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Full text of "Donizetti's opera, La fille du regiment"

MUSIC LIBRARY^ 

UN{V?:RSITY 

OF CAUFOPNtA 

BEf?KELEY 



I 








{ $ITSON & OO.'S STANDARD OPERA LIBRETTO. 



'^ LA HUE BV RECIENT, 

COMPOSE» BY iBOWI^IETTI, 
WITH ENGLISH AND ITALIAN WORDS, 




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This Scries of Handbooks includes tlie following Operas : 



LE PROPHETE. MEYERBEER. 

NORMA. BEEMNI. 

IL BARBIER«E DI SIVIGLIA. ROSSINI. 

LUCREZIA BORGIA. DONIZETTI. 

LA CENERENTOLA. ROSSINI. 

LIMDA DI CHAMO INIX. DONIZETTL 

DER FREYSCHUTZ. WEBER. 

LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR. DONIZETTI. 

DON PASQUALE. DONIZETTL 

LA FAVORITA. DONIZETTI. 

DON GIOVANNI. MOZART. 

SEMIRAMIDE. ROSSINL 

ERNANI. VERDI. 

ROBERT LE DIABLE. MEYERBEER. 

MASANIELLO. AUBER. 

LA SONNAMBU'-A. BELLINL 

LA ZINGARA. (Bolumian Ciri.) BALFE. 



LA FILLE DU REGIMENT. 

FIDELIO. 

L'ELISIRE D'AMORE. 

LES HUGUENOTS. 

I PURITANI. 

I CAPULETTI E MONTECC 

IL FLAUTO MAGICO. 

IL TROVATORE. 

RIGOLETTO. 

WILLIAM TELL. 

LA TRAVIATA. 

MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. 

FRA DIAVOLO. 

LUISA MILLER. 

MARTHA. 

IL GUIRAMENTO. 

LA GAZZA LADRA. 



HI. 



DONIZETTI. 

BEETIIO-VEN. 

DONIZETTL 

MEYERBEER. 

BELLINI. 

BELLINI. 

MOZART. 

VERDI. 

VERDI. 

ROSSINI. 

VERDI. 

MOZART. 

AUBER. 

VERDI. 

FLOTOW 

MERCADANTE. 

ROSMINI. 



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YOUNG FOLKS' GLEE BOOK. Songs, Duets, Glees, &c. $1.00. 

BOSTON MELODEON. Songs, Glees, Rounds, Catches, &c. 3 vols., each $1.00. 

HOME MELODIST. A Collection of Popular Songs, (Words and Music.) Neatly boui;.l in 
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DONIZETTTS 



OPERA. 



U FILLE DI] EEGIMENT. 



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CONTAINING THE 



ITALIAN TEXT, WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION, 



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€\t Pttsk of all t^e f rinripl %xxb. 



BOSTON: 
PUBLISHED BY OLIVER DITSON & CO., 

277 WASHINGTON STREET. 






Entered, according to Aci of Congress, in the year 1859, by 
.•-. ' : -■■ ': 5)nYÈp, BITSON '& CO., 
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts 



I5I?,-a.:l^c-AuTis i>Ei^soisr-ss. 



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MABIA, the " adopted Daughter of the Begiment," but really 

Daughter of the Marchioness. SOPRANO. 

STJLPIZIO. A Sergeant in the French Army. BASS. 

MABCHIONESS OP BEBKENPIELD." Maria's Mother. SOPRANO. 

TONIO. A Tyrolese peasant in love with Maria. Afterwards 



Colonel in the French army. 
OBTENSIO. Intendant of the Marchioness. 

GOBFOBAL. 

SOLDIEBS, PEASANTS, &C., &o. 



TENOK. 

BASS. 
BASS. 



THE SCENE 18 LATO IN THE TYROL DURING THE INVASION OF THAT COUNTRY 

BY THE FRENCH. ; 



M52192 



A. B. XISDSB's Hn«0 TTPOOBAPHT, BOSTOW. 



ARGUMENT. 



The scene of this opera is laid in the Tyrol, during the 
occupation of that country by the French. 

The heroine is Maria, a vivandiere, or suttler, called the 
Daughter of the Regiment, because she had been found in 
the field, after a battle, by Sulpizio, a French serjeant, by 
him conveyed to the encampment of the 11th Regiment of 
the Grand Army of Napoleon, and by them adopted as 
their daughter. On the person of the infant, however, was 
aflSxed a letter, written by her father, a captain, and ad- 
dressed to the Marchioness of Birkenfeld. This letter the 
good seijeant carefully preserved. 

At the opening of the opera the foundling has grown up 
to a sprightly young woman, full of spirit and enterprise, 
the delight of her parent, the regiment, and the especial 
admiration of Tonio, a Tyrolese only a year or two older 
than herself, who has saved her life when in danger of fall- 
ing over a precipice. He asks her hand, and the regiment, 
in its paternal character, assembles, discusses the proposal, 
and comes to the conclusion to consent to the match on the 
soldierlike condition that Tonio shall enlist into the regi- 
ment. To this Tonio readily consents, and all seems going 
as the course of true love has been said never to do, when 
the Marchioness of Birkenfeld appears on the field. Sul- 
pizio recollects the name, and, considering himself bound 
in duty so to do, delivers to her the letter he had found on 
the person of the infant, Maria. The Marchioness well 
knows the handwriting, declares Maria to be her niece, 
haughtily demands her of her more loving guardian, the 
regiment, and dismisses Tonio as wholly unfit to be con- 
nected with any one of her highborn family. At this point 
of the story the first act closes. 

In the second act we find Maria transferred to the Castle 
of Birkenfeld, her vivandiere costume rejected for habili- 
ments more suited to her changed position, and masters 

\ 



about her to eradicate all traces of her military antece- 
dents; but with a result not quite satisfactory to the Mar- 
chioness. Accomplished and ladylike in her bearing, Maria 
undoubtedly becomes ; but she sighs for her former free- 
dom, and is frequently caught in the act of singing the 
joyous Rataplan, and going through some of the evolutions 
of the regiment — her beloved parent. Still more deeply 
does she sigh over her separation from Tonio. While these 
regrets are preying on her mind, the sound of approaching 
drums and fifes announces the advance of a military force. 
In a short time the castle is in the possession of the be- 
siegers, who turn out to be the gallant Eleventh, with 
Tonio at their head, who, for his noble conduct throughout 
his career as a subaltern, has been made a field-offlcer. 
Mutual recognition of course secures the safety of the in- 
mates of the caetle, and Tonio renews his supplication for 
the hand of Maria. The Marchioness again rejects him, 
on the plea that she has promised her to the son of a 
neighboring Duchess. Tonio proposes to Maria that she 
shall elope with him, and she, indignant at her supposed 
aunt's cruelty, gives her consent. This coming to the 
knowledge of the Marchioness, in order to establish a new 
claim on the obedience of Maria, she reveals to her the facts 
that in early life she had contracted wedlock with an officer 
in rank so far below the aristocratic expectations of her 
family, that she had found it necessary to conceal the cir- 
cumstance — that the officer who had fallen on the field, and 
placed the letter addressed to her on the neck of a child, 
was her husband — and that Maria was consequently her 
daughter, and not her niece- Maria, who had refused to 
obey the behests of her aunt, cannot set at defiance the 
wishes of her recently discovered mother, and in an agony 
of grief she renounces Tonio. But her suffering and devo- 
tion have awakened the dormant maternal feelings of the 
Marchioness, who, declaring the happiness of her daughter 
to be more dear to her than earthly grandeur, she consents 
to the union of Tonio and Maria. 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



(THE DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT.) 



ATTO I. 



SCENA I. — Alla destra una casipola ; alla sinistra le prima 
case d' una Villaf/io ; da lontano delle Montagne. La. Mar- 
chese di BiRKENFELD è ossìsa sopra un banco rustico alla 
sinistra. Ortensio sta a lato di lei. Paesani Tirolesi 
san aggroppati sopra una collinetta didietro, come di guardia, 
intanto le loro moglie e figlie si sono prostrate avanti in ginoc- 
chio, verso il lato sinistro, innanzi all' Immagine di pietra 
della Vergine. 

Coro. — Sulla Cdonna. 
Arraiamci in silenzio. 

Ci assista l'ardir, — 
Che l'oste avversaria, 

Già sembra venir, 
Andiam — andiam. 

Coro di Donne, in Ginochio. 
Cielo clemente. 
Cielo possente 
Prostrate a te, 
Chiediam consiglio 
In tal periglio 
Danne mercè. 

Ort. Ma si calma — via Marchesa, 

Si remetta faccia cor ! 
Mar. Da nemici, oh Dio ! sorpresa 

Qui — ad un tratto — è un vero orror. 

Coro. — Un Paesano sulla Montagna. 
Son da nemici i monti abbandonati ; 
Coraggio, amici miei, siam salvati ! 

Coro. 
Eh ! niente paura 

Viva il piacer. 
La lora ventura 

Non dessi temer. 
La pace bramata 

Rallegra ogni cor, 
La terra salvata 
Rinasce all' amor. 
E salvo l'onor, eh ! niente paura. 
Mi viva il piacer. — La, la, la, la ! 

Mar. Deh ! mi reggete per pietà — Ragazzi — 

Deh ! non m' abbandonate. 
Ort. E che poteva immaginarsi mai. 

Che il giorno appunto, in cui vostra 

Eccellenza, di Lauffen rispettabile 

Marchesa, al nativo Castel volgea le 

Spalle, volesser le milizie di Savoja, 

(Abbandonando a un tratto le frontiere) 

Le marcie ripigliar ? 



SCENE l.—On the nght is a Cottage ; on the left the first 
Houses of a Village ; in the background are Mountains. 
The Marchioness óf Birkenfeld is seated on a rustie 
bench on the left, Ortensics standing by her side. Tyro- 
lese Peasants are grouped on a rising ground behind, as if on 
the look-out, while their Wives and Daughters kneel in 
front, towards the left hand, before a stone Image of the 
Virgin. 

Chords — of Men. 
Up ! the foe's advancing ; 

To arms, friends, to arms ! 
For home 'tis we battle ! 
Who, then, will shrink from war's alarms ! 

Chorus — of Women. 
Santa Maria, 

Gentle and holy. 
Lo, lo ! to thee 

We bend in pray'r ; 
Maiden and mother. 

Behold our despair. 

Ort. Take heart, I pray, my noble lady ; 

Our friends approach, and soon they will be here. 
Mar. Yes, but I fear the enemy is closer ; 

Those sounds ! — they seem so very near. 

Chorus — Peasants entering from behind. 
Friends, rejoice ; see' the French retreating : 
All the danger is past. 

, Chorus. 
Rtìjoice, brave companions, for the peril's o'er; 
Their star, it has set, and it rises no more. 
Peace, life's greatest blessing, 

Returns again ; 
And our songs of triumph 
Sound on hill and plain, — 
The heavens be praised ! 
Our country is saved, and no more shall we fear. 
But happily live in our villages here. 

Mar. Alas ! support me, for pity, my friends ! 
Alas ! do not abandon me. 

Ort. And who would ever have imagined 

That precisely on the day on which your 
Ladyship, the honored Marchioness of Laufen, 
Returned to your native place, the castle, — 
The armies of Savoy should have chosen 
( Quitting, at once, the frontiers) 
To resume their march ? 



