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Full text of "The Domesday book for the County of Derby, reprinted from "The feudal history of the County of Derby," (chiefly during the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries)"

4. ^ 




THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



THE 



DOMESDAY BOOK 



FOR THE 



County of H)evbiP. 



REPRINTED FROM 



"^be jfeu^al Ibietor^ of tbc County of Dcrb^," 

{Chiefly during the iilh, .I2th, and 13//; Centuries,) 



BY 

JOHN PYM YEATMAN, ESQ., 

(ty Lincoln s Inn, Barrister-at- Law, formerly of Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge, and F.R.H.S,, ^'c.) 

Author of "The Early Genealogical History of the House of Arundel;" "The 
History of the Common Law ok Great Britain and Gaul;" "An Introduction to the 
Study OF Early English History;" " The Mayor's Court Act, 1857;" "An Introduction 
TO THE History of the House of Glanvili.e;" "A Tkeatise on the Law of Trades 
Marks;" "The Origin of the Nations of Western Europe;" ' The Records of Ches- 
nFKFiEiL):' ' A Treatise on THE Law of Ancient Demesne ; " "An Exposure of the 
Mismanagement of the Public Recokd Office," &c., &c. 



XonDoii : 

liEMROSE & SOiNS, 23, OLD JiAILEy; AND Dl.ki'.V. 

LONDON AND OXIOKD: I'AKKER & Co. 
CnESTEKFIKLI): WILFRED EDMUNDS, ," UERIiY.SHIRE TIMES." 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2008 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/domesdaybookforcOOyeat 



THE 



DOMESDAY BOOK 



FOR THE 



douiit^ of 2)eib^. 



REPRINTED FROM 

*' Zbc Jfcu^al Ibistor^ of tbe County of 2)crbv>/' 

(C/iieJly during the Wth, izth, and \T,th Centuries,) 
BY 

JOHN PYM YEATMAN, ESQ., 

(Of Lincoln's Inn, Barrisler-at-La'w, formerly of Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge, and F.R.H.S,, &^c.) 

Author of "The Early Ges-ealogical History of the House of Arundel;" "The 
History of the Common Law ok Great Britain and Gaul;" "An Introduction to the 
Study of Early English History;" " The Mayor's Court Act, 1857;" "An Introduction 
TO the History of the House of Glanville;" "A Treatise on the Law of Trades 
Marks;" "The Origin of the Nations of Western Europe;" " The Records of Ches- 
terfield;" "A Treatise on the Law of Ancient Demesne;" "An Exposure of the 
Mismanagement of the Public Record Office," &c., &c. 



Xon^on : 

BEMROSE & SONS, 23, OLD JiAlLKV ; AND DERBY. 

LONDON AND OXFORD: PARKER & Co. 
CHESTERFIELD: WILFRED EDMUNDS, "DERBYSHIRE TIMES." 



DA 



SECTION I. 



COLLECTIONS FOR THE HISTORY OF 
DERBYSHIRE. 



THE BOOK OF DOMESDAY 



CHAPTER I. 

The great work of Domesday is the foundation of feudal 
history ; and a (e\v observations upon its nature and value 
may assist the learned reader in fairl\- considering it. The 
great importance of this work does not arise because feudal 
institutions were founded in England at this period, as so 
many writers pretend, but because prior to this period writing 
was rarely used, either in the transfer or in the dealing with 
lands and manors, and it is the first fiscal record that we 
possess. The laws which then governed the country, especially 
with regard to measurements affecting taxation of land, varied 
from petty kingdom to kingdom, and frequently in the same 
territory, and it was only in those laws which affected the 
Sovereign state that uniformity prevailed. It was chiefly in 
order to assimilate these laws that the survey was made. We 
find proof of the first proposition in the ever-varying customs 
of manors which prevail at the present day, whilst Domesday 
gives us distinct jjroof of the latter. 

In Domesday we possess, probabl)', the sum of the law, 
or as it was called the common law, to distinguish it from 
local custom, wliich existed in P.ngland for centuries prior to 

2 



G298i0 



2 BOOK OK DOMESDAY. 

its date, even so far back as the occupatu)n of the Romans. 
Each monarch, as he ascended the throne, undertook to govern 
by the laws of his predecessors, and it is probable, though it 
is by no means clear, that this undertaking was reduced into 
writing, }'ct it is tolerably clear from the absence of contempo- 
rary authority, that William the Conqueror, who gave the same 
undertaking as did Canute and others, did not reduce his 
charter of liberties into writing, for there is no evidence of its 
existence at any time ; possibly he felt that it would be more 
convenient to trust (as the English custom was) to the memories 
of his chiefs ; and it was probable, upon fmdiiig them somewhat 
treacherous, that he resolved to reduce the question of their 
relative rights and duties into the form of Domesday. 

However this may be, the Book of Domesday is the first 
account we possess of the tenures of English estates, and so far 
as regards Derbyshire, the on!}' comprehensive record for a 
considerable period. 

It is true that we shall find here and there in the charters 
granted by the Crown to various religious houses, and in the 
Pipe Rolls, and in some of the earliest public records, and in 
occasional private charters, facts of importance to county 
history ; but the first class. Abbey Cartularies, are not cotem- 
porary records, these documents having generally been com- 
piled as late as the thirteenth century ; and the writers of 
them had too much concern for the special interests of their 
orders to be invariably reliable, and as the earliest charters 
recorded in their books must have perished before they were 
compiled, it is obvious that they can only have been handed 
down by tradition ; indeed, the fact that before the Conquest 
writing was not employed in the transfer of land, seriously 
detracts from the little respect that can generally be accorded 
to them. 

That it was a fact, clear beyond dispute, that writing was 
not employed in land transfer, we may learn from the double 
system of conveyancing, that by charter, and that by fine, with 
livery of seizin (without charter), which prevailed down to the 
time of Charles the Second. 

And it is only after the Records of the County Court and 
of the Aula Regis were reduced into writing (a system which 
was inaugurated by the composition of Domesday), that we 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 3 

can positively state, apart from the evidence of Domesday, 
what was the law affecting land in private hands, and who 
were the holders, and the terms of their tenure ; yet, looking 
at the tenacity with which the landowners clung to their rights 
during the 450 years of which we have official record, and 
indeed as regards under-tenants in private manors quite down 
to the present day, we may safely conclude that little change 
was made for centuries before this period, yet this is at best 
conjecture, and in endeavouring to write a history of these 
institutions, it is necessary to rely strictly upon facts, and to 
give the best positive proofs that can be supplied in support 
of it. 

Another reason why Domesday must be taken as the 
groundwork of our history, is that the greatest mystery and 
suspicion hangs over the question ; it is a fact that, until 
within a very short period, the existence of the so-called Saxon 
charters was unknown, even to so great an antiquary as Seldon. 
He declared that he never saw one, and well knowing that the 
English before the Conquest did not use writing in the con- 
veyance of land, he, not unnaturally, doubted their existence. 

Since the days of Seldon, however, a complete Saxon litera- 
ture has been unearthed ; when, where, and how, it is not the 
province of this work to discover, but it may be remarked that 
the vast majority of these documents betray their own untrust- 
worthiness, by the fact that they contain no dates or details of 
the smallest value, which were previously unknown, and which 
can be tested by ascertained facts, whilst the authentic Norman 
contemporary charters and chartularies upon which this work 
is based are of the greatest value and interest, since they abound 
with life and instruction, and give us an insight into the [public 
as well as the private history of estates antl individuals. 

If the learned reader is desirous of following up the author's 
views on this subject, he must refer to his books on " harly 
English History," and that on "The Origin of the Nations of 
Western Europe." Here they would be out of place, and are 
only referred to for the purpose of weighing the value of tlic 
testimony of Domesday. 

It must here be remarked that, although very precious, 
Domesday is not so comprehensive and so valuable as it is 
generally supposed to be, and as both Sir Henry James and 



4 noOK OV DOMKSDAV. 

Mr. Lloucllyiiii jcwitt insist. Holh these learned writers seem 
to sum up their estimate of it, by (^uotiii^;' a passage from tliat 
mvthieal and wholly unreliable work, the Saxon Chronicle, 
the sjjist of which is, that in the j-ear 1085 Kinsj^ William, 
hearini^ when in Normand)- of a projected Danish Invasion, 
came over to England " with so large an army of horsemen and 
foot from France and from Brittany, as never before had sought 
this land, so that men wondered how this land could feed all 
that arm}-, but the king caused the army to be distributed 
through all this land among his vassals, and they fed this army, 
each according to the measure of his land." 

"After this the king had a great counsel and very deep speech 
with his witan about this land, how it was peopled and by 
what men, then sent his men over all England into every 
shire, and caused to be ascertained how many hundred hides 
were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and cattle 
within the land, and what dues he ought to have in twelve 
months from the shire. Also, he caused to be written how 
much land his archbishops had, and his suffragan bishops, and 
his abbots, and his earls, and though I may narrate somewhat 
prolixly what or how much each man had who was a holder 
of land in England, in land or in cattle, and how much money 
it might be worth, so very narrowly he caused it to be traced 
out, there was not one single hide, nor one yard of land (this 
should be translated " Yardland " or Virgate), nor even (it is 
shame to tell, though it seemed to him no shame to do) an 
ox, nor a cow, nor a swine was left, that was not set down in 
his writs, and all the writings were brought to him afterwards." 

Now before referring to the errors and inaccuracies of 
this account, it may be worth while to enquire w^ho was the 
author of it. 

Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt calls it "a remarkable and important 
passage from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle," but the date shows 
that it could not have formed a portion of that Chronicle, 
which was, in fact, that of Marianus Scotus, as the author has 
proved in his " Early English History," and it was first called the 
Saxon Chronicle by Archbishop Parker, who himself invented 
the absurd compound term Anglo-Saxon, a word which 
puzzles foreign archaeologists, since it compounds the native 
with the foreign name of Englishmen. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 5 

Marianus Scotus probably concluded his portion of the history 
about the j-ear 1056, when he left this country ; but the writer 
of this paragraph evidently resided here. He was probably 
Florence of Worcester, who adopted and continued INIarianus, 
but whose work was so little thought of by William of Malmes- 
bury, that in giving an account of the histories extant in 1 1 20, 
he does not even refer to Marianus, the Saxon Chronicle, or to 
Florence of Worcester ; indeed, none of these works were 
brought to light until long afterwards, when a market was 
created for the concoction of Saxon literature. 

Now, first, as to the motive of the compilation — to find pro- 
vision for the army. This is a palpable error. The army might 
be billetted by necessity, but not by law, upon the people, for 
the peo{)le were the army, A standing army was then unknown. 
The king had no rights, and Domesday shows that he had no 
rights, over the lands of his tenants, except as regards his 
hidage, or, as Mr. Boult (Transactions of the Historic Society of 
Liverpool, 1871), states, the "aids" due from the land to 
the Crown, and the rights (courtesy, more properly), when the 
king made his journeys (progresses) through the country, he 
had nothing to do with the oxen, cows, or pigs on the estates, 
except when in progress he consumed a part of them. Nor 
could he intermeddle with the sub-rents of the tenants in any 
way. Each barony, nay, each manor, was a separate kingdom ; 
an iniperiiun in iinperio, governed by its own laws. Florence 
(or the writer of this paragraph) has blushed needlessly for the 
king on this account. His mistake, no doubt, arose from the 
mention of bovats or oxgangs, on which hides were payable ; 
just as at an earlier period, instead of in money prices were 
measured by so many oxen. 

The rents which the king could exact were only rack, or dry 
rents, and by no means represented the true value of the estate 
to the holder, but only the hidage or aid due to the king. It 
was originally a fixed measure of one pound — the old l^ritish 
tunc pound — which every knight paid for his fee of so many 
ploughlands. The record strictly only takes in the number of 
these ploughlands or bovates hidable in each village or town, 
and sometimes we luckily get at the name of the tenant — though 
very rarely more than his Christian name — but nothing more, 
for the kin" had no interest in him or control over liim, c.\'cc[)t. 



6 HOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

perhaps, as a measure of the number of fees in the viUage upon 
which his lenant-iii-cliicf ought to pay liide. Tlie rents of the 
sub-tt n.mt and the terms of his tenure was a matter solely 
between the uuder-lord and himself, and of no importance to the 
kint;-. 

A \av more reliable account of the motives of the g;veat Survey 
is to l>c found in the Register of Bermondsey under the years 
1083--I, from which it would seem that it was a mere register 
of rents due to the Crown. It is quite clear, also, that, although 
the Commissioners, probably in consequence of special instruc- 
tions, made a return of all the fees in each village, they were not 
all geldable — that is, they did not all of them pay aid to the king, 
for we frequently read that in certain places only so many 
carucates were geldable, though others are mentioned, and 
even in King Edward's time, the payment for a carucate was 
variable. A carucate is only another name for ploughland ; 
hide refers to the aid payable in respect of it. Carucate is the 
cart team necessary to work it, supposed to be so called after 
the Roman manner of four horses having been yoked abreast. 

To show the variable nature of the tax, in Foston, four knights 
had, in King Edward's time, two and a half carucates hidable; 
then, twelve villains and eight borders had three ploughs and 
ten acres of meadow, of which the value was forty shillings. 

In Alkmanton there were four ploughs, two in demesne, and 
eight villains ; and then there were seven borders who had two 
ploughs and twelve acres of meadow. The value was the same. 

In Holloington, six thanes had one and a half carucates 
geldable. and land for twelve oxen ; eleven villains and seven 
borders had seven ploughs and eight acres of meadow, and a 
little underwood, in the time of King Edward, and then it was /^ 
worth forty shillings. 

In Bradley, two knights had one carucate hidable, land for 
two ploughs, and it was worth forty shillings. 

In Snelston, six ploughs were valued at the same rate ; indeed, 
so variable is the number of carucates, ploughs, bovates, and 
acres for each forty or twenty shillings, that no rule can be laid 
down on that measure ; and the only safe conclusion seems to be, 
that for every separate holding in a village, one pound — the 
ancient British tunc pound — was originally charged : that is, a 
place was reckoned by so many knights' fees, each of which 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. J 

was assessed at that sum. And in the course of centuries the 
actual value and working capacity of the estate had greatly 
increased, whilst the hide had not been raised. The king's 
thanes held their lands at a much cheaper rate. It was 
evidently originally taxed as the other land by pounds ; but 
these were now generally measured by shillings, probably 
according to the goodwill of the former sovereign at the time of 
the grant. In early days, land given to favourites was described 
as being held by a fraction of a knight's fee, sometimes a 200th 
part, or a nominal sum. 

These thanes are a particularly interestiiig class, as they 
represented the ancient nobility of the kingdom, and who were 
allowed still to hold their ancient fiefs. Many more were 
under-tenants of the Norman lords, but these men were never 
displaced. Another class of men rated were those living in 
towns where a hide or aid was paid for so many mansions or for 
so many ploughlands adjacent to the town, and belonging to it. 

Mr. Kemble (" Saxons in England," Vol. I., p. 488), who, with 
a certain class of writers (unfortunately a very large one), 
persists in ignoring the Celtic element in our laws, language, and 
literature (though it is the chief element), has made a ridiculous 
mistake in confounding the hide with the ploughland — that is, 
the tax with the subject of taxation. He writes, "it is necessary 
to bear in mind, that the hide is exclusively arable land," a state- 
ment which is at once disposed of by the taxes upon towns. For 
instance, Chester was assessed at 50 hides, whilst Exeter was 
assessed at 5. Derby, in King Edward's time, had 243 
burgesses ; then it had 100 burgesses, and 40 lesser ones, "whilst 
103 mansions, which used to be assessed, were waste." In King 
Edward's time the town had 12 carucates adjoining it, and 
rendered ;i^24 ; then, with the ten mills and Litchurch, it was 
worth £10. At the same period (King Edward's time) Notting- 
ham had 173 burgesses, and only 6 carucates of land, for which, 
with the burgesses works, they paid only 75 shillings and 
7 pence. In King William's time there were only 136 men 
dwelling there, 13 of whom had been put in by Hugh fitz Baldric, 
the Sheriff. In the time of King Edward, Nottin;j;ham yielded 
in rent ;^i8; at Domesday, ;^30. 

It is very difficult tf) say at what hidagc each of these towns 
was assessed, or whether they were assessed only according to 



HdOK OK DOMliSDAY. 



the hiiri^css aid. Tlu> threat increase from ^i8 and £24. to ^^30 in 
Nottini^hani antl Derby, in spite of decrease in the number of 
burj^esses in both, adds to the difficulty. The mini at Nottin;j[ham 
paid ;^io extra. Mines, saltworks, fisheries, and other properties, 
all contributed to make up the hides, so that many houses must 
have f^one to form a single hide Where a city was measured 
b\- hides, the probability is that each parish in a city represented 
one or more hides, just as did a vill in the country. It may 
be, however, that the value at which these towns were assessed 
was only in respect of the lands held by tlicm adjacent to the 
town, for the Pipe Rolls show that independently of the Dane- 
geld there was a distinct burgess aid. The particulars given are 
hardly conclusive on the point. Another class of land owners, 
or rather of manors, which were enquired into were the Terra 
Regis, the lands of ancient demesne, that land which had always 
supplied the royal revenue. For the most part this was let to 
the king's tenants, some of whom supplied food for the royal 
tables ; whilst others were let to farm at substantial rents, called 
fee-farm rents, just as the tenants-in-chief underlet their own 
estates ; or perhaps at a nominal rent, if the estate were given 
as a reward to a favourite. In only some instances, and probably 
for these reasons, is there any value placed on these lands. 
Those lands so let at fee-farm could not be disposed of by 
the sovereign, except for his life. Upon his death they re- 
verted unfettered to his successor. 

VVc see, therefore, that not only did not the king, "to his 
shame," take an account of his subjects' cattle, but that he did 
not tax all their lands, but only those which, doubtless, from time 
out of mind, had been regularly taxed for the royal revenue, and 
those which he himself had granted, but it would rather seem 
that he increased the taxes on towns in proportion to their 
works, and the number of their burgesses. 

The following tables have been extracted from the MSS. of 
the late Rev. Robert Eyton, now deposited at the British 
Museum, and numbered 31924 amongst the Additional MSS., 
and they give at a glance an important fact, which supplies the 
true reason of the Survey. Instead of the king growing richer, 
the revenues of the Crown were, in country places at least, 
being sensibly diminished. Omitting fractions, the gross value 
of the five wapentakes of Derbyshire had fallen from £$^7 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 9 

to ;^455 ; and again, the measurement of a carucate varied 
in each hundred, no doubt to the king's loss. This calculation 
of the royal revenue, however, does not include the fee-farm 
rents of the Crown. 

We learn one important fact from the consideration of this 
subject which is generally overlooked. Not only were many 
ploughlands in vills which might have been taxed left out of 
the calculation, but only those vills in which lands are taxed 
are mentioned in Domesday, so that it is not a perfect record 
even of the estates of the nobles. The author has found nearly 
as many places in Derbyshire (many, if not most, of which must 
have been manors at this period), and which are unmentioned in 
Domesday as those which are given, and the number is con- 
tinually increasing, a fact which teaches us that Mr. Eyton's 
valuable tables must only be read as applying to Domesday, 
that is, to only part ot the county, and not as illustrative of the 
whole ; unfortunately, we have no means of obtaining statistics 
as to the rest. 

The Rev. Mr. Eyton, in his Derbyshire Notes, has pointed 
out various small distinctions observable in the different surveys 
of Derbyshire and Stafford, with a view to determine under 
which circuit they were severally surveyed, a matter of not very 
great importance ; his criticisms, however, are of greater value 
in determining the objects of the survey. In Derbyshire, mill 
sites, churches, and portions of manors apportioned to others, 
were mentioned, but not in Staffordshire, and the latter only 
invariably gave the measurements of small woods. These 
differences would appear to show that much was left to the 
discretion of the Commissioners, that the Crown desired to learn 
as much as possible, but that no special instructions were given 
on some subjects and therefore it would seem to follow that 
many items of property were referred to which were not taxable 
at that period. 

It would be interesting to learn whether the Conqueror took 
any legislative action in con.sequcnce of the report, or whether 
the laws relating to taxation remained unaltered, but were only 
more strictly applied. Judging from the evidence of the I'ipc 
Rolls, it would seem that nothing was done, and no legislation 
of any consequence appears to be recorded by contemixtniry 
chrcjniclers. 



10 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

It certainly appears from ICytoii's studies that Derby was 
surveyed by the same Commissioners who surveyed Yorkshire, 
Huntini;t]on, Nottingham, and Lincohishire, and that part of 
Rutland which was included in Nottingham ; and it is probable 
tliat the sur\e\-s of Lincolnshire and Yorkshire induced the 
Commissioners to call the hundreds of Derbyshire wapentakes. 
Why, it is not very clear, because there is nothing in common 
in the derivation of the two words, indeed 'the latter is generally 
used as a portion of the former, and there is one instance of 
such a measure of a hundred in Derbyshire in the Manor of 
Sawley. A portion of the wapentake or hundred of Morleston 
is called itself a liundred, and it contained 12 carucates, the 
standard measurement of the smaller kind of hundred. 

There can be but little doubt that before the Conquest, and 
when Derby formed a portion of the Kingdom of Mercia, it was 
then divided into hundreds, like its sister counties on the south 
and v/est. The name wapentake was only occasionally used in 
Derbyshire down to the time of Edward I., or perhaps a little 
later, when that of hundred became again permanently in use, 
but even when it was used, both words were used indiscrimi- 
nately. Eyton has expended a good deal of labour on this 
point, which is scarcely intelligible. Had he examined the 
records he would have seen that, whatever their meaning, the 
terms were used interchangeably, as if identical ; just as hide 
and carucate were afterwards confused. 

That in Derbyshire a wapentake is equivalent to a hundred is 
quite clear, from the fact that the modern hundreds are con- 
terminous with the Domesday wapentakes, although some of 
them have been sub-divided into two parts, or, perhaps more 
properly, half hundreds ; and this at once disposes of Eyton's 
idea that the county was divided into hundreds of 12 carucates 
each. 

Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt has not hazarded much upon the 
question of measurements, nor has he formed a definite system 
for Derbyshire ; perhaps in doing so he has exercised a wise 
discretion. He gives a carucate as equivalent to a ploughland, 
a rather indefinite expression ; a hide, which he also, with Mr. 
Kemble, regards as a measure of land and not of taxation, 
according to him varying from 30 to 120 acres. A bovat 
or oxgang, a ploughland, equal to an eighth part of a carucate. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. II 

and equal to a quantity varying from 8 to 24 acres. A virgate 
as a fourth, or perhaps an eighth of a hide, which, tabulated, 
omitting variations, leaves a virgate, and a bovat equal to an 
eighth of a hide, and therefore equal to each other, and each 
equal to eight acres, or it may be that one virgate equalled two 
bovats of that amount. 

The term hide does not appear to be used in the Derbyshire 
Domesday, nor does- virgate appear till a later period. Eyton 
has, according to the writer's ideas, fallen into great confusion 
by insisting upon the terms hide and carucate being identical, 
simpl)' because he supposed that he found that each contained 
48 geld acres (fol. 6) ; he, however, rejects the measure hide as 
applied to this county. He describes the county of Derby as 
divided into wapentakes, caiucates, bovats, and geld acres, 
whilst his own tables show that some of these measures bear 
no sort of proportion to each other, and indeed that they vary 
in each hundred. Omitting fractions, in Apletre there were 
512 acres to the carucate, in Morleston 261, in Hameston 736, 
and so on. Of course this discrepancy may be accounted for 
by supplying the acres which were not geldable, but taking it 
as true, this would give 64 acres to the bovat in Apletre, 
32 in Morleston, and 92 in Hameston ; yet in another part of 
his treatise, he has broadly stated that a Derbyshire carucate 
or ploughland measured 120 acres (fol. 12), and the mode he 
arrives at this calculation is so remarkable that the whole 
passage is transcribed. 
He writes : — 

" While on the subject of the ploughland, I would fain add 
from the Derbyshire Survey a corroboration of my theory 
adopted long since on other grounds, that the ordinary Terra 
ad unam caracam measured 120 statute acres. The passage 
describing Henry dc Ferrars' two manors of Hertshorne runs 
as follows : — Doms 80, 274, 3, 2. Manerium in Meorteshorne 
habebat Aluricus iiii carucatas terra: ad geldam. Terra iiij 
carucis, wasta est, silva pastilis dimidia Icuva lunga ct dimidia 
(Icuva) lata. Terra arabilis taiitundcm T. R. K. valebat iiij 
libras modo (valet) x solidos. 

