(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Drum"

•7;A 



w 



DRUM 



// 



^^£>o/oy 



DEC 2 4 1974 

UNIV. OF MASS. 
ARCHIVES 




BLACK LITERARY EXPERIENCE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CONTENTS page 



BLACK CULTURAL CENTER STATEMENT FROM MILLS HOUSE 



EDITORIAL 

Robin Chandler 



BLACK STUDIES AT U-MASS (STUDENT OPINIONS) 
Sandy Mitch em 



POEM of ACADEMIC RELEVANCE 
Stokes W. Hall Jr. 



BLACK STUDIES INTERVIEW WITH PROF. BERNARD BELL 
Carlton Brown 



BLACK STUDIES INTERVIEW WITH PROF. LAWRENCE JOHNSON 
Philip Pettijohn 



QUESTIONS of RELEVANCE 
Carol Seales 



AMHERST OCCUPATION: STATEMENT of POSITION 

Five-College Black Student Community 



AFRO SONNETS 

All the beautiful people 10 



A TOUCH of COSBY 

Jimmy Wilkinson 22 



BROADSIDE BULLETINS 23 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/drum12univ 



THE FOLLOWING IS A STATEMENT OF POSITION BY THE 
BLACK STUDENT COMMUNITY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS CONCERNING THE PRESENT OCCUPATION 
OF MILLS HOUSE. 



"Culture is an organized integrated pattern of 

behavior followed by a society of people. 

Further from the life experience of a people they 

develop a set of rules and procedures to meet 

their needs. 

These rules and procedures are supported by a 

system of ideas and values that together they 

form an organized integrated pattern of behavior 

and this we can call a culture." 

Also, culture is: Morals , art , law, manners .folkways , 

and all things that men learn and share as a group. 



WE, THE FOLLOWING BLACK STUDENTS FEEL THAT THERE IS 

NO BLACK CULTURE UNLESS WE LIVE IT. 

LIFE IS CULTURE. 

CULTURE IS LIFE. 

WE CANNOT VISIT THAT CULTURE AND BE A PART OF IT. 

WE MUST LIVE IT! 

WE MUST SURVIVE WITHIN THAT CULTURE EVERY MINUTE 

OF THE DAY, EVERY HOUR OF THE DAY, IN ORDER TO 

PROLONG THAT CULTURE AND ENRICH IT. 



( it's about the secret blood rite that's been goin' down ) 



rejoice... my fine BLACK roots 

For the fruit of spiritual amnesty 

harvested , f o-eva 

f orever . . .Wantu Wazuri 

Wantu Wazuri, "the beautiful people" 

and Wantu Wazuri 

the landless 

and Wantu Wazuri 

the dustless 
NOWHERE to re 
Turn . . . towards one another 

which tells me 
Wantu Wazuri 

our minds are land 
Wantu Wazuri 

our voices , one, is money 

we ARE the nation 

of future antiquity 
which tells me, "there are thieves among us" - 

and we know it 

Black angels since 
Black angels gone. . 

And the power clutch of revolution bein shifted by the beautiful people. 
Black angels' spirits fly-by-night 

and on another stage bojangles . .f or real.. square business 
while off to the side 

behind a purple curtain, shirley temple 
buys her a villa 
that bojangles folks tapped upon eons ago "tryin to make tht thing real' 

to make it grow green 
and productive. 

we built this whole damn world, 

and you know it 
so go hustle your liberal curls where the walls meet the ceiling, dimples 

where folks dig white on rice 
THIS HAPPENS. 



And elsewhere Wantu Wazuri continue to continue to continue to continue 

(to be continued) 



elsewhere Wantu Wazuri 

revolve 

evolve 

dissolve 

resolve 

involve 

and solve ourselves 

our tension, when it's really 
your problem 

and you know i t . 

Always finding some expression for what 

WE ALL 

SCREAM 

[inside] 
because everything you HAVE 

is ours 
and you will never adequately feel precious ecstasy 

a basic sovereignty ever-growing 
no longer scattered as sand is in wind from 9 to 5 

sand? y'all even gut the sand breezin to your 
funky rhythm 



Blackness is a faith we LIVE 

LIVEl Hear? 
Not a Sunday deal with gawd... your fantasy 

your problem 
but meditated on silently. .forever 

in, yeah, 

in Wantu Wazuri style 



rejoice... my fine black roots 

For the fruit of spiritual amnesty 

harvested 

forever, 

if we struggle. 

