 
ferred to, 1005 ; memoir of, 1183 ; part of the ex- 
penses attending her funeral paid by grants of land, 
v., 11], 407; reverend Mr. Sharp preaches the 
funeral sermon of, 315. 

Comele, John, IV., 936. 

Cornells, " with one eye," was the first who made a dwell- 
ing on the South river, 1 , 597. (See Mey.) 

Cornells (Cornelisen, Cornellius), Akus, an Indian inter- 
preter, III., 323, 431, 747. (See Akus.) 

Cornells, Maes, IV., 754, 941. 

Cornells, Salomon, IV., 940. 

Cornelisen, WUliam H., III., 6-52. 

Cornelison, William, IV., 605. 

Cornelisse (Cornelisson), Arnout, an Indian interpreter, 
III., 611., IV., 170, 345, 347. (See Arnout; Viele.) ' 

Comelissen, Albert, magistrate of Breuckelen, II., 482, 483. 
(See Wantcnaar.) 

Comelissen, Claes, II., 482. 

Cornelissen, Cniyn, I., 359. 

Comelissen, Hendrick, killed at the Esopus, III., 150. 

Cornelissen, Jan, schoolmaster at New Amsterdam, I., 424. 

Cornelissen, Laurens, refused permission to return to New 
Netherland, I., 165; unable to defend his case 
through fear of Director Kieft's authority, 204, 207 ; 
banished from New Netherland, 211, 427. 

Cornelissen, Margaret, III., 747. 

Cornelissen, Peter, declaration of, as to a conversation with 
Director Kieft, I., 195 ; killed, 497; prevented plant- 
ing on the Schuylkill by the Swedes, 595. 

Cornelius (Cornells), the Mohawk, IV., 758, 897, VI., 15, 
16. 



Cornell, , hard up for money, III., 662. 

Comely, Arien, II., 467. 

Cornille, captain, X., 1088. 

Cornock, Morgan, V., 332. 

Cornwall (Orange county), III., 395; early patentees of 
land in, 716. 

Cornwall county (Maine), III., 402; referred to, 498; un- 
der sir E. Andros' government, 722 ; destroyed, 724 ; 
governor Sloughter about to send a member of the 
council to, 761. 

Cornwall, duchy of, Edward Eliot receiver-general of the, 
VII., 536. 

Cornwell. captain, attends a conference with the Indians, 
v., 786, 791. 

Cornwell (Cornwall), Richard, appointed referee, 672, 695 ; 
resides near Flushing, 685 ; justice, the Dutch gene- 
ral visits governor Lovelace at the house of. III., 201 ; 
forced to resign his patent, 303, 309 ; magistrate of 
Queen's county, IV., 27. 

Cornwallis, [Charles, 3d] lord, member of the privy council, 
IV., 103. 

Cornwallis, [Charles, Sth] lord, member of the privy coun- 
cil, VI., 757. 

Cornwallis, Charles Mann, 2d earl of, sir Henry Clinton 
publishes observations on an answer of, VIII., 717; 
mentioned, 802 ; surrenders, 806, 814 ; biographical 
notice of, 808 ; in Virginia, 812. 

Cornwallis, governor, of Nova Scotia, X., 90, 92; reports 
French intrusions into Nova Scotia, 216 ; notice by 
the French government thereof, 218. 

Cornwallis (Nova Scotia), original name of, X., 108. 

Coroners, the people empowered to elect, V., 82. 

Corporation, for the propagation of the gospel in New Eng- 
land, contribute towards the conversion of the five 
nations, IV., 230; the earl of Bellomont applies for 
some of the money paid by the, 334 ; restricted to 
New England, 455 ; sir William Ashurst, governor 
of, 521 ; referred to, 549, 631 ; some particulars re- 
specting, 717 ; misapplication of the funds of the, 
718 ; names of missionaries in the pay of, 755 ; con- 
sents to pay ministers for the five nations, 766 ; Mr. 
Ashurst active in establishing the, 771 ; the lords of 
trade engaged in negotiations with, 844. 

Corrie, David, sheriff of Suflblk county, V., 929. 

Corriveau, Jean Jacques, a prisoner, X., 711; proposes that 
he be exchanged, 712, 713, 714 ; governor Vaudreuil 
will not consent to his exchange, 715 ; governor Vau- 
dreuil writes to, 716 ; taken prisoner at the battle of 
Lake George, 771 ; parole of, 772 ; permitted to re- 
turn to Canada, 774, 775, 776 ; exchanged, 878. 

Corrman, Barent, IV., 939. 

Corsen (Korsen), Arent, sent to Holland with specimens of 
New Netherland minerals, I., 280 ; obtains a convey- 
ance from the Indians, of their lands on the Schuyl- 
kill, 588, 593, 593 ; mentioned, II., 180. 

Corsen, Jan (John), II., 722; III., 741. 

Corsica, captain Pouchot killed in, X., 668. 

Corsicans, the, a New York military company, VIII., 602. 



-Cot] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



163 



Corstens, Johannes Lorents, naturalized, VI., 118. 

Corstiaenssen, Henrick, I., 11. 

Corteljouw, Jacques, II., 452, 459, 646, 683, 684, 716. 

Cortilliau, Peter, IV., 28. 

Cortisen, a privateer, II., 29, 30. (See Van Campen.) 

Cortland (Courtland) manor, act passed to regulate the 
choice of a representative for, VI., 28 ; privileged to 
elect a member of assembly, 29 ; title of an act re- 
lating to, 118; the furnaces not worked, VII., 335; 
elects a member to the assembly, VIII., 444. 

Cortlandt, Phillip, IV., 1135. 

Cortlandt, R., III., 436. (See Van Cortland.) 

Cortlant, Jacobus, IV., 849. 

Cortois, Jean Baptiste de, a French deserter, VI., 832, 833. 

Corunna, Robert Livingston puts into, IV., 135. 

Corvees (Corvies), in Canada, disapproved of, IX., 276 ; 
whfit, 564; ruinous effects in Canada of, ibid; com- 
muted, 668. 

Corver, J , I., 617. 

Cosby, Mrs., accompanies her husband to New York, V., 
937; Mr. Van Dam solicits an interview with, VI., 
43, 46, 48; Mr. Clarke protects, 47; embarks for Eng- 
land, 65 ; eseeutris, 66 ; a pension proposed for, 76 ; 
well acquainted with young Mr. Morris' behavior, 
81 ; aided to accomplish the suspension of Mr. Van 
Dam, 153. 

Cosby, William, appointed governor of New York and New 
Jersey, V., 930 ; his instructions preparing, 931 ; draft 
of his commission submitted for approval, 932 ; modi- 
flcatious in his instructions, 934; about sailing for 
New York, 935 ; arrives there, 936 ; appoints his son 
secretary of New Jersey, 937 ; charges brought against 
chief justice Morris by, 942, 943 ; demands half the 
salary and perquisites, since the date of liis commis- 
sion, 944, VII., 499, VIII., 250, 258 ; accepts a present 
from the New York assembly to stop a bill in parlia- 
ment, v., 954; transmits the New York acts of 1733 
to England, 956; chief justice Morris transmits to the 
board of trade sundry papers against, 957; univer- 
sally hated, 959 ; minutes of his conference with the 
Indians, 962; letters of the governor of Cape Breton 
to, 970, 971 ; recommends the erection of additional 
forts on the frontier, 972; his letter on receiving Mr. 
Van Dam's articles, 974 ; articles against, 975 ; opinion 
of the council of New York on the articles against, 
979 ; James Alexander opposed to, 982 ; names of the 
members of the council of New York under, 985 ; 
letters to the board of trade from, VI., 4, 19, 20, 24, 27, 
32, 37 ; his reasons for removing Mr. Morris from the 
office of chief justice, 8 ; letters of the lords of trade to, 
16, 35 ; destroys an Indian deed belonging to the city 
of Albany, 16, VIII., 306; Ms complaints against Rip 
Van Dam, James Alexander and others, VI., 21, 34; 
suspends Mr. Van Dam, 24, 45, 46, 47 ; letter of, to the 
duke of Newcastle, 26 ; draft of an additional instruction 
to, 33 ; his reasons for removing chief justice Morris 
pronounced insufficient, 36, 37 ; death of, 42, 44, 46, 
47, 73,87; was prevented by illness from transmitting 



his reasons for suspending Mr. Van Dam, 70; his 
efforts for the encouragement of immigration into 
New York, 72 ; a paper published in New York re- 
flecting on the memory of, ibid ; recommended Messrs. 
Richards and Moore for seats in the council, 119 ; ac- 
counts of the public revenue not sent since the 
death of, 213 ; Mr. de Lancey's ambition the source of 
distraction in the time of, 356 ; practice in voting 
appropriations in the time of, 433 ; Mr. Clark, com- 
mander-in-chief on the death of, 436 ; provision 
made for the support of government for five years 
under, 615, 640, 820 ; probably accompanied to New 
York by Mr. Horsmanden, VII., 528; issues pro- 
posals for the encouragement of settlers in the province 
of New York, 629 ; succeeds president Van Dam, 
VIII., 250 

Cosby, William, junior, appointed secretary of New Jersey, 
v., 937; attends an Indian conference, 963, 966; 
sheriff of New York, 982 ; accused of partiality at 
the New York election, VI., 56. 

Cosby's land, VIII., 122. 

Cosens (Cozens), B., clerk to the council of New York, IV., 
439, 567, 812, V., 56; preparing the journals of 
assembly and minutes of council to be sent to 
England, 1181. 

Cossar, Jacob, III., 75. 

Cost4, Jacques, reports affairs at Louisbourg, X., 66; com- 
mands a number of refugees in Acadia, 171 ; arrives 
at Quebec, 173 ; carries off tliree Englishmen, 174. 

Costebelle, M. de, IX., 779, 831, 859, 930; reports progress 
of affairs at Placentia, 927, 929. 

Costeloga. (See Custalaga.) 

Costenmeal, marquis de, IX., 303. 

Coster, Anthony, IV., 754, 940. 

Coster, Cornelis Cornelissen, II., 101. 

Coster, Jan, III., 75. 

Costurier, Jacques, III., 75. 

Coteau du lac, S., 349. 

Cotterel, sir , master of the ceremonies to Charles II., 

II., 562. 

Cotterel, Robert, ensign in king James II. army in Ireland, 
IV., 781 ; shot for mutiny in New York, ibid. 

Cottington, Francis, lord, secretary of state. III., vii; mem^ 
ber of the privy council, 19. 

Cottis, , deputy-commissary in the continental army, 

VIII., 807. 

Cottomear, captain. III., 745. 

Cotton, sir John Ilinde, baronet, member of the board of 
trade, III., xvi, V., 352, 361. 

Cotton, sir Robert, III., xlx. 

Cotton, Roland, missionary at Sandwich, IV., 755. 

Cotton imported into Holland, I., 62; to bo imported into 
New Netherland from Brazil, 155 ; exported from the 
West Indies, 437; on the way to New England, II., 
662 ; cultivated in Virginia, 742 ; one of the chief 
staples of the Leeward islands, IV., 1133 ; imported 
into New York from St. Thomas, V., 686. 

Cottrell, Stephen, clerk of the privy councO, VIII. , 89, 91, 418. 



164 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cot— 



Cotts, Richard, II., C63, C64. 

Couagne (Coagne), M. de, VII., 234; at Detroit, 7 

Couclierouclieotacha, sent from Canada with a i 

the Mohawks, IX., 671; returns from the Mohawks, 

Coui island, near Cataracoui, X., 351. 

Conlange, M. de, winters on the upper Ottawa, IX., 594; his 
fort besieged, 595 ; brother-in-law of M. de Vaadreuil, 
778 ; a tract of land refused to his widow, ibid. 
Conlon, captain, commands a detachment in Acadia, X., 64; 
news from, 69 ; to prevent the English making new 
settlements in Acadia, 70 ; atMinas, 71. (See Villiers.) 
Coulonge river, IX., 595. (See Coulange.) 
Coulonnerie. (See RicherviiU.) 

Council, colonial, order approving instruction regulating the 

presidency of the, V., 3; the instruction, 5 ; a mere 

cypher in proprietary governments, 255; governors 

not to sit and vote as members of the, VI., 41. 

Connecticut, names of the members of the, in 1700, 

IV., 613. 
of finance (a), established in France, X., vii. 
Maryland, names of the members of, II., 94, III., 347. 
Massachusetts, number of members composing, V., 596 ; 

how chosen, ibid. 
New England, powers of the, lU., 538, 544; names of 

the, 543. 
New Hampshire, number composing the, V., 595. 
New Netherland, names of the, I., 43, 81, 350 ; agents 
ofthepatroons to be members of, 99 ; to consist of four 
or five members, 152; powers of, 154 ; the twelve men 
complain of the small number of, 202 ; particulars re- 
specting the persons composing the, 304, 307, 308, 
o, ; director Kieft had two votes in, 334; proposed 
modification of, 390, 392 ; powers of the dli-ector and, 
405 ; an armed force eject vice-director van Dinckla- 
gen from, 456 ; composition of, 491, 529 ; number of, 
495 ; director Stuyvesant canes a member of the, II., 
152 ; minutes of the, for 1673, 1674, 569 ; Cornelius 
Steeuwyck appointed a member of the, 610. 
New Jersey, the, ditficuUies experienced by governor 
Hunter from, V., 199 ; titles of bills rejected by, 199-, 
200, 201; alterations in, recommended, 204; neces- 
sity of appointing new members to, 355 ; changes in, 
361, C98 ; David Lyell appointed to, 402, 411 ; names 
of gentlemen recommended for seats in, 420, 471 ; 
appointments to, 511; number of members in, 602; 
v;.'- ncies in, 919, 920 ; changes recommended in, VI., 
35, 36 ; issue protections, 346 ; Peter Kemble, presi- 
dent of, VIII., 247. 
New York, governor Andros to choose a, III., 218 ; 
number of members composing, 260 ; names of gover- 
nor Dongan's, 331, 369, 416 ; copy of the journal of 
the, to be transmitted to England, 371 ; to consist of 
seven members, 377, 623, 828 ; powers of the, 378, 
624, 654, 828 ; Isaac Swinton, clerk to the, 407 ; pass 
an act taxing real estate, 476 ; advise lieutenant-gov- 
ernor Nicholson to proceed to England, 585 ; send an 
account of lieutenant-governor Leisler's proceedings 



