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Full text of "The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel collection : fifty works for fifty states"

The 

Dorothy and 

Herbert Vogel 

Collection 



Fifty Works for 
Fifty States 



The 

Dorothy and 

Herbert Vogel 

Collection 



Fifty Works for 
Fifty States 



A joint initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection 

and the National Gallery of Art, with the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts .md the 

Institute of Museum and Library Services. 



This publication is produced by the 

National Endowment for the Arts, 

Washington, DC 

Editor and Production Manager: Don Ball 

Catalogue entries by Mary Lee Corlett 

Designed by Fletcher Design, Inc. /Washington, DC 

Photo Credits: 

Every effort has been made to locate copyright holders for the photographs 
reproduced in this book. Any omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions. 

Except as noted below, all artwork photography courtesy National Gallery of Art, 
Lyle Peterzell, photographer. 

Page 2: Milton Hitter 

Page 4: Lee Ewing. © 2008 Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington 

Pages 5 and 16: John Dominis 

Pages 6 and 15: Photographer unknown 

Page 8: Dorothy Alexander 

Page 10: Steve Konick 

Page 12: Nathaniel Tileson 

Page 18: John Tsantes. © National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gallery Archives 

Page: 44: Lorene Emerson. © 2008 Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, 

Washington 

In addition, the following credits apply: 

Page 36: © Richard Anuszkiewicz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 

Page 47: © Robert Watts Estate, 2008 

Page 85: © 2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 

Page 87: © 2008 Keith Sonnier / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

Pages 92 and 1 12: © Lynda Benglis/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 



Page 1 1 1 
Page 121 
Page 122 
Page 141 
Page 173 
Page 154 
Page 214 
Page 218 



© David Salle/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 

© 2000 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved 

Courtesy of the Artist and Metro Pictures 

© 2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VI$COPY, Australia 

© 2008 Richmond Burton / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

© Larry Poons/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 

© Tony Smith Estate, New York 

© Vik Muniz/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 



Cover Image: Red Cascade (1996-97) by Pat Steir, a gift to The Speed Arts 
Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. 



Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data 

The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel collection : fifty works for fifty states / 
[editor, Don Ball], 
p. cm. 

Includes bibliographical references and index. 

1. Art, American- -20th century-Catalogs. 2. Vogel, Dorothy-Art 

collections-Catalogs. 3. Vogel, Herbert-Art collections-Catalogs. 

4. Art-Private collections- -Washington (D.C.)-Catalogs. I. Ball, Don, 1964- 

N6512.D596 2008 

709.73'074753-dc22 

2008035963 

© 2008 National Endowment for the Arts 



Preface 



The National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Li- 
brary Services are proud to support this ambitious project that underscores 
the remarkable vision of two people committed to acquiring and sharing 
the art of our time. The generosity shown by Herbert and Dorothy Vogel 
in their eagerness to distribute their marvelous collection to museums in 
each state is an inspiring testament to their strong sense of public service. 
In sharing their passion for material that represents a significant period of 
art making in the United States, the Vogels are ensuring that people who 
otherwise might have limited access to works such as these will be able to 
see, study, and enjoy them. The National Endowment for the Arts is dedi- 
cated to ensuring greater access to the arts for all citizens of this country, 
and the Institute of Museum and Library Services provides resources that 
enable our nation's museums and libraries to serve their communities with 
quality programs and collections. What better way to promote our respec- 
tive missions and honor two patriotic American citizens than through the 
catalogue and Web-based learning resource for Fifty Works for Fifty States. 



Dana Gioia 

Chairman 

National Endowment for the Arts 



Anne-Imelda Radice 

Dircetor 

Institute of Museum 

and Library Serviees 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 111 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/dorothyherbertvoOOball 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Preface by Dana Gioia, NEA Chairman, and Anne-Imelda Radice, IMLS Director iii 

Foreword by Earl A. Powell, Director, National Gallery of Art vii 

A Word from Dorothy Vogel ix 

Acknowledgments xi 

Building a Collection: "Every Spare Moment of the Day" by Ruth Fine 1 

Selected Bibliography 24 

Fifty Works for Fifty States 

Alabama: Birmingham Museum of Art v 28 

Alaska: University of Alaska Museum of the North, Fairbanks 32 

Arizona: Phoenix Art Museum 36 

Arkansas: The Arkansas Arts Center, Litde Rock 40 

California: The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 44 

Colorado: Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center 48 

Connecticut: Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven 52 

Delaware: Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington 56 

Florida: Miami Art Museum 60 

Georgia: The High Museum of Art, Atlanta 64 

Hawaii: Honolulu Academy of Arts 68 

Idaho: Boise Art Museum 72 

Illinois: University Museum, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale 76 

Indiana: IMA-Indianapolis Museum of Art 80 

Iowa: Cedar Rapids Museum of Art 84 

Kansas: Spencer Museum of Art, The University of Kansas, Lawrence 88 

Kentucky: The Speed Art Museum, Louisville 92 

Louisiana: New Orleans Museum of Art ^6 

Maine: Portland Museum of Art 100 

Maryland: Academy Art Museum, Easton 104 

Massachusetts: Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge 108 

Michigan: The University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor 1 12 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • V 



Minnesota: Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, University of Mnnesota, Minneapolis 116 

Mississippi: Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson 120 

Missouri: Saint Louis Art Museum 124 

Montana: Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings 128 

Nebraska: Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha 132 

Nevada: Las Vegas Art Museum, Las Vegas 136 

New Hampshire: Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover 140 

New Jersey: Montclair Art Museum 144 

New Mexico: New Mexico Museum of Art, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe 148 

New York: Albright- Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo 152 

North Carolina: Weatherspoon Art Museum, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 156 

North Dakota: Plains Art Museum, Fargo 160 

Ohio: Akron Art Museum, Akron 164 

Oklahoma: Oklahoma City Museum of Art 168 

Oregon: Portland Art Museum 172 

Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia 176 

Rhode Island: Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence 180 

South Carolina: Columbia Museum of Art 184 

South Dakota: South Dakota Art Museum, South Dakota State University, Brookings 188 

Tennessee: Memphis Brooks Museum of Art 192 

Texas: Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin 196 

Utah: Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Utah State University, Logan 200 

Vermont: Robert Hull Fleming Museum, University of Vermont, Burlington 204 

Virginia: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond 208 

Washington: Seattle Art Museum 212 

West Virginia: Huntington Museum of Art 216 

Wisconsin: Milwaukee Art Museum 220 

Wyoming: University of Wyoming Art Museum, Laramie 224 

Artist Index 229 



VI • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Foreword 



DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL have been extremely generous donors to the 
National Gallery of Art for almost two decades. Since 1991 the Vogels have given 
or designated as promised gifts approximately 1,100 drawings, paintings, sculptures, 
photographs, prints, and illustrated books. Drawn from the extraordinary collection 
of minimal, conceptual, and post-minimal art they have been assembling for more 
than forty-five years, these gifts and promised gifts are an essential component of the 
National Gallery's holdings of contemporary art. Selections from the Vogel Collec- 
tion have been featured in two special exhibitions at the National Gallery: From Mini- 
mal to Conceptual Art: Works from the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection (1994) 
and Christo and Jeanne-Claude in the Vogel Collection (2002). Moreover the Vogels 1 
gifts play an important role in our permanent collection installations, greatly enrich- 
ing the National Gallery's representation of the art of our time. 

Dorothy and Herbert Vogel have now expanded their largesse exponentially by 
making this daring and varied resource available not only to vast museum audiences in 
the nation's capital but as well to museum visitors throughout the country. Their plan 
to donate fifty works from their collection to each of fifty art institutions in the United 
States — The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States — evolved 
during conversations between the Vogels and Ruth Fine, the National Gallery's cura- 
tor of special projects in modern art. Through this program, the Vogels are donating 
a total of 2,500 works by 177 artists. They hope their gifts will significantly enhance 
the representation of contemporary art in all regions of the country, also adding to 
the renown of those artists for whose work they have a deep and abiding respect. 

Ruth Fine has overseen the realization of the Vogels' massive undertaking, and 
Mary Lee Corlett, research associate in the department of special projects in modern 
art, has worked tirelessly on all of its organizational aspects with assistance from de- 
partment colleague Janet Blyberg. Molly Donovan, associate curator of modern and 
contemporary art, and Judith Brodie, curator of modern prints and drawings, both 
have long-standing associations with the Vogels and have been immensely helpful as 
work has progressed. 

We are associated in this undertaking with our colleagues at the National En- 

FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • vii 



dowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services 
(IMLS), whose chairman and director, Dana Gioia and Anne-Imelda Radice respec- 
tively, have joined with us to carry out the Vogels' dream. Through this catalogue, 
supported by the NEA, and the Web site (www.vogel50x50.org), supported by the 
IMLS, the collectors are able simultaneously to keep their treasures together as a 
shared presence and make them accessible to widely dispersed audiences. The Dorothy 
and Herbert Vojjel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States initiative is a model of donor 
generosity. The National Gallery of Art is delighted to be working with Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel in placing works from their landmark collection in museums through- 
out the country. 

Earl A. Powell III 

Director 

National Gallery of Art 



Vlll • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



A Word from Dorothy Vogel 



WE BEGAN COLLECTING VERY EARLY IN OUR MARRIAGE, in 1962. While 
Herb had an art background, I did not, and I learned from him. In fact, my first 
art lesson was at the National Gallery of Art when we came to Washington on our 
honeymoon. 

In 1987 we returned to the National Gallery on our twenty-fifth wedding 
anniversary, and we looked up lack Cowart, the National Gallery's head of twentieth- 
century art at the time. It was because of him we gave many works to the National 
Gallery in 1991. Since then we have had two exhibitions there: From Minimal to 
Conceptual Art: Works from the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and Christo and 
Jeanne-Claude in the Vogel Collection. Other works from our collection frequently 
have been installed as part of the museum's permanent collection. 

Over these several years when our works were being catalogued at the National 
Gallery, it became apparent that the collection is so expansive that no single museum 
would be able to research and exhibit all of it to its full potential. In order for more 
of the works to be seen and for the many facets of the collection to be most fully re- 
vealed, we realized that it would have to be divided among several institutions. With 
this Fifty Works for Fifty States project, we can bring together a huge portion of the 
collection. Although physically the works will be in fifty locations, there is the added 
bonus that they will be visible to many people, especially those who cannot travel. 
Hopefully they will enjoy the experience of looking at these works from our collection 
and will be inspired. 

Before our association with the National Gallery, we had many exhibitions from 
our collection in sixteen states, coast to coast, and four foreign countries. Because we 
have experienced the pleasure of displaying our art widely, we like the idea of continu- 
ing to share our collection throughout the United States this way. 

While this book gives an idea of the number of artists in the collection, it does 
not reflect the depth of their work, and not all of our artists are represented in the 
project. The related Fifty Works for Fifty States Web site will bring together informa- 
tion about all of the 2,500 works that have been donated to museums as part of the 
project. In addition to other works that we have given to the National Gallery of Art, 

FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • i\ 



we still have art at home, and while we are not interested in adding new artists, we 
are still collecting. 

We want to thank Earl A Powell III, director, and Alan Shestack, deputy direc- 
tor of the National Gallery, for their support of this project from the very beginning; 
Dana Gioia, chairman, and Robert Frankel, director, museum and visual arts, of the 
National Endowment for the Arts, for making this publication possible; Anne-Imelda 
Radice, director, and Marsha L. Semmel, deputy director for museums and director 
for strategic partnerships, of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, for their 
support of the shipping and transporting of the works being given to the fifty institu- 
tions, as well as the related Web site. 

Our thanks also go to Ruth Fine, National Gallery curator of special projects 
in modern art, who had the idea for this project, for all she has done to execute it. 
Mary Lee Corlett, the department's research associate, has attended to every detail, 
undertaking a tremendous amount of work which she did very accurately with loving 
care. Research assistant Janet Blyberg also has been helpful in many ways, as were two 
summer interns, Edward Puchner and Ted Gioia. We also thank Elizabeth A. Croog, 
general counsel for the National Gallery of Art; Julian Saenz, on her staff; and Jane 
Gregory Rubin, our long-time lawyer and advisor, for overseeing the legal aspects of 
these gifts. 

Others at the National Gallery with whom we personally have worked on the 
project over the years and whom we would like to thank include several members of 
the conservation staff, especially Jay Krueger (paintings), but also Shelley Sturman 
(objects), Kimberly Schenck (drawings), Connie McCabe (photographs), Julia Burke 
(textiles), and Hugh Phibbs (matting and framing); in the registrar's office, Sally Fre- 
itag, and Gary Webber, who has made many trips to our New York apartment to help 
transfer our works to Washington. Lyle Peterzell did the extraordinary photography 
for this catalogue, and we appreciate his enthusiasm for working on the project. The 
many other people at the National Gallery who contributed to the success of The 
Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project are noted in 
Mr. Powell's foreword to this book and Ms. Fine's acknowledgments. 

Most importantly, Herb and I want to dedicate this book to all the artists whose 
generosity and encouragement enabled us to assemble this collection. It is with great 
pride and pleasure that we give their works from our collection to fifty museums 
throughout the United States. 



X • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Acknowledgments 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION: Fifty Works for Fifty 
States project has evolved over several years and has drawn an enormous number of 
participants into its fold. Our greatest appreciation is to Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, 
for their generosity in sharing their collection with museum-goers throughout the 
United States, and for sharing their memories, their knowledge, their friendship, and 
their collection with all of us at the National Gallery of Art. 

We are likewise indebted to the 177 artists whose works are included in the 
gifts documented in this book. We are grateful to them for their creativity and for 
their generosity in taking the time to respond to our inquiries about their art. We owe 
extended thanks to those who were called upon many times, especially Edda Renouf, 
Pat Steir, and Richard Tuttle. We also thank the artists' dealers, estate overseers, and 
other representatives for information they have provided to us. 

At the National Endowment for the Arts, Chairman Dana Gioia suggested the 
creation of this book. His imagination and encouragement added greatly to the over- 
all success of the project, as did the support of Robert Frankel, director of museums 
and visual arts; Karen Elias, acting general counsel; and Don Ball, editor. At the In- 
stitute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Anne-Imelda Radice, director, and 
Marsha Semmel, deputy director for museums and director for strategic partnerships, 
expanded the scope of the project to include a groundbreaking Web site. We appreci- 
ate their creative input along the way, as well as the contributions of Nancy Weiss, 
IMLS general counsel. 

At the National Gallery of Art, we are grateful to Earl A. Powell III, director; 
Alan Shestack, deputy director; Elizabeth A. Croog, secretary and general counsel, 
and lulian Saenz, associate general counsel; and Dave Rada, comptroller in the trea- 
surer's office. I am immensely grateful to two of my departmental colleagues, Mary 
Lee Corlett, who facilitated every aspect of this immense project with constant dedi- 
cation and grace; and Janet Blyberg, who was called upon frequently to assist with a 
wide variety of tasks. Curatorial colleagues Judith Brodie, Carlotta Owens, Charles 
Ritchie, and Amy Johnston in the department of modern prints and drawings, and 
Molly Donovan, Veronica Betancourt, and Jennifer Roberts in the department of 

FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • XI 



modern and contemporary art worked with us at every stage of this project. 

For sharing their expertise in preservation and conservation, we thank Hugh 
Phibbs, Jay Krueger, Kimberly Schenk, Marian Dirda, Connie McCabe, Katy May, 
and Simona Cristanetti. Sally Freitag, chief registrar, has provided crucial assistance, 
along with her extraordinary staff of registrars and art handlers, particularly Susan 
Finkel, whose support in the form of computer searches and downloads was invalu- 
able, Lehua Fisher, and Gary Webber. We also thank Anne Halpern, in the depart- 
ment of curatorial records, whose assistance has also been immensely helpful. 

In the department of imaging and visual services we are grateful to Alan New- 
man and his staff, including Robert Grove, Lorene Emerson, Peter Dueker, Katherine 
Mayo, and Lyle Peterzell, who returned to the National Gallery for two months to 
photograph works in the Vogel Collection for this catalogue and for use in the Web 
site developed for the project (www.vogel50x50.org), for which oversight we are 
grateful to Joanna Champagne and John Gordy in the publishing and Web office. 
Judy Metro, editor in chief, has likewise been extremely helpful in our work, as has 
Nancy Deiss in the deputy director's office. 

And for their advice and assistance in all matters related to The Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, we are grateful to the National 
Gallery's chief information officer, Deborah Ziska, as well as staff members Anabeth 
Guthrie and Steve IConick. 

Former National Gallery of Art colleagues Jack Cowart and Laura Coyle of- 
fered memories that have aided our work, for which we are most appreciative. 

Ruth Fine 

Curator of Special Projects in Modern Art 
National Gallery of Art, Washington 



XH • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Building a Collection: 
"Every Spare Moment of the Day" 



Ruth Fine 



THE RENOWNED ART COLLECTION assembled since 1962 by Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel has been called "one of the most remarkable American collections 
formed in [the twentieth] century, one that covers most of the important develop- 
ments in contemporary art." 2 Two civil servants by profession with no independent 
financial means, the Vogels have acquired some four thousand objects, primarily 
drawings. In the early years of their collecting journey, the Vogels provided moral and 
modest financial support to a number of relatively unknown artists who subsequently 
would receive international acclaim. Among them are Robert Barry (plates 101 and 
113), Sol LeWitt (plate 186), Edda Renouf (plates 56 and 128), and Richard Tuttle 
(plates 4, 28, 38, 72, and 124), with all of whom the Vogels became close friends. By 
the 1970s, when the work of these and other artists represented in the Vogel Collec- 
tion became widely exhibited and recognized by the international art press, Dorothy 
and Herbert likewise were acknowledged for their early, prescient attention to their 
work. v 

As is the case for many collectors, the Vogels started with no intention of build- 
ing "a collection" per se, but rather to acquire works they admired, with which they 
wanted to live. The art community's awareness of the limited funds the couple could 
devote to these acquisitions brought the Vogels considerable admiration, as did their 
enthusiastic response to a range of contemporary practices, which included work many 
collectors found difficult to appreciate — new forms employing non-traditional materi- 
als such as latex, string, and Styrofoam. Most frequently referred to as collectors of 
minimal and conceptual art, the Vogels have always had a more expansive reach. They 

FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 1 




figure 1: Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel on 
their wedding day, 
January 14, 1962. 



collected art rooted in abstract expressionism, as exemplified by Michael Goldberg 
(plates 83 and 194) and Charles Clough (plates 73 and 133); innovative post-mini- 
malist approaches, as seen in the art of Richard Francisco (plates 10 and 182) and Pat 
Steir (plates 48 and 67); and diverse figurative directions, such as that embraced by 
Will Barnet (plates 57 and 165) and Mark Kostabe (plate 87), among others. 

