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Full text of "Drake's Road Book of the Sheffield and Rotherham Railway; with a visiter's guide to the towns of Sheffield and Rotherham"

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DKDICATBD, BY PERMISSION, TO THE CHAIRMAN AND DlBKCTOBli OF TUE 
SHEFFIELD AND UOTHERHAM BAILWAT COMPANY. 



DRAKE'S 

ROAD BOOK 

OP THK 

SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM 
KAILWAY: 



WITH A VISITER'S GUIDE TO THE TOWNS OF 
SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM. 



Snustrateti bg a fttap sni Sngrabinss- 



LONDON: 
HAYWARD AND MOORE. 

BIBHINOHAM: JAMES DRAKE, 62, NEW STREET. SHEFFIELD: "n'lLLIAM 
8AXT0M. ROTHERHAM: J. HINCBLIPFE. 

1840. 



KNTEBED AT STATIOHEBS' HALI.. 



BIRMINGHAM : 
PBIKTED BT JAUES DBAKE, 52, NKW-STaE8T. 






Ijj CHAIRMAN AND DIRECTORS 

OF THB 

SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM RAILWAY COMPANY, 

us. 

^ 8Ct)ifl 'Folume 



BY PERMISSION, RESPKCTFCLLY INSCRIBED, 
BT THB 

AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER. 



May 21 tt, 1840. 

647044 



STANZAS 

ON THE OPENING OF THE 
SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM RAILWAY. 

BY EBENEZF.R ELLIOTT, 



They come! the shrieking steam ascends, 

Slow moves the banner' il train ; 
They rush ! the tow'riug vapour bends ; 

The kindled wave again 
Screams over thousands, thronging all 
To witness now the funeral 

Oi' law-ci-eated pain. 

Behold it, Osgathorpe, [a) behold .' 

Look down, and cry. All hail 1 
Skies! brighten into blue and gold. 

O'er all the living vale ! 
Pale, liug'ring foxglove ! you, ye trees ! 
TJiou, wood of Tinsley ! tell the breeze. 

That Hell's dai'k cheek turns pale 1 

For Mind shall vanquish time and space, 

Bid east and west shake hands, 
Bring over ocean face to face. 

Earth's ocean-sever'd strands; 
And on his patli of iron bear 
Words, that shall wither in despair, 

The tyrants of all lauds. 

Eternal river ! (6) roaring still. 

As roar'd thy foamy wave, 
When first each wild rose-skirted rill 

Heard moorland echoes rave, — 
Thou seest, amid thy meadows green. 
The goodliest sight that earth hath seen, 

Since man made fire his slave. 

Fire kindling man ! how weak wast thou ! 

Ere thou hudst conquer'd fire! 
How like a worm, on Cauklow's brow, 

Thou shrank'st from winter's ire ! 
Or heard'st the torrent-gathering night 
Awake the wolf with thee to fight, 

Where these broad shades aspire ! 

(a) Osgathorpe, Canklow, Winco, and Tinsley, aj-e hills and woods, po! tions 
of the scene, 
(ft) The Don. 



VI STANZAS. 

Bat he wl.om cold and hunger ban. 

Whom law and ease belie, 
Who vainly asUs his lellow-man 

For leave to toil and die, 
Is sadder, weaker, than wast thou. 
When, naked here, on Winco's brow. 

Thou didst the wolf defy ! 

In vain thou mak'st the fire a slave. 

That works, and will not tire ; 
And burn'st the flame-destroying wave, 

And rid'st on harness'd fire ; 
In vain, if millions toil unfed, 
And Cronipton's children, begging bread, 

Wealth-hated, cui-se their sire. 

Fire-kindling man ! thy life-stream runs, 

Ev'n yet, through sighs and groans ; 
Too long thy Walts and Stepheusons 

With brains have fatten'd drones! 
O Genius! all too long, too oft. 
At thee the souls of clay have scoff'd. 

And sold thy little ones ! (r) 

Sold them to misery's dungeoo-gloom, 

To rapine's menial blow, 
To beggary's brawl-fill'd lodging-room, 

Where famine eurses wo ; 
Then to the pest-deu's workhouse floor. 
To which good Christians send the poor. 

By stages sure and slow. 

Butlo! the train ! On! onward! stilJ 

Loud shrieks the kindled wave; 
And back fly hamlet, tree, and hill. 

White steam, and banners bi'ave ; 
And thoughts on vapoury wings are burl'd, 
To shake old thrones, and change u world. 

And dig Abaddon's grave. 

Eternal river! roaring now, 

As erst, in earliest years. 
Ere grief began, with youthful brow. 

To live an age of tears; 
Thou hear'ht, beneath thy forests high, 
A voice of power, that will not die, * 

While mau bath hopes and fears. 

He, conquering fire, and time, and space. 

Bids east and west join hands. 
Brings over ocean face to face. 

Earth's ocean-sever'd stitinds ; 
And on his iron rod will bf ar 
Words that shall wither in despair. 

The tyrants of all lands. 

(f) I do not believe that men of genius are less able than other men to gain 
their living; but if they attempt more, they are more liable to failure ; but if 
they live where men are robbed of three-fourths of their earnings is it sur- 
pn«ing that they do not thrive? 



ROAD BOOK 



SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM RAILWAY. 



. CHAPTER I. 



HISTORICAL ACCOUNT. 

The Sheffield and Rotherham Railway is a monument 
of the public spirit and enterprise of its projectors of 
which they may well be proud. Severe was the 
contest which they had to maintain in the commence- 
ment of their great undertaking, and flourishing and 
honourable are the laurels which now rest on their 
brows. Could we add one floweret to that garland 
of honour, we should consider we had performed a 
worthy act. But our aim at present is higher than 
this. Our object in writing this volume is not to 
weave a wreath for the railway Company, but to carry 
out still further their praiseworthy designs. They 
have done all that Science and Art could tcacli them, 
to add lightning to the feet of the traveller. We 
would now humbly profess that we intend, 1jy the aid 
of Minerva, Apollo, the muses, and all the deities that 
smile propitiously upon the wielders of the grey goose 

B 



^ HISTORICAL ACCOUNT. 

quill, to render his flight still more rapid. This we 
shall endeavour to do by cunningly beguiling each 
moment as it flies. Courteous traveller, we lay our 
volume at thy feet, — vouchsafe to make it the com- 
panion of thy journey. It will give to thy passage 
a quicker appearance; and, wherein is that less bene- 
ficial than making it actually more rapid ? What 
would it avail thee were thy journey performed in as 
short a time as the head of Bagdad's monarch was 
immerged in the water-tub of the learned dervish, if 
that brief moment were crowded, as in his case, with 
the sorrows and toils of seven long dreary years '? 

Away, however, with this trifling, and to our task. 
Attend, then, in the first place, gentle reader, to the 
following brief Historical Account of the Shefiield and 
Rotherham raUway, — its origination, its progress and 
completion, and its subsequent successful operation. 

The project of constructing a railway between Shef- 
field and Rotherham was first brought before the 
public in the month of July, 1834. The principal 
design of its projectors appears to have been, to 
render coal cheaper at Sheffield ; and the saving upon 
which they calculated, was i;30,000 per annum. The 
bill to invest the directors with the necessary powers, 
was first brought before parliament by lord Morpeth, 
on the 11th of March, 1835. 

It was strongly opposed by the Duke of Norfolk, a 
few other landed proprietors, the Canal Company, and 
the River Don Company. One hundred and twenty 
highly respectable inhabitants of Rotherham also 
united with its opponents, and petitioned against it, on 
the ground that it would probably have the effect of 



HISTORICAL ACCOUNT. d 

causing the idle, drunken, and dissolute portion of the 
Sheffield community to flock to Rotherham. The 
railway Company, however, carried the day, being 
strenuously supported by the people of Sheffield, and 
also by the majority of the inhabitants of Rotherham. 
Upon the committee dividing on the preamble of the 
bill, two appeared against it, and twelve in its favour. 
On the 10th of June the committee reported the bill to 
the House ; and on the 23rd it was read a third time 
and sent up to the Lords. 

In the Upper House the Duke of Norfolk's influence 
proved more formidable ; and on the 27th of July, the 
advocates of the bill had the mortification of beholding 
it thrown out in committee by a majority of 7 to 5. 

Not at all daunted by the failure of their first 
attempt, the Company were soon in a condition again 
to take the field. On the 12th of February, 1836, 
their bill was a second time introduced into the House 
of Commons ; on the 28th it passed through com- 
mittee without a division ; and on the 14th of April, 
having been read a third time in the lower House, it 
was again launched into the perilous seas where it had 
previously been stranded. Skilful was the piloting 
which was necessary in order to steer it into the now 
not distant haven. Twice it was read without oppo- 
sition. On the 21st it went into committee. Here all 
the power of the opposition was brought to bear 
against it ; and every nerve was strained by its ad- 
vocates in order to bear it successfully through. 
Amongst other objections it was urged, that the deed 
executed by the shareholders in 1834 was invalid, 
owing to its not including the Greasborough branch, 
B 2 



4 HISTORICAL ACCODNT. 

for which this was the first tinae of making application. 
This compelled the company to solicit time to prepare 
a new deed ; and with a little difficulty they obtained 
a postponement of the question until May the 9th. 
During this short interval, by means of greart exertions, 
the new deed was prepared and signed. At the ap- 
pointed time the company w^ere again before the com- 
mittee ; and two days afterwards obtained a favourable 
decision. Having been reported to the House of Lords 
the bill was immediately read a third time; and on the 
4th of July received the royal assent. Thus terminated 
successfully the company's parliamentarian conflicts, 
after having lasted from the 11th of March, 1835, to 
the 4th of July, 1836. By the act then obtained, 
authority was given to raise a capital of £100,000, in 
4,000 shares of £'25. each, and £30,000 on mortgage. 
The works were commenced in February, 1837, at 
the Brightside cutting. From that time they pro- 
ceeded rapidly without any impediment, or the occur- 
rence of any incident calHng for remark; and in the 
month of October, 1838, were deemed in a sufficiently 
perfect state to authorize the opening of the railway 
to the public. This event took place en the 31st of 
October, and was attended with all the pageantry, fes- 
tivity, and excitement, which is usually manifested on 
such occasions. Earl Fitzwilliam and a considerable 
number of the neighbouring nobility and great landed 
proprietors were present. So also were the Directors 
of the North Midland railway, George and Robert 
Stephenson, and many other illustrious individuals 
interested in the success of this and similar schemes. 
The order of the proceedings was as follows: — a trip 



HISTORICAL ACCOUKT4 b 

from SheiTield to Rotherham at twenty minutes 
before eleven, which occupied seventeen minutes ; 
breakfast at Rotherham Court House ; return trip to 
Sheffield at twelve ; and dinner at the Tontine Inn at 
five. 

The history of the railway subsequent to its opening 
is happily marked by no tragical occurrences, by the 
relation of which we might give interest to our narra- 
tive. Monotonous as the strokes of the piston of a 
steam engine, events have followed each other in re- 
gularly recurring succession, and few days bear any 
marks by which they can be distinguished from their 
fellows. The opening of the Greasborough branch 
took place on August the lOth, 1839, The following 
is a brief summary of the traffic on the railway during 
the first year of its operation. " The number of pas- 
sengers carried (and that without the loss of life or 
limb, oi* serious injury to any passenger) from No- 
vember 1st, 1838, to October 31st, 1839, both days 
inclusive, is as follows: — 1838. — November, 37,876 ; 
December, 44,614.-1 839.— January, 28,071; February, 
27,729 ; March, 30,034 ; April, 38,109 ; May, 50,325 ; 
June, 37,500 ; July, 43,358 ; August, 39,882 ; Sep- 
tember, 41,801 ; October, 36,076; making a- total of 
455,375." The amount of money received for the.se 
passengers has been £13,204 16s. 3d. The shares at 
present bear a premium of from £5. to £6. 

So much for the past history of the Sheffield and 
Rotherham railway. Were we disposed to indulge 
ourselves in a prophecy of the future, very bright 
would be the colours in which we should paint it ; for 
we cannot close our eyes to the vast increase of traffic 
B 3 



O HISTOHICAL ACCOUNT. 

which will flow upon this railway, when the sluices of 
the north and the south are opened into it by the 
completion of the North Midland line. However 
justly the inhabitants of Sheffield in general may com- 
plain of the distance at which the North Midland 
railway passes their town, the proprietors of the Shef- 
field and Eotherham railway, have good cause to 
congratulate themselves that it runs jusl where it does. 

In the ensuing session of parliament the company 
intend to apply for an act to enable them to raise, at 
such times as they think fit, either by creating new 
shares or by mortgage, or in both those ways, any fur- 
ther sum they may require, not exceeding £70,000. 
The new shares will be offered in the first instance to 
the proprietors of original shares. 

Before introducing our reader into the peculiar do- 
mains of the Fire-King and commencing our description 
of railway scenery, we shall, in accordance vvith the 
plan of our work, devote a chapter to the history and 
description of Sheffield. 



SHEFFIELD. 



CHAPTER II. 



HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF 
SHEFFIELD. 



The town of Sheffield is situated upon the river Sheaf, 
near its confluence with the Don, and forms the 
chief town of the extensive Saxon Manor of Hallam, 
now called Hallamshire. It is a place of great anti- 
quity, and derives its name from the river upon the 
banks of which it is situated. At the time of the Nor- 
man survey the manor of Sheffield was held by Roger 
de Busli, and the widowed countess of the Saxon Earl 
Waltheof, who had been beheaded for entering into a 
conspiracy against the Conquerer. It was subsequently 
possessed by the family of De Lovetot. It afterwards 
descended to the Earls of Shrewsbury, and from them 
finally passed into the possession of the Dukes of 
Norfolk. Edward I. granted various privileges to the 
lords of the manor ; and they in turn released the in- 
habitants, in consideration of a fixed annual payment, 
from the feudal tenure by which they held their 
estates, and thus occasioned Sheffield to become a free 
town. Cardinal Wolsey after his arrest in 1530, was 
detained in the manor house for eighteen days, in 
the custody of the Earl of Shrewsbury. Mary Queen 
of Scots also during her fourteen years' captivity re- 
B 3 



8 SHEPPIBLD. 

sided, with the exception of a few short intervals, in 
the same place or in the castle. During the civil war 
in the reign of Charles I., the inhabitants were in 
favour of the parliamentarians, and made a feeble 
effort to retain for them the town and castle. The 
Earl of Newcastle, however, with a party of royalists, 
quickly gained possession for the king, placed a garri- 
son in the castle, and appointed Sir William Saville 
governor. The Earl of Manchester afterwards sent a 
force to attempt its reduction, and after a protracted 
siege, it was surrendered upon honourable terms, and 
soon afterwards by order of parliament demolished. 

The town is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence 
rising out of a spacious valley. It is sheltered on 
every side, except the north east, by a chain of lofty 
hills richly clothed with wood. It is nearly surrounded 
by the rivers Don, Sheaf, and Porter. Over the river 
Don a stone bridge of three arches was erected, in 
1485, and was called the Lady Bridge, from a religious 
house dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, which stood 
near it. An iron bridge of three arches has since been 
constructed over the same river ; and in 1828 an addi- 
tional stone bridge of three arches was erected, for the 
purpose of affording an easier communication between 
the Rotherham and Barnsley roads, and the new com 
and cattle markets. The bridge over the Sheaf consists 
of one arch, and was built in 1769, by Edward Duke 
of Norfolk. The town extends nearly a mile from 
north to south, and three quarters of a mUe from east 
to west. The streets in the principal parts of the town 
have of late been greatly improved, both by the erec- 
tion of new and handsome shops, and the substitution 



SHEFFIELD. 9 

of modem and elegant fronts. The houses, which are 
chiefly of brick, and of a somewhat sombre appearance, 
are intermixed with many of very ancient character. 
The chief portion of the town is within the angle 
formed by the Sheaf and the Don, but there are con- 
siderable ranges of buildings on the opposite banks. 
Considerable improvements have taken place under 
the provisions of an act obtained in 1818, by which the 
town is well paved, and lighted with gas, from exten- 
sive works at Sheaf Bridge, and those of the New Gas 
Company, on Blonk Island. The town was formerly 
supplied with water from springs in the neighbouring 
hills, by means of private works on Crook's moor ; but 
the supply becoming inadequate to the increasing de- 
mands of the town, a company with a capital of 
£100,000 was formed in 1829, and suitable works were 
erected. 

The public subscription Library and Reading room 
occupies a commodious room in the Music Hall, and is 
supported by an annual subscription of one guinea 
from each of its members. A Literary and Philoso- 
phical Society was instituted in 1822. Its meetings 
are held in an elegant apartment of the Music Hall, 
which contains their apparatus, a collection of fossils, 
botanical specimens, and curiosities from the South 
Sea islands. There are three public news rooms ; the 
oldest is in the East Parade, and is supported by an 
annual subscription of £1. 1*. each; another occupies 
a room in the music hall, and the third forms part of the 
handsome edifice, called the Commercial Buildings, 
which has recently been erected in High Street. The 
Mechanic's Library was established in 1824 ; it con- 



10 SHEFFIELD. 

* 

tains more than 2,000 volumes, and is open every 
evening. The Music Hall is a spacious and elegant 
building in the Grecian style of architecture. It is 
situated in Surrey Street, and was erected in 1824 ; it 
comprises on the ground floor a room for the public 
library, 38 feet long, and 35 feet wide ; a reading room 
and saloon, and a spacious room for the Literary and 
Philosophical Society. The buildings also contain an 
elegant music room, 99 feet in length and 38 wide, 
with a well-arranged orchestra, and a handsome saloon, 
35 feet long and 28 wide. The theatre and assembly 
rooms were erected in 1762, and form an extensive 
building of brick, handsomely ornamented with stone, 
and having a central portico supporting a pediment, 
The theatre is generally open from Oct. to Jan. 

The Town's Trust has arisen from a grant made by 
one of the ancient family of Furnival, about the year 
1300, and consists of property in lands and tenements, 
shares in the river Don navigation, &c., producing 
about £1,400 per annum, which is under the manage- 
ment of twelve trustees, resident in the town, elected 
by the freeholders, who have been lately incorporated, 
under the title of the "Town's Trust," or "Sheffield 
Free Tenants. " The income is applied to the main- 
tenance of Lady's bridge, the keeping in order the 
pump in Barker pool, the repair of the church and the 
highways, the payment of three assistant clergy, and 
other charitable and public uses. 

This town appears to have been distinguished at a 
very early period for the manufacture of articles of 
cutlery, for which the numerous mines of coal and iron- 
stone in the neighbourhood rendered its situation pecu- 



SHEFFIELD. II 

llarly favourable. Chaucer, in his Canterbury Tales, 
mentions the " Sheffield Thwytel, or Whittel," a kind 
of knife worn by such as had not the privilege of wear- 
ing a sword, for the making of which, as well as the 
iron heads for arrows, Sheffield had, even then, become 
celebrated. Arrow heads, indeed, compose the arms 
or crest of the town. From that time the principal 
articles manufactured were implements of husbandry, 
including scythes, sickles, shears, and other sharp in- 
struments of steel, till the middle of the last century, 
when considerable improvements were introduced, 
and great ingenuity displayed in the finer articles of 
cutlery. The superintendence of the trade was en- 
trusted to twelve master cutlers, appointed at the court 
leet of the lord of the manor, with power to enforce the 
necessary regulations for its protection and improvement. 
In 1624 the cutlers were incorporated by an act of 
parliament entitled, " An act for the good order and 
government of the makers of knifes, scissors, shears, 
sickles, and other cutlery wares, in Hallamshire, in the 
county of York, and parts near adjoining;" and the 
government was invested in a master, two wardens, six 
searchers, and twenty-four assistants, consisting of free- 
men only, in number about 600. The master, who, 
with the other officers of the company, is chosen annu- 
ally by the whole corporation, on retiring from office, 
nominates the senior warden as his successor ; but if 
the latter be rejected by the company, he nominates 
another member, till one is approved of by the body : 
the wardens are chosen by the officers of the company 
from among the searchers for the time being. The 
master, wardens, and assistants, have power to make 



12 SHEFFIELD. 

by-laws for the regulation of the trade, and to inflict 
penalties for the neglect of them ; and the jurisdiction 
of the company, which is restricted exclusively to 
affairs relating to the trade, extends throughout the 
whole district of Hallamshire, and all places within six 
miles of it. By an act obtained in 1814, permission is 
given to all persons, whether sons of freemen or not, 
and without their having served an apprenticeship, or 
obtained from the company a mark for their goods, to 
carry on business anywhere within the limits of Hal- 
lamshire. The privilege thus bestowed has been a 
great means of advancing the trade to its present state of 
perfection, by affording encouragement to men of 
genius from every part of the country to settle in this 
town ; and the competition thus produced has furnished 
exquisite specimens of workmanship, in the finer 
branches of the trade, which abound in the show- 
rooms of the principal manufacturers, particularly in 
those of Messrs. Rodgers and Sons, and excite the 
admiration of the spectator. The cutlery trade em- 
ploys from 8,000 to 10,000 persons. The principal 
articles are table knives and forks ; pen and pocket 
knives of every description; scissors; razors; surgical, 
mathematical, and optical instruments ; engineers' and 
joiners' tools ; scythes, sickles, and files, of which 
great quantities are manufactured and exported ; and 
an endless variety of steel wares, which may be con- 
sidered the staple trade of the town, though various 
other branches of manufacture have been subsequently 
introduced and carried to a high degree of perfection. 
Connected in some degree with the cutlery, but 
embracing a great variety of other objects, is the manu- 



SHEFFIELD. 13 

facture of ivory articles; but the principal branches 
of manufacture which have more recently been estab- 
lished, and in which the town has obtained a de- 
cided superiority, are spoons, tea and coffee pots, 
candlesticks, and. a great variety of articles of Bri- 
tannia metal, which are made in great quantities, and 
of every pattern ; likewise silver-plated goods of every 
kind, among which are dessert knives and forks plated, 
upon ste^l, tureens, epergnes, and services for the 
table, candelabras, ice pails, urns, and a variety of 
similar articles, of the most elegant patterns, and of 
the richest workmanship, which are generally known by 
the name of, " Sheffield plate with silver edges." The 
manufacture of silver plate in all its branches, from the 
most minute to the most massive articles, is also car- 
ried on to a considerable extent, and has obtained 
deserved celebrity. The most ingenious and highly 
finished specimens of cutlery displayed in the principal 
shops in the metropolis, and in those of the principal 
towns in England, notwithstanding their being stamped 
with the venders' names, are manufactured here ; and 
so highly are the manufactures of this town esteemed, 
that they are found in every market in Europe, and 
exported in great quantities to every part of the globe. 
The making of buttons and button moulds, wire draw- 
ing, and the refining of silver, are also carried on ; and 
along the banks of the rivers are numerous iron and 
steel works, in which the heavier castings are pro- 
duced, and extensive works for slitting and preparing 
the iron and steel for the use of tlie manufacturers : 
among the manufactured iron goods are, boilers for 
steam engines, stove grates, (of most elegant design 



14 SHEFFIELD. 

and exquisite workmanship,) fenders, fire irons, and 
various smaller articles. There are also extensive 
factories for the weaving of carpets, and of horse-hair 
seating for chairs. In 1806, a type foundry was estab- 
lished with considerable success ; and another was 
commenced in 1818, the proprietors having purchased 
the business of a house in London : both these estab- 
lishments are now considerable, and supply type not 
only to printers in the provincial towns, but to several 
highly respectable houses in the metropolis. 

The trade of the town has been greatly facilitated by 
its advantageous line of inland navigation. The river 
Don was, in 1751, made navigable to Tinsley, about 
three miles from the town ; and, in 1815, a bill was 
obtained for enabling the proprietors of the Sheffield 
canal to connect the Don, at Tinsley, with the town, 
by means of a navigable cut, which was accomplished 
in 1819, thus forming a direct communication with the 
North Sea. Adjoining the basin of this canal, at the 
eastern extremity of the town, is a commodious wharf, 
where vessels can load and unload under cover ; and 
also spacious warehouses and offices for the transac- 
tion of business. The basin is capable of containing 
more than forty vessels of about fifty tons' burden, 
many of which are constantly arriving from Hull, 
York, Gainsborough, Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool, 
and Thorn, at which last place vessels from London 
generally unload goods intended for Sheffield. 