to England, 633 ; members of lieutenant-governor 
Leisler's, 636, 657, 679, 684, 703 ; lieutenant-governor 
Leisler converts his committee of safety into a, 676 ; 
names of governor Sloughter's, 685 ; quorum of, ibid, 
IV., 267, 284, v., 392 ; names of the, under lieuten- 
ant-governor Ingoldesby, III., 793, 800, 813, 814 ; 
members of governor Fletcher's, 818 ; write to Mr. 
Blathwayt, 836 ; Messrs. Dudley and Pinhorne sus- 
pended from the, 848 ; letter to the lords of trade 
from, IV., 245 ; quorum of, 267, 284; names of lord 
Bellomont's, 284; mostly merchants and therefore 
not disposed to enforce the acts of trade, 303 ; William 
NicoU suspended from, 309 ; governor Fletcher cor- 
rupts the members of, 320 ; suspension of members 
of, 321, 354, 363, 386, 389, 395, 398, 424; the earl of 
Bellomont empowered to suspend members of, 361 ; 
new members for, recommended, 396 ; nominated, 
399; changes in, 424; mostly intere.sted in the ad- 
ventures of pirates, 459 ; minutes of, seldom read, 
467 ; equally divided on the bill for vacating governor 
Fletcher's extravagant grants, 510 ; James Graham 
sworn into the, 511 ; Ducy Hungerford recommended 
for a seat in, 517; Robert "Walters sworn into, 518; 
the clerk of, a sot, 520 ; David Jamison charged with 
having altered the minutes of, ibid ; minutes of, sent 
to England, 533, 592, 600, 611, 647, 726, 796 ; reve- 
rend Mr. Dellius cited before the, 534; the earl of 
Bellomont required to send a list of tlie members of, 
549 ; reverse a judgment pronounced by a previous 
governor and council, 550 ; names of the members of, 
suspended and appointed by the earl of Bellomont, 
620; military captains proposed to be members of, 
702 ; proprietors of extensive gi-auts of land form the 
majority of, 725 ; contest for the presidency of the, 
777 ; number of the members of, in 1700, 834 ; names 
of the members of, in 1701, 849 ; difiiculties in, con- 
sequent on the earl of Bellomont's death, 850, 857, 
865, 867; names of lieutenant-governor Nanfan's, 
943 ; Messrs. Atwood, Weaver, Abram Depeyster, S. 
Staats and Walters removed from, 959, 1024 ; their 
right to amend a money bill denied, 1122, 1147, 1153, 
v., 183, 191, 263; death of old, and appointment of 
new members of, IV., 1136, 1137; ought to have a 
right to amend money bills, 1139 ; appointment of new 
members to, approved, 1156 ; not to be allowed the 
privileges of the house of lords, 1172 ; names of the 
members of, in 1706, 1178, 1180 ; names of the fittest 
persons to be members of, transmitted to England, 
1181 ; colonel Peartree appointed a member of, V., 
1 ; their report on pressing men for his majesty's 
ships of war, 102 ; no grants of land to be made by 
the president of, 110 ; William Peartree dismissed and 
doctor Staats and Robert Walters reiippointed to, 123 ; 
names of governor Hunter's, 124 ; members of, not to 
be absent over two years without leave, 126 ; David 
Provoost and Robert Walters sworn of, 167 ; the board 
of trade support the pretensions of, 184 ; address of, 
to the board of trade complaining of the course pur- 



-Cou] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



165 



Council (New York) — continued. 

sued by the assembly, 292 ; the board of trade desire 
the names of the members of, 413 ; George Clarke 
recommended for a seat in, 419, 420, 471 ; doctor 
John Johnson recommended for a seat in, 437, 471 ; 
supernumerary members recommended for, 437 ; 
names of the members of, in 1715, 458 ; names of 
persons recommended for seats in, 459 ; number of 
members of, limited, 471, 836 ; Peter Schuyler, pre- 
sident of, 531 ; Francis Harrison appointed to, 537 ; 
the members paid whilst attending in a legislative 
capacity, 552 ; changes recommended by governor 
Burnet in, 579, 584; number of members in, 600; 
Cadwallader Colden and James Alexander recom- 
mended for seats in, 647 ; Abraham Van Horn recom- 
mended for a seat in, 649; changes in, 697; Philip 
Livingston recommended for a seat in, 713; appoint- 
ed, 772; reasons offered by Cadwallader Colden in, 
against the bill for the easier partition of lands held 
in common, 807, Lewis Morris, junior, suspended 
from, 881 ; PhiliiJ Courtland recommended for a seat 
in, 882 ; the governor sits and votes as a member of, 
886 ; bad effect of such practice, 887 ; Henry Lane 
recommended for a seat in, 919, 920, 938 ; minute of, 
appointing James de Lancey chief justice of New York, 
951 ; all the members ol^ are officers of government, 
ibid ; form part of the legislature, 976 ; their observa- 
tions on the articles presented by Mr. Van Dam against 
governor Cosby, 979 ; names of the members of, in 
1739, 985 ; changes recommended in, VI., 24, 35, 36 ; 
when acting in a legislative capacity the governor sits 
with the, 56 ^ certain members of, attend an Indian 
conference, 99 ; Messrs. Richards, Moore .ind Bradley 
recommended for seats in the, 119 ; George Clarke, 
junior, appointed member of the, 129 ; members of, 
in 1739, 152 ; Mr. Clarke resigns his seat in the, 270 ; 
captain Rutherford appointed to, 271,272; Jeremiah 
Van Renselaer appointed to, 277 ; proceedings of, on 
the printing of governor Clinton's treaty with the five 
nations, 316, 330; Mr. Colden's letter on the pro- 
ceedings in, 331 ; Mr. Holland recommended for a 
seat in the, 407 ; Messrs. Horsmanden and Bayard 
suspended from the, 408 ; names of the anti-Clinton 
faction in, 413 ; character of the majority of the, 671 ; 
. a committee of, appointed to inquire into the circum- 
stances attending sir Danvers Osborn's death, 804; 
Benjamin Pratt appointed to, VII., 464; Charles 
Apthorp appointed to the, 623 ; resolve that no ap- 
peal except in error be allowed, 696 ; names of sir 
Henry Moore's, 763 ; their resolution respecting the 
stamps, 768 ; limited to twelve in number, and few 
attend, 916 ; maintain the precedency of the civil 
over the military authority, VIII., 16; lord Stirling 
resigns his seat in, 60 ; William Smith, junior, called 
to, 62 ; Hugh Wallace and James de Lancey called to, 
109 ; Henry White called to, 139, 156; Hugh Wallace 
sworn into, and James de Lancey refuses a seat in, 
148 ; Henry White sworn into, 149 ; amend the act 



excluding judges from seats in the assembly, 207 ; 
Henry Cruger desires to resign his seat in, 296; 
Oliver de Lancey and Henry White, members of, 
304 ; the death of sir William Johnson occasions a 
vacancy in, 485 ; sir John Johnson asks to be aijpoint- 
ed to a seat in, 494 ; John Watts and Roger Morris 
appointed to, 590 ; members of, in 1776, 685. 
Plymouth, obtain a grant of a certain portion of America, 
IV., 475 ; obtain agrant of New England, V., 594, 596. 
privy, report on the province of New York made to 

the, VI., 614; letter of the board of trade to, 754. 
Quebec, their letter to the commissioners of New 
England, IX., 5 ; names of the members of the, in 
1651, 6; edict organizing, 7; names of the members 
of the, in 1665, 36 ; how composed, 86 ; recall the 
French traders among the Indians, 133 ; count de 
Frontenac ill-treats some members of the, 156. 
(Virginia), number of the members of, V., 606. 

Council of state (England), secret resolution of the states 
general on the answers to the thirty-six articles of 
the, I., 475; their answer to the proposal of the 
Dutch for free trade and the settlement of the boun- 
dary in America, 486 ; lord Lisle president of, 487. 

Council of state (Holland), resolution of the, in favor of sir 
Thomas Dale, I., 19. 

Counterfeiting, one Ludlow, a merchant, convicted of clip- 
ping and coining, IV., 520. 

Counties, a law passed to divide the province of New York 
into, III., 355 ; in 1739, number of the, VI., 155 ; in 
1774, names of, VIII., 441, 445. 

Countries, new, resolution in favor of those who discover, 
I., 4; a general charter for those who discover, 5 ; 
discolored by Cornells Jacobse Mey, 24. 

County courts. (See Courts.) 

Coupel, lieutenant, wounded, X., 1085. 

Couper, John, II., 657. 

Courand, John, under-secretary of state. III., si. 

Courcelles (Coarsell, Corsell, Coursell, Courzelle), Daniel de 
Remy de, governor of Canada, III., 118, IX., vii ; an 
account of his expedition against the Mohawks, III., 
118, 119, 126, IX., 46, 79, 86 ; titles of, 122, 126, 135, 
IX., 45 ; returns thanks for attentions his men re- 
ceived at Albany, IIL, 127; mentioned, 130, 132, 
156 ; governor Nicolls remonstrates against the ex- 
pedition under, 133 ; M. de Tracy explains to gov- 
ernor Nicolls, the expedition of, 152 ; appointed in 
the place of M. de M6zy, IX., 19, 25, 785; Mr. 
Talon bears testimony to the zeal of, 35 ; returns 
from the expedition against the Mohawks, 56 ; or- 
dered to undertake a new expedition against the 
Iroquois, 58 ; informed that the trade to Canada is 
opened, 61 ; to encourage early marriages, 63 ; in- 
structed to organize the militia, 69, 71; does not 
find it convenient to make a journey into the Iroquois 
country, 70 ; about to return to France, 89 ; returns 
there, 90; reference to his expedition against the 



166 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cotj- 



Courcelles, Daniel de Reray de — continued. 

Mohawks, 146; visits Kataraqui, 381; obliged the 
Iroquois to sue for peace, 702 ; extracts from letters 
to, aud from, 788, 790, 791. 

Courcy d'HercuUes, M. de, a volunteer recommended for 
promotion, X., 372. 

Coureurs du bois, what, IV., 715, 749 ; regulations regard- 
ing, IX., 65 ; evils anticipated from, 90 ; to be broken 
up, 128 ; intendant Duchesneau complains of, 131 ; 
prosecuted, 141 ; an amnesty granted to, 145 ; of two 
sorts, 152; allowed to settle at the mouth of the 
Mississippi, 735. 

Coumoyer (Coenoyer), lieutenant, at the siege of Niagara, 
X., 977, 979 ; on a reconnoisance, 983 ; signs the cap- 
itulation, 992. 

Coui-se, Barren, III., 75. 

Coursey (Courcy), colonel Henry, member of the council of 
Maryland, II., 91 ; conducts Messrs. Heermans and 
Waldron towards secretary Calvert, 92 ; ambassador 
from Maryland to New York, III., 256, 321, 322, 323, 
324, 325 ; commissioned to treat with the Susque- 
hannas, IX., 227. 

Court, Wells, III., 109. 

Court of admiralty (England), confirms governor Colve's 
decision in regard to prizes, III , 233 ; officers of the, 
to be commissioned for the plantations, IV., 292. 
Massachusetts, recommended to be organized. III., 67; 
no cases before, IV., 885; Mr. Atwood treated with 
indignity in Boston whilst acting as judge of, 930 ; 
Mr. Newton judge of, 1109 ; colonel Byfield judge of, 
1116. 
New York, explanation of its jurisdiction in the duke 
of York's territories. III., 239; how appointed, 260; 
warrant to appoint officers of, in New York, 268 ; the 
governor of New York empowered to erect, 380, 626, 
830, IV., 270; condemns a Dutch dogger, 408; the 
officers of, appointed by the crown, IV., 28; governor 
Fletcher applies for power to appoint a judge, register 
and marshal of the court of, 112 ; condemns the ship 
Fortune, 323, 460 ; asserts jurisdiction over the Jer- 
seys, 332 ; sends for pirates to New Jersey, 359 ; con- 
demns pirates' goods, 389 ; ship Elizabeth libeled 
in the, 461 ; William Smith judge of the, 535, 868 ; 
pirates to be tried in the, 594 ; the chief justice to 
act as judge of, 599 ; mode of proceeding in the court 
of, 828 ; judge Atwood's report on, 886 ; particulars 
respecting the establi.-ihment of, 1000 ; judge Mom- 
pesson's report on, 1116 ; Roger Mompesson, judge 
of the, v., 69, 423; colonel Quarj' judge of the, 199 ; 
Caleb Heathcote judge of the, 584 ; minute of a cause 
tried in, VI., 154; Mr. Morris, judge of, VII., 455; 
appeals from, where lying, VIII., 445; officers of, 
455. 
Pennsylvania, colonel Quary judge of the, IV., 543, 

665, v., 199. 
Rhode Island sets up a, IV., 334. 
of appeals. (See Appeals.) 



Comt of assize. New York, II., 681, 685; fixes a time for bring- 
ing in ground briefs. III., 143 ; exercised legislative 
powers, 188 ; empowered to redress grievances, 230 ; 
informed of governor Andros' intended departure for 
England, 256 ; sends William Dyre, collector of New 
York, prisoner to England, 287 ; proceedings in the, 
28S, 289 ; how often it sits, 304; abolished, 389, 657. 

of chancery, New Jersey, the people of, groan for a, V., 
355 ; Mr. Morris presides in, 947. 

of chancery. New Y'ork, the composition and juris- 
diction of. III., 389, IV., 28 ; much needed, 721 ; none 
established, 829 ; the erection of, demanded, 834 ; 
difficulties of holding a, referred to, 844 ; ordered to 
be held, 882 ; chief justice Atwood helps towards 
settling a, 885 ; ordered to be established, 914, 929 ; 
governor Hunter pelted with petitions for a, V., 208; 
the governor empowered to erect a;- 252 ; the assem- 
bly declare it established contrary to law, 295, 298, 
330, 359, v., 946; not without precedent, IV., 296; 
the resolution of the assembly on the erection of, 
censured, 333; the people find ease and relief 
from the, 355 ; proceedings for the recovery of quit 
rents commenced in, 357; quit rents collected by 
means of the, 499 ; the assembly pass resolutions 
against, 844 ; governor Burnet publishes an answer to 
those resolutions, 847 ; why the people are prejudiced 
against the, 848, V., 947; the governor and council 
constitute the, 857; governor Montgomerie recom- 
mends a change in the constitution of the, 858 ; its 
constitutionality questioned, IV., 874; governor Mont- 
gomery will not act as chancellor in, 875 ; Lewis 
Morris' review of the controversy respecting the, 883 ; 
governor Montgomerie will hold a, 897; governor 
Hunter held a, 930 ; president Van Dam ordered to 
continue, 931 ; the governor, chancellor of, 947 ; 
delays of, complained of, VI., 4 ; a bill to vacate a 
land patent brought into the 30 ; speech of Lewis Morris, 
junior, against, published, 49 ; president Clarke takes 
the oath as chancellor, 64 ; William Smith clerk in 
the, VII., 909!; Goldsborow Banyar, register of, VIII , 
188; Robert R. Livingston, chancellor of, 192; a 
master of the rolls proposed to be appointed for, 397 ; 
practice of, the same as in England, 444. 

circuit, New York, by whom held, V., 944 ; strange 
conduct of Lewis Morris at, VI., 9; provision for 
holding, 10; go annually through the counties, VIII., 
444. 

of common pleas, in each county in the province of New 
York, IV., 26; jm-lsdiction of the, 28, VIII., 444; 
George Duncan Ludlow, judge of, 2J8. 

of equity, erected by ordinance in the supreme court of 
New York, V., 976; controversy respecting the power 
of the supreme court to try causes as a, VI., 5. 

of exchequer, established in New York, III., 390; Mr. 
Santen accused of scandalizing the court of, 499 ; 
erected by lieutenant-governor Leisler, 683 ; autho- 
rized, 688, 821, IV., 287; reason why it cannot be 
held, 442 ; none in New York, 847 ; governor Cosby 



-Cou] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



167 



Court (of exchequer) — continued. 

sues Mr. Van Dam in the, V., 944; controversy re- 
specting, ibid, et seq. ; views of the judges of New 
York on the subject of the, 952 ; necessity for a, in 
New York, VI., 4; in Barbadoes, 6; establislied in 
effect in New York, 215 ; absolutely necessary in New 
York, VII., 827; not to be hastily established in New 
York, 845. 

