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Full text of "Douglas "20" police journal"

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SAN FR '. 




RYROOM 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Not to be taken from the Library 



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READ IN THIS ISSUE: 



Capture of Murderous Thugs 
Famous Colusa County Murder 

By Officer Peter Fanning 

Our Fire and Police Departments 

By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 

Modern Crime and Causes 

By Judge C. S. Hardy 

Careless Auto Drivers 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

SAN FRANCISIPO POLICE DEPARTMENT 



PANTAGEs Theatre 

SHOW PLACE OF THE WORLD 



C^he greatest it\j 
<Vdudex^iJ/e ^ 



Market St. at Civic Center 



C^he finest ii\j 
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ADMIRATION 

THE MILD TAMPA CIGAR 
SHAW- LEAHY CO., Inc. 






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and Better Service 



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OFFICERS 

THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR. 

GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

A. D. PLUGHOFF 

VICE-PRES. AND TREASURER 

G. G. BUNDY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 

G. L. PICKRELL 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 






Joseph H. Cote— Manager northern Division 

WEST AMERICAN BUILDING 

1431 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Phone Graystone 7700 



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DIRECTORS 

WM. L. HUGHSON. chairman 

board of directors 
JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G. BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO- DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A. FINCH 
O- R- FULLER 
P- H. GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H. LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 
JOHN F- MCKNIGHT 
ROBT. W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A- D. PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI, Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L. V. STARR 



I^ovember. J 926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 




Members of the Police Dept. — 

Your Credit is so good at The Redlick- Newman Co. that we require 

INOTHIINQ DOWIN 

on Purchases up to $50.00 PAY AS LITTLE AS $1.00 A WEEK 

Furniture — Carpets — Stoves — Crockery — Linoleum — Draperies — Phonographs 



EDLICK NEWMANf, 

. COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS Vi; 
SoutheastCorner- 17 thand Mission Sts. 



y.^c- 4 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovemher, 1926 



The things we depend upon most we appreciate least 

5c worth of ELECTRICITY 



WHAT A WONDERFUL NICKEL'S WORTH IT IS 



5c 
5c 



5c 



spent for electricity wiU run a 
washing machine over 3 hours. 5C 

spent for electricity will make a 

hot kitchen comfortable with an ^Q 

electric fan for over 1 1 hours. 

spent for electricity will run a 5C 
sewing machine for 15 hours. 



spent for electricity will keep 
the refrigerator cold for over 11 
hours. 

spent for electricity will run a 
vacuum cleaner for over 5 hours. 

spent for electricity will hght 
your reading lamp for 4 long 
evenings. 



Since 1913 the cost of living increased 65% while the cost of electricity 

DECREASED. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

•PACIFIC SERVICE •• 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
hy Calif ornians 











THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 




MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 




MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 


HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WFTHDRAWN QUARTERLY 


4 


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• 




• 



Vol. IV. NOVEMBER, 1926 

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No. 13. 



Murderous Thugs Jailed 

Cruel Croo\s Rounded Up After 'Weed's Hunt By Police 



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As this magazine was going to press last month, 
San Francisco was shocked by one of the most 
atrocious and horrible series of wanton murder, 
assault and robbery that has been recorded in 
this city. For three nights three young bandits 
shot to kill, robbed their victims and left them 
dead or dying. For ten days people were in fear 
of their lives, but with the quickness and dis- 
patch for which the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment is noted, the safety of the city's citizens 
was safeguarded after the second onslaught of 
the murderous thugs, and it was as safe to tra- 
vei'se the streets at night as it is in the day 
time, so far as any acts of banditry was con- 
cerned. 

Four men were killed, three others injured and 
several more robbed. The perpetrators of these 
horrible deeds worked quickly and changed their 
places of operation with all the speed made pos- 
sible by stolen automobiles. 

On the first night the bandits engaged in a 
pistol duel with Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 
and Sergt. James Neeley after they had killed a 
man. The stick-ups had a little too much start on 
the officers and escaped. 

As was said in the opening paragraph, in less 
than ten days the police, by fast work, had the 
three boys, booze-ci'azed, locked up in jail, two 
confessing, and third, shot through the neck, 
maintaining his innocence. They were indicted 
by the grand jury and they are now in the su- 
perior court, the department presided over by 
Superior Judge Harold Louderback, going through 
the preliminary stages of their appearance be- 
fore a court of justice. 

These facts have all been set forth in the news- 
papers, but there was brought forth a condition 
in the police department that should have all the 
emphasis possible by woi'ds, and that is the loy- 
alty of the members of our police organization. 



of their willingness to work 20 hours a day, 24 if 
necessary, to safeguard the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco. Of their ready response to the call for 
duty, of the giving of their automobiles to patrol 
the streets and their answer to the call for vol- 
unteers by the Chief, were things that make those 
who head the department proud and can make the 
citizens feel proud. 

On the night of October 13th when the bandits 
came out for their second and last raid, people 
throughout the city were thrown into a state of 
terror. Chief O'Brien, Captain Matheson of the 
Detective Bureau, Capt. William J. Quinn, chief 
clerk, Capt. Arthur Layne, Lieut. Michael Rior- 
dan, with other commissioned officers, hastened to 
the Hall of Justice. From the Chief's office re- 
quests were sent to the radio broadcasting sta- 
tions that they send out an emergency call for 
men to return to their stations whither they may 
be. The response was wonderful. In less than 
half an hour there was such a congestion of 
traffic at Kearny, Clay and Washington streets, 
caused by the scores of police officers reporting 
to headquarters in their machines, that traffic offi- 
cers had to be placed on duty to keep the men 
moving to the places they were assigned, and to 
keep the streets clear. 

Men were assigned to street patrol in automo- 
biles, two and three men to a machine. Nothing 
was done haphazard, every block of the city was 
covered from sundown to sunrise. Men worked 
16, 20 and as higl: as 21 hours at a stretch. None 
complained, and when the Chief asked for volun- 
teers to continue the patrol, over 60 per cent of 
the department responded. i\Iore than enough. 

Another feature that was good to see was the 
wonderful co-operation of the San Francisco Fii*e 
Department. 

Chief Thomas Murphy sent word to Chief 
O'Brien that he could spare many men and ma- 



Page 6 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, 1926 



chines. These were accepted to a certain num- 
ber and it is a matter of record that the firemen 
did as splendid patrol work as the police. This 
spirit of co-operation is indeed a gi-eat thing, and 
none appreciates it more than Chief O'Brien. 

Then there was the Army. The commandant 
at the Presidio phoned in to ask if he could dis- 
patch men, any number, to assist in patrolling the 
streets, in doing anything to lessen the dangers. 
He said the Army would do anything suggested to 
help out in the matter. The offer was received 
with the greatest of appreciation, another indica- 
tion of splendid co-operation. However, it was 
not necessary to ask anything of the Army au- 
thorities but to close the Presidio reservation and 
check on all strangers. This request was readily 
granted. 

Business men, manufacturers, automobile deal- 
ers, all sent in word they would help in every way 
possible. Men came to the Hall of Justice to 
offer their services. It was indeed an inspiring 
sight, and shows just how closely associated are 
the various units of the city government, the na- 
tional government, the people and the business 
men. 

With some 2,000 men patrolling the streets, the 
members of the Detective Bureau, under Captain 
Matheson, proceeded to follow every clew. Work- 
ing at top speed, night and day, the details under 
Sergt. McLoughlin, Lieuts. Henry Powell of the 
Pawnshop Detail, Bernard McDonald of the Auto- 
mobile Detail, Charles Dullea of the Homicide 
Squad, Sergt. Richmond Tatham of the Burglary 
Detail, left nothing undone. The vags were 
rounded up, suspicious characters taken into cus- 
tody and every man who had no good excuse for 
hanging around places where honest people fail 
to hang around were given a questioning. 

Finally Detective Sergt. Louis DeMatei and De- 
tective Patrick Wafer got a tip, and that tip led 
to the arrest of Lawrence Weeks and Clarence 
Kelly. Weeks was brought in first. He confessed, 
implicating Kelly. Kelly was then captured after 
being shot by Wafer. Weeks also implicated a 
17-year-old boy named Papadaches. A day or so 
after Weeks was captured, Papadaches was ar- 
rested and he likewise confessed, giving even 
greater details than Weeks. The gi-and jury 
promptly indicted the three for murder, assault 
to commit murder, assault to commit robbery, 
robbery and grand larceny. 

After the three men were safely behind prison 
bars a gang of their kind, as an act of revenge, 
went down in San Mateo county and set fire to 
some houses owned by Paddy Wafer. This gang 
was also rounded up and are in jail in Pvedwood 
City awaiting trial for arson. 

The wanton murderers, the three in jail here 
committed, stand without parallel in this state. 
Men were shot down and not even robbed. A 



young taxicab driver, Walter Swanson, was held 
up, robbed, shot dead, thrown out of his cab, and 
the two bandits working that night used his car 
to commit their other acts of banditry. 

But like all other law breakers who will try 
their hand in this city now and then their term 
of activity was short-lived, and they are on a 
fair way to stretch a piece of hemp, all excepting 
Papadaches whose youth will save him from the 
gallows. 

And all praise is due the San Francisco Police 
Department, first for safeguarding our citizens, 
and secondly at the same time keeping up the 
hunt for the murderers. It is something we can 
always look back upon with pride. 

Following is copy of a letter that the Chief of 
Police forwarded last month to the Board of 
Police Commissioners : 
Honorable Board of Police Commissioners: 

I wish to call your attention to the loyalty and 
devotion to duty, as exemplified by the men of San 
Francisco's Police Department, during the trying 
police situation which lasted from October 10th, 
1926, up to this date. 

The members of the Board are fully acquainted 
with the conditions from a police standpoint, that 
were presented to this department on Monday 
evening, October 11, 1926 — prior to eight o'clock 
on that evening a call was broadcasted from the 
radio broadcasting stations, requesting the men 
of the department to report immediately at their 
district headquarters, and within an hour and a 
half almost the full strength was engaged in ac- 
tive police duty, even men who were on their 
vacations reported for duty. 

During the early hours of the morning a call 
was sent to each police district headquarters for 
volunteers among the members of the department 
who would be off duty at 6 p. m. on the following 
day to report for duty with their privately-owned 
automobiles, a report to be submitted by the com- 
manding officer of each district at 2 p. m. on said 
date, showing the number of men and the number 
of automobiles. The response was so gi'eat in 
numbers of men and in numbers of automobiles 
that it was possible after the first night to divide 
the men and automobiles so they would work only 
every other night, and the city was patrolled and 
policed in a more efficient manner than at any 
previous time. 

The men of the 8 a. m. to 4 p. m. platoon re- 
turned at 6 p. m. each evening, working into the 
early hours of the next morning, then returning 
for regular duty. Members of the 12 midnight 
to 8 a. m. platoon reported on at 6 p. m., remaining 
on duty until 6 and 8 a. m. the following morning. 
Members of the 4 p. m. to 12 midnight platoon re- 
ported on at 3 : 45 p. m. and remained on duty until 
2 a. m. and later the following morning. 
(Continued on Page 33) 



}^ovemb:r, J 926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 7 



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PETER FANNING 



Famous Murder in Colusa County 

An IntcrcsUng Article By Officer Peter Fanninc 

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In the year of 1883, 

Dr. Hugh J. Glenn who 

was known over nearly 

the entire world as tlie 

Farmer King, was 

murdered by one of his 

employes in Colusa 

County, which caused 

a high state of excite- 
ment in the commu- 
nity. 

Huron Miller, who 

had been employed by 

Doctor Glenn, was the 

author of the foul 

deed. It seemed that 

he and the Doctor had 

some difficulty a few 

days previous when 
Miller called the Doctor a liar wlio later knocked 
him down and then discharged him. ]\Iiller re- 
turned the next day carrying a double barreled 
muzzle-loading shotgun and upon seeing the Doc- 
tor standing on the porch of the hotel where he 
was stopping, opened fire, shooting him in the 
back of the head. The Doctor fell to the floor in 
an insensible condition. Miller started across the 
road into the fields and was pursued by a foreman 
of the Doctor's ranch named R. M. Cochran. 
Miller raised his gun as if going to shoot, when 
Cochran fired at him with a rifle, the ball entering 
the fleshy part of ]\Iiller's right leg just below the 
thigh. Miller then surrendered and was brought 
to the town of Willowa and charged with the mur- 
der. 

Dr. Hugh James Glenn had an eventful life be- 
ing brought up in Missouri, and had been given 
every available opportunity at private schools, 
receiving an education also in a medical college at 
St. Louis where he went through a course of lec- 
tures. Upon the Mexican War breaking out, he 
v.-as seized \\'ith a spirit of patriotism and enlisted 
in a division of the armj% participating in several 
battles. Later he received an honorable discharge, 
after which he found his way back to St. Louis 
where he continued his medical studies and grad- 
uated from there. A little later he started across 
the plains to seek his fortune in California with a 
party that was composed of three companies and 
several ex teams. After an adventurous journey 
the party arrived safely in Sacramento. He then 
went to the mines and staked a claim out at a place 
called the "Murderer's Bar," on the middle fork 
of the American River near Colma, where the 
original gold discovery was made in California. 



Remaining there for a few months he returned to 
Sacramento with a little stake he made in the 
mine and procured an ox team carrying freight 
from that city to Coloma and other mining points 
in the mountains. After teaming for about five 
months he opened up a livery stable in Sacra- 
mento and a little later he returned to Missouri 
and brought his family out and settled in the 
northern part of Colusa County. He lived in this 
place for about three years superintending a sheep 
ranch and buying and selling cattle. He then be- 
came associated with a man by name of S. E. 
Wilson in the cattle trade, the markets being found 
at Weaverville, Shasta County, and other mining 
centers. He then sold out his interest and with 
his family returned to Missouri, intending to re- 
main in that state permanently, but his restless 
spirit prompted him to return to California again. 
With him he brought a large drove of horses and 
cattle. In the northern part of Utah the horses 
and cattle were stampeded by Indians and Dr. 
Glenn, unattended, went on the back track after 
h'is property. He had gone but a few miles when 
he sighted his horses, and at the same moment 
seven or eight Indians made their appearance and 
immediately charged on the Doctor. The latter 
had no weapon but a revolver, while the Indians 
were fully armed with guns, so he began a slow 
retreat, keeping himself protected as well as pos- 
sible by rocks and trees. Shots were frequently 
exchanged but without effect and it was not long 
before Dr. Glenn had expended all of his ammuni- 
tion. The Indians, ascertaining this, made ar- 
rangements with a gi'and rush and the Doctor 
thought his last moment was at hand, when sud- 
denly a dozen shots rapidly fired, announced a res- 
cuing party, consisting of his companions who had 
heard the firing and came up as quickly as pos- 
sible. After getting together the animals again 
the journey w'as continued and the company ar- 
rived safely in Sacramento. For several years 
following. Dr. Glenn traveled back and forth over 
the plains with droves of cattle, horses and mules, 
varying the trip occasionally by going to New 
Orleans to sell in the markets there. Prices were 
ver.v high in California, owing to the scarcity of 
horses and mules. 

A few years later upon learning this Di\ Glenn 
stai'ted from IMissouri with a large drove of 
horses. On the way over a severe snow storm was 
experienced, in which man and animals came near 
perishing. A delay of three weeks was only fol- 
lowed by other unfortunate forced stoppages, 
and upon arriving again in California, prices had 
(Continued on Page 38) 



Page « 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovemher, 1926 



I Remember When- 



Reminiscences of An Old-Time Police Reporter 

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Bob Hogan was a detective detailed in practically all of 
the District Attorney's offices up to a few years ago. He 
was one of the best known detectives on the force and 



Otto Heyneman was the first police stenographer. He 
worked under the late Chief Lees and later, in engaging 
in the private detective business, adopted the name of Lees. 

He is now dead. 

* * * 

Ed Ring, one of the oldest Central Station men prior to 
the fire, was later a Police Court bailiff and is now doing 
duty at the Western Addition Station under Captain 

Coulter. 

* » * 

Jim Ward, he of the red hair, was another of the old 
time Central patrolmen. Jim was always one of the most 
genial men on the force and is now a corporal at the North 

End. 

* * * 

George Weatherford was connected with the Mission 
Station all of his police life until recently transferred to 
the Potrero as a corporal. He is the champion story 

teller of the department. 

* * * 

Bob Williams was detailed with District Attorney Fick- 
ert. Before that he spent years at the Southern and is 
now a sergeant at the Park looking after the wide ex- 
panse of real estate in the Sunset. 

* * * 

Thomas H. White was an o'd time motor cycle cop with 
P. B. Mahoney. Tom is at present detailed to protect the 

banks at the West Portal of Twin Peaks Tunnel. 

* * * 

Burr Love was on the floor of the old City Prison before 
the fire. Before that he patrolled a beat on Battery and 
Sansome in the second section of the Central. His wife 
was, after his death, a matron in the City Prison. Burr 
was one of the few policemen with whiskers and was al- 
ways jovial with his contagious laugh. 

* * * 

Bert Wren, before he went out in plain clothes in the 
Central before the fire, patrolled Stockton street. Frank 
McGrayan, with whom Bert was detailed, had Pacific 
street when it was tough. Wren is now connected with 

District Attorney Brady's office. 

* * * 

Charles Cody, one of the old time detectives under Cap- 
tain of Detectives John Seymour, worked on the Nora 
Fuller murder case. Nora Fuller was choked to death in 
a vacant flat at 2211 Sutter street after being foully mis- 
treated by her murderer. 

* * * 

Achille Ross was foreman of the Coroner's jury which 
heard evidence in the Nora Fuller case and recommended 
a State reward of $5,000 for the apprehension of, at that 
time, an unknown slayer. 

* * * 

Thomas P. Gibbons, now at the Harbor, drove a stage 
over thirty years ago in Tuolumne County where holdups 
were moi'e than frequent. Lieutenant "Hank" Helms, re- 
tired, also drove stage in the same part of California. 
Helms for years bought all the horses used by the depart- 
ment. 

* * * 

George Geimann was a patrolman on Grant avenue from 
Market to California. He was always a pleasant officer 
and acquired the sobriquet of "Dandy George" because 
he was always neatly dressed. George is now clerk at 
the Bush after having spent many years in the various 
offices about the Hall of Justice. 



helped unravel some of the famous cases during the regime 

of Chief Lees. 

* * * 

Fred Esola, now United States Marshal, was a lieuten- 
ant in charge of the old California street station located on 
Califoi-nia street just east of Kearny. There are a few 
old timers in the Central who worked out of that station. 
After the Charter went into effect Esola became Property 
Clerk under Chiefs Sullivan and Wittman. He resigned 

when Jerry Dinan was made Chief. 

* * * 

Captain Eugene Wall was a patrolman with retired 
Captain Bamey McManus. They covered the whole West- 
ern Addition from Market street to the old cemeteries 

facing Presidio avenue. 

* * * 

Ed Meredith and Tom Handley, two of the very oldest in 
the Central, have for years taken care of the morals of the 
North Beach District. Both are still going strong at the 

Central and still look like young fellows. 

* * * 

Joe Nolan, now patrolling the east and west streets 
around the Hall of Justice used to be a copper on Ninth 
street when a policeman could have a dozen fights in a 
night. Joe trained under the master — Johnny Spillane. 
He was in the upper office under Captain Mooney. 

4: ^ He 

Another of Captain Spillane's men, Pat O'Connell, had 
the Howard street beat in the Southern. Pat was for 
years with Jimmy Regan doing detective work in the 
Southern District. Pat and Jimmy are two of the oldest 

detectives in the bureau. 

* * * 

Charles Uhte was for years in the City Hall District. 

He is now on Devisadero sti'eet. 

» * * 

Jim Doran, now a .sergeant with Captain Bunner at Bay 
View, was for years a patrolman connected with the 

Central. 

* * * 

Arno Dietel was for years in the Mission and Southern 
Districts. He is now alternating with Leo Tackney in 

charge of the Detective Bureau at night. 

* * * 

Al Williams (Handsome Al) was patrolman for years 
on the Beach; was afterward Police Court Bailiff' and is 
now giving the ladies a treat in the Central District. Al 
has a smile that is winning, and despite his years in the 

business still looks like a kid. 

* * * 

The late Captain Pat Shea patrolled a beat on Fifth 
street, was a lieutenant at the Central, later Captain of 

Detectives and died as Captain of the Harbor District. 

■1= * * 

Fred Suttman, now a sergeant under Captain Fred 
Lemon, was the first department man to be put in charge 

of the moral squad. 

* * * 

Warren Phillips now detailed to shoot cats in the Park, 
rode a horse in the Park and Sunset. He was also, when 
autos came into real vogue, a trouble shooter out of the 
Park Station. 

(To Be Continued) 



?^ovember, 1926 



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"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



s^^CHlEFS PAGE 

By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 




Paper Submitted by DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, Chief 
of Police of San Francisco and President of 
the International Association of Chiefs 
of Police, to the 33rd Annual Con- 
vention of the Pacific Coast 
Association of Fire 
Chiefs. 

Taking into consideration the objects to be ac- 
complislied by police and fire departments in their 
respective spheres I feel we can safely assert 
that there are no two branches of government so 
closely allied in their functions as these two de- 
partments. They are established, organized and 
maintained for the specific purpose of manning the 
front line trenches in peace times against the 
gi'eatest enemies of organized society and civil- 
ized government. Indeed, we can better visualize 
the necessity for their existence and the services 
they render by considering the chaos and confu- 
sion which would exist were it not for the activi- 
ties they engage in. These two departments prop- 
erly co-ordinated and efficiently functioning give 
the highest possible degree of security to the law- 
abiding citizens. Fire departments as a whole, 
and through their sub-bureaus, are always on the 
watch for the removal of fire hazards. In other 
words, in the first instance, preventive measures 
are engaged in and where fires actually occur the 
sei'vices rendered by a fire department in extin- 
guishing it and preventing its further, spread is 
indeed a valuable asset to organized society. As 
analogous to that we have police departments 
functioning along parallel lines. In the first in- 
stance, we have crime prevention bureaus estab- 
lished, having for their object the frustrating of 
criminal plans ; observing weak points in buildings 
and structures which encourage the criminal in 
carrying out his unlawful object and finally, where 
crime has been committed we have the d'epartment 
as a whole, as well as the individual members, run- 
ning down every angle toward bringing the perpe- 
trator before the bar of justice. 

While the foregoing may be stated as funda- 
mental and general principles, nevertheless it is 
self-evident that the object to be accomplished — 
the peace and security of the human being in his 
person and property — by both departments is the 
same excepting that tliey operate in diflferent 
provinces which are closely allied. 

Having in mind the general good of tlie com- 
munitv and the necessity for a close co-operation 



between state, county and municipal officials, it 
is hardly necessary to say that the workings of a 
fire and police department must be of close in- 
terest to each other. 

Of course, the details may differ in different 
communities and no doubt the efficiency of one 
county or municipal department may be increased 
by taking advice and counsel with the heads of 
other municipal and county departments. 

I have always been a strong advocate of con- 
ventions for the reason that the discussions car- 
ried on, the papers written, the lectures given, by 
men who are experts in their particular branches 
are highly advantageous to others. 

Commenting on conditions in the City and 
County of San Francisco, I feel we can safely say 
that there is a great deal in common between the 
San Francisco Fire and Police Departments. 
Where a certain condition is observed by the men 
of one department which aflf'ects the other de- 
partment, that information is immediately trans- 
mitted to the responsible heads and in fact, our 
responsibilities to the people of this municipality 
are set forth in our charter based largely upon 
the same foundation. We are responsible for our 
living conditions directly to the people and we can 
say with pride that we are the servants of worthy 
masters as our experience has been that our rea- 
sonable requests have been always met with in a 
spirit of liberality. 

Among the many acts of co-operation between 
the fii'e and police departments of the City and 
County of San Francisco there is one which is of 
a great deal of importance in dealing \nth fire 
fighting. Of C0U1S3, it is a matter of common 
knowledge that a ready response to fires is very 
essential on the part of a fire department. Ave- 
nues of travel must be maintained and kept open 
— in fact, every other line of activity on our public 
highways must be surrendered to the apparatus of 
the fire department responding to a fire. It has 
always been our aim and object to give every as- 
sistance along traffic lines to the fire department 
and I might add this privilege as to right-of-way 
has been recognized by the laws of our state and 
the ordinances of our municipality. 

Supplementing these laws and regulations the 

rules of our police department provide for actual 

co-operation from a police standpoint at the scenes 

of fire. The superior officer in charge of a given 

(Continued on Page 40) 



Page 10 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



'M.ovemher, 1926 



Modern Crime and Causes 

Bv Carlos S. Hardy, Judge of the Superior Court, Los Angeles, Written EspeciaUy for the Los Angeles Examiner 

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It is generally recognized that there is more 
crime today than ever before in the world's his- 
tory, and that is true throughout the world, but 
especially so in America. The history of the 
world and of our own country shows that, with 
the increase of population, there is an increase of 
crime. The more cities there are, and the greater 
the city and town population, the greater the 
amount of crime. 

It is a noteworthy fact that there is very little 
crime committed in the country districts away 
from the cities, and the more sparsely settled are 
the country districts, the less there is of crime. 

It is seemingly difficult for many members of 
the human family to adapt themselves to the com- 
plicated social life prevailing in the cities, and 
this is especially true when the cities are new or 
growing fast. 

The cost of crime in treasure is the greatest 
expenditure of tlie American people. The money 
cost of crime annually in the United States ex- 
ceeds ten billion dollars, which is almost an in- 
conceivable sum. It is about half the total cost 
of America's participation in the World War. 
Think of the cost of our part in a great World 
War, with over four million soldiers in our army 
and navy, who fought for more than one year, 
and the entry to realize that crime costs each year 
about one-half of the cost of that war. 

And what of the cost in degraded manhood and 
womanhood, and the tears and broken hearts and 
wrecked lives? About one million of our people 
are annually in crime. Wasted and misspent en- 
ergies and lives, and all for no good purpose, be- 
cause crime never pays. No one ever profited 
from committing a crime. Crime is a miserable 
scourge that plagues society and destroys every 
one who engages in it. 

Fifty years ago those committing crime were 
generally of mature age. There was very little 
juvenile crime, so little that there was not a 
juvenile court in the whole United States. 

Times have changed, and the present day crimi- 
nal is a youth, and every city in the country has 
a court whose time is taken up with crimes com- 
mitted by children. The most violent crimes, 
such as burglary and highway robbery are now 
chiefly committed by boys of 16 to 21 years of 
age. 

The great majority of those charged with 
crime are under 2.5 years of age. They are mere 
youths who have never yet started in any busi- 
ness nor, as a rule, have ever done any real work, 
except possibly an occasional job for a day "or so. 



There are fifteen or twenty automobiles stolen 
every day in Los Angeles, and the thieves are 
mostly boys. 

While presiding as judge in a criminal court, 
I have had exceptional opportunities to add prac- 
tical knowledge to my theoretical knowledge of 
criminality, and from this study of hundreds of 
cases under actual observation, I can and do state 
that present day crime is a social disease. Its 
causes are clearly seen, and, as in the case of all 
diseases, knowing the causes of disease, the cui'e 
is discoverable. Crime is not confined to any 
class of society, but crime invades all classes, the 
rich and the poor, the educated and the ignorant 
are all alike victims. 

Recently, on one day in my court when sen- 
tences were being pronounced on the week's col- 
lection of cases, there were thirty odd persons be- 
fore me who had either confessed their guilt or 
had been proven guilty, and over 90 per cent of 
them were under 25 years of age. 

The parents of two or three were well-to-do, 
while the large majority came from the gi'eat 
middle class of fairly prosperous people, and the 
remainder from the poorest homes. There was, 
liowever, an outstanding fact common to about 
all of the cases, namely, that the accused were 
far below the normal in education, but few of 
them liaving got above the fourth grade in com- 
mon school, and were almost totally lacking in 
moral sense. Many of them were also physically 
subnormal. 

Investigation further showed that there had 
been practically no restraint or discipline in their 
home lives, but on the contrary they had done 
pretty mucli as they pleased all of their lives, 
having eked out the best sort of existence they 
could by living upon the support of others. It 
was formerly supposed that education was a sure 
preventive of crime, but it is not so, although it 
undoubtedly greatly lessens crime. 

The recent Loeb and Leopold cases in Chicago, 
as well as many others, have satisfactorily shown 
that intellectual development alone does not pro- 
tect against crime. There is but one perfect pre- 
ventive, and that is true moral consciousness. 
Crime can be prevented by proper moral training, 
and it is greatly lessened by education and intel- 
lectual development. The complete preventive 
treatment against crime can best begin at the 
mother's knee, and in the father's lap, where duty 
to fellow man and love to God sanctifies the family 
home. 

C Continued on Page 34) 



November, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 11 



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Highway Traffic Men Meet 



Prepare Tv^eif Motor Lmws 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiii^ 

Lt. C. L. Hemphill, veteran head of the Oakland 
Ti'afiic Bureau, on Nov. 11, v^^as elected president 
of tiie California Ass'n of Highway Patrolmen, 
succeeding- Capt. Henry Gleeson of San Francisco, 
and the association, concluding its annual conven- 
tion, recommended that the next legislature make 
five changes in motor traffic laws. Other officers 
selected for 1927 are: 

M. F. Brown, Los Angeles, first vice-president. 
Fred Lotsey, San Francisco, second vice-presi- 
dent. 

Otto Langer, San Diego, third vice-president. 
C. K. Harder, Sacramento, fourth vice presi- 
dent. 

Ernst jMcCluskey, Fresno, secretary. 
The five suggested law changes are as follows: 
That state traffic officers shall be selected 
through civil service rather than on recommenda- 
tion of county supervisors. 

That it be unlawful to drive any automobile hav- 
ing a cut-out which can be operated from the 
driver's seat. 

That one dollar a year be charged for each au- 
tomobile driver's license. 

That injured traffic officers henceforth be com- 
pensated out of motor vehicle funds rather than 
through the regular State compensation channels. 
That driving an automobile while under the in- 
fluence of intoxicants or narcotics be made a mis- 
demeanor instead of a felony, as at present. 

This last recommendation was made, according 
to an announcement, in an effort to expedite con- 
victions which are said to be difficult to secure un- 
der the felony provision. The "five-day" grace 
period allowed arrested motorists under the felony 
clause before they appear for hearings would be 
eliminated if the association's request is granted. 
The convention recommended a minimum pen- 
alty of $100 fine and ten days in jail for drivers 
convicted of drunkenness or narcotic addiction, 
and a maximum penalty of $500 fine and six 
months in jail. 

A plea for uniform traffic laws in California, 
both as a measure of protection to the public and 
as an aid to motorists in law observance, was 
urged by Mayor James Rolph, Jr. of San Fran- 
cisco in an address November 10 before the Cali- 
fornia Association of Highway Patrolmen in an- 
nual convention at Sacramento. 

"There is no reason", said Mayor Rolph, "why 
Los Angeles traffic law^s against jay-walking, left- 
hand turns, etc., should be different from those 
enforced in San Francisco. The traffic regulations 
should be uniform throughout California. Uni- 
formity, I believe, would bring- about gi-eater 



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protection to the public, and also assist the motor- 
ists in obeying the law." 

Mayor Rolph praised the traffic officers for the 
splendid service, he says, they are rendering the 
State in patrolling the highways, and he admon- 
ished them to be particularly zealous in "taking 
care of the careless and drunken drivers who con- 
stitute a menace to the public and careful auto- 
ists." 

The Mayor told of the efforts being made in 
San Francisco to master the traffic problem, which 
he characterized as one of the most serious con- 
fronting California. He declared that in the case 
of San Francisco the problem could be relieved 
to a greater extent by providing more highways 
leading out of the city. 

"To provide for the traffic of the future", said 
Mayor Rolph, "we must have four more high- 
ways leading out of San Francisco, which is a 
city of automobiles and the converging point for 
Northern California travel." 



THINGS POLICEMEN SHOULD REMEMBER 

Information has reached this office to the effect 
that a lottery purporting to emanate from Monte 
Carol (Monaco) has been organized in this city by 
persons bent upon defrauding local residents. 

The information reaching this office is that any 

such enterprise is merely a swindle. Should any 

such entei-prise be discovered here proper action 

will be taken under our lottery laws. 
^ ^ Hi 

In the future, where arrests are made in any of 
the existing labor controversies, report of such 
arrest shall be made in DUPLICATE. Such re- 
ports shall be forwarded to this office in the regu- 
lar manner, one copy of which will be sent to As- 
sistant District Attorney Harman Skillin by this 
office. The officer making the arrest or appearing 
in court to prosecute such case shall see Mr. Har- 
man Skillin or Mr. Peter Mullins, Assistant Dis- 
trict Attorney, at the office of the District Attor- 
ney, 333 Kearny sti'eet. The duplicate reports 
mentioned in this section refer to those made by 

company commanders. 

* * * 

Complaint is made at this office that punch- 
boards are being unlawfully operated at many 
places throughout this city and county. 

You will have a survey made with reference to 
tlie foregoing and you will instruct the members 
of your respective commands to take proper action 
where any violation of law or ordinance is dis- 
covered in connection with the said punchboards. 




2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



J^ovember, 1926 



If ECTIVE BUREAU 



Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson in Charge 

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OLD-TIMERS GIVEN GOLD STARS 

The first week of this month witnessed a splen- 
did ceremony in the Detective Bureau. James 
Mackey and James Pearl, recently retired from 
the department, following many years as valuable 
members of the San Francisco Police Depai-t- 
ment, had been served with a subpoena asking for 
their presence in the Detectives Assemble room. 

These two veteran detective sergeants, whose 
records will stand for many decades as examples 
of high class police work, rcsoonded, wondering 
the while "what's coming off." 

They were not kept long in suspense for short- 
ly after the roll call they were asked to stand up 
and they were presented each with a beautiful 
gold retired officer's star. 

Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson, under 
whom the two retired officers worked with for 
over a quarter of a century, made the presenta- 
tion speech and he said some nice things about 
the work of these two officers. 

The committee in charge of purchasing the 
stars, which were bought by funds donated by 
every member of the Detective Bureau, was made 
up of Lieut. Bernard McDonald, Det. Sergts. Wil- 
liam Proll and John J. Dolan, Sr. 

Both Mackey and Pearl were so overcome by 
the beautiful tokens that they were hardly able 
to respond, but you can bet your last pack of 
cigarettes they will treasure those stars more 
than they treasure anything they were ever pre- 
sented with in their life time. 



MARINES ON MAIL TRUCKS 



QUICK DETECTIVE WORK 

I want to congratulate you on havins such an efficient 
detective in the person of Detective John J. Palmer. 

I had an opportunity of proving his worth a few weeks 
ago. 

I had a valuable collection of stamps stolen, worth sev- 
eral thousands of dollars, from my home, and within 
twelve hours, Mr. Jack Palmer had them back in safe 
keeping. He not only recovered the stamps, but located 
a 16-year old girl, a runaway from Los Angeles in this 
man's apartment. Have been intending to wi-ite you, but 
read in papers you were out of town. 

It's a worthw'hile story, the loss of stamps and their 
recovery, the finding of the 16-year-old girl from Los 
Angeles, and the arrest of this man, George Baker, a 
stiikebreaker from Los Angeles. 

It's too long a story to write, but some day, when you 
have the time, have Detective Jack Palmer tell you about 
it. 

MRS. T. LUNDY, JR., 
1545 Cole Street. 



Sometime recently the President of the United 
States, Calvin Coolidge, directed the United States 
Marine Corps to guard mails in transit and in 
pcstoffices throughout this country. San Fran- 
cisco has been designated as a city to be pro- 
tected. 

On this date I have had a personal chat with 
Major Alexander A. Vandegrift in relation to co- 
operation between the United States Marine 
Corps and the San Fi-ancisco Police Department. 

The Federal law is most explicit in relation to 
mails, ^either in transit or at postoffices, and 
specific orders have been issued to the members 
of the Marine Coi-ps concerning this special detail. 

This Department has in the past and will in the 
future co-operate with all branches of the federal, 
state and municipal governments. 

Members of the department will assist whenever 
it becomes necessary in the passing through of 
mail trucks or wagons through traffic congestion. 
At fixed posts clearance and right of way will be 
given to mail trucks, particularly those on which 
members of the Marine Corps may be detailed. 

Among the arrests credited to Detective Sergeants 
Michael Desmond and Barth Kelleher are: B. Dancel, en 
route to Oakland; Violet Bradlee, embezzlement; John 
Westgate, embezzlement; James Davis, violating parole; 
and a flock of vags. 



"KNOCKOVERS" OF BUREAU 

Among the night shift boys we have: Fred Chrisman, 
wanted in Redding, and Elias Rector, wanted by the U. S. 
Marshal, arrested by Detective Jack O'Connell; James 
Roberts, Jr., en route to Berkeley, arrested by Detectives 
Charles McGreevy and George Page; S. R. Fernando, 
charged with murder, arrested by Detectives O'Connell, 
Everett Hansen and Charles White; Albert Bergson, va- 
grancy, by Detectives Frank Brown and Charles Dorman. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants James Gregson, Irvin Finlay, Ser- 
geant Alex. McDaniell and Corporal Nels Stohl, of the 
Burglary Detail, worked together to land at various times 
during the past month the following: Garvin Caldwell and 
Dan Kramer, burglary; Fred Ponzini, en route to Santa 
Barbara for auto theft; Lawa-ence Tough, en route to Santa 
Rosa; Ben Kreuger, grand larceny; Robert Vargas and 
Jack Shanahan, petty larceny. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant William Ai-mstrong and his pair of 
check passer grabbers. Sergeants Charles Maher and 
James Hansen, got among others for the month, eight 
476a boys; two forgers, one with three charges; one 
embezzeler, a couple of en routes and one maker of ficti- 
tious checks. 



J^ovember, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



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*^Knockovers'' of Bureau 



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If you think that Sergeant George Healy and Detective 
Sergeant Martin Porter, who have the assignment of in- 
vestigating "kicks" in the Oriental, North Beach, and some 
of the down town districts, don't keep the boys who break 
ihe law busy ringing up friends to get them out of the 
city prison, read over some of the names on the big regis- 
ter upstairs. This pair of detectives soon "spot" an idler 
and they watch him pass the time away until they have 
enough to uphold a vag charge and in the idler goes. In 
less than a week, last month, they brought in a dozen of 
$1000 vags. During the month they also arrested Frank 
Cosenza, Anthony Cosenza, Carlo Spingole and Amelio 
Franehi, a quartette of bad boys whom they booked en 
route to Oakland. It was a good knockover; also Edward 
Brown, wanted in San Jose, and Fernando Moncado, want- 
ed in Sacramento. 

Detective Sergeants Arthur McQuaide and William ProU 
arrested among others, the past month: Herman Flourney 
for forgery; Harry Sherwood for bad checks and Lionel 
Swensen for felony embezzlement. 

Lieutenant Bernard McDonald and posse of the Auto 
Detail, assisted by Detective Sergeant William Armstrong, 
arrested Richard Baker, Ray Watson and Frank Wilson, 
wanted in Los Angeles. McDonald also arrested Robert 
Murphy, wanted in Redwood City. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Andrew Gaughran and James Skel- 
ly, of the Retail Stores Detail, put in among others, Claudie 
James, bad checks and obtaining goods by false pretenses; 
Wenda Boswell, three charges forgery and en route to 
Oakland; George Skondin, James Anderson and Harold 
Keller, petty larceny; Edward White, burglary and petty 
larceny. , » * 

Lieutenant Thomas Hoertkom and his side kick. Ser- 
geant Morris Harris, knocked over a flock of vags, slick 
young men who find a way of making a living without 
working. A few of their arrests are: Albert Germain, 
receiving stolen goods; Fred Campbell, many aliases, 
Harry Glenfall, also extra names; John Murray and Rich- 
ard Adams. These latter were vagged and all have police 
records. * * * 

Detective Sergeants William Millikin, Harry Husted 
and Augustus Thompkins teamed up and landed the fol- 
lowing in the city prison; Harry Cheader, 4 charges steal- 
ing automobiles, 1 burglary, 2 robberies; Everett Wliite, 
same; Frank White, same. Detective Sergeant Vernon 
Van Matre and Jesse Ayers assisted in this. Jack Rock- 
well, for Medford, Oregon; Robert Denny and Frank 
Chandler, grand larceny; John Holland and Frank Chand- 
ler, en route to Anaheim and Redwood City. 

* * * 

John Don Q, whose specialty is selling stock in an expe- 
dition or exploration into Central and South America to 
get animals and pictures for movie companies, was ar- 
rested for grand larceny by Detective Sergeant Fred Bohr 
and Detective Clarence Herlitz. 

* * * 

Among the arrests credited to Detective Sergeants 
Thomas Reagan and Thomas Conlon are William H. 
Burton, grand larceny; Thomas Minzio and William Small- 
man, same charge. ,5 ^ .^ 

Detective Sergeants Frank Brown and Rasmus Ras- 
mussen of the Auto Detail, rounded up Charles Weaver 



wanted in Los Angeles and Redwood City as a desei-ter 
from the U. S. Navy; Harry Lester, grand larceny, and 
Frank Noble and Ray Doniel, stealing automobiles. 

* * * 

Eine.st Aultman, a fugitive from justice, was arrested 

by Detectives Daniel Fogarty and John Sturm. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Thomas Conlon and Edward Wis- 
kotchill landed Antonio Granera in prison on two charges 
of burglary and James Perry, en route to Berkeley. 

« « * 

Lieutenant Charles Dullea, with Sergeant Alex Mc- 
Daniell booked John Cannon at the city prison on a charge 
of murder; Richard Huggard, 2 charges assault to commit 
murder; Lawrence Weeks, charge of murder and 10 
charges of robbery; Michael Papadaches, 3 charges of 
murder and 5 of robbery. Lieutenant McDonald of the 
Auto Detail, Otto Frederickson of the Homicide Squad, 
assisted in these arrests. Albert Moore, assault to com- 
mit murder; Sergeant Tatham assisted in this. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Richard Hughes and James Johnson 

of the Burglary Detail and Detective Sergeant Richmond 

Tatham, landed the following in prison: Stanley Kirby, 

burglary; Sam Jenkins, burglary and violating gun law; 

George Washington, en route to San Bernardino; Lee 

Lawrence, en route to Stockton; Tony Logan, burglary; 

Sergeants Dinan and Porter assisted in this one. 
if- * * 

Leonard Torres was arrested last month for stealing an 
automobile by Detective Sergeants Jack J. Cannon and 

J. McKenna, of Lieutenant McDonald's Auto Detail. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant George Hippely of the Pawnshop 
Detail and Detective Clarence Herlitz of the Hotel Detail, 

teamed up to get Eugene Addington for burglary. 

* * * 

Corporal William Gillmore and Sergeants Cannon and 
Husted vagged Robert Eldridge. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants George Wall and William McMahon 
got a couple of auto thieves and potential stickups, who 
each had a gun; their names are Everett Wliite and Frank 
White and they wei-e given a double booking. They also 
arrested William and George Perkins, wanted in Los 

Angeles. 

* * » 

Two more of Sergeant George McLoughlin's boys. De- 
tective Sergeants Leo Bunner and Robert Rauer, arrested 
James Montgomery for robbery and a half dozen good 

vags. 

» * * 

Detective Sergeant Nicholas Barron arrested Richard 
Keegan for petty larceny. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Allan McGinn and Detective Charles 
Iredale arrested John Striplin for manslaughter. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Vernon Van Matre and Detective 
Jesse Ayers brought in Frank Downs for robbery and 
John Restuch for Oakland. 

* * » 

Detective Sergeant George Stallard of the Pawnshop 
Detail and Detective Dan Fogarty picked up Joe Donovan 
and Dan Quinn who had another man's automobile with- 
out permission. 



Page 14 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



y^ovemher, 1926 



Careless Auto Owners 

This Class of Citizen Causes Much Wor\ For Police, By Opie L. Warner 



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It's amazing, when you look at the matter, the 
number of automobiles stolen each year in this 
city. It is even more amazing that the police re- 
cover 99 out of every 100 stolen. 

Being amazed, the writer sought a little light 
upon the subject and his seeking has revealed 
some very interesting things. 

For instance, it is generally conceded that 95 
per cent of the cars stolen are stolen through 
the carelessness of the owners. We will say in 
the most of these cases, simply downright lazi- 
ness, and in the rest an attitude that implies 
the owner bears this sentiment: "I hope some- 
one steals the old can, it's insured for more than 
it is worth." 

Now about this laziness. Nearly every auto- 
mobile is equipped with locks. The ignition can 
be locked, the transmission has a lock, if it is a 
closed car there is another lock provided. Where 
there are no such locks outside of the ignition 
lock, there are scores of simple and inexpensive 
devices for securely locking an automobile. 

But, no sir, the average automobile owner will 
drive his car up to the curb in some secluded 
place, leave it unlocked, too lazy to bend down and 
turn the key in the transmission lock. They will 
go away and stay for hours, thinking nothing of 
it until they return to find their car gone. 

Now the car owner who hopes his car will be 
stolen. Such an owner, once he has the experi- 
ence of having some thief drive off with his car, 
never hankers to have the same experience twice. 
For after he has recovered the car, found the en- 
gine damaged, the other mechanical parts injured, 
after he has tried to convince some insurance 
company that he should have the car overhauled 
at their expense, and awakes to find that the in- 
surance company makes a fair adjustment for 
the theft and such damage as they can reason- 
ably be sure was occasioned by the thief who 
took the car, after he checks up and finds he has 
lost money on the deal, that he has lost confidence 
in his car as he drives five miles from a gai'age; 
after he has gone to the inconvenience necessi- 
tated by the less of his automobile, of the time 
taken to get an adjustment with the insurance 
company, and after he tries to sell the car and 
gets a comic section off'er for it, he don't "want 
no more of his cars stolen." 

He lost sight of the fact that his car would be 
found. He lost sight of the possible damage that 
might be done to it by men who are going to use 
it for a short time only. He is set aright on this. 



liiNiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

Now the leaving of automobiles to the prey 
of crooks is something that Chief of Police Dan- 
iel J. O'Brien characterizes as almost making the 
owner the accessory before the fact in many 
crimes committed in this city. 

The Chief points out that the records show that 
in most every robbery, every bank hold-up, in 
most safe-blowing jobs, stolen automobiles are 
used. They furnish fast getaways; they afford 
the thug with a means of getting to safety. In 
some of these crimes murder is done. 

Now can you see Mr. Automobile Owner where 
your responsibility lies? Can't you see that you, 
by your carelessness, are aiding men to carry out 
some criminal act that may result in murder, and 
too often does? 

The Chief says, and so does Lieut. Bernard Mc- 
Donald, in charge of the Automobile Detail, that 
every owner should be compelled to lock his car. 
If the car does not come equipped with locking 
devices they should be made to put one on the car 
and thus make it more difficult for the crook to get 
some means of making his escape. 

Men or boys who are seeking a car to steal will 
not fool long with one they find is locked. They 
will pass on until they find one that is ready to go. 
This holds true of the criminal who wants one 
for his particular job, as well as for the ones who 
steal a car to sell, or those who steal a car for a 
joy ride. 

Lock your car, and lock them sure, and thus 
reduce the hazard of auto thievery, the chance of 
your unsuspectingly assisting a murderer, and 
decreasing the great amount of work the police 
must do when a car is reported and which must 
be done in recovering it. 



MUDU GETS GOOD HUNCH 



Detective William Mudd, who drives the detec- 
tive car during the day time and who is known 
as "Alabama Bill", hps always maintained that 
he could spot a colored person who was "wrong." 
He brought in a colored woman the other night 
and vagged her. She beat the "rap", much to 
Bill's chagrin. He said he knew she was bad and 
that she should not have been turned loose. The 
Judge, however, let her go. Bill remarked as he 
went out of the courtroom: "I bet that woman will 
be in here in five days on a 'kick' that will be 
caused by someone having their money stolen." 
Sure enough, the fourth day she was locked up on 
a grand larceny charge, being accused of reliev- 
ing a gent of several hundred dollars. 



J<lovcmbcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page IS 



nil iiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiin i iiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiii ini niiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiii iiiiii iniiiiii iriiiiiiiHJiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Citizens Commend Police 



iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiliiiiiN 

That the citizens of San Francisco appreciated 
the splendid worl< done by Chief of Police Daniel 
J. O'Brien and every member of the department 
during the so-called terror bandit outbreak is em- 
phasized by the avalanche of letters, phone calls 
and personal visits from men and women through- 
out the city lauding the police for their prompt- 
ness in rounding up the trio of miserable murder- 
ers. Herewith are some of the letters received by 
Chief O'Brien, headed by one from Mayor James 
Rolph, Jr., who hastened at the first opportunity 
to express his appreciation of the excellent endeav- 
ors of the department. These letters are well 
worth reading and indicate that the people of San 
Francisco are always ready to extend the credit 
deserved to our Department. 

The following letter has been received by Chief 
Daniel J. O'Brien from Mayor James Rolph, Jr.: 

It has been a source of keen gratification to 
•me to receive your reports upon the rounding up 
of the bandits who committed so many depreda- 
tions in San Francisco a little over a week ago. 

I am writing you this letter of appreciation to 
thank not only the members of the Police Com- 
mission and yourself, but also every member of 
your Department for the splendid work that has 
been done. I appreciate the fact that the men 
under your command worked many extra hours to 
bring about the capture of these desperate youths. 
I know of the determination that they have all 
along had to place these criminals behind the bars 
and of the unselfish efforts that have been ex- 
pended toward this end. Your men during the 
hours in which they were supposed to be off duty 
have used their own. private automobiles in comb- 
ing this City for some trace of the bandits, and it 
is through the careful work that has been done 
that the men now in custody have been arrested. 

I am more than ever proud of what I, like so 
many others, feel is the best Police Department 
in the world, and in thanking you and everyone 
of your command I am sure I speak in behalf of 
all the people of this city. 

It is with a feeling of keen satisfaction that I 
note that those responsible for the killings that 
occurred very recently in our City, have been ap- 
prehended and are in custody and that there is 
no question as to their guilt. 

As a Citizen of this Community, I think your 
Department should be commended highly for its 
efficiency, and the Officers working on the case 
commended highly also for their intelligence and 



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devoted services. 

You probably will not receive very many letters 
along this line, but as I know that you are giving 
your whole soul, as it were, to your line of en- 
deavor, I think a word of encouragement occa- 
sionally from those that are vitally interested in 
your work, does not come amiss. 
Kind assurance of regard, 1 am 

PAUL M. NIPPERT, 
The Insurance Exchange. 
433 California Street. 
* « * 

The Officers of the Board of Directors of the 
North Beach Merchants Association, at a special 
meeting held October 28th ult. unanimously 
voted to go on record highly praising the efficient 
work of our Chief of Police and the officers under 
your command, for effecting the capture of the 
terror bandits. 

We also desire to make mention and highly com- 
mend the two officers Mr. Louis De i\Iatei and Mr. 
Paddy Wafer for the valiant part they staked. 

NORTH BEACH MERCHANTS' ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Martin Lewkowitz, 
Secretary Pro Tem. 

Again we congratulate you and your officers for 
your splendid work in capturing Mike Papadaches. 
This wonderful piece of work of clearing up and 
apprehending this "pack of wolves" will go down 
in history as one of the greatest achievements in 
police annals. We are all elated here, but sorry 
that the law will not permit of the execution of 
this last one. 

T. N. KOENING, 
Chief of Police, Sacramento, Calif. 

^: * * 

Congi-atulate you on the great and good work 
you have done so recently to make our city we 
all love safe, and that this may be a lesson to such 
bandits. We are all so grateful to the policemen 
also for the great work they are doing. 

M. SHOPMAN, 
440 Scott Street. 

* * * 

The membership of Golden Gate Post No. 40, 
American Legion, is justly proud of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department. The thorough and re- 
assuring manner in which the campaign against 
the recent "Terror Bandit outrages" was con- 
ducted and its successful conclusion is a credit to 
you and your men. At our last meeting, a motion 
(Continued on Page 35) 



Page 16 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, 1926 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— BOOM 9, HALL OF JUSTICE 
OflQcial Publication 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT; 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASS'N.; 
STATE HIGHWAY PATROLMENS' ASS'N. 

A Police News and Educational Magazine 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY "2-0" PUBLISHING CO. 

Printed by 

ALEX. DULFER PRINTING CO., 853 Howard Street 

Phone: Douglai 2377 



Make all Checks Payable to- 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



OPIE L. WARNER 
JOHN F. QUINN . 



Editor 

-Business Manager 



EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 
THEODORE J. ROCHE. President 
^ESSE B. COOK ; ANDREW F. MAHONY ; DR. THOS. E. SHUMATE 
DANIEL J. O'BRIEN. Chief of Police 

AUGUST VOLLMER, Past President International Association of 
Chiefs of Police 
Captain of Detectives Captain BERNARD JUDGE 

DUNCAN MATHESON Captain JOHN J O MEARA 

Captain HENRY GLEESON Captain H J. WRIGHT 

Captain EUGENE WALL Captain ARTHUR ^ {jAYNE 

Captain HENRY O'DAY Captain PATRICK HERLIHY 

Cantain ROBERT A. COULTER Captain CHARLES GOFF 

SpttiS ?OHN J. CASEY Captain WILLIAM J QUINN 

Captain FRED LEMON Captain WM.T.HEALY 

Captain STEPHEN V. BUNKER Captain J H LACKMAN 

Captain PETER McGEE Captain CHARLES SKELLY 



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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subscribe to "2-0" POLICE JOUR- 
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ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



Vol. IV. 



November, 1926 



No. 13. 



Strikes are at all times things to be avoided, 
they breed hatred; they breed hardships on the 
workers and the employers alike, but strikes we 
will have. And when an industrial dispute arises 
in San Francisco it usually calls for the most ex- 
acting police work. 

The present building trades strike is no excep- 
tion. 

In the heat of the contest men sometimes throw 
reason to the winds. Injury, personal injury is 
done someone, and in the present strike the mat- 
ter has gone farther than injuries, it has gone to 
murder. 

Last month when a non-union carpenter was 
killed a great hue and cry went up for different 
kind of police action. Suggestions were made by 
some of police work that would have been of such 
a revolutionary nature that it would have taken 
years to bring the department back to its present 
high standard of efficiency, had the suggestions 
been followed. 



Many people took a hand in lambasting the de- 
partinent. They cried for quick, direct action; 
they sought to infuse something into the police 
department, other than a desire to do police duty 
in a sane and rational way. 

And let it be said that Chief O'Brien, working 
with the police commissioners, and captains of 
the various districts, sat down and listened to 
many unkind things heaped upon their heads, 
while they carefully, sanely and with an effective- 
ness born of years of experience and of an un- 
derstanding of human nature, human traits and 
human weaknesses held their counsel, and kept 
following the leads they uncovered by tireless 
work and energy. 

Then they began to get the results that such 
a course as they follow always produce. They 
got men who confessed to the murder. These 
men gave the names of others implicated. With 
this information they went before the grand jury 
and had indictments returned against eight men, 
charging murder. 

This done, the men were arrested and now await 
trial in the Superior Court. 

Many people who were quick to criticize, quick 
to say unkind things about the department and 
its methods of handling police matters have ad- 
mitted privately they were wrong, but we have 
not heard any come forth and publicly admit it. 

When it is taken into consideration that during 
this strike trouble the police department, in addi- 
tion to its regular duties, was confronted by a 
tong war which resulted, on account of proper 
police vigilance, in no killings in this city, two 
other strikes, and the careful surveying of the 
city, and the prevention of crime in San Fran- 
cisco, the preparing for the usual winter's in- 
creased work in handling criminal matters, one 
can easily see that the department members have 
done c'lceptional work during the past few 
months. 

The San Francisco Police Department has for 
many years been free from politics. It has 
grown into one of the greatest agencies for the 
protection of lives and property there is in this 
or any otlier country. It has refused to be made 
a football for anyone to kick around, and if a few 
people, and we ai-e glad to say there are but a 
few such in this city, who always rush in and 
demand a lot of extra weight, and expect the 
police to do things that are not in the books, will 
let the police department do its work, the quicker 
will the desired results be accomplished, and the 
sooner will all be satisfied. 



J^ovember, J 926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 17 



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Commendatory Letters to Chief O'Brien 

iiiliHlllillilliiiiHiiiliiiliiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiNHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiu iiiiiiiiiiieiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii«iiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii«iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNittiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiMin»iiiii^ 

1 am prompted to write this letter by the particularly 
cool and efficient manner Police Officer Robert L. Smith 
and Special Officer Andrew Brady handled a situation here 
at the beach last week which might have developed into a 
thinp of serious consequence in the hands of less able men. 
In the face of determined resistance, Smith and Brady 
took into custody five husky hoodlums who had been in- 
sulting women. Although violently attacked by the rest 
of the gang, sufficient in number to fill two large automo- 
biles, they resisted the attack unassisted and held their 
prisoners. 

I ha\e come in contact with few members of your force 
outside the Richmond district, but I wish to say that if all 
your officers and men are of the caliber and character of 
those of this district, then I feel that San Francisco is to 
be congratulated on her police department. 

Considering the large number of people who come to 
the beach we have surprisingly little trouble due mainly to 
the efficiency of the men assigned here. 

I take this occasion to thank you and your men of this 
district for your able co-operation. 

GEO. K. WHITNEY, 

Manager of Chutes at the Beach, Inc. 

790 Great Highway. 



Permit me to advise that the following resolution was 
adopted by the Forty-Second Grand Council of the Young 
Men's Institute, held in this city in the first week of 
October. 

RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Grand Coun- 
cil be tendered to Hon. Daniel J. O'Brien, Chief of 
Police of the City and County of San Francisco, for 
the assistance and co-operation extended to the 
General Committee in stopping the operation of 
street cars and all traffic along the line of march 
during the parade of Sunday, October 3rd, 1926, and 
for the assistance given in the sightseeing tour of 
October 5th. 

We were denied earlier opportunity of acquainting you 
wth the action of the Grand Council by reason of Grand 
Council work demanding immediate attention; we hope, 
however, that you will not hold our deferred acknowledg- 
ment as any less sincere. 

GEO. A. STANLEY, 
Grand Secretary, Y. M. I. 
50 Oak Street. 
^ ^ ^ 

Last Monday evening, about 9:30 p. m., I was called to 
the phone by Officer John S. Ross of your station who in- 
foi-med me that the glass in one of the windows of the 
Bancroft-M'hitney Company's building at Hyde and McAl- 
lister streets had been broken and suggested that I come 
do^^•n immediately to arrange for the boarding up of the 
window. I shortly thereafter arrived at my place of busi- 
ness and was greeted by Officers John S. Ross and Henry 
J. Kieman. Both officers were very courteous and imme- 
diately secured lumber and boarded up the window, leaving 
same secure. 

These officers did everj-thing they could to protect the 
property of Bancroft-Whitney Company, and it gives me 
pleasure on behalf of Bancroft-Whitney Company to ex- 
press the appreciation of this company for the help ac- 
corded by your officers in protecting our property. They 
certainly are entitled to all the credit that can be bestowed 
upon them. 

Will you kindly extend to these officers the thanks and 



very best wishes of Bancroft- Whitney Company. 
S. B. FOLGER, 
Acting President, 
Bancroft-Whitney Company, 
■Je * m 

We want to convey our appreciation for the manner in 
which traffic is being handled in Jessie street. Officer 
John J. Kelly is to be commended indeed, as he is largely 
responsible to a great extent for the present conditions. 
Jessie street, we believe, is one of the most congested 
streets we have in San Francisco and it takes an officer 
of exceptional ability to keep this street clear. 

C. C. HOLMES, Gen. Superintendent, 
The Emporium. Market Street. 

* * * 
A couple of weeks or so ago we opened the new and 

beautiful market at Mission and Sixteenth streets and 
whether by request of the mayor, or yourself, or perhaps 
at the suggestion of one of the captains of the district, you 
had five or six officers there to handle the crowds on our 
Opening Day. 

As Secretary and Treasurer of the Misison and Sixteenth 
Investment Company, the ownership of which partly rests 
in the mayor and a number of other prominent business 
men of this city, I want to thank you for your great atten- 
tion and particularly express to Sergeants J. MacCormick 
and S. Aitkens and Officers Henry M. Smith, Michael H. 
Dolan, Michael J. Mantell and John L. Kohr, our great 
appreciation of their efficiency, tolerance and good will 
displayed in making everyone feel comfortable and at 
ease. 

If you will be kind enough to make this an order of the 
day, we will appreciate it and this letter is to signify our 
great respect. 

J. C. BERENDSEN, 
Secretary and Treasurer, 

Mission and Sixteenth Investment Co. 

* * * 

Permit me, although a trifle late, to express my sincere 
thanks and appreciation for the splendid work done by 
your detective force in the recovery of my clothes, which 
were taken from my apartment a short while ago, and, I 
am happy to say, were all recovered. Most especially I 
desire to thank and compliment Detective Sergeant Hughes 
on the very efficient ser\'ice rendered in such very short 
time and in praise of which I cannot say enough. Once 
more thanking you sincerely, 

MRS. WILLIAM KELDAY, 

795 Gearv Street. 



Phone Sutter 643 



Dan* P* Maher 

COMPANY 

Paints and Varnish 



677 Folsom Street 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Page 18 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



J^ovemher, 1926 



HE WAS A BOY ONCE HIMSELF— A TRIBUTE 

TO THE VETERAN OFFICER 

GEO. COLLINS 




JACK LAWLOR 



By Jack Lawlor, Police Reporter, "Daily T^ews" 

"Here George, take this telegram and go out 
and find this boy and book him en route to Los 
Angeles. He ran away from home and his 
father wants him arrested", said Lieut. Frank 

Winters as he handed 
Officer George Collins 
a telegram with the 
last known residence 
of a 17-year-old boy 
whose name makes no 
difference. 

George took the tele- 
gram and went out. 
In a few hours he re- 
turned with a perplex- 
ed look on his face 
but no runaway boy. 
"Where's the kid, 
George", exclaimed Lieutenant Winters as he 
looked up from his desk in surprise because Col- 
lins had never been known to return without his 
man. 

"Well?" queried the Lieutenant, as the officer 
stood mute. 

"Well, lieut, er, it's this way, you see, I could 
not — er-er-ah — " stammered George. 

"You could not— er-ah-huh— what in the devil 
ails you?" thundered \A'inters, "Why don't you 
talk in Indian language, I can savvee that better 
than this lingo you are handing me?" 

"Well, the truth is, I liaven't got the heart 
to arrest that lad. He's learning a trade, work- 
ing hard every day and living a clean moral life 
and I'm sure you'll feel just like I do about it 
when you talk with him." And George shifted 
about as he addressed his superior officer. 

"Go bring him in", directed Winters, "and we'll 
see what we'll see", and the Lieutenant smiled 
to Sergt. Frank Black as George strolled out. 

In a short time Collins returned accompanied 
by a bright-eyed lad with a freckled face and tow 
colored hair. 

"Here he is Lieutenant, he's working in a cop- 
per shop learning a trade that will pay him $10 
a day in tiine", exclaimed the officer as he pushed 
the boy forward. 

After listening to the boy's story Lieut. Winters 
and the officer notified the father by wire that his 
son was learning a good trade, going to night 
scliool and doing well and there was no good rea- 
son why he should be arrested and returned to 
a town he didn't like. 

That was about a year ago. 

<r:ontinued on Page 28) 



GOLDMAN'S 

THE HOUSE OF VALUES 

Suits, Coats, Dresses, Furs, Millinery 

Always Reliable 
788 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 

Opposite Fourth 



14th & Washington Sts. 



Oakland, Cal. 



COLDWELL, 
CORNWALL 
& BANKER 

REALTORS 
57 Sutter Stieet 

SAN FRANCISCO Sutter 5420 



Phone Kearny 4100 

SCHIRMER 
STEVEDORING CO. 

Wm. Schii-mer, President 

STEVEDORES, BALLESTMEN AND 
GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



Pier 39 



San Francisco, California 



Residence 723-42nd Ave. Res. Phone Bayview 890 



Thomas Hamill 

Contractor and Builder 

HOMES AND FLATS FOR SALE 
ON EASY TERMS 



Phone: Evergreen 3200 
6242 Geary Street San Francisco 



T^ovember, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 19 



NEW MEN AND OLD 



At a meeting- of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners lield on November 1st: Edward L. Quast, 
rank 187(11), was appointed a regular policeman 
in the Police Department, star number 1004 tem- 
porarily. 

At a meeting- of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners held on October 25: Richard R. Smith, 
rank 184(11), star 1182; Edward A. Miller, rank 
185(11), star 1192; Samuel Cohen, rank 186(11), 
star 1193, were appointed regular policemen in 
the Police Department. 

At a meeting of the Board of Police Commission- 
ers held on October 18, the following Police Offi- 
cers were appointed: 

Andrew J. Bell, rank 130(11), star 1010; Peter 
H. Schroeder, rank 164(11), star 1066; George A. 
Young, rank 176(11), star 902; Fred M. Fitz- 
simmons, rank 179(11), star 1045; John V. Cobb, 
rank 180 (11), star 1061. 

The newly appointed officers mentioned above 
shall undergo the usual instructions under'~Ser- 
geant Patrick H. McGee, Instructor in the Depart- 
ment School of Instructions. During- the period of 
their instructions they are hereby temporarily as- 
signed with the Headquarters Company and shall 



report to Captain J. Henry Lackmann, command- 
ing the Headquarters Company, for orders and 
assignments. 

The following transfers have been made in the 
department last month: Officer Frederick J. Flynn, 
Co. G to Headquarters Co. ; Officer John L. Rogers, 
Headquarters (Chinatown Squad) to Co. G; Officer 
Stephen Hinriciis, Co. K to Headquarters Co.; 
Officer John Floyd, Co. K to Headquarters Co.; 
Officer Walter R. Frye, Co. F to Co. D; Officer 
Frederick H. Goessel, Co. B to Co. M; Officer 
Charles F. Keck, Co. D to Co. B; Officer Edward 
J. McDevitt, Co. M to Co. D; Officer Albert E. 
Cronin, Headquarters Co. to Co. J. 

The following assignments have been made dur- 
ing the past month: Niles E. Driver to Co. D; 
John D. Long, to Co. C; Walter R. Frye, to Co. F; 
William A. Hanrahan to Co. G; Ralph H. Mc- 
Kenna, to Co. H; John J. O'Donnell No. 2, to Co. L; 
Raymond F. Doherty, to Headquarters Co. 

Police Officer Edward Hagan attached to the 
Bush Street Station reports the loss of his star, 
numbered 1070. The star was lost between the 
City Treasurer's Office and his home at 1202 Pow- 
hattan street, on October 10th, 1926. 

Police Officer Herman A. Mohr, Ingleside Police 
(Continued on Page 34) 



To the Wives & Families of Members of the San Francisco Police Department 

The Police Journal— "2-0" has made a special arrangement with one of the biggest 
clothes washers, ironers, vacuum sweepers, stores on the Pacific Coast to secure for you 
a discount of $10.00 on any make washing machine and $7.00 on any make vacuum 
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Page 20 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, J 926 



aiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiiiii^ 




DiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiio^ 



Just to keep the boys moving and let them know that 
though he has been made a Lieutenant don't make him 
inactive so far as going out on the street to grab off the 
lawbreakers, Lieutenant Frank McConnell and his partner 
Detective Sergeant Charles Gallivan now and then "hit 
the street" and when they return to the Hall of Justice 
they generally have a lad whose mug has been up in 
Sergeant Emmett Hogan's room awaiting an opportune 
time for comparison. One day last month McConnell and 
Gallivan took a "little" walk and when they got back they 
had with them John Berg, Jack Fay, Ray Bi-ewer, Tony 
Deus and Tony Marquise, all of whom they booked as 
thousand Dollar vags. Brewer, who is a card sharp, has 
been mugged in other states, but this was his first visit 
here and it will probably be his last as long as Lieutenant 
McConnell and Sergeant Gallivan are on the job, which 

will be a long time yet. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Jack Manion and his posse, who have 
kept tong killings out of Chinatown during the war just 
ended between the Bing Kongs and Hop Sings, never let 
the hired gunmen light. The Chinatown squad boys 
brought in five highbinders one night all armed; four other 
Chinese, who tried to open up an opium joint in Chinatown 
got a nice reception and a nice ride to the station on a 
state prison law charge; and two Chinese were booked 
for statutory charges; and a couple of Americans who 
tried to start something were caught before they could 
be booked for anything worse than malicious mischief; and 

a half dozen Chinese were arrested as vagrants. 

* * * 

Among the prisoners booked during the month by De- 
tective William Bennett and possee working out of the 
Chief's oifice were Edwin Franklin for violating Section 
146 of the Motor Vehicle Act; William Fritz, transporting 
intoxicants; and a score of vags who were doing no good 
for the country or themselves. 



A GREATER MARKET 

Is now at your service — 
13,000 square feet of space 
have been added and each 
foot augments our savings 
power. 

CrustalAPalace 

Sax firmdsna KcdSaiiet^ltlP^iiirieiMlssioiiffigMI Sb. 



Lieutenant Kinble and Detective Jack O'Connell arrested 
John Cavagna for murder following the death of the 
prisoner's wife from a gunshot wound. 

* * :}; 

Officer J. Riley got a lad who was unsteady in his opera- 
tion of an automobile and Riley locked the lad up for 
violating Sect. 112 of the Motor Act. The youth's name is 

William Puett. 

* * * 

Another 112'er was Roy Rooney, grabbed and delivered 

by Officer Carlysle Field of the License Bureau. 

* * * 

Officer E. L. Olivero brought to the city prison, Yoush 
Khinoo, charged with violating Section 261 of the Penal 
Code, par. 3.3. 

* * * 

Detective J. J. Masterson picked up Adolph Haupt, 
wanted in Los Angeles for non-support of wife and child- 
ren. 

. * ^ * 

Detectives Patrick Walsh and Al Christ removed from 
the streets four good vagrants during a round up one 
night last month. 

* * :K 

Coiodore Apichino, carrying a gun and threatening to 
use it was apprehended and locked up before he carried 
his threats into execution. He was booked on two charges 
by Officers W. Thompson, W. Salisbury and J. O'Connor. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Harry Husted and Detective Robert 
Smith got enough on Edwin Carey to lock him up on five 
charges of petty larceny. 

* * * 

Charles Carlson won't be so handy with a deadly weapon 
the next time he gets all "het up", because the last time 
he did he got locked up for assault by Off. Harry Peshon. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Michael Mitchell didn't like the looks of 
Joseph Thomas as he night after night hung around the 
water front, so he "vagged" him, and the next thing he 
found out about him was that Joseph was a deserter from 

the V. S. Army. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



T^ovember, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 




Lieutcnnnts: 



CENTRAL 

STATION 



Capt. Arthur D. Layne 
Harry I'. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 



Drop in to the Central Station and take a few looks at 
the business office, note the changes that have been made, 
the paint that City Painter Jack Lane and his landscape 
artists liave applied with such good effect, further observe 
the spaciousness of the quarters since some of the par- 
titions have been removed and the phone booth shrunk 
and whatever you do, don't spit on the floor or Corporal 
John Dower will be on your neck instanter. There is no 
new linoleum on the floor yet, but Corporal Donegan 
says they are going to get some and that he and Dower 
want the visitors to keep from getting the habit of violat- 
ing the expectoration ordinance. Yes sir, the improve- 
ments are worth while and were needed. Captain Layne 
says he is going to have the windows in his private office 
washed up one of these days now that the business office 
has been renovated. 

* * * 

Armando Leon knows now that robbery doesn't pay. 
He was nabbed by Corporal Frank Hoeckle and Harry 
Gurtler and slammed in the well known city prison. 

^ * * 

It was a hard month for burglars. Sergeant James F. 
Rooney and some of his lads rounded up Aladrano and 
Ric Spina, giving them two bookings for this species of 
larceny. While Officer J. Twoomey administered the same 
treatment to Placido Laganapan. 

But the automobile law violators were the ones that got 
the merry run in. Officer Charles Gallatin got Vivian 
Duncan for a 112 and 121 charge; Officers John Dooling, 
Joseph Murray and Charles Rogerson locked John Brophy 
up for having another man's automobile; Gurtler and 
Rogerson gave Leonard Jones four charges of violating 
Section 121 of the Motor Act; Lung Hook was arrested 
for manslaughter growing out of an automobile accident, 
being tagged by Officer Rogerson; Pete Madrianl, arrested 
by Officers William Porter, Martin Foley and George 
Burkhardt, was booked for 112, 141 and reckless driving; 
and S. A. Moorhaub as a hit-runner and reckless driver, 
by Officers Rogerson and Dooling. 

t- =:: * 

Petty larcenists arrested were Charles Snell by Officer 
George Ohnirnus, Jack Kreir, 2 charges, by Officer Jerome 
Fitzgerald, Louis Barcomb, by Fitzgerald and Detective 
Clarence Herlitz, and William Quarles by Fitzgerald. 

* * * 

Officers Joseph Mulcahy and John Dyer brought in Ir- 
ving Eddall whom they found armed with a gun. 

* * * 

David Mendoza arrested for Oakland authorities by Offi- 
cer Frank Kennedy, wanted for assault with a deadly 
weapon, was booked on Oct. 18. 

* * * 

Officer Dan Pallas put Margaret Smith behind steel bars 
on a charge of assault wth a deadly weapon. Maggie 
has been arrested before and has a lot of extra names to 
u.se when occasion demands. 

* * * 

Fred Witschi, wanted for felony embezzlement, was 
takon in custody by Officer Jack McGreevv. 




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Page 22 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



"Nfivewher, 1926 




SOUTHERN 

STATION 



=j 



Capt. Charles Goff 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Richard Foley 

The winter influx of vagrants, idlers and others who seek 
the larger cities during the winter months, has been felt 
in this district. During the past month 65 vagrants have 
been arrested by the police on the night watches. Corporal 
Flynn, Corporal Dennis Dineen, Corporal Jagger, Martin 
Brennan, Officers Bongard, Tom Feeney, J. Conroy, Wil- 
liam Gleeson, Hachette, J. Ersamy, William Fogarty, J. 
Burke, Martin Brannan, Oliver Lunborg, William Henley 
and Sergeant Dowie keeping the patrol wagons busy. 

* * * 

Corporal Emmett Flynn arrested and charged with rob- 
bery Edward Bargo, while he and his posse did the same 
thing to Michael J. Sheehan; Officers D. Devine and O. 
Lundborg arrested Martin Daken for assault with intent 

to commit robbery. 

* * * 

William Cale was arrested for burglary by Special 
Officer T. J. Winler. James Wilson was booked for at- 
tempted burglary by Officer Andrew Lennon. 

* * * 

Three gents got all mixed up with the law on driving 
while drunk charges. They were Mike Minan, arrested by 
Tom Feeney, and who has had a similar experience; Bert 
Johnson by Officer Lundborg and Fortune Brasseur by 

Officer J. Conroy. 

* * * 

Officers William Fogarty and T. Maloney spotted two 
pair of youths whom they thought were looking over the 
district in cars that did not belong to them. They gave 
the men a halt and arrested them for violating the pro- 
visions of section 145 of the Motor Act. The names of the 
men so arrested are: Frank Rossi, Archie Knighton, Walt 

Rush, Jack Camerin. 

* * * 

A few petty larcenists were active for awhile, or until 
the gendarmes stopped their pilfering. Five were gath- 
ered into the well known police net. They were Fritz Her- 
bert, arrested by Officer W. O'Halloran; George Kelchner, 
arrested by Officers R. Curtin and Al Wenzler; Charles 
Graham arrested by Officers Lundborg and Hanley Delmar 
Marchall arrested by Corporal Flynn. 

* .i; * 

Corporal Flynn and Officers Charles Russell and T. 
Herring arrested William Vauglin, a fugitive from justice. 
Flynn also arrested Tom Miller charged with mayhem, 
and Manuel Silvan and Andrew Silver for assault with 
means and force likely to do great bodily injury. 

:;; * .f. 

Lieutenant Arthur DeGuire and some of the men on his 
platoon stepped out October 27 and brought in Hans 
Kosky, whom they charged with attempt to commit bur- 
glary. 

* * * 

Berno Solin was arrested, taken to the station and given 
a booking for assault w\t\\ a deadly weapon. He was es- 
corted and so charged by Officers A. McDonnell and Lund- 
borg. 

* * * 

Danny ToiTes is awaiting trial, having been snared by 
Officers William Hyland and T. Hurley. 

* * * 

Sergeant Lynch with a posse of patrolmen arrested and 
charged John W. Hart with assault with a deadly weapon. 



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T^ovembcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 23 



\wi\m m>y STATION 



STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

Recently Officer John J. Doran, attracted by a crowd 
at Market and Embarcadero found a husky Japanese 
named H. Hlohitchi giving a Swedish sailor a wrestling 
lesson. As Doran came up, the Japanese switched his 
attack to Ireland's son, and Doran had plenty to do as 
the Jap was fortified with a goodly cargo of sacki. The 
officer finally landed his man in the station jail, booking 
him for drunk, but the blue coat was nearly smothered by 
the fumes of the sacki. Hlogitchi was here to see the 
three Japanese boxers at Dreamland, but he never got to 

see them. 

* * * 

Corporal Martin Gallagher has formed a jazz orchestra 
of waterfront folks, and every nationality is represented 
except the sons of Erin, Martin being the only representa- 
tive Ireland has in the orchestra. Nevertheless, the favor- 
ite airs are Irish music and the boys are practising twice 
a week. The following are the members of the musical 
aggregation: 

"Spider" Anderson, tin flute; "Scotty" McPherson, first 
string banjo; Ole Olson, drums; Napoleon, Jews' harp; 
Fighting Kid, harmonica; an undercover agent, horn. 

Jack Convey has been trying to get in the band but 
Barber Jones says they can't practice in his barber shop 
if Convey makes the grade. 

First it was Lieutenant Michael Mitchell, with his 
trained seagull, who has learned to outdo a homing pigeon; 
then it was Officer Samuels, Inspector Ed. Lj-nch's able 
assistant who got great results with an owl he trained 
to act as messenger from this city to Eureka; now we have 
Officer James IMahoney, who comes forward with a parrot. 
James got "Polly" and in three weeks had trained him to 
call him when it was time to get out of bed, and when 
James does not hurry fast enough the Pol sings out 
"363, Over the Top, Charge of the Light Brigade". 

Mahoney thought it would be nice for the parrot to have 
a little playmate, so he bought a monkey named "Jocko". 
The bird and the simian became fast friends, but they had 
a great fight the other night. Seems like when Jim comes 
home the parrot hops upon hi.-: shoulder and the monkey, 
not to be outdone, climbs on top of James' head. The 
polly didn't like this, and after thinking it over following 
Mahoney's retirement for the night, the Pol lit into 
"Jocko" and a fight followed that woke up everybody in a 
block radius. Jim w-as doing a hot foot in his pajamas 
trying to get the combatants and stop the parrot's cries 
of "Police, Police". 

He finally captured the pair and peace was restored, 
and now Jocko is learning to work with a hand organ, 
Jim having promised him one. 

* * * ' 

Charles Avedano got John Adams for misdemeanor 
embezzlement the other dav. 



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Page 24 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, 1926 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. Frederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

Captain Fred Lemon's boys have kept the old wagon 
going pretty regularly the past month bringing in the 
evil doers who were unwise enough to endeavor to ply 

their trades in this sector. 

* * * 

George J. Harney was packing a gun in vnolation of 
the muchly referred to penal code as well as ^^olating the 
provisions of section 417 of the same well worn book. 
He was halted, questioned, arrested and finally booked by 
Officer J. Crawhall. 

A. Stone Waldo, who has been in trouble before about 
mixing gin and gasoline, got hauled in for violating 
section 112 and for i-eckless driving by Officer R. Smith. 

James Burke, who was also arrested before for violat- 
ing section 112 got arrested again on the 17th by Cor- 
poral Keene and Officer J. Kenney. This time he was 
charged with violating sections 112, 141 and 121 of the 
motor act. Plenty of trouble for any one man. 

* * * 

Sergeant Fred Suttman and Officer James Gremminger 
"spotted" Joseph L. Morris in an automobile which had 
been reported stolen. They hauled him in on a 146 charge. 

* * * 

Officers William Barnes, assisted by Officer S. Desmond 
arrested Earl Anderson for 146 Motor Act violation and 
also for obtaining money by false pretenses. 

* * * 

Nieman Paulsen, a cook, was arrested and landed in the 
station prison charged with manslaughter. His grief was 
occasioned by the combined activities of Officers C. 
Wennerberg and W. Rausch. 

* * * 

Vincent Allessandro, wanted by the authorities of Mo- 
desto, was picked up by Sergeant Thomas Roche and posse. 

+ * * 

Officers Charles Thompson and C. Hess found it neces- 
sary to arrest John Worley on a charge of assault with a 
deadly weapon. 

* * * 

The following named folks were arrested and booked for 
petty larceny during the month: CaroljTi Cassard by 
Officers Charles Foster and M. Frannusich; John Brad- 
ford by J. Crowley; and Bert Brown and James Hartman 
by Sergeant Fred Suttman and posse. The last two were 
also charged with vagrancy. 

* * * 

Nicholas Watson, charged with vagrancy, was arrested 
by Officer Fred Nuttman. 

* * * 

Sergeant Sheble and posse found it necessary to remove 
from the streets Eugene Brady, Maurice McCarthy and 
John Nihal, who evinced no desire to do anything that 
would enhance the prosperity of our city. The trio were 
charged with being thousand dollar vagrants. 

* * * 

Sergeant William Flinn, who has moved from the Pope 
Tract where he has resided on Shrader street for years, 
has now taken up his abode on Claremont drive, Merrit 
Terrace, adjoining St. Francis Wood and Forrest Hill. 
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T^uvember, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 2$ 




BUSH ST. 

STATION 



Capt John J. Casey 
Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mignola 

Captain John J. Casey was preambulating along one of 
the streets in his district the other day when he saw an 
automobile running an uncertain course. Experience told 
him the driver was not in the proper mental condition to 
keep an even course, so he made him pause, investigated 
and gathered enough information to justify him in ar- 
resting the driver and charging him with violating the 
provisions of section 112 and for reckless driving. The 
operator gave the name of Horace Springer. Officer John 
Dolan, Jr., had a similar experience with Andrew Delaney, 
except that Andy was also charged with being a hit- 

iTjnner. 

* * * 

The following were arrested for driving about in auto- 
mobiles they had borrowed without asking anyone foi 
the loan of them, which as you are well aware is in viola- 
tion of the provisions of section 146 of the Motor Vehicle _ 
Act: Burton Neill by Officer William McRae. Burton 
Bergarud by Officer R. Burgerson; Edgar Emanuel by 
Officers N. Kieman and E. Vogt; and Charles Poust and 

James Cook by Officers J. Riordan and A. O'Brien. 

* * * 

Threats against human life were numerous in this dis- 
trict the past month. The following were arrested and 
charged with that offense: Viggi Block by Officer Eugene 
Hottinger; John DeWitt by Officers N. Kavanaugh and 
C. Engler, Harry Loman by Corporal William Boyle, and 

Xick Podeviroff by Officers J. Hart and Gus Betger. 

* * * 

Officers J. Ross and Kieman booked Nel O. Jimmers for 

violating section 21 of the Juvenile Court Law. 

* * * 

George Kortoff, accused of attempted burglary, was 
arrested by Captain John J. Casey and posse October 14. 

* * * 

Officer John Scanlon brought in Robert L. Turner on a 

charge of \iolating section 288 of the penal code. 

* » * 

Harry Jones, accused of being a petty larcenist, was 
arrested and put in a nice steel bar-lined cell by Officer 
Ray O'Connell, while the same fate befell Harold Johnson 
who was taken in tow by Officer Ed Gough. 

* * * 

Vagrants are always plentiful in this district. The 
idler seems to dote on this sector of the city and the 
police just as much dote on giving the ladies and boys 
a ride in the covered wagon. Corporal William Boyle 
and posse brought in half a score during the month. 

* * * 

Officer Walter Harrington arrested James Daly, Arnold 
Guerra and William Sullivan for vagrancy and disturbing 
the peace. 

* * * 

Corporal James Ray speared a vag or so, as did Officer 
Arthur Lahey. 

* * * 

T6ny Silardi is a thousand dollar vag according to the 
records at the station where he was booked as such by 
Officer John Dolan, Jr. 

* * * 

Officer Ed Gough got one of these high priced vags 
when he arrested Corrine Jones. 









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Page 26 



2-0" rOLICE JOURNAL 



J^ovember, 1926 



TRAFFICE BUREAU 

Captain Henry Gleeson 
Lieutenants J. J. Casey. J. (Cliff) Field and Grover Coats 



Captain Henry Gleeson, who was the victim of a serious 
operation last month, is rapidly recovering from the effects 
of the cutting and will soon be back on the job again. He 
is still confined at the Lane Hospital, and at this writing 
no visitors are allowed to see him. However, his physi- 
cians report that he is getting along nicely and is coming 
out of the ordeal splendidly. 

During the absence of Captain Gleeson, Lieutenant John 
J. Casey is in charge of the Traffic Bureau and is handling 

the business like an old timer. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer Byron Getchell laid off long enough from 
his irksome labors, answering questions for confused old 
ladies, halting near-sighted automobile drivers, who can't 
see the signals and generally supervising affairs around 
Market, Kearny, Geary and Third streets, to do a little 
reg-ular police work. He saw a guy walking away mth 
some effects which another gent said was his. In fact 
it developed that there were two of these walkaway guys. 
Byron surrounded the pair and snapped some nice steel 
bracelets on them and went to the box and rang for the 
wagon. He told Officer Jack McGreevy to book them for 
petty larceny; Byron even got the names of the prisoners, 
John Bannister and Lloyd Roy Jones. Nice work, Byron. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer J. J. Kelly can lay aside the multitudin- 
ous duties of directing traffic to make an arrest for any 
sort of a crime. He demonstrated this when he snared 
Clyde Radcliffe for vagrancy. 

* * * 

Motorcycle Officer Wi.snon contends a lot of motorists 
ought to have their eyes examined, for the first thing they 
say when he halts them is: "I didn't see the stop sign". 
Wis. says if they can't see these boulevard stop signals, 
they couldn't see the Ferry building. 

Traffic Officer Harry Lundy |lhinks sober motorists 
cause enough confusion, but one who has taken aboai'd a 
few too many can sure throw a monkey wrench into the 
machinery of traffic. D. Mill did this and Lundy just 
naturally booked him for violating Section 112 of the 
Motor Vehic'.e Act. 

* * * 

Motorcycle Officer Edward O'Day, veteran speed chaser 
of many years, says those black backed slips they hand 
out to speeders and reckless drivers sure put the receivers 
into a state of mourning. 

* * * 

They don't go too fast for Traffic Officer Patrick Ma- 
honey. He may not get them in one block in his automo- 
bile, but he is sure to get them before many blocks go 
by, and if one does get away, Pat has his number and he 
waits till about supper time and slips up to the front door 
of the speeder with the sad news that he must say "good 
morning" judge. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer Pete Smith has hung about twenty miles 
of the little straw colored tags on automobiles whose 
o\vners think the pedestrian lanes are parking stations, 
and fire hydrants are put along the curbs to tie machines 
to. 

* * * 

Mounted Officer George Sullivan wonders why some 
men will park their auto under a 40 minute parking sign 
and then go away for four hours. 



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2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 27 




PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'RIeara 
Lieutenants Charles A. Pfeiffer and Fred W. Norman 

People living in Forest Hill, Morritt Terrace, and other 
districts above the Twin Peaks Tunnel can certainly take 
joy in the knowledge that they are well protected and 
can get some quick police action when such is needed. A 
short time ago a resident of Forest Hill telephoned Cor- 
poral William Kelly that there was a suspicious automo- 
bile driving about the neighborhood after midnight. There 
was a peculiar creaking that made the presence of the 
machine moie ominous. Kelly told the resident the matter 
would be attended to. In six minutes after the message 
was received at the station, two police officers drove up in 
front of the home of the man who phoned and explained 
how the thing happened and that the man and the machine 
that had caused the annoyance would bother no one any 
more. They explained that it was a gent who had been 
to a party and had left in a huff and was trying to find 
where the party was so he could go back again. He could 
not get his bearing, but when the two officers in the Buick 
patrol machine drove up, thrust a gun in his face, he lost 
all desire to go anywhere but home. He explained who 
he was, produced credentials to show who he was and was 
allowed to proceed. 

* * * 

Leonard Bash will realize henceforth that it is not con- 
ducive to his freedom to be caught preambulating around 
the Park district with a gun, especially when the officers 
suspect him of assault with intent to commit murder. He 
got this enlightenment through the actions of Officers J. 
Dono^•an and Bums who gave him a twin booking. 

:}: ^ ^: 

Bernard Derwin got himself into a lot of grief when 
he was pulled in by Sergeant Robert Williams. All Der- 
win has to square himself out of is a charge of dri\'ing 
while dnink and hit and run. 

* * :ic 

Joseph Mendenhall had no hit and run "clouf against 
his name but he got the Sec. 112 writings when Officers 
Herbert Hays and W. Hansen led him before Corporal 
C. C. Farr and wised the non-com. w'hat Joey had been 
doing. 

^ ^ ^ 

Clarence Widener went over two years 'without getting 
arrested for vagrancy, but he wandered out in the Park 
district and his actions were such that led Officer Fred 
Kracke to nab him and put him in on one of those vag 
"kicks". 



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Page 28 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



J'lovember, 1926 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

One of the surest ways of getting in jail is to walk out, 
drive out, or ride out through the Richmond district witli 
a gun sticking out of your hip pocket. Seems like the 
boys under Captain William Healy can spot these sort of 
gentry quicker than a bootlegger can a prohi. 

For verification of this statement, one should ask Harry 
Wiles and Albert Saunders who were pesticating around 
the Richmond. They seemed bent upon nothing in par- 
ticular and their presence attracted the official attention of 
Officers Francis and Schuldt who conducted a litt'e inves- 
tigation and soon found both young men were anned. The 
youths wei-e booked for violating the state gun law and 
vagrancy. 

* :»: * 

Another example that gin and gas don't team up very 
well is indicated by the case of Harry Walburg. He was 
picked off for violating the tenets of Section 112 of the 
Motor Act as well as being a hit and run driver. His 
arrest was made by Corporal George O'Brien and Officer 
J. O'Leary. 

* :f: * 

Corporal Frank Rhodes and Officer Tom O'Connell let 
Charles Lambert know that assault with a deadly weapon 
is a serious offense, for they locked him up where he 
could meditate upon his predicament. 

* ■^- * 

Misdemeanor embezzlement is the charge against Edna 
Lewis, who was arrested by Officer W. J. Francis. 

^- ■-^- * 

Aaron Coff was locked up by Officer T. O'Connor for 
violating the Juvenile Court law. The same fate befell 
Oakley Rice who was arrested by Corporal W. .Jones 
and Officer J. Green. 



LAWLOR 

(Continued from Page 18) 
An(i that boy, lielped on his way by a good- 
hearted policeman who unconsciously did one of 
the biggest things in hfe — a voluntary act of 
kindness — is so appreciative of what was done for 
him that he never misses a month to call on the 
officer at the Detective Bureau and consult and 
advise with him. 



Kenney Bros* 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drin\s 

132 Fourth Street, Corner Minna 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Ladies' Cloaks, Suits, Dresses, 
Furs, Waists, Etc. 

Men's Clothing, Hats, Shoes, 
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Charge Accounts Invited 

The Home Clothing Co. 

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Phone Mission 5036 



MERCHANTS 
PARCEL DELIVERY 



Telephone Davenport 362 



FREMONT R. NASH 

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6 Mission Street :: :: San Francisco 



AUTHORIZED 



NASH DEALER 

JACOPETTI 

Gore Columbus Avenue and Washington Street 



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Phone MARKET 952 



New Process Laundry Co. 

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931 MARKET STREET 

Telephone Kearny 46.33 San Franci.sco 



T^ovembcr, 1926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. Eugene Wall 
Lieutenant William Lambert 

The other day the Redwood authorities phoned up that 
shortly before midnight of the date of communication a 
pent had wandered into a Redwood cafe and stuck up the 
Chinese proprietor. A description of the machine used 
and the number of the license was obtained and furnished 
the San Francisco Police. A posse under Officer L. Hagen 
went forth in the station Buick to await the arrival of the 
holdup man. He came along, tried to outsprint the Buick, 
fired at the officers and was fired upon, and finally was 
overtaken and arrested for robbery and a few other 
charges, such as breaking the speed laws, reckless driving 
and assault. 

The gent gave the name of Millard McClelland. After 
being taken to the city prison he confessed to a score of 
robberies up and down the state and as many more bur- 
glaries. He has enough charges against him to insure his 
detention in one of our penal institutions for .some time 
to come. The boys from the Ingleside certainly did good 
work, as the letter Captain Wall wi-ote the Chief about 
it wll indicate, and which will be found on another page 
of this issue. 

Special J. Cully paused long enough from his duties of 
seeing if careless merchants had left ary doors unlocked, 
to observe the antics of Frank Vannucci. He watched long 
enough to convince him that John was breaking the var- 
ious provisions of Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act, 
and he arrested him and booked him accordingly. 

John Holton had an automobile that he had no lawful 
right to. He was stopped by Officer Charles King, ques- 
tioned and locked up on a Section 146 charge. 

^ :^ ^: 

Officer Frank McHugh had the number of a car reported 
stolen, so when he saw the said car come along the street 
he got curious and after asking a few embarrassing ques- 
tions of the driver, whom he halted, he satisfied himself 
that the you .ng man had driven it off without the owner's 
consent. He gave him a "frisk" and the first thing he 
found was a loaded gun. The stolen automobile and the 
loaded gun gave McHugh much food for reflection, as the 
combination usually winds up in a robbery or something 
worse. The young man, who gave his name as James 
Richardson, was booked for violating Section 146 of the 
Motor Act and for violating the revolver law. 

^ :!: :}: 

Robert Valergo got a lot of charges heaped upon him 
when he was arrested by Officer R. L. Smith and Special 
Officer Brady. The charges, three in number, are: threats 
against life, resisting an officer and disturbing the peace. 
* * * 

Sergeant Christiansen and a posse of officers rounded up 
William Moore who was fracturing the peace of some tax- 
payer. 



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Telephone Market 7906 

Sanitary Towel Supply Co. 

84 NINTH STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Kearny 1628 



MASKEY^S 

Manufacturer c\ 

FINE CANDIES 
52 Kearny Street, San Francisco 

629 W. 7th Street, Los Angeles 



Page 30 



POLICE JOURNAL 



J^ovemher, 1926 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

Captain H. J. Wright and his force of men have had 
time to attend to the lawbreakers as well as devote their 
full time to strike matters and the week of the so-called 

"Terror Bandits." 

* * * 

This is one of the few districts that got by without any 
drunken automobile drivers tearing up the landscape dur- 
ing the month. 

However, Mark Jones decided to observe the beauties of 
the North End section out of an automobile. He had none 
of his own but that meant nothing in his young life. He 
just grabbed the first one he found unlocked and ready 
to roll, hopped in and fared forth. His faring was short 
lived for Coi'poral Meilicke and Officer James Dowd got 
a peek at the number on the machine he was in, recognized 
it as one reported stolen and they just simply up and 
arrested Mr. Jones and charged him with violating section 

146 of the Motor Vehicle Act. 

* * * 

Special Duty Oflncers Peter Neilson and Edward Ken- 
eally can handle forgeiy cases as well as they do any of 
the other hundreds and one criminal cases. They demon- 
strated this when they picked up Mr. John Beeley and 

put a forgery charge against his name. 

* -^ ^ 

Joseph Yates got a little too rough and his roughness 
earned him a booking entitled assault by means and force 
likely to produce great bodily injury. He was arrested 
by OflScers Edward Plume, Keneally and Neilson. 



Albert Morris has the attractive charge of violating 
section 288 of the penal code chalked up to him. He was 
sent to the station by Corporal W. Kelly. 

+- ^; * 

William Dover and Ramon Cortez are two others who 
have to face such a charge, having been rounded up by 
officers T. Brady and Walter Pullen. 

* * * 

Pablo Magtoto has a pair of petty larceny charges 
marked up against him at the station. He was arrested 
by Officers Harry Gaylord, Keneally and Neilson. 

:}: ^ 4: 

Corporal Jagger and Officer F. Goesse! took into custody 
John T. Adams whom they locked up for assault with 
intent to commit mui'der. 



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'hloivynhjr. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 




\Y/E STERN 
iWrADDlTION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Emmet E. Moore and John M. 



Sullivan 



Volent Climes and major criminal acts were scarce in 
the terrain in charge of Captain Robert Coulter. How- 
ever, there was plenty to keep the boys busy, among some 
of the arrests will be found the following: 

* * Hi 

Cornelius Driscol hurrying through the streets in an 
automobile, uncertain in his line of travel attracted the 
attention of Lieutenant Emmett Moore and Officer J. 
Johnson. They caused him to tarry while they did some 
police investigating. They determined Conny was working 
in violation of Sec. 112 of the Motor Act as well as 

those of section 121. 

* * * 

Officer Al Johnson and Oliver Josephs took a gander at 
Sam L. Rogers and they remarked in unison as he passed 
that all was not well. The two officers got busy and be- 
fore they knocked off with the case they had Sam en- 
cased in some steel bars charged with driving while drunk. 

^ ^ :^ 

Richai'd Walsh, who "fell" once in Tucson, breezed into 
this territory the other day to be arrested for misdemeanor 
embezzlement and vagrancy. His predicament was brought 
about by Officer F. Corby and Special Tilton. 
^ ^ ^ 

Captain Robert Coulter, assisted by Officer L. Oliver 
and Detective Sergeant Thomas Hyland had a little strike 
matter to handle and they closed the day's work by 
arresting George Fredman and charging him with assault 
by means and force likely to produce great bodily injury. 

* * * 

Norman Smith knows just how the police go about 
arresting and booking a persori for first degree arson. 
He got this bit of intelligence following his experience 
w-ith Officers John Clasby and J. Casey, 
^•i * ^ 

Thomas Brown committing an indecent act was ar- 
rested by Corporal Zaun and L. Oliver. 

* * * 

Sidney Hewitt strayed off Folsom street to get arrested 
in this district for manslaughter. He was taken in cus- 
tody by Corporal McCarthy and Officer L. Berzone. 

One lone vag was gathered in this section of the city 
during the month being one arrested by Officers L. Linns 
and James Fleming. The prisoner gave the name of John 
Lonsdale. 



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Lumber & Planing Mill Co* 

JERROLD and BARXEVELD AVENUES 

Near Army and Potrero, San Francisco 

Telephone Mission 902 

GENERAL LUMBER YARD 



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Page i2 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, 1926 




BAY VIEW 

STATION 



Capt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowie 

There was more work for the boys in blue the past 
month than usual. Seems like there are a few guys who 
won't get the idea percolating through their domes that 
this is no district to pull any illegal stuff. They come, 

they try and they fall. 

* * * 

Now Manueal Corastanzas took a trip out here in an 
automobile. The machine did not run like a respectable 
machine should run and when Officer D. Twoomey and P. 
Finnegan got through investigating, the driver was locked 

up for dri\'ing while drunk. 

* * * 

A couple of weeks later Walter Klumich did the very 
same thing and he found himself all surrounded by nice 
half -inch steel bars with a section 112 charge tacked 
against his name. He was arrested by Officers Gerlack 
and J. Doherty. 

* * * 

Corporal William Harrington and Officer John Sunseri 
caught Elmer Walker whom they accused of petty pilfer- 
ing. They arrested him for petty larceny. 

* * » 

John Varnu, came out this way and proceeded to spread 
some checks that didn't have the necessary financial back- 
ing in the bank- Officers Tierney and James Hansen 
dragged him to the station on three 476a charges. 

* * * 

Jack Lally was carrying away some chattels of another 
man worth less than $200 when he was arrested by Special 
H. Hughes and booked for petty larceny. 

^ ^ 4^ 

John Carelli evidently thought he was in the wild and 
woolly west for he was going about properly armed. He 
was observed by Corporal Charles Broen and Officer Ryan 
who gave him a gun law violation booking and also for 
violating Ordinance 812. 

* * * 

Carl Smith got a ride in the wagon when he was ar- 
rested by Lieutenant DeGuire and Officer McDonnell for 
violating the Juvenile Court Law. 

* * * 

Leo Papen wanted for grand larceny was brought in by 
Officers R. Clifford and Charles Keck. 



JOHN FINN, President 



ROBERT B. FINN. Secretary 



John Finn Metal 
Works 

SAN FRANCISCO 

AND 

SEATTLE 

Babbitt Metals and Solders^Galvanizing 
Sherardizing 

372 - 398 SECOND STREET 

Telephone: Sutter 4188 




In San Francisco, at the Palace, 
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PALACE 

HOTEL 

HALSEY E.MANWARJNC 

San Francisco 

iSKlarf{ct atJ^ew Monl^mery St. 




'hlovembcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 33 



MURDEROUS THUGS JAILED 

(Continued from Page 6) 

Members of the detective bureau worked con- 
tinuously, some of its personnel being on duty 
for twenty-four hours and over straigiit; members 
of the tralfic bureau worked on traffic control and 
then volunteered their services, with their auto- 
mobiles at night, and until the early liours of 
the morning. 

Members of the headquarters company fulfilled 
their regular duties during the day, responding at 
night with their automobiles, those having no 
automobiles volunteering their services, and 
worked into the early hours of the following 
morning. 

Commanding officers of the various units of the 
department remained on duty almost continuously, 
directing the activities of the members of their 
respective commands, counseling with and advis- 
ing them in police duty. 

Immediately upon the mobilization of the man 
power of the department, with equipment, criminal 
activities of the so-called bandits ceased alto- 
gether, and during the week crime was reduced to 
a minimum. Concentrated police effort intelli- 
gently planned and developed resulted in the cap- 
ture of two perpetrators, one being seriously 
wounded by being shot while resisting arrest and 
attempting to escape. 

I respectfully submit that the devotion to duty 
and the loyalty of the membership of the San 
Francisco Police Department to the good citizens 
bf this city should be presented to your Honorable 
Board with a I'ecommendation that proper action 
be taken officially. 

Respectfully, 

D. J. O'BRIEN, 

Chief of Police. 



Thank you very much for the prompt and intelligent 
response of your Officers Moran and Kennedy, in taking 
action when the burglar alarm in our Geary street store 
rang on October 17th. 

ALBERT S. SAMUELS, 

33 Kearny Street. 



COLUMBIA 

STEEL CORPORATION 

Manufacturers of 

STEEL PRODUCTS 

CASTINGS— BARS— ANGLES 

LIGHT SHAPES 

SHEETS 

BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

WIRES 

BRIGHT— ANNEALED— GALVANIZED— BARBED 

NAILS 

BRIGHT— BLUED— CEMENT COATED— GALVANIZED 
WIRE RODS. STAPLES. TWISTED WIRE HOOPS 

PIG IRON— COAL— COKE 

Al! Made in the VJest from Western Raw Materials 
PLANTS 



Pittsbui-E, Calif. 
Portland, Ore. 



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Ironton. Utah 



SALES OFFICES 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles. Calif. 

Portland. Ore. Seattle. Wash. 

Salt Lake City, Utah Phoeni.x, Ariz. 



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BOOTHS 




CRESCENT 
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Sakdini^s 



Pacific Meter Works 

OF 

AMERICAN METER COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of Gas Meters 

495 Eleventh St., San Francisco, Calif. 2118 Atlantic St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



Page 34 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Jslovember, 1926 



MODERN CRIME 

(Continued from Page 10) 

There are many new kinds of crime nowadays 
that were wholly unknown a decade ago. Drug- 
addiction as a factor in crime is of the present 
generation. Habit forming drugs have no doubt 
been used improperly ever since drugs became 
common. But the drugs of those days did not 
make the user a criminal. Cocaine and heroin are 
new drugs, and the most dangerous the world 
has ever known, and heroin, the most devilish of 
all, is no more than ten years old. 

The present day dope user is, as a rule, either 
a criminal or, in all probability, will become crimi- 
nal. Not all crime is attributable to dope, but 
all dope is a factor in crime. Many of the worst 
crimes are directly chargeable to dope. When 
the addict has reached a certain stage he is likely 
to commit a violent crime. The State prison is 
no terror to the dope addict. As soon as he fin- 
ishes one term, he will commit another crime, if 
necessary, in order to secure the drug. Recently 
I sentenced a man who is not yet thirty years 
of age to his fourth term in a penitentiary. Dope 
was the cause of each offense. Dope is unques- 
tionably the cause of much crime. 
(To be Continued) 



NEW MEN AND OLD 

(Continued from Page 19) 
District, reports the loss of his 38 cal. Smith and 
Wesson revolver which was lost on October 9th. 
The holster also was lost. Loss occurred after he 
reported off duty at 8 a. m. last Saturday and 
while on his way home at 27 Casselli avenue. 

Star No. 1170, used by Robert E. Burns, re- 
signed, has been assigned to Patrolman Thomas L. 
Bassett, rank 163(11), certification 2488. Officer 
Bassett has been permanently assigned for duty 
with Company F, but he will remain on duty tem- 
porarily in the city prison (Headquarters Com- 
pany) until further orders. 