"Manerium in alia Meorteshorne habetat Aluricus ij caru 
tcrrae ad geldam. Terra ij carucis, wasta est, silva pastilis 
dimidia Icuva lon<ja ct dimidia Icuva lat.i. Terra arabilis 



12 HOOK OV DOIMKSDAV. 

tantuiulcin T. R. IC. valcbat xl solidos modo valet x 
sol id OS." 

In each case the plough capacity (Terr. 4 car., Terr. 2 car.) 
is calculated perhaps on that ordinary feature of the carucate 
or hitlc, that each carucate or hide involved one ploughland, 
or it may have been that the Domesday Commissioners found 
actual record that 4 teams and 2 teams had been employed 
at some previous period on the two estates respectively. 
There could be no other adaptability or normal capacity ot 
the plougiiland, for we see that in one manor the four plough- 
lands co-ordinated with just the same quantity of arable land 
as did the two ploughlands of the other. The expressions terr 
iiij car, terra ij carucis, are used then either technically, erro- 
neously, or else with reference to some known antecedent, to 
correct the glaring inconsistency or inaccuracy, and to certify 
the Commissioners' opinion about adaptability or present 
capacity. They added, perhaps, those unusual words, measur- 
ing the arable land by an exact measure. 

The whole case will best be stated algebraically. In one 
manor, of 4 ploughlands = | league x h a league = 360 statute 
acres, 

or I ploughland = 90 statute acres. 

In the other manor, 2 ploughlands = h league x h a. league 
= 360 statute acres, 

or I [jloughland = 180 statute acres. 

It is not likely that the Domesday Commissioners were 
ignorant of the doctrine that two things equal to the same 
were equal to one another, but it is not improbable that, to 
point inaccurate or suspected jM'emises, they might use a process 
akin to what logicians term a rcductio ad absurdam ; they used 
other formula; suggestive of a similar suspicion, e£., terra est 
ij carucis sed tamen ibi iiij carucis. 

In all such questions, if we cannot surely interpret the text 
and intention of isolated passages of Domesday, we can estab- 
lish pretty safe conclusions by adding further premises and 
calculating general results. In the present case, the question 
of the average measurement of a Domesday ploughland, we 
need to add no further premises, we need only to combine 
the two seemingly discordant premises. The added equations 
will be : — 



HOOK OF DOMESDAY. 1 3 

4 pis. + 2 ploughs. = 360 a. + 360 a. 

6 ploughs. = 720 a. 

I plough. = 120 a. 

and such is the exact conclusion to which 1 arrived when 

studying the Dorset Survey, and arguing from other lights. — 

(See Key to Domesday, 23, 24.) 

It is only fair to point out that this MS. was not prepared 
for the press, and had it been, probably the learned author 
would himself have corrected it. 

Now, putting aside the extraordinary reasoning which could 
satisfy a man of such undoubted talent as Mr. Eyton, let us look 
at these entries, and two facts are at once apparent. First, that 
there is no other instance in the Derbyshire Domesday where 
arable land is measured by leagues ; it is invariably measured 
by carucates or land measures. That woods and underwoods, 
on the other hand, are never measured by carucates or plough 
measures, but always by lineal measures. And we shall see at 
once that, curiously enough, the scribe has used the words 
"arable land " twice, in mistake for underwood. In no instance 
in this Domesday is land, whether arable or not, given after 
wood ; besides, the land, although waste, was already measured, 
by land and not by lineal measure. Why, then, measure it twice 
over.'* This is not done in any other instance, as Mr. Eyton 
himself has discovered. But assuming that arable land was 
intended and only described by lineal measure, because, like 
wood, it was of little value (as a fact, waste lands are never so 
meahiured), how possibly could a simple addition and division 
sum, magnified here into an equation, solve the difficulty ? 
There is literally nothing in the entries ! In the first manor the 
tenant paid £4 for four carucates, and in tiic second £2 for a 
couple, that is the old tunc pound for each carucatc. lioth 
manors being waste, they were each reduced to the nominal 
payment of half a hide. 

The truth is, that many ancient terms, as hundred, hide, 
acre, etc., etc., have several distinct meanings, and at various 
periods either lo.sc their true meaning or arc misapplied. The 
important question for Derbyshire history is, what was the 
meaning of these terms in this county ? I'olidorc Vergil states- 
a hide to be 20 acres ; whilst Agard fixes it at 100; and other 
instances as high as 240. Sir George Sitwell has furnislR-d a 



14 WOOK OV I)(.>Mi:Sl)AV. 

Dcrbj'shire record, wherein a bovatc is stated i)i()[)eily to 
contain 8o acres (Charter concerning land at Barlhorongh), 
but a question nvAy arise whether this quantity was general 
throughout the count}', or only ap[)licable to a particular 
manor ; or, in fact, wliethcr it was not a generous bovat. 

Mr. Frederick Seebohm, in his interesting work, "The Village 
Community," has paid great attention to the origin and meaning 
of the word hide, and although he has missed its correct 
etymology (probably he had not the advantage of reading Mr. 
Boult's admirable paper upon the subject), he is not very far 
wrong in its application. He writes, p. 398, " The word hide, 
which still baffles all attempts to explain its meaning, may 
possibly have had reference to a similar tribute. Even in 
England it does not follow that it was, in its origin, connected 
with the plough team." He was referring to the Frisians, with 
wh.om existed the custom of the tribute of a hide for every so 
many oxen, which, he adds, " was as ready a mode of assessing 
the tribute as counting the plough teams would be in an 
agricultural district." 

Mr. Seebohm has given a very interesting table of measures 
for Huntingdonshire, taken from the Hundred Rolls, from which 
it appears that in nineteen cases the number of virgates in a hide 
varied from 4 to 8 ; in seven cases the number was 4 ; in five it was 
5 ; in six it was 6 ; and in one, 8 ; whilst the number of acres in 
a virgate varied from 15 to 48. The number of acres in a hide 
was less variable : in eight cases there were 1 20 acres to a hide ; in 
four, 125 ; the other seven all differing from them. Mr. Seebohm 
calculates that the normal virgate or yard land was one-fourth 
of a hide, and contained 30 acres. But in the face of such varia- 
tions it seems almost idle to endeavour to arrive at a definite 
solution of the question, and all that can positively be predicted 
is that the hide, or carucate, really represents an uncertain 
amount of land, varying according to soil and climate, which a 
single plough-team could work. 

This learned writer seems to think that carucate is a later 
word than hide, and supplanted it subsequently to the period of 
the Hundred Rolls, but this is obviously a mistake. Both are 
to be found in Domesday, and both probably were of Gaelic 
origin, the one describing the tax or aid (eid), and the other the 
thing by which the aid was measured. It is, therefore, not 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 1 5 

strictly accurate to describe the hide as varying ; what varied 
was the subject of the hide. 

Perhaps the true cause of the variable quantit}' of the carucate 
is to be found in its unit. It is clear from the statute of 33rd 
Edward I., which fixed the acre at 40 perches in length and 4 
in breadth, that its variable nature was a source of contention 
and strife, which it was desirable to avoid. The shape of the 
acre shows that it was so many furrows ; and we learn an 
important fact from Mr. Seebohm's book that down to a late 
period the idea of every acre being a specific part of a carucate 
or plough-team was no fiction, but a reality ; and that the joint 
owners of the carucate were also the joint owners of the 
plough team, and took their part in the ploughing in a 
regular rotation. This is proved conclusively by the descrip- 
tion of the virgate of one John Moldeson, in the manor of 
Winslow, which consisted of over 68 half-acre strips of land, 
scattered in different common fields of the manor. In 66 cases 
his land on one side abutted upon the land of John Watkins ; 
on 43 of the other to Henry Ward's land ; and in 23 to John 
Mayn's land. These four men, therefore, each held one or a 
part of one virgate of the carucate, and jointly owned the 
plough team. And we get at this further fact, that the fields 
would be each of 2 acres (40 rods in length, by 8 broad), 
which would constitute a double day's ploughing for a full 
team of oxen, or perhaps only one day in a light soil. 

It is in the history of this system of co-operative ploughing 
that the confusion between the hide and the carucate and bovat 
arose. Our only true measure of what was the English law 
before tiie Conquest is to be found in the Welsh, the ancient 
British laws ; and from these we learn that the common profits 
of the common undertaking were divided nominally between 
the oxen, in a regular system of rotation the place in the team 
depending as much, perhaps, upon the share of its owner, as 
upon the strength and ca[)abilitics of the ox. 

The author has derived very great benefit from the labours of 
Major-General Wrc^ttcsly for the William Salt Society for 
Staffordshirc. They cannot be too highly commended, since 
they su[)ply, in an admiral)le form, the most important imforma- 
tion relative to that county. It is U) be hoped that the learned 
author will continue his labours in this direction. (iciieral 



l6 BO(1K OK ItOMKsnAV. 

Wrottcsly has noted that the assessment for that count)- only 
varicil one penny (.Uirinp; the reip;ns of Henry I. and II. ; and he 
infornis ns that in S Henry II., it was reduced to ^42 os. yd. 
Mis table of land measures seems too fanciful to be of real value 
to Derbj-shire students. He would i;ive a knii^ht's fee as equal 
to 3000 acres, or three hides, or four carucates ; three vir^ates, 
or 750 acres, being equal to one carucate. The Evesham 
Cartulary suggests the following table : — " Twelve acres 
to a virgate, four virgates to a hide, eight hides to a 
scutage ; a carucate being only equal to three virgates." 
Derbj'shire Domesday only mentions carucates, bovats, and 
acres ; and from that book itself the relation of bovats to 
carucates can be certainly adduced, and from several instances. 
In the king's manor of Langdendale, it is shown that eight 
bovats go to the carucate ; so it would appear from Snelston, 
though there is an error of one bovat in the calculation. But it 
is quite clear again from Henry de Ferrers' manor of Burnaston, 
so that Mr. Llewelh'nn Jewitt's estimate of from eight to twenty- 
four bovats would seem not to apply to Derbyshire, since it is 
there a fixed and not a variable measure. In Geoffry Ascelins' 
manor of Braideston we appear to get the measure of a carucate. 
Gilbert de Gant held there two carucates of land, one mile in 
length and three furlongs in breadth, which would give 120 
acres to the carucate and fifteen to the bovat, counting 640 acres 
to the square mile. Curiousl)', this exactly agrees with Mr. 
Eyton's calculation respecting the number of acres in a carucate. 
Hubert fitz Ralf's manor of Middleton is measured by one 
mile in length and four furlongs in breadth. One carucate was 
geldable in it, and there was land for one plough, but it was 
waste, and little evidence can be gathered from this estimate. 

"Whatever ma)' have been the case in Derbyshire, it would 
seem that the normal measure generally throughout the country 
was twelve acres to the bovat and eight bovats to the 
carucate, and eight carucates to the knight's fee, or scutage, 
and the virgate, which we do not find in Derbyshire until long 
after Domesday, was in some places equivalent to a bovat, and 
in others to a double bovat. 

As already observed, Domesday is not what it is generally 
supposed to be, an account of every yard of land and, of all the 
creeping things upon it (that is a record of the national 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 1 7 

property), but simply an account (with occasional additional 
facts, suggestive of an attempted increase in taxation) of the 
number of carucates within each county which were hidable, 
that is, a merely fiscal document, and it becomes a very interest- 
ing problem to ascertain how far this can be proved by, and 
compared with, subsequent records. The earliest records which 
we possess bearing directly upon the question are the Pipe 
Rolls ; and at irregular periods, as necessity compelled a levy, 
we find the scutages, as they were then called, paj^able by 
those knights who held estates which were liable to 
pay danegelt. It would be a mistake, perhaps, to confound 
danegelt with the geld payable at the time of Domesday. 
These taxes were probably payable on other occasions besides 
those when danegelt are exacted : that is, whenever the State 
required a subsidy ; and Domesday records the very manors 
and the fractions of the scutage which each manor or soke 
was liable to contribute upon these occasions. Unfortunately, 
we can only gather from the Pipe Rolls the gross amount of 
scutage payable in each county. But these figures seem to 
prove that, if the Conqueror took any action in consequence 
of this Domesday Survey, it soon died out, and the ancient 
order of things was restored, for the amount of scutage 
remained the same, whilst that of levy still continued to 
decrease. We have a scutage in a Pipe Roll which Mr. 
Hunter has attempted to date as that of the year 
31 Henry I., and unthinking persons accept that date as 
conclusive, although Dugdale and the older writers, whose 
opinions should not lightly be discarded, considered that it was 
of the date of 5 Stephen; others thought the 15th of that 
king; others the 1st; whilst some writers, even of the present 
day, have supposed that it supplied the missing Roll of i 
Henry II. (if, indeed, that roll is missing), the series of these 
records being perfect from the second year of that king. And 
there is more weight in this suggestion than is general!)' 
accorded to it. It is usually set aside without consideration, 
because the .sheriffs in this Roll and that of 2 licni)' H., 
are different, but that is surely to be exi)ected, for necessarily 
Henry II. would find Stephcnite sheriffs when he came to the 
throne, and would speedily replace them by his own iVieml.s. VVe 
hardly know upon what facts or evidence Dugdale and llie 
3 



l8 liOOK OV nOMKSDAV. 

elder writers relietl, but the trutli sceins to bo that each of the 
contending; parties have strong" evidence chavvn from different 
Rolls in support of their separate views, and each may be ri^rht 
with regard to these different Rolls, for it by no means follows 
that it is a Roll of one year : it may be a collection of the 
fragments of several. The Roll is imperfect, many counties 
being omitted ; and this fact alone should warn the positive 
guessers of uncertainty and danger. Wliether this be the case 
or not, it is undoubtedly of a very early date, and most probably 
about fifty years later than Domesday. We, then, beyond all 
question, have the Roll of 2 Henry II., which was exactly 
seventy years later, and the following notes, extracted from 
these Rolls, shows conclusively that there was essentially no 
difference between the assessments of these two periods ; and 
this assessment continued the same for centuries afterwards. 
It is submitted that the discrepancies between them arose from 
accident —from manors falling out of cultivation, or from 
ignorance or mistake, and not from any change in the law or 
from Resign. On the fourteen following counties, the difference 
in the assessment was under ^10, although the difference in the 
actual receipts was much greater. The large sums allowed for 
waste in 2 Henry II. shows the misery which ensued from 
the violence suffered under King Stephen, and the diminution 
in the amount of tax between the time of Domesday and that 
of the end of Henry I.'s reign may well represent the waste 
occasioned by the rebellions against, and the violent conduct of, 
that monarch. 

It would be very interesting to contrast the relative amount 
assessed under Domesday for the whole country, but the labour 
would be too great. The rate of the assessment of Henry II. 
is, fortunately, quite clear from the Pipe Roll for the county 
of Worcester. The bishop said he had only fifty knights who 
ought to be assessed, for which he paid ^^'40 los. into the 
Treasury (and for which payment of ^^19 los., was excused), 
or exactly at the rate of £i per scutage. The author has 
roughly calculated the amounts assessed in Nottingham and 
Derbyshire. They are, unfortunately, lumped together in the 
Pipe Rolls as one county : why, is not so clear. Other counties 
besides Nottingham and Derby had the same sheriff, as 
Yorkshire and Northumberland, Cambridge and Huntingdon, 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



19 



Wilts, and Dorset, Dorset and Somerset, Bucks, and Beds., and 
some others. The last two counties are lumped together in 
2 Henry II., but kept separate in Henry T. The author 
has calculated roughly the amount of scutage levied in both 
Notts, and Derby at the date of Domesday ; and for Derbyshire 
his calculation is within a couple of carucates of that of the 
Rev. Mr. Eyton, so that both are probably nearly accurate. 
Mr. Eyton's gives the sum of 698 carucates, with a fraction, for 
Derbyshire, and the author has calculated that Nottingham had 
a little under 500 hidable carucates. Now, dividing the sum 
of the two counties by eight, we find that Derb}^shire and 
Nottingham between them possessed about 149 scutages, or 
knight's fees. Taking it at the sum of £1 per scutage, we see 
that it had sunk in the time of Henry I. in about the same 
proportion as the scutage of that year had fallen in the time of 
Henry II., that is generally, throughout the country. The 
proportionate waste in Derbyshire was excessively high, probably 
because so large a portion of it was devoted to the chase. 



Pipe Roll, 31-5 Henry I. 
NOTTINGHAM AND DERBY— 
£ s. d. 

78 13 9 paid into Treasury. 
24 13 I excused payment. 
5 2 8 in hands of sheriff. 



Pipe Koll, 2 Hknky H. 



108 9 6 
•STAFFORD— 

29 15 5 paid. 
14 5 6 excused. 



44 oil 
LEICESTER- 

56 19 o paid. 
39 10 10 excused. 
3 10 2 ill hand. 



100 o o 
HERT.S — 

61 I 8 paid. 

4' 4 7 excused. 

715 I in h.inci. 



£ 


s. 


d. 




38 


5 


5 


paid into Treasury. 


15 


5 





excused payment. 


58 


II 


6 


waste since former assessment. 


112 


I 


II 




25 


5 


6 


paid. 


10 





6 


excused. 


8 


8 


4 


waste. 





7 





in hand. 


44 


I 


4 




25 


7 


6 


liaid. 


22 


8 


3 


cxcus-rd. 


5« 


8 


2 


waste . 





16 





in hand. 


99 


'9 


II 




45 


12 


7 


paid. 


29 


II 


4 


excused . 


29 


17 


4 


waste. 


5 








in hand. 



20 



I'lIK K<n.l., 31-5 llENUY I. 

OXFORD— 
C s. <1. 
116 6 5 paid. 
no 17 10 excused. 
12 5 o in hand. 



i;OOK OK nOMF.SDAV. 

I'lTK RlM.I., 2 IIkNRY II. 



239 9 3 



DORSET— 

gS 2 3 paid. 
130 2 9 excused. 



22S 5 o 



WILTS — 

146 o o paid. 

241 8 2 excused. 

I 5 o in band. 



3S8 13 


2 




liVKRWIC- 


- 




114 4 





paid. 


51 19 


2 


excused. 


166 3 


2 




SURREY- 






84 II 





paid. 


90 10 





excused . 


175 « 







ESSEX- 






134 8 


6 


paid. 


78 18 


I 


excused 


23 '7 





in hand. 


237 3 


7 




KENT- 






SI 2 


3 


paid. 



52 9 9 excused. 
I 10 10 in hand. 



C s. d. 

44 6 I paid. 

103 4 4 excused. 

96 2 10 waste. 

5 14 2 in liand. 



249 7 5 



169 12 10 paid. 

39 15 8 excusul. 

15 II O waste. 

315 6 in liand. 



228 15 o 



199 10 5 paid. 



80 


iS 


I 


excused, 


99 


16 


9 


waste. 


9 


7 


9 


in hand. 



389 13 o 

124 10 10 paid. 

10 19 4 excused. 

11 18 waste. 
18 17 8 in hand. 



165 9 6 



105 3 o paid. 
37 6 6 excused. 



142 9 6 



98 6 o paid. 
76 1 8 o excused. 
61 4 o waste. 



236 8 o 



88 15 o paid. 

16 7 3 excused. 

080 waste. 

o 6 7 in hand. 



105 2 10 



105 16 10 



Pipe Roll, 31-5 Hlnkv I. 
SUSSEX- 

£ s. d. 

94 o 4 paid. 
11^ 8 ^ excused. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Pipe Roll, 2 Henry II. 



21 



209 8 7 
LINCOLN— 



191 4 o paid. 
65 7 4 excused, 
o o S in liand. 



256 12 o 
BUCKS.— 



115 o o paid. 
84 3 o excused. 
511 7 in hand. 



BEDS. 



76 8 9 paid. 
30 8 9 excused. 
3 14 6 in hand. 



3'5 6 7 



£ s. d. 

157 12 4 paid. 

33 7 O excused. 

920 waste. 

16 19 2 in hand. 



217 



141 o o paid. 

48 16 10 excused. 

70 14 10 waste. 

5 8 o in hand. 



265 19 8 



The two counties — 



118 8 5 paid. 

81 4 6 excused. 

107 14 3 waste. 

307 7 2 



These returns are interesting, as showing the relative importance 
of the several counties ; but they are immensely valuable 
in proof of the practically identical assessment at these two 
periods, and their agreement with Domesday. The item of 
waste, tevipe Henry II., shows that the account was made up 
relatively to an earlier one. That of Henr)- I. unfortunately 
omits this series of items. Unfortim.itely, too, wc have no 
account of the waste created prior to Domesday in the amounts 
of assessable land. We know that it was then so much, but we 
have no record what it was in the time of Edward the Confes.sor 
— that is, probably, the time of Canute. We get the decline in 
the value of the manor or soke at Domesday aud T.R.lv, but 
this gives no idea of the value of the scutage, wiiich bore no 
proportion to the value of the manor. In the following table, 
which was compiled by the late Mr. ICytoii. wc se(.- liie latter 
values : — 



22 



nOOK OF POMF.SDAY. 





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BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



23 



It will be seen that Mr. Eyton has contrasted the gross value 
of the manors with that of the scutage, but they appear to have 
no relation to each other ; and this is apparent from the 
variation of the proportions to a carucate in each hundred. 
The gross value of the wapentakes is £$^7 6s. od., and the 
number of carucates over 100 more. This would give a 
hidage of nearly seven times the proper amount. But the 
hidage was never variable : it always was fixed at the same sum 
for the whole of England, usually 20s. So, too, the calculations 
of the number of acres to a carucate are useless. They are 
inserted from respect for Mr. Eyton. and because some persons 
will prefer his reading of the document ; but it is confidently 
submitted that, although the gross value of the wapentakes bore 
a certain proportion to the cultivated acreage of the county, it 
had no relation whatever to the hidable carucates. The latter 
quantity, in fact, depended upon the generosity or caprice of 
previous kings, who had assessed some knights or thanes 
strictly, or the reverse. We see that the gross value of the 
wapentakes had fallen from ^^587 6s. T.R.E., to ^455 i8s. at 
Domesday, or nearly 23 per cent. It is improbable that the 
decrease occurred during William's reign. Much as he loved 
sport, he valued money more. Nor is it probable that it 
occurred during the reign of Edward the Confessor, for no 
forests or chases were laid down in most of the wasted manors ; 
we know that, from the record of the population remaining. 
We therefore necessarily conclude that the assessment of T.R.E, 
was the old assessment of King Canute and his Danish 
successors, and hence possibly in hatred of the tax, we find 
it still called Dane gelt in the reign of the Plantaganets : this, 
and not the popular notion of it, is probably the truth. The 
learned reader must al.so be cautioned from a too great reliance 
upon other portions of Mr. E}'ton's tables, especially those of 
wood acreages. The Domcsda)' Commissioners calculated 
them very roughly, rarely condescending to a less measure 
than half a mile. A wood of two miles long by one and a half 
broad, and so forth, evidently mere guesses, for in a hilly county 
like Derbyshire it would be difficult, even in these days, to (liul 
a wood at all similar in shape to a parallelogram. 

The author has not been able to iliscover the data on w hich 
Mr. Eyton founds his rcputetl arable acreages. It is prob.ilile 



-4 



I'.OOK Ol' DOMl'lSDAV. 



that ho obtained it by ailcliiiij the number of carucates and 
bovatcs, which are invariably set down in Domesday after the 
eninneratioii o( the hidal assessment. If, instead of calculating 
this stun in acres, it had been left in carucates, it would have 
been of far greater value, as it would have shown how many 
carucates escaped assessment. Taking the libert}' of calculating 
it upon this basis, and with Mr. Eyton's table of 48 acres 
to the carucate, we find that only 693 carucates were gcldable, 
out of a gross number of 18S7, or little more than one-third of 
the land under plough cultivation ; and, taking the gross 
acreage only, that number, out of 8825, or calculating it in acres, 
only 33,264 acres were hidable, out of a gross sum of 423,594, 
or only about one-thirteenth of the whole county. The accuracy 
of this calculation, however, depends upon the correctness of 
Mr. Eyton's assumption that a carucate contained only 48 
acres. In all probabilit)- the true measure of a carucate is 
nearh' three times as much. 