-RC- 



BLACK STUDIES :ITS NECESSITY, OPERABILITY AND SUCCESS AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL 



The following is the first in a series of student opinions concerning 
the establishment of a Black Studies Department within the structure of the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 



QUESTION: The necessity of whites in 
Black Studies? Is it profitable to 
blacks? Is it an educational advantage 
for black and white students to be ed- 
ucated in the same manners and methods? 

Many who argue the merits of in- 
tegration and assimilation feel that 
there is no difference in the abilities 
of black and white students and their 
capacity to be educated. Others argue 
that ethno-cultural education must be 
approached by different methods. It 
seems that it is not the students 
alone who must be educated. The in- 
structors (all instructors) of the Arts, 
of Culture. .History .Politics , Literature 
and Education itself Must be considered 
when laying the groundwork for an ever- 
expansive Black Studies Department. 
Their educational background, their cap- 
acities for growth and also their nat- 
ural human limitations must be realized 
if we are thinking of the new direction 
being taken by education. Methods used 
must be convincing, in-depth, and infor- 
mative. The instructor of a course must 
never sacrifice the criteria of his 
course material to please,f latter , or 
persuade the bigoted liberal types he 
may be instructing. 

And then, what could possibly 

convince a white person that he should 
have an education in Black Studies 
when we know that there are still our 
younger brothers and sisters who des- 
perately need education and mental 
discipline FIRST 1 But thera are many 
"rationales" for integrated education 
from a white standpoint. After all, 
they must keep a watchful eye on all 
the black man does. Any attempts he 
makes towards achieving the promises 
made to him by the ancestors of feu- 
dal Americans could be a threat to 
their equality or standards. Most 
students feel that they must spend 
their four years at the university 



becoming involved in arbitrary causes. 
CAUSES THEY ABANDON WITH THEIR CAPS 
AND GOWNS AT GRADUATION. They believe 
they have now earned the robes of the 
middle-class majority. Many feel that 
if they run the gambit of radical col- 
lege protest groups and support pseudo 
black militants that they have paid 
their fair share to the liberal concerns 
of America. 

If white students are able to at- 
tend black studies courses with black 
students , will they be able to accept 
the ideals and form the same hypothesis 
which black students will extract from 
the course? 

What should be considered is the 
nature in which Black Studies courses 
must be taught in order to reach and re- 
inforce the ideals of the black student. 
Whites will rarely comprehend or appre- 
ciate the methods which should be used. 
In their own defensive ways they feel 
threatened . 

. . .Another question 

Would white Instructors be able to 
teach a course in Black Studies with sig- 
nificant relevance to students black or 
white? One answer is probably not, as in 
the case of the white American educator. 
He is already a walking example of the 
ass-backward beliefs of his own race. 
Being white he is the creator and perpet- 
uator of his own institutionalized prob- 
lems in rascism. 
Could he reach a black student? 
Could he inspire a black student? With 

what, we ask? With what? 
This university should make it a point to 
try and understand that a Black Studies 
Department at this school would be an at- 
tempt at a long overdue committment at 
arriving at a justifiable beginning to- 
wards a solution to THEIR problem. 

sandy mitchem 
***** 



where you at ?? 



Black Power no longer the phrase of the hour... 