Sheffield's means of railway communication do not 
as yet extend beyond Rotherham ; but the completion 
of the North Midland Railway, in the ensuing spring, 
will at once open to its inhabitants the whole range 



SHEFFIELD. 15 

both of the southern railways, and of those which pass 
through the manufacturing districts of Yorkshire. We 
may, therefore, justly look forward to that period as a 
grand era from which to date Sheffield's accelerated 
increase in manufacturing celebrity and wealth ; and 
though some of her more ardent well-wishers might 
have been desirous that so important a line should 
have passed nearer to her borders, yet none can refuse 
to admit the vastness of the advantages she will derive 
from the line which has actually been selected ; and, we, 
especially, as retained at present by the Sheffield and 
Kotherham Railway, are bound to manifest exuberant 
joy that the whole of the railway traffic of Sheffield, 
both inward and outward, must necessarily pass along 
the rails of our fortunate little client. The opening of 
the Sheffield and Manchester Railway will, it is true, 
put an end to this boasting ; but six or seven years, 
we are well assured, will elapse ere the power of 
steam manages here to twine together the rival roses 
of York and Lancaster. 

The market was granted in 1296, to Thomas Lord 
Furnival ; the market days are Tuesday and Saturday : 
the former, chiefly for corn, is held in the corn ex- 
change ; a handsome building, erected under an act of 
parliament obtained in 1827, by the Duke of Norfolk, 
on the site of the Shrewsbury hospital, which has been 
removed. The market for butcher's meat is held ui 
a convenient situation near Newmarket-street ; and 
adjoining to it is the market for eggs, poultry, and 
butter. The vegetable market, which consists of 
ranges of shops, is on the outside of the enclosure for 
the butcher's meat. The fruit market is held on the 



16 SHEFFIELD. 

south side of Newmarket-street ; and the fish market, 
which is well supplied with salt-water fish on Monday 
and Thursday, and with fresh-water fish every day 
during the season, at the back of the Corn Exchange. 
The fairs for cattle and toys are on the Tuesday in 
Trinity week, and on Nov. 28th. A cheese fair is also 
held on the last-mentioned day, in which are sold many 
hundred tons of cheese from the counties of Derby, 
Staflford, Chester, and Lancaster. 

By the act of the 2nd of Wm. iv!,cap. 45, Shefllield 
has been constituted a borough, with the privilege of 
sending two members to parliament. The number of 
voters registered at the first general election under the 
Reform Act was 3,508, of whom 3,056 polled. The town 
is within the jurisdiction of the magistrates for the dis- 
trict, who meet in the town hall every Tuesday and 
Friday, for the determination of petty causes; and the 
Oct. sessions for the West Riding are also held here by 
adjournment. A court is held every second week, 
under the steward of the manor of Shefllield, for the 
recovery of debts under £5 ; and a court of requests 
every Thursday, for the recovery of debts not exceed- 
ing £5, of which the jurisdiction extends for several 
miles round the parish. By the act of the 2nd and 
3rd of William IV., cap. 64, SheflTield has been made 
a polling-place for the West Riding. The Town Hall, 
a spacious and commodious building, at the foot of the 
hay market, was erected in 1808: It contains a large 
and well-arranged room, in which the sessions are held ; 
and apartments for the use of the police magistrates, 
the commissioners of the court of requests, and for 
the transaction of public business. On the ground floor 



SHEFFIELD. 17 

is a prison for felons within the liberty of Hallamshire, 
with apartments for the keeper. The Cutlers' Hall, 
in Church-street, in which the business of that com- 
pany is transacted, and their public meetings held, 
was erected in 1832. It is a neat and capacious stone 
building, ornamented with the arms of the company 
well sculptured ; and contains, besides other offices, 
three large rooms in front for the transaction of business. 
On the second floor is a spacious dining room, elegantly 
fitted up, and ornamented with several well-executed 
portraits. In addition to an excise office and post 
office, there is also an assay office, erected in 1773, in 
order to relieve the manufacturers from sending their 
silver goods to London to receive the Hall mark. 

The living is a vicarage, in the archdeaconry and 
diocese of York, valued in the king's books at 
£12. 155. 2|t?. The patron is the Duke of Norfolk; 
itnpropriators, P. Gell, Esq., and M. Lawson, Esq., 
late M.P. for Thirsk, who have alternately the right of 
presentation. Three stipendiary clergymen, who are 
independent of the vicar, and have an income of £250. 
each, are appointed to assist him by the church bur- 
gesses. These were incorporated by charter of Queen 
Mary, and hold certain lands and estates in trust, for 
the payment of the stipendiary assistants, and for the 
repairs of the church. They hold their meetings in a 
room over the vestry room of the church ; and vacan- 
cies in their number are filled up by vote among them- 
selves. The church, which is a spacious cruciform 
structure, with a central tower and spire, was erected 
in the reign of Hen. I. ; but it has been so altered by 
repairs, that, with the exception of part of the tower 
c 



18 SHEFFIELD. 

and spire, and a few small portions of the interior, very 
little of its original character can be distinguished. 
The chancel contains the first production from the 
chisel of Chantrey, consisting of a mural tablet, with 
the bust of the llev. James Wilkinson, late vicar, cano- 
pied with drapery, in Carora marble. Many illus- 
trious persons have been interred in this church, 
among whom were Mary, Countess of Northumber- 
land ; Elizabeth, Countess of Lennox, mother of the 
xmfortunate Lady Arabella Stuart; Lady Elizabeth 
Butler ; four of the Earls of Shrewsbury ; and Peter 
Roflet, French secretary of Mary Queen of Scots. 
St. Paul's chapel was erected in 1720, by subscription, 
towards which Mr. R. Downes, silversmith, contri- 
buted £1,000 : it is a handsome edifice, in the Grecian 
style of architecture, with a tower surmounted by a 
well-proportioned dome, and a cupola of cast iron ; the 
interior is light, and elegantly ornamented, and con- 
tains a bust, by Chantrey, of the Rev. Alexander 
Mackenzie, with emblematical sculpture finely exe- 
cuted. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net income, 
£136; patron, the Vicar. St. James's chapel, a neat 
structure, in the Grecian style of architecture, with 
a campanile turret, was erected by subscription in 
1788 : the interior is well arranged, and the east 
window is embellished with a beautiful painting of 
the Crucifixion, by Peckett. The living is a per- 
petual curacy ; net income, £160 ; patron, the Vicar ; 
impropriator, Duke of Norfolk. St. George's church, 
on an eminence at the western extremity of the 
town, erected in 1824, is a very handsome structure, 
in the later style of English architecture, with a 



SHEFFIELD. 19 

lofty square embattled tower, crowned with pin- 
nacles. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net in- 
come, £365. ; patron, the Vicar. St. Philip's church, 
near the infirmary, was erected in 1827, by grant from 
the parliamentary commissioners, at an expense of 
£13,970. 16.9. ; it is a neat edifice, in the later English 
style of architecture, with a square embattled tower, 
crowned with pinnacles. The living is a perpetual 
curacy; net income, £135.; patron, the Vicar; im- 
propriator, Duke of Norfolk. St. Mary's church, in 
Brammall-lane, of which the first stone was laid by 
the Countess of Surrey, in 1826, is a handsome 
structure, in the later style of English architecture, 
with a tower and a porch of beautiful design ; it was 
erected by grant from the parliamentary commis- 
sioners, at an expense of £13,946. Ws. 9cl. ; the site 
and the cemetery were given by his Grace the Duke 
of Norfolk. The living is a perpetual curacy ; net 
income, £190. : patron, the Vicar. The Park church, 
dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, stands on three 
acres of land, given by the Duke of Norfolk, near the 
lofty summit of Park Hill. It is a Gothic structure, 
and will accommodate more than 1,000 persons. 
There are five places of worship for Independents, 
six for Wesleyan Methodists, and one each for Bap- 
tists, the Society of Friends, Unitarians, and Roman 
Catholics. 

The free grammar school was founded by letters 
patent in the reign of James I., and endowed by 
Thomas Smith, of Crowland, in the county of Lincoln, 
with lands producing, in 1603, £30. per annum, which 
have been since exchanged for lands at Wadsley, pro- 
'c 2 



20 SHEFFIELD. 

ducing, together with subsequent benefactions, a 
revenue of £175. 10*. The school is under the control 
of the vicar and twelve inhabitants of the town, who 
appoint the master, with a salary of £60. per annum: 
there are at present about twenty scholars on the 
foundation, who are gratuitously instructed in the 
classics. The present handsome school house, situ- 
ated near St. George's church, was erected a few 
years ago, in lieu of the old structure in Town Head- 
street. The boys' charity school, at the north-east 
corner of the churchyard, was established in 1706; 
and the present school house, a neat and commodious 
edifice of stone, has been recently erected on the site 
of the original building ; it has an income arising from 
a benefaction of £5,000 by Mr. Parkins, in 1766, aided 
by a donation from Mr. T. Hanby, which maintains 
six boys on the establishment, at an expense of up- 
wards of £60. per annum, the past masters of the 
Cutlers' Company being his principal trustees : the 
whole revenue is about £284. per annum, with which, 
and annual subscriptions, eighty boys are maintained, 
clothed, educated, and apprenticed. At the opposite 
corner of the churchyard is a similar school, in which 
sixty girls are maintained, clothed, and educated, and 
afterwards placed out in service: a convenient school 
house was erected, in 1786, at an expense of £1,500. 
A school for reading, writing, and arithmetic, has also 
been established here, in pursuance of the will of Mr. 
William Birley, who, in 1715, bequeathed £900. in 
trust for the purchase of an estate, of the rental of 
which, one third was to be appropriated to the estab- 
lishment of the school, one third towards the main- 



SHEFFIELD. 21 

tenance of indigent tradesmen, or their widows, and 
the remainder towards the support of a minister to 
officiate in the chapel of the hospital. The school of 
industry was estahlished in 1795, and removed to its 
present situation in 1815: the huildings, which are 
upon an extensive scale, and well adapted to their use, 
were erected by subscription: there are 350 children 
in this establishment, A Lancasterian school for 
boys, established in 1809, and a similar institution for 
girls, established in 1815, are supported by subscrip- 
tion. National schools, in which 390 boys and 391 
girls are instructed, are maintained in connexion with 
the National Society, which, in addition to a grant 
of £320. from the district society, has granted £650. 
towards the erection of the buildings ; and a national 
school for 400 children has been erected at an esti- 
mated expense of £700, of which £350. was defrayed 
by the Lords of the Treasury, under an act passed in 
1833. There are also numerous Sunday schools. 

The Collegiate School is pleasantly situated in the 
vale of the Porter, and was opened in August, 1836. 
It belongs to a company of proprietors, and is con- 
ducted in conformity with the principles of the church 
of England. The Wesleyan Proprietary Grammar 
School, in Glossop-road, is a very large establishment. 
It has just been finished, and will accommodate 300 
boys. The bestowment of a decidedly Wesleyan 
training was the principal object had in view by its 
projectors. 

The Earl of Shrewsbury's hospital was projected 
by Gilbert Earl of Shrewsbury, in 1616, and com- 
jjleted, in 1673, in pursuance of his will, by the 
c 3 



22 SHEFFIELD. 

Earl of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England. It 
is amply endowed for eighteen men and eighteen 
women, who have each a comfortable dwelling; ten 
shillings per week for each man, and eight shillings 
for each woman, with an allowance of coal, coats, 
and a gown annually. The original buildings were 
recently taken down to make room for the new market 
place, and the erection of the corn exchange; and a 
neat range of buildings, in the later style of English 
architecture, has been erected on the southern side of 
the town, in the centre of which is a chapel. The 
general infirmary was first opened for the reception of 
patients in 1797, and, in a manufacturing town, where 
so many artisans are continually exposed to accidents, 
and their health materially injured by the processes of 
many of the trades in which they are employed, has 
been deservedly regarded as an object entitled to the 
most liberal patronage and support. The premises, 
occupying an extensive site about a mile to the north- 
west of the town, and guarded against the too near 
approach of other buildings by the purchase of thirty- 
one acres of surrounding land, were erected by public 
subscription, at an expense of nearly £20,000, includ- 
ing the purchase of the land. They are handsomely 
built of stone, and form a conspicuous ornament in the 
principal approaches to the town. In front of the 
building is a neat portico, ornamented with statues of 
Hope and Charity, finely sculptured ; and the grounds 
are enclosed by an iron palisade, with a central gate- 
way, and a porter's lodge on each side. The internal 
arrangements are extensive and complete, and the in- 
stitution is supported by an income arising from dona- 



SHEFFIELD. 23 

tions and bequests, and by annual subscription. 
Among the principal benefactions are, £'200. by the 
Rev. James Wili\inson, late vicar; £200. by Dr. 
Browne, under whose auspices the establishment was 
materially promoted ; £1,000 by Mrs. Fell, of Newhall ; 
a donation of £2,000, and a subsequent legacy of £500, 
by F. H. Sitwell, Esq. ; and £6,337. 25. 10^. be- 
queathed by the late Rev. Thomas Gisborne, who also 
gave like sums to the infirmaries of Nottingham and 
Derby. 

The Botanical and Horticultural Gardens, which 
were opened to the public in 1836, occupy about 
eighteen acres of land in the picturesque valley of the 
Porter. The grand entrance is in Clarkhouse-lane, 
and is a chaste Ionic structure, adapted to the model 
of the temple on the banks of the Ilissus, at Athens. 
The General Cemetery occupies an abrupt but broken 
and verdant acclivity of Sharrow Vale, and extends 
over upwards of five acres. It was opened in July, 
1836, and is one of the most beautiful establishments 
of the kind in England. The Cholera Monument is a 
lofty, slender, and elegant obelisk. It stands in the 
Claywood cholera burial ground. It was erected in 
1834, in memory of those who had been swept away by 
that terrific scourge. 

The neighbourhood, which is rich in mines of iron 
and coal, abounds also with quarries of excellent 
stone, some of which, especially that at Grimsthorpe, 
contain many admirable specimens of calamites ; and 
the coal shale and iron stone have beautiful impres- 
sions of various vegetable productions. In 1761, two 
thin plates of copper were ploughed up on a piece of 
c 4 



24 SHEFFIELD. 

land, called the Lawns, each containing an inscription 
commemorating the manumission of some Roman 
legionaries, and their enrolment as citizens of Rome. 
From the prevalence of iron ore, the waters of Shef- 
field have a slightly chalybeate property. The Rev. 
Dr. Robert Saunderson, Regius Professor of Divinity 
in the University of Oxford, and Bishop of Lincoln ; 
and the Rev. Mr. Balguay, Prebendary of North 
Grantham in the Cathedral Church of Salisbury, and 
an eminent disputant in the Bangorian controversy, 
were natives of Sheffield : and Chantrey, the celebrated 
sculptor, was born at Norton, a village about three 
miles from it. Sheffield gives the title of Baron and 
Earl to the family of Holroyd. 



DBSCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 25 



CHAPTER HI. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE EAILWAY. 



The entrance to the Slieflield station is through a 
substantial and well-designed gateway facing up the 
Wicker, at the angle of the Barnsley new road and 
Saville-street. It is intended for passengers only ; the 
entrance for goods being in Saville-street. On entering 
the station which is very commodious, a handsome and 
spacious shed, supported by cast-iron pillars, presents 
itself. It contains four lines of rails for the engines 
and carriages, and turn-rails at the end for reversing 
the position of the engines and carriages. The con- 
struction of the shed deserves notice, combining, as 
it does, strength with apparent lightness. A flagged 
pathway, raised a couple of feet above the level of the 
rails, renders the step into or from the carriages f ery 
easy and convenient. A similar shed is to be built in 
this station for the use of the North Midland Railway, 
with waiting room and offices suitable to the wants 
of the town of Sheffield ; and passengers for Leeds or 
Derby and all intermediate places, will here take 
their seats, and proceed to their destination without 
any change of carriages. 

Upon issuing forth from our entrenchments, we 



26 DESCniPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

behold, close to the line on the right, the works of 
Mr. Brownell. Saville-street and the river Don run 
immediately behind these works, and from the oppo- 
site bank of the river rises the elegant and lofty 
chimney of the New Gas Works. The two conspicuous 
chimneys which are a little more distant belong to the 
new colliery, which has lately been established by the 
Duke of Norfolk, and which is working the Yorkshire 
Silkstone seam, at a depth of 126 yards. A range of 
lime-kilns, in which the lime is prepared by a process 
altogether novel, are visible behind the colliery; and 
the prospect is bounded by the verdajit slope of Shef- 
field Park, in the midst of which St. John's church 
is conspicuously situated. 

Along the high ground on the left nms the new road 
to Barnsley. It gradually declines away from the 
railway in the direction of the old road, with which it 
forms a junction at Pitsmoor Bar. The design of its 
formation was to avoid the tremendous ascent of Pye 
Bank, which all who have ever left Sheffield by the 
north road will not fail to remember. 

Were our traveller now to look behind him, and had 
he power by some potent charm to dispel the murky 
cloud that spreads itself over the landscape, he would 
obtain a tolerable view of the town of Sheffield ; and 
would behold the tower of St. Paul's rising proudly 
in the centre of the picture, and lifting its well-pro- 
portioned dome and elegant cast-iron cupola far above 
all surrounding edifices. 

The prospect speedily opens to a considerable extent 
on the right. As the eye ranges from the smoke- 
capped buildings of Sheffield in the rear, to the beau- 



DESCRIPTION OP THE RAILWAY. 27 

tiful turrets of AtterclifFe church in advance, it passes 
over a wide tract of country. Through this spacious 
valley winds the placid stream of the Don ; but the 
eye cannot here catch a glimpse of its waters. The 
sight of this valley, and the park on its opposite 
acclivity, in which are the ruins of the Manor House, 
which formed the prison of the ill-fated Mary of 
Scotland, are well calculated to call up whatever remains 
of chivalric feeling that may exist in the bosom of the 
beholder. Perhaps he may apostrophise the mean- 
dering stream in some such elegiac strains as the 
following : — * 

There, on Reflection's pensive breast, 
A shade of distant days will rest ; 

Where near yon ivied tower 
Thy stream would weirble soft and low, 
Listening to sounds of royal woe, 

Told to the midnight hour. 

On thee, with many a tear suffused. 
The beauteous captive nightly mused. 

And in thy fleeting wave 
Saw the light bubble glittering rise. 
Then break in air,—" Behold," she cries, 

" Mary, thy crown, thy giave ! " 

Other associations of a less mournful character will 
also rush upon the mind whilst contemplating the 
valley which now lies before us. This is the 
famous " Valley of the Don," in which the author 
of Waverley has laid the scene of Ivanhoe, and with 
a description of which he opens that enchanting 
romance. "In that pleasant district," says he, " of 
merry England which is watered by the river Don, 



28 DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

there extended in ancient times a large forest, cover- 
ing the greater part of the beautiful hills and valleys 
which lie between Sheffield and the pleasant town of 
Doncaster. The remains of this extensive wood are 
still to be seen at the noble seats of Wentworth, of 
WharnclifFe Park, and around Rotherham. Here 
haunted of yore the fabulous dragon of Wantley; 
here were fought many of the most desperate battles 
during the civil wars of the Hoses ; and here also 
flourished in ancient times those bands of gallant out- 
laws, whose deeds have been rendered so popular in 
English song." Such is Sir Walter Scott's descrip- 
tion of the scene of our present excursion ; and from 
his account we perceive that the dragon -like monsters 
that now sweep along it, are not the first creatures of 
that species that have rendered it famous by their ex- 
ploits. We cannot here resist the temptation of giving 
our traveller a description, by the same hand, of a 
landscape in this valley when it was covered by the 
forest of Rotherwood, in order that he may compare it 
with what meets his own eye as he dashes along it in 
his steam-borne car. " Hundreds of broad short- 
stemmed oaks, which had witnessed, perhaps, the stately 
march of the Roman soldiery, flung their broad 
gnarled arms over a thick carpet of the most delicious 
green sward. In some places they were intermingled 
with beeches, hollies, and copse-wood of various de- 
scriptions, so closely as totally to intercept the level 
beams of the sinking sun ; hi others they receded from 
each other, forming those long sweeping vistas, in the 
intricacy of which the eye delights to lose itself, 
while imagination considers them as the paths to yet 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 29 

wilder scenes of sylvan solitude. Here the red rays of 
the sun shot a broken and discoloured light, that par- 
tially hung upon the shattered boughs and mossy 
trunks of the trees, and there they illuminated in 
brilliant patches the portions of turf to which they 
made their way." This looks like poetry, but it is 
doubtless a correct representation of what often 
greeted the eye of the Saxon swineherd, as he drove 
his charge towards the castle of his Norman lord. A 
change, however, both great and surprising, has past 
over this vision. Forest, and castle, and serf too, have 
vanished together ; or, if any remnant of Rotherwood 
remains, it is but the unsubstantial shade of what 
once bore the name ; and if every stone of the keep 
and the turret has not been thrown down, only suffi- 
cient remain to attract the gaze of the antiquary, and 
cause the artist to draw forth his pencil. We would 
fain pursue this theme ; but, whilst we mourned over 
the loss of much of what was picturesque and romantic 
in the England of eight centuries back, we would 
pour our strains of loftiest panegyric on that spirit of 
change, which, although it has stripped our land of her 
beautiful forests, has also operated upon her inhabi- 
tants, — has torn the gorget from the neck of the 
thrall, has dashed the bow from the grasp of the outlaw, 
and the spear from the hand of the marauding knight. 
To the reflections with which we have seen proper to 
introduce our traveller into the valley of the Don it 
behoves us now to put a stop : we must apply our- 
selves to our more legitimate task, of describing the 
various objects which present themselves to his notice 
as he sweeps along his iron pathway. 



30 DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

In the centre of the view we have been describing 
appear the Park furnaces, throwing forth copious 
volumes of fire and smoke, by which their position is 
even more distinctly revealed by night than by day. 
These furnaces are employed in reducing the argil- 
laceous carbonates of iron, derived froniTinsley Com- 
mon and other places adjacent. At present there is 
but one stack at work, which produces a larger 
quantity of metal than any other in Yorkshire or Lan- 
cashire, namely, twelve tons per day when the weather 
is favourable. The vitreous slag yields £500 or £1,000 
per year for mending the roads. The process not only 
of smelting the ore and running the metal into pigs, 
but particularly of casting heavy articles, such as im- 
mense cylinders for conduit pipes, is very interesting, 
and may at any time be witnessed by the stranger. 
On the left the prospect is of course contracted, as we 
are proceeding along that side of the valley : Spittal 
Hill which is a little in the rear, and that of Hall Carr 
which is somewhat in advance, form the boundaries 
of vision in that direction. 

At a distance of not quite half a mile from the sta- 
tion the line makes a curve to the left. It is not how- 
ever of much consequence, as it has a radius of fully 
three quarters of a mile. On the right may now be 
seen, at a short distance, a white building called 
Royd's Mill, and a pile of brick buildings which con- 
stitute the silver refinery of Messrs. Reed and Co. 
The plantation very near to the line on the left is Hall 
Carr Wood. 

* In crossing Hall Carr lane on the level, the fires of 
the Manor Colliery are clearly distinguishable over the 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 31 

tops of the cottages on the right. AtterclifFe church 
then forms the most interesting object in the right 
hand landscape, and of it we can obtain a very perfect 
view. This beautiful structure is in the early style of 
English architecture, and has an embattled tower 
crowned with pinnacles. It was erected in the year 
1822, at a cost of £1 1,700, which was defrayed by a 
grant from the parliamentary commissioners. It is 
remarkable for the rich display of heraldic ornament 
which adorns its windows. The pulpit is surmounted 
with a curious and effective parabolic sounding board, 
which was invented by Mr. Blackburn the incumbent, 
and is described in the philosophical transactions for 
1828. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the arch- 
deaconry and diocese of York, of which the net income 
is £194. and the patron, the vicar of Sheffield. The 
old chapel can also be distinguished from the rail- 
way. It was allowed to fall into a sadly dilapidated 
state, but it has just undergone very considerable 
repairs. 