It would appear that much of the confusion which exists 
between the terms hide and carucate, is attributable to the 
changes made in the assessment of landed property by Arch- 
bishop Hubert, in 1198, a most important event in feudal 
histor\', which will be noticed hereafter. His Commissioners, 
in order to prevent loss to the Exchequer, determined in a 
kind of sub-parliament (equivalent to a sitting of the House 
of Commons), that in future the carucate throughout the whole 
country should consist of lOO acres, and thus confusing the 
ploughland with the hide. 

General Wrottesly observes that " Staffordshire was assessable 
to the geld tax to the extent of only 440.I hides, and which 
left a large area ungeldable, not," he observes, " by reason of 
the accidental privilege in favour of the king's writ, but of 
immemorial prescription." He adds that " the rate of assess- 
ment for tlie year was 2s. per hide." This is probably arrived 
at by calculating the scutage at ten hides, and dividing by the 
well-known amount of £] per knight's fee. 



25 



TRANSLATION OF DOMESDAY. 



S)erb^0bire. 



Abhreviations. — M = Manor. S - Soke. B = Berewite. T. R. E. vnl. = In the 
time of King Edward it was worth. Land= Aral)le Land. 



Page 272^ Domesdny, column I. Each leaf oiil\^ of the 
Original MS. being ninnbered, the paging 272^, or 2721^, indi- 
cate-s the front or back of each leaf respectively. These 
numbers are commonly used in references to the MS. 



Here are noted those who 

I. King William. 

II. The Bishop of Chester. 

III. The Abbey of Bertone. 

nil. Hugh Earl of Chester. 

V. Roger of Poictou. 

VI. Henry de Eerrars. 

VII. William Pevercl. 

VIII. Walter Dcincourt. 

IX. Geoffrey Alselin. 



HOLD LAND IN DERBYSHIRE. 

X. Ralph Fitzhubert. 

XI. Ralph de Byron. 

XII. Hasculf Musard. 

XIII. Gilbert de Gant. 

XI II I, Nigel de Stafford. 

XV. Robert Fitzwiliiam. 

XVI. Roger de Biisli. 

XVII. The King's Thanes. 



I. THE LAND OE 11 ll-: KING.— (TliRRA RhlGIS.)- 
SCARVEDELE WAPENTAKE. 

Ful. 277a. C-.l. 1 1 ] 

M. In Nevvcbold with vi. l)crcvvitcs, Witintuiic, iirimintunc, 
Tapetunc, Ccstrefcld, Huitorp, I'^chintunc, tlicrc arc vi. 



' It was held by the Jii<igcs in 'a'ly linics tliat mi land is of the ancient (1<im< mi 
if the Crown, unless it is reconled amnnpst the Terra Kcjjis <if Domesday. 



26 nOOK OF nOMESDAV. 

Fot. J7M, Col. II.l 

canicatcs aiul i. bovato of latul hidal)lc. Land for vi. 
ploughs. Tlic Kiivjj has xvi. villanes and ii. bordars and 
i. scrvus there havinijj iv. ploughs. To this Manor belong 
viii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, iii. miles in 
length, and iii. miles in breadth. T. R. E. val. vi. pounds ; 
now, X. pounds. 

S. In Wingreurde ii. carucates of land. Soke of this Manor 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs, xiv. soke-men have iv. 
ploughs there. 

S. In Greherst and Padinc iv bovates of land hidable. It 
is waste. 

S. In Normantune the I part of i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough, i. soke-man has ii. oxen in a plough 
there. 

S. In Honcstune the ^ part of i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for ii. oxen. 

S. In Drancfcld i. carucate of land hidable. Land for i. 
plough, iii. villanes and i. bordar have ii. ploughs there. 

S. In Rauenesham and Vpetun i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough, iv. soke-men having i. plough there. 

S. In Toptune and Nortune ii. bovates of land hidable. To 
these lands of the soke-men vii. acres of meadow are 
adjoining. Wood, pasturable, v. miles in length, and iii. 
miles in breadth. Of level land, Ix. acres. 

M. In Onestvne and Normantune Lewin and Edwin had vii. 

and bovates and iv. acres of land hidable. Land for xii. oxen. 

'"" i. plough now in demesne there ; and vi. villanes, and iv. 
bordars, having iv. ploughs. A church there, and a priest, 
and ii. mills worth iv. shillings, and ii. acres and -^ of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, J a mile in length, and ^ in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xiii. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 

M. In Waletvne Hundulf had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. It is waste. Wood, pasturable, i. 
mile in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillinffs. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 27 

HAMMENSTAN (HIGH PEAK AND WIRKSWORTH) 
WAPENTAKE. 

Fol. 272a, Col. II.] 

M. In Dereleie King Edward had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Bere- In Farlcic and Cotes and Beileie i. carucate and ii. bovates 

wites. 

of land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. The King has i, 
plough there, and vii. villanes having iii. ploughs. A priest 
there, and a church ; and xii. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, ii. miles in length, and ii. in breadth. T. R. E. 
val. xl. shillings, and ii. sextaries of honey ; now, iv. 
pounds. 

M. In Mestesforde King Edward had ii. carucates of land not 
iiidable. It is waste, viii. acres of meadow there, and i. 
lead-work. Wood, pasturable here and there, iii. miles in 
length, and ii. in breadth. To this Manor adjoin these 
berewites : Meslach, Snitiretone, Wodnesleie, Bunteshale, 
Ibeholon, Teneslege. In these vii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for vii. ploughs. xi. villanes and xii. 
bordars have vi. ploughs there, and xxii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and i. mile in breadth. 
As much under-wood. 

Fol. 272^, Col. I.] 

M. In Werchesvorde there are iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. A priest and a church there, and 
xvi. villanes and ix. bordars having iv. ploughs. There 
are iii. lead-works, and xxvi. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, ii. miles in length, and ii. miles in breadth. 

lierewites of this Manor. 

In Crunforde ii. carucates, and Middcltunc ii. carucates, 
and Opetune iv. carucates, and Wellcdcne ii. carucates, 
and Chcrsintune ii. carucates, and Caldclauuc ii. carucates, 
and Miretunc iv. carucates ; xviii. carucates of land liid 
able. Land for as many pkuiglis. In these there are 
xxxvi. villanes, and xiii. bordars, having xiv. ploughs and 
a 1. There xiv. acres of meadow. Wood, i)astural)le, and 
iindcr-wood, iii. miles in length, and ii. in hrcadlh. 



jS hook l)l' nOMl'.SDAV. 

Kol. .>7.-J., Col. I.l 

iM. In Essobiirno arc iii. caiucatcs of lain! liidablc. Land for 
iii. plout^hs. It is waste, yet it renders xx. shillings A 
priest and a church there, with i. carucatc of land hidable; 
and he has there ii. villancs, and ii. bordars, having | a 
l^lougli. lie himself i. plough, and i. man who renders 
xvi. pence ; and xx. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
i. mile in length, and J, a mile in breadth. 

Berewites of this Manor. 

In iMaplctune ii. carucates, and Bredelauue ii. caiucates, 
and Torp ii. carucates, and Bencdlege ii. carucates, and 
Ophidecotes ii. carucates, and Ochenauestun iv. carucates ; 
xiv. carucates of land hidable. Land for as many ploughs. 
They are waste, except xi. villanes and xvii. bordars 
having vi. ploughs and a i. There are xxv. acres of 
meadow. 

M. In Pevrewic are ii. carucates of land hidable. Land for 
ii. ploughs. It is waste. Colne holds it of the King, and 
he has there vi. villanes and ii. bordars with iii. ploughs. 
There are xii. acres of meadow. 

To this Manor adjoin iii. Berewites. 

Elleshope. Hanzedone, Eitune. There are ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. These 
V. Manors, Derelei, Mestesforde, Werchesuorde, Esseburne, 
and Peurcuuic, with their Berewites, rendered, T. R. E., 
xx.xii. pounds, and vi. sextaries and a ^ of honey ; now, 
xl. pounds of blanch silver. 

M. In Walctvnc and Rcdlaucstun Earl Algar had vi. carucates 



and 



Bcre- of land hidable. Land for vii. plough.s. The King has two 
ploughs in demesne ; and iii. soke-men, and xxxiii. villanes, 
and x. bordars, having xii. ploughs. 

In Westone ii. parts of ii. carucates of land, and in 
Smalci and Chiteslei iv. bovates of land. A church and a 
priest there, and i. mill worth vi. shillings and viii. pence, 
and xl. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable here and 
there, vii. furlongs in length, and v. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. vi. pounds ; now, x. pounds. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 29 

Fol. 2726, Col. I.] 

M. In Newetvn and Bretebi Algar had vii. carucates of land 
Bere- hidablc. Land for v. ploughs. The King has i. plough 
and a |- there, and xix. villanes, and i. bordar, having v. 
ploughs. There are xii. acres of meadow. Wood, pas- 
turable, ii. miles in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E. and now val. c. shillings. 
M. In Milebvrne King Edward had vi. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for vi. ploughs. The King has i. plough 
there, and xx. villanes, and vi. bordars, having v. ploughs. 
A priest and a church there, and i. mill worth iii. shillings, 
and xxiv. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and -h mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. pounds ; 
now, vi. pounds ; yet it renders x. 
Berewites of this Manor. 

Fol. 272^, Col. II. J 

This Soc belongs to Mileburne, in Scaruesdele Wapen- 
take. Bareuue xii. bovates and a |. In Suerchestune i. 
carucate. In Celerdestune i. carucate and a h. In Osmun- 
destune ii. carucates and ii. bovates, and Codetune iv. 
bovates ; together ii. carucates and vi. bovates. In Nor- 
manestunc i. carucate. Land for xii. ploughs, viii. caru- 
cates and ii. bovates hidable. (A mistake here for vii. 
carucates, and vi. bovates and a i.) 

M. and B. In Rapendvne and Middeltunc Earl Algar had vi. 
carucates of land hidable. Land for viii. ploughs. The 
King has ii. ploughs in demesne there, and xxxvii. villanes 
and iii. bordars having xii. ploughs. A church is there, 
and ii. priests with i. plough. There are ii. mills, and 
xlii. acres of meadow. Pasturable wood i. mile in length, 
and h niilc in breadth. T. R. E. val. xv. pounds ; now, 
viii. pounds. 

S. In Wiulcsleie ii. carucates of land hidablc. Land for ii. 
ploughs. A soke. ii. sokc-men and vii. villanes and i. 
bordar there have ii. ploughs and a L Tiiere are xvi. 
acres of meadow. Pasturable wood i. furlong in length, 
and i. furlong in breadth. 

S. In Tichenhalle ii. carucates of land and ii. bovates and ii. 
parts of i. hidable. Land for ii. plough.s. ii. .sokc-men 
have i. plough there, and x.xii. acres of meadow. 



30 BOOK t)F DOMliSDAV. 

Fol. l72^Col. II.] 

S. In Traiii^csbi h a carucatc of land hidable. Land for iv. 
oxen. 

H. In Mcsscliani ii. carucatos of land hidable. Land for iii. 
plou'jhs. It is waste. There arc xx. acres of meadow. 
Under-wood, i. furlong- in length, and i. furlong in breadth. 

IV In Caldecote iii. carucates of land hidable. Land for iii. 
ploughs, iii. villanes have ii. [)loughs there, and xii. acres 
of meadow. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, x. shillings. 
This belongs to Cliftune in Stadford. 

S. In Englebi iii. bovates of land hidable. Land for iv. oxen. 
Soke in Rapendun. ii. soke-men have i. plough there, and 
iv. acres of meadow, and i. acre of brush-wood. 

Pasturable wood in Tichenhalle i. mile in length, and 
h a mile in breadth. 

I\I. In Badeqvella with viii. Berewites King Edward had xviii. 
carucates of land hidable. Land for xviii. ploughs. The 
King has now in demesne there vii. ploughs, and xxxiii. 
villanes, and ix. bordars. ii. priests are there, and a 
church, and under them ii. villanes and v. bordars. All 
these have xi. ploughs, i, knight has xvi. acres of land 
there, and ii. bordars. There is i. mill worth x. shillings 
and viii. pence ; and i. lead-work, and Ixxx. acres of 
meadow. Under-wood i. mile in length, and i. in breadth. 
Of that land iii. carucates belong to the church. Henry 
de Ferrar claims i. carucate in Hadune. These are the 
Berewites of this Manor. Hadun, Holun, Reuslege, Bur- 
tune,. Cranchesberie, Aneise, Maneis, Had una. 

M. In Aisseford with the Berewites Ralunt, Langesdune, 
Hetesope, Caluoure, Basselau, Bubenenli, Berceles, Scelha- 
dun, Tadintune, Flagun, Prestecliue, Blacheuuelle, King 
Edward had x.\ii. carucates of land hidable, and i. carucate 
of land not hidable. The King has now in demesne there 
iv. ploughs, and xviii. villanes have v. ploughs. Land for 
xxii. ploughs. There is i. mill worth xii. pence and the 
site of i. mill, and i. lead-work, and xl. acres of meadow. 
Wood not pasturable, ii. miles in length, and ii. in breadth. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 3 1 

Fol. 273^5, Col. I.] 

M. In Hope with the Berewites Aidele, Estune, Scetune, Half 
of Offretune, Tidesuuelle, Stoche, Muchedesuuelle, King 
Edward had x. carucates of land hidable. Land for x. 
ploughs. Now XXX. villanes and iv. bordars have vi. 
ploughs there. A priest there, and a church, to which 
belongs i. carucate of land. There is i. mill worth v. 
shillings and iv. pence, and xxx. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable in places, iv. miles and ii. furlongs in length, 
and ii. miles in breadth. These iii. Manors T. R. E. 
rendered xxx. pounds, and v. and a i sextaries of hone)' 
and V. loads of lead, of 1. tables ; now they render x. 
pounds andvi. shillings. William Peverel keeps it. 

M. In Langedenedele and in Tornesete Ligulf had iv. novates 
of land hidable. In Lodeuorde Brun had iv. bovates of 
land. In Cheuenesuurde and Chiseuurde Luin i. carucate 
of land. In Ceolhal Eilmer iv. bovates of land. In Hetfelt 
iv. bovates. In Padefeld Leuine i. carucate of land. In 
Dentine Luenot ii. bovates of land. In Glosop Leuine iv. 
bovates of land. In Witfeld iv. bovates of land. In Hed- 
felt Eilmer iv. bovates of land. In Chendre Godric ii. 
bovates of land. Among them all, vi. carucates of land 
hidable, and xii. Manors. The whole of Langedenedele 
is waste. The wood there is not pasturable, fit for hunting. 
The whole viii. miles in length, and iv. miles in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xl. sliillings. 

M. In Begelie Godric had vi. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for vi. oxen. iii. villanes and v. bordars have there i. 
plough and i. acre of meadow. 

M. In Langcleie and Chetesuorde Leuenot and Chetel had 
X. bovates of land hidable. Land for x. oxen. This 
belongs to Ednesoure. William Pevrel keeps it for the 
King. v. villanes, and ii. bordars, have ii. ploughs, and 
i. acre of meadow there. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and i. in breadth, and a little uiidcr-wood. T. R. E. 
val. x.x. shillings ; ncnv, xvi. shillings. 

M. In Aivne Caschin had ii. carucates of l.md hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. xii. villanes and vii. bordars have v. 



32 HOOK OV DoMKSn.W. 

Kol. >73(^, Col. 1.1 

plou;j[hs there. WcxkI, pa.sturable, i. iiiilc in Iciii^^th and 
i. in breadth. T. R. K. and now, val. x.x. shillinos. 

M. In Middeltvnc Godctl hatl iv. bovatcs of land billable. 
Land for iv. oxen. viii. villane.s and i. bordar have ii. 
ploughs, and iv. acres of nieatlow, and a little under-wood 
there. T. R. E. and now, val. vi. shillings. 

M. In Maperlie Stapeluine had iv. bovates of land hidable. 
Land .... William Tevrel keeps it for the King. 
It is waste. There is h an acre of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, iv. furlongs in length, and iv. in breadth 
T. R. V. val. xvi. shilling.s. In the same place is i a 
carucatc of land of a Soke belonging to Spondune. A 
Manor of Henry's. 

M. In Tibecel Ligulf had iii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iii. ploughs. William Pevrel keeps it for the King. 
Now in demesne there i a plough ; and ix. villanes having 
ii. ploughs. There is i. acre of meadow. Wood, pastur- 
able, i. mile in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
xl. shillings ; now, x. shillings. Robert holds it. 

M. In Westvne, with the Berewites, Earl Algar had x. caru- 
cates and ii. bovates and a ^ of land hidable. Land for 
as many ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. [ploughs ; 
and xxiv. villanes and vi. bordars having xii. ploughs, 
and iv. censers rendering xvi. shillings, ii. churches are 
there, and a priest, and i. mill worth xix. shillings and 
iv. pence, and a fish-pond, and a ferry worth xiii. shillings 
and iv. pence, and Ii. acres of meadow. Meadow, ^ a mile 
in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. viii. 
pounds ; now, xvi. pounds. 

Berewites of this Manor. 

B. In yEstun and Scrdelau vi. bovatcs and a I hidable. 
There is i. plough in demesne ; and iv. villanes, and ii. 
bordars, with i. plough aiul iv. acres of meadow. Vcte- 
brand holds it of the King. It is worth v. shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 33 



II. THE LAND OF THE BISHOP OF CHESTER. 
MORELESTAN WAPENTAKE. SALLE HUNDRED. 

Fol. 273a, Col. II.] 

M. and B. In Salle and Draicot and Opeuuelle the Bishop of 
Cestre had xii. carucates of land hidable. Land for as 
many ploughs. The Bishop had there iii. ploui^hs, and 
xxix. villanes, and xiii. bordars, having xiii. ploughs. A 
priest is there, and ii. churches, and i. mill worth xx. 
shillings, and i. fishery, and xxx. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, iii. furlongs in length, and i. furlong in breadth, 
and a little brush-wood. Ralph fitz Hubert holds 
Opeuuelle. 

S. In Aitone, xii. carucates of land hidable. Land for xii. 
ploughs. There are xxii. soke- men, and x. bordars under 
them. They have ix. carucates of this land and xiii. 
ploughs. The other iii. carucates of arable belong to the 
villanes. ii. sites of mills are there, and xl. acres of 
meadow. A little under-wood, T. R. E. val., viii. pounds ; 
now, the like. 

M. In Bvbedene and in its appendages v. carucates and ii. 
bovates of land hidable. Land for v. ploughs. The Bishop 
of Cestre has i. plough there, and xii. villanes, and iii. 
bordars, having vii. ploughs. A priest is there, and a 
church, and i. mill worth x. shillings, and xl. acres of 
meadow. T. R. E. val. vii. pounds; now, iv. pounds. 



HI. THE LAND OF THE ABBEY OF BERTONK. 

M. In Vfrc King Edward had x. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for xv. ploughs. To the same belong iii. bcrewites, 
Parva Vfre, Findre, Potlac. The Abbot of Bcrtone has 
now in deinc sue there v. ploughs and a h ; and xx. villanes, 
and X. bordars, having viii. ploughs, ii. sites of mills arc 
there; and Ixxiii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
h a mile in length, and \ in breadth ; and as much under- 
wood. T. R. E. val. XXV. pounds ; now, x. pounds. The 
sokes of the Manor : Snellestunc xii. bovate.s. Berucrdes- 
cotc iv. bovates. DcUingebcrie iii. bovates. Ilougcn ii. 
4 



34 nOOK OF DOMESDAY, 

Kol. 1731, Col. II.) 

bovatcs. Redcslcic xii. bovates. Sudbcrie iv. bovates. 
Hiltune iv. bovatcs. Sudtuii i. carucate. In the whole vi. 
carucatcs and ii. bovates of land hidablc. 

M. Ill Aplob}- the Abbot of Hcrton had v. carucates of land 
hidablc. Land for v. ploughs. Of this land Abbot Leuric 
made over to the Countess Goda i. carucate of land which 
the Kini^ now holds. In the same vill now in demesne are 
ii. ploughs ; and viii. villanes, and i bordar, with i. plough. 
T. R. E. val. XX. shillings ; now, Ix. shillings. 

M. In Wineshalle the Abbot of Bertone had ii. carucates of 
land billable. Land for iii. ploughs. Now in demesne are 
ii. ploughs ; and x. villanes having i. plough and a |. King 
VV'illiam placed there vi. soke-men belonging to Rapendune 
who have i. plough, i. mill worth v. shillings and iv. pence 
is there ; and viii. acres of meadow. Under-wood i. mile 
in length, and i. furlong in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillings; now, Ix. shillings. 

M. In Cotvne (Cotes) Algar had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. The Abbot now has it of the King. 
Now in demesne there i. plough ; and vi. villanes, and iii. 
bordars, having ii. ploughs. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; 
now, XXX. 

M. In Stapenhille the Abbot of Bertone had iv. carucates and 
ii. bovates of land hidable. Land for iv. ploughs. Now 
in demesne there ii. ploughs ; and xii. villanes having 
ii. ploughs. There are iv. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth 
T. R. E., and now, val. Ix. shillings. 

M. In Caldewelle yElfric had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. Now in demesne there i. plough ; 
and vi. villanes with i. plough. T. R. E., and now, val., xx. 
shillings. King William gave this Manor to the Monks 
for his beneficium. 

In Tichenhalle the Abbot of Bertone had v. bovates of 
land, and the J part of i. hidable He has there in 
demesne i. plough, and iv. villanes with i. plough, and viii. 
acres of meadow, and the I part of the pasturable wood of 
that Manor. It is worth x. shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 35 



nil. THE LAND OF EARL HUGH. 

Fol. 273^, Col. I.] 

M. In Marchetone Earl Siward had ix. carucates and a i of 
land hidable. Land for ix. ploughs. Earl Hugh has there 
ii. ploughs in demesne ; and xv. villanes and vii. bordars 
having v. ploughs. A priest is there, and a church, and i. 
mill worth vi. shillings and viii. pence, and i. fishery, and 
xxiv. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, 
and i a mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, 
iii. pounds. 

BS. In the berewites of Cheniuetun and Machcuorde and 
Adelardestreu iv. carucates of land hidable. Land for iv. 
ploughs. It is waste. There are xxx. acres of meadow ; 
and wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and ^ a mile in 
breadth, i. carucate of these iv. belongs to Ednodestun, a 
Manor of Henry's. Gozelin holds it of the Earl, and Colle 
renders for it to Gozelin x. shillings and viii. pence. 



V. THE LAND OF ROGER OF POICTOU. 

In Svdtvne Stcinulf had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for v- plough.s. The Lord has there i. plough, and 
vi. villanes, and i. bordar with i. plough, i. mill worth ii. 
shillings is there, and viii. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, l- a mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. 

S. In Bectune v. bovates and a | are hidable. Land for vi. 
oxen. A soke. ii. villanes have i. plough and i. acre of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and I a 
mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. v. shillings ; now, vi. shil- 
lings and iv. pence. 

M. In the ii. Lvnt Steinulf had ii. carucates of land hitlable. 
Land for ii. piougiis. viii. villanes have iii. ploughs and 
X. acres of meadow there. Wood, pasturable, iv. furlongs 
in length, and iv. in breadth. T. R. K. val. xl. shillings ; 
now, X. shillings. 



36 HOOK OK DOMESDAY. 

Fol. 97>*. Col. 1.1 

M. In Steincsbi and in Tunestalle Steinulf had xii. bovates 
of land liidablo. Land for ii. plough.s. Now in demesne 
there ii. ploiii;hs, and viii. villancs, and v. bordars having iv. 
ploughs. A priest there, with iii. bordars, and i. acre of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, vi. furlongs in length, and iv. 
furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxx. 

M. In Blanghesbi and Ilcrtestaf Steinulf had i. carucate of 
land hidable. Land for ii. plough.s. i. soke-man and i. 
villane there, and iii. bordars, having i. plough. There are 
iii. acres of meadow. Wood, not pasturable, ii. furlongs in 
length, and ii. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, 
viii. shillings. Roger of Poictou held these lands ; now 
they are in the King's hands. 

Fol. 373*, Col. II.] 

M. In Winefeld Elnod ii. carucates of land hidable. Land for 
iii. plough.s. Robert holds it of Earl Alan under William 
Peurel, and has i. plough. A priest there, and viii. villanes, 
and ii. bordars, with iii. ploughs. There are four acres of 
meadow. It was, and is, worth xx. shillings. 



VI. THE LAND OF HENRY DE FERIERES. 

HAMELESTAN WAPENTAKE (HIGH PEAK AND 
WIRKSWORTH HUNDREDS). 

Fol. 274a, Col. I.] 

In Winbroc Chetel had v. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. It is waste. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings. 

