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Full text of "The Drift"

m 



COPYRIGHT 1925 




E D I TO R - I N - CHIEF 




N A.C ER V 



'T)edication 



TO THE COLLEGE 
WOMAN — SEEKER 
OF KNOWLEDGE, 
LO VER OF THE 
MOST BEAUTIFUL, 
BENEFACTRESS OF 
REFINEMENT AND 
UPHOLDER OF THE 
HIGHEST IDEALS OF 
AMERICAN WOM- 
ANHOOD. (THE 
PORTRAIT IS A 
COMPOSITE OF THE 
THREE WINNERS 
OF THE BEAUTY, 
POPULARITY AND 
CAPABILITY 
CONTESTS.) 



Forezvord 



FOR THREE SCORE 
AND TEN YEARS 
BUTLER HAS BEEN 
EXPANDING UNTIL 
TODAY SHE HAS 
OUTGROWN HER 
FACILITIES. HOW- 
EVER, THE DAY OF 
A STILL GREATER 
BUTLER IS NEAR. TO 
RECALL BUTLER OF 
YESTERDAY, TO POR- 
TRAY BUTLER OF 
TODAY, AND TO VIS- 
UALIZE BUTLER OF 
TOMORROW IS THE 
ENDEAVOR OF 
THE 1925 
DRIFT. 




University 




j^^^^^^^gl^^j^^^^^Jjg^;^^ 




Administration 



OFFICERS HOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Hilton U. Brown, President; William G. Irwin, Vice-President i diaries \V. Wilson, Secretary; 
Elijah N. Johnson, Treasurer; J. W. Atherton, Financial Secretary. 

OFFICERS ENDOWMENT AND BUILDING FUND CAMPAIGN COMMITTEES 
William G. Irwin, Chairman General Committee; L. C. Huesmann, Chairman City Committee; 
Emsley W. Johnson, Chairman Alumni Committee; J. W. Atherton, Executive Secretary 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Arthur V. Brown, Hilton U. Bro\vn, Lee Burns, Scot Butler, John E. Canaday, James L. Clark, Perry 
H. Clifford, C. L. Goodwin, Thomas W. Grafton, Marshall Hacker, Lora C. Hoss, Louis C. Huesmann, 
William G. Irwin, Emsley W. Johnson, Henry Kahn, Lex K.irkpatrick, Hujh Th. Miller, Allan B. Phil- 
putt, George F. Quick, Albert G. Snider, Z. T. Sweeney 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 

Robert J. Alev Presid.-,:! 

James W. Putn.^m _ _ Dean aiii Vice-Presiden: 

Evelyn- M. Butler _ - Dean of Women 

Frederick D. Kershner ._ Dean of College of Religion 

Sar.^h E. Cotton .._ _ Examiner and Registrar 

Henry L. Bruner Curator of Museum 

Milton D. Baumgartner Secretary 

Eleanor A. Hester _ ...Secretary to the President 

MiLDREU Dlrbin _ _ issistant in Registrar's Office 



Faculty Committees 



ADMINISTRATION 
President Robert J. Aley, Professor Henry L. Bruner, Miss Sarah E, Cotton, Professor Henry M. 
Gelston, Professor Elijah N. Johnson, Dean James W. Putnam and Professor Gino A. Ratti 

ATHLETICS 
Professor Henry M. Gelston, Claris Adams, Professor Paul L. Haworth, Coach Harlan O. Page, 
Professor Guy H. Sliadinger and Assistant Professor Walter L. Slifer 

AUDITING 
Professor Paul L. Haworth, Instructor Irving Allen and Assistant Professor Juna Marie Lut7 

COLLEGE BULLETINS 
Miss Sarah E. Cotton, Professor Henry E. Birdsong and Associate Professor Corinne Welling 

GRADUATE STUDY 
Professor Henry L. Bruner, Professor Howard E. Jensen, De.in Frederick D. Kershner and Professor 
William L. Richardson 

INTERCOLLEGI.ATE RELATIONS 
Dean lames W. Putnam, Dean Frederick D. Kershner, J. Arthur M.icLean, Edward Nell, President 
diaries T. Paul and Dean James A. Rohbach 

LIBRARY 

Professor Milton D. Baumgartner, Dean Evelyn M. Butler, Professor Paul L. Haworth, Professor 
Elijah Jordan, Professor Guy H. Shadinger and Assistant Professor Ida B. Williitc 

PUBLIC OCCASION 

Professor William L. Richardson, Instructor Emily M. Helming, Instructor Mirv S. McRrlJe, Instruc- 
tor Allegra Stewart and Professor RoIIo A. Tallcott 

RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS 
Professor Howard E. Jensen, Instructor Gladys Banes, .Assistant Professor Pleasant R. Hightouer 
.md Instructor Harriet De CratT Jolmson 

SCHEDULE 
Associate Professor Ray C. Friesncr, Miss Sarah E. Cotton and Assistant Professor Juna Marie Lut7. 

SOCIAL AFFAIRS 
Dean Evelyn M. Butler, Assistant Professor A. Dale Beeler, Instructor M.irgaret F. Bruner, Pro- 
fessor How.inl E. Jensen and Associate Professor Corinne Welling 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES' 
Professor GIno A. RattI, Professor Milton D. Baumg.irtner, Assistant Professor A. Dile Beeler, 
Professor Henry E. Birdsong, Associate Professor Ray C. Friesner, Assistant Professor Joseph G. Fucilla, 
Assistant Professor Juna Marie Lutz, Professor Rollo A. Tallc.tt and Professor Anna F. We.iver 

[,e] 




HILTON' U. RROWN 



(.f Butler li\e in the hope th.it 1925 will sec ;i siihst.inti;il beginninj: 
prise in Fairvicw. As the policy of the Board is to keep free from debt, 
d until there is actual money in sight to take care of the work entered 
?ady for building: operations, but it is common knowledge that building 



THE Board of Directo 
of our new building ei 
we shall not break gr 
upon. We have a snug sun 
costs are very high, and the Board is not disposed to plunge. However, the Fairview site is all paid for; 
we have taken possession of the ground and have a property there that we believe to be worth a million 
dollars already. The purchase price paid, $200,000 cash, was only a fraction of the value of the ground, 
the rest being in the nature of a donation. The building plans completed by Robert Frost Daggett and 
his assistant, Thomas E. Hibben, e.vceed in beauty even our fondest expectations. 

A little patience and we shall h.ne a plant at Far\iew that will be worthy of Butler, of the city 
and of the state. 




ALWA\S LOOKING 01 T FOR BL FLER 

[,9] 




J. W. ATHERTON 



challenge 

•ind Mrs. 



ONE outst.indinj; thing that gives us hope a 
of the future is the enthusiasm, assistan 
first of this year, William G. Irwin and 
give $.300,000 to a huilding fund for Butle 
by the end of the year 
bv the example ofMr. 
before the vear ends. 

Thomas E. Hibben, .issistant to Robert Frost Daggett, who has 
new college buildings, has been in England, studying the architecture 
of the old world ideas, combined w^ith the new, will be worked out 
Gothic design to be followed in the new Butler structures. Th 
declared to be ideal in every detail. Butler promises to have the n 
During the year a general campaign will be conducted, at 



id encouragement in the effort to provide ftir 
:e and liberality of Butler's friends. Shortly 
his sister, Mrs. Z. T. Sweeney, of Columbus, 
1 the condition that an additional $700,000 b 
repted. Several important contributions have bee 
nd we have reason to believe that the go 



employed . 
ducational 
onnection 



architc 
nstituti 
/ith th 



lost beautiful grounds in Amer 



the Butler 
after the 

e donated 
■n inspired 
be reached 

ct for the 
IS. Some 
collegiate 
has been 




WORKINC FUR A 1-.REAT1';R lU'TI.ER 

[20 J 






ROISKR'r J, ,\LE^' 




X-\ UTLER COLLEGE has a long, Iioik 


M-able and consistent history. Those responsible lor tiic i 


nstitu- 


r\ tioii laid a foundation that was bru 


ad, deep and liberal From the opening day of the inst 


itution 


"^"^ to the present hour, the faculty has 


been composed of able, scholarly. Christian teachers — the 


: peers 


of the best in the college world. Good i 


.vork, high standards and splendid ideals have been the 


objects 


sought by directors, teachers and students. 






The new Butler at Fairview, with a 


campus of unsurpassed beauty and .1 plant of buildini 


ts, the 


pioduct of superior architects, will ofl'er : 


facilities, conveniences and opportunities, not even drean 


led of 


by students of the earlier days. The futu[ 


■e is big with promise. The full realization of this futui 


■e will 


appear if we profit by the lessons of the p; 


tst and use to the utmost the opportunities of the present. 


The 


past is secure in liistory, the present is ni<)\ 


■ing on by hard work, and the future is pregnant with ho 


pe. 



(2rUU^^^^ 






THE BEST PRESIDEN r IX THE COUXTRY 




J. w. pi:tnam 



THE grcMt growth In student enrollment at Butler within recent years has both extended her oppor- 
tunity for service and placed upon her the burden of providing an adequate training for the increas- 
ing numbers, seeking here their preparation for life's responsibilities. An enlarged teaching staff 
and an expanded and enriched curriculum have necessarily followed. To the departments and disciplines 
of other days, courses in Business .Administration, Education, Home Economics and Journalism have been 
added. 

But expansion in student attendance and in curriculum do not tell the whole story of recent develop- 
ment. Numbers are not the most significant thing about an institution of learning. The character and 
quality of work done are of primary importance. Butler is fortunate in her record of past achievement, 
but she looks forward to greater accomplishment in the days to come. The "grade point" system has 
raised the general level of scholarship in the graduating classes, and the honorary scholastic society, Phi 
Kappa Phi, has contributed to the same result. In addition to these incentives, the system of "honors" 
enables the capable high grade student to accomplish a worth while piece of work in his special field of 
scholastic endeavor. Past tradition and present interest unite in impelling Butler to the maintenance of 
hith scholastic standards. 



.. ^^^JyiJLAy'\yL,'<X^^yyy\y 




rllK FRII.M) OK i:\l.R\" SllDEXl 



[22] 




F.\^i:i.VN MirCIIKLI. HITLER 



THIS office attempts ti. s.ifegu.ird the interests of the %\omen students ,.f liutler and, in addition, to 
strengthen the unity of campus life by encouraging and promoting the "all college" type of activi- 
ties. Here in room 12 are held student conferences and committee meetings, in which plans are 
developed for the Woman's League, Chimes, May Day, matinee talks, the activity point system, class teas, 
"all college" formals and for such publications as the Handbook, the Directory and, most cherished (.f 
all, the College Song Book. 

In this office may be found listed the student organizations with their officers; available schol.irships 
and loan funds; suitable boarding places; student and faculty committees; also the Student Events Cal- 
endar and a file of all women students with addreesses, activities and recitation schedules. 

The work of women students has been rendered much more efficient by this provision of a dean of 
women's office for definite headquarters where their plans may be formulated, abetted .ind preserved to 
beci;mc part of college tradition. The spirit of the students of Butler has been an unf.uling support and 
inspiration in carrying on plans to unify and strengthen life on our campus. 



dnA^ ^^./^^ ^'Su/^^tL^ 




)L\ KR OF COED PROBLEMS 




PROliAliLV no one cm rmIizc more than the Rcgistr.ir, the rapid growth of Butler. The routine 
of j^eeping records has increased enormously within the past few years. To be specific, ten years 
ago (1914-15) our enrollment was .H3. This year our grand total is 1,483, an increase of more 
than 3(1(1 percent. 

As the University e.>:pands it behooves the Registrar to become more and more alert, seeing to it 
that the machinery is in such condition that at a moment's notice the records may be available for the 
student and for the administrative officers, vvhoe duty it is to guard the general welfare of the students. 
If we succeed in attaining this ideal, this department will serve its real purpose — that of a link between 
the administration and the students — and will also be in accord with the efficient management of our 
Hoard of Directors and the program followed by our faculty. 

With increased facilities that will come with the removal of Butler to Fairview. the possibilities 
of service of this department \\U\ be increased to the realization of our ideal. 




^^a^ 





AI.WWS SMll.INC,, .VLW.AIS MKLIMNf. 




Faculty 




Rop.EKT JuDsoN Aley, Ph. D., LL. D. 
Presi/leiit 
B. S., Wilparaiso, 1882; A. B., Indiana 
University, 1888; A. M., w/V., 18911; 
Ph. D., Univcrsitv of Pennsylvania, 1897; 
LL. D., Franklin College, i909; LL. D., 
L'niver?itv of Pennsylvania, 1917; LL. D., 
Butler College, 1922. 

[ames William Putnam, Ph. D. 
Dentin y ice-P resiri eiit and Professor of 

Economics anil Business Administration 
Ph. B.. Illinois College, 1894; A. M., 
Cornell University, 1903; Ph. D., Uni- 
versit^■ of Wisconsin, 1909. 

^ Henrv Lam: Bruner, Ph. D. 
Professor of BioIog\ and Geology and 

Curator of Museum 
A. B., Eureka (Abingdon) College, 1880; 
Ph. D., Freiburg, Baden, 1896. 
Elijah Newton Johnson, A. M., M. S. 
Professor of Mathematics, and Treasurer 
A. B., Drake University, 189.3; A. M., 
ihid, 1895; M. S., University of Kans.as, 
1904. 

Katharine Merrill Gravdon, .A. M. 
Catharine Merrill Professor of English 

Literature 
A. B., Butler College, 1878; A. ^L, In- 
diana University, 188.3. 



Henry Mills Gelston, A. B. 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature 
A. B., University of Michigan, 1900. 

Elijah [ordan, Ph. D. 

Professor of Philosophy 
A. B., Indiana University, 1907; A. ^L, 
Sage School of Philosophy, Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1908; Ph. D., University of Chi- 
cago, 1911. 

Milton D. Bau.mgartner, Ph. D. 
Secretary Armstrong Professor of Ger- 
manic Languages and Librarian 
A. B., University of Kansas, 1902; A. M., 
ihid., 1903; Ph. D., University of Chi- 
cago, 1913; Librarian Butler College, 
1920. 

.Anna Frances VV'eayer, .A. ^L 
Professor of Greek 
A. B., Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 
1898; A. M., ihid., 1899." 

Evelyn Butler, .A. ^L 
Dean of Women and Demia Butler Pro- 
fessor of English Literature 
A. B., Butler College, 1893; A. M., 
C.ilumbia Universit^•, 1917. 




[ze] 




iy^ 




William Leeds Richardson, Ph. D. 
Professor of Ediicat'ioii and Head of De- 
fart me lit of Edurat'ton 
A. B,, Uni\-ersity of Toronto, 1911; Ph. 
D., University of Chic.igo, 1919. 

Harlan Or\ ille Pa(.e, S. B. 
Director of Physical Culture and Athletics 
S. B., University of Chic.igo, 1910. 

Guv Howard Shadincjr, I'h. D. 

Professor of C/!emistr\ 
Ph. B., Hamline University, 1900; Ph. 
D., Johns Hopkins University, 1907. 

GiNo -Arturo RAiri 
^^Docteur de PU iiiz'ersite de Grenohte'" 
(France) and Professor of Romance 
Languages 
X. B., Middlebury College, 1907; A. M., 
ihid., 1909; Degree of "Docteur de I'Uni- 
versite de Grenoble," 1911. 

Howard Eikeni;erry Jensen, Ph. D. 

Professor of Socioloi^x 
A. B., UnnerMt^ of k.mvis 19U, \ M , 
i'>!d., 1915, B. D., UnI\erMt^ ot ChiLii;., 
1917; Ph. D., I'^id., 1920 



Pace Lei. and Hahorth, Ph. D. 

Professor of History and Political Science 
A. B., Indian.1 Univcrsitv, 1899; A. M., 
il'id., 1901; Ph. D., Coliimbi.i Univcrsitv, 
1907. 

Ja.mes a. RoHiiAcH, A. M., LL. D. 
Lecturer in Business Late 
A. B., \^■e^tern Reserve Universitv, I8S + ; 
A. M., ibid., 1890; LL. B., Universitv of 
low.1, 1893; LL. D., Univer-^ity of' In- 
dian.Tpolis, 191+. 

Frank Hatch SrREU.iiEoiT-, Ph. D. 

Professor of Economics 

A. B., Weslevan Universitv, 1909; A. M., 

ihid., 1910; Ph. D., Columbia Universitv, 

1913. 

RoLLo .Anson Tallcott, .A. M. 
Professor of Public Speaking 
A. B., Syr.acuse Universitv, 1909; A. M., 
//';,/., 1920. 

Frederick Dovle Kershner, .A. M., 
LL. D. 

Dean of College of Religion and Professor 

of Christian Doctrine 
B Lit , Tran^vlvania L'niversit^-, 1899; A. 
M, Princeton UnnerMt\, 19110, LL D., 
Beth.^n^ College, 1913, LL D, Fini^^l- 
\ania Unnersifs, 1916. 




[27] 




Henry Ei.lis Birdsong, A. M. 
Professor of Journalism 
A. B., University of Missouri, 1912; B. J., 
ibid., 1913; Graduate Student University 
of Wisconsin, 1923-'2+; A. M., University 
of Wisconsin, 192+. 

Seth Earl Elliott, M. S . 
Professor of Phxsifs 
A. B., Morningside College, 1912; M. S., 
State Uni\-ersit\- of Iowa, 1915. 



Sarah Elizabeth Cotton, A. B. 
Registrar and Examiner 
A. B., Lake Forest College, 1896; A. 1 
Leland Stanford, jr.. University, 1900. 



Pleasant R. Hichtower, A. M. 
Assistant Professor of E duration 
A. B., Indiana Central University, 191 + ; 
A. M., Indiana Universitv, 1917. 



Ray Clarence Friesner, Ph. D. 
Associate Professor of Botan\ 
A. B., Ohio Wesleyaii University, 1916; 
Ph. D., Universitv of Michigan, 1919. 



JuNA Marie Lutz, .A. AL 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A. B., Butler College, 1917; A. M., Uni 
versitv of Chicago, 11923. 



CoRiNNE Welling, A. M., 
Associate Professor of English 
A. B., Butler College, 1912; A. M., RaJ 
clifi'c College, 1914. 



Ida B. WiLHiTE, B. S. 
Assistant Professor in Home Economics 
B. S., Purdue Universitv, 1921. 



Harry 'F. Mercer, A. M., 
Acting Associate Professor of English 
A. B., Universitv of California, 1921 
A. M., ihid., 1921. 



[osEPH G. FuciLLA, .A. M. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 
A. B., University of Wisconsin, 1921; A. 
M., ihid., 1922.' 




[.8] 




A. Dale Bi;ki,ek, A. B. 

Assiitaiit Professor of History 
A. B., Iiidi.in.i Uni\crfit\, 1910; A. M., 
Columbia Uni\"crsit\', 1924. 

1r\-in T. SuL-i/r/, A. M. 
Assist, lilt Professor of E due at ion 
A. B., E^irlham College, 1918; A. M., 
Columbia Univcrfit\\ 1922. 

Hui.n William Giiokmliv, A. M., B. D. 
Ass'tstaiit Professor 'in Bihl'ieal Historx and 

Literature 
A. B., Drake Univerjitv, 1922; A. M., 
Drake Unlver-^ity, 192.^; B. D., Drake 
University, 1924. 



Alislri Mock, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Ediiration 

(Tradiiate of Indiana State Normal; A. B., 

Indiana Uirn ersity, 1916; A. M., Indiana 

L'niver^it^■, 1922.' 



Marie Cousin 
Instructor in Frenrh 
(Graduate of the .Acadcmv of Poitiers. 



Mar7Ha May Kincaid, .A. M. 

liislnirtor in Frenrh 
A. E., Butler College, 1913; A. M., In- 
diana Un!Versit^■, 1914. 



Walter L. Slifer, A. M., 
Assistant Professor of Histor\ 
A. B., Blue Ridge College (Md.), 1921: 
A. M., Universitv of Chicago, 1922. 



Hazel Whisenand, A. B. 
Instrurtor in Spanish 
A. B., Indiana Universitv, 1920. 



G. Nelson Graham, A. M. 

Acting Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages 
A. B., Ohio State University, 1917; A. M., 
Ohio State Universitv, 1922. 



Alle(.ra Stewart, A. M. 
Instructor in English 
A. B., Butler College, 1921; A. M. 
Columbia Universitv, 192.3. 




[as] 




Emily Mathildk Hklming, A. 
liistruitor in Engliih 
A. B., Butler College, 1899. 



Esther Asenath Renfrew, A. B. 

liistriirtor in Romance Ldnguages 
A. B., Butler College, 1921. 



Wood Unger, A. B. 
Instructor in English 
A. B., Butler Colle'ge, 1912. 



Marv -Agnes Showaeter, A. B. 
Instructor in Romance Languages 
A. B., Unlversitv of Illinois, 1922. 



Irving .Allen, A. B. 
Instructor in Economics 
A. B., University of Michigan, 191+. 



Mrs. Sarah Hill Baumgartner, -A. 

Instructor in German 
A. B., Earlh.im College, 1901. 



Margaret Emilie Bre'ner, A. M. 
Instructor in Home Economics 
A. B., Butler College, 1921; A. M. 
Columhi.i Universitv, 192,i. 



Herbert Ralskin Hill, .A. B. 
Instructor in Journalism 
A. B., Butler College, 1922. 



Harriett De Grai-f Johnsion, .A. M. 

Instructor in Zoolog\ 
A. B., Universitv of Missouri, 1921; A. 
M., ;■/■/>/., 1922.' 



Glauvs Banes, .A. B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 
A. B., Butler College, 1920; Gr.idu.ue 
Student Rndcliffe Colkge, 192.^-'2+. 




[30] 




Stanley Adair Cain, B. S. 
Instructor in Botjnx 
B. S., Butler Collesjc, 192+. 



Mae Schai;i-ek, A. B. 

Uutrtirtor hi Zoologx 
A. B., Butler College, 1 92+. 



Ci.ioE E. Aldrich, A. B. 

liiitrui'tor 'in Romance Languages 
A. B., University of low.i, 1922; A. M. 
University ot' Iowa, 192+. 



Mrs. Eugene Fii--e 
Assistant in Publir Speaking 



Louise Marcaruiie Schulmever 

Instructor in Physical Education for 

W omen 

Dlploni.i, North Americm Gymnasti 

Union, 1907. 



Mrs. Rav C. Friesner, B. S. 
Laboratory Assistant in Botany 
B. S., Butler College, 192+. 



Chester B. Camp, M. S. 

Instructor in Economics 
B. S., University of Illinois, 1923; M. S.. 
Universitv of Illinois, 1924. 



Charles W. Wilson 
Treasurer 



Mildred Katharine IES^l p, A. M. 

Instructor in English 

.A. B., Universifi' of Southern Cnlifornia, 

1918; A. M., Columbia Universitv, 192+. 



Eleanor .A. Hester 

Secretarx to the President 




[3,] 



"Butler 'V residents 



John Youxc 1855-1857 

Samuel K. Hoshour 1857-1860 

Allen- R. Benton 1860-1868 

Otis A. Burgess 1868-1871 

AViLLLAM F. Black 1871-1873 

Oris A. Burgess 1873-1880 

Harvev W. Everest _._._. 1880-1886 

Allen R. Benton ....___ 1886-1891 

Scot Butler 1891-1903 

Winifred E. Garrison 1903-1906 

Scot Butler 1906-1907 

Demarchus C. Brown (Acting) 1906 

Thomas C. Howe 1907-1920 

James W. Putnam (Acting) 1921 

Robert Judson Ai.ev 1921 



I " I 




Seniors 



Seniors Seek Finisli'uiq l^oucli 

DETERMINED to get the proverbial finishing touch, three hundred of us chose 
Butler as the training ground for a degree. We presented our credentials to Miss 
Cotton. Some of us paid our tuition, but all of us began a new life. We passed 
through the usual period of knocks that are well known to all verdant beings and organized 
as the Class of 1925, with Hughes Updegraff as president; Ruth Froram, vice-president; 
Mildred Foxworthy, secretary, and Arthur Black, treasurer. 

The first }'ear went by quickly. We re-entered school in the fall of 1922 a? cocki' 
as a second lieutenant. We elected Gerald Woods, president; Marv Patia Carver, vice- 
president, and Fred Schultz, secretary and treasurer. Besides attending classes and partici- 
pating in school acti\-ities, we licked the Freshman army. 

As Juniors two of the biggest jobs in school fell on our shoulders, nameh', the pub- 
lishing of the Drift and the throwing of the Junior Prom. Paul Habbe edited the pub- 
lication while George Ostheimer looked after the business end. It was one of the best 
annuals ever published by a Junior class. The Prom was a brilliant social function, held 
at the fashionable Indianapolis Athletic Club on .April 18, 1924. .Anna Mae Albershardt, 
Prom queen, and Glenn Duttenhaver, president of the class, led the grand march. The 
other Junior officers were: Dorothea \'arntz, vice-president; Fielen Gandall, secretary, 
and George Ostheimer, treasurer. 

Returning last fall as supposedly' serious-minded Seniors, we began our last lap for 
the pro^"erbial finishing touch. We took possession of the Senior walk with pride. .As 
the months rolled by, we thought we were about the most comfortable class in school, but 
when we stepped out in our caps and gowns for the first time on Founder's Day, we lost 
'ome of our ease. 

On March 27, we produced a Senior vaudeville tor the benefit ot our exchequer. It 
was a financial success, due to the efl^orts of George Gamble, Eugene Colway and George 
Schumacher as stage hands and managers. 

Now we are on the eve of receiving our diplomas, and we realize that a degree is by 
no means a finishing touch. We have much to learn. Of course, we regret to leave Butler 
that is soon to be a greater Butler, but we, the three score and tenth graduating class, must 
make room for the seventy-first. 

However, we would like to know just what will become of the W M. C. .A. without 
Paul Habbe; the Y. W. C. -A. without Irene Seucl ; dramatics without Catherine Cavins, 
Constance West, Daisy Schulz and Mildred Stilz; Scarlet Quill without Margaret Schoener, 
Elizabeth Bertermann and Katharine Lennox; Sphinx \vithout Robert Bull; Collegian 
without Frank Trost; oratorv without Doyle Mullen; athletics without Hal Griggs, Nig 
Woods, Robert Blessing, Scott Ham and Rilus Doolittle; Butler without the wise cr.icks of 
Jerome Bash, the frequent laughs and cute sayings of Louise Padou, the publicity of John 
Metzger, the capability of Patia Carver, Culver Godfrey and Nictor Twitty, and the 
scholastic achievements of the new Phi Kappa Phi members. The writer could name the 
whole class, but the following pages will depict what the Seniors ha\e done in Butler life 
during the past four \'ears. Howexer, Butler will go on just the same and there will be 
others to take our places. 



[34] 





scorr 11AM 



MII.DRll) lACIl.l': STIL/. 



Officers 



Scott Ham, President 
Scotty is known for his friendliness, his congeniality- and his ability- to perform on 
the cinders. 

Mildred Luciee Stii.z, \"icE-PREsiDENr 

Mildred with her e\cr present smile has made good in dramatics, especialh' in "Lady 
VV"indernierc"< Fan" and "The Boomerang." She made Phi Kappa Phi. 

Sue Eseelle Mae Harmon, Secretary 
Sue is quite \-ersatile, a haslvetball and volleyball player of note and member of cjuite 
a tew clubs. 

George S. Gamble, Treasl'REr 
George is quiet, a mathematician and a good chemist. 





SUE ESTELLE MAE HARMON 



1R(.E S. f.AMlil.E 



[3=] 




AoAMS, Esther Lexington 

Botdny 
Phi Kappa Phi; PVench, Chemistry, Bi- 
ology and Botan^' |ournal Clubs; 
\V<rman's League; Y. \V. C. A. 

Adams, VV'ii.hei.mina IndidnapoHi 

English 
French, Dramatic, History and Glee 
Clubs; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A.; 
Western College. 

Ai.EERSHARDT, Anna Mae Tifton 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Junior Prom 
Queen, '24; Woman's League; Y. W . 
C. A.; Illinois University, '21, '22. 

Andrews, .A(;nes .Acneu InilianafoHs 

English 
Sigma Delta; \'arslt\ Debating Team, 
'24, '25; intramural Debating, '24, "25; 
Forensic and Dramatic Clubs; "The 
Piper"; Junior Prom Committee, '24; 
\'ice-President Student Teachers' Asso- 
ciation; Woman's' League; Ticket Man- 
ager May Fete, '24; Y. W. C. .A. 



Rockford Coll 
Colorado, '22. 

Appei,, Richard 
History 
Sigma Chi. 



!1 ; Uni\crsit\- of 



IntHanafoH. 



Baker, Hester Indianafolis 

Latin and Histor\ 
Phi Kappa Phi; .-Mumni Scholarship, 
"24, "2 5; Classical antl Social Science 
Clubs. 

Barcea'i, Harold Indijnjpolis 

Business A dn/inistrdtion 
Lambda Chi .Alpha; Sphin.x; Drift 
Business Staff, "25; Interfraternity Base- 
ball, "25; Chemistry Club; L'niversity 
of Pittsburg. 

Barnes, F.da ^LARGARET Greenfield 

English 
French Club; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. .A.; DePauw L'niversit^', '21. 

BARRErr, DoHOi HV Indijnjpolis 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Purdue University, 
"21-'2.5. 

Bash, [erome K. Indidmipolis 

English 
Sigma Chi; Sphin.x; Fourth Estate; Col- 
legian Staff; Dramatic Club; Business 
and Property Manager, '24, "2 5. 




[36] 




Bates, Ruth Edwards liiiihiiiapolii 

English 
Treasurer Student Budget, "2+; Freneh 
and Scarf Clubs, '21-'2 + ; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C A. 

Beattv, Amy H'no, Tcwjj 

English 
Sigma Delta; Scarlet Quill; Chime^; 
Phi Delta Phi; Dramatic Club; Student 
Teachers' Association; Woman's League; 
Y. W. C. A. 

BKDhi.i,, Hhlen Li,'cii,E hidiiiiiapolis 

English 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Classical, Scarf and 
Dramatic Clubs; Woman's League; Y. 
W. C. A. 



Bernstein, Blanche 

English 
Woman's League. 

Bernstein, Goi.du: 

English 
Woman's League. 



litdianafoli. 



Indiiinafolis 



Bertekmann, Ei.i/ap.eth Indidiuifolis 

English and Raniante Languages 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Scarlet '^ Quill ; 
Drift Staff, '24; Collegian Staff, 
'21, '22; Chairman Social Committee 
Woman's League, '2+, '2 5; Intramural 
\'ollevball, '24; W. A. A.; Spanish 
Club;' Y. W. C. A. 

Bi,EssiN<., Robert Indianapolis 

Economics and History 
Sigma Chi; Skulls; Press Club; Captain 
Baseball, '24; Letters, '22, '23, '24; 
Footbiill Letters '22, '23; B.isketball. 

BoCKSTAHI.KR, Wll.LUM RaLPH 

French Indianapolis 

Delta Tau Delta; Press and Biology 
Clubs; Literfraternity Baseball and 
Football; Lidiana University. 

Book, Mary \ iR(;iNr^ Columbus 

English and Sociology 
Phi Kappa Phi; Chimes; 'Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet; Inter-racial Committee; Cam- 
pus, Philosophi' and Social Science 
Clubs; Student Teachers' Association; 
Woman's League. 

Brosnan, Mildred Indianapolis 

English 
Kappa .Alpha Theta; Classical Club; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 




["] 




Bro\\n, Kaihrvn M. Huntington 

Latin 
Campus and Classicnl Clubs; Student Teachers' 
Association; Woman's League. 

Bi_Li., Robert Holton Chicago 

English 
Phi Delta Theta; President Sphinx, '24, '25; 
President Philokurian, '23, '24; Drift Staff, 
'24; Collegian Staff, '21, '22; French, Biology 
and Pen and Pencil Clubs. 

Campbeli,, Harry R. Indianapolis 

Histort 
Kappa .Alpha Psi ; Student Endo\%nient Com- 
mittee, '22; German Club, 



Carter, Neal 

English 

Phi Delta Theta 



Int/ianapoli. 



Carn'er, Mary Patia ludianafolis 

English 
Kappa .Alpha Theta; President Woman's 
League, '24, '2.i; Scarlet Quill; Phi Delta Phi; 
Associate Editor Drift, '24; Drift Staff, '23; 
Collegian Staff, '23; Secrctar>' Intercollegiate 
Press Association, '23; Vice-President Press 
Club, '24; May Day Chairman, '24; Vice- 
President Sophomore Class, '23 i Sophomore 
Beauty Contest, '23; Secretary W. A. A., '23; 
Varsity Numeral Basketball, '23; Senior Team, 
'25; W. A. A. Award, '25; Intramural Volley- 
ball; Spanish and Home Economics Clubs; 
Committee of 125. 



Car\-er, Merel 

Social Science 



Roann 



Delta Phi Sigma; President Y. M. C. A., '24; 
Interfraternity Council; Interf ratemity Foot- 
ball, Basketball and Baseball; Social Science 
Club. 



Ca\inj, Catherine 
Social Science 



Indianapolis 



Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chairman Matinee 
Talks Committee Woman's League, '24, '25; 
Dramatic Club; Lead in "The Boomerang" 
and "Icebound"; "Pirates of Penzance"; Phil- 
osophy, French, Glee and Opera Clubs; Com- 
mittee of 12 5; Y. W. C. A. 



CoLWAY, Eugene H. 
Economics 



Muncie 



Phi Delta Theta; Sphinx; Philokurian; Foot 
h.ill Letter, '21; Basketball Letters, '22, '23, '25 



CiiRisriAN, Edith Marie Fianklin 

English 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Student Teachers' Association; 
Woman's League. 

CoRYii.i,, lu.i^ANdR Marik Vemon 

Mathematics 
Alpha Chi Omega; Pan-HcUcnic; Vice-Presi- 
dent Math Club, '24; Classical Club; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 




[3e] 




Clrrv, Wilbur L. linrhiiidpolis 

Eiunotuu's 
Lambda Chi Alph.i; Sphinx; Chemistry 
and Press Clubs. 



Dalk, Dorothy ^'ern'on Bezier, Mo. 

Spiuiish ami E//g/is/i 
Alpha Chi Omega; Pen and Pencil 
Club; Intramural Basketball and \olley- 
ball, '23-'25; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 

Daughhrtv, Rkbecca Inifuvijpolis 

English 
PI Beta Phi; French and Biology Clubs; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 

Da\is, Charles liiduiiiapolh 

English 
Pen and Pencil Club. 

Day, loSEPiiiNE Eastman Indianapolis 

English 
Alpha Chi Omega; Biology Club; In- 
tramural Basketball; Woman's League; 
Y. W. C. A. 



DoDDS, Hf.lkn Louise liulianapults 

English 
Sigma Delta; Dramatic and Biology 
Clubs. 

Dooi.iTTLE, RiLus Eastman Imlianapolis 
7,oology and Chemistry 
Western Conierence Champion Two 
Miles, '24; State Champion Two Miles, 
'22-'24; Member .American Olympic 
Team, '24; Track Letters, '22, '2.V, '24; 
Biology Club. 

DouciLAS, Florence Mareta Greenshurg 
Home Economics and Chemistry 
Pi Beta Phi; Spanish, Biology and 
Home Economics Clubs; Varsity Basket- 
ball and Volleyball; W. A. A.'; Student 
Teachers' .Association; Woman's League; 
Y. W. C. A.; Lombard College. 

DuGAN, May Indianapolis 

English 
Student Teachers' .Association; French 
Club; Woman's League. 

DuTTENHAVER, Gi.ENN E. Bunnell, Fla. 
History 
Lambda Chi .Alpha; President Junior 
Class, '24; Sphin.x; Interfraternity 
Council; Football Letter, '22; Inter- 
fraternity Baseball, Football and Bas- 
ketball; Biology Club. 




[39] 




EwBANK, Albert W. Indiaiiafolis 

English 

Collegian Staff, '2.', '24; Cliemlstrv and Span- 
ish Clubs; Student Teachers' Association. 



FicHTMAN, CHE^TER L. I ndianafol'ii 

Econo?n'u'i 
Phi Kappa Phi; Social Science Club; Y. M. 
C. A. 



Foley, Helen Ann Indiatuifol'ii 

History 
Chemistry Club; Woman's League; V. W. 
C. A.; St. Mary of the Woods, '23, 

FoRsvrn, Const .ANCE Indiiuupolis 

Chemistry 

Pi Beta Phi; Scarlet Quill; Chimes; Scirf 
Club; Vicc-Pre>idcnt Student Budget, '2 ^ ; Art 
Editor Drift, '24; Art Staff, '23; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, '23; Committee of 125; Philokurian ; 
Chemistry and Dramatic Clubs; Intramural 
Volleybail; Woman's League. 

FoxwoRi Hv, Mildred D. Indianapolis 

Mathematirs 
Delt.i Delta Delta; Secretary Freshman Class, 
'22; Secretary Math Club, '23; Tennis Letter, 
'22; Intramural Basketball and Volleyball; 
W. A. A.; Spanish and Camera Clubs; 'Com- 
mittee of 12 V Woman's League; Y. W. C. A, 

Frev, Fr.^nklin Indianapolis 

Mat/ieinatirs and Physics 
Saiulwich, French and Chemistry Clubs, 



G.AM DEE, George S. Indianapolis 

Chemistry 
Delta Tau Delta; Senior Class Treasurer, '2 3; 
Chairman Senior Stunt Day, '25; Drift Staff, 
'24; Interfraternlty Baseball; President Math 
Club, "23; Chemistry and French Clubs; Stu- 
dent Teachers' .Association. 

G-ARDNER, .Ann.\ C. Indianapolis 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Pan-Hellenic; President 
Scribblers' Club, '24, '25; Editor "Christmas 
Stocking"; Drift Staff', '24; Collegian Staff, 
'23-'25; Matinee Talks Committee Woman's 
League, '25; Intramural Volleyball; Press 
Club; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

Goi)iRi:v. CuL\ER C. Indianapolis 

Economics 
Delta Tau Delta; President Interfraternlty 
Council, '23, '24; President Sphin.v, '23, '24; 
Committee of 12 3. 

GoEPPER, Sis,\NN.\ Indianapolis 

English 

Delt.i Delt.i Delta; Biology .ind Spanish Clubs; 
Student Teachers' Assocl.ition ; W. A. A.; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 




[40] 




Grapperhaus, Raymond H. hn/ianapolis 
Ecoiiotn'iis 



Greenherg, Anne Iniihiiiapoli. 

French 
Biology Club; W. A. A, i Wom^in's League. 



Griggs, Haedane Indumapolis 

English 
Phi Delta Thcta ; Track Captain, '24; Track 
Letters, '22, '23, '24, '25; Football Letters, 
'21, '22, '23, '24; Basketball Captain, '24, '25; 
Basketball Letters, '22, '23, '24, '25; Baseball 
Letters, '23, '24, '25. 



HAif.irr, Helen — E>i«lish liidiaiiapol'is 

Kappa .Alpha Theta , B.isketball Letter, '22, 
'23; Intramural Basketball, '23, '24; W. A. A.; 
Woman's League; V. W. C. A.; Chicago Nor- 
mal School of Physical Education, '21, '22. 



Ha.vi, Scott — English Inifianjfolis 

Phi Delta Theta; President Senior Class, '25; 
Sphinx; Secretary Interf raternity Council, '23, 

. '24; Track Letters, '22, '23, '24, '25; Phil- 
osophy, Biology and Dramatic Clubs. 

Har.mon, Se'e F.sieele Mae Indiiinafolii 
English 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Secretary Senior Class, '25; 
Secretary W. A. A., '24; Varsity Basketball, 
'23, '24; Varsity Volleyball; Senior Team, 
'2 5; Phi Delta Phi; Dranwtic, French, Chem- 
istry, Glee and Philosophy Clubs; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



HaDEEY, F.IHEE L. 

Ptihlir Speaking 
Dramatic Club. 



Habee, Paul S. 
Economies 



Frankfort 



Indianapolis 



Phi Delta Theta; Editor-in-Chief Drift, '24; 
Drift Staff, '21-'24; President Y. M. C, A., 
'24; Y. M. C. A., '21-'25. 



Harrvman, Ilene Indijiijpolis 

Zoologf- ' 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Delta Phi; President, 
'23; Varsity Debating; Gold "B" Intercol- 
legiate Debating; Forensic Club; Philokurian; 
Student Council, '22; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
'22; Dramatic, Biology and Glee Clubs; 
Woman's League; Western College, '23, '24. 

Hein/, Fleeta Proctorfille, Ohio 

English 

Pi Beta Phi; Philokurian; Vice-President 
H.,ni.- Ecuiomics Club, '2}. '24, Y. W. C. A 




[4,] 




HiLi., I'ail Grandison liidijiiaforu 

Biisinesi A dmhi'istrjlujii 
Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Interfra- 
tcrnity Council; Drift Art Staff, '2 5; 
Drift'Staff, '21 ; Press Club. 



HosEA, Maxwell Indianafolis 

English 
Delta Phi Sigma; Drift Staff, '24; In- 
terfraternitv Football; Chemi?trv and 
Math Clubs; Y. M. C. A. 



HiNES, Floyd Milton 

Botiinx 
Butler Association; Student \'olunteer 
Y. M. C. A.; Trl-State College, '2!. 



Howie, Hillis Indianapolis 

Economics 
Psi Upsilon; Philokurian, '24; Con- 
necticut W'eslevan, '21 -'23. 



O. F.ARI. HlNSHAW 

History 



Carmel 



Hitch, Doris Lajasette 

English and French 
French, Poetry and Dramatic Clubs; 
W. .A. A.; Woman'' League; Indiana 
University, '22. 



HuRKR, Charlotte Indianafolis 

Mathematics 
Math Club; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



HiGHKS, Florence H. Indianafolis 

Botan\ 



Hoo\i R, Helen' Ne^rccas/le 

Sociology and Bihle 
Delta Delta Delta; Phi Kappa Phi; Phi 
Delta Phi; Philokurian; Biology, French 
and Philosophy Clubs; W. A. A.; Wo- 
man's League; Y. W. C. A. 



\EHNi:, Harriot Indianafolis 

French and English 
Alpha Delta Pi; Secretary Scribblers' 
Club, '24, '25; Collegian Staff; French, 
Press and Math Clubs; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 




["] 




|l>MS, Rl TH McCllRMlCK 1 lilt ijlldpol i s 

Jaql'iih, Maurinf liiiihiiuipoHi 

English 
PI Beta Phi; Drift St.iff, '2 + ; French 
and Biology Clubs; W. A. A.; Wo- 
man's League; Y. W. C. A. 

Kalhv, Lkona Mae Bic-ui^ii 

C/ieniis/ry 
Phi Kappa Phi; \'ice-Prcsident Chem- 
istry Club; Catalytic Club; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 

Kennedy, Dema Lazcreiice 

English 
Pi Beta Phi; Phi Kappa Phi; Chimes; 
President Delta Phi, '23-'25; \'arsity 
Debating, '22-"24; Forensic, Math and 
French Clubs; W. A. A.; Woman'- 
League; Y. W. C. A. 

King, Eleanor lu/iianapolis 

Engliih 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Pan-Hellenic; Student 
Advisory Council; Intramural Basket- 
ball, '22, '23; W. A. A.; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



KiNNAHi), Hi:i.ijN Pendleton 

History 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Student Teachers' 
Association; Woman's League; Y. W. C. 
A. 

Kniii, Hi (.11 Miirt'msville 

English 
Delta Phi Sigma; Intertraternltv Foot- 
ball and Ba'^seball. '22-'24; Interfra- 
ternitv Basketball, '21, '23, '24; Y. M. 
C. A.' 

Ki.i(.iR, Marcarfi F. Inilianjpolis 

Chemistry 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Scarf 
Club; Litramural Debating; Collegian 
Staff; Chemistr"\', German, Biolog^• and 
Forensic Clubs; Committee of 12S; 
W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A. 