Corporal of Police Horace S. Drury of this de- 
partment (Bush Street Police District) reports the 
loss of his 38 caliber Smith and Wessen revolver. 
Description: handle chipped on one side and 
wrapped with red tape. Number of gun is 113649, 
88 cal. S. & W., and purchased through the Prop- 
erty Clerk's office. The revolver was lost some- 
where in the first section of the Bush Street Po- 
lice District, boundary. Market to Ellis street, 
Leavenworth to Steiner street. 

Police Officer James A. Carpeneti of this Depart- 
ment, having completed his course in the Depart- 
ment School of Instructions, has been permanently 
assigned for duty with Company L. 

Officer Niles Driver of this department has had 
his star number changed from 1182 to 792. The 
department records shall be altered accordingly. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

H With the largest lobby in the world, 
offers an ideal locatfon for Convention 
Headquarters. 

K FaiiTnont stands for hospitality un- 
excelled. 



D. M. LINNARD 

President 



LE KOY LINNAHD 
Manaser 



Civilization Owes a Debt of Qratitude to PRINTINQ 



Price and Quality 

IN MOST instances, price and quality go 
hand in hand. Cut the price — cut the 
quality. Quality determines the price; price 
reflects the quality. The laws of merchan- 
dising are unchangeable. They apply to all 
sales and all purchases. Little apples are 
cheaper than big apples; poor eggs are 
cheaper than good eggs; stale butter sells 
for half the price of good butter. Cheap 
printing is poor printing — almost always. 
Poor service costs less than good. Every 
thing has its price and quality is the deter- 
mining factor. 




Alex. Dulfer Printing Co. 

iEMbUshcd 1896] 

853 How.\RD Street San Fr.^ncisco 

Phone Douglas 2377 



Chas. W. Brown Wm. E. Kennedy 

{MemberB of Florists Telegraph Delivery) 

Flowers for All Occasions 

No Order Too Large for Us to Fill 
None Too Small for Consideration 

Brown & Kennedy 

Floral Artists 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Funeral Work a Specialty 

Reasonable Prices 

3091 16th Street 

Market 5725 



7\uuembc'r, 1926 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 



CITIZENS COMMP]ND POLICE 

(Continued fiom Page 15) 
was passed unanimously, "that a letter be sent to 
the Chief of Police and a copy of same to the Police 
Commission, expressing- our appreciation of the 
liigh efficiency of the Police Department in cap- 
turing- the "Terror Bandits." Believe us to be 
sincere in expressing- our utmost confidence in the 
finest police department in the United States. 
COPvWIN HANSEN, 
Executive Sficretary, Golden Gate Post No. 40. 



CAPTAIN WALL COMMENDS OFFICERS 

The following report has been submitted to the 
Chief's oflice by the Commanding- Captain, Eugene 
R. Wall, of the Ingleside Police District: 

"I respectfully invite your attention to the effi- 
cient and prompt police action performed by Pa- 
trolmen Lawrence W. Hagan, John C. Bigelow and 
Joseph D. Fitzpatrick of my command in appre- 
hending Millard K. McLellan at 12:30 a. m. No- 
vember 3rd, 1926, at Guttenberg and Morse 
streets. At 11:25 p. m., November 2nd, 1926, a 
telephone communication was received at this sta- 
tion from the detective bureau, that a Chinese 
restaurant was held up in Redwood City, San 
Mateo County, by a man with a Chevrolet auto- 
mobile, bearing- state license 816-297, wiiich was a 
stolen automobile from San Francisco. On receipt 
of that communication the above-named officers 
were immediately dispatched in the Police Buick 
touring- automobile attached to this station, to 
cover the Mission Road in the vicinity of the 
County Line. The above-named officers appre- 
hended Millard K. McLellan, after a chase in which 
the Police Department Buick automobile proved a 
success for speed in overtaking- the Chevrolet au- 
tomobile driven by McLellan who had a revolver, 
and it w^as necessary for the police officers to dis- 
charge their revolvers and police shotgun to stop 
McLellan." 

In the premises, the officers mentioned are here- 
by commended by the Chief of Police for the po- 
lice duty performed. 

D. J. O'BRIEN. 



CARL LEONHARDT 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 



Telephone San Bruno 1009 
SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 



J^ow it's 



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Offices 



Market ' Van Ness Office 

is now open in temporary 
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2626 Mission Street at 22nd 
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Atwater Kent, Radiola 
and Crosley sets. Trade 
in your old set. Liberal 
terms. 



BYINGTON 

ELECTRIC CO. 

1809 Fillmore Street 
Near Sutter West 82 



Page 36 "2-0"POLICEJOURNAL 

WORK OF MEMBERS APPRECIATED f 



7S(ouember, 1926 



At various times I have discussed and compli- 
mented the men of this department to various 
company commanders on their loj'alty to the 
police cause and devotion to duty during the try- 
ing times just passed. 

The men of San Francisco's Police Department 
have written police history that will be talked of 
in the department and throughout the country 
long after some of us have ceased to function as 
members of this department. 

As Chief of Police, each member of the depart- 
ment has my personal thanks for his co-operation 
and I am satisfied that proper action will be taken 
by the Honorable Board of Police Commissioners. 
I feel too, that the Chief of Police knows the aver- 
age citizen of San Francisco and that he or she 
will not be unmindful of the splendid services 
rendered. 

Company commanders will compute the over- 
time worked by the men of their respective com- 
mands so that proper action may be taken at a 
later date and when it will not interfere with po- 
lice service, so that they may be repaid for tlic 
additional time put in doing extra duty. 

Company commanders will have reports sub- 
mitted by the members of their respective com- 
mands, who used their automobiles, giving the 
number of hours in which said automobiles were 
in service and the number of miles traversed. 
From reports submitted company commanders will 
compile a report in triplicate to be forwarded to 
the Office of the Chief of Police, showing the name 
of the member of tlie command, set forth in alpha- 
betical order, the make of car and the year model, 
also the number of miles covered in police duty. 

At a meeting of tlie company commanders held 
in the office of the Chief of Police on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 19th, 1926, safeguarding the lives of the 
men of the department was discussed and I trust 
that each member of the departinent, regardless 
of his rank, will co-operate to the fullest extent 
with his commanding officer so that the criminal, 
who preys upon persons and property will not be 
permitted to find a place suspected of illegalities, 
which might be a haven of refuge to him, for the 
purpose of resting up between criminal activities 
and being stimulated to further illegal acts. 

Continuous police activities during the past 
week have driven undesirables from the city and 
those who remained have been taken into custody, 
thereby making San Francisco practically safe for 
its good citizens, and the duties of the police offi- 
cers less hazardous. 

Orders and information have been disseminated 
from this office on various occasions in the past, 
calling the attention of the members of the de- 
nartment to thp hazardous duties of a police 



DodeeBrothers 

MOTOR CARS 



J. E. FRENCH CO. 

O'Farrell at Polk 
2366 Mission St. 

Prospect 9000 



FIREMAN'S 
FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

401 CALIFORNIA STREET 
¥ire ' Automobile • Marine 



Phone PARK 6800 



Phone PARK 6801 



SYMON BROS. 

WRECKERS 

Full Line of Buildinp Materials — New and Second Hand 

Office and Yards - 1435-1437 Market Street 



BANCA POPOLARE FUGAZI 

(FUGAZI BANK) 

F. N. BELGRANO, Pres. 
San Francisco — Oakland — Santa Barbara 

C«lifomi« 

ASSETS OVER $16,000,000.00 



Phone Kearny 1701 P. O. Box 2143 

San Francisco International Fish Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Fish Dealers 
535-539 WASHINGTON ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



LA CAMPANA CAFE 

Italian Restaurant and Hotel 

Dancing 440 BROADWAY 

Every Evening SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Satter 8805 



Islovember, 1926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 



officer and the vicious nature of criminals as a 
wlioie. 

We owe a service to tiie good citizens of this 
city and a service to our brotiier officers — we can 
repay our obligations to both by keeping- the un- 
desirables either in jail or on the move. 

In conclusion, I wish to say that I personally 
appreciate the loyalty and service of the men of 
this department, and am grateful to the Almighty 
that no member thereof suffered any serious in- 
jurv during the trying ordeal just passed. 

DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police. 



SERGEANT MILLER PROMOTED 



Adhering to a policy whereby he has sought to 
have at least a sergeant in charge of the License 
Bureau, Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien the first 
of the month assigned Sergt. Sam Miller, for six 
years in charge of the reception office of the Chief, 
to take over the License Bureau. Corp. John 
McCausland, who for the past two years has been 
in charge, was given Miller's place. 

In appointing Sergt. Miller to his new post, 
Chief O'Brien announced that he was giving the 
sergeant a well earned promotion, as Miller's con- 
duct in his outter office, where he has met thou- 
sands of people having business with the Chief of 
Police, has been of such a high order that he has 
made many friends for the department. 

We might also add that those whose business 
was of such a nature that it could be attended to 
by another were shown the proper police official 
they should see, and no one ever went away after 
talking with Sam ]\Iiller feeling anything but kind- 
ness for the police department. 

Corporal McCausland has made a splendid rec- 
ord for himself in the License Bureau and we ex- 
pect he will maintain the same good reputation in 
his new billet. 

Meeting the public, and seeing that they are 
given the best in police service is the first duty 
of a police off.cer and Chief O'Brien has been most 
fortunate indeed in his staff of men in the "outer 
off.ce", from Capt. William J. Quinn, chief clerk, 
down through the line of Coi-p. McCausland, John 
Coughlan and Corp. Horace McGowan. 

These officers have a difficult task and they 
handle it in a manner that make all, the high and 
• the low, the rich and the poor, feel that they get 
the attention they are entitled to. 



Gaffney Drayage Co. 

Kearny 3648 
48 CLAY STREET 



Buy a Better Mattress at Factory 



All styles 
and sizes 



gd]#^sl^ 



NATTRESSFACTODY 



$12.75 

to 
$47.50 



1865 MARKET ST. 



AT GOUGH ST. 



(No Branches) 



HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A PARTICULAR LAUNDRY FOR PARTICULAR PEOPLE 

We Handle All Classes of Laundry Work 
PHONE MARKET 130 



IL TROVATORE CAFE ROOF GARDEN 

DANCING EVERY EVENING 

PAUL KELLrS JAZZ ORCHESTRA 

ITALIAN CUISINE 

Telephone 506 BROADWAY 



Sutter 8547 



San Francisco, Cal. 



DOUGLAS 6346 

EASTMAN KODAK STORES, Inc. 

Formerly Ho-wland & Dewey Co. 

EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 

545 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Roaches, Ants, Bedbugs, 
Fleas, Moths, Rats, Etc. 

Scientifically and Permanently 
EXTERMINATED by 

Ih£ INSECTICIDE CO. 

Manufacturers and Exterminators 

(Established 1892) 

MAX SALOMON, Manager 



NON-POISONOUS, STAINLESS 

PREPARATIONS 

Sold at Factory Prices 



OfBce: 657-659 PHELAN BUILDING 

Phone: Douglas 953 
SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 38 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovemher, 1926 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 
gone down again and a buyer could not be found 
at any reasonble figure owing to tlie dryness of the 
season. The animals were then put out to pasture 
and this move put Dr. Glenn in the mood to try 
farming. He formed a partnership with Major 
Biggs and the big ranch in Yolo was noted 
throughout the country. They finally rented it 
for ordinary farm operations and these two part- 
ners went into stock trading and freighting be- 
tween there and Idaho. In the spring of 1867 
Dr. Glenn concluded to make his permanent home 
in California and with that object in view he 
purchased land in Colusa County and moved there 
with his family to a place called Jacinto on the Sac- 
ramento River which was his home from that time 
up to his death. This ranch had become almost 
world-renowned and known as the Jacinto Ranch, 
it being one of the largest ranches in the world, 
extending along the banks of the Sacramento six- 
teen miles and averaging a width of over five miles. 
The land was devoted principally to wheat raising ; 
it being divided up into sections and worked by 
separate gangs of laborers, all of whom were per- 
sonally overseen by Dr. Glenn himself. He was 
not averse to exercise, his hands being hardened 
and horny from actual labor, while his bronzed 
and sunburned face combined with his gentler 
qualities earned him the name of the gentleman 
farmer. He was quiet and unobtrusive in his 
manners and commanded the respect of all with 
whom he came in contact. His distinguished 
characteristic was a full flowing beard, but serious 
looking eyes, which betokened great mental quali- 
ties. His first and only experience in public life 
was a member of the State Board of Agriculture. 
He was born to be a leader in whatever he under- 
took. Educated as a physician, an unexpected 
event made him a land holder and in a few years 
he became the largest farmer on the globe, and 
the only wheat grower in America who chartered 
his own ships and sold by telegraph his own grain 
in Europe, dispensing with middle men entirely. 
His payments for labor and supplies on his gi-eat 
ranch would reach as high as six hundred thou- 
sand dollars a year. In addition to this he owned 
a seventy thousand acre ranch in Oregon stocked 
with cattle, neither land nor cattle of which he 
had ever seen. He also owned cattle ranges in 
Nevada. He was a man naturally given to large 
and bold operations. He never lost his balance. 
Losses never disturbed him, nor great profits 
elate him. Physically, Dr. Glenn was almost a 
perfect man. There was not a weak spot in his 
1 round, well knit body and broad shoulders. He 
could ride a mule 18 hours a day without fatigue, 
and had often done it when personally superin- 
tending his ranches a long distance apart. He was 
an indulgent father, and there never was anything 



Your ''laundry trials^' will he 
over when you try us 

La Grande and Whitens 
Laundry Company 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
Phone Market 916 

250 - 12th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: MARKET {9} "4 



Little Auto Parts Company 

NEW and USED 
WHEELS, RIMS, PARTS and ACCESSORIES 



701 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

Cor. Franklin St. San Francisco, Cal. 




of(^udify 



PLEDGED TO GIVE 

"Most Miles per Dollar" 



Good Work, Courteous Routemen 

SAN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY 
Telephone West 793 



M 


Irvine & Jachens 

Manufacturers 

Badges : Police Belt Buckles 

1068 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 



All Phone orders delivered within the hour — Special 

motorcycle delivery anywhere — No charge 
Phones: Garfield 4417 
Garfield 4418 

Broemmels Prescription Pharmacy 

SECOND FLOOR, FITZHIIGH BLDG. 

Rooms 201-202-203 



Prescription Department 

Open Week Days. 8. A. M. to 9. P. M. 

Sundays. 9 to 1 and 6 to 8 



Post & Powell Sts. 
San Fi-ancisco 



Fisher's Dancing Pavilion 

Eddy and Jones Streets 
DANCING EVERY EVENING 

Mnsic by 

DR. RITTER'S GOLDEN GATE SINGING BAND 
ADMISSION 10 CENTS 



Jslovember, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 39 



too good for his family. He was a popular man 
in his own neighborhood, which for so large an 
employer was high praise. 

The trial of Huron Miller for the killing of the 
doctor was held in Colusa before Judge Bridge- 
ford. Jackson Hatch was counsel for the de- 
fendant, while General Joe Hamilton was for the 
prosecution. Hatch argued that if the defendant 
firmly believed in his own mind that it was neces- 
sary to kill Dr. Glenn in self-defense, then he was 
justified in so doing. He said as to the presump- 
tion in the case, the law allowed the defendant 
to rest upon the presumption of innocence. 
Hatch in his argument of this case occupied nearly 
eight houi-s. General Joe Hamilton argued that 
in the course of the trial after the evidence of the 
prosecution was all in the defendant takes the 
stand and for the first time pleads self-defense in 
justification of the homicide. This plea of self- 
defense the counsel argued was an after-considera- 
tion. Counsel argued that the prowling about of 
the defendant before the homicide and his having 
deadly weapons on him proved premeditation and 
malice. He said that Dr. Glenn was undoubtedly 
not in a pleasant frame of mind at finding Miller, 
who was his bookkeeper, drunk, and when he said 
"you are drunk again," Miller replied, "you are a 
liar," and Dr. Glenn knocked him down and there 
was no excuse for the defendant slaying him a 
week later. Counsel also said in his argument 
that drunkenness was no excuse and he warned 
the jury against sentimental maudlin sympathy, 
and charged them not to allow an opportunity 
for it to be said perhaps a few months later, "an- 
other good citizen shot down by a drunken man," 
but let it be telegi'aphed over the world that a jury 
in Colusa County had found that unlawful killing 
is murder. He devoted one hour and fifteen min- 
utes to the closing argument. The case was given 
to the jury that afternoon and they remained out 
for a long time; there was no possible pros- 
pect of their arriving at a verdict and had made no 
progress, and the court then made an order that 
if there was no possibility that the jury would 
agree that they be discharged, and remanded Mil- 
ler into custody again. It was stated on the con- 
cluding ballot the jury stood 8 for murder in the 
1st degi-ee with 4 for murder in the 2nd degree 
and this was about the vote throughout when it 
was stated that 1 vote was for manslaughter. It 
was also stated after that the eight were willing 
to vote for a life sentence provided the four would 
come up to that degree but the latter stood out. 



Phone Prospect 2867 



K. B. COBB, Prop. 



HOTEL SUTHERLAND 

Steam Heat. Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 
Private Exchange Connecting All Rooms 
465 ELLIS STREET, San Francisco 

Special Rates to Permanent Guests 



re GRANEY 
Billiard Parlor 

Finest in the World 
924 MARKET STREET 



CW.MARWEDEL 

EstabUshed 1872 

TOOLS METALS 

SHOP SUPPLIES 



Brass, Copper, Steel, Bronze, 
Aluminum and Monel Metal 



store and Office— 76 FIRST STREET 

Metal Dept.— 31 JESSIE STREET 

San Francicso, Cal. 



WM. H. HAMBLETON 

NOW IN OUR NEW STORE 

50 CALIFORNIA ST. San Francisco, Calif. 

All TJiat Is Good for the Smoker 



KEARNY 5044 



HOTEL MELBA 

214 JACKSON STREET 



CAESAR ATTELL 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
6 - 6TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



They Advertise — Let'i PationJie 



453 GRANT AVE 



G. 



632 QaANT AVE. 

Unilcr Samt Managtrnenl 



CHIITESE AMEEICAi; DISHES — ^MEECHANTS* LUNCH, 60e 

Jazz Dance Music Every Evening 8 p. m. to 1 a_ m. 

REAL CHOP SUEY 



Page 40 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



T^ovember, 1926 



CHIEF O'BRIEN 

(Continued from Page 9) 
district must respond to fires, ropes must be 
stretched, persons are not permitted to enter fire 
lines except a limited few who are clothed with 
proper authority. Details are immediately made 
to protect life and property at fire and to pre- 
vent crimes. Outposts are established so that 
traffic will be properly diverted and nothing is 
left undone to prevent any possibility of hindrance 
to the efficient workings of the fire-fighting unit. 

Our police activities are further extended by 
the necessity of maintaining a proper clearance at 
all times at fire hydrants. Of course, all activities 
along this hne find their authority in the legal 
enactments of our state and municipal legislative 
bodies. Our officers are constantly on the alert to 
^prevent unlawful blockading of fire hydrants and 
citations are always given where violations of this 
(kind are discovered. That this requirement is es- 
sential can be readily seen by the interruption 
caused a fire-fighting apparatus in making proper 
connections with a water hydrant when an auto- 
mobile is found unlawfully parked in front of a 
hydrant. It goes without saying that the better 
regulation of traffic upon our public highways and 
the more orderly and expeditious the movements 
of motor vehicles, the more ready will be the 
response in cases of fire and the more efficient 
will our fire department activities be. While our 
traffic problems have been discussed at length 
among police officials we have in mind the great 
requirement for co-operation with fire depart- 
ments along traffic lines. We realize the gi-eat 
responsibility resting on fire departments in the 
protection of property and we are always endeav- 
oring to effect a closer co-operation for the com- 
mon good. 

Another police activity which is engaged in is 
that of the apprehension of those who set fire to 
property in violation of our statutory enactments, 
particularly the statutes governing arson and the 
attempts to unlawfully collect fire insurance. This, 
of course, comes strictly within the sphere of 
police activity, but in the apprehension of crimi- 
nals the preparing of evidence, the arranging of 
witnesses and establishing of our cases for the 
prosecution in general we have always had the 
close co-operation of our Fire Marshal. 

The efficiency of one department has a most 
favorable and encouraging effect upon the other. 

It is the aim and object of each to give the 
highest possible degree of service to the people 
of the county or municipality in which they sei-ve. 
Every efficient improvement is taken advantage 
of and I might say in concluding that the i-espect 
and confidence of our people has been gained 
through this efficiency and the co-operation be- 
tween the respective departments. 



Telephone Kearny 2453 



Night Phones — 
Pacific 1333 
Oakland, Piedmont 1149 



EUREKA BOILER WORKS CO. 

Designers and Builders of All Kinds of 

MARINE, STATIONARY and 
LOCOMOTIVE BOILERS 

Special Attention Paid to 

REPAIRS OF SHIPWORK, BOILERS, 

TANKS and SHEET IRON WORK 

Building and Installing of Oil Plants a Specialty 

MACHINE BLACKSMITHING 



MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS: 

166-178 Fremont St. San Francisco, Cal. 



Learn to Play a BANJO 



It's EasA^ on a 

VEGA 

Professional 
Favorite 




FREE 

Lessons 

Included 



SPECIAL OUTFIT OFFER 

Term Price $43.58 

7^0 Interest or Extra Charges 

Pay 75c a Week 

Outfit includes Genuine Vega Tenoi" Banjo, 
Case, Strings, Picks, and Course of Indi- 
vidual Lessons by Reputable Teachers. 




250 STOCKTON STREET 
2345 MISSION STREET 



7\[over7iber, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 41 



The Officers of the San Francisco 

Police Department are respectfully 

asked to patronize the firms 

supporting their paper* 

MENTION THE POLICE JOURNAL 

CLASSIFIED 



ADVERTISING— PUBLICITY 
Norman F. D'Evelyn _Balfour Bldg. 



Harold Wurts-.. 

N. W. Aver & Sons_. 

Municr, Leon E.- 



Chronicle Bldg. 

Matson Bldg. 

_863 Howard St. 



H. K. McCann Co 451 Montgomery St. 

Emil Brischer & Staff .Flood Bldg. 

AMUSEMENTS 
Chutes at the Beach. 

AUTOMOBILES 

1601 Van Ness 
1700 Van Ness 



Chandler 

Cleveland 

Ford 

Dodge Cars- 
Star Car _ 



-Sacramento-Van Ness 
-Wilbur Smith 



G'Farrell & Polk 

_1625 Van Ness Ave. 

AUTO WRECKERS 
Little Autoniobile Cc-TOl Golden Gate Ave. 

BADGES 
Irvine & Jachens^. __.1068 Market St. 

BANKS 

.American Bank 

Fogazi Bank . ? Columbus 

Italian- American — 

Montgomery and Sacramento 
San Francisco Baiik B26 California St. 



BILLIARD PARLORS 



-924 Market St. 



The Graney . 

BONDS & INVESTMENTS 
De Fremery & Co 341 Montgomery St. 

CIGARS 

Admiration "Mild Tampa" 

Hambleton, Wm. H 50 California St. 

Optimo . "Very Mild" 

Shaw-Leahy Co., Inc 207 9th St. 



."Your Cigar" 



Van Camp 

CLEANING AND DYEING 
F. Thomas 27 Tenth St. 

CLOTHING 
Columbia Outfitting C«.— -Mission and 22nd 
Home Clothing Co 2500 Mission St. 

DAIRIES 

Del Monte Creamery 375 Potrero Ave. 

San Francisco \ Turk and Steiner 

DANCING 

Fisher's Dancing Pavilion Eddy & Jones 

Roseland Ball Room Sutter & Pierce 

DENTISTS 
Hoagland, Dr. 908 Market St. 

ELECTRICAL GOODS 
Collonan Elect. & Mfg. Co. — 

3201 Mission St. 

EXTERMINATORS, INSECT 

Insecticide Co 667 Phelan Bldg. 

FLORISTS 
Brown & Kennedy 3091 - 16th St. 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

California Poultry Co 313 Washington 

and Sacramento Sts. 
San Francisco International Fish Co. 

535 Washington St, 

Sperry Flour Co Tested Every Hour 

Western California Fiah Co._- 656 Clay 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
White's Service _2200 Sutter St. 



FURNITURE 
Redlick-Newman Co. 17th & Mission 



GARAGES 



Page's Modem 



.-740 Valencia 



GASOLINE 
"General" — 

Look for the Green and White Sign 
Richfield Oil Co The Gasoline of Power 



HALLS 
Dreamland Auditorium > 



-Steiner & Post 



Lundstrom-. 



St. Francis 



Bellevue 

Fairmont 

Lankershim- 
Melba.- 



HATS 

-.10 Inclusive Hat Stores 



HOSPITALS 



-Bush and Hyde 



HOTELS 



Geary and Taylor 

-California and Powell 

5th near Market 

-214 Jackson St. 



Palace Market & New Montgomery 

Van Noys Terminal __60 Market St. 

Whitcomb Market and Eighth 

INSURANCE 

Fireman's Fund . . JM California 

James Rolph, Jr., W. B. Swett Co., Inc. 

150 Sansome 
West American Insurance Co. 

1431 Van Ness Ave. 

JEWELRY 
Attell, Caesar . 6 Sixth St. 

KODAKS 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Inc.-645 Market St. 



LAUNDRIES 



-3338 - 17th St. 
—250 - 12th St. 
_-385 - 8th St. 



Home 

La Grande & White's. 

New Process -_ 

San Francisco 1432 Turk St. 

Sanitary Towel Supply Co _-84 - 9th St. 

United States 1148 Harrison St. 

LUBRICANTS 
"General" — 

Look for the Green and White Sign 
(Richlube) Pennsylvania Oil 



LUMBER 



Sudden-Heitman- 



1960 - 3rd St. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
Rudolph Wurlitzer Co 250 Stockton St. 

MATTRESSES 

McRoskey, Edw. L 1506 Market St. 

MOTORCYCLES 

Harley-Davidson The Police Standard 

OIlie Cummins 57 Page St. 

OIL PLANTS 
Eureka Boiler Works ^166 PVemont St. 

PAINTS 
Fuller. W. P. & Co.. 



301 Mission 

Send for Booklet on Home Beautifying 



PUBLICATIONS 

"2-0" to Advertisers. 



PRINTERS 



Dulfer, Alex 

Quinn, John F.. 



-853 Howard St. 
Douglas 2377 



PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS 
Great Western Power Co. 
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

REAL ESTATE 
McGuire, Walter E 220 Monteomery 

RESTAURANTS 

Blanco's . 859 O'Farrell St. 

Fior D'ltalia 492 Broadway 

Hoyt's 6 Doughnut and Sandwich Shops 

n Trovatore — 506 Broadway 

La Campana Cafe . 440 Broadway 

New Poodle Dog Polk & Post 



Shanghai Cafe, New — 
Schwartz's Waffle Inn 
St. Germaii 



-463 Grant Ave. 

126 O'Farrell 

-60 Ellis St. 



SIGHTSEEING TOURS 

Gray Line Motor Tours 920 Market 

STEAMSHIP LINES 
Luckenbach Steamship Co. 

TAXIS 

White Top Cab Phone Franklin 6 

TAILORS 

Kelleher & Browne The Irish Tailors 

THEATRES 
Loew's Warfield — The Best in 

Pictures and Weekly "Ideas" 
Pantages — Selected Photoplays — 

Six Vaudeville Acts 
Union Square — Feature Photoplays — 

Five Vaudeville Acts 

TIRES 

"Serve You Well" 

_"Most Miles Per Dollar" 
166 - 12th St 



C. & L 

Firestone- 
Michclin-.. 



TOOLS 



Marwcdel, C. W- 



-76 - iBt St. 



NEW ADVERTISERS 



Schluter & Co. 

Columbia Steel Corp. 
Pacific Metal Works.- 



-1400 Market St. 

Matson Bldg. 

-495 - 11th St. 



Byington Electric Co 1S09 Fillmore St. 

Golden State Butter \t Your Grocer 

Caldwell-Cornwall & Banker- 57 Sutter St. 
North Amer. Imp. Co. (NACO) all grocers 

John Finn Iron Works 372 - 2nd St. 

Schrimer Stevedore C« Pier No. 39 

F. R. Nash Stevedore Co 6 Mission St. 

Johnson's Saws 26 Stillman St. 

Hotel Sutter Kearny at Sutter 

Uncle Tom's Cabin —San Bruno 

Park Sanitarium 

Fernando Nelson & Sons 2 W. Portal Av. 

The Envelope Co. 352 - 6th St. 

Symon Bros., wreckers 1435 Market St. 

Jones-Thierbach Co At Your Grocer 

rhas. Hamil. builder 6242 Geary St. 

Dan P. Maher .Paints, Oils, Varnishes 

Reinhart Lumber Co. 

Monterey Packing Co. At Your Grocer 

Normans. Inc.. costumes 1061 Market St. 

Maske>-8, candies 52 Kearny St. 

H. Friedreich, furniture manufacturer 
I. Goldman, clothier 788 Market St. 



Page 42 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL November, ] 926 

AUSTRALIAN TRAFFIC EXPERT HERE DET. SERGEANT JAMES MITCHELL A "DAD" 



They have their traffic problems over in Au- 
stralia, the same as they do, here, so says J. H. 
Lomperd, head of the traffic branch of the Mel- 
bourne Police Department, who has been in San 
Francisco for several days and who is in the 
United States for a long and intensive study of 
automobile traffic in all the cities, and of the 
methods employed in handling it. 

Officer Lomperd visited the local traffic bureau, 
and had several conferences with Captain Dun- 
can Matheson, the first traffic commander in the 
city. 

The visitor declared he was very much im- 
pressed with the methods used here and that he 
can apply some of them to the problems of his 
home city. He says Melbourne is faced with 
somewhat similar conditions regarding exits from 
the city, as is San Francisco. The Antipodes city 
has two bridges that furnish the main outlet and 
he says these driveways are taxed to handle the 
100,000 machines in the section. 

In Australia he says there are no speed laws. 
The law says no one must drive at "a speed or 
manner dangerous." This system, he said, had 
proven very satisfactory and people were careful 
not to violate the laws. 



Det. Sergt. James Mitchell reported' off early 
November 10 and was late the next morning. 
All because an eight-pound baby daughter was 
born to Mrs. Mitchell at the St. Francis Hos- 
pital. James says the mother and young heiress 
is doing fine and he expects the first words she 
will say will be "Uncle Mike." James found his 
desk in the Detective Bureau all dolled up for 
him when he showed up, there being plenty of 
pink ribbon and several accessories that little 
baby girls find handy in their every day life. 



HOTEL SUTTER 



FIREPROOF 

Kearny and Sutter Sts, 



EUROPEAN PLAN 
Phone Sutter 3060 

San Francisco, California 



Hotel Sutter is a modem, strictly first-class 
hotel, noted far and wide for its fine furnishings, 
splendid service and popular prices. 

No hotel in the city has a better location; in 
fact, the Sutter is in the heart of the city, with 
banking, business and shopping districts surround- 
ing it on all sides. 

Nothing better could be said of the Sutter than 
that it is heartily endorsed by Califomians them- 
selves, from one end of the State to the other. 
Management of 
GEORGE WARREN HOOPER. 



You may match the price, perhaps 
BUT— Not the car! 

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■iiniiiiiiiiiiiii 



1B-V 



Annual Police Concert 
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Date - Saturday night, February 19, 1927 

Place ' Exposition Auditorium. 

Object - Charity; Raising of funds for widows and 
orphans of deceased San Francisco police officers 

Event - Annual Concert and Ball, and entertainment 
of the Widows and Orphans Aid Association 
of San Francisco Police Department 

Admission - $1.00 

Where tickets can be procured - From any 

Police Officer, at any Police Station, or by calling 
"Davenport 20" 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



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OFFICERS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGH. 

GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

A. D. PLUGHOFF 

VICe-PRES. AND TREASURER 

G. G. BUNDY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 

G. L. PICKRELL 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 










Joseph H. Cote— manager northern division 

WEST AMERICAN BUILDING 

1431 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Phone Graystone 7700 



DIRECTORS 

WM. L. HUGH SON. CHAIRMAN 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G- BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO- DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A. FINCH 
O. R. FULLER 
P. H. GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H. LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 

JOHN F. Mcknight 

ROBT- W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A. D. PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI, Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L. V. STARR 



J^ovemher, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Pagel 



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DEDLICK NEWMANr 

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Page 4 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 






.Mmx 




The 

Hibernia Savings and Loan 
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Incorporated 1864 

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SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT MISSION OFFICE 
and GEARY ST. - 10th AVE. OFFICE 



• 




Vol. V. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiimiiiiHiiriiiriiiiininiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinininniiJiiiiimummiriiiriiirii^ 



• 



DECEMBER, 1926 



No. 2. 



iiiiiitiiniiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiimmuiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiim 



The Killing of Joe Tanko 

Edwin C. Gillen, Police Reporter in San Francisco for Oa\land Tnbune. Writes Interesting Article 

of End of Jsiotorious Murderer 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiiiinui;;ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiii uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i iiiimiiiiiiimiiii iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii iiiiBiiiiiiiiiii i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiJ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiramiiiuLiiiiiimitiiimmiinii wiimmiiiriimiiiiiiirauiiiiiim 




It was in a dimly lit basement flat 
of a house in jMcAllister sti'eet, re- 
pugnant with the smell of gun- 
powder and the sight of bullet-rid- 
dled, blood splotched walls that Joe 
Tanko, arch-bandit and murderer, 
with the ferociousness of a cornered 
rat, fought a duel to death with De- 
Edwin c. Gillen ^gctive Sergeant Earl Roney. And 
it was with the traditional courage of the police 
department and the individual heroism of a brave 
man that Roney, dangerously wounded, \\n'ot<2 
"finis" to the bandit's career of crime and col- 
lected in full the debt he owed society. 

Abruptly, accidentally and with the invariable 
uncertainty that accompanies the duties of a 
policeman, Roney and his brother officers. Detec- 
tive Sergeants Vernon \^an Matre, Jack Palmer 
and Edward McSheehy, unwittingly walked into 
the lair of the lion Tanko, prey of 100 posses 
throughout the country. Before the bare twink- 
ling of an eye law and banditry met and fought 
it out. 

The tragedy was enacted when the officers went 
to the McAllister street address to search for 
Willie De Bardelaben and his gang, wanted for 
an assault on a man and his wife. De Bardelaben 
is well known to the police and no trouble was 
expected. De Bardelaben, it was thought how- 
ever, might make a break for liberty. Precau- 
tions to spike such a move were taken. The offi- 
cers surrounded the house. Two doors, a window 
and an upstairs flat were guarded by the four 
policemen as they closed in on their prey. Mc- 
Sheehy guarded a rear door; Palmer a side door; 
Van IMatre was stationed at the only window to 
the place, while Roney guarded an upstairs out- 
let to close in behind the men who were sought. 



When all men were stationed Van Matre raised 
the window and peering through a screen dis- 
cerned the figure of De Bardelaben stretched out 
on a bed. 

"Willie", called Van Matre, "Come out and ^vith 
your hands up — we have the place covered." 

De Bardelaben leaped to his feet, fully dressed, 
and appeared to comply with the command, when 
suddenly he recoiled in horror and, hands stretch- 
ed high, backed slowly toward the interior of 
the room. 

"I can't", he choked, "he's got me covered." 

"Wlio has you covered"? queried Van Matre. 

His question went unanswered. Van Matre 
then thrust aside the screen, put his leg through 
the window and started to enter. 

A shot rang out. Van ]Matre gasped and 
slumped from the window. He drew the first 
fire from Tanko's gun in the bandit's last stand 
for life. The bullet found its way deep into the 
officer's groin. 

Before Palmer and McSheehy raised the fallen 
\'an Matre to his feet a volley of shots reverberat- 
ed throughout the house and the officers knew the 
battle was ended — Roney and Tanko shot it out. 

When Tanko fired at Van Matre. he ran for 
the stairway leading to the flat above. That was 
his last means of escape. His flight was cut short, 
however, for at the top of the naiTOw unlit stair- 
case stood Roney waiting for such a move. 

Tanko paused! 

Roney instantly recognized his adversary! 

Not the Tanko who escaped from San Quentin 
and carried on a reign of terror in Sacramento, 
to be sure, but an emaciated, haggard Tanko with 
the look of a hunted deer. 

For a fleeting second, officer and criminal stared 
at each other! A dramatic tableau and then^ — 
it was all over. 



Page 6 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



Tanko fired the first shot and with the same 
deadly aim that he exhibited throughout his com- 
paratively short life, sent a bullet ripping into 
Roney's abdomen. Then Roney answered. 

Five shots were fired by the officer. The first 
plunged close to the bandit's heart and probably 
was the shot that saved Roney's life, for Tanko, 
mortally wounded, was no longer the "dead" shot 
and his other bullets went wild. Roney emptied 
his gun and four of his five shots entered Tanko's 
body. 

As the final lead pellet tore through the bandit's 
body, Tanko, king of the underworld, ingloriously 



examples of real policemen and a tremendous as- 
set to the San Francisco Police Department. 

The law won, though at a great sacrifice, for 
two brave and courageous officers were shot by 
the cold blooded murderer. Roney, who unflinch- 
ingly met Tanko on his own grounds and terms, 
was felled by a bullet through his abdomen. Van 
Matre with a shot through the groin. 

Van Matre, though wounded, rushed as best he 
could to the assistance of Roney, being outdis- 
tanced on account of his injury, by Palmer and 
McSheehy. They saw their comrade was badly 
hurt. He told them the bandit was dead at the 




TWO HEROES GET REWARDS 
Detective Sergeants Earl Roney and Vernon Van Matre Being Presented Checks by Chief O'Brien and Captain Matheson 



toppled over and rolled heavily to the bottom of 
the stairs, his limp trigger finger stayed forever 
from his murderous career. 

Then Roney, with Tanko's bullet in his abdo- 
men, showed the grit and courage exacted from 
a policeman. With teeth clenched to lessen the 
agonizing pain, and with trembling fingers, Roney 
reloaded his empty gun in anticipation of further 
combat! It never came. Tanko was dead! 

It was because of this that Roney, Van Matre, 
Palmer and McSheehy have been commended by 
Mayor James Rolph, the Board of Supervisors, 
the Police Commission and every citizen of San 
Francisco and why they all pray for Detective 
Roney's speedy recovery, and it is also why this 
writer points to the quartet of officers as shining 



foot of the stairs, that he had asked Tanko to 
surrender, but he shot first. Ambulances were 
summoned and a general alarm sent to headquar- 
ters that brought automobile after automobile 
loaded with detectives, armed for combat, but 
there was no need. Roney had done his work 
well. De Bardelaben was in shackles and Palmer 
and McSheehy turned their prisoner over to 
patrolmen and assisted in the work of caring for 
the injured. 

Every attention was given the two wounded 

detectives. Chief O'Brien, Captain Matheson and 

other officials high in police circles rushed to the 

hospital where they asked that nothing be spared 

(Continued on Page 40) 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 7 



I im iniitiii I niiiiiiii ill i imi iiiiiin inmiiiiniiiii mil 



iniiioiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiimmiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiioiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



The Career of Jesse James 

An Interesting Article By Officer Peter Fanning 



„ II I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiniion niiiiiiiiin: iimiiiiiiiiiiiiliii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiimimiiiini miii'iinm iiiiiiwiiiiimiii iiiiiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiuiniuimiiiiiiiii iiiiiii iiuiiuiiiimiiiuiii iNimmiiiiiiuii 




PETER FANNING 



Jesse James was 
born in Clay County, 
Missouri, in the year 
of 1846. His father 
was a minister and his 
mother a well-educated 
woman. Jesse and his 
brother Frank made 
their first experience 
in killing and robbing 
when they joined 
Quantrell's notorious 
Guerrilla band. As 
mere boys of 18 and 16 
years of age, Frank 
being the eldest, they 
distinguished t h e m - 
selves as marvelously 
good pistol shots, and 
reckless young marauders generally. 

At the time he gave his boyish ambitions a 
treat and joined Quantrell's gang, Jesse is des- 
cribed as having been a youth of pleasant ex- 
pression, round, jovial face and merry laugh. 

Jesse had always done the talking while Frank 
was creditably reported to have never laughed and 
never joked with the gang. 

After several little jobs were pulled off for 
Quantrell, they were then initiated into their first 
grand robbing, burning, murdering experience. 

That was the sacking of the town of Lawrence, 
over the Kansas border. In that horrible affair 
the James boys, then actually boys, distinguished 
themselves by shooting down an unusual number 
of defenseless men, women and children. 

In this barbarous warfare Jesse received three 
wounds, two in the legs and one through the 
lungs. 

The latter wound was a terrible one and almost 
saved the people and various railroads much sub- 
sequent annoyance, but Jesse was taken in by 
friends after escaping from his pursuers, and was 
sent home to his mother. Just after the close of 
the Civil war, Frank James was very badly wound- 
ed in the hip by a posse who were looking for 
horse thieves; but his great luck attended him, 
and after a desperate fight, in which he is said to 
have killed three of the posse, he escaped. 

The first big robbery after the war credited to 
Jesse James' long account, was the holdup of the 
Liberty Bank of Missouri taking seventy thousand 
dollai-s. 



For this Jesse James was wanted by the author- 
ities but having established a reputation as a 
very bad man and dead shot, his capture was given 
to five cavalry men to perform. 

As usual Jesse escaped, although surprised, 
while still suflfering from the wound in his lung. 
He first killed two and badly wounded two 
others of his would be captors. The next affair 
which brought Jesse into notoriety was the rob- 
bery of the bank of Russell ville, Logan County, 
Kentucky. This was done in the James style of 
doing that kind of work. A gang of mounted men 
dashed into Russellville headed by Jesse shouting, 
swearing, and firing pistols to reduce the citizens 
to a proper condition of inactive fear. 

Two of the men rushed into the bank, argued 
briefly with the cashier and a large portion of the 
safe's contents soon departed. 

Shortly after this robbery the James boys came 
out to this coast for their health, and proceded 
to Paso Robles sulphur springs where a hotel was 
kept by their uncle. 

The quiet of sulphur springs life was not to the 
James boys liking, and they soon drifted up into 
Nevada where they were known as tough char- 
acters. They got into a bloody fight in a gambling 
joint in Battle Mountain and made their escape as 
soon as possible. 

The next heard of them was in 1869 when the 
bank of Gallatin, in Missouri, was robbed in the 
James boys style. 

In this affair the cashier of the bank was killed 
and some of the assets of the bank were taken 
away in a sack. 

At this time the police and detectives were all 
on the hunt for them and all trace of them were 
lost; the next that was heard of them was in 
1872, when a little village in Adair County, Ken- 
tucky, received a visit from this gang, and in regu- 
lation fashion held up a bank there. 

The Pinkerton Detectives were obtained to hunt 
down these bandits, and they scoured the country 
for them. 

The next that was heard of them was when the 
pool seller's cash box and the gate money of the 
Kansas City Fair was robbed. This was done with 
the usual rush and yell, and in the presence of 
twenty thousand people with the gang getting 
away on horseback. 

The next rally that they made was a holdup of 
the St. Genevieve Bank in IMissouri. This was 
done in the regulation style, the gang compelling 
(Continued on Page 42) 



Page S 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



I Remember When ' 



. Reyniniscences of An Old-Time Police Reporter 

'iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Captain Bill Healy was in charge of the China- 
town squad in 1912-1913 and was made a tem- 
porary sergeant by the late Chief of Police White. 
In 1914 Bill was a sergeant in Co. B; an acting 
lieutenant from 1916 to 1920 and an appointed 
lieutenant in 1920 and a captain in 1923. Captain 
Healy was made commander of the Richmond 
station which position he now holds. Bill used 

to be a molder before he went on the force. 

* * * 

Hamilton Dobbin, one of the oldest men in point 
of service in tlie department, is Captain Healy's 
clerk. "Ham" is a corporal and knows as much 
about old San Fi-ancisco and the police depart- 
ment members as anyone. He began as a Park 
policeman under the old Park Commission before 
that individual force was merged with the regu- 
lar police department. Dobbin and 15 men were 
made members of the force when the Charter 
went into effect in 1900. He worked in the Park 
and old O'Farrell street stations; was a detective 
sergeant; was in the Mission, and is now in the 

Richmond. 

* * * 

Of the old Park police there are three men 
still in the department. They are Manuel de la 
Guerra, Hamilton Dobbins and James H. Kava- 
naugh. * * * 

Thoinas F. O'Connell, now a trouble shooter at 
the Richmond, worked with Charlie Gallatin on 
the dip and bunk detail from 1910 to 1917. He 

also worked with Tom Reagan. 

* * * 

Charles G. Budd, the smallest man mounted, 

rode in the Park. He is now retired. 

* * * 

Frank Black, on a horse, patrolled the Cliff 
House road and Ocean Beach. Frank is now in 
the office of the Detective Bureau. 

* * ^N 

Tom Guest, retired, patrolled tlie streets from 
10th avenue to 25th avenue, from the Park to 
the Presidio. 

The O'Farrell street station was a sub-station 

of the Park district. 

^ * ■■\'' 

Handsome Bill King, with the row of gold 
teeth, was at the Park. Bill is now connected 
with the North End. 

* * * 

Frank McGuire, now a lieutenant at the Rich- 
mond, entered the department 18 years ago, on 



the same night that Chief of Police Dan O'Brien 
was appointed. Frank was in the Chinatown 
squad for a long time and served under Sergeants 
Lionel Shaw, Morrissey and Jack Herlihy. Lieu- 
tenant McGuire spent 13 years in the tough old 
Southern district. 

^ ^ ^ 

On the day of the earthquake of 1906, and the 
succeeding fire, the line-up at the Park station 
was : Captain Gleeson in charge ; Lieutenants Jas. 
Kelly and John Lackmann ; Sergeants James H. 
Helms and Henry O'Day; Corporals Bill Fergu- 
son and John Rainsbury. All policemen worked 
12-hour and longer shifts and most were detailed 

on fire duty. 

* * * 

Sergeant Rainsbury was in charge of the mount- 
ed men in the Park. Kelly, Rainsbury and Fergu- 
son are all dead. 

* * * 

Joseph "Cliff" Field, now a lieutenant with the 

traffic squad, patrolled a beat in the Park. 

* * * 

William E. Rice, now in the city prison, also 
walked a Park district beat. 

Ed Wiskotchill, for many years, and still, in 
the Detective Bureau, pounded the pavements at 
the Park. ^ ,^ ^ 

Captain Eugene Wall of Ingleside was Captain 
of Detectives. 

^ ^ :}: 

Those members who could save a dime or two 
always invested their money in flats. Many liv- 
ing and retired are reaping the fruits of their 
savings. ^ ,,, ^ 

There were but eight mounted men connected 
with the Park station. They were Frank Black, 
heretofore mentioned ; Michael J. Greggains, still 
on a horse in the Park; Frank J. Haley, also 
mounted in the Park; Tom Guest, retired; War- 
ren M. Phillips, the Park cat killer; Tom Daly, 
yet on the same job; James H. Mann, now a ser- 
geant at the Harbor, and Ed. Pidgeon, dead, who 
used to ride into the Ocean Beach surf and rescue 
many a drowning person. 

* ^: * 

Jolm Cotter, Joseph B. Kenny and Michael 
Brady were patrol-wagon drivers at the O'Farrell 
station. That was in 1906. Joe Leary, William 
D. Burns and Tom Fitzpatrick guided the horse- 
drawn wagons at the Park at the same time. 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ ,m,ji„ uiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiiiin 

*CH1EF'S PAGE 





By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 



CHIEF ISSUES NEW WINTER ORDERS 



As the winter months are approaching-, the 
Chief of Pohce takes this opportunity of again 
issuing- a word of warning- to the end tliat the 
people of San Francisco will have assurance that 
they will not be victimized by the unlawful ac- 
tivities of the burglar, holdup man and others of 
similar ilk. It is with a great deal of satisfaction 
that we can look back on the services performed 
during the past year by members of this depart- 
ment and more particularly, to the splendid serv- 
ices recently rendered in the apprehension of 
desperate criminals. It was with keen apprecia- 
tion of such splendid services that I communi- 
cated with the Honorable Board of Police Com- 
missioners on October 19, 1926, advising said 
Board of the loyalty displayed by our officers of 
all ranks and the efficient and faithful services 
rendered by them, and more particularly by those 
who were specifically detailed to face a most try- 
ing situation. A copy of my letter to the Board 
was transmitted in General Order No. 276, on 
October 19, 1926. 

At this writing, the Chief of Police and I am 
sure all other members of the department, are 
not unmindful of the heroic and commendable 
services rendered by members of this depart- 
ment on this date, in the apprehension of the 
notorious bandit-killer and fugitive Joe Tanko. 
Words- cannot express our appreciation for the 
heroic conduct of Detective Sergeants Earl Roney 
and Vernon V. Van Matre who, though seriously 
wounded, rendered unflinching services in the 
very face of death itself. 

Indeed, the words of Detective Sergeant Roney, 
"I merely acted the part of a police officer", are 
inspiring and while we sincerely hope for his well 
being and speedy recovery, we can say with pride 
that he has bravely played his part as an officer 
and hero in the face of the most trying circum- 
stances. He well merits to be placed among the 
galaxy of heroes who have showered glory upon 
this department in the past and whose names 
and deeds are an inspiration to us in our future 
conduct. 

The loyalty and devotion to duty showed by 
Detective Sergeant Vernon V. Van Matre and his 
persistency in remaining at his post of duty after 
being seriously wounded, have received universal 
commendation. We can proudly point to his 



achievement and in common with our thoughts 
for Detective Sergeant Earl T. Roney we look 
forward for his speedy recovery. While Fate 
decreed that Detective Sergeants Edward J. Mc- 
Sheehy and Jolm J. Palmer should go through 
this trying ordeal witliout being the victims of 
the murder-bandit's bullet they played their part 
well and furthermore, saw to it that no criminal 
escaped through the barriers established. 

A municipality protected by men of this caliber 
can well be proud of them and their achievements. 
We have in the past been most successful in 
apprehending the so-called gangs of criminals 
wlio have operated in our midst. The statement 
has been made that no crook can operate for two 
weeks consecutively in San Francisco, without 
being placed behind prison bars by the members 
of the San Francisco Police Department. This 
statement is not a mere boast as police history will 
show it to be a confirmed fact. 

The Chief of Police, however, wishes at this 
time to remind the members of our department 
that the climatic conditions of San Francisco have 
a tendency to attract many persons to our midst. 
We welcome the law-abiding citizen and we guar- 
antee him that a 100 per cent sei-vice will be ren- 
dered in the protection of his person and his 
property. We must not forget, however, that 
the criminal is also attracted by our climatic con- 
ditions and with the thought in his mind that 
quite possibly he may find a fertile field here for 
his unlawful endeavor. 

Each member of this department well knows 
that the burglar, thug and holdup man is no re- 
spector of rights of others and that his vicious 
and criminal tendencies are directed more par- 
ticularly to the law-enforcement officer whether 
in or out of uniform. 

It is the wish of the Chief of Police, and I am 
sure of every member of this department, that 
San Fi-ancisco be kept free from the crook and 
criminal. Apprehension of criminals demands in- 
genuity, skill and bravery, but let us not forget 
that the adage "An ounce of prevention is worth 
a pound of cure", is still a living principle. Crime 
prevention has always been the aim of our de- 
partment and all the laws and regulations should 
be applied to those who are known or suspected 
of being maintained and dependent upon the fruits 
of their unlawful endeavors. 

(Continued on Page 41) 



Page 10 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



Modern Crime and Causes 

By Carlos S. Hardy, Judge of the Superior Court, Los Angeles, Written Especially for the Los Angeles Examiner 

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Bootleg liquor is a large contributor to present 
day crime. A few drinks of this liquor cause 
many people to commit crime who previously have 
led exemplary lives. 

The dispenser of bootleg liquor must be classed 
along with the dope peddler as a crime producer. 
In some respects bootleg is more dangerous to 
the general public than dope, because of the great 
and ever growing congestion on the highways. 
Many deaths and serious accidents which are 
criminally caused as the result of poison bootleg 
liquor are of daily occurrence. The highway is no 
longer safe, because of the man — sometimes a 
woman — who has partaken of the merchandise 
of one engaged in violating the laws of the State 
and of the United States. 

The failure and neglect of parents to discipline 
their children and instruct them along moral 
lines is undoubtedly one of the chief causes of 
crime. This duty of parents to their children 
is the highest duty. 

If children have inculcated in their conscious- 
ness in their first seven years obedience, truth- 
fulness and honesty, they will never go into crime. 
If children are disobedient to parents, they are 
likely to be disobedient in school, and if they are 
disobedient there, they will be disobedient to the 
restraints of law and order. If honesty and 
truthfulness are made part of the children's 
character, they will be honest and truthful in 
adult life. 

It has been told of olden times that an ounce 
of prevention is better than a pound of cure, and 
that is true in matters of crime. When the tree 
is bent over, it is not easy to straighten it up, and 
so it is with human beings. When criminal 
tendencies have been developed, and are culti- 
vated, the individual becomes a criminal. It is 
not so easy then to remake the character and 
change the criminal into an honest, upright citi- 
zen. 

Crime's best preventative is home discipline and 
moral training of the child in the pre-school age. 
A human being has a physical body that re- 
quires food, drink, exercise and rest in oi'der for 
it to be healthy and strong. Such a being also 
has a mind which requires training, study, medi- 
tation and the exercise of thinking. Also, such 
a being has a spiritual nature which requires 
spiritual food and exercise and neither of these 
parts of the human being can be neglected or 
abused without injury to the whole being. 

The child's body demands certain care, that it 



may gi'ow and become normal, and its mind re- 
quires education, and its spiritual nature calls for 
moral training. 

Many parents are turning over to the schools 
the training of their children. This refusal of 
parents to meet their responsibility to their chil- 
dren is making itself known in the character of 
the citizenship of the country. The best school 
is but a poor substitute for parents in the early 
years of the child's life. Children learn by ob- 
servation during their first years, more than by 
precept, and the qualities of truthfulness, hon- 
esty and obedience to law and order are readily 
inculcated in children by their parents. Every 
week young men come into my court charged 
with crimes which are rooted in habits of selfish- 
ness and dishonesty formed in childhood, and 
right before the eyes of their parents. 

If juvenile crime continues to increase it may 
become necessary in a few years to enact a law 
fixing the responsibility of the crime upon the 
parents. If parents refuse to teach their chil- 
dren the essential virtues of society, why should 
they not bear some of the consequences of their 
neglect 

The home training and religious influence which 
each child is entitled to receive, cannot be coun- 
terfeited. There is no safe substitute for it. 

Recently three young boys, whose ages were 
between 16 and 18 years, came before me, charged 
with highway robbery. An investigation dis- 
closed that the trio had committed ten highway 
robberies within two weeks. None of the boys 
had gone beyond the fourth gi'ade in school, and 
all of them had been wild, disobedient boys since 
their earliest childhood, and while small children 
had been both dishonest and untruthful. 

Their parents had allowed them to grow up 
without having given them any discipline or moral 
training. These boys truly illustrate the Bible 
saying that, "As ye sow, so shall ye reap." The 
courts are crowded with such examples. 

The modern school is the right hand of the 
home in the training of children. At the present 
time, children spend more of their childhood years 
in school than they spend at home. The school 
training relates chiefly to mental education. Some 
little consideration is given to the body, but prac- 
tically very little moral training is given. The 
soul, or spiritual part of the child, is ignored. 
And yet, who will not say that that is the most 
important part of the human? 

(Continued on Page RH') 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 11 



Meeting of State Highway Patrolmen's Association 

Officer Peter Lotsey, of S. F. Trajftc Bureau, and Vice-President uf State Organization. Owes Details of Meet 



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On November 9th, Sacramento citizens polish- 
ed up their motor manners and prepared to be 
unusually good for three days, 9, 10 and 11, in- 
clusive, wliile the California Association of High- 
way Patrolmen convened for its seventh annual 
convention in the assembly chambers of the 
capitol. 

There were about 350 of the highway guard- 
ians present when I opened the convention in 
Ithe absence of the President, Captain Henry 
Gleeson. I conveyed heartfelt regrets from the 
captain for being incapacitated to such an ex- 
tent as to be unable to be present and wished the 
organization and every member a good time and 
a successful meeting. 

Business and pleasure were mingled on the con- 
vention schedule with the former occupying the 
bulk of the official delegates' time and attention. 
Many of the officers brought their wives and a 
special program was worked out for the ladies 
attending. 

The opening morning session convened prompt- 
ly at 10 o'clock following an official welcome to 
the city by Hon. Mayor A. E. Goddard after 
which two addresses were heard during the fore- 
noon, Harold J. McCurry, Postmaster of Sacra- 
mento, and W. E. Schoppe of San Fi-ancisco, a 
representative of the Pacific Coast Automobile 
Underwriters. 

Mr. McCurry reviewed the history of California 
highways, tracing the growth and development 
of the main arteries of the state from the early 
wagon roads to their present improved conditions. 
He also gave some impressions of the work of 
policing the highways gained from 250,000 miles 
of travel over California highways during the past 
ten years. 

Mr. Schoppe dealt more particularly with the 
theft problems. He recommended the creation 
of a theft squad by the state to co-operate with 
county officials and the passage of a more drastic 
auto theft law by the State Legislature. 

At noon the delegates and their families were 
entertained at a luncheon at the Sacramento 
Hotel as guests of the house. 

The afternoon's activity was opened by the 
grand street parade, of which the visiting officers 
and their families formed an important part. 

Four motorcycle officers from the Sacramento 
city police department headed the line, followed 
by the executives of the association in automo- 
biles. Then came the 32 members of the Los 
Angeles Police Department, known as their crack 



drill team on motorcycles. 

Then came the Sacramento Fire Department 
Band, followed closely by 15 tow cars with wreck- 
ed automobiles attached. This was intended to 
drive home to spectators the folly of speeding 
and reckless driving. 

All members of the Association with motor- 
cycles and in uniform rode four abreast ahead of 
the union band. Those without motorcycles 
followed on foot, and the families of the 
officers in automobiles completed the parade, 
which was about ten blocks long. 

After the parade the convention re-assembled 
for the afternoon business session in the assembly 
hall of the capitol. 

One of the afternoon features of the day's pro- 
gi-am was the address by Governor F. W. Pach- 
ardson. The Governor was escorted to the speak- 
ers' stand by four uniformed officei's and was in- 
troduced by Will H. Marsh, chief of the division 
of motor vehicles. 

Dwelling on his approval of all law enforce- 
ment and lauding the State officers for their splen- 
did work, he stated that the highway patrol offi- 
cers stands well with the people of the State, as 
the Governor's office hears but few complaints of 
the work of the traffic department. 

He signified his belief in allowing the forces of 
the law to take their course and in enforcement 
of the traffic laws by saying that such measures 
are for the protection of the people and their 
property, "In such laws is the basis of liberty", 
he said. 

After a shv^rt talk by Frank E. Merriam, speak- 
er of the assembly, the remainder of the after- 
noon was devoted to business discussions. 

Three speakers were on the second day's pro- 
gram. 

Geo. G. Radcliff, chairman of the State Board 
of Control, urged careful consideration of the 
legislative measures planned to refer to the next 
Legislature. He pointed out that the traffic offi- 
cers were in a position to see needed legislation 
and to observe where the present traffic code is 
inadequate. 

T. A. Rafferty, chief of the Oregon traffic divi- 
sion, reviewed the gi-owth of the automobile in- 
dustry with the attendant specialization in traffic 
enforcement. Mr. Rafferty compared many of 
the Oregon methods with those of California and 
recommended uniformity of traffic laws in a State 
and between States as a much needed improve- 
(Continued on Page 45) 



Page 12 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, J 926 





§^ECTIVE BUREAU 



Captain of Detectives Du 

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STRONG ARGUMENT FOR CAPITAL 
PUNISHMENT 



The following are accounts made by Captain of 
Detectives, Duncan Matheson, before the open 
forum in a debate on the question of capital 
punishment : 

Tonight the question is this: "Is Capital Pun- 
ishment Right?" That is, is it justifiable. Is it 
expedient. for the sovereign power of the state to 
punish murder by the infliction of the death pen- 
alty? It is often stated that Christianity and 
benevolence are arrayed against it, and that 
Christianity repudiates punishment and teaches 
the doctrine of Love and Forgiveness. But or- 
ganized society, in the form of the state and in 
the person of a judge and jury has both the right 
and bounden duty to administer justice. They 
are the instruments of God for the protection of 
society. Infliction of the death penalty for mur- 
der is not revenge or retaliation. It is in accord 
with the teachings of the Bible. 

II. 

Capital punishment is countenanced by the 
Bible and indeed Gen-9-6 made obligatory by it. 
"Whosoever sheddeth man's blood, by man, shall 
his blood be shed. For in the image of God, he 
made man." Nothing can be plainer than that. 
It is a world-wide commandment and principle of 
justice and a regulation given to society for all 
time. It was not a Jewish statute and was not 
abrogated by the Mosaic Law. A murderer 
strikes at a mortal, being invested with super- 
natural glory inasmuch as mankind reflects God's 
image. 

III. 

Then some say that the Old Testament Law is 
out of date with modern thought. What does 
the New Testament say about it? Romans 13:4 
has this word: "If thou do that which is evil, be 
afraid for he beareth not the sword in vain, for he 
is the minister of God." Paul spoke of the officers 
representing the government and the sword was 
the sword of the executioner, a clear assertion for 
the right of Capital Punishment. Again Paul, 
standing at Ceasar's Judgment Seat, said: "If I 
have committed anything worthy of death I re- 
fuse not to die." He admitted the justice of the 
death penalty on proper causes. No solution or 
justification can be found for the abohtion of the 



NCAN Matheson in Charge 

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death penalty in the Bible from cover to cover, 
but it stands firmly for it and will stand to the 
end of time. 

IV. 
Opponents declare, however, that Capital Pun- 
ishment is contrary to the Sixth Commandment. 
They claim, "Thou shalt not kill" has no excep- 
tions. If they insist on that, then the taking of 
all life, such as the killing of cattle, sheep and 
fowl is forbidden. Does any loyal citizen deny 
the right of the State to exercise the sovereign 
power to draft its citizens for its protection and 
defense in time of war, knowing full weU that 
many useful lives will be forfeited? If the sov- 
ereign state may call upon a citizen to sacrifice 
his life for the common good and welfare of the 
nation, has the people, then, not the right to take 
the life of a person who is destructive of society, 
bj' taking the life of another? 

V. 

The literal reading of the Sixth Commandment 
is "Thou shalt do no murder." The Mosaic Law 
itself directed capital punishment. The Com- 
mandment is against personal murder, not against 
taking the life of an individual for the preserva- 
tion of society, when lie himself is a murderer. 
The process of law that inflicts the death penalty 
fs not personally taking life, but as the agent of 
the State which must protect society. 

VL 
Genesis : 9-6. 

"Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man, shall 
his blood be siied, for in the image of God, made 
he man." 
Leviticus : 24-17. 

"And he that kiileth any man, shall surely be 
put to death." 

"And he that kiileth a beast, he shafl restore 
it and he that kiileth a man, he shall be put to 
death." 
Numbers : 35-30. 

"Whoso kiileth any person, the murderer shall 
be put to death by the mouth of witnesses, but one 
witness shall not testify against any person to 
cause him to die." 

"Moreover he shall take no satisfaction, for the 
life of a murderer, which is guilty of death, but 
he shall be surely put to death." 

(Continued on Page 38) 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



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'■TiiiM laiiwiriiiii. 



^^Knockovers^' of Bureau 



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Detective Sergeant Firtl Bohr and Detective Clarence 
Herlitz of the Hotel Detail certainly have been making it 
interesting for the gentry who hang around upon hotels. 
Following are some of their arrests: Lester Johnson, 
wanted in Los Angeles; James Robson, wanted by his 
bondsmen; Rene DeBeer, fugitive from Kansas City; Betty 
West, wanted in Monterey ; Graham Ellison, violating state 

gun law. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Michael Desmond and Barth Kel- 
leher built up a good batting average in their district 
along the water front; here are some of their arre.'^ts: 
Charles Bailey, burglary; John Kelly, violating Section 
476a; Russell V. Roberts, fugitive; Joseph Connors, three 
charges burglary; James Grimes, 504a P. C. Detective 
Sergeant William Armstrong assisted in this arrest. 

* * * 

William Schimelpfinig, ex-con, arrested for disturbing 
the peace and vagrancy by Sergeant Emmet Hogan of the 
Bureau of Identification, was given six months in the 

county jail by Judge Lazaras. 

* * » 

Detectives Dan Fogarty and John Sturm brought in 
Eugene Valancia and Samuel Galli for obtaining money by 
false pretenses; Detective Sergeants Allan McGinn and 
Charles Iredale assisted in arresting the latter; they also 
assisted Detective Sergeants James Hayes, James Hansen 
and Harry McCrea in arresting Gus Waggenheim, wanted 
for bad checks and violating Sec. 504a of the Penal Code. 

Lieutenants Bernard McDonald and his aggregation of 
automobile thief takers arrested the follo\\'ing: Meyer 
Heft, recei\-ing stolen property, by the Lieutenant him- 
self; Maurice Toumec and Ray Le\\-is, grand larceny and 
two petty larceny, by Detective Sergeant Harry Husted 
and Detective R. Smith; James Murphy, for 146 Motor 
Vehicle Act, by Detective Sergeants John J. Cannon and 
J. McKenna; Jack Bishop, same offense, by Detective Ser- 
geants James Hayes and Harry McCrea; Jack Holt, same 
charge, by Detective Sergeants William Milliken and James 
Hayes; Howard Steele, grand larceny and en route to 
Oakland, by Detective Sergeants Frank Brown and Rasmus 
Rasmussen; Charles Cole, embezzlement, by Detective Ser- 
geants Augfustus Tompkins and Nicholas Barron and Earl 
Stanley, same charge by Sergeants Brown, Cannon, Tomp- 
kins and Special Britt. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Charles Dullea and Detective Sergeant Otto 
Frederickson brought in Theodore "Creepy" W^ilson, 
charged with robbery. Sergeant McLoughlin and Sergeant 
Tatham were booked in on this arrest. 
« » * 

Detective Sergeant Allan McKinn and Officer Richard 
Ga\Tior were coming from lunch one day last month, when 
on California street they heaid a hue and cry and saw a 
man running. They gave chase, caught him, found he was 
wanted for grabbing some money from a patron of the 
San Fi-ancisco Sa\'ings Bank. The man gave the name of 
Orin Dccius and was charged with robbery. 

* * * 

Bad check passers gave plenty of work for Detective 
Sergeant William Armstrong and his gold du.^t twins, 
.'■■orgeants Charles Malier and James Handsen. Here are 
:.ome of the arrests this trio made during the past few 
vccks: For 476a: Thomas Robinson. 3 charges; Charles 



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Cameron; Thomas Stewart; George E. Glass; George Skin- 
ner, 3 charges; and Edmond P. Jarvis; Paul Marcelli, 2 
charges forgery; Warner Ute and Thomas Boone, burglary. 

* * • 

Here are some of the arrests made by Detective Ser- 
geants Andrew Gaughran and James Skelley of the Shop- 
ping Detail: Joe Yang, burglary and petty larceny; Max 
London, burglary; Edward King.ston, 476a P. C; and Harry 

Clarke, burglary. 

* * * 

Ra>Tnond Rocells, accused of being a forger, was ar- 
rested by Detective Sergeants Arthur McQuaide and Wil- 
liam Proll of the Banking Detail. 

* * * 

Sergeant George Healy and Detective Sergeant Martin 

Porter booked Naomi Henning at the city prison for grand 

larceny; also William Henning for violating Section 266 

of the Penal Code and Joe Ybarra for burglary, Officer J. 

Amend assisting in this aiTest. 

« * « 

Detective Charles Dorman of the night shift arrested 
John Young for embezzlement. 

* « * 

Detective Sergeant Richmond Tatham and his Burglary 
Detail brought to book the following: James Luttrell, petty 
larceny, by Sergeants Palmer and George Richards; Syl- 
vester O'Brien by Tatham, Palmer and Corporal Nels 
Stohl; Jos. Garby and Joseph Specito, by Sergeants James 
Jlitchell and Irvin Finlay; Nick Oakes, larceny, by Palmer, 
Richard Hughes, James Johnson and Martin Porter. 

* * « 

Detective Sergeants Henry Kalmbach and George Rich- 
ards picked up Robert Martin, wanted in Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Sergeant George McLoughlin and the boys of the Rob- 
bery Detail chalked up the following among other arrests: 
Duke Keith Deavaux, grand larceny; Roy Long, larceny, 
by Sergeants Leo Bunner and Robt. Rauer; Basil W^alter, 
three robberies, Bunner, Rauer and Sergeant William 
McMahon; Perfiro Bonilla, Robert Stevens and Douglas 
Mackean, by Sergeants Vemon Van Matre and Edward 
McSheehy; William Moore, Harry Brady, fugitives, by Ser- 
geants George Wall and William McMahon; James Mac- 
Donald, 2 robberies, by McLoughlin and Sergeant Tatham. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Thomas Conlan and Edward Wis- 
kotchill and Detective Louis DeMatei arrested James Mit- 
chell for burglary. 

« * * 

Sergeants John Callaghan, James Regan, Thomas Con- 
Ion and Wiskotchill brought in Carl Dipple on a burglary 
"clout". 

* * * 

Two potential pickpockets, Eulie J. Rice and Robert 
Grey were taken off the streets and put in the city prison, 
charged \\-ith vagrancy, by Lieutenant Tliomas Hoertkom 
and Detective Sergeant Morris Harris. 



Seaboard Garage 



160 M.AIN ST. 



San Francisco 



Page 14 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



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Proposed New Laws for Coining Legislature 

Presentation of Recomrr\endations Made by State Crime Procedure Commission and Adopted by 

State Peace Officers' Association 

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Outline of tentative program for 
revision of criminal procedure by 
the Commission for the Reform of 
Criminal Procedure of the State 
of California. 

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 

The last Legislature of the State of California 
created a Commission for the Reform of Criminal 
Procedure and directed it to submit to the next 
Legislature a new or revised system of criminal 
procedure. The Commission has made a careful 
study of the subject and has formulated a ten- 
tative program, but the subject is one of such 
great impoitance that before proceeding to the 
completion of its task the Commission desires 
to secure comments and suggestions from inter- 
ested persons throughout the state. It is, there- 
fore, submitting this brief outline of the nro- 
posed plan. 

The primary purpose of the Commission is to 
make the administration of criminal justice in 
this state swift and certain in its operation. We 
have inherited a criminal procedure which was 
developed in past centuries to meet conditions en- 
tirely different from those prevailing today. Dur- 
ing the time that this criminal procedure was 
evolving, it was widely felt that pi'osecution 
meant persecution, and as a result many techni- 
cal rules were developed, chiefly designed for the 
protection of the defendant. These rules, in many 
cases, actually prevented the ascertainment of 
the truth. If there were any justification for 
such a policy, it has long since ceased to exist. 
E}ngland, where the system originated, discarded 
it three-quarters of a century ago. 

The Commission recognizes that no right of 
a defendant should be infringed, but it feels that 
this principle does not justify the existence of 
technical rules of procedure whicli tend to work 
injustice to the law abiding citizens of the state. 
In other words, while always guarding every right 
of a defendant, it is believed that the criminal 
law should be framed to give all the people the 
fullest possible degree of protection and safety. 

Crime has become an organized business ir^ 
this country. Either society must control organ- 
ized crime, or organized crime will control so- 
ciety. Experience teaches that the criminal law 
which is most effective is the one which oner- 
ates with the greatest swiftness and certainty. 
This tentative program is presented in order to 



secure suggestions for the improvement of crimi- 
nal procedure in this state. 

Method of Approach 

The suggestions of the Commission are pre- 
sented under these heads: 

First : Declaration of policy governing all pro- 
ceedings. 

Second : Proceedings prior to trial. 

Third: The conduct of the trial. 

Fourth : New trials and appeals. 

Fifth : Punishment of convicted persons. 

Sixth: Certain general provisions. 

Seventh: Certain constitutional amendments. 
Declaration of Policy, Etc. 

The enactment of a new section declaring it 
to be the policy of the state that all courts and 
district attorneys shall expedite the hearing and 
determination of all criminal proceedings to the 
gi-eatest degree consistent with the ends of jus- 
tice. 

(a) Amend Section 872 of the Penal Code so 
that the magistrate shall commit simply for a 
felony, leaving it to the district attornev to 
charge the particular felony which the evidence 
at the preliminary hearing shows has been com- 
mitted ; 

(b) Amend Section 951 by setting up simple 
forms of indictment and information and to elimi- 
nate, so far as possible, technical questions of 
pleading; 

(c) Amend Section 969 to require the district 
attorney to charge all prior convictions of 
felonies ; 

(d) Insanity. The Commission is endeavoring 
to work out a system which will avoid abuses of 
the plea of insanity. In the past this plea has 
frequently been made not in good faith, but in 
order to open the way for the introduction of 
evidence designed to appeal to the sympathy, 
passion or prejudice of the jury, and this has very 
often resulted in gross miscarriages of justice. 
The Commission expects to recommend a statute 
which will provide a new plea to be known as 
"Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity." 

Whatever conclusion is reached as to the form 
of pleading insanity, the Commission expects to 
recommend that the Legislature shall create a 
hospital for the criminally insane. California 
now has no such hospital, and undoubtedly it is 
one of the state's greatest needs. At the pres- 
ent time the criminally insane are either turned 
loose upon the public or committed to a hospital 
(Continued on Page 48) 



December, J 926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page jy 



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De Luxe Shoplifters Given a Tough Run 

Account of Recovery of Thousands of Dollars 'Worth of Loot, as Made by Local Pi dice 



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Coping with the cleverest band of shoplifting 
thieves working in the United States, having their 
headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, wanted in 
a dozen cities on the Pacific Coast, San Fi'ancisco 
detectives by just as clever work had the opera- 
tives of the mob in their hands but to lose them 
through powerful influences that this gang has in 
many large cities. 

Three women and a man were arrested in Kan- 
sas City through the efforts of Lieutenant Henry 
Powell of the Pawnshop Detail and Detective Ser- 
geants Andrew Gaughran and James Skelly of the 
Shopping Detail. Before Lieutenant Powell could 
reach Kansas City and advise the police just what 
they had in custody for the San Francisco depart- 
ment, the quartet made bail and when tlieir hear- 
ing on extradition came up they were notable by 
their absence, and not a word has been heard of 
them since. 

The presence of this mob was first felt in this 
city in January, 1925 when the women of the 
bunch made way with over $12,000 worth of furs, 
rugs and Spanish shawls. The next heard of them 
in San Fi-ancisco was when the above mentioned 
detectives got a line on them last October and tliis 
tip led to the recovery of several thousands of dol- 
lars worth of stolen goods and the arrest by quick 
thinking on the part of the local police oflScials. 

Information was obtained that on October 10 
a man giving the name of B. Schmidtz alias Jacob 
Cohen and many other extra monikers rented a 
room in a fashionable hotel, purchased four trunks 
which were sent in empty to the hotel. On Oc- 
tober 12th the Detectives learned that one trunk 
was shipped to Brooklyn; on the day following 
two more were shipped by express to the same 
city. 

• It was further learned from proper sources that 
these trunks contained fur coats and silks, one 
having $5200 worth in it, stolen during the gang's 
two day stay here on their second visit. 

Getting a court order to stop these trunks and 
hold and search them. Lieutenant Powell, Gaugh- 
ran and Skelly wired New York police and inter- 
cepted the cases and had them shipped back to 
this city where the goods were put on display and 
all identified as having been reported stolen, later 
being returned to the rightful owners. 

The detectives further learned that three wo- 
men checked out of the hotel on October 14 for Los 
Angeles. Hot on the trail the detectives got the 
information that the women and a man had left 
a Los Angeles hotel after buying tickets for St. 
Louis, Mo., on October 17th. 

Powell and his associates, satisfied that the best 



place to tie in on this mob would bt Kansas City, 
wired the chief of police there to take them off 
the train as they were wanted here. This was 
done. Powell left immediately after getting extra- 
dition papers for the Missouri city, for the return 
of Mrs. Rupert Kramer, Rose Bro\\Ti and Anna 
Silver and Salomia Schmitz. 

Arriving in Kansas City he got some distressing 
intelligence. The four had been aiTested at 10 
p. m., October 10th. Two days later Schmitz was 
released on $1500 bail and on the day following the 
women were "hitting the street" on a "gi-and" 
bail. 

The case was set for November 11. Powell 
waited for the day, realizing that his thieves 
would be so far away by the 11th that a 9-tube 
radio wouldn't reach them. He also found that 
none of the prisoners had been photographed or 
finger printed. But he found by looking over 
rogue gallery photos that the Kramer woman 
went under the following aliases : Anna ^Milliman, 
May Weinstein, Rose Jold, May Hyman and Yetta 
Fein; that the Silver woman had the following 
aliases: Beckey Rosenblum, Becky Greenstein, 
Becky Schroeder and Becky Sheer; and the other 
woman was known as Sara Greenstein, Sai'ah 
Weinstein and Sara Goldstein, all wanted in New 
York for jumping bail on two charges of shoplift- 
ing, had done a stretch in Blackwell Island prison, 
were wanted in New York, New Jersey, Detroit, 
Rochester and Chicago for bail jumping and shop- 
lifting. 

Schmitz, with many aliases, was also wanted in 
these cities. 

The trunks shipped back to this city contained 
over $35,000 worth of silks, shawls, fur coats and 
rugs. 

Another trunk shipped from Los Angeles con- 
tained two Persian rugs worth $1200 each, stolen 
from a Los Angeles rug dealer by the women. 

The "mob" had worked in Seattle, Portland, 
Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Denver and this city 
during October. Among their loot was 7 shawls 
worth $3500 ; five fur coats worth $5000 stolen by 
a highly perfected system of shoplifting. 

The women would go into a store, look over the 
stock, settle upon what was wanted ; two of them 
would get the salesman engaged showing them 
various furs, rugs or shawls or silks as the case 
miglit be. One of the women would hold aloof. 
When she saw the coast was clear she would gi-ab 
the article wanted, pass it to the man who was 
waiting handy and he would duck for an automo- 
bile and be on his way. It was sometimes two or 
(Continued on Pape 39) 



Page 16 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



About Law Enforcement 



By DISTRICT Attorney Earl 

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Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Peace Offi- 
cers' Association: I am very glad of the oppor- 
tunity to be present with you today to discuss 
the very important subjects of Probation and 
Parole. 

I don't know what the difference is between 
peace officers and district attorneys — surely, we 
are all engaged in the one great problem of sup- 
pressing crime, and your problems are mine, and 
my problems are yours, and I believe that the 
sooner we have a perfect co-ordination, perfect 
understanding between, the peace officers of the 
state and the district attorneys of the state, just 
that much sooner will we really start on sup- 
pressing the gi'eat amount of crime prevalent in 
this state today, and so firm am I convinced of 
that I believe it would be a wise thing to do in 
the future — perhaps it is not possible during this 
year, or the coming year, but I think our inter- 
ests are so much in common, it would be a wise 
thing for the peace officers' association and the 
district attorneys' association of this state to 
meet at the same time and place in order that we 
may exchange ideas; in order that we might be- 
come better acquainted and have a deeper un- 
derstanding of the problems which confront us. 

Now, the subject of probation to my mmd is 
the most serious problem that confronts law en- 
forcement officers today, because it seems to me 
that the probation law has been stretched to an 
absurdity. It is functioning now in exactly the 
opposite way it was designed to do. Probation 
is comparatively a new thing; it was thought 
by progressive people and enlightened people that 
the law under the then existing ciixumstances 
was too ironclad ; there should be some light way 
for our courts of justice when meeting out punish- 
ment to men convicted of crime, and so there 
was written into law the probation system which 
gave to courts the power to discriminate between 
felonies and say one man by reason of particu- 
larly extenuating circumstances should have a 
right to rehabitulate himself while on probation 
rather than be confined in a penal institution. I 
believe it is humane; I believe fundamentally it 
is sound, but I believe it should not be stretched 
beyond the ordinary meaning of the words of 
the statute. I believe the probation law should 
be applied only where there are particularly ex- 
tenuating circumstances. Like all new laws and 
things, the probation system worked admirably 
for a short time; it was used with discrimination, 
but as time went on and the law was handled 
more and more people began to stretch it further 



Warren of Alameda County 

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and further. They say familiarity breeds con- 
tempt, and I am not sure that's the real thing 
that causes us to really abuse the probation sys- 
tem. Men would be convicted of crime and 
through influence would be admitted probation, 
and as years went on admitted in larger numbers 
and larger proportion to the years preceding un- 
til at the present time I am very much ashamed 
to say, very much alarmed to say at the present 
time in a great many communities in this state 
we have more probation than we have sentences 
to San Quentin; and gentlemen, I am not at all 
proud to say that's the exact condition that pre- 
vails in my own county, the County of Alameda. 
Now, when that situation exists I believe that 
probation is functioning just the opposite from 
what it was designed to accomplish. No longer 
is a man placed on probation only when there 
are particularly extenuating circumstances, but 
at the present time a man is only sent to San 
Quentin when he is particularly depraved or par- 
ticularly nauseating circumstances concerning 
the commission of his offense. Now, the figures 
of the Attorney General of this state for the two 
years ending July, 1924 — figures available on this 
subject are really assisting, and it won't take 
very long for me to point out to you just a few 
of the figures which I mention. During these 
two years ending June 30, 1924, there were in 
the State of California 5336 pleas of guilty to 
felony; during the same period there were 2191 
convictions of felony, making a total by pleas of 
guilty and convictions by juries of 7527 felonies. 
Now, how many gentlemen of these 7527 do you 
think went to state's prison — it means 4356 were 
placed on probation, given a minor fine, or a short 
term in the county jail. Now, it seems to me 
that we have the situation of the tail wagging 
the dog, when the penal code of this state pro- 
vides that the punishment for felony shall be 
imprisonment in the State Prison and probation 
and county jail sentences given only where there 
are particularly extenuating circumstances; and, 
usually we find out of 7500 convictions of felony 
there are only 3100 sentences to San Quentin, I 
say to you, gentlemen, that that is responsible 
for the large amount of crime which prevails in 
this state today. 

It was my pleasure to have handled the crimi- 
nal activities in my county for a few years prior 
to my appointment as District Attorney, and in 
the capacity of deputy I came in personal contact 
with every man who passed through our court, 
(Continued on Page .52) 



December, 1926 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page n 



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Official Recognition of Brave Deeds 

Supervisors of This City and Council of Sacramento Pass Resolutions Ctirn7nencling Detectives Roney and Van Matre 

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On motion of Supervisor John B. Badaracco, 
tlie Board of Supervisors unanimously adopted 
tiie following, following the shooting of Joe 
Tanko : 

RESOLUTION NO. 26432 (New Series) 

"WHEREAS, The San Francisco Police De- 
partment has again demonstrated the high order 
of efficiency, as well as the unparalleled bravery 
of its officers in the recent capture of Joe Tanko, 
and previously in the capture of the 'Auto Bandits' 
wiio terrorized San Francisco for a week by their 
dastardly outrages ; 

"RESOLVED, That this Board of Supervisors 
deem it proper and expedient at this time that 
tiae appreciation and gratitude of the people of 
San Francisco be extended to the brave officers 
who so nobly risked their lives in the pei'formance 
of their duty in apprehending these lawless ele- 
ments whose depredations have worked death to 
unoffending citizens of San Francisco and brought 
misery and sorrow to the homes of their families i 

"WHEREFORE, This Board commends to the 
Police Commissioner and the Chief of Police the 
splendid service of Detective Sergeants Earl 
Roney, Vernon Van Matre, Edward McSheehy and 
John Palmer, who effected the capture of the 
notorious Joe Tanko, the first two mentioned hav- 
ing been severely wounded; and Lieutenants 
Charles Dullea and Bernard McDonald, Detective 
Sergeants George Wall, William McMahon, Leo 
Bunner, Robert Rauer, Otto Frederickson, Allan 
McGinn, Sergeant George McLoughlin, Detective 
Officers Charles Iredale, George P. Wafer and 
Louis De Matei, who apprehended the 'Auto 
Bandits'. 

"FURTHER RESOLVED, That copies of this 
resolution be sent to the Board of Police Com- 
missioners and to the Chief of Police, and also 
to the families of the officers above mentioned." 

J. S. DUNNIGAN, Clerk, 
The Board of Supervisors. 



If anyone has any doubts as to how the people 
of Sacramento felt over the killing of Joe Tanko, 
brutal slayer, crook, and pervert, they should 
read the resolutions which follow*, and which 
were passed by the city council of Sacramento 
and a copy forwarded to this department. 

City of Sacramento 

State of California 

RESOLUTION NO. 131, CITY COUNCIL 

NOVEMBER 18, 1926. 



In Honor of the valorous sei*vices of 
Sergeants Van Matre and Roney of 
San Francisco Police Department. 

WHEREAS, Sacramento was unfortunately one 
of the cities infested with the ruthless, lawless 
and murderous perpetrations of one of the State's 
most defiant desperadoes — "TANKO", and 

WHEREAS, This city has been deeply con- 
cerned in the capture and award of justice to this 
and his allied fugitive from incaixeration, because 
of the atrocious murder of one of Sacramento's 
worthy citizens and merchants, namely, Harry J. 
Litzberg, the personal friend and classmate of 
the Mayor and other members of the Sacramento 
City Council, and 

WHEREAS, Patrolman Clyde E. Nunn of the 
police department was also the victim of a wound 
inflicted by the foregoing convict in a returned 
reign of "terror" banditry in this city, and 

\A'HEREAS, After many months' search over 
the State and country, througli ingenious detec- 
tion by members of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment the long-sought law-breaker was suc- 
cessfully traced, fearlessly encountered, and his 
notorious activities forever terminated by Ser- 
geants Vernon Van Matre and Earl Roney w^ho 
barely escaped fatality, 

NOW^ THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, That 
the City Council of the city of Sacramento, gi-ati- 
fied with the cessation of this extended series of 
abhorent outrages, recognizes and highly com- 
mends the unusual valor and courage displayed by 
Sergeants Van jMatre and Roney, and on behalf 
of the city extends the thanks of our people to 
those detectives for their meritorious services, 
and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the City 
of Sacramento hereby tenders its congi-atulations 
to Mayor Rolph and the Board of Supervisors of 

(Continued on Page 54) 



Fred R* Butterfield 

Home Furnishings of 
Distinction 



222? MISSION ST., near Eighteenth 
Phone Mission 1022 San Francisco 



Page 18 



« II inn 




"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL December. 1926 

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Tolerance 



By Dr. S. L. Katzoff, Dietician, Author and Health Authority; Also 
President of the San Francisco Open Forum 

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For nearly ten thousand years, the human race 
has been taught numerous theologies, systems of 
ethics, principles that makes for kindness, bene- 
volence, courtesy, patience and tolerance; and 
yet, gi-eed, envy, hatred and intolerance still con- 
tinues to pester and divide mankind into groups 
and factions with its enevitable bickerings, mis- 
understandings and disease, even in this, our en- 
hghtened age! Why is it so? What are some 
of the causes ? Can it be remedied ? If so, how ? 

Victor Hugo once said, "Toleration is the best 
religion." And no less a character than George 
Eliot wrote, "The responsibility of tolerance lies 
with those who have the wider vision." How 
philosophically true and humanly beautiful! 

From observation and reflection one is led al- 
most to feel that tolerance is the only real test 
of civilization. If the extent of our tolerance in 
matters pertaining to religion, politics, science, 
medicine, literature and philosophy were the in- 
dex of our civilization, how would we register on 
a tolerant-ometer? Would we register favorably? 

When we look through a retrospective lense, 
under a psycho-analytic microscope, we are un- 
pleasantly surprised. Wliat do we find? We 
observe, as the wheel of human history turns, 
that the noble souls and brilliant minds, who 
'have enlightened the world, generally have met 
with misunderstanding, contempt, ridicule, perse- 
cution and poverty, because of intolerance. Most 
of the explorers, scientists, philosophers and 
humanitarians have drunk from this "fountain 
of bitterness." 

A few of the many illustrations: Moses was 
criticized by his own people because he wanted 
to free them of the slavery of Egyptian tyranny. 

Anaxagoras, the Greek philosopher, 500 B. C., 
was sentenced to banishment for life for saying 
that the sun was a red-hot stove, (that was blas- 
phemy) , and he probably would have suflfered the 
fagot, had it not been for the eloquence of the 
mighty Pericles. 

Socrates, the Athenian thinker, was finally 
"rewarded" with the lethal cup of hemlock for 
his advanced utterances on scientific subjects. 

The great Plato was sold as a slave to Aegina 
by Dionysius of Sicily. 

Xenophon was banished and deprived of his 
property. 

Aristotle fled to escape punishment and died on 
the isle of Euboea. 

Demosthenes took poison to escape returning 



to the death chamber. 

Christ, the great teacher, and carpenter of 
Galilee, was crucified because it was said, his 
revolutionary teachings "stirreth up the people." 

Copernicus, in the sixteenth century, labored 
many years applying his fund of observations 
and mathematical knowledge to improving the 
antiquated theories of astronomy which prevailed 
in his time. 

The Heliocentric theory was completed in his 
57th year, but was not introduced to the world 
at large until shortly before his death, because 
he feared the lash of intolerance. 

Bruno, in the same century, continued the work 
of Copernicus, but his career was soon ended. 
Seven years of persecution and imprisonment was 
his "reward" in the hope that he would recant. 

Galileo, who expounded the theory that the 
world moved on its axis, was forced to swear that 
the world was flat and immovable before he could 
regain his liberty. 

Harvey, in his work on cadavers, discovered 
that a liquid (blood) circulated in the human 
vessels (arteries and veins) instead of air, devils 
and the like as most physicians believed then. 
His contemporaries, of course, had plenty of time 
to have their "fling" at him. 

Let us continue with our historical outline of 
intolerance. Lamark, the great evolutionist, in 
the 18th century, was poor, blind and forsaken, 
as a result of intolerance. 

Columbus was called a dreamer and after mak- 
ing three voyages on the "sea of darkness" was 
bound in fetters and sent "home" to Spain as a 
tyrant and adventurer. He died forsaken. 

Marx, the great economist, was forced to flee 
Paris, and move to London. 

Darwin was abused and maligned for the dis- 
covery of the law of natural selection. 

Thomas Paine, virtually the instigator of the 
American Revolution, is not considered at great 
length in our histories, because of his liberal 
views on theology. 

When Samuel Moore, in 1842 asked Congress 
for an appropriation of $30,000 to establish an 
experimental telegraph line from Washington to 
Baltimore he was ridiculed by most of its mem- 
bers. 

And so down through the pages of history we 
meet such notable characters as John Brown, 
William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips and 
(Continued on Page 41) 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 19 



Growth of Department in Six Years 

By Chief of Police Daniel J. O Brien 



Mr. Opie L. \A'arner, 
Editor, "2-0" Police Journal, 
Hall of Justice, San Francisco. 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

In response to your request that I write 
an article for "2-0" Police Journal, relative 
to the many things I have accomplished 
during my six years tenure of office as 
Chief of Police, I most sincerely advise 
that alone I could have accomplished 
nothing, but, with the co-operation of the 
members of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment, of the Hon. Board of Police 
Commissioners, His Honor the ]\Iayor, and 
other public officials, we of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department have accomplish- 
ed much. 

We believe that through proper appli- 
cation of authority, mingled with the 
proper appreciation of our responsibility, 
we have merited and receive splendid co- 
operation from the decent people of San 
Francisco. 

The department has progressed, keeping 
up with the trend of the times, from a 
police standpoint, and developed into a 
fairly well modernized department. jMuch 
has been accomplished by means of the 
automotive equipment of this department. 
Proper patrol attention has been given to 
the outlying districts, which have been re- 
cently and rapidly built up. 

Ti-affic control has been enlarged upon, 
many points being covered, the traffic dis- 
trict extending westerly from Sixth and 
Market to Van Ness avenue and Market, 
and at some points, into the outlying dis- 
tricts ; easterly on j\Iarket, from Third St. 
to the Embarcadero, taking in intersec- 
tions both north and south of ]\Iarket, re- 
cently having been augmented with auto- 
matic traffic signals designed and manu- 
factured by Ralph W. Wiley, Chief of the 
Department of Electricity of the City and 
County of San Fi-ancisco, as are the police 
and fire alarm boxes. 

Special attention has been given to Crime 
Prevention, and proper education, plus 
good example set for the owners and op- 
erators of motor vehicles. A world-wide 
reputation has been made in the detection 
of crime and the apprehension of crimi- 
nals. For many years San Francisco has 
enjoyed a good reputation and each year 
sees more laurels added to it, insofar as 



police protection is concerned, the last year 
being the banner year, during which the 
membership of the department functioned 
almost 100 per cent, despite the many 
police problems presented. 

We recently had a wonderful demon- 
stration of the loyalty and devotion of the 
men of the depai'tment to Its traditions, 
during the time the men were deprived of 
their days off, not a murmur of discontent 
or complaint was heard, even when men 
left their homes, some of them coming 
from long distances and vacations, in re- 
sponse to the call for help when the so- 
called terrorist raid was rampant, in which 
Felly, Weeks and Papadaches participated. 
The memory is still fresh in our minds of 
the activity and courage of members of 
th's de'^ai'tment as exemplified in the pis- 
tol battle with the well known terrorist 
Joe Tanko. 

I believe in giving credit where credit is 
due, and what could the commanding offi- 
cer of a company, a battalion or a regi- 
ment accomplish in time of war, without 
the whole-hearted co-operation of the men 
under his command — nothing. What 
could the commanding off.cer of a police 
department accomplish, when the police 
are always at war with the crooks, if he 
had not the loyal support of the men of the 
department, regardless of rank — nothing. 

So, in conclusion, I must again reiteravt 
my statement that it is the rank and file 
of the department, co-ordinating and co- 
operating for the common good, that ac- 
complishes results and renders a perfect 
police service to our city, and not the in- 
dividuals. The Supreme Being watched 
carefully over the membership of the de- 
partment this year, as only two men have 
met with violent deaths, one of whom was 
returning from duty and stepped from a 
street car directly into the path of a taxi- 
cab which killed him instantly, the other 
was killed by a fall from his motorcycle, 
while on duty. 

We of the police department thank the 
Almighty that none of our brother officers 
had to die at the hands of any crooks, 
from the first of the year up to this writ- 
ing, and we sincerely pledge ourselves to 
further and progressive police activity. 

D. J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police. 



Page 20 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— ROOM 9, HALL OF JUSTICE 
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Captain of Detectives 

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VoL V 



December, 1926 



No. 2. 



DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, CHIEF SIX YEARS 



Six years ago, the first of this month, Daniel 
J. O'Brien, then Brevet Captain Daniel J. O'Brien, 
chief clerk to the Chief of Police, was appointed 
head of the San Francisco Police Department. At 
that time he had spent 12 years as a member of 
the organization working rapidly through the 
civil service examinations to the rank of lieuten- 
ant, which rank he held when appointed chief, 
thence to the top rank of a captain, he being on 
the list of eligibles at the time of his appoint- 
ment. 

During those six years the San Francisco Police 
Department has witnessed many changes. 

More men have been added to its personnel. 
More automotive equipment has been given the 
members, that they might better cope with the 
criminal element which is quick to utilize every 
agency for speedy get-aways, sure destruction 
and instant death. Armored cars are numerous, 
safeguarding greatly, the brave men who patrol 



the streets at night, looking for the lurking thug, 
prowler or thief. New traffic systems Uave been 
installed to better handle this problem that is 
attracting the attention of engineers in every 
large city; radio and telephoto transmission of 
pictures between outside cities have become part 
of tlie regular police routine; two new police dis- 
tricts have been added, the Western Addition and 
the Bayview and the Traffic Bureau has been made 
a company during those six years. 

The members of the department have received 
two increases in pay since he has been chief, get- 
ting now a salary that is commensurate with the 
high cost of living. 

The number of men in the Detective Bureau 
have been increased by 50 some odd men and the 
bureau divided into details specializing on every 
sort of crime common or frequent in a metropoli- 
tan city. 

The efficiency of the department has been in- 
creased in many ways since December, 1920, and 
today stands out as one of the best police organ- 
izatior.s in either of the Americas. 

Chief O'Brien himself, from a reputation that 
was purely local, and good, has become the best 
known Chief of Police in North America, being 
at the present time President of the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police, which organization 
he has manifested a whole-hearted interest in and 
has done much to make the success it is today. 

He has seen the fruition of a dream every well 
informed chief of police has had for years, the 
establishment of a national bureau of criminal 
identification, and the one now established in 
^^'ashington, D. C. is fulfilling a need that has 
been felt for a long time. It is functioning near- 
ly perfect now and is proving a wonderful weapon 
on the crooks. 

Chief O'Brien has seen as well, and has taken 
an active part in, the bringing to a high state of 
efficiency the State Peace Officers' Association, 
made up of sheriffs, chiefs of police, captain of 
detectives, constables, town marshals and district 
attorneys. This organization has become an im- 
portant factor in the matter of legislation per- 
taining to criminal procedure, and is looked to 
by the members of the Legislature for helpful 
advice. 

Many innovations have been introduced into 
the San Francisco department by the chief dur- 
ing his incumbency as head, and they have all 
been for the betterment of the service and the 
betterment for protection of the people of the 
city, their property and their lives. 

The record of the department during the past 
six years is one all can be proud of. There has 
been no crime waves, there has been sporatic out- 
breaks of lawlessness by mobs who after a few 
(Continued on Page 44) 



December, 1926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 




DAHIEL ]. O'BRIEH 
Who Has Completed His Sixth Year as Chief of Police of San Francisco 



Page 22 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December , 1926 




Brain and Brawn 
Pay Tribute to 
this Coffee of the West 

As you hoverov^er a cup of Hills Bros. Coffee, 
the aroma that floats upward sets your whole 
being astir. Eagerly you lift it to your lips and 
dash it down . . . drain every drop. That first 
savory sip tells you the aroma has not held 
out false promise. 

Brew a cup and taste that marvelous flavor! 
Any wonder \\\\\ thcv call it The Recognized 
Standard from the Coast to the Mississippi? 

Hills Bros, originated the vacuum pack for 
coffee. Tt is still fresh whenever you break the 
seal — days, weeks, even j^^jrj later! Hills Bros. 
Coffee is economical to use. 




Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



HILLS BROS COFFEE 




In the original Vacuum Pack 
vihicli keeps the coffee fresh. 



December. 1926 



"2'0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 23 



CURIOUS PEOPLE 



One cannot but help wonder wliat is in the 
minds of people these days. P"or months the citi- 
zens of Central California had been in mortal 
fear of the notorious murdering- bandit, Joe 
Tanko. His escape from San Quentin where he 
was sent for ruthlessly murdering Chief Meehan 
of San Bruno, his subsequent acts with his part- 
ner in crime, Floyd Hall, awaiting a second trial 
for murder in Sacramento; his shooting policemen 
in the capital city, his unlawful and brutal acts 
against law-abiding folks, were headlined in all 
papers. 

Everybody wanted Joe Tanko back in jail. They 
knew he was a dangerous man. They felt he 
might strike most any time and some of the peo- 
ple who were out at nights might be his victim. 
But Joe Tanko was killed in a duel with the brave 
and courageous Detective Sergeant Earl Roney, 
who was seriously injured. Joe Tanko shot the 
equally brave and courageous officer. Detective 
Sergeant Vernon Van Matre. Joe Tanko's body 
was taken to the city morgue. 

And what happened. 

Over 20,000 people visited the morgue to look 
upon this vile, debased creature. And a large 
number of this curious horde came not to gloat 
at the end of a career that was trailed with hu- 
man blood. No, sir; they came to sympathize 
with this low criminal. Women and girls were 
heard to make sympathetic remarks that such 
a nice boy should have been killed. They said 
he looked so lovely. Some came two or three 
times and asked for one more chance to see 
"poor Joe." 

None of these had much to say of Earl Roney 
and Vernon Van Matre, out at the San Francisco 
Hospital, over whom surgeons were waging a bat- 
tle for their lives. 

It was sickening these maudlin visitors, and we 
wonder if over 20,000 would have come to the 
morgue if Earl Roney had been killed by Joe 
Tanko, we regret to say that we don't think they 
would. 

We don't like to see anyone dead, but the writer 
looked on Joe Tanko as he lay propped up in the 
morgue, duty forcing him to do so, and he could 
not find anything to be sorry over the passing of 
such a debased human being. 

We join with the thousands who did not come 
to the morgue in offering up thanks that the two 
valiant officers were spared their lives and will 
soon be out ready to meet again any other crook 
of the stripe of Joe Tanko. 



Robert Styles knows what the formalities are for getting 
booked for violating the Juvenile Court Law. He was 
y-ivcn some instructions along these lines by Officer George 
Hus?ey and J. Regallo. 



Qive thanks to the 
Officer--- 



for his great services in time of fire. 

We depend on the policeman to 
keep the streets clear so that fire 
apparatus will have a straight path 
and hydrants will be free of obstruc 
tion. 

It is the officer on duty who does 
most to clear burning and threat' 
ened buildings of their inhabitants, 
saving many lives. Fire lines, keep' 
ing people out of the firemen's way 
and out of danger, are maintained 
by the police. 

By night, the watchful officer is 
alert to turn in the alarm at the first 
sign of fire. By day he is ever ready 
to support the fire department in 
dealing with needless fire hazards 
that threaten the safety of an entire 
neighborhood. 

Our thanks to the pohce! They 
save thousands of lives and millions 
in property by their help in fire 
fighting. 



Board of Fire 
Underwriters 

of the Pacific 

Merchants Exchange Building 
San Francisco 



Page 24 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL December, 1926 

aniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




Lieutenant William Lambert, for 24 years a member 
of the San Francisco Police Department, died at his home 
in Mission Terrace, December 8. Lieutenant Lambert 
had been ill for many months. 

At the time of his death he was a member of the 
Ingleside command, having been there for a long time; 
prior to that, having been in the Central district. He 
joined the depaitment in 1902, was made a corporal in 
1910, a sergeant in 1914 and promoted to the rank of 
lieutenant in 1923. 

Lieutenant Lambert was very popular in the depart- 
ment and had many friends outside the ranks. 

* * * 

Corporal Tom Mclnemey and Al Christ brought in 
their quota of easy winners during the month, making it 
tough for the work evaders. 

* * * 

Frederick Emmons, with a charge of burglary against 
him, can give any inquiring soul a lot of information as 
to what processes one goes through when arrested for 

a crime. He was garnered in by Sergeant Henricks. 

» * » 

A dozen hop-heads and vags can thank Officer Patrick 

Walsh for the nice ride they got in the patrol wagons 
during the month. 

* * * 

Special Duty Officer William Bennett of the chief's 
office removed a score of potential crooks from the streets 
of recent weeks, placing them where the dogs wouldn't 
bite 'em. 

* * * 

The rail birds of the Detective Bureau welcomed De- 
tective Sergeant Frank McGrayan, veteran member of 
the department, back to headquarters. Frank has been 
ill for some months but has beat the old gent with the 
scythe for many moons more we trust. We also welcomed 



Have You Visited Our 
New Addition 

70,000 square feet of selling space 
in the Greater Crystal Palace Mar- 
ket — The largest and most sanitary 
food market in the United States. 




Palace 



the Sunshine Club of which Lieutenant John Fitzhenry 
of the complaint department, is president, and Sergeant 
Patrick McGee of the training school is chairman of the 
board of directors, composed of himself and Officer Pete 
Maloney. 

* * * 

Talking of Sergeant McGee, he has been seriously ill at 
the Franklin Hospital but fiom last reports he has the 
game beat and will be back on the job soon showing 
young policemen how to work. 

* * * 

Corporal Harvey Deline of the city prison says that he 
could equip a male chorus most any night of the week 
from the young men full of "Oh, Be Joyful", whose fancy 
turns to vocal solos during the still hours of the night. 

* * * 

Bailiff Joe McCarte of Judge O'Brien's police court 
says if Santa Claus will give the judge's chambers a 
new carpet he and his "side-kick" can walk about the floor 
without getting splinters in their feet. 

* * * 

Sergeant John Manion of the Chinatown squad brought 
in John Wong, charged with vagrancy, the other day. 
This is an unusual charge for a Chinese. 

* * * 

Bailiff Jack Lyons of Judge Golden's department of 
the police court, was telling Bailiff Mannie Joy the other 
day that the Widows' and Orplians' Ball and Concert 
would be the biggest in the history of the association, 
to which Mannie agreed. 

* * * 

Officer Tom Larkin was asking Officer Tom Handley 
if he remembered the time when the Bay came up to 
Montgomery street, and Handley said, yes: the first time 
he went down thei'e Tom was working on a tug boat. 

* * * 

Bailiffs Charles Bill and Tom Maloney of the police 
court presided over by Judge Lazarus must have had 
some pull to get that new carpet in the judge's chambers. 