Ms. II. In Winsterne Leuing and Rauen had xii. bovates of 
land hidable. Land for xii. oxen. There Cola the man 
of Henry has vii. villanes, and xii. bordars having iv. 
ploughs. Under-wood, ^ a mile in length, and iv. furlongs 
in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. xx. shillings. 

Ms. II. In Collei Suain and Vctred had ii. bovates of land 
hidable. Land for iv. oxen. ii. villanes and i. bordar 
have i. plough there. There are iv. acres of meadow. 
Under-wood, | a mile in length, and ii. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E., and now, val. x. shillings. Suan holds it. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 37 

Fol. 274rt, Co!. I.] 

Ms. II. In Eltvne Caschin and Uctred ii. carucates of land 
liidable. Land for ii. ploughs. Now in demesne there 
i. plough ; and ix. villanes, and x. bordars, having iv. 
ploughs, and xii. acres of meadow. Under-wood, iii. fur- 
longs in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E.. 
and now^, val. xl. shillings. 

M. In Brazinctvn Siuuard had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. ploughs ; 
and xvi. villanes, and ii. bordars have vi. ploughs and xxx. 
acres of meadow. Under-wood iii. furlongs in length, and 
i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. vi. pounds ; now, iii. pounds. 

M. In Bradebvrn Eluric had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. Now in demesne ii. ploughs ; and 
xii. villanes, and iv. bordars have iv. ploughs. A priest 
there, and a church ; and xii. acres of meadow. Under- 
wood iii. furlongs in length, and ii. in breadth. T. R. E. 
val. iv. pounds ; now, xxx. shillings. 

Ms. Vir. In Tizinctvn Vlchel, Edric, Gamel, Vluiet, Wictric, 
Leuric, Goduin had iv. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. ploughs ; and 
xii. villanes, and viii. bordars having iv. ploughs, and i. 
mill worth iii. shillings ; and xxx. acres of meadow. 
Under-wood i. mile in length, and iv. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xl. shillings. 

M. In Nevtvne Osmcr had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. It is waste. There are viii. acres 
of meadow. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings. 

Ms. II. In Hortedvn Godwin and Ligulf had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. There 
are xvi. acres of meadow. Under-wood iii. furlongs in 
length, and ii. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings. 

M. In .Salham Cole had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for ii. plough.s. It is wa.stc. There are xvi. acres of 
meadow. Under-w(jod i a mile in length, and h in 
breadth. T. R. K. val. xl. shilling.s. 

M. In Pile-^berie and LodouucUo KW\ had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. There 
arc xii. acres of meadow. T. K. E. val. x. shillings. 



38 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Fol. 374<i. Col. 1.) 

M. and B. In Sothelle and Walestunc Gamcl had vi. caru- 
cates of land hidablc. Land for as many ploughs. Now 
in demesne there i. plough ; and iii. villanes, and iii. 
bordars having i. plough, and v. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, iii. miles and a i in length, and ii. miles and 
a A in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, x. 
shillings. Godric holds it. 

Fol. 3740, Col. II.] 

M. In Etelavve Eluric had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. There are iv. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, h a mile in length, and iii. furlongs in 
breadth. Under-wood, of the same extent. T. R. E. val. 
XX. shillings; now, ii. shillings. 



WALECROS WAPENTAKE (REPTON AND GRESLEY 

HUNDREDS). 

M. In Crocheshalle Sivvard had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for viii. ploughs. Now in demesne there ii. ploughs, 
and XXXV. villanes, and xi. bordars, having viii. ploughs, 
ii. mills worth xviii. shillings there ; and xxii. acres of 
meadow. Under-wood, ii. furlongs in length, and i. fur- 
long in breadth. T. R. E. val. iii. pounds ; now, iv. 
pounds. Roger holds it. 

In Ednunghalle i. carucate of land hidable. Land for 
ii. ploughs, iv. villanes have i. plough there. Under- 
wood, iii. furlongs in length, and i. furlong in breadth. 

M. In Streitvn ./Eluric had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. iv. villanes have ii. ploughs there, and i. 
mill worth v. shillings, and x. acres of meadow. T. R. E. 
val. XX. shillings ; now, xv. shillings. Roger holds it. 

M. In Chctvn Siuuard had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. ploughs ; 
and xiv. villanes, and ii. bordars having iv. ploughs, and 
xxiv. acres of meadow. Under-wood, i. furlong in length, 
and i. furlong in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. Ix. 
shillings. Nigel holds it. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 39 

Fol. 274a, Col. II.] 

M. In Bolvn Eluric had iv. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. Now in demesne there iv. ploughs ; and 
viii. villanes, and viii. bordars, having iii. ploughs, and 
xviii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. furlong in 
length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. c. shillings : now, 
iv. pounds. 

M. In Linctvne Leuric had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for xii. oxen. It is waste. Under-wood, i. furlong 
in length, and h in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings. 

N. In Wivleslei Aluric had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. It is waste, iii. villanes have v. ploughing 
oxen there. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, xvi. shil- 
lings. 

M. In Stantvn Alwin had h a carucate of land hidable. 
Land for iv. oxen. i. soke-man and i. bordar have i. 
plough, and x. acres of meadow there. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillings ; now, x. shillings. 

M. In Heorteshorne Aluric had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. It is waste. Wood, pasturable, 
^ a mile in length, and ^ in breadth. As much arable 
land. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, x. shillings. 

M. In another Heorteshorne Aluric had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. Wood, pas- 
turable, i a mile in length, and h a mile in breadth. 
Arable land, of the same extent. T. R. E. val. xl. shil- 
lings ; now, X. shillings. 

Ms. II. In Merstvn Biun and Elric had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. Now in demesne there 
ii. ploughs ; and xviii. villanes, and v. bordars having v. 
plough.s. A priest there, and a church, and i. mill worth 
vi. shillings and v. pence. There are 1. acres of meadow, 
and i. acre of under- wood. It is worth c. shillings. The 
monks hold it of Henry. 

M. In Dvbrige Earl Edvin had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land f(;r vi. ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. pknighs ; 
and XXX. villanes, and x. bordars having vii. ploughs. A 



40 BOOK OK DOMESDAY. 

Kol. ;74^, Col. I.) 

church there, and .1 priest, and i. mill worth x. shillinjrs, 
and xlviii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile 
in Icni^th, and h a mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. viii. 
pounds ; now, c. shillings. The monks hold it of Henry. 

1\I. In Farvlvestvn Leuenot, Ulmcr, Baldric, and Vluric had ii. 
carucatcs and a i of land hidable. Land for xx. oxen. 
Now xii. villanes and viii. bordars have iii. ploughs and x. 
acres of meadow there. It is worth xl. shillings. 

M. In Scrotvn with iii. berewitcs, Tochi has vi. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for vii. ploughs. Now xxxii. villanes, 
and xxvi. bordars, have xii. ploughs there. A priest there, 
and a church, and i. mill, and the site of another mill. In 
demesne now iv. ploughs, and a certain knight iii. ploughs, 

X- and a cxx. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, iv. furlongs 
in length, and ii. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. viii. 

-j- pounds ; now, x. pounds. G. Alsclin claims it. 

M. In Estvne Leuenot had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. Now in demesne there iii. ploughs ; 
and viii. villanes, and iv. bordars, having ii. ploughs, and 
xxiv. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, | a mile in 
length, and ^ in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, 
xl. Alcher holds it. 

Ms. II. In Sapertvne Godric and Leuin Cilt had i. carucate of 
land hidable. Land for xii. oxen. Now v. villanes have i. 
plough there. Wood, pasturable, iv. furlongs in length, and 
ii. in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. xx. shillings. Roger 
holds it. 

M. In Svdberie Godric and Vluric and Elmer had ii. carucates, 
less ^ a bovate, hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. Now xiv. 
villanes and iv. bordars have iii. ploughs there. There a 
priest, and a church, and i. mill worth vi. shillings and a 
hundred eels ; and xxii. acres of meadow, and a small piece 
of under-wood. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings; now, xx. 
Alcher holds it. 

S. In the same place h a bovate of land, and the -V part of 1. 
4. bovate hidable. Soke in Scroftun. A certain old woman 
held it. Now Alcher holds it. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 4 1 

Fol. 2741^, Col. I.] 

M. In Broctvne Vluric had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 

for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; and x. 

villanes and ii. bordars having iii. ploughs, and xviii. acres 

of meadow, and iv. acres of pasture. 
Ms. II. In Svmmersale Ormer and Erniet had ii. carucates 

of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in 

demesne i. plough ; and v. villanes and i. bordar have ii. 

ploughs, and xiv. acres of meadow, and iv. acres of pasture. 

Wood, pasturable, i a mile in length, and J in breadth. 

T. R. E., and now, val. Ix. shillings. Alcher holds it. 
M. In another Summersale Elric had i. carucate of land 

hidable. Land for i. plough, vi. bordars have i. plough 

and xxiv. acres of meadow there. Wood, pasturable, i. 

mile in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; 

now, i. mark of silver. Alric holds it. 
Ms. VIII. In Barctvne Godric and another Godric, Edric, 

Leuenot, Elfeg, Ledmer, Dunninc, and Eduard had iv. 

carucates of land hidable. Land for iv. ploughs. There 

now in demesne iii. ploughs ; and xix. villanes, and xf. 

bordars having vii. ploughs. There a priest, and a church, 

and ii. mills worth xx. shillings, and Ixiv. acres of meadow. 

T. R. E., and now, val. iv. pounds. Radulph holds it. 
M. In Alchementvnc Vluiet had i. carucate and a J of land 

hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. 

ploughs ; and viii. villanes, and vii. bordars having ii. 

ploughs and xii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. 

mile in length, and ^ in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings; 

now, xl. shillings. Radulph holds it. 
M. In Beneleie Vluiet and Vlchel had one carucate of land 

hidable. Land for i. plough. It is waste. T. R. E. val. 

XX. shillings ; now, xi. shillings. Radulph holds it. 

Fol.274^Col. II.] 

Ms. II. In Eisse Vlchel and Auic and Hacon had xvi. bovates 
of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in 
demesne ii. ploughs, and vii. villanes having i. plough. 
There arc xviii. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; 
now, xxx. Robert holds it. 

Ms. II. In Toxcnai Vlchetcl and Auic had xii. bovates of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There ikjw in demesne i. 



42 BOOK OK DOMESDAY, 

Kol. 37^^Col. II.) 

plough, and iv. villancs, and v. bordars having ii. ploughs 
and a h. v. fanners render v. shillings there, and ii. soke- 
men v. shilling.s. There are xxxiii. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile in length, and iv. furlongs in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shilling ; now, xxx. shillings. Hugh holds 
it. 

Ms. V. In Svdtvne Tori, Elwold, Vnban, Lewin, and Edric 
had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. 
There now in demesne iii. ploughs, and ix. villanes having 
vii. ploughs. There a church, and a priest, and i. mill worth 
X. shillings, and xxiv. acres of meadow. T. R. E., and 
now, val. Ix. shillings. Wazelin holds it. 

M. In Brailesford Earl Wallef had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs ; 
and xxiv. villanes, and iii. bordars have v. ploughs. There 
a priest and ^ a church, and i. mill worth x. shillings and 
viii. pence ; and xi. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. 
mile in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; 
now, xl. shillings. Elfin holds it. 

S. In Holintune and Sireleie iii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for | a plough. 

M. In Holintvne Lepsi, and Elfag, Auic, and three other 
thanes had i. carucate and a ^ of land hidable. Land for 
xii. oxen. xi. villanes and vii. bordars have vii. ploughs 
and viii. acres of meadow there, and a little under-wood. 
T. R. E., and now, val. xl. shillings. 

Ms. V. In Sirelei Chetel, and Ulmer, Turgis, Elric, ^Elgar, 
Vluiet and Lepsi had ii. carucates of land, less | a bovate 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. 
ploughs ; and vi. villanes and vii. bordars having iii. 
ploughs. There a priest, and a church, and i. mill worth 
ii. shillings. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xl.. 

Ms. II. In Braidelci Aluric and Lewin had i. carucate of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs, xi. villanes and vi. bordars 
have iv. ploughs there, and i. acre of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
xl. shillings ; now, xx. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY, 



43 



Fol. 274<5, Col. II.] 

Ms. II. In Geldeslei Ulchetel and Godwin had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne 
ii. ploughs and a |, and one villane having .1^ a plough. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. Cola holds 
it. 

Ms. IV. In Hiltvne Vluric, and Vlf, and Vbe, and Elric had 
iii. carucates of land hidable. Land for iv. ploughs. There 
now in demesne ii. ploughs ; and xii. villanes and vii. 
bordars having iv. ploughs There ii. mills worth x. 
shillings ; and Ix. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. vi. 
pounds ; now, iii. pounds. Robert holds it. 

Ms. III. In Hoge Vlsi, and Godvin, and Vlsi had ii. carucates 
of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs and ii. oxen. There 
now in demesne ii. ploughs ; and xi. villanes and v. bordars 
having ii. ploughs, and i. mill worth ix. shillings ; and xl. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xl. 
Sasuualo holds it. 

In Hatune vi. bovates and a ^ of soke ; and i. bovate and 
a h of thane-land. This belongs to Scrotune. 

Ms. II. In Hatvn Edric, and Collinc, and Baldric had i. 
carucate of land hidable. Land for i. plough, v. villanes 
and v. bordars have ii. ploughs there, and xx. acres of 
meadow. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. Sasuualo 
holds it. 

M. In Aitvn and Segessale Vluric had i. carucate of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs, v. villanes and v. bordars 
have iii. ploughs there, and i. mill worth iv. shillings, and 
xvi. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, 
and h in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. .shillings; now, xxx. 
shillings. Alcher holds it. 

M. In Merchctvne Aided had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land (ov iv. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs ; 
and xviii. villanes and v. bordars have iii. ploughs and 
xii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, 
and i. in breadth. T. R. K. and now, val. Ix. shillings. 



44 BOOK OK DOMESDAY. 

Fol. a75<», Col. I.] 

M. Ill liiibcdcne Vlchil liad vi. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for i. ploui]fh. iii. bordars and i. scrvus have i. plough and 
a \ there aiul xx. acres of meadow. Wood, pa.sturable, 
k a mile in length, and h a mile in breadth ; and as 
much under-wood. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. 
shillings. Ellin holds it. 

Ms. III. In Snellcstvne Leuenot, Elfric, and Saulf had ii.caru- 
cates and ii. bovates of land, and the ^ part of ii. bovates 
hidable. In the same i^lace ^ a carucate of land, the soke 
in Ouere, and iii. bovates of land the soke in Rouecestre, 
and v. bovates of land and ii. parts of ii. bovates which 
belong to Nordbcrie. Land for iv. ploughs amongst the 
whole. Now ix. villanes and ix. bordars and i. servus have 
vi. ploughs there, and 1. acres of meadow. Wood, pas- 
turable, i. mile in length, and ^ in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
viii. pounds ; now, xl. shillings. Radulf holds it. 

In Cobelei Siuuard had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs ; 
and iv. villanes and iv. bordars and i. scrvus have i. plough. 
There a priest, and a church, and i. mill worth xii. pence, 
and viii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and i. mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. c. shillings; 
now, xl. shillings. Radulph holds it. 

Ms. II. In Boilestvn Godric and Leuenot had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne 
ii. ploughs, and viii. villanes and viii. bordars having iii. 
ploughs, and i. mill worth xii. pence, and vi. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and | a 
mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. sliillings ; now, xxx. 
shillings. Roger holds it. 

Ms. II. In Faitvne and Stertune Vlchil and Wodi had ii. 
parts of i. carucate of land hidable. Land for vi. oxen. 
Now xi. villanes and x. bordars have vi. ploughs there, 
and i. mill worth viii. shillings, and viii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, iv. furlongs in length, and iv. in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 45 

Fol. 275a Col. I.] 

M. In Nortberie and Rosch intone Siuuard had iii. carucates 
of land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. There now in 
demesne ii. ploughs, and xvii. villanes and vii. bordars 
having iv. ploughs. There a priest, and a church, and 
i. mill worth x. shillings, and xxiv. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. c. shillings ; now, Ix. Henry holds it. 

In the same Roschintun i. carucate of land hidable, 
belonging to Rouecestre. Now ii. villanes are there. 

Ms. II. In Osmundestvne Wallef and Ailiet had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs, viii. villanes and iv. 
bordars have v. ploughs there, and ii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. mile in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xl. shillings. Elfin holds it. 

M. In Widerdestvne and Duluestune Earl Edwin had ii. 
carucates of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. ix. 
villanes and iv. bordars have ii. ploughs there, and ii. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and i. 
mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings : now, xx. 
shillings. Orm holds it. These ii. vills are of the king's 
farm in Rouecestre, except i. bovate which lies in Osmun- 
destune. 

M. In Torverdestvne and in Bubedune Vlchel had v. bovates 
of land hidable. Land for i. plough, iii. villanes and iii. 
bordars have i. plough and a ^ there, and xx. acres of 
meadow, and a little under-wood. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; 
now, XX. shillings. Elfin holds it. 

Ms. II. In Gheveli Two Liguli'i had xii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for xii. oxen. vii. villanes and iii. bordars have iii, 
ploughs there. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i, 
in breadth. T. R. Ii. val. iv. pounds ; now, xl. shillings. 
Alsi holds it. 

M. In Rcdeslci Brunc had xii. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for xii. oxen. There now in demesne i. plough ; and vi. 
villanes and ii. bordars have ii. ploughs and ii. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and h a 
mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xx. 



46 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Fol. J75.1, Col. ll.l 

.shillinL;s. John hold.s it. The Abbot claims sokage of this 
vill. 

I^ves 

Ms. II. In Oswnrdestvnc Ernwi and Lcuuin had xii. bovates of 
land hiilablc. Land for iii. ploughs. There now in demesne 
ii. ploughs, antl xii. villanes and iv. bordavs having iii. 
ploughs. Wood, pasturable, i a mile in length, and iv. 
furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xl. 
shillings. John holds it. 

M. In Tvrverdestvne Hedul had xii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. plouglis. There now in demesne ii. ploughs ; 
and vi. villanes and iii. bordars have ii. ploughs and xii. 
acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ^ a mile in length, 
and iv. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. four pounds ; 
now, xl. shillings. Robert holds it. 

M. In Bradestvne Leuenot Sterre had iii. bovates of land 
hidable. Land for i. plough. There now in demesne i. 
plough ; and ii. villanes have v. oxen in ploughs, and iii. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; now, iv. 
shillings. Herbert holds it. 

Waste Waste 

M. In Dvvelle, and Bradelei, and Holebroc, and Muleforde, and 

Waste 

Machenie, and in Herdebi, Siuuard had vii. carucates of 
land hidable, and the ^ part of i. carucate. Land for vii. 
ploughs and the ^ part of i. plough. There now in demesne 
iii. ploughs ; and xxxii. villanes, and viii. bordars, and x. 
servi having viii. ploughs and xx. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, iv. miles in length, and ii. in breadth. 
There a priest, and a church, and ii. mills worth viii. 
shillings. T. K. E. val. ix. pounds ; now, vii. pounds. In 
Herdebi (qu. Hardwicke) Henry has the ^ part of i. 
carucate. 

M. In Spondvne Stori had v. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for V. ploughs. There now in demesne iii. ploughs; and 
xiv. villanes and ii. bordars having iv. ploughs. There a 
priest, and a church, and i. mill worth v. shillings and iv. 
pence. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 47 

Fol. 276a, Col. I.] 

S. In Cedesdene iv. carucates and a ^ of land, and ii. parts of 
i. bovate hidable. Land for as many ploughs. Now xi. 
soke-men, and x. villanes, and v. bordars have vi. ploughs 
there, and xxviii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, h a 
mile in length, and v. furlongs in breadth. Under-wood of 
the same extent. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, iii. pounds. 

M. In Braideshale Siward had v. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for v. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs, 
and xxi. villanes and vii. bordars having viii. ploughs, i. 
knight has i. plough there. There a priest, and a church, 
and i. mill worth xiii. shillings and iv. pence ; and xii. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, viii. furlongs in length, and 
viii. in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. iv. pounds. Robert 
holds it. 

Morleia. 

There Siward had the J part of ii. carucates hidable. 
Henry has iv. villanes with i. plough there. Wood, 
pasturable, iv. furlongs in length, and iii. in breadth. 

M. In Pirelaie Dunning had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. There ii. acres of 
meadow, and of under-wood iii. furlongs in length, and ii. 
in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings. 

M. In Longesdvne Colne had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. It is waste. There vi. acres of 
meadow. Under-wood ii. miles in length, and i. mile in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xxx. shillings. 

M. In Stantvne Godric and Rauen had i. carucatc of land 
hidable. Land for i. plough, iv. villanes and vi. bordars 
have iii. ploughs there. There xxiv. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. mile in breadth. 
T. R. E., and now, val. x. shilling.s. 

Berewites. 

B. In Barcoucrc i. carucate of land hidable. Land for i. 
plough. It is waste. There viii. acres of meadow. Under- 
wood i a mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth ; the h 
part pasturable. T. R. K. val. viii. shillings. 



48 HOOK 01>" DOMKSDAV, 

1\I. Ill llortcl Chetcl had iv. bovates of land hidable. It is 
waste. There iii. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. v. 
shiUings and iv. pence. 

M. Giolgrave Colle and Chetel had xii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. plough.s. There now in demesne iii. ploughs ; 
and i. villane with i. plough, and i. mill worth v. shillings 
and iv. pence and iv. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xxxii. 
shillings ; now, xvi. shillings. 

M. In Middeltvne Dunninc and Elvinc had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. It is waste. There are ii. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings. 

M. In Gratvnc Chetel had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; and iv. 
villanes and ii. bordars have ii. ploughs. There iii. acres of 
meadow. T. R. E. val. x. shillings. 

M. In Wruenele and Muchedesuuelle Siuuard had iv. carucates 
of land hidable. Land for iv. ploughs. It is waste. There 
XX. acres of meadow. Under-wood i. mile in length, and 
iii. furlongs in breadth. 

M. In Chetelestvne Vlsi and Godwin had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. 
ploughs, and v. villanes and v. bordars with i. plough, and 
i. mill worth v. shillings, and a little under-wood. T. R. E. 
val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. Gulbert holds it. 

In Turulveston Geoffrey Alselin holds of Henry i. 
carucate of land. It is waste ; but yet val. iii. shillings. 

M. In Barvve Godwin and Colegrines had iii. bovates and a 
^ of land hidable. It is waste, i. villane has iv. oxen and 
viii. acres of meadow there. T. R. E. val. xiii. shillings and 
iv. pence ; now, ii. shillings. 

Ms. III. In Sorchestvn Game!, and Vlestan, and Vlf, and Vluiet 
had i. carucate of land hidable. Land for i. plough. There 
now in demesne i. plough, and vi. villanes having i. plough. 
There Ixviii. acres of meadow, and i. site of a mill. T. R. E., 
and now, val. xx. shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



49 



Fol. 275^ Col. II.] 

M. In Celardestvne Vlsi had iv. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for h a plough. It is waste. There iv. acres of meadow. 
T. R. E. val. xii. shillings ; now, iii. .shillings. Amalric 
holds it. 

Ms. II. In Erlestvne Golegrim and Rauenchel had i. carucate 
of land hidable. Land for i. plough. There now in 
demesne ii. ploughs, and vii. villanes with i. plough. There 
XX. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, xl. 
shillings. 

M. and B. In Tviforde and Steintvne Leuric had iv. carucates 
of land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. There now in 
demesne ii. ploughs, and iv. villanes and v. bordars with i. 
plough, and i. mill worth v. shillings, and xxiv. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. furlong in length, and i. in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. viii. shillings ; now, iv. pounds. 

Ms. II. In the same place Godwin and Vlfstan had i. carucate 
of land hidable. Land for i. plough. It is waste. 

M. In Osmvndestvne Osmund had iii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
i. villane rendering ii. shillings and viii. pence. There xx. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. Of 
these monies ii. parts are the King's ; the i, Henry's. 

M. In Codetvne Osmund had iv. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough, ii. villanes have i. plough there, and iii. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. v. shillings ; now, ii. 
shillings and vi. pence. 

B. In Osmundestune iii. bovates of land hidable, belonging to 
Codctune. 

M. In Scdenefeld Vlchel had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
ii. villanes having i. plough, and vi. acres of meadow. 
T. R. Iv, and now, val. x. shillings. William hoUls it. 