The white house which occupies so elevated a posi- 
tion on the left is Woodhill house and was formerly 
the residence of Colonel Fenton, commandant of the 
Sheffield volunteers. Brightside lane runs on the 
right, between the railway and the river Don, and a 
little beyond it is Attercliffe Forge, an extensive pile 
of smoky brick buildings. Near the forge is New Hall , 
now in the occupation of Mi*. Sanderson, the American 
merchant, who is master of the works at Attercliffe. 
New Hall was formerly the seat of Mrs. Fell, the libe- 
ral benefactress of the Sheffield Infirmary. The vil- 
lage of Attercliffe stands upon the turnpike road from 



32 DESCBIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

Sheffield toRotherham, one mile from the former town. 
Its population is 3,741. The conspicuous windmill 
which also lies in the direction of AtterclifFe Forge is 
the property of Mr. George Hill ; and near to it there 
was wont to be obtained an excellent species of cannel 
coal, with which the Sheffield Gas Works were for a 
considerable period supplied. 

Upon arriving at a distance of a mile and a half 
from Sheffield, the range of hills, which has hitherto 
rendered our left hand prospect so very contracted, sud- 
denly opens and discloses the village of Grimesthorpe. 
The appearance of this village from the railway, when 
first it bursts upon the sight, is exceedingly striking, 
and partakes in some degree of the grotesque. The 
most conspicuous object is the blackened brick build- 
ing of the Grimesthorpe Grinding Wheel Company ; 
the village lies beyond, and around it rise high 
hills, which have been invested with a somewhat 
romantic air by the extensive quarrying operations 
to which they have been subjected. The lofty hill 
in which the excavations appear, and whose bold 
brow is shaded with wood, is the classic Wincobank, 
of which Sheffield bards have often sung, and on 
which, say they, — 

" The golden cheek of eve re^ts loveliest." 

But not only has Wincobank been the favourite resort 
of the poet and the admirer of Nature's exterior garb, 
but the mineralogist and the antiquarian may also be 
found wandering thither in search of the objects of their 
peculiar study. The one finds embedded in the brown 
sandstone the fossil remains of numerous plants which 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 33 

appear to have flourished beneath a tropical sun. The 
other, ascending to the top of the hill and discovering 
amongst the bushes and thick underwood faint traces 
of castrametation, doubts not that he is standing within 
the sacred limits of a Roman camp ; and, as he looks 
down from his elevation, can almost see the burnished 
helmets of the legionaries winding through the valley, 
and glittering amongst the trees of the revivified forest. 

The Grimesthorpe and Brightside road is crossed by 
an iron bridge with stone parapets. A culvert beneath 
the eastern wing affords a passage for the Baggaley 
Brook; a small stream which, after washing the western 
foot of Wincobank, and turning the Grimesthorpe 
Grinding Wheel, crosses the line of the railway as it 
hastens to swell the waters of the Don. The village 
of Grimesthorpe does not continue in view for more 
than three quarters of a mile. On the right, however, 
a very interesting view is now disclosed. A somewhat 
lofty hill appears in advance, and upon its precipitous 
brow the village of Brightside stands, whilst the waters 
of the Don wend their sinuous course along its base. 
The prospect is very picturesque ; but it must be con- 
fessed that its beauty is in no degree enhanced by the 
dingy buildings of Brightside Forge, which, standing 
on the bank of the river, forms one of its most pro- 
minent features. 

We now cross a private road by a beautiful stone 
bridge — one which is in fact the only ornamented 
bridge upon the line, and also the only one that is 
graced with parapets. The absence of parapet walls 
on this railway may be considered as one of its distin- 
guishing features ; and yet it is strange that it should 

D 



34 DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

have quite escaped the talented engineers of other 
lines, that were le monstre, in passing over a bridge, 
to feel at all inclined to make a digression to the right 
hand or the left, a wall would form but a very slight 
impediment to his wishes ; and were he, on the other 
hand, rather inclined to preserve the even tenor of his 
way, still less would any beneficial purpose be an- 
swered by the two costly parapets. Perhaps, however, 
our friends in other parts of the kingdom may not 
exactly coincide with us in our ideas on this point, 
and may fancy that a few pounds sacrificed at the 
shrine of taste are well expended, whatever mere 
motives of economy might suggest. After crossing 
this bridge we have a still more interesting view of 
Brightside, which from our present position has a truly 
romantic appearance. By looking forward we can per- 
ceive that the hill on the brow of which it stands, has 
been divided in order to afford a passage for the rail- 
way ; but before we enter this excavation we check our 
speed, and make a halt at the station which bears the 
name of the neighbouring village, 

BZtZGHTSISS 8TATZOV. 

The houses of Brightside stand chiefly on the right 
of the railway ; but a few appear scattered on the left. 
The little wooden box which serves for a temporary 
station-house also stands on the left. 

The pleasantness of its situation has caused Bright- 
side to be much frequented by pleasure parties from 
Sheffield. On every fine Sabbath especially, the sallow 
artizan may be seen wending his way thither, to inhale 
the freshness of the country air, and enjoy the beautiful 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 35 

and extensive prospect which the hill affords. The 
opening of the railway has not been productive of 
much benefit to it in this respect. Those who, when 
performing their peregrinations on foot, were com- 
pelled to confine them within a circuit of a mile or 
two round Sheffield, can now ride to Rotherham for 
sixpence ; and the consequence is, that the publicans 
of Brightside have the mortification of beholding their 
quondam customers gliding past their very doors to 
consign to the pockets of the more fortunate retailers 
of spirits in a more distant town, those gains which 
they had been accustomed to calculate upon as theirs. 
That the respectable inhabitants of Eotherham are 
satisfied widi this state of things is more than we 
should like to assert. Some of them we know had 
much rather that the draff of the Sheffield pot-houses 
were emptied into any other place than their once 
quiet and moral town. Nay, some have ventured to 
malign even the railway company, and to charge them 
with breaking the laws of God in opening their railway 
on the Sabbath as a channel for this polluting stream to 
pass through. We would ask such objectors what 
they suppose the consequence would be were all the 
common sewers in Sheffield closed on the Sunday ? 

Immediately after leaving the Brightside station, 
we enter a deep cutting, made through the hill upon 
which the village stands. This excavation is about 
three quarters of a mile in length, and frequently 
forty feet deep. It is crossed by two bridges, — the 
first conveying the road to Wincobank, called Jenkin- 
lane, across the railway ; and the second an occupa- 
tion road, in a farm belonging to the trustees of the 
. E 2 



36 DESCRIPTION OP THE RAILWAY. 

Shrewsbury hospital, and occupied by Mr. Ellis. 
The stratification of the rock, which is here beautifully 
developed, is what chiefly demands the attention of 
the traveller in passing through this cutting. The 
peculiar character of the geology of the valley of the 
Don has long caused it to attract the attention of sci- 
entific men. A paper was read on the subject at the 
Bristol meeting of the British Association, and it has 
frequently occupied the attention of the West Riding 
Geological and Polytechnic Society. Perhaps the 
following brief statement, as we cannot pretend to 
enter into detail, will enable the reader to understand 
the appearances which the sides of the cutting 
present: — At Ickles Hall, which is a mile and 
a half west from our present position, the Tinsley 
Park four feet ironstone lies at a depth of fifty yards 
below the Rotherham red rock. Twenty yards below 
the iron-stone, there is a thin seam of furnace coal ; 
and sixty yards lower still, the High Hazles coal, 
which is four feet six inches thick. Ninety-one yards 
below this, there is a six feet seam; and seventy- 
eight yards below it, we find the Swallow Wood coal, 
which is six feet in thickness. After this follow the 
Park Gate seam, or Shefiield Manor coal, Walker's 
Furnace coal, and the Silkstone seam, which last lies 
about 440 yards below the Swallow Wood coal. Un- 
der the river all these beds lie horizontally, the one 
over the other, but just before they reach the line of 
the railway, they suddenly rise at an angle of about 
forty-five degrees, and all except the three last-men- 
tioned reach the light. Of these strata the railway 
makes a partial section about the place where the 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 37 

Swallow Wood coal bassets out. Were this section 
made at right angles to the strata, it is evident that it 
would present one uniform appearance from beginning 
to end ; but as the angle which it makes with the line 
of inclination is somewhat less than a right angle, m^any 
strata are exposed to view as they successively rise to 
the surface. Beds of freestone, ironstone, (which may 
be distinguished by its rusty appearance,) and shale, 
interspersed with numerous little veins of coal, succes- 
sively appear and disappear ; but the Swallow Wood 
seam is the only coal measure of importance that is 
exposed to view. It is this seam which is at present 
worked at the pits of Messrs. Chambers, which we shall 
presently have to pass. What was obtained from the 
cutting was turned to profitable account by the con- 
tractor, who employed it in burning the ballast in 
\,hich the sleepers are embedded. We must not how- 
ever neglect to inform our traveller before we conduct 
him forth from this cutting, that it is in its right hand 
bank alone that the various strata are distinguishable ; 
the great inclination at which they lie having rendered 
it necessary on the other side to shelve off the superior 
ones, to prevent them from sliding down upon the 
railway. Thus the one bank affords a pretty correct 
idea of the inclination of the strata, whilst the other 
exhibits their order with as much clearness as could 
be done by a coloured diagram. Towards the close of 
the cutting, the strata can be seen abruptly to terminate, 
what is technically termed a fault being made; and 
immediately afterwards the interesting appearance of 
their undulation is distinctly perceivable. But per- 
haps the reader may imagine that we are describing 
D 3 



38 DESCRIPTION OF TUE^ RAILWAT. 

phenomena, which can be observed only by a pedes- 
trian survey of the cutting. We can assure him 
however that the geological appearances we have de- 
scribed are so clearly marked, that notwithstanding 
the rapidity with which his steam car bears him along, 
a very little attention will enable him to notice them 
all. 

Upon issuing forth from the cutting a wide prospect 
bursts in our view on the right, and a contracted but 
beautiful landscape is unfolded on the left. Tiie one 
view embraces the wide valley of the Don, from Black- 
burn Forge, in the direction of Sheffield, to the Holmes 
Furnaces near Eotherhani, — the glistering waters of 
the Sheffield canal and the tortuous stream of the Don 
occupying the centre, whilst Tinsley village and Park 
form the back ground, and the spire of Handsworth 
church rises above the distant trees. The lovely view 
in the opposite direction extends up the narrow but 
picturesque valley of the Blackburn Brook, and is 
beautifully bounded by the noble woods of Thunder- 
cliffe Grange. The Blackburn Brook rises in the 
neighbourhood of Chapel Town, and flowing by Mea- 
dow Hall, here unites its waters with those of the Don. 
The Grange, as it is elliptically called in the neigh- 
bourhood, is the scat of the Earl of Effingham. Kcp- 
pel's column, a pillar raised in commemoration of that 
gallant admiral's honourable acquittal, can just be dis- 
tinguished peering above the trees of the Grange, 

The bridge, or rather the viaduct, over the Black- 
burn Brook, is composed of five beautiful stone arches. 
It crosses, in addition to the Brook, a private road 
and the head stream of Blackburn Forge. 



DKSCaiPTION OP THE RAILWAY. 39 

We now proceed through the Meadow Hall estate 
on an embankment twenty feet in height. The rails on 
this embankment are laid upon cross pieces of kyanized 
timber ; whereas elsewhere the sleepers are of stone. 
Running along the side of Kimberworth Hill we make 
a curve to the right of three-quarters of a mile radius. 
After sweeping across two private bridges, and admir- 
ing for a moment the Don winding through the mea- 
dows on the right, we catch a glimpse of Jordan Dam, 
washing the very banks of the railway, just as all the 
external beauties of Nature are hidden from our view 
by the side of another excavation. Jordan Dam is an 
elbow of the Don, from which the river Don Company 
have recently made a new cut to Rotherham. This 
was done much to the annoyance of the railway com- 
pany, whose bill was before parliament at the very 
time that the river company were empowered to make 
their alterations, and who were compelled thereby con- 
siderably and injuriously to divert their original line. 
The new cut is broad and deep enough for vessels of 
ninety tons burden, and is nearly two miles in length. 
It extends from Jordan Dam to the Holmes, and 
thence in a direct line to the vicinity of the Rother- 
ham bridge. 

The cutting into which we have now entered, is 
neither so deep nor so interesting as the former. 
The stratification of the rock presents a similar appear- 
ance, but is not quite as well defined. It will pro- 
bably be observed that the strata here appear to incline 
in a different direction from those in the Brightside 
cutting. This, it would appear to us, must either be 
occasioned by a considerable undulation in the strata, 
D 4 



40 DESCBIPTION OP THE RAILWAY. 

as they rise from the valley, in a direction parallel 
with their line of inclination, or must be accounted 
for by supposing that the curve which we have made 
since we emerged from the last excavation has caused 
the railway to form with the ascending strata an obtuse 
instead of an acute angle. 

The river Don company's new cut lies on the right, 
at a distance of only a few feet, but is concealed by the 
sides of the excavation. The smoke with which the 
air now becomes redolent, wams us of the proximity 
of the Holmes Furnaces ; and, immediately upon 
emerging from the cutting, they burst upon our 
view, smoking, and flaming, and roaring, at but 
a few yards' distance on the right. This huge and 
unsightly temple of Vulcan assumes its sublimest 
appearance at night, when all surrounding objects are 
enveloped in darkness, and itself illuminated only by 
the fitful glare of the flame which it unceasingly 
throws forth. These immense iron works were founded 
by Samuel Walker, Esq., in the middle of the last 
century. This remarkable person, when twelve 
years of age, was an orphan, without money, and 
almost without education. In conjunction with his 
two brothers he established a small foundry ; and, by 
his talents and industry, eventually rendered it one of 
the most flourishing in Europe. During the wars with 
America and France, immense quantities of cannon of 
the largest calibre were manufactured by him; and the 
iron bridges of Sunderland, Yarm, and Staines, and 
the Southwark bridge, at London, were cast at these 
foundries. Considerably less business is done here 
now than formeriy ; for, when Peace visited Europe in 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 41 

1815, and, waving her olive branch, scattered plenty 
and prosperity over the nations, she frowned upon 
those who had forged the engines of war, smote 
down their proud looks, and ofttimes scattered their 
possessions. The Walkers then abandoned the greater 
part of their works, which have subsequently been 
divided, and let off to more humble speculators. 
- On the opposite side of the li^ie are the coal pits of 
Messrs. Chambers. From these the Holmes Furnaces 
are supplied ; and the brick bridge of one arch, which 
here crosses the railway, is for the conveyance of the 
coal and coke to the works. 

More distant than the Holmes Furnaces on the 
right are Stubbs' Steel Works, and Habershon's Iron 
Works and Forge. Holmes Hall, the plain, square 
brick building, with a somewhat antiquated appear- 
ance, which presents its back to the railway at a very 
short distance, is at present a farm house, but was 
formerly the residence of the noble Earls of Effingham. 
Here we make our second and last halt. 

HOIiZaSS STATION.* 

Before carrying our traveller further on his way to 
Rotherham, we must make a short digression, as the 
Greasbrough branch, which we promised to describe, 
here diverges from the main line. As this branch, 
however, is mainly designed for the conveyance of 
coal from Earl Fitzwilliam's collieries at Greasbrough, 

* We should anticipate at this station the speedy springing up 
of a large and populous to\vn. We refer our reader to a pro- 
spectus, which he will find at page 9 of our advertising sheet, for 
the reasons on which we ground this opinion. 



43 DESCRIPTION OP THE BAILWAY. 

and of goods from the canal, and is seldom honoured 
by the transit of passengers, it will not be necessary to 
be very minute. 

The branch to the Greasbrough canal, upon diverg- 
ing from the main line, approaches Masbrough by a 
curve to the northwards, and unites with the North 
Midland Railway at Masbrough-street, near the foot of 
the hill leading to Ferham, the residence of William 
Swann, Esq. From this point, as far as the Greas- 
brough canal, the two railways run parallel with, and 
close beside, each other. 

A bridge carries both railways over the Masbrough 
street. After which they encounter the high ground of 
Masbrough Common, and pass under Back-lane, and 
through a cutting nearly half a mile long and between 
fifty and sixty feet deep, to the brook which separates 
the township of Kimberworth and Greasbrough. 
Here, on the left, appear Car House, now occupied 
by Mr. Singleton, and The Clough, the residence of 
George Wilton Chambers, Esq. ; and, on the right, 
the river Don, with Eastwood, beautifully situated on 
the opposite hill, and Aldwark, amidst the thick and 
picturesque woods in the distance. The railway now 
])asses over the Rotherham and Wentworth turnpike 
road by a neat and substantial bridge; and through 
the lowlands, called Greasbrough Ings, on an embank- 
ment from fifteen to twenty feet high, until it reaches 
the Greasbrough canal. Here it terminates; and a 
basin and wharf have been constructed for loading 
and unloading goods from the canal,* which commu- 

• From this wharf, in connexion witli tlie Humber Union Steam 
Packet Company, goods and merchandise can be shipped twice a 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 43 

nicates with the river Don, at a distance of about 250 
yards from this station. Uniting with the railroad at 
this point, Earl Fitzwilliam has formed a branch rail- 
way to his collieries, which is traversable by the 
locomotive engines and colliery waggons. On the 
Greasbrough branch, only a single line of rails has 
been laid down, as the conveyance of coal is the 
almost exclusive purpose for which it is designed. 

We now return to the main line. At the Holmes 
station, the road from the Holmes to Masbrough, 
which is called Salter's Lane, crosses the railway upon 
its level. Upon leaving the station, we have the 
village of Masbrough very adjacent to us on the left; 
Eotherham church lifts its lofty spire in advance ; and 
the valleys of the Don and the Rother display their 
beauties on the right. Masbrough, in addition to its 
iron works, can boast of a pottery and a glass house ; 
and the Don is there crossed by a stone bridge of five 
arches. The Eother rises in the county of Derby, a 
little to the south of Chesterfield. After flowing past 
that town, it waters, during the rest of its course, a 
lovely vale renowned in song, and forms a confluence 
with the Don near the town which we are fast ap- 
proaching, and for which it has furnished the name of 
Jio/hcrham. 

The North Midland Railway here crosses the Shef- 
field and Rolherham line by a magnificent viaduct. 
The lofty embankment along which it proceeds can 
be seen stretching up the valley of the Rother, almost 

week, at the same rate of carriage as to Rolherham, and without 
any charge of wharfage or cartage ; and vessels dischai-ging there, 
can liave the cargo delivered iu Sheliield the same day. 



44 DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 

as far as the eye can reach. An imposhig view is 

afforded of a considerable portion of this vast work; 

when the eye has followed it as far as it can, the 

mind still runs on, and views it penetrating the huge 

mountains and spanning the enchanting valleys of 

Derbyshire. The desecration of this poetic valley by 

the steam engine, has not been allowed to take place 

unbewailed by the minstrels of the neighbourhood. 

" Ilother's Rose," sacred to poetry and sentiment, 

shrinks from unfolding her red blossoms to the gaze of 

every railway traveller, and blooms not beneath the 

unpoetic cloud of vapour ; and the poet cares not to 

have the eyes of a thousand travellers upon him as he 

wanders through the once secluded glades of his be- 
es o 

loved valley, nor yet to have his divine inspirations 
mingled with the inharmonious din of a hundred iron 
wheels. The following elegiac strains would appear to 
have been poured forth upon a farewell visit to this 
beauteous, but now to the poet disfigured, vale : — 

How still and silent seems this valley now, 
Save when, at intervals, some rural sound 
Breaks on the listening ear. How different far 
Will all things seem, when on the iron road 
The whirling steam car, with its waggon train. 
Shall shoot adown the vale : fire, vapour, smoke. 
Oft startling the lone wanderer, where e'en now 
The nightingale enchants the quiet shade. 

We mourn not, however, the change ; and, were it 
cur's to possess the poet's laurel wreath, rather than 
impede the progress of such works as this, we would 
take the proud garland from our brow and cast it into 
the flames of the locomotive itself. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE RAILWAY. 45 

The North Midland Railway strikes off from the 
Midland Counties Railway about a quarter of a mile 
from Derby. It first runs up the Derwent valley, 
from which it emerges near Belper. It then passes 
through the Amber valley, leaving Matlock six miles 
on the left. It next enters the Rother valley and 
proceeds along it past Chesterfield and across the 
Yorkshire boundary as far as the Sheffield and Rother- 
hara Railway. Proceeding northward, it passes three 
miles to the east of Barnsley, and two and a half to 
that of Wakefield. Ten miles from Leeds it is joined 
by the Leeds and Manchester Railway, and shortly 
afterwards by the York and North Midland. It ter- 
minates at the east side of Marsh-lane, at Leeds, and 
is there joined by the Leeds and Selby Railway. Its 
total length is seventy-two miles ; it passes through 
five tunnels in its course, and is expected to cost at 
least two millions sterling. The summer of the 
present year will, in all probability, behold its com- 
pletion ; and, at the same time, we shall have the 
happiness of again appearing before our readers as its 
historian, describer, and eulogist. 

The view of Rotherham from this part of the rail- 
way, is beautiful and imposing ; but as it lies directly 
in advance, it can only be seen by adventuring ,the 
head from the window of the carriage. The church 
rises majestically on the left of the landscape ; Can- 
klow Wood clothes the hills which stretch far away on 
the right ; and, on the beautiful acclivity which forms 
the centre, rests a considerable portion of the fair town 
of Rotherham. On the top of the hill the Methodist 
chapel stands conspicuously ; and not far from it 



46 DESCRIPTION OP THE RAILWAY. 

appears the New Poor House. The mass of the town 
lies beyond the rising ground, and is consequently in- 
visible. Canklow Wood, which so beautifully over- 
hangs the town, is the property of the Duke of Norfolk. 
On the summit of the hill which it envelopes, a little 
structure has been erected, on which the name of 
Boston Castle has been bestowed. From this point 
the eye can range over a wide tract of country; and 
the prospect is as enchanting as it is extensive. 

After crossing the headstream of the Holmes, we 
cross the river Don company's new cut by a hand- 
some bridge of three arches, of which the centre one 
is iron and of thirty-six feet span. Again we cross 
the headstream, and immediately afterwards the river 
Don, by a noble wooden bridge of seven arches. 
This bridge is well exhibited in the view of Rother- 
ham, which forms the frontispiece of this volume. 

Immediately after passing this bridge, we find our- 
selves beneath the spacious shed of the Eotherham 
station. As this, however, closely resembles that at 
the other extremity of the line, a description of it is 
unnecessary. 

We have now accompanied our traveller to the end 
of his locomotive flight. By the potent agency of a 
little boiling water, he has been whirled from Shef- 
field to Eotherham. W'e will now assimie the more 
old-fashioned office of the mere topographer, and 
cause to pass before our reader whatever is most 
worthy of his notice in the famous and ancient town to 
^irhich we have now conducted him. 



ROTHKBHAM. 47 



CHAPTER IV 



ROTHERHAM. 



The town ofRotherham* is situated near the junction 
of the little river called the Rother with the Don. 
Baxter has given the true etymology of the name of 
this stream from the fulness of his Celtic knowledge, 
ITr Odar, (terminus,) the limit or boundary. There 
are three rivers of this name in England, and they are 
all limitary streams. A Roman origin has been 
claimed for Rotherham. About half a mile higher on 
the stream of the Don is a rectangular encampment, 
which has long been known by the name of Temple- 
borough, or Castle Garth by Templeborough, It is 
situated on the south bank of the river, a very small 
space being left between the outer agger and the water. 
The area is defended by a double agger, the outer 
line exceeding the inner considerably in height and 
thickness. The lines are parallel, and the space be- 
tween the two lines equal, except that it is much 

* In introducing some few notices of the ancient history of 
Rotherham, we sliall at once own ourselves indebted to Dr. 
Hunter's estimable work, "The History of the Deanery of Don- 
caster;" and as this large and expensive work is necessarily in 
very few hands, we hope our readers will thank us for making 
more generally known this very small and condensed portion of 
its valuable contents. 