6 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



Mar. Ma che far deggio ? andar innanzi — 

Oppur tornare addietro 1 
Ort. Ma — Eccellenza — 
Mar. Indagate — vedete — esaminate — prendete 

Lingua in somma ; e la vettura, ditemi 

Ortensio — sarà poi sicura ? 
Ort. In quanto a questo — 
Mar Cha fra costoro ad aspettarvi resto. ' 

Entra Sulpizio, poi Maria. 

Sul. Corpo di mille diavoli ì che gambe hanno cotesti 

Svizzeri ; temono della guerra ed in vece abbiam la 
Pace'sHl'paJmo deila.raaiio*.' IlnJogni loco sortito 
E il manifèsto — >ì tulli queìtó li\ié sdegnar di 
Savo|a seguitar la bandiera, possocQ rimanersi e 
B,ftor.a«s^ft "•' -Malclù^Tiva ? -"•Scomltette i camerati 
Nó'dAw'eiìo— e Maria*-*la ^igCià «ost'ra — 
La perla e l'ornamento dell' undecime invitto 
Reggimento. Eccola qua. Veh ! un pò s'ella è 
Gentile ! Più felice esser puote il Reggimento, 
Che tal figUa possiede 1 



Maria. Il Reggimento mio ! ne vò propria superba ! 

E desso che ha vegliato con affetto paterno 

Agli anni miei primieri ! 
Svi. Non è vero 1 

Maria. Ma poi — senza adularmi — di fargli onore io credo. 
Sul. Senza dubbio ! gentil come un amore. 
Maria. D'un militare io chiudo in petto il core. 



Mar. 

Ort. 

Mar. 



Ort. 
Mar. 



Sul. 



But what shall we do now 1 go on. 

Or turn back ? 

But — your ladyship — 

Consider — see — examine — take counsel ! 

And the carriage, tell me, Ortensio, 

Will it, then, be safe ? 

As to that — 

Go — be quick — 

I will await you among those people. 

Enter Sdlpizio, then Mai^ia. 



A thousand devils ! what legs those Swiss have ! 

They fear war, and therofore have we 

Peace thrust upon us. Every where 

The manifesto has gone forth — and all those who 
disdain'd , 

To follow the standard of Savoy may stay behind. 

And farewell to them ! But who comes hither ì 

I guess some comrades — 

No, indeed, it is Maria, our daughter. 

The pearl and ornament of the unconquer'd Twen- 
tieth. 

There she is. Ah, how beautiful ! 

Oh, how happy is the regiment 

That possesses such a daughter ! 
Maria. My regiment ! I am proud of it indeed ! 

And it has watched with paternal affection 

Over my youthful years. 
Sul. Is it not true Ì 

Maria. But now, without flattery, I think I do them honor. 
Sul. Without question. Thou art graceful as a Cupid. 
Maria. A soldier's heart pants in my bosom. 



APPARVI ALLA LUCE— THE CAMP WAS MY BIRTH-PLACE. Aie. Maria. 



, Moderato. 




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Ap - par - vi al - la lu - ce. 
The camp was my birth-place, 






Sul cam - po guer-rier : E il suon del tam - bu - ro. Mio 
'Mongst brave men and free ; And the drum is the mu - sic Sounds 






so - lo pia - cer, mio so - lo 
sweet-est to me, sounds sweetest 



pia - cer. 
to me. 



S'af - fret - ta al - la glo 
I march with the fore 



■ ria In - tre - pi - do il 
most When dan - gers in- 




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cor; Sa - vo - ja'e vit - to - ria! E il gri 

vite ; The fiere - er the bat - tie, The more 



do d'o - nor, 
my de - light. 



Sa - vo - ja, e 
The fiere - er 



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the bat- 



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tie, the bat - - tie. The more 



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the bat - tie. 



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rial è il gri-do d'o 
Ue, The more my de 



- nor, — è il gri - do 
light, The more my 



d'o - nor. 
de - light. 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



Sul. Io l'ho educata, 

Non e' è che dire 
Con quel sentire, 

Con quel \'igor ; 
Una Duchessa 

Non può vantare 

Più nobii fare. 

Più amabil cor : 

No! 

Oh ! che bel giorno fu quel che il cielo, 

Ancor fanciulla t' offerse a me 
Quando il tuo pianto, turbò il silenzio 
Del campo intero che accorse a te. 
Maria. Ognun qual padre dolce amoroso 
Sul proprio dorso recommi allor. 
Sul. E m' era il sacco di munizione, che bel di ! 
Maria. D'ogni altra culla ben più miglior ! 

Sul. E dolce sonno gustavi allor. 

Mentre il tamburo faceà rumor. 
Maria. E dolce sonno gustava allor. 

Mentre il tamburo faceà rumor. 

Or poi che sono più grandicella 

Ciascun la mano porta al bonnet. 
Sul. E la consegna, ragazza bella, 

E quest' omaggio dovuto a te. 
Maria. Con voi divido sul campo ognor 

E strage, feste e buon umor. 
Sul. Ed ai feriti facendo cor 

La destra stringi del vincitor. 
Maria. Quindi alla sera, alla cantina 

Chi v' incorraggia ? chi v' affascina ? 
Svi. In noi chi desta letizia e ardir ? 

Sei tu, sei tu — ^non e' è che dir. 
Maria. E quindi in merto del mio talento, 

A voti unanimi il reggimento 

Sua vivandiera mi nominò. 
Sul. Sua vivandiera a voti unanimi. 
Maria. Ah ! si. 

Il reggimento mi nominò— 
Sul. H reggimento ti nominò. 
Maria. Son persuasissima che alla battaglia 

Io pur cogli altri 

Sapre'i pugnar. 
Sul. Saprai pugnar. 
Maria. Si — e schioppi, e sciable, bombe e mitraglia, 

Con voi pugnando saprei sfidar. 
Sul. Oh ! saprei sfidar. 
Maria. Se un figho al padre dee somigliar. 

Al mio somiglio. 
Sul. Si — quest' è parlar. 
Maria. La gloria voglio. 
Sul. Benone affé. 
Maria. Io vò marciar. 
Sul. Quest' è parlar ! 
Maria. En avant — 
Sul. En avant. 

Maria. Suol l'undecimo gridar — 
Sul. Suol l'undecimo gridar. 
Maria. En avant — en avant — 
Sul. En avant — en avant. 



RATAPLAN— -RATAFLATH 



Sul. 'Tis ali my doing, 

I own it freely : 
And how genteelly 
She marches on ; 
No duchess ever 

Was half so clever 
With pike, or saber, 
Or e'en with gun. 
How we then rejoic'd to find vou. 

On the battle-field — deserted ! 
Each eye in pity look'd upon you, — 
• Each would claim you, then, for his own. 

Maria. You took me up, and bore me off. 

With all the love that mothers feel. 
Sul. Glorious day ! 
Maria. Yes, and then, instead of a cradle, 

I was rock'd in a cap of steel. 
Sul. In which you seem'd to be at home. 

Sleeping to the rolling drum. 
Maria. In which I seem'd to be at home. 
Sleeping to the rolling dram. 

But BOW, my friends, I'm older grown — 
Sapperment ! — they all salute me so. 
Sul. Of course, of course ; your fathers all 

^alute a militaire, you know. 
Maria. On days of feast, in battle's tumult. 

Still I'm first upon the field. 
Sul. And give fresh courage to the wounded. 

Making of your breast their shield. 
Maria. And then, wto is it o'er the goblet 

That sings at evening gay and wild ? 
Sul. Or plays a thousand tricks upon us ? 

'Tis still the reg'ment's gallant child. 
Maria. And better yet, to try my talent. 

My fathers made me sutler to the corps — 

There's an honor ! — ne'er conferred before. 
Sul. We chose you by general consent. 
Maria. Oh yes ; 

All consented — sutler was I nam'd by all. 
Sul. All consented — sutler were you nam'd by all. 
Maria. And in the day of glorious battle. 

When cannons "rattle, 

I'm still the first. 
Sul. She's still the first. 
Maria. Yes ! I fear not swords nor the bullet. 

And know to fight like one of you. 
Sul. Ha ! she fights like one of us. 
Maria. My kind father's fame, I hold, is sacred; 

I've made it more. 
Sul. Ha ! she has made it more. 
Maria. And in the field — 
Sul. And in the field — 
Maria. I'm still the first. 
Sul. She's still the first. 
Maria. March away — 
Sid. March away — 
Maria. Where the guns and sabres play — 
Sul. Where the guns and sabres play — 
Maria. March away — march away. 
Sid. March away — march away. 

Duet. Màbia and Sulpizio. 




Ap-par-ve alia lu-ce, 
The camp was her birthplace, 



Sul campo guerrier. Sul cam-po guer- 
'Mongst brave men and free, 'Mongst brave men and 



8 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 




suon, del tam-bur ro mio so - lo pia-cer, mio so -lo pia-cer, Ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta- 

drum is the mu sic sounds sweetest to me, sounds sweetest to me, Rx-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta- 

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ner. 
free; 



Su-on del tambur-ro, 
The sound of the drum 



suo so-lo suo so-lo pia - cer. 
sweet music, sweet music must be. 



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plan, ra - ta - plan, ra - ta - plan, ra - ta-plan, plan plan.plan plan,plan plan,plan plan,plan plan,plan plan! 
plan, ra -ta - plan, ra -ta - plan, ra - ta-plan, plan plan,plan plan,plan plan,plan plan,plan planjplan plan ! 



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ra-ta-plan, plan plan, plan plan, plan plan, rataplan, rataplan,rataplan,rataplan,rataplan,rata- 
ra-ta-plan, plan plan, plan plan, plan plan, rataplan, rataplan, rataplan, j-ataplan, rataplan, rata- 

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plan, rata-plan, ra - ta - plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, rataplan,plan plan, plan plan.plan plan,rataplrfn,rataplan,rata- 
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En a-vant — 
Then advance- 

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ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, march ! 

ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, march ! 






ra-ta- 
ra-ta- 






^— ^ ^— ^^ - -P— ?- 

plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta - plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta- 
plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta - plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan, rata-plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-la- 






JZ± 



iJiziz 



• F 



S^^^eU 



H 



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W~0~ 



plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta - plan! 
plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta -plan! 

I ^ _t(_5— -~P-v-t--— -- 



Mi chia - ma 1 o - nor • 
For faìne and for hon 









P—0~ 









i^i 



-=^ 



V — »-t-F— I p- 






plan, ra-ta-plan, ra-ta-plan !-E il suo grido, il suo grido d'o-nor. 
pian, ra-ta pian, ra-la-ptlan ! Rataplan, 'tis the roll of the drum. 



-0 
III 
V-J-'- 

Sa - vo - ja vit - to-ria e suo 
It leads us to lion - oi\ 




chia - ma I'o - nor, 
fame, and re-nown! 



pre-sent! 
present ! 



feES: 






v-z^;m-^^-- 



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gri - do d'o-nor. Vi - van - die - ra del reg - gi - men - to, plan, plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra-ta- 
fame, and re-nown. Vi - van-diere be-lov'd by our reg'ment, plan, plan, ra -ta-plan, ra -ta-plan, ra-ta' 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



9 







march ! 
march ! 



^^ i=znbi:t^::L?:i:gi=gi_*iz*zr^*zz*z 



Sargen te del Reggi-mento. 
The Regiment is my glory ! 



