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Full text of "Donald Robertson and his wife, Rachel Rogers, of King and Queen County, Virginia, their ancestry and posterity; also, a brief account of the ancestry of Commodore Richard Taylor of Orange County, Virginia, and his naval history during the war of the American Revolution"

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iKobertson 



THE 
NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBBARYI 

Aster, Lenox and Tiiden^ 
V Foui d?.tions. 




William Kyle Anderson. 



Donald Robertson 



AND HIS WIFE 



Rachel Rogers 

OF 

King and Queen County, Virginia, 

Their Ancestry and Posterity; 

also 
A Brief Account of the Ancestry of 

Commodore Richard Taylor 

OF 

Orange County, Virginia, and his 

Naval History 

During the War of the American Revolution. 

BY 

William Kyle Anderson. 



Dedicated 

To THE Memory of Mv Mother, 

A Tribute of Love. 








INTRODUCTION. 



"My boast is not that I deduce niy birth 

From loins enthroned and rulers of the earth; 
But higher far my proud pretensions rise, — 
The son of parents passed into the skies." 

Cozvper. 

Family chronicles, as a rule, are exceedingly dull 
reading to outsiders; they ought to be, however, and 
generally are, of surpassing interest to all those in 
whose veins courses the same ancestral blood. Patriot- 
ism and family pride are virtues that usually go hand 
in hand, '"cotland's immortal bard, in impassioned 
verse, said of the "wretch," in whose heart there 
burned no love of coinitry. 



''For him no tninstreVs raptures swell." 

And Edmund Burke, the celebrated British orator and 
statesman, said, " Those 70/10 do not treasure up the 
ttiemory of their ancestors do not deserve to be remeinbered 
by posterity. ' ' 



4 INTRODUCTIOX. 

It is impossible to imagine any descendant of Don- 
ald Robertson lacking in patriotism, devoid of rever- 
ence for his progenitors, or indifferent to the ties of 
kinship I 

In launching this little volume — a mere compilation 
of family annals and traditions — the author makes no 
pretensions to originality or literary merit. Were it 
intended for the general public, the cruditj' of the 
work could not fail of condemnation by the critics; 
but knowing that it will fall under the friendly eyes of 
his kinsmen onl}', he feels confident they will be suf- 
ficiently interested in the narrative to pass leniently 
b}' his imperfections as a writer. 

From earh- youth the compiler of this geneaolog>' 
has indulged in a fondness for looking up family his- 
tor3\ A few ^-ears ago, while turning over a mass of 
unassorted material, collected together by him and 
others of like mind and taste, during the last half 
century or more, the thought occurred to him that it 
was somebodj^'s duty, for the benefit of coming gen- 
erations, to collect and arrange the memoranda, and 
put them in shape for use by a future family historian, 
in case such a person should arise. The idea of print- 
ing and publishing the result of his labors in book form 
was an afterthotight, suggested as the best means of 
preserving and rendering available the materials 
collected. 

Moreover, as the expressed wishes of numerous 
members of the famih- for copies of the geneaology 
could be gratified in no other wa}-, the aid of the 
printer had, as it were in self defense, to be called in. 

The work of arranging the materials at hand and 
collecting together much of the information contained 



INTRODUCTION. 5 

in the following pages proved an agreeable recreation 
during leisure moments, extending through many 
months. It was practically nearly completed in the 
summer of 1897, but was then laid aside, when on the 
eve of publication, on account of a temporary change 
in the residence and occupation of the author. What 
was expected to be only a few months' interruption has 
lengthened into three 3'ears, and doubtless many have 
despaired of ever seeing the book. Meanwhile many 
changes have been going on in the old famil}' tree. 
New twigs have been added to the ever wider-spread- 
ing branches, and we hail their advent with joy. On 
the other hand, in more than one of our homes, hearts 
are bowed down with woe over the departure of dear 
ones, — and to all such we tender our affectionate sym- 
path}-. Our country, in the defense of human rights, 
has waged a glorious and successful war, and some of 
our number have not hesitated to lay down their lives 
for the cause of freedom, proving themselves worthy 
scions of their illustrious revolutionar}- sires. In con- 
templating their deeds of valor and heroism our hearts 
swell with exultation and pride. 

To become acquainted with his numerous cousins 
and to learn something about their homes and lives, 
has given the author a world of satisfaction, and he 
trusts they, in turn, will appreciate his efforts to bring 
them into affiliation with each other. A complete 
roster of all the descendants of Donald Robertson and 
his wife, Rachel Rogers, was the goal for which he 
strove, and the list will be found to embrace every 
name, down to the latest generation; that is to say 
down to July, 1897. C^o attempt has been made to 
chronicle all the changes since that date) . To bring 



6 INTRODUCTION. 

about this very unusual result has required a vast 
amount of correspondence, much patient persistence 
and no small expense. The whole, as now presented, 
has been a labor of love, a grateful testimonial of 
reverence for a long line of honorable ancestors. If in 
some instances the records are not so full as might be 
desired, or contain errors, it is because some have 
neglected to reply to frequently-repeated requests for 
information, and the facts had to be secured at second 
hand. An}- corrections will be thankfully received 
and duh- acknowledged. 

The author is exceedingly grateful to all who have 
rendered him any kind of assistance in the preparation 
of this work. He is under special obligations for 
valuable help to the following, viz.: Mrs. Adaline 
Semple Bradford, and Miss Sue A. Bradford, of 
Springfield, Illinois; Mrs. Zoe Green Radcliffe, of San 
Francisco; Miss May Semple Moss, of Clinton. K}'.; 
Col. Richard T. Jacob, Miss Sue E. Bate, Mr. John I. 
Jacob and Miss Kate Jacob Johnson, of Louisville, Ky.; 
Mrs. Matilda Robertson Taylor, of Lamar, Texas; and 
Mrs. Mildred W. Dorsey, of Newport, Arkansas. 
Except for their efficient and earnest co-operation, 
many interesting facts contained in the book would 
have been omitted. 

For a time, after beginning this compilation, it 
seemed desirable to embody with it a list of all the 
descendants of Giles Rogers, the grandfather of Rachel, 
and to this end a large amount of material was avail- 
able. This would have involved a vast amount of 
time and labor, and the idea was abandoned, although 
with some reluctance. In this connection it is very 
gratifying to note that a work having practically that 



INTRODUCTION. 7 

scope is now in course of preparation b}' our kins- 
man, General John Cox Underwood, of Covington, Ky . , 
a man of rare endowments and peculiar fitness for such 
an undertaking. 

The plan adopted in this geneaology is very simple 
and scarcely requires any explanation. Any one men- 
tioned in it should be able, without difficulty, to locate 
himself and trace out his line. A number is assigned 
to each descendant, beginning with Donald Robertson, 
who is No. I, and running serially through the whole 
list. The descendants are arranged in order, accord- 
ing to their generation. The first generation contains 
only two persons, Donald Robertson and his wife, 
Rachel Rogers. The second generation consists of 
their children, three persons. The third generation 
consists of their grand-children; the fourth, of their 
great-grand-children, and so on. In each generation, 
all those descended from Donald Robertson's daughter 
and elder child, Luc}' Robertson Semple, are given 
before those descended from his son and younger child, 
Isaac Robertson. The numbers in brackets over each 
name indicate the line of ancestry of the person whose 
history follows, back through the different generations 
to No. I. The names of all descendants of Donald 
Robertson are printed in full face type, to distinguish 
them at a glance from others mentioned in the book. 

Readers of this genealog}' cannot fail to notice how 
each succeeding generation has vied with the preced- 
ing one in the number of its members wlio have borne 
the baptismal name of our revered progenitor. Is it 
not a strange and unaccountable fact, that in no single 
instance has a similar honor been bestowed upon our 
beloved ancestress? Surely, to her memor}- equal 



S INTRODUCTION. 

honor and respect are due. Fortunate!}' this is a 
wrong which can yet be righted, and the author calls 
attention to the fact, in full confidence, that in coming 
generations the name of Rachel Rogers will frequently 
be found. 

About half of the persons mentioned in the follow- 
ing pages trace their lineage through Matilda Taylor, 
wife of Isaac Robertson, to the great Taylor family of 
Orange county. A'irginia. It has therefore been deemed 
appropriate to embody herewith a brief account of the 
earlier generations of that family in America, begin- 
ning with James Taylor, the emigrant from Carlisle, 
England, and ending with Commodore Richard Taylor, 
the grand old revolutionary hero, father of the said 
Matilda. The information regarding the generations 
preceding Commodore Taylor was obtained mostly dur- 
ing a visit, in 1897, of the author to Virginia, and for 
the greater part of it credit is due to the courtesy of 
Dr. Andrew G. Grinnan, of Madison county, Virginia, 
a descendant of Erasmus Taylor, and an animated 
encyclopsedia of Taylor family history. The naval his- 
tory of Commodore Taylor is the result of the author's 
personal researches in the Virginia State archives and 
other reliable sources, and he vouches for its truth. 

In conclusion, the author hopes that some chronicler 
of a future generation may take up and continue the 
work he has so imperfectly begun, and to any such he 
begs to tender a hearty God-speed. 

Detroit, Mich., 1900. 




The Robertson Clan. 



THE ancient homes of the Robertsons of Scotland 
were located principally in the highlands of Perth- 
shire, although many of the clan lived in Aberdeenshire, 
Invernessshire and other parts of the kingdom. Until 
recently, it has been the tradition that the chieftains 
of the Robertsons were descended from the MacDon- 
alds, the "Lords of the Isles," but that theor}^ is now 
considered erroneous. In fact, the "Clan Donachie" 
(Robertson ) can trace its lineage to even a more remote 
period than the MacDonalds, viz.: to the ancient earls 
of Atholl, whose progenitor was Duncan, King of 
Scotland (called by Shakspeare in Macbeth "The 
gracious Duncan"), who reigned A. D. 1033 to 1039. 
Skene, the learned historian, says, "The Robertsons 
are unquestionably one of the oldest and most eminent 
families in Scotland, being the sole remaining branch 
of that royal house, which occupied the throne during 
the eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and 
from which they can easily trace their descent." 

The name Robertson (that is, the son of Robert) 
is Saxon in its derivation, but the race was a Gaelic 
one. They first appear as a distinct clan in the year 



lO THE ROBERTSOX CLAN. 

1 39 1, but were conspicuous almost a century previous 
in the wars for the defense and liberty of their coun- 
trj', under the great patriot-warrior, Sir William Wal- 
lace. The}- also served with distinction under Robert 
Bruce at Bannockburn, in 13 14, when he with thirty 
thousand Scots routed King Edward II. of England 
with a hundred thousand English troops. In the year 
1437, Robertson of Strowan, chief of the clan, arrested 
Graham and the Earl of Atholl, the murderers of King 
James I. of Scotland, and, as a reward for that ser- 
vice, his lands were made a baronj' and he was granted 
an honorable addition to his coat of arms, consisting 
of a man lying in chains, a hand holding a royal crown 
and the motto, ''Virtutis Gloria Merces,'' meaning, 
"Glory the reward of Braver\'." 

In 1483, Donald Robertson, a chieftain of the clan, 
led eighteen companies of highlanders into the service 
of Louis XL, King of France. He was a soldier of 
fortune and won much honor and fame in the French- 
Italian wars. In 15 16 we find another account of him, 
not so flattering to him nor so agreeable to his de- 
scendants. After his return from France he became a 
freebooter and outlaw, as Rob Roy did at a later date. 
On one of his expeditions or forays he was defeated 
and captured, and his history ends with this laconic 
sentence, "Beheadit for his monj' willanes !" 

In 1645 the clan, eight hundred strong, joined the 
army of Montrose, their leader being Donald Robert- 
son, "the tutor," who assumed the command because 
the chieftain of the clan, his nephew, was too young 
to perform military duty. At the battle of Inverlochy, 
February 2d, 1645, when Montrose utterly crushed the 
Campbells, one of the clan, a veritable Samson, is said 



THE ROBERTSON CLAN. II 

to have cut down nineteen of the enemy with his bat- 
tle axe. 

Through adversity as well as prosperity, the Rob- 
ertsons were ever firm and loyal adherents of the royal 
house of the Stuarts. Under their young chieftain, 
Alexander Robertson, who was gifted as a poet, the 
clan, in 1689, raised the standard of insurrection 
against William and IMary and fought bravely to 
restore James II. to his throne. Again at the battle of 
Sheriff-muir, in the rebelHon of 17 15, he distinguished 
himself greatly by his valor. Thirty years afterwards, 
in 1745, he was "out" with "Prince Charlie," the 
"Young Pretender," grandson of James II, He was 
then a very old man, but when the young prince, 
Charles Edward (who was said to unite in his person 
"all that was graceful and honorable in a prince, to- 
gether with the spirit of a military hero' ' ) , landed in 
Scotland and raised the standard of rebellion against 
George II., the Hanoverian King of England, Alex- 
ander Robertson hastened to join his fortunes to the 
forlorn cause. The rebellion however, was of short 
duration, and received its death blow at Culloden, near 
Inverness, on April 16, 1746, when King George's 
troops, under the Duke of Cumberland, defeated most 
disastrously the Scotch clans and scattered them to the 
four winds. Then was fulfilled Lochiel's direful 
warning: 

"Lochiel, Lochiel, beware of the day 
When the lowlands shall meet thee in battle array, 
For a field of the dead rushes red on my sight, 
And the clans of Culloden are scattered in fight. 
They rally, they bleed for their kingdom and crown. 
Woe, woe, to the riders that trample them down! 
Proud Cumberland prances, insulting the slain. 
And their hoof-beaten bosoms are trod to the plain." 



12 THE ROBERTSON CLAN. 

The leaders of the clans were pursued and perse- 
cuted relentlessly. Some fled to their mountain fast- 
nesses and thus eluded pursuit, while many escaped 
b}^ ship to France and other parts of the continent. A 
large number were apprehended and tried b)- court- 
martials. The leaders were, some of them, summaril}^ 
executed, while those of inferior rank were sentenced 
to imprisonment and compelled to pay heavy fines. In 
most cases the estates of all prominent rebels were 
declared confiscated to the crown. The colonies in 
America received large accessions of such refugees, 
and to-da}- their descendants in the United States and 
Canada, a vast multitude, are recognized among our 
most substantial and influential citizens. 

The Scotch people are a grave, sober and dignified 
race, careful and frugal in their habits, but generous 
and kind to the poor and suffering, notwithstanding 
the fact that they are generally represented as austere 
in character. They are noted for their morality, 
probit}', and steadfastness, and wheresoever in the 
world they roam, still adhere to and have an abiding 
reverence for the faith of their forefathers. In the 
great battle of the ages, for the uplifting of mankind, 
for the regeneration of our race, and its freedom from 
the shackels of superstition and ignorance, our kins- 
men are now and ever have been pressing forward in 
the vanguard. As we contemplate their achievements 
in the arts of peace, their unswerving patriotism and 
valor in war, their triumphs in diplomacy, their de- 
votion to religion and morality and their well-deserved 
honors in the realms of science and literature, our 
hearts swell with pride, exultation and thanksgiving. 




Our Branch of the Robertsons 
IN Scotland. 



WE confess with great regret our inability to name 
the exact localit}^ in Scotland where the ances- 
tors of our family lived. We believe, however, it 
would be an easy task for a patient investigator to 
determine this very desirable matter, starting with the 
clues and facts which we, upon two or three short 
visits to Scotland, have been able to obtain. It may 
be some future chronicler will have the good fortune 
to solve this interesting question. 

Charles Robertson, the grandfather of our ancestor 
Donald, lived, so tradition says, in or near the city of 
Inverness. Concerning him and his wife we have no 
information whatever, except that they had one son, 
whose name was likewise Charles, and who was born 
on the eighth day of March, in the year 1681. We 
have no record of other children. A family tradition 
says that our ancestor Donald was descended from six 
successive generations of Charles's, his elder brother, 
Charles, making the seventh of that name. 



14 DOXALD ROBERTSOX'S AXCESTRY. 

Charles Robertson, the father of our ancestor Don- 
ald, married early in life Isabella MacDonald. Her 
father was a member of the MacDonald clan, and thus 
our famil}' can trace its lineage back to two powerful 
and illustrious clans, and through them to the royal 
house of Scotland in the eleventh, twelfth and thir- 
teenth centuries, as well as to the "Lords of the Isles." 
The eminent historian, William Robertson, sa3'S, "The 
clan ^MacDonald is, by ever\- rule of antiquity, power 
and numbers, fully entitled to be spoken of before any 
others." 

As to the home of Charles Robertson and his wife, 
Isabella MacDonald, nothing positive is known. Al- 
though tradition says his father was an Invernessshire 
man, the same authority indicates that Charles and 
Isabella lived in that ancient district of Aberdeenshire, 
between the rivers Dee and Don, known as Mar. He 
was possessed of a considerable fortune and was known 
and recognized as a gentleman of good breeding and 
family. His presence was imposing, his education was 
extraordinarily good for those times, and his manners 
were polite and agreeable. His neighbors and friends 
looked upon him with high respect and esteem. 

Two children, both sons, were born to him and his 
wife, viz.: 

Charles, whose date of birth is unknown. 

Donald, born September 27th, 1717. 

An old family history' makes mention of a daugh- 
ter named Mollie, but if there was such a child she 
probably died in infanc}-, as we have no further record 
of her. Mrs. Lucy Robertson Semple, daughter of 
Donald Robertson, says she never heard her father 
speak of having a sister. 



DONALD ROBERTSON'S ANCESTRY. I5 

When Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the "Young 
Pretender," came over from France, in 1745, and 
headed the Scottish rebelHon against George II. of 
England, Charles Robertson (Donald's father) was 
already a man sixty-five j^ears of age. His martial 
ardor and strength of body were, however, unabated, 
and his loj^alty to the house of the Stuarts compelled 
him to espouse their cause. With the rest of his clan 
he took part in the ill-fated battle of Culloden, April 
16, 1746, and was among those whose estates were 
thereafter confiscated by the crown. Neither of his 
sons appears to have been an active participant in the 
rebellion, at least there is no record of such being the 
fact. The elder son, Charles, was married and had 
gone to England to live. Donald, then twenty-nine 
years of age, was also probably married, and was living 
at Edinburgh, to which city the aged parents, now 
dependent on their sons for support, determined to 
remove. There Isabella MacDonald, the mother, died 
on March 5, 1753, and the record says was "decently 
buried in the West Friar's churchyard." A few weeks 
before her death Donald, having despaired of advance- 
ment, on account of adverse political conditions, had 
determined to try his fortune in the new world and had 
sailed for Virginia. Charles, the father, immediately 
after his wife's death, went to live with his son Charles, 
at Sunderland, in England, and there continued to 
reside for the rest of his life. He outlived his son 
Charles some three years, remaining with his daugh- 
ter-in-law and her children until the year 1761, when 
he died, in his eighty-second year. A letter written 
by him on his seventy-sixth birthday, March 8th, 1757, 
to his son Donald, in Virginia, is now in our possession; 



l6 DONALD ROBERTSON'S ANCESTRY. 

also one from the brother Charles to Donald, written 
on same date. Both give undoubted evidence that our 
Scotch ancestors were men of education and refinement 
and possessed of warm, loving hearts. 

Charles Robertson, Donald's brother, early in life 
entered the navy and spent the whole of his career in 
maritime pursuits. He was captain and probabh- 
owner of a merchant vessel plying between Sunderland 
and ports in Holland. He married and lived at Sun- 
derland. His wife's name was Margaret, and she bore 
him five children, two sons and three daughters. Both 
of the sons and one daughter died in infancy. Two of 
the daughters, named respectiveh- Margaret and Eliza- 
beth, grew to womanhood. Margaret was born in 
August, 1754, and Elizabeth on November 27, 1756. 
They both married. Margaret's husband name is un- 
known to us. She had one child, but we do not know 
whether a bo}' or girl, or anything of its subsequent 
history. Elizabeth married Sir William Smart, of the 
navy, and died without issue. 

A letter dated Stmderland, March 30th, 1760, writ- 
ten by Margaret Robertson, widow of Charles, to her 
brother-in-law Donald, in Virginia, is in the possession 
of Mrs. Adaline S. Bradford, of Springfield, Illinois. 
In it she gives an account of her husband's death, 
which occurred, as she stated, "a j^ear ago last July," 
that is to say in July, 1758. He was in command of 
his vessel, on a return trip from Holland. During a 
violent storm he was blown overboard and lost. In 
the same letter she said her husband's and Donald's 
father was still living at her home and was in excellent 
health. At that time he had gone on a visit to Edin- 
boro, but was expected back very soon. 



First Generation. 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 



WE learn from an ancient Latin Bible, now in pos- 
session of Richard Taylor Byrne, of Tilden, 
Texas, which belonged to our ancestor, Donald Robert- 
son, and in which the record of his birth and of his 
children is inscribed in Latin, by his own hand, that 
he was born in the Highlands of Scotland on Septem- 
ber 27th, 1 7 17. A "Robertson Genealogy," compiled 
many years ago by General James Semple, of 
Illinois, from old letters and records belonging to 
his mother, Mrs. Lucy Robertson Semple, states 
that the birth-place of Donald Robertson was Mar, 
Invernessshire, Scotland. After a careful investiga- 
tion of the matter, we are convinced General Semple 
made an error in this statement. There is no place in 
Invernessshire called Mar, and we cannot learn that 
there ever was. There is, however, in Aberdeenshire, 
between the rivers Don and Dee, a district which was 
then and is now called Mar. It is situated in the heart 



l8 DOXALD ROBERTSON. 

of the Highlands, and we believe is the birth-place of 
our ancestor. A confirmation or disproval of this 
opinion by the future family historian will be a subject 
well worthy of his careful investigation. It is the key 
which once surely in hand may unlock the history of 
our family for many generations, concerning which we 
now know almost nothing. 

Donald's parents were earnest Christian people and 
desired him to embrace a clerical calling, and to this 
end he was placed in the College at Aberdeen, where 
he obtained a liberal education, after which, we are 
told, he entered the University of Edinburgh and 
received from that celebrated institution his degree. 
For reasons unknown to us he never became a clergy- 
man, but instead prepared himself for the profession of 
teaching. After his course in the university, he re- 
mained in Edinburgh, and was there while the rebellion 
instigated by "Prince Charlie" was in progress. His 
sympathies were doubtless enlisted with the rebels, but 
he appears not to have taken an active part in the in- 
surrection, probably because of the influence of his 
wife's family, all of whom were on the other side. 
Her name was Henrietta Maxwell, and she was 
the daughter of Sir Patrick Maxwell, of Springkel. 
Sir William Maxwell, her brother, succeeded to the 
title and landed estates upon the death of Sir Patrick. 
For the other children, however, including Henrietta, 
a certain provision was made in the will of their father. 
Her portion amounted to eight thousand five hundred 
merks, which for those daj's was a very considerable 
sum. After the death of her father, and until her 
marriage to Donald Robertson, she made her home 
with her brother, Sir William; but he violenth- opposed 



DONAI^D ROBERTSON. I9 

the union and never afterward became reconciled to 
her or forgave her husband. He was an intense loyal- 
ist and adherent of the Hanoverian house, and could 
not tolerate a man whose sj^mpathies and political 
opinions failed to coincide with his own. Scotland 
was in an exceedingly perturbed condition at this time. 
No man who had taken part in the rebellion against 
King George, or whose sympathies lay in that direc- 
tion, could hope for any sort of preferment, either in 
public or private life. Donald's father's life had been 
spared, but his property was all confiscated, and he 
was dependent for support upon his two sons. Under 
these circumstances, and also owing to the unpleasant 
relations existing between him and his wife's brother, 
it is not strange that Donald determined to say fare- 
well to kindred and the land of his birth and seek his 
fortune in America. Thither many of his compatriots 
were going or had preceded him. Entrusting his j^oung 
wife to the care of a cousin of his in Edinburgh, a 
wealthy merchant named Malcolm Ogilvie, and placing 
in his hands sufficient funds for her maintenance until 
he could return or send for her, he set sail from Leith, 
the seaport of Edinburgh, probably in the month of 
December, 1752. The record made by himself in the 
before-mentioned Latin Bible shows that he arrived in 
or rather "saw Virginia" {"'prospexit Virginiam'') on 
March 29th, 1753. He soon became well established 
in King and Queen countj^ \^irginia, and was so much 
encouraged by his prospects that he determined to send 
for his wife, and had actually completed arrangements 
for that purpose, when the intelligence of her death 
reached him. She died at the house of Malcolm Ogil- 
vie, in Edinburgh, March 25, 1753 (four days before 



20 DONALD ROBERTSON'. 

her husband's arrival in Virginia), and was interred 
in the family tomb of the Maxwells, in Cannon-Gate 
churchyard, Edinburgh. The report of her death did 
not reach him until several months later. Mails were 
very uncertain in those days and the average time of a 
voyage across the Atlantic was about three months. 
She made a will devising all her estate to her husband, 
and he could have recovered it from Sir William Max- 
well by process of law, but as his wife had died with- 
out issue, he magnanimously waived all his rights and 
gave directions also that all her jewelry, wearing 
apparel and personal effects be handed over to her 
sister. The remainder of the funds in Malcolm Ogil- 
vie's hands was devoted to the support of his father. 
He never again returned to Scotland. 

The education and training acquired by Donald 
Robertson under the best instructors of his time at 
Aberdeen and Edinburgh was of inestimable value to 
him in the Colony of Virginia. Institutions of learn- 
ing in America were scarce. Children of wealthy 
parents were occasionally sent across the ocean for 
their schooling, but the great mass had little or no 
educational advantages. Under such circumstances, a 
teacher of his erudition and experience was a most de- 
sirable acquisition in any communit}-, and from the 
very beginning he met with a hearty welcome and the 
most distinguished consideration. Immediatel}- after 
his arrival in King and Queen county he was engaged 
as a private tutor in the family of Colonel John Baj'lor, 
a man of great prominence, as well as an intimate 
friend and confidant of the colonial Governor, Din- 
widdie. 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 21 

The position of private tutor was, however, too 
Hmited in scope to satisfy a man of his ability and am- 
bition. Many other influential families lived in the 
vicinity, and they desired their children also to enjoy 
the advantages of a higher education, and at their 
solicitation he determined to establish an academy and 
boarding school. The place selected was in Drysdale 
Parish, in King and Queen county. He soon acquired 
a great reputation as an educator, and his school 
received the patronage of the best people in all that 
section of the colony. Drysdale Parish was a district 
composed of the upper parts of King William and 
King and Queen counties and the lower part of Caro- 
line county, Virginia. It is no longer known by that 
name. The exact location of the academy was on a 
farm overlooking the Mattapony river and on its east 
bank, about four miles above the present Dunkirk 
bridge, connecting King William and King and Queen 
counties. The place is still occasionally called the 
"Robertson Farm." The establishment of boarding 
schools in the country districts of Virginia is yet prev- 
alent, and we have recentlj' visited two such institu- 
tions there, in which boys and girls from all over the 
State are preparing for colleges and universities. 

Among Donald Robertson's pupils were James 
Madison, fourth President of the United States, and 
George Rogers Clark, the famous pioneer and "Con- 
queror of the Northwest" during the war of the 
revolution. Owing to the scarcitj' of text books, our 
ancestor was obliged to prepare those used by his 
pupils. One of these, in his own handwriting, now in 
possession of Donald Robertson Green, of Colusa, 
California, we have seen. The chirography is beautiful 



22 DOXALD ROBERTSON. 

and the contents prove that his knowledge of rhetoric, 
history, literature and the Latin language was accurate 
and profound. 

The eminent historian, John Fiske, in his Ameri- 
can Revolution, Vol. II., page 104, alludes to Donald 
Robertson as "That excellent Scotch schoolmaster." 
Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography, \'ol. I., 
page 626, and Vol. IV., page 165; also Sidney Howard 
Gay, in his "Life and Times of Madison." \'ol. I., 
page 10, make complimentary mention of him. When 
James Madison arose to eminence in the affairs of the 
nation, he gave much of the credit of his successful 
career to the thorough training he had received under 
Donald Robertson, whom he termed "The learned 
teacher." 

After the death of his first wife, Donald Robertson 
remained single eleven and a half years. He then 
remarried, his second wife being Rachel Rogers, fifth 
daughter and youngest of nine children of John Rogers, 
of King and Queen county, Virginia. She was grand- 
daughter of Giles Rogers, who emigrated to America 
from Worcestershire, England, in the year 16S6, and 
settled on the Mattapony river. The marriage took 
place on September 27th. 1764, his forty-seventh birth- 
day. She was then not quite twenty-seven years old, 
the date of her birth having been October 17th, 1737. 
(A more detailed account of the fanuly of our maternal 
ancestress will be found hereinafter.) They lived 
for many years at their home on the river, in the en- 
joyment of a competency acquired from his school, 
and he died there January 30th. 1783. in his sixty- 
sixth year. His death was sudden, and the circum- 
stances connected therewith will be of interest to his 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 23 

descendants. During the whole of the revolutionary 
war he had been ardently American in his sympathies 
and a strong advocate for the independence of the 
colonies. Although himself too old a man to endure the 
hardships of military ser\-ice, many of his pupils, as well 
as his wife's kinsmen, were actively and prominently 
engaged in the war. He himself had never had an}'- 
love for the reigning sovereign of England. The 
severe penalties imposed upon his aged father after the 
defeat at Culloden were still fresh in memory, and he 
dreaded lest a similar fate should be the lot of his 
friends, in case the British arms should meet with suc- 
cess. This was frequently the theme of his conversa- 
tion. News from the seat of war seldom reached that 
region, consequently the suspense and uncertainty 
were very wearing upon those left at home. One day 
an acquaintance called at his house and brought a 
newspaper containing an accoiuit of the ratification of 
the treaty of peace between Great Britain and the 
United States, and the acknowledgment of our coun- 
try's independence. His joy and gratitude over this 
intelligence were unlx)unded, and he remarked, "This 
is the end for which I have longed and prayed. Hav- 
ing lived to see the independence of my coinitry estab- 
lished, I am now satisfied." Then expressing weari- 
ness, he went into his bed-room and lay down. Shortly 
thereafter one of the family followed him and discovered 
him lying dead upon his bed. The sudden change 
from extreme apprehension and depression to elation 
and joy had caused his spirit to take its flight. His 
death, although peaceable and quiet, was as truly that 
of a patriot as if he had poured out his blood for his 
countrv on the field of battle. 



24 DONALD ROBERTSON. 

His wife continued to reside with her children at 
the family homestead, in Drj'sdale Parish, until her 
death, which occurred November 7th, 1792, at the age 
of fifty-five 3-ears. 

The last resting place of Donald Robertson and his 
wife is unknown. It is probable that their remains 
repose in the churchj-ard of the old Park church, in 
King and Queen county, where man}- of the Rogers 
family were buried; or it may be they were laid in 
Saint David's churchyard, in King William county. 
They frequently attended ser^-ice at the latter church. 
It is most unfortunate that none of the eighteenth cen- 
tur}- records of either church can be discovered. In 
the summer of 1897, when in King and Queen and 
King William counties, we sought diligently to find 
some stone marking their graves, but without success. 

"Of what church were Donald Robertson and his 
wife adherents?" is a question frequently asked but 
difficult to answer. They attended the English church 
service; but it does not necessarily follow from this 
fact that they were Episcopalians in faith. At that 
period no other churches existed in that part of Vir- 
ginia, although it is altogether probable there were 
people of other denominations, who occasionally met 
together for worship. The Rogers family was stanch 
Presbyterian in faith, and so also, we are inclined to 
believe, was Donald Robertson. He may have been a 
member of the Church of England, but we think not, 
as he was never an officer or vestryman of that church. 
Moreover, his early associations and training would 
have naturally inclined him to Presbyterianism. Some 
of his descendants claim he was a Catholic, and many 
masses, according to the ritual of that church, have 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 25 

been offered for the repose of his soul. The basis for 
their claim, so far as we can learn, is that the old Latin 
Bible, which he owned, contains in his handwriting a 
list of scripture texts, said by Catholics to authorize 
prayers for the dead and the use of the sign of the 
cross. We dismiss this claim as without foundation, 
because we have in our possession a letter from his 
daughter, Mrs. Semple, wTitten to the author's mother, 
in which she states categorically, that she never heard 
of her father's being a CathoHc. Strange to say, how- 
ever, she does not indicate to what church he belonged. 
Possibly he was not a member at all. To us it is a 
matter of small moment, whether our honored ancestor 
w^as b}^ profession an Episcopalian, a Presbyterian, or 
a Catholic, or neither of them. That he was a good 
and true man, a loving husband, a devoted father, a 
kind friend, an honest patriot, and a broad-minded 
Christian we have abundant evidence, and that is all 
sufficient. 

"He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; 
and what doth the Lord require of thee but 
to do justly, and to love mercy and to walk 
humbly with thy God?"— Micah VI., 8. 

In connection with this ecclesiastical question, the 
following incident will be of interest: 

Mrs. Adaline Semple Bradford, the only hving 
grandchild of Donald Robertson, inherited from her 
mother, Mrs. Semple, several massive silver spoons, 
marked "D. R. , " which were said to have been brought 
from Scotland by him. Being an ardent church- 
woman, she determined to have them remelted and 
made into a communion service, for presentation as a 



26 DOXALD ROBERTSOX. 

memorial of her grandfather and her mother to the 
Episcopal church in King and Queen county, Mrginia, 
situated nearest to the old Robertson homestead. 
Bishop Whittle, of Virginia, was consulted as to which 
church should receive the donation, and, much to Mrs. 
Bradford's disappointment, reported there were no 
churches of his denomination in that county; that after 
the revolution the English church had become unpopu- 
lar on account of its name and associations, and the 
old church buildings had fallen into the hands of other 
denominations. There was, however, the good bishop 
said, a chm-ch true to the old name and faith, across 
the Mattapony river, at the village Ayletts, in King 
William county, and he recommended it as the bene- 
ficiar}'. And thus Saint David's received the service, 
consisting of a chalice and a paten, beautifully wrought 
and of exquisite pattern, the one inscribed "Offered to 
the Lord in memory- of her grandfather, Donald Rob- 
ertson, 1717-1783," the other, "In loving memory- of 
her mother, Lucy Robertson Semple, by Ada Semple 
Bradford." When Mrs. Bradford related this incident 
we inquired if she ever heard the name of the church 
that her grand-parents attended. She replied by saj-- 
ing that her mother, in speaking of it, alwa^'s called it 
the "Ctz/Za//," but she, herself, was not aware what 
the real name of the church was. Shortly after this, 
in consulting Bishop Meade's book, "Old Churches 
and Families in \'irginia," we found a description of 
the old churches in King William county, and among 
them the following: "Saint David's church -^ ^ ^ 
* ^-^ * is a regular quadrangular building, and is 
sometimes called 'Cattail.' " Thus the commimion 
service seems to have been providentially directed to 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 2^ 

the very church where our ancestors worshipped, al- 
though the generous donor knew nothing of the fact 
until we drew her attention to it. 

Three years ago we made a journey to the "Old 
Dominion," with the intention of running down to 
King and Queen county and having a look at the old 
"stamping grounds," and, if possible, locating the 
very spots where our ancestors lived and died. How 
best to reach there was a much-discussed question, for 
means of locomotion are still in a primitive condition 
down that way and very much as they were a century 
ago. No railroad exists in the limits of the count}'. 
The Mattapony river extends along its western border, 
and occasional boats from Norfolk and the Chesapeake 
ascend it, but that was too round-about and uncertain 
a route to our mecca. The way we had to take 
was across country, and the means of locomotion 
such as we might find. By the aid of some good 
friends in Richmond, the course was mapped out. 
Boarding the afternoon train of the York River R. R. 
(a mixed passenger and freight, which goes every 
other day from Richmond to West Point) , we alighted 
at the station, or rather siding, known as "Sweet 
Hall," which, upon our arrival, was absolutely devoid 
of humanit}', either white or black. After some search 
we discovered a pickaninny, who for a slight subsidy 
went in search of a neighboring farmer, who owned a 
good buggy and team, and who consented to drive us 
over to Frazer's Ferry, on the Mattapony, a distance 
of some seven miles. There we were ferried in a skiff 
across the river and some two miles down stream to 
what is known as "King and Queen Court House 
Landing." Formerly a warehouse was located at this 



28 DONALD ROBERTSON'. 

point, and considerable business was done in shipping 
produce and receiving merchandise, but now its glory 
has departed, and only a dilapidated shanty and a 
broken-down dock remain. No human being greeted 
our arrival. It was a broiling day, and we looked in 
vain for any means of transportation to the "Court 
House," some three-quarters of a mile further inland. 
Seeing the dilemma in which we were placed, and 
which he had doubtless anticipated, our whilom ferry- 
man offered, for a reasonable additional compensation, 
to guide us by a shady path through piney woods to 
our destination, as well as to act in the capacity of 
porter, and we accepted with alacrity. In this primi- 
tive fashion we at length arrived at the village, which 
consists of the following buildings, viz., a court house 
and clerk's office, both one-story brick structtu"es, good 
and substantial; a diminutive ten by twent3'-foot jail, in 
which one lone prisoner languished; a general country 
store, and a farm house of moderate size, dignified 
with the sign "Hotel." The whole aggregation might 
easil}^ pass for a comfortable farm house and out-build- 
ings. No hospitable landlord greeted us as we crossed 
the threshold of the "Hotel." The hamlet put us in 
mind of "Goldsmith's Deserted Village," as no signs 
of humanity were visible. An ancient, rheumatic dog, 
however, wagged us a welcome, and soon a colored 
woman bearing a pail of fresh spring water on her 
head informed us the ' 'white folks' ' would be there in 
a little while and be glad enough to entertain us. The 
aged county clerk, who had held office more than fifty 
years, we learned upon inquiry-, had gone fishing, so 
taking advantage of his absence, we eagerly invaded 
his office, impatient to have a look at the old records. 



DONATED ROBERTSON. 29 

Greatl)' to our dismay and chagrin, we could find none 
of an earlier date than 1864. In that j^ear, we after- 
wards learned, a raid had been made through the 
county by the Union forces from Norfolk, and the old 
court house, clerk's office and every existing record 
had been burned. This was, indeed, a sore disappoint- 
ment, for we had hoped to find not only records of 
deeds, etc., by which the old Robertson and Rogers 
and Semple homesteads might be identified, but also 
copies of wills, marriage licenses, etc., which might 
settle some of the family questions, concerning which 
there has been much discussion; among them that of 
the identity of the wife of John Rogers, and who Mary 
Bird (or Byrd) was. 

Balked of our expectations in this direction, we 
nevertheless determined to prosecute our journey 
through the county, in the hope that by some 
good fortune we might yet obtain some information 
that would compensate for the trouble undertaken. 
In this we were not altogether disappointed. "Rose- 
Mount," the old Semple homestead, is still known by 
that name, and was easil}^ found. It is a beautiful 
and extensive farm, on a high plateau, about a mile 
back from the river, but overlooking it, and having an 
unimpeded view far away into King William count3\ 
It is about three miles northwest of the village of 
Walker ton, and is now owned by Mr. Wm. Dew, a 
gentleman, who welcomed us with true Virginia hospi- 
tality. He pointed out the spot where the Semples 
were buried, but if there had ever been any stones to 
mark their last resting places, none remained. The 
residence, a comparatively new one, stands on a por- 
tion of the foundation of the old Semple house. An 



30 DONALD ROBERTSON. 

immense spreading oak, that must have been there a 
century ago, and much longer, overshadows the house 
and is a prominent object in the landscape from every 
direction. We had greater difficulty in finding the 
Robertson place, but at length an old man, over eighty 
3'ears of age, who lives within a mile or two of it, told 
us of its location. He said it was alwa3-s called the 
Robertson place, when he was a boy, and is still so 
designated by the older inhabitants. It is situated on 
the Mattapony river, four miles above Dunkirk Bridge. 
The farm has been subdivided and is worked by a 
number of small tenants. There is absolutely nothing 
now left to recall the memory of our ancestors, its 
former owners. The homes of the Rogers's were in 
the immediate neighborhood of Donald Robertson's, 
but we were unable to find an}body who had ever 
heard of the family or knew where they lived. The 
old Park church, around which the Rogers's were 
buried, is a mass of ruins. Only a portion of the 
foundation remains to mark the spot, but not a vestige 
of a tomb-stone to tell whose remains lie there. Of 
course we made a pilgrimage to Saint David's, the Old 
"Cattail" church. It is situated in King William 
county, about two and a half miles from the village of 
Aylett's, where Donald Robertson used to do his trad- 
ing and sell his crops. Its unique nick-name, received 
long before the Revolution, still clings to it, although 
the swamp in which the cattails grew has long since 
been drained. For many years after the Revolution it 
was abandoned as a house of worship. \'egetation 
grew rank about it, its roof fell in, and the elements 
made sad havoc with its walls. Several years ago, 
however, it was again put in thorough repair and is 



DONAI.D ROBERTSON. 



31 



now used regularly as a house of worship. The size 
of the building has been somewhat reduced and the 
old pulpit and pews have given place to new ones. In 
general appearance it must be almost as it was in 1776. 
The walls, about two feet thick, are firm and solid, 
and are built of brick brought from England. About 
the door and over the entire front wall of the church 
successive generations of youthful swains have carved 
their own and their sweet-hearts' initials in the hard 
burned bricks. Here, too, not a remnant of an ancient 
tomb-stone exists. The old church records, as stated 
heretofore, have also long since disappeared, and 
although we made diligent efforts and inquiries, noth- 
ing definite could be learned regarding them. 



^^/^ 




'C^ 



^^^-^^^ <^C\.^^>- 



THE 

NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY' 

^ (kiter, Lenox and Tilden^ 
Fourdalions. 




^IRS. LrCY ROHKRTSON Semple. 
Forn 1773. Died 1856. 



^v?-^' 



»^2.=-a7V 



Second Generation. 



CHILDREN OF DONALD ROBERTSON AND HIS WIFE, 
RACHEL ROGERS. 



The Second Generation consists of three per- 
sons, viz., Charles Robertson, Lucy Robertson, 
and Isaac Robertson, children of Donald Robertson 
and his wife, Rachel Rogers, all of whom were born at 
the old homestead on the east bank of the Mattapony 
river, in Drysdale Parish, King and Qneen county, 
Virginia. 

No. 2. 

Charles Robertson, eldest son of Donald Robert- 
son and his wife, Rachel Rogers, was born August 
17th, 1765, and died March 23d, 1767. 



No. 3. 

Lucy Robertson, second child and only daughter 
of Donald Robertson and his wife, Rachel Rogers, was 
born, as the record in the old iLatin Bible informs us. 



34 SECOND GENERATION. 

"multomane" (that is to sa}-, very early in the morn- 
ing), on July 9th, 1773. After the death of her 
mother, which occurred when Lucy was nineteen years 
of age, the old home was abandoned, and she went to 
live with her cousin Ann, or "Nancy," Clark Gwath- 
mey, wife of Owen Gwathmey, and sister of General 
George Rogers Clark, of revolutionarj- fame; also of 
Governor William Clark, of the celebrated "Lewis and 
Clark Expedition." There she remained four years, 
until her marriage, which occurred March 23rd, 1797, 
to Major John Walker Semple (bom November 18, 
1761 ) , of King and Queen county. He was a widower 
and eldest son of John Semple and his wife, Elizabeth 
Walker, of "Rose-Mount," in said county. The fol- 
lowing congratulatory lines by her cousin, Kitt>- Tem- 
ple, were read at the wedding: 

"Health to my friend, with long unbroken years, 
By storms unruffled and unstained by tears, 
Winged by new joys, may each bright moment fly. 
Bloom on thy cheek and sunshine in thine eye. 
May day improve on day and year on year. 
Without a pain, a trouble or a fear, 
'Till death, unfelt, thy tender frame destroy, 
In some soft dream, or ecstasy of joy; 
Peaceful sleep out the Sabbath of the tomb, 
.•\nd wake to rapture in a life to come." 

The honey-moon, consisting of a few weeks, was 
spent at "Rose-Mount" amid a constant round of fes- 
tivities, given in their honor by their numerous friends 
and relatives; but in May following ' 1707* they, in 
company with the bride's brother, Isaac Robertson, 
a promising young lawyer, emigrated to Kentucky. 
The route followed bv them was the old "Wilderness 



SECOND GENERATION. 35 

road,'" entering Kentucky at Cumberland Gap, near 
the borders of North Carolina and Tennessee. It was 
little more than a rough path, "blazed" through the 
primeval forest and over the rugged mountains separ- 
ating Virginia and Kentucky. The journey, lasting 
for several weeks, was made b}' them alternately on 
horseback and afoot, "with many a weary step and 
many a groan," but at length the}' arrived in safety at 
Lexington, then and for many years afterwards the 
most important settlement in Kentucky. At that time 
it contained a few hundred inhabitants. The same 
year they went further into the wilderness to Green 
county, where they remained until 1803, and where 
their four elder children were born. They then re- 
moved to Cumberland county, and settled on a farm 
which they named "Mount Radiance," situated upon 
the Cumberland river, and there their five younger 
children were born. In 18 18 they removed still 
another time, going to "Seventy-six," in Clinton 
county, Kentucky, where Major Semple died, Novem- 
ber 13, 1820. He was buried in Clear Fork church- 
yard near the town of Albany, Ky. After his death, 
Mrs. Semple remained at Seventy-six and reared her 
younger children there. Eleven years later, in 183 1, 
she remarried, her second husband being William 
Green, a wealthy farmer of Russell count)', Kentucky, 
and a widower with several children, two of whom, 
viz., Eleanor Green and Henry Lewis Green, were 
already married, resj)ectively, to her son, James 
Semple, and her daughter, Lucy Bird Semple. She 
had no children by her second husband. 

In March, 1854, she visited her son, General 
James Semple, and her daughter, Mrs. Adaline S. 



36 SECOND GENERATION. 

Bradford, in Illinois, and remained with them some 
two years and a half. From there she went in No- 
vember, 1856, to visit the family of her deceased son, 
Isaac Robertson Semple, in Clinton, Kentucky, 
where she died about a week after her arrival, on No- 
vember 23d. 1856, aged eighty-three. She was buried 
by the side of her son, Isaac Robertson Semple, in 
John Moore's private burying ground, Ballard county. 
Kentucky. 

Lucy Robertson Semple was a woman of large 
and powerful frame, and was endowed with rare intel- 
ligence and executive ability. During her widowhood 
she not only conducted her own household admirably, 
but at the same time carried on successfully extensive 
farming operations and managed a grist mill and a saw 
mill, both of which prospered under her direction. 
John J. Crittenden, the eminent statesman and former 
U. S. Senator from Kentucky, used to say Mrs. Semple 
was the most intelligent woman he had ever seen. 
Although, owing to the responsibilities which were 
thrown upon her, and the circumstances which sur- 
rounded her, Mrs. Semple's character seemed to pos- 
sess some of the masculine and sterner qualities; she 
was, nevertheless, a woman full of tenderness and 
affection for her family and friends, and ever ready to 
sacrifice her own comfort to ensure theirs. Her ster- 
ling qualities of mind and heart, as well as her robust 
physical nature, were reproduced in her children. The 
Semples are indeed a stately race.* 

*NoTE. — In this connection a brief account of her husband's, 
John Walker Semple's family, is appropriate. 