Revolution is a super black man with a super afro administered 

to by a super hair spray and being so anti white he refuses 

to take a bath being natural and having no need for deodorants... 

and Freedom is a murky word with dynamic implications and strong 

tendencies and is spoken from the barrel of a comb... 



white proff 
White prof fessor, white proffessor, white proffessor 
teach me the golden rules 
teach me to be relevant 
make me a credit to my race 

can you ? 
will you? 
help me 
with your Brooks Brother's suit, your razor cut, your black and 
white wingtips,and your diamond jack socks but you know you're 
as clean as the board of health and sharp as a mosquitoes peter- 
ain't you a bitch... 
White prof fessor, white prof fessor , white proffessor 

white educator of the masses 
groove me, move me, sooth me, teach me to melt into the pot 

can you? 
can you? 
teach me Malcolm, teach me Che, teach me Mao, teach me revolution 
teach me real, teach me real, teach me what is real and not 
ideal. . . 

instead 
you 

teach me german, teach me french, teach me russian, teach me 
george, teach me woodrow, teach me teddy, teach me A's, teach 
me B's, teach me C's, cause D's don't transfer... 
teach me to turn to the last page of the exam. . 

what's my grade? 
what's yours? 



the Appeal 
I me, 

am of 

the ripe taste 

fruit pick and 

of a of kingdoms 

lost fig tree... Black Queen 



Stokes W. Hall Jr. 
( Ola ) 



PROFESSOR BERNARD BELL 

( AN INTERVIEW BY CARLTON BROWN ) 

Professor Bernard Bell is the acting director of the University of 
Massachusetts Black Studies Department. Professor Bell was born and received 
part of his early education in Washington, D.C. He has also resided in and at- 
tended public schools in Maryland, New Jersey, Chicago, and New York. Most of his 
secondary school education was received in Manhattan and the Bronx. He grad- 
uated from DeWitt Clinton High School in New York, the same predominantly 
white school that James Baldwin attended. 

Professor Bell received his undergraduate degree from Howard University 
where he also did graduate work and taught for a year and a half. It was at 
Howard that Bell first became acquainted with Mike Thelwell(the present di- 
rector of the University Black Studies Program) . He also became acquainted 
with Stokely Carmichael and Sterling Brown while at Howard. From Howard Univ- 
ersity, Professor Bell returned to Washington, D.C. and taught in the public 
school system there for four years. 

It was due to the persuasions of Sterling Brown that Bernard Bell came 
to the University of Massachusetts. Sterling Brown had impressed him with the 
work and conversation about Sidney Kaplan of the University English Department 
and a member of the University Black Studies Committee. Professor Bell came 
here first as a teaching assistant and will receive his doctorate in June of 
this year. He is a revisionist scholar in Black Literature with a specializa- 
tion in black fiction writing. He has been called upon to lecture around the 
country on the subject of Black Literature. 

On the subject of Black Studies Bell sees the objectives of the department 
as a two-pronged effort. One aspect or orientation of the department would be 
service-oriented; that is, it would be to create a group of community-oriented 
black people here who would eventually function within "the community" itself. 
These people, upon the academic completion of their education, would return to 
the black community to become public school teachers , functioning in, and organ- 
izing institutions such as Harlem Preparatory School in addition to street 
academies . 

The second orientation would be a scholarly or academic pursuit. This as- 
pect of Black Studies would concern itself with the development of the neces- 
sary revisionist scholarship in all areas of the social sciences. This cadre 
would be more involved with academic endeavors relating to Black people. More 
specifically this would entail research and the publishing of materials deal- 
ing with Black poeples , their characteristics , culture and perspectives. Prof- 
essor Bell insists , though, that the personnel in this cadre would not be isolated 
from the Black community because of their pursuits, but only different from i. 
those in the community. These educators must still acquaint themselves with 
and function within black schooling systems , street academies and high schools 
in order to give them the necessary academic legitimacy that they may make sound 
judgments in relating to the black experience. Bell believes strongly in the 
development of community-oriented scholars. They would not be an elitist group 
or an isolated one merely by virtue of their collective black committment. 

In response to the recent proposal issued to the College of Arts and 
Sciences concerning the Black Studies proposal, Bell was strong in his rejection 
of this new move. The response to the proposal stated to the community that 
what was really needed and sought by the content of our proposal was a school 
or college and not a department. Professor Bell believes that we should be 
specific and insist on a department, the one which was proposed, and not "accept 



7. 