Krik<;, Frances liiJicuuipoHs 

(ji'eek aiiii L^tin 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Classical Club; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A.; St. 
\Liry of the Woods, '22, '23. 

KlR7ROtK, Ir'INI. LawRINCE 

English Indianapolis 

Butler Association; Tennis Letters, '23, 
'24, '25; Literfratcrnity Basketball, 
'22-'25; Litcrfraternlty Baseball, '22- 
"24; Biolog\', Chemistr\' and Classical 
Clubs. 




51 .» #4^ 




3 



[43] 




LANDRtrH, |. RUSSEI.L 

Hist'ory 

Lavei.le, Helen 
History 
Woman'? League. 



liiJia/uipoHs 



Indianapoli. 



I.AVCOCK, Wyant 
Histoid 
Student Teachers" Ajsociation; Y. M. 
C. A. 

Lennox, Katharine Iniiiaiiafol'u 

English 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; President Scar- 
let Quill; Treasurer Woman's League, 
'24, '2 5; Chairman May Day Dance, 
'2 5; Student Industrial Committee Y. 
W. C. A., '23-'25; Drift Art Staff, '23; 
W. A. A.; Scarf, French and Math 
Clubs; Senior \aude\illc Committee, 



LiHKiNf;s, Frank Indiaiiafolis 

Philosophy mill English 
Phi Kappa Phi; German and Philos- 
ophy Cluhs. 



LiKELV, Iosephine IniHjnjpoHs 

English 
Pi Beta Phi; Intramural Basketball and 
\'olleyball; Spanish and Biology Clubs; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 

LiNDSEY, Opal Oxford 

History 
President Campus Club; Biology Club; 
Student Teachers' Association; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 

Luc KEY, George Amos Marion 

Bible 
Sandwich Club; Secretary Y. M. C. A., 
'23-'2 5; Indianapolis Intercollegiate Y. 
M. C. A. Council; Law Enforcement 
Conference, Washington, D. C '24; 
Butler Band, '21 -'24; Biology and 
Classical Clubs. 

LuzADER, Eloise Indiandpotis 

English 
Alpha Delta Theta ; Spanish Club; In- 
tramural Basketball and \'olleyball; W. 
.A. A.; Woman's League; Y. W. C. .A. 

Lynn, Doris Indijnapolis 

English and History 
Secretarv Social Science Club, '24; Stu- 
dent Teachers' Association; Woman'? 
League; Y. \X . C. A. 




["] 




McCandi.kss, George Currvhk 

Eioiiomia hiduinafolU 

Butk-r Assi.ci.ition; Frcshni.in .it Indiana Law 
School. 



McD.AMEL, Alice 
Bot.iti\ 



Liizi 



Student Teachers' Association; Botany T""rnal 
and Ruzz.ird Chibs; Woman's League, Y. W. 
C. A. 



McD.AMEi., Ethel Hittle Xe-rcriisf/t; 
English 

Phi Kapp.i Phi; Social Science Club. 

McNoRTov, P.AUL Rockz-iUe 

Economin 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Basketball, '21, '22, '2-'; 
Spanish and Economics Clubs; Interf raternitv 
Football, Basketball and Baseball. 



M.ADifoN, F.iTZ.'MiETH C.^LLON Indiana fol'is 
English and Spanish 
Alpha Delta Pi; Vice-President Scribblers' 
Club; Opera Club; "Pirates of Penzance"; 
"Fairview Revue"; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



M..UiiiN, Lii.i.iAN J. Indianapolis 

Romance Languages 
Delta Delta Delta; Phi Kapp.i Phi; Chimes; 
Treasurer Scarlet Quill; President French Club, 
'2+, •!=•; Vice-President, '23, '24; Treasurer 
W, A. A.. '24, '25; Captain Varsity Basketball, 
•2-, -24, Captain Senior Team, '25; Volleyball 
Letter, '24, '25; W. A. A. Awards, '25; Student 
Teachers' Association; Math, Chemistry, Poetry, 
Spanish and Dramatic Clubs; Costume Manager 
"The Piper"; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 

Medlam, Mildred Indianapolis 

English and French 
Phi K.appa Phi; President Philosophv Club, 
'23-'25; Vice-President French Club, '24, '25, 
Glee and Opera Clubs; Woman's League; Y. 
W. C. A. 

Met/ger, John Nohlesville 

English and Education 
Dr.imatic Club; Advertising Manager, '2?, 
Business Manager, '25; "Cappy Ricks"; Drift 
Business Staff, '23; Collegian Staff, '22. 

Meyer, Hoi'ston Linuooc, 

liotanx and Zoologx 
Delt.i T.iu Delta; Football' Letters, '17, '18, 
Basketball Letters, '17, 'IS; R.iseball Letters, 
'IS, '19; Biology Club. 

Miller, Leota Indianapolis 

English 
Alpha Chi" Omega; Student Teachers' Associa- 
tion; Sp.inish and Dram.itic Clubs; Intramural 
Basketball and Volleyball; W. .A. A.; Woman's 
League; V. W. C. .\. 




Wk->' 



[«] 




Miller, K. Maurice liirihiiuifolis 

Econoin'iis 
Delt.i Phi Sigma; Spanish, Social Science and 
Commerce Clubs; Interf raternity Basketball, '24. 



Mullen, Alice Young 
English 


Inrlijllilpol'l 


Student Volunteer, '22-'25 
President Student Volunteer, 
University, '19-'22. 


Regional Vice 
'22, '23; Indian: 



Mitchell, Marguerite Sherwood 

English InJianapolis 

Secretary Student Teachers' Association; Scarf 
and Poetrv Clubs. 



MoE'FETT, Helen C. Indianafolis 

English 
Alpha Delta Theta; Pan-Hellenic; Student 
Council Board, '24; Chemistry Club; Intra- 
mural Basketball; Senior Team, '25; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



Mullen, Doyle L. Indianafolis 

Sociology 
President Tau Kappa Alpha, '23, '24; President 
Sandwich Club, '24; President Indiana Student 
Volunteer Union, '23; National Chairman Vol- 
unteer Council, '23, '24; Butler Representative 
State Oratorical Contest, '23. 

Nester, Henry G. Indianafolis 

7,oology 
President German Club, '24, '25; President 
Biology Club, '24, '25; Vice-President, '23-'24; 
Indiana University Scholarship, '25, '26; 
Wood's Hole Zoological Scholarship, '23; 
Chemistry and Rotanv Clubs; Student Teachers' 



Morris, Mildred Pendleton 

History 
Pi Beta Phi; Home Economics Club; Woman's 
League; V. W. C. A. 



Mueller, Eleanor Bos Indianafolis 

English 
Scarf Club; Opera and Dramatic Clubs; "Fair- 
view Revue"; "The Boomerang"; "The Pirates 
of Penzance"; Woman's League; V. W. C. A. 



Neukom, WiLLLAM R. ludiaiiafoHs 

Lau- 
Tau Kappa Tau; Fourth Estate; Press Club; 
Treasurer Men's Union, '23, '24; Treasurer 
Boosters' Club, '23, '24; Delegate to National 
Association of College Unions, '23; Treasurer 
Freshman Class Indiana Law School; Delta 
Theta Phi. 

NucKLES, Lkona M. Indianafolis 

Latin and English 
Classical Club; Woman's League; V. W. C. A. 




[.o] 




OcKKR, Ellen hiJijiupolis 

M. A. Eiliii-Jtioii 

B. S. University of lllin.jis, '23. 

OrNER, HlNRV R. hlilhUldpdlii 

Coiitiriene 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Football, "21; In- 
terfratcrnity Football and BasL'ball, '23, 
'24; Dramatic Club. 
OsBORN, Geori.ia K. llliJij/iapolii 

English 
Pi Beta Phi; Dramatic Club; Intramural 
Basketball; Woman's League; \. VV. 

C. A. 

Padoi", LoiiSL Imiunapiilii 

French 
Delta Delta Delta; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Scarlet Quill; Secretary Woman's League, 
'24, '2 5; President Spanish Club, '24, 
'25; \'ice-President, '23, '24; Pan-Hel- 
lenic; Scarf Club; W. A. A. Award, 
'25; Varsity B,isketbal!, '22, '23; Intra- 
mural \"ollevball; French, Math and 
Dramatic Clubs; "Honor Bright"; 
"Lady Windemere's Fan"; "The Boom- 
erang"; Student Teachers' Association; 
Committee of 12 5. 

Painter, Emmett IfVj/rr>// 

Sociology 
Classical Club; \'ice-President Social 
Science Club, '24. 



I'l KRiN, Opal luisr liiJuuhipolis 

Eugliih 
.Alpha Chi Omega; Biology, Social Sci- 
ence, F'rench and Chemistr\- Clubs; W. 
A. A.; Woman's Leasue; \. W. C. A. 



PiKi, Marion .A. hiduinjpolis 

Eiononi'ui 
Chemistry and French Club-; L'ni- 
\ersity of Pennsylvania, '23. 

PoLLAK, .Anne liidianapolii 

H islorx and French 
Phi Kappa Phi; Biology Club; Inde- 
pendent Basketball Team, '21; W. A. 
.A.; Woman's League. 

Pvi.i:, F'.DNA .A. Vincennes 

English 
Campus and Biolog\ Clubs Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 

Powell, D(jRorHv Indijnapnlis 

French and Engliih 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chcmistr\- Club; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. .A.; De- 
Pauw L'liiversitx', '21 -'2 3. 




> ^ ; 




[47] 




QuAiD, )ack bidianafoiis 

Cliemiitr\ 
Chemistry" Club; Chemistry Assistant, 
"21-'2;. ' 

Rii:s, Oscar C. liidianafoiu 

English 
Lambda Chi Alpha; President Student 
Teachers' Association, '24, '25; Presi- 
dent Interfraternity Council, '22; \'ice- 
President, '21; Chemistry and French 
Clubs; junior Prom Committee, '24. 

Robinson, Marc.aret C. Indianafolis 

Spanish and French 
Zeta Tau Alpha; French, Spanish, 
Math and Biology Clubs; Student 
Teachers' Association; Intramural Bas- 
ketball and \'olleyball; Senior Team, 
'25; W. A. A.; Woman's League; Y. 
W. C. A. 

Rose, Marian Anderson 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Drift Staff, '24; 
Dramatic, Poetry and Press Clubs; Wo- 
man'* League; Y. W. C. A.; Western 
College, '22, "23. 

RtrasH. Zkrhi.da hidiiind-polis 

English 
Delta Zela; Opera and Spanish Clubs. 



Ruth, Martin Indianafolis 

Science 
Student Teachers' Association. 

Schmidt, Anna A. Seymour 

English 
Classical Club; Woman's League; Y. 
W. C. A. 

ScH.MiDT, Gertrude Indianapolis 

English 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; President Pan- 
Hellenic, '24, "25; Secretary-Treasurer, 
'23, '24; Secretary Pen and Pencil 
Club; Chemistry' Club; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C'. A. 

ScHOENER, Margaret Indianapolis 

English 
Pi Beta Phi; Mce-President Scarlet 
Quill, '24, '25; President Phi Delta 
Phi; Collegian Staff, '22; Drift, '24; 
French and Biology Clubs; Y. W. C. 
.A.; Committee of 12 5. 

Sent i.ER, Ruth Anderson 

French 
Delta Delta Delta; Treasurer Y. W. C. 
A., '24, '25; Philokurian; French Club; 
W. A. A. 




[.e] 




ScuLi,/, Daisy liu/ijiidpolis 

Engliih otid Freiitli 
Zeta Tau Alpha i Phi Kappa Phi; Vice-Presi- 
dent Delta Phi, '24; Varsity Dehating-; Secre- 
tary Forensic Club, '23, '24; Drift Art Staff, 
'25; Student Teachers' Association; Student 
Budget Committee; French and Dramatic 
Clubs; "Gappy Ricks"; Y. W. C. A.; Intra- 
mural Debating, '24, '2 5, Student Budget C.m- 

ScHUMACHER, George 1 H/i iaiMpol is 

English 
Phi Delta Theta; Sphinx; Organization Editor 
Drift, '24; Collegian, '23, '24; Student Budget; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '22, '23; Senior Stunt 
Day Committee; German Club. 

Seuel, Irene Louise Inilianapolis 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Phi Kappa Phi; President 
Y. W. C. A., '24, '25; Vice-President, '23, '24; 
Scarlet Quill; Chimes; Phi Delta Phi; Scrib- 
blers' Club; Collegian Staff, '22-'24; Activities 
Editor Drift, '24; Treasurer Intercollegiate 
Press Association, '23, '24; Budget Committee, 
'25; Committee of 125; French and Press 
Clubs; Woman's League. 

Shearer, Samuella IinfuinafoHs 

French 
Biology, Chemistry and Social Science Clubs; 
Treasurer French Club; Y. W. C. A.; Indiana 
Dental College, '24, '2 5. 

Shumaker, Albert liidianafoHs 

Eiii-liih 



Indiiinapoli. 



Snyder, Ralph 
Greek 

Butler Association; M.igna Cum Laude; Phi 
Kappa Phi; Y. M. C. ".A. Cabinet, '22, '23; 
Senior Scholarship; Frencli and Classical Clubs. 

SriLz, Mildred Lucile Imiicinapolis 

English 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Phi Kappa Phi; Vice- 
President Senior Class, '25; Philokurian; Social 
Committee Woman's League; Committee of 
125; Secretary Biology Club, '21, '22; French 
and Dramatic Clubs; "Ladv Windemere's Fan"; 
"The Boomerang". 

Stockdale, Mu.dred Ellzabeth 

English Indianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Treasurer W. A. A., 
'2-'!, '24; Intramural Basketb.ill, Dramatic 
Club; Woman's League; Student Industrial 
Committee Y. W. C. A. 



Indianapolis 



Stokes, Mary 

Mathematics 

Magna Cum Laude; Phi Kappa Phi; Math 
Club. 

Talbert, Merrill Indianapolis 

English 
Butler .Association; Director Band; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet, '23, '24; Geneva and Quadriennial 
Convention, '24; Sandwich, Biologv and Ger- 
man Clubs. 




[.9] 




Thompson, Albert B. Columbus 

Etonoin'tci 
Delta Phi Sigma; Hunmr Editor Drift, 
"24; Collegian Staff; Intcrfraternity 
Basketball; Glee, Spanish, Social Science 
and Commerce Clubs; Y. M. C. A. 

Thornherry, Ruel Eut.ENE 

Eiononius West he'.cton 

Delta Phi Sigma; Intcrfraternity Bas- 
ketball, Football and Baseball; Spanish 
and Social Science Clubs; \'arsity Base- 
ball, '2+, '25. 

Tipton, |ames ludianapoln 

History and Econoiiius 
Sigma Chi; Intcrfraternity Council, 
'22-"24; History, Chemistry and Dra- 
matic Clubs; "The Piper". 

Trost, Frank C. Indianapol'is 

English 
Sigma Chi; Editor Collegian, '23, '24; 
Associate Editor, '22-'23; President 
Fourth Estate, '24; Drift Staff, '24; 
Student Budget Committee, '24; Skulls. 

T\\rrrv, \'icroR C. Indian,ipoHs 

Che??iistr\ 
Butler Association; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Chairman Student Budget, '25; Cold 
Spring Harbor Scholarship, '24; Presi- 
dent Chemistry Club; Vice-President 
])i.il()g\' Club; Zoology .Assistant. 



Tvner, Lucile Indianapolis 

English 
Pi Beta Phi; Student Council; Dra- 
matic Club; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 

Um|!ENHi)\\ HR, Flovu Wilmer 

History Indianapolis 

Magna Cum Laude; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Student Teachers' .Association; Social 
Science and Classical Clubs. 

Updegrae'f, Hughes Indianapolis 

Economics 
Sigma Chi; Sphinx; Intertraternit\' 
Council, '23, '24; President Freshman 
Class, '21; Football Letters, '21, '22; 
French, Glee, Spanish and Press Clubs. 

\'arnt/., Dorothea Lebanon 

Spanish 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Scarlet Quill; 
Chimes; \'ice-President Junior Class, 
'24; Phi Delta Phi; Y. \V. C. A. Un- 
dergraduate Representative, '24; Philo- 
kurian; Committee of 125; Intramural 
Debating, '23, '24; Forensic, Spanish 
and Dramatic Clubs; "Honor Bright", 
'23; Woman's League. 

Walton, F.spik L. Oaklandon 




[so] 




Watkins, T. Cole liiiluiHii-polii 

English 
Glee and Classlc.il Clubs; Y. M. C. A. 



Weitknfxht, Lena E. Indiaiiaforu 

English 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; Philo- 
kurian; Student Industrial Committee 
Y. W. C. A.; Library Assistant; W. A. 
A.; Math and Glee Clubs. 

West, Constance Ben Davis 

English 
Sigma Delta; Scarf, Spanish and Dra- 
matic Clubs; "The Whole Town's 
Talking"; W. A. A.; Woman's League. 

Whitmire, D\M(,h r T. Induiuifotis 

Mathematics 
Butler Association; Interfraternity Bas- 
ketball; Chemistry Club. 

WiESON, Dorothy Baii.ev Indianafolis 
Spanish and English 
Sigma Delta; Scari, Dramatic and Span- 
ish Clubs. 



WisHARD, Lois Esther Indianapolis 

English 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Delta Phi; \arsit\- 
Debating, '24; Delegate Student \'ol- 
unteer Convention, '23; Intramural 
\'olleyball, '24; Finals Women's Tennis 
Tournament, '22; French, Math and 
Home Economics Clubs; Vice-President 
Forensic Club, '2 5; Student Teachers' 
Association; Woman's League; \. W. 
C. A. 

Woods, Geraed Greenfield 

Econojnics 
Phi Delta Theta; Skulls; Football Cap- 
tain, '24; Football Letters, '21, '22, '23, 
'24; Track Captain, '23; Track Let- 
ters, '22, '23, '24, '25; President 
Sophomore Class, '23; Press Club; 
Committee ot 125. 

WuKiv, Nellie Indianapolis 

English and French 
Alpha Delta Pi; French and Press 
Clubs; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 



VouNc, John A. hid 

English 
Butler .Association; Y. M. C. .A 



\'oi'N(;, Leonard L. 
Economics 
I'hilokurian. 



poll 



lanapoli. 



Indianapolis 




[='] 



He iclio wis/u's tu fulfill Ji'is ?!iis- 
s'lon ?niist he a nia/i of one idea^ that 
is, of o)ie great overmastering pur- 
pose, oversliado'w'mg all /lis ai??is^ 
and guiding and eontrolling /lis en- 
tire life. 

HA TE 




Juni 



ors 



Juniors Use Hackneyed Expression 

MUCH less than three score and ten years ago, in fact sixt\'-se\'en 
years less, we members of the Class of 1926 began our college 
career under the colors of blue and white. Despite the fact that 
sixt\'-nine Butler Freshman classes had trials and tribulations, we did not. 
Howe\'er, do not misunderstand us. We mean that we got into plenty of 
trouble, but our Freshman English teachers would not permit us to call 
the disagreeable part of our first year trials and tribulations because the 
expression is hackneyed. Anyway, we had 'em, are ha\'ing 'em and will 
continue to have 'em. We realize that they are part of the old game of 
life and are incenti\'es to success. 

As a class, we have done very little compared to what these other sixty- 
nine have said they ha\'e done. However, if \ou will permit us to dis- 
regard that which people like — modesty — we will proceed to tell you 
about ourselves. 

In 1922, we elected Robert Nipper president; Justine Halliciay, vice- 
president; Sarah Frances Downs, secretary, and Arnold Davis, treasurer. 
They did their duties as officers nobly until the fall of 1923 when we made 
Cordon Paul, president; Marjorie Chiles, vice-president; Dorothy Rey- 
nolds, secretary, and Brewer Graham, treasurer. In 1924, we made another 
good selection which is e\'ident on the opposite page. 

We won the Freshman-Sophomore scrap the two \ears in which we 
were eligible to compete. We subscribed for the Butler endowment, got 
into actix'ities, went to class and cut. As a matter of fact, we did all those 
things for which students are condemned and praised. 

We have made good grades, too. Did you notice the "eciitorial we" 
which is often used when a few I's would be sufficient.^ Some of us mem- 
bers of the "editorial we", because of the law of averages or of the lack of 
intelligence, have obtained letters on our cards that are exactly like number 
six of the alphabet. However, we console ourselves by realizing that 
some class a\erages would not ha\ e run true to form, were it not for us. 

In the past year, we ha\'e felt more responsibility than formerly. 
Two of the biggest activities of the school, namely the 1925 Prom and 
DRiF'r, were gi\en to us to put over. The former was a success and an 
c;\ent that will be remembered by all who attended, and the latter is now 
HI \"our hands for appro\'al. 

Before we begin oin- Senior year, it is well for us to stop and consider 
that it is not the number of actixities after our names that counts, but how 
Well are we prepared to gix'e ser\'ice Xo others. "It is the rent we pay tor 
tlie space we occupy in the worlci". 



[=-] 





DA\ ll> r.lRON KILliORE 



CAROLINE GODLEY 



Officers 



Da\ii> Bvron Kin.oRE, President 
D.ive is .1 rare comhinatii)n oi .m .ithlcte and a good student. 

Caroline Godlkv, \'ice-President 
C. G. Is quite a journalist and a real Butler enthusiast. 

JiijA Aim RKiN Brown, Secretary 
julia'< smile and personality generate the spirit oi" the "House of Browns". 

Brick King Maii.ock, Treasurer 
Bruce with his western frankness and his eastern polish is a very capable officer. 





JULIA ATHERTON brown 



BRUCE KING MATLOCK 



["] 




Abboti, Bernick M. W lilt el and 

Alpha Chi Omcg.); Intramural De- 
bating; Y. VV. C. A.; Woman's League; 
Opera Club; W. A. A.; Intramural 
Basketball and Wjllcyball ; Franklin 
College; Thcta Alpha Phi. 



R.M.i.Whc., Pauline IiiJijnjpoHi 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Collegian, "24, 
'25; Pan-Hellenic, '25, '26; Intramural 
\'ollevba!l, '24; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's 
League. 



Anderson, Ei,i/,abeih Indianafolis 

Alpha Chi Omega; Woman's League; 
Y. W. C. A.; Lasell Seminary. 



Bass, Shaii.er Ind'uinnfolis 

Butler Association; Classical, German, 
Chemistry, Catahtic and Booster Clubs. 



.Armstrong, Makiha Ki-i/abeth 

Indtdna-polii 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Scarf Club; Chairman 
Program Committee Y. W. C. .A.; W. 
.A. .A.; Woman's League. 



.Atkins, Frank C. Indianafolis 

Sigma Chi; -Art Lditor Drift, '25; 
Drift Staff, '23, '2+; Baseball; Glee 
Club; Interfraternity Football and 
Baseball. 



Bates, Lvdea C. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Indianapolis 



Bailev, Jov 



Hellonz'ille 



?ELi., MARGAREr .Ann RuslwUle 

Delta Zeta; French Club; Intramural 
\'olleyball; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; 
Woman's League. 



Bicgerstaef, Mary Elizabeth Wabash 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Business Man- 
ager Song Book; French Club; W. .A. 
.a\; Y. VV. C. A.; Woman's League. 




[56] 




BlLLMAN, BKUNlCt Fjirljlld 

Zft.i T.ui Alph.i; Philokurutn; Dram.itic, 
Foreiuic, Biologv .md Press Cluhs; In- 
tr,imur,il Basketb.ill; W. A. A.; W'o- 
m.in's League. 



Mkiihn, Ji-i.iA Iiiiiijii.ipoli.' 

Kappa Alpha Thcta; Philokurian ; Sec- 
retary |unior Class; Chairman May Day 
Breakfast; Press Cluh; Intramural Bas- 
ketball and \olleyball; V. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, '2+, "2i; Cummittee of 125; 
Woman's League. 



Black, Mary \'irginia liidicinapoiu 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Collegian Staff, 
'22, '23, '2 + ; Dramatic Club; De- 
bating; Y. W. C. A.; Woman's League. 



Bruns. Joseph H. Iiidianafolii 

Tau Kappa Tau; Biology' and Pen and 
Pencil Clubs. 



Bloint, Friknd Carroi-i, Tipio). 

Y. W. C. .A.; Woman's League. 



Bl'rcan, Kaihirim' h:dianjpolis 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Pan-Hellenic, '2+, '25; 
Spanish and Biolog-i' Club~; W. A. A.; 
Junior Basketball Team, '25; Intramural 
Basketball and \'ollevball; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



Bonnet. L, Carroll C. Ind'taiiaprJi 

Butler .Association; Band; Quartet. 



BiRKHARivr, Blvthi hiiihmjpiAii 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Y. W. C. A.; 
Woman''; League. 



B 


ROSS man, 

Phi Del 


Dean 

ta The 


ta. 


hiriitviapo 


lis 










• "r^^!^9»^^^!^»-<. 


^ , 








\ 


f^ 


"S 


i! 


/v. 



lU'RKHARl, H. GlVNDON I lid UVlJpol ii 

Sandwich and Glee Clubs; Interfra- 
ternitv Basketball' Student \"olunteer. 




["] 




Caraway, Hasdlv William liuliaiiafolh 
Phi Delt.i Thcta; Track Letters, '22, 
'23. '24, "2;. 



Ckcil, Carl 

Footb.il! Letters, 
Press Club. 



Iniliivnipoli.i 
'24; B.iseb.ill; 



Carpenter, F.\elvn ludianafol'i. 

Cl.ifsic.ll Club; Wom.in's Le.igue. 



Chiles, Marjorie IiidiaHafolis 

Pi Bet.i Phi ; Mce-President Sophomore 
C1.1SS; Le.id in "Honor Bright"; "Pirates 
of Penz.ince"; "Fairview Revue"; 
President P.in-Hellcnic, '25; Ch.iirm.in 
Founders' Dav and Ma\" Da^' Commit- 
tees, '2 5; Board of Directors and Sec- 
retary of Dramatic Club; Chimes; Opera 
and French Clubs; Y. W. C. .4. Mem- 
bership Committee, '23; Woman's 
League; Committee of 12 5. 



Christie, Harold Austin 

Butler .Association; Biology Club. 



Carper, Florence Rorerta hiil'ictihipolis 
Delta Delta Delta; Collegian, '22, '23, 
'24; Chimes; Dramatic, Forensic, Ger- 
man, Mathematics, Home Economics, 
Chemistry and Catahtlc Clubs; Intra- 

■ mural Basketball; W.' .A. .A.; Y. W. C. 
.A.; Woman's League. 



Car I IK, Hopi v.. liiJ'uuijpolii 

Delta Zeta ; French, Home Economics 
and Chemistry Clubs; W. ,A. A.; W. S. 
G. .A. 



Clayson, Dorothy hiJianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Cluford, F.if.ENE R. Andeno)! 

Lambda Chi .Alpha; .Associate Editor 
Collegian, '24; Collegian Staff, '23; 
President Press Club, "'24; Vice-Presi- 
dent Fourth Estate; Sphinx Club. 

Coate, Mar'i Miles Itui'iiinafoVii 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Earlham College, 




[53] 




Alph.1 Dclt.i Thct.i; Phi Delta Phi; 
P.ui-Hcllcnic, '24; Chemistry Club; V. 
W. C. A.; Woman's Le.igue. 



CciMns, Rlim A'ali.ria 
Botany Assist;tnt, '24, 
Woman's League. 



Press Club; 



CoRVA, Mar 1 HA Stkki.e Indiaiia-polh 

Alpha Chi Omega; President Phi Delta 
Phi, '24, '2 5; "The Piper"; Dramatic 
Poetr-\' and Spanish Clubs; Intramural 
Basketball and Volleyball; Y. W. C. A.; 
Wi, man's League. 



Co\AI., I'.1(.1MA 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



Iniiia/iapoli. 



Craw, Joe R. Eaton 

Butler .Association; Spanish and Biolog\' 
Clubs; y. M. C. A.; Student \oluntcer. 



Cl-Mmins, JAMis O. Biii/iexi' 

Lambda Chi .Alpha; Sphinx and Booster 
Clubs; Litert'raternit\- Council; Liter- 
fraternity Football and Baseball. 

Clriis, \'iRi.i\i\ Inil'hiihipolii 

Alpha Chi Omega; Collegian Staff, '22- 
'25; \'ice-President Woman's League, 
'24; Social Chairman, '23; Phi Delta 
Phi; Delta Phi; Chimes; Editor Student 
Direct;.iry, '2 5; Varsitv Debating, '24; 
Litramural Debating; "Miss Somebody 
Else"; Dramatic, Forensic, Poetrv and 
French Clubs; Committee of 125; W. 
A. A.; y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '24. 

Davis, .Arnold Imluviafolii 

Delta Tau Delta; 'I'reasurer Dramatic 
Club, '2.^, '24; "Come Out of the 
Kitchen"; "Miss Somebodv F'.lse"; Dra- 
matic Club \'audeville; Pen and Pencil 
and College Corner Clubs; Literfratern- 
it^- Baseball; Committee of 125. 



Da\is, Chari.is Morrison 



liii/'hi?iafoli> 



Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx, Dramatic and 
Opera Clubs. 

Da\ IS, Rol.LIN 

Phi Delta Theta 
cil ; Philokurian 



yorlh Sd/em 
Literlraternit\' Coun- 
Treasurer Dramatic 



Club; y. M. C. a. Delegate to Geneva. 








["] 




D'jDSON, Catharine liidijiiLipoHs 

Alpha Delta Thet.i; IVIathematics and 
Spanish Clubs; Basketball Letter, '23; 
First Team Basketball and ^'olle^■ball ; 
Tennis; W. A. A.; Y. W. C'. A.; 
Woman's League. 

Downs, Sarah Francics Ind'uuidfolis 

Kappa Alpha Theta; \'ice-President and 
Social Chairman Chimes; Homecoming 
Chairman for Woman's League, '24; 
Social Chairman Woman's League, '2 5; 
Geneva Stunt Dav Committee, '2+; 
\'ice-President Dramatic and Glee Clubs; 
Intramural Basketball and Debating; W. 
A. A.; Committee of 12 5. 

DiNCAN, DoKoiTiKA A. Greenfield 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Biology' and 

Chemistry Clubs; W. A. A.; Y."w. C. 
A.; Woman's League. 

DvKR, Kathi.ken hidianapolis 

De'ta Zeta; Secretary Pen and Pencil 
Club, '23; Chairman Handbook Com- 



mittee, '23, '24; 
Spanish Clubs. 



^ress, Dramatic and 



iNilijiiapol I. 
Spanish and Chcnr 



FppKRr, Marion 
Tau Kappa Tai 
tr\- Clubs; Interfraternit\- Basketball and 
B.aseball; Y. M. C. A. 



F.RBi R, Helen M. IndijiuipoHs 

.Alpha Chi Omega; Social Committee 
Woman's League, '24, '25; Dramatic and 
Chemistry Clubs; Intramural Basketball 
and \olleyball; Y. W. C. A.; Committee 
of 125. 



F.uiNG, Carlyle Ind'uiuifolii 

Phi Delta Theta; Baseball Letters, '23, 
'24, '2 5; Biologv Club. 



FlI.I.MORE, KArHARINE JaNE hid iiinjpol IS 

Delta Zeta; French Club; Intramural 
\'olle^ball ; Woman's League; \' . W. 
C. A.' 



Fink, Paul hidivi^ipolis 

Tau Kappa Tau; Philokurian, Clas-ical, 
Press and Opera Clubs; Football. 



Fletchall, N'iRc.iMA Po.'ex:-i//e 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Intramural \ ol- 
le\ball; Woman's League. 




[60] 




Fritts, Fi.oKisci: I'".. hidhviafoli. 

Classical Club; Y. W. C. A. 



Gkrman, Paul M. liitihiiiafolii 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Sphinx Club; In- 
terfraternitv Football, Basketball and 
Baseball; Intcrfraternity Council ; Fresh- 
man Football; Biology Club. 



GeSS'' 



Inituuiafolii 



GocHKNoi'R, Ri.oi; Fi.RN \y b'lteitcrzvii 

Biolog\ a]iJ Campus Clubs; Student 
Teachers' Association; Woman's League; 
V. W. C. A. 



GoDi.FV, Caroline Iniliaiiafolh 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chimes; \'ice- 
President |unior Class, '24, '2 5; Scrib- 
blers; Staff Secretary Collegian, '24, '2 5 ; 
Drift Staff, '25; Editor Handbook, '24; 
Dramatic, Forensic and Poetrv Clubs; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A'. 



ooDE, Kl\'A liiiiiiiinipoli.' 

Alpha Delta Theta; Scarf, Pen and 
Pencil, Classical and Biology Clubs; hi- 
tramural Basketball; W. A. A.; Woman's 
Leasjuc. 



Grail\m, Briwkr Iiii/hiiapoli.i 

Sigma Chi; Sphinx; Tau Kappa Alpha; 
Treasurer Sophomore Class, '23, '24; 
Track Letters, "23, '24, '25; Spanish and 
Social Science Clubs. 



Grav, Glenn .Albert Indiana-pol'i. 

Sigma Chi; Skulls; Track Captain, "25: 
Track Letters, "23, "24, "2 5. 



Greai r,Ai OH, \ i\ IAN Rave Sfeedway Citv 
-Alpha Delta Theta; Dramatic, Spanish 
and H: me l'',con<imics Clubs; Tennis; 
Intramural Ba>ketl\ill; junior Team, "2 5. 

Gremelspacher, [oe liii/iaiijpolis 

Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Business Man- 
ager Collegian, "24, '25; Business Man- 
ager junior Prom, "25; President Opera 
Club, "24, '25; Intcrfraternity Council; 
Basketball ; Hnn.ecoming Committee, '24. 




[61] 




Haggard, Doris hididiufolii 

Sigma Delta; Biology Club; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



Haldv, .Marc.arkf Indiatidprjlis 

Delta Delta Delta; French, Poetry and 
Dramatic Clubs; "Miss Somebody Else"; 
"The Piper", '24; Intramural \'olley- 
ball; W. A. A.; Woman'- League; \' . 
W. C. A. 



Harkkr, Albert Frjiikfort 

Sigma Chi; Basketball Letters, '23, '2 + ; 
Glee and Dramatic Clubs; Lead in 
"Icebound"; "The Whole Town's Talk- 
ing"; "The Piper". 



Harmon, Harold 
Sigma Chi. 



Sullivan, III. 



Hall, Hildreth Lucern 

Campu-. and Classical Clubs; Y. W. C. A. 



Harris, .Ada B. Indianjfoiu 

1' e n and Pencil and 1' r e s s Clubs; 
Woman's League. 



Hall, Sarah NezccastU 

Delta Delta Delta; Woman's League; 
Y. W. C. A. 



Harrison, Robert 
Delta Tau Delta. 



A1/'JH\ 



Hallidav, [usiiNE Indianapolij 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Phi Delta Phi; 
Society Staff Collegian, '24, '25; Hand- 
book Committee Woman's League, '24; 
Spanish Club; W. A. A.; Y, W. C. A. 



Hakroi.d, Ernest L. F<iinnoiint 

Bi:t!cr Association. 




[62] 




jy:^'j!ggsr?; ^vj ie w^ ' t»v:fe^ ^? t^^ 



^, C^ o, 




HASbi.v, Mildred Iiniijiupolii 

Delta Delta Delta; Chemistry, Home 
Economics and Press Clubs; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A.; Franklin College, 
'21, '22. 



HtNSKI,, HlRAM L'igJNipOrl 

Delta I'au Delta; Football Letters, '22, 
'23, '2 + ; Interfraternitv Basketball and 
B;iseball. 



Hfi.i.kk, Lois Frances Colinnb'ui City 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Intramural Basketball; 
Woman's League; Y. W. C. A.; Del'auw 
L'niversit^-, '22-'24. 



HodPiR, Fi.oRiNCi Fairki r Inifutupolii 
Chemistry Assistant, '24, '25; Botany 
Assistant; Chemistry and Botany Jour- 
nal Clubs; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Helton, Carter liiiiianjpolh 

Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Business 
Man.iger Collegian, '23, '24; Football 
Letters, '22, '23, '24. 



Hopper, Mvron liidianapolii 

Butler .Association; Mce-Pre^dent Y. \r 
C. A., '24, '25. 



Henderson, Lawrence Leujiion 

Sigma Chi; Collegian Start"; Dramatic 
Club; "The Piper." 



Henry, Lee Berd'in 

Sigma Chi; Secretary-Treasurer Sphinx. 



Huston, Ray F. 



Pmi>, III. 



Ice, Harrv T. iNJijiuipolis 

Delta Phi Sigma; Drift Staff, '25; 
President Pen and Pencil Club, '24; 
Forensic Club; Interfraternitv- Baseball, 
Fotball and Basketball. 




[."^.] 




\LKSKi, Clarence b/iliaiiapolii 

Butler Association; President Chemistry 
Club; Catahtic, Botan\' Journal and 
Biology Clubs. 



Kknnon, James Iiid'mnjpolis 

Phi Gamma Delta; Alpha Rho Delta; 
Wabash College, '22, 'U. 



INSON, DoRoriiY M. 



Fori \]\iyiie 



Johnson, Ruth Pratt Ind'iaiiaforu 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; LaSalle Semi- 
nary, '22-'24. 



Jones, A'irginia Lytee liidiatiiifolis 

Delta Zeta; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Keach, Robert Sey)iiour 

Sigma Chi; Skulls; Football Letters, '23, 
'24; Basketball Letters, '24, '25; Base- 
ball Letters, '21, '24, '2S. 



KiEGORE, David Bvron liidiaiiiifolii 

Delta Tau Delta; President Junior 
Class, '25; Skulls; Football Letter, '24; 
Track Letters, '23, '24, '25; Interfra- 
ternitv Basketball; President German 
Club,' '23, '24; Chemistry Club. 



KoNoi-D, David Winoiia Lake 

Phi Delta Theta; Skulls; Philokurian; 
Footb.ill Letters, '21, '22, '24; Basket- 
ball Letters, '21, '2 5; Tr.ack Letter, '21. 



Lamb, L.aDonna G. lud'uuuifol'u 

Alpha Chi Omega; Spanish and Biology 
Clubs; W. A. A.; hitramural B.asketball 
and \'olle-\ball ; Woman's League. 



f.r\cn, \"Esr\ \ . 



hidiiVhipoli. 




[54] 




Leslie, Marv Fairlaiid 

Alphii Delta Thet.i ; Chemistrv and 

Math Clubs; Woman's Lea£;uc-, Y. W. 
C. A. 



McCoLLOUM, El.KAXOR I llii iiVld polis 

Biology, Classical and Dramatic Clubs; 
"Cappy Ricks"; Student Endowment 
Committee, '23; W. A. A.; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



LiEBiAG, Ted IndiaiiafolU 

Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Glee and 
Math Clubs. 



McCracken, Martin Indijiiafolii 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Philokurian ; Butler 



iand; 

ball. 



Interiraternitv Football and Bas^ 



LucAR, Lucii,le ^y at 'S c-ctoii 

\'ice-President W. A. A., '24, '2 5; 
Woman's League. 



McGixNis, Alice Martinsville 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; French, Math 
and Home Economics Clubs; Intramural 
Basketball; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



LvMAN, Damien" Joe ludiaiia-pol'u 

Lambda Chi .Alpha; Social Science and 
Chemistry Clubs; Literfraternitv Coun- 
cil; Interfraternitv Baseball. 



McGrau, Eunice Tipton 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; L'ndergraduate 
Representative Y. W. C. A., '25; 
Woman's League. 



McCeusky, Berxice Ann iNdiaiidpolis 
Alpha Chi Omega; Scarf and Dramatic 
Clubs; Woman's Leasjue; Y. W. C. A. 



McLeav, \'ai,i.orol's llldijildpolii 

Beta Theta Pi; Sphinx; President Inter- 
fraternitv' Council, '25. 




[55] 




McMeans, Marv liidiaiiafolh 

Sigma Delta; Chimes; \"ice-President Y. 
W. C. A., '24, '25; Collegian Staff, '23, 
'24; Social Committee Woman's League; 
Committee of 12 5. 



Miller, Francis A. Ind'uiuifoiu 

Tau Kappa Tau; Interfraternity Coun- 
cil; Math and Chemistrv Clubs; Inter- 
fraternity" Baseball. 



Mann, Caihkrine Camby 

Wcman's League; Y. W. C. \. 



Miller, Helen Elizabeth hidiaiiafolii 
Spanish and Biology Clubs; Woman's 
League; Y. A^. C. .A. 



Mann, John S., Jr. Indianapolis 

Phi Delta Theta; Sphinx; .Assistant Busi- 
ness Manager Drift, '2+. 



Minor, Bessie Indianapolis 

Dramatic and Social Science Clubs; 
Woman's League ; \ . W. C. .A. 



Mart/, Joseph .A. Tipton 

Lambda Chi .Alpha; Press Club; North- 
western Lfniversitv, '22, '23. 



Montgomery, Marv Indianapolis 

Kappa .Alpha Theta; Forensic and Dra- 
matic Clubs; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A. 



Matlock, Bri'ce King Denver, Colo. 
Phi Delta Theta; Treasurer junior 
Class; Interfraternity Football and Bas- 
ketball; Committee of 125; LIniversit\- 
of Colorado, '21, '22. 



Morris, Glenn Knightsto^cn 

Delta Phi Sigma; Interfraternity Bas- 
ketball; Y. !\L C. A. 




[60] 




MuLiioi.J.AND, Geokc.e E. I ndtaiiafrjlii 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Skulls; Collegian 
Staff, '23, '24; Press Club; Butler Band, 
'2 5; Interfraternity Baseball; Football 
Letters, "23, "24; Ohmpic Boxing Team, 
"24; Track; Interl raternitv Baseball. 



Neal, Elizabeth Virginia W h'tteitozvn 
Woman's League; Franklin College, 
'23, '24. 



NicEWANDER, Lester L. Indianafolu 

Delta Tau Delta, Press, Spanish and 
Biology Clubs; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee, '25; Interfraternity Baseball and 
Basketball; University of Illinois, '22. 



Nipp, Carroll E. Intiianafolii 

Delta Phi Sigma; Pen and Pencil, 
Opera and Press Clubs. 

Nipper, Robert hidijiiafolii 

Sigma Chi; Skulls; President Pen and 
Pencil Club; Football Letters, '22, '24; 
Basketball Letters, '23, "24, '25; Baseball 
Letters, '23, '24, '2 5. 



Noble, Grace 
Scarf Club. 



Ind'uiiiaporii 



N't ssBAUM, IMarv R. Marion 

Alpha Delta Pi; Campus, French and 
Spanish Clubs; Woman's League. 



0(.LE, Mary Frances IndiiinapoUs 

Pi Beta Phi; Pan-Hellenic; Forensic, 
Spanish and Dramatic Clubs; "Honor 
Bright"'; Intramural Debating; Woman"s 
League; V. W. C. A. 



Okks, iMarjorie hidianapoli) 

Pi Beta Phi; Pen and Pencil and Dra- 
matic Clubs; Intramural \'olleyball; 
Woman's Leasue; Y. W. C. A. 



Paeierson, DoRotiiv Marie IndianapoVu 
Alpha Chi Omega; Pan-Hellenic; Span- 
ish and Dramatic Clubs; "The Piper""; 
W. .A. A. Board; Intramural V'olleyball 
and Basketball; ]unior Team; Woman"s 
League; Y. W. C. A. 




[67] 




Paul, Gordon Brad for J, Ohio 

Delta Tau Delta; Skulls; Football Let- 
ters, '22, '23, '24; Basketball Letters, 
'23, '24. 

Payne, Helen Claire Indknafolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Editor Butler 
Song Book, '25; French, Opera and 
Dramatic Clubs; "Miss Somebody Else"; 
"Fairview Revue"; Director Glee Club, 
'24, '25; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A.; 
Mu Phi Epsilon. 

Pectol, Rvth Spencer 

Pi Beta Phi; W. A. A.; Intramural 
Basketball; Woman's League; Y. W. 
C. A.; Oxford College, '23, '24. 