of Holland, the, ordered to prepare a judgment in the 
case of Blommaert and others against Van Renselaer, 
I., 330 ; judgment in the case of Blommaert and others 
against Van Renselaer, pronounced by, 406. 

justices', New York, for determining causes of forty 
shillings and under, VI., 117; empowered to try 
causes to the value of five pounds, VII., 342 ; reasons 
in favor of, 427 ; their jurisdiction in civil suits ex- 
tended, VIII., 167; powers of the, 445. 

martial, at Albany, IV., 28; proceedings of the, upon 
the Schenectady deserters, 162. 

mayor's. New York, III., 18S ; power of, IV., 26, 28. 

oyer and terminer, erected. III., 389 ; try Jacob Leisler 
and Jacob Milborne, 760, which convicts them, 762 ; 
constituted by lieutenant-governor Leisler, 765 ; held 
illegally at Albany, IV., 428, 454 ; the council consent 
thereto, 520. 

palatine, lord Baltimore vested with a jurisdiction of, 
v., 605. 

prerogative, New York, jurisdiction of, IV., 28, VII., 
830, VIII., 445 ; Philip Livingston, junior, applies for 
the oifice of princip.^l surrogate of, 187 ; Goldsboro 
Banyar appointed register of, 188 ; contesting claims 
to the registership of, 322 ; account of its rise, 324 ; de- 
cision of the lords of trade on the registership of, 413. 

sessions. New York, by whom held. III., 188, 389; 
how often it sits, 304 ; about meeting at Albany, 481 ; 
by whom held, IV., 26 ; powers of the, 28. 

superior, Massachusetts, procedure of, IV., 930. 

supreme. New Jersey, the, Daniel Coxe associate judge 
of, v., 204; constitution of, 208; William Trent, 
cliief justice of, 705. 

supreme. New York, William Pinhorne justice of, III., 
716, IV., 37; the, justices of, in 1693, 25; juris- 
diction of, 28, 923 ; Leisler's adherents prosecuted 
before, 218, 219 ; the commissioners of the revenue 
obtain judgment against Mr. Van Sweeten in, 397 ; 
number of its terms in the year, 442 ; collector Hun- 
gerford refuses to submit to a judgment of, 664 ; by 
whom to be held, 683 ; Abraham de Peyster, judge 
of, 777 ; chief justice Atwood preparing to hold a ses- 
sion of, 885 ; a special session of, recommended, 
886 ; doctor Bridges appointed chief justice of, 1071 ; 
lord Cornbury suspends the chief justice and judges 
of, v., 107; the assembly endeavors to weaken, 844; 
salaries of the judges of, 877, 878 ; salaries of the 
judges of, reduced, 880; judges of, in 1732, 942; 
holds four terms a year in the city of New York, VI., 
10 ; salary of the chief justice of, 434 ; John Cham- 
bers second judge of, 728 ; the same as the king's 



I bench, VII., 427 ; Mr. de Lancey, chief justice of, 

dead, 441 ; office of chief justice of, vacant, 444 ; 
judge Chambers asks to be appointed chief justice of, 
445 ; judges of, to be commissioned during good be- 
havior, 466 ; lieutenant-governor Colden's objections 
to that law, 467 ; conflicting practice in the commis- 
sioning of judges of, 468 ; cases decided by, carried 
up by writ of error, 677 (see Appeals) ; the clerk of, 
sued for refusing to affix the seal to a writ of execu- 
tion, 684 ; JLLstices of, in 1765, 700 ; number of causes 
in which appeals have been sued out from the judg- 
ments of, 707 : Robert R. Livingston, one of the 
judges of, 791, VIII., 319 ; William Smith appointed 
justice of, VII., 909 ; not to take cognizance of 
suits for sums below fifty pounds, VIII., 167 ; judges 
of, declared incapable of sitting as members of the 
assembly, 192 ; Mr. Ludlow appointed judge of, 248 ; 
judges of, in 1773, 456 ; in session at Johnstown when 
sir William Johnson died, 480 ; Whitehead Hicks 
appointed judge of the, 594 ; Thomas Jones, judge 
of, 685. (See Courts.) 
Courts, Canadian, officers of, X., 271, 272, 273, 274. 

New Netherland, recommended to be established, I., 
390 ; provision for appeal from patroons, 404 ; vice- 
director Dincklagen forcibly removed from the, 
439 ; erected in Fort Orange, 523 ; recommended to 
be increased, 555 ; at the South river, Adrian Van 
Tienhoven, clerk of the, 602 ; at the South river, 
constitution of the, 621, 631 ; organization and pow- 
ers of, II., 172, 580, 620, 621; provision in the ar-. 
tides of capitulation, respecting the judgments of the, 
251 ; of Fort Orange and Rensselaerswyck, clerks of 
the, 372 ; established at the South river, list of the, 
605 ; appeals from town courts, lie to, 704 (see Ap- 
peals) ; proceedings of the, 683, 684, 687, 689, 691, 
693, 695, 698, 703, 719, 721, et seq. 
New York, by whom held. III., 188 ; in 1677, 260; pro- 
vision for the erection of, 333, 539, 625, 626, 829, 857, 
IV., 268, v., 94, 132, 252, 295, 394, 837, 883; an 
act passed for settling. III., 355 ; enumeration of the 
several, 389 ; limitation to the erection of, 687, 820, 
IV., 287, 428, 548, V., 131; established by sir E. 
Aridros, IIL, 723 ; enumeration of, in 1696, IV., 186 ; 
cannot be established by the king on his sole authori- 
ty, 515 ; report on the proceedings of, 827 ; strangely 
managed, 830 ; for the trial of small causes, re- 
commended to be established, V., 132 ; governor Hun- 
ter ordered to transmit a report on, 283 ; chief justice 
Mompesson's report on the common law, 409 ; no 
new ones erected in governor Burnet's time, 778 ; an 
attempt made to establish them by act of assembly, 
VII., 462 ; what laws regulate the proceedings of, 
480 ; necessity of admitting the evidence of Indians 
in, 663, 668 ; chief justice Hale's description of the 
English county courts, applied to, 697 ; state of, re- 
ported to the earl of Halifax, 760 ; retrospect of the 
history of appeals from, 762 ; closed in consequence 
of the passage of the stamp act, 802, 806. 



168 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cor— 



Courts — conlinued. 

Massachusetts, closed, VIII., 567. 

Pennsylvania, colonel Quart's report on the, IV., 1045. 

in Virginia, 1719, V., 609. 

Courteen, Mendert, under sentence of death, IV., 55 ; men- 
tioned, 83. 

Courtemanclie (Cortemansche), captain, sent to recall 
coureurs du bois from the western country, IV., 782; 
at Otawawa, 894 ; in the attack at Cajjcobay, IX., 472 ; 
sent to the Hurons and western Indians, 496 ; pro- 
ceeds to MichiUmakinac, 516, 712, 713; on an expe- 
dition against the Mohawks, 550, 557, 558 ; protects 
the wounded, 561 ; sent to the Illinois, 569 ; com- 
mands at the river St. Joseph and defeats a party of 
Iroquois, 603 ; subject to the orders of the com- 
mandant of MichiUmakinac, 625 ; recommended for 
a company, 714 ; sent to invite the western nations 
to send deputies to Quebec, 722 ; envoy to Boston, 

Courtemanche, M. de, at the siege of fort William Henry, X., 
621; commands a party of Indians at Ticonderoga, 811; 
sent with a detachment to the neighborhood of fort 
Edward, 848 ; his report, 819 ; sent to the island of 
Orleans, 994, 1018 ; retires before the English, 995, 
1019. 

Courtemanche, Croisille de. (See Croissilh.) 

Courtin, Antoiue, French ambassador extraordinary to Eng- 
\a.nd, memoir of, II., 336; reports Charles II. indis- 
posed to a peace, 340 ; paj's a visit to Mr. Van Gogh, 
356; opinions of, 357; sets out for Oxford, 360. 

Courval, captain, his services at the siege of Quebec, S., 
1000. I 

Courval, Miss de, resembles Louis XV., IX., 1028. j 

Cousseau, Jacques, II., 249, 253, 413, III., 75, 130, 178, 
179. I 

Cousseau, Miss, III., 130. 

Coustrier, Isaacq, II., 250. 

Cousturier, Henry, III., 71. 

Coutakilmy, his death condoled, IX., 675. 

Couterier, David, II., 752. 

Coutey, Jacob, II., 191. 

Coutrie, Daniel de Honde, III,, 75. 

Cousture, M., sent to Albany with letters from governor 
Tracy, III., 133, 134, 153; mentioned, 157; an Indi- 
an trader, IX., 214; visits Hudson's bay, 268, 304, 
784. 

Couturier, M., brings letters to governor Burnet from the 
Duke of Newcastle, v., 710 ; Indians taken from, sent 
to the West Indies, 711. 
Contzer (Bautzer), George, IV., 937. 

[Conwenhoven,] Gerrit Wolphertse van, one of the eight 
men, I., 140, 191, 192, 213; signs a petition, 417; 
Elbert Elbertzen, marries the widow of, 432. 
Couwenhoven (Wolfersen, Van Kouwenhoven), .Jacob, signs 
the certificate of election of the eight men, I., 192, 
193 ; a delegate to HolLand from the people of New 
Netherland, 258, 261, 270, 318, 319, 397, 476 ; analy- 



sis of a remonstrance delivered by, 331 ; church- 
warden, 340, 424 ; his father and brothers conveyed 
to New Netherland free of expense, 343 ; at the Man- 
hattans, 353, 356 ; and others, enter into a contract to 
convey immigrants to New Netherland, 379, 380 ; at 
the Hague, 399 ; petitions the states general, 417 ; re- 
turns to New Netherland, 420, 447, 448 ; mentioned, 
421, 441, 499, 503 ; particulars of, 431 ; brother of 
Gerrit Wolphertsen, and brother-in-law of Govert 
Lookermans, 432 ; director Stuyvesant refuses to 
leave guns for the militia in the hands of, 438 ; ex- 
tract of a letter on public affairs from, 445, 416 ; 
complains that the guns he had brought for the mili- 
tia have been given to Indians, 449 ; director Stuyve- 
sant sells to Indians gnns brought over by, 455 ; 
director Stuyvesant charged with crnel behavior to- 
wards, II., 151 ; signs the petition urging director 
Stuyvesant to surrender to the English, 250. 

Couwenhoven, JolmVan, III., 77; member of Leisler's coun- 
cil, 679, 684 ; member of the coui-t of exchequer, 683. 

Couwenhoven, Mr., II., 152. (See Gerritsen ; Wolfersen.) 

Couwenhoven, Pieter. (See Wolfersen.) 

Covenants for the palatines' residence and employment in 
New York, drafts of, V., 121. 

Coventrie, sir Thomas, ordered to make out a patent of in- 
corporation for the colony of the north part of Vir 
ginia. III., 4. 

Coventry, [Gilbert, 4th] earl of, member of the privy coun- 
cil, v., 539. 

Coventry, Henry, memoir of, II., 564; secretary of state, 
• 565, 733; III., vii, 229, 257. 

Coventry, sir William, knight, one of the council of trade, 
III., 31, 33, 48 ; Mr. Maverick writes to, 65, 66 ; secre- 
tary to the duke of York, 103, 106, 114; knighted, 
160, 161 ; one of the council of state, 177. 

Coward, Hugh, IV., 1144. 

Cowbay (Long island), II., 145. 

Cow boys, the Westchester loyalists called, VII., 402. 

Cowen, Moses, VII., 902. 

Cowes, III., 19, IV., 915, 916. 

Cowessit, sir Robert Carr applies for a tract of land in Rhode 
Island, called. III., 109. 

Cowneck, Mr. NicoU resides at, IIL, 662. 

Cows, the sale of English, forbidden in New Netherland, I., 
203; thrive in New Netherland, 277; need not be 
sent to New Netherland, 362; furnished to farmers in 
New Netherland, 371 ; not to be exported from New 
Netherland, 382, 383 ; number of, on the Delaware in 
1663, II., 210; purchased in New England, 433; 
seized by the English, 438 ; scarce in New Netherland, 
768; at fort Duquesne, X., 300. (See Cattle.) 

Cox, George, junior, IV., 937, 1008. 

Cox, Samuel, V., 420. 

Cox, Richard, one of the ablest statesmen Ireland ever pro- 
duced, VIII., 803. 

Cox, Thomas, III., 652; conveys lands in New Jersey to sir 
Eugenius Cameron, V., 758. 



— Cee] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



169 



Cox, William, III., 425, 602; drowned, 617. 
Coxboro, Oneida county. New York, TIL, 926. 
Coxe, Daniel, III., 652; sells his interest in West Jersey, 
838 ; proprietor and for some years governor of West 
Jersey, 839, V., 204; agent for New Jersey, IV., 105 ; 
Jolin Tabor Kempe marries a daughter, VII., 926. 
Coxe, Daniel, junior, recommended for a seat in the coun- 
cils of New York and New Jersey, IV., 965 ; objec- 
tions to, 966; his removal from the council of New 
Jersey recommended, v., 204; biographical notice of, 
ibid ; his character, 335, 338 ; about to go to England, 
355; removed from the council of New Jersey, 361; 
elected to the assembly of New Jersey, 399, 404; a 
noisy fool, 401 ; creates confusions in New Jersey, 
417 ; governor Hunter knows nothing of, 420 ; effects 
of the evil example of, 481 ; writes that New Jersey 
is to be put under a separate government, 482 ; com- 
plains against governor Hunter, 483 ; licenses for 
whale fishing issued during his residence in the colo- 
nies, 498; the New Jersey legislature insulted by, 
508 ; a common disturber, 510 ; the hearing of his 
case postponed, 513; has had a hearing in council, 
521 ; the sheriff of Burlington favors his election, 767. 
Cose, Daniel, VI., 345 ; chairman of the board of refugees, 

VII., 926. 
Coxe, Grace, wife of John Tabor Kempe, VII., 926. 
Coxe, Rebecca, VII., 926. 
Coxe, William, VII., 926. 

Coshaukee, petition of the inhabitants of, VI., 391. 
Coxhill, John, member of governor Andros' council, III., 

543. 
Cox's manor (New York), VII., 926. 
Coyler, Caspar, VI., 392. 
Coyman, Balthy Jan, I., 437. 
Craacke bay, II., 45. 
Craay, Tenuis, II., 463. 
Crabb, Theodore, X., 883. 
Crabbe, Jacob, II., 104. 
Cracos, I., 506. 
Cracy, Emanuel, X., 593. 

Cradock, , III., 271. 

Craence, sergeant, IV., 946. 

Craf, , X., 592. 

Crafton, ensign George, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 730. 
Craggs, James, secretary of state. III., ix ; letters of the 
lords of trade to, V., 535 ; notifies the appointment 
of William Burnett to be governor of New York, 536 ; 
an order to prevent the dissolution of the New York 
assembly signified to, 537; member of the privy 
council, 539 ; frustrates the plan of calling a new 
assembly in New York, 578 ; governor Burnet's appli- 
cation for presents for the Indians transmitted to, 
VI., 157. 
Craig, Andrew, VII., 983. 
Craig, reverend Mr., VII., 496. 
Grain, Louis, I., 191. 