* * :^ 

George "Jerry Jarrett", formerly police reporter for 
the Bulletin but for the past few months one of the sales 
force of the Howard Automobile Company, Buick dis- 
tributors, was down to the hall the other day greeting 
his many friends, and wishing them a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. George told the boys around 
headquarters that he can fix them up with some swell 
new Buicks for Christmas presents, they being most ac- 
ceptable for that purpose. 



HjuL 



COFFEE AND LUNCH HOUSE 

SINCE 1876 

Trv Our Special Plate Lunch 

448 MONTGOMERY STREET 



December. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 25 




Lieutenants: 



CENTRAL 

STATION 



Capt. Arthur D. Layne 
Harry P. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 



Captain Arthur Layne wants the rotund white bewhis- 
kered December 25th visitor designated as Santa Claus 
to bring the new office some linoleum. The way the place 
looks now all dolled up and no covering on the floor re- 
minds one of a diamond on a dirty shirt. So harken Saint 
Nick. 

Here are a few of the 112 Motor Act \'iolators gathered 
in during the month: Han-y Hill, arrested by Officers 
Harry Gurtler and William Cullen; George Brown, who 
drew an additional charge of having liquor in his posses- 
sion, taken in custody by Sergeant Rooney; Harry Miller, 
arrested by Officers John Lawless and W. Curtis; and John 
McKenzie, arrested by Officers Frank Pleasand and Frank 
Kennedy. The latter two offenders got an additional 
charge of 141 of the Motor Act. Aslo Jos. Finley, nabbed 
by Officer J. Fitzgerald, charged additionally with having 
a stolen car and booze. 

Sergeant William Flinn and Officers George Ohnimus 
and Ed Christal didn't do so bad when they placed Joseph 
Doner behind steel bars, for Joseph is said to be a robber. 
« * * 

Captain Arthur Layne and posse arrested Steve Tamen 
for violating Sec. 337a of the Penal Code. 

* * * 

Officer J. Bell locked up Thomas Roderiquwz for assault 
with a deadly weapon. 

* * * 

Joseph Margarsino is another gent charged with the 
same offense who was arrested by Officer C. Rogerson. 

* * * 

John Figoni and Edward Nelson, accused of petty lar- 
ceny, were landed in the city prison by Officers C. Zipperle 
and J. Buckley. 

* * * 

Another petty larcenist likewise treated was Miguel 
Davalos, tagged by Officer George Burkhardt. 

* * * 

Harry Davis, safe cracker with an eastern record, and 
James Hunter, were arrested by Officer Frank Kennedy 
and Special Gray, charged with attempted grand larceny 
and ^\^th assault by means and force likely to produce 
great bodily injury. 



HARLEY-DAVIDSON 

MOTORCYCLE 




The Police Standard 

DUDLEY PERKINS 

116-126 VAN NESS AVE. Park 6162 



Phones: Sutter 8600 and Sutter 8492 



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Between Post and Geary 
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Louis R. Greenfield Theatres 

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Helpful Booklets on 
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PAI NTS ^m VARNISHES 

PIONrER WHITV LIAO 



Page 26 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 




SOUTHERN 

STATION 



Capt. Charles Goff 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Richard Foley 

Captain Charles Goff wants old Santy Claus to know 
how much he likes the new Southern Station, and wants 
him to keep the law \'iolators out of the district the coming 
year. 

* * * 

There was a wide range of arrests made for as wide a 
range of offenses the past month. 

* -t * 

Corporal Emmet Flynn and Officer William Desmond ar- 
rested Amando Garcia for assault with intent to commit 
murder. 

* * * 

The following were arrested for grand larceny: Edward 
Everson, by Officer Thomas Feeney; Edward Kennedy, by 
Officer 0. Lundborg; and Martha Hudson, by Corp. Flynn 
and Officer Desmond. 

* * * 

Officer Lundborg arrested D. K. Kazangsen; Officers 
Erasmy and J. Hourigan arrested James Wallace and Offi- 
cers Charles Keck and Robert Clifford arrested John 
Martinez for passing worthless checks. Officer P. O'Con- 
nell brought in Jose Regreti for robbery. 

* * * 

Joe Valentino was arrested by Officers R. Curtin and 
James King and charged with burglary. 

* * * 

Floyd Hanks was arrested for attempted extortion 
and impersonating an officer, he being arrested by Officers 
Andrew Lennon and Lundborg. 

* * * 

Officers Hourigan and Lennon arrested William Wadill 
for assault to commit murder. 

* * * 

Harry Bond furnished the motive of an arrest for vio- 
lating Section 112 of the Motor Act, the execution of the 
law being performed by Officers Lennon and Lundborg. 

* * * 

A 288 charge was hung onto James Wright who was 
arrested by Lieutenant Richard Foley. 

* * * 

An epidemic of petty larceny kicks resulted in the arrest 
of the following for that offense: William White and 
Frank Bartell, by Officers Lennon and Lundborg; Bert 
Robinson, by Officer O'Connell; Charlie Williams and Dan 
Gallagher, by Officer Tim Hurley and posse; John Duddy, 
by Officer King. 

The following were arrested by Officers Erasmy and J. 
Horgan, wanted by the U. S. Marshal: Charles Holmes, 
Patricia De La Rose and Antone Lecarte. 
* * * 

A. Darini was arrested as a JIOOO vag by Officer Nutt- 
man; J. Keeley and Fred Kohero, same charge, booked by 
Officers Slane and J. Crauhall. 



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Established 1869 Incorporated 1907 

LIBERTY DAIRY COMPANY 

Producers and Distributors of 

Pure Pasteurized and Claritied 

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271-279 Tehama Street Phone Douglas 5829 

SAN FRANCISCO 



I 




1 



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Hinting is better than hoping! Leave 
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Det-t-mbiT, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 27 




HARBOR 

STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

Captain Pat Hevlihy wants to thank Santa Claus for the 
subway on the viaduct and asks him to keep the commut- 
ers as good natured as they have been since he has been 

in the Harbor. 

* * * 

Corporal H. H. Ludolph and Officer T. Bluitt grabbed off 
a couple of robbers one night last month. The gents 
ai-rested gave the names of William Hagerman and Frank 
La Pointo. 



The Largest Plant of its Kind in the 
United States 

— plus 60 years of cleaning and dyeing 
experience, is at your service when you 
phone F. Tliomas. We are equipped to 
produce the highest quality of work — to 
handle everything from the most delicate 
crepe de Chine garment to the heaviest 
carpet or rug. 

F. XHOIVIAS 

PARISIAN DYEING AND 
CLEANING WORKS 



27 TENTH STUEEET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MARKET 230 



You wouldn't think that a man with any idea of direc- 
tion would head for the harbor district with a skin full of 
liquor. But nevertheless Officer F. F. Flynn arrested 
James A. Parker and Officer W. Olson arrested Hiram 
Montgomery for violating Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle 
Act. ^ * , 

Thomas Brennan is inside looking out through the steel 
bars awaiting some action on his charge of burglary. He 
was arrested by Officers Henry Heschon and William 
Keane. * * « 

Officer Han-y Fi-ustick and Officer John Doran put the 
finger on Loxiis Andrades for assault with a deadly wea- 
pon. 



THANKS FOR CO-OPERATION 



Please let me take this opportunity of thanking you 
and the San Francisco Police Department for the won- 
derful co-operation and assistance given me on last Thurs- 
day, November 11th. 

Also, please let me take this opportunity of thanking 
you for having detailed Officer John B. Surges to me. 
Without Officer Surges' efficient co-operation we could 
not have gone through the crowds and placed our buglers 
in position to sound "taps" at 11 a. m. 

I would also like to express my opinion that Officer 
Surges is one of the most capable men I have ever worked 
with and he certainly reflects great credit upon the San 
Francisco Police Department whose spirit of co-opera- 
tion and efficiency is exemplified in him. 
ALVIN GERLACK, 
Chairman of Traffic Committee, 
Citizens' Annistic Day Committee, 1926. 



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Mr. Officer: 
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Let Us Help You Win Tliat Promotion 



Page 28 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. Frederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

Captain Fred Lemon hopes that the well-kno-wn Mister 
Santa Claus will continue the era of prosperity that has 
favored the district of recent years. 

* * * 

Three double action crooks were nabbed by Officer C. 
Foster the other day. They are: Peter Ruscheinsky, 
Charles Wimmer and James Johns, each being charged 
with burglary and with violating Sec. 476a of the penal 
code. ^ ^ ^ 

Another burglar man locked up for being such was John 
Davis, who has several aliases, and has graced San Quentin 
and Folsom. Officers William Ridgeway and W. Hennessey 
boosted him into the tail end of the patrol wagon. 

* * * 

Reckless driving and driving while dinank were the 
charges placed against Wm. J. Butler, arrested by Officer 
Curran. ^ ^ ^ 

Charles J. States, wanted in Los Angeles, was arrested 
by Officer M. GaflFey. , , , 

Arthur Lucio, accused of violating Section 288 of the 
Penal Code, was led to a prison cell by Officer J. Crowley 
and Special McClennan. 

Henry Vance and Frank Willson, caught trying to walk 
off with some automobile accesories, got a double booking 
of attempted grand larceny and vagrancy when they were 
taken to the station by Officers J. Foley and P. Thompson. 

* * * 

Officer Thompson with Officer C. Wennerberg and Offi- 
cer Frank Nuttman, took into custody Andrew Batliner, 

charged with manslaughter. 

* * * 

Two charges of petty larceny grace the name of William 

Kirk, arrested by Corporal Patrick Shannon and posse. 

* » * 

Clarence Maxwell knows now that there is a law against 
going about this city armed with a gun. He was arrested 
by Sergeant Fred Suttman and locked up, being accused 
of violating the state gun law. 

» * * 

Officer R. W. Hams booked Gabriel Cazares for assault 
with a deadly weapon. 



DEL MONTE CREAMERY 


M. DETTLING, Proprietor 


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December. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




BUSH ST. 

STATION 



Capt, John J. Casey 
Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mignola 

Captain John J. Casey hopes that Santa Claus will bring 
him a new automobile to take the place of the one smashed 

up by a drunken automobile driver last month. 

* * * 

Talking about di'unken drivers, the followng were 
booked during the past month for violating Section 112 
of the Motor Vehicle Act: Alexander Lee, by Officer John 
Dolan, Jr.; Allan Mohr, by Officer James Toohig; William 
Sage, by Officers A. Navembri and R. McCarte; and Wil- 
liam Sanborn, by Officer J. O'Keefe. 

* * * 

Thomas Wiitelaw was locked up by Officer M. Fitz- 
patrick, charged with being a hit-runner. 

Officer A. Barrett locked up James J. Billings, accused 

of manslaughter. 

* * * 

Clarence Sharps, accused of robbery, was an-ested by 

Officers J. Ross and H. Kiernan. 

* * * 

Edward Bryant found prowling very dangerous to his 
liberty for he was arrested and put in the city prison, 
charged with burglary. Officers Dolan and P. Considine be- 
ing the nemisis of Mr. Bryant. 

* * * 

Officer Toohig and posse grabbed a couple of auto thieves 
when they put the snaps on Michael Donovan and Milton 
Cliiford. ^ ^ ^ 

John E. Goldbery has two charges of burglary to wiggle 
out of. His detention was occasioned by the watchfulness 
of Officer Benn. 

* * * 

Corporal William Boyle and Officer William Ward got 
another burglary suspect when they brought in Arthur 
Dale. 

* * * 

Thomas Cheeks is facing a charge of assault with a 
deadly weapon. His predicament being brought about by 
the activity of Officers J. Collins, E. Keane and Dolan. 

Officer Tobin and Officer Bergeron sent Larry Lanka 
to the city prison charged with violating Sec. 288 of the 
Penal Code. 

* * * 

Richard Hawley, accused of attempt to commit grand 
larceny, was locked up by Officer L. Atkinson. 

Officer R. Cuicci arrested Jack Cunningham wanted for 
petty larceny. 

* * * 

Officers F. Nuttman and P. Slane let Scott Dahl know it 
\vas unlawful to go armed in this city. They booked him 
for violating Chapter 339, Sec. 5 of the Statutes of 1923. 



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VENTURA MOTOR OIL 



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Page iO 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



TRAFFIC BUREAU 

Captain Heiu-y Gleeson 
Ldeutenants J. J. Casey, J. (Cliff) Field and Grover Coats 



All of Captain Henry Gleesonjs friends hope that old 
Saint Nick will hand him a discharge from the hospital 
and doctors and that he will be fully recovered from his 
recent operation which has laid him up for some t\yo 

months. 

* * * 

Mounted Officer Mahoney has given autoists some inten- 
sive education along lines of traffic \'iolation. You can skip 
along Market street from Van Ness to Second and you 
won't find any double parking, and the pedestrian lanes are 
left unobstructed by machines and you will also find the 
proper space between fire hydrants and parked cars. The 
drivers who leave "sleepers" along the curb also get a 
trip to see Officers John LjTich and Andy Miller at Traffic 
Headquarters. Forty minutes is forty minutes to Ma- 
honey and he keeps close tab on all parked automobiles. 

* * * 

Officer Mildahn, one of the officer force of Captain 
Gleeson, demonstrated the other day that he can handle 
law \'iolators as well as he handles the office work in- 
trusted to his care. He noticed that Kenneth Dumal was 
not driving with the observance of traffic laws demanded 
by those laws. He caused Mr. Durnal to pause while he 
asked a few questions. The upshot of it was that Ken was 
sent to headquarters charged with driving while intoxi- 
cated and reckless driving. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer P. McEvoy is a good traffic officer and he 
can do any other police work with equal dexterity as ex- 
emplified by his arresting Edward Ferguson for violating 
Section 476a of the Penal Code, which, as all policemen 
know, has nothing to do with traffic \'iolations. 

* * * 

Another traffic officer who can step out from his station 
directing autoists is J. Clasby, veteran member of the 
traffic bureau. The other day he ups and arrests Walter 
L. Roberts who was promising to do dire things to a fel- 
low citizen. Walter got a booking for threats against life 
and disturbing the peace. 

* * * 

Officer William Rakestraw pitched in and gave Officer 
E. Hansen a hand in rounding up Alphonse Leure and 
Louis Monalla who were booked at the city prison for petty 
larceny. 



Another okl-timer of the bureau who is laid up is Det. 
Sergt. Frank McGrayan. He is improving and will be on 
his feet again looking as chirper as ever. 



Excelsior Ranch 

LABRUCHERIE BROS. CO. 
Proprietors 



Producers of Mil\ on Ranch 
in Colma 

Telephone Mission 6141 
242 CHATTANOOGA ST. San Francisco 



When You Buy 
A First Mortgage Bond 

your money is secured by an undivided interest in an underlying 
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Ask us about attractive first mortgage 
bonds, which may be bought on time. 



de Fremery & Company 

AJiiiibi-T Sju Fjdiicisco Stock ^ Bond Exchange 

341 Montgomery St. 3004 - 16th Street 

Room 209 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephones : 
Davenport 1515, 1516, 1517. 1518 




Top Floor, San 
Francisco Stock 
and Bond Ex- 
change Building 



Phones: GRAYSTONE 2027— GRAYSTONE 2028 



F. F. RATHJENS 



P. F. Rathjens & Sons 

PORK PACKERS 

Manufacturers and Dealers in All Kinds of 

SAUSAGES 



Manufacturers of Sauerkraut 
Exposition Frankfurters 



1331-1345 PACIFIC ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Bet. Leavenworth and Hyde Streets 



L-oins 

Feet 



HAMS 



PORK CUTS— FRESH AND SALT 

Legs Shoulders Bellies Spare Ribs Heads 
Knuckles Tails Kidneys Leaf Lard 



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SMOKED BEEF 



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riub Sausage Pork Sausage Nut Sausage Frankfurters 

Garlic Sausage Bologna Sausage Head Cheese Liver Sausage 

Ham Sausage Blood Sausage Blood Tongue Sausage 

Exposition Frankfurters Exjwsition Garlic Sausage 

SPECIALTIES 

Bock-Wurst. Blutschwartemagen. Bauernwurst Bremer (Style) 
Pinkel-Wurst. C'repenette. Deer Foot Farm (Style) Sausage, 
Extra Liver Sausage. French Boudin. Grutz-Wurst, Rosinen 
Blutgruetzw-urst. Holsteiner (Round Style) Mettwurst, 

Hamburger (Style) Mettwurst, Sardellen Liver Sausage, 

Schweitzer Bratwurst, Salami, Tomato Brat\\'urst, Mettw'urst 



BOILED MEATS 

Tongues 
Soused Feet (in barrels) 



Salami 



TusTin's 

Radio and Electric Store 

428 SUTTER STREET 



"I want every police officer to feel that he can 
come here and make this place his radio head- 
quarters. 

"He can send his wife or his child here and be 
sure they will be treated right." 



Radio Sets 



Repairs and Parts 



December. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 




PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'Meara 
Lieutenants Charles A. Pfeiffer and Fred W. 



Norman 



If old Santy Claus wants to make Captain John J. 
O'Meara happy, he will bring a couple of camels, a hip- 
popotamus, a giraffe or two, and a few ant eaters to grace 
the Park menagerie. He says that if he gets these things 
for Christmas, Inspector George Merchant will have them 

all doing useful work by New Year's Day. 

* ')■' * 

Sergeant John Alpers says he had no idea of the build- 
ing that has been going on out in the Sunset until he came 
out to the Park from the Central, where the most building 

consists of new business blocks. 

* * * 

Corporal Gene Egan contends that Kezar field will be a 
better football field than any other stadium in the city. 

* * * 

John Wetter was wetter than the officers thought he 
ought to be. They saw him weaving about the Park 
drives and they felt it was up to them to find out if the 
axle of his car was bent. They found out it wasn't. They 
also found some "drinking licker" in the car. They also 
found enough e\idence to charge John with reckless driv- 
ing. Violating Section 112 of the Motor act and \nolating 

the state prohibition law. 

* * * 

Officer Julius Hiett got a call from a couple of old ladies 
the other day. They said a couple of sailors were gi^^ng 
the bears booze. Julius went forth, found the sailors, who 
admitted they had, but as the bears had drank all the 
e\'idence, the bottle broken and no witnesses to testify. 
the ladies going on their way, Hiett and other well legal 
versed policemen decided the two sailors could not be 

locked up. 

* * * 

Another 112 boy picked up by this station was John 
O'Day. He was arrested by Patrol Driver D. Rollins after 

John nearly took a wheel off the patrol wagon. 

* * * 

Peter Marino tried his hand at robbery. It didn't work, 
he was arrested for attempted robbery by Sergeant John 
Alpers and Detective Sergeants William McMahon, George 

Wall, Robert Rauer and Leo Bunner. 

* * * 

Patrick Chambeis had the honor of being arrested on 
a bench warrant served bv Officer William Casev. 



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NELSON BROS. 



9.50 Monterey Blvd. 



Phone Randolph 32 



JAMES ROLPH, Jr., 
W. B. SWETT & CO., 

INC. 




Insurance : General Agents 

ff rittng all Classes oj 
Insurance 

150 SANSOME STREET 

San Francisco 



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Phone Valencia 1036 

21 Hour Service TOWING 

Automotive Engineerine We Know How 



PHONE DAVENPORT 7340 

Western-California Fish Co. 

556-566 CLAY STREET San Fi-ancisco 



Page 3: 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronii, Francis J. McGuire 

Captain William Healy says he always hangs his stock- 
ings up Christmas, and he don't know just what he wants 
this year. His command has made a dandy record for 
catching law breakers, has kept the streets safe for all, 
and handled hundreds of thousands of visitors out at the 
beach without an accident or any trouble worth mention- 
ing. So about all the Captain can hope is that the spreader 
of gladness on December 25 can send him in an official 
way a lot more law-abiding citizens. 

* * * 

Joseph Green, charged with violating Section 288 of the 
Penal Code, was arrested by Officers W. Francis and E. 

Schuldt. 

* * * 

Corporal Dobbins, who has seen the Richmond grow up, 
points out that there is witliin the confines of that district 
many things to attract the visitor as well as our own 
citizens. The well known Pacific Ocean can be seen in all 
its grandeur; the municipal golf links afford a place for 
the pasture pool players to cavort; the Palace of the Le- 
gion of Honor is a place worth .seeing; the Seal Rocks are 
worthy of a few gazes at any time; the Chutes at the 
Beach will afford fun for young and old; you can get into 
Golden Gate Park from his district at a dozen places; 
and there are some swell scenic drives. 
« * « 

Corporal Frank Rhodes and Officer C. Cornelius, who 
don't give much time on fellows who loiter around skip- 
ping by work, gave Bert Parker a free ride to the station 
on a vagrancy charge. 

* * * 

Percy Derose, petty larcenist, gave the nod to desk offi- 
cer after being arretted by Officers C. Radford and J. Mc- 
Kittrick. 



SMOKE 

EL SIDELO 



GLASER BROS. 



PHONE SUTTER 3720 

LANKERSHIM HOTEL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
FIFTH STREET, bet. Market and Mission. SAN FRANCISCO 

350 Rooms of Solid Comfort — Positively Fireproof 

R A T P S " 

Without Bath— $1 and $2 With Bath— $2 and $2.50 

Stase* for all Pacific Coalt Pointa Stop at Oar Door 



Ladies' Cloaks, Suits, Dresses, 
Furs, Waists, Etc. 

Men's Clothing, Hats, Shoes, 
Boys' Clothing 

Charge Accounts Invited 

The Home Clothing Co. 

2500 MISSION STREET, Cor. 21st 
Phone Mission 5036 




CADILLACS 

New and Used 



Garage Open All Night 

Washing Storage 

General Repairs 




PROSPECT 100 



VAN NESS at O'FARRELL 



Use Sperry Drifted Snow Flour 

'^"^^S. It's tested every hour 




Sperry Flour Co. 



Phone MARKET 952 



New Process Laundry Co. 

385 EIGHTH STREET 

OOOD WORK AND PROMPT SERVICE 



FIOR D'lTALIA RESTAURANT 

Music :-: Dancing :-: Entertainment 

Banquet flails for small or large parties 

492 BROADWAY 

Bet. Kearny and Montgomery Sts. 
Phone Douslas 1504 SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Phones: Sutter 1306; Douglas 2658 
Compliments of 

BAY CITY MARKET 

S. J. Shapro 

WTiOLESALE BUTCHERS AND JOBBERS 

945 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 33 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. Eugene Wall 



Captain Eugene Wall says that if the district presided 
over by his command keeps on growing in the next year 
as it has in the past year, old Saint Nicholas will have to 
slip a lot of new policemen in his stockings to keep up the 
high efficiency of police protection that has characterized 
the Ingleside district for years. 

* « * 

Officer Jack Rudden, veteran desk man at the station 
says he can remember the time when nearly all the vege- 
tables used in San Francisco were gro\\'n ■\\'ithin a half 
mile radius of the Ingleside station. Now he says the 
folks all have to have their vegetables sent out from the 

stores. 

* * * 

Katherin Launister, arrested for robbery by Officer R. 
Hall, con\'inced Judge Sylvan Lazaras that she wasn't 
guilty and so she beat the rap. She was accused by an- 
other woman of taking some of the latter's chattels. 

* * * 

Jurgen Robertsen knows what the inside of the station 
looks like, for he had to spend a few hours in one of the 
cells until transferred to the city prison where he was 
charged with dri\'ing an automobile while full of intoxicat- 
ing beverages of some kind. His arrest was made by Offi- 
cer E. Keck. 

* * * 

William Rose, charged with robbery, was arrested on 
Nov. 21 by Officers E. Donahue, L. Hagen and Special 
Lavoy. Rose, who is 43, is a member of the navy. 



G. Engler picked up Robert Clay, 
Section 476a of the Penal Code. 



wanted for violating 



Officer G. N. Wuth put James Bowers in a cell on a 
vagrancy complaint. 



"To have an ideal, which you will in good faith 
strive to live up to." — Theodore Roosevelt. 

When the owners chose as the name of 
their new hotel, that of the outstanding 
American of modem times, they did so with 
the purpose of making the hotel typify in 
its methods of operating and its business 
relations, the dominant principles of square 
dealing which marked the character of the 
late president. 

HOTEL ROOSEVELT 

JOXES AT EDDY 

Alex. Vayssie and Rene A. Vayssie 

Owners and Managers 

EVERY ROOM 'VNTrH BATH RADIO IN MANY ROOMS 



PHONE PRWATE EXCHANGE DOUGLAS 3394 

CALIFORNIA POULTRY CO. 

Incorporated 1905 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

LIVE and DRESSED POULTRY 

SUPPLIERS OF HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 
313-315 Washington St. San Francisco, Calif. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



Only Uie Best of The Great 
.Motion IMcture Plays — 

Fanclion & Marco's Ever-new 
" I I) E A 8 •• 



FUED BIAGINI 



CHAS. DEHICUELI 



BANK GARAGE 

A utoinobile Reconstruction 
35 MONTGOMERY ST., Cor. Jackson 



Motor Overhauling Body Building 

Upholstering Tops Recovered 

Washing and Polishing Greasing and Oiling 

Painting Enameling Varnishing 

Fender and Radiator Work 



Repairing Damaged Cars Oor Specialty 
Towing — Day or Niglit 

Phone Davenport 5333 — 5334 



St. Germain Restaurant 

60 and 68 ELLIS STREET 

300 Seats 

Main Dining Room 

300 Second Floor 

We are prepared 

to serve 

Sumptuous or 

Modest Dinner 

Parties 

Banquet Halls with 

Dancing Floors 

Lunch 65c and $1 

Dinner SI. 25 

De Luxe S2.50 

A la carte at all hours 




NEW POODLE DOG 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

POLK AND POST STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 



Daniel T. Hanlon Chaa. M. O'Brien 

Telephone Market 7906 

Sanitary Towel Supply Co. 

84 NINTH STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Chesterfield Sets a Specialty 


Telephone Market 70M 


Ellis Market Furniture Co., 

'Miinujacturer to Consumer 
R. C. WAX. Manaser 


Inc. 


nil MARKET STREET 


San Franci 


SCO. Cal. 



Page 34 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

Captain Herbert Wright wants old Santy Claus to bring 
him a lot of good luck and help keep up his record for 
crime suppression in the North End District. All the boys 
in the station have hit the ball the past year and they 
say them are going to bat higher the coming. 

Officer William Maguire, on the desk during the day 
watch, says that folks wouldn't recogTiize the old Marina 
these days, it having undergone some transformation since 
the Exposition closed ten years ago. 



MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION PRAISES 



The officers of the Board of Directors of the North 
Beach Merchants' Association at a special meeting held 
October 28th ult. unanimously voted to go on record 
highly praising the efficient work of our Chief of Police 
and the officers under your command, for effecting the 
capture of the teiTor bandits. 

We also desire to make mention and highly commend 
the two officers,. Louis De Matre and Paddy Wafer for 
the valiant part they staged. 

NORTH BEACH MERCHANTS' ASS'N, 
Martin Lewkowitz, Secretary Pro. Tern. 



California's 
largest 
clothing 
specialists 



Pauson & Co. 

Kearny at Sutter 

M 



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Loan Association 

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HARVEY M. TOY, 
President 



GEO. S. WALKER, 
Secretary 



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Phone PROSPECT 10000 



Dccevibcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 35 




\Y/E STERN 
iWrADDITION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Emmet E. Moore and John M. Sullivan 

Captain Robert Coulter wants Old Saint Nicholas to 
make all the law abiding folks in his district as happy as 
he did last year. Says he has the best station in the city 
and can't think of a thing that he needs this Xmas day. 

* * * 

John H. Crow-der and Richard Blake stole a car and 
went forth to do some fancy robbery work. They pulled 
a couple of jobs before Officers W. Classen and W. Casey 
got busy. These two officers got the two adventurers and 
when the proceedings w^ere completed each gent arrested 
faced two robbery charges, one of stealing an automobile 
and Blake with carrying a gun. 

* * * 

Gents full of gin and riding in a gas buggy will persist 
in coming out in this district, and the officers, just as per- 
sistent, lock them up. Ask Elmer Pearson about it. He 
was arrested for violating Section 112 by Officers E. Paul 
and J. W. Doyle. 

* * * 

Lowell Lefler went from the Southern District to try his 
hand at a robbery job. He got caught before he had con- 
summated his intention, and Corporal J. O'Leary locked 
him up for attempt to commit robbery. 

* * * 

Irving MacKeever thought he could skip through the 
district in a car he had driven away without the owner's 
consent. He got fooled; also got put in jail by Coi-poral 
Cullinan for violating Section 146 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Frank Coleman, accused of violating Section 288 of the 
Penal Code, was airested by Captain Coulter. 

He « * 

Officer Charles Wedekind brought to the station Jack 
Lj-nch and George Gibson for statutory offenses. 



BERNSTEIN'S 

FISH GROTTO 

123 POWELL ST. 
6 SACRAMENTO ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

A Fact! 

Fish caught at 5 a. m. 
served at noon same day. 

Home of the COO-COO COCKTAIL 

It's a treat 
Oysters are now in season 



Phone GARFIELD 2336 



H. W. FRANK, Proprietor 



MILWAUKEE FURNITURE CO. 

FURNITURE 
CHAIRS AND UPHOLSTERY 



832 MISSION STREET 

Between Fourth and Fifth Streets San Francisco. Calif. 



ACKERMAN & HARRIS ATTRACTIONS 

UNION SQUARE 

Formerly HIPPODROME 

0'FAIlKEL.L NEAR POWKJjL 

ContinuoaB Performance Dally 



FIVE ACTS 

of 

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FEATURE 

PHOTOPLAYS 

witti 

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Kiddies Always 10c 



SOCIAL 
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Every Night 



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LESSONS 
$1.00 HOUR 



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DANCING 

EVERY 
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NIGHT 



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QUALITY FIRST 

UNITED STATES 
LAUNDRY 

TELEPHONE MARKET 

1721 

FINEST WORK ON SHIRTS AND COLLARS 



Page 36 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, J 926 




BAY VIEW 

STATION 



Capt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowie 

Captain Stephen Bunner hopes that Santa Claus will 
make all the people of his district be as law abiding as they 
have been since last Christmas. He has had but little 
trouble with evil-doers and he wants this condition to 

continue. 

* * * 

Corporals Charley BrowTi and Rudy Maier says that Cor- 
poral William Harrington is looking fonvard to the time 
when there will be a big parade out in this district so he 
can put on his nice new Corporal's uniform and give the 

villagers a real treat. 

* * * 

Gilbert Anderson sure grabbed off a bunch of grief for 
himself when he drove out into this section. He wound up 
in jail by being charged with violating Section 112 and 
141 of the motor vehicle act, either charge being enough to 
give a lot of work to a smart lawyer. Officers A. O'Brien 
and A. Schwind made the "pinch". 

* * * 

Sergeant Nolan and Sergeant Lance gave Jesus Beun- 
rostro a demonstration of the activity of the police force 
out in this district. Jesus has had a course in San Quentin 
and a post graduate course in Folsom. He figured that the 
Bayview would be a fertile field to ply what knowledge he 
possessed of burglary and sharpened by association with 
some of the best prowlers in captivity, where most of the 
prowlers wind up; he figured wrong, for the two above 
mentioned sergeants just grabbed him off and when they 
poured him out of the patrol wagon, they had enough on 
him to charge him with burglary and two attempted 
burglaries. 

* * * 

Alex Vai has mixed forgery with burglary, so he goes 
armed. This armed business is "agin the law". Officer 
A. O'Brien knows about this law, so he tags Mr. Vai with 
a charge of violating the gun law. 



To Tou and Tours 




2526 MISSION STREET 



Bank and Office Fixtures ; Hardwood Interiors ; Show Window 
Novelties ; Store Fronts ; Special Furniture ; Museum Cases. 

S. LEVI 

STORE FIXTURES 

Designs and Estimates Furnished 
Telephone MARKET 2216 

243 SEVENTH STREET San Francisco 




In San Francisco, at the Palace, 
-*■ interesting and well-ordered sur- 
roundings unite, for your enjoy- 
ment, with a service, unobtrusive, 
alert. 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

Q^lanagement 
HALSEY E.MANWARJNC 

Saji Francisco 

^S^ar/^t af^McwMont^omejy St. 



iiiiiJuiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiLno j 



Dreamland 
Auditorium 

POST and STEINER STREETS 




December. J 926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 




POTRERO 

STATION 



Capt. Harry J. O'Day 
Lieutenants Albert S. Munn, J. C. Malloy 

Captain Hariy O'Day hopes that Santa Claus will be as 
good to him the coming year as he has been in the past. 
Records show that his district has been a very law-abiding 
one and when some law breaking was done the boys of his 
command have been on the job and quickly brought the 
violators to book. CaptLun O'Day wishes all the member;-, 
of the department from the Chief down, a Merry Christ- 
mas and a Happy New Year. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Malloy feels that the streets are not safe 
when a gent ginned up tries to steer a gas wagon. He ob- 
served Archie Luna the other day steering an uncertain 
course, so he ups and investigates and the investigation 
.satisfied him that Archie was breaking all the pro\dsions 
of Sec. 112 of the Motor act and he arrested him, booked 
him and locked him up on a charge of violating that well 
known statute. He also vagged Raymond Flores who was 
a passenger with Luna. Sergt. Emmet Hogan found on 
checking Mr. Luna's finger prints that he was wanted in 
Solano county for burglary, committed in August, 1925. 
So Mr. Luna has a heap of grief to break away from. 

* * * 

George Perkins and Frank Claus were getting an eyefull 
of the beauties of the Protrero hills from an automobile. 
The automobile belonged to another man, who did not 
know the boys and did not know they had the machine. 
Officer H. Heracy spotted the lads and seeing they were in 
an automobile reported stolen, stopped them and did a 
little question and answer work. He wound up by march- 
ing the boys to the Potrero station where they were 

charged with violating Section 146 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Frank Schmitz was driving an automobile in \aolation of 
the provisions of Section 112 when Officer N. Kavanaugh 
got a peek at him, and the next thing Mr. Schmitz knew 
he was surrounded with a lot of perpendicular steel bars 
and the books told the story of his being aiTested for 

dri\'ing while drunk. 

* * * 

Joe Gutirez is a bold sould. He tried a little burglary 
in the district and he had the pleasure of being arrested 
by Lieutenant Malloy, Sergeant Kerrigan and Officer D. 

Henderson. 

* * * 

Officer H. Doyle believes in an industrial district like 
this, there is no excuse for a man to be loafing, so he ar- 
rested Salvadore Martinez, who seemed to be avoiding 
work most assiduously. Sal was charged with vagrancy. 

* * * 

Det. Sergt. Tom DriscoU underwent an operation last 
month that has confined him to his home for some time, 
but the doctors say he is getting along nicely and will 
soon be back on the job. 



JOE BIANCHINI 



Phone Garfield 3784 



Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

Ladies' and Gents* Suits Cleaned, Pressed, Repaired and Altered 
Glove and Hat Cleaning a Specialty 

1715 STOCKTON STREET 

Bet. Filbert and Greenwich San Francisco, Cal. 



'1/ 





HOTEL 

MARK 

HOPKINS 



San Francisco's 

Newest and Finest 

Hotel 



Atop Nob Hill 

California at Mason 

Davenport 6300 



Geo. D. Smith. Pres. and Managing Director 
Will P. Taylor. Jr., Resident Manager 



A Bank Book 

for Christmas 



What more fitting present 
for the boy or girl, proud 
of his or her chore money? 
Give each child a start, 
however small. Depend 
upon it, he'll do the rest. 



TK, 



American Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System 

California Street at Montgomery 

2595 Mission Street at 22d 
1550 Market Street near Van Ness 



2J Banl^ing O^ices in the San Francisco hay Region 



Page 38 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



MATHESON 

(Continued from Page 12) 
VIL 

In a preceding article, (America, May 16), I 
put the question as to tlie right of the State to 
take human Hfe as a punishment for crime. With 
no intent to stir controversy, but merely to re- 
flect the mind of Catholic philosophers and theo- 
logians, I wrote that tlie question must be an- 
swered in the affirmative. The Catholic opinion, 
stated broadly, is that the right flows from the 
very nature and purpose of the State, and is sup- 
ported by the teaching of Holy Scripture as well 
as by the common usage of nations. 

An examination of the various State laws dis- 
closes a surprisingly large number of capital 
crimes. I do not pretend to have surveyed the 
entire field, but the following synopsis is correct, 
I think, at least in general outline. Six States: 
Maine, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, South Da- 
kota and Wisconsin, have abolished the death 
penalty. 

(To be Continued) 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 

H With the largest lobby in the world, 
offers an ideal location for Convention 
Headquarters. 

IT Fairmont stands for hospitality un- 
excelled. 



D. M. LnsfNARD 
President 



LE ROY LINNARD 
Manager 



MODERN CRIME 

(Continued from Page 10) 
It is clearly understood that mental education 
alone is not sufficient in the making of men and 
women. In Amei'ica the church is supposed to 
furnish the religious training, and from that each 
one is presumed to receive all required moral and 
ethical development. It is well to leave to the 
church the imparting of religious instruction, but 
moral and ethical instruction and training can 
be imparted in any properly equipped school. 



We extend to you 
our Sincerest Wishes for a 

Happy aed 
ProsperoMS 
Ne^w Year 

and when New Year's Day has passed 

may the many good things 

we wish for you linger until this 

momentous day comes again 



CHIEF COMMENDS OFFICERS 




On November 18, 1926, two holdup men, Rob- 
ert Schenk, alias Richard Blake, and John Crowd- .. .^ ., - t\ . • /"^ 
er, were arrested by Police Officers Patrick Glea- /^IgX* DullCr Printing L>0. 

[Established 1896] 



son and James H. Casey of the Western Addition 



police district. 

The report submitted, dealing with this ar- 
(Continued on Page 40) 



853 Howard St. San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 2377 



THE 

Stringer Storage Company 

In San Francisco Since 1880 

TWO MODERN WAREHOUSES 
FIRE PROTECTED 

STORAGE MOVING 

PACKING SHIPPING 

Our Employees are Experts in Their Line 

PHONE WEST 999 



OFFICE : 
2027 SUTTER STREET 



PACKING ROOMS: 
1820 STEINER STREET 



Chas. W. Brown Wm. E. Kennedy 

(Memberg of Florists Telegraph Delivery) 

Flowers for All Occasions 

No Order Too Large for Us to Fill 
None Too Small for Consideration 

BROWN & KENNEDY 

Floral Artists 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Funeral Work a Specialty 

Reasonable Prices 

510 VALENCIA STREET 
Market 5725 



Dixembcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 39 



SHOPLIFTERS 

(Continued from Page 15) 
three days before the goods would be missed, and 
tlie thieves would be far away. 

Pictures of the three women and the man were 
shown to storekeepers who had been victimized 
and were readily identified as the would-be pur- 
chasers who visited the stores at the time the 
goods were stolen. 

These photographs and descriptions have been 
sent broadcast throughout the country, but so far 
not a "rumble" has been heard of them. 

Lieutenant Powell returned to San Francisco 
without his prisoners but he had the satisfaction 
of Jvnowing that he had all the goods in his pos- 
session that had been stolen here and a lot that 
had been taken in other cities on the coast. 

He also found that the gang was tipped off that 
the trunks intercepted had been grabbed by the 
police and they were told not to ship any more to 
Brooklyn. This information came from the coast 
end of the mob, and he represents a powerful in- 
fluence in underworld circles in a city on the Pa- 
cific. 

However, Powell, Tatham, Gaughran and Skelly 
feel certain that sooner or later the gang will 
"fall" and when they do they will have a chance 
to face a San Francisco jury before they wiggle 
out of their trouble. 



APPRECIATION EXPRESSED 

May I take this opportunity of expressing my appre- 
ciation of the wonderful performance of duty as exem- 
plified by Officer Leo O'Connor in a case recently as- 
signed to him for solution. Officer O'Connor in less 
than 36 hours after the report of a theft to him, was 
able to notify me of the location of the articles stolen 
from my apartment. With the splendid powers of de- 
duction as used by this officer, I was enabled to become 
again possessed of my personal property within such 
a short period of time that its loss was, through the 
efficiency of this officer in recovering same, of a negli- 
gible character. 

I am happy to send this communication to your officers 
and through them, to be able to express my thanks to 
one who has proven his ability coupled with efficiency. 

PAUL F. COLLINS, 

347 Mills Building. 



Phone DOUGLAS 3164 

Compliments of 

ALBERT A. ROSENSHINE 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

V 

467 MILLS BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



ABE JACOBS 

.'/ 
MAISON ADELAIDE 

287 GEARY ST. 

Wishes the Members of the 
San Francisco Police Department 

A MERRY CHRISTMAS * 

AND 

A HAPPY NEW YEAR 




"MADE FOR 
REST" 

Deep, luxurious bed- 
springs of tempered 
steel coil construction 
make restful sleep for 
children as well as 
tjrrown-ups. The Pre^ 
niier Tru-flex. a coil 
bedypring guaranteed 
for 25 years, sells for 
only 520 at your fur- 
niture dealer's. 



PREMIER BED 
and SPRING CO. 

5700 Third Street, San Francisco 



Telephone Mission 2365 



J. G. Johnson 



Wholesale 
Butcher 



Office and Plant 

.ARTHUR AVE. NEAR THIRD ST. 
SAX FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 40 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



THE KILLING OF JOE TANKO 

(Continued from Page 6) 
in the fight for Roney's life and the reUef of Van 
Matre. 

At the San Francisco Hospital quarters were 
inade ready for the two men and they were given 
the best modern surgery to be offered. Roney's 
mother came from across the bay and took her 
place at the bedside of her son, she being a train- 
ed nurse. 

When Roney could be seen by his brother offi- 
cers he assured them he was going to get well, 
that he was all right and would be on the job 
again. 

This brave spirit, coupled with a wonderful 
constitution and a body that has never suffered 
from excesses of any kind, has assured his re- 
covery. 

Van Matre had to have his leg opened to get 
the bullet and a piece of clothing that was car- 
ried into the bullet hole by the leaden missive 
that nearly cost him his life. 

No one would claim Tanko's body and he was 
burried in the potters' field, "unhonoi'ed, unsung 
and in disgrace." 

The other members of De Bardelaben's mob 
were rounded up, "Creepy" Wilson and Theodore 
Johnson. They all face robbery chai'ges and in- 
dictments for harboring a criminal. Their cases 
present no argument for sympathy and the sooner 
they are put behind bars the better off law-abiding 
people will be. 

They admitted they knew their guest was 
Tanko and that he had been hiding out with 
them for weeks. Tanko, after his escape from 
Sacramento, went to Colorado where he got a 
"roll" and came back to Sacramento a sick man. 
He laid low in a Chinese hideout until able to 
travel and came to this city a mere shadow of 
hi.s former self. 

Once again are the people of San Francisco 
brought face to face with the unwavering bravery 
and courage of our police department. The mem- 
bers meet their duty without fear of personal 
injury or death itself. 



Nearly a score of vags were arrested during the recent 
roundup of undesirables by posses led by Captain Arthur 
Layne, Officers Ed. Moran, Jack Mangan, J. Lawless, and 
William Sullivan. 



CHIEF COMMENDS OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page 38) 
rest, shows that both officers displayed high effi- 
ciency in apprehending the two holdup men men- 
tioned, and for the efficient and faithful police 
service rendered they are hereby commended by 
the Chief of Police. 



DddbeErdthers 

MOTOR CARS 



J. E. FRENCH CO. 

O'Farrell at Polk 
2366 Mission St. 

Prospect 9000 



FIREMAN'S 
FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

401 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Fire • Automobile • Marine 




The WHITElMrCOMPANY 
TRUCKS and BUSSES 



BANCA POPOLARE FUGAZl 

(FUGAZI BANK) 

F. N. BELGRANO. Pres. 

San Francisco — Oakland — Santa Barbara 
Califomia 

ASSETS OVER $20,000,000.00 



Phone Kearny 1701 



P. O. Box 2143 



San Francisco International Fish Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Fish Dealers 
535-539 WASHINGTON ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



LA CAMPANA CAFE 

Italian Restaurant and Hotel 

Dancing 440 BROADWAY 

Every Evening SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Salter 8805 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Pazc 41 



NEW WINTER ORDERS 

(Continued from Pago 9) 

In the premises, company commanders shall 
issue proper instructions so that all places wherein 
or whereat undesirables may seek refuge will re- 
ceive proper attention. Tiie application of the 
vagrancy laws is a splendid crime prevention 
measure. Under our fingerprint system the vag- 
rant can be checked upon and by this means he 
can be connected with crimes for which he may 
be a fugitive from justice. At any rate, finger- 
prints have shown and will show the vagrant's 
criminal history and in this way the officer on the 
beat, and in fact all members of the department, 
will know with whom they are dealing. 

It is hardly necessary for me to say that every 
precaution must be used by members of this de- 
partment in their investigation of criminals. The 
penal laws of this state have definitely set forth 
the circumstances under which a peace officer may 
use his revolver and entirely apart from the penal 
regulations the mandates of the natural law guar- 
antee the fundamental rule of self preservation. 

For the protection of the men of this depart- 
ment and in order that they may render the 
highest possible degree of efficient service to the 
people of this municipality, company commanders 
may in their judgment pair men on the beats 
within their respective districts on the 4 to 12 
midnight and the 12 midnight to 8 a. m. platoons. 
This system of pairing men shall commence Tues- 
day, November 16, 1926, and shall continue up 
to 8 a. m. of February 1, 1927. 



TOLERANCE 

(Continued from Page 18) 
many others who had the shafts of persecution 
(the result of intolerance) thrust upon them. 

In our very city, this very day, let anybody 
try to express themselves, publicly, on such popu- 
lar and ordinary subjects, such as Russia, Birth 
Control, the League of Nations, the Volstead Act, 
Unionism, Capital Punishment, Dietetics, the 
Public School System, Political War Prisoners, 
H. L. Mencken, Bernard Shaw, the Key Route 
System, Hon. James Rolph, Jr., Hon. Daniel J. 
O'Brien, our Fire Chief, the four tracks on Market 
street, California, Incorporated, or anything else, 
no matter how significant or insig-nificant, there 
will be enough mortals left over possessing a 
medieval spirit of intolerance, manifesting symp- 
toms of a sluggisli liver, inflamed spleen and a 
swollen thyroid gland — all of which must be ex- 
ercised on the "innocent by-stander." Why is 
this so, in spite of our progress in other direc- 
tions? 

(To bo Continued) 



Buy a Better Mattress at Factory 



All styles 
and sizes 






.75 
to 
$47.50 



1865 MARKET ST. 

(No Branchefl) 



AT GOUGH ST. 



HOME LAUNDRY CO. 

A PARTICULAR LAUNDRY FOR PARTICULAR PEOPLE 

We Handle All Classes of Laundry Work 
PHONE MARKET 130 



DOUGLAS 6346 

EASTMAN KODAK STORES, Inc. 

Formerly Rowland & Dewey Co. 

EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 

545 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Roaches, Ants, Bedbugs, 
Fleas, Moths, Rats, Etc. 

Scientifically and Permanently 
EXTERMINATED by 

Th^ INSECTICIDE CO. 

Manufacturers and Exterminators 

(Established 1892) 

MAX SALOMON, Manager 



NON-POISONOUS, STAINLESS 

PREPARATIONS 

Sold at Factory Prices 



Office: 657-659 PHELAN BUILDING 

Phone: Douglas 953 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



IL TROYATORE CAFE ROOF GARDEN 


DANCING EVERY EVENING 


PAUL KELLI'S JAZZ ORCHESTRA 


ITALIAN CUISINE 


Telephone 506 BROADWAY 


Sutter 8547 . San Francisco, Cal. 



Page 42 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, J 926 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 
the cashier to open the safe and then taking the 
cashier with them as a preventive of any shooting 
by citizens anxious to bag a James boy. 

Their first train robbery was the Chicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific train, which was stopped near 
Council Blufi's, by track obstructions, the engineer 
was killed and the passenger, mail and express cars 
were rifled. In this job the Younger boys joined 
forces with the James, and were supposed to have 
managed the job. 

A Missouri stage was the next objective point 
of these active boys and the passengers were re- 
lieved of about four thousand dollars and the stage 
driver of one of his horses. 

The next that was heard of them was in tlie 
holdup of the St. Louis and Texas express train, 
which was stopped at Gadshill, in Missouri, and 
the work was done at night, the robbers getting 
about nine thousand dollars. In pursuing the 
bandits, two detectives were killed by the Younger 
brothers, and a Pinkerton man killed by the 
James. This led to a more determined hunt by 
the Pinkerton men, and one night the James boy's 
house, in Clay County, Missouri, was attacked by 
a party who threw into it a hand bomb, which in 
exploding tore off' the arm of the boys' mother 
and killed a younger half brother. Every possible 
effort to capture Jesse failed, although the State 
was alive with detectives. 

A most remarkable feature about this remark- 
able history was the introduction of a bill in the 
Missouri Legislature in 1875, off'ering amnesty to 
the James boys, if they would return quietly to 
their homes and live there. 

The next job that they were supposed to have 
done was the robbing of the San Antonio and 
Austin, (Texas) Stage. 

Fi'om the passengers, men and women, a great 
deal of jewelry and tliousands of dollars were 
taken. There was no resistance at the time and 
no one captured. 



Golden Eagle Soap Company 

767-781 BEACH STREET 

Opposite Golden Gate Ferry 
Manufacturers of 

HIGH GRADE SOAPS 

Hand, Sand, and Salt Water Soaps 

Soap Chips and Soap Powder 

Sal Soda 

AUTOMOBILE SOAP A SPECIALTY 

Suppliers of Washing Soaps and Cleansing 
Materials to Steamship Lines 



Prompt Deliveries 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



We launder Curtains and Blan\ets, too, 
and return them looking almost li\e new. 

La Grande and Whitens 
Laundry Company 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
Phone Market 916 

250 - 12th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: MARKET 



Little Auto Parts Company 

NEW and USED 

WHEELS, RIMS, PARTS and ACCESSORIES 



701 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

Cor. Franklin St. San Francisco, Cal. 




ofQualily 



PLEDGED TO GIVE 

"Most Miles per Dollar" 



Good Work, Courteous Routemen 

SAN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY 
Telephone West 793 



R. 


PRIGIONI 




A. VIVORIO 




BAY 


CITY 


GRILL 






The Land Mark c 


f S. F. 




OYSTERS. STEAKS. CHOPS 

Private Dining Room 
Telephones— Prospect 10049 
15 TURK STREET 


FISH and POULTRY 

for Ladies 
: Franklin 3431 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



WILSON - The Coffee Man 

TWO STORES 

GRANADA MARKET, Market St., bet. 3rd and 4th 

Factory — Mission St., bet. 7th and 8th 

.3.5c - 40c - 45c - 50c 



Fisher's Dancing Pavilion 

Eddy and Jones Streets 

DANCING EVERY EVENING 

Music by 

DR. RITTER'S GOLDEN GATE SINGING BAND 

ADMISSION 10 CENTS 



December. J 926 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 43 



The remarkable amnesty bill not passing, the 
James boys revenged themselves on a farmer 
neighbor who had taken sides against them. 

In the latter part of 1875, a train was boarded 
on the Kansas, Pacific Railroad, near Kansas City, 
and the express car was robbed of thirty thousand 
dollars in gold dust, and twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars in other valuables. None of the passengers 
were molested. This robbery was supposed to be 
done by the James Gang. 

The next job, showing the handiwork of the 
James Gang was the robbery of the Huntington, 
West Virginia, bank, in open air dash style. One 
robber was captured in the pursuit and sent to 
prison. 

Then a great sensation was created in tlie City 
of St. Joseph, Missouri, by the announcement that 
Jesse James, the notorious bandit and train rob- 
ber, had been shot and killed, the news spreading 
with great rapidity, and most people received it 
with doubt, until investigation established the 
fact beyond question. The excitement became 
more and more intense, and crowds of people 
rushed to that quarter where the shooting took 
place, anxious to view the body of the dead outlaw 
and to learn the particulars. In a small frame 
shanty Jesse James had lived with his wife and 
two of his gang, Robert and Charles Ford, made 
their headquarters at the house. They were in 
the act of making preparations for a raiding expe- 
dition on which they were to start. Jesse had 
planned to rob a bank at Burgess City. While the 
Ford boys had been in the house with Jesse, they 
had watched for an opportunity to shoot him, but 
he was always heavily armed, and it was impossi- 
ble to draw a weapon without him seeing them. 

They always declared that they had no idea of 
taking him alive, and they considered the under- 
( Continued on Page 60) 



Telephone Market 4330 

Water and Rail Connections 

Sudden Lumber Co. 

Office Number— 1950 THIRD STREET 
San Francisco, California 



"SUDDEN SERVICE" 



Phone Prospect 2S67 



K. B. COBB, Prop. 



HOTEL SUTHERLAND 

Steam Heat. Hot and CoM Water in Every Room 
Private Exchange Connecting Ail Rooms 
4«>5 ELMS STREET, San Francisco 

Special Rates to Permanent Guests 



We GRANEY 
Billiard Parlor 

Finest in the World 
924 MARKET STREET 



CW.MARWEDEL 

Established 1872 

TOOLS METALS 

SHOP SUPPLIES 



Brass, Copper, Steel, Bronze, 
Aluminum and Monel Metal 



store and Office— 76 FIRST STREET 

Metal Dept.— 31 JESSIE STREET 

San Francicso, Cal. 



WM. H. HAMBLETON 

NOW IN OUR NEW STORE 

50 CALIFORNIA ST. San Francisco, Calif. 

All That Is Good for the Smoker 



KEARNY 5044 

HOTEL MELBA 

2 1 4 JACKSON STREET 



CAESAR ATTELL 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 
6 - 6TH STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



They AdvertlM — L«ff P»troiilx« 






453 GR ANT AVE 

CHDTESE AMEEICAN DISHES— MEECHAUTS' LUNCH, 60e 

Jail Dance Music Every Evening 8 p. m. to 1 a. m. 

KEAL CHOP SUEY 



632 QRANT AVS. 
Un^cr SiBc Manigemcnl 



Page 44 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



CHIEF O'BRIEN 

(Continued from Page 20) 
days have fallen into the hands of the police and 
put in prison. 

The rambling crook has learned that this is a 
"tough town" for all their kind, and we have but 
few of the migTatory sort trying their game here. 
Pickpockets and buncomen are and have been 
scarce. Bank robberies have been few. Payroll 
stickups have been almost unknown, and the 
crook has been kept on the move and out of this 
city. 

The achievements of the chief, so splendid, 
have been made possible by his police of crime 
prevention. He has done much to educate the 
public to assist in their own protection, by taking 
precautionary measure to outwit the thief. He 
has had in all his undertakings the heartiest co- 
operation of the board of police commissioners, 
Theodore Roche, Jesse B. Cook, Dr. Thomas Shu- 
mate and Andrew Mahoney, as well as the rank 
and file of the men under him. 

Every modern weapon of defense possible to 
obtain has been .adopted in this department by 
Chief O'Brien, to combat the thug, the crook, the 
thief. Tear bombs, gas, machine guns, etc., are 
ready at a moment's notice. 

He has brought about a gi'adual change from 
old time metliods to new, and he is working out 
all the time better means to give to the people 
of San Francisco the maximum of police protec- 
tion, and he can look back upon his six years as 
chief of the department with the satisfaction that 
he has done his task well and has the support 
of all honest people and the appreciation of the 
citizenry of San Francisco generally. 

We wish him continued success and happiness. 



American Baking Co. 

INC. 

1252 MISSION ST. Market 2194 



BEST WISHES 

to the whole of San Francisco's 
Police Force 



The Rix Company, Inc. 

400 FOURTH STREET 



Telephone Kearny 2453 



Night Phones — 
Pacific 1333 
Oakland, Piedmont 1149 



EUREKA BOILER WORKS CO. 

Designers and Builders of All Kinds of 

MARINE, STATIONARY and 
LOCOMOTIVE BOILERS 

Special Attention Paid to 

REPAIRS OF SHIPWORK, BOILERS, 

TANKS and SHEET IRON WORK 

Building and Installing of Oil Plants a Specialty 

MACHINE BLACKSMITHING 



MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS: 

166-178 Fremont St. San Francisco, Cal. 




'pHE STUDIO GRAND is a dainty piano 
-*■ with the tone quality and volume of large 
grands. Its length is 4 feet 9 inches; width, 
4 feet 8% inches. Takes scarcely any more 
floor space than an upright. Every feature of 
de.sign, constiuction and finish is typical of 
Wurlitzer quality. Mahogany, walnut or ebony 
finish. To see it, hear it, play it is to want it. 
Price and terms make possession so easy. 

WurljIzer $^2^ 

Studio Grands \J *^ -^ 

$10 Down. Balance over 2\i. years. 

Wui^LlIZER 

IP REG U S PAT.OPF. V 

250 STOCKTON STREET 
2345 MISSION STREET 



December, J 926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 45 



STATE PATROLMEN MEET 

(Continued from Page 11) 

ment and stated that lack of co-operation between 
enforcement officers and those who are called 
upon to impose the penalties of the law was held 
detrimental to the good of the community. 

Geo. E. Sanford, general attorney of the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association, completed 
the day's program with an address on methods of 

law enforcement by traffic officers. 

* * * 

A delegation of 30 uniformed officers on motor- 
cycles met Mr. and Mrs. James Rolph, Jr., Mayor 
of San Francisco, at the Southern Pacific Depot 
who made a special trip to Sacramento to be on 
hand to fulfill his promise. Therefore the chief 
speaker at the afternoon session was the Mayor, 
who was escorted to the platform by six uniform- 
ed officers. 

Tracing the great growth of the motor indus- 
try during the last ten years and the concentra- 
tion of population in cities during the same 
period the Mayor termed traffic regulation as one 
of the major problems of the nation. 

The keynote of the program was struck in an 
address given by Senator J. M. Inman, who pledg- 
ed his support of any measure proposed by the 

traffic officers in the coming legislative session. 

* * * 

Our friend from up country was sm-e there on 
the job. Hon. Judge R. G. Cornell of Chowchilla, 
under whose judicial power Ralph De Palma, fa- 
mous racing driver, and Tom Mix, of the movies, 
were fined for speeding. In addition to the above 
mentioned, Judge Cornell mixed it with Jack 
Dempsey but lost the decision to the ex-heavy- 
weight fighter when a jury returned a verdict of 
not guilty for speeding. 

The judge gave reasons for the strict enforce- 
ment of the speed laws, saying that the majority 
*■£ accidents came from ordinary speeding. 

* * * 

Ivan Kelso, head counsel of the Southern Cali- 
fornia Auto Club, stressed the need for uniform- 
ity in State motor laws and declared that arbi- 
trary enforcement of traffic rules by a fair officer 
was often better than absolute enforcement by 
one of tyrannical nature. 

F. K. MacComber of Tulare introduced a new 
note in suggesting that traffic officers should be 
ready to give information to tourists concerning 



Phone KEARNY 5475 

We Exchange Used Cameras for 'Slew 
Autographic Models 

San Francisco's Camera Exchange 

88 Third Street, at Mission 




INTEREST 

can do HALF 
your saving 

for you 



This free booklet 
tells you how 



You know, of course, how much capital it will 
take to make you comfortably independent. 

But do you know that it is only necessary to put 
away half that much — that if you re-invest each 
dividend earned by your investments, they will 
more than double your capital in 20 years? 

This new booklet explains a definite plan that 
makes saving twice as easy by letting interest do 
half the work. It tells, too, why Great Western 
power 6% Preferred Stock, yielding 6.19% and 
purchasable on convenient Partial Pa>'ments, should 
be your first investment for greater savings. Send 
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GREAT WESTERN POWER COMPANY 

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437 Sutter St., San Francisco 



Telephone Sutter 3400 



Our Volicy is to Serve All 



NO 



LUMBER 



ORDER 



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J. H. McCALLUM 

Bryant St. bet. 5th and 6th Sts. 

COMPLETE SHED STOCK 
Handy Location for Quick Picking 



Phone 

Garfield 

6600 



GIVE US 
YOUR ORDER 



SHIPMENTS MADE OUT OF TOWN 



Page 46 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



points of interest, and play the part of booster. 

Earl Warren, district attorney of Alameda 
County, whose talk favored points brought out in 
previous discussions, concluded the day's session. 

At 8 p. m. reconvened to take action on im- 
portant committee matters. Decision was reach- 
ed to recommend some changes in the present 
motor vehicle law at the session of the Legisla- 
ture in January, which were as follows: 

That State highway patrol officers be selected 
through civil service rather than on recommenda- 
tion of county supervisors; that injm-ed officers 
be compensated through the motor vehicle fund 
rather than the regular State compensation chan- 
nels; that it be unlawful to drive a car in which 
the cut-out can be operated from the driver's 
seat; that driving while drunk or under the in- 
fluence of narcotics be changed from a felony to 
a misdemeanor, eliminating the five day clause 
with punishment of minimum $100 or 10 days, 
or both; maximum $500, or 6 months, or both, 
and to eliminate chaufi:eurs' license entirely, and 
charge $1.00 annually for an operator's license. 

A committee was appointed to request that a 
record of the entire registration in the State be 
kept at all branches of the motor vehicle depart- 
ment, with 24-hour service. 



Purchasers of Live Stock 
Liberal Advances on Consignments 
Beef, Calves, Sheep and Hogs Bought or 
Slaughtered on Commission 



James Allen & Sons 

WHOLESALE 

BUTCHERS 



OFFICE AND ABATTOIR 

THIRD STREET and EVANS AVENUE 

San Francisco 
Telephones: MISSION 6975; MISSION 991 




The Gift of 
Thoughtfulness! 




The skillfully designed, sturdily built, cleaner-wash- 
ing Maytag meets the demand for a useful Christmas 
gift, that will be more and more appreciated as it 
proves its everlasting helpfulness in the home. 

Sparkling cleanliness in every garment! Clothes 
washed so sweetly, so hygenically clean, that you'll 
marvel at their unusual cleanliness. 

—that's what the gift of a Maj-tag brings! 




A MAYTAG is as near to you 

as your telephone. 713 MISSION STREET 

PHONE DOUGLAS 2060 FOR A DEMONSTRATION. NO OBLIGATION. 



December, 1926 



" 2 - " POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 47 



'SAFETY-FRONT" STREET CARS 



By SAMUEL KAHN, Executive Vice-President 

(Market Street Railway Company) 



Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien has asked for 
a short statement in "2-0", the Police Journal, 
explaining why so many white-front street cars 
are appearing on our lines. 

There seems to be a general impression among 
tlie public that the "white-front" is for display 
pui"poses. This, however, is not its purpose. 

It is an experiment in safety. So far as we 
know this city is the first place where the idea 
has been tried and it has already begun to cut 
down accidents to pedestrians, and accidents be- 
tween street cars and automobiles. 

The standard warning for street cars seems 
to have been the headlight. This is necessary 
to show the motorman what is on the track. Our 
thought was to go further and improve on the 
lieadlight by lighting up the car front behind it, 
so that people in the street can get a prespective 
on the street car and know whei'e it is located. 

Two lights, hidden from the eye, illuminate tlie 
white fronts below the motorman's window at 
night. This makes the front of the street car 
visible for some distance. Also, this offers an 
object to the vision of street travelers which 



gives perspective and enables the observer to 
judge accurately the distance to the street car. 

Even though it be daytime, if the weather is 
foggy we find that pedestrians and auto drivers 
see the street cars much more readily since we 
began painting the fronts white. 

We have found that the traveling public likes 
the white fronts. Man),' auto and truck drivers 
have expressed their approval of "safety-fronts" 
to us. By avoiding accidents and assisting driv- 
ers to more accurately judge the position of a 
street car, we believe the "safety-front" tends to 
cut down traflSc delays and congestion. 

"Safety-fronts" are standard with the ]\Iarket 
Street Railway Company now. More than 300 
cars have them, and others are being equipped 
as rapidly as possible. 

The Market Street Car Co. has ever co-operated 
to the furthest extent witii the police department 
and this safety first policy has been a feature 
that has attracted great favorable attention. The 
terse window paragraphs found in all cars have 
given a course in education that has caused cau- 
tion and care on the part of the public. — Editor. 



The Harbor station has been getting a renovation. New 
tan tinting with brown trimmings make the old station 
look like it ain't. A few more needed articles and the 
place will be a regular place and no fooling. 



As Christmas comes this year 

— We can express our greetings to you in no better way 
than promising to keep your gas and electric service as 
nearly perfect as possible. 

So when your Holiday dinners are cooking merrily on 
your gas or electric range, you'll then know our Christmas 
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Page 48 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



NEW LAWS 

(Continued from Page 14) 
for the ordinarily insane from which they are 
very frequently paroled within a few months. The 
Commission expects to recommend that when a 
hospital for the criminally insane is created, all 
persons who are acquitted of felonies on the 
ground of insanity shall be committed to such 
hospital and there detained until it has been judi- 
cially adjudicated that their sanity is restored. 
This will serve both to protect such persons from 
themselves, and to protect society from the depre- 
dations of this class. 

A new statute which will require defendant, 
relying- upon the defense of alibi, to give notice 
at the time of his plea that he will make such a 
defense. The purpose of this is to minimize the 
perjury that so frequently accompanies this de- 
fense and to give the people a fair opportunity 
to meet it; in other words, to make it more cer- 
tain that the trial will arrive at the truth. 

Section 1050. A new section which will re- 
quire the court to set all criminal cases for trial 
for a date not later than thirty days after the 
entry of plea by defendant, providing that no 
continuance shall be granted except upon affirma- 
tive proof that the ends of justice require it; 
that no continuance shall be gi'anted for any 
longer period than it is proved the ends of jus- 



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December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 49 



tice require, and that when a continuance is 
granted, the court shall enter upon its minutes 
the facts proved which require it. 

This is a very important provision. The more 
quickly a case can be brought to trial, the more 
likely it is that the trial will arrive at the truth. 
Delays have always been one of the greatest 
loopholes for the escape of the guilty. The 
promptness with which cases are heard and de- 
termined is one of the greatest factors in the effi- 
ciency of the British and Canadian systems. 
Conduct of the Trial 

A new section requiring the trial court to con- 
trol all proceedings during the trial and to limit 
examination, cross-examination and argument to 
relevant and material matters. One weakness in 
our criminal procedure has been that it is too 
much a game between opposing counsel, with the 
trial court frequently sitting simply as an um- 
pire. The matter of the administration of crimi- 
nal justice and the ascertainment of the truth 
is too important a matter to be a game. 

(b) Amend Section 1070 to provide that the 
people and defendant shall have the same num- 
ber of peremptory challenges. In capital cases, 
ten; in all other cases, five. At the present time 
the defendant is allowed twice as many perempt- 
ory challenges as the people. This gives the de- 
fendant an entirely undue advantage. 
(To be Continued) 



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The Police Journal — "2-0" has made a special arrangement with one of the biggest 
clothes washers, ii'oners, vacuum sweepers, stores on the Pacific Coast to secure for you 
a discount of $10.00 on any make washing machine and $7.00 on any make vacuum 
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mail the coupon below to the publishing office of the Police Journal — "2-0", 8.53 Howard 
St. and you will receive a saving certificate to the amount named above. The following 
are just a few of the many standard makes. 

Regular prices less the discount. Remember, we can get you any make machine 
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Page 50 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



NAVAL COMMANDER PLEASED 



It gives me pleasure to send you herewith, copy 
of letter addressed tb the Mayor by Vice-Admiral 
L. R. de Steiguer, in which he compUments you 
and the members of your department upon the 
co-operation and courtesy given to his Patrol 
Officer and the men under his command during 
their recent stay in San Fi-ancisco. I would sug- 
gest that you transmit the letter in one of your 
Department Bulletins in order that the members 
of the Police Department may know that their 
efforts are appreciated. 

W. F. BENEDICT, 
Assistant Secretary to the Mayor. 
To the Mayor : 

I have received a letter from my Patrol Officer, 
Commander F. Cogswell, U. S. Navy, stating that 
during the stay in San Francisco, from 25 to 28 
October, he received from your Chief of Police 
Daniel J. O'Brien, the utmost co-operation and 
courtesy. Such reports indicating the efficiency 
of your organization must be pleasing to you. 
Thanking you for the courtesy shown us during 
our recent stay in San Francisco, I remain, 
L. R. DE STEIGUER. 
Vice-Admiral, U. S. Navy, 
Commander Battleship Divisions, 
United States Fleet, Battle Fleet. 



The writer wishes to commend the action of one of 
your officers, Motorcycle Officer Edward D. O'Day. Yes- 
terday, I was leaving a home on 25th avenue, after making 
a sales call. As I was getting in my auto with the two 
heavy sample cases which I carry. Officer O'Day drove 
along side and made pertinent inquiry as to my business 
and the contents of the grips. 

He was very courteous but persistent enough to satisfy 
himself that everything was right before letting me leave 
the vicinity. 

I liked the way he did his duty and I believe it right 
that I should express myself to you and tell you that I 
liked his way of handling the situation. 

E. J. PRICE, Assistant Manager, 
Super-Maid Cook-Ware Corporation, 
185 Valencia street. 



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December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page SI 



TONG AVARS ENDED ON THE COAST 



Following' months of bitter warfare among two 
powerful Chinese orsanizations, the P>ing Konp 
and the Hop Sing Tongs, leading Chinese citizens 
have, after working assiduously for some time, 
brought about peace and the hostilities are over. 
This tong war lias been the most fatal since 1913 
when the streets of our own Chinatown were made 
red witli human blood and over a score were kill- 
ed in this city alone. 

The following was issued out of Chief O'Brien's 
office relative to the ending of the war, and in it 
Sergeant Manion and his squad come in for a 
just amount of praise, for by their strict, firm 
and judicious handling of the situation they pre- 
vented any bloodshed in San Francisco's Oriental 
quarters. In fact, there has not been a tong 
shooting or death in Chinatown since Sergeant 
Manion has been in charge of the policing of that 
district. 

The Chief's observations: 

"The tong war between the Bing Kong Tong 
and the Hop Sing Tong came to an end at 2 p. m. 
November 6, 1926. This war started at Santa 
Barbara on July 1, 1926. 

26 men were shot during this outbi'eak. 

18 men were killed, and 8 men were wounded. 

11 members of the Hop Sing were killed, none 
wounded. 

3 Bing Kong men were killed and 3 men were 
wounded. 

4 men were killed who were not connected 
with either the Bing Kong Tong or the Hop 
Sing Tong and .5 such men were wounded. 

"There was no shooting in the Chinatown dis- 
trict of this city during this war." 

Chief O'Brien issued the following orders: 
Detective Sergeant John J. Manion and the 
members of the department assigned to duty 
with him in the Cliinatown section during the 
period mentioned in the report quoted are hereby 
commended by the Chief of Police for the splen- 
did and efficient police service. 



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Page n 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



WARREN 

(Continued from Page 16) 
and I took particular occasion to talk with these 
men, and I tried to get their viewpoint, their 
attitude, tried to find out what they thought of 
the law and what they thought of their chances 
of going to San Quentin, of getting probation, 
and as often as conditions would permit I would 
ask these gentlemen, "What are you going to 
do?" and I was going to say hundreds of times, 
but invariably when I asked this question of these 
young men the answer would come back, "Plead 
guilty and take probation", not ask for proba- 
tion, not beg for probation — they were going to 
plead guilty and take probation; now, why? 
Because they knew in the great majority of cases 
young men not twice convicted of felony are al- 
most certain to obtain probation, and what do 
you think of that effect on the mind of a young 
man predisposed to crime? They go and commit 
it, and I believe you will agree with me. You 
gentlemen perhaps see more of that than I do 
because you see them in the field, and I only see 
them on their good behavior in the office. 

The same applies to our parole system. I be- 
lieve parole systems in county jails are abused 
just as much as the probation system. Out of, 
yes, three men of ten who go to state prison — 
no, three out of seven who go to state's prison — 
I wager that a large majority get out at the 



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December. 1926 







POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 53 



niininnim length of time tlirougli the pai'ole sys- 
tem, and they go out througli tlie state and na- 
tion and commit more crime. Now, the persons 
who advocate the parole system as it functions 
at the present time — the probation system as it 
now functions, will tell you it is a success because 
tliey have less than five per cent of parole viola- 
tions. In other words, they return to tlie state's 
prison less than 5 per cent of all men wlio are 
admitted to parole, and they revoke less proba- 
tion — to less than 5 per cent of the total number 
placed on probation, but I wonder what that indi- 
cates to your mind. I'll tell you wliat it indicates 
to me. The reason they don't revoke more pro- 
bation and parole violators is because they don't 
know what is going on among their probationers. 
I know this: I have called attention to the pro- 
bation officers throughout the state the fact that 
men placed on probation in one county have com- 
mitted felonies in another county, and in my 
county I have asked them if they will kindly 
send for the man by terminating their sentence, 
and I don't know where a probation officer has 
said, "Yes, we will take care of the man." The 
usual comment is that if he has committed a 
crime in your county, go ahead and try him by 
jury and convict him, and if we cannot convict 
him the man goes scot free. We have perhaps 
five or six or seven hundred persons on probation 
every year with 1.50 or more on probation, and 
we have people in that office who investigate 
those 150 cases who are supposed to take care 
of and supervise several hundi'ed old probation- 
ers, and they don't have any idea of what they 
are doing. We had a case two and one-lialf 
years ago where a man was convicted of rob- 
bery, and because of his excellent w'ar record, 
and because of the fact he had only committed 
a dozen or so robberies; before that he was placed 
on probation by the court for a period of twelve 
years, and he was given the most scathing lec- 
ture I ever heard, and the probation officer given 
the most stringent orders concerning his conduct 
in a court I ever heard — this man was placed on 



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Greetings to the San Francisco Police Department 

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Page 54 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



probation — had a couple of pals who didn't plead 
guilty, and two or three weeks after that we had 
occasion to try them, and I wanted to use this 
fellow placed on probation as a witness, and to 
my sui"prise the probation officer of our county 
didn't know where he was. The man hadn't skip- 
ped — the man hadn't ducked out, but the proba- 
tion officer hadn't made sufficient efforts to lo- 
cate him, and I had to send out a couple of de- 
tectives until I found him working in the oil 
fields of Bakersfield. That's a typical case — the 
probation officers don't have any idea where their 
probationers are, and that's the very reason we 
don't have more sent to state's prison for viola- 
tion of their parole. 

(To be Continued) 



Phone Mission 8673 



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OFFICIAL RECOGNITION 

(Continued from Page 17) 
the City of San Francisco upon the employment 
of such efficient officers, through which Board 
the City Clerk is hereby directed to transmit a 
copy hereof to Sergeants Van Matre and Roney 
with best wishes for their speedy convalescence. 
I HEREBY CERTIFY, That the above and 
foregoing is a full, true and correct copy of 
Resolution No. 131, of City of Sacramento, 
adopted by City Council on date of November 18, 
1926. 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set 



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December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page SS 



my hand and caused the Official Seal of the 
City of Sacramento to be hereunto affixed 
this 20th day of November, 1926. 
(Signed) H. G. DENTON, 

City Clerk of the City of 
Sacramento. 

* :j! * 

Though I am not at present the official moutli- 
piece of this branch, still I feel safe in assuming 
that I voice the sentiments of many of our good 
members in congratulating you and your brave 
force and asking you to transmit our sincerest 
prayers for a speedy recovery for Detective Ser- 
geants Earl T. Roney and Vernon V. Van Matre. 
The department's efficient work in clearing this 
city of undesirable characters ought to bring ad- 
miration from people in all walks of life and my 
humble appreciation with those of my fellow mem- 
bers is but a scant recognition of the valuable 
services rendered by you and your efficient force. 
I had occasion to admire the San Francisco 
police force under yom- able leadership while 
serving as Secretary for this branch for the past 
five years. 

I and the members of this branch have re- 
ceived untold expressions of friendsliip and kind- 
nesses at the hands of your department and you 
will, therefore, accept my sincere letter with the 
same warmth of the heart as it is meant to be. 

May the good Lord protect your brave officers 
from harm and here is hopes that the criminals 
responsible for the ills to Detective Sergeants 
Roney and Van Matre may find speedy and well- 
deserved punishment. 

MAX WEBER, Secretary, 
International Geneva Association, 
151 Mason Street. 



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A L . C O H X 



The Chief 
Says--- 



"Everybody knows that down- 
town crowds will be at their 
annual peak during the next 
three weeks," says Police Chief 
Daniel J. O'Brien. "The days are 
the shortest of the year. And 
we may have wet weather. 

"These three factors — crowds, 
short days and wet pave- 
ments — make the year's greatest 
traffic danger season. 

"If pedestrians will take it upon 
themselves to obey traffic 
signals, street accidents will be 
greatly reduced. Crossing streets 
with traffic is crossing streets 
carefully. Walking contrary to 
traffic is to walk into danger." 

The police are working for your 
safety and comfort. They 
have a big job. Your co-opera- 
tion not only helps them, but it 
helps you. Chief O'Brien says 
you can make your own traffic 
laws by simply doing what is best 
for yourself — "Go" and "Stop" 
with traffic signals. 




Samuel Kahn, Executive }' ice-President 



Page 56 "2-0"POLICEJOURNAL 

GRAND JURY COMMENDS POLICE 



December, 1926 



Herewith is a set of resolutions passed by the 
grand jury in regular session and a copy sent 
to our department. These' resolutions have to 
do with the splendid work of the members of the 
police force in handling the short reign of terror 
of the Kelly-Weeks-Papadaches murderous gang, 
and who are now all in jail, Kelly's trial having 
started in Superior Judge Harold Louderback's 
court December 7th, and is still on at this writing. 

The resolutions follow: 
Honorable Board of Police Commissioners, 
Hall of Justice, San Francisco, Calif. 
Gentlemen : 

At a meeting of the Grand Jury held in regu- 
lar session I was instructed to send you the fol- 
lowing resolution passed at that meeting: 

WHEREAS, During the course of the past two 
weeks, San Francisco was suddenly turned from 
a peaceful, progressive metropolis, proud of the 
safety, comfort and opportunity it offered its 
citizens, into a place of chaos, brought on by a 
reign of terror perpetrated by bloodthirsty, 
plundering killers who outraged our community 
with five cold-blooded murders and a score of 
robberies of the boldest description, causing our 
citizens to tread the streets of their own city 
apprehensively and in fear of their lives, while 
the killers were at large; and 

WHEREAS, Our efficient and capable Chief of 
Police, Daniel J. O'Brien and his colleague. Captain 
of Detectives, Duncan Matheson, realizing they 
faced a crisis never before equalled in the annals 
of police history in this city, threw the entire 
resources of the police department into service 
and by stratagem and good generalship, kept the 
killers off of the streets; and 

WHEREAS, Through the subsequent diligent 
and efficient metliods of Detectives George P. 
Wafer and Louis De Matei of tlie Bank Shofo-un 



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December. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 57 



Detail in obtaining a slender clue and working 
out the same, and later by the courageous and 
heroic efforts of these iwo Detectives and Detec- 
tive Sergeants George McLoughlin, Leo Banner, 
Robert L. Rauer, William McMahon, George Wall, 
Allan JMcGinn, Charles Iredale, Lieut. Charles 
Dullea, Lieut. Bernard McDonald and Detective 
Sergeant Otto Frederickson, San Francisco saw 
the capture of the three terror bandits and con- 
fessions obtained from two of them within a 
week after the commission of their crimes; 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, By 
this Grand Jury in meeting assembled, that the 
members of this body want to take this occasion 
of expressing, not only their own feelings, col- 
lectively and individually, but the feeling as well 
of the entire citizenry of San Francisco, for the 
brilliant work done by members of the depart- 
ment heretofore mentioned, and the entire per- 
sonnel of the department, and offer thanks and as 
much well-earned praise as a few words can con- 
vey, for the splendid spirit, the stratagem, the 
intelligence and the courage, displayed by all in 
arising to meet so unusual an emergency, and for 
saving the reputation and restoring the peace, 
safety and comfort, for which San Francisco is 
noted, boasts of and cherishes above all else. 
JOSEPH H. FINIGAN, 
Secretary of the Grand Jury. 



Lieutenant Pengelly, assisted by some of his trusty 
platoonists, fi.xed up a nice ride in the station carryall for 
Joseph Burks and Jay Corliss, who the Lieutenant found 
were fugitives from justice as well as being drug addicts. 
Tlie pair also were booked for vagrancy. 
* * * 

In the old days anything might happen on the water 
front, but nowadays nothing is too tri\'ial to attract police 
attention. This got Gordon Maloney locked up for petty 
larcenv, the arrest being made by Officer James Malonev. 



$ 



25 



that's all 
for an 
overcoat! 



Oregon City overcoats are pure 
virgin wool right from the sheep's 
back. Woven and tailored where 
the wool is grown. A quality prod- 
uct that will wear, and wear and 
wear ! Tr>' one on i 



Oregon City Woolen Mills 

San Francisco Retail Store 

KH2 Maikct Street \eai- Vowell 



"fVe WelcoDic Ymi" 



Clinton Cafeterias 



136 O'FARRELL ST. 

Near Powell 



1059 MARKET ST. 

Near Sixth 

72.5 MARKET ST. 18 POWELL ST. 

Near Third Near Market 

Open 6:30 i. m. to 8:00 p. m. Open 700 a. m. lo 800 p. m 

171 SUTTER ST., at KEARNY 

Orchestral Music 



Clinton Coffee Shop 

open 6 30 a. m. to S 00 p. m. Sundays 10 p. m. 

48 MARKET STREET, opp. S. P. Building 

Clinton Lunch 

171 SUTTER STREET 



CLINTON IDEAI^-SATISFIED CUSTOMERS 
SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 



ESTABLISHED 1890 

T/ie San Francisco Barber Supply House 

Deckelman Bros* 

INCORPORATED 

CUTLERY AND BEAUTY PARLOR 
EQUIPMENT 

48 TURK STREET 



PHONE FRANKLIN 2870 



San Francisco, Calif. 



MERMAN & LEFKOMTZ 

BOTTLES 

1266-1268 HOWARD .>^TKEET 
Phone Market 925 San Francisco, Cal. 



Greetings from 

HENRY ROSENTHAL 



Page 58 "2-0"POLICEJOURNAL 

MARK HOPKINS HOTEL— ITS MANAGER 



December, 1926 



"Hullo, Georgie!" 

"Hullo, Chief!" 

It was the night of the opening of the new 




GEORGE D. SMITH. Managir. Mark Hopkins Hotel 

$5,000,000 Hotel Mark Hopkins on Nob Hill and 
among the hundreds of George D. Smith's per- 
sonal friends who shared in his triumph that 
gala evening, there was none more pleased than 
Chief Daniel O'Brien. 

For George D. Smith has not only had time to 
achieve a name for himself as the youngest and 
one of the most successful hotel builders and 
owners in America today. 

Ever since the day when Mr. Smith first start- 
ed building hotels in San Francisco, during the 
years he operated the Canterbury Hotel on Sut- 
ter street and while erecting the magnificent 
Mark Hopkins, every officer on the force from the 
Chief down who has come in contact with Mr. 
Smith has become his friend. 

So it was a hearty handshake, that one be- 
tween the Chief of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment and the head of San Francisco's finest 
hotel on the hotel's natal night. 

The event was the most brilliant hotel open- 
ing ever held in San Francisco and the more than 
1300 guests who filled every available room paid 
homage to Mr. Smith for his great achievement 
in creating the most beautiful hotel in the world. 

The success of the Hotel Mark Hopkins, like 



MT. DIABLO 
CEMENT 

Awarded Gold Medal, P. P. I. E. 

COWELL SANTA 
CRUZ LIME 

Always Used Where Quality Counts 

HENRY COWELL LIME 
AND CEMENT CO. 

2 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Branches at : 

SACRAMENTO OAKLAND 

SAN JOSE SANTA CRUZ 

PORTLAND. ORE. 



G. W. THOMAS 



E. W. KOLL 



G.W.THOMAS DRAYAGE 
AND RIGGING CO. 

GENERAL DRAYING 
SAFE AND MACHINERY MOVING 

Special Attention Given to Rigging Hoisting and Placing 
Heavy Machinery. Safes. Vaults, Smokestacks. Boilers 

Telephones 

Kearny 3299— Kearny 789— Kearny 3298 
160 FIRST STREET San Francisco 



New REX GARAGE 

Phone DOUGLAS 2900 
149 FOURTH ST. San Fiancisco, Calif. 



Mr. Smith's, has been phenomenal. Already so- 
ciety has recognized it as "the place to go", and 
the nightly dinner dances are drawing capacity 
crowds. 

There are 500 guest rooms at the Mark Hop- 
kins, practically all of which are now occupied. 



December. 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 59 



COACHING CLASS EXAMINATION FOR 
CORPORALS 



The eligible list of Corporals expires on Decem- 
ber 20, 1926, and Messrs. William P. Golden, Asst. 
Dist. Attorney, and Joseph L. Sweeney, Asst. U. S. 
Attorney, announce that they will conduct a coach- 
ing class in preparation for the next examination 
as soon as the date thereof has been set by the 
Civil Service Commission. As such an examina- 
tion is usually set many weeks before the date 
of the holding thereof, they plan to begin their 
class sessions about five weeks before the date of 
the examination so as to cover a period of four 
weeks and thus accommodate the men who are 
affected by the changes in watch. 

All the written subjects, except Miltary Tactics, 
will be covered in the class and a test similar to 
that given by the Civil Service Commission will 
be given each night. 

In order to facilitate the preparation for the 
class patrolmen who desire to participate therein 
are requested to enroll at once and may do so by 
communicating with Mr. Golden in the forenoon 
at the Warrant and Bond Office, Phones Daven- 
port 213 and 170, or in the afternoon at 1005 De 
Young building, Phone Hemlock 6991, or with 
Mr. Sweeney, Phone Hemlock 2800. 



AUTO DETAIL THANKED FOR WORK 

Would you kindly tharik for me Detective Sergts. Peter 
Hughes and Phillip Lindecker for the able manner in 
which they recovered my automobile which was stolen on 
Friday evening and returned to me Saturday. It is a 
gi-eat pleasure to know that such efficient officers are at 
the sei-vice of the citizens of this city and we may well 
feel proud. Again with tlianks, I remain, 

W. R. OTTO, Business Agent Local #278, 
Retail Delivery Drivers, Labor Temple. 



Phone Market 432 



MAGAZINES 



JOS. LERER & SONS 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 

Special Exporters Newspaper 

398 - 11th STREET, San Francisco 
Residence — 739 - 14th Avenue Phone Pacific 4742 



Qjcddentaf 

'STOVTOP^ G4SIIANGES 

■ iiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiini 




iini iiiiiiiitiiiiuiiiii. iiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiini 



Place an Occidiental Qas Range in your kitchen 

Built on the Coast of the finest 
materials by skilled artisans, by a 
factory with 55 years of experience. 

Steiger & Kerr Stove & Foundry Co. 

18th and Folsom Streets 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Neptune Meter Co* 

Manufacturers of 

TRIDENT WATER METERS 



320 Market Street San Francisco, California 

PHONE SUTTER 2260 

701 East Third Street Los Angeles, California 

PHONE TRINITY 2S79 



5KF- 

Industries of California, Inc. 

BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
115 New Montgomery St. 



Complete stocks at: 

LOS ANGELES 
1114 South Hope St. 



PORTLAND 
480 Burnside St. 



Page 60 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Decemher, 1926 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 43) 

taking suicidaL After they had all had breakfast 
on the morning of the shooting, Charles Ford and 
Jesse James had been in the stable currying their 
horses, preparatory for their night's ride. 

On returning to the room where Bob Ford was, 
Jesse said : "It's an awful hot day." He pulled off 
his coat and vest and tossed them on the bed. 
Then he said, "I guess I will take off my pistols 
for fear that somebody will see them while I walk 
in the yard." He unbuckled the belt in which he 
carried two 45 caliber revolvers. He laid them on 
the bed with his coat and vest. He then picked up 
a dusting brush with the intention of dusting 
some pictures which hung on the wall. To do this 
he got on a chair. His back was now turned to 
the Ford brothers, who silently stepped behind 
Jesse and at a motion from Charley both drew 
their guns. Bob was the quickest of the two, and 
in a moment had the muzzle no more than four 
feet from the back of the out^aw's head. Even in 
that motion, quick as thought, there was some- 
thing that did not escape the acute ears of the 
hunted man. He made a motion as if to turn his 
head to ascertain the cause of that suspicious 
sound, but it was too late. A nei-vous pressure on 
the trigger, a quick flash, a shai-p report, the well 
directed ball crashed through the outlaw's skull. 
There was no outcry, but just a swaying of the 
body, and it fell heavily upon the carpet. The shot 
had been fatal, the ball entered the base of the 
skull and made its way out through the forehead, 
over the left eye. It had been fired out of a Colts 
45 Caliber, improved pattern, silver mounted and 
pearl handled revolver, presented by the dead man 



'Tours for Amusement' 



EXHIBITING THE CREAM OF 
THE WORLD'S PHOTOPLAYS 



The Alhambra 

POLK AT GREEN 
Graystone 321 



The Royal 

POLK at California 
Graystone 98 



DOWNTOWN GARAGE 

A. BENEDETTI, Prop. 

."ith and Folsoiti Sts. San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 29 



PROTECTION 

Physical fitness means so much to the efficiency 
of a Police Officer. Good Teeth have a great 
deal to do with physical fitness- 

The great National Institution using the E. 
R. Parker System of Dentistry affords you the 
highe.st type of dental service at Moderate 
Prices. 

Painless Dentistry 

In Crown and Bridge Work — Fillings, Pyorrhea 
Treatments — Extraction of Teeth. 

Plates That Fit 



FREE EXAMINATIONS 

You are cordially invited to any oflSce using 
the E. R. Parker System for a complete exam- 
ination of your teeth by experienced and com- 
petent dentists. There is no charge for this 
service. 

Painless Pai-ker Dentist 

using the 

E. R. PARKER SYSTEM 

San Francisco Offices: 

12 ELLIS ST. 1.-, STOCKTON ST. 

1802 GEARY at Fillmore .St. 

1012 MARKET ST., cor. Golden Gate Ave. 



DOUGLAS 7896 



No Elevators 



Stevenson Garage 

CAPACITY 400 CARS 

A. V. HASSETT. Mgr. 

Parking 2,'>c and 3.5c. Night Storage 50c 

Storage Rates $8 Up. 

S|>cri:il Rates on Application. Cars Called for and Delivered. 
Washing and Grease Racks. Quick Service. 

71 STEVENSON STREET 

Between Ist and 2nd, and Market and Mission 




/ MEMORIALS IN 
.STONE 



CARROLL 
BROS. 

Works : 

AT CEMETERIES 

Phone Randolph 3316 

Residence ; 

1850 Golden Gate Ave. 

Phone Fillmore 2531 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 61 



to his slayer a few days before. Mrs. James was 
in tiie kitciien when the shooting was done; she 
heard the shot, ran into tlie room wiiere she saw 
her husband lying- on his back and his slayers, 
each holding his revolver in his hand, making for 
the fence in the rear of the house. She cried out, 
"Robert, you have done this." They then returned 
to where she stood. Mrs. James ran to the side of 
her husband and lifted up his head. Life was not 
extinct, and when asked if he was hurt it seemed 
that he wished to say something, but could not. 
She tried to wash away the blood that was cours- 
ing over his face, but it came faster than she 
could wash it awaj', and in her hands Jesse James 
a moment later died. Charley Ford explained to 
Mrs. James that "a pistol had accidently gone off." 
"Yes," said Mrs. James, "I guess it went off on 
purpose." 

In the meantime Charley and Bob Ford left the 
house and telegraphed a message to the sheriff, to 
the Governor and other officers, and then sur- 
rendered themselves to the Marshal. A reward 
for fifty thousand dollars from the State Govern- 
ment for the capture of Jesse James, dead or 
alive, had been posted and the Ford boys set up 
claim for this reward. Nevertheless the Ford 
boys were tried and convicted of the murder, and 
the Governor immediately pardoned them. 



CHANGES IN DEPARTMENT 



The following changes have been made of stars 
in this department: 

Officer Edward J. Hagan, Co. E., star changed 
from 1070 to 1194 ; Officer Walter Thompson, Co. 
L, star changed from 429 to 1195; Officer Edward 
Healy, Co. J, star same as he had, 1. e., 429. 



PHONE MISSION 8007 



Alpert Packing Co. 

Wholesale 'butchers 
Office and Abattoir 

Third Street and Evans Ave. 
san francisco, calif. 



J, W, CULLEN 

CIGARS 

228 TOWNSEXD STREET 




^ genu me duello 
l/i^ zvorUHfJinest ^ - 
^asoliH^£rM{?far Oils/ 



Traveling CRANES For All Purposes 

Electric or Hand Operated 

Ice and Refrigerating Machinery 

with Automatic or Manual Control 

Cyclops Iron Works 

Represented by J. W. HORSMAN 



General Offices and Factory 

837-847 FOLSOM STREET 
i=^an Francisco, Cal. Phone Sutter 3030 



D. J. O'Hara 
Manager 



Phones: Market 154 
Pacific 161 



McAvoy, O'Hara & Co. 

Funeral Directors 

% 

2051 Market Street 4450 Geary Street 

San Francisco 



Page 62 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



THE RISE OF HALSEY MANWARING 

(Manager of Palace Hotel) 



The first time Halsey 
E'. Manwaring ever saw 
the Palace Hotel (the 
stately old building that 
preceded the present 
structure) he was stand- 
ing- at Mission and New 
Montgomery Sts., won- 
dering where he was go- 
ing to get a job. That 
was in 1898. 

"It looked like a fairy 
palace to me", Manwar- 
ing says reminiscently. 
"All I saw of it was the 
bright lights, the plate 
glass and the rich car- 
pets as I walked by the 
door." 

Today Manwaring is general manager of the 
Palace Hotel. His offices are less than 100 feet 
from the spot where he stood in 1898 and looked 
out on a world that seemed to him to be entirely 
devoid of promise. 

With the arrival of the first troops bound for 
the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, he 
enlisted and served as a hospital steward. 

After the war he became manager of the Grand 
Hotel at Yokohama, Japan, a famous hostelry, 
owned by English stockholders. 

In 1919 D. M. Linnard, prominent Califoi-nia 
hotel magnate, engaged him to manage the Pal- 
ace — and there he has been since. 




HALSEY MANWARING 



Office Telephone Sutter 1044 



Slaughterhouse Phones 
Mission 6926 — Mission 7651 



H. MOFFAT CO. 

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS 



Beef, Cattle and Calves Bought or Slaughtered 
On Commission 



Office: Crocker First National Bank Building 

1 Montgomery Street 

Abattoir: Arthur Ave. and Third St., San Francisco 



RUBBER STAMPS ■ SIGNS 

MOISE-KLINKNER CO. 

369 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Davenport 1750 



FEDERATED 

METALS 

CORPORATION 

Great Western Smelting & Refining Branch 

75-99 FOLSOM STREET 
San Francisco 

Phone Davenport 2540 



METALS 



BABITT, SOLDER, TYPE METAL, 

INGOT COPPER, INGOT BRASS, LEAD, 

and All White Metal Alloys 



Telephone Kearny 804 



Established 1895 



Fred L. Hilmer Co* 

Commission Merchants 

wholesale dealers in 
Dairy Produce and Provisions 

CRANBERRIES 

BUTTER, EGGS, CHEESE AND POULTRY 
S. W. Cor. Davis and Sacramento Sts., San Francisco 



Electric Signs and Theatre 
Lighting 



Established 1912 



Electrical Products Corp. 

255 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Phone Hemlock 7220 



December. 1926 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 

DAYS OFF RESUMED 



Pnge 63 



The following is a copy of a resolution passed 
by the Board of Police Commissioners: 

"At a meeting of the Board of Police Com- 
missioners held on November 8, 1926, days 
off for the members of the police department 
were ordered resumed under sucli conditions 
and in the manner prescribed by you." 
To which Chief of Police O'Brien added: 
"Pursuant to the discussion held and agree- 
ment reached by commanding officers of this de- 
partment at a meeting held in the office of the 
Chief of Police on Monday, November 8, 1926, 
and agreeable to the Board of Police Commission- 
ers, company commanders may immediately per- 
mit days off for members of this department on 
all days, but will do so with the thought in mind 
that it will not interfere with the efficient per- 
formance of police duty within their respective 
distx'icts. 

"In the event that a situation should arise 
necessitating the stopping of days off immediately 
such action shall be taken by the commanding 
officer and . immediate notification given to this 
office by telephone, followed by a written report." 



JUVENILE COURT CASES CHANGES 



The following communication has been received 
from E. M. Leonard, Assistant District Attorney, 
Juvenile Court Department, 150 Otis street: 

"Beginning on December 3rd the court sessions 
in Conti'ibuting Cases will begin at 2 o'clock p. m. 
instead of at 2:30 p. m. as has been the custom. 
We will appreciate your letting the police stations 
know of the change of time and also the Detective 
Bureau and the protective officers. Will you 
kindly notify the city prison of the change of 
time in bringing out any prisoners that may be 
in custody. 

"Thanking you for your attention to these mat- 
ter's, I am, Very truly yours, 
E. M. LEONARD." 



If You Are Sick or Injured 

WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN TO 
YOU AND YOUR FAMILY 

You can guarantee your income to continue 

if you are .sick or injured under the "New 

Pioneer Income Plan" for only 

a few cents a day. 

Covers nearly all of the occupations 
to employed men and women. 

Sir)00 FOR LOSS OF LIFE 

fl»»y r f\rk Per month for all time lost — Acci- 
«PlD«UU dents or sickneAS of one day or more. 



Or if you are con- Ol cn AA per 



fined in hospital 



month 



Tou owe it to yourself and your family to protect 
yourself. Fill in the coupon and you will receive 
full particulars on the '"Hew Pioneer Income Plan." 



PIONEER CASUALTY CO.. Mail This Coupon Xow 

Head Office. 

503 Market Street. 
San Francisco. 
Gentlemen : 

Without obligating myself please mail me more infor- 
mation on your "New Pioneer Income Plan." 

Name 

Address . . — — ■ 

Occupation -■- — . 

(Use pencil) 



TOWNSEND'S 

CALIFORNIA 

Glace Fruits 

AND 

Candies 

59 GRANT AVE. and 221 POWELL ST. 



LEONARD & HOLT 



OWNERS — 



1923 OCEAN AVENUE 
Randolph 4157 



REALTORS 

DEVELOPERS — BUILDERS 

220 KEARNY STREET 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 150 

26th AND TARAVAL 
Delaware 2192 



— BROKERS 



1845 IRVING STREET 
Sunset 7944 



Page 64 "2-0"POLICEJOURNAL 

TIM CRONIN OF THE "B OF I" 



December, 1926 



By Jack Lawlor, Police Reporter, Daily ?iews 




JACK LAWLOR 



It's the County Kerry, one of the finest in the 
Emerald Isle, next to the Queens County and the 
County Kildare. 

No one in the County Kerry places "stirabout" 

on their back stoop at 
night for the little men 
in red and green to eat 
before morning and if 
they meet a banshee 
wailing near anyone's 
house they chase her 
clean off the premises. 
Besides the Kerry- 
ites have a keenness of 
vision that's uncanny. 
It's said of them that 
they can see even the 
wind. 

That's the kind of people Tim Cronin comes 
from. So when Chief Dan O'Brien looked around 
for a good man for news editor of the police de- 
partment it was natural for him to select Officer 
Timothy Cronin with this backgraund behind 
him of romance and legend given to but few here 
below. 

Tim holds the unique distinction of being the 
only police exchange editor in the world so far 
as is known. 

It is liis duty to read every item of police news 
published in all the San Francisco newspapers and 
everytliing else published affecting the depart- 
ment directly or indirectly. His 25 years as a 
police officer and his natural ability give him 
especial fitness for the job. 

When reporters and city editors can't find 
police news they want to check on in their paper 
files they send down to Tim to look it up and he 
never fails. 

With his gi-een eye shade and shears and his 
always present "dudeen" Tim keeps pace with the 



Telephone Davenport 291 



WM. LYONS 

BAIL BONDS 



657 MERCHANT STREET 

Between Montgomery and Keamy 



R. M. J. 

Armstrong 

Attorney for 
SHERIFF 

Thomas F. Finn 



Harry I. Stafford 

ATTORNEY 



Banks Wrecking Co. 

1610 HARRISON STREET 



Phone Market 5760 CHAS. J. TRONOFF 


Pacific Granite & Marble Works 


MONUMENTS 


Mausoleums and Statuary 


1281 FOLSOM STREET 

NEAR NINTH SAN FRANCISCO 



December, 1926 



2-0" POLICE lOURNAI, 



Page 6 J 



police news of the world. 

And a well-informed man is Officer Timothy 
Cronin. 

Few questions can be asked of him that he 
fails to answer on any subject. 



OFFICER RONEY 



"The San Francisco Police Department added a 
creditable episode to its record when two of its 
officers ended the career of Joe Tanko, escaped 
convict, murderer and bandit. 

"Officer Earl Roney was the central figure in 
tliis affair. He displayed a personal heroism 
equaled only when a man scorns death and is pre- 
pared to yield his life to service. Tanko shot 
Roney first, a dangerous bullet blow in the in- 
testines. With a body immediately paralyzed, 
Roney's mind and fingers worked and Tanko is 
dead. A murderous career has been brought to 
an end. jMay Officer Roney speedily recover from 
his wounds! The world is a better place to live 
in because of the likes of him." 

— Sacramento Union. 

* ♦ * 

"Congratulations to you and your brave officers. 
Detective Sergeants Earl Roney and Vernon V. 
Van Matre, also to Detective Sergeants J. Palmer 
and E. McSheehy, for their wonderful work for 
protecting the people of San Francisco; and my 
deepest sympathy for the brave officers who were 
shot while in line of duty. Earl Roney and Vernon 
Van Matre. Hope for their quick recovery and 
wish to be remembered to them." 

WILLIAIM BERGSTROM, 
Deputy Sheriff, Island Mt., 
Trinity County, California. 



Phone Hemlock 1062 

HAUSER WINDOW COMPANY 

THE SIMPLIFIED HAUSER REVERSIBLE WaNDOW 

Easily Installed. 
Perfect Workinjr Operation and Durability Guaranteed. 

Office and Factory. 1362-66-70 Harrison St.. San Francisco. Calif. 



^Wilsons 

Thj^andy with a Collage Education 

PALO ALTO 
«AN FRANCISCO (333 GEARY-708 CLEMENT) 
FRESNO--SAN JOSE-STOCKTON -^ 

SACRAMENTO-SAN DIEGO \] 



CANDY — FOUNTAIN — RESTAURANT 

GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



Enterprise 
Foundry Company 

Marine and Stationary 

Gas Engines : : Iron 

Brass &. Steel Castings 

Sash Weights 



V 



2902-2998 NINETEENTH ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Mission 863 



3-STAR 

BRAND 

|HAtfiv>| M^'t Syrup 

Richest ' Purest 
Best 



E. CLEMENS HORST CO. 

SAN FRAN'CISCG 

Largest Hop Crouers in the World 





FIRE PROOF STORAGE ^^ 

FR.\NKLIN 531 370 TURK ST. 



Moving, Packing, Storage, Shipping 
(direful H audi i tig All the Way 



Page 66 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



A STERN DUTY TO THE HEAD OF EVERY 
FAMILY 



Do you love your wife, your children? This is 
a question that every man is faced with. 

What is known as the Pioneer Casualty Com- 
pany, has home offices at 503 Market street, San 
Francisco, California, headed by its president, J. 
L. Maritzen, and it has been the object and ambi- 
tion of Mr. Maritzen to make it possible for every 
home to be properly cared for. As a matter of 
fact, the campaign that Mr. Maritzen conducts is 
one for humanity. 

The Pioneer Casualty Company have antici- 
pated that perhaps you might need the aid of 
a doctor, you may need financial aid, you may lose 
a leg, an arm, you may meet with an accident in 
traveling, you may be sick or certain contingen- 
cies may happen that your widow and children 
need money. 

This has all been provided for in a most un- 
usual way by this organization. 

To those who are not protected it would be 
our suggestion to call at the offices of the Pioneer 
Casualty Company and there consult with them 
concerning protection for those you love. 

Tliis is their work and will be freely given with- 
out any obligation on your part. 



DOWNTOWNERS ADD PRAISE FOR RONEY 
AND VAN MATRE 



Tlie Board of Directors of the Downtown As- 
sociation have asked me to express to you and 
through you to the entire police department their 
high appreciation of the splendid work of the 
department. I refer particularly at this time to 
the prompt arrest of the boy bandits and to 
courageous action of the members of the police 
force that resulted in the death of the notorious 
Tanko. 

On behalf of the Downtown Association I have 
taken much pleasure in sending flowers to De- 
tective Sergeants Earl Roney and Vernon Van 
Matre with the message that San Francisco's 
business interests admired their splendid courage. 

ANDREW G. McCarthy, 

Chairman, Police Committee of the 
Downtown Association. 



OFFICER DELAHANTY PRAISED 



At the last regular meeting I was insti-ucted to com- 
municate with you in regards to the parade held by us 
on November 1, 1926. 

We want to thank you for sending us so fine an officer 
as I. S. Delahanty in helping us conduct our parade. 
Thanking you for past favors received, I beg to remain, 
BERNAL BOOSTERS, INC., 
J. H. PIERSON, Secretarj-. 