48 ROTHERHAM. 

smaller on the side towards the north. The entrance 
was on the south, where there was a depression in the 
work exactly in the centre, A similar depression in 
the north agger has at present the appearance of 
having been no part of the original work, but made 
since the whole plot was given up to the purposes of 
husbandry. About 300 yards to the west of the camp 
Btill higher on the river, is another earth work, but which 
is probably only a fragment of some larger work, the 
lines of which have been obliterated by the plough. 

The form bespeaks it to be the work of a civilized 
nation, and the Koman Idicia which are from time to 
time discovered, leave no doubt that it was a work of 
that people. Pieces of Roman brick-work and pottery 
are found ; and coins are also sometimes discovered, 
of which the most remarkable is an Aureus of Vespa- 
sian. 

The industrious and generally cautious Horsley has 
fixed upon Templeborough, as the site of the Morbium 
of the Notitia. The work of Richard of Cirencester, 
with its new Roman Itinerary, had not been produced 
4n the days of Horsley, In that Itinerary we meet 
with a station called Ad Fines, lying between Ches- 
terfield, as it is supposed, and Castleford, and this 
station, till the appearance of that Itinerary unknown 
to our antiquaries, has been placed near Templebo- 
rough, and the town of Rotherham is supposed to 
have arisen out of it. 

But there are no indications of anything resembling 
a town in the immediate vicinity of Templeborough. 
Rotherham, which is more than half a mile from the 
camp, has no appearance of having been built on a 



UOTHBRHAM. 49 

Roman model ; and although the name of Rotherham 
may appear to be a reflection oi Ad Fines, yet it is on 
the other hand to be considered, that it" the Itinerary 
be not a genuine work, an admirable hint for the name 
of Afi Fines was afforded in the glossary of Baxter 
under the word Rotherham. 

On the whole as the subject now stands, I would 
recommend to the good people of Rotherham, to be 
content with a Saxon antiquity, to which the early 
foundation of their church and the great extent of their 
parish justly entitle them. 

Lords op Rotheruam. — In the times of the Con- 
fessor, Rotherham was held by Acun, as a manor of 
five caracutes. It was valued at £4, but at the time 
of the survey, the value through some cause has fallen 
to 40,s-. The new lord had one caracute in demesne 
and eight villains, and three borderers, who had two 
caracutes and a half; and there was a mill which how- 
ever yielded no more than ten shillings rent. This, 
with the church, was Rotherham at the end of the 
eleventh century. 

Acun was displaced with the other Saxon proprie- 
tors, and his manor was given to the Earl of Morton, 
who had subinfeuded Nigel Fossard before the date of 
Domesday. The family of Nigel granted Rotherham 
as a separate member of their fee, to a race of subin- 
feudatories. One of these was Eustace Fitz John, 
who received from Henry I., a declaratory or con- 
firmatory charter of all his lands, in wliich are named 
those which he held of the fee of William Fossard. 
In conformity with this in the Testa of de Nevil!, 
we find William de Vesci, a descendant of Eustace, 

£ 



50 ROTHERHAM. 

holding one knight's fee in Rotherhara, of Peter de 
Mauley. The posterity of Eustace enjoyed a feudal 
superiority at Rotherham, till the town and church were 
given to the monks of Rufford. A branch of the 
family of de Vesci, bearing the hereditary name of 
Tilli, disputed with the posterity of Eustace the pos- 
session of Rotherham. Dodsworth, copying as it 
seems some ancient piece of evidence, says, " Robert 
de Tilli was the first conqueror or purchaser of Rother- 
ham, and from him issued John de Tilli ; and from 
John, Ralph Tilli, and the same Ralph forfeited and 
lost his lands of Rotherham, and King Henry, father 
of King Edward, entered into the same lands and held 
them as his escheat. John de Vesci in the reign of 
Edward L, gave all he possessed at Rotherham, to the 
monks of Rutford. 

Dodsworth records that, in the answer which the 
abbot of Rufford returned to the commissioners under 
the quo rvarranto proceedings of Edward I., it being 
demanded by what right he claimed assize of bread 
and beer, tumbrel, pillory, standard of measure, of 
both length and weight, infangtheof, gallows,* and 
half the market ; — he said he claimed in right of the 
moiety of the manor of Rotherham, which had belonged 
to Ralph de Tilli, &c. 

* In conformity with this we find there is still a field kiiowii 
by the name of Gallow-tree-hill, on part of the common lands of 
Rotherham. Another kind of capital punishment was in use in 
Rotherham in the time of the middle ages ; for among the many 
charges in the hundred rolls against Henry de Normanton, the 
tmder-sherifi", was one, that he had taken the horse, value forty 
shillings, of a certain thief beheaded at Rotherham. 



ROTHERHAM. > 51 

For the next two centuries and a half Rotherham 
was under the peculiar patronage of the abbots and 
monks of the Cistertian house of Rufford, in Notting- 
hamshire. To that house the whole church belonged, 
and as they obtained an appropriation of it, it was 
served by a vicar as is now the case. All the feudal 
interests centred there. In the 13th year of Edward 
I., the abbot of Rutford obtained a grant of free warren 
in all his demesne lands of Rotherham. 

Whatever the town of Rotherham might have been 
previously, it appears that after the Conquest it 
became something more than one of the agricultural 
towns of the district, for we find it had a market 
and fair while still in the hands of the Vescis. Of 
the origin of this privilege, which was much coveted, 
and doubtless very valuable in early times, we have 
no account. It appears to have been a prescriptive 
right, and may possibly have originated in the Saxon 
times, when the church of Rotherham was the only 
place of resort to a wide district, for the performance 
of the rites of Christianity ; for many are the instances 
in which we find the meetings for traffic held at the 
places which were peculiarly sacred to the purposes 
of religion. Rotherham had unquestionably both a 
market and fair long before we have any reason to 
think that Sheffield enjoyed either of those privileges. 
King Edward I., in the 35th year of his'reign, 1307, 
granted to the people of Rotherham another market, 
which was to be held on Friday, and a fair, yearly, at 
Midsummer. Two years after, another charter was 
granted for a market and fair at Rotherham, probably 
on the resumption of the former grant ; for what reason 
E 2 



02 ROTHERHAM. 

cannot be discovered, for the market is on the same 
day, Friday ; the fair however is not at Midsummer, 
but on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Edmund, and 
the five following days. This grant was made to Ed- 
mund de Dacre ; and Dodsworth notices one to the 
same effect, except that the market was to be on the 
Monday granted to the abbot of RufFord. 

With these advantages, situated as it was upon one 
of the principal high roads of the kingdom, the com- 
munication between London and Carlisle, being in the 
line of Mansfield, Rotherham, and Wakefield, popula- 
tion would flow in upon Rotherham, and it would 
acquire more definitely the character indicated by the 
word town in the present use of it. The immber of 
its chantries, the devotion of property to public uses, 
and the existence of streets possessing distinct appella- 
tions, all bespeak that Rotherham was, in the middle 
ages of our history, a place of some consideration, 
though its name does not appear in our chronicles ; and 
having no residence of its lord, it affords in those pe- 
riods very little matter for the topographical historian. 

The name of Rotherham occurs but seldom in 
the history of the public affairs of the kingdom. The 
Queen of Scots rested a night there, in her journey 
from Bolton to Tutbury ; and King Charles I., when a 
prisoner in the hands of the Scots, was brought from 
Wakefield te Rotherham, and after resting a night, 
(in the house in High Street, which is now the bank,) 
was canied to Mansfield. 

The people of Rotherham zealously espoused the 
parliament cause ; and the vicar, John Shaw, a most 
uncompromising partizan, escaped very narrowly 



HOTHERHAM. 53 

when the town was taken by Lord Fairfax, by lying 
for three days and nights in the church steeple, while 
the Earl's forces were in possession of the town. His 
own published account of his escape, is of a marvellous 
and almost incredible description. It was on Rother- 
ham Moor that the people assembled when the first 
act of hostility in this part of the kingdom was com- 
mitted, the burning of the out-houses of Sir Edward 
liodes, at Great Houghton. This was in September, 
1642. The townspeople immediately proceeded to 
throw up works about Rotherham, and it was settled 
as a parliamentarian garrison by Lord Fairfax. AVe 
may perceive with what enthusiasm the people at 
large entered into the contest, when it is slated that 
even the school boys of Rotherham fought against the 
Earl with courage and pertinacity ; about thirty under- 
taking the management of a drake, which was planted 
at the entrance of the bridge, and did considerable 
execution against the assailants on the hill. The gar- 
rison fought till all the powder they had was expended, 
when they yielded the town on what Shaw the vicar 
calls honourable terms. 

Thk College of Jesus or Rotherham. — The 
splendid foundation of archbishop Rotherham, is at 
once the most prominent and by far the most interest- 
ing feature of its history. Thomas Scott, or as he was 
afterwards called, De Rotherham, was born on August 
24th, 1423. He says of himself that he was born at 
Rotherham, and in that particular part of the town 
where afterwards he planted the college. He was 
baptized in the church of Rotherham, and lived there 
till he was removed to King's College, Cambridge. 
e 3 



54 ROTHEBHAM. 

On the accession of Edward he was nominated one of 
his chaplains, and as in those days civil and ecclesias- 
tical offices were often united, he was made secretary 
to the king, the keeper of the privy seal, and finally, in 
1474, lord high chancellor. 

His ecclesiastical preferments were not less splendid. 
He was provost of Beverley and of Wingham ; arch- 
deacon of Canterbury; in 1467, bishop of Rochester; 
1471, bishop of London; and finally, in 1488, made 
archbishop of York. He died at Cawood, on May 29th, 
1500, and was sumptuously interred in his own cathedrd. 

On the feast of St. Gregory the Great, 1482, he laid 
the foundation of an edifice at Rotherham, which was 
designed for the foundation of a college ; and on 
January 12th, 1483, being then archbishop of York, by 
his own ordinary metropolitical authority, he erected 
one perpetual college, consisting of a provost and two 
fellows ; and inducted, by the delivery of a ring, the 
provost aqd fellows into the possession of the building 
he had erected. The description of the site of the col- 
lege is, a piece of land lying between the river and the 
Abbot's Close, called the Imp Yard. An imp yard is 
what is now known by the term nursery garden. Le- 
land visited Rotherham while still the college was 
flourishing. He says, " Rotherham is a meately large 
market town, and hath a large and faire collegiate 
church. The college was instituted by one Scott, 
archbishop of Yorke, otherwise caullid Rotherham, 
even in the same place where now is a very faire col- 
lege sumptuously builded of brike,* for a provost, 

* Several small portions of the original beautiful brick wurk 
still remain to be seen in the College Inn Garden. 



ROTHEUHAM. 55 

V prestes, a scholemaster in song, and VI chorestes ; 
a scholemaster in grammar, and another in writing." 
It is presumed to have been one of the first edifices in 
this part of the kingdom built of that material, as it 
became a popular saying in the neighbourhood, " As 
red as Rotherham College." It lived through the 
attacks which King Henry made upon the foundations 
of our ancestors ; but it fell never to rise again beneath 
the act of the 1st year of Edward VI. for the suppres- 
sion of charities, colleges, and guilds. Its possessions 
were seized and granted out in parcels to different 
persons, and the building itself much altered, but 
still retaining some marks of its pristine character, has 
at last become an inn. 

The Chuhch op Rotherham. — The church of 
Rotherham is one of the most beautiful in the diocese ; 
it is in one instance called the church of St. Mary, but 
is more commonly called the church of All Saints or 
All Hallows. All Saints" day was the feast of dedica- 
tion at Rotherham, and is still observed as the day on 
which the Statutes are held. 

It was erected in the reign of Edward IV., and arch- 
bishop Rotherham,* whose heraldic insignia of three 
bucks trippant appears upon it, was, if not the sole 

• In another place Dr. Hunter says: " The church of Rother- 
ham which appears to have been rebuilt by him from the founda- 
tion, is itself a fabric of surpassing beauty; and the vestments of 
his priests, and the utensils for the altar, were of the most costly 
fabric and the most gorgeous description. A catalogue of them is 
given by the archbishop himself, and fully bears out this statement. 
Chalices and cups, basons, crosses, of the richest description ; 
vestments of coloured velvet and cloth of gold, to the number of 
more than a dozen, are mentioned. Other persons contributed to 
give the church an appearance of uncommon splendour. 

£ 4 



56 ROTH£RHAM. 

founder, yet a principal contributor to a work, which, 
without such assistance, was beyond the means of even 
so extensive a parish, aided by the funds of a wealthy 
monastic establishifient. It is built of the red stone of 
the neighbourhood. It presents to us a complete 
model of the ecclesiastical architecture of England in 
what is perhaps its purest age ; more adorned than in 
the preceding century, but not with that extreme rich- 
ness of minute ornament which appears in buildings of 
half a century later. We enter by a noble porch on 
the south side, to a lofty and spacious nave with side 
aisles. The transverse beams of the cross are of the 
same height with the highest part of the nave ; and at 
the intersection rises a tall and graceful spire, with 
pinnacles rising from its base, and accompanying it to 
about a third of its height, and crockets to the top. 
The head of the cross is so constructed as to afford 
private recesses for the chantries * which were founded 
in the church, and opportunities for processions to the 
high altar, by having two chapels, one on each side in 
the angle made by the cross beams with the head of 
the cross. 

The chapels are of the same height with the sides 
within, and the clerestory windows of the nave have 
others correspondent to them, through which light is 
admitted to the chancel. 

The old font, perhaps a relic of the Saxon church, 
is in the churchyard. There are three stalls on the 

♦ The valor of King Heur}' mentions five chantries in tlie 
church, viz., the chantry of the Holy Cross, St. Mary, Our Lady, 
St. Catherine, and the chantry of Henry Camebull, who was 
archdeacon of York, and one of the executors of archbishoj) Ro- 
therham. 



ROTHERHAM. 57 

south side of the altar, and a slanting niche may be 
observed, cut through the substance of a very thick 
wall, through which a view was admitted of what 
passed at the altar to persons assembled in the south 
chancel. The north limit of the transverse beam is 
separated from the rest of the church by some beau- 
tiful cancella. Here, as it seems, was the chantry of 
Heniy Carnebull ; and the large altar tomb against the 
north wall, with an enriched arch over it, may have 
been his monument. The church within is well 
pewed and lighted with gas, and proper regard is paid 
to its being kept in good order. The Rev. Thomas 
Blackley, is the vicar ; the Rev. Frederick Blackley, 
curate ; and the Rev. Mr. Hugile, evening lecturer. 

Public Institutions. — The Grammar School 
was founded, as it is said, by Lawrence Woodnett, 
Esq., of Lincoln's Inn, and Anthony Collins, Esq., 
of London, who, by deed dated September 1st, 1584, 
conveyed to certain trustees, lands (supposed to be 
crown lands) at Rotherham, Masbrough, and Brins- 
worth, together with a building called the town hall, 
for the purpose of establishing a grammar school ; 
but it seems that as early as the 3rd of Elizabeth, 
1561, the sum of £10. 15*. 4d. was paid to the 
masters employed in a grammar school out of the 
profits of the country ; most probably a reserve made 
on the dissolution of the college. 

Robert Saunderson, the divine and antiquary, was 
educated at this school; and perhaps reflects more 
honour on this institution than any other name con- 
nected with it. He was born at Sheffield, and removed 
with his father to Gilthwaite in his early childhood. 



58 ROTHERHAM. 

Charles Hoole, a kinsman of Bishop Saunderson, and 
one of the most celebrated schoolmasters of his day, 
was one of the masters of this school. The Rev. 
Benjamin Birkett was for some years master to this 
school, and, since his death, after a lapse of some 
time, the Rev. Joshua Nalson, A.M., has been ap- 
pointed. 

The scholars have a claim to a fellowship and two 
scholarships in Emanuel College, Cambridge, founded 
by John Freston, of Altofts, in turn with other schools, 
when they are not claimed by the scholars of the school 
of Normanton. There is also a claim on a fellowship 
of Lincoln College, Oxford. This school forms part 
of a building which was erected in 1829, on the site of 
the old town hall, by public subscription, amounting 
to near £2,000, and which comprises the library, 
the newsroom, and the dispensary. This latter ex- 
cellent institution has been nobly sustained, and per- 
haps is nowhere much more needed, than in a district 
where the labouring class are, from the nature of their 
employment, subjected to many accidents and injuries. 
This institution, since its establishment in 1806, to the 
present time, 1839, has aflforded surgical aid and 
medicine to 15,800 afflicted poor persons. Mr. J. 
Goodall is the resident apothecary and secretary. 

The Library contains upwards of 3,000 volumes 
of books ; and we dare venture to say, that a more 
judicious and valuable selection will be seldom found. 
Miss Turner is the librarian. 

Opposite to this building is the Court House, a 
large and handsome fabric, built at an expense of up- 
wards of £5,000, with a noble court room, in which is 



ROTHERHAM. 59 

held the quarter sessions, public meetings, &c.; and 
other spacious rooms, well adapted for the transaction 
of the great weight of business which, as the centre of 
the wapentake of Upper StrafForth and Tickhill, has to 
be disposed of here. 

HoLLis's School was founded by Thomas Hollis, 
who lived at Rotherham, and was buried there in 
1663. He was a nonconformist, and placed the 
patronage of this school in the hands of the minister 
of the dissenting congregation which was formed 
there ; he was the principal contributor to the erection 
of the Unitarian chapel, with which this school is con- 
nected, and which was built in 1705. Of this chapel 
the Rev. Jacob Brettel, author of " The Country 
Minister," a poem too little known, and other poems 
and elegant translations, is the minister. 

The Feoffees' School, in the Crofts, was built in 
1776. The yearly income of this school is stated to 
be about £100.; of which, £50. is paid to the master, 
and the residue expended in providing clothing and 
books for twenty-eight boys and twenty girls, who are 
instructed in reading, writing, and arithmetic. Great 
attention is now paid by the gentlemen who form the 
present feoffees, to the interest of the children attend- 
ing this school. Mr. John Mycock is the master, and 
Mrs. Mycock the mistress. 

The British School was built by subscription in 
1833, in which education on the Lancasterian system 
is given to children of such of the labouring class as 
choose to avail themselves of this means, on payment 
of a small weekly sum. The schools will accommo- 
date 200 of each sex. Mr. Sharp is the master of the 



60 ROTHERHAM. 

boys' school, and Miss Eliza Turner mistress of the 
girls' school. 

The Independent Chapel, at Masbrough, was 
built principally at the expense of Samuel Walker, 
Esq., and has, within the last two years, been consi- 
derably enlarged, and the interior received much 
tasteful and elegant improvement; which, together 
with the advantage of being warmed in winter, by a 
new apparatus, renders it a most comfortable and 
pleasant place of worship. With this chapel is con- 
nected the Independent college, erected in 1795, for 
the education of ministers of the Independent con- 
nexion : it has since been enlarged, and is capable of 
accommodating twenty-five students, who are in- 
structed in classics, mathematics, rhetoric, and com- 
position, and attend regular lectures on theology. 
Dr. Williams was the first president and theological 
tutor, who was succeeded by Dr. Bennett, now of 
London, and afterwards the Rev. Clement Perrot. 
The Rev. W. H. Stowell is now the theological tutor, 
and highly respected minister of the chapel ; and the 
Rev. Thomas Smith, A.M., the classical tutor. Some 
of the most acceptable and talented amongst the minis- 
ters of the present time, of this denomination, received 
their education here. 

The Methodist Chapel, in Talbot-lane, built in 
1805, and since twice enlarged, is a handsome and 
spacious structure, capable of holding upwards of 
1,500 hearers, and is worthy of the highly respectable, 
influential, and increasing, denomination to which it 
belongs ; and whose exertions at Rotherham, as at 
other places, have been crowned with great success. 



BOTHERHAM. 61 

The present ministers are the Revs. William Leech, 
James Bromley, and W. H.Taylor. With this, as 
indeed with every other place of worship at Rother- 
ham, large Sunday schools are connected. 

The Methodist New Connexion have a chapel 
in Westgate, but no regular minister appointed. 

The Baptist Chapel, at the bottom of Westgate, 
built in 1836, is a small but very elegant structure, in 
the Grecian style, and is at once an accommodation 
and an ornament to this end of the town. The Rev. 
James Buck is minister. 

Great alterations and improvements have been made 
in Rotherham within the last twenty years. The 
streets, which are in many places being widened, are 
well paved, flagged, and lighted with gas ; almost every 
house in the town is supplied with excellent water ; the 
low and old buildings which deformed the High-street 
and other parts of the town, have, in many instances, 
given place to good substantial erections, with hand- 
some fronts ; and it may be reasonably supposed that 
very few years will find still further and more important 
improvements and additions effected, called for by 
and calculated to meet the increased business which 
the railways must necessarily bring into the town. 
One striking and considerable improvement we must 
not omit to mention, namely, the widening of the top 
of Westgate ; for which purpose from £2,000 to £3,000 
was subscribed, and which will now present a spacious 
entrance, formed of lotty and handsome buildings, of 
which, the Ship Hotel forms the first and most distin- 
guished object, supplying, as it does, a striking con- 
trast in appeaiance to the old, low, and ruinous. 



62 ROTHERHAM. 

building which lately presented itself under that 
name. 

The com and cattle markets, always considerable, 
have been rapidly increasing in importance, particularly 
the latter : within the last twelve months, about double 
the amount of business was transacted to what was 
done the previous year. In addition to the numbers of 
Manchester butchers who have long frequented this 
market for the purchase of fat cattle, many purchasers 
from Leeds have lately been present ; and, when the 
North Midland opens its increased facility of inter- 
course and conveyance, no doubt corresponding in- 
crease in numbers may be calculated upon, from this 
and other places on the line. Perhaps very few 
places out of London can at times furnish a finer show 
of cattle than Rotherham market. 



VICINITY OF ROTIIERHAM. 63 



CHAPTER V. 



VICINITY OF IIOTHERHAM. 



Leaving the town eastwardly, on the right of the road 
leading to Doncaster is Clifton, the elegant mansion of 
Henry Walker, Esq. ; and a little further on, and on 
the left of the road, Eastwood House, built by the late 
Joseph Walker, Esq., and now the residence of James 
Sothern, Esq. Two miles from Rotherham is Ald- 
wark Hall, " embosomed in woods, among which the 
river Don meanders until it retires into, and is lost 
amongst, the thick foliage of Thrybergh Park," where, 
three miles from Rotherham, beautifully situated, 
rises Thrybergh Hall, a handsome Gothic structure, 
erected by its present possessor, Colonel Fullerton. 
About one mile to the right of the road from hence, is 
Ravenfield Hall, the family mansion of the Bosviles, 
now the residence of Thomas Walker, Esq, 

Between six and seven miles from Rotherham, the 
traveller comes to the pleasant and picturesque village 
of Conisbrough, where the majestic keep of the demo- 
lished castle arrests the eye ; and where, higher up in 
the village, the ancient tower of " the church the hill 
top crowns." Sir Walter Scott, in a note to Ivanhoe, 
says, " There are few more beautiful or striking scenes 



64 VICINITY OP ROTHERHAM. 

in England than are presented by the vicinity of this 
ancient Saxon fortress. The soft and gentle river Don 
sweeps through an amphitheatre in which cultivation 
is richly blended with woodland ; and on a mount 
ascending from the river, well defended by walls and 
ditches, rises this ancient edifice, which, as its name 
implies, was, previous to the Conquest, a royal resi- 
dence of the kings of England." A barrow in the 
vicinity of the castle is pointed out as the tomb of the 
memorable Hengist ; and various monuments of great 
antiquity and curiosity ate shown in the neighbouring 
churchyard. 