Ms. III. In Normantvne Leuric, Camel, and Tcodric had vi. 

bovates of land hidable. Land for i. plcjugh. There now 

in demesne i. plough, and i. villain; rendering xii. pence. 

Tiiere xii. acres of meadow, and a little under- wood. 

5 



50 ROOK OK DOMESDAV. 

Fol. 375*, Col. II.] 

T. R. E. val. XX. shillings ; now, x. .shilling.s. Amalric holds 
it. In the same place ii. bovates of land hidable belonging 
to Tuifcjrdc. 

M. In Irct\-ne Godwin had i. carucatc of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough, and vi. 
villanes and vi. bordars having ii. ploughs. There vi. acres 
of meadow, and i. mill worth xvi. pence. Wood, pasturable, 
h a mile in length, and 5 in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. 
shillings ; now, xx. shillings. Orme holds it. 

Soke 

M. In Estvne Vctebrand had i. carucate of land and ii. bovates 
and a h hidable, and v. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. vi. 
shillings ; now, viii. shillings. 

M.S. V. In Bvrnvlfcstvne and Bereuuardescote Gamel had x. 
bovates ; Aluric, ii. bovates ; Elric, ii. bovates ; Ledmer, i. 
bovate ; Leuing, i. bovate. In the whole, ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for iii. plough.s. There now in 
demesne iii. ploughs, and viii. villanes and i. bordar having 
iv. ploughs. There are xxxvi. acres of meadow, and a little 
under-wood. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxx. shillings. 
Henry holds it. 

]\I. In Mogintvn Gamel had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; 
and viii. villanes and viii. bordars having ii. ploughs. There 
a church, and a priest, and i. mill worth iii. shillings, and iii. 
acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile and a | in 
length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, 
XX. shillings. Chetel holds it. 

M. In Merchenestvne Gamel had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for vi. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
vi. villanes and iv. bordars have i. plough. There xiv. acres 
of meadow, and the site of i. mill. Wood, pasturable, ^ a 
mile in length, and iv. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
xl. shillings ; now, xxx. shillings. Robert and Roger holds 
it. 

M. In Delbebi Godric had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs, and vi. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAV. 5 I 

Fol. 276a, Col. I.] 

villanes and 1*. bordar with ii. ploughs. There a priest and 
a church, and xx. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
i. mile in length, and i a mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. 
shillings ; now, Ix. shillings. Robert holds it. 

Ms. V. In Etewelle Gamel, Edric, Vluiet, Eluric, Eluulnc had 
V. carucates of land hidable. Land for v. ploughs. There 
now in demesne iii. ploughs, and xiv. villanes and viii. 
bordars having viii. ploughs. There a priest, and a church, 
and XXX. acres of meadow. T. R. E., and now, val. c. 
shilHng.s. Sasuualo holds it. 

M. In Radbvrne Vlsi had iii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. There now in demesne iii. ploughs, and vi. 
villanes and v. bordars having iii. ploughs. There xii. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, h a mile in length, and iv. 
furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxx. 
shillings. Ralph fitz Hubert claims the h part of Radburne, 
and the Wapentake bears witness for him. 
Hennesoure. 
In Morelei Seward had the ^ part of ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Now Henry has it. 

In Edncsovre Leuenot and Chctel had ii. carucates of 
land for ii. manors. Henry now iv. carucates hidable, and 
as many ploughs for ploughing. There x. villanes, and vii. 
bordars with vi. ploughs and i. acre of meadow. Formerly 
xl. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 



VII. THE LAND OF WILLIAM PEVEREL. 

Fol. 2 J 6a, Col. 1 1.1 

M. In Belesovrc Lcuric had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. plcjughs. There now in demesne ii. pU)Uglis, 
and xiv. villanes and iii. bordars iiaving iv. ploughs and viii. 
acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and 
i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, Ix. Robert 
holds it. 

M. In Glapewelle Lcuric had i. carucatc of land hidable. 
Lanri for i. plough, viii. villanes having ii. ploughs there. 
T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, x. shilling.s. Serlo holds it. 



52 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Kol. J76a. Col. II.) 

M. In Esnotrewic Aldene had h a canicate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
vi. villanes and i. bordar having iii. ploughs. There a site 
of i. mill, and wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and iv. 
furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. 
shillings. Drogo holds it. 

M. In Normentvne Elfag had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
vi. villanes and i. bordar with i. plough. There v. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile and iv. furlongs in 
length, and ii. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillings ; now, x. Eduin holds it. 

M. and B. In Sirelvnt and in Vftune Leuric had ii. carucates 
and a i of land hidable. Land for as many ploughs. 
Now, live villanes and i. bordar have ii. ploughs there. 
Wood, pasturable, ix. furlongs in length, and iv. in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xvi. shillings ; now, x. shillings and viii. pence. 
Warner holds it. 

Ms. VI. In Cotenovre and Hainoure and Langeleie and Smite- 
cote viii. thanes had vii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for as many ploughs. There now in demesne iii. ploughs ; 
and xi. villanes, and ii. bordars, and iii. soke-men having v. 
ploughs and a h. There a church, and i. mill worth xii. 
pence, and xxxv. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. 
miles in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
iv. pounds ; now, xli. shillings and iv. pence. Warner holds 
it. 

Ix Pechefers. 

Ms. II. Gernebern and Hundinc held the land of the castle of 
William Peverel. There they had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. There is land for ii. ploughs. There now in 
demesne iv. ploughs, and iii. villanes with i. plough, and viii. 
acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, 1. 
shillings. 

Ms. III. In Bradewelle Leuing and Sprot and Ouuine had ii. 
carucates of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There 
now in demesne ii. plough.s, and viii. villanes having ii. 
plough.s. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, xxx. shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 53 

Fol. 276a, Col. II.] 

M. In Heselebec and Leitun Lewine had iii. carucates and a 

i of land hidable. Land for as many ploughs. There now 

in demesne i. plough, and iii. villanes with + a plough. 

There ii. acres of meadow, and a little under-wood. T. R. E. 

val. XX. shillings ; now, iv. shillings. 

]\Is. III. In Hochelai Ernui, Hundulf, Vluric ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. plouglis. It is waste. 

M. In Habenai Suain had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. It is waste. 

M. In Watrefeld Lewin had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. It is waste. 

VIII. THE LAND OF WALTER DE AINXVRT. 

Fol. 2766, Col. I.] 

M. In ]\Iortvne and Oughedestune and Wistanestune Suain 
the younger (Cilt) had xi. borates and a ^ and viii. acres of 
land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. There now in 
demesne ii. ploughs, and xiv. villanes having v. ploughs and 
a h, and iv. servi. There a priest, and a church, and i. 
mill worth vi. shillings and viii. pence, with the keeper of 
the mill, and viii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. 
mile and a | in length, and as much in breadth. T. R. E., 
and now, val. iv. pounds. Walter de Aincurt holds it. 

M. In Brandvne and Wadescel Wade had iii. bovates and a 
^- and iv. acres of land hidable. Land for h a plough. 
Walter has now in demesne there i. plough ; and i. villane 
and iii. bordars having h a plough, and ii. acres and i. perch 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile and a | in length, 
and i. furlong and a | in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. 
V. .shillings and iv. pence. Concerning this land, Walter 
vouches the King as warrantor, and Henry de Fcrrariis as 
giving livery. 

M. In Pinncslei and Caldecotes and Wilelmestorp Suain Cilt 
had ii. carucates of land, less ^ a bovate hidable. Land for 
iv. plough.s. Walter has now in demesne there ii. plough.s, 
and xii. villanes and iii. bordars having vi. phnighs. To 



54 r.OOK OV DOMKSUAV. 

Kol. 376;*, Col. I.] 

this Manor belong ii. bovates of land hidable. Soke in 
Winncfelt, and there are v. sokc-mcn, and a priest, and a 
ciuuch ; and in Topetune i. bovalc of land and the ^ part 
of one bovate is hidable ; and there is i. soke-man, and viii. 
villanes, and i. bordar, with iii. ploughs and a |. There are 
iii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, 
and i. in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. iv. pounds. 

M. In liolmesfclt Suain had i. caruc'ate of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. Now x. villanes have iii. ploughs there, and 
i. acre of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length 
and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings; now, xx. 
shillings. 

M. In Helmetvne Suain Cilt had i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. Walter has now in demesne there 
i. plough, and xxxvi. villanes and ii. bordars having- ix. 
ploughs. There a priest, and a church. Under- wood i. 
mile in length, and ^ in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. shillings, 
now, vii. pounds. 

M. In Holtvne Suain Cilt had iii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs, xviii. villanes and vi. bordars have 
viii. ploughs there. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; now, Ix. 



IX. THE LAND OF GOISFRID ALSELIN. 

Fol. 276*, Col. II.] 

M. In .(dvvoldestvn and Emboldestune and Torulfestune and 
Aleuuoldestune Tochi had x. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for xiv. ploughs. Goisfrid Alselin has now in 
demesne there ii. ploughs, and a certain knight of his i. 
plough, xxxii. villanes have xv. ploughs there. There a 
priest, and a church, and i. mill worth xii. shillings, and i. 
smith, and Iii. acres of meadow, and a little under-wood. 
T. R. E. val. xii. pounds ; now, x. pounds. 

M. In Etewelle Dunstan had i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough. Now i. villane has ii. oxen in a plough 
there. There vi. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillings ; now, iv. shillings and iv. pence. Azelinus holds 
it. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 55 

Fol. 276*, Col. II.] 

M. In Ednodestvne and Hoilant Tochi had iii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. There now in demesne 
i. plough, and ii. villanes, and ii. bordars, and h a church, 
and ii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and i. in breadth ; and another wood i- a mile in 
length, and h in breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, 
XXXV. shillings. To this Manor belong ii. bovates and a 
I of land hidable. Soke is in Holintune. Land for ii. oxen 
and a h 

M. In Eghintvne Tochi had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for vi. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough, and 
ii. villanes, and v. bordars, having i. plough. There a priest, 
and a church ; and i. mill worth v. shillings ; and vi. farmers 
rendering xiv. shillings and iv. pence. There ii. hundred 
acres of meadow, and a little under- wood. T. R. E. val. 
viii. pounds ; now, Ix. shillings. Azelinus holds it. 

S. In Braidestune i. bovate of land hidable. Land for i. ox. 
A soke, and waste, and it renders ii. spurs. There i. acre of 
meadow. Gislebert de Gand has there ii. carucates of land 
i. mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth. 

M. In Ochebroc Tochi had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. Now x. villanes and ii. bordars have 
iii. ploughs there ; and iv. farmers rendering xiv, shillings. 
There v. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and i in breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds; now, 
xl. shillings. Goisfrid holds it. 



X. THE LAND OF RALPH FITZ HUBERT. 

M. Echintvnc Leuenot had iv. carucates of land hidahlo. 
Land for v. ploughs. There Ralph Fitz Hubert has now in 
demesne i. carucate, and xiv. villanes having v. plough.s. A 
priest is there, and i. servus, and i. mill worth iii. shillings, 
and viii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles and 
i. furlong in length, and i. mile and h a fuilong in breadtli. 
T. R. E val. vii. pounds ; now, l.\. shillings. 



56 lU)OK OF DDMKSDAY. 

Fol. a77<i, Col. 1.) 

S. Ill Moresburg ii. carucatcs of land hidable. Land for iv. 
ploui^lis. A soke. Tlicre xiii. soke-mcn have now v. 
ploui:^hs and iii. acres of mcadt)\v. Wood, pasturable, i. mile 
and a .1 in lcn;j;th, and i. mile in breadth. 

S. In Bettune iv. bovates of land hidable. Land for as many 
oxen. A soke. It is waste. 

M. and B. In Barleburg and Witeuuelle Leuenot had vi. 
carucatcs of land hidable. Land for viii. ploughs. There 
now in demesne iii. ploughs, and x. soke-men, and x. 
villanes, and xxxvi. bordars having viii. ploughs. There 
a priest, and a church, and i. servus and ii. mills worth iii. 
shillings. There iii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
ii. miles in length, and i. in breadth. Under-wood i. mile in 
length, and i. in breadtli. T. R. E., and now, val. vi. pounds. 
Robert holds it. 

In Clvne ii. bovates of land hidable belonging to this 
Manor. 

M. and B. In Paltretvne and Scardeclif and Tunestal Leuenot 
had vi. carucatcs and ii. bovates of land hidable. Land for 
viii. ploughs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs, and x. 
villanes, and i. soke-man, and ii. bordars, having iii. ploughs, 
and i. farmer with i. plough. There i. mill worth iv. 
shillings, and viii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. 
mile in length, and ^ a mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. vi. 
pounds ; now, 1. shillings. Raynouuard holds it. 

M. In Dochemanestvn Leuenot had iv. carucatcs and ii. bovates 
of land hidable. Land for v. ploughs. Now xviii. farmers 
have V. ploughs there. There viii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. mile in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xix. shillings. Goisfrid holds 
it. 

M. In Stratvne and Tegestou and Henlege Leuenot had i. 
carucate of land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There 
now in demesne i. plough and a ^, and vi. villanes and iv. 
bordars having iii. ploughs, and viii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and i. in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. Robert holds 
it. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 57 

Fol. 277a, Col. II.] 

M. In another Stratvne Leuric had ii. bovates and a ^ of land 
hidable. Land for iv. oxen. Now ii. villanes and iv. 
bordars have ii. ploughs and ii. acres of meadow there. 
Wood, pasturable, iii. furlongs in length, and i. in breadth. 
T. R. E., and now, val. iii. shillings. Robert holds it. 

Ms. II. In Essovre Leuric and Leuenot had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. Now iii. farmers and 
xiv. bordars have iii. ploughs there. There now in demesne 
i. plough, and a priest, and a church, and i. mill worth xvi. 
pence. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles in length, and ii. in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xxx. shillings. 
Serlo holds it. 

M. In Nevtvne Leuric and Leuenot had iii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for v. ploughs. There now in demesne i. 
plough, and xiii. villanes and iv. bordars having iii. ploughs. 
There a priest having i. bordar, and vii. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and | in breadth. T. 
R. E. val. iv. pounds ; now, xxx. shillings. Radulph holds 
it. 

Ms. II. In Crice and Scochetorp Leuric and Leuenot had iv. 
bovates of land hidable. Land for i. plough. There now 
in demesne i. plough, and x. villanes and ii. bordars having 
iii. ploughs. There iii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
iii. miles in length, and i. mile in breadth, and i. lead-work 
(plumbaria). T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxx. shillings. 
Radulph holds it. 

In Wcrchesuuorde and Lcde and Taiieslcge iv. bovates of 
land hidable. Land for i. plough. Now iii. villanes and 
vii. bordars have i. plough there, and ii. acres and a i of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, h a mile in length, and as 
much in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; now, vii. 
shilHngs. This land lies in Crice, but the hide is rendercil 
in Hamelcstan Wapentake. 

S. In Wistancstvne iii. bovates and a h of land are hidable. 
Land for i. [)l(jugh. Soke in Crice. Now i. vii lane and vi. 
bordars have ii. ploughs there. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and ^ in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; now, 
v. shillings. Leuiuc liulds it. 



58 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Fol. 377<i, Col. II.l 

S. In Ougedcstvn ii. bovates of land hidablc. Land for iv. 
oxen. Wood, pasturable, h a mile in lenj^th.and iv. furlongs 
in breadth. Soke in Cricc, and it i.s waste. 

H. In X'ffentvne iv. bovates of land are hidable. Land for h a 
plough. Bcrewite in Pentric. It is waste. There ii. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, S a mile in length, and iv. 
furlongs in breadth. Nigel holds it. 

M. In Middeltone Leuenot and his brother had i. carucate of 
land which was hidable. Land for i. plough. It is waste. 
This Manor has i. mile in length, and iv. furlongs in breadth. 

Ms. II. In Hereseigc Leuenot and Lturic had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. plough.s. To this Manor belong 
iv. berewites, Banford, Heret, | Offretune, ii. parts of 
Middletunc. In these ii. carucates of land are hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. Now viii. villanes and ii. bordars have 
V. ploughs there. W^ood, pasturable here and there, ii. miles 
in length, and ii. miles in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. 
shillings; now, xxx. shillings. 

M. In Hortil Leuenot had ii. carucates of land hidablc. Land 
for ii. plough.s. Now v. villanes and iii. bordars have ui. 
ploughs there. There viii. acres of meadow, and a little 
under-wood. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, xii. shillings. 
Colic holds it. 

M. In Boletvne Leuenot had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; and ii. 
soke-men and iv. villanes have i. plough. There x. acres of 
meadow. Pasture iv. furlongs in length, and iii. furlongs in 
breadth. T. R. T. val. xl. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 

M. In Willetvne Leuric had iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploughs. Now iv. villanes and ii. bordars have 
iv. ploughs there, and xxx. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. 
xl. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 

M. In Langelei Leuenot had iv. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for vi. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; 
and ii. villanes and iv. bordars have ii. ploughs. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth, and 
a little under-wood. T. R. E. val. c. shillings ; now, xl. 
shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 59 

Fol. 277a, Col. II.] 

Ms. II. In Belidene Leuric and Leuenot had iv. carucates of 
land hidable. Land tor iv. ploughs. There now in demesne 
i. plough, and vi. villanes have i. plough. There xvi. acres 
of meadow. Under-wood i a mile in length, and i. furlong 
in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xii. shillings 
and vi. pence. 

M. In Englebi had i. carucate of land and the i part of i. 
carucate hidable. Land for i. plough and a h. There now 
in demesne i. plough ; and iii. villanes and ii. bordars have 
i. plough. There vii. acres of meadow, and the site of i. 
mill. Val. X. shillings. 

Fol. 2771J, Col. I.] 

Ms. II. In Cliptvne Leuric and Leuenot had iii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for iii. ploughs. Now viii. villanes and 
v. bordars have iv. ploughs there, and iv. acres of meadow. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, x. shillings. 

Ms. II. In Ripelie and Pentric Leuenot had ii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne 
iii. ploughs ; and xiii. villanes and iii. bordars have iii. 
ploughs. There iii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
ii. miles in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. val. iv. 
pounds ; now, 1. shillings. 

S. In Bareuue xii. bovatcs of land are hidable. Soke to 
Mileburne. There a priest and a church, and i. soke-man 
with h a plough and xviii. acres of meadow. In Werredune 
Leuenot ii. bovates of land hidable. Land for iv. oxen. 
Now vi. villanes have i. plough there, and i. acre of meadow, 
and under-wood. T. R. E., and now, val. v. shilliiig.s. 



XI. THE LAND OF RADULIMI I)I<: HVRVN. 

M. In Wcstvne Vlsi had i. carucate of land hidable. Land for 
i. plough. There now in demesne i. plough ; and vi. villanes 
and vi. bordars have ii. plough.s. There viii. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and A in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. .shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 
Gulbcrt holds it of Radulph dc lUnun. 



6o BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Fol. 377/', Col. I.) 

1\I. Ill Horselei Turgar h;ul iii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iv. ploui^^hs. There now in demesne ii. ploughs; 
and xix. villane.s ani.1 iv. bordars having vi. ploughs. There 
Ix. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, 
and i. in breadth. T. R. K. val. c. shillings; n(^w, Ix. 
shillings. A Knight of Radulph's holds it. 

M. In Denebi Osmond hail ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. Now vii. villanes and i. bordar have iii. 
ploughs there. There xii. acres of meadow, and the site of 
i. mill. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and i. in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. c. shillings ; now, xx. shillings. A 
knight of Radulph's holds it. 

M. In Halvn Dunstan had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. There now in demesne i. plough ; and v. 
villanes and iv. bordars have ii. ploughs. There xvi. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, vii. furlongs in length, and 
vi. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. xx. 
shillings. 

M. In Herdebi Turgar had v. parts of i. carucate of land 
hidable. Land for i. plough. It is waste. There vi. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and ^ in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xxx. shillings ; now, viii. shillings. 

XII. THE LAND OE ASCUIT MUSARD. 

Fol. 277*, Col. II.] 

M. In Barleie Hacon had ii. parts of i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for ^ a plough. Now vi. villanes and i. bordar have 
i. plough there. There ii. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile and a h in length, and viii. furlongs in 
breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. x. shilling.s. Ascuit 
Musard holds it. 

M. In Stavelic Hacon had iv. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for iv. ploughs. Now Ascuit has in demesne there iii. 
ploughs ; and xxi. villanes and vii. bordars having iv. 
ploughs. There a priest, and a church, and i. mill worth 
V. shillings and iv. pence. There Ix. acres of meadow. 
Wood, pasturable, i. mile and a ^ in length, and the same in 
breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. vi. pounds. 



I know 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 6l 

Fol. 2776, Col. II.) 

M. In Holvn, and Wadescel, and Brantune, Dunninc had x. 
carucates and a i of land hidable. Land for xii. oxen. 
Now viii. villanes and v. bordars have iii. ploughs there. 
There iii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile and 
a h and i. furlong in length, and ii. furlongs and a i in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, x. shillings. 
Ascuit holds it. 

M. In Brantvne and Wadescel Branuuine had vii. bovates of 
land and iv. acres hidable. Land for i. plough. One 
"°" plough now in demesne there; and iii. villanes and i. 

whom, bordar have i. plough. There v. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile and a ^ in length, and iii. furlongs in 
breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. x. shillings. Ascuit holds 
it. 

M. In Chinewolde Maresc Aluuold had | a bovate of land 
hidable. It is waste. There ^ an acre of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, i. mile in length, and xxx. perches in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xvi. pence ; now, xii. 



XIII. THE LAND OF GISLEBERT DE GAND. 

M. In Tilchcstvne, and Halen, and Stantonc Vlf Fenisc had vi. 
carucates of land and vi. bovates hidable ; and in Braides- 
tone soke ii. carucates of land hidable. Land for viii. 
ploughs and vi. oxen. iii. ploughs now in demesne there ; 
and X. soke-men with ii. carucates of this land, and xviii. 
villanes and vii. bordars having xii. ploughs. The site of 
i. mill there; and Ixx. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, 
i. mile in length, and iii. furlongs in breadth ; and under- 
wood, V. furlongs in length, and ii. in brcatlth. T. R. K. val. 
viii. pounds ; now, c. shillings. Malger hokis it. 

Ms. II. In Scipclie Brun and Odincar had ii. carucates of land 
hidable. Land for ii. ploughs. Now vii. villanes, and i. 
soke-man, and i. bf)rdar liavc v. ploughs there. There iii. 
acres of meadow. Wood, i)asturablc, vii. furlongs in length, 
and iii. in breadth. T. K. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxx. 
.shillings. Malger holds it. 



62 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

The Jiii>' (the men who were sworn) found that this 
himl tliil not bclon<^ to Vlf Fenisc in the time of King 
Edward, but that ii. thanes so held it that tiiey were able to 
give or to sell it to whom they pleased. 



XIV. THE LAND OF NIGKL DE STATFORD. 

Fol. iySa, Col. I.] 

M. In Drachelavve and Hedcote Elric had iv. canicates of land 
hidable. Land for iv. ploughs. Now Nigel de Stadford 
has in demesne there iv. ploughs, and vi. villanes having iii. 
ploughs. There is the site of i. mill ; and xii. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, ii. miles and a ^ in length, and 
ii. miles in breadth. T. R. E. val. Ix. shillings ; now, xl. 

M. In Stapenhille Godric had vi. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough, i. plough now in demesne there ; and 
iv. villanes and iii. bordars have i. plough. There iii. acres 
of meadow. Under- wood i. furlong in length, and i. in 
breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. x. shillings. 

M. In Sivardingescotes Godric had i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough, i. plough now in demesne there ; and 
iv. villanes and ii. bordars have i. plough, and i. farmer has 
i. plough. There i. acre of meadow. Wood, pasturable, iv. 
furlongs in length, and iv. in breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. 
shillings ; now, xxx. 

M. In Fornevverche Vlchel had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs, i. plough now in demesne there ; and 
V. villanes and iii. bordars have i. plough. There i. mill 
worth ii. shillings ; and xxiv. acres of meadow. Wood, 
pasturable, ^ a mile in length, and as much in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xv. shillings. 

S. In Englebi iii. bovates of land hidable. Land for iv. oxen. 
Soke of the same manor, i. villane and ii. bordars there 
with ^ a plough ; and iv. acres of meadow. 