AN INTERVIEW WITH PROFESSOR LAWRENCE 
JOHNSON OF THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION CONCERNING BLACK 
STUDIES AT U-MASS 
by 

Philip Pettijohn 

Professor Lawrence Johnson of 
the School of Business Administration 
believes that a Black Studies Depart- 
ment is possible and should be imple- 
mented at the University of Mass. as 
soon as possible. According to Prof. 
Johnson the only hang-up about the 
indoctrination of a Black Studies 
would be a possible lack of qualified 
faculty to run the department, or if 
the faculty would also have the ade- 
quate credentials to educate the par- 
ticipating students. But Professor 
Johnson reminds us that a substantial 
portion of the present faculty at 
U-Mass are graduate students and whose 
"credentials", in the same respect, can 
be questioned. 

Professor Johnson theorizes that 
the main objective of a Black Studies 
Department shoud be to destroy that 
lethal myth about black people, the 
myth of the inferiority complex of 
black poeple in their relations with 
the white elements . This is one of 
the major drawbacks in the attempt to- 
wards Black Unity says Professor John- 
son and even to the present time there 
is not one black man who is not affected 
by this inferiority complex, whether it 
be directly or indirectly. 

Moreover, he stresses the importance 
of courses in economics and Black Cap*" i ' 
italism (call it what you want) , being 
included in the Black Studies Depart- 
ment. Blacks are going to have to deal 
with money and how to obtain, manage, and 
channel it. Most of the "Mans'" power 
lies in the capital he controls. Thus, 
if black people are going to master 
some or even all of this power they 
should be prepared to manage it in the 
mos t (ef f ective)way . 

Professor Johnson concluded the 
interview by stressing the fact that 
Black students on campus should become 
more politically aware , They must start 
dealing with the "Man" , start gaming 
and sheming with the "Man" and even- 



tually learn how this political machine 
operates . 

Professor Johnson assures the Black 
students that he will totally support 
any rational action on the part of Blacks 
at U-Mass. 



(interview with Bernard Bell con't. from 
page 3) 

less than what is there in the proposal." 
It would be premature to undertake the 
establishment of a larger unit until the 
department is sound and functioning 
properly. He says that we are not play- 
ing games. "We are serious about devel- 
oping a community consciousness among 
Black students and a disciplined group 
of Black scholars" to create a black 
mood here. He feels that we should start 
our department and staff it with the best 
black scholars and continue to build un- 
til we have "the best Afro-American 
Studies unit on the east coast." Profes- 
sor Bell goes on to say that it is impli- 
cit in the idea of five-college coopera- 
tion and it is imperative that depart- 
ments be established on all campuses si- 
multaneously . 

Bell explained his feelings concern- 
ing the committment of the other colleges 
in comparison with the University's black 
contingent. He believes that if the others 
were as seriously committed they would 
have "more vigorously investigated cap- 
able faculty and the establishment of 
meaningful black courses in their respec- 
tive institutions," Bell was impressed, 
however, with the new spirit of unity de- 
monstrated by the five-college black oc- 
cupation of Amherst College. He feels 
we are now "seeing a common need and a 
common goal and cooperating in achieving 
these." Professor Bell believes that the 
student-faculty Black Studies Committee 
is the only valid means by which individ- 
uals may determine their own future, goals , 
education and life direction. 

In conclusion, he stated: "We are all 
one people, all one destiny" insofar as 
we need to control our own communities , 
ourselves and our collective life. 



II 



Questions of Relevance 



An important question for all 
black students on the University of 
Massachusetts campus and on other 
campuses across the nation is - 
what are the criteria for relevance? 
This word is thrown around by every- 
one and usually refers to courses 
or areas of study related to our 
black experience. I wonder if the 
scope of the connotation is too 
narrow . 

Unfortunately, too many of the 
brothers and sisters are walking 
around with Reader's Digest mentali- 
ties . We absorb whatever we hear 
either on authority or through 
emotional willingness. We don't think I 
We've never been trained to think. I 
don't even think we're supposed to 
think. 

At a time when every black mind 
on campus needs to be cultivated for 
present and future use, we need to 
take this up with ourselves. We need 
to begin to focus on directions and 
goals in keeping with our realities. 
One of these immediate realities is 
Black Studies. 