ÌÌ=:^='=5E^^=b=^g3±Ìa3=:z5|ìr ^^= 



En a-vant ra-ta- 
Then advance, ra-ta- 



plan. En a-vant, en a - vant, ra-ta-plan, en a-vant, ra-ta-plan, 
plan. Then advance, then advance, rataplan, then advance, rataplan. 



present! 
present , 




a - vant, Ra - ta-plan, 
advance. Ha - ta-plan, 



J 



ta-plan, En a-vant, en a-vant, en a - vant ! 
ta-plan. Then advance, then advance, then advance ; 

:tjzz?:|z±r^: 



i 



pzzpzzpzz^zzp=|czl7:zp-? 

:t2-t;i^z=;;i_;2: 



a-vant, Ra - ta-plan, ra 
advance. Ma - ta-plan, ra 



_-_;;z_t7. 



ta - plan, En a-vant, en a-vant, en a-vant! E il suo giudo, il suo grido d'o- 
• ta'plan,Then advance,then advance,then advance, Rataplan, 'tis the roll of the 



_#,_«_zr^_, — 

if—ni — I — h—f- -I — F— #■ 






T==f=- 



:EzÈtE3E:f::i 



Mi chia - ma 
or, fame, and 

■-M- 



I'o-nor! 
renown I 



S±EE-E3E: 



Sa 
It 



vo - 
leads 



ja 



vit 
to 



to - ria! E suo gri - do 
hon - or, fame, and 



d'o-nor. 
renown. 



Recitativo. 
Sul. No, no, Maria ; non va ben : da noi 

Tu fosti adottata, protetta ed allevata, 

Colle nostre mensile economie ; 

E ci devi riguardo e confidenza. 
Maria. Ma, Sulpizio, mio caro, abbi pazienza. 
Sul. Abbila tu pur ora, e stammi attenta ; 

Sai che non f ìi possibile scoprir la 

Tua famiglia, il tuo paese, in onta 

Ad una lettera trovata sii di te : 

Riposta quindi nel fondo del mio sacco 

A posto tìsso, e che — 
Maria. Ma se so tutto ? 
Sul. E perchè dunque soletta e pensierosa. 

Sorti dalla cantina fuggendo i camerata, 

Eh? 
Maria. Perche ? 
Sul. M'han detto che nell' ultimo nostro accampamento 

T'han sorpresa in colloquio con un — ma non 

Sarà, vero. 

Maria. Anzi è la verità — sparlo sincero — con un 
Giovine Svizzero, gentil, garbato, e che mi 
Tolse un giorno da sicuro pericolo : ma pure 
Tutto adesso è finito ; egli è là — noi slam qua. 

Sul. 1 Udendo rumore. | Che cosa è stato ì 
Cos' è questo rumore indiavolato ì 

Entra Caporale e Coro. 

Coro, i Avanti ; andiamo — tutto si sa. 
Cap. \ Fra noi ti spinse curiosità. 
Maria. [Aparte.] Che vedo ! Oh del, è lui ! 
Sul. Sia tratto altrove. 



Recitative. 

Sul. No, no. Maria ; it is not well : by us 

You were adopted, protected, and brought up, 

By our little savings on the passing month : 

And you owe to us regard and confidence. 
Maria. But, my dear Sulpizio, be patient. 
Sul. Have patience yourself, this time, and attend to me : 

You know that it was not possible to discover 

Your family, your country, although 

A letter was found upon you ; 

It now lies at the bottom of my knapsack, 

Safely kept ; and that — 
Maria. But suppose I know all this 1 
Sul. And why, then, lonely and pensiye. 

Do you leave the canteen, and quit our society, 

Ehi 
Maria. Why ? 

5m/. They have told me that, when we were last en- 
camp'd. 

They surprised you in conversati jn with a — but no, 

It cannot be true. 
Maria. It is even true — I make no concealment — 

With a young Swiss, handsome, agreeable, and who 

Rescued me once from certain danger ; but, indeed. 

All that is over — he is there — we are here. 
Sul. [Hearing a noise.] What noise is that 1 

What is that diabolical noise ? 

Enter Corporal Spontoon and Chorus. 

Cho. 1 Forward, go on — all is known ! 

Corp. \ Among us we punish curiosity. 

Maria. [Aside.] What do I see 1 heaven, 'tis he ! 

Sul. Let him de dragg'd hence. 



10 



LA FIGLIA DEL EEGGIMENTO. 



Marta. [At Soldati.] Fermate ! 

I Sotto voce a Sulpizio.] E lui ! 
)avvero ! lo straniero che t' ama ? 
Tonio. [Fissando Maria.] Ah ! pel mio core qual trasporto ! 

Maria. [Piano a Tonio.] E che mai vi guida a noi 1 
Tonio. Posso cercarvi, cara — altri che voi ? 
Coro. E un briccone, un villanzone, 

Che qui venne a specular ; 

Ma gagliardi Savojardi 

Ci sapremo vendicar. 
Maria. [Precipitandosi in mezzo ai Soldati.] 

Un istante amici miei 

Deh ! cedete al mio desir. 

Che ! la morto a colui che mi salvò 

La vita ■? 

Che dice ? 

Ha il ver parlato. 



Coro. 
Sul. 
Coro. ] 
Cap. \ 
Maria 



Questa parola ha il suo destin cangiato. 

D'un precipizio in fondo, io stava per cader ; 
Ei m' a salvata esponendo i suoi giorni, 
Volete ancor eh' egli perisca ? 



Sul. 



No, dawer !' 

S' ella è così mio bravo camerata, 

Sii nostro amico. 
Tonio. [Tendendogli la mano.] E il voglio 

Che così potrò allora avvicinarmi 

A lei che 1' alma adora. 
Sul. Or via per festeggiar il salvator di questa amabil 

Figlia beviam ! Trinchiam al suo liberator ! 

Coro. Trinchiam al suo liberator ! 

Sul. In guo il rum. [A Maria.] E festa di famiglia. 

Coro. E festa di famiglia. 

Sul. Si trinchiamo alla Svizzera, alla natal tua terra. 

Tonio. Oh no ! giammai ! rompo più tosto il mio bicchier ! 

g-;JE pazzo. 

Tonio. Viva Italia ! e i nuovi amici miei ! 
Sul. ) 

Coro. \ Viva dunque Italia, e tu con lei ! 
Cap. ) 

Sul. Perchè la festa sia completa, intuona. 
Figliuola mia, la nostra ronda usata. 
Coro. Del Keggimento è la canzon piti grata. 



Maria. [To the Soldiers.] Stay ! 

[Aside to Sulpizio.] 'Tis he ! 
Sul. Indeed ! the stranger that loves you ? 
Tonio. [Looking at Maria.] Ah, in my heart what transport 

reigns ! 
Maria. [Aside to Tonio.] And what ever led you to us ? 
Tonio. Can I seek, dearest, any other than you 1 
Cho. He's a rogue, a peasant, 

Who came hither to spy ; 

But the gallant Savoyards 

Well knew how to avenge themselves. 
Maria. [Throwing herself into the midst of the Soldiers.] 

One instant, my friends, — 

Ah, yield to my wish. 

What ! death for him who saved my life Ì 



Cho. 
Sul. 
Cha. Ì 
Cor. \ 

Maria. 



Sul. 

Tonio. 

Sul. 



Cho. 
Sul. 



What says she ? 

She has spoken the truth. 

That word has chang'd his destiny. 

, I was near falling from the top of a precipice to 
the bottom ; 

He saved me by venturing his own life. 

Is it yet your will that he should perish t 

No, indeed ! 

If it be as you say, let the brave fellow 

Become our friend. 

And I will, [Extending his hand to them,] that so I 
shall then be able to approach her whom my 
soul adores. 

And now, the saviour to welcome 

Of this our amiable daughter, let us drink. 

Let us drink the health of her deliverer ! 

Let us drink to her deliverer ! 

Pass round the wine. [To Maria.] It is a family fes- 
tival. 

It is a family festival. 

Drink thoj^ to Switzerland, thy native land. 
Oh, no ! never ! Sooner would I break my glass. 



' Is he mad ? 



Cho. 

Sul.^ 

Tonic. 

Cho. 

Cor. . 

Tonio. Long live Italy ! and my new friends ! 

Sid. \ 

Cho. ( Long live Italy, then, and you, too ! 

Cor. ] - 

Sul. 



Cho. 



That the festival may be complete, sing, 

My daughter, our usual round. 

Ah ! sing to ns the song of the Regiment. 



CIASCUN LO DICE ^ALL MEN CONFESS IT. Aie. Maria. 



Maestoso. 



mm^m 



Ciascun lo di - ce. 
All men con-fess it, 




Ciascun lo sa! 
Go where we will ! 



E il Keg-gi - men-to Ch'e 
Our gallant Twentieth Is 



guai non ha. 
wel - come still. 



II sol cui 
Landlords, when 



^^^^m^^^m^-^mmi^M 



cre-di-to Con a-mis-tà, 
sur - li-est, To us are kind, 



Fac-cian le bet - to-le 
Aiid when we're merriest 



Del - la cit - tà. Il Reg-gi-men-to Che o'vimque 
They then are blind. Husbands and lovers, They dread our 

Vivace. 



•^ „r,<1^. Mn-ri -ti P. ftTiian - ti Di-san -i-mò, Del - la bel - tà, oh ! ben supremo ! Eg-li è la, eer-Ii è la. Eir-li 



- - . -P- 
andò; Ma-ri-ti eaman-ti Di-san - i-mò. Del - la bel - tà, oh ! ben supremo ! Eg-li è la, eg-Ii è la, Eg-li e 
sight ; But oft / the fair, We are their delight, We are their delight, we are their delight, They are here,they are here. With 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



11 



mf^^m^^s^^^^f^^m 



là dav-ver: Ve-di - là, eg-li è là Eg-li è là, si si; Eg-li è là, eg-li è la, Dubbio non v'ha; 
sword and spear; They are here, they are here, With sword and spear, They are here, they are here, With sword and spear; 




-Jtz^ 



I'un de - ci - mo che e-gual non ha; 
brave Twen - ti - eth, none are like them : 



^' 



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i-T r^-ft~j-0—^ 

— K — 0-+-M h h-T-| • — ir 

-- 1 1 — +-r — l^ — K^-+ ?- 



Coro. Egli è il davver ! vedila, si, 

Ecco l'undecimo eh' egual no ha. 



Tonio. Viva l'undecimo ! 

Sul. Silenzio, silenzio ! 

Aria — Maria. 
Tante batta glie 
Ei guadagnò. 
Che il nostro principe 

Già decretò. 
Ch' ogni soldato, 

Se in salvo andrà, 
Generalissimo 
Diventerà. 
I Perch' egli è 

Questo il reggimento, 
A cui sia facile 

Ogni cimento. 
Che un sesso teme. 
Che l'altro adora. 

Egli è la, &c, 
[Odisi un hntano mono di tamburo. 

Recitativo. 

Sul. [Ai Soldati.] E 1' ora dell' apello ; 

Andiamo e non si scherzi con il regolamento. 

Maria, i . u 

rr ■ f Ah, se ne vanno. 

Ionio. ] ' 

Sul. [A Tonio.] E tu ragazzo — ^via di qua. 

Maria. Egli è nostro prigioniero, e d' lui noi rispondiamo. 

Sul. [Piano a Maria.] Ma non io. Signorina ! _ _ 

[A Tonio che viene consegnato a due Soldati, ì quali lo 

conducono via per la montagna. 

Andiamo, andiamo. 

Coro — Sulpizio, Caporale, e Coro. 
Tal volta è un poco duro 

Piergarsi ed obbedir. 
Ma suona già il tamburo. 