Since 1975 a dozen exhibitions featuring various aspects of the Vogel Collection 
have been organized. They are documented in the catalogues that are recorded in this 
volume's bibliography. These exhibitions generated interest from several museums, 
eventually prodding the couple to give form to their long-standing intention to place 
their treasures in a public institution. In 1992 the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in 
Washington, DC, announced an agreement with the Vogels that established the gal- 
lery's stewardship of their collection. Since that date 1,100 paintings, objects, draw- 
ings, photographs, prints, and illustrated books have entered the NGA collection or 
have been designated as promised gifts. During this same period, owing to the Vogels 
ongoing purchases and the gifts they receive from artists, their collection has doubled 
in size from some 2,400 works originally brought to Washington, already too many 
to be reasonably placed in any one institution, to approximately 4,000 objects. Thus 
the Vogels have worked closely with NGA staff to develop The Dorothy and Herbert 
Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, a program to facilitate gifts of fifty works 
to one museum in each of the fifty United States. 3 The project has received essential 
support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and 
Library Services. 

SHAPING THE COLLECTION 

In January 1962, twenty-six-year-old Dorothy Faye Hoffman married Herbert Vo- 
gel, thirteen years her senior (figure 1). The small synagogue ceremony took place 
in Dorothy's home town of Elmira, New York, where her father was a stationary 
merchant and her mother, by then deceased, had been a homemaker. The bride had 
no particular interest in the visual arts, but rather was focused on classical music and 
theater. To this day the living stage remains a high priority for her, and, on most 
Wednesday afternoons from September through June, Dorothy is to be found in the 
vicinity of 42nd and Broadway attending a matinee. Other ongoing interests include 
watching ice skating and reading fiction, especially mysteries. By contrast, Herbert's 
deep immersion in painting and drawing already was in place at the time of their mar- 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



riage. According to Dorothy, "art is Herby's only interest, except for animals." 4 He 
immediately set out to share these twin passions with his new wife. She was an eager 
participant. 

His father a tailor, his mother a homemaker, Herbert Vogel (Herb to most 
of his friends) had grown up in Harlem, on 100th Street between 5th and Madison 
Avenues, and later on 105th Street. As an adult, he clerked for the United States 
Postal Service, assigned to several different Manhattan branches until he retired in 
1979. Starting in the mid-1950s Herb also took classes in art history at the New York 
University (NYU) Institute of Fine Arts. Among his teachers were Max Friedlander, 
Robert Goldwater, and Erwin Panofsky. These brilliant scholars provided him a his- 
torical framework for the art-based adventure he and Dorothy began during their 
honeymoon in Washington, DC, where the National Gallery of Art became the set- 
ting for her introduction to old master paintings. 

Before his marriage, Herb had frequented the early havens of the so-called 
abstract expressionists, including Greenwich Village's Cedar Tavern and the artists' 
club, and he also had journeyed to the Provincetown, Massachusetts, artists' com- 
munity. He still speaks with special warmth about his association with Franz Kline 
and David Smith. By the close of the fifties, Herb was painting nights and weekends 
in a work space he set up in the Bronx apartment where he was living in 1960 when 
he met Dorothy, a librarian for the Brooklyn Public Library system with bachelor's 
and master's degrees in library science from Syracuse University and the University of 
Denver respectively. 5 (She retired in 1990.) 

Dorothy's association with Herb introduced her to the practice of painting as 
well as the study of art history. Shortly after their marriage, the couple rented a stu- 
dio at 41 Union Square, and Dorothy, like Herb, took weekly painting and drawing 
classes at NYU. After work and on weekends they developed their budding talents as 
abstract painters. Dorothy's hard-edged style presented a strong contrast to Herb's 
colorful expressionism. In addition to the time in their studio, they devoted part of 
each weekend to prowling New York art galleries, then a far smaller world than now. 
Dorothy stated, "It was 57th Street, and then up Madison and the 70s, mainly."" 
They started with visits to venues that had been established by the end of the 1950s, 
including Grace Borgenicht, Sidney Janis, Tibor de Nag)', Betty Parsons (an artist 
herself [see plate 16]), Poindexter, Stable, and Zabriskie. But they quickly expanded 
their range and kept abreast of shows at Bykert, Leo Castelli, Paula Cooper, Virginia 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 










FIGURE 2: John 

Chamberlain, 
Untitled, 1962, 
crushed car metal on 
wood base, National 
Gallery of Art, Dorothy 
and Herbert Vogel 
Collection. 



Dwan, Rosa Esman, Fischbach, Green, OK Harris, Kornblee, and Holly Solomon. 7 
"In the beginning it was more looking than buying," Dorothy remembered. "I was 
just learning and Herby was the one who thought of perhaps buying." 8 They occa- 
sionally visit galleries today, but for the past decade the Vogels have tended to learn 
about new art and artists directly from artist friends. 

Herb made a few art purchases before he married Dorothy, among the earliest 
of which was an untitled painted wood wall piece by Giuseppi Napoli (plate 167). To 
celebrate their engagement the Vogels jointly selected one of Pablo Picasso's ceramic 
vases; and their initial purchase as a married couple, just one month after the event, was 
an untitled crushed-car metal sculpture by John Chamberlain (figure 2), now in the Na- 
tional Gallery of Art's collection. 9 Its selection marked Dorothy's first visit to an artist's 
studio. Chamberlain was far less well known than he subsequently would become, and 
in 1975 Suzanne Delehanty, then director of Philadelphia's Institute of Contemporary 



4 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Art (ICA), applauded this as a most daring acquisition for so early a date. 10 The Vogels 
installed their few purchases and Herb's paintings in the living room of what had been 
Dorothy's Brooklyn apartment, into which Herb settled after their marriage. 

Within a year, the couple moved across the East River to an interim Manhattan 
space, and by the close of 1963 they were living in the Upper East Side one-bedroom 
apartment they inhabit to this day. Two months into their marriage 
they adopted their first cat, and since have shared their lives with as 
many as seven exotic breeds simultaneously, including flame point Hi- 
malayan, Siamese, Manx, Abyssinian, and Rex. (See John Salt's Un- 
titled (Vogel Livinjj Room Drawn from Memory), 1972, plate 140.) 
Several of the cats have been named for nineteenth- and twentieth - 
century artists such as Cezanne, Renoir, and Whistler, because either 
the cat's appearance or personality reminded the Vogels of its name- 
sake's work. Their menagerie over the years also has included some twenty turtles 
from around the world and a diverse community of tropical fish (figure 3). 

From the start, the Vogels were committed to having art function as an active 
and engaging presence in their lives: "We had a lot of flexibility and we didn't buy a 
lot of big furniture that would interfere with the collection. We did not buy, for in- 
stance, mirrors [to] compete with the art work." 11 Their furniture consisted of multi- 
purpose pieces, such as a sofa constructed of flat wooden panels on and against which 
pillows would be arranged for seating. These horizontal and vertical panels also could 
function as tables and backdrops, respectively, for small sculpture; and a narrow shelf 
atop the headboard of their bed was similarly employed (figure 4). Their apartment 
essentially became an art gallery, with one wall each devoted to Dorothy and Herb's 
abstract paintings. According to Dorothy, "our obsession was really our own work, 
in addition to having our jobs. And then we just started buying other artists' work.... 
I think I got more enthused about collecting than I was about painting.... And you 
know, collecting is not easy, it's a lot of hard work, too." 12 

After about three years of dividing their weekends between studio work and 
gallery visits, Dorothy and Herb realized that practicing art required more substantial 
dedication and time than they cared to commit. They also were finding more im- 
mediate pleasure and long-term gratification in the hours they spent looking at other 
artists' work than in those they devoted to creating their own. So in 1965 the Vogels 
gave up the Union Square studio and began "[to put] together, through passion and 




figure 3: Herbert and 
Dorothy Ve/jel with 
cats, in front of fish 
and turtle tanks, 1992. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 5 




figure 4: The Voxels' bed- 
room with works by Leo 
Valledor, Gary Stephan, 
Richard Turtle, Robert 
Mangold, Alan Saret, 
Ron Gorchov, Joseph 
Kosuth, Vito Acconci, 
Joseph Beuys, and Peter 
Hutchinson, among 
others, c. 1975. 



trust in their own judgment, an extraordinary collection," to quote the artist Richard 
Nonas (plates 148 and 176). 13 

Herb's salary (and subsequently his pension) served as the couple's resource for 
art acquisitions, and Dorothy's was directed to more pedestrian living expenses like 
rent, subway fare, and food. She recendy commented that "I paid the bills and Herby 
was the mad collector who bought the art." 14 Their limited means and space mandated 
parameters for what they would buy. They learned a crushing lesson early: having ac- 
quired a vertical sculpture by Sol LeWitt, they discovered it was too tall to stand in their 
living room. They subsequendy exchanged it for a horizontal piece, Floor Structure 
Black, 1965. 15 And LeWitt made a smaller version of the vertical work for them. Draw- 
ings soon became the Vogels' focus, eventually making up approximately three-quarters 
of their collection, which in great measure is "a record of ideas rather than an assembly 
of objects," as it includes many studies for large scale and environmental works. 16 

When the Vogels started their journey they were part of a relatively small com- 
munity of people interested in looking at and collecting contemporary art, but the 
number of participants has grown radically since 1962. This becomes evident when 
comparing the occurrence of international art expositions now with then (when the 



6 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT V0GEL COLLECTION 



Venice Biennale was one of very few); and by considering the expanding number of 
art journals over these years, as well as the increase in their listings for galleries and for 
exhibition reviews. (The two journals Herb has consistently read are Art News and 
Art in America.) A primary signifier of the Vogels' prescience as collectors is their ear- 
ly passion for drawings, which were of considerably less interest to the collecting com- 
munity in 1962 than now. But even today drawings tend to appeal to a particular kind 
of collector only — one who prizes the intellectual challenges and visceral pleasures 
possible at the origins of the artistic process over a more finished presentation. 17 

Given their essential focus on drawings, the Vogels have nonetheless tried to 
acquire examples of every aspect of "their" artists' practices, works that reveal develop- 
ment over time. Martin Johnson's art, for example, is represented in the collection by 
paintings, sculptures, and works on paper that incorporate collage and photography 
(plates 86 and 142). And according to Barry, "looking through the things [the Vogels 
have] purchased over the years gives a sense of the way my work has developed. . . . They 
have many smaller, more intimate pieces — the personal things artists don't always show 
in a gallery. I like that quality and that sense of adventure.... I remember Sol LeWitt 
saying to me, T think [the Vogels] have the best collection in the country.'" 18 

The Vogels credit the directions in which their collection moved to their friend- 
ships with artists, in particular Dan Graham (plate 98) and LeWitt. For approximately 
one year around 1965, Graham managed the Daniels Gallery which Dorothy and 
Herb frequented to look at art and also to engage in conversation. Subsequent to 
the gallery's closing, the Vogels and Graham continued to get together, often sharing 
dinner. The essential subject of their discussions was the emergence of new art forms, 
especially the work of Donald Judd and Robert Morris. When the Vogels decided to 
purchase a LeWitt sculpture after the closing of his first solo show, held at Daniels in 
1965, the gallery was about to cease operation. So Graham suggested they contact the 
artist and conduct the transaction directly, which they did. LeWitt had met Herb be- 
fore, "in the late fifties. [He] was painting at the time. He was interested in seeing my 
work, so I invited him to my studio. He was then as he is now — enthusiastic. M19 The 
friendship thrived and, during the last decades of Le Witt's life, he and Herb spoke by 
telephone virtually every Saturday morning, except when the artist was abroad. Simi- 
larly Herb has maintained frequent contact, often by telephone, with several other 
artists, especially Tuttle (figure 5). The couple's collection of his art is unparalleled. 20 

The Vogels had purchased a painting by Will Insley (plate 37) from the Stable 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 7 



FIGURE 5: The Vojjfls 

with Richard Tuttle 
in bis New York studio, 
early 1980s. 






Gallery shortly before the LeWitt acquisition, but their serious collecting started with 
that August 1965 studio purchase, which also was LeWitt's first sale of his art. 21 He 
delivered the sculpture to the Vogels' apartment with the help of his artist friend, 
Robert Mangold (plate 31), who owned an automobile. Shortly thereafter he and 
Sylvia Plimack Mangold (plate 170) would be counted among the Vogels's growing 
community of artist friends. 

Dorothy and Herb love to talk directly with artists, and they often reiterate 
how these conversations are essential not only to their understanding of individu- 
als' oeuvres, but also to the expansion of their broader aesthetic appreciation and 
knowledge of the field. An avid collector himself, LeWitt's interests, like Graham's, 
were immensely influential on the Vogels, who always responded to his suggestions 
of exhibitions they should see. An important one was Seth Siegelaub's now legendary 



8 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



"January Show," where they first encountered the work of Barry, Douglas Heubler, 
Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner (plate 12 ). 22 

At the start of the seventies the Vogels gave up European travel to enlarge 
their art-buying budget. 23 They were being invited to virtually every contemporary 
art opening at New York galleries and to important museum celebrations as well. 
Always together and notably small in stature (both barely reach five feet tall), the 
Vogels were recognizable and stood out in any crowd. At times Herb delighted "in 
showing up at openings exuberently 'clashed,' as he puts it, in plaid pants and a 
houndstooth overcoat." 24 Now that Dorothy is in her early seventies and Herb in his 
mid-eighties, they have slowed down somewhat, but in their heyday of some thirty- 
five years, they went to as many as twenty-five shows a week, where they would often 
encounter artists. 

It is common for artists to work in galleries to support their creative work early 
in their careers, and in addition to Graham at Daniels, the Vogels met Lynda Benglis 
(plates 65 and 85) when she was working at Bykert, and William McWillie Chambers 
(plate 129) and Peggy Cyphers (plate 158) when they worked for Grace Borgenicht 
and John Weber, respectively. Following LeWitt, it became commonplace for artists 
to introduce their artist friends to these enthusiastic collectors; and the Vogels, of 
course, would be eager to make studio visits to those artists whose work they knew 
and admired. 25 Years after they met Nonas at his 1971 show at 1 12 Green Street, an 
alternative exhibition space, the artist reported that "[Herb] comes to visit me once 
a month, he's consistent. The collection is a real commitment for them, the works 
are their children, their pride." Nonas also mentioned the Vogels' comments as early 
as 1981 about placing their art in a public institution; he thus viewed his presence in 
the collection as "a big responsibility... [part of] a record of American art during these 
twenty years." 26 

The Vogels have focused on artists working in New York City, where studio 
visits could be an essential part of their collecting experience. 27 European and Ameri- 
can artists living elsewhere that are represented in the collection generally visited New 
York (or were briefly based there), met the Vogels and saw their collection, and subse- 
quently brought work to show them. In addition to buying works directly from artists 
and galleries, the Vogels often bid at benefit auctions supporting chanties, political 
causes, and arts organizations. 

Not intending to make a political statement of any kind, but by buying art they 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



FIGURE 6: TljC Vogeh 

'with Vat Steir in her 
New York studio, 
April 4, 2008. 




admire Dorothy and Herb have assembled an impressive collection of art by women. 28 
Edda Renouf and Pat Steir, both of whose work the couple collects in depth, have 
spoken enthusiastically about their studio visits, and the strength, in particular, of 
Herb's "eye." Renouf described first looking at her paintings with them in the 1970s 
this way: "They took their time... looking at my works with full attention [which was] 
very inspiring to me and the beginning of our long-lasting friendship based above all 
on our mutual devotion and understanding of art." 29 Steir (figure 6), who also met 
the Vogels in the 1970s, recently commented that for them collecting "became much 
more than a hobby, it is a profession. It is extraordinary they could see so well." 30 

The couple has, together, chosen everything in the collection apart from art- 
ists' gifts and occasional exceptions when Herb (the more inveterate studio visitor) 
selects a work in Dorothy's absence. Their judgment is complementary, each agreeing 
that the other is better at selecting a particular kind of art. As they describe it, the 
breakdown reflects their youthful painting styles: Herb is in the forefront when select- 
ing more flamboyant post-minimalist art, for example by Lucio Pozzi (plates 54 and 
123), with Dorothy more keen when considering work of a conceptual and minimal 
orientation, especially by LeWitt. 

Dorothy's librarian background undoubtedly nourishes her commitment to 
maintaining documentary files on artists represented in the collection (and many who 
are not). She assiduously collects and organizes exhibition announcements and clips 
journal and newspaper articles, including solo and group show reviews. Housed at 



10 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



the Archives of American Art (AAA) in Washington, DC, this rich resource is pep- 
pered with personal correspondence. 31 And in addition to postcards enhanced with 
sketches that have been accessioned by the NGA, the rest of the Vogels' postcards 
from artists are housed in the NGA Archives and currently number approximately 
160 pieces, many of which likewise are annotated with drawings. 

Dorothy and Herb's 1981 "Collection of Thoughts on the Vogel Collection" 
in the 4x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection exhibition catalogue beautifully articu- 
lates how the couple's lives are defined by their collecting: 

Collecting is not just buying art works but it is also the whole experience 
of being part of the art world. It means going to artists' studios, openings, 
galleries, and museums, and seeing, reading, talking, and thinking about art 
every spare moment of the day. It means rushing through dinner to go to an 
opening, continually filling out loan forms, clipping articles from newspapers 
and magazines for our archives, constantly meeting new people, strangers 
stopping us in the street because we met them years ago at a lecture or an 
opening, missing a movie or a play because there is no time, getting up early 
on Sunday morning because there is no time, and having to schedule super- 
market visits or else we would have no food in the house. Our life is indeed 
hectic, but we love it. We are constantly seeking new art and artists and have 
so far been able to find and collect it.... It is most gratifying to be a part of 
the art world of our time, to inspire some artists, collectors and curators. 32 

THE COLLECTION GOES PUBLIC 

Around 1970, increasing numbers of artists started asking the Vogels to see the col- 
lection. Renouf remembered that "it was immediately clear to me that for the Vogels, 
their apartment was not only for them to live in; it was for housing what was most 
essential and important in their lives — the art works. 33 Once people started visiting 
them to see the collection, they would tell others, so within a very short period of 
time, there were many visitors, who might join the Vogels for dinner, first at home, 
and then at local German or Chinese restaurants. 