Hopefully (and necessarily) 
every black student realizes the leg- 
itimacy and the urgent necessity of 
a well-defined and functional Black 
Studies program. Hopefully, every 
black student who takes the courses 
offered is making an effort to do 
everything possible to catch up on 
his lost twelve years of school. 
This is an idealistic hope, but 
we're getting it together. 

The main point, however, is that 
black students must decide, from their 
own particular frame of reference, 
what courses of intellectual pursuit 
are relevant to them and meet their 



individual needs and the future needs 
of the black community. 

It is obvious to me that brother 
Donaldson knows the American political 
system - the white establishment system. 
Leroi Jones knows his white classical 
and contemporary literature among other 
things. Attend one of Ivanhoe Donaldson's 
classes or read even the shortest poems 
by brother Jones and you'll see what I 
mean. 

Black Studies does not exist or func- 
tion in a vacuum. Neither does the Black 
community. Black communities, in solving 
their problems and directing their desti- 
nies, have to, by the nature of the make- 
up of this country, deal with the man. 
And you cannot deal with the man if you 
don't know his tricks. 

There are no set guidelines for 
deciding what is relevant and what should 
be studied. Each student must carefully 
decide which area he intends to concentrate 
in and then decide exactly what necessary 
knowledge he needs to accumulate. He has 
to decide what background is necessary in 
order for him to deal with the complex issues 
and problems of the black experience; 
whether in literature, education, or 
politics. Before we write off Government 
100 as irrelevant, we need to see if it 
offers anything we can use. You can't 
fight the enemy unless you know who he is , 
where he is and what he's doing. We know 
who he is and where he is. Now all that's 
necessary is a more than cursory knowledge 
of what he's about and direction in order 
to fight back. 



carol seales 



***** 



9. 



STATEMENT 



At 1:00 A.M. Wednesday morning, Black students from the Five College 
area moved to occupy several buildings on the Amherst College campus. The 
specific goal of this action was to close the college down. The outstand- 
ing feature of this action was that it represented an ideological and phy- 
sical committment to the concept of a Five College Community (Black) . Black 
students from each college in the area(Smith, Amherst ,U-Mass , and Mt. Holyoke) 
as a coordinated unit, planned and implemented this action. 

We, the Black Student Community , recognize that the Colleges are not, 
and have never been, seriously committed to satisfying our needs and the 
needs of the broader Black Community. Previous efforts to implement programs 
that speak to needs have led to meaningless dialogues between individual 
campus groups and their respective administrative structures. Innumerable 
meetings , countless proposals and "advisory" committees have continually 
frustrated our efforts to determine the reality of our presence. That reality 
demands the acceptance of our right to determine our own programs , policies , 
and directions. 

Our collective presence at Amherst was a statement of committment to 
the Concept of Community, for indeed Amherst is the white college community 
in microcosm. The Black Student Community is addressing itself to the in- 
ability of the white college community to define the nature of the Black 
reality and its refusal to recognize the validity of self-determination on 
the part of the Five College Black Community. 

Self-determination and self-definition are the crucial issues in this 
and subsequent actions. We will not compromise our position on these issues. 



10, 



afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 
afrosonnets 



MY JUDGMENT & I 

"Heaven, that bright and lovely place" 

It's jive heart is left between my judgment & 



Many a time people say to me 
God damn it, when they know that 
the world or anything within it 
was not damned by God, but 
by man. Man alone damned his 
own existence 

We have the inalienable right to live 
Live for what? A dog lives. 

Dirt lives tool 

Hell's a manifest destiny , ready to control 

everyone's soul 

Like night preys on day, weakened any way, 

it eats up enlightenment 

Here's an envelope that bears in 
bold print "Pray For Peace". Shit, 
that's what's wrong with people 
today. They're praying for peace 
and nothing's getting done. 
Instead of praying for peace, they 
should get their asses out in the 
streets working for it. The 
"All-Knowing" gave us a road to 
take. Why, I don't know. If 
we don't get off our knees and 
start trying to help ourselves , 
the "all-knowing" is not going to 
lift a damned finger for us . 



war : congress : government : shit : the night before 
Christmas : ass inine views of the future:? 
Money is a worldly treasure 
But so isn't life 



-Mother Fucker 



11, 



GROUPS 
We sit 
in these cold 

circles 
listening to 

windows 
and what they 

always say. 
There is nothing 

any of 
us can say 

that would not 
cause an echo 

across these 
empty circles . 