PoiNDEXTER, DoROTHV P. I nd ijllilpol ii 

Sigma Delta; Scarf Club; Program 
Committee Y. W\ C. A., '22; W. A. A.; 
Basketball Letter, "22; Captain Junior 
Team ; Woman's League. 



Porter, Herman 
Phi Delta Theta. 



Indianapolis 



Pritchard, Grace Jayne Indianapolis 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Press and French 
Clubs; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 



PiHi., Margaret C. Indianapolis 

Woman's League; Y. W. C. \. 



Raraba, Adele Yvonne Indianapolis 

Spanish Club; Student Teachers" .Asso- 



Pn IS, Rebecca Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta ; Secretary-Treasurer Chimes ; 
Scribblers; Phi Delta Phi; President 
Y. W. C. A., '2 5, '26; Secretary, '24, 
"2 5; Biology', Dramatic and Philosophy 
Clubs; President Classical Club, "24; 
Wcnian"s League. 



Rhichkl, Louis Indianapolis 

Phi Delta Theta; Skulls; German Club; 
Football Letters, "22, "23, '24; B.isket- 
ball; B.aseball. ' 




[6B] 




Reynolds, Alice liidiaiuifoln 

Dramatic, Social Science, Chemistry and Foren- 
sic Clubs i Dcbatinsi Woman's Leasue. 



Richards, Wallace 
Sig 



liid'ia7:afolis 
Chi; Collegian Staff, '2.^i Copyreader, 
■; Varsity Tennis i Fourth Estate and Dra- 
tic Clubs. 



Ridge, Raymond Forrest Indianafolis 
Delta Tau Delta j Sphinx i Fourth Estate i Sports 
Editor Drift, '25; Collegian Staff, '23-'25; 
Press, Pen and Pencil, and Opera Clubs; 
"Pirates of Penzance"; "Falrview Revue"; 
Committee of 125. 



Riley, Winston Indianapolis 

Delta Phi Sigma; .Advertising Manager Drift, 
'24, '25; Collegian Staff, '22-'24; Varsity De- 
bating; Press, Social Science, Forensic, Opera 
and Dramatic Clubs; "Honor Bright"; "Pirates 
of Penzance"; "Fairview Revue"; "Miss 
Somebody Else"; "The Boomerang"; "Ice- 
bound"; Financial Editor Handbook^ '23; In- 
terfraternltv Basketball, Football, Baseball; 
Golf Squad, '25; Y. M. C. \.', Ohio Univers- 
ity, '22; Quadrennial Convention. 



Ror.Y, \'iRc.iL \'. Indianapolis 

Phi Delta Thcta; Sphlii.v; Business Man.iger 
Drift, '25; President Philokurian, '24, '25; 
(lolf Team Manager, '25; Interf rateniity Foot- 
ball and Baseball. 



Rock, Dorcas Greenfield 

Kappa Alpha Theta ; Vice-President Philo- 
kurian, '24, '25; Secretary Y. W. C. .-X. Cabi- 
net, '25; Alternate Varsity Debating Team, 
'24; Press, Forensic and i?iology Clubs; W. 
A. A.; Woman's League. 



Rockwell, Georcian.j 



Indianapoli. 



Alpha Chi Omega; Student Industrial Council; 
Chairman Y. W. C. A, Library Committee, '25, 
Student Budget Committee, '2 5; Opera Club, 
Woman's League. 



Rodecker, Sarah Phelps Indianafolis 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Press, Home Economics, 
Biologv and Dramatic Clubs; "Miss Somebody 
Else""; Intramural B.isketball ; Woman's Le.igue; 
Y. W. C. A. 



RiNEiiARr, Dorothy Louise Indianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; French, Opera and 
Glee Clubs; "Pirates of Penz.nice"; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



Rohm, John T. Indianapolis 

Delta Phi Sigma; Biology and Math Clubs; 
Interf raternitv Basketball; Y. M. C. A. 




[69] 




RuNDELL, Mary Louise Indianapolis 

Delta Zeta; Pan-Hellenic; Chemistry 
and French Clubs; W. A. A.; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



RuTurRioRD, AisTiN D. I nii lanapol i. 

Delta Phi Sigma. 



Sandkfir, Dorothy huiianafolis 

Sigma Delta; Y. W. C. A. Membership 
Committee, '23; Student Budget Com- 
mittee, '2 5; Opera Club; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



SCHLENDER, Emma I mi iaiiiipolis 

Biology, Botany [ournal and Classical 
Clubs; Botany Assistant, '24, '25; W. 
A. A.; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 



ScnfT.7, Edna bulianapolis 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
'25; Social Service Committee, '24; 
Social Science Club; Woman's League. 



ScHWENK, Glen juanita Indianapolis 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Scarf Club; Art 
Staff Drift, '24; Y. W. C. A.; Publicity 
Committee, '24; Dramatic Club; Stu- 
dent Budget Committee, '25; W. A. A.; 
Woman's League. 



Sells, .Allen M. Indianapolis 

Lambda Chi .Alpha; Collegian Staff, 
'2.3, '24; ChemistrN' and Biolog-i Clubs; 
Y. M. C. A. 



Sieloff, Helena R. Indianapolis 

Pi Beta Phi; May Queen, '2 5; Biology, 
Spanish and Dramatic Clubs; "The 
Whole Town's Talking"; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



SissoN, Frank T. 
Tau Kappa Tau. 



Indianapolis 



Smith, I\tn Indianapoli. 

Butler .Association; 'V'. ^L C. .A. 




['°] 




Smiih, Lillu; F. 
Alph.T Delt.i Pi) Phi 
Biology Clubs i \V. , 



Ruihz'ille 



y. w. c. A. 



Smith, Thomas Franki.ik InilianafoHs 
Lambda Chi Alpha; EJitor-in-Chicf Drift, '25; 
President Sphinx; President Fourth Estate; 
Drift Staff, '24; Associate Editor Collegian, 
'24; Sports Editor, '23; President Press Club, 
'23, '24; Debating; Forensic, Dramatic, Math 
and Pen and Pencil Clubs; Board of Directors 
Men's Union, '23, '24; Booster Club, '23, '24; 
Committee of 125; Homecoming Committee, 
'24; Chairman Junior Prom; Cheer Lender; 
Interfratcrnitv Football and Baseball. 



Stahi., Edgar Iniiiauapolis 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Interf raternity Basketball, 
Football and Baseball; Social Science Club. 



Steinmetz, Louis J. Indianafo'is 

Lambda Chi Alpha; John Herron Art Institute. 



Stemiiii, Clarence T horntoziu 

Delta Phi Sigma; Interf raternity Council; 
Drift Staff, '24, Spanish and Social Science 
Clubs, Student Budget Committee, '25; Inter- 
tl ,'e.nit; RlvbiM 



Stephenson, Dorothy .\. hn/'uuuipoHi 
Delta Delta Delta; Chimes; Vice-President 
Scribblers, '24; President, '23; Secretary Phi 
Delta Phi, '23, '24; Woman's Sports Editor 
Drift, '25; Collegian Staff, '23-'25; Y. W. 
C. .A. Cabinet, '24; Woman's League Publicity 
Chairman, '24, '25; Poetry, Press and Opera 
Clubs; Committee of 125; President W. A. A., 
'24, '25; Varsity Basketball, '23-'25; Volley- 
ball; Tennis. 

SiEVENS, Helen Louise liidianafol'u 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Woman's League Hand- 
book Committee, '24; Pen and Pencil, Biology, 
Home Economics and Forensic Clubs; Secre- 
t.iry Ex-Tech Club, '25; W. A. A.; Intra- 
mural Basketball; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 

Storer, Horace Elbert liiiiianapolis 
Sigma Chi; President Tau Kappa Alpha; Skulls; 
Associate Editor Collegian, '24; Extemporaneous 
Speech Contest Winner, '24; Collegian Staff, 
'23-'25; Varsity Debating; President Forensic 
Club, '24; Dramatic Club; "Honor Bright", 
'23 ; Stage Manager "Cappy Ricks" and "Whole 
Town's Talking". 

Strole, Gerald W. KeiitLvid 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Footb.ill Letters, '22, '23, 
'24; Basketball Letter, '25; Baseball. 

Tacoma, Marie L. Indiatuifolis 

Zeta Tau Alpha; President W. A, A., '25, '26; 
World Fellowship Committee Y. W. C. A., '2 5; 
French and Spanish Clubs; Woman's League; 
Junior Team; Intramural Basketball and Vol- 
ifvball. 




[''] 




Thompson, Grace Agnes Rockville 

Campus and Classical Cluhs; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. 



Thompson, Juamta Ind'ianafolis 

Pen and Pencil and Spanish Clubs; 
Woman's League. 



Thomson, Jack A. 
Sigma Chi. 



In/iianapolis 



Thokp, A\-anelle Indijiutfol. 

Kappa .Alpha Thcta; Drift Staff, '2 5 
^'ice-President Spanish Club, '24, '2 5 
W. A. A.; Woman's League; Y. W, 
C. A. 



TuLLV, WiLMA Indianafol'u 

Alpha Delta Theta; Phi Delta Phi. 

L'l.RicH, Irma Elizabeth Iniianafol'n 
K.appa Kappa Gamma; President Chimes, 
'2+, '25; .Associate Editor Drift, '25; 
Drift Staff, '24; Society Editor Col- 
legian, '23, '24; Matinee Talks Com- 
mittee Woman's League, '23, '24, Mem- 
bership Committee Y. W. C. .A., '23, 
'24; Secretary-Treasurer German Club, 
'24; Dramatic Club; "Miss Somebodv 
Else". 

Waters, Margaret Rr fh Indianafolii 
Delta Delta Delta; Secretary Dramatic 
Club, '24, '2 5; Secretary Press Club, 
'24; \'ice-President Forensic Club, 23; 
Spanish, Opera and Poetry Clubs; "Miss 
Somebody Else"; "The Piper"; W. A. 
.A.; Intramural \'olle\ball; Woman's 
League; Y. W. C. A. ' 



Trov, Edward A. Iiidijiuipolis 

Tau Kappa Tau; President Math Club, 
'24, '2 5; Dramatic Club. 



Wheat, W. Herman 
Y. M. C. A. 



WnrrK, ^'oenki: M. 
Sigma Chi. 



Beech Grove 



hidijujpolis 




['=] 




VVniTHAM, LoRENK 1 II dldlUfoll i 

Kappa Alpha ThcCa; Scarf, Glee and 
Dramatic Clubs; "Miss Somebody Else"; 
Hospitality Committee Woman's League, 
'24, '25; May Day Breakfast Commit- 
tee, '2 5; Program Chairman Y. W. C. 
A., '24; Social Chairman, '25, '26. 



Wilson, Jeanne Elizabeth hidiaiiafolu 
Sigma Delta; Scarf, Dramatic and Ger- 
man Clubs; Student Budget Commit- 
tee, '25; Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. 



Wilson, Lewis Indij/upolii 

Delta Tau Delta; Tau Kappa Alpha; 
Varsity Debating, '24, '25; Philokurian; 
Forensic and Commerce Clubs. 



WiKiD, Iap.e/, Hai.l liid'ijihiporn 

Sigma Chi; Editor-in-Chief Collegian, 
'24, '25; Associate Editor, '2.5, '24; 
Fourth Estate; Press and Dramatic Clubs. 



Wi)()ijLiN<„ Ho.MiK E. LogjHiport 

Delta Tau Delta; Skulls; ^L^th Club; 
Football Letters, '2.5, '24; B.isketball; 
Baseball. 



Wrk^ht, Beiiy ItiJiitiijpolii 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Dennison Col- 
lege, '2.5, '24. 



Winter, Mary Lester hidijiiaprAii 

Delta Delta Delta; Philokurian; Y. W. 
C. .A. Cabinet, '25, '26; President 
Classical Club; Chemistry Club; 
Woman's League. 



Wolfe, Robert Llther Iiidian.ipoli. 

Y. M. C. A.; Butler Band, '22. 



"York, Joe William hidianapotii 

Sigma Chi; Commerce Club. 



Voi'NC, .Alice Templer liidianapolh 

Sigma Delta; Pan-Hellenic; Scarf, Biol- 
og}-, French, Opera and Dramatic 
Clubs; Program Chairman Y. W. C. .A., 
'22; Committee f-f 29; Woman's League. 




[^^] 



To stand icit/i ii smile upon your 
face against a stake from nv/i'ich you 
cannot get away — t/iat^ no Joi/bt, is 
heroic. But t/ie true g/ory is resig- 
nation to t/ie inevitable. To stand 
unc/iained., with perfect liberty to 
go away^ held only by t/ie higher 
claims of duty^ and let the fire creep 
up to the heart — this is Jieroism. 

F. ir. ROBERTSON 




Sophomores 





ROBtRI WAKEFIELD, PRES 



EDYTHE HUl-.CARD, \K'E-PRE5. 



Sophomores Discard 



tlu-i 



IN the fall of 1924, our Freshmen of last year, having completely outgr. 
habits, returned and began their second year at Butler. 

Robert Wakefield was elected the gavel-wielder of the class to succeed Doughi 
tioned in the same capacity during the Freshman year. Edythe Hubbard was chosen vi 
Currie, secretary, and Joel Wilmoth, treasurer. The last three offices were competenth 
preceding year by Suzanne Kolhoff, Virginia Foxworthy and Robert Hutchinson, respecti 
The next big event staged by the Class of '27 was in joint collaboration with th 
whom the Sophs ignominiously walloped in the annual inter-class scrap, held on Irwin 
part of November. The victory served greatly in the recovery of the second-year folks' 
they lost last year by their defeat at the hands of the Class of '26. The protection of c 
occasion for the annual egg-throwing encounter, and tattered 
id bloody noses were evidences of heroic participation. 



dant 


: toggery 


and 


Dal 
?-pn 
fiUe 


le, who f 
ssidentj 
■d during 


lane 
the 


ield 
self. 


nder-clas! 
in the 1 
■respect \\ 
:olors, ho 


atter 
hich 
isted 



aloft the flagpole, was the 
el, dishevelled hai 




[76] 





JANE CURRIE, SEC V 



JOEL W 11, Moth, TREA 



Verdant To g- gcrv 



st> 



The Twenty-Sevens impressed their 1 elK.« -cl.issm.ites im.st eniph.itic.illy this ye.ir by their athletic 
.ibillty, making a substantial contribution to the success of the football team in the persons of Vincent 
C:.nfield, Francis Fletcher, Melvin Puctt and Ralph Hitch. The class president, Bob Wakefield, and 
Clarence Christopher did their share in representing the Sophs on the varsitv basketball squad. Thcv 
ar? a classy pair of forwards. Hermon Phillips has made some splendid track 'records. 

In the less vigorous activities, the Sophomores have contributed their share of participation. In both 
"The Whole Town's Talking" and "Icebound", many of the leading roles were portrayed by second-year 
folks, and the Sophomore debating and oratorical talents have also been outstanding during the last 
school year. Eight Sophomore girls received just recognition for participation in worthy student activities 
and for splendid college spirit, when they were pledged to tlie Junior honorary, Chimes, at the annual 
Gridiron Banquet, held at the Indianapolis Athletic Club on April 6, 1925. The pledges are Lucy 
Ashjlan, Dorothy Avels, Julia Bretzmann, Jeanne Bouslog, Kathryn Eowly, Edith Corva, Dorothy 
Carroll and Dorothy Kemp. 




["] 



/ consider a liuniau soul liutJiont 
education like marble in a quarry^ 
ic/iic/i s/ioics none of its inherent 
beauties until the skill of the pol- 
isher sketches out the colors^ makes 
t/ie surface shine ^ and di s cover s 
ever\i ornamental cloudy ^P^-'U '"^'^ 
vein that runs tlirougJiout the body 

of it. 

ADDISOX 




Freshmen 





O. K. MCKITTRICK, PRES. 



FRANCES PETERS, VICE-PRES. 



Freshmen Get Into 



EX'rERING iiutlcr with the distinction of being the h.rgest chiss in the history of the University, the 
Freshmen immediately settled down to work and to show the other classes that iiuality is sometimes 
parallel to quantity. On October 10, the class met for the first time and elected O. K. McKittrick, 
president; Frances Peters, vice-president j Bertha Green, secretary, and James Carvin, treasurer. 

A large number of men reported for football under Coach Hinkle. Although they lost two games 
bv close scores, they were an asset to the members of the varsity and gave them much competition in practice 
prior to the big games. Eighteen were awarded numerals. They included McLaughlin, captain, Thaung, 
Holcomb, Garrett, Bell, Green, Collyer, Casey, Franklin, Ball, Wcnrick, Cecil, Summers, Wood, Cottrell, 
Johnt-on, Leichty and Meek. 

After the close of the football season, the Frosh army reported to Pat for the annual scrap. The 
Sophs were outnumbered by more men than the Confederates in 1851. However, the "Clipping" class 
took advantage of strategy and won by a narrow margin. Horatius at the bridge would not have had a 
chance in this battle in vvhich scores of discarded eggs struck Frosh faces with unpleasant sounds. 




[eo] 





DERTHA cRLhN, stL i 



JAMLS CAR\1N, TREAS. 



Many Activities 

The Sophomores .ilso won the football fr.inies but lost both the ej .md c.ied tuj:-of-«ar con 

In all forms of athletics, the Green Caps have participated during the past year. T« 
including Captain Chadd, Bell, Collyer, Jackman, Collier, Zell, Tudor, Thornton, Meek, Eckstein 
and Hok, were awarded basketball numerals. Quite a few went out for track and baseball and n 

In activities, the first year students took much interest. Margaret Jenkins won the oratoric 
Robert Finney was the only Freshman to make Tau Kappa Alpha, national honorary debating 
Adiian Pierce, Phyllis Nordstrom, Margaret Jenkins and Elmo Richey took important parts i 
club plays, and more than a score of other p'rcshmen were in the various casts; Louise E. R 
Stheleen and Pauhvirth Waldo reported on the Collegian; Finney was Freshman Assistant on 
staff, and O. K. McKittrick was in charge of a successful Freshman dance, April 17, to raise 
the endowment drive. 

When Butler moves to Fairview, the Class of 192S will doubtless look back and sav the 
Yesterday was a grand old school after all. 



Summers 
,adc good. 
1 contest; 
fraternity; 
1 dramatic 
iss, Joseph 
the Drift 
money for 




[e,] 



\V /lilt ever you arc by nature^ keep 
to 'it; never desert \<otir line of tal- 
ent. Be ic/iat nature intended \ou 
for^ and you ic'ill succeed ; he anv- 
t/iing else, and you -icill be ten thou- 
sand tunes it'orse than nothini. 



SYDXEY SMITH 




Butler — Past^ Present and Future 




NORIHWE? TERN' CHRISTIAN VN]\'FRflTY 

History of Butler University 

MOKY, th:in three score and ten years ago, in the \e.ir 184-1, representatives of the 
Christian Church of Indiana, realizing the meagerness of the state's educational 
facilities, met and proposed the establishment of an institution of learning for the 
Middle West. However, no definite action was taken until 18+8, at a meeting in Flat 
Rock. The Presbvterians had already founded Hanover and Wabash; the Methodists, 
DePauw, and the Baptists, Franklin. The Christian brotherhood, therefore, took a thor- 
ough canvass of the churches during the following year and found that the majoritv were 
wholeheartedly interested in the new plan. At the Indiana convention of the Disciples ot 
Christ in 184-9, the following resolution was passed: "That a Northwestern Christian 
University be founded at Indianapolis as soon as a sufficient amount ol funds can be raised 
to commence it, and that a committee of seven be appointed at this meeting to take the pre- 
liminary steps in reference to the founding and endowing of such an institution." 

Foremost among the men who supported the educational movement was Ovid Butler, 
a \cry prominent citizen of Indianapolis, who devotedh' served the cause of education the 
greater part of his life. As chairman of the committee of seven, he drew up the charter 
that was granted by the Indiana Legislature to Northwestern Christian University, January 
15, 1850. The following excerpt is evidence that it is one of the most liberal, pious and 
charitable charters ever granted in the Hoosicr state: 

"To found and maintain an institution of learning of the highest class, for the edu- 
cation of the youth of all parts of the United States; to establish in said institution depart- 
ments or colleges for the instructing of the students in every branch of liberal and profes- 
sional education; to educate and prepare suitable teachers for the common schools ot the 
country; to teach and inculcate the Christian faith and Christian morality, as taught in the 
sacred scriptures, discarding as uninspired and without authority all writings, formulas, 
creeds and articles of faith subsequent thereto; and to promote the sciences and arts." 

During the following two years the committee was occupied with its assigned task of 
raising funds for the endowment of the proposed University A campaign to raise $75,000 
by the sale of stock was inaugurated in March, 1850, by F.lder (ohn O'Kanc. .According 
1(1 the July, 1S^1 is<ue of the "Christian Record," a monthly publication of the Christian 
Church, :f2v000 worth of ^tock was sold within ^ix months. 



[e.] 




PRESENT ADMINISTRATION BITI.DING 



the 


amount 


sue 


-CSS per- 


But 


cr gave 


Ave 


lue and 



The editor further explained that "Brother O'Kane has not yet visited one-tenth of 
the congregations and brethren in the state oi Indiana and has not, we believe, been out 
of the state at all. The brethren everywhere see the propriety and even the necessity of 
such an institution and are only waiting to be called on to take the stock. The brethren 
in our sister states of Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and perhaps Kentucky will 
unite with us in building up an institution of learning of the highest order. The point 
chosen for its location is very favorable. Indianapolis is emphatically the Cit\ of Railroads 
?nd, of course, eas\' of access to the whole country. Bv the time that the institution gets into 
operation we shall have some six or eight railroads running into the city .md two or three 
plank roads." 

Bv June 22, 1852, the agent secured subscriptions for the entire $75,0011 
required by the charter before a board of directors could he organized. Thi 
mitted the committee to consider a campus site and building plans. Ovid 
twenty-five acres of wooded land, near the edge of Indianapolis, at College 
Thirteenth Street. The building contracts were let in July, 1853. William Tinsley, an 
architect from Cincinnati, Ohio, drew up plans for a Gothic structure, three stories in 
height, with an east and west wing, but the west wing was the only part that was built. 

November 1, 185 5, Northwestern Christian University opened. This was a great 
day for Indianapolis and for all the member* of the Christian Church, whose diligent 
labors had made possible better educational facilities for Hoosier settlers. Exercises were 
held in the new chapel in the atternoon and at thi; Masonic Temple in the evening to 
accommodate the many interested citizens and distinguished guests. 

The beginning of instruction 'was deeply significant, for it meant the opening of a 
university in the great Middle West that admitted men and women of all races. North- 
western's liberal principles were far in advance of those of contemporary schools. Women 
students were received on the same basis as men; all religious denominations were wel- 
comed, and all students were permitted to elect their own courses. The last was an inno- 
vation, attempted previously only at Brown and Bethan^'. 

One hundred and thirteen enrolled the first year under a faculty of five members, 
consisting of John Young, president and professor of natural sciences and law; .Allen R. 
Benton, professor ot ancient languages and literature; George W. Hoss, professor of mathe- 
matics and civil engineering; fames R. Challen, professor of English, and Love H. Jameson, 



[85] 




MJMIMfTRAIION AND SCIKNCE BUILDINGS 



jn assistant professor. All of these were learned teachers, capable of inspiring their stu- 
dents with high ideals of living. They gave graduating exercises for only three the first 
lear. The late Nancv Burns .Atkinson was the first woman to finish and one of the first 
women in the United States to receive a B. S. degree. 

Regarding women students, the faculty experienced considerable diificulty in handling 
situations and deciding questions. Regulations were passed that required young ladies, 
during recitation hours, to be under the immediate care of the lady professor and to meet 
men students onlv in the recitation rooms. Degrees offered to women are described in 
one of the earlv catalogues as the "mistress of science degree" and the "degree of mistress 
of art." The former was conferred upon the ccmpletion of a required three-year woman's 
collegiate course, and the latter was given upon the completion of a regular tour-year 
man's collegiate course. 

In the verv earliest vears of the University, the students had little to occupy their 
lime besides scholastic pursuits. There were no athletic contests, student activities and 
fraternities. Northwestern in those days wa< a place for only those who wished to get a 
college education. 

However, the routine ot the school was broken up somewhat in 1861. One hundred 
and eightv-four Northwestern students enlisted in the service of their country after Fort 
Sumter was fired upon. .Academic work was carried on with great difficulty. Camp 
Morton was located so near the campus that fifes and drums could be heard as the soldiers 
in blue marched hv. In 1X6.^, the attendance decreased to fifty students and one graduate, 
nnd disabled soldiers were given free tuition. 

It was not long after the war, howe\er, before the University became firmly estab- 
lished again. In 1X70, the facult\- numbered twenty and the student body, .H5. The 
development of the school was made possible at this time by the endowment of several 
academic chairs. The first was the Demia Butler chair of English Literature, endowed 
by Ovid Butler, in memory of his daughter who was the first woman to graduate from 
the full classical course of' Northwestern. This marked the establishment of the first 
English department in an Indiana college. It was headed by Miss Catharine Merrill, a 
teacher of rare abilit\- and influence, who was the second woman to hold a position on a 
faculty of an .American college. Dean Eveh n Butler, granddaughter of the donor, holds 
this professorship at the present time. Other additions included: the Law School in 



[B6] 




BONA •I'HO\IP'-l)\ I II r XK'l 

1S70, the [ereni^' Anderson chair in Greek Language and Literature, the Armstrong chair 
of Germanic Language?, the Reeves chair of Biblical Literature and the Catharine Merrill 
chair of English Literature. 

hi 1873, the Board of Directors decided to change the location of the Lhiiversity to 
Irvington. This decision grew out of the fact that the school was greatly handicapped by 
an insufficiencv of funds and that the College Avenue site could be sold for a good price. 
Construction began the following vear on the Administration Building which was com- 
pleted in 1875. Listruction began immediately although the dormitory, observatory, power 
house and gvm were not completed until later. At the formal opening, September 15, 
between 5 00 and 600 citizens attended the chapel exercises, perhaps in response to the 
I'ollowing letter which was sent out bv President Burgess for publication in the In/t'uui- 
jpolii ]oun!iil : 
"To the Editor of the Jourih^l: 

10 A. M. Rev. Lsaac Errett of Connersville will deliver the address. A basket 
dinner will be served on the grounds, and it is hoped that friends of the L^niversity will 
provide bountifulh for the occasion and that none ma} suffer hunger. .A train will leave 
the Union Station at 9;10 .A. \L, the round trip being only 25 cents. .At Irvington, those 
having baskets will be met at the depot with conveyances for the same, which will be 
safeh' deposed in the building until needed." 

The name. Northwestern Christian University, w'as changed in 1877 to Butler, in 
recognition of Ovid Butler, who, in addition to giving the school the largest subscription 
and the College Avenue site, served as president of the Board of Directors for twenty years. 
He was neither in favor of changing the name nor the location, but his disappointments 
did not alter his allegiance to the school he founded. His birthd.ay, February 7, was cele- 
brated as Founder's Day for the first time in 1882. 

.As to student actiiities, literari- societies w'ere the first to creep into the strictl\- academic 
life of Northwestern and Butler. Their purpose was to study the arts of conversation, 
debating and oratory. The Mathesian and Pythonian Literary Societies were both estab- 
lished during the first session of Northwestern; the .Athenian Society, in 1867, for women 
students onlv; Philokurian Literary Society, in 1869, for ministerial students, and the Demia 
Butler Literary Society, in 1881. They first met in a professor's lecture room or in a private 
home but later secured their own quarters at school where the\' collected libraries. The 



[87] 



" II H ^- 



-- '""''i^::^^^''^'-- . ag;^^~ 




I i 



.|S 



J. * 



1 II' II " ' 



».!« 




GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE FEATURES PLANS FOR ILIIRI |;L1I,1,R 



decreasing interest in literary societies proved fatal tu all except the Philokurian, the onh' 
survivor of the fi\"e. 

The Y. M. C. A., which began its existence at Butler in 1887, rapidly developed into 
an organization of wide intiuence, due to the general interest in Biblical studies. Several 
years later, in 189(1, its sister organization, the Y. W. C. A., followed. 

The advent of national fraternities on the Butler campus also illustrates another aspect 
of the develcpnient of the school. Phi Delta Theta, the first fraternitv to enter the school, 
was established as early as October 22, 1859. The installation of Indiana Gamma was 
significant because it was the third Phi Delt Chapter in Indiana and the seventh in the 
United States. Rho Chapter of Sigma Chi was established si.\ years later, in the spring 
of 1865. Delta Tau Delta came in 1878 and Kappa Sigma, February 17, 1891^. 
Kappa Alpha Theta entered the fraternity ranks in 1874; Kappa Kappa Gamma, in 1878, and 
Pi Beta Phi, in 1897. Although fraternity life was not given 
the prominence which it claims today, still the establishment ot 
these organizations on the campus, no doubt, effected a consider- 
able change in college life. 

The historv of the Butler Colleguii dates back to |anuary, 
1886. According to an early Drift, "it was the outgrowth of 
,1 desire among the students to be represented in that field ot 
amateur literature, somewhat circumscribed, but nevertheless, 
full of spirit and enthusiasm, known as college journalism." 
The staff, composed of two representatives from each of the 
five fraternities, published a monthly magazine of much literar\ 
content. Its narrow proportions soon expanded into a twenty- 
tour-pagc magazine that contained as much school news as would 
be of interest to the outside world, t)gether with prize ess.i}s 
and orations of the classroom. When Butler became affiliated 
with the Medical, Dental and Law Schools, in 1896, the Cnl- 
le^^hvi changed from a monthh' to a weekly. Copy for the new 
paper, the V ii'iveis'its Brief, was contributed hy a staff from 
each of the four schools. 

The fir^t Butler Drifi appeared in 1891. The enterprise 
\va> undert.iken bv the frateniitie--, who formed a "Board of 




[Be] 



\ 



■ W 



frvit 






-r 







^K1 llll l!l' m:u" commkrcl r,L'ii.i)i> 



Editors". It was a quaint book of about 100 pages. The aim and number of courses, pains- 
takingly described by the head professor in each of the departments, the crude artwork and 
the old-fashioned photogravures of the facultv and the few fraternities composed the con- 
tent of the book. The Senior Class later undertook its publication. However, since 1909, 
the responsibility has rested with the Junior Class. An interestmg collection ot these early 
Drifts can be found in the Bona Thompson Library. 

In 1896, Butler University became one of the four schools of the Uni\"ersity ot Indian- 
apolis, by virtue of its affiliation with the Medical, Law and Dental Schools of this city, 
and the Board of Directors adopted the name, "Butler College", rather than "University", 
to designate the undergraduate department of liberal arts and sciences. The consolidation, 
which was effected to further the interests of higher education, w-as quite practical, since 
the students from the four schools united in all school enterprises. The organization dis- 
banded in 1905. 

Athletics have had an equally long and interesting history 
as these other activities. Football, especially, has been in the 
swing since 18S5, when Butler won the state championship for 
the first time. It was largelv through Butler's efforts that foot- 
ball gained and maintained its great success in Indiana. In the 
autumn of 1887, the Indianapolis Athletic Association formed a 
football le.ague, consisting of Indiana, Wabash, Hanover, Frank- 
lin and Butler. Baseball did not receive the enthusiasm that 
football did until later years, even though a state league was 
formed. Tennis attracted some attention. Doubles and single-; 
were annually played off b^- the members of the "Racket Club". 
Bicycling enthusiasts also organized a club for both men and 
women in 1891. Basketball was later included in Butler's field 
of sports, but the schedules were much more lenient than today's, 
just as their oufits were more cumbersome than those of the 
modern thinlv-clads. 

Butler was first represented in the Oratorical Contest of 
Indiana in 1875, fiftv years ago, by Samuel J. Tomlinson, '75. 
Much prominence was formerly given to oratory and debating, 
and splendid support was given the teams who debated against 







[83] 




fuch schools a; DePauw, Notre Dame, 
Earlham and Wabash. It is interesting 
to know that Tau Kappa Alpha, which 
today is one of the prominent national 
debating honoraries, was founded at 
Butler College in 1908. 

Few Butler students toda^" know that 
their school was formerly affiliated with 
Chicago University. During the sum- 
mer of 1898, the trustees of the two 
institutions entered into an agreement, 
whereby everv student with a B. A. de- 
gree from Butler could receive a B. A. 
degree from Chicago, upon the comple- 
tion of one quarter's additional studv 
there. Final e.\amination questions had 
to be approved bv Chicago offici' '3 before 
the Butler faculty could u^e them. 
Though the College submitted to certain 
other regulations, the affiliation did not 
compromise its independence. The affili- 
ation was dissolved in 1910 bv mutual 
agreement. 

Commencement exercises formerly 

required an entire week, during which 

time Irvington residents entertained guests 

.;t their homes. The ti\e literar}' societies gave intellectual exhibitions. The Baccalaureate 

Sermon came on Sunday, the Alumni Banquet on Thursday, and the commencement exercises 

01? Friday. The Seniors read essays and delivered orations. 

In 1910, the College of Missions was established in Irvington and immediately became 
affiliated with Butler. By special arrangements, the students of one ma\- elect courses in 
the other. 

.After the United States entered the World War, .April 6, 1917, Butler men eagerly 
entered the service of their countr}' for the third time. .At a mass meeting of the men of 
the College, on March 3, a large majority passed a resolution, providing for temporary, 
compulsory and universal military training. In a month, a squad of sevent\' men drilled on 
Irwin Field under Captain Hurt at 6:30 A. M. and at 3:30 P. M. The campus was 
immediatel}' converted into a martial-looking government post by the erection of two 
barracks, a bath house, a mess hall and a canteen. The college curriculum had to be enlarged 
to offer courses necessary for the 264 soldier-students, as well as the regular students. 
During the %ears 1918 and 1919, the College continued as best it could, though the attend- 



made up largely of women and underclassmen, 
nished and regulated a hospital, and the Y. W. C. .A. 
remembered every Butler student in service at Christ- 
mas, 1917. The fraternities, besides doing Red Cross 
work, bought bonds and adopted French or Belgium 
war orphans. More than 800 Butler men served their 
country during the world conflict and learned invalu- 
able lessons of sacrifice and of de\()tion to Aulx. 
Memorial services were held on December 14, 1919, 
in honor of the sixteen who did not return. 

The years of readiustment, following the war, 
ha\e Hcn an almost phenomenal development in Butler 
College \vhich is celebrating the seventieth anniversar\' 
of Us founding this year. The enrollment of the 
H hool has increased almost six time- in the last decade. 



But' 



er women 



impro\iscd, fur- 




[.o] 



i,!,i 



S?^^ 



and today the Freshman Class outnum- ■ ■■" 

bcrs the entire enrollment ot ten ^cars 

ago. The registration in 1914-1915 

records 266 students. B\' a consistent 

and gradual increase in attendance, the 

enrolhnent of 1924-192 5 is 1478, 72 5 

ot whom arc men and 753 are women. 

Dr. Robert Judson .Ale'i' now heads [1 

a faculty of sl.\ty-onc members, which § 

number, when comp.ared with the first ( 

facult}' group of five and the group of , 

thirty-three in 1918, illustrates the cred- ', .* 

itable progress of the school. This increase ' , ' 

has necessarily taken place simultaneously ^^fe^ I 

with the enlargement and addition of '7^ 4l ' 

college departments. The courses ot ,' 

stud:", including all subjects leading t;) "' ' ' i , J 

the degrees of B. A., B." S., M. .A.,\ind > ' \ 

M. S., are included in twenty depart- i ' hf '■■ 

ments and 210 courses. In an attempt £ 1 

to meet the varied and insistent demands - _,__ 

of the community and state, Butler has ~^^S 

especially increased its courses in Business jlmiia, wj,,iW.-j. 

.Administration, Home Economics, Soci- i„pi '.^ *'^«,i '^"— 

ology. Journalism, Education and Relig- 
ion. In the fall of 1924, the Metropoli- 
tan School of Music and Fine .Arts and the John Herron .Art Institute affiliated with Butler. 

The few student activities of the old Northwestern University have increased as rapidly 
as the enrollment, especially in the past few years. Honorary and departmental organiza- 
tions and fraternities hold the attention of the students in all phases of campus life. In 
athletics, Butler has made remarkable progress. Pat Page has built up an athletic m.achine 
that has caused the name of Butler to be flashed frcni coast to coast. 

However, for several lears, the equipment at Irvington has been overta.xed. Conse- 
quently, the Board of Directors purchased 246 acres at Fairview in the spring of 1923, at 
a cost of $200,000 and launched an endowment campaign to raise $1,500,000. It could 
not have chosen a more ideal site than Fairview with its rolling, wooded ground, extending 
from Sunset Boule\"ard to the Canal and White River, and from Fort}'-second to Fifty- 
fourth Streets. 

The outstanding events in the dri\-e for a better and bigger Butler, during the last 
twelve months, have included reaching the endowment fund goal, increasing the building 
tund, completing payment for the new site, adoption of architectural plans for the future 
plant and the enlistment generalh' ot support lor the institution. 

Under the direction of John W. .Atherton, finan- 
cial secretary of Butler, the campaign has gone 
ahead steadily and with gratifying results. The present 
endowment is $1,073,000, an over-subscription of the 
original amount sought. One of the not.able things 
connected with the building fund was the start, early 
this year, to raise $1,000,000 before December 3 1', 
1925, this sura to be used in erecting buildings. Wil- 
liam G. Irwin and his sister, Mrs. Z. T. Sweeney, of 
Columbus, pledged $300,000 to this fund, providing 
the remaining $700,000 is raised. Several substantial 
pledges have been announced since then, .md Mr. 
.Atherton is confident the million will be in hind when 
the :-ear ends. 




[B,] 



Full payment has been made for the Fairview Park site and the mortgage was burned 
with appropriate ceremonies. 

Robert Frost Daggett, architect for the new buildings, has worked out pleasing plans 
in the collegiate Gothic style. His tentative program was accepted by the College authori- 
ties. Work on the drawings, plans and specifications is now being pushed, so that thev ma^' 
be submitted to contractors for bids on actual construction. 

The Butler Board has set aside ground at the south side of the campus for fraternity and 
sorority buildings. The sale of lots to the campus organizations is now in progress. Certain 
restrictions will govern the expense of construction in order to eliminate extravagance and 
make the homes of equal value. Priority in the selection of lots for fraternities, sororities 
and other organizations is based on the date of their establishment at Butler. 

The building committee has been at work grading the campus and arranging the pre- 
liminary program of beautification, preparatory to the beginning of actual building opera- 
tions. In this connection, the city administration has given hearty and enthusiastic co-opera- 
tion. It has promised to build a boulevard that will encircle the entire campus and to 
widen the streets approaching the college grounds. 

In every department connected with the work of moving Butler trom Irvington to 
the new Fairview site, satisfactory progress has been made. The task is one that cannot 
be ccmpleted overnight. The authorities realize that they are building for a century or 
more in the future, and the foundation they lav will provide the basis on which the cultural 
future of the communitv will rest. 



ie"^s4^^^rs« 



[s.] 




Activities 




Bulldogs Trail 





After Receiving Diploiiiiis 



P.irt'nipjnts in 
''Class Z)JV" 




Listeiihii^ to Hji <\i/iiiirc\ite Sennoii 




'Piper'' Cjit 




AIhvdu Siiffei 



Butler^s mere handful of 
track stars, outnumbered bs 
Notre Dame, gained individual 
honors in the Indiana Inter- 
collegiate Track and Field 
Meet, held at South Bend, Max 
24, 1924, and took second 
place zvith 45 points. Notre 
Dame a-as first zcith ii-'-t 
points. 




They^re o^ 







Caplain-decC Gray is about to break the tape in third place at 
'the end of 100-yard dasA. 



/ t^^kx 



^«sHjiiaasii£ *) 



A ig easily clears the bar i'^r j nice lump. 





"^^ 



Cajlain (iriggs, high point man of meet, covers 120-yard 
high hurdles in -.15 2 , 5. 



Northa?/! makes a long leap in the bn/ad iiimp. 



hi 1921 , Butler scoreil b point > }ii ihe stjte 

meet; in 1922, 19; hi 192.^, 3S and 

III 192-1, -15. 




Si/\iier on the strai^litjzcay 



Piit sizes up Cartier Field. 




S/\u/fl Quill gii'ule,! the n-nzcdi over the grniiiids hefore the •i.ime. 




Josephiiit () 
borne, AutLo 
Direr I or I 
Pageant 



Clarire Heaiirirk, zvith her tZL-entx-foiir Ladies of the Court, rez'eals her id en tit \ 
as Oiieen. 



October 




Sp-'iiig Flo:i 



ZereliLi Riiinuh, 

Spirit of ALiy ^J'i/i,/. 

anil Spirits 





Delhi Tail DfliSs Tooiu-rvilli- Tr',1- 
ley, filoteii l/y Paul Hill, zcoi: ilie 
Sfhhix silver trofhy for tlie best float 
ill the Homecoming -parade, October 
IS, 1924. Thirty decorated floats and 
ISO aiitoinohiles zvere in line. 



Biology Club 




iiig Cijiiiinittee, and }lh Four Parade Marshals 

Morrison Davis, Thomas F. Sinifh, Joe 

Creiiielsparher and Cc-or^c Srlnimafhei 




WM:''^'mM 




Crii^'^s kirks «0dl over the posts after Paul 
rrossed Centei:ary\i goal to tie rouiit. 




Kappa's \]'eliome Inn 



Parade halts on Circle for a pep session. Speakers and yell leaders 
are on English Hotel platform. 




Fros/i 



Treihman ami Sophomore Pres'ideiiti 
and the zceapon ■zch'tih spurred the Sophs 
on to z''irtor\ 



Sophs t.:il to srore. Ball is a foot 
irom ooal line. 




A real srrap, Kovenii^e, _'o, ]924 




Soplioi'tores are reads for action 







Btitler celebrated its jurts-lhiiii Foiimler^s Duy, 
Fe/iniary 7, /'» commemoration of the one hundred and 
tzi-enty-thlrd birthday of Ovid Butler. Dr. Charles Hub- 
bard Judd, Dean of tlie School of Education, of the Uni- 
z-ersity of Chicago, zcas the principal ipeaker of the 
morning services held in the chapel. His subject zcas ".4 
Nezc Humanism Suited to the Modern Conditions'". 
Seniors appeared in cap and gozcn on this occasion for the 
first time in their collegiate life. 

The celebration zias concluded by a banquet in the 
Riley Room of the Claypool Hotel. Speeches zcere given 
by Dr. Judd- Dr. Robert J. Aley, Frederick E. Shorte- 
nieier. Secretary of Stale and a Butler graduate; John E. 
Spiegel, President of the Butler Men's Club; Professor 
Elijah N. Johnson, Head of the Mathematics Department, 
and Victor T nitty, Senior representative. 




Regislrjiiol! 
Day 




Chun,-,' w,'W ■',■;; ,;.../;/ .1//j.. <.'.•. Ito'i. 




Miimn't feed ha. 
ket squad. 



1924 Pro?,! King 
and Oiieen 



StuJxiiii;, May.he 



Kdppas have best' 

stunt at Senior 

\nide'Alle. 





The '25 .lia/ior P,oin -.ca> j ^'Pn,,, to Re-uemher. The ronunillfe -cuk 
<'>•!, fjied of Tom Sm'ith, ,/n,h;,uiii , Joe Grenielsfarher, hmbiess „iai,a<-er- Pen 
Wjten ami Lester ISiice-.cdNiter. '"■ 




Toiii'i! C.iipttiin 



WihuihU- P/jx,; 



THE BUTLER COLLEGIAN 



INIHANAI'OLIS. IM), Tl'KSDAV, MAY 19, 11125 



1925 DRIFT TO ENTER NATIONAL ANNUAL CONTEST 



FIRS! Ill COLLEGE IS REPRESENe 



STdia i;!- lllMKTSKKADSl.lhKAMODKKN 

HISTOKV, HUT VAKiKTV IS SPICK OF IIFK 



s,nxM,.sjI)RIFTlSKSl!KST 
„\""^ COVFK MATFKIAI.S 



HfADUlARrfKs IN CHIC\CO 



PRIZE FOR PUZZLE SOLUTION 



M\NY UNUSUAL SECTIONS 



SMMi ^r\iFH)ns 

l>l((,bSTVET DRII'T 





n;,;;;.MS'.,-.r.u:^ 




ROB! SlirS IRE 1025 


TtSEi'. 