S. In Tichenhalle i. carucate of land hidable. Land for i, 
plough. The soke belongs to Rapendun the King's Manor. 
Nigel has i. plough in demesne there, and i. villane and i. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 63 

Fol. 278a!, Col. I.] 

bordar with i. plough. There x. acres of meadow. Val. 
iii. shillings. The \ part of the pasturable wood of the 
same vill, of which the length is i. mile, and the breadth ^ a 
mile, belongs to Nigel. 

M. In Smidesbi Eduin had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs, i. plough is now in demesne there, and v. 
villanes with i. plough. Wood, pasturable, A a mile in 
length, and vi. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E. val. xl. 
shillings ; now, xx. shillings. 

M. In Ravenestvn Godric had i. carucate of land hidable. 

Land for i. plough. It is waste. There viii. acres of 

meadow. T. R. E. val. xv. shillings ; now, xii. pence. 
M. In Dvrandestorp Carle had i. carucate of land hidable. 

Land for h a plough. It is waste. T. R. E. val. v. shillings ; 

now, xii. pence. 

M. In Achetorp Ernuin had vi. carucates of land hidable- 
Land for h a plough. It is waste. T. R. E. val. v. shillings ; 
now, iv. pence. 

M. In Trangesby Elnod had i a carucate of land hidable. It 
is waste. T. R. E. val. v. shillings ; now, ii. pence. 

XV. THE LAND OF ROBERT FITZWILLIAM. 

M. In Stanlei Vlfar had ii. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. Robert the son of William has ii. villanes 
and ii. bordars with i. plough there. There vi. acres of 
meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in length, and ^ in 
breadth. T. R. E. val. xx. shillings ; now, x. shillings. 



XVI. THE LAND OF ROGER DE liUSLI. 

Fol. 278a, Col. 1 1. 1 

M. In Braidestvnc Ligulf and Lcuuin Cilt had iii. carucates of 
land hidable. Land. Fulk the man of Roger de Ikisli has 
V. villanes with ii. ploughs there, and x. acres of meadow. 
T. R. E. val. xl. shillings ; now, xxi. shillings. This Ligulf 
had ^ a carucate of the soke which Fulk dc Lusoris has 
taken from Gilbert de Gaud. 



64 HOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

Fol. 3jSa, Col. II.] 

RI. Ill Risclcia Vlsi had v. bovates of land and the J part of 
i. bovate hidablo ; and Godric v. bovates and the ^ part of 
i". bovate hidablc. Land. Now v. villanes have ii. ploughs 
there and xx. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ix. fur- 
loni;s in Icnt^th, iuu\ iii. furloni^s in breadth. T. R. E. val. 
xxi. shillinf^s and iv. pence ; now, xxii. shillings and viii. 
pence. Fulk holds it of Roger. Ernuin claims it. 

M. In Bcctvnc Swain had vi. bovates and a ^ hidable. There 
is land for i. plough and a h. Yet iv. ploughs are there, and 
xi. villanes and ii. bordars. Formerly xx. shillings ; now, 
xxxii. shillings. Roger holds it, and Leuuine of him. 

M. In Dure Edwin ii. bovates of land hidable. There is land 
for A a plough. 

M. In the same place Leuuin ii. bovates of land hidable. There 
is land for i. plough. Formerly xx. shillings ; now, Ixiv. 
pence. 

Ms. In Nortvn Godeva and Bada had xii. bovates and a ^ and 

viii. acres of land. Land for ii. ploughs, iii. villanes have i. 

plough there. Ingram holds of Roger. Formerly xx. 

shillings ; now, xviii. pence. 
M. In Elstretvne Morcar had for a Manor iv. bovates and a ^ 

and iv. acres of land hidable. There is land for i. plough. 

ix. villanes and iii. bordars with ii. ploughs there. There 

are v. acres of meadow. Formerly xx. shillings ; now, xxx. 

shillings. Ingram holds of Roger. 

M. In Rvgetorn Vlsi and Steinulf had i. carucate of land hidable 
as a Manor, and in Branlege two bovates of land of the soke 
of Rvgetorn. There is land for ii. plough.s. vi. villanes 
with i. bordar have i. plough there. In demesne i. plough, 
and ii. acres and a i of meadow. Formerly xx. shillings ; 
now, xvi. shillings. 



XVII. THE LAND OF THE KING'S THANE. 

Fol. 278*, Col. I.) 

Ms. II. In Barleie Leuric and Uctred had ii. bovates and a | of 
land hidable. Land for v. oxen. Now iii. villanes and iv. 
bordars have i. plough there. Wood, pasturable, iii. miles in 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 65 

Fol. 278*, Col. I.) 

length, and iv. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. 

vi. shillings and viii. pence. 
Ms. III. In Chinevvoldemaresc Godric, and Edric, and Turgisle 

had vii. bovates and a h of land hidable. Land for i. plough. 

Now V. villanes have i. plough there. There are vii. acres of 

meadow. Wood, pasturable, iii. miles in length, and v. 

furlongs and Ixx. perches in breadth. T. R. E. val. xviii. 

shillings ; now, ix. shillings. 
M. In Topetvne Dolfin had ii. bovates of land hidable. It is 

waste. T. R. E. val. viii. shillings ; now, v. shillings. 
M. In Totingelei Tolf had iv. bovates of land hidable. Land 

for one plough. It is waste. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 

length, and h a mile in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; 

now, xii. pence. 

M. In Estvne Tolf had v. bovates and a A of land hidable. 
Land for one plough. Now two soke-men, and vi. villanes, 
and i. bordar having iii. ploughs there. There are ii. acres 
of meadow. Wood, pasturable, vii. furlongs in length, and 
iv. furlongs in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. xx. shillings. 
Leuuin holds of the King. 

M. In Henleie Godric had vii. bovates of land hidable. Land 
for i. plough. Now in demesne there i. plough ; and ii. 
soke-men, and iv. villanes, and ii. bordars, have iii. ploughs 
and a i. There are ii. acres of meadow. T. R. E. val. x. 
shillings ; now, xx. shillings. Leuuin holds of the King. 

M. In the same place Raucn had i. bovatc of land hidable. It 
is waste. Sedret holds of tiie King. 

M. In Tapetvne Bada had i. bovate of land and iv. acres 
hidable. Land for ii. oxen. Now iv. villanes have i. plough 
there, and i. acre of wood in length, and i. acre in breadth. 
T. R. E. val. X. shillings ; now, ii. shillings and viii. pence. 
Dolfin holds of the King. 

Ms. III. In Calchalc Sbernc and Ilacon had i. carucate of land 
hidable. Land for xii. o.xcn. Now Stcinulf and Dunning 
have ii. ploughs antl a ^ there, and xvii. villanes and i. bordar 
with ii. phnighs. There are iii. acres of meadow. W<jod, 
pasturable, i. furlong in length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E. 
val. XXX. shillings ; now, xx. shilling.s. Dolfin claims it. 
6 



66 HOOK Ol" DOMKSDAV. 

Fol. 27S^ Col. I. & II.) 

M. In Clvne Ernui h.ul vi. bovatcs of land lii(lal)le. Land for i. 
ploiiijjh. ^ a pUnis^li now in demesne there, and viii. villanes 
with i. ploui;li. T. R. E. val. xx. .shilling.s ; now, viii. shilling.s. 
I'^rniii hold.s of tlic King. 

M. In LvUitviic Auti had v. carucates of land hidable. Land 
for V. ploughs. Now Edmund hold.s there of the King. xxi. 
villanes, anil iii. bordars with iv. ploughs. There is a priest ; 
and i. mill worth vi. shillings and viii. pence ; and xii. acres 
oi meadow. T. R. E., and now, val. iv. pound.s. 

M. In lulnvnghale /Elgar had ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. Now xii. villanes have viii. ploughs 
there, and iv. acres of meadow. Underwood, iii. furlongs in 
length, and i. in breadth. T. R. E., and now, val. xl. shilling.s. 

M. In Tilchestvne Osmund Benz had three bovates of land 
hidable. He himself holds it of the King. 

M. In the same place Toli had iii. bovates of land hidable. 
Land for as many oxen. Now ii. villanes have v. oxen in a 
plough there. There are v. acres of meadow. This land 
belongs to Sandiacre. 

Ms. III. In Sandiacre Toli, Cnut, and Gladuin had iv. carucates 
of land hidable. Land for v. ploughs. Now Toli holds of the 
King. In demesne there are ii. ploughs ; and x. villanes and 
vi. bordars having v. ploughs. There is a priest and a 
church ; and i. mill worth v. shillings and iv. pence ; and 
XXX. acres of meadow, and a little under-wood. T. R. E., 
and now, val. xl. shillings. 

M. In the same place Osmund had i. carucate of land hidable. 
Land for i. plough. Now it is waste. There are vi. acres of 
meadow, and a little under-wood. 

]\I. In the same place Tochi had ii. bovates of land hidable. 

IM. In Cellesdene Osmund had four bovates of land, and the ^ 
part of i. bovate hidable. Land for vi. oxen. He holds it of 
the King ; and has there iii. villanes with i a plough, and ii. 
acres and a ^ of meadow. Wood, pasturable, iii. furlongs in 
length, and ii. in breadth. T. R. K. val. x. shillings; now, v. 
shillings. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. tj 

Fol. 2781^, Col. II.] 

M. In Vlvritvne Alun had i. carucate of land hidable. Land 
for ii. ploughs. Now Alden holds of the King. There 
are xii. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, i. mile in 
length, and J- in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. shillings ; now, ii. 
shillings. 

M. In Riselei Lewin had v. bovates of land, and the \ part of 
i. bovate hidable. His son now holds of the King. There 
are x. acres of meadow. Wood, pasturable, ix. furlongs in 
length, and i. furlong and a \ in breadth. T. R. E. val. x. 
shillings and viii. pence ; now, v. shillings and iv. pence. 

M. In Mers Leuenot had iv. bovates of land hidable. Land for 
iv. oxen. It is waste. 

M. In Stantvn Edward had i. carucate and a | of land hidable. 
Land for ii. ploughs. Yet iv. ploughs and a \ are there ; 
and iv. soke-men, and iv. villanes, and xl. acres of meadow, 
and a mill worth ii. shillings. Ernui holds. It was worth, 
and is worth, xx. shillings. 
In Englebi ii. parts of i. bovate of land. It lies in Stantun. 



68 lU)OK OF DOMKSDAV. 

11-lottiiU3haniebirc. 

{Thne Entries are takex from the ^oltiiiii/iaiiisliire Survey.) 

In the Borough of Derby, T. R. E., there were residing cc. and 
xUii. burgesses, and to that borough adjoins xii. carucates of land 
hidable, which viii. ploughs can plough. This land was divided 
between xii. burgesses, who had xii. ploughs, ii. parts of the tax 
and toll forfeitures, and of every custom, are the King's, and a i 
part the Earl's. In the same borough there was in the King's 
demesne i. church with vii. clerks who held freely ii. carucates of 
land in Chester. There was likewise another church of the 
King's, in which vi. clerks likewise held ix. bovates of land freely 
in Cornun and Detton. In the town itself there were xiv. mills. 
Now, there are c. burgesses there, and xl. other lesser ones. c. 
and iii. houses are waste, which rendered tax. There are now x. 
mills there, and xvi. acres of meadow. Underwood, iii. furlongs 
in length and ii. in breadth. T. R. E., it rendered in the whole 
xxiv. pounds ; now, with the mills and the town of Ludecerce it 
renders xxx. pounds. 

M. In Ludecerce the King has ii. carucates of land hidable. 
Land for iii. ploughs. There is i. soke-man, and ix. villanes 
having ii. ploughs and xii. acres of meadow. 

In Derb}', the Abbot of Burton has i. mill, and i. masure of 
land with sac and soc, and ii. masures of which the King has soc, 
and xiii. acres of meadow. 

Geoffrey Alselin has i. church, which belonged to Tochi. 
Ralph Fitzhubert i. church, which belonged to Leuric, with i. 
carucate of land. Norman de Lincolia i. church, which belonged 
to Brun. Edric has there i. church which belonged to Coin his 
father. Earl Hugh has ii. masures and i. fishery with sac and 
-soc. Henry de Ferrers in like manner, iii. masures with sac and 
soc. Osmer, the priest, has i. bovate of land with sac and soc. 
Godwin, the priest, in like manner, i. bovate of land. 

At the feast of Saint Martin the burgesses render to the King 
xii. thraves of corn, of which the Abbot of Burton has xl. sheaves. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 69 

Moreover, in the same borough, there are viii. masures with sac and 
soc. These belonged to Algar, now they are the King's. 

The two parts of the King's moneys and the Earl's k, which 

and censur 

issue from Apletree in Derberic Wapentake, are in the hand of 
the Sheriff, by the testimony of the two shires. 

Of Stori, the ancestor of Walter de Aincurt, the Jury find, 
that without the license of any one, he might for himself make 
there a church on his own land and soke, and assign as much of 
his tithe as he pleased. 

In Nottinghamshire and Derb)shire, if the King's peace, given 
by his hand or seal, should be broken, it is made good by xviii. 
hundreds. Each hundred viii. pounds. Of this amend the King 
has ii. parts, the Earl tlie ^. That is to say, xii. hundreds 
compensate the King, and vi. the Earl. If any one should be 
outlawed according to law for any offence, no one but the King 
can restore to him peace. A thane having more than vi. manors 
does not give relief for his land, except only viii. pounds to the 
King. If he has only vi. or less, he gives iii. marks of silver to 
the Sheriff as a relief, wherever he resides, in the borough or 
without. If a thane having sac and soc should forfeit his land, 
the King and the Earl have the moiety of his land and chattels 
between them, and the lawful wife with his lawful heirs, if there 
are such, have the other moiety. 

Here are noted those who have soc and sac and thol and 
thaem, and the King's custom of ii. pence. 

The Archbishop of York, upon his manors, and Godeva the 
Countess, upon Ncwerk Wapentake. And Ulf Eenisc upon his 
land. The Abbot of Burgh upon Colingeham. The Abbot of 
Bertune. Earl Hugh upon Marcheton. The Bishop of Chester. 
Tochi. Suen, the son of Suaue. Siuuard bnrn. Azor, the son 
of Saleue. Ulric cilt. Elsi illinge. Leuuin, the son of Ahiuin. 
The Countess .^Iveva. The Countess Goda. Elsi, the son of 
Cashin upon Werchessope. Henry de Ferrers upon Ednodcs- 
tunc and Uubridge and Breilesfordham. Walter do Aincurt 
upon Grancbi and Mortune and I'inncslcig. Of all these no one 
could have the /j penny of the Earl unless by his consent, and 
that only as long as he lived, except the Archbishop and Ulf 
Fenisc and the Countess Godeva. 

Upon the Soke which is at Cliftunc, tiie Ivirl ()U;.^ht to have 
the I part of all customs and work.s. 



70 



a Hicit of tbc riDanore, Rc„ ot Undent 2)cmcc>nc 
of tbc Crown ((Terra IRctjie). 



Aestun - 

Aidcle - 

Aisscford 

Aivne - 

Ancise - 

Badaquella 

Barrcuuc 

Basselau 

Begalic - 

Benedleg 

Bcrceles 

Bereleie 

Blackeuuelle 

Bredelawe 

Bretcbi - 

Briniinton 

Bubciiele 

Buitorp - 

Buiitesliale 

Burtune 

Caldecote 

Caldelawe 

Caloure 

Celardestune 

Ceollial - 

Cestrefcld 

Chendre 



32 


Cheseuurdc - 


- 31 


31 


Chetesuuorde 


- 31 


30 


Chevenesworde 


- 31 


31 


Chersington - 


- 31 


30 


Chiteslie 


- 28 


30 


Cliftunc 


- 3C 


29 


Codetune 


- 29 


30 


Cotes - 


- 27 


31 


Cranchesberie 


- 30 


28 


Ciunforde 


- 27 


30 


Dentine 


- 31 


27 


Derelie - 


- 26 


30 


Dranefeld 


- 26 


28 


Echintune 


- 26 


29 


Ednesoure 


- 3> 


26 


Eitune - - - 


- 28 


30 


Elleshope 


- 28 


26 


Engelbi 


- 30 


27 


Esseburne 


- 28 


30 


Estune - 


- 31 


30 


Farleie - 


- 27 


31 


Flagun - 


- 30 


30 


Glosop - - - 


- 31 


26 


(ircherst 


- 26 


31 


Iladun - 


- 30 


26 


Iladuna 


- 30 


31 


lladuiic 


- 30 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



71 



Hanzedone - 


- 


28 


Prcstclive 


- 30 


Hedfelt - 


- 


31 


Ralunt - 


- 30 


Hetfeld 


- 


31 


Rapendune - 


29, 30 


Hetesope 


- 


30 


Ravenshain - 


- 27 


Hiretune 


- 


27 


Redlavestune 


- 28 


Holun - 


- 


30 


Reuslegc 


- 30 


Honeston 


- 


26 


Scelhaduna - 


- 30 


Hope 


- 


31 


Scetune 


- 31 


Ibeholon 


- 


27 


Serdelaue 


- 22 


Lancredenedele 




- 


31 


Smalei - 


- 28 


Langesdune - 


- 


30 


Snitertone 


- 27 


Lodeuorde 


- 


31 


Spondune 


- 32 


Maiieis - 


- 


30 


Stoche - 


- 31 


Mapelton 


- 


28 


Suerchestune- 


- 29 


Maperlie 


- 


32 


Tadington 


- 30 


Meashain 


- 


30 


Taptune 


- 26 


Meslac - 


- 


27 


Teneslege 


- 27 


Metesford 


- 


27 


Tibecel 


- 32 


Middletune - 


- 27, 29 


,32 


Tichenhale - 


29, 30 


INIilburne 


- 


29 


Tidesuuelle - 


- 31 


Muchedesuuelle 


- 


31 


Toptune 


- 26 


Neuubold 


- 


26 


Toriiesete 


- 31 


Neuuetone 


- 


29 


Torpe - 


- 28 


NoriDantune - 


26 bis. 


29 


Transgebi 


- 30 


Nortunc 


- 


26 


Vpetiine 


- 26 


Oclieauestoii 


- 


28 


Waletune 


27, 28 


Offretune 


- 


31 


VVclledeiie 


- 27 


Onestune 


- 


26 


Werchesvvorde 


- 27 


Opetunc 


- 


27 


Wcstune 


28, 32 


Ophidccotes - 


- 


28 


VVineslic 


- 29 


Osmundesthorpc 


- 


29 


Wingreudc 


- 26 


Padefeld 


- 


31 


Witfeld - 


- 31 


Pad i lie - 


- 


26 


VVitcnton 


- 26 


Pcvcrwic 


- 


28 


Wodncslcic - 


- 27 



The king's under-tenants at Domesday were very few in 

number; perliaps they were pur[)oscly omitted. 
William Pcvercl kept for the king ICdensor, Hope, and Mapelton. 
Coin held Pevcrcwie. 
Robert, Tibccl. 



72 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

IliKlcbrand, Aeston and Serdelau. 

In the time of Kin<j Edward several of the Royal Princes held 

part of these demesnes. 
Earl Ali:^ar held Bretibi, IMitldelton, Neutonc, Rapcndon, Red- 

laveston, Waletime, and Westune. 
Lewin and Edwin (two of the Princes) held Oncston and 

Normantune ; with Levenet, Leuric held Dentine ; and with 

Chetel, Langelie and Chatworde ; he also alone held 

Chesuuorde and Chetesuarde and Padfeld. 
Hundolf held Waletune. 

Ligulf, Langedcnedele, Tornsctc, and Tibcel. 
Brun, Lodeuuorde. 
Caschin, Aiune. 
Eliner, Ccolchal and Hedfelt. 
Godric, Chendre and Begele. 
Stapuline, Maperlie. 



No. II. THE LAND OF THE BISHOP OF CHESTER. 

The Bishop himself held Salle, Draicot, Aitone, and Biibdene. 
We do not know the value of the great manor of Salle. Sawley 
was a hundred in itself; nor is the value of Draicot and 
Opeuuelle given. Eaton was worth ;^8 ; Bubdene, £"]. His 
onl}' tenant was Ralf fitz Hubert. For Opeuuelle there is no 
record of any tenant T. R. E. No doubt these manors were 
then part of the Bishop's possessions. 



No. III. THE TENANTS OF THE ABBOT OF 
BURTON. 

The Abbot of Burton held the whole of his estate in demesne. 
He held Ufre, with its berewites ; Parva Ufre, Findre, Potlac 
and its sokes ; Snellcstune, Berucrdescote, Dellingeberie, 
Hougen, Redesleie, Sudberie, Hiltune and Sudtun, Apelby, 
Wineshalle, Cotune, Stapenhille, Caldewelle, and Tichcnhalle. 
It was worth altogether ;^22 ; in the time of Edward, ^^33 lOs. 
Then Earl Algar held two carucatcs in Cotune ; and Abbot 
Leuric made over a carucate in Apelby to the Countess Goda ; 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 73 

whilst Alfric held Caldewelle, which manor, however, did not 
belong to the Abbey T. R. E., King William having given it to 
the Monks for his beneficium. 



No. IV. THE EARL OF CHESTER 

Had only a small holding in this County. He had in demesne 
Merchestone (which had been Earl Siward's, worth only jCs) and 
its berewites of Chenuestun and Macheuorde and Adelardestreu, 
which Gozelin held of him, and Colle of Gozelin, for los. 8d. 
yearly. 

No. V. THE LAND OF ROGER POICTOU. 

Of the baronx' of this great personage we know but little. 
He was evidently out of favour with the king, for he had his 
estates in his hands, but not, as it would seem, as an escheat ; for 
here, as in other places, Roger de Poictou is still styled the 
tenant-in-capite. The manors were Sutton, Bectune, Lunt, 
Steinesbi, Tunstal, Blanghesbi, Hertstolf, and VVinfeld, and 
Steinulf held the whole of them T. R. E. but the last, which 
Elnod then held ; and at the date of Domesday Robert 
(probably de Hcriz) held this manor of Earl Alan, who held it 
under William Peverel. This manor of South Winefeld was the 
only one held by Earl Alan (Richmond) in this county^ 



No. VI. THE TENANTS OF HENRY DE FERRARS. 

The Earl of Ferrars held in demesne hfty-scven manors : — 
Winbroc, Eltune, Branzintune, Bradburnc, Tizincton, Hortedun, 
Salham, Pilsburie, Lodouuellc, Etclaue, Ednunghalle, Bolun, 
Linctune, Wivelslei, Stantunc, 2 Hcorteshornes, Farulvcston, 
Scrotun, Brocton, 2 Holmtune, 2 Sirelie, Braidclci, Mcschctune, 
Faitunc, Stretunc, Northberie, Roschinton, Duvelle, Bradclei, 
Holbroc, Muleford, Machenie, llerdibi, Spondunc, Pirelaie, 
Longcsdune, Stantune, Barcoucre, Hortcl, Giolgrave, Middcltune, 
Gratune, Wrucnele, Muchedcsuuellc, Barvve, Sorchcstun, Erles- 
tune, Tuiforde, Steintune, Osmundcston, Codetunc, Estun, 
Radburne, ]'l<lncs<jvic. 



74 HOOK OK DOMKSDAV. 

Tlic order dI tlicsc manors is that of Domesday. 

The followinfT arc the names of his tenants which are to be found 
in Domesday, and the)-, probahl}-, arc the \^ery knic^hts, or the 
ancestors of the 26 knights asserted by WilHam, Earl Fcrrars, 
early in the reign of Henry II., to have been enfcoffeed by 
Robert de Fcrrars, his grand tatlier, not ont of his demesne, but 
out of that of his father, that is, of Henry de Fcrrars of Domesday. 
(Red Book of the Exchequer.) It must be noted that the attempt 
to identify them with the families who subsequently held the 
estates is only tentative. It is made with the full knowledge that 
great danger of falling into error exists in taking this course, and 
that very possibly after enquiries will cause an alteration. It is also 
made with this reserve, that although generally all the manors 
are grouped under one name, it by no means follows that there 
were not several persons of the same name, and that is especially 
probable in the first name which follows; and it may be the case 
also, that where the names are separated, the entries properly 
relate to one person : — 

1. Alcher held Estune, Sudberie, and Somersale. These 3 

manors were held by the Montgomeries subsequently. 

4. Segishale. Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies this place with 

Sedsall, neither of which places are found in Lysons. 

5. Eiton. This manor was held by Tuberville. Wm. fil 

Alcher and Geoffery his son were knights of the Earl of 
Derby, tempe Henry II. 