California Stevedore 
and Ballast Company 



ROBERT DOLLAR BUILDING 
311 Calif omia Street San Francisco 



Phone Prospect 3780 



Hotel Mentone 

387 ELLIS ST., AT JONES 
San Francisco, California 



HAMILTON & BARBER. Props. 



From Third and Townsend Depot Take No. 20 Car 
From Ferry take Geary or No. 4 to Jones 



COMFORT — COURTESY 



SERVICE 



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 1255 



L. J. BORCK 

Fine Tailoring 
175 O'FARRELL STREET 



Between Powell and Stockton 



San Francisco. California 



The GOLDEN STATE THEATRE 


AND REALTY 


CORPORATION 


Extends 


to the boys in the Department 


the best 


wishes 


and gratitude for the 


efficient 


service 


rendered in behalf of 


the pubh 


c and our Theatre. 




E. 


H. EMMICK 




R. 


A. McNEIL 




C. 


R. MOSER 
By Theo. M. Newman 



J. J. REGAN, Prop. 

JACK REGAN 

Builder of 

MOTOR TRUCK BODIES 

General Blacksmithing Light Forging Tool Sharpening 

459 to 465 Eleventh St. Telephone Market 1525 

Between Harrison and Bryant San Francisco, Calif. 



December , 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 67 



SOCIETY MAKES HUMAN SACRIFICES TO 
TANKOS 



Helpless desperation of the law, reports of vari- 
ous crime commissions, the maudlin viciousness 
of pacifism in the war on criminals — all these are 
graphically dramatized in the Tanko affair. Con- 
sider the facts: 

On September 19, 1923, Tanko and Floyd Hall 
murdered the Chief of Police at San Bruno. The 
pair were quickly captured. There was no ques- 
tion as to their guilt. They boastingly confessed 
the murder and more than forty robberies. 

Through a quirk in the law, a concession to 
mawkish sentimentality, the murderers' confes- 
sion saved their worthless necks. The pair were 
sentenced to San Quentin for what the law fool- 
ishly called a life term. Tanko and Hall had 
other ideas on the subject. They made a desper- 
ate attempt to escape while on their way to 
prison. In less than eighteen months after their 
arrival they did succeed in breaking jail, and 
began another long series of crimes which in- 
cluded at least one murder. 

To this record of slaughter now is added the 
shooting of two San F'l'ancisco policemen, witli 
the possible death of one of them. 

Students of criminology who approach the sub- 
ject from the point of view of the protection of 
the public are virtually unanimous in their con- 
clusion that the extermination of tlie Tankos in 
the first instance would have done more than 
save their later victims. Swift, inexorable 
punishment — capital punishment for capital 
crime — would deter those youths wlio now see 
in the activities of the Tankos heroic exploits to 
be emulated, and who are urged to crime by the 
amply justified hope that they can get away 
with it. 

The vitiating influence of these false heroics 

on a certain light-minded portion of the public 

was illustrated in the scandalous outbreaks of 

sympathy for Hall, a confessed murderer, during 

(Continued on Page 70) 



J. M. Litchfield, Manager 



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Night Phone Mission 3680 



DANIEL R. BUCKLEY & SON 

Merchants of 
Mining. Electrical and General Machinery 

449 TENTH STREET San Francisco 



Phone Mission TOOii 



ROTH BLUM PACKING CO. 

Packers and Exporters 

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Bertillion 

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940 MARKET STREET 

Phone Kearny 895 San Francisco, Cal. 

"California's Greatest Hat Stores" 



Page 68 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



"THE COP" 

By George Sidney 



Look out, here comes a "Cop", 

A name that rings with awe, 

A feeling- of dread creeps in your heart 

Look out, here comes the "Law." 

At the sight of his unifoi-m 
Your soul is filled with fear. 
Why should you be afraid of him 
If your conscience it is clear. 

He's just as you and I 

You never thought of that; 

Well he is, and possibly a little more — 

Now get this through your hat. 

Did you ever stop to think 
What a "copper" has to do. 
When he takes that solemn oath 
He does it all for you? 

For he pledges all he has — 
His heart, his soul, his life. 
Yes, sir, even more than that 
His children, home and wife. 

He stalks the street the whole night through 

While you soundly snore. 

Keeps disaster, thieves and trouble 

From your home and business door. . 

In daylight it's the traffic 
And the "birds" that run you down. 
Do you think they earn their pennies 
In tliis or any town? 

In the night when thieves are cornered 

Escaping with their loot. 

The "copper" — does he waver? 

No, he'll dare a crook to shoot. 

His life is yours, he's pledged it. 
Like tlie solider in the war, 
He'll fight, protect you till he drops 
Can anyone do more? 

He has loved ones waiting 

The same as you and I 

But you come first and they come next 

His oath he's standing by. 

Did you ever think of all the tilings 
Did you ever even stop. 
And think kindly of the man 
You fear, and call a "Cop"? 

If you don't think he's human 

Just talk to him a while. 

He'll greet you with "How are you, sir"? 

And always with a smile. 

He'll laugh and tell a joke with you 
Even though he's duty bound, 



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Manufacturers of 

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Deceynbcr, 1926 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 69 



And grateful for any little thought 
When the Yule-tide comes around. 

Of course in all the cities 
And in every foreign clime, 
The discipline is different. 
For these enemies of crime. 

But up in San Francisco there's a gang, 
A dandy little force; 
Efficiency's their middle name 
And you know who's the boss. 

This is no boost for San Francisco. 
Just shows what can be done. 
If you're honest and you're human 
And have love for everyone. 

Now there's the Cohens — the Kellys, 
The Chinks — the Greeks — the Wops, 
They all are treated with respect 
By Dan O'Brien's "Cops." 

Religion doesn't enter 
Where humanity is at stake. 
Their motto is "To always give 
A man an even break." 

And after all I'll tell you 
It's a saying old and true. 
Just spread a little sunshine 
And love comes back to you. 

So before your days are counted 
And you hear the curtain drop, 
Just remember he is human 
The guy they call a "Cop." 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 



At a meeting of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners held on November 1st, Edward L. Quast, 
rank 187 (11), certification No. 2535, was ap- 
pointed a regular policeman in the police depart- 
ment of the city and county of San Francisco; 
said appointment to take effect immediately and 
to be subject to the probationary period of six 
months as is provided for in the Charter. This 
officer has been given star number 1004 tem- 
porarily. Officer Quast shall undergo the usual 
course of instructions in the Department School 
of Instructions under Sergeant Patrick H. Mc- 
Gee, instructor in the department school. He 
shall report to Captain J. Henry Lackmann, com- 
manding the Headquarters Company, in which 
company he is hereby temporarily assigned while 
undergoing the course of instructions in the de- 
partment school. 



Officer Joe O'Shaughnessy of Judge Jacks bailifFatorial 
staff and his associate, Herman Arentz, often disagree as 
to who has the best football team, U S C or Stanford. 



Mark M. Meherin & Son 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Established 1883 



Insurance Exchange Building 
433 California St. San Francisco, Calif. 

Davenport 3960 



CONSTRUCTION 
EQUIPMENT 

ERIE GAS AND AIR SHOVELS 

PLYMOUTH LOCOMOTIVES 

CONCRETE MIXERS 

HOISTING MACHINERY 

INSLEY EQUIPMENT 



Garfield & Co. 

Hearst Bldg., S. F. Phone Sutter 1036 



Phone Mission 1 

GEORGE L. SUHR 

SUHR & WIEBOLDT 

Funeral Directors and Embalmers 

1465 to 1473 VALENCIA ST. 

Between 25th and 26th Sts., San Francisco, Calif. 



SLJF»ERBA 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

F. MOLINARI and JEKNY SCARRONE, Props. 

1354 HARRISON ST., Bet. 9th and 10th 

Phone Market 8059 San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone Douglas 1533 



San Francisco, Calif. 



PACIFIC BAG COMPANY 

Manufacturers and Importers 

BAGS— BURLAP— COTTON— TWINES 
869-875 FOLSOM ST. 

Branch— Los Angeles. Calif. JOSEPH SCHWARTZ 



Page 70 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



December, 1926 



HUMAN SACRIFICES TO TANKOS 

(Continued from Page 67) 
his trial for a killing committed after his escape 
from prison. He was cohvicted, but the verdict 
has been overturned, and he is now awaiting a 
second trial, with the statistical chances of 100 
to 1 in favor of his escaping the noose. 

In the meantime, Policeman Eai-1 Roney lies 
at the point of death for no reason other than 
that he had the courage to face a killer coddled 
by the law. The answer is obvious. It seems 
idle to point it out, but there it is. Had Tanko 
and Hall been swung off for their first known 
murder they would have committed no more 
crimes. There certainly can be no argument on that 
point even from the most perverted sobsister. 

The human sacrifices which society is making 
to the Tankos are in most cases absolutely un- 
necessai'y. — S. F. Chronicle. 



BIG GAME DETAIL 

Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien detailed the follow- 
ing members of the police department to assist the Berke- 
ley police during the big football game between the 
University of California and Stanford, November 20: 

Lieutenants Frank McConnell, Thomas Hoertkorn, De- 
tective Sergeants Charles Gallivan and Morris Harris, 
Officers Carlysle Field, Fred Fitzsimmons, John V. Cobb 
and George A. Young. 

The first four officers are specialists in pickpocket de- 
tection and there were none of the boys bold enough to 
"make" Berkeley the day of the game. 



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OFFICERS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR. 

GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

A. D, PLUGHOFF 

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JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 

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DIRECTORS 

WM.L.HUGHSON. CHAIRMAN 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G. BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO. DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A. FINCH 
O. R. FULLER 
P. H. GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H. LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 

JOHN F. Mcknight 

ROBT. W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A. D. PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI. Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L. V. STARR 



January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 



LUCKEIMBACH 

Largest and Fastest Freighters in the INTERCOASTAL TRADE 
UUCKEINBACH STEAMSHIP CO., Inc. 



COLLONAN Electrical & Manufacturing Co. 

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Telephone Mission 7282 



CONTENTS 






TakinK of Statenft-nts, by Robert Fitzperald _- 

Cruelties on the Hi^'h Sens, by Officer Peter Fanning , 
I Remember When, by An Old Time Police Reporter >_ 

Chiefs Page 

Industrial Orders 



Page 

__ 5 

7 

8 

9 

9 

— 9 

10 

10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

James Cottle's Police Star No. 15. by Patrol Driver Wm. D. Bums 21 

Captain Goff Lectures - — 22 

A Thought for Every Day 23 

Coverincr Beats by Stations. 

They Have Passed On 
Widows and Orphans Aid Officers. 
A. J. Kane Praises Police 
Retiring Federal Officer Pleased 




Coroner Commends Officers .... 

New Assignments 

Commendatory Letters -.- 

Richards and Kalmbach. Federal Aids, by Jimmie Hicks 

Law Enforcement, by District Attorney Earl Warren 

Knockovers of the Detective Bureau 

Proposed New Laws for Le.gislature 

"Vale Amigos". by Detective Sergeant James Cottle 

Police Ball and Concert 

Tough Going. But Officers Win. by Corporal Tom McEnerney 

Editorial Page 




Advertising That Didn't Pay 
Another Hall of Justice Bomb Scare 






peyi€E| 

^:"i>' i^' I,-' ;/' r E'' V 



N 



□0 dO 00 oauf n 
93 ^^?2d01^ 




Captain Healy Commends Special Officer 

New Bullet Proof Glass 

Officers of Bush Commended 



Members of the Police Dept. — 

Your Credit is so good at The Redlick- Newman Co. that we require 

INOTHirsa DOWIN 

on Purchases up to $50.00 PAY AS LITTLE AS $1.00 A WEEK 
Furniture — Carpets — Stoves — Crockery — Linoleum — Draperies — Phonographs 



EDLICK NEWMANf, 

. COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS VI: 
Southeast Corner- 17 th- and Mission Sfs. 



Page 4 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




Our Aim This Year 



To render a dependable service — To 
the greatest possible number of people 
— Through a liberal extension policy, 
and always at the lowest cost consist- 
ent with the class of service rendered. 

Pacihc Gas and Electric Company 

"PACIFIC SBRVfCE" 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Calif ornians 



1-127 



• 




• 



Vol V. 



JANUARY, 1927 



No. 3. 



iiffliuwMiunimiiiiiiiii»iiiiJnioiiiiiiniiiiiiminiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiinj»u:«iiiiii:iiijiiiiimuiiiiimimiiiMi^ 



Taking of Statements 

By Robert Fitzgerald, Formerly Assistant District Attorney 



iniuiininiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiiuijjiiiJiiiiinniiniiiiiiiiiimiii 



Broadly considered, the rule against the admis- 
sibility of hearsay evidence forbids the reception 
of any statements made outside the courtroom. 
For this rule there are several extremely cogent 
reasons. The declarant was in most such cases 
not under oath and all testimony should be pro- 
tected by at least this formal sanctity and assumed 
safeg-uard against deception. The defendant un- 
der the constitution is guaranteed the right to be 
confronted by the witnesses against him and, as 
well, that he be afforded, if he desires to exercise 
it, the privilege of cross-examination. 

But to this as to so many principles and rules of 
law there are exceptions which should be known 
to the officers engaged in the gathering of evi- 
dence if they would adequately prepare for trial 
the case against the accused. We can not con- 
sider all of the exceptions. Some of them are of 
more peculiar interest and importance to the law- 
yers. There are those, however, which are of 
importance to the investigator and should be kept 
by him in mind from the outset of his work if he 
would be assured of gathering and perpetuating 
all of the evidence which may later be found to be 
of value in the proof of the ultimate fact — the de- 
tei-mination of the guilt or innocence of the ac- 
cused. 

First of all there are the statements which were 
part of the crime itself. Statements made either 
by the accused, his victim or other factors in the 
affray, known to lawyers and the law as the "res 
gestae". Roughly speaking, this means the thing 
done or part of the thing done which makes up 
the offense itself. The most familiar examples 
arise in cases of assaults. The pei-petrator of a 
robbery or of assault, or attempt to commit injurj' 
or homicide may have introduced against him 
proof of the statements made not only by him 
but as well by the complainant and any others en- 



gaged in the affray which were made during the 
affray and serve to explain it and the actions and 
motives of the accused. The testimony may be 
received from one of the parties to the encounter 
or from any other who may have heard such state- 
ments. Our Appellate Court has said: 

"Res gestae is a matter incidental to the main 
fact and explanatory of it. It is made up of acts 
and words which are so closely connected with a 
main fact as to really constitute a part of it, and 
without a knowledge of which the main fact might 
not be properly understood." People vs. Edwards, 
13 C. A., 551. 

What are and what are not parts of the "res 
gestae" is a question often difficult to decide. It is 
therefore well to furnish to the prosecutor a rec- 
ord of all statements made before, during and im- 
mediately following the commission of a crime by 
any of the actors in it. 

Next after the statements constituting part of 
the "res gestae" come dying declarations, admissi- 
ble, of course, in those cases only in which the 
accused is being tried for ha\ing caused the death 
of the declarant. Such declarations are state- 
ments of material facts concerning the cause and 
circumstances of the homicide, made by the victim 
under the solemn belief of impending death, the 
effect of which on the mind of the declarant is re- 
garded as the equivalent of the sanctity of an oath. 
They are permitted to be received under Section 
1870 of the Code of Civil Procedure, which pro- 
vides in part, "evidence may be given upon trial 
of the following facts: * * in criminal cases, 
the act or declaration of a dying person made un- 
der a sense of impending death, respecting the 
cause of his death." 

Before such statements can be received it must 
affirmatively appear to the court that they are 
made undei' a belief that the declarant was about 



Page 6 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



to die and had no hope or beUef of recovering. 
Any expression on his part tending to show doubt 
as to his condition or even remote hope he may 
recover will render the statement inadmissible. 
Whenever possible the statement of the dying per- 
son should be reduced to writing and should con- 
tain an expression indicating an expectation of 
death. Proof of the belief of impending death 
may, however, be made from other statements of 
the deceased or from the circumstances alone, such 
as the nature of his wound or injury, and accom- 
panying proof of his knowledge of it. It is enough 
if it satisfactorily appears in any mode that the 
declaration was so made, whether directly proved 
by the express language of the declarant or in- 
ferred from his evident danger or from his con- 
duct or other circumstances of the case, all of 
which may be resorted to in order to ascertain 
the state of the declarant's mind. 

There are also admitted in evidence cases in 
which the crime charged was committed as a re- 
sult of or as a part of a conspiracy or where the 
crime charged is itself a conspiracy proof not 
alone of the acts but also of the declarations of any 
of the conspirators which were made by him dur- 
ing the life of the conspiracy and for the purpose 
of furthering its objects and attaining its desired 
results. Such statements are admissible not alone 
against tlie person proved to have uttered them 
but against whichever of his co-conspirators may 
be on trial. 

In all these cases the extra-judicial statements 
made by other than the accused are admissible as 
direct proof of the truth of facts therein stated. 

There is another class of cases in which proof 
of hearsay statements made by others than the 
accused are admissible for a limited purpose. 
These are accusatory statements. These are based 
upon subdivision 3 of Section 1870 of the Code of 
Civil Procedure, which provides that evidence may 
be given upon a trial of "An act or declaration 
of another, in the presence and within the observa- 
tion of a party, and his conduct in relation thereto 
* * * ." Not all statements made in the pres- 
ence and hearing of the accused are admissible. 
It is only when such statements have to do with 
some of the circumstances of the crime and wlien 
there is something in the conduct of the accused 
in response thereto which is material to the issue 
that they are admissible at all and they are then 
admissible, not as proof of the truth of anything 
contained in the accusatory statement, but for 
the purpose of explaining his conduct. In other 
words, it is only the conduct of the accused that 
is evidence in such cases. There is a theory of 
law, evolved from ordinary experience of human 
conduct, that an innocent man when accused of 
participation in or commission of a crime will deny 



his guilt. Upon that theory there is based the rule 
that incriminating statements or admission in res- 
ponse to the accusation, and even the fact of the 
silence of the accused upon accusation, may be 
given in evidence to the jury so that they may de- 
termine whether he failed to act as might rea- 
sonably be expected an innocent person would act. 
It is necessary, therefore, that the accusations 
made to him be read to the jury, not as evidence 
of what is contained in the accusation, but so that 
the jury may fully understand the significance of 
his conduct. It may readily be seen that it is good 
practice to read to him the various statements 
made either by his accomplices or by other wit- 
nesses against him. This is not for the purpose of 
providing a means of getting these statements be- 
fore the jury (for the court must instruct them 
they cannot consider the statements as evidence) , 
but for the purpose of eliciting admissions, either 
by silence or otherwise, of the main charge on 
materially connected circumstances. 

Of course it must be shown that the accusations 
were made to him under circumstances which af- 
forded to him and reasonably called from him a 
response. 

If he fully and promptly denied the charge, 
then there is no admission to be received in evi- 
dence and it has been held to be error for the Dis- 
trict Attorney to read the accusation before the 
jury. This rule, however, is subject to qualifica- 
tion. If in addition to the denial he makes a state- 
ment calculated to deceive or which is subsequent- 
ly shown to be false, or if he later admitted the 
accusation or material portions of it the accom- 
panying falsehood in the first instance or the pre- 
vious denial in the second are evidence against 
him upon the same principle that flight would be 
and the accusations are admissible to give color 
and effect thereto. 

(To Be Continued) 



BAND PRACTICE RESUMED 



On January 4th, regular practice by the Police 
Band was resumed to be continued on Tuesdays 
and Fridays until further notice. 

The practice is held between the hours of 3 p. m. 
and 5 p. m. instead of in the morning as last year. 

Lieut. Richard Foley, director, promises to have 
the band up to its high state of efficiency as 
marked it appearances last year. This he says will 
be accomplished by the time the annual Ball and 
Concert comes off next month. 

The band is one of the best musical organiza- 
tions on the Pacific Coast and has made a hit with 
all citizens of this city, and we are pleased to see 
that it will be continued as it is an asset to San 
Francisco. 



January, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 7 



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Cruelty on the High Seas 



An Interesting Article By Oll-iChR PtTtR F.\nnin(; 

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PETER FANNING 



The horrible brutal- 
ity practiced by the of- 
ficers of the ship Gath- 
erer on her voyage to 
this coast in the year 
1882 and the story told 
by the crew after they 
arrived in this port, 
presented a chapter of 
startling incidents that 
not only corroborated 
the old adage that 
'truth is stranger than 
fiction", but even 
transcended some of 
the barbarities of the 
Inquisition. 

The ship Gatherer 
w a s commanded by 
Captain G. N. Sparks, whose officers were William 
Watts, the first mate, Cornelius Curtis, second 
mate, and John Driscoll, the third mate, all of 
them being comparatively young men. Loaded 
with railroad iron, this ship sailed out of the port 
of Antwerp, and while the dim outline of the 
Fatherland was yet perceptible to the sailors, the 
fiendish brutality of Watts and Curtis was dis- 
played. For a trifling breach of discipline they 
unmercifully thrashed a seaman named Peter 
Clark, and shortly afterward a seaman named 
Turner, who was so badly beaten that he was laid 
up for months. 

A few days later, Curtis, the second mate, so 
brutally dealt with John Hanson that one of his 
eyes was nearly put out and his mouth so badly 
injured that eating and speaking was rendered 
very painful and difficult. Another sailor named 
John Burns was lashed to the rail, and his nose 
was broken by a pair of brass knuckles, when a 
boy, whose spirit would not permit him to stand 
by without giving expression to his horror, was 
struck on the head by the mate. 

The mates lashed a heavy capstan bar to the 
back of Burns, compelling him to sti'ide up and 
down the deck, at the same time revengefully kick- 
ing the helpless sailor as he passed. They then 
compelled three sailors known as Peter, George 
and McCue, to strip themselves, and they were 
forced to submit to hoi-rible treatment. George 
took his revolting treatment so much to heart, 
that to escape further torture, he jumped over- 
board and was drowned. Hanson, one of the other 
sailors, was so brutally treated that he either de- 



liberately committed suicide by jumping over- 
board, or fell from sheer weakness into the water. 
Anotlier sailor was struck in the face with a be- 
laying pin by the mate and his nose was broken 
and permanently injured. The steward of the ship 
was also struck by one of the mates over the head, 
and then placed in confinement and deprived of 
food for five days. 

They then took McCue and fastened a strap to 
his waist and hoisted liim up to the mizzen stay, 
and held him in this position head downward till 
black in the face from the effects of the blood 
rushing to his head. Gustave Adlung, a youthful 
German who was so unfortunate as to ship on 
the vessel made a statement that the brutal treat- 
ment of the men which was often repeated on 
the voyage, was known to the captain, whom he 
said was a witness to a great deal of it and he 
further stated that the cruelty that was practiced 
on the Chinese steward drove him crazy by in- 
juries inflicted by the first mate. 

Taking pity on the Chinese steward, the seamen 
carried him back to his bunk, in which he re- 
mained until the vessel reached Wilmington where 
he was removed from the ship to a hospital. An- 
other member of the crew was ill-treated by one 
of the mates because he had spilled some paint on 
the deck while painting and this sailor offered to 
go and clean it up, whereupon the mate shouted 
and knocked him down, jumping on him and beat- 
ing him unmercifully, kicking him in the eyes, 
which laid him up for four weeks. After getting 
up again this same sailor on a dark night was 
ordered aloft by the mate, saying "I wish you 
would fall and kill yourself." John Anderson, an- 
other of the crew went half crazy by beatings 
about the head, shoulders and legs with knotted 
ropes so severe that the flesh was cut from his legs 
and his entire body was a mass of bruises and 
sores. 

He was ordered aloft to mend the sails and the 
poor fellow, being exhausted and weak, fell into 
the sea from the mizzen. Two victims had found 
a watery grave; tliere was no cessation in the bad 
treatment. A gi"eat deal of the time the sailors 
were fed on hard-tack and water. The spii'it of 
the first mate at times displayed itself when he 
exclaimed: "I am king of you low beasts" and 
he split a belaying pin over a sailor's head named 
"Frenchy". 

On another occasion a sailor named Chai-lie was 
at the wheel and he received a heavy blow under 
(Continued on Page 38) 



Page 8 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January. 1927 



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I Remember When - 



Reminiscences of An Old-Time Police Reporter 

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The O'Farrell street station was in charge of 
three sergeants, one for each 8-hour watch. They 
were, Albert A. Perrin, David W. Boyd and Bar- 
ney Harper. Boyd is retired and the other two 
are dead. The only other ranking officer in that 
old station was Corporal John P. Herlihy. He 
was a patrol officer. 

^ i^fi ^ 

Martin Judge was killed by a Geary street car. 

* * * 

Philip Brady, now a sergeant at the Central, 
was a "copper" connected with the old Park. 

Sergeant Bill Flinn of the day watch at the 
Central was a patrolman and station keeper at 

the Park. 

* * * 

Cleve Peters, who afterward conducted a saloon 
on the "Coast", patrolled Pine and Bush streets. 
Cleve is now dead. 

Jim Rooney, sergeant, was before the ffre on 
Sixth street as a patrolman ; also on Second street 
and after the fire, ten years on Market street. 
Jim is now sergeant in the second section of the 
Central. 

m * * 

Ren W. Harris was detailed with the Dumbrell 
Grand Jur/. Ren now has a beat in the North 

Beach district. 

* * * 

Charlie Jenkins was assistant to Sergt. Owen 
Gorman, head of the old hack detail; later the 

auto detail. 

* * * 

Former Detective Sergeant Tom Gibson caught 
and got a confession from John Winter, who cut 
into the floor of the bouillon room of the Selby 
Smelting Company at Crockett and stole gold 
bars worth $280,000. All of the precious metal 
was recovered from the Bay where Winter dump- 
ed it, to later reclaim it. 

"Little Pete", clever boss of Chinatown, cor- 
rupted jockeys at the old Bay District Race Track, 
made. a fortune and was later killed while being 
shaved in a Chinese barber shop. 

* * * 

"Begie" O'Donnell, an alleged tough character 
along the cocktail route, took Attorney George 
D. Collins across the Bay so that Collins could 
escape to Canada. Collins was wanted for bigamy 



and perjury. 
San Quentin. 



He was extradited and sent to 



Harry Seguine was at the old Southern. He 
still is and probably will spend his life there. 
Seguine's father was the first real Chief of Police 

in San Francisco. He bore the title of Marshal. 

* * * 

Frank Scollin, another old-timer, was at the 
Harbor for many years. Frank is now a Corporal 

at the Mission. 

* * * 

Lieut. Fred Green (retired) known as "The 
Admiral" because of his flowing mustache asked 
for key inspection at the old Central and told the 
watch that he "asked for key inspection and not 

for beer bottle openers and bung starters." 

* * * 

Sergt. Johnny Green, so many years around the 
Hall of Justice in the business offices, went to a 
fight in Oakland where his son, who had trained 
Harry Foley, was substituted in a mill at the last 
moment and under an assumed name. When his 
boy was announced as "Kid Somebody", Green 
jumped up and announced his boy's true name — 
GREEN! 

Joseph A. Murphy, now with the Mercantile 
Trust Company, was secretary to the late Chief 

White. 

* * * 

Katheryene Eisenhai't, Margaret Higgins and 
Kate O'Connor, were the first policewomen ap- 
pointed on the force. 

* * ♦ 

Peter Peshon was for years a patrolman at the 
Central and is now the movie censor for the de- 
partment. Pete has seen service. 

* * * 

Sergeant Frank Norman, former Chief Clerk 
to Chief Wittman, used to halt newspapermen 
when they became too inquisitive. Frank is now 
at the Bush and has three sons in the business. 
One, FVed, is a lieutenant at the Park; another, 
with Co. J ; and the third is with Co. F. 

Charles Sheble used to be sought for his knowl- 
edge of Chinese, as a member of the squad by 
many Chinatown sergeants. Sheble is now a ser- 
geant at the Mission under Captain Lemon. 

* * * 

Captain Fred Lemon seldom had anything to 
say unless it was worth while. Fred still has the 
same trait. 



January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



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^CHIEF'S PAGE 





By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 



INDUSTRIAL ORDERS 



The attention of Company GL.nnianders and the members 
of this Department is called to the many orders issued 
by this office since March 31st, 1926, dealing with labor 
controversies and in this connection you are advised that 
from information received at this office it is very evident 
that participation in violations of law and ordinance will 
be indulged in again by the respective parties to the con- 
troversy. 

There is very little that can be added by the Chief of 
Police to the orders already issued by him dealing with the 
path to be pursued by members of this Department in 
dealing with controversies of this kind, but it may be well 
to again remind the membership of this Department that 
they sci'upulously refrain from expressing any opinion or 
participating in any activity which would be indicative of 
partisanship and that there is but one road for them to 
follow and that is, the rigid and impartial enforcement of 
the penal statutes and penal ordinances against those (ir- 
respective of affiliations) who violate the provisions of said 
penal laws and ordinances. 

In connection with contemplated labor difficulties you 
will again call to the attention of the members of your 
respective commands the provisions of General Order No. 
279 issued under date of October 23rd, 1926. The said 
order, as well as many others, clearly show that those who 
violate the penal statutes and penal ordinances are no 
friends to a police department or to the individual police 
officer and that the officer who through negligence or wil- 
ful laxity allows such conditions where he can prevent 
them, detracts from the reputation and efficiency of his De- 
partment and renders himself useless as a law-enforcement 
unit. 

As has been heretofore stated on numerous occasions, 
we have no grievance against any party to labor difficulties, 
but by our oath of office and the solemn obligation we have 
assumed it becomes our duty to fearlessly and impartially 
enforce the penal laws and ordinances and to comply strict- 
ly with the rules and regulations of this Department and 
the orders issued by our superiors. 

It is a matter of common experience that the police 
officer who performs his duty in an efficient manner cannot 
be "all things to all men", but when he has accomplished 
his task in the efficient performance of duty he has satis- 
fied his conscience and has fulfilled the trust imposed upon 
him. 

The merit of the individual officer and the efficiency of a 
police department is put to the "acid test" when a crisis 
arises between well-organized conflicting forces. It is then 
he can show the integrity and the courage which he pos- 
sesses and the ability to accomplish a task which is laid 
down for him by the legislative branch of Government in 
the proper execution of his duties, that is, by the fair, 
fearless and impartial enforcement of those statutes and 
regulations which are applicable to a particular set of 
facts. 

DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, 
Chief of Police. 



CORONOR'S JURY COMMENDS OFFICERS 



The following communications have been received by 
Chief O'Brien from Dr. T. B. W. Leland, Coroner, and deal 
with the killing of the notorious Joe Tanko in this city: 

Enclosed please find verdict of Coroner and jury in case 
of Joseph Tanko, deceased. 

The commendation, from the people of the City and 
County of San Francisco, represented by jury and Coroner 
is for duty well and bi-avely performed. 

The jury requested me as a mark of approval of the 
good work of the department to have official copies of the 
commendation made and either posted at each station or 
read by Company Commanders to their watches. I am sub- 
mitting this request to you for official approval. 

With kindest personal regards and most cordial Christ- 
mas and New Year's greetings from myself and staff to 
you and the officers under your command, I remain, 

THOS. B. W. LELAND. 

"Inquisition taken at the Coroner's Court on the 30th day 
of November, 1926, before Dr. T. B. W. Leland, Coroner 
of said City and County, upon viewing of the body of Jos- 
eph Tanko find: 

"That the said Joseph Tanko, male, white, about 24 
years old, nativity, residence, occupation, unknown, came 
to his death at 1378 McAllister street, from shock and 
hemorrhage following gunshot wound of body. 

"And we further find: That said deceased came to his 
death at the hands of Detective Sergeant E. Roney in 
the performance of his duty, attempting to arrest certain 
men known to have committed a crime. 

"We wash to especially commend Detective Sergeant E. 
Roney for his bravery in having shot and killed this des- 
perate criminal after having been almost fatally wounded 
by the bandit. 

"We also wish to commend the bravery of Detective 
Sergeants Van Matre, McSheehy and Palmer, the other 
detectives concerned in the arrest as excellent represen- 
tatives of the personnel of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment who, in the recent wave of crime in San Fran- 
cisco, having shown themselves efficient, brave and 'wild 
to go' when ordered by their superiors. 

"In witness whereof, as well as the said Coroner, the 
Jurors aforesaid have to this Inquisition set their hands 
and seals on the date thereof. Thomas Roche, Foreman, 
George N. Bro^\'ning, C. N. Fulcher, John T. Lucas, A. L. 
Rabing, Leo P. Hurley, H. C. Spoerer, Albert Springer, 
Geo. Seeger, L. Keady. 

"Approved: Thos. B. W. Leland, Coroner." 



GREETINGS FRO.AI DULUTH 



It is my hope that you and the members of your De- 
partment enjoy a very merry Christmas and a happy and 
prosperous New Year. 

Thanking you for your co-opei-ation in the past and 
hoping our relationship this coming year will be as pleas- 
ant, I am, 

E. H. BARBER, Chief of Police. 
Duluth, Minnesota. 



Page 10 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



ASSIGNMENTS 



At a Special Meeting of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners held on December 27th, 1926, the following named 
police officers were appointed ajid promoted to the rank of 
Corporals of Police: James L. McDermott, William B. 
Henley, Jeremiah J. Coughlan, Martin Brennan, James J. 
Ruane, John F. Cavanagh, Henry M. Smith, Thomas P. 
Naughton, Tevis L. Herring, Thomas J. Feeney, Michael 
Goffey, James P. Johnson, Allan G. Moran, John J. Hor- 
gan, Frederick T. Jewett, Peter R. Maloney, John T. 
Trainer, Edward P. Donahue, Thomas R. Ritter, Gregory 
D. Higuera, Raymond W. O'Connell, James M. R. Hayes, 
George R. McKenney, Alfi-ed C. Williams, Edward A. 
Mitchell Albert P. Christ, John C. Hachette. 

The following newly appointed Corporals will remain on 
their present assignments until further orders: James 
P. Johnson, Detective Bureau; James M. R. Hayes, Detec- 
tive Bureau; George R. McKenney, Detective Bureau; 
Peter R. Maloney, Headquarters Co.; John T. Trainer, 
Headquarters Co.; Albert P. Christ, Headquarters Co.; 
Thomas R. Ritter, Co. K; James McDermott, Co. K. 

The following transfers of non-commissioned officers 
were made: Sgt. Arthur L. Christiansen, Hdqrs Co. to 
Co. E.; Corp. Harvey A. Deline, Hdqrs. Co. to Co. J.; Coitd. 
James J. Muldoon, Co. F to Co. B; Corp. Robert E. Lind- 
sey, Co. B to Co. F; Corp. Luther H. Arentz, Co. A to 
Co. K; Corp. Alfred C. Williams, Co. A to Co. E; Corp. 
William B. Henley, Co. B to Co. G; Corp. Jeremiah J. 
Coughlan, Co. B to Co. L; Corp. Martin Brennan, Co. B 
to Co. C; Corp. Tevis L. Herring, Co. B to Co. P; Coi-p. 
Thomas J. Feeney, Co. B to Co. H; Corp. John J. Horgan, 
Co. B to Co. I; Corp. John C. Hachette, Co. B to Co. F; 
Corp. James J. Ruane, Co. C to Co. B; Corp. Allan G. 
Moran, Co. C to Co. B; Corp. Henry M. Smith, Co. D to 
Property Clerk; Corp. Michael Gaffey, Co. D to Co. H; 
Corp. Gregory D. Higuera, Co. D to Co. L; Corp. Edward 
A. Mitchell, Co. D to Co. B; Corp. Raymond W. O'Con- 
nell, Co. E to Co. P; Corp. John F. Cavanaugh, Co. F to 
Co. G; Corp. Thomas F. Naughton, Co. G to Co. L; Corp. 
Edward P. Donahue, Co. H to Co. G; Corp. James L. Mc- 
Dermott, Co. K (not transferred); Corp. Thomas R. Ritter, 
Co. K (not transferred); Corp. Wm. T. Moran, Co. J to 
Co. I; Corp. F. T. Jewett, Co. I to Co. J. 

The following transfers of patrolmen were made on 
January 2nd: 

Patrolman James B. Miles, Co. F to Co. A (day watch); 
Patrolman James M. McEachern, Co. A to Co. D (day 
watch); Patrolman Peter H. Murphy, Co. L to Co. A; 
Patrolman James A. Carpeneti, Co. L to Co. D; Patrolman 
Frederick Spooncer, Co. F to Co. A; Patrolman James J. 
Hart, Co. E to Co. B; Patrolman Bernard A. Smith, Co. 
F to Co. D; Patrolman Edward P. Fewer, Co. F to Co. A; 
Patrolman William J. Riley, Co. F to Co. D; Patrolman 
John J. McDonnell, No. 2, Co. L to Co. H; Patrolman John 
Donovan, Co. F to Co. B; Patrolman Vernon S. Olsen, Co. 
H to Co. B; Patrolman Charles Neary, Co. I to Co. B; 
Patrolman John P. Haley, Co. J to Co. C; Patrolman Clar- 
ence E. Kronquist, Co. L to Co. A. 

The following named members of the Department School 
of Instruction were permanently assigned to the Com- 
panies hereinafter shown: Andrew J. Bell to Co. L; Fred 
M. Fitzsimmons to Co. F; John V. Cobb' to Co. F; George 
A. Young to Co. F; Peter H. Schroeder to Co. F; Samuel 
Cohen to Co. F; Edward A. Miller to Co. F; Edward L. 
Quast to Co. H; Thomas J. Lynch to Co. I; Richard R. 
Smith to Co. J; John E. Gleeson, Jr., to Co. L (Officer Glee- 
son, however, will remain temporarily in his present as- 
signment in the City Prison). 

Robert P. Brown, Rank 188, assigned Star 170; John 
E. Gleeson No. 2, Rank 189, assigned Star 1197; Ferdinand 



Bork, Rank 190, assigned Star 279 ; Dewey Kauffman, Rank 
191, assigned Star 959, were appointed regular policemen 
in the Police Department of the City and County of San 
Francisco; said appointments to take effect immediately 
and to be subject to the probationary period of six months 
as is provided for in the Charter. 

Andrew C. Wood, Rank 36 was appointed a chauffeur 
in the Police Department. 

Thomas C. Naylor, temporary patrol driver-, has been 
assigned patrol driver's star number 29. 

Louis T. Lammers, temporary patrol driver, has been 
assigned patrol driver's star number 28. 

Police Officer Walter Talleur of this department reports 
the loss of his police star, number 489. He has been given 
star number 163. 



COMMENDATORY LETTERS 



You have no idea how much your talk was enjoyed at 
yesterday's meeting of the Altiurians. I heard nothing but 
praise from everyone and the talk was not alone enjoyable 
but very informative and I am sure that all of the Club 
members appreciated your sparing the time to lunch with 
us. 

Personally, I am sorry that more ladies were not present 
as some of the advice and counsel you gave was particu- 
larly valuable. 

Please accept the Club's thanks and my thanks, person- 
ally and also thank the Chief for permitting you to spare 
the time. (Note: Letter was addressed to Mrs. Katherine 
Sullivan, Woman Protective Officer). Sometime I will ask 
you for a return engagement. 

LOUIS A. COLTON, President, 
Alti-urians of San Francisco. 

559 Monadnock Building. 

* * * 

It is my pleasant duty to extend to you on behalf of our 
Board of Directors and members our sincere appreciation 
of the splendid co-operation extended by the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department during the visit to San Francisco 
of President Thomas P. Henry, officers and directors of the 
American Automobile Association. 

Acting under your orders Lieutenant John J. Casey, com- 
manding the Traffic Bureau, took personal charge of the 
detail of motorcycle officers which included Officers Claude 
Ireland, Joseph Perry and W. Martin. This detail escorted 
our distinguished visitors from place to place during their 
two-day stay in San Francisco. The courteous manner and 
efficient handling of the arrangements by Lieutenant Casey 
and his men brought forth enthusiastic praise from every 
member of the party. 

We are most grateful to you as the Chief Executive of 
the Police Department for your personal appearance at 
the Ferry building upon the arrival of President Henry 
and party and your attendance at the luncheon given in 
their honor at the St. Francis Hotel. 

D. E. WATKINS, 

Secretary and General Manager, 

California State Auto Association, 

150 Van Ness Avenue. 
* * * 

Just a line to thank you for your Idndness in delegating 
certain officers to the Hotel Mark Hopkins on Saturday 
evening, December 4th. I desire to state that these gentle- 
men carried out their duties in a very splendid manner, 
and that we had no trouble of any nature, which I consider 
is due to the foresight of the Detail in anticipating possible 
fracases in time to prevent their occurrence. 

With very best wishes, and again thanking you, I am 
HOTEL MARK HOPKINS, 
W. P. Taylor, Jr., Resident Manager. 



January, J 927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 11 



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Richards and Kalmbach, Federal Aids 

By Jimmy Hicks, Police Reporter, San Franasco Bulletin 

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You have undoubtedly heard of unsung heroes. 
And undoubtedly you have sympathized with them 
and then promptly forgotten them. 

Now, f'rinstance, you may take George Rich- 
ards and Henry Kalmbach, detective sergeants 
extraordinary. Give them the passing thought of 
these few lines and then forget 'em. The powers 
that be in \^'ashington that rule on Uncle Sam's 
personal obligations demand that. 

George and Henry are San Fi'ancisco's tribute 
to the Federal machine of law enforcement. They 
are unsung heroes. And unsung heroes are mar- 
tyrs. 

Captain Thomas B. Foster, chief of the San 
Francisco bureau of the Secret Service, testifies 
to that. 

Some wit once called them the "kid glove boys". 
He had watched them, "soup and fish", keeping 
an eagle eye on a foreign dignitary. And he had 
seen them uncomfortably taking in the weddings 
of prominent people. Or sitting in at the gather- 
ings of political generals. Hob-nobbing with the 
upper crust, as it were. Unsung heroes ! 

George Richards has been doing that for fifteen 
years. When the Post Office Inspectors decided 
that they wanted a police assignment to aid them 
in their endless and tireless investigations, they 
requested the pick of the Department. Michael 
Burke and George were sent to the Post Office 
building. When the beloved Burke got hurt and 
retired, Kalmbach took his place. 

Catering to the notables is "the night shift in 
the Mission" to the pair. It brings longer hours 
and no extra pay. While they may dislike that 
end of the work intensely, they never say so. 
But Captain Foster, the genial chief, has that sort 
of a hunch. 

So now you have the idea that George and 
Henry are the perfect "kid glove" pair. They are ! 

But let's get away from the social lights. Did 
you ever hear of Ed Nicodemus, Fred Elkins, Bob 
Yates, Frank Cole, Johnny Coy, Parker B. "Jerry" 
JMillisack, Ralph Brightman, Joe Fiegin, Harry S. 
Sullivan, Leo Hannan, Bill Crowe, Jim Nagle and 
Nick Rudonick. Y^ou probably have. Each one 
represented a high light in San Francisco's crime 
history. "Kid glove" crime. 

Do you remember when Secret Service men, 
playing a hunch, went to a certain bank vault and 
found $150,000 in jewels, $40,000 in cash and 
?20,000 in "hop" and how "Jerry" Millisack and 
Brightman stood trial for violation of the narcotic 



law and went to prison and how the robbery of 
the Continental Loan Association in Los Angeles 
of its fortune in jewels was solved? 

And if you search back in your mind you will 
remember the fake ?20 Federal Reserve notes that 
flooded the Pacific Coast a few years back. $3,000 
had been passed here when Richards found $10,000 
worth of the paper in a bank vault. Nicodemus 
got four years, Elkins, eight years, Yates and 
Cole two years and six months and Coy one year 
and a day. 

And then the Beal street holdup of the mail 
truck in which $60,000 was taken. Over a year 
later, out of a clear sky, Hannan, the government 
guard, was arrested. Crowe, under cross examina- 
tion by Richards and Kalmbach, revealed the plot. 
Then came the arrest of Nagle and Rudonick. Sul- 
livan was taken in London a short time ago. Sen- 
tences of twenty-five years resulted. 

Joe Fiegin, the poison-booze druggist and coun- 
terfeiter, was taken into the net. He knows Rich- 
ards and Kalmbach. Unless the memory of the 
others is impaired by the toll taken by the Gov- 
ernment, they also remember the pair. 

Desperate men cast the dice in the gamble 
against Federal law. They are brainy men, grad- 
uates of the school of ordinary crime, scholars in 
tlie college of crookdom. They flunk in their 
studies only when smart masters take them in 
hand. That is why Richards and Kalmbach have 
been loaned to Uncle Sam. 

Now, let's forget it. 



POLICE FUND GETS $500 FOR BANK AID 



The Widow's and Orphans' Fund of the San 
Francisco Police Department was presented with 
a check for $500 yesterday by the Crocker First 
National Bank. The presentation was made on 
behalf of William H. Crocker to Chief of Police 
Daniel O'Brien in appreciation of the police assis- 
tance during the recent gas explosion in the bank. 



14 PASS LIEUTENANT TEST 



Arthur L. Christiansen, 1346 Twenty-fourth 
avenue, heads the list of fourteen sergeants in the 
San Francisco Police Department who successfully 
passed examination for promotion to the rank of 
lieutenant, the Civil Service Commission an- 
nounced this month. The examinations were held 
on October 29. 



Page 12 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




DIRECTIVE BUREAU 



Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson in Charge 

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LAW ENFORCEMENT 



By District Attorney Warren of Alameda 

Now gentlemen, of course there is no use con- 
demning the system unless we can do something 
to remedy it, and I suppose you are saying in 
your mind, what would you suggest to remedy 
this situation? I don't know how it can be en- 
tirely remedied, because the people at the pres- 
ent time are for the probation system. They 
have been taught that it is the humane system ; 
they have been taught that the criminal is the 
under-dog, and the criminal is entitled to th'^ 
court protection and rehabitulation just as a sick 
man is entitled to be healed, to such an extent 
that it is my opinion that the public believes that, 
men of bad reputation or character, and any of 
and that the public believing in the probation 
system, it is a hard thing to make it anything 
different than at the present time, but I believe 
if we can bring to the public through the press 
every flagrant abuse of the probation system, I 
believe that the public can be educated against 
the present method of administering that law 
just as it has been propagandized for it at the 
present time, and there isn't a large district in 
this state where the probation law isn't violated 
and abused. I wager there isn't a large commu- 
nity in this state where probation isn't given at 
times to men who have served a term in San 
Quentin, and it is a crime to give probation, in 
my opinion, to a man who has once had his chance 
on probation on felony, or in state's prison for 
felony, but it is done right along, and if things 
of that kind are brought to the attention of the 
public they will get out of sympathy with the 
present method of administering the probation 
laws. 

I think one case where the peace officers can 
assist in taking care of these probationers is 
this: These men placed on probation of course 
are under strict rules — cannot drink, nor fre- 
quent places of ill repute, cannot go around with 
these things would constitute a violation of pa- 
role, and I believe if the peace officers of this 
state were to definitely undertake to report all 
violations of that kind to the court — you can 
get no sympathy from probation officers — report 
it to the court directly, and I believe some good 
can be accomplished. 



Truly I believe that the work of all law enforce- 
ment officers should be co-ordinated, and by law 
enforcement officers I mean peace officers, dis- 
trict attorneys and judges. Why, gentlemen, 
there should be no discord between these three — 
each are relying on the other, each should co- 
operate with the other and give help to the other, 
because it is all one task — the arrest, trial, con- 
viction and sentence of men convicted of criminal 
ofi'enses, and lastly I think the main thing that 
can be done by this Peace Officers' Association is 
to maintain a militant lobby at the State Legis- 
lature. 

Gentlemen, all of you don't go to the Legis- 
lature, and all of you don't know what goes on 
at that place. You don't know how the forces 
of vice and criminality work in our Legislature. 
You don't know how many men in our Legislature 
are subsidized by vice — people who are interest- 
ed in vice conditions. Captain Matheson knows 
something about it; Chief Drew knows some- 
thing about it, and the Chief of San Francisco 
knows something about it because they are 
there — they are on the job all the time. Would 
you believe it if I told you there was a law in- 
troduced in the Legislature last year which gave 
a defendant in a criminal case the right to re- 
sist by force a search warrant which he deemed 
to be insufficient. In other words, this law re- 
quired a peace officer before executing a search 
warrant to first find the defendant, show him the 
search warrant and if the defendant believed that 
that search warrant was insufficient he had a 
right to resist with force the action of the peace 
officer in executing it. Now, that's fine, isn't it; 
but, let me tell you that very law gave Captain 
Duncan Matheson and some more of your peace 
officers many sleepless nights because it looked 
as if it would pass, and they worked on it night 
and day, and a large percentage of the lawyers 
in the Senate, Legislature, were going to vote 
for it ; and, another law along the same line made 
it a felony for a person to swear to a search war- 
rant if they didn't find the subject matter they 
were looking for, and likewise that took very 
seriously with the members of our State Legis- 
lature. 



Joe Phontes was walking off with some small articles 
of less than $200 value when Officers L. Morch and J. Dyer 
arrested him. 



January, 1927 



0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



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"Knockovers^' of Bureau 



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Sergeant George McLoughlin's Robbery Detail was forced 
to engage in other crimes than robbery the past month, 
as there were not so many of this sort of major crime 
committed. However, Sgts. Leo Bunner, George Wall and 
Robert Rauer brought in Fred McCormick and James 
Hombeck, charged with robbery, while Bunner and Rauer, 
with Sergeant Edward McSheehy, gave Joseph Perioni 
three such "raps". McLaughlin, with McSheehy and Sergt. 
Jesse Ayers arrested Homer Ford and Charles Johnson 
for the same offense; and Wall, with Sergt. William Mc- 
Mahon, grabbed off another pair of stickup boys when 
they landed Henry Leroy and Frank Dominguez in the 
city prison. The detail brought in a dozen other men 

charged with lesser crimes. 

* * * 

Detective Sergt. Martin Porter, Lieutenant-to-be George 
Healy's side-kick, doubled up and were responsible for the 
arrest of Jos. Ditsky for grand larceny, and they picked 
up Thomas Clark, wanted in Oakland. 

* * * 

Following are the most important arrests made by De- 
tectives Daniel Fogarty and John Sturm: Aleo Andrakin, 
Nick Milasky and Peter Lelikoff, charged with assault with 
a deadly weapon; W. Leagarrigus, assault to do great 
bodily harm; John Picetti, same charge; and Frank Ed- 
wards, for violating Juvenile Court law. 

* * * 

The Burglary Detail, under Detective Sergt. Richmond 
Tathani, checked in for the month their most important 
arrests as follows: Theodore Miller and Chester Hook, 
burglaiy, by Tatham and Sergts. Jack Palmer and Finley; 
Tony Stipovich, receiving stolen goods, by Tatham and 
posse; by Detective Sergts. Richard Hughes and James 
Johnson, Robert Foster, burglary and en route to Fresno; 
Ben Kaplan and Phillip Beyer, burglary; Detective Sergts. 
James Gregson and Joseph Lippi booked the following 
for burglary: Harry Leonard, Leonard Maclsaac; Sergts. 

Irving Finlay and James Mitchell locked up Moses Grow. 

* * * 

Detective Sgts. William Armstrong, Charles Maher and 
James Hansen of the Bad Check detail, arrested 250 bad 
check passers during the last three months of 1926. These 
men and women passed checks varying from S2.00 or 
$300.00 for a total amount of ?8000.00. This sum is not 

a total loss as the prisoners "squared" some of the "beefs". 

* * * 

Detective Sergts. Fred Bohr and Clarence Herlitz of the 
Hotel Detail got a varied lot of complaints to work out. 
They did just that thing. Their names appear after the 
following: Ray McCullough, en route to Monterey; William 
Lamberton,. bench warrant; Kenneth Await and Edward 

Felix, grand larceny. 

« * * 

Sergts. George Richard and Henry Kalmbaeh of the 
Federal assignment, nabbed Phillip Peterson for the U. S. 

Marshal. 

* * » 

Jack Van, who has had a score of charges of embezzle- 
ment against him, was locked up again the other day by 
Detective Sergts. Thomas Reagon and Thomas Curtis. 

* ? iK 

Detective Sergts. Andrew Gaughran and James D. 
Skelly kept the wheels of justice and the patrol wagons 
busy during the month with their "Knockovers", the more 
important ones of which run like this: Burt Brown and 



James Rose, burglary and petty larceny; Harry and Ed- 
ward Keller, same offenses; Albert Cable and Jean Mar- 
gette, ditto; Matilda Leyba and Mernice Putnam, likewise; 
John Lenoe, 476a; Harry Allen and Harry Keller, petty 
larceny; John Spenee, burglary. 

» » * 

Lads who don't like to do honest work flocked to the 
city during the holiday sea.son to eke out some sort of a 
livelihood. They played crowds and .stores. Lieut. Thomas 
Hoertkom and his partner Detective Sergt. Morris Harris 
gave them a merry time. Here are some that they es- 
corted to the Hall: Harry Castro, Juan Lopez, John J. 
Horan, Gordon Foxall, Louis Walker, Helen Hase, burglary 
and petty larceny; Damarole Aligio, burglary; Aaron 
Schwartz, Joe Levin and David Rubin, fake platinum wire 
peddlers, and Manuel Sousa, petty larceny. 

* * « 

Lieut. Bemard McDonald's Automobile Detail gave the 
courts plenty to do last month. Here are some of the 
arrests made by various members of the detail : Detective 
Sergt. James Hayes and his partner, Harry McCrea: Rob- 
ert Ai^hbum and Harry Allen, violating Section 146 of the 
Motor Act; Albert Brose, dri\-ing while intoxicated; Salva- 
dore Tapia and Frank McDermott, larceny. 

T- t * 

Detective Sergts. John J. Cannon, James McKenna and 
G. Wafer were in on the following arrests: Jack Taylor 
and George Mitchell, grand larceny and carrj-ing guns; 
Frank Mclntyre, \'iolating parole and James Howard, en 
route to Weed. , ^ ,. 

Detective Sergts. Frank Brown and Rasmus Rasmussen 
arrested Fred Clark and Frank O'Connell for the Watson- 

ville authorities. 

* * * 

Willis Peterson was nabbed by Detective Sergts. W'illiam 
Milliken and Phillip Lindecker when they saw him dri\-ing 
off with some one else's automobile; 46 was the charge. 

* » » 

Detective Sergts. Augustus Thompkins, Nicholas Barron 
and Detective P. Evans and Special Britt, had a hand in 
getting the names to follow: Roy Ostrander, \-iolating 
Section 504a; James Marley, grand larceny; Harry Beal, 
fugitive; Jesse C. Hopkins, vagi-ancy; and John Conley, 
embezzlement. 

* * » 

Detective Sergts. P. Badaracco and Edward Jones ar- 
rested Frank Vidal for violating Sec. 146 of the Motor 
Vehicle Act and %-iolating parole. 

4: « * 

Nick De Pinto was arrested by Detective Sergts. Phillip 

Lindecker, Peter Hughes and Millikin. 

* * * 

The boys on the night shifts certainly were busily en- 
gaged during the electric light hours. Read further: De- 
tectives J. McKenna and Jack O'Connell picked off George 
Vamey for the Oakland police; Coi-poral Da^•id Stevens 
and Jack O'Connell nabbed James Bresnahan for Hills- 
borough and Roger Menchaca and Rogue Arande for Sac- 
ramento. * » * 

Detective Sergeant Harry Cook ought to be a very popu- 
lar man with sundry wives who complain about their hus- 
bands leaving them and the childi-en. Harry picks these 
husbands up for most every city in the state. Some he 
(Continued on Page 25) 



Page 14 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



Proposed New Laws for Coming Legislature 

Presentation of Recommendations Made b>' State Crime Procedure Commission arid Adopted by 

State Peace Officers' Association 

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(Continued from Last Month) 
(c) Selection of Jui-y. A new section providing 
that it shall be primarily the duty of the trial 
judge to select the jury, but authorizing the trial 
court in its discretion to permit reasonable ex- 
amination of prospective jurymen as to their 
qualification by counsel. At the present time, one 
of the gi-eat abuses in criminal trials is the ex- 
cessive length of time that is taken in the selec- 
tion of juries. Experience in all other English 
speaking jurisdictions, as well as United States 
courts, has shown that a gi-eat amount of time, 
inconvenience and expense can be saved by mak- 
ing the selection of a fair jury primarily the duty 
of the court. 

Proceedings on New Trial and Appeal 
The recommendations of the Commission as to 
handling matters on appeal are designed to in- 
sure that the records shall be brought up and 
the case heard with the utmost promptness. To 
this end the Commission expects to recommend 
the enactment of statutes having the following 
effect : 

Motion for new trial must be made immediately 
upon return of the verdict and heard within ten 
days ; 

Notice of appeal must be given immediately 
after sentence; 

All appeals shall be set for liearing for a date 
not later than thirty (30) days after the filing of 
the transcript. 

It is made the duty of the district attorney 
trying the case to co-operate with the attorney 
general in presenting the matter on appeal. 

A new section providing that where defendant 
moves for a new trial and a new trial is granted, 
or when defendant appeals and on appeal the 
judgment is reversed, the effect of such order 
shall be that the verdict is vacated and abrogated 
in every respect and that defendant be retired 
on the original charge the same as if there had 
been no prior trial. The reason for this rule is 
that at the present time if the jury convicts for 
a lesser offense than that charged and the ver- 
dict is then set aside on motion for a new trial 
or on appeal, defendant cannot be charged with 
or retried for any crime greater than that of 
which he was convicted. If the verdict is set 
aside, it should be set aside completely and the 
case left in the same situation as if there had 
been no verdict. 

A new section providing that where on appeal 



or on motion for a new trial it appears that the 
evidence is not sufficient to justify conviction of 
the crime for which the defendant was convicted, 
but is sufficient to sustain conviction of a lesser 
crime included within the crime for which de- 
fendant was convicted, the court may either 
grant a new trial or order judgment rendered on 
the lesser offense. The need of this section is 
illustrated by a recent decision of the Supreme 
Court of this State. A defendant bad been con- 
victed of arson in the first degree. A conviction 
of this crime in the first degree requires proof 
that the building burned was inhabited. The 
evidence failed to show this fact, but did clearly 
show that arson in the second degree, a lesser 
offense, had been committed. On account of the 
absence of any such statute as that proposed the 
Supreme Court was compelled to reverse the case 
and gi-ant a new trial. 

Punishment 

It is not the purpose of the Commission to 
recommend any genei'al sj'^stem of harsher punish- 
ment. Neither is it the purpose of the Commis- 
sion to recommend the repeal either of the Pro- 
bation system or of the Indeterminate Sentence 
law or Parole law. Our studies indicate that both 
the Probation and Parole systems and the Inde- 
terminate sentence law have certain very definite 
merits. It is true, however, that they can be, 
and sometimes have been, seriously abused. The 
attempt of the Commission has been to devise 
statutory provisions which will retain all the 
benefits of these sj'stems and at the same time 
lessen and minimize the possibility of their abuse. 
Probation 

The fundamental purpose of probation is to 
afford to the first offender, who has not shown 
himself to be a dangerous criminal, an oppor- 
tunity to reform and become a useful member of 
society without being stained with the disgrace 
of having served a penitentiary sentence. In cases 
of this character probation serves a most useful 
and valuable purpose. But when probation is 
granted to hardened or vicious criminals, it is 
entirely misapplied, its function prostituted, and 
great harm may result to the public. To this 
end the Commission expects to recommend as 
follows : 

No person shall be eligible to probation unless 
it shall appear to the satisfaction of the court 
that he has never theretofore been convicted of 
a felony either in this state or elsewhere. 
(To Be Continued) 



January, 1927 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page IS 




DET. SERGT. JAMES E. COTTLE 



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In bidding good- 
bye to one's voca- 
tion, there is gen- 
erally the solace of 
relief, particularly 
so if one's line of 
activities have 
been tinged with 
strenuous issues, 
issues involving 
certain risks of life 
and fortune. I 
would not be hu- 
man , I suppose, 
were I to say that 
rest and leisure of- 
fer no appeal at 
sixty - six, and I 
would stand self-convicted as a liar, and a big one, 
were I to state that I left the department without 
sincere regret. One cannot serve and mix daily 
for over a quarter of a century without forming 
ties of friendship and affection which rebut at 
severing. 

These sentiments are mine in leaving the Police 
Department of my city, which the weight of years 
and failing health have forced me to do. 

Appointed by the late Patrick Crowley, then 
Chief of Police, in 1892, I have seen many heads 
of this fine body of men come and go, and the 
department itself grow to the splendid showing 
which it makes today in numbers and efficiency. 
I am proud to have been a member of it and can 
conscientiously say I don't believe I have an enemy 
within its ranks; I hope not anyway. 

During my long years of service, I have ever 
endeavored to be both human and humane and 
have tried to mind my own business, a perilous 
stunt, but one which pays big- dividends in the 
end. At any rate, I was never rebuked by my 
superior officers, which helped some. \Miere I 
could lend a helping hand to those unfortunates 
of tender years when fate threw them in my 
path, I have extended it and have yet to regret a 
single instance of doing so; my hand was never 
bitten. Only so recently as my late serious ill- 
ness a young fellow now occupying an important 
position of trust whom I was instrumental in put- 
ting upon the right path instead of charging him 
with a felony, heard of my sickness and wrote to 
me saying his purse was at my disposal. To my 
mind, kindness disarms and softens. There should 
be more of it used, it is a gi'eat weapon ! 



Vale Amigos 

By James E. Cottle, Detective Sergeant. Retired 

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In the course of my duty, I have been obliged 
to send some to San Quentin; it is a i-elief to 
know that I have saved others from going there. 

To the young men going onto the force today 
tliere looms before them gi*eater chances and op- 
portunities for advancement and for distinguish- 
ing themselves than we old birds ever had in the 
days of our novitiate. You have now a Police 
Commission of which few cities can boast, and a 
Chief second to none. In closing, let me hand 
down to the younger members of the Force a 
couple of crisp epigrams which old Chief Crowley 
slipped to me wlien I was a "beginner". They are 
worth remembering. He said : 

"Use, at all times, good horse sense. If you 
have not got it, try and borrow some. 

"Never play tlie bully or the brute. 

"Never strike a man on the head with your 
club, unless you mean to kill him. 

"Alind your own business." 

There were other gems of sage advice which I 
have forgotten, but these have lingered longest 
in my memory. 

I could say much more in reminiscence of the 
past, and of those of the department wjio have 
crossed the Great Divide ahead of me, but I must 
not usurp all the space in this issue with my swan 
song. I must leave some of it for the advertise- 
ments. 

So, in conclusion, let me simply add in passing 
from the ranks to the oblivion of private life, that 
the Boys of the department, all of them, will not 
entirely forget me until I cease to remember tliem, 
which will be a long time from now. 

And in closing, let me take you, each one, by 
the hand in parting, from our good Chief down, 
and say with all my heart to all of you. 
May God bless you. 



There was a lot of gladhanding around the Hall 
of Justice January 8, and a lot of gladness. It 
was all occasioned by the return to duty of Sergt. 
Patrick jMcGee, in charge of the School of Instruc- 
tion of new police officers. 

Sergt. Pat has been sick for a long time and 
the boys around the hall missed him. The news- 
paper boys missed him and the folks who liked ti 
have the exhibition teams appear at various func 
tions, and listen to the sergeant's able and inter- 
esting talks, missed him. And each and ever, 
one of them were glad when he came back and 
that includes the writer of this article. 



Page 16 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



Annual Police Ball and Concert 

. Plans Being Made for Biggest Celebration at Auditorium 

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CAtri. v>l>i. MuliNN 



Again is the Police Widows' 
and Orphans' annual ball and 
concert ready to entertain the 
people. The date has been set 
at February 19th, and from the 
advance sale of seats the Civic 
Auditorium will be crowded 
again this year, and a show 
will be presented to the thou- 
sands who will attend, that 
could not be equalled anywhere for ten dollars, 
let alone a dollar. 

This annual benefit of the Association has be- 
come one of the fixed entertainments of this city 
and it has become recognized as a show where the 
ticket holder gets his money's worth and a lot 
more. 

■ Then the cause for which it is put on makes it 
one that appeals to all law abiding people. The 
Widow's and Oi-phan's Association, an insurance 
concern made up of members and retired members 
of the department, has by hard work, careful in- 
vestment of money, earned by the ball, monthly 
payments of the members and donations, been 
■able to make easier the burdens of the families of 
deceased police officers. 

There is no money paid to salaried officials, every 
dollar but the barest sums needed to carry on the 
business being devoted to the payment of life 
insurance. 

Owing to the hazardous life of a policeman, life 
insurance companies cannot carry these men ex- 
cept at heavy premiums. Therefore the only way 
an officer can protect and provide for his family in 
case of death is through this mutual association 
made up of members of the department. 

The 1927 event is under the direction of a gen- 
eral committee headed by Captain William J. 
Quinn, -chief clerk to Chief O'Brien, and he has 
subdivided this general committee into the follow- 
ing sub-committees, and each one is functioning in 
a manner that insures this year's celebration one 
well worth seeing. 

The sub-committees follow: 

Hall and DecoratinR Committee 

Capt. Herbert J. Wright (Chairman) Company J 

Lieut. George Duffy Company J 

Lieut. Frederick W. Kimble Company D 

Lieut. Joseph Mignola Company E 

Sergt. Louis H. C. Nye Company E 

Sergt. Peter S. Hinrichs .Company L 

Corp. Frank P. Scollin _ Company H 

Officer Edward J. Plume :Company J 

Inspector John F. Ryan Headquarters 



Printing Committee 

Officer Peter R. Maloney (Chairman) Headquarters 

Detective Sergt. William R. Proll Det. Bureau 

Sergt. Thomas G. Roche Company D 

Sergt. Arthur T. McQuaide Det. Bureau 

Corp. Charles J. Ward Headquarters 

Officer George R. P. Grunwald Company A 

Officer Joseph P. Maloney Company D 

Officer Edward J. McNamara Company 1 

Concessions Committee 

Corp. William C. Gilmore (Chairman) Det. Bureau 

Detective Sergt. Leo. E. Bunner Det. Bureau 

Detective Sergt. Harry L. Cook Det. Bureau 

Corp. Eugene J. Egan Company P 

Corp. William J. Harrington Company M 

Officer John J. Lyons Company A 

Officer Patrick McAuIiffe Company B 

Officer Walter E. Harrington Company E 

Edward J. Thomson No. 404 

Inspector John F. Ryan Headquarters Co. 

Music and Talent Committee 

Capt. Frederick Lemon (Chairman) Company D 

Capt. John J. Casey Company E 

Capt. Henry J. O'Day Company I 

Capt. Robert A. Coulter Company L 

Capt. Stephen V. Bunner Company M 

Lieut. Daniel J. Collins Company D 

Lieut. Frederick O'Neill Company G 

Lieut. Emmett Moore Company L 

Sergt. Patrick H. McGee Headquarters 

Officer J. Griffith Kennedy Company A 

Officer George F. Barry Company C 

Publicity Committee 

Lieut. Michael Riordan (Chairman) Headquarters 

Lieut. Arthur H. DeGuire Company B 

Lieut. William E. Dowie.. Company M 

Sergt. Patrick H. McCJee Headquarters 

Sergt. Patrick J. Murray _ Headquarters 

Corp. John L. McCausland Headquarters 

Officer Charles J. Gallatin Company A 

Officer George F. Barry Company C 

Officer William I. Bums Headquarters 

Frank C. Tracey No. 1621 Market Street 

Frank J. Egan No. 333 Kearny Street 

Radio Committee 

Officer William F. Bennett (Chairman) Headquarters 

Sergt. Patrick H. McGee Headquarters 

Officer Peter R. Maloney Headquarters 

Corp. Thomas P. Mclnerney Headquarters 

Invitation to Mayor Committee 
Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien (Chairman) 

Police Commissioner Jesse B. Cook O'Fan-ell St. 

Capt. William J. Quinn Headquarters 

Capt. Duncan Matheson •.. ._ Headquarters 

Capt. Arthur D. Layne Company A 

Capt. Charles Goif Company B 

Capt. John J. O'Meara Company F 

Capt. William T. Healy Company G 

Capt. Charles F. Skelly Headquarters 

Lieut. Michael Riordan Headquarters 

Lieut. Michael J. Griffin Det. Bureau 

Officer John J. Cummings Company C 

(Continued on Page 42) 



January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 17 



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Tough Going, But Officers Win 

By Corporal Thomas McEnerney 

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iiiuiiiiiiiJiujiuuiihMuuiiiiiin 



One of the most thrilling expei'iences that three 
members of my command and I have ever had 
since becoming members of the Police Depart- 
ment took place on the afternoon of January 10, 
1927. No doubt, Officer John Scanlon will never 
forget it so long as he lives. The knowledge he 
gained in the Department School of Instructions 
in preventing the fire of revolver in the hands of 
a thug undoubtedly saved his life. 

About 3:30 p. m. on that eventful afternoon, 
while waiting for the auto patrol to convey to the 
Bush Street Station a petty thief whom we had 
just apprehended, Officer Morrison, attached to 
the Headquarters Company, accompanied by In- 
spector John McCarthy of the State Board of 
Pharmacy, hailed me as they were passing in 
their machine and informed me that they had 
just recognized a notorious narcotic peddler 
getting into a Chrysler roadster parked on Hyde 
Street between Eddy and Ellis Streets. Inasmuch 
as Officer Morrison and Inspector McCarthy were 
in pursuit of another notorious dope peddler and 
could not stop to arrest the man in the Chrysler 
car, they requested me to effect his arrest, and 
in company with Officers Ray O'Brien and John 
Scanlon I proceeded to investigate. 

Upon arriving at the spot where the Chrysler 
was parked I recognized the driver of the machine 
as Alex McDonald, a notorious narcotic peddler 
and an ex-convict, who had on a previous occa- 
sion been arrested by Corporal Albert Christ and 
Officer Patrick Walsh (also of my command). I 
questioned McDonald regarding the ownership of 
the machine and as he could not give me a satis- 
factory answer I decided to place him under arrest 
and ordered Officer Scanlon to take him in our 
machine and make a thorough search of his per- 
son for weapons and narcotics, while Officer Ray 
O'Brien and myself made a search of the Chrysler 
car. Unfortunately McDonald had cleverly con- 
cealed in a secret compartment located in the up- 
holstery of the Chrysler car a loaded 45 caliber 
Colt's revolver, which could not be detected ex- 
cept by one who was aware of its hiding place. I 
then instructed Officer Scanlon to take McDonald 
in the Chrysler car to the Hall of Justice for fur- 
ther investigation. 

Accompanied by Officer Ray O'Brien, I followed 
in the Department's Buick and picked up Officer 
James Coleman at Turk and Hyde streets. We 
then proceeded to closely follow the Chrysler ma- 
chine. As it passed Grant avenue and Washing- 
ton street I noticed a scuffle taking place in the 
Chrysler car. McDonald had taken from its hid- 



ing place the 45 calibre Colt revolver previously 
concealed by him and had thrust it against the 
side of Officer Scanlon who was driving the car 
and at the same moment threatening his life if 
he (Scanlon) did not comply with his command 
to speedily drive the car as he directed. 

This is the point where the training which Offi- 
cer Scanlon received in the Department School of 
Instructions was brought into play and with the 
agility of a cat, combined with the knowledge 
obtained in the Department School of Instruc- 
tions, he baffled McDonald's plans. He promptly 
set the foot brakes which stopped the momentum 
of the car and with his left hand quickly thrust 
the revolver to one side, and with his right hand 
grasped the barrel of same, thus preventing its 
discharge. In doing this it was necessary to leave 
go of the steering wheel and the machine jumped 
the curb and came to a stop against a building 
at the corner of Brennan Place and Washington 
street. Officers James Coleman, Ray O'Brien and 
myself presently came to the rescue of our brother 
officer who was still grappliing with McDonald for 
possession of the revolver. The thug tried des- 
perately to shoot one or more of us, but he was 
finally outwitted and overpowered. During the 
scuffle Officer Scanlon's finger was badly lacerated 
as the result of being caught by the trigger of the 
45 calibre revolver which prevented the gun from 
being discharged and which, no doubt, saved his 
life. 

The harrowing experiences of all of us during 
those brief moments will never be forgotten and 
we all can truthfully say that had it not been for 
the knowledge as to blocking of "gun play" re- 
ceived in the Department School of Instructions, 
Officer Scanlon would certainly have been shot and 
one or more of us might have made the supreme 
sacrifice in the service of the police department. 



MORE PRAISE FOR RONEY AND VAX MATRE 

There has been much favorable comment e.xpressed by 
some of our representative business men on the acts of 
bravery of Detective Sergeants Earl Roney and Vernon 
Van Matre, who participated in the capture of Tanko. 

The sentiment has been expressed that when our brave 
police officers perform their simple duty, regardless of con- 
sequences, that some e^■idence of commendation should be 
conveyed. May I, therefore, on behalf of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce, reflect to you these senti- 
ments, that in addition to any commendation which you 
find it proper to give to these men, that you may also add 
the appreciation of the business community. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 
ROBERT NEWTON LYNCH, 
Vice-President. 



Page 18 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— ROOM 9. HALL OF JUSTICE 
Ofi&cial Publication 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT; 

WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASS'N.; 

STATE HIGHWAY PATROLMENS' ASS'N. 

A Police News and Educational Magazine 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY "2-0" PUBLISHING CO. 

Printed by 

ALEX. DULFER PRINTING CO., 853 Howard Street 

Phone: DougUi 2377 



Make all Checks Payable to- 



."2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



OPIE L. WARNER 
JOHN F. QUINN 



...Editor 



-.Business Manager 



EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 
THEODORE J. ROCHE. President 
JXSSE B. COOK ; ANDREW F. MAHONY ; DR. THOS. E. SHUMATE 
DANIEL J. O'BRIEN. Chief of Police 

AUGUST VOLLMER, Past President International Association of 
Chiefs of Police 



Captain of Detectives 

DUNCAN MATHESON 
Captain HENRY GLEESON 
Captain EUGENE WALL 
Captain HENRY O'DAY 
Captain ROBERT A. COULTER 
Captain JOHN J. CA.SEY 
Captain FRED LEMON 
Captain STEPHEN V. BUNNER 
Captain PETER McGEE 



Captain BERNARD JUDGE 
Captain JOHN J. O'MEARA 
Captain H. J. WRIGHT 
Captain ARTHUR D. LAYNE 
Captain PATRICK HERMHY 
Captain CHARLES GOFF 
Captain WILLIAM J. QUINN 
Captain WM. T. HEALY 
Captain J. H. LACKMAN 
Captain CHARLES SKELLY 



SUBSCRIPTION TERMS— $3.00 a year in advance; 25 cents a num- 
ber. In Canada $3.50 a year. Remittances must be made by Post Office 
or Express Money Order, by Registered Letter, or by Postage Stamps 
of 2-cent denominations, or by check. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subscribe to "2-0" POLICE JOUR- 
NAL through agents unknown to you personally, or who cannot present 
proper credentials written on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



Vol. V. 



January, 1927 



No. 3. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM QUINN, CHIEF CLERK 



With the close of 1926, Capt. Wilham J. Quinn, 
Chief O'Brien's right hand man, completes his 
sixth year as chief clerk. 

Capt. Quinn, since his membership in the San 
Francisco Police Department, has been an officer 
of which the city can well be proud. In the days 
of the Barbary Coast, when things along that dis- 
trict were so tough policemen had to work in pairs, 
Patrolman Quinn performed his police duties in 
a manner that won the respect of his superior 
officers, and fear from the characters who hung 
around the Coast. He could do police work on any 
basis, and if some tough bird thought a little phys- 
ical combat might free him, he got a chance to try 
it and always came out second best. 

Then in Chinatown he was a valued member of 
Corp. O'Brien's squad. Fi'om there to the license 
bureau, thence to the outer office of Chief D. A. 
White. When Chief White passed away and 



Daniel J. O'Brien was made Chief of Police, the 
new Chief's first official act was to appoint his loyal 
fellow officer as chief clerk. 

In this position Captain Quinn has acquitted 
himself with the same credit as has marked his 
years of duty in the department. He has handled 
the varied details of the Chief's office in a com- 
mendable manner, arranged the details for all the 
big events that have been held during the past six 
years, competently held down the Chief's chair 
when the Chief was away, and has generally 
proven liimself a high-class, competent executive 
officer. 

We trust he holds the job as long as he desires. 



COMMISSIONER ROCHE RE-APPOINTED 

On January 3, Mayor James Rolph, Jr., reap- 
pointed Tlieodore J. Roche, police commissioner, 
making tlie fifth appointment to this position the 
president of the board has been honored with. 

President Roche was re-elected as head of the 
Board at the meeting following the appointment, 
a position he has had since he was first appointed 
in September, 1912. 

Reappointed in 1915, again in 1919, then in 1923 
and lastly this year. Commissioner Roche has 
brought to tlie Police Commission a legal mind, a 
keen understanding of the police business, a sym- 
pathetic heart, an unwavering fairness to all who 
come before the Board, that with Commissioners 
Jesse B. Cook, Dr. Thomas Shumate and Andrew 
Mahoney, makes it a commission that is un- 
equalled in any city in this country. 

Only one member of the Board has longer ser- 
vice than Commissioner Roche, and that is Com- 
missioner Cook, who was appointed in January, 
1912. 

The progress that the San Francisco Police De- 
partment has made in its work, and the reputa- 
tion it has attained, commenced with the admin- 
istration of the present Board, and they can look 
back on the years they have served and feel a 
satisfaction in the knowledge that they have func- 
tioned well and have been behind every move for 
the bringing of police work to the highest state of 
efficiency it is possible for a municipality to attain. 



BEST WISHES FROM THE MAYOR 

The following telegram has been received by Chief 
O'Brien from Mayor James Rolph, Jr.: 

"Please convey to all the members of your Department 
through your usual channels my very best wishes to them 
and their families for a Happy New Year." 



George Stone, accused of being a hit-nanner, was taken 
in custody by Officer J. Benn. 

* * * 

Mike Nichols, arrested by Officers A. Novembri and 
Walter Harrington, and George Kalcjner, nabbed by Lieut. 
Cullinan and posse, were booked as petty larcenists. 



January. 1927 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 

ADVERTISING THAT DIDN'T PAY 



Page 19 



Xavier S. Joffre, alias Santibanez, was arrested 
in tlie Palace Hotel on Jan. 10, 1927. His arrest 
was due to an advertisement inserted by him in 
the local morning papers, stating: 

Outdoor man for South American-Mexico 
enterprise, hunting with guns and cameras, 
Indian tribes, wild animals, etc. Also import- 
export business. Investment required. As- 
sured by commercial acceptance. Opportunity 
to make money. All expenses paid. Call 
Saturday or Sunday, room 5032, Palace Hotel. 
This advertisement was noticed by Curtis and 
Reagan who called on Joffre at the Palace Hotel 
in company with Loren Davis, house detective of 
the hotel. Curtis recognized Joffre as the pro- 
moter of a like scheme in 1922 in which fourteen 
men were induced to jgin in a hunting trip to 
Panama. Joffre secured $14,000.00 from the vic- 
tims and left them stranded at Panama. Joffre 
was attempting to put over the same scheme at 
the time of his arrest and during the time spent 
in his room investigating and questioning him, 
several persons called in response to the adver- 
tisement. 

Investigation showed that Joffre was a lying 
swindler. His entire capital when he entered the 
hotel on January 7th, 1927 was $100.00. At the 
time of his arrest this had dwindled to about $5.00. 
He was booked on a vagrancy charge and held 
for investigation. Later two victims of the 1922 
scheme showed up and filed Grand Larceny charg- 
es against him. He is now in jkil awaiting hear- 
ing on those charges. 

At the time of arrest Joffre had a brief case in 
his room. On searching same it was found filled 
with shirts, stockings, etc., just received from the 
laundry. Joffre intended taking French leave from 
the hotel without bothering paying his bill, only 
he intended moving with the brief case instead of 
the proverbial cigar box. 



Corp. William Boyle kept the wagon running, shooting 
in vags and his list was quite ample. 



Phone Sutter 6472 



The Original and Only 

Betts Spring Co. 

Established 1868 

Automobile and Auto 
Truck Springs 



Office and Factory 
888-890 FoLSOM Street San Francisco 



Automobile Insurance 




P.\CIFIC DEPT. SAN FRANCISCO 



CHAS. C. MOORE & CO., ENGINEERS 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF 
COMPLETE POWER PLANTS 

Main Office: SHELDON BLDG., SAN FRANCISCO 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



BRANCH OFTICES- 

Salt Lake New York 



Portland 



Phoenix 



Vancouver 



Page 20 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



HALL OF JUSTICE HAS ANOTHER BOMB 
SCARE 



Last month some fiend in'human guise left in the 
telephone booth on the first floor, one of the most 
destructive bombs that has come under the obser- 
vation of the San Francisco Police Department. 
Before it had time to explode Robert Berg, police 
reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, dis- 
covered it, and with members of the detective bu- 
reau night shift opened the Gladstone bag contain- 
ing the infernal machine. 

When it was discovered that a bomb was inside 
the bag, the contraption was isolated. A call was 
made for volunteers to take the bomb apart and 
reduce it to uselessness. Detective Sergt. Rich- 
mond Tatham was on the job and he took it apart. 

It was an acid bomb, that is, it was exploded by 
a vial of acid eating its way through four layers 
of silk; three layers had already been penetrated 
by the acid and but one more, a few minutes, and 
the chemically filled cylinder, capped at both ends, 
would have set off the explosive and more dam- 
age would have been done to the Hall of Justice 
than the bomb a couple of years ago. 

Powder experts say the chemicals in the cylin- 
der, when exploded, would have produced a strik- 
ing force of 10,000 pounds to the square foot. 
Lives would have been snuffed out had it not been 
for the timely discovery by Berg and the fearless 
action of Tatham. 

Tathan's bravery brought the following from 
Chief O'Brien: 

"The greatest exhibition of personal courage I 
have ever seen." 

Tatham said: "It's all in the business; some 
one had to do it, why not I." 



HUNT'S 

QUALITY 

FRUITS 

HUNT BROTHERS' PACKING 
COMPANY 

CANNED FRUITS AND 
VEGETABLES 

Main Office 
2 PINE ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

CANNERIES 

CALIFORNIA — Hayward, San Jose, Los Gates, 
Exeter, Suisun 

OREGON — Salem, McMinnville, Albany 
WASHINGTON — Puyallup, Sumner 



Fisher's Dancing Pavilion 

Eddy and Jones Streets 
DANCING EVERY EVENING 

Huic br 

DR. RITTEB'S GOLDEN GATE SINGING BAND 

ADMISSION II CENTS 



THE HERMANN SAFE CO. 



MANUFACTURERS- 



-DEALERS 



Fire and 

Burglar 

Proof 

Safes 




Vaults, 

Safe 

Deposit 

Boxes, 

Etc. 



HOWARD AND MAIN STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAU 



January, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 



By Patrol Driver William D. Burns 

Apropos of the retirement of Detective Sergt. 
James Cottle during the month of January, I am 
reminded of a series of incidents that happened 
during the first trying days of our earthquake 
and fire, in which the veteran poHce officer played 
an unknowing, and certainly an unwilling part, in 
a little drama that almost proved tragical to the 
writer. 

During the first days of the great calamity, 
when everything was in disorder, and excitement 
ran high, Cottle, like all other members of the de- 
partment was doing police duty day and night 
as best he could. In some unaccountable manner 
he lost his police star and continued to perform 
his duty with a badge given to him by Chief 
Dinan who was in charge of the department at 
that time. 

Now it so happened that a report was received 
by the military authorities within a few days that 
a civilian wearing a police star number fifteen 
had torn the earrings from the ears of a woman, 
and orders had been issued to shoot the wearer 
of said star on sight. 

The writer was attached to the Park Police 
Station on Stanyan street at that time, as a patrol 
driver and my star number was also fifteen. I 
was in ignorance of the brutal attack on the wo- 
man, as no orders had been received by me at that 
time. 

During those days all members of the Police 
and Fire Depai'tments wore their badges at all 
times on their civilian clothes, and on one of these 
occasions I reported for duty at midnight, and 
Lieut. Kelly said to me, "You better bury that 
star," but, as he made no further explanation, I 
continued to wear it. 

On the following day I was stopped by a sol- 
dier while walking through the cut on Duboce 
avenue where a Militia regiment was encamped. 
I was brought before the officer in charge and 
questioned as to who I was and where I obtained 
that star. I was able to prove my right to it, and 
continued on my way to Haight and Scott, when 
I was again stopped by a sergeant and two pri- 
vates and marched back to another military out- 
fit in Duboce Park, where I was again questioned 
even more thoroughly than before, and then one 
of the soldiers said he didn't think that was the 
star the order referred to. Luckily I had several 
letters in my possession that at least proved my 
identity and once more I was allowed to go, still 
in ignorance of the order issued to the soldiers. 

That night when I reported for duty I was met 
by Chief Dinan who explained the whole mys- 
tery to me, laughed at my experiences of the day 
and loaned me a newer and safer star. 

WM. D. BURNS. 



HARTFORD 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 
720 California Street 

HARTFORD 

ACCIDENT AND INDEMNITY 
COMPANY 

720 California Street 
SAN FRANaSCO, CALIF. 



Writing Practically Every Form of 
Insurance Except Life 



Combined Resources $115,000,000.00 
Combined Capital and Surplus Over $31,000,000.00 



Paid in San Francisco Conflagration 
Over $9,000,000.00 



More Power 




"My old car topped a hill at 23 miles 
per hour that 1 thought impossible to 
make in high." 

— M. H., of Centralia.VVash. 

The new and greater General Gasoline 
is "economy fuel," but power has not 
been sacrificed to produce more gas- 
miles. 

GENERAL 
GASOLINE 



Pr o r e d fcy 
THE PUBLIC 




So I J th rough 
INDEPENDENTS 



GASpUNEy 

{Look for the Green and White Sign} 



Page 22 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



CAPTAIN GOFF LECTURES IN CHURCH 



Extracts from an address made at Howard 
Presbyterian Church on a recent Sunday, by 
Captain Charles Goff of the Southern district. 

Captain Goff made the following- references to 
Chief O'Brien and the police department: 

During the years of 1919 and 1920, the ex- 
convicts being released from the Northwestern 
Penitentiary were coming to San Francisco. One 
of the officials of the State prison at Walla Walla 
had warned Captain Matheson and myself, at that 
time, that such was the case. 

The Northwestern States were dry. San 
Francisco was wet. Under the National Prohi- 
bition act the police had little or no control over 
the blind pigs. 

You remember the Howard street shack case 
and its revelations — that over 50 desperate ex- 
convicts were in our midst. Public opinion was 
worked up to a dangerous pitch. So it was a 
trying situation that Dan O'Brien faced when he 
was sworn in as Chief of Police, but he tackled 



the job with a smile and immediately started a 
clean-up. 

Chief White had been sick for some time and 
the ex-convicts were flocking here from Northern 
dry States, seeking shelter afforded by numbers. 
But Chief O'Brien knew the police business, also 
he knew men and how to place them to get re- 
sults. He said he would clean up the city and he 
did. 

Now and then you see headlines in the daily 
l)apers, headlines about waves of crime, but I as- 
sure you that the crime wave has not swept this 
city, and I can prove it by those very same papers. 
Here is a statement from one of the daily papers 
showing that San Francisco has one of the lowest 
burglary and robbery insurance rates of any city 
in the United States. These insurance companies 
are not a bit sentimental when it comes to figur- 
ing rates of insurance. You will find their fig- 
ures based on facts, for they are cold-blooded 
when their mpneyis at stake. You will find our 
rates on such insurance about one-third of the 
rates in other cities. 




One Hundred and Eighteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



SAVINGS 



CO M M ERC I AL. 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolida tions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

826 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



. , DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets — 

United States Bonds, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and Securities 

(total value $32,674,080.25), standing on books at $29,573,305.89 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 69,335,912.91 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities...... ..." 1,776,558.10 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $1,880,000.00), 

standing on books at ." 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value over $60,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $565,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 11,090,787.56 

Total $111,776,567.46 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $107,226,567.46 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,550,000.00 

Total $111,776,567.46 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Vice-President and Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1926. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE- QUARTER (4M) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 
AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 

Deposits made on or before January 10th, 1927, will earn interest from January 1st, 1927. 



January, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 2i 



"We have the best record of any city in Amer- 
ica in automobile losses and other offenses. By 
checking up on crime reports you will find that 
San Francisco is second to none in police effi- 
ciency. 

"It is true we occasionally have morons like 
Kelly and his gang, who suddenly run amuck and 
after stealing an automobile, commit several 
crimes, but they are always caught. A crowd of 
such morons can, by use of the automobile, com- 
mit thirty crimes to one such crime before the 
advent of the automobile. 

"How about pay-roll bandits? The San Fran- 
cisco Police Department has transported millions 
of dollars in pay-rolls and have never lost a penny 
of any pay-roll they were guarding. The South- 
ern district keeps one officer and automobile es- 
pecially for conveying pay-rolls and bank deposits 
alone. One week we handled over one and one- 
half million dollars. We have been doing tJiat 
very thing for 5 years and 10 months and liave 
never lost a penny of any pay-roll that we were 
covering. Only two small pay-rolls have been 
lost in six years, and they were lost by companies 
who refused our help. 

"The San Francisco Police Department takes 
great pride in its friendship for children — a sort 
of partnership which is reflected in the lack of 
Juvenile offenses. Considering the increase in 
population, there has been a decrease in such 
offenses since 1917. The records of the juvenile 
court show that 678 juvenile offenses were com- 
mitted in 1918; 911 in 1921, and only 753 in 1925. 

"In the Southern district alone there has been 
a decrease in both crime and property loss since 
1919. There were 1299 felonies committed in 
that disti-ict in 1919, with a property loss of 
$134,365.64 from those felonies alone. In 1925 
there were 1080 felonies and a total property 
loss from all crimes amounted to $80,680." 



A THOUGHT FOR EVERY DAY 



When you work for a man, in lieaven's name 
work for him. Speak well of him and stand by 
the institution he represents. Remember an 
ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness. 
If you must gi'owl, condemn and eternally find 
fault, resign your position, and when you are on 
the outside damn to your heart's content; but 
as long as you are a part of the institution do 
not condemn it. If you do, the first high wind 
that comes along will blow you away and proba- 
blv vou will never know why. — Exchange. 



Sergt. Mark Higgins, who will be a lieutenant one of 
these days, rounded up Lloyd Murphy, who was landed in 
the city prison with a "kick" of assault by means and 
^orce likely to produce great bodily harni. 



ALWAYS 

On The Job 

Like the faithful buoy serving 
the traffic of the sea, the Harbor 
Tug and Barge Company's fleet 
is always on duty. 

365 days are the service year 
of the Harbor Tug and Barge 
Co. 

The efficient organization op' 
erating the largest fleet of its kind 
on the Pacific Coast, including 
Diesel Tugs, Derrick Barges, 
Wrecking Gear, etc., performing 
all forms of Bay and River Tow- 
ing, is composed of experts who 
^noic' how. 

They are ready to ser\'e you 
—ANY TIME! 



Harbor 

Tug & Barge 

Co. 

Howard St. Wharf — San Francisco 
Telephone Davenport 1855 

Franklin St. Wharf— Oakland 
Telephone Oakland 274 

The 

Dominant Service 

that 

Spans the Bay 



Page 24 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL January. 1927 

QiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ 




aifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiininiiiii(iH^ 



The publishers of 2-0 Police Journal wish every member 
of the department the happiest and most prosperous 12 

months of 1927. 

* * * 

Officer Samuels, chief deputy under Inspector Edward 
Lynch, says Ed hasn't changed much since he got married. 
Sam does say, however, that Ed has been pricing washing 
machines, dish washing contraptions and other modern 
inventions that make house work less irksome. Ed says 
Sam has been exposed and may break out in matrimony 
most any time now. 

* * * 

Police Officer Richard Manning of the Richmond Station 
reports the loss of his locker and signal box keys as well 
as the keys to his home. They were lost between the sta- 
tion and 29th and Castro streets. 

* » * 

Officers John Dooling and James Morley of the Central 
District, brought in Jose Ayla, Jesus Balmeron, Fred Cur- 
reon, Vicente Carlok, Mike Castillas and William Felix, 
who were engaged in doing some petty stealing. 

* * * 

The many friends of Leslie C. Gillen, efficient and well- 
liked police reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, will 
be sorry to learn that he has been in St. Mary's Hospital 
where he underwent a serious capital operation earlier in 
the month. All the members of the department around 
the Hall of Justice will certainly pull for his speedy re- 
covery. 

* * * 

Charles Metzger, wanted by the U. S. Marshal, \vas ar- 
rested by Detective Sergeants George Richards, Henry 
Kalmbach and Officers C. Christensen and P. Geauge of 

the Ingleside Station. 

* * * 

Detective Sgts. Arthur McQuaide and William ProU and 
Officer Joseph Barker of the Bush Station, arrested John 
Lehner, wanted for defrauding a taxi driver, en route to 
Oakland, and passing worthless checks. 

* * * 

Chester Beam, wanted down in Ventura, was arrested on 
the 13th of December by Detectives George Page, Frank 
Jackson and Charles Dorman. 

* * =*: 

Detective Sgts. Michael Desmond and Barth Kelleher 
curtailed the following of their liberty during the past few 
days: Arthur Jatton, embezzlement; Varnon Gill and 
James Sullivan, manslaughter, violating state prohibition 
act; Harry Franklin, fugitive; and Candidjo Andrado, re- 
ceiving stolen property. 

* * * 

Officer Al Williams, for years in the central district, has 
gone out to the Bush District. Al is assistant engineer on 
the Station Ford. 

* :is * 

Corp. Thomas Mclnerney kept up his batting average, 
maintained since being assigned to the Chief's office. He 
had over a dozen wrong doers whom he landed behind 
chilled bars. 



Special Duty Officer William Bennett, from the Chief's 
detail, also kept on high and demanded the sei^v'ices of the 
patrol wagon a dozen or more times. 

* * * 

Officers Patrick Walsh and Al Christ heaped a lot of sor- 
row on the heads of gents who would not heed the ad- 
monition of "seek ye honest work". This pair landed a 
score in the city prison and among them were a couple 
of shoplifters, Joseph Lemon and Aruelio Gayton, who 
got a burglary charge against their names, which had been 
written on other police prison books. 

* * * 

Sgt. John J. Manion and his squad of boys in Chinatown 
rounded up a gang of tong gunmen, who, being out of work 
since the recent peace signing between the latest warring 
tongs, flocked to this city, and as they needed money, they 
might get busy trying to start something, so Manion and 
his men vagged about a dozen of them. 

* * » 

The Chinatown Squad also arrested Edward Bailiff for 
manslaughter; Pauline Stark for grand larceny; Lee Fook, 
for selling opium; and Otto Davis and John Brown, for 
larceny. 

* * » 

Officer Tom Handley, veteran member of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department, and for years and years doing 
duty in the Central District, particularly along the docks, 
has been assigned bailiff in Judge Joseph Golden's court, 
filling a vacancy in the list of bailiffs made by the appoint- 
ment of Luther Arentz a corporal. Arentz was in Judge 
Jack's department of the police court, but Bailiff Mannie 
Joy was switched from Golden's court and Handley took 
Joy's place. Bailiff Handley is a good man for the place 
and his host of friends sure are pleased to see him get 
the job. 



ECONOMY 



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Palace 



January, 1927 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 25 




POTRERO 

STATION 



Capt. Harry J. O'Day 
Lieutenants Albert S. Munn, J. C. Malloy 

Captain Henry O'Day says if the year 1927 is as good 
to his district as 1926 was, he will certainly be pleased. 
Crime in the Potrero has been at its minimum, and that 
which was committed was quickly solved and those respon- 
sible put where the canines would not bother them. 

* * * 

Sam Degrura needed a box of shells. He came across 
some; they were just what he wanted, so he took them. 
However, he did not comply with the provisions of Sec. 
496 of the much used penal code. Officer Tom O'Connor 
brought him in after the "kick" was registered. 

* * * 

Officer O'Connor also, assisted by Officer John Coglan, 
speared Nick Nelson, who was wanted on a charge of 
robbery. 

^ :^ df 

Once in a while a gent wanders out this way in his 
automobile and does not observe the tenets of Sec. 112 of 
the Motor Vehicle Act. When he does amble out this way 
and does this thing, he is sure to bump into a police officer 
who will take the proper actions to remove him as a 
hazard to innocent bystanders. Joseph Boroak did this 
very thing and he bumped into Officers P. King and Frank 
Mascarelli and the next thing he knew he was in the sta- 
tion booked as above and a charge of reckless driving as 
well. 

Officer King assisted Officer Charles Neary in the cere- 
monies attendant to the arresting of Alex. Kornof for 
grand larceny. 



"KNOCKOVERS" 

(Continued from Page 13) 
garnered the past month were: George Beamish for Los 
Angeles; John Gustavson for Riverside; James Sterling 
for Florida; John Hughes and Balus Jacobs, wanted here 
for omitting to provide for minor children. 

* * * 

Fred Dorris, wanted for abandoning his wife, got locked 
up by Detective Charles Dorman. 

* * * 

Detective Sergt. Allan McGinn and Detective Charles 
Iredale booked Frank Kelly at the city prison charged with 
being a hit-runner. 

* * * 

Detective Sergts. Edward Wiskotchill and Thomas Con- 
Ion arested Edward Harner as a fugitive. 



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Page 26 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, J 927 




BAY VIEW 

STATION 



Capt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowie 

Captain Stephen Bunner says one of the greatest events 
attending the year 1926 was the malcing of William Har- 
rington a corporal. Corp. Harrington now has two uni- 
forms, one blue, the other yellow. 

* * * 

Guess John Frazer will be sort of careful when he oozes 
out this way hereafter, especially if he is taking a "gander" 
at the varied and beautiful scenery that projects itself 
here and yon in the Bay View District. John got this use- 
ful bit of infomnation as a result of his experience with 
Officer Edward Gerlach who watched him trying to drive 
his car as a man in possession of all his faculties should 
not operate it. John got a reading of violating Sec. 112 
of the Motor Act. Yes sir-ee-bob, as Corp. Charles Brown 
says, you sure have got to be law-abiding if you want to 
get along in the Bay View. 

* * * 

Officer Thomas May gave Frank Hughes a pretty fair 
idea of the efficiency of the personnel of this station the 
other day when he locked Frank up for violating Sec. 417 
of the penal code. Corp. Rudy Maier says he bets there 
are policemen in this department who don't know what 
Sec. 417 is. Sergt. Cyrus Lance says Rudy sure knows 
what he's talking about. 



THEY HAVE PASSED ON 

During the past month the grim reaper lias 
reached in and taken from our midst a number of 
police officers. 

Officer Fred Smith, for many years an efficient 
and courteous officer in the city prison, was called 
as the old year was passing out. He was as well 
liked by the unfortunates who came under his care 

as he was so well liked by his fellow officers. 

* * * 

Lieut. William Lambert of the Ingleside Station, 
after a long illness, succumbed to the call of a 
higher Chief and was buried on Dec. 11. Lieut. 
Lambert was connected with a number of stations 
during his police career and had many friends in 

and out of the department. 

* * * 

Retired Lieut. Shadrick Campbell, who in years 
gone by was in charge of the Golden Gate Park 
District and who was known for his strict en- 
forcement of laws pertaining to the Park, died on 
December 26. 

* * # 

Fire Marshal Michael Hannon, though not a 
member of the department, was so near so that he 
was considered part of the organization. At his 
funeral on December 4th, Chief O'Brien assigned 
a police escort for the able and fearless marshal. 



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Officer William Porter and G. Lillis arrested George F. 
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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 27 




HARBOR 

STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

They don't get by when they bounce down the bad paper 
along the front. Bert Haywards found that out after he 
was arrested by Sergt. J. J. Farrell for passing worthless 
checks. 

Samuel McMasters is said to be a fugitive. He was 

picked up by Officer Robert Husted. 

* * * 

John Parker must have read something about the water- 
front of early days and felt it was not safe unless you had 
a six gun strapped to your belt. He tried going armed and 
Corps. Emil Hearne and J. Byrne ran him in for violating 

the state revolver law. 

* * * 

Harry Snowden got hooked by Officer W. Doran when he 
was steering an uncertain course along the streets down 

this way. He was charged with driving while intoxicated. 

* * * 

Inez Zarraga, charged with assault with intent to com- 
mit murder, was kept from a more serious charge by being 
arrested by Lieut. Wilford Pengelly. 
« « * 

Officer Harry Frustick grabbed Carl Wagner, wanted for 
manslaughter. 

* * * 

Edward Barrett got himself surrounded by a lot of steel 
bars when he was pulled in by Officers H. Peshon and J. 
Long, who accused him of assault with a deadly weapon. 

* * * 

Two charges held Frederick A. Rapp for assault with a 
deadly weapon. He was arrested by Officers Doran and 
Frusdick. 



WIDOWS AND ORPHANS AID OFFICERS 



The officers elected last month, in one of the 
hottest contested elections held in recent years 
by the members of the San Fi-ancisco Police 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association, were in- 
stalled Fi'iday afternoon, January 14. 

The new President, J. J. Cummings, took over 
the office from the retiring president, Lieut. 
Michael Griffin, who during the past year had 
headed the association. 

For President 

Officer John J. Cummings _._.. 

For Vice-President 

Corp. Peter R. Maloney _._ 

For Treasurer 

Officer Gilbert P. Chase Headquarters 

For Recording Secretary 

Coi-p. George F. Kopman _ _ _ Headquarters 

For Financial Secretary 

Officer James W. Boyle — -.. 

For Trustee 

Detective Sergt. Leo E. Bunner _._ 

Detective Sergt. George F. Wall 

Detective Sergt. Harry L. Cook. 

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Page 28 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. Frederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

There sure was an epidemic of violators of Section 112 
of the Motor Vehicle Act out this way. Those arrested, 
however, do not live in this district, selecting the fine paved 
streets as a means of passing in or out of the city. 

The roll call is: 

Joseph Taylor, arrested by Officers J. McVeigh and 

E. Keck. 

Jesse Pledger, arrested by Officer Joseph Brouders. 
David Ryan, arrested by Officers P. Griffin and F. 
Glennon. 

Lester C. Wilson, arrested by Sergt. John McCormack. 
Martin C. Rhode and Henry Fowler, arrested by Officer 

F. Nuttman. 

John Lesto, arrested by Officers William Barnes and 
F. Desmond. 

Thomas Curtin, arrested by Officer P. Slane. 
Frank Phillips, arrested by Officer Charles Foster. 
Joseph Birch, arrested by Officer C. Wennuberg. 

* * » 

Herman Stahl was arrested by Lieut. Oollins and 
charged with murder and two charges of assault with in- 
tent to commit murder. 

* * * 

Sergt. Fred Suttman and posse brought in George Car- 
rolle, who was given the following bookings: Robbery, 
having a car without the owner's consent, and assault by 
means and force likely to do great bodily injury. 

* * * 

Officer George Ewing got a hit and run charge put 
against Joseph Polger, as well as one charging reckless 

driving. 

* * * 

Reed Mosoo had an accident with his automobile that 

resulted in a death. He was booked for manslaughter by 

Officer C. Foster and Detective Sergt. Allan McGinn and 

Detective Charles Iredale. 

» * * 

Fred Pidgeon knows by now that it is "agin the law" 
to be "totin' a pop" in this state. He was put into the 

covered wagon by Officers Foster and W. Curran. 

» * * 

"Felony Embezzlement" was the charge opposite the 
name of Alfred Herman, who was arrested by Officer 

Nuttman. 

* * * 

Officer Frank Molke booked Frank Goldie on a charge 

of violating the juvenile court law. 

* * * 

Tony Bozonovich walked off with a couple of cans of 
coffee and was apprehended by Officers J. Donohue and 

C. Meyer, who charged him with petty larceny. 

* * * 

Sergt. Thomas Roche and Officer A. Smith "knocked 
over" Elmer Wheadon, whom they charged with petty lar- 
ceny and vagrancy. Wheadon took a course at San Quentin 
and a post graduate course at Folsom. First thing he 
knows he will be a permanent guest at the latter place. 

* * * 

Arnold Ortaga and Lester Ford were the only two vags 
arrested in this district during the month. Their down- 
fall was caused by Officer Weinert. 



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January. 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




BUSH ST. 

STATION 



Capt. John J. Casey 
Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mi^rnola 

Gents who partook too freely of the flowing bowl, and 
who could not navigate an automobile according to the pro- 
visions of Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act, gave the 
police in this sector plenty of work during the month, 
almost equalling the arrests in the Mission for off'enders 
of this sort. 

Those who ran afoul of the law were: 

Julius Quistberg, arrested by Officers Gus Wuth and 
Matt Tiemey. 

Raie Snow, arrested by Officers C. Tobin and J. Reardon. 

Louis Goz, by Officers Joseph Barker and Fred Kcrsch- 
ner. 

George Eldridge, arrested by Officer John Dolan. 

Dementre Dcmstrof, arrested by Officer Engler. 

Ruby French, arrested by Officer J. Cloney. 

Mamie Dobin, arrested by Officer Matt TieiTiey. 