Southwardly of the town, on the road leading to 
Worksop, Mansfield, &c., the hand of improvement 
has been busy, as the elegant residences of South 
Terrace and South Grove manifest; further on, on the 
left of the road, is Moorgate, formerly the residence of 
Samuel Tooker, Esq.; and which, with its beautiful 
groimds, plantations, &c., then formed the most at- 
tractive feature the neighbourhood could exhibit : it 
is now a boarding school. Further on, Boston Castle, 
a shooting box built by Thomas Earl of Effingham, 
crowns the summit of an eminence, which aflfords one 
of the most splendid bursts of varied and striking 
scenery which this part of the country, rich as it is in 
such views, has to show. A little further on is the 
residence of John Oxley, Esq, On the lower road, 
southwardly of the town, is the Broom, the residence 
of John Boomer, Esq., from whence the road diverges 
to the left, through Wickerley, famous for its quarries, 
whence Sheffield is supplied with grinding stones, past 
Bramley to the charming village of Maltby ; from 



VICINITY OF ROTHERHAM. 65 

whence a foot road leads amongst the quiet of a beau- . 
tifully secluded dell, through which the winding rivulet 
"wanders at its own sweet will" to Eoach Abbey; 
and few, indeed, are the lovely spots on this green 
earth which display a richer diversification of se- 
questered sylvan beauty, hallowed by its venerable 
vestiges of monastic grandeur, — relics of the olden 
time, — than does this attractive spot, — 

" Where the graceful ivy greenly creeps 
O'er the grace of hoar antiquity." 

We return to the town, and pursue the outlet by 
Bridgegate. Passing over the bridge, on the centre 
of which stands what was formerly a chapel, but is now 
the gaol, and over the canal bridge, we come to Mas- 
brough; a part of the suburbs which sprung up during 
the rise and prosperity of the iron trade carried on there 
by Messrs. Walker. Masbrough has to boast being 
the birth-place of one of our best and most original 
modern sons of song, Ebenezer Elliott; who, best 
known by his least distinction of the " Corn Law 
Rhymer," has poured forth his thoughts in fervid, mu- 
sical, and glowing strains, which will live while poetry 
can touch the heart, and when the debatable question, 
now too much mixed up with his verse, shall have 
become one of the " things which were." Passing 
through Kimberworth, the road turns abruptly to the 
right, and about four miles from Eotherham is the 
entrance to ThunderclifFe Grange, the seat of the Earl of 
Effingham; and a little further, on the right of the road, 
amidst a wood of magnificent oaks, rises a lofty Doric 
pillar, built by the Marquis of Rockingham, in honour 



66 VICINITY OP ROTHEnHAM. 

of Admiral Keppel ; from hence the road continues to 
Chapel Town, Wharncliffe, Wortley, Peniston, &c. 
Another road, after passing over the bridge, takes a 
sudden turn to the right, and about one mile from 
Rotherhara, leads to the steel works belonging to 
Messrs. William Oxley and Co. The extensive works 
of the Birmingham Tin Plate Company, and the New 
Park Gate Colliery, belonging to Earl Fitzwilliam, 
from which, by an extension of the Sheffield and Ro- 
therham Railway, as shown on the map, coals are 
conveyed to Sheffield. A little further on, the road 
passes through Rawmarsh to the Rockingham Works, 
celebrated for the splendid specimens of china manu- 
factured there by Messrs. Brameld. One of these, a 
dessert service, made for his late Majesty, consisting 
of upwards of 200 pieces, excited general admiration 
from the beauty of the material, the excellence of the 
workmanship, and elegance of taste displayed in its 
production. They have lately introduced a novel 
article in china bedsteads, which is stated to be under 
the immediate patronage of her present Majesty. A 
visit to these show rooms will highly gratify the curious 
in porcelain ; the best white glaze being considered the 
clearest and most perfect white that can be imagined. 
Little more than a mile further is the considerable 
village of Wath. Here, in his youth, with a shopkeeper 
of the name of Hunt, lived the author of " The World 
before the Flood ; " * and here too, the idol of his early 
worship, she who formed the " starlight of his boy- 
hood," immortalised in his exquisite poem of " Han- 
nah," resided, 

• Jumcs Montgomery, Esq. 



VICINITY OF ROTHERHAM. 67 

Returning to where this road branches ofi' at Mas- 
brough, another road, passing Masbrough brewery, 
Messrs. Singleton and Wingfield, the Phoenix foundry, 
belonging to Mr. Sandford, the glasshouses of Messrs. 
Close and Clark, and the Effingham works, belonging 
to Mr. James Yates, in whose show rooms the visiter 
will find great variety of beautiful specimens of iron 
and brass castings in stoves, fenders, &c., and in iron- 
stone china letters for signs and ornaments for deco- 
rating buildings, of which new and beautiful articles 
Mr. Yates is the sole manufacturer and patentee. The 
road passes Carr House, late the residence of William 
Fenton, Esq., and now of John Singleton, Esq. ; and 
about one mile from Rotherham is Barbot Hall, the 
residence of Lord Howard. Of this place a beautiful 
writer says : * " The site of this pleasant mansion 
commands a magnificent semicircle of many miles 
extent. The town, the River Don, Moorgate, Broom, 
Clifton, Eastwood, Aldwark, and the woods of Raven- 
field andThrybergh, are all included in the prospect.'' 

The village of Greasbrough is about a mile fur- 
ther, and amother mile the entrance to Wentworth 
Park, a visit to which will afford the lover of magni- 
ficent scenery a high gratification. The splendid 
palace-like mansion, the woods, glades, lawn, and 
waters ; are all grand and striking, and, connected and 
harmonised, as they now are, by judicious planting, 
form a magnificent whole, while the cloud-capt height 
of Keppel's column, the pyramidal elevation of Hoober 
Stand, and the mausoleum, with its " classic dome," 

• Rhodes's Excorsions in Yorkshire, &c. 
F 2 



68 VICINITY OF BOTHERHAM, 

and interior with " richest sculpture graced," give to 
different points of view a beauty and grandeur rarely 
surpassed. 

The west end of the town has been the scene of 
most striking and considerable additions and improve- 
aients. Here an elegant chapel has lately been built 
by the Baptists ; here is the Rotherham corn-mill, the 
property of Mr. James Hodgson ; the extensive brewery 
of Robert Bentley, Esq., who has just erected a malt 
house en such a scale as to form a considerable archi- 
tectural ornament to this entrance. Above this rises 
the New Union Poor-house, built at an expense of 
upwards of £8,000 ; presenting, from the mass of 
building of which it is composed and the elevation on 
which it stands, a most imposing appearance. A little 
beyond, on the brow of the hill, forming part of Moor- 
gate plantations, is pointed out as the site of a new 
cemetery ; a company for the promotion of which de- 
sirable object is now forming, v/ith every probability 
of succeeding in their undertaking. 

Viewed from this wooded eminence, the viaduct, 
forming part of the North Midland Railway, which 
crosses the road to Sheffield, forms a fine feature in 
the scene. It consists of twenty-five arches, including 
two of seventy-two feet each span over the old river, 
and is, indeed, a noble specimen of massive architec- 
ture, which reflects upon Mr. Buxton, the contractor, 
the highest and most unquestionable credit. 



APPENDIX. 69 

A P P E N D I X. 



SHEFFIELD AND ROXHERHAM RAILWAY. 
OFFICERS. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Vickers, Esq., Chairman. 
Mr. John Booth, Deputy Chairman. 

William Ibbotson, Edward Vickers, William Jackson, Tliomas 
Linley, William Swann, John Spencer, Samuel Jackson, James 
Roberts, E. I. Heseltine, G. W. Chambers, William Glossop, 
J G. Clark, George Knowies. 

Solicitors. — Mr. Thomas Badger and Mr. Henry Vickurs. (Tho 
transfer registration books are kept at Mr. Vickor's office, Sheffield.) 

Engineer. — Mr. Frederick Swanwick. 

Secretary. — Mr. Thomas Pearson. 

Superintendent and Resident Engineer. — Mr. Isaac Dodds. 

DEPARTURE OF TRAINS. 

FROM SHEFFIELD, 

At 7f , S\, 9§, 10§, Ui, 12f , a.m. ; and 1§, 2^, 3|, A\, 5i, 6^, 7|, 
8§, p.m. 

FROM ROTHERHAM, 

Every hour from 8 a.m., until 9 p.m. 

SUNDAYS, FROM SHEFFIELD, 

At 9 and 10 a.m.; and at 1^, 2|, 4^, 5|, G^, /i, 8|, p.m. 

FROM ROTHERHAM, 

At 9§ a.m.; and at 1, 2, -3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, p.m. 
Tho Station Gates will bo closed precisely at theiimes above 

specified for tho departure of the Trains. 
Parcels for Rotherham may be booked, fice of charge, at 
M essrs. Fisher and Holmes, Nursery and Seedsmen, Market Place, 
Sheffield. 

F 3 



70 



APPENDIX. 



FROM THE SHEFFIELD STATIO.V. 

An Omnibus runs on the arriTal of each Train, (fare 4<l.,) pass- 
ing the Tontine, Albion, Commercial, King's Head, and George 
Hotels; and through the heart of the town, up the Glossop Road, 
as far as the first toll bar, within a few minutes' walk of the 
beautiful Botanical Gardens, the Cemetery, the Collegiate and Wes- 
leyan Proprietary Schools, and some of the finest views in tlic 
neighbourhood. The Omnibus returns by the same route, to tliu 
Sheffield Station, in time for each train to Rothcrhara. 



NORTH MIDLAND RAILWAY. 
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF THE TRAINS. 



BETWEEN DERBY AND SHEFFIELD. 



Departure from Sheffield. 


Arrival at Derby 


5 30 a.m. 


7 45 a.m. 


9 15 „ 


11 30 „ 


12 noon. 


2 Id p.m. 


2 p.m. 


4 15 „ 


6 „ 


8 10 „ 


SUNDAY 


TRAINS. 


6 30 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


9 30 „ 


12 noon. 


6 p.m. 


8 25 p.m. 


Departure from Derby. 


Arrival at Sheffield. 


5 55 a.m. 


8 a.m. 


9 15 „ 


11 30 „ 


12 45 p.m. 


3 p.m. 


3 15 „ 


5 30 „ 


8 „ 


10 15 „ 


s»:nday 


TRAINS. 


9 a.m. 


11 30 a.m. 


3 p.m. 


5 30 p.m. 


640 „ 


8 „ 



APPENDIX. 



71 



BETWEEN LONDON AND SHEFFIELD. 
Departure from London. Arrival at Derby. Arrival at Sheffield. 



6 a.m. 


12 30 p.m. 


3 p.m. 


9 „ 


3 15 „ 


5 45 „ 


1 p.m. 


7 45 „ 


10 15 „ 


8 30 „ 


5 40 a.m. 

SUNDAY TRAINS. 


8 a.m. 


8 a.m. 


3 p.m. 


5 30 p.m. 


8 30 p.m. 


5 40 a.m. 


8 a.m. 


ure from Sheffield. 


. Departure from Derby. 


Arr. at Lon 


5 30 a.m. 


8 a.m. 


3 30 p.m. 


9 15 ,, 


11 45 „ 


6 30 „ 


12 Onoon. 


2 30 p.m. 


9 30 „ 


2 p,m. 


4 30 „ 


11 30 „ 


6 „ 


8 25 „ 

SLNUAY TRAINS. 


5 30 a.m. 


9 30 a.m. 


12 noon. 


7 30 p.m. 


6 p.m. 


8 25 p.m. 


5 30 a.m. 



BETWEEN BIRMINGHAM AND SHEFFIELD. 

Depai'ture from Sheffield. Departure from Derby. Arr. at Birm. 



5 30 a.m. 
9 15 „ 

12 Onoon. 

2 p.m. 

6 „ 

6 30 a.m. 
9 30 „ 
6 p.m. 
Departure from Birming, 

3 15 a.m. 
6 45 „ 

10 30 „ 
1 p.m. 
5 30 „ 



8 a.m. 
11 45 „ 
2 30 p.m. 
4 30 „ 
8 25 „ 

SDNDAY TRAINS. 

9 a,m. 
12 noon. 

8 25 p.m. 
Arrival at Derby. Arrival at Sheffield. 

5 40 a.m. 8 a.m. 

9 „ 11 30 „ 
12 30 p.m. 3 p.m. 

3 „ 5 30 „ 

7 45 „ 10 15 ^ 

F 4 



10 


15 


a.m. 


1 


45 


p.m. 


4 


33 


}■) 


6 30 


» 


10 45 


» 


11 


15 


a.m. 


2 





p.m. 


10 45 


» 



72 APPENDIX. 

SUNDAY TRAINS. 

3 lo a.m. 5 40 a.m. 8 a.m. 

6 4.5 „ 9 » 11 30 „ 

12 45 p.m. 3 p.m. '5 30 p.m. 

Note. — Passengers maybe booked through between LONDON 
and SHEFFIELD, and BIRMINGHAM and SHEFFIELD, 
by the above Trains, at the respective Railway Stations at those 
places. Trains run between DERBY, NOTTINGHAM, 
LOUGEBROUGH, and LEICESTER; and Coaches to and 
from LEEDS, YORK, &c., (those to and from Y'ork, in conjunc- 
tion with the trains of th« Y'ork and North Midland Railway). 
Places by Coaches, in connexion willi the North Midland Rail- 
way, may be bespoken at the Branch Railway OlTice, iu Euston 
Square. 

A Quarter of an Hour is allowed at Derby for Refreshment. 



EOTHE'bHAM. 

MAGISTRATES, PUBLIC OFFICERS, &c. 

Colonel FuUerton, Thrybergh Park; Henry Walker, Esq., 
Clifton ; The Rev. George Cliandler, Treeton ; T. B. Bosville, Esq., 
Conisbro; Thomas Walker, Esq., Ravenfield Park; and Lord 
Howard, Barbot Hall, Magistrates and Commissioners of Assessed 
Taxes. 

Rev. John Lowe, Swinton ; John Aldred, Es<i., Rothcrluun ; Com- 
missioners of Assessed Taxes. 

Mr. John Oxley, Clerk to the Magistrates, and CommissionerB 
of Assessed Taxes for the ri)pir Division of Slrafforth and 
Tickill. 

Thomas Badger, Esq., Coroner for the County of York. 
Mr John Bland, High Constable, and Inspector of Weights and 
Measures for the Upper Division of Slrafforth and TickhilL 
UNION POOR HOUSE. 

Mr. Worsley, Governor; Mrs. Worslcy, Matron; Rov. J. Hugill, 
Chaplain; Mr. Joseph H. Turner, Surgeon; Mr. John Barras, 
and Mr. R. T. Barras, Relieving Officers ; John Oxley, Esq., Clerk 
and Superintendent Registrar to the Union ; W. F. Hoyle, Esq., 
Auditor. 



APPEKDIX. 



73 



FEOFFEES OF THE COMMON LANDS, (18-10.) 
The Feoffees of the Common Lands of Rotherham, are twelve in 
numher, elected by the freeholders and rate payers. Their income 
amounts to about £6C0 a year, wliich is distributed in charities, 
doles, coals, &c., &c., to the poor inhabitants, and to the improve- 
ment of the town ; tliera ai-e at present two vacancies to be sup- 
plied. The following gentlemen, with the earl of Effingham, at 
present constitute this cmijorate body, viz., — 

Messrs. Benjamin Badger, Greave; Thomas Badger, Thomas 
Bagshaw, Edward Pagdin, Sen., Henry Walker, C. Nighlingale, 
John Nightingale, William Eamshaw, Robert Bentley. 

An Act for a Local Court for the recovery of debts, of not more 
than £15., was obtained on the 29th of July, 1 839. F. Maude, Esq., 
is appointed Judge, and E. Newman, and W. F. Hoyle, Esqrs., 
Clerks. 

,FOST OFFICE. 

Post Mistress, Mrs. Wilson. 
Delivery of Letters. — London Letters, ISJ noon. — Hull ditto, 
1 p.m. — North ditto, 3 p.m. 

COACHES, &c. 

FROM THE STATION. 

The Times — From Doucaster for the nine o'clock Train, return* 
to Doncaster after the anival of the three o'clock Train, ex- 
cept on Sunday, when it leaves on the arrival of the ten 
o'clock Train. 

The Commander in Chief — From Doncaster to meet the one 
o'clock Train, returns to Doncaster on the amval of the six 
o'clock Train from Sheffield. 

77(6 Relford Coach — From the Cromi Inn, Retford, on Monday, 
at 5i a.m. ; Tuesdays and Thursdays, at 8 a.m. ; and Satur- 
day at 4 p.m. — From the Railway Station, Sheffield, on Sun- 
day at 9 a.m., and Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 3 p.m., 
in time for Coaches to Gainsbro', Tuxford, Newark, London, 
and all parts of the South; and in summer time will run 
daily. The above Coach will pass through Wickersley, 
Bramley, Maltby, Stone, OJdcoats, Blyth, and Bamby Moor. 



74 APPENDIX. 

The Pelfiam ■ — From the Crown Inn, at ^5 a.m., throagh Wickers- 
ley, Maltby, Tickhill, to Bawtry, Gainsbrough, Loutli, Lin- 
coln, &c., and returas at 8 p.m. 

The Packet Coaches — From the Crown Inn, at 6 a.m., to Thome 
water side, through Conisbrough, and Doncaster. 

The Transit — From the Crown Inn, at 8 a.m. to York, througli 
Doncaster, returns at 8 p.m. 

ITie Eclipse — To Doncaster, at 10 a.m., and returns at 4 p.m.. 

The Louth Mail — Through Wickersley, Maltby, Tickhill, Bawtry, 
Gainsbrough, to Louth, at 9^ a.m., and returns at 3 p.m. 

The London Mail — To Doncaster. at ^12 a.m., and returns 
at \\ p.m. 

WATER CONVEYANCE. 

River Dun Company's Wharf — Vessels every day to Thome and 
Hull, &c. 

Pearson and Co. — Vessels in connexion with sailing Brigs, to 
Stanton's Wharf, London, and with the Victoria, Gazelle, and 
Yorkshireman Steam Packets. Agent, John Copeland, Esq- 

Hull, number, and Steam Packet Company — Boats from the 
Bridge, or Fleck's Wharf, on Wednesdays and Saturdays, to 
their Whai-f, 1 , Humber Tlace, Hull, in connexion with the 
Wilberforce, Vivid, and Water Witch Steam Packets to Lon- 
don. William Fleck and Co., Agents. 

Thomas Smith — Vessels to Mancbester> Lancashire, &c., every 
fortnight. 

Thomas Wright — Doncaster Market Vessels with Com, Sec, to 
Sheffield. 

John Newbold — New Fork Gate, Gainsbrough Canal Vessels. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




CLARK'S 
METALLIC HOTHOUSE MANUFACTORY, 

5u, LIONEL STKEET, BIRMINGHAM. 

The above Establisliment has been placed by its Proprietor 
uiitlor tiio sole management of Mr. John Jones, whom that able 
Horticulturist, Loudon, pronounces to be, in his judgment, "de- 
cidedly the best Hothouse Builder in Britain," and whose elegant 
structures have long formed the chief points of attraction in the 
extensive Botanic Gardens, both of Manchester and Birmingham. 
The great and llatlcring encouragement which Mr. Clark has re- 
ceived from the principal Nobility and Gentry of the United 
Kingdom, during tlio last twenty years, and more especially since 
entering into the engagement with Mr. Jones, above referred to, 
allbrds the most convincing proof of the vast superiority of his , 
Metallic Hothouses and Conservatories over all others ; and the 
spontaneous testimonials to the same effect, -which have emanated 
from various quarters in which they have been introduced, all 
lend to establish and confirm the fact. Mr. Clark is also well 
known as tlie Manufacturer of Copper Sashes of the most ex(iuisite 
workmanship, and which are adapted, not only for the mansions 
of the opulent but for churches, and all other public buildings ; 
they have likewise been extensively introduced into the splendid 
plate-glass windows of the first-rate shops in Ijondon, and other 
large towns ; for which, indeed, their extreme lightness, combined 
witii great strength and durability, render Ihem peculiarly eligible. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAMES YATES, 

MASBROUGH, 

il^ttiamental ixon antr Bras(0 iFountier, 

MANVFACTUKER OF 

STOVES, STOVE GRATES, AND FENDERS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
OF THE 

IMOM STOHE CMIE"A ILETTEMS 

AND 

FIGURES FOR SIGNS, ORNAMENTS, &c., 
rOB SECOBATmO BTTIIJ>II7a8 ; 

AND MANOFACTURER OF 

EARTHENWARE IN GENERAL. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ADAM RENWICK, 

62, Central Bnildings, Fargate, comer of Orchard St. 
and 82, Fruit Xttarket, Sheffield. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Dealer in Brushes, Coopery, Furniture, Sieves, Com ami 
Wire Riddles, Toys, Turned and Fancy Goods, Hair Bruslies, 
Combs, &c. 

FAHCT ]REFOgIT(D]RT. 



WILLIAM JACKSON, 



FANCY BRUSHES, 

EKGLISH AKD FOREIGN TOTS, 

AND A GREAT VARIETY OF USEFUL &ORNAMENTAL ARTICLES. 
Ii-ory Ctmihs at Manufdi'iurers prices. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




UNWIN AND RODGERS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF PISTOL KNIVES, 

FIXE 

LOCK, SNECK. DAGGER, DIRK, 

AMEIIICAN, IXDIAX HUNTING, 

AND 

SELF DEFENCE KNIVES, 

LAXCETS, 
ZBIFKOVED FEN MACHINES, 6cc. &c. 

\o, 23, BURGESS STREET, SHEFFIELD. 

JOHN SKINNER, 

Sbeffield, 

MANUFACTURER OF 
SCISSORS, KNIFE SHARPENERS, PLUMBERS' SHAVEHOOKS. 

AND 

JJTEEIL FEE'S. 

These Pens are so universally used and approved as to 
render comment unnecessary. It will be sufficient to say, for the 
information of those who have not tried them, that they are made 
from Steel of a particularly elastic quality and exquisite temper, 
and subjected to a process wliich effectually prevents their being 
corroded by the ink; and so iierfect is the principle upon which 
they are constructed, that one trial will be sufficient to prove their 
superior utility. 

Sold by all Dealers in Steel Pens. 

a 3 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOHN HARDY, 

52, BURGESS STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

MANCFACTCREB OP 

^mvl anU ^olisfieti Steel Article », 

BOOT HOOKS, BUTTON HOOKS, NAIL FILES, TWEEZERS, 

CORK BC&Evirs, 8tzz.x:ttos^ 

Fancy articles for Ladies' Work Boxes and Gentlemen's 
Dressing Cases. 

JOHN GREAVES AND SON, 

56, South Street, London Eoad, SHEFFIELD, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Blistered, Shear, Coach Spring, and best r^ned cast Steel, 

ALSO 

SAWS, FILES, EDGE TOOLS, JOINERS' TOOLS, tus. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF DIAMOND CAST STEEL, 
Which is confidently recommended as the best that can be used 
for fine Cutlery, Turning Tools, Chisels, Mill Picks, and other 
articles, in which an enduring cutting edge is required. 

Corporate \( /y Blark. 

JOHN DAVENPORT, 

Boekingbam Steam Engine, 

185, ROCKINGHAM STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SAWS, MACHIICE :E:i^ivEs, 

FOR CUTTING HAY AND STRAW; 

MINCINQ AND SADLERS' KNIVES; 

Inventor of the Patent Lathe-turned Circular Saw/, Cast Steel Refiner, ^e. ; 

ALSO, INVENTOR AND SOLE MANUFACTURER OF THE 

PATENT ELASTIC SILVER STEEL BUSKS FOR LADIES' STAYS, 

WARRANTED NOT TO CORRODE OR RUST. 

Black, Bright, Blue, Gold, Silver, and Copper Bronzed. 



ADVERTISEMENTS, 



WILLIAM SAXTON, 

TOP OF HIGH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

printer, ^ook^tlUx, ^oohbinttv, anti <$tattoncr. 

Bibles, Prayer Books, Hymn Books, &c., 

IN- PLAIN AND ELEGANT BINDINGS. 

Ledgers, Day Books, 6fc., Muled and Bound to any Pattern. 

TRACT SOCIETV'S PUBLICATIONS IN GREAT VARIETV- 

A Parcel from London every "Week. 

W. p. SLACK'S, 
|3ribatc Commercial BoarDrng l^otise, 

10, MILK STREET, 

DAVID WRIGHT, 

MANUFACTURER OP 

AaLi KIHBS OW gPECTACILEg, 

With Glass or Pebble Eyes ; 
MICROSCOPES, 

l^caDing ©lagged, ^gc ©lagged, $cc., 

94, FARGATE, SHEFFIELD. 