John and James Semple, who emigrated to the Colony of 
Virginia from Scotland in 1752, were sons of the Rev. James 



SECOND GENERATION. 37 

John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucj- Robertson, 
had nine children, viz.: 

No. 5. James Semple, bom January 5, 1798. 
No. 6. Eliza Baylor Semple, born July 10, 
1799. 

Semple, minister of the Parish of Dreghom. John and James 
were born there, John on October 17th, 1727, and James on May 
i8th, 1730. Their father came of the family of Blackburn, Ren- 
frewshire, and was lineally descended from the Seniples of 
Elistoun, Lochwinwoch. Upon their arrival in Virginia, John 
settled at "Rose-Mount" farm, about three miles northeast of 
the village of Walkerton, in King and Queen county. James 
went to New Kent county. John became a lawyer and married, 
Januarj- 17, 1761, Elizabeth Walker, by whom he had four 
children, viz., (i) John Walker Semple, {2) Elizabeth Baylor 
Semple, (3) James Semple, (4) Robert Baylor Semple. He died 
February, 1770, and his wife survived him twenty years She 
died in May, 1790. They were buried at "Rose-Mount" farm, 
as was also their son, Robert Baylor Semple, who was a very 
distinguished Baptist preacher. 

James Semple, the brother of John, who, as sUited above, 
settled in New Kent county, became a clergyman of the Church 
of England. He married Rebecca Allen, who bore him four 
children, one of whom. Judge James Semple, married .\nn 
Countess Tyler, sister of Pre.sident John Tyler. 

John Walker Semj)le, eldest child of John Semple and Eliza- 
beth Walker, his wife, was born November 18, 1761. He was 
twice married, first to Frances Lowry, daughter of Colonel 
Thomas Lowry and sister of Mrs. Robert Baylor Semjjle, his 
brother's wife, no i,s.sue; and second, to Lucy Roberts >n, daugh- 
ter of Donald Robertson, by whom he had nine children. He 
was a member of the Virginia General Assembly; removed in 
May, 1797, to Kentucky, and practiced his profession as a 
physician many years, but later in life devoted himself to farm- 
ing. From 1804 to x8o8 he was a member of the Kentucky 
Legislature. He died at Seventy-six, Clinton county, Kentucky, 
November 13th, 1820. 



38 SECOND GENERATION. 

No. 7. Frances Semple, born August 9, 1801. 
No. 8. John Walker Semple, born Julj- 28, 

1803. 
No. 9. Robert Baylor Semple, born February 

3, 1806. 
No. 10. Isaac Robertson Semple, born June 

28, 1808. 
No. II. Charles Donald Semple, born July 6, 

1810. 
No. 12. Lucy Bird Semple, born February 25, 

1815. 
No. 13. Adaline Matilda Semple, born October 

2, 1817. 

No. 4. 

Isaac Robertson, second son, third and youngest 
child of Donald Robertson and his wife, Rachel Rogers, 
was born August 27th, 1776, at the homestead in 
Drysdale Parish, King and Queen County, Virginia. 
He was seven j-ears old when his father died, and six- 
teen at the death of his mother, at which time he was 
a student of Nassau Hall, Princeton College, New 
Jersey. His early education was acquired at Bowling 
Green Academy, in Caroline county, Virginia, in which 
institution he won the first prize for scholarship, a 
silver medal, now in possession of his great-grandson, 
Richard Taylor Robertson, of Newport, Arkansas. 
While at Bowling Green Academy he probably became 
acquainted with Matilda Taylor, his future wife, whose 
home was near there. He entered the College of New 
Jersey at Princeton as a freshman in the year 1791, at 
the age of sixteen, and would have graduated with the 
class of 1794 had not ill-health compelled him to give 



SECOND GENERATION. 39 

up study and return home when in the midst of his 
senior year. The writer has the certificate which the 
faculty gave him at that time, expressing great regret 
at his departure, and commending him for his excel- 
lent scholarship and gentlemanly deportment. Recov- 
ering his health in the succeeding year, he returned to 
college and received his degree of A. B. March 29th, 

1795- 

In 1796 he entered upon the study of law at Rich- 
mond, Virginia, under the celebrated lawj^er, Bushrod 
Washington, and the following year (May, 1797,) re- 
moved to Kentucky to engage in the practice of his 
profession. He went in company with his sister Lucy, 
and her husband. Major John Walker Semple, shortly 
after their marriage. Leaving them in Lexington, he 
proceeded to Louisville, then knowTi as the Falls of 
the Ohio, and began practicing law. On May 30th, 
1799, he married Matilda Taylor (born in Caroline 
county, Virginia, December 19, 1784), second daughter 
of Commodore Richard Taylor, late of the Virginia 
revolutionary navy. She was then under fifteen j'ears 
of age. The marriage took place at Commodore Tay- 
lor's home, then in Jefferson county, but now in Old- 
ham county, Kentucky. They removed to Greensburg, 
in Green county, Kentucky, in the latter part of 1800, 
or early in 1801, and afterwards to Glasgow, in Barren 
count}', Kentucky. Remaining there only a few 
months, the)' came back to Jefferson county and set- 
tled at Middletown, about ten miles east of Louisville, 
where he continued the practice of law until 18 10, 
when they again removed to Frankfort, the capital of 
the State and seat of the Court of Appeals. There he 
soon became well established, with fine prospects of a 



40 SECOND GEXERATION. 

successful career, but his life came to an untimely end. 
He and his family were boarding at a hotel, and there 
he had a difficulty or misunderstanding with a portrait 
painter named Samuel H. Dearborn, in regard to a 
room, the exact nature of which the writer has been 
unable to discover. Dearborn appears to have been a 
vindictive and unscrupulous man, and, having secured 
a dirk, made a cowardly attack upon Mr. Robertson 
while he was seated in the garden of the hotel sur- 
rounded by his little children and entirely unarmed, 
and stabbed him savagely. The wound proved fatal, 
and death ensued the same da^', April 17th, 181 1, in 
his thirty-fifth j-ear. Dearborn fled to Canada, where 
he was captured, and whence, upon requisition, he was 
brought back to Kentucky' for trial. He, however, 
assisted by some outsider, broke jail and escaped, and 
was never heard of aftenvards. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. Robertson 
spent some time at the home of her half-brother 
Colonel Richard Taylor (known as "Hopping Dick," 
because of lameness) , who received and entertained her 
and her family with great kindness and hospitality. 
Afterwards she and the children went to live with her 
father, Commodore Richard Taylor, at his home 
"\Voodla^\'n," near Westport, Kentucky, on the Ohio 
River, about twenty miles above Louisville, where they 
all continued until his death, which occurred August 
30th, 1825, after which they removed to Louisville. 
There she died March 5th, 1833, at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. James B. Anderson, on Green street, 
between Fourth and Fifth. Her remains were interred 
on the lot of her son-in-law, John I. Jacob, in Cave 
Hill Cemetery. 



SECOND GENERATION. 4I 

Isaac Robertson and his wife, Matilda Taylor, 
had five children, as follows, viz.: 

No. 14. Lucy Donald Robertson, born March 

17, 1 801. 
Xo. 15. Richard Taylor Robertson, born 

August 10, 1S03. 
Xo. 16. Eliza Matilda Robertson, born May 

12, 1806. 
Xo. 17. Catherine Ann Clark Robertson, born 

September 4, 1808. 
Xo. 18. Mary Ann Martin Robertson, bom 

January 2, 181 1 . 

[end of second generation.] 




THE 
II NEW YORK 
PUBLIC library) 

^Astor, Lenox and TWAan jl 
V Fouidafions. 





Hon. James Semple. 

Born 1798. Died 1866. 




Third Generation. 



GRAND CHILDREN OF DONALD ROBERTSON AND 
HIS "WIFE, RACHEL ROGERS, 



The Third Generation consists of fourteen per- 
sons, viz.: 

Nine children of John Walker Semple and his wife, 
Lucy Robertson (No. 3); and 

Five children of Isaac Robertson (No. 4) and 
his wife, Matilda Taylor, as follows, to-wit: 

No. 5. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

General James Semple, eldest son of Major John 
Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy Robertson, was 
born January 5, 1798, near Greensburg, in Green 
county, Kentucky; married March 29, 1820, Ellen 
Duff Green (born November 10, 1800), fifth child of 
William Green, of Horse-shoe Bottom, Russell county, 
Kentucky, by his first wife, ne'e Marshall. In 1820 



44 THIRD GENERATION. 

they removed to Chariton, Missouri, where Mrs. 
Seniple died Julj' 12, 182 1, without issue. 

In March, 1828, he removed to Edwardsville, 
IlHnois, and married June 5, 1833 Mrs. Mary Steven- 
son Mizner (born October 29, 1806), widow of Henry 
C. Mizner, daughter of Dr. Caldwell Cairns and niece 
of S. Bond, first governor of Illinois. 

He died at "Trevue," near Elsah Landing, Jersey 
county, Illinois, December 20, 1866, in his sixty-ninth 
year. Mrs. Semple survived him until December 15, 
1875. They were both buried in Belief ontaine Ceme- 
terv, St. Louis. 



Ada Semple, born April 30, 1834. 
Lucy Virginia Semple, born April 17, 

1836. 
Eugene Semple, born June 12, 1840. 
Julia Ellen Semple, born July 27, 1845. 

General Semple was a natural leader of men. 
Possessed of a magnificent presence and charming 
manners, earnest and faithful in the discharge of everj- 
obligation, straightforward in all his dealings, he won 
the confidence, respect and affection of the people, and 
rapidly rose to distinction. He was elected colonel and 
commanded the 8th Illinois regiment in the Black Hawk 
war, and was afterwards appointed General, command- 
ing the militia of Illinois; was for six j-ears a member 
of the State legislature, and during the whole period 
was each j-ear elected speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives. In 1833 he was elected Attorne}-- General 
of the State, and in 1837 was appointed by President 



Four childf 


en 




No. 


19. 






No. 


20. 






No. 


21 . 






No. 


22 





THIRD GENERATION. 45 

Martin Van Buren United States Minister Plenipotenti- 
ary to New Granada, South America, the same position 
which General William Henry Harrison held in 1828. 
He resided in Bogota about five years, and upon his 
return home, in 1842, was elected one of the judges of 
the Supreme Court of Illinois. In 1843 he was elected 
United States Senator from Illinois for a term of six 
years, at the end of which he voluntarily retired from 
political life. 

No. 6. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

Eliza Baylor Semple, eldest daughter, second 
child of John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy 
Robertson, was born July lo, 1799, in Green county, 
Kentucky; married, June 30, 1819, William H. Cheat- 
ham, of Glasgow, Kentucky, by whom she had several 
children, all of whom died in infancy. They removed 
to Illinois, and she died at Washington, in that State, 
February 13, 1841, and was buried there. 

No. 7. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

Frances Semple, second daughter, third child of 
Major John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy Rob- 
ertson, was born August 9, 1801, near Greensburg, 
Green county, Kentucky; married, June 15, 1824, 
Curtis M. Garner (born October 13, 1799; died 1835), 
at Seventy-six, in Clinton county, Kentucky. They 
lived at Seventj^-six and he died there. 



46 THIRD GEXERATIOX. 

Four children: 

No. 23. Walker Semple Garner, born Maj^ 29, 

1825. 
No. 24. Ellen Jane Garner, born April 14, 

1S27. 
No. 25. Lucy Ann Garner, born Februar}' 4, 

1S30. 
No. 26. Sarah Eliza Garner, born May 2, 1832. 

Mrs. Garner married in 1847 or 1848, secondly, 
Edward Maxey, at Seventy-six, Clinton count}', Ken- 
tucky, who died in Kentucky, March, 1850, leaving 
no children. 

After the death of her second husband, Mrs. 
Maxey lived with her daughters, Lucy Ann Maxey 
and Sarah Eliza January, alternately, at their homes 
in Tompkinsville, Kentucky, and Trenton, Tennessee. 
The said daughters after^vards removed to Texas, and 
Mrs. Maxey died there at Piano, in Collin count}', 
August 3, 1874. 

No. 8. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 3 and I. 

John Walker Semple, Jr., second son, fourth 
child of Major John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy 
Robertson, was born July 28, 1803, near Greensburg, 
in Green county, Kentucky. Like his brother, Robert 
Baylor, he attained the enormous height of six feet 
eight inches. He was an able law}"er at Louisville, 
Kentucky, for many years; died May 11, 1840, at 
Seventy-six, in Clinton county, Kentucky, having 
never been married. 



THIRD GENERATION. 47 

No. 9. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

Robert Baylor Semple, third son, fifth child of 
Major John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy Rob- 
ertson, was born February 3, 1806, at "Mount 
Radiance" farm, near Burkesville, in Cumberland 
county, Kentucky; was indentured by his father to 
learn printing, but did not like it, and concluded to 
study dentistry, which suited his taste no better, and 
he essayed the law; finally found his choice in the 
study of medicine and practiced successfully many 
years in Kentucky. He was also of a roaming dispo- 
sition, and moved about in Kentucky' even more 
frequently than he changed occupations. He was 
among the earliest California pioneers, having removed 
to that State in 1845. 

He was married twice, firstly, to Sallie Parish, in 
Kentucky, from whom he was divorced, and secondly, 
to Frances Ann Cooper (born in Howard county, Mis- 
souri, July 13, 1825), daughter of Major Stephen 
Cooper, of Missouri, to whom he was united on 
November 28, 1847, at Benicia, in California. 

He was editor of the first newspaper published in 
the English language in California; was president of 
the convention that framed the constitution of that 
State, and was the designer of the seal and motto of the 
State of California. He was also the founder of the 
city of Benicia, for a time the capital of the State, and 
named it in honor of the daughter of the Mexican 
General Vallejo, in whose capture he assisted, and who 
afterwards became his fast friend. He died October 
25, 1854, at his home, "Almo Ranch," now called the 



48 THIRD GENERATION. 

Van Winkle Place, seventeen miles west of Colusa, 
California. 

His second wife survived him and in 1S57 married 
Dr. John Pulsifer, by whom she had three children, 
one son and two daughters. She is now living in 
California. 

Ttvo cJiildren : 

By his first wife: Xo. 27. John Walker Semple 
(2nd), born 1831. 

By his second wife: Xo. 28. Mary Benicia Sem- 
ple, born Xovember 22, 1848. 



No. 10. 

DESCEXDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

Isaac Robertson Semple, foiu-th son, seventh 
child of Major John Walker Semple and his wife, 
Lucy Robertson, born June 28, 1808, at "Motmt 
Radiance" farm, near Burksville, in Cumberland 
county, Kentuck}^- married, April 4, 1832, Eliza 
Brandenbtu-g, of Brandenburg, Kentuck3\ The}' lived 
there many years, he being engaged in manufactiu-ing 
lime; afterwards removed to Louisville and thence to 
Ballard county, Kentucky, where he located and 
obtained a large tract of government land. He died 
there, May 8, 1848, and was buried in John Moore's 
private grave yard. Mrs. Semple removed to Clinton, 
Kentucky, and died there, April 20, 1873. She was 
buried by her husband's side. 



THIRD GENERATION. 49 

Eight children : 

No. 29. Lucy Robertson Semple, born Febru- 
ary 22, 1833. 
No. 30. Solomon Brandenburg Semple, born 

1835- 
No. 31. John Walker Semple (3rd), born 

1837- 
No. 32. Elizabeth Swan Semple, born August 

7, 1840. 
No. 33. James Semple (2nd), born 1842. 
No. 34. Ada Mary Semple, born October 25, 

1844. 
No. 35. Isaac Robertson Semple, born 1846. 
No. 36. Henrietta Louisiana Semple, born De- 
cember 13, 1848. 

No. II. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I. 

Charles Donald Semple, fifth son, seventh child 
of Major John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy 
Robertson, was born July 6, 1810, at " Mount 
Radiance" farm, near Burksville, in Cumberland 
coimty, Kentucky; was a lawyer at Louisville, and 
also edited a newspaper there; removed to California 
and settled near Colusa. Late in life he married and 
died at Colusa, February 27, 1872. He had three 
children, two of whom died in infancy, and one sur- 
vives, viz.: 

No. 33. Charles Donald Semple, born Novem- 
ber 13, 1865. 



50 THIRD GENERATION. 

No. 12. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I. 

Lucy Bird Semple, third daughter, eighth child of 
Major John Walker Semple and his wife, Lucy Rob- 
ertson, was born at "Mount Radiance" farm, near 
Burksville, in Cumberland count)', Kentucky, Febru- 
ary 25, 1 815; married, December 23, 1830, Doctor 
Henry Lewis Green (born December 9, 1807), son of 
William Green, of Horse-shoe Bottom, Russell county, 
Kentucky, and his first wife, ne'e Marshall. 

Four children : 

No. 38. William Semple Green, born Decem- 
ber 26, 1832. 

No. 39. Mary Frances Green, born 1834. 

No. 40. Duff Green, born February 22, 1836. 

No. 41 . Donald Robertson Green, bom May 27, 
1839. 

Dr. Green was unsuccessful in business and lost all 
his property. He and his wife separated and were 
afterwards divorced. He went to Missouri, married 
again, and had by his second wife a daughter, now 
Mrs. J. T. Akin, of Humansville, Missouri. He died 
there in 1875. 

Mrs. Lucy Bird Green, his first wife, was also 
married again to a Mr. Howard, a farmer in Clinton 
county, Kentucky. No issue. She died June 7, 1871, 
near Albany, in said county. 




■p^ 



^-f- 



'^^^^^^^^'.< 




Mrs. Adai.ixk Matii.ha Bradford. 



THIRD GENERATION. gl 

No. 13. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 3 AND I . 

Adaline Matilda Semple, fourth daughter, ninth 
and youngest child of Major John Walker Semple and 
his wife, Lucy Robertson, born October 2, 181 7, at 
"Mount Radiance" farm, near Burksville, Cumberland 
County, Kentucky, is the sole surviving grand-child 
of Donald Robertson and his wife, Rachel Rogers. 

Her early childhood was spent in Cumberland and 
Clinton counties, and her schooling was obtained under 
the direction of an excellent "Yankee" schoolmaster 
in the mountain village of Monticello, Kentucky. At 
the age of nineteen her first journey was made, in 
company with her brother, Isaac Robertson Semple, 
to his home in Brandenburg, Kentucky, on the Ohio 
River, some forty miles below L,ouisville. The distance 
was about a hundred miles, much of it being in very 
rough country and unfit for a vehicle. She rode horse- 
back and her brother went afoot, getting an occasional 
"lift" on the horse with her. From there she went to 
Illinois, to visit her eldest brother. General James 
Semple, who at that time was Attorney- General of 
the State. The winter was spent at Vandalia, then 
the State capital, amid much gaiety and festivity. 
Among others, she met there a young and handsome 
civil engineer from Philadelphia, named John S. Brad- 
ford (born June 15, 1815), a lineal descendant of the 
celebrated Governor Bradford, who came over in the 
Mayflower. He was engaged in the construction of 
the "National Road," the great post route between 
the east and the west. Their acquaintanceship ripened 



52 



THIRD GENERATION, 



into an ardent attachment, and before the winter was 
over they were betrothed. She returned to her broth- 
er's home in Brandenburg, and there the marriage was 
celebrated July 15, 1841. Mr. Bradford served as an 
officer in the U. S. army during the Mexican war. 
They removed to California in 1849, and he was for 
several years a member of the California legislature. 
They then returned to Illinois and established their 
home in Springfield, where Mr. Bradford embarked in 
the book and publishing business and became public 
printer of the State. He acquired a very handsome 
fortune and died there, January 28th, 1892. 



Seven children : 

No. 42. William Bradford, born July 13, 1843. 

No. 43. Oscar Bradford, born September 28, 
1845. 

No. 44. Susan Amanda Bradford, born June 
12, 1848. 

No. 45. Eugene Bradford, born November 22, 
1852. 

No. 46. John Bradford, born May 3, 1855. 

No. 47. Antrim Campbell Bradford, born Janu- 
ary 16, 1857. 

No. 48. Donald Bradford, born September 14, 
1861. 



Mrs. Bradford is now (1900) living at Springfield, 
in the enjoyment of excellent health. Like all her 
family, of tall stature and imposing presence, she still, 
at the age of eighty-three, carries herself as erectly and 
firmly as most women a score of years 3'ounger. A 
constant reader and observer of ciu-rent events, she 



THIRD GENERATION. 53 

takes the liveliest interest in political affairs and all the 
burning questions of the day. An extensive acquaint- 
ance with many of the noted people of our country, 
coupled with an unfailing memory, renders her con- 
versation at all times entertaining and witty. The 
author is indebted to her "reminiscensing," on the 
occasion of a short visit he made her in 1897, for very 
many of the facts related herein concerning the earlier 
members of our family. 



No. 14. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4 AND I . 

Lucy Donald Robertson, eldest child and daugh- 
ter of Isaac Robertson and his wife, Matilda Taylor, 
was born March 17, 1801, in Greensburg, Green 
county, Kentucky ; married February 5, 1822, John 
Jeremiah Jacob (always called "John I."), of Ivouis- 
ville, Kentucky, who at the date of their marriage was 
a widower with three children, two daughters and one 
son. (A list of the descendants of John I. Jacob, by 
his first wife, will be found in the note below.) 

John I. Jacob, of Louisville, Kentucky, was born 
October 20, 1778, in the city of Baltimore, Maryland. 
He was the youngest of three children of William and 
Maria Monk Jacob, and was descended from John Jacob 
(his great-great-grandfather), who emigrated from 
England and settled in Anne Arundel county, Mary- 
land, in 1665. The emigrant, John, acquired large 
tracts of land and became a tobacco planter. His will, 
and that of his son John, are now on file at Annapolis. 
They were Church of England people, and most of 



54 THIRD GENERATION. 

their descendants are to-day adherents of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church. John I. Jacob was neither a 
member nor a regular attendant of any church, but was 
charitable and liberal to all denominations. His wives 
were both Presbyterians. He moved to lyouisville 
about the year 1800 and invested largely in real estate 
in and about that city, which rapidly increased in 
value, and in a few years made him a very rich man. 
He was Louisville's first millionaire, and one of its 
most public spirited and highly respected citizens. His 
own and his wives' benefactions to both public and 
private charities were large and constant, but always 
without parade or ostentation. For many years Mr. 
Jacob was president of the Branch Bank of the United 
States at Louisville . He was also one of the founders 
and the president of the Bank of Kentucky, which is 
still the most important financial institution in the 
State. His home embraced the whole square, now 
bounded between Walnut and Chestnut streets and 
Third and Fourth streets, Louisville. 

Mrs. Jacob bore her husband eight children, and 
died at Louisville June 25, 1842. Mr. Jacob survived 
her ten 3'ears and died April ist, 1852. Their graves 
are in Cave Hill Cemetery at that city. 

Eight children : 

No. 49. Susan Maria Jacob, born January 17, 

1823. 
No. 50. Richard Taylor Jacob, born March 13, 

1825. 
No. 51. Thomas Prather Jacob, born March 

22, 1827. 



THIRD GENERATION. 55 

No. 52. William Rinaldo Jacob, born Decem- 
ber 27, 1829. 
No. 53. Isaac Robertson Jacob, born April 28, 

1833. 
No. 54. Eliza Catharine Jacob, born August 

19. 1835. 
No. 55. Charles Donald Jacob, born June i, 

1838. 
No. 56. Lucy Anderson Jacob, born October 6, 

1840. 

Note. — The first wife of John I. Jacob, of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, was Anne Overton Fontaine. They were married June 
II, 181 1. She was the daughter of Captain Aaron Fontaine, one 
of the pioneers of Louisville, a descendant of a prominent 
Huguenot family. She died August 13, 1819, leaving three 
children, two daughters and a son, viz.: 

Matilda Prather Jacob, born February 27, 1815. 

Mary Jacob, born April 24, 1817. 

John I. Jacob, Jr., born January 10, 1819. 

Matilda Prather Jacob married Colonel Curran Pope, of 
Louisville, who was killed at the battle of Perryville in Ken- 
tucky, in 1862, fighting for the Union. Mrs. Pope died in 
Louisville January 24, 1880. Their only child, Mary Tyler Pope, 
was born June 4th, 1845, and married her coiisin. Judge Alfred 
Thruston Pope, September 26, 1865. He died October 26, 1891, 
leaving surviving him his widow, also three children, viz.: 

Dr. Curran Pope, born November 12, 1866. 
Pendleton Pope, bom June 22, 1872. 
Alfred Thruston Pope, born August 3, 1876. 
All unmarried and living at Louisville, Kentucky. 

Mary Jacob married, May 11, 1835, John W. Tyler, of 
Louisville. He died June 7, 1854. She survived her husband 



56 THIRD GENERATION. 

No. 15. 

DESCENDED FKOM NOS. 4 AND I. 

Richard Taylor Robertson, only son, second 
child of Isaac Robertson and his wife. Matilda Tay- 
lor, was born August 10, 1803, i^^ Glasgow, Barren 
count3% Kentucky. His early years were spent in 
Middletown, Kentucky, and at the farm of his grand- 
father. Commodore Richard Taylor, in Oldham county. 
When eighteen years of age he became a clerk in a 
mercantile house at lyouisville, and afterwards was 
admitted as a member of the firm; married August 12, 

many years, and died at Louis\-ille December 27, 1891. They 
had seven children, viz. : 

Anne Overton Tyler, born December 18, 1837; died 

April 16, 1840. 
John Jacob Tyler, bom October i, 1840; died November 

15, 1872. 
Robert Tyler, bom March 5, 1843. 
Mary Jacob Tyler, bom Februarv- 21, 1846; died January 

2, 18S1. 
Ebward Tyler, bora Januan.- 2, 1849; died September 24, 

1S92. 
Matilda Tyler, bom April 7, 1851. 
Levi Tyler, born August 12, 1853. 

Robert Tyler married, November i, 1865, Mary Crutchfield. 
They have two children, \-iz. : Edward C. Tyler and Kate Jacob 
Tyler, both of whom have in turn married. Edward C. Tyler 
married Etta Johnson, and they have a son, Edward C. Tyler, 
Jr. Kate Jacob Tyler married Niell Brooks, and they have 
three children, viz. : Mary Tyler Brooks, Virginia Field Brooks, 
and Niell Brooks, Jr. 

Mar\- Jacob Tyler married. May 20, 1868, George P. Nash, 
and died Januarv' 2, 1881, leaving five children sur\-iving, viz.: 
Mary Jacob Nash, TjlerNash, Thomas Lawrence Nash, Maurice 



THIRD GENERATION. 57 

1826, Susan Iv. Bond Bate (born August 27, 1807), 
daughter of James Smalley Bate and his wife, Lucy 
Throckmorton, and a lineal descendant of Governor 
Spotswood, of the Colonj^ of Virginia. 

They lived in Louisville until 1832, then went to 
Brandenburg, where he embarked extensively in the 
mercantile and milling business; sold out in 1836, but 
lost more than forty thousand dollars by one of the 
parties to whom he sold, and was thus financially 
ruined. They then removed to an extensive farm in 
Breckenridge and Meade counties, inherited by Mrs. 
Robertson from her father. This farm, called "Elk 

B. Nash, and George P. Nash, Jr. Of these three are married 
and two unmarried, as follows: 

Mary Jacob Nash married Thomas P. Averill, and has one 
child, Rebecca Averill. 

Tyler Nash married Mary Gay, and has three children, viz.: 
Lewis Nash, John Tyler Nash, and Boyle Nash. 

Maurice B. Nash married Sue Gardner, and has three child- 
ren, viz.: Maurice B. Nash, Jr., Thomas Lawrence Nash (2nd), 
and Margaret Nash. 

Thomas Lawrence Nash (ist), and George P. Nash, Jr., are 
unmarried. 

Edward Tyler married, January 4, 1871, Fannie Beazley, 
and died September 24, 1892, leaving two children, viz.: Mary 
Jacob Tyler and Robert Tyler, both of whom are unmarried. 

Matilda Tyler married. May 11, 1870, Judge A. E. Richards, 
of Louisville, Kentucky. They have two children, viz.: John 
Tyler Richards (unmarried), and Jessie Richards, who married 
Albert Glover Ronald, of Louisville, and has three children, viz. : 
George Webb Ronald, Mary Tyler Ronald, and Edward Rich- 
ards Ronald. 

Levi Tyler married, in 1879, Mary E. Williams, and has 
three children, viz. : Mary Jacob Tyler, LiHie Stucky Tyler, and 
Mattie Richards Tvler. 



58 THIRD GENERATION. 

Grove," consisted of more than four thousand acres, 
and is situated immediately adjoining the present town 
of Ir^'ington, Kentucky. In 1842 he bought the farm 
called "Hap-hazard," two miles east of Owensboro, in 
Daviess county, but sold it after two years and removed 
to another farm, known as "Bell Forest," six miles east 
of Owensboro. Eventually they returned to the home- 
stead, "Elk Grove," and there he died April 23, 1849. 

John I. Jacob, Jr., born in Louisville, Kentucky, January 
10, 1819, married Evelyn Johnson, of Fayette county, Ken- 
tucky, March 11, 1845, ^iif^ c^ied at Louisville January 21, 1873. 
His widow still survives. They had four children, viz. : 

Anne Overton Jacob, born September 5, 1846. 
Lena Jacob, born September 17, 1852. 
Matilda Pope Jacob, born July 22, 1S54. 
Edwina Jacob, born December 5, 1862. 

Anne Overton Jacob married, January 30, 1866, Lemuel S. 
Hardin, and has two children, viz.: John Jacob Hardin (unmar- 
ried), and Evelyn Jacob Hardin, who married Frederic S. Sher- 
man, of Chicago, and has three children, viz.: Annie Hardin 
Sherman, Elizabeth Sherman, and Samuel Sterling Sherman. 

Lena Jacob married, July 5. 1873, C. JeiTerson Clark, of St. 
Louis, Missouri, who died in Februarj-, 1896. She has three chil- 
dren, viz. : Susie Clark, Evelyn Clark, and Marguerite Clark. 
Evelyn and Marguerite are unmarried. Susie Clark married 
Clarence S. Houghton, of New York, and has two children, 
Evelyn Clare Houghton, and Edwina Houghton. 

Matilda Pope Jacob married, February 17, 1874, Edgar Hill, 
who died November 25, 1899. She has three children, viz.: 
Evelyn Jacob Hill, Mary Tyler Hill, and Edgar Hill, Jr. The 
second and third are unmarried. Evelyn Jacob Hill married, 
January 22, 1896, \Vm. S. Dalliba, of Paris, France. 

Edwina Jacob married, June 10, 1885, Wm. S. Dalliba, and 
died March 3, 1890, leaving one child, Wm. Swift Dalliba, Jr., 
who was born February 24, 1890. 

Mr. Dalliba's second wife, Evelyn Jacob Hill, is niece of 
his deceased first wife, Edwina Jacob. 



THIRD GENERATION. 59 

His widow survived him until September lo, 1882, 
and died at the home of her daughter Frances (Mrs. 
James Webster), in Maury county, Tennessee. 
Their remains repose, side by side, in the old family 
burying ground at "Elk Grove." 

Thirteen children : 

No. 57. Lucy Jacob Robertson, born August 
13, 1827. 

No. 58. Matilda Taylor Robertson, born April 
12, 1829. 

No. 59. Isaac Robertson, born January 15, 
1831. 

No. 60. Richard Taylor Robertson, born De- 
cember 17, 1832. 

No. 61. Susan Eliza Robertson, born Decem- 
ber 5, 1834. 

No. 62. James Bate Robertson, born January • 
24, 1837. 

No. 63. Benjamin Lawrence Robertson, born 
December 9, 1838. 

No. 64. Mary Ellen Robertson, born November 

26, 1840. 
*No. 65. Mary Ann Robertson, born July 31, 

1842. 
*No. 66. Maria Boothly Robertson, born July 
31, 1842. 

No. 67. Frances Robertson, born June 2, 1843. 

No. 68. Catharine Robertson, born November 
12, 1845. 

No. 69. Charles Donald Robertson, born April 
16, 1848. 

*Twins. 



6o THIRD GENERATION. 

No. i6. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 4 AND I . 

Eliza Matilda Robertson, second daughter, third 
child of Isaac Robertson and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor, born in Middletown, Jefferson county, Ken- 
tucky, May 12, 1806; married at Louisville, June 17, 
1829, Thomas King Byrne (born August 10, 1801, in 
Wicklow county, Ireland; emigrated to America 1814). 
Mr. Byrne was a member of the Catholic church, and 
immediately after their marriage Mrs. Byrne also 
united with it, and ever afterward remained a devout 
believer in and adherent to that faith. Thej' remained 
at Louisville several years, then removed to Branden- 
burg, whence, in 1838, the}^ went to New Orleans, 
Louisiana; returned to Meade county, Kentucky, in 
1845, si^d remained until 1S48, and then again removed 
south and settled at Lamar, Texas, on the Gulf of 
of Mexico. In 1850 the}' bought a farm, called "Point 
Pleasant," on San Antonio Bay, and there Mrs. Byrne 
died, June 26, 1851. Mr. Byrne survived only a few 
months longer, and died Februar}- 18, 1852. After 
their deaths, the children went to school in New- 
Orleans, where they were under the care of their 
guardian and uncle, Charles Byrne, but returned to 
Lamar in 1856. 

Ei}^h t ch ildren : 

No. 70. Eliza King Byrne, born June 17, 1830. 

No. 71. Richard Taylor Byrne, born October 
10, 1833. 

No. 72. Matilda Robertson Byrne, born De- 
cember 28, 1835. 




Mrs. Mary Ann Robertson Anderson. 



THIRD GENERATION. 6 1 

No. 73. Lucy Jacob Byrne, born August i, 

1837- 

No. 74. Thomas King Byrne, born July 19, 
1840. 

No. 75. James Edward Byrne, born October 9, 
1843; died May 27, 1853. 

No. 76. Catharine Spalding Byrne, born June 
13. 1845. 

No. 77. Charles Robertson Byrne, born Feb- 
ruary 3, 1850. 

No. 17. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4 AND I. 

Catharine Ann Clark Robertson, third daugh- 
ter, fourth child of Isaac Robertson and his wife, 
Matilda Taylor, born September 4, 1808, at Middle- 
town, Jefferson county, Kentucky; married at Louis- 
ville, in August, 1835, Isaac Stewart of that city, and 
died there June 19, 1845. Mr. Stewart died there in 
1856, leaving a handsome estate to their only child. 

No. 78. Susan Maria Stewart, born August 

31, 1838. 

No. 18. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4 AND I . 

Mary Ann Martin Robertson, fourth daughter, 
fifth and youngest child of Isaac Robertson and his 
wife, Matilda Taylor, born January 2, 1811, at Frank- 
fort, Kentucky; married, December 30, 1828, at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. John I, Jacob, of Louisville, 



62 THIRD GENERATION. 

to James B. Anderson (born June ist; 1808, at Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky"), a son of John Anderson, of Lexington 
(who emigrated to America from T>Tone county, 
North of Ireland, shortly after the war of the Revolu- 
tion), and Sarah Quicksall, his wife, whose parents 
were Quakers, and who lived at Burlington, New 
Jersey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson lived at Louisville, where 
he was first an employe, and later, for several N-ears a 
member of the firm of Thomas Anderson & Co., in 
which business he acquired quite a good competency. 
His health having become impaired by reason of over- 
work, they decided to remove to the country. After 
spending a year or two in Brandenburg, they returned 
to Louisville, and there he established the mercantile 
house of Anderson & Evans. Continued ill health 
compelled him to give up a sedentarj- life, and in 1837 
he bought a thousand acres of land in the "Beech 
Woods," six miles east of Owensboro, in Daviess 
county, Kentucky, where they lived until Januarj-, 
1 85 1. He was then chosen cashier of the Southern 
Bank of Kentucky, at Owensboro, an institution which 
he managed successfully until it went into voluntar}^ 
liquidation on account of the civil war. He afterwards 
organized the Planters" Bank of Kentucky, at Owens- 
boro, and was cashier and principal stockholder thereof 
until his death, which occurred October 17, 1864. 
He was a man of unblemished character, having a 
high sense of honor and a heart ever read}- to respond 
to the call of charity; a devoted husband, kind father, 
consistent christian, and true friend, he commanded 
and received the esteem, confidence and respect of all 
who knew him. During the civil war he was an 



THIRD GENERATION. 63 

unswerving friend of the cause of the Union. He and 
his wife were among the original founders of the 
Presbyterian Church at Owensboro, and he was a 
ruHng elder in it until his death. She was a woman 
of rare sweetness of temper and of beautiful character. 
Devoted to her family, her friends, and her church, 
and abounding in deeds of kindness, she exemplified 
in her daily life the real essence of Christianity. 

Five children: 

No. 79. Matilda Robertson Anderson, born 

November ii, 1838. 

No. 80. Thomas Sidney Anderson, born July 
8, 1S42. 

No. 81. Sallie Quicksall Anderson, born No- 
vember 13, 1844. 

No. 82. William Kyle Anderson, born March 
24, 1847. 

No. 83. James Anderson, born April 22, 1851. 



[end of third generation.] 



Fourth Generation. 



GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN OF DONALD ROBERTSON 
AND HIS WIFE, RACHEL ROGERS. 



The Fourth Generation Consists of Sixty-Five Persons. 

No. 19. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5, 3, AND I. 

Ada Semple, eldest daughter and child of General 
James Semple and his wife, Mary Stevenson, was 
born in Edwardsville, 111., April 30, 1834; married at 
"Treviie," the home of her parents, in Jersey county, 
Illinois, December 25, 1854, Napoleon Mulliken, a 
steamboat owner, of St. lyouis, Missouri, and by him 
had one son; died April 15, 1858, at St. I^ouis, and 
was buried in the family burying ground at Elsah, 
Illinois; remains afterwards removed to Belief ontaine 
Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri. 



One child: 
No. 84. 



Lansing Semple Mulliken, born Octo- 
ber 8, 1855. 



66 FOURTH GENERATIOX. 

No. 20. 

DESCKNDED FROM XOS. 5, 3, .VXD I. 

Lucy Virginia Semple, second daughter and child 
of General James Semple and his wife, Mary 
Stevenson, was born in Edwardsville, Illinois, April 
17, 1836. Her childhood and youth were passed at 
Elsah; married at "Trevue," Jersey county, Illinois, 
June 5, i860, Edgar Ames, of St. Louis, who was 
born October 26, 1824, in Oneida county, New York. 
His father was Nathan Ames, and his family was of 
English descent. In St. Louis Mr. Ames was a lead- 
ing citizen and conspicuously identified with numerous 
large enterprises of great importance to it. Possessed 
of ripe wisdom, sound judgment, strict integrity, and a 
genial, kind temper, he was at all times an honored 
example, a safe guide, and a trusted friend. He was 
also a large-hearted, generous man, ever ready to give 
freely to those in need. Intellectuall}" and morally he 
was strong, and in culture broad and liberal. He died 
at St. Louis, December 9, 1867, suddenly, and in the 
ver}- prime of his life. IMrs. Ames was left in charge 
of her four small children and biurdened wdth the man- 
agement of a vast estate, in both of which capacities 
she has acquitted herself with great credit. In pur- 
suance of the plans of her husband, and in fulfillment 
of the wishes of her father, she has built an imposing 
mansion on the bluffs of the ]Mississippi River, over- 
looking the village of Elsah. Here she resides in 
summer, and, as the representative of the Semple 
family, dispenses hospitality at "Notch Cliff," while 
contributing largel}' to the material prosperity of the 



THE 

NEW YORK 

PUBLIC library'! 

1^ Aster, Lfinox and Tild«n , 

Four.dations. 

)9U2 




Hon. Eugene Semple. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 67 

village. In St. Louis her home is at No. 3824 Lindell 
Boulevard. 

Four children: 

No. 85. Ada Semple Ames, born March 3, 1861 . 
No. 86. Henry Semple Ames, born March 4, 

1S63. 
No. 87. Mary Semple Ames, born August 9, 

1S64. 
No. 88. Edgar Ames, born February 26, 1868. 

No. 21. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 5, 3, AND I. 

Honorable Eugene Semple, only son, third child 
of General James Semple and his wife, Mary 
Stevenson, was born June 12, 1840, in Bogota, New- 
Granada, South America, while his father was United 
States Minister there. 

The following sketch of his life is gleaned from 
Julian Hawthorne's "History of Washington Terri- 
tory : ' ' 

He was five years old and spoke only the Spanish 
language when his parents returned from South 
America to the United States; attended school during 
the winter months until sixteen 3'ears old in Madison 
and Jersey counties, Illinois, and w-orked on his fath- 
er's farm in summer; afterwards was a student in 
St. Louis University and studied law at Cincinnati 
College, from which institution he received his degree; 
went immediately thereafter to Oregon, going by sea 
from New York via Panama and San Francisco, and 
arrived at Portland in the fall of 1863. There he 



68 FOURTH GKNKRATION. 

practiced law continuously unil iS6iS, witli the excep- 
tion of two summers spent in the mines of Idaho and 
Washington Territories; then engaged in journalistic 
work, first as reporter, later as editor of the daily 
"Oregon Herald," the leading Democratic paper of 
the State. He strenuouslj- opposed Chinese immigra- 
tion and was an earnest advocate of the construc- 
tion of railroads, but under such restrictions as to 
prevent them from becoming monopolies. Under his 
editorship, the Herald became a power in the State, 
and, after the Democratic victory in 1870, his efficient 
services during the campaign were recognized ]:>}• his 
receiving the appointment of State printer. In 1874 
he leased a farm in Lane count}-, Oregon, and after- 
wards purchased one in Columbia count}-, and followed 
the occupation of his youth until 1883. He then 
engaged in the manufacture of cedar shingles and was 
the pioneer of that great industr)- in the northw-estern 
Pacific States. He was police commissioner of the 
city of Portland, and received the nomination as Demo- 
cratic candidate for the mayoralty; was also clerk 
of the Circuit Court in Columbia county, and w-as 
appointed Brigadier- General of the National Guard by 
Governor Grover, but declined the honor. In 1884 he 
removed to Vancouver, Washington Territor3% and 
built the "Lucia Mills" there. While a member of 
the Vancouver Board of Trade, he was the prime 
mover of the Columbia Waterway Association, designed 
to secure the opening of the Columbia River to free 
navigation, a project which he began to advocate in 
1869, and has continued ever since. He was appointed 
b}- Governor Ferry a member of the State Board of 
Harbor Commissioners, and while acting in that 



FOURTH GENERATION. 69 

capacity had charge of the harbors of Seattle, Blaine, 
Vancouver, Sidney and Shelton. In 1 88g he formulated 
a plan for improving the harbor of Seattle, by connect- 
ing lyake Washington with the salt water by means of 
a canal, and this great work, involving an expenditure 
of about five millions of dollars, is now being pushed 
to completion under his direction, and will rank among 
the great engineering works of the century. President 
Cleveland appointed him the last Territorial Governor 
of Washington, and he was the Democratic candidate 
for the governorship at the first State election, running 
many hundred votes ahead of his ticket. He resides 
now at Seattle. 

Mr. Semple married. May 17, 1870, at Portland, 
Oregon, Ruth A. Lownsdale, daughter of Hon. Daniel 
H. IvOwnsdale, one of the early pioneers of Oregon, 
and one of the founders of the city of Portland. By 
her he had four children. In 1882 he and his wife 
peparated and were divorced on June 29, 1882. The 
children, four in number, remained with Mr. Semple, 
and their names and births are as follows: 

Four children: 

No. 89. Adda Maude Semple, born January 14, 

1S72. 
No. 90. Zoe Agnes Semple, born April i, 1873. 
No. 91. Mary Ethel Semple, born December 

30. 1S75. 
No. 92. Eugene Lownsdale Semple, born 

October 31, 1877. 



70 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 22. 
DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5, 3, AND I. 

Julia Ellen Semple, fourth and youngest child of 
General James Semple and his wife, Mary Steven- 
son, was born at Alton, Illinois, July 27, 1849; mar- 
ried in Christ Church Cathedral, St. Louis, Missouri, 
November 27, 1872, Ashley D. Scott, a wholesale 
merchant of said city. He was born in Windham, 
Ohio, July 19, 1840, and died at St. Louis December 
15, 1893, leaving his widow and children well provided 
for. Mrs. Scott now lives in St. Louis. 



Mary Semple Scott, born December 

31. 1873. 
Semple Stillman Scott, born August 

28, 1875. 
Ashley David Scott, born March 21, 

1S7S. 
No. 96. Edgar Ames Scott, born October 21, 

1880. 
Xo. 97. Isabel Semple Scott, born June 13, 

1885. 

No. 23. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7, 3, AND I. 

Walker Semple Garner, only son and eldest 
child of Curtis M. Garner and his wife, Frances 
Semple, born Maj- 29, 1825, at Seventy-Six, Clinton 
county, Kentucky; died January- 23, 1845, at Bran- 
denburg, Kentucky-, unmarried. 



Fi\ 


ve children 




No. 


93- 




Xo. 


94- 




Xo. 


95- 



FOURTH GENERATION. 7 1 

No. 24. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7, 3, AND I. 

Ellen Jane Garner, eldest daughter, second child 
of Curtis M. Garner and his wife, Frances Semple, 
born April 14, 1827, at Seventy-Six, in Clinton county, 
Kentucky; married at Alton, Ills., October 8, 1846, 
Henry P. Hulbert (born October 11, 1813), of that 
city; they moved to California, he in 1852, and she 
two years later. She died at San Francisco April 10, 
1855- 

Three children: 

No. 98. Ellen Garner Hulbert, born September 

17. 1847- 

No. 99. Marcia Semple Hulbert, born Sep- 
tember 29, 1849. 

No. 100. Ada Mizner Hulbert, born February 
10, 1855. 

Mr. Hulbert married again at San Francisco on 
February 6, 1S60 Mary Henrietta Goodfellow, of 
Clearfield, Pennsylvania, who died June 13, 1878, 
having survived her husband fourteen years. He was 
captain of the steamboat "Sophie McLean," plying 
between San Francisco and Suisun, California, and 
lost his life, October 27, 1864, by the explosion of the 
boiler. 

No. 25. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7, 3, AND I. 

Lucy Ann Garner, second daughter, third child 
of Curtis M. Garner and his wife, Frances Semple, 



72 FOURTH GENERATION. 

born February 4, 1830, at Seventy-Six, in Clinton 
county, Kentucky; married April 25, 1850, at Tomp- 
kinsville, Kentucky, Doctor Albert H. Maxey (born 
there August 16, 1817), a nephew of Edward Maxey, 
who was second husband of Frances Semple (No. 7). 
Dr. Maxey was a graduate of Louisville Medical Col- 
lege, and practiced his profession more than forty 
years. They lived at Tompkinsville until September, 
1873, then moved to Piano, Collin county, Texas, and 
thence to Sherman, in Grayson county, where he died 
December 11, 18S9. Mrs. Maxey is now (1897) resid- 
ing: there. 