Clara Hughes, arrested by Officer E. Connell. 

* * * 

Officers Eugene Hettinger and E. Keene were responsi- 
b'e for the arrest of Joseph Keefe on a charge of assault 

with a deadly weapon. 

* * * 

Officer Edward Gough rounded up a flock of schoolboys 
whom he caught burglarizing a school house. They were 
all charged with burglary and taken to the juvenile deten- 
tion home. 

* * * 

Some folks will insist on going armed in the Bush Dis- 
trict, and when they do it is a long odds bet that those who 
so insist will get a ride to the station. Ask John Kazarin, 
arrested by H. Kiernan and R. Vogt, or Raymond Baldwin, 
arrested by Corp. James Ray, or William Bigley, arrested 
by Officer J. Cooper, all booked for violating the State 

revolver law. 

* * * 

Alfred Molvik was nabbed by Officer C. Tobin and 
Thomas Natthes by Officer L. Rose, when they were appre- 
hended enjoying the scenery from an automobile they had 
surreptitiously taken while the owner wasn't around. 

* » * 

John L. Winn tagged by Officer A. Hutchinson and John 
L. Winn, likewise by Officer J. Gleeson, were charged with 
assault with a deadly weapon when taken to the station. 

* * * 

Lieut. Mignola escorted R. Morrow Hamilton to the 
city prison after arresting him for assault to murder. 

* * * 

Lemuel Ledford, wanted in San Jose for auto stealing, 

was apprehended by Officer J. Cooper. 

* » * 

Officer Engler gave Louis Shankland plenty of grief to 
wiggle out of when he booked him for vagrancy, violating 
the state revolver law, the state poison law and threats 

against life. 

* * * 

Hilton Farrell and Kenneth Turner, a couple of youths 
who had no car, took one that looked good to them, though 
they did not know the owner. This little act cau.sed them 
to be arrested by Officers J. Ross and H. Kiernan, who 
charged the pair with violating Sec. 146 of the Motor 
Vehicle Act. 



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Page 30 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



TRAFFIC BUREAU 

Captain Henry Gleeson 
Lieutenants J. J. Casey, J. (Cliff) Field and Grover Coats 



Captain Henry Gleeson, who for the past three months 
has been laid up from a serious operation, is steadily 
mending and his family say he will soon be fully recov- 
ered. 

* * * 

Lieut. John J. Casey, in temporary command of the 
Traffic Bureau, is handling the job like he had been used to 
it all his life. Well, it is said a good policeman can make 
good in any job of his calling. 

* * * 

Detective Sgt. Harry Walsh, for years in charge of the 
so-called hack detail, which now handles the automotive 
traffic attendant upon theatres, has taken a pension and 
is going to recover from injuries to his pedal extremeties. 
Harry has been a member of the department for many 
years. He was an honest, efficient and capable officer. As 
a member of Corporal Daniel J. O'Brien's Chinatown 
squad in 1913 he displayed a loyalty to his superiors that 
won for him continued advancement as the Chief pro- 
gressed. His going will be missed by many who will wish 
for him every happiness in whatever undertaking he en- 
gages in. 

* ;.^- * 

And Officer William Rakestraw, who for years has been 
associated with Sgt. Walsh, has been drafted for the 
detective bureau and this month took up his duties on the 
night detail in the bureau. As a traffic officer and as a 
member of the hack detail, Rakestraw has displayed abil- 
ity, courtesy and pep. He will prove a valuable addition 
to the bureau. 

* :|> * 

Some day Traffic Oflncer Mildahn of Captain Glee.son's 
clerical staff will get a job as efficiency e.xpert. He deliv- 
ers the goods on his present job and as the boys up on 
Broadway say, "comprehends his garlic". 

* * -p 

Traffic Officer L. O'Connell displayed his ability to step 
off a corner and grab a wrong doer in other lines than 
traffic. He arrested Nicholas Brown, many aliases, for 
i)etty larceny and en route to Redwood City. 

* * * 

, Another petty larcenist arrested by a traffic officer was 
one taken in custody by Officer E. Anderson. 

« * « 

Luther Arentz, for over six years bailiff in Judge Lile 
T. Jacks Department of the Police Court, was promoted to 
the rank of Corporal last month following the death of 
Lieut. William Lambert. 

Corp. Arentz has been assigned to motorcycle duty with 
Corp. Archie Schmidt, and this pair of non-coms will have 
the handling of the motorcycle squad. 



CARDS OF THANKS 



I wish to express my most sincere thanks to your dear 
self and the members of your department for all the kind- 
ness and good thoughts and lovely flowers sent in the 
darkest hour of my life. 

With my heartiest thanks and kindest personal regards, 
I am, 

ELIZABETH J. HAYES, 

405 Capp Street. 

* * * 

The family of the late Robert J. Hayes acknowledge with 
deep appreciation your kind expression of sympathy. 
ALYCE SHEEHAN HAYES, 
ELIZABETH HAYES. 



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Last month we defined the First Mortgage Bond. The Refund- 
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that type of bond the inexperienced investor needs guidance in 
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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 




PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'Meara 
Lieutenants Charles A. PfeifFer and Fred W. Norman 

Captain Jolin O'Meara says the people are getting wiser. 
Says the flock of sheep in the park haven't been sold to 

some visiting yokel for over a year. 

* * * 

The month's toll of intoxicated drivers was small for 
December. The following got their names smeared on the 
police records for mixing gin with gas: Joe Lapkin, ar- 
rested by Officer P. Gleeson; Charles Pazok, arrested by 
Officers R. Smith and Ed Fewer; Ernest Roberts, by Officer 
Joseph Foye. ^ ^ , 

Fred Smith got himself enmeshed with the well-known 
law when he drove off in another man's machine without 
the formality of grabbing permission to do so. Officer 
Foye presided at this function, hanging a Sec. 146 charge 
after his name. * , » 

John Doretti, who has a charge of assault to commit 
murder facing him, was given police escort by Corp. Glen 

Hughes and Officers J. McCarthy and B. Smith. 

* * * 

Officers A. Nicolini got a trio of prow-lers who were 
making things bad for the residents around the Forest Hill 
sector. The gents taken to the hoose-gow, properly 
charged, were Robert Henning, Herb Parmenter and Robert 
Marquero. * * * 

Officers Andrew Coleman, C. Weyman, B. Hall and J. 
Tuemey combined their police ability in rounding up one 
John Dunlap, who had been, according to well founded re- 
ports, engaged in some window lifting and house prowling. 

* * * 

James Maher was hanging around the district trying to 
evade work. Officers W. Ryan, W. Riley and J. Palmer 
took him to prison on a vag charge. 



A. J. KANE BOOSTS POLICE 



In an address before the Mutual Business Club, 
at their weekly luncheon at the Palace Hotel one 
day last month, and which was broadcasted, A. J. 
Kane, of the Kane Detective Agency, after telling 
of the robbery and apprehension of the robbers of 
the Alvarado Bank in 1920, when $23,000 was 
stolen, paid a high tribute to the San R-ancisco 
Police Department when he told of the able work 
of men in our department in solving and rounding 
up this dangerous band of bank thugs, as well as 
of the splendid work of the Alameda authorities. 

Then he told of another I'obbery. He said : 

On January 11, 1924, the Orpheum Theatre was 
held up and the men pulling the job got away with 
over $7000, receipts of two performances. 

"Realizing the necessity of getting some depend- 
able co-operation and knowing the reputation of 
Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson, I went 
to him, and he assigned the Robbery Detail, under 
command of Sergt. George McLoughlin. And I 
(Continued on Page 32) 



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Page 32 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

This district is the only police section which got by the 
month without any drunken automobile drivers trying to 
tear up the landscape. Other evil doers were not so active, 
but the police promptly attended to the small number that 
did try their luck. * si * 

Special Gillispie eliminated a dangerous hazard when 
he picked up John Winthrop who was skimming along 
serenely with a big gun strapped to his hip. See another 

story of this arrest in this issue. 

* * * 

William Bourns laid down one "bum check", and see 
what happened to him. Officers Walter Francis and Ed 
Schmidt gathered him in their arms, poured him into the 
waiting wagon and booked him for violating Section 476a 
of the penal code. * * * 

Dominico Guglielmini was another dangerous risk for 
the folks out here. He was ambling along in devious places 
when obsei-ved by Officers George O'Brien and E. Schuldt, 
who also obsen'ed a familiar bulge, no bottle bulge either. 
They gave Doiie a frisk and found a gat. They booked 

him for breaking the revolver law. 

* ^ * 

Officer Charles Cornelius found Thomas 0. McCabe walk- 
ing off with some chattels of another person worth less 
than $200, so he gave Tommy some reading that said petty 
larceny. ^ ^ ^ 

William Lester had no valid reason for going about 
the Richmond armed with a gun so he was arrested by 
Officers J. Green and Robert Manning and booked accord- 
ingly. 

* * * 

Officers George O'Brien and J. O'Leary found it incum- 
bent to arrest and lock up Ludwig Reise for disturbing the 

peace and vagrancy. 

* * * 

Kenneth Vancours, percolating through the Richmond 
scenery too unsteadily, was arrested as a 112'er by Officers 
J. Green and Richard Manning. 



KANE 

(Continued from Page 31) 
want to tell you gentlemen how, working in close 
harmony with these valiant and capable officers we 
went to work, and the men of the San Francisco 
Police Department working with me, got some hot 
tips on the hideout of the men who had connec- 
tions with the theatre job. 

"This place was in a bootleg joint out on Geary 
street. We went there, expecting to find trouble. 
Without any great display of authority or arguing 
. over what was the best way, Sergt. McLoughlin 
placed his men at strategic points, and we got 
ready to "crash the joint", which is a way of say- 
ing entering it. 

"McLoughlin and I led the way, and I want to 
impress upon you gentlemen that the feeling of 
(Continued on Page 33) 



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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 33 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. Eugene Wall 



Maybe Reno Sibona and Andrew Piazza thought they 
had lawful use to carry guns out in this district, but they 
couldn't convince Officers S. Dubose and C. Wafer that they 
had legal grounds for going about armed with revolvers. 
This failure on their part caused the pair to be booked 
for violating the state gun law. 

* * * 

Anna Johnson got a ride to the station on a burglary 
charge, having been arrested by Officers T. Whalen and A. 
Smith. 

« * * 

Perry Mann kept this district from having a clean score 
as far as violations of Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act 
is concerned. He had to wander out this way and he got 
liimself arrested by Officers C. Radford and M. Driscoll. 

* * * 

Officers Dominic Hogan and James McVeigh felt that 
Harold Strunk was wasting too much time dodging work, 
so they made up their minds to make the dodging easier; 
they ragged him and put him in the station cells where 
there isn't very much to do but watch the time fly by. 



KANE 

(Continued from Page 32) 
security, under such circumstances, when you 
know there were half a dozen guns backed bj^ 
brave, fearless and courageous officers, was one 
that made a person feel that he was with a bunch 
of fellows who would finish with you when once 
they started with you. 

"McLoughlin broke in the door, and we found 
three men, not the men wanted for the Orpheum 
job, and from these we got information that led 
to even better clews. 

"The three men apprehended were jail breakers 
and were wanted in half a dozen cities, and had 
there not been the necessary precaution taken in 
entering the house, a windup akin to the shooting 
of Sergt. Earl Roney and Sergt. Vemon Van 
Matre. 

"These two brave officers, with their equally 
brave companions, Sergts. Jack Palmer and Ed- 
ward McSheehy displayed the fortitude and nerve, 
the bravery that has marked every crisis faced by 
a San Francisco police officer. In all its history, 
never a man has hesitated to meet the crook on 
his own terms, no quarter asked, none given. 

"I am glad that at this time I can say to such 
a representative body of men what 1 feel and think 
of the San Francisco Police Department, and I 
would I were a gifted orator that I might frame 
a tribute in keeping with their gi'eat and glorious 
deeds." 

Tlie lecture of Kane was received by loud and 
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Page 34 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

Dolores Vejar is a slick, fast working young man who 
tried to talk himself out of a bad jam when caught by 
Officers Henry Gaylord and Edward Plume. Mr. Vejar 
went to the Palidini home and represented himself as a 
government officer. The family, a law abiding one, hav- 
ing no fear of an officer of this kind, notified the police. 
Gaylord and Plume hastened to the Palidini home and took 
Mr. Vejar to the North End Station. Here he protested 
his innocence to Capt. Wright, insisting he was a Federal 
officer. He was turned over to the U. S. Marshal and 
booked for impersonating a United States Officer. Later 
he was found to be a probation \'iolator and got a book- 
ing on that too. 

* * * 

James Jones, arrested by Officer W. Norman; August 
Martin, arrested by Officers Gaylord and R. Oppenheim; 
and Jack Miller, arrested by Corp. Cagney, contributed to 
the month's "knockovers" for driving an automobile while 

intoxicated. 

* * * 

August Becchi was arrested on Dec. 19th by Sergt. J. J. 

Wade and charged with assault. 

* -^ * 

August Silva, accused of attempted burglary and booked 
also en route to Los Angeles, was gathered into the net by 
Officers Walter Pullen, T. Brady and Kenneally. 

* * * 

Corp. James Casey arrested Robert C. Crouche on a 
charge of assault with intent to commit murder. 

31: * * 

Joseph Smith is in the city prison charged with violating 
Sec. 288 of the Penal Code. Officers W. Lawless and J. 
Haley turned the keys on him. 



RETIRING FEDERAL OFFICER EXPRESSES 
APPRECIATION 

Before I relinquish my deputyship voluntarily in the 
United States Marshal's Office on January 1st, 1927, I wish 
you to know that I appreciate very sincerely the many 
favors you extended to me both personally and by the men 
under your command. 

Especially do I wish to mention Captain Peter McGee 
and Lieutenant James Boland of the City Prison and 
Sergeant Emmett Hogan of the Bureau of Identification 
for their many kindnesses extended and also by their men, 
too. I don't want to forget Captain John J. Casey of the 
Bush Street Police Station and the men under him, as also 
the officers of the Central Station for their favors in seeing 
that I had a wagon promptly to transport prisoners to the 
Marshal's office. 

All this was made possible by your good self and I wish 
to convey to you and the gallant men under you, my sin- 
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help, possibly I could not have functioned. 

So with the Happiest of New Years for you and yours, 
I am sincerely, 

JACK DONNELLY, 
424 Ellis Street. 



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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 J 




W/E STERN 
iWrADDITION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Emmet E. Moore and John M. Sullivan 

Of course when anyone wants to go any place in San 
Francisco from do\\Titown out to the ocean beach, Cliff 
House, The Chutes, or to see the Seal Rocks, they have to 
pass through the Western Addition. This, mayhaps, lias 
something to do with the fact that during December, 
twelve gentlemen neglected to weaken their toddies so 
they could keep their minds on their business of driving an 
automobile. Thus they violated the muchly abused Section 
112. The readings for the month are: Charles Curtis 
and Thomas F. Ball, each for 112 and 121, arrested by 
Officers J. Doyle and Edgar Paul, who also arrested Lloyd 
A. McLead for Sec. 112; D. C. Metz, arrested by Officer 
John Clasby; H. M. Crowell, by Officer C. O'Leary; Cecil 
Baldwin, arrested by Officers L. Linns and Frank Corby; 
Harris Klein, arrested by Officers T. Leary and D. Des- 
mond. 

* * * 

Quite a epizoodic of 288 out this way during the past 
month. Officer Charles Wedeldnd arrested Charles Ketler, 
Wilfred Kemp, Victor Sitran, Henry Reilly, Thomas Xat- 
sumo, Carl Reinke and Charles Bluhm for this serious 
statutory offense. Officers Paul and W. Salisbury brought 
in Walter Cissow. 

* * * 

Thomas Neilson got a boost into the police patrol wagon 
by Corp. John Crofton, who charged him \\'ith assault b\" 
means and force likely to do great bodily injury. Corp. 
Crofton and Special Hoeffer also brought in Richard Allen 
as a thousand dollar vag. 

* * * 

Corp. Henry Zaun, Jr. and Officer L. Oliver put James 
Keeler, wanted for stealing an automobile, where his folks 
had to look at him through a quarter-inch mesh wire 
screen. 



CAPTAIN HEALY COMMENDS SPECL\L POLICE 
OFFICER 



The following report is from Captain William T. Healy, 
commanding the Richmond Police District, and the request 
contained in the last paragraph was approved by Chief 
of Police O'Brien, and the Patrol Special Officer com- 
mended by him. 

"General Order No. 350 states that Special Officers 
should be urged to extra police activity on account of 
numerous details made to cover unusual activities in the 
celebration of the advent of the New Year. Special officers 
instructed as ordered. 

"At about 12:50 a. m.. Special Officer Patrick Gillespie, 
star letters S.R., in pursuance of his duty, noticed a man 
acting suspiciously in the \ncinity of 30th avenue and 
Camino del Mar. The man suspicioned was halted, 
searched, and found in his possession was a 32 caliber 
Iver Johnson revolver. This gentleman confessed to var- 
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was booked at this station under the name of John Win- 
throp, residence none. 

"Recommend that the police service rendered by the 
above named Patrol Special Police Officer be i-ecognized 
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Page 36 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



I 




SOUTHERN 

STATION 



Capt. Charles Goff 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Richard Foley 

Robbery seemed to be a great pastime among the evil 
doers during the past month down in this district, and 
scooping up the robbers seemed to be equally as great a 
pastime among the police, as the i-ecords show an aggre- 
gate of eight hauled to the station. 

* * * 

George Adams, Charles Larson and Albert Larson gave 
some added work to Corp. Emmett Flynn, Officer William 
Desmond and a few of the other boys. This trio of prison- 
ers were charged with robbery. 

* * * 

Howard Odum needed some change which he sought by 
the gun route. He got a booking as a robber by Officer 

Charles Russell. 

* * * 

Hugh MeCall was another who suffered likewise, Officers 
Thomas Feeney and F. J. Kerr assisted by Special Blakes- 

ley, pouring him into the wagon. 

* * * 

Officer Feeney and Officer J. Conroy locked up Frank 

Mansfield on a like charge. 

* * * 

Officers A. McDonnell and J. Coughlan treated Martin 

Morris to the same medicine. 

* * * 

The violators of Sec. 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act were 
as follows: Robert Tobin, arrested by Officer A. McDon- 
nell; Louis Smith, arrested by Officer R. Curtin; George 
Young and Oscar Sweeney, arrested by Officer Thomas 

Feeney. 

* * * 

A few burglaries in the di.strict resulted in the arresting 
of the following during the month: Domingo Cancel, by 
McDonnell; Lester Hasson and Dodd Wasmuth, by Officers 
Andrev- Lennon and T. Mahoney; and James M. Stewart, 

by Corporal J. Johnston. 

* * * 

Capt. Charles Goff stepped out and arrested George 
Hutchinson, who is a fugitive from justice. 

* * * 

A couple of grand larcenists, Jean LaRue, arrested by 
Officer J. Driscoll; and Manuel Serras, by Officer Feeney 
and Special Kane, were booked during the month. 

* * * 

Ted Unitt, lugging a "gat" around with him, got snared 

by Officer E. Morarity for violating the State gun law. 

* ^ * 

Corp. Jaeger assisted Detective Sergt. Fred Bohr in 
arresting James Leonard, wanted by the Los Angeles 
authorities. 

Officer E. Anderson led James Staves to the station be- 
cause he wouldn't support his children. 

* * * 

Harry Katzer coveted the automobile of someone else 
and took it without the owner's consent. He was arrested 

by Officers Hachette and O. Marshman. 

* * * 

Simon Sequestra was caught riding around in a machine 
that he had no one's permission to have. He was arrested 
by Officers McDonnell and James Begley, and charged with 
violating Section 146 of the Motor Act. 




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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 




CENTRAL 

STATION 



Cupt. Arthur D. Layne 
Lieutenants: Harry P. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 

Captain Arthur Layne has a new carpet on the floor of 
his office in the Central Station, and when visitors come 
in to' see the captain, they have to scrape their feet and 
wipe their shoes, and a guy who would violate the anti- 
expcctorating ordinance might as well ring for Officer 
James Coleman and get himself locked up. Seems like 
Supervisor Jack Badaracco had occasion to call upon Capt. 
LajTie and in getting into the Cap's office stumbled and 
nearly broke his leg. He vowed then and there that a new 
carpet would be forthcoming, and by George, there was 
one, and it is as swell a pattern as will be found in the 
Hall of Justice. 

* * :|: 

Seven 112ers got a chance to explain to the Judge how 
they were not driving while drunk, how "there was some 
awful mistake" and "the very idea", and so on. 

Here are the violators of that well known section of the 
Motor Vehicle Act and their captors: 

Ralph Bose, by Officer M. McDonald; Mark Handich, by 
Officer James Fitzgerald; Joseph O'Leary, by Oflicer E. J. 
Johansen; Dave Tucker, by Sergt. J. J. Rooney; Fred 
Kurtz, by Officers Harry Gurtler and Tom Stack, who 
charged Kurtz with an additional charge of having another 
man's car unlawfully; John Sullivan, by Officer J. Mul- 
cahy; and Irvin Barrett, by Corp. Hoeckle and Officer 
Gurtler. 

* * * 

Burglars didn't have much luck during the month, for 
the following were booked at the Central: 

Alfonso Bagutti, by Officers Harry Gurtler and Dan 
Cahill; Manuel Betels and Manuel Cardoza, by Officers 
Martin Foley and George Lillis; Wong Ching and Harry 
Ching, by Officer James Murray and Special J. Clark; 
August Consull, by Officer A. Balhaus. This last arrest 
has a record that takes an extra sheet of paper to set 
forth. 

Gabriel Cazares got an object lesson on being arrested 
for assault with a deadly weapon. His tutor was Officer 
R. E. Harris. 

* * * 

Thomas Casper got into a lot of grief by being booked 
on a grand larceny "rap". He was booked by Officer 

Walter Savage. 

* * * 

Another charged as a grand larcenist was Morris Agron, 
who walked away with a suit case full of valuables, left 
parked in a parked automobile. He was speared by Officer 
C. White. 

* * * 

William Allison hankered after a Chevrolet coupe. He 
spotted one and started off with it. He didn't get far 
before Officer Frank Hoepner grabbed him and placed him 
in a cell with a charge of violating Section 146 of the 

Motor Vehicle Act. 

* ^ * 

John Bryan was lost, so he pulled a fire box to find 
where he was at. Officer Charles Wiite on the job, 
showed Bryant where he was at when he s'ammcd the city 
prison door on his back. Judge O'Brien gave the prisoner 
thirty days for making the extra work for the fire depart- 
ment. 





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Page 38 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 
the ear, knocking- him senseless to the deck, des- 
troying his hearing. 

The sailors were afraid to rebel against their 
persecution on account of the mates going about 
armed with a brace of pistols. Driscoll, the third 
mate, who was a friend of the sailors, was appealed 
to for protection, but declared he was powerless 
to interfere, but at the same time he always as- 
sured the men that while he was on watch he 
would protect them and when he was questioned 
at the Marshal's office, he corroborated the sailor's 
story, declaring at the same time that he was 
powerless to protect the men some of the time. 
He said he witnessed a fiendish attack on two of 
the sailors and said that the treatment was the 
worst that he had ever seen. A meeting of fellow 
countrymen of the outraged men was called and 
among many prominent citizens, ship owners and 
business men were present for the purpose of tak- 
ing action in behalf of the unfortunate crew of 
the Gatherer. 

The direct object of the meeting was to engage 
counsel to assist in the prosecution of the officers 
of the ship who caused so much suffering and 
deatli. Nearly all of the crew were young men 
and the best friend the men had on board the ship, 
the third mate, when interviewed at this meeting, 
told of some of the recent horrible experiences. 

And then the trial of Captain Sparks, who had 
been arrested, took place in the United States 
Court, where a multitude of people had gathered, 
and the first witness that was called was John 
Driscoll, the third mate of the Gatherer, who testi- 
fied as follows : The Gatherer left Antwerp, Sep- 
tember 1st, 1881. There were 18 men before the 
mast and 23 on board, all told. The officers were 
Watts, first mate, Curtis, second mate, and Cap- 
tain Sparks. I saw Watts knock down Gustave 
Adlung with his fist and kick him in the eye. 
The captain stood about one hundred feet away. 

When Adlung fell, his head hit upon a spar and 
he made a loud outcry that could be heard 60 yards 
distant. He got up and wiped the blood from the 
deck and from his face. Before that, his eyesight 
was good; now he could not open his eyes until 
after witness left the ship and had hardly been 
able to see out of them since the occurrence. He 
was laid up below for months from his injury. 
The Captain made no inquiry into the matter, nor 
supplied any medicine for the boy, so far as wit- 
ness knew. Did not see the Captain pay him the 
slightest attention after he was beaten. The wit- 
ness continued — saw Jack Broyer beaten on the 
24th of December. The Captain was at the wheel 
60 feet away; the second mate beat Broyer first 
with his fists and then with a belaying pin over 
the head. 



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January, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 39 



There was fresli blood on tlie deck every day 
during the voyage. Every man liad to clean up 
his own blood. Saw iron rings put on Carl Ander- 
son's wrists. His face was badly cut up by the 
mates. He attempted to jump overboard, but I 
prevented him. Archibald Turner and George 
Bloucher were beaten by both mates with their 
fists and with a rope's end also. The third day 
after leaving port, the second mate called William 
Olman down out of the rigging, beat him and 
kicked him on the head and he bore the marks for 
two or three weeks. Saw him beaten by the mate 
tliree times during a single watch. 

The mate broke his nose with a wooden belaying 
pin. The man cried out, and blood flowed freely. 
He was 22 years of age and a very good seaman. 
Saw the mate beat Joseph Brown, a colored man, 
when the Captain was but a short distance away. 
For about 8 weeks all hands were on deck from 8 
in the morning until 5 in the afternoon without 
any watch below except the dog watch. 

This trial excited a profound interest, especially 
among seafaring men, and a great deal of indigna- 
tion was manifested against the Captain. 

Gustave Adlung was sworn, and testified as fol- 
lows: Was born in Hamburg, am 19 years old, 
was one of the boys on board the ship Gatherer. 
Was struck by the first and second mates of the 
ship during her voyage from Antwerp to this 
coast. The first mate struck me on the first of 
October, when I was in the afterpart of the fore- 
rigging. He struck me with his feet and his fist. 
He knocked me down against the rail, and put his 
foot on my throat. He said if I was not a boy 
he would have kicked me more. The Captain was 
walking up and down on the deck ; he saw the act 
and never said a word. The mate kicked me in 
the eye and it began to swell and everything 
looked black. I reported to the captain the next 
day. I went to him for medicine. He asked me 
what was the matter with my eye and I told him. 
I was laid up below for 4 weeks on account of these 
injuries. I made a loud outcry; there was blood 
from my injuries on the deck and rail. The mate 
told me to wipe it up, and I did so. I spilled a little 
tar water on the white paint, and I was struck for 
that. While I was going below the captain passed 
my room many times and asked me how my eye 
was. After I came out I could see a little. The 
mate made me turn to. My other eye was also 
affected. I cannot see to read, and I can only dis- 
tinguish a face by going close to it. I was first 
struck the second day out of Antwerp by the sec- 
ond mate. This happened between one and two in 
the morning. 

The assault by the mate on the 2nd of Septem- 
ber gave me a black eye. I saw Henry Able struck 
by the first mate in the presence of the captain 
and Ahle's face was bloody all over. The marks 



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Page 40 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



remained on Ahle's face about 4 days. All hands 
were on deck at the time he was struck. We were 
just getting ready to 'bout ship. Saw the mate 
and second mate strike McCue — his face was all 
swollen from these effects and the marks remained 
on him during the rest of the voyage. Saw the 
mate strike Peter Tomassen, but do not know 
whether the Captain saw it or not. While I was 
lying below I often heard the men crying out when 
they were being beaten. My eyesight was right 
enough when I first went on the vessel. After we 
arrived at San Pedro, I asked the Captain to let me 
go ashore and see a doctor. The Captain said "No, 
the best thing you can do is to stay on board and 
go with me to San Francisco and I will put you 
in a hospital." I afterwards went ashore. I stayed 
at a hotel last night. Witness was here requested 
to identify a person present as the one who took 
him to a hotel. He was unable to see him until the 
individual had got close up to him. Before I was 
hurt, the mate said he did not want me at the 
wheel. Nobody told me to say these things. The 
Captain never did anything for my eye, nor or- 
dered anything to be done. The mate brought me 
some poultices. He got them from the third mate. 

Defendants' counsel made several attempts to 
lead the witness into an admission that would 
show his blindness to be a pretense and sham, but 
failed. 

Henry Mills was sworn. Was one of the crew 
of the Gatherer; was on the mate's watch. Re- 
membered the circumstances of the mate's strik- 
ing Gustave Adlung and injuring his eye. The 
Captain was on the starboard side of the ship 
when this occurred and was in full view. In about 
a quarter of an hour the boy's face swelled up 
about the size of your fist and his eye closed. 
There was blood all over his face and coming from 
his nose. He cried out so that he could be heard 
all over the ship. The mate was afterwards cup- 
ping it every day, using a sharp needle. The boy's 
eyes were all right before this occurred. He was 
kept below on account of this for four weeks and 
when he came up on deck again his eye was still 
closed. Saw the second mate strike him about 
a half hour after the mate kicked him. The man- 
ner in which it occurred was this — the boy was 
leaning over picking up a bucket of water. He was 
singing. The mate put his hand over his mouth 
and knocked him down and then kicked him. Saw 
the mate also strike McCue just after leaving 
Antwerp. 

I was born in Germany, and I have gone by the 
name of Henry Mills. Never went over the dates 
with Driscoll, from his memorandum. I never was 
struck. Heard the Captain call McCue a vile name 
about eight or ten days after we left port. I was 
at the wheel. I saw the mate beat Gustave Adlung 
about the head when he was on the top gallant 



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January, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 41 



mast. About a quarter to 9 P. M. one evening 
while off Cape Horn, I saw the Captain strike Gus- 
tave on tlie head and knock him down. I saw a 
man up on the top gallant cross tree bending sail 
and he was so weak from beatings he got that the 
poor fellow fell, striking the forward chains and 
bounced into the sea. 

After the examination of several more witnesses 
who testified more or less the same as the others, 
the prosecution rested. There was a disagreement 
of the jury in the case of the Captain; but the 
mates were convicted. Watts, the first mate, after 
the Gatherer had arrived in this port, skipped out 
on another vessel, and was captured in Queens- 
town, Ireland; he was detained in Clerkenwell 
Prison until officers from this city went after him 
and brought him back. 



CHARLES KURTZMAN NEW MANAGER OF 
GRANADA 

Charles E. Kurtzman, manager of the St. Fi'an- 
cis Theatre, and previous to that of the Imperial, 
has been appointed managing director of the 
Granada. 

Kurtzman, one of the youngest managers in the 
Publix organization, is a San Francisco Boy and a 
prominent member of the South of Market Boys. 
For a time he was director of publicity for War- 
ner Brothers in Los Angeles, but for the last five 
years has been connected with local theatres. 



KROEHLER MFG. 
COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

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FURNITURE 



CHARTER OAK AND OILMAN AVE. 
Phone Market 500 San Francisco, Calif. 



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We Handle All Classes of Laundry Work 
PHONE MARKET 130 



IL TROVATORE CAFE ROOF GARDEN 

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Page 42 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



POLICE BALL 

(Continued from Page 16) 

Committee on Badges and Programs 

Capt. Eugene R. Wall (Chairman) Company H 

Capt. Patrick N. Herlihy Company C 

Capt. John H. Lackmann Headquarters 

Capt. Peter M. McGee Headquarters 

Lieut. Frederic W. Norman Company F 

Lieut. Albert S. Munn Company I 

Lieut. James Boland Headquarters 

Detective Sergt. Thomas F. Regan Det. Bureau 

Officer William Isaacs Company H 

Officer Frank G. Fella Company L 

Committee on Invitations 

Lieut. Charles W. Dullea (Chairman) Det. Bureau 

Lieut. Michael E. Mitchell Company C 

Detective Sergt. William McMahon Det. Bureau 

Detective Sergt. William R. ProU Det. Bureau 

Sergt. John M. Morrissey Company E 

Sergt. Samuel Miller Headquarters 

Corp. George F. Kopman Headquarters 

Officer Gilbert P. Chase Headquarters 

Officer Charles Ute Company L 

Committee on Sale of Tickets 

Lieut. Henry N. Powell (Chairman) Det. Bureau 

Detective Sergt. George F. Wall Det. Bureau 

Sergt. William D. Flinn Company A 

Sergt. Thomas G. Roche Company D 

Corp. Martin F. Gallagher Company G 

Corp. Charle.s W. Brown Company M 

Corp. Charles J. Ward _ Headquarters 

Officer Patrick McAuliffe Company B 

Officer James W. Boyle _ Company E 

Officer Thomas D. Daly _._ Company F 

Officer Elwood F. Cordray _ - Company G 

Officer William Isaacs Company H 

Officer Edward J. McNamara Company I 

Officer Edward J. Plume Company J 

Officer James L. McDermott Company K 

Officer Frank G. Fella Company L 

Transportation Committee 

Capt. John J. Casey (Chairman) Company K 

Capt. Henry Glesson Company K 

Lieut. Edward F. Copeland Company A 

Detective Sergt. Robert L. Rauer _ _ Det. Bureau 

Sergt. Bernard Maloney Company C 

Corp. Howard H. Chamberlin Company K 

Officer James L. McDermott Company K 

By direction of 

CAPT. WILLIAM J. QUINN, 



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La Grande and White's 
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Phones: MARKET [ 9 } J 4 

Little Auto Parts Company 

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January. 1927 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 

NEW BULLET PROOF GLASS 



Page 43 



Crash ! Fifty men covered their ears as the bul- 
lets flew. It was a series of shootings in the Hail 
of Justice, but every shot may save the life of a 
San Fi-ancisco police officer. 

A new form of unbreakable windshield glass 
was ofllcially tested before Chief O'Brien and mem- 
bers of the Board of Supervisors, and after being 
subjected to what the chief termed "the most 
severe test imaginable", was given the stamp of 
approval. Tlie glass will be installed on thirty 
armored police automobiles, twenty of them oper- 
ating from the Detective Bureau and ten as patrol 
cars from the district stations. 

McGee Does Firing 

Sergt. Patrick McGee, in charge of the instruc- 
tors' school of the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment, did the firing with four high-powered guns, 
and after each shot a big star appeared in the 
glass, but the plate did not shatter. The impact 
tore the bullets, all steel jacketed, into shreds. 
The back of the glass showed no effects from the 
shooting. 

The test was conducted on the police target 
range in the basement of the Hall of Justice. 
Sergt. McGee stood at distances ranging from ten 
to twenty feet from tlie glass target. Among 
those observing the test besides Chief O'Brien, 
were Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson; 
members of the Supplies Committee of the Board 
of Super\'isors ; John B. Badaracco, chairman; 
Charles J. Powers and Warren Shannon; Leonard 
S. Leavy, city purchaser of supplies, and many 
police officers and glass experts. 

Supplied Locally 

The new glass is manufactured in Philadelphia 
and is supplied by a local automobile firm. It is 
seven-eighths of an inch thick, a quarter-inch 
thicker than the present glass used in armored 
cars of the police department. 

"It is a remarkable glass," said Chief O'Brien 
after the test. "The shots, fired direct, will hardly 
ever be met in actual practice. Of course, each 
shot destroys a windshield as far as further use is 
concerned, but the city of San Francisco can buy 
windshields as long as it can save its police officers. 
I consider adoption of this glass will be an impor- 
tant step forward in the police figlit on automobile 
and street bandits and thugs." 

The guns used to fire at the glass target were of 
.32, .32-20, .38 army and .45 caliber. 



Phone Prospect 28G7 



K. B. COBB. Prop. 



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465 ELLIS STREET, San Francisco 

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924 MARKET STREET 



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store and Office— 76 FIRST STREET 

Metal Dept.— 31 JESSIE STREET 

San Francicso, Cal. 



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KEARNY 5044 



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REAL CHOP SUEY 



Page 44 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



January, 1927 



OFFICERS OF BUSH COMMENDED 



The following is a copy of a report submitted to Chief 
O'Brien by Captain John J. Casey of the Bush Street Police 
District, and deals with excellent police services performed 
by the following officers: Edward Gough, Walter Har- 
rington, James J. Cooper, Special Patrol Officers Woods 
and Shelley. The foregoing officers were commended by 
the Chief of Police for the excellent police services per- 
formed which terminated in the capture of George Der- 
ringer and Joseph Maxwell, and the subsequent arrest 
of Harold Kocher, Robert Cordero and Ray Barthow. 

Captain Casey's Report 
"To Platoon Commanders: 

"Burglaries have been committed of late on stores on 
Fillmore street, also on Polk street, and it is evident that 
a gang of burglars intend to work those thoroughfares 
during the holidays. Therefore, officers detailed to patrol 
these streets mu.st be strictly on the alert on their differ- 
ent tours of duty and use their utmost efforts toward ap- 
prehending these burglars. 

"Discontinue the practice of having the second section 
Larkin and Polk street officers, of calling in for orders at 
this station. They must devote all their attention to the 
duties on the street on the night watches. 

"Lieutenants will instruct Special Patrol Officers Baci- 
galupi and Deasy to give strict attention to the stores on 
their respective tours of duty, and in connection with the 
regular officers on Fillmore street, as well as the Polk 
street officers, do all in their power to effect the capture 
of these store burglars, as well as other classes of crim- 
inals. 

"Further: I instruct all members of your platoons who 
patrol beats intersecting Fillmore street, also Polk street, 
to give this form of crime their strict attention, while 
patrolling in the vicinity of stores on the above-mentioned 
thoroughfares. 

"In connection with the above order, will call your atten- 
tion to the excellent police work accomplished by Officers 
Edward Gough, Walter Harrington, James J. Cooper, and 
Special Patrol Officers Woods and Sheeley, who arrested 
George Derringer, age 17 years and Joseph Maxwell, age 
16 years, while they were in the act of burglarizing the 
ladies' and gents' furnishing goods store conducted by Dil- 
ler and Farbe, 1642 Fillmore street, at 11 p. m., December 
1st, 1926. 

"These lads made a confession in which they implicated 
Harold Kocher, age 16 years, Robert Cordero, age 15 and 
Ray Barthow, who later were arrested by the said officers. 

"Attached hereto will be found a list of 27 burglaries 
which these boys confessed to have perpetrated in different 
parts of this city, and in the list is mentioned the Fair- 
mont School, located at Randall and Chenery streets. 

"Dorrigan and Maxwell confessed that they entered this 
school, stole 80 cents, ate some pineapple, and lit a candle 
on a desk in the office of the principal and left the same 
burning, when they left the school premises at 4 a m. 
A few hours later, the building was afire, and it is appar- 
ent that the candle that had been left lighted by the boys 
was the cause. 

Max Bohr, brother of Detective Sergt. Fred 
Bohr of the Hotel Detail, who is associated with 
the Chandler-Cleveland automobile agency, circu- 
lates around the members of the department and 
gets a customer here and there. 

Max is a popular young man with the members 
of the department and is always given a genuine 
welcome when he appears about the Hall of Jus- 
tice. 



Telephone Kearny 2453 



Night Phones — 
Pacific 1333 
Oakland, Piedmont 1149 



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January, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



OFFICE CHIEF OF POLICE 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION 



Page 45 



Wanted for 
Embezzlement 




CARL WIEDEMANN 

Age 40 years; height, 5 ft. 8 ins.; weight, 145 lbs; grey blue eyes, round face, long 
nose, black hair, black mustache. Native of Germany. Speaks German, French, English, 
Spanish and Chinese. Always speaks with German accent. 

Is neat dresser; carries a cane. Always brags about his appearance. Wears gold 
wrist watch with radium dial ; platinum ring with two diamonds with blue stone in center. 

Tears off finger nails and also scratches his head continually which has caused scabs 
and bald spots. 

Was with German Embassy in China ; acted as director for Rudolph Valentino at one 
time; knows medicine, stock markets and all subjects in general. Is habitual dice player, 
very quick and hasty. Has a German Police Dog with him. 

The above described man is wanted in this City for the embezzlement of $10,000.00 
from Florence E. Mogan, General Credit and Loan Association, #659 Pacific Bldg. in this 
City where he was employed as Clerk and Manager on December 24th, 1926. Felony 
Warrant on file. A reward of $50.00 is offered by Mrs. Mogan for information leading to 
his arrest. 

If located, arrest, and I will send Officer with proper papers for Jiis return to this City. 



Dated- 
San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 15, 1927. 



D. J. O'BRIEN, 
Chief of Police, 



Page 46 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



January. 1927 



JACK BLACK'S BOOK OF CROOKDOM "YOU 
CAN'T WIN" 



Stories by men who have been professional 
crooks, ex-convicts and such, have always been 
frowned upon because the wi'iters who claim to 
be giving- the inside of their questionable busines'' 
always have a tendency to give themselves the 
best of the deal. 

They may start out with the honest intention 
of telling the truth, whether it places them in 
an unfavorable light or not, but some how they 
wander away from that intention and before 
one gets through with such a story he finds the 
writer trying to justify his condition, his plight 
or his vocation. 

Not so with Jack Black, master burglar, safe 
blower, jewelry store thief, payroll robber. In 
his book, just out, entitled "You Can't Win", pub- 
lished by the MacMillan Company of New York, 
he puts the cards on the table, and tells a story 
of a misspent life with a frankness that is aston- 
ishing and holds the reader from start to finish. 

Jack Black does not spare himself. He does 
not lay his life of crime to economic conditions, 
fate, or in fact upon anything that he had no 
control over. He tells the reader that he went 
into crime as a business and he got beat. He 
paid dearly for tlie money he stole, dearly in 
liberty, health and cash. 

He tells of his imprisonment in many penal 
institutions of punishment meted out for various 
crimes. He tells of those crimes, how lie com- 
mitted them, how he disposed of the loot, of how 
they were planned, of the get-aways. He tells of 
the code among the underworld, of the places one 
could in his day hide out. He tells how he re- 
formed, how for over 10 years he has been an 
employe on the local papers, for the most part 
librarian on the San Francisco Call. 

He winds up his interesting book thus: 
"What chance hss a young man, inclined to 
crime, with shotgun squads, strong arm squads, 
with crime crushers cruising tlie highways and 
by-ways, with the deadly fingerprinting, central 
identification bureaus, the telephoto, police radio 
broadcasting stations, shooting ahead your de- 
scription?" 

For thirty years he followed a life of crime, 
half this was spent in prison he says, and he 
handled some $50,000 in those thirty years, and 
when he decided to go straight he had nothing 
but his health and liberty. 

"Had I engaged in some honest labor during 
those thirty years I would be independent today", 
he concludes, "instead of being satisfied to get 
along with necessities of life." 



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President and General Manacer 



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^ictvres ^ 











THE CIGAR THAT WINS 

ADMIRATION 

THE MILD TAMPA CIGAR 
SHAW- LEAHY CO., IncP*'^^ 






207 NINTH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 





St. Francis Hospital and 

Training School for Nurses 



Stands for Better Health 
and Better Service 



N. E. Corner Bush and Hyde Streets, San Francisco 



Phone Prospect 7600 



OFFICERS 



THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESrDENT AND GEN, MGR, 



GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 



RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 



A. D. PLUGHOFF 

VICE-PRES. AND TREASURER 



G. G. BUNDY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 



JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 



G. L. PICKRELL 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 






Joseph H. Cote— Manager northern Division 

WEST AMERICAN BUILDING 

1431 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Phone Graystone 7700 



DIRECTORS 

WM. L. HUGH SON. CHAIRMAN 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G. BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO. DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A, FINCH 
O. R. FULLER 
P. H. GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H. LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 

JOHN F. Mcknight 

ROBT. W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A. D. PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI. Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L. V. STARR 



Ffbruary. 1927 



POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 



LUCKEIMBACH 

Largest and Fastest Freighters in the INTERCOASTAL TRADE 
UUCKBINBACM STEAMSHIP CO., Inc. 



COLLONAN Electrical & Manufacturing Co. 

Electrical Work In All Its Branches 

3201-11 MISSION STREET Telephone Mission 7282 




Members of the Police Dept. — 

Your Credit is so good at The Redlick- Newman Co. that we require 

INOTHIING DOWIN 

on Purchases up to $50.00 PAY AS LriTLE AS $1.00 A WEEK 

Furniture — Carpets — Stoves — Crockery — Linoleum — Draperies — Phonographs 



DEDLICK NEWMANS 

IV COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS Vy. 

Southeast Corner- 17 th and Mission Srs. 



Page 4 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 




ADVANTAGEOUS 



Comradeship reigns in this organization 
and It IS reflected in the service rendered. 
The employees are part-owners — and 
service is given with a smile. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



"PACIFIC SBKV1CC*' 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
hy Californians 



5-227 



• 




• 



Vol. V. 



FEBRUARY, 1927 



No. 4. 



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International Association of Chiefs of Police 

Written b>' Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Briek, Its President 

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The International Association of Chiefs of Po- 
lice is, as its title indicates, an organization made 
up of police officials from the various states of the 
American Union, from the Dominion of Canada, 
and from other Nations outside of the American 
Continent. The purposes for which the Associa- 
tion is organized are set forth in Article I of its 
Constitution which reads as follows: 

To secure a closer official and personal 
relationship among police officials at home 
and abroad ; to secure unity of action in 
police matters ; to elevate the standard of 
police institutions by urging the elimina- 
tion of politics from their conduct; a 
tenure of office for those employed in 
the ser\'ice; the maintenance of honor- 
able men and means in the transaction of 
police business; the general adoption of 
pension and relief laws; the adoption of 
humane efforts in the enforcement of 
laws; the provision of temporary relief 
for its worthy members and their fami- 
lies in certain emergencies ; advancement 
along all lines pertaining to prevention 
and detection of crime and the identifica- 
tion and treatment of prisoners. 
From a reading of this statement it will be 
readily seen that the organization as such looki, 
upon police problems in their widest application. 
Unity of action in police matters is one of the 
essential purposes of the organization, but we 
must bear in mind that insofar as the police 
units in the United States are concerned, their 
organizatiors must necessarily follow the theory 
of government upon which the American Nation is 
established. We have our federal police officials 
enforcing the federal laws ; we have our state 
police enforcing state laws; and finally, we have 



our county and municipal police officials to en- 
force, in addition to the state laws, the regula- 
tions and ordinances of their particular counties 
and municipalities. While the frame work of our 
form of government is not of the making of our 
present generation, we do know that under that 
structure our people have progi'essed and our Na- 
tion has become prosperous and gi'eat. Indeed, 
the rapidity of the development of our Nation, 
since our national Constitutional was brougiit 
about, has brought many changing problems for 
police departments to deal with, necessitating 
changes in the material and machinery of law en- 
forcement. 

Demands are made quite frequently for a closer 
centralization of our police organizations. The 
answer is apparent when we consider the original 
theory of our government, that is, the delegating 
of powers to our federal government and the 
states retaining all the rights of sovereignty 
which were not ceded to the central federal gov- 
ernment. Of course, this form of national and 
state governments has established certain bar- 
riers against absolute centralization which cannot 
be overcome, and in their respective splieres each 
police unit has full power to act within the con- 
stitutional limits set forth. The police problems 
in each state and each municipality differ, depend- 
ing upon area, location, population, traff.c, condi- 
tions, seaport and railroad conditions, and upon 
tlie laws and ordinances in effect. 

It is the theory of our International Association 
that notwithstanding legal barriers which may 
exist between federal and state governments and 
the diversity of police problems in various states 
and municipalities, there is a great deal in com- 
mon among police departments and with a view 
of obtaining the best results possible, our organ- 



Page 6 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



ization calls its membership together at least once 
a year for discussion of existing problems and 
for the purpose of giving concrete expression to 
the statements of the purposes hereinbefore 
quoted. It has been my pleasure to meet a goodly 
number of police executives of the United States 
and of the Dominion of Canada. These police 
executives are men of integrity who take a keen 
interest in the affairs of the Nation and are using 
every effort to safeguard the lives of our people 
and to protect their properties by up-to-date and 
scientific police methods. 

The membership of our organization recognize, 
however, that the first and most essential pre- 
requisite to the official functioning of a police de- 
partment is the enactment of necessary laws and 
regulations. The police officer being the instru- 
ment through which the people preserve law and 
order, he can only function efficiently when the 
necessary power from a legal standpoint has been 
placed in his hands. They are also mindful that 
when this essential requirement of necessary laws 
and regulations is furnished by the legislative 
branch of our government, proper material must 
be secured to make up police department person- 
nel. Based on common experience, police execu.- 
tives are united in asserting that no one should 
be accepted as a law-enforcement officer unless he 
possess integrity and an aptitude for that par- 
ticular calling. First class physical make-up and 
unimpeachable integrity are necessary, and in 
addition thereto our police executives recognize 
the fact that the police officer must be well versed 
in the application of the laws and regulations 
which govern his conduct. Unless he has a good 
working knowledge of these laws and regulations 
liis achievements will fall short of that which is 
demanded of him by the American people. In- 
deed, this demand for service and efficiency made 
by our citizens is a matter which cannot be lightly 
looked at. 

I think we can say without fear of contradiction 
that as a general rule our police departments arp 
manned at the present day by men well developed 
physically, by men whose integrity is carefully 
scrutinized before appointment, and by men who 
interest themselves in understanding the applica- 
tions of the laws and regulations which they are 
bound to enforce. In fact, the careful examina- 
tion made as to the integrity of our police ma- 
terial prior to appointment has as a general rule 
borne good results. We can point with pride that 
notwithstanding the many temptations surround- 
ing the official life of our police officers, they have 
with very few exceptions kept clear of all en- 
tanglements which would impede faithful per- 
formance of police duty. 



It has been truly said that the police officer is 
the unit of the nation's first line of defense. On 
his shoulders rests the burden of making it pos- 
sible for the law-abiding citizen to carry on his 
calling without being the victim of the burglar, 
thug and others of similar ilk. We have many in- 
stances of heroism and extraordinary bravery on 
the part of individual officers. In fact, our police 
system demands that the individual officer face 
single-handed the most trying situations. His re- 
sponsibility to police a given territory alone has 
caused him to rely upon himself and the so-called 
mass psychology has no place in his make-up. 
He realizes that he has a duty to perform and he 
faithfully executes this duty against the most un- 
favorable odds. 

While the prevention of crime and the appre- 
hension of criminals may be called the major 
portion of his responsibility, we must not forget 
that our present-day police officer engages in 
many activities which may be deemed to be out- 
side of his strict province, but these activities 
he carries on for the benefit of the community 
in general. For a few specific illustrations we 
can look back to the days when our Nation was 
engaged in a world war and during that great 
crisis we found the peace officer doing, in addition 
to his regular police work, a one-hundred-percent 
service in the sale of bonds, war trading stamps, 
and in soliciting subscriptions to replenish the 
treasuries of those agencies who were doing work 
in aiding and sustaining the active fighting units. 
Many other instances may be given where he has 
engaged in many undertakings as a matter of co- 
operation with citizens as a whole. Indeed, the 
activities of our national life in its various aspects 
are well reflected by the diversity of the police 
officer's duties. 

The one great object which our International 
Association seeks to accomplish is the co-ordina- 
tion and co-operation of all law-enforcement units. 
It is the one organization which seeks to bring 
about unified and concentrated effort on the part 
of our police officials throughout the country. It 
admits and encourages peace officers' organiza- 
tions in each state, but with the realization that 
some central agency is most essential as a bind- 
ing link in giving a national aspect to the activi- 
ties of the various state organizations. It is now 
some thirty odd years since our International As- 
sociation was first formed. In common with all 
movements in their incipiency, progress was 
rather slow at first. As years went on it became 
more and more apparent to police executives that 
to successfully combat the organized efforts of 
criminals, close co-operation should exist among 
police officials. Experience has demonstrated 
(Continued on Page 9) 



February, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page? 



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The Hoodlum of Former Times 

An Interesting Article By Officer Peter Fanning 

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PETER FANNING 



In the days long 
gone by, quite a num- 
ber of young men 
would assemble every 
evening on different 
street corners in dif- 
ferent sections of the 
city and quite a num- 
ber of amateur crimi- 
nals sprung up among 
tliem from these asso- 
ciations. As time went 
along there were 
gangs formed and a 
title given to each 
gang in that particu- 
lar part of the town. 
The careful San Fran- 
ciscan of those days 
when circumstances called him from his home 
after dark, very often went out armed, sallying 
forth with eyes wide open for a garroter or high- 
wayman in the shadow of every corner of the 
gloom of each awning. There possibly might 
be some who did not take all these precautionary 
measures from the fact that they were not aware 
of those conditions. That robberies and gar- 
roting had been numerous to an appalling degi'ee, 
and that when one garroter was captured, ten 
got away with their booty and left their victim 
in a greater or less state of demoralization ac- 
cording as time committed them and circum- 
stances would allow. The irascibility of the aver- 
age citizen thus treated, might or might not be 
modified, did he consider the fact that these mid- 
night operators who had thus despoiled him, were 
productions of his own city and who had grown 
up and perfected themselves in their calling un- 
der his own eyes; hoodlums, in fact, the crop; 
the abundance and evil effects of which bade fair 
in the future so as to make the city almost un- 
tenable for law-abiding residents. 

The curse of hoodlumism had become more 
and more apparent as the years rolled along and 
the fact began to be understood that, like mus- 
tard seed in a hayfleld, the more it spreads the 
larger grows the ratio of increase. These bands 
who made their presence felt by constant practice 
in their particular lines of burglary, sneak- 
thieving, garroting and the like, made themselves 
masters of their profession. Odd periods of I'e- 
tirement, and meditation in the county jail had 



helped them along. Besides this class, however, 
the small fry, that is the boj;s growing up, some 
of them began to be faithful copyists of their 
predecessors, and endowed with a remarkable 
aptitude for crime in all shapes, they ranged the 
city in all directions, and kept the police con- 
stantly busy and it would have been of just pride 
to the city if at that time she could point to as 
many young skilled mechanics of her own pro- 
duction, as she could to skilled idlers, for it is 
an unfortunate fact that Satan's pupils learn 
twice as industriously and quickly as any others. 

The life of tliose hoodlums had a series of 
graduations and they were mostly gathered into 
what was known as the "Kearny Street Gang", 
members of wliich had always been in jail; that 
rather disagreeable ceremony was a necessary 
initiation to membership of this gang. They 
lived a precarious life in the avenue, Olympic- 
Racine, and other cheap lodging houses in the 
vicinity of Kearny, Jackson and Pacific streets. 
Nearly all kept, or rather were kept by hoodlum 
girls, who had adopted lives of infamy and who 
shed their basely gotten earnings to the disrepu- 
table brutes. The revenue thus obtained partially 
supported the "hood" and paid the room rent. 
His time was divided among the genteel pastimes 
of playing cards, rolling drunks, coping in green- 
horns to the various swindles, with which he was 
acquainted; night robberies and garrotings, 
sneak-thieving and burglary, and the more am- 
bitious branciies of this art was crib-cracking 
and safe blowing. Ofttime it happened that the 
hoodlum or his mistress got in jail, in which 
case "Darby" sought another "Joan" or vice 
versa, and the life was resumed as before. 

The Kearny Street Gang made its headquarters 
at the New York Saloon, a free and easy "joint", 
located at Kearny and Jackson streets. This 
gang ranged along Kearny street and on Pacific 
street and a squad could be generally found at 
the corner of Broadway and Kearny streets, to 
pass compliments of the season to their unfor- 
tunate friends as they passed to and from the 
county jail, which was located in the middle of 
the block on Broadway street. The enumeration 
of names would be useless as the gang had time 
and again adorned the police records and the gal- 
lery contains pictures of them all. Next in promi- 
nence, perhaps, was the North Beach Gang, who 
took care that Chinamen and grocery keepers had 

(Continued on Page 34) 



Pages 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, )927 



I Remember When - - 



Reminiscences of Wm. (Doc) Mun 

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Runaway accidents were common in the down- 
town district and Park and developed many an 

unsung- police hero. 

* * * 

Officer James Cook was murdered by one of four 
men he caught stealing telephone cable at Sev- 
enth and Brannan in 1902. 

Dick Bell was one of the popular detectives in 

the old bureau. 

* * :<= 

The late "Scotty" Campbell was in charge of 
the Chinatown Squad and had with him but few 
men. His force included Jim Skelly, now a de- 
tective sergeant, Jack Kramer, retired, "Black" 
McCormick and "Doc" Flynn (not the present 
corporal but an officer who afterward studied 
medicine while detailed about the old Hall of 
Justice). Flynn was often dressed up as a 
"Chink" and succeeded in crashing the gate in 
many a Chinese gambling joint. Those were the 
days when banging oak and iron-bound doors 
sounded like pistol shots all throughout China- 
town. 

* * * 

The department used to issue a police bulletin 
and Bill Harrington was the editor and printer. 
The isheet was pattenied after eastern police 
bulletins and was valuable in refreshing an offi- 
cer's memory as to wanted men. 

* * * 

Arthur McQuaide was in charge of the Bureau 
of Identification and Detective Tom Reagan 

worked with him. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Frank Winters, now in charge of 
the outer office of the Detective Bureau, was a 
mere corporal connected with Company E. Frank 
has gone through the ropes in police work. 

* :!c * 

The late and lovable "Gus" White when first 
appointed Chief of Police, refused to wear a gilded 
uniform but finally succumbed to the importuni- 
ties of the Police Commission. When in civilian 
clothes "Gus" always wore a broad-brimmed 
black fedora hat, commonly known as a sheriff's 
hat. His father was once sheriff of San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

Captain Henry Gleeson, as a lieutenant, wore 
star No. 3, and James H. Helms, a lieutenant 
with Co. G had star No. 1. In those days every 



DELL, An Old-Time Police Reporter 

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man was after a low-numbered star. The late 
John Freel and Captain Steve Bunner, who used 
to work together out of the Detective Bureau had 
stars No. 4 and 5, respectively. Tom Atchison, 

former Chief Clerk, possessed star No. 2. 

* * * 

Mounted Patrolman Arthur J. Dolan, the hero 
of the Ocean Beach, saved many persons from 
drowning in the surf. Arthur, on the force since 
1906, spent a short time on a beat at the Harbor 
and since then has been mounted. His first horse 
"Don" had the intelligence of a human. "Don" 
swam into the surf many times with Dolan to 
rescue drowning people. Now Dolan's horse is 
"Pete." George Merchant bought Pete and Dolan 
taught him to like the water. Dolan saved a 
Mexican girl from drowning and brought in a 
man who tried to rescue her from the beach un- 
dertow and got a medal from the Government of 
Mexico. Dolan learned to throw the lariat while 

working in old Butchertown. 

* * * 

Captain William Quinn, Chief Clerk, Arthur 
Dolan, George McLaughlin and Jack Mangan all 
joined the force the same day — November 20, 
1906. All have made more than good. 

;;< ^ :^ 

Pat McNamara, now at the Richmond Station, 
is one of the old timers. Pat, known as the "Ter- 
rible Swede," learned police work under Captain 
Johnny Spillane. Pat patrolled a beat under Capt. 
Short and worked as a traffic cop at Third and 
Mission before the days of autos under Captain 
Short. He later patrolled Market street with 
Dan Driscoll. Pat was a tough fighter. Captain 
Spillane, after Pat had brought in a fractious 
hodcarrier from Clementina street who put his 
wife's eye out and threatened to kill McNamara, 
looked the badly battered prisoner over and said: 
"You can always depend on McNamara to bring 
in a piece of his man, anyway." 

^ $ ^ 

The days wlien every patrolman in the old 
Southern District had to battle fiom one end of 
his watch to the other and it was no place for 
weaklings. 

Frank Lord, the neatly dressed, had a beat in 
the old City Hall District, was for many years 
on the bank detail out of Va.i Detective Bureau 
and, now retired, is in charge of the safe deposit 
vaults of the Bank of Italy at Eddy and Powell. 



February, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



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By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 



INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS 

(Continued from Page G) 
that criminals take advantage of progressive in- 
novations and to cope with situations of this kind 
it became essential that police officers should be 
equipped witli the best and most up-to-date in- 
struments. The instruments for efficient police 
service are many. Our International Organization 
has been the medium through which better laws, 
better working conditions and better organiza- 
tions have been promoted. Profiting by the many 
masterly papers read at our conventions and the 
learned discussions carried on at our conventions, 
our delegates have returned to their respective 
communities and through their state organiza- 
tions have been instrumental in securing from the 
legislative body more effective laws for the re- 
straint of criminal activity. In many cases, de- 
fects in legislation have been pointed out and it 
has been our experience that legislative commit- 
tees who prepare legislation have on many occa- 
sions sought the advice and counsel of our police 
executives. 

Nothwithstanding the constitutional barriers 
which have been laid down separating our state 
and federal governments, our International Asso- 
ciation has persistently endeavored within legal 
limitations to bring about that close co-operation 
between federal and state officials. Many splendid 
achievements have resulted by means of this co- 
operation and among those worthy of mention I 
feel that the greatest step which has been taken 
in recent years along police lines is the establish- 
ment of a National Bureau of Criminal Identifica- 
tion at Washington, D. C. This bureau has been 
the dream of police executives for more than 20 
years and from a dream it has at last become a 
reality. 

Some few years ago, through the co-operation 
of a committee authorized by the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police and federal offi- 
cials, the necessary congressional legislation was 
brought about and this bureau was established 
under the jurisdiction of our federal government. 
Prior to the establishment of this bureau at Wash- 
ington, D. C, a bureau was maintained by the 
International Association, but due to the lack of 
legislation and the lack of central control it was 
found that it could not function efficiently. After 
the new bureau was established under federal 



control the records of the former bureau of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police and 
the records of the bureau formerly conducted at 
Leavenworth, Kansas, were consolidated. As a 
nucleus for the working of the present federal 
bureau, over 130,000 criminal records with office 
equipment were turned over to the United States 
Department of Justice without any cost or obliga- 
tion on the part of the federal government. At 
the present time, the new bureau has over 1,100,- 
000 criminal records classified and it is function- 
ing most efficiently. A very sex'ious objection had 
to be overcome in the establishment of this bu- 
reau, that is, the rights of state officials to secure 
information from this source. Now that the Na- 
tional Bureau has been in existence for practically 
three years it has been the experience of our 
state officers that the services rendered are high- 
ly efficient and that the records of the bureau 
are available not only to federal officials, but to 
the constable of the smallest township in our na- 
tion. When we consider the roundabout metiiod 
which had to be adopted some years back in re- 
ceiving the criminal history of a particular in- 
dividual we can realize very well the efficiency of 
the present bureau. Heretofore, if a complete 
criminal history of an individual were required, 
it was necessary to communicate with a large 
number of departments and to be conclusive on 
the subject every police department of our nation 
should be communicated with. Now that we 
have our police departments contributing their 
criminal records to the central national bureau we 
have but to communicate there and within a few 
days we have direct and definite information as 
to the criminal history of a particular individual. 
In police life where work must be done quickly 
this bureau is an invaluable asset and if the In- 
ternational Association of Chiefs of Police had no 
other achievement but this, it has well fulfilled 
the purpose of its organization. 

DO YOU REMEMBER WHEN— 

The "Midway Plaisance," a replica of the old 
Bella Union on Kearney street put on risque 
shows in its booze theater on Market street near 
where the Humboldt Bank is now located. Po- 
lice were frequently called by the "suckers" to 
recover their bank-rolls from the painted ladies 
who both "acted" and "gathered" as cappers in 
the booths on the balcony. 



Page 10 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



Commissioner Cook's Narrow Escape 



Bv Opie L Warner 



With the arrival of the Chinese New Year this 
month, with all the pomp, customs and noises 
that have been lianded down from time immemor- 
able, Police Commissioner Jesse B. Cook, became 
reminiscent the other day, when down at the Hall 
of Justice. 

In talking with Captain of Detectives Duncan 
Matheson and Chief Clerk, Captain William J. 
Quinn, he told a most interesting incident which 
occurred back in 1895, the first year of over five 
trips he made to the Chinese quarters to head 
the Chinatown Squad. 

This incident was one of the rare occasions 
where Chinese deliberately made plans to do in- 




COMMISSIONER JESSE B. COOK 

jury to a member or a commander of a squad 
of police officers in Chinatown. 

It was designed to remove the then Sergeant 
Cook from activities that had been the forerunner 
of suppression of gambling and worse vices in 
the Oriental quarters. 

Commissioner Cook said he was given a tip on 
a place in Washington street, near Waverly Place. 
The tip intimated tliat something of interest 
might be found if the Sergeant investigated. He 
started out alone to investigate. 

He gained entrance, in a way police officers 
have, and began a survey. He found a lot of 
empty rooms on the ground floor. He went down 
into the basement and found the same there. 
Then he went into a sub-basement. His progress 
was retarded by cleverly concealed panel doors 



and he was some time getting to the bottom. 
Finally arriving at a place that seemed as far 
as he could go, he satisfied himself that nothing 
was wrong below ground, so he started to go 
above ground. 

Imagine his surprise when he found the door 
through which he had gained entrance securely 
fastened, blocking every effort of his to open it. 
He shouted and knocked and made all efforts to 
get out or attract attention from members of his 
squad or someone friendly to him. His efforts 
were in vain. 

Finally he managed to work his way up under 
the sidewalk, into a small space. This place of- 
fered no avenue of escape. He tried everything 
in his power to get someone to hear him, but all 
were dumb. Even his police whistle failed to draw 
attention, or if it did those who heard it could 
not locate from whence it came. 

After five hours of his involuntary imprison- 
ment, and after he had made up his mind that 
the imprisonment was a deliberate plot to put 
him out of the way, a way that would have been 
a long and torturing one, he decided that he would 
liave to wait for something favorable to happen. 

Through a small hole in the flagstone coping,\ 
through which he could look out on the sidewalk, 
a hole no larger than a half dime, he pinned his 
hopes. After what seemed hours to him, he final- 
ly spied through this little hole a pair of feet, en- 
cased in a pair of shoes that were familiar and 
unmistakable of an American. 

He recalled that but a short time before George 
Downey, for years a special officer in Chinatown 
and of whom there were none better posted on 
matters of Chinatown, had bought a pair of shoes 
that were a little different than the ordinary run 
of shoes. He recognized the pair he was looking 
at, as those of Downey's. He began to call "Dow- 
ney", "George", "George Downey". He could see 
the feet move, as Downey, whom it proved to be, 
turned this way and that, trying to locate the 
source of the noise. 

Finally recognizing the voice as that of Sergt. 
Cook, he asked: 

"Where in the dickens are you, Sergeant?" 

Sergt. Cook tried to tell him, but it was several 
minutes before he could make his exact presence 
known. When he did Downey got busy, and call- 
ing members of the squad, of which Officer Mannie 
Joy, bailiff in Judge Lyle T. Jacks' police court is 
the last surviving member, the Sergeant was soon 
(Continued on Page 38) 



February, 1927 



•2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



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Police of Harbor Praised 

By H. C. Emmons, Special Agent, T^orthem Pacific Railway 

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i 



In the June issue of Douglas 20 for 1926, you 
printed on page 15, my letter under the caption 
of "A Record to Be Proud Of". 

In this letter I commended the activities of your 
different departments for their alertness during 
the year of 1925 in the district in which the 
Nortli western Pacific Railroad handles millions 
of dollars worth of merchandise, baggage, mail 
and other valuables, and thousands upon thous- 
ands of passengers who represent all the nation- 
alities, colors and creeds on earth. It was the 
alertness of the officers of your department that 
enabled me to report that during the year of 1925 
we had only one small pilfer and one of your offi- 
cers recovered the loot taken within a few hours. 
It was that record that caused the caption as 
described above. 

\ATien we have good information I do not be- 
lieve in hiding it ; therefore, I beg to report to you 
that we have found, after checking our records 
for the year of 1926, no pilferage for the entire 
year that can be charged to the San Francisco 
district. There were no reports of theft of any 
kind at the Ferry building where we handle the 
thousands of passengers to and from the north 
bay district. There was not one case of pocket 
picking. In fact, we liave a clean record for the 
entire year. 

During the past year the press has carried, con- 
tinually, stories of the great crime wave. I won- 
der how many people realize the importance of 
the statement I made above. Few can, unless 
they know the district in which we do business 
and the conditions under which the officers work. 
All local people know pretty well the Ferry 
building. They do not know, though, how many 
hundreds of moves your officers have to make 
around that same building during a year so as 
to insure safety to the people, and their property, 
moving through it. In order to understand the 
situation thoroughly, they would have to have a 
lot of experience as an officer. I have watched the 
system work as an outsider and can say it is ex- 
cellent. The crooks have looked the place over 
many times and liundreds have traveled back and 
forth through there, and their judgment has been 
good, for they leave the place strictly alone. 

A suspicious move is made by a crook. Instant- 
ly, I see a uniformed officer pass, observing every- 
thing as he goes. A plain clothes man has his eye 
on the crook, who may or may not know him. If 
he does know him, he shoves off. If he does not 
know him, he is soon very much acquainted, and 



leaves the Ferry building off his list thereafter. 
An old lady witii a perplexed expression wanders 
off one of the boats, looking here and there, as if 
not knowing where she is going. Instantly one 
of the officers is at her elbow, and a few moments 
later she is smiling and on the right track. If 
her people are not there to meet her, she is soon 
in the good care of tlie Travelers' Aid and sure to 
have the best of care. "I want my mamma", is 
heard, and the oflficer knows another absent- 
minded mama has boarded the boat leaving baby 
behind. Soon after the boat has landed on the 
other side of the bay, the telephone rings and a 
frantic voice inquires if a baby has been found. 
She is always happy to find the officer has taken 
the baby to the Travelers' Aid, and it is well taken 
care of. These are only a few of the thousands of 
cases handled. All are handled, quickly, thorough- 
ly and efficiently. 

Between the Ferry building and Pier 43, we 
have sometimes in one night, thousands of dollars 
worth of valuable merchandise. It is scattered 
over the entire length of the Embarcadero, and 
the side tracks connecting. Most of it is plunder 
a thief would take great delight in looking over. 
No doubt, if he could, he would carry off a lot of it. 
He cannot get away with it though, and it is safe, 
for your officers are here and there, all through 
this district, at all hours of the night. This is the 
district novelists have written books about in the 
past, describing it as a very dangerous place to be 
at night, a place where thieves lurk in every dark 
corner and no one is safe. There must have been 
a great change, for I have moved around this dis- 
trict at all hours of the night, and have sat at 
the foot of Telegraph Hill for an hour, around 
midnight, witliout seeing anyone but your officers. 
They were moving thither and hither seeing that 
all was well. Peace reigns supreme on the Em- 
barcadero at night now, and property is safe. 

I thank you myself, and in behalf of the North- 
western Pacific Railroad, for this protection, and 
too much credit cannot be given those loyal men 
who work so diligently to bring about so good a 
record. 

H. C. EMMONS. 
Chief Special Agent of 
Northwestern Pacific Railroad. 



Sei-gt. Doherty and Officer L. Morch arrested and 
charged Cliff Leonard with being a $1000 vag. 

» » • 

Dooling also made a good "knockover" when he brought 
in John Herbert and Ed Long on robbery charges. 




2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, J 927 



D^^rPXTlVE BUREAU 

Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson in Charge 

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CODDLING OF CRIMINALS 

"Coddling-" of criminals was scored by former 
Governor George C. Pardee recently when he said 
that instead of being punished, a law-breaker is 
entertained by bands, dances, motion pictures and 
has bouquets and gifts sent to him while he is in 
prison. 

In a discussion of the growth of crime in the 
United States before the Oakland Kiwanis Club, 
Pardee declared that a criminal is made to feel 
that he is being persecuted. 

"Society is to blame for this attitude, and the 
I'esults will be dangerous for all of us," he said. 

In England, he pointed out, a murderer comes 
up for trial almost immediately and he is sent to 
the gallows often in as short a time as three 
months, while in the United States it takes from 
eighteen months to three years to convict a mur- 
derer. 

He continued: 

It is no crime to kill a policeman nowadays, 
and apparently any time is open season on the 
guardians of the peace. It is time our lawyer 
friends took this situation in hand. 

First, they should see that proper laws are 
passed; secondly, that these laws are enforced, 
and in the third place that delays in the convic- 
tion of criminals be avoided. 

Pardee appealed to the Kiwanis Club members 
to attempt to arouse a feeling of interest in seeing 
that ci'iminals are punished in order to make it 
impossible for them to continue to follow this 
profession. 

The difference between a boy who steals cher- 
ries and the confirmed criminal whose deed is 
premeditated was brought out by the speaker. 

"Who of us is not daily breaking a law?" he 
asked. "But we are doing it unconsciously, with 
no desire to become criminals. Others, with 
malice aforethought, do it intentionally." 

It is not a crime wave, but a rising tide of 
crime that is sweeping the country, he stated. 
The crime is organized and in every city are to 
be found organized gangs of gun men to dispose 
of anyone's enemy at his wish. 



DR. CAMPBELL COMMENTS ON CRIME 



Versatility is a characteristic of Detective Thomas Mur- 
phy. Tom is good on any kind of a "kick", but the one 
he particularly shines in is when he gets an assignment 
for picking up an insane man. Then Tom "do smile." 



Prohibition, coupled with a lack of proper home 
training of children, is bringing about an increase 
in crime in the United States, Dr. William Wal- 
lace Campbell, president of the University of 
California, said recently upon his return from a 
three months' tour of Europe. 

In comparing this country to England, where he 
spent the greater portion of his stay in Europe, 
Dr. Campbell said that he was "appalled at the 
seeming increase in crime in the United States." 

"Murder and anti-social acts seem to be on the 
increase", the educator said. "The sentiment of 
the American people is too lukewarm on that 
phase of national life. Many criminals escape, 
and after they are captured oftentimes they are 
not punished severely enough. Many culprits are 
never caught and made to suffer for their crimes. 

"There is too much feeling against capital pun- 
ishment and too generous a system of parole. 
Criminals should be apprehended promptly and 
punished speedily. Capital punishment, I believe, 
is a great deterrent to murder." 

That prohibition was forced upon the Nation 
too suddenly was the belief of the educator. 

Dr. Campbell laid particular stress upon the 
lack of home training and its effects upon the 
children of the present day, or what is known as 
the "jazz age." 

"Lack of home training", he said, "in addition 
to prohibition, is responsible for a great deal of 
the increase in crime. In the last decade there 
exists a higher percentage in the United States 
than earlier of parents who do not exercise proper 
care in bringing up their children. There is 
need for stronger supervision within the home." 
* * * 

At a meeting of the Council held by the Golden 
Gate Council No. 80, United Commercial Travel- 
ers of America ; Resolutions passed congratulating 
the Chief of Police and the personnel of the police 
department on their efficient efforts and capture 
of the terror crooks that have kept our city in 
suspense for the past two weeks. And we wish to 
assure you that we are mighty proud of our won- 
derful police department and assure you of our 
heartiest co-operation at all times. 

GOLDEN GATE COUNCIL NO. 80, 
By B. Hirschberg, Secretary. 



February, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



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'^Knockovers^^ of Bureau 



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Detective Sergeants Andrew Gaughran and James D. 
Skelly of the Shopping Detail took the joy out of life for 
a lot of shoplifters and people who try to "gyp" the de- 
partment stores. The following were arrested for burglary 
and petty larceny: John C. Coman, Grace Moore. Maria 
Garcia, Sophie Mannix, Fred Gardiner, Dan O'Connell, 
for forgery: Elsie Rowan and Fred Lathrop; for grand 
larceny, Frank H. Dunham; for bad checks, Roy Patter- 
son; for petty larceny, Frank Fay, Alphonse Borge, James 
Harris. 

* * * 

Lieut. Bernard McDonald's autotaker.s apprehenders 
registei-ed the following: By Sergts. Nicholas Barron 
and Augustus Tompkins, Jesse Nettles, burglary; Morris 
Keegan, James Murphy, felony embezzlement; John 
Bautiste and Leland McFall, Section 504a, Richard Hedke 
and Jerome O'Brien, forgery and fugitive, assisting in 
this arrest was Sergts. Hansen and Maher of Check De- 
tail; by Sergts. Jack Cannon and Jack McKenna, Frank 
Mclntyre, en route, Thomas Bologna, Lawrence Gasperi 
and Al Hicks, first and second 146'ers and obtaining goods 
by false pretense. Sergt. DeMatei and Officer Sunseri 
assisted in these arrests. Sergts. William Milliken and 
Harry Husted got John Allen in a stolen machine; Sergt. 
Hayes and McCrea got Sidney Hoskins for same. 

Corp. Frank Brown and Officer Percy Keneally got 
Harry Xash for like kick, and Millikin and Husted added 
Jack Blaney, Wm. R. Jordan and A. Davis for similar 
offenses. 'Vt 

* * * 

Det. Sergts. Fred Bohr and Clarence Herlitz of the 
Hotel Detail led the following to the Hall: James 
Michaelson, Henry LaMoureaux and James Mastei'son 

(two charges) 476a; William Gamberg, 504a. 

* * * 

Javier JofTre, charge grand larceny, and Harry King, 
with three charges of petty larceny, were arrested by 

Det. Sergts. Thomas Curtis and Thomas Reagan. 

* * * 

The following were booked by Det. Sergts. William 
Armstrong, Charles Maher and James Hansen of the 
Bad Check Detail: William Dentis, Frank R. Miller, 
Richard Sennett, George Murov, Max Rosengard, John 
Fezzi, Norman Clark, Alex Hillman, 476a, and William 
Garrell, Jos. Rosberg and Edgar DeWolf, two charges 
of same; Clay M. Lewis, three charges forgery, and 

John Meldrus, embezzlement. 

* * « 

Det. Sergts. Henry Kalmbach and George Richards of 
the Federal Detail turned the following over to the L". S. 
authorities: Robert Rogeis, Martha Richards, Fred Bor- 
den, Chester Clubb, Harry Edwards, Harry Hardman. 

* » * 

Here is a part of the record Lieut. Thomas Hoertkom 
and his partner, Det. Sergt. Morris Harris, made during 
the month: Chester Ayhens. burglary; Joe Harris, fugi- 
tive; Jose Burget, Oscar Mejia. Pete Garcia, Benito Mora 
and Stewart Thj-nn, petty larceny. 

* * * 

John Baggett, specializing in carpenters' tools, was ar- 
rested by Det. Sergt. George Hippely on a burglary 
charge; other arrests by Lieut. Henry Powell's Pawnshop ' 
Detail were: By Hippely and Sergt. Michael Desmond, 



Manuel Suares and Raymond Rodriquez, two charges of 
burglary; Roy Jackson, en loute to Los Angeles, by 
Sergts. John Callaghan and James Regan; Fred Norton, 
by Hippely and Sergt. L.vnch; by Hippely and Sergt. 
George Stallard, Frank Berryl, vagrancy; by Sergts. 
Gable and Jere Dinan, John San Jose, larceny. 

* » » 

Among the "knockovers" of Sergts. Arthur McQuaide 
and William Proll were George Kyle, forgery; Charles 
Karpel, fugitive, and John R. Williamson, 653 Penal Code. 

* * • 

James McKnight and James Ricketts were arrested and 
charged with assault to murder and assault with a deadly 
weapon. Lieut. Charles Dullea and Sergt. Otto Freder- 
ickson took them into custody. 

T * * 

Detectives Daniel Fogarty and John Stui-m apprehended 
Joseph Under, a fugitive. 

* * * 

Sergt. George Healy and Det. Sergt. Martin Porter of 
the North Beach Detail brought to headquarters Richard 
Trabert, Thomas Moore and Harold Fitzgerald, wanted 
in Sacramento; Charles Edwards, wanted in San Jose, 
and Fred Peri and Frank Constantine, assault to murder. 

* * * 

The members of the Burglary Detail, under Sergt. 
Richmond Tatham, registered the following on the prison 
books: Walter Anderson, embezzlement; Harry Drake 
and Eugene Rrou.se, burglary, by Sergts. Lippi and Jas. 
Gregson; James Wallace, burglary, by Sergts. Jack Palm- 
er and Nels Stolz; Gorden Whelan and James Phillips, 
burglary, by Sergts. James Mitchell and Irvin Finlay. 

* * * 

Det. Sergt. Harry Cook got Sam Jones, wanted in 
Fresno; Donald W>Tnan, wanted in Eureka; John C. 
Tunigan. wanted in San Jose, and William Myers, want- 
ed in Los .\ngeles. 

-:: * * 

Murray XeA\Tnark, en i-oute to Fi-esno, and Amo 
Bretenberg, larceny, were arrested by Det. Sergts. Thos. 
Conlan and Edward Wi.skotchill. 

* * * 

Det. Sergts. Michael Desmond and Earth Kelleher 
skooted the following into the "kooler." Grant Knight, 
vagrancy; Albert Berg and Thomas Conway, same, and 
Angel Rodriquez, larceny. 

* * * 

Sergt. George McLoughlin, in charge of the Robbery 
Detail, and Det. Sergt. Edward McSheehy arrested Ar- 
mand Betters for robbery; Sergts. George Wall and Wil- 
liam McMahon arrested Ralph Russell for same charge: 
Wall and Sergt. Robert Rauer assisted in the arrest of 
Russell Chelini for stealing an automobile; McLoughlin 
assisted Policewoman Katherj-n Eisenhart in arresting 
.\gostine Piagniri for vagrancy. 
« # * 

Det. Charles McGreevy and Policewoman Kathleen Sul- 
livan arrested John Neves and James Dawkins for vag- 
rancy. 

» * « 

Det. Sergts. Fiank Jackson and Det. George Page 
brought in during the night shifts Harry Da\ns for em- 
bezzlement. 



Page 14 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



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Proposed New Laws for Legislature 

Presentation of Recommendations Made By State Crime Procedii.re Commission and Adopted By 

State P'eace officers' Association 

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No person shall be eligible to probation who 
was armed with a deadly weapon when the offense 
was committed or at the time of his arrest. A 
person who arms himself with a deadly weapon 
and commits a felony is a potential murderer. 
Disregard of human life has become so great in 
this country that it must be made known that 
any person who commits a felony while armed 
with a deadly weapon shall not be eligible for 
probation. 

Parole and Indeterminate Sentence Law 

Under tlie system formerly in force in this 
state, and still in force in many states, the trial 
judge fixed the term of a defendant's sentence 
for a conviction of felony. This system had cer- 
tain definite advantages and also certain definite 
disadvantages. Under the present system, the 
trial judge has nothing to do with fixing the 
sentence. He simply pronounces the judgment as 
fixed by the indeterminate sentence law. The 
fixing of the actual sentence is committed to the 
Board of Prison Directors, which body is also 
given power to release convicts on parole. This 
plan, too, offers certain definite advantages as 
well as disadvantages and these have been so gen- 
erally discussed as to make further consideration 
here unnecessary. 

Since this state has had a number of years' 
experience under both systems, it has seemed that 
it should be possible to devise a plan by which 
tlie benefits of both could be retained and their 
disadvantages eliminated or reduced to a mini- 
mum. The Commission has directed its studies to 
this end and has evolved a plan which it is hoped 
and believed will bring about this result. 

The plan briefly is this : 

That tlie trial judge, at the time of imposing 
sentence and as a part thereof, shall recommend 
the minimum term which the defendant should 
serve in the penitentiary before being eligible for 
parole, and that the Board of Prison Directors 
shall not release the defendant on parole or other- 
wise prior to the expiration of such period, unless 
in its opinion exceptional cause therefor is shown. 
If this statute should be adopted, it will give an 
opportunity for the trial judge, who sees the de- 
fendant during the trial, who sees and hears the 
witnesses, and who knows the local condition to 
have some voice in the matter of the amount of 
punishment which the defendant shall actually 
receive, and at the same time will leave in the 
Board of Prison Directors the power to correct 
any injustice, or to consider and give proper 



weight to any new facts or circumstances that 
may be presented. 

In this connection the Commission expects to 
recommend an amendment to the constitution 
(for it cannot be accomplished by statute) by 
which the Legislature may provide fair compen- 
sation to the members of the Board of Prison 
Directors, and may furnish them necessary scien- 
tific assistance, such as psychiatrists, etc. At 
the present time our constitution provides that 
the Board of Prison Directors must serve without 
compensation. This constitutional provision was 
adopted long before the members of the Board of 
Prison Directors had imposed upon them the 
heavy and important duties which the law now 
devolves upon them. With their present onerous 
burdens and important I'esponsibilities it is un- 
fair, both to the public, to the members of the 
Board, and to the persons under their jurisdic- 
tion, to expect the Boai'd to serve without com- 
pensation and to give gi-atuitously the time, study 
and effort which the proper performance of their 
duties requires. It seems clear that the Legis- 
lature should have power to compensate them 
properly, and to give to them the benefit of the 
advice and services of scientific men. 

The Commission will probably recommend a 
statute providing that in certain cases a fixed 
minimum must be served in the penitentiary be- 
fore the convict is eligible for parole. The fol- 
lowing are being tentatively considered: 

That no person who is sentenced to life im- 
prisonment shall be eligible for parole until he 
shall have served a minimum of twenty-five (25) 
years ; 

No person who, at the time of the commission 
of the felony, or at the time of his arrest, was 
armed with a deadly weapon shall be eligible to 
parole until he shall have served a minimum of 
ten (10) years in case of first conviction of a 
felony; or a minimum of fifteen (15) years in 
case of second conviction of a felony; 

That one convicted of a felony who was not 
armed with a deadly weapon, but who has been 
theretofore convicted of a felony, shall not be 
eligible for parole until he has served a minimum 
term of seven (7) years. 

It seems desirable in the interest of making 
punishment certain and for its deterrent effect 
that in these cases there should be a definite 
minimum term which must be served before the 
convict shall be eligible for parole. 
(To Be Continued) 



February, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



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Officer Farley's Uniform Pants 

By Patrol Driver William D. Burns 

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Page IS 



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After years of silence I am about to make a 
confession. After countless nights of lying awake 
battling with a troubled conscience, I am going 
to make an open breast of the partial wrecking 
of a fire engine, and the total destruction of Offi- 
cer Elliot Farley's uniform pants. And as a fore- 
word to my confession, permit me to state, that 
as a recompense for my part of the offense against 
the "peace and dignity of the people of the State 
of California" 1 am now willing to go so far as to 
purchase a pair of pants for any of the male des- 
cendants of Farley's or even to the extent of buy- 
ing a new fire engine for the city and county of 
San Francisco. 

Come back with me to the days of wooden side- 
walks, when school boys were more interested in 
such characters as Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry 
Finn, than the average boy of today is in who "put 
over" the Eighteenth Amendment. To be more 
definite, let us go back to the days when the South- 
ern Police Station was on Folsom street between 
Fourth and Fifth, when the cops wore derby hats, 
and only buttoned the top button of their coats. 
Come back I ask you, to the days when movies 
were unthought of, %\hen Morosco opened Union 
Hall on Howard street as a theatre, and the public 
play gi'ounds consisted of the vacant lots of the 
neighborhood. 

It was on one of these improvised playgrounds, 
situated on the Southeast corner of Folsom and 
Hawthorne streets, that I did unwillingly, and un- 
knowingly, personally conduct the wrecking of a 
part of the city's fire apparatus, and the complete 
destruction of Elliot Farley's trousers. 

It all came about in this manner. Several other 
lads and myself, after a careful reading of Mark 
Twain's books had decided to emulate his boy char- 
acters, and had dug a large cave into the clay bank 
of the lot before mentioned. We had spent a full 
week on the task and now all that was needed was 
a stove to make things homelike. \A'ith the as- 
sistance of an old coal oil can and a length of stove 
pipe I was enabled to fashion a sort of makeshift 
heating apparatus and one day when the grass 
in the lot was good and dry I ventured to give the 
stove a tryout before my companions arrived. Well 
I started the fire all right, and along with the 
fire I unknowingly started several other things. I 
did not figure that a spark from the chimney of 
our dugout was going to find its way to the far 
corner of the lot where the grass was high, and 
I certainly had no knowledge of what was hap- 
pening in the outside world until I saw firemen 



from No. 10 Engine on Bryant street, battling 
with a fierce grass fire in the immediate vicinity 
of our cave. 

Just about that time the patrol wagon from the 
Southern Station hove in sight with Officer Elliot 
Farley in charge. It was my first meeting with 
the officer and he seemed anxious to meet me, but 
just about that time I remembered that I had 
business out on Folsom street, and I took a short 
cut over a barbed wire fence to get there. But 
Farley appeared more anxious than ever to make 
my acquaintance and he likewise followed me. 

And then for the space of a few minutes, he 
seemed to hesitate as if giving up the chance 
meeting, and remained on top of the fence. Re- 
mained is hardly the word to be used in this 
case. I might better say that he was suspended. 
Yes, suspended between heaven and earth. And 
for a few moments he remained in that position 
lield by the barbed unre, and then with a dull 
sickening sound, like the falling of a hot water 
bottle, he fell to the earth. But only Farley's 
body reached the gi'ound. His new uniform 
pants, still clung to the top of the fence. 

\Miile poor Elliot was taking stock of his sur- 
roundings I disappeared in the direction of Fol- 
som street, but as I went, I could still hear him 
calling to me "Come back boy, I'm not after you," 
but I never even hesitated. I just kept going 
until I met a fireman, and I told him that a police- 
man wanted him on the other side of the fence. 
^\'ell it was some time before I saw Farley again 
and when I did, he was draped in the fireman's 
overcoat looking more like a Roman gladiator 
than a cop, but while the Romans wore their 
togas thrown over the shoulders, Farley wore his 
mostly from his waist down. After the patrol 
wagon had departed for the station I discovered 
that No. 4 Engine had broken an axel while re- 
sponding to the alarm, but luckily no one was 
hurt. And now after all these years, I want to 
"come clean." I want to restore my peace of 
mind. And in conclusion I further wish to state 
that if the Statute of Limitation does not prevent 
it, all bills for tlie above mentioned damages may 
be sent to U'm. D. Burns, Room 9. 



I REMEMBER AVHEN— 

Patrolmen used to keep mobs of eager melo- 
drama lovers from wrecking the "nigger heaven" 
entrance to the old Grand Opera House on Mis- 
sion near Third and where special cops circulated 
with clubs tlirough the gallery gang and main- 
tained peace during the performance. 



Page 16 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927' 



Taking of Statements 



By Robert Fitzgeic^ld, Formerly Assistant District Attorney 

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(Continued from last Issue) 
We then come to the subject of the admissions 



and confessions of the accused other than those 
admissions in response to accusatory statements. 
It must be kept in mind that these two classes of 
Statement are essentially different. A confession 
is an admission of the accused of his guilt of the 
crime charged and for which the accused is then 
on trial. An admission is less than a confession 
and relates to the statements by him of facts or 
circumstances, from which when considei-ed to- 
gether with other facts and circumstances proven 
in the case, guilt of the main charge may be in- 
ferred. Thus one on trial for robbery or burglary 



prosecution do first affirmatively and conclusively 
show an entire absence of either class of inducing 
circumstances. 

(To be Continued) 



EXAMINATION HELD 



Corporal to Sergeant examination held October 
22, 1926. List adopted December 23, 1926, as 
passed in the following order: 

John Alexander Reed, Maurice Reardon, Jos. 
M. Walsh, George S. McCullough, Henry H. Lii- 



dolph, Edward R. Pootel, Glen L. Hughes, Patrick 
may "admit the possession by him of the stolen Shannon, Joseph Edward Powers, Howard H. 
property ; or charged with a homicide he may ad- Chamberlin, Alfred J. Strei, John J. Donegan, 
mit his presence at or near the scene thereof, or John O'Leary, Clarence A. Byrne, Austin Cagney, 
may admit the ownership of the weapon with William L. Danahy, Lawi-ence Mclnerney, Nels 
which the crime was committed. His admission Steven Stohl, Thomas P. Mclnerney, John F. 



may amount to a confession of guilt of some other 
crime than the one for which he is on trial. In 
the admission of possession of stolen property he 
may explain this possession by stating he pur- 



Quinlan, John J. Mullin, Patrick Hallisy, Cornelius 
J. McCarthy, David M. Stevens, William F. Bran- 
nan, Frank P. Scollin, Theobald H. McCarty, Ern- 
est Bortfeld, William J. Quinn, Horace S. Drury, 



FOURTEEN PASS LIEUTENANT TEST 



chased the property from the actual robber or James Carrig, John C. Crofton, Fi'ank F. Brown, 
burglar and may even admit that at the time of Emmett C. Flynn, John R. Dower, Charles A. Ma- 
the purchase he knew it to have been stolen. The her, William Denser, Edward J. Lynch, Hezekiah 
fact such admission carries with it the admission Combs, John J. Feeney, Marvin E. Dowell, Otto 
of guilt of crime of knowingly receiving stolen Frederickson, Michael McCarthy, Michael J. Cole- 
property does not put such admission in the class man, James J. Breen, William T. Jones. 

of confessions for the reason that it is not a con- 

fession of guilt of the crime for whi(5h he is on 
trial. The distinction is important. Confessions 
can not be received in evidence except after and 
upon preliminary proof (called foundation) that 
they are freely and voluntarily made, without any 
inducement through offer of reward, or threats 
calculated to inspire fear of any danger in event of 
reward, or threats calculated to inspire fear of 
any danger in event of refusal. It may safely 
be admitted that in the past there have been 
innumerable instances of confessions obtained 
through inexcusable use of the so-called third 
degree — confessions made by the accused solely 
for the purpose of escaping further administra- 
tions of these persuasive influences. It has also 
been known that the desire to escape the em- 
barrassment, delay and expense of trial has 
caused innocent persons falsely to admit guilt up- 
on assurances that there would be no resulting 
prosecution, or that other pending charges would 
not be pressed. These cases may be, and we hope 
they are, indeed rare, but the possibility of their 
recurrence causes the court to limit jealously proof 
of confessions to those cases alone in which the 



Arthur L. Christiansen, 1346 Twenty-fourth 
avenue, heads the list of fourteen sergeants in the 
San Fi-ancisco Police Department who successfully 
passed the examination for promotion to the rank 
of lieutenant in the order of the grade received: 

Arthur L. Christiansen, Samuel Miller, Aloysius 
L. O'Brien, Alexander E. McDaniell, George M. 
Healy Michael Flynn, John B. Carney, Henry A. 
Reilly, Patrick J. Murray, Thomas J. Sullivan, 
Mark Higgins, William J. Dougherty, John Alpers 
and Thomas G. Roche. 



I take great pleasure in complimenting Detective I. 
Findley and Detective Sergeant J. Mitchell in their clever 
work in apprehending one Mollie Moses, a maid in my em- 
ploy, who took some cash and clothing from my home. 
They were courteous, patient and gentlemanly. Trusting 
you will acknowledge this, I am, 

HENRY ROSS, 
848 33rd Avenue, 
San Francisco. 



February, J 927 



20'^ POLICE JOURNAL 



Page J 7 



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For Policemen 



About Action to Ta\e m Law Violation on Mail TruLi^s 

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In the event that a traffic violation occurs, 
wlietlier of minor or serious importance, in rela- 
tion to trucks which are being protected by guards 
of tiie United States Marine Coi-ps, there will be no 
stopping of said trucks for the obtaining of infor- 
mation. No citation shall be issued at the scene 
of the violation, and under no circumstances shall 
a member of the department board a mail truck 
or wagon, except at the request of the Marine in 
charge, to assist him in preventing a violation of 
the law, or the apprehending of a violator of the 
law. 

Should a violation occur, officers will make 
proper notations, taking number and description 
of mail trucks, time, etc., and shall immediately 
submit a report covering all these matters in de- 
tail, through proper channels, so it may be for- 
warded to this office and the same referred to the 
proper Federal authorities. 

In various localities throughout the country 
men posing as peace officers have in the past in- 
tercepted mail trucks and when the operators of 
same were at a disadvantage, have committed 
felonies. 

Members of the Marine Corps are subject to 
strict discipline and the officers in charge will not 
permit any laxity. They desire to co-operate with 
this department and ask for our fullest co-opera- 
tion, which the Chief of Police has promised. 

United States mail must be moved. Trucks and 
other methods of conveyance are protected by Fed- 
eral statutes, but the individual is not immune 
from violating the state or local regulations, and 
such violations will not be immediately dealt with, 
but will be dealt with later on through the office 
of the Chief of Police, the commanding officers of 
the United States INIarine Corps in charge at San 
Francisco, and then through the proper channels. 
D. J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police. 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE OPERATION OF 
TRAFFIC SIGNALS 

To open signals — Turn main snap switch to the 
"ON" position with the control switch on the ex- 
treme left, or "STOP" position, then throw the 
control switch to the middle position. This will 
open the shutters in signals on north and south 
streets, displaying the "STOP" signs. Next, 
throw control switch over to the extreme right, 
or "GO" position. Ths will open the shutters on 
the east and west streets, displaying the "GO" 
signs. 

To close signals— With control switch at "GO" 
position, press shutter button, throw switch to 
center position and then to "STOP" position. The 
shutters in all signals will now be closed. Turn 
off light switch, if the lights had been turned on, 
then tuiTi off main snap switch. 

General Instiuctions— The words "STOP" and 
"GO" on top of the control switch designate the 
position of the signals on the east and west 
sti-eets. With the control switch in the center 
position all signals will display the "STOP" signs. 
This i)Osition of the control switch permits the in- 
tersection to be cleared before opening traffic in 
the opposite direction. It also permits the officer 
in charge to stop traffic in all directions upon the 
approach of fire apparatus or for any other rea- 
son when it is desired to stop all traffic. 

The foregoing is for the information and guid- 
ance of the members of this department. 



TRAFFIC OFFICKR BIRDSELL, 



Sometimes I think we all like to hear nice things about 
ourselves and our interests so I thought that I would 
drop you a line and tell you about one that occurred 
under my window last Tuesday. 

The Powell street cable car started down the hill back- 
wards and had it not been for the coolness and quick 
thinking of Traffic Officer Birdsell, stationed at the cor- 
ner of Sutter and Powell streets, it might have been a 
very serious affair. It was as beautifully handled as any 
traffic emergency I have ever seen and reflected great 
credit on you and your department. 

ARTHUR COLLINS GIBSON, M. D.. 
Physicians' Bldg., 516 Sutter Street. 



\ MEMBEai OF SUNSET DISTRICT BOOSTS 



In connection with the parade held a few weeks ago in 
the Sunset District, preceding the Carnival for the Boy 
Scouts Building Fund: 

I feel it is my duty to inform you of the many very 
favorable comments received by the Committee in gen- 
eral, in regard to the efficient manner in which the Police 
Department handled the crowds and more so, the auto- 
mobile traffic immediately after the parade. It is being 
called to our attention by a number of residents that 
there were no traffic jams and that the streets were 
cleared of machines to the normal condition without the 
least confusion. 

I have been directed by the General Committee to 
write you in this connection as a token of appreciation 
for the excellent police duty performed on the evening 
of November 9, under the direction of Captain O'Meara 
and Lieutenant Pfeitfer of the Park Police Station. 
CARL L. MARITZEX, 
Chairman of the Parade Committee, 
Sunset District Carnival. 
* « * 
Oflicer A. Barrett arrested Melvln Wagner on a va- 
grancy charge. 



Page 18 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— ROOM 9, HALL OF JUSTICE 
Official Publication 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT; 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASS'N.; 
STATE HIGHWAY PATROLMENS' ASS'N. 

A Police News and Educational Magazine 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY "2-0" PUBLISHING CO. 
Printed by 

ALEX. DULFER PRINTING CO., 853 Howard Street 

Phone: Douglal 2377 





"9.-n' 


POLICE JOURNAL 








OPIK L. WARNER _.. . 




..- Editor 


JOHN F. QUINN .. 









EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 
THEODORE J. ROCHE. President 
JISSE B. COOK I ANDREW F. MAHONY ; DR. THOS. E. SHUMATE 
DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police 

AUGUST VOLLMER, Past President International Association of 
Chiefs of Police 

Captain BERNARD JUDGE 



Captain of Detectives 

DUNCAN MATHESON 
Captain HENRY GLEESON 
Captain EUGENE WALL 
Captain HENRY O'DAY 
Captain ROBERT A. COULTER 
Captain JOHN J. CASEY 
Captain FRED LEMON 
Captain STEPHEN V. BUNKER 
Captain PETER McGEE 



Captain JOHN J. O'MEARA 

Captain H. J. WRIGHT 

Captain ARTHUR D. LAYNE 

Captain PATRICK HERLIHY 

Captain CHARLES GOFF 

Captain WILLIAM J. QUINN 

Captain WM. T. HEALY 

Captain J. H. LACKMAN 

Captain CHARLES SKELLY 



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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not suba.-ribe to "2-0" POLICE JOUR- 
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proper credentials written on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



Vol. V. 



FebiTiary, 1927 



No. 4. 



WHERE PENALTY FOR ROBBERY IS 
FIFTEEN DAYS 



From the humanitarian standpoint few men 
are so well equipped to discuss crime and crimi- 
nals as Professor George W. Kirchwey. In the 
Survey he has written his regret that the atten- 
tion given to the increase of crime is resulting in 
public demands for more severe laws because he 
does not believe that harshness of punishment is 
the right way to reform criminals. 

Alarm on this score seems groundless in view 
of a report just issued by the Missouri Crime 
Commission. In this, the most ambitious docu- 
ment of the kind that has come to hand, the 
severity of laws has little to do with what happens 
to the criminal. Perhaps it is not reasonable to 
take the Missouri report as a cross section of con- 
ditions everywhere, but in a general way it prob- 
ably is fairly typical. 

The report discloses that the average penialty 



for a robbery in Missouri is fifteen days. 

Over the period covered 2075 cases of robbery 
came to the attention of the authorities. There 
were 379 arrests, showing that the criminal had 
something better than one chance in five of es- 
caping the police. Of these 379 prisoners, eighty- 
five, were convicted and sentenced. This gave 
the prisoner better than one chance in four of es- 
caping conviction. The average sentence was 
something more than four years. As a result of 
pardon, parole, commutation and the like, the 
average sentence served was less than twelve 
months. 

Eighty-five robbers served aggregate sentences 
of 1020 months. This averages less than half a 
month apiece for the 2075 robberies. 

Put it another way. The chance is almost 25 
to 1 against being caught and convicted. This is 
a better chance than the law of averages gives 
an honest business man to succeed in legitimate 
industry. 

The report further shows that the average 99- 
year sentence really means 11.19 years. The 
average life sentence means eleven years. And 
even these penalties are not certain. In Kansas 
City the chance of escaping conviction for mur- 
der is 10 in 11, in St. Louis 5 in 6. 

Everywhere that statistics are available the 
evidence shows a very large part of the crime 
tide due to professional criminals. This would 
seem to divide the crime problem into two classes 
—the casual or first offender and the profession- 
al. The only means at hand to discourage the 
professional is to make his trade unprofitable, and 
that the mills of justice, if the Missouri report is 
accepted as typical, do not seem to be accomplish- 
ing. The penalties are, perhaps, severe enough 
as they stand on the books. 

If they are made reasonably certain, crime 
will become a hazardous occupation. 

—The S. F. Chronicle. 

To the Policemen and Matrons 

The Journal would like very much to run arti- 
cles of events happening in your homes or sta- 
tions. Anything that is interesting to you would 
be interesting to others, but it is necessary to re- 
ceive them. We would be very thankful to re- 
ceive the cooperation of the women members of 
the department. 

If you feel that you cannot get the item or 
news matter together in the correct way give 
us a call, and we will be glad to do the rest. 
* * # 

Grace Walker was locked up by Officers J. Ross and 
H. Kiernan on a vag-rancy charge when she was seen 
gliding along the dark side of a street. 
* * * 

Layon Harper got a charge like that slammed against 
his name when Officer Cornelius Cregan spotted him 
dodging- work. 



February, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 19 



I 



OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE 

BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




WANTED 

for Murder 
QUAN GIN LEONG 

Alias Quan Gin, age about 38 years; height, 5 ft. 
8 ins.; weight, 165 lbs.; heavj^ black eyebrows; is neat 
dresser, wears bow ties and fancj^ woolen vests. Wore 
dark suit and gre}^ Fedora hat. 

Wanted in this Citv for murder of Low Wah on 
February 6th, 1927. A reward of $1000.00 is offered 
by the Four Famih' Association and Low Family Asso- 
ciation for his capture. 

If located, arrest and I will send Officer with proper 
papers for his return to this City. 

D. J. O'BRIEN, 

Chief of Police. 