Knowledge of the collection quickly spread, leading to visits from internation- 
al museum professionals — from Europe at first, particularly Belgium, Germany, and 
Holland. "When curators come from Europe they visit the Museum of Modern Art, 
the Whitney, and the Vogels' apartment," Nonas reported. 34 Despite this interest from 
foreign curators, apart from individual works, the Vogel Collection was not exhibited 
abroad until 1987 when Beyond the Picture: Works by Robert Barry, Sol LcWitt, Rob- 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 11 



figure 7: Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel at Tlie 
Clocktower with a 
drawing by Philip 
Pearlstein behind 
them, 1975. 



ert Mangold, Richard Tattle from the Collection, Dorothy & Herbert Vogel, New York, 
opened at the Kunsthalle, Bielefeld, Germany. On this side of the Adantic, however, the 
collection was brought to public view more than a decade earlier. 

From mid-April through mid-May 1975, the first Vogel Collection exhibition 
was installed in Manhattan at The Clocktower gallery (figure 7). Selections from the 
Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel initiated a Collectors of the Seventies series at 
this SoHo exhibition space sponsored by the Institute for Art and Urban Resources. 35 
According to the accompanying catalogue, the show was selected and installed by 
Dorothy and Herb. It focused on the minimal and conceptual aspects of the col- 
lection and included one work by each of forty-two artists, among them Stephen 
Antonakos (plates 49 and 185), David Rabinowitch (plate 55), and Ruth Vollmer 



! 



\ 



vfl 



•1 






mm 



• 






J 



) 



(plate 104). A statement by Alanna Heiss, the institute's president, referred to the 
Vogels as "underground figures in the New York art world for years [who] have 
been collecting brilliantly and obsessively since 1962. " 36 Later that year, a larger but 
similarly focused show, Painting, Drawing and Sculpture of the '60s and the '70s from 
the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection, organized by Philadelphia's ICA, included 
more than 200 of approximately 500 works then in the collection. Delehanty praised 
the collection in the catalogue as "an excellent educational resource for the study of 
aesthetic activities during the last decade." And in a April 21, 1975 letter to the Vo- 
gels, Jack Boulton, director of the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
to which the ICA show traveled, praised them for exemplary "scholarly stewardship 
toward building a collection." 37 

In an effort to correct the already commonly held misconception that the 
Vogel Collection consists entirely of the minimal and conceptual art included in 
The Clocktower and ICA shows, in 1977 Bret Waller, director of the University of 
Michigan Museum of Art, selected a more diverse group of artists for Works from 
the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, including, John Torreano- (plate 80) and 
Judy Rifka (plate 44), among others of a post-minimalist orientation. Nevertheless, 
even today, the public continues to associate the Vogel Collection with minimal and 
conceptual art. 

Exhibitions continued through the 1980s, including the 20th Anniversary Ex- 
hibition of the Vogel Collection, organized in 1982 by the Brainerd Art Gallery at the 
State University College of Arts and Science in Potsdam, New York. It also marked 
the twentieth anniversary of the couple's marriage, and was accompanied by a hand- 
some catalogue designed by Barry. Drawings from the Collection of Dorothy and Her- 
bert Vogel, at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 1986, celebrated the works 
on paper in the collection, and the catalogue included individual brief essays about 
every artist in the show. It was the most substantial publication about the collection 
to that date. The decade closed with From the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vo- 
gel, organized in Dorothy's hometown of Elmira in 1988 by the Arnot Art Museum, 
which traveled to four additional venues through 1989. By this time the Vogels and 
their collection had been featured in many mass media publications, including New 
York and People.™ And they were frequent participants in lecture series and panel dis- 
cussions about collecting contemporary art. 

A dramatic change to the Vogels' apartment was slowly taking place. When 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 13 



drawings that had been framed for public presentation were returned at the close 
of these several exhibitions, the sheets took up much more space than previously, 
when they we're stored unframed in folders and boxes. As the 1970s turned into the 
1980s the Vogels had no choice but to maintain part of their collection in exhibition 
shipping crates, which gradually displaced their furniture. Eventually their apartment 
was transformed from its function as an art gallery to that of an art warehouse. This 
circumstance, plus their advancing ages, caused Dorothy and Herb to think more seri- 
ously about a permanent home for their treasures. 

GIFTS TO THE NATION I: 

THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WASHINGTON H 

Over the years, major institutions such as New York's Solomon R. Guggenheim Mu- 
seum had expressed interest in acquiring the Vogel Collection. 39 The fit never seemed 
quite right to Dorothy and Herb, however, until Jack Cowart, then curator of twenti- 
eth-centurv art at the NGA, initiated a conversation about the National Gallerv's ex- 
panding representation of contemporary art. As curator at the Wadsworth Atheneum 
in the early 1970s, Cowart had followed minimal and conceptual art through LeWitt, 
Carl Andre, Morris, and Lucy Lippard, and he certainly was aware of the Vogels 
and their collection before he actually met them, probably in the late 1970s. 40 Both 
Cowart and the Vogels remember talking to each other at a Museum of Modern Art 
luncheon in the mid-1980s, around the time the museum reopened after renovation. 
Cowart suggests he first visited the Vogel's apartment around 1986. The following 
year, when they were finalizing their twenty-fifth anniversary celebration — a return 
visit to their honeymoon city — Dorothy and Herb scheduled an appointment with 
Cowart. He enthusiastically introduced them to the workings of the NGA and to col- 
leagues engaged with contemporary art. 41 Further conversations about the NGA as a 
possible home for the collection ensued. Two things that made the National Gallery 
attractive to the Vogels were the free admission to everyone at all times and a poli- 
cy against deacessioning objects (other than duplicate prints) that are accepted into 
the collection. 

When the Vogels visited the NGA in 1962, the East Building had yet to be de- 
signed. Apart from a selection of prints and drawings, contemporary artists essentially 
were represented in the NGA collection by artists of Picasso's generation. Alive, but 
quite advanced in years, their art bore no relationship to that of the young radicals the 



14 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Vogels were starting to collect. This circumstance changed 
drastically when the East Building opened in 1978, after 
which contemporary art maintained a siable place in the 
NGA's embrace. By the time the aquisition of the Vogel 
Collection was under discussion, exhibition and collecting 
practices at the National Gallery had expanded to include 
a substantial representation of art from the later twentieth 
century. Nevertheless, the Vogels' interests presented the 
potential for a massive departure from previous concerns, 
which primarily had focused on the abstract expressionist 
generation. 

As the conversation about a relationship between the 
Vogels and the NGA progressed, it became clear that it was 
not possible to view more than a small fraction of the 
collection. While paintings and drawings covered their 
apartment walls, and objects were suspended from ceilings 
and resting on every available flat surface (figure 8), much 
of the collection was buried. According to Cowart, "There 
was this mountain of wrapped art. Crates on top of crates on top of boxes. The ac- 
tual apartment had reduced itself to maybe 15 square feet. You had these tantalizing 
glimpses of things — a Donald Judd sculpture or a Michael Lucero ceramic piece." 42 
For the collection to be seen in its entirety, the art had to be transferred either to a 
warehouse or to the National Gallery itself, and the latter was determined to be the 
best solution. 

In late summer 1990, two staff members from the NGA registrar's office, Anne 
Halpern and Gary Webber, made a reconnaissance trip to the Vogels' apartment (fig- 
ure 9). They calculated that it would require five truck shipments to bring the collec- 
tion to Washington — and it did. 43 More than 2,400 works of art were transferred in 
September and October, followed by many months of intense activity on the part of 
Cowart and several assistants — as well as staff from multiple departments — working 
to unpack, check in, and provide museum-appropriate housing for the collection. The 
Vogels traveled back and forth from New York to provide assistance and information. 
Laura Coyle, then a member of the twentieth-century art department's staff, remem- 
bered how the experience "made me realize that passion, commitment, vision, and 




figure 8: Entrance to 
the Vogel apartment, 
c. 1975, with works 
on display at left (top 
to bottom) by Rich- 
ard Tattle, Richard 
Artschwajjcr, Mark 
DeSiirero, and Christo; 
a work by Judy Rifka is 
on the door. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 15 



figure 9: Gary Webber 
packing art for 
transfer from the 
Vogel apartment to 
Washington, 1992; 
the collectors are looking 
on, with Jack Cowart 
and associate in 
background. 




the ability to set priorities and make sacrifices are more important than wealth when 
it comes to building an art collection. Though it never hurts to have money also." 44 
Once the art was properly stored in Washington, it was reviewed by everyone involved 
in NGA collection-building decisions: curatorial staff; J. Carter Brown and Roger 
Mandell, director and deputy-director at the time; and eventually the trustees. 

J. Carter Brown heralded the National Gallery's relationship with the Vogels at 
a National Press Club lunch on January 7, 1992, and the acquisition was included in 
a press release two days later. Through gift and partial purchase (the former far out- 
weighing the latter) the NGA had acquired from Dorothy and Herbert Vogel 214 
works by Andre, Richard Artschwager, Benglis, John Cage, Christo, Judd, LeWitt, 
Robert Mangold, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Joel Shapiro, and Tuttle, and had entered 
into an agreement that made other works available to the National Gallery. Given the 
understanding that the collection was too large ever to be accessioned in its entirety, 
conversations ensued about placing portions of the VogePs art with other institutions. 

The first Vogel Collection exhibition in Washington was organized by Mark 
Rosenthal (who had succeeded Cowart as curator of twentieth-century art), his as- 
sociate Molly Donovan, and the present writer. On view in 1994, From Minimal to 
Conceptual Art: Works from the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection highlighted what 
had remained the best-known aspects of the collection (figure 10). In 2002 Donovan 
organized Christo and Jeanne-Claude in the Vogel Collection. And over the years, many 
works acquired from the Vogels have been installed in the East Building's perma- 



16 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



nent collection galleries, including LeWitt's Wall Drawing No. 681C. A wall divided 
vertically into four equal squares separated and bordered by black bands. Within each 
square, bands in one of four directions, each with color ink washes superimposed., which 
has been on view at the entrance to the auditorium almost without interruption since 
1993. 45 According to Donovan, "The Vogel Collection not only deepened our hold- 
ings of numerous artists' work, but greatly expanded our relationships with those art- 
ists as well. In countless cases the National Gallery has built strong ties to the artists 
in the Vogel Collection as a direct result of the Vogels' beneficence." 46 

The NGA worked closely with other institutions both on individual loan re- 
quests, and in support of exhibitions drawn entirely from the Vogel Collection, such 
as The Poetry of Form: Richard Tattle's Drawings from the Vogel Collection (1992), 
which opened at the Institute Valenciano de Arte Moderno, Valencia, Spain, was on 
view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (1993), and traveled to the Museum of Fine 
Art, Santa Fe ( 1995). Women Artists in the Vogel Collection ( 1998) was organized by 
Brenau University in Gainesville, Georgia. Both of these exhibitions combined works 
that are part of the National Gallery's holdings and those that remained on deposit, 

9 

now to be part of the Fifty Works for Fifty States program. 

Dorothy and Herb continue to travel to Washington twice a year to meet with 
NGA staff about a melange of issues related to the collection, including conservation 
discussions — primarily with Jay Krueger, senior conservator of modern paintings — 
and oral history interviews that will be housed in the National Gallery Archives. Be- 
fore each trip they send a list of works from their collection that they would like to see 
during their stay, what has become Dorothy and Herb's way to visit works they think 
of as "old friends." Their recent acquisitions are brought from New York to the NGA 
on a periodic basis. By the close of 2007, a total of 1,100 works had been acquired by 
the NGA or designated as promised gifts, and plans for The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel 
Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States were in place. 

GIFTS TO THE NATION PART II: 

THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION: 

FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES 

As the twentieth century turned into the twenty-first and the Vogel Collection had 
reached a critical mass of some 4,000 works, Dorothy and Herb were ready to final- 
ize plans for donations to additional museums. A broadly based philanthropic effort 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



17 




figure 10: The Vogels at 
the opening reception 
o/Trom Minimal to 
Conceptual Art: Works 
from the Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel 
Collection, May 25, 
1994. 



seemed best, one that would offer opportunities for works by the 
artists they admire to be seen on a regular basis throughout the 
country. Their decision was to donate fifty works ( many of which 
consist of multiple parts) to the permanent collections of one in- 
stitution in each of the nation's fifty states. Tided TJje Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States, the project 
provides for a total donation of 2,500 drawings, paintings, ob- 
jects, prints, and photographs by 177 artists. 
The Vogels' plan is modeled on Samuel H. Kress's vision of making his entire 
collection of old master paintings and sculptures available to the public, for which 
purpose the Kress Foundation was chartered in 1929. When the NGA opened in 
1941, 375 paintings and 18 sculptures from the Kress Collection were on view. Like 
the Vogel Collection, the Kress Collection continued to grow, and by 1961 when the 
Kress Foundation's gifts were completed, paintings and sculptures had been distrib- 
uted to forty-four institutions throughout the United States, including twenty-three 
colleges and universities, plus the NGA. 47 The Vogels hope their national program 
will enable museums to exhibit work by contemporary artists they otherwise might 
not have been able to acquire, just as the Kress Foundation's gifts enables them to 
showcase earlier masters. 

Dorothy and Herb used a range of personal criteria to determine institutions 
to which they would offer gifts. Some had exhibited aspects of the collection or had 
invited the Vogels as speakers; others were staffed by professionals the couple had 
worked with over the years, or were in cities that had meaning to one or the other 
of them, like Buffalo, where Dorothy earned her bachelor's degree. For some states 
they based their decisions on research that identified institutions with a demonstrated 
interest in contemporary art. 

The enthusiasm of Dana Gioia, NEA chairman, generated the idea for this publica- 
tion, and Anne-Imelda Radice, director of the IMLS, with equal vigor, offered to 
fund the dissemination costs of the project. 48 Radice also suggested the development 
with IMLS support of a groundbreaking educational Web site to document the proj- 
ect: www.vogel50x50.org. The site links the fifty institutions across the country in 
a major collaborative undertaking that at the outset echoes the content of this book. 
But each institution will have the option over time to expand its segment of the site, 
adding new data about the works in its gift. In that way the site eventually will be able 



18 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



to carry a complete record of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for 
Fifty States initiative. 

"Insight, Persistence & Daring: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Story" is the 
apt title of a recent piece about the Vogels 1 collecting practice. 49 But a more rigorous 
version of that story is told in a feature-length documentary film, Herb and Dorothy, 
produced and directed by Megumi Sasaki, that is in its final production stage as this 
book goes to press."' Any full description of the couple must convey their capacity for 
friendship. It is apparent from the many works of art they have received as gifts from 
artists to mark birthdays, anniversaries, and other special events, many of them bear- 
ing affectionate inscriptions. Friendships are further documented in the Vogel Collec- 
tion archives at the AAA and the NGA, where letters, notes, and postcards from artists 
and their spouses (and occasionally their children) mention wonderful dinner parties 
at the couple's apartment, thank them for their support, and report on the writers' 
travels, often emphasizing art they encountered that particularly excited them. All of 
this, taken together, offers a picture of Dorothy and Herb as a gregarious couple who 
embrace artists and their clans as family. 

9 

The Vogels' warm and daring modus operandi is also apparent to viewers of the 
collection who have never actually met Dorothy or Herb, like Lyle Peterzell, who 
photographed the art for this volume. He commented: 

I was only vaguely aware of the Vogel's as major modern collectors... going 
into this project. I don't think anything could have prepared me for the va- 
riety and intensity of the art.... It became apparent after a few days of shoot- 
ing that the pieces were having an impact on me.... the common thread 
seemed to be that, although these were serious works of art, they came from 
a free-spirited, calm, and joyful place. It was hard to not feel good just being 
around them, and leave feeling uplifted at the end of the day. 51 

Long admired for the distinctive nature of the collection they assembled over forty- 
five years, and for their many supportive efforts on behalf of artists, Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel were counted among the world's top art collectors in several Art 
Newsarmual listings, and they are included in James Stourton's recent text, Great Col- 
lectors of our Time: Art Collecting Since 1945. S2 Tlje Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collec- 
tion: Fifty Works for Fifty States is an initiative of creative generosity that undoubtedly 
would also place the Vogels on any proposed list of the world's top art benefactors, 
celebrated and influential participants in the arena of contemporary art. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 19 



POSTSCRIPT 

The National Gallery of Art's April 2008 press release about The Dorothy and Herbert 
Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States listed the first ten museums to which the 
Vogels were making donations from their collection. Its publication in the art press 
immediately generated a flurry of requests from museum staff throughout the coun- 
try, eager to become part of the project. By then, however, the Vogels already had 
determined the additional forty institutions, but had yet to contact them, engaged 
as they were in the process of finalizing object lists to include in the letters offering 
their gift. 

As this book goes to press all fifty' institutions have accepted the Vogels' gener- 
ous gift offer and the distribution of the works of art to museums is underway. Ex- 
hibitions including these gifts are planned, selectively in upcoming shows of recent 
acquisitions (in advance of exhibiting the gift as a whole), as well as in special exhibi- 
tions featuring the entire gift. "Sharing it Out" by Louise Nicholson in the July 2008 
issue of Apollo quotes Dorothy summing up the Fifty Works for Fifty States project as 
"50 different entities but still our collection, brought together by a website." 53 And 
also this book. Reinforcing the connectedness of the collection, communications al- 
ready are taking place between recipient museums; and curatorial staff are in contact 
with artists whose work is included in the collection, eager to learn more about the 
art they received. Thus, the vision of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty 
Works for Fifty States project as a way of keeping the Vogel Collection together while 
also sharing it throughout the country is taking shape. 

Additionally, Herb and Dorothy, the 85-minute documentary film directed by 
Sasaki, which includes lengthy interviews with the couple and several of their artist- 
friends, was previewed in June 2008 at the Silverdocs film festival in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. Following two showings (one in a packed 400-seat auditorium), the film 
received the Audience Award for the festival's most popular feature-length presenta- 
tion. Dorothy and Herb, who attended the festivities, were given standing ovations 
from the audiences at the end of each viewing. Sasaki closed the film with an an- 
nouncement of The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States 
project, sparking questions and comments during the discussion periods following 
the viewings that were equally attentive to the couple's generous gifts to museums 
throughout the country as they were to Sasaki's extraordinarily warm and cogent 
rendition of the Vogels' focused life as collectors. 



20 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



NOTES 

1 The title quotation is from Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, "A Collection of Thoughts on the 
Vogel Collection, " 4x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection [exh. cat.:William Paterson College 
Ben Shahn Gallery] (Wayne, New Jersey, 1981 ), unpaginated. Typographical errors and 
misspellings in the published text have been corrected with approval from the Vogels. 