Ten children 


No. 


lOI. 


No. 


102. 


Xo. 


103. 


No. 


104. 


Xo. 


105. 


Xo. 


106. 


Xo. 


107. 


Xo. 


loS. 


Xo. 


109. 


Xo. 


no. 



Mary Jane Maxey, born March 9, 

185 1. 
James Semple Maxey, born February 

15. 1853- 
Radford Maxey, born May 2, 1855. 
Rice Maxey, born May i, 1857. 
Alfred G. Maxey, bom June 8, i860. 
Frances Ellen Maxey, born January 

10, 1S62. 
Lucetta A. Maxey, born June i, 1864. 
John Benton Maxey, born July 28, 

1867. 
Samuel Bell Maxey, born September 

2, 1869. 
Leslie Maxey, born February i, 1874. 

All were born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky-, except 
Leslie, and he at Piano, Texas. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 73 

No. 26. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7, 3, AND I. 

Sarah Eliza Garner, third daughter, fourth child 
of Curtis M. Garner and his wife, Frances Semple, 
born May 2, 1832, at Seventy-Six, in Clinton county, 
Kentucky; married October 4, 1854, at Tompkinsville, 
Kentucky, Dr. J. Orville January of Trenton, Ten- 
nessee. They lived a few years at Tompkinsville, 
where Dr. January and his brother-in-law, Dr. Albert 
H. Maxey, were partners in the practice of medicine; 
moved to Trenton, Tennessee, and lived there until 
February 2, 1877, then again removed to Cleburne, 
Johnson county, Texas. Dr. January was an officer 
in the C. S. A., was taken prisoner and confined in 
the military prison on Johnson's Island, I,ake Erie, 
but through the influence of the late John S. Bradford, 
Esq., of Springfield, 111., with President Lincoln, a 
reprieve was obtained and he was released. He is now 
living near the town of Bono, in Johnson county, 
Texas. Mrs. January died at Cleburne, April i , 1882. 

Eight children: 

No. III. Frances Harriet January, born De- 
cember 24, 1856. 

No. 112. Lucy Ellen January, born October 16, 
1858. 

No. 113. Bradford January, born October 5, 
i860. 

No. 114. John Houston January, born March 
4, 1866. 

No. 115. James Russell January, born March 
16, 186S. 



74 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. ii6. Susan Ada January, born April 20, 

1S70. 
No. 117. Charles January, born February, 

1873- 
No. 118. Robert Andrew January, born March 
3- 1875. 

Frances Harriet was born at Tompkinsville; all the 
rest at Trenton, Tennessee. 

No. 27. 

DESCEXDED FROM XOS. 9, 3, AND I. 

John Walker Semple (2nd), onlj- son of Robert 
Baylor Semple, and Sallie Parish, his first wife, born 
1 830 or 1 83 1, near Burksville, Kentnck}-; went to Cali- 
fornia 1849, with his cousin. Will S. Green, and died, 
Februar)', 1850, at Benicia, California. 

No. 28. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 9, 3, AND I. 

Mary Benicia Semple, only daughter of Robert 
Baylor Semple and Frances Ann Cooper, his second 
wife, was born at Benicia, California, November 22. 
1848. On her mother's side she is descended from 
John Hancock, of Boston, the famous Revolutionarj- 
patriot and signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
She is also reputed to be the first girl of American 
(English speaking) parentage born in California. 
Married August 16, 1870, at Colusa, California, Hosea 
B. Tiuman (born January 24, 1846, in Ohio), a stock 
trader of that place. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 75 

Four children: 

No. 119. Oscar Bartlett Turman, born Septem- 
ber 6, 1 87 1. 

No. 120. Joseph Benton Turman, born Sep- 
tember 24, 1873. 

No. 121. Louis Francis Turman, born July 29, 
1876. 

No. 122, Robert Semple Turman, born August 
22, 1878. 

No. 29. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. ID, 3, AND I. 

Lucy Robertson Semple, eldest daughter and 
child of Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, 
Eliza Brandenburg; born, February 22, 1833, at Bran- 
denburg, Kentucky; married John Moore, of Bland- 
ville, Ballard county, Kentucky, and died there 
November 29, 1879. 

Five children: 

No. 123. Samuel J. Moore, born September 26, 

1857. 
No. 124. Carrie Elliott Moore, born December 

4, i860. 
No. 125. Robertson Semple Moore, born April 

3, 1863. 
No. 126. Minnie Swan Moore, born August 27, 

1S67. 
No. 127. Charles Wickliffe Moore, born June 

6, 1871. 



76 FOURTH GENERATION, 

No. 30. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. lO, 3, AXD I. 

Solomon Brandenburg Semple, second child of 
Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, Eliza Bran- 
den])urg; born 1S35; died in infancy. 

No. 31- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. ID, 3, AND I. 

John Walker Semple (,3rd ), third child of Isaac 
Robertson Semple and his wife, Eliza Brandenburg; 
born 1837: died in infancy. 

No. 32. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. lO, 3, AND I. 

Elizabeth Swan Semple, second daughter, fourth 
child of Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, EHza 
Brandenburg; born August 7, 1S40 in Meade county, 
Kentucky; married August 4, 1864 at Canton, Missis- 
sippi, William Lindsay, a lawyer of Clinton, Kentucky. 
He afterwards became judge of the Kentucky Court of 
Appeals, and was for many \'ears U. S. Senator from 
Kentucky. She died June 14, 1867 at Clinton, Ken- 
tuck}', and was buried there. 

Tii'o children: 

No. 128. Ada Lindsay, born October i6, 1865; 

died September 26, 1S66. 
No. 129. Swan Lindsay, born January 31, 1S67; 

died October 8, 1867. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 77 

No. 33. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. lO, 3, AND I. 

James Semple (2nd), third son, fifth child of 
Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, Eliza Bran- 
denburg; born 1S42, in Meade county, Kentucky; 
died, about nineteen years of age, at Springfield, 
Illinois. His death was caused b}- breaking a blood 
vessel while exercising in a gymnasium. 

No. 34- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. ID, 3, AND I. 

Ada Mary Semple, third daughter, sixth child of 
Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, Eliza Bran- 
denburg; l)orn October 25, 1844, in Meade county, 
Kentucky; married November 7, 1871 at Clinton, 
Kentucky Nathaniel P. Moss, a lawyer of that place, 
now judge of the Circuit Court of the first judicial 
district of Kentuck}-, and residing at Clinton. She 
died there December 10, 1S93. 

Tliree children: 

No. 130. Mary Semple Moss, born May I, 1873. 
No. 131. Nell Semple Moss, born August 20, 

1874. 
No. 132. Harry Semple Moss, born August 9, 

1881. 

All at Clinton, Kentucky. 



78 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 35- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. lO, 3, AND I. 

Isaac Robertson Semple (Jr.), fourth son, 
seventh child of Isaac Robertson Semple and his 
wife, EHza Brandenburg, was born 1S46, and died at 
the age of nine years. 

No. 36. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. lO, 3, AND I. 

Hettie Louisiana Semple, fourth daughter, eighth 
child of Isaac Robertson Semple and his wife, EHza 
Brandenburg; born December 13, 1848, in Meade 
county, Kentuck}-; married October 9, 1868, at Clin- 
ton, Kentucky-, Hon. William Lindsay', widower of 
her deceased sister, Elizabeth Swan Semple. 

Th ree ch ildre n : 

Xo. 133. Paul Lindsay, born August i6, 1869, 

at Clinton. 
Xo. 134. Marion Sem.ple Lindsay, born August 

9, 1 87 1, at Clinton. 
Xo. 135. Henry Semple Lindsay, born April 8, 

1882, at Frankfort. 

Paul died at Frankfort, Kentucky, April 22, 1878. 
Henry Semple died at same place, December 8, 1882, 
and Mrs. Lindsay also died there, April 18, 1882. 
All are buried in the Frankfort Cemetery. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 79 

Sketch of the IvIFE of Honorable 
William IvIndsay. 

William Lindsay- was born in Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, September 4, 1835; settled in Clinton, Hick- 
man comity, Kentucky, November, 1854, and com- 
menced practice of law 1858; served in Confederate 
States army continuously from July, 1S61, to May, 
1865; was paroled as prisoner of war at Columbus, 
Mississippi, May 16, 1865; resumed practice of law in 
Hickman county, Kentucky, in autumn of 1865; was 
elected State senator for the Hickman District August, 
1867; was elected Judge of the Kentucky Court of 
Appeals in 1870, and served until September, 1878; 
from September, 1876, until September, 1878, was 
Chief Justice of the Kentucky Court of Appeals; has 
practiced law in Frankfort, Kentucky, since Septem- 
ber, 1878; was elected State Senator for the Frankfort 
District, in August, 1889; was appointed and served as 
a member of the World's Columbian Commission for 
the country at large, from the organization of the Com- 
mission until Februar}' 20, 1893; was appointed a 
member cf the Interstate Commerce Commission in 
January, 1892, but declined to accept the appointment; 
was elected United States Senator from Kentucky, 
February 14, 1893, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of John G. Carlisle, and was re-elected in 
January, 1894, for the full term commencing March 4, 
1895. His term of service as senator expires March 3, 
1901. 



8o FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 37- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 11,3, -'^N'D I. 

Charles Donald Sample (Jr.), son of Charles 
Donald Semple and his wife, was born November 
13, 1865, at Colusa, California. He is unmarried and 
is living at San Francisco. 

No. 38. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 12, 3, AND I. 

William Semple Green, eldest son of Henry 
Lewis Green and his wife, Lucy Bird Semple, was 
born at Horseshoe Bottom, Russell county, Kentucky, 
December 26, 1832; lived in Kentuck}- until seventeen 
5'ears of age and then went to California, arriving at 
San Francisco October lo, 1849; in July, 1850, went 
to Colusa, California, and married there, January' 22, 
1862, Mar}' Josephine Armstrong (adopted and step- 
daughter of Howell Davis, Esq., of Sycamore, Colusa 
county, California). She was born in Missouri. 

Seven children: 

No. 136. Zoe Lucy Green, born April 13, 1863. 

No. 137. William Green, died in infancy. 

No. 138. Mary Luella Green, born December 2, 
1866. 

No. 139. Genevieve Green, born May 31, 1869. 

No. 140. Louis Robinson Green, born Novem- 
ber 25, 1872; died April 29, 1883. 

No. 141. Anna Raphael Green, born June 4, 

1875- 
No. 142. Donald Robertson Green (2nd), born 
August 3, 1877. 




Hon. Wilt.. S. Green. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 8l 

Mrs. Green died at Colusa, California, May 29, 
1 88 1. Mr. Green married secondly at Salt lyake City, 
Utah, on September 16, 1891, Sallie Bedinger Morgan, 
of Mississippi, daughter of Dr. J. B. Morgan, and 
grand-daughter of General Gideon Fitz, of that State. 
Her ancestors were eminent in colonial and revolution- 
ary times. She is an accomplished authoress, and has 
contributed many of her writings to the magazines 
and periodicals of the country. 

In September, 1863, Will S. Green bought the 
newspaper, "The Colusa Sun," and has owned and 
edited it continuously ever since. It has a wide circu- 
lation in California and exerts a potent influence. In 
1867 he was elected a member of the State L,egislature; 
he has also been elected a number of times to various 
town and county offices. He is an enthusiastic worker 
in the cause of reclaiming barren lands by means of 
irrigation, and, in fact, is known throughout California 
as the "Father of Irrigation." He is the author of 
the book called "Green's Land Laws," a code now 
recognized as an authority and in general use. Presi- 
dent Cleveland appointed him, in 1894, Surveyor- 
General of the United States for the District of Cali- 
fornia, While in charge of that department of the 
public service his office was in San Francisco, California, 
but his home is Colusa. He is now treasurer of the 
State of California. 

No. 39. 

DESCENDED FROM NOB. 12, 3, AND I. 

Mary Frances Green, second child and only 
daughter of Dr. Henry Lewis Green and his wife, 



S2 FOURTH GKN'ERATIOX. 

Lucy Bird Semple; born in the year 1834; died when 
five years of age. 

No. 40. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 12, 3, AND I. 

Duff Green, second son, third child of Dr. Henry 
Lewis Green and his wife, Lucy Bird Semple, was 
born February 22, 1836, at Horse-Shoe Bottom, Rtis- 
sell county, Kentucky. At the outbreak of the Civil 
War, in 1861, he entered the Confederate States army 
and ser\'ed as an officer under Generals Chalmers and 
Price in Missouri, Arkansas and Mississippi, and was 
killed at the battle of Holly Springs, Mississippi, in 
1863. 

No. 41. 

DESCENDED FR0:M NOS. 12, 3, AND I. 

Donald Robertson Green, third son, fourth child 
of Dr. Henry Lewis Green and his wnfe, Lucy Bird 
Semple, was born at Sevent^^-Six, CHnton county, 
Kentucky, May 27, 1839, and received his education 
in the common schools of Alton, Illinois, while living 
in the family of his uncle. General James Semple. 
His history seems to be the most chequered of any of 
the clan Robertson. In 1854, at the age of fifteen, he 
went to California and obtained a situation on a steam- 
boat, called the "Washoe," running between San 
Francisco and Sacramento. On one of the trips, when 
the boat was crowded with exctirsionists her boiler 
blew up and a great many persons lost their lives; he, 
however, escaped with but sHght injuries. He then 



FOURTH GENERATION. 83 

went to Portland, Oregon, and for a short time was 
clerk on another steamboat, called the "Success," ply- 
ing between Portland and Salem. Tiring of steam- 
boating, he tried his luck next at mining in Washington, 
Nev^ada and Montana, but with poor success; returned 
to Kentucky in 1869, to visit his mother, and at 
Lebanon, Kentucky, on August 28, 1870, married 
Margaret Ellen Browning (born at Newmarket, in 
Marion coutit}', Kentucky, October 17, 1851), a cousin 
of the famous poet. Immediately thereafter they went 
to Springfield, Missouri, and thence in the same year 
to Fort Scott, Kansas, where he engaged successfully 
in mercantile business; sold out in 1876 and went to 
Wichita, Kansas, and other western places, looking 
for a good location; dealt in cattle and horses in Texas 
and lost all he had made; settled in Kingman, Kansas, 
in 1885, and established and operated a number of 
stage lines in Kansas, Colorado and Texas, known as 
"Green's Cannon Ball Stage Lines." He founded the 
town of Greensburg, the county seat of Kiowa county, 
and the place was named in his honor; was elected a 
member of the Kansas State legislature from Kiowa 
county in 1889. When the Oklahoma Territory 
"Strip" was thrown open to settlers, and homesteads 
were awarded to all who came, on the principle of 
"first come, first served," he made a successful "run" 
and secured a good claim on Pond Creek, in Grant 
county, where he established his home and was living 
in 1897. He was the Republican candidate for county 
treasurer of Grant county in 1894, and was elected; 
again, in 1896, received the nomination, but suffered 
defeat from the combined forces of the Populists and 
Free Silver Democrats. It is to be hoped that by the 



84 



FOURTH GENERATION. 



return of our cousin's party to power in Kansas he is 
once more on the crest of the wave. 

Eight children: 

No. 143. Lucy Lee Green, born August 2, 1871. 



Xo. 144 
No. 145 
No. 146 
No. 147 
No. 1 48 
No. 149 
No. 150 



William Duff Green, born July 29, 

1873- 
Oscar Semple Green, born July 26, 

iS75- 

Zoe Josephine Green, born March 18, 
1878. 

Imogene Eleanor Green, born August 
28, 1881. 

Ena Lorilla Green, born June 22, 
1SS4. 

Roberta Browning Green, born No- 
vember 3, 1888. 

Lucile Marie Green, born January i, 
1891. 



No. 42. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 3, 3, AND I. 

William Bradford, eldest son and child of John 
S. Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda Semple, 
was born Jul}- 13, 1843, at Springfii \, Illinois, and 
died there September 13, 1896. Unmu d. 

No. 43. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I3, 3, AND I. 

Oscar Bradford, second son and child of John S. 
Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda Semple, was 
born at Springfield, Illinois, September 28, 1845; was 



FOURTH GENERATION. 85 

educated in the public schools of his native city and 
lived there until December, 1870; married at Owens- 
boro, Kentucky, November 17, 1870; Mary Crutcher, 
daughter of Burr H. Crutcher and his wife, Hetty 
Brandenburg, of that place; removed in 1870 to New- 
ton county, Mississippi, where he engaged in the 
business of cotton planting, but, after experimenting 
for three years, concluded cotton growing was not his 
forte, and in 1873 went to St. Louis, Missouri, and 
became president of the Curtis & Co. Manufacturing 
Company, makers of mill and wood-working machinery. 
The business proved a lucrative one and he remained 
there until 1892; then moved to Chicago and assumed 
charge of the Expanded Metal Company, as its presi- 
dent. The industry was developed by his efforts 
and bids fair to prove an extensive and important one. 
Expanded metal is used in fire-proof buildings instead 
of ordinary lathing, also used for strengthening floors 
and ceilings. His office is (1900) in the "Old Colon}' 
Building," Chicago, but he claims Helena, Montana, 
as his home. He has there extensive real estate 
interests. Mr. Bradford has recently published a 
small book entitled "The Great Boom of 1901 and 
How it Began," in which he advocates ably and 
forcibly the in' ^-iguration of a comprehensive system 
of canal irr .Ion, to be undertaken by the U. S. 
gov2rnment .or tiie purpose of developing the vast 
agricultural resources of the Rocky Mountains arid land 
regions. 

In 1869 he was elected city treasurer of Springfield 
and afterwards a member of the Board of Education 
for a term of three years. 

No children. 



S6 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 44. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 13, 3, AND I. 

Susan Amanda Bradford, only daughter, third 
child of John S. Bradford and his wife, Adaline 
Matilda Semple, was born June 12, 1848, at Spring- 
field, Illinois. 

She is unmarried and resides with her mother at 
Springfield. 

No. 45. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. IT,, 3, AND I. 

Eugene Bradford, third son. fourth child of John 
S. Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda Semple, 
was born November 22, 1852, at Springfield, Illinois; 
married at Springfield, Ma}- 20, 1S83, Vitula Donovan, 
formerl}^ of Dundee, Cook county, Illinois. Thej^ 
lived at Aurora, Illinois, 1883 to 1886; Springfield, 
Illinois, 1887 to 1892; and St. Louis, Missouri, 1892 
to 1897. They then removed to Chicago. 

Mr. Bradford is an expert mechanical engineer, and 
is said to be the inventor of the first successful power 
press for printing from steel engraved plates. 

Six children : 

No. 151. Oscar Bradford, born March 11, 1884. 

No. 152. Antrim Bradford, born February 2, 
1885. 

No. 153. William Eugene Bradford, born Feb- 
ruary 5, 1886. 

No. 154. Russell Crawford Bradford, born 
August II, 1SS7. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 87 

No. 155. Harry Donald Bradford, born June 

28, 18S9. 
No. 156. Robert Semple Bradford, born May 

4, 1S93. 

No. 46. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. r3, 3, AND I. 

John Bradford, fourth son, fifth child of John S. 
Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda Semple, was 
born May 3, 1855, ^^ Springfield, Illinois. He is agent 
of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern R. R., at Pana, 
Illinois. Married April 2, 1900, at Springfield, Illinois, 
Grace Hostral of same place. 

No. 47. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I3, 3, AND I. 

Antrim Campbell Bradford, fifth son, sixth child 
of John S. Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda 
Semple, was born January 16, 1857, at Springfield, 
Illinois, and died at same place April 14, 1884. He 
was unmarried. 

No. 48. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 3, 3, AND I. 

Donald Bradford, sixth son, seventh child of John 
S. Bradford and his wife, Adaline Matilda Semple, 
was born September 14, 1861, at Springfield, Illinois; 
married at same place September 27, 1888, Esther Fox 
(born at Springfield July 18, 1865). He settled in 
Helena, Montana, and at the age of twenty-seven 



SS FOURTH GENERATION. 

years was elected mayor of the cit}". Is (1897) a 
member of the Board of Irrigation Commissioners of 
the State of Montana, and is dealing in real estate in 
and about Helena. 

Two children : 

No. 157. Lucy Semple Bradford, born June 10, 

1890. 
No. 158. Sidney Lorenz Bradford, born June 

20, 1893. 

No. 49. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I4, 4, AND I. 

Susan Maria Jacob, eldest daughter and child of 
John I. Jacob and his second wife, Lucy Donald Rob- 
ertson, was born January 17, 1S23, at Louisville, 
Kentucky; married at same place, October 12, 1843, 
James Brown Claj-, of Lexington, Kentuckj-, a sketch 
of whose life will be found following. Mrs. Clay, now 
over seventy-seven years old, is in moderately good 
health and is living at present (1900) with her son 
George and her daughter Lucretia, at "Balgowan" 
farm, in Fa3-ette county, Kentucky, near the city of 
Lexington . 

The author has rareh', if ever, met so interesting 
and delightful a conversationalist as Mrs. Clay. Her 
information concerning our country's history, and 
especially with regard to the people who in the past 
half century have molded public opinion and controlled 
affairs of state, is both varied and profound. Intimate 
association with distinguished men and women at the 
Nation's capital, as well as in Kentuck}-, during the 



FOURTH GENERATION. 89 

years of her earl}^ womanhood, developed in her an 
intense interest in political affairs, which has in no 
wise diminished as the 3'ears rolled on. To this day 
she is a constant reader and close observer of all mat- 
ters affecting our country's welfare. 

Ten children: 

No. 159. Lucy Jacob Clay, born August 10, 

1844. 
No. 160. James Brown Clay, Jr., born January 

27, 1846. 
No. 161. John Cathcart Johnson Clay, born 

December 23, 1847. 
No. 162. Henry Clay, born November 17, 1849. 
No. 163. Lucretia Hart Clay, born July 3, 

1851. 
No. 164. Thomas Jacob Clay, born April 5, 

1853. 
No. 165. Susan Jacob Clay, born February 12, 

1855- 
No. 166. Charles Donald Clay, born January 

7. 1857. 
No. 167. George Hudson Clay, born October 

24, 1858. 
No. 168. Nathaniel Hart Clay, born April 10, 

1861. 

Sketch of the IvIfe of Honorable 
James Brown Ceay. 

James Brown Clay, fourth son of Hon. Henry 
Clay, of Lexington, Kentucky, and his wife, Lucretia 
Hart, was born at Washington, D. C, November 9, 



90 FOURTH GENERATION. 

1817; was educated at Transylvania University, Lex- 
ington, and in 1841 received liis degree from the law 
school of the same university. He practiced law as 
his father's partner mi til 1849, then was appointed by 
President Zachar}^ Taylor charge d'affaires of the 
United States at Lisbon, Portugal. After the death 
of his father, he, in 1853, pmrchased "Ashland," the 
Clay homestead, near Lexington, and made it his 
home the remainder of his life. In 1S56, he with 
other leading men attempted to resuscitate the old 
Whig party, but the movement was hopeless. He 
refused to become a member of the American or 
"Know-Nothing" party, and allied himself with the 
Democrats, whom he considered the onlj' party entitled 
to the name "National;" took an active part in the 
presidential campaign of 1856, on the Democratic side, 
and in appreciation of his eminent services, was offered 
by President Buchanan the U. S. mission to Berlin. 
He declined, however, to accept any honors or emolu- 
ments. Soon afterwards he received the Democratic 
nomination for congressman from the Ashland District, 
and was elected in spite of the fact that his opponent, 
General Roger Hanson, was a very popular man, and 
the district usually a Whig one. This he regarded as 
a vindication of his political course and the greatest 
triumph of his life. He declined a renomination and 
retired to private life. 

During the national campaign of 1S60 he spoke 
occasionally, but did not take a ver)^ active part in the 
canvass. In 1861 he became a member of the Peace 
Congress and attempted to stay the strife between the 
North and the South, but when all efforts failed he 
determined to cast in his lot with the South in the 



THE 

(/ NEV/ YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, 

Aster, Lenox and Tiiden , 
Foui dations. 



ir- 



/ 



.^'- 



Colonel Richard Taylor Jacob. 




FOURTH GENERATION. 9 1 

great contest. When the confederates under General 
Bragg invaded Kentuckj-, Mr. Clay was confined to 
his bed with consumption, but, at the earnest solicita- 
tion of Bragg, consented to raise a regiment for the 
C. S. A. General Thomas, however, of the Union 
army, in a short time compelled Bragg to retire into 
Tennessee, and Mr. Clay went with him. His health 
continued to decline so that he was unfit for active 
service, and during the following winter he made his 
way to Havana, Cuba, and thence to Halifax, in Nova 
Scotia, where he arrived in the summer of 1863. 
Thence he went to Montreal and died there January 
26, 1864. 

In all the relations of life Mr. Clay was a singularly 
attractive man. As citizen, neighbor, friend, son, 
husband, father, he possessed to an eminent degree 
those qualities of mind and heart that caused him to 
live in the hearts of those around him. 

No. 50. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I4, 4, AND I. 

Colonel Richard Taylor Jacob, eldest son, second 
child of John I. Jacob and his second wife, Lucy 
Donald Robertson, was born March 13, 1825, at the 
home of his great-grandfather. Commodore Richard 
Taylor, in Oldham county, Kentucky. He received 
his education in the Louisville schools; afterwards 
studied law and made a tour through South America; 
visited California in 1846, recruited a company of 
cavalry and served under General John C. Fremont 
until its conquest was completed; returned home in 
1847; soon thereafter was called to Washington to tes- 



92 FOURTH GENERATION. 

tify as a witness in behalf of General Fremont, and 
while there met and married his first wife, Sarah 
Benton (born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, Febru- 
ary, 1827; third daughter of Hon. Thomas H. Benton, 
U. S. Senator from Missouri), to whom he was united 
on January 17, 1848. Her mother was Elizabeth 
McDowell, who was a daughter of Colonel McDowell 
and sister of Governor McDowell, of Virginia. Mrs. 
Jacob died at Louisville, Kentucky, January 4, 1863, 
leaving two children. 

Colonel Jacob resided in Louisville from January, 
1848, until November, 1849; then removed to Missouri 
and lived on a farm about ten miles from the town of 
Boonville; returned to Louisville in December, 1853; 
remained there until 1855; then removed to his farm 
in Oldham county, Kentucky, and lived there till 
August, 1891 , since which date he has resided in Louis- 
ville. He married secondly, June 6, 1865, at Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, Laura Wilson (born at Lexington, 
January 18, 1841). She died at Louisville September 
22, 1895, and left five children. 

Seven children : 

By first -wife t~wo, viz . : 

No. 169. Richard Taylor Jacob, Jr., born No- 
vember 20, 1S4S. 
No. 170. Elizabeth McDowell Benton Jacob, 

born July 12, 1850. 

By second -wife five, viz.: 

No. 171. John L Jacob, born January 22, 1870. 
No. 172. William Jay Jacob, born July 17, 
1872. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 93 

No. 173. Donald Robertson Jacob, born May 

27, 1874. 
No. 174. Laura Wilson Jacob, born January 

7. 1877. 
No. 175. Brent Kirk Jacob, born February 23, 

1S79. 

Colonel Jacob's Public Career. 

When the War of the Rebellion broke out in 1861, 
Colonel Jacob espoused the cause of the Union, not- 
withstanding the fact that he had the }'ear before been 
an earnest supporter of the Breckinridge and Lane 
presidential ticket. He determined to join the Union 
army, and proceeded at once to recruit a cavalr}' regi- 
ment, which was known as the 9th Kentucky Cavalry. 
The place of rendezvous was at Eminence, and such 
was the enthusiasm that in seven days a regiment of 
twelve hundred and fifty-four men was assembled. He 
was chosen colonel, and in ten days thereafter was at 
the seat of w^ar. He took part in many battles, and in 
one of them had a hand-to-hand encounter with 
Colonel Allston, of South Carolina, and severely 
wounded him.-'^ During the war he received three 

*NoTE. — The Colonel Allston here mentioned is said to 
have been a great-grandson of Aaron Burr, whose daughter, 
Theodosia, one of the most beautiful and witty women of her 
time, became the wife of Joseph Allston, Governor of South 
Carolina. 

During Christmas week of the year 1812, Theodosia Burr 
Allston set sail in the ship "Patriot" for New York, intending 
to visit her father, who had begun practicing law there, and was 
endeavoring to live down the hatred of his countrymen. She 
sailed gaily out of Charleston harbor, but was never afterwards 



94 FOURTH GENERATION. 

woiinds, one of which was nearly fatal; he rendered 
active and valuable services under General Don Carlos 
Buell, and was in the celebrated pursuit of General 
John Morgan's Confederate cavalry on their raid 
through Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio. Morgan sur- 
rendered at Bufhngton's Island to a battalion of 
Colonel Jacob's regiment, under Major Rue. Colonel 
Jacob frequently commanded brigades, and once a 
division consisting of five regiments of infantry and 
three of cavalry. 

In March, 1863, he was nominated by the Union 
party for the ofhce of Lieutenant-Governor of Ken- 
tucky, and was elected the following August, along 
with Governor Bramlette. While in that position he 
performed for the State services of great value. 

When President Lincoln issued his Emancipation 
Proclamation, Colonel Jacob opposed it as unwise 
and an act of violated faith toward loyal friends of the 
Union in the border States .who were slave owners. 
He insisted that all such should receive compensation 
for their property thus taken , and censured the admin- 
istration in unsparing terms Vv-hile canvassing Ken- 
tucky in favor of General McClellan for the presidency. 
While thus engaged, he was forcibly seized by order 
of General Stephen G. Burbridge, U. S. A., then 
military commandant in Kentuck}-, and on the night 

heard of It was supposed the ship, with all ou board, went 
down in a storm off Cape Hatteras. 

It is a curious coincidence that this vessel, the same that 
Commodore Richard Taylor commanded during the Revolution, 
should, on its last voyage, have carried as a passenger the grand- 
mother of the man who, half a century later, was to fight a 
hand-to-hand battle with the old Commodore's sfreat-sjrandson. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 95 

of November i8, 1S64, was forwarded with great 
secrec}- to the Confederate hues in West Virginia and 
there abandoned. He eventual!}' made his way to 
Richmond, and from there demanded of President 
Lincohi an unconditional repeal of the order b}' which 
he had been sent south. This was promptly granted, 
and he returned home. 

Colonel Jacob was for several j-ears a Commis- 
sioner of Public Parks at I,ouisville, to which ofhce he 
was elected on the Republican ticket. Declined a 
re-election and has now retired to private life. 

No. 51. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I4, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Prather Jacob, second son, third child 
of John I. Jacob and his second wife, Lucy Donald 
Robertson, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, March 
22, 1827; married at Louisville September 28, 1859, 
Henrietta Wilson Pope (born at Louisville, January 
10, 1835), daughter of William H. Pope and his wife, 
Mary Wilson. 

They resided alwaj's at Louisville, where he was a 
prominent and highl}' respected citizen, as well as a 
modest, consistent christian gentleman. 

Mrs. Jacob died at Louisville, June 10, 1889, and 
Mr. Jacob in less than a month afterward, on July 6, 
1889. Both are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. 

Nitie children : 

No. 176. John Jeremiah Jacob, born September 

29, 1861. 
No. 177. William Pope Jacob, born August 5, 
1863. 



96 FOURTH GEXERATIOX. 

No. 17S. Mary Pope Jacob, born January 24, 

I S65 . 
No. 179. Thomas Prather Jacob, Jr., born 

March 18, 1867. 
Xo. iSo. Etta Pope Jacob, born August 15. 

1868. 
Xo. iSr. Susan Jacob, born March 8, 1870. 
Xo. 182. Charles Pope Jacob, born August 2, 

1871. 
Xo. 183. Donald Robertson Jacob, born March 

5. 1873- 
Xo. 184. Lucy Robertson Jacob, born Septem- 
ber 14, 1874. 

No. 52. 

DESCEXDED FROM NOS. 14, 4, AND I. 

William Rinaldo Jacob (called ''Buck"), third 
son, fourth child of John I. Jacob and his second wife, 
Lucy Donald Robertson, was born December 27, 
1829, at Louisville; was married twice: first, on July 
10, 1855, to Kate Baird (bom Xovember 5, 1829, at 
Cumberland, Maryland), a grand-niece of his father, 
and sister of General Absalom Baird, U. S. A. She 
died at Louisville February ir, 1857, leaving one 
daughter. He married, secondh-, in 1859, at Louis- 
ville, Maria Brook Hall, of Shelby county, Kentucky, 
and had by her one daughter. 

Mr. Jacob died at Louisville July 27, 1867. His 
second wife lived twentj'-two years longer and died at 
Louisville December 31, 1889. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 97 

Two children : 
By first wife: 

No. 185. Nannie Lancaster Jacob, born May 
22, 1856. 

By second wife: 

No. 186. Lizzie Wintersmith Jacob, born May 

12, 1861. 

No. 53. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 4, 4, AND I. 

Isaac Robertson Jacob, fourth son, fifth child of 
John I. Jacob and his second wife, Lucy Donald 
Robertson, was born April 28, 1833, at Louisville, 
Kentucky; married in 1853 Mary Hall Mulholland, of 
Elizabeth town, Kentucky, and died there January 19, 
1873. No children. He was buried at Cave Hill 
Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky. Mrs. Jacob re-mar- 
ried, her second husband being a portrait painter, 
named Stewart. 

No. 54. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 14, 4, AND I. 

Eliza Catharine Jacob, second daughter, sixth 
child of John I. Jacob and his second wife, Lucy 
Donald Robertson, was born August 19, 1835, at 
Louisville, Kentucky; married at Louisville May, 1862, 
Samuel Howell Jones, of Philadelphia (born there 
June 30, 1818). They lived at Hanover, New Jersey, 



98 FOURTH GENERATION. 

and Mrs. Jones died there August 4, 1864. Mr. Jones 
died in Florida January 19, 1883. 

One child: 

No. 187. Samuel Howell Jones, Jr., born De- 
cember 15, 1862. 

No. 55. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I4, 4, AND I, 

Honorable Charles Donald Jacob, fifth son, 
seventh child of John I. Jacob and his second wife, 
Lucy Donald Robertson, was born June i, 1838, at 
Ivouisville, Kentucky, in the old Jacob homestead, 
which, with its yard, at that time occupied the entire 
square between Walnut and Chestnut streets and 
Third and Fourth streets. He was educated by private 
tutors, and in the schools of Louisville, and was pre- 
pared at Cambridge, Massachusetts, to enter Harvard 
University. His health gave way, and in 1857, at the 
age of nineteen, he went abroad accompanied by his 
brother, Thomas P. Jacob, and two sisters. On 
January 12, 1859, he married Addie Martin (born at 
Louisville January, 1838), daughter of Thomas J. and 
Jane Martin. She died March 4, 1878, leaving three 
children. Again, in 1879, he went to Europe on 
account of ill-health, taking his entire family with 
him, and returning in October, 1880. In 1890 he 
made the tour around the world, visiting en route 
Japan, China, India, Africa and Europe. He also 
traveled in Europe in 1894-95, ^^1*^ i^i i897. iw com- 
pany with his nephew, Donald Robertson Jacob 



FOURTH GENERATION. 99 

(No. 183), made the tour to Honolulu, New Zealand 
and Australia. 

He married a second time on June 2, 1897, Edith 
Bullitt, of Louisville, who survives him. 

His death, caused by angina pectoris^ took place at 
the Louisville Hotel on Christmas morning in the year 
1898, and his remains were interred in Cave Hill 
Cemetery. 

Three children: 

No. 188. Jennie Robertson Jacob, born Decem- 
ber II, 1859. 

No. 189. Lucy Donald Jacob, born April 3, 
1863. 

No. 190. Charles Donald Jacob, born Novem- 
ber 2, 1876. 

Charles Donald Jacob's Public Career. 

We glean from the Louisville Courier-Journal and 
the Louisville Times, under date of December 26, 1898, 
the following accounts of Mr. Jacob's death and esti- 
mates of his public career and character: 

Charles D. Jacob, four times Mayor of Louisville, 
ex-Minister to Colombia, President of the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Kentucky, and one of Louis- 
ville's most honored and best-loved citizens, died 
unexpectedly yesterday morning at the Louisville 
Hotel. He had been ill only a few days. Angina 
pectoris was the immediate cause of his death. The 
funeral will take place to-morrow. 

The death of Hon. Charles Donald Jacob cast a 
shadow over Christmas in Louisville. 



lOO FOURTH GENERATION. 

The tolling of the fire bells gave notice that a nota- 
ble citizen had passed away and sensed to spread the 
fact that the deceased was the beloved ex-Mayor. 

To-morrow morning loving friends will pay him 
the last tribute. Nephews who had reason to love him 
in life will carry the remains to the last resting place, 
and distinguished men in public and private life will 
accompany the remains as honorary pall-bearers. The 
whole city will mourn him. 

The remains of the Hon. Charles D. Jacob are lying 
in state in the parlor of the Louisville Hotel, and dur- 
ing the whole of yesterday afternoon were viewed by 
many who were glad to call him friend. The casket 
is a rich but simple cloth-covered one, with ebony 
handles and a silver plate bearing the name "Charles 
D. Jacob." Pinned to the lapel of his coat is one of 
the Marechal Niel roses he delighted so to wear in life, 
and these flowers were also laid freely about the casket 
and spread over the top. Ferns and other flowers 
blanket the coffin, while the room is made fragrant 
with cut flowers and potted plants set about in great 
profusion. 

Those who called to take a last look at the remains 
were from all classes and conditions of citizens — his 
business associates, those in the humbler walks of life, 
whom he was able at some time to befriend, policemen 
and firemen. During his life he numbered among his 
friends believers in all creeds and religions, and in 
death all these showed their sorrow in their own pecu- 
liar way. Many of the Roman Catholic faith, whose 
friend he had been, kneeled at the cofiin and offered 
up a silent prayer. Not only those he had befriended 
personally visited the remains, but their wives and 



FOURTH GENERATION. lOI 

mothers as well, and many wiped away tears as they 
left. 

If any one class of men showed their sorrow 
more than another, it was the firemen. About thirty 
years ago, when Mr. Jacob was in the General Council 
and before he had been Mayor, an effort was made to 
cut the salaries of the firemen. Almost unaided, at 
first, he began the fight against reducing the salaries, 
and succeeded in having them maintained at the old 
figures. This fight in their behalf became a sort of 
tradition among the firemen, and they were, almost to 
a man, friends of Mr. Jacob in every race he made 
after that. 

The funeral will take place this morning at ii 
o'clock from Christ Church Cathedral. The funeral 
procession will leave the I^ouisville Hotel at about 
10:45 o'clock. The services will be conducted by the 
Rev. C. E. Craik, dean of Christ Church Cathedral, 
assisted by the Rev. E. T. Perkins, rector emeritus of 
St. Paul's church, and the Rev. M. M. Benton, State 
evangelist of the Episcopal Church. Dr. Benton was 
the minister who married Mr. and Mrs. Jacob, and 
was formerly rector of the Church of the Advent, of 
which the Rev. Thomas P. Jacob was afterward rector. 



An Imperishable Record. 

Louisville never produced a man who had more 
personal friends than Charles D. Jacob. Though five 
times before the public as a candidate ror Mayor, he 
was defeated but once, and then by a narrow margin. 
The public, as a rule, tires of men who ofiFer as candi- 
dates, but it was not so with Mr, Jacob, No matter 



I02 FOURTH GENERATION. 

what he was mentioned for, thousands at once declared 
for him. He never appeared in the capacity of an 
office-seeker, but rather was forced into public position 
by his admirers, and sometimes against his own will. 

It was in 1870 that Mr. Jacob was first induced to 
enter public life. He was elected to the Council from 
the Seventh ward. At once he became a leader, and 
was put forward two years afterward as a candidate 
for Mayor, and again in 1875. The latter race will 
ever be remembered as one of the most hoth^ contested 
in the history of this city or State. John G. Baxter 
was the opposing candidate. Mr. Jacob, in this con- 
test, showed his great ability as an organizer and cam- 
paigner. Over $300,000 was spent against him and 
more than $250,000 was wagered on the result. A 
count of the vote showed Mr. Jacob to be a winner by 
900 majority. Mr. Jacob relieved Mr. Baxter and was 
the first Mayor to sit in the new City Hall, which had 
been begun under Baxter's administration. Mr. Jacob 
was a man of broad views, and at once set about 
making public improvements of permanency. The 
city was just getting out of town ideas. 

This period marked the beginning of a metropolitan 
police and fire system. At the end of his three-year 
term in 1875 M^r. Jacob, contrary to the general rule 
in Louisville, was as popular as when he first went 
into office, and was re-elected without opposition. He 
ser^^ed the two terms of six 3'ears with great credit to 
himself and retired with the applause of the public. 
He was succeeded by John G. Baxter, who remained 
in office until 1881. Following Mr. Baxter's term 
there was a great demand for Mr. Jacob's return to 
municipal life, and he consented to run again. He 



FOURTH GENERATION. I03 

was elected, serving until 1884, when he was succeeded 
by P. Booker Reed. In 1888 Mr. Jacob was again 
called upon by his friends to make the race as an inde- 
pendent candidate, and he easily defeated Judge W. B. 
Hoke, Democrat, and Samuel Avery, Republican, 
receiving a plurality of 4,000 votes. 

During all of his terms Mr. Jacob endeavored to do 
something which would be of lasting benefit to the 
city. He built granite and asphalt streets, instead of 
macadam, over much opposition, paved the way for a 
park system and increased the efficiency of the charit- 
able institutions. 

Mr. Jacob was often urged to run for Congress and 
was on several occasions urged for Governor. He had 
no desire, however, to serve in any capacity except 
Mayor of his native city, where he might be of benefit 
to his fellow-citizens. He accepted office under Presi- 
dent Cleveland in 1884, as Minister to the United 
States of Colombia at Bogota, but resigned after two 
years. 

Some of His Work. 

Probably no man in Louisville has been of more 
service to the city than Mr. Jacob. The respect, the 
admiration, the confidence which he acquired from the 
people were truly meritoriously won. It was by his 
suggestion and during his administration that the 
Home for the Aged and Infirm was built. It was dur- 
ing his administration that the city came out of the 
dull pallor of the gas jet into the glare of the electric 
light. 

Seeing that the city would become bankrupt in 
repairing and building the Nicholson block streets, 



I04 FOtmTH GENERATION. 

Mr. Jacob made a tour of the country himself to secure 
better material, and it was during his administration 
that the city's first granite and asphalt streets were 
made. 

He is the father of the parks. It was mainly 
through his efforts during his last term in office that 
the Legislature adopted a measure creating a Park 
Commission, and the park bond issue was voted dur- 
ing his administration. In 1889 Mr. Jacob himself 
purchased all the property now known as Jacob Park, 
but which was then called "Burnt Knob." The price 
paid was $9,000. Despite the fact that a syndicate 
offered Mr. Jacob $23,000 for the property, he refused 
to sell, preferring to dispose of it to the city. This he 
finally did, selling the land at exactly what it cost him 
and refusing to charge the city the interest on the 
money. 

The Third avenue boulevard, said to be the finest 
in the South, was Mr. Jacob's pet project. The work 
of extending it from the end of Third avenue to Jacob 
Park was done principally by means of private dona- 
tions, which Mr. Jacob and his friends tried so hard to 
secure. 

When Mr. Jacob had built on Breckinridge street 
the bridge which bears his name, people hooted at 
him. The bridge was called "Jacob's Folly." But 
the city continued to build out to the east and the 
bridge finally came to be a public necessit3\ 

No man was ever more loyal to his friends. A 
polished gentleman in ever}' sense of the word and a 
man of honor, he disdained to be a party to any ques- 
tionable act. Many of the leading politicians of to- 
day in Louisville were started in the paths of success 



FOURTH GENERATION. I05 

by Charles D. Jacob. He never failed to respond 
when those who befriended him called upon him for 
assistance or for the exertion of his influence in their 
behalf. In the Police and Fire Departments he was 
especially loved and respected. 

Mr. Jacob was a prince of politeness and generosity. 
Politics cost him a fortune. His faculty for remem- 
bering names and faces was truly remarkable. High 
and low, rich and poor, were greeted with the same 
consideration. This trait of knowing people was 
invaluable to him in making a contest for office. 



Was Always a Prince. Bound His Acquaint- 
ances IN Close and Lasting Friendship. 

Every one who knew Mr. Jacob, and they were 
legion, always found him the same handsomely dressed, 
dignified, democratic gentleman. He was never with- 
out a Marechal Niel rose in his button hole, a pleasant 
little peculiarity, which always cut a prominent figure 
in his numerous campaigns for Mayor. No man was 
more democratic than he, and few men so prominent 
in politics and so much before the people were able to 
maintain dignity so well. It has been said that no 
one, not even his closest friends, ever spoke of him 
other than "Mr. Jacob," yet no man bound his friends 
closer to him than did Mr. Jacob. 

When he spoke to a man or a woman his words and 
his tone were cordial, and his bow was princely. He 
always spoke to every one he knew, no matter how 
poorly some might be dressed, nor in whose company 
he or they might be. It is told of him that just after 



Io6 FOURTH GENERATION. 

one of his trips abroad he was riding out Third avenue. 
Almost every one he saw he knew, and to all of those 
he lifted his hat in that courtly and characteristic style 
of his. Most of those he saw were as well dressed as 
he and were among his business and political associ- 
ates. But one of those he passed wore the old clothes 
of a laborer and carried his tin pail in his hand. Mr. 
Jacob was quick to recognize him and his hat was off 
in just as cordial a recognition as it had been to any of 
those in beavers and moleskins. 

During one of Mr. Jacob's races for Ma^-or the 
police force was divided between him and his opponent. 
One of the lieutenants was a friend of Mr. Jacob and 
worked in season and out for his success. Mr. Jacob 
was defeated and a friend of the successful candidate 
was given the lieutenant's place on the police force, 
the lieutenant being reduced to the ranks. The loss 
of position was a loss of money to the police officer 
and it appeared a year afterward that Mr. Jacob would 
never be in an official position to show his appreciation 
of the sacrifice made by his friend on the force. A 
reporter was standing with the patrolman one day, 
when Mr. Jacob passed. 

The ex-mayor smiled cordially, bowed and in the 
friendliest and kindliest manner greeted the patrol- 
man, w^ho took off his helmet and bowed, too. 
"He's a gentleman," remarked the patrolman, with 
pride at the recognition from Mr. Jacob. "I lost 
my place supporting him, but I would gladly do it 
again . ' ' 

It may be added that Mr. Jacob was in a position 
to remember those who were his friends, and he did, 
and no place of honor or profit was more worthily 



FOURTH GENERATION. I07 

bestowed than when the patrolman was duly made 
captain. 

Mr. Jacob was a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Elks, the Veteran Firemen's Association and other 
secret and benevolent associations. He was a member 
of the old Reindeer Hose Companj^, No. i, and loved 
the excitement of a big fire in the old volunteer fire 
company as well as any of the "boys." He was 
heartily in favor of a firemen's historical building and 
gave his support to the scheme to have one established 
in Louisville. 