Page 20 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




Sergeant Patrick McGee, Corporals Thomas Maloney, 
Horace McGowan and Detective Sergeant William Bennett 
have been using the radio to broadcast the Policemen's 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association concert and ball. 
They have broadcasted some excellent programs, nightly 
using the microphone to advise the people of the big 
show and to state the cause of the big benefit given an- 
nually to keep up the funds for the wives and children 
of police officers. One of the features was the singing of 
old time songs by Sergeant McGee, and another was the 
harmonica solos given by Corporal McGowan. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Richard Foley of the Southern Station ar- 
rested Geraldine Fitzgerald on a burglary charge. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Thomas Hyland, some times referred 
to as the Demosthenes of the Detective Bureau, says that 
from his long and varied experience as a member of the 
San Francisco Police Organization he has become more 
than ever convinced that if you want to keep the prisons 
free from patrons, the principles of crime prevention must 
be more and more inculcated into the minds of the grow- 
ing youth. Hyland says he has locked men and women in 
jail, sent men and women to State's prison for nearly 
every crime in the well known penal code, city ordinance 
book, national statutes, and despite his activities along 
this line he does not have to use a telescope to see that 
crime still thrives and in some places increases. Sergeant 
Hyland says the object lesson he strived to impress upon 
the evil doers by active police work, able presentation 
of the mass of evidence he gathered in each and all of 
his cases, personal attention to all details, advising the 
members of the district attorney's office just what to do, 
have failed, and he gets sometimes discouraged in his 
work. However, he says that the only beacon light lead- 
ing him out of the darkness of discouragement is offered 
by what he has attained since he put in working condition 
and saw to a successful fruition, the Crime Prevention 
Detail. Using his own words, "This detail will prove a 
panacea of all wrong doing if followed along the lines 
which I have suggested." 

* * * 

Inspector John Lyons says he will be at the Ball in a 
full dress outfit and that the fellow who tries to switch his 
outfit this year will get a ride to the top floor of the Hall. 

* * * 

They have painted the interior of Room 9. The color 
scheme was selected by Boss Painter Jack Lane after 
waiting several days for Joe Lee and Officer William 
Kearny to agree upon a color scheme. Joe wanted robin 
egg blue and Bill said black was the right color for the 
place as it didn't show the dirt so easily. Sergeant John 
Caples and Corporal Peter Peshon tried to get some sort 
of a compromise but Bill and Joe were adamant and so 
Lane had to spread on a cream colored paint. 

* * * 

Sergeant Frank Latulipe says he hopes to get his photo- 
graph detail up on top of the Hall of Justice by next 



Chri.'tmas. The new horseless elevator leading from the 
B of I to the gallery on top is about ready for service and 
it will prove a great convenience to prisoners being taken 
from one place to another, though Officers James Galla- 
gher and Tim Burke of Sergeant Emmett Hogan's bureau 
will be shortchanged out of a lot of exercise by being 
able to be hoisted from the fourth floor to the prison 
or gallery. 

Lieutenant Frank McConnell and Detective Charles 
Gallivan, experts on pickpockets, bunco men and other 
easy winners, whose activities are usually centered in 
keeping such gentiy who do come to this city circulating 
on their way, now and then find it necessary to have the 
keys turned on some insistent ones, who think their ad- 
monitions are now well meaning. Such fates befell Ed- 
ward Drown whom they vagged and booked en route to 
Los Angeles; and Frederick Walker who got the same 
treatment. They also arrested Robert Evans, who has 
been in several cities and who has a whole set of phoney 
monickers. This gent was booked as a fugitive and for 
vagrancy. 

* * * 

Chinatown is a different place than it used to be. Hop 
smoking is a thing of the past, yet now and then some 
brave celestial tries to sneak a puff and smuggle a little 
hop into the Chinese quarters. This year the weeks pre- 
ceding China New Year saw some try these things, and 
the vigilance of Sergeant Manion and his squad caused 
the arrest of nine Chinese, who were charged with vio- 
lating the State Poison Law. The squad also arrested 
three or four gunmen, who, owing to the tongs all being 
at peace, are for the time being without employment. They 
booked the prisoners for violating the state gun law. 



ECONOMY 

does not mean a miserly 
denial of life's pleasures 
and comforts. Economy 
means saving where ever 
possible. This market 
affords the best at the 
lowest prices. 

CrustalAPalaoe 

San rr<masnafbodBai/i<'t'''II^Mar6elMsslon(tl<^Sb. 



February, 1927 



•2-0 



POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 2 J 




CENTRAL 

STATION 



Capt. Arthur D. Layne 
Lieutenants: Harry P. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 

Sergeant William Flinn says that one of the greatest 
musical treats he has ever heard was Officer Jack 
Evatt's solo "The Star Spangled Banner," played on a 
bass drum. The Sergeant says radio broadcasting sta- 
tions are overlooking a hot bet when thoy don't sign Ofii- 
cer Al Williams, formerly of this station but now director 
general on the Bush Station's Bustling Buick for the cele- 
brated deaf and dumb act. 

* * * 

Officers Harry Gurtler and Walter Leonhardt brought 
in a brace of burglars, when they nabbed Charles Collins 
and Forest Durling. These latter bozos drew additional 
charges of assault by force. 

* * * 

A couple of lawbreakers were landed behind prison 
bars by Officers George Ohnimus and Edward Christal 
when they turned the keys on Angelo Sabini for burglary 
and Anna Bert for grand larceny. 

* * * 

Officer Edward Fewer found Salivo Segale "totin' a pop" 
and he hung one of those gun law charges onto his name. 
Fewer also got Peter Pera who was doing a little plain 
paper hanging. 

James Clifford was walking off with a vacuum cleaner 
when Officer L. Morch appeared on the scene. James got 
vacuumed into the wagon on a petty larceny "kick." 

* * * 

Officer Fred Hoepner found Lawrence Martines ambling 
about with unlawful sidearms. Larry went in on the gun 
law violation. 

^ ^ ^ 

(Jeorge Cavanaugh got gay with a damsel who did not 
want to do what he wanted her to do, that is work while 
he idled. He was locked up for assault to do great bodily 
harm by Officers Spooncer and George Lillis. 

^ ^ ^: 

Russell E. Graham had the pleasure of being locked up 
on a bad check charge by Sergeant William Dougherty. 

Pedro Areda has two assault to commit murder charges 
pending against him. He was arrested by Officer Ballhaus. 

* * * 

Officers William Jurgens and C. Rogerson spotted James 

McNemy dashing hither and thither in a car that had been 
reported stolen. They grabbed Jimmie and gave him a 
booking for violating Section 146 M. V. A. 

Santiago Carrion, in on a petty larceny "rap", was lo- 
cated and landed and loaded into the wagon by Officer P. 
Haggerty. 



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Page 22 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



February. 1927 



<r!iii iimi !i!!u 



' MMfr' n j.'Bi mmml 



SOUTHERN 



STATION 



Capt. Charles Goff 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Richard Foley 

Corporal Emmett (Doc) Fljmn, the active special duty 
Corporal of the Southern gave John O'Kely and James 
Clayton a ride on a robbery charge, and his posse con- 
sisting of Officers William Desmond and William Fogarty 
also brought in Frank Young charged with burglary. 

* * * 

Officer J. Hart also got a burglar when he arrested 
Ernie Inbrigton, while Officer Oliver Lundborg got an 

attempt burglar in the person of Vic Cejo. 

» * * 

Officer Charles Russell is "agin" guys carrying pocket 
artillery and when he sees a bulge of a gun on a gent 
he calls for the prison conveyance. This happened to 
two persons the past few days. One of them was Tony 
Loon and the other Jasper Madicon, each charged with 

violating the state gun law. 

* * * 

Only three of inebriated auto drivers invaded the South- 
ern precincts the past month, or who were charged and 
caught as such. One was Don Holcomb, arrested by Offi- 
cer James Morley, another was George Roach, arrested 
by Officer Clarence Tregonning, while the third was Ben 

Bell, arresteed by Officer T. Mahoney. 

* * * 

Officers John Erasmy and Lundborg found Ira Smith 
in illegal possession of one automobile. They also found 
him in illegal possession of one pistol. They arrested 
him for violating Section 146 of the Motor Act and for 

violating the state gun law. 

* * » 

Lundborg with Officer Francis Kerr locked up George 
Henderson for carrying a gun and got two of his pals 
for vagrancy. * # * 

Ben Seay, charged with burglary was put in the prison 

cell by Officers William Fogarty and John Bongard. 

* * * 

Percy McClellan "bounced down a bad check" and got 
entangled with the law under one of those 476a charges. 
He was nipped by Officer Charles Lyons. 

* * * 

Officers Andrew Lennon and A. McDonnell brought in 

John Moran for grand larceny. 

* * * 

Cliff Pecery, accused of assault to do great bodily harm, 
was arrested by Officers Pootel and Richard Curtin. 

* * * 

The boys of the Southern Station are wondering how 
"Red" Moriarty, the Beau Brummel of Third street, has 
such a "drag" with Lieut. Foley that he gets off every 
Monday of each week. He must be hanging hams. 

* * * 

Daniel Dineen has resumed practice on his bora so he 

can take part in Lieut. Foley's Band. 

* * * 

"Short story writers" attracted the attention of some of 
the members of the Southern. Dan Kamajin got a book- 
ing on a 476a charge when arrested by Officer 0. Lund- 
borg; Frank O'Connor, by J. Hachette; and David Sloan, 
arrested by Officer William Fogarty got a like charge 
placed against their names. 



Clever Up Your 
Appearance 

- — with a smart new Lundstrom or 
Stetson hat. Be as well dressed 
off duty as on! The new fall felts 
are here in greys and browns — ■ 
jaunty styles that can be worn with 
brim turned up or down. 

If you want a hecoming 
hat, he coming to 




HAT COMPANY 



72 Market St. 

720 Market St. 

1120 Market St. 



2640 Mission St. 26 Tliird St. 

3242 Mission St. 1457 Fillmore St. 

167 Powell St. 
1205 Broadway 
1435 Broadway, Oakland 
226 W 5th St., Los Angeles 



The First Hotel on 
Market Street 

AND THE ONLY HOTEL WHERE 
ALL CAR LINES PASS ITS DOORS 



This hotel is just two minutes' walk 
from the Ferry Building. 



TERMINAL HOTEL 

60 MARKET STREET 



Fisher's Dancing Pavilion 

Eddy and Jones Streets 
DANCING EVERY EVENING 

Music by 

DR. RITTER'S GOLDEN GATE SINGING BAND 

ADMISSION 10 CENTS 



Phone Davenport 3558 

SAM ISRAEL 

WHOLESALE 

CIGARS, CIGARETTES, TOBACCOS 

AND CANDIES 

310-314 JACKSON ST. San Francisco, Calif. 



February, 1921 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 23 



1^^ HARBOR 



111 



STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

There was a small sized crime wave in the district the 
past month, but the boys "cleared all kicks" as following 
addenda will indicate. 

* * * 

Sergeant Lawrence Boland and some of his trusty 
assistants arrested Jess Campoe for burglary. 

* * ♦ 

Corporals Byrne and Emil Heam, two of the depart- 
ment's handsomest and best dressed police officers favored 
Fred Katun with their attention. Fred who has worked 
the other side of the bay extensively was locked up for 
grand larceny. 

* * * 

Byrne and Officer Cliff Dunleavy snared John Thomas 

and Frank McGrory for petty larceny. 

* * * 

George W. Connett was saved from the chill waters 
of the bay when he was arrested by Officer J. Mulcahy 
and charged with violating Section 112 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Mike Cunningham got too loud in telling what he was 
going to do to a certain party. Officer J. Phelan locked 

him in the station cell for threats against life. 

* * * 

Antony Caponi will know that the Harbor district is 
no place to pull a robbery. He got cuffed on a robbery 

"clout" by Special Officer C. Hoerber. 

* * * 

Ray Bates charged with grand larceny, arresting Offi- 
cer George Barry; Frank Kerwin, same kick, arresting 
officer, T. Fljiin, were a pair of prisoners booked by the 

sergeants at the station. 

* t' * 

Ottis Barber packing a gun was nabbed by Officer James 
A. Mahoney and J. McLaughlin, charged with carrying 

a gun and en route to Redwood City. 

* * * 

The boys have the details about completed for a flight 
race between Lieutenant Michael Mitchell's trained sea- 
gull. Officer Jim Mahoney's parrot and Officer Samuels 
long distance flying Owl. Details wdll be ready later. 



On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Crocker 
First National Bank, I take this means of expressing to 
you and your officers our deep appreciation for the prompt, 
untiring, and efficient services rendered in the safe- 
guarding of our institution on Saturday evening and the 
days following the explosion therein. We all feel that 
too much praise cannot be given for the help received 
at the hands of your men at the time when we were in 
such great need. 

We would like to express our appreciation to you and 
each one of your men personally, but this cannot easily 
be done. 

We ask that you kindly accept the enclosed check for 
$500, payable to the San Francisco Police Department 
Widows' and Orphans' Mutual Aid Association, as an 
expression of our appreciation. 

WM. H. CROCKER, President, 
Crocker First National Bank. 



The Largest Plant of its Kind in the 
United States 

— plus 60 years of cleanintf and dyeing 
experience, is at your service when you 
phone V. Thomas. We are equipped to 
produce the highest quality of work — to 
handle everything from the most delicate 
crepe de Chine garment to the heaviest 
carpet or rug. 

F. XHOIVIAS 

PARISIAN DYEING AND 
CLEANING WORKS 



27 TFA'TH STREEET 



SAN FRANCLSCO 



Phone MARKET 230 



San Francisco Dairy Co. 

HIGH-GRADE MILK and CREAM 
Isleton Butter Clover Leaf Butter 



"The Fat of the Land" 
Turk and Steiner Sts. TeL West 6110 



— HOTEL ^ 

WHITCOMB 



D.M.Linnard 
Lessee 



Ernest Drmty 

Manager 



San Francisco's 

Newest Large 

Hotel 

Located in the heart 
of the new Civic 
C«nter Business Dis- 
trict. Garage !n con- 
nection. : : : 



CAFE AND RESTAURANT 

859 G'FARRELL ST., between Polk and Larkin Sts. 

Regular Dinner M'eek Days and Sundays 

$1.50 

Also a la carte. 

Banquet Halla PHONE GRATSTONE 8100 



EVERY 
Auto Accessory 

at a 

LOWER Price 

LEVIN'S AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

Van Ness at Market, San Francisco 



Page 24 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. Frederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

Special Officer Cahill works while a lot of folks sleep 
and the other night while following this custom he ap- 
prehended Charles Fitzpatrick whom he locked up on two 
charges of robbery. 

* * * 

Officer McDaniel don't like burglars and when he sees 
one he locks him up. He did this to Laura Brewer. 
He also detests degenerates and he turns the keys on 
them too. He did this very thing to Waynne McCormick 
on a 288 charge. 

* * * 

Sergeant Thomas Roche booked John Edwards for vio- 
lating Section 330a of the code, conducting a disorderly 
house and violating the prohibition law. Which would 
furnish sufficient efforts for any dock hound. 

Officer F. Nuttman gathered in Pete Caumon for wob- 
bling too much while driving his car. 112 was the charge. 

* * * 

Sergeant Fred Suttman and Officer C. Foster got John 
J. Brown on exactly the same sort of a charge. 

* 4: It: 

And Officer J. Begley not to be out-done brought in 
Thomas Logan on a similar "kick." 

* * * 

Corporal Keane, assisted by that noble gladiator, Officer 
Stephen Clark, demonstrated how two good men arrest 
one bad man, when they gave the police rites to Frank 
Boroho for violating Section 288. Lieutenant DuUea gave 
additional grief to Frankie by booking him en route to 

Oakland. 

* * * 

Officer P. Griffith locked up Henry Kaufman, Jay Tower 
and Horance Tower for violating the Juvenile Court Law; 
while Corporal Patrick Shannon and posse arrested George 
Walter on the same charge. 



POIiICK AND FOOTBAMv GAME 



I wish to call your attention to the excellent work of the 
Police Department, under the supervision of Captains 
O'Meara and Coulter, in handling the large crowd that 
witnessed the "East and West Football Game" at the 
Kezar Stadium on January 1st. 

Over twenty thousand people witnessed this game and 
about two-thirds of the crowd used their automobiles, 
and it is impossible to estimate the number of machines 
that were in this district. 

While the spectators were arriving for the game, and 
also when leaving, at no time was there any congestion 
of traffic, and our cars were not blocked in any way. 

Too much credit cannot be given for the excellent work 
of your Department, and especially Captains O'Meara and 
Coulter, for the excellent manner in which this crowd was 
handled. 

With kindest wishes, 

M. McCANTS, General Manager, 
Market Street Railway Company. 



'' Cheerful Credit '' 

is a modern way of paying 
for the Clothing needs of 
the entire Family ! 

Small Payments Weekly or Monthly 

Columbia Outfitting Co. 

Mission at 22nd 




Doughnut and Sandwich Shops 

658 Market Street 24 Geary Street 

1014 Market Street, Opposite 6th 
Mission at 22nd Fillmore at Geary 

VISIT OUR RESTAURANT at 658 MARKET ST. 



Gray Line Motor Tours 

The World's Largest and Best Equipped 
SIGHTSEEING SERVICE 

Operating in fifteen cities of United States 
and Canada 



San Francisco OfBce 

920 MARKET STREET 

Phone Sutter 5186 

Seven Distinctive Tours of San Francisco and Vicinity 



Through the courtesy of Mr. Ignatius McCarthy, brother 
of our Director, Rev. E. T. McCarthy, who completed ar- 
rangements with Captain Quinn, Corporal Peter Maloney 
and Corporal Coghlan, our Sodality recently made a tour 
through Chinatown and the Hall of Justice, and spent a 
most pleasing and instructive evening. 

We thought it only fitting that we should express a few 
words of gratitude to you and your staff for having made 
this possible, and wish to make particular comment regard- 
ing the high type of officers from the Chinatown Squad, 
under whose guidance we made the trip. Not only were 
they most courteous, but they took a personal interest in 
seeing that we enjoyed ourselves and were very kind in 
giving answers to our many questions. 
Again thanking you, we are 

THE PARTHENIANS, 

By RUTH HOFFMAN, President, 

Y. M. L Building, 50 Oak Street. 



February, 1927 



'2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 




_....^^^,, ^^^iauiiir/ijaTj/rr?jT r. 



BUSH ST. .i^pHlT&si 

STATION ^M^^ERVIC^^ 



Page 25 



P 



Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mi^ola 
Capt. John J. Casey 

Corporal William Boyle anil his shock troops consisting 
mainly of Special Duty Officers Gus Betger and William 
Ward, among the scores of arrests they made during 
the past month, Louise Slydelle for grand larceny, Frank 
Hayden for vagrancy, and Arthur Knott for Santa Rosa. 

* * * 

Lieutenant J. Mignola and some of his fleet footed and 
nimble brained assistants garnered John Bousquet and 
Horace Grammer for attempt burglary and John DriscoU 
for burglary. 

* * * 

Officer Gus Wuth kept the wagon drivers hopping about. 
Some of the numerous arrests he made included Frank 
Skain vagrancy and Leslie Lansdowne for driving while 

intoxicated. 

* * * 

Vernon Johns and Cliff Jepson, accused of robbery were 
arrested by Corporal Feeney and Oflficer H. Kiernan. This 
duet of thief takers also arrested Francis Dioboso for em- 
bezzlement. 

* 4; H« 

There is no occasion for going about the Bush district 
armed. So Ira F. Smith got a ride in the covered vehicle 

when observed doing so by Oflficer J. Dolan. 

« » * 

Haron Hallory needed an overcoat so he grabbed the 
first one he saw that was not being used. It belonged to 
another party. Officer L. Atkinson saw him with the coat 
which had been reported stolen and he marched him to 
the book. 

:*: * * 

Officers G. Engler and F. McCann arrested Constantino 
Scoger for using the streets for driving an automobile 
while under the influence of intoxicants. 

* * * 

Henry Shelby got caught while he was driving a stran- 
ger's car. Officer John Dolan, Jr., gave him the well 
known rites attending a "pinch." 

* * * 

Ofl^cer E. Talbott surrounded William Brady, George 
Anthony and Thomas Reilly who were wanted for petty 
larceny and vagrancy. 



We very much appreciate your presence with us at the 
distribution of our Christmas baskets last Friday. We feel 
that everything went off very satisfactorily and that at 
least some of the Christmas festivities were brought to 
some hundreds of worthy people on that occasion. 

It was very nice indeed to hear from you at that time. 
Your presence and your words added to the success of the 
day. We very much look forward to having you with us 
again. 

C. WILFRED BOURNE, 
Lieutenant Colonel, 



Corporal Thomas Mclnemey and his posse of recruits 
made many arrests during the past month, the most 
imrortant being the arrest of Andrew McDonald for as- 
sau't to commit murder, vagrancy, violating the state 
poi.'Jon law and violating his probation. 



^uprrtnr iFunrral ^rrtiirr 

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hcaiity actuated by a sincere desire to immortalize 
the last tribute and most fittingly express the 
devotion and respect of family and friends. 
WHITE'S SERVICE has set a standard impos- 
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Why not call the ranking funeral service in this 
#ty— WHITE'S SERVICE. 

S. A. WHITE 

Leading Funeral Director 

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2200 Sutter Stree^ t' San Francisco 



lcl«pAon» 
West- 



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k. WHITE TOP CAB ^ 



256 TURK ST. 



HOTEL BELLEVUE 

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HULL AND STARKWEATHER, Mgrs. 

Telephone Franklin 16SS 



PHONE PRIVATE EXCHANGE DOUGLAS S3S4 

CALIFORNIA POULTRY CO. 

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WH01,FS\LF DFAI.FRS IN 

LIVE and DRESSED POULTRY 

SUPPLIERS OF HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 

313-315 Washington St. San Francisco. Calif. 



Page 26 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



TRAFFIC BUREAU 

Captain Hciu'y Gleesoii 
liieiitenajits J. J. Casey, J. (Cliff) Field and Grover Coats 



Captain Henry Gleeson who has now been laid up for 
some foui- months is reported "to be steadily improvinj: 
and from reports received by the writer will be able to bo 
about in a short time. The Captain has had a tough 
seige of it, and nothing but such a rugged constitution 
such as he possesses would have pulled a man through. 

* * * 

Motorcycle Officer Elmer Esperance, who spent four 
months in Europe with his family, visiting relatives and 
many places of interest is home again. He says the old 
country is all right to visit but he is not hankering for 
any steady diet of it. Elmer will have some articles in 
future issues of "20" Police Journal. 

Lieutenant Jack Casey in charge of the Traffic Bureau 
says he hopes the people will heed the aroused public 
interest that has been aroused over the enforcement of 
the traffic laws. His records for arrests and citations are 
excellent but there has been a lack of co-operation on 
the part of the driving public to heed the laws, and it will 
take a campaign such as is now in pi-ogress to make peo- 
ple realize just how serious is the traffic problems of 

today. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer John Vann has dished out about two 
miles of tags to people who fail to make boulevard stops, 
who insist on going the wrong way on a one-way street, 
and who park their cars where their fancy indicates with- 
out regard to such signs that might be placed in advan- 
tageous places giving implicit instructions as to what a 
driver should or should not do. 

* :>: -■!: 

Officer Andrew Miller, who administers with Officer John 
Lynch necessary reprimands and instructions for arrests 
to the matinual influx of traffic violators is wearing a 
nicely bandaged eye. Andy says it wasn't a stick of wood 
as they bum gas in his house, nor was it a door that he 
ran into, neither was it a pole he bumped into. When 
asked how it happened he says "You ought to see the 
other guy." 

* :^ --fi 

Traffic Officer C. Lyons nabbed a 112'er the other day, 
and Corporal Luther Arentz, motorcycle rider grabbed 

another for the same offen: e. 

:!s * ••:: 

Mounted Officer Jack Hanley, who has a domain that 
includes Montgomery street, which thoroughfare allows no 
parking to Sacramento street from Market, says it's re- 
markable how few people believe in signs or either can't 
lead the English language. Jack wears out about two 
pencils a week filling out tags for folks who pay no at- 
tention to the "no parking" signs. 



John Torres got gay with a knife while visiting some 
lady folks and his capriciousness got him booked on a 
charge of assau't with a deadly weapon. Officer Charles 
White did the honors. 



Use Sperry Drifted Snow Flour 

Its tested every hour 

Sperry Flour Co. 




Facts You Want to Know 
CONVERTIBLE BONDS 

This type of security has won increasing favor among investors, 
as it gives the holder the privilege of exchanging (converting) 
his bonds for stock (usually) at a fixed price within a fixed 
time. If the stock goes up beyond the conversion price he can 
enjoy the profits. 

As\ for more details 

de Fremery & Company 

Mt-mbt-T Sa>\ Francisco Slock &" Bond Exchange 

341 Montgomery St. 3004 - 16th Street 

Room 209 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Top Floor, San ^ , ^ 

FVancisco Stock Telephones: 

and Bond Ex- Davenport 1616. 1616, 1617, 1B18 

change Building 




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iOU-,1 




"My old car topped a hill at 23 miles 
per hour that 1 thought impossible to 
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The new and greater General Gasoline 
is "economy fuel," but power has not 
been sacrificed to produce more gas> 
miles. 

GENERAL 
GASOLINE 



Proved by 
THE PUBLIC 




Sold through 
INDEPENDENTS 



[Look for the Green and White Sign] 



TusTin's 

Radio and Electric Store 

428 SUTTER STREET 



"I want every police oflScer to feel that he can 
come here and make this place his radio head- 
quarters. 

"He can send his wife or his child here and be 
sure they will be treated right." 



Radio Sets 



Repairs and Parts 



February. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 



trrmk PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'Meara 
Lieutrnants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

With a new amusement park a possibility now at the 
junction of the Great Highway and Sloat Boulevard, 
Capt. John J. O'Meara will shTire with Captain William 
Healy of the Richmond, who has in his precincts the 
Chutes-at-the-Beach, one of the greatest amusement 
centers on the Coast, and which has grown until It is 
one of the largest. 

* * * 

"It won't be long now" is a phrase used by Sunset 
folks about the new car line that will soon be running 
through the Duboce tunnel to the ocean. It will make 
the district grow as did the Richmond when they got 
the Geary street line, and on what are now sand dunes 
will rise homes for thousands of people now housed in 
flats and crowded places in the cities, as well as fur- 
nish homes for the thousands who annually come to San 
Francisco to make their homes. 



Officer Sam Higgins, detailed to the city treasurer's 
office, says they have a lot of money there but it is safe 
from those who have no business with it. We'll say it 
is when we look over the list of officers guarding it, among 
them being beside Sam: Officers John Edwards, Edward 
Hagan, Smith Carr, William Gilford, William Wilson. 




LEST YOU FORGET 

PAGE'S MODERN GARAGE 

740 VALENCIA STREET 

Phone Valencia 1036 



24 Hour Ser*-ice 
Automotive EnginecrinB 



TOWING 
Wc Know How 



PHONE DAVENPORT 7340 

Western-California Fish Co. 

.^."i6-.i66 CLAY STREET San Francisco 



SPEEDY JUSTICE 

At 5 o'clock on November 24, just 33 hours 
after he entered the Mechanics' Bank in Rich- 
mond with an armed confederate and escaped 
with $16,300 in cuiTency, Hicks Anderson, Al- 
bany plasterer, was being registered in San Quen- 
tin prison, where he will spend from five years 
to life for robbery in the first degree. 

Anderson's arrest and sentencing provided one 
of the fastest convictions on a major crime in 
the history of Contra Costa county. The au- 
thorities are looking for his confederate, declared 
to be James Edgar McFarlane, 23, who is said 
to have the remaining $8,000 of the loot. The 
other $8,000 was in Anderson's possession when, 
he was arrested at his home, 646 Madison street. 

Once taken into custody, Anderson told his 
story without reserve to Undersheriff William 
Veale and Chief of Police Cox of Richmond. He 
repeated it twice today. 

The first time was before Justice of the Peace 
Frank L. Glass, at Martinez, before whom he 
waS( arraigned in the morning. He waived pre- 
liminary examination in the justice court, and 
was pi'omptly held over. The same afternoon he 
was arraigned before Superior Judge A. B. Mc- 
Kenzie, again pleaded guilty, and was sentenced 
to San Quentin. 



GOOD THIEF CAUGHT 

A man jailed by police following an automobile 
accident last month admitted to detectives eight 
burglaries in San Francisco apartment houses 
since November 20, in which loot valued at more 
than $10,000 was taken. 

The admitted thief, who has been souglit for a 
month as the "Lone Wolf", the burglar aristocrat 
of San Francisco's underworld, gave the name of 
Robert Foster and the address of 344 Ellis street. 

Detective Sergts. Richard Hughes, James John- 
son, Martin Porter and George Healy, who ob- 
tained the alleged confession, however, said his 
real name was Al Falkin, and that he lives in Santa 
Rosa when not operating in San F^-ancisco. He is 
24 years old. 

Police began questioning him yesterday when 
Hughes recognized a tie pin he was wearing as 
having been stolen from the home of Albert Zuck- 
erman, 1745 Fi-anklin street, December 12. 

Falkins' mode of operation, according to police, 
was to come to San Francisco fi'om his Santa Rosa 
home, swiftly execute a series of burglaries and 
then depart on a peddling trip through the Sacra- 
mento Valley to dispose of his loot. 

His first coup was the latter part of November. 
He was said to have admitted being at the end of 
another series of raids, and prepared to leave the 
city on another selling expedition. 



Page 28 



POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

Pearl Wilson will know better the next time she gets 
the urge to try any illegal operations. She is a colored 
lady who invaded the district and got arrested by Officers 
C. Cornelius and L. Lang for grand larceny and vagrancy. 
She has had occasions before to learn just what happens 

to people who break the law. 

* * * 

John McGill wanted to see all the beauties of Rich- 
mond. He wanted to see them from an automobile. 
Having none of his own he annexed one belonging to a 
fellow he had never seen. He started forth on his mis- 
sion, but his enjoyment was short lived for Officer M. J. 
O'Rourke "spotted" the "sneezed sled" and called a halt 
to all further proceedings, and John was saying "Howdy" 
to the booking sergeant, who duly checked him in for 
violating Section 146 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Officer Cornelius with Corporal Frank Rhodes had a 
similar experience with Harold Davis, who was booked 
for violating Section 148 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Officer Edward McKevitt got Joseph L. Morris for aban- 
donment and neglect of wife. Ed says a man shou'd 
never do that out in the Richmond where everyone is 
happy and peaceful. 



The Advertising Columns 




BRING 
RESULTS 

RATES ON APPLICATION 



Ladies' Cloaks, Suits, Dresses, 
Furs, Waists, Etc. 

Men's Clothing, Hats, Shoes, 
Boys' Clothing 

Charge Accounts Invited 

The Home Clothing Co. 

2500 MISSION STREET, Cor. 21st 
Phone Mission 5036 



Tuxedos and Full Dress 
Suits Rented 

A New Department with Us. 



All New Suits and 
the Latest Styles. 



Peerless Clothing Co, 

719 MARKET ST. 



BANC A POPOLARE FUGAZl 

(FUGAZI BANK) 

F. N. BELGRANO, Pres. 

San Francisco — Oakland — Santa Barbara 
California 

ASSETS OVER S20,000,000.00 



Phone MARKET 952 



New Process Laundry Co. 

385 EIGHTH STREET 

OOOn WORK AND PROMPT SERVICE 



FIOR D'lTALIA RESTAURANT 

Music :-: Dancing :-: Entertainment 

Baaquet halls for small or large parties 

492 BROADWAY 

Bet. Keamy and MontgomerySU. 
Phone Douslas 1504 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PHONE SIITTF.R 3720 

LANKERSHIM HOTEL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
FIFTH STREET, bet. Market and Miaaion. SAN FRANCISCO 

S.SO Rooms of Solid Comfort — Positively Fireproof 

RATES: 

Without Bath— $1 and $2 With Bath— $2 and $2.50 
Omsi'* for all Pacific Coait Poinbi Stop at Our Door 



I 



February, 1927 



2 - " POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. Eugene Wall 
Lieutenants Charles A. Pfeiffer and Fred W. Norman 

With the completion of the new bridge over the gulch 
on San Jose avenue, past Geneva avenue, the traffic on 
San Jose avenue hap increased until the stream of auto- 
mobiles going in and out of the city equal that on Mis- 
sion street and affords another problem in automobile 
traffic for Capt. Eugene Wall of this station. 

This district now has three main arteries out of the 
city and yet the congestion seems to increase. How- 
ever, let it be said to the credit of the district commander 
the machines are kept moving and for the number that 
pass over the three highways, the number of accidents 
are kept at a minimum. 



COTTLE GIVEN GOLD STAR 



Speech of James E. Cottle on being presented 
with a g-old star by members of the Detective 
Bureau, San Francisco Pohce Department, Feb- 
ruary 1st, Captain Matheson making- the presenta- 
tion address: 

Captain Matheson and Fellow Officers: 

In accepting- this tribute of kind regard and 
friendship, I want to assure you that the bright- 
ness of the metal will at all times mirror and re- 
flect the features, individually of you all. And 
while I need no star or emblems to remind me of 
the good fellows and kind friends I am leaving 
officially, I can promise you that as long as I 
wear clothes, that this- golden badge of comrad- 
ship will be a part and parcel of my daily ward- 
robe. 

I am very grateful. I stand here today amongst 
you, ex-officio, at the end of the trail, near the 
cross-roads. And I want you to know that it is 
with sincere regret that I sever my connections 
with the Police Department, and the friends and 
comrades with whom I have associated for over 
a quarter of a century. And even at this time 
I find it hard to express the feelings of depression 
and loneliness that fill my heart at parting. I 
do not want to presume too much, but in leaving, 
I hope I have the good will of every member of 
the department. 

I am going away to try and regain my lost 
health. But no matter where I go, no matter 
in what part of the State I may find a resting 
place, it will be with the kindest feelings that my 
thoughts will wander back to the Police Depart- 
ment, to the kind friends and good fellows I 
leave behind me. 

So in parting let me say with all my heart, and 
from my heart, that I wish you all long life, hap- 
piness and success in all your undertakings. 

I thank you. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



Only tiic lioHt of The Great 
Motion Picture Plnya — 

Fanrlion & Marco's Kvcr-new 
" I 1) 10 A S •• 



Telephone Market 4330 

Water and Rail Connections 

Sudden Lumber Co. 

Office Number— 1950 THIRD STREET 
San Francisco, California 



"SUDDEN SERVICE" 



St. Germain Restaurant 

60 and 68 ELLIS STREET 

300 Seats 

Main Dining Room 

300 Second Floor 

We are prepared 

to serve 

Sumptuous or 

Modest Dinner 

Parties 

Banquet Halls with 

Dancing Floors 

Lunch 65c and SI 

Dinner $1.25 

De Luxe S2.50 

A la carte at all hours 




NEW POODLE DOG 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

POLK AND POST STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 



Daniel T. Hanlon 



Chu. M. O'Brien 



Telephone Market 7906 

Sanitary Towel Supply Co. 

84 NINTH STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A. Giurlani &. Bro. 

STAR * BRAND OLIVE OIL 

537 FRONT STREET .SAX FRANCISCO, CAL, 



Page 30 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

Getting a guy before he can "kickover" a joint is bet- 
ter than getting him after he pulls the job, is the belief 
of Corporals James Casey and Carl Meilicke. They ap- 
plied this bit of practical philosophy in the cases of Joe 
Armentas and Frank Cruz whom they locked up for at- 
tempt to commit burglary. 

* * * 

Corporal W. Kelly accused Clarence B. Council of 
being a hit and run driver. He therefore booked him for 
violating Section 141 of the Motor Vehicle Act. 

* * * 

A few autoists who could not drive in accordance with 
the precepts of Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act 
were taken to the station. They were: Walter Murray, 
arrested by Officer Smith. Frances Black, arrested by 
Officers J. Fleming and F. Corby, and Fred Volkman, 
arre.sted by Corporal Michael Callanan and Officer Corby. 

Corporal Meilicke and Officer J. Dowd gave the boys a 
chance to look up and see what violating paragraph 3, 
Section 261 of the Penal Code means, when they booked 
Roy Feres on that charge. 

* * * 

Thomas Duffield, found that this section is no place to 
play the trade of begging, especially when it comes to 
using battery to do such a thing. Tommy got a double 
booking when arrested by Officer Thomas Brady. 



"THE HUE BRIGADE" 



"The Fire Brigade" which has finished a run in this 
city, and in which members of the local fire depart- 
ment assisted In making, is a filmization that shows 
more forcibly the hazards which firemen face than any 
lecture or book could do. This great organization, like 
the Police Department, engage in a line of \york that 
has dangers not realized by the ordinary citizen, and it 
takes a picture like "The Fire Brigade" to impress it 
upon them. 

It shows the life of the fireman, how his family, torn 
with anxiety, face the realization of the dangers their 
menfolk face when a big fire breaks out. 

It is a picture all should see, and as it is shown 
throughout the United States it is bound to prove a 
strong lesson for drawing closer understanding between 
the people and their brave fire fighters. 



Your Captain, Mr. Charles Goff, gave us a most interest- 
ing and helpful talk at the Father and Son Banquet held 
here last evening. 

Such messages as his will do much towards making 
friendly relations between the police and the boys of the 
Mission District. 

A. J. HART, Director, 

Young Men's Christian Ass'n of S. F. 



Corporal A. Chri.st and his partner, Officer Patrick 
Walsh, who keep the downtown parks as free as possible 
from drifters, degenerates and such, gave the boys a 
merry time. They vagged a score and brought in a dozen 
for violating the state poison law. 



DodeeBrdthers 

MOTOR CARS 



J.E.FRENCH CO. 

O'Farrell at Polk 
2366 Mission St. 

Prospect 9000 



FIREMAN'S 
FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

401 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Fire • Automobile • Marine 



"qA Taste of Its Own" 

VAN CAMP 

:: CIGARS :: 

iiiiiriiiitiiiiiiiiiriiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiii 

QUALITY cTVIILD 

SELECTION 



Phone Kearny 1701 



P. O. Box 2143 



San Francisco International Fish Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Fish Dealers 
535-539 WASHINGTON ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



LA CAMPANA CAFE 

Italian Restaurant and Hotel 

Dancing 440 BROADWAY 

Every Evening SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Saner 8805 



February, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page il 




W/ESTERN 
iWrADDITION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Emmet E. Moore and John M. Sullivan 

Officer W. Salisbury and A. Bell nipped a hit-runner 
when they arrested George Bunn on a -Motor Act charged, 
141. 

* * * 

Salisbury, with Officer P. Gleason arrested John E. 
O'Brien for driving in violation of the provisions of 

Section 112 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Salisbury also locked up Samuel Bozio for illegally 
carrying a gun and threats against life. 

* * * 

Officers John Clasby and James Casey sure "knocked 
over" a couple of bad ones when they arrested Joseph Bell 
and Edward Free, a couple of youths accused of robbery. 
Bell had a gun and got an added charge of violating the 
gun law and Free was booked also as a deserter from 
the navy. 

* * » 

Officers J. Doyle and A. Bell found it necessary to lock 
up Michael L\-nott whom they were convinced was under 
the influence of intoxicating liquor to the extent that he 
could not drive a machine in accordance with such pro- 
visions set forth in Section 112 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Benjamin Sedlowski was arrested by Officers Peter 

Henricks and Oliver Josephs. 

* * * 

Gerald McMahon, charged with burglary, attempt burg- 
lary, violating Section 3 of the State Revolver Law and 
the State Prohibition Law, who was caught in a spec- 
tacular manner by Lieut. Enimett Moore, Corporals Cal- 
lanan and Higuera and Officer Lloyd Groat, was booked 
at the city prison, January 19. 



BOOST FROM FORMER HARBOR OFFICIALS 



Indeed would I be unappreciative if I did not 
acknowledge the splendid co-operation of your de- 
partment with this Board in the handling of the 
tremendous crowds through the Ferry building 
Saturday, November 20. There was not a single 
accident or mishap of anj' kind in the building 
during the day. The streets were also kept suffi- 
ciently cleared so that, had there been any nec- 
essity to call out the fire department or an am- 
bulance, there would have been no delay because 
of congestion. Such splendid co-operation un- 
questionably creates a most favorable public opin- 
ion for the various departments of government. 
Your co-operation has always been outstanding 
and greatly appreciated by this Board. 
With kind personal regards, I am, 

WM. A. SHERMAN, President, 
Board of State Har. Commissioners, 
The Ferry Building, City. 



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FLNEST WORK ON SHIRTS AND COLLARS 



Page 32 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



February, J 927 




POTRERO 

STATION 



Capt. Harry J. O'Day 
Lieutenants Albert S. Munn, J. C. Malloy 

Elmer Sacherer, on parole from Preston, could not re- 
sist taking another chance, and this lack of will power 
caused his arrest by Officers T. O'Connor and J. Coghlan 

on a burglary charge and an added "kick" of vagrancy. 

* * * 

The two above named officers also arrested H. Argo for 
vagrancy, assisting Policewoman Kathleen Sullivan. 

* * * 

Officers Stanley Doyle and J. Cronin can tell when a 
man should be stopped as he tries to fool people in di'iv- 
ing his car. They observed Pete Armanta nudging other 
autoists to the side of the highway and they observed 
long enough to satisfy themselves that Pete was violating 
Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act. 

* -t. =|: 

Officer J. Sunseri who is assisting Detective Sergeant 
Louis DeMatei on some special bomb investigation teamed 
up with DeMatei to lock George Palo up on a thousand 
dollar vagrancy charge. 



PRAISE FOR EFFICENCY 

The following letter was written to Captain Stephen 
Bunner of the Bay view Police District: 

"Undoubtedly, you are aware that our company is just 
completing a new factory building in your district. I 
wish to take this occasion to thank you for the attention 
given this activity by your department within the last 
few months. 

"We have experienced no trouble whatsoever, and am 
certain it has been due largely, to the close super\'ision 
you have given to the building operations in your district. 

"We will be moving into our plant within the next sixty 
days, and I want to drop over to your station some day 
and make your acquaintance. We are moving into the 
district and into San Francisco with the idea of being a 
help to the community and wish to establish friendly 
relations with everyone concerned. 

"With best regards and wishing you a happy and 
prosperous New Year, 

E. R. TESENSTRATOR, 
Kroehler Mfg. Company, 
1636 Bryant Street. 



OFFICER PRAISED 



It is with pleasure and appreciation that we pen these 
few words commending your splendid officers of the Mis- 
sion District Station, especially referring to Officer No. 788 
(i.e.. Officer Patrick Griffin) who, on the 10th instant, when 
he was off duty and on his way home between 12 p. m. and 
1 a. m., noticed two suspicious characters loitering at our 
store entrance and when they could not give a satisfactory 
answer, explaining their presence, he locked them up for 
the night. 

Then it was this same officer who telephoned our store 
manager, Mr. Solomon, recently, when he found one of our 
plate glass windows broken and two overcoats missing. 
JOS. V. NELSON, 
c|o Cherry's, Incorporated, 
512 15th Street, Oakland, CaUf. 




JN San Francisco, at the Palace, 
-*■ interesting and well-ordered sur- 
roundings unite, for your enjoy- 
ment, icith a service, unobtrusive, 
alert. 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

C^Management 
HALSEY E.MANVVAHJNC 

San Francisco 

fD^ark^t af!^av Monlpomery St. 




February, 1927 



2-0" POLICE rOlJRNAL 



Pa^e 33 




,BAY VIEW 

*A^ STATION 



t'apt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowic 

Joe Cardoni skittered out this way and tried to show 
this station up. He tried several lines of criminal endeavor 
and when it was all over and the smoke of battle had 
cleared Joe found himself charged with robbery, violat- 
ing Section 476A of the Penal Code and malicious mis- 
chief. He got himself tangled up with the law when Ser- 
geant A. O'Brien and J. Ross nabbed him. 

* * * 

Some one telephoned the .station that a guy in a ma- 
chine was raising some ruckus in the district. Corporal 
William Harrington nodded to his posse to follow him. 
They did, and when the expedition was over they had 
landed behind the perpendicular barred cell Jacob Frank. 
Jacob was charged with dri\nng a car while drunk and 
also for being a hit and runner. He got a lot of service 
and the gent he bumped into got a lot of action. 

* * * 

Sergeant Lance and Officer J. Murray got a call to 
look upon the condition of Eugene Valencia. They gave 
him close scrutiny and their diagnosis convinced them 
that Gene was not a fit person to be allowed to steer an 
automobile. They therefore booked him for driving while 
intoxicated and with violating Ordinance 811, which has 
to do with being drunk in a public place. 

* :J: * 

A COUPLE OF BOQUETS 

Allow me to congratulate you and the Department of 
which you have the honor to command, on the capture of 
Joseph Tanko by Detective Sergeants Earl Roney and 
Vernon Van Matre. 

The action of these men was certainly very brave and 
deserving of the highest commendation by the citizens of 
San Francisco, as we'l as by the Officers of the Department, 
and their act should be an incentive to all citizens as well 
as members of the Department, to perform their duty 
regardless of consequences. 

I am sending this to you as a small token of my appre- 
ciation of the deed and trust that others will do likewise. 
WM. M. Fitzhugh, 
The Fitzhugh Building, 
Post and Powell Streets. 

* * * 

I am taking this opportunity to congratulate you on 
the unusually high efficiency of your department. My 
Chrysler sedan, license No. F 60-407, was stolen from 
in front of the Fleishhacker Tennis Courts last Tuesday 
about 4 o'clock in the afternoon — at which time the de- 
scription of the car was given to the officer on duty there 
at that time. Less than ten hours later the car was 
located by Officer Charles H. Foster of the Mission Police 
Station — over in the Mission District. His locating the 
car was particularly commendable as it was covered with 
dust and the license plates scarcely readable. Feeling 
grateful that my car was recovered so speedily and again 
complimenting you on the efficiency that made this pos- 
sible, I am 

CECIL F. PRATT, President, 
National Equipment Company. 



7, / 





HOTEL 

MARK 

HOPKINS 



San Francisco's 

Newest and Finest 

Hotel 



Atop Nob Hill 

California at Mason 

Davenport 6300 



Geo. D. Smith. Pres. and Managing Director 
Will P. Taylor. Jr.. Resident Manager 



U 



CAMP FIRE 



HAMS 



LARD 



SAUSAGE 




SHGRTEXIXG 



SALAD OIL 



VIRDEN P.ACKING CO. 

S.\N FRANnSCO 



Officer J. Hart booked Elcodero Lopez for robbery. 



I wish to express my appreciation to you of the service 
rendered me by two of your men. Corporal Henry Zaun 
and Officer L. J. Olivier of the Western Addition Station. 

My Nash Coupe automobile was stolen on December 7th, 
1926. On December 8th, I received notice from the Centra! 
Station, Auto Detail, that it had been located at Colma, 
stripped of wheels, batteries and most everything else 
rcmovab'e. In some manner Corporal Zaun, Jr., got a line 
on the property and has recovered the five wheels and tires 
as well as the battery. The work of locating the property, 
the recovery of it an<l arresting of the thief speaks of high 
efficiency of Corporal Zaun and Officer Olivier. 

I cannot thank these men enough for their work and I 
desired you to know of their good work and that they are 
men to be proud of in the service of our city. 
ROBERT D. SCHOLES, 
Office of General Manager, 
The Southern Pacific Company. 



Page 34 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Fehrnary, 1927 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 

just as hard a time. In this gang, which num- 
bered about 40, ranging from 16 years up to 20 
years, made themselves very obnoxious in the 
numerous varieties which hoodlums generally ef- 
fected. Grocery stores were raided and stripped 
of their wines and liquors and canned edibles. 
Chinese were plainly informed by means of brick- 
bats, clubs and other impressive arguments, that 
the beach air was unhealthy for them. 

The headquarters of this bunch was a saloon 
on Francisco street, adjacent to Meigg's Wharf. 
In a cage which was hung in front of this saloon, 
was an Australian magpie. Whenever a police- 
man hove in sight tiie magpie would chirp and 
the boys would be making their way under the 
whai'f. The leader of this gang was Tom Mc- 
Guirk, who was about as handsome hnd well 
built a man as could be found in that section. 
The Telegraph Hill Rockrollers usually hung 
around Montgomery and Alta streets, and they 
were led by the redoubtable "Brick" Butler, who 
was known as the terror of the Hill. Their fa- 
vorite pastime was rolling boulders down at 
Chinamen whenever they hove in sight. The 
First Street Gang made its headquarters at a 
saloon on First street, between Mission and How- 
ard sti-eets, and their leader was Mich Wetherby. 
Many of tiiis gang were formerly leading spirits 
of the Tar Flat Gang. This was formerly about 
the toughest gang in the city, ranging around 
Fremont and Beale streets, towards the water- 
front. Their depredations became so notorious 
that a police station was established in that lo- 
cality and called the South Harbor Police Station, 
which was instrumental in breaking up this gang. 
The arrests made at this station would number as 
high as 200 men per month and little by little 
the gang faded away. The Brannan Street Gang 
was unpleasantly prominent. They hung out at 
Sixth and Brannan streets and ranged from there 
down to the foot of Fourth street and the South- 
ern Pacific Railway Depot. NumeroRs raids were 
made on freight cars by them. The Post Street 
Gang hung out at a grocery store in a small 
street running from Jones to Taylor streets, north 
of Post street. They ranged all around up as 
far as Bush and Sutter streets and the vicinity 
of the Hill. The Brady Street Gang ruled over 
tlie territory at the old San Jose Depot, which 
was located at 12t]i and Market streets and rang- 
ed along that section up through the Market 
street cut. The Vallejo Street Gang hung out at 
Vallejo and Card Alley and they were a bad lot, 
composed of young Mexicans and negroes. The 
leader of this gang was Locksy Dill and they 
numbered about 30 men. The Russian Hill Gang, 



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D. M. LEONARD 

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LE ROY LINNARD 
Manaser 



CwiUzation Owes a Debt of Gratitude to PRIHT^IHG 



PERSONALITY 

To BE noticed at all in these days 
of stifling competition one must 
have something in personality and 
individuality that stands out and up 
above the pack, whether one sells 
peanuts or printing. Encores follow 
only the fellow who sells quality. 
Quahty printing is invariably "sold" 
— not bought by a price beater. The 
buyer of good printing usually leans 
toward the man with a personality 
— the salesman who stands out and 
above the bell ringers — like a 
pimple on a cucumber. 



ALEX, DULFER 
PRINTING CO. 

[Estahlishcd 1896] 

85 3 Howard St. San Fr.^ncisco 

Phone Douglas 2377 




Chas. W. Brown 



Wm. E. Kennedy 



(MemberB of FIoriBta Telegraph Delivery) 

Flowers for All Occasions 

No Order Too Large for Us to Fill 
None Too Small for Consideration 

BROWN & KENNEDY 

Floral Artists 

SAN FRANCI5C0 
Funeral Work a Specialty 

Reasonable Prices 

510 VALENCIA STREET 
Market 5725 



February, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 35 



whose meeting place was at Hyde and Union 
streets, kept the people of tlie western slope of 
tliat mound in hot water. As lamp post destroy- 
ers, this gang- had the popular impression that 
they could hit a pane of glass as far as they could 
see it. They also had a good deal to say on the 
Chinese question, and Coolie laundries in that 
section were not marked with financial successes. 
Tiiey ranged over Larkin and Polk streets. 

The Clay and jMason streets gang was another 
bad crowd ; there were only about two dozen in 
this gang and they ranged around Clay, Sacra- 
mento and Yerba Buena streets and always made 
their headquarters in Happy Jack's saloon. The 
Hayes Valley Gang centered in Hayes and Gough 
streets and they consolidated with their not dis- 
tant neighbors, "The Sunrise Gang", who were 
well known to many in this city. The cemeteries. 
were gi'eat hiding places for those lads after pul. 
ing some trick. The Mission and Bernal Height. 
Gangs; the former crowd congi'egated at the coi 
ner of 15th and Mission streets and ranged ah 
around the vicinity, their forays extending down 
to Mission Bay. A branch of this gang made 
their headquarters every Saturday night at 
Sheers Hall where a dance was held. The Ber- 
nal Heights leader was Mountain Jack, assisted 
by Jim Agee, who was known as the "goose" on 
account of his weakness for web-footed animals. 
These lads ranged along the San Bruno Road and 
throughout the Ingleside country. Tlie advent 
of Officer ^^'illiam King, of the Ingleside station, 
into that territory produced results, when he ulti- 
mately wiped out the gang, which made him a 
friend of the neighborhood and a credit to the 
department. 

These various gangs comprised all tlie "hood" 
organizations in the city and the most of them 
enumerated were only amateurs to a certain ex- 
tent and not up to the standard of the "Kearny 
Street Gang". Those operators were well school- 
ed on the Barbary Coast and when they found 
business dull on Kearny street, they ranged all 
over the city selecting the best spots for their 
enterprises. After the booty had been obtained 
they would make their way back to the "Coast" 
and enjoy a spree over the proceeds. 

The greatest hardships that a policeman had 
in those days was the irregular hours and the 
moving of his prisoner when arrested to tlie sta- 
tion with a crowd following. A passing express 
wagon would be hailed to assist him when he 
was far distant, or else walk ; and even wheel- 
barrows have been used to bring in the drunks. 
The increase of the force from tiiat time and 
the modern facilities used today has brought it 
up to the standard of efficiency in keeping with 
all well regulated institutions. 



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IL TROVATORE CAFE ROOF GARDEN 

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Telephone 506 BROADWAY 

Sutter 8547 San Francisco. Cal. 



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Office: 6.")7-6.^>9 PHELAN BUILDING 

Phone: Douglas 953 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



Page 36 "2-0"POLICEJOURNAL 

SHERIFF T. C. McGOVERN INDUCTED 



February, J 927 




Sheriff McGovern 



By Mrs. Laura F. Collins 

Sheriff .Thomas C. McGovern, 
familiarly known as "Brick" by 
his close associates, was inducted 
into office as Sheriff of San 
Mateo County at Redwood City, 
January 3, 1926. 

Sheriff McGovern's victory was 
won at the primary election when 
lie beat his opponent by 6,101 
votes. 

The votes won at the primary 
election, together with the large 
complimentary vote scored at the 
general election, gave Sheriff McGovern the en- 
viable record of being the first, of any county 
official, to receive the highest number of votes 
cast in San Mateo County to date, since the 
county's organization in 18.56. 

Sheriff McGovern ranks as the sixteenth 
Sheriff of San Mateo county, his experience of 
over fifteen years of service being attained when 
he served as deputy sheriff under the adminis- 
tration of Sheriffs Robert S. Chatham, the late 
J. H. Mansfield, Michael Sheehan and the late 
H. W. Lampkin. 

Born and reared in San Mateo county, of which 
his late parents were pioneers, gives Sheriff Mc- 
Govern the advantage of knowing every short 
cut, path and roadway which is a great aid in 
running down crime. Time saved in reaching 
scenes of trouble plays an important part in the 
duties of a sheriff and one knowing the lay of 
the land in San Mateo county as well as Sheriff 
McGovern gains over the person who is un- 
familiar with short road cuts. 

The new sheriff has over 400 square miles of 
territory to guard, tlie larger portion of this be- 
ing on the coast side and areas outside of the 
incorporated cities. 

San Mateo county is growing by leaps and 
bounds and more deputies are needed to assist 
the sheriff in carrying out the increased amount 
of work which is enlarging daily. 

Sheriff McGovern's many friends predict a suc- 
cessful term of office and entertain hopes that he 
will be re-elected for a second term when the 
present one terminates. 



I OS Anpcles Offire 
U'ashinirton Bldsr. 



Oakland Office 
1001 Franklin Street 



PACIFIC MANUFACTURING CO. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

M I L L w o R K 

Main Office. Santa Clara, Cal. 
180 Stevenson St.. San Francisco. Calif. Phone Sutter 395 



The more particular you are 
the better you will like us. 

La Grande and White's 
Laundry Company 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
Phone Market 916 

250 - 12th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones: MARKET I9I04 

Little Auto Parts Company 

NEW and USED 

WHEELS, RIMS, PARTS and ACCESSORIES 



701 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

Cor. Franklin St. San Franciico, Cal. 




ofQualify 



PLEDGED 10 GIVE 

"Most Miles per Dollar" 



Good Work, Courteous Routemen 

SAN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY 
Telephone West 793 



I wish to convey to you and to Capt. Quinn. through you, 
our appreciation and thanks for your kind co-operation in 
helping us to we'.come the Oakland Aerie Drum Corps and 
its friends. 

I learned, at the last moment, that the Oakland friends 
of the Oakland Aerie Drum Corjis had decided, at a meet- 
ing held in Oakland on Monday evening, to take earlier 
boats so as to be at the San Francisco Lo<Jge rooms when 
the Corps arrived. Consequently, most of the friends of 
the Oakland Aerie arrived in San Francisco last evening 
in advance of the boat on which the drummers came. The 
reception committee was, therefore, reluctantly obliged to 
dismiss the detail you so kindly furnished. The Oakland 
visitors packed our Aerie room to capacity and evidently 
had a good time as those to whom I spoke pronounceil 
the entertainment a huge success. I feel confident that 
each visitor went home with the thought in mind that "San 
Francisco knows how." If there is ever a time at which 
we, the members of Golden Gate Aerie No. 61, can be of 
service to you, Chief O'Brien, or to your Department, we 
shall be only too glad of the opportunity. I again thank 
you and the Captain for your co-operation." 

CHELLIS M. CARPENTER, 

Worthy President, 

Golden Gate Aerie No. 61. F. 0. E. 



February, 1927 



2-0 •■ POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 



POLICE CHANGES 



The following transfers have been made in the 
department. 

Officer Joseph Murphy, Co. E to IL Q. Co. 

Officer James F. Sullivan, Co. H to IL Q. Co. 

Officer Charles i\L Rogerson, Co. A to H. Q. Co. 
(C. T.) 

Officer John L. Kohr, Co. D to H. Q. Co. (C. T.) 

Officer Chas. L. Zipperle, Co. K to Co. A. 

Officer George F. Laine, H. Q. Co. to Co. D. 

Officer ^^'illiam J. Riley, Co. D to Co. E. 

Officer Lawrence P. Delmas, H. Q. Co. (C. T.) 
to Co. K. 

Officer Peter A. Conroy, Co. G to H. Q. Co. (C. 
T.) 

Officer William Minahan, Co. H to Co. D. 

Officer Jei'emiah J. Hurley, Co. D to Co. H. 

Corporal \Mlliam T. IMoran, Co. J to Co. L 

Corporal Frederick T. Jewett, Co. I to Co. J. 

Police Officer Albert E. Birdsall of Co. K has 
been transferred to Co. F to do mounted duty 
there. 

Patrol Driver Charles Smith has had his star 
changed from No. 13 to No. 30. 

Patrol Driver Andrew C. Wood has had his star 
changed from No. 30 to No. 31. 

Police Officer Albert F. Kern, Richmond Police 
Station, was granted an additional leave of ab- 
sence from January 27th, 1927, to April 27th, 
1927, said leave to be without pay. 

Rudolph Herman, certification No. 2575, was 
appointed a regular policeman January 27. Star 
No. 15 has been given to this officer. He shall be 
temporarily assigned for duty with the Head- 
quarters Co. during his course of instruction in 
the Department School of Instructions under the 
immediate jurisdiction of Sergt. Patrick H. 
i\IcGee, Instructor in Department School. As a 
member of the Headquarters Co. he shall report 
to Captain J. Henry Lackmann, commanding 
Headquarters Co., for orders and assignment to 
the Department School. 



ITALL\X.S GRATEFUL 

It is with gratif\-ing pleasure that I express to you my 
heartfelt thanks and my highest praise for the very 
efficient and splendid service that under your direction was 
displayed by the San Francisco Police to maintain perfect 
order during the lecture of General Nobile. If at any 
time my office can be of ^er^•ice to you, do not fail to call 
upon me, and rest assured that such serv-ices would be 
welcomed and would be rendered with the greatest joy. 
CONSUL GENERAL OF ITALY, 
550 Montgomery Street. 



Phone Prospect 2S67 



K. B. COBB. Prop. 



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6 - 6th STREET 101 - 3rd STREET 

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Ther AdTertlM — L«t'f P»tronlie 




lai 

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CHUTESE AMERICAN DISHES— MERCHANTS' LUNCH, 60o 

Jazi Dance Music Every Evening S p. m. to 1 •- m. 

REAL CHOP SUEY 



Page 38 







POLICE JOURNAL 



February, 1927 



COMMISSIONER COOK 

(Continued from Page 10) 

rescued, and it's a safe bet that there was some 
repair bill after the rescue. 

Sergt. Cook was sent into Chinatown at a time 
when there was about 30,000 Chinese in those 
quarters, where there was not a half dozen Chin- 
ese women who could speak English, where gamb- 
ling was syndicated, where Chinese lotteries were 
being run openly, where slave girl traffic and 
opium using was at its height. 

He had orders to stop all these vices. He went 
up there the first time in 1889. His efforts were 
so successful that he was sent back time and time 
again, and each time he left the district clamped 
down more tightly. Naturally he brought upon 
himself the enmity of the powerful Chinese who 
controlled the gambling, lotteries, slave traffic and 
opium traffic. 

When he first went into the district, he was 
convinced that the understanding, and the speak- 
ing of Chinese would be an invaluable asset to 
him or any other squad man. He found encour- 
agement in his determination to leani Chinese in 
the persons of a Chinese Baptist minister and 
his wife. For months they taught him, furnished 
him rare books, dictionaries and gave him per- 
sonal coaching that made him proficient in read- 
ing, writing and speaking Chinese fluently. 

The deadwalls of Chinatown in years past have 
contained in Chinese characters many things that 
were intended to stir up unlawful acts, proclama- 
tions that had a hidden meaning and other warn- 
ings. Through his knowledge of the language, 
gotten by hard application in spare time, Sergt. 
Cook could translate these placards and thereby 
gather valuable information. Many a place was 
raided on information furnished by one of these 
red paper, black lettered bulletins, and it was 
years before the Chinese became aware that the 
"Sargie" could read Chinese, most of them think- 
ing it impossible for a white man to do such a 
thing. 

In 1901 Commissioner Cook says he went into 
the district again; there were over 250 gambling 
places, with from 12 to 1.5 tables each. Lotteries 
were being run in a score of places. Before he got 
through with his raiding, there were but a very 
few getting by. On this occasion he had as a 
member of his squad, Captain Duncan Matheson. 
Matheson, then a young officer, went into the du- 
ties of the squad with a will, and soon became one 
of the most feared men among the lawbreakers of 
Chinatown. 

Commissioner Cook, however, still retains the 
respect of all law abiding Chinese who have lived 
in the Chinese quarters from the day when he was 
head of the wrecking crews. 



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Success Crowns 1927 Police Show 

By Captain Wii.iiam J. Ql inn 

Career of Sir Harry Westwood Cooper 

By Officer Peter Fanning 

Killing of Church Bomber 

By Opie L. Warner 

Mayor Rolph^s Police Day Proclamation 

Notorious Woman Pickpocket Jailed 

Detective Sergeant Michael Desmond^s 
Recovery of Bodies from Bay 

Captain Max Fisher of Sacramento 

By Eugene Jones 

South San Francisco and Colma Section 

Telling of Mayor Cunningham, Chief Belloni of South City and 
Constable Landini of Colma 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



i 



isco police department 



PANTAGEs Theatre 

SHOW PLACE OF THE WORLD 



C^/ie greatest !r\j 
QJdudeyPi'lle ^ 



Mirket St. at Civic Center 



C^he finest it\j 
Pictures ^ 











THE CIGAR THAT WINS 

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THE MILD TAMPA CIGAR 
SHAW- LEAHY CO., Inc. 






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and Better Service 



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Phone Prospect 7600 



iSt 



I 



OFFICERS 

THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR. 

GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

A. D. PLUGHOFF 

VICE-PRES. AND TREASURER 

G. G. BUNDY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 

G. L. PICKRELL 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 



''# 



is-l^ 



•</.V'A. f ^ 



tv 







Joseph H. Cote— manager Northern Division 

WEST AMERICAN BUILDING 

1431 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Phone Graystone 7700 



DIRECTORS 

WM- L. HUGHSON. chairman 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G- BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO. DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A. FINCH 
O. R. FULLER 
P. H, GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H. LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 

JOHN F. Mcknight 

ROBT. W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A. D. PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI. Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L, V. STARR 



\ 



March, J 927 



0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 



LUCKEIMBACH 

Largest and Fastest Freighters in the INTERCOASTAL TRADE 
UUCKEINBACH STEAMSHIP CO., Inc. 



COLLONAN Electrical & Manufacturing Co. 

Electrical Work In All Its Branches 



3201-11 MISSION STREET 



Telephone Mission 7282 




Tsmf 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Success Ci-owns 1927 Police Show, by Captain WilUiim J. Quinn G 

Career of Sir Harry Westwood Cooper, by Officer Peter Fanning- 
I Remember When— By William (Doc) Mundell 

The Chiefs Pane 

Church Bomb Detai! Report, by Lawrence Mclnemey. 
Drills for Annual Police Review. 
Church Bomber Killed 



""^2'-0*n!:' 



jm "2-u' 

X", 1'' f .•' ,' I- !■'■■? 



on 30 aJ -■' ^•' -I 




Members of the Police Dept. — 

Your Credit is so good at The Redlick- Newman Co. that we require 

INOTHIINQ DOWIN 

on Purchases up to $50.00 PAY AS LITTLE AS $1.00 A WEEK 

Furniture — Carpets — Stoves — Crockery — Linoleum — Draperies — Phonographs 



DEDLICK NEWMANr 

IV COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS Vy. 

Southeast Corner- 17 th- and Mission Sts. 



Page 4 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 




Plan Red Seal wiring for your new home 

Brings lifetime comfort, increases happiness 

The owner of the above home knows the wiring will be convenient, 
always. For the wiring is a Red Seal job. 

This system of wiring gives the home owner many convenient outlets 
for the vacuum cleaner and for the toaster. There are handy switches for 
all the lights — provisions for "plugging in" any purchase such as a washing 
machine, floor lamp or radio. There is an outlet in the kitchen for an elec 
trie range. Every modern wiring detail is in this home. That's the Red 
Seal Plan. 

The Red Seal Plan protects you against rc'wiring your home for some' 
thing forgotten or unforeseen. Two free inspections by Red Seal representa' 
tives guarantee that the Plan is properly followed. 

Write or phone to local P G and E office for free pamphlet about 
Red Seal wiring. 

Pacihc Gas and Electric Company 



"PACIFIC SERVICE" 

Owned - Opprated - Managed 
iy Californians 



#104-327 



* 




• 



Vol. V. 



MARCH, 1927 



No. 5. 



II r n II I n 



Success Crowns 1927 Police Show 

Captain William J. Quinn Tells How All Wor\ed to Ma\e It the Biggest Ever Held 



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EDITOR'S NOTE — The Widows' and Orphans' concert 
and ball this year was an unqualified success. Never was 
one like it held before. In the article below, I notice that 
the writer — Captain WilHam J. Quinn — wishes it to be 
known that the success was all due to the hard work of 
the members of the association. He may feel that way 
about it, but of my own personal knowledge and observa- 
tion, I can say without fear of contradiction that Captain 
Quinn was the man more than any other responsible for. 
putting the ball over this year. He was the originator of 
the slogan — "Make it at least $50 OOO". He was the brains 
— the guiding spirit of the whole scheme. He was tireless. 
In addition to being chairman of the Executive Committee, 
he never lost touch with the work of any one of the sub- 
committees; in fact he was a most active worker on each 
and every committee. 

On February 19th, 1927, the 
twenty-first Annual Grand Con- 
cert and Ball of the Widows' and 
Orphans' Aid Association of the 
San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment was held at the Exposition 
Auditorium, and although the 
night was stormy, rain having 
fallen all afternoon and evening, 
c.pt. wm. J. Quinn ).j-,g largest crowd that ever at- 
tended this annual function was present. 

This ball, without a doubt, was the gi-eatest so- 
cial and financial success ever given by the Wi- 
dows' and Oi'phans' Aid Association of this de- 
partment. Appi-oximately fifty thousand tickets 
were sold for this event, and the net proceeds 
will more than offset the deficit created by the 
deaths of our brother members during the pre- 
ceding year. 

It was the aim of the committee in charge to 
arrange something new and novel, and, if possi- 
ble, to get away from the staid and routine af- 
fairs of preceding years. Working upon this 
plan, two additional committees were appointeu 
by the Chairman of the Executive Committee in. 




mediately after his appointment, the first o 
which was the Committee on Sale of Tickets, o 
which Lieutenant Henry Powell, of the Detectiv. 
Bureau, was made chairman. 

Many new plans for the sale of tickets to th> 
community were worked out by this particula 
committee, with the result that a public demam. 
was created for the tickets which assisted mater- 
ially the men of the department in disposing of 
them. 

Much credit for the success of the ball is due 
to this committee, because in the main, no matter 
how successful the entertainment and ball may 
have been, from a theatrical or social standpoint, 
if it was not a financial success the work and the 
endeavors of the Executive Committee would be 
for naught. This committee was considered the 
rock on which the structure was built. 

A Radio Committee was also formed with De- 
tective Sergeant William F. Bennett, as Chairman. 

This committee worked in close conjunction 
with the Ticket Sales Committee, and with the 
Publicity Committee, with the result that every 
possible feature for disseminating information 
in relation to our affair and the sale of the tickets 
therefor, which was the ultimate object of us all, 
was co-ordinated to such an extent that our suc- 
cess was assured from the outset. 

This committee made arrangements with K. F. 
W. I., K. P. 0., K. F. R. C, and K. J. B. S. broad- 
casting stations of this city to broadcast adver- 
tisements each day through their respective sta- 
tions. In addition to this, a weekly progi'am of 
police talent was arranged for each Wednesday 
night, beginning on Wednesday, January 27th, 
1927, and up to and including Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 16th, 1927. On each of these occasions 
advertising matter was worked in with the police 
talent at our radio station entertainments, with 



Page 6 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 



the result that we received communications, not 
only from San Francisco, but from all over the 
State in relation to our Annual Concert and Ball 
through our weekly entertainment. Telegrams of 
good cheer, wishing us success, etc., were received 
from all over California. 

This, together with the publicity which was 
procured in newspapers and other periodicals by 
Lieutenant Michael Riordan and his Publicity 
Committee, covered all other angles which might 
have been overlooked by the committees above 
mentioned. 

His Honor, Mayor James Rolph, Jr., always a 
friend of the Police Department, sent for the Chief 
of Police and the Chairman of the Ball Committee 
to come to his office and discuss the Annual Con- 
cert and Ball of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association of the department, and much to the 
surprise and delight of the Chief and the Chair- 
man of the Ball Committee, the Mayor informed 
them that it was his intention to set aside Satur- 
day, February 19th, 1927, by proclamation to the 
citizens of San Francisco as "Police Day". For 
the first time in the history of the United States, 
such a day was set aside and dedicated for such 
a purpose. On behalf of the Police Department, 
Chief O'Brien thanked His Honor, Mayor James 
Rolph, Jr., and on behalf of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the 1927 Concert and Ball, Captain Wm. 
J. Quinn, Chairman thereof, thanked Mayor Rolph 
for having been so thoughtful. The Mayor res- 
ponded in his usual gracious manner and assured 
both these gentlemen that he would do everything 
in his power to help towards the success of the 
ball. Much publicity was given to the declaration 
of the Mayor in setting aside this day as "Police 
Day" to such an extent that telegrams were re- 
ceived from all the principal cities of the United 
States and Canada by Chief of Police Daniel J. 
O'Brien congratulating him and thanking Mayor 
Rolph, through Daniel J. O'Brien, for having pion- 
eered the matter of recognizing the work of the 
police officer by setting aside a day in his honor. 
All these telegrams speak of the movement as 
being for making "Police Day" a nationally or in- 
ternationally recognized day. 

The entertainment put on at the ball was one 
that will be long remembered by those who were 
fortunate in being present on the eventful Satur- 
day night of February 19th, 1927. The doors 
were open at 6:00 P. M., to admit the thousands 
who had already assembled in front of the Audi- 
torium, and before seven o'clock, the time for the 
opening of the program, the Auditorium was 
crowded. At 7:00 P. M., Lieutenant Richard F. 
Foley and his band of fifty-two pieces opened the 
program with a concert that lasted until 7:30 p.m. 
And how these men of the police department did 
play! They had been preparing for this, their 



second concert in aid of the Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association, for a year. Their one desire was 
to play as they had never played before — which 
they succeeded in doing, as was attested to by the 
frequent encores of the audience. Lieutenant 
Foley and his musicians are to be commended for 
the wonderful strides they have made in advanc- 
ing themselves as musicians since their last ap- 
pearance before the public. 

The Sciots— S. F. Temple No. 1, A. E. 0. S. 
H. T., Drill Team, came on the floor, and for fif- 
teen minutes executed every possible military 
maneuver and a number of special drill movements 
of their own creation. The drill of the Sciots was 
a revelation even to those familiar with the mili- 
tary movements, and the way these young men 
acquitted themselves on the ball-room floor was 
really wonderful. The drill of the Sciots fitted in 
very nicely in this part of the program and much 
thanks is due them from the Widows' and Or- 
phans' Aid Association. 

Captain Frederick Lemon and his Music and 
Talent Committee members, in collaboration with 
our dear friend, Karl Eber, put on a performance 
which included theatricals, dancing and singing 
numbers which lasted until 9:00 p.m. This fea- 
ture of the program contained the most beautiful 
and entertaining bits of theatricalism that have 
ever been seen in the Auditorium or elsewhere. 
The dancing, the costumes, the singing and the 
music were all perfect; and the lighting effects 
blended in such harmony that one was wafted to 
the land of dreams and fairies. The hard work 
of members of this committee and Karl Eber was 
clearly demonstrated by the wonderful perform- 
ance that was given us. No impresario — profes- 
sional or amateur — could, or ever did, put on a 
better program or a program that worked with 
such clock-like precision. As the circus barker 
would say — there were "No Waits, Stops or De- 
lays". Everything was run on schedule. The 
professional producer had better look to his lau- 
rels as it has been here clearly demonstrated that 
we have many budding impresarios in our midst. 

Had the entertainment ceased here, those who 
had attended would have been well repaid for the 
time spent, but after the conclusion of this part of 
the entertainment. Detective Sergeant William F. 
Bennett and his Radio Committee assumed charge, 
and for the first time in the history of theatricals, 
a radio broadcasting station, fully equipped, was 
depicted for the edification of the audience. 

The curtain rose on the beautiful scene of a 
radio studio furnished elaborately with the rich- 
est of drapes and rugs, the artists standing 
around waiting for their turn at the microphone, 
which was exposed to the view of the audience. 
The entertainment was started by Detective Ser- 
( Continued on Page 16) 



March. l'J27 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page? 



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Career of Sir Harry Westwood Cooper 

By Otuci-R I'trtR Fanninl, 

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PETER FANNING 



Dr. Ernest Edward 
Moore Chadwick, alias 
Sir Harry Westwood 
Cooper and a great va- 
riety of otiier names, 
was known as one of 
the most vicious crim- 
inals that made his ap- 
pearance in this State 
many years ago, being 
charged with forgery, 
bigamy and many 
other crimes. Previous 
to his coming to this 
State, he operated long 
and extensively in 
Australian and East- 
ern cities. His meth- 
od of obtaining money 
under false pretenses were marvelous in their in- 
genuity. The Bankers' Association of the United 
States had detectives everywhere on his trail. A 
fictitious title and an aristocratic air enabled him 
to pose successfully as a gentleman of means. His 
wanderings brought him to San Francisco, where, 
after perpetrating a half dozen swindles, he was 
captured for attempting to pass a draft upon the 
Crocker-Woolworth Bank of this city, for which 
he was given a three year sentence. During his 
trial several women, each of whom claimed to be 
his wife, were heard from, and it was generally 
expected that upon being liberated from prison he 
would be arrested and charged with bigamy. 

While serving his term he was known as an 
incorrigible and was the leader of several plots 
to escape. He was for a time kept in solitary con- 
finement, yet he had managed to communicate 
with desperate convicts on the outside by a tele- 
graphic signal code of raps. When his time was 
up and upon leaving the prison, he was extremely 
nervous, his gaze shifting from point to point, 
fearing- that after all, he might be confronted with 
a warrant to prevent him from regaining his free- 
dom. "This will be a lesson to me," he said. "If I 
ever get out of this, I shall get into no more 
trouble." 

The next heard of him was when he obtained 
a position as a waiter in a liotel up at Crockett, 
Calif. Hardly a week had passed when he met a 
pretty girl named Nora Sclineider, and from that 
moment seemingly, dated iiis purpose to woo and 
win her. Being educated as a physician, and a 
fraternal society member, gave him a chance to 
rise and resume the position of a professional man. 



In a fortnight he was assisting in the practice of 
a Port Costa physician. Directly thereafter he 
posed as a capitalist, as the possessor of money 
in hand and the heir to a large estate of an aunt 
in England. Then he felt qualified to pay his ad- 
dresses to pretty Nora, and as many another girl 
has done, she listened to his ardent words and 
looked upon him as a desirable suitor. Sir Harry 
was not slow to see his advantage; like Claude 
Melinot, he promised jewels, costly apparel, a 
iiandsome home and luxury. In due time the par- 
ents sent out notices of the engagement of their 
daugiiter to Sir Harry. Then followed a momen- 
tous visit to San Francisco, when he took her and 
iier mother to select the girl's trousseau. None 
but the costliest fabrics would do. The pretty 
country girl must be gaibed like a queen to suit 
the esthetic taste of this princely purchaser. A 
bill of goods amounting to §700.00 was ordered. 
On her engage- 
ment finger a dia- 
mond ring glitter- 
ed. He ordered for 
her a diamond tia- 
ra to cost $1,500.00 
and diamond ear- 
ings costing $400. 
Was ever a 
young and innocent 
country girl given 
a better opportu- 
nity to be dazzled. 
Furniture galore 
was ordered. A fine 
settlement would 
Nora have — $20.- 
000.00 at least. Sir 
Harry had an at- 
torney draw up a 
prenuptial settlement giving her $20,000.00 in 
lier own right and the attorney was instructed to 
find a location in Oakland, Calif., upon which to 
erect a mansion. At tlie same time, to provide 
for the present emergencies, pending the payment 
of the coming $1.5.5,000.00, the amount of the 
legacy from his deceased aunt, the attorney drew, 
by instruction, papers to effect the transfer of 
the lucrative practice of a certain country physi- 
cian to Sir Harry. So far the course of love had 
run smoothly for Nora. As an assurance of the 
reality of his coming wealth, Harry presented to 
his prospective father-in-law and mother-in-law. 
a document which bore a gilt seal and covered 
(Continued on Page 40) 




IR HARRY WESTWOOD COOPER 



Pages 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 



I Remember When ' - 



Reminiscences of Wm. (Doc) Mundell, An Old-Time Police Reporter 

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render a daily report of all birds and animals 
killed and was to bring into the Park Station the 
wing of each bird, the foot of each squirrel or 
gopher, the tail of each rabbit, the ear of every 
dog, rats to be brought in whole and THE HEAD 
OF EACH CAT. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiini^ 

Capt. Steve Bunner used to drive a horse-drawn 
patrol-wagon at the Park Station and was known 
as "Stevie." Steve not only took a great pride 
in his personal appearance but also kept his team 
and wagon in apple-pie order. In his day as a 
driver, himself, his team and wagon were the 
envy of all department members. His horses were 
named Jim and Lucy. Lucy did all of the pulling 
while Jim loafed along just far enough ahead of 
the patrol wagon to keep from being run down. 
* * m 

Bunner then had Al Williams on the wagon 
with him and Al was instructed to throw rocks 
at Jim when he loafed, but was explicitly told by 
Steve not to hit Lucy. 



James T. Gallagher, one of the most genial of 
upper office men did plain clothes duty in the 
Mission with Bill Meltke. They succeeded Bill 
Harrison and Bob Graham. In those days there 
w?s plenty of work for that detail. In the detec- 
tive department Gallagher teamed with Miles 
Jackson. Both are now dead, their end coming 
in the line of duty. 



Henry Pyle, one of the oldest in the game, kept 
the cattle and goats off of the streets in "Cow 
Hollow." Henry is now and has been for a long 
time turnkey in the City Prison. 

* * m 

Bob Curtin, known as "Literary Bob," when in 
the upper office, wrote his reports in verse. Bob's 
brother was State Senator Curtin from the 
Mother Lode District. Bob is now a rancher. 

* * * 

Harry Webb, now pensioned, was one of the old- 
timers patrolling in the Harbor District and par- 
ticularly around East street. 

* * ^ 

Harry L. Sauer, one of the old Southern Sta- 
tion gang walked every day along Bryant street 
from Fourth to Eleventh. Bryant was a lively 
street then. Harry is now dead. 

* » * 

George Clark, a middle-west squirrel shooter 
and good marksman, joined the force and was de- 
tailed to shoot destructive birds and animals, 
principally cats, in the Park. One day having 
been delayed by this added duty, to square him- 
self he reported to Lieutenant James Kelly, after 
ward Captain Kelly, that he had killed a cat with 
a head as big as a tiger. Kelly, ever skeptical, 
in his gruff manner told Clark to bring in the 
cat. Clark reported back that a taxidermist had 
gotten the carcass from a Park laborer and taken 
it to Oakland. Kelly repeated his order that 
Clark bring in the cat. Clark was gone two days 
and returned with the information, unconvincing 
to Kelly, that the body of the mammoth feline was 
so much in demand that it had been shipped from 
Oakland to Oregon. Kelly, not to be outdone, 
issued an order to Clark that henceforth he was to 



William H. King was with the late Joe Redmund 
on the slot machine detail when royal flushes 
were impossible to get, no matter how many nick- 
els one dropped in the groove. Bill is now with 
Captain Al Wright at the North End Station. 

* * * 

Larry Boland, now a sergeant at the Harbor, 
watched over the safety of the motley aggregation 
living on Sacramento, Clay and Commercial 
streets near the old Hall of Justice. 

* » * 

All that a police reporter had to identify him- 
self with policemen and firemen, to whom he may 
have been unknown, was a fire badge, issued 
yearly by the Fire Commission. Bill Levings, 
once a policeman, then a first-rate police reporter 
got Jerry Dinan, when Chief of Police, to issue 
metal press passes to every accredited newspaper- 
man. 

* * ^ 

George F. Kepman, now in the business office 
with Captain John Lackmann, did his bit as a 
patrolman in the Mission. George has been many 
years around the Hall of Justice and is now a cor- 
poral. 

* * * 

The yearly roster of department members got- 
ten out by Captain Jack O'Meara, then chief 
clerk, listed the two Caseys as John J. Casey No. 
1 and John J. Casey No. 2. It was a relief to 
department heads that the rest of the John J. 
Caseys did not join the force, for segregation 
would have been made more difficult. 

* * » 

John Annear, now at the Potrero, killed in 
South Park a saki-loaded Jap "who tried to knife 
him. 



March. 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



II iHinnnnii in in u imiiiniiini i n j 




^^CHIEF'S PAGE 

By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 




CHURCH BOMB DETAIL REPORT 

Bv Corporal Lawrence McInerney 



Captain Arthur D. Layne, 
Central Police Station. 
Sir: 

As per Chief's order, the following members of 
this department reported to you for orders on 
February 10, 1927, and were detailed by you to 
prevent the bombing of Saint Peter and Paul's 
Churcii and capture the bomber, in accordance 
with instructions given by the Chief: 

Coi-poral Lawrence McInerney Company H. 

Patrolman Andrew P. Lennon Company B. 

Patrolman Joseph C. Gremminger.._. Company D. 

Patrolman Joseph Wickstrom .—Company K. 

Patrolman Dewey A. Kauffman, Dept. School Inst. 

Patrolman F^-ank Davis .Dept. School of Inst. 

Patrolman Alfred W. Hutchinson Company E. 

Patrolman Willis A. Casey Company M. 

This squad was distributed to the various points 
of advantage as worked out in the general plan. 
Each man was instructed as to his particular 
duties and the duties of each post was fully ex- 
plained to each officer before taking that post. 
Each man alternated around the several posts. 
thus equally dividing the work, some of which 
was very difficult. This detail was kept up con- 
tinuously from February 10, 1927, to and includ- 
ing March 6, 1927, on which date the bomber was 
captured at 4:20 a. m. 

At 4:17 a. m. of Sunday, March 6, 1927, an un- 
identified man walked quietly up the church steps 
and crouched doM"n against the East wall of the 
vestibule. There he placed a package, lighted a 
match and ignited something; he lit a second 
match and used on the same object. The object 
immediately began to sputter fire. I saw from the 
sputtering flashes that it was a djTiamite fuse; I 
knew that he had placed a dynamite bomb which 
would soon explode. This man stood up, turned 
and started away. I commanded him to halt, 
which he failed to heed and continued on his way; 
I fired a shot from my pistol to prevent his escape. 
The shot which I fired took effect in his back. 
Officer Dewey A. Kauffman, w^ho was also in the 
look-out station with me fired one shot from the 
shot-gun, part of the shot-gun load taking effect 
in the bomber's right cheek and neck. At this 
moment Officer Joseph Gremminger, who had been 



previously instructed to do so, passed out of the 
door, gi-abbed the bomb and cut the burning dyna- 
mite fuse, which prevented the explosion of the 
dynamite bomb. It was then discovered that the 
bomb was made up of twenty (20) sticks of dyna- 
mite, each stick twelve inches long, packed in 
wet clay and inserted in the bomb was a dynamite 
cap attached to the burning fuse. 

While the man was placing this bomb there was 
a man acting as a look-out across the street, who 
was also captured. He was shot at by Detective 
Sergeant Louis De Matei, when he attempted to 
escape. 

Immediately, the ambulance and patrol wagon 
were called. Instructions were given to notify 
the Central Station, Detective Bureau, Captain 
Layne and the Chief, which was done. 

During the 25 days this detail was in effect 
members of the squad performed vigilant duty, 
and I feel it is my duty to request that they be 
commended for their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LAWHENCE McINERNEY, 
Corporal of Police, Star No. 4. 



DRILLS FOR ANNUAL POLICE REVIEW 
STARTED 



The following is a copy of a communication re- 
ceived by me this date from the Honorable Board 
of Police Commissioners: 

"In view of the fact that no inspection and 
review of the department was held during 
1926, you are hereby directed to make prep- 
arations to have an annual inspection and re- 
view held sometime during the month of 
July, 1927, and the definite date of which will 
be subsequently fixed." 

In conformity with the foregoing companies 
will start drilling in the School of the Soldier and 
the School of the Squad immediately. This drill- 
ing will be conducted three times a week for a 
period of approximately fifteen minutes. Partic- 
ular attention shall be given to the "facings" and 
to the "squad movement," that is, insofar as mov- 
ing and fixed pivots are concerned. The time of 
falling in will be 3:30 p. m. The officers from 
the 4 to 12 platoon and such members of the day 
platoon as company commanders may direct will 
constitute the drilling classes. ]\Iembers of the 
(Continued on Page 37) 



Page 10 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 



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Church Bomber Killed 

Courageous Police Detail Puts End to Dynarmter's Dastardly VJor\ 

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After a year, San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment's one big unsolved crime has been practi- 
cally cleared, and with the solution one man lies 
dead at the city morgue and another lies wounded 
at the San Francisco Hospital, while the depart- 
ment has been glorified by the wonderful work 
of less than a dozen policemen to whom was en- 
trusted the work of getting the fiend who four 
times had hurled a bomb into the vestibule of 
Saints Peter and Paul's church on Filbert and 
Powell streets. 

Eluding every effort to trace him or get any 
clue rs to his movements, or a line on his motive, 
the bomb thrower selected Friday morning and 
Sunday morning to commit his dastardly deed. 

Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien, Captain of 
Detectives Duncan Matheson and Captain Arthur 
D. Layne of the Central police district determined 
to get the bomber if they had to keep a detail on 
the church for months. 

Selecting three men, well known for tlieir ability 
to work and obey orders. Chief O'Brien detailed 
these three men, Detective Sergeant Louis De- 
Matei, Sidney Dubose and James Sunseri of 
the Bayview Station to start the preliminary 
watching. 

DeMatei, after a few weeks on the job in- 
formed the chief and Captain Layne that it would 
be necessary to have assistance and some system 
whereby all men detailed might keep in toucli 
with each other. 

Captain Layne was told to decide on what de- 
tail he needed and apply for the men. He asked 
for a non-commissioned officer, Corporal Lawrence 
]\lclnerney, and seven patrolmen to work with 
DeMatei and Sunseri. The added patrolmen were 
J. C. Gremmenger, Andrew Lennon, Willis Casey, 
Joseph Wickstrum, Alfred Hutchinson, Frank 
Davis and D. A. Kauffman. 

The next thing was the communicating system. 
General Manager Thomas Dulury of the Tele- 
phone Company was consulted. He made sug- 
gestions and offers to furnish what materials 
were necessary. He said the man to install the 
work was Ralph Wiley, chief of the Department 
of Electricity. Wiley was taken into the secret, 
and detailed an expert who put in a system of 
phones and buzzers where every man could be 
advised of any untoward event. 

With all this arranged, and anticipating the 
fifth stroke of the fiendish bomber for the night of 
the policemen's concert and ball, Chief O'Brien, 
on February 11. called all men detailed on the job 



to appear before him, also Captain Layne and 
Detective Matheson. 

The chief told them the necessity of the ut- 
most secrecy. He impressed upon them the dan- 
gerous and hazardous assignment they were going 
on. Of the absolute dependence of one on the 
other for continual vigilance. Of how they must 
act and never for a moment relax any vigil they 
were assigned. Without as much as batting an 
eyelash, and with the courage of San Francisco's 
police force, each man went forth to work with 
DeMatei, Dubose and Sunseri, and for 25 days 
these men, face to face with impending death, 
kept up the watch, until the morning of the 9th, 
Dubose and Sunseri up in a flat saw a figure 
stealthily approach the church with something 
under his coat. They held their breath until they 
saw him turn into the entrance and start up the 
steps. Instantly they pressed the buzzer, giving 
a general alarm. 

DeMatei, on watch in the priest's house heard 
it, Lawrence Mclnerney heard it and his assist- 
ant in the rear of the church at another phone 
heard it. They answered and heard Dubose 
whisper, "He's gone up the steps." 

Mclnerney looked through a little isinglass 
peek hole and saw the man take the package from 
under his coat. Saw him take a paper off the 
package, which revealed a small box. Saw him 
strike a match, saw the match blown out. Saw 
liim strike another, and saw the man bend over 
to light a fuse. 

The man took one look at the burning fuse and 
started away. Mclnerney yelled, "Halt, we have 
you covered." 

The bomber hesitated for one instant, thrust 
his right hand into his coat pocket and started to 
run. Mclnerney fired. The bullet took effect. 
Kauffman jumped out and let a charge of buck- 
shot loose from a sliot gun. The man fell dead 
to tlie pavement, a loaded revolver clutched in his 
right hand. It was well he was killed for he 
would have fired had he been able to see anyone 
before he was laid low. 

DeMatei, who had been obsei'ving a man across 
in \\'ashington Park for some time, jumped from 
his hiding place and ordered the man across the 
street to throw up hia hands, that he was an 
officer. 

The man across the street took one look, and 
shot his right hand under his coat as if to reach 
for a gun held in a shoulder holster. He started 
(Continued on Page 39) 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



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Mayor Rolph Proclaims Police Day 

Police Officials from All Over Country Send Congratulations 



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For ihe first time ui the history of this country, 
a day was set aside desigTiated as Pohce Day, by 
Mayor James Rolph, Jr. Mayor Rolph proclaimed 
February 19, as that special day. 

In issuing his proclamation the Mayor set forth 
the splendid series of achievements of our de- 
partment. He reviewed many of its notable cap- 
tures during his long term as chief executive and 
of the work that had been done in crime preven- 
tion as well as the apprehension of criminals. He 
pointed to the fact that we had comparatively 
little crime in San Francisco, due, as he said, to 
the vigilance of our police department. 

The day was generally observed in the city, 
and policemen were saluted by many of our citi- 
zens as they walked their beats, and made to know 
that this recognition had met with general favor 
and indicated that it should be a custom from now 
on. The big concert and ball given by the Police 
Widows' and Orphans' Association wound up the 
day in a blaze of glory. 

The innovation of a Mayor setting aside an 
especial Police Day caught the fancy of the police 
chiefs and city executives throughout the United 
States and Mayor Rolph was deluged with tele- 
gram and letters commending him on this idea. 
We reproduce some of the many messages re- 
ceived. 

My sincere congratulations to you as the originator 
of Police Day as one day that should and will be estab- 
lished peiTnanently in memorial of the many brave offi- 
cers who have lost their lives in line of duty in their 
respective communities. Your name will always be hon- 
ored as the one who made this possible and it is confi- 
dently hoped that your efforts will be crowned with de- 
served success. (W. T. Stanford, President, Peace Officers' 
Association of California, Vallejo, Calif.) 
:^- * -.- 

This department sends its hearty congratulations and 

thanks to you for establishing a certain day each year 

to be known as Police Day. We will do all we can to 

make Police Day a national affair. Knowing Chief 

O'Brien as I do I know that the widows of San Francisco 

are safe in his hands. (Herbert C. Wildey, Chief of 

Police, Morristown, N. J.) 

* * * 

It is indeed a pleasure to commend and co-operate with 
you in the interest you are displaying and the heartfelt 
thoughts you have in mind for those dear to the men 
who were always sincere in the preservation of the peace, 
my best wishes and hearty co-operation. (John M. 
Tracey, Chief of Police, Patterson, N. J.) 

Thanks for invitation to Widows' and Orphans' Ball, and 
congratulations as the father of the movement to make 
Police Day a national institution. (James F. Quigley, Ex- 
Chief of Police, Indianapolis, Ind.) 



Camden, New Jersey, congratulates the father of Police 
Day and e.xtnnds to you personally its expressions of 
thanks and hearty accord. (James E. Tatem, Chief of 
Police, Camden, New Jersey). 

* * * 

Heartiest congratulations to you for proclaiming Feb- 
ruary ILth Police Day. Regret that distance prevents me 
from participating in this celebration. (H. L. Denton, 
General Superintendent of Police, Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road ) . 

* * + 

Congratulations for your great movement for Widows' 
and Orphans' Aid Association, and wishing you greatest 
success as it is a grand idea to have such a day as Police 
Day for so worthy a cause. I surely would be with you 
all if I owned an airplane but in my heart I am there. 
(John C. Rosencrans, Chief of Police, Westfield, N. J.) 




MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR.. Who Proclaimed First Police Day 

In recognition of the honor conferred on members of 
police department by your proclamation designating this 
day as Police Day I send you this message of apprecia- 
tion and congratulation and extend to you, all officials, 
members of the department, and friends, my every good 
wish for a continuance of the success that has come to 
you on this occasion. (William F. Clossey, Chief of 
Hudson County Boulevard Police, Jersey City, N. J.) 

* * * 

Your proclamation declaring February 19th Police Day 
in San Francisco is no doubt the first step toward making 
this day a national institution and the effect it will have 
on the public sentiment will be very far reaching. Please 
accept my sincere thanks and appreciation for your efforts 
in fathering this great movement. (Edward Brickk, St. 
Cloud, Minn.) 

* « * 

Congratulations on your good work. (J. E. Smith, Chief 
of Police; L. W. Hammond, Chief of Detectives, Green- 
ville, South Carolina). 

(Continued on Page 28) 



Page 12 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 





mam BUREAi] 



Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson in Charge 

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NOTORIOUS WOMAN "PICK" JAILED 

By Lieut. Thomas Hoertkork 



The holiday season of 1926-27 found the shop- 
lifting and pickpocket detail particularly on the 
alert, as numerous complaints had been received 
from the larger department stores of customers 
reporting the loss of their purses and handbags. 

The detail, following a check made with nu 
merous arrests, established the fact that they 
must apprehend a stranger, a new operative who 
plied the trade among the many thousands th&l; 
daily visited the different stores. 

Only descriptive identification had been mad*., 
but acting on this, the efforts of the Detectiv*^ 
Bureau were redoubled with those of the Specials 
employed by the various stores. 

The Modus Operandi was shopping, standing 
alone at a counter, her handbag on her arm, the 
bag opened and contents extracted without her 
knowledge; a large handbag opened and purse 
taken out, handbag closed, never worked a floor 
where a detective watched, was evidently cool and 
calculating knowing those on guard in protecting 
the merchandise and property of customers, as a 
prospective customer she rubbed elbows with 
salesladies, salesmen and customers. 

The managers of several stores made a special 
detail of employees but without meeting with any 
success, various subterfuges were used without re- 
sult, purses were placed in conspicuous location as 
bait but the thief would not even nibble. 

On January 31, 1927, a saleslady stated she was 
astonished at the very boldness exhibited by this 
clever thief, when she observed her working in 
this way. Close to the counter she held up a towel 
she had taken from the counter, evidently for the 
purpose of examination, holding it in such a 
screened position she would or could not be ob- 
served by any person in front of her. With the 
towel in this position, she swiftly opened the 
handbag of an employee of the local post office 
who was making a purchase nearby, taking the 
sum of $60 from her handbag as it hung on her 
arm ; at this point the saleslady called the loser's 
attention to the fact she had been robbed. The 
thief walked calmly towards the entrance and the 
loser ran after her, accosting her, demanding her 
property. The small puree extracted from the 
handbag was on a counter nearby and recovered 



by the loser ; a slight wave of excitement followed 
and as the culprit made such a pitiful appeal, the 
loser allowed her to go her way. 

In the report made on this theft, we obtained 
the best description received up to this time and 
from a casual remark made by a saleslady that 
a certain woman of this description came into her 
store many times, loitered a short period of time, 
made no purchases and left. From this point of 
deduction, I detailed Det. Sergt. M. Harris at the 
store witli instructions to conceal himself in the 
rear. 

On February 7, 1927, the thief entered this 
store at about 1 :00 P. M. and being immediately 
observed by Harris, he quickly approached and 
began to question her. She became quite indig- 
nant, making threats if arrested, etc. Being 
convinced, she was taken to headquarters where 
I saw her. Immediately I recognized her as 
Frances Matthews, a notorious pickpocket who 
was wanted on charges of violating her parole on 
release from San Quentin, where she had served 
a term, being committed from Los Angeles county, 
charged with grand larceny (pickpocket). 

She had been taught the art of picking pockets 
by her mother, Mrs. Kate Dietrick, whom we ar- 
rested in 1924, charged with opening handbags. 
At this time Mrs. Dietrick was 78 years of age 
and had a long record in the East as one of the 
best developed pickpockets during a period of 
perhaps 40 years. 



FOLEY AND MOORE IN BUREAU 



New faces are seen on the night watches in 
the detective bureau. New faces so far as com- 
missioned officers are concerned. 

Lieutenant Richard Foley, band master, and 
for a number of years a foe to the evil doers down 
south of Market Street, has swapped jobs with 
Lieutenant Arno Dietel, who has been with the 
bureau for the past year or more. Lieutenant 
Emmett Moore from out the Western Addition 
station, where he has sei-ved since the station was 
re-opened traded jobs with Lieutenant Leo Tack- 
ney. 

Lieutenant Foley says the only kick he has 
about the new job is that he can't practice on his 
cornet, realizing as he does that the music might 
disturb the prisoners up stairs. 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



^^Knockovers'' of Bureau 



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Lieut. Bernard McDonald's Auto Detail registered high 
the past month. The following were booked to Det. 
Sergts. James Hayes and Harry McCrea and Det. Richard 
Smith — Sam Gordon, Robert King, Paul Reynolds, Solo- 
mon Daniels, violating Sec. 146; Ralph Carriers and 
Al Mars, en route to San Mateo; by Lieut. McDonald and 
Det. Sergts. Frank Brown and Rasmus Rasmussen, Wil- 
liam C. Friedel and Anton Friedel, 146'ers; by Det. 
Sergts. Percy Keneally and J. J. McKenna — Kenneth 
Peters, Gimmurd Nordquist, Leon Feurstein and Lawrence 
Carey; to Det. Sergts. William Millihin and Harry Rus- 
ted — Theodore Kurrell, William Harris and William 
Kidder, grand larceny; to Det. Sergts. Nicolas Barron 
and Augustus Thompkins — Settimio Murra and Law- 
rence McBride, embezzlement; Joe Paris and Harry Cas- 
tro arrested for larceny by McKenna, Keneally, and Det. 
Sergt. Jack Cannon. 



The bad check detail, composed of Det. Sergts. Wil- 
liam Armstrong, Charles Maher and James Hansen, 
booked, among others, Gerard Del Corro, 476a; Ordell 
Marthal, same, Policewoman Kathleen Sullivan assisting 
In this arrest; Alexander Klein, arrested by Officers 
Eugene Hottenger and D. DoUiver of the Bush Station; 
Klein has two more 4 7 6a's and an en route to Oakland; 
Frank De Lai, forgery, and Frank Gordon, Calvin Lucas, 
John Lucas and Ferman Kellum, fugitives. 

H: * i-fi 

Among some of the arrests of Det. Sergts. Andrew 
Gaughran and James Skelly of the Shopping Detail, 
were Bernard Ephriam, forgery; Edwin Schultz, three 
bad check charges; and Albert Jones, burglary. 

* :f: :[: 

Det. Sergt. Fred Bohr and Clarence Herlitz of the 
Hotel Detail locked up Joseph Gemme and Earl Nelson 
for burglary and their side kick, Jack Lavender for 
vagrancy; Ralph Hogan, wanted in Modesto; and Jack 
Lee and Alfred Robb, for vagrancy. 

* * * 

Detectives Frank Jackson and George Page of the 
night crews rounded up Jess Boydson, who was charged 
with driving an automobile while intoxicated and with 
reckless driving. 

The Robbery Detail in charge of Sergt. George Mc- 
Loughlin, kept the tough eggs moving into the city 
prison. Among some of the knockovers noted were: by 
Det. Sergts. George Wall and William McMahon — James 
Ross, Charles Hotaling, Frank Berg, Pat Kelly, Gus 
Oldenberg, Lawrence Mallery, Patrick Kelly, en route 
to Los Angeles, and Orley Horr, on a bench warrant. 
Wall and Det. Sergt. Leo Bunner booked James O'Mal- 
ley, James LaVette, Amos Parks and Robert Marek, 
wanted in Los Angeles. Bunner, Wall and Det. Sergt. 
Robert Rauer booked Melvin Bellmer for robbery, while 
Bunner and Rauer arrested William H. Ford for the 
same offense, and Rauer, Bunner and Det. Sergt. Ver- 
non Van Matre booked Theodore Mostowski en route 
to San Mateo. 

* * * 

Dets. Daniel Fogarty and John Sturm brought in Jas. 
C. Howard on a grand larceny "clout". 

* * * 

Here are some of Lieut. Thomas Hoertkorn and Det. 
Sergt. Morris Harris' bookings: Frances Matthews, grand 



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larceny, and parole violator; John J. Byrnes, violating 
Sec. 786; Sara Byrnes, en route to Paso Robles; Frances 
Stewart, John Horan, D. M. Soto and Gabriel Arellano, 
vagrancy. 



Det. Sergts. Thomas Conlan and Edward Wiskotchill 
landed Ted Lewis in jail on a charge of burglary. 

-c * * 

Edward Gallisforder, Clarence Spratte and Albert San- 
ford, charged with vagrancy, were arrested by Det. Sergt. 
Martin Porter and Sergt. George Healy. 

* * * 

Det. Sergt. Harry Cook fixed up Chester Hogan for 
Los Angeles, and Vernon Gayton for Fresno. 



Det. Sergt. Richmond Tatham and Sergts. Jack Palmer, 
James Gregson and Joseph Lippi of the Burglary Detail 
arrested Theodore Cronek for extortion and violation of 
Sec. 476a of the code; other members of the detail plac- 
ing offenders behind the bars were: Sergts. Hughes and 
James Johnson, who arrested John Williams, wanted 
in Pittsburg; Abraham Stolzoff, for burglary; Hughes, 
assisted by Officer H. Garrick and P. Porter, arrested 
Anthony Del Sol for burglary; Det. Sergts. Irvin Finlay 
and James Mitchell booked Pedro Flores for violating 
Sec. 504a of the code. 

* * * 

In their drive to stop the moulders' war, Lieut. Charles 
Dullea, Sergt. Alex. McDaniell, Det. Sergts. Thomas Hy- 
land, Marvin Dowell, Otto Frederickson and Jesse Ayer 
arrested Earl Parent!, violating gun law, Frank Brown, 
conspiracy, William Allen and Tony Mello for assault, 
the first to commit murder and the other to do great 
bodily Injury. 

* * * 

Chester Papineau arrested by Officer T. Doyle of the 
Western Addition, was found to he a fugitive from jus- 
tice by Det. Sergts. Henry Kalmbach and George Rich- 
ards. 

* * * 

May Grant, brought to the city prison on a minor 
charge, was found to be a young lady wanted very badly 
in Los Angeles. Sergt. Emmett Hogan of the Bureau of 
Identifi<»tion, checking her fingerprints and photos, 
quickly found that May has many aliases and she was 
booked en route to the Southern city. 



MRS. COWHIG GETS AUTOMOBILE 



Irene Cowhig', wife of Officer Cowhig of the 
Mission station, has a new automobile. It is the 
one members of the department disposed of for 
Mrs. James O'Donnell, whose husband, formerly 
attached to the Harbor station, recently died. 

Officer Massing of the Richmond station had 
charge of the disposal, assisted by Lieut. Fi-ank 
McGuire, Corp. Fi-ank Rhodes, and Officers Pat 
McNamara and Thomas O'Connell. Some $1200 
was realized for Mrs. O'Donnell. 