Pian e devesi servir. 
In tempi cosi strani 

Niun bada più al dolor, 
Pugnando all' indomani. 

Porse si vince o muor, . 
Ma suona già il tamburo 

E devesi servir. 

[Exeunt Sulpizio, Caporale, e Coro. 

Maria, poi Tonio. 

Maria. L'hanno condotto seco ; ed io che avre cotanto 

Volontier con lui parlato ! Povero giovinetto ! per 
Vedermi esporsi in questa guisa ! 



Tonio. [Correndo dalla montagna.] Signorina! 
Maria. Ma come ! — siete voi ? 



Ec - co l'un de - ci^- mo, che e-gual non ha. 
See our brave Twen-ti - eth, none are like them. 

Che. Hear the drum ! 

They come, they come ! 

Here in your land they pitch their tent, 

The gallant Twentieth Regiment. 
Tonio. Long live the regiment ! 

The Twentieth regiment ! 
Sul. Be still — be silent ! 

'SoKG — Mnna. [Resumed.] 
Highest and lowest. 

Heroes are we ; 
Any amongst us 

Marshal may be. 
Foremost in victory. 

Last in retreat. 
Death we can suffer. 

But not defeat. 
First in the battle, 

First in the dance, 
The brave hussar, 

With sword and lance. 

They are here, &c. 
[The sound of a distant drum is heard. 



Recitative. 
Sul. [To the Soldiers.] It is the hour of roll-call ; 

Let us go, and not trifle with the regulations. 

ToSo.' \-^^> *^®y ^^ Soing ! 

Sul. [To Tonio.] And thou, young man, away from hence. 
Maria. He is my prisoner, and I will answer for him. 
S^d. [To Maria.] But I will not, my little lady — 

[To Tonio, who is placed under guard of two Soldiers, 
and led away toivards the mountains.] 
Awaj ! away with you. 

Chorus — Sidpizio, Corporal, and Chorus. 
This course is rather severe. 

To carry him away ; 
But already the drum beats; 

And we must obey. 
In times so strange as these, 
No one thinks much of grief; 
Before to-morrow, while fighting. 
Perchance we conquer or die. 
But already the drum sounds. 

And we must obey. 

[Exeunt Sulpizio, Corporal, and Chorus. 

Maria, ajlerwards Tonio. 

Maria. They have led him away with them ; 

And yet I wished so much 

To have spoken to him. — Poor young man ! 

To have exposed himself to such danger for the sake 
of seeing me ! 
Tonio. [Running down from the mountain.] Fair lady ! 
Maria. How ! — Is it you Ì 



12 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



Tonio. 



Maria 
Tonio. 

Maria 
Tonio. 
Maria 
Tonio. 
Maria. 



Tonio. 

Maria 
Tonio. 
Maria 
Tonio. 



Maria 



Tonio. 



Essi han creduto eh' io li seguissi ; eh si 1 
Non son venuto per chiacchierar con esse che 
Non sono gentile. Affato quel vecchio poi- 
vecchio ? 
, Egli è mio padre. 

Il vecchio 1 — allor mi son sbagliato. 
E' 1' altro ? — quel piccolino ! 
, Egli è mio padre anch' esso. 
Anch' esso 1 — Gli altri adunque. 
, E gli altri pure. 

Che diamine ! Ne avete un reggimento ? 
, E appunto :-^il reggimento è il mio padre 
Addotivo ; e lor deggio il mio stato — 
L' educazione — tutto in somma — tutto. 
E dipendo da lor unicamente ; ma 
Dite finalmente che volete da me, 
Qual mai segreto vi condusse fra noi 1 
Egli è, eh' io bramo tutto aprirvi il 
Mio cor — egli è che v' amo. 
, ,Che ? voi m'amate 1 
Non ci credete ? udite poi decidete. 

Vediam, udiam ; ascoltiam e giudichiam. 
Da quell' istante che sul mio seno, 
Io vi raccolsi venuta meno ; 
L'immagin vostra dolce e vezzoza, 
Non mi da posa la notte e il di. 

Ma carin quest' è memoria, 
E memoria e nulla piti. 



-quel 



No non è tutto — e' è di peggio, 

Si mia cara — e' è di piìi. 
Maria. Vediam, udiam ; ascoltiam e giudichiam. 
Tonio, Il bel soggiorno de tempi andati. 

Tutti gli amici cotanto amati. 

Per voi, Maria ! — Sin d'or lo sento ; 

Senza tormento potrei lasciar. 
Maria. Ma una tale indifferenza, 

E' impossibil perdonar. 
Tonio. E finalmente da voi lontano, 

Tanto la vita fu in odio a me ; 

Che sfidar volli furente insano ; 

La morte stessa — ma al vostro pie ! 
Maria e Tonio. 

Ah ! eh' io lo so ! lo capisco ! anch' io ! 

Ma i giorni dennosi amico mio. 

Per quei che s'amano assicurar. 



Tonio. They thought I should follow them ; but I did not 
come to gossip with them, who are in fact 
scarcely civil. Yet, that old man — ^who is he ? 

Maria. He is my father. 

Tonio. That old man ? — then I am mistaken. 

And the other ? — that little fellow ! 
Maria. He is my father also. 
Tonio. He also ! And the others "? 
Maria. And tlie others as well. 

Tonio. The deuce ! Have you a regiment of fathers 1 
Maria. I have : — by the wliole regiment was I adopted, 

And to them I owe my present position — 

My education ; — in fact, all — everything ; 

And I depend entirely on them. 

And tell me, now, what do you wish from me — 

What secret motive has brought you among us 1 
Tonio. It is that I wish to open all 

My heart — it is that I love you ! 
Maria. What ? — you love me ! 

Tonio. Do you not believe me 1 Hear me, and then decide. 
Maria. Let us hear and see — let us listen and judge. 
Tonio. From the instant when to my bosom 

I clasped you, reviving from affright, 

Your fair and lovely image 

Has left me no repose by night or day. 
Maria. [Coquettishly.] But, ray dear little friend, this is a 
recollection ; — 

And nothing more. 
Tonio. No, indeed, it is more than a mere recollection : 

It is true love. , 

Maria. Let us see and hear, and — 
Tonio. The beautiful abode of past days, 

And all the friends so much beloved, 

For you, Maria, I feel, 

Without regret, I could leave them all. 
Maria. But such indifference as that 

It is impossible to forgive. 
Tonio. I could not live without you, dearest ; 

It were pain worse than death itself ; — 

Hence, defying all, I've ventur'd here. 

Let them now do their worst — I have seen you. 



ENSEMBLE. 



Maria. Say not so, 

Say not so : pray forbear ; pray 
forbear. 

He who loves as he ought, re- 
spects his life, 

For the sake of her he's wooing. 

]fou understand, I hope. 



Tonio. I have pross'd once again 

your hand, 
And should die now contented ; 
Yes, should die most happy, 
BIy dear, my best Maria. 



A VOTI COSI ARDENTE— NO LONGER CAN I DOUBT IT. Duet. Maria and Tonio. 

allegretto. 



— 3:-^_i ^ X 



vo - ti 



CO - si ar-den 



No long - er can I doubt it ! 





aa* * •+ — ' 1 \ Nt — N — *j — S* 

(•V- F-+-0 — g — J — ■y+ — 1-— ^ — n^-j 



Non sen - te che 1' a-mor; Si 1' a - mor, si I'a-mor, si I'a-mor. 
Oh, yes, it beats for thee; Yes, for thee — yes, for thee — yes, for thee. 



— 0—jr^ 
A vo - ti co-si ar- 
No long-er can I 



3 



p_LE__H — U — ■ ' — i^zzztjZH* — t_C 'z^* — ' — Ci — » — ^ '-4—1 1 II'- TOZ^Z 



den-£e! II te - ne -ro suo cori 

doubt it ! Her heart is giv'n to me ! 



Si mon-stre-ra cle-men - te 
And mine, too, beats responding,— 



Al pre-go dell' a-mor, si dell' amor. 
Oh yes, it beats for thee — oh yes, for thee. 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



13 



Eecitativo. 
Tonio. Cara voi ben vedete ma — v'ama sol. 

Maria. Si? decidete. 

Tonio. Vediam, udiam, ascoltiam e giudichiam. 

Maria. Ci vetta un tempo felice e lieta, 

Di niun amante sentia pietà ; 

Ma l'alma adesso turbata, inquieta — 

Sa che v'è un altra felicità. 
Tonio. Va ben ! va ben ! 
Maria. E fra i nemici che debbo odiar ; 

Per un di questi degg'io tremar. 



Tonio. Di bene in meglio. 

Maria. E in un giorno d'orror che i sensi invigorino. 
All' olezzar d'un fior cospersi io lo sentii • 
Del vostro pianto quel caro fior tesor, 
Pieno d'incante mai da quel giorno. 



^ Aria. [-4?icora.] 

Tonio. ì Abbandonò il mio cor, 
Maria. ) A voti così ardente, &c. &c. 

[Si precipitano l'un l'altra ne. 
Tonio. ì Quest' alma è rapita nell' estasi d'amor. 
Maria. 3 Io perderò la vita ma fido al tuo bel cor. 

[Partono. 



Sul. 



Mar. 
SuJ. 



Mar. 
Sul. 



Mar. 
Sul. 



Mar. 



Entra Sulmzio, la Marchesa, e poi Ortensio. 

Lo dico con il cuore sulle labbra. 

[Alla Marchesa che legge. 
Dovermi separar da quella cara 
Amabile fanciulla è tal cordoglio 
Che non lo so spiegar. Ma non e' è 
Verso : se il Capitan Roberto fu sposo 
A lei segreto ; a lei strettemente 
Celate al nobilissima cosata dei Marchesi 
Di LaufFen. 

Onde astretta venni a tener occulto 
Quest' imeneo cotanto desperato ! 
Poi lo scritto trovato vicino alla fanciulla, 
E a lei diretto, parla chiaro abbastanza, 
E aperto mostra che la figliuola è 
Sua ; che il capitano mortalmente ferito 
Raccommandava a le materne curo 
Quell' angiol di bontà. 
Ma vi scongiuro, a nessuno palese 
Si faccia questo arcano ; e siate certo 
Che un compenso condegno a tante cure — 
Eh ! se lo tenga pure ; che col perder 
Maria, a tutto si perde ! Vado dunque 
A pigliarla. 
Io là v' aspetto. 
Preferirei, le mille volte e mille 
Morire dalla fame in alcuna città 
Stretta d' assedio, che perderla così. 
Non e' è rimideo. 

Ortensio ! presto, Ortensio ! Andate 
Subito a ordinar i cavalli ! è necessario 
Allontanarla tosta da questi militari 
Ad ogni costo. 



Entra Caporale e Soldati. 



[Parte. 



Eecitativb. 
Tonio. Yon see it now, I love — 

Perhaps, though, I love alone. 
Maria. Decide for yourself, sir. 
Tonio. Well, then, tell your tale : 

I will listen and decide it. 
Maria. Long time coquettish, so free and joyous, 

I'd no notion of love's pains ; 

But too well now I read the secret, — 

'Tis a lesson taught by love alone. 
Tonio. Go on — go on. 
Maria. I lov'd but battle. 

The noise and tumult of the camp ; 

But ah ! I freely will confess it, 

All my feelings now are chang'd. 
Tonio. Oh, better still. 
Maria. Since the day when I met you, 

Upon the steep abyss's edge depending, 

I pluck'd this flower, in its wild bed blooming. 

