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Full text of "The Drift"

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DEDICATION 

To J. I. Holcomb, in recognition 

of his efforts to beautify 

the cannpus of Butler University, 

this year's DRIFT is dedicated. 



THE DRIFT 
1953 

BUTLER UNIVERSITY 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 




CsmiER UNIVERSITY 




. . . spin a tale of seasons, clocks, and progress at 

Butler University, 1953. There will be some talk of 

the desperate minutes before a three-hour final, 

the usual small talk about weather and seasons; and 

a lot of proud talk about progress. We wish we 

could stop that clock and talk of many other things, 

but the hands will not be halted, nor will the steady 

procession of DRIFTS and the story of progress 

they tell. 




TABLE 



up througli the years 



down throush the seasons 



around the clock 




OF CONTENTS 



7-23 



24-7 



Butler 1952-1953 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 



• Athletics 

• Organizations 

• Activities 

• Administration 

• Classes 



28-31 



Up through 4ie Years 



1946 

1947 

1948 

I 9 49 

I 9 5 O 

19 5 1 
I 9 52 



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26 


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29 


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Down through the Seasons 







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UP 




The imposing structure on the left 
housed the first students to attend But- 
ler University. Completed in 1855, it 
opened its doors in November of that 
year as North Western Christian Uni- 
versity. 

In 1875 students and faculty aban- 
doned the College Avenue location for 
modern accommodations in Irvington. 
Contemporary records noted down the 
reluctance with which students once 
again moved to a more spacious site, 
this time to Fairview Park in the north- 
ern residential section of Indianapolis. 







1 




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THROUGH THE YEARS * 



The new building, Arthur Jordan Memorial 
Hall, was ready for occupancy in 1928, and the 
Fieldhouse was completed in the fall of that year. 
An appraisal of page seven affords a graphic pic- 
ture of the tremendous growth which Butler has 
undergone since thai time. 

The Union and Pharmacy buildings both repre- 
sent a current high-water mark in our ever-expend- 
ing facilities. Atherton Center opened its doors in 
1950, and the Pharmacy building, our most recent 
structure, was ready for occupancy in 1951. 

Fairview's campus will be the site of another 
building project next spring. Construction crews, 
a familiar sight on campus for the last few years, 
are slated to begin erecting a new dormitory to 
house Air ROTC and other men students. 




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UNDER THE CLOCK 



These pictures of 
student life under 
the big clock in Jor- 
dan Hall contrast sharply 
to the historical sketch on 
the preceding pages. But a 
hurried look at The Collegian 
before class and the proverbial 
"jam in jelly hall" are all a part 
of 1953 Butler history. These pictures 
of contemporary Butler history may be relics 
of the past fifty years from now. 




10 




Nothing comes more directly 
under the influence 
of the big clock than 
pre-election frenzy, a 
very significant element 
in contemporary history. 





Inside Atherton Center 



Most important laboratory dedicated 
to the study of "campusology" is the 
C-club, only one of the many recreational 
facilities contained in Atherton Center. 
Release from academic pressure can also 
be found in the cafeteria, the billiard 
and table tennis rooms, the drugstore, or 
the extra-curricular offices on the third 
floor. 

The bookstore, operated as a separate 
department for the first time this year, 
has now become an inexpendable part 
of every student's academic life. 

These scenes, like those under the big 
clock in Jordan Hall, reflect history in 
the making at Butler University, 1953. 




The quiet and refreshing atmosphere of the cafeteria means 
a respite from duty for students and faculty alike. 




JORDAN COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Concluding its second year as a full-fledged 
college of Butler University is the Jordan Col- 
lege of Music, located at 1116-1204 North 
Delaware street. Jordan merged with Butler 
in 1951 as its sixth college. 

The Jordan College of Music of Butler Uni- 
versity is an outstanding pivotal point of com- 
munity culture which offers courses in music, 
radio, drama, and dance. 

As complementary to their scholastic pro- 
gram, Jordan presents all-school dance and 
musical productions in addition to individual 
recitals. Some of these features are pictured 
on the following pages. 




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14 




UP THROUGH THE YEARS 




An affiliated college of Butler University 
is the John Herron Art School, located at 
16th and Pennsylvania. The facilities of the 
Art School and of the Art Institute Museum 
are available to students of Butler by special 
arrangement with the Director of the Art 
School and with the Curator of the Museum. 

Herron and Butler co-operate in a program 
for the preparation of art teachers and super- 
visors, offering courses in studio and applied 
art. 



JOHN HERRON ART INSTITUTE 




15 






Up Through the Years With the Greeks 

The growth of Butler University over 
the past ninety-four years has witnessed 
a similar expansion of Greek letter or- 
ganizations. Throughout the nation, these 
organizations have made a signal con- 
tribution to the status of modern univer- 
sity lile, and Fairview's history offers 
no exception. 

Placing an emphasis on scholarship as well as 
extra-curricular and social activity, the Greek letter 
organization delivers an impetus to individual 
achievement. 

Starting with the inception of Phi Delta Theta 
in 1859 and Kappa Alpha Theta in 1874, Greek 
organizations at Butler have grown to number seven 
sororities and nine fraternities. 

The latest innovation in Butler's Greek world is 
Tau Kappa Epsilon which received its charter in 
October, 1951. The Phi Kappa's (large picture) 
are now completing their third year at Butler as a 
colony and are expecting to receive their charter 
soon. 





The dates pictured represent the date of char- 
tering: for the fraternities (left) ; Phi Deha Theta, 
1859; Sigma Chi, 1865; Delta Tau Delta, 1875; 
Lambda Chi Alpha, 1915; Sigma Nu, 1926; Sigma 
Alpha Mu, 1948; and Kappa Sigma, 1949. 

For the sororities: Kappa Alpha Theta, 1874; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, 1878; Pi Beta Phi, 1897; 
Delta Delta Delta, 1914; Zeta Tau Alpha, 1920; 
Delta Gamma, 1925; and Alpha Chi, 1925. 

Many of these organizations pictured have ac- 
quired new houses during the school year 1952- 
1953. Wherever possible The Drift has pictured 
them on following pages. 

BISA, the Butler Independent Student's Associa- 
tion, and Trianon joined with these Greek organi- 
zations in promoting, through competition, many 
worthy campaigns which took place in 1953. 
Among these were the blood drive, sponsored by 
Kappa Alpha Theta and the Cheer Drive, which 
was won this year by Phi Delta Theta. 

Fraternity presidents of these campus organiza- 
tions try to achieve harmony through the Inter- 
fraternity Council, under the supervision of L. 
Gray Burdin, Dean of Men. Unity and co-opera- 
tion among sororities is promoted through the Pan- 
hellenic Council. 

Through their work in the Student Council, 
Greek letter organizations strive for more repre- 
sentative student affairs and co-operation among 
students, faculty, and administration. 



17 





GREEK ACTIVITIES 



Once more we make the transition from 
past to present, from ancient to contemporary 
history, with these candid scenes appropriate 
only in 1953. The scope of Greek activities 
are broad and sometimes peculiarly unde- 
finable. 

They include a potpurri of the scholastic, 
the extra-curricular, the social, and (only on 
rare occasions) the nonsensical. 





18 




The phone calls, the housework, 
card games, study, hasty prepara- 
tions for a last-minute date, home- 
comings, exchange dinners, study- 
breaks in front of a piano, and the 
indispensable bulletin board all 
play their part in Greek activities. 



19 




BOTANICAL GARDENS 




The James Irving Holcomb Botanical 
Gardens are symbolic of a long-range plan 
of building and beautification that its slow- 
ly changing the face of Butler's campus. 
With its central theme of modernity and 
grace, the gardens are as much a part of 
community relaxation as the college itself 
is a part of community culture. 

Its grace derives from the statue of Per- 
sephone, goddess of growth and vegetation, 
and its modernity is reflected by the Gar- 
den House. The canal completes a picture 
of beauty that is both architectural and 
scenic. 

A lake (pictured on page 23), newly- 
created this year, is a further enhancement 
of the Garden's beauty. A glance at the 
architectural drawing (upper left) shows 
how closely the present gardens conform 
to their original plan. 

The Garden Road, another scenic feature 
of the modern Butler University, is pic- 
tured on page 25. 



20 




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A Dormitory is Planned and 



No discussion under the title "Up Thi'ough 

the Years" would be complete without some mention of 

the future. With such factors as war and inflation 

remaining constant, Butler's future was as bright as 

ever in 1953. Definite plans have been made 

regarding a new AROTC dormitory, and 

this year Butler became the site of a new 

lake located midway between the 

Fieldhouse and the campus. 




22 



a Lake Is Filled 




23 



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DOWN THROUGH THE SEASONS 




The evolution of seasons is incompar- 
ably more effortless than the evolution 
from North Western Christian Univer- 
sity to Butler or the evolution from fresh- 
man to senior, but it, too, is an element 
of time and progression without which 
the picture of Butler, 1953, would be 
incomplete. 

Autumn, as the Drift will eventually 
show, means registration, the opening of 
classes, and football. Winter, by the 
same token, is a season of term papers 
and finals; spring means Geneva Stunts 
and graduation. 



24 



AUTUMN 



• WINTER 



• SPRING 




25 




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DOWN THROUGH THE SEASONS 



From summer, through winter, 
and into spring is a swift motion 
as seasons go, but since it can mean 
the difference between a junior and 
a senior or the span between 
"finals" and graduation, it was a 
very significant transition as far 
as the Butler student in 1953 was 
concerned. 




27 





Tlie retrospect of years may evoke for us 
a picture of the past, and the dependable pro- 
gression of seasons carry with it a hint of the 
future, but the present can be pictured only 
in terms of a clock. 

Thus "Around the Clock" is the ultimate 
picture to be presented in introducing Butler, 
1953. There's the clock that points to ten 
minutes before eight and means a hurried 
dash to the first class and the clock that spells 
out coffee-break. For some, ten o'clock may 
mean study and research in the library; for 
others, a stroll through the drugstore and to 
a rendezvous in the campus club. 





Twelve o'clock spelled out luncli 
time, whether tit home, in the cafe- 
teriii, or in a sorority house. Two 
o'clock meant more classes and more 
study, and eight in the evening pointed 
to exchange dinners, liomecoming cele- 
brations, and pin serenades. 




29 








AROUND THE CLOCK 



But we were not automatons, moving 
through the rut of routine under the tyranny 
of a clock. Every hour signified a new 
challenge to think or to relax. 

And each challenge drove home its les- 
son. The challenge of eight o'clock on a 
rainy Monday morning brought with it self- 
discipline, the virtue of which was amply 
rewarded when the clock pointed to two 
o'clock on a warm Saturday afternoon. 

Some of us will remember 1953 as a 
year when the challenges never ran out 
and the clock never ran down. 




In picturing chronologically the action 
at Butler, 1953, the yearbook staff would like to 
acknowledge the obvious assistance rendered by Keith 
Bratton's caricatures. We have adapted the story 
which these murals have to tell in the narrative of 
Butler, 1952-53. 




32 



/ 9 5 2 ' BUTLER • / 9 5 3 




WHEN IT ALL STARTED . . . 



In 1952 we learned 

that September was both a significant 

and an eventful month. 

It signified arrival 

and beginning, 

and its crowded events 

included registration, 

freshmen mixer, rush, 

and the opening 

of football season. 

A flurry 

of the traditional open houses 

brought this significant 

and eventful month to a close. 



34 



SEPTEMBER 





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FRESHMAN CAMP 



The purpose of this co-educational camp 
was to familiarize new students with Butler 
University. Approximately sixty freshmen 
and forty upper-classmen attended the annual 
YMCA and YWCA sponsored camp held this 
year at McCormick's Creek August 29, 30, 
and 31. Dr. DeForest O'Dell (pictured 
above), Alumni Secretary, showed movies of 
the campus. 

Oval picture: Ross Copeland, Dick Stan- 
field, Voldemar Pihlak, national representa- 
tive, and Maureen Pleak roast wieners over 
an open fire. Copeland and Pleak were co- 
chairmen of the affair. 



36 



TYPICAL FRESHMEN 

AND 

RUSH: 

Scott Chandler and Maggie Davis were 
named typical freshmen boy and girl of 
the year at the annual YM-YW Freshmen 
Mixer. Skip Booher and Char Green were 
co-chairmen of the dance. 

1952 was the second year in succession 
that a Sigma Chi pledge gained the title. 
Last year Frank Abbott and Bev Siegal, Pi 
Phi, were the first crowned couple of the 
year. Maggie Davis, this year's typical 
freshmen girl, is a Kappa pledge. 

(Below) Women's Rush loosed legions 
of he-ribboned, excited and confused fresh- 
men coeds on the Butler campus in Sep- 
tember. 






REGISTRATION 



Of all the events falling in September, 
registration is at once the most signifi- 
cant and colorful. The seemingly endless 
lines, the pile of cards, and the chaos 
that ended as suddenly as it began grad- 
ually were all a part of this memorable 
Pandemonium. 

Posing for you I. D. picture was an 
anti-climatic process that mirrored fa- 
tigue and relief, and you couldn't help 
but feel that a semester of school would 
be a relief, too, by comparison. 



38 




INTRAMURAL FOOTBALL 

September also meant the beginning of in- 
tramural sports. This increasingly popular 
program included competition in basketball, 
football, track, swimming, volleyball, base- 
ball, and billiards. 

This year's action began with iootball, 
dominated by the Sigma Nu's who copped 
first spot in the league by downing the Phi 
Belt's in a decisive game, 12-2. Final stand- 
ings for the league put Sigma Nu into first 
place, followed by Lambda Chi in second, 
and Phi Delta Theta in third. 

(Below) The championship Sigma Nu team 
assumes the menacing pose that brought them 
to a number one niche in intramural football 
in 1952. 






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The Football Season Begins Against Evansville 





A high scoring Bulldog offense which accounted for 
231 points and an average of better than four touch- 
downs per game started the 1952 season by downing 
Evansville 25-20. Trailing 20-19 with less than a min- 
ute to play, the Bulldogs clicked on a 69-yard scoring 
play to win the ball game. Fred Davis threw the touch- 
down pass to Don Kelly who scampered across the goal 
line for the second time in the evening. 

By the end of the season, the Bulldogs had won five, 
lost three, and tied one; but at the time the Pocket City 
game was considered by some to be an upset for Coach 
Paul D. Hinkle's inexperienced team. Norm Ellen- 
berger and Johnny Riddle scored the Bulldogs' other 
touchdowns. 



41 




PRE-GAME PEP SESSIONS 

A good football season is suggestive of many things other 
than the actual playing of a game. It means pep sessions, 
bonfires, parades, cheer leaders, and noise. The 1952 sea- 
son, being a good one, had all these. 



BUTLER 47. NORTH CENTRAL 6 

The Bulldogs scored in every quarter to bury 
a new opponent. North Central, under a 47-6 score. 
Norm Ellenberger, the junior fullback punter from 
New Haven, Indiana, who was to be named most 
valuable player for the season, started the romp 
by running 53 years on the first Butler play from 
scrimmage. 

Ellenberger later added another touchdown, and 
Don Kelly, Frank Meier, Clarence Ewald, Jeff 
Brown, and Scott Chandler also got into the scor- 
ing act. Bill Hughett converted after five of the 
seven touchdowns. 





OPEN HOUSES 

A flurry of open houses, an 
institution that has both tradition and utility 
behind it, also contributed to making September 1952 
a memorable month. 



44 



Innovated in the dim past and designed 
to introduce the new pledge classes 
to present students and faculty, the open house 
enjoyed its usual place of importance in the 
early fall activities at Butler, 1952. 



EXCHANGE DINNERS 

No picture of fall activity at Butler 

would be complete without 

introducing another venerable institution 

which played its part in making September 1952 

a typical one. 

The last word in Greek high society 

is the exchange dinner, 

a delightful reprieve from the work-a-day frenzy 

of going to college. 




45 



IN THE GALLERY OF MEMORIES . . . 

October, of course, 
meant one thing to us 
in 1952: HOMECOMING. 
And Homecoming, in turn, 
meant a myriad of other things, 
like parades, house decorations, 
pole fights, bonfires, queens, 
and football games. 



46 




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51 




To the obvious pleasure of townspeople and 

collegiates alike, 

the annual homecoming pageant 

wends its way down Meridian, 

fronted by the Butler marching band. 

The winning Sigma Nu float is pictured in the foreground. 

"Alums" get into the act. 





48 




LAMBDA CHI'S WIN HOUSE DECORATIONS 

To the tune of "Sickle More Sycamores," the Lambda Chi's 

marched to a first place in 

house decorations with the creation pictured above. 

The contest was sponsored by Scarlet Quill and Blue Key. 



49 




FROSH WIN TUG O' WAR 




An undaunted freshmen crew 

(pictured above) humbled the 

sophomores in the tradition-steeped 

tug o' war between the coeds of those two classes. 

Spectacles like these 

make Homecoming festivities 

long-awaited and long-remembered 

for students, faculty, and alumni. 

The 1952 Homecoming was considerably enhanced 

by the weather 

which co-operated in making it 

the highpoint of October. 

This feature was sponsored by Chimes. 



50 



BUT LOSE THE GREASED POLE SKIRMISH 



Tlie pole figlit is as essential 

to a successful Homecoming 

as Homecoming itself is to a successful October. 

The fifteen hundred fans 

who witnessed the annual greased pole fight, 

a tradition of old and bloody vintage, 

saw the freshmen go down to defeat 

after three fruitless attempts 

to dislodge the beanie 

suspended fifteen feet in the air. 

This was sponsored by Sphinx. 




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THE BONFIRE 

Photographers and students thronged to the bonfire, an indis- 
pensable preliminary to the all-important Homecoming football game. 
The bonfire was followed by an informal dance 
in the Campus Club, 
which climaxed a day of pole fights, 
tugs o' war, and parades. 




A war dance 

around the bonfire 

breaks up as students disperse. 

Next stop: Campus Club. 



52 




BUTLER 13. INDIANA STATE 13 

Obviously over-confident after reading that Indiana 

State had lost to Ball State, 33-0, the previous Saturday, 

the Bulldogs had their hands full with the underrated Sycamores. 

Fred Davis passed to Charley Johnson late in the 

fourth quarter to pull Butler to within a point of State, 

and then Johnson toed the ball through the uprights to tie the score. 

John Riddle scored from 16 yards out for the first BU touchdown. 

The Bulldogs dropped a heartbreaker to the Wabash Cavemen, 27-25, 

three weeks earlier and followed this up 

by wins over Ball State, 28-6, and St. Joseph, 33-0. 

The Indiana State game brought Butler's 

conference mark to three wins and one tie. 

A week later, the Bulldogs lost to Valparaiso, 14-13, 

which made their final conference standing 3-1-1, identical to the 

standing of Valparaiso which inflicted the Bulldogs' only conference defeat. 



53 



CAMPUS CLUB CORONATION 



Immediately after the announcement of her victory, 

the glamorous Miss Cooksey 

became subject to a spontaneous demonstration of approval. 

Here she is feted . . . Campus Club style. 






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THE FINALE: TWO QUEENS ARE ELECTED 



Students and alumni put the lid on another year 

of Homecoming activities 

by dancing to the music of Harry McCrady's orchestra 

in the Egyptian Room of the Murat Temple. 

Highlight of the annual affair, 

sponsored by Scarlet Quill and Blue Key, 

was the presentation of the Homecoming Queen for 1952, 

Jane Cooksey (above right) and the alumna queen mother, 

Mrs. Reece (Kathy Hart Zay), class of '47. 

Mrs. Patterson is being escorted by Don Shaw. 

Miss Cooksey is introduced by Patti Payne. 



55 



FALL AND FOOTBALL DRAW TO A CLOSE 

Christmas vacation was staying at an obstinate distance 

and "finals" loomed dangerously close behind, 

but we were too absorbed with Panhel, class elections, 

and football to notice the Imminency of either. 

Still we were aware that fall, 

with its registration and Homecoming, 

was drawing to a hasty but eventful close. 



56 



NOVEMBER 




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HALLOWE'EN DANCE 



Janie Knoebel, Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
and Ray Stewart, Sigma Chi, 
gathered honors at the annual 
Women's Recreational Association 
square dance in the Fieldhouse. 
Miss Knoebel carried off the witch title, 
while Stewart got the nod as scarecrow. 



CLASS ELECTIONS 



The nation was in a transport 

of election-year frenzy in November of 1952, 

and Butler was right in tune, caucuses and all. 

November 19 reflected the national political scene in miniature 

as students elected the officers 

who would preside over their respective classes 

for the remainder of the year. 

Senior officers elected were Doug Hatton, president; 

Bob Lincks, vice-president; 

Shirley Stillwell, secretary; and Paul Ross, Jr., treasurer. 



Junior officers elected were Skip Booher, president; 

Frank Tardy, vice-president; 

Janet Brucker, secretary; Jim Hogshire, treasurer; 

and Bob Given, prom chairman. 

Sophomores were Richard Garret, president; 

John Shreve, vice-president; 

Mary Jo Ober, secretary; Tom McCarthy, treasurer. 

Freshman officers included 

Roland Becker, president; 

Dan Englehart, vice-president; 

Carol Manwaring, secretary; and 

Sherman Reeves, treasurer. 



58 




Jordan activities for the fall 
included Marjorie Lawrence, inter- 
nationally acclaimed dramatic 
soprano, who launched Butler's Jordan 
College of Music Orchestra Series in 
November. 



(Below) Joseph Victor Laderoute, 
Canadian-American tenor and head of 
the Jordan Voice Department pre- 
sented a recital in October. Mr. 
Laderoute appeared with the Jordan 
Symphony in April. 










PANHELLENIC DANCE 



60 



Dating rules were foresaken 

at the annual Panhellenic dance, 

sponsored by the Panhellenic Council. 

The gals squired their men to this traditional favorite 

where Bill Dudley was elected Panhel king. 

Skip Elder's corsage designed by Carolyn Auble, 

won him a ticket to the Junior Prom. 

Pictured above are (left to right) Valera Hume, publicity chairman, 

Betty Lou Gunter, Bill Dudley, Skip Elder and Carolyn Auble. 



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Judges are presented with a knotty proposition 
in selecting the winning corsage. 
Creations, as usual, ran the gamut 
from the heautiful to the bizarre 
and the decorative to the zany. 



The indispensable dance atmosphere 

was conjured at the Indiana Roof 

by Earl Newport and his band. 

Attention was usually divided between your date 

and the stars that blinked from the roof. 



61 







1 







Valparaiso 14, Bu+ler 13 

Butler had to settle for a share of the ICC 
title when they lost to a tough Valparaiso 
team, 14-13. Jolni Riddle scored both touch- 
downs for the Bulldogs, one on an 87-yard 
pass play with Fred Davis the thrower. Riddle 
caught the ball on his 30, and weaved 70 
yards for the score, a block by Gene Mangin 
on the Valpo safety man springing Riddle 
into the open. 

The other touchdown came on a delayed 
hand-off to Riddle by Davis, a modification 
of the statue of liberty play. Riddle covered 
the 29 yards to pay dirt. 



62 




«_ -» 



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Butler 33, Washington 20 

Playing their best game of the season, Butler 
powered over three last quarter touchdowns to 
beat a good Washington team, 33-20. The two 
teams played to a 13-13 halftime tie. Wash- 
ington drove 63 yards in the third quarter to 
take the lead. 

Don Campbell caught a touchdown pass (his 
second of the game), and Don Kelly ran for 
two scores in the last quarter to salt the game 
away. Kelly played more offense in this game 
than in any other game since early in the season, 
and his running was the difference between the 
two teams in the game. Kelly was forced to the 
defense early in the season when Joe Adams 



received a broken nose and was unable to back 
up the line on defense. 

Western Reserve 42, Butler 14 

Western Reserve scored four times in the sec- 
ond half to turn a close game into a rout, and 
send the Bulldogs down to their worst defeat of 
the 1952 season. 

Norm Ellenberger scored just before the end 
of the half to pull the Bulldogs up to the short 
end of a 7-14 halftime score, but after the sec- 
ond half started everything went wrong from 
Butler's standpoint, and the final score became, 
42-14. George Freyn scored his first touchdown 
of the season, and Butler's last when he grabbed 
a Fred Davis aerial late in the fourth quarter. 



63 




Four Touchdowns Per Game Lead Bulldogs to Winning Season 



A high scoring Bulldog offense which ac- 
counted for 231 points, an average of better 
than four touchdowns per game, led the 1952 
Butler football team to a winning season. They 
won five, lost three, and tied one. 

Due to a mid-season slump the football squad 
was able to gain just a share of the Indiana 
Collegiate Conference championship. Butler 
won three conference games in a row before tie- 
ing Indiana State and losing to Valparaiso. 

This placed Butler's final conference mark 
at 3-1-1, identical to the standing of Valparaiso, 
which inflicted the Bulldogs' only conference 
reversal. 

Indiana State led Butler throughout most of 



the ball game until the Bulldogs scored and 
converted in the final minute to gain a 13-13 tie 
with the Sycamores before a large Homecoming 
crowd. 