Cramah6 (Cramahie), Hector T., lieutenant-governor of 
Quebec, VIII., 312, 718. 
22 



Cramprich, Mr., ambassador from the emperor to the states 

general, II., 534. 
Crance, commissary Dubois de, taken prisoner, X., 357, 392. 
Crane, Jasper, II., 582. 
Cranfield, Edward, appointed governor of New Hampshire, 

v., 594. 
Cranfield, [Lionel, 1st] lord, member of the privy council, 

IIL, 5, 7. 
Cranill, Robert, IV., 936, 1007. 

Cranston, John, governor of Rhode Island, IV., 586; his 
speech to the assembly a specimen of insolence and 
nonsense, ibid; resents the inquiry instituted into 
the alleged misgovernment of Rhode Island, 600 ; 
commissions privateers, 1116. 
Cranston (Cranson), Samuel, governor of Rhode Island, at- 
tends the congress at New London, V., 258, 261; 
allowance for attending the congress at Boston, 259 ; 
the offer to raise men for the Canada expedition ac- 
cepted on application of, 260 ; to bo supplied with 
fusees, ibid. 
Cranwell, Robert, IV., 389. 

Cratchrode, , IV., 1094. 

Crato, Jan, II., 75, 103, 189. 

Crauford, P., IV., 1135. 

Craven, sir Thomas, major Andros marries a daughter of, 

II., 741. 
Craven, sir William, major Andros marries a sister of, II., 741. 
Craven, William, lord, II., 741. 

Craven, [William,'lst] earl of, member of the privy council, 
IIL, 166, 177, 229, 230, 245, 257, 360, 376, 388, 427; 
one of the proprietors of Carolina, 532. 
Crawford, James, IV., 929, 932. 

Crawford, Mr., Pontiac requests that he may be appointed 
assistant-commissary at Detroit, VII., 858, 859 ; weU 
acquainted with the manners and customs of the 
Indians, 860 ; the Indians renew their application in 
favor of, 863 ; sir William Johnson promises to em- 
ploy, 865. 
Crawford, colonel William, biographical notice of, VIII., 

464 ; serves in Delaware, 733. 
Cray, Teunis, IIL, 75. 
Cregier. (See Crygier.) 
Crego, Richard, deceased, V., 419. 
Crego, Sarah, empowered to sell real estate, V., 419. 
Crego, Thomas, X., 593. 

Cremille, Louis Hyacinthe Bayerode de, adjoined minister 
of war, X., vii, 861 ; inspector-general of infantry, 
286 ; narrative of the battle of Ticonderoga sent to, 
762, 766 ; biographical notice of, 768 ; M. de Mont- 
calm reports the condition of things in Canada to, 
855 ; news of the defeat of major Grant near fort Du- 
quesne sent to, 887, 901 ; events in Canada reported 
to, 956, 958, 968. 
Cremon, captain de, wounded, X., 431. 
Cresap (Cressop, Cressup), Michael, biographical notice of, 
VIIL, 459 ; cruelty and baseness of, 460, 461, 471 ; 
continues hostilities against the Indians, 463 ; the ill 
behavior of the Indians alleged in favor of, 477. 



170 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cre- 



Cresap, Thomas, ordeivd to aid in building a fort in western 
Pennsylvania, VII., 2C9 ; obtains a grant of land on 
tlie Ohio, S95 ; emigrates to Maryland, VIII., 459. 

Cresap's fort, a fight with a French detachment near, X., 
435. 

Crespieu, reverend father, S. J., IX., 93 ; goes to winter at 
lake St. John, 791. 

Creuse river, course of, IX., 594. 

Crevecceur, Wicacoa in Philadelphia called bj the Dutch, 
I., 59S. 

Crevecceur (Illinois), a fort erected at, IX., 383. (See Fort 
Crevecceur.) 

Crevelt, count de Gizors wounded at the battle of, X., 696. 

Crevier, M., proprietor of the seigniory ot St. Francis, 
brought prisoner to Albany, IV., 66 ; his son killed, 
IX., 471 ; discovers a party of Indians, 482 ; surprised 
by Indians, 554, and taken prisoner, 555. 

Crimes. (See Administration of Justice.) 

Criminal cases, how to be judged in New Netherland, I., 
154 ; few, in New Netherland, 505 ; an appeal allowed 
in New Netherland, in, 621; no appeal in, II., 166; 
provision for punishment in, 653, 654. (See Admin- 
istration of Justice.) 

Criminals proposed to be sent to New Netherland from Hol- 
l.ind, I., 99. (See Convicts.) 

Crips, John, X., 592. 

Crips, William, X., 592. 

Crisasy (Cresaffy, Cresafly, Cresafy, Cressassy, Grisaffy, 
Grisalfy), chevalier de, IX., 307 ; distinguishes him- 
self at Repentigny, 518 ; commands the forces sent to 
fort Frontenac, 609; returns to Montreal, 618; death 
and notice of, 642 ; M. du Luth succeeds to his com- 
pany, 662. 

Crisasy (Crisafy), marquis de, IX., 307; in command at 
Sault St. Louis, 556 ; in command at lake Onondaga, 
652; mentioned, 824; dead, 829. 

Crisp, James, II., 217. (See Christie.) 

Crispe, Miss, married to sir Edmund Andros, II., 742. 

Crispe, sir Nicholas, member of the council for foreign plan- 
tations, III., 31, 33, 36, 47, 48, 49. 

Crocheron, , commits felo de se, IV., 423. 

Croessen, Jacob, II., 469. 

Croft, sir Archer, baronet, member of the board 'of trade, 
III., xvii, v., 931, 932, 933, VI., 17, 41, 138. 

Croghan, Dennis, X., 592. 

Croghan (Crochan), George, has great influence among the 
western Indians, VI., 600; transmits information 
from the Ohio to governor Glen, 710 ; trades with 
the Twigtwees (Miamis), 730 ; at fort Cumberland, 
973; attends a council at Onondaga, VII., 136; at 
fort Johnson, 152, 174, 175, 196, 211, 230, 232, 236, 
325, 327 ; marches with a party of Indians to fort 
Edward, 169 ; reports excitement among the Indians, 
177, 178 ; ordered to the Oneida carrying place, 188; 
the Oneidas defer accompanying, 190 ; deputy to sir 
William Johnson, 229, 231, VIII., 455; heads an 
Indian detachment, VII., 229 ; holds a meeting with 
the Susquehanna Indians, 246; attends a meeting of 



Delawares, 260 ; at Philadelphia, 266 ; his transac- 
tions with the Indians previous to the hostilities on 
the Ohio, 207 ; resides in Pennsylvania, 271 ; attends 
an Indian conference at Easton (Pennsylvania), 277, 
290, 291, 294, 295, 298 ; his journal of the treaty at 
Easton, 280; presented to Tedyu.scung, 289; well 
acquainted with the Indian language, 295 ; his speech, 
296 ; authorized to find out the meaning of some dark 
hints thrown out by Tedyuscung, 302 ; reports the 
conduct of some of the people of Pennsylvania at the 
treaty at Easton, 321 ; attends the meeting of Indians 
at Lancaster, 330 ; at Easton, 331 ; several years 
Indian agent for Pennsylvania, 332 ; in what capacity 
at Easton, 387; reports what tribes are besieging 
Detroit, 525 ; bearer of despatches to general Am- 
herst, 552 ; going to England, ibid ; general Amherst 
objects to his going to England, 569 ; accompanies 
the troops to Detroit, 574 ; his salary, 579 ; bearer of 
sir William Johnson's despatches to England, 681, 
632 ; his letter to the board of trade, 602 ; submits a 
project of a boundary between the settlements and the 
Indian.'i, 603 ; recommends that a colony be planted 
at the Illinois, 605 ; his view of the Indian character, 
606 ; shipwrecked on the coast of France, 624 ; may 
effect the occupation of Illinois, 689 ; sent to take 
possession of Illinois, 711; difiiculties experienced 
by, 716 ; the Delawares to escort, 739 ; clears up 
charges maliciously brought against Iiim and sets out 
for the Illinois, 746 ; arrives there, 749 ; a number of 
prisoners delivered to, 750 ; escorted by the Shawa- 
nese,',752 ; holds a conference at fort Pitt, 753 ; obtains 
possession of Illinois, 705 ; his adventures down the 
Ohio, ibid ; ariives at Detroit, 766, 775, 781 ; settles 
matters with the Indians, 776 ; journal of his tians- 
actions with the western Indians, 779; the Indians 
respect their engagements with, 808 ; treats with the ■ 
western Indians, 855, 860, 892, 894; returns from the 
Illinois, 894 ; attacked by the Illinois Indians, 966, 
VIII., 204; biographical notice of, VII., 982; Indian 
agent at fort Pitt, VIII., 49, 225 ; attends the con- 
ference at fort Stanwix, 112 ; the Indians give a tract 
of land to, 128 ; the king declines to confirm that 
grant, 166 ; explanation respecting that grant, 181 ; 
an Indian council at the house of, 465 ; endeavors to 
preserve peace on the Ohio, 501. 

Croghan, Susannah, marries lieutenant Prevost, VII., 983. 

Croilsou, captain, wounded, X., 431. 

Croiset, M. de, IX., 784. 

CroisUle, M. de, commandant at fort St. Frederic, X., 52; 
information transmitted by, X., 55. 

Croisille de Coui-temanche, ensign, returns from Acadia, X., 

Croisille de Montesson, ensign, sent to Port Lajoie, X., 57. 

(See Montesson.) 
Croissou, John, IV., 942. 
Croisson, Peter, II., 644. 
Croissy, Charles Colbert, marquis de, IX., 784; minister of 

foreign affairs, X., t. 



-Cro] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



171 



Crol, Bastiaen, director of fort Orange, II., 764, IV., 352; 

member of the consistory, 765, 766. 
Cromelin, Daniel, a merchant at New York, IV., 624, 934, 

1007, 1135. 
Cromeline, A., IV., 1135. 
Crommegouw (Krommegou), tlie, I., 360, 545, II., 135 ; an 

inland sea in Long island, 565. 
Cromon, Mr., II , 353. 

Cromwell, Oliver, the earl of Warwick's nephew married to 
a daughter of, I., 130 ; appoints lord Lisle lord 
lieutenant of Ireland, 132 j John Thurloe, secretary 
to, 557 ; reverend Hugh Peters appointed chaplain to, 
667; Mr. Nieuport, Dutch ambassador to 573, 574; 
commissioners expected in Holland from, 575 ; con- 
ceals his opinion on the question of emancipating the 
jews, 579 ; a body guard appointed for, 583 ; a letter 
brought to the English of Long island from, II., 136, 
162 ; the English of Long island petition, 163 ; con- 
cludes a treaty with the Dutch, 323 ; the Dutch 
promised to restore Poulerou in the time of, 355 ; 
George Downing attracts the notice of, 416, and com- 
plains of not being so well received in Holland as 
when he came from, 417 ; the United Netherlands at 
war with, 435 ; reinforcements for New Netherland 
asked for during the war with, 441 ; sends a fleet 
against the Spanish West Indies, 619 ; furnished with 
many agents from Massachusetts, III., 112 ; guns 
brought to Boston from a French fort taken in the 
time of, 113; New England had an agent in England 
in the time, of, 270 ; the leisleriaus say that there has 
been no legal king in England since the days of, 617 
(see Oliverians) ; Nova. Scotia siezed by order of, IV., 
476 ; Pembroke castle besieged in the time of, V., 
973; grants Acadia to sir Thomas Temple, IX., 75, 
783 ; rebels emigi-ate to New England after the death 
of, 267. 

Cromwell, Richard, I., 557; employs George Downing as his 
agent in Holland, II., 416. 

Croock, Mr., I., 117. 

Crooke (Crook), John, persecuted by lieutenant-governor 
Leisler, III., 600, 604; assaults lieutenant-governor 
Leisler, 740, 741, 742, 746; mentioned, IV., 937; 
slaves conspire in the orchard of, V., 341. 

Croon, Jan Franssen, I., 514, 515, 516, 517. 

Croon, Lysbet Jansen, seduced by Cornelis Van Tienhoven, 
I., 514, 515, 516, 517. (See Hoochvelt.) 

Croonenburgh, Tryntie, II., 104. 

Crosby, reverend Aaron, biographical notice of, VIII., 551 ; 
his letter to colonel Guy Johnson, ibid ; refuses to 
baptize the children of unconverted Indians, 552. 

Crosby, John, VII., 902. 

Cross, a, at Niagara, inscription on, IX., 387; adopted by an 
Indian tribe as their arms, 1055 ; the, set up at Oswego, 
X., 463. 

Cross, Mary, IV., 581. 

Cross, Mr., VL, 346. 

Crosse, Johannes, notary, at Amsterdam, II., 117, 119. 



Crosse, William Glen. (See Glenrross.) 

Crossfield. (See Totten and Crossfield.) 

Crossis, Johannes, I., 514. 

Crossweeckes, IL, 682. 

Crouch, Mr., and others complain of the earl of Bello- 
mont, IV., 667; mentioned, 795. 

Crow, captain, at Boston, IV., 001 ; commands his majesty's 
ship Arundel, 665 ; mentioned, 712. 

Crow, Mr. V., 942. 

Crow, sir Sackvill, member of the council of trade, III., 31. 

Crown, the, proposal to reserve certain timber on private 
estates for the use of, IV., 507. 

Crowne (Crone), William, part proprietor of the Nova Scotia, 
IV., 476 ; IX., 783. 