2 Edward J. Sozanski, "The Simple Collectors," The Philadelphia Inquirer (July 26, 1994), El. 

3 Edward Wyatt, "An Art Donor Opts to Hold on to His Collection," The New York Times 
(January 8, 2008), Bl, reports that Eli Broad announced his intention to maintain his collection 
in a foundation that will make loans to museums, preferring the works be on view in a range of 
institutions rather than owned by and held in storage at one. The Vogels 1 goal is similar, but they 
hope to achieve it by placing ownership and responsibility for the art in the hands of multiple 
institutions. 

4 Dorothy Vogel in a tape-recorded interview by the author on January 29, 2001. An interview 
with Herbert also was made that day. The Vogels describe this as the first time each of them was 
interviewed individually. Additional individual interviews were recorded on June 20, 2001, along 
with a joint interview on June 2, 2003, for the National Gallery of Art Archives Oral History 
Program. Subsequent endnotes reference these interviews as DV followed by the interview date. 
Other data in this essay is based on conversations with one or both of the Vogels over the past 
eighteen years, in person, by telephone, and via e-mail. The accuracy of my memory and undated 
notes have been confirmed by the collectors. 

5 The Vogels met at a social for vacationers at Tamiment, a resort in the Pocono Mountains thaj 
Dorothy had visited. Herb had not, but he read about the event in the New York Post and thought 
it would be a good place to meet people. He was right. 

6 DV, June 20,2001. 

' In addition to those identified in the text by their eponymous gallery names, Klauss Kertess, 
director of Bykert Gallery from 1968 through 1975, and Richard Bellamy at Green Gallery were 
helpful and influential in these early years of the Vogels' collecting. 

8 DV, e-mail to author, April 14, 2008. 

9 Accession number 2007.6.96. 

10 Suzanne Delehanty, "Foreword," Painting, Drawing and Sculpture of the '60s and the '70s from 
the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection [exh. cat., Institute of Contemporary Art, University of 
Pennsylvania]( Philadelphia, 1975), 3. 

11 DV, June 20,2001. 

12 DV, June 20,2001. 

13 Nonas in 4.x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection. 

14 DV, telephone conversation with author, April 1 1, 2008. 
is Accession number 1991.241.53. 

16 Delahanty, Foreword, 4. 

17 Werner H. and Sarah-Ann Kramarsky formed a major drawings collection during a similar 
time frame as the Vogels. They, too, have donated or promised much of it to museums. See 
Amy Eshoo, ed. 560 Broadway: A New York. Drawings Collection at Work, 1991-2006, New York, 
New Haven, and London, 2008. Kramarsky's Fifth Floor Foundation is establishing a Web site- 
highlighting the importance of drawings: www.aboutdrawing.org. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 21 



18 Barrv in 4x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection, unpaginated. 

19 LeWitt in 4 x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection, unpaginated. 

20 The Vogels gifts of Tuttle's art to the NGA number almost 300 works, and they are donating 
multiple works by him to every museum in the Fifty Works for Fifty States project. 

21 It was an untitled sculpture, painted gold. LeWitt later asked the Vogels to exchange it for a 
more recent work (described earlier, which would not stand up in their apartment). They have 
since regretted agreeing to that exchange, all the more so because LeWitt eventually destroyed the 
gold-painted work. 

22 The show was held at 1 100 Madison Avenue from January 5-31, 1969. There is a catalogue. 

23 They traveled abroad for pleasure in 1963, 1965, and 1970, devoting much of their time to 
museum visits. Subsequently all of their travel to Europe was related to exhibitions drawn from 
their collection and Tuttle's solo shows. 

24 Sara Rimer, "•Collecting Priceless Art, Just for the Love of It," The New York Times (February 
11, 1992). 

25 The Vogels report that they do not make studio visits to artists whose work is unknown to 
them, thereby avoiding encounters in which they find the work to be of no interest. 

26 Nonas in 4 x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection, unpaginated. 

27 Some artists who prefer collectors not visit their studios requested anonymity in reporting that 
this circumstance essentially ended their association with the Vogels. 

28 See Women Artists in the Vogel Collection (exh. cat., Brenau University) [Gainesville 1998]. 
2y Renouf, e-mail to author, January 15, 2008. 

30 Quoted by Jacqueline Trescott in "Avant-Garde Art Collection to Be Split Among All 50 
States," The Washington Post (April 11, 2008), C4. 

31 The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 
(AAA) include personal letters and published materials related to most artists represented in the 
collection and others who are not. 

32 Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, "A Collection of Thoughts on the Vogel Collection," in 4 x 7 
Selections from the Vogel Collection, unpaginated. 

33 Renouf, letter to author, January 15, 2008. 

34 Nonas in 4 x 7 Selections from the Vogel Collection, unpaginated. 

35 The Clocktower gallery opened in 1973 in the penthouse of the old New York Life Insurance 
Building at 346 Broadway, between Leonard and Lafayette Streets. Several artists the Vogels 
admired had solo exhibitions there prior to the exhibition from their collection. The couple's 
advocacy for artists whose work they collect has included their insistence that exhibitions from 
their collection be documented by publications, however modest, to make the artists better 
known . 

36 The title page of the exhibition checklist describes Collectors of the Seventies as "A series of 
presentations about collectors of contemporary art." Heiss' introductory statement describes 
the project as illustrating "a diverse approach to collecting, from buying drawings to sponsoring 
projects." 

7 Vogel Papers, AAA. Other exhibitions mentioned in this essay also traveled beyond the 
organizing institution as recorded in the bibliography. 



22 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



38 Anthony Haden-Guest, "A New Art-World Legend: Good- by, Bob and Ethel; Hullo, Dorothy 
and Herb!" New York (April 28, 1975), 46-48; and Harriet Shapiro, "Using Modest Means, the 
Vogels Build a Major Collection," People (September 8, 1986), 59-65. 

39 In an October 26, 1976 letter, Thomas M. Messer, the Guggenheim's director, makes mention 
of tentative discussions regarding the possibility of the collection eventually coming to that 
museum, Vogel Papers, AAA. 

40 Cowart, e-mail to author, January 5, 2008. 

41 In a November 11, 1986 note in the Vogel Papers, AAA, Cowart suggests several January dates 
that would work for a visit to the National Gallery. This writer met the Vogels during this visit. 

42 Rimer, 1992. 

43 Works were brought to Washington by Atlantic Storage on September 5, 11, 12, 18, and 
October 17. We are grateful to the detailed notes and splendid memory of Anne Halpern for data 
related to the transfer. Mary Suzor was the National Gallery's acting chief registrar at the time. 

44 Coyle, e-mail to author, April 15, 2008. 

45 Accession number 1993.41.1 

46 Donovan e-mail to author, April 13, 2008 

47 I am grateful to Maygene Daniels, chief of National Gallery Archives, for providing data about 
the Foundation's gifts. 

48 Robert Frankel, director of museums and visual arts at the NEA, and Marsha Semmel, deputy 
director for museums and director for strategic partnerships at the IMLS, orchestrated the project 
for their agencies. 

49 The segment is in Estelle Ellis, Caroline Seebohm, and Christopher Simon Sykes, At Home 
with Art: How Art Lovers Live with and Care for their Treasures (New York, 1999), 80-83. In 
Emily Hall Tremaine: Collector on the Cusp (Meriden, Connecticut, and Hanover, New 
Hampshire, 2001), 2, Kathleen L. Housley names "great collectors of modern and contemporary 
art" of the Tremaines' generation: "Peggy Guggenheim, several members of the Rockefeller 
familv, Raymond and Patsy Nasher, John and Dominique de Menil, Herbert and Dorothy Vogel, 
Stanley Marsh, Edgar Kaufman, Victor and Sally Ganz, and Robert and Ethel Scull." 

50 Herb and Dorothy premiered at SILVERDOCS Film Festival, June 16-23, 2008, Silver Spring, 

Maryland. 

51 Peterzell, e-mail to author, April 18, 2008. 

52 London, 2007, 156-158, under the category "New York Modernists" which also includes 
Victor and Sally Ganz and Agnes Gund. 

53 Louise Nicholson, "Sharing It Out," Apollo 168 (July/August 2008), 56-59. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 23 



HERBERT AND DOROTHY VOGEL: SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Books and Articles 

'The ARTnews 200. [The World's 200 Top Collectors]" ARTnnvs95 (Summer 1996), 
122. 

Barnett, Catherine. "A Package Deal: With Very Little Money But Lots of 
Determination, The Vogels Have Put Together an Incredible Collection of Art." 
Art & Antiques (Summer 1986), 39-41. 

Berman, Avis. "Papers and Documents Received." Archives of American Art Journal A2 
no. 1/2(2002), 50-5. 

Cembalest, Robin. "We're Giving It to the Whole Country." ARTnews 91 (March 
1992), 34-5. 

Cox, Meg. "Postal Clerk and Wife Amass Art Collection in New York Flat." Wall Street 
Journal, January 30, 1986, 1, 20. 

D'Arcy, David. "The Unlikely Medici: A Pair of Art Fans Assemble What May Be the 
'Premier Collection' of Its Type." Los Angeles Times, January 16, 1992, Fl, F8, F9. 

Donovan, Molly. "Minimal to Conceptual: The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel 
Collection." American Art Review 6 (October-November 1994). 

Ellis, Estelle, Caroline Seebohm, Christopher Simon Sykes. "Insight, Persistence & 
Daring: The Dorothy & Herbert Vogel Story." In At Home with Art: How Art Lovers 
Live with and Care for Their Treasures. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 1999, 
80-83. 

Flack, Michael. "The Vogel Collection: A Sense of Ordered Purposefulness." Drawing 
18 (Spring 1997), 97-100. 

Gardner, Paul. "Look! It's the Vogels!" ARTnews 3 (March 1979), 84-88. 

Gardner, Paul. "Mesmerized by Minimalism." Contemporanea — International Art 
Magazine 9 (December 1989), 56-61. 

Gardner, Paul. "An Extraordinary Gift of Art from Ordinary People." Smithsonian 7 
(October 1992), 124-26, 128, 130, 132. 

Gardner, Paul. "Good Hands, Good Eyes." ARTnews96 (December 1997), 26. 

Haden-Guest, Anthony. "A New Art-World Legend: Good-by, Bob and Ethel; Hullo, 
Dorothy and Herb!" New York (April 28, 1975), 46-48. 

Hemphill, Chris. "The Vogels: Minimal Collectors." Interview 5 (May 1974), 19. 

Lewis, Jo Ann. "National Gallery's Cache Advantage: Vogels Promise Vanguard 
Collection." The Washington Post, January 8, 1992, CI, C3. 



24 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Mandell, Jonathan. "Maximum Minimalism." New York Newsday: Part II, January 23, 
1992,60,61,89. 

Rimer, Sara. "Collecting Priceless Art, Just for the Love of It." New York Times, 
February 11, 1992,A1,B4. 

Ryan, Michael. "Trust Your Eye." Parade Magazine (April 12, 2002 ), 10-11. 

Shapiro, Harriet. "Using Modest Means, die Vogels Build a Major Collection." People 
(Septcmber8, 1986), 59-65. 

Simmons, Kenna. "The Collective Eye." Horizon 8 (October 1988), 14-16. 

Stourton, James. "Dorothy and Herb Vogel." In Great Collectors of Our Time: Art 
Collecting Since 1945. London: Scala Publishers Ltd., 2007, 156-58. 

Vogel, Carol. "National is Pledged 2,000-Work Collection." New York Times, January 8, 
1992, C13. 



Exhibition Catalogues 

4 X 7: Selections from the Vogel Collection. Ben Shahn Gallery, William Paterson College, 
Wayne, New Jersey, October 10 - November 11, 1981. 

20th Anniversary Exhibition of the Vogel Collection. Brainerd Art Gallery, State Univer- 
sity, College of Arts and Science, Potsdam, New York, October 1 - December 1, 1982: 
Gallery of Art, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, [erroneously published as 
Cedar Rapids] Iowa, April 5 - May 5, 1983. 

Beyond the Picture: Works by Robert Barry, Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold, Richard Tuttle 
from the collection Dorothy & Herbert Vogel, New York. Kunsthalle Bielefeld, May 3 - 
July 5, 1987. 

Christo and Jeanne-Claude in the Vogel Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
February 3 - June 23, 2002. Essay by Molly Donovan. 

Drawings from the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, Department Art Galleries, 
The University of Arkansas at Little Rock, September 7 - November 16, 1986; The 
University of Alabama Moody Gallery of Art, University, February 2 - February 27, 
1987; The Pennsylvania State University Museum of Art, University Park, March 
15 -May 10, 1987. 

From the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, Arnot Art Museum, Elmira, October 
15 - December 31, 1988; Grand Rapids Art Museum, January 27 - March 19, 1989; 
Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago, April 8 - June 4, 1989; Laumeier Sculpture 
Park, St. Louis, June 18 - August 13, 1989; Art Museum at Florida International 
University, Miami, September 15 - November 10, 1989. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 25 



From Minimal to Conceptual Art: Works from The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection. 
National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 29 - November 27, 1994. With Essay by 
John T. Paoletti. Interview with the Vogels by Ruth Fine. 

Painting, Drawing and Sculpture of the '60s and the '70s from the Dorothy and 
Herbert Vogel Collection. Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, October 7 - November 18, 1975; The Contemporary Arts Center, 
Cincinnati, December 17, 1975 - February 15, 1976. 

Tlje Poetry of Form: Richard Tuttle, Drawings from the Vogel Collection. Institute 
Valenciano de Arte Moderno, June 25 - August 30, 1992 and at the Indianapolis 
Museum of Art, October 2 - November 21, 1993. [traveled to Museum of Fine Arts, 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1995] 

Selections from the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel, The Clocktower, The 
Institute for Art and Urban Resources, New York, April 19 - May 17, 1975. (Part I 
of "Collectors of the Seventies: A Series of Presentations about Collectors of 
Contemporary Art.") 

Women Artists in the Vogel Collection. Brenau University, Gainesville, Georgia, February 
5 - April 5, 1998. With Essays by Molly Donovan and Ruth Fine. 

Works from the Collection of Dorothy and Herbert Vogel. The University of Michigan 
Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, November 11, 1977 - January 1, 1978. 



26 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



Fifty Works for 
Fifty States 



Museum Gifts 



NOTE TO THE READER 

Listings of museum gifts are organized in alphabetical 
order by state. 

The following information is supplied for each 
museum section: 

1 . An alphabetical list of the artists whose work is 
included in that state's gift 

2. Illustrations of four works from each gift accompanied 
by basic catalogue information as known: 

• artist's name 

• artist's nationality, dates 

• object title, date 

• medium 

• size in inches, height before width before depth 

At least one work is illustrated by every artist 
represented in the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel 
Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States initiative. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 27 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham Museum of Art 

BIRMINGHAM 

ERIC AMOUYAL • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD • ALLAN MCCOLLUM 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • DAVID RABINOWITCH • DAVID REED • EDDA RENOUF 
RICHARD STANKIEWICZ • DARYL TRIVIERI 




PLATE 1 

Eric Amouyal 

Israeli, born 1962 
Seeds: New York #2, 1998 
acrylic on canvas 
17 1/16x15 1/8 in. 



28 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 2 

Allan McCollum 

American, born 1944 

For Presentation and Display: 
Ideal Setting by Louise Lawler and 
Allan McCollum, 1984 

black and white photographic print on . 
Kodak paper 

10x8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 29 



PLATE 3 

Richard Stankiewicz 

American, 1922 - 1983 
Untitled, n.d. 

welded found metal objects, with rust 
17 1/2x17 1/2x11 in. 




t - 



•'4 





PLATE 4 

Richard Tuttle 

American, born 1941 
Ball Drawing, 1969 

graphite on paper 
11 7/8x8 7/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 31 



ALASKA 

University of Alaska Museum of the North 

FAIRBANKS 

ROBERT BARRY • ANN CHERNOW • CHARLES CLOUGH • JOEL FISHER • RICHARD FRANCISCO 

DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • STEWART HITCH • PATRICK IRELAND (BRIAN O'DOHERTY) • BILL JENSEN 

STEPHEN KALTENBACH • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN 

MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 

JUDITH SHEA • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 



PLATE 5 

Ann Chernow 

American, born 1936 

I Get Along Without You 
Very Well, 1979 

lithograph on paper 
edition: 34/75 

27 3/8 x 21 in. 




32 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 6 

Stewart Hitch 

American, 1940-2002 
Schenevus, 1982 
oil on canvas 
36 x 30 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 33 




H HF>&V C>iRTHOA>/+toeirJY MORE re HE/?G FRO^i B^jg^^fi *<v,o B*?>aN/f>#rR"J<; 



P. i. "AiA«.i_ 



PLATE 7 

Patrick Ireland (1972 - 2008) 
aka Brian O'Doherty 

American, born 1934 

Untitled, 2002 

dored ink with press type and graphite on paper 
11 15/16X9 in. 



34 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 8 

Lori Taschler 

American, born 1959 

Untitled, 1984 

oil on canvas with painted wood frame 

14 x 14 in. 

frame: 15 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 35 



ARIZONA 

Phoenix Art Museum 



PHOENIX 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS 
LOREN CALAWAY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON 
STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD 
ANDY MANN • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • DAVID REED • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • LAWRENCE WEINER 




PLATE 9 

Richard Anuszkiewicz 

American, born 1930 

Temple of Red with 
Orange, 1983 

acrylic on wood panel 

I 31 x23in. 



36 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 1 

Richard Francisco 

American, born 1942 
Studio Garden, 1976 

paint, balsa wood, canvas, glue, string 
in a wood, glass-covered box 

13x18 1/4x3 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 37 




PLATE 1 1 

Andy Mann 

American, 1949-2001 
X Matrix, 1975 
ink on paper 

11 x 13 15/16 in. 



38 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 







PLATE 12 

Lawrence Weiner 

American, born 1940 
Paris^ 1963 

gouache, ink, and graphite on torn 
portion ofmanila envelope 

6 1/4 x 5 1/4 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 39 



ARKANSAS 

The Arkansas Arts Center 



LITTLE ROCK 

WILLIAM ANASTASI • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) 
CHARLES CLOUGH • ROBERT DURAN • RICHARD FRANCISCO • CHARLES GAINES • MICHAEL GOLDBERG 
JENE HIGHSTEIN • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE 
MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD • RICHARD NONAS • BETTY PARSONS • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 13 

William Anastasi 

American, born 1933 
Subway Drawing, 1978 
graphite on paper 
9 1/16x12 1/4 in. 