No. 56. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I4, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Anderson Jacob, third daughter, eighth and 
youngest child of John I. Jacob and his second wife, 
Lucy Donald Robertson, was born at Ivouisville 
October 6, 1840; married at "Ashland" (the home of 
her sister, Mrs. James B. Clay), near Lexington, 
Kentucky, October 28, 1858, to Darwin Ward John- 
son (born in Scott county, Kentucky, January 8, 
1838). 

They lived at Lexington, and Mr. Johnson died at 
"Ashland" October 27, 1862. 

Two children: 

No. 191. Kate Jacob Johnson, born February 

II, i860. 
No. 192. Darwin Ward Johnson (Jr.), born 
Ma}^ 5, 1862. 



loS FOURTH GENERATION. 

Mrs. Johnson married, secondly, at Louisville 
October iS, iS66, Robert A. Johnson (born at Lexing- 
ton, Kentuck}', Maj' 3, 181 7), a cousin of her first 
husband. He was a widower with two children, and 
by him also she had two children: 

No. 193. Claudius Marcellus Johnson, born 
August 1 1, 1S67. 

Xo. 194. Thomas Jacob Johnson, born Febru- 
ary 16, 1869. 

Mrs. Johnson died at New York City August 4, 
1870, and Robert A. Johnson, her second husband, 
died at Knoxville, Tennessee, March 15, 1886. 



No. 57. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I5, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Jacob Robertson, eldest daughter and child 
of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, Susan 
L. Bond Bate, was born at "Berry Hill" farm, the 
home of her grandfather Bate, near Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, August 13, 1827; married John Fouchee, of 
Brandenburg, Kentucky, November 6, 1850, and died 
there April 12, 1854; was buried in the family grave 
yard at "Elk Grove" farm, in Breckinridge county, 
Kentucky. 

One child: 

No. 195. Mattie Fouchee, born August 22, 
1851. 



FOURTH GENERATION. I09 

No. 58. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I5, 4, AND I. 

' Matilda Taylor Robertson, second daughter and 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan L. Bond Bate, was born at lyouisville, Kentucky, 
April 12, 1829; married April 4, 1850, at "Elk Grove" 
farm, in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, James Ed- 
ward Wilmans. She and her husband were playmates 
from earliest childhood, and were educated by the same 
teachers and governesses. Their parents were intimate 
friends and lived on adjoining farms. Their union by 
marriage, which occurred before either of them was of 
age, is still blessed by undiminished affection and un- 
broken harmony. On April 4tli of this year (1900), 
in the midst of loving children, grandchildren, rela- 
tives and friends, they celebrated their golden anni- 
versary, both of them being still remarkably favored 
with strength of body as well as vigor of mind. 

Except during the last eighteen years their changes 
of residence have been numerous. Between 1850 and 
1858 they lived successively in Brandenburg, Louis- 
ville, Meade and Grayson counties, and at Hawesville, 
all in Kentucky; then removed to Arkansas and lived 
at Jacksonport and Elgin in that State until 1863, 
when, on account of the danger surrounding them by 
reason of the Civil War, they were obliged to return to 
Kentucky. In 1867 they again returned and have 
resided there ever since, with the exception of three 
years, 1871 to 1874, when they were at St. Eouis, Mis- 
souri. Since 1882 their home has been at Newport, 
Arkansas. 



no FOURTH GENERATION. 

Nine children : 

No. 196. Mildred Ann Wilmans, born Septem- 
ber 13, 1 85 1. 

Xo. 197. Lucy Robertson Wilmans, born Octo- 
ber 26, 1S53. 

Xo. 198. Charles Hermann Wilmans, born 
December 10, 1855. 

X'o. 199. Susan Robertson Wilmans, born 
February 10, 1858. 

Xo. 200. Richard Taylor Wilmans, born Sep- 
tember 8, 1S60. 

Xo. 201. James Smith Wilmans, born March 
8, 1863. 

Xo. 202. Edward Beatty Wilmans, born De- 
cember 24, 1865. 

Xo. 203. Elizabeth Beatty Wilmans, born Xo- 
vember 26, 1S68. 

Xo. 204. Robert Dorsey Wilmans, bom Sep- 
tember 2, 1 8 76. 

GoLDEx Wedding. 

At Xewport, Arkansas, on April 4 was celebrated 
the golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Wilmans, 
who were married at Elk Grove, Breckinridge county, 
Kentucky, April 4, 1850. The invitations in gold 
type had been sent out a month previous to the friends 
and relatives in seventeen states. Owing to the large 
acquaintance of the family, necessity compelled the 
restriction of the invitations to near friends, old neigh- 
bors and those closely related. 

The entertainment was given in the home of Mrs. 
M. A. Dorsey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilmans. 



FOURTH GENERATION. Ill 

This home, with its plain exterior, is a treasure-house 
of the antique, some of its furniture having been made 
in England in the sixteenth century. 

The house was decorated with evergreens, Ameri- 
can flags and Chinese lanterns and was a blaze of light, 
reflected from the brass andirons, the yellow shades 
of the numerous candles and the yellow jardinieres. 

In one parlor, on either side of tiers of flowering 
plants, in chairs united by a band of yellow ribbon, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmans sat and received their friends. 
Between them were their eleven grandchildren, and 
around their chairs were grouped their eight children. 

A bank of violets, fringed with trailing ferns, com- 
pletely covered a table in one of the parlors, and by its 
fragrance and cooling color furnished a contrast to the 
prevailing yellow. 

A string band concealed in the conservatory fur- 
nished the music for the occasion. 

The dining room was a bower of beauty. In one 
corner was a polished mahogany table, where only 
those were seated who had attended the wedding fifty 
years before. The cloth covering the table was fifty 
years old, the china and glass used in serving were at 
least of the same age — one piece of glass noticeable for 
its peculiar shape had passed the century mark. 

In the center of the table were fifty yellow carna- 
tions, and around it were seated Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 
Wilmans, Mrs. J. J. Webster of Nashville, Tennessee; 
Mrs. S. E. Bate, and Miss Kate Robertson of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky; Mr. James Bate Robertson of Eliza- 
bethtown, Kentucky, sisters and brother of Mrs. 
Wilmans, and Mrs. Maria G. Ross of Newport, 
Arkansas, aunt of Mr. Wilmans. 



112 FOURTH GEXERATIOX. 

The main table was stretched the full length of the 
dining room. Crossed under the center mirror and 
ending at the comer of the table in rosettes with 
fringed ends were broad bands of yellow ribbon. The 
center piece in a cut glass bowl two feet in diameter 
was composed of narcissus and spears of grass. A 
border of lattice ferns and yellow jonquils surrounded 
the table, while at the corners were tall candelabra 
with pendant prisms and j^ellow shades. 

Arranged artistically on the table were baskets of 
oranges, dishes of the various yellow fruits, almonds 
and bonbons of buttercups, rosebuds and violets. 

The guests were served by the daughters and 
the granddaughters of the hostess. 

Numbers of gifts were received, and a tray laden 
with greetings. The idea of the golden remembrance 
was prevalent, even to a globe of goldfish, whose occu- 
pants lent animation to the scene; the golden gift of 
Hon. and Mrs. H. L. Remmel of Little Rock, was 
remarkable for its purity, simplicit}' and grace. 

Perhaps the most luiique gift was a promissor^^ 
note for S500 at compound interest, presented by the 
four sons of the host and hostess. It was engraved 
on parchment in gold ink and framed in brass. The 
proceeds of this note are to be devoted to the education 
of a future grandson, who shall bear the name of James 
Edward Wilmans. 

The people of Newport united in a gift consisting 
of a gold-handled ebony cane for Mr. Wilmans, and a 
work basket, all of whose appurtenances were gold- 
plated, for Mrs. Wilmans. Many other handsome 
remembrances were sent by relatives and friends from 
abroad who were unable to attend. 



FOURTH GENERATION. II3 

No. 59. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I5, 4, AND I. 

Isaac Robertson, eldest son, third child of Rich- 
ard Taylor Robertson and his wife, Susan L,, Bond 
Bate, was born at Ivouisville, Kentucky, January 15, 
1831; married July 17, 1856, at Jefferson ville, Indiana, 
Sarah Charlotte Goss (born at Geneva, New York, 
January 31, 1835). After marriage they lived until 
i860 on a farm in Calhoun county, Kentucky' ; then 
removed to Elgin, Arkansas, where he established and 
conducted successfully a mercantile business. When 
the war broke out in 1861, he desired to join the Con- 
federate States army, but on account of deafness was 
ineligible for military service. He was, notwithstand- 
ing this infirmit}', an active and ardent supporter of 
the Southern cause, and thus became an object of per- 
secution by the Union soldiers and was forced to leave 
his home. He returned to the old homestead in Ken- 
tucky with the Wilmans family, and remained there 
until 1866. The war having ended, he returned to 
Elgin, and there became principal of the public schools 
(his wife being first assistant), and held that position 
until his death, caused by pneumonia, occurred on 
December 30, 1876. 

His wife now resides at Newport, Arkansas. 

Seven childre?i: 

No. 205. Ida Robertson, born April 27, 1857. 
No. 206. Susan E. Robertson, born May 20, 

1859. 
No. 207. Katharine H. Robertson, born Janu- 
ary 5, 1862. 



114 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 208. Fannie Lee Robertson, born October 
14, 1864. 

No. 209. Richard Taylor Robertson (2nd), 
bom October 25, 1867. 

No. 210. Hattie May Robertson, born May 10, 
1870. 

No. 211. S. Charlotte Robertson, born Decem- 
ber 21, 1872. 



No. 60. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Captain Richard Taylor Robertson, second son, 
fourth child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his 
wife, Susan I,. Bond Bate, was born at Louisville, 
Kentucky, December 17, 1832; married Mehetabel 
Brashear at Stephensport, Kentucky, December 30, 
1874. 

Like his brother, Isaac, he also was an ardent 
believer in the right of secession, and when the South- 
ern States declared themselves out of the Union, was 
one of the first from Kentucky to volunteer to fight in 
their cause; served gallantly and with distinction as a 
Captain in General Joe Wheeler's cavalry division, but 
was captured by the Union troops and suffered confine- 
ment for a long period in Camp Chase, the military 
prison at Columbus, Ohio. By reason of the priva- 
tions there endured, his health was for a great while 
seriously impaired. After the war he and his wife 
lived in Arkansas, and later removed to Texas. He 
died at San Antonio, Texas, May 4, 1891, and w^s 



FOURTH GENERATION. II5 

buried there. His wife returned to Kentucky and 
resides at Stephensport. 

One child: 

No. 212. Richard Webster Robertson, born 
September 3, 1878. 



No. 61. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Susan Eliza Robertson, third daughter, fifth 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan ly. Bond Bate, was born at Brandenburg, Ken- 
tucky, December 5, 1834; married at "Klk Grove," in 
Breckenridge county, Kentucky, March 25, 1858, to 
Richard A. Bate, her first cousin (born in Jefferson 
county, Kentucky, October 8, 1833; died at Smith- 
field, Kentucky, June 25, 1870). She now resides 
with her daughter, Mrs. Henry Watts Clarke, at 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

Five children: 

No. 213. Lucy Bate, born March 3, 1861. 
No. 214. James S. Bate, born March 23, 1863. 
No. 215. Fannie Barbour Bate, born June 6, 

1865. 
No. 216. Virginius Alexander Bate, born June 

16, 1868. 
No. 217. Richard Alexander Bate, born Feb- 
ruary 5, 187 1. 



Il6 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 62. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 15, 4, AND I. 

James Bate Robertson, third son, sixth child of 
Richard Taylor Robertson aad his wife, Susan L. 
Bond Bate, was born at "Mount Morina" farm, in 
Meade county, Kentucky, January 24, 1837; married 
December 15, 1870, Fowler E. Landers (born October 
18, 1848, near Big Spring, Kentucky). Their home is 
at Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and he is in the hotel 
business. 

Three children: 

No. 218. Stedman Robertson born May 29, 

1875. 

No. 219. Mary Eugenie Robertson, born April 
15, 1878. 

No. 220. Susan Louisa Robertson, born Octo- 
ber 25, 1880. 

No. 63. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 15, 4, AND I. 

Benjamin Lawrence Robertson, fourth son, 
seventh child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his 

wife, Susan L. Bond Bate, was born December 9, 1838, 
and died June 27, 1840. 

No. 64. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Mary Ellen Robertson, fourth daughter, eighth 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife. 



FOURTH GENERATION. II7 

Susan Iv, Bond Bate, was born November 26, 1840 and 
died May 2, 1841. 

Nos. 65 and 66. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I5, 4, AND I. 

Mary Ann Robertson and Maria Boothby Rob- 
ertson, twins, fifth and sixth daughters, ninth and tenth 
children of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan ly. Bond Bate, were born July 31, 1842. 

Mary Ann died the same day, and Maria Boothby 
died August 15, 1842. 

No. 67. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Fannie Robertson, seventh daughter, eleventh 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan Iv. Bond Bate, was bom at "Haphazard" farm, 
two miles east of Owensboro, Daviess county, Ken- 
tucky, June 2, 1843; married at "Elk Grove," in 
Breckenridge county, Kentucky, April 30, 1867, to 
James Webster of Maury county, Tennessee (born 
there July, 1843). They reside in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. 

No children. 

No. 68. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. I5, 4, AND I. 

Catharine Robertson, eighth daughter, twelfth 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan ly. Bond Bate, was bom November 12, 1845, at 



Il8 FOURTH GENERATION. 

"Belle Forest" farm, six miles east of Owensboro, in 
Daviess count}^ Kentucky. 

She is unmarried and resides alternately in Louis- 
ville and Nashville with her sisters, Mrs. Bate and 
Mrs. Webster. 

No. 69. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 15, 4, AND I. 

Charles Donald Robertson, fifth son, thirteenth 
child of Richard Taylor Robertson and his wife, 
Susan L. Bond Bate, was born April 16, 1848, at 
Brandenburg, Kentucky; died of typhoid fever Febru- 
ary 6, 1859, at "Elk Grove" farm, and is buried 
there. 

No. 70. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6. 4, AND I. 

Eliza King Byrne, eldest daughter and child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Eliza Matilda 
Robertson, was bom at Louisville, Kentucky, June 
17, 1830. 

Since 1848 she has lived at Lamar, Texas, and has 
taught school there many years. Is unmarried and 
makes her home with her sister. Mrs. Matilda R. 
Taylor. 

No. 71. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Richard Taylor Byrne, eldest son, second child 
of Thomas King B3rne and his wife, Eliza Matilda 
Robertson, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, October 



FOURTH GENERATION. II9 

10, 1833; married September 23, 1865, at L,amar, 
Texas, Caroline Sarah Gregory (born at Cincinnati, 
Ohio) . 

At the outbreak of the Civil War, in 1 861, he 
entered the arm}^ of the Confederate States as a soldier in 
Company "K," twenty-first regiment Texas mounted 
volunteers, Carter's Brigade, and served as such dur- 
ing the whole war in the Departments of Louisiana, 
Arkansas and Missouri; was offered promotion for 
gallant services, but declined it, preferring to serve as 
a private. He is now a "stock man" (that is a raiser 
of horses and cattle) in McMullen county, Texas, near 
Tilden. His "ranch," about ten thousand acres of 
land, lies on the Nueces river. 

Five children: 

No. 221. Sarah Eliza Byrne, born May 10, 

1868; died May 12, 1868. 
No. 222. Jane Elizabeth Byrne, born October 

30, 1869. 
No. 223. Sarah Caroline Byrne, born February 

6, 187 1. 
No. 224. Henrietta Catharine Byrne, born 

March 23, 1873. 
No. 225. Eleanor King Byrne, born August 11, 

1875- 

No. 72. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Matilda Robertson Byrne, second daughter, third 
child of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Eliza 
Matilda Robertson, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, 



I20 FOURTH GENERATION. 

December 28, 1835; married at St. Marys, Texas, 
May 27, 1866, William Taylor of Lamar, son of 
John and Elizabeth Hancock Taylor of Kentucky. 
Mr. Taylor died at Galveston, Texas, in 1871. Mrs. 
Taylor and her two sons have for many j-ears lived 
on a ranch near Lamar where they have carried on 
the business of stock raising. Their home is, how- 
ever, now temporarily at Rockport, in Aransas county, 
Texas, across the bay. 

Tzvo children: 

No. 226. Sidney Albert Taylor, born February 

29, 1868. 
No. 227. Charles Thomas Taylor, born August 
9, 1871. 



No. 73. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Jacob Byrne, third daughter, fourth child 
of Thomas King Bjrne and his wife, Eliza Matilda 
Robertson, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, August 
I, 1837; married in Goliad county, Texas, October 29, 
1865, Samuel Pinckney Walker (born near Bolivar, 
Tennessee, October 12, 1835. His father and mother 
were Alfred Moore and Nancy Duff Walker, and they 
went to Texas in 1837 and settled first in Austin county. 
In 1844 they removed to De Witt county. 

Mr. Walker served during the Civil War in the 
24th Texas cavalry; was captured at Arkansas Post in 
1863, and held as prisoner of war three months in 
"Camp Butler" military prison at Springfield, Illinois; 



FOURTH GENERATION. 121 

was exchanged and served until 1 864 and then honor- 
ably discharged on account of ill health; was engaged 
in the stock raising business on Brigantine creek, 
about seventeen miles from L,amar, until his death, 
which oocurred November 3, 1899. 



Mary Eliza Walker, born February 

16, 1867. 
Samuel Pinckney Walker (Jr.), born 

November 18, 1869. 
Lucy Gertrude Walker, born May 4, 

1872. 
Thomas Alfred Walker, born March 

26, 1875. 
A son, born February, 1878; died in 

infancy. 



No. 74. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Thomas King Byrne (Jr.), second son, fifth child 
of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Eliza Matilda 
Robertson, was born at New Orleans, Louisiana, 
July 19, 1840; married August 25, 1865, in Goliad 
county, Texas, to Mary Throckmorton (born in Ozark, 
Arkansas, January 8, 1848), a niece of Governor 
Throckmorton of Texas. Her parents moved to Texas 
about 1840. Thomas King Byrne served in the 
Confederate States Army, Company "A" Green's 
Brigade Texas Mounted Volunteers, during the entire 
Civil War; was captured by the Union troops and con- 
fined as a prisoner of war for eight months during the 



Fi, 


ve children 




No. 


228. 




No. 


229. 




No. 


230. 




No. 


231. 




No. 


232. 



122 FOURTH GENERATION. 

regime of General Benjamin F. Butler, at New Or- 
leans. After the war he engaged in stock farming, 
and is still so occupied; lives near Goliad, Texas. 

Twelve children : 

No. 233. A son, born February' 3, 1867; died in 
infancy. 

No. 234. Catharine Garnett Byrne, born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1868. 

No. 235. Mary Matilda Byrne, born December 
19, 1869. 

No. 236. Belle Eliza Byrne, born October 11, 
1871. 

No. 237. Lucy Hill Byrne, born December 24, 

1873- 
No. 238. Thomas Henry Byrne, born Septem- 
ber 16, 1876. 
No. 239. James Edward Byrne, born January 

I, 1879. 
No. 240. Robert Joseph Byrne, born August 

15, 1881. 
No. 241. Charles Reuben Byrne, born January 

7, 1884. 
No. 242. Agnes Mabel Byrne, born May 6, 1886. 
No. 243. William Albion Byrne, born August 

18, 1888. 
No. 244. Samuel Harold Byrne, born April 9, 

1891. 

No. 76. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Catharine Spalding Byrne, fourth daughter, 
seventh child of Thomas King Byrne and his wife. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 1 23 

'Eliza. Matilda Robertson, was born at New Orleans, 
Ivouisiana, June 13, 1845; married at Lamar, Texas, 
December 31, 1868, William Kuykendall of Tilden 
(born May 13, 1839, in Austin county, Texas), a son 
of William and Eliza M. Carothers Kuykendall, and 
grandson of Abner Kuykendall. His father and grand- 
father were both among the early pioneers and were 
prominent participants in the struggle for Texas inde- 
pendence. During the war he served in Company 
" B," First Regiment Texas Mounted Voulnteers, 
C. S. A. Since then he has been elected several times 
and served as county judge of McMullen county. 
Resides near Tilden, Texas 

£ig/i t ch ildren : 

No. 245. Ada Eliza Kuykendall, born January 
8, 1S70. 

No. 246. Thomas Richard Kuykendall, born 
December 20, 1871. 

No. 247. Charles William Kuykendall, born 
May 27, 1874. 

No. 248. Catharine Byrne Kuykendall, born 
October 21, 1876. 

No. 249. Annette Sileta Kuykendall, born 
August 27, 1879. 

No. 250. William Kuykendall (Jr.), born April 
8, 1882. 

No. 251. Mary Alice Kuykendall, born Decem- 
ber 19, 1884. 

No. 252. Albert Sidney Kuykendall, born Feb- 
ruary 5, 1888. 



124 



FOURTH GENERATION. 



No. 77. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Charles Robertson Byrne, fourth son, eighth 
child of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Eliza 
Matilda Robertson, was born atlvamar, Texas, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1850; married there December 13, 1869, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal (born in Natchitoches Parish, 
Louisiana, September 19, 1852), a daughter of a 
Louisiana planter, who came to Texas in 1855. Their 
home is about ten miles from Tilden on the Frio river, 
where he owns a ranch of five thousand acres and is 
engaged in stock raising. Post-Office address, Tilden, 
Texas. 

Twelve children: 

No. 253. Amelia Eliza Byrne, born December 

28, 1871. 
No. 254. Ida Virginia Byrne, born July 8, 1873. 
No. 255. John Richard Edward Byrne, born 

August 29, 1875. 
No. 256. Corinne Agnes Byrne, born April 2, 

1877. 
No. 257. Charles Edmond Robertson Byrne, 

born Jul)^ 15, 1879. 
No. 258. Albert Thomas Byrne, born May 24, 

1881. 
No. 259. Mary Josephine Byrne, born October 

23, 1884. 
No. 260. Walter Francis Byrne, born July 7, 

1886. 
No. 261. Alice Louise Byrne, born August 3, 

1888. 



FOURTH GENERATION. I25 

No. 262. Frances Laura Byrne, born March 26, 
1890. 

No. 263. James Webster Byrne, born Febru- 
ary 12, 1897. 

No. 264. Grace Gertrude Byrne, born April 23, 

l8q8. 



No. 78. 

DESCKNDED FROM NOS. 1 7, 4, AND I. 

Susan Maria Stewart, only daughter and child of 
Isaac Stewart and his wife, Catharine Ann Clark 
Robertson, was born at lyouisville, Kentucky, August 
31, 1838. A few years after the death of her mother 
she came to live with her aunt, Mrs. J. B. Anderson, 
at Owensboro, and remained there from August, 1853, 
to February, 1856; then returned to her father in 
Louisville, who died soon afterwards; married at 
Owensboro September ii, i860, John S. Buckner of 
Oldham county, Kentucky (born there March 18, 
1832), who died March 27, 1893. Her death, caused 
by an accident in getting into a carriage, occurred Sep- 
tember 1 6th, 1895. Their home was at Buckner' s 
Station, in Oldham county, Kentucky. 

Three children: 

No. 265. Curran Pope Buckner, born July 18, 
1862. 

No. 266. Mary Brent Buckner, born July 28, 
1867. 

No. 267. Isaac Coleman Buckner, born Febru- 
ary 25, 1871. 



126 FOURTH GENERATION. 

No. 79. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 18, 4, AND I. 

Matilda Robertson Anderson, eldest child and 
daughter of James B. Anderson and his wife, Mary 
Ann Martin Robertson, was born November ii, 
1838, at "Woodlawn," six miles east of Owensboro, 
in Daviess county, Kentucky; married March 12, 
1857, at "Riverside," Owensboro, Ken tuck}', Charles 
R. Tyler of that place (born in Virginia, June 11, 
1817). He died at Owensboro March 26, 1880, leaving 
his wife and surviving son each a handsome competency. 
Mrs. Tjder continued to reside at "Riverside," the 
handsome old homestead overlooking the Ohio, until 
January, 1900, and then after the death of her only 
son, removed into the city of Owensboro, where she 
now lives. 

Two children: 

No. 268. Edmund Alexander Tyler, born May 
9, 1862; died October 23, 1862. 

No. 269. Donald Robertson Tyler, born August 
18, 1865; died December 20, 1899. 

No. 80. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Sidney Anderson, eldest son, second 
child of James B. Anderson and his wife, Mary Ann 
Martin Robertson, was born at "Woodlawn," six 
miles east of Owensboro in Daviess county, Kentucky, 



^"v? 





Thomas Sidney And?:rsox. 



THE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

V ^5te^, Lenox and Tiiden 
fou' dstions. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 1 27 

July 8, 1842. He was educated at the schools of 
Owensboro and at the University of Michigan, in Ann 
Arbor, where he went on account of the disturbed 
condition of affairs in Kentucky during the war. After 
being there more than two years, he was called home 
during his junior year on account of the death of his 
father, October 17, 1864. He assumed charge of his 
father's estate, as executor, and although only twenty- 
two years old, was immediately elected cashier of the 
Planters' Bank of Kentucky, to succeed his father, and 
managed its affairs successfully for a number of years. 
In 1 87 1, he and his brother, William K. Anderson, 
organized the Owensboro Savings Bank, of which he be. 
came the president . That institution was from the very 
beginning a pronounced success, and is to this day one 
of the most prosperous banks in the State of Kentucky. 
In 1877 he purchased the interest of his brother in the 
bank and assumed entire control and management of 
it. In 1883 he sold out his stock and removed to 
Detroit, Michigan, whither his brother had in 1877 
preceded him, and there in October, 1883, in connec- 
tion with other capitalists, organized the State Savings 
Bank. He was at first vice-president of it, and after- 
wards for several years its president. Under his man- 
agement the bank rapidly rose to prominence, and is 
now the largest and most influential financial institution 
in the State of Michigan. He retired from the bank 
and for a few years dealt extensively in real estate on 
his own account at Detroit, then decided to go back 
to the old Kentucky home at Owensboro, where he 
and his family now reside. There, in August, 1900, 
he with others organized the Daviess County Bank & 
Trust Co., and he became its president. 



128 FOURTH GENERATION. 

He married, May 29, 1867, at Petersburg, Virginia, 
Susan E. Harris (born March 23, 1846), a daughter 
of the late Giles Harris of that city. He is a ruling 
elder in the First Presbyterian Church at Owensboro, 
and an exemplary christian man; large hearted and 
generous, honorable and true, he possesses the respect 
and esteem of all who know him. 

Three children: 

No. 270. Mary Ann Anderson, born February 
II, 1S6S. 

No. 271. Martha Bransford Anderson, born 
September 30, 1871. 

No. 272. Susan Harris Anderson, born Febru- 
ary 28, 1875. 



No. 81. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. l8, 4, AND I. 

Sallie Quicksall Anderson, second daughter, 
third child of James B. Anderson and his wdfe, Mary 
Ann Martin Robertson, was born November 13, 
1844, at "Woodlawn," six miles east of Owensboro, 
Daviess county, Kentucky. She attended private 
schools in Owensboro, also the Caldwell Institute at 
Danville, Kentucky, and finished her education at 
Oxford Female College, Oxford, Ohio; married at 
Owensboro August 2, 1864, Thomas Samuel Venable 
(born in Prince Edward county, Virginia, June 17, 
1840), who came to Kentucky in i860 and settled in 
Owensboro. He is engaged in the mercantile business 
there, is also President of the Owensboro Savings Bank 



FOURTH GENERATION. I29 

and has extensive gold mining interests in Colorado; is 
also a ruling elder in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Owensboro. 

Five children: 

No. 273. Virginia Woodson Venable, born 
July 4, 1865. 

No. 274. James Anderson Venable, born March 
9. 1868. 

No. 275. Mary Ann Venable, born October 27, 
1871. 

No. 276. Matilda Tyler Venable, born Decem- 
ber 4, 1876. 

No. 277. Elizabeth Tompkins Venable, born 
September 21, 1882. 

No. 82. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. l8, 4, AND I. 

William Kyle Anderson, compiler of this gene- 
alogy, second son, fourth child of James B. Anderson 
and his wife, Mary Ann Martin Robertson, was 
born March 24, 1847 at "Woodlawn," six miles east 
of Owensboro in Daviess county, Kentucky; received 
his early education in private schools at Owensboro; 
at the age of seventeen entered the literary department 
of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and there 
spent four years as a student, and received in June, 
1868, the degree of A. B. In 187 1 he was further 
honored with the degree of A. M. from the same 
institution; went abroad in 1868 and spent autumn and 
winter of 1 868-' 69 in attending lectures on art and 
history in the University of Berlin, and afterwards 



13° FOURTH GENERATION. 

several months in travel on the continent of Europe 
and in Great Britain, returning home in the autumn 
of 1869. Married at Detroit, Michigan, January 26, 
1870, CorneHa M. Cook (born at Detroit January- 22, 
1 851), daughter of the late Joseph Cook and his wife, 
Marj^ Ann Robinson, of that city. In company with 
his brother, Thomas Sidney Anderson, he in 1871 
organized the Owensboro Savings Bank, and was 
cashier of it until 1877, when he sold out his interests 
to his brother and removed to Detroit, Michigan, where 
he has since continued to reside. For many years he 
was associated in business with the Honorable John S. 
Newberry and the Honorable James McMillan, wealthy 
capitalists of Detroit, in their various manufacturing, 
commercial and maritime corporations, of all of which 
he was the treasurer, as well as a member of the board 
of directors. In 1894 he resigned active service in said 
corporations, and with his family went abroad and 
spent about a year and a half in travel in Great Britain, 
Central and Southern Europe, Norw^ay, Sweden and 
Russia, returning the latter part of the year 1895. 
Since that time he has not taken an active part in busi- 
ness, except in the management of his own personal 
affairs. 

In July, 1897, President McKinley appointed him 
United States consul at the city of Hanover, Germany, 
which position he accepted and filled until September, 
1899, when, on account of personal business, he resigned 
and came home. 

He is a director of the Detroit Savings Bank, also 
of several manufacturing, commercial and marine cor- 
porations at Detroit; a charter member of the Detroit 
Club, a member of the Michigan Club, the Fontinalis 



FOURTH GENERATION. I3I 

Club, and the Lake St. Clair Fishing and Shooting 
Club. He is also a member of the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, and of the Society of 
Colonial Wars. Residence, in winter in Detroit; in 
the summer and autumn at his country home, "Sunny- 
croft," on the bank of Lake Ste. Clair, Grosse Pointe 
Farms, Michigan. 

One child: 

No. 278. Catharine Clarke Anderson, born 
June 23, 1884. 

No. 83. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 1 8, 4, AND I. 

James Anderson, third son, fifth child of James 
B. Anderson and his wife, Mary Ann Martin Rob- 
ertson, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, April 22, 
1 85 1, and died at same place July 23, 1852. 



[end of fourth generation.] 




Fifth Generation. 



GREAT-GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN OF DONALD 
ROBERTSON AND HIS WIFE, RACHEL ROGERS. 



The Fifth Generation Coosists of One Hundred and 
Ninety-Five Persons. 

No. 84. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 19, 5, 3, AND I. 

Lansing Semple Mulliken, only son and child of 
Napoleon Mulliken and his wife, Ada Semple, was 
born at St. Louis, Missouri, October 8, 1855, and died 
at Elsah, Illinois, October 3, 1861; buried at Belle- 
fontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri. 



No. 85. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 20, 5, 3, AND I. 

Ada Semple Ames, eldest daughter and child of 
Edgar Ames and his wife, Lucy Virginia Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, March 3, 1861; mar- 
ried October 17, 1883, at " Notchcliff " in Jersey 
county, Illinois, Henry S. Turner of St. Louis, a son 



134 FIFTH GENERATION. 

of Major Henry S. Turner, formerly one of the lead- 
ing and wealthiest citizens of that place. 

They reside at their handsome country seat, "Elis- 
toun," in Jersey county, Illinois. Mr. Turner is 
engaged in farming and the raising of fine stock. 

Two children : 

No. 279. Edgar Ames Turner, born at St. 

Louis, Missouri, October 29, 1884. 
No. 280. Julia Marian Turner, born at "Elis- 

toun," December 26, 1892. 

No. 86. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 20, 5, 3, AND I. 

Henry Semple Ames, elder son, second child of 
Edgar Ames and his wife, Lucy Virginia Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, March 4, 1863; was 
educated in the schools of his native city and in Europe; 
afterwards became a student in Yale, and graduated 
with honor from that institution in 1886. The follow- 
ing year he entered the Law College of Washington 
University, St. Louis, and after a three years' course 
received his degree. He was chosen class orator and 
won the first prize upon a thesis presented by him. 
He is engaged in managing his father's estate; also 
has large business interests in Helena, Montana, and 
Seattle, Washington. Unmarried. 

No. 87. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 20, 5, 3, AND I. 

Mary Semple Ames, second daughter, third child 
of Edgar Ames and his wife, Lucy Virginia Semple 



FIFTH GENERATION. 135 

was born at St. L,ouis, Missouri, August 9, 1864; mar- 
ried October 15, 1890, at "Notchcliff," Jersey county, 
Illinois, Dr. Weyman Crow Cushman, of St. Ivouis. 

Two children: 

No. 281. Henry Semple Cushman, born August 
6, 1892, at Bar Harbor, Maine. 

No. 282. Robert AUerton Cushman, born July 
19. 1893, at "Notchcliff," Illinois. 

No. 88. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 20, 5, 3, AND I. 

Edgar Ames, second son, fourth child of Edgar 
Ames and his wife, Lucy Virginia Semple, was born 
at St. lyouis, Missouri, February 26, 1868; educated 
in schools at St. Louis and at Yale University, where 
he took his degree in 1890; spent several years in 
Europe, engaged in study and travel; is now in charge 
of the work of building the waterway canal from Puget 
Sound to Lake Washington in the State of Washing- 
ton. Unmarried. 

No. 89. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 21, 5, 3, AND I. 

Adria Maude Semple, eldest daughter and child 
of Hon. Eugene Semple and his wife, Ruth A. 
Lownsdale, was born at Portland, Oregon, January 14, 
1872; married June 17, 1891, at Seattle, Washington, 
Ensign Edward Moale, U. S. Navy. He served with 
distinction on the U. S. Steamship "Helena" during 
the Spanish- American War, and has since done arduous 
duty in the Philippines; was in the naval battle at 



136 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Manzanillo, Cuba; was promoted to a lieutenancy, and 
received honorable mention in the despatches for gal- 
lantry in battle. He is now at Norfolk Xavy Yard, 
Virginia, a member of the staff of Admiral Cotton, 
U. S. N. 

One child: 

No. 283. Edward Semple Moale, born July 22, 
1892, at San Francisco. 

No. 90. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 21, 5, 3, AND I. 

Zoe Ag-nes Semple, second child and daughter of 
Hon, Eugene Semple and his wife, Ruth A. Lowns- 

dale, was born at Portland, Oregon, April i, 1873. 
Unmarried. Lives with her father at Seattle. 

No. 91. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 21, 5, 3, AND I. 

Mary Ethel Semple, third daughter and child of 
Hon. Eugene Semple and his wife, Ruth A. Lowns- 
dale, was born at Portland, Oregon, December 30, 
1875. Unmarried. Lives with her father at Seattle. 

No. 92. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 21, 5, 3, AND I. 

Eugene Lownsdale Semple, only son, fourth 
child of Hon. Eugene Semple and his wife Ruth A. 
Lownsdale, was born at Portland, Oregon, October 31, 
1877. Unmarried. Lives with his father at Seattle. 



FIFTH GENERATION. I37 

No. 93. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 22, 5, 3, AND I. 

Mary Semple Scott, eldest daughter and child of 
Ashley D. Scott and his wife, Julia Ellen Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, December 31, 1873. 
Unmarried. Lives with her mother at St. Louis. 

No. 94. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 22, 5, 3, AND I. 

Semple Stillman Scott, eldest son, second child 
of Ashley D. Scott and his wife, Julia Ellen Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, August 28, 1875; was 
educated at St. Louis schools and graduated from 
manual training department of Washington University, 
St. Louis, in 1894. He and his brother, Ashley David 
Scott, are engaged in manufacturing electrical machines 
and batteries at St. Louis, and have patented a num- 
ber of valuable inventions. 

No. 95- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 22, 5, 3, AND I. 

Ashley David Scott, second son, third child of 
Ashley D. Scott and his wife, Julia Ellen Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, March 21, 1S78; is 
engaged with his brother, Semple Stillman Scott, in 
the electrical business at St. Louis. 

No. 96. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 22, 5, 3, AND I. 

Edgar Ames Scott, born October 21, 1880; 
died October 31, 1881. 



138 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 97. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 22, 5, 3, AND I. 

Isabel Semple Scott, second daughter, fifth child 
of Ashley D. Scott and his wife, Julia Ellen Semple, 
was born at St. Louis, Missouri, June 13, 1885. 

No. 98. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 24, 7, 3, AND I. 

Ellen Garner Hulbert, eldest daughter and child 
of Henry P. Hulbert and his wife, Ellen Jane Garner, 
was born at Alton, Illinois, September 17, 1847; 
married October 17, 1870, at the home of her cousin, 
Mrs. Edg-ar Ames, in St. Louis, to Charles Shepard 
Beardsley, (born at Auburn, New York, March 7, 
1845,) a lawyer. He was a member of the New York 
General Assembly from Auburn in 1874; Deputy 
County Clerk New York County in 1883, and Attorney 
for collection of Arrears of Personal Taxes, New York 
County, 1 885- 1 890. His office is at 42 New Street, 
New York; home at Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. 

Five children: 

No. 284. Ada Hulbert Beardsley, born June 29, 

1871, at Auburn, New York. 
No. 285. Hulbert Ten Eyck Beardsley, born 

December 4, 1873, at Auburn, New 

York. 
No. 286. Ten Eyck Remoen Beardsley, born 

May 2, 1875, at Auburn, New York. 
No. 287. Marion Semple Beardsley, born 

December 4, 1878, at New York City. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 139 

No. 288. Ruth Hulbert Beardsley, born April 
30, 1884, at Yonkers, New York, 
died January 12, 1886. 



No. 99. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 24, 7, 3, AND I. 

Marcia Semple Hulbert, born at Alton, Illinois, 
September 29, 1849, died at San Francisco, California, 
November 21, 1864. 

No. ICO. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 24, 7, 3, AND I. 

Ada Mizner Hulbert, third daughter and child of 
Henry P. Hulbert and his wife, Ellen Jane Garner, 
was born at San Francisco, California, February 10, 
1855; married there February 7, 1878, John Hinkel of 
same place (born at Galena, Illinois, June 12, 1849), 
a wealthy real estate owner. They removed May, 
1896, to Berkeley, across the bay from San Francisco 
and in full view of it. The University of California is 
located there. Their residence is No. 2520 Channing 
Way, Berkeley. 

Three children: 

No. 289. Milton Hulbert Hinkel, born Decem- 
ber 19, 1878; died November 28, 1884. 

No. 290. Lewis Cassell Hinkel, born May 8, 
1880. 

No. 291. Hulbert Hinkel, born October 27, 1881. 



I40 FIFTH GENERATION, 

Nos. loi and 102. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Mary Jane Maxey, born March 9, 1851; died 
July 24, 1852, at Tompkinsville, Kentucky. 

James Semple Maxey, born February 15, 1853; 
died September 23, 1875, at Piano, Texas. 

No. 103. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Radford Maxey, second son, third child of Dr. 
Albert H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann Garner, 
was born at Tompkinsville, Kentuckj', May 2, 1855; 
married December 20, 1885, Susan Shanks of Van 
Alstyn, Grayson county, Texas; moved to Indian 
Territory; is a farmer and stock raiser and lives on a 
ranch near Raff. 

Four children: 

No. 292. Alfred H. Maxey, born November 14, 

1886. 
No. 293. Fannie Maxey, born July 25, 1888. 
No. 294. Maggie Rice Maxey, born August 13, 

1890. 
No. 295. Leslie Maxey (2nd), born July 12, 

1895; di^^ March 5, 1896. 

No. 104. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Rice Maxey, third son, fourth child of Dr. Albert 
H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann Garner, was born 



FIFTH GENERATION. I4I 

at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, May i, 1857; married at 
Palestine, Texas, May 12, 1887, Maggie A. Broyles. 
He is a lawyer; was prosecuting attorney of Houston 
county, Texas, November, 1886, to January, 1890; 
resigned and removed February, 1890, to Sherman, 
Grayson county, Texas ; was elected prosecuting 
attorney of Grayson county 1892; re-elected 1894. 
Resides at Sherman. 
No children. 

No. 105. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Alfred G. Maxey, born June 8, i860, died May 
27, 1864, at Tompkinsville, Kentucky. 

No. 106. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Frances Ellen Maxey, second daughter, sixth 
child of Doctor Albert H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy 
Ann Garner, was born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, 
January 10, 1862; married at Van Alstyn, Texas, 
November 13, 1884, Sewell L. Brown, a merchant of 
Velasco, Texas, where they now reside. 

Five children: 

No. 296. Perry Maxey Brown, born August 16, 
1885, at Decatur, Texas. 

No. 297. Gabrielle Brown, born March 17, 1887, 
at Decatur, Texas. 

No. 298. Evans Brown, born March 31, 1889, 
died September 20, 1890. 



142 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 299. Carrie Rice Brown, born July 8, 1 891, 

at Decatur, Texas. 
No. 300. Ford Brown, born July 17, 1893, at 

Decatur, Texas. 

No. 107. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Lucetta A. Maxey, third daughter, seventh child 
of Dr. Albert H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann 
Garner, was born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, June 
I, 1864; married at Van Alstyn, Texas, July 22, 1883, 
James P. Leslie, a lawyer, of Sherman, Texas. 

Six children : 

No. 301. Corinne Estelle Leslie, born August 

22, 18S4. 
No. 302. James P. Leslie, Jr., born March 4, 

1886, died in infancy. 
No. 303. Throckmorton Maxey Leslie, born 

March 1 1, 1887. 
No. 304. Lucy E. Leslie, bom October 30, 1888. 
No. 305. William L. Leslie, born April 4, 1892, 

died in infancy. 
No. 306. Marguerite Leslie, born February — , 

1894. 

No. 108. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

John Benton Maxey, fourth son, eighth child 
of Dr. Albert H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann 
Garner, was born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, July 



FIFTH GENERATION. 143 

28, 1867. He is a lawyer, practicing at Purcell, 
Indian Territory. Was in 1897 unmarried. 

No. 109. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Samuel Bell Maxey, fifth son, ninth child of Dr. 
Albert H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann Garner, 
was born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, September 2, 
1869; is a graduate of Marion Simms Medical College 
of St. Louis, Missouri, and is practicing medicine at 
Angleton, Texas. Unmarried in 1897. 

No. no. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 25, 7, 3, AND I. 

Leslie Maxey, sixth son, tenth child of Dr. Albert 
H. Maxey and his wife, Lucy Ann Garner, was born 
at Piano, Texas, February i, 1874; is a graduate of 
Austin College, Sherman, Texas, and in 1897 was 
studying law at Sherman. 

Unmarried. 

No. III. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 26, 7, 3, AND I. 

Frances Harriet January, eldest daughter and 
child of Dr. J. Orvdlle January and his wife, Sarah 
Eliza Garner, was born at Tompkinsville, Kentucky, 
December 24, 1856; married at Cleburne, Texas, No- 
vember 28, 1877, John Leak Maxey (born 1851, near 
Tompkinsville, Kentucky — not a relative) . They lived 



144 FIFTH GENERATION. 

at Cleburne until November, 1887, then removed to 
Fowler, Fresno county, California, and now live 
there. 

Seven children : 

No. 307. John Walker Maxey, born September 

I, 1S78, at Cleburne, Texas. 
No. 308. Edward Garner Maxey, born January 

14, 1 882, at Cleburne, Texas. 
No. 309. Nellie May Maxey, born August i, 

1884, at Cleburne, Texas. 
No. 310. Ruby Lee Maxey, born December 28, 

1886, at Cleburne, Texas. 
No. 311. Flavia Maxey, born February 20, 1891, 

at Fowler, California. 
No. 312. Henry Maxey, born November 18, 

1894, at Fowler, California. 
No. 313. Clarence Alvin Maxey, born February 

4, 1896, at Fowler, California. 



Nos. 112, 113, 114, and 115. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 26, 7, 3, AND I. 

Lucy Ellen January, born October 16, 1858, 
died January 4, 1878. 

Bradford January, born October 5, i860, died 
March — , 1869. 

John Houston January, born March 4, 1866, 
died November 6, 1879. 

James Russell January, born March 16, 1868, 
died January 12, 1887. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 



145 



No. 116. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 26, 7, 3, AND I, 

Susan Ada January, third daughter, sixth child 
of Dr. J. Orville January and his wife, Sarah Eliza 
Garner, was born at Trenton, Tennessee, April 20, 
1870; married May 4, 1895, Janies Thomas Bills; they 
reside at Bono, Texas. No issue. 



No. 117. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 26, 7, 3, AND I. 

Charles January, born in 1873, died December, 

1874. .. . _ 

No. 118. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 26, 7, 3, AND I, 

Robert Andrew January, fifth son, eighth child 
of Doctor J. Orville January and his wife, Sarah Eliza 
Garner, was born at Trenton, Tennessee, March 3, 
1875; married December 29, 1896, Lela Davis. 
Residence, Bono Texas. 

One child: 

No. 314. Flavia January, born January 28, 
1897. 

No. 119. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 28, 9, 3, AND I. 

Oscar Bartlett Turman, eldest son and child of 
Hosea B. Turman of Colusa, California, and his wife, 



146 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Mary Benicia Semple, was born at Bartlett Springs, 
Lake County, California, September 6, 1871; is un- 
married and lives at Colusa. 

No. 120. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 28, 9, 3, AND I. 

Joe Benton Turman, second son and child of 
Hosea B. Turman of Colusa, California, and his wife, 
Mary Benicia Semple, was born at Santa Maria, 
Santa Barbara County, Cahfornia, September 24, 1873; 
married July 14, 1893, Fannie Allen. 

Two children: 

No. 315. Rita Benicia Turman, born June 26, 
1894, at Colusa, California. 

No. 316. Hosea Vivian Turman, born March 
14, 1896, at Colusa, California. 

No. 121. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 28, 9, 3, AND I. 

Louis Francis Turman, third son and child of 
Hosea B. Tturman and his wife, Mary Benicia Semple, 

was born at Colusa, California, July 29, 1876. Un- 
married in 1897. 

No. 122. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 28, 9, 3, AND I. 

Robert Semple Turman, fourth son and child of 
Hosea B. Turman of Colusa, California, and his wife, 
Mary Benicia Semple, was born at Stanton Springs, 
California, August 22, 1878. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 147 

No. 123. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 29, lO, 3, AND I. 

Samuel J. Moore, eldest son and child of John 
Moore of Ballard County, Kentucky, and his wife, 
Lucy Robertson Semple, was born September 26, 
1857; was unmarried in 1897, ^^^ Clerk of the Circuit 
Court in Ballard County; lives at Wickliffe, Kentucky, 

No. 124. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 29, lO, 3, AND I. 