Coi-poral Hoeckle brought to the station Dan Cruz, 
charged with vagrancy and disturbing the peace. 



Page 14 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 



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Desmond Gets Two Bodies From the Bay 

Detective Sergeant Puts Knowledge of Bay Waters to Good Use 

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Detective Sergeant 
Michael Desmond 



The San Francisco Police De- 
partment is in a position to meet 
most any emergency. This is 
demonstrated most every week. 
Whicli leads us to refer to a 
couple of deeds performed by 
Detective Sergeant Michael Des- 
mond, who with Detective Ser- 
geant Bartholomew Kelleher do 
the follow-up on the "kicks" 
from the water front. 
Sergeant Desmond is a powerful man, and he 
has used this strength as a swimmer on many 
occasions. He has done some wonderful feats 
on the bay in a swimming role. He has learned 
the bay, studied the tides and currents. He is an 
authority on these matters. 

So when recently there was need for someone 
with such knowledge to assist in recovering from 
the bottom of the bay, bodies of a man and a boy, 
Desmond was called upon. 

Last January Elton McMahon with a friend, 
drove off the wharf at the foot of the Embar- 
cadero. It was some days before the police were 
advised of the accident, and Captain Matheson de- 
tailed Desmond and Detective Sergeant Phillip 
Lindecker, who is a sea dog of some ability, and 
who has a record for recovering machines and 
bodies as well. 

These two officers got the police boat and with 
Engineer Badaracco went to the scene of the ac- 
cident. Though several days had elapsed they 
succeeded in getting a line on the sunken car in 
short time. It was hoisted and carried ashore. 

Captain Matheson then detailed Desmond to 
see what he could do about locating the body of 
McMahon. Though ten days had passed since the 
accident, Desmond went to the task with a deter- 
mination. He studied the tides of the night of 
the accident, of their changes, of the strength of 
the current and finally decided where to lower the 
grappling irons. 

Again taking the police boat and the necessary 
equipment, Desmond set out and the grappling 
hooks had scarcely been lowered when they hit 
something. The spool was turned and up came 
the body of unfortunate McMahon. But few peo- 
ple had any idea the body would be thus found. 
Most folks thought the body would have been 
washed far from the spot where it was sunk. 
Desmond was sure it had not and he found it a few 
feet from where the automobile was located. 



Then on February 19 an 11-year-old newsboy, 
Ivan Judson, went over the 16th street bridge. 
His body did not appear on the surface and three 
days later Captain Matheson again called uppn 
Desmond to see what he could do about finding 
tlie little fellow. Desmond made a trip to the 
scene of the accident, again got a line on the tides 
and currents and in less than an hour after arriv- 
ing at the place with the police boat brought the 
lad's body to the surface. 

Desmond has recovered many bodies, dead and 
alive from the waters, not only in this city, but 
back in Ireland. Once along tlie coast of South- 
ern Ireland he was in a shipwreck when the boat 
upset. He and his brother and a companion, 
Micliael Sullivan, held on for two hours before 
they were able to get to safety. 

He has from years of experience perfected a 
stroke tliat enables him to help save drowning 
people and bring them ashore. 

Only last summer he showed liis ability as a 
diver, when at Capitola he dove into the Capitola 
river and brought up the body of a young boy 
who had drowned. He had to remain under water 
for some time until he could locate the body, and 
when he brought it to the river bank he proceeded 
to display a knowledge of resuscitation that won 
him the admiration of several doctors who came 
to the scene. Had Desmond been advised of the 
accident a few minutes before he was, there is no 
doubt that he would have revived the lad. 

Sergeant Desmond has been commended for 
his work in recovering the body of McMahon and 
that of the Judson boy, but as he says it's all in 
the day's work. 



May I take this opportunity to convey to you 
my appreciation for recent very valuable assist- 
ance rendered our service by your officers, which 
resulted in the apprehension of a number of aliens 
of the deportable classes. In this connection I 
wish to mention especially, Officer James Cole- 
man, through whose diligent efforts a number of 
important cases have been brought to our atten- 
tion, the most recent of these being the case of 
Mrs. Rita Leslie, alias Pachie, alias Forneris, alias 
Menzio, a foreign born prostitute. May I assure 
you of the desire of this office to reciprocate when- 
ever opportunity offers. 

JOHN D. NAGLE, Commissioner, 
Department of Immigration. 



March. 1927 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 1 5 



Captain Max Fisher of Sacramento 

By Eugene Jones of Sacramento Union 

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Captain Max Fisher, head of the Bureau of 
Identification of the Sacramento Police Depart- 
ment, and father of the movement that brought 
about the estabhshment of a State Bureau of 
Criminal Identification in the Capitol City, known 
by many San Fi-ancisco detectives, and by them 
recognized as one of the best experts on identifi- 
cation in the West, was given a splendid writeup 
in the Sacramento Union this month in a feature 
article by Eugene Jones of that paper. 

A copy was received by Sergeant Emmett 
Hogan of our bureau, and we are reprinting a por- 
tion of the article. 

Officer Peter Fanning, who has probably taken 
more finger prints of men arrested for crime than 
any man in this Western country, tells many in- 
teresting things of Fisher's ability to remember 
crooks and obtain from them confessions by his 
methods where every other means had failed. 

The article says: 

"There is only one Captain Fisher in the world 
— and the crooks wish there was one less. Fisher 
founded the Sacramento Police Department of 
Criminal Identification years ago, and ever since 
then he has been dumfounding law breakers from 
coast to coast. Having heard a gi'eat deal about 
what he did, but little about how he did it, we 
cornered him in his office the other day, and put 
the matter squarely before him. 
Guilt Apparent 

"Well," he said, examining us through a pair 
of eyes that saw the hair on the back of our rep- 
ortorial head, "I don't really do it; the criminal 
does it. His guilt and his history are stamped 
all over him for those who can observe. There 
is an enormous diff'erence between seeing and ob- 
serving. Here, I'll show you. Sit down in that 
chair!" 

We sat timidly. 

Fisher, facing us, closed his eyes for a few sec- 
onds, then opened them. After that he closed 
and opened 'em again. "What do you think you 
look like?" he asked. We admitetd we had no 
very clear idea, but outside, unsolicited opinions 
had never been complimentary. 

Haven't you ever seen your ears?" asked Cap- 
tain Fisher. "They're not mates; one is a half-inch 
lower than the other. You have a mole on your 
right cheek; your nose extends slightly to the 
left; one side of your face is broader than the 
other ; your mouth tilts up at the corners ; one 
tooth in your lower set has been broken and filed 

"That's enough !" we said firmly, moving out of 
even — " 



the light. "How on earth could our wife ever 
have married us?" 

When we had managed to compose ourselves 
again, Fisher continued: "First comes observa- 
tion; I have demonstrated that. Then comes the 
ability to recollect. Anybody can learn visual 
identification who will devote sufficient effort to 
the subject. You have seen examples of this in 
doormen at famous clubs, head waiters and so 
forth. Now if you'll come into the laboratory I'll 
explain a basic principle of this science." 

Fisher's laboratory contains, among other 
equipment, a large plate camera, and it was this 
he pounced upon. "Look here. Do you know the 
function of a lense? It is the eye of the camera. 
It merely reflects on a sensitive plate the image 
placed before it. No lens on earth can retain a 
picture. And so it is with the eye, which 
is the lens of the brain. Prepax'e your brain to 
forever retain a picture given it, then adjust your 
lens at the best focus to view the picture. Never 
stand too close to your subject; you can't tell what 
a man really looks like when you are close to him. 
Don't you know that when a crook walks into a 
bank to pass a bad check he keeps his head down 
until he is as near the cashier as possible. In the 
brief clcseup the cashier sees an image out of 
focus, and afterwards he has no accurate idea of 
what the man looked like. 

"That is why a one-eyed person remembers 
faces better than a two-eyed person. He has no 
focus to adjust. Watch out for the one-eyed fel- 
low if he sees you commit a crime. He'll identify 
you some day for the police. 

"Of course, features may be changed by acci- 
dent or disease, but the expression of the eye — - 
never! Eyes never lie, although they often try 
to. Sleepy eyes may half hide a villian ; innocent 
eyes may half hide a crook. Half, remember. So 
when you are memorizing a face, get a good, 
square look at the eyes. In fact, always be sure 
you are on the same angle as the subject. I al- 
ways demand that a corpse be placed vertically if 
I am going to identify it. That is why so few 
people searching morgues and hospitals for 
friends are able to recognize them — they look at 
a face on an angle, and naturally it is unfamiliar." 

We next asked Fisher to tell us exactly how he 
went about extracting confessions from criminals 
whom he had never before seen. 

Some years ago, when Grant Williams, retired 
New York captain of detectives, visited the Sac- 
ramento Bureau of Criminal Identification, he 
(Continued on. Page 35) 



Page 16 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 



POLICE SHOW 

(Continued from Page 6) 
g-eant Bennett, who acted as announcer, and who 
introduced in turn each of the artists who ap- 
peared before the microphone, and from then on 
until two o'clock a.m. the following morning, radio 
star after radio star followed each other doing 
their own particular specialty before the micro- 
phone. 

A halt was called in the radio program on the 
entrance to the Auditorium of His Honor, Mayor 
James Rolph, Jr., who was met at the door by the 
Caledonian Pipers' Band, who escorted His Honor 
about the Auditorium and then to his box. 

Immediately after the Mayor's entrance, the 
Grand March was started. This was the most 
colorful and beautiful of any of the grand marches 
for which the Police Department Concert and Balls 
have become famous that has ever been held by 
them. San Francisco's finest, dressed in evening 
clothes, accompanied by their beautifully gowned 
women, marched around the Auditorium, led by 
His Honor, The Mayor, followed by the Honorable 
Board of Police Commissioners, the Chief of Po- 
lice, Daniel J. O'Brien, the Chairman of the Ball, 
Captain Wm. J. Quinn, the Officers of the Widows' 
and Orphans' Aid Association, members of the 
Police Department, and distinguished visitors and 
guests. The salvos of applause that greeted the 
conclusion of the grand march indicated very 
plainly that the vast attendance had been touched 
by the beautiful picture that was produced for 
their edification. Immediately at the conclusion 
of the grand march. His Honor, Mayor James 
Rolph, Jr., was called upon to present medals to 
the four distinguished heroes of the Police De- 
partment for the preceding year. The Mayor 
made his annual address to the vast audience, and 
in a very touching tribute to the heroes, Detec- 
tive Sergeant Earl Honey, Detective Sergeant Ver- 
non Van Matre, Detective Everett Hansen and 
Motorcycle Officer Walter Mathes, presented and 
pinned on each, medals of distinction and honor. 
Lieutenant Michael Griffin, past president of the 
Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association, was then 
presented with a beautiful watch for the wonder- 
ful work that he had done for the organization 
during the preceding year. 

Band Leader, Lieutenant Richard F. Foley was 
next called to the platform where he was pre- 
sented by His Honor, Mayor James Rolph, Jr., 
with a beautiful baton, given by a naval officer 
to the Lieutenant, in recognition of the wonderful 
work he had done in organizing the San Francisco 
Police Department Band. 

Following these presentations, dancing was re- 
sumed and continued until 2:00 a.m., Sunday 
morning. Intermissions were created in the dance 
progi-am to admit the radio artists who were pres- 



ent to appear and entertain from time to time. 
Not a dull moment was had from 7:00 p.m. until 
2:00 a.m. the following morning. Dancing was 
held in Larkin and Polk Halls; in the latter the 
old timers held forth, while in the former, jazz 
was indulged in from 8:00 p.m. until quitting 
time. 

For the success of this ball, no one individual 
or set of individuals is responsible. All credit 
must go where it belongs — to the entire rank and 
file of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 
of the San Francisco Police Department. 
(To be Continued) 



MOLDERS ARRESTED FOR MURDER 



The concentrated efforts of months by Lieut. 
Charles Dullea, Sergts. Alex. McDaniell, Thomas 
Hyland, Marvin Dowell, Otto Fredrickson and Jess 
Ayer culminated this month in what Capt. Mathe- 
son characterizes as the end of the long moulders' 
war. 

Acting upon advice obtained, and information 
gained by weeks of quiet work, this aggregation 
of detectives swooped down on a Stockton hotel 
and, assisted by Detective Cannon, (brother of 
Detective John J. Cannon of this city), arrested 
Tony Mello, William Allen, Robert Burton, T. Par- 
enti, purported leaders in the moulder's union, and 
whom police say have been responsible for the 
reign of terror, beatings and killing of numerous 
non-union workers during the past thi-ee years. 

Dashing back to this city these officers took 
into custody Frank Brown, business agent. At a 
specially convened session of the Grand Jury, Bur- 
ton and Brown were indicted for murder and the 
others with assault to murder. 

The detail making these arrests have worked 
hard and persistently on this case and they have 
been obstructed many times in gathering the in- 
formation necessary. However, they stuck to 
their tssk and they now feel they have rounded 
up the men responsible for the trouble. 

However, all the men protest their innocence 
and have retained able attorneys to make their 
fight. 



OF INTEREST TO POLICE OFFICERS 



You will instruct the members of your respec- 
tive commands that in all cases where prisoners 
are arrested under section 21 of the Juvenile 
Court Law, the said prisoners shall be instructed 
before being released on bail that they must ap- 
pear in 150 Otis street on the following Friday 
at 2:30 p. m. 



Detective Sergeant William Bennett working out of the 
Chief's office arrested Louis Reed for driving an automo- 
bile while intoxicated. 



March. 1927 



POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 17 



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Dr» T* B» W« Leland — Coroner 



Co operation with Police Dcj-iartment His Aim 

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DK. T. B. W. LELAND 



Pel haps in no large 
city in the United 
States does the cordial 
relationship between 
the Police Department 
and the Coroner's of- 
fice result in such effi- 
ciency as does that 
existing between the 
two departments in 
San Francisco. 

It has been the con- 
stant effort of Coroner 
Leland during the 
years he has occupied 
tliis office to promote 
these cordial relations. 
The routine worked out and adopted by him and 
perfected after a most wonderful experience with 
a great number of all types of cases has estab- 
lished a reputation for his office as being one of 
the most efficiently administered in the United 
States. 

The type and character of men and women se- 
lected by him as assistants has been of the high- 
est and they have in turn sustained the reputation 
of the office for honesty, efficiency and faithful- 
ness in their service to the public. 

The office of Coroner in San Fi'ancisco is a most 
important and trying one. The great number of 
deaths occurring under such a variety of circum- 
stances require immediate and most careful in- 
vestigation, and the possibility of overlooking 
crime in connection therewith is constantly pres- 
ent. 

Trained deputies as investigators with years of 
experience carefully performed autopsies and tox- 
icological examinations in every case where there 
could be a shadow of suspicion, together with most 
searching examination of witnesses and evidence 
at inquests by the Coroner — make the overlooking 
of death from violence or crime verj^ remote. 

All deaths reported to the Coroner's Office are 
required by the Coroner to be immediately report- 
ed to the Police Department. A patrolman arrives 
on the scene coincidently with the deputy and 
after careful investigation, if circumstances war- 
rant, the detective bureau is immediately notified 
and the body with its surroundings is not allowed 
to be disturbed until the arrival of the detectives 
who take charge. The evidence gathered is pre- 
sented at tlie Coroner's inquest when the sworn 
testimony is taken and becomes available at the 
future trial of the case. 

The careful, strictly adhered to, co-operative 



routine of Coroner's office and Police Department 
makes the commission of those types of crimes 
due to carefully planned attempts at poison and 
murder by similar means infrequently attempted 
in San Francisco. Among the most famous ones 
uncovered by the vigilance of the Coroner's office 
are the Soder case — a murder for life insurance 
and the Bowers case — gradual and protracted 
poisoning of husband — love for another man. 

While the office of the Coroner primarily deals 
with deceased persons and their affairs. Coroner 
Leland has developed what he terms the "life 
saving function" of tlie Coroner's office. The 
important facts concerning all accidents are care- 
fully noted, accurate statistics are compiled, and 
after their intelligent study remedial legislation 
is recommended by Coroner and jury. These life 
saving measures enacted into safety laws have 
been the means of saving lives of innumerable 
workmen and others. 

Coroner Leland, in San Francisco, has pioneered 
the effective work of diminishing the death toll 
from auto accidents, his measures actively sup- 
ported by Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien, the 
San Francisco Police Department, and the news- 
papers of San Francisco leading to the strenuous 
campaign now being prosecuted. 

Coroner Leland served the city first under the 
late Coroner, Dr. R. Beverly Cole, an autopsy 
surgeon, and had his training with the old school 
of detectives. Bob Hogan of the District Attor- 
ney's office, Dinan, Wren, Gibson, Thomas Ryan 
and other men of those times. 

He married the daughter of a police officer, the 
late Philip P. McMahon, and his uncle by marriage 
was the late Detective Sergeant George McINIahon 
for so many years specially detailed in Chinatown 
and the Mexican quarter. He is also a cousin by 
marriage of Sergeant Patrick McGee of the San 
Francisco Police force. 

Coroner Leland resigned his office as Coroner 
to serve in the United States Navy in the late 
World War, serving as Senior Medical Officer of 
the U. S. S. Oregon and of Division Two Pacific 
Fleet. He was promoted for efficient service dur- 
ing the war from the rank of Lieutenant Com- 
mander to that of Commander. 

At the end of the war he was reappointed Coro- 
ner by Mayor Rolph, Dr. John Gallagher, who 
had served in his absence, resigning for that 
purpose. Dr. Leland was re-elected the following 
year without opposition, receiving the highest vote 
given to any city official. 

San Francisco is justly proud of its Coroner's 
office, visitors from over the world pronouncing 
(Continued on Page 31) 



Page 18 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— ROOM », HALL OF JU8TICB 
Official Pnblicstion 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT; 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASS'N.; 
STATE HIGHWAY PATROLMENS' ASS'N. 

A Police News and Educational Magazine 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY "2-0" PUBLISHING CO. 

Printed by 

ALEX. DULFER PRINTING CO., 853 Howard Street 

Phone: DodkIu 2377 



Make all Checks Payable to- 



OPIE L. WARNER — 
JOHN F OlIINN 



-Editor 



Vol V. 



March, 1927 



No. 5. 



NOTABLE WORK OF OUR POLICE 



The past month has been particularly notable 
for work done by the members of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department. During- the first week, 
members of the Detective Bureau, led by Lieut. 
Charles Dullea of the Homicide Squad, and com- 
prising Sergts. Alex. McDaniell, Det. Sergts. 
Thomas Hyland, Otto Fredrickson, Jess Ayer and 
Marvin Dowell, arrested four men, prominent in 
moulder union affairs, whom they have had in- 
dicted for murder and assault; while Det. Sergt. 
Louis DeMatei, Patrolmen James Sunseri, Sydney 
Dubose, Corp. Lawrence Mclnerney, and 6 patrol- 
men under him brought to an end the reign of 
terror occasioned by the persistent bomber of 
Saints Peter and Paul's Church. 

These are two outstanding accomplishments of 
the police department during the year. The kill- 
ing of Joe Tanko, notorious bandit and murderer, 
is another one; the capture of the Matthews wo- 



man by Lieut. Thomas Hoertkorn and Sergt. Mor- 
ris Harris is another that has put at ease many 
large stores where this woman has worked at 
times. 

The San Francisco Police Department meets 
every contingency in a manner that causes it to 
stand out as an organization any community could 
well feel proud of. In the war on crooks the mem- 
bers ask no quarters and give none when that 
issue is make by the crook. 



•■2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



-Business Manager 



EOrrORIAL ASSOCIATES 
THFOPnRF. J. ROCHE. President 
XESSE B. COOK: ANDREW F. MAHONY; DR. THOS. E. SHUMATE 
DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police 

AUGUST VOLLMER, Fast President International Association of 
Chiefs of Police 

Captain of Detectives Captain BERNARD JUDGE 

DUNCAN MATHESON Captain JOHN J. O MEARA 

Captain HENRY GLEESON Captain «• J- BRIGHT 

CsntBin EUGENE WALL Captain ARTHUR D. I.AYNE 

Captain HENRY O-DAY Cant.-n PATRTCK HERT.IHY 

CaptMn ROBERT A COTTLTER Captain CARLES GOTT 

Captain JOHN J. CASEY Captain WIT.LIAM J^ OUINN 

Capt»in FRED T.EMON Captain WM. T. HEALY 

Captain STEPHEN V. BUNNER Captain J. H. LACKMAN 

Captain PFTER McGEE Captain CHARLES SKELLY 



The law enforcement officers of this State may 
well feel proud of the position they occupy in 
California today. It is a splendid tribute to the 
State Peace OflScers' Association to have every 
bill they fostered adopted by the present State 
Legislature. The men who deal with criminals, 
who have the enforcement of the law in their 
hands should be the men who should be consulted 
on matters pertaining to stricter laws and punish- 
ment. In the past this has not been done. How- 
ever, for the past few years these men have been 
asked for advice and suggestions and it has been 
found by experience that their advice and sug- 
gestions have been good and of benefit to the 
State, generally. 



Ci-ime prevention costs less than criminal ap- 
prehension. 



SUBSCRIFTION TFRM.'S — J3 00 a year in advance: 26 cents a num- 
ber In Canada S3. BO a year. Remittances must be made by Post Office 
or Express Money Order, by Reiristered Letter, or by PosUee SUmps 

nf •>.,,„„* *loTi"miTin*ioT>« or bv rbe/*V 

IMPORTANT NOTICE— Do not subs-ribe to "2-0" POLICE JOUR- 
NAL throuEh Btrents unknown to you p rsonally, or who cannot present 
proper credentials written on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



It is indeed pleasing to observe how well the 
commands in the outlying districts keep down 
criminal acts. The daily crime reports reveal a 
condition of freedom from crime that many a 
small town would be rather proud to boast. 



TO THE WIVES OF OUR POLICEMEN 



"Two-O" would like very much to run articles of 
events, such as parties, graduations, births or 
other happenings which occur in your immediate 
families. But to do this it is necessary to receive 
the articles first. Someone must be the first one 
to contribute, so why not let it be you. 

We would be thankful for any co-operation on 
the part of our readers. Anything that is inter- 
esting to you will be just as interesting to others. 
Perhaps there has been a new amval in your 
home or a guest arrived out of town, or you had 
a party of some sort. If you find you cannot get 
the notice together in the right way, just write 
us a letter and we will do the rest. 

Remember our address. Room 9, Hall of Justice; 
telephone number is Douglas 2377. 



Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson has been 
called to Sacramento on several occasions since the sec- 
ond session of the legislature has convened, for consulta- 
tion and advice on some of the bills having to do with 
crime legislation and change in criminal procedure. 



March, 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 19 



I III nun 



South San Francisco and Colma Section 




CHIEF OF POUCE LOUIS BELLONI (Center) OF SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 
I — Vincent Bianchini: 2 — Floyd Menzie: 3 — Henry McGraw; 4 — Joe Bildhauer ; 5 — Tony Martin. 



MAYOR FRED ALONZO CUNNINGHAM 

The city of South San Francisco was incorpo- 
rated in the year 1908. Two years later Fi-ed 
Alonzo Cunningham, real estate man and insur- 
ance bi'oker, ran for the office of city trustee. He 
was duly elected and has served in that capacity 
ever since — 17 years in the service of his com- 
munity. 

Now it so happens that South San Francisco's 
municipal charter does not provide for a mayor. 
The highest official is the chairman of the board 
of trustees and to this position Cunningham was 
recently chosen by his fellow members of the 
boai'd. "Mayor" is the title that rests on him 
more by common consent than by official designa- 





"CAMP 


FIRE" 


HAMS 




^^V^^^^^^^K^ 


LARD 


BH 


Ij^l^B^H 


s,™ "^^ 


^r' s.^„.. 




VIRDEN PACKING CO. 




SAN FRANCISCO 



Page 20 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. J 927 




City Hall, South San Francisco 

tion, and in his 20 or more years as a resident 
of South San Francisco, 17 of which he has served 
as city trustee, that honor has been so securely 
earned that no questioning voice has ever ques- 
tioned it. 

"Mayor Fred" was born in Nebraska. He spent 
the early years of his life on the farm, learning 
the meaning of hard work. The same industry 
and activity have characterized his entire life and 
success has come to him both in his public and 
private endeavors. 

His education he received largely in Kansas, 
where he became a student of the State Univer- 
sity. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American 
war, "Mayor Fred" enlisted in the United States 
Army, which brought him for the first time to 
the coast. His regiment was encamped at the 
Presidio for some time prior to going to the 
Philippines, and here "His Honor" saw opportu- 
nity. 

After the war was over, and Cunningham's 
service in the islands, under General Frederick 
Funston, was completed, he made his home in 
South San Francisco. Here he made his "mark", 
and here he is honored to the fullest extent that 
South San Francisco can honor any man. 

Following are the members who make up the 
Board of Trustees of South San Francisco and 
their business: 

F. A. Cunningham, Chairman, Real Estate. 

A. J. Eschelbach, Theatre Manager. 

Reese Lloyd, Steel. 
. M. Minucciani, Contractor. 

R. Tibbetts, Mechanic. 



Officer Bill Kearny of Room 9 is glad the voters did 
not ask for a weekly pay day for the municipal em- 
ployes. He says with a twice a month payroll to make 
up he often has to ask the assistance of his little play- 
mate, Joe Lee, the rapid typist of the General office, 
who is always willing and ready to give Bill a helping 
hand. 



Coff in-Redington Co. 

Wholesale Druggists 

Dealers in Sponges and Chamois 

Distributors for Parke, Davis & Co. 

Pharmaceuticals and Biologies 

S.AN FR.4NCISC0, CALIFORNIA 



South San Francisco 142 



Mission 2664 



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

UNION STOCKYARDS 

COMPANY 

PubUc Stock Yards 
Market Every Day But Sunday 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, 



If you don't get satisfaction and sei'vice 
at 

WAKELEE'S 

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then call 

DAVENPORT 20 

WAKELEE'S PHARMACIES 

POWELL and ELLIS STREETS 



POOL 




BILLIARDS 


c. 


T. CONNELLY 


CTGARS, TOBACCO 


and SOFT DRINKS 


257 GRAND AVENUE 


SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



E. C. PECK 



DR. J. 0. McGOVERN 



King Mountain Sub-Division 

A Good Place for Tired Policemen 
304 LINDEN ST. SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 



CHIEF LOUIS BELLONI 



Bv R. L. Spangler 



It is written that "A prophet is not without 
honor but in his own country." Eitlier Chief of 
Police Louis Belloni holds this quotation in con- 
tempt, or endeavors to prove it by being tlie ex- 
ception, he is in every sense one of South San 
Fi-ancisco's own. Chief Belloni was born and 
raised in South San Francisco. Five years ago 
he was merely a member of the force, officially a 
"deputy marshal." For the past two years he has 
been chief, and under his leadership the police 
department of the city has become more active 
than ever before in the history of the community. 

Belloni's war service is perhaps one of the chief 
reasons for his popularity. As a member of the 
famous "363rd", Belloni became a crack gunner of 
the "suicide squad", the machine gunners, and 
soon won the title of sergeant. Ask any of his 
friends and they ^^ill tell you of Belloni's daring 
in the four great drives. "Yes", they will tell 
you, "Louis mowed down quite a few 'Dutch- 
men'." 

As to the details of Belloni's career as chief, 
the story can be best summed up in fable fashion. 
Once upon a time there was an election and three 
men were put into office by the narrow margin of 
one or two votes. Belloni was promoted to chief 
by these men, but when they failed to agree as 
to the duties and obligations of the Chief of Police, 
Louis was let out. 

Then it was that his friends gathered round 
him, and with much hard work and intelligent or- 
ganizing, recalled the three trustees who had re- 
lieved him of his job. When the new officers of 
the board were installed, Belloni was once again 
made chief. So you see how really important a 
man Chief of Police Louis Belloni is in South 
San Francisco. 

Louis Belloni, January 1, 1922, to April 17, 1924. 
April 17, 1924, to present. 

Following are the police officers who make up 
Chief Belloni's force: 

Vincent Bianchini, Officer No. 1, appointed Apr. 
17, 1924. 

Floyd Menzie, Officer No. 2, appointed Sept. 1, 
1925. 



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Italian and French Dinners at all Hours 
MISSION ROAD COLMA. CALIF. 



Page 22 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 



1 



Henry McGraw, Officer No. 3, appointed Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

Joe Bildhauer, Officer No. 4, appointed Septem- 
ber, 1924. 

Antone Martin, Officer No. 5, appointed Novem- 
ber 23, 1926. 



DAN O'BRIEN, JR., ATTORNEY-INSURANCE 
BROKER 



Deciding that lie could do just as well, if not 
better, for himself in the insurance business, as 
for someone else, Daniel J. O'Brien, Jr., the young- 
est son of the Chief, has opened up an insurance 
service office on the sixth floor of the Adam Grant 
Building, 114 Sansome street. 

Following several years of experience in this 
interesting and, today most important business 
young Dan has gained a knowledge of insurance 
that has gained for him a reputation in that line 
of endeavor that will prove a valuable asset, now 
that he has gone into it on "his own hook." 

He will have a brokerage business in all lines 
of insui'ance, fire, life, theft, automobile, accident 
and so on. He will handle claim adjustments and 
all subrogation matters that the owners of dam- 
aged property may desire to handle through his 
office in the interest of saving time. 

Young Dan goes into the business with a com- 
plete understanding of all the angles of insurance, 
and those who give him their business will know 
that he will give to each account, no matter how 
large or small, his best personal attention. 

Just after he announced his intention of open- 
ing up his office, Daniel, Jr. was notified that he 
had successfully passed the bar examination, ad- 
mitting him to the practice of the law. He says 
he will continue along the line of insurance until 
some future date, being convinced that his license 
to practice law will be of valuable assistance in 
his new venture, particularly to adjustment mat- 
ters. 

Young Dan has made good as an insurance man, 
has devoted his spare time to the study of the 
law, and is now besides being in business for him- 
self, entitled to practice the legal profession. 
All these coming while he is yet a young man, 
barely past his majority. 

We join with his many other friends in wishing 
him success in his new work. 



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JAMES SPURI, Photographer 

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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 




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h4arch. 1927 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 

COLMA'S COMPETENT CONSTABLE 



Page 2i 



That Your Lights May Keen Rnrning 







^ANO^"^ 



Constable S. A. Landini of the First Township 
of San Mateo County is a police officer to the 
"manner born." 

In taking- care of his district for the past 13 
years, he has proven his ability as an officer. The 
solution of many famous cases are placed to his 
credit but "Sil", himself, claims this was due to 
the untiring co-operation of Police Chief D. J. 
O'Brien, Capt. Duncan Matheson and their aids. 
Constable Landini has the confidence of the police 
force of the entire State, the mail each day bring- 
ing' police news of problems from all over the 
country. The constable keeps a record of all cases 
that come under his supervision for future refer- 
ence. His superiors regard him as a valuable 
man of few words and depend on him for quick 
results. He, like many other successful men, was 
born and reared in San Francisco. Landini is al- 
ways on the alert for suspicious characters, but 
never overlooks an opportunity of giving the 
"first-time bad boy a chance." 

The Landini home in Daly City was one of the 
first five homes built in Crocker Tract almost 20 
years ago. His office is in Colma, where the folks 
feel secure in knowing that this district is patroled 
and guarded bv Landini. 



When on the Highway Stop at 

GEORGE'S PLACE in COLMA 

For the Finest Lines of 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Smokers' Supplies 

Sandwiches, Light Lunches and Soft Drinks 



ESTRADA SPANISH KITCHEN 

Spdiusfi Dinners, Banquets and Short Orders 



Telephone Randolph 7686 

FRESNO 
370 Blackstone Ave. 



COLMA, California 

VISA LI A 
414 W. Main Street 




'irouble Shooters Render Real Service 



A part of the unseen service rendered by power company men. is 
the patrolling of lines, flumes and ditches — battling snow, sleet and ice. 

If the water fails to flow, the generators in the power hoases stop 
and electric energy ceases to flow over the lines. 

Tons of snow and sleet often accumulate on the power lines, break- 
ing them down. The Trouble Shooter endeavors to avoid the breaking. 
Should a break occur, it is his job to restore the service. 



DALY CITY POOL HALL 

Cigars ■ Cigarettes ■ 'Xohaccos 
Complete Line o/ Smo\er s Supplies. Candies. Etc. 



POOL 



SMOKES 



Page 24 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 



STREET MEN PRAISED FOR RECOVERIES 
OF STOLEN AUTOMOBILES 



The following- reports, submitted to the com- 
manding officer of the Detective Bureau, Captain 
Duncan Matheson, and approved by him, have 
been received at this office, and I hereby com- 
mend the officers mentioned in the said reports: 

Respecting the attached report of Officer David 
R. Dobleman of the Bush Street Station, forwarded 
to this office by Captain J. J. Casey. I have 
checked the records of the Automobile Detail for 
the month of January and believe that the record 
made by Corporal A. C. Williams and Officer David 
R. Dobleman, in recovering automobiles during 
the month of January, deserves commendation by 
the Chief of Police. 

LIEUT. BERNARD J. McDONALD, 
Star No. 62. 

During the month of January, Coi^poral A. C. 
Williams and I have recovered fifteen stolen auto- 
mobiles while touring the district in the Buick 
automobile attached to this station, also five aban- 
doned automobiles taken to the Columbia Garage. 
DAVID R. DOBLEMAN, 
Police Officer, Star 978. 

Report on recovered automobiles as per your 
request of this date. 




SPRING 
1927 

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JOHN M. FRIEDLE 

President and General Manacer 



i 



I 



March. 1927 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 2? 



OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE 

BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



Wanted 

For Safe Blowing 




MAX GOLDMAN 

Alias Sam Kaufman, alias Rosen. Los Angeles Police No. 17,187. 

Age, 47 years; height, 5 ft. 5 in.; weight, 140 lbs.; dark brown eyes, 
black hair, dark complexion; Jewish. 

This man has operated in Los Angeles and Portland, Oregon. He is 
a very thorough worker. He usually rents a room over the place he de- 
cides to burglarize and then proceeds at proper time to gain entrance to 
store. He also opens account in nearest bank to pay expenses for his 
room. 

The above man is wanted by the Department for blowing safes of two 
local jewelry stores, in April and June, 1926, taking jewelry amounting 
approximately to $30,000. Insurance carriers offer reward of 10% of 
value of property recovered. 



Dated — San Francisco, 
March 15, 1927 



D. J. O'BRIEN, 
Chief of Police. 



Page 26 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL March. 1927 

giiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




DlllllllllllllillilllllflllllllllllinillllllllllOllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllilllllllllllH 



After a re-check of the sergeants who took the recent 
civil service examination for lieutenant, Sergeant George 
Richards of the Detective Bureau was found to have 
passed and is on the eligible list for promotion. 

« * * 

Augustus and Sil Oliva of Oliva Brothers are reported 
to have sold over 1,500 tickets to the policemen's con- 
cert and ball last month. This is a record that many 
members of the department could shoot at, and the 
activities of this pair of brothers to hold the widows' 
and orphans' fund is a worthy demonstration of cooper- 
ation and appreciation. 

Among the men booked at the city prison by Detective 
Sergeant John J. Manion, in charge of the Chinatown 
Squad, were Quong Fong for murder, Vincent Oiara, 
grand larceny. 

Officer James Coleman and posse working out of the 
Chief's oflice. brought in Charles Robinson and Edward 
Adams for larceny. 

Among Detective Sergeant William Bennett's con- 
tribution to the city prison population were three drug 
act violators, a half dozen vags. and several street beg- 
gars. 

Corporal Al Christ and Officer Patrick WaLsh rounded 
up nearly a dozen drug addicts whom they booked at 
the city prison. 

Detective Edward Mills, who did his bit in settling the 
recent building trades strike is back on the job helping 
Mrs. Martha Evans of the Domestic Relations Bureau 
of District Attorney Brady's office, round up neglectful 
husbands and fathers. 

:i: * * 

Joe Spohn, who sees that most of the first floor is 
kept -tidy, suggests that if they had made a swimming 
tank oft the light well space instead of putting in more 
offices, there would have been more joy among the hired 
help of the Hall of Justice. 

!): ^- ;;; 

Officer Tim Connell of Tax Collector Edward Bryant's 
police guard, is recognized as one of the best tax experts 
in the city. Tim never comes down to the hall but what 
some policeman asks him what the assessment will be 
on their 1921 Ford, 1922 Chevrolet or on their 1925 
Buick. Tim's got it all down in his head and he can 
give the boys the lowdown right off the reel. 

Sergeant Frank Latulipe, assisted by Officers Hugo 
Dietel, George Blum, Peter Fanning, Louis Meyer and 
Janitor William Foley, have been busily engaged of 
recent days moving the photograph gallery from the 
fourth floor where it has been since the fire of over a 
year ago, to the new quarters atop of the Hall of 
Justice. A "horseless, self-commencing" elevator has 
been established which will convey the attaches having 
business in the gallery from the fourth floor and the 
city prison, to and fro. 



Officer Henry Pyle, who has turned the keys on the 
elevator doors in the city prison on more men and women 
arrested for every crime on the books, and who for 
nearly a year has been off duty is back on the job again. 
Though still not fully recovered, Henry has his same 
glad greetings to all comers, prisoners, visitors and 
officers alike. Henry Pyle has been on the job for over a 
quarter of a century and he has seen hundreds of thou- 
sands of men locked in the jails of this city. But 
through it all he has maintained a kindly and sympa- 
thetic feeling' for the unfortunates whom he lets in and 
out. The writer, who has watched him for some fifteen 
years, has never heard him utter an unkind word to any 
unfortunate who came in, and has heard him give a 
cheery speeding, and a few words of advice to many who 
were being turned out. All around the Hall are sure 
glad Harry is back, and trust he will he hitting on all 
six before long. 

;!c * :!t 

Inspector Edward Lynch and his trusty assistants, I. 
Samuels and Kenney, have been given a lot of additional 
space in the basement for parking police cars. The 
increased area was made possible by the additions being 
completed on the Hall of Justice whereby Captain Bern- 
ard Judge of the Property office is given a lot of addi- 
tional space for his department. 

Officer Harry Higgins got his picture in the paper as 
a baby expert recently and all the boys in the Property 
Clerk's office were somewhat envious. Harry looked 
very paternal in his poses with the infant. 

:!t * * 

Detective Sergeant Pat O'Connell was telling Detec- 
tive George Collins the other day that strong drink as 
made by the modern moonshiners was one of the con- 
tributing factors to the appalling increase of juvenile 
crime. 



ECONOMY 

does not mean a miserly 
denial of life's pleasures 
and comforts. Economy 
means saving where ever 
possible. This market 
affords the best at the 
lowest prices. 



CrnstalAPala<De 



San fran^scGsIhodBmttQt 



\far^L.AttssioH^EigMi Sis. 



March. J 927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 




CENTRAL 

STATION 



Capt. Arthur D. Layne 
Lieutenants: Harry P. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 

Corp. F. Hoeckle and George Burkhardt, landed the 
following at the city prison: John Rohinson, assault with 
a deadly weapon; Paul Romero, en route to Oakland; 
and Edward Seymour, assault. 

* * * 

Joseph O'Donnell, charged with burglary, was arrested 
by Officer Charles LaDue. 

* * * 

Officer Vincent Lewis did the same to George Wong. 

Carrying a gun is a serious offense these days, but 
there were a number of folks in the district who seemed 
to think the "totin' of pops" was okeh. The following 
were shown the error of such thoughts: Pete Cresci, 
arrested by Othcers Martin Foley and James Twomey; 
John Orlando, arrested by Jerry Fitzgerald; Jesus Perez, 
arrested by Officers Edward Meredith; and Bert Davis, 
arrested by Officers A. Ballhaus and J. Gallagher. Davis 
was also booked for passing worthless checks. 

Grand larceny was another favorite pastime in the 
Central confines the past month. The following were 
booked on such charges: Ray Williams, by Officer Ed- 
ward Fewer; John Rogers, by Officers John Dyer, F. 
Hoepner and E. Argenti; Harry Van Horn, by Officer J. 
Schinkwind; and George Alexakis by Sergt. Rooney and 
Officer Ray Harris. 

* * * 

Louis Romino was not steering a straight course along 
the street when Officer Joseph Murray spotted him. 
After due questioning, Louis was locked up for driving 
an automobile while under the influence of "licker". 

Joaquin Rivera was locked up by Officers Edward 
Christal and George Ohnimus for petty larceny. 



THANKS FOR QUICK WORK 

To Captain Duncan Matheson: Permit me to 
thank you, and through you, the officers of your 
department, for the prompt service rendered in 
finding the lost automobile of Mrs. B. Gothie, 
1359 Union street. This matter was reported to 
you through me on January 15th, and by tele- 
phone this morning Mrs. Gothie advised me that 
the machine has been returned to her safely. 

R. B. HALE, 
Hale Bros., Inc. 



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Page 28 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 




SOUTHERN 

STATION 



Capt. Charles GofF 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Arno Dietel 

Corporal Emmett Flynn and his husky sidekick, Of- 
ficer William Desmond, brought in three bad young men 
when they unloaded William Beck, charged with bur- 
glary. Edward Day, charged with robbery, and James 
Brown, charged the same. The trio were not unacquaint- 
ed with the operation of the law as applying to the acts 
of the enforcement department for they had all been 
"in'' before. 

* * :^. 

Officers Al Wenzler and Richard Curtin grabbed off 
three burglars when they locked up Domingo Cancel. 
Paul Pigueroa and Leo Sanchez. 

Another prisoner charged with burglary was Stanley 
Morris, tagged by Corp. Dennis Dineen. 

Carl Overman will tell you that if there is any doubt 
about your being under the influence of liquor, don't 
try and drive an automobile in this dsitrict. He couldn't 
pass the sobriety tests as propounded by Officers J. Dris- 
coll and J. Donovan, so the officers locked him up for 
violating Sec. 112. 

* * * 

Jack Snyder found a gent down this way who trusted 
him enough to cash a check. Try this some time and 
find out how tough it is to get some rash on a check in 
this district. Officer P. Zgraggen was told the check was 
no good and he went forth and arrested Snyder for vio- 
lating Section 476a of the Penal Code. 



POLICE DAY 

(Continued from Pape 11) 
Many thanks and congratulations in recognition of your 
efforts towards creating a national Police Day period. 
May every success crown your efforts. (A. E. Bargren, 
Chief of Police). 

* * * 

May I extend my hearty congratulations to you for 
designating today as Police Day in San Francisco. The 
fact that in conjunction with this day you are holding the 
annual ball for the benefit of the Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association of your police department is a further 
evidence of your well kno^^^l interest in providing for 
dependents of police officers who have answered the last 
call. San Francisco is to be congratulated for having 
as its chief executive a man who is so sincerely intere.sted 
in the activities of the police department. (William P. 
Rutledge, Commissioner, Detroit Police Department). 

Jjf * :'fi 

Hearty congratulations and well wishes for your interest 
in designating a day to be known as Police Day. My 
wife, Grace G. Bliss, when a child, was a pupil of your 
grandmother, Mrs. Henry C. Rolph, in Sunday School at 
Congregational Church in Ayer, Mass. (Charles A. Ken- 
dall, Chief of Police, Somerville, Mass.) 
* * * 

Congratulations for instituting a Police Day. You have 
thus blazed the trail for a bigger and better appreciation 
of police officers throughout the country. (H. E. French, 
Police Chief, Columbus, Ohio). 

(Continued on Page 29) 



Clever Up Your 
Appearance 

— with a smart new Lundstrom or 
Stetson hat. Be as well dressed 
off duty as on! The new fall felts 
are here in greys and browns — 
jaunty styles that can be worn with 
brim turned up or down. 

If you want a hecoming 
hat, he coming to 




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March, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




HARBOR 

STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

OfBcers E. L. McLaughlin and Clift' Dunleavy nabbed a 
couple of "birds" wanted in New York. Thomas Bruno 
was one, and Frank Paulus was the other. The latter 
has a record that didn't help him any. Lieut. Charles 
Dullea of the Homicide Squad assisted in the knockover. 

William Colwell, who has an intimate acquaintance 
with the police along the way from Oregon to San Jose, 
was meandering around the waterfront when he was 
observed by OfBcers G. Ball and A. Walsh. He was 
shown the inside of our well known city prison. 

* :?- * 

Corps. Emile Hearne and Byrne, special duty men, 
have no use for a work dodger, so they vagged Thomas 
Gilgan, engaged in doing nothing in particular. 

* -]■■ * 

Austin C. Hussey picked a nice district to try a little 
plain burglary. He didn't get far with his ideas when 
he was lamped by OfBcers James Mahoney and C. Ave- 
dano. He was duly charged. 



^' POLICE DAY 

(Continued from Page 28) 
Congratulations on the initiative taken by you in offi- 
cially proclaiming that one day be observed as Police Day. 
It is a splendid tribute to the profession and I want you 
to be assured of my co-operation in effort to have it 
nationally observed. (John A. Curry, Superintendent of 

Police, Niagara Falls, N. Y.) 

* * * 

Best w'ishes for great success of this most praiseworthy 
venture. (Guy C. Payne, Chief of Police, Huntington, 
Ind.) 

* * :!: ; 

Congratulations, thanks, and best wishes for this and 
future Police Days. (Henry Rex, Chief of Police, Stna- 
thers, Ohio). 

* * * 

Best wishes for successful ball for Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association. (Alfred Seymour, Chief of Police, Lan- 
sing, Mich.) 

■): -f --f 

Heartiest congratulations and sympathy in your move- 
ment for the benefit of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association in declaring Saturday, February 19th, Police 
Day and with the hope that your example will be followed 
by all the cities throughout the United States, very truly 
yours. (E. F. Reilly, Chief of Police, Montclair, N. J.) 

* :'f ''!^ 

Congratulations on your proclamation on Police Day, 
February 19th, 1927. (Martin Feeney, Chief of Police, 
Fall River, Mass.) 

Syi'acuse, New York, Police Department wishes to ex- 
tend thanks and congratulations to the father of Police 
Day. (M. L. Cadin, Chief of Police, Syracuse, N. Y.) 
* * * 

Thanks for invitation ball Widows' and Orphans' Aid 

Association. Congratulations on adoption of Police Day. 

(W. H. Hackett, Chief of Detectives, Chattanooga, Tenn.) 

(To Be Continued) 



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Page 30 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. Frederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

Seems like the boys who get full of gin like to drive 
out this way, and Capt. Fred Lemon's men proceed to 
give them an object lesson on the evils of so doing. 
Here are three gents who were snatched off the streets 
while in a condition, according to the officers, that ren- 
dered them unfit to drive an automobile as demanded 
in Section 112 of the motor vehicle act: Sloan Barbee, 
arrested by Officers C. McDaniell and Earth O'Shea; 
Alvie Bicker, arrested by Officer Thomas Cole; Oroville 
Cline, arrested by Officer Charles Thompson. 

Emile Bouille was the only burglar who tried his hand 
in the Mission. He was arrested by Officers C. Foster 
and F. Nuttman. 

* :!t i: 

Frank Gallagher tried a little burglaring, but before 
he could get so tar as to have his efforts dignified by a 
burglary charge, he was apprehended on an attempted 
burglary charge by Officers C. McDonald and Thomas 
Feeney. 

Ridney Lynn has a pretty name and that is probably 
why he was able to get a merchant to cash a check that 
proved to be worthless. Officer G. Laine arrested him 
for violating Section 476a of the code. 

Raymond Krau.se had an automobile that he surrep- 
titiously took while the owner wasn't looking. He got 
a 146 Motor Act booking when arrested by Officers M. 
O'Malley and Barth O'Shea. 

='- * :5r 

Officer R. Smith brought in John Fennuchi and Dom- 
inic Frugeli, whom he charged with violating Section 148 
of the Motor Act. 

Officer P. Conroy and E. Keck locked up Alex Chris- 
tiansen on a petty larceny kick. 



STREET MEN PRAISED 

(Continued from Page 24) 

During the month of January, 1927, the Buick 
automobile attached to this station on the late 
watch has found five stolen automobiles. During 
the month of January the Buick has not been on 
patrol during the late afternoon watch. This 
does not include automobiles placed in the garage 
at the owner's request after accidents. 

JOHN S. ROSS, Police Officer, 
Star No. 407. 

Recovered automobiles for the month of Decem- 
ber, 1926. 

During the month of December, 1926, while 
detailed to the Buick automobile on the 6 to 2 
watch, Officer H. Kiernan and myself recovered 14 
automobiles. 

JOHN S. ROSS, Police Officer, 
Star No. 407. 



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Small Payments Weekly or Monthly 

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Mission at 22nd 




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March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 




BUSH ST. 

STATION 



Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mig^iola 
Capt, John J. Casey 

Frank Burroughs, loaded for action, was apprehended 
by Corp. T. M. MoCarty and posse attempting to bur- 
glarize a store. He was accordingly led to a prison cell 
and properly charged. 

Robbery is a serious offense as Frank M. Hertzler can 
attest. He is booked in the city prison on such a charge 
having been arrested by Officers Frank Jeschki and Edward 
Talbot. 

* * * 

Driving a stolen automobile through the Bush District 
is a hazardous undertaking, as will be vouched for by 
Edgar Martin, who was caught doing just that thing by 
Officer J. Roger, who gave him a booking under Section 
146 of the Motor Act. 

Leslie Downing, 23, dapper, and looking like ready 
money, "laid down a coppla bum checks" in this district. 
Corp. Drury laid a "coppla" husky hands on Mr. Down- 
ing's shoulders and he faces two charges of violating 
Sec. 476a of the Penal Code. 

John Ramsey picked this district to try and prove to 
the world that he was able to drive an automobile though 
he was accused of being intoxicated. Officer G. Engler 
stopped, arrested and locked him up for breaking the 
proviso of Sec. 112 of the Motor Act. 

* :;: * 

Another gent who did this same thing was Albert 
Thornton. He was arrested by Sergt. Christensen and 
Officer John Dolan, Jr. 

^ 'r ^ 

Officers Dolan and Fred Bauman brought Clarence 
Miller to the station, where they charged him with petty 
larceny. On searching him they found a nice loaded 
black jack. Two "raps" were put against Clarence. 



J,f^. 



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LELAND 

(Continued from Page 17) 
it the most up-to-date visited and with the most 
refined surroundings. Noted newspaper men who 
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most important cases. — Adv. 




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Page n 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 



TRAFFIC BUREAU 

Captain Henry Gleeson 
Lieutenants J. J. Casey, J. (Cliff) Fields and Grover Coats 

Captain Henry Gleeson, who for many weeks 
has been seriously ill and who submitted to a 
dangerous operation, has recovered to the extent 
that he can come down to his office in the Traffic 
Bureau. 

Though a little shaky yet Captain Gleeson says 
he will be as fit as ever just as soon as he gets 
used to ambling out in the sunshine. 

He has already taken over much of the business 
in the Traffic Bureau and announces that he will 
be able to do his share in putting a stop to reck- 
less and careless automobile drivers. 

During the Captain's illness Lieutenant John 
J. Casey has acted as captain of the bureau and 
he has conducted affairs in such a manner that 
he has won much favorable commendation for 
himself, not only from his superior officers, but 
from organizations which have taken an active 
interest in seeing that the traffic laws are prop- 
erly enforced. This is but natural for Lieutenant 
Casey has had long and active service in the bu- 
reau, having been connected with it since it was 
practically formed, working up from the lowest 
rank to that of lieutenant. There are but few 
people in this city who have a better knowledge 
of traffic conditions in San Francisco than Jack 
Casey No. 2, as he used to be known. 

* * * 

Corporal John McCausland has been assigned 
to the job held for years by Sergeant Harry Walsh 
as head of the detail handling vehicular traffic 
around the theatres during the night hours, and 
as a sort of supervisor of taxicabs and rent cars. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer Andy Miller, on office duty at the 
traffic bureau, says on these rainy days the inside 
job has the crossing job skinned to death. 

* * * 

Motorcycle Officer Edward O'Day, acting as a 
committee of one on welcoming and bidding de- 
parting motorists to slow down along Mission 
street, notices that the average driver thinks 
more of his own progress than of the other fellow. 
He gets a great kick out of calling down the gent 
who crowds in ahead of a law abiding di'iver. 

* * * 

Motorcycle Officer Joe Perry figures that the 
recent crusade has discouraged the hasty driver 
in going on the wrong side of a street car. 

* * * 

Corporal Luther Arentz opines that a few more 
weeks of the present method of education of mo- 
torists will learn a lot of careless drivers to stop 
and read the boulevard stop signs. 



DIVIDENDS vs. INTEREST 

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money to the issuing corporation, and your income is usually 
received through coupons attached to the bonds which can be 
cashed at the Company's office or. ordinarib'. at your bank. 

For facts about investment consult 



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Radio Sets 



Repairs and Parts 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 33 




PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'Meara 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

Capt. John J. O'Meara points out that during the year 
every outdoor sport can be seen in Golden Gate Park, 
as well as most indoor sports. Football of the best is 
played at Kezar stadium, soccer as well; there ai-e no 
better tennis courts anywhere than those in the park, 
baseball, professional as well as amateur, is played in 
the stadium as well as a half dozen games at a time on 
the park grounds, along the south drive, bowling on the 
green is a well patronized sport near the Childrens' 
playground, croquet, as well, fly casting on Stow Lake 
draws many a follower of Ike Walton, who keep in 
training for the open season in the mountain streams. 
Now, with the opening of the new Kezar gym on Stan- 
yan street side of the park, every indoor game imaginable 
is played. Basketball, handball and such, di'aw crowds 

out every day and many evenings. 

# * * 

Seems like people come out here and become so fas- 
cinated by the beauties of the park and the opportuni- 
ties offered to enjoy themselves, that no one wants to 
commit crime. The Park District is another large sec- 
tion that has comparatively little crime, and that little 

is ably and promptly handled by the boys of the station. 

* * * 

Now and then some wanderer without any visible 
means of support will amble out this way and try and 
hang around and do nothing. It's an odds on bet that 
he will get a ride in the wagon when he does. Frank 
Retzloff and James Forrester tried it and they were shot 
to the station pronto by Officer Tom Lavell. 



A BRAVE ACT RECOGNIZED 



At the intersection of Grant avenue and Sutter 
street at about 12:15 p. m. recently, I chanced 
to witness one of those Uttle everyday acts of 
courageous pohcemanship which makes San Fran- 
cisco justly proud of its police personnel. A team 
of excited gray horses drawing an American Ex- 
press Company's wagon No. K-347, driverless, 
were hitting a runaway gait up Grant avenue 
near Sutter street. The intersection was jammed 
with noon crowds igiiorant of the danger. Officer 
Nels Mathewson, S. F. P. 820, directing traffic, 
quickly saw the possibilities of a tragedy, mo- 
tioned a street car across the intersection to turn 
the excited team, rushed out and regardless of 
danger to himself, grasped the bridles and hung 
on, tliough off his feet, for nearly half a block 
down Sutter street. When one reahzes what 
would likely have occurred in property damage 
and possible injury to, or loss of life, had this 
officer not acted as keenly and quickly as he did, 
the performance takes on the characteristics of 
real heroism. 

J. BLAINE SELLECK, 
2030 Lincoln, Berkeley, Calif. 





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Page 34 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

Captain William Healy has a young police officer at his 
station that certainly made good with a bang the other 
morning, and an account of whom will be given more 
elaborately in the next issue of the Police Journal. His 
name is Robert Caldwell, and he saw some gents working 
suspiciously going in and out of a garage. Without sum- 
moning assistance he tackled five hijackers and after 
engaging in some gun work, got all of them to the station. 



PRAISE IN SONG 

Parody on "Remembering", written and sung at Police 
Concert by Hugh B. Dobbs. 



I. 
Once friends, a brave young soldier, 
Came back home from overseas, 
He did his part for home and country, 
And fought bravely for you and me. 

But coming home — his old job taken. 
Had a hard time to get along, 
Then took the examination, and became 
A Police Officer — both brave and strong. 

H. 
His Sweetheart and he were married. 
Then came the kiddies — a girl and boy. 
They were oh, so very happy, 
Their hearts thrilled with pride and joy. 

But one night a bandit's gun barked, 
Our Laddy fought bravely, I'll say — 
He got his man and brought him in, friends, 
But in the dawning our lad passed away. 

HI. 
Remembering at that dear fireside, 
Sits a widow alone and blue. 
Remembering are two little kiddies, 
Their little hearts are broken, too. 

Oh, remember, kind friends, remember! 
For it's our duty for me and you, 
To show by our contributions, 
We surely remember, too! 

IV. 
And tonight, friends, four brave officers 
Mayor James Rolph Jr. will pi-esent to you : 
Vernon Van Matre and Earl T. Roney, 
Walter T. IMathcs and Everett Hanson, too. 

On each breast he'll pin a hero medal, 
They each got their man, though wounded, too. 
And these medals will tell the world, friends. 
That their comrades — Remember, too! 

February 18, 1927— Hugh Barrett Dobbs. 



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I 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 35 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. EuRene Wall 
Lieutenants Charles A. I'feiffer and Fred W. Norman 

For a district that embraces the largest area in the 
city, and which as well includes probably the fastest 
srowing residential district in San Francisco, the Ingle- 
side has less crime, population considered, as will be 
found'in any section of this state. Capt. Wall's problems 
are varied, and the tenants of his district as various as 
will he found in any portion of this city, yet with the 
men at his disposal he has maintained such order that he 
has received much praise from men high in the affairs of 
public life. Major crimes are few and such are quickly 
cleared up and closed by arresting and prosecuting such 
offenders responsible for the acts. The past month is a 
splendid example of the wonderful work done in the 
Ingleside. No robberies or burglaries, murders or as- 
saults, and the arrests for the month run for lesser of- 
fenses as will be noted below. 

Hugo Falk was arrested for driving an automobile 
while intoxicated. He was stopped and queried by Offi- 
cers Harry Honnef and E. Hippely, who locked him up. 

Minnie Kaiser was going around the neighborhood 
loaded with a gun. She was arrested by Officers T. 
Price and J. Kennedy for violating the State Revolver 
Law. 

.lohn Senimellasck, fooling with little children, was 
apprehended and booked on a Section 288 charge by 
Officers Dominic Hogan and E. Mahoney. 

Esteven Cisoci got a reckless driving charge and a hit 
and run charge put opposite his name when he was 
brought into the station by Officer A. Smith. 

Officer Jerry Kelleher says he has to get a new road 
map every week now as they are putting so many new- 
streets in his district. 



FISHER 

(Continued from Page 15) 
said that Sing- Sing convicts knew about Fisher 
and called him "the man who doesn't forget." 
He also said emphatically: "New York City, with 
all its millions of people and its marvelous police 
system, cannot boast such a bureau as I have 
seen today." 

When we walked thoughfully out of the Hall of 
Justice where Fisher works his wonders, we 
understood why the Legislature passed a bill at 
his instigation in 1917 for the establishment of a 
State Bureau of Criminal Identification. Califor- 
nia, and Sacramento particularly, should be very 
proud of this wizard who has taught the entire 
underworld to fear and respect him. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



OfTicer Martin Brennan got enough on Charles Lenand 
togh'ehim a booking on_a^ robbery charge. 



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San Francisco, Cal. 



DOUGLAS 6346 

EASTMAN KODAK STORES, Inc. 

Formerly Holland & Dewey Co. 

EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 

545 MARKET ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Page 36 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

Everyone about the station is happy these days. 
"Whiskers" the North End District mascot attached to 
this command was sick. He is now well and again on 
duty. So pleased with Whiskers' recovery which was 
brought about through the efforts and attention and 
treatment of Dr. T. R. Creely, well known doctor of 
dogs, that Captain Herbert J. Wright sent the following 
letter to the eminent doctor: 
Dr. T. R. Creely, 

3170 Sacramento St., City. 
Dear Sir: 

Please accept my thanks and that of the members of 
this Company in the rejuvenation of our mascot, "Whis- 
kers." When he arrived here he looked like the Valen- 
tino of the dog world, and when he made his appear- 
ance on the street on patrol, he was the envy of all the 
dog fanciers in this vicinity. 

Again thanking you, I remain. 
Yours truly, 
H. J. WRIGHT, 

Captain of Police. 
» * * 

George Shoemaker was fulla gin, according to Ser- 
geant James Wade and Officer Walter Pullen, when he 
hit another machine and drove on. The two police 
officers rounded up Mr. Shoemaker and when they got 
through with their end of the investigation the prisoner 
was charged with being a hit and runner and driving 
while intoxicated. 

* * * 

Pullen with Officer T. Brady arrested and booked Ray 
Williams as a $1,000 vag. 



ED HEALY WITH DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
AGAIN 



Edward Healy, brother of Captain William 
Heal.v of the Richmond district, and Sergeant 
George Healy of the Detective Bureau, and who 
for years was a valued member of the Warrant 
and Bond Office under District Attorney C. M. 
Fickert, has been appointed as a member of Dis- 
trict Attorney Matthew Brady's staff. 

Ed Healy, one of the best known entertainers 
in this city, has a following in all parts of San 
Francisco. He is active in South of Market Boys' 
affairs, has given of his ability as a singer and 
story teller to every worthy cause during the past 
dozen years, and is popular with organizations of 
all kinds for his services. 

His appointment is particularly good for the 
district attorney's office for he brings to it an 
understanding of the business and a personality 
that will surely make many friends for the office. 



DodbeBrothers 

MOTOR CARS 



J. E. FRENCH CO. 

O'Farrell at Polk 
2366 Mission St. 

Prospect 9000 



FIREMAN'S 
FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

401 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Fire ' Automobile • Marine 



"cA Taste of Its Own" 

VAN CAMP 

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SELECTION 



Phone Kearny 1701 



P. O. Box 2143 



San Francisco International Fish Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Fish Dealers 
535-539 WASHINGTON ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



Corporal Mullin and Officer Arthur Lahey got a won't- 
worker when they anested John W. Allen on a vag charge. 



LA CAMPANA CAFE 

Italian Restaurant and Hotel 

Dancing 440 BROADWAY 

Every Evening SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Sutter 8805 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 




W/E STERN 
iWrADDITION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Leo Tackney and John M. Sullivan 

Robert Durand, William Gonzales, and Louis Richards 
were starting something that they thought was all right 
but before they got through with the minions of the law 
they had a pretty good idea that what they were doing 
was not alright. The first two were arrested and charged 
with assault with a deadly weapon and the other, in addi- 
tion to the same charge, was booked for assault to murder, 
and assault by means and force likely to produce great 
bodily injury. Officers J. Casey and W. Salisbury attend- 
ed to all the details. 

» * » 

Lester Hancock was arrested by Corporal J. O'Leary 
and Officer Salisbury and charged with driving an auto- 
mobile while intoxicated. 

* * * 

George Meyers forgot to pause when he hit another 
machine with a driver, and this neglect got him into 
considerable trouble. Officer J. Flemming apprehended 
him and booked him for reckless driving and as a hit- 
runner. 

* * :? 

Thomas Matthews will learn that when he comes out 
this way, he had better have some lawful means of mak- 
ing a living. He did this the other day and got locked 
up as a $1000 vagrant. Officers L. Lunnes and Lester 
Brooks arrested him. 



POLICE DRILLS 

(Continued from Page 9) 

department on the midnight watch shall not be 
required to drill until further orders. Patrolmen 
of the Department who have had twenty years' 
service will be excluded from the said drills. All 
commissioned and non-commissioned officers of 
the Department will drill excepting those excused 
by company commanders on account of sickness or 
other physical disability. 

The Detective Bureau and Headquarters Com- 
pany shall be combined as a single unit in the 
preparatory drills mentioned. 

Each company commander shall designate one 
member of his command who will supervise and 
instruct in the preparatory drills. The name of 
the said officer shall be submitted to this office 
not later than Thursday, Mai-ch 3, 1927, and at 
the same time and date company commanders 
shall submit a list of the names of men of their 
respective companies who are excused from par- 
ticipating in this drill. 

Captain Duncan Matheson shall designate the 
officer in charge of drill for members of the detec- 
tive bureau and the headquarters company who 
will be available. 



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Page 38 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 




POTRERO 

STATION 



Capt. Harry J. O'Day 
Lieutenants Albert S. Munn, J. C. Malloy 

This district has a couple of mighty active special 
duty men in Officers Tom O'Connor and J. Coughlan. 
This pair of lads can cover more territory and clean 
up a kick quicker than a lot of folks can think about 
them. They have the district pretty well under their 
ideas of lawfulness and they keep the evil doers on the 
move. If they don't move out of the district the offi- 
cers move them to the city prison. Most of the people 
who live in the Potrero are woi-king people who have a 
general plan of attending to their own business and the 
lawbreakers are for the most part those who come from 
without. 

* * * 

O'Connor and Coughlan. assisted by Detectives John 
Sturm and Daniel Fogarty, arrested Peter Dariotis 
wanted on a charge of assault to commit murder. 

John Carpoff and John Shubin got themselves locked 
up for disturbing the peace when the neighbors com- 
plained that they were pulling a lot of rough stuff. 




BAY VIEW 

STATION 



Capt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowie 

Corporal William Harrington wa.>; telling Corporal Rudy 
Maier the other day that it look.<; as if the gents who mix 
gin with gas were convinced that thi.^: district was a bad 
place to operate under such circumstances, for they 
haven't had a 112 case in the Bay view thi.s year. Rob- 
beries and burglaries are al.«o a .'scarce charge found in 
the daily reports to Captain Stephen Bunner. 

When they need a good, active and capable as well as 
fearless police officer to carry out some especial work 
this station can furnish the men. Jim' Sunsari sure proved 
that he knew his onions when he helped put the church 
bombei' out of commission. 



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Phone Valencia 1036 



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TELEPHONE WEST 146 




March, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 39 



BOMBER KILLED 

(Continued from Page 10) 
to run and DeMatei fired, hitting- him in the leg. 

The injured man's name is C. S. Eklund, though 
at first he gave the name of Moss. He will re- 
cover. 

The name of the dead dynamiter is yet un- 
determined. 

As the firing began there was enacted as great 
a piece of bravery as was ever enacted any place. 
Joe Gremmenger, terror to the lioodlum, feai'less 
in his everyday duty, rushed out through the 
front door, quickly stooped over and with a knife 
he had prepared for such an emergency cut the 
burning fuse. 

Joe Gremmenger did not know whether there 
was one foot or fifty feet of fuse. He did not 
know whether it was instantaneous, slow or fast 
burning fuse, he just knew he had to go out there 
and stop it from exploding the 25 sticks of dyna- 
mite, covered with clay, that had been set there 
by a villanous murderer. And he did just that 
very thing. 

One should stop and think and then realize just 
what it meant to these 11 policemen in that 
church, if a TNT bomb had been hurled into the 
building. It would have killed every one of them. 
These men knew that, yet they kept unflinchingly 
to their duty and they brought honor and glory 
to themselves and to the department of wiiich 
tliey are members. 

The whole thing was a magnificently staged 
piece of police work arranged in detail, and which 
went ofl: without a hitch. 

It reflects great credit to Chief O'Brien and 
Captain Layne particularly, and these two officials 
iiave come in for their share of the congratula- 
tions. 

The day following the killing of the bomber 
Father Oreste Trinchieri, in charge of the church 
came down to the Chief's office to thank him and 
his men, and to present them with the $1,000 re- 
ward offered for the apprehension of the bomber. 
Be it said to the credit of each of the men en- 
titled to the reward they refused the same and 
asked the Reverend Father to put it so some good 
use. 

Cliief O'Brien called the men before him and 
personally commended each, pointing out the 
wonderful way they had executed the task given 
them, of their courage and bravery, of their splen- 
did judgment and of the way they guarded their 
secret work. He gave each man five days off'. 

When the Police Commission met. President 
Theodore Roche elaborated in his able manner 
upon the splendid work of the officers and said the 
police commission was giving two weeks more 
•off in addition to the Chief's order. 
(Continued on Page 42 i 





HOTEL 

MARK 

HOPKINS 



San Francisco's 

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Hotel 



Atop Nob Hill 

California at Mason 

D.WENPORT 6300 



Geo. D. Smith, Pres. and Managing Director 
Will P. Taylor. Jr.. Resident Manager 



M J B 

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lat spell 

Confentment 




Page 40 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



March. 1927 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 
over with several official looking stamps, and the 
document read as follows: 

The High Court of Chancery in its probate jur- 
isdiction: The estate of the late Eliza Adelaide 
Chadwick, widow, deceased — All to whom these 
presents shall come, greeting: Whereas, on the 
24th day of November, in the year 1900 at Stock- 
well Park Road, London, E. C, Eliza Adelaide 
Chadwick died, and .by virtue of an instrument in 
writing executed by her, the said Eliza Adelaide 
Chadwick, opened and read by Edward Patrick 
Hayden, a barrister of Grays Building, Strand, 
London, and Mrs. Edith Adelaide Oliver, now of 
Stockwell Road, London, E. C, executors of the 
aforementioned instrument; Ernest Moore Chad- 
wick, a physician and surgeon of San Francisco, 
CaUf., was named as heir at law in the said in- 
strument, it being the last will and testament. 
The aforesaid Ernest Moore Chadwick was be- 
queathed the sum of thirty-one thousand pounds 
sterling in good and lawful coin of Great Britain. 
And it has been decreed that the petition of the 
executors be granted and final distribution of said 
estate be made. These are therefore to command 
you, the said Ernest Moore Chadwick, to appear in 
person or by your attorney or counsel to receive 
the sum of thirty-one thousand pounds sterling, 
the sum being your share of the estate, by virtue 
of the afoi'esaid will. 

Given under my hand and seal at Somerset 
House, London, E. C. 

JAMES BOW]MAN, Probate Judge. 

Shortly after, Nora's mother asked Chadwick 
why was he so hasty to marry her girl, because 
he had known her only a few weeks. He replied 
with a flood of the most ardent declarations. Then 
Nora's parents became suspicious that all might 
not be right after all. They immediately came 
to this city and sought the services of an attor- 
ney, who advised that cablegrams of inquiry he 
sent to London and the result did not disprove 
his judgment. The first answer received was: 

London, Feb. 22, 1901— Eliza Adelaide Chad- 
wick. No such case in the Registry. (Signed) 
Probate Registry, London. 

Another cablegram was received stating: No 
St. James Road, Blackfriars. No name Patrick 
Hayden, either barrister or solicitor, in Directory. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schneider, sorry to dash the hopes 
of their daughter, but unwilling to have an en- 
gagement continue under these circumstances, 
gave Nora to understand that her dream was over. 
The same night she returned her diamond ring 
and other gifts. Nevertheless, she was mamed 
to Chadwick the succeeding night. Concerning 
the event and immediately preceding it, Mrs. 
Schneider told the following story: "My husband 



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Alex. Dolf er Prietiog Co. 

[EstahUihcd 1896] 

8 53 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Douglas 2377 



Chas. W. Brown Wm. E. Kennedy 

(Member! of Florists TeUgrsph Delirery) 

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None Too Small for ConsideratioD 

BROWN & KENNEDY 

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SAN FRANCISCO 

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Reasonable Prices 

3089 SIXTEENTH STREET 

MARKET 170 



March. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 41 



and I came down to the city and went to see our 
attorney. Chadwick had come in the same train 
and entered the building before we did. He met 
us and told us there was a mistake, that the at- 
torney had telegraphed to the wrong court, and 
that he, Chadwick, would send a cablegram and 
get an answer showing that it was all right as he 
had represented. We were together during the 
day after that. He said he wanted the diamond 
ring, which he had left in Crockett, Calif., for 
some reason, and he would go up there and get it, 
returning on the next train. After he had gone 
I felt uneasy, so went down to the foot of Market 
street to meet him when he returned. The train 
he should have come on was late, and when it came 
in I found he was not there ; in the meantime our 
train to Crockett had gone. Chadwick married 
our daughter in this way : He took a forged tele- 
gram which he signed with our names, to Nora, 
telling her we wished her to marry Chadwick at 
once. At that she was very happy. She kissed 
her grandmother and two sisters and went out 
with Chadwick and was married that night by the 
Rev. Mr. Travis in Crockett." The next morning 
they ate breakfast at Dr. Riley's house at Port 
Costa. Dr. Riley had taken him in as a partner. 
It was then afterwards learned that Chadwick 
began his operations in San Francisco at the 
Donahue-Kelly Bank some time before. Accord- 
ing to the statements made at the Bank, Chadwick 
called there with a draft for $1,000.00 from the 
New Zealand Bank on New York. He was allowed 
to deposit this and received a pass book with the 
understanding he would not check against it until 
the genuineness of the draft had been ascertained. 

A few days later a check for $250.00 came in 
from A. Andrews, for a diamond ring. That was 
paid. After that there was a continual succession 
of checks from people to whom they were given 
by Chadwick. Some were for goods, some were 
for money. A number came from Crockett, others 
from San Francisco. In the aggregate they 
amounted to thousands of dollars. The bank re- 
fused to pay any of them. Then telegraph lines 
to the east, north and south carried the name and 
a description of Sir Harry Westwood Cooper, alias 
Chadwick, all 'round rogue, beguiler of innocent 
maidens and ex-convict, with a request that he 
be apprehended wherever found, and held until he 
could be returned here. He was arrested in Ogden 
on a telegram from the police of San Francisco, 
charging him with forgery ; his wife was with him 
at the time of his ai'rest, and as the jailer took 
Cooper to lock him up, he turned to kiss her, but 
she spumed him. She said that she did not want 
anj-thing more to do with him and she was anxious 
to return to California. 

"I cannot love a man who has deceived me," 
she said, "and I want to go home to my mother," 



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REAL CHOP SUEY 



Page 42 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



March, 1927 



and she returned to California. Nora's mother 
immediately consulted an attorney with the result 
that it was decided to have the necessary papers 
served on the notorious swindler as soon as he 
reached the city to the end that the courts would 
nullify the marriage. Arriving in this city at that 
time was a woman named Miss Bertha Young, who 
was married to Sir Harry in Brisbane, Queens- 
land, Australia. She was a tall, pretty girl with 
brown eyes and dimpled cheeks. The story she 
told of how Cooper wooed and won her was in 
many particulars like the sad experience of Nora 
Schneider. 

When Sir Harry met Miss Young he was posing 
as a poor physician at Brisbane. Little by little 
he built around himself a tale in which he figured 
as a hero who had fallen heir to an English estate 
that grew gradually from 2,000 to 18,000 pounds 
sterling. After Cooper married Miss Young, he 
managed to borrow 400 pounds from her aunt in 
Melbourne and then went with his bride and her 
little brother to England, and then to Toronto, 
Canada, where he deserted them. In the mean- 
time, the mother of Bertha also arrived in the city 
and with two wives and two mothers-in-law. Sir 
Harry found himself in an awful predicament. 
Miss Young produced a paper showing that they 
were married by a minister at his residence in Har- 
court street, Brisbane. The groom recorded him- 
self as Henry Irving Lewellyn Cooper, a medical 
student, a bachelor, 27, native of Dublin, Ireland. 
His father's name was given as Henry \\'estwood 
Cooper, Baronet, and his occupation, surgeon in 
the Royal Navy. The bride was aged 18 and the 
daughter of a drover. The certificate was signed 
by the contracting parties and the witnesses were 
the bride's mother and the minister's wife. 
(To Be Continued) 



BOMBER KILLED 

(Continued from Page 39) 

Chief O'Brien also said he would present the 
names of all the men to the Meritorious Board and 
suggest they be given meritorious service for 
their exceptional and distinguished service. 

He was also loud in his praise for the assist- 
ance given the department in their case by Mana- 
ger Tom Dulury and Chief Ralph Wiley. 

Louis DeMatei, in charge of the activities at 
the church has been lauded most highly for his 
excellent handling of his share of the investiga- 
tion. Louis as it will be recalled is the detective 
who got the line on Lawrence Weeks, one of the 
terror bandits last October. 



Phone Prospect 2867 



K. B. COBB, Prop. 



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Telephone Kearny 2453 



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How to Keep Your Car from 
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An Instructive Article 

Career of 
Sir Harry Westwood Cooper 

by Officer Peter Fanning 

Paddy Walsh— Some Detective 

by John G. Lawlor 

Coroner^s Jury Extols Police 

Praise Officers for Getting Bomber 

Taking of Statements 

}r\ Attorney Robert Fitzgerald 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT 



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OFFICERS 

THOMAS R. LAMB 

PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR. 

GEORGE HABERFELDE 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

RALPH HAMLIN 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

A. D, PLUGHOFF 

VICE-PRES. AND TREASURER 

G. G. BUNDY 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

JOSEPH MUSGROVE 

SECRETARY 

G. L. PICKRELL 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 



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1431 VAN NESS AVENUE 

Phone Graystone 7700 



DIRECTORS 

WML. HUGHSON. CHAIRMAN 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JAMES V. BALDWIN 
G. G. BUNDY 
GEORGE CAMPE 
GEO. DUNTON 
H. ECKART 
BENJ. A. FINCH 

o. r. fuller 

P. H- GREER 
E. B. GIFFEN 
GEORGE HABERFELDE 
RALPH HAMLIN 
J. J. JACOBS 
THOMAS R. LAMB 
C. H- LETCHER 
C. W. McCABE 

JOHN F. Mcknight 

ROBT. W. MARTLAND 
JOSEPH MUSGROVE 
LOUIS O. NORMANDIN 
G. L. PICKRELL 
A. D, PLUGHOFF 
JOS. PIEROTTI. Jr. 
T. LYELL PUCKETT 
L. V. STARR 



A/wil, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 3 



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CON T ENTS 



Keep Your Car from Being Stolen- 



Page 
5 



Career of Sir Harr>' Westwood Cooper, by Officer Peter Fanning- 

I Remember When — by Wm. (Doe) Mundell 

Chiefs Page , ,,, 




Police Vigilance Lauded , 

It Pays to Be Nice 

Paddy Walsh — Some Detective, by John G. Lawlor_ 

Mayor Rolph Proclaims Police Day 

Detective Bureau 

Shoplifter "Lifted" 



George Stallard Kills Thug_ 

Knockovers of Bureau 



Taking Statements, by Attorney Robert Fitzgerald 

Letters to Chief Praising Officers 

Success Crowns 1927 Police Show, by Captain William J. Quinn>^ 

Coroner's Jury Extols Police 

Worth While Reward 

Editorial Page . . 

Commendatory Letters to the Chief 



Patrol Wagon Ser\'ice, by William D. Buma 
Peninsula Traffic Police Organize 



The Desert Shall Rejoice. Poem, by Chief Arthur E. DowelL 
Couldn't Escape Our Bureau of Identification- 
Department Changes 



Police Baseball League Formed 

Covering Beats by Stations^-. 

Mayor Thanks Police for Good Time at Annual Show. 

Clever Thief Pulls One Here. 

Vacation Announcement 



r-rtr-fi\ hi *>i N M W 



^ 




yr-^yr 






Members of the Police Dept. — 

Your Credit is eo good at Tlie Bedliclt-Newinati Co. that we require 

INOTHIINQ DOWIN 

on Purchases up to S50.00 PAY AS LITTLE AS $1.00 A WEEK 

Furniture — Carpets — Stoves — Crockerj' — Linoleum — Draperies — Phonographs 



DEDLICK-NEWMANr; 

IV COMPLETE HOME FURNISHERS V^. 

Southeast Corner- 17 th- and Miss ion Sts. 



Page 4 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 




More freedom when electric range 

cooks for you 

COOKS AUTOMATICALLY WHILE YOU'RE OUT IN THE SUNSHINE 

The electric range eliminates the hours of watching in the kitchen. 

That is why many women — perhaps some of your neighbors — have 
more freedom. For an electric range cooks automatically. 

While you're away the electric cuiTent turns on at any time you wish. 
After the cooking is finished it turns off. 

When you return, the dinner is deliciously done and ready to serve. 
Even if you come home an hour late, the insulated oven keeps the food 
warm. 

One of our representatives will gladly tell you about the electric range 
and how it gives you freedom, a cool summer kitchen and keeps cooking 
utensils clean. Just phone or write to P G and E office. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

"PACIFIC CBRVICC** 

Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



107-427 




Vol. V. 



APRIL, 1927 



No. 6. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiii:>»iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii!iiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Keep Your Car from Being Stolen 

Drive Away With an Automobile 

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be avoided if the owners used ordinary precau- 
tions and jotted down the engine number and 
Hcense number of their cars on a memorandum 
pad and put it where it would not get lost. In 
addition, if owners will place secret markings at 
several points on the car, identification can be 
made positive. A vmtten notification of owner- 
ship hidden within the upholstery is very good. 

Oui- statistics show that 83 cars out of every 
hundred stolen are taken by the thief within five 
minutes after the owner leaves his car. It is a 
practice of experienced automobile thieves to be 
on watch and to notice the car drive up and take 
a good look at the occupant and watch him go 
away before attempting to steal a car. Exper- 
ienced thieves are familiar with all makes of cars, 
and it is usually just as easy for them to drive off 
a Cadillac as a Ford. Consequently, it takes very 
little time for them to jump into the driver's seat, 
turn a switch key, start the motor, and be off. 
The owner does not have to go very far or be gone 
very long to give the thief all the time he needs. 

However, if the thief experiences trouble in 
starting the motor, he may do one of two things. 
If he is pretty sure the o\vner is going to be de- 
layed and is not coming back right away to sur- 
prise him, he will investigate the cause of the 
trouble. If the thief is in doubt about the owner 
returning immediately, he will likely get out of 
the car and abandon the attempt to steal it. 
Thieves are lazy people as a class and do not like 
work. Here is where the oviTier can take ordinary 
precautions — the ignition system of your car. The 
more difficult it is for a thief to start your motor, 
the less chance there is of your car being stolen. 
Ignition System Precautions. 

Most makes of cars have standard types of 
switch keys, and most thieves have a supply of 
these keys to unlock the switch of any car they 
attempt to steal. Under no circumstances leave 



Read Wfi>i Thieves Find it Easy to 

iNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

Editor's Note — The following is a series of in- 
structions to motor car owners which is to be 
broadcast over various radio stations and which 
has been submitted to Lieut. Bernard McDonald 
of the San Francisco Automobile Detail of the 
Detective Bureau. 

Investigation shows that, of the thousands of 
automobiles stolen in this county, the owners of 
the cars have themselves, in most cases, contribut- 
ed negligence. Of those persons who have their 
cars stolen, nearly all invite theft by failing to 
take ordinary precautions. 

In the campaign against crime and criminals, if 
we can fight from both ends toward the middle, 
so to speak, with our officers doing their work 
effectively on the one end and the public using 
ordinary precautions to make the work of crim- 
inals more hazardous on the other end, crime will 
be sandwiched between two mighty forces that 
will not give it breathing room. 

Ordinary precautions do not aim to make the 
theft of an automobile or its accessories impos- 
sible, but they do serve to make it harder for 
thieves to steal, and often are sufficient to cause 
him to fail entirely to do so, or cause him to get 
caught in the act. 

Some automobile owners take no precautions of 
any kind against theft. It is sui-prising that, with 
so many careless owners, there are not more auto- 
mobiles stolen than there are. 

License and Engine Numbei's 

Hardly five percent of the people who report 
their cars stolen to this oflice know the number of 
the engine or the State license. These two identi- 
fication numbers are perhaps the most important 
means of identifying any car. It frequently takes 
days to get the correct license and motor numbers 
of stolen cars by writing or wiring to the State 
office at Sacramento. This time and expense could 



Page 6 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



the switch key in the lock, but remember, the 
thief may have a duphcate key, so do not put too 
much confidence in your switch key alone. 

To render the ignition inoperative even when 
the thief has a duplicate key, you may find it a 
simple matter to raise the hood of your car and 
take the top off the distributor box, if your car 
is so equipped. Inside the distributor box is a 
small roller which can be taken out very easily. 
The motor will not start if this is removed. This 
is a good precaution, especially if you intend to 
leave the car parked for some time. Of course, 
experienced thieves are familiar with this precau- 
tion, but it serves to hamper their quick opera- 
tions, especially if they do not see the owner re- 
move the roller, as in that case, the thief might be 
forced to take quite a little time discovering why 
the motor does not start. 

Another means of rendering the motor inopera- 
tive is to have a secret switch hidden somewhere, 
perhaps behind the dash board or under a seat, so 
as to cut off all power from the battery to the 
motor. Such a switch may give the thief no end 
of trouble trying to discover where it is located 
and may prevent the theft of the car entirely. 
Ti-ansmission Locks 

Many makes of cars are equipped with trans- 
mission locks. These locks are very good, but 
many people have them and never use them. It is 
just an ordinary precaution to get into the habit 
of locking the transmission every time you park 
your car. Do not think that just because you are 
going into a bakery for a loaf of bread and will 
be right out again, that you can afford not to lock 
the transmission. A car was recently stolen under 
just such circumstances. The owner had not been 
gone four minutes before it was taken. 
Protecting Tires 

Probably more than one-half of the spare or 
extra tires being carried on automobiles in this 
county can be removed from the car by unscrew- 
ing two or three nuts. This condition is a stand- 
ing invitation to thieves. In fact it encourages 
thieves to steal from you. It is just too easy to 
steal spare tires. That is why so many 14 and 15 
year old boys ai-e able to do it. If every car owner 
took just ordinary precautions and bought three 
feet of heavy chain at about 10 to 20 cents a foot 
from a hardware store and padlocked this chain 
about the spare tire to some fixed part of the car, 
one-half of the spare tire thefts in the county 
would stop. Use heavy chain — too heavy to be cut 
with snippers. Use a good heavy padlock. 

Also make a memorandum of the numbers on 
your tires and jot down the name of the manufac- 
turer, the size and type of the tire. The law pre- 
vents us from returning stolen property that has 
not been properly identified by the owners, and 
every year we are forced to sell at auction large 



quantities of recovered property which can not be 
properly identified. 

Closed Cars 

A closed car provides many means to make it 
difficult for a thief to get the motor started, but 
many people are careless about using these means. 
If you own a closed car it is only taking ordinary 
precaution to elevate all the windows every time 
you park and lock all the doors on the inside except 
the driver's door, which usually has to be locked 
by a key from the outside. Also be doubly sure 
and lock tiie transmission if you have a transmis- 
sion lock. Do this every time you park. Get 
into the habit. Do not think you are going to 
too much trouble just to leave the car for a few 
minutes. Don't forget that 83 per cent of all 
stolen cars are taken within five minutes after the 
owner leaves it. 

Tire Locks 

Cars with small tires can not be conveniently 
driven off under their own power at least, if locked 
with a heavy safety tire lock. Such locks have 
proved very effective in the past and their use is 
strongly recommended by insurance companies 
and the police. 

Theft Insurance 

Some people have an erroneous idea that it is 
not necessai-y to take ordinary precaution against 
theft of a car if they have it fully covered by in- 
surance. Irrespective of how much insurance you 
carry, insurance companies seldom settle for more 
than 80 per cent of the value of a car at the time 
it is stolen. You can over insure, but do not think 
you will beat the insurance company by trickery. 
You can put it down as a fact that every stolen 
car means a loss of 20 per cent or more to the 
owner, whether insurance is carried or not. Help 
to create a reduction in the number of cars stolen, 
and insurance rates will come down. 

Auto Thefts and Major Crimes 

Statistics show that most major crimes are 
committed with a stolen automobile as an acces- 
sory to the crime. The average holdup man, or 
burglar, does not make the mistake of riding to, 
or from, the scene of his crime in his own auto- 
mobile. He steals one for the purpose — one that 
is easy to steal. Hence it follows that every 
citizen who does not take ordinary precaution 
to prevent the theft of his car is indirectly guilty 
of creating conditions which help the holdup, the 
burglar, the miu'derer, and all types of lawless- 
ness against society. Few automobile owners 
realize this. 

Auto Thefts and Juvenile Crime 

More than half of the stolen cars are taken by 
juveniles — boys below the age of 21. In the be- 
ginning the cars were merely taken for joy rides 
and abandoned. Soon, however, the practise of 
(Continued on Page 24) 



April, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 7 




PETER FANNING 



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Career of Sir Harry Westwood Cooper 

By Officer Pftfr Fanning 

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Another paper indi- he did, he would not have spoiled her life. As a 

pastime while fleecing some of the people of the 
town where he wooed this girl, and to gi'atify his 
vanity, he led her away from home and clouded 
her life. He must have had in mind that his in- 
famous conduct toward the young woman who 
loved him would insure him the full penalty of the 
law should he be caught and convicted, but reck- 
less and foolish daring is a characteristic of the 
criminal mentality, and it has been shown that 
he was without conscience or mercy. He was a 
unique study in criminology and in a class by him- 
self. Suave, interesting, educated, possessed of a 
nerve that experience made strong and sure of its 
footing, it was not hard to understand how he 
got to the purses of unwary men and the hearts 
of unsuspecting maidens. But, clever as he was in 
the ways of crime, he was caught up at last and 
found himself inside the prison bars. 

When Sir Harry was asked to show- cause w-hy 
sentence should not be passed, he stated that he 
merely requested that the usual rebuke adminis- 
tered to felons upon being committed to prison be 
omitted in his case. The court replied that a 
judge was but the servant of the people, and that 
it was but right that comment should be made. 
Judge Lawler reviewed the checkered and inter- 
esting career of the prisoner, censuring him in the 
most bitter terms as follows: "It was by means 
of the forged message to the parents of Nora 
Schneider which forms the basis for the charge, 
that the marriage ceremony between the defen- 
dant and this young woman was brought about. 
The message in question purported to give the 
consent of the mother of the girl to the marriage, 
and this expedient was resorted to by the defen- 
dant because an inquiry instituted for the purpose 
of verifying his representations concerning him- 
self disclosed that he was a sham and a fraud. He 
exhibited as little concern in giving testimony 
which reeked with perjury, as he did in using his 
arts and blandishments in bringing about the dis- 
comfiture and humiliation of a respected and con- 
tented family. As a witness, he shocked the moral 
sense of all who heard him and exhibited a de- 
pravity as pronounced as it was rare. The place 
for this defendant is behind prison bars. His free- 
dom in any country is a menace to its tranquility 
and a danger to the best interests of society." 

Judge Lawler then said: "The maximum pen- 
alty for this offence is 5 years in the state prison. 
Lender the law governing increased punishment, 
the former conviction brings the maximum pun- 
ishment to 10 years and it is the judgment of the 

(Continued on Page 40) 



Gated that Cooper's 
system of securing the 
confidence of his vic- 
tims was much the 
same in Australia as 
elsewhere. It was a 
printed bulletin enti- 
tled "Special Gazette" 
in large type. It pui'- 
ported to have been is- 
sued by the Royal Col- 
lege of Surgeons, and 
to describe an opera- 
tion performed by H. 
W. Cooper at the To- 
ronto General Hospi- 
tal. It proceeded that 
the case was of such a 
grave and complicated nature that the visiting 
and residing staff were afraid to perform the 
operation. Then Cooper appeared on the scene 
and notified the physicians that their treatment of 
the case w'as all wrong. To their astonishment 
he then performed successfully one of the greatest 
operations ever known in Toronto, removing a five 
and one-half pound tumor. He is described as a 
graduate of Christ's Church College, Oxford, Eng- 
land, "who was an extremely clever student, be- 
ing graduated at the age of 17." He was also a 
member of the Royal College of Surgeons, and the 
son of Sir Harry Cooper, Bart. The bulletin con- 
cludes: "He sailed for Australia, where he won 
fame as a specialist for women." This was one 
of the many papers that Cooper displayed to in- 
gratiate himself with his victims. He also had 
some official papers from the Probate Court of 
London ordering sums of money paid to him on 
account of legacies from fictitious relatives. 

It has been often said that if criminals of the 
more intellectual classes would spend half the 
energy in honest industry that they spend in de- 
signing and perfecting crime, they might be hon- 
ored and well to do instead of hunted, miserable, 
and much of the time in prison. No better exam- 
ple of the perversity of the criminal intellect is 
needed than the case of this man. He had the 
criminal kink in his brain, and an honest life, how- 
ever prosperous, was insufferably tedious to him. 
He had spread a story of the death of an English 
relative who had left him sole legatee of a rich 
fortune: had borrowed money from a number of 
people and then we see him elope with an innocent 
young girl, the daughter of a leading citizen of 
Crockett. This man did not love the girl, for if 



Pages 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



I Remember When ' - 



Reminiscences of Wm. (Doc) Mun 

iniiniiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinittiiiiiiiiin 

A brewer working in Wielands' Brewery at 
Second and Clementina streets drank about a bar- 
rel of beer per day, weighed 560 pounds and went 
calmly to sleep on any patrolman's beat. One 
midnight he parked himself on the footboard of 
a bootblack stand at Second and Howard streets. 
The stand faced on neither street but was still 
on the corner, or it might be said to have faced 
on both streets. Pat Tracey and Jim Tuite walk- 
ed the Howard and Second street beats respect- 
ively. They met and discovered the brewer, an 
old acquaintance. 

"Take him in," said Tuite. 

"Take him in yourself", replied Tracey. "He's 
not on my beat." 

"Neither is he on mine", replied Tuite." 

"Then we'll leave him lie", said Tracey. 

Two hours later Sergts. Jim Donovan, Jack 
O'Meara, (now captain at the Park) Tuite and 
Tracey all met on the corner. It was decided to 
try to get the drunken brewer into the wagon. 
Billy Kearney, then driver at the Southern, re- 
sponded to the call. With the aid of the saloon- 
keeper, his bartender and a few hangers-on, the 
policemen got the beer-drinking prodigy into the 
wagon. Reaching the station it was found the 
brewer could not be aroused so the officer in 
charge ordered him taken to the Emergency Hos- 
pital where Dr. Fitzgibbons announced that the 
prisoner was dead. Next day, in his character- 
istic high-pitched voice, Capt. Johnny Spillane, as 
the men lined up on watch, went from Keaniey 
to Tracey. Each officer said the brewer was all 
right when picked up. Reaching Tracey, "Black 
Jack" asked him how he knew the prisoner was 
alive when put into the wagon. Tracey, with his 
usual Irish wit, quickly responded: "Because he 
called me a lot of dirty names." Spillane gave a 
snort of defeat and walked away. 

Charlie Gallatin used to be one of the fast upper 
office men. 

* * * 

Charlie Brown, now a corpoi-al on special duty 
with Bill Harrington over at "Bunner's Reform 
School" (Bay district station), alternated with 
Jim Reade on Merchant, Clay, Commercial and 
Sacramento streets. Charlie has been on the 
force over 30 years and still looks like a young 
fellow. He was the first jitney driver in San 

Francisco and operated a horse and buggy. 

* * * 

The shooting range in the old Hall of Justice 



DELL, An Old-Time Police Reporter 

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was used as a temporary morgue during earth- 
quake days and was filled with 37 bodies, later 
buried in trenches in Portsmouth Square. The 
officers who acted as grave-diggers were: Al 
Holmes, Charlie Brown, "Big Jim" Kavanaugh, 
Jake Nelson, Felix Dougherty, Eddie Mills and 
Detective Charlie Taylor. 

The wooden door leading from the basement 
to the old shooting range was not even burned, 
though the old hall was destroyed. Lockers, etc., 
in the range were found intact after the fire 
swept by. 

* * * 

Lieut. Grover Coats, now one of the heads in 
the Traffic Bureau, rode a horse on traffic duty. 

Louis Cornelius, one-time plain clothes man in 
the City Hall District with Leo Bunner and 
"Kiddo" Walsh while detailed at the City Treas- 
urer's office, used to buy and sell junk. Louis 

has been dead some time. 

* * * 

Charlie Fennell, one of the old regulars, was 
guardian of the peace in the before-the-fire ten- 
derloin. 

Sergt. John Mooney, later captain and Captain 
of Detectives, was sent to the then new Park 
station on Stanyon street, near Page, to prepare 
in about 1899, for the taking over, when the Char- 
ter went into effect in 1900, the Park police force. 
Patrolman Charles Waterman was then day man 
in charge of the station. 

* :}: 4: 

Old Beechner operated the front elevator in the 
old Hall at night time. This and another elevator 
located where the stairs to the second floor now 
are, ran direct to the old city prison. When 
Beechner went to eat at about 10 p. m., some one 
of the police reporters acted in his place. 

:(c ^ * 

John Phelan was once pensioned and then re- 
stored to duty after over 30 years' service in the 
department. John, the Mercury of Bay View 
station, is loved by all of the kiddies he helps 
across dangerous crossings on their way to the 
Taylor Elementary School at Goettinger and Bur- 
rows streets. 

* * * 

Richard J. Hanley rose to be six feet four inches. 
He is better known as "Big Dick" by his fellow 
officers and all the kids. He has been 33 years 
on Third street from 9th to San Bruno avenue. 



Apnl. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 9 



n k II n 




:^<?CHIEF'S PAGE 

By Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien 




POLICE VIGILANCE LAUDED 



The public at times are startled and shocked 
when some bandit wounds or shoots at one of the 
department and gloom is all over the city, and in 
the rush of affairs it passes along with other 
events. Seldom, if ever, we hear of the vigilance 
and human side of the rank and file of the de- 
partment in its silent watches of the night when 
all is still. 

I was visiting in West Portal District last night. 
My two daughters were attending a shower in an- 
other part of the city. They called for me about 
midnight and we drove home along the Great 
Highway and just at Balboa we ran out of gas. 
I went around the corner to a garage, but it was 
closed. I took a No. 7 car. The conductor said 
that there was a garage at 7th avenue and Lin- 
coln way. I got the gas and was leaving with it 
when two police officers were leaving and they 
asked me where I was going and I told them. 
"Oh, I guess we can help you a bit", they said. 
I was worried, because the girls did not know 
where I was and I did not go back to tell them 
to close the window of the machine. I got in 
their machine. They rang in their station on the 
way and took me to our machine. Just imagine 
if I had to stand on the corner and wait for an- 
other hour for the street car, and the girls scared, 
at the other end of the line. We reached them 
as a machine was leaving and I was scared. What 
happened to them was this: Two officers pati'ol- 
ling the beach saw them in the machine alone 
and flashed a light in the open windows on them. 
"What are you girls doing alone at this hour on 
the beach ?" they inquired. The girls related the 
circumstances. They flashed the light on the 
back seat and there was the silver the girls had 
loaned for the shower. "Oh, so your mother has 
gone for gas, has she?" and the girls explained 
the loan of the silver. We filled the tank and the 
officers took the can back, saying they had to get 
back that way in time and would return it. I 
offered them a tip for a cigar, but they absolutely 
refused to accept anything, saying they were 
glad to serve us. 

I want to thank you, Chief O'Brien, and those 
two fine officers for their kindness to me and my 
two girls and did I not write this it would, no 
doubt, be hidden along with thousands of other 



human little acts of good works your men do in 
the silence of a sleeping gi-eat city. What a won- 
derful thing it is and we realize it only after our 
experience, and it's fine to know that mothers and 
their daughters are safe and protection is afforded 
in its most isolated sections by such a chief of 
police as yourself and your efficient department. 
I tliank you and trust you will be blessed with 
good health to continue your good work. 

(Signed) ANNIE A. SCANLON, 

601 Forty-first avenue. 



The two officers referred to in the letter %\'ritten 
to the Chief of Police by Mrs. Annie A. Scanlon, 
601 41st avenue, are Antone De Paoli and Chris- 
tian Grutzmacher, both of Company F. 



IT PAYS TO BE NICE 



A very nice thing, in the writer's judgment, 
happened a few Sundays ago with one of your 
sergeants at the Ferry building, and I think it 
should be called to your attention because I be- 
lieve it reflects the management of the Police 
Department. 

My boy, with one of his chums, had gone to 
Palo Alto to attend the basketball game and one 
of them had laid 75 cents aside for fare crossing 
the Bay. On arri\ang at the Ferry building they 
found that this money had been lost. They 
therefore looked into your station at the Ferry 
building and explained their predicament to the 
sergeant there. I do not recall his name, as he 
was not there when I returned the money the 
next day, but he understood their condition and 
gave them enough to take them home. I fully 
realize this was not a police matter, but the ser- 
geant was impressed with their honesty, and I feel 
that in most instances the officers might have 
accepted their story as being untrue and told 
them to go elsewhere. I wanted to thank the 
sergeant personally, but he was out when I called, 
so I just left the money and advised one of your 
other officers to thank him. 

Little acts like this are what make the world 

so much better and I am so pleased that the 

cahbre of your men is such that in dealing with 

the class they do that the human side is not lost. 

R. W. MYERS, 

1 Drumm Street. 



Page 10 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, J 927 



^^ Paddy '^ Walsh - Some Detective 




JOHN G. LAWLOR 



By Jack Lawlor, Police 

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Paris had its super-detective, the great Vidocq ; 
London its Sherlock Holmes, but it remained for 
the City by the Golden Gate to produce a "Paddy" 
Walsh. 

A typical police officer of the old school, with a 

hard fist and a warm 
heart, "Paddy" is de- 
veloping into one of 
the keenest sleuths in 
the department. Some 
of the cleverest work 
seen in many months 
is his present crusade 
against the narcotic 
smugglers and mem- 
bers of the opium ring. 
Recently, with other 
officers, h e swooped 
down on a rendezvous 
of a "hop queen". Dago Mary and her associates, 
"Charity Alice", a female peddler, and a couple of 
the scum of the universe that play around with 
them. The women were in the room but the 
men were missing. "Paddy" determined to get 
them. 

"I guess we'll wait around and. see what turns 
up", said he to the others, as he sat down and 
lit his pipe for a comfortable smoke. 

He noticed that the girls were nervous and 
anxious to go. 

"Oh, don't be so anxious to go to the Hall, 
Mary", said "Paddy" with a reassuring smile, 
"you will get there in good time." 
Just then the telephone rang. 
"Ting-a-ling-a-ling." 

"Dago Mary" darted tovard the phone but 
"Paddy" beat her to it. Imitating Mary's voice 
to perfection in a way that would have made 
Julian Eltinge turn as green as a St. Patrick's 
day shamrock with envy, he carried on a rapid 
fire conversation in a high falsetto: 

"Paddy"— "Hello, hello." 

Hophead— "Hello— that you Mary?" 

"Paddy"— "Yes, dear." 

Hophead — "Alice and the boys there?" 

"Paddy" — "Yes, honey dove." 

Hophead — "Any 'bulls' around?" 

"Paddy" — "No, dear, everything is eggs in the 
coffee, hurry and come up." 

"Paddy" — "And say, sweetheart, bring Frank 
with you." 

Hophead — "Alright, I'll be there in a jiffy, leave 



Reporter, "Daily T^ews" 

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the door unlatched." 

"Paddy" — "Absolutely, honey bunch, hurry 
now." 

In fifteen minutes more or less the hophead 
appeared, was gi-abbed by the scruff of his neck 
by "Paddy" as he dodged back and tried to do 
a Charley Paddock down the hall and soon was 
on his way to the city prison in the patrol wagon 
with his female consorts. 

"Paddy" got a big tumble on this clever catch 
from D. Wooster Taylor, one of the star reporters 
on the Examiner, who told this writer that 
"Paddy's" work was the cleverest that had ever 
come to his notice. 

This police officer is a quick thinker, loo. A 
few days ago in Judge O'Brien's court "Knock- 
out" Brown, a former fighter, attempted to swal- 
low the morphine used as evidence against him 
while the case was being heard. "Paddy" was 
some distance away but like a streak of lightning 
he jumped half-way acrcss the room and gi'ab- 
bing the defendant by the neck forced him to 
disgorge enough of the evidence so that he will 
be convicted when he appears in the Superior 
Court. Had he swallowed it all he would have 
beaten the case with ease. 



THANKS FOR POLICE CO-OPERATION 



As you are no doubt aware, I am severing my 
connection with the Department of Justice and 
taking up the duties of Prohibition Administrator 
of Northern California and Nevada. Before 
leaving the Bureau of Investigation, Department 
of Justice, I desire to express to you, and through 
you, my deep appreciation for the splendid co- 
operation I have always received from you and 
those who come under your jurisdiction. It has 
been a pleasure to work with your department, 
and those with whom I have come in contact with, 
have always been efficient, courteous and depend- 
able. I am particularly sorry to lose the kind, 
efficient help of Detective Sergeant Henry Kalm- 
bach and Sergeant George Richards, who have 
always been ready to assist me with their intelli- 
gent co-operation. However, in changing to the 
Prohibition Department, I feel that I am simply 
changing my residence, not my friends, and that 
I can feel still that I will have their co-operation 
which in the past has been so very helpful. With 
kindest personal regards. 

(Signed) EDWARD R. BOHNER, 
Department of Justice, S. F., Cal. 



Afiril. '^-'7 



•'20" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 1 1 



Mayor Rolph Proclaims Police Day 

Police Officials from All Over Country Send Congratulations 



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For the first time in the history of this country, 
a day was set aside designated as Police Day, by 
Major James Rolph, Jr. Mayor Holph proclaimed 
February 19, as that special day. 

The innovation of a Mayor setting- aside an 
especial Police Day caught the fancy of the police 
chiefs and city executives throughout the United 
States and Mayor Rolph was deluged with tele- 
grams and letters commending him on this idea. 
We reproduce some of the many messages re- 
ceived. 

* * * 

Accept my thanks and congratulations for your official 
proclamation on Police Day in recognition of your police 
department. (J. A. Thomas, Chief of Police, Winston 
Salem, North Carolina). 