40 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 14 

Robert Duran 

American, born 1938 
Untitled, 1970 
watercolor on paper 

8 7/8x11 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 41 








*t*»iiM4>4 



■ 




PLATE 15 

Charles Gaines 

American, born 1944 

Walnut Tree Orchard Set L, 1976 

one black and white photograph, drymounted, 
and two drawings in ink on paper 

photo: 19 7/8x15 7/8 in. 
photo mount: 21 7/8 x 18 in. 
each drawing: 22 x 17 15/16 in. 



42 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



PLATE 16 

Betty Parsons 

American, 1900- 1982 
Brush Up, 1974 

paint on weathered wood construction 

26 x 21 3/8 x 1 3/8 in. 




FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 43 



CALIFORNIA 

The Museum of Contemporary 
Art, Los Angeles 

LOS ANGELES 

WILLIAM ANASTASI • CARL ANDRE • STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS 
CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DAN GRAHAM • JOAN JONAS 
STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • MICHAEL LUCERO • RICHARD NONAS • NAM JUNE PAIK • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • ALAN SARET • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 



p : 




-i— 

















1 












— I— 














— i 
i 




















UE 


i 




4 *Vt«nn> 


t 





PLATE 17 

Carl Andre 

American, born 1935 
Untitled, n.d. 

ink (rubber stamp) on paper 
8 1/2x8 9/16 in. 



44 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




/ 






' 






; 



■--'; 
. 









V »EHL- 



.*,^ 



/ 











PLATE 18 

Joan Jonas 

American, born 1936 

Dojj/Dccoy, L996 

oil pastel on paper 
16 3/8 x 11 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 45 




PLATE 19 

Daryl Trivieri 

American, born 1957 

Portrait of Herb and Dorothy, 1988 
acrylic on canvas 
22 1/4x22 3/8 in. 



46 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 20 

Robert Marshall Watts 

American, 1923- 1988 

Untitled (Assorted Eggs from American 
Supermarket), 1964 

six chrome-plated and flocked eggs 

each: 2 1/4x13/4 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



47 



COLORADO 

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center 

COLORADO SPRINGS 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LOREN CALAWAY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • ADAM FUSS • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE 
MICHAEL LUCERO • SYLVIA PLIMACK MANGOLD • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 21 

Michael Clark 

American, born 1946 
Dorothy, 1983-1985 

construction, acrylic on wood, 
mirror, with collage 

13 1/4x13 1/4x2 in. 



48 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 22 

Adam Fuss 

British, born 1961 
Untitled, 1997 

manipulated photograph 
edition: 61/100 

10x12 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 49 




PLATE 23 

Don Hazlitt 

American, born 1948 

Sunset 1989 

mixed media on board with painted frame 

20 x 20 3/4 in. 



50 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 24 

Michael Lucero 

American, born 1953 

Untitled (Standing Figure 
with Spotlights), 1979 

wax crayon with incised lines on paper 
31 x 22 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 51 



CONNECTICUT 

Yale University Art Gallery 

NEW HAVEN 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LOREN CALAWAY • PETER CAMPUS • CHARLES CLOUGH • LOIS DODD 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • MICHAEL LUCERO • SYLVIA PLIMACK MANGOLD • RICHARD NONAS 
NAM JUNE PAIK • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • STEPHEN ROSENTHAL 
LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 



PLATE 25 

Peter Campus 

American, born 1937 
Untitled, 1974 

9 color Polaroids, 
mounted and framed 

mount: 11 x 10 1/2 in. (sight) 
frame: 12x11 1/2 in. 




52 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 26 

Lois Dodd 

American, born 1927 
Butternut Branches, L988 
oil on masonite 

11 7/8x11 7/8 in. 
frame: 12 7/16 x 12 3/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 53 




PLATE 27 

Nam June Paik 

American (born Korea), 1932 - 2006 

Untitled, 1973 

colored pencil on black paper 

19x25 1/4 in. 



54 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 28 

Richard Tuttle 

American, born 1941 

Dorothy's Birthday Present 1991 
graphite and watercolor on paper, framed 

10 1/8 x 12 3/4 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 5S 



DELAWARE 

Delaware Art Museum 



WILMINGTON 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • LOREN CALAWAY 
MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • KATHLEEN COOKE • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • TOM HOLLAND • MARTIN JOHNSON • RONNIE LANDFIELD 
ROBERT MANGOLD • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • PAT STEIR • DONALD SULTAN 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • JOE ZUCKER 



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PLATE 29 

Kathleen Cooke 

American (born Ireland), 1908 - 1978 

Untitled, 1972 

pastel and graphite on paper 

11 x 14 in. 



56 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECT 



ION 






PLATE 30 

Tom Holland 

American, born 1936 

Untitled #7, 1971 

collage with staples and acrylic on paper 

12 x 28 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES 



57 




PLATE 31 

Robert Mangold 

American, born 1937 
Violet/Black Zone Study, 1996 

acrylic, charcoal, and graphite on 
3 attached sheets of paper 

overall: 30 1/4 x 66 7/8 in. 



58 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 32 

Joe Zucker 

American, born 1 94 1 
Candle, 1976 

cotton, rhoplex, and acrylic on canvas 
stretched over plywood 
diameter: 18 3/4 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



59 



FLORIDA 

Miami Art Museum 



MIAMI 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • JOEL FISHER 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • RALPH HUMPHREY 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • MICHAEL LUCERO 
SYLVIA PLIMACK MANGOLD • ANDY MANN • WILLIAM MOREHOUSE • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • ROBERT STANLEY • DONALD SULTAN • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 33 

Joel Fisher 

American, born 1947 
Untitled, 1992 

painted plaster with surface 
abrasions and incisions 

3 7/8x2 3/4 x 3 in. 



60 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTIOI 




PLATE 34 

William Morehouse 

American, 1929- 1993 
Untitled, 1981 
pastel on black paper 
22 1/8x30 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 61 




PLATE 35 

Robert Stanley 

American, 1932 - 1997 
Crackerjack, 1971 

screenprint on paper 
artist's proof 

14 x 17 15/16 in. 



62 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 






PLATE 36 

Donald Sultan 

American, horn 1951 
Pomegra nates^ 1 990 
graphite and charcoal on paper 
39 1/8x29 3/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 63 



GEORGIA 

The High Museum of Art 



ATLANTA 

WILLIAM ANASTASI • STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS 
LOREN CALAWAY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
MICHAEL GOLDBERG • RODNEY ALAN GREENBLAT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • STEWART HITCH • WILL INSLEY 
STEVE KEISTER • RONNIE LANDFIELD • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • ALAN SARET • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE • URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD • THORNTON WILLIS • BETTY WOODMAN 




PLATE 37 

Will Insley 

American, born 1929 

Untitled, 1964 

acrylic on masonite 

17 5/8x173/4x1 3/4 in. (irregular) 



64 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 38 

Richard Turtle 

American, born 1941 

Two Black Dots with a Space 
In Between, 1973 

ink and graphite on paper 

13 7/8x11 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 65 




PLATE 39 

Ursula von Rydingsvard 

American (born Germany), born 1942 
Light Drawing 2/7/81 12 Noon, 1981 
charcoal on paper 
29 x 23 in. 



66 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECT 



ION 




PLATE 40 

Betty Woodman 

American, born 1930 
Garden Corner, 1999 

clay, wax, dye and crayon on 
Thai Mulberry paper 

36 3/4x25 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 67 



HAWAII 

Honolulu Academy of Arts 

HONOLULU 

ROBERT BARRY • CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT 
JENE HIGHSTEIN • BILL JENSEN • JOAN JONAS • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI 
WENDY LEHMAN • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • JOEL PERLMAN 
LUCIO POZZI • DAVID REED • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • BARBARA SCHWARTZ • LORI TASCHLER 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RUTH VOLLMER 



PLATE 41 

Bill Jensen 

American, born 1945 
Untitled, 1986 

colored pencil, ink and 
white-out on paper 

9 1/16x6 1/8 in. 




68 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 42 

Joel Perlman 

American, born L943 
Untitled, L995 

cast bronze, silver 

nitrate patina 

12x6 1/2x4 in. 




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PLATE 43 

David Reed 

American, born 1946 

Working Drawing for #508, 2004 

graphite and ink on graph paper 

11 x 17 in. 



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70 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 44 

Judy Rifka 

American, born 1945 
Untitled, 1974 
acrylic on plywood 

48 x48 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



71 



IDAHO 

Boise Art Museum 



BOISE 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH • R.M. FISCHER 

RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • BRYAN HUNT 

MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • RONNIE LANDFIELD • ROY LICHTENSTEIN 

MICHAEL LUCERO • FORREST MYERS • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF 

STEPHEN ROSENTHAL • CHRISTY RUPP • PAT STEIR • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 45 

R.M. Fischer 

American, born 1947 
Doctor's Lamp, 1979 

steel, flexible metal tubing, light 
bulbs, sockets and wiring 

76 x 20 in. (variable) 



72 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 46 

Ronnie Landfield 

American, born 1947 
Untitled, 1998 
acrylic on paper 
29 15/16x22 1/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 73 




PLATE 47 

Roy Lichtenstein 

American, 1923 - 1997 

Turkey Shopping Bag 1964 

screenprint on white paper 
shopping bag 

23 1/2x17 1/16 in. (including handles) 



74 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 48 

Pat Steir 

American, born 1940 

Little Paynes Gray 
Brushstroke on a Paynes 
Gray Background, 2000 

oil on canvas 

23 1/8 x 23 1/4 in. 







FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



75 



ILLINOIS 

University Museum, Southern 
Illinois University 

CARBON DALE 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH 

PEGGY CYPHERS • WILLIAM FARES • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT 

JENE HIGHSTEIN • BRYAN HUNT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE 

RONNIE LANDFIELD • MICHAEL LUCERO • FORREST MYERS • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 

EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • ALAN SARET • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 

THORNTON WILLIS 











PLATE 49 

Stephen Antonakos 

American, born 1926 

Five Incomplete Circles, 1976 

colored pencil on paper 

29 15/16x22 5/16 in. 



76 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 50 

William Fares 

American, born 1942 
Untitled, \977 
ink on altered paper 
11 x 11 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 77 




PLATE 51 

Cheryl Laemmle 

American, born 1947 
Specters in the Forest, 1988 
oil on canvas 

30 1/4x40 1/8 in. 



78 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 52 

Thornton Willis 

American, born 1936 
The Tall Patriot 1981 
oil stick on paper 
30x22 1/4 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 79 



INDIANA 

IMA-Indianapolis Museum of Art 

INDIANAPOLIS 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • JAMES BISHOP 
LOREN CALAWAY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
JON GIBSON • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • STEVE KEISTER 
RONNIE LANDFIELD • ROBERT MANGOLD • ELIZABETH MURRAY • LUCIO POZZI • DAVID RABINOWITCH 
EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 



"50's" 

For any number of performers. 

:h performer has two pitches, tincres, cnorda, or 
sonorities. 

Percussion I sh aa dr ibals, wood 

blocks, and written- that is, 

rhythmically, or, at times, the fir;*. - :ote of 

a tied ;. (tne notes with the X over ay be played. 

Sustained instr : organs and winds, also 

play as written, or play the notes in a particular tied group- 
ing as one note. For instance, in section (f)tne grouping? can 
be played a; -notes (d- ) instead of six separate 

ith-notes ({jjjxi) . Also, wl1 :"-ruments, e- . 

::.ord rather than Just one Ditch, and sore 
than one performer can play at one keyboard. If i.-.ords are 
used, the notes for the chords should be chosen with descre- 
tion. Octaves, Perfect Fifths, and Fourths s.iould predominate. 
Dissonant relati irritating to the ears very 

quickly In tnis piece so that a generally sonorous, consonant 
sound, utilizing vol a particular scale or ton- 

: , is recommended. Here is one Lned low 

Keyboard part. Tnese notes car. be repeated in other relation- 
's in a higher part by another perfor:;.er on the same key- 
board. 



All performers start at (T) (not necessarily at once) a 
repeat It until t r ' © • (P > etc > successively 

e. Sec everyone at 

once. One Derf or :.er car. still be on(T)whlle other performers 
are on (t) , (j) , (J) , (6) , and even (|c) . However , it is necessary 
to remal ier In the sense Chat everyone plays the Is 

two teats (the sixteenth-note figure) at the same time at all 

:. As the piece progresses rssible to skip sec- 

tions or ivlous sections and repla 

eneral, the various Juxtopoaitlons 
should be repeated enou,~ to be reasonably he 

appreciated. Procee ieisurly pace, taking your time with 

each section. The piece can last for any lengtn of time from 
twenty minutes to an hour^or so- maybe longer. V.'nen all the 
performers have reached (53)and repeated it to their satisfac- 
tion, tne piece T " tly (on cue) at the thirty- 
second beat of the cycle (the sixteenth-note figure). Explore 

f performing the piece. 






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PLATE 53 

Jon Gibson 

American, born 1940 
30's, 1970-72 

one of five sheets and three 
photocopies: ink and graphite on 
graph paper; collage of ink on 
musical staff paper, and tape on 
bond paper with typescript 

each sheet: 8 1/2x11 in. 



80 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PU\TE 54 

Lucio Pozzi 

American, born 1935 
Famiglia, 1996 
watercolor on paper 
24x23 1/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 81 




PLATE 55 

David Rabinowitch 

Canadian, born 1943 

Linear Mass in 3 Scales J, 1972 

Steel 

3/4x52 1/4x4 in. 



82 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 56 

Edda Renouf 

American, horn 1943 
Wing Piece II, 1980 

acrylic on linen 
39 1/2x39 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES 



82 



IOWA 

Cedar Rapids Museum of Art 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • JOSEPH BEUYS • LOREN CALAWAY 
CHARLES CLOUGH • PEGGY CYPHERS • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT 
PETER HUTCHINSON • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • RONNIE LANDFIELD 
ANNETTE LEMIEUX • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • KEITH SONNIER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 57 

Will Barnet 

American, born 191 1 

Study for the Voxels (Herb with 
hands on chin), 1977 

graphite and charcoal on vellum 
tracing paper 

29 15/16x42 in. (irregular) 



84 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



BLACKBOARDS 
CORK BULLETIN 




FOR 

NOISELESS BUCKB4 



ERASEI 




^°*K BIAC^BOAR^ IN( 

139 SPRING STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Telephone; 96M>555 



BLACKBOARDS 

CORK BULLETIN 

BOARDS 

CABINET BULLETIN 

BOARDS / • 

OAK AND ALUMINUM 

FRAMING 

ACCESSORIES 



- MUlWI ILUTHI MM- 
A/»W*im fetACkBOARD, INC I 






PLATE 58 

Joseph Beuys 

German, 1921 - 1986 

Noiseless Blackboard Eraser, 1974 

felt blackboard eraser (two), each with printed 
and stamped paper label, with marker 

each: 2x5x1 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 85 




PLATE 59 

Annette Lemieux 

American, born 1957 

Popular Wall Painting 
(after Ken), 1997 

tempera, with graphite, on graph paper 

sheet: 8 1/2x10 15/16 in. 



86 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 





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PLATE 60 

Keith Sonnier 

American, bom 1941 
BA-O-BA III 1976 

marker on graph paper 
10 5/8x8 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 87 



KANSAS 

Spencer Museum of Art, The University 
of Kansas 

LAWRENCE 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH • GENE DAVIS 

RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • PETER HUTCHINSON 

MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 

RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • PETER SCHUYFF 

BARBARA SCHWARTZ • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • JOSEPH WHITE 




PLATE 61 

Gene Davis 

American, 1920- 1985 

Untitled, 1970 

acrylic on canvas, framed 

10x12 1/8 in. 

framed: 10 3/4 x 12 3/4 in. 



88 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 62 

Steve Keister 

American, born 1949 
Untitled, 1990 

painted masonite, wood, and string 
8 x 10 x 7 in. (not including string; variable) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 89 




PLATE 63 

Daryl Trivieri 

American , born 1957 

The Elements of Drawing, 1990 

airbrush and inkwash on paper 

22 1/4x30 1/8 in. 



90 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTIOI 




PLATE 64 

Joseph White 

American, born 1938 
Untitled, n.d. 
graphite on paper 
8 1/2x8 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 91 



KENTUCKY 

The Speed Art Museum 



LOUISVILLE 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • LOREN CALAWAY • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) 
CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • RONALD GORCHOV 
PETER HALLEY • JENE HIGHSTEIN • STEWART HITCH • BRYAN HUNT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
ROBERT MANGOLD • RICHARD NONAS • EDDA RENOUF • PAT STEIR • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 
URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD • MARTIN WONG 




PLATE 65 

Lynda Benglis 

American, born 1941 
Gestural Study, 2005 
egg tempera on paper 
22 1/2x15 1/8 in. (irregular) 



92 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 66 

Bryan Hunt 

American, born 1947 
Quarry Study, 1979 

ink on paper 

6 5/16 x 9 in. (approx.) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 93 




PLATE 67 

Pat Steir 

American, born 1940 

Red Cascade, 1996-97 

oil on canvas 
30 1/8x30 1/8 in. 



94 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 68 

Martin Wong 

American, 1946 - 1999 
Untitled, n.d. 

oil on canvas, diptych 

overall: 7 1/8 x 18 1/4 in.; 
each: 7 1/8x9 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 95 



LOUISIANA 

New Orleans Museum of Art 

NEW ORLEANS 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • JAMES BISHOP • LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH 
PINCHAS COHEN GAN • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • JENE HIGHSTEIN • STEWART HITCH 
BILL JENSEN • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • RONNIE LANDFIELD • JOHN LATHAM • MICHAEL LUCERO 
RICHARD NONAS • LIL PICARD • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • BARBARA SCHWARTZ 
DARYL TRIVIERI * RICHARD TUTTLE 



PLATE 69 

John Latham 

British, 1921-2006 

One Second 
Drawing, 1971 

enamel on wood panel 
8 1/8x7 5/8 in. 




96 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



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PLATE 70 

American, born 1953 
Untitled (Head Study), 1982 
glazed ceramic with incised line 
16 1/2x11 3/4x8 3/4 in. 



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PLATE 71 

Lil Picard 

German, 1899- 1994 

The Voxel's Napkinian Fantasy, 1976 

collage of paper and cloth napkins, 
linen placemat, photos, ink, and plastic 
push-pins in painted wood and plexiglas box 

16 3/4x21 3/4 in. 



98 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 72 

Richard Tuttle 

American, born 1941 
Chicago 14, No. I 1982 

watercolor on lined notebook paper in wood 
frame 

9 5/8x 14 1/8x1 5/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 99 



MAINE 

Portland Museum of Art 



PORTLAND 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE 
RACKSTRAW DOWNES • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT 
PETER HUTCHINSON • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • RONNIE LANDFIELD 
MICHAEL LUCERO • ANTONI MIRALDA • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • BARBARA SCHWARTZ • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE • TOD WIZON 




PLATE 73 

Charles Clough 

American, born 1951 
August Fifteenth, 1985 
enamel on panel, framed 

23 7/8 x 25 3/8 in. 

frame: 24 7/8x26 1/4 in. 