And wore it here as it had been your gift. 

Till at length it wither'd on my heart. 
Tonio. Go on, go on ! 
Maria. What need to tell thee more 1 

You must now decide. 
Tonio. Maria! 

Air. [Resumed.] 

Tonio. 

No longer can I douljt it, 

Her heart is giv'n to me ; 
And mine, too, beats responding ; 
Oh yes, it beats for thee — yes, far 

thee. 
I love you, Maria I 

My heart is ever thine. 
Oh ! death itself were welcome, 
Could I but call thee mine. 

[Exeunt. 
Enter Sulpizio, the Marchioness, and afterwards Orten- 
sio. 
I speak it with my heart upon my lips. 

[ To the Marchioness, who is reading a letter. 
To be obliged to part from that dear 
Amiable girl, is such a grief, 
That I cannot express it. But it cannot 
Be helped. If Captain Roberto was married 
To her in secret, from her carefully 
Conceal the noble wardenship of the Marquis 
Of Lauffen. 

Wherefore I have kept concealed 
This unpropitious marriage ! 
Then, the writing found near the little girl. 
And directed to you, speaks clearly enough ; 
And dis<-inctly shows that the daughter 
Is yours — that the captain, when mortally wounded, 
Commended to your maternal care 
This angel of goodness. 
But, I conjure you, to none reveal 
This secret ; and be certain 
That recompense adequate to such care — 
Eh ! Nothing will recompense me for losing 
Maria ! Yet I must bring her hither. 



Maria. 

No longer can T doubt it, 

His heart is giv'n to me ; 
And ming, too, beats respond' 

Oh yes, it beats for thee ; 
Yes, for thee — yes, for thee. 



Sd. 



Mar. 
Sul. 



Mar. 



Sul. 



Mar. I will expect her. 

Sul. [Aside.] I should prefer, a thousand times. 

To die of hunger in any city 

Closely besieged, to losing her thus. 

Yet it cannot be helped. 
Mar. Ortensio ! haste thou, Ortensio ! Oh, 

Go thou quickly, and the horses order ; 

Por 'tis expedient at once to remove her 

Prom these most fearful soldiers 

At any cost. 

Enter Corporal and Soldiers. 



[Exit. 



14 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



EATAPLAN. Choetts. 




Allegro con Brio. 



:4:=iÈ='z}z==z:J3: 



Ra - ta - pian, ra - ta - pian, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta - pian, pian, pian pian, pian! Ea - ta- 
Ha -ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, pian, pian, pian, pian! ra - ta- 






ì-, 



T-^- 



'^m 





m i V 2 ^ w w — f% — Er 



i^TTB- 



pian! Mil - i - tar 
/ Not a sol 



• : -^ — 9 ^~ w 



:r.:=rr 



non v'ha Cui non bat - ta il cor. 
dier wJwse heart does not beat At the live 



Del tamburo al bel fra - gor. 
Ij/ rat - tie of the 



f\— ,S K -«j N f \ 



■0 — ^—0 — -~\ —0 *| - » — # - 



> -r — h T~N — ì : > ^ h k ^ r1 — ^ : — Kr T~t^ — ?r — >r — ^~F — ^ 

Ì2Ee5E?Pz=5=J^Ìz=^PEE^3:!|:'=:fc^^=gz=ti- 

-L -L i- 

or. Ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan ! Pian di zcl — picn d'ar-dpr — Pien di 

Ma - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan, ra - ta-plan ! Full of zeal— fidi of ar - dor — of 



gor, 
drum. 



U j^ ^ X ^ ^ j ^ 1 



zel, dar - dor — Di fer - vor — a que - sto fra-gor Ri - sponde con a - mor. 

fer - vor — To that sound he re - sponds with de-light, re - sponds ivith delight 



Cap. 



Viva la pugna ! gli affanni suoi, 

E la vittoria, e il guerregiar ! 

Viva la moi-te ! che ognun di noi 

Nella battaglia vola a cercar. 

Ma chi diavolo viene ? Oh ! il quel giovinotto 

Che fra noi questa mane è capitato. 

Bravo ! d' avvero, egli si fé' soldato. 

Entra Tonio, con la coccarda Francesa al berretto. 



Tonio. Miei cari amici, che lieto giorno ! 
Le vostre insegne io seguirò ; 
Sol per amore a voi ritorno, 
E un grande àroè diventerò. 
Ah, si ! colei ond' io sospiro 
Ebbe' pietade del mio martiro ; 
E questa speme desiata, ognor 
Altera i sensi ed il mio cor. 

Coro. Il camerata e innamorato. 

Tonio. Ed In voi soli confida il cor. 

Coro. Che ? — Nostra figlia l'ha incatenato ? 

Tonio. Deh ! m' ascoltate deh ! 

Deh ! m' ascolcate suo genitor 

Le nozze stringere con lei non posso. 

Se il vostro mancami saldo favor. 

Cap. } La nostra figlia, s' è stabilito, 

Coro. ) Un inimico non prenderà, no ! 
Le si conviene miglior partito. 
Tal' è d' un padre la volontà. 



Cor. 



Hail to the battle, its shouts and its din ; 

Hail to the victors, their laurels wlio wia ; 

Hail too to death, when we've fought the good fight ! 

The brave will ne'er compass their safety by flight ! 

Eh ! but who comes hither ? Oh, it is the youngster 

Who was taken this morning ; bravo ! surely 

He has enlisted — he has become a soldier. 



Enter Tonio, with the French cockade in his cap. 

Tonio. My brave companions, this day so joyful ! 
I'm come to follow your much-priz'd flag. 
For love alone do I return to you ; — 
And a great hero will I become. 
Ah yes ! e'en she for whom I'm sighing 
Has pity on my deep felt passion. 
And this fond hope and joy long wish'd for 
Aflects my thoughts, enchants my heart! 

Cho. Our comrade has in love fall'n deeply. 

Tonio. To you alone confides he his hopes ! 

Cho. What ! — has our daughter enthralled you ? 

Tonio. Ah ! pray now hear me ; hear ! 

You who are her father, hear me, I pray ! 
I cannot hope to gain her in man-iage, 
If the consent of all of you be denied. 

Cor. Ì Our dearest daughter, it is resolved, 

Cho.- ) Shall not be wedded to a foe. No ! 

A match much better shall be accomplished ; 
Of that her fathers will take care. 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



15 



Tonio. 
Cap. \ 
Coro. ! 

Tonio. 



Cap. 
Tonio. 

Coro. 

Tonio. 

Coro. 

Tonio. 

Coro. 



Tonio. 
Cap. 

Coro. 



Vi ricusate ? 
\ Con fondamento ; 
Mentr' ella da già promessa 
Al nostro reggimento. 
No lo poteva affato, 
Se appunto mi son fatto, 
Pfer essa militar. 
Peggio per te ! 

Signori miei — voi, suo buon padre, 
Deh ! m' ascoltate ! 
Peggio per te ! 
La vostra figlia m' ama. 
Possibil mai ? — La nostra figlia ! 
Si, m' ama ! lo giuro al ciel. 
Che dire 1 che fare ? Poi che egli è piacuto 
D' un padre avveduto al nodor assentir. 
Ma senza mistero, non sembra pur vero, 
Che questo bombacelo, c'è l'abbia a ghermir. 
Ebben'? 

Se dici il ver, suo padre adesso 
Il suo consentimento ci fa promesso. 
Si ; — il suo consentimento, ci fa promesso. 



Tonio. Qual destino ! qua! favore ! 
La sua mano, ed il suo coro ! 
Ah ! finito è il mio penar — 
Son marito e militar. 
Suo padre me l'ha data ! — e sposa mia ! 



Entra Sulpizio e Maria. 



Sul. 



Esser non può d' alcun che di sua zia. 
Se la porta con se — 

? Che ! Nostra figlia portarla via ? Sei pazzo. 

Tonio. Lunge da me condurla ! e sarà ver mio 
Bene egliè un sogno crudel. 



Cap 
Coro 



Tonio. 
Cor. l 
Cho. S 

Tonio. 



Cor. 
Tonio. 

Cko. 

Tonio. 

Cho. 

Tonio. 

Cho. 



Tonio. 
Cor. 

Cho. 

Tonio, 



Do you refuse her ? 
"With good sound reason ; 
Pledg'd she is, not to marry 
Without consent of the reg'ment. 
Of which I have the honor to be one. 
I hafe become, for her sake. 
One of your reg'ment. 
The worse for thee ! 

Gentlemen, hear me : you, her good fathers — 
Ah, pray now, hear me ! 
We want not thee. 
Your beauteous daughter loves me. 
Can it be true I—our own dear daughter ! 
She loves me ; bear witness, Heav'n ! 
What say we in answer ? It is the duty 
Of a prudent father his consent to give. 
It seems, though, unlikely, beyond e'en belief, 
This youth should have won her, and call her his 
But, speak ! [own. 

If he speaks tnith, her fond loving fathers. 
In promise most faithful, will give their consent. 
Yes : in promise most faithful, we'll give our con- 
sent. 
O, happy fate ! oh, joyous hour ! 
Her hand and heart I now have gain'd ! 
Ah ! my anguish is all ended — 
Now a husband and a soldier. 
Her fathers now have giv'n her — she's wholly mine ! 

Enter Sulpizio and Maria. 



Sul 



She can belong to none but to her aunt. 

Should she take her away — 
Cor. ] What, our own daughter ! take her away ! What 
Cho. ) madness ! 
Tonio. Take her away from Tonio ? And shall, indeed, 

My happiness pass away like a dream 1 



CONVIEN P^ZZr/i?— FAREWELL, A LONG FAREWELL. Air. Maria. 
Larghetto. j^ n ^ ^ 



Con - vien par - tir! o miei compagni d'ar-me; E d'o-ra in poi Ion-tan - da voi fug-glr, — 
Fare-well ! a long fare-wdl I my dear companions, In pi - ty, do not strive to hide your sorrow, — 






^'IS^^eI 



Ma per pie - ta ce - la-te a mi quel pianto, fia il vostro duol per il cor 
Jn pi - ty, do not strive to hide your sorrow — Those tears,those tears will be 



Di Ma - ria supremo in- 
7ny comfort on the 






canto. Convien par-tir, convien par-tir; Ah, per pie - ta, ce - la-te il vos - tro pian - to,— 

morrow. Farewell, my friends ; farewell,my friends, farewdl, In pity, do not strive to hide your sor • row,— 




^p:?=[!i»r— i;z1: 



itzzitittz 



zNzjT— iE:fl«=:i= 



•E-:S 



u^i^ ^^^E^^^^^m^i^^Es- 



ad - 
fare 



dio; 
well ; 



con 
I 



vien, 
now 



par - tiri 
must hence. 



16 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



") Io perdo, o cara la sola speme 
> Ogni mio bene perdendo te. 
J A tant' 



Cap. 

Sul. 



Coro. 



Sul. 

Tonio. 

Cap. ) A tant' affanno non regge il core 

Simil dolore non v' è per me. 
Maria. Cenvien partir — o voi che nel mio core ; 

Destate, te i primi palpiti d' amore ! • 

Ed il piacer, con me partiste e' il pianto. 

M' offron dell' or — in cambio di quel ben puro sol- 
tanto. 

Convien partir, &c. 
Tonio. Amici, ah ! in ver ciò mai non sia ; 

Partir non de' — non de'" — Maria. 

Ah ! no ! 

A tanto affanno regge il core ; 

Simil dolore, non è per me. 