Carrie Elliott Moore, eldest daughter, second 
child of John Moore of Ballard County, Kentucky, 
and his wife, Lucy Robertson Semple, was born 
December 4, i860; married October 12, 1884, to M. L. 
Morris of Valparaiso, Indiana. They live at Clinton, 
Kentucky, and he is Clerk of the Circuit Court, in 
Hickman County. 

Three children: 

No. 317. Harry Moss Morris, born October 12, 
1885, died August 6, 1895. 

No. 318. Minnie Moore Morris, born October 
10, 1889. 

No. 319. Paul Robertson Morris, born January 
22, 1897. 

No. 125. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS, 29, lO, 3, AND I. 

Robertson Semple Moore, second son, third 
child of John Moore of Ballard County, Kentucky, 



148 FIFTH GENERATION. 

and his wife, Lucy Robertson Semple, was born 
April 3, 1863; married Annie Atchison; residence near 
Bardwell, Carlisle Count}-, Kentucky. 

Two children: 

No. 320. Mattie Lucy Moore, born September 

28, 1890. 
No. 321. Carrie Eula Moore, born December 2, 

1894. 

No. 126. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 29, ID, 3, AND I. 

Minnie Swan Moore, second daughter, fourth 
child of John Moore of Ballard County, Kentucky, 
and his wife, Lucy Robertson Semple, was born 
August 27, 1867; married at Clinton, Kentucky, 
January i, 1890, Robert M. Ray. They reside at 
Dade City, Florida. 

Three children: 

No. 322. Mary Rennick Ray, born September 

27, 1890. 
No. 323. Lula Ray, born March 5, 1893. 
No. 324. Carrie Morris Ray, born January 25, 

1896. 

No. 127. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 29, ID, 3, AND I. 

Charles Wickliffe Moore, born June 6, 1871; 
died young. 



FIFTH GENERATION. • 149 

Nos. 128 and 129. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 32, lO, 3, AND I. 

Daughters of Hon. William lyindsay and his wife 
Elizabeth Swan Semple. 

Ada Lindsay, born October i6, 1865, died 
September 26, 1866, at Clinton, Kentucky. 

Swan Lindsay, born January 31, 1867, died 
October 8, 1867, at Clinton, Kentucky. 

No. 130. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 34, lO, 3, AND I. ' 

Mary Semple Moss, eldest daughter and child of 
Judge Nathaniel P. Moss and his wife, Ada Mary 
Semple, was born at Clinton, Kentucky, May i, 1873. 
Unmarried. 

No. 131. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 34, ID, 3, AND I. 

Nell Semple Moss, second daughter and child of 
Judge Nathaniel P. Moss and his wife, Ada Mary 
Semple, was born at Clinton, Kentucky, August 20, 
1874; married December 20, 1900, at Clinton, Ken- 
tucky, James Smalley Bate (No. 214) of Louisville, 
Kentucky. 

No. 132. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 34, lO, 3, AND I. 

Harry Semple Moss, only son, third child of 
Judge Nathaniel P. Moss and his wife, Ada Mary 
Semple, was born at Clinton, Kentucky, August 9, 
1881. 



I50 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 133. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 36, lO, 3, AND I. 

Paul Lindsay, elder son and child of Hon. 
William Lindsay and his second wife, Hettie Louis- 
iana Semple, was born at Clinton, Kentucky, August 
16, 1869, and died at Frankfort, Kentucky, April 22, 
1878. 

No. 134- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 36, ID, 3, AND I. 

Marion Semple Lindsay, only daughter, second 
child of Hon. William Lindsay of Frankfort, Kentucky, 
and his second wife, Hetty Louisiana Semple, was 
born at Clinton, Kentucky, August 9, 1871. Un- 
married. 

No. 135- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 36, ID, 3, AND I. 

Henry Semple Lindsay, second son, third child 
of Hon. William Lindsay and his second wife, Hettie 
Louisiana Semple, was born at Frankfort, Kentucky, 
April 8, 1882 and died there December 8, 1882. 

No. 136. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Zoe Lucy Green, eldest daughter and child of 
Hon. William S. Green of Colusa, California, and 
his wife, Mary Josephine Armstrong, was bom at 
Colusa, California, April 13, 1863; married there, 
March 4, 1885, Frank Corwin Radcliffe, (born at 



FIFTH GENERATION. 151 

Princeton, Illinois, September 9, i860). Their home 
is in San Francisco. Mr. Radcliffe is employed in the 
Land Department of the Southern Pacific Railroad Co., 
and Mrs. Radcliffe in the Draughting Department of 
the United States Surveyor General's Office. 

Three children: 

No. 326. Lucille Geneva Radcliffe, born Sep- 
tember 30, 1886, at San Francisco. 

No. 327. Ramona Radcliffe, September 28, 1888, 
at Colusa. 

No. 328. Willette Radcliffe, born February — , 

1890, at Sacramento, died May — , 

1 89 1, at Colusa. 

No. 138. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Mary Luella Green, second daughter, third child 
of Hon. William S. Green and his wife, Mary Jose- 
phine Armstrong, was born at Colusa, California, 
December 2, 1866; married at Colusa, October, 1886 
Charles Horton, (born at Seymotu-, Indiana), from 
whom she was upon her petition divorced in 1891. 

One child: 

No. 329. William Green Horton, born Decem- 
ber 12, 1888, at Fresno, California. 

No. 139- 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Genevieve Green, third daughter, fourth child of 
Hon. William S. Green and his wife, Mary Josephine 
Armstrong, was born at Colusa, California, May 31, 



152 FIFTH GENERATION, 

1869; she was for several years Assistant State Libra- 
rian of California; since 1897 has been at Paris, France^ 
engaged in literary work and writing for papers and 
magazines in the United States. Unmarried. 

No. 140. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Louis Robinson Green, born November 25, 1872; 
died April 29, 1883. 

No. 141. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Anna Raphael Green, fourth daughter, sixth 
child of Hon. William S. Green and his wife, Mary 
Josephine Armstrong, was born at Colusa, California, 
June 4, 1875; is employed in the Draughting Depart- 
ment of the United States Surveyor General's Office,, 
in San Francisco. Unmarried. 

No. 142. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 38, 12, 3, AND I. 

Donald Robertson Green ^ 2nd t, third son, seventh 
child of Hon. William S. Green and his wife, Mary 
Josephine Armstrong, was born at Colusa, California,. 
August 3, 1877. 

No. 143. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 41, 12, 3, AND I. 

Lucy Lee Green, eldest daughter and child of 
Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his wife, 
Margaret E. Browning, was bom at Fort Scott,. 



FIFTH GENERATION. I53 

Kansas, August 2, 1871; married March 7, 1895, 
George R. Parham, a druggist of Wichita, Kansas, 
which place is now their home. 

No. 144. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 41, 12, 3, AND I. 

William Duff Green, eldest son, second child of 
Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his wife, 
Margaret E. Browning, was born at Fort Scott, 
Kansas, July 29, 1873; married February 4, 1895, Ida 
Duty. He was Deputy Sheriff of Grant Count}^ 
Oklahoma Territory, for two years. Resides at 
Jefferson, Oklahoma. 

No. 145. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 41, 12, 3, AND I. 

Oscar Semple Green, second son, third child of 
Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his wife, 
Margaret E. Browning, was born at Taylorsville, 
Illinois, July 26, 1875. He is in the stock and cattle 
business at Jefferson, Oklahoma. 

No. 146. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 41, 12, 3, AND I. 

Zoe Josephine Green, second daughter, fourth 
child of Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his 

wife, Margaret E. Browning, was born at Danville, 
IlHnois, March 18, 1878. 



154 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 147. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4I, 12, 3, AND I. 

Imogene Eleanor Green, third daughter, fifth 
child of Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his 

wife, Margaret E. Browning, was born at Danville, 
Illinois, August 28, 1881. 

No. 148. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4I, 12, 3, AND I. 

Ena Lorilla Green, fourth daughter, sixth child 
of Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his wife, 
Margaret E. Browning, was born at Kingman, Kansas, 
June 22, 1884. 

No. 149. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 41, 12, 3, AND I. 

Roberta Browning Green, fifth daughter, seventh 
child of Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his 

wife, Margaret E. Browning, was born at Greensburg, 
Kansas, November 3, 1888. 

No. 150. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 4I, 12, 3, AND I. 

Lucille Marie Green, sixth daughter, eighth child 
of Hon. Donald Robertson Green and his wife, 
Margaret E. Browning, was born at Greensburg, 
Kansas, January i, 1891. 



FIPTH GENERATION. I55 

No. 151. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, I3, 3, AND I. 

Oscar Bradford, eldest son of Eugene Bradford 

and his wife, Vitula Donovan, was born at Aurora, 
Illinois, March ii, 1884. 

No. 152. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, 13, 3, AND I. 

Antrim Bradford, second son and child of Eugene 
Bradford and his wife, Vitula Donovan, was born at 
Aurora, Illinois, February 2, 1885. 

No. 153. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, 13, 3, AND I. 

William Eugene Bradford, third son and child 
of Eugene Bradford and his wife Vitula Donovan, 
was born at Aurora, Illinois, February 5, 1886. 

No. 154. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, I3, 3, AND I. 

Russell Crawford Bradford, fourth son and 
child of Eugene Bradford and his wife, Vitula 
Donovan, was born at Springfield, Illinois, August 11, 
1887. 

No. 155. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, 1 3, 3, AND I. 

Harry Donald Bradford, fifth son and child of 
Eugene Bradford and his wife, Vitula Donovan, was 
born at Springfield, Illinois, June 28, 1889. 



156 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 156. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 45, 13, 3, AND I. 

Robert Semple Bradford, sixth son and child of 
Eugene Bradford and his wife, Vitula Donovan, was 
born at St. Louis, Missouri, May 4, 1893. 

No. 157. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 48, I3, 3, AND I. 

Lucy Semple Bradford, daughter and eldest child 
of Donald Bradford and his wife, Esther Fox, was 
born at Helena, Montana, June 10, 1890. 

No. 158. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 48, I3, 3, AND I. 

Sidney Lorenz Bradford, son and second child of 
Donald Bradford and his wife, Esther Fox, was 
born at Helena, Montana, June 20, 1893. 

No. 159. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Jacob Clay, eldest daughter and child of 
Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born at "Ashland," near Lexington, 
Kentucky, August 10, 1844, and died there March 7, 
1863. 

No. 160. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

James Brown Clay, Jr., eldest son, second child 
of Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born at Lexington, Kentucky, January 27, 



FIFTH GENERATION. I57 

1846; married January, 1880 Eliza Ingels of IvCxington. 
No issue. He is a farmer and fine stock raiser in 
Fayette Count}^, Kentucky, near Lexington. 

No. 161. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

John Cathcart Johnson Clay, second son, third 
child of Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan 
Maria Jacob, was born at Lexington, Kentucky, 
December 23, 1847, and died at Mansfield, near 
Lexington, September 15, 1872. "Of noble and 
lovely character and full of promise." 

No. 162. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

Henry (called " Harry") Clay, third son, fourth 
child of Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan 
Maria Jacob, was born November 17, 1849, in Lisbon, 
Portugal, while his father was charge d^ affaires of the 
United States there. He was elected Prosecuting 
Attorney of the City of Louisville, Kentucky, in 
which position he made a brilliant record, but resigned 
in 1880 to join the Howgate Expedition to the Arctic 
regions; spent the winter of 1880-81, at Upper Navik, 
in Greenland, and thence proceeded in the ship 
" Proteus," of the United States Exploration Survey, 
to Lady Franklin Bay and returned in the same vessel 
to the United States in 1881. He was unmarried. 
Died at Louisville, Kentucky, September 22, 1884. 



158 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 163. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, 1 4, 4, AND I. 

Lucretia Hart Clay, second daughter, fifth child 
of Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan 
Maria Jacob, was born at Lexington, Kentucky, 
July 3, 1 85 1. 

She is much interested in the development of 
patriotic American Societies, and has just been re- 
elected State Regent for Kentucky of the ' ' Daughters 
of the American Revolution;" is also author of a 
charming book, a romance, entitled " The Hilliards," 
which, it is hoped, will soon be published. 

No. 164. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, 1 4, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Jacob Clay, fourth son, sixth child of 
Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born at "Ashland," near Lexington, 
Kentucky, April 5, 1853. He studied medicine at 
Louisville Medical College and received the degree of 
M. D. in March, 1873; practiced his profession at St. 
Louis, Missouri, 1 873-1 875; was appointed by Presi- 
dent Hayes in April, 1877 Second Lieutenant United 
States Army, and was retired as First Lieutenant in 
March, 1894, his retirement being necessitated, owing 
to heart disease contracted while campaigning against 
hostile Indians in Arizona and New Mexico. During 
his term of service in the Army, he was graduated 
from the Infantry and Cavalry School at Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas; also served on the staffs of Generals 
Miles, Guerson and McCook, as Inspector of Small 
Arms and Practice and Acting Ordnance Officer of 



FIFTH GENERATION, I59 

the Department of Arizona. He is unmarried and at 
present is engaged in farming and raising fine stock in 
Fayette Count}'-, Kentucky, near Lexington. 

No. 165. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, 14, 4, AND I. 

Susan Jacob Clay, third daughter, seventh child 
of Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan 
Maria Jacob, was born February 12, 1855, and died 
September 14, 1863. 

No. 166. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

Charles Donald Clay, fifth son, eighth child of 
Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born at ' ' Ashland," near Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, January 7, 1857; was appointed Second 
Lieutenant United States Army in 1883 by President 
Arthur, graduated from the Infantry and Cavalry 
School of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and was promoted 
to a First Lieutenancy in the 17th Regiment Infantry, 
United States Army, March 19, 1891. During the 
Spanish war his regiment was sent to the front and 
was in the thickest of the fighting all through the 
Cuban campaign. Lieutenant Clay served as Regi- 
mental Adjutant and was distinguished for gallantry 
and devotion to duty. After the glorious victories 
won by our arms at San Juan Hill and El Caney, he 
was promoted to a Captaincy on the battle field, and 
was recommended by his regimental and brigade 
commanders for a brevet "for conspicuous courage and 
coolness, and for efficiency in transmitting orders 



l6o FIFTH GENERATION. 

under the fire of the enemy." At the conclusion of 
the war, the regiment returned to Columbus, Ohio, 
and while there, Captain Clay at a great memorial 
meeting, delivered an eloquent and impressive eulogy 
upon Colonel Haskell and the other heroic dead of the 
regiment who had laid down their lives upon the altar 
of their countrj^'s honor. When the Philippine re- 
bellion under Aguinaldo broke out, the Seventeenth 
Regiment was forwarded to Manila, to aid in quelling 
it, and there again Captain Clay saw much hard 
service in the field. For cool bravery in battle he was 
promoted by General Hall to the position of Adjutant 
General of the Third Brigade, and also received honor- 
able mention in a despatch from General Otis. He was 
severely and almost fatally wounded in an engagement 
with the insurgents near Banlac, on March 25, 1899. 
A ball from a Winchester rifle pierced the left side of 
his neck, almost severing the jugular vein and, rang- 
ing downwards, lodged in his back under his left 
shoulder blade. Being entirely disabled for further 
active service, he was sent home. The bullet gave 
him continual pain but was finally located by means of 
X rays and extracted by surgeons at Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, on July 20, 1899, after which he recovered 
health. He is now stationed at Nashville, Tennessee, in 
charge of the United States Army recruiting station. 

Captain Clay married September 8, 1896, Maria 
Hensley Pepper, (born April 4, 1870) of Frankfort, 
Kentucky. They have 

Two children: 

No. 330. Susanne Jacob Clay, born July-, 1897. 
No. 331. Charles Donald Clay, Jr., born June 
— , 1899. 



FIFTH GENERATION. l6l 

No. 167. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND I. 

George Hudson Clay, sixth son, ninth child of 
Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born at "Ashland," near Lexington, 
Kentucky, October 24, 1858; is unmarried and resides 
with his mother and sister at ' ' Balgowan' ' near Lex- 
ington; business farming and stock raising. 

No. 168. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 49, I4, 4, AND 1. 

Nathaniel Hart Clay, seventh son, tenth child of 
Hon. James Brown Clay and his wife, Susan Maria 
Jacob, was born April 10, 1861 and died May 17, 
1862. 

No. 169. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

Captain Richard Taylor Jacob, Jr., eldest son 
and child of Colonel Richard Taylor Jacob, and only 
son by his first wife, Sarah Benton, was born at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, November 20, 1848; was educated at 
Kentucky Military Institute at Frankfort and was ap- 
pointed, October ist, 1867, by President Andrew John- 
son, Second Lieutenant United States Army; promoted 
to First Lieutenancy November, 1879 and resigned from 
the army July 15, 1881; entered political life and has 
held several important offices in the municipality of 
Louisville. He married at Lexington, Kentucky, 
January 16, 1877, Louise Williams of that place (born 



l62 FIFTH GENERATION. 

March i, 1854 at Sewickly, Pennsj-lvania.) During 
Spanish - American war he was commissioned as a 
captain and raised a company-, but his regiment was 
not sent to the seat of war; was mustered out at 
Chicamauga Camp. 

Four children: 

No. 332. Louise Benton Jacob, born November 
16, 1877, at Fort Buford, North 
Dakota. 

No. 333. Richard Taylor Jacob, born August 
13, 1 88 1, in Oldham County, Ken- 
tucky. 

No. 334. Bessie Chappelle Jacob, born January 
6, 1880, died July 12, 1886. 

No. 335. Harry Clay Jacob, born July 19, 1885, 
at Louisville, Kentucky. 



No. 170. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

Elizabeth McDowell Benton Jacob, second child 
of Colonel Richard Taylor Jacob, and only daughter 
by his first wife, Sarah Benton, was born in Cooper 
county, Missouri, ten miles south of Boonville, July 12, 
1850; married at Lexington, Kentucky, December 9, 
1869, Daniel Vertner \V00lle3' (bom at "Burnt Station 
Farm," September 20, 1841, died at " Norfolk Farm" 
February 6, 1899). Mrs. Woolley resides at "Norfolk 
Farm," near Milton, in Trimble County, Kentucky. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 163 

Eight children: 

No. 336. Douglas Vertner Woolley, born 
October 7, 1870, died January 7, 1899. 

No. 337. Richard J. Woolley, born April 14, 
1872. 

No. 338. Sallie Howard Benton Woolley, born 
November 10, 1873. 

No. 339. Roberta Wickliffe Woolley, born 
July 28, 1877. 

No. 340. Leila McDowell Woolley, born April 
22, 1879. 

No. 341. Thomas Benton Woolley, born De- 
cember 30, 1 88 1. 

No. 342. Mary Preston Woolley, born August 
18, 1883. 

No. 343. Preston Woolley, born June 4, 1886. 

Roberta Wickliffe Woolley, married February 2, 
1899, Horace Magruder Barrett, and lives near Carroll- 
ton, Kentucky. They had one son, Thomas Vertner 
Barrett, born at "Norfolk Farm" December 16, 1899. 
This son, the only representative of the Seventh 
Generation, recorded in this genealogy, died July 5, 
1900. 

No. 171. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

John (I.) Jacob, second son of Colonel Richard 

T. Jacob, and eldest child by his second wife, Laura 
Wilson, was born on " Clifton " farm near Westport, 
Kentucky, January 22, 1870. He is a lawyer and 
practiced his profession for some years in Chicago; 



l64 FIFTH GENERATION. 

during the campaign of 1896 he wrote a book favor- 
ing bimetalism and "free silver;" is unmarried. 



No. 172, 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

William Jay Jacob, third son of Colonel Richard 
T, Jacob and second child by his second wife, Laura 
Wilson, was born on " Clifton " farm near Westport, 
Kentuck}-, July 17, 1872; is unmarried; lives at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and is employed in the post-oflBce 
there. 

No. 173. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

Donald Robertson Jacob, fourth son of Colonel 
Richard T. Jacob, and third child by his second wife, 
Laura Wilson, was born on "Clifton" farm, near 
Westport, Kentucky, Maj' 27, 1874; he is a physician 
and has a rapidh- growing practice at Louisville, Ken- 
tuck3^ Unmarried. 

No. 174. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 50, 1 4, 4, AND I. 

Laura Wilson Jacob, second daughter of Colonel 
Richard T. Jacob, and fourth child by his second 
wife, Laura Wilson, was born at "Clifton" farm, 
near Westport, Kentucky, January 7, 1877. She 
lives with her father at Louisville. Unmarried. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 165 

No. 175. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 50, I4, 4, AND I. 

Brent Kirk Jacob, fifth son of Colonel Richard 
T. Jacob, and fifth child by his second wife, Laura 
Wilson, was born at " Clifton " farm, near Westport, 
Kentucky, February 23, 1879. Is (1900) a student 
in Rose Polytechnic Institute, at Terre Haute, Ind. 

No. 176. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 51, I4, 4, AND I. 

John Jeremiah Jacob, (named in honor of his 
grandfather and like him always called "John I.") 
eldest son and child of Thomas Prather Jacob and his 
wife, Henrietta Wilson Pope, was born at Louisville, 
Kentucky, September 29, 1861; was educated at 
Rugby School, Louisville, and graduated in June, 1879; 
was prepared for Har\^ard University but changed 
his mind and, instead of entering that institution, 
went abroad in September 1879 and spent two years 
on the continent of Europe in study and travel; upon 
his return home was appointed Deputy United States 
Collector of Internal Revenue; when the Columbia 
Finance and Trust Company of Louisville was organ- 
ized, in 1889, he accepted a position in it, and later, 
in 1891, was appointed Superintendent of the Comp- 
any's Safe Deposit Vaults, which position he still 
holds. He is prominent in society and church circles; 
a charter member of Pendennis Club, and one of its 
officers, and a member the of the vestry of Christ 
Church Cathedral. He manages the affairs of his 



l66 FIFTH GENERATION. 

father's estate, which has been kept undivided, and 
which owns much valuable property. Unmarried. 



No. 177. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I, I4, 4, AND I. 

William Pope Jacob, second son and child of 
Thomas Prather Jacob and his wife, Henrietta 
Wilson Pope, was born August 5, 1863 and died July 
13, 1865. 

No. 178. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I, I4, 4, AND I. 

Mary Pope Jacob, eldest daughter, third child of 
Thomas Prather Jacob and his wife, Henrietta 
Wilson Pope, was born January 24, 1865 and died 
July 13, 1865. 

No. 179. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I, I4, 4, AND I. 

Reverend Thomas Prather Jacob, third son, 
fourth child of Thomas Prather Jacob, and his 

wife, Henrietta Wilson Pope, was born at Louisville, 
Kentucky, March 18, 1867; was the first and, up to 
this time, the only descendant of Donald Robertson to 
choose the sacred calling as his profession; educated in 
the public schools of Louisville; entered Princeton 
University in September, 1883 and, although the 
youngest member of his class, won the highest honors 
for scholarship; on account of ill-health was obliged to 
leave the University before completing his course; 



FIFTH GENERATION. 167 

graduated from Louisville Law School in 1888 and 
practiced law two years, after which he determined to 
enter the ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church; 
was ordained Deacon October 18, 1891, and Priest 
November 22, 1892 and was at same date installed as 
Rector of the Church of the Advent at Louisville, 
which was an important field and prospered well under 
his ministration, continuing through several years. 
He married September 28, 1892 at Louisville, Martha 
Baird, (born there April 17, 1874), daughter of James 
W. and Martha Howard Baird. His health declined 
in the year 1897 SLtid^ after about a year's illness, he 
died of tuberculosis on June 5, 1898. 

T7V0 children: 

No. 344. Henrietta Pope Jacob, born Novem- 
ber 8, 1893, at Louisville. 

No. 345. James Baird Jacob, born June 2, 1896, 
at Louisville. 

Nos. 180, 181, and 182. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I, I4, 4, AND I. 

Two daughters and one son of Thomas Prather 
Jacob and his wife, Henrietta Wilson Pope, born and 
died as follows : 

Etta Pope Jacob, born August 15, 1868, died 
February 6, 1870. 

Susan Jacob, born March 8, 1870, died July 23, 
1870. 

Charles Pope Jacob, born August 2, 1871, died 
March 18, 1896. 



l68 FIFTH GEXERATION. 

No. 183. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I. I4. 4, AND I. 

Donald Robertson Jacob, fifth son, eighth child 
of Thomas Prather Jacob and his wife, Henrietta 
Wilson Pope, was born at Loms^-ille, March 5, 1S73. 
During the Spanish-American war he volunteered and 
s€r\-ed as First Lieutenant in the Fourth Regiment 
of Kentucky Volunteers. The regiment was in camp 
at Anniston, Alabama, and was not sent to the front. 
He resides at Louisville, Kentucky. 

No. 184. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 5I, I4, 4. AND I. 

Lucy Robertson Jacob, youngest daughter and 
child of Thomas Prather Jacob and his wife, 
Henrietta Wilson Pop>e, was bom September 14, 1874 
and died November 24, 1894. 

No. 185. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 52. I4, 4. AND I. 

Nannie Lancaster Jacob, daughter and only 
child of William Rinaldo Jacob by his first wife, 
Kate Baird, was born May 22, 1S56 and died April 23, 
iS59- 

No. 186. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 52, I4, 4, AND I. 

Lizzie Wintersmith Jacob, second daughter of 
William Rinaldo Jacob and only child by his second 

wife, Maria Brook Hall, was bom at Louisville, Ken- 



FIFTH GENERATION. 169 

tiicky, May 12, 1861; married at Elizabethtown, Ken- 
tucky, September 24, 1891 to James Decatur Headley, 
from whom she was upon her petition divorced in 1898. 
She resumed her maiden name. Resides at Louisville. 



No. 187. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 54, I4, 4, AND I. 

Samuel Howell Jones, Jr., only son and child of 
Samuel Howell Jones and his wife, Eliza Catherine 
Jacob, was born at Hanover, New Jerse}', December 
15, 1862; married October 19, 1886 Elizabeth Dunbar 
Lockwood, (born at Philadelphia June 13, 1861), He 
died at Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, October 21, 1894. 

T7V0 children : 

Xo. 346. Rees Lockwood Jones, born April 19, 

1S90, at Philadelphia. 
Xo. 347. Mary Bishop Jones, born X'ovember 

30, 1893, at Philadelphia. 



No. 188. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 55, I4, 4, AND I. 

Jennie Robertson Jacob, eldest daughter and 
child of Hon. Charles Donald Jacob and his wife, 
Addie Martin, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, 
December ii, 1859; married at Louisville in Xovember 
1883, Isaac Caldwell, (born December 11, 1857), an 
attorney of that city. Xo issue. 



lyo FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 189. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 55, I4, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Donald Jacob, second daughter and child of 
Hon. Charles Donald Jacob and his wife, Addie 
Martin, was born at Louisville, April 3, 1863. Un- 
married. 

No. 190. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 55, I4, 4, AND I. 

Charles Donald Jacob, Jr., only son, third child of 
Hon. Charles Donald Jacob, and his wife, Addie 
Martin, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, November 
2, 1876. 

At the beginning of the Spanish- American war he 
enlisted as a soldier in the First Kentucky Cavalry, 
and went to the front. His regiment took part in the 
battle of San Juan Hill, Cuba, and he was killed while 
performing an act of heroism in behalf of a wounded 
fellow soldier, on July i, 1898. 

Following are detailed accounts of his death and 
funeral, taken from the ''Louisville Courier Journal" 
and the Associated Press reports: 

LOUISVILLE BOY DIED A HERO. CHARLES D. JACOB, JR. 
TRIED TO SAVE THE FIRST SERGEANT OF HIS 
COMPANY. BUT A SHRAPNEL AND MANY BULLETS 
KILLED THE BRAVE LAD. DEAD BOY WAS THE 
ONLY SON OF THE MAYOR OF LOUISVILLE. COM- 
RADE TELLS THE TALE. 



Louisville, Ky., July 13-— A story of heroism in 
the ranks has been brought out through inquiries made 
as to the fate of a trooper in the First Cavalry. The 



FIFTH GENERATION. IJI 

list of dead sent out by the Associated Press after the 
battle of El Caney, July i, included the name of C. D. 
Jacob. Charles D. Jacob, Jr., enlisted in Louisville 
in the First Cavalry. He was a son of Hon. Charles 
D. Jacob, four times mayor of this city. His parents 
could not believe the name in the list was their son. 
But the following telegram received to-day settles the 
doubt: 

Fort McPherson, Ga., July 13. — I learn from a 
wounded trooper of the First Cavalry in the hospital 
here of the death of Charles D. Jacob, Jr., July i, 
while attempting to carry First Sergeant Barry of 
his troop, who had been wounded by Spanish sharp- 
shooters, out of the line of fire of the enemy. At the 
time of the death of Jacob, four troops of the First 
Cavalry were lying concealed behind an embankment 
about half a mile from the trochas surrounding San 
Juan, where were located the heavy batteries protect- 
ing the approach to Santiago waiting commands, when 
an observation balloon settled just in the rear of them 
and attracted the fire of the Spanish sharpshooters and 
light artillery. First Sergeant Barry being upon the 
embankment, was wounded, and Jacob, seeing he 
would be killed unless immediately brought to cover, 
promptly ran forward and was attempting to carry 
him out of the line of fire, when he was struck in the 
head by a shrapnel and instantly killed. He also 
received several bullet wounds. 

I have this information from several eye witnesses, 
all of whom were comrades in his troop and well 
acquainted with him. Jacob was buried about nine 
miles from El Caney between El Caney and San Juan. 
His grave is marked by a wooden head post. 

E. M. HEADEEY. 



172 FIFTH GENERATION. 

His remains were disinterred and brought home 
and buried with miHtarj' honors in Cave Hill Cemetery 
on Monday, November 20, 1898. 



No. 191. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 56, I4, 4, AND I. 

Kate Jacob Johnson, only daughter and elder 
child of Darwin Ward Johnson and his wife, Lucy 
Anderson Jacob, was born at "Ashland," near Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, February 11, i860. She is un- 
married and resides at Louisville, Kentucky, with her 
brother Darwin Ward Johnson. 

No. 192. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 56, I4, 4, AND I. 

Darwin Ward Johnson, Jr., only son and 
younger child of Darwin Ward Johnson and his wife. 
Lucy Anderson Jacob, was born at New Orleans, 
Louisiana, May 5, 1862: graduated, June, 1878 from 
Louisville High School; married at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, October 14, 1890 Louise Burge, (born at 
Louisville, March 23, i86r.) He is Vice-President of 
the Enterprise Tobacco Company of Louisville. 

Two children: 

Xo. 348. Martha Burge Johnson, born Novem- 
ber 5. 1 89 1, at Louisville. 

No. 349. Louise Katherine Johnson, born Nov- 
ember II, 1896, at Louisville. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 173 

No. 193. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 56, I4, 4, AND I. 

Claudius Marcellus Johnson, elder son of Robert 
A. Johnson (second husband) and his wife, Lucy 
Anderson Jacob, was born at lyouisville, Kentucky, 
August 1 1, 1867. He has been twice married, first on 
December lo, 1890 to Eliza Emmons Wade in New 
York (no issue); and second on November 22, 1896 in 
Brooklyn, New York, to Florence Clarke, (born in 
Brooklyn, September 23, 1875). He is General 
Manager of the Yonkers, New York, Street Railway 
Company and resides there. 

No. 194. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 56, I4, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Jacob Johnson, second son of Robert A. 
Johnson (second husband) and his wife, Lucy Ander- 
son Jacob, was born at Louisville, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1869; married in Bullitt Countj^, Kentucky, 
February 3, 1892, Jennie Coleman, (born at Louisville, 
Kentuck}', November i, 1866) . He owns and operates 
the street railway system at New Philadelphia, Ohio, 
and lives there. 

Ttuo children: 

No. 350. Thomas Coleman Johnson, born 
March 3, 1893, at Cleveland, Ohio. 

No. 351. Robert Jacob Johnson, born April 26, 
1897, ^t Louisville, Kentucky. 



174 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 195. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 57, 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Mattie Fouchee, only child of John Fouchee of 
Brandenburg, Kentucky, and his wife, Lucy Jacob 
Robertson, was born at "Elk Grove" farm in Breck- 
enridge County, Kentucky, August 22, 185 1; married 
at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Sue E. Bate, in Henry 
County, Kentucky, April 23, 1873, FeHx Webster, a 
farmer in Maury County, Tennessee. They live in 
Maury County, Tennessee. 

Four children: 

No. 352. Lawrence F. Webster, born October 
23, 1874, in Maury County, Tennessee. 

No. 353. Fannie T. Webster, born August 31, 
1880, in Maury County, Tennessee. 

No. 354. Lucy Robertson Webster, born No- 
vember 2, 1882, in Maury County, 
Tennessee. 

No. 355. Felicia Webster, born August 26, 
1888, in Maury County, Tennessee. 

No. 196. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, I5, 4, AND I. 

Mildred Ann Wilmans, eldest daughter and child 
of James Edward Wilmans and his wife Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born at the Wilmans farm 
in Meade County, Kentucky, September 13, 1851; 
married at Baltimore, Maryland. November 5, 1872, 
Dr. Robert Dorsey "of Edward," of that city. No 



FIFTH GENERATION. 1 75 

issue. They resided at Baltimore and Dr. Dorsey 
died there June 29, 1889. In 1890 Mrs. Dorsey re- 
moved to Newport, Arkansas, and now lives there 
with her parents. She is a woman of unusual talent 
and is a versatile writer, and has contributed to 
magazines and periodicals articles of decided merit, 
both in prose and verse. 

No. 197. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, 15, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Robertson Wilmans, second daughter and 
child of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born at the Wilmans farm 
in Meade County, Kentucky, October 26, 1853; 
married at "Oakland" farm in Jackson County, 
Arkansas, October 17, 1878, James S. Jones (born in 
Hayward County, Tennessee, June 30, 1845). He is 
a book-keeper and accountant. Home at Newport, 
Arkansas. 

One child: 

No. 356. Susan Dorsey Jones, born June 21, 
1880, in Jackson County, Arkansas. 

No. 198. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, I5, 4, AND I. 

Charles Hermann Wilmans, eldest son, third 
child of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born in Grayson county, 
Kentucky, December 10, 1855; married in the M. E. 
Church, Newport, Arkansas, January 9, 1884 to 



176 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Anne Esther Brandenburg, (born in Jackson county, 
Arkansas, March 2, 1865). No issue. He is senior 
member of the firm Wilman Bros., general merchan- 
dise dealers, Newport, Arkansas. 

No. 199. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, I5, 4, AND I. 

Susan Robertson Wilmans, third daughter, 
fourth child of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, 
Matilda Taylor Robertson, was born in Grayson 
county, Kentucky, February 10, 1858; married at 
"Oakland" farm in Jackson county, Arkansas, 
October 17, 1878 to Ignatius Sprigg, (born in Jackson 
county, Arkansas, November 26, 1856). He is en- 
gaged in the dairy business at Newport, Arkansas. 

Eight children: 

No. 357. William Donald Sprigg, born March 

ID, 1881. 

No. 358. Edward Wilmans Sprigg, born July 
12, 1883. 

No. 359. Matilda Robertson Sprigg, born 
November 10, 1885. 

No. 360. Mary Mildred Sprigg, born Septem- 
ber 13, 1888. 

No. 361. Charles Wilmans Sprigg, born March 
17, 1891. 

No. 362. Lewis Maynard Sprigg, born July 5, 

1893- 
No. 363. Elizabeth Sprigg, born October 12, 

1895- 

No. 364. Lucy Robertson Sprigg, born 

— , 1 89-. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 177 

No. 200. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, 15, 4, AND I. 

Richard Taylor Wilmans, second son, fifth child 
of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born at Jacksonport, Arkan- 
sas, September 8, i860, and died at Searcy, Arkansas, 
December 8, 1877, while there attending school. 

No. 201. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, I5, 4, AND I. 

James Smith Wilmans, third son, sixth child 
of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born at Elgin, Arkansas, 
March 8, 1863; married at Newport, Arkansas, No- 
vember 25, 1886, Ella Overton Daswell (born in Han- 
over count}', Virginia, February 14, 1865). No issue. 
He is a member of the firm, Wilmans Bros., general 
merchandise dealers at Newport, Arkansas. 

No. 202. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, 15, 4, AND I. 

Edward Beatty Wilmans, fourth son, seventh 
child of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born in Jefferson county, 
Kentucky, December 24, 1865; is unmarried and a 
member of the firm Wilmans Bros., general merchan- 
dise dealers, at Newport, Arkansas. 



178 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 203. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 58, 15, 4, AXD I. 

Elizabeth Beatty Wilmans, fourth daughter, 
eighth child, of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, 
Matilda Taylor Robertson, was born in Jackson 
county, Arkansas, November 26, 1868; married in the 
Presbj'terian Church, Newport, Arkansas, December 
14, 1892, Walter Mays Harris of Columbia, Tennessee. 
The}' removed to Water Valle^^, Mississippi, and thence 
returned to Newport, Arkansas, where the}- now live. 

Two children : 

No. 365. Robert Dorsey Harris, born October 

26, 1896, at Water Vallej'. 
No. 366. Jennie Harris. 

No. 204. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 58, 15, 4, AXD I. 

Robert Dorsey Wilmans, fifth son, youngest 
child of James Edward Wilmans and his wife, Matilda 
Taylor Robertson, was born in Jackson county, 
Arkansas, September 2, 1876. He owns a successful 
famil}- grocer}- at Newport, Arkansas. 

No. 205. 

DESCEXDED FROM XOS. 59, 1 5, 4, AXD I. 

Ida Robertson, eldest daughter and child of Isaac 
Robertson and his wife, Sarah Charlotte Goss, was 
born at "Elk Grove" farm, Breckenridge count}-. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 179 

Kentucky, April 27, 1857; married at Jacksonport, 
Arkansas, May 12, 1875, to Joseph W. Phillips, an 
attorney of Newport, Arkansas, (born in Grenada, 
Mississippi, August 15, 1844). No issue. 

Nos. 206, 207 and 208. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 59, 15, 4, AND I. 

Susan E. Robertson, born May 20, 1859, died 
June 12, 1865. 

Katharine H. Robertson, born January 5, 1862, 
died March i, 1876. 

Fannie Lee Robertson, born October 14, 1864, 
died June 19, 1866. 

No. 209. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 59, 1 5, 4. -^^"^ I. * 

Richard Taylor Robertson, (2nd), only son, 
fifth child of Isaac Robertson and his wife, Sarah 
Charlotte Goss, w^as born at Elgin, Arkansas, October 
25, 1867; married at Baltimore, Maryland, April 14, 
1896, Rara R. King (born at Sheperdstown, West 
Virginia, July 31, 1868). He is a clerk in the post- 
office at Newport, Arkansas. 

No. 210. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 59, I5, 4. ^ND I. 

Hattie May Robertson, fifth daughter, sixth 
child of Isaac Robertson and his wnfe, Sarah Char- 
lotte Goss, was born at Jeffersonville, Indiana, May 10, 



iSo FIFTH GENERATION. 

1870; married in the M. E. church, at Newport, 
Arkansas, October 10, 1894, to Moultrie Holland, 
(born in Charleston, South Carolina, June 8, 1865), 
now a druggist at Newport, Arkansas. Mrs. Hol- 
land died at Newport, Arkansas, Januar}- 24, 1896. 

One child: 

No. 367. Hattie Robertson Holland, born Jan- 
uar3-22, 1896, at Newport, Arkansas. 



No. 211. 

DESCEXDED FROM XOS. 59, 15, 4, AND I. 

S. Charlotte Robertson, sixth daughter, seventh 
child of Isaac Robertson and his wife, Sarah Char- 
lotte Goss, was born at Elgin, Arkansas, December 21, 
1872; married at Newport, Arkansas, June 26, 1895, 
Hollis E. Cobb, (born at Butler, Illinois, February 15, 
1872) a dealer in books and stationery at Newport. 

No. 212. 

DESCEXDED FROM XOS. 60, I5, 4, AXD I. 

Richard Webster Robertson, only son and child 
of Richard Taylor Robertson of San Antonio, 
Texas, and his wife, Mehetabel Brashear, was born 
near Elgin, Arkansas, September 3, 187S. He lives 
at Louisville, Kentucky, and is employed as salesman 
in a wholesale hat house. Unmarried. 



FIFTH GENERATION. iSl 

No. 213. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 61, 15, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Bate, eldest child of Richard A. Bate and 
his wife, Susan Eliza Robertson, was born at 
"lyocust Grove" farm, six miles east of Louisville, 
Kentucky, March 3, 1861; married at Louisville, Ken- 
tuck}', in the Baptist church, corner Fourth avenue 
and Walnut street, November 15, i88g, to Henry 
Watts Clarke (born in Paducah, Kentucky, April 22, 
i860.) He is a stenographer employed in the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company's offices at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, c 

Two cJiildren: 

No. 368. Richard Bate Clarke, born July 8, 

1S90, at Louisville. 
No. 369. William H. Clarke, born December 

29, 1892, at Louisville. 



No. 214. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 6l, 15, 4, AND I. 

James S. Bate, eldest son, second child of Richard 
A. Bate and his wife, Susan Eliza Robertson, was 
born at "Locust Grove" farm, six miles east of 
Louisville, Kentuck}', March 23, 1863. He married at 
Clinton, Kentucky, December 20, 1900, Nell Semple 
Moss (No. 131). They live at Louisville, Kentucky, 
and his business is that of a commercial traveler. 



lS2 FIFTH GEXERATIOX. 

No. 215. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 61, I5, 4, AXD I. 

Fannie Barbour Bate, second daughter, third 
child of Richard A. Bate, and his wife, Susan Eliza 
Robertson, was born at " Locust Grove " farm, six 
miles east of Louisville, Kentuckj-, June 6, 1865; 
married in Broadway ^L E. church, Louisv-ille, No- 
vember 10, 1 89 1, to Theodore T. Drane, (bom in Henry 
county, Kentucky, January 20, i860). They resided 
at Louisville several j-ears; removed to Henry county, 
Kentucky, where Mr. Drane is farming. 

Four children: 

Xo. 370. Theodore Robertson Drane, born 

August 3, 1892, at Louisville. 
Xo. 371. Lottie Alexander Drane, born June 

20, 1895, at Louisville. 
Xo. 372. Richard Bate Drane, born June 14, 

1897, at Louisville, died December 

9- 1899. 
Xo. 373. Benjamin Franklin Drane, born April 

3, 1S99, at Louisville. 

No. 216. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 6l, 15, 4, AXD I. 

Virginius Alexander Bate, second son, fourth 
child of Richard A. Bate and his wife, Susan Eliza 
Robertson, was born at "Locust Grove" farm, six 
miles east of Louisville, Kentucky-, June 16, 1868. 
He is bookkeeper and accountant in the employ of 



FIFTH GENERATION. 183 

Wm. Kendrick's Sons Co., Fourth Avenue, Louisville, 
Kentucky. Unmarried. 



No. 217. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 61, 15, 4, AND I. 

Richard Alexander Bate, third son, fifth child 
of Richard A. Bate and his wife, Susan Eliza 
Robertson, was born at " Fairview " farm in Henry 
county, Kentucky, February 5, 1871. He graduated 
with the degree of A. B. from the Louisville High 
School and studied medicine in the Hospital College of 
Medicine at Louisville, from which institution he re- 
ceived the degree of ^L D. He is Chief of the Medical 
Clinic and Assistant Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Medicine in that College; and is the author 
of several important medical treatises. He practices his 
profession also at Louisville, having his office at 
corner of Second and Burnett Streets, and has achieved 
great success and an enviable reputation. Unmarried. 



No. 218. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 62, 15, 4, AND I. 

Stedman Robertson, only son and eldest child of 
James Bate Robertson and his wife. Fowler E. 
Landers, was born at " Elk Grove " farm, Brecken- 
ridge county, Kentucky, May 29, 1875; married at 
Jeffersonville, Indiana, September 11, 1895, Lillie 
Bethel of EHzabethtown, Kentucky, at w-hich latter 
place he is a grocer. 



1S4 FIFTH GKNKRATION. 

No. 219. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 62, 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Mary Eugenie Robertson, elder daughter, second 
child of James Bate Robertson of Elizabeth town, 
Kentucky, and his wife, Fowler E. Landers, was born 
at "Elk Grove" farm, Breckenridge county, Ken- 
tucky, April 15, 1878; married April 17, 1899 John 
Baird of Hardin county, Kentucky. 

No. 220. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 62, 1 5, 4, AND I. 

Susan Louisa Robertson, second daughter, third 
and youngest child of James Bate Robertson of 
Elizabeth town , Kentucky, and his wife. Fowler E. 
Landers, was born at "Elk Grove" farm, Brecken- 
ridge county, Kentucky, October 25, 1880. Un- 
married. 

No. 222. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 71, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Jane Elizabeth Byrne, second daughter, and child 
of Richard Taylor Byrne and his wife, Caroline 
Sarah Gregory, was born at Lamar, Texas, October 
30, 1869; married November 28, 1888 to Michael 
Carroll, a ranchman of McMullin county, Texas. 

Five childrfH: 

No. 374. Richard Patrick Carroll, born Janu- 
ary 13, 1890, in McMullin count}', 
Texas. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 185 

No. 375. Michael Stanley Carroll, born July 

26, 1 89 1, at Tilden, Texas, died 

July 18, 1899. 
No. 376. Jane Gregory Carroll, born August 

14, 1893, at Tilden, Texas. 
No. 377. Sarah Anna Carroll, born October 7, 

1895, at Tilden, Texas. 
No. 378. Henrietta Catharine Carroll, born 

September 24, 1899, at Tilden, Texas. 

No. 223. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7 1, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Sarah Caroline Byrne, third daughter and child 
of Richard Taylor Byrne and his wife, Caroline 
Sarah Gregory, was born at Lamar, Texas, February 
6, 187 1. Unmarried. 

No. 224. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 7I, 16, 4, AND I. 

Henrietta Catharine Byrne, fourth daughter 
and child of Richard Taylor Byrne and his wife, 
Caroline Sarah Gregory, was born at Lamar, Texas, 
March 23, 1873; married July 20, 1897, at Tilden, 
Texas, Henry Lowe, eldest son of Judge Marcellus 
Lowe of said place; she died November 13, 1897. 

No. 225. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 71, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Eleanor King Byrne, fifth daughter and child of 
Richard Taylor Byrne and his wife, CaroHne Sarah 



l86 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Gregory, was born at Lamar, Texas, August ii, 1875. 
Unmarried. 

No. 226. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 72, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Sidney Albert Taylor, elder son of William 
Taylor and his wife, Matilda Robertson Byrne, was 
born at Corpus Christi, Texas, February 29, 1868. 
He is a stock raiser and farmer, and lives with his 
mother and brother on a ranch near Lamar, Texas. 
Unmarried. Post-Ofl&ce address, Rockport, Aransas 
county, Texas. 

No. 227. 