100 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 74 

Rackstraw Downes 

British, born 1939 

Disused Weather Station, 
Galveston, TX, 1997 

graphite on two attached sheets of 
gray charcoal paper 

7 1/4 x 16 3/4 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 101 




PLATE 75 

Antoni Miralda 

Spanish, born 1942 
Untitled, 1972 

bread, colored and baked, mounted on mat 
board, on wood inside plexiglas case 

case: 3 3/4x12 1/4x12 1/4 in. 



102 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 76 

Tod Wizon 

American, born 1952 
Untitled, 1979 
graphite on paper 
5x3 7/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 103 



MARYLAND 

Academy Art Museum 

EASTON 



STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • ROBERT BARRY • LISA BRADLEY • ANDRE CADERE • CHARLES CLOUGH 
CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • PETER HUTCHINSON 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • MOSHE KUPFERMAN • CHERYL LAEMMLE 
MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 
BARBARA SCHWARTZ • LORNA SIMPSON • LORI TASCHLER • JOHN TORREANO • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE 









PLATE 78 

Moshe Kupferman 

Israeli (born Poland), 1926 - 2003 
Untitled, 1994 

acrylic, graphite and charcoal on paper 
19 3/4x26 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 105 




PLATE 79 

Lorna Simpson 

American, born 1960 

III (Peter Norton Family 
Christmas Project), 1994 

ceramic, rubber, and bronze wishbones 
with felt (printed and fitted) in wood box 

box: 13 5/8x5 3/8x2 1/8 in. 

each wishbone: 4 1/4x2 1/2 x 5/8 in. (approx.) 



106 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 80 

John Torreano 

American, born 1941 
Untitled, 1977 

acrylic modeling paste, oil, and faceted 
plastic on canvas 

16 1/4 x 16 1/4x2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 107 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Harvard University Art Museums 

CAMBRIDGE 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • JAMES BISHOP 
RONALD BLADEN • CHARLES CLOUGH • RACKSTRAW DOWNES • BENNI EFRAT • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DAN GRAHAM • STEVE KEISTER • MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • DAVID SALLE • PAT STEIR 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 



PLATE 81 

James Bishop 

American, born 1927 
Untitled, 1972 
oil and crayon on paper 
22 x 22 in. 




108 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 82 

Benni Efrat 

Israeli, born 1938 
From Ex to X, 1969/70 
ink on graph paper 

21 15/16x29 7/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 109 




PLATE 83 

Michael Goldberg 

American, 1924 - 2007 
Tarascon, 1959 
oil on canvas 
52 x 47 3/4 in. 



110 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 84 

David Salle 

American, born 1952 

Untitled, 1995 

ink. and Xerography (?) on paper 
3 15/16x3 15/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 111 



MICHIGAN 

The University of Michigan Museum of Art 

ANN ARBOR 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • PETER HUTCHINSON 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • RONNIE LANDFIELD • JILL LEVINE • ROBERT LOBE 
MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF 
YINKA SHONIBARE • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 85 

Lynda Benglis 

American, born 1941 

Tacpere Maptom, 1985 

glass 

22x5 1/2 (diam.) in. 



112 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 86 

Martin Johnson 

American, born 1951 
Inure Self, 1984 
acrylic and thread on canvas 
10x8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 113 




PLATE 87 

Mark Kostabi 

American, born 1960 
Progress of Beauty 3, 1988 
ink on paper 
11 15/16x9 in. 



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114 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTIOI 



PLATE 88 

Yinka Shonibare 

British, born 1962 

Doll House (Peter 
Norton Family 
Christmas Project), 
2002 

miniature English 
Victorian townhouse, with 
furnishings; in cast resin, 
plastic, wood, paper and 
fabric 

house: 12 3/4x8x 10 5/8 in. 





MINNESOTA 

Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, 
University of Minnesota 

MINNEAPOLIS 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE 

RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • PETER HUTCHINSON 

MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • RONNIE LANDFIELD • MICHAEL LASH 

MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 

BARBARA SCHWARTZ • ALAN SHIELDS • GARY STEPHAN • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI 

RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 89 

Claudia de Monte 

American, born 1947 
Claudia with Snake, 1980 

handmade paper (paper mache; 
celluclay), acrylic and glitter 

13 5/8x8 1/2x1 1/2 in. (irregular) 



116 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 





PLATE 90 

Michael Lash 

American, born 1961 

Simon's a Sissy, 1988 

ball point pen and crayon on mat board 

8 3/4x11 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 117 




PLATE 91 

Alan Shields 

American, 1944-2005 
Untitled, 1972 

painted and stitched canvas over 
plywood and twine base 

19 1/4x18x21 1/4 in. 



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118 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 92 

Gary Stephan 

American, born 1942 

Untitled, 1969 

pigment and polyvinyl chloride 
with crayon on verso 

25 x 52 1/4 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 119 



MISSISSIPPI 

Mississippi Museum of Art 



JACKSON 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH 
CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • RONALD GORCHOV • DON HAZLITT 
JENE HIGHSTEIN • PETER HUTCHINSON • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI 
RONNIE LANDFIELD • MICHAEL LASH • MICHAEL LUCERO • TAKASHI MURAKAMI • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • CINDY SHERMAN • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 
LYNN UMLAUF 




PLATE 93 

Ronald Gorchov 

American , born 1930 
Untitled, 1973 
oil on muslin stapled to wood 
18 7/8 x 13 x 1 5/8 in. 



120 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 95 

Cindy Sherman 

American, born 1954 
Untitled, 1975/97 
black and white photograph 
10x8 in. 



122 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 96 

Lynn Umlauf 

American, born 1942 

Untitled, 1979 

pastel on mat board mounted on board 

board: 25 x 16 1/2 in. (irregular) 
mount: 28 x 22 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 123 



MISSOURI 

Saint Louis Art Museum 



ST. LOUIS 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH 

CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DAN GRAHAM • WILLIAM L. HANEY • JENE HIGHSTEIN 

PETER HUTCHINSON • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • MICHAEL LASH 

MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 

BARBARA SCHWARTZ • HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • LEO VALLEDOR • RUTH VOLLMER 




PLATE 97 

Lisa Bradley 

American, born 1951 
Inside Out, n.d. 

oil on canvas 

40x36 in. 



124 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 98 

Dan Graham 

American, born 1942 

For Laumier Sculpture 
Park, St. Louis, 1985 

graphite and ink on paper 

17 x 14 in. 










FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



125 




PLATE 99 

Hap Tivey 

American, born 1947 
Mivajje #4, 1978 

aluminum and copper on wood 
panel beneath stretched latex 

24 3/4x15 7/8x2 5/8 in. 



126 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 100 

Leo Valledor 

American, 1936 - 1989 
Untitled, 1965 

graphite and crayon on paper 
22 1/16x30 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 127 



MONTANA 

Yellowstone Art Museum 



BILLINGS 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • CHARLES CLOUGH • PINCHAS COHEN GAN 
CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • NEIL JENNEY 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEPHEN KALTENBACH • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN 
MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RUTH VOLLMER 



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PLATE 101 

Robert Barry 

American, born 1936 
Untitled, 1984 

acrylic and gilt paint on canvas 
18 x 18 in. 



128 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 102 

Pinchas Cohen Gan 

American, born 1942 
Figurative Circuit Nl, 1975-76 
graphite, marker, oil, gouache on paper 

21 5/8x26 11/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 129 



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PLATE 103 

Stephen Kaltenbach 

American, born 1940 

God gave Noah the rainbow sign: No 
More Water, The Fire Next Time, 1968 

graphite and marker on paper 

17 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. 



130 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 104 

Ruth Vollmer 

American, 1903 - 1982 

Pentagon, 1974 

colored pencil and graphite on tracing paper 

14x 11 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 131 



NEBRASKA 

Joslyn Art Museum 

OMAHA 



STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH 
CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • PETER HUTCHINSON 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • MICHAEL LASH • MICHAEL LUCERO 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • HANS J_RGEN [H.A.] SCHULT 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RICHARD VAN BUREN 



PLATE 105 

Jene Highstein 

American, born 1942 
Untitled, 1997 

opaque watercolor (bone black 
pigment) and graphite on two 
attached sheets of graph paper, 
with graph paper collage 

33 13/16x21 7/8 in. 




132 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 







PLATE 106 

Jene Highstein 

American, born 1 C H2 

Aluminum Casting 
of Room with One 
Door, 1997 

cast aluminum | edition: A.P| 

7x6 (diam.) in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



13c 







PLATE 107 

Hans Jiirgen [H.A.] Schult 

German, born 1939 

Untitled, 1985 

screenprint with glitter on poster board 

46 3/8x30 13/16 in. 



134 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 108 

Richard Van Buren 

American, born 1937 
Untitled, 1971-1972 
polyester resin with fiberglass 
23 3/4 x 16x2 3/8 in. 



NEVADA 

Las Vegas Art Museum 



LAS VEGAS 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • CLAUDIA DE MONTE 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • NEIL JENNEY • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • F. (FRANK) L. SCHRODER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 
BETTINA WERNER • LARRY ZOX 






■nnss 









PLATE 109 

Edward Renouf 

American, 1906 - 1999 
Untitled, 1973 
oil on masonite (two panels) 
each: 15 x 10 in. 



136 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 110 

F. (Frank) L. Schroder 

American, born 1950 

Automatic Pilot 1979 

ink, marker, and graphite on graph paper 

8 1/2x 10 15/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 137 



PLATE 1 1 1 

Bettina Werner 

Italian, born 1965 

Campi neri di pensiero 

(Black Fields of Thought), 1991 

salt, resin and pigment on 
plastic panels (triptych) 

overall: 27 3/4 x 10 1/8 in. 
each: 10 1/8x8 1/8 in. 




138 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



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PLATE 112 

Larry Zox 

American, 1937-2006 

Scissors Jack Series, 1965 
black ink, gouache on graph paper 
sheet: 11 1/16 x 13 15/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 139 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College 

HANOVER 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • JOHN CLEM CLARKE • CHARLES CLOUGH 
CLAUDIA DE MONTE • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • BILL JENSEN 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN • MICHAEL LUCERO 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • DAVID SAWIN 
MICHELLE STUART • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RUTH VOLLMER 





















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PLATE 113 

Robert Barry 

American, born 1936 
Silver Collage, 1968 
metallic strips affixed to board 
7 1/2 x 12 1/8 in. 



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140 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTIO! 




PLATE 114 

John Clem Clarke 

American, born l 1 )^ - 
Untitlcd. 1965 

acrylic and screenprint 
on canvas 

55 x 30 3/4 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES 



141 




PLATE 115 

David Sawin 

American, born 1922 
Formal Structure, 1953 
oil on canvas 
14x18in. 



142 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 116 

Michelle Stuart 

American, horn 1938 

July, New 
Hampshire, 1974 

microfine graphite 
(rubbed), silver paint, 
with indentations 
(pounded with rock) on 
heavyweight canvas paper 

9 13/16x6 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



14; 



NEW JERSEY 

Montclair Art Museum 



MONTCLAIR 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • RONALD BLADEN 
MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH • STUART DIAMOND • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
DON HAZLITT • BRYAN HUNT • BILL JENSEN • MARTIN JOHNSON • ALAIN KIRILI • CHERYL LAEMMLE 
MICHAEL LUCERO • RICHARD NONAS • LARRY POONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • RODNEY RIPPS 
ALAN SARET • BARBARA SCHWARTZ • JUDITH SHEA • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 1 1 7 

Ronald Bladen 

American (born Canada), 1918 - 1988 

Five Studies: 'Black Tower'' and four 
unknown sculptures, 1984-85 

graphite on paper 

22 1/8x42 3/8 in. 



144 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 118 

Stuart Diamond 

American, born 1942 
Untitled, 1997 

collage of various papers, with acrylic, 
ink, and tape on paper 

sheet: 21 7/8 x 17 in. (approx.) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 145 




PLATE 119 

Rodney Ripps 

American, born 1950 
Galaxy \ 1978 

oil paint and wax medium on 
cloth on wood 

13 x 31 1/4x7 in. (irregular) 



146 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 120 

Alan Saret 

American, born 1944 

Untitled, 1967 

colored pencil and graphite on verso of graph paper 

10 15/16x22 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 147 



NEW MEXICO 

New Mexico Museum of Art, 
Museum of New Mexico 

SANTA FE 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • R.M. FISCHER • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • NEIL JENNEY • BILL JENSEN • JOAN JONAS • STEVE KEISTER 
ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
RICHARD NONAS • KATHERINE PORTER • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 
BARBARA SCHWARTZ • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 121 

Neil Jenney 

American, born 1945 

Herb Vogel Thinking, 1999 

Xerox collage and graphite on 
mat board 

47 1/8x36 1/8 in. 



148 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 122 

Katherine Porter 

American, born 1941 
Untitled, 1974 

graphite, colored pencil, and glue, with incised 
and scraped lines, on paperboard 

12x18 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 149 




PLATE 123 

Lucio Pozzi 

American, born 1935 

Nude, 1980 

acrylic on canvas mounted on wood, 
with collage (photograph on board, 
nails, plastic) 

25 1/8x24x1 1/4 in. 



150 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 124 

Richard Tuttle 

American, born 1941 
Rome Drawing #63, 1974 

black felt tip pen on lined notebook 
paper, framed 

11 9/16x9 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 151 



NEW YORK 

Albright-Knox Art Gallery 

BUFFALO 

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • KOKI DOKTORI 
R.M. FISCHER • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • BILL JENSEN • TOBI KAHN 
STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • WENDY LEHMAN • MICHAEL LUCERO 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LARRY POONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 
BARBARA SCHWARTZ • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 125 

Richard Artschwager 

American, born 1923 
Thousand Cubic Inches Prototype, 1996 
wood with metal hardware [edition: XXV/XL] 
12 1/2x15 15/16x5 in. 



152 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 126 

Koki Doktori 

Israeli (?), 1941 

On the Run, 1983 

oil stick and graphite on paper 

22 3/8x30 1/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



15 




PLATE 127 

Larry Poons 

American, born 1937 
Untitled, 1967 

graphite on graph paper 
16 15/16 x21 15/16 in. 



154 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 







PLATE 128 

Edda Renouf 

American, born 1943 
August- Week 2, 2000 

oil pastel with ink, graphite and 
incised lines on paper 

19 x 15 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 155 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Weatherspoon Art Gallery, The University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

GREENSBORO 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • MCWILLIE CHAMBERS • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • RALPH IWAMOTO • BILL JENSEN 
STEPHEN KALTENBACH • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • ALEXIS ROCKMAN • LORI TASCHLER 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • MARIO YRISSARY 



PLATE 129 

McWillie Chambers 

American, born 1951 

Untitled woodcuts, n.d., and 
S.V. Elissa with Sun, 2000 

paper folder, housing eight 
woodcuts (4 variations of two 
images i of various colors, edition 
sizes and papers 

sheets: six at 6 x 8 13/16 in.; 

four at 8 7/8 x 12 in.; 

one at 8 1/2 x 12 1/4 in. 

folder dimensions (closed); 13x9 3/8 in. 




156 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 130 

Ralph Iwamoto 

American, born 1927 
Study Steps #3, 1977 
acrylic on canvas 

9 1/2x14 1/2 in. 
frame: 10 x 15 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 157 




PLATE 131 

Alexis Rockman 

American, born 1962 
Untitled, 1996 

watercolor and silver 
spray paint on board 

4 1/2x6 1/4 in. 



158 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 132 

Mario Yrissary 

American, born 1933 

Untitled, 1973 

crayon, colored pencil, and watercolor on paper 

19 7/16x19 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 159 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Plains Art Museum 



FARGO 

ROBERT BARRY • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN 
PETER HUTCHINSON • BILL JENSEN • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • JILL LEVINE 
ROBERT LOBE • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 
EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • PETER SCHUYFF • JUDITH SHEA • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE • RUTH VOLLMER 




PLATE 133 

Charles Clough 

American, born 1951 
3/24/02, 2002 
watercolor on paper, framed 
8 1/8x11 in. (approx.) 



160 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 134 

Peter Hutchinson 

British, born L930 

Che in icn I Sc itlptin r 
with Four Tubes. ls>70 

glass tubes w ith salt, 
copper sulphate and 
potassium eliminate 
formations 

9x73/4x6 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 161 




PLATE 135 

Robert Lobe 

American, born 1945 
Untitled, 1969 

metal, including steel pipe, coated 
spring wire, solder wire, and wood 

33 x 60 x 27 in. 



162 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PU\TE 136 

Peter Schuyff 

Hutch, born L958 
Graham, L998 
oil on tbund canvas 

28 1/8 x 12 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



163 



OHIO 

Akron Art Museum 



AKRON 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • DAVID HUNTER • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI 
MARK KOSTABI • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
NAM JUNE PAIK • RAYMOND PARKER • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • JOHN SALT 
JUDITH SHEA • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 137 

Loren Calaway 

American, born 1950 
Untitled, 1979 

wood, woven fabric, felted fabric, and 
copper-alloy hardware 

44 x 5 x 10 in. 



164 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 138 

David Hunter 

American, born 1947 

Untitled #33, 1997 

pigment with hinder and graphite on paper 

14 1/4 x 15 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 165 




PLATE 139 

Raymond Parker 

American, 1922 - 1990 
Untitled, 1962 

oil on canvas, in shadowbox frame 
canvas (sight): 16 1/8 x 13 1/4 in. 



166 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 140 

John Salt 

British, born 1937 

Untitled (Vogcl living room drawn 
from memory), 1973 

colored pencil, ink, and graphite on paper 

sheet (as folded): 3 1/2 x 5 1/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



167 



OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma City Museum of Art 

OKLAHOMA CITY 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN • RALPH HUMPHREY • MARTIN JOHNSON 
STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
HENRY C. PEARSON • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • JUDITH SHEA • LORI TASCHLER 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS • TOD WIZON 




PLATE 141 

Ralph Humphrey 

American, 1932 - 1990 

Untitled, 1971 

graphite, pastel, acrylic and collage on paper 

21 15/16x29 3/4 in. 



168 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



PLATE 142 

Martin Johnson 

American, born 1951 
Exerptunis, 198 1 

metal armature, resin, textile, paint, 
wood and plastic 

49x33x 10 in. 