Butler's three conference wins were posted 
over Evansville, 25-20; Ball State, 28-6; and 
St. Joseph, 33-0. 

Prospects for the 1953 season look bright 
since only three seniors were on the 1952 squad. 
The three, who were presented trophies at the 
Blue Key banquet at the end of the season, are 
Don Campbell, Charles Johnson, and Wayne 
Walls. 

Norman EUenberger, junior fullback and 
punter from New Haven, Indiana, was named 



64 



most valuable player for the season by a vote 
of local newspapers and radio stations. 

Varsity "B" awards were made to the follow- 
ing player: Joe Adams, Dick Berndt, Charles 
Boltin, Don Campbell, Fred Davis, John Davis, 
Bernard Eagan, Bob Eichholtz, Norm Ellenber- 
ger, Les Gerlach, Jay Jacobs, Charles Johnson, 
Don Kelly, Ralph London, Gene Mangin, Mike 
Marmion, Leo Mahoney, Bill Norkus, Tom 
O'Brien, John Riddle, Bob Safford, Wayne 
Walls, and Norm Wilson. 

John Riddle, right halfback, and Ralph I^on- 
don, tackle, were named to the all conference 
team on the offensive platoon. Bill Norkus, 
guard; Fred Davis, quarterback; Don Kelly, 
halfback; and Norm Ellenberger, fullback, were 
selected on the defensive platoon. 




The Homecoming queen and her court look 
on as Butler ties Lidiana State, 13-13. 




DECEMBER WAS SHORT BUT CROWDED . . 

As the first semester closed down around us, 

we found December to be a short month, 

but one crowded with events. 

December was a month of last-minute campaigns, 

like the Collegian Cheer Drive and the Blood Drive. 

Relaxation from the competitive fury of these drives 

was afforded by the student players' production 

of Androcles and the Lion and Riders to the Sea. 

December also meant the beginning of basketball season, 

an event that was to absorb so much 

of our time and interest in the coming semester. 



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Two Furious Campaigns are Waged 



The annual Collegian Cheer Drive, a campaign 
to provide clothing for the needy at Christmas time, 
was won this year by the Phi Belt's. 
Pictured above is Beverly Siegal whose whole- 
hearted support is being appreciated by 
Tom McCarthy, Sigma Nu, Chairman of the Drive. 
(At left) Refreshments are being served 
after students contributed to the blood drive, 
sponsored this year by Kappa Alpha Theta. 
Co-chairmen of this highly successful drive 
were Rolene Woodward and Pat Martin. 



68 



The Student Players Meant Relaxation 



Theater-in-the-Round productions were presented 

of "Androcles and the Lion" and "Riders to the Sea." 

The two plays represented 

the joint effort of Jordan's Department of Drama, 

Butler University's Department of Speech and Drama, 

and the Butler Student Players. 

Cast in the leads of the Shaw comedy were Bill McAnallen, 

as Androcles, and Norm Bess as the lion. Charlotte Green 

portrayed Maurya in "Riders to the Sea." 



69 



Basketball Season Begins 



Crosley clicks against Purdue 
as Stewart and Grave look on. 
The Bulldogs won 67-61. 



70 




Crosley scores against Ohio 
State. The Bulldogs tallied 
up their second win against 
Big Ten competition by downing 
State 63-60. 




Butler won three games out of 
seven in December, bucking up 
against teams like Michigan, 67-63, 
Iowa, 52-62; Illinois, 57-75, North- 
western, 72-90, and Notre Dame, 49-63. 




DECEMBER GAMES 



Dec. I — At Iowa 

Dec. 6 — Purdue 

Dec. 1 3— Ohio State 

Dec. 20— At Illinois 

Dec. 22 — At Northwestern 

Dec. 27 — Notre Dame 

Dec. 29 — At Michigan 



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67 


61 


63 


60 


58 


75 


72 


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63 


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63 



71 



OFF TO A FAST START— THEN FINALS . . . 

Socially, January was one of our shortest months, 

but acadennically it was our 

most significant and memorable. 

The Delts acquired a beautiful and spacious new home, 

Kappa Kappa Gamma celebrated an anniversary, 

and two Jordan students received national recognition. 

In basketball it was a month of conquest. 

We remember all this now, 

but at the time it was rather eclipsed 

by the phantom cloud of "finals." 




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DELT'S HAVE A NEW HOUSE 



As evidence that all facets of 
Butler University have been equally 
subject to growth, Delta Tau Delta 
abandoned their former residence 
on 46th street to occupy the new 
quarters (pictured above) a few 
blocks southwest of the campus. 



KAPPAS CELEBRATE 

The local chapter of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma solemnized a na- 
tional anniversary by reenacting the 
historic event. Pictured at right are 
Carol Welch, Helen Letsinger, 
Claire Anderson, Gloria Gustofson, 
and Sue Clyne. 




74 






Jordan Students Win Recognition 

Jordan College of Music of Butler University was justi- 
fiably proud when national recognition was accorded them in 
1953. Miss Charlotte Schwartz, a student at Jordan College 
(above left) garnered honors for the whole of Butler University 
when she placed first in the Indianapolis Symphony audition 
for pianists. Another nationally acclaimed recipient was Miss 
Carol Boyer (above right) who won the Indianapolis Symphony 
vocal audition. 

Miss Schwartz and Miss Boyer are pictured with Fabien 
Sevitzky, conductor of the Indianapolis Symphony. 



75 



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Basketball for January 

The Bulldogs opened play in the ICC conference the same 
way thev closed the '51-'52 campaign — winning. Evansville 
was the victim in the Pocket City, 74-61. 

Playing one of its best games of the season, Butler exploded 
for 58 points in the second half, burying DePauw under a 
93-68 avalanche; the Bulldogs then won their fourth straight 
game by turning in a workmanlike 65-53 win over Wabash 
in Crawfordsville. 

Taking a long step toward the ICC title by outlasting the 
Sycamores, 78-64. Butler experienced that inevitable "off 
night" when the Pumas' came from 11 points behind at half- 
time to lace the Bulldogs by 15, 72-57. 

Then came the second win of the season over Wabash, 87-58. 

Hardworking Don Holloway experienced the best night of 
his varsity career by leading his teammates to a tight 74-70 
conference win over Evansville. 



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A LIHLE MONTH— A BIG SCHEDULE . . . 

February was a month of manifold potentialities: 

Valentine's Day, first full month of the second semester, 

Drift Beauty Queen Contest, 

the close of basketball season, 

the Theta Sig Banquet, and Freshman Rose Dance. 

The Sigma Nu's further evidenced the progress 

of Butler housing facilities 

by acquiring a spacious new home. 



FEBRUARY 



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Drift Beauty Contest 

Five Drift Beauties were chosen on the 
night of February 6 from a field of twenty- 
five of Butler's loveliest coeds. For the first 
time the Drift sponsored a dance after the 
presentation of awards to the winners. Bud 
Helms and his Commanders played for the 
contest and dancing in the cafeteria. 

Bea Douglass was selected as Queen of 
Queens by judges Jeanne Reed, fashion co- 
ordinator for the Wm. H. Block Co.; David 
MiUigan, director of WFBM-TV public rela- 
tions; and Col. Ben K. Armstrong, head of 
Butler's Air Force ROTC. Bob Morrison, pop- 
ular disc jockey from WIRE, acted as the 
master of ceremonies. 





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Pictured left to right are Kathy Zay, Kappa 
Alpha Theta; Barbara Bugg, Pi Beta Phi; Sharon 
Billing, Alpha Chi; Joyce Barnard, Delta Gamma; 
and Bea Douglass, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Queen 
of Queens. 










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Queen of Queens 



Bea Douglas 



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Barbara Bugg 



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Sharon Billing 



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Joyce Barnard 



85 



New Sigma Nu House 

Only a few months after the Delt 
purchase of a new residence and just 
a little over a year since the Sigma 
Chi construction, Sigma Nu acquired 
a comparable mansion, which further 
indicated that Butler's housing facili- 
ties were moving upward and outward. 
The estate pictured at right is con- 
tiguous to the new Delt house. 




Theta Sigma Phi Banquet 



Theta Sigma Phi, women's national professional 
journalism honorary, honored outstanding Butler 
coeds at their annual Matrix Table banquet and 
program held February 11 in Atherton Center. 

Mrs. Betty Hinckle Dunn, national president of 
Theta Sig, was the featured speaker. 




86 




Freshman Rose Queen 



Eileen Reis 



After a precarious start, the Freshman Rose Dance was successfully 
held at the Lincoln Hotel, Travertine Room. Because of slow ticket sales, 
and warnings from the Dean's office, it was feared the dance would be 
called off. The freshies gave the extra push that meant success by con- 
tributing one dollar a piece until the dance expenses were underwritten. 

A large crowd saw Ronnie Becker, dance chairman, present the crown 
and trophy to Eileen Reis, candidate from Alpha Chi Omega. 



87 




Basketball Games for February 



Butler took revenge for the Indiana 
and Notre Dame reversals on Ball 
State, clipping the Cardinals, 82-52. 
Keith Greve snapped out of his two 
game slump by tallying 21. Jim 
Crosley held high-scoring Cardinal 
guard. Jack Cross to one point and 
threw in 13 of his own. Butler canned 
30 of 73 field shots for a percentage 
of .411. 

The Sycamores inflicted Butler's 
second ICC reversal by protecting a 
one-point lead the last minute and a 
half of the game. Dick Atha scored 
four free throws in the last 90 seconds 
when Butler fouled trying to gain pos- 
session of the ball. 



Butler evened the score with St. 
Joseph for a defeat earlier in the sea- 
son at Rensselaer by clobbering the 
Pumas, 85-64. For the second straight 
home game the Bulldogs hit better 
than 40% from the field. 

For the second time of the season, 
Butler took DePauw into camp, win- 
ning 75-67. The Tigers made more of 
a game out of it this time than in the 
earlier encounter when Butler estab- 
lished a new record for points scored 
in one game. 

Butler made it nine victories out of 
10 starts on its home floor by breezing 
past Valparaiso, 75-53, on the strength 
of .411 accuracy; and completed the 
season by losing to Ball State, 77-54. 



88 



Best Season Since '48 for '53 Bulldogs 



Butler played its best season since the 1948-49 campaign by winning 
14 of 23 games during the 1952-53 season. The Bulldogs' schedule included 
seven games with Big Ten teams, and home games with the other five mem- 
bers of the Indiana Collegiate Conference, Notre Dame, Wabash, and 
DePauw. 

Keith Greve, sophomore forward from Waveland, Indiana, took a long 
step toward establishing himself as the scoringest player in Butler history 
by totaling 394 points for the season. Jim Crosley, Don Holloway, and 
Ray Stewart were other solid members of the first five. Harry Porter, Bob 
Reed, and Norm EUenberger shared duty at the fifth starting position. 

Mike Radkovic, the team's only senior, and Stewart, who plans to 
enroll in med-school at Indiana next fall, are the only two men who will not 
return for the 1953-54 season. 

The Bulldogs won seven of 10 ICC games, good enough to tie them with 
St. Joseph for the conference championship. Butler won three of the seven 
encounters with Big Ten competition. Victories were over Purdue, Ohio 
State, and Michigan. 




Pictured below are Jim Crosley, Don Holloway, Keith Greve, Harry Porter, anc 
Ray Stewart. 





PI PHI'S 
WIN CONTES" 



Successful contestant for the Drift 
title of "Typical Social Organization 
on Campus" was Pi Beta Phi. The Pi 
Phi's won this recognition by achiev- 
ing one hundred percent representa- 
tion in Drift sales. 

Upper left: Mary Baumgar+I, Judy Wool- 
gar, Barbara Bugg, Mary Grady, Mrs. 
Howe, housemother; and Marilyn Shaw. 

Left: Carolyn Adams and George Ann 
Varnes with Mrs. hlowe. Carolyn and 
George Ann were mentioned in "Who's 
Who." 



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George Ann Varnes, president, pic- 
tured with Bev SiegeL 



Below: George Ann Varnes, Dottie 
Dunnington, Jody Steidle, Nancy 
Hastings, Barbara Bugg, and Jo 
Gottberg. 



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JUNIOR PROM 

The annual Junior Prom was 
held at the Indiana Roof. Joan 
O'Neil, Kappa Kappa Gamma 
and her court reigned over the 
1952 dance. 

Prom Chairman, Sandy Rader, 
began the festivities leading up 
to the dance by declaring Ray 
Lines as the winner of the beard 
growing contest. 

Ralph Martere's band provid- 
ed the music for the Prom. 

Breakfasts were held at the 
Fraternity and Sorority houses 
following the dance. 



Left to right: Zay, Stonestreet, Lane, 
Locke, O'Neil, Rader, Freemond, Mathews, 
Gottberg. 






SOPHOMORE COTILLION 

Elizabeth Young was elected Queen at the ainiual 
Sophomore Cotillion in 1952. Miss Young was the 
candidate from Trianon. Other leading candidates were 
Betty Rosenberry, Pi Beta Phi; Mary Reis, Alpha Chi 
Omega; Lois Bock, Delta Delta Delta; Nan Barney, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; and Marjorie Tarkington, 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

The dance was held in Atherton Center in March. 




95 




GENEVA STUNTS 



Pictured at left are scenes from the 
1952 production. The 1953 Drift could 
not adjust its deadline schedule to this 
year's presentation. 



Ross Copeland and Cora Lane, co- 
chairmen for Geneva Stunts, presented 
trophies to major act winners Kappa 
Alpha Theta and Sigma Nu and to minor 
act winners Delta Delta Delta and Phi 
Delta Theta for the 1953 competition. 



Abe Shankerman, 
chairman for the an- 
nual heart fund cam- 
paign, presented his 
own trophy to Delta 
Gamma as the soror- 
ity which made the 
greatest contribution 
to the fund. 




96 



Spring Sing 

With Geneva Stunts, Spring 
Sing represents one of the most 
popular and closely contested ac- 
tivities among Butler social or- 
ganizations. 

In the spring of 1952, Sing com- 
petition saw Tau Kappa Epsilon 
and Kappa Kappa Gamma roost 
in first place. Delta Tau Delta 
and Kappa Alpha Theta were 
defending champions. 





Pictured above is Joseph Victor Laderoute, Canadian-American tenor and head 
of the JORDAN Voice Department, who appeared with the JORDAN Symphony 

in April. 



98 



../•^:,»' 



Holcomb and Brown Celebrate 




The 1953 Drift would scarcely be complete without 
a picture of the personality to whom it is dedicated, 
James Irving Holcomb. Mr. Holcomb's projected dream 
of making the Butler University campus one of the most 
scenic in the midwest is rapidly being realized in the 
Botanical gardens (pictured on pages 20-21). 

Nor would any Drift be complete without a picture 
of Butler's "Grand Old Man," Hilton U. Brown, adver- 
tised in The Collegian as being 94 years young in 1953. 




Pictured above are James Irving Holcomb, the personality behind Butler's Botani- 
cal Gardens, and hiilton U. Brown, Butler's illustrious patriarch. 



99 



SPRING SPORTS 

Coach Galvin Walker's freshman-dominated squad was victorious in 
four meets last spring while taking the back seat in three meets. The "thinly- 
clads" lost both the ICC and Little State track crowns, placing second in 
the ICC and fourth in Little State. 

The Blue-and-White runners set five new records in the ICC meet. 
Captain Frank Campbell accounted for two — a 22.3 second 220 and a 50.1 
second quarter mile. Freshman John Owensby set two moi^e — a 4:35.1 mile 
and a 10:12.2 two-mile. The fifth record was a 3:30.2 mile relay set by 
Glenn Meyer, Tom Wetzler, Russ Greenburg, and Frank Campbell. 

Of the ten freshmen on the team, the three most outstanding were John 
Owensby, Gaton Allen, and Jodean Crist. The only one of the trio returning 
this year is Jodean Crist. 



Jim Glass displays shot-putting form. 





John Fouty and Rod Franz finish 1-2 for Butler in the low hurdles. 




Tonn Wetzler leads the field home in the 



101 




ATHLETICS 



Row I: Sheppard, Campbell, Woolgar, Garrett. 
Row 2: Dixon, Etherldge, Sleet, Sandburg. 



Row I: Eagen. Macy, Garrett, Rohrabaugh, Riddle, Wilson, Zilson, 

Scruggs, Olinghouse, Wheeler, Norris, Shehan. 
Row 2: Kennedy, Ford, Walls, Kuzmlc, Adams, Kovach, R. Campbell, D. 

Campbell, Freyn, F. Davis, Berndt, Duncan, Johnson, Mangin, Hughett, 

Coach Hedden. 




Row 3: Eichholtz, Ellenberger, London, Atlas, J. Davis, Marmion, Brown 
Jacobs, Mahoney, O'Brian, Chandler, Gerlach, Wagner, Lewis, Sat 
ford. Middlesworth. 

Row 4: Norkus, Holderfield, Chastain, Riddle, Rutz, Hook, Pierson, Bolton 
Ewald, Lehan, Hickman, Kelley, Johnston, Hauss, Coach Hinkle. 







TRACK 

Row I: Meyer. Grissom, Tucker, Owens- 
by, Rouse, Burgess, Gurevitz, Bertey 
Murphy. 

Row 2: Walker, Franz. Christ, Green- 
berg. Sturm, Benjamin. J. Foutty, 
Campbell. Wetzler, A. Foutty. 



BASEBALL 

Row I : McElfresh. Schumacher, Jackso 
Arnold, Turner, Kaiser. 

Row 2: Wolfe, D. Campbell. Atlas, Pi 
tie, R. Campbell, Davis. 

Row 3: Coach Hinkle, Ellenberger, Joh 
son, Hudson, Scott, Sparlcs. 



CROSS COUNTRY 




Row I: Murphy, Lytle, Wort 

Row 2: Wetzler, Owensby. Ward, Coach 
Walker. 



BASKETBALL 



Keith Sreve 





Don Hollowa 



Ray Stewart 



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Jack Mackenzie, Norman Ellenberger, Jack Frayman, Mike Radkovic, 
Bob Reed 



BASKETBALL TEAM 



Row I: Ellenberger, Greve, Crosley, 
Radkovic, Porter, Brannon, Lamb- 
da, Frayman. 



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Row 2: Coach Hinkle, Holloway, 
Mackenzie, Stewart, Benjamin, 
Mustain, Reed, Kaiser. 



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ALPHA CHI OMEGA 



Mrs. Fern Myers, housemother, and Cora 
Lane, president, are reflected in a mirror ex- 
amining the song book with a representative 
of the pledge class. 



Ill 1885 at DePauw University the first 
chapter of Alpha Chi Omega was founded. The 
Alpha Chi chapter was installed on Butler campus 
in 1925. Leading the organization this year were 
Cora Lane, president; Kathryn McCartney, vice- 
president; Elsie Slaick, pledge trainer; Beverly 
Brantner, treasurer; and Sue Phares and Joan 
Schloesser, secretaries. 

Alfred Marshall Honor Society claimed Cora 
Lane and Kathy McCartney this year. Other school 
activities included Shirley Jo Waltz, Georgia Tonar 
and Beverly Brantner as Spur members. Diana 
Garceau and Barbara Lamb were Chime members. 
Cora Lane was vice-president of YWCA and AWS, 
a member of Scarlet Quill and a "Who's Who." 
President of the Student Union Board was Connie 
Boldman. Alpha Chi was represented in the Air 
Angel Court by Jane Ballard and Cora Lane. 

Chapter social activities were launched with an 
open house in October introducing the pledges. 
"Snow Frolic" was the theme for the Christmas 
Dance. State Day was held in March and a Senior 
Breakfast in June. 

We are deeply thankful to Mrs. Fern Myers who 
was our gracious housemother this year. 



108 




ACTIVES 

Row I : Waltz. Rike, Schlesser, 
Wegener. 

Row 2: Black, Bran+ner, Rei?. 
Slaiek, Lane, McCartney. 

Row 3: Lamb. Garceau, Hum- 
phreys, Phares. Warner, Ly- 
ons, Hartley, Tonar. 



PLEDGES 



Row I: Billing. Sterns. McCay, 
Griffon, Goodwin, Rels, Ba- 
lard. 

Row 2: Byers, Skinner. S. 
Smith, Terrell, Marchino, Van 
Dyke. Cory, Maters, Ashley. 





DELTA DELTA DELTA 



Pictured below are Mrs. Emma Lutz, house- 
mother, and Mary Lou Renick, president hav- 
ing coffee with a member of the pledge class. 



Delta Delta Delta was founded at Boston Uni- 
versity on Thanksgiving Eve of 1888. The Delta 
Lambda chapter was founded at Butler in 1914. 
Officers for the 1952-53 year were Mary Lou 
Renick, president; Carol Mathews, vice-president; 
Carolyn Wagner, recording secretary; Betty Lou 
Gunter, corresponding secretary; and Mary Evans, 
treasurer. 

Tri Delta was honored to pledge seventeen girls 
in fall rush. They were introduced at an open- 
house held in October. The annual Christmas 
dance was held at the chapter house. Other social 
events during the year included a Father's Day 
Dinner during basketball season, a Mother's Day 
Banquet, open houses after games, the annual Dub- 
lin Fair and a costume Pledge dance in March. 

Members have been active in various activities 
on campus. Spur members included Alice Mandl, 
Marjorie McDowell, and Martha Sherman. Mary 
Lou Renick was president of the YWCA and of 
Scarlet Quill. Betty Lou Gunter was president of 
Pi Epsilon Phi. Charlotte Green was president of 
Tau Beta Sigma and the choir, AWS treasurer and 
Captain of the Color Guard. Teena Overpeck was 
vice-president of FTA and recently elected State 
FTA president. Associate Editor of the Drift, 
a Theta Sigma Phi and Gamma Alpha Chi was 
Lois Bock. Mary Evans was WRA treasurer. 

We are deeply grateful to Mrs. Emma Lutz, who 
was our loyal and devoted housemother. 

no 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Strahl. Bock, Starr, B. 
Greene, M. A. Green. C. 
Green, McDona!d. 

Rov/ 2: Jones, Evans, Gunfer, 
Wilson, Renick, Kuehrmann, 
Wagner, Mathews. 

Row 3: Sherman. McDowel!, 
Kerr, Smith. Ehrhardt, Over- 
peck, Mandl, Hays. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Olsen, Logan, Eschell, 
M. Smith, Huber, Ross, Hin- 
kle. Rand. 

Row 2: Bolte, Essex, Williams, 
Shanks, Wachstetter, Wil- 
kens, McArthur, B. Smith, 
Doak. 





DELTA GAMMA 



Delta Gamma, which was founded in 1873. 

was established as the Alpha Tau chapter on the 
Butler campus in 1925. The chapter officers were 
Doris Ann Nordyke, president; Mary Tostenson, 
vice-president; Barbera Porter, secretary; and 
Edna Ballenbach and Lois Aufderheide, treasurers. 

We are very proud to have gained two honors at 
Homecoming, one by winning the trophy for the 
best float entered in the parade, and another by 
receiving second place in house decorations. 

Joyce Barnard was crowned 1953 Air Angel 
at the Military Ball. Merrie Jo Ober was in the 
Air Angel Court and Sophomore Class secretary. 

Delta Gammas were active in numerous campus 
organizations. Spur members included Ann Duff, 
Helen Dillow, Joan Sandberg, Merrie Jo Ober, 
Barbara Boyd and Janet Jett. Doris Nordyke was 
Scarlet Quill and WYCA treasurer. Kappa Delta 
Pi president and a "Who's Who." Silvia Schmidt 
was Lambda Kappa Sigma treasurer. Secretary of 
Welwyn Club and social chairman of WRA was 
Gerry De Frank. 

Social activities throughout the year included an 
open house in October, and a Christmas dance. 
The Pledge dance was held in April and a spring 
rush breakfast was given in May. 

Mrs. Clara Fulton completed another year with 
us as our loyal and gracious housemother. 



112 



Mrs. Clara Fulton, housemother, and Doris 
Nordyke, president, are' seated at the piano 
with a representative of the pledge class. 




ACTIVES 



Row 1 : Bo 


yd, 


DeFrar 


k. Cor 


bin, Rar 


nsay. 


Mine 


, Ober 


Dillow. 








Row 2: Ba 


rnard 


. P. 


Thomas 


Watson, 


Gi 


sh, Tostenson 


Nordyb 


For 


er, Be 


lenbach 


Aufderheide. 







Row 3: A. Duff, L. Duff, Hol- 

derman, Lowe, Essex, N. 

Thomas, Suess. Sandburg 

Schmidt, Jett, Cook. 




PLEDGES 



Rov, I: Alhand, O'Hara, Har- 
bold, Ephlin, Barnes. Nich- 
olson, Cliff. 

Row 2: Bibler, Dady. Walker. 
McMahan. McBride, Kings- 
ton, Hancock, Robinson, 
Dowd. Robertson. 





KAPPA ALPHA THETA 



One of the big activities for Gamma Chapter 
of Kappa Alpha Theta was the sponsorship of the 
Blood drive on campus. The enthusiasm gained 
from this activity lasted into the Homecoming fes- 
tivities when they took first place in the House 
decoration contest. Jane Cooksey was elected 
Homecoming Queen and Kathy Hart Zay was 
elected Queen mother. The chapter was lead by 
Patty Payne, president, who was assisted by Judi 
Reynolds, vice-president; Kathy Zay, secretary; 
and Lou Ann Phillips, treasurer. 