Spectacles and Optical Instruments repaired. — Broken Plate 
Glass purchased in any quantity. 

__ - 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Ncto and 5cfonli=5anl) 33oofe jKcpogitors, 

STATIONERY WAREHOUSE, V PRINTING OFFICE, 
Gibralter Street^ Sheffield, 

NEAR THE LANCASTERIAN SCHOOL. 



J. PEARCE AND SON 

Have ou hand upwards of Twenty Thousand Volumes of New 
and Second-hand Books, in all classes of Literature, English and 
Foreign, which they are offering at verj- low prices, for ready 
money. 



A large stock of Stationery of every description. 

PRINTING AND BINDING ON THE SHORTEST NOTIOK. 
PARCELS FROM LOXDOS TWICE A WEEK. 

TO FABSXEBS, OBAZIBBS, CATTI.Z: I>Z3AZ.Z:BS, &c. 

EDMUND F. PLATT, 

Bigb-street, Botberbam, 
Begs to in\ite attention to his Medicines and Preparations for the 
prevention and cure of diseases in Horses, Cattle, and Slicep. 
They are made from recipes of iicknowledgcd merit, with drugs of 
genume quality; and, as remedies in the common disease* of each 
class of animals, will be found at once simple, prompt, safe, and 
efficacious. 

E. F. Platt, in thanking his Friends and the Public gene- 
rally for tlieir kind favours, begs to inform them that he has just 
selected in London, from the first houses in each department, a 
supply of genuine Drugs and Chemicals, Farina's Eau-de- 
Cologne, Lozenges, Spices, &c., &c. Superior Sperm, Machine, 
and other Oils; Sperm and Wax Candles, Oils, Faints, and 
Colours. 

Arabic Lozenges, hif/hli/ recommended as an agreeable and effeciin- 
remedy in Colds and Cmujhs, price 2s. Gd. per packet. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HOLMES ESTATE, 

SITE OF ROTHERHAM NEW TOWN. 



The owner of this extensive and valuable estate has instructed 
Mr. William Flockton, Architect, to lay out some of the best parts, 
in Convenient Lots for Building Purposes. It is a circumstance 
of rare occurrence that an opportunity for investing Capital to 
such advantage presents itself. The vast increase in the Value of 
Property in particular Districts, consequent on those magnificent 
Works, the Railways, in no place exceeds, if it equals, the advan- 
tages obtained in the immediate neighbourhood of Rotherham, 
but more especially on the Holmes Estate. The Grand Line of 
Communication from the North to the South of Great Britain by 
the North Midland Railway. The Sheffield and Rotherham 
Railway joining hand in hand the two Towns ; and the New Canal 
of the River Don ; all these pass in different directions through 
the Estate, giving an almost Unparalleled Facility of Communica- 
tion from the very thresliold of Manufactories erected here, Avith 
all parts of tliis realm, and the whole World. Few persons vriU 
doubt but that along the line of the North Midland Railway, and 
at the Junction of the Sheffield and Rotherham Railway and 
Canal, with the North Midland, a new Town will of necessity 
spring up. Here will be the Stations and Warehouses of the two 
Railways and Canal; and it is not improbable that the celebrated 
Cattle Market of Rotherham will be removed to adjoin the Rail- 
ways. As a Situation for Manufactories, it stands without a rival. 
The Neighbouring Lands abound with Minerals of tlie first Qua- 
lity; there is an exhaustless supply of excellent water for Steam 
Power,— an article frecjuently of more value for that purpose than 
the liand itself. It is the prevailing opinion that the heavier 
branches of the Sheffield Trade will be gradually removed into 
this Neighbourhood; and of this there can be no doubt, when the 
immense advantages to be obtained are so apparent. Distance 
from Sheffield, and insufficient roads, might have been fairly 
urged against this opinion before the Railway was established ; 
but now there is the best of roads, and the distance is annihilated. 
A Merchant may leave his Villa on the West of Sheffield, and be 
at his Works near Rotherham in little more than fifteen minutes. 
Lots of Jjand to suit the convenience of persons will be laid out 
along the line of, and having a frontage, to the Canal and Rail- 
ways. 

The price will be such as to induce persons to embark their Capital on this 
eliirible Site ; and also those who have no immediate intention of building to 
take plots prospectively. It is impossible to state the price in an advertise- 
ment, as it will, of course, vary with the situation. 

Plans of the estate may be seen, and further particulars had, at the offices of 

Mr. W. flockton, AHCHITECT, 

DEVOXSHIUE STREET, SHEFFIELD- 



10 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. FLECK AND COMPANY, 

IBOS" A:^B ILEAB MEMCHAETS, 

CHEMISTS, SfcC, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

BRIDGE WHARF, ROTHERHAM. 

DEALERS IN 

iSloci^ ^in, ^inmH ^Uten, Bar anD Hot) tron; 

SHEET, PLATE, AND HOOP IRON ^ 
STEEL OF ALL KINDS; GLASS BOTTLES; 

IP A S J@ Sa"5? S JE ® s § 
RED AND WHITE LEAD; SHEET LEAD AND LEAD PIPES; 

Paints, Oils, and Colonrs; 
VARNISHES, DRUGS, AND DRYSALTERY GOODS ; 
WHARFINGER'S COMMISSION 
AND 

GENERAL SHIPPING AGENTS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 11 

CROWN INN 

AND 

GENERAL COACH OFFICE, 

KOTHESBABX. 

J. SHAW 

Begs leave most respectfully to return thanks to the Nobility and 
G entry for the patronage and support with which he has hitherto 
been honoured ; and further begs leave to assure them, that no 
exertion on his part shall be spared to merit a continuance 
thereof. 

CoMMBRCiAL GENTLEMEN and Others may depend upon 
that sedulous attention being paid to their comfort, which, with 
the superior accommodation this Old Established Inn has to offer, 
will, he trusts, meet with and retain their approval and support. 

Neat Post Chaise, and good Horses. — Funeral Equipages. 
ZK>ck-iip Coaeb Offices, Sec, &c. 



12 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

M O IL M E S H- A IL L, 

ANCIENTLY THE SEAT OF 

THE EARLS OF EFFINGHAM, 

AND MOST DESIRABLV SITUATED NEAR THE STATION OF TUE 

NORTH MIDLAND RAILWAY, 

AT MASBROUGH, 

AND AT ITS Jl'NCTlON WITH THE 

SHEFFIELD AND ROTHERHAM RAILW.AY. 



A Licence having been obtained for the purpose of con- 
verting the above capital messuage with its extensive premises 
into an Inn, the Propkietor begs leave to call the attention of 
Families, Commercial Gentlemen, and other Travellers, on the 
above-mentioned lines of Railway, to the advantages connected 
with this Hall, &c., as an Inn, to those whom business or pleasure 
may call for a few days into this neighbourhood ; combining, as 
it does, the pleasantness of a country residence, amidst the beau- 
tiful scenery surrounding Sheffield and Rotherham, with a close 
proximity to the extensive and rapidly increasing business marts 
connected with these places. 

From this Inn (forming part of the projected New Town of 
Rotherham) the Traveller will reach Sheffield in quarter of an 
hour; Chesterfield in three quarters of an hour; Derby in one 
hour and three quarters ; Station near Bamsley in tliree quarters 
of an hour ; Station near Wakefield in one hour ; and Leeds in 
one hour and a quarter, &c., &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 13 



NAGS HEAD INN, 

MARKET PLACE, ROTHERHAM. 



J. FLINTHAM, 

Begs leave to return thanks to the Public generally, for favours 
already received in the above lines of business, and hopes by assi- 
duity and attention to merit a continuance thereof. 

BEEF STEAKS AND CHOPS ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 

Bcittlcy'x Entire, Best. Beer, and Spirits of the best quality. 

GOOD B£3}S^ &C. 

BUTCHER'S ARMS, 

CATTLE I\L\RKET, CROFTS, ROTHERHAM. 



G. DOBB 

Begs leave to return thanks to Farmers, Butchers, Cattle Salesmen, 
and the Public, for favours already received, and hopes, by paying 
every attention to their accommodation, to merit a continuance 
thereof. 

Market Breakfast table every Monday morning, extensive Stablim/, 
Grazing for Cattle brought to market, and every acconunodation for 
Fanners, Butchers and Salesmen attending the same. 

BLUE BELL INN, 

:\I A R K E T PLACE, ROTHERHAM, 



WILLIAM PERKINS, 

Begs leave to return thanks to his Friends and the Public gene- 
rally, for favours already confen-ed upcn him, and to assure them 
that nil attention on his part to their accommodation shall be 
spared to merit a continuance thereof- 



Fine .lies, Best Beer, and Spirits of the best quality. 



14 AOVKRTISEMBKTS. 



R. ROBINSON, 

TAIJLOB ANU) WOOLILEH" BIRAFEM, 

HIGH STBEET^ BOTBESBAIK, 

Particclarly invites the attention of the public in general to 
his new Stock of Goods for the present Season, both in Woollen 
Cloths, Kerseymeres, Toilanets, and other Novelties, suitable for 
Gentlemen's Garments, as well as in London Beaver and Stuff 
Hats, and Children's Caps of the newest patterns and primest 
qualities, all of which he is offering at the most reasonable prices ; 
and, having also received his supply of Fashions, (being regularly 
forwarded from London,) he can assure those who may be pleased 
to favour him with their orders, that every attention will be paid 
to give satisfaction, and ensure future support 

R. R. begs leave to call the attention of Sporting Gentlemen 
to his superior Leather Small Clothes, Gaiters, and Overalls, made 
in the most fashionable maimer, and on the shortest notice. 

A large quantity of Plate and Carriage Leathers of the best quality. 

An assortxaent of SKacintosbes constantly on hand. 



.^s^rcgjia sss'ss'j, 



HIGH STREET, 
BOTBBBHABE. 



JAMES BOOTH 

Most respectfully begs leave to inform Commercial Gentlemen 
and the Public generally, that ho has taken tlie above Old 
Established Inn ; and hopes, by constant assiduity and attention, 
to merit a share of their patronage and support, assuring them he 
will have 

Wines and Spirits of the very best Quality, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 15 

F. DENTON, 

WATCH MAKER AND JEWELLER, 
HXaZI STBEET, BOTHSBHAXff. 

GOLD AND SILTEB WATCHES, GOLD RINGS, WEDDING RINGS. 
MOUENINO RINGS, WATCH APPENDAGES, ETC. 

Clocks and Watches expeditiously and accurately repaired. 

W. H. TAYLOR, 

COMMERCIAL EATING HOUSE 

ANO 

COFFEE ROOMS. 

NEAB THE RAILWAY STATION, KOTHERHAM. 



Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Tea, and Supper, supplied on the 
shortest notice. 

GOOD BEDS, &o. 



J. MOWER, 
SADDLER AND HARNESS MAKER, 

MARKET PLACE, ROTHER^AM, 

Begs leave most respectfully to return thanks to the Gentry and 
Public generally for their patronage and support ; and hopes, by 
assiduity and attention, to merit a continuance thereof. 

Portmanteaus, Carpet Bags, Carriage and Door Mats. 

A, great variety of Iiondon VHiips, Bits, and Spurs. 

AN EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT OP ALL SORTS OP HOBSE CLOTHS, ETC. 



16 



Jt^VERTISEMENTS. 



THE ARROW, 

A NEW COACH TO LEAMINGTON, 

THROUGH 

. (Seven miUs nearer than by way of Coventry,) 

IN CONJUNXTION WITH THE FIUST MOBNIXG TRAIN FROM, 
AND THE LAST EVENING TRAIN 

TO DERBY, 

Affording the most direct communication between Nottingham, 
Sheffield, Leeds, Derby, Burton, Tamworth, Coleshill, Hampton, 
Kenilworth, Warwick, and Leamington. 







FARES. 








LEAMINGTON. 


Meriden. 


HAMPTON. 


KENIl 






Ins. 
6 

5 6 


Out. 
4 

3 6 




Meriden 


s. d. 
1 6 


s. d. 
1 




Hampton 


s. d. 


s. d. 


LWORTI 


Kenilwth 


1 6 


1 


3 


2 


2 6 


2 


S. d. 


s. d. 


"Warwick 


1 




6 


40 


6 6 


3 6 


1 6 


I 



THE ARROW COACH 

Leaves Hampton-in-Arden Railway Station for Kenilworth, War- 
wick, and Leamington, every morning (Sunday excepted), about 
ten o'clock, after the arrival of the first train from Derby, and re- 
turns every evening (Sunday excepted), at a quarter before five 
o'clock, from the 

CROWN HOTEL, LEAMINGTON, 
Calling at the Wai-wick Arms, Warwick, and King's Arms, Kenil- 
worth, in time to convey Passengers to Derby or Birmingham by 
the l^st Train. The most reasonable charge will be made on all 
Paicels directed to go by the ARROW Coach, together with imme- 
diate Deliverv. 

CHARLES BLAKESLEY, 
, Proprietor. 



Post Horses, Chaises, &c., are in readiness on the arrival of 
Derby Trains, — Hampton being seven miles nearer Leamington 
and Warwick, than by way of Coventry ; this route also affording 
a view of the beautiful ruins of Kenilworth Castle. 
Hampton Railway Station, Oct. 1, ia39. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



17 



Us Special ^ppotntment 




THOMAS WILKINSON AND SON, 

MAXtJFACTURERS OF 

SCISSOES 

IN ORDINARY TO HER MAJESTY, 

AND 

(&EITE]BIA]L CUTJLEHiS, 
27, HIGH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

( Opposite the Post Office ). 




SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

OF THE 

IMPROVED PATENT TAILOR'S SHEARS, 

WITH BRASS OR GERMAN SILVER HANDLES, 

AND 



18 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WILLIAM PARKER, 

ATTERCLIFFE, NEAR SHEFFIELD, 

AND 

POND FORGE, SHEFFIELD, 

MANUFACTUKEU OF 



Spades and Shovels, all sorts 

Shod Tools 

Grafting Tools 

Paring Spades 

Hay Si)ades 

Cinder and Dust Shovels 

Tulip Shovels 

Stove Shovels, iron and wood handles 

Stoaking Shovels 

Crane Chains, all sizes 

Chain Cables 

Cart and Plough Traces 

Back Chains 

Sacktackle Chain 

Backhands 

Cow and Beast Chains 

Homes 

Mill Cliisels 

Scrap Anvils 

Vices, Scrap Iron 

Oval and Bound Frying Pans 

Lead Ladles 



Patten Binp 

Spade Shatts 

Waggon Clouts 

Peal Plates 

Water Tue Irons 

Gavel ocks 

Sei-ajiling Irons 

Navigator's Picks 

Stone Wedges 

Sledge and Hand Hammers 

Stone and Masons' Hammers 

Blocks, all sizes 

Tinmen's and Braziers' Tools, all sorts 



©: 



STEEL. 



Bar 
Double Shear 
Single Shear 
Cast St<!cl 
Coach Spring 



Shear Steel made. Scrap Iron manu/aetured, 
SPADES AND CAST THOWELS PLATED AT POND FORGE, 

Rolling at the Soho and Pond Forge Mills. 



TIMOTHY SCOTT, 
PRINTER AND BOOKSELLER, 

Removed from High-st., 

To larger Premises a little above the Cutler's Hall, in 

CHURCH STREET, 

SHEFFIELD. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 19 

THE 

TEA WAREHOUSE, 

AHOEIL STE,EET, 

Established for supplying the inhabitants of Sheffield and the 
public, with 

TEAS 

Oftjie choicest and most delicious flavours, at the lowest possible price, 

BY 

BALLANS AND COMPANY 

"Who beg to inform the public that their whole 

TIME, TALENTS, AND CAPITAL, 

are employed in the selecting of TEA. Their customers may at 
all times depend upon obtaining the best and choicest descriptions 

OF 

CONGOU, SOUCHONGS, NING YONGS, 

SCEITTEB OMASTQ-E PEKOES, 
CAPERS, 

FLOWERY, OR BLOSSOM PEKOES, 
HYSONS, 

70VXV0 Hirsosrs, i»[fx:rxaz.s^ 

AND 

(aUETPOWBEMS, 

AT A. 8MAX.I. PEOFIT ON THE FIE8T COST PKICE. 

TEA WAREHOUSE, 

ANGEL STREET, SHEFFIELD. 

__ . 



20 



ADViSnTISEMENTS, 




M . BARNES, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SCI8SOB XmV&S, PEN AZTO POCKET KSTIVES, 

No. J3, ALLEN STREET, SHEFFIELD. 



SHEFFIELD AND EOTHERHAM 
CHEAP CIiOTBinO ESTABZ.XSBXaS33TS. 



THOMAS WILD, 

45, FARGATE, 62, SNIG HILL, 

( Oppo.site the Black Swan,) 

SHEFFIELD, 

ALSO TOP or HIGH STREET, ROTHERHAM, 

Pf ({s mo.si respectfully to inform bis Friends and the Public that he has 
iilways a iar^e assorluicut of 

Hew and Second-hand Clottaes, 

Consisting of Top Coats, Body Coals of all colours, Trowscrs and Waistcoats, 
of every ue.scTiption, also a hirge assortment of 

WEST OF ENGLAND AND TORKSHIRE CLOTHS, 

CASSJilERES, FANCY OOODS, WAIHTCOATINaH, Ifc, 

In fireat variety. 

Hats, Caps, Macliintoshe.s, &c., of the best manufacture. 

N.B. Mot. KNINO BJttde to order on the shortest notice. The best Workmen 

employed. 



AKVERTISKMENTS. 



21 




CHARLES F. YOUNG, 

35, HIGH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SILVER AND SILVER PLATED GOODS, 

AND GENERAL FURNISHING IRONMONGER. 

Tliis extensive Establishment and Suit of Kooms, offers to the inspection 

of the public, 

A LARGE AND CHOICE SELECTION OF 

FINE JEWELLERY, 

Consisting of 

LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S GOLD AND SILVER 

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN WATCHES, 

Of the best quality anil woi-l<nianship, 

EAK-RINGS, SUITS, &c., &c., &c., 
aiLVER, TEA AND COFFEE SETS, SPOONS, FORKS, 1,-e. 

AND ALL OTHER 

ARTICLES IN SILVER PLATE. 
FZ.ATSD TABZ.Z: SEZtVICES, VXZ: — 

Dishes and Covers, Corner Dishes, Epergnes, &c., to coiTespond; large 
and SMALL waiters, with rich Silver Mountings and Shields; Tea and 
Coffee Sets, ; Swing Kettles ; Candlesticks and Branches, and all other 
articles; Table and Pocket cUTLKliy in all its branches; Bronze and Or- 
Molu Table and Chimney Piece Ornaments; Spring Time I'icces ; Cabinet 
Wares ; Fancy articles in Silver, Mother-ol'-Pearl, and Tortoise Shell, &c.. 
Papier Machee and Japanned Ti-ays in extensive variety; Suspending and 
Table Lamps, &c,, &c. ; Bronze and Steel Mounted Fenders, Polished Fire 
Irons, and all other articles in the Fuinishing Department. 
XJlverySies and Buttons, Arms, Crests, and TCottos,&c., 
Engraved on Seals, Plate, &c., to order. 
C. F. Y. will have much pleasure in showiny his Establishment to Parties 
passiiiy through Sheffield, as he trusts it will deserve their attention. 



b 3 



22 ADVBRTISEMENTS. 



GENUINE DRUG ESTABLISHMENT. 



ROBERT HARDY 

CONFIDENTLT RECOMMENDS HIS SUPERIOB — 

POLISHING PASTE, for cleaning Brass, Tin, Pewter, German Silver, 

Britannia Metal, &c., iu pots at 6d. and Is. each. 
PLATE POWDER, for giving a beautiful appearance to Silver, Plated Goods, 

ice, Is. per box. 

LIOCID BLACKING, in botUes at Is. and Is. 6d. each; 10s. and ISs. per 
dozen. 

ESSENCE of ANCHOVIES, Is. per bottle; 10s. per dozen !! I 

SUPERB SAUCE, for Fuh, Gavie, Steaks, SiC, 2s. per bottle. The superior 

richness and flavour of this much admired Sauce is vnequalled. 
MARKING INK, for writing on Linen, &c., requiring mo preparation, Is. 

per bottle. 

CAMPHORATED and other TOOTH POWDERS, Is. per box. 

LAVENDER WATER, of superior quality. 

COLD CREAM and LIP SALVE. 

CHRYSTALLIZED AROMATIC VINEGAR, in neat stoppered botUes, 

Is. 6d. each. 
ADELAIDE PERFUME, for the Handkerchief, in bottles at 2s. and Ss. 6d. 

each. 
BRITISH EAU DE COLOGNE, 2s. per bottle. 

EFFERVESCING LEMONADE POWDERS, for the immediate produc- 
tion of Lvnonade, in the highest state of perfection. 
SEIDLITZ and SODA POWDERS, &c., &c. 

A supply of the finest Wax, Spermaceti, and London Mould Candles, 
Durham Mustard, Pickling Vinegar, Spices, finest Isinglass, new Almonds, 
Mulgatawny Paste, genuine Cayenne Pepper, Fish Sauces, Windsor and 
Fancy Soaps, Tooth and Nail Brushes, Havanna Cigars, German Eau-de- 
Cologne, &C., &'!. 

PICKLES, Is. per bottle; lis. per dozen ! !! 

Patent Medicines and Perfumery. 

OILS, PAINTS, AND COLOURS. 

HORSE AND CATTLE MEDICINES. 

AOEMT FOB THE S.*LE OF HOLLAND'S SNOW AND WaTERPBOOF LEATHER 

Paste. 
Agent to the Celebrated 

East mdia Tea Company, 

For the Sale of their much admired TEAS, in Packets from an Ol'Ncb to a 
Pound. 

ROBERT HARDY, 

BISFEHBIE"© CHEMIST, 

No. 3, CABTXiX: STBEST^ SHEFFIBZJ). 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ESTABLISHMENT FOR THE SALE 

OF 

WINES AND SPIRITS, 

Br 

'VirHOz.BSAX.i: and setazz., 

CONDUCTED BY 

JOHN BOLTON AND COMPANY, 

{From London,) 
KTo. 2; Market-street, and 102, West Bar Green, 

CORNER OF STEELHOVSE LANE, 

SHEFFIELD. 



TO THE INHABITANTS OF SHEFFIELD, ROTHERHAM, AND THE SURROUNDINf* 
DISTRICT OP COUNTBY. 

We be^ to direct your attention to the above Establishment, where you may 
be supplied with Wines, Spirits, and every article in the trade, of sterling and 
genuine quality, at the very lowest rates, consistent with our invariable 
system of payment on the delivery of goods. We do not insert a list of the 
prices of our articles, but trust to the high celebrity that their price and ex- 
cellent quality obtain for us wherever they are introduced; and which, since 
our commencement in Sheffield, in 1829, have secured to us the success and 
pre-eminence in the trade which we now enjoy, and to which we proudly refer, 
as a guarantee to those who have not yet paid a visit to our Establishments. 

We also add, that, in addition to those in Sheffield, we have three of the first 
Establishments in the trade in London, viz., at 16, Q,ueen's Buildings, 
Knightsbridge; 34, King's Cross ; and in the Commercial Road East; and, 
by the employment of an ample capital, expended with the experience which 
the conducting of an extensive trade lor more than thirty yeais must neces- 
sarily engender, we supjjly every article in the trade under such advantages to 
the public as cannot be surpassed by any other firm iu the kingdom. Our 
British Spirits are rectified expressly for our Establishments, by the first house 
in the trade in London; and our Foreign Wines and Spirits are imported and 
selected from the finest parcels imported by other merchants, with such a nice 
discrimination and judgment, as can only be attained by one who has devoted 
the greatest part of his life to it, and which department of the trade is managed 
by one of the partners in the firm, who resides continually iu London. 

We have the honour to subscribe ourselves. 

Your obedient Servants, 

JOHN BOLTON & CO. 



24 



ADVERTISEMENTS, 




JOHN AND WILLIAM RAGG, 

NURSERY, SHEFFIELD, 

SOLE MANUFACTURE KS 
OF THE 

NAPOLEON AND PARAGON RAZORS, 

OF PRE-EMINENT EXCELLENCE : 

ALSO, 

SCISSORS 

In every variety, from the lotcest to the mo$l eligant and costly. 