PLATE 143 

Henry C. Pearson 

American, 1914-2006 
The Aspects of the Case, 1969 
ink and watercolor on orange paper 
12x24 7/8 in. 



170 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 144 

Judith Shea 

American, born 1948 
Untitled, 1991 

ink wash, watcrcolor, graphite, 

and copper ink on paper 

26 1/8 x 18 7/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 171 



OREGON 

Portland Art Museum 



PORTLAND 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • DIKE BLAIR • RICHMOND BURTON • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • JOHN HULTBERG • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
ALAIN KIRILI • MARK KOSTABI • MOSHE KUPFERMAN • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • JUDITH SHEA 
HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS • BETTY WOODMAN 



PLATE 145 

Dike Blair 

American, born 1952 
Untitled, 1990 

c-print, epoxy on etched 
glass mounted on aluminum 
strainer, triptych 

overall: 54 x 18 in. 
each panel: 18 x 18 in. 




172 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 146 

Richmond Burton 

American, born 1960 
Untitled, 1997 
acrylic on paper 

11 x 8 9/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 173 




PLATE 147 

John Hultberg 

American, 1922 - 2005 
Suspension 5, 1967 
oil on canvas, framed 

18x22 1/8 in. 

frame: 19 3/8x23 3/8 in. 



174 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




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PLATE 148 

Richard Nonas 

American, born 1936 

From Northern/Southern, 1974 

graphite on paper 

6 7/8x7 5/8 in. 






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FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 175 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

PHILADELPHIA 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • GARY BOWER • LISA BRADLEY • LOREN CALAWAY 
CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HA2LITT • JENE HIGHSTEIN 
STEWART HITCH • JIM HODGES • MARTIN JOHNSON • TOBI KAHN • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI 
MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
NAM JUNE PAIK • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • CHRISTY RUPP • ALAN SHIELDS 
HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 149 

Gary Bower 

American, born 1940 
Untitled, 1971 

watercolor and graphite on paper 
22 1/8x30 1/8 in. 



176 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 150 

Jim Hodges 

American, born 1957 

Blanket (Peter Norton Family 
Christmas Project) , 1998 

woven wool textile 

52 x 72 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 177 




PLATE 151 

Tobi Kahn 

American, born 1952 
OKYN, 1985 
acrylic on panel 

13 3/4 x 17 3/4 in. 
frame: 21 1/8x25 1/8 in. 



178 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 152 

Christy Rupp 

American, born 1949 

Pigeon Flock with Rats, 1980 

29 pieces: wire mesh, newspaper, 
adhesive, plaster, aluminum and 
paint, plus 2 screenprinted labels, 
variable installation 

rats and pigeons range in size from approximately 
8 x 4 x 4 in. to 14 1/2 x 13 x 9 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



179 



RHODE ISLAND 

Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design 

PROVIDENCE 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • WILLIAM (BILL) BOLLINGER • CHARLES CLOUGH 

RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 

ALAIN KIRILI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • WENDY LEHMAN • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO 

JOSEPH NECHVATAL • NAM JUNE PAIK • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • JOEL SHAPIRO 

ALAN SHIELDS • HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 153 

William (Bill) Bollinger 

American, 1939 - 1988 
Untitled, 1968 

graphite (sprayed) on paper mounted 
on board 

sheet: 14 1/4x22 7/8 in. 
mount: 16 1/2 x 25 in. 



180 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 







PLATE 154 

Don Hazlitt 

American, born 1948 
Shaped Edjjc, 1980 

oil on corrugated cardboard with 
wire and painted wood dowels 

29 x 18 1/2 x 1 3/4 in. 

(including wire extension) 






PLATE 155 

Wendy Lehman 

American, born 1945 
Going Dotty >, 1981 
acrylic on wood construction 
23 x 16 3/4x6 1/8 in. 





PLATE 156 

Joel Shapiro 

American, born 1941 
Model for Two Houses, 2000 

wood and white primer 

height, including base: 11 in. 
base: 16 3/4 x 15 x 11/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



183 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Columbia Museum of Art 



COLUMBIA 

ROBERT BARRY • ZIGI BEN-HAIM • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • PEGGY CYPHERS 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • WILLIAM L. HANEY • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON 
STEVEN KARR • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RAYMOND PARKER • BETTY PARSONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 
ROBERT STANLEY • HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS • BETTY WOODMAN 




PLATE 157 

Zigi Ben-Haim 

American, born 1945 
Just Before c 84 , 1983 

branches, newspaper, oil, wire 
mesh on burlap on wood, diptych 

left: 32 x 17 in. (irregular) 
right: 30 1/8 x 17 in. (irregular) 



184 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




•••-'■ -.;;,; 



PLATE 1 58 

Peggy Cyphers 

American, born 1954 
Galaxy's Empire, 1986 

oil on two panels: top, oil on Mylar, laminated to 
Plexi; bottom, oil and spray paint on mineralized 
tar paper, laminated to wood 

22 3/8 x 22 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



185 




PLATE 159 

William L. Haney 

American, born 1939 
If Need Be, 1974 

softground and drypoint etching on paper 
edition: 10/13 

9 1/2x12 3/4 in. 









186 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 160 

Steven Karr 

American, born L923 
Untitled. L975 
Limestone 

12 1/8x6 1/16x4 7/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 18 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

South Dakota Art Museum, South Dakota 
State University 

BROOKINGS 

ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
PETER HALLEY • DON HAZLITT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MICHAEL LATHROP 
JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • JOSEPH NECHVATAL • BETTY PARSONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF 
JUDY RIFKA • ROBERT STANLEY • HAP TIVEY • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS 




PLATE 161 

Peter Halley 

American, born 1953 
Prison 7, 1995 
ink. and graphite on paper 
5 x 7 in. 



188 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



PLATE 162 

Steve Keister 

American, born 1949 
Untitled, 1992 

multiple types of wire, including 
galvanized wire mesh, with metal 
fasteners 

12 x 12 x 16 1/2 in. (irregular) 





PLATE 163 

Michael Lathrop 

American, born 1958/59 (?) 

Vision of Nature III, 1999 

acrylic on canvas board 

7x4 15/16 in. 

frame: 10 3/4x8 13/16 in. 



190 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 164 

Joseph Nechvatal 

American, born 1951 

The Moral Constant 1985 
graphite and crayon on paper, diptych 

each sheet: 11 x 14 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 191 



TENNESSEE 

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art 

MEMPHIS 

WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 

DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • CHERYL LAEMMLE 

RONNIE LANDFIELD • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • GIUSEPPE NAPOLI • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 

HENRY C. PEARSON • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • STEPHEN ROSENTHAL • PAT STEIR 

JOHN TORREANO • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS 




PLATE 165 

Will Barnet 

American, born 1911 
Untitled, 1984 
graphite and charcoal on paper 
7 3/4x9 3/4 in. 



192 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECT 



ON 




PLATE 166 

Cheryl Laemmle 

American, born 1947 
Untitled, 1987 

watercolor and graphite on paper 
14 1/8x10 3/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 193 




PLATE 167 

Giuseppe Napoli 

American, 1929- 1967 
Untitled, n.d. 

wood wall relict with paint, nails, 
collage and incising 

13 3/8x9 3/8x3 1/8 in. 



194 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 168 

Stephen Rosenthal 

American, born 1935 

ABRL, 1974 

oil on unstretched canvas 

24 1/4x21 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES 



195 



TEXAS 

Blanton Museum of Art, University 
of Texas at Austin 

AUSTIN 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • RONALD BLADEN 
LISA BRADLEY • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • JENE HIGHSTEIN 
STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • MICHAEL LUCERO • SYLVIA PLIMACK MANGOLD • ELIZABETH MURRAY 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • RICHARD PETTIBONE • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF 
DONALD SULTAN • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RUTH VOLLMER • URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD 






IB 




PLATE 169 

Alain Kirili 

French, born 1946 

Commandment, 1995 
collage and charcoal on paper 
22 1/4x30 in. (irregular) 



196 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTIOI 




PLATE 170 

Sylvia Plimack Mangold 

American, born 1938 
Untitled (August), 1980 
ink and watercolor on paper 
5 15/16 x9in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 197 




PLATE 171 

Elizabeth Murray 

American, 1940 - 2007 

Green Cup - Brown Table, 1999 

paper collage, with gouache and watercolor 

11 3/4x9 3/8 in. (irregular) 



198 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 









PLATE 172 

Richard Pettibone 

American, born 1938 

Warhol's Marilyn Monroe, 1973 

acrylic and silkscreen, six canvases 

each: 2 3/8x1 15/16x3/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • L99 



UTAH 

Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, 
Utah State University 

LOGAN 

JO BAER • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
DENISE GREEN • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI 
CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • CATHERINE E. MURPHY • JOSEPH NECHVATAL 
RICHARD NONAS • LARRY POONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • PAT STEIR • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE • LEO VALLEDOR • THORNTON WILLIS 




PLATE 173 

Jo Baer 

American, born 1929 
Untitled, 1968-69 
oil on canvas board 

9x9 3/4 in. 



200 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 174 

Denise Green 

American, born 1946 
Untitled (Steps), 1976 
ink on paper 

12 15/16 x 13 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 201 




PLATE 175 

Catherine E. Murphy 

American, born 1946 

Still Life with Reproductions, 1974 

lithograph on paper 
edition: 84/150 

8 1/8x12 1/4 in. 



202 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 176 

Richard Nonas 

American, born 1936 
Dry Creek Shorty, 1972 
wood with nails 
7 x 36 x 34 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 203 



VERMONT 

Robert Hull Fleming Museum, 
University of Vermont 

BURLINGTON 

CAREL BALTH • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • LOREN CALAWAY • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • RODNEY ALAN GREENBLAT • DON HAZLITT • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI 
CHERYL LAEMMLE • RONNIE LANDFIELD • JILL LEVINE • MICHAEL LUCERO • FORREST MYERS 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • LIL PICARD • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • BARBARA SCHWARTZ 
PAT STEIR • JOHN TORREANO • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • RICHARD VAN BUREN 




PLATE 1 77 

Carel Balth 

Dutch, born 1939 
Line I, 1977 

four color photographs mounted 
on aluminum 

23 1/4x30 11/16 in. 



204 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 1 78 

Rodney Alan Greenblat 

American, born 1960 
Wall Pal, n.d. 
paint on plaster 
6 1/4 x 5 x 5/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 205 




PLATE 179 

Forrest Myers 

American, born 1941 
Untitled, 1975 

metal sphere composed of various 
metal tubes, ropes, wires and cables 

diameter: 17 in. (irregular) 



206 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 180 

Barbara Schwartz 

American, 1948 - 2006 
Herodia, 1985 
painted bronze 

25 5/8 x 24 3/4x1 1/2 in. 









VIRGINIA 

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 

RICHMOND 

ANNE ARNOLD • ROBERT BARRY • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO • DON HAZLITT 
MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • DAVID NOVROS • LARRY POONS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA 
PAT STEIR • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS 




PLATE 181 

Anne Arnold 

American, born 1925 

Cat 1963 

watercolor and marker on paper 

7x10 in. 



208 



• THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 182 

Richard Francisco 

American, born 1942 
Southern Lightening, 1977 
watercolor on paper on balsa wood 
23 1/4x22 1/8 x 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 209 





PLATE 183 

Jill Levine 

American, born 1953 
Suzy Hates Nancy, 1989 
modeling compound, paint 

14 1/4 x 11 3/4x17 1/8 in. 



210 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 184 

David Novros 

American, born 1941 
Untitled, 1992 

ink on two joined sheets of paper 
9 13/16x8 3/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 21 1 



WASHINGTON 

Seattle Art Museum 



SEATTLE 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS • WILL BARNET • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH 
PEGGY CYPHERS • RICHARD FRANCISCO • MICHAEL GOLDBERG • DON HAZLITT • ALAIN KIRILI 
CHERYL LAEMMLE • RONNIE LANDFIELD • SOL LEWITT • MICHAEL LUCERO • ROBERT MANGOLD 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • JUDY RIFKA • TONY SMITH • DARYL TRIVIERI 
RICHARD TUTTLE 




PLATE 185 

Stephen Antonakos 

American, born 1926 
Nov #2 1986, 1986 
colored pencil on vellum 

23 5/8 x 20 in. 



212 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 186 

Sol LeWitt 

American, 1928-2007 

Maqucttc for Complex 
Form MH #1(1 L990 

synthetic resin panels, 
adhesive, and paint, with 
graphite 

12x8 3/8x5 1/2 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



213 











PLATE 187 

Tony Smith 

American, 1912-1980 
Untitled, 1971 

heavy-weight paper, adhesive, and paint 
6 1/4x9x3 3/4 in. 



214 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 






HAND LINE REFLECTION METHOD ff~ $ 




>■ 



PLATE 188 

Terry Winters 

American, born 1949 

Hand Line Reflection 
Method 15/100, 1995 

ink on paper 

13x8 1/2 in. 



^tr 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 215 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Huntington Museum of Art 

HUNTINGTON 

NANCY ARLEN • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 

DIXIE FRIEND GAY • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER • ALAIN KIRILI 

CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE • ROBERT MANGOLD • VIK MUNIZ • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI 

EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • RODNEY RIPPS • DONALD SULTAN • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 

THORNTON WILLIS • MICHAEL ZWACK 




PLATE 189 

Nancy Arlen 

American, 1947 - 2006 
Dorothy, 1979 (?) 

cast polyester cylinders with 
metal screws 

28x21 x 17 in. 



216 



THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 190 

Dixie Friend Gay 

American, born 1953 
Double Head #5, 1980 
ink and graphite on paper 
10 1/2x8 1/4 in. 







FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 217 






Us? 




PLATE 191 

Vik Muniz 

Brazilian, born 1961 

Untitled (Re-Creation 
of Car av agio's Medusa) 
(Peter Norton Family 
Christmas Project), 1999 

Bernardaud Limoges porcelain plate 
diameter: 12 3/8 in. 




PLATE 192 

Michael Zwack 

American, born 1949 

The History of the Worlds 2003 

raw pigment and oil on paper 

19 1/4x24 5/8 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 219 



WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee Art Museum 



MILWAUKEE 

JOE ANDOE • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHARLES CLOUGH • RICHARD FRANCISCO 
MICHAEL GOLDBERG • SIDNEY GORDIN • DON HAZLITT • MARTIN JOHNSON • STEVE KEISTER 
MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • JILL LEVINE • SOL LEWITT • ROBERT MANGOLD • KYLE MORRIS 
RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF • RODNEY RIPPS • DONALD SULTAN 
DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE • THORNTON WILLIS • BETTY WOODMAN 




PLATE 193 

Joe Andoe 

American, born 1955 
Untitled, n.d. 

lacquered acrylic on paper 
9 1/2x6 1/2 in. 



220 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




PLATE 194 

Michael Goldberg 

American, 1924 - 2007 
Untitled, 1990 

oil and charcoal on paper 
10 1/2x19 3/4 in. (irregular) 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



221 




PLATE 195 

Sidney Gordin 

American (born Soviet Union), 1918 - 1996 

Untitled, n.d. 

metal construction on wood base 

18 1/2x13x7 in. 




PLATE 196 

Kyle Morris 

American, 1918-1979 

Fall - Winter Series '72 No. 3, 1972 

ink on paper 

11 x 17 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 223 



WYOMING 

University of Wyoming Art Museum 

LARAMIE 

GREGORY AMENOFF • ROBERT BARRY • LYNDA BENGLIS • CHRYSSA • CHARLES CLOUGH 
RICHARD FRANCISCO • DAVID GILHOOLY • DON HAZLITT • STEWART HITCH • MARTIN JOHNSON 
STEVE KEISTER • MARK KOSTABI • CHERYL LAEMMLE • ROBERT LOBE • ROBERT MANGOLD 
JOSEPH NECHVATAL • RICHARD NONAS • LUCIO POZZI • EDDA RENOUF • EDWARD RENOUF 
RODNEY RIPPS • DONALD SULTAN • LORI TASCHLER • DARYL TRIVIERI • RICHARD TUTTLE 
URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD • JOE ZUCKER 




PLATE 197 

Gregory Amenoff 

American, born 1948 
Laumede #16, 1997 
gouache on paper, framed 
frame: 13 x 10 in. 



224 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 







8 






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b 










it 










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PLATE 198 

Chryssa 

American (born Greece), born 1933 
Analysis o/T, n.d. 

pencil and conte crayon on paper 
mounted on board 

sheet: 12x8 3/4 in. 
mount: 12 3/4x9 1/2 in. 




FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 225 




PLATE 199 

David Gilhooly 

American, born 1943 
~Frog Sandwich, 1977 
glazed ceramic with sesame seeds 
4x33/4x3 5/8 in. 