Crown Point, distance of Chinanderoga (Ticonderoga) from, 
III., 802, 815, VI., 997, X., 383, 470; scouts recom- 
mended to be sent to, IV., 65 ; French name of, 347, 
VI., 126; the French propose to build a fort at, V., 
910, IX., 1021; the French build a fort at, V., 926, 
928, VI., 112, 124, IX., 1025, 1027, 1037, 1044; in 
the country of the Iroquois, V., 933; the English 
ambassador at the French court to insist on the imme- 
diate demolition of the fort at, ibid ; the five nations 
claim, VI., 101; latitude and longitude of, 124, VIII., 
435 ; a source of alarm to the English colonies, VI., 
125; date of the erection of the fort at, 131, 229, 
VIII., 578 ; not laid down on English maps, VI., 
138 ; the board of trade desire its location to be 
pointed out, 142 ; lieutenant-governor Clarke marks 
its situation on a map, ibid, 143, 145 ; Wood creek 
between Albany and, 144 ; French batoes met going 
to, 146 ; S.iraclitoga the nearest settlement to, 151 ; 
the French promise not to settle south of, 152; the 
answer of the governor of Canada respecting, laid 
before the secretary of state, 169; necessity of re- 
ducing, 229 ; in the Indian country, 286 ; governor 
Clinton endeavors to get up an expedition against, 
ibid, 288, 306, 647, 659 ; the frontiers of New York 
not far from, 341 ; attack made by Indians near, 343 ; 
price paid for scalps brought from, 3G1 ; the Indiana 
dissatisfied because it is not destroyed, 386 ; an In- 
dian party sent against, 388 ; condition of, in 1747, 
389 ; an expedition proposed against, 419, 421, 422, 
424 ; when reduced to be maintained at the expense 
of the crown, 426 ; of great advantage to the French, 
440 ; the English accused of trying to induce the 
French Indians to massacre the garrison of, 453 ; a 
plan foraied for an attack on, 463 ; an encroachment 
on British territory, 484 ; prisoners to be exchanged 
at, 495, X., 191 ; the French commandant at, ignorant 
of Indians going to attack New England, VI., 515, 
517 ; captain Marshal forwards a letter from the com- 
mandant of, 518 ; letter of captain Lusignan, com- 
mandant of, to captain Marshal, 519 ; an instance 
that those who fortify first in the Indian country are 
not disturbed, 541 ; John H. Lydius obtains lands 
north of, 569 ; description of, 582, X., 193 ; governor 
Clinton proposes to build a fort near, VI., 642; can- 



172 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cky- 



Crown Point — continwd. 

non fiunislicd from New York for the expedition 
against, 647, 991 ; commissioners to meet at New 
York to agree on the expedition against, 667 ; the 
other governments to he called on for their quotas 
against, 683 ; otherwise called fort St. Frederick, 714, 
716, VIII., 345 ; advantages of, VI., 746 ; no instruc- 
tions given to sir Danvers Osborne regarding, 793 ; a 
sharp thorn in the side of Massachusetts and New 
York, 816 ; the French route to Massachusetts from, 
817 ; Massachusetts alarmed at the French encroach- 
ments at, 824 ; three forts proposed to he huilt be- 
tween Albany and, 852; the five nations hindered 
from taking, 870 ; a strong fort at, 886 ; the Indians 
who attacked Hoosick fitted out at, 909 ; Instructions 
to general Braddock for the reduction of, 921, 922 ; 
lieutenant-governor de Lancey's suggestions regard- 
ing, 923, 925 ; forces raising for an expedition against, 
943 ; advantages to be gained by an attempt on, 945 ; 
governor Shirley's plan for attacking, communicated 
to the New York assembly, 950 ; an expedition formed 
against, 953, 954, 955 ; forces in motion against, 956 ; 
great spirit manifested in the expedition against, 957 ; 
major-general Johnson about to march against, 963; 
982; report of scouts sent to, 969; conmiencement 
of the French at, 970 ; the New Y'ork assembly pro- 
Tides for raising forces against, 989 ; the last division 
marches from Albany for, 990 ; Connecticut raises 
forces to reduce, 999 ; minutes of a council of war 
held on the expedition against, 1000 ; number of men 
in the expedition against, 1001 ; French forces at, 
1003 ; the French march from, and are defeated, 1005 ; 
major-general Johnson meditates a movement on, 
1015 ; government proposes to repay part of the ex- 
penses incnrred in the expedition against, VII., 1; 
forts on lake George and Wood creek would com- 
mand, 4; necessity of securing it, 5; the Indians 
impressed with a favorable opinion of the English on 
account of the operations towards, 19 ; principal 
reason why the Mohawks joined the expedition 
against, 22 ; m i nute of the expense of the expedition 
against, sent to the board of trade, 34 ; other expe- 
ditions against, 37, 201, 339, 340, 345 ; intelligence 
of the French at, 38 ; parties of Indians sent from 
fort Johnson to, 93 ; the French pushing for, 125, 
383 ; Canada to be invaded by way of, 350, 351, 358 ; 
colonel Gridley in the expedition against, 357 ; taken 
by the EngUsh, 401, 403, X., 333 ; general Amherst 
returns to, 405 ; difficulties which prevented general 
Amherst proceeding beyond, 417; date of general 
Amherst's return to, 418 ; its importance acknow- 
ledged, 424 ; combinations formed in New England to 
settle lands south of, 456 ; provincial colonels apply 
for lands between No. 4 and, 510 ; a large fortification 
commenced at, 588 ; proposed to be erected into a 
separate government, ibid ; a design formed to settle 
a colony between the Connecticut river and, 615 ; set- 
tlers invited to establish themselves at, 629 ; the earl 



of Ilchester and others advised to locate their lands 
between Ticonderoga and, 708 ; land valuable near, 
742 ; military ordered to New Y'ork from, 759 ; ought 
to be kept in good repair, 984 ; a town proposed to 
be built at, VIII., 139, 154; a plan of the town 
di'awn up, 140 ; major Woodhull in the expedition 
against, 295 ; grant to the reverend Mr. Dellius ex- 
tended to the north of, 345 ; the fort at, burnt, 371, 
395 ; major Skeene in command of, 415 ; only a small 
guard at, 451 ; about to be reestablished, 468 ; Adol- 
phus Benzel obtains a grant of the military reserve at, 
488; taken by the Americans, 581, 616; number of 
guns, &c., taken at, 597; the French propose station- 
ing a detachment at, IX., 400 ; M. de Ramezay fails in 
his plan to seize, 830 ; the English about to seize, 
833 ; the French at, 837 ; memoir by M. de la Come 
on, 1022; Louis XV. approves the erection of a fort 
at, 1033 ; ofi5cers at, ibid ; declaration of the English 
government respecting the fort at, 1034 ; M. de la 
GauchetiJre commandant at, 1038 ; garrison of, 1040, 
1045,1068; about to be attacked, X., 296, 519; the 
gi-ound between it and Ticonderoga to be occupied, 
910; the English erect a strong fort at, 1055, 1078; 
English force at, 1102. (See Fort St. Frederic.) 

Crown point river, a French seigniory in, VII. , 642. 

Croydon, reverend East Apthorp, vicar of, VII., 375. 

Croy-sobre, Emmanuel, prince de, notice of, X., 527. 

Crozat, Antoine, notice of the patent granted to, V., 508 ; 
obtains the exclusive trade of Louisiana, IX., 671. 

Cruger, Henry, commissioner for the prosecution of the war, 
VI., 670; biographical notice of, VIL, 843, asks to 
resign his seat in the council, VIII., 296; mayor of 
New York, 594; member of the New York council, 
685. 

Cruger, John, IV., 1135. 

Cruickshanks, lieutenant John, obtains a grant of land in 
Bennington (Vermont), VIII., 206. 

Cruller, Peter, naturalized, VI., 29. 

Crundall, Thomas, III., 425; alderman, turned out of the 
fort, 596. 

Cms, Louis, X., 881. 

Cruyer, Harmen Harmensen, I., 359. 

Crygier (Cregier, Crigier, Crygier, Kregier, Krigier, Kringer, 
Kryger, Krygier), Martin, L, 206, 425, 550, a slave 
wench in the service of, 343; and others, request the 
intervention of the burgomasters of Amsterdam in 
behalf of New Netherland, 549, 552, 555 ; at the South 
river, 595 ; captain lieutenant of the New Amsterdam 
burgess company, 599 ; olfers to command Fort Cas- 
imir, 642; commissioned captain of a company in 
New Netherland, 646; arrives at fort Casimir, II., 10; 
sent commissioner to the South river, 103, 104, 112, 
113 ; the English sent to confer with captain Scott, 
393 ; sent to request the Indians of Neversink not to 
sell any lands to the English, 397 ; the English 
assault the son of, 402, 405, 483 ; mentioned, 458, 
463, 464, 467, 468, 502, 700; elected to confer with 



—Cue] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



173 



Crygier, Martin — continued^ 

commanders Evertaen and Benckes, 573 ; recom- 
mended for the office of burgomaster, 574 ; captain of 
a company at New Orange, 670 ; merchant at New 
Orange, 685 ; takes the oath of, allegiance to the En- 
glish, III., 75 ; on an embassy from Delaware to Mary- 
land, 344. 

Crygier (Cregier, Krygier), Martin, junior, signs the remon- 
strance against resisting the English, II., 249 ; as. 
saulted for refusing to take his hat off to captain 
Scott, 402, 405, 483 ; contracts to victual fort Nassau, 
608 ; ordered to supply fort Nassau, 618 ; merchant 
at Willemstadt, 676 ; collector at Willemstadt, 687 ; 
signs a petition, IV., 940. 

Crygier (Kregier), Willem, II., 459. 

Crynssen, commander Abraham, destroys a number of 
English ships in James river, II., 518, 619 ; com- 
missioned by the Zealand board of admiralty, 520, 
521, 522. (See Quirynsen.) 

Crystal mountain, a, between the South river and Manhat- 
tans, II., 63. 

Cuba, opposite to the cape of Florida, I., 66 ; Holy Trinity, 
harbor in, plundered, II., 746 ; a strong force arrives 
at St. Augustine from, VI., 128. 

Cuba (New York), Indian name of, IX., 1085. 

Cudworth, James, III., 273, 274. 

Cuilliere, captain, dead, X., 430. 

Culerier, , an Indian intt-rpreter, IX., 184; imprisoned, 

810. 

CuUiford, captain, put in temporary command of the Rich- 
mond frigate, IV., 312. 

Culliford, William, commissioner of customs, V., 41. 

CuUoden, PhUip Skene at the battle of, VIII., 415 ; the earl 
of Albemarle at the battle of, X., 217. 

Galium, sir Dudley, baronet, II., 599. 

Culpeper, John, 1st lord, member of the council of trade, 

m., 31. 

Culpeper, Thomas, 2nd lord, member of the council for 
foreign plantations. III., xiv 191, 192, 213; governor 
of Virginia, 244, VII., 362; governor Andros goes to 
Boston to wait on, III., 308. 

Cumana, I., 223. 

Cumberford, lieutenant, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 731, 735. 

Cumberland, duke of, prince Rupert created, II., 275. 

Cumberland [William Augustus, 3rd] duke of, sir Peter 
Halkett refuses to violate his parole on the order of, 
VI., 915; places in America called after, VIII., 113 ; 
defeats the pretender, X., 58; major-general Napier, 
aid-de-camp to, 312; his letter to general Braddock 
falls into the hands of the French, 380 ; his capitula- 
tion regarding Hanover, disapproved of and he resigns 
all his ofaces, 705. 

Cumberland, Mr., secretary to the board of trade, VIII., 
762, 763. 

Cumberland county (New York, now in Vermont), VII., 
902, 903, 904, 905 ; objections of the board of trade 
against the act organizing, 918; erected and organiz- 



ed, 932, VIII., 65 ; lamentable condition of, 252; re- 
ferred to, 346 ; the people of, petition to be continued 
within the jurisdiction of New York, 358 ; settled 
chiefly under grants from New Hampshire, 376; 
strength of the militia in, 377 ; sparsely settled, 441 ; 
population of, in 1771, 457 ; a dangerous insurrection 
in, 566; not represented in the provincial congress, 
580. 

Cumberland head, Indian name of, X., 480. 

Cumberland mountains, why so called, VIII., 113. 

Cumberland river, why so called, VIII., 113. 

Cumby (Cumbe), captain, IV., 917, 921. 

Cumiuing, Mr., VIII., 156. 

Gumming, Timothy, carried prisoner to Canada, X., 48. 

Cummins, Thomas, VI., 513. 

Cummins, WUliam, IV., 942. 

Cunajus, secretary, II., 294, 359. 

Cuningham, Mr., II., 677. 

Cunningham, Henry, governor of Jamaica, notice of, VI., 
51. 

Cunningham, Mathew, X., 593. 

Cunningham, Philip, IV., 166. 

Cunningham, Waddel, a writ of appeal sued out for, VII., 
676, 706, 707; his case, 797. 

Gunstaghrathankre creek, Johannes Lawyer purchases lan.i 
at, VI., 785. 

Gup, a gold, presented to governor Fletcher, IV., 222. 

Curasao (Curasao, Curascao, Ciirasso, Gurazaw), island of, 
I., 100, 102, 105, 110, 115, 138 ; Jan Claessen Vaa 
Campen, director of, 125 ; the settlement of, to b^ 
considered, 136 ; New Netherland to be preferred as a 
naval station to, 152 ; to be used for the improve- 
ment of the slave trade, 158 ; the assembly of tLd 
XIX. recommended to consider the affairs of, 163 ; 
Petrus Stuyvesaut presents a remonstrance on tl;e) 
subject of, 164; project to sustain, dependent on 
New Netherland, 165 ; salaries at, 166 ; cannot l.^ 
abandoned, 167; commission to Peter Stuyvesaut fa 
director of, 177, 178, 492 ; proposal to detain provi- 
sions and men about to be sent from New Netherland 
to, 185; trade to, regulated, 223; director Stuyvt- 
sant at, 308, 455 ; plan for the colonization of, 365 ; 
allowed to export salt and horses only to New Nn- 
therland, 363 ; provisions sent from New Netherland 
to, 425, 426, II., 366, 373, 430-433, 492, 494 ; horsf-a 
sent to Antigua from, I., 455 ; Jacob Van Couwen- 
hoven furnishes wheat for, 499, 503 ; proceedings 
of director Stuyvesaut at, 604 ; the Spanish amba.-i- 
sador requests that orders be sent to the governor of, 
to arrest certain pirates, II., 2; order granted, 3; Spau. 
ish slaves sent to, 31 ; the Spaniards capture the ship 
Haen sent to, 44, 46 ; Mr. Rodenborch, vice-direclur 
of, 46 ; director Stuyvesant, governor-general uf 
New Netherland and of, 411 ; ship Diiyf arrives at 
New Amsterdam from, 468 ; ship (Jideon arrives 
from, 469 ; Johan Doncker, governor of, 711 ; gover- 
nor NicoUs recoimnends the reduction of. III., 115; 
a ship puts into New Y'ork from, 701 ; advices received 



174 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[CCR- 



Curii<;a.o — continued. 

at New York from, IV., 277; trade carried on be- 
tween New York and, 317, 413, 419, 793, V., 57, 685, 
686, VI., 393; a list of vessels which traded from 
New York to, sent to England, IV., 454; illegal trade 
carried on between New York and, 4G1 ; captain Kidd 
Bends for supplies to, 584 ; trade carried on from the 
British colonies with, V., 30, 31 ; persons to be pro- 
secuted who are engaged in illegal trade from New 
Y'ork to, 159 ; horses exported from New Y'ork to, 
556 ; imports into New York from, 68G ; exports 
from New Y'ork to, VI., 127 ; an order issued by the 
government of New York to prevent supplies being 
furnished the enemy through, 180, 181 ; a neutral 
port, 511. 

Curl, Nathaniel, his evidence in regard to the price of beaver, 
v., 749. 

Ciirodeau, captain, arrives at Quebec, from the West Indies, 
X., 131 ; sails from Quebec, 165 ; returns to that 
port with a prize, 176. 

Cnrot, , an Indian interpreter, dead, IX., 1064, 1067. 

Curpensen, Isaacq, IV., 940. 