2. Alric held Somersale. Probably the same person as Alcher. 

3. Alsi held Gheveli. Probably the same person as Elsin No. 8. 

4. Amalric held Chelardestun and Normanton. The ancestor 

I)robably of the family of the name of Cheladestun, who 
became extinct about the time of King John. Robert 
fil Rich de Normanton was a knight of Earl Fcrrars, 
tempe Henry II. 

5. Ascelin Goisfred held Turalveston. This was probably the 

fee which Robert de Chauces held, tempe Henry I. 

6. Chetel held Moggington. 

7. Cola held Winstunc and Geldeslie. Robert, his son, sold 

them to the Monjoie.s. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 75 

8. Elsin held Brailsford, the 2 Bubdens, Osmondestune, Torver- 

destune, and Geveley. 

9. Godric held Sothell and Walestune. The first place is clearly 

Shottle in Duffield ; and Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies 
Walestune also with a vill in that great manor. 

10. Gulbert held Chedelestune. Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies 

this place with Kedleston, if that be so, this knight was 
probably the ancestor of the Curzon family. 

11. Henry held Burnaleveston and Bereuuerdicote. This knight 

was probably Henry de Cambrics, who is mentioned in the 
certificates of said Wm. Ferrars, and who attested his 
charter to Wm. Pan ton 1. 

12. Henry held Morlei. 

13. Herbert held Bradestune. Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies 
this place with Breaston, Earl Roger de Bush's manor, but 
this appears to be doubtful. 

14. Hugh held Toxenai. Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies this 
place with Trusley, and Lysons would identify his descen- 
dants with Hugh le Arbalaster of the time of Henry H., 
but at that time Robert de Trusley was a Knight of this 
Barony, and in Henry I. reign William de Trusley, his 
father, held his fee. 

15. Nigel held Chetune. This was undoubtedly Nigel Albini, 

who married the daughter of Henry de Ferrars. 

16. Orm held Widerdestune, Dulvestune, and Iretune. 

17. Radulf Barchetune and Alchementune. This, no doubt, was 

de Bakcpuz. 

18. Radulf held Snelleston and Cobclai. This is equally clearly 

the ancestor of the Montgomery family. 

19. Radulf held Benclei. 

20. Robert held Eissi, Hiltune, and Turvadcstune. This was 

probably Robert Avenel de Bosch vi lie. 

21. Robert held Bradcshelle and Merchencstunc. This was 

probably Robert dc Dun. 

22. Roger held Crocheshale and Stretton. This was probably 

the ancestor of de Camville, who brougiit it to Curzon. 

23. Roger held Sapertune, Boilston, Merchencstunc. 



76 HOOK OF DOMKSDAV. 

24. Suan held Collci. Aelatn fil Swain held it in the time of 

Henry II. 

25. Saswah) held Hoge, Hatune, and Ktewell. His sons Henry 

and Fulc held 9 manors tcmpc Henry I., and in the reijrn of 
his i^randson the\' were held by the co-heirs of Henry, yet 
the Heralds claim these Knii^hts as the ancestors of the 
noble house of Shirley. 

26. Wazelin (Wachiline) held Sutton. 

27. William held Sedenefield. Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt identifies 

this place with Sinfin. If this be so, the probability is that 
this William is the ancestor of the family of Toke, of whom 
both William and Humfrey flourished in the reign of 
Henry II. 

No. VII. THE TENANTS OF WILLIAM PEVEREL. 

William Peverel himself held the land of the Forest of 
Pechefers, which Gernebern and Hundinc held T. R. E. Brade- 
welle, which Leuing, Sprot, and Owini held ; Heselbec and 
Leitun, which Lewine held ; and Hochelai, Habenai, and 
Waterfeld, which Ernui, Hundulf, Uluric, Suuan, and Lewine had 
held, at that period they were waste. 

Robert (de Heriz ?) held Bolsover, which Lcuric had held. 
T. R. E. Silo (de Pleslie .') held Glapwelle, also held by Leuric ; 
Drogo held Esnotrewic formerly Aldene's; Edwin held Norman- 
ton, formerly Elfag's ; and Warner (de Insula?) lield Sireland, 
Uftune, Cotenoure, Hainoure, Langeleleie, and Smithce^te, part 
of which Leuric had held ; and the rest, which 8 Thanes formerly 
held. 

No. VII I. THE LAND OF WALTER AINCOURT. 

Walter de Aincourt kept the whole of his Derbyshire manors 
in demesne. T. R. E. Swain Cilt the younger had held all but 3 
and I bovates and 4 acres, which Wade held. 

The names of his 1 1 manors were Mortunc, Oughedestune, 
Winstanestune, Brandune, Wadescel, Pinneslei, Caldecotes, 
Wilelmstorpe, with Soke in Winefelt and Toptune, Holmesfelt, 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. "JJ 

Hclmetune, and Holtune. They contained together 6 car. 4 bov., 
\, J, and 12 acres, and were worth b)- the year ^19 5s. 4d. 

No. IX. THE LAND OF GOISFRED ASCELIN. 

Goisfred Ascelin had in his demesne the manors of Aelwoldes- 
tune, Emboldestune, Torulfdestune and Aleiuioldestune, Ednod- 
estune and Hoilant, Ochebroke and Breaston, all which Tochi 
held T. R. E. Azelinus (Anselin or Lanceline, his chief tenant 
in Nottingham) held Eghintune, which Tochi also held, and 
Etewelle, formerly held by Dunstan. It measured 22 carucates 
and I bovate altogether, besides the waste, of which there was 
probably much, for its value had been £2<^ T. R. E., now it was 
only worth £\6 19s. 6d. 

No. X. THE LAND OF HUBERT FITZ RALE. 

He held in demesne 12 manors with their berewites — Echinton, 
Moresburg, Bettune, Ougedeston, Middelton, Heresage with its 
berewites, Banford, Heret, half Offerton, two parts of iMiddletune, 
Hortil, Boletune, Willetune, Langelei, Beledene, and Engelbi, 
land at Wirksworth, Lede, and Tineslege, part of Crich, Cliptane, 
Ripley, and Pentricc, Bareuue, and Werradune. 

1. Robert (de Meincl i*), his chief tenant held for 5 Knights' fees 

7 manors in Barlburg, Witcuuelle, Clune, 2 Stratunes, Tcgcs- 
ton, and Henclege, which Levcnet and Lewric, the princes 
before mentioned, held T. R. E. 

2. Goisfred (de Ridel t) held Dachcmanestun, which Leuenct 

held, and which afterwards Geoffry Ridel, the son of 
Richard Basset, held by inheritance of the old feoffment. 

3. Ra>'nouard held Paltrcton, Scardecliff, and Tunestal. 

4. Ralf (fil Eudo ?) held Newtone and Crich and Scochctorpc. 

He eventually married the co-heiress of his lord. Lcuric and 
Lcucnot held these manors T. R. E. 

5. Serlo fde Pleslic?) lield Essovrc, which the same tenant held 

T. R. E. 

6. Leuinc held Wistanestunc, soc to Crich. 

7. Nigel held Uffretune with its Ikrewic in I'cntrice. 

8. Colle held I^(;ltunc. 



HOOK OF DOMESDAY, 



No. XI. THE LAND OF R.ALF DE HURUN. 

Ralf dc l^iirun had but a .small holding- in Dcrl)}'.shirc, only 
between 7 and 8 carucate.s worth £"] los., which ULsi, Turgar, 
O.sniond, and Duii.stun iiad held T. R. E. He held in demesne 
Hoislee, Halun, and Meidibi. We.stunc was held of him by 
Gulbert, anil a knight unnamed held Denebi. 

No. XII. THE LAND OF ASCUIT MUSARD. 

He also had only a small Barony in this county, of which 
Staveley was the head, the whole of which he held in demesne. 
It consisted besides of Barleie, Holun, Wadecel, and Brantune, 
and part of Chinewolde Marsh. His holding was nearly similar 
in size and value to that of Ralf de Burun. 

.Hacon, Dunninc Bramuine, and Aluuold were the tenants 
T. R. E. 

No. XIII. THE LAND OF GILBERT DE GAND. 

Ilkeston, Halun, Stanton and Shipley comprised this small 
Barony, and the whole of it was held under the Earl by Malger 
(no doubt his steward of Rollcston), and the ancestor of that 
family. Ulf Fcnisc, Brun, and Odincar held it T. R. E. 

No. XIV. THE LAND OF NIGEL DE STAFFORD. 

This Baron had no under-tenants. He kept the whole of the 
manors in demesne. It contained altogether 14 carucates and 3 
bovatcs, and was then worth £6 14s. 6d. Some of the manors 
were valued at a nominal rate — one at 4d., another 2d., — so that 
they were probably greatly wasted. The names of his manors 
were Drackelowe, the head of the Barony, Hethcote, Stapenhill, 
Suardingecotes, Fornewerche, Engelbi, Tichenhalle, Smidesbi, 
Ravenestun, Durandstorp, Achetorp, Trangesby, and the tenants 
T. R. E. were Godric, Elric, Ulchel, Eduin, Ernuin, and Elnod. 

No. XV. THE LAND OF ROBERT FITZ WILLIAM 

Consisted only of the manor of Stanley, which Ursar held 
T. R. E., of the value of only los. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 79 

No. XVI. THE LAND OF ROGER DE BUSLI. 

Tliis great Nottingham and Yorkshire Baron had only one 
manor, Rvgetorn, in demesne in this county. His chief tenant, 
Ingram, held Norton and Elstretvne, wiiich formerly ]\Iorcar's 
(the Earl) Godeva (the Countess) and Bada held. Leuuine held 
Bretune and Dore, which Swain (of Colley ?) and Eduuin formerly 
held ; and Fulco held Braidestune and Riseleia, formerly held by 
Leuuine, Ligulf, and Godric. 

The King's Thanes were few in number, only 19, and some of 
them did not hold the estates they formerly possessed. The 
manors they held were neither important nor numerous, but 
several of them will be found holding manors under Norman 
Lofls, with many others of their nation. 

1. Alden held Ulwritune, which Alun formerly held. 

2. Algar held Ednunghall. 

3. Dolfin held Topton and Taptune, which Bada formerly held. 

3. Edmund held Wllitune, formerly Auti's. 

4. Ernuin held Clune T. R. E. and now, and Stanton, which 

Edward formerly held, 

5. 6, 7. Godrich, Edric, and Turgisle held Chinewaldcmersh. 

8. Leuuine held Estunc, formerly Tolf's and Stanley formerly 

God rice's. 

9. Leuuine, the son of, held Risley, which his father held 

T. R. E. 

10. Levenot held Mers, which was then waste. 

11, 12. Leuric and Uctred held Barleie. 

13. Osmund Benz T. R. E., and then held Tichclston and part of 

Sandiacre and Cellesden. 

14. Toli held part of the two former places, which Canute and 

Gladwin formerly held. 

15. Tochi had part of Sandiacre. 

16. Raven held part of Henlcic. 

17. 18. Stinnulf and Dunning held Calehale, which formerly 
Sbcrne and Ilacon held, and which Dolphin then claimed. 

19. Tojf li<:ld Totingleie. 



8o 



B Hic^t of tbc fIDanorci nlClltionc^ in tbc IDcrbv^* 
ehiuc IDonlcc>^av^ witb eomc fIDobcrn Bamccn 



( T/ii" Initiiih s/iaiv the Lords of the several Manors. ) 



Abbreviations.— Abb. B. = Abbot of Burton, 33; A. M. = Asculf Musard, 
61 ; B. = Radulf de Buron, 59 ; D. = Walt Deincourt, 53 ; E. H. = Earl Hugh, 
35 ; Epis C. — Epis Chestre, 33 ; F. = Ferrars, 36 ; G. Ans. = Geofiry Anselin, 
54; G. G. = Gilbert de Gant, 61 ; K. = the King, 25-64; N. S. = Nigel de 
Stafford, 62 ; P. = Wm. Peverel, 51 ; R. P. = Roger Poictou, 35 ; R. B. = Roger 
de Busli, 63 ; R. fitz H. = Ralf fitz Hubert, 55 ; R. fiiz W. = Robert fitz William, 63. 



N. S. 


Achetoip, 63. 




R. fitz H. 


E. H. 


Adelardestrew 


(Alles- 


K.&A.M. 




tree), 35. 




R. fitz H. 


K. 


Aestun (Aston - on - 


K. & F. 




Trent), 32. 






G. Ans. 


Aeluuoldestun 


(Alvas 


F. 




ton). 54. 




K. 


K. 


Aidele (Edale), 


31- 




K. 


Aisseford ( Ashford), 30. 


K. 


Epis C. 


Aitone, n. 




R. fitz H. 


F. 


Aitune, 43. 




P. 


K. 


.Aivne, 31. 




Abb. of 1!. 


F. 


Alchementune 


(A Ik- 


K. 




manton), 41. 




F. 


P. 


Aldene. 




K. 


K. 


Aneis, 30. 




R.R.R.fitz 


Abb. B. 


Appleby, 34 




H.,&R.B. 

K. 


K. 


Badequella (Bakewell), 


R. R 




30 




K. 


R. fitz H. 


Banford (Bamford) 58. 


F. 


F. 


Barcoiiere, 47. 




R. fitz H. 



Barleburg, 56. 
Barleie, 60, 64, 65. 
Bareuue, 59. 
Barreuiie (Barrow), 29, 

47- 
Barctune (Barton), 41. 
Basselau, 30. 
Bectune, see Beitune. 
Begelie (Beeley), 31. 
Belidene (Ballidon).59. 
Belesovre, 51. 
Beruerdescote, 33. 
I!enedlege(Bentley),28. 
Beneleie (Bentley), 41. 
Berceles, 30. 

[Bettune, 35, 56, 64. 



Blackeuuelle, 30. 
Blangesbi, 36. 
Bobeneule(Bubnel), 30 
Boilstune, 44. 
Boletune (Boulton), 58 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



8i 



F. 


Bolun, 39. 


F. & K. 


F. 


Bradeburn, 37. 




F. 


Braedeshaile, 47. 


K. 


F., & G. 
Ans.,&B 


- Braidestune, 46,55,63 


K. 
K. 


F. 


Braedelai (Bradley), 42, 
46. 


E. H. 


F. 


Brailesford, 42, 69. 


F. 


P. 


Bradewelle (Bradwell), 


K. 




52- 


K. 


D. 


Brandune, 53. 




R. B. 


Bianlege (Bramley 
Lane), 64. 


K. 


A. M. 


Brantune (Brampton), 
60. 


F. 


F. 


Brazington (Brassing- 


K.&R. P. 




ton), 37. 


A. M. 


K. 


Bretebi, 29. 


K. 


K. 


Bredelauue (Broadlaw), 






28. 


K. 


K. 


Briminton, 26. 


K. 


F. 


Broctune, 41. 


RalffitzH. 


F. 


Bubdene (Bubden in 


K.&R.fitz 




Longford), 44, 45- 


& H. 


Epis C. 


Bubdene, 33. 


F. 


K. 


Bubinelli, 30. 


K. & F. 


K. 


Buitorp (Boythorpe), 






26, 28. 


F. 


K. 


Bunteshale (Bonsall), 


P. 


F. 


27. 
Bvrnvlfestone, 50. 


K. 


K. 


Burtune, 30. 


Abb. B. 
K. 


K. 
D. 


Caldecote, 30. 
Caldecotes, 53. 


R. fitz H. 
F. 


Abb. B. 
K. 


Caldcwell, 34. 
Caldelauue, 27. 


K. 


"k. 


Calchale, 66. 




K. 


Caluoure (Calvcr), 30. 




F. 


Cedesdcne (Chaddes- 
dcn), 47. 


Abb. H. 


K. 


Cellesdene, 66. 


F. 



Celardestune (Chellas- 

ton), 29, 49. 
Cestrefield, 26. 
Ceolhal (Chunal), 31. 
Chendre (Kinder), 31. 
Cheneiuton(Kniveton), 

35- 
Chetune (Catton), 38. 

Cheuenesuurde, 31. 
Chersintune (Carsing- 

ton), 27. 
Chetesuorde (Chats- 
wood), 31. 
Chetelestune (Kedel- 

ston), 47. 
I Chinewoldesmaresc 
I (Killamarsh), 61, 65. 

Chiseuurde (Chis- 

worth), 31. 
Chiteslei, 28. 
Cliftune, 30, 69. 
Cliptune, 59. 

-Clune, 56, 66. 

Cobelei (Cubley) 44. 
Coditune, 29, 49. 
Colingeham, 69. 
Collei, 36. 

Cotenoure(Codnor),52. 
Coruun. 
Cotes, 27. 
Cotune, 29, 34. 
Cranchesberie, 30. 
Crice (Crich), 57. 
Crocheslialle (Crox- 

hall), 38. 
Crunford (Cronifonl), 

27. 



Dellingcberic 

I )(.lt.'bi, 50. 



Dal- 



82 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



r.. 


Henebi, 60. 


K. cV F. 


Estune (Aston), 31 bis, 


K. ] 


Dentine (Dinting), 31. 




40. 5°> 65- 


K. 


Derbi, 68. 


F. 


Etelavve (Atlowe), 38. 


K. 


Dereleie (Darley), 27, 


F. & G 


. Etewelle (Atwell), 51, 
54- 




28. 


Ans. 


D. 


Detton. 






R. B. 


Dore, 64. 


F. 


Faitvne, 44. 


R. fitz H. 


Dochemaneslune, 56. 


K. 


Farleie, 27. 


N. S. 


Drachelavve, 62. 


F. 


Farvlveston, 40. 


Epis C. 


Draicote, 33. 


Abb B. 


Findre, 33. 


K. 


DranefeUl, 26. 


K. 


Flagun (Flagg), 30. 


F. 


Dulveslune, 45. 


N. S. 


Forneuverche, 62. 


N. S. 


Dvrandestorp, 63. 






K. & F. 


Dobridge (Doveridge), 


F. 


Gelderlei (Yeldesley), 




39. 69- 




43- 


F. 


Dovelle (Duffield), 46. 




Ghersintune. 






F. 


Ghevele (Yeaveley), 45 


K. 


Echintune, 26. 


F. 


Gilgraie (Yolgrave), 


R. fitz H. 


Echintune, 55. 




48, 67. 


K. & F. 


Ednesoiire, 31, 51. 


P. 


Glappevelle, 51. 


E. H.&F. 


Ednodestune (Ednas- 


K 


Glosop,3i. 




ton, 35, 55, 69. 


D. 


Granibi, 69. 


F. & K. 


Ednunghalle (Eding- 


F. 


Gratune, 47. 




hal), 38, 66. 


K. 


Greherst, 26. 


G. Ans. 


Eghintune (Egginglon), 








55- 


P. 


Habenai, 53. 


F. 


Eisse (Ash), 41. 


R. 


Hadun. 30. 


K. 


Eitune (Cold Eaton). 


K. 


Haduna (Over Had- 




28. 




don), 30. 


K. 


Elleshope (Alsop), 28. 


K. 


Hadune, 30. 


R. B. 


P^lstretune, 64. 


P. 


Hainour (Heanor), 52. 


F. 


EltLine (Elton), 37. 


B. 


Hakin (Hatam), 60. 


G. Ans. 


Emboldestune (Ambas- 


G. G. 


Halen, 61. 




ton), 54. 


K. 


Hanzedone (Hanson), 


F., K., R. 






28. 


fitz. H., 

& N. S. 


Engelbi, 30, 59, 62. 


F. 


Hatun (Hatton), 43. 


F. 


Erleston (Arleston),49. 


N.S. 


Hedcote(Hethcote),62. 


P. 


Esnoteric, 52. 


K. 


Hedfelt (HadfieUi), 31. 


K. 


Esseburne (Ashbourn), 


D. 


Helmetune (Elmton), 




28 bis. 




53- 


R. fit/. H. 


Essovre (Ashover), 56. 


R. fitz 


H. Heiilege (Hanley), 56. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



83 



K. 


Henleie (in Wingfield), 


K. 




Langeleie, 31. 




65- 


P. 




Langeleie, 52. 


F. 


Hennesoure, 51. 


K. 


& F. 


Langesdune (Longs- 


R. P. 


Hertestaft (Hertstaft), 






don), 30, 46. 




36. 


R 


fitz H. 


Lede, 57. 


R. fitz H. 


Heret, 58. 


P. 




Leitun (Litton), 53. 


F. (2) 


Heoteshorne (Harts- 


F. 




Linctune (Linton), 39. 




horn), 39. 


K. 




Lodeuuorde (Lud- 


B. 


Herdibi, 60. 






worth), 31. 


R. fitz H. 


Hereseige (Hather- 
sage), 5S. 


F. 




Lodouuelle (Lud- 
worth), 37. 


P. 


Heselbec, 53. 


K. 




Ludecerce (Litchurch), 


K. 


Hetesope (Hassop), 30. 






68. 


K. 


Hetfelt, 31. 


K. 




LuUetune (Lullington), 


Abb.B.&F. 


Hiltune, 34, 42. 






66. 


K. 


Hiretune (Ireton), 27. 


R. 


P. 


Lvnt (Heath), 35. 


P. 


Hochelai (Hucklow), 










53- 


F. 




Machenie (Makeney), 


F. 


Hoge, 43. 






46. 


G. Ans. 


Hoilaiit (Hulland), 55. 


E. 


H. 


Macheworde, 35. 


F. 


Holebroc, 46. 


K. 




Maneis, 30. 


F. & G. 


1 Holintune (HoUing- 


K. 




Maperlie, 32. 


Ans. 


)■ ton), 42, 55. 


K. 




Mapeltune, 28. 


1). 


Holmsfelt, 53. 


K. 


& K. H 


. Marchetone( Marching- 


A. M. 


Holon, 60. 






ton), 35, 65. 


I). 


Holtun, 41. 


F. 




Merchetune (Mark- 


K. 


Holun, 54. 






eaton), 43. 


K. 


Hope, 31, 30. 


F. 




Mercheuestune (Mer- 


K. 


Honestune (Unston). 






casion), 50. 


B. 


Horslei, 60. 


F. 




Merstun, 39. 


F. 


Horteden, 37. 


K. 




Mers, 67. 


R. fiiz H. 


Hortel, 58. 


K. 




Meslac, 27. 




Horeeton. 


K. 




Mestesforde, 27, 28. 


Abl^. B. 


Hougen, 33. 


K. 




Messeham, 30. 


K. 


Hope, 31. 


K. 
K. 




Mileborne, 29. 
Middletune (Wirks- 


K. 


Ibeholon (Ible), 27. 






worth), 27, 29, 32. 


F. 


Irelune, 50. 


F. 




Middletune, 47. 






R. 


fitz H. 


Middletune (in Yol- 


K. 


Langedencdale (Lon- 






greavc), 58. 




dcndale), 31. 


F. 




Mogintune, 50. 


R. fil/. U. 


Langelci, 58. 


F. 




Morelie, 47, 51- 



84 



BOOK OF DOMKSDAY. 



R. fitz 11. 


Morcsburg (Mosbro), 


K. 


Padefeld, 31. 




56. 


K. 


Padinc, 26. 


1). 


Mortune, 53, 69. 


R. fitz H. 


Paltretune, 56. 




Moruine (Morwine). 


Abb. B. 


Parva Vfre (Litlleovcr), 


K. & F. 


Mucliedesiiuelle,3i, 48. 




33- 


F. 


Muleford, 46. 


P. 


Pecliefers (Peak 
Forest), 52. 


K. 


Neuuebold (Newbold), 
26. 


R. fitz H. 
K. 


Pentric, 59. 
Peverwic (Parwicli), 


F. Neutone, 37. 
^R.fit;H.)Nevtune.29,37,57. 


F. 
D. K. 


28 bis. 
Pilesberie, 37. 
Pinneslei, 53, 69. 


P. 


Normentune, 52. 


F. 


Pirelaie, 47. 


K. 


Normantune, 26 bis, 


Abb. B. 


Potlac, 33. 




29. 


K. 


Prestclive (Priestcliff), 


F. 


Normantune, 49. 




30- 


F. 


Nortberie, 45. 






K. 
R. B. 


Nortune, 26. 
Nortune, 64. 


F. 
K. 


Radburne, 51. 
Ralunt (Rowland), 30. 






K. 


Ranesha, 26. 


G. Ans. 


Ochebroc, 55. 


K.,Abb.B. 


, [Rapendune (Repton), 
29, 30, 62. 


K. 