ORIEI ISJE8I EVER 


''ifiM;- 


RILEY WORKS HARD ON ADS 


\NM \l IS I'RINTRK 


iS^S^ 


onoiiii\of.vi'w:r ' „'.-;-,-. ,. ...kI 


►;• 





section cnlled the Uni- 

.■■^*stl■^n Cliristian col- 
|..lan,s tur the- new Eut- 

, of Hillon U. Brown. 

■oarJortliri-clurs, Prcsi- 

-uiy nf ihe Butler en- 
.!i E. Collon, aivl Denn 

liiUon tu his phase of 

rmincd by\heir"senro"r- 
Lier faculty. There are 

act.vii.es included for 

Mure. Individual phoLo- 

e officera of the four 



PR4ISL DMFT lll(.IIL\ 
ENGRA\l.\(,CO. HtADS 



I he 1025 Hiitl.r Orili uill ]„■ liy far the (incst 
iiiiiuhI cviT ijsuid :il Butkr Collcf;.'. It is l>cin<; 
print* )l hy 

Barnes Gault <S: Co. 

"The Color Printers oj Indianapolis" 
Cenlui\ Buildiiii' 




S(j/?!c of the truph'ics Pat's iciir- 
nors /nrcr ico/i ui the past five years. 
W'/iat eoulJ he in ore fitti//g than to 
elose the BiiIldo[i, Trail icit/i siieh a 
display '< 




Hono 



varies 




PROF. EMJAH JOH-\SON, PRES 



Thi Kappa Thi 

TWENTY-FOUR Seniors, hftcon percent of the 192 5 class receiving the highest 
grades, were Initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, national honor societv, on Honor Da'V', 
May 7. They are: Ralph Snyder, 93.78; Pearl Soltau, 93.21 ;'Leona M. K.iyley. 
93.13; Floyd Umbenhower, 93.04; Mary Stokes, 92.65; Hester Baker, 92.30; Margaret 
Kluger, 92'.09; Victor Twltty, 91.89; Frank C. Libkings, 89.89; Mildred L. Medlani, 
89.79; Esther F. Adams, 89.66; Mary V. Book, 89.59; Irene L. Seuel, 89.42; Lillian J. 
Martin, 89.37; Forest Caldwell, 89.34; Chester L. Fuchtman, 89.06; Helen Hoover, 
88.73; Anna Pollak, 88.43; Lena F. Weltknecht, 87.96; Mildred Stilz, 87.84; Louise 
Padou, 87.61 ; Ethel Hittle McDanlcl, 87.34; Dema Kennedy, 87.24 and Dals^' F. Schulz, 
87.11. 

The officers are: Professor Elijah Johnson, president; f-'rofessor William L. Rich- 
ardson, vice-president; Miss Emll}' Helming, secretary, and Professor Juna M. Lutz, 
treasurer. 

The fdllowing weix iinnminccd at the Honiecuminjr boniire: 

First Row— Helen Hoover, Frank Lihkings, Hester Baker, Ralph Snyder 

Second Row — Floyd Umbenhower, Leona Kaley, Chester Fuchtman 

Third Ro«— Mary Stokes, Mildred Medlani, Esther Adams, Mary V. Rook 




["■■] 




MARTHA STEELF CORYA, PRES. 

Tlii 'Delta 'Phi 

PHI Dl'lLTA PHI, n.uion.i! honor.iry org.miz.itioii, w.iv in-t.illcJ on the Butler c.impus 
in 1920. The membership is composed of both fr.iternit\- .md non-fratcrnitv 
\vomen who co-operate in the maintenance oi a democratic teeling among Butler 
girls and in the furtherance of school spirit. Two representatives from each of the 
women's Greek letter fraternities and four from the non-fraternity group are selected to 
membership at the end of the Sophomore year, so that there is a Junior and Senior repre- 
sentative in the organization at the same time. 

Phi Delta Phi sponsors in the spring semester the annual Kid Kaper which is attended 
bv all women student' attired in unique juvenile wearing apparel. Only the most youthful 
iorms ot entertainment are indulged in. 



Fir^t Ro«— Doris Smith (Sfcret.iry ), Suf Harmon, Wilm.l Tully, M.irg.i 
t Si. Ill D 1 til Bi u 



Kvigi-iii.i lirouks. 



Stc n I R w — lldtn H 
L II I Sm til lu^.^ Aslii in 



\ irsini.i Curtis, Gl.idys Cdlins 




[,,5] 



?^-=^ 




RERERT BULL, PRES. 

Sphinx 

A GROUP of Butler Greeks, realizing the need of an organization that would pro- 
mote and encourage -worthy activities of Butler and fellowship among the members 
of national fraternities, assembled in 1920 to found the Sphinx Club. The charter 
members were initiated b^^ the ritual of the Wabash Sphinx who in turn had received it 
from the Indiana Chapter. 

Membership into the organization is deemed an honor and is restricted to members 
of national fraternities who have become outstanding in some form of university life. 
Meetings are held semi-monthlv at the chapter houses where campus problems are dis- 
cussed. The ensignia of a member is a gold Sphinx head worn below the fraternity pin, 
and that of a pledge is a black and white ribbon worn in the coat lapel. 



First Ro^^ 



-Thon 



F. Smith (Vi 



■ idem), R:i 



(Secretary), Lc 



He 



(Tn 



George Schumacher, Carter Helton 

Second Row— Paul German, Glenn Duttenha%cr, Jerome Bash, Ted Liebtag, Herbert Hill, Douglas Dale 
Third Row— Paul Hill, loe Gremclspacher, Fremont Snyder, Hughes Vpdegraft, C. Morrison Davis 
Fourth Row— Riewer Gra'ham, Virgil Roby, Cuher Godfrey, Wilbur Curry, Harold Barclay, Scott Ham 
Fifth R"«— Bruce Matlock, Eucene ColHay, Vallnrous McLcay, Eugene Clifford, James Cummins 




[nc I 




-o 



f.l RAI.n WOODS, PHES. 



Skulls 



I 



X the fall of 1920, Coach Harlan O. Page organized the Skull? Cluh to support Butler 
in all branches ot endeavor, to promote all worthy campus projects and to form an 
organized body of men to act as leaders in Butler's activities. 
The Skulls is quite similar to Sphinx in that it chooses men who have pro\en them- 
selves loyal to Butler. However, unlike Sphinx, it does not restrict its membership t i 
members of national Greek letter fraternities. It has done much to promote fellowship 
among the "B" men. 

Meetings are held semi-monthly at fraternity- houses. Members are recognized bv 
a Skull watch charm and black and white knitted caps. Pledges are known b\' a black 
ribbon w'orn in the coat lapel. 



First Row — Robert Nipper (Secretnry-Trensurer), Frank Trust, George Mvilholl.inJ, Fr.i.ik Teague, 

D.-'ve Konold, Carl Bernhardt 

Second Row — Hermon Phillips, Homer Woodling, Robert Blessing, Gordon l',.ul 

Third Row— Louis Reichel, Lawrence Henderson, D:nc Rilsore," Horace Storer. Glenn Grav, Rober'. 

Reach 




^ 



?/ 








[,,7] 




]^w 



KATHARINE I.EN\(1X, PRES. 

Scarlet On ill 

ON]'', of the highe-t honor? for a senior girl to attain is to be elected to membership 
into Scarlet Quill which is restricted to twelve girls who are chosen on the basis 
of scholarship, activities and personality. The organization strives t3 support all 
Butler enterprises, to encourage and recognize high scholastic standards and to assist the 
facult\- in the carr\'ing out of campus traditions. 

The goal of Scarlet Quill, since it:- founding in October, 1921, has been to petition 
Mortar Board, a national organization with the same purposes and membership require- 
ments. Each 1 ear the organization gives a dinner for the Seniors and presents a scholar- 
ship to a Sophcmcre girl who has maintained a high scholastic average. Black felt hats 
bearing a scarlet Quill is the distinctive garb. 



FiRsr Rov\ — Margaret Schoener (\'ice-President), Elizabeth Bertermann (Secretary), 
Lillian Martin (Treasurer), .Amy Beatt\' 

Second Row — i\Tar\- Patia Car\er, Constance Forsi th, Dorothea ^^^rntz, Louise Padou, 




[nsj 



r- 




IKM\ ILKUII, HKi;: 



r/' 



limes 

CHIMES, an honorary society for junior wMiicn, was established April 14, 1924, 
under the auspices of Woman's league. At th.it time eight Sophomores were care- 
fully selected on the basis of personality, co-operation and participation in school 
activities, h'.ight Juniors were chosen as honorary members, and the pledges were "spiked" 
with gold and silver ribbons at a clever Gridiron banquet in the Canteen. Initiation was 
held [une ,^, \vhen the members received gold pendants in the shape ot chimes. 

The purpose of the organization is to introduce Freshman girls to campus life. To 
this end Chimes, aided by Miss Butler, assisted Freshmen on and before matriculation day 
and has sp>onsored several successful piarties lor their benefit. 



FiRsr Row — Sarah Frances Downs (\ice-President), Rebecca Pitts (Secretary-Treas- 
urer), Mary McMeans, Marjorie Chiles, \irginia Curtis, Irene Seuel 

Second Row — Lillian Martin, Amy Beatty, Constance Forsyth 

Third Row — Dorothv Stephenson, Dema Kenned^', Mar\ \ . Book, Dorothea \'arnt7., 
Caroline Godle\\ Florence Carper 




[,,.] 




.-o 



JEANNE BOUSLOC, PRE5 



T//6' Scarf (^luh 

THE Scarf Club is an honorary- organization which was started, December 18, 1921, 
h\ ten girls. One girl from each sororltv and ten unorganized students are chosen 
once a -sear for scholarship and character. The purpose of the organization is to pro- 
mote good fellowship among the Butler coeds. The four officers must be Sophomores. 

Meetings are held every Monday nocn at school, and one supper party is given each 
month at the home of one of the members. .At Thanksgiving and Christmas, baskets ot 
food and tovs are taken to those people who are in need of help. Each semester one enter- 
tainment is given for all Freshman girl^. Miss Nellie Hester and Miss Mary S. McBride 
,'re the sp;:nsors. 

The officers are: feanne Bouslog, president; Dorothy .Avels, vice-president; Martha 
Zoercher, secretary', and lone Agnew, treasurer. 




[,ao] 




Publications 




1^ 

THOMAS F. SMITH, KDITDR-IN-CUI HI' 

. 1925 ^Drift 

STAFF 

First Ro-zi- 

AvAXELi.E Thorp ------- Jioiior Assistant 

HARR^■ T. Ice -------- Jm/ior Assistant 

Caroline Godi.ev ------- Jia/ior Assistant 

Second Rozv 

Frank. C. Atkins -------- Art Editor 

Dorothy Stephentox - - - ll'o/nan's Sports Editor 
l^A^'MOND V. Ridge ------- Sports Editor 











iR\i^ 1 I I RICH, \^s le m I n)n()R 

1925 ^Drift 

STAKF 

First Roz:- 
Pai-l (,. Hii.i, - - - ^ - - Assoriti/t' Art Editor 
D.Aisv I'\ ScHULZ --------- Art Staff 

JUT.IA L. BrETZMAN - - - - - - _ I;-/ .S'/rf/f 

Second Raze 

Robert A. Finnev ----- Fre's/>///iii/ Assistcii/t 

ArsTix JoHXSOX ------ SopJiouiore Assistant 

\'ioi.ET I.. Hexdersox - - - - Sophomore Assistant 

Albert \\'. Bt.oemfcer - - - - Sophomore Assistant 




[,23] 





VIRGII. V. ROl'.Y, BUSINESS MANAGER 

1925 Drift 

STAI<F 

Firs/ Rozi- 
Harold M. Barclay - - - Assistant Business Mgr. 
Albert F. Siegml'xd ------ Busii/fss Staff 

St-coiid Ro-zv 

John Metzger -------- Business Staff 

BiLLiE Mae Kreider ------ Business Staff 

Lester E. Budd -------- Business Staif 




[-1 



r--. — 




WINSTON KI1.11-, A1J\ I R |■|^l^(, MANAGER 



1925 ^Drift 

EDITOR'S NOTE 



T 



O the best of our ability, we members of the staff ha\ e strixcn to 
gi\"e old Butler an annual of which she will be proud. W'c have 
tried to portray the Butler of Toda\', to recall the Butler of ^'es 
terday and to visualize the Butler of Tomorrow. We realize the extent of 
our task and the meagerness of our ability. Therefore, if wc ha\e fallen 
short in our endeavor, we ask your forgi\eness. Howexer, may the 1926 
Drii r staff profit by our mistakes and publish an annual that will win the 
National Art Craft Guild Contest. 

Editor. 




[,as] 



^^^ 




^^^ 



J.\Rf,7 H. WOOD, ElllTOR-lN-CHIEF 



(Collegia// 

Carolinf M. GdDi.HV ------- S/jfi Sgcr^tiiry 

Lucv S. Ash J IAN - - - . - _ _ - Society Editor 

William Bockstahlpjr -------- Copsreader 

Harrioi Jaehnh --------- Cop\redJer 

Thomas F. Smith - - - _ .. . Cop\reiuler 

Albkrt B. Thompson -------- Copyrejder 

Dorothy \'. Dalk --------- Cofyreaiier 

Dorothy a. STtPHENSoN ------- Cofyreader 

Aisi i\ [oHNSov --------- Sports Editor 

JoSKPH C. ScHLLthN -------- SpOrtS Staff 

Ralph L. Hitch --------- Sports Staff 

Elizabeth G. Hekii-knan ------- Society Staff 

Justine M. Halliuay -------- Society Staff 

Dorothy F. Carroll -------- Society Staff 




[,.5] 




JOK riREMHlSPACHKR, RUSINKSS MANACFR 



(^ollc^'uui 

Dorothy N. Evkrroad ------._ Reporter 

Raymonu F. Ridge -----.._. Reporter 

Charlotte R. Gu.xtan -------- Reporter 

Wilson S. Daily ---------- Reporter 

Loi'iSE Eleanor R(>s< --------- Reporter 

IMerle H. Miller ------... Reporter 

Dorks U. Smith --------_. Reporter 

J. Doii.LAS Perry --------- Reporter 

\'iR(,iNiA D. CiRiij --------- Reporter 

Bii.LiE Mae Kreider --------- Reporlei 

\'ioLET L. Henderson --------- Reporter 

Edith L. Cokya ---------- Reporter 

Paulwirth Waldo --------- Reporter 

HeriMon E. Phillips - _ - _ - Aisistjut HmiiieiS Muiuger 

George Clark -------- CirniLitioii Mjudi'er 




['"] 




HORACE E. STORER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Qolleg 



^ lan 

BUTLKR iournalism has made rapid strides during the past year under the direction 
of Professor Henry Ellis Birdsong who came to Butler last fall from the University 
of Wisconsin to take charge of the department. He has organized a School of Jour- 
nalism for the purpose of meeting two general needs of undergraduates: (1) To equip 
as completely as possible for later practice those students who intend to pursue journalism 
as a profession, and (2) to afford opportunity for students taking a general Liberal Arts 
course or other major subjects to gain a practical Insight into the history, the purposes, the 
workings and the ideals of the press, and to acquire facility and precision of expression in 
writing — no matter in what field. journalism may now be elected as a major subject 
toward the A. B. or B. S. degree. Ultimately a B. J. will be granted. 



EDITORS AT WORK 




[,.e] 




ALBERT W. ]',I,OKMKER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Collcg 



lan 

THE COLLEGIAN began its thirty-ninth year, September 26, 1924, .is n weekly 
jftcr having been published scnii-weekly the previous semester. The office was 
removed to Room + and equipped to resemble a city office of a regular newspaper. 
Due to the efforts of Jabez, Joe Gremelspacher and a conscientious staff, the paper appeared 
;emi-weeklv after February 10. Professor Birdsong's editing class took over the copy desk 
and adopted a stvle sheet the second semester. The Collegian has indeed made rapid 
progress in '24 and '25, and indications point to a daih' in the very near future. One of 
its feature achievements during the year was the scooping of the Indianapolis News and 
Times on the Centenary Homecoming football game. The paper was on Irwin Field a few 
seconds after the final whistle. 



BUTLER'S "CITY OFFICE" 




['"] 




-€> 



Fourth Estate 



A DELEGATION, composed of Professor Hcnrv E. Birds Jiig, Frank Trost, Eugene 
Clifford, |abez Wood, Joe Grcmelspacher, Robert Swinehart and Thomas F. Smith, 
attended the national convention of Sigma Delta Chi at Blocmington, November 
18. 1924, for the purpose of getting permission to petition in behalf of the Fourth Estate 
Club. Permission was granted a few weeks later, and the club mailed out tormal petitions 
in the spring to fortv chapters and the national officers. No word had been received when 
the Drift went to press. 

The club was organized in November, 1923. Its members are chosen from upper- 
classmen who have been .ictive in journalism on the campus and who expect to go into 
journalism for a profession. Meetings are often featured by talks from prominent news- 
paper men and members of Sigma Delta Chi. 

First Row — Thomas F. Smith (President), Horace Storer (\ice-President), Raymond 
Ridge (Secretary-Treasurer) 

Second Row — Eugene Clifford, Jabez Wood, Professor Henry E. Birdsong, Herbert R. 
Hilt, joe Grcmelspacher 

Third Row — Albert Bloemker, Wallace Richards, Jerome Bash, .Austin Johnson 




[,30] 




, \KI)NER, PR] ! 



Scribblers 



THE Scribblers Club is a coed journalistic honorar}' organization founded for the 
purpose of petitioning Theta Sigma Phi, a national fraternity-. Activit\' has fallen 
under different lines, including a stunt given at Senior vaudeville last vear, a 
special May Day edition of the Collegian, assistance at the Press Convention, a journalistic 
tea for coed members of the Journalism department, Collegian staff and the local Theta 
Sigma Phi. The crowning achievement was The Christmas Stocking, a humorous magazine, 
which was both a literar^' and financial success. The Mav Da\- Collegian was also published 
by the club. Plans are now under wa\' for the presentation of a formal petition to Theta 
Sigma Phi and the publication of another magazine. Dean E\elvn Butler and Miss Marv 
Agnes Showalter are honorarv members. 



First Row — Harriot Jeahne (Secretary), Elizabeth Callon Madis:)n (\'ice-President), 
Irene Seuel 

Skcond Row — Rebecca Pitts, Dorothy Stephenson, Caroline Godley, Dorothy Carroll 
(Treasurer) 




[,3, ] 



r^r 




J 



EUCKNH IJ.iri nKli, PRES. 



Frcis Cluh 

Hl'.RlU'.R r K. HILL, .issijtant telegraph editor of the hidianapolis News and instructor 
in Butler"; School of Journalism, has made the Press Club one of the most inter- 
esting departmental organizations on the campus. He brings practical journalism 
to the class room direct from the press. His keen insight into the practical problems of 
newspaper work has contributed to making the one hour course very popular among the 
students. 

Furthermore, newspaper men from the Indian.ipolis News, the Indianapolis Star and 
the Indianapolis Times ha\-e been kind enough to talk to the club at its weekly meetings 
throughout the year. The members act in the capacit}' of reporters by writing up the 
speeches in regular newspaper style. One hour of college credit is given for one semester's 
work in the course. 

The officers are as follows: (First semester) Eugene Cllff'ord, president; Mary Mont- 
gomery, vice-president; Margaret Waters, secretary; Gerald Woods, treasurer; (Second 
semester) Ravmond Ridge, president; Dorothy Kemp, vice-president; Austin Johnson, 
secrctar\', and Paul Fink, treasurer. 




[,3=] 




Religi 



ion 




-o 



EDWARD THISTLEI'HUAITK, PREf 



Y. M. C. J. 

THE Young Men'? Christian Association is one of the largest men's organizations on 
the campus. Its purpose is to promote the highest ideals in men's activities. This 
is being done hv gospel deputation teams, b\' personal interviews, by bringing out- 
standing men to the campus, bv aiding in registration work and by personal contact with 
students on the campus. 

Weekh-noon meetings are held at the Unhersity, and monthly banquets are held at 
the central Y. M. C. A. building. Each year "Y" delegates arc sent to Lake Geneva, Wis., 
for the training conference in order to be better prepared to serve Butler and the ever 
increasing student bod^'. 

The "Y" is here to serve. Can we help you? Let us try! 

First Roxv — [oseph Craw, George Amos Luck^-, |asper Cox, Pleasant R. Hightower, 
J. H. Ehlers 

Second Row — Paul H. Klmberlin, Merle Car\er, Paul Habbe, Floyd Hines, Paul 
Wilcox 




[,3.] 




IRENE SEl'EL, PRKS 



Y. W. C. A. 

THE Young Women's Christian Association cabinet was installed, March 18, 1924, 
and went into office earnest and full of enthusiasm. The advisory board under 
Mrs. ). W. Putnam and Dean Evelvn Butler have been a source of inspiration 
and material aid. Each girl on the cabinet had a definite task to perform, and she carried 
it out efficientlv. The feature activity of the year was the Geneva Stunt Day, from which 
enough monev was made to send representatives to the New York and Geneva conferences, 
liowever, other work equallv significant was acconiplishd in Social Service, World Fellow- 
ship and among the industrial girls of the city. 

First Row — Margaret Schoener (Chairman Social Committee), Mary McMeans (Vice- 
President), Rebecca Pitts (Secretarv), Ruth Schuler (Treasurer), |anet Rinch (Chairman 
World Fellowship Committee) 

Second Row — Kathrvn Bowlb\ (Chairman Industrial Cnnimittee), Dorothea \arntz 
(Undergraduate Representative), Julia Brown (Chairman Room Committee), \'irginia 
Curtis (Chairman Geneva Committee) 




[,35] 




-^o 



DOVLE MULLEN, PRKs 



Sandwich Club 

THE Sandxvlch Club affiliated kst month with the Oxford Club of America, a national 
ministerial organization, to further its purpose of preparing men tor Christian service 
in the ministry, on the foreign fields as Y. M. C. A. secretaries and in other allied 
activities. 

Having organized in 1905, the Sandwich Club has alumni serving as missionaries, 
ministers and Christian workers all over the world. The charter members include such 
prominent men as the following: H. H. Harmon, endowment secretary of the Board of 
Education of the Disciples of Christ, and Clo}d Goodnight, president of Bethany College. 
Bi-weeklv luncheon meetings are held at the College of Missions, and a social gathering 
is sponsored each fall for the purpose of promoting a broader acquaintance and fellowship 
among the students of both Butler and the College of Missions. A number of the members 
serve in the capacity of ministers in churches of the state. 

The officers for next year are; Bruce Moore, president; Lavon Fisher, vice-president; 
Urban Ogden, secretar\ , and Gl}ndon Burkhart, treasurer. 




[:3.] 




Dramatics 




Icebound 



I 



N "Icebound", the Dramatic Club found itself assuming a role entirely different from 
anv previous undertaking — a difficult play, not of the type to command the natural 
interest of the cast as did "Cappy Ricks" and "The Whole Town's Talking". A few 
practices were somewhat discouraging, and the final dress rehearsal was plainly a disappoint- 
ment. But at the first performance. May 12, "Icebound" "went over". The plot untolded 
smoothjv, and the plavers, with parts most unnatural to themselves, presented impersona- 
tions of real merit and eliminated almost entire!}' the strained tone expected by many. 



CAST 

HlNRV JdRDON ---------- IJ'i/l.ifo// Ri/c-\ 

Emma 1 or don - - - - - - - - - Mar^arel Jenkins 

Ni:iriK JoRDON ---------- Liiiile T\iier 

Sadie Fki.i,o\\s ---------- Helen Panoe 

Orin Fki.i.ous ---------- Dorrjt/i\ Cdiroll 

Kli.a [ordi>\ ---------- Mar^^jret ]]\ileri 

Bi N J'lRDoN ----------- Ah'ierl Hjrker 

DocioR Ci Riis ---------- Imin Ej^jii 

|l Di.i: Bkadicird ---------- Doiig/iis Diile 

Iank Crosi!v ---------- Catherine C<:viii> 

Hawa ------------ Oi'w ///i,'_i;/'//.' 

)iM Iav, Shiriii- --------- J^nie- Forsyl/i 



[ 138 




Geneva Stunt Da 



AS'^'XCOPATED DREAM, a singing and dancing act woven into a background of 
cleverly worked out ideas, brought Sigma Delta the award of first honors on the 
annua! Geneva Stunt Dav program held in the chapel. May I, and sponsored by 
the Y. W. C. A. Following a precedent set by the better stunts of past years, "A Synco- 
pated Dream" was somewhat long but smoothly executed with interesting ideas. Sigma 
Delta was not alone m presenting a skit ot class, however, tor Pi Beta Phi, Alpha Chi Omega 
and Delta Delta Delta staged novelties only a little less perfect than the judges' choice. 



PROGRAM 

.Alpha Chi 0\\¥x\.\ - - - - K'uhia-pfeii zi-'uh Afologiei to Stevenson 

.Alpha Dklta Pi--------- Mi/sirj/ Romiuice 

Dki.ta Dki.ta Delia --------- Ship-a-Ho\ 

Dhlta Zeta -----------/// Bolieiiihi 

Kappa Kappa Gam.\la -------- The Land of I/leas 

Pi Beta Phi ------- The Stith, in My Cherk Book 

Su;ma Delta --------- \ Sxncofateii Dream 



[:39] 




Senior Vaudeville 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA took first pkcc in the Senior A'audeville, March 27. Its 
stunt entitled "Radio-ologv" well deserved the beautiful loving cup that was awarded 
hy the Senior class. Clever songs, dances and a lecture were broadcasted and received 
at the chapel stage before a capacity crowd. Eight stunts, that had previously survived the 
elimination tests, constituted the program. 



STUNTS 

Kappa Kappa Gamma --------- Rjiiio-ology 

Su.MA D) i,iA - - - - - - -.- Ml/sir.'/ Aiiz-erlise»!ei!ts 

Dki.ta Dki.ta Dki.ta ----- Skit from The W'lZJrJ of Q- 

Dki.ta Zkta ----------- Sutler Mm,1s 

Dki.ia Phi Su.ma -------- Miuic Box Re-'u-.c 

Kappa Alpha Thi;ia -------- .-1 Trip to Mms 

Lamp.da Chi Alpha -------- From biJij to Dixie 

Zlia Tau Alpha --------- Crosizvord Puzzle 



['-'] 




The Wlwlc Toz:::;/'s TalkiNq 

THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING cuiscd the Kutlcr campus to talk In praise of 
one of the most successful plays ever put on b}' the Dramatic Club. Under the 
coaching of Professor Rollo Tallcott, the players, picked from fifty applicants, 
staged a feature production. The scenery was painted bv fulia Bretzman ; the management 
was executed by John Metzger; the stage was arranged by Horace Storer, and the laughing 
was done hx the entire audience. 



CAST 



Mr. Si 
Mrs. Si 



- Ad,u,u P:rne 

■ Katln-yn Bo'.ilhy 

ALirga,,/ U'\,/crs 

Parker W/,c;,/lcy 

Phyllis Xnrjsin,,,, 

- Alhrrl H.ukcr 

- - Carl rnrph, 

- - Jane O shorn 



Hcic 



Roller 
Cue,, 
SicUff 

- Lomau Cohle 

- Louhc Padou 
Charlullc Gilman 

■ Constance West 
- M:ldred Kelly 




Cappy Ricks 



THE Dramatic Club began its theatrical season, December 16, 1924, with "Cappy 
Riclis", a sea story. The cast received much applause from the audience at the 
Masonic Temple because of the professional manner in which the actors conducted 
themselves in turning a waterless stage into a seaport. Fred Schulz's characterization of 
Cappy was flawless, and the entire cast scored a hit. 



CAST 

Cappy Ricks ----------- Fiy// Srhiilz 

Florknce Ricks ---------- Helen Pjjroe 

Captain Phasi.i v ---------- Elino Rir/iev 

Goi.Dii' Glaki. ---------- Dciisx Sr//u/z 

Cec[i. ------------ Jo/ifi Metzger 

Aunt Lucy --------- Eleanor MeColluin 

Skinnkr ----------- Marion Higgi/ii 

CuAiiiiiR ----------- Fret/ S/i!ri 

SiNGi.i.roN ----------- Jj/nes Btirrin 



[M. ] 




The Piper 



Ai .1 clini.ix of Butler's sixn-nliith commencement day. Professor Rollo Tallcctt coached 
a whole citv into giving "The Piper" on the north campus. The town of Hamelin 
" was built for the setting under the direction of Fred Schulz, and a shrine was made 
bv Julia Bretzman. The large ca-^t with its unique costumes displayed a great deal of talent. 



C.'\ST 



Strolling Plavers — The Piper, La\vrence 
Henderson; Michael (The Sword Kater), 
Horace Storer; Cheat (The Devil), Irwin 
Egan ; Jacobus (The Burgomeister), fames 
Forsyth; Kurt (The Syndic), Edward 
Troy; Peter (The Cobbler), James Perry; 
Haiis (The Butcher), Deryf Case; .A.xel 
(The Smith), Fred Sanders. 

Men of Hamelin — Martin (The 
Watch), Jercme Bash; Peter (The S,Kris- 
tan), George Johnson; Anselem (.A Young 



Priest), James Tipton; Old Claus (A 
Miser), .Arnold Davis; Town Crier, Fred 
Schick. 

Children — fan, Thelma Thomas; Han- 
sel, Leila Befje Shipman; Use, Ted Os- 
borne; Trude, fulia Patton ; Rudi, Marian 
Rose. 

\'eronika (The Wife of Kurt), Julia 
Bretzman; Barbara (Daughter of facobus), 
Marie George; Wife of Hans the Butcher, 
Marjorie Chiles; Wife of .Axel the Smith, 
Eloise Owings; Old Ursula, Irma Dvkes. 



[,«] 



vy^ 




i-,^ 







DOUGLAS DALE, PRES. 

Dramatic Club 

THE Dramatic Club, organized for the devotees of the fine arts of the theatre, con- 
sists of both active and postulate members. All who pass the tryouts are entitled 
to postulate membership, whereas active membership is restricted to those who have 
participated in one of the club's major productions. 

During the school year, the Dramatic Club has presented three highly successful plays 
under the direction of Professor Rollo A. Tallcott. "Cappy Ricks", given at the Masonic 
Temple on December 16, 1924, was a delightful performance with Helen Pascoe, Fred 
jhultz and Elmo Richev in the leading roles. The most outstanding presentation, due to 
its unusual financial, as well as dramatic success, was "The Whole Town's Talking", pre- 
sented at the Irvington School, March 26, 1925. Parker Wheatlcy, Constance West, 
Kathrvn Bowlb^- and Adrian Pierce took the leading parts. The third major production, 
"Icebound", closed the most successful season in the history of the Dramatic Club. Catherine 
Cavins and Albert Harker, in the leading roles, played to capacity houses at both per- 
formances, May 12 and 13. 

The club also held monthly meetings in the evenings at fraternity houses for the 
purpose of reading plan's and exhibiting home talent. Twenty-one members ot the organiza- 
tion were initiated on May 13, into Pi Epsilon Delta, national professional dramatic fra- 
u rn't-i-. Professor Robert Williams of DePauw was in charge of installing the Butler chapter. 




['"J 




Dchatirio; 




HoRAlL !lOKER, PRr 



Tau Kappa Alpha 

MORRIS EDWARDS, national secretary, and Edward J. Hecker, formcrlv national 
.-ccrctar^", were invited guest?, April 27, at an initiation and banquet of the Alpha 
Chapter of Tau Kappa Alpha. Robert Finney, '28; Robert Hutchinson, '27; 
Lawrence \'ollrath, '27, and Ferdinand Mehrlich, '27, became members on this occasion. 
The committee in charge of the ceremony consisted of Lewis Wilson, chairman; Lester 
Budd and Albert Bloemker. Horace Storer was toastmaster at the banquet. 

Tau Kappa Alpha was founded at Butler in 1908, for the purpose of creating student 
interest in debating and oratory. Today it is a national honorary fraternity with chapters 
in the leading colleges and universities of the country. Only the very best members of 
varsity teams are chosen for membership into the organization. 



First Row — Albert Bloemker (Secretary), .Arthur Long, Brewer Graham 
Second Row — George Wilson, Louis Wilson, Lester Budd, Irwin Egan 




['«] 



?c_- 




DI;MA KhNMDV, PRES. 



Delta Phi 

ALTHOUGH women's deb.itlng has been in existence at Butler for six ve.irs. Gamma 
chapter of Delta Phi was not established until June, 1921. With the purpose of 
*■ maintaining and promoting public speaking, Delta Phi is the onh' national honorary 
debating sororit}' in the United States. Since its membership requirement insists on partici- 
pation in at least two intercollegiate debates, Butler \vomen have an additional incentive to 
go out for debating. 

Members of Delta Phi were quite prominent in the intramural debating during the 
past year on the subject, "Resolved, that the several states should adopt a plan similar in 
principle to the Huber plan of unemployment insurance". It is evident that the organiza- 
tion is an encouraging factor in the development of women's debating at Butler. 



First Row — Daisv Schulz (Mce-President"), Kathr^n Bowlbv (Secretary-Treasurer) 
Second Row — Ilene Harryman, \irginia Curtis, Lois Wishard 




[,47] 






Intraiyiural Wbincrs 



LESTER BUDD, BENJAMIN KOHN, WINSTON RILEY 



1925 Varsity Members 

First Row — Horace Storer, Robert Hutchinson. Ferdinand Mehrlich 
Second Row — Frank Furstenberg, Albert Bloemker, Lester Budd, 

Lewis Wilson 

Third Row — Robert Finney, George Wilson, Francis Meunier, 

Lawrence Vollrath, Winston Riley (Gerald Dunlap and Wesley Wilson 

are not in picture > 




[Me] 






hitramural Winners 



3ILLIE MAE RREIDER, ESTHER TILFORD, MARV FRANCES OGLE 



1925 Varsity Members 

First Row — Luc\' Ashjiun, Louise I'Visbic, Ileiie Harrynian, Mary 
Frances Ogle 

Second Row — Margaret Jenkins, Billie Mae Kreider, Agnes Andrews, 
Alice Reynolds 




['"] 




LEWIS WILSON, PRES. 



Forensic Club 



T 



HK Forensic Club was organized in December, 1923, for a two-fold purpose: first, 
to arouse an interest in debating among the student body in general, and, secondly, to 
furnish those students sufficienth' interested a means of trving out for the varsity 



During the two years of its existence, the club has sponsored elimination intramural 
debates. The winning team has been awarded a silver loving cup each year, and the varsity 
teams have been chosen from those students participating in the elimination contests. 

Although the results, as far as intercollegiate debating is concerned, have not been all 
that could be desired, the club is furthering the work in such a way that ultimate success is 
assured. 

The officers are: Lewis Wilson, president; Lois Wishard, vice-president; Daisy Schulz, 
secretary, and Arthur Long, treasurer. 




[,50] 




Organizations 




^ 




/^^:- 


^ 


iM'^^ 


|gB^';.W. JK' 


^mH 


■M;> 4C?t| 


Blli 


BlsJ 


& 


^■^H "^^^^i^^^^l 


Hi 


h'^otI 


r'^ 



^^y/ 



PAT CARVER, PRES 



Womaris League 



TWV. Woman's League of Butler University, established in September, 192+, is the 
greatest single unifying force that has been developed among the women students. 
It strides for the promotion of a college spirit, for the maintenance of a high social 
and moral standard among Butler wcnien and for the support of student activities. 

The League has been responsible lor the following enterprises: the publication of the 
Student Handbook, Student Directorv and Butler Song Book; the adoption of an activitv 
point system, the foundation of a woman's Building Fund, the obtaining of prominent 
matinee speakers, the establishment of the four annua! class teas, the Formal Cotillion and 
the annual Ma\' Da^' celebration. Such accomplishments have been highlv successful and 
worthv of commendation. 



First Row — Vlrg-In 
Second Row — Cliai 
bcth Bertcrman. 

Third Row— l)„ri. 
Fourth Row— .Xht 



Curtis (Vice-President), Louise Padou (.Secretary), K.itharine Lcnno.v (Treasurer) 
lien of Committees: Barbara Fisher, Margaret Sclioener, Caroline Godley, Eliza- 



ly .Steplienson, Marjorie Chiles, Sarah Frances 
Meitty, Cathryn Headrick, Helen Payne, Cathc 




[,5.^] 



ifep 




Student Budget 

o 

PHILANTHROI'ICALLY speaking, the Student Budget Committee i-: one of the most 
liberal organizations on the campus. Since 1922, when it was organized by Edward 
McGavaran, it has been eliminating some of the numerous demands for monev that 
are made on the students during the school rears. The first year, $1,000 was raised; the 
second, $2,000 and the past year, $1,500. Twenty percent is given to the Y. M. C A., 
twenty to the Y. W. C. A., thirty to the general relief and student friendship funds and 
lhirt\' to an emergence' fund tor the student body as a whole. Kdward McGavaran was 
chaiiman of the committee in '22 and "25, Eugene Bushong in '23 and '24, and \'ictor 
Twitty in '2+ and '25. 

A yearly drive is made for voluntary subscriptions from the students and the facult}' 
H'lembers. All those who make pledges, indeed, have an oj5piortunit\' to keepi their word 
and to help a worthy organization to serve some students who are realh' in need of assistance. 
First Roh— -C.inst.mcc Forsyth, SIi.iIIlt R.iss, Professor R.iy C. Friesner 
Sec.n-d Row— D.iisy Scluilz, CI.UL-nci- Stombcl, Ruth li.itcs 




['"] 




JAMES B. \AN'DA\\(!RKER 



Band 

JAMES B. \ANDA WORKER, head of the Indianapolis Newsboys' Band, was appointed 
director ot the Butler Band last fall after an absence of five rears, during which time 
he has been instructing newsboys' and high school bands. Mr. ^'andaworker was the 
original organizer of the Butler musicians. 

The band has been placed on the same status with other subjects in the University-. 
One hour of credit is given for participation, and Freshmen and Sophomores ma\ elect the 
course in preference to gymnasium. 

Interest in the organization has increased since last fall, and new aspirants have turned 
out for the musical course. At the Illinois football game of 1924, the band, seated opposite 
the mini rooters, sent sounds of fight and Bulldog spirit in the notes of the new "Butler 
War Song" to the team that was playing against one of the strongest elevens in the country. 

George Cornelius and Walter Smith, alumni, are anticipating raising subscriptions 
among the members of the Butler Booster's Club to ecjuip the members of the band with 
new uniforms. Indications point to a squad of musicians in full regalia bv next semester. 




['"] 




HENRY NESTER, PRES 



Biology Club 

WITH a purpose of stimulating interest in Biology, the Butler Biology club was or- 
ganized, October 16, 1913. Harry Dletz, now assistant state entomologist, was 
the first president. After twelve years of activity, the organization can be proud of 
the large number of its former members who have taken advanced degrees and are now 
actively engaged in scientific work. Pauline Wolff, M. D., Ph. D.; Anita Muehl, M. D., 
Ph. D.; Mary Brown, A. M.; Phillip Spong, A. M.; Helen McDonald, A. M.; Vera 
Koehring, A. M., and David Rioch, M. D., leader of class at Johns Hopkins, were mem- 
bers of the Biology Club. 

In keeping with the purpose of the club, a Wood's Hole scholarship was established in 
1916, and nine members of the organization have enjoyed the advantage of a summer at 
this famous laboratorv. Earle McRcberts, an Indianapolis physician, had the distinction of 
receiving the first scholarship. 

The present laboratory assistants, Henry Nester and Clarence Jaleski, were sent to 
Woods Hole. \"ictor Twittv also attended another noted laboratory at Cold Springs Harbor. 

The officers are: Henry G. Nester, president; Mctor C. Twitty, vice-president; 
F.velvn M. Forsvth, secretary-, and Rilu< E. Doollttle, treasurer. 




[,S5] 







CLARENCE JALESKI, PRES. 



Chemistry Club 

APPL'V'lNG Chumi^try to commerce, furthering the stud\' of thcorv and promoting in- 
terest in the major science, are the three aims of the Chemistrv Club, reorganized, 
'■ November 29, 1922, after two years in abeyance. The three-fold purpose is carried 
out in several wavs. Members of the organization do research work in the preparation of 
special papers which they read at the meetings. Several trips are taken during the year to 
industrial plants where the processes of compounding formulas are actually seen in practical 
use. Furthermore, prominent physicians and expert chemists in the professional and teaching 
fields portra-i' to the club manv important phases that cannot be obtained in the classroom. 

Professor Gu-i- Howard Shadinger, voted the most handsome professor in Butler in the 
1925 Drift Popularit\- Contest, is sponsor of the organization. His experience and kno\vledge 
of Chemistrv have contributed much first hand information to the members. 

The officers are: Clarence jaleski, president; Leona Kalcy, \ice-president ; Esther 
Adams, secretarv, and Shailer Bass, treasurer. 




[,5.] 







MARV WIN lER, PRES. 



Classical Club 

THF, Classical cluh, now in its fifth year, is composed of present and former students 
of Greek and Latin. The growing membership shows the increasing interest in the 
affair? of another age. The purpose of the organization is to give students an op- 
portunity' to studi' phases of classical life which cannot be touched upon in the class room. 
These include art, archaeology, political rivalries, public festivals, drama and religious and 
home life. 

The programs are varied and interesting and are often enlivened by Latin songs and 
p-antomine shows ot well-known events. Sometimes a Latin or Greek play is produced to 
delight the members. The faculty members of the Latin and Greek departments are spon- 
sors of the organization. Their informal talks during the meetings promote fellowship 
between them and the stucients. However, the annual initiation of new members into the 
Eleusinian masteries is the climax of the club's activities. 

The officers are: Marv Winter, consul; Florence Fritts, pro-consul; Gertrude Insley, 
Quaestor, and Pearl Collins, Praetor. 




[157] 




ROLI.IN DA\'IS, PRE?. 



Commerce Club 

THE Commerce club consists of two branches, one composed of Butler students, and 
the other, Indianapolis business men. General headquarters are located on the fifth 
floor of the Century Building where an employment division will be maintained 
for the members. The ultimate object of the organization is to conduct an industrial sur- 
ve}', plans for which are now being completed for next year. 

The student roster includes the following: Rollin Davis, Fellow Supreme; Lewis 
Wilson, Fellow Recorder; Joe York, Fellow Councillor; Dean J. W. Putnam, Irving 
Allen, Chester Camp, Leonard Young, Julius Sagolowsky, Harold Harmon, .Albert Thomp- 
son, Hugh Kivett, Carl Cecil, Irwin Eagan and Maurice Miller. 

General officers are as follows; Earl Beck, Fellow Supreme and Director of Person- 
nel of Eli Lilly Sc Company; R. N. Phelps, Vice-Fellow- Supreme and Director of Per- 
sonnel of the Link Belt Companies; R. J. Axtell, Fellow Recorder and Office Man.agcr of 
Eli Lilly & Company; W. E. Teer, Fellow Auditor and Division Manager of the Royal 
Typewriter Company. 




[,5B] 




OSCAR C. RIES, PRES. 



Student Teachers' Association 

THE Student Teachers" Association was organized in the fall of 1923, bv tho^e \vhu 
expect to teach, for the purpose of de\"eloping professional spirit and good fellowship, 
promoting the name of Butler University and bringing its students In contact with 
educational leaders. 