DESCENDED FR0:M NOS. 72, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Charles Thomas Taylor, second and jounger 
son of William Taylor and his wife, Matilda Robert- 
son Byrne, was born at Lamar, Texas, August 9, 
1 87 1 ; lives with his mother and brother and is engaged 
in stock farming; has also contract for carrying U. S. 
mails between Rockport and Lamar, Texas. Post- 
Office address, Rockport, Texas. Unmarried. 

No. 228. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 73, 16, 4, AND I. 

Mary Eliza Walker, eldest daughter and child of 
Samuel Pinckney Walker and his wife, Lucy Jacob 
Byrne, was born near Goliad, Texas, February 16, 
1867; died at Falkner, Texas, August 14, 1899; buried 
at Lamar. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 1 87 

No. 229. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 73, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Samuel Pinckney Walker, Jr., eldest son, second 
child of Samuel Pinckney Walker and his wife, Lucy 
Jacob Byrne, was born at Indianola, Texas, Novem- 
ber 18, 1869; is a farmer and stock raiser, Post-Office 
address, Falkner, Texas. Unmarried. 

No. 230. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 73, 16, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Gertrude Walker, second daughter, third 
child of Samuel Pinckney Walker and his wife, Lucy 
Jacob Byrne, was born at Lamar, Texas, May 4, 1872. 
Unmarried. 

No. 231. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 73, 16, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Alfred Walker, second son, fourth child 
of Samuel Pinckney Walker and his wife, Lucy Jacob 
Byrne, was born March 26, 1875, at "Willow Cove," 
on St. Charles Bay, Aransas county, Texas; is a farmer 
and stockman. Post-Office address, Falkner, Texas. 
Unmarried. 

No. 234. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Catharine Garnett Byrne, eldest daughter, second 
child of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Mary 
Throckmorton, was born at Lamar, Texas, February 
10, 1868; married at Goliad, Texas, September i, 1891, 



iSS FIFTH GEXERATIOX. 

Charles Eidelbach of Matagorda, Texas (born 1S67). 
She died at Matagorda Jaiiuar\- iS, 1S95. Mr. Eidel- 
bacb lives at Galveston and is emploj-ed in connection 
with the U. S. Life Saving Station there. 

On£ child: 

^o- 379- Charles Henry Eidelbach, born June 
14, 1S92, at Matagorda, Texas; died 
January- 13, 1895, at same place. 



No. 235. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4. AND I. 

Mary Matilda Byrne, second daughter, third 
child of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Marj^ 
Throckmorton, was born at Lamar, Texas, December 
19, 1869. She is teaching school at San Antonio Baj^ 

Refugio county-, Texas. Unmarried. 

No. 236. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AXD I. 

Belle Eliza Byrne, third daughter, fom-th child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Mary Throck- 
morton, was born at Lamar, Texas, October 11, 1S71; 
married at Goliad, Texas, February 9, 1898, Joseph A. 
Turner of that place. 

One child: 

Xo. 3S0. Allyn Kenr}- Turner, born December 
12, 1S98. 



FIFTH GEXERATIOX. 189 

No. 237. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Lucy Hill Byrne, fourth daughter, fifth child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Marj- Throck- 
morton, was born near Pittsville on Brazos river, Fort 
Bend county, Texas, December 24, 1873; married at 
Goliad, Texas, Februar}- 24, 1897, Leonard Von 
Dohlen Cborn in Goliad October 12, 1869), a farmer 
and cotton planter near that place. 

One child: 

Xo. 381. Leonard Byrne Von Dohlen, born 
July 21, 1898. 

No. 238. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Henry Byrne, second son, sixth child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Man,- Throck- 
morton, was born September 16, 1876, at Salt Creek, 
Aransas count}', Texas. He is a horticulturist. Un- 
married. 

No. 239. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

James Edward Byrne, third son, seventh child of 
Thomas King- Byrne and his wife, Mar\- Throck- 
morton, was born at Lamar, Texas, January- i, 1879. 
Unmarried. 



igo FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 240. 

DEvSCEXDED FROM XOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Robert Joseph Byrne, fourth son, eighth child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife Mary Throck- 
morton, was born at Lamar, Texas, August 15, 1881. 
Unmarried. 

No. 241. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Charles Reuben Byrne, fifth son, ninth child of 
Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Mary Throck- 
morton, was born at Lamar, Texas, Januarj^ 7, 1884. 

No. 242. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Agnes Mabel Byrne, fifth daughter, tenth child 
of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Marj' Throck- 
morton, was born near Tilden, Texas, May 6, 1886. 

No. 243. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

William Albion Byrne, sixth son, eleventh child 
of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Mary Throck- 
morton, was born at Lamar, Texas, August 18, 
1888. 



FIFTH GENERATION. I9I 

No. 244. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 74, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Samuel Harold Byrne, seventh son, twelfth child 
of Thomas King Byrne and his wife, Mary Throck- 
morton, was born at lyaniar, Texas, April 9, 1891. 

No. 245. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Ada Eliza Kuykendall, eldest daughter and child 
of Judge WiUiam Kuykendall and his wife, Catharine 
Spalding Byrne, was born at Hyne's Bay, Calhoun 
county, Texas, January 8, 1870; married at Tilden, 
Texas, March 19, 1888, Andrew ly. Dilworth (born 
June 9, 1862 in McMullin county, Texas), a lawyer 
of Tilden. He is a son of Dr. G. A. Dilworth, and is 
county attorne}^ of McMullin county; resides at Tilden. 



Ada Mary Kate Dilworth, born Feb- 
ruary 15, 1SS9, at Tilden, Texas. 

Calpernia Jane Dilworth, born March 
22, 1S91, at Tilden, Texas. 

Andrew George William Dilworth, 
born January 23, 1894, at Tilden, 
Texas. 

George Anson Dilworth, born July 9, 
1896, at Tilden, Texas. 

George Blackstone Dilworth, born 
Sejotember iS, 1899; died November 
6, 1899. 



ive childreti 


No. 


382. 


No. 


383. 


No. 


384- 


No. 


385. 


No. 


386. 



192 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 246. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 76, 16, 4, AND I. 

Thomas Richard Kuykendall, eldest son, second 
child of Judge William Kuj-kendall and his wife, 
Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born at Hyne's Bay, 
Calhoun county, Texas, December 20, 187 1; was 
twice elected county attorney; is a lawyer, living at 
Tilden, Texas. He married Juh' 13, 1898, at Camp- 
bellton, Atascosa count}', Texas, Mamie Kerr. 



No. 247. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Charles William Kuykendall, second son, third 
child of Judge William Kuykendall and his wife, 
Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born at HA-nes's Bay, 
Calhoun county, Texas, May 27, 1874. He is a farmer 
and manages his father's place near Tilden, Texas. 
Unmarried. 

No. 248. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4. AND I. 

Catharine Byrne Kuykendall, second daughter, 
fourth child of Judge William Kuykendall and his 
wife, Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born at "Wil- 
low Cove," St. Charles's Bay, Aransas county, Texas, 
October 21, 1876; married April 17, 1895, ^t Tilden, 
Texas, Anson Mortimer Dil worth (born October 5, 
1865), a brother of Andrew Dilworth, who married 



FIFTH GENERATION. I93 

Ada Eliza Kuykendall. He is a ranchman on the 
Leoncita river near Tilden. 

Two children: 

No. 387. Mary Mangum Dilworth, born June 7, 
1896, at Tilden. 

No. 388. William Anson Dilworth, born De- 
cember 29, 1897; died June i6, 1899. 

No. 249. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Annette Sileta Kuykendall, third daughter, fifth 
child of Judge William Kuykendall and his wife, 
Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born near Tilden, 
Texas, August 27, 1879. Unmarried. 

No. 250. 

DEvSCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

William Kuykendall, Jr., fourth son, sixth child 
of Judge William Kuykendall and his wife, Catharine 
Spalding Byrne, was born near Tilden, Texas, April 

8, 1882. 

No. 251. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 16, 4, AND I. 

Mary Alice Kuykendall, fourth daughter, seventh 
child of Judge William Kuykendall and his wife 
Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born near Tilden, 
Texas, December 19, li 



194 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 252. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 76, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Albert Sidney Kuykendall, fourth son, eighth 
child of Judge William Km'kendall and his wife 
Catharine Spalding Byrne, was born near Tilden, 
Texas, February 5, 1S88. 

No. 253. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Amelia Eliza Byrne, eldest daughter and child of 
Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife Corinne 
Cecelia Teal, was born at Lamar, Texas, December 
28, 1 871; married September 12, 1888, in McMullin 
county, Texas, Patrick X. Grover (born in Bell 
county, Texas, January 7, 1867), a farmer. They 
live in McMullin county, ten miles from Tilden. 

Two children: 

No. 389. Patrick DeWitt Grover, born March 

6, 1S90, in McMullin county. 
No. 390. Dora Cecelia Grover, born September 

26, 1893, i^ McMullin count}'. 

No. 254. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

Ida Virginia Byrne, second daughter and child of 
Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, Corinne 
Cecelia Teal, was born at Lamar, Texas, July 8, 1873; 
married in McMullin county, Texas, November 13, 



FIFTH GENBRATION. I95 

1895, William Holland, (born in said county July 7, 
1874) a farmer and stockman. 

Two children: 

No. 391 . William Murry Holland, born Septem- 
ber 26, 1896, at Tilden. 
No. 392 . Lorinne Cecelia Holland, born October 

I, 1898, at Tilden. 

No. 255. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 77, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

John Richard Edward Byrne, eldest son, third 
child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born at "Willow Cove," 
St. Charles' Bay, Aransas county, Texas, August 29, 
1875. He is a farmer and stockman. Unmarried. 
Post-Office address, Tilden, Texas. 

No. 256. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Corinne Agnes Byrne, third daughter, fourth 
child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born at "Willow Cove," 
St. Charles' Bay, Aransas county, Texas, April 2, 
1877. Unmarried. 

No. 257. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

Charles Edmond Robertson Byrne, second son, 
fifth child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 



196 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born at Salt Creek, Aransas 
county, Texas, Juh* 15, 1879. Unmarried. 

No. 258. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 77, 16, 4, AXD I. 

Albert Thomas Byrne, third son, sixth child of 
Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, Corinne 
Cecelia Teal, was born at Salt Creek, Aransas county, 
Texas, May 24, 1881. 

No. 259. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

Mary Josephine Byrne, fourth daughter, seventh 
child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born on a ranch ten miles 
from Tilden, Texas, in McMullin count}', October 23, 
1884. 

No. 260. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

Walter Francis Byrne, fourth son, eighth child 
of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, Corinne 
Ctcelia Teal, was born on a ranch ten miles from 
Tilden, Texas, in McMullin county, July 7, 1886. 

No. 261. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

Alice Louise Byrne, fifth daughter, ninth child 
of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, Corinne 



FIFTH GENERATION. I97 

Cecelia Teal, was born on a ranch ten miles from 
Tilden, in McMuUin county, Texas, August 3, 1888. 

No. 262. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 77, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Frances Laura Byrne, sixth daughter, tenth 
child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born on a ranch ten miles 
from Tilden, in McMullin county, Texas, March 26, 
1890. 

No. 263. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 16, 4, AND I. 

James Webster Byrne, fifth son, eleventh child 
of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, Corinne 
Cecelia Teal, was born on a ranch ten miles from 
Tilden, in McMullin county, Texas, February 12, 
1S97. 

No. 264. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 77, 1 6, 4, AND I. 

Grace Gertrude Byrne, seventh daughter, twelfth 
child of Charles Robertson Byrne and his wife, 
Corinne Cecelia Teal, was born April 23, 1898. 

No. 265. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 78, 17, 4, AND I. 

Curran Pope Buckner, eldest son and child of 
John S. Buckner and his wife, Susan Maria Stewart, 
w^as born at Buckner, Oldham county, Kentucky, July 
18, 1862, and died there October 10, 1881. 



198 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 266. 

DESCENDED FROM XOS. 78, 1 7, 4, AND I. 

Mary Brent Buckner, only daughter, second 
child of John S. Buckner and his wife, Susan Maria 
Stewart, was born at La Grange, Kentucky, July 28, 
1867; married Maj' 31, 1893, Joseph Edward Tharp 
(born at Georgetown, Kentuck3% October 29, 1867), a 
farmer living near L,a Grange. 

Two children: 

No. 393. Coleman Buckner Tharp, born March 
17, 1894, in Oldham county, Ken- 
tucky. 

No. 394. Mary Josephine Tharp, born Novem- 
ber 27, 1896, in Oldham county, 
Kentucky. 

No. 267. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 78, 1 7, 4, AND I. 

Isaac Coleman Buckner, second son, third and 
youngest child of John S. Buckner and his wife, 
Susan Maria Stewart, was born at La Grange, Ken- 
tucky, February 25, 187 1; married March 14, 1894, 
Mattie Owsley Hopper of Charleston, West Virginia. 
He is a lawyer at La Grange, Kentucky. 

Ttvo children: 

No. 395. Mattie Elizabeth Buckner, born July 

ID, 1S95. 

No. 396. Annie Byrne Buckner, born October 

20, ii 



FIFTH GENERATION. 199 

No. 268. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 79, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Edmund Alexander Tyler, elder son of Charles 
R. Tyler and his wife, Matilda Robertson Ander- 
son, was born at Owensboro, Kentuck)^ May 9, 1862; 
died there October 23, 1862. 

No. 269. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 79, 18, 4, AND I. 

Donald Robertson Tyler, second son, second 
child of Charles R. Tyler and his wife, Matilda 
Robertson Anderson, w^as born at Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky, August 18, 1865; was educated in the schools 
of his native place and Lakeville, Connecticut, and at 
Yale university; afterwards spent several years in 
Europe, mostly in Paris; married at Owensboro Janu- 
ary 14, 1891, Virginia Griffith Watkins (born January 
31, 1872), daughter of Philip T. Watkins and his wife, 
Ann Cecelia Woolfolk, of that place. 

He went to Gunnison, Colorado, in the autumn of 
1899, in quest of health, and died there of consumption 
December 20, 1899. 

Two children: 

No. 397. Donald Robertson Watkins Tyler, 
born March 23, 1893, at Owensboro. 

No. 398. Nanette Watkins Tyler, born No- 
vember 10, 1894, at Owensboro; died 
there November 24, 1900. 



200 FIFTH GENERATION. 

No. 270. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 80, 18, 4, AND I. 

Mary Ann Anderson, eldest daughter and child 
of Thomas Sidney Anderson and his wife, Susan 
E. Harris, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, Febru- 
ary 11, 1868; married at same place November 22, 1894, 
William A. Underbill (born June 5, 1864, at Brooklj-n, 
New York) . They lived a short time at New York 
cit}', then removed to Owensboro, where the}' have 
since resided, and where Mr. Underbill is a successful 
business man. He has considerable mining interests 
in Colorado. 

T7i'o children: 

No. 399. Sidney Anderson Underbill, born 
August 7, 1895, at Owensboro. 

No. 400. Fanny Underbill, born August 3, 
1897, ^t Monteagle, Tennessee. 

No. 271. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 8o, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Martha Bransford Anderson, second daughter 
and child of Thomas Sidney Anderson and his wife, 
Susan E. Harris, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, 
September 30, 1871; married Ma}' 3, 1898, at Owens- 
boro, to John McFarland Williams of same place. 
They removed to Montgomery, Alabama, and thence 
to Selma, Alabama, where Mr. Williams holds a 
position of responsibility with the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad Company. 

One child: 

No. 401. John McFarland Williams, Jr., born 
January 11, 1900, at Owensboro. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 20I 

No. 272. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 80, 18, 4, AND I. 

Susan Harris Anderson, third daughter and 
child of Thomas Sidney Anderson and his wife, 
Susan E. Harris, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, 
February 28, 1875. Unmarried. 

No. 273. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 8l, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Virginia Woodson Venable, eldest daughter 
and child of Thomas Samuel Venable and his wife, 
Sallie Quicksall Anderson, was born at Owensboro, 
Kentucky, July 4, 1865; married at same place May 
14, 1889, James Truman Shaw (born at Almont, 
Michigan, October 14, 1856) of Detroit, Michigan. 
He is a prosperous business man, engaged in the grain 
commission business. Chamber of Commerce building, 
Detroit; was for several years President of the Detroit 
Board of Trade. Mrs. Shaw is prominent in society 
and is active in charitable and hospital work of the 
city. They have no children. 

No. 274. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 81, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

James Anderson Venable, only son, second 
child of Thomas S. Venable and wife, Sallie Quick- 
sall Anderson, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, 
March 9, 1868. For several years he lived at Detroit, 
Michigan, and was employed in the State Savings 
Bank and afterwards in the offices of the Michigan 



202 FIFTH GENERATION. 

Peninsular Car Compan}-; is now manager of the 
branch house of Berr}- Brothers, Limited, of Detroit, at 
No. 1X2 South Fourth street, Saint Louis, Missouri. 
Unmarried. 

No. 275. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 81, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Mary Ann Venable, second daughter, third child 
of Thomas S. Venable and his wife, Sallie Quicksall 
Anderson, was born at Owensboro, Kentucky, October 
27, 187 1, and died at same place Ma}' 8, 1880. 

No. 276. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 81, 18, 4, AND I. 

Matilda Tyler Venable, third daughter, fourth 
child of Thomas S. \'enable and his wife, Sallie 
Quicksall Anderson, was born at Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky, December 4, 1876. Unmarried. 

No. 277. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 81, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Elizabeth Tompkins Venable, fourth daughter, 
fifth and youngest child of Thomas S. Venable and his 
wife Sallie Quicksall Anderson, was born at Owens- 
boro, Kentucky, September 21, 1882. 

No. 278. 

DESCENDED FROM NOS. 82, 1 8, 4, AND I. 

Catharine Clarke Anderson, adopted daughter 
of William Kyle Anderson and his wife, Cornelia 



FIFTH GENERATION. 203 

Martha Ceok, was born at Detroit, Michigan, June 
23, 1884. Her father is Frederick W. Clarke of 
Owensboro, Kentucky, and her mother was Grace 
Cook, his first wife, youngest sister of Mrs. Anderson. 
After the death of Mrs. Clarke, which occurred at 
Owensboro, Januar}^ 25, 1886, Catharine came to live 
with her uncle and aunt, Mr, and Mrs. Anderson, in 
the house where she was born, and shortly thereafter, 
b}^ consent of her father, was legally adopted by them 
and assumed their name. 



[end of fifth generation.] 



Note. — The members of the sixth generation are, at this 
writing (1900), all young children, and their names and date of 
birth, as far as reported, will be found under those of their 
parents. 




The Ancestry of Rachel Rogers, 

WIFE OF 

DONALD ROBERTSON. 



GIIvES ROGERS, the grandfather of our progeni- 
tress, Rachel, emigrated from Worcestershire, 
England, to Virginia in the year 1686. 

Tradition says he was born in the city of Edinboro, 
Scotland, about the middle of the 17th century, and 
was named Giles, in honor of the patron saint of his 
native city. 

The Rogers family was of English origin, protestant 
in faith and Presbyterian in doctrine. Why Giles's 
parents lived in Scotland we cannot tell. Probably 
his mother was Scotch. Her name is said by some to 
have been Sarah Iverson. Others claim that Sarah 
was the wife of Giles. We are inclined to believe the 
latter is the fact. His father's name was John. 

Their residence in Scotland seems to have been but 
temporary, and during the latter part of the reign of 
Charles II. they returned to Worcestershire, in order 



2o6 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

to escape the annoyances and persecutions then in- 
flicted upon the Presbyterians in Scotland. In that 
part of England the reformed faith was then strongly 
in the ascendant, but, as yet, its adherents were un- 
molested.* 

Soon after the return of the Rogers's to "Worcester- 
shire, it became the hot-bed of a rebellion against 
James II., at the head of which was the Duke of Mon- 
mouth, who came over from Holland, and with a small 
and badh- equipped army of raw recruits attempted to 
overthrow the throne of the Stuarts. Tradition, how 
true we cannot determine, says Giles Rogers recruited a 
company, was elected its captain, and joined the 
rebels, and took part in the disastrous battle of 
Sedgmoor on July 5, 1685. The King's regulars, 
however, under the Earl of Feversham, made short 
work of the undrilled rabble Monmouth had gotten 
together, and the insurrection was quelled with a 
strong arm. Immediately thereafter, the notorious 
Judge Jeffries inaugurated his "blood}- assizes", and 
man}', who had managed to escape the sword, laid their 

*(NoTE. — Our kinsman, the late Joseph Rogers Underwood, 
United States Senator from Kentucky, spent considerable time 
and money in endeavoring to trace the antecedents of Giles 
Rogers, and for this purpose employed the College of Heraldry 
at London to prosecute the investigation. Much difficulty was 
encountered in tracing back an unbroken line, but enough in- 
formation was discovered to warrant the claim that he was 
directly descended from the great reformer, John Rogers, ' 'the 
martyr", who was burned at the stake in Smithfield, February 
4) 1555) by order of "Bloody Mary". In token of Judge Under- 
wood's descent from an ecclesiastical ancestor, who suffered 
martyrdom, the college authorized him to add a crossed crosslet 
to the familv arms. ) 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 207 

heads upon the block. The King— determined to 
stamp out heresy and reinstate CathoHcism as the state 
rehgion — was relentless in his hatred, and Jeffries was 
his pliant tool. A reign of terror ensued, and safety 
could be secured only by flight from the country. 
The colonies in America, alone, offered a safe retreat. 
There every man was accorded the right to worship 
God according to the dictates of his own conscience, 
and thither many fled, among them Giles Rogers, who 
in the winter of 1685 took ship for Virginia, and 
arrived off the Chesapeake early in the year 1686. 

Whether he was married in England, or after arriv- 
ing in America, we are unable to state with positive- 
ness, but the weight of evidence seems to be in favor 
of the former. There is a generally accepted and 
fairly well established tradition that his marriage took 
place in Worcestershire, and that there the two eldest 
children were born; that during the voyage his third 
child, our ancestor John, was born, and the remaining 
three children after settling in their new home. We 
have no reason to doubt the truth of this tradition. 

Giles Rogers and his wife settled in King and 
Queen county, Virginia, on the bank of the Matta- 
pony river, in the immediate vicinity of the place 
selected by Donald Robertson for' his home some sixty- 
six years later. John Semple, who came to America 
about the same year as Donald Robertson, located a 
few miles further down the river; and James Taylor, 
the first American ancestor of the great Virginia and 
Kentucky family of that name, had some twentj^-one 
years previously established his home a little further 
up the same river, in New Kent county, now Caroline 
county, Virginia. 



2o8 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

As indicated above, Giles Rogers and his wife had 
six children, three boys and three girls. All of them 
grew to maturit}', married, and left descendants. The 
three boys were named respectively Giles, Peter, and 
John. One of the girls was named Lucy. The others 
are im known to us. 

The scope of this work does not permit us to follow 
with even the most meagre detail the fortunes of any 
of the six children, except John. Such a volume, 
however, as stated hereinbefore, we understand is now 
in course of preparation by our kinsman. General 
John Cox Underwood, and we shall with impatience 
await its appearance. 

John Rogers, third son of Giles, the emigrant from 
Worcestershire, lived all his life in King and Queen 
county, Virginia. Having received a fair education, 
he adopted as his profession that of sur\x3-or, and 
located many original grants of land in that county. 

He married in the year 17 16, and this statement 
brings us to the consideration of two questions, which, 
time without number, have been propounded us. They 
are: 

1 . Who was John Rogers' wife ? 

2. Did he marry Mary Byrd or Bird, and, if so, 
who was she ? 

To these much mooted questions we have given 
careful and impartial consideration, having examined 
all the traditions and testimon}' available, and we hope 
now to be able to settle them conclusively in the minds 
of our readers. 

Two theories have been advanced, which we shall 
state briefly, and then endeavor to examine as to their 
authenticitv. 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 209 

The first is, that John Rogers' wife was Mary 
Byrd, third daughter and j'oungest child of Colonel 
William B}-rd (ist), of Westover, Virginia, and his 
wife, Mary Horsmanden. 

The second is, that John Rogers' wife was Rachel 
Eastham, daughter of a Mr. Eastham of King and 
Queen count}-, Virginia, and his wife, Mary Bird^ and 
that the latter was a sister of Colonel William Bird, 
a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, from 
said county, and a contemporary of Colonel William 
Byrd of Westover. 

We had an ancestress named Mary Byrd, or Bird. 
Of that fact we are absolutely sure. She was either 
the mother or the grandmother of Rachel Rogers. We 
shall try to discover which is correct and who she was. 

It cannot be gainsaid, that theorj' No. i has, dur- 
ing the last half century, grown to be the popular one. 
So many of us have come to think of Mary Byrd as 
our progenitress, and to talk of "Westover" as our 
ancestral home, that it would seem almost sacrilegious 
to suggest a doubt of its correctness. To appreciate 
this fact, it is only necessary to read the account of 
Colonel Byrd's life. 

He was born in London in 1652, emigrated to Vir- 
ginia in 1673, and died at Westover in 1704. From 
his uncle. Captain Thomas Stegge, he inherited an 
immense estate, embracing the entire site of the pres- 
ent city of Richmond and of Manchester on the oppo- 
site side of the James. The King made him his 
special representative in the colony. He was an 
aristocrat by birth as well as by training; lived in 
baronial state, maintained his own military establish- 
ment, and frequenth^ headed expeditions against the 



2IO THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

surrounding hostile Indians. He became Receiver 
General of the Royal Revenues, a member of the 
Colonial Council, a member of the House of Burgesses, 
and was probably- the most influential and important 
personage in Virginia. Later in life he purchased a 
magnificent estate, about forty miles below Richmond, 
on the James River, called "Westover," which after 
the lapse of more than two centuries is still owned and 
occupied by one of his lineal descendants. The house 
has always been counted as one of the most perfect 
specimens of old colonial architecture in existence; and 
in story and song, as well as in real life, has been the 
scene of many a romantic episode. Although in the 
track of contending armies in both the Revolutionary 
and Civil Wars, and often within sound of the can- 
non's roar, the historic old mansion has almost 
miraculously escaped injury and is yet in perfect con- 
dition. Colonel Byrd's son, the second Colonel Wil- 
liam Byrd (known as the "Black Swan"), was, if 
possible, more aristocratic and important a personage 
than he. The society which assembled at Westover 
during his regime was the gayest, most select and 
brilliant in the whole commonwealth. Wealth in- 
creased, and honors were heaped upon honors. He 
traveled abroad, and in the salons of the old world wit 
and beauty smiled upon him. He became the toast of 
the clubs in London and Paris, was made a member of 
distinguished societies, decorated with insignia, and 
treated with consideration such as was accorded only 
to scions of noble families. Surely, to trace one's 
lineage back to such sires and to claim "Westover" as 
the home of one's forefathers were indeed an honor 
to be coveted, especially in these days of colonial and 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEI, ROGERS. 211 

revolutionary societies, when so many of our people are 
running "ancestor mad." 

Now, why should any one assume the role of an 
iconoclast and cast down from its pedestal this agree- 
able tradition? Why disturb the equanimity of 
some of our number who have pitched their tents at 
"Westover" and do not wish to move? Have not 
some of the present generation of the Byrds acknowl- 
edged us as to the manor born and admitted us into 
their sacred circle? We are told this is so, and that 
our title is clear. What more can we want ? 

As intimated above, the object of this inquiry is to 
arrive at the truth ^ regardless of sentiment. We take 
it for granted that no descendant of Donald Robertson 
and Rachel Rogers would be willing to sail under false 
colors or to masquerade under borrowed plumage. If 
Mary Byrd of Westover was our ancestress, we want 
to know it absolutely; if she was not, we are equally 
interested in finding out who was, in order that we 
may give honor to whom honor is due. Tradition, 
if well established, should have due consideration 
and carry full weight with every impartial historian, 
but whenever it comes into conflict with competent, 
unimpeachable testimony, must fall to the ground. 
Fortunately, in our researches, we have discovered 
such testimony as we think will settle this question in 
the mind of every unprejudiced reader. 

Before producing it, however, let us give the tra- 
dition a hearing and examine the grounds upon which 
it has been built. 

So far as we have been able to ascertain, it had its 
origin within the last half century, and was scarcely 
known twenty- five years ago. It came into being 



212 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

about as follows: Some member of our famih-, who 
knew or had heard that away back in the dim past we 
had a progenitress named Mary Bird, "a sister of 
Colonel William Bird," while searching for her 
identity, concluded to look into the famil}' record of 
Colonel William B>Td ( ist) of Westover, in the hope 
of there finding a clue. It was discovered that he had 
a daughter named Mary, and that her age was prob- 
ably such as to make it possible for her to have been 
the wife of our ancestor, John Rogers. A connection 
with the B}Tds of Westover was considered desirable, 
and forthwith our investigator announced he had 
found the missing UnkI It mattered not that the 
B\"rd charts contained no allusion to the marriage 
of Mar>- (although those of her brother and of her two 
sisters were minuteh^ recorded), nor that the only 
reference therein to the said Mary, viz.: that she was 
"unmarried in 1698," seemed to indicate by implica- 
tion that she was then of marriageable age, while her 
alleged husband was as \'et only a boj^ twelve jxars 
old. These small discrepancies, our investigator 
hoped, would in some wa3- or other be accounted for. 
For the present it sufficed that a Marj' Bj'rd had been 
foimd. If she did not exactly fit into the niche to be 
filled, so much the worse for the niche I It could and 
should be altered to fit Mary I Corroborative evidence 
was anxioush* sought, but none found. Still, the 
ardor of those \\\\o were determined to have Mary 
Byrd, willy nilly , as progenitress, abated not one whit. 
The familj- traditions were all gone over and eagerly 
examined by our B}Td enthusiasts, in the hope of 
obtaining some sort of confirmation of their theory-, 
but all in vain. As a last resort the}- pinned their 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEE ROGERS. 213 

faith to a story related by the late Edmund Rogers, a 
grandson of John Rogers. He had in his childhood 
heard it from his father, George Rogers. The fact, as 
related by Mr. Rogers, doubtless occurred, but by what 
course of reasoning it can be appropriated or utilized 
as a confirmation of the Westover theory is a problem 
too deep for us to solve. The storj^ is this: John Rogers 
had hanging in his hall a Bird (or Byrd) family coat of 
arms. One day, when all of the Rogers's happened to 
be away from home, a young man, one of the Birds 
(or Byrds^ as our Westover advocates allege) came 
along to pay his relatives a visit. The servant who 
answered his call informed him of the absence of the 
famil}'. Through the open door, however, the visitor 
espied the escutcheon, and immediately became greatly 
enraged and expressed his indignation that the Rogers's 
had dared to appropriate it. Not content with that, 
he pushed his way into the house, tore it from the 
wall, and left immediately in high dudgeon, declaring 
that none of the name Rogers should be permitted to 
display his family arms! 

The coolness with which our enthusiasts, when 
they heard this storj^ assumed that the coat of arms 
in question was that of the Westover- Byrds was cer- 
tainly sublime. There was no proof of the fact, and, 
in the nature of things, there could be none. It was 
an assumption on their part, pure and simple. Crests 
and escutcheons were very much more common in 
those days than now. Almost every family in Virginia 
during the colonial times, making any claims to qual- 
ity, had its arms, — the Rogers's among the rest. Now, 
it so happened that at this very time there lived in 
King and Queen county, near John Rogers, a prominent 



214 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

and influential family of the name of Bird, and 
their descendants are still numerous in that locality*, as 
we have denaonstrated b}- personal investigation. It is 
altogether probable, na}-, almost sure, that they had a 
coat of arms, and the chances are ten to one it was 
the same as that of the Byrds of W^estover, there being 
very good evidence that both families sprang from the 
same English stock. The original way of spelling the 
name in England was Bird, and the introduction of 
the letter y was an innovation. 

Curiously enough, one of this King and Queen 
count}- famil}- was a certain Colonel William Bird, 
"Gent.," an active and aggressive politician, a man of 
influence, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, 
representing his count}' in that body, and a contempo- 
rary of Colonel Wm. Byrd (ist), of Westover. Refer- 
ence is made to him in the Calendar of Virginia State 
Papers, vol. I, at pp. 79 and 80, under dates May 26th 
and 29th, and June 23rd, 1702. Moreover, as the 
record shows, he was of a rash and impetuous dis- 
position and sometimes did and said things for which 
he incurred rebuke from his peers. It would be no 
stretch of imagination to believe that he, or one of his 
sons, was the hot-headed fellow who carried off the 
coat of arms in question. We have no doubt what- 
ever of this Colonel William Bird's having been the 
brother of our progenitress, Mary. 

In further consideration of this question, it should 
be borne in mind that the only member of the West- 
over Byrds to whom this incident of the coat of arms 
could be attributed was Colonel Wm. Byrd (2nd), and 
he, at the date of John Rogers's marriage, was already 
a man past forty years old. Mar}^ Byrd, of Westover, 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 215 

had no other brother, except one, and he died in 
infancy. Westover was distant from the Rogers home 
almost, if not quite fifty miles. Even at this day, 
after a lapse of nearly two centuries, there is no direct 
or expeditious route between the two places. Then, 
communication was rare, difficult and dangerous. We 
submit, is it reasonable to believe that the elegant, 
cultivated and aristocratic Col. Wm. Byrd (2nd) of 
Westover would have made so long and arduous a 
journe}^ to visit a beloved sister and been guilty of 
such an act of vandalism? The idea is preposterous. 
To our mind it is plain that the guilty party was a 
young member of the Bird family who lived in the 
immediate neighborhood. It was a boyish freak, and 
may have been done not in malice, but thoughtlessly. 
That there was a relationship or connection of 
some sort between the Rogers and Bird families is 
indicated, w^e think, by the recurrence in both of a 
very unusual and peculiar baptismal name. We do 
not offer this as a proof, but mereh' as a straw ^ showing 
which way the wind blows. John Rogers's second son, 
Giles, named one of his sons '' Parmetias.''' The name 
struck us as very odd, when we saw it, but we gave 
no more thought to it until in 1897, when, visiting 
King and Queen county, Virginia, we accidentally met 
a Mrs. Pursell there, who told us her maiden name 
was Bird, and who showed us her family bible, in 
which had been kept the record of three generations. 
The first name entered therein was that of Parmenas 
Bird, born June 21, 1790. Mrs. Pursell' s father's 
name was also Parmenas. Parmenas Rogers was 
born about 1750. 



2l6 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEI< ROGERS. 

To continue the argument, we have intimated here- 
tofore that the Byrd family charts do not give the date 
of Mary's birth, although they imply that she was of 
marriageable age in 169S, or as we should sa}- at least 
fifteen years old, that is, three j-ears older than Jolm 
Rogers, who was born in 16S6. He was married in 
the year 17 16, when thirt}- years of age. Mary was 
then at least thirty-three, and we think considerably 
older. Now, John Rogers's wife bore him nine chil- 
dren. We know their names and the date of birth of 
each. Rachel Rogers, our ancestress, was the young- 
est, and she was born October 17, 1737. At that date 
Mary Bj-rd, her alleged mother, was certainly not less 
than fifty-four years old f 

It cannot be denied, that in the olden time our 
forebears almost universally spelled their famih- 
name Bird, not Byrd. They spoke of Mary Bird as 
their ancestress, not Mary Byrd. John Rogers named 
one of his sons Bird, and this son always wrote his 
name in that wa^'. Mrs. I^ucy Robertson Semple, a 
grand-daughter of John Rogers, named one of her 
daughters Lucy Bird, and never wrote it any other 
wa3^ The latter married a man named Green, and 
her descendants published a little book, called "The 
Green Family," in wdiich the name is invariabl}' 
printed Bird. Our examinations of old family records 
and letters proves conclusively that the use of the 
letter y in the name is an innovation. At rare inter- 
vals we have found a case where a person would in the 
same document use both spellings, as if in doubt 
which were correct. Outsiders spelled the name both 
ways indiscriminately, as witness the following ex- 
tracts from the Virginia State Papers: 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEl, ROGERS. 217 

Under date of May 26, 1702. 

"Mr. Wm. Bj'rd, burgess elect from King and Queen 
county, declines to take the oath as burgess, on the ground of 
the reported death of King William." 

"May 29th, b}' the House of Burgesses ordered: 

That a message be forthwith sent to his Exc'lcy, to desire 
him to issue out a new writ for the Election of a Burgess to 
serve in this next Assembly for New Kent county, in the room 
of Coll. William Basse tt, who has refused to take the oathes. 
And also to issue out a new writ for the Election of a Burgess to 
serve in this Assembly for King and Queen county, in the room 
of Mr. William Bird, who has refused to take the oathes. 

Wm. Randolph, 

Clk. H. Burgesses. 

Having examined the tradition, and, as we think, 
demonstrated the iinprobahility of Mar}^ Byrd of West- 
over's having been our ancestress, we come now to the 
testimony. 

In presenting it we shall give extracts from two 
very lengthy and exceedingly charming letters, written 
by the late Thomas Rogers of Bowling Green, Ken- 
tucky, to his cousin, Mrs. Lticy Robertson Semple of 
Seventy-Six, in Clinton county, Kentucky. 

They were both grandchildren of John Rogers; he 
a son of George Rogers, and she a datighter of Rachel 
Rogers. The said letters, now in otir possession, are 
dated respectively December ist, 1848, and May i6th, 
1850, the latter being in reply to a long one from Mrs. 
Semple to him, answering the inquiries made of her in 
the first letter. Mr. Rogers and Mrs. Semple were 
both past eighty years of age when the correspondence 
took place. 

He writes as follows: 



2l8 the ancestry of rachel rogers. 

Lapsley Hall, near Bowling Green, 
Warren County, Dec. ist, 1848. 
Mv De.\r IMadam — 

At the request and under the auspices of the Kentucky His- 
torical Society, Lyman C. Draper, Esq., has undertaken to write 
the Hfe and times of our relative, General George Rogers Clark, 
and understanding that I was perhaps the oldest near relation 
of General Clark now living, and had a brother who serv^ed 
manj- 3'ears as an officer under him, he has written to me a num- 
ber of letters for information on the subject of his intended 
book. In his last, among other things, he says: "I learn from 
Mrs. Bullitt that G. R. Clark went to school to Mr. Donald 
Robertson, and that the latter married an aunt of yours. Did 
you ever understand that Clark attended Mr. Robertson's school? 
Where was the school kept ? What sort of a man was Mr. Rob- 
ertson ? When and where did he die, and did he leave any 
children ? * * * * It is said that Mr. Robertson taught 
several scholars, who rose to distinction. Do you know who 
they were?" 

I have answered these inquiries as well as I could bj- telling 
Mr. Draper it was true that Mr. Robertson married an aunt of 
mine, that he was a learned man from Scotland, and kept for 
many years a noted boarding-school in King and Queen county, 
Virginia, on the Mattapony river, a few miles above the place 
where now stands the little village of Dunkirk, formerly Todd's 
ware-house; that he left two children, a son and daughter, and 
that he died on his own farm where his school was kept; that I 
could not tell whether or not G. R. Clark ever attended his 
school, but had often heard that James Madison, formerly Presi- 
dent of the United States, was one of his pupils, and I added 
that my aunt Robertson had the character of being a very sen- 
sible and intelligent woman, etc. Now, mj- dear madam, I take 
the liberty to ask you to do me favor to answer a number of 
inquiries which I propose to make, not only to enable me to 
reply to Mr. Draper more fully, but for my own satisfaction and 
to give me a chance to add to or correct the geneaologj- of the 
Rogers family, which I have been writing at the request of 
several of its younger members. Some of these inquiries will 
be about things of which I have already tome knowledge, but of 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEI. ROGERS. 219 

which you can perhaps give me more information. * * * * 
You will also give me all the information you can with respect 
to our ancestors. * * * Did not our great-grandfather, Giles 
Rogers, emigrate from Worcestershire in England and settle in 
King and Queen county, somewhere near your father's old 
place, and at what period ? How many children did he raise, 
and what were the names of his sons (besides John, our grand- 
father) , and who did his daughters marry ? Was his wife's 
maiden name Esom, or perhaps more properly Eastham, or how 
was the Rogers family related to the Esom or Eastham family ? 
Was not Mary Byrd the girlhood name of our Grandfather, John 
Rogers's wife? And did you ever hear that the ancestry of the 
Byrd (or Bird) family could be traced to a foundling in England, 
discovered in and rescued from an eagle's nest, or do you recollect 
of ever hearing of a tradition like that respecting the Byrd family? 
Can you tell whether our grandmother, INIary Byrd, was related 
to Col. Wni. Byrd, who was a conspicuous character in Virginia 
about the middle of the last century ? Have you any reason to 
believe that the Rogers family, to which we belong, are descend- 
ants of John Rogers, the Smithfield Martyr?" * * * * * 
Then follows a sketch of his own life, and the letter closes as 
follows: 

"I am now a poor old widower in the 83rd year of my age, 
hobbling along to the grave, which my infirmities tell me I must 
soon reach and go to another, but I trust a better, world. * * 
* * But I nmst stop, for I am tired of writing this long epistle, 
and you must be so in reading it. Pray pardon the garrulity of 
old age. Whenever I write or talk about old matters, or old 
times, I am too apt to be tedious." 

With my best wishes for your happiness, both in time and 
eternity, I remain. 

Respectfully your affectionate friend and relation, 

Ths. Rogers. 

Mrs. Semple replied promptly to this communica- 
tion. We have no full copy of her letter, but, 
from Mr. Rogers's reply to it, under date of May i6th, 
1850 (the original of which is before us), we know it 



220 THE AN'CESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

was long and explicit. Its substance and many quota- 
tions from it are given in his answer, so that we have 
her very words. 

Quoting from her reply, Mr. Rogers says: 

"You say Mary Bird had three brothers Col. WilHam Bird, 
Doctor Philip Bird, and Otway Bird; that she married a Mr. 
Easthatn, who lived two miles below your father's on the Mat- 
tapony river, and that their daughter, Rachel Easthatn, was the 
wife of our Grandfather Rogers. 

Now, my dear cousin, are you not mistaken in supposing 
Mary Bird was our great-grandmother, instead of being our 
grandmother ? I have always understood that she was our 
grandmother, and that our uncle, Bird Rogers, w-as named after 
her, his mother; and it seems to me I must have gotten this in- 
formation from my father." 

Mr. Rogers writes further at great length on other 
family matters of mutual interest and closes his letter 
thus: 

"Although I have been tardy in replying to your much 
esteemed and friendly letter, I have said enough now, I fear, to 
tire you completely, so I must come to a close by telling that 
my pretty little black-eyed granddaughter, Mar}- Bird, is the 
sweetest little prattler I ever saw, and that you and yours have 
the best wishes of our family for your happiness, both in this 
world and that to which we are all hastening, and which, in the 
course of nature, I must ver\- soon reach. May I hope for 
another letter from you? Write soon, or I shall be gone." 

Whether Mrs. Semple replied to this letter or not, 
we do not know, but, had she done so, we are fortun- 
ate in being able to say with certainty what her reply 
would have been and that she was still of the same 
opinion in reference to the identity of Mary Bird. 
The mother of the author, a niece of Mrs. Semple, in 
June, 1856, wrote to her, making inquiry as to the 



THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEI. ROGERS. 221 

maiden name of John Rogers's wife. Mrs. Semple 
replied under date of July ist, 1856, and her letter is 
now in our possession. In it she says ^^Grandfather, 
John Rogers, lived and died in King and Queen coiaiiy. 
He married Raehel Eastham. She was daughter of 
Mary Bird, and that is the way Bird came into the 
family. " 

This article has far exceeded the limits originally 
intended, and perhaps an apology is due our readers 
therefor, but as this is our only opportunity to present 
the matter, we have deemed it advisable to enter fully 
into details. 

Before concluding the discussion, we think it well 
to call special attention to some of the salient points of 
the letters, from which we have given extracts: 

I St. Thomas Rogers's questions in his first letter 
to Mrs. Semple prove that he, himself, kneiv nothing 
positive about his ancestors in the Bird faniily. All was 
hazy and uncertain in his mind, and he wrote to his 
cousin for information. This is not strange, in view of 
the fact that he left Virginia when a very young man 
and for many years had given little or no thought to 
such matters. 

2nd. The inquiry made by him as to whether 
Mary Byrd was not the maiden name of his grand- 
mother, and whether she was '' related to'' the cele- 
brated Colonel Byrd of Virginia, is abundant evidence 
of this, and is also absolute proof that he (Thomas 
Rogers) had never heard of Colonel Byrd's being the 
father or brother of his ancestress, or that Colonel Byrd 
of Westover was his progenitor in any degree. This, 
coupled with the fact that Thomas Rogers, on account of 



222 THE ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 

his ability and knowledge, had been requested by other 
relatives to write a history of the family, justifies our 
assertion that the Westover tradition being unknown 
to him, is necessarilj- of recent growth. He certainly 
had never heard of it. 

3rd. Note that while Thomas Rogers in his first 
letter used both methods of spelling the famih- name, 
in the second letter he writes it invariably Bird. He 
also says that his uncle Bird Rogers was named for 
Mar}' Bird, and finallj' mentions his little grand- 
daughter by name as Mary Bird. 

4th. Mrs. Semple, in her reply, is as positive and 
sure as Mr. Rogers was uncertain and doubtful in his 
inquiries. Her's is not a bald assertion, but is backed 
up b}' a number of corroborative facts, which she 
knows absolutely and states without hesitation. 

She says Mar^- Bird was her great-grandmother 
(not grandmother); that Mar}- Bird married a man 
named Eastham, and that John Rogers her grand- 
father, married Rachel Eastham, a daughter of Mary 
Bird. Moreover, she tells the names of Marj- Bird's 
three brothers, and says the home of her Bird great- 
grandparents was located onh- two miles from her own 
birth-place, and where she passed her entire childhood 
and youth. Doubtless she was perfectly familiar with 
the place. It should be borne in mind that Mrs. 
Semple was an only daughter and lived at home with 
her mother until nineteen years of age, at which time 
the latter died. After that she lived for several years 
in the immediate vicinity of the old home. She was, 
moreover, a woman of remarkably acute intellect and 
retentive memory. Now, she saj-s her grandmother's 



THK ANCESTRY OF RACHEL ROGERS. 223 

name was Rachel Eastham. Her mother bore the 
same baptismal name; that is to say, her mother was 
her grandmother's namesake. Can any sane person 
doubt that Mrs. Semple knew whereof she spoke and 
wrote? 

5th. Mrs. Semple says Mary Bird, her great- 
grandmother, had three brothers, and gives their exact 
names as well as the titles of two of them ^ as if she, her- 
self, were personally acquainted with them. They 
were ''Colonel Wtn. Bird, Doctor Philip Bird, and Oiivay 
Bird." It is inconceivable that she could have made 
this statement containing so many details, except she 
knew of its truth. Now, Colonel Wm. Byrd (ist) of 
Westover had no brothers named Philip or Otway; 
Colonel Wm. Byrd (2nd) had only one brother, and 
he died in infancy. Two generations further along 
we find that Colonel Wm. Byrd (3rd) had a son 
named Francis Otway, who served in the Revolution- 
ary War, but this was more than a century after Mary 
Bird's time. Nowhere in the Byrd family records do 
we find any mention of a Philip Byrd. The fact that 
the peculiar name, Otway, appears a century apart in 
the two families corroborates what we have claimed, 
viz.: that the Birds of King and Queen and the Byrds 
of Westover in all probability sprang from the same 
English ancestry. 