The Butler Thetas well represented themselves on 
campus in the various honoraries sponsored by the school. 
They include Sara Clark, Alpha Lambda Delta; Carolyn 
Aldrich, Sally Devaney, Helen Middleton, and Sara 
Clark, Spurs; Chimes, Janet Brucker; Patty Payne, Ann 
Fuller, Judi Renolds, and Norma Stultz, Scarlet Quill; 
Ann Fuller, Phi Kappa Phi; Patty Payne, Tau Kappa 
Alpha; Patty Payne, Doris Graham, Paula Baumgartner, 
Sally Bell, Julie Farmer, Janet Brucker, Lou Ann Phillips, 
Babs Schulmeyer, and Norma Stultz, Eta Tau Delta. 
Those listed in "Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities" are Jane Cooksey, Patty Payne, Ann Fuller, 
Norma Stultz. Wheel awards were presented by Theta 
Sigma Phi to Patty Payne and Norma Stultz. Other 
Members of honoraries include Marga Carter, Gamma 
Tau Gamma, and Judi Reynolds Kappa Delta Pi. 

Leading the Campus along the honorary line, are 
Doris Graham, vice president of Eta Tau Delta; Paula 
Baumgartner, secretary of Eta Tau Delta; Kathy Zay, 
president of Welwyn Club and vice-president of Newman 
Club; Judi Reynolds, president of WRA; Jane Cooksey, 
vice-president of Kappa Tau Alpha, Managing editor of 
the Collegian, president of Theta Sigma Phi, president 
of Gamma Alpha Chi; president of Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Sara Clark ; president of AWS, Norma Stultz, secretary of 
the junior class, Janet Brucker; and secretary of Tau 
Kappa Alpha, Patty Payne. 

The social calendar at the Theta house is filled with 
such events as an open house, Dad's day, Christmas dance 
and Spring Formal. 

Mrs. Vesta Grant has completed her first year as Theta 
housemptheiij^ I '' 

114 



Theta officers join Mrs. Vesta Grant, house- 
mother, in proudly displaying the Homecom- 
ing Queen trophy, won this year by Jane 
Cooksey. 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Stultz, Clark, M 
ton, Ries, Campbell, 
ington. Joyce, DeVa 
Landers. 

Row 2; Hall, Cooksey, 
Zay, Payne, Reynolds, 
nold, Phillips, Carter, 



ddle- 
Tark- 
ney. 

Ball, 
Ko- 



Row 3: Woodward, Giar 
Bruckey. Martin, Sc 
meyer, Lowe. McCor 
F-armer, Baumgartner. 
rich, Hyde, Tudor, P 
Snnock, Peeling. 



hule- 
mick, 
Ald- 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Shirley, McLain, Doyle, 
Stassus, Baker, McCallum, 
Spradling, Sleeth, E. Miller, 
R. Jones. 

Row 2; Toombs, Boyle, Wilcox, 
Hughly, Carter, Moore, Han- 
son, Norbury. 





KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 



By securing the trophy for the Annual Cheer 
Drive sponsored by The Collegian, the members of 
Mu chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma proved that 
they were in the midst of another big year. With 
president Joan O'Neill guiding them they went on 
to capture the Scholarship Trophy as well as the 
one for the Sigma Nu Christmas decorations. Other 
activities which added to their collection of trophies 
include Spring Sing, WSSF Drive and intramural 
bowling. 

Kappas who are represented on campus in the many 
honoraries are Polly Dixon, Claire Anderson, Helen Let- 
singer, Sue Clyne, Joan Raybold, and Lynette O'Neill, 
Spurs; Char Walton, Scarlet Quill; Barbara Knotts, 
Alice Rose Moore, and Carolyn McClurg, Chimes; Char 
Walton, Mary Ellen White, and Martha York, Sigma Tau 
Delta; Char Walton, Theta Sigma Phi; Patsy Parrish, 
Char Walton, Jane Knoeble, Gamma Alpha Chi; Kappa 
Tau Alpha, Char Walton; Sue Clyne, Kappa Tau Alpha; 
Jane Knoeble, Margie Davis, Polly Dixon, Diddy Keeling, 
Patsy Parrish, Tau Beta Sigma; Who's Who in American 
Colleges and Universities, Joan O'Neill, Mary Ellen 
White, and Char Walton; Carolyn McClurg received a 
Theta Sigma Phi spoke award at the annual Matrix Table. 
Those who are the recipients of Lilly Foundation Scholar- 
ships are Claire Anderson, Marty Peterson, Nancy Lee, 
Betty Ann Groene, and Betty Fiddes. 

Typical Freshman Girl chosen at the Freshman mixer 
was Margie Davis, and Bea Douglas was chosen Queen of 
Queens at the annual Drift beauty contest. Joan O'Neill 
was Junior Prom Queen in 1952. 

The other officers of Kappa Kappa Gamma are Betty 
Fiddes and Mary Ellen White, vice-president; Carolyn 
McClurg, treasurer; and Nancy Adams, secretary. Mrs. 
Matalia Wilhoyte is housemother. 



116 



Mrs. Matalia Wilhoyte, housemother, and 
two Kappa Kappa Gamma officers reminisce 
over the sorority scrapbook. 



■m^^m 





ACTIVES 

Row I: Anderson, York. Welch, 
Jeffries, Walton, Groene. 

Row 2: Barneff , Barney, 
Woods, Adams, O'Neill 
Parrish, White, McClurg, 
Lnoeble. 

Row 3: Garrett, Douglass, Ra- 
bold, Arnold, Gustafson, 
Clyne, Lee, Peterson, Let- 
singer, Dixon, Fiddes, Job. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Cox, Niblack, Horvath, 
Bechtold. Brooks, Davis, Ya- 
key, Bundy. 

Row 2: Kingsbury, O'Dell, 
Jose. Baxter. Moore. Watts. 
Gentry. Adams, Everman. 
Whitecotton. 





PI BETA PH! 



Mrs. John R. Eden, housemother, and Va- 
lera hlume, president are pictured below with 
a representative of the pledge class. The Pi 
Phis have a special spread on page 90 and 91 , 



Pi Beta Phi was founded at Monmouth Col- 
lege in Illinois in 1867. The Indiana Gamma 
chapter was installed at Butler in 1897. The chap- 
ter officers for this year were Valera Hume, presi- 
dent; Jeannette Sheppard, vice-president; Nancy 
Hastings, secretary; and Shirley Stilwell, treasurer. 

The pledges were introduced to the campus at a 
formal open house held early in October. In No- 
vember the pledges gave a Barn and Square Dance. 
The Christmas dance was held in December. 

Judy Clark was crowned sweetheart of Sigma 
Nu. Valera Hume and Judy Woolgar were mem- 
bers of the Air Angel Court. 

Honoraries and campus activities were well 
represented by our fraternity. President of Chimes 
was George Ann Varnes; other members were 
Kathy Siegel and Virginia Bruce. Barbara Bugg 
was Spurs president, while other members included 
Maureen Pleak, Bev Siegel, Marillyn Shaw and 
Rowene Higbee. Valera Hume was Panhellenic 
president. Carolyn Adams, Jeannette Sheppard 
and Dottie Dunnington were Kappa Delta Pi mem- 
bers. Secretary of Kappa Beta was Maureen Pleak. 

Mrs. John R. Eden was our gracious and loyal 
housemother. 



18 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Shaw, Dunnington, Far- 
rls, Lewis, Deltour, B. Siegel, 
Bruce, Rich. 

Row 2: C. Siege!. Hurley, 
Hastings, Adams, Hume 
Sheppard, Gotfberg, Grady, 
Stilweil, Verbarg. 

Row 3: Carlsen, Tipton. Clark, 
Johnson. Clendenen. Bugg, 
Schrader. Ludwig. Rosen- 
berry, Pleak. 



PLEDGES 



Row 1: 


Hac 


kern eye r 


King, 


Cox, 


Leslie 


;, Norther 


n, Ste- 


idle. 


Baldw 


in, Woolg 


ar. 


Row 2: 


Bloei 


-nker, Bau 


mgarti 


Robir 


ison. 


Childes, 


Butter- 


worth 


, Nll( 


5S, Nixon, 


Shep- 


pard, 


Meyers. 








wM 


^K 




%^ 


It J M W ?'v^s 


1^ 


m 


I Hi m « ^ 




mm 


"*■ 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 



Nancy McKeown, president, Carol Man- 
waring, pledge president, and Mrs. Hailie 
Hopper, housen^other are seated listening to 
election returns. 



With the awarding of the All Sports Tro- 
phy, Alpha Delta Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha came 
out on top. Other awards presented to the Zetas 
included the Tennis Plaque, Table Tennis Plaque. 
Table Tennis Cup, and Field Hockey Plaque. In- 
dividual honors went to Carol Manwaring, secre- 
tary of the Freshman class; Nance McKeown, treas- 
urer of Gamma Alpha Chi; Mary Ellen Higburg, 
Caucus chairman, Marian Bremer, Barbara Warch, 
WRA representative. Members of the various But- 
ler Honoraries include Nance McKeown, Gamma 
Alpha Chi, and Kappa Tau Alpha ; Barbara Warch, 
Spurs; Delta Psi Kappa, Marion Bremen; Isabelle 
Thrush, Kappa Beta. 

The social life of the local chapter of Zeta Tau 
Alpha included an openhouse, a State Day tea and 
open house, a scholarship dinner and a Christmas 
dance. This year, the dance was called the Top 
Hat. The chapter was led by Nance McKeown, 
president; Isabelle Thrush, vice-president; Marian 
Bremer, secretary; and Mildred Twigg, treasurer. 
Their housemother was Mrs. Hailie Hopper. 

Zeta Tau Alpha was founded October 15, 1898, 
and the local chapter was organized in June of 
1920. 



120 




ACTIVES 



Row I: Twigq, Bremer, Mc- 
Keown, Thrush, Book. 

Row 2: Warner, A. Greene, 
Tuschlnsky, Dalmbert, Why- 
song, Warch, Highburg. 



PLEDGES 



Row I: Wolf, Manwaring, Wil- 
son, Greve. 



Row 2: Wesling. Williams, 
Johnson, Walker. 




TRIANON 



Pictured below is Doris Herbert, president 
of Trianon, posed with Mrs. Karl Means, 
faculty sponsor for the organization. 




Under the Leadership of Doris Her- 
bert, president, Trianon completed an- 
other successful year in 1953. Chief 
among Trianon accomplishments was the 
winning of second place in Homecoming 
Float competition. 

Members of the sorority who con- 
tributed to campus activities were Mary 
Ruth Gillespie, Spurs; Nan Lou King, 
Chimes and Kappa Delta Pi; Doris Her- 
bert. Scarlet Quill and Phi Kappa Phi; 
and Katie Simmons and June Wolfe, 
Theta Sig. June Wolfe was also a mem- 
ber of the Drift staff. 

Officers for the year were Doris Her 
bert, president; Katherine Simmons 
vice president; Nan Lou King, corre 
sponding secretary; June Wolfe, record 
ing secretary; Laurel Kettlehut, mar 
shall ; and Dixie Weaver, rush chairman 



122 



ACTIVES 



Row I: Wolfe, Holtman, Sim- 
mons, Herbert. King, Kettel 
hut. 

Row 2: Scifres, Ruch, Gilles- 
pie, Auble, Allen. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Pickett, Andrews, 
Amate, Palmer, Felton. 





DELTA TAU DELTA 



Mrs. Addison Parry, housemother, and Vic 
Tanguy, president, show the Delta Tau Delta 
scrapbook to a representative of the pledge 
class. 



Beta Zeta of Delta Tau Delta begin its social 
whirl with the annual outing at Spring Mill Park. 
Vic Tanguy was elected president, and the chapter 
was represented in several of the campus honor- 
aries. They are Arnold Air Society, Bob Reed, 
Larry Davis , Jack Whaley, Marlin Husted ; Alpha 
Epsilon Rho, Vic Tanguy; Sphinx, Bob Teed, Jim 
Smith; Blue Key, Marlin Husted, Jim Shroc, Ross 
Copeland ; Student Council, Ross Copeland ; Kappa 
Kappa Psi, Dave Northam. 

December 13 was a lucky day for the Delts when 
they moved their chapter house from its 46th street 
location to 940 W. 42nd street. Mrs. Addison 
Parry is the housemother and the rest of the officers 
include George Goodnight, vice-president; and 
Jim Shrock, secretary. 

Leading the campus in some of the honoraries 
are Vic Tanguy, vice-president of Alpha Epsilon 
Rho; Dave Northam, president, society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management; Jim Smith, treasurer 
of Sphinx. 

Delta Tau Delta was founded in 1859 at Bethany 
College, Virginia and the local chapter was found- 
ed in 1875. 



124 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Bol + in, Heinbaugh, 
Ryan. Copeland, Truby, Mar- 



Row 2: Nor+ham, Davis, Mc- 
Cardle, Tanguy, Goodnlghf, 
Husted, Shrock, Cast. 

Row 3: Whaley, Denny, Reed, 
Moore, Ainsworth, Buser, J. 
L. Smith. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Van Horn, Britton, 
Lewis, Hickman, Garrett, 
Michesell. Hogan. 

Row 2: Haymaker, Blue, Nor- 
kus, Hoffner. Burndt. Miner, 
Carson, Reineche. 

Row 3: Wheller, Martin, Gar- 
stang. Leer, Tirsell, Wallman, 
Sommers, Ditmire. 





KAPPA SIGMA 



Mrs. Julia Sweet, housemother, discusses 
some material on the proverbial fraternity 
bulletin board with two Kappa Sigma officers. 



Kappa Sigma was founded in 1869 at the 
University of Virginia. There are now one hun- 
dred and twenty-five chapters. The Epsilon Omi- 
cron chapter came to Butler in 1949. Leading the 
chapter this year were Bill Dudley, grand master; 
William Price, grand procturator; John Williams, 
grand master of ceremonies; Fred Harbold, grand 
scribe; and Jim Hogshire, grand treasurer. 

The new Kappa Sigma pledges were introduced 
at an open house held in early fall. In February 
eleven men were initiated into the active chapter. 
Leading class offices on campus were Roland 
Becker who was elected president of the Freshman 
class, and treasurer of the Junior class was Jim 
Hogshire. In other campus activities were John 
Walsh who is a Blue Kev, Alpha Delta Sigma and 
Kappa Tau Alpha member. Gene Bennett a cum 
laude graduate was a member of Blue Key and Phi 
Kappa Phi. Other Blue Key members were Bill 
Dudley, Jack Baxter and Dean Morrow. 

Outstanding events in the yearly social calendar 
were the French dance held in December. Founder's 
Day, the Spring Formal in March and the Mother's 
Spring Tea given in May. During the annual But- 
ler Panhellenic Dance held in November, Bill 
Dudley was crowned "1952 Pan Hel King." 

We are indebted to our housemother, Mrs. Julia 
Sweet, who served us as a devoted housemother. 



126 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Chanley, Harbold. 
Williams, Dudley, Hogshlre, 
Price. Achor, D. Clark. 

Row 2: Harper, Bliss, McMur- 
try, Austin, Walsh, Bennett, 
Byrum. Bobbe. 



PLEDGES 



Row I: Deckard. Love, Wells, 
Ahern, R. Clark. 

Row 2: Shew, Morgan, Bur- 
nett, Fable, Becker, Davis, 
MacKinnon, Case. 

Row 3: Marvel, Seipel, Robins, 
Scheuer, Laut, Brock, Eberg, 
Roedding, Hamilton, Brood- 
lick. 





LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



With Dick Anderson at the hehn, Alpha 

Alpha Zeta of Lambda Chi Alpha came through 
another successful year. Some of the honors en- 
joyed by the chapter were the trophy for the Home- 
coming decorations and various intramural titles. 
The social calendar for the year was filled with 
dances, parties, and an open house for the student 
body. The Watermelon Bust, Spook Dance, and a 
Christmas party for underprivileged children were 
some of the highlights of the social seasons. 

Representing Lambda Chi in the various honor- 
aries are Ray Lines, Dick Anderson, Dick Van- 
Buskirk, Blue Key; Sphinx, Bill Clarck; Utes, 
Bob Fine; Phi Eta Siema, Tom Wetzler, Ralph 
Mills; Kappa Kappa Psi, Tom Pickett, Fred Ben- 
nett, Doug Jordan, Charles Covy; Kappa Psi, Dick 
VanBuskirk, Jack O'Shaughnessy, Ted Ballard. 
Sherman Reeves is treasurer of the Freshman class 
while other Lambda Chis who hold campus officers 
are Gilvert Therien, president of the American 
Chemical Society; Dick Anderson, President of the 
Insurance Society; Dick VanBuskirk, president of 
the American Pharmaceutical Association; Tom 
Wetzler, president of Interfraternity Council, and 
Fred Bennett, secretary of Kappa Kappa Psi. 

Other leaders of Lambda Chi include Keith 
Greve vice-president. Alpha Alpha Zeta chapter; 
Raymond O'Shaughnessy, secretary; and Curtis 
Dankert, treasurer. Mrs. James Steel is their house- 
mother. 



128 



Mrs. James S+eel, housemother, Dick An- 
derson, president, and a representative officer 
of the pledge class while away pre-dinner 
minutes on Wednesday night in front of the 
piano. 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Mills, Wilson, Woelfel, 
Collins, Covy, O'Shaughnes- 
sy- 

Row 2: Wetzel, Therien, Lines, 
Ballard, Anderson, Van Bus- 
kirk, Labda, Hecklinski. 

Row 3: Yager, Sauer, Clark, 
Fine, Mann, Szymula, Ben- 
nett, Pickett. 

Row 4: Fox, Cassel, Taylor, 
Jordan, Weber, Greve, Bald- 



PLEDGES 



Row I: Sheffer, Mast. Edwards, 
Kaiser, Lawrence. 

Row 2; Bore, Giankos, Hook, 
Whitecotton, Storchetf. Ar- 
nold, Mustain. 

Row 3; Marker, Ryan, Therien 
Larsen, Jett. Edison, Goss, 
Kerr. 




. :^'^ .^*5^ .-^s, <-->. 


wff r 


■k .^v 


:||i'3u:»^ ''^"I^HH 





PHI DELTA THETA 



Pictured below is Doug Ha+ton, president, 
Mrs. Shaffer, housemother, and a representa- 
tive of the Phi Delta Theta pledge class. 



Phi Delta Theta was founded in 1848. The 
Indiana Gamma chapter was installed at Butler 
in 1859. Officers for the 1952-53 year were Doug 
Hatton, president; Jack Erickson, reporter; Lewis 
Spear, secretary; and Bob Kruger, treasurer. 

Outstanding offices held on campus this year 
were Doug Hatten Senior class and Interfraternity 
council president. Dick Gharrett was Sophomore 
class president, and Dan Englehardt was Freshman 
class vice-president. Frank Little headed the ROTC 
as Cadet Commander and YMCA vice-president. 
President of Utes was Holland Perry. Honoraries 
claimed Bob Riddell, Ed Cox and John Mercer as 
Sphinx members. Rolland Perry, Paul Croyle. 
Dick Gharrett, Sid McKenna, Loren Comstock, Ed 
Hughes and Bob Barnes were Utes. Kappa Psi 
members were Jim Bogart and Doug Hatton. Jim 
Mueller was president of Alpha Phi Omega. 

Phi Delta Theta began the year by winning the 
Cheer Drive. The social season began with an 
open house in October, and an annual fall outing 
at the Scout Camp. A Spook Hop, Christmas dance, 
and a Pledge dance completed the year. 

We are deeply gratful to "Mom" Shaffer who 
has been our faithful and devoted housemother. 



130 




ACTIVES 



Row I: Cale, DeFer, Hug'nes, 
Riddle, R. Barnes, Chadd, 
Cuppy, Bartle, Cox. 

Row 2: Middlerow, Mueller, 
Bates, Gaines, Jaggar. Lit- 
tle, Hatton, Wilson. Crist, 
Roberts, Hess Bundy, Wol- 
seslci. 

Row 3: Spear, Campbell, 
Croyle, McKenna, Erickson, 
Volz, Brown, Perry. Mercer, 
Moore, London, Gharrett 
Comstock. Lyons, Marsella. 
Meyer. 



PLEDGES 

Row 1: Bog art, Wentworth, 
Mitchell, White, Baker. 

Row 2; Hipes, Seidner, Davis, 
Lee, Doles, Hopkins, Ander- 
son, Cleary, Sink, Dickason, 
Englehart, Wurster. 

Row 3: Hague. Walker, Rea- 
gan, Mattox, Zinn, Silcox, 
Allen. Ward. Beem, Goldey, 
Harris. 




HI HI mm. i| !■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■■ ■■■ iHii i \ 
■iiiiiri^ Hii.lljULiii ■■■■■■■wi! ^ 



W^ 




PHI KAPPA 



Rev. Raymond Bosler peruses a chapter 
publication with two of the fraternity mem- 
bers. 



Beginning their first year in a house, the 
members of Beta colony of Phi Kappa emerged as 
a permanent fixture in Butlers' social life. Rev. 
Raymond Bosler served as housefather for the out 
of town men. Roger Pluchebaum served as presi- 
dent along with John O'Hara as vice president, 
Herb Gerard as secretary, and Pat Lavdrigon, 
treasurer. 

Those who are members of honoraries include 
Bob Simon, Kappa Mu Epsilon; Jerry Donahue, 
Arnold Air Society and Alpha Phi Omega; and 
Sigma Tau Delta, John Mills. 

The Social Calendar for the Phi Kaps included 
an Open House and a Christmas dance. 

National Phi Kappa was organized in 1886, and 
the local colony was founded in 1950. 



132 




PLEDGES 



Row I: Stanford, Krahn, Bat- 
trell, Barwiler. 

Row 2: Wiecheckl, Scheetz, 
Ittenbach, Vasko, Huneck. 

Row 3: Meyer, Henn, Sturm, 
Crawford, Stanley, Krahn, 
Birkofer, Beck. 



ACTIVES 

Row I: Gerard, Pluckebaum 
Donahue, O'Hara, Pickett. 

Row 2: Landrigan, Becher, Ba 
ker, Osselear, Simon. 





SIGMA ALPHA MU 



With their treasured scholarship trophy as a 
backdrop, Mrs. C. Wild and two Sigma Alpha 
Mu officers add a clipping to their scrapbook. 



On November 26, 1909 Sigma Alpha Mu 

was founded at New York City College. The Mu 
Iota chapter was installed on the Butler campus on 
June 4, 1948. Leading the fraternity this year 
were Sanford Rader as president; Richard Sandler, 
secretary; and Abe Shankerman, treasurer. 

The chapter was very proud when they won first 
place for scholarship among fraternities for the 
sixth consecutive semester. At the annual Pledge 
Banquet held in February Sigma Alpha Mu re- 
ceived the Dean Cup award for scholarship, which 
is a permanent trophy that will remain in the 
"Sammie" house. 

On campus Sandy Rader was president of Blue 
Key and Abe Shankerman headed the Student 
Union. 

Highlights on the social calendar were the open 
house for the pledges held in early fall. State Day 
in March, Founder's Day in April and a costume 
dance held in February. 

We are thankful to Mrs. C. Wild who has been 
a constant help and guide to us. 



134 




ACTIVES 

Row I: Loeb, Gurevitz. Wolfe, 
Morgan. 

Row 2: Bleetsteln, Tamler, 
Sandler, R a d e r, Schanker- 
nnan, Greenfiel, Schlannberg. 

Row 3r Kahan, Marienthal, Ja- 
cobs, Ewen, Selfert, Siegei, 
Shane, Schlensky. 




PLEDGES 

Row I: Lampel. Weintrub, 
Soldenson. 

Row 2: Zlotnlck, Singer, Edel- 
son, Richter, Saks, Woloshin, 
Beilach, Welcher. 



Ci ^ '^ r>^ 




13 n f 



»« »'•• 




SIGMA CHI 



Mrs. Ruby Hoffman, housemother, Ray 
Stewart, president, and Tom Rohrabaugh, 
pledge president, discuss a coming exchange 
dinner. 



After the election of Paul Ross as treasurer 
of the Senior class, Rho chapter of Sigma Chi was 
ready to take its place as a leader in campus ac- 
tivities. Other members who have taken a leading 
role in Butler's campus life are Bob Given, Junior 
Prom chairman; John Shreve, Sophomore secre- 
tary; Dick Stanfield, president of YMCA; and Don 
Shaw president of Arnold Air Society and Alfred 
Marshall Society. Bill Andree is president of the 
Press club and treasurer of Kappa Tau Alpha. 
Tom Abrams is president of Kappa Tau Alpha. 

Other leaders include Ray Stewart and Tom 
Abrams, members of Phi Eta Siema; Ray Stewart, 
Jack Bowers, and Tom Tegg, Utes; King Smith, 
Bob McCallum, Jack Bowers, Rav Stewart, Vic 
Brian, Sphinx; Don McCallum and Paul Ross Blue 
Key; and Tom Abrams and Bill Andree, Sigma 
Delta Chi. 