Io perdo, o cara ! la sola speme ; 

Ogni mio bene perdendo te. 

Partir no non de. 
Tonio. Ah ! se voi mi lasciate io vengo via. ' 

Sul. Ma ingaggiata non sei, bellezza mia. 
Maria. Tonio ! 
Tonio. Mia bene amata ! 

Maria. Questo colpo mancava al mio tormento. 
Tonio. Maria 1 ' 

Maria. Perderlo adesso ? Ah ! che morir mi sento. 
Snl. Ma ingaggiata tu sei. 
Maria. ) Questo colpo mancava al mio cor. 
Tonio. \ Ahimè ! 

Cap. 1 Oh ! duol, oh ! sorpresa, lasciarla partir 
Sul. > Al diavolo Marchesa, che ce la vuol rapir. 
Coro. ^ In ogni cimento, che s'abbia a sfidar 

Del nostro reggimento è I' angiol tutelar. 
Maria. ) Ah ! non più speranze — non più piacere — 
Tonio. \ D'un giorno solo potrò goder. 

Ah ! eh' ogni bene disprezza il cor, 

Se a tante pone lo danna amor ! 
Mar. Andiam, nipote. 
Maria. Miei cari amici, addio ! per sempre ! 

La man, o Pietro — la tua Matteo ; 

La tua, vecchio Tommasso. 
Mar. Ah, qual oiTor ! 
Maria. Che ancor bambina in braccio mi portavi : — 

Abbracciami, Sulpizio ! 

Ah ! di costoro io son 1' amor ! 
Mar. Oh, 1' orror ! 
Tonio. Oh, r orror! 
Coro. Nostra figlia nostro amor. 
Tonio. Il mio core è a te serbato ; 

E fedele a te sarò. 

Ah, si' il mio core è di Maria ; 

E fido a lei lo serberò. 
Mar. Andiam, partiam. 
Ort. Andiam, Marchesa ; su via partiamo. 

r.'^f' I Al diavol la Marchesa, 
^ ' j E con lei chi la pai-ta. 

FINE dell' atto PRIMO. 



ATTO II. 

SCENA I. — // teatro rappresenta un Salone, che per mezzo 
di porte in fondo mette ad una galleria. Portee finestra 
laterali — Unclavicenihalo, tavolini, etc. 
Ortensio e Sulpizio, che avrà un braccio al collo, ma 
di tempo in tempo gestisce per provare che la ferita va meg- 
lio. 
Ort. Ecco le carte che il notaro invia. 
Il duca e la sua madre 
"Per lo sei saran qui." Feste ! allegria ! [Via. 



Sul.^ 
Tonio 
Cor, 



io. > 



Cor. 
Sul. 
Cho. 



Break not my heart ! 
Must we, then, part ? 
Glory and arms 
Have now no charms. 
Maria. I must now go — but I can ne'er forget you ; 
No, live where I may, my heart is yours : 
I shall ever, in pomp and pleasure, still regret you. 
No friends can be so dear as those I leave be- 
hind me. 
Farewell ! farewell ! farewell ! 
Tonio. My friends, in truth, this ne'er must be ; — 

You should not ever hence depart, Maria : 

Ah ! no ! 

To lose you thus my heart is filled with pain ; 

Such grief as this will ne'er be mine again. 

I lose, belov'd one, now my only hope ; — 

And every joy is gone in losing thee ! 

To leave us ! — No, it must not be ! 
Tonio. Yes, yes : if thou dost leave us, I fain must follow. 
Sul. But art thou not enlisted, my tender youngster Ì 
Maria. Tonio ! 
Tonio. My own beloved ! 

Maria. This alone was wanted to complete my anguish. 
Tonio. Maria ! [feel it. 

Maria. And must I leave him ? Ah, worse than death I 
Sul. But you are enlisted. 

Maiia. ^ This dread blow my fond heart will surely crush. 
Tonio. > Alas ! 

Cor. 3 grief ! surprise ! to let her depart 
Sul. ^ With the cruel Marchioness. 
Cho. J In every trial that we have endured 

She has of our regiment been the tutelary angel. 
Maria. } Ah ! no longer hope — no longer pleasure, 
Tonio. 5 May I for a single day enjoy. 

Ah ! let my heart despise every delight, 

If love condemns it to such pains as this ! 
Mar. My niece, now let us depart. 
Maria. My dear friends, farewell ! farewell for ever ! 

Your hand, dear Pietro — yours, too, Matteo ; 

And yours, old Tomasso. 
Mar. Ah, I am shock'd ! 
Maria. When yet a little child, in his arms he bore me ; — 

Embrace me, dear Sulpizio ! 

Ah ! by them I am beloved ! 
Mar. I am shock'd ! 
Tonio. So am I ! 

Cho. Our daughter dear is our best treasure. 
Tonio. My heart now beats for thee alone ; 

And constant will I ever be. 

Ah, yes ; my heart is now Maria's, 

And faithfully will I devote it to her. 

Let us away. 

Even so, my lady — we'll thither journey. 

The deuce take the Marchioness, 
And him along with her. 

END of act I. 



ACT II. 

SCENE I. — The Stage represents a Saloon opening by fold- 
ing doors at the back on to a gallery. A clavecin, small 
tables, S^c. 

Ortensio and Sulpizio discovered, who has an arm in a 
sling, but makes signs from time to time, to show that the 
wound is better. 
Ort. Here are the cards sent by the notaiy. 
The Duke and his mother 
" Will be here at six o'clock." What pleasure ! [Exit. 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



17 



Sul. Povera figlia ! Io più non ho coraggio 

Di vederla soffrir. Già da quattr' ore , 

Le van storpiando i piedi, perchè impari 

Il minuetto — e quella, abituata 

A saltare con noi liberamente, 

Piange — e ripete : Non ne faccio niente ! 

Vestita da gran dama — 

Entra Maria. 
Maria. Oh, mio Sulpizio ! 

Io non ne posso più — vonno ammazzarmi — 
Ma tei dissi, e il ripeto schiettamente. 
Hanno un bel dir : " Non ne faremo niente." 

10 Tonio voglio — e non baroni o duchi. 
Tonio per me si fé' soldato, ed io — 

Sul. La zia ! — 
Maria. Che importa ? 

Sul. Zitti. 

Misericordia ! che toelette. 

Esce la Marchesa, in toupet. 
Mar. La romanza in quistione è ritrovata. 

E cosa prelibata — 

Venere scende — 
Sul. (E monta il mal amore.) ' 

Mar. Che dite ? 

Sul. Io ? Nulla affatto— 

Mar. Venere scende fra la notte opaca, 

Per vedere colui, che amor le inspira — 

[Musica del Maestro CoffarieUo. 
Maria. (Sulpizio, senti?) 

Sul. . (Oh, beUo!) 

Mar. Ebben, Maria, stupida resti. Andiamo ; , 

Voi zitto ; tu sta attenta — incominciamo. 

\Si pone al clavicembalo, e suona con caricatura. 

Maria. Sorgeva il di del bosco il seno, 

E vener bella scende a dal ciel. 

Scendeva in questo soggiorno ameno. 
Sul. Il nos tro canto era più bel. 
Maria. Sul orme amiche del sue fedel. 
Sul. Rataplan, 

E il Reggimento eh' egual non ha. 
Maria. Rataplan, 

E il Reggimento eh' egual non ha. 
Mar. E — ma che sento mai ì • 

Maria. Perdon — perdono ! 

Confusa un po' mi sono. 

Ero distratta : perdon ! perdon ! 

E quest' amante a cui Ciprigna. 

Donava il premio del valor, 

11 più gentile della città 
La cui beltà — 

Sul. Oh, ben supremo della beltà. 
Maria. ì Ecolo qua. 

Sul. ! Ecco r undecime eh' egual non ha. 
Mar. Oh, quale infamina — che dite la ? 
Maria. [A Sulpizio.[ (Ohimè che noja!) 
Mar. Andiamo avanti. 
Maria. Sia pur cosi. 

[Alla Marchesa, condispetto, poi piano a Sulpizio. 

Ma non e' è caso — non e' entra qui. 

Vener scorgendo tanto vezzosa, 

L' eco del monte, della valle 

Di Filomela 1' ansia gelosa 

Ripeteranno col suon d' amor. 
Mar. Via sospiriamo siccome lei. 
Sul. le preferisco a que' sospiri 

D' un buon tamburo il bel fragor. 
Maria. Ah ! non ho più pazineza, — 

Troppe è ridicol cosa ; 

Io non ne posso più. 



Sìil. Poor girl ! I have no longer courage 

To see her suffer. For four hours has she been 
Twisting her feet in every direction, learning 
The minuet ; and she who has been used 
To do just as she pleases with us, 
Now weeps, and repeats : " I can do nothing 
Dressed as a grand lady." 

Enter Maria. 

Maria. Oh, Sulpizio, 

I can do no more of it, if they kill me for it. 
But I have already said, and I now repeat it, [nothing." 
We have a good saying : " Against my will I will do 
I will have Tonio, and no barons and dukes. 
Tonio for my sake became a soldier, and I — 

Sid. Your aunt ! — 

Maria. I care not for her ! 

Sul. Gently. 

Mercy on us ! what a toilette. 

Enter the Marchioness, in toupés. 
Mar. The romance in question is found, — 

It is an exquisite gem. 

Venus descends — 
Sul. (And bad humor ascends.) 

Mar. What do you say Ì 
Sul. I ? Nothing, truly. 

Mar. Venus descends in the midst of night. 

To see him who has inspired her with love. 

[Music by the Maestro Caffariàlo. 
Maria. (Sulpizio, do you hear ?) • 

Sul. (Oh, splendid !) .- — 

Mar. "Well, Maria, you stand there like a stupid. 

Come, pay attention — we will begin. 
[She places herself at the piano, which she plays in an 
exaggerated style. 
Maria. The light of early day was breaking. 

When from the skies above 

Fair Venus to her grot descended. 
Sul. Our songs in camp were much more gay. 
Maria. To seek the object of her love. 
Sul. Rataplan, 

Roll on, roll on, and march away. 
Maria. Rataplan, 

Roll on, roll on, and march away. 
Mar. Eh ! what in the name of fate do I hear ? 
Maria. Forgive me, forgive me ; 

I am a little confused. 

My thoughts were wandering ! forgive me ! 

It is this lover, to whom Ciprynia 

Gave the premium of valor, 

The most charming in all the city. 

Whose beauty — 
S'd. Our regiment for beauty pre-eminent. 
Maria. Ì This is it. 

Sul. ) The Eleventh without a rival remains. 
Mar. (0, what infamy — what are you saying ?) 
Maria. [To Sulpizio.l (Oh, what an annoyance.) 
Mar. Let us continue. 
Maria. Be it so. 

[To the Marchioness, with spitefalness, afterwards whis- 
pering to Sulpizio. 

But it is not so — it does not come in here. 

Venus discovered so many charms. 

That the echoes of the hills and valleys 

Repeated with sounds of love 

The jealous pangs of Philomel. 
Mar. Here you must sigh as she did. 
Sul. I prefer to such sighs 

The sound of a good drum. 
Maria. Ah ! I have no more patience,-»- 

It is truly ridiculous ; 

I will bear no more of it. 



18 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



Mar. 



Oit. 
Sul. 
m. 

Sul. 



Ort. 



Mar. Ohimè che sento ! ah qual risposta ! 
Maria. En avant ! En avant ! 

Rataplan — plan — plan ! 