John Rogers died at the age of eighty-two years, 
in King and Queen county, Virginia, and was buried 
in the old Park Church yard. The grave is near the 
altar wall of the church, but outside it. Giles Rogers, 
his father, was also bturied in the same church-yard. 



224 



THE ANCESTRY OF IL^CHEL ROGERS. 



The names and births of the nine children of John 
Rogers and his wife, Rachel Eastham, were as follows: 
JoHX Rogers, born 17 17. 
Giles Rogers, bom 17 19. 
George Rogers, born June 11, 1721. 
Mary Rogers, born 1725. 
Axx Rogers, born 1729. 
LrcY Rogers, born 1731. 
Mildred Rogers, born 1733. 
Bird Rogers, born 1735. 
Rachel Rogers, born October 17, 1737. 




Aj *i. 



w/iim 



^w 



■ -\ 








Commodore Richard Taylor. 



BRIEF ACCOUNT OF HIS ANCESTRY AND 
NAVAL HISTORY DURING THE WAR OF 
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 



HIS 



BISHOP MEA.de, in his "Old Churches and Fam- 
ilies of Virginia," says: "The Taylors of Virginia 
are allied to the oldest and most distinguished families 
of the Old Dominion, — the Madisons, Lees, Pendle- 
tons, Barbours, Conways, Gaines's, Hunts, and Talia- 
ferros." 



JAMES TAYLOR, 

the first of the family in America, emigrated from 
Carlisle, England, to Virginia, between the years 
1 650- 1 667. The exact date or year of his arrival is 
not known. One tradition fixes it as early as t"-e year 
1658. We think as late as 1666 or 1667 is mo apt to 
be correct. 

In or about the year 1668 he entered a tract of 
land as a homestead, consisting of about one thousand 
acres, situated on the Mattapony river, in that part of 



226 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

Drysdale Parish which then lay in New Kent county, 
but which afterwards was included in the southerly 
part of Caroline county. Part of this tract had been 
previousl}' taken up by other parties, but had been in 
the year 1662 forfeited by them on account of failure 
to comph- with the terms of settlement required by 
law. 

We have no knowledge of James Taylor's father or 
mother, or whether he had brothers or sisters. The 
connection between him and the family at Carlisle has 
never been traced. As to the date of his birth we are 
also ignorant. In "Hdtton's List of Emigrants from 
England to America" between the years 1600 and 1700, 
there appears the name "Zachary Taylor, aged twent}'- 

^ '"^^ four," who sailed from Gravesend 6th June, 1635, for 
Virginia, on the ship "Thomas and John," of which 
Richard Lambert, was master. We suspect from this 
early emigrant's name — a name kept up for three cen- 
turies by the Taylors in America — that he was a near 

. \Jwi" kinsman, an uncle, or possibly a brother of our 

j^; ancestor. 

James Taylor was married twice. Tradition says 
the first marriage took place in England. The sur- 
name of his first wife is not known to us, but her given 
name was Frances, and in ever}^ generation of Taylors 
since her time it has been a favorite. She was a 
woman charming in person and amiable in character, 
and her descendants have always delighted to render 
her honor. Their first child was born in the j'^ear 
1668, and from this fact we draw the inference that 
they had then been married not more than a year or 
two; and if we assume as correct the tradition that 
they were married in the old country, the date of their 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI,OR. 227 

arrival in Virginia could not have been much, if any, 
before the year 1667. 

James Taj^lor's wife, Frances, died September 22nd, 
1680, having borne him four children, one of whom, a 
daughter, died in infancy, and three of whom, two 
daughters and a son, survived her. Their names and 
births were: 

Jane Taylor, born December 27, 1668. 
James Taylor, born March 14, 1674. 
Sarah Ta^-lor, born June 30, 1676. 

We have no record of the two girls, except that 
Sarah grew to womanhood and married a man named 
Powell. Of the son we shall have more to say at the 
proper time. 

James Taylor, the elder, married secondly, on 
August 12, 1682, Mary Gregory, sister of Richard and 
John Gregory, and by her had four sons and five 
daughters, as follows: 

John Taylor, died in infancy. 
Ann Taylor, born January 12, 1684. 
Twin Sister, born January 12, 1684; died in infancy. 
Mary Taylor, born January 21, 1686; died in in- 
fancy . 

Mary Taylor, born June 29, 1688. 
Edmund Taylor, born July 5, 1690. 
John Taylor, born 1692; died in infancy. 
Ehzabeth Taylor, born June 10, 1694. 
John Taylor, born October 18, 1696. 

Notice that three sons were named John, two of 
whom died young. There must have been a strong 



228 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

reason for such persistency in this name. Probably it 

J was James Tavlor's father's name. -t.\ {kTCLd^ I 

. Ann married a man named Eastham. The East- 

■^r ^^^<'/W/)hams were numerous in King and Queen county. 

■" Mary married twice: first in 1701, when fifteen years 

of age, to Henr}- Pendleton (born 1683; died 172 1), 

then eighteen jears old; and secondly to Ed. Watkins. 

She died 1770, in Culpepper county. One of her sons 

was the celebrated patriot and chancellor, Edmund 

Pendleton (born 1721, died 1803); and General E. P. 

Gaines, U. S. A., is descended from her. 

Edmund moved to North Carolina, and we know 
nothing more of him. 

John Taylor, the third of the name, married 
Catharine Pendleton, daughter of Philip Pendleton 
(born 1650 in Norwich, England) and Isabella Hart, 
his wife, and sister of Henry Pendleton, who married 
Mary Taylor. Colonel John Taylor (born 1750) of 
Caroline count}^ U. S. Senator and one of Virginia's 
most noted men, was descended from them. 

James Taylor, the elder, spent the rest of his life 
in Drysdale Parish, and died April 30, 1698, He was 
buried on his own farm, about eight miles south of the 
present town. Bowling Green, in Caroline county. 
The place is still owned and occupied by one of his 
descendants. Major William Pendleton. 

We are informed that James Taylor, the elder, 
attained a "very advanced age," a statement which, 
though possibly true, we accept cu^/i grano salis^ as four 
of his children were born within the last eight years 
of his life, and the last one only a year and a half 
before his death. 




THE 

PU&LiC LIBf?ARV,'; 
Aster, i.enox and Jitden //' 




Coi.ONEi. James Tayi^or, 2nd. 

Born March 14. 1674. Died June 23, 1729. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 229 

COLONEL JAMES TAYLOR, 2nd. 

James Taylor, eldest son of James, the emigrant 
from Carlisle, England, and only son of Frances, the 
first wife, was born March 14, 1674. He has been 
called "James 2nd," to distinguish him from the 
numerous others of same name. His childhood was 
spent at the homestead in Caroline county, Virginia, 
but after arriving at man's estate, he resided in King 
and Queen county, later, again in Caroline, and finally 
in Orange county. 

He married February 23, 1699, Martha Thompson 
(born 1679), a daughter of Colonel William Thompson 
and grand-daughter of Sir Roger Thompson of Eng- 
land, who was a prominent figure in Virginia at the 
time of Bacon's rebellion. Colonel Thompson was an 
officer of the British army, and a man of wealth and 
large influence. His home was at Blackwell Neck in 
Hanover county. His family was a large one, and his 
descendants in the male line are very numerous in 
Virginia and Kentucky. Martha Thompson was a 
brilliant, vivacious girl, possessed of a graceful form 
and endowed with charming manners. She was always 
counted a famous beauty. In bearing she was proud 
and queenl}^ and in character noted for firmness and 
dignity. We are indebted to Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Taylor- Buford of San Bernardino, California, for her 
silhouette as well as that of her son, Erasmus Taylor, 
reproduced herein ; also for the following story, illus- 
trating her courage and presence of mind in time of 
danger: 

In those early days of the settlement of Virginia, 
danger from marauding Indians was always imminent; 



230 COMMODORE RICHARD T.WXOR. 

and it was necessary that the frontier woman as well 
as her husband should be ready for defense at any 
moment. The rifle was his constant companion, 
whether at home or in the field, and every cabin was 
a semi-fortress, that could be barred instantly by the 
wife and children, at the sound of the dreadful war- 
whoop. It was amid such scenes as this that our fair 
ancestress reared her famih'. One da}', when her hus- 
band and elder sous were some distance from the 
house preparing a field for planting, three savages 
crept from the forest near by, and suddenly darted 
into the kitchen, where she was superintending the 
preparation of dinner. Their intent was evidently 
hostile, but they were not prepared for her method of 
defense. As they pushed their way into the kitchen 
and made for the house adjoining, she seized a ladle, 
dipped it into a pot of hot mush and dashed the boil- 
ing liquid on their naked bodies. Howling with rage 
and pain, they fled into the house and hid under a 
bed, where she bravely held them at bay, threatening 
them with further doses of the mush, until her hus- 
band and sons returned and captured them. 

James Taylor, 2nd, was colonel of a regiment of 
colonial militia {vide Beverly's History of Virginia), 
and probably did active duty during the Indian wars. 
He was also a member of the House of Burgesses, 
representing King and Queen county, and was said to 
have served as Surveyor- General for the colony. In 
1736 his widow was paid by the colonial government 
fifteen thousand pounds of tobacco for running the 
boundary lines of Caroline, Spottsylvania, Hanover and 
Orange counties (Herring's Statutes of Virginia, vol. 
iv. p. 514.) When Governor Spotswood made his 



!! NV / OIK 



iPUbL 




B-'ARY 



Asvor, Lenox and Tiiden ,// 




Mrs. Martha Thompson Tavi.or (in early womanhood). 

Born 1679. Died 1762. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 23I 

tramontane expedition to Swift Run Gap in the Blue 
Ridge and to the Shenandoah River, James Taylor 
was a member of the company. (Campbell's History 
of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia). 
The last camp of this expedition, at the foot of the 
Blue Ridge was named in his honor, and the mountain 
adjoining Swift Run Gap, called "Saddle Back," is 
said to have been named by him after the one of same 
name near Carlisle, England. 

He entered large tracts of land for himself in 
various counties and was one of the pioneers and 
original settlers of Orange county, where he took out 
patents for about fifteen thousand acres, in two tracts. 
One of these containing about ten thousand acres 
bordered on the Rapidan river and extended from the 
mouth of the Robinson to where the Madison Mills 
now stand. More than one-third of Orange county 
is called the "Taylor District," and is so marked on 
the county maps. 

About the year 1720 Colonel Taylor came up from 
Caroline county to Orange prospecting for a location. 
It is said that upon arriving on this ten thousand 
acre tract, he for the first time saw the famous red cla}^ 
soil of Virginia. It was a region of rare beauty and 
fertility. Magnificent forests covered a well-watered, 
rolling country, and under its shade the wild pea vine, 
the delight of cattle, grew profusel3^ The place was 
a veritable paradise for the hunter, the grazier and the 
farmer, and, having found a home where all his tastes 
might be gratified, he decided to seek no further. 
There, in the year 1722, he built for himself a home, 
which he named "Bloomsbury." The spot chosen was 
about four miles southeast of the present town of 



232 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

Orange. The house (see engravmg), the oldest in 
Orange coiintj', is j-et in an excellent state of preser- 
vation. It is built of wood, one and a half stories 
high, with dormer windows in the roof and having 
two large brick chimneys, in which are huge old- 
fashioned fire-places. A portico with four columns 
adorns its front. Ever}- nail used was wrought by a 
blacksmith. Inside, it is quite pretentious, the walls 
are handsomely' wainscoted with hard wood panels, 
and a wooden cornice ornaments the ceiling. A sub- 
stantial antique picture rail is also there, a proof that 
the Taylor ancestral home did not lack artistic decora- 
tion. At the end of the large reception hall or living 
room is a hard wood staircase of unique construction. 
The landing, two-thirds of the way up, partially con- 
cealed by the wainscoting and a spindle railing, is 
long enough to seat comfortably three or four persons, 
and under it are capacious hat and coat cupboards, 
with paneled doors and wainscoting, all built as part 
and parcel of the staircase. The whole effect is quaint 
and graceful. On festive occasions, and such were 
frequent — for moroseness and asceticism had little to 
do with the life of the cavaliers of the "Old Domin- 
ion" — musicians* were seated on the stair landing or 
galler}- and fiddled untiringly while the merry throng 
of young folks below "tripped the hght fantastic" 
until rosy-cheeked Aurora gilded the surrounding hill 
tops, and 

"With a foot more light, a step more true 
From the heath flower dashed the dew." 



*In those daj's almost every male member of the Taylor 
family could play the violin, and the same is true now. 




^encx and h.dtn 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI.OR. 233 

The second story of the old house is divided into 
small bed-rooms lighted by dormer windows. An 
"office" built in the yard, after the old southern fash- 
ion, and used for the transaction of Colonel Taylor's 
farm and surveying business, was pulled down a few 
years ago. 

"Bloomsbur}^" is now owned by a Mr. Jourdan, 
who courteously gave us permission to examine the 
premises. Towards the close of his life Colonel Taylor 
gave this place to his eldest son, James Taylor, 3rd, 
and built for himself a house some two miles nearer to 
Orange C. H., which he named "Greenfield," and 
there he died June 23, 1729, aged fiftj^-five. His 
widow, Martha Thompson, survived him thirty-three 
years, until November 19, 1762, at which time she was 
eighty-three. Both were buried in the family grave- 
yard at "Greenfield," as were many others of the 
family, their children and grandchildren, whose tombs, 
'though sadly neglected and broken, are still there. * 

Martha Thompson Tajdor's will is on record at 
Orange C. H., but that of Colonel Taylor has not been 
found. 

"Greenfield" was in later years the home of James 
Taylor, son of Colonel George Taylor and grandson of 
James Taylor 2nd. He was clerk of Orange county 
many j^ears, and the county records were kept in the 
office on this place. It is now the property of a man 

*NoTE. — A subscription has just been set on foot by Dr. 
A. G. Grinnan of Orange to reinclose this old burying ground 
with a substantial fence and to repair the tombstones and care 
for the graves. The object is a most worthy one, and we hope 
his efforts will meet with success. 



234 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

named Booten. The old Taylor house there, however, 
has been replaced by a new one. 

It is interesting to note here that a portion of the 
old homestead tract is still owned and occupied b}' a 
descendant of Colonel Taylor in the male line, viz.: 
Major Erasmus Taylor, at whose handsome country 
seat, "Meadow Farm," we were delightfully enter- 
tained in the summer of 1S97. 

One more fact especially worthy of mention is 
this: Colonel James Ta^-lor, 2nd, and his wife, Martha 
Thompson, enjoy the absolutely unique honor of hav- 
ing been great grand-parents of i'ci'o very distinguished 
Presidents of the United States, viz.: James Madison, 
the "Father of the Constitution," and Zachar}' Ta\'lor, 
the hero of Palo Alto, Monterey and Buena Vista. 
Many others of their descendants have attained great 
prominence as statesmen and in the fields of science, 
literature, medicine and jurisprudence. We have not 
space to mention even their names, let alone to record 
their achievements. 

Their children were nine in number, viz.: 

(i.) Frances Taylor, born August 30, 1700; died 
November 25, 1761. She married August 24, 1731, 
Ambrose Madison of Orange counts^ (then Spottsyl- 
vania county), and their eldest son, James, (born 
March 27, 1723, died February 27, 1801); married 
Eleanor Rose Conway, and had several children, of 
whom President James Madison was the eldest. 

(2.) Martha Taylor, born January 17, 1702, mar- 
ried Thomas Chew of Orange county, and had eight 
children. Among her sons was the famous Captain 
Colby Chew of the French and Indian w^ars. 



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COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI.OR. 235 

(3.) James Taylor (3rd), born March 30, 1703; 
died March ist, 1784. He was a member of the House 
of Burgesses from Orange county and held other polit- 
ical offices ; was married three times, ist to Mrs. 
Alice Thornton Catlett, daughter of Colonel Francis 
Thornton of Caroline county; 2nd to Mrs. Elizabeth 
McGrath Lewis ; and 3rd to Mrs. Gregory. No issue 
by second and third wives. They lived at "Blooms- 
bury" in the house erected by James Taylor (2nd) in 
1722, and all died there and were buried about one 
hundred yards east of the house, adjoining to and just 
west of the Quarles family burying ground, which is 
enclosed there. By his first wife he had several chil- 
dren, among them Major Francis Tajdor (born 1730) 
of the French and Indian wars, who married Ann 
Craddock ; and Colonel James Taylor (4th ) , born 
December 27, 1732; died 1814), of Midway, Caroline 
county, who commanded a regiment during the Revo- 
lutionary war and fought in the French and Indian 
wars, and held many high political offices. 

(4.) Zachary Taylor, born April 17, 1707; died 
1768; married, ist, Elizabeth Lee of Westmoreland 
county, Virginia, daughter of Hancock and Sarah 
Allerton Lee, and sister of Hancock Lee of Fauquier 
county, Virginia. She was a direct descendant of 
Lord Willoughby of England. Married, 2nd, Mrs. 
Blackburn, whose maiden name was Jones. Zachary 
Taylor lived at the place called "Meadow Farm," 
mentioned above, now occupied by Major Erasmus 
Taylor, and was the father of seven sons, but we only 
know of three of them, viz.: Zachary, who married 
Alice Chew; Hancock, who never married, and who 
was killed in 1774 by Indians in Kentucky; and the 



236 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

celebrated Colonel Richard Taylor (born April 3, 1741; 
died June 19, 1829) of Virginia and Kentucky, who 
married Sarah Strother (born December 11, 1760; 
died December 13, 1829) of Orange county. These 
last were parents of General Zachary Taylor, President 
of the United States; of General Joseph P. Taylor, and 
others. 

(5.) George Taylor, born February 10, 171 1; 
father of Commodore Richard Taylor. For the pres- 
ent we shall pass him by and resume his history after 
concluding the list of his brothers and sisters. 

(6.) Tabitha Taylor, born March 2, 17 13; mar- 
ried T. Wild. No record of her descendants. 

(7.) Erasmus Taylor, born September 5, 1715; 
died July 19, 1794; buried at "Greenfield." He 
married Jane Moore (died 181 2), who was daughter of 
John Moore and his wife, (Mrs.) Rebecca Catlett Con- 
way. He was of a retiring disposition and declined 
all public offices. Among his issue were Hon. Robert 
Taylor of Orange county, Captain John Taylor of the 
Revolutionary Army, and Elizabeth Taylor (born 
1755). who married in 1776 Andrew Glassell, a Scotch- 
man from Dumfries, who emigrated to Virginia in 
1756 and settled in Madison county. These last were 
grandparents of Dr. A. G. Grinnan, now of said 
county, who furnished us most of the foregoing his-, 
tory of the Taylors. 

(8.) Hannah Taylor, born March 15, 1718; mar- 
ried a Frenchman named Nicholas Battaille. Their 
son moved to Kentucky and left descendants. 

(9.) Mildred Taj-lor, born December 11, 1724; 
married August 24, 1753, Richard Thomas of Orange 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI.OR. 237 

county, who died in 1790. She lived some years 
longer. We know nothing as to their issue. 



COLONEL GEORGE TAYLOR 

of Orange county, mentioned above, fifth child, second 
son of James Taylor (2nd) and his wife, Martha 
Thompson, was born February 10, 171 1. He was a 
broad-minded, public spirited man, took a prominent 
part in all affairs affecting the welfare of his country 
and was frequently honored by election to high office, 
and appointment to important positions of trust in the 
gift of the government. 

He was a vestryman of the Church of England; a 
justice of the peace and magistrate; was elected clerk 
of the County of Orange repeatedly, and served in 
that capacity for twenty-three years, from 1750 to 
1772, when his son James succeeded him; was a mem- 
ber of the House of Burgesses of Virginia for eleven 
years, 1748 to 1758 (see "Dinwiddle Papers;" vol. ii, 
p. 104; also "Burk's History of Virginia," vol. iii, p. 
133; also "Journal of the House of Burgesses," Feb- 
ruary 28, 1752, November 5, 1753, February 16, 1754, 
May 15, 1755, April 19, 1757; and Virginia Almanac 
1 756- 1 758); was commissioned, July 18,1755, Colonel of 
the Orange county militia by Governor Dinwiddle (see 
"Virginia Historical Collections, Dinwiddle Papers," 
vol. ii, pp. 103 and 104), and served in the French 
and Indian wars; was a member of the Orange County 
Committee of Safety in 1774, and a member of the 
Virginia Convention of 1775 (see "Virginia Geneal- 
ogies" by Rev Horace Edwin Ha5'den). 



238 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

He was twice married; ist, on February 28, 1738, 
to Rachel Gibson (bom May 4, 171 7), daughter of 
Jonathan Gibson and his wife, Margaret Catlett.^ By 
her he had eleven children, all boys. Later we shall 
give their names and records. She died February 16, 
1 761, aged 44. He married 2nd in 1767 (Mrs.) Sarah 
Taliaferro Con way, [widow of Captain Francis Conway, 
and daughter of Colonel John Taliaferro and his wife, 
Sarah Smith, and by her he had one son, (completing 
his dozen) George Conway Taylor, who was born 
January 13, 1769; married Elizabeth Dixon, and died 
without issue March 9, 1805. 

Colonel[George Taylor's home was known as "Mid- 
land" and was situated about two miles northeast of 
Orange Court House, between " Bloomsbur>'" and 
"Greenfield." These three places were all in sight of 
each other, and it was the custom, whenever visitors 
arrived for dinner at any one of them (which occiirred 
nearly every da}-), to hoist a flag as a signal to the 

*NoTE, — Jonathan Gibson was one of the earliest clerks of 
the Orange County Court, and was succeeded in that position 
by Colonel George Taylor. He was also, in 1736, a member of 
the House of Burgesses from Caroline county. He was never 
sheriff of King George county, as has been said by some. 
Edmund Gibson, Bishop of^London, was his brother, it is 
claimed, and his parents were Edmund and Jane Langhom 
Gibson. Jonathan Gibson was one of the godfathers of James 
Madison, President of the United States. He was accidentally 
poisoned and died in the prime of life. Margaret Catlett, wife 
of Jonathan Gibson, was daughter of John Catlett of Essex 
county, Virginia, and granddaughter of Colonel John Catlett of 
" Greenmount " at Port Royal in Essex county, now Caroline 
county, Virginia. He emigrated from Sittenbourne Parish, 
Kent county, England, to Virginia, and was killed in 1670 by 
Indians at the fort near Port Roval. 




V As'o.. Leiiiix ?.i»d fiiden// 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI^OR. 239 

other houses and an invitation for the rest of the clan 
to come over and join in the festivities. The house 
(see engraving), built by Colonel George Taylor at 
"Midland," where he lived and died (November 4, 
1792), was visited by us in 1897. It is larger and 
more imposing than " Bloomsbury," being full two 
stories and an attic, and having a remarkably hand- 
some chimney, whose brick work is as perfect as the 
day it was put up. The interior and stair-case are 
much the same as at "Bloomsbury." The present 
owner, an Englishman, named Farrer, insisted on our 
"breaking bread " with him in the old house, and his 
son, an amateur photographer, was good enough to 
furnish us with photographs of the Taylor houses. 

Colonel Taylor was buried in the family grave- 
yard at "Greenfield," by the side of his mother. 



THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF 
COLONEL GEORGE TAYLOR. 

In the name of God, Amen. 

I, George Taylor of the County of Orange, being 
in good health and of sound and disposing memory, 
thanks be to God for the same, do make and ordain 
this my last Will and Testament, in manner and 
form following : 

Imprimis. I desire all my just debts to be first 
paid. 

Itetn. I give to my son, James, all the household 
furniture that were mine, where he now lives, and a 
young negro woman, named Rachel, now in his pos- 
session; also two young negros, between the ages of 



240 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

five and fifteen, such as my executors shall chuse, to 
him and his heirs for ever. 

Item. I give to my son, Jonathan, five pounds 
current money. 

Item. I give to the executors of my son, Edmund, 
five pounds current money. 

Item. I give to my son, Richard, five pounds cur- 
rent mone}-. 

Item. I give to my son, William, five pounds cur- 
rent money; also three negros, Phil, Aaron and Doll, 
now in his possession, the three said negros being of 
equal value to four such as I gave to my other children ; 
also thirty-three pounds cur't money, being the bal- 
ance of one hundred and fifty pounds cur't money. 

Item. I give to my son, Charles, five pounds cur't 
money. 

Itetn. I give to my son, Reuben, five pounds cur't 
money. 

Ite7n. I give to my son, Francis, five hundred 
acres of land, including the plantation I now live on; 
also a negro man named Frank, now in his possession; 
also one other grown negro and two j'oung negros, 
such as my ex'ors shall chuse to make them equal in 
value to such four I give to the other of my children, 
which said land and negros I give to him and his heirs 
forever. 

Itetn. I give to my son, Benjamin, four negros, 
two of them to be grown, and the other two to be 
young ones; also I give him four other negros, such 
as my ex'ors shall chuse, in lieu of my not giving him 
land or money, which said negros I give to him and 
his heirs forever. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI,OR. 24I 

Item. I give to my son, George, five hundred and 
twenty-five acres of land in Faj'ette county, on Ken- 
tuck}' river, to him and his heirs forever, he paying 
to the executors of his brother, Edmund, the expences 
attending the taking up and surveying the same. 

Item. I leave the remaining part of the tract of 
land I li\'e on, with one hundred and fourteen acres I 
purchased, adjoining the lower part of my tract, to be 
sold by my executors, or the survivor of them, for 
raising mone}- for the payment of my debts and 
legacies. 

Iteyn. I give all the rest of my estate to be equally 
divided among all my before-mentioned sons and their 
representatives, to them and their heirs forever. 

And, lastly, I do nominate and appoint my sons, 
Francis and Benjamin, executors of this, my last Will 
and Testament, revoking all Wills by me heretofore 
made. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
and seal this fifth day of September. 1789. 

Geo. Taylor. 

N. B. — As the Will contained in this paper \ 
is wrote by iny own hand, it requires f_ 
no witnesses. i 

Geo. Taylor, j , 

At a court held for Orange county on Monday, the 
26th November, 1792, this last Will and Testament of 
George Taylor, dec'd, was presented into court by 
Francis Taylor and Benjamin Taylor, Ex'ors therein 
named, and the said Will appearing to the satisfaction 
of the court to be altogether in the own handwriting 
of the said deceased, the same is admitted to be 



242 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

recorded, and on the motion of the said ex'ors, who 
made oath according to law, certificate is granted them 
for obtaining a probate thereof in due form. 

Whereupon, they, with James Taylor and Charles 
Taylor, their securities, entered into bond for the same 
in the sum of Five Thousand Pounds. 

Teste, 
James Taylor, C.O.C. 

The record of Colonel George Taylor's family 
in the War of the Revolution was most remark- 
able and is deserving of commendation. 

As stated heretofore, he was the father of twelve 
sons, eleven by his first wife and one by his second 
wife. The youngest was onh' thirteen j'ears of age 
when the war ended, and was therefore ineligible for 
militar}- service. The second son by the first wife, 
George, Jr., died January 2, 1761, aged 19, fourteen 
years before the colonies rebelled. 

The remaining ten, all volunteered in the Contin- 
ental arm}' or navy and served gallantly' in the struggle 
for independence. Taking into consideration their 
number, their rank and their distinguished services, it 
is doubtful whether the record has ever been surpassed 
or equaled by anj* one familj- in the annals of our 
country. Everj' descendant of Colonel George Taylor 
ma}^ well thrill wath patriotic pride in contemplating 
the part our ancestors took in the Revolution. 

I. James Taylor, eldest son, born December 16, 
1738. was Sergeant-Major in the Continental line. 
After the war he received two hundred acres of land 
in recognition of his services. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 243 

From 1772 to 1798 he held the office of Clerk of 
Orange county, succeeding his father ; married his 
third cousin, Ann Pendleton, daughter of James Pend- 
leton and granddaughter of Henry Pendleton and Mary 
Taylor, his wife ; moved to Jefferson county, Ken- 
tucky, in 1799 and died there leaving a numerous 
family. 

2. George Taylor, second son, died before the 
Revolution. 

3. Jonathan Taylor, third son, born December 3, 
1742, was Lieutenant in the Virginia Convention 
Guards. He married Ann Berry and had thirteen 
children; removed to Clark county, Kentucky, in 1789 
and died there 1804. 

4. Edmund Taylor, fourth son, born October 21, 
1744, was Captain of a company in the Virginia State 
Line ; married Sarah Stubbs and had ten children ; 
moved to Kentucky after the war and died there July 
I, 178S. 

5. Francis Taylor, fifth son, born March 9, 1747, 
was commissioned Maj^ 8, 1776, Captain in the Second 
Virginia Regiment; commissioned March 20, 1778, 
Major of Fifteenth Virginia Regiment; December 24, 
1778, Lieutenant Colonel Virginia Convention Guardsr 
and March 5, 1779, Colonel of same regiment. He 
died in 1799, unmarried. 

6. Richard Taylor, sixth son, born January 6, 
1749, was commissioned February 6, 1776, Captain in 
the Virginia Nav}^ and during the war commanded 
a squadron in the Chesapeake, and captured several 
British vessels; was twice wounded. After the close 
of the war he was made Commodore and chief officer 



244 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

of the Virginia Navy. His histor}-, more in detail, 
will be given hereinafter. 

7. John Taylor, seventh son, born January 27, 
1 75 1, was commissioned August 13, 1777, Midshipman 
in the Virginia Navy; promoted August, 1778, to 
Lieutenant and served under his brother Richard: was 
captured by the British, and died on the old Jerse}^ 
prison ship at New York. 

8. William Taylor, eighth son, born January 23, 
1753, was commissioned January 29, 1776, First Lieu- 
tenant Second \'irginia Regiment; promoted to Cap- 
tain December 28, 1776; promoted to Major of Ninth 
Virginia Regiment December 7, 1779: retired February' 
12, 1781; received a bounty of 5,333 acres of land. 
He removed to Kentuck}- in 1786, and lived at Louis- 
ville. He married ist (in 1786), Luc\- Hord; 2nd 
(July 25, 1796), Elizabeth Coats, and died April 14, 
1830. 

9. Charles Ta^dor, ninth son, born January 3, 
1755, served first as Surgeon's Assistant in the Second 
Virginia Regiment; October 26, 1779, was commis- 
sioned Surgeon of the \'irginia Convention Guards, 
and served in that capacity until June, 1781. Was 
awarded 6,000 acres of land in consideration of his 
services. 

He married March 11, 1777, Sarah Conway (born 
November 27, 1759), daughter of Captain Francis 
Conway and his wife, Sarah Taliaferro, who (the 
latter), in 1767, became his father's. Colonel George 
Taylor's, second wife. He died Januarj- 27, 1821. 

10. Reuben Taylor, tenth son, born Januarj- 14, 
1757, was commissioned April S, 1777, First Lieutenant 




THE 










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\-t-. 



!i<' 



L^yi^fe*^- 



. iCtr^ 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAVI.OR. 245 

of the Canadian Regiment; promoted Februar}- 2, 
1778, to Captain, and retired January' i , 1783. Received 
as bounty for his services 4,000 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Februar>- 11, 17 82, Rebecca Moore: moved to 
Kentucky in 1797, and died there man}- years after- 
ward, leaving a number of children. 

II. Benjamin Taylor, eleventh son, born Novem- 
ber II, 1759, served as Midshipman on one of the 
vessels commanded by his brother Richard. Received 
from the United States Government in recognition of 
his services 2,666 acres of land. He never married. 

We shall now bring this genealogy to a close 
by giving a brief outline of the 

NAVAL HISTORY 

OF 

COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

As stated heretofore, he was the sixth .son of 
Colonel George Ta3'lor of Orange county, Virginia, 
and his wife, Rachel Gibson, and was born in said 
county January 6, 1749. About the year 1771 he 
married Catharine Davis (born November 20, 1750), a 
daughter of James Davis* and niece of Colonel William 
Rowley, a very wealthy planter of King George 
county, who died May 25, 1774. In the latter's will, 
a copy of which appears hereinafter, he devised to 
James Davis and to Catharine, herself, a large amount 
of real and personal property, and appointed Richard 
Taylor one of his executors. We are uncertain what 

*NoTE. — Others sav her father was the Rev. Wm. Davis. 



246 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

the given name of Catharine Davis's mother was, but 
think it was Ann. After marriage, Richard Taylor 
and his wife lived in Caroline count)-. He was the 
father of six sons and five daughters, of whom his 
wife Catharine Davis, bore him five sons and five 
daughters. Commodore Taylor's eldest son, Richard, 
by another mother, was adopted by Catharine Davis 
and treated by her as her own son, and he returned 
her affection with a devotion, if possible, greater than 
any of her own children. 

Their names and births were as follows: 

1. Richard Taylor, above mentioned, known as 
Colonel "Hopping Dick," on account of lamenes 
caused by a wound received in battle during the War 
of 1 81 2. He was colonel of a regiment and was greatly 
distinguished for bravery. General Harrison said of 
him, "If I wanted a man to storm the gates of hell, I 
would send Dick Taylor!" He married (Mrs.) Mary 
Ann Martin Buckner. 

2. William Rowley Taylor, born June 11, 1772; 
was Captain of the schooner "Sally," owned by Alex- 
ander McCalley; sailed October 21, 1793, from Nor- 
folk, Virginia, bound for Kingston, Jamaica, and was 
lost at sea, the vessel having never been heard of 
afterward. 

3. Thompson Taylor, born September 23, 1775; 
married Ann Oldham. Was a Major in the War of 
1 81 2, and bre vetted for gallantry. 

4. Richard Taylor (2nd), born December 2, 1777; 
married his first cousin, Mary Tajdor, daughter of his 
uncle, Captain Edmund Taylor, and Sarah Stubbs, his 
wife. His descendants are very numerous in Kentucky. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 247 

5. Colby Taylor, born January 8, 1780; married 
three times: ist to Elizabeth McGuire; and to Lucy 
Taylor; 3rd to Lucy Minor. He left a large family, 
and his descendants in Clarke county, Kentucky, are 
numerous. 

6. Roger Taylor, born September 12, 1781; mar- 
ried Hannah Fishback. 

7. Catharine Taylor, born February 5, 1783; mar- 
ried, ist, Peter Fontaine; 2nd, Captain John Nelson. 

8. Matilda Taylor (grandmother of the author), 
born December 19, 1784; married May 30, 1799, Isaac 
Robertson; died March 5, 1833. (See her history 
with that of her husband, pp 38-41 of this work. 

9. Lucinda Taylor, born December 12, 1786; 
married Philip Barbour, and left a family. The Har- 
bours of Kentuck}' are among the most prominent 
people of the State. 

10. Elizabeth Taj-lor, born March, 1788; died 
unmarried. 

11. Sallie Taj-lor, born March 6, 1890; died un- 
married. 

Soon after the outbreak of hostilities between the 
American colonies and the mother country, Richard 
Taylor offered his services to Virginia, and on Febru- 
ary 6, 1776, was commissioned as Captain in the 
Navy. He served gallantly and wdth great distinction 
from that date until November, 17S1; was twice 
.severely wounded, once in the thigh and once in the 
knee. On account of the latter he was completely 
disabled, and was therefore obliged to retire from 
further active participation in the war. 



248 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI.OR. 

The term of his service is shown b}' the following 
certificate of Benjamin Harrison, Governor of Vir- 
ginia, taken from the \'irginia State Papers: 

"No. 133. 

Council Chamber, February 19, 17S3. 

I do certify that Captain Richard Taylor is entitled to the 
proportion of land allowed a Captain in the Xaxy of the Com- 
monwealth for service from February 6, 1776, to November, 
1781. 

(Signed) Benjamin Harrison. 

Thomas Merriwether. 

Warrant for 5,3335^ acres issued to Richard Taylor Febru- 
ary 19, 17S3." 

The following letters, orders, etc., having reference 
to Captain Taylor's service, are gleaned from the 
Virginia State Papers and from other public documents 
in the \^irginia Land Office and State Library: 

P'rom the Journal of the \'irginia Committee of 
Safety, page 123, 14th March, 1776. 

"Richard Taylor of Caroline is appointed Captain of the 
armed vessel fitted out by Col. Fielding Lewis, and he is to 
recommend to the committee as soon as possible proper persons 
to be first and second officers, etc." 

From the same, page 205: 

June 15, 1776. 

' 'The Committee of Safety send to Captain Richard Taylor 
an order for /"150 upon account, for pay of seamen on board 
his cruiser in the Rappahannock." 

From the Letter Book of the \'irginia Xav\- Board: 

' ' To Captain Richard Taylor. 

Sir — The Commissioners of the Navy require your attend- 
ance at the Board as soon as you possibly can (come), they 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAVLOR. 249 

having appointed you to the command of the galley building 
up the Mattapony by Mr. Herbert. 
April 19, 1777. Thomas Whiting, 

First Commissioner." 

From the same: 

"7^1? Captain Richard Taylor. 

The cables for your vessel are come to hand. When you 
are in want of them, you must send to Williamsburg, where 
they now are. We have ordered a carver (?), which Captain 
Callender purchased for the use of the Navy, to be sent down to 
you. When he comes, you'l set him about such work as you 
think proper. 

Navv Board, Thomas Whiting, 

ist August, 1777. I st Commissioner." 



From the minutes of the Nav}' Board: 

October 11, 1777. 
"Mr. John Herbert is directed to furnish eight good hands, 
calkers and carpenters, with a quarter-man, to finish Captain 
Taylor's ship, which the Board are desirous should be speedily 
done. 



From the same under same date: 

"Ordered that Messrs. Smith & Roane deliver to Captain 
Richard Taylor two hogsheads whisky, for the use of the ship 
Tartar. ' ' 



From the same: 

December 11, 1777. 

"Ordered that Captain Richard Taylor of the ship 'Tartar' 
deliver to Captain Maxwell the bell belonging to said ship for 
the use of the Chickahominy ship yard." 



250 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

From the same: 

Januar\- 14, J77S. 
"Ordered that the keeper of the publick store deliver to 
Captain Richard Taylor, for the use of the ship 'Tartar" 
Two half-hour glasses. 
One two hours do 
One hour do 

Ten pair hinges. 
Six pad-locks. 
Three scrubbing brushes. 
Four paint do 

Fifteen coils ropeing twine. 
Ten yards white bunting, and 
Six scrapers." 

From \'irginia State Navy Papers (after the Revo- 
lution) : 

"List of Officers of State Navy, agreeable to the arrange- 
ment of 3rd May, 1784." 

In the said list appears the name Richard Taylor, Captain. 

From the same, vol. iv.. 1785-1789, page 357: 

The record shows that Captain Richard Taylor was appointed 
to the command of the State Navy, consisting of the vessels 
"Patriot" and "Liberty," in June, 17S7, upon the death of 
Captain Barron. 

The armament of the "Patriot" consisted of "eight swivels 
mounted on carriages, nine muskets and six pistols, with powder 
horns, flints, cutlasses, etc." 

That of the "Liberty" consisted of "six swivels, nine nms- 
kets and three baj-onets, six pistols and five cutlasses." 

From \'irginia State Xavy Papers: 

August 16, 17S4. 

"I have not the Steward's Book to compare with Mr. 
Frazer's acct., it having been lodged, to the best of my knowl- 
edge, with the Xavy Board in 1778, but I believe the articles 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYI,OR. 25 1 

were found as is charged since June 16, 1777. My having been 
wounded and taken from the ship (the "Tartar") in the manner 
that I was, and other officers taking charge, I could get only the 
book above mentioned." 

Richard Taylor. 



From the Southern Literary Messenger, 1857, 
page 13: 

"The Virginia Navy of the Revolution." 

"Commodore J. Boucher, early in the war commanded the 
Brig 'Mosquito' and fourteen sail in the Potomac ; and Captain 
Richard Taylor at a later period was in command of a squadron 
at Hampton Roads." 



From the same, page 137: 

"But the schooner 'Liberty' was not idle at this time. She 
was commanded by Captain Richard Taylor, who was fortunate 
enough to surprise and secure in the Rappahannock no less than 
four vessels in the service of the enemy, all of which were 
merchantmen." 

The name of one of these vessels was the "Speedwell," 
which was, after capture, equipped as a cruiser and employed 
in bringing supplies from the West Indies. 



From the same, page 141: 

"In October, 1779, Captain Taylor in the 'Patriot' schooner, 
whilst cruising off the Virginia coast, fell in with the 'Lord 
Howe,' an English privateer. According to the account, it was 
warmly contested by both vessels, and the result would probably 
have been very doubtful had not the 'Patriot' received assist- 
ance from the State Brig 'Northampton.' The 'Howe,' seeing 
she was about to be attacked by a superior force, retired from 
the action." 



252 COMMODORE RICHARD TAVI,OR. 

From the same, page 142: 

"Another instance is afforded in the meagre account of a 
very severe action, said to have taken place in Lynhaven Bay, 
between the 'Tartar,' Captain Taylor, and an English schooner- 
It is stated that Captain Taylor was badly wounded in the thigh 
in the encounter, and strange to say, it is left in doubt whether 
the Englishman was captured or not. It is mentioned by the 
late Commodore Barron of the U. S. Navy, in his sketch of the 
'Patriot,' to be seen in the Virginia Historical Register, that 
when she was commanded by Captain Richard Ta3'lor she had 
an action with a 'Government English schooner,' which she 
would have taken had not Taj-lor and so man}- of his crew been 
severely wounded. In the account, to which we refer, of the 
action in Lynhaven Bay, Taylor is mentioned as captain of the 
' Tartar,' and Barron as being in the 'Patriot,' and it is stated 
that the latter was probably not in the fight. From the fact 
that Captain Taylor was wounded in a hard fought action, these 
two incidents of our revolutionary struggle maj' have been con- 
founded with each other, or perhaps Taylor was wounded more 
than once. In the affidavit, in which it is stated that the 
'Tartar' engaged the Englishman, the deponent strengthens his 
statement by remembering that a certain surgeon, whom he dis- 
tinctly names, dressed Captain Taylor's wound, hence there can 
be little doubt of the truth of the fact. If Captain Barron be 
accurate in his account of the encounter between the 'Patriot' 
and the English Government schooner, Taylor must have been 
twice wounded during his gallant career." 

With reference to the nttmber of times Captain 
Taylor was wounded dttring the w^ar. we tmhesitatingly 
say twice: first, in the action between the "Tartar" 
and the EngHsh schooner, previous to November, 
1778, and referred to in his letter dated August 16, 
1784, when he was wounded in his thigh; and secondlj^ 
in the action between the "Patriot" and an English ves- 
sel in November, 1781. In this latter engagement a 
grape-shot pierced his knee, disabling him for life and 




,v THE 

PUSLiC Lie-VARY'; 
x^ Asiop, lenox c.r.6 i\.^ // 




Mrs. Martha Thompson Taylor. 

At the age of 75. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAVLOR. 253 

compelling him to retire from active service. The 
wound in his knee never healed, and although he lived 
more than forty-four years afterwards, it was eventu- 
ally the cause of his death. The author's mother was 
a grand-daughter of Captain Taylor and lived at his 
home until his death, at which time she was fourteen 
years of age. The wound was not allowed to heal and 
required dressing every day, in which she occasionally 
assisted. She frequently told her children about the 
wound, and always said it was caused by a grape-shot, 
which went clear through his knee. 

The engagement, in which he received this latter 
wound, occurred in November, 17S1, and was with a 
British cruiser off the capes of A'irginia, near the 
entrance of Chesapeake Baj-. The sea was calm and 
the breeze insufficient to manipulate his vessel. Cap- 
tain Taylor, therefore, determined to attack the Eng- 
lishman in open boats, and board and capture her by a 
hand-to-hand fight. As his boats approached the 
enemy, they were the target for volley after \-olley 
from the guns of the British, but without damage to 
any of them. It looked as if the Americans would 
have an easy task in getting into close quarters and 
boarding the English ship as their gunners continued 
to overshoot the mark, when one of Captain Taylor's 
young and enthusiastic sailors cried out in foolish 
bravado to the English gunners, "Why don't you 
elevate your metal?" (that is, elevate the breeches of 
their guns), whereupon the British, taking the hint, 
poured a well-aimed voile}- of grape-shot into Cap- 
tain Taylor's boat, killing a number of his men and 
wounding him severely. It was the brave Captain's 
last battle. He was compelled to beat a retreat and 
abandon all further attempts to capture the enemy. 



254 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

After the close of the war, the State of Virginia 
still continued to maintain its "navj^" consisting only 
of Captain Taylor's old ships, the "Patriot" and the 
"Tartar." He was disabled and could do no active 
service, and Captain Barron was put in charge of them 
and continued so until June, 1787, when he died. By 
that time Captain Taylor was able to hobble around 
on his crutches, and although there were numbers of 
naval ofiicers who aspired for the position, he was 
immediately appointed by the Governor and confirmed 
by the Naval Board as Chief Ofiicer of the Navy, and 
served in that capacity several years. Thenceforth he 
received the rank of Commodore, and to the end of his 
life always bore that title. 

In the year 1794 he resigned in order to remove to 
Kentucky. The journey thither was made by him 
with his family, about one hundred negro slaves and 
his personal propert}', in wagons and on horse-back, 
from Caroline county to a point on the Ohio River, 
and thence by flat-boat down that stream to the Falls 
of the Ohio, the present site of the city of Louisville. 
A certain Major Fishback (whose daughter Hannah 
married Roger Taylor, son of the Commodore ) and his 
family were in the party. Owing to the danger from 
hostile Indians, the boat was floated silently down 
stream at night only, and before dawn of day was 
moored in some secluded spot, concealed by the dense 
forests. One night it became necessary to kill a young 
horse that became restive and stamped continually. 
They arrived at length in safety at their destination. 

Commodore Taylor settled on the tract of land 
granted to him by the United States for services dur- 
ing the Revolution. It consisted of 5333 acres of 



COMMODORE RICHARD TA\XOR. 255 

land, then in Jefferson county, but now in Oldham 
county, Kentucky, near the present town of Westport. 
The place extended to the Ohio River, but his house, 
a two-story log one, sat about a mile back from it, and 
overlooking it. He named it "Woodlawn," and con- 
tinued to live there the rest of his life. 

When the Marquis de I^a Fayette visited America, 
as the guest of the nation, in the j'ear 1824, he came 
to Louisville, and on that occasion did Commodore 
Taylor the honor of paying him a call. The writer's 
mother remembered the occasion well and used often 
to relate it to her children. She was at that time 
thirteen years old. La Fayette took her on his lap 
and kissed her, causing her for the moment, at least, 
to be the envy of all her playmates. Her mother, Mrs. 
Matilda Taylor Robertson, widow of Isaac Robertson 
and daughter of the Commodore, lived with him at 
"Woodlawn" and kept house for him from the year 
181 1 until his death, which took place there August 
30, 1825. The wound which he received in his knee 
in November, 1781, never healed, and after nearly 
fortj'-four years of suffering was the cause of the old 
hero's death. Just before his soul passed into the 
deep waters, he roused himself for a brief moment and 
said triumphantly, 

" The ship is foundering, but the cargo is saved/" 

His wife, Catharine Davis, our revered progenitress, 
died early in the centur}^, previous to the year 1811, 
but we are unable to state the exact date. 