Under the capable leadership of Oscar C. Ries, a well rounded program of speakers 
and Interesting meetings were held during the year. The speakers included George Buck, 
Principal of Shortridge, who spoke on "The Human Element In Teaching"; |. R. H. 
Moore, head of the History department of Manual Training, whose subject w"as "Some 
Mistakes I Have Made"; G. E. Gill, head of the Indianapolis Employment Bureau, who 
talked about "How You Look to Your Boss"; Milo H. Stuart, Principal of .Arsenal Tech- 
nical, who discussed "The Individual In a Large School" and Oscar C. Ries, who emphasized 
"The Relation of Travel to Teaching". 

The officers are: Oscar C. Ries, president; .Agnes .Andrews, vice-president, and Mar- 
garet Sherwood, secretary-treasurer. The members of the executive committee include the 
following: Professor W. L. Richardson, facultv ad\"i<er; Dema Kennedy; George Gamble; 
Louise Padou and Daisv Schulz. 




[,59] 



r=~-r:&!;'c'- 




:-0 



LILLIAN MARTIN, PRES. 



French Club 

THl", French Club was organized at Butler in 1921, under the guldiance of Professor 
Ratti, head of the Romance Language department, for the purpose of giving students 
an uppurtunity to speak the French language and to become familiar with the customs 
and traditions of the people. Since its founding, the organization has been directed by 
the facult\ of the French department. 

Meetings are held at fraternity and sororitv houses the second Mondav of every 
month, and membership is limited to second }ear French students having a B average. The 
try-cut system is used, and successful candidates must take part in the programs. Playlets, 
readings, songs, musical solos and games comprise the entertainment. 

After the trv-outs are completed, speakers are obtained to give talks on all phases ot 
French life. French festivals, such as the "Twelfth Night" and the "Mardi Gras", are cele- 
brated appropriatclv. This vear the club has sponsored the play, "Le Monde ou L"on 
L'F.nnuie", directed by Miss Martha Kincaid of the French department. 

The officers are: Lillian Martin, president; Mildred Medlani, vice-president; Janet 
Rioch, secretarv, and Mari' Nussbaum, treasurer. 




[,60] 



^- 



•'^V> 




^^ 



HENKV G. NEST1£R, PRES. 



German Club 

DKR DEUTSCHl', \ 1-^RElN, one of the older department.il org.iniz.itions, was revived 
last ^■ear, and the members entered into the work of the club with enthusiasm. The 
club has as its sponsor Professor Milton D. Baumgartner, head of the German depart- 
ment. Membership is limited to the students showing proficiency and interest in German, 
and onlv students recommended by the German department are eligible for election. 

The purpose of the club is to further" the study and appreciation of the German lan- 
guage, literature and folk lore. Meetings are held once a month at the homes of members. 
These meetings are conducted in German in order to acquaint the members with the lan- 
guage. Interesting programs are arranged in which German songs are sung and studies are 
made of great German classical poets and ot modern writers. 

Among its activities last \ed.T, the club produced "Untcr Vier .Augen" by Ludwig Fulda 
which proved quite successful. .A similar production was given this year. 

The officers are: Henrv G. Nester, president; Charlotte .A. Reissner, vice-president, 
and Fred S. Ballweg, secretar"\'-trcasurer. 




[,6, ] 




'^-L^ 



EDWARD TRdV, PRK; 



Mathematics Chd 



THE Mathcm^uics Club of Butler \v:is org.mi/.cJ in the t.ill of 1922, with Professor 
l''.Iij.ih X. [ohnson a; the faculty sponsor. 

The club holds its meeting in the sorority houses and in room 14 in the 
Administration Building on the first Thursday of each month. Interesting programs are 
given bv students, bv members of the Butler faculty and ot the Mathematics departments 
ol other institutions. 

Students of the History of Mathematics class read papers. Entertaining talks are 
given on astronomy and other subjects that arc of interest to mathematicians. 

The organization is fortunate in having such a man as Professor Johnson ior its 
sponsor. Its members feel sure that, under his guidance and direction, the Mathematics 
Club will expand and beccmc a permanent factor in the campus life of the "Greater 
Butler" at Eairview. 




[■"] 



r 




Roi:i;Rr mfi'i k, i'Ki 



Pc7/ and Pencil Club 



^r~\\\V. I'en .md Pencil Club made its debut among the clubs of Butler in the fall of 
I 1921. It was founded by Dean Evelyn Butler's Short Story class. During meetings, 
the members read their own short stories and hold informal discussions concerning 
them. A further purpose is to create appreciation for high literarv excellence and to bring 
before the club Indianapolis speakers who have attained renown in the literar\' field. 
Meetings are held e^"ery Friday morning during the class hour. Membership is restricted 
to the students enrolled in the Short Story course. 

The officers for the first semester were: Robert Nipper, president; John Tro^x-r, 
vice-president, and Barbara Fischer, secretary. Those for the second semester are: lohn 
Troyer, president; Jcseph Bruns, vice-president, and Gertrude Schmidt, secretary. 




[,S3] 




'^^^s:^ 



\ IRCII. \'. ROBV, PRK; 



Phil oku via n 

To promote the interest of ministerial students, the Philokurian Literar\' Society- \\as 
organized at Northwestern Christian University in 1 869. In those davs, literar^■ 
societies held the attention of the students as much as social fraternities do todav. 
Such organizations as the Alathesian, Pythonian, Athenian, Philokurian and Demia Butler 
Literary Societies met in a professor's lecture room or in a private home to stud^" the arts 
of conversation, debating and oratory. Later, they secured their own quarters at school 
where they collected libraries. However, the decreasing interest in literarv societies proved 
fatal to all except the Philokurian, the onh' survivor ot the five. 

It is now open to both men and women students in all departments of Butler for the 
purpose ot promoting the literarv ideals of the members. The weeklv meetings are devoted 
to literature, debate, open discussions and social gatherings. 

The oflicers for the first semester were: ^ irgil W Rob\', president; Lena Weitknecht, 
vice-president; Constance Forsyth, secretary', and Eugene Colwa\', treasurer. Those for the 
second semester are: Lewis Wilson, president; Dorcas Rock, vice-president; Edythe Hub- 
bard, secretarv, and Eugene Colw3^', treasurer. 




[,,:..] 




LOUISE PADOl', PRl ; 



Spcuiish Club 

ON October 9, 1923, Professor Joseph G. FuclUa of the Romance L.ing.iuge depart- 
ment, called a meeting of all those interested in Spanish. After organization plans 
were completed, Scott Ham was electeci president of the organization. The name 
decided upon for the club was the Scciedad Hispanica. 

The purpose of the organization is to promote a more fluent use of the language and 
to better teach the customs of Spanish-speaking countries. 

The club meets the second Tuesday night of each month at the various sorority 
houses. .At these meetings, talks are made by speakers accjuamtcd with Spaniards and their 
customs; songs are sung in Spanish and spelling and definition contests are held. Nothing 
but Spanish is spoken at these meetings, and the business proceedings are carried on in the 
same manner. 

Membership is limited to those who have had one •('ear of Spanish, either in high 
school or at college. Due to its interesting programs at each meeting, the club does not 
experience any difficulty in maintaining a large membership. 

The officers are: Louise Padou, president; Avanelle Thorp, vice-president, and Albert 
Thnnip-oii. -ci rct.ir'. -trc.Hiirer. 




[,65] 




y 



Campus Club 



SCHOLARSHIP .md rcfidcncc on the c.impus arc the m.iin requirements for member- 
ship in the Campus Club. It was organized in 1922 to promote scholarship, happiness, 
Butler loyalty and the preservation of the College Residence traditions. During its 
three years of existence under the sponsorship of Dean Evelvn Butler, the organization has 
done much to fulfill its purpose. 

It gives such social events as a Hallowe'en partv, a Christmas dinner, a \'alentine 
party and a coed dinner-dance on St. Patrick's Dav. Members of the student body and 
faculty are always invited to these annual affairs in which a spirit of hospitalitv and good 
lellowship prevails. 

The officers for the first semester were: Opal Lindsey, president; Lillie Smith, secre- 
tary; Rlou Goehenour, treasurer. Those for the second semester are: Hildreth Hall, 
president; Louise Dingle, secretary, and Mary Xussbaum, treasurer. 




[,6G] 




^^;,.^.^-: 



Who's Who? 




C \ V \ H L E 




CAPABLE 




I' () P U L A R 




\ r r I i" I- L 




HANDSOME 




P () P L' L A R PRO l- I-: S S () R 




HANDSOME PROFESSOR 



Drift Contest 



THK photographs on the foregoing eight pages 
represent the winners of the 1925 Drift pop- 
ularity, beauty and capability contest. Each 
Drift subscriber was entitled to cast five votes for his 
choice of the contestants who were nominated by the 
fraternities and sororities. AVood Unger was voted the 
most popular professor and Professor Guy H. Shad- 
ineer, the most handsome. 



[,7e] 






dthlctics 




HARLAN O. PACE 

IT i? harder to uphold a reputation than to ever attain one. Butler men have climbed 
to the top of the athletic world in the past five years. Their spirit has been the 
dominating factor. The Bulldog is a go-getter and overcomes all opposition. Our 
men try to play the game iust a little fairer than our oppionents, if possible. Thev win 
though thev lose. 

We look to the iuture, as it has much in store. Our dreams are about to come true. 
Butler athletes are deserving of a memorial at Fairview. The trustees have created a 
Department of Athletics; the faculty believe in physical education for every one, and the 
student body, alumni and friends are keen for competitive sport which gives life and 
punch to the community. With co-operation on all sides, Indianapolis will continue to 
have home town teams, not only a credit to Hoosierland, but to the Middle West. 

"More dynamite," that's what we need! Wake the dead, discard the riff-raff. Seeing 
is believing. Butler Bulldogs build before being beaten by Backwardness. 




[177] 




Harlax Orville Page 

Pat, for five years, has been building, until today 
Butler has an athletic machine of which she is proud — 
one that has competed with the country's best and one 
that has caused the name of Butler to be flashed from 
coast to coast.. Too much credit cannot be given him 
who has pro\'en to his men that power lies in persist- 
enc\' and clean li\-ing. 




Paul D. Hixki.e 

Hink coaches Freshman basketball 
and football and varsity baseball. He 
gi\'es the newcomers the fundamental 
pointers of the game. He is Pat's right 
hand man, who has trained teams to 
battle the varsity on e\en terms. Hink 
knows baseball from A to Z, and he has 
largely been responsible for Butler's 
success on the diamond. 




Hi 



\\ AT. DEN MlDDI.lCSWORTH 



W'u]] ac(]uaiiited with the Page system after four 
years of training on Butler's football, basketball anci 
baseball teams, W'ally took the place of Strohmeier as 
assistant coach at the beginning of the past semester. 
With his e\er present fighting spirit, he led the '23 
baseball team to a state championship and the '24 bas- 
ketball team to a National A. A. l\ championship. 



[,.e] 



Justus I^aul 

As miuKiger, jub hunter and recognizer of ath- 
letes. Jut is invaluable to }kitler's Athletic Department. 
He has managed crowds that ha\ e packed Irwin l-'ield 
to capacit\', anci he has seen that Butler teams ha\'e 
ridden on the best Pullmans and eaten the most noLU'- 
ishinu foods. He edited the I'^llS Basketball Re\iew. 



Fred Fei.uows 

When something goes wrong, b'reci 
is the first to recei\e the complaint. If 
one desires a towel, hot water, a band- 
age, a rubdown, new equipment or a 
kind word, "Heh, Fred" can be heard 
from one sicHe of Irwin Fielci to the 
other. He has won the esteem of e\ery 
one with whom he has come m ce)ntact. 
He's e\'erybody's pal. 




Otto N. Strohmeier 

Otto left Butler's C(jaching staff to go into busi- 
ness. He IS a prociuct of the Unnersity oi Chicago, 
and one of the best ends e\"er graduated b\' the Windy 
City school. His knowledge of football has been of 
much assistance to Pat, especialh' m the scouting de- 
partment of the game. He also assisteci in the other 
sports. 





"1 



['"] 



Football Rixords from 1920 to 1923 



DUTI.ER ____ / 

BuTLf;R 5 3 

Butler 7 + 

Butler 1 3 

Butler 39 

Butler 21 

Butler 3 5 

Butler 9 



1920 

Wittenberg . 

Hanovfk 

Wilmington . 

Earlham 

Georgetown . 

Franklin 

Rose Polv 

Chicago ''Y" . 



1922 

20 Butler ._ 6 Wilmington 

. 7 Bi rLER 14 Franklin 

- Butler --- 16 Chicago "Y" 

- 7 BuiLLR 10 Illinois 7 

. Butler 5 7 Earlham 

.10 BiTLER 9 Wabash 7 

_ 7 Butler 19 Rose PoLv 

. Butler 19 DePauw 

Butler _ 3 Notre Dame 32 

Butler 7 Bethany _.29 



Butler 

Butler 70 

Butler 1 22 

Butler 3 3 

Butler .- 

Butler 7 

Butler 3 

Butler 28 



1921 

9 Den ISDN 6 

Rose Polv 6 

Hanover 

Earlham 7 

Wabash 14- 

Chicago "Y" 14 

Michigan Aggies.— 2 
Franklin 



1923 

Hanover 

Chicago "Y" 6 

Franklin 7 

Illinois 21 

Bethany 

Wabash 

DePauu- 

Notre Dame 34 



Butler—- 39 

Butler 26 

Bl'TLER 1 3 

Butler 7 

Butler 16 

Bltler _.__ 2 

Butler ...I 3 

Butler.... 7 

Butler 1 9 Haskell 1 3 



Indiana Collegiate Athletic League champions, 1920 and 1921. 
Runners-up to Notre Dame, state champions, 1922 and 1923. 



[,80] 








Football 




1924 Scores 



CAPTAIN NIC 



Butler 


- -.21 


Hano\er 


...... 6 


Butler 


10 


Franklin 


._._._. 7 


Butler 


10 


Illinois 


......40 




7 




9 


Butler 


12 


Wabash 


...... 


Butler 


26 


DePauw 














7 


Bl-TLER- -.,, 


Ohio Wesleyan 


24 


Bl'tler 


7 


Haskell 


..... 20 



CAPTAIN Gl'RALD E. WOODS has been one 
ot Butler's outstanding backs for the past four 
\ears. He is a crack punter, passer and track 
man with a side-kick play that drops tacklers in their 
tracks. In 1923, he was selected as an all-state half- 
back, and, in 1924, he received honorable mention 
from Walter Camp. Between halves at the Ohio 
Wesleyan game. Nig and Hal, his running mate, were 
presented with football trofjhies bv Butler alumni in 
appreciation of what they have done for Butler ath- 
letics in the last four rears. 



B(vi TOM Row — C(.ur;ne}', Helton, Teague, Woolgar, Fink, Miller, Bruning, Smith. 

Skcond Row — Woodling, Strole, Konold, Duttenhaver, Woods, Griggs, Paul, Nipper, 
Floyd. 

Third Row- Paul, Fellows, Canfield, Webb, Bernhardt, Hensel, Kilgore, Puett, 
Hitch, Strohnieier, Page. 

Top R<h\ -Hinkle, Reichel, Mulholland, Cecil, Kcach, Brossman, J.tcks jn, Fletcher, 
Fcsslcr. 









'"> f^f^ 




[.62] 



1925 Schedule 

EaRI.HAM AI Ir\\I\ Flll.l) __ Sl.PTEMBER 26 

DkPai'w Ai Ikwin FiFi.i) OcroBKR 3 

ii.i.iNois AI L'ri!a\a, III. „_ October 10 

Franklin at Irwin Fiii.i)__. __„ October 17 

Wabash al Irwin Fili.d October 2 + 

Rose Polv ai Irhin F'ield October 31 

Minnesota at Minkeapoeis November 7 

Dayton at !r\\i\ Field No\t:mber 14 

Centenary al SnRK\'HPORr, La. .__N()\ imllr 21 



CAI'IAIN-IXKCT LOUIS J. REICHKL Is 
the type of pl.tyer who puts his heart and 
'iiul into ever^' pl.n'. The t.ict that he has 
been placed on se\"cral all-state teams is evidence 
that he is one of the best linesmen in Indiana. He 
delights in playing floating center and backing up 
the line. For the past three years, he has been 
Pat's mainstay in the line because of his uncanny 
abilit}- to judge plays and stop passes. At Iowa in 
1924, some spectator remarked that Butler's best 
play was Parkin to Reichel. 




\PI MN-LI.ECl LOf RLICUEE 



BoTLoM Riiw — Franklin, R. Fiayes, Stewart, King, Case}', Brown. 

Second Row — Cecil, Woods Gearhart, Keach, Chadd, C. Fia\es, Jones, Wenrick, 
Meek, Baker. 

Third R(av— Hinkle, Fellows Collier, Holccmb, Leichty, Green, Royce, Scheleen, 
Cottrell, R. Stewart, Paul. 

Top Row— Garrett, Ryan, McQueen, Ball, Johnson, Stokes B.iMiia, Phillips. 




[,83] 




'6'cV7 Hii'uk'''' Leads 
'Tlitckx Hanover 



D 



ISPLAYIXG a superior, 

dazzling attack which 

completely baffled the 

smaller Hano\'cr eleven, the 

Bulldogs chalked up a victorv 

over the Hilltoppers. Hanover 

fought for every inch of 

ground and held the Butler 

squad to a 7 to 6 advantage at 

half time. By substituting 

continualh' during the final 

-•:'> -ession. Coach Page managed 

\i to keep a fresh combination on 

■* - the field, and the reserve 

Xic: Woods Hm fp.xck strength of the Blue and White 

gave the Bulldogs the long end 

of a 21 to 6 count. 

Butler's first touchdown resulted from a fumble by Cox, fianover's safeti- man, when Woods 
booted to him a high spiral that bounced out of his arms. Reichel covered the ball on the eight- 
yard line, and Paul squirmed across the goal on the next play. Hanover's tallv came in the second 
period when Cox passed to Manaugh who sprinted forty }"ards to cross the Butler goal. Cox, 
however, missed the try for point and failed to tie the score. 

Led by George Haugh, the "Sea Hawk," Hanover threatened seriously to take the lead during 
the third quarter, but fresh players in the Bulldog line offset the fight of the Hilltoppers and 
paved the way for two more touchdowns by the Blue and White. Woods grabbed a long pass from 
Griggs to count the second Butler tally. In the closing minutes of play, the local captain snaked 
through the Hanover defense and dashed fifty yards for the final points of the game. Haugh, 
fighting Hanover fullback, played one of the most spectacular games ever staged at Irwin Field, 
and the bloods-nosed "Sea Hawk" bore the brunt of the Bulldog attack throughout the entire game. 





iiano\i:r s vii.irr iiamri-s opkn'inc camf- 



[,B4] 




FriUikliN Siirprtsr.s 
Sjllin Fans 



m^- 



E 



IGHT ■JHOUSAM) 

t.in^ \\"crc perched on 



\ 






HAL C.RICCS, HALFBACK 



IRl.l M L'LHOLL-\\I), 



the ble.iehers sur 

iny lr\s"in Field \vhen the 

Bulldot; \v.^rriol•^ celebrated 

"Indianapolis Day" \vith a lit 

ti) 7 victJr^" over the Frank- 
lin College 'cloven. The Bap- 
tists came to the capital city 

with the best football team 

e\"er turned out at the [ohn- 

>■ o n count\' school. Hal's 

"Golden Toe" accounted for 

Butler's narrow margin of vic- 

t ty m the closing minutes of 

a feature earh' season game. 
On the opening plav, Nig 
Woods made the Ci;ntest appear as if it were little more than a Butler track meet. He smashed 
oft'-tacklc and galloped fiffi" ^■ards before he w;'.s downed by \'andl\'er, Franklin's safet}' man. 
Franklin gridders braced and phn-ed on even terms with the Bulldogs during the remainder of 
the quarter, but in the second period the \'isitjrs outguessed the entire Butler team and scored 
the first touchdown of the game. 

Canfield fumbled a punt on his o\vn twenty-yard line, and after a Franklin lineman cov- 
ered the ball, the invading aggregation suddenl}" (.pened up an aerial attack. Red Rohrabaugh 
dashed around the end, grabbed one of Fuzzy \'andi\"er's passes out of the air and romped across 
the goal to score the initial marker of the game. 

Holding the short end of the score at the start of the final session, the Pagemen started their 
famed forward passing attack. Griggs made a spectacular catch of Xig's long t:ss. Backed by 
splendid interference, he snaked across the goal line and made the kick from placement to tie the 
score. Griggs counted the winning points by a perfecth- executed held goal from placement. 




r.UTLER FORWARDS OPEN HOLLS IN BAPTIST LINE 



[.85] 




Grange Is Bdckboiic 
of lUnio'is 



K 




ED GRANGE and the 

fighting mini ran true 
to form against But- 
ler's grid team in the first 
game of the Illinois home 
schedule b}' drubbing t h e 
Bulldog eleven 40 to 10. The 
Pagemen battled the Suckers 
on even terms during the sec- 
ond period. Both teams 
counted ten points, but the 
Blue and White was com- 
pleteh- lost during the open- 
ing session. Illinois totaled 
thirty points against the Bull- 
dogs who apparently were not 
used to the memorial stadium in 
which they were playing. The splendid courtesy and sportsmanship of the Illinois student body 
had not been lost. .Amid the mass of concrete of the new stadium, the attitude of the Illini root- 
ers was one of the most gratifying ever received hx a Butler team and rooters. 

Starting with the initial kickofF of the scrap, Grange ran wild. The big "red-head" dashed 
around end, plowed through the line, tossed forward passes while on a dead run and in short 
completely demoralized the Bulldog squad. .Aft;r the intermission, Griggs booted a brilliant place- 
ment kick from the forty-yard line, and the Bulldog pep and fight returned to the Blue and White 
players who suddenh' appeared to come out of a "trance" and play real football. Smashing line 
plays, spectacular end runs and beautifully executed forward passes carried the ball to within a 
single yard of the goal. 

Superior weight sta\ed off the Bulldog attack and gave the Illini possession of the ball on 
downs. When Britton attempted to punt out of danger, Paul rushed through the for\vard \vall, 
blocked the kick and hurled himself on the pigskin for Butler's lone touchdown. 



DAVK KONOLD, liNU 



nop, NIPPER, QUARTl-R AND 
HALFBACK 











11 iiMiis i)i-'fi:\sr: roo n 



j£!iL.. 



[lec] 




C.cnfcimrv Blocks to 
1 1 ■/;'/, 9-7 



u 




\ 1) 1', R ,1 familiar 
M)iiihcni Hin, Bo Mr- 
Millan's heavy Ccn- 
t II m College elexen fiimi 
^hre^Lplrt, Louisiana, invaded 
'n\in Field on Homecomin_'» 
Dax, Oetoher 18, and no-ed 
( ut the fighting Bulldog ag- 
gregation 9 to 7 before n 
Lipaeitx crowd of more than 
12,0110 enthusiastic B u t 1 e r 
rooter'.. The Southern "Gen- 
tlemen" outweighed the Blue 
and White pla\'ers more than * 

fifteen pounds per man and 

, , V I 1 • 1 11 I'OI! Kl At H, lACKI.E 

t lok the held against the I'age- 

nien with a record unmarred 
by defeat. .After an exchange of punts earh- in the game, a Centenary back intercepted a pass at 
midfield, and on the next plav, Farell, visiting full back, tore around Butler's right end for a 
touchdown. Weaver place-kicked the extra point t) give Centenary' a 7 to advantage. Fighting 
for every possible inch of ground, Griggs and Words crashed through and around the opposing for- 
ward wall. .At the start of the second quarter, Paul completed the offensive drive by smashing over 
the goal line for Butler's initial points. Grigg- tied the count with a perfect goal from place- 
ment. 

The Bulldogs were plaving splendid ball against their hea\ier opponents, but superior weight 
enabled the visitors to batter through Butler's defense and again carr\- the pigskin to within scoring 
distance of the Blue and White goal. Farell att.-mpted to pass o\er the line for another touchdown 
near the close of the period. Nig Woods made a leaping one-hand catch tv) gain possession of the 
ball. Butler's \o\ ivas short-lived, however, for Weaver blocked a punt and forced Nipper t) fall on 
the oval behind the Bulldog goal, giving McMillan's eleven a 9 to 7 advantage. 



DA\E KII.GORK, Cl'ARD AND 
PC 1,1. BACK 




PAUL lACKLED AITER TOUCHDOWN IN SECOND QUARTER 



[,ev] 




Pat's 



Fake Surprises 
Wabash 



W!: 




ITH the one inten- 

of crossing the 

Wabash goal line, the 

hi<hting Bulldog combination 

took the field against the Wa- 

b 1 ■- h Cavemen and broke 

through the forward \vall ot 

the little Giants for two 

touchdowns which contrib- 
uted to a 1 2 to victory for 

Butler. Although the 'Blue 

and White had won in each 

of the two previous years, the 

I'agemen had not crossed the 

Scarlet goal for nine seasons. 

Everv available inch of space 

was taken by the crowd of 
i'ho jammed the bleachers to witness the battle. Battering off-tackle and through the 
very heart of the Wabash forward wall, the Blue and White attack carried the pigskin to within 
ten yards of the Scarlet goal only to lose the ball on downs. Singleton punted to mid-field, but 
the Bulldogs resumed their relentless drive through the Little Giant line. Eight slashes through 
the opposing defense gave the locals possession of the pigskin on the eleven-^ard line. .A short 
pass by Griggs surprised the Wabash backs and enabled Nipper to cross the goal for the first But- 
ler touchdown since 1915. 

A cleverly executed fake kick gave the BuUdcgs their other tallv. With the ball in mid- 
field, Griggs dropped back as if to punt on the third down. Nipper slipped bv the Wabash sec- 
ondary defense, received a long pass and scored Butler's second touchdown before half time. Wabash 
started the final session with a powerful punch that had been lacking during the earlv part of the 
game, but brilliant defensive rallies, in the shadow of their own goal posts, enabled the Buldlogs 
to stave off the Little Giant advances until the time-keeper ended the fracas. 



KLE AND 



LEFTV WOODLINC, 



spectators 




r.uiG(;s i'AKi;s place kh 



l'\S>IS 111 MIM'IR Willi SlOKi:! 



[,sa] 




DrPiinic Fdi/s to Stap 
Old Rivals 



c 




CARL CECIL, GUARD 



OMPLl'.TEIA' () u t- 
cl.ifsing the Dcl'.uiw 
Tigers in evcr^■ de- 
partment of the game, Coieh 

I'age's hlue-clad warriorv id- 

ministcred a thorough 26 to 

drubbing t.) their ineient 

rivals from Greencastle The 

splendid interference i n d 

team work of the Bulldo^ 

eleven kept the ball in the \i - 

itors' territory' eontniuilh 

and the Blue 'and White of 

Butler \vaved in triumpih o\"er 

the Old Gold of DePauw for 

the fourth consecutive year. 
Within five minutes after 
the starting whistle had sounded, Hal Griggs carried the ball within scoring distance of the Tiger 
goal when he made fifty-two -lards on four consecutive dashes around the wings of the DePauw 
line. He again attempted an end run, but, when he was tackled, the ball bounced from his arms. 
Paul scooped up the oval and romped across the goal for the initial points of the game. Griggs 
and Woods were both taken from the game to rest during the remainder of the period, but the 
Blue and White continued to menace tlie Tiger goal. Keach attempted two short placement 
kicks, but both were wide of the bar. 

DePauw had but few substitutes to use in the fracas, and during the final session, reserve 
strength gave Butler a decided advantage. Hal Griggs counted In the third quarter, and Nig Woods 
flashed into prominence during the closing minutes of plav with two long sprints which both 
resulted in touchdowns. The Tigers threatened bat once. Sturtridge got loose around end to dash 
to the ten-yard mark before Nipper brought him to the ground. Paul intercepted a pass on the 
next play, however, and carried the ball to mid-field where the game ended. 



HIRAM HENSEI., TACKLE 




OLD GOLD LINE FAILS TO STOP BULLDOGS 



[.SB] 



loii'd Applauds Grid 
Skill of Butler 

Si; T T I X G the dope 
bucket on end and lar 
surpassing the fondest 
hopes of the Butler rooters, 
Pat Page's Bulldog gridder^ 
hopped off to Iowa City and 
fought the Hawkeyes to a 7 to 
score. Although the Bull- 
dog eleven was outweighed 
and minus the services of Hal 
Griggs during the second 
period, the Blue and White 
held the ioiva eleven to a 
single touchdown and threat- 
ened continually to win the 
game with long end runs. 
Iowa's touchdown was an- 
I'he Bulldogs had made a cotrragtfou!; stand and took the ball on 
ne. Woods punted to the fast-flying Parkin who shook off the 
Butler tackles before crossing the goal line. The ball was called back because of Iowa's holding. 
However, Parkin's dash had instilled pep in the Iowa offense. Schirmer received a pass from 
Parkin, shook off three Butler men and snaked past Griggs and Nipper to score the onlv p^oints 
of the game. Griggs dislocated his left shoulder on the play and was forced from tlie game. 

Butler's running attack gained ground constantly. Time after time, Paul, Canfield, Kil- 
eore and Nig Woods, with Reichcl running splendid interference, carried the ball from Butler's 
territorv down to the danger mark in front of the Hawkeye goal only to have a costly fumble 
halt each march. Speaking of the contest, the Indianapolis News said "Butler made a fine im- 
pression. It clearh' outplaved Iowa throughout the entire first half and in the greater part ot the 
second period. Iowa stands were generous in applause to the Hoosiers." 





GORDON PALI,, KM) AND 
FULLBACK 

nexed in the second tjuarter. 
downs on their own tour-vard 



K IILI.ION, OLARTLR 




M(, I.AINS ARnlM) low A S LI IT IM) 



[ISO] 




W'cs/t'Vi!// EcLii/y 
Defeats Blue ' 



K 




S n result of the strenu- 
pl.iv .It lo\v:i on the 

'preceding S.iturd.i\', a 
let-down of the season came 
on the following week when 
the Bulldogs, playing far he- 
low their usual standard, fell 
before the superior attack of 
the powerful Ohio Wesle}'an 
aggregation at Irwin Field and 
were walloped 2+ to 0. 

The Buckeyes played splen- 
did football and certainl}' 
earned the victory, but the 
Blue and White team had 
every break against it. In ad- 
dition, the usually spectacular 
passing game of the Pagemen was completely swamped by the visitors, largeh' because Hal Griggs 
\vas forced to ivatch the contest from the bench as the result of a seriously di'^located shoulder. 

Pearce, visiting half back, gave the Wesleyan eleven a } t(j lead at half time when he booted 
a perfect place kick between the uprights after Nipper had missed two trys from near the center 
of the field. The game belonged to anybody at the start of the final session, but two intercepted 
forward passes and a cjstly Butler fumble enabled the Buckeyes to clinch the victory- with three 
touchdowns. 

Captain Nig Woods undoubtedly was the out'^tanding Bulldog player on the field, and he dis- 
pla\'ed a dangerous running ofi'ense. The Butler back carried the ball time atter time tor long 
gains around the \vings of the Buckeye line. His remarkable secondare' defe}isive work prevented 
the visitors from completely swamping the Blue and White. p'.asle}' and Pearce were the con- 
sistent ground gainers tor the Wesle^'an team. 



\1NCENT CAN FIELD, FULL- 
BACK 



FLKrCHlR, lACKLE 




HEAVY WESLEYAN LINE HALTS BLUE RACKS 



[,3,] 



Indians Get Revenge 
With Weight 

SERIOUSLY handicapped 
by injuries, the Butkr 
squad took the lieki 
against the Haskell Indian ag- 
gregation in the wind-up 
game of the gridiron schcduk 
at Irwin Field, and, as a re- 
sult, the redskin scalping 
party crushed the Pageraen 2lJ 
to 7 to avenge the dctcat 
handed them by the Bulldogs 
during the previous season. 
Nig Woods was on the bench 
with a cracked rib, and Griggs 
\vas nursing a dislocated shoul- 
der that he iniured in the 
Iowa fracas. 

Because ot their superior weight, the Indians crashed through the Blue and White line con- 
tinually during the initial period and carried the ball to within a yard of the Butler goal. A 
brilliant defensive rally enabled the locals to punt out of danger, but a well-organized open at- 
tack of the Indians again took the pigskin within scoring distance of the goal, and Colbv, red- 
skin fullback, skirted around the left end for the first touchdown. In the second half, brilliant 
defensive play by the Butler linemen again stopped the Haskell rushing game. However, the 
visitors opened up wqth an aerial attack, raising the score to 20 to when Lew and Kipp scored 
another touchdown apiece. 

During the fourth quarter. Coach Page revised his entire lineup, and the re\amped team 
carried the ball straight down the field with a dazzling line-plunging attack and an occasional short 
forward pass. After Nipper took the pigskin to the sixteen-yard line, Gordon Paul hit the op- 
posing forward wall on four consecutive plays and plowed across the line for Butler's onlv touch- 
down. 





MEL\IN PUETT, GUARD 
CENTER 



XLPH IincH, 




PMl, Pl.iiHS rilRoli.ll IMVANS MM. FOR r iH C II DOU \ 



['"] 




Basketball 



1924-25 Scores 




CAPJAIN HAI, (.RK.l 



Opponents 
25 
30 
22 
16 
17 
13 
17 



Butler 

Manchester College here 5 

E.irlham College here 40 

L'niv. of Iowa at Iowa City 26 

Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison 22 

Marquette U. at Milwaukee 2 5 

State Normal Col. at Muncie 28 

V'anderbilt University here 3 7 

University of Illinois here 2 + 

Ohio State Univ. at Columbus 3 + 

Kansas City Athletic Club 29 

Notre Dame University here 31 

Lombard College 41 

Univ. of Dayton at Dayton 28 

F.arlham College at Richmond 28 



CAPTAIN HALDANF. A. GRIGGS, center and senior 
member of the squad, has been a big point getter tor 
the Bulldogs during the past four years. During this 
time, he has been given a place on practically every all-state 
team. In 1924, when Butler won the national A. A. U. title 
at Kansas Citv, Hal was the high point man of the tourna- 
ment. He was placed on the mythical ail-American team. 



Seco> 



I K.M R<i\\ — Paul, Konold, Harkcr, Colway, Kcach, Christopher, Woodling 
Row— Hinkle, Daubenspeck, Wakefield. Fellows, Strole, Nail, Page. 




t f 4 




fltAfi 




[,94] 



1924-25 Scores 



Butle 

Wab.ish College here . _ 19 

DePamv Univ. .it Greencastlc 18 

Concordia at St. Louis .^2 

\'anderbilt Univ. at Nashville 3 3 

Univ. of Chicago at Chicago 23 

Freshmen vs. Franklin here . 46 

Notre Dame Uni\-ersity at South Bend 32 

Franklin College here ._- 17 

Freshmen vs. DePauw at Greencastlc --_ _ 31 

DePauw Universitv here 30 

Franklin College at Franklin 29 

Freshmen at Franklin .. +5 

Wabash College at Crawfordsville 31 

Freshmen at Cul\"er_ _ - -_ 32 



r Opponent^; 
■>2 
16 

13 

17 



39 
25 
16 
29 
3 5 
20 




C.APT.AIN-ELECT ROBKRT L. NIPPER plays either 
forward or guard. During the past three years he has 
been in almost everv game. His coolness at the foul 
line and his clever guarding ha\'e been factors in many vic- 
tories. He was selected all-state t;uard. 



CAP I AIN-Kl.lC 1 BOB NIPPUR 



Bottom Row — Collier, Summers, Jacknian, Captain Chadd, Thornton, Holt/,, Tudor. 
Second Row — Fellows, Ball, Meek, Hinkle. 
Top Row — Eickman, Colher, Zell. 




[,95] 




Butler Bnikctmcii 

Win 20 Out of 24 

G a flies 



B 



U T L E R'S 

squad won 



basketball 
twenty of 
twent\- - lour regularly 
scheduled contests during the 
past season and finished as 
runner-up for the state col- 
lege basketball championship, 
which was won by the Wabash 
netters, who finished the sea- 
son without losing to an In- 
diana opponent. The Bull- 
dog netters made a brilliant 
showing against the leading 
teams of the Middle West by 
defeating four out of five Big 
Ten conference opponents 
and winning all games against out-of-state teams, with the one exception oi the Ohio State con- 
test at Columbus, Ohio. The Buckeves nosed out the Blue and White by a narrow margin in this 
tussle, and then started a string of victories which carried them to undisputed claim to the Big 
Ten Conference championship. 




ITER 



BOB NIPPER 
FORWARD 



The Blue and White basketeers started the season with an easy 
Jege at the Butler gym. Wakefield, sophomore flash from Ben Dav 



victory over Manchester Col- 
is, gathered twenty-one points 
and enabled the locals to finish on the long end of a 50 to 25 count. Christopher, another star 
sophomore forward, teamed with Wakefield in the second contest, and Butler downed Earlham 40 
to 30 when the two second year players gathered twelve field goals and four free throws. With 
two early-season games safely tucked in the victory hag. Coach Page and his fighting Bulldogs 
started a Big Ten Conference invasion, which clearly pro\ed Butler's supremacy on the hardwood. 

.After riding all night and part of the following da}', the Pagemen dropped off the Pullman 

at Iowa Citv and drubbed the highly-touted Hawkeye aggregation, 26 to 22, in one of the lastest 

amp. Early on the following morning, the Bulldogs again hoarded 

sin, to clash with the University of Wisconsin in the evening. A 

terrific blizzard tied up rail- 

^^^ET- road traffic during the greater 

I Kfr^'^^^^^ 'lien reached the Badger stronj^- 

I ^k ^ hold just in time to take ihi 

I y^ ^ floor against Dr. MeanwelT 

r ^j^' ^. famed short-passing combina- 

tion, which had tied for the 

l^^^^^^_ „ conference title the previous 

^^^^^Hp Worn 

^^^^^ i long ride, Butler started slow, 

but gradualh' warmed lo ihe 
task, and nosed out the Norlh- 
erners, 22 to 18, in another 



contests ever staged at the Ii 
the rattler- for M.uli i.n, \\ 



I BUTLt 



CKM: COIAVAI 
(.I'AUl) 




spectacular struggle. Mariiuelte 
bowed to the Blue and White 
on the following night, and 
the Bulldogs returned with 
three more scalps hanging on 
their \ ictorv belt. 




KflUllEft. 



nilB Kl ACll 

c. u A R a 



[,.6] 




DAVE KONOLD 
CENTER 



Uni\-cr?ity 
Koiiold "?ot hot 



of the strongest ti 



Defeat Fold- Big 

Trii C'.<i!ifcrc/icr 

Tciu/is 

In the most thrilling con- 
test ever staged for the benefit 
of the local backers, the Butler 
squ.-id clashed with Illinois on 
the following week-end at 
Tomlinson Hall, and brilliant 
work bv Nipper and Chris- 
topher gave the Pagemen a 24 
to 22 advantage. Chicago fell 
before the attack of the Page- 
men, 22 to 17, but Ohio State 
proved to be the stumbling 
block. The Buckeyes rushed 
into an early lead and finished 
the contest on the long end of 
a 34 to 29 count. Winderbilt 
:ams in the South, dropped tw( 




d L^k iXI 



JERRY STROLE 
GU.^RD 



Earlham also fell before the Butler attack in a return 



ocals when 
at Richmon 



Dave 



Butler talterecl momentarih' in two important games with Hoosier opponents, and Wabash 
and Franklin both came to town and returned to their respective camps with the long end of the 
scores, 22 to 19 and 22 to 17. Both games were hard fought, and Butler led practically all of 
the way in each contest, only to be nosed out in the closing minutes of play. Bob Keach and 
Jerry Strole came to the front in the Notre Dame contest and enabled the Irvingt m team to 
crash through the Irish for a top-heavy, 31 to 16 victory. Lombard, Dayton University and the 
Blue Diamonds of the Kansas City A. C, all took the short end of the score, and then the I'age- 
men started a final drive for the state net title. 



The 


local 


the resul 


of b 


Franklin 


sharps 


shooting 


rom ; 


however. 


when 




; invaded the Baptist camp and crashed through for a decisive, 29 to 16 victory 
rilliant work by Captain Griggs and Pug Colwa)-, who completely smothered 
hooters. Nipper and Griggs made possible Butler's high score by uncanny ba: 
ill corners of the floor. Butler's title hopes failed to materialize at the last monK 
Pete \'aughan's Scarlet-clad warriors played host to the Bulldogs and defeated 

Pagemen 3 5 to 3! in another 

"fe.Uure" tussle. Inability to 

connect with the basket pre- 

\ented the Bulldogs from win- 
ning this final game, and as a 

result the Little Giants nosed 

out the Pagemen in the state 

title race. 



Captain Hal Griggs was far 
trom his usual iorm at the 
start of the season, but bril- 
liant work in the closing games 
ot the schedule more than 
made up for this fact. Pug 
Cohsa^, the only other senior 
lettcrman on the stpad, played 
an unusually consistent game 
at back guard during the entire 
year. 




CLARENCE CHRISTOPHER 
FORWARD 



BOB WAKEFIELD 
FORWARD 



['"] 



Cheer Leaders 




TOM 



THOMAS F. SMITH 




DICK 

KICIIARU MILLS 



i 




"HARRY" 

i;veki;ti r. mildni r 



[,8e] 





Track 



1924 Track Season 




At K.ins.is Rcl.iy-, L:nvrence, Kansas — Second in 
t}ie half mile, ^L-cond in the medley and third in 
the mile. 

At Drake Relays, Des Moines, Iowa— First in the 
medley, second in the half mile and third in the 



-Butler 



De- 



In dual meet with Del 
Pauw, 5OV3. 

In triangular meet \vith Franklin and N. A. 
G. U.— Butler, 101; N. A. G. U., 27; Frank- 
lin, 22. 

At state college meet, Richmond — Butler, 
63 >^; Wabash, 44V2 ; DePauw, 36. Griggs was 
high point man. 

At state meet, Notre Dame — Notre Dame, 
53^4; Butler, +5; Wabash, 23; DePauw, IT-M; 
Purdue, 16;;4; Indiana, 4-'4. Griggs was high 
point man. 

At Western Conference meet, Chicago — Gra\ , 
second in 220; Doolittle, first in two-mile run. 

Dooiittle, distance runner, and Mulholland, bo.xer, 
made the .American Olympic team. 

STATE RECORDS 

;9 4, 5--Ec]ualed by Gr.iy in 1923. 

220-yard dash^.. :21 3/5— Equaled by Gray in 1924. 

Two-mile run 9:45 4/5 — Established bv Doolittle in 1922. 

120-vard high hurdles :15 2/5 — Equaled b\- Griggs in 1924. 

Mile' relay 3:22 3/5— Establishecl by Northam, Gray, 

Ham and Carawa\" in 1923. 
iiroM Row — Huber, Doolittle, Griggs, Graham, Graw 
coND Row- — Reid, Woods, Ham, Snyder. 
)P Row — Fellows, Caraway, Northam, Kilgore, Page. 



CAPIAIN HAL (.RIGGS 



lOO-yard dash 




'•*• fe4' 







[200] 



the 
the 



+ 3.1 

30 
23.9 



1925 Relay Records 

At Illinois Indoor Rcl.iys Fcbni.iry :s- hirst ii 
mile (e.irnix.il record). Time, 3:26.2. 

At Cleveland Indoor Meet, M.irch 10 — First ii 
mile. Time, 3:28. 

-At Te.xas g.imej, Austin, 'T'ex.is, M.trch 27 — 
First in the qu.irtcr mile. Time, 

First in the h.ilf mile. Time, I 

First in the mile. Time, 3 

At Rice Rehiys, Houston, Te.x.is, M.irch 28— 

Tie with Illinois for first in half mile. Time, 1 :3I.+ 
First in the mile. Time, 3:24.5 

At Kansas Relays, Lawrence, Kans., April 17-18 — 
First in the half mile (carnival rec.rd). Time, 1 :28.9 
First in the mile (carni\al record). Time, 3:23.2 
Fourth m the c]uarter mile. Kan-as 

made a world's record. Time, AlA 

At Drake Relays, Des Moines, Iowa, .April 24-2 5 — 
First in the medlev, 1 J-^ miles (new 

national record). Time, 7:43.9 

First in the mile (new collegiate 




3:1! 



colk 



Time, 1:27.8 
Time, :42.6 
Mav 23. — Nctre D, 



record ) . 
First in the half mile 
record ) . 
First in the quarter mile. 