The social life at the Sigma Chi House where 
Mrs. Ruby Hoffman is housemother included a 
Pledge costume ball. Sweetheart dance and an 
Annual Open House. Other activities in which the 
Sigs participated and won are the Sigma Nu Christ- 
mas decorations and the intramural swimming 
meet. The rest of the officers include Forest Reeh- 
ling, vice-president; Jack Bowers, treasurer, and 
Jack Lannagan, secretary. 



136 




ACTIVES 



Row I: Abrams, Ross, Bowers, 
Lenington, Nichols, Kenny 
Shreve. 

Row 2: Brocker, Andree, Mc- 
Callum, Stewart, Smith, 
Tegge. Brian, Lanagan. 

Row 3: Stanfield, Toombs, 
Roepke. Harter. Hayhugh. 
Freyn, McCallum, D. Smith, 
Nelson, Dixon, Blackard. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Metcalfe, Olinghouse, 
Tully, Heck, Arnold. Shauqh- 
nessy, Johnson. 

Row 2: Sleeth, Savage, Ab- 
bott, Wad dick, Billeison, 
Mattingly, Hughett. Leffler. 

Row 3: Pierson, Moeller, Bur- 
get, Piers, Billings, King, 
Dhonau, Phillips, Crumley, 
Briggs, Rohrabaugh, Wilson. 





SIGMA NU 



Epsilon Mu chapter of Sigma Nu realized a 
ten year dream this year with the acquisition of a 
new house. The third fraternity within a year to 
add a new home to the Butler colony, the Sigma 
Nu's, with their 11 acre estate and English Tudor 
home valued at over $250,000, will start a whole 
new development in their chapter's history when 
they move into the house in the fall. 

Their last year in the house at 655 W. Hampton in- 
cluded the traditional Sigma Nu features — white rose 
serenade, memorial day service, white rose formal, Hal- 
lowe'en dance, Christmas party for the underprivileged, 
Sigma Nu kite flying contest, western dance, help week, 
and spring formal. 

Sigma Nu added to their ample trophy case early in 
the year by winning both the Homecoming float trophy 
and the intramural football trophy. They also received 
second place honors in the Homecoming house decoration 
contest. 

Outstanding men in the chapter this year included: 
Dave Walker, Blue Key member. Editor of the Col- 
legian, member of Kappa Tau Alpha, vice-president of 
the Loyalty Legion, vice-president. Press Club, secretary, 
Sigma Delta Chi, Bob Lincks, vice-president senior class, 
Collegiate "Who's Who" of 1951; Tom McCarthy, treas- 
urer. Sophomore class, president, LItes treasurer. Press 
Club, chairman of Collegian Cheer Drive, city-editor of 
Collegian; Irv Williams, secretary. Kappa Psi; Skip 
Booher, president, junior class, vice-president, Indiana 
Student YMCA; Dick Brooks, secretary, Utes. 

In athletics, Norm Ellenberger, ranked third best 
college punter in the nation, and Gene Kuzmic were 
varsity football men. In basketball four Sigma Nu's were 
often found at one time among the first five. Jim Crosley, 
Norm Ellenberger, Jack MacKensie, and John Benjamin 
were these four. 

Credit for the year goes to Fran Ethridge, Com- 
mander, Norm Bess, Lt. Commander, Irv Williams, sec- 
retary, and Jim Crosley, treasurer. 

Mrs. Gertrude Steelman, or "Mom" as this vital lady 
is called, finished her third year as housemother. 



138 



Mrs. Gertrude Steelman, housemother, Fran 
Ethridge, president, and a representative of 
the Sigma Nu pledge class, leaf through a 
copy of the "Drift." 




ACTIVES 

Rov/ I: Mines, Crosley. Wil- 
liams, Etheridge, Bess, Ellen- 
berger, Broolcs. 

Row 2: McCarthy, Lareau, 
Rand. Jacob, Brlen, Laugh- 
on, Franz, hHaynes, Phillips, 
Frayman, Greenburg, Benja- 

Row 3: Kuzmic, Wagoner, 
Jones, Hewl+t, Walker, Ma- 
han, Ramon, Gutzwaller. 



PLEDGES 



Row I: Whi+fleld, Proed. An- 
derson. Lain, Sams. 

Row 2: Caruso. Standriff, 
Chastain, Dickson, Johnson, 
Kaye. Simmons. 

Row 3: McGhee, Warren, 
Camp, Vogel, Ebert, Ford, 
Kahl, Sheldon. 




TAU KAPPA EPSILON 



Tau Kappa Epsilon officers review minutes 
of last meeting. The TKE's won Spring Sing 

trophy this year. 




Ganinia Psi Chapter of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon started the year by taking the 
Spring Sing trophy for the men's com- 
petition. From there, they went on to win 
second place in the Collegian sponsored 
Cheer Drive. Starting its second year on 
Butler's campus, the local chapter has 
added several honoraries to its list. 
Some of them include Walter Blair, 
Gamma Tau Gamma; Jim Hargis, Tex 
Sandberg, and Dick Anderson, Arnold 
Air Society; Allen Long, Utes; Jim Har- 
gis, Accounting Society; Bill McAnallen, 
MSS; Jack Highberger, Alpha Epsilon 
Rho. 

The officers of the chapter were Tex 
Sandberg, President, assisted by Jim 
Cameron, vice-president, Walter Bliss, 
secretary, and Jack Truit, treasurer. 

The social calendar of the chapter in- 
cludes a Pledge dance, and Annual "Red 
Carnation" dance, a founders day dinner 
and a state day. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon was founded Jan- 
uary 10. 1899 at Illinois Weslyn, and the 
Butler chapter was organized in 1951. 



140 



ACTIVES 

Row I: Truitt, Highberger, 
Sandberg, Long, Cameron, 
McAnallen. 

Row 2: Hargis, Blau, Worley, 
Cowan, Fairchlld, Harris. 



PLEDGES 

Row I: Disinger, Selmeir 
Wells. Haskins, Powell. 

Row 2: Leonard, Barnes, Of 
■fu+t, Cook, Taylor, Capron. 




Row I; Vaughn, Swain, Hughes, Schafer, Weinantz, 

Taylor. 
Row 2: Burger, Atwell, Siddens, Tardy, Hahn, 

Thompson, D. Blankenhorn, Cox, Zoderer. 
Row 3: Schroer, Cury, Smith, Shoemaker, G. 

Blankenhorn, O'Nan. 




Bu+ler Independent 
Student Association 

Founded in 1949, the Butler In- 
dependent Students Association pur- 
poses to represent students who are 
not associated with a social fratern- 
ity or sorority that has an active 
chapter on campus. 

Leading the organization this 
year were David Schafer, presi- 
dent; Eugene Hughes, vice-presi- 
dent; Horace Turner, treasurer; 
and Marjorie Vaughn, secretary. 

Representatives in Butler organi- 
zations are Eugene Hughes, Frank 
Tardy, and Dick Hahn, Arnold Air 
Society; Eugene Hughes and Frank 
Tardy, Sphinx; John Schroer, Kap- 
pa Kappa Psi; and Eda Jane At- 
well, Chimes. 

Caroline McClure was elected to 
the Air Angle Court, and Frank 
Tardy was vice-president of the 
Junior class. 

Dr. and Mrs. Karl S. Means 
served as faculty sponsors for the 
year. 



Headquarters for the Butler Indepen- 
dent Students Association, located in 
room 302 in Atherton Center, is an 
oasis of study or relaxation to indepen- 
dent students. 



142 



BUTLER 
HOUSEMOTHERS 



Pictured from left to right are Mrs. 
Harriet Ferguson, Zeta Tau Alpha; Mrs. 
Grace Watkins, Kappa Kappa Gamma; 
Mrs. Gertrude Steelman, Sigma Nu; 
Mrs. Irene Stahl, Alpha Chi Omega. 



Absorbed in a card game are Mrs. 
Steel, Lambda Chi Alpha; Mrs. Eden, 
PI Beta Phi; and Mrs. Shaffer, Phi Delta 
Theta. 



Confering on problems they all have 
in common are (left to right) Mrs. Ful- 
ton, Delta Gamma; Mrs. hHoffman, 
Sigma Chi; and Mrs. Wild, Sigma Alpha 
Mu. 



143 





G/^ 






144 





145 




Row I : Hogshire, Wetzler, McCartle. 

Row 2: Sandburg, Brown, Stewart, Jacobs, Ethridge. 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The Iiiterfraternity Council is composed of the 
presidents and one alternate from each of the fra- 
ternal organizations on campus. The council en- 
deavors to solve cooperatively the common prob- 
lems that arise in the fraternities, and to work with 
and for the benefit of the school. 

This year the activities of the council were high- 
lighted by the writing of a new constitution. 

The officers for the year were: Doug Hatton, 
president; Dick Anderson, vice-president; and John 
McCartle, secretary-treasurer. 

Dean L. Gray Burdin served as adviser for the 
council. 




146 




PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

The Panhellenic Council is composed of the 
president and rush chairman of each of the 
sororities represented on the Butler campus. 
During the summer months rules and regula- 
tions pertaining to rush are set up and a rush 
booklet is prepared. The Panhellenic dance 
was held on November 21. A King was 
crowned, and prizes were awarded for the 
most outstanding corsages. 

Valera Hume served as president and Mary 
Lou Renick as secretary-treasurer. Dean 
Elizabeth Durflinger was the faculty sponsor. 



STUDENT UNION 

The Butler Student Union works to promote 
loyalty and spirit among the students. It also 
plans several all-school activities and acts as 
a service organization by sponsoring events 
put on by other school groups. 

Activities sponsored by the group were 
Wednesday night C-club dances, and the 
Homecoming Bonfire Rally Dance. This year 
the Union presented Sunday movies for Butler 
students. 

Officers were Connie Boldman, president; 
Horace Turner, vice-president; Barbara Boyd, 
secretary; and Mr. Newton, treasurer. 

Mr. Arden Eichsteadt was the organiza- 
tion's advisor. 



Row I : Lane, Overpeck, Fuller, Payne. 

Row 2: McDonald, Dean Durflinger, Hume, Renick, Ros- 
enberry, Grady. 

Row 3: Tarkington, Barney, Nordyke, Gish, Reis, Thomas, 
Barnett. 




Row I: Newton, Schaffer, Boldman, Mandl, Mr. Eich- 
steadt, Fuller. 

Row 2: Dalmbert, Lanagan, Breen, Van Buskirk, Walker, 
Crist, Holtman, Hogshire. 



147 



STUDENT COUNCIL 




Student government not directly supervised by the adminis- 
tration and faculty is under the jurisdiction of the Student 
Council. All class and queenship elections are conducted by the 
Council along with the regulation of all campus organizations 
except social fraternities and sororities. Student representatives 
on certain faculty committees are nominated by the Council. 

The council is composed of the representative from each 
social organization, one man and one woman from BISA and 
one unorganized independent student from each college in the 
University appointed by the Dean of the College. 

Ray Lines served as president of the group. Cora Lane was 
secretary, and Betty Fiddes, treasurer. Dr. George Comfort 
and Mrs. Rosamond R. Jones were the faculty advisors of the 
group. 



Row I: King, R. R. Jones, Lane, Lines, Fiddes, Boyd. 
Row 2: Rader, Ross, Franz, Wallcer, Hogshire, Sandburg, 

Warch. 
Row 3: Holland, Mercer, Copeland, Tardy, Roberts, 

Cowan. 




148 




i#N 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m Jl^^k ^""^^ — -1 1 _ . ', JjiSjft 


' ^'"W'A^HiHikl^^^l^^ - %>^':!ttl':: 1' "' 




'\ '^'^'-.^sgiajsis 


#^sa«5i^ "' 



Association of Women Students 




Row I : Keeling, Green, S+ultz, Thonnas, Renick. 
Row 2: Herbert, Mitchell, Knotts, Simmons, Warch, 
Siegel, Ephlin, Reynolds. 

The Association of Women Students at Butler 
is a member of the national Intercollegiate Associa- 
tion, an association for all college girls. 

The purpose and aim of the organization is to 
fortify the morale of Butler by fostering a spirit 
of pride in the achievements of all departments. 

The AWS House Council worked with the Dean 
of Women in regulating housing rules and check- 
ing house sheets. It sponsored the annual Nickle 
Hop and a Sadie Hawkins dance and a Christmas 
party for underprivileged children. 

Leading the association's activities were Norma 
Stultz, president; Cora Lane, vice-president; Pa- 
tricia Thomas, secretary; and Charlotte Green, 
treasurer. 




Pictured above are Elizabeth Durflinger, 
Dean of Women, Char Green, Patricia 
Thomas, and Norma Stultz, president. 



149 




•,^TjSg25 




^J^^ tJ&F*, 






Row I: Boyle, Phillips, Bell, Clark. 

Row 2: Walker, Dady, Robinson, Holtman, Uphaus. 

Row 3: Jones, Zay, Harbold, Clark, Niblack. 

Row 4: Riddell, Mercer, Jagger, Merkle, Lee, Robbins. 



YOUNG REPUBLICANS 

The purpose of the Young Republican Club is 
to further the interest in the Republican party and 
to acquaint the members of the club with govern- 
ment procedure both local and federal. 

The Young Republicans club was very active 
since 1952 was a presidential election year. 

The officers for the year were: John Trask, 
president; Robert Riddell, vice-president; Kathy 
Zay, secretary; and George Ann Varnes, treasurer. 



LOYALTY LEGION 



The purpose of the Butler Loyalty 
Legion is to assemble college men and 
women in a combined force to render 
service and develop spirit in the uni- 
versity. 

Four members of each social organi- 
zation and four unorganized indepen- 
dents are elected to membership each 
year. 

This year the Legion organized a card 
section of LSO people to promote spirit 
at basketball games. 

The Loyalty Legion had charge of the 
Torchlight parade and pep session pre- 
ceding Homecoming. At the half-time 
ceremonies of the Indiana State-Butler 
game the queen was presented with the 
traditional bouquet of roses. 



Officers for the Legion included: 
Marga Carter, president; Dave Walker, 
vice-president; Bill Lyons, secretary; 
and Beverly Seigel, treasurer. 

Mr. Jack Shakelford was the faculty 
advisor. 



Row I : Farris, Schrader, Gunter, Starr. 

Row 2: McCarthy, Phillips, Walker, M. 
Carter, Siegel, Clark, Alhand. 

Row 3: Dady, Warch, hHumphreys, Eph- 
lin, C. Carter, Boyle, Wolfe. 

Row 4: Dalmbert, h^oltman, Bartley, 
Brooks, Essex, Wilson. 

Row 5: Glogas, Vasko, Krahn, Wald- 
man, Sielegman, Mitchell, Rea- 
gan, Hosowsky. 






YMCA 



Row I: Bundy, Stanfield, Little, 
Spear, Mr. Pihiak. 

Row 2: Lee, Mercer, Good, 
Richey , Jacobson . 
Denny. 



The YMCA has the purposes of service to 
Butler and the furtherance of Christian prin- 
ciples in all activities. 

The year started off with the Freshman 
Coed camp and mixer. Then came the All 
School picnic, the publishing of the Blue 
Book, and the World Student Service Fund 
Carnival and drive. The YMCA aided the 
cheer drive, sponsored the Outstanding Fresh- 
man awards, Geneva Stunts, Spring Sing and 
All School Y-night. 

Officers for the year were: Dick Stanfield, 
president; Frank Little, vice-president; Lew 
Spear, secretary and Keith Bundy, treasurer. 
Faculty advisor was Mr. Voldemar Pihiak. 






YWCA 

The YWCA opened the year by assist- 
ing the YMCA in sponsoring Freshman 
Coed camp and mixer and the All-School 
picnic. 

With the YMCA they were co-sponsors 
of the Blue Book, the World Student 
Service Fund and Drive, the outstanding 
Freshman awards, Geneva Stunts, Spring 
Sing and All-School Y-night. 

Officers for the year were: Mary Lou 
Renick, president; Cora Lane, vice-presi- 
dent; Mary Ellen White, secretary and 
Doris Nordyke, treasurer. Dr. Anne 
Northrup was the faculty advisor. 




ki If 1 



Row I : Green, Niblack, Dr. Anne 
Northrup, Lane, White, A. Duff, 
L. Duff. 

Row 2: Walton, Brucker, Reis, 
Pleak, Ephlln, O'Dell, Reynolds. 

Row 3: Overpeck, Bruce, Wright, 
Welch, Smith, Jeffries, Brooks, 
Anderson, Bibler. 



Dr. Comfort explains the situa- 
tion to a group of YM-YWCA 
members at the annual Freshman 
Camp. 




Top — Row I: Major Lumley, Little, Shaw, Husted. Whaley, 
Donahue. 

Row 2: Radar, Anderson, Therien, Hargis, Campbell, Mor- 
gan. 

Row 3: McCardie, Hughes, Oshier, Wilson. Willingham, 
Davis. 

Row 4: Tardy. Gaines, Bowers, Mercer, Reed, Ballow. Doty, 
Chas+ain. 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY 

The Arnold Air Society is made up of men en- 
rolled in the advanced course of the Air Force 
ROTC unit who have an accumulative average of 
2.0. 

The officers for the year were: squadron com- 
mander, Don Shaw; executive officer, Marlin 
Husted; operations officer, Frank Little; treasurer, 
Jack Whaley; adjutant recorder, Jerry Donahue. 
Major Jack T. Lumley, United States Air Force, 
was the faculty advisor. 



Row I: Schmidt, Shors, Mackie, Kenny, Dankert, Martin, Wal- 

genback, Thom. 
Row 2: Turner, Hargis. Laut. Doty, Vondersoar, Marlowe, 

Mussman. 
Row 3: Harbold, Adklns, Faust, Hughes, Shaw. 

ACCOUNTING SOCIETY 

The purpose of the Accounting Society is to give 
accounting majors a connection with men in the 
accounting profession. The requirements for mem- 
bership are that the student must be an accounting 
major and be taking advanced accounting courses. 

The officers for the year were: John Kenney, 
president; Curt Dankert, vice-president; Tom 
Macky, secretary; and Jerry Martin, treasurer. 




Sigma Delta Chi members are 
selected on the basis that they intend 
to follow the journalism profession, 
must be journalism majors, and have 
a better than average scholastic 
rating. 

Sigma Delta Chi sponsored the 
SDX-Ray, the selection of outstand- 
ing campus leaders to be featured in 
the Collegian; took part in publish- 
ing the special Homecoming edition 
of the Collegian and took an active 
part in Journalism Field Day. 

The officers for the year were : Don 
Herring, president; Dave Walker, 
vice-president; and Chris Theofanis, 
treasurer. Dr. DeForrest O'Dell was 
the faculty advisor. 

Row I : Andree, Vlasses, Stilberger, 

Walker. 
Row 2: Van Dusen, King, Abrams, 

Herring, O'Dell. 



The Butler chapter of Alpha Delta 
Sigma, the national advertising hon- 
orary fraternity, has been represent- 
ed on campus since 1932 by the 
Merle Sidener chapter. 

The purpose of the fraternity is to 
promote a link between professional 
advertisers and advertising students. 

This year the Butler chapter spon- 
sored the Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas convocations, inaugurated a 
"get out the vote" campaign and as- 
sisted the Indianapolis Star gather 
election results in the 1952 presi- 
dential election. 

Presiding over the organization 
this year was Rav Sanders. Assisting 
him were John Walsh, vice-president 
and treasurer, and Bob Malsberry, 
secretary. 

Pictured at right are Sanders, Schu- 
macker, R. R. Jones, Siddons, Walsh, 
Clery, Malsbury, and Butler. 



SIGMA DELTA CHI 

and 

ALPHA DELTA SIGMA 




Future Teachers of America 

The Future Teachers of America Organization is for students preparing 
for the teaching profession in elementary and secondary education. 

The purpose of the organization is to acquaint teachers in training 
with the history, ethics and program of the organized teaching profession 
and to give them practical experience in working together on problems of 
the profession and the community. 

The officers for the year were Katherine Pulos, president; Teena 
Overpeck, vice-president; Jeannette Shepherd, secretary; George Olinick, 
treasurer and Marilyn Blackman, librarian. 



Row I: Embry, Lockwood, Olinick, Sheppard, Pu- 
los, Dr. Dean, Overpeck, Stilweli, Go+tberg, 
Dunnington. 

Row 2: Webb, Fiddes, Sterns, Reynolds, Wach- 
stetter, Mathews, Mitchell, HIastings, M. 
Wilson, Smyrnis, Werner, Thrush. 

Row 3: Walker, Day, Peterson, Wagner, Terrill, 
hHinkle, Van Dyke, Shanks, Nordyke, Gish, 
Gunter, hluber, J. Essex. 



Row I : Reis, Barney, Woods, Green, Thompson, 
Wright, Boyd, Thomas, Clark, McDonald. 

Row 2: Roberson, Anthony, Cook, Zoderer, Lyons, 
Weaver, Epperson, Starr, L. Duff, A. Duff. 

Row 3: Dillman, Kettlehut, Long, Lovejoy, Farlee, 
King, Slebe, Dorman, Joyce Essex, Bellen- 
bach. 

Row 4: Turecek, hlubble, Kelly, Meek, BIy. 




156 




Gamma Alpha Chi members pictured above are 
(left to right) Slegel, Simmons, Perish, Walton, Mc- 
Keown, Knoeble, Bock, Mrs. Jones, hHutton, Cook- 
sey, and Mullen. 

GAMMA ALPHA CHI 

Gamma Alpha Chi is the national professional 
advertising fraternity for women. It was founded 
in 1920 at the University of Missouri. The Butler 
chapter, Rho, was installed on February 4. 1948 bv 
Pat Burnett of the Indianapolis News. 

The officers for the year were Barbara Hutton, 
president; Lois Bock, vice-president; Joan Mullen, 
secretary, and Nance McKeown, treasurer. Mrs. 
Rosamond R. Jones was the faculty advisor. 

Pictured at right are Abrams, Mullen, Mc- 
Koewn, hiarbaugh, Keyler, Cooksey, and 
Walker. 

KAPPA TAU ALPHA 

Kappa Tau Alpha is a national journalism 
honorary whose purpose is to promote greater 
relationships among students of unusual and 
outstanding achievements in the school and 
department of journalism. 

A member must have had ten or more hours 
in journalism and must be a junior or senior 
ranked in the upper ten percent of his class. 

Officers for the year included: Tom 
Abrams, president; Patricia Keyler, secre- 
tary; and Bill Andree, treasurer. 

Dr. DeForrest O'Dell was faculty sponsor. 




157 




PRESS CLUB 

The Butler university Press 
Club opens its membership to all 
students in the journalism or ad- 
vertising departments interested in 
a journalism career. 

The Press Club sponsored semi- 
annual banquets at which time 
new staff members of the Col- 
legian are appointed. The club 
also awards a $50 scholarship 
each year to the outstanding 
sophomore journalist. 

Officers for the year were: Bill 
Andree, president; Dave Walker, 
vice-president; Patricia Keyler, 
secretary; and Tom McCarthy, 
treasurer. Faculty advisor was Dr. 
DeForrest O'Dell. 

Row I: Stassus, Manwaring, Boyle, R. R. 

Jones, Mullen, Andree, Walker, Cook- 

sey. 
Row 2; Vlases, Abrams, King, Buck, Sle- 

gle, McCarthy, Schumacher, Curry, 

Arbaugh. 



THETA SIGMA PHI 

Theta Sigma Phi, national hon- 
orary and professional fraternity 
for women in journalism, unites 
women students who have the 
same interests and provides oppor- 
tunities for contact with people in 
the profession. 

The Matrix Table is an annual 
project. This year's speaker was 
Mrs. Betty Hinckle Dunn, national 
president of Theta Sigma Phi. 

This year's officers were: Jane 
Cooksey, president; Charlotte 
Walton, vice-president, Katie Sim- 
mons, secretary; and Lois Bock, 
treasurer. Mrs. Rosamond R. 
Jones was the faculty advisor. 

Theta Sigma Phi members pictured 
above are Mullen, Bock, Simmons, Key- 
ler, Liebert, Greene, Stassus, R. R. Jones, 
Walton, and Cooksey. 




158 





SIGMA TAU DELTA 

Sigma Tau Delta, national literary hon- 
orary, is open to those with an English major 
or minor with a 3.0 accumulative average. 

The officers for the first semester were: 
Richard Burnett, president; Allan Sutherland, 
vice-president; Sally Bell and Mary Ellen 
White, secretaries; and Susan Benjamin, 
treasurer. Dr. Paul A. Cundiff was faculty 
advisor. 



MSS 



Row I: Bell, Payne, Baumgartner, Foer- 
derer, Graham, Hollander, Keyler. 

Row 2: York, Marshall, Dutton, Abrams, 
Vanderbilt, Malsberry, Goldbla+t, Pear- 
son. 

Row 3: Marz, Diemer, Graham, Dr Cun- 
diff. 