Their remains repose peacefully side by side on a 
gentle slope, shaded by a grove of locust trees, about 
one hundred yards northeast of where the old home 



256 COMMODORE RICHARD TA\XOR. 

stood. The spot is at the rear end of Thomas Bottorff's 
farm, two and a half miles northeast of the village, 
Goshen, Oldham county, and one mile north of the 
Ivouisville and Westport turnpike. 

We are glad to chronicle a beautiful act of filial 
piet}^ just performed b}'^ Commodore Taylor's great- 
grand-son and name-sake. Colonel Richard Ta^'lor 
Jacob of Louisville, viz.: the erection of a substantial 
and handsome monument of red granite over their 
graves. The foundation for it is made of the stones 
formerly in the chimney of the old house, an exceed- 
ingly appropriate use of them. 

The writer applied to the United States Pension 
Office at Washington for information regarding the 
pension granted Commodore Taylor, and received the 
following: 

Department of the Interior, ) 

Bureau of Pexsions, [ 

Washington, D. C, October 31, 1895. ) 

Sir: — In response to your request for the naval history of 
Richard Ta3-lor, an oflScer of the Revolutionary War, I have the 
honor to advise j'ou that his name was placed upon the pension 
roll b)- a special Act of Congress, approved March i, 181 7, and 
the papers on file in this Bureau contain onl}' such details of his 
ser\-ices as appear in the Act for his relief, which reads as fol- 
lows: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America, in Congress assembled: 

That from and after the third day of September, one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixteen, a pension of three hundred 
dollars per annum be allowed to Commodore Richard Taj-lor, in 
consequence of a total disability, arising from a wound received 
in a conflict with the enemy in the Revolutionan.- War, while in 
command of a flotilla in the waters of the Chesapeake, under a 
commission of Captain in the Navj- from the State of Virginia, 
to be paid to him, the said Taylor, half yearly, out of any 
monies in the Treasury, not otherwise appropriated by law. 
Very respectfully, 

Wm. Lochren, Commissioner. 




THE \ 

// NEW VQRK t 
/PUBLIC L!e'''.A'^V 

Ai'er. Lenox .-r.C -.dwi 




Erasmus Taylor. 

Born 1715. Died 1794. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 257 

In the book entitled "Virginia Genealogies," by- 
Rev. Horace Hay den, published in 1891 at Wilkes- 
barre, Pennsylvania, on page 678, we find the follow- 
ing: 

"Captain Richard Taylor served in the Virginia Navy dur- 
ing the Revolution. His heirs received 2,000 acres of land in 
1834." 

None of the descendants of Commodore Taylor, 
whom the author has seen, know anything about this 
grant of land. 

The State of Virginia, as stated heretofore, granted 
him 5,333/^ acres on February 19, 1783. 

The will of Colonel William Rowley, who devised 
a large estate, consisting to a great extent of negroes, 
to Catharine Davis Taylor, is an interesting document 
and is appended hereto: 



THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF 
COLONEL WILLIAM ROWLEY. 

Wholly resigned to the Will of God, I, William 
Rowley of the county of King George, Gent., being of 
sound mind and understanding (thanks be to God for 
the same), do make and declare my last Will and testa- 
ment in manner following, that is to say: 

First. I give to my wife the use and occupation 
of the House and plantation, where I now live, untill 
my Ex'trs, at the expense of my estate, shall repair 
and finish off in a workmanlike manner the dwelling 
house where my wife lived before our marriage. I 
give to my wife forever my chair horses called Tapps 
and Buck, together with my single chair and harness, 



258 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYtOR. 

and I desire that my wife may keep my keys as usual 
till her said house is finished. 

Item. I give to my brother, Moses Rowley, the 
use & occupation of the land, Plantation & Grist 
mill, where he now lives, also the use of the following 
negroes, to wit: Prince and Dinah, with their children, 
named Moses, Winnj', Betty, Nan, and a very young 
child; a man named Ned and a boy named Charles, 
& the use of the increase of the said female slaves, 
together with the use of all the stocks and utensils on 
the said Plantation & at the said mill during his 
natural life. I give the said land, mill, slaves, stocks 
and utensils, subject to the occupation and use afore- 
said, to my sister, Ann Marders, and her heirs forever. 
I acquit my said Brother of all debts due by him to me. 

Item. I give to my sister, Ann Marders, forever, 
the following negroes: Old Tom and Patt & their 
child Battaley, also Moses, now in her possession, & 
the future increase of the said female slaves, together 
with one good Bed, Bedstead, Sheet, Blanket, Rug, 
Pillow and Bolster, & I release all debts due by her to 
me. 

Item. I give and devise unto James Armstrong, 
and his heirs forever, an equal moiety of the lands I 
purchased of Jno. Thompson and William Grigsby, 
together with the following negroes: Nan and her 
three children, Charles, Susannah and Sarah, with 
their future increase; also a moiety of the stocks and 
utensils belonging to the said land, and I release all 
debts due by him to me. 

Item. I give to my wife the land I bought of 
Simon Thomas, for the term of ten years, and after 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAyi^OR. 259 

the expiration of the term, I give the said land to 
George Armstrong for hfe, if he should return to this 
colony. I likewise give to the sd. George Armstrong 
a negro named Buck, if he should return; but if he 
should not return, or should die without heirs, I give 
the sd. land and negro to James Armstrong & his 
heirs forever. I release to the sd. George what he 
owes to me. 

Ite7n. I give to my wife one thousand weight of 
pork yearly untill she can raise stocks sufficient for 
herself. I give my wife twelve sheep & 2 com- 
pleat sett of bed clothes, & clothes for her people at 
the end of the year. I likewise give to my wife one 
hundred and ten pounds Cash, and a negro named 
little Harry, forever. 

Item. I give and devise unto Elizabeth Armstrong, 
the wife of Thomas Armstrong, the land and planta- 
tion where she lives, purchased of John Grigsby, and 
a negro named London, during her life, & at her 
death I give the said land and negro to her son, James 
Armstrong, and his heirs forever. I acquit the said 
Thomas Armstrong of all demands. 

Item. I give to my Ex'ors for the use of William 
Armstrong during his life two negroes named James 
and Sam, and at the death of the said "William Arm- 
strong, I give the said negroes to the right Heir of the 
sd. William forever. I acquit the sd. William of all 
demands. 

Item. I give and devise unto Samuel Marders and 
his heirs forever, the remaining moiety, or equal half 
of the lands purchased from John Simpson and Will- 
iam Grigsby, together with four negroes, named Jockey 



260 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR- ' 

and Lucy, and their children, Moses and Hannah, with 
their increase, and a moiety of the stocks & utensils 
on the said land. I acquit him likewise of all de- 
mands. 

Item. I give unto Aaron Marders forever Xegro 
Nell & her daughter Bett, with their future increase, 
and I do acquit him of all Debts. 

Item. I give unto Moses Marders forever Xegro 
Yambo (Nell's son), and I acquit him of all de- 
mands. 

Itetn. I give unto my Ex'ors to the separate use 
of Jane Owens, the wife of Richard Owens, & to the 
use of her heirs, a negro named Cain, son of Xell, & 
I release the said Richard from all Debts. 

Ite}n. I give and devise unto James Davis and his 
heirs forever the land and plantation where he lives, 
also the negros, James, Jude and little George, wnth 
the increase in future of the said Jude, and I acquit the 
said James Davis of all debts due from him to me. 

Hem. I give and beqtieath unto Blanche Davis, 
Elizabeth Davis and Lucy Davis, daughters of Samuel 
and Barbara Davis, two hundred pounds current 
mone}' to each of the said Daughters, to be paid to 
them respectively at any time within three years 
without Interest. 

Item. I give unto Mary Florence forever the 
negros, Lettice and Mar\' and their increase. 

Item. I give unto Jane Willis, Mary White, Sarah 
Ford, Bettie Tunne, Jane Sathy, Bett\' Curtis and 
Ann Proctor Ten Pounds Currency to each, and I 
acquit every of them and Mary Florence of all debts. 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 261 

Item. I give unto Rowley Smith the sum of Five 
pounds, and whereas I sold unto Joseph Smith, a negro 
woman and two children, for whom he has agreed to 
pay me the sum of ninetj' pounds, which is still due, 
my Will is that the said Joseph do pay unto William 
Smith & Thomas Smith the sum of thirt}' Pounds 
each, out of the said Ninetj- Pounds, and I acquit the 
said Joseph of the remaining thirty Pounds, and I 
release all other debts every of the last named Legatees. 

Item. I give unto Ann Arnold ten Pounds, and 
acquit her of any due me. 

Item. I give and devise unto Lettice Wishart, wife 
of the Rev'd. Mr. Jno. Wishart, and to her heirs for- 
ever, the land and plantation where I now live, together 
with the land I purchased of Jno. Rowe, extending up 
to Grigsby's line, also the land I purchased of Jno. 
Lunsford, which said several tracts of land I devise 
unto the said Lettice & her heirs forever. 

Item. I give and bequeath unto the sd. Lettice 
Wishart and Catharine Taylor, the wife of Capt. 
Richard Taylor, the forty-six negros following, to-wit: 
George and Grace & their four children, Martin, 
Jack, Daniel, Milly ; Harry and his two children, 
Reuben & Gerard; Ben and Betty and their three 
children, Jane, Lydia and Tamar; Scipio & Rose and 
their children, Davie and Peter; Rachel and her child, 
Rose ; Tomo Parker and little Nell and their five 
children, Baldwin, Gerard, Ben, Tomo & Lucy ; 
Liny and her child, Dinah ; Glasgow and Jenny and 
their seven children, Sucky, Esther, Aaron, Solomon, 
Judy, David & Liny ; Great Will, Frank, Tomo, 
Harry ; Cheshire & Dinah and their two grand- 
children, Cheshire and Sarah ; all which said slaves I 



262 COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 

give unto the said Lettice & Catharine forever, 
equally to be divided, share and share alike, together 
with the future increase of the said slaves, equally to 
be divided in like manner. 

Item. I give and devise unto Elizabeth Armstrong, 
the wife of Thomas Armstrong, three hundred acres of 
land bought of John Grigsby during his life, remain- 
ing to her son, James Armstrong, and his heirs forever, 
but this devise is in lieu of the land given in the former 
part of the Will to Eliz'h & James, being one hundred 
and thirty-five acres, which sd. one hundred & thirty- 
five acres I do devise to Lettice Wishart & her heirs 
forever. 

Item. I give all the rest of my Est. subject to 
the payment of mj* debts and legacies in money to the 
sd. Lettice Wishart & Catharine Taylor, equalty to be 
divided among them ; and I appoint the Rev'd. Jno. 
Wishart and Rich'd Taylor my Ex'ors. 

In Testimony Whereof, I have set my hand and 
seal to this, my last Will, this nth day of May, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and 
seventy-four. 

I revoke all former wills made before the date of 
this, which is written on the four pages annexed to 
this, whereon is m}' signature. 



William Rowley. !t seal. | 



Signed, sealed and published 
in the presence of 

Alexander Rose, 
Daniel McDonald, 
Richard Todd. 



§6'?«?'1?Tl8 



COMMODORE RICHARD TAYLOR. 263 

Before this Will is attested I further direct, that my 
Ex'ors may satisfy the three daughters of Samuel 
Davis aforesd, for their Legacies in slaves, stocks and 
furniture, to be appraised and set apart for them, 
respectively, at reasonable prices within the said three 
years. 

WiLUAM Rowley. ^ skal. |^ 

Test: 

Ai^. Rose, 

Daniei, McDonald, 

Richard Todd. 

At a Court held for King George County, 2d day 
of June, 1774. 

The last Will and Testament of Will'm Rowley, 
Gent. deed, was presented into Court by the Rev'd 
J no. Wishart and Richard Taylor, Ex'ors therein 
named, & being further proved by Daniel McDonald 
& Richard Todd, two of the witnesses thereto, is 
admitted to record. 



INDEX. 



The Figures Refer to Pages of the Book. 



A 

Akin, J. T., Mrs 50 

Ames, AdaSemple 67, 133 

do. Edgar 66 

do. Edgar, Jr 67, 135 

do. Henry Semple 67, 134 

do. Lucy Virginia Semple, Mrs 66-67,138 

do. Mary Semple 67, 134 

Anderson, Catharine Clarke 131, 202 

do. Cornelia Cook, Mrs 130 

do. James 63, 131 

do. James B 62-63 

do. John 62 

do. Martha Bransford 128, 200 

do. Mary Ann 128, 200 

do. Mary Ann Martin Robertson, Mrs 40, 61-63, ^25 

do. Matilda Robertson 63, 126 

do. Sallie Quicksall 63, 128 

do. Susan Harris, Mrs 128 

do. Susan Harris, Jr 128, 201 

do. Thomas Sidney 63, 126-128 

do. William Kyle 63, 127, 129-131 

AvERiLi., Mary Jacob Nash, Mrs 57 

do. Rebecca 57 

do. Thomas P 57 

B 

Baird, John 184 

do. Mary Eugenie Robertson, Mrs 184 

Barbour, Philip 247 



11 INDEX. 

Barrett, Horace Magruder 163 

do. Roberta Wickliffe Woolley, Mrs 163 

do. Thomas Vertner 163 

Bate, Fannie Barbour 115, 182 

do. James Smalle}' 57 

do. James Smalley (No. 214) 115, 149, 181 

do. Lucy 115, 181 

do. Lucy Throckmorton, Mrs 57 

do. Nell Semple Moss, Mrs 149, 181 

do. Richard A 115 

do. Richard Alexander, Dr 115, 183 

do. Susan Eliza Robertson, Mrs 6, iii, 115 

do. Susan L. Bond 57 

do. Virginius Alexander 115, 182 

BaTTAILLE, Nicholas 236 

Baylor, John, Colonel 20 

Beardsley, Ada Hulbert 138 

do. Charles Shepard 138 

do. Ellen Jane Garner, Mrs 138 

do. Hulbert Ten-Eyck 138 

do. Marion Semple 138 

do. Ruth Hulbert 139 

do. Ten-Eyck Remoen 138 

Bills, James Thomas 145 

do. Susan Ada January, Mrs 145 

Bird, Mary 208-224 

do. Otway 220, 223 

do. Parmenas 215 

do. Philip, Dr 220, 223 

do. William, Colonel 214, 217, 220, 223 

Bradford, Adaline Matilda Semple, Mrs 6, 16, 25, 35, 51-53 

do. Antrim 86, 155 

do. Antrim Campbell 52, 87 

do. Donald 52, 87-88 

do. Esther Fox, Mrs 87 

do. Eugene 52, 86 



INDEX. Ill 

Bradford, Grace Hostral, Mrs 87 

do. Harry Donald 87, 155 

do. John 52, 87 

do. John S 51-52, 73 

do. Lucy Semple 88, 156 

do. Mary Crutcher, Mrs 85 

do. Oscar 52, 84-85 

do. Oscar (2nd) 86, 155 

do. Robert Semple 87, 156 

do. Russell Crawford 86, 155 

do. Sidney Lorenz 88, 156 

do. Susan Amanda 6, 52, 86 

do. Vitula Donovan, Mrs 86 

do. William 52, 84 

do. William Eugene 86, 155 

Brooks, Kate Jacob Tyler, Mrs 56 

do, Mary Tyler 56 

do. Niell 56 

do. Niell, Jr 56 

do. Virginia Field 56 

Brown, Carrie Rice 142 

do. Evans 141 

do. Frances Ellen Maxey, Mrs 141 

do. Ford 142 

do. Gabrielle 141 

do. Perry Maxey 141 

do. Sewell L 141 

BuCKNER, Annie Byrne 198 

do. Curran Pope 125, 197 

do. Isaac Coleman 125, 198 

do. John S 125 

do. Mary Brent 125, 198 

do. Mattie Elizabeth 198 

do. Mattie Owsley Hopper, Mrs 198 

do. Susan Maria Stewart, Mrs 125 

BUFORD, Elizabeth H. Taylor, Mrs 239 



Byrd, Francis Otway 223 

do. Mary 208-224 

do. William, Colonel (ist) 209-210 

do. William, do (2nd) 210 

do. William, do (3rd) 223 

Byrne, Agues Mabel 122, 190 

do. Albert Thomas 124, 196 

do. Alice Louise 124, 196 

do. Amelia Eliza 124, 194 

do. Belle Eliza 122, 188 

do. Caroline Sarah Gregory, Mrs 119 

do. Catharine Garnett 122, 187 

do. Catharine Spalding 61, 122 

do. Charles Edmond Robertson 124,195 

do. Charles Reuben 122, 190 

do. Charles Robertson 61, 124 

do. Corinne Agnes 124, 195 

do. Corinne Cecelia Teal, Mrs 124 

do. Eleanor King 119, 185 

do. Eliza King 60, 118 

do. Eliza Matilda Robertson, Mrs 60 

do. Frances Laura 125, 197 

do. Grace Gertrude 125, 197 

do. Henrietta Catharine 119, 185 

do. Ida Virginia 124, 194 

do. James Edward (No. 75) 61,122 

do. James Edward (No. 239) 122, 189 

do. James Webster 125, 197 

do. Jane Elizabeth 119, 1S4 

do. John Richard Edward 124, 195 

do. Lucy Hill 122, 189 

do. Lucy Jacob 61, 120 

do. Mary Josephine 124, 196 

do. Mary Matilda 122, 188 

do. Man.- Throckmorton, Mrs 121 

do. Matilda Robertson 60, 119 

do. Richard Taylor 17,60, 118-119 

do. Robert Joseph 122, 190 

do. Samuel Harold 122, 191 



INDEX. V 

Byrne, Sarah Caroline iig^ i8^ 

do. Sarah EHza nq 

do. Thomas Henry 122, 189 

do. Thomas King 60 

do. Thomas King, Jr 61, 121 

do. Walter Francis 124, 196 

do. William Albion 122, 190 

c 

Cai.d\vei.i„ Isaac 1 69 

do. Jennie Robertson Jacob, Mrs 169 

Carroll, Henrietta Catharine 185 

do. Jane Elizabeth Byrne, Mrs 184 

do. Jane Gregory 185 

do. Michael 184 

do. Michael Stanley 185 

do. Richard Patrick 1 84 

do. SarahAnna 185 

CatlETT, Alice Thornton, Mrs 235 

do. John 238 

do. John, Colonel 238 

do. Margaret 238 

Cheatham, Eliza Baylor Semple, Mrs 45 

do. William H 45 

Chew, Colby, Captain 234 

do. Thomas 234 

Clark, C. Jefferson 58 

do. Evelyn 58 

do. George Rogers, General 21, 218 

do. Lena Jacob, Mrs 58 

do. Marguerite 58 

do. Susie 58 

do. William, Governor 34 

Clarke, Frederick W 203 

do. Grace Cook, Mrs 203 



Vi INDEX. 

Ci:,ARKE, Henry Watts i8i 

do. Lucy Bate, Mrs 115, 181 

do. Richard Bate l8l 

do. William H 181 

Clay, Charles Donald, Adjutant General 89, 159-160 

do. Charles Donald, Jr 160 

do. Eliza Ingels, Mrs 157 

do. George Hudson 89, 161 

do. Henry 89, 157 

do. James Brown, Hon 88-91 

do. James Brown, Jr 89, 156 

do. John Cathcart Johnson 89, 157 

do. Lucretia Hart 89, 158 

do. Lucy Jacob 89, 156 

do. Maria Hensley Pepper, Mrs 160 

do, Nathaniel Hart 89, 161 

do. Susan Jacob 89, 159 

do. Susan Maria Jacob, Mrs 88-89, io7 

do. Susanne Jacob 160 

do. Thomas Jacob 89, 158 

Cobb, HoUisE 180 

do. 8. Charlotte Robertson, Mrs 180 

Conway, Francis, Captain 238, 244 

do. Sarah Taliaferro, Mrs 238, 244 

CUSHMAN, Henry Semple 135 

do. Mary Semple Ames, Mrs 134 

do. Robert AUerton 135 

do. Weyman Crow, Dr 135 



D 

Daluba, Edwina Jacob, Mrs 58 

do. Evelyn Jacob Hill, Mrs 58 

do. William S 58 

do. William Swift 58 

Davis, Catharine 245, 246, 255, 257, 261, 262 

do. James 245, 260 



INDEX. Vll 

D11.WORTH, Ada Eliza Kuykendall, Mrs 191 

do. Ada Mary Kate 191 

do. Andrew George William 191 

do. Andrew L 191 

do. Anson Mortimer 192 

do. Cal pernia Jane 191 

do. Catharine Byrne Kuykendall, Mrs 192 

do. George Anson 191 

do. George Blackstone 191 

do. Mary Mangum 193 

do. William Anson 193 

DiNWiDDiE, Governor 20 

DoRSEY, Dr. Robert of Edward I74-I75 

do Mildred Ann Wilmans, Mrs 6, 174-175 

Drane, Benjamin Franklin 182 

do. Fannie Barbour Bate, Mrs 182 

do. Lottie Alexander 182 

do. Richard Bate 182 

do. Theodore Robertson 182 

do. Theodore T 182 



E 

EasTham, Rachel 209, 220, 221, 222, 224 

EiDEtBACH, Catharine Garnett Byrne, Mrs 187-188 

do. Charles 188 

do. Charles Henry t88 

F 

FiSHBACK, Hannah 247, 254 

Fontaine, Aaron, Captain 55 

do. Ann Overton 55 

do. Peter 247 

FoucHEE, John 108 

do. Lucy Jacob Robertson, Mrs 108 

do. Mattie 108, 174 



vni INDEX. 

G 

Gaines, E. P., General 228 

Garner, Curtis M 45 

do. Ellen Jane 46, 71 

do. Francis Semple, Mrs 45 

do. Lucy Ann 46, 71 

do. Sarah Eliza 46, 73 

do. Walker Semple 46, 70 

Gibson, Jonathan 238 

do. Margaret Catlett, Mrs 238 

do. Rachel 238 

Green, Anna Raphael 80, 152 

do. Donald Robertson 50, 82-84 

do. Donald Robertson (2nd) 21,80, 152 

do. Duff 50, 82 

do. Eleanor 35 

do. EnaLorilla 84, 154 

do. Genevieve 80, 151 

do. Henrj' Lewis, Dr 35, 50 

do. Ida Duty, Mrs 153 

do. Imogene Eleanor 84, 154 

do. Louis Robinson 80, 152 

do. Lucile Marie 84, 154 

do. Lucy Bird Semple, Mrs 50, 216 

do. Lucy Lee 84, 152 

do. Margaret E. Browning, Mrs 83 

do. Mary Frances 50, 81 

do. Mary Josephine Armstrong, Mrs 80 

do. Mary Luella 80, 151 

do. Oscar Semple 84, 153 

do. Roberta Browning 84, 154 

do. Sallie Bedinger Morgan, Mrs 81 

do. William 35, 43 

do. William (2nd) 80 

do. William Duff 84, 153 

do. William Semple 50, 80-81 

do. Zoe Josephine 84, 153 

do. Zoe Lucy 80, 150 



INDEX. IX 

-Grinnan, a. G., Dr 8, 233, 236 

-Grovkr, Amelia Eliza Byrne, Mrs 194 

do. Dora Cecelia 194 

do. Patrick De Witt 194 

do. Patrick N 194 

■GwATHMEY, Ann Clark, Mrs 34 



do. Owen. 



34 



H 

Hardin, Ann Overton Jacob, Mrs 58 

do. Evelyn Jacob 58 

do. John Jacob 58 

do. Lemuel S 58 

Harris, Elizabeth Beatty Wilmans, Mrs 178 

do. Jennie 178 

do. Robert Dorsey 178 

do. Walter Mays 178 

H11.I,, Edgar 58 

do. Edgar, Jr 58 

do. Evelyn Jacob 58 

do. Mary Tyler 58 

do. Matilda Pope Jacob, Mrs 58 

HiNKEl*, Ada Mizner Hurlbut, Mrs 139 

do. Hulbert 139 

do. John 139 

do. Lewis Cassell 139 

do. Milton Hulbert 139 

Holland, Hattie May Robertson, Mrs 179 

do. Hattie Robertson 180 

do. Ida Virginia Byrne, Mrs 194 

do. Lorinne Cecelia 195 

do. Moultrie 180 

do. William 195 

do. William Murry 195 



X INDEX. 

HoRTON, Charles 151 

do. Mary Luella Green, Mrs 151 

do. William Green 151 

HovGHTON, Clarence S 58 

do. Edwina 58 

do. Evelyn Clare 58 

do. Susie Clark, Mrs 58 

Howard, Luc}- Bird Semple, Mrs 50 

Humbert, Ada Mizner 71, 139. 

do. Ellen Garner 71, 138 

do. Ellen Jane Garner, I\Irs 71 

do. Henry P 71 

do. Marcia Semple 71, 139 



IVERSON , Sarah 205 



J 

Jacob, Addie Martin, Mrs 98 

do. Ann Overton 58 

do. Ann Overton Fontaine, Mrs 55 

do. Bessie Chappelle 162 

do. Brent Kirk 93, 165 

do. Charles Donald, Hon 55, 98-107 

do. Charles Donald, Jr 99, 170-172 

do. Charles Pope 96, 167 

do. Donald Robertson (Son of Col. R. T.) 93, 164 

do. Donald Robertson (Son of T. P.) 96, 98, 168 

do. Edith Bullitt, Mrs 99 

do. Edwina 58 

do. Elizabeth McDowell Benton 92,162 

do. Eliza Catharine 55, 97-98 

do. Etta Pope 96, 167 

do. Evelyn Johnson, Mrs 58 



INDEX. XI 

Jacob, Harry Clay 162 

do. Henrietta Pope 167 

do. Henrietta Wilson Pope, Mrs 95 

do. Isaac Robertson 55, 97 

do. James Baird 167 

do. Jennie Robertson 99, 169 

do. John I., Sr 40, 53-55 

do. John I., Jr 55, 58 

do. John I. (son of Thos. P.) 6,95, 165 

do. John (I) (son of Col. R.T.) 92,163 

do. Kate Baird, Mrs 96 

do. Laura Wilson, Mrs 92 

do. Lanra Wilson, Jr 93, 164 

do. Lena 58 

do. Lizzie Wintersmith 97, 168 

do. Louise Benton 162 

do. Louise Williams, Mrs 161 

do. Lucy Anderson 55, 107-108 

do. Lucy Donald 99, 170 

do. Lucy Donald Robertson, Mrs 53-54, 61 

do. Lucy Robertson 96, 168 

do. Maria Brook Hall, Mrs 96 

do. Martha Baird, Mrs 167 

do. Mary 55 

do, Mary Hall Mulholland, Mrs 97 

do. Mary Pope 96, 166 

do. Matilda Pope 58 

do. Matilda Prather 55 

do. Nannie Lancaster 97, 168 

do. Richard Taylor, Colonel 6, 54, 91-95, 256 

do. Richard Taylor, Jr., Captain 92, 161-162 

do. Richard Taylor 162 

do. Sarah Benton, Mrs 92 

do. Susan 96, 167 

do. Susan Maria 54, 88 

do. Thomas Prather 54, 95, 98 

do. Thomas Prather, Jr., Rev 96, 166-167 

do. William Jay 92, 164 

do. William Pope 95, 166 



jACon, Williatn Riiialdo 55, 96 

January, Bradford 73, 144 

do. Charles 74. US 

do. Flavia 145 

do. Frances Harriet 73, 143 

do. James Russell 73, 144 

do. John Houston 73, 144 

do. J. Orville, Dr 73 

do. Lela Davis, Mrs 145 

do. Lucy Ellen 73, 144 

do. Robert Andrew 74, 145 

do. Sarah Eliza Garner, Mrs 46, 73 

do. Susan Ada 74, 145 

JOH>fSON, Claudius Marcellus 108, 173 

do. Darwin Ward 107 

do. Darwin Ward, Jr 107, 172 

do. Eliza Emmons Wade, Mrs 173 

do. Florence Clarke, Mrs 173 

do. Jennie Coleman, Mrs 173 

do. Kate Jacob 6, 107, 172 

do. Louise Burge, Mrs 172 

do. Louise Katherine 172 

do. Lucy Anderson Jacob, Mrs 107-108 

do. Martha Burge 172 

do. Robert A 108 

do. Robert Jacob 173 

do. Thomas Coleman 173 

do. Thomas Jacob 108, 173 

Jones, Eliza Catharine Jacob, Mrs 97-98 

do. Elizabeth Dunbar Lockwood, Mrs 169 

do. James S 175 

do. Lucy Robertson Wilmans, Mrs 175 

do. Mary Bishop 169 

do. Rees Lockwood 169 

do. Samuel Howell 97-98 

do. Samuel Howell, Jr 98, 169 

do. Susan Dorsey 175 



INDEX. 



K 



KuYKENDAivt. Ada Eliza 123, 191, 193 

do. Albert Sidney 123, 194 

do. Annette Sileta 123, 193 

do. Catharine Byrne 123, 192 

do. Catharine Spalding Byrne, Mrs 122-123 

do. Charles William 123, 192 

do. Mamie Kerr, Mrs 192 

do. Mary Alice 123, 193 

do. Thomas Richard 123, 192 

do. William, Judge 123 

do. William, Jr 123, 193 



Lee, Elizabeth 235 

do. Hancock 235 

do. Sarah AUerton 235 

Leslie, Corinne Estelle 142 

do. James P 14- 

do. James P., Jr 142 

do. Lucetta A. Maxey, Mrs 142 

do. Lucy E 142 

do. Marguerite 142 

do. Throckmorton Maxey 142 

do. William L 142 

Lewis, Elizabeth McGrath, Mrs 235 

Lindsay, Ada 76, 149 

do. Elizabeth Swan Semple, Mrs 76,78 

do. Henry Semple 78, 150 

do. Hetty Louisiana Semple, Mrs 78 

do. Marion Semple 78, 150 

do. Paul 78, 150 

do. Swan 76, 149 

do. William, Hon 76, 78-79 



XIV INDEX. 

Lowe, Henrietta C. Byrne, Mrs 185 

do. Henry 185 

M 

MacDonald, Isabella 14, 15 

Madison, Ambrose 334 

do. Frances Taylor, Mrs 234 

do. James, President U. S 21, 234, 238 

Maxey, Albert H., Dr 72 

do. Alfred G 72, 141 

do. Alfred H 140 

do. Clarence Alvin 144 

do. Edward 46 

do. Edward Gamer 144 

do. Fannie 140 

do. Flavia 144 

do. Frances Ellen 72, 141 

do. Frances H. January, Mrs 143 

do. Frances Semple Garner, Mrs 45 

do. Henry 144 

do. James Semple 72, 140 

do. John Benton 72, 142 

do. John Leak 143 

do. John Walker 144 

do. Leslie 72, 143 

do. Leslie (2nd) 140 

do. Lucetta A 72, 142 

do. Lucy Ann Gamer, Mrs 46, 71-72 

do. Maggie A. Broyles, Mrs 141 

do. Maggie Rice 140 

do. Mary Jane 72, 140 

do. Nellie May 144 

do. Radford 72, 140 

do. Rice 72, 140 

do. Ruby Lee 144 

do. Samuel Bell 72, 143 

do. Susan Shanks, Mrs 140 



INDEX. XV 

Maxwell, Henrietta i8 

do. Sir Patrick i8 

do. Sir William i8, 20 

MoALE, Adria Maude Semple, Mrs 135 

do. Edward, Lieutenant U. S. N 135-136 

do. Edward Semple 136 

Moore, Annie Atchison, Mrs 148 

do. Carrie Elliott 75. I47 

do. Carrie Eula 148 

do. Charles WickliiTe 75. 148 

do, John 75 

do. Lucy Robertson Semple, Mrs 75 

do. Mattie Lucy 148 

do. Minnie Swan 75, 148 

do. Robertson Semple 75, 147 

do. Samuel J 75. M7 

Morris, Carrie Elliott Moore, Mrs 147 

do. Harry Moss I47 

do. Minnie Moore I47 

do. M, L 147 

do. Paul Robertson 147 

Moss, Ada Mary Semple, Mrs 77 

do. Harry Semple 77. I49 

do. Mary Semple 6, 77, 149 

do. Nathaniel P., Judge 77 

do. Nell Semple 77. I49, 181 

MuLLiKEN, Ada Semple, Mrs 65 

do. Lansing Semple 65, 133 

do. Napoleon 65 



N 

Nash, Boyle 57 

do. George P 56 

do. George P., Jr 57 

do. John Tyler 57 



Nash, Lewis 57 

do. Margaret 57 

do. Mar}' Gay, Mrs 57 

do. Mar)- Jacob 56 

do. Mar\- Jacob Tyler, Mrs 56 

do. Maurice B 56, 57 

do. Maurice B., Jr 57 

do. Sue Gardner, Mrs 57 

do. Thomas Lawrence 56, 57 

do. Thomas Lawrence (2nd) 57 

do. Tyler 56, 57 

Nelson, John, Captain 247 



O 

Oghvie, Malcolm 19, 20 



P 

Parham, George R 153 

do. Lucy Lee Green, Mrs 152 

Pendleton, Catharine 228 

do. Edmund 228 

do. Henrj- 228, 243 

do. Isabella Hart 228 

do. Philip 228 

do. William, Major 228 

PhilUPS, Ida Robertson, Mrs 178-179 

do. Joseph W 179 

Pope, Alfred Thruston, Judge 55 

do. Alfred Thruston, Jr 55 

do. Curran, Colonel 55 

do. Curran, Dr 55 

do. Mary Tyler, Mrs 55 

do. Matilda Prather Jacob, Mrs 55 

do. Pendleton 55 



INDEX. 



Q 

QuiCKSAi,!,, Sarah, Mrs 62 



R 

RadcliFFE, Frank Corwin 150 

do. Lucille Geneva 151 

do. Ratnona 151 

do. Willette 151 

do. Zoe Lucy Green, Mrs 6, 150-151 

Ray, Carrie Morris 148 

do. Lula 148 

do. Mary Rennick 148 

do. Minnie Swan Moore, Mrs 148 

do. Robert M 148 

Richards, A. E., Judge 57 

do. Jessie 57 

do. John Tyler 57 

do. Matilda Tyler, Mrs 57 

Robertson, Alexander, Chieftain 11 

do. Benjamin Lawrence 59, 116 

do. Catharine 59, in, 117 

do. Catharine Ann Clarke 41,61 

do. Charles (Donald's Grandfather) 13 

do. Charles (Donald's father) 14, 15 

do. Charles (Donald's brother) 14, 15, 16 

do. Charles (Donald's son) 33 

do. Charles Donald 59, 118 

do. Donald 7, 14, 17-31, 207, 218 

do. Elizabeth 16 

do. Eliza Matilda 41, 60 

do. Fanny Lee 114, 179 

do. Fowler, E. Mrs 116 

do. Frances 59, 117 

do. Hattie May 114, 179 

do. Isaac 7, 8, 33, 34, 38-41, 43, 247 

do. Isaac (son of R. T. ) 59, 113 



XVIU INDEX. 

Robertson, Ida 113, 178-179 

do. Isabella IMacDonald 14 

do. Jauies Bate 59, iii, 116 

do. Katharine H 113, 179 

do. Lillie Bethel, Mrs 183 

do. Lucy 33-37. 47 

do. Lucy Donald 41, 53-54 

do. Lucy Jacob 59, 108 

do. Margaret 16 

do. Margaret 16 

do. Maria Boothby 59, 117 

do. Mary Ann 59, 117 

do. Mary Ann Martin 41, 61-63 

do. Mary Ellen 59, 116 

do. Mary Eugenie 116, 184 

do. Matilda Taylor, Mrs 38-41, 43, 255 

do. Matilda Taylor ( Wilmans) 59, 109-112 

do. Mehetabel B., Mrs.... 114 

do. Rara King, Mrs 179 

do. Richard Taylor 41, 56-59 

do. Richard Taylor, Captain 59, 114 

do. Richard Taylor (2nd) 38, 114, 179 

do. Richard Webster 115, 180 

do. Sarah C. Goss, Mrs 113 

do. S. Charlotte 114, 180 

do. Stedman 116, 183 

do. Susan E 113, 179 

do. Susan Eliza 59, 115 

do. Susan L. B. Bate, Mrs 56-59 

do. Susan Louisa 116, 184 

Rogers, Ann 224 

do. Bird 224 

do. Edmund 213 

do. George 213, 224 

do. Giles (the emigrant) 6, 22, 205-208 

do. Giles, Jr 208, 223 

do. Giles (son of John) 215, 224 

do. John 208-224 

do. John, Jr 224 



INDEX. XIX 

Rogers, John, "The Martyr" 206 

do. Lucy 224 

do. Mary 224 

do. Mildred 224 

do. Parmenas 215 

do. Peter 208 

do. Rachel Eastham 209,220, 221 

do. Rachel 6, 7, 22, 205-224 

do. Thomas 217-223 

Ronald, Albert Glover 57 

do. Edward Richards 57 

do. George Webb 57 

do. Jessie Richards, Mrs 57 

do. Mary Tyler 57 

Rowley, William, Colonel 245, 257-265 

s 

Scott, Ashley D lo 

do. Ashley David 70, 137 

do. Edgar Ames 70. ^37 

do. Isabel Semple ^o, 138 

do. Julia Ellen Semple, Mrs 70 

do. Mary Semple 70i ^37 

do. Semple Stillman 7°. ^37 

Semple, Ada 44, 65 

do. Adaline Matilda 38, 51-53 

do. Ada Mary 49, 77 

do. Adria Maude 69, 135 

do. Charles Donald 38, 49 

do. Charles Donald, Jr 49. 80 

do. Eliza Baylor 37, 45 

do. Elizabeth Swan 49, 7^ 

do. Eliza Brandenburg, Mrs 48 

do. Ellen Duff Green, Mrs 43.44 

do. Eugene, Hon 44. 67-69 

do. Eugene Lownsdale 69,136 

do. Frances 38, 45 



XX INDEX. 

Semple, Frances Ann Cooper, Mrs 47 

do. Henrietta Louisiana 49, 78 

do. Isaac Robertson 36, 38, 48, 51 

do. Isaac Robertson, Jr 49, 78 

do. James the emigrant) 36, 37 

do. James, General 17, 35, 37,43-45, 5i, 82 

do. James, 2nd 49, 77 

do. John (the emigrant) 34, 36, 37, 207 

do. John Walker, Major 34,39,43 

do. John Walker, Jr 38, 46 

do. John Walker, 2nd 48, 74 

do. John Walker, 3rd 49, 76 

do. Julia Ellen 44, 70 

do. Lucy Bird 35. 38, 50, 216 

do. Lucy Robertson, Mrs... 7, 14, 17, 25, 35, 36, 216, 217-223 

do. Lucy Robertson (Moore) 49, 75 

do. Lucy Virginia 44, 66-67 

do. Mary Benicia 48, 74 

do. Mary Ethel 69, 136 

do. Mary Stevenson Mizner, Mrs 44 

do. Robert Baylor, Rev 37 

do. Robert Baylor 38, 46, 47-48 

do. Ruth A. Lovvnsdale, Mrs 69 

do. Sallie Parish, Mrs 47 

do. Solomon Brandenburg 49, 76 

do. Zoe Agnes 69, 136 

Shaw, James Truman 201 

do. Virginia Woodson Venable, Mrs 201 

Sherman, Annie Hardin 58 

do. Elizabeth 58 

do. Evelyn Jacob Hardin, Mrs 58 

do. Frederick S 58 

do. Samuel Sterling 58 

Spotswood, Governor 57, 230 

Sprigg, Charles Wilmans 176 

do. Edward Wilmans 176 

do. Elizabeth 176 

do. Ignatius 1 76 



Sprigg, Lewis Maynard 176 

do. Lucy Robertson 176 

do. Mary Mildred 176 

do. Matilda Robertson 176 

do. Susan Robertson Wihnans, Mrs 176 

do. William Donald 176 

Stewart, Catharine Ann C. Robertson, Mrs 6r 

do. Isaac 61 

do. Susan Maria 6r, 125 

STROTHER , Sarah 236 

Stubbs, Sarah 246 



Taliaferro, John, Colonel 238 

Tayi,or, Ann 227, 22<S 

do. Benjamin 240, 241, 245 

do. Catharine 247 

do. Catharine Davis, Mrs 245, 246, 255, 257, 261, 262 

do. Charles 240, 242, 244 

do. Charles Thomas 120, 186 

do. Colby 247 

do. Edmund 227, 228 

do. Edmund, Captain 240, 241, 243, 246 

do. Elizabeth, daughter of James, the emigrant 227 

do. Elizabeth 247 

do. Erasmus 8, 236 

do. Erasmus, Major 234, 235 

do. Frances, wife of James, the emigrant 226-227 

do. Frances, daughter of James 2nd 234 

do. Francis, Colonel 240, 241, 243 

do. George, Colonel 233, 236-245 

do. George, Jr 241, 242, 243 

do. George Conway 238 

do. Hancock 235 

do. Hannah 236 

do. James, Emigrant 8, 207, 225-228 



Tavi,ok, James, 2nd 227, 229-237 

(io. James, 3rd 233, 235 

do. James, 4th, Colonel 235 

do. James, son of Col. George 233, 239, 242 

<lo. Jane 227 

do. John, son of James, the emigrant 227 

do. John, Colonel (of Caroline county) 228 

do. John, Lieutenant 244 

do. Jonathan, Lieutenant 240, 243 

do. Joseph P., General 236 

do. Lucinda 247 

do. Lucy 247 

do. Martha 234 

do. Martha Thompson, Mrs 229-230, 233-234 

do. ^Nlarj' 227, 243 

do. Mary Gregory, Mrs 227 

do. INIatilda 8, 38, 39, 247 

do. Matilda R. Byrne, Mrs 6, 119-120 

do. Mildred 236 

do. Rachel Gibson, I\Irs 238 

do. Reuben 240, 244 

do. Richard, Commodore S, 39, 94, 225-263 

do. Richard ("Hopping Dick"), Colonel 40,246 

do. Richard (2nd), Jr 246 

do. Richard, Colonel 236 

do. Roger 247, 254 

do. Sallie 247 

do. Sarah 227 

do. Sarah Taliaferro Conway, Mrs 238 

do. Sidney Albert 120, 186 

do. Tabitha 236 

do. Thompson 246 

do. William 120 

do. William, Major 240, 244 

do. William, Rowley 246 

do. Zachary, Emigrant 226 

do. Zachary, son of James, 2nd 235 

do. Zachary, President U. S 90, 234, 236 

Th.\rp, Coleman Buckner 198 



INDEX. XXIU 

Tharp, Joseph Edward 198 

do. Mary Brent Buckner, Mrs 198 

do. Mary Josephine 198 

Thompson, Martha 229,230, 233, 234 

do. Sir Roger 229 

do. Colonel William 229 

Thornton, Francis, Colonel 235 

TuRMAN, Fannie Allen, Mrs 146 

do. Hosea B 74 

do. Hosea Vivian 146 

do. Joseph Benton 75, 146 

do. Louis FVancis 75, 146 

do. Mary Benicia Semple, Mrs 74 

do. Oscar Bartlett 75, 145 

do. Rita Benicia 146 

do. Robert Semple 75, 146 

Turner, Ada Semple Ames, Mrs 133 

do. Allyn Henry 188 

do. Belle F:iiza Byrne, Mrs 188 

do. Edgar Ames 134 

do. Henry S 133 

do. Joseph A 188 

do. Julia Marian 134 

TvxER, Ann Countess 37 

do. Ann Overton 56 

do. Charles R 126 

do. Donald Robertson 126, 199 

do. Donald Robertson Watkins 199 

do. Edmund Alexander 126, 199 

do. Edward 56, 57 

do. Edward C 56 

do. Edward C, Jr 56 

do. Etta Johnson, Mrs 56 

do. Fannie Beazley, Mrs '. 57 

do. John Jacob 56 

do. John W 55 

do. Kate Jacob 56 



XXIV INDEX. 

TvxER, Levi 56, 57 

do. Lillie Stucky 57 

do. Marj' Jacob, Mrs 55 

do. Marj' Jacob (Nash) 56 

do. Mary Jacob 56, 57 

do. Mary E. Williams, Mrs 57 

do. Mary Crutchfield, Mrs 56 

do. Matilda 56, 57 

' do. Matilda Robertson, Mrs 126 

do. Mattie Richards 57 

do. Nanette Watkins 199 

do. Robert 56 

do. Robert, 2nd 57 

do. Virginia Watkins, Mrs 199 



u 

Untderhill, Fann}- 200 

do. Mary Ann Anderson, Mrs 200 

do. Sidney Anderson 200 

do. William A 200 

Underwood, John Cox, General 7, 208 

do. Joseph Rogers, Hon 206 



V 

Venable, Elizabeth Tompkins 129, 202 

do. James Anderson 129, 201 

do. Mary Ann 129, 202 

do. Matilda Tyler 129, 202 

do. Sallie Q. Anderson, Mrs 128, 129 

do. Thomas Samuel 128 

do. Virginia Woodson 129, 201 

Von Dohlen, Leonard 189 

do. Leonard Byrne 189 

do. Lucy Hill Byrne, Mrs 189 



INDEX. XXV 

w 

WAI.KER, Elizabeth 34, 37 

do. Lucy Gertrude 121, 187 

do. Lucy Jacob Byrne, Mrs 120 

do. Mary Eliza 121, 186 

do. Samuel Pinckney 120 

do. Samuel Pinckney, Jr 121, 187 

do. Thomas Alfred 121, 187 

Watkins, Ed 228 

Webster, Fannie Robertson, Mrs 59, iii, 117 

do. Fannie T 174 

do. Felicia 174 

do. Felix 174 

do. James 117 

do. Lawrence F 174 

do. Lucy Robertson 1 74 

do. Mattie Fouchee, Mrs 174 

Wii.i,iAMS, John McFarland 200 

do. John McFarland, Jr 200 

do. Martha B. Anderson, Mrs 200 

Wn,MANS, Ann E. Brandenburg, Mrs 176 

do. Charles Hermann no, 175-176 

do. Edward Beatty no, 177 

do. Elizabeth Beatty no, 178 

do. Ella O. Daswell, Mrs 177 

do. James Edward 109-112 

do. James Smith no, 177 

do. Lucy Robertson no, 175 

do. Matilda T. Robertson, Mrs 109-112 

do. Mildred Ann no, 174-175 

do. Richard Taylor no, 177 

do. Robert Dorsey no, 178 

do. Susan Robertson no, 176 

Wooi.l,EY, Daniel Vertner 162 

do. Douglas Vertner 163 

do. E. McD. Benton Jacob, Mrs 162 



XXVI INDEX. 

WooLLEY, Leila McDowell 163 

do. Mary Preston 163 

do. Preston 1 63 

do. Richard J 1 63 

do. Roberta Wickliffe 163 

do. Sallie Howard Benton 163 

do. Thomas Benton 163 





m^^ 



PRINTERS, 
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DETROIT.