Currency, of New Netherland, wampum the, I., 87, 303, II., 
371, 436, 594; its value to be raised, I., 203; not 
regulated, 336 ; beaver a part of the, 386, II., 457, 
697, 698, 703; depreciated, 218, 219; the value of 
pieces of eight cannot be affected by marks stamped 
on them in the colonies. III., 234 ; English farthings 
may be sent to the colonies, ibid ; the value of 
pieces of eight raised, 236 ; not to be altered, 824, 
IV., 290; difference between New York and sterling, 
134, 236, 645, 711, 777, 780, 796 ; in Canada, paper, 
351, IX., 494, 1049; value of Arabian gold in New 
York, IV., 469; Arabian gold in New York, 480; 
also pieces of eight and lion dollars, 542, 614, IX., 
549 ; difference between Carolina, and New Y'ork, 
IV., 669 ; various denominations of Carolina, ibid ; 
value of a piece of eight in the respective colonies, 
757, 1059 ; silver sixpences recommended to be coined 
in New York, 757 ; colonel Quary recommends that 
all coins of America be of one standard, 1047, 1049 ; 
necessity of one standard in the colonies, 1059 ; cap- 
tain Wenham remonstrates against the recent regu- 
lation of the, 1119 ; a proclamation issued for set- 
tling and ascertaining the current rates of the coin in 
the plantations, 1131 ; the proclamation disregarded, 
1132 ; petition of the merchants of New York against 
the proclamation, which is suspended, 1133 ; history 
of the New York, 1134 ; the lion dollar introduced 
into New Y'ork, ibid ; its value not known, 1135 ; the 
New York assembly censured for assuming a right to 
settle the, 1139 ; suspension of the proclamation re- 
ferred to the attorney-general of England, 1156 ; ef- 
fects of the suspension of that proclamation, 1180 ; 
the assembly of New York passes an act to regulate 
the, v., 66 ; report of the board of trade on that act, 
■67 ; veto of that act, 71 ; veto ordered to be pub- 
lished, 72 ; published in New York, 83 ; the act passed 



by parliament for ascertaining the rates of foreign coins 
in America, published but not obeyed, ibid ; acts passed 
in New Jersey for the currency of bills of credit, 84, 
305, 767, 832 ; no laws to be passed in New York for 
altering the value of coin, 130 ; two thousand five 
hundred ounces of plate voted for the governor of 
New Y'ork, 177, 191 ; the act against counterfeiting 
and clipping foreign coin, amended, 181, 185 ; an 
act passed to retrench the growing interest of bills of 
credit, 185, 210 ; bills of credit struck in New Jersey 
for the expedition against Canada, 205 ; the council 
attempt to make them a legal tender, 206 ; appro- 
priations for public purposes voted in ounces of plate, 
294, 299, 344, 480 ; objections to the New York act 
for striking bills of credit, &c., 435 ; silver and bills 
of credit the only, in New York, 461 ; low denomi- 
nation of bills of credit, ibid ; governor Hunter pro- 
poses that cojjper coin be manufactured in his govern- 
ment, 462 ; the provinces neighboring on New Y'ork 
have never complied with the proclamation for settling 
the, 476 ; sUly notion of the people of America in 
regard to, ibid ; a sinking fund provided for the 
redemption of New Y'ork bills of credit, 494, 500, 
683, VI., 30, 111; which command a higher rate in 
Boston than those of Massachusetts, V., 494, 516 ; 
objections made to the issuing of more bills of credit 
in New Y''ork, 500 ; the act of parliament for settling 
the rates of foreign coin in the plantations dis- 
regarded, 601 ; price of specie in New England and 
Carolina, 509 ; causes of the continuance of the old 
silver, 514; New York bills of credit at par 
over the greatest part of the continent, 514 ; acts 
passed in New York relating to the currency of bills 
of credit, 523, 583, 631, 682, 735, 738, 773, 782, 812, 
872, 895, 904, VI., 160, 185, 316, 624, 653, 680, 941 
(see Acts, New York) ; the governor of New York to 
be forbidden to assent in future to any acts for the 
issue of bills of credit, V , 526 ; order in council against 
passing any law in the colonies for issuing bills of 
credit, 539 ; an act passed in New York to raise the 
value of lion dollars, 583; of Massachusetts, in 1721, 
599 ; in New York, what it is composed of, 686 ; 
paper money issued in New York, Pennsylvania and 
New Jersey, 700 ; drives gold and silver out of the 
colonies, ibid, VI., 116 ; New Jersey votes supplies for 
ten years In order to obtain paper money, V. , 705 ; 
governor Burnet's ideas on the subject of paper 
money, 736 ; benefits derived by the colonies from pa- 
per money, 738 ; origin of paper money in New York, 
805, VI. ,535, 699; theiuterest on bills of credit in New 
Jersey recommended to be applied to the expenses of 
government, V., 810 ; recommendation rejected, 821 ; 
paper money, a remedy for a deficiency of specie, 832 ; 
governor Montgomerie writes to the lords of trade on 
the subject of the paper money of New Jersey, 888, 
889 ; views of the board of trade on the paper money 
of New Jersey, 922 ; relative value of New York bills 
of credit, VI., 32, 33; amount of paper money in 



— Cus] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



175 



Currency — continued. 

circulation in 1739, 111 ; copper money introduced 
into New York, and the consequence, 117 ; an act to 
prevent the furtlier importation of copper money into 
New York, ibid ; the assembly of New York resolve 
to do all iu their power to establish a paper, 158 ; 
parliament thinks of reducing the money of the 
plantations to one standard, 161 ; paper money, the 
only New York, 179 ; why the governor and council 
of New Jersey refuse to authorize the issue of papar, 
328 ; how paper bills are made current monej' in 
New York, 412; the treasurer reissues the New 
York bills of credit for his private benefit, 534 ; 
origin of paper money in New York, 535, 699 ; Mr. 
Golden enters on the journals his dissent to the act 
for the more effectual canceling bills of credit, 536 ; 
an act passed in New York for the more effec- 
tual canceling of bills of credit, 624; a bill is 
introduced into parliament to prevent the issuing 
of paper money in America, 643 ; objections of 
the New York assembly to, ibid ; Mr. Colden's 
objections to an act canceling bills of credit, 681 ; 
leave asked to emit additional bills of credit in 
New Y'ork, 840 ; parliament passes an act to restrain 
the issue of ijaper money in the New England colo- 
nies, 937, VII., 79; New York assembly vote an issue 
of additional bills of credit, 37 ; New York issues 
paper moiioy to defray the expenses of troops to be 
raised, 121 ; provision for sinking New York bills of 
credit, 201 ; New York bills of credit loaned on 
interest, 204; parties being unprepared to pay the 
loan, are allowed an extension, ibid ; New Y'ork 
makes a loan to the crown in bills of credit, 400 ; 
uniformity recommended in the colonial, 443 ; the 
New York assembly apply for the removal of the 
restriction on paper money, 820 ; very little silver in 
New York, 821, VIII., 72, 96 ; report of the hoard of 
trade on New York bills of credit, VII., 827 ; amount of 
such bills in circulation, 828; a further issue of bills 
of credit in New York authorized, 844 ; the New York 
assembly would gladly lay aside all emissions of paper 
money, 878 ; a bill about to be introduced into the 
British parliament relative to paper money in the colo- 
nies, 884 ; funds applied to sink bills of credit, 907 ; 
additional quantity of paper money authorized to be 
issued, VIII., 1 ; governor Moore opposed to the 
emission, ibid ; no laws for issuing paper money to 
take eflect until Ms majesty's pleasure he known, 13 ; 
New York always kept up the credit of its paper 
money, 72 ; governor Moore vetoes an act passed to 
make gold and silver a legal tender, 169 ; governor 
Moore recommends that a bill for a fresh emission of 
bills of credit receive the royal assent, 170 ; paper 
money increases the consumption of British manu- 
factures, 189 ; objections to the New York bill for the 
emission of additional bills of credit, 193 ; reports of 
the board of trade on that bill, 195, 202; additional 



bills of credit, authorized in New York, 198 ; dis- 
allowed, 205, 210 ; bills of credit not a legal tender, 
206 ; parliament empowers the New York legislature 
to enact a law for issuing bills of credit and making 
the same a legal tender, 215 ; a man sentenced to be 
hanged for counterfeiting bills of credit, 338 ; gover- 
nor Tryon vetoes an act more effectually to call in 
bills of credit, 370 ; amount of bills of credit issued 
in 1771, 453 ; the continental congress proposes to 
issue paper money, 580 ; and issues two millions of 
dollars iu paper money, 589 ; continental paper money 
to be given in exchange for plate, 646 ; congress has 
no other money than paper, 808 ; value of the 6cu in 
France and in Acadia, X., 16 ; governor Shirley autho- 
rized to emit bills of credit, 44 ; value of Massachusetts 
paper money in 1747, 100 ; paper money discredited 
in Boston, 144; the troops iu Canada paid in paper 
money, 652 ; amount of paper money in Canada in 
1759,938, {See Beaver; Exchange; Wampum.) 

Curry, ,X., 592. 

Curtenius, Peter T., member of the general committee of 
New York, VIII., 601. 

Curtin, John, VII., 902. 

Curtis (Curtes), John, II., 708, III., 295. 

Curtis, Richard, IV., 942. 

Cnstalaga, chief of the Ohio Delawares, VII., 731, VIII., 396. 

Customs of Antwerp, the, alluded to, II., 55. 

Customs, frauds in the plantations on the, III., 44, 47, 48, 
305 ; officers about to be sent to the colonies to pre- 
vent those frauds, 49, 50 ; the farmers of the, desire 
that Scotch ships going to New York be obliged to 
touch at an English port, 180 ; reply to such demand, 
181; annual proceeds of the colonial, 211, 306; 
established at New York, 217 ; an inquiry instituted 
into, at New York, 280 ; the merchants of -New York 
refuse to pay, 289, 575, 590, 592 ; power of the duke 
of York to impose, doubtful, 291 ; officers of the, in 
New York, III., 302, 305, 401, 495; report on the, 
302-308 ; salaries of officers of the, 405, 497, 498 ; 
commissioners of, appointed in New York, 596 ; 
lieutenant-governor Leisler seizes the, 672 ; officers 
of the, in 1693, in New York, IV., 25 ; orders issued 
for commissioning officers of, for the plantations, 292 ; 
of New York, great decrease in the, 303 ; Chidley 
Brook collector at New York of, 304; lord Bello- 
mont's letters to the commissioners of, in England, 
319, 663, 778 ; officers of the, resisted in New York, 
324; S. Van Cortland and Mr. Monsey .appointed 
commissioners of, 356 ; quarrel at New York between 
the naval officer and the collector of, 602 ; the earl of 
Bellomont requests that a comptroller of, be sent 
from England to New York, 664 ; officers of, at Bos- 
ton, 792; British commissioners of, under queen 
Anne, V., 41 ; officers of, at New York in 1711, 229, 
230, 231 ; Caleb Heathcote, surveyor-general of the, 
584; at New York to be paid in silver, VIII., 96; 
officers in New York, number in 1774, 448 ; their 
names, 454, 455. 



176 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Cut— 



Cutler, John, VI., 908. 

Cntler, John, M. D., of Boston, dead, VII., 496. 

Cntler, reverend Timotliy, D. D., letter to the bishop of 
Oxford from, VI., 90G ; his son, curate to the dean of 
Booking, &08 ; biograpliical sketch of, ibid ; disabled, 
VII., 397, 451 ; refuses the use of his church to Mr. 
McClennaghan, 409 ; report of his death contradicted, 
496 ; the only doctor of divinity of the episcopal 
church in New England, 592. 

Cuts, Richard, II., 715. 

Cutt, president John, Samuel Peuhallow marries a daughter 
of, IX., 905. 

Cutts, [John, 1st] lord, at the siege of Venloo, VI., 170. 

Cuyler, , transports provisions from Albany to the army, 

VI., 658. 

Cuyler, , bearer of governor Burnet's letter to the gover- 
nor of Canada, IX., 899, and of the latter's answer, 
900. 

Cuyler, Abraham, alderman of Albany, V., 220, 223, 572; 
commissioner of Indian affairs, 910, VI., 59, 132, 235, 
238 ; merchant, VII., 615. 

Cuyler, Abraham C, mayor of Albany, VIII., 480. 

Cuyler, Coruelis, merchant at Albany, VI., 29, VIL, 614 ; 
alderman, VI., 58; commissioner for Indian affairs, 
59, 232, 233, 238, 251-, 821, 856 ; his report on return- 
ing from Canada, 131 ; sent with despatches to Canada, 
711, 731, 734; saw the Pennsylvanians in Montreal, 
who were taken prisoners in Ohio, 733 ; mayor of 
Albany, X., 19. 

Cuyler, Harmauus, VII., 615. 

Cuyler, Hendrick, alderman of Albany, III., 483, 485. 

Cuyler, Hendrick (Hendrick the baker), lieutenant in a New 
York city company. III., 584; complains of lieuten- 
ant-governor Nicholson, 593 ; delivers fort James to 
the leislerians, 594, 6:J7, 668; captain of the fort, 
604; his affidavit transmitted to England, 630; 
major, 636 ; substance of his affidavit, 639 ; one of 
Leisler's councU, 663, 679, 684, 703, 716 ; drags Mr. 
Tudor to the fort, 673. 

Cuyler, Hendrick, junior, merchant at Albany, VII., 489. 

Cuyler, Henry, a New York merchant, V., 332. 

Cuyler, John, alderman of Albany, IV., 494, 495, 539, 567, 
572, 575, 896, 899, 904, 911, 992, 994, 995; signs an 
address to the earl of Bellomont, 754 ; commissioner 
for Indian affairs, V., 226, 228, 274, 446, 463, 528, 
562, 565, 567, 569, 572, 635, 638, 657, 658, 661, 662, 
664, 667, 675, 679, 720, 786, 791, 794, 910 ; visits 
Canada, VI., 734; merchant, VII., 614. 

Cuyler, Neicholas, merchant at Albany, VIL, 489, 615. 

Cuyter (Kuyter, Pieterse), Jochem Pieterse, one of the eight 
men, I., 140, 186, 189, 191, 192; petitions the states 
general, 188; accused of sending lies and libels 
against director Kieft to Holland, 203; defense of, 
205 ; signs a petition to director Stuyvesant, 209 ; 
sentence of, 213 ; accused of drawing up a false and 
libelous letter against director Kieft, 214; complains 
of directors Kieft and Stuyvesant, 215 ; his petition 



referred, 248 ; permitted to return to New Nether- 
land, 249 ; mandamus in the case of the appeal of, 
250, 351 ; states general grant letters of protection to, 
252 ; passport to, 253 ; freely discusses director 
Kieft's proceedings, 299 ; director Stuyvesant exhi- 
bits great arrogance against, 310, 335 ; the West India 
company opposed to, 333 ; West India company con- 
siders it strange that complaints should be made by, 
339 ; the West India company ignore director Stuyve- 
sant's demeanor towards, 341 ; accused of forgery, 
350 ; letter of the prince of Orange in favor of, 351 ; 
vice-director Dincklage voted through error for the 
banishment of, 355; one of the twelve men, 415; 
declaration of, as to a statement of director Stuyve- 
sant, 450 ; threatened by the Indians, 497 ; one of 
the selectmen and an elder of the church, 500. 



Dablon, reverend Claude, S. J., letter of, to governor Don- 
gau. III., 454; to reverend Mr. Dellius, of Albany, 
IV., 48; superior in Canada, 49; the minister at 
Albany writes to, 80 ; notice of, IX., 97; mentioned, 
98 ; attends a conference on the subject of the Iro- 
quois, 169, 170, 194; sent to Hudson's bay, 268, 304, 
783 ; governor Dongan writes to, 308 ; at the falls of 
St. Mary, 804. 

Dackashata, a Seneca orator, IV., 238. 

Dacre, [Francis Leonard, 14th] lord, one of the council for 
foreign plantations, III., 33, 36. 

Daffom, John, II., 715. 

Dagaeyse, a Cayuga sachem, HI., 774. 

Dagley, John, X. 593. 

Dagneaux de la Saussaye. (See Saussaye.) 

Dagneaux Douville, X , 188. 

Dagworthy, lieutenant Eli, wounded at Ticonderoga, notice 
of, X., 730. 

Daillfi, reverend Peter, notice of, III., 651. 