-Peggy Janey- 




12. 



Throughout the ebb and flow of the revolution 
It is crucially important that 
we recognize 
Unity in Diversity., 

that 
we recognize the Commonness 
in the plight against oppressive organs 
which 

we share with our darker 
BROTHERS ! EVERYWHERE . . 
The following is a thought from Ricardo SAnchez, 

one of many of our Chicano BROTHERS . . 

* * * 

date written: TIMELESS 



"To La Causa. . ." 

corky gonzales , 

cesar chavez, 

reies tijerina, 

jose angel gi^tierrez, 

emiliano zapata, Cuauhtemoc and moctezuma 

la causa is old, ^ 
pre-dates the gachupin — that 
european on horseback — leaping out 
my lore . • . 

words at captive times 

locked in mines and cotton fields, 

singing out spirit-alma canticles 

hued by bronze 

with the lash of toledo steel 

and moorish ulullation. . . 

la causa is brown-flecked 
California to texas, lands 
drenched in mestizo sweat and blood, 

la causa is Indian featured 
with a bit of castilian,moor, 
and sephardic Semite 
along with pungent blackness 
that roamed spain eons ago — 



la causa 

is the human-ness of brown people 

articulating 

el ritmo de la humanidad .... 



Ricardo Sanchez 



la causa is supple brown hands 

harvesting 

Aztlan lands 

and hurting chicano children 

die of malnutrition 

and deprivation 



13. 



The Lemans 

Black 

He sits there 

Silent and Meditating. Then... 

Silent and meditating no more 

He jumps up with rage. 

Tired of kissing your ass I 
Tired of carrying your load'. 
Tired '. 
Just plain tired I 

You've incured his wrath much too long, 
And now he asks for freedom along with 
some of your power 

He shall have it I 

Why? 

Because ... He is the Lemans 

He shall rise and bring forth a new life 

for hi people 
A life of blackness, brilliance and brightness. 

Why? 

Because ... He is the Lemans, 

*sister Benetta Pearson 



YOU 

When I sleep 
You are there 
I hug you 
I kiss you 
I love you 



When I wake 
You are gone 
There is no more you 
There is only you. 

*J.E. Ward 



14. 



POEM TO MY BROTHERS (U MASS) (from a sister for sisters to dig on) 

Brothers like to rap 

yeah I my brothers dig rappini 

& though most of it is: 

"yeahji dig hearin myself rappin my shit" 

my brothers put down a whole-lotta 

shit worth hearin: 

like when the brother 

gets into his thang about 

me bein queen. . .liis backbone 

( if his backbone breaks he breaks) 

& when the brother crys 

"i'm diin & i need my folk 

to live" 

it's worth hearin & i gotta listen 

right-on, sisters I 

my brothers dig that jawbone calastestics 

& we all know they steady 

checkin us out 

& tellin us bout ourselves 

but check again sisters 

when our thang is tight 
they're diggin that too 
& even then 

amongst all their lippin & mouthin 
my brothers gotta lot to say 
& it's worth sayin 
& worth hearin 

. . . .listen. . . . 



sister Jean Parrish 
2/12/70 



15, 



To Know . . . 

I Know. And to know is more than to say that I know. Because to know 

and really know is to be able to 

know how to express what you know 

without showing that you know so that 

you are not the only one to know. I 

know that it is nothing to know and not 

have others know too. But when you 

do know [and I do Know], you'll Know 

not to say what you Know, because 

to Know just to speak of what you 

Know is not to Know, it is to speak 

of what you think you Know. And when 

you think you Know you tend to think more 

of showing and less of Knowing so you don't 

Know 

as much of Knowing as you would 

have had you thought to Know more. To know 

is to Know ... Do you Know? 

I Know . 

by 

"waiter "grass" wintchell" 



16, 



BLACK THOUGHTS 



What is liberty to a slave? 

All he knows of is to be free in a grave. 
Slaves are men, Black 

Which only equality lack. 

america you took away our culture. 