Ochenauestun (Hog- 


& N. S. 




naston), 28. 


N. S. 


Ravenestune, 63. 


R. fitz H. 

& K. 
K. 


' Offretune, 31, 58. 
Onestune (Unstone), 


Abb. B. & 

F. 
K. 


) Redesleie (Rodsley), 

^ 34, 45- 
Redlaveston, 28. 


K. 


26. 
Opetune (Hopton), 27. 


K. 


Reuslege (Rowsley), 
30- 


Epis. C. 


Opeuuelle (Hopwell), 


R. fil H. 


Ripelie, 59. 


K. 


23- 

Ophidecotes (Offcote), 

28. 


K. & R. B 
F. 


. Riseleia, 64, 67. 
Roschintune (Roston), 


F. 


Oswardestiine (Osles- 


F. 


45- 
Rouecestre, 44. 


K. 


ton), 46. 
Osmundestune (Os- 
maston), 29. 


R. B. 


Rogetorn (Rowthorne), 
64. 


F. 


Osmvndestune, 45, 49 








bis. 


F. 


Salham (Saulm), 37. 


D. 


Ougedestun (Ogston), 


Epis. C 


Salle (Sawley), 33. 




53- 


K. 


Sandiacre, 67. 


R. fitz H 


Oughedestane, 58. 


F 


Sapertune, 40. 


F. 


Ouere (Over). 


R. fitz W. 


Scardecliff, 56. 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



B5 



K. 
K. 

G. G. 

R. fitz H. 

F. 

F. 

F. 

K. 

K. 

F. 
P. 

N. S. 
K. 

N. S. 
P. 

Abb. B. &) 
F. j 
F. 

K. & F. 
R. fitz W. 
K. F. 
G. G. 
Abb. B. &) 

N S 
A. M. 
R. P. 
F. 
F. 
K. 



Scaruesdale. 

Scetune (Shatton), 31. 

Scelhadun (Sheldon), 

30- 
Scipelie (Shipley), 61. 
Scochtorp, 57. 
Scrotun, 40 bis. 
Sedenefeld, 49. 
Segersale, 43. 
Serdelau (Shardlow), 

32. 
Sinetretone (Snitter- 

ton), 27. 
Sereleie (Shirley), 42. 
Sirelunt (Shirland), 52. 
Sivardingscote, 62. 
Smalei, 28. 
Smidesbi, 63. 
Smitecote, 52. 



SnellfStune, 33, 44. 

Sothelle (Shottle), 38. 
Spondune, 32, 46. 
Stanlei, 63, 
Stantune, 39, 47, 68. 
Stantone (by Dale), 61. 

Stapenhille, 34, 62. 

Stavelie, 60- 

Steinesbi, 36. 

Stenitune, 49. 

Stertune (Sturston), 44. 

Stoche (Stoke), 31. 

F. & R. fil ( Streitune (Stretton), 

H. )■ 38, 56. 

R. fitz H. Stratune, 56. 

Abb. B., & I c „ ■ , 

y [Sudberie, 36, 40. 

K. P. Sudtune (in the Dale), 

34, 35- 
Abb. B. &i Sudtune (on the Hill), 

F. I 42. 
F. (2) Summersales, 41. 



K &F. 



K. 
K. 
K., R. fitz 

H. 
R. fitz H. 
K. 

K., Abb. of 
B., &N.S. 
K. 

G. G. 
F. 
K. 
K. 

K. 
K. 
F. 

K.,&N.S. 
R. P., (Sc 
R. fitz H. 
F. 

R. fil H. 
Abb. B. 
P. 
K. 
K. 



Suerchestune (Swarkes- 
ton), 29, 47. 

Tadintune, 30. 
Tapetune, 26, 66. 
Teneslege (Tansley), 

27, 57- 
Tegeston, 56. 
Tibecel, 32. 
Tichenhalle, 29, 30, 

34, 62. 
Tidesuuelle, 31. 
Tilchestune, 61, 66. 
Tizinctun, 37. 
Toptiine, 26, 65. 
Tornesete (Thornsett), 

31- 
Torp, 27. 
Totingelei, 65. 
Toxenai, 41. 
Tranbesbi, 30, 63. 

Tunestalle, 36, 56. 

Tviforde, 49. 

Vffentune (Ufton), 58. 
Vfre, 33. 
Vftone, 52, 
Vpetun (Upton), 26. 
Vlvritune, 67. 



D. & A. M. Wadescil, 53, 61. 

F. Walecross, 38. 

K. Waletune, 27, 28. 

F. \Valestune(inDiifiicld), 

3S- 
P. Walrefeld, 53. 

K. W'elledene, 27. 

K. Wodnesley (Wendcs- 

ley), 26. 
B. Wersedune. 

Werchesoppa, 69. 



86 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 



K., & R. ) Werchesiuiorde, 27, 
fitz H. 1 28, 57. 



[Westune, 28, 32. 

Westone (on Trent), 59. 
Widerdostune, 45. 
Wilclmestorp, 53. 
WiUetune (Willington), 

58. 
Winbroc, 36. 
Wineslei, 29, 39. 
Winfeld, 36. 
Wingreude, 26. 



K. 


. \: G. 




G. 


B. 




F. 




D. 




R. 


fitz 11. 


F. 




K. 




R. 


P. 


K. 





Abb. B. Wineshalle, 34. 

F. Winsterne (VVinster), 

36. 
D. & R. ) Wistanestune (Wessing- 
fitz H. ) ton), 53, 57. 
Witfeld, 31. 
Wilintune, 26. 
Wituuelle (Whitwell), 

56. 
Wivleslei (Willesley), 

29. 39- 
Wodneslei, 27. 
Wriieuele, 48. 



K. 
K. 
R. fitz H 

R. F. 

K. 
F. 



Note. — The modern names of many of these manors are 
offered, but with great hesitation. For some of them proofs will 
be given hereafter in the Parochial History ; for others, the author 
relies upon the writings of Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt, Lysons, Eyton, 
and WoUey, and other Derbyshire historians ; especially the 
first-mentioned, whose valuable work upon Domesday has been 
frequently referred to with advantage. The fear, however, is 
entertained that far too many of the derivations here given 
are mere guesses, and, as such, liable to error. County 
Historians, as a rule, are too anxious to identify places, and 
too ready to adopt any similarit\- in sound as proof of identity 
in name. But it should be remembered that many Domesday 
manors were waste even at that time, and that many more 
must have become so since ; and the very site of some of such 
places is lost, and that, on the other hand, manors were 
frequently created down to the date of the statute which prohibi- 
ted subinfeudation, and, also, that often old names (those of their 
lords) were given to them. And, above all, it must be borne 
in mind that nearly half the names of the present places in 
Derbyshire are not mentioned in Domesday — some of them 
now, and perhaps then, large towns, such as Belper, Matlock, 
Borrowash, Butterley, Chapel-en-le -Frith, Clay Cross, Plcasley^ 
and scores of others, many of which, no doubt, existed, at 
any rate as vills, before Domesday, but were not visited by the 
Commissioners, because it was known that they paid no hide. 
It is considered certain that the Commissioners had written 



BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 87 

instructions to guide them. It is difficult to believe that 
Chesterfield is identical with the small place mentioned in 
Domesday, a mere Berewic of Newbold ; or that Alfreton is 
to be found under the name of Elstreton. Both were probably 
important stations even at that date, but for some cause — 
perhaps they were the head-quarters of different members of the 
royal family, or of some court favourite — they were especially 
exempted. With regard to Alfreton, it is tolerably clear that 
Roger de Busli succeeded here, as well as elsewhere, to the 
possessions of Earl Morcar and the Countess Godiva, who held 
Alfreton and Norton ; and these two small places comprised the 
Barony of Ingelram, whose son Ranulf was Sheriff of Notting- 
ham and Derby. Yet Elstreton, of Domesday, was assessed 
at 30s. (it had previously been 20s.), and Norton at is. 6d. Is 
it possible that so small a holding could have formed the 
barony of so important a person as Ranulf fil Ingleram ? 
Again, Peak Castle is not assessed at all, although the land, 
about it, is assessed at 403. ; and a castle at Bolsover is not even 
mentioned. But it is clear from the geographical position of 
both places (as from the actual mention of Peak), that both 
were great strongholds at this period, and long previously. 
These facts should prevent a too rash acceptance of an identity. 
Besides, it must be recollected that frequently the same names 
were given to more than one place, especially to newly-created 
manors, and that we have now perhaps only knowledge of one 
of them. 

A curious instance of the danger of rashly accepting a 
possible identity exists in the case of Abney. Every Derbyshire 
historian without exception identifies it with Henry Ferrars' 
wasted manor of Habenai, which, with other places, was wasted 
(probably purposely) for the chase. But actual proof exists in 
numerous charters, of the Abncy family, that their name, and 
the name of the nianor, was Albini, a family who had but little 
connection with the County at this early period, and whose 
name has no affinity with Habenai. 

With reference to Chcstcriield, it is quite clear that there 
were two places of this name in Derbyshire. Of this we have 
actual proof in that most valuable record, " Ihe Testa de 
Ncvil." liut the lesser Chesterfield is lost. Tiic Testa records 
"That there was one carucate in Chesterfield in Wingcrworth, 



88 BOOK OF DOMESDAY. 

anciently of the soke of Chesterfield," and it was <:riven to^the 
ancestor of VVachilinc de Fcrrars by Kini^ William the liastard. 
Now, it niiL;Iit have been contended that Chesterfield was a 
berewite of Wini^erworth before it became a bercwite of 
Newbold. But that is impossible in face of the fintlin<^ of the 
jury that former!}- the Chesterfield in Wingerworth was of the 
soke of Chesterfield : that is, that the smaller Chesterfield was 
a member of the latter. It is a curious fact that Wingerworth 
itself, at Domesday, was not recorded as a member of Chesterfield, 
as it is now esteemed ; that record states that it had a soke of 
its own. In later times it is treated as a chapelry of Chesterfield, 
and ecclesiastical reasons may account for this fact. Again, 
Chesterfield had a church, for William Rufus gave it to Lincoln. 
Very possibly the bishop had the town as well. It is im- 
probable that a mere berewite to Newbold would have one. 
Wm. Rufus gave the church of Chesterfield, with those of 
Mansfield, and two other manors ; and he actually includes the 
lands and chapels which belonged to each of those four manors 
(calling them manors in the document). It is clear that the 
second Chesterfield, which was then soke to the greater, was not 
the berewite of Newbold, or it would have been described as of 
the soke of that place ; and it is clear, also, that Chesterfield at 
the time of Domesday was an important place, holding eccle- 
siastical sway over many surrounding places, including Newbold 
itself, just as it does at the present day. So, too, with 
regard to Eckington, it is hardly likely that this important 
manor, the head of Ralf fitz Hubert's barony, which Domes- 
day records contained four carucates, and had been worth 
£j, was identical with the berewite of that name in Newbold. 
Newbold, with seven berewites, including Chesterfield, had only 
seven carucates, and had been worth only £6, although then 
the relative values had altered. Besides, the fact that Kckington 
was recorded separately as a manor, is sufficient to show it is 
a different place altogether from the Newbold berewite. If 
that were situated in Eckington Manor, it would have been 
described, not as a berewite, but as a soke of Newbold in 
Eckington. This second Eckington may be found somewhere 
else. The learned reader must therefore accept these possible 
derivations as intended general!)- to identify the name and not 
the place. 



WORKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR. 



THE HISTORY OF THE HOUSE OF ARUNDEL. 

One Volume, folio, large paper copies bound in Morocco, Price Six 
Guineas; small paper copies bound in cloth. Four Guineas. 

Mitchell and Hughes, 140, Wardour Street, W.C. 

The Author has the gratification to receive permission to publish the 
following very generous criticism of the First Part of this Work from the 
pen of Mr. Thomas Helsby, the learned Editor of the last edition of 
Ormerod's History of Cheshire, who writes : — 

" I have had the pleasuie and profit just lately of perusing an admirable book of 
the kind (Mr. Pym Yeatman's recent work on the Earls of Arundel), which contains 
a great amount of entirely orii,'inal matter, with all doubtful points acutely raised, and 
well — almost intensely — argued, showing the zeal and pains which have backed up the 
learned Author's judicial powers and natural acumen. Of course, like all other 
history, this one of a family which represents in tlie aggregate avast extent of Norman 
and English territory, is of a tentative character, but the valuable historical and 
genealogical matter is purified from the ordinary dross of such productions by having 
had the advantage of passing through a mind evidently thoroughly capable of reducing 
it into that state best suited for the critical reader ; although repetitions mav be found 
numerous enough in works of this kind, they have their use in constantly keeping 
before the mind of the reader facts and arguments that less tenacious and ordinary 
minds would let slip." 

And the following from Sir Bernard Burke, Ulster King at Arms, 
with reference to the whole book : — 

" What a wondrous store of information you have laid up for genealogists in your 
grand ' History of the House of Arundel.' I am at every leisure moment poring over 
its contents." 

Extracts from the "Manchester Courier" of 30th March, and 
6th April, 1883 : - 

FIRST NOTICE. 

** In an age when the press teems with stately folios, lumbering weak-backed 
quartos, and even with octavos, of [listory. Genealogy, and Archa:ology, every one 
of taste and learning may be congratulaied on the birth of a new folio of great 
originality and meiit, and from the true historical standpoint. ' The History of the 
House of Arundel,' taking us back for a ]icriod of looo years, is one of those Works 
which may well have em|)loyed the valuable hours of a member of the learneil pro- 
fession to which the Author, Mr. Yeatman, belongs. The judicial faculiics which he 
has brou'^ht to bear ujion his subject have, on the whole, thrown so searching a light 
upon some long-buried pfiinls in national history, as well as genealogical problems, 
that the volume will be hailerl by eveiy sch<jlar of unbiassed mind with the cordiality 
it deserves. 'The Early History of the House of Arundel' is that of many of the 
most Histoiic Kamilies in this country and in France ; and the bridge, which hitherto 
has been almost of the flimsiest character, is now fairly established upon the sound 
basis of numerous, if often fragmentary, facts— worked together, it may be, by some 
defective arguments, by much necessary repetition, <lry and wearying details, but, on 
the whole, with n sagai ily and acumen that redeems the work from all rei>roach." 



" Nothing; can well he of i^reator interest to the student than the genealogical 
connection of this kingdom with that of our continenlMl neiglibours and the old 
Duchies of Normandy and l?ritt;iny. Ahsolutely little of conseeiuence was known 
(and this far from accurately) until the puliliration by the late distinguished Herald, 
Mr. rianche, of his 'William the Conqueror and his Companions.' Sir Francis 
Palgrave in iiis Work was barred from going into all those details of history so neces- 
sary to a just appreciation of the connection of the ruling liouses of England and 
Normanily, but his eloquent skelclies of the Duchy will never fade from the memory 
of the cultivated so long as history holils its dt)main in the human mind. Other 
gentlemen of reinite have since written upon this subject more or less fully ; but it 
s-.-ems to have remained for the present learned Author to unearth from the various 
archives of the French Republic, and from the great stores of materials in the Pipe 
Rolls and the Red Hook of the Exchequer, and those in the possession of the Duke of 
Rutland and Lord Arundel of Wardour (extending in date from the reigns of the 
Dukes of Normandy and regularly down to the time of Henry HI. of England), a 
large amount of original informatit)n, which, although of so fragmentary a character 
in many cases as to necessitate tiic utmost industry, skill and circumspection in using, 
has enabled Mr. Vealman to give to the reader something approaching a sound ami 
reliable Work on this interesting period of Anglo-Norman history." 

SECOND NOTICE. 

" To handle all the multitude of facts in this book (far exceeding in number, and 
often in abstruse significance any disclosed in the greatest cause cclebre), and to deal 
with them in a comprehensive manner, giving full effect to the numerous subtleties 
of meaning they often disclose, recpiires a grasp of intellect which can never be too 
fully appreciated. It is not surprising tlien if some should slip out of hand, 
and it would ill become the critic to score his page with black marks where there 
is abundance of merit so conspicuous to compensate for almost any degree of 
shortcoming, especially in a costly first edition which cannot easily very soon be 
supplanted by a second. 

"In conclusion, the least that can be said of 'The History of the House of 
Arundel ' is, that it is an admirable collection of facts ; and, if for this reason 
only, is very valuable, but its facts are skilfully arranged, and the learned Author 
has placed them in the most candid manner in every conceivable light before the 
reader, however laboured his efiforts may occasionally ai^pear ; and after the judg- 
ment and research displayed in this work, if he has failed to command, he has 
certainly deserved success. As a volume for the earnest student of both direct 
and circumstantial evidence, it is to be warmly commended ; and the many tabular 
pedigrees will repay the perusal of every one interested in the strtam of history 
which connects so many of the past and present races with those of our own. We 
conlially congratulate Air. Veatman on the production of this admirable book." 



From the " Bristol and Gloucester Archselogical Journal," 
Vol. VII., Part I., a criticism by Sir John MacLean of Bicknor 

Court : 

"The chapter on the settlement of the house of St. Sauveur, in the West of 
England, will be found of special interest to our readers, inasmuch as it gives the 
origin of many ancient families in the western counties, but the space at our 
disposal will not admit of our entering into details. 

•'To compile an authentic pedigree of one ancient family is no light task, 
but to grapple with those of many of the Norman nobility and trace their 
descendants respectively from original authorities is a work of Herculean labour, 
and Mr. Yeatman's Book, when completed, will form a monument of industry and 
patient research. He seems to be well acquainted with the several personages who 
come within his range, and, throughout all tlicir shifting scenes, maintains, upon 
the whole, a firm grasp of their individuality. That there are many, and possibly 
important, mistakes in such a work would jje unavoidable, and some of the state- 
ments made seems to us not to be vouched for by sufficient evidence ; nevertheless 
allowing for all these errors and shortcomings, the Work will prove a most useful 
contribution to English history and genealogy." 



THE ORIGIN OF THE NATIONS OF WESTERN 

EUROPE. 

Price 6s. 

Burns and Gates, London. 

" Every one must own the clearness ot style, the cogency of argument, the wealth 
of illustration in the way of learning, the depth of thought, and the perfect indepen- 
dence with which the history of England is sifted. To many, perhaps most people, 
the criticism on the Aryan Theory, &c., will seem like an unpleasant revelation, but 
we strongly suspect it will be found far from easy to answer this liook." — The Metro- 
politan, Tpth August, 1879. 

" Mr. Yeatman is one who has had the courage to combat popular opinion on 
Philology. Should the statements contained in the book lying before us be true, 
and to bear testimony without prejudice, we think it will be no light task to prove the 
basis of his theory to be untrue, the Oxford School of Philology is undubitably 
worthless, especially Max Miiller's Aryanic Theory, which, in plain language, rejects 
the Mosaic Account of the Early History of Mankind, and holds up the Sanscrit to 
be the parent of all languages." — The Auckland Times [ist Notice), 26th Se/t., 1879. 



A TREATISE ON THE LAW OF ANCIENT 
DEMESNE. 

Written in Illustration of the Records of Chesterfield. 

Price 3s, 6d. 

Wilfred EdxMunds, Chesterfield. 

Prom Dr. Charles Cox's criticism of the "Records of Chester- 
field (Journal of the Derbyshire Archselog-ical Society, 1885.") 

"The work of transcribing, translating and editing these archives was entrusted 
to the capable pen of Mr. Pyru Yeatman, and most ably has he done his task. The 
introduction is helpful and original, its only fault being its brevity." 

"The work has been most ably dune by Mr. Yeatman, than whom no one could 
have been found more competent for the task, and he has preceded the body of the 
work by a masterly, ?ble and valuable historical preface, which adds immensely to its 
value." — The Reliquary, April, 1885. — By the Editor. 

" This little book deals with a subject that is very interesting just now, and the 
records quoted by the Author, from documents relating to the Borough Courts of 
Chesterfield, are exceedingly curious. Mr. Yeatman gives some curious facts from 
Manor records and elsewhere, and his essay appears to us to contain some important 
facts which are svell worth close attention from those whose special study it is to 
reconsider the history of land-holding in England." — The Antiquary, December, 1884. 



Some Extracts from tlie Press relating to 

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF EARLY 
ENGLISH HISTORY, Srr. 

The Metropolitan, 14th August, 1874. 

"Old-fashioned people who believe in ' Mangiiall's ()ueslions,' ' Pinnock s 
Catechism of English History,' or in Hume and Smollett, will read this work with 
fear and trembling. We are not prepared to endorse all the views set forth in these 
|>ages, but the book is so immeasuralily aixjvc the ordinary run of histories, which 
are mere repetitions of facts previously invented and judiciously arranged, that wc 
must cordially advise every reader to study it intently.' 



Evening- Standard, 12th November, 1874. 

'■ Tliis is a in^st tuis^iiKil Work, Dvciilowinj^ with loaiiung, nnd mmked tlirougli- 
out witli a complete mastery over the most miiuitc iletails t)f this extensive subject. 
By far the most iiiterestiiii; portion of tlie W(jik is the patient researcli shewn by the 
.Author into the orii^in of the Kns^li.sh language, and his disseitation on our Saxon 
literature, laws, and customs. Some of the most dangerous errors of Drs. Marsh and 
Lathauj are freely exposed, and with success ; witii like freedom and success the his- 
torical errors of Air. Freeman, Lord Macaulay, aiul Sir Kdward Creasey, are brought 
liome to their sevi-ral authors." 

The Press, Philadelphia, 20th November, 1874. 

"The present volume is a remarkable example of orii^inal thouglit, historical 
research, philosophical deduction, and bold disregard of the merely traditional views 
of previcus writers, who, taking too much for granted, have been content to travel in 
beaten tracks merely because they are old. To a laige extent the Author ignores the 
claims of the Saxons as founders of eitlier the language or the laws of England, and 
doubts whether, indeed, they had a distinct nationality. The Work is earnest and 
able." 

The Law Review (English), Vol. III., N. S., p. 1139 (1S74). 

" Mr. Yealman writes with all the spirit of a true antiquary. He has an ardent 
appreciation of his subject, and pursues it with a keenness and a zest known only to 
those who have for some time indulged in antiquarian research. His work turns up 
much fertile soil, and though we do not concur in his main views, yet we willingly 
recognise the general value of his treatise. Its main object seems to be to unearth 
those jural elements that lie deep at the base of our laws, and to assign them, if 
possible, to a British rather than a Saxon origin. In this view he is undoubtedly 
nearer the truth than those writers — and they are legion, inchiding the great 
Blackstone himself — who asciibe a Saxon origin to our Common Law. 

" His description of the influence of ]\oman jurisprudence on modern law 
indicates much literary grace and skill. It is clear that Mr. Yeatman is a rheto- 
rician, and a poet of no mean order. If ever he divests his thoughts from the 
Common Law, a boundless and more fertile field will lie before him in the domain of 
general literature. He certainly has all the qualities that constitute a vigorous 
writer. Tliere is not anytliing improbable in most of Mr. Yeatman's views. His 
woik indicates great facility of composition, and an intimate familiarity with all the 
leading arcana of Celtic lore." 

The American Law Review, Vol. IX. (1^74-75), p. 123. 

" Mr. John Pyni Yeatman possesses at least two qualities in common with the 
distinguished Englishmen whose name he bears — independence and courage ; without 
the former he could not have written, without tlie latter he would hardly have 
published, the extraordinary book which forms the subject of this notice. Mr. 
Yeatman has produced a remarkable book." 

The Freeman's Journal (Dublin). 

" Under this unpretending title Mr. Yeatman has given to the world a veiy 
valuable book. His introduction is not, as such works usually are, a mere transcript, 
more or less al:)ridged, of the standard and apjiroved authors on the subject. It is as 
remarkable for the boldness and originality of its views as it is for patient research and 
ea-y vigour of style. The author sets out with the theory that falsehood and exaggera- 
tion have mingled so largely with the writings of English historians, more esjiecially 
since the Reformation, that it has become almost impossible to recognise the truth in 
its twisted, distorted form. He contends that it is not in the history of the .Saxons, 
but in the ignored history of the Celtic race, that England has to look for the origin 
of all that she possesses that is valuable or noble — her language, her literature, her 
Common Law, and her Constitution. In the couise of his very able work he boldly 
exposes the innumerable misrepresentations with which English history is underlaid, 
and advances many strong and ingenious arguments in support of the theory he has 
adopted. The book is characterised throughout by a patient, industrious, laborious, 
and patient research, and an honest desire to discover and declare the truth at all 
hazards and imder all circumstances." 



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