Last Minute News — Lafayette, Ind 
collegiate Track and Field meet here today with 43 1/7 poin 
34 r 7. Other scores were: Purdue, 29 2/7; DePauw, 19 9, 
1(1 1 7; State Normal, 4 1/2; Rose Poly, 4 and Franklin, 1 1/ 

Bottom Row — Luckett, Shinn, I'uett, Floyd. 

Second Row — Ash, Captain Phillips, Robinson, McGuire. 

Top Rou— Durbin, Miller, Hart, Teague, Struhmcier. 



CAPIAIN l.I.KNS (.RAY 



me \\o\ 
:s. But 
'14; W 



the 
ler w 
abash, 



India 

as seci 

19; 



na Inter- 
)nd \vith 
Indiana, 




[201] 




Captain Haldane A. Griggs, Senior, hurdler, shot putter, broad jumper, discus and 
javelin thrower. Hal is the greatest all-round athlete in the State of Indiana and one of 
the most versatile in the Middle West. Making and equaling records and carrying off high 
point honors have been his performances for the past four years on the cinder paths and 
in field events. He is Butler's only four-letter man since the days of Cully Thomas. 

Captain Glenn A. Grav, junior, Icadoff or anchor man of the record-breaking relay 
team and joint holder of the 100 and 220-yard state records. Glenn has been in the lore- 
ground of Indiana cinders for the past six years, both in high school and college. During 
the 192 5 season, he led his team in the most successful year in Butler's track career. Last 
vear he went to the finals in the Olympic trials at the Harvard Stadium. 

Ex-captain Gerald E. Woods, Senior, hurdler, high jumper and broad jumper. Nig 
has been a point getter for four years. During the past season, he jumped to prominence 
at the Rice Relavs at Texas and the Penn Games at Philadelphia. His leaps were better 
than twcnu-four feet for a first at both places. He also placed third in the high hurdles 
at the Penn Relay's. 

David B. Kilgorc, Junior and leadoff member of the relay team. Dave is Pat's war horse. 
When he leads off, he give' the Bulldog quartet a good position with his tight and weight. 




;u\v SI AitriNc. last QrARiiis oi- MiLi: uri.AV 



[.o. ] 




Rilus E. Doolittle, Senior, member of the United States Olympic team and distance 
runner. Rilus holds the record for the two-mile run in the Big Ten Conference and in 
the state. He did not get a place in the International Games, hut he made a creditable 
showing against the stars of all nations, including Nurnii and Ritola. 

Brewer W. Graham, Junior and pole \aultcr. Brewer tied for iirst place in the 
state meet in I 923. in 1924, he was a consistent punit maker. 

Fremont W. Snyder, Sophomore and handsome distance runner. Fremont has never 
won a first place, but he has contributed quite a te\v points U) Butler's totals. He was a 
member of the medley rel.iy team of 1924 which won at Drake. 

Carl W. Huber, graduate in the Class of 1924, half-miler and member of the 1924 
relay team. Carl helped to win the relay event in the state meet at Notre Dame last year. 




DOOLITTLE WINNING 5,000 METER OLYMPIC ITNALS .Vl ANN ARIiOR, MICH. 



[203] 




Scott Ham, Senior, member of the relay team and low hurdler. Scott%' alternates with 
Kilgore on the mile quartet. Thirty-two degrees in Masonry kept him out of some races 
this past spring, hut he hit his old stride before the season closed. 

Handly W. Caraway, Senior, half-miler and member of the rel.ay team. Handly puts 
the punch into the crack relay squad. In a recent race, he held back at the finish to let a 
teammate finish first — because the latter had an opportunity to be high point man. 

John T. Northam, Sophomore, sprinter, broad jumper and member of the 192 + 
rela^' team. John holds the state high school record for the broad jump. He runs a close 
second to Gray in the dashes. In 1924, he was the best broad jumper on the Blue squad. 




U, \')1^ Kl enl;l)-l;l;l Al^lM. I; 1 1, AV Tl-iAM 
KILGORE Al.riiUNATliS Willi HAM 



[204] 



Baseball 




r 



{ 







19 


2-1 


SC0?'€S 




^/ 


Butler 




2 


Wisconsin 


10 


I5utlcr 

Butler _ 




.._ 6 

...15 
... 4 


Indiana 

Purdue 

DePauw 





^ J< 


Butler „„ 




3 


'*-agr%MfC 


Butler 




8 


Chicago 

Cincinnati 


6 


f^^ 


Butler 




...11 


4 


%r^ 


Butler 




... 6 


Wabash 


7 




Butler 

Butler 




..^ 3 
...23 


Ohio State 


-) 


Muncie Normal 





YV 


Butler . 




... 4 


Purdue 


6 


Butler 

Butler 




..14 
... 4 








Cincinnati 


3 




Butler 




... 6 


Indiana 


9 


^^B 


Butler 




... 6 


Northwestern 


2 


^m^M 


Butler 




1 


Chicago (rain) 


1 


' V_|f^j* 


Butler 




2 


Franklin 


4 


'iiv"^'^i£ite 


Butler 




2 


State Normal 


3 


jJrbiim^^^^HB' 


Butler 

Butler 




...20 
. 2 


DePauw 




'IHP.J^BJ-'i-' 


Michigan Normal 

Michigan Aggies 

Wabash 


8 


CAPTAIN' Ron Rl.KSSING 


Butler 

Butler 




... 4 
... 4 


8 

6 



BoTioM Row — Phillips, Thornberr\ , McGuire, \'ennard, Christopher, Dixon. 
Skconi) Row— Captain Rayle, Floyd, Queisser, McCaskey. 
Third Row — Stewart, Green, Strohmeier, Brown, Bruning. 
Top Row — Stahr, Wakefield. 



3f : 









ir>' 






^r*~:S^i^n 




[aoo] 



1925 Scores 



Butler 7 

Butler \i 

Butler. 5 

Butler 2 

Butler 10 

Butler 11 

Butler 2 

Butler 9 

Butler. 7 

Butler 11 

Butler. 4 

Butler 8 

Butler.. 3 

Butler 10 

Butler 3 

Butler 13 

Butler 9 

Butler .X 

Butler 5 

Butler 7 



Iiuii.iii.i Ceiitr.il 3 

CumhcrlanJ, Lebanon, Tenn 6 

Cumberland, Lebanon, Tenn 13 

\'andcrbilt, Nashville, Tenn._ 7 

Louisville 7 

Muncie Normal 2 

Ohio State I 1 

Louisville 6 

Dayton . 6 

Indiana Central 9 

Hanover 2 

Franklin 1 

Wabash 2 

State Normal 2 

Chicago 3 

DePauw 3 

State Normal 2 

Hanover (rain) x 

DePauw 1 

Davton 1 




CAPrAlN l)U K \I11.LS 



First Row — Mills, Reichel, Welborn, Staton, Blessing, Middlesworth, Goett, Jones, 
Nipper. 

Second Row — Strole, Griggs. 

Third Rou — Fellows, Cecil, Keach, Hinkle, Slaughter, Thornbcrry, Page. 

Top Row — Woodlin^, F.wing. 




[20V] 




Ex-captain Heiirv O. Goett, graduate in the Class of 192+, shortstop and catcher. 
Heinc-s- was captain of the team in 1922. He played short for three years and catcher during 
his Senior rear. He has been one of Pat's diamond mainstays since his Freshman year. 

Captain Richard Mills, Junior and shortstop. Dick has been captain during the past 
season. His size and ability to hit make him the best lead-otf man on the team. 

E.x-captain Robert Blessing, Senior and third baseman. Bob led the team last year 
frcni the hot corner. He was home-run king of the squad. He pLayed with the Indians 
last summer and is now with the Senators. 

Hugh Walden Middlesworth, graduate in the Class of 1924 and outfielder. Wally 
was captain in 1923 when Butler won the state championship. He is now teaching Pat's 
svsteni to the Freshmen. 




vi I hi;ci:i\im; i'i:i. ro caicii ciikm.o kinm_r 



[2oe] 




Robert L. Nipper, Junior and second baseman. Bob is not a daz/.ling performer, but a 
coo], consistent fielder and hitter. His fielding was among the best in 1924, and his batting 
has been one of the features of the past season. 

Carlyle Ewing, junior and pitcher. Carlyle was an alternate pitcher during his fresh- 
man and sophomore years. However, during the 1925 season he filled Glen Staton's shoes 
in a creditable manner. He defeated Robinson of Wabash, who had never lost a game 
during his college career, 3 to 2, in the pitcher's battle. 

Robert |. Reach, junior and outfielder. |im is a heavy hitter and comes through 
when hits count. With the bases full in the tenth inning of the Wabash game at Irwin 
Field, Mai- 1, he singled to win the game. 

Haldane A. Griggs, Senior and outfielder. Hal can play any position on the team 
when called upon. He demonstrated his pitching ability on the recent southern trip. He 
i-- one of the heaviest hitters and the best pegger on the squad. 




nATTlNG PRACTICK ON IRWIN FIEI 



[209] 




James Elwood Slaughter, Sophomore, pitcher and nutlielder. Slaughter did not return 
last season. However, he was a good hitter and moundsnian in 192+. He saved the da\- in 
the state championship game with the Little Giants in 1923 Lvv pitching air-tight hall in the 
last four innings. 

Lundy Earl Welborn, graduate in the class of 192+, and outlielder. Lund\- was a 
leadoff man and a heavy hitter. He coached for three ^■ears at Wilkinson before he com- 
pleted his last year on the Bulldog diamond. 

Paul Jones, graduate in the Class of 1924 and hrst baseman. Dizz\', because of his 
size, has made many bad pegs count for outs. He came through with the bat in his senior 
■<ear. 

Glen O. Staton, Senior and pitcher. Jake was Butler's pitching ace from 1921 to 
1924. He has probably won more games for Butler than ani" other one man. He was 
also a good batter, but he did not receive a letter last ^'ear. 




h 







'/j^'^yy 




z^.^ 




IINKI.l: (.IXINC. SI.IDlNc. I'OlSri US 



[=,0] 





T 



cnnis 




CAPT. KURZROK, MCLEAV, nullMtl)-, i \l'l. -\i.\l' 

(Dixon replaced NULc.iy in April, 1925) 



'Fcnnis Squad Has Tuco (jvcat Seasons 



l'J24 

April 1')— Rotk-r 5 Sta 

April 211— Butk-r - 6 Ea 

April 2> — ButUr 3 Ch 

April 29- Butler -..- 3 Fr^ 



3— Rutlo 
7— Biitic 
9— Biitk- 



5 St: 



itL- Normal 





April 
April 
April 
April 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 


1 5— Butler .... 
IS— Butler... 


5 

s 


Earlham ... 
State Norm 
Franklin 




II 


rlham 




_._.„ 
...... 

1 


al ... 


1 


'"go 

anklin 


22 — Butler 




1 




3 


Washington 
Illinois 


U. ... 


. 1 


Jtre Dame .- 


8— Butler 

9 — Butler 


3 
3 






, 4 

a 

n 




Washington 
Oklahoma . 

DePauw 

DePauw .... 

State Norm; 


U. .. 




itc Normal 


12— Butler ... 
13— Butler ... 
19— Butler... 

20- Butler .. 


4 

6 

6 


3 


anklin 

rlham 


il 


.... (1 





5 


II 




46 




12 



JULIUS S.\(;.\L()WSKY and Leo Kiirzrok, Butler's tenni? aces, tinished the most suc- 
cessful season in the history of the school hy winning the state doubles championship. 
May 31, 1924-, from Donovan and Centlivre of Notre Dame in straight sets, 7-5, 0-.3. 
Sagolosky lost to Donovan in the finals for the state singles championship. 

The pair also flashed to prominence when they traveled to the semi-finals of the West- 
ern Conference meet at Chicago last year. Sagalo\vsk^■ went to the singles linals but was 
defeated by Wilson of Chicago. 

Wally Richards and \'al McLeay were the other two members of the squal which per- 
f(/rmed in stellar st\le all season. The quartet won lort\" and lost onh' h\e sets out ol 
nine dual meets. Illinois defeated the Blue four sets to two, and Notre Dame captured 
one set. 

Last Minute News — Chicago, May 23. — Sagalowsky and Kur/.rok of Butler won the 
Western Conference doubles championship here today. Kur/.rok defeated Sagalowsky fur 
the singles title. 



[z,.] 




Intramural Sports 








jVIANN'AN, MCIIAAIN, CAPI. 11 1 OK M; )• KK V, TEAGUE, CAR\ER 



Delta Phi Sigma Defeats All Basket Contenders 

GOING thrcii{<li the entire season n-ith(;ut a single defeat. Delta Phi Sigma basket 
tossers fought an uphill battle to defeat the Phi Delts in the final game," 28 to 23. 
The Lambda Chis made a strong bid for the right to meet the leaders but fell be- 
fore the Phi Dclts prior to the finals. The m.ajority of the games were evenly matched 
and the scores were close. However, the feature attraction of the Interfraternit\- League 
was the second half of the game between the Phi Delts and Delta Sigs. Trailing' 14 tj 7, 
the winners, with c\-ery player a star, scored from all parts of the floor t) win in the last 
three minutes of plaw 



HOW THKY FINISHED 

Won 

Delta Phi Sigma 8 

Phi Delta Tlieta _„. 6 

Lambda Chi Alpha 5 

Butler Association 4 

Delta Tau Delta _ 3 

Tau Knppa Tau _ 2 

Alpha Rho Delta .__ 1 

Sandwich Club 



Lost 



ret. 

i.ono 
.rio 

.714 

.571 
.428 
.2SS 
.142 
.(KM) 



[2,4 I 




Fn 1 Ro\\ Smith Oritr L i)- 1 DuttLnln\Li Ml\ it n Llifl)ii 
SiLcMi Row— MlLti L(_n Stihl MunL\ Stewnt ChritJj^hLr GLinmi 
TiiiKi) R u- Po t MuLlkr W- ikhtld Copplc ] hlci 



Lawhda Chi Alpha Wins Football Championship 

Al-'TKR playing Dclt.i Phi Signi.i to .1 scoreless tic, L.inibd.t Chi Alpha came through 
in the final game with a brilliant brand of football to defeat the Sigma Nu peti- 
• tioners by an 18 to count. Paul AlcNorton, by his terrific line plunging, was 
the backbone of the Lambda Chi offense. He plowed through the mud and hit every 
Delta Phi Sig player for gains. Morris and Talbcrt showed up best for the losers, espe- 
cially in the last minutes of plai- when the Delta Sigs reeled off first downs in fast order, 
to be stopped fi\"e }-ards from the Lambda Chi goal as the game ended. 



RESULTS OK GAMES 



Lambda Chi Alpha 
Delta Phi Sigma _„. 
Delta Phi Sigma .... 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



18 Phi Delta Theta 6 

18 Delta Tau Delta 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

18 De'ta Phi Sigina 





First Row — D.ivis, Ertle, Puett, Paul, Helton, Nitcw.mdcr 
Second Rnw — Bockstahlcr, Gremelsp.ichcr, Clark, Brennan, Miller 

Delta Tau Delta Leads 1924 Baseball League 

HOW THEY FINISHED 

Won Lost Pet. 

Delta Tau Delta ....._ __,„7 2 .885 

L.amhda Chi Alpha 6 3 .750 

Delta Phi Sigma 4 3 .572 

Phi Delta Theta 4 3 .572 

Butler Association 3 4 .429 

Sigma Chi 2 5 .286 

Tau Kappa Tau 2 5 .286 

Sandwich Club 1 6 .143 



[2,6] 



W\ 



^r^k 



Women Athletics 




DOROTHY STEPHI.NSDN, PRl 



ir. A. A. 



T 



HI*'. Wom.m's Athletic Association was organized in the spring of 1923 for the pur- 
pose of promoting school spirit and interest in physical education. Miss Louise 
Schulnie\'er, director of wcmen's athletics, brought the idea to Butler alter attending 
a national conference of W. A. A. Sue Harmon and Dorothy Stephenson have taken an 
active part in the development of the organization which is now a member ot the national 
W. A. A. Recenth- thcv attended a meeting of W. A. A. at Bloomington where delegates 
gave reports of the national conference held at Berkeley, California. 

Last fall a point svstem was put into effect by which a girl, who shows athletic ability, 
ma^' \\\n three awards — a W. .A. A. pin for +00 points, a monogram for 700 and a sweater 
for 1,000. One hundred points entitles one to membership provided lifty additional points 
are made each year. 

First Row — Sue Harmon (Secretary), Lillian Martin (Treasurer), Dorothy Kemp. 
Shcond Row — Dorothy- Patterson, Doroth-\^ .A\'els, Katherine Hall, Lucille Lugar 
(\'icc-Pre<Ident). 




[=■«] 




-0 



riHLI.Ml VI R, DIRl C I OR 



Varsity 



THI". highest honor that a coed athlete can attain at Butler is to make the mythical 
basketball varsity, selected by Miss Louise Sehulmeyer at the close of the inter-class 
games. One hundred points are awarded to each member of the team on the basis 
of abilitv and sportsmanship. The squad Is composed of Miriam Fa}' and Dorothy Kemp, 
forwards; Lillian M.trtin, jumping center; Sue Harmon, side center; Louise Padou and 
.Augusta Bowerman, guards; .Audrey Ow-ens and Helen Moffet, substitutes. 

.A second team was also chosen, and each girl on this squad received seventy-hve points. 
The team includes: Catherine Dodson and Margaret Robinson, forwards; Dorothy .Avels, 
jumping center; Katherine Burgan, side center; Maude Searcy and Lucille Lugar, guards; 
i-eefe Worth and Margaret Hunt, substitutes. 

First Row — Sue Harmon, Louise Padou, .Audrey 0^vn•lgs 

Second Row — Helen Moffett, Miriam Fay, Lillian Martin, .Augusta Bowerman, 
Doroth-\- Kemp 




[.,»] 




First Row — Dorothy Kemp, Augusta Bowerman, Marie Taeoma 
Second Row — Sue Harmon, Margaret Robinson, Lois Heller, Pauline Ingalls, Ma 
garet Hunt, Katherine Burgan 



Zeta Faus Capture Schulmexcr Cup 

ZETA TAU ALPHA netters copped the 1925 intersorority basketball championship 
and the Schulmeyer troph}- for which the Tri Delts and Independents were fight- 
ing. Both teams had won it twice. The Zeta Taus, besides winning seven out of 
eight games, scored I 1 1 points. The ne.xt best record was made b^" the Independents with 
eighty-seven. Because the series took up much valuable time, there will be an elimination 
system in effect next year in order that more time and interest niav be devoted to the inter- 
class games. 



HOW THEY FINISHED 

Won 

Zeta Tau Alpha 7 

Delta Delta Delta 6 

Independents 6 

Alpha Delta Theta 5 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 5 

Sigma Delta 2 

Alpha Chi Omega 2 

Kappa .Alpha Theta 1 

Pi Beta Phi 1 



Lost 



[ 220 ] 




Maude SearL^', Doroth)' Stephenson, Lillian Martin, Margaret Water-, Dorothy A\el-, 
Edvthe Hubbard,' Eldena Meier 



Tri Dclts Win First Vollcv Series 



1 



IXTERSORORITY volleyball, which was introduced at Butler in the spring of 1924, 
was met with much interest and enthusiasm. Because the game is less strenuous than 
basketball, an opportunity of enjoying athletics and profiting by physical exercise is 
jfforded every girl. During the period when two teams, consisting of eight members, are 
fighting for twenf\--one points, there is as much suspense and excitement as there is in a 
football game. 

The Tri Delt team, composed of Margaret Waters, captain; Lillian I\Lirtin, Dorothy 
Stephenson, Dorothy Avels, Thelma Carter, Louise Padou, LaVern Bishop, Josephine Os- 
borne, Maude Searcv, Mildred Foxworthy, Kdythe Hubbard, Margaret Haldy and Eldena 
Meier, defeated the Alpha Delt squad in the finals, 21 to 11 and 21 to 6 for the chain- 
pionship and the silver cup. Neither finalist' had lost a game during the tournament. 



["•] 



1- 



^t 



J f 1 I -)- "^ 





Seniors 



First Row — Capt. Lillian Martin 
Second Row — F.lcisc Luzador, Louise 
-ue Harmon 



aJoii, Helen Moffect, ^La^£Jaret Ribinsm, 



Sop/is^ Champs 



Fir? r Rtiw — Capt. Dorothy Kemp 

Second Row— NLiude Searcv, Leefe Worth, Djrothv Avcls, Helen 



e, Mildree 








["=] 




] iimors 



First Ro\\' — Cath.iriiie Dudson, Capt. Doruth}' Pi;indc\tcr, \'i\-iaii Grcatbatch 
Second Rou — Lucille I.ugar, Pauline Ingallf, Dorothy Patterson, Dorothy Stephen- 
son, Marie Taconia, Katherine Burgan 



Frosh 



First Rou— Catherine Gilbert, Ellen McLean, Capt. Miriam Fay, Evelyn Forsvth, 
Clara Fo.\\vorth\' 

Second Row — Pollie Du\'al. Dorcthy Dugdale, Helen Strawmyer, ^L^rgaret Hunt, 
Augusta Bowerman, Audrev Owens 




[223] 







THE nATTLE IS ON 



]V. A. J. Sponsors Point System 

ACCORDING to A. C. A. C. \V., of which the Butler W. A. A. is a member, inter- 
collegiate competition is prohibited. Heretofore a varsity' team had been chosen 
' after the completion of the intersororitv series, and games with other colleges and 
outside teams w-ere carded. But this year, as outside competition was abandoned, all the 
interest was centered within the school in the interclass series. 

Miss Schulme}er selected a Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior team cf the most 
capable plavers in the sorority league. .A si.\-game series was then played, and each class 
team tried to prove its superiority over the other three. As a result the Sophomores out- 
classed their ri\'als and won the series. 

These games were the closest ever plaved at Butler, and the rivalrv was sa intense that 
much excitement was manifested. The Sophcmores had to exert themselves to the utmost to 
defeat their competitors and attain the honor of being queen of the hoops. Good spirts- 
mau'^hip and keen interest were displayed throughout the tournament. 

Fifty points towards W. A. A. credit w-ere awarded to the participants. 

For attaining 700 points since the establishment of W. .A. .A. at Butler, the following 
received monograms: Sue Harmon, Pat Carver and Lillian Martin. For earning 400 
point? W. A. A. pins were awarded to Pauline Ingalls, Sue Harmon, Louise Padou, Dor- 
othy Kemp, Dorothy Avels, Catharine Dodson, Lillian ALartin, Pat Car\er, Mildred Stock- 
d.-le and Doroth}' Stephenson. 



["-] 




Cr reck 



X'fCS 




-D 



iS?> 



Cl'IAFR (.(IDl'Rl V, PRES. 

Iritc rf ra te rriity C o unci I 

ALTHOUGH only five years old, the Iiiterfr.Uernity Council is one of the leading 
organizations on the campus. It strives to regulate rushing, raise scholarship and 
'"prevent lifting of pledge pins. With such a close contact with one another, the group 
members are able to promote fellowship, school spirit and co-operation among themselves 
and to solve problems that arise everv dav in fraternity life. However, the Council's main 
purpose is to serve Butler. 

It sponsors interfraternit}' football, basketball, baseball, track and horseshoe pitching. 
Next year it will award a scholarship cup to the fraternity that makes the highest average. 

Tw'o representatives are selected bv the fraternities that are members and meetings 
.ire held semi-monthlv at the various chapter houses. The Council is at present composed 
of Phi Delta Theta,' Delta Tau Delta, L.ambda Chi .Alpha, Tau Kappa Tau and Delta 
Phi Sigma. 

First Row— \al McLe.ay (President, "25), Rollin Davis (\'icc-President), joe Grem- 
elspacher, Scott Ham 

Second Row — Robert Hittle, Carroll Nipp, Mercl Carver, Damien L}ii!an (Secre- 
tary-Treasurer), Glenn Duttenhaver 




[2.5] 




GERTRVOK SCHMIDT, PRES 



Pan-Hcllcnic 



THl', Butler P.m-Hellcnic Association was organized \n 191+ to unifv the interests 
of tlie women's fraternities, to regulate rush conditions and to promote a feeling of 
good fellowship and democracy among fraternity girls. The Association todav is 
composed of a Senior, Junior and Alumna representative from each of the ten women's 
Greek letter organizations. It meets the first Monday of each month at the various chapter 
houses. 

The offices are automatically held each year by the representatives in the order of 
their fraternity's establishment at Butler, namely: Kappa Kappa Gamma, Pi Beta Phi, Kappa 
.Alpha Theta, Delta Delta Delta, Zeta Tau .Alpha, .Alpha Delta Theta, Delta Zeta, .Alpha 
Chi Omega and Alpha Delta Pi. 

First Row — Marjorie Chiles {Secretar\"-Treasurer), Sarah Frances Downs, .Anna C. 
Gardner, Pauline Ballweg, Mary Frances Ogle 

Second Ro«' — Louise Padou, Margaret Waters, Eleanor King, Katherine Burgan, 
Gladys Collins, Helen Moffett, Loui.^e Rundell 

Third Row — Hope Carter, Doroth\- Patterson, Eleanor Cornell, Eleanor Mueller, 
Alice V..Liiit<, Florence Lcshcr, Xcllic Wurtz 




fH <^ 







<-> 



I 



[225] 




Fraternities 



'Phi 'Delta Thcta 




Founded at Mi 



Indiana Ga 
Co/or..— Argent and Azure 



■niversity, Oxford, Ohio, December 26, 1S(4S 

Ninety-three Chapters 
I Chapter established, October 22, 18^9 

Flo'-ver — White Carnation 



Fir.t Roci— 

George Schumacher, '25, (Prcs.), Indianapoli; 
Guv Dixon, '27, Indianapolis 
Clifford Courtney, 27, Linton 
Douglas Dale, '2", Indianapolis 

.V,co«,y Rozt — 

Virgil Robv, '26, Wabash 
Robert H. Bull, '25, Chicago, 111. 
Albert Siegmund, '27, Wabash 
Carlisle Ewing, '26, Indianapolis 
David Konold, '26, Winona Lake 

r/iird Roc- 
Carl Cecil, '26, Indianapolis 
John Mann, '26, Southport 
Rollin Davis, '26, North Salem 
Eugene Colvvav, '25, Muncie 
Robert Webb, '2", Indianapolis 
Handlv Caraway, '26, Indianapolis 

Foiirl/: Roa — 

Louis Reichel, '26, Indianapolis 
Haldane Griggs, '25, Indianapolis 
Scott Ham, '25, Indianapolis 
Herman Porter, '26, Indianapolis 
Gerald Woods, '25, Greenfield 



Bruce Matlock, '26, Denver, C(do. 
Dean Brossman, '26, Indianapolis 
Xeal Carter, '25, Indianapolis 
Russell Hottle, '27, Indianapolis 
Merrill BRLtNiNC, '27, Indianapolis 
Edwards Andregg, '28, Indianapolis 
ixrh R»ct — 
Willard Robinson, '27, Indianapolis 
Worth Schantz, '27, Chicago, 111. 
Paul H.abee, '25, Indianapolis 
Hugh Envart, '27, Indianapolis 
Willard Leichty, '27, Wabash 



.SVr 



Rou 



Liield 



Herman Blumenauer, '2S, Gr 
Norman Poinier, '28, Indianapolis 
.TuRi-iN Davis, J.H. Indian.ipolis 
W.VLTER Floyd, '27, Indianapolis 
Ralph I.. Hitch, '2", Lafayette 
Robert Woolgar, '2", Indianapolis 
Eii^/'t/i Rw— , 

Robert H.*ys,''28, Wilkinson 

George Freidenberger, '28, Marshall, 111. 

Harrison Smithson, '28, Tipton 

George Cecil, '2S, Indianapolis 

Gerald Friedman, '27, Wabash 




[22B] 



Sigma Qhi 




Founded at MKimi University, Oxford, Ohio, 1S55 

Eighty-four Chapters 

Rho Chapter established, April 10, 1S65 



Colors— mw and Gold 



Flouc, — White Ros: 



First Roa: — 

Jerome Bash, '25, ( Prcs. ), Indianapolis 
James Tipton, '25, Indianapolis 
Robert Reach, '26, Sevmour 
Robert Cooper, '26, Indianapolis 

Lawrence Henderson, '26, Lebanon 
Frank Atkins, '26, Indianapolis 
Albert Marker, '26, Frankfort 
Frank Trost, '25, Indianapolis 
Robert Blessing, '25, Indianapolis 
Harold Harmon, '26, Sullivan, 111. 

T/i,rJ Ro'.i — 

Brewer Graham, '26, Indianapolis 
Toe York, '26, Indianapolis 
Robert Nipper, '26, Indianapolis 
Hughes Updegraff, '25, Indianapolis 
Horace Storer, '26, Indianapolis 

Fnur/h Ro'-L — 

[oHN BoLTE, '27, Indianapolis 
Fred Sanders, '27, Indianapolis 
Karl Stegemeier, '27, Indianapolis 
Wallace Richards, '26, Indianapolis 
Fred Schick, '27, Indianapolis 
John Stahr, '27, Elkhart 



Fifth Ro'.i— 

Robert Hitchinson, '2", Pittsburg, Pa 
Robert Batchelor, '27, Indianapolis 
Jack Thomson, '26, Indianapolis 
"Taeez Wood, '26, Indianapolis 
James Perry, '27, Columbus 

Sixth Roa— 

Wilson Daily, '27, Indianapolis 
HcGH Andrews, '28, Indianapolis 
Pacl Kimberlin, '28, Wanamaker 
Glen Gray, '26, Indianapolis 
Horace Brown, '28, Indianapolis 
Almon Coble, '28, Indianapolis 

Seventh Ro'.i— . 

Harold IVIeek, '28, Greensburg 
Norman Cook, '28, Indianapolis 
Wells Hampton, '28, Indianapolis 
Russell Gray, '27, RushviUe 
Richard Beem, '28, Indianapolis 

Eighth Riitt — 

Arthur Long, '27, Indianapolis 
Edward T. Summers, '28, Indianapolis 
Harold Hollingsworth, '28, Indianapolis 
Charles Keach, '28, Seymour 
Harold Holz, '28, Frankfort 
William Walker, '2S, Indianapolis 




[230] 



T)elta Tcju 'Delta 




Founded at Bethany College, West Virgini.i, 1859 

Seventy-one Chapters 

Beta Zeta Chapter established, Fehnian,- II, IS'S 

Co/ors— Purple, White and Gold f/o:i,r— Pansy 



First Ro'.i— 

David Kilgork, '26, (Pres.), Indianapoli: 
Ray Ridge, '26, Indianapolis 
George Gamble, '25, Indianapolis 
Carter Helton, '26, Indianapolis 
Gordon Pall, '26, Bradford, Ohio 



FiflJ, Rozc — 

Hermon Phillils, '2", Ru3h\ille 
Lewis Wilson, '26, Indianapolis 
Gareth Hitchcock, '28, Indianapoli; 
Noble Boston, '27, Indianapolis 
Waide Price, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Roa— 

Arnold Davis, '26, Indian.ipolls 
Homer Woodling, '26, Logansport 
Pall Hill, '25, Indianapolis 
Melvin Puett, '27, Logansport 
Clever Godfrey, '25, Indianapolis 
Joe Gremelsi-acher, '26, Indianapolis 



Sj'xtA Ro'u — 

Harvey Garrett, '28, Indianapolii 
James Carter, '28, Marshall 
Lowell Love, '28, Indianapolis 
Don Gearhart, '28, Logansport 
Eric Downie, '28, Indianapolis 
James Carvin, '28, Indianapolis 



T/iirJ Roa — 

William Ertle, '27, RushviUe 
Ted Liebtag, '26, Indianapolis 
Morrison Davis, '26, Indianapolis 
John Conley, '27, Indianapolis 
Lester Nicewander, '26, Indianapolis 

F,j!,rrA Ri,'.i — 

Hiram Hensel, '26, Logansport 
Jack Miller, '27, Indianapolis 
William Rali-h Bockstahler, '25, Indh 
Raleigh Martin, '27, Anderson 
Cranston Mlgg, '27, Indianapolis 
Haroii. Brennan, '2". Indianapolis 



i- 


'Vcnth R 


OK- 












Robert 


Harri 


ON, 


'26, Albanv 








George 


Clark 


'27 


, Indianapolis 








Harriso 


N COLI 


lER, 


'28, Wilkins 


in 






L. Jose. 


H Str 


CKL 


^ND, '28, Ind 


an 


ipol 




Armand 


ROACI 


, '2 


7, Chicago 






E 


}ghlh Ro 


-,. 












Marion 


Well 


, '2 


", Indianapol 


s 






Joe Sch 


ELEEN, 


'28 


Laporte 








Glnnar 


Thal 


NG, 


28, St. Paul, 


M 


nn. 




George 


Walk 


ER, 


27, Indianapo 


lis 






Donald 


Bell, 


'28, 


Indianapolis 








John T 


ROVEJ!, 


•2", 


Indianapolis 








["=] 



Lambda (^hi • Ilpha 




Founded at Kuston University, Bostun, Mass., November 2, 1905 

Sixty-seven Chapters 

Alpha Alpha Chapter established, December 1", 1915 

6 (,/or.i— Purple, Green and Gold F/ocr.-;— Violet 



Firsl Rozi— 

Damiex Lvman, '26, (Pres.), Indianapoli; 
GuKNN DfTTEXHAVER, '25, Bunnell, Fla. 
Pavl McNorton, '25, RockviUe 
Hesrv Orxer, '25, Indianapolis 
Haroi.d Barclay, '25, Indianapolis 
Whbi-r Cl-rrv, '25, Indianapolis 

Sc.oini Rocr— 

Wayne Money, '27, Indianapolis 
Fremont Snyder, '27, Indianapolis 
Eugene Clifford, '26, Anderson 
Oscar C. Ries, '25, Indianapolis 
Thomas F. Smith, '26, Birmingham, Ala 

r/„ni Ro'.c — 

Martin McCracken, '26, Indianapolis 
Amos Nordman, '27, Indianapolis 
George Mulholland, '26, Indianapolis 
Edgar Stahl, '26, Indianapolis 
Louis Steinmetz, '26, Indianapolis 
Clarence Christopher, '27, Indianapolis 

Four//: RozL- — 

Gerald Strole, '26, Kentland 
Julius Mattes, '28, Logansport 
josEi-H A. Martz, '26, Tipton 
Robert Wakefield, '27, Ben Davis 
Paul German, '26, Indianapolis 
Ali EN Sells, '26, Indianapolis 



Fiiih Ro-.L — 

Aleeri Bloemker, '27, Indianapolis 
Carl Bernhardt, '27, Indianapolis 
Gaylord Stewart, '27, Indianapolis 
Francis Fletcher, '27, Shelbvville 
James Cummins, '26, Birdscye 

S:x//i R,.'.i — 

Xeal Firestine, '28, Indianapolis 
MoRDECAl Lee, '28, Indianapolis 
Marvin Hufford, '2S, Frankfort 
Austin Johnson, '27, Indianapolis 
Ernest Copple, '27, Rushville 
Frank Furstenberc, '28, Indianapolis 

Sez'culh RozL — 

Rorert FiNNEV, '28, Indianapolis 
James Burrin, '2S, Advance 
Albert Ehlers, '28, Indianapolis 
Carl McBride, '28, Waldron 
Paul Green, '2S, Shelbyvillc 

E}ghrli Rozi — 

Claude Holcomb, '28, Lafayette 
Clair Dean, '28, Advance 
Charles Post, '28, Indianapolis 
Everett Mildner, '28, Indianapolis 
Stewart Springer, '28, Indianapolis 
\'osf Mueller, '2S, Indianapolis 




["-] 



'0 .. ^ 






S 



V. 







\ r 



%' ^'t 



•-I'ifr**? 








'Butler ' Association 



Founded :it Hutlf.-, December, 1919 
Co/or.!— Blue and White F/oti.r— Lily i.f the Valley 



George McCandi.i 
Ferdinand Mehrl 

Merrill Talbfrt, 
.Jack W. Londen, 

cco,:J «»■:< — 
George Henderso 
Clarence Jaleski 
Ernest Harrold, 



ss, '25, (Pres.), Indianapoli. 
ICH, '27, Indianapolis 
'2\ Indianapolis 
27, Li.ngmont, Colo. 



Bruce Mo 



N-, '28, Indianapolii 
, '26, Indianapolis 
'26, Fairmount 
, Indianapolis 
Milton 



r/nni Ron — 

Shailer Bass '26, Indianapolis 
Eldrin Smith, '2", Indianapolis 
David Wilkinson, '27, Indianapolii 
Victor Twitty, '25, Indianapolis 
Carroll Bonnell, '26, Indianapolii 



Four//, Ro'.i — 

John Volng, '25, Indianapolis 
Irving L. Klrzrok, '25, Indian 
Urban L. Ogden, '28, Indianapo 
Joseph Craw, '26, Eaton 
I,. L i. -NVDER, '25, Indianapoli: 



Paul S. Staples, '27, Indianapolis 
MvRON Hopi-ER, '26, Indianapolis 
IviN WiLKENS, '27, Indianapolis 
Kenneth Lemons, '27, Indianapolis 
DwiGHT Whitmire, '25, Indianapol 



S/.rl/i flacf — 

Harold Chrvstie, '27, Austin 
Marion Higgins, '28, Lebanon 
IviN Smith, '26, Indianapolis 




[23G] 



T^au Kappa Tau 




Founded at Butler, January S, \<: 
Goal— Beta Thcta Pi 



Co/«-.— Maroon and Blue 



First Ro'.i— 

Robert Hittle, 'Z6. (Pres.), Indianapoli; 
Vallorol-s McLeav, '26, Indianapolis 
Marion Eptert, '26, Indianapolis 

^e,ond Ro'.i — 

Joseph Brlns, '26, Indianapolis 
Fred Ballweg, '27, Indianapolis 
Fred Cheney, '2', Indianapolis 
William Aspinall, '2", Indianapolis 

Third Ro'.L~ 

Roger Reynolds, '2", Indianapolis 
George Wilson, '27, Indianapolis 
Edward Troy, '27, Indianapolis 
Fraxk SissoN, '26, Indianapolis 
William Neukom, '25, Indianapolis 



Fourth Ro'.: — 

Francis Miller, '26, Indianap >lis 
Irwin Egan, '27, Indianapolis 
O. K.. McKiTTRicK, '28, Indianapolis 
Henry Morgan, '2", Indianapolis 

Fiith Rozi — 

Carl QtEissER, '28, Indianapolis 
Pail Fink, '26, Indianapolis 
Milton Gallon-, '28, Indianapolis 
William Lochhead, '28, Indianapolli 
George Cottrell, '2", Indianapolis 

Sixth Ro'.i — 

William Llther, '2i„ Indianapolis 
Parry Oakes, '28, Indianapolis 
Morris Silvev, '2S, Mount Comfort 
I.AXYRENCE Brafford, '2S, lodianap.d 




[=38] 



'Delta 'Phi Sigma 




Founded at Butler, January 11, 1923 
Goal— Sigma Nu 



Colon— Blue and Gold 



F/oci-.-r— Aaron Ward Ro 



Fin/ Ro'u— 

l-ARROLL Ni.i', '26, (Pres.), Indlanapolh 
John Roh.m, '26, Indianapolis 
Gi.KNN Morris, '26, Knig^htstown 

S,\-o,:d Ro!c— 

Albert Thompson, '25, Columbus 
Pall Olsen, '27, Indianapolis 
Winston Rilev, '26, Indianapolis 
ArsTlN Rltherford, '27, Indianapolis 
Clarence Stembel, 26, Thornt.nvn 



Harry Ice, '26, Indianapolis 
Maxwell Hosea, '25, Indianapolis 

FJftA Ro'.t — 

Carl Hilgedick, '2S, Linton 
Harold McGee, '28, Indianapolis 
Homer Dacbenspeck, '27, Indianapoll- 
Arthur Snoddv, '28, Rushville 
Pall Wickliff, '28, Indianapolis 
Leonard Moore, '28, Rushville 



T/,,nl Ro'.i — 

Adrian Nail, '27, St. Paul 
Howard Phillips, '2S, Indianapolis 
Maurice Miller, '25, Indianapolis 
Rlkl Thornberrv, '25, Indianapoli; 
Frank Teagle, '27, Indianapolis 
Mkrel Carver, '25, Roann 

Fount, R„-u — 

High Kivitt, '25, Martlns^lllc 
Merle Miller, '27, Indianapolis 
Ira McIiaain, '28, Rushville 



Sixll, RO'.L— 

Cortland Davis, '28, Indianapolis 
Robert Thornton, '28, Indianapolis 
Glenn McClain, '28, Indianapolis 
Robert Becker, '28, Indianapolis 
Marshall Ckabill, '27, Indianapolis 

Sc-.-c>Uh Rezi — 

Reid Thornberrv, '28, West Newton 
Wendell Brown, '28, Indianapolis 
Robert Lowerv, '28, Indianapolis 
Glenn Xeglev, '2S, Indianapolis 




[..o] 



Alpha Rho 'Delta 




S/'^V 



Founded ;it Butk-r, October 1, 1924 
Gonl— Ph: Gamma Delta 
Co/orj— Black and Gold F/oa.r 



-White Carnati. 



Firsl Ro'u— 
James Kenno> 
Adrian Pjerc 



, '26, (Pies.), IndlanapoH: 
I, '28, Indianapolis 



Walter Hou 
James Forsvi 
Robert Stee 



, '2", Indi.mapoli; 
'27, Indianapolis 
'28, Indianapolis 



Si 


;co, 


ni Ro: 


:<- 


— 










Fr 


ED St 


0< 


:kd. 


ILE 


, '2S, 


Tipton 




C.A 


,RL Tl 


.-R 


IPIN, 




,8, Ir 


idianapolis 




Re 


ieert 


S: 


HFRl 


er, 


'27, 


Indi.mapoli 



Fo,,rf/, Rozc — 
Kelton Whe: 
Marion Crofi 
Clifeord And 



SE, '2S, Indianapolii 
2S. Indianapolis 
)N, '28, Mooresville 



T/iird Ro'.. 
Rav Da 



Joel Wilmc 
Richard Br 



7, Indianapolis 
•2~, Indianapoll! 