226 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



















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PLATE 200 

Joseph Nechvatal 

American, born 1951 

Tlte New Sobriety, L983 

graphite and crayon on paper 
11 1/16x 13 15/16 in. 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 227 



ARTIST INDEX 



GREGORY AMENOFF, American, bom 1948 
Laumede #16, page 224 

Wyoming 

ERIC AMOUYAL, Israeli, born 1962 
Seeds: New York #2, page 28 
Alabama 

WILLIAM ANASTASI, American, bom 1933 
Subway Drawing, page 40 
Arkansas, California, Georgia 

JOE ANDOE, American, born 1955 
Untitled, page 220 
Wisconsin 

CARL ANDRE, American, born 1935 
Untitled, page 44 
California 

STEPHEN ANTONAKOS, American, born 1926 

Five Incomplete Circles, page 76; Nov #2 1986, page 212 

Arizona, California, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, 
Texas, Washington 

RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ, American, born 1930 
Temple of Red with Orange, page 36 
Arizona 

NANCY ARLEN, American, 1947 - 2006 
Dorothy, page 216 
West Virginia 

ANNE ARNOLD, American, born 1925 
Cat, page 208 

Virginia 

RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER, American, born 1923 

Thousand Cubic Inches Prototype, page 152 v 

New York 

JO BAER, American, born 1929 
Untitled, page 200 

Utah 

CAREL BALTH, Dutch, born 1939 
Line I, page 204 
Vermont 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 229 



WILL BARNET, American, born 1911 

Study for Voxels (Herb with hands on chin), page 84; Untitled, page 192 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, 
Washington 

ROBERT BARRY, American, born 1936 
Untitled, page 128; Silver Collage, page 140 

All states 

ZIGI BEN-HAIM, American, born 1945 
Just Before '84, page 184 

South Carolina 

LYNDA BENGLIS, American, born 1941 

Gestural Study, page 92; Tacpere Maptom, page 112 

Arizona, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Douisiana, Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North 
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

JOSEPH BEUYS, German, 1921-1986 
Noiseless Blackboard Eraser, page 85 

Iowa 

JAMES BISHOP, American, born 1927 
Untitled, page 108 

Indiana, Douisiana, Massachusetts 

RONALD BLADEN, American (born Canada), 1918 - 1988 

Five Studies: 'Black Tower' and four unknown sculptures, page 144 

Massachusetts, New Jersey, Texas 

DIKE BLAIR, American, born 1952 
Untitled, page 172 
Oregon 

WILLIAM (BILL) BOLLINGER, American, 1939-1988 
Untitled, page 180 

Rhode Island 

GARY BOWER, American, born 1940 
Untitled, page 176 

Pennsylvania 

LISA BRADLEY, American, born 1951 
Inside Out, page 124 

Douisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Texas 

RICHMOND BURTON, American, born 1960 
Untitled, page 173 
Oregon 

ANDRE CADERE, Romanian, 1934 - 1978 
A-1 0203000 = 25=1x12=, page 1 04 
Maryland 



230 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



LOREN CALAWAY, American, born 1950 
Untitled, page 164 

Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Vermont 

PETER CAMPUS, American, born 1937 
Untitled, page 52 
Connecticut 

MCWILLIE CHAMBERS, American, born 1951 
Untitled woodcuts and 5. V. Elissa with Sun, page 1 56 

North Carolina 

ANN CHERNOW, American, born 1936 

J Get Along Without Ton Very Well, page 32 

Alaska 

CHRYSSA, American (born Greece), born 1933 
Analysis ofT, page 225 
Wyoming 

MICHAEL CLARK (CLARK FOX) American, bom 1946 

Dorothy, page 48 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, 
New Jersey, Oklahoma 

JOHN CLEM CLARKE, American, born 1937 
Untitled, page 141 
New Hampshire 

CHARLES CLOUGH, American, born 1951 
August Fifteenth, page 100; 3/24/02, page 160 

All states 

PINCHAS COHEN GAN, American, born 1942 
Figurative Circuit Nl, page 129 
Louisiana, Montana 

KATHLEEN COOKE, American, (born Ireland), 1908 - 1978 
Untitled, page 56 
Delaware 

PEGGY CYPHERS, American, born 1954 
Galaxy's Empire, page 185 

Illinois, Iowa, South Carolina, Washington 

GENE DAVIS, American, 1920 - 1985 
Untitled, page 88 
Kansas 

CLAUDIA DE MONTE, American, born 1947 
Claudia with Snake, page 1 1 6 

Hawaii, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 231 



STUART DIAMOND, American, born 1942 
Untitled, page 145 
New Jersey 

LOIS DODD, American, born 1927 
Butternut Branches, page 53 

Connecticut 

KOKI DOKTORI, Israeli (>), born 1941 
On the Run, page 153 
New York 

RACKSTRAW DOWNES, British, born 1939 
Disused Weather Station, Galveston, TX, page 101 

Maine, Massachusetts 

ROBERT DURAN, American, born 1938 
Untitled, page 41 
Arkansas 

BENNI EFRAT, Israeli, born 1936 
From ExtoX, page 109 

Massachusetts 

WILLIAM FARES, American, born 1942 
Untitled, page 77 
Illinois 

R.M. FISCHER, American, born 1947 
Doctor's Lamp, page 72 

Idaho, New Mexico, New York 

JOEL FISHER, American, born 1947 
Untitled, page 60 
Alaska, Florida 

RICHARD FRANCISCO, American, born 1942 

Studio Garden, page 37; Southern Lightening, page 209 

All states 

ADAM FUSS, British, born 1961 
Untitled, page 49 
Colorado 

CHARLES GAINES, American, born 1944 
Walnut Tree Orchard Set L, page 42 

Arkansas 

DIXIE FRIEND GAY, American, born 1953 
Double Head #5, page 217 
West Virginia 

JON GIBSON, American, born 1940 
30% page 80 
Indiana 



232 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



DAVID GILHOOLY, American, born 1943 
Frog Sandwich, page 226 

Wyoming 

MICHAEL GOLDBERG, American, 1924 - 2007 
Tarascon, page 110; Untitled, page 221 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Montana, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin 

RONALD GORCHOV, American, born 1930 
Untitled, page 120 
Kentucky, Mississippi 

SIDNEY GORDIN, American (born Soviet Union), 1918 - 1996 
Untitled, page 222 
Wisconsin 

DAN GRAHAM, American, born 1942 

For Laumier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, page 125 

California, Massachusetts, Missouri 

DENISE GREEN, American, born 1946 
Untitled (Steps), page 201 

Utah 

RODNEY ALAN GREENBLAT, American, born 1960 
Wall Pal, page 205 

Georgia, Vermont 

PETER HALLEY, American, bom 1953 
Prison 7, page 188 

Kentucky, South Dakota 

WILLIAM L. HANEY, American, born 1939 
If Need Be, page 186 
Missouri, South Carolina 

DON HAZLITT, American, born 1948 
Sunset, page 50; Shaped Edge, page 181 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, 
Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, 
Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, 
Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming v 

JENE HIGHSTEIN, American, born 1942 

Untitled, page 132; Aluminum Casting of Koom with One Door, page 133 

Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, 
New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas 

STEWART HITCH, American, 1940 - 2002 
Schenevus, page 33 

Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 233 



JIM HODGES, American, born 1957 

Blanket (Peter Norton Family Christmas Project), page 177 

Pennsylvania 

TOM HOLLAND, .American, born 1936 
Untitled #i, page 57 
Delaware 

JOHN HULTBERG, American, 1922 - 2005 
Suspension 5, page 1 74 
Oregon 

RALPH HUMPHREY, American, 1932 - 1990 
Untitled, page 168 

Florida, Oklahoma 

BRYAN HUNT, American, born 1947 
Quarry Study, page 93 

Idaho, Illinois, Kentucky, New Jersey 

DAVID HUNTER, American, born 1947 
Untitled #33, page 165 

Ohio 

PETER HUTCHINSON, British, born 1930 
Chemical Sculpture with Four Tubes, page 161 

Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, 
North Dakota 

WILL INSLEY, American, born 1929 
Untitled, page 64 
Georgia 

PATRICK IRELAND (1972 - 2008) AKA BRIAN O'DOHERTY, American, bom 1934 
Untitled, page 34 

Alaska 

RALPH IWAMOTO, American, born 1927 
Study Steps #3, page 157 

North Carolina 

NEIL JENNEY, American, born 1945 
Herb Vogel Thinking, page 148 

Montana, Nevada, New Mexico 

BILL JENSEN, American, born 1945 
Untitled, page 68 

Alaska, Hawaii, Louisiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, 
North Dakota 

MARTIN JOHNSON, American, born 1951 
Inure Self, page 113; Exerptunis, page 169 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, 
Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, 
Wyoming 



234 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



JOAN JONAS, American, born 1936 
Dog/Dcco\, page 45 
California, Hawaii, New Mexico 

TOBI KAHN, American, born 1952 
OKYN, page 178 
New York, Pennsylvania 

STEPHEN KALTENBACH, American, born 1940 

God gave Noah the rainbow sign: No More Water, The Fire Next Time, page 130 
Alaska, Montana, North Carolina 

STEVEN KARR, American, born 1923 
Untitled, page 187 
South Carolina 

STEVE KEISTER, American, born 1949 
Untitled, page 89; Untitled, page 189 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, 
Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Min- 
nesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New 
York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South 
Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, 
Wyoming 

ALAIN KIRILI, French, born 1946 
Commandment, page 196 

Alaska, Hawaii, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Okla- 
homa, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, 
Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia 

MARK KOSTABI, American, born 1960 
Progress of Beauty 3, page 1 14 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

MOSHE KUPFERMAN, Israeli (born Poland), 1926 - 2003 
Untitled, page 105 

Maryland, Oregon 

CHERYL LAEMMLE, American, born 1947 
Specters in the Forest, page 78; Untitled, page 193 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, 
Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

RONNIE LANDFIELD, American, born 1947 
Untitled, page 73 

Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Vermont, Washington 

MICHAEL LASH, American, born 1961 
Simon i a Sissy, page 1 1 7 

Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 235 



JOHN LATHAM, British, 1921 - 2006 
One Second Drawing, page 96 

Louisiana 

MICHAEL LATHROP, American, born 1958/59 (?) 
Vision of Nature III, page 190 

South Dakota 

WENDY LEHMAN, American, born 1945 
Going Dotty, page 182 

Alaska, Hawaii, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island 

ANNETTE LEMIEUX, American, born 1957 
Popular Wall Painting (after Ken), page 86 
Iowa 

JILL LEVINE, American, born 1953 
Suzy Hates Nancy, page 210 

Colorado, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South 
Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin 

SOL LEWITT, American, 1928 - 2007 
Maquettefor Complex Form MH #10, page 213 
Washington, Wisconsin 

ROY LICHTENSTEIN, American, 1923 - 1997 
Turkey Shopping Bag, page 74 
Idaho 

ROBERT LOBE, American, born 1945 
Untitled, page 162 

Michigan, North Dakota, Wyoming 

MICHAEL LUCERO, American, born 1953 

Untitled (Standing Figure with Spotlights), page 51; Untitled (Head Study) , page 97 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, 
New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington 

ROBERT MANGOLD, American, born 1937 
Violet/Black Zone Study, page 58 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio, Washington, West 
Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

SYLVIA PLIMACK MANGOLD, American, born 1938 
Untitled (August), page 197 

Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Texas 

ANDY MANN, American, 1949 - 2001 
X Matrix, page 38 

Arizona, Florida 

ALLAN MCCOLLUM, American, born 1944 

For Presentation and Display: Ideal Setting by Louise Lawler and Allan McCollum, page 29 
Alabama 



236 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



ANTONI MIRALDA, Spanish, born 1942 
Untitled, page 1 02 
Maine 

WILLIAM MOREHOUSE, American, 1929 - 1993 
Untitled, page 61 
Florida 

KYLE MORRIS, American, 1918 - 1979 
Fall - Winter Series '72 No. 3, page 223 

Wisconsin 

VIK MUNIZ, Brazilian, born 1961 

Untitled (Re-Creation of ' Caravaj^gio's Medusa) (Peter Norton Family Christmas Project), 

page 218 

West Virginia 

TAKASHI MURAKAMI, Japanese, born 1963 

Oval (Peter Norton Family Christmas Project), page 121 

Mississippi 

CATHERINE E. MURPHY, American, born 1946 
Still Life with Reproductions, page 202 

Utah 

ELIZABETH MURRAY, American, 1940 - 2007 
Green Cup - Brown Table, page 198 

Indiana, Texas , 

FORREST MYERS, American, born 1941 
Untitled, page 206 

Idaho, Illinois, Vermont 

GIUSEPPE NAPOLI, American, 1929 - 1967 
Untitled, page 194 

Tennessee 

JOSEPH NECHVATAL, American, born 1951 

The Moral Constant, page 191; The New Sobriety, page 227 

Alaska, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North 
Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Wyoming 

RICHARD NONAS, American, born 1936 

From Northern/Southern, page 175; Dry Creek Shorty, page 203 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, 
New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, 
Wisconsin, Wyoming 

DAVID NOVROS, American, born 1941 
Untitled, page 2 1 1 
Virginia 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 237 



NAM JUNE PAIK, American (born Korea), 1932 - 2006 
Untitled, page 54 
California, Connecticut, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island 

RAYMOND PARKER, American, 1922 - 1990 
Untitled, page 166 

Ohio, South Carolina 

BETTY PARSONS, American, 1900 - 1982 
Brush Up, page 43 

Arkansas, South Carolina, South Dakota 

HENRY C. PEARSON, American, 1914 - 2006 
The Aspects of the Case, page 170 
Oklahoma, Tennessee 

JOEL PERLMAN, American, born 1943 
Untitled, page 69 
Hawaii 

RICHARD PETTIBONE, American, born 1938 
Warhol's Marilyn Monroe, page 199 
Texas 

LIL PICARD, German, 1899 - 1994 
The Voxel's Napkinian Fantasy, page 98 

Louisiana, Vermont 

LARRY POONS, American, born 1937 
Untitled, page 1 54 
New Jersey, New York, Utah, Virginia 

KATHERINE PORTER, American, born 1941 
Untitled, page 149 
New Mexico 

LUCIO POZZI, American, born 1935 
Tamiglia, page 81; Nude, page 150 

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, 
Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Sourii Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, 
Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

DAVID RABINOWITCH, Canadian, born 1943 
Linear Mass in 3 Scales I, page 82 

Alabama, Indiana 

DAVID REED, American, born 1946 
Working Drawing for #508, page 70 
Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii 

EDDA RENOUF, American, born 1943 
Wing Piece II, page 83; August-Week 2, page 155 
All states 



238 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



EDWARD RENOUF, American, 1906-1999 

Untitled, page 136 

Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Nevada, West Virginia, 
Wisconsin, Wyoming 

JUDY RIFKA, American, born 1945 
Untitled, page 71 

Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New 
Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Washington 

RODNEY RIPPS, American, born 1950 
Galaxy, page 146 
New Jersey, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

ALEXIS ROCKMAN, American, born 1962 
Untitled, page 1 58 
North Carolina 

STEPHEN ROSENTHAL, American, born 1935 
ABRL, page 195 

Connecticut, Idaho, Tennessee 

CHRISTY RUPP, American, born 1949 
Pigeon Flock with Rats, page 179 

Idaho, Pennsylvania 

DAVID SALLE, American, born 1952 
Untitled, page 111 
Massachusetts 

JOHN SALT, British, bom 1937 

Untitled (Vogel living room drawn from memory), page 167 

Ohio 

ALAN SARET, American, born 1944 
Untitled, page 147 
California, Georgia, Illinois, New Jersey 

DAVID SAWIN, American, born 1922 
Formal Structure, page 142 
New Hampshire 

F. (FRANK) L. SCHRODER, American, born 1950 
Automatic Pilot, page 137 
Nevada 

HANS JURGEN [H.A.] SCHULT, German, born 1939 
Untitled, page 1 34 
Nebraska 

PETER SCHUYFF, Dutch, bom 1958 
Graham, page 1 63 
Kansas, North Dakota 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 239 



BARBARA SCHWARTZ, American, 1948 - 2006 
Herodia, page 207 

Hawaii, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New Mexico, New 
York, Vermont 

JOEL SHAPIRO, American, born 1941 
Model for Two Houses, page 183 
Rhode Island 

JUDITH SHEA, American, born 1948 
Untitled, page 171 
Alaska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon 

CINDY SHERMAN, American, born 1954 
Untitled, page 122 

Mississippi 

ALAN SHIELDS, American, 1944 - 2005 
Untitled, page 118 

Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island 

YINKA SHONIBARE, British, born 1962 

Doll House (Peter Norton Family Christmas Project), page 115 

Michigan 

LORNA SIMPSON, American, born 1960 

III (Peter Norton Family Christmas Project), page 106 

Maryland 

TONY SMITH, American, 1912 - 1980 
Untitled, page 214 
Washington 

KEITH SONNIER, American, born 1941 
BA -O-BAIII, page 87 

Iowa 

RICHARD STANKIEWICZ, American, 1922 - 1983 
Untitled, page 30 
Alabama 

ROBERT STANLEY, American, 1932 - 1997 
Crackerjack, page 62 
Florida, South Carolina, South Dakota 

PAT STEIR, American, born 1940 

Little Paynes Gray Brushstroke on a Paynes Gray Background, page 75; Red Cascade, page 94 

Delaware, Idaho, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia 

GARY STEPHAN, American, born 1942 
Untitled, page 119 

Minnesota 

MICHELLE STUART, American, born 1938 
July, New Hampshire, page 143 

New Hampshire 



240 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 



DONALD SULTAN, American, born 1951 
Pomegranates, page 63 

Delaware, Florida, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming 

LORI TASCHLER, American, born 1959 
Untitled, page 35 

Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota, 
Ohio, Oklahoma, Wyoming 

HAP TIVEY, American, born 1947 
Mirage #4, page 126 

Missouri, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota 

JOHN TORREANO, American, born 1941 
Untitled, page 107 
Maryland, Tennessee, Vermont 

DARYL TRIVIERI, American, born 1957 

Portrait of Herb and Dorothy, page 46; The Elements of Drawing, page 90 

All states 

RICHARD TUTTLE, American, born 1941 

Ball Drawing, page 3 1 ; Dorothy's Birthday Present, page 55; Two Black Dots with a Space In 
Between, page 65; Chicago 14, No. 1, page 99; Rome Drawing #63, page 1 5 1 

All states 

LYNN UMLAUF, American, born 1942 
Untitled, page 123 
Mississippi 

LEO VALLEDOR, American, 1936 - 1989 
Untitled, page 127 
Missouri, Utah 

RICHARD VAN BUREN, American, born 1937 
Untitled, page 135 

Nebraska, Vermont 

RUTH VOLLMER, American, 1903 - 1982 
Pentagon, page 131 

Hawaii, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Texas 

URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD, American (born Germany), born 1942 
Light Drawing 2/7/81 12 Noon, page 66 

Georgia, Kentucky, Texas, Wyoming 

ROBERT MARSHALL WATTS, American, 1923 - 1988 
Untitled (Assorted Eggs from American Supermarket), page 47 
California 

LAWRENCE WEINER, American, born 1940 
Paris, page 39 
Arizona, Texas 

BETTINA WERNER, Italian, born 1965 

Campi neri di pensicro (Black Fields of. Thought), page 138 

Nevada 



FIFTY WORKS FOR FIFTY STATES • 



241 



JOSEPH WHITE, American, bom 1938 
Untitled, page 91 

Kansas 

THORNTON WILLIS, American, born 1936 
The Tall Patriot, page 79 

Georgia, Illinois, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, 
West Virginia, Wisconsin 

TERRY WINTERS, American, born 1949 
Hand Line Reflection Method 15/100, page 215 

Washington 

TOD WIZON, American, born 1952 
Untitled, page 103 
Maine, Oklahoma 

MARTIN WONG, American, 1946 - 1999 
Untitled, page 95 

Kentucky 

BETTY WOODMAN, American, born 1930 
Garden Corner, page 67 
Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, Wisconsin 

MARIO YRISSARY, American, born 1933 
Untitled, page 159 
North Carolina 

LARRY ZOX, American, 1937 - 2006 
Scissors Jack Series, page 139 
Nevada 

JOE ZUCKER, American, born 1941 
Candle, page 59 

Delaware, Wyoming 

MICHAEL ZWACK, American, born 1949 
The History of the World, page 219 
West Virginia 



242 • THE DOROTHY AND HERBERT VOGEL COLLECTION 




NATIONAL 
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