Quale orror : possibil mai ? 

Che si possa avviluppar 

Ad un canto si gentile 

La canzon d' un militar ! 
\La Marchesa allontana, sdegnata. Maria entra nelle 
proprie stanze, e mentre; Sulpizio sta per andarsene 
dal fondo s' incontra con Ortensio. 

Giusto voi, granatiere. 

Cos' è accaduto ? 

C è a basso un militar — ma di que' grossi !' 

Ha uno spallino d'or. 

Uno spallino '? 

(Forse lui ! — cospetton — ci voiTia questa ! 

Che gazzabuglio allora e che tempesta.) [Parte. 

Un giorno o 1' altro — ed esser dee pur bello ! 

Dee cangiarsi in quartier tutto il castello. [Via, 

Entra Maria. 

Maria. Per sì fatai contratto tutto è letizia intomo. 

La mia sventura io computo in tal giorno — 

Ma cosa sento io mai 1 

Ciel ! — ah m' illudessi 1 

Questa marcia guerriera — 

Ah son pur dessi ! 

Oh trasporto ! oh dolce ebrezza ! 

Son gli amici del mio cor. 

Bei piacer di giovinezza 

Ritornate almen con lor; 

Evviva l'Italia ! 

E i prodi guerrier ; 

Son dessi mia gioia. 

Mio solo pensier. 

Al essi soltato 

Aspiva il mio cor ; 

Con essi ritrovo 

La gloria, 1' amor. 
Coro. E lei, nostra figlia. 

Qual piacer, qual destin ! 

L' antica tua famiglia 

Ti vede alfin. 

Entra Sulpizio, poi Tonio e Ortensio. 

Sul. camerati ! amici ! 

Coro. Oh ! veh, Sulpizio ! 

Sai. Si, Sulpizio in persona, 

Che vi stringe e v' abbraccia tutti quanti. 

Tommaso — Amlw-ogio — Pietro — 

Nessun manca all' appello ! 
Sfuria. [Cercando collo sguardo.] Oh si, nessuno ! 
Tonio. E peppur Tonio. 
Maria. [ Correndo ad esso.] Ah, Tonio mio ! ma, guardo, — 

Ha uno spallino. [A Sidpizio. 

Tonio. Per Bacco ! 

Quand' un si è messo in testa 

])i morire sul campo dell' onore, 

Non e' è a dir — o sale in alto, o more. 
Sul. Ma voi, miei buoni amici, un bicchie ino 

Forse ne bevereste ? 
Coro. Figurarsi ! 

Maria. E se torna la zia ? 
Sul. Staran celati 

In fondo al parco. Ortensio ! 
Ort. Misericordia ! 
Maria. Senza tante smanie, 

A costor fate dare una bottiglia. 
Oli,. Ce ne vuole una botte 1 
Sul. Meno ciarle, 

Sien gli ordini eseguiti, e se resiste — 



Mar. What do I hear ? Ah ! what an answer ! 
Maria. En avant ! en avant ! 

Rataplan — plan — plan ! 
Mar. For shame ! Is it possible ? 

Thus dare to disfigure 

With a noisy military tune 

A song so charming as this ! 
[Exit the Marchioness, enraged — Maria enters her own 
room ; Sulpizio is also about to leave. Ortensio 
enters. 
Ort. You are just the person I wanted to see, grenadier. 
Sul. What has happened Ì 
Ort. There is a soldier below — but one of the great ones ; 

He has a wounded shoulder. 
Sul. A wounded shoulder'? 

(Perhaps it is he. Zounds ! that this should happen ! 

What an uproar there will be !) [Exit. 

Ort. Every day there is something happening. 

And the whole castle is turned topsy-turvy. [Exit. 

Enter Maria, alone. 

Maria. All around rejoice at the fatal contract, 

Whilst I in one day see my misery complete. 

But what do I hear Ì 

Heavens ! — is it an illusion Ì — 

This martial music ! 

Ah ! it is them ! 

Oh ! what happiness, what delight ! 

'Tis my heart's best friends. 

Sweet pleasure of jwuth. 

With them to return. 

Long live my country, 

And all its brave wamors : 

They are my delight — 

They are my sole thought ; 

For them — them alone, 

Does my heart now long ; 

With them I should find 

Love and glory once more. 
Cko. 'Tis she, our daughter. 

What happiness ! what joy ! 

Your loving family 

Sees you at length again. 

Enter Solpizio, followed by Tonio, and afterwards Oe- 

< TENSIO. 



Sul. 
Cho. 
Sul. 



Maria. 
Tonio. 
Maria. 

Tonio. 



Sul. 

Cho. 

Maria. 

Sul. 

Ort. 
Maria. 

Ort. 
Std. 



Oh, comrades, friends ! 

Oh, Sulpizio ! 
Yes, Sulpizio himself, 
And he embraces every one of you. 
Thomas — Ambrose — Peter — 
None are missing at my call. 
, [Looking around.] Oh yes, all are here. 
Ay, even Tonio. 

, [Running to him.] Ah, my own Tonio ! But look, 
He has a wounded shoulder. [To Sulpizio. 

By Bacchus ! 
When a man has taken it into his head 
To die on the field of honor. 
No one can tell where the blow may fall. 
But you, my dear friends. 
Perhaps you would like a cup of wine. 
Willingly. 
, And if my aunt should return ? 

They shall be concealed 
In the park. Ortensio ! 
Good Heavens ! 

Without more ado, 
Go and get a cask of wine. 
Do you want a whole cask ? 

Without any prating, 
Let the order be obeyed ; and if you resist — 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



19 



Ort. 

Sul. 
Coro. 
Ort. 
Coro. 

Sul. _ 

Maria 

Tonio. 

Sul. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Sul._ 

Iconio. 

Sul. 



Sul. _ 

Maria, 

Tonio. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Sul. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Tonio. 

Sul. 

Siti. _ 

Maria. 

Tonio. 



10 poi — 
Già intesi siamo. 
Andiam. 

No, che non vengo. 

Andiamo— randiamo. 
[/ Soldati partono via Ortensio. 
( Stretti insiem tutti tre, 
1 Qual favor ! qual piacer ! 
' j Tanto ben, tal mercè, 

V Non può il cor sostener. 
Dolce memoria ! 

Bel tempo andato ! 
Da noi lontano — 

S' e trasportato. 
Ma tornerà. 

Lo spero invano. 

11 tempo andato tornò per me, 
A lui vicino, vicino a te. 

Stretti insiem tutti tre. 

Qual fiivor ! qual piacer ! 
Tanto ben, tal mercè. 
Non può il cor sostener. 
Tu parlerai per me — 

Per lui tu dèi parlar. 
Premiar la nostra fé. 
Né devi poi tardar. 
Ma udite, udite almen. 

La tua promessa è urgente. 
Ei m' ama immensamente. 
Il core e la sua fé. 
Ma al diavolo voi e me. 
( Stretti insiem tutti tre. 
J Qual favor ! qual piacer ! 
1 Tanto ben, tal mercè, 

V Non può il cor sostener. 

Entra La Marchesa. 
Mar, Che vedo ! un uffiziale ?— E voi, Sulpizio, 

Qui rinchiuso con lor, che fate 1 
Maria. Oh, zia ! 

Questi è quel Tonio che salvommi un giorno. 

Da certa morte — quest' è 1' amor mio. [Timida. 

Mar. Che — amor ! — che dite voi 1 
Tonio. Signora — 

Mar. Zitto ! 

Al Duca Krakentorp sposa è Maria — 
Sul. Cioè (perdonif sbaglia un po'la zia ! 

E promessa soltanto suo malgrado ; 

Ed or che Tonio capitano è fatto, 

E che la vuol, va a monte ogni contratto. 

Mar. Come, Sulpizio ? — voi — in tal guisa, voi 

Che sapete — 
Tonio. Ma, signora — 

Mar. Escite ! \A Tonio. 

Né qui osate mai pih di porre il piede — 
Tonio. [ Offeso.] Qual baldanza è la vostra ! 

V ado e tomo. Maria ; 

Sarai mia sposa al nuovo giorno. 

[A Maria, che piange e parte. 
Sul. Bravo ! 
Mar. Che dite? 

Tonio. Addio le ho detto. 

Mar. [A Maria.] Ritiratevi tosto ; invan piangete. 

Maria. Parto — ma, Tonio — * 

Mar. E quando ubbidirete 1 

* " [A tutti, due che andavan via. Maria da uno sguardo 
a Sulpizio, e parte. 
" Fermateri, Sulpizio — 
Un gran segreto confidar dovrei — 
Alla vostra onestà. Lo leggete. 



Sul. 

Maria. 

Tonio. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Sul. 

Tonio. 

Maria. 

Tonio. 

Sul. 

Sul. 

Maria, 

Tonio. 



Ort. I then— 

Sul. We understand each other. 

Cho. Let us go. 

Ort. No, do not come. 

Cho. Let us go, let us go. 

[ The Soldiers depart from Ortensio, 
g^l { All three united together again — 
Maria < ^^^^ ^ f'^vor ! what a pleasure ! 
Tomo ' t '^^^ heart can scarce sustain 

' Such unlooked-for happiness ! 
Sul. Sweet remembrances ! 
Tonio. Oh, days gone by ! 
Maria. Far from us. 
Std. They are gone. 
Tonic. But they will return. 
Sul. I hope it, in vain ; 

But past times come again for him and me, 

When near, oh, near to thee. 

C All three united together again ; 

) What a favor ! what a pleasure ! 

y The heart can scarce sustain 

C Such unlooked-for happiness ! 

You will speak for me — 

You must speak for him. 

And plead our plighted faith. 

You must not delay. 

But listen, listen at least. ♦ 

Your promise is urgent. 

He loves me immensely. 

With heart and soul. 

The plague take you and me. 

' All three united together again, 
Wliat a favor ! what a pleasure ! 
The heart can scarce sustain 
Such unlooked-for happiness. 

Enter the Marchioness. 
Mar. What do I see ? an officer ! — and you, Sulpizio, 

You here with them — what are you about ? 
Mario. Oh, aunt ! 

This is Tonio, who long ago saved me 

From certain death — this is my lover. [Timidly. 

Mar. What — love ! What do you say ! 
Tonio, . Lady — 

Mar. Be silent ! 

Maria is to the Duke of Krakenthorp betroth'd. 
Sul. This is — (your pardon) — a little mistake of her good 
aunt's ; 

She is promised only in defiance of herself; 

And, now that Tonio is made a captain, 

And that he will marry her, the contract is ended. 
Mar. What, Sulpizio ? — you — in this manner — you 

Who well know — 
Tonio. Butj signora — 

Mar. Go ! [To Tonio. 

And never dare here again to put your foot. 
Tonio. [Offended.] What presumption is yours ! 

I go, but will return, Maria ; 

You shall be my wife by break of day. 

[To Maria, who weeps. 
Sul. Bravo ! 

Mar. What say you 1 

Sul. ' I merely said " Good bye." 

Mar. [To Maria.] Withdraw immediately; you weep in 

vain. 
Maria. I go — but, Tonio — 
Mar. And when will you obey Ì 

" [To both, who are going. Maria gives a look at Sul- 
pizio, and goes. 

" Remain, Sulpizio — 

I am about to confide a great secret 

To vour discretion. Read this. 



* The Passages printed within inverted commas are not used in the Representation. 



20 



LA FIGLIA DEL KEGGIMENTO. 