[ =■■= ] 



(^hi Rho Zcta 



Colo rs — Tu rquo 



JtiHN Kerr, '2S>, Indl; 



Cartv, Spon 



WIS C. M( 

roREW Young, '27, Leba 
Rov BuRNEY, '28, Indi: 
MEs Hamilton, '28, EI 
E LaBareera, 26, Shelb 



S,-co;,l Ro'.c — 



Fo 


unc 


led a 


t Butlt 


■r February- 5, 1925 






Go; 


il— Xo 


t announced 


and Ivon 








Harry Smith, '2S, Indianapolis 


•abash 

polls 








Edgar Zell, '2S, Kokomo 
Lloyd Ne\vlin, '28, IndianapoHs 


1S01-, Yale 


Ui 


liver: 


sity 


Graham Kevil, '25, Brooklyn, X. Y 


inon 








Robert Thompson, '28, Indiancp.ills 


anapolis 










AVood 










byville 








Third Ro'.L — 

Bernard Rusher, -2", Odon 
DoiLE RE^NoLDS, T. liluftton 
John E. Tanselle, '28, Lebanon 
Harold Crose, '28, Thornto\vn 


v'awasee 








L. K. McMurty, '28, Evansvill; 


(Pres.), Ir 


idi; 


inapc 


>Iis 


DuRWARD Parrett, '28, Kokomo 




[2«] 




Sororities 



Kappa -Ilpha Thcta 



Foundud ,it DcP.iuw University, C.rconciistle, Ind., J.inuniy 2", 1S"(I 

Fifty-three Chapters 

Giimm.i Ch.ipter established February 2", 1S"+ 

Co/ors— Black and Gold F/uciv-r— Black and Gold Pans 



Firs/ Ron — 

AvANEM.K THnRi', '26, (Pres. ), Indian; 
Frances Krieo, '25, Indianapolis 
As-N-A C. Gardner, '25, Indianapolis 
Marian Rose, '25, Anderson 
Mildred Krosnan, '25, Indianapolis 
Anna Mae Albershardt, '25, Tipton 
Marv Patia Carver, '2 5, Indianapolis 

S,;or,d Ro!c — 

Helen Kinnard, '25, Pendleton 
Lois Wishard, '25, Indianapolis 
LoRENE Whithan, '26, Indianapolis 
Irene Selel, '25, Indianapolis 
Helen Haight, '25, Indianapolis 
Helen Stevens, '26, Indianapolis 

77/;;rf Ro'U-- 

Eleanor UlNN, '27, Indianapolis 
Jul. A Brown, '26, Indianapolis 
Sarah Rodecker, '26, Indianapolis 
Mary Ann Huggins, '27, Indianapolis 
Sarah Frances Downs, '26, Indianapo 
Alma Lucas, '27, Indianapolis 
Marv Montgomery, '26, Indianapolis 

Four//, Rozi— 

Blvthe Burkhardt, '26, Tipton 
Beatrice Moore, '27, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Bertermans, '25, Indiana 
Dorcas Rock, '26, Greenfield 
Edith Corva, '27, Indianapidis 
GiKN SciiwKNK, '26, Indianap.dis 



polis 



F!fi/i R„zi — 

Marian Barney, '27, Indianapolis 
Martha Zoercher, '27, Indianapolis 
.Iuanita Stamper, '27, Indianapolis 
Mary Alice Wishard, '27, Indianapolis 
.i \>:e Currie, '27, Chicago 
Agnes Larmore, '27, Indianapolis 
VniAN Stevenson, '27, Indianapolis 

Si:tlh Rijzc— 

Charlotte Reissner, '27, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth De Grief, '27, Indianapolis 
Emma Deal, '27, Indianapolis 
Marv McCann, '28, Lebanon 
Jane Ogborn, '2S, West Newton 
Edith Robinson, '27, Indianapolis 

S,-v,;,//, R„:f— 

Frances Peters, '2S, Indianap.dis 
Martha Alice Thomson, '28, Indianapoii 
Mary Caroline Means, '28, Tipton 
Helen Wilson, '28, Indianapolis 
Betty Lee, '28, Indianapolis 
Genevieve Miller, '27, Indianapolis 
Helen DeGrief, '28, Indianapolis 

Eig/i//! Ron— 

Mary Lee Orlokk, '2S, Indianapolis 

Florence Eleanor Perkins, '28, Lebanon 

Rosemary Smith, '28, Lebanon 

Audrey Owens, '28, Tipton 

OciE Higgins, '28, Lebanon 

Margaret IIoi daway, '2S, Indianap.dis 




[=«] 



Kappa Kappa Cjamma 




Fouiuk-J ;U Monmouth College, Monmouth, III., Octobe." 13, 1S70 

Fifty-four Chapters 

Mu Chapter established January 2, 187S 

Co/on— Light and Dark Blue F/ocrc-r— Fleur-de-lii 



irsi RozL — 




Mildred Stockdale, '25, (Pr 


es.). 


Dorothea Varntz, '25, Leban 




iLESE Harrvman, '25, Indian 


a polls 


Katharine Lennox, '25, Indi 


inapol 


Gertrlde Schmidt, '25, Indi 


inapo 


Catherine Cavins, '25, India 


lapoll. 


'cond RozL— 




Justine Hallidav, '26, India 


n.ipoli 


Pauline Bai.lwec, '26, India 


lapoli 


Mildred Stilz, '25, Indianap 


A\s 


Dorothy Powell, '25, Indian 


ipolis 


Dorothy Rinehart, '26, Indi 


inapo 


Caroline Codlev, '26, India 


apolis 


Helen Payne, '26, Indianapo 


is 



Indianapolii 



Third Ro'u — 

Irma Ulrich, '26, Indianapolis 
Jean Co^■AL, '26, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Clayson, '26, Chicago 
Alice McGinnis, '26, Martinsville 
Mary V. Black, '26, Indianapolis 
Mary Coate, '26, Indianapolis 

Four/A Rozc — 

Betty Wright, '26, Indianapolis 
Kathryn Bowley, '27, Indianapolis 
Eloise Owings, '27, Indianapolis 
Dorothea Duncan, '26, Greenfield 
Eunice McGraw, '26, Tipton 
Maude Custer, '27, Logansport 
Mary Bigcerjtafk, '26, Wabash 



mu, Ro:i— , 




RUTI 


Clarke, '2", Ir 


dianapolis 


Emil 


V Brossman, '27, 


Indianapolis 


Mar 


' Kinneman, '27 


Martinsville 


Lydi 


A Bates, '27, Ind 


anapolis 


Mar 


■ Martha Lewis 


'27, Lebanon 


K.ATt 


ERiNE Hall, '27 


Indianapolis 


Sixth R 


O'.C— 




Mar 


Havens, '27, K 


okomo 


Char 


lotte Gilman, 


27, Indianapolis 


Mar 


rHA Belle Pierc 


E, '27, Indianapo 


ViRG 


N.A Fletchall, 


'26, PoseyviUe 


Ann 


Cunningham, '2 


7, Frankfort 


Mar 


• Wagoner, '27, 


Indianapolis _- - 


RuTh 


Johnson, '26, It 


idianapolis 


Siveiith 


Roa— 




Ona 


Emily Boyd, '2S 


Indianapolis 


Mar 


■ Margaret Pat 


rick, '28, Indiai 


JOYC 


; Jackson, '2S, I 


adianapolis 


Dorothy Gandall, '2 


8, Indianapolis 


Mar 


;aret Elrod, '28 


Indianapolis 


Lile( 


N INNIS, '2S, Gr 


■enwich, New V, 


Eighth 


RozL— 




Cons 


ANCE Johnson, 


28, Indianapolis 


Mart 


rHA Dean, '28, I 


ndianapolis 


Cath 


ARINE BoSLEY, '2 


8, Milrov 


Mar 


,aret Hacklema 


N, '28, indianap 


Mar- 


FHA Beard, '28, I 


ndianapolis 


Hele 


N Strawaiver, '2 


8, Indianapolis 


MARt 


aret Woessner, 


'28, Indianapolis 




["«] 




i^ ^^A i.-'ik, .r^ -f^. .^M,^. » 
^ si> ^ ^ " 

4f4.] r^ 1^% i% g^ 




,00^^ 



'^ 



-. V 




{\ M m 








T* 



J 



Ti ^Bcta ^Phi 



Founded at Monmouth College, Monnioutli, III., April 27, 1S67 

Sixty-eight Chapters 

Indiina Gamma Chapter establi^he.l August 27, 1S97 

Co/nr.<— Wine and Siher Blue f/ocrrr— Red Carnatio 



Firil Ri.'.i — 

Margaret Slhokner, •2^ (Pres.), Indianapoli; 
Marjorif. Chiles, '26, Indianapolis 
Constance Forsyth, '25, Indianapolis 
Dema Kennedy, '25, Lawrence 



l;r)ZAi!ETH Holmes, '27, Indianapolis 
Jeanne Bolslog, '27, Indianapolis 
Margaret Graham, '2S, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Lou Thomas, '2". Indlanapulii 



i:i,,„l Rn:t — 
Rebecca Daugherty, '25, Indianapolis 
Georgia Osborn, '25, Indianapolis 
Mary Frances Ogle, '26, Indianapolis 
Maurine Jaqcith, '25, Indianapolis 
Fleeta Heinz, '25, ProctorviUe, Ohio 



■W/; Ro'u — 
Elizabeth Love, '28, Piqua, Ohio 
Ruth Pectol, '26, Spencer 
Dorothy Drake, '27, Indianapolis 
Mary Josephine Arnold, '2S, Delphi 
Kathleen Hottel, '27, Indianapolis 
Iosephtne Kennedy, '28, Indianapolis 



T/,i,,i R<,7i — 

BiLLiE Mae Kreider, '27, Plainfield 
Mareta Douglas, '25, Greensburg 
LuciLE Tyner, '25, Indianapolis " 
Josephine Likely, '25, Indianapolis 



Eugenia Brooks, '27, Indianapolis 
Marjorie Okes, '26, Indianapolis 
Suzanne Kohloff, '27, Indianapolis 
Mildred Morris, '25, Pendleton 
Helena Sieloff, '26, Indianapolis 



LiLA Dunn, '28, Iiidianapolii 



Sci;;,//, Razi — 

Esther Tilford, '28, Martinsville 
Janet Sheehe, '28, Indianapolis 
Martha Thomas, '28, Indianapolis 
Violet Henderson, '27, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Deem, '27, Greensburg 



E}g.h/I: RiizL — 

Louise Lewis, '28, Frankfort 
Lois Vliet, '28, Indianapolis 
Evelyn Forsyth, '28, Indianapolis 
Irma Crowe, '27, Fortworth, Texas 
Katherine Reagan, '28, Indianapolii 
Frances Jaquith, '28, Indianapolis 




["°] 



^elta ^elta 'Delta 




Founded at Boston University, Boston, Mass., November 24, ISSS 

Sixty-eight Chapters 

Delta Lambda Chapter established May 14, 1914 

Co/or,— Silver, Gold ,ind Blue F/oc;>t— Pans, 



inl Ro'.i— 
LOLJSE Padol-, '25, (Pres.), Indianapolis 
SizANNA GOEPPER, '25, Indianapolis 
Mildred Foxworthv, '25, Indianapolis 
Helen Hoover, '25, Newcastle 
Ruth Schuler, '25, Anderson 
LiLLjAN Martin, '25, Indianapolis 



econd Rozc— 
Jean Richardson, '27, Indianapolis 
Mary Winter, '26, Indianapolis 
Frances Woolerv, '27, Indianapolis 
Sarah Hall, '26, Newcastle 
Thelma Carter, '27, Indianapolis 



T/,ird Rou.:— 

Margaret Haldv, '26, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Stephenson, '26, Indianapolii 
Cathryn Headrick, '27, Indianapolis 
Edythe Hubbard, '27, Indianapolis 
Virginia Foxworthy, '27, Indianapolis 
Pavline Kelley, '27, Frankfort 



ernan, '27, Indianapoli; 
?, '26, Indianapolis 



DOROTH 


V AVELS, ' 


27, Indianapolis 


Mildre 


n Haselei 


,-, '26, Indianapolis 


Malde 


Searcy, '. 


27, Indianapolis _--^ 


Fifth Roz, 






Eldena 


Meier, '2 


'J, Indianapolis 


Margaf 


iET WaTEI 


<s, '26, Indianapolis 


Mildre 


D Glick, 


'27, Newcastle 


Vera E 


IKLOR, '2S, 


, Frankfort 


Clara 


Fox-worth- 


v, '28, Indianapolis 


Marth. 


A NaUER, ' 


'28, Vernon 


Sixil, Rij'u 






DoROTH 


EA Canfield, '2S, Indianapoli 


Sue Etta Warre 


N, '28, Marshall 


France 


s Welker 


, '28, Vernon 


Mildre 


D Kelly, 


'28, Frankfort 


Gladys 


Hooker, ' 


'28, Indianapolis 



Sc-veiil/i Rozi — 

Harriet Shoemaker, '28, Indianapolis 
Martha Baker, '28, Indianapolis 
Alice Hartman, '28, Lawrenceville, Illii 
Bertha Green, '28, Indianapolis 
Marianna Kennedy, '28, Indianapolis 
Orpha Ewing, '28, Indianapolis 




["=] 



A 











f 5 «,?. ^ 

4^C 







^f 











N 





u^ 



"•^k 





?^ 



^^ 










1^ ^' 




f 






/ 







4^ 




7V- 



Zcta T an ■ llpha 




Founded :it Virginia St:itc Norninl, Farnivilli-, Va., October 2> 
Forty-nine Chapters 
Alpha Delta Chapter estahlished June ^, 192(1 
Co/on— Steel Grav and Turouoise RUic Flouc 



-White Violet 



so, '26 (Pres.), Indianapolli 
)N, '2i, Indianapolis 
'2^, Indianap(,lis 



S,a,„d Ro'.L — 

Lena Weitknecht, '2^, Rnknmo 
Sue Harmon, '25, Indianapolis 
Marie Tacoma, '26, Indianapolis 
Helen Bedell, 25, Indianapolis 
Eleanor King, '2S, Indianapolis 
Daisy Schil/, '2i, Indianapolis 



'rhlrd Ro'.L — 

F,DNA Schllz, '26, Indianapolis 
Bern.ce BiLLMAS, '26, Fairland 
Grace Pritchard, '26, Indianapolis 
Lois Heller, '26, Cohimbia City 
Katherine Burcan, '26, Indianapoli; 

Fonrlh Ro'u — 

Margaret Hohl, '27, Indianapolis 
Pearl Collins, '27, Roachdale 
Barbara Fisher, '27, Indianapolis 
Thelma Haworth, '27, Lebanon 
Mary Rogers, '27, Ladoga 
Ruth Patterson, '27, Nc\v Saleii, 



F}i//J RUZL — 

Dorothy Kemp, '27, Anderson 
Freda Doeppers, '27, Indianapolis 
Helen Libkings, '27, Indianapolis 
Louse Kerr, '27, Indianapolis 
Lois Hunt, '27, Crawf ordsviUe 



^ixlh Ro'.i— 

Ellen Look, '28, Greeniield 
Helen Gorman, '28, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Ann Miller, '28, Indianapolis 
Naomi Adams, '28, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Hill, '28, Indianapolis 
Margaret Jenkins, '28, MartinsYllle 

Sev.-iilh Ron — 

Mary Elizabeth Joyce, '28, Indianapolis 
Augusta Bowerman, '28, Indianapolis 
Edna Miller, '28, Fountaintown 
Harriet Gaddis, '28, Indianapolis 
DoRRis Walsh, '27, Indianapolis 

Eig/>//i Ro:i — 

Rith Darnell, '28, Indianapolis 
Margaret Hunt, '28, Indianapolis 
Anna Baldauf, '28, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Fletcher, '28, Indianapolis 




["-] 



L'^/i 



\J 








|,^ ,^-fc, 





Alpha 'Delta Theta 




Founded at Transylv;ini,i College, Lcxinjiton, Ky., Jnnii.iry 1, 1919 

Eleven Ch.iptcrs 

Epsilon Ch^ipter est:ibi;shed October 13, 1923 

Cr>/»n— Turquoise ;ind Silver F/or<rr— Sweet Pe 



r,r,> R„:t — 


Four/A RrKC— 


Helen Moffett, '25 (Pres. ), Indianapolis 


WiLMA TiiLY, '2;, Indianapolis 


Gladvs Collins, '26, K.nightstown 


Dorothy Everroad, '27, Indlanapol 


Oladvs Elmore, '27, Indianapolis 


Susan Hiatt, '28, Indianapolis 


Bernice Giltner, '2", Indianapolis 


Mabel Rvokr, '28, Indianapolis 


Paula Karch, '27, Indianapolis 




S,.-r,,„l Ro:t^- 


Fift/, Ro'.i — 


LEEfE Worth, '2", Indianapolis 


Helen Schmitz, '28, Indianapolis 


Eloise Luzador, '25, Indianapolis 


Dorothy Schaffer, '28, Indlanapol 


Catharine Dopson, '26, Indianapolis 


Virginia Barnes, '28, Indianapolis 


Rave Greatbach, '26, Indianapolis 


Mary Ann Beale, '28, Rushville 




Mary Rurnell, '27, Indianapolis 


77;/>^ R„'.t — 




Margaret McIntvre, '27, Cambridge City 


Slxl/, Ron— 


Irene Wilson, '27, Shclbyvllle 


JuANurA Haehl, '28, Crawfordsville 


Mary Leslie, '26, Fairland 


Ann Conway, '28, Indianapolis 


EisiE Shelley, '27, Indianapolis 


Helen Tomlinson, '28, Indianapoli! 


Elva Coodf, '26, Indianapolis 


Helen Brennen, '28, Indianapolis 




[=56] 



^Delta Zcta 




Founded :it Miami University, Oxf.nd, Oilio, October 24, 1902 

Forty-four Chapters 

Alpha Nu Chapter established June 17, 1924 

Co/on— Nile Green and Rose Flozrer—KiU..rne^ Ro 



F:r!l Ro-.i— 


Llcille Gullette. '2S, Indianapolis 


Louise Rundell, '26 (Pres.), Indianapolis 


Helen Howard, '28, Indianapolis 


Kathleen- Over, '26, Indianapolis 




Katharine Fillmore, '26, Indianapolis 




Zerelda RiBisii, '25, Indianapolis 


Fourlh Roa:— 




RlBv Gibson, '28, Indianapolis 




Katherine Rubush, '28, Indianapolis 


Seco„d RotL— 


Elizabeth Kitzinger, '28, Columbus 


Hope Carter, '26, Indianapolis 


Rlth Emigholz, '28, Indianapolis 


Virginia Jones, '26, Indianapolis 


Mary Kinsley, '27, Indianapolis 


Helen Kerr, '27, Indianapolis 




Alberta Cobi rn, '27, Indianapolis 






Fifth Ro'.c— 




Ada Rlblsh, '2S, Indianapolis 


Third RoK— 


Phyllis Nordstrom, '28, Indianapolis 


Margaret Ann Bell, '26, Rushville 


Frances Quirk, '27, Indianapolis 


DoROTHV Duesenberg, '28, Indianapolis 


Lee Zwickel, '28, Anderson 




[.5S] 



^Alplia £hi Omega 




Founded at DcP.iuw University, Greencastic, Ind., October 15, 1S85 

Forty-five Chapters 

Alpha Chi Chapter established February 2S, 1925 

Co/o«— Scarlet and Olive Green Flo'.ifr — Red Carnation 



'26 (Prcs. ), Indianapolii 
H, '27, Indianapolis 
5, Indianapolis 



Second Ro^L — 

Leota Miller, '25, Indianapolis 
Helen Erber, '26, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Dale, '25, Bevier, Missouri 
Dorothy Patterson, '26, Indianapolis 
La Donna Lamb, '26, Indianapolis 
Leila Belle Shu-man, '27, Indianapoli' 



Thirtl Rozc — 

Martha Steele Corya, '26, Indianapoli: 
Julia Patton, '27, Indianapolis 
Rernice McClusky, '26, Indianapolis 
Dorotha Berger, '27, Indianapolis 
Josephine Lewis, '27, Indianapolis 



^ll, '26, Indianapolis 
27, Indianapolis 



Eleanor Coryell, '25, Vernon 
Dorothy Coryell, '27, Franklin 



Fif//: Roci— 

GERTRtnE Wysong, '2S, Indianapolis 
Alice Hollingsworth, '2S, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Brown, '27, Indianapolis 
Eernice Abbott, '26, Whiteland 
Mary Swain, '2S, Indianapolis 



Slx//j Ro'u— 

Julia Bretzman, '27, Indianapolis 
"Kathryn Harrod, '28, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Bassett, '2S, Indianapolis 
Katherine Keenax, '28, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Ensminger, '27, ShelbyviUc 
Margaret Barlet, '28, Indianapolis 



ScvcUh Ra'.i — 

LuciNDA Smith, '28, Indianapolis 
Irma Roller, '28, Indianapolis 
Jean McBride, '28, Kansas City, Missi 
Elizabeth Anderson, '26, Indianapoli: 




■aosasf 



[2C0] 



llpha 'Delta Ti 




Founded at Wcsleyan College, Macon, Ga,, May 15, 1851 

Forty Chapters 

Alpha Phi Chapter established April 4, 1925 

C„lors~Ught Blue and White F/oc; ,r— Purple \'i(ilct 



F,nt RozL— 

Harriot .Taeh> 
Nellie Wirtz 



, '25 (Pres.), Indianapoli. 
'25, Indianapolis 



Florence Lesher, '27, Indianapolis 
Bfrmce Gaskins, "2", Indianapolis 



■:cond Rczi — 
LiLLiE Smith, '26, Rushville 
Elizabeth Callon, '25, Indianapolii 
Marv Xlssfaum, '26, Marion 



n.-rj R„-.L— 
Thelma Rub 
Doris Smith, 



SH, '27, Indianapoli! 
'27, Indianapolis 



F,>nrll, R,„L — 

Katherine Sweet, '28, Indianapolis 
Rlbv Stout, '28, Indianapoli; 
Mary Latham, '28, Indianapolis 

F:!!li R,KL — 

Elizabeth Carpenter, '2b:, Indianapoli 
Ruth Drake, '2S, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Poe, '28, Indianapolis 
Pauline Poe, '28, Indianapolis 




[ "^ ] 



Sigma 'IJcltci 



Colors— Tnvquo 



Founded nt Butler, Janua.y 4, 1923 
Suoi, to be Delta Gamma 
se Blue and Gold FIoa-.-n—Mri. Aaron Ward Rose and Delphii 



Ftrs/ Ro'u — 

Alice Volng, '26 (Prcs.), Indianapolii 
Dorothy Wilson, '25, Indianapolis 
Mary McMeans, '26, Indianapolis 
Agnes Anorenys, '25, Indianapolis 

Second Rozc— 

Dorothy Sandeelr, '26, Indianapolis 
Rebecca Pitts, '26, Indianapolis 
Eleanor Mleller, '25, Indianapolis 
Jean Wilson, '26, Indianapolis 

r/iirj Ro'.c— 

Doris Hacoard, '26, Indianapolis 
Amy Beatty, '25, Hico, Texas 
Constance West, '25, Ben Davis 
Helen Donns, '25, Indianapolis 
Jean Mander, '26, Indianapolis 



Founh R. 


OZC- 


— 














LCCY 


As: 


H JIAN, 


, '2 


", Ir 


idia 


inapoli 






Marga 


RE 


T TrO 


Y, ' 


'27, : 


Ind 


ianapo 


lis 




Elizae 


ET] 


H MaTTH 


EVVS, 


'2! 


i, Indi 


an 


apoli 


Cathei 


!IN 


E Gir 


.F,Ef 


IT, '2 


:8, 


Indian 


ap 


olis 


Fiilk Ro: 


















DOROTI 




Dlgc 


.ALE 


, '2S 


, I 


ndiana 


pol 


lis 


Agnes 


Jf. 


AN Hi 


ILL.^ 


IND, ■ 


■2S, 


, K.niy 


ins 


towr 


Lelah 


W 


'rioh-i 


', '2 


S, II 


idi. 


ulapoli 


s 




DOROTI 




HEL^ 


lAR, 


'2S, 


In 


dianap 


oli 


5 


SJx//i Roz 


















Polly 


Di 


V'al, 


'2i>, 


Ind 


ian; 


ipolis 






Helen 


Si 


lADE, 


'2b;, 


Kok 


om 


d 






Helen 


P 


ASCOE, 


'27 


, Cal 


;uni 


et. Mi 


ch. 






[ =" ] 




DRIFT S CONCKPTIOi Or A I'RATERMTV HOME AT FAIRXIKW 



[zr 




Law 




Faculty; 



William G. Whiie, LL. B. 
Professor of Lazr 



NoRLE C. Butler, LL. D. 
Professor of Coiistitutioiijl Ljcc- 



Fremont Alford, LL. B. 

Instructor in Cr'i'tiin.il L.izi. .via Procedii 



RoscoE E. KIRK^LAN, .A. M., LL. 
Professor of L.i-x 



Robert N. Fulton, LL. 
Professor of Laze 



Fred McCallister, .A. B., LL. 
Instructor in La-.i- 



L. Rov Zapf, .A. B., LL. B., ^L Dip. 

Professor of liiternationji Ljcv and 

Diploinac\ 



.Anl^nua Sellers, B. S. 

L'lhrari.m 




[ ='^^ ] 




T/iirci Year Class 



[oiiNSdX, Ralph ]''.lmi;r I/jr/i.uhipo/ii 

President Senior Class; Sigma Delta 
Kappa; Manual Training High School. 



Bfai.?, Carlton Madison Doiigliis, Ariz 
Douglas Hitfh School, Arizona. 



Merriman, Luster Mason Blujfton 

Mce-Presicient Senior Class; Delta 
Theta Phi ; Franklin. 



Bell, |ostPH Scoii- Leliaivj, 

Delta Theta Phi; DePauw University 
'19, '20; Ladoga High School. 



Woody, Gladys Maree liidianafolis 

Secretarv Senior Class; Illinois Uni- 
versity-; Tulsa L'nlversitv, Oklahoma. 



Brlt.aklr, Gedrgi; Lawrence Roanoke 
Delta Theta Phi; Huntington College; 
Huntington High School; Bar .Associa- 
tion. 



ates, Howard Haywood hiitianapolis 
Treasurer Senior Class; Delta Theta 
Phi; Butler University. 



BuENTiNc;, John Ernest Indianafolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Butler L'niver- 
sitV, '2.^. 



Hill, Lloyd Oli\er LaFoiiljiiw 

Class Speaker; Sigma Delta Kappa; De- 
Pauw University, '19-'21; Arcadia 
High School. 



Cole, Wili.l.\m .Arnei i DnOitoin, III. 
Kappa Alpha Psi; Lincoln High School, 
Cape Guardian, Mo., "21. 




[ 269 1 




Third Year Class 



Cowan, Alfred Fini.ev hidiaiutpolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Butler Universit}. 



GioRci, Paul Gar^ 

Sigma Delta Kappa; National University 
of Science?, Chicago, 111., M. B.; Froe- 
bel High School. 



Carlson, Lawrence Edward Huntiiigtrjii 
Theta Chi; Phi Alpha Delta; Indiana 
University; DePauw Universit\-; Mem- 
ber Indiana State Legislature, '2 5. 



Hanlkv, William Edward Im/'LuupoHs 
Delta Theta Phi; Butler Universitv. 



Hatfield, Harrv Delbert Inriid/uipoli. 
Sigma Delta Kappa; Dublin High School 



Clark, George Aubrey hniianapolis 

Delta Theta Phi; Bar .Association; 
Shortridge High School, '2L 



Horat, John Dewev LaFj^elte 

Purdue L'niversit\; Jefferson High 
School. 



Danner, Knoei'el Wilson liitiiiuuipoHs 
Sigma Delta Kappa; Da\eyville, Tenn. 



Johnson, Ralph .Almek iNi/'uinjpolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; [efferson Hiijh 
School. 




[270J 








Third Year Class 







Lewsader, Rav Perr\fi//e Rhuades, Lvman H. hidijnjpolis 

Sigma Delta K.ippa; Pcrryville High Delta Theta Phi; Butler University. 

School. 



Mei.i.en, James William luilijuapolis 

George Washington University, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Stewart, Clarence North Terre Haute 



Pfister, Paul Anselm Mount Vernon 
Mount \'ernon High School. 



Ream, Donald Meredith Huntington 
Sigma Delta Kappa; Butler Universitv. 



Everett, Carl Titus Indianafol'-is 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Butler Universitv. 



r 



■^ «^i* 



*IM 





Watkins, John F. Whitehall, Mich. 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Whitehall High 
School. 



Watson, Chester Kav Fort M'jyne 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Prairie Depot High 
School, Ohio. 




> *^- f*^ 



^ 




[27,] 




Second Year Class 



Teckmever, Earl Blrtox bufuiiupolis 
President Junior Class; Sigma Dclt.i 
Kappa; Shortridge High School, '22. 



Bkaslev, Homer Edwin Ehiora 

Terre Haute State Normal School; F.l- 
nora High School. 



SuHANEK, Lko Henry Erie, Peiui. 

\'ice-President Junior Class; Sigma Delta 
Kappa; Freshman Bar Association; Cen- 
tral High School. 



'jenham, Fred Robert C/jv C//v 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Cla\- City High 
School. 



Railiff, Rliu Sherwood Bedford 

Secretar\' [uiiiiir Class. 



B(iA/, RnscoE Cohnnbiis 

Bartholomew C()unt\' High School. 




[=7.] 




Sixond Year Class 



}RiNui,hv, Reno Hamlin Et/ici Green Fkeik, Krnkst Frank liiJiaiuf'Ais 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Northwestern Uni- Arsenal Technical High School, 

versitv. 



Cl'NNINGHAM, FrPI) D. hldumafoVu 

Shortridge High School. 



Glfnn, Burr Hoover Huntington 

Delta Theta Phi; Freshman Bar Asso- 
ciation; Illinois University. 



Fears, Barney Howell ItidianafrAi, 

Louisville Male High School. 



Grant, Wilhlr Homer Indianapolis 

Kappa .Alpha Psi ; Indiana University. 



Ferguson, Gvv Oris Blue field, W. Xa. 
Tri-State College; Be.iver High School. 



Harrison, William Da\is Bedford 

Delta Theta Phi; Franklin College, 
A. R., '22. 



Field, Morris Brisior Indianapoli. 

Indiana School for Blind. 



Kealino, Harold Freeman hidianapijlis 
Delta Theta Phi; Butler Universitv, 
A. B., '24. 









>a 




[ "3 ] 




Scco}ni Year Class 



Kendic, Otis G. Freiierii'ksburg, Vj. 

Sigrn.) Delta K.ipp.i; Blackjtone Military 
Academv. 



Laffev, Ai.tXANDER ] .,\V il kes-Bjne,Peii II . 
Tri-State College; St. Mary's College, 
Orchard Lake, Mich.; Wyoming Semi- 
nary, Kingston, Pcnn.; Wil kes- Bar re 
High School. 



McFari.ano, Har()].I) Earl R'uigevUU 
Sigma Delta Kappa; Kentucky Military 
Institute. 



I'jiARCv, William Thomas liidijiufoth 
Delta Theta I'hi; Butler Uni\ersitv, 
A. B., '23. 



QuiNN, MiCHMI, ALi:\ANL)KR llultJIUfolii 

Manual Training High School. 



Ratliff, Wesley Wilson Lazireiwe 

Delt.i Theta Phi; DePauw Universitv. 



Riddle, Pall McLain Linlo/i 

Delta Theta Phi; President Bar Assocl;.- 
tion; Indiana University 



SiAMM, Charles Henrv Ke-.L\i>iiiJ 

Kewanna High School, '17. 



S'oYLES, Xelson Hardy Shjuneeloun, III. 
\ alparaiso L'niversit\". 



West, George Wallace bnrutii.ifoll 

Butler University'; Phi Kappa Phi. 



^ W. -il^ 




[='•■] 




First Year Class 



AisKETT, Marion T. 
Abel, Charles C. 
Amos, Gordon M. 

BkRRVHILL, F.DHIN C. 

BossE, Edmund A. 
Beard, Lewis L. 
Breeding, Harold A. 
Brinkman, Frank F. 
Brown, Dolclas 
Brown, Frank H. 
Blcker, Giv F,. 
Butler, Gilhert W. 
Caldwell, Al\in |. 
Campbell, Henrv C. 
Campbell, James G. 
Chambers, George O. 
Collins, James G. 
Conn, Clifford C. 
Crooks, Florence 
Dale, James A. 
DicKEV, Wade L. 
Engle, James R. 
Garrison, Leonard E. 
GoETT, Henry O. 
Harris, Donald ^L 



llldhlllJfoili 
IllilidllJporii 

Gieeiisbui'i^ 

Illi/hllUfoli! 

Decatur 

hlithlllJJ'olis 

hiil'ijiiapol li 
InJidiiafolii 
Indhuijfol IS 

lllilijlhlpolii 

Mooresville 
Marthut'iUe 

lllJhIIIJf'Olii 

l?n/'hiiijpolii 

lllilhllUpolii 

litilijiijpolis 

liidiandfiolh 

Mi.ldUtozcii 

Miiiii'ie 

Ru'IlDirjIlll 

Tene Haute 

Bloomfeld 

Iiidiiiihi-polis 

luduuiapolii 

Hohlo 



Hi INLY, John H. 
Jackson, Harold \'. 
loYNER, Dale W. 

KlRKPATRICK, SaMIEL M. 

LuENGOoD, Walter E. 
Long, Edward W. 
Long, Harold B. 
McCandless, George C. 
Mackey, Maurice C. 
Miller, Frank K. 
Millikan, Norman E. 
Moss, Charles D. 
Nielsen, Charles L. 
Nasser, Nasser G. 
Neukom, William R. 

NiLES, LoRlNG L. 

Pattison, Coleman B. 
Ranier, Louis O. 
Stockton, Helen R. 
SrucKY, Harold R. 
Swain, Charles R. 
L'nderwood, Howard G. 
Watkins, Thomas R. 
Wit, John A. 
Wrr.ht, John N. 



Ind'iJiiJfolh 

LaFjyette 
RussellvUle 

Falmouth 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Se\i)iour 

Sexniour 

Indianapolis 

Martinsville 

Erie, Penn. 

Terre Haute 

Indianapolis 

Ne-zrcastle 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Xezccastle 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



[2V5] 



Sigma 'Delta Kappa 




Fiiunded at University of Michigan, 1914 

Nineteen Chapters 

Eta Chapter established, 1916 



John Buenting, '25, Indianapolis 
Alfred F. Cowan, '25, Indianapolis 
Lloyd O. Hill (Prcs.), '25, LaFontaii 
C. Titus Everett, '2 5, Indianapolis 
Pail Giorgi, '25, Gary, Ind. 



Fourlh Ro^l — 

Harold E. McFarland, '26, RidgcviUc, Ind. 
Charles H. Stamm, '26, Kewanna, Ind. 
Fred R. Benham, '26, Clay City, Ind. 
Earl B. Teckemever, '26, Indianapolis 
Nelson H. Vovles, '26, Shavvneetow n, 111. 



Harry D. H.atfield, '25, Indianapolis 
Ralph A. Johnson, '25, Indianapolis 
Knoefel W. Danner, '25, Indianapolis 
Ray Lewsader, '25, Pcrryville, Ind. 
Donald Ream, '25, Huntington, Ind, 



FifiA Roa— 




Gordon M. .-^mos, '2", Greensburg, 


Ind 


F. Hale Brown, '27, Indianapolis 




Leo H. Sl-hanek, '26, Erie, Pa. 




Charles H. Neilsen, '27, Erie, Pa. 




LoRiNG L. NiLES, '27, New Castle, I 


nd. 



T/iirJ Ro^L— 

John F. Watkins, '25, Whitehall, Mich. 
C. Kay Watson, '25, Fort Wavne, Ind. 
Ralph E. Johnson, '25, Indianapolis 
Reno H. Br.ndley, '26, Etna Green, In 
Otis Kendig, '26, Fredericksburg, Va. 



ixiA Ro:i— 
Charles D. Mo 



Martinsville, Ind. 




[=70] 



'Delta Theta 'Phi 




Founded at Univcrsit}- of Chicago, 1900 

Fiftv-six Chapters 
\'orhces Senate Chapter established, 1922 



First Rozv — 

Howard H. Bates, "25, Indianapolis 
L. M. Mkrriman, '25 (Pres.), Bluffton 



Fourth RozL- — 

Wii.i.iAM T. Pearcv, "26, Indianapolis 
VV'ksi.kv W. Railiff, "26, Lawrence 
Paue M. Riddle, '26, Linton 
Lewis L. Beard, "27, Indianapolis 



Sero?iti Rozf — 

Joseph S. Bkm,, '25, Lebanon 
George L. Brubakkr, "25, Roanoke 
George A. Ci.ark, '25, Indianapolis 
Wim.iam E. Hani.ev, "25, Indianapolis 



Fifth RrKC— 

Edwin C. Berrvhill, '27, Indianapolis 
Henry C. Campbell, '27, Indianapolis 
James R. Engle, "27, Bloomfield 
Hknrv O. Goett, '27, Indianapolis 



Thin! Ro'.i — 

Lyman H. Rhoad)-s, '25, Indianapolis 
Burr H. Glenn, "26, Huntington 
William D. Harrison, "26, Bedford 
Harold F. Kkai.ing, "2/), Indianapolis 



•S/.V/// ROZL — 

Dale W. Joynkr, '2-, Russellville 
Maurice C. Mackey, '27, Seymour 
William R. Nkukom, '27, Indianapolis 
Louis O. Rami r, "27, Indianapolis 



[a78 I 







-#<^; 



^1 



r 



**w 



if") 



/^^ 



r 











Indiana Law School Is Ideally Located 

AS thf location for a law school the city of Indianapolis has 
AA no superior in the countr\-. Nowhere has the student better 
opportunities to watch the progress of all sorts of litigation 
in courts of all grades. All of the courts of the State of Indiana, 
from the Supreme Court down to that of the lowest jurisdiction, 
and also the United States Circuit and District Courts, are in 
almost continuous session here during the school year. The value 
to the student of the knowledge of court procedure to be thus 
secured can hardly be placed too high. He not only learns routine 
court work, but he learns, also, the manner of cross-examination 
of witnesses; he sees the practical application of the rules govern- 
ing the admission of evidence and the methods of its introduction; 
not only this, but the student is thus afforded opportunities to 
observe and study the trial methods and st\'les of argument of 
prominent lawyers from all parts of the country as they are 
brought here by litigation in which they are interested. 

The classes may attend the open sessions of the Supreme 
Court, where they are greatly interested and instructeci by the 
oral argument of some of the ablest lawyers of the country-. 

Indianapolis presents the ad\'antages of city life without the 
drawbacks of a city of the largest size. The cost of li\ing here 
is low, although it is the seat of great professional and commer- 
cial acti\'ity. The litigation arising in the different courts is of 
the most x'aried character, and involves the most di\'erse business 
interests, and the student may thus acquaint himself with business 
methods as well as court procedure. 



[ rao ] 



BUTLER 

UNIVERSITY 
DRIFT 



Iiidianapvl'is^ April 9, 1925. 

T/ionicis F. S/f/it/i, 
Editor 1925 Butler Drift, 
Butler University, Indiauapulis. 

Dear Torfuny — 

// is with pleasure t/iat I announce the completion of the 
advertising section o/ the 1925 Drift and submit it to \'ou for 
approval. 

May I state t/iat it has been a source of great pleasure to 
be associated with you in tliis capacity, and although it has required 
an enormous amount of time and energy and the bur?iing of the 
proverbial midnight oil, it has been a fascinating endeavor to con- 
tribute my share to the most wortJiy activity of Butler. 

I wish it were possible to make a personal appeal to every 
reader of this Drift, with the thoug/it of strengthening his attitude 
tcjward those fine m-en of business who have assisted us so fnaterially 
in the publication of this book. I have instituted a novel means of 
acquainting the student ^ivith the advertiser by the solution of a 
popular cross-word puzzle, to which we will give the winner a copy 
of the 1926 Drift. 

Any suggestions w/iich you may have that will bring ab(jut 
a closer relationship between the advertiser and tJie student will 
be appreciated. May I take this last opportunity to thank you for 
your able assistances' Hoping tliat t/ie success of the 1925 Drift 
will be thus achieved, I am 

Yours for the future Butler, 



/Swfef c^ 




Advertising Manager 1925 Drift. 



Butler University 



Indianapolis 



SUMMER SESSION, 1925 

JUNE 15 to AUGUST 8 



Qourses 


of 


histructiofi 


Astronomy 






Latin 


Athletic Coaching 




Mathematics 


Botany 






Philosophy 


Chemistr\' 






Physics 


Economics 






Political Science 


Education 






Psychology 


English 






Romance Language 


History 






Zoology 




Colh 


'g^' 


• Qredit 



All the work is of standard college grade. Credits may apph' on college degrees. Students 
may take a maximum of nine semester hours credit. Teachers and college students will find 
the work particularly well adapted to their needs. 

Butler L'ni\erslty is centrally located and easily accessible. The cit\- of Indianapolis offers 
many attractions through its churches, libraries, parks, st; res and theaters. 

The detailed announcement of the Summer Session, giving full information regarding 
courses, fees, academic credit and housing, will be mailed on application. Send for one. 



The Director of the Siiiiiiiier Session, But/er University, I iiiliaiiapolis, Iiid. 



[.82] 



DEPENDABLE 
DRUGS 



PERSONAL 
IN THE STORE 



Milford's Pharmacy 

Service 



IR\lNGTON 0471 



RELLABLE 
DRUGGIST 



PROMPT 
BY PHONE 



M. FURSTENBERG 



WATCHMAKER 

WATCH REPAIRING THAT SATISFIES SPECIALIST ON WRIST WATCHES 

601 ODD FELLOW BLDG. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



The following regulation, if strictly enforced, would doubtless do 
away with smash-ups at Butler and University avenues: When two cars 
approach at the intersection, both shall stop and neither shall proceed until 
the other has passed on. 



PETOT SHOE CO. 

Distributors of Dress S/ioes 
For — 

Men and Women 



The style clock ticks constanth' — e\'er\- tick 
records a change of st\'le and at Petots e\'ery 
tick is \'isualized for \ou in new footwear — 
and further, each st\'le is sold at so small a 
profit that \i)U are pro\'ided Petot super 
quality. 



h 



All Styles 
One Price 



(^etotSAoe^jo: 



[.94] 



We I'lacc TcachLTS in Univcrsltic-s, C(.llepc-s, Public .ind Priv.ilc Schocils 

THE EBLE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

401 Guaranty Building - Indianapolis, Ind. 

Phone, Cirde 1,^61 Free Registration 



IRVINC; THEATRE 

The Home of S})iiles 
W E L C O M E S YOU 

"Meet )iie face to face" 

C. M. WALKER, M.in.iKiT 



Dick Mills, while standing in front of Daphne's, noticed an old lady 
about to cross the street, and he asked her if he might accompany her across, 
to which she replieci: "Certainly, sonny; have you been waiting long:" 




ROBERT H. HASSLER 

II or/c/\f Largest SVLaiiujacturcr uf Shuck 'Absurbci \ 
IXDIANAI'OLIS, U. S. A. 



[265] 



All Portraits and Scenic Photographs 

in the 

1925 Butler University Drift 

were m.ide by the 

NORTHLAND STUDIOS 

^'■Specialist in Qollege -Atinual Work''' 



THE NORTHLAND STUDIOS 

Occidental Building, Washington and Illinois Sts. Indianapulif, Ind. 



[="] 



CASH IN" O X A (, R K A T () 1^ \' O R T T N I T Y 

A LIVK AN'D THRUIXG DISTRICT ADJACENT In 

NEW BUTLER UNIVERSITY 



In every growing city tliere ar 
Profits because tliese propert\' 



[in lands and lots located wliere tliey nial<e the purcha-ers La 
ments are located directly in the path of important developme 



CEDAR CREST — NORTH RUTLER TKRR ACE — M UST AR D WOODS 




Public appreciation of the |,)resent opportunity has been great. It is plainly foreseen what excellent increase in value 
will be realized by present buyers. The city's grand boulevard system for the district, together with building the 
new college, insure these profits. However, many who definitely plan to have their home adjacent to New Butler 
have not secured information about the trend of property values there; yet the fact is known to many that remaining 
available NORTH BUTLER TERRACE, CEDAR CREST and MUSTARD WOODS homes and home sites become 
scarcer with each passing month. Fully two-thirds of the platted property clear north to the canal line and adjacent 
to New Butler on the east has already been sold. Our Building Service to lot purchasers is complete. We sell you 
the lot, we furnish the plans, build the house and finance the deal. These four services AT the cost of one. Your 
investigation is invited. Write or call for literature. References: INDIANA NATIONAL BANK, the UNIO.N 
TRUST COMPANY, or any home owner in our development. 