Marz, Walton, Beyer 
5, Manwaring, Wag- 



Row I: Dr 
Row 2: R 

enblast. 
Rrw 3: Distlehor; 

Goldblatt, Hallan 



MSS is the literary magazine sponsored by 
the Butler English department. Both fiction 
and non-fiction, poetry and prose, written by 
students in the department, is published in the 
magazine. 

Members of the staff are divided into the 
upper class staff and the freshman staff. 
Editors this year are Charlotte Walton, edi- 
tor; Allan Sutherland, associate editor; Lois 
Bock, art editor; Sally Lou Bell, exchange 
editor; and Don Marienthal and Martha Sher- 
man, copy editors. 

Sponsors were Dr. Werner W. Beyer and 
Dr. Roy B. Marz. 





ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

Alpha Lambda Delta, is the freshman wom- 
en's honorary fraternity at Butler. 

The purpose of the organization is to pro- 
mote interest in high scholastics during the 
four years at Butler and to encourage interest 
in campus affairs. 

Meinbership requirements are a 3.5 aver- 
age or above during their first semester. 

Alpha Lambda Delta presents a book each 
year to the Alpha Lambda Delta senior with 
the highest accumulative average. 

Officers for the year were Sara Jane 
Clarke, president; Sandy Moore, vice-presi- 
dent; June Uphaus, secretary; Alice Mandl, 
treasurer and Janet Dorman. historian. 

Left to right: Mandl, Clarke, Uphaus, Dorman. 



PHI EPSILON P! 

Pi Epsilon Phi is the Butler university 
honor fraternity in home economics. The pur- 
pose of the club is to advance and promote 
interest in home economics as well as a closer 
relationship between those in the department. 

Juniors and seniors who rank well in gen- 
eral ability and maintain an average of 2.8 
in home economics and a 2.5 in academic 
work are eligible for membership. 

The officers for the year were: Betty Lou 
Gunter, president; Norma Stultz, vice-presi- 
dent; Julia Farmer, secretary and Mary Lou 
Renick, treasurer. 

Miss Lundgren was the faculty advisor. 

Left to right: Phillips, Farmer, Gunter, H. Lundgren, 
Stultz, Reynolds. 



160 




MATH CLUB 

and 

CLASSICAL CLUB 



Kappa Mu Epsilon is an organi- 
zation for those students who have 
an above average scholastic rating 
in mathematics and who are tak- 
ing calculus or above. 

The officers were: Donald R. 
Cassady, president; Joseph Muel- 
ler, president-elect; Mary Alice 
Evans, vice-president; Austin Wer- 
nci. recording secretary; and Ray 
Cowan, recording secretary-elect. 
Mis. J. L. Real was corresponding 
secretary and David Woodward, 
1 reasurer. 

I)i. Harry E. Crull was the fac- 
iilly advisor. 

Row I: Cassidy, Simon, Mrs. Beal, 
Mueller. 

Row 2: Bowers, Dr. Crull, Evans, 
Wuerner, Woodward. 

Rov/ 3: Cowan, Young, Thomp- 
son, Needier, Tardy. 



All Greek and Latin students 
;irc able to join the Classical Club 
uliich fosters fellowship among 

I lie students of these languages. 

II is the purpose of the club to 
piomote interest in Latin and 
(/reek studies and to further the 
knowledge of students concerning 
the conditions of the Graeco-Ro- 
nian world. 

The club officers were: presi- 
dent, William Clark; vice-presi- 
dent. Paul Clark; treasurer, Lois 
Griffin; secretary, Caroline Valen- 
tine. The Faculty sponsors were 
Dr. Hiatt and Dr. Macdonald. 

Row I: Griffin, W. Clark, P. 

Clark, Valentine, Dr. J. 

Macdonald, Dr. V. hiiatf. 
Row 2: Fernkas, Buntain, MacFar- 

lane, DeTrude, Fortune. 

Praed, Maynes. 

161 



Geographic Society 

Gamma Tau Gamma, the geography organi- 
zation, has as its purpose the furtherance of 
the understanding of geography and geology 
over the world. 

The organization is open for membership 
to those students of geography or veterans of 
the ten day field trip or those whose work 
includes a basic understanding of geography. 

The officers of the organization were Betty 
Van Derbilt, president; Molly Kuehrman, 
vice-president; Jo Ann Dillman, secretary; 
and George Olinick; treasurer. Dr. Moulton 
was the advisor for the organization. 



Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management 

The Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement is a recognized national professional 
society of management people in industry, 
commerce, government and education. It rep- 
resents the desire to spread the benefits of 
scientific management wherever management 
is required. 

Its purpose is to forward the elimination of 
waste and the development of efficiency 
through study and application of scientific 
principles and methods of management. 

Officers for the year were Dave Northam, 
president; Thomas Harold, vice-president; 
John Baxter, secretary; Marlin Husted, treas- 
urer. Professor Herbert E. Sim is the Butler 
chapter's sponsor. 




Row I: Dr. Moulton, Dillman, 
Kuehrman, Van Derbilt, Olinick. 

Row 2: Walghous, Blair, Lips- 
comb, King, Hart, Shaw, Brac- 
ken, Woodward, 

Row 3: Carter, Vinson, D. Wood- 
ward, Cassel, Brooks, Evans, Ly- 
mon, Schilling. 



Row I: Dr. Sim, Harold. North- 
am, Baxter, Husted, Gillespie. 

=!ow 2: Blankenhorn, Reidelbach 
Shrock, Cameron, Smith, Wil- 
liams, Brodnax, Goodnight, 
Schroer, Reehling, Shaw, Achor, 
Collins. 

162 




Butler Student Players 

The Butler Student Players has as its purpose the pre- 
sentation of educational, legitimate theater to the students 
of Butler. 

In carrying out this purpose they presented Androcles 
and the Lion and Riders to the Sea. 

In the Spring Romeo and Juliet was given by the Players 
in the Holcomb Botanical Gardens. 

A policy making board governed the workings of the 
Players. It was composed of two alumnae, two faculty mem- 
bers, the director and representatives from each class. 




I: M. Tompkins, Hoskins, 
Barnard, Foerderer, Hol- 
lander, Mills, Austin, Wil- 
liams, Bolfe. 

2: Payne, Carter, Dorman, 
Sunter, Grigsby, Hall, 
Clark, Zay, Walton. 

3: Greenfield, Chastain, T. 
Tompkins, HecklinskI, Dud- 
ley, Moore, Ryan, Crist. 





ICHTHUS 

Ichthus is the undergraduate club of the school 
of religion and the department of religion in the 
College of Liberal Arts. 

Its purpose, as stated in its constitution is to 
"deepen the spiritual life, develop the capacity to 
serve, and enhance Christian fellowship." 

One of the activities of the organization this year 
was to collect and send clothes to Korean orphan- 
ages. 

Serving as officers for the year were: Marion 
Ericson, president; Frederick Murphy, vice-presi- 
dent; Dorothy McGuire, secretary; and Avis Smith, 
treasurer. The faculty advisor was Professor F. 0. 
Reisinger. 

Row I: F. Reisinger, D. McGuIre, M. Ericson, F. Murphy, 

A. Smith. 
Row 2: H, Boruff. C. Zoder, D. Lennington, D. Stinger, S. 

Moore. 
Row 3: P. Porter, F. Clabaugh. W. Knudson, G. Burns. 



RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 

Representatives to the Religious Council are 
elected from each religious organization on campus. 

The purpose of the council is to foster and en- 
courage religious activities in student life. 

The council each year promotes the observance 
of Religious Emphasis Week. 

Serving as officers for the year were: Jack Al- 
bertson, president; Paul Ross, vice-president; Har- 
old Ewen, vice-president; and Maureen Pleak, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 

Professor F. 0. Reisinger was the faculty advisor. 

Row I: Booher, Ewen, Albertson. Ross, Reisinger. 

Row 2: Horine, Keeling, Smith, Knudson, McCiure, Moore. 



KAPPA BETA 

Iota chapter of Kappa Beta, an honorary fratern- 
ity for girls who attend the Fellowship of University 
Women of the Disciples of Christ. The fraternity's 
object is to support and cooperate with the national 
organization and to promote Christian fellowship 
among university women on the campus. 

Officers for the year were Flora Williams, presi- 
dent; Georgianna Horine, vice-president; Maureen 
Pleak, recording secretary; Sandra Moore, corre- 
sponding secretary; Isabelle Thrush, treasurer. 

Advisor for the year was Mrs. Karl Means. 

Row I: Sherman, Cook, Adkins, McArthur, Flinn, Lacy, Far- 
ley. 

Row 2: Mrs. Means, Pleak, Williams, Horine, Moore, Mrs. 
Norris. Dr. Norris. 

Row 3: Fisher, Wachstetter, Smith, Stevens, A. Smith, Stin- 
ger, Mantooth, Bellenbach. 



164 



1 

1 



STUDENT VOLUNTEERS 

Student Volunteers was founded in 1898 for the 
purpose of disseminating information on missions 
and providing an opportunity to hear missionary 
speakers. Requirements for membership are an in- 
terest and activities in missions. 

This year's officers were: Victor McAnallen, 
president; Carl Alexander, vice-president; Peggy 
Day, treasurer; John Ralls, corresponding secre- 
tary; Jacqueline Nipper, recording secretary; Jack 
Albertson, religious council representative; and 
Alvand Williams, program chairman. Dr. A. C. 
Watters was faculty advisor. 



- m m - 



NEWMAN CLUB 

Members of the Newman club compose one of the 
most active religious groups of its kind on campus. 
They are Catholic students actively concerned with 
promoting social and religious functions. 

The officers for the year were : Don Pickett, presi- 
dent; Jim Breen, vice-president; Ann Dowling, 
secretary; and Beverly Siegel, treasurer. Dr. An- 
thony Schwartz was the faculty advisor. 

Row I: Doling, Pickett, Breen, Weber. 

Row 2: Reeve, Boyle, DeFrank, Joyce, Zay, Wade. 

Row 3; White, Clyne, Zoderer, iovlne, Johantgen. 

Row 4: Tegge, Nichols, Hann, Wiiensch. 






BLUE KEY 

The Blue Key, national activities and scholastic 
honorary fraternity, was organized at the University 
of Florida in 1925. Just one year after its national 
inception, a Blue Key chapter was initiated on the 
Butler campus. 

Officers this )'ear were: Sanford Rader, presi- 
dent; Bill Dudley, vice-president; Dick Stanfield, 
corresponding secretary; Dick Anderson, recording 
secretary; and Marlin Husted, treasurer. Faculty 
advisor was Mr. Howard Grigsby. 

Row I: Shaw, Anderson. Rader, Husted, Stanfield. 
Row 2: Walsh, Dudley, Van Buskirk, Grigsby, Ross. 



SCARLET QUILL 

Scarlet Quill is the Butler senior women's hon- 
orary. Each spring the members capped at Spring 
Sing are girls chosen on the basis of scholarship, 
character, and participation in extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. 

Officers this year were Ann Fuller, president; 
Mary Lou Renick, vice-president; Jerry Mitchell, 
secretary: and Doris Nordyke, treasurer. 

Miss Thornbrough was the faculty sponsor. 

Row I: Nordyke, Fuller, Renick, Mitchell. 
Row 2: Stuhz, Lane, Herbert, Payne, Walton. 





Row i : Bowers, Smith, Tardy, Jacobs. 

Row 2: Oshier, Riddell, Hahn, Mercer, Hughes. 

Not shown: Stewart, McCallum, Reed, Oshier, Smith, Brian. 



SPHINX 

Sphinx is the honorary organization for junior men. Members are 
selected in the spring of their sophomore year on the basis of leadership, 
scholarship, personality and participation in extra-curricular activities. 

This year the organization promoted the Greased pole fight and Pep 
Rally at Homecoming. 

The officers for the year were King Smith, president; Ray Stewart, vice- 
president; Frank Tardy, secretary; and Jim Smith, treasurer. Mr. Walgen- 
bach was faculty advisor. 



167 



CHIMES 



UTES 



Chimes is the jmiior women's national hon- 
orary society. Its members are selected on the 
basis of character, scholastic achievement, 
participation in extra-curricular activities and 
service to the school. 

The purpose of the organization is to give 
honor to those who have shown superior 
ability. 

Chimes is in charge of decorating the goal 
posts at Homecoming and ringing the school 
chimes. They sponsor the tug of war between 
the freshman and sophomore women. 

The officers for the year were : George Ann 
Varnes, president; Mary Stultz, vice-presi- 
dent; Nan Lou King, secretary; Virginia 
Bruce, treasurer. Faculty sponsor is Miss 
Wilma Wohler. 



Row I: Slegel, Bruce, Mrs. Woh- 
ler, Varnes, Stultz, King. 

Row 2: Brucker, McClurg, Knotts, 
McTarsney, Lamb, Garceau, 
Farlee. 



Garrett, Dr. Young, McCarthy, 
Breen, Tegge. 



168 



The Sophomore men who have been chosen 
to Utes, national sophomore men's honorary, 
have been keeping Butler school tradition high 
by sponsoring the annual basketball banquet, 
the Homecoming bonfire, and selling the 
Freshman beanies. 

The purpose of the organization is to foster 
school loyalty, promote high scholastic 
achievement, and develop leadership abilities. 

Officers for the year were Tom McCarthy, 
president; Richard Gharrett, vice-president; 
Sid McKeima, secretary; Paul Croyle, treas- 
urer; and Ed Hughes, social chairman. 

Dr. William Young was the faculty advisor. 





Row I : Siegel, Anderson, Mandl, Sherman, 
Bugg, Waltz, Uphaus, A. Duff. 

Row 2: Ingram, Shaw, Clark, Clyne, Dor- 
man, Aldrich, Brantner, Lovejoy, 
Sandberg, Letsinger, Bolte, Atwell. 

Row 3: Boyd, Tonar, Middle+on, Pleak, 
Gillespie, Dixon, Warch, McDowell, 
Flinn, Moore, Rabold. 



SPURS 

The Butler Spurs, national honorary organiza- 
tion for sophomore women, is composed this year 
of thiry-six women who showed an interest in col- 
lege activities, dependability, a sense of honor and 
democracy and a scholarship rating of at least 2.5. 

The purpose of the organization is to promote 
school spirit and support all activities in which 
the student body participates and to uphold all the 
traditions of the college. 

The organization sold corsages and balloons at 
Homecoming, sponsored the Path of Pennies and 
decorated Christmas trees at Christmas time. 

Serving as officers for the year were: Barbara 
Bugg, president; Martha Sherman, vice-president; 
Alice Mandl, secretary; and Shirley Jo Waltz, 
treasurer. Dr. James Diemer was faculty advisor. 



169 




WRA 

The Women's Recreation Associ- 
ation is open to all women inter- 
ested in athletics. The group is gov- 
erned by the Advisory Board, com- 
posed of a representative from each 
social organization, and a sports 
council made up of physical educa- 
tion majors and minors. 

The officers of WRA and the Ad- 
visory Board are identical. Judy 
Reynolds was president; Pat Mc- 
Tarsney, vice-president; Patsy Par- 
rish, secretary; Mary Evans, social 
chairman; and Gerry De Frank, 
social chairman. 

Mrs. Magdalene Davis was facul- 
ty advisor. 




170 



Below — Row I: DeFrank, Evans, Reynolds, Parrlsh, Mrs. Davis. 
Row 2: Siege!, McCormick, Wolfe, Uphaus, Herbert, Dalmbert. 
Above — Row I : Bugg, S+arr. 

Row 2: BIy, Essex, Loveless, Uphaus, Martin, McTarsney, Knoeble, 
Bremer, Warch, Lyons. 



COED SPORTS 



VOLLEYBALL 



BADMITTON 



SWIMMING 




171 





THE COLLEGIAN 

Under the capable leadership of Don Her- 
ring (above), Patricia Keyler and Dave 
Walker I above left), The Butler Collegian 
rounded out another year of diligent editorial 
activity, highlighted by the promotion of such 
worthy campaigns as the Cheer Drive and the 
Blood Drive. 

Herring served as the Editor-in-Chief for 
the first semester of the year, and Keyler and 
Walker co-edited the publication during the 
second semester. 

Other positions filled during the second 
semester were Dick King (second from top) 
and Jane Cooksey, managing editors: Bob 
Malsberry, business manager; Max Schu- 
macher (second from bottom), associate edi- 
tor; Katie Simmons, news editor; John Vlases 
(lower right I , make-up editor; and Paul Har- 
baugh, sports editor. Nancy Niblack and 
Nancy Stassus combined their talents to edit 
the ever-popular society column. 

Dr. DeForest O'Dell was faculty sponsor, 
Mrs. Rosamond Risser Jones oversaw the 
business and advertising side, and Hershel 
Van Dusen superintended the print shop. 



172 






THE DRIFT 

Confronted with the rigorous job of pub- 
lishing The Drift this year were Tom Abrams 
(top), editor; Lois Bock (upper right with 
Helen Letsinger), associate editor; and .loan 
Mullen ( right I , business manager. Noel 
Wildman and Nancy Gates provided yeoman 
service as photographer and art editor. Jack 
Conolly (right) was responsible for the art 
work, most notably the caricatures of campus 
luminaries contained in previous pages. 

Once again the Drift staff would like to 
acknowledge the cooperation of Keith Brat- 
ton, '51, whose vivid characterizations of cam- 
pus life are to be found throughout the book. 
Other staff members included Max Schu- 
macher, sports editor; Nell Libbert, activities" 
editor; Natalie ODell and Betty Lou Gunter, 
fraternity and sorority editors; and Bill 
Roberts, Jordan representative. June Wolfe 
was editor for the faculty section, and Beverly 
Siegel and Helen Letsinger helped out with 
the copy. 



173 



AFROTC 



The 1952-53 school year brought with it 
several new innovations in the Butler 
AFROTC Unit led by PAS & T Col. Ben K. 
Armstrong. With the new and the old, the 
year was very successful for the cadets and 
their instructors. 

Newest of the new were the Staff members 
assigned to Butler. They included Maj. 
Ryan, Capt. Sparkman, Lt. Mulkey, and Sgt. 
Norman. The new cadet staff was led by 
Cadet Col. Frank Little. 

Cadets elected their new Air Angel shortly 
after the start of school, and she, Joyce Bar- 
nard and the rest of her court received honors 
at the first gathering of the entire AFROTC 
Unit of Butler. For the first time all of the 
Cadets were outfitted in the new Air Force 
Blue. 

Captain Sparkman headed the formation of 
the Unit's Drum and Bugle Corp, which was 
making its first appearance on the BU campus. 
He also formulated plans for, and directed, 
the new Butler AFROTC Glee Club. Captain 
Sparkman piloted Mayor Clark's atomic 
bomb witnessing journey. 



ABOVE — Cadet Wing Staff members are 
(seated): Cadets Harris, Whaley, Little, 
Shrock, and Husted. Standing: Wilson, 
King, Walsh, Tanguy, and Anderson. These 
men are the top cadet officers and have 
charge of different groups within the unit. 

MIDDLE — Honorary women sponsors of the 
unit include: Woolgar, Ober, Baumgartner, 
Barnard, Hume, Douglass, McClure, and 
Ballard. These women represent each group 
in the parades or inspections which the unit 
may participate in during the school year. 

BOTTOM — Instructing and administrative 
work is done by the members of the 
AFROTC Staff which includes (seated): 
Capt. Sparkman, Maj. Ryan, Lt. Col. John- 
son, Col. Armstrong, Maj. Lumley, Capt. 
Wampler, Lt. Mulkey. Standing: Sgts. 
Moeller, Norman, Check, Rentchler, Cham- 
bers, Schlebal, and Wallace. 



175 




{r>- * 





DRILL TEAM practices after classes each day and 
has molded itself into a precision marching ma- 
chine. Cadet director is Richard Anderson and 
Staff coach Lt. Mulkey. 

Row I : Anderson, McCardle, Whyte, Finch, Hog- 
shire, Mulkey. 

Lewis, Carruso, Powell, Macker, Schwartz. 

Keen, hiart, hianes, Casey. 

Good, hHester, Smith, Weemhoff, Harris. 

Strater, Brocker, Morgan. 

Selmier, Cavender, Cook, Fairchild. 



Row 2 
Row 3 
Row 4 
Row 5 
Row 6 



DRUM AND BUGLE CORP is in its first year at 
Butler. Capt. Sparkman got together his group of 
men at the break between semesters and by this 
June they have rounded into a group which the 
Butler unit has every right to be very proud of. 

Row I : Cloe, Merkle, Fox. 

Row 2: Nichols, Mursh, Dryer, Krahn, Schroor, Bar- 
wiler. 

Row 3: Disinger, ZIotnick, Sigafoose, Breen, Rob- 
erts, Beechler. 

Row 4: Coble, Cassel, Wells, Birkofer, Yeager. 

Row 5: Switzer, Fautedenom, Hidy, Johnson, Dona- 
hue, Stephenson, and Capt. Sparkman, the in- 
structor. 



Cadet Lt. Col. Marlin Husted headed the organization of this year's Military Ball 
which was held at the Indiana Roof. Tony Pastor and his orchestra played for the 
dance in which some 600 cadets attended. The Military Ball is rapidly working its 
way to becoming the largest dance held at Butler. The Air Angel and her entire court 
was presented to the public during a half-hour broadcast. Publicity for the dance was 
furnished by Cadet Capt. Jack Highberger and the PIO staff. Cadet Robert Given 
provided the excellent decorations and Cadet George Toombs got the fine band. 



AIR SCIENCE IV men will receive their com- 
missions as 2nd Lt. in the Air Force as soon as they 
receive their college degrees. The 38 men will go 
into several different fields. 



AIR SCIENCE III men will go to summer camp 
for a four week training course this summer. There 
are 71 men in III and several of them may become 
pilots within three years. 



■int ..-._ 



"f#t'd* 




Cadets and their dates enjoying themselves before 
the Military Ball are: Warren Clements, Jo5'ce Bar- 
nard, Joan O'Neil, Frank Little, Mary Brubaker, 
Jack Whaley, Gale Raines, and James Shrock. 



Joyce Barnard, Air Angel, is being presented with 
her awards by Col. Ben K. Armstrong and president 
M. 0. Ross, while Cadet Co. Frank Little watches 
the presentation. 



An extensive campaign was headed by Major Ryan to sharpen the cadets up for 
the annual inspection of the Unit. This campaign consisted of early morning drills, 
posters, and work in perfecting the inspection drill. The inspection was highly success- 
ful for the Unit as the inspecting officers had nothing but praise for all phases of 
AFROTC on the campus. 

Cadet Jerry Donahue was editor of the "WING," the units' publication which was 
formerly called "FLY-PAPER." Cadet Jack Lannagan assisted him in his publication 
work. 

Finals in AFROTC for the cadets in first and second year Basic Air Science were 
held in April, before the Federal Inspection, and the rest of the semester was spent 
drilling. 



Taking time out from their dancing, these cadets 
and dates pose for a picture during the highly suc- 
cessful Military Ball. Seated is Cadet Hienbaugh 
and Mrs. Hienbaugh and standing behind them is 
Ann Harris, Bob Crist, Bonnis Coffman, and Tom 
Finch. 



The Rifle Team has approximately 25 matches a 
year against top-flight opposition. Members seated 
are: Elder, team captain, Hemler, Settle, Loury, 
Shaw. Standing: Hester, Dickey, Needier, J. Smith, 
and Staff coach Lt. Mulkey. Absent from picture 
is Cadet Bill Davis. 





JORDAN FACULTY 

Voice Faculty: H. Campbell, M. Warner, M. Ho- 
well, J. Adkins. 
Back Row: F. Koehrn, J. V. Laderoute, F. Jefry. 

Piano and Organ Faculty: M. Engle, D. Rosasco, 
M. Broden, M. Henninger, M. Fekete. 

Row 2: H. Harlan, M. Laut, G. Lewis, M 
Knauer, E. Gott, J. Gardiner. 

Row 3: E. H. Jones, P. Lindstaedt, O. Marsh, M 
Bransford, G. Gallager, J. Gates, H. Leaman 

Theory Department: W. Pelz, M. Walker, H 
Stratton, H. Johnson. 

Drama Department: M. Maillard, J. Phillippe, G 
Rawlings. 

Dance Department: M. Mahan, E. Poston, C 
Stoner, S. Smith. 




William Moody, percussion; Robert Getchell, brass; J. 
Winkle, accordion. 

Radio Faculty: J. Phillippe, T. Carnegie, J. Chapman. 

String Faculty: G. Chenowith, M. Lind, B. Leonard. 

Woodwind Faculty: R. Lang, N. Jones, R. Schumacker, W. 
Moody, N. Hovey (seated at piano). 





MU PHI EPSILON 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 




TAU BETA SIGMA 



KAPPA KAPPA PSI 



PHI MU ALPHA 



ALPHA EPSILON RHO 



181 





CHORALE 



CHOIR 



JORDAN CHORALE 

Row I: P. Day, P. Macey, D. Jackman, J. Faylor, D. 
Spaulding, M. Moon, J. Strebe, C. McClure, L. 
Lavengood, R. Myers, P. Thompson. 