DaiUeboust, chevalier, attend.s an Indian conference, X., 188 ; 
king's lieutenant at Montreal, 445, 500. 

d'Ailleboust de Coulonge, Louis, governor of Canada, IX., 
vii ; sends delegates to New England, 382. 

DaiUeboust de St. VUm^, captain, died, X., 74. 

Daillebout, captain, votes to surrender Quebec, X., 1007. 

Daillebout, M., superintends the departure of the French 
troops from Louisbourg, X., 3; writes reverend M. 
de la Loutre, 11. 

Daillebout, M., ordered on a scout, X., 748; bearer of a 
letter from M. de Vaudreuil to M. de Montcalm, 759. 

D'aillebout, sublieutenant, wounded, X., 1086. 

Daillebout de Cuisi, cadet, ordered on a war party, X., 166. 

Daillebout (Dalibout) de Muceaux, M., attends an Indian 
conference, IX., 194. 

Daine, captain, wounded at Fort St. Philip, X., 431. 

Daine, Mr., reports the Misses Desaunier, IX., 1071. 



— Dae] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



177 



Daine, Mr., reports great scarcity of provisions in Canada, 
X., 704, and the arrival of supplies, 706; transmits 
details of -the battle of Ticonderoga to the minister of 
war, 813 ; transmits news of fort Duquesne, 834 ; 
transmits intelligence of the defeat of the English 
near that place, 884 ; reports the defeat of the French 
before Quebec, 1014, and the complete route of that 
army, 1015 ; length of service of, 1016. 
Dains, M. (See d'Hinse.) 

Dale (Dayl), sir Thomas, commissioned captain of infantry 
in the Dutch service, I., 1; leave of absence granted 
to, 2 ; employed in Virginia, 3 ; letter of king James 
I. to the states general requesting further leave of 
absence for, 9 ; leave of absence granted to, 10 ; ad- 
dress of sir Dudley Carleton to the states general in 
favor of, 16 ; letter of the Dutch ambassador in favor 
of, 17 ; petition of, to the states general, ibid ; par- 
ticulars of the services and date of the return from 
Virginia of, 18 ; recommended by sir Dudley Carle- 
ton, English ambassador to the states general, 19, who 
order him to be paid half his wages, 20 ; ordered to 
he paid his full wages, 21. 
Dall, Mark, refused permission to reside at Mespath, II., 

661. 
Dallet, lieutenant, wounded, X., 1085. 

Dalling, sir John, baronet, biographical notice of, VIII., 
794 ; recruits required for an expedition under, 801. 
D'Allonne, Miss, captured by the Iroquois, IX., 389; re- 
stored, 391. 
Dalmas, reverend Mr., S. J., murdered, IX., 554, 507. 
Dalquier, captain, commandant at Ticonderoga, X., 610. 
Dalquier, lieutenant-colonel, his bravery at the battle of 

Sillery, X., 1083; wounded, 1085. 
Dalrymple, [Elizabeth], marries lord Allan Cathcart, VI., 187, 
Dalrymple, sir John, author of The Rights of Great Britain 

Asserted, VIII., 673. 
Dalrymple, Joseph, turned out of doors by a New Jersey 

mob, VI., 346, 347, 343. 
Daly, Mr., attends an Indian conference, VIII., 518. 
Dalyell, captain James, VII., 524; leaves Presqu'isle for 

Detroit, 545 ; notice of, 547 ; killed, 962. 
Damarascot river, IV., 831. 

Damarasoove (Damaras Cotte, Damaricotta, DemareU'scove), 
original name of. III., 248 ; mentioned, 719 ; a fort 
formerly on the island of, IV., 831; lieutenant-colo- 
nel Vaughan, settles at, X., 45. 
Dambour, captain, IX., 302. 

Damen, Jan Janse, (Daem, Dam, Damen, Jan Claessen), re- 
quests xiermission to attack the Indians, I., 151, 193, 
197, 199 ; one of the eight men, 192 ; expelled the 
board of the eight men, 193, 194 ; interrogatories for, 
200 ; referred to, 206 ; proposes a mysterious toast, 
21.J ; the committee of the states general recommend 
sending for, 388; mentioned, 411, 412, 414; one of 
the twelve men, 415 ; summoned before a committee 
of the states general, 434 ; returned to New Nether- 
land, 435, 439. 

23 



D' Amours, M., member of the council at Quebec, IX., 36 ; 

imprisoned by count de Frontenac, 156 ; returns from 

captivity among the Oneidas, 553 ; connected with 

the Vaudreuil family, 778. 

Dampville-Vantadour, [Francois Christophle de Levis], duke 

de, viceroy of America, IX., 782, 783. 
Dana, [reverend James], reference to his party in the church, 

VII., 516. 
Danbury, military stores destroyed at, VIII., 711, 713. 
Danes, the, at war with the Swedes, I., 147; of the West 

Indies, receive supplies from New York, V., 160. 
Danforth (Danford), reverend Samuel, IV., 684 ; minister at 

Taunton, 755. 
Danforth, Thomas, sent commissioner to Maine, III., 107, 
108 ; mentioned, 274 ; president of the council of 
Maine, IX., 527. 
Daniel, Captain, a Mohawk, killed, VIII., 661. 
Daniell, captain, hires the ship Fortune to New York mer- 
chants, IV., 460. 
Daniels, Jan, IV., 161, 162, 163. 
Daniels, Petrus, his son leads a party of Indians to annoy 

Crown Point, VII., 93. 
Danielzen, Jacob, III., 75. 
Dannelle, captain, wounded, X., 431. 
Danseville, ensign, X., 936. 

Dansville (New York), Indian name of, VII., 57, 69. 
Danube (New York), general Herkimer dies at, VIII., 720. 
Darat, captain John, X,, 72, 173. 
Darby (Connecticut), reverend Mr. Lyons missionary at, 

VII, 397. 
D'Arcy, lady Amelia, marries the marquis of Carmarthen, 

and elopes with captain Byron, R. N., VI., 757. 
Darechragergare, an Onondaga sachem. III., 774. 
Daret, Joseph, IV., 1008. 

Darien, the Scotch settle near, IV., 513; two ships put into 
New York from, 591 ; provisions sent from New 
York to, 592 ; a brief account of the Scotch settle- 
ment at, where to be found, 596 ; final fate of the ad- 
venturers to, 711, 760 ; John Anderson commanded 
a ship to, v., 335 ; William III., aspersed an account 
of, 758. (See Caledonia.) 
Dark, James, captain in the 8th Virginia continentals, VIII., 

731 ; his services, 732. 
Darkins (Darking), Robert, III., 604, IV., 935, 944, 946, 

1008. 
Darlin, Richard, II., 730. 

Darmstadt, John, landgrave of, visits London, I., 109. 
Darnall, Henry, member of the councU of Maryland, III., 

347. 
Darnall, John, member of the council of the province of 

Maryland, III., 347. 
Darragay, Mr., contracts to send supplies to Canada, X., 

945. 
Darragory, captain, X., 164. 
Darraq, captain St. Jean, arrives at Quebec from Martinico, 

X., 129. 
Dartmouth, [George Legge, 1st] lord, member of the privy 
council. III., 357, 388, 389. 



178 



GENEEAL INDEX. 



[Dae — 



Dartmouth, WUliam [Legge, 2a] lord (1st earl of), secretary 
of state, III., viii ; oue of the lords of trade, xv, xvi, 
IV., 9C3, 9G6, 1037, 1039, 1140, 1157, 1173, 1175, 
1176, 1179, v., 7, 26, 88, 89, 92, 120, 122, 124; 
member of the privy council, IV., 961, 1127; gov- 
ernor Hunter writes to, V., 169, 183; the board of 
trade transmit their report on naval stores and the 
Palatines to, 187 ; letter of the earl of Clarendon to, 
on the scheme for employing the Palatines, 195 ; 
governor Hunter receives a letter from, 199 ; wearied 
with the grievances of New York and New Jersey, 
255 ; advised of the wreck of his majesty's ship Fe- 
versham, 284, and of the state of the government of 
New York, 285 ; an address for the renewal of the ex- 
pedition against Canada transmitted to, 296 ; com- 
municates a petition of New York merchants to the 
board of trade, 331 ; governor Hunter's complaints of 
the house of assembly laid before, 359 ; his son in 
the navy, X., 131. 
Dartmouth, William [Legge, 2d] earl of, secretary of state, 
III., x.VIII., 303, 311, 313; first lord of trade. III., 
xviii, xix, VII., 763, 772, 828, 843, 845, 847, VIII., 
322, 337, 355, 380, 401, 485, 545, 577; letters of gov- 
ernor Moore of New York to, VII., 789, 802, 807, 
826 ; letters of, to the governors in America, VIII., 303, 
388, 409, 509, 515, 527, 542, 545, 569, 634, 642; give 
notice that a settlement is to be formed on the lands 
purchased of the Indians on the Ohio in 1768, 311, 
315, 348, 369 ; his letters to sir William Johnson, 
311, 348, 360, 392, 404, 416, 468; letters of sir 
William Johnson to, 313, 340, 361, 368, 395, 405, 
419, 421, 459 ; letters to governor Tryou from, 317, 
337, 338, 339, 347, 356, 358, 359, 372, 387, 391, 398, 
399, 400, 408, 409, 413, 415, 569, 572, 574, 587, 591 ; 
does not think that all the territory south of the St. 
Lawrence originally belonged to the five nations, 318 ; 
judge Livingston lays his case before, 319 ; letters of 
lieutenant-governor Golden to, 327, 431, 433, 469, 
485, 488, 491, 492, 510, 512, 528, 530, 531, 543, 564, 
566, 571, 579, 588 ; applied to, for a salary for the 
lieutenant-governor of New Y'ork, 329 ; is averse to 
the calling out the military except in cases of absolute 
necessity, 239, 399; censures governor Tryon, 339 ; 
letters of governor Tryon (o, 341, 342, 349, 350, 369, 
870, 371, 372, 373, 377, 380, 389, 393, 397, 400, 402, 
403, 407, 417, 434, 589, 592, 593, 597, 603, 631, 633, 
638, 643, 644, 645, 647, 649, 651, 663, 666 ; letters of, 
to lieutenant-governor Golden, 347, 468, 487, 509, 514, 
529, 530, 547 ; declines to allow a salary to the lieu- 
tenant-governor of New York, 348; chief justice 
Horsmanden reports the difficulties he experienced 
in Rhode Island to, 350, 390; is of opinion that the 
original titles in the New Hampshire grants ought not 
to have been disturbed, 356 ; member of the privy 
council, 357; blowing up of Crown Point and the 
settlement of the New York and llassachusetts boun^ 
dary reported to, 371 ; condemns the practice of issu' 



ing licenses to purchase Indian lands without the 
king's previous consent, 392 ; transmits veto on lot- 
teries, 398 ; opposition to the importation of tea into 
the colonies reported to, 400, 402, 407, 408, 431, 488, 
512 ; informed that the seeds of civil war are growing in 
Bennington, 403 ; burning of the government house 
in New York reported to, 407 ; announces the king's 
intention to secure the dependence of the colonies, 
409 ; transmits royal instructions respecting the grant- 
ing of lauds in the colonies, ibid ; expresses his indig- 
nation at the audacious insult offered to the authority 
of England at Boston, 413; grants governor Tryon 
permission to return to England, 415 ; informed that 
the administration of the government of New Y'ork 
has devolved on lieutenant-governor Golden, 417, 
431 ; requested to appoint Guy Johnson superinten- 
dent of Indian affairs in case of sir William John- 
son's death, 419 ; informed of the excitement conse- 
quent on the news of the Boston port bill, and that 
steps are taking in the colonies to stop all trade with 
Great Britain and the West Indies, 433; governor 
Tryon transmits hig report on the province of New 
York to, 434 ; notified of the intended meeting of the 
continental congi-ess, 469, 485, 488 ; death of sir 
William Johnson announced to, 471, 485; letters of 
Guy Jolinson to, 471, 472, 489, 494, 515, 533, 548, 
635 ; calls the attention of the government of New 
Y'ork to the illegal importation of military stores, 487 ; 
letters to Guy Johnson from, 489, 531, 570, 592, 596 ; 
riotous proceedings in the New Hampshire grants 
reported to, 491, 566 ; notifies the governors in 
America that the exportation of gunpowdej- from 
Great Britain is prohibited, 509, and that gunpowder 
is smuggled from Holland into the colonies, 510 ; 
proceedings of the continental congress transmitted 
to, ibid; address of the congress to the people of 
Quebec transmitted to, 512 ; Mr. Galloway's plan for 
the government of the colonies sent to, 513 ; commu- 
nicates the king's resolution to maintain the authority 
of parliament over the colonies, 515 ; orders the gov- 
ernors of the colonies to prevent election of dele- 
gates to the continental congress, 527 ; would wish 
the proceedings of congress had been such as not to 
provoke the vengeance of the mother country, 529 ; 
transmits to America the joint address of parliament 
to the king, 542, and the resolution of the house of 
commons thereon, 546 ; states that the king is re- 
solved to discourage in the colonies all ideas of 
independence, 547; will recommend parties for grants 
of land if they disavow all association to obstruct the 
trade with Great Britain, 570 ; effect of the news from 
Lexington on the public mind communicated to, 571 ; 
informed that the powers of government are entirely 
prostrated in New York, ibid ; orders governor Tryou 
to return to New Y'ork, 572; his instructions to that 
officer, 573 ; presents the petition of the New York 
assembly to the king, 574 ; informed that congress is 



-DeaJ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



179 



Dartmouth, William, 2d earl of — continued. 

raising an army and erecting forts, 580, and that 
Ticonderoga and Crown Point have been taken, 581 ; 
makes known the king's resolntion to exert every 
power to compel the colonies to obedience and that 
an army and a fleet are about to be sent to America, 
587, 591; informed that oceans of blood may be spilt 
but America will never submit to parliamentary taxa- 
tion, 589 ; instructs Guy Johnson to prevent the 
Indians supporting the rebellious proceedings in the 
colonies, 592 ; orders that the Indians be let loose 
against the colonists, 596; notified of the progress of 
the American revolution, 597, 603, 631, 646, 650; 
informed that the Indians will cooperate with his 
majesty's troops, 636, and of the invasion of Canada 
by the Americans, ibid, 644, also that oixlers have 
been issued to secure all the crown officers in New 
York, 638; authorizes the crown officers to retire 
from their posts whenever their personal safety re- 
quires them so to do, 642; informed that governor 
Tryon and other public officers have retired on board 
ship, 643 ; that sir John Johnson has been arrested, 
and that general Montgomery has been defeated, 663 ; 
advised that the New York records have been removed 
on board the ship Duchess of Gordon, 667; sends to 
America a commission to Inquire into the burning of 
his majesty's schooner Gaspie, 708. 

Darvall, John, III., 312. 

Dastrel, lieutenant, sent in pursuit of an English scouting 
party, X., 570. 

D'auberville, lieutenant, IX., 535 ; captain, in the expedition 
against the Oneidas, 655. (See Auberville.) 

Daulinge, Trever, III., 501. 

D'Aumeny, captain, IX., 235. 

Daumont. (See St. Lusson.) 

D'Aunay-Charnizay, Charles de Menou, lieutenant-governor 
on the Etchemin coast, IX., 4; governor of Acadia, 
782 ; extent of his government, ibid ; dead, 783. 