Active developn 



inspectu 



desirable. It will be to 



profitable 



ntage 



PRICES 

$1,000 
TO 

$5,000 




&00 Statf: 
Life Building 
Riley I-I-O/ 



REA1.TOR 
a/r9 BUILDER 



5I3S Noi\TH 
Illinois St, 
Wash. 3IO/ 



\ERY 

I'.ASY 

TERMS 



[.87] 



LET US FIGURE ON YOUR FURNITURE REQUIREMENTS 



GRAHAM FURNITURE CO. 



2873 Clifton Stre 



WE FURNISH THE ENTIRE HOME 



RANDOLPH 1541 



Printing 



WM. W. HAMPTON 



20 EAST OHIO STREET 



Indianapolis 



We understand that Joseph Gremelspaucher has been signed to pose 
permanently for Mellen's Food advertisements. He is the personification 
of health and energy, but despite these hardships he manages to accomplish 
his work with the maximum of efficiency and the minimum of quiet. Most 
of his time is spent in running down advertising copy for the Collegian. 



HOTEL LINCOLN 

offers unsurpassed facilities to care for 
gatherings of from 10 to 500 for 



Banquets, Conventions, Meetings, Private Dinners, 

Bridge Parties, 




Weddings, 
Dances 



The Travertine Room, 
14th lloor, is the only Ball 
Room in the State 
equipped with a wonderful 
ICstey Cathedral Organ. 
Seats 500 persons. 
There are Private Dining 
Rooms for all occasions for 
which no extra charge is 
made. 

Meeting Rooms for Con- 
ferences, large and small, 
are jirovided — free for the 
asking. 



[ zee ] 



The Shop of JMaxxvell Q. Laiig 

Mil KAHN lilll.DIXC 

HAXDVVROUGHT FRATERNITY JEVVKLRY 

1NDI\ IDUAL DESIGNS FOR FA\ORS AND DANCE PROGRAMS 

CUPS AND MEDALS FOR ATHLETIC MEI'.TS 

HUME-MANSUR POCKET BILLIARDS 

FIFTEEN TABLES 
EXCELLENT SERVICE 

Schcible & Dougherty, Props. Coilecf. Headqlarters 



We must place \\'inston Riley in the niche of notables along with 
Shakespeare, Dunlap and Bates when it comes to the writing of spoken 
literature. His virtue lies in the number of contributions submitted; his 
vice in the enormous amount of material he gets back. 



METROPOLITAN 


SCHOOL OF 


MUSIC 


AFFILIATED WITH 


BUTLER UNIVERSITY 






Directors 




Hugh McGibenv Edw.<rd Nell 




Leslie E. Peck 


Flor.a M. Hunter 


THIS IS THE FACULTY AND IT 


IS 


WITH PRIDE TH.AT WE 


POINT TO IT 


Pi^no Lulu Brown 




Publir School Mialc 


Orchestral Instru- 


Flora M. Hunter F"fda Heidcr 




Ernest G. Hesser 


ments, Instrumenta- 


ArthurG. Monnmger ,-,>,/„, 
Earle Howe Tones ,, , ». ^l 
Mary E Wilhitc ""^^ McG.heny 
.viary t. wiinitc DonnWitson 
Mrs ArthurG. Monninger ^,^.,^^^, ^j^^^^^,, 
Tull E^Brown ^ ^^^^^^^ 
Grace Hutchings Edwin lones 
Helen Louise Quig Ed" m Jones 
Frieda Heider Vio/a 
Nora Beaver Donn Watson 
Allie Frances Eggleton 
Lucille Lockman Wagner ' irjloncello 




Harmonf 


tion, Counterpoint 




Arthur G. Monninger 
General Theory of 
Music — Essentials 
Arthur G. Monninger 

History of Music 
Donn Wat'son 

Sight Singing 


and Composition 

Adolph H. Schellschmidt 

Folk Dancing and 

Singing Games 

Bernice Van Sickle 

Reading and 

Dramatic Art 

Frances Beik 


Geraldine Trotter Adolph H. Schellschm 


idt 


Lulu Brown 


Fav Heller 


Leone Kinder Cornet and Truth 
Frances .Anne Wishard Leslie Eugene Peck 
Laura Doerflin j,, 
Harry Otis Pruitt ^'"'' 
. Arthur Deming 

Edward Nell Chrmet and 


'pe, 


Musical Form and 
Analysis 
Earle Howe Jones 
Musical Appreciation 
Grace Hutchings 


Helen Sartor 
Bernice Van Sickle 

Play A nulysis 
Frances Beik 

Classic Dancing 
Madame Gano 


Franklin N. Tavlor Saxrjphone 




Ensemhle 


Social Dancing 


Ida Belle Sweenie AJolph H. Schellschm 


idt 


Adolph H. Schellschmidt 


Nan Hunt 


Phonce: Ci 


rcl, 


.- 3737 and 3738 




BALDWIN AND ELL 


I 


N G T O N P 1 A 


N O S USED 



[289] 



CHAS. A. VOLLRATH 

Fancy and Staple CJroccrics 

202 S. AL'DUnOX ROAD Irvinctos 0567 



A R E A L S P O R TING C, O () D S S T O R E 

AI IILKI'IC EUVII'MIAT FOR MICH SCHOOL, Cf)LLE(;E 

Axi:) iNi)i;iM:Mn;\T riiwis 

S M I T H - H A S S L. E R - S T U R M CO. 

2K)-:21 M.is^.idiufctts Airiim^ 11 f, E.isl Ohio Street 



"Come, come", said Jack's father, "At your time of life 
There's no longer excuse for thus pla\'ing the rake. 

It is time you should think, boy, of taking a wife". 
"Why, so it is, father — whose wife shall I taker" 



1887 1925 

I HE RAIEROADiMEN'S 

BUILDINC; AND SAVINGS 

ASSOCIATION 

21-:.^ \ iR(.iM \ \\ i:nuk 

INDIANAPOLIS 
Assets oviT Fnrt\-thn-r Millions 



KIGE R &: CO. 

Primary Supplies, Art Materials, Playyruund l)c\ ices, 
Laboratory Apparatus, General School l'A|uipineiit 

113 S. PKXNSVIA AMA S'l'KKi;r INDIANAPOLIS 



T liere h tihtli'iiig tlut -n-itl h/i pinyc ymir dpf'i-jr.iiu e I ike .; //(-,;/ hdir cut 
\VK WILL AI'l'RKt lAlK ^■OLR lilMNESS 

THE IRVINGTON SANITARY BARBl-'.R SHOP 
ami ALT A BEAUTY" PARLOR 

N. RITTER A\'K. Phonh Irv. 2922 i-or Arpointmints 



Headline: Butler Uni\'ersity Golf Team Begins Season. It is ex- 
pected that the Coffin course will be in shape for the golfers again b\ the 
middle of next week. 



CoDipliiiients 
of 



HOTEL 

SEVERIN 

Induuui''s Vuicst Hostelry 



[29, t 



Hendren Printing Company 



T^riiiting^ 'Binding and Engraving 



INDIANAPOLIS 



465 Cl.NlLRV Bl 11.1)1NC_ 



THE IRVINGTON HARDWARE CO. 

A Cumpleic Central Line of 

HARDWARE AND PAINTS 



Perso>uil Service 



5 50 5 E. WASHINGTON ST. 



lR\'INGTON 0324 



The reason why Moke does not take her to the theatre any more is 
because one night it rained and they sat in the parlor. 

We understand that the last word in closed cars is "Lemmeout." 







SILVE.R 
STE.E.L 

For b'i \c.ir? wc h.ivc ni.inul":ictured Saws, Saw Tools, Saw Spccial- 

tic'S and Machine Knives in Indianapolis.' 

Wc- make all kinds of Saws for the carpenter and mechanic, also 

Band and Circular Saws for saw and planing mills, woodworking 

and furniture factories. 

The qualit\- of our products is of the highest standard and a trial 

order will convince you that they are 

"7V;(' F'liit'sl on luirlli" 

Ask for our product-; the next time you are in the market; if yon 
ha\e diiruidt\" in ulitaining them, inform us and your reiiuirements 
will be given the hesl attention. 

E. C. ATKINS & COMPANY 

i:-l.ildi-hed 1X57 T/u- Siher Stee/ Sj:, I'fop/,- 

(.)ne BUnk South of L'nion Stati.Mi on Illinois Street IXDI W M'Ol.lS, L'. S. A. 




[=,= ] 



YolCU Like the Flavor 

OF 

KiNGAN'S 

"RELIABLE" 
Hams and Bacon 

Made from choice corn- fed hogs 
Each piece carefully selected 
Proper proportions of lean and fat 
Cured hy special mild-cure formula 
Smoked slowly with hickory wood 

Sweet and Tender 



Did you ever try the "Reliable" Sliced Bacon 
in the handy one-pound carton? It's mighty fine 



For cooking and haking there's nothing better than 
KINGAN'S "RELIABLE" LARD 



King AN & Co, 

Pork and Beef Packers 
INDIANAPOLIS 



[293] 



IRVING STYLE SHOP 

ALMA RAHL Br. 7198 

My Mono — "CuurU-sy and ^alisfactian" 

A complete line uf Hats for mil.ijy with inJi\ iJualitv at popular prices. 
Also carry a line of House Dresses, Ladies' and Children's Hose. 

Ope 12 Sciturdiiy Evenings 
5502 East Washington Street 



He went to Bloomington and brought her back in his rented car; 
entertained her royally for two days; took her to every game, show and 
dance within a fifty-mile radius, and introduced her to everyone of note in 
Butler. SHE, in return, did him the great honor of allowing him to be 
the first to hear of her engagement to a fraternity brother. 



Tomorrozv''s 
Qitizens 




b'amous for its farms and factories, Indiana has not neglected the 
welfare of its future citizens while building up its industries. 

Butler Lni\ersity, located hei"e in Indianapolis, pla\s an impor- 
tant role 111 this great educational s\stem. It is a plant that pays 
priceless dividends of broad knowledge and high citizenship. 

As education develops it calls for better facilities for communica- 
tion, rile telephone, itself the [iroduct of many scientific minds, 
is used most widely wliere education is most general. 

I NM) I A N A B !•: L L V V. L L PHONE CO 



[ =" 1 



•m 



fljii 



()71 \V.ib.i5h Ave. 
Tcrrc Haute 

Si 10 i:. Washington 
Indian.ipolis 

Refrkshments 



Student Roidczvoiis 

Where luscu)us fruits and s\ rups ar( 

concocted into drinks that ri\al 

the nectar of the gods. 

Drinks 




Lk.hi- Lunches 



"I lo^•e you, dear; I adore \'ou; I'm mad about you; marrv me; 
you're the onh' girl I'\'e e\ cr ]o\ed; say you love me; let's elope tonight; 
will you wear m\- pin; your eyes are wonderful; I'll he frantic if \-ou turn 
me down; \ ou're m\' dream gnd." "'i ou're not kidding, arc \"ou-" 
"I'h-huh." ' 



Est.iblishcd lSi'» 

'■'■The IM 1 1 c/icl 1 s have hern printing over fifty vears 



Printers 

to 



XC^RTHVVKS'rKRN CHRISTIAN UM\KRSrry 
BUTI.ER COLLEGK 
RUTEFR UM\FRS1TV 



1 he plant complete. Bookmaking in its entiret}' under one roof 
and one supervision. Complete ser\-ice. Editorial, Composition, 
Presswork, Plates and Binding. Output limited to the manufac- 
ture of books, colors, anci business literatiu-e. 

Special Department of University Puljlicatioiis: Annuals, Hand- 
books, Catalogues, Brochures, Diploma Cases, Text Books, Lab- 
oratory Manuals, Engraving, Steel Die stamping, etc. Makers 
of Mitchell-Made SUPERMNISH book covers, the beauti- 
fully grained, highh' embossed and artistically colored line. 



WM. MITCHELL PRINTING CO. 



Edition 'Printers and 'Bindi 



GREENFIELD 



INDIANA 



["'] 



Character 




To certain indi\iduals who achie\ e success honor- 
ably, we ascribe that indefinable attribute, charac- 
ter. The inherent qualities of those individuals 
are also possessed by certain publications. 

Editorial excellence gives The Indianapolis News 
character. Impartial judges rank it among the great 
newspapers of the Nation. Since 1 869, The Indian- 
apolis News has striven to be, first of all, a great uezvs- 
paper. Its columns reveal its character. 

S T I' n >■ T (I E I N D I A \ V I' fi I. I S \ E W S AS A X E If .^ P A PER 



["«] 



Ex-officio AI embers of Drift Staff 



T 



HE Drift would be incomplete without a word of recog- 
nition to the ex-officio members of its staff. The book is 
debted : 

To those who refused to subsci'ibe early in the year when 
their mone\' could ha\"e been a great help in getting discounts 
for pa)'ing bills in ad\'ance; 

To those who forced the staff into a long subscription cam- 
paign in order to sell enough copies to make the Drift possible; 

To those who haci their pictures taken after a dozen or more 
rec]uests ; 

To those who do not purchase a book because they think it 
is too high — \et spend se\'eral times the price on dances and 
social functions; 

To those who accuse the editor and business manager of 
making a neat income when the circulation pa\s for little more 
than half the cost of publication; 

To those who say the Drift is a bunch of graft and that the 
editor is a terrible guy for spending a thousand hours or more on 
such a worthless enterprise; 

To those who ha\ e foiuid fault with everything in coiniec- 
tion with the book, who refuse to ccjoperate to make it the kinci 
of an annual the\' want and who borrow one to see how many 
times they can find their pictures. 

Such boosters ha\e made the task of publishing the 1925 
Drift easv and delightful. 



[297 J 



NATIONAL 



KcDioiibcr 
E D U C A T I O N A L 



AGENCY 



_MS TRACTION TERMINAL ISLTI.DING. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

OUR MOTTO — SERMCE 

We have openings ALL THE TIME for wc-Il-traincd and progressive teachers. 

We will give intelligent service in finding the place for which you are best fitted. 

Write us concerning the subject and salary desired and we will put you in immediate touch 

with calls corresponding to vour desire. 

!\IARV ERANCES WILSON 



The editor may scratch with his pen until the ends of his fingers are 
sore, but someone is always sure to remark, "How stale — I've heard that 
one before". 



SPINK ARMS HOTEL 

INDIANAPOLIS' NEWEST AND 1-TNEST HOTEL 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 

Transient Rates $3.00 Per Day and L^p 
410 North Meridian - MAin 58(13 




\\'e ai"e de\'uting our greatest efforts 
towarci making the Spink Ar 



rcncic 



.1.^1 ,...i,v.,.^ .,,^ ..[_., ,.,v Arms the 
iez\ous for all special luncheon 
and dinner parties, club and fraternal 
dances — in fact, the sort of hostelry 
where personal ser\ ice rules through- 
nut. 



Furnished and Unfurnished Kitchenette Apartments 
W. A. HOLT, Manager 



[298] 



Quality and Style 

uirm)Li' 

EXTRA\AGANCr: 



HARRY LEVINSON 

YOUR HATTKR 

37 N. Pennsylvania Si. +1 S. li.r.iNois Si. 

Cor. Illinois and Markii Sirkets 




A gum-chewing girl and a cud-chewing cow seem alike, hut they seem 
different somehow — the difference.^ Ah, \es, I ha\'e it now; there's an 
intelligent look on the face of the cow. 



IR\ INGTON'S HEAi:)QUAR'n',RS FOR 

Coal and Building Material 

IRVINC; TON COAL AND LIME CO. 

5 543 Bonn;> .A\L-nuc 
Phones— Irvington 4196 and 4197 



PROMPT SERVICE 



COURTEOUS TREATMENT 



We invite ConsulLition on all Matters pertaining 
to our Lines of Business. 



[299] 



INTERSTATE 

1 he Rlectric \]^ay 

INDIANAPOLIS — L()UIS\ILLE, KY 
STANDARD SLEEPER SERMCE 




SKR\1CE THAT IS RKI.IARI.l': 
COMFORTAIiLK CI.l'.AN COW I'.MENT 

r\Ri,()R-RUFKi';r si',r\ ici' 



All -Steel }iqu'ip}iieiit 



c^i= 



1 N T E W S r A r E P r B L I C S E R \- I C I', C O M 1' A N Y 

M.iln Ofluc, j. Y. Wild BIdg. lTidi.in.ipolls 

[ 300 ] 



IVe trust that 'Bcrtcr)iia>i?i''s 
Florccrs ivill often 
aid 'Butler 




in acriiev- 



71 g Its certain 
and wonderful destiny 



Ovlost cordially yours^ 

BERTERMANN BROTHERS CO. 



r 3"' ;i 



Oldest TeacJiers'' jigericy in Indiana 

Teachers Co-operati\ e Employment Bureau 

HOMER L. COOK, MGR. 

721 State Life Building Indianapolis 

RADIO RECEIVERS AND ACCESSORIES 

Come to Indiana's Pioneer Radio House for your needs. 
Prompt and courteous attention. 

ALAMO SALES COMPANY 

131 K.ASr OHIO STRl-.KT 



The music of the house dance breathed over the youthful couples. 
He eyed her closely. "Now you know what college is like", he told her. 
"Yes, dear", she remarked. "It's just as I read in books. But it isn't like 
this always, is it.^" "Oh, no — on other nights I study". He pressed her 
nearer. A remark from another couple reached their ears. 



McCRAY REFRIGERATORS 

For 'All 'Purpf/ses 
McCRAY REFRIGERATOR CO. 

Home Oflicc and Faetory 
KHNnAi.i.vn,i,i:, Indiana 



Salesroom In All Indianapolis Salesroom 

Principal Cities 228 E. Ohio Street 

Sec Telephone Directory Telephone: Main 0468 



[30Z] 



. THE EDUCATOR'S BUREAU 

\V. A. MvKR«. M.nuig,, 

We have calls daily for teachers for Grades, High Schools, Normal Schools, 
Colleges, Universities 

!:i-:':2 occidental hldg, circle 2I4i 

THE PLACE W H E R E B V T L E 1^ EAT S 

B U T L E R C A E E 

Spe'c'tix Service 
7 A. M. MRS. C. H. HAMAKF.R 5 P. M. 



"He is so \'oung — just a boy. And she must he all of thirty — • 
although she is attractive". He looked at her. She did not blush. But 
a smile broke over her lips. "I guess it's true, dear", she murmured, "but 
we can get along pretty well, can't we.^" His young face flashed back an 
affirmative. He pressed her nearer as he said, "Of course, mother". 



Qu!/i pinnciits of 

JOHN K. KINGSBURY, M. D. 

WALTER F. KELLY, AL 1). \\'. B. GATES, D. D. S. 



[303] 



DESKS CHAIRS 

W. C. BRASS 

Ojfict' Outfitter 

^„ p. 116 SOVTH PkSSM.V.S,. ST...T C A PFQ 

-T J-J^-T'^J IXDIAN'APOLIS, IXD. orVl r^D 



The students of a certain Spanish course are proposing to bu\' out the 
Martha Washington Shop anci profit hy the mistakes of former students 
of the same course. 



The Butler Alumnal Quarterly 

Sc7id G?'eetings to Svery Student 

It has well hccii said that the next best thing to being a student at Butler is to be a member 
of the alumni association and entitleel to receive the Quarterly. 

This splendid college magazine, edited by Katherine Merrill Graydon, carries to former 
students the inspiration of Butler. It prints scholarly reviews, records progress in the differ- 
ent departments, heralds the athletic achievements and gives news of the activities of thou- 
sands of former students scattered over all the world. 

You can well look forward xvith pleasure to the time when you will be a graduate and on the 
mailing list of the Quarterly. 



SPEEDWAY LUMBER COMPANY 

^'■Everything to Build a Home'''* 

Herbert K. Hill, President Bel. 2000-4957 



[30. ] 



Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern 
Traction Company 




Trains Every Hour for EASTERN, WESTERN 
and NORTHWESTERN Indiana. 



Connects with Traction Lines at Indianapolis for 
points in Indiana, ( )hio, Illinois and Michigan. 



Through Service to DAYTON, Ohio 

Connecting at Dayton for Springfield, 

Columbus, Lima and Toledo, Ohio, and 

Detroit, Mich. 



S A \^ E TIME AND MONEY 



Travel the ^'■Electric K'c/v" 



[ 305 ] 



Qo}}ipl'i))ie>its of 

IRVINGTON COFFEE CO. 

9 SOUTH RITTER AVE. 



PIERSON FURNITURE CO. 
IN IRVINGTON 



IR\"IXGT(X\ 3+3: 



06 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 



'Twas midnight in the parlor, 'twas darkness everywhere, 
The silence was unbroken — for there was no one there. 



She has a Delta Tau pin; it sparkles bright and gay; 

But who'll be wearing it next year, is more than we can say. 



L. M. Pfeikker, Prcihic 



josE.'H T. Stokes, Secreliiry-Trcasur. 



INDIANA OPTICAL COMPANY 



224 NORTH MKRIDIAN STREET 



PHOXE, M.AIN .'nsi 



INDIAN.^POLIS 





wool) SPLIT PLLLH'i' 



i- the strongest .ind most durable belt pulley 

manut'.ictured. 

Ciu.ir.inteeJ to drive xny lo.id in nny mill 

or hietur\ .ind oper.ite satisf.ictorily in ,uiy 

climate. 

Reeves Puli.ev Co. 

Coi.UMHLS, ImM.WA 



[30C] 



HOLMES WALL PAPER ik HARDWARE CO. 

WALL PAl'KR, PAINT AM) OIL 

'Decorating and 'Paiiit'nig 

Phdiic, R.mdolph 295S ^103 NorlhwcslL-rn Av 

PATTERSON SHADE COMPANY 

.M.,„:,t.ulNr,rs „.„/ (.7,.„;,r. vl 

WINDOW SHADES 

2128 South Meridian Street Drexel 24 



King: As a token of my esteem, I present you with the Order of the 
Garter. 

Collegian: Sorrv, old tnner, hut as a representative college man I 
ne\'er use the ballv things. 



Ir-vuigtofPs Bakery nud Cafeteria 

THE PASTRY SHOP 

ERNEST O. JOHNSON 
5450 East Washington Street Ph'jne, Irvington 1888 

MERRILL'S PHARMACY 

s464 East Wasliington Strc.-t 

IRVINGTOX'S POPULAR DRUG STORK 

LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED EOUXTAIN 

THE STUDENTS" ERIENDLV STORE 

Our Prescription CoDipoiiinling is Accurate and Safe 

WE DELU ER Telephone, Irvington 0140 

[307] 



The Union Trust Co. 



OF INDIANAPOLIS 

120 East Mjrkct Street 



Uepart/HCfits of Service 

TRUST BOND FOREIGN SA\INGS INSURANCE 

LOAN BANKING REAL ESTATE RENTAL FARM MORTGAGE 

Complete Financial Ser\ice Through These Departments 



Officers 



Yuur Aftalrs Administered bv These Successful Men 



ARTHUR y. I!ROW\ 
JOHN K, REED 
HARR^' K. McNUTT 
ALFRED F. GAUDrXC 
CORNELIUS O. ALIO 
ALAN A, RITCHIE 
GEORGE A HCSK.IRK. 
MERLIN M. DCNIiAR 
CHAS. T. liLIZZARD 
RICHARD A. KURTZ 
IIARRV L. CUSHWA 
HARRY L. MOTT . 
FRANK L. THOMAS 
JAMES C. GOOUI.ET 



Assistant Treasure 

Assistant Secretary 

Trust Office 

i Income Tax OtBcc. 

Audi to 

Foreign Departnien 

nsurance Departnien 

I Estate Departnien 

- Rental Departnien 

uckv Avenue Brand 



^Directors 



JOHN J. APPEL 

Gregory and Appel 
A. A. BARNES 

President Udell Works 
HENRY W. BENNETT 

President State Lite Insu 
ARTHUR V. HROVVN 

President 
WM. T. CANNON 

President, Railroadmen's 
E. H. DARRACH 

President Inter-Stalc Car Co. 
THOMAS C. DA^' 

of T. C. Day A Co., Mortgage L 
FRED C. DICKSON 

Dickson and Talbott 
BERKLEY W. DUCK 

President 'nu- Sp.uin Co. 
G. A. EFRO^'MSON 

President H. P. Wasson .<: Co. 



Co. 



nd Savings As-n. 



HENRY EITEL 

Vice-President Indiana National Ban 
I. C. ELSTON 

President Elston Nal'l Bank, Crawfor. 
EDGAR H. EVANS 

President Acme-Evans Co. 
HENRY H. HORNRROOK 

Attorney at Law 
LOUIS C. HUESMANN 

President Central Supply Co. 
WILL G. IRWIN 

President Irwin's Bank, Columbus, Ir 
JOSIAH K. LILLY, Jr. 

Ell Lilly & Co. 
EDWARD L. McKEE 

Treasurer McKee Realty C. 
SAMUIT, E. RAUH 

President Belt R.iliroad and St..ck Ya 
FR.XNK 1), STAl.NAKER 

President Indl.in.i N.itl.uial H.ink 



L\)iirtcsy' and I'Apcrt Serxlce Kxtciuicd to "\ dii h\' "Fhesc Officers 



[30.] 



BARNES, GAULT & COMPANY 

■Prinlen of 

College Annihils - Direct Advertising 
Hig/i GniJe Hci/ftone and Color Work 

CI^^TUR^■ BUILDING 1 M)l WAI'Ol.lS 



In a Latin book belonging to a Sophomore wc found written abo\'e 
the words, "Haec in Gallia est importantus", "Hike into daul, it is im- 
portant". 



O'SHEA SWEATERS 

ARE WORN BY 

Qhcwipions of Svery Sport 

OF COURSE 

ATHLETES OF BUTLER UNR'ERSITY 

WEAR THEM CONTINUALLY 

[309 1 




/fm/Yf 



He — Let's sit this dance out. 

She — I can't. I've lost ni}' powder puflF. 




M05T "btnuTiruL GiRU 
On yML CoMPus ? 



ACCOMODATIONS 



Service Roidcred by the 

Interurban Railways 

for scholars attending schools and colleges 
cannot he duplicated hv any other means 



We Try to (jive You the "Best 



Union Traction Company 

of Indiana 



[3„] 



1882 Teachers College of Indianapolis 1 9 2 S 

A STANDARD NORMAL SCHOOL i. y ^ ^ 

Courses Two and Four Years in length. 

A special school devoted to the training of Kindergartners and teachers lor all of the grades 
in the Public Schools. For catalog and further inlormation, write to — 

F.LizA .\. Blakhr, President 23rd and .Alabama Sts., Indianapolis, Indiana 

Send It Hninc 

THE BUTLER COLLEGIAN 

TUKSDAV FRIDAY 



He asked us if we saw the chalk on his shoulder, and when we re- 
plied, "\ep", he remarked, "Well, that ain't chalk". 



E. DIRKS 

STAPLE AND F.\XCY 

GROCERIES 

FINE MEATS A SPECIALTY 
5524 EAST WASHINGTON STREET IRVINC.TON 280(1-1-2 

CONH'LIMENTS OF 

SHIRLEY BROS. CO. 

Free Estal)Iish)>!c')i!s ni- huliaiiapolis 
FUNERAL I)lR]-:CTORS 

Our (neatesl .!/;;; — "BLTIKR SERMCK" 

[3,.] 



Health and Accident [Mume, Office, Main 1 369 

Auto Insurance H(ime, Beech Grove 1 3H-R-1 

J. S. MANN, JR. 

THK HOOSIFR CASl'ALTV CO. INDIANAPOLIS 

IRVINGTON STATE BANK 

// rites All Kinds of Insurance — Insured Safe 'Deposit "Boxes 

^Ti^asonable 'Hates 

Washington and Ritter Indianapolis 



"Chocolate Holdup" is Daphne's new offering. 



PENNANT SNOWDRIFT 

atid Other Fancy Tabic Syrups 

MADE R^' 

Union Starch Refining Co., Columbus, Ind. 
sold by .all grocers 




MAIN OFFICE— 6nl NORTH PENNSYLVANIA 

BRANCH OFFICE— 1 EAST MARKET 

MAIN 1227 

QUALITY ,,,, , -™- --- --^^ ,^ ^,^^ SERVICE 



[3,3] 




for 6ve)'y thing In JMusic 



C. G. CONN- 
BAND INSTRUMENT; 



\'EGA 
liANJOS 



Victrolas 

27 East 
Ohio Street 



Standard Sheet Music-Books and Studies 



Hume-Mansur Buiidmg Indianapoli; 



LEEDY 
DRL'MS 

Brunsich'ks 



At the Butler-Wabash basketball game some one said that Butler 
couldn't find the basket, to which a spectator replied, "Well, why don't 
they put it in a more conspicuous place:" 



Coitipl'iuieiits of 



Eastern Coal & Export Corp. 



1226 Mkvkk-Kisi.k Hi.i.. 



1m>i\nvpoi.is 



[3,4] 



The Davenport Pharmacy 

]l'i'Icu//H\i Butler Stiulcfits 



"SER\'KK WITH tOURTES\'" 
IXDIANAPOLIS IR\-. :4S2 132 S. ALDLT{6\ ROAD 



^/^^^/y/^f"^^^ 



A hopeful Freshman wrote on his Botany blue book, "May the Lord 
ha\'e mercy". It was returned with the notation, "The Lord didn't grade 
this paper". 



We Trint— 

The 'Butler Qolleguvi 

MAGAZINES PERIODICALS 

NEWSPAPERS OFFICE FORMS 

HOUSE ORGANS DIRECT ADVERTISING 

"Sei-vke Is The Thing" 

<2 



THE MAIL PRESS 

312 K.i?t Market Street INDIANAPOLIS 



[3,S] 



INDIANA 

PORTLAND CEMENT 

COMPANY 



Manufacturers of 

"HOOSI ER" 

Portland Cement 

Our plant is located on the Main Lines of the Pennsylvania and 
C. I. & L. Railways with Big Four connection at Greencastle, In- 
diana. We are also on the T. H. I. & E. Traction Company Lines. 



General Offices: Plant: 

808 Continental Bank Bldg., I.imedale, 

Indianapolis, Indiana Indhna 



[3,e-l 



Where School ami Teac/iey Meet 

W. H. Reasoner Teachers Agency 

National City Bank Bldg. Indianapolis 

Register Nozc For Next Fall 
EXTRA FINK! EXTRA FAST! EXTRA CARE! 

(tEO. W. RUSSELL & CO. 

Real Estate, Loans, Rents, hisuraiice oj - III Kinds 
PERSONAL SERMCE 

7 S;)Uth Ritter Avenue- Res., Irv. 1666; Office, Irv. 1212 



When Miss Hester asked Eddie Tro\' if he had any thumb tacks, he 
answered, "No, hut I've got some finger nails". 



INDIANA LAW SCHOOL 
UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS 



Three years' course of stud\' leading to the degree 

of Bachelor of Laws. C.raduation c]ualifies 

for admission to the Bar. 



For itifortJiatioii, aildress the Dea>i 

JAMES A. ROHBACH, A. M., LL. D. 

312-322 Columbia Security Bldg. 
143 East Ohio Street 

INDIANAPOLIS 

[3,7] 



ASK FOR 



FURNAS' ICE CREAM 

"The Cream of Quality" 
For Sale at Druggists and Confectioners 



I always give my seat to a ]ady who stands, 

She makes me think of mother with that strap in her hand. 

We didn't notice the earthquake the other evening, but maybe it was 
because we were out in Revnolcis' Ford. 




Edi/cat'idiidl Act i-vi ties Center at 



THE C L AY P O O L 

The RUc\ R(/(ini is iiistiiicti^-cly chosen 
for itiiiversity social functions 



[3,8] 



ROBERT FROST DAGGETT 

<•_{)■! hitecl for liiitler L' iircers'ity 



INDIANAPOLIS 




Grand Puukjs^ V ictrolas 
and Radios 

H.il p. SluMrcr, Prcs. 



INDIANAPOLIS MUSIC HOUSE 



For Qollege Annuals 
and Other "Books 

BECKTOLD COVERS 

I 



X the binding of thi? book \im have an example nf how beautiful and pra 
tical a Becktold Cover can be. 



Attractiveness, durability, adaptabilitv and economy are outstanding charac- 
teristics of Becktold Covers. Then they offer an almost unlimited range of colors 
and color combinations and can be embossed with practically any sort of design. 
Year bv vear the popularity of these covers as bindings for College Annuals in- 
creases. In the business world, too, there is a fast growing demand tor them on 
catalogs and other books that need a durable and attractive dress. 

We shall be glad to send samples to anyone interested in Becktold Covers and to 
make suggestions as to how the\" can be adapted to any book. 

Becktold Printing and Book Manufacturing Company 

Alanufacturers of distinctive 
covers for college annuals 



ST. LOUIS 



MISSOURI 



[3,9] 



IN THE SPRINS A 




PIGGLY WIGGLY 

. /// Over the World 

iMOST COMPLETE (tROCERY 
STOCK IN IRVINGTON 



5460 E. Washington Street 



It used to be wine, women and song. Now it's home-brew, your wife, 
and static. 



INDIANAPOLIS AND CINCINNATI TRACTION CO. 
TIME TABLE 

Subiecl lo Chamse Wilhoul Notice 

LIMITED TRAINS 

To RUSHVILLE and CONNERSVILLE 



STATIONS 


AM 


AM AM PM 


PM 


PM 


*PM 


*PM 


*PM 


Indianapolis Lv. 

Rushville 

Connersville Ar. 


7 00 

8 24 
8 54 


8 IS 10 30 12 30 

9 38 , 11 52 , 1 52 
10 10 12 22 2 22 


1 45 
3 08 
3 38 


4 45 
6 09 
6 40 


7 00 

8 22 
8 57 


9 00 
10 26 
10 57 


11 30 

12 49 
1 19 


To INDIANAPOLIS 


STATIONS 


AM 


AM 


PM PM 


PM 


PM 


*PM 


*PM 




Connersville Lv. 

Rushville . 

Indianapolis Ar. 


8 00 

8 30 

9 55 


9 20 
9 52 
11 14 


12 40 

1 10 

2 32 


2 25 

3 48 


4 15 
4 45 
6 07 


7 00 
7 31 


8 30 

9 01 
10 23 


10 00 

10 32 

11 54 






To 


SHELBYVILLE and GREEN 


SBURG 








STATIONS 


1 AM 


AM 


PM 


PM I PM 


*PM 


*PM 


*PM 




Indianapolis 

Shelbyville 

Greensburg. ... - 


1 8 19 
1 9 20 
1 10 01 


9 35 

10 40 

11 20 


12 30 

1 37 

2 18 


2 00 I 5 00 

3 08 5 59 
3 49 6 36 


7 10 

8 16 

9 00 


9 00 
10 06 
10 45 


11 30 

12 36 
1 16 




To INDIANAPOLIS 


STATIONS 


AM 


AM 


M PM PM 


1 *PM 


*PM 


*PM 





Greensburg. 
Shelbyville 
Indianapolis 



9 OS 
9 46 
10 52 



12 00 
12 42 
1 49 



1 30 

2 13 

3 IS 



4 30 

5 10 

6 15 



6 15 I 8 30 10 IS 

6 57 9 12 10 66 

8 08 10 18 12 00 



♦Will make local stops on request t 



"TRAVEL TRACTION" 



[=z,] 



The Laundry Service Complete 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY CO. 

840-848 NORTH NEW JERSEY' STREET 
Phone, Main 3180 INDIANAPOLIS 



If the seats are in the balcony, she just adores the ele\'ation. 

If you call for her in the flivver, she really enjoys the ride. 

If \'ou dine at Thompson's instead of the Claypool, she thuiks the 
food is the best she ever tasted. 

If she misses her appointment, she makes one feel that it does not 
matter. 

If you suggest that home would be the best place to spend the eve- 
ning, she says that she is tired of the theatres and dances and was gomg to 
suggest the same thing. 

She is the perfect date. She ;)iust exist somewhere! 



FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

SCHOOL JEWELRY - CLUB PINS 

HAND WROUGHT JE\\ ELRY 

Let us fill your needs for presents or 
favors with frat or school seal nKumted 



C. B. DYER 

JEWELER 

234 Massachusetts .Ave. Indianapolis 

[3"] 




'OLLEGE and High School Annuals have 
come to be recognized as an institution. 
Year by year they are growing in import- 
ance and number. They are growing, too, 
in beauty and character, so that many high 
school annuals now excel the books issued 
from colleges a few years ago. In this ad- 
vancement we have had no small part. For more than twenty- 
five years we have been helping create representative annuals 
for schools thruout the middle west and south and thru our help- 
ful co-operation have won a position of recognized leadership 
among annual engravers. Last year three of our annuals won four 
first and second prizes in state and national contests — a testi- 
monial to our service of which we are proud. This is one of 154 
annuals, published in eleven states, that bear the Indeeco imprint 
this year. Not content to rest on laurels won we have worked 
out plans to make our service to 1926 staffs more helpful than 
ever. Editors, business managers or faculty advisors are invited 
to write and give us opportunity to explain how Indeeco Service 
can help them publish the best annual they have ever had. 



Indianapolis Engraving Company 



222 EAST OHIO STREET 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



[3=3] 



e 



Shortest 
Line 



to 



Chicago 

Four Fast Trains Daily 
Each One as Good as the Best 



MONON ROUTE 



Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville Ry* 

"The Hoosier" 

Leaves Indianapolis .... 7:45 A.M. 
Leaves Boulevard Station . .8:00 A.M. 
Arrives Chicago 12:45 P. M. 

"Chicago Limited" 

Leaves Indianapolis . . . 12:00 Noon 
Leaves Boulevard Station . . 12:15 P.M. 
Arrives Chicago 4:55 P. M. 

'The Tippecanoe" 



Leaves Indianapolis .... 4: 
Leaves Boulevard Station . . 4 
Arrives Chicago 9 

'Midnight Special' 



30 P. M. 
44 P. M. 
10 P. M. 



\^ 



Leaves Indianapolis .... 1:00 A.M. 
Leaves Boulevard Station . .1:15 A.M. 

Arrives Chicago 7:10 A.M. 

Sleepers ready in Union Station at 9 P. M. 
Also special sleeper ready at Boulevard Station at 9 P. M. 

AU trains arrive Dearborn Station, Chicago, 
only two blocks from the loop 

When you travel on the MONON you are protected by 

Automatic Block Signals 
All the Way 



J 



[3..] 




Development of compact and graceful new 
fixtures easily adapted to limited spaces and 
fixed floor plans, has brought the comfort 
and convenience of an "extra bathroom" 
into countless American homes. 
The Crane A»cv; lavatory pictured above 
mav be had in three sizes, to fit various re- 
quirements — 21 X 24, 22 X 2 7 and 24X 30. 
Of cream-white vitreous china, in color it 



matches the lustrous enamel of the Tarnia 
bath, set here in the soft green vitrolite tiles 
lining the walls. The Tarnia bath is sup- 
plied in three lengths also — 5, 5^2 and 6 feet. 
The Cj-r.fv" chair seat and back are of cane. 
Crane plumbing and heatingfixturesaresold 
through contractors only, in a wide variety of 
styles at prices within reach of all . Let us send 
you "The New Art of Fine Bathrooms." 



CRAN E 

CRANE CO., 333 W. MARKET ST., INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 

Branihn and Sal,, Ogtic, in On, Hundrii and Forlj-iighl CiU,: 

Naiimal Elhibi, Rotm,: Chuaso, Neiu Ytrt, AlUnlic Cin, San Franiuto and M<.nlr,al 

l^'arS!: Chttago^ Bridg,f>t,rl^ Birmingham^ Chattanooga, Trenton and Montreal 




[3^5] 



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[3^6] 











HORI'/OXTAL 

1 A word found in the Union Starch Refining C..nip.iii.v .id\ ertiscnu-nt. 

5 Kind of registration offered by John Ehle. 

10 First two initials of a proper noun on page 28'), inverted. 

13 A word appearing in an advertisement on page -U'6. 

15 First two letters of a proper name foimd on page -'24. 

17 Distributors of dress shoes. 

2(1 Initials of a director of the Union Trust Comp.my. 

21 Same as No. 13, inverted. 

2.3 Second and third letters of a word found in the advertisement of Willi.im Mitchell I'rlutiiis 

24 Kind of fountain in Merrill's Pharmacy. 

25 The man that says '"Cash in' on a great opportunity." 

26 The president of the Indianapolis Music House. 

27 Same as No. 12. 

29 Initials of a grocer on page 312, Inverted. 

31 The first two initials of a grocer ,it 202 South Audubon Road. 

33 The cream of quality. 

34 Where Greeks meet Greeks. 

36 A word found in the advertisement on page 316. 

37 A pronoun in the advertisement of Graham Furniture Company. 

38 Same as last two letters of No. 5. 

+0 A degree mentioned in the Indiana Law School advertisement. 

42 Street location of the .Alamo Sales Comp.my. 

44 You will find this word in Kingan * Co. advertisement. 

46 An abbreviation found in the advertisement of the Butler Cafe. 

49 Same as the Monon, abbreviations. 

50 Initials of a faculty member of the Metropolitan School of Music. 

51 The shortest route to Chicago. 

54 Initials of the editor of the 1925 Dr,h. 

55 Same as No. 46, inverted. 

56 Same as No. 3S. 

58 A prominent shop at 310 Kahn Building. . ' 

S'l The manager of a sh..p for milady, on page 294. 

VERTICAL 

2 An abbreviation, inverted, in an advertisement below tlie Hendren Printing Company advertii 

3 Initi.ils of the president of tiie Indiana Optical Company. 

6 First syllable of a word found on page 306. 

7 Pronounced the same as No. 13, horizontal, but spelled differently. 

9 Initials of the representative of the Hoosier Casualty Insurance Company. 

12 The first and last letters of a word in KIger & Co. advertisement. 

14 Same as No. 35, inverted. 

16 A word in the advertisement of William Mitchell Printing Company. 

18 Same as No. 7. 

19 A preposition found on page 316. 

20 Initials of an agency whose office is 721 State Life Building. 

22 Initials of a barber shop at 5 North Ritter avenue. 

23 An article sold by Holmes Wall Paper and Hardware Company. 
26 A director of the Union Trust Company, initials. 

28 A word found in the advertisement of Interst.itc Public Service Company. 

30 Initials of the advertising manager of the 102 5 Drift. 

31 Where Butler eats. 

32 A word in an advertisement which begins with "Tomorrow's Citizens." 

33 Last two initials of a piano teacher on page 289. 

34 First two letters of a word found on page 282, inverted. 

35 Initials of "Your Hatter." 

37 Same as No. 50, horizontal, inverted. 

39 A three-letter word in Shirley Brothers Company advertisement. 
+ 1 First syllable of a word in Milford Drug advertisement. 

43 Initials of the manager of Spink Arms Hotel, inverted. 

45 A word found in the" first advertisement o 

47 An abbreviation appearing in most of the 

48 First two letters of a word next to Monon 

50 Same as No. 34, honizontal. 

51 Singular of a word in the advertisement o 

52 A word of negation found in the advertls 

53 Initials of the firm of which Mary France 
55 Invertion of a degree found on page 317. 

57 Same as No. 26, vertical, inverted." 

[32V] 



n page 
adverti 


298. 


nts. 




1, on p; 


ige 3 


24. 




if Petol 
s Wilsc 


; Sho 
of H 


e Co 
otel 
man 


Li 



Last Piece of Copy 



THE last piece of copy for the 1925 Drift has gone to 
press. Countless hours have been spent In its making. 
If it has fallen short in its purpose of recalling the Butler 
of Yesterday, portraying the Butler of Today and visualizing the 
Butler of Tomorrow, the staff only hopes that it will not be a 
discredit to the Institution for which it was published. 

To the members of the staff who have willingly contributed 
their time and ability, to the Indianapolis Engraving Company 
who has done superfine work collaborated with efficient ser\"ice, 
to the Northland Studio who has more than gone out of its way 
to satisfy students with photographs of character, and to Barnes, 
dault & Company %vho has added a personal touch to e^'ery page 
that it has printed, I am deeph" indebted. 

May the Butler of Tomorrow be the Butler of Today in a 
few tomorrows! 

— Editor. 



/f 









V ,0 ■,