Row 3: J. Rooney, R. McClure, R. McClintic, C. Moore, 
W. Roberts, J. Leaman, W. Moody, W. Bishop, P. 
Schutz, R. Lambert. 

Row 2: Richard Whittington, A. Anderson, S. Camp, M. 
Beck, A. Remler, J. Ray, C. Boyer, G. Weest. 



182 



Opposite page: top, Orchestra; center, Marching Band; bottom, Concert Band. 






69 }(tl 







^(mJ!^(zn/i 




184 




185 



President Ross 



One of the most familiar and friendly figures to 
Butler students is the president of the university, 
Dr. M. 0. Ross. Although administrative duties 
require the greatest amount of his time, Dr. Ross 
is never too busy to teach a class, have an occasional 
chat with a member of the student body or to par- 
ticipate in campus activities. 




Treasurer Barnett 

Treasurer of Butler University is 
John T. Barnett, whose office is lo- 
cated in the Morris Plan Building. 
Former public relations director, Mr. 
Barnett was also a member of the staff 
of the journalism department and 
served as assistant to the president be- 
fore assuming his present duties. 




Secretary Bromley 

At the center of every vital and im- 
portant institution is a capable board 
of directors. Butler is fortunate in 
having as the president of its board, 
Hilton U. Brown, and as secretary 
Kathryn Bromley. Miss Bromley who 
assumed her present position in 1947 
has her office in the Morris Plan 
Building. 



187 




Serving as Dean of Women is Dr. 
Elizabeth Ward Durflinger, who is 
also in charge of all social functions 
on the campus. 



Dean of Men, Director of Employ- 
ment, and chairman of the Men's Ad- 
visory Committee is L. Gray Burdin. 



Handling the money of the uni- 
versity and keeping the accounts of 
the organizations is Raymond Glad- 
den, Bursar. 



Looking after the academic welfare 
of the student is the job of Dr. C. R. 
]\'Iaxam, Registrar. 



188 




Administration 

(Continued) 




111 charge of the official news bur- 
eau, better known as the Public Rela- 
tions department, is Jack Shackelford. 
This department handles all the pub- 
licity on both academic and athletic 
matters that is sent to the papers, radio 
stations, and other publications. 



Alumni Secretary and Iiead of the 
journalism department of the uni- 
versity is Dr. DeForest O'Dell. Dr. 
O'Dell's duties include making ar- 
rangements for the annual Homecom- 
ing activities, editing the Alumni 
magazine, "The Butler Alumnus," and 
teaching in the journalism department. 




The library staff includes: Thel- 
ma Schuller, Jessica Mannon, Har- 
old Boisen, Elaine Whi+inger, Thel- 
ma Brenner, Luella Wilson, Faye 
Cantrall, Emily Helming. 



Keeping the students healthy 
are Dr. Rolla Burghard, university 
physician and Mary Jane Dailey, 
nurse. 

189 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Students in the College of Business Administration 
take courses designed to provide them with a foundation 
for careers in the various business fields. These courses 
may lead to obtaining an undergraduate degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or 
Bachelor of Science in journalism. The Master of Sci- 
ence degree in Business Administration may also be 
obtained. 



Dean H. C. Graebner, Dean of the College of Business Administration. 




190 




Back row: Gustav C. Klippel, Herbert E. Sim, 
William F. Shores, Paul H. Walgenbach, 
Walter Myers, Jack H. Shackelford, W. W. 
Imboden. 

Second row: D. J. Bowden, Arthur hi. North- 
rup, Harold J. Miller, DeForest O'Dell, 
Robert F. Newton. 

Front row: Clarence W. Efroymson, Harriet 
Paddock, Rosamond R. Jones, Dean H. C. 
Graebner. 




191 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



The College of Education at Butler was estab- 
lished in 1930 when the Department of Education, 
organized in 1919, was combined with the Teachers 
College of Indianapolis. Its main purposes are to 
prepare students for teaching in elementary and 
secondary schools, and to provide an appropriate 
foundation for advanced study in the various areas 
of education. The college also maintains a Bureau 
of Teacher Placement. 



Dr. J. Hartt Walsh, Dean of the College of Education 








Standing: C. Ross Dean, John W. 
W. Best, Amos B. Carlile. 

Seated: Roger W. Coulson, Wil- 
liam L. Howard, Lloyd E. Mc- 
Cann. 



Anthony N. Schwartz, Ralph C. 
Graetz, Ruth Patterson, Arden 
C. Eichsteadt. 



Standing: Galvin LeRoy Walker, 
Herbert F. Schwomeyer, Paul D. 
Hinkle, James S. Hauss, Frank 
B. Hedden. 

Seated: Magdalene Davis, Ada L. 
Loveless. 




193 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 




IN MEMORIAM 

All faculty members and the 
students of Butler were saddened 
this year by the unexpected death 
of Dr. Ray C. Friesner, Dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 

Dr. Friesner joined the Butler 
staff in 1919 as assistant professor 
of botany. He became head of the 
department in 1925, and was di- 
rector of graduate instruction 
from 1944 until 1947, when he 
became dean. His memory will 
long be revered in the hearts of 
those who knew him. 



Botany Department: John E. Potz- 
ger, Rex N. Webster. 





DEAN CUNDIFF 

Dr. Paul A. Cundiff, Dean 
of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, succeed- 
ed the late Dean Friesner. 



The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
has as its main objective the continuation 
and integration of a program broad in the 
liberal education which is provided for in the 
divisions of the University College. In addi- 
tion, it offers opportunities for specialization 
in a field of major interest. 



English Department — Top: Charles R. Carl- 
ton, William B. hlornback, James L. Wood- 
ress, James S. Diemer, George G. Story, 
Roy V. Marz, George S. Barber. 

Bottom: Paul Cundiff, Nancy Moore, Allegra 
Stewart, Margaret T. Fisher, Werner W. 
Beyer, C. B. Graham. 





Sociology Department: Harold S. 
Frum, James H. Peeling. 



Language: Clide Aldrlch, C. T. Mocas, Thor 
Wesenberg, Martha May Kincaid, Esther 
Renfrpw, Virginia Brunson. 

Home Economics: Margaret Smith DeHoff, 
hHattie Lundgren, Wilma Wohler. 



Religion: Jay R. Calhoun, Francis O. Reis- 
inger, Nellie Young. 

History and Political Science: R. G. Usher, 
David Silver, hH. hi. Hawkins, G. O. Com- 
fort, Emma Lou Thornbrough, A. Dale 
Beeler, Roy M. Robbins. 



196 





Physics Department: Seth E. Elliott, Bradf 
Noyes. 

Math Department: Ira W. Connor, Harry E 
Crull, Juna L. Beal. 

Philosophy Department: William Young, G 
don H. Clark. 

Speech Department: E. Edward Green, How- 
ard L. Grigsby, L. Gray Burdin, George P 
Rice. 

Chemistry Department: Martin Allen, K. M 
Seymour, Karl S. Means, James W. Fer- 
guson. 

Zoology Department: Elizabeth Durfiinger 
May Iske, Nathan E. Pearson. 




3WiBW 






OPPORTUNITIES 



IN TH6 PROFESSION OF SERVICE 



Bert Mull, Ralph M. Hedges, Earl Brake, Edward Rowe. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



In addition to preparing 
graduates to operate drug stores, 
the College of Pharmacy fits 
students for all other types 
of pharmaceutical activity. The 
new building was opened in 1951. 



198 




Dr. Karl L. Kaufman, Dean of the College of Pharmacy. 




PHARMACY (Continued) 

Donald Meyer, Samuel H. Hopper, Robert 
Swanson. 



John W. Martin, Arthur A. hiarwood, Nathan L. Michener, Lloyd O. Poland. 




199 




Dean O. L. Shelton, Dean of the 
School of Religion. 



SCHOOL OF RELIGION 



The School of Religion is a graduate institution 
within the University organization. 
Its primary purpose is to train candidates for 
the ministry and for other types of religious service. 
It provides the students with adequate knowledge 
and techniques necessary for work in the fields 
of pastoral, educational, and missionary ministry, 
and in the vocations of social service. 



Top row: Alfred R. Edyvean, B. A. 
Norris, R. E. Osborn, James 
Blair Miller, Walter W. Sikes, 
Willard Robinson, Frank J. Al- 
bert, A. C. Walters. 

Bottom row: T. W. Nakarai, S. 
Marion Smith, Dean O. L. Shel- 
ton, David C. Pellett. 




w'^*, m^ m 




'» ^ (?' ■^ ' » 




Director of the University College. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

The primary purpose of the University 
College is to mobilize the educational re- 
sources of the university as a whole in 
order to provide a common background of 
education needed by all students, no matter 
what their specific future educational, 
professional, or vocational objectives may 
be. It aids the students by providing 
a sound program of counseling and guidance 
service. 








201 




J. K. Ehlert, Director of Jordan College of Music of Butler University. 



JORDAN COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



One of the newest colleges of the university is the Jordan 
College of Music of Butler University. Here the students re- 
ceive instruction in dance, radio, speech, and drama, as well 
as all phases of musical education. 

Plans are underway for the construction of a new building 
on the campus to house the new college. The building will con- 
sist of an auditorium, class rooms and studios for WAJC-FM, 



Donald M. Mattison, Direc- 
tor of the John hierron 
Art Institute. 




JOHN HERRON ART INSTITUTE 



The facilities of the John Herron 
Art Institute and Herron Art Museum 
are open to all Butler students. A joint 
arrangement has been made with the 
Herron faculty to provide credit at 
Butler for work done at the art school. 

The school is recognized as one of 
the outstanding art schools in the coun- 
try, and students attend Herron for a 
full period of time and enter com- 
mercial fields. 




203 



PH0T05 




< 



5vx 





SENIOR CLASS 





Senior class officers were (left to right) : Shirley Stillwell, secretary; 
Doug Hatton, vice-president; Robert Lincks, president; and Paul Ross, 
treasurer. 



207 




ADAMS. CAROLYN JEAN. Indianapolis: Education; Pi 
Beta Phi corresponding secretary. Kappa Delta Pi, 
Young Republicans, FTA, EESO, YWCA, AWS, WRA, 
Who's Who. 

ADAMS, NANCY CAROLYN, Indianapolis: History and 
Political Science; Kappa Kappa Gamma recording 
secretary, YWCA, AWS. WRA. FTA, Young Repuh- 
licans. 

AFFOLD. LOUIS. Fort Wavne. Ind.: Pharmacy. 



ALLEN. PATRICIA LOCKE, Indianapolis: Trianon presi- 
dent. AWS. WRA. MSS, Ichthus. 

ANDERSON, RICHARD H.: Insurance; Lambda Chi Alpha 
president, treasurer. Blue Key. Sphinx, IPC, Insurance 
Society president. 

ANDERSON, DICK W., Indianapolis: Music-Dance; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon. 



AL!BLE. ROLAND LEE, Indianapoli: 
Delta Chi. 



Religion; Epsilon 



AUFDERHEIDE. LOIS ANN: Liberal Arts; Delta Gamma 
treasurer. Pledge treasurer, president, vice-president, 
treasurer Tau Beta Sigma, Coed Counselor, AWS, 
YWCA. WRA, Student Union, Spurs. 

AUSTIN, CARL E. JR.: Religion; Kappa Sigma, YMCA, 
Young Republicans Club, Butler Student Players. 

BAXTER. JOHN A.: Kappa Sigma, Blue Key, Inter-Frater- 
nity Council, Student Union, Society for the Advance- 
ment of Management. YMCA. Loyalty Legion, Drift 
Sale and Promotion, Young Republican Club. 

BATES, JERRY: Insurance; Phi Delta Theta treasurer, 
treasurer Utes, Sphinx, treasurer Student Council, 
YMCA Cabinet, Insurance Society, Society for the Ad- 
vancement of Management, Loyalty Legion, Alpha Phi 
Omega. Young Republicans Club, Student Union. 

BARNES. THOMAS B.. Indianapolis: Business— Insurance; 
Phi Delta Theta. president Sophomore class, president 
Student Council, president Sphinx, Utes, Insurance 
Society, 



BARNARD, JOYCE, Burlington, Ind.: Home Economies; 
Delta Gamma. 

BANDER, LILLIAN, Hammond, Ind.: Music Education; 
Sigma Alpha Iota. 

HALLOW, JOHN C: Business Administration; Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, Indiana State Teachers College 1947-48, 
Arnold Air Society, Young Democrats. 



BALLARD. TED DAMON. Gary. Ind.: Pharmacy; Lambda 
Chi A'pha. vice-president YMCA. Utes, Freshmen and 
Varsity Track, Kappa Psi, American Pharmaceutical 
Association. 



BEABOUT, LAWRENCE, Obln 



Ind.: Journalism. 



BEARD. PAUL G., New Castle. Ind.: Pharmacy; Kappa 
Psi, APhA treasurer. 



208 



BELL, SALLY LOU, Indianapdlis: Psychology-English; 
Kappa Alpha Thfia Cliaplain, secretary Sigma Tan 
Delta, secretary Psychology chih, AWS, YWCA, WRA, 
Young Republicans. MSS Senior staff. MSS Freshman 
staff, Student Union. 

BETRAS, GUS. Indianapolis: Pharmacy; Kappa Psi. 

BLEETSTEIN. JOEL: Sigma Alpha Mu. secretary Alpha 
Delta Sigma, But'er Student Players, Young Republi- 
cans Club, Loyalty Legion, Religious Council, Col- 
legian, Press Club, Publicity chairman. Junior Prom. 



BOBBE, HENRY: Business Administration; Kappa Sigma 
secretary. Student Union, YMCA, International Rela- 
tions Club, FTA, Young Republicans Club, Sphinx. 

BORUFF, HAROLD, Bloomington, Ind.: Religion. 

BROSNAN, JAMES, Indianapolis: Pharmacy. 



BROSIUS, KENNETH, Plainfield. Ind.: Elementary Educa- 
tion. 

BROWN, LILLIAN, Indianapolis: Music Education; Phi 
Sigma Mu. 

BUNDY, KEITH L., Indianapolis: Marketing; Phi Delta 
Theta president, president YMCA, president Utes Club, 
secretary treasurer Inter-Fraternity Council, Who's 
Who. 



BURNETT, RICHARD: English-Speech; Sigma Tau Delta 
president, Tau Kappa Alpha, Who"s Who, manager 
Varsity Debate. 

CAMERON, JAMES L.; Tau Kappa Epsilon vice-president, 
Society for the Advancement of Management, YMCA, 
Student Council, Sphinx. 

CAMPBELL, DON W., Indianapolis; Sigma Chi, football, 
basketball, baseball, Physical Education Club. 

CAMPBELL, FRANK, Indianapolis: Physical Education; 
Omega Psi Phi. 

CARTER, MARGA LEE; Kappa Alpha Theta, Editor. 
Scholarship Chairman, Political Chairman, president 
Loyalty Legion, president, vice-president International 
Relations Club, secretary Junior class, WRA Advisory 
Council, AWS Coed Councilor, YWCA Freshman 
Camp, program Director But'er Student Players, Blue 
Gills, Young Republicans, Gamma Tau Gamma. 

CASSADY, DONALD R.; Kappa Mu Epsilon president. 
Student Affiliate president, American Chemical So- 
ciety, president Mathematics Club, Sphinx, Outstanding 
Junior Chemistry Major. 

CAVE, HAROLD E., Indianapolis: Pharmacy. 

CHRISTIE, MERRILL JR.. Indianapolis: Pharmacy. 

CHRISTMAN, GEORGE WILLIAM. Indianapolis: Busi- 
ness Administration; Alternate John Chapman Miller 
Public Speaking contest. Collegian staff. Young Re- 
publicans. 




'J ^ *wt ^ f^rm^^ 




209 




CHURCHILL, WINSTON, Martinsville, Ind.: Pharmacy. 

CLARK, WILLIAM GUY: Religion; Delta Epsilon Chi, 
Ichthus Club, Classical Club, Nu Sigma Phi. 

CLINE, HAROLD E.: Delta Tau Delta, vice-president 
Utes, president Ichthus Club, president Eta Sigma Phi, 
president Religious Council, Who's Who 1950-51, '52- 
'53, Phi Eta Sigma, Blue Key, YMCA, Classical Club, 
Phi Kappa Phi, Track — Letterman, Cross-Country — 
Letterman. 



COHEN. MEYER, Indianapolis: Pharmacy. 

COLLINS, WILLIAM J., Forest Park, 111.: Zoology, Pre- 
Medical; Lambda Chi Alpha, Newman Club president, 
YMCA, Young Republicans Club, Arnold Air Society, 
Religious Council. .Student Union. 

COOKSEY, JANE KATHERINE, Indianapolis: Journalism 
(Business Administration) ; Kappa Alpha Theta, Social 
Chairman, corresponding secretary 1952 Homecoming 
Queen, 1952 Drift editor. Associate Editor Bluebook 
1949-50, 1952-53, Coed Codes Editor 1952. Collegian. 
Managing Editor, Editorial Editor Who's Who 1951-2, 
1952-3, Lambda Chi Alpha National Crescent Queen. 
2nd place. Theta Sigma Phi president, Theta Sigma Phi 
spoke award. Gamma Alpha Chi president. Kappa Tau 
Alpha vice-president. Spurs, Student Council, YWCA 
Y Cabinet, Press Club, AWS, Welwyn Club, Blue Gills. 

COPELAND, ROSS H., Indianapolis: Speech; Delta Tau 
Delta, Tau Kappa Alpha, Blue Key. 

COPELIN, JOSEPH E., Fairmount, Ind.: New Testament. 

COVY, CHARLES T., Indianapolis: Education; Lambda 
Chi Alpha, Kappa Kappa Psi, YMCA, Band. 



CRIST, ROBERT, Indianapolis: Business; Phi Delta Theta. 

CRUMLEY, JAMES L.: Sigma Chi, football. Physical 
Education Club, Young Republicans. 

CUTTING, HARVEY, Indianapolis: Religion. 



DANKERT, CURTIS WILLIAM: Accounting; Lambda 
Chi Alpha treasurer, vice-president Accounting Society, 
Captain of Tennis Team, YMCA, B. Man. 

DAVIS, BARBARA H., Indianapolis: General Business; 
YWCA, AWS, Student Union, Young Republicans. 

DAVIS, LAWRENCE C. JR.: Business Administration; 
Delta Tau Delta Sgt. at Arms, Arnold Air Society, 
Society for Advancement of Management, Young Re- 
publicans Club, YMCA. 



DAY, NANCY ANN, Indianapolis: Religion-Music. 

DAY, MONNA LOUISE, Indianapolis: Kappa Beta, Choir, 
Madrigals, Jordan Chorale, Ichthus, Student Volunteer, 
Religious Council. 

DECKER, ROBERT OWEN, Michigan City, Ind.: Track, 
Service Award, FTA. 



210 



DERVENIS, GEORGE N., Indianapolis: General Business; 
YMCA, AROTC, Intramural basketball. 

DEWEESE, ROBERT, Boonville, Ind.: Pharmacy. 

DICKEY, EARL: Liberal Arts and Sciences, Mathematics; 
Kappa Mu Epsilon, AROTC. 



DILLON, WILLIAM T., Colfax, Ind.: Pharmacy. 

DOLATOWSKI, JOHN E., Gary, Ind.: Pharmacy. 

DONAHUE, JEREMIAH J.: Phi Kappa president, Newman 
Club, International Relations Club, YMCA, Alpha Phi 
Omega, Band, Arnold Air Society corresponding secre- 
tary, Drum and Bugle Corps, Editor of AFROTC 
Newspaper. 

DOTY, CARL, Indianapolis. 

DUDLEY, BILL, Indianapolis: Kappa Sigma, Student 
Council, YMCA, Young Republicans, Blue Book, Stu- 
dent Players, Interfraternity Council, junior Class, vice- 
president. Homecoming dance chairman, Panhellenic 
dance King, Kappa Sigma, pledge president, presi- 
dent. Blue Key vice-president. 

DUNNINGTON, DOROTHEA: Elementary Education; 
Kappa Delta Pi '53, FTA. YWCA, WRA, AWS, EESO 
'49-'51, Spurs '50-*51 secretary. Chimes '51-"52, Pi 
Beta Phi Historian. 



DUNKETT, MAURICE. 

ELLIOTT, ROBERT, Boonville, Ind.: Pharmacy; Kappa 
Psi, Arnold Air Society, Student APhA. 

EMBRY, C. DOLORES, Indianapolis: Kindergarten-Ele- 
mentary Education; FTA, EESO. 



ERICKSON, JOHN, Logansport, Ind.: Phi Delta Theta. 

FARMER, JULIE, Indianapolis: Kappa Alpha Theta. 

FEGER, JOHN V.: Pharmacy; Lambda Chi Alpha secre- 
tary, St. Louis University, Sphinx, Newman Club, 
YMCA, FEPS, American Pharmaceutical Association. 



FEIN, MARVIN: Sigma Alpha Mu, American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

FIDDES, ELIZABETH ANNE. Detroit, Mich.: Elementary 
Education, Kindergarten; Kappa Kappa Gamma vice- 
president. Pledge president, treasurer Student Council, 
Sophomore Cotillion dance committee. Young Repub- 
licans Club, AWS, WRA, YWCA, WRA, FTA. 

FISHER, BETTY, Rushville, Ind.: Education. 




211 




FLEMING. WILLIAM, Indianapolis. 
FRANCIS. RICHARD, Indianapolis. 
FRITCH. E. THOMAS, Jasper, Ind. 



FllLLER, ANN: Kappa Alpha Theta, Rush Chairman, 
president Scarlet Quill, Alpha Lambda Delta. Spurs, 
Chimes, Alfred Marshall Society, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Young Republicans Club, Student I'nion, AWS, 
YWCA, WRA. 

GAINES, BRUCE: Insurance; Phi Delta Theta, treasurer 
Arnold Air Society, Philosophy Club, Society for the 
Advancement of Management, Insurance Society, 
Young Republicans Club. 

GARDNER, BETTY, Indianapolis. 

GARRISON, ANN, Indianapolis: Elementary Education; 
Trianon pledge president, YWCA, AWS, WRA, Young 
Republicans, Kappa Beta. FTA, Kappa Delta Pi sec- 
retary-treasurer. 

GATES, NANCY S., Indianapolis: Journalism; Simmons 
College, Boston, Mass.. Collegian, Art Editor of Drift. 

GISH. BETTY M.: Delta Gamma Rush Chairman, Song 
Leader. AWS, YWCA. WRA, FTA, Psychology Club, 
Welwyn Club. Student Union, Young Republicans 
Club, University and Concert Choir. 

GOODNIGHT, GEORGE D. JR.: General Business; Delta 
Tau Delta vice-president, treasurer Sphinx, vice-presi- 
dent Alfred Marshall Society, Utes, Kappa Mu Epsilon, 
YMCA, Society for Advancement of Management, 
Honor Roll, Freshman basketball. 

GOTTBERG. JOANNE. Indianapolis: Elementary Educa- 
tion; Pi Beta Phi. FTA. AWS, WRA. YWCA. EESO, 
Coed Counselor, Blue Gills, Young Republicans, Coed 
Codes, Student Union. 

GREENHUT, BRUNO, Indianapolis. 



GREGORY. ROBERT. 

(;R0ENE. BETTY ANN, Indianapolis: Elementary Educa- 
tion; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Newman Club, FTA, 
AWS. YWCA secretary 1951-52. WRA. Drift Oueen 
1949-50 and 1950-51. Air Angel Court 1949-50. 

GUBA. EMIL. Indianapolis. 



Gl NTER. BETTY LOU. San Juan. Texas: Education; 
Delta Delta Delta corresponding secretary, Student 
Players, Loyalty Legion. Young Republicans, Coed 
Counselor. YWCA, AWS, WRA, FTA, International 
Relations Club, Welwyn Club secretary, corresponding 
secretary. Pi Epsilon Phi president. 

GliREVITZ, HAROLD, Indianapolis: Pharmacy; Sigma 
Alpha Mu. Student APhA. football, track. B-Men's 
Club. 

HALL, ANN, Indianapolis: Speech-English; Kappa Alpha 
Theta. 



212 



HALL, WILLARD. 

IIARBOLD, FRED: Acxounting; Kappa Sigma vice-presi- 
dent, secretary. Accounting Society. YMCA, Young 
Republicans Club. Band, Society for Advancement of 
Management. 

HARDY, OLIN R. JR., Indianapolis: Music Education: 
Phi Mu Alpha. Phi Sigma Mu, Student Council, .Jordan 
Band and Orchestra. 



HARGIS, JAMES T. : Accounting; Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
YMCA, Wing staff, Accounting Society, Arnold Air 
Society. 

HARRIS, WES. 

HART, JOHN R.. Princeton, Ind. 



HASTINGS, NANCY JANE, Indianapolis: Elementary 
Education; Phi Beta Phi recording secretary, YWCA, 
AWS, WRA, FTA, EESO, Student Union. 

HATTON, DOUGLAS, Delphi, Ind.: Pharmacy; Phi Delta 
Theta president, president Senior class, Kappa Psi. 