ARTIFICIAL TEETH AND GOLD PALATES. 
Mr. ESKELL, Surgeon Dentist. 

Tbe loss of Teeth supplied on the imprevpd principle, whether arising' 
from neglect, disease of the gums, or ngs; from a single Tooth to a com- 
plete set, without extracting the roots, or giving any pain, and in every 
rase restoring perfect articulation and mastication. Mr. Eskell assuring 
the public, that he has brought the science to that state of perfection that 
the Artificial Teeth are not discernible from the productions of nature, 
and likewise wan-anted to bite the hardest substance without pain or in- 
convenience; tender and decayed Teeth effectually preserved from fUrlhcr 
decay, and every case appertaining to his profession submitted to his care, 
will meet with immediate attention, 

AT HIS ESTABLISHMENT, 

9, XTorfolk Street, opposite St. Panl's Cbnreb, 

SHEFFIELD. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 25 




GERMAN WHEATCROFT AND SONS, 

NORFOLK ROW, 

HAVING ENTERED INTO AN ARRANGEMENT 

WITH THE 

JVNCTIOZO' BAIZ.WA7 C O BX F A N 7 , 

Beg to inform their Friends and the Public generally; that they have put on 

SPRING-VANS 

WHICH LEAVE THEIR WAREHOUSE, NORFOLK ROW, 

Every Evening at Nine o'clock. 

And arrive at Derby for the Morning Trains — thereby ensuring delivery in 
liiriuingham at 2 o'clock, p.m. next day, and London the day following. 

THEIR CONVEYANCES LEAVE 

BIRMINGHAM DAILY FOR 
WORCESTER, GLOUCESTER, BRISTOL, 

And all parts of the West. 

Their Trains leave Birmingham every Morning at a quarter-past Six, 
delivering early the following Morning iu Sheffield ; from whence proceed 
tlieir 

Post 'Waggons to Bamsley, VTake field, Iieeds, 

And all parts of the North. 

rOST-WAGGONS EVERY EVENING 

To tbeir Establisbment, Buckland-Hollo'ov, 

I'UOM WIIKNCF, 

5'Si'S' = S}®i^"S'S 
PROCEED TO BIRMINGHAM, WORCESTER, GLOUCESTER, 

BRISTOL, AND ALL PARTS OF THE WEST; 
And to Iieicester, Market-Harborougta, nortliampton, 

Xiondon, and all parts of tbe Sontb. 

Waggons every Evening for Manchester, Liverpool, &:c., 
as usual. 

G.W. and SONS beg to remind the Ti-ade of Sheffield, that they are 
the OXLY Cakiiiers who work through themselves, thereby ensuring re- 
gularity and dispatch, which cannot be relied upon when goods pass 
through several Carrier's hands. 



26 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 

TEA AND GROCERY 

EgTABLIBMME:^T, 
EDWARD BINGHAM, 

PROPRIETOR. 



At this Establisbinent Families are supplied with strong rich flavoured 
TEAS, and at Prices materially below those generally charged by dealers in 
the country, a fact, which if brought to the test of comparison will be 
readily acknowledged. 

TEA is an article in which such a variety of qualities and flavours 
prevail, that great care and nicety is requisite in making selections. As 
quality is the only criterion of cheapness, those who judge by actual 
value, and not exclusively from the low price at which goods may be 
advertised, will be induced, on comparison, to give a preference to the 
STRONG ROUGH BREAKFAST TEAS, and the RICH PEKOE SOU- 
CHONG, as the most useful Teas in point of strength, flavour, general 
utility, and sterling value. 

He has always on hand a large assortment, at such prices as to meet 
the views of the most frugal. Also a great variety of the most choice 
and rare sorts of Padrae, Pekoe, Pouchong, Caper, Ouchain, Hysons, 
&c., &c., at reasonable prices, and which will be sought after by con- 
noisseurs. 

The foUmoing list is respectfully submilted, as being with respect to quality 
and price 

EQUAL TO ANY HOUSE IN THE 
METROPOLIS:- 



GREEN TEA. 
Good Strong Twuukey 
Fine Bloom 
Fine Hyson 
Cowslip ditto 
Fine young Hyson 
Fine Ouchain 
Imperial Hyson 
Fine Gunpowder Hyson 



BLACK TEA. 
Congou, strong, rough body 
Fine ditto, full body 
Superior ditto, Pekoe flavour 
Very strong 

Choice Pekoe Souchong, full and rich 
F'ine Souchong 
Lapsang ditto 
Caper ditto 
Pouchong 
Padrae 

Pekoe Blossom 
Orange Pekoe 

In Coffees he recommends the Demerara and Berbice for sti'enpth, and the 
Moun'.ain Jamaica, Ceylon, Bourbon, andTurkey or Mocha, for fullness and 
richness of flavour. 

The proprietor of the above Establishment respectfully cantions the Public 
against the unsound Teas and Cofiees, of which there is so large a proportion, 
as injurious, and even dear, however low the piice- 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



27 





28 ADVERTISEUENTS. 



BEARDSALL'S 

TEMPERANCE HOTEL 

AND 

COFFEE HOUSE, 

32, CHANGE ALLEY, 
shx:fpiz:z.d. 

Good accommodation at hand/or Horses and Carriagcx. 

WILSON AND SOUTHERN, 

SOZ.X.'S- STItBBT AlfD 'WBBEX.DOXr "WOSKS, 

SHEFFIELD, 
Manufacturers of 

SHOE, jBITTCMUB, BKEAB, 

AND 

COOK KNIVES, 

TABLE KNIVES AND RAZORS, 

By a particular process ; 

AND 

GENERAL DEALERS IN CUTLERY. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



29 




30 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOSEPH W OLSTEN HOLME, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

BRITANNIA METAL 

AND BRITISH PLATE 

In every variety 0/ pattern, 
Of a superior quality, and on the most reasonable terms. 



The durability of British Plate is greater than Silver, and unite* 
tuefulness and elegance with economy. 

To Hotel and Tayem keepers, and in sea risks, it offers peculiar advantages. 

OBDERS FOB EXPOBTATION AT THE SHOBTBST MUTICB. 

High Street, (corner of George Street,) 
SHBFFISU). 



G. B. MARGETTS, 

(SCCCCSSOR TO MB. BICHABD BABBISON,) 

RpsPECTPrLlT informs the Nobility, Gentry, Clergy, and Public generally, 
of ShefiReld and its vicinity, that he will be enabled, from extensive alterations 
in bis Shop, to tra)isact business with dispatch, and dispense Physicians' 
Prescriptions with the greatest accuracy. He also hopes, by selecting 
genuine Drugs and Clicniicals of the utmost purity, from the first houses in 
the trade, combined with moderate charges, to merit their patronage and 
support. 

G. B. M. begs at the same time to call the attention of those who may 
favour him with their commands, to the following brief list of select aiticies: — 

Chemical Apparatus; a large assoitment of richly cut Toilet and Smelling 
Bottles; Medicine Chests of all si/.es, upon the sbort<'st uotice; Seidlitz, 
Soda, and Ginger Beer Powders; highly carbonated Soda Water; Farina's 
Eau-de-Cologne; Otto, British Lavender; best Gorgona Anchovies; Ham- 
burgh Leeches; finest Wax and Spermaceti Candles; genuine Sperm and 
Seal Oil; with every other preparation either for Mediciues or domestic 
purposes. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 31 

]LO:srBOE' OirSTIEE, I&OOMS, 

-WATSON'S -WALK, SHEFFIEi:.!). 



PAUL ASHLEY 

Bkgs to return thanks for the support with which he has been faToured, and 
to announce that his engagements in London enable him to have a dailif 
supply of the 

Best Native Oysters, direct from the Boats. 

Those Friends who may favour him with their Orders, can have any 
quantity sent direct from Town, by informing him three days previous to the 
time required. 

Out-doors Is. and Is. 3d. per score. I Barrels 6s. and 8s. each 

lu theKooms. .Is. 4d. ditto. | Double Barrels. ...IGs. ditto. 

Private Oyster Boom up stairs. Country Orders duly executed. 



XNBIA 7 ALE ALE. 

This favourite Bevkrage, brewed expressly for the East Indies, is 
strongly recommended by the Faculty in this Country, for persons suiTering 
from Bilious Complaints, Indigestion, &c., and may be di-ank even by the 
most delicate, with whom no other Malt Liquor will agree. 

F'rom the extreme perfection to which this Ale has been brought, to enable 
it to withstand the effects of an Indian climate, it is divested of every particle 
of acidity, and is a most delightful Summer Beverage ; and at the table of the 
Connoisseur, entirely supersedes Porter and other heady kinds of Malt Liquor. 

To be had both Draught and in Bottle, of 

P. ASHLEY, 

25, Xrf>ndon Oyster Booms, and 26, -Waterloo -Wine and 
Spirit Vaults, 

WATSON'S WALK, SHEFFIELD. 

Pints.... 4s. per Dozen for Cash. Quarts 7s. 6d. ditto, ditto. 

Bottles and Hampers charged, and allowed for when returned. 

-Wines and Spirits. 

BURTON AND HOME BREWED ALE. 

LONDON BOTTLED AND DB AUGHT FORTES, ETC. 

The Sun newspaper received daily; Bell's Life in London, the Vork 
Herald, Sheffield Mercury, and Doncaster Gazette, as soon as possible after 
publication. 

N.B.— The rooms for the purveying of Oysters are open for Gentlemen to 
give orders; and the India Pale Ale may be hud in draft at 2.Jd. per glass, or 
lOd. per Quart ; or in Small Bottles at 4d., and Large Bottles at 8d. ; as also 
the Strong Burton Ale, and home-brewed Beer. 



32 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




HENRY HAWKSWORTH, 

31, SABIi STBEET, SHSFrXEXiS, 

MANUFACTURER OP 

,1I01E"EM'§ TOOILS, SKATES, 

BRACES, BITS, QIMBLETS, ScC, ScC, 

Of every description and superior quality. 



SPEAR AND JACKSON, 
STEEL CONVERTERS AND REFINERS, 

MAXUFACTUttEES OP 

LEDGER BLADES, 

cimBisR'8 Kxnvrs, xacsute kshvus, &e., 

SAVILLE WORKS, SHEFFIELD. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



33 



T. WILEY, 

^Foreign anD ^xiti%^ 

mm wpmw mmmimi. 



wm[ 



GSZrSRAX. NE-WS AGENT, 

Old Haymarket, (opposite the Tontine,) 

AND 

No. 2, CASTLE FOLDS, 
Sbsffield, 

Thankpullt acknowledges the liberal supjinrt he has hitherto received, and 
which his system of business has secured to him in Sheffield and ueighbour- 
hood, begs to inform the inhabitants of Kotherham and surrounding Villages, 
that he imports all his own goods, and pays the (Jueen's duties upon the same 
himself, which not only prevents the possibility of adulteration in quality, or 
deteiioration in strength, but enables him (having a wholesale license) to serve 
families and others in small or large quantities, at" Trade" prices, viz.: — 

Gallon. Quart. Bottle. 
». d. 
Old French Brandy (the very best imported) 
Betts's celebrated Brandy (full legal strength) 
Very old Pale Jamaica Hum (best imported) 
Curious Wliite ditto ditto (ovirproof) .. 
Nicholson's best quality unsweetened Gin. . 
Morayshire small-still Malt Whisky (overproof ). 
Fine rich Cordials and Stomachic i3ilters . . 



Foreign Wines. 



Superior old full-flavoured Port 
Very excellent Gelden Sherry 

Superior rich Tent Wine 

... Cape Madeira 
.... Cape Triuacia Dinner Wine 
Sicilian and Sardinian ditto 
Very superior old Pale and Golden Sherries 
.... .... Crusted Port 



.V. 


d. 


s, <f. 


s. d. 


32 





8 


5 4 


16 





4 U 


2 8 


16 





4 


2 8 


18 





4 6 


3 


12 





3 


2 


^^l 





5 3 


3 S 


12 





3 


2 


D02 


:en. 


Bottle. 


Q,it. 


s. 


ri. 


s. d. 


». d. 


yo 





2 6 


3 8 


30 





2 6 


3 8 


32 





2 8 


4 


20 





1 8 


2 -6 


21 





1 9 




22 





1 10 




31-) 





3 




36 





3 





British \7ine8. 

Superior rich Raisin, Bed and White Currant, 
Orange, Gooseberry, Ginger, Elder, ice 16 14 

The above Wines are in full-sized Wine Quarts — the Bottles chargod 3g. doz. 

and allowed for if returned. 

Guinness's celebrated Dublin Stout, Elliott's Lond' i mild and Brown Stout 

Porter, in quart and pint bottles, and Wiley's Araber Ale, in lasks of all 

Kizes. 
N.B. — Orders by Post, CaiTiers, and Servants, strictly attended to in quality 

and measure; and, for facilitating business, a large quantity of Wines and 

Spirits are kept ready put up in all sized glass and stone botlles, Si aied and 

labelled, and the can iagc paid twenty n.iles round Shutlield. 



34 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



FURNIVAI. WORKS. 




WILLIAM BRIGGS, 

Fumival-street, Sbeffield, 

Manufucturer of 



SILVER CUTLERY, 

AND 

IMPROVED BRITISH SILVER. 

JOHN HEPPENSTALL, 

M®®[LiLira 1MB umm wm^^m,, 

SILK MERCER, &c., 
58, SNIG HILL, 

AND 

32, ANGEL STREET, 

SHEFFIELD. 



Tailoring Establishment upon the Premises, Angel Street. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



35 




JOHN NOWILL AND SON, 
17, MEADOW STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

Manufacturers of 

Sb\XtitK anU Stlber piatcti ^tmtxX i^nibfs. 

And every description of 

PEN, POCKET 

KNIVES; 

SUPERIOR RAZORS AND TABLE CUTLERY; 

BUTTON-HOOKS, STtLETTOES, &c.; 

Also articles for 
LADIES' WORK BOXES 

AND 



'0 ^rie^^lwi Ca^i0, 



In great variety. 



J. N. and Son respectfully invite the attention of Merchants 
and the Public, to their long established and highly reputed 
Corporate mark, Q-Jf first granted by the Cutler's Company to 
Thomas NowiU, in the year 1700. 
__ 



36' ADVERTISEMENTS. 




ATKINSON AND BRITTAIN, 

(Bottom of Angel Street,) 

LINEN AND WOOLLEN DRAPERS, 

SILK MERCERS, &c., &.C., 

DEALERS IN CARPETS, 

AND 

LINCOLNSHIRE LIVE GOOSE FEATHEIIS ; 

A Xiarge Assortment of Fnrs^ Macintosh's "Waterproof 

Coats, Caps, tec. See. 

WILLIAM NOW ILL, 
No. 126, 

ROCKINGHAM STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

(Late W. and J. Nowill,) 

MANUFACTURER OF 

SILVER FRUIT & DESSERT KNIVES, 

AND EVERy VARIETY OF 
FBXr AZVD FOCXCX:'!' KSTXTEB, XTAIZ. FXI.E8, 

BUTTON-HOOKS, STILETTOES, &C. 



SUPERIOR TABLE CUTLERY. 



ADVERTISEHKNTS. 37 

DUKE'S PLACE, 

50, ROCKINGHAM LANE, DIVISION STREET, 

SHEFFIELD. 



HENRY DUKE, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



WIRK, AND SNUFF BOXES 

ALSO OF 

SCALES, SPRINGS, SHIELDS, 

AND OTHER ARTICLES OF CUTLERY. 



DOOR rLATESj 

OF AXY KIND OF METAL, GOT UP IN THE FIRST STYLE 
AND ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 



H. Ut'KE llattors himself that, by long experience and the late 
improvements he has made by adding Steam I'ower to his Works, 
he will be able to serve his Friends and the Public with the above 
Articles, equal in i^uality and cheapness to any House in th»« 
Trade. 



N.B.— STEAM POWER TO LET, 

Connected with entire rooms, free from that inconvenience and 
dust which arises from Grmding Stones. 



c 3 



38 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



S. CAMS, 
NEW LONDON COFFEE HOUSE, 

No. 7, CASTLE FOLDS, 

Bottom of Haymaxket, 

IMMEDIATELY BELOW THE TONTINE HOTEL. 

SHEFFIELD. 

GOOD BEDS. 

A (freaf variety of London (daily) and Provincial Newspapers. 

PRIVATE ACCOMMODATiON 

FOR 

COMMERCIAL GENTLEMEN, 

AT 

J. THEAKER'S, 

LONDON COFFEE HOUSE, 

HAY MARKET, 

A variety of London and Country Newspapers. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 39 



IRON WORKS, 

NEAR 
SHEFFIELD. 



NEWTON, CHAMBERS, AND Co., 



MANDi-ACTUEEES OF 



PIG IRON, 

PLAIN 

AKS 

OBNAMEIJTAIL C A S T I J^ O § 

or 

EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
_ 



40 ADVBUTISEMENTS. 

PHILLIP HEPPENSTALL, 

HABERDASHER, &c., 
30, ANGEL STREET, 

SHEFFIELD. 

LEOPAUD COFFEE HOUSE, 

AND 

TEA ROOMS, 

BOTTOM OF WAINGATE. NEAR 

LADY'S BRIDGE, 

5i)cfficlD. 



T. ORTTON, 

Respectfully informs the Public that he has opened the abovo 
Establishment, (within two minutes' walk of the Railway 
Station,) and hopes by attention to merit a share of their 
support. 



GOOD BEDS. 



ADVliUTlSEMENTS. 41 




ANDREW BADGER, 

ILOMa (DJROFT, 

MANUFACTURER 

OF 

m©©'}? mmm'i^ 5? a ^ ^ n g 

AND 

STEEL PINS, 

AND 

WHOLE SALE AND FOR EXPORTATION 



42 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ABRAHAM DYSON, 

No. 12, CHARLES STREET, SHEFFIELD. 

MANUFACTURER OF 

GOLD, SILVER, AND SILVER PLATED 

©liiiKT Kmmm m® mmm, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION; 

FISH AND BUTTER KNIVES. 

AND 

Warranted of the best material. 

GILBERT, BROTHERS, 

EYRE STREET, 

CORNER OF CHARLES STREET, 

SHEFFIELD, 



N. B. Manufacturers of the celebrated India Steel Elastic 
Edge Razor. 



ADVEHTISEMENTS. 



43 



BY THE 

ittng'» Itogal H^tt^s patent, 

FOR MANUFACTURING 

MULE, JENNY, AND BILLY 




GEORGE WHITHAM AND Co., 

8BBFFIEU>, 

FILE, SCREW, AND BOLT 

MANUFACTURERS, 

AND 

STEEL REFINERS; 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

The Improved Pointed Wood Thread Screws, Iron Thread Sett 
Screws, and Bolts for Machinery, Bobbin Screws, Bed Screws, 
Washers, Weavers' and Power Loom Spindles, Doffer Plates, 
Lever Links, Lever Screws, Shuttle Hoops, Tongs, Tips, &c. 



44 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



NORTH STREET WORKS. 



BROADHEAD AND ATKIN, 

MANUFACTDRERS OF 

BRITANNIA IVIETAL GOODS, 



USr THE ARTICLES PRODUCED IN THIS MANUFACTORY HAVE 
GRADUALLY ADVANCED TO THE HIGHEST REPUTE: 

THIS IS FULLY TESTIFIED BY THE INCREASING DEMAND FOR 
THEIR 

teji and coffee pots, 

COFFEE PEKCOLATORS, 
SPOONS, FORKS, LADLES, &c., &c. 



B. and A. particularly invite attention to the recent improve- 
ments made in TEA and COFFEE POTS of their manufacture, 
by the introduction of their solely invented non-conductors, by 
which Britannia Metal Handles are enlindy prevented from 
becoming hot when in use ; an improvement which was greatly 
required. 



ADVEnXISEMENTS. 45 

LEEDS HOUSE, 

HIGH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 



JOHN HEPWORTH, 

Respectfully invites the attentioa of Woollen Cloth Buyers, 

to his extensive Stock of 

WEST OP ENGLAND 

YOMKSHIME CLOTHS, 

Embracing every variety in Style, Colour, and Quality, 



The system of Business adopted by the Leeds House, is to 
sell a prime article at the lowest possible prioe; such price 
being invariably marked on each article in Plain Figures, 
showing that no attempt is made (which can so well be 
done in anything whose value is not generally known, and 
in nothing more than in Woollen GJoths) to charge pariies", 
not conversant with the value of the article, more than if 
they understood it, 

LEEDS MOUSE, 

HIGH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

AND AT 

SOUTH FAMABEp EOTTi:M(aHAM. 

For Cash Only. 



46 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

T. WATSON, AND Co., 
No. 6, FARGATE, 

GEOCERS, TEA DEALERS, 

AND 

(S (^ S^r IS* IS (g 'IT a (D 55? IS IB g * 



T. Watson and Co., beg leave most respectfully to inform 
the Gentry, Merchants, &c., of the Town and its Neighbour- 
hood, that they supply all Articles of Confectionary required 
for Parties, &.C., of Uie best description, and in the most ele- 
gant style. 

a sdpplt of 

FOREIGN PRESERVED 

AND 

DRIED FRUITS 

Of the best Quality, constantly on hand. 

LEMONS, SAUCES, PICKLES, 
&c., &c., &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 47 



DAVY, BROTHERS, 
SHEFFIELD, 

MANUFACTUIIEBS OP 

LOCOMOTIVE 

ENGINES, 

MIIilLWBIGMTS, 
IRON AND BRASS FOUNDERS, S^c, 

Also Manufacturers of 

PATENT AXLES, SLIDE LATHES, 
HYDRAULIC PRESSES, 

AND 

ALL SORTS OF LARGE PRESS SCREWS, ffc, !(c. 



Daw, Brothers, having extensive Machinery, are enabled 
to execute in the very best Style, all descriptions of Planing 
and Turning, &c. &c. 



48 ADVERTISKMENTS. 



FREE TRADE TEA WAREHOUSE, 

KSTABLISHED AT THE EXPIRATIOIJ OF THE CHAKTKR 
OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY'S MONOPOLY. 



A. BOOTH, 
GENUINE TEA & GROCERY WAREHOUSE, 

(2, Castle Street, bottom of Angel Street,) 
SHEFFIELD. 



ITie Public sue supplied v/ith TEAS truly Genuine, selected witli 
much care, and purchased direct as imported. 

KS^ Coffees Fresb Boasted every ^XTeek. 

BEST LONDON VINEGAR. 



A. PADLEY, 

No. 33, SOUTH STREET, SHEFFIELD, 

MANCFACTCREIl OF 

RAZORS, PEN & TABLE KNIVES, &e. 

THE ONLY MAKER OF THE PERUVIAN STEEL, 

Which is a highly rtlined apd purified Stce), of a fiiin nud close texture, 
(admirably ada)ited for Cutlery). The process by which it is made is known 
oily to himself, none of his late Partners being allowed (nor any of item 
competent) to assist in mixing the compound fur purifying the Steel, or 
sorting it for meltii^g 

His Corpoitte Mark for Razors, Knives, &c., is " PERUVIAN." 
A. P. was of the lute lirm, " Padi.et, Nobbubn, and Co.," or " Gbbpn, 
PlCKSLKY, and Co.," CnlU-rs, Royal I'ork Works, 

CAUTION. 

All imitntiinis of the above Mark, whi ther by inipressiun, stsmp. erpratiiig, 
mark, or device, (either used or caused to be used,) are illegal impositions on 
the Public iiiid » fraud upon the origiiilil Mi'Ker, who is thus induced to 
publish the above, Irom the daily impesinjc practices of others. 

NM.—A. PADLEY S Razor SO ops and Potrer/ul Brail PasU. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



49 



SOHO BREWERY. 

A CARD. 

BRADLEY AND COMPANY, 

PALE INDIA ALE, 

Vor home and exportation. 

JOHN HARRIS, SON, AND Co., 

MAP SELLERS AND PUBLISHERS, 

57, ARUNDEL STKEET, AND 6, SURREY STREET, 

A(/cnts fur Pope's " Yearly Journal of Traded' " Modern Atlas 
of the Earth," and other Commercial and Literary Works. 