"Sili. \Legge.] Educata nella mia gioventù troppo severa- 
mente, a toltami ogni via di conoscere la società — al 
primo comparir nel mondo vidi un giovane ufficiale 
— mi piacque — Io amai — partiva — e da un matrimo- 
nio clandestino n' ebbi una figlia. Ora, una mano 
celeste a me la guida ; ma, per mio rossore, pubbli- 
car non posso in faccia agli uomini, per legami di 
famiglia per inimicizie nazionali, che fui sposa — e 
qualla che ad ogni istante abbraccio — quella Maria 
che voi mi rendeste, quelle è figlia mia. 
" [La Marchesa quasi piangendo si getta a' suoi piedi. 

" Sul. Ah, signora ! — 

Disponete di me come vi piace — 

"Mar. Al Duca Krakentorp la persuadete 
A passar in isposa-^e sopra tutto 
Non svelate il mistero — 

"Sul. Yado— volo." 

Filtrano la Duchessa ed il Notare. 

Due. Mio figlio il Duca 

Occupato alla Corte, può verir, 

Ma ov' è vostra rigote ? 
Mar. Tuttora alla toilette ; 

Ma serva 'tosto. 

Entrane Maria e Sulpizio. 

Mar. Maria ! 

Maria. Cara madre ! [Piangendo. 

Mar. Oh, figlia — zitto ! 

Sid. Giudizio — [Ad entrambe sotto voce. 

Mar. Un compimento avrà la festa ! 

Maria. Deggio segnar ■? [Alla Marchesa. 

Mar. Ah ! la mia brama è questa. 

[Odesi un improvviso rumore. 

Entrano Tonio e Soldati. 

Tutti. Giusto Ciel ! quali gradi ! qual chiasso ! 
Tonio. Mi seguite, compagni. 



" Sul, [Reads.] Brought up in my youth too strictly, and 
deprived of the opportunities of mixing in society, 
at my first appearance in the world I saw a young 
officer — he pleased me — and a daughter was the off- 
spring of a clandestine marriage. Now a heavenly 
hand has brought her to me ; but shame prevents 
me revealing in the face of the world that I forgot 
family ties and national enmities — that I became a 
wife — that she whom I embrace every moment — that 
Maria, whom you restored to me, is my daughter. 
" [The Marchioness throws herself, weeping, at his feet. 

"Sul. Oh, lady! 

Dispose of me as you please. 

"Mar. Persuade her to become the wife 

Of the Duke of Krakenthorp ; and, above all, 
Do not reveal the secret. 

" Sd. I go— I fly." 

Enter the Duchess and a Notary. 

Due. My son the Duke 

Is at the court so occupied. 

That he cannot hither come. 
Mar. All things are here prepared. 

And we have been waiting for him. 

Enter Maria and Sulpizio. 

Mar. Maria. 

Maria. Dear mother. • [ Weeping. 

Mar. Oh, daughter, hush ! 

Sul. Justice. [ Whispering to both. 

Mar. The feast will be complete. 

Maria. Must I sign ? [To the Marchioness. 

Mar. Yes ! such is my wish. 

[An extraordinary noise is heard. 

Enter Tonio and Soldiers. 

All. Just Heaven ! What cries ! What a bustle ! 
Tonio. Follow me, companions. 



TI RINCORA, AMATA FIGLIA— WE HAVE COME OUR CHILD TO EREE. Chorus. 



Vivace. 




i^Éi^illiiiiiiigii^ 



Ti rin-cora a-ma - ta fig-lia; Per giovar-ti sia-mo qua, Da ogni mal la tua fa-mi-glia, Te defen-de-re sa- 
We have come our child to free; Gallant, loving fathers we; Oh,we soldiers know our duty, Never fear them, never 




^fl*ÌiÌÌ^ÌÌEÌÌlì{slS3ili 



^-^i^liiiii 



prà. Tergi il pianto,affrena il duolo : In noi fede aver puoi solo. Se ogni speme in te svari i. Per te sola ognun è qui. 
fear. Spite of velvet, silk and feather, We'll the castle leave together. Welcome to the field and tent, Daughter of the regiment. 



Tonio. 



Sul. 

Mar. 

Sul. 

Mar. 
Sul. 



La misera forzata 

Si vuol da noi salvata : 

Lei sola è il nostro bene, 

Ne trarla ad un imene, 

Ch' ella non può compir. 

Bravo, Tonio ! 

Cosa fiite ? 

Vivandiera al reggimento 

L' ha veduta e 1' adorò. 

Oh rossore ! oh avvilimento ! 

{La Marchesa in cor gelò.) 



Tonio. 



Sul. 

Mar. 

Sul. 

Mar. 
Sul. 



From certain misery 

We shall save her : 

In her alone is our happiness, 

And she shall not be forced 

Into a detested union. . 

Bravo, Tonio. 

What are you doing ? 

When suttler of our regiment, 

He saw her and adored her. 

Oh, shame ! oh, disgrace ! 

(The Marchioness is melting.) 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



ai 



QUANDO IL DESTINO— WSES I WAS LEFT. Aia. Maria. 



Andante 




zz-±i 



iiSg 



Quan-do il de - sti - no in 
When I was left, by 



mezzo a stra-gi - e - ra, 
all a - handon^d. 



Nel lor se - no fan clul - la mi get- 
Where in the death - sleep thou - sands 







to, Essi han rac - col - to 
lie, With these brave men I 



la mis - e - ria 
found pro 




mi - a, 
tec - tion 



Ei primi 
And shall 



miei cias-cun gui- 
now my friends de- 




Di-menti-carli il cor, Se non e' 
I found pro - tection, And shaU I 



Infatte ella è gen-ti - le, 
Her heart is really no-ble, 



Ne può tener sia vi-le ! 
Although by soldiers nurs'd ! 




si-sto per to-ro a 



So il ve-ro ella con-fes-sa se aper to mostra il cor. 
Such thought should surely give her a place among the first. 



Coro. A vii non può tenei-si, 

S' ella confessa il vero ; 

S' è il labbro suo sincero, 

Se mostra schietto il cor. 
Mar. (Or tutto è noto; non mi rimane che segnar.) 

Tonio. Che dirà mai ì 
Maria. Ne morirò. 
Mar. T' arresta ! 

Per me sì gran dolor — per me soltanto ? 
Altra. Cielo ! che intende dir ? 
Mar. Vieni, deh vieni ? 

Sacrificar non voglio un cor si bello. 

In me taccia 1' orgoglio, 

E quel eh' ella sceglieva, omante onesto, 

Alfin ottenga. 
Aitila. E qual è desso ? 

Mar. [Ponendo Tonio nelle braccia.di Maria.] E questo. 
Sul. Bene ? 
Maria. Tonio ! 

Tonio. Maria ! 

Sul. Brava, Signora Zia ! 

So non avessi il mustaccio 

Le darei proprio un militar abraccio. 

Coro di Donile. 
Oh, che scandalo, che errore ! 
Questo Imen fa inorridir. 
Andiam, partiam. » 



Clio. No one can think it wrong. 
That she the truth confesses : 
The bashfuhiess of her tongue 
Betokens the candor of her heart. 

Mar. (Now everything is known, 

There is nothing left to me but to sign.) 

Tonio. What will she say ? 

Maria. It will be the death of me. 

Mar. Stop ! 

Sliall I cause such wretchedness — I alone ? 

The others. Heavens, what mean you ? 

Mar. Come, oh come ! 

I will not sacrifice such a noble heart ; 
Pride is silenced within me ; 
And the one she has chosen — 
Thou, honest lover, shall obtain her. 

TTie others. And which is he ? 

Mar. [Bringing Tonio to Maria.\ TMs one. 

Sul. Good ! 

Maria. Tonio ! 

Tonio. Maria ! 

Sul. Bravo, Signora Aunt ! 

Were it not for my moustache, 
I would give you a military salale. 

Chorus of Ladies. 
What a scandal, what a horror ! 
This marriage shocks us. 
Let us go and leave them. 



IÌ3: 



y 



Tutti. 
Maria, 



LA FIGLIA DEL REGGIMENTO. 



Salvezza alla Francia 
A suoi lieti di 
Vivan le gioje 
Che amor nadri. 
Dolce tesoro, 
Han fin le pene ; 
Ah ! mal sostiene 
La gioia il cor. 
Quanto io t' adoro 
Div non saprei. 
Per me tu sei 
Un ciel d'amor. 



[A Tonio. 



Ali. Hurrah for France ! 

For all their living days 
May the joys of love 
Attend upon them. 

Maria. Dearest treasure, 

My griefs are ended ; 

An, scarcely can this head 

Its joy sustain. 

How much I love thee 

I cannot tell thee. 

For me thou art 

A heaven of love. 



[To Tomo. 



THB BND. 



'"^"^^m^^. 



•*«* 




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CONTENTS : 



Ah, I have sighed. Ah ! che la 
morte— Tenor. (Troyatore.) 

Annie Ijaurie. 

Annie Lisle. 

Angel of light. (La Favorita.) 

Be kind to the loved ones. 

Below, above. 

Bime, Bome, Bell, (Round.) 

Blanche .\lpen. 

Bobbin around. 

Bonnie Dundee. 

Cheer 1 boys, cheer. 

Child's wish. 

Come landlord.*, fiU your. 

Darling Nelly Gray. 

Dearest spot of earth to me is. 

Devotion. 

Do they mis.s me at home. 

Erin is my home. 

Ever of thee. 

Female auctioneer. 

Floating on the wind 

Gentle Uallie. 

Gentle Nettie Moore. 

Golden hiU. 

Grave of Bonapaite. 

Grandmother's lesson. 

Hearts and homes. 

Here's a health to thee, Tom 
Moore. 

Heart bowed down. (Bohe- 
mian Girl.) 

Home again. 

How so fair. (Martha.) 

I wandered by the brookside. 

I wandered by the sea-beat 

I'd offer thee this hand of mine. 

I'll pray for thee. (Lucia.) 

Indian's prayer. _ 

I'm leaving thee in sorrow. 

Jamie's on the stormy sea. 

Jane O'Malley. 

Johnny Sands. 

Juanita. 



Kitty Tyrrell. 

Last greeting. (Schubert.) 

Lilly Dale. 

Little white cottage. 

Lone starry hours. 

Lulu is our darling pride. 

Mother's vow. 

My soul is dark. 

My last cigar. 

My pretty Jane. 

Near the broken style. 

Nelly Gray. 

Not for gold or precious stones. 

Oh 1 whisper what thou feelest. 

Our flag is there. 

O summer night. (Don Pasq.) 

Our own sweet thoughts. 

Over the summer sea. (Rigo- 
letto.) 

Prison song. (Trovatole.) 

Rest, troubled heart. (Pestai.) 

Round, for three voices. 

Scenes that are brightest. Ma- 
ri tana.) 

Shells of ocean 

Speak gently. 

Strike the light guitar. 

Switzer's farewell. 

The blind girl. 

The bloom is on the rye. 

The serenade. (Schubert.) 

Then you'll rememberme. (Bo- 
hemian Girl.) 

Thou hast learned to love. 
Twas off the blue Canairies. 

Valley of Chamouni. 

Vilikins and his Dinah. 

When the swallows homeward. 

■\Vhere are the friends of my. 

Widow Machree. 

Willie's on the dark blue sea. 

Work 1 work. 

Yes. the die is cast. (Pestai.) 

Young recruit. 



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Price, Handsomely Bound in Muslin, Embossed, 
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Publi.=hed by Oliver Ditson & Co., Boston. 











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