* * * 

Congratulations for success you have achieved in recog- 
nition of Police Day in San Francisco. Hope same will 
receive national recognition. (C. H. Vanduesen, Chief of 
Police, Omalia, Neb.) 

* * * 

Many thanks for kind invitation to Police Widows' and 
Orphans' Aid Association entertainment and ball. I wish 
to congratulate the good people of San Francisco for 
their eiforts in their behalf. I hope the affair will be 
a grand financial success. (George Black, Superintendent 
of Police, Secretary International Association, Chief of 
Police). 

We wish to congratulate you for the inauguration of 
February 19th as Police Day in your department. We 
believe this movement can and will be universally adopted 
by all police departments. A national Police Day could 
be made of untold value to such departments and their 
constituents. (H. D. Harper, Chief of Police). 

* * * 

Congratulation on Police Day proclamation. May all 
first class cities soon follow suit and make national fea- 
ture. Will be glad to sponsor success. Movement in 
Houston, Texas. (T. C. Goodson, Chief of Police, Houston, 

Texas). 

* * * 

May I extend to you my congratulations for your recog- 
nition and support of law enforcement officials in dedi- 
cating today as Police Day. Greetings and best wishes 
to you and your associate. (J. Edgar Hoover, Director, 
Bureau of Investigation, Department of Justice). 

* * * 

Best wishes to you and your highly efficient police 
force. (C. E. Caine, Post Office Inspector in Charge, 
Berkeley, Cal.) 

* * * 

Accept felicitations on your proclamation, naming 
February 19th, Police Day. All honor to you in initiating 
this worthy movement. Trust it will be followed by 
mayors throughout the country issuing like proclamation 
for a Police Day. (Jos. P. Thompson, Chief of Police, 
Harrisburg, Penn.) 



Proclaiming Police Day wonderful idea, if national 
practice better understanding and re.spect for law will 
result. Regret did not know in time to .'iend Duluth 
Police Chorus of twelve voices to your celebration to say 
hello with a song or two. Sincere congratulations. (E. 
H. Barber, Chief of Police, Duluth, Minn.) 

* * * 

Congratulations on your proclamation to observe Sat- 
urday, February 19th, as Police Day in your city. (Peter 
B. Walsh, Superintendent of Police, Pittsburgh, Penn.) 

* * * 

Heartiest good wishes to yourself, Chief O'Brien and 
the San Francisco Police Force on Police Day. Sorry 
I am unable to be with you. (H. C. Long, Chief Con- 
stable, Vancouver, B. C.) 

* * * 

The Spokane Police Department congratulates you on 
your forward step in police affairs and wishes you all 




MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., Who Proclaimed First Police Day 

the success the movement deserves. (A. McDonnell, Chief 

of Police, Spokane, Wash.) 

* * * 

Congratulations for originating Police Day. Entire co- 
opeiation from me assured. (Warren Burch, Chief of 

Police, Mobile, Alabama). 

* * * 

Wish to express thanks for kind invitation to annual 
ball and to wish you every success. (Wm. J. Lahey, 

Chief Inspector, New York). 

* * * 

Congratulations to you and your chief of police chiefs 
on your national Police Day program. We are in hearty 
accord with the movement. Our mayor, Ben F. Staple- 
ton, will proclaim Monday, April 18th, date of our annual 
ball, Denver Police Day. Sincerely yours. (Robert F. 
Reed, Chief of Police). 

(Continued on Vase S4) 



Page 12 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April. 1927 



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grECTlVE BUREAU 



Captain of Detectives Duncan Matheson in Charge 

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I 



SHOPLIFTER "LIFTED' 



Shoplifting is a time worn occupation for those 
out of money, those who need some articles of 
wearing apparel, or those seeking a living without 
any great physical exertion. 

Store keepers must necessarily place their wares 
where they can be seen by shoppers. The dis- 
plays are sometimes left unwatched. They afford 
a temptation to the above mentioned folks, and 
too often the annual, semi-annual or quarterly 
inventory discloses to the shopping house owner 
a very decided discrepancy in the goods on hand 
and that which should be on hand after legitimate 
disposals have been taken into account. 

The Shopping Detail of the Detective Bureau, 
composed of Detective Sergeants Andrew Gaugh- 
ran and James Skelly, by their many arrests, de- 
monstrate how common is this store thievery, 
and be it said to their credit they clean up most of 
the "kicks". 

Most of the shoplifting is done by those who 
display no particular cleverness. Now and then 
there appears in this city a shoplifter, male or 
female, sometimes several forming a ring, who 
have made this sort of crime a matter of deep 
study, and who have developed schemes of getting 
valuable articles that baffle the cleverest of house 
and police detectives. The apprehension of these 
kind is difficult and only comes about through 
the disposal of goods stolen. 

Last month there showed up in this city a young 
lady who has made shoplifting a life's work. She 
has operated in many cities, and in San Francisco 
she was going strong, several stores having been 
"touched" for over $5000 worth of merchandise 
before she was caught. 

She was Frieda Shienberg, pretty, well dressed, 
educated and of a splendid presence. But Frieda 
went to the well once too often and now she is out 
at the county jail "lying out a 90 day jolt". 

She was arrested by Detective Sergts. Michael 
Desmond and Barth Kelleher, Lieut. Hem-y Powell 
and members of his Pawnshop Detail, who, acting 
on information they had gathered as well as on 
information fuiTushed by Gaughran and Skelly of 
the Shopping Detail, finally trapped the young 
lady. In trapping her they recovered a great 



quantity of loot and made an arrest of Mrs. Mary 
May, who conducted a slightly soiled garment 
place on Geary street. 

Frieda says Mrs. May handled all her stuff and 
that she stole on orders furnished by Mrs. May. 
Mrs. May denies any such thing, but nevertheless 
she is held under high bail and her case will 
come up later this month. 

Frieda is out on probation from Los Angeles, 
and under various aliases is wanted in other cities, 
especially in Chicago. 



GEORGE STALLARD KILLS THUG 



Detective Sergeant George Stallard of the 
Pawnshop Detail went home one night early in 
April. He dl'ove up to his garage and got out to 
open the door, at 2010 Golden Gate avenue. 

As he climbed out of his car, a man with a 
gun slunk up and told him to stick 'em up. George 
complied. He was then ordered to turn the lights 
off. He complied with that order, using his right 
hand. As he leaned over to throw the switch he 
pulled his gun with his left hand and fired. The 
holdup crumpled to the pavement. Seeing he had 
his man, Stollard took the gun from the mortally 
wounded man, summoned an ambulance and had 
the thug taken to the Park hospital where he died 
a few minutes afterwards. 

The only information obtained from him was 
his name, which he gave as Herbert Cardoza. On 
his person were found some very risque letters 
from a love smitten maid across the bay, who 
poured out her "love" to the bandit. 

Sergeant Hogan of the Bureau of Identification, 
identified Cardoza as an ex-convict released from 
San Quentin, January 28th, after semng three 
years for burglary. Cardoza had been arrested 
by Detective Sergeant George McLoughlin, Leo 
Bunner and Harry Cook. 

Some four yeai's ago he was implicated in a 
kidnapping which wound up in a big robbery in 
Gilroy. 

Sergeant Stallard certainly displayed courage 
and coolness in a position that had originally 
placed him in a mighty uncomfortable position, 
and he has been highly commended by his asso- 
ciates and superior officers. 



April. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 13 



"Knockovers^' of Bureau 

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Sergeant George Healy and Detective Sergeant Mar- 
tin Porter arrested as some of their Knoekovers, George 
Webster, en route to Los Angeles; John Weber, bur- 
glary; Irving O'Neill, felony embezzlement. 

* • * 

Lieutenant Thomas Hoertkorn and Sergeant Morris 
Harris arrested Mike Silver for grand larceny. 

* * * 

Among the evil doers brought in by Detective Ser- 
geants Arthur McQuaide and William Proll were: Jacob 
Adamonuk, grand larceny; Ray Burrill, felony embezzle- 
ment; Russell Griffin, bad checks; James Kleupfer and 
Martin Walsh on two forgery charges. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Andrew Gaughran and James 
Skelly made things hot for the shop lifters during the 
past month. They registered among other Mercedes 
Secins, burglary and petty larceny; Abindo Colio, Robert 
Vilches, Helen Cress, Pablo Fernandez and Peter 
Christopher, same charges; Alejandro Morales and John 
Murray, petty larceny; Helen Murray, forgery; Angelo 
Rappa, obtaining goods by false pretenses, and Arthur 
Young, bad checks. 

* * * 

Harry Cook, detective sergeant, brought in Chester 
Wiggins, wanted in Fresno; Otto Metzger, wanted in 
San Jose; Gerald Stevens, fugitive; Louis Wolfinger and 
Peter Trois, omitting to provide for minor children. 

* * • 

Lieutenant Henry Powell and posse arrested Elmer 
Wheadon and Ray Wheadon, larcenists. Other members 
of the Pawnshop detail bringing in law breakers were 
Detective Sergeants George Hippelu and George Stal- 
lard, who arrested Harry Martin, larceny; Patrick Mona- 
han, burglary; Harvey Harris, tool burglar, while Ser- 
geants John Callaghan and James Regan, assisted by 
Sergeants Kalmbach and George Richards, arrested Hen- 
rietta Cunningham, wanted by the Postal authorities. 

* • * 

Some of the arrests by the team of Sergeants Thomas 
Reagan and Thomas Curtis were: Malcolm Lowrey, 
larceny; Thomas Paterson, same; Joseph Silverman, two 
charges felony embezzlement; Anna Silverman, receiving 
stolen goods, and Thomas Muehlisen, obtaining money 
on false pretenses. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants Thomas Conlan and Edward Wis- 
cotchill locked up Donal Fen for burg-lary, and Albert 
Lemmon and George Higgen for larceny. 

* * * 

Mears Hansen, who has a penchant for tying ladies 
up and then fondling them, was arrested by a clever trap 
set by Detective Sergeants Fred Bohr, Clarence Herlitz, 
and Detective John Sturm. Bohr and Herlitz arrested 
Fred Halmos on two charges of embezzlement; Henry 
Verne, two charges of burglary; Jules Hecht, Phillip 
Taylor, Mack Griner and Edith Reyndlds for larceny. 

* * « 

Detectives Daniel Fogarty and John Sturm nabbed 
Owen Wells on a conspiracy charge. 



Amerillo Bonills and Frank McGorrlty were a couple 
of burglars booked by Detective Sergeants Michael Des- 
mond and Barth Kelleher. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeants George Richards and Henry Kalm- 
bach booked Sam Borzellino and Frank Diminnie as 
fugitives. 

* * * 

Some of the activities of the Automobile Detail under 
Lieutenant Bernard McDonald for the month were as 
follows: Arrests by Detective Sergeants William Milli- 
kin and Harry Husted, Harold Smith, Fred Keyes and 
James Cahalan, violating Section 146 M. V. Act; by 
Detective Sergeants James Hayes and Harry McCrea, 
Clark Torres for 146; by McCrea and Rasmussen and 
Frank Brown, James Smith, same offense; by Detective 
Sergeants John Cannon, James McKenna and Richard 
Smith, Theodore Klemuskiken, Pete Lelikotf and Charles 
Hunter; en route to U. S. Marshal's office by Brown and 
Rasmussen, Merle Overholtzer and Sam Bono, wanted in 
Sacramento; by Detective Sergeants Nicholas Barron 
Augustus Thompkins, Edmond Oil, burglary; Maurice 
Hessel, embezzlement. 

* * * 

Detective Sergeant Richmond Tahtham's bunch of 
burglar bouncers operated as follows: Arrests made 
by Detective Sergeants Irvin Findlay and James Mitch- 
ell, Frank Madamba, Julis Wolfe and Wm. Hopkins, vio- 
lating Section 472 P. C; by Gregson and Lippi, John 
Cardoc, John Hyde and Frank Knox, burglary; by Rich- 
ard Hughes and James Johnson, Monroe Russell, William 
Ford, burglary; James Beltran, Section 146 Motor Act; 
by Corporal Nels Stohland, Jack Palmer, assisted by Of- 
ficer J. Amend, James Lopez, burglary; Frank Backulich, 
112. 

* * * 

Detective Charles McGreevy of the night force, with 
Detective George Page, rounded up Ella Hall, wanted 
in Seattle; Julius Ebel, for Santa Maria; Dan Adler, 
Santa Ana, and James Hall, for Seattle. Page, McGreevy 
and Detective Sergeant Frank Jackson brought in Phil 
Zimmerman and Val Taylor for grand larceny and Leo 
Wilson for receiving stolen goods; Jackson and Page ar- 
rested E. Baldonado for assault to commit murder. 

* * * 

Sergeant George McLoughlin, of the Robberj' Detail, 
got Clayton Hall for Oakland. Other members of the 
detail operated as follows: Sergeants George Wall, Mc- 
Mahon, Leo Bunner, Vernon Van Matre and Edward 
McSheehy arrested Jerry McCarthy, Teddy Mosfowski, 
William McShea and Wilmer Florence for robbery, the 
latter getting three kicks; Sergeant Robert Rauer 
brought in Frank Andreas, assisted by Clarence Herlitz 
of the Hotel Detail; Wall, McMahon and McLoughlin, 
George Stratos, robbery; Wall and Bunner, Wm. Ivy, 
robbery; McSheehy and Van Matre, John Mills and Jack 
DeVreaux, robbery; McSheehy, Lionel Wolff, grand lar- 
ceny. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Charles Dullea, Otto Frederickson, Ser- 
geant McDaniell, Marvin Dowd, Thomas Hyland, Jesse 
Ayer locked up William Burton and Earl Parent! for as- 
sault to murder; Dullea, Van Matre and McSheehy 
locked up Grist for murder. 



Page 1 4 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, J 927 



Taking of Statements 

By Robert Fitzgeeiald, Formerly Assistant District Attorney 

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(Continued from February Issue) 

It has been held that a statement by a sheriff 
he "would do all he could" for the prisoner and the 
statement that it "would be better for" the ac- 
cused to make full disclosure or to tell all he knew 
rendered the resultant confession inadmissible. 
Any statement made by the officer to the prisoner 
from which the latter might infer, or the court 
might consider that he perhaps did infer, that he 
might be granted immunity upon that or other 
charges or might be granted lesser punishment 
or might in fact receive any official leniency or 
consideration are dangerous. For the thii"d de- 
gree nothing need or can be said. Its use for the 
purpose of compelling confessions is inexcusable. 
There are no doubt occasions when either the ag- 
gravated character of the prisoner's crime or his 
conduct toward the officers when under arrest are 
such as to provoke from one or more of the officers 
reprisals which under other circumstances might 
well be excused, but in many instances the fact 
of such conduct has prevented the introduction of 
proof of confessions made, not as a direct result 
thereof, but during the same period of custody; 
and has resulted in the discharge of a guilty defen- 
dant. Not only is such method dangerous (be- 
sides being unethical) but it is far inferior in its 
results to that of persistent examination of the 
accused. It has recently been said by a man for 
many years in the Detective Bureau in New York 
City and more recently the head of an eminently 
successful private detective agency in that same 
city that "one lie is better than three beatings". 
If the accused be guilty, and will talk at all, there 
must inevitably in his answer be some false state- 
ment. It is the theory of the man I mentioned 
that this one little lie when vigorously followed up 
by the inquisitor whose previous investigation of 
the accused, his antecedents and his movements, 
have been thorough, will call forth two lies to cover 
it up, two call for four, four demand eight and the 
geometrical ratio progresses until the accused 
weakens under the weight of his own fabrication 
and his inability longer to stimulate the truth. In 
such practice whether the confession finally fol- 
lows or not we inevitably discover that the relation 
of such falsehoods accompanied by proof of their 
falsity has an extremely beneficial result when 
presented to the consideration of the trial jury. 

When a confession is obtained from an accused 
it should be reduced to writing and should either 
be read by him or read carefully to him and he be 
asked whether he then desires to make any amend- 



ments or additions thereto. If any be made they 
should be added and the accused's signature, if 
possible, be subscribed. Witnesses who were pres- 
ent should add their signatures and either at the 
outset of the confession or at its conclusion there 
should be a notation of the time and place where 
the confession was made and written and the per- 
sons who were present, if any were present in ad- 
dition to those who signed as witnesses. 

Since objection is frequently made at the trial 
to the introduction of a confession or proof of it 
because it does not contain the exact words of the 
accused but rather the substance of them as writ- 
ten by the interrogator, it is advisable when pos- 
sible to have all of the questions and answers taken 
down by a shorthand reporter and later ti'ans- 
cribed by him. In sucli cases for the avoidance of 
the effect of later denials the accused should be 
asked to sign the reporter's notes and when the 
latter are transcribed you should seek to obtain his 
signature on the transcription. In the absence of 
a reporter there is the better practice, though 
often impossible to obtain, to have the accused 
write out his confession in his own handwriting. 
If this for the reasons which are obvious is im- 
possible, the person writing the confession should 
endeavor so far as possible to use the words and 
expressions of the accused and to avoid the use 
of words which are obviously foreign to his vocab- 
ulary and understanding. It must not be forgot- 
ten that when the prosecution has in its hands a 
weapon against the accused so dangerous as a con- 
fession, the defense will have recourse to every 
ingenious attack and argument to weaken its ef- 
fect in tlie minds and consideration of the jury, 
and since many a confessing criminal has become 
subsequently repentant of his confession after se- 
curing the services of counsel and when on trial 
repudiates such confessions, claiming either it 
was not made or that it was extorted from him by 
violence or threat of further violence, it is indeed 
important that the investigator should not rest 
content upon securing the prisoner's admission of 
guilty responsibility. The investigation should 
continue and there should be furnished to the 
prosecutor all possible evidence corroborative of 
the facts and circumstances mentioned in the con- 
fession as well as independently pointing to the 
guilt of the accused. For while it is a rule of law 
that a confession resulting in any way from vio- 
lence or threats of violence is inadmissible and 
wliile the court in a given case may reject the con- 

fOnntinufid on Paee 29) 



A[>nl, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 1 5 



IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltll'lllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

Letters to Chief, Praising Patrolmen 

Two Captains Commend Officers 

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Two letters are herewith published emphasizing 
the ability of two police officers, whose alertness 
and fearlessness attracted the attention of their 
respective captains. Tlie two officers are properly 
pra'sed for their actions and commended by the 
Chief. 

The following- report has been received by Chief 
of Police Daniel J. O'Brien. It is signed by Cap- 
tain \A^illiam T. Healy, commanding officer of our 
Richmond Police District. In connection witli the 
same, the Chief commended the officers mentioned 
in Captain Healy's report. 

"Your attention is respectfully called to the fol- 
lowing police service rendered by Coi-poral Frank 
P. Rhodes, Star 884, Patrolman Charles H. Corne- 
lius, Star 59, and Robert C. Caldwell, Star 1172. 

"At about 3:25 o'clock a. m., March 9th, 1927, 
Patrolman Robert C. Caldwell, detailed to patrol 
in uniform, California and Lake streets from 18th 
to 33rd avenues, observed two automobiles drive 
into an alley in the rear of 293 28th avenue. On 
approaching the garage for the purpose of making 
ah investigation, a large automobile drove rapidly 
away and another roadster backed out of the 
garage under 293 - 28th avenue and also drove 
away, disregarding the patrolman's order to halt. 
Five shots were fired at the roadster, two taking 
effect in the body of the automobile. Patrolman 
Caldwell unhesitatingly entered the garage, find- 
ing concealed therein one Carl McGee. Carl Mc- 
Gee was brought to this station, where he refused 
to make a statement. Coi"poral Frank Trainor, 
acting Lieutenant in charge, summoned Corporal 
Frank Rhodes and Patrolman Charles Cornelius, 
detailed in citizen's dress, to this station, and Carl 
McGee admitted that one of his accomplices was 
named Tucker and lived at 770 Larkin street. The 
three officers went there; they received informa- 
tion that Tucker was employed at irregular in 
tervals in the Essex Garage at 819 Ellis sti-eeH, 
The officers repaired to the named garage, ancJi 
on the second floor found Tucker with three othei 
men and five boxes of assorted liquors, which thej 
admitted hi-jacking from 293 28th avenue. Also, 
in garage was found a Hupmobile automobile, 
stolen by Tucker. The Chrysler roadster automo- 
bile also used in committing this burglary was re- 
covered at 847 Olive avenue. The men gave their 
names as Carl McGee, Alfred Freitas, Lawrence 
Parlette, Ira Tucker and George Parker and were 
charged at this station with burglary and crim- 
inal conspiracy. A second charge of violating Sec- 
tion 146, California Vehicle Act, was placed 
against Ira Tucker. Name of owner of premises 



attached, Maurice Salomon. Crime committed 
3:25 a. m. and at 6 a. m. all participants an-ested 
and property recovered. Police service rendered 
shows courage, initiative and a rare knowledge 
of how police service should be rendered. Res- 
pectfully recommend that this police service re- 
ceive your commendation and be published in or- 
ders." 

The following report has also been submitted 
to the Chief by Captain John J. Casey, command- 
ing the Bush Street Police District, and concerns 
the arrest by Officer William J. O'Brien, a member 
of his command, of one Roy Frenna, alias Roy 
Renner, who had previously murdered two women 
at 331 Octavia street, this city. Chief O'Brien 
likewise commended this oflScer. 

"Your attention is respectfully called to the 
splendid police service rendered by Patrolman 
William J. O'Brien, a member of Co. E, in arrest- 
ing Roy Frenna, alias Roy Renner, about 9:15 
a. m. on March 26, 1927, at Post and Webster 
streets. Frenna, who had been a former boxer, 
murdered a Mrs. Klatt and a Mrs. Olson about 
10:10 a. m. on March 24, 1927, at 331 Octavia 
street, and escaped immediately following the 
murders. 

"Officer O'Brien, who some years ago had been 
detailed at boxing exhibitions, did not know Fren- 
na personally, but on observing him on the street 
recognized him as a man who had previously en- 
gaged in boxing exhibitions, and as he had given 
close attention to the description of Renna, in 
the orders issued through this department, he im- 
mediately placed him under arrest and Frenna 
admitted that he was the party wanted. 

"Frenna was then transferred to Headquarters 
where he made a complete confession of the mur- 
ders. 

"Officer O'Brien did not know whether or not 
Frenna was armed, but immediately approached 
him, exhibiting courage, and a strict observance 
of the orders and description of the criminal is- 
sued through this department and in effecting this 
arrest, Ofl!icer O'Brien performed a commendable 
piece of police service. 

"I therefore respectfully recommend that Offi- 
cer O'Brien be commended by you for the service 
so rendered." 



Al Hicks (Big Al) was on traflfic duty at Fourth 
and Market streets and also was a patrolman in 
the old Central. Al is now connected with the 
Western Addition Station. 



Page 16 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



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Success Crowns 1927 Police Show 

Captain William J. Quinn Tells How All Wor\ed to Ma\e It the Biggest Ever Held 

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The work of the Reception 
Committee under the direction 
of Chairman John J. Casey was 
of the most strenuous kind. It 
was the task of himself and his 
committee to receive and care 
for the guests of tlie evening. 
Considering that this was done 
without any complaint being re- 
capt. wm. J. Quinn ceived, but on the contrary given 
much commendation, it can be easily seen how 
well the work of this particular committee was 
taken care of. 

Another very important committee which di( 
its work with credit to itself and the society, wat, 
the Floor Committee, under the direction of Cor- 
poral Thomas P. Mclnerney. It was he who had 
charge of the grand marcii and the dance, not only 
in the main hall, but in the two side halls — and it 
is easily seen how this was so successful. The 
members were given many rehearsals by their 
chairman and his assistants, and the members of 
the committee were thoroughly drilled in theu 
duties. When we speak of the success of the ball, 
every committee should be considered as a detei- 
mining factor in that success. Each committee 
had its work to do, and in the success which 
crowned the aiTair, tlie work of the various com- 
mittees co-ordinated, of necessity, to a nicety. 
Take the Reception Committee, for instance, of 
which Captain John J. Casey was chairman. 
When you entered the hall, you were met by a 
member of the Reception Committee and escorted 
to your seat. 

You heard the concert, which was under the 
direction of Band Leader Lt. R. F. Foley, and 
saw the theatrical program and enjoyed the other 
entertainment, all of which was under the direc- 
tion of the Music and Talent Committee. You 
either saw or took part in the grand march, which 
was under the direction of the Floor Committee. 
You heard and saw the Mayor — when he spoke 
on his presentation of tlie medals and other things 
— which was under the direction of the Presenta- 
tion Committee. You heard or saw, for the first 
time in a theatre or public hall, a presentation 
of a radio station, the artists depicting for your 
edification, their mode of transmitting the human 
voice over the microphone; and you also saw the 
other necessary adjuncts of a radio station. All 
this was under the direction of the Chairman of 
this particular committee. You enjoyed the mu- 
sic. Yon listened to the wonderful music of the 



Municipal Band. All this was under the direc- 
tion of the Music and Talent Committee; or maybe 
you danced in either Palk or Larkin Hall. Perhaps 
you enjoyed yourself in these halls, which were 
under the direction of the assistants of the Floor 
Committee Director. You may have enjoyed the 
decorations and the lighting of the hall, which 
were under the direction of the Hall and Decora- 
tions Committee. Your ticket and your invita- 
tion and your program were the work of the Print- 
ing Committee. The ice cream and refreshments 
that you were served with were the work of the 
Refreshment Committee. No doubt what brought 
you there was the fact that the information you 
had about the Concert and Ball, was learned 
through the newspapers or over the radio or other 
method of getting news to you. This was the 
work of the Publicity Committee. You may have 
admired the sashes and badges worn by the var- 
ious committees and their aides. The Badge and 
Program Committee was responsible for this. An- 
other committee that was hard pressed and res- 
ponsible to a great extent for the success of the 
affair, wrs the Committee on Invitations. The 
chairman and members of this Committee were 
responsible for the proper issuance of the invita- 
tions. 

The Mayor was there through an invitation 
sent to him through the Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment. This invitation was tendered to him 
by no less personages than our Chief of Police, 
Daniel J. O'Brien and the Honorable Jesse B. 
Cook, Police Commissioner. So you see, it re- 
quires thought and consideration to determine 
how a big success has been achieved. 

All of these committees were absolutely neces- 
sary to the success of the affair and the personal 
co-ordination of each with the other, is what gave 
the thousands who attended the biggest and best 
entertainment they ever had. 

The success of this year's event will be dupli- 
cated, if not improved upon, next year — and so on, 
each year. 

The Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association of 
the San Francisco Police Department is a progres- 
sive organization. It is imbued with progres- 
sivism. It is always going forward, continually 
making improvements on the past. So, we can 
look for each succeeding year to produce a bigger 
and better event than the preceding one. 

Every member of every committee and every 
member of the department who in any way worked 
(Continued on Page 28) 



April, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 17 



Coroner's Jury Extols Police 

Detail Praised for Killing Church Bomber 
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A verdict teeming with praise for the officers 
who shot and killed the bomber of SS. Peter and 
Paul Church, on Union street last month, was 
rendered by the coroner's jury investigating the 
death of the dynamiter. 

Coroner Thomas B. W. Leland, at the instance 
of the members of the jury, mailed a copy of the 
findings to each man detailed, including Detec- 
tive Sergts. DeMatei, Detectives Sunseri and Du- 
Bose, Corp. Lawrence Mclnerney and Officers An- 
drew Lennon, Kaufman, Casey, Gremminger, 
Wickstrum, Hutchinson and Frank Davis. 

The following letter from the coroner to Coi-p. 
Mclnerney, together with the jury's verdict, in- 
dicates the appreciation of those who had charge 
of the inquiry: 
Corp. Lawrence Mclnerney, 
Hall of Justice, 
San Francisco, Calif. 
My dear Corporal: 

Have forwarded to you under separate cover 
copy of the verdict of Coroner's jury with recom- 
mendation in tlie case of John Doe No. 21, de- 
ceased, shot and killed by police officei-s while he 
was endeavoring to dynamite the church of SS. 
Peter and Paul in the early morning of March 6, 
1927. 

The jury desired me to forward to you as a 
participant and each of your detail, a copy of this 
verdict and recommendation to which I wish to 
add my personal commendation for a duty in 
which intelligence, patience, fidelity to duty and 
the unflinching meeting of personal danger were 
rewarded by accomplishing the object for which 
detailed. Once more by your actions have you 
reflected credit upon the officers and members of 
the San Francisco Police Department. 
Very sincerely. 

Dr. T. B. W. LELAND, 
Coroner of the City and County of San Francisco 

INQUISITION taken at the Coroner's Court on 
the 18th day of March, 1927, before Dr. T. B. W. 
Leland, Coroner of said City and County, upon 
viewing of the body of John Doe No. 21, upon the 
oath of seven jurors, who being duly summoned 
and sworn to inquire into all the circumstances 
attending the death of the said John Doe No. 21, 
and by whom the same was produced, and in Vv-hat 
manner and when and where the said John Doe 
No. 21 came to his death, do say upon their oath 
aforesaid : 

"That the said John Doe No. 21, male, white, 



about 38 years old, nativity, occupation and resi- 
dence not known, came to his death on March 6, 
1927, at the Harbor Emergency Hospital from 
shock and hemmorhage following gunshot wound 
of chest, severing aorta (arch). 

"And we further find: That on March 6, 1927, 
about 4:20 a. m., deceased was seen to light a 
fuse attached to 26 sticks of dynamite which he 
placed in the vestibule of the Church of SS. 
Peter and Paul with intent to destroy the church. 
Upon refusing to surrender to the police and 
while attempting to draw a weapon he was shot 
by police and died as a result. 

"We desire to commend in the highest terms 
the diligence and bravery of Coi-p. Mclnerney, 
Officers Kaufman and Gremminger, Detective 
Sergt. DeMatei and Detectives Sunseri and Du- 
Bose who endangered their lives in the perform- 
ance of tiieir duty." 

(Signed by Jurors) : Aaron A. Levin, K. A. 
Wellman, Wm. A. Medina, Percy P. Grisez, Car- 
lyle Tibroe, Jerome S. J. Bettman. 

George E. Starr, Foreman. 

(Approved) : Thos. B. W. Leland, Coroner. 



WORTH WHILE REWARD 



At a meeting of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners, the following resolution, which is self-ex- 
planatory, was adopted: 

RESOLVED, That the following members of 
the San Francisco Police Department be and they 
are hereby gi'anted a leave of absence of two 
weeks with pay in addition to their annual vaca- 
tion for meritorious police work performed by 
them in the capture of two men in the act of bomb- 
ing SS. Peter and Paul Church, Filbert and Stock- 
ton streets, on March 6th, 1927: 

Detective Sergeant Louis P. De Matei. 

CoiTJoral Lawrence Mclnerney. 

Police Officer Andrew P. Lennon. 

Police Officer Joseph Wikstrom. 

Police Officer Joseph C. Gremminger. 

Police Officer Alfred W. Hutchinson. 

Police Officer Willis A. Casey. 

Police Officer Dewey Kauffman. 

Police Officer Frank J. Davis. 

Police Officer James Sunseri. 

Police Officer Sidney B. Du Bose. 
Respectfully, 

THE BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS, 
BY CHAS. F. SKELLY, Secretary. 
In addition to the above time off, Chief O'Brien gave 
each of the men mentioned 5 days more vacation. 



Page 18 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, J 927 




EDITORIAL OFFICE— ROOM 9, HALL OF JUSTICE 
Oflicial Publication 

SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT; 
WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' AID ASS'N.; 
STATE HIGHWAY PATROLMENS' ASS'N. 

A Police News and Educational Magazine 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY "2-0" PUBLISHING CO. 

Printed by 

ALEX. DULFER PRINTING CO., 853 Howard Street 

Ptione: Douglal 2377 



Make all Ch ecks Payable to- 

OPIE L. WARNER 

JOHN F. QUINN 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Editor 

.Business Manager 



EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 
THEODORE J. ROCHE. President 
XESSE B. COOK; ANDREW F. MAHONY : DR. THOS. E. SHUMATE 
DANIEL J. O'BRIEN, Chief of Police 



AUGUST VOLLMER, Past President Internat 

Chiefs of Police 

Captain of Detectives Captain 

DUNCAN MATHESON Captain 

Captain HENRY GLEESON Captam 

Captain EUGENE WALL Captain 

Captain HENRY O'DAY Captain 

Captain ROBERT A. COT'LTER Captain 

Captain JOHN J. CASEY Captain 

Captain FRED LEMON Captain 

Captain STEPHEN V. BUNNER Captain 

Captain PETER McGEE Captain 



:ional Association of 

BERNARD JUDGE 
JOHN J. OMEARA 
H. J. WRIGHT 
ARTHUR D. LAYNE 
PATRICK HERI.IHY 
CHARLES GOFF 
WILLIAM J. QUINN 
WM. T. HEALY 
J. H. LACKMAN 
CHARLES SKELLY 



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IMPORTANT NOTICE — Do not subs ;ribe to "2-0" POLICE JOUR- 
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proper credentials written on our stationery. 

ADVERTISING RATES on application. 



Vol V. 



April, 1927 



No. 6. 



WINTER SEASON FREE FROM CRIME 



The winter season is about over. The season 
that brings so much apprehension to police offi- 
cials of large cities, especially of the West, for it 
is then that crime seems to increase and the 
problems of the police department multiply. 
Winter usually brings to this coast an influx of 
crooks who, like the law-abiding tourist, seeks 
the salubrious climate in preference to the frigid 
East. Naturally, the crook must make expenses, 
so he plies his nefarious trade and brings woe and 
trouble to the honest citizen, storekeeper, banks 
and others. 

But we of San Francisco can look back over 
the winter months and point to an enviable low 
record of crime. We find that the crook has 
given this city the go-bye, not that our climate 
is unattractive, but because the migi-atory yegg 
has learned that the members of the San Fran- 
cisco Police Department, under Chief of Police 



Daniel J. O'Brien, has constituted itself a recep- 
tion committee for the crooked visitor that is 
anything to be desired. The reception is invari- 
ably followed by an ai-rest and incarceration in 
one of our penal institutions. 

The vigilance of the police, the system of pro- 
tecting law-abiding folks and the rapidity with 
which apprehension is accomplished, has built up 
a reputation for achievements for our police or- 
ganization that does not encourage the bandit to 
invade our city during the winter months, or any 
other month, for that matter. 

It is well for us and speaks well for our police- 
men. 

* * * 

Police Officer Robert Caldwell has not been in 
the department very long, but he was given the 
acid test one morning, early last month, and he 
came through with colors flying. He suiisrised a 
hijacking expedition, engaged in a pistol duel 
with one of the men, arrested him, and in less 
than three hours had the entire gang in jail. 
Read Capt. William Healy's recommendation to 
Chief O'Brien, in another part of this issue. Offi- 
cer Caldwell will be heard of again. 

* * * 

Detective Sergt. William Bennett, working out 
of the Chief's office, has done more than any one 
man to spread the reputation of our department 
outside of this city. For weeks he has been 
engaged in broadcasting from various radio sta- 
tions, preparing and presenting programs that 
have made a hit among the fans of radioland, and 
it is sui*prising how much of an impression these 
programs have made. Letters to the stations 
from listeners throughout the State indicate how 
they are received. 

BURGLAR CAUGHT SELLING LOOT 

Joseph Lawrence prowled a house out in the 
residential district and got away with a lot of loot. 
Having the loot on his hands he realized he had to 
hypothecate it into cash. This realization led 
to the time honored custom of taking it to a sec- 
ond hand store for barter. Like many of his kind, 
he found a couple of detectives present, who, hav- 
ing a description of the loot, proceeded to do some 
questioning and finally Mr. Lawrence was locked 
up. Detective Sergeant Bernard Riehl and Detec- 
tive Leo O'Connor of the Pawnshop Detail pre- 
siding at ceremonies of incarceration. 



Chief Daniel J. O'Brien, who was taken ill in 
Los Angeles, is home and has so recovered from 
his illness that he is on the job again.' 



Sergeant William Fb-nn arrested C. W. Yamako, wanted 
in Oakland; Ed Christal and Georg-e Lilli.s arrested Sam 
Valenzuli, wanted in San Jose. 



April 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 19 



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Commendatory Letters to Chief O^Brien 



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I wish to convey to you the thanks and appreciation of 
this organization for your courtesy in detailing Lieut. 
Field to address the membership on the subject of traffic 
regulations and control on the occasion of our monthly 
meeting the evening of March 22, 1927. 

Lieut. Field's graphic exposition of the various angles 
of traffic work, and his explanation of the reasons for the 
different necessary regn^lations was of very real interest 
to all who heard him. It is firmly believed that talks of 
this character are of great value in helping to establish 
and build up a feeling of co-operation between the gen- 
eral public and those charged v^ith the responsibility of 
administering our traffic laws, thus contributing to the 
solution of this complex and serious problem. 

FKITZ R. CLAXTON, Chairman, 
Education Committee, San Francisco 
Federal Reserve Bank Club. 

* * * 

On the night of March 17th, I was dining with friends 
at 2751 Clay street. I was in the back part of the house 
and I heard my wife go to the telephone and call the 
Police Department. On inquiring what was the matter, 
she told me there was a woman screaming on the street 
in front of the house and was being robbed and that she 
had phoned for the police. 

I had hardly reached the ground floor of the apartment 
before two representatives of the Police Department ar- 
rived. Their promptness was so unusual and, in addition 
to the quickness of their arrival, the businesslike manner 
in which these officers conducted themselves is worthy of 
considerable note and was commented on most favorably 
by the crowd which usually gathers under such circum- 
stances. 

I inquired from these officers who they were and the 
station to which they were assigned. They stated that 
at that time they were under Lieut. John Sullivan. The 
officere' numbers were 1104 (Officer Nicholas D. Eniser) 
and 614 (Officer Louis H. Linss, Jr.). The promptness 
. and conduct of the representatives of the Police Depart- 
ment I thought you would be pleased to note. 

H. R. C.A.SEY, Lt. Col.. Q. M. C, 

Fort Mason, California. 
Permit us to thank you for the splendid co-operation 
rendered in the case of the above-named man. We feel 
greatly indebted to Captain Quinn, Corporal Thomas Mc- 
Inemey arid Officer James Coleman for the splendid service 
they rendered. 

MISS EGIE ASHMUN, 

Executive Secretary, 

American Red Cross, Civic Auditorium. 

* * * 

I have been requested by many parents of children who 
attend the State Norman School to communicate to you, 
commending the painstaking work and interests of Officer 
Slade A. Earle, Jr., who is stationed at Guerrero and 
Market streets. Personally, let me state that those reck- 
less auto drivers of days gone by have learned to re- 
spect this officer. He is to be appreciated and I hope 
he retains his present position for many years to come. 
Accidents will then be unlieard of while he is on duty. 
EUGENE PFAEFFLE, President, 
Market and Guerrero St. Imp. Club, 
45 Guerrero Sti-eet. 



The writer was parked in front of 1245 California 
street, Sunday, and during my stay there some "long 
fingers" came along and removed my wife's handbag 
from the car. I do not think I was there more than an 
hour and during that time the handbag was stolen and 
recovered by one of your "plainclothes" men and he was 
back with the thief getting his information to prosecute 
him. Surely this was quick action and I would not be 
recognizing what I term 100 per cent efficiency if I did 
not commend your organization. 

I am just recognizing and appreciating your organiza- 
tion and the protection given the public. 

Thanking you and the department, I am, sincerely, 
J. MYRON CARR, M. D., 
Physicians and Surgeons Physio-Therapy 
Clinic, 25 S. San Joaquin street, Stockton. 

NOTE: The "plainclothes" men referred to just above 
are Lieut. Thomas L. Hoertkom and Detective Sergeant 

Morris M. Han-is. 

* * * 

The committee for the All-Veteran Smoker wish to 
thank the police department for the police troupe and 
quartette that sang at the Smoker. Your representatives 
did themselves well, and I am most certain that the chair- 
man in his introductory remai'ks made no mistake when 
he introduced the officers as San Francisco's first line of 
defense. The men assigned to keep order carefully car- 
ried out their work, and too much praise cannot be given 
both Sergeant Patrick H. McGee and the troupe, and 
Corp. James W. Ray, in charge of the detailed men. It 
was, indeed, a very successful affair, but the success was 
obtained through the kindly efforts of the San Francisco 
Police Department. 

PAUL F. COLLINS, Commander, 818, 

347 The Mills Building. 
:f * ^*- 

May I take this opportunity of thanking you and the 
pawnbrokers detail for your efficiency in recovering all of 
the instruments stolen from the high schools of this city 
during my term as bandmaster for the Board of Educa- 
tion extending over five years. Such efficiency is to be 
commended and I hope I am not too late in offering 
such commendations. During my term of sel■^•ice as head 
of the Music School, L'nited States Naval Training School 
on Goat Island, San Francisco, two insti-uments were 
stolen and were immediately recovered by your pawn- 
brokers detail. After observing such efficiency and ob- 
taining such co-operation I hope you will accept this letter 
of thanks. 

THOMAS J. KENNEDY, 
Chief Bandmaster, U. S. N., Retired, 
Director of R. 0. T. C. and High School 
Bands, S. F. Calif. 
» * * 

We wish to acknowledge with sincei-e thanks the kind 
expression of your sympathy and we assure you that the 
honor and respect accorded to our dearly beloved departed 
by yourself and the members of your department will never 
be forgotten. 

GERTRUDE and JOAN CAMPBELL. 

* * « 

The family of the late James O'Donnell acknowledges 
with grateful appreciation your kind expression of sym- 
pathy. 



Page 20 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



THE PATROL WAGON SERVICE 



Little is known these days of tlie difficulties of 
the old-time policeman, in arresting and conveying 
to the City Prison persons charged with crime, 
prior to the introduction of patrol wagons into the 
police department in 1891. 

In those days when nearly every corner har- 
bored a saloon or liquor store, the class of prison- 
ers charged with drunkenness were more numer- 
ous than now, and as a consequence of the ample 
supply of liquor to be had, the policeman was often 
called upon to send some unfortunate to the City 
Prison or hospital. 

As the department had no conveyance of its 
own, it was necessary to press into service any 
sort of horse-drawn vehicle that happened to 
be found in the vicinity of the arrest, and the 
owner, after delivering his load at the City Prison 
received a check for two dollars for his services. 

This state of affairs continued until about 1891 
when one of our city newspapers began advocating 
the purchase of several patrol wagons for the 
benefit of the department, and after vainly trying 
to get the Board of Supervisors to appropriate 
money for such a purpose, the paper started a 
campaign that opened the eyes of the public to 
"The Power of the Press". 

One fine summer afternoon a young woman 
stylishly dressed, was taken suddenly ill, and fell 
in a faint near Lotta's Fountain. She remained 
there, apparently unconscious for some time, sur- 
rounded by men and women who were unable to 
help her. Finally a policeman arrived and after 
engaging an express wagon he conveyed her to 
the Receiving Hospital, at that time situated in 
the basement of the old Hall of Justice, now oc- 
cupied as a department garage. 

On the following day the newspaper printed an 
article on its first page, exposing the crude meth- 
ods of the city in caring for its unfortunates, and 
dwelt on the humiliation imposed on one of their 
female reporters who had been purposely assigned 
to write up the existing conditions, on the previ- 
ous day. 

This episode eventually resulted in the super- 
visors appropriating money to purchase a couple 
of open wagons similar to the Fire Department 
hose wagons of the present day, and for a short 
time those vehicles seemed to satisfy the wants 
of the department, but the winter rains soon 
brought about the demand for covered wagons 
and in a short time they were replaced by more 
suitable ones built in this city, and were a familiar 
sight on our streets until 1912, when the first 
motor patrol was installed in the Richmond Police 
Station. 

Since that time the patrol wagon service has 
taken great strides in the matter of equipment. 



FRESH PORK. CURED MEATS. SAUSAGES, 

PURE LARD AND COMPOUND 

HOGS BOUGHT AND SOLD 

ESTABLISHED 1880 

South San Francisco 

Packing and Provision 

Co. 

PORK PACKERS 

Office and Store: 

407-413 FRONT ST. Phone Sutter 1159 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



Monson Brothers 

BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION 

* * 



251 KEARNY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Massachusetts Bonding 
and Insurance Co. 

Home Office — Boston, Mass. 

Writes All Lines 

FIDELITY and SURETY BONDS 

PLATE GLASS. BURGLARY, GOLFERS' INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE and GENERAL LIABILITY 



Branch Office; 

401 INSURANCE EXCHANGE BUILDING 

San Francisco, California 



ORIGINAL 

Play Ball 

Third Season 
RELIABLE 




BUY THE ORIGINAL 

Beware of Imitations 



I 



April. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 21 



nearly all stations being supplied with the most 
modern motor vehicles, and with the prospect of 
several more in the coming year. 

Tiie position of driver in the department has 
always been rather unique. In 1891 when the 
first wagons were put in service, civilians were 
employed to do the driving. After a few years 
police officers were detailed for that purpose, and 
continued until 1902. Those officers performed 
no other duty than that to which they were as- 
signed, and this arrangement depleted the num- 
ber of men on the street to a minimum. 

About that time Chief Whitman made a demand 
on the Board of Supervisors for fifty more patrol- 
men, and when the board failed to appropriate 
the necessary money, he took the policemen off 
the wagons, put them back on their beats and 
compelled the Supervisors to once again employ 
civilian drivers. 

In July of that year, the first of the present 
day drivers were appointed, several still remain- 
ing in the department. In April, 1907, they were 
placed under Civil Service, and in 1913 the first 
examination for chauffeur was held and all new 
appointees since that time have been taken from 
that list. 

The status of the police patrol driver is defined 
by the Charter in Section 1, Chapter 1, Article 
VIII, and Section V.'-j, Chapter VI, Article VIII. 

Numerous old-time police officers have driven 
the wagon during their younger days in the de- 
partment, and within the memory of many of us 
a present day Captain of Police did his bit on the 
covered wagons. Wm. D. BURNS, : 

Patrol Driver. 



PENINSULA TRAFFIC POLICE ORGANIZE 

Marking the opening of a new drive on law- 
breakers in the San Francisco peninsula, with spe- 
cial attention to traffic law violators, police offi- 
cers from communities from Daly City to San 
Jose met March 3 and formed the Peninsula Police 
Officers' Association. 

The organization will seek more thorough co- 
operation between the forces of the various cities. 
The organization was brought about through the 
initiative of the officers themselves, and is an as- 
sociation apart from that entered into by the 
chiefs of the various forces. 

Police Oflicer Jack Thuer of Burlingame was 
elected temporary president and R. C. Lawrence 
of Palo Alto, secretary. 

Among those leading in the formation of the 
rssociation were Officers Edward McAuliffe and 
Stanley Woods of Redwood City, C. A. Caldwell 
of Belmont, Sergeant A. Lawrence and Officer R. 
C. Lawrence of Palo Alto, Officers John Hartnett, 
Earl Christenson and A. Waldeck of Burlingame, 
and members of the San Mateo force. 



Guide 
Motor Head Lamp 
Guide Ray and Tilt Ray 



AND PARTS 



Original Bosch 

Magnetos, Spark Plugs, 
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Generators, Starters, Etc. 



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Phone Graystone 4410 



All Ma.\es of Magnetos Repaired 




Hutton Building, Montgomery and Bush Sts., San Francisco 

E.F.HUTTON&CO. 

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and other principal exchanges 

San Francisco Office — Jlontgomery and Bush Sts. 
OAKLAND— Franklin at 13th St. 



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Los Angeles Hollywood Del Monte 

Pasadena San Diego San Jose 

New York Offices 

61 Brnadway Plaza Hotel 

Woolworth Building 

PRIVATE WIRES COAST TO COAST 



Page 22 "2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 

"THE DESERT SHALL REJOICE" 



April, 1927 



The poem below was written by Chief Arthur Dowell 
of Fort Worth, Texas, who is an uncle of Detective Ser- 
geant Marvin Dowell of the S. "F. Department. 



What a wealth the desert holds 

Of our Lord Omnipotent ; 
Amid the cacti in the waste, 

The myriad rose was sent: 
To teach and please the Sage Hen, 

With her brood, and passers by ; 
To show life, within solitude. 

Beneath a desert sky ! 

The hand that made the desert. 

Cast the mesa and the buttes ; 
In reach of purple mountains. 

Where the mirage ti-embles mute ! 
To the Desert's vast wilderness 

The rays from stars were sent 
To show the wealth of love, 

In our Lord Omnipotent! 

Every desert has its purpose, 

To compete with mortal mind, 
In fixing lack and limitation ; 

The strictest one could find; 
. But no place in God's Kingdom 

Fails to yield a share of gold. 
If our thought is ever perfect; 

Like God's blessings manifold ! 

Our privilege to seek the desert, 

To commune with God, Omnipotent; 
In the vastness of this world. 

Where Bethlehem's Babe was sent ; 
To teach the Mighty Doctrine, 

Of Love — the only power — 
That heals sin and disease, 

Within this present hour ! 

— Envoi — 
The mirage is only seeming. 

Like a dream within the night; 
And our fear within the desert. 

Is a lack of Spiritual Light! 

—ARTHUR E. DOWELL, 
Chief of Police, Fort Worth, Texas. 




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Oakland 2592 

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TRinity 8997 



i 



April, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 23 



COULDN'T ESCAPE OUR BUREAU OF 
IDENTIFICATION 



Samuel T. Stewart is a negro door tender nearly 
seven feet tall. April 5th he was arrested by De- 
tective Sergeants John J. Cannon, J. J. McKenna 
and Special Britt, of the lilotor Vehicle Depart- 
ment for trying to beat an insurance company out 
of a fee by having a companion wlieel an auto- 
mobile over a cliff. In fact, he had two compan- 
ions, Frank Reynolds being one, and John Mc- 
Donald, the other. There was some dispute about 
the compensation the companions were to receive 
after they had performed their task, and as a re- 
sult, as generaly is the case, when "thieves fall 
out, honest men get their dues". Anyhow they 
turned Stewai-t up. 

He was quizzed after being charged wth vio- 
lating Sec. 548 of the penal code. He denied ever 
being arrested before, in fact the experience of 
having the heavy hands of the law set upon his 
broad and elevated shoulders was something new 
to him. Also he had never been mixed up in any- 
thing that would call for any activity of any police 
department, so far as he was concerned. 

Yes indeed, Mr. Stewart was somewhat cha- 
grined, confused and confounded by being locked 
up in his nice gray uniform, trimmed wdth red. 
He didn't think it was right, in fact he insisted it 
was wTong. 

All this was before Sergeant Emmett Hogan. 
of the Bureau of Identification, Officers James Gal- 
lagher, and Timothy Bm-ke, got busy on Mi'. 
Stewart. 

Then the scenes changed, as the show folks say. 
It was found by comparing his finger prints, that 
he was badly wanted back in Detroit by Chief 
William T. Rutledge for murder. He was accused 
of having murdered a man named Gurnsey ^^■hit- 
field back in January, 1924. He was immediatelj' 
given an additional booking as a fugitive and the 
Detroit authorities notified. 



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Telephone Davenport 4520 



Page 24 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April. 1927 ■ 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES 



At a meeting of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners held on March 28th, 1927, the following 
proceedings wei'e had: 

Corporals John A. Reed, rank 1 ; Maurice Rear- 
don, rank 2; Joseph M. Walsh, rank 3; George S. 
McCullough, rank 4, and Henry H. Ludolph, rank 
5, were appointed and promoted to the rank of 
sergeants of police, said appointment and promo- 
tion to take effect April 1st, 1927. 

The above promoted Sergeants remain with 
their present respective commands. 

The following transfers have been made in this 
department, effective March 28th, 8 a. m. 

Sergeant Bernard Maloney, Co. C to Co. H. 

Corporal Edward A. Mitchell, Co. B to Co. F. 

Corporal Robert E. Lindsey, Co. F to Co. L. 

Coiijoral Thos. F. Naughton, Co. L to Co. F. 

Officer Michael F. Fitzpatrick, Co. E to Co. A. 

Corporal Thomas F. Buckley, Jr., 1. to L., Star 
885. 

Corporal Thomas R. Ritter, K. to M., Star 141. 

Corporal Albion Erickson, L. to 0., Star 878. 

Officer Herman T. Lewis, G. to E., Star 665. 

Officer Frank J. Corby, L. to A., Star 175. 

Officer Frank Robert Pleasants, A. to L., Star 
1021. 

Officer George B. Marshman, B. to F., Star 952. 

Officer John S. Duryea, F to B., Star 1044. 

Officer George W. Clark, H. to L, (day watch) 
Star 387. 

Officer Edward William Schuldt, G. to B., Star 
1023. 

Officer Michael Sweeney, B. to G., (Relieved 
from temporary detail with Co. K. He is at pres- 
ent on disabled list.) Star 753. 

Officer Frank J. Davis, having completed his 
course of instruction in the Department School of 
Instruction, has been assigned to duty with the 
Bush Street Police District, Company E, effective 
8 a. m., March 28th, 1927. 

Paul T. Sullivan was appointed a patrol wagon 
driver in the Police Department, said appointment 
to take effect immediately and to be subject to the 
probationary period of six months as is provided 
for in the Charter. 



KEEP YOUR AUTO FROM BEING STOLEN 

(Continued from Page 6) 
stripping the accessories of such abandoned cars 
is tried by the boys, and perhaps a life of crime 
starts from such beginnings. Boys steal only 
those cars which are easy to steal. 

If you value your life, the lives of others, if you 
believe in law and order, if you believe in reducing 
all types of crime, take ordinary precautions 
against the theft of your automobile, for this one 
crime is responsible for many others of a more 
serious nature, and is the most prevalent of all 
crimes. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
OAKLAND 



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MEMBERS 

SAN FRANCISCO STOCK 

& BOND EXCHANGE 



April. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 2S 



POLICE BASEBALL LEAGUE FORMED 

A four-team league has been formed to partici- 
pate in the police baseball tournament whicli 
started April 1st. 

The stations participating in tiie league are 
Mission, Bush, Park and Ingleeide. 

Two years ago the Missions won the pennant 

and they are out with a strong team to repeat, 

but the other stations have strengthened their 

line-up and it will be a meiTy battle. 

PLAYING SCHEDULE 

1927 SAN FRANCISCO POLICE LEAGUE 

At Mission At Bush At Park At Ingleside 

*May 6 Apr. 22 Apr. 8 

Mission *June 17 June 3 May 20 

*July 29 July 15 July 1 



Bush 



Apr. 15 
May 27 
July 8 



*Apr. 8 
*May 20 
*July 1 



*Apr. 22 
*June 3 
*July 15 



*Apr. 1 


Apr. 29 




May 6 


Park *May 13 
*June 24 
*Apr. 29 


June 10 
July 22 
Apr. 1 


*Apr. 15 


June 17 
July 29 


Ingleside *June 10 
*July 22 


May 13 
June 24 


*May 27 
*July 8 





*To be played at the Harrison street diamond 
Weekly Sche<lulc 
April 1: Park at Mission — Ingleside at Bush 
April 8: Mission at Ingleside — Bush at Park 
April 15: Bush at Mission — Ingleside at Park 
April 22: Mission at Park — Bush at Ingleside 
April 29: Ingleside at Mission — Park at Bush 
May 6: Mission at Bush — Park at Ingleside 
Park at Mission — Ingleside at Bush 
Mission at Ingleside — Bush at Park 
Bush at Mission — Ingleside at Park 
Mission at Park — Bush at Ingleside 
Ingleside at Mission — Park at Bush 
Mission at Bush — Park at Ingleside 
Park at Mission — Ingleside at Bush 
Mission at Ingleside — Bush at Park 
Bush at Mission — Ingleside at Park 
Mission at Park — Bush at Ingleside 
Ingleside at Mission — Park at Bush 
Mission at Bush — Park at Ingleside 
club plays 18 games. Each club plays 
No club plays any other 



May 13: 
May 20: 
May 27: 
June 3: 
June 10: 
June 17: 
June 24: 
July 1: 
July 8: 
July 15: 
July 22: 
July 29: 
NOTE— Each 

every other club 6 times 



club twnce in succession. Each club plays ha'f its 
games on the Harrison street diamond as indicated 
by stars in the schedule given at top. 

ACKNOWLEDGES SERVICE RENDERED 

Your letter of recent date received and please accept 
my thanks for the information contained therein. It is 
gratifying to know the splendid results that our Police 
Department are having with the clearing up of this light 
menace in the automobile traffic. As a citizen I wish to 
thank your department for their efforts along this line 
and hope that they will continue their diligence and it may 
be that some day all autoists will obey the law on this 
matter. May I, in passing, speak a word of commendation 
for our Police Captain in the Western Addition, Captain 
Coulter; he is a splendid officer, a courteous gentleman and 
a credit to any Department. 

DR. MERREL E. THOMAS, 
426-8 Shrader Street, City. 



LOGAN 6t, BRYAN 

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35 POST STREET 426 - 13th STREET 

Sutter 7140 Phone Lakeside 101 

HONOLULU 

FIRST N.\TI0N'AL BANK BLDG. 

Phone 12S3 



Page 26 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




Officer Cornelius Desmond has been transferred from 
ollice man at the Central station to a similar position 
with Lieut. Bernard McDonald in the otiice of the Auto- 
mobile Detail. Officer Evans, whose clerical ability is 
well known, has been shifted to the general office where 
he is assisting under Captain John Lachman. 

* * * 

Joseph Skelton and Charles Dunn are looking out of 
the barred side of felony row, each faced with two 
charges of robbery. They were placed in durance vile 
by Officers J. Toohig and Special V. Bacigalupi. 

* * ^: 

Perambulating along the streets of our city, Thomas 
Newbar attracted the attention of Officer J. Rogers, who 
felt that Tommy wasn't easing along as he should be, 
so he caused him to pause, asked a few embarrassing 
and personal questions, and satisfied that his suspicions 
wei'e well grounded, the next thing Tommy knew he was 
surrounded by a lot of up and down half-inch steel bars 
and the station clerk was writing infomiation that indi- 
cated to all who cared to read that Tommy was duly 
charged with violating Sections 112 and 121 of the 
Motor Vehicle Act. 

« « * 

Detective Sergt. Thomas Hyland has taken up the 
study of hypnotism and those who have seen him demon- 
strate his knowledge of this fascinating science say he 
has the goods. 

* * * 

There are a few Chinese who think they can still carry 
on a traffic in narcotics. It is Sergeant John J. Manion's 
idea to dispel this belief and to do this he and his 
squadron certainly give plenty of free rides to these law 
violators. Here are a few scooped in during the past 
month, all for violating the State poison law: Sam Yet, 
Tom Lung, Chin Foo, Lai Tin Yee, Jue Chun, four 
charges. Other arrests by the Chinatown squad were 
Yee Lock, carrying a gun; Charles Graney and Joe Lynch, 
grand larceny by trick and device. 

« « 4: 

Corporal Thomas Melnerney arrested Edith Edwards 
for grand larceny, Thomas Varnum for bad cheeks, 
George J. Walsh, violating the juvenile court law, to- 
gether with a score of vags. 

In addition to contributing heavily to the prison pop- 
ulation with vags and such, Corp. Al Christ and Officer 
Patrick Walsh arrested Georgia Zollicoffer for violating 
State poison law. 

* * * 

Corporal Daniel O'Neill of the Bureau of Identification 
was assigned by Chief O'Brien the beginning of the 
month to entertain Congressman Jarrett of Honolulu. 
Some years ago Corporal O'Neill was detailed by the late 
Chief White to the police department and sheriff's office 
of the Hawaiian capital to install a bureau of identifi- 
cation. At that time the now Congressman Jarrett was 
high sheriff, and during O'Neill's stay in the Islands he 
and the Congressman became fast friends. So well did 
the San Francisco identification expert do his work that 
he was highly commended by the authorities of the 
Island province. 



Oflicer Harry Ross of Company 
number changed from 783 to 1198. 



M has had his star 



Members of the department were deeply grieved the 
early part of this month to learn of the death of the 
wife of Sergeant J. J. Farrell assigned with the Harbor 
station. Mrs. Farrell passed away at St. Mary's hospital 
after a brief illness. 

H: * * 

Sergeant Hayden and Officer J. McCarthy arrested L. F. 
Connors for driving while intoxicated. 

* * * 

Patrol Wagon Driver John J. Flynn of the Bush station 
died March 27th, the funeral taking place on March 29th. 
The deceased was accorded a police full honor funeral 
and associates of the department tenderly carried him 
to his last resting place. 

# * * 

Officer John Keeley of the General Office, was strut- 
ting around the other day because of the arrival of a 
second daughter in the Keeley family. Mrs. Keeley and 
the young lady are both now able to be home and John 
says the new arrival will either be a movie star or a 
policewoman. 

* * « 

Away back in New York State, with plenty of snow on 
the ground, it makes me proud to have been bom in San 
Franci.sco when I read about the fine work of your noble 
army of policemen. 

May I congi-atulate you and the brave officers on last 
Sunday morning's wonderful work in the capture of the 
Church bomber. 

JOE McCARTY, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 



ECONOMY 

does not mean a miserly 
denial of life's pleasures 
and comforts. Economy 
means saving where ever 
possible. This market 
affords the best at the 
lowest prices. 



Palace 

VarlSet,Wssioit(£ig^tt Sb. 




April 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 27 




CENTRAL 

STATION 



Capt. Arthur D. Layne 
Lieutenants: Harry P. Braig and Edward F. Copeland 

Officers George Ohnimus and E. Chrlstal with Officers 
F. Corby arrested Jolin Nesbit and Charles Snell on 

charges of robbery. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Harry Braig headed a posse that arrested 
Henry Flores on an assault charge. 

* * * 

Joe Bentince and Danacio Torres were another pair of 
assaulters taken in custody by Officers Ray Harris and 

James Morley. 

* * * 

Officer George Lillis grabbed off Peter Perry, who was 
also wanted on an assault by means and force. 

* * * 

Lillis and Officer George Burkhard brought in William 
Meyer charged with driving while intoxicated and with 
reckless driving. 

Mi * * 

Officers Harry Gurtler, Dan Pallas and John Twomey 
booked Ed Sing for violating the state gun law and en 
route to Oakland. Gurtler also arrested Alfred Soria for 
manslaughter. 

* * * 

Bailiff Mannie F. Joy booked Frank Resales on a kick 

of threats against life. 

* * * 

Helen Williams, charged with assault with a deadly 

weapon, was arrested by Officer James Morley. 

* * * 

Elmer Hull, charged with violating Section 146 of the 
M. V. Act, was locked up by Officer John Bell. 

* :^ * 

Charles Foster, accused of grand larceny, was taken 
to the city prison by Officer James Gallagher. 

Frank Peterson, charged with refusing to support his 
children, was served with a warrant by Officer Frank 
Akers. 

^ ^ ^ 

Reginald Wilson, grand larcenist, was put behind 

prison bars by Officers William Porter and J. Lawless. 

* * * 

Officer L. Rosa brought in George Ricasa and Carlo 
Ricci, a couple of petty thieves. 

* * * 

Mike Fachin, charged with assault to commit murder, 
was tagged by Officer F. Hoepner. 

* * * 

Russell Kenney was another grand larcenist who was 
put away by Officers Pallas and Edward Fewer . 

* * * 

Sergeant Dougherty and Officer M. Carmody grabbed 
off Edward McGovern. who was driving around in viola- 
tion of Section 112 of the Motor Act. 



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Page 28 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 




SOUTHERN 

STATION 



Capt. Charles Goff 
Lieutenants Arthur DeGuire and Arno Dietel 

Gents charged with not fulfilling the requirements 
of Section 112 of the M. C. Act, and arrested for not 
so doing are: Thomas McCullough, arrested by Officer 
G. Sullivan; John Hooland, arrested by Officer William 
Gleeson, and William Wanderer, arrested by Officers 
Oliver Lundborg and L. Bubose. 

Officer A. Wenzler brought in Edward Holzer, a 112'er 
and charged with driving oft with another man's auto- 
mobile. Holzer's partner, Eldon McLeod, got a book- 
ing also on the latter charge. 

* * :!; 

Officer M. McCarthy No. 2 arrested Charles Dolan, 
wanted for grand larceny. 

Corporal Emmett Flynn, one of Captain Charles Goff's 
shock troops, arrested Algernon Montigel, wanted in Los 
Angeles, and Dwyte Wolfe, wanted by the U. S. Navy. 

Harry Johnson, a petty larcenist, was snared by Offi- 
cer William Kruger and the same officer hung two petty 
larceny charges on John Burge. 

H.: If. -J:. 

Officer P. Zgraggen grabbed off James O'Conner, who 
was enjoying an outing in another gent's car. 

* * * 

Layton Main got two counts of 288 and two of 288a 
when he was locked up by Officers Charles Keck and W. 
Frye. 

:;: S: * 

Officer J. Hart charged Thomas Corra with assault to 
commit robbery and violating the gun law as he marched 
him up to the booking desk. 

* * * 

Thomas Meehan walked off with a flock of fountain 
pens and got himself all locked up by Sergeant John 
Dowie and Officer J. Donovan. 

••:: * * 

Carl Ewert was wanted down in Burlingame, so Offi- 
cer Richard Curtin picked him up and sent him down to 
Chief John Harper. 



POLICE SHOW 

(Continued from Page 16) 

towards the success of the ball, is entitled to credit 
for our great success, because without the whole 
machine co-ordinating perfectly, the affair could 
not have been the success that it was. As Chair- 
man of the 1927 Executive Committee of the Wi- 
dows' and Orphans' Aid Association of the San 
Francisco Police Department's Grand Concert and 
Ball, I want to personally thank every member of 
every committee, and every member of the Police 
Department who helped to make this, our recent 
ball, the greatest social and financial success that 
has ever been given by the Widows' and Orphans' 
Aid Association of the San Francisco Police De- 
partment. 



Wear a Hat Like the Chief's! 

Leave it to an O'Brien to know a "kelly." Chief 
Dan calls on Lundstrom every season for the 
smartest thing in hats. This year he's wearing 
the "Californian", the new snap brim, priced $5. 



JUHid^lcm/ 




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April, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 29 




HARBOR 

STATION 



Capt. Patrick Herlihy 
Lieutenants Wilbert F. Pengelly and Michael Mitchell 

Alex Alexanderoff was steering an uncertain course 
along the front in his automobile. Otficer J. J. Cum- 
mings observed hira and decided he was breaking the 
provisions of Section 112 of the Motor Vehicle Act, 
and arrested him in accordance with those provisions. 
* * * 

James Walsh tried a little plain burglarying and he 
got snared by Officer J. Argenti, who can tell a burglar 
as far as he can see him. 

* H: * 

This is all Officer Peter Peshon, Jr.. did to Charles 
Ray when he got him to the station. Put two charges 
of 146 of the Motor Vehicle Act; two charges of hit and 
run, and one charge of driving while intoxicated. 

* * :!: 

When a citizen approached Officer Thomas Bluitt and 
said a couple of guys had tried to stick him up, the citi- 
zen was asked a general description of the assailants. 
The description was forthcoming and in no time Bluitt 
had James Morro and Frank Spencer at the station, and 
they were identified as the birds wanted and were each 
booked on a charge of assault with intent to commit 
robbery. 



FITZGERALD 

(Continued from Page 14) 
fession in its entirety because of a suspicion that 
all was not as it should be in obtaining it, yet if the 
prosecution is able by other proof to establish the 
existence of facts and circumstances related to 
the confession then to such extent the confession 
is admissible despite the contention as to the 
manner in which it was obtained. The importance 
of such proof in many cases is obvious. In a trial 
for homicide in which the accused in a confession 
made immediately following his arrest not only 
admits his guilt but relates the details of the 
tragedy he may on the advice of counsel repudiate 
the confession and endeavor to establish an alibi. 
The court may hold the confession inadmissible as 
such. If the prosecutor then by independent evi- 
dence establishes affirmatively a number of the 
details related to the confession, the establishment 
of the proof then renders such portions of the con- 
fession admissible and the guilty knowledge and 
complicity of the accused is thus brought con- 
clusively before the jury and renders ineffective 
his claim of alibi. Their arrival at the verdict is 
then but a short step. 



Percy Smith, now patrol sergeant at the North 

End used to walk a beat at the old Central. 

* * * 

Jack ]\Ianion, detective sergeant in charge of the 
Chinatown Squad \\as on street duty in the Cen- 
tral District. 



The Largest Plant of its Kind in the 
United States 

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SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone MARKET 230 



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Located in the heart 
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BLANCO'S 

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859 O'FARRELL ST., between Polk and Larkin Sts. 

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Also a la carte. 
Banquet Halls PHONE GRAYSTONE 8100 



EVERY 
Auto Accessory 

at a 

LOWER Price 

LEVIN'S AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

Van Ness at Market, San Francisco 



Page iO 



"2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April. J 927 




MISSION 

STATION 



Capt. FYederick Lemon 
Lieutenants Peter A. Mclntyre and Daniel J. Collins 

Officer P. Keeling brought in a couple of young men 
whom he charged with burglary. The pris-oners gave 
the names of Howell Collins and Vincent Gavigen. 

Corporal Patrick Shannon arrested Clarence Emery 
wanted in Santa Clara, and George Salzman, a juvenile 
Court Law violator. 

•^ -i^ * 

Jack Long accused of manslaughter and Prank Esman, 
charged with the same offense, were locked up by Offi- 
cer F. Nuttman. 

* * * 

Officer Charles Foster booked George Devince for 
grand larceny. 

* * * 

Harold Dornberger invaded this district in a condition 
that warranted Officer William Byrne arresting him on 
a 112 charge. 

Officers Cliff McDaniell and J. Laine arrested Ray 
Thompson on a similar charge. 

While Officers Charles Wennerberg and Laine locked 
up Gustaf Kaasik as another driver while intoxicated. 

* * * 

George Murray, accused of grand larceny, was brought 
to the station by Officer J. Carpenti. 

S: « S: 

James Allen, charged with petty larceny, was taken 
in custody by Officer McDaniell. 

Charles Russ^ell was another likewise charged when 
arrested by Officer C. Andrus. 

:|: * * 

Eugene Dower and James Murphy spread some bad 
checks out in this section, as is the case with all evil 
doers, they got locked up. Officers J. McKenna and J. 
Keeley turned the keys on the pair. 

* * * 

Officer C. Thompson gave John Egui a ride on a 
charge of receiving stolen goods. 



Cherry's Courteous Credit 

Stylish Apparel for Men and Women 

CASH PRICES on CREDIT 

Eighteen Tears in San Francisco 
Eight Stores on the Coast 

CHERRY'S 

2400 MISSION ST. Cor. 20th St. 



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is a modern way of paying 
for the Clothing needs of 
the entire Family! 

Small Payments Weekly or Monthly 

Columbia Outfitting Co. 

Mission at 22nd 




Doughnut and Sandwich Shops 

658 Market Street 24 Geary Street 

1014 Market Street, Opposite 6th 
Mission at 22nd Fillmore at Geary 

VISIT OUR RESTAURANT at 658 MARKET ST. 



Gray Line Motor Tours 

The World's Largest and Best Equipped 
SIGHTSEEING SERVICE 

Operating in fifteen cities of United States 
and Canada 



San Francisco Office 

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Phone Sutter 5186 

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SAN FRANCISCO LAUNDRY 
Telephone West 793 



Buy a Better Mattress at Factory 






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1687 MARKET ST., at Goiiah St. 
<No Branchei) 



Park 4333 



April. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 31 




BUSH ST. 

STATION 



Lieutenants Edward L. Cullnan and Joseph Mignola 
Capt John J. Casey 

Robbery arrests in this station included Frank Longuy 
by Sergeant Christensen and Officers John Dolan, Jr., 
and Frank Jackson: John Nosoff by Officers J. Riordan 
and G. Tobin, and Joseph Brandon, by Corporal Drury 
and Officer E. Clancy. 

* -■:: -i- 

The list of 112'ers reads as follows: Virginia Linehan, 
arrested by Officer N. Kavanaugh; Harold Waganiau, by 
Officers John Dolan and L. Atkinson; John Johnson, by 
Officer Gus Petger; Harry LaVerne, by Officers J. Ross 
and F. Jescke; Mike O'Connell, by Officer G. Bergerson. 

:i; ^; ^ 

Burglary arrests recorded were Fred Lacey, Dewey 
Brigman and A. Whitehead by Corporal T. M. Mc- 
Carthy and posse; William Walsh, by Officers E. Clancy 
and G. Fitzpatrick. 

* * * 

Captain John J. Casey headed a bunch of his boys on a 
raid and they met up with John Jackson who was "totin" 
a pop. Jackson got a gun charge booking and charges 
of violating several other well known laws. 

* * * 

Hugh Orr, accused of manslaughter, was brought to 
the station by Officer R. Anderson. 



Richard Wallace, wanted for embezzlement, 
prehended by Corporal Thomas Feeney. 



was ap- 



Milbrand Bell, accused of grand larceny, was taken in 
tow by Corporal Boyle and William Ward. 

William Reynolds, violating gun law, and William 
Brown, charged with assault with a deadly weapon, were 
a couple of others that Boyle and his posse brought in. 

Officers Robert Garrick and E. Connell got Joseph 
Sullivan, who was wanted for assault with a deadly 
weapon. 

* * « 

Lawrence Castner, accused of assault, was locked up 
by Officer M. Fitzpatrick. 

Corporal James Ray headed a posse that arrested Al- 
bert Gross for threats against life. 

* * « 

Edgar Jacobs, arrested by Corporal Ray and Emory 
Lowe, arrested by Officer John Dolan, were a couple of 
auto takers, put behind prison bars. 

* * * 

Officer Gus Wuth brought in James Moran for omit- 
ting to provide for his child. 

^:: * * 

Thomas Wagner, charged with assault to murder, was 
locked in by Officers Dolan and L. Atkinson. 

* * * 

Officer Edward Keane booked John Crenshaw for vio- 
lating Section 442% of the P. C. 

* * * 

Ernest Fleming, charged with violating Section 504 
of the P. C. was arrested by Officer E. Lindenau. 



V 



SERVICE:; 



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this city have made "WHITE'S SERVICE" the 
premier funeral service of the West. 

A quiet investigation will prove to you that we 
are indeed leaders in sensible charges, and render 
always a "SUPERIOR FUNERAL SERVICE." 



S. A. WHITE 

Leading Funeral Director 

TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE 
2200 Sutter Street €; San Francisco 



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Rates from $2.60 

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Incorporated 1905 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

LIVE and DRESSED POULTRY 

SUPPLIERS OF HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 

313-315 Washington St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Page 32 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



TRAFFIC BUREAU 

Ca|rtain Hcni>- Gloeson 
liieuteiiants J. J. Casey, J. (Cliff) Fields and Grovcr Coats 

Here are the boys who ride, the motorbikes and keep 
the speeders within check, working under Corporals 
Archie Schmidt and Luther Arentz: I. Bittles, A. J. 
Curry, L. Delehanty, Elmer Esperance, E. A. Franke, 
C. C. Ireland, W. J. Martin, W. T. Mathes, G. M. McArdle, 
Charles Neary, J. H. Nyland, Edward O'Day, M. J. 
O'Rourke, J. E. Perry, C. E. Perscheid, G. W. Thulander, 
J. Wichstrom, J. Wisnom, Jr. 

These lads cover this town in a manner that is sur- 
prising when one considers the small number of the 
squad, which, divided into two shifts, each having to 
spend considerable time in police courts to present their 
cases. 

Corp. Harold Levy got oft his horse to assist Detective 
Clarence Herlitz arrest Charles Snell, who was wanted 

for vagrancy. 

* * --i-- 

Traffic OfBcer W. O'Halihan quit directing trafiic long 
enough to spear Edward Moll, who was making away 
with some radio tubes from a Market street store. Moll 
was booked for larceny. 

* * * 

Frederick Plack was wobbling about a bit in his car 
when Traffic Officer J. Kelley spotted him. Freddie was 
halted and marched to a nearby police box where he was 
shunted into a patrol wagon, properly charged with 
violating Section 112. 

* -f- * 

Traffic Officers H. Lundy and E. Anderson had a sim- 
ilar experience with Victor McMahon. McMahon was 
given one of those driving while intoxicated bookings. 

* * * 

Traffic Officer Andrew Miller, the serious minded 
young man who greets the tag holders each morning, 
says some folks think fire hydrants are erected for the 
purpose of anchoring autos to. 



MAYOR THANKS POLICE FOR GOOD TIME 
AT ANNUAL SHOW 



The following communication which has been 
received by Captain William J. Quinn, chairman 
of the Grand Concert and Ball Committee of the 
1927 Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association Po- 
lice Ball: 
Dear Captain Quinn: 

I thank you and the members of the Widows' 
and Orphans' Aid Association for your kind let- 
ter of February 16, enclosing reserve box seats 
for your concert and ball held last Saturday eve- 
ning at the Exposition Auditorium. 

I enjoyed the concert and ball immensely and 
wish to congratulate you and the entire Police 
Department for the wonderful way in which the 
affair was handled. 

With my compliments and best wishes to the 
entire department, 

Yours very sincerely, 

JAMES ROLPH, JR. 
Mayor. 



FACTS YOU WANT TO KNOW 
ABOUT DIVERSIFICATION 

In the last analysis all this basic investment principle means 
is this: "Don't put all your eggs in one basket." If all your 
money is in one security or in one area some unforeseen and 
unforeseeable happening may spell havoc. There's safety in 
spreading the risk. Feel free to consult us. 

For facts about investment consult 

de Fremery & Company 

Member 
The San Francisco Slock & Bond Exchange 

341 Monteomerjr St. 3004 - 16th Street 

Room 209 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephones : 
Davenport 1516, 1616, 1617. 1618 



Top Floor. San 
Francisco Stock 
and Bond Ex- 
change Building 




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GENERAL 
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Proved by 
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Sold through 
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iLook for the Creen and White Sign} 



TusTin's 

Radio and Electric Store 

428 SUTTER STREET 



"I want every police officer to feel that he can 
come here and make this place his radio head- 
quarters. 

"He can send his wife or his child here and be 
sure they will be treated right." 



Radio .Sets 



Repairs and Parts 



April, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 33 




PARK 

STATION 



Capt. John J. O'Meara 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

Arthur Robinson found hanging around this district 
a good way to get a ride in the wagon. Officers C. 
Murphy and F. Haley brought him in on a vag charge. 

* * * 

Donald Booth got the same sort of an object lesson 
when he was arrested by Haley and Officer T. Lynch on 

Dewey Boulevard. 

* ^ * 

Moses Vexelman was doing nothing of any conse- 
quence so long that he attracted the attention of Offi- 
cers H. Hayes and C. Pruitt, who finally vagged him. 

* * • 

Officers W. Hansen and P. Schroeder arrested a couple 
of youths who were hanging around the park and hav- 
ing no apparent reason for so doing. The officers sent 
the lads to the juvenile detention home. 



CLEVER THIEF PULLS ONE HERE 



One should be careful in hiring- domestics. This 
has been indicated on several occasions during the 
past year. There is a class of women who get a 
job, generally in some well-to-do family, remain 
a while, get a lay of the valuables and then when 
the family is out, move all such articles away. 
And the domestic doesn't come back. 

Margaret Kerringer, with a flock of extra names 
to fit all occasions, is such a woman. She got a 
job in this city recently as a maid. She presented 
a ten month's old baby which threw the family 
who employed her oflf guard. She was a good maid 
for a few days. Finally the lady of the house 
went out for the day. When she returned, her 
maid was gone and so was about everything that 
could be moved. 

Some of the stolen articles showed up in the 
pawnshops, and Lieut. Henry Powell and his boys 
recovered it. 

There had been four similar jobs pulled in Los 
Angeles and they had been fastened on Mrs. Ker- 
ringer, who had been arrested, but escaped to 
Denver. Pictures were shown the woman who em- 
ployed her here and she readily identified her as 
the missing maid. 

Beside a ten months old baby, the Kerringer 
woman has a husband who undoubtedly furnishes 
the transportation for the loot taken. 



Eflfective February 25, 1927, temporary details 
from one company to another on account of the 
carpenters' labor difficulties, shall be returned to 
the original company, and effective at the time 
and date mentioned above the original company 
shall re-establish any special details which were 
disestablished on account of the labor difficulties. 




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Page 34 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April. 1927 




RICHMOND 

STATION 



Capt. William T. Healy 
Lieutenants Daniel W. Cronin, Francis J. McGuire 

Corporal Frank Rhodes and Officer Charles Cornelius 
brought in a bunch of young men whom they charged 
with burglary. There were five in the party and they 
gave their names as George Parker, Alfred Frietas, 
Ira Tucker, Lawrence Parlette and Carl McGee. The 
first two were given additional charges of conspiracy and 
all were booked en route to Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Timothy Crowley and Timothy Howard were picked 
up by Officers R. Smith and R. Nierney who booked them 
at the station on robbery charges. 

* * * 

Officers M. O'Rourke and G. McArdle saw an automo- 
bile reported stolen. They gave chase and when they 
stopped it they found a couple of kids taking a joy ride 
in the car. They booked the pair on Section 146 charges. 

* * * 

Albert McAllister, charged with driving while intoxi- 
cated and reckless driving and of violating the state pro- 
hibition law, was arrested by Officer George O'Brien. 

* * * 

Officers John Glennon and E. McCann made no mis- 
take when they arrested John Hill on a charge of at- 
tempted burglary. Hill is a two time loser. 

* 4: * 

Officers George O'Brien and J. Healy combined to 
capture Charles Worden, a hit and run driver. 

:!: ;i: * 

Leslie Curran and Ann Ballard were vagged by Offi- 
cers C. Radford and Edward Cordray. 

* * * 

Charged with assault by means and force likely to 
produce great bodily injury. Gene Alice was locked up 
by Officers R. Smith and J. Glennon. 



POLICE DAY 

(Continued from Page 11) 
Congratulations on your official Police Day movement. 
Your pioneer efforts in this direction commendable and 
such a move should be made national in scope. Success 
to your annual concert in behalf of the Widows' and 
Orphans' Aid Association of your police department. 
(William P. Walter, Chief of Police). 

* * * 
Congratulations for Police Day with hearty endorse- 
ment for permanent national recognition and richest bless- 
ings on widows and orphans. (J. L. Beavers, Chief of 
Police, Atlanta, Georgia). 

* * * 

Please accept thanks and congratulations on institution 
of Police Day during celebration today. (A. E. Foote, 
Commissioner of Public Safety, Massachusetts). 

* * * 

Thanks for invitation to Widows' and Orphans' Aid 
Association concert. Thanks also and congratulations for 
your proclamation of Police Day. (Joseph Gilholly, 
Deputy Chief Constable, Ottawa, Canada). 
* * * 

The Far East greets the Golden West and congratulates 

you as father of Police Day, Febi-uary 19, 1927. Best 

wishes to your Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association. 

May love, happiness and prosperity be writh you always. 

(Continued on Page 35} 



You get more in Service, without paying 
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La Grande and Whitens 
Laundry Company 

"The Recommended Laundry" 
Phone Market 916 

250 - 12th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Peninsula Phone San Mateo 1488 



Tuxedos and Full Dress 
Suits Rented 

A New Department with Us. 



All New Suits and 
the Latest Styles. 

Peerless Clothing Co. 

719 MARKET ST. 



BANCA POPOLARE FIJGAZI 

(FUGAZl BANK) 

F. N. BELGRANO, Pres. 
San Francisco — Oakland — Santa Barbara 

CalifornU 

ASSETS OVER $20,000,000.00 



Phone MARKET 952 



New Process Laundry Co. 

385 EIGHTH STREET 

GOOD WORK AND PROMPT SERVICE 



FIOR D'lTALIA RESTAURANT 

Music :-: Dancing :-: Entertainment 

Baaquet Halls tor small or lame parties 

492 BROADWAY 

Bet. Kearny and MontgomerySU. 



Phone Douglu 1504 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PHONE SUTTER 37J0 

LANKERSHIM HOTEL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
FIFTH STREET, bet. Market and Mission, SAN FRANCISCO 

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RATES: 

Without Bath— $1 and $2 With Bath— $2 and $2.50 

SUge. for all Pacific Coait FoinU Stop at Our Door 



A[>ril. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 35 




INGLESIDE 

STATION 



Capt. Eugene Wall 
Lieutenants Charles A. PfeifFer and Fred W. Norman 

Clifford Peterson and John Frisella were arrested by 
Officer D. O'Connell and charged with manslaughter, 
the arrest growing out of an automobile accident. 

* * # 

There were a few of the lads who were accused of 
using too much gin with their gasoline brought to the 
station for proper action by our legal machinery. 

* * * 

Thomas Malcolm was brought in by Officer O'Connell 
ind given a section 112 booking. 

:;: :;: * 

John Bouchi was another who ran his car in a manner 
that indicated he was breaking some of the demands of 
Section 112. and Officer J. O'Brien scooped him in. 

* * * 

Officer H. Mohr felt that Ben Taylor should be taken 
in on a like charge, so he took him to the station. 

* * * 

Officers Jerry Kelleher and Dominic Hogan, recently 
restored to patrol duty after months on the strike de- 
tail, arrested Maurice O'Callaghan. former prohibition 
igent, on a charge of felony embezzlement. 

* # * 

Lester H. Ninnie and Bert Seward were arrested by 
Officers R. McKenna, Charles Flanagan and A. Smith. 
Minnie got bookings as a violator of the gun law, the 
juvenile court law, state prohibition act, sections 410 
ind 6 7 of the Motor Vehicle Act. Seward was locked up 
is a vagrant. 

* * * 

Officer H. Honnef arrested Jose Fernandez as a petty 
larcenist. 

* * :;: 

Alex Culba was booked by Officers Higan and Kelleher 
is a vag. 



POLICE DAY 

(Continued from Page 34) 
Police Day instituted by you and advent in police af- 
fairs are worthy of emulation. Convey to those present, 
greetings from Toronto Police Department. (S. J. Dick- 
son, Chief Constable). 



PRAISE FX>R GOOD POIJCE WORK 



As an old time citizen of San Francisco and a.'; a na- 
tural admirer of yours, I did not want to let an oppor- 
tunity like the present pass ^dthout sending- you a line 
of admiration for the very extraordinary work of the de- 
partment of which you have the honor to be the head. 

The recent work of the police in rounding up and effec- 
tively stopping such disturbing criminal acts as have 
come to the notice of our commonwealth is especially 
noteworthy and commendable. 

I take great pleasure, and I hope you will allow me to 
say, pardonable pride, in giving expression to such praise. 
J. C. BERENDSEN, 
CO Hinz and Landt, Inc., 
Market at Fifth Streets. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



Only the Best of The Great 
Motion Picture Plays — 

Fanchon & Marco's E)ver-new 
"IDEAS" 



.Telephone Market 4330 

Water and Rail Connections 

Sudden Lumber Co. 

Office Number 1950 THIRD STREET 
San Francisco, California 



"SUDDEN SERVICE" 



St. Germain Restaurant 

60 and 68 ELLIS STREET 

300 Seats 

Main Dining Room 

300 Second Floor 

We are prepared 

to serve 

Sumptuous or 

Modest Dinner 

Parties 

Banquet Halls with 

Dancing Floors 

Lunch 65c and $1 

Dinner $1.25 

De Luxe S2.50 

A la carte at all hours 




NEW POODLE DOG 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

POLK AND POST STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO - - CALIFORNIA 



Daniel T. HaiUon Chal. M. O'Brien 

Telephone Market 7906 

Sanitary Towel Supply Co. 

84 NINTH STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



DOUGLAS 6346 

EASTMAN KODAK STORES, Inc. 

Formerly Rowland & Dewey Co. 

EVERYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 

545 MARKET ST. SAX FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Page 36 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 




NORTH END 

STATION 



Capt. Herbert J. Wright 
Lieutenants D. M. Reavis and George Duffy 

CORPORAL CASEY COMMENDED 



To Police Captain, North End Station: 

I wish to thank the personnel of the North End police 
station for their co-operation in locating my stolen car. 
I also wish to commend Corp. James Casey for his brave 
and efficient work in capturing the thieves responsible. 
"He is a man on the job." 

B. P. McBRIDE, 1363 5th Avenue. 
* * * 

Charles P. Connoly, who has a lot of extra monikers 
and who has a nice record up on the books In Sergeant 
Emmett Hogan's department, was grabbed off by Cor- 
poral Casey who got Connoly's partner, Elmer E. Dunne. 
The pair of prisoners have two charges of having a stolen 
automobile and one charge each of Section 147 of the 
Motor Vehicle Act. 



VACATION ANNOUNCEMENT 



The following is a copy of a communication re- 
ceived by me from the Honorable Board of Police 
Commissioners which is self-explanatory: 

"At a meeting of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners, held on April 4, 1927, the following reso- 
lution was adopted: 

RESOLVED, Tliat all members of the Police 
Department, both uniformed and civilians, be and 
they are hereby allowed an annual vacation of 
15 days during 1927, excepting those appointed 
since May 1, 1926, who will be allowed one day 
for each month of service; said vacations to com- 
mence April 18, 1927, and the senior members of 
the department will be permitted to have first 
choice as to time; and be it 

FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Annual Re- 
view and Inspection of the Police Department will 
be held on Saturday, July 23, 1927. 

You are hereby directed to arrange the vaca- 
tions for the members of the department in ac- 
cordance with the above resolution, and arrange 
vacation periods so that all men will be available 
for the Annual Review and Inspection, except 
those excused on account of old age or disability." 

Company commanders will be governed by the 
foregoing in allowing vacations to the members 
and employees of their respective commands and 
they shall note on watch reports, daily, the names 
of the men on vacation. They shall also make a 
complete report at the expiration of their vaca- 
tions on one of their watch reports showing the 
dates on which each member was away. 

Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien. 



Do 


deeErdthers 

MOTOR CARS 


J. 


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O'Farrell at Polk 




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FIREMAN'S 
FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

401 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Fire • Automobile • Marine 



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VAN CAMP 

CIGARS :: 

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QUALITY cTVlILD 

SELECTION 



Phone Kearny 1701 



P. O. Box 2143 



San Francisco International Fisii Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Fish Dealers 
535-539 WASHINGTON ST. San Francisco, Cal. 



LA CAMPANA CAFE 

Italian Restaurant and Hotel 

Dancing 440 BROADWAY 

Every Evraiing SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Sutter 8805 



April. 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 37 




\Y/E STERN 
WrADDITION 

STATION 



Capt. Robert A. Coulter 
Lieutenants Leo Tackney and John M. Sullivan 

Nathan Meister, charged with violating Section 112 
and reckless driving, arrested by Corporal McCarthy, 
shared the honors with Lawrence Dinelli, charged the 
same, and arrested by the same oflRcer. 

* * * 

Sonya Michael, another 112er, was taken in custody 

by Officer Patrick Gleason. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Jack Sullivan, Corporal Callanan and Offi- 
cer L. Lines arrested Erling Johansen on an attempted 

burglary charge. 

» * * 

Lines, with Oflficer Frank Small, did the same thing 
to Raymond Thompson on a charge of assault by means 
and force, likely to produce great bodily injury. 

* * * 

Officers John Clasby and E. Paul brought in Ben Gor- 
don, who was accused of assaulting a fellow-being with 

a deadly weapon. 

* * » 

Officer Frank Pleasants and Special Tilton picked up 
Edward J. Bradley who was percolating around the dis- 
trict in an automobile that he had taken from another 
man without the owner's consent. 

* * * 

James Hallan, charged with a 288 kick, was taken in 

tow by Officers Paul and J. O'Connor No. 2. 

* * * 

Officers J. M'right and Oliver Josephs vagged William 

Brady. 

* * * 

Michael Aguilar, a petty larcenist, was brought to the 
station by Officers Lines and Small. 

* » * 

Officer J. Casey tagged Frank Lazzari for violating 
Section 51 of the Motor Act. 



I REMEMBER WHEN— 



William F. Krueger, participant in several gun 
battles, killed "Big Mouth" Smith, a gambler, 
dui'ing a stick-up by five men of the old Powell 
Social Club. One of the thugs, Gl'iffith, shot 
point blank at Krueger but missed. Griffith was 
an escape from an Ohio penitentiary. 

4: * * 

About 1897, jMike Carroll, afterward captain, 
Jim Aiken and Joe Burnett, later captain of de- 
tectives, all met by a house at Broderick and 
Post in the old O'Farrell street station district. 
An earthquake occurred while they were standing 
there and bricks fell from a chimney. Aiken 
looked up, not having felt the shake, and wanted 

to know who was throwing bricks at him. 
* * * 

Charlie Bills, bailiff in the Police Court of Judge 
Lazarus, was a traffic officer. 



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FINEST WORK ON SHIKTS AND COLLARS 



Page 38 



2-0 '• POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 




POTRERO 

STATION 



Capt. Harry J. O'Day 
Lieutenants Albert S. Munn, J. C. Malloy 

If your car is driven away by a joy rider or an auto 
thief, get in touch with Special Duty Officers Tom 
O'Connor and John Coghlan and you'll get a lot of 
action. A brother officer from the Bay View had his car 
taken and in no time after being advised of the loss, 
Coghlan and O'Connor had Daniel J. Neal and the car 
at the station and Daniel charged with violating Section 
146 of the Motor Vehicle Act. 

* * * 

Officers Charles Wyman and N. McDonald know how 
a man should act when he drives a car. When they saw 
Thomas Durno he wasn't acting like they knew he should 
so they investigated and the first thing Durno knew he 
was in the station locked up and charged with violating 
Section 112 of the Motor Act. 

* * * 

Sam Moreici. Harold Butler and Vincent Guardino 
were arrested by Officer T. May and Special Officer 
Hughes. The first was charged with receiving stolen 
goods and the latter two prisoners with driving away an 
automobile without the owner's consent. 

* * * 

Coghlan and O'Connor got another bozo when they 
put Joseph Lazerich in the "can" charged with assault 
with a deadly weapon. 




BAY VIEW 

STATION 



Capt. Stephen V. Bunner 
Lieut. Frank DeGrancourt, Lieut. Wm. Dowie 

Sergeant Aloysius O'Brien nabbed William Del Carlo 
as he was trying to get along the best he could in his 
automobile. Del was not driving as the makers of Sec- 
tion 112 of the Motor Act expects all to drive, and Carlo 
was locked up for driving while intoxicated. 

* * H: 

Corporals William Harrington and Thomas Ritter 
didn't like the way John Ribero was hanging around 
doing nothing, so they finally decided he was a regular 
vag and they arrested him as such. 

* * * 

• George White, charged with petty larceny, was given 
a trip in the station's covered wagon after being arrested 
by Officer H. Schwind. 

* * * 

Harry Bennett got all het up and was so riled that he 
sought to take his feelings out on a fellow citizen. This 
act on his part being an unlawful one, caused his arrest 
on a charge of assault with intent to commit murder. 
Sergeants Al O'Brien and Morton and Officers J. Han- 
rahan, T. Doyle and J. Malcolm garnered him him into the 
arms of the law. 



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A[^ril, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 39 



SOUTH OF MARKET BOYS "21 YEARS 
AFTER" PAGEANT-BALL 



Tender memories of a quarter of a century ago 
in tliat favored part of San Francisco, "South of 
the Slot", will be revived at the "21 Years After" 
Pag-eant and Grand Ball of the South of Market 
Boys, Inc., in the Civic Auditorium, Saturday 
evening-, April 23. A spectacular Pageant, with 
several hundred people in the cast, will be pro- 
duced under the personal direction of Ralph Pin- 
cus, and will bring back to life the characters 
and favoi'ites of the San Francisco of olden days. 
Then will come the fasti y-changing periods in the 
city's history, and a culmination in a great pres- 
entation of modern-day musical, dancing and 
singing attractions, on the specially-constructed 
stage in the Civic Auditorium. 

The Pageant will open the evening's perform- 
ance and will be followed by the Grand Ball. Ac- 
cording to President Thomas P. Garrity of the 
South of Market Boys, who will officiate as 
floor director, dancing will hold sway until the 
early hours of dawn. 

Probably the most unique and equally active 
organization in San Francisco, the South of Mar- 
ket Boys was founded on the traditions and 
never-to-be-forgotten sentiments of tlie golden 
days in the city by the Golden Gate, previous to 
the great fire of April, 1906. Since its forma- 
tion, little over two years ago, the society has 
gi'own by leaps and bounds and is today consid- 
ered one of the outstanding institutions in the 
West. Civic, business and professional leaders 
are nunlbei-ed among its 3,500 members, and all 
walks of life are represented in the great mem- 
bership roster. 

Arrangements are being made to liandle a ca- 
pacity crowd in the Civic Auditorium on the 
night of April 23. James F. Smitli is general 
chairman of the committee. 



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Geo. D. Smith. Pres. and Managing Director 
Will P. Taylor. Ir., Resident Manager 



Market 580 



Christenson 
Lumber Co, 

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YARDS 
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5th and Hooper Streets 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Page 40 



20" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, 1927 



FANNING 

(Continued from Page 7) 
law that you be confined in the state prison at 
San Quentin for 10 years." 

While Sir Harry was confined in the Broadway 
jail, his marriage to Miss Schneider was annulled 
by Judge Sloss upon the testimony of Miss Bertha 
Young of Melbourne, Australia, and once more 
his penchant for matrimony was indulged in. He 
was married in the Broadway jail unbeknownst 
to his jailors and the authorities. In fact, with- 
out even arousing their suspicions. In the most 
novel and original manner he achieved an elope- 
ment, so far as it is possible for a man locked up 
in prison to achieve an elopement. He had been 
in the jail quite a long time languishing there, 
trying to escape his ten year sentence on techni- 
calities, and his weakness for acquiring new wives 
without the formality of divorce or the interven- 
tion of death in the cases of the already acquired 
wives. Locked fast in jail it was generally sup- 
posed that his polygamous tendencies were curbed, 
but with him the marrying habit was second na- 
ture. So in spite of the fact that he was in jail, 
and in spite of the fact that he was booked for 
ten years, and in spite of the shameful record of 
his past and the dismal prospect of his future, this 
man of many names and many wives found one 
more woman willing to marry him. She was Mrs. 
Tressa Van Velden, widow, a worker in a gospel 
mission. It was in the prosecution of her work 
of soul saving in the jail that she met and loved 
"Sir Han-y" and the courtship was carried on 
while this lady in the case was presumably leading 
"Sir Harry" into the straight and narrow path 
that leads to salvation. She had a permit to visit 
"Sir Harry" made out in the name of Mrs. Van 
Valden, and it was through this permit that the 
matrimonial aff'air began to leak out. Then again, 
when she made her customary call, she presented 
the permit with the name of Van Valden erased 
and Mrs. Ernest Moore Chadwick inserted in its 
stead. The chief jailor asked about the change. 
"I am now," said the lady, with downcast eyes 
and becoming humility, not unmingled with sat- 
isfaction, "Mr. Chadwick's wife." 

(To be continued in next month's issue) 



Please allow me to express my appreciation of the 
courtesy and kindness sho'WTi to me by Officer J. King, 
March 1, 1927, in an accident which occurred to me on 
the Mission street car line. While I was getting off, the 
car started, throwing me to the ground and causing the 
fracture of my wrist. Officer J. King, being on the 
scene, pi-omptly came to my assistance and extended to 
me the help I needed, personally seeing that I reached 
the Convent in safety. Again expressing my hearty ap- 
preciation of the gentlemanly kindness of Officer King, 
I am, 

SISTER M. SERENA, 

St. Mary's School, Oakland. 



FAIRMONT HOTEL 

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D. M. LINNARD 
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LEROY UNNARD 
ManaKer 



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Alex, Delf er Frietieg Co, 

[EMbUihcd IS96] 

853 Howard St. San Francisco 

Phone Doughs 2377 



Chas. W. Brown Wm. E. Kennedy 

(Memberg of Florists Telegraph Delirery) 

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3089 SIXTEENTH STREET 

MARKET 170 



Apnl, 1927 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



Page 41 



McGinn and iredale 

No detail Ox the Detective Bureau has the con- 
tinuity of hibor as does that Iiandled by Detectives 
Sergeants Allan McGinn and Cliarles Iredale. 

Their work has to do with the cleaning up of 
automobile accidents, hit and run cases and often 
of driving while intoxicated. 

When such of any one of these "kicks" come 
to the bureau it is their duty to take the reports 
from where the patrolman on the beat left off and 
gather the evidence, determine if there is enough 
cause for arresting an offender, prepare the case 
for the courts and see that all the details are 
properly presented to the jury. 

And they have plenty of material to work on. 
They get a bunch of "prospects" every week, and 
their work never seems to get slack, yet this pair 
of detectives keep at their task and never fail to 
bring into court the man they go after. 

They have been given some cases where the 
information placed in their hands was so meagi'e 
and so incomplete that one would never believe 
there was a chance to even get a clew of the ob- 
ject of the complaint. However, with a piece of 
glass found near an accident, a tire tread imprint- 
ed in the roadway by another accident, with a 
couple of numbers from the license plate of a hit- 
runner, or from the bent fender or bumper of a 
car found in some garage they have brought forth 
sufficient evidence to justify an arrest and sus- 
tain a conviction. 

The work of McGinn and Iredale is such that 
they do not figure so often in the news, but you 
can take it from the writer that they deliver the 
goods and deliver it plenty, as many an unhappy 
motorist, whose names have been put on the big 
book "upstairs," can tell. 



I REMEMBER WHEN- 



Jim Anderson, brother of Captain Marcellus 0. 
took care of the books in the old City Prison. 
Jim, who wore a beard and mustache, was then a 
sergeant, after having broken in at the old South- 
ern. He is now retired on lieutenant's pay. 

* il: * 

Jacob Amend was one of the old timers walking 
beats in the Central prior to the fire. He is still 
there and on the day watch in North Beach Dis- 
trict. 

* * :!: 

George Bailey became one of the first of our 
present force of traffic officers. George is still in 
the same job. 

* ^ :{< 

Gus Beisel used to pitch on the baseball teams 
that held forth in a sand lot at Seventh and Har- 
rison streets. Gus is now piloting a horse over in 
the Potrero. 




Te GRANEY 
Billiard Parlor 

Finest in the World 
924 MARKET STREET 



Podesta &.Baldocchi 

Florists 

224-226 GRANT AVENUE 

(Next Door to White House) 
San Francisco, California 

Telephone Kearny 4975 



WM. H. HAMBLETON 

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KEARNY 5044 



HOTEL MELBA 

214 JACKSON STREET 



CAESAR ATTELL 

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6 - 6th STREET 101 - 3rd STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



They Advertlae — Let'i Pstronlie 




532 ORAirr AVB. 

Under Sime Mlntgcratnt 

CHUTESE AMERICAN DISHES — MEECHANTS' LITNCH, 60e 

Jazz Dance Music Every Evening 8 p. m. to 1 a. m, 

REAL CHOP SUEY 



Page 42 



2-0" POLICE JOURNAL 



April, J 927 



I 



LETTERS ON SHOOTING OF CHURCH 
BOMBER 



A resolution has been adopted by this Association, com- 
mending the action of the Police Department for the de- 
tection of the bomber of the Italian Church. 

FRANK FISCHER, Secretary, 
North Beach Promotion Association, 
1329 Jackson Street. 

* * * 

Please allow me as a very humble resident of this city 
to congratulate you and your men on the excellent work 
done in frustrating the bomb outrage at SS. Peter and 
Paul Church. It was a scientific piece of work. These 
officers used their heads and kept their mouth shut as 
to their plans. The officer who cut that fuse desei-\'es a 
medal with the others. The whole thing was the most 
clever work that could be done. They should all feel 
happy to think of the hundreds of lives they have saved. 

A. M. O'DWYER, R. N., 

3406 California Street. 

* * * 

I want to add my word of congratulations for the 
splendid work done by your department in connection 
with the apprehending of the men involved in the bomb- 
ing of the Italian Church. 

The San Francisco Police Department has always proved 
its efficiency when put to the test and I am sure that all 
good citizens are extremely proud of the splendid record 
you have made, not only in the instance above referred 
to, but also in the detection and apprehension of others 
who have recently been engaged in criminal work in our 
city. 

As a citizen let me express my appreciation, and in 
so doing I know that I am voicing the sentiment of a 
great many others who have the real interests of the city 
at heart. 

With kindest personal regards and best wishes, I am, 
EDWARD J. DOLLARD, 
1815 Laguna Street. 

* * * 

I wi.sh to extend my heartiest congratulations to you, 
Capt. Matheson, and the men of your department, who 
recently frustrated the attempt to bomb the church of SS. 
Peter and Paul. 

I feel sure that the manner in which this case was 
handled was a source of considerable satisfaction to you, 
and a great relief to the law-abiding citizens of San 
Francisco, who should be proud of their Police Depart- 
ment. It was a difficult and dangerous situation, and the 
officers and men of your department who participated in 
the case are deserving of the highest commendation for 
the intelligent, patient and courageous manner in which 
It was handled. 

EDWIN N. ATHERTON, Special Agent 
in Charge, Depai-tment of Justice, Bureau 
of Inve.stigation, P. 0. Box No. 374. 

* * * 

In behalf of the Presidio Heights district it is indeed 
a pleasure to extend to you and to your department our 
most hearty congratulations for the efficient and clever 
work that it has been doing for our city. 
With kind personal regards, I am, 

DR. THOS. R. CREELY, President, 
The Presidio Heights District. 



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