Daures, lieutenant Deseau, wounded, X., 431, 

Dauteuil, M., IX., 875. 

Dautray, M., IX., 791. 

Dautrechaux. {See Autrechaux.) 

Dautrive, Mr., treasurer's clerk at Montreal, cause of his re- 
tirement, X., 938. 

Davan, John, lieutenant of the royal artillery, VIII., 603. 

Davaugour, reverend father, IX., 994. 

Davenant, doctor, his work on trade quoted, IV., 792. 

Daveiiport, judge Addington, William Dudley marries a 
daughter of, IX., 941. 

Davenport, John, IV., 936, 941, 1006, 1010. 

Davenport, reverend John, invited to Boston, III., 161; 
makes a rent in the church there, 184. 

Davenport, Nathaniel, II., 667; accused of being a spy, 668; 
mentioned, 703, 723. 

Davenport (Davenport), Thomas, IV., 934, 1135, V., 332. 

Daventry, baron, sir Heneage Finch created, II., 534. 

Daveth, Jan, II., 371. 



David, , IX., 160. 

David, a Schoharie chief, VII., 110, 111 ; a Canajoharee 

Indian, 515. 
David (Daviel), brigadier, X., 147. 
David, king, numbers the people of Israel, V., 777. 
David, Guillaume, IX., 139. 
David, James, III., 75. 

Davidson, William, secretary of st.^te, III., vi. 
Davidts, Tomes, II., 249. 
Davies, Joseph, IV., 128, 144, 180. 
Davies, Margaret, III., 344. 

Davis, , Indians repulsed in an attack on the house of, 

IX., 614. 
Davis, Experience, VII., 903. 
Davis, George, IV., 936, 1007. 
Davis, John, VII , 905. 
Davis, Jolin, discoveries of, IX., 3, 305 ; goes in search of a 

northwestern passage, 702. 
D.avis, Jonathan, IV., 1008. 

Davis, lieutenant, E. N., in command of the Triton's prize, 
IV., 1189 ; refuses to obey orders from lord Cornbury, 
1191 ; is arrested and restored to his command, 1192 ; 
captain, sunt in chase of a French privateer, V., 20; 
is wounded, 21 ; mentioned, 168. 
Davis, Mr., VIII., 51. 

Davis, Mr., searcher at New York, V., 230, 233. 
Davis, lieutenant Michael, killed at Ticonderoga, X., 730. 
Davis (Davies), reverend Mr., a candidate for holy orders, 

VII., 440 ; a missionary in Connecticut, 497. 
Davis, Nathaniel, captain of New Jersey rioters, VI., 346, 

347. 
Davis, Nicolas, II., 647. 
Davis, Richard, IV., 936, 1009. 
Davis, Salomon, IV., 941. 
Davis, Samuel, III., 200, 213. 

Davis, captain Silvanus, exchanged, IX., 461; brought 
prisoner to Canada, 473; biographical notice of, 489. 
Davis, captain Simon, wounded at lake George, A^I., 1006. 
Davis, Thomas, IV., 1008. 
Davis, William, IV., 937, 1007. 
Davis, captain William, brings stamps to New York, VII., 

768, 791. 
Davis straits, discoveries in, IX., 1, 3; mentioned, 67. 
Davison, captain Charles, commands a privateer, VI., 243. 
Davison, John, captain of the Eagle galley, IV., 1105, 1107. 
Davison, major, exports timber from Massachusetts to Por- 
tugal, IV., 645. 
Davison, sir William, III., 167. 
Davits, Jean, IV., 937. 
Daxley, Joseph, III , 273. 
Day, cornet, attacks the government of England from the 

pulpit of one of the London churches, I., 579. 
Dayton (Deayton), lieutenant of provincials, killed, VII., 562. 
Dayton, major-general Ellas, biographical notice of, VIII., 

682 ; mentioned, 806. 
Deacon, George, member of the council of New Jersey, V., 
335, 338, 521. 



180 



GENERAL INDEX. 



[Dea- 



Deal (England), III., 839, V., 739. 

Dean, Mr., recommended to congress, VIII., 627. 

Deane, captain, in the navy on lake Ontario, VII. 123. 

Deane, Thomas, III., 95, 107, 110. 

Dease, John, assists at an Indian conference held at Johns- 
town, VIII., 362, 496, 497, 499 ; at Staten island, 683. 

Deat, reverend Anloine, biographical notice of, IX., 1021. 

Deaths, among the early settlers on the Delaware, II., 69; 
in Canada in 1679, IX., 143. 

D'Eau (Dau, Deaux, d'O), chevalier, seized at Onondague 
and sent prisoner to New York, III., 732, IV., 214, 
IX., 470; instructionsto, III.,733; returns to France, 
855 ; suspected of having corresponded with Canada 
whilst a prisoner, IV., 42; mentioned, 66; Indian 
name of, 121 ; his treatment by the Indians referred 
to, 124, 125 ; escapes to Canada, 214, IX., 533, 543 ; 
sent by count Frontenac on an embassy to Onondaga, 
469 ; efforts made to gain intelligence of, 482 ; perfidy 
of the Iroquois towards, 495 ; sent to Boston, 499, 
501 ; Iroquois burn his interpreter and two canoemen, 
501, 502 ; at New York, 515 ; his restoration demanded, 
525 ; Mr. Nelson may be exchanged for, 531 ; name 
of a soldier taken with, 582. 

Debelin6. (See Nivcrvillc.) 

De Blois, , an Indian interpreter, VII., 752. 

Debonne, captain, killed, X., 1089. 

Deboraveille, M., IV., 116. (See d'lbervilk.) 

De Boyteulx, Gabriel, III., 749. 

De Bruyn, Francis II., 375, 463, 577; schepen of New 
Utrecht, 480, 481 ; appointed auctioneer to the Dutch 
towns on Long island, 675. 

De Bruyn (D. Broun, Debrowne), captain John, summoned 
to attend at the proclaiming of their majesties, III., 601 ; 
attends, 617 ; colonel Bayard issues commands to, 
647 ; order of colonel Bayard to, 658 ; and others com- 
missioned to superintend affairs at Albany, 702, 703 ; 
mentioned, 727 ; affidavit before, against Eobert Liv- 
ingston, 747; one of Leisler's council, 751. 

De Bruyn, Jo'n Henry, major of militia, IV., 809. 

Debts, public, why ordered to be collected, I., 429 ; pro- 
vision in the articles of capitulation of New Neth- 
erland for the payment of the, II., 251 ; of the 
province of New York, in 1700, IV., 829 ; in 1702, 
1052; in 1704, 1129 ; preferential, by the law of Eng- 
land, v., 3 ; an act passed for the payment of the 
public, 378, 379 ; governor Hunter urges the confir- 
mation thereof, 380; lord Cornbury's objections to 
the act for paying the public, 398 ; acts for paying 
the public, approved, 412, 447, 470 ; an act passed 
for paying the remainder of the, 499 ; caveat entered 
in England against the confirmation of that act, 503 ; 
governor Hunter's remarks on that act, 504; efforts 
made to prevent the confirmation of the last act for 
paying the public, 516 ; report of the board of trade 
on the New York act for paying the public, 522 ; an 
act passed in New York in relation to imprisonment 
for, 904 ; laws for the collection of, suspended in 
Massachusetts, VIII., 652. 



Debtors, an act passed to prevent frauds in, VIII., 356. 

Decanisora. (See Dckanissore.) 

Decanohoge (Dekanoge), a Mohawk village, IV., 655, 802. 

Decariaderoga, Indian name of Mr. Joseph Chew, VIII., 
501 ; its derivation, ibid. 

Decarihoga, his address to governor Try on, VIII., 304; 
chief of Canajoharie, 478 ; titular head of the Mo- 
hawks, 500. 

Decarry, , wounded, X., 1086. 

Dechambeau, the English laud at, X., 1002, 1033. 

Decker, Brour, IV., 1010. 

Decker, Cornelius, lieutenant of a troop of horse, IV., 810. 

Decker, Jacob, ensign of militia, IV., 810. 

Decker, Johan de, sent to Virginia to reclaim a ship and 
slaves captured by a privateer, II., 222 ; mentioned, 
253, 453, 467. 

Deckere, Abraham, L, 480, II., 187, 189. 

Declarain, M., IX., 518. 

Declaration, of vice-director Van Dinclage and fiscal Van 
Dyck against director Stuyvesant, I., 441 ; of Wap- 
panghzewan, an Indian sachem, respecting governor 
Printz wishing to buy his lands, 596 ; of Amatte- 
hooren and other Indians, of the cession of lauds on 
the South river to Peter Stuyvesant, " Chief Sachem 
of the Manhattans," 597, 599; of Jan Gaillardo, II., 
26; of Adrian Janssen, 28; before the Dutch consul 
at Cadiz, 44 ; in support of the Dutch title to the Dela- 
ware river, 80 ; of sundry persons at the South river 
as to attempts to induce them to move to the Manhat- 
tans, 103, 104, 105; of captain John Underbill, 
showing forth the reasons which impel him to re- 
nounce director Stuyvesant's government, 151 ; of 
.the states general, in favor of the title of the West 
India company to New Netherland, 228 ; of Aegidius 
Luyck and others, that there was not powder enough 
to defend fort Amsterdam, 469 ; of Messrs. Van 
Ruyven and Bayard, respecting the efforts made by 
director Stuyvesant to obtain provisions from New 
England, 473 ; of sundi-y persons, respecting the 
violent conduct of captain John Scott on Long island, 
480 ; of Herman Martens van der Bosch and Evert 
Williamsen Munnick, respecting the circumstances 
attending the surrender of New Netherland, 508 ; of 
the West India company, in favor of the proprietors 
of Rensselaerswyck, 558 ; of the commanders of 
sundry New England vessels captured and brought into 
New Orange, 715 ; showing the illegality, &o., of the 
patent of Maryland, III., 23; of deputies from the 
towns on Long island, 91 ; of the general court of 
Massachusetts against the king's commissioners, 95 ; 
ordered published, 96; reply to the, ibid; of William 
Weexe, about the Indians seizing a vessel, 168 ; of 
governor Lovelace, that if a minister shall come from 
Holland, he shall have a proper salary, 189 ; of the 
freeholders of Suffolk county (Long island), 577 ; of 
the inhabitants and soldiers of New York in 1689, 
referred to, 639 ; of the lords and commons assembled 



— Dej] 



GENERAL INDEX. 



181 



Declaration — continued. 

in 1689, extracts from the, 683 ; of governor Clinton 
upon Mr. Horsmanden's affidavit, VI., 601 ; of some 
soldiers in Shirley's regiment, about the capture of 
Oswego, VII., 126; of independence, accepted by 
New York, VIII., 295 ; signed by Philip Livingston, 
470, and issued, 682 ; copy thereof transmitted to 
England, 684 ; of the desire of the Iroquois to remain 
neutral between the French .and English, IX., 384; 
addressed in the name of the king of France to the 
Canadians, X., 1165. 

Decliiratory act. (See Act.) 

De Collier, Mr. (See Callieres.) 

Decombles (Decombes), Lombart, engineer, ordered to re- 
connoitre the works at Oswego, X., 441, 472; killed, 
442, 455, 459, 461, 465, 468, 473, 476, 478, 485, 631, 
532, 916, 918 ; name of the Indian who killed, 560 ; 
his effects sold, 564. 

Decout, M., sails for cape Breton, X., 178. 

Decoiiverte, M. de la, IX., 778. 

Decree, accepting M. de la Salle's propositions respecting a 
colony in Canada, and granting him fort Frontenac, 
IX., 123. 

Deeckeneamer, Pieter Pietersen, II., 49, 102. 

Deed, of lands on the Schuylkill, I., 593; of Shelter island 
to Nathaniel Silvester, II., 590 ; of trust and confir- 
mation of their lands, by three of the sis nations, to 
the crown of Great Britain, V., 800 ; of the Mohawks 
conveying the Mohawk fliits to the king, VI., 15 ; of 
land round Irondequoit, 204 ; of lands on the Ohio 
surrendered by Pennsylvania, mentioned, VII., 388 ; 
to be lodged in the council house at Onondaga, 390 ; 
recorded, 391 ; determining the Indian boundary, exe- 
cuted at fort Stanwix, VIII., 135. 

Deene, R., IV., 935. 

Deepinge, William, surgeon, I., 77. 

Deer, price of, at the Delaware river, II., 12; acts passed for 
the preservation of, IV., 1168; V., 782; of Canada 
handsomer than those of Europe, IX., 102; abundant 
on Lake Erie, 885. 

Deerfield (Deirfild, Guerrefille), (Massachusetts), III., 562, 
786 ; New York Indians suspected of having killed 
some persons at, IV., 38, 41, 44, 46 ; those murders 
charged to Indians from Canada, 45 ; the Mohegan 
Indians protest their innocence of the murders com- 
mitted at, 47; cut off, 1083, 10S5, 1099, IX., 758, 
762, a party set out from Canada to attack, V., 86, 
IX., 831; attacked by Canada Indians, X., 33; de- 
feat of a detachment from, 77 ; a French party march 
towards, 143 ; their leader killed, ibid ; Samuel Al- 
len of, a prisoner in Canada, 153, 158. 

Deering, lieutenant, in the Arundel frigate, IV., 712 ; takes 
a pair of snow shoes to the lords of trade, 719 ; 
commands the ship Fortune, 722, 760. 

Deer island, IX., 651, X. 349. 

Defense, of Messrs. Knyter and Melyn, I., 205 ; of fiscal 
Hendrick Van Dyck, 489 ; of Dr. Barclay against 
Smith, mentioned, VIL, 536, 566, 592. 



Defiance (Ohio), ancient name of, IX., 891. 

De Foreest, Isaac, I., 192, 193, 327, 597, II., 249, 700; taken 
pi-isoner and released by the English, 601, 503 ; 
takes the oath of allegiance, III., 75 ; deacon of the 
Dutch church at New Y'ork, 749 . 

Deforeest, Isaac, an Albany merchant, VII., 615. 

Deforest, Jose, makes application in behalf of the Wal- 
loons, III., 10. 

Degachnawadichqui, an Onondaga sachem, IV., 898. _ 

Deganatuichtiage, on the north side of lake Cadaracqui, IV., 
732. 

Degarandagoo, an Oneida sachem, IV., 897. 

Degaronda, an Oneida chief, IV., 910. 

De Gay, lieutenant, of the frigate I'Aurore, sent with a mes- 
sage to Minas, X., 62. 

Degemesais. (See Gameraye.) 

De Gens, Lourens, II., 183. 

Degonhondie, a Seneca chief. III., 322. 

De Graeff, Cornells, lord of South Polsbrock, 11., 21, 71, 75 ; 
memoir of, 56 ; vice-director Alricks communicates 
an account of affairs at the Delaware to, 68, 76 ; ap- 
pointed to confer with the West India company on 
the affairs of the colonie at the Delaware, 206, 210 ; 
report of, 212. 

DeGrau, Gerrit, an act passed to entitle him to the fishery of 
porpoises, V., 390. 

Degraw, lieutenant, wounded, X., 731. 

De Grays, ciptain, serves against the Onondagas, IX., 
650. 

De Grey, Thomas, father of William, lord Walsingliam, 
VIII., 256. 

De Grey, Thomas, under-secretary of state, III , xii, VI