HAWKINS, CLINTON, Indianapolis. 



HEHR, MILTON, Clinton, Ohio: Music. 

HERRING, DONALD CARL: Journalism; Kappa Tau 
Alpha, Blue Key. Sigma Delta Chi president. Press 
Club secretary. Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. Student Union, YMCA, Editor-in-chief 
Collegian first semester 1952-53, Associate editor 
Collegian second semester 1951-52. 

HEWITT, CHARLES AMOS: Pharmacy; Sigma Nu. 
Kappa Psi, YMCA, American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion. 



HlGHBllRG. MARY ELLEN. Indianapolis: Elementary 
Education; Zeta Tau Alpha, YWCA. AWS. WRA. 
FTA. Panhellenic Council, Young Republicans. Loyalty 
Legion, social chairman, rush chairman, political 
chairman. 

HOBBS. JOE, Indianapolis. 

HORTON, JOE, Nest Newton, Ind.: Music. 

HURLEY, MARY LOU: Physical Education; Pi Beta Phi 
Pledge supervisor. AWS, YWCA, WRA .Sports Council. 
Women's Physical Education. Major and Minor Clubs. 

IIUSTED. MARLIN KENT: Business Administration; 
Delta Tau Delta treasurer, treasurer Blue Key. Sphinx. 
Utes, Cadet Lt. Col. AFROTC. Military Ball chairman, 
vice-president Arno'd Air Society, YMCA, Honor Roll. 

HUME. VALERA: Secondary Education; Pi Beta Phi 
president, president Panhellenic, Air Angel Court. 
AWS Council. WRA. YWCA, Young Republicans Club. 
FTA. 




213 




JACOBSON, ROGER JR.: Business Administration; Mar- 
shall Sigma Nu, International Relations Club, Loyalty 
Legion, YMCA Cabinet, chairman WSSF Carnival, 
Student Union. 

JACKSON. MARTHA, Clayton, Ind. 

JAGGAR, MERRITT M.. Indianapolis: General Business; 
Phi Delta Theta, warden, rush chairman, YMCA cabi- 
net. Young Republicans, Student Union, Insurance 
Society, History and Political Science club. 



JOB. JUDITH. Indianapolis: Kappa Kappa Gamma rush 
chairman and corresponding secretary, YWCA, AWS, 
WRA. MSS staff. Blue Gills, Panhellenic Council. 

JOHNSON, CHARLES, Mommenee, IlL: Education; Lam- 
bda Chi Alpha. 

JONES, WILLIAM B.: Pharmacy; Sigma Nu rush chair- 
man, APhA, Utes vice-president. Varsity basketball. 
Loyalty Leg on, Intramurals, Young Democrats, Fresh- 
man class treasurer. Sophomore class secretary, YMCA. 



KEYLER, PATRICIA A.: Business Administration- Jour- 
nalism; Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Tau Alpha secretary. 
Collegian co-editor, Theta Sigma Phi, Press Club 
secretary, and FTA. 

KING, RICHARD K., Indianapolis: Journalism; Sigma 
Delta Chi, PIO of ROTC unit. Press Club, Collegian 
managing editor. Collegian make-up editor. 

KLIPLINGER, GLENN F.: Pharmacy; Kappa Psi, vice- 
president American Pharmaceutical Association. 



KIRBY. MIMI, Indianapolis. 

KENOLD, JENNIE: Liberal Arts; Kappa Alpha Theta 
recording secretary, AWS, YWCA, WRA, Young Re- 
publicans Club, Student Union. 

KUEHRMANN, MOLLY: De'ta Delta Delta Historian and 
Chaplain, Gamma Tau Gamma vice-president; Psy- 
chology Club treasurer, Philosophy Club treasurer, 
AWS, YWCA, Young Republicans, Future Teachers of 
America, Coed Counselor. 



LACY, RICHARD, Indianapolis, Ind.: Radio; Sigma Chi. 
LANDERS, MARY, Indianapolis: Liberal Arts. 
LAVENGOOD, LOUISE, Wabash, Ind. 



LEE, NANCY YVONNE. Indianapolis: Elementary Educa- 
tion; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica. Women's Recreation Association, YWCA, AWS, 
Young Republicans. 

LENNINGTON, DAVID MAURICE: Sigma Chi, Ichthus 
Club, Butler Choir, YMCA, Young Republicans. 

LEWIS. BARBARA MORTON. Indianapolis: Pre-nursing 
and Zoology-German; Pi Beta Phi, AWS, YWCA, 
WRA, Wehvyn Club, '51 Drift staff. Young Republi- 
cans, International Relations, Group Captain of 1952 
Blood Drive. 



214 



LEWIS, GEORGE J.: Student Players, Young Democrats. 

LIGE, WARREN: Pharmacy; Kappa Psj, American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 

LINCKS, ROBERT: Physical Education: Sigma Nu presi- 
dent, YMCA, Physical Education club, B-Men's club, 
Arnold Air Society, Cadet Major, football manager, 
basketball manager, student trainer. Who's Who, Utes 
secretary. Junior class treasurer. Senior class vice- 
president. 

LINES, RAY: Lambda Chi Alpha president, secretary and 
Pledge trainer, president Student Council, president 
Blue Key, Who's Who, YMCA, Equiteer's Club, Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, Senior Day committee. 
Men's Advisory Board, Beard Growing contest. 

LIPSCOMB, ROBERT, Indianapolis: Science. 

LITTLE, FRANK E.. Indianapolis: Business Administra- 
tion; Warden Phi Delta Theta, Rush chairman. Alumni 
secretary, vice-president YMCA, Operations Officer 
Arnold Air Society, chairman Freshman Mixer, Utes, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Student Union. Intramurals, Fresh- 
man football. 



LOCKWOOD, SUE, Indianapolis: Elementary and Kinder- 
garten Education; FTA. 

LUCE, HAROLD, Indianapolis. 

LYMAN, SALLY: Botany; Gamma Tau Gamma, Geog- 
raphy Honorary, Christian Science Organization. 



McANALLEN, WILLIAM H., New Castle, Ind. 

McBRIDE, HARRY RAY, Indianapolis: Physics; Math 
Club 1951. 

McCALLUM, DONALD, Indianapolis: Sigma Chi presi- 
dent, YMCA Cabinet treasurer, Who's Who, Blue Key, 
Young Republicans, Interfraternity Council, Drift 
Photographer, Loyalty Legion. 



McCartney, KATHRYN ANN: Business Education: 
Alpha Chi Omega vice-president, Alfred Marshall 
Honor Society, FTA, WRA, AWS, Young Republicans 
Club. 

McCLUNG, ROSENA: Kindergarten Education; FTA. 

McLaughlin, dale, Indianapolis. 



McMAHAL, HAROLD, Beech Grove, Ind. 
McMURTLY, max, Indianapolis. 
MacBETH, ROBERT, Southport, Ind. 




215 




MacFARLANE, IAN. Duluth, Minn.: Philosophy. 
MACKIE. THOMAS. Chatham. N. J. 
MACRI, JOE, Indianapolis. 



MAHN, CHARLES E., Indianapolis. 
MARSH, HARRISON A., Indianapolis 
MARTIN, JERRY C. Indianapolis. 



MARTIN, PATRICIA SUE, Rushville, Ind.: Marketing; 
Kappa Alpha Theta, WRA, YWCA, AWS, Student 
Union, Young Republicans Club, Colorado Women's 
College. 

MARTZ, GERALD, Indianapolis. 

MATHEWS, CAROL, Indianapolis: Education; Delta Delta 
Delta vice-president, pledge trainer, YWCA, WRA, 
AWS, FTA, Young Republicans, Coed Counselors. 



MAYHUGH. JACK. Speedway, Ind. 

MERKLE. JOHN A. JR.: Liberal Arts; Phi Delta Theta, 
president Pre-Legal Society, secretary-treasurer Inter- 
national Relations Club. AFROTC Drum and Bugle 
Corps Commander, Young Republicans Club, Wabash 
Co'lege 1949-50. 

MILLS. GLENN. 



MILLS, JOHN, Indianapolis: English; Phi Kappa, Stu- 
dent Players, Sigma Tau Delta, Newman Club. 

MINER. MARILYN. Warsaw, Ind. 

MITCHELL, JERRY: Elementary Education; FTA, 
YWCA, AWS Council, WRA, Young Democrats, Spurs, 
vice-president Chimes, secretary Scarlet Quill, Kappa 
Delta Pi, Who's Who, basketball. 



MOORE. JOHN THOMAS, Indianapolis. 
MORIARTY, PATRICK, Indianapolis. 
MUELLER, JOSEPH, Indianapolis. 



216 



MUSSMANN. EDWIN R.: Accounting; Tennis team, Ac- 
counting Society; Alfred Marshall Society. 

NAY, EUGENE, Whiteland, Ind. 

NELSON, HAROLD, Gary, Ind. 



NORDYKE, DORIS ANN: Elementary Education; Delta 
Gamma president, president Kappa Delta Pi, treasurer 
Scarlet Quill, treasurer YWCA, president Chimes, vice- 
president FTA, vice-president ESSO. Geneva Stunts 
chairman. Spurs. Who's Who, AWS, WRA. Young 
Republicans Club. 

NORTHAM. J. DAVID: Business; Delta Tau Delta, presi- 
dent, vice-president Society for Advancement of Man- 
agement, Associate Editor of Drift. Photography Editor 
of Drift 1951-52. Kappa Kappa Psi. Utes. YWCA, 
Young Republicans, Band. 

O'BRIEN. TOM, Indianapolis. 

OLINICK. GEORGE A., Indianapolis: Elementary Educa- 
tion; Gamma Tau Gamma treasurer, treasurer FTA. 

OLIVA, ANGELO, Mishawaka, Ind. 

O'NEILL, JOAN, Logansport. Ind.: Delta Psi Kappa, 
YWCA, AWS. WRA vice-president. Blue Gills, Stu- 
dent Union, Young Republicans. Student Players. 
Loyalty Legion, sophomore class vice-president. Spurs, 
vice-president. Leprechaun Fair, queen. Air Angel 
Court, Track Queen court. Junior Prom Queen, Theta 
Sigma Phi Spoke, Hub awards. Who's Who. 

O'SHAUGHNESSY, JOHN J.: Pharmacy; Lambda Chi 
Alpha, University of New Mexico, Kappa Psi, Newman 
Club, YMCA, American Pharmaceutical Association. 

PADGETT, ALBERT L. : Pharmacy; American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

PARRISH, MARY PATRICIA: Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Song Chairman, corresponding secretary, WRA A.d- 
visory Board, secretary WRA, Tau Beta Sigma, Pro- 
duction Director, WAJC. Pledge Trainer, Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, Gamma Alpha Chi. Publicity Director, WAJC. 

PAYNE, PATRICIA ANN, Fort Wayne, Ind.: Speech, 
English; Kappa Alpha Theta treasurer, president, 
YWCA, AWS, WRA, Young Republicans, Spurs, 
Chimes, Scarlet Quill, Sigma Tau Delta, Who's Who, 
Theta Sigma Phi Spoke, Hub and Wheel awards. 
Student Players, Varsity debate. Loyalty Legion, Stu- 
dent Union Constitutional committee. Homecoming 
dance chairman. Senior Day chairman, Panhellenic 
council, fraternity editor 1952 Drift, MSS, YWCA 
Cheer Drive head. Coke forums speaker. Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Senior advisor president, Dionysians president. 
Student Council secretary. 

PETERSON, MARTHA LEE, Indianapolis: Elementary 
Education; Kappa Kappa Gamma scholarship chair- 
man, FTA, AWS, YWCA, WRA, Kappa Delta Pi. 

PFAU, JAMES E. : Pharmacy; Kappa Psi, American 
Pharmaceutical Association. 



PIRTLE, JOE, Indianapolis: Education. 
PLUCKEBAUM, ROGER, Indianapolis. 
PORTER, PAUL, Indianapolis. 




217 




PRUETT, IRWIN, Indianapolis. 

PULOS, KATHERINE. Indianapolis: Elementary and Spe 
cial Education; FTA jjresident, YWCA. 

RADER, STANFORD. Indianapolis: Business Administra- 
tion. 



RAMSAY. CLAUDETTE, Tipton. Ind.: B. S. Radio; Co- 
Ritual chairman. Ritual chairman of Delta Gamma, 
AWS, YWCA, WRA, Press Club. Psychology Club, 
Anchora Correspondent. 

RENICK, MARY LOU. Indianapolis: Education; president 
Delta Delta Delta. 

RENICK. ROBERT. Indianapolis: Pharmacy. 



RENYOLDS, JOE. Indianapolis. 

REYNOLDS. JUDITH: Elementary Education; Kappa 
Alpha Theta vice-president, president WRA, Kanpa 
Delta Pi, Scarlet Quill, AWS Council, YWCA Cabinet, 
Young Republicans Club. FTA, Spurs, ESSO, Newman 
Club. 

ROBERTS, DICK, Indianapolis. 



ROONEY, JOHN: Music. 

ROSS, PAUL M. JR.. Indianapolis: English; Sigma Chi 
secretary, treasurer Senior class. Phi Kappa Phi, Blue 
Key, secretary Sphinx, Utes. vice-president Phi Eta 
Sigma, Collegian. YMCA Cabinet, vice-president Re- 
ligious Counci', Assistant Editor MSS. Student Council. 
Sigma Tau Delta, Who's Who. YMCA Outstanding 
Freshman Boy Award, secretary of Eta Sigma Phi. 

RUTHERFORD. WALLAS, Indianapolis. 

RYAN, FRED G. JR.: Liberal Arts— History and Political 
Science; Intramural chairman Delta Tau Delta, Butler 
Student Players. Newman Club, Pre-Legal Society, 
Freshman Football. 

SANDBERG, TEX: History and Political Science; Tau 
Kappa Epsi)on historian, president. Cheer leader, 
Arnold Air Society, YMCA Cabinet, Loyalty Legion, 
ROTC Drill team commander. Wing staff, Interfrater- 
nity council. Varsity debate team. 

SCALES, WALDO S.. Evansville College: Zoology, Chem- 
istry; Band, Concert Band, Methodist Student Move- 
ment, Science Club. 



SCHAFER, RAPHAEL, Indianapolis. 

SCHANKERMAN, ABE: Exchequer Sigma Alpha Mu, 
president Sophomore class, chairman Sophomore Co- 
tillion; chairman Heart Fund, Butler Student Players, 
Intercollegiate Debate Team, LItes, Interfraternity 
Council, YMCA Cabinet, Young Democrats Club. 

SCHMIDT, JAMES, Indianapolis. 



218 



SCHULTZ, WILLIA^r 0.: Education— Social Studies; 
Kappa Kappa P^i. 

SEIFERT, SOL, Chicago. 111.: Pharmacy; Sigma Alpha Mu, 
Sphinx, Student APhA. 

SHAW, DONALD H.: Sigma Chi treasurer. Band, Kappa 
Kappa Psi, Alfred Marshall Society president, Arnold 
Air Society president. Captain Rifle Team, Drill Team. 
Founder, Gamma Tau Gamma. Blue Key. Utes, YMCA 
Cabinet. 

SHEPPARD, JEANNETTE V.. Indianapolis: Elementary 
Education; Pi Beta Phi scholarship chairman, program 
chairman, vice-president, YWCA. AWS. WRA. Kappa 
Delta Phi, Spurs, ESSO, Chimes secretary, FTA sec- 
retary. 

SHROCK, JAMES R.: Business Administration; Delta Tau 
Delta corresponding secretary, society chairman. Blue 
Key, president Sphinx. AFROTC Deputy Wing Com- 
mander, Utes, Historian. Alfred Marshall Society, 
Society for the Advancement of Management, Honor 
Roll. YMCA. 

SHOEMAKER. GERALD D.: Radio; Political Chairman, 
BISA, WAJC Newscaster, Alpha Epsilon Rho. 



SIMON, ROBERT A.: Phi Kappa, Kappa Mu Epsilon, 
Math Honorary. 

SMITH. DEMARIS, Indianapolis. 

SMITH, RICHARD L., Indianapolis: Business. 



SMITH, ROBERT LEE: General Business; BISA, Account- 
ing Society. 

SMITH, ROBERT W., Indianapolis. 

SMITH, TOM v., Lafayette, Ind. 



SMYRNIS, MARIAN, Indianapolis: Business Education; 
YWCA, AWS, FTA. 

SPEAR, LEWIS BENSON: Zoology; Historian, secretary 
Phi Delta Theta, YMCA Cabinet secretary, Co-Chair- 
man All Y Nile 1951-52, Young Republicans Club. 

STANFIELD, RICHARD CARPENTER: Pre-Law; Sigma 
Chi president, president Y'^MCA Cabinet, president 
Young Republicans Club, president Inter-fraternity 
Council, Phi Eta Sigma, Blue Key. Who's Who. 



STEINMETZ, HAROLD, Milan, Ind. 

STEWART, TRILI, Indianapolis. 

STILWELL, SHIRLEY ANN, Indianapolis: Elementary 
Education; Pi Beta Phi, YWCA, AWS, WRA, FTA, 
Blue Gills, Student Union, coed counselor, senior class 
secretary. 








219 




Ji^^^^ud^M 






.JWi^ ^iwi^, 





L^ ^ 




STULTZ, NORMA JEANNE: Liberal Arts, Home Eco- 
nomics; Kappa Alplia Tlieta, Association of Women 
Students, president, coed counselor, social chairman, 
Welwyn president, vice-president, social chairman, 
chairman fashion show. Pi Epsilon Phi vice-president, 
YWCA, WRA, Scarlet Quill recorder. Chimes, Spurs 
president, Ichthus, Student Union, Future Teachers 
of America. 

TANGUY, VICTOR EDWARD JR., Logansport, Ind.: 
Delta Tau Delta president, vice-president Alpha Epsilon 
Rho, secretary-treasurer IFC, Utes. YMCA, Newman 
Club. ROTC, Sports Director WAJC. 

SUESS, GLORIA, Indianapolis: Delta Gamma. 

THERIEN, GILBERT C, St. Ann, 111.: Lambda Chi Alpha, 
YMCA, Choir, Arnold Air Society, Young Republicans, 
American Chemical Society vice-president. 



Insurance; YMCA, 



THOMAS, WILLIAM A., Indianapolis 
Math club. Insurance Society. 

THROOP, SHIRLI SWARTZ, Indianapoli: 



TRUITT, JACK E. : Tau Kappa Epsilon treasurer. Alpha 
Delta Sigma, Past Commander Arnold Air Society, 
YMCA, Loyalty Legion, Collegian, Press Club. 

TILFORD, JOHN, Indianapolis. 

TROTTER, WILMA, Indianapolis. 



TROUT, CLIFFORD N.: Religion; Ministerial Association 
president. 

TROWBRIDGE, VICTOR, Frederickburg, Ind. 

TWIGG, MILDRED: Elementary Education; Zeta Tau 
Alpha treasurer, FTA, AWS, YWCA, Newman Club, 
Student Union. 



URBINE, STANLEY. 

VANBUSKIRK, RICHARD W.: Pharmacy; Lambda Chi 
Alpha vice-president, president American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association, Historian Kappa Psi, Blue Key, 
Sphinx, Student Union Council, FEPS. 

VanDERBILT, ELIZABETH B.: Sigma Alpha Iota, Sigma 
Tau Delta, Gamma Tau Gamma, Indiana Academy of 
Science. 



VINSON, DON, Stilesville, Ind. 

VLASES, JOHN, Indianapolis: Journalism. 

WAGNER, CAROLYN, Vincennes, Ind.: Education; Delta 
Delta Delta house president, recording secretary, 
YWCA, WRA, AWS, FTA, Coed Counselors, Blue 
Book staff. Drift staff. 



220 



WAGONER, MIKE, Indianapolis: Religion; Sigma Nii. 

WALKER. DAVE: Journalism; Sigma Nu, Editor-in-Chief 
of Co'legian, Managing Editor Collegian, chairman 
1951 Cheer Drive. Blue Key. vice-president of Press 
Cluh. vice-president of Sigma Delta Chi, vice-president 
Loyalty Legion, Student Union, Student Council, Kappa 
Tau Alpha. YMCA. Puhlicity. Young Republicans. 

WALKER. LLOYD S. 



WALLS, HOLLIS WAYNE: Football, Student Council. 

WALTON, CHARLOTTE. Indianapolis: English; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, Who's Who 1952-53, Editor MSS. 

WATSON, LAURA THEIS: Elementary Education; Delta 
Gamma house president. Advisory Board WRA, Cheer 
Leader 1950-51, AWS, Young Republicans, Blue Gills. 
Loyalty Legion, FTA. 



WEAVER, DONALD EUGENE: Pharmacy; American 
Pharmaceutical Association, Kappa Psi, Rho Chi. 

WEBB, MARGARET ELLEN: Elementary Education: 
FTA. 

WELLS, LAWRENCE A.: Elementary Education; Tau 
Kappa Epsilon Pledge president 1952. FTA. 



WERNER, PAT, Hopkins. Minn. 

WAHALEY, JOHN. 

WHITE, MARY ELLEN: 2nd vice-president. Activities 
chairman, Music co-chairman Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
secretary YWCA, secretary Sigma Tau Delta, AWS, 
WRA, Who's Who, Newman Club. 



WHITMOYER, GEORGE. 

WILLIAMS, IRVINE D.: Pharmacy; Sigma Nu secretary. 
Kappa Psi historian, Utes, APhA, YMCA, Young 
Republicans, Student Union, Intramurals. 

WILSON, JOHN R.: Omega Psi Phi, FTA, Arnold Air 
Society, Captain ROTC, Debate Team. 



WILLIAMS, FLORA S.: Sociology— Social Work; Kappa 
Beta president. 

WILSON, MARTHA. Rushville. Ind.: Education; Social 
chairman of Delta Delta Delta. 

WINEINGER, LEROY. Gary. Ind. 




221 




WOIZESKI, ROBERT A.. Indianapolis: Phi Delta Theta 
vice-president, American Chemical Society, YMCA, 
Utes, Interfraternity Council, Young Republicans, 
Senior Announcement Committee. 

WOODWARD, DAVID: Mathematics; Kappa Mu Epsilon, 
Gamma Tau Gamma. 

WOLF, HUGH. Indianapolis: Education and Political 
Science; Sigma Chi. 



WYCISKALLA, JOAN, Indianapolis. 

YAGER, MARVIN. Indianapolis. 

YORK, MARTHA ANN, Indianapolis: English; Kappa 
Kappa Gamma, YWCA, WRA, AWS, De Pauw Uni- 
versity 1, 2. 3. Young Republicans, Sigma Tau Delta. 



YOUNG, JOE. 

ZAY, MARY KATHERINE. Huntington, Ind.: Home Eco- 
nomics; Kappa Alpha Theta out of town rush chair- 
man, corresponding secretary, YWCA, AWS, WRA, 
Blue Gills, Student Union, Color Guard, Geneva 
Stunts, Sprang Sing. Welwyn Club, social chairman, 
president. Loyalty Legion, chairman Torchlight Parade, 
Newman Club vice-president. Young Republicans sec- 
retary. 

TOSTENSON, MARY JANE, Chicago, III.: Delta Gamma. 



TRUITT, JACK. 

BAKER, JACK, Indianapolis: Business; Phi Kappa. 

SPARKS, CARYL SHAW: Delta Delta Delta. Tau Beta 
Sigma secretary. Kappa Delta Pi, AWS, FTA, EESO, 
WRA, YWCA, Majorette and Color Guard. 



SPARKS, LAWRENCE R.: Lambda Chi Alpha secretary, 
Utes Club, YMCA, International Relations Club, Young 
Republicans Club, Arnold Air Society, Student Union. 



WM. J. CASTLEMAN 
CARL HANN 



MARY MASON 

MRS. C. H. STANLEY 
J. B. VAN SICKLE 




RONALD ROAK 

GORDAN LUCAS 



'^■mm^nmrm^^^ 




lunior 



CI 



ass 




Officers for the Junior class this year were (left 
to right) : Frank Tardy, vice-president; Jim Hogshire, 
treasurer; Janet Brucker, secretary; and Skip Booher, 
president. Not pictured is Robert Given, Junior Prom 
chairman. 

In addition to sponsoring the annual Prom, the 
Junior class published the 1953 Drift with Tom 
Abranis as editor; Joan Mullen, business manager; 
and Lois Bock, associate editor. 

Another member of the Junior class who con- 
tributed his talents to producing the '53 Drift was 
Jack Conolly, artist. 




223 




Abrams, Tom 

Anderson, Adeline 
Andree, G. W. 

Banchansky, John 



Barnett, Ginsel 
Barney, Nan 

Baumgartner, Paula 
Becker, Paul 



Bellenbach, Edna 
Bennett, Fred 
Bess, Norm 

Blackard, Clyde 



Blair, Walter 
Bliss, Jack 

Bly, Virginia 
Bock, Lois 

Bogart, James 

Boldman, Connie 
Booher, Skip 

Book, Marty Jean 

Bowers, Jack 

Bowers, Melvin 

Brown, John M. 