HOLMES 

(near kotherham) 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN TIMBER YARD, 

AT THE JUNCTION OF THIE 

Sheffield and Aotherham and ITortli BXidland Railways, 

AND ON THE NEW CANAL WHARF. 



GEORGE GILLOTT, 

I)£ALEB IK 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN TIMBER, LATHS, 
Welsli, 'Westmorland, and Orey Slates, Tiles, &c., 

FLAGS, FIRE AND FLOORING BRICKS, 

AND GENERAL 

BUILDING MATERIALS. 



50 ADVEBTISEMEMTS. 



HOLMES ENGINE WORKS. 



ISAAC DODDS, 

MANUFACTUUEH OK HIS 

PATENT STEAM ENGINES, 

AND BIS 

PATENT ANTI-ATTRJTION SLIDE VALVES; 

ALSO, OV 

TURNTABLES, POINTS, CROSSINGS, 

AND 

"DODDS' AND OWEN'S" 

PATENT AND OTHER 

SWITCHES FOB RAILWAYS; 

HIS 

FBBSSES FOa STBAXaBTSXTmO BAXX.'WA-r BABB 

OF ALL FORMS, AND UIS 

IMPROVED RAILWAY WHEELS AND AXLES, 

PATRONIZED BY 

SUGAR MILLS, 

HIS 

FATEXOTT AND OTBBB SAW BXZZ.ZiS^ 

AND EVERT DESCRIPTION OF 

MILL WORK AND OTHER MACHINERY. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 51 



CHARLES S. R. SANDFORD, 
PHGBNIX FORGE 

AND 

IRON FOUNDRY, 

MASBROUGH, 

MANDFACTUKKn OF 

''DODDS' AND OlFEJST'S" 

PATENT 

WROUGHT IRON RAILWAY WHEELS, 

AND VARIOUS OTHEX DESCRIPTIONS OF 

CAST & WBOIlKS-MT IMOE" WMEELS, 

HEAVY WROUGHX IRON NA^ORK 

FOR 

MARINE AND OTHER ENGINES; 

ALSO, 

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF WROUGHT IRON WORK 
roa 

RAILWAY CARRIAGF:P " 
_ 



52 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



SHIP HOTEL 

NEAR THE RAILWAY STATION, 
ROTHERHAM. 



The above Inn having been entirely rebuilt and enlarged at 
an expense of upwards of £2,000, and being most desirably situ- 
ated, within a minute's walk of the 

R A I J- W A Y STATION, 

J. PARKIN, 

Begs leave most respectfully to iufornx the public generally, that 
no expense will be spared in the furnishing and fitting-up of the 
house, in a superior manner, in order to ensure to Families, Com- 
mercial Gentlemen, and others, that accommodation and comffirt, 
which he tiusts will entitle him to their patronage and support. 

J. P. cannot omit this opportunity of returning thanks to his 
Friends for favours already received, and hojies by assiduity and 
attention, to merit a continuance thereof. 



VP-INES AND SPIRITS 

Of the very best qualUy. 



£xc«Ueut Stabling, Lock-up Coach Houses, Grazing for Cattle 
brought to market, and every accommodation for Farmers and 
Salesmen attending (he same. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 53 



JOHN BLACKMOOR, 

JOINER AND BUILDER, 

CABISTBT maKISB, 

PAPER HANGEB, 
CARPENTER, &c., &c., 

TOP OF WESTGATE, 

^cto parift <ffiate %Xttl 9!2lorfts, 



WILLIAM OXLEY AND Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

GENUINE® BLISTERED, 

SUPERIOR COACH SPRING, 
DOUBLE SHEAR, 

TILTED & BEST REFINED CAST STEEL, 
&,C. 

— _ 



54 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



VICTORIA 




FEINTING OFFICE, 

HIGH STREET, ROTHERHAM. 



JONATHAN BROWN, 

PRINTS K, 

BOOKSELLER, BOOKBINDER, 

AND 

MAl^UFACTUE,!:^® STATIOKEM, 



Posting and Hand Bills, Circulars, Lists of Prices, Catalogues, 
and every variety of Letter-press printing, executed with neatness, 
accuracy, and dispatch. 

BOOKS BOUND IN EVERY VARIETIT OF STYLE. 

Ledger, Journal, and all other Account Books, ruled by ma- 
chine on the premises, to any pattern, and bound on the improved 
principle to open perfectly flat. 

Paper Hangings, comprising every variety, and suitable for 
every description of Rooms, &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 55 



JOSEPH HINCHLIFFE, 

PRINTER, BOOKSELLER, BOOKBINDER, 

AND 

Top of Westgate, Botberbam. 



BIBLES, TESTAMENTS, AND BOOK OF COMMON 

PRAYER, 

WATTS' AND WESLEY'S HYMNS, &c., 

In plain and elegant Bindings, 

Account Books ruled and bound to pattern on the premises. 

fcj* SCHOOLS SUPPLIED. 

Depository for tbe Tract Society's Publications. 

HENRY KIMPSTER, 

MASBMOIUG-Mp MOTMEIEHAM, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

BOILERS FOR STEAM ENGINES, 

ELL AND BACK BOILERS, 

Oasometers, <&a» Betorts, 

WROUGHT IRON PANS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

Scale Beams, Water Tue Irons, Hammers, Kckaxes, Screw Bolts, 
Straw Knives, and Knives for Paper Mills, Mill Spindles, and all 
sorts of Mill Work, Cart Axletrees, Wheel Hooping, and General 
Job-smith. 

__ __ 



56 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



E. SALES AND SON, 
BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS, 

WHOLESALE AND HETAIL, 

2rea ^tnkv» anU ©balers m Brttt»i) SHtms, ^c. 

N. B. BRIDE CAKES AND FUNERALS 

Furnished on the shortest notice. 

CHARLES SAYLES, 

VETERINARY SURGEOX, 

CROWN AND ANCHOR INN, 

MASBBOirOB, 

Begs leave to inform his Friends and the Public generally, tliat 
he has taken the above Inn, where he hopes by assiduity and 
attention to their comfort, to merit a share of their patronage and 
support. 

C. S. further informs the Gentry, Farmers, and others, that he 
continues to follow his profession as Veterinary Surgeon, and 
assures them that no exertion shall be wanting on his part, to en- 
sure a continuance of that patronage which he has already 
received. 

ZrOTTXNOHABS HOUSE^ 

HIGH STREET, ROTHERHAM. 



R. BROWN'S 

ESTABLISHMENT, 
PATENT STAY WAREHOUSE, &c. &C. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 57 

JOHN BOOTH, 

WESTGATE, ROTHERHAM, 

DEALEE IN 

^vn\}t %tont», jFlags, Slates, Smiles, 

CHIMNEY PIPES, CEMENT, &c. 
BUILDING SURVEYOR AND VALUER. 

WATERHOUSE AND PARKER, 

MANUFACTCRERS OF 

munm. im® ^LiAim wimm, 

No. 45, St. Paul's, Birminebam, 

AND 16, THAVIES' INN, HOLBORN, LONDON. 

The following articles in Plated or Silver : — 

Table Services ; Dishes, Water Plates, Tureens, Salts, &c., Epergnes and 
Plateaus; Liquor, Cruet, Pickle, and Soy Stands; Candle Sticks, and 
Branches; Bread, Cake, Flower, and Fruit Baskets ; Tea and Coffee Kettles 
and Urns ; Tea and Coffee Sets, Waiters, and Trays ; Snuffers and Trays, 
Bottle and Glass Stands ; Toast Racks, Wine Strainers, and Corks; Inkstands, 
Segar Cases, and Wax Winders; Communion Services; Lamps of all 
descriptions ; East and West India Shades and Branches ; Painted Sideboard 
and Chimney ornaments. 

THOMAS ROLLASON, Jun., 

CUT GLASS MANUFACTORY, 

CHINA, EARTHENWARE, LAMP, &c., &c., 

SHOW ROOMS, 24, UNION STREET, 

(Opposite the Herald Office,) 

(For upwards of Fifteen Tears connected in tlie business till lately 
carried on by his Father in Steelhouse Lane). 



58 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Wholesale and for Exportation. 




JOSEPH GILLOTT, 

PATENT 

6 9, NEWHALL STREET, AND GHAHANI STREET, 

Wholesale and for exportation. 

Joseph Gillott has been for nearly twenty years engaged in the 
manufacture of STEEL PENS, and during that time has devoted his 
unceasing attention to the improving and perfecting this useful and 
necessary article — the result of his persevering efforts, and numerous 
experiments upon the properties of the metal used, has been the con- 
struction of a Pen upon a principle entirely new, combining all the 
advantages of the elasticity and fineness of the quill, with the durabi- 
lity of the metallic pen, and thus obviating the objections which have 
hitherto existed against the use of Steel Pens. 

The Patentee is proud to acknowledge that a discerning public has 
paid the most gratifying tribute to his humble, though useful labours, 
by a demand for his Pens far exceeding his highest expectations. 

The following statement will show the estimation in which these 
Pens are held, and it is presumed will be an inducement to those who 
desire to have a really good article, at least to make a trial of Josspll 
OlUott'S Steel Pen. 

The number of Steel Pens manufactured at Joseph Gillott's Works, 
is as follows : — 

From October, 1837, to October, 1838 : — 
35,808,462 
or 2,984,037 2-3rds dozen, 
or 248,669 gross, 9 dozen 8 pens. 

From October, 1838, to October, 1839 r — 

44,654,702 

or 3,721,226 2-12th8 dozen, 
or 310,102 gi'oss, 1 dozen. 

•«• May be had of all stationers, and other respectable deaUrsin 
Steel Pens throughout the Kingdom. 

The universal celebrity of these Pens has induced certain disre- 
putable makers to foist upon the public a spurious article, bearing the 
mis-spelled name of the Patentee and Sole Manufacturer, thus, 
' GILOTT," by omitting the L : and in some instances the omission 
of the final T is fraudently resorted to in order to retain the same 
SOUND as GILLOTT; but observe, none are genuine but those 
marked in full, 

J08EFB OIX.X.OTT. 



Printed by James Drake, 52, New-street, Bimungham. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 59 

l&EORGE RICHMOND COLLIS & CO., 

(Late Sir Edward Thotnason's Manufactory,) 
CHURCH STREET, BIRMINGHAM, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

"arti'tlfs in X^t J)igt)«st ©lassts of t^e "arts, 

IN 

aOJJi, SIIiVEB, FZ.ATEDj BBOIVZEj Ain> OB-9IOZ.Xr. 



In this Establishmeut is manufactured Gold and SilverPlate, including 
Racing Cups, Dinner and Tea Services of various Patterns ; Communion 
Plate and Presentation Plate made to description given ; or, if required, 
a variety of elegant designs furnished for approval; Silver-mounted Plated 
Wares of every denomination ; Plated Cutlery upon Steel, Cut Glass, Or-Molu, 
Candelabra, and Lamps; Manufacturers of Medals in great variety, adapted 
for Societies and Institutions. Amongst the numerous series of Dies, are the 
celebrated Dassier Dies of the Kings of England; the Mudie Dies, for the 
series of grand National Medals, commemorative of the Victories of the late 
War; and forty-eight Dies, for Medals of the Elgin Marbles; also, Sir 
Edward Thomason's splendid series of one hundred and twenty large Medal 
Dies, illustrative of the Holt ScuirTUREs, and a series of sixteen Medals 
upon Science and Philosophy, for Societies; Livery Button Dies cut, and the 
Buttons made ; numerous patent Mechanical Inventions in the Metals, Papier 
Machee, Brass and Bronze Staircases; manufacturers of tine Gold Jewellery 
of the most splendid descriptions ; dealers in Diamonds, Pearls, and lane 
Gems; Diamond Suits made to order, and altered to the present style, or, if 
required, purchased, and payment full value in cash; English and Foreign 
Money exchanged ; Old Gold and Silver articles reworked as New. or Pur. 
cba.sed. Manufacturers of Sportsmen's Fine Fowling Pieces, upon an im- 
proved principle. Duelling Pistols, Rifles, Air-Guns, and Canes, and Guns of 
every variety for exportation. 

Messrs. COLLIS and Co. inform the Nobility, Gentry, and their numerous 
Friends, that having very considerably enlarged their Works, are now enabled 
to manufacture the whole of their goods from the raw material to the finish. 
It will be evident that purchasers will find very considerable advantages in 
obtaining articles of very superior quality at such moderate prices that none 
but a Manufacturer could be enabled to supply. Their whole trade being with 
the consumers, Messrs. C. and Co. feel confident that all persons furnishing, 
or requiring their goods, will find it of undeniable advantage to pay them a 
visit, either personally or by letter, rather than make their purchases from 
shops that are only the retailers of goods made by the manufacturers, and 
necessarily sold at a very considerable advance of price. 

These extensive SHOW ROOMS and MANUFACTORY are situate in 
Church Street, in the centre of the Town, adjoining St. Philip's Church-yard. 
The Ware-Rooms contain the Finished Articles for Sale, and are open to all 
persons of respectability. 

The fac-simile of the celebrated WARWICK VASE, of upwards of twenty- 
one feet in circumference, was made in metallic Bronze at this Manufactory. 
The Copper Bronze Statue of His late Majesty, George the Fourth, upwards 
of six feet in height, was modelled, cast, and sculptured, at this Establish- 
ment; as also a Shield in honour of the Duke of Wellington's Victories. 
These and numerous other works are stationed in separate rooms to exhibit 

the progress of British Art. Servants are appointed to conduct Visiters 

over the different Workshops, to whom and to the Work-people, the Visiter is 
requested to abstain from giving any gratuity. 

N.B. — Mr. George Richmond Collis is Vice-Consul for France, Russia, 
Portugal, Turkey, &c., with the privilege of granting Passports to persons 
visiting France and its Dominions. 



60 



ADVEBTISEMENTS. 




PRINTING OFFICE. 

J. DRAKE, 52, NEW STREET, BIRMINGHAM, 

Respectfully solicits the orders of his Friends and the Public in 
this department of his Business, which shall be executed with 
dispatch, and in a superior manner, at the prices affixed. 

ZiSTTSB-FSESS FBXZaTTIZrO 

EXECUTED IN THE NEATEST STYLE, AND WITH PLAIN OR FANCT LETTER 
ON GOOD PAPEB AND CARDS. 



100. 

Post 8vo. CirciUar, fly leaf . . 4 6 

Ditto 4to. ditto tlitto . . 7 6 

Foolscap 8vo. Biil Head . . 4 

Ditto 4t«. ditto ditto . . 4 

Ditto folio ditto ditto . . 5 

Address Cards, common size . . 3 

Ditto ditto, large ... 4 

Ditto Third large . . . . 2 8 

Handbills or Catalogues, Demy 4to.' 8 

Ditto ditto, Demy folio ... 18 6 

J^^ Other sues and descriptions of work at proportionate prices ; 
and where a large number is ordered, the price is considerably less. 

N.B.— COPPEK-PLATE AND LITHOGRAPHIC PRINTING ON 
REASONABLE TERMS. 

^^ BOOKS and PAMPHLETS Printed at this Office, and 
Published in London and in all the Towns in the Midland District, 
upon advantageous terms. 



200. 


300. 


400. 


6 


8 


9 


8 6 


11 


12 


4 6 


6 


6 6 


5 


7 6 


8 6 


7 


10 6 


13 


5 


7 


9 


6 6 


9 


11 6 


4 4 


6 


7 8 


9 


12 6 


14 


17 


1 1 6 


1 4 



500. 
10 
13 
7 
10 
15 
OHO 
14 
9 4 

15 6 

1 6 6 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 61 



WORKS 
PRIIVTED AND PUBLISHED BY J. DRAKE, 

52, NEW STREET, BIRMINGHAM, 

AND SOLD BY HAYWARD AND MOOKE, LONDON, AND ALL OTHER 
BOOKSELLERS. 



RAILWAY PUBLICATIONS. 



Drake's Roiid Book of the entire Line of Railway from London to Liverpool 
and Manchester — with Views and Maps. Price, foolscap 8vo., 4s. 6d. ; 
large paper, with engravings, &c. 

Drake's Road Book of the Loudon and Birmingham Railway — wilh a coloured 
Map and Views. Price 2s. ; large paper, wilh steel engravings, 4s. 6d. 

Dralie's Road Book of the Grand Junction Railway — with a Map and Views. 
Price, foolscap 8vo., 2s. 6d. ; lai'ge paper, with steel engravings, 6s. 

Drake's Road Book of the Nottingham and Derby, and Derby and Birming- 
ham Railway. Price, foolscap 8vo., sewed, Is. ; cloth. Is. Od. 

Maps of the entire Line of Railroad, from London to Liverpool and Man- 
chester — with the Time, Fare, and Distance Tables, &c. Price on Canvass, 
in a case for the pocket, 2s. 

Tables of the Times, Fai"es, and Regulations of the Grand Junction Railway. 
— Published by authority. Including, also, the branch traffic, conveyance 
by omnibuses, hackney coaches, and cars, and all other information requi- 
site for travellers on this line. Price 3d. ; or with a Map of the Line. 6d. 

Drake's Railway Sheet of the London and Birmingham, Grand Junction, 
Aylesbury, Liverpool and Manchester, North Union, Newcastle and Car- 
lisle, Newcastle and North Shields, Leeds and Selby, London and South 
Western, Great Western, &c.. Railways. — Price 4d,, in a neat case for the 
pocket ; ou pasteboard, 6d. 

TOPOGRAPHICAL WORKS. 

Drake's Picture of Birmingham — third edition, greatly improved ; being a 
concise but comprehensive historical and descriptive account of that place, 
intended for the use both of residents and visiters, with a Map and twelve. 
Views of public buildings; and a complete, and the only con-ect list of 
the principal manufacturers. Price 4s., bound in cloth. 

Drake's Map of Birmingham — on a sheet of imperial drawing paper. Size of 
Map, 23J by 20 inches. With a Map of the Boundaries of the Borough, 
price 3s. 6d. ; or coloured, to show the wards, price 5s. On canvass, in a 
case, plain, 6s. 6d.; coloured, 7s. 6d. Sold in a neat frame, plain, 8s. 6d.; 
coloured, 9s. 6d, 

The Birmingham Street Director,— with a Map. Price Is. in a neat case for 
the pocket. 

The Visiter's Guide to Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester.— Price Is. 



62 ADVBRTISEMKKTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS NEW WORKS. 

An Introductory Lecture on the Anatomy, Pliysiolopy, and Diseases of the 
Eye.— By Richard Middlemore, Surgeon to the Bii-mingham Eye Infif' 
m'ary, &c. Demy 8vo. Price 2s. 
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BlEMINOHAM:— Printed by James Drake, 52, New-street. 



INDEX TO THE ADVERTISEMENTS. 

WHICH ARE HEKE CLASSIFIED 4CC0KDING TO THE TRADES. 



SHEFFIELD. 

Baskkt Maker 

Adam Ren wick, 4 
Boarding House 
W. P. Slack,? 
Bookbinder 

W. Siixton,? 
Bookselleis 
W. Saxfon, 7 
J. Pearce and Son, ft 
T. Scott, 18 
Brass Founders 
J. Greaves and Sou, 6 
Henry Duk"e, 37 
Davy, Brothers, 47 
Brewer 

Bradley and Co., 49 
Britannia Metal Goods 

Broadbead and Atkin,44 
British Plater 

J.Wol3teuholme,30 
Carrier 

G. Wheatcroft, 2j 
Caster of Cutlery 

A. Badger, 41 
China Rooms 

J Johnson, 3 
Clothing Establishment 

T. Wild, 20 
Coffee Houses 
S. Cams, 38 
J. Theater, 38 
T. Orttoa, 40 
Confectioner 

T. Watson and Co., 46 
Cutler 

T. Wilkinson, 17 
Dentist 

Mr. Eskell, 24 
Dispensing Chemist 
R. Hardv, 22 
G. B. Margetts,30 
Fancy Repository 
W. Jacksuu, 4 



Forge 

Soho Works, 18 
German Silver Manufacturer 

Henry Duke, 37 
Giocers 

E.Bingham, 20 

T.Watson and Co., 46 

A. Booth, 48 
Holmes Estate 

W. Flockton, 9 
Hotel 

Beardsall's Temperance, 28 
Instrument Maker 

W. and H. Hutchinson, 27 
Iron Founders 

Newton, Chambers, and Co., 39 

Davy, Brothers, 47 
Jeweller 

C. T. Young, 21 
Joiners' Tool Maker 

H. Hawksworth, 32 
Knife Manufacturers 

Unwin and Rogers, 5 

John Davenport, 6 

M. Barns, 20 

Wilson and Southern, 28 

J. Nowill and Son, 35 

W. Nowill, 36 

Abraham Dyson, 42 

A. Padley,48 
Linen Drapers 

J. Heppenstall, .14 

Atkinson and I5rittain, 36 

P. Heppenstall, 40 
Locomotive Engine Maker 

Davy, Brothers, 47 
Map Sellers 

J. Harris, Son, and Co., 49 
Millwright 

Davy, Brothers, 47 
Needle Maker 

S. Cocker and Son, 29 
Oyster Rooms 

P. Ashley, 31 
Pearl and Polished Steel Articles 

John Hardy, 6 



INDEX TO THE ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Trinteis 

William Saxton, 7 

J. Pearce and Son, 8 

T. Scott, ] 8 
Eazor Makers 

J. and W. Ragg, 24 

Gilbert, Brothers, 42 
Saw Maker 

John Davenport, 6 
Silver Platers 

C.T.Young, 21 

W. Eriggs, 34 
Spectacle Maker 

David Wright, 7 
Spindle Makei-s 

Whitham, &Co.,43 
Stationers 

William Saxton, 7 

J. Pearce and Son, 8 
Steel Converters 

Spear and Jackson, 32 
Steel Pen Makers 

John Skinner, 5 
Steel Kefiners 

Whitham and Co., 43 
Tea Dealers 

Ballans and Co., 19 

Z.Bingham, 26 

T. Watson, 46 

A. Booth, 48 
Wine Merchants 

J. Bolton and Co., 23 

T. Wiley, 33 
Woollen Drapers 

J. Heppenstall,34 

Atkinson and Brittain, 36 

P. Heppenstall, 40 

John Hepworth, 4-5 

KOTHERHAM, HOLMES, &c. 

Brass Founder 

James Yates, 2 
Bookseller 

J. Hinchliffe, 55 
Bookbinder 

J. Hinchliffe, 55 
Chemist and Druggist 

E.T.Piatt, 8 
Confectioner 

£. Sales and Son, 56 
Eating House 

W. H. Taylor, 15 
Foundry 

C. S. k. Sandford, 51 
Harness Maker 

J. Mower, 15 



Hosier 

K. Brown, .06 
Hotels and Inus 

J.Shaw, U 

Holmes Hall, 12 

Nag's Head, 13 

Butchers' Arms, 13 

Blue Bell Inn, 13 

Angel Inn, 14 

Ship Hotel,. 02 

Crown anil Anchor, "-O 
Iron Founders 

James Yates, 2 
Iron Merchants 

W. Fleck and Co., 10 
Jeweller 

F. Denton, 15 
Joiner 

Blackmoor, .03 
Lead Merchants 

W. Fleck and Co , K' 
Locomotive Engine Maker 
• J. Dodds, 50 
Mason 

J. BooUi, 57 
Printers 

J. Brown, M 

J. Hinchliffe, 55 
Saddler 

J. Mower, 15 
Shipping .4gents 

W. Fleck and Co., 10 
Steel Works 

W. Oxley audCo.M 
Tailor 

H. liobinsoD, 14 
Timber Yard 

G. Gillott, 49 
Watch Maker 

K. Denton, 5 

BIRMINGHAM. 

Bookseller 

J. Drake, 60 
Coaches 

C. Blakesley, 16 
Glass Manufacturers 

T. RoUason, 57 
Hothouse Manufacturer 

T. Clarke, 1 
Law Stationer 

J. Drake, 60 
Printer 

J. Drake, 60 
Silver Platere 

CoUis and Co., 59 

■Walerhouse and Parker, 57 

Steel Pen Maker 

J. GUlott, 58 



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