Bruce, Virginia 



224 



Brucker, Janet 

Bunnell, Glenn 

Campbell, John 

Cambell, Richard 

Carlson, Glenn 

Carpenter, Stan, Jr. 
Cast, Lloyd 

Clabaugh, Frank W. 

Clark, Judy 

Clements, John 
Clift, Sally 

Collins, Charles 

Collins, Mike 

Commiskey, Joe 
Conolly, Jack 

Cook, Marlane 

Corbin, Carolyn 
Cox, Ed 

Croddy, Robert 

Cunningham, Robert 

Darkus, Ingrida 

De Frank, Gerry 
DeFur, Ronald 

Dillman, Jo Anne 












225 




Dixon, Herbert 

Dolphus, Lambert 
Douglass, Bea 

Dutchess, Portia 

Ellis, Owen 

Epperson, Phyllis 
Farlee, Benita 
Finch, Jack 

Franz, Don 

Garceau, Diana 

Gianakos, Mary 

Gillespe, Daniel 

Gospodareck, Lillian 
Gardy, Mary 

Graham, Doris 

Green, Charlotte 

Green, Don 

Green, Elizabeth 

Green, Mary Ann 

Greenburg, Russ 

Gutzweiler, Don 
Hahn, Richard 

Haskins, Robert 
Harner, Lloyd 



226 



Harrell, John 

Harris, Delmar 

Hauck, Ronald 

Haynes, William 

Hecklinski, C. A. 

Highberger, Jack 

Hogshire, James 

Horine, Georgana 

Hughes, Eugene 
Hutson, Paul 

Hutton, Barbara 

Jerries, Dorothy 

Hohnson, Grif 

Kaplan, Myrna 
Kelly, Albert 

Kettlehut, Laurel 

King, Nan Lou 

Kinsbury, Ringinia 
Knoebel, Jane 
Labda, Lodie 

Lacy, Joy 

Lahr, Jane 

Lamb, Barbara 

Lanagan, John 




227 




lA>i 




Laut, Harold 

Lawyer, Herman 
Leamon, Jos. 

Lingo, Betty 

Lofton, John 

Marmion, Jack 
Mann, Alvin 

Marple, Elmer M. 

Marsella, Frank 

McCardle, John 

McClurg, Carolyn 

McCormick, Mickie 

McCoy, Dean 

McDonald, Pat 

McGruder, Virginia 
McLure, Jo Ann 



McMahan, Diane 
Mercer, John 

Meyer, Glenn 

Miller, Eugene 

Minneman, Jacq. 

Morgan, Richard 
Mullen, Joan 

Mullendore, Thomas 



228 



Olsen, Joyce 

Oshier, Leon 

Overpeek, Tina 

Possmaii, Myron 

Pearson, Martha 

Pearson, Lois May 
Peightal, Arlene 

Peightal, Clifton 

Pferrer, John 
Phares, Sue 

Phillips, Lou Ann 
Plis, Joe 

Price, William 
Ramos, Jose 
Ray, Jean 

Reasoner, Harriet 

Reed, Robert 
Reis, Mary 

Rich, Marilyn 

Rickey, David 

Riddell, Robert 

Roberson, Barbara 
Robinson, Ann 
Roepke, Bill 




229 




llosenberry, Betty 
Salzniann, Bill 

Schafer, Davis 

Schmidt, Sylvia 

Schioer, John 

Schulmeyer, Babs 
Scifris, Dixie 

Shaughnessy, Joseph 

Short, Jerald W. 
Siddens, Jack 

Sigafoose, Robert W. 
Simmons, Kath. 

Smith, Donald 
Smith, King 

Spalding, Delores 
Starr, Joan 

Steidle, Joan 

Stewart, Ray 

Stultz, Mary June 
Tardy, Frank 

Taylor, Earl B. 

Thom, Delores 
Thomas, Pat 

Thompson, Marcella M. 



230 



Thornburg, Larry 
Thrush, Isabelle 
Tiebert, Betty 
Tilton, Jack 

Toombes, George 
Trees, Beverly 

Tudor, Carolyn 
Turacek, Lucy 

Turner, Horace 

Varnes, George Ann 
Volz, Stan 

Waller, Ethan 

Weinke, Wilnia 
Wetzler, Tom 

Wildman, Noel 

Woods, Carla 



Worley, Jack 

Wright, Patsy 








231 




Officers for the Sophomore class this year were (seated left to 
right): Mary Jo Ober, Delta Gamma; Tom McCarthy, Sigma Nu; Dick 
Gharrett, Phi Delta Theta; and John Shreve, Sigma Chi. 

Gharrett held the presidential reins, with McCarthy second in command. 
Ober was secretary, and Shreve acted as treasurer. 



232 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 





Abbott, Frank 
Abney, James 
Ainsworth, John 
Anderson, Claire 
Arnold, Fred 

Arnold, Martha 
Atwell, Ada 
Auble, Carolyn 
Baker, Jack 

Baldwin, Kenneth 

Barker, Darlene 
Baxter, Ferrell 

Baxter, Mary Alice 
Bigstaff, Jack 
Black, Rita 

Black, Sabra 
Blackwell, Jane 

Blankenhorn, Garland 
Blue, David 
Breen, James 

Bolte, Martha 
Boltin, Chuck 
Boyd, Barbara 
Brantner, Beverly 
Brocker, Toby 

Brooks, Joan 
Bugg, Barbara 
Burget, Paul 
Buser, Carl 
Cain, Max 

Cale, Bill 

Campbell, Jim 
Cambell, Margie 
Campbell, Virginia 
Carlsen, Shirley 



234 



Cecrle, John 
Chaney, Robert 
Clark, Dick 
Clark, Paul 
Clifton, Arlene 

Cloe, Lee 
Clyne, Sue 

Cook, Carolyn 
Cox, Peggy 
Crist, Jo Dean 

Curry, Hubert 

Dalnibert, Marilyn 
Davis, John 
Davis, Don 

Deltour, Suzanne 

Dickason, Harold 
Dillow, Helen 
Disinger, Louie 
Dixon, Polly 
Dorman, Janet 

Duff, Ann 
Duff, Lyn 

Ehrhardt, Nancy 
Ericson, Marian 
Essex, Lowell 

Faylor, Jean 
Flinn, June 

Fretz, Jeannette 
Freyn, George 
Gillespie, Mary 

Good, Stanley 
Griffith, Marg. 

Grigdesby, Richard 
Gustafson, Gloria 
Hackleman, Norma 




235 




Haffner, Leon 
Hartley, Sue 

Heinbaugh, Jimmie 
Heironimus, Wesley 
Herbert, Doris 

Herold, Thomas 
Higbee, Rowene 
Hoffman, Madelon 

Holderman, Laura Rose 
Holland, Dick 

Holtman, Judy 

Horton, Merrice James 
Howard, Edna 
Hughes, Ed. 

Hughes, Kenneth 

Hughes, Ralph 

Humphreys, Gladys 
Ingram, Miriam 
Isenbarger, Judith 
Jackson, Larry 

Johnson, Virginia 
Joyce, Joanne 

Keeling, Elizabeth 
Kerr, Eloise 

Kingham, Karel 

Kivett, Joe 

Koontz, James 
Larson, John 
LaRue, Vince 
Layton, Don 

Lemasters, William 
Leslie, Joan 

Letsinger, Helen 
Libbert, Nell 
Long, Allan 



236 



Long, Jane 

Lovejoy, Miriam 
Lowe, Janet 
Lowe. Katie 

Ludwig, Barbara 

Lyons, Patricia 
McClain, Tom 
McClure, Maurice 
McDowell, Marjorie 
McLain, Linda 

McMahan, Jack 
Madle, Alice 

Mantooth, Marilyn 
Middleton, Helen 
Miller, Edith 

Montgomery, Don 
Murphy, Fred 
Murphy, Russell 
Needier, Wm. Chas. 
Nichols, Bernie 

Niles, Barbara 
Northern, Nancy 
Ober, Mary Jo 
Oleksy, Fran 
Peeling, Marge 

Phillips, Jack 

Pickett, Barbara B. 
Pickett, Tom 
Pleak, Maureen 
Potter, Ted 

Powell, Max 
Rafferty, Tom 
Rand, David 
Ranes, Gail 
Remler, Alice 




237 




ilS^ i<SL 








Ries, Joan 
Rike, Janice 
Rigdon, Walter 
Roberts, William 
Roembke, Corinne 

Rose, Tom 
Ruch, Joan 

Sandburg, Joan 

Sandler, Richard T. 
Savage, Bill 

Saver, Ed. 

Schloesser, Joann 
Schrader, Janet 
Schwartz, Sanford 
Seymour, John 

Shaw, Marilyn 
Siegel, Beverly 
Smith, Donnasue 
Smith, Doris 
Smith, June 

Smock, Loretts 
Spaid, Don 

Spraetz, Ronald 
Szymula, Roman 
Tarkington, Marg. 

Tegge, Tom 

Thomas, Nancy 

Thompson, Richard 
Tonar, Georgia 

Trowbridge, Virginia 

Uphaus, June 
Van Sickle, J. B. 
VanSlyke, William 
Vasko, John 

Wagenblast, Clarence 



238 



Wagoner, Karl 
Walker, Claude 
Wallman, Don 
Waltus, Keith 

Waltz, Shirley Jo 

Warch, Barbara 
Warner, Ellen 
Weemhoff, Jack 
Wegener, Billie 
Weinantz, Carolyn 

Welch, Carol 
Wells, Jerry 

Whysong, Clarice 
Whyte, Robert 
Wich, Rose Ann 

Wolfe, June 

Woodward, Rolene 
Yeager, Ben 

Zoderer, Rosemary 




239 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



BURSAR 





Officers of the Freshman class this year were (seated left to right) : 
Sherman Reeves, treasurer; Carol Manwaring, secretary; Roland Becker, 
president; Dan Englehart, vice-president. 



241 




Achor, John 
Adams, Sandra 
Ahem, James 
Alhand, Janet 
Allen, Ronnie 

Allison, AUeine 
Andrews, Carolyn 
Arnett, Dorothy 
Ashby, Alice 
Baker, Sandy 

Baldwin, Beverly 
Ballard, Jane 
Barkley, Sara 
Barnes, Barbara 
Barnes, Dale 

Barnes, Robert 
Baumgartl, Mary 
Beam, Ronald 
Beasley, Howard 
Becher, Thomas 

Bechtold, Joan 
Beck, Mary Lou 
Beck, Joe 

Bibler, Beverly 
Billing, Sharon 

Birkofer, Bob 
Bloemker, Skip 
Blue, David 

Bohnenkamp, George 
Boyer, Carol 

Boyle, Marilyn 
Britton, Don 
Broadlick, Don 

Butterworth, Martha 
Camp, Georgia Ann 



242 



Campbell, George 
Carter, Cardine 
Case, Robert 
Casey, Robert 
Childes, Nancy 

Cisco, Thomas J. 
Coble, Robert 
Cole, Wilis 
Cook, Ronald 
Cory, Suzie 

Cox, Patsy Lee 
Crawford, John 
Dady, Norma 
Darnell, Gail 
Davis, M. Ann 

Davis, Will E. 

Davis, William R. 
Denny, Paul 

Detrude, Howard 
Dhonau, Robert 

Dickard, Noble 
Dirkey, James 

Distelhorst, Nancy 
Ditmire, Joe 
Doak, Norma 

Doles, Dick 
Dorsey, Clif 
Dowd, Pat 
Dowling, Ann 
Doyle, Shirley 

Dyar, Robert 
Eberg, Fred 
Edison, Jack 
Edwards, James 
Elmore, Delzie 








^ 'JS^ ^M xt 




243 




Ephlin, Kay 
Echell, Joan 
Essex, Jane 
Essex, Joyce 

Evernian, Rosahelle 

Fable, Vaudene 
Fetton, Barbara 
Fleener, Duane 
Fontaine, Donald 
Ford, Beverly 

Forester, Louise 
Garrett, Jerry 
Gasper, Birdella 
Gill, Ronald 
Goldenson, Don 

Goodwin, Virginia 
Gray, Ken 

Gregory, Fred 
Greve, Phyllis 
Griffin, Lois 

Grow, Charles 

Grislitis, Gundors 
Gwaltney, Ivanna 

Hackemeyer, Eleanor 
Hamilton, Don 

Hanes, Thomas 
Hansen, Ronald 
Harbold, Dorothy 
Harlan, James 

Harrison, Travis C. 

Hart, Thomas 

Hartenstein, Robert 
Haymaker, Don 
Haywood, Max 
Hazelrigg, Janet 



244 



Heck, Bill 

Herbertz, Robert 
Hess, Dorothy 
Hester, Frederick 
Higdon, Charles 

Hinkle, Annette 
Hobbs, Juanita 
Hoffmann, Diana 
Hoffmann, Mickey 
Honath, Denny 

Huber, Sally 
Hughett, Bill 
Hughey, Susan 
Jackman, Donna 
Jensen, Christine 

Jett, Tom 

Johantgen, Patricia 
Johnson, James 
Johnson, Nancy 
Jones, Ronda 

Jose, Jean 
Karl, Phil 
Kaye, James 

Keeling, Charles 
Keen, Randolph 

King, Robert 
Klepper, Bill 
Knarr, Marilyn 
Knudson, Wayne 
Kronke, William 

Landis, Joseph 
Lanier, Lavert 
Leas, Robert 
Lehane, Dan 
Lee, William L. 




iiu.'^.l^ 



245 




%ji^ 




I T^^: 'W<^'" j*^'^'- 






Leonard, Robert L. 
Lewis, Victor 
Lime, John 
Lloyd, Will 
Love, Bill 

Logan, Dorothy Ann 
Kindred, Lowell 
John Doe 

Lytle, Richard 
McArthur, Ann 

McBride, Irene 
McCallum, Marge 
McClure, Carolyn 
McCoy, Betty 
McGhee, David 

MacKinnon, Don 
Mahoney, Leo 

Manwaring, Carol 
Marchino, Patricia 
Marker, Lester 

Maroon, Louis 
Mascoe, Jerry 
May, Joe 

Maynes, Walter 
Metcalf, Paul 

Meyers, Mary Lou 
Mikesell, Milton 
Miner, Bill 
Mode, Ed 

Moon, Marilyn J. 

Moore, Kay 
Moore, Sandra 
Morgan, Paul A. 
Mullens, Betty 

Murdock, Patricia 



246 



Musselman, Mary 
Niblack, Nancy 
Nicholas, Phillip 
Nixon, Carol 
Norbury, Sara 

O'Dell, Natalie 
O'Hara, Mary Jo 
Olinghouse, David 
Orwig, Donna 
Owens, Jim 

Parker, James 
Perkins, Will 
Pipher, James 
Praed, Ed 

Proffitt, John 

Rand, Carol 

Rawlinson, Ken 

Reeve, Loretta 

Reis, Eileen 

Rhodes, Richard 

Richter, Lawrence 
Robinson, Marsha 
Robinson, Max 
Roedding, Gordon 
Rogers, Bill 

Ross, Betsy 
Rucker, Fred 
Ryan, Jerry 
Ryker, Dave 
Sawyers, Paul 

Schwab, Wallace 
Schwartz, Janice 
Segall, Lewis 
Seifert, Richard 
Settle, John 




247 




1^.^; J^jl ^^^'~ 






Shanks, Julie 
Sheffer, Jack 

Sheppard, Cherry 
Shew, Randy 
Shirley, Clare 

Shultheis, John 
Siebe, Mary Ruth 
Silcox, Rick 
Silvey, Jean 
Sink, Richard 

Skinner, Marcia 
Sletth, Sue 

Smith, Barbara 
Smith, James A. 
Smith, Marjorie 

Smock, Charlene 
Sommer, Harold 
Sorens, Valda 

Spradling, Sara Jane 
Sterns, Ann 

Stoicheff, Karl 
Strebe, Jo Ann 
Strodtman, Don 
Swenson, Don 
Taylor, Alan 

Taylor, David 
Taylor, Lacy 
Taylor, Robert 
Terrell, Mancy 
Therien, Wayne 

Thompson, Patricia Sue 
Tirsell, Glenn 
Titus, Beverly 

Tompkins, Leonard 
Toombs, Jean 



248 



Townsend, Charles 
Tully, Bill 

Valentine. Carolvn 
Van Dyke, Eleanor 
Vogel, Philli[) 

Wachstetter, Jan 
Waddick, Jim 
Walker, Ann 

Walker. Anloinelte 
Walters, Shirley 

Weintraub, Arnold 
Wells, Bob 

Wentworth, Nelson 
Werling, Joan 
Wheeler, Thomas 

White, Don 

Whitecotton, Darlene 
Wier, Gerald 
Wilcox, Suzan 
Wilkens, Diana 

Williams, Lolita 
Williams. Robert 
Wilson, Carol 
Wittry, Wayne 
Wolf, Joy 

Wollgar, Judy 
Worcel, Lewis 
Wuensch, Ronald 
Wurster, Will 
Yakey, Carolyn 



Zimmerman, Bette 




249 



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251 



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252 



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253 




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254 



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FINE MEATS 

Catering to 

FRATERNITIES — SORORITIES 

HOTELS and INSTITUTIONS 

1900 Churchman GA. 4647 

BEECH GROVE 



WHEN IN NEED OF 






COAL, FUEL OIL OR COKE 






ORDER A SUPPLY FROM 






WRIGHT COAL 


& OIL 




COMPANY, 


Inc* 




5135 NORTH KEYSTONE AVE. 


BR. 


244! 



255 



The Wadley Company 


POULTRY 


BUTTER 


EGGS 


Indianapolis 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE 

GLENN F. FINDLEY 

109 Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 

INDIANAPOLIS 4. IND. 

PLaza 3334 Lincoln 5278 

Member of the Indianapolis Insurance Board 



1 




All Cream 
ICE CREAM 


1 


1 


Delicious 
SANDWICHES 


■ 




THE 


**" '" ^ ' ^^^'-^^ 


PARKMOOR 

At the Gate of the 
State Fairgrounds 


yisir^Mgoff-^ 


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COGHILUS MARKET 



4155 Boulevard Place 



HUmboldt 1387 



■ALWAYS THE FINEST IN FOODS'" 



BIG— BECAUSE 

We have under all circumstances faithfully 
maintained quality standards. The people 
KNOW this. 




IMperial 6501 



256 



The Direct Road 

To Business Positions . . . 

The following definite, specific courses are designed 
to supply the connecting link between young people's 
general education and desirable, promising business 
connections: 

Private Secretarial 

Executive Secretarial 
Junior Accounting 
Senior Accounting 

Advanced Cost Accounting 
Junior Executive 
Stenographic 

Complete Commerce 
This is the — 

Indiana Business College 
of Indianapolis. The others are at Marion, Muncie, Lo- 
gansport, Anderson, Kokomo, Lafayette, Columbus, 
Richmond, and Vincennes — Ora E. Buti, President. 
Free personal placement service for graduates. 

Approved for Veteran Training 
Call personally, if convenient. Otherwise, for day 
or evening school bulletin describing and quoting tui- 
tion fees, telephone or write the I. B. C. nearest you, or 
Fred W. Case, Principal. 

Central Business College 

802 North Meridian (St. Clair Entrance) 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. LI. 8337 




Means the Best 

In 

Coffee, Canned and 
Frozen Foods 

HARRY LINK, JR., Representative 



HAYES BROS., Inc. 

General Piping Contractors for Student Union, 

Pharmacy Building, Holcomb Gardens and 

Jordan Hall 

Heating - Ventilating - Refrigeration 

Automatic Sprinklers 

Plumbing 

236 West Vermont St. Plaza 332 1 

ESTABLISHED OVER 55 YEARS 



ANDERSON 

Lumber and Supply Co. 



LUMBER 


^ 


MILLWORK 


J 



QUALITY MATERIALS— DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

Lumber Sash Storm Sash Plywood 

Siding Doors Millwork Wallboard 

Cabinets Insulation Fence Posts Roofing 

"BUILD A HOME FIRST" 

BROADWAY 2411 

1 140 East 46th St. 

(46th Street and Monon Railroad) 



THE BUTLER BOWL WAS FENCED 

25 YEARS AGO 

BY 

SIER 

UNitto. 

LAWN AND FACTORY FENCE 

WIRE PARTITIONS AND WINDOW GUARDS 

IRON PORCH RAILS AND COLUMNS 





HbOSIER FENCE CO. 



VISIT OUR OFFICE AND DISPLAY 
CallTa. 2434 1701 East 38th St. 



257 



DON MASSA 




ELECTRICAL APPLIAISCES \ 


General Electric Products 


Television 


3817 North Illinois St. 


WAbash 5000 



Have 


YOU 


Remembered 

THE SALVATION ARMY 








In YOUR 


Will? 




State 


Commander, LT. COL. HERBERT PUGMIRE 
234 East Michigan Street 





CARTER-LEE LUMBER COMPANY 

1621 West Washington St. 
MArket 5331 



Candy 

For Butler University 

Furnished bv 

HAMILTON-HARRIS & CO. 



GLADYS ALWES 
MUSIC SHOPPE 

We are Glad as Always 

to Serve You 

120 North Pennsylvania St. Franklin 9501 





ZIER 


"S MARKET 




FRESH 


PRODUCE DAILY 




Who 


lesale and Retail 




Fruit Gif 


Baskets a Specially 


We 


Cater to 


Fraternities and Sororities 


195 CITY MARKET 


FR. 2471-2 



MAPLETON BARBER SHOP 

AIR CONDITIONED 

Established in 1925 

5 BARBERS— 6 OPERATORS 

3824 North Illinois Street WA. 0110 



D ANNER'S 

5 AND lOc TO $1.00 STORES 

745 East 63rd Street 711 East 38th Street 

Broad Ripple Maple Road 

5612 East Washington Street 1054 Virginia Avenue 

Irringtoti Fountain Square 




In 1871, the first public water supply in Indianapolis began operation. It was 
not until 1903, however, that the Indianapolis Water Company caught up with Butler. 
At that time, water mains were laid in Butler Avenue and University Avenue, adjacent 
to the Irvington campus. Today, a safe and adequate water supply surrounds Butler 
and from the campus can be seen the canal, another landmark for the homing student. 



258 



ALWAYS REQUEST 

Candies 



Wellmade 



e* -«»■-**■-•-'''*"■'*" *'»5, 




McAfee candies of ind., inc. 

Successors +o 

HOMER J. WILLIAMSON. Inc. 

1720 EAST 38th STREET 

INDIANAPOLIS 



DEEP VEIN COAL CO. 

CIRCLE TOWER LI. 1456 

INDIANAPOLIS 



259 



• * * * 
PHARMACY 

ADVERTISING 

• • jf • 



Hook's 

For All Your 
Dru3 Store Needs 

Hurry to Hookas 

Each one of Hook's 55 stores is, first of all, 
a health center. 

Each Store is stocked with essential drugs. 

Your favorite toiletries, candies and 
smokes are available. 

COMPLETE SODA FOUNTAIN SERVICE 



BEST WISHES TO 

— "the future Pharmacists 
of Indiana" 

C. I. D. 

Wholesalers of Drug, Sundries, Toys and 
Spor+ing Goods 

CENTRAL INDIANA 
DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

233 South Meridian Street 
INDIANAPOLIS 











MOONEY-MUELLER^WARD 
COMPANY 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 

INDIANAPOLIS 











261 



HUME MANSUR 
PHARMACY 

(First Floor of the Hume Mansur Building) 



Come in and See Indiana's Newest and Most 
Modern Prescription Shop 



Free Delivery Service — Mail Orders Promptly Filled 

• 

"Pharmacists to the Medical Profession" 
Five Registered Pharmacists on Duty 



Phone IMperial 5481 
Kenneth S. Bogart. R. Ph. '33 Chas. R. Hay. R. Ph.. '42 



STOKES 
PHARMACY 

"T/ie Prescription Store'' 

449 North Pennsylvania St. 



THOMAS N. BELTON 









i 


PITMAN-MOORE COMPANY 

Division of Allied Laboratories, Inc. 

PHARMACEUTICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTS 
INDIANAPOLIS 











262 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

NATIONAL WINDOW 
DISPLAY CO. 

134 South Meridian Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

'YOUR WINDOW DRESSERS FOR THE 
LAST 28 YEARS" 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to the CLASS of 1953 
and to the 

BUTLER COLLEGE 
OF PHARMACY 

MICHEL 
PHARMACIES 

2202 Shelby St. 
1857 Shelby St. 
2602 Shelby St. 
2177 S. Meridian 
2143 Prospect 

PRESCRIPTIOJS SERVICE 



Congratulations 



BOB TODD '40 



2724 West 1 0th St. 



John Hoffman & Sons, Inc. 



EXCAVATORS 



Highland 6655 



AKRON SURGICAL HOUSE, Inc. 

HOSPITAL, PHYSICIAN AND SICK ROOM SUPPLIES 

Trusses, Elastic Hosiery and Abdominal Supporters 

Braces and Orthopedic Appliances 

221-223 N. Pennsylvania St. Indianapolis, Ind. 



263 



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222 EAST OHIO STREET • IN DIANAPOLIS 6, INDIANApS 



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264 



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