So as we become prey, and you the vulture. 

What is this Non VIOLENCE that is preached? 

You do not know yourself what to teach 
You go from country to country setting a goal 

But you, yourself do not even know the role. 

What does the Fourth of July mean to me? 

When I don't even know what it is to be free. 

Men have died for what you call liberty 

But BLACKS still don't have equality 
Jefferson, hancock,patrick henry who are they supposed to be 

NAT TURNER, DU BOIS, MALCOLM X,are the men for me. 

white heroes are what we have been taught 
BLACK HEROES are what we want. 



by 

glenn walker 



18, 



THE PROMISED LAND 



" I may not get there with you, but I want you 
to know tonight that we as a people will get to the 
promised land," said Rev. Martin Luther King. 

William Greer, author of Black Rage , wrote 
" For the average Negro so much time has passed 
and so little has changed." 

From Senator Fred Harris , 

" Despite greater acceptance of Negroes into our 
major institutions, both public and private, it is still no 
easy thing to be a black person in America." 

Many black people who enter these major institutions 
soon forget the predicament black people face. They honestly 
believe they have reached the promised land; but remember 
Rev. King said; 

" We as a people will get to the promised land." 

Don't forget the thousands of brothers and sisters 
who are still out there struggling to get there with 
you. 

" We are climbing a mountain, a very steep mountain." 
Some of us are stronger and more apt to overcome all 
obstacles. Don't continue up and leave the weaker ones 
behind. Turn around and give a helping hand to your own brothers 
and sisters, and this way we will all get 
to the promised land, as one people, destined to live 
together, love together, fight together and 
die together. 



brother Cal. B. Whitworth 



It's raining? 

Yeah, it's raining; 

Of course it's raining. 

Raining , raining . 

The sun shines . 

Still it rains. 

Clear white rain. 

On me. 

On us . 

Clear white rain 

STOP. 

your 

time 
has 

come 

Ingrid 



< 



19, 



ODD ONE DEM IS 

lord luv a duck. I'm dotty. And dottier now. 

Why's they brought me here? 

To kill me? 

To condition me? 

Dem teach me of George Washington 

To be separate from my unlucky brothers and 

sisters out there 
Odd one dem is, odd as they come 
Best watch myself. 

But I no fool as dem think 

Mek me jus play along wid dem fi di time 

being. 
Bloody nice arrangement , a meal and a good bed 

fi once 
Snug it is 

Does a man's soul good, it does, to have warm meat 
and a desant place fi sleep. 

Dem think dat if dem fatten me up on 

food 
I might slip mi guard 

And dem can dispatch me some dark night 
Odd one dem is, Odd as they come 
Best watch myself. 

*brother Cal. B. Whitworth 



Black is ; 



Black is a thought that 

has been explored, 

Black is an experience. 

Black is a combination 

of beautiful things. 

Black is a wish. 

Black is you and me, 

Black is what we go through. 

Black is hunger and poverty, 

power and dissent, 

Black is a question. 

Black is the past, the present 

and the future. 

Black is life. 

Black is kinks and hair grease, 

cornbread and chittluns. 

Black is nice. 

Black is segregation, integration 

and bussing. 

Black is dicussion. 

Black is meeting and jiving 



and doin your thing. 

Black is what's happenin' . 

Black is partying and smokin' 

and poppin' pills. 

Black is death . 

Black is love and hate, happiness 

and sorrow. 

Black is . . . 

*sister B.J. Grotames 



21. 



BLACK PEOPLE 

Black facial features are in harmony with themselves, 

hard and soft at once. 
Emotion plays honestly upon Black faces... 

but when necessary, the curtain descends, 
and the stage is dark and 
mysteriously empty. 
Black thought strikes at the heart. 
It adresses the emotion. 

It rejects irrelevant restrictions of 
White logic. 
Black people are English-innovators . 

Even with proper grammar they speak Jazz. 
Black people speak in everday poetry... 

Full and heavy, not thin, sharp and chintzy. 

Black voices are velvet and brocade. 

Black people make words fluid, 
like liquid gold. 

I prefer the logic, the language and the voices 

of Black people. 

I like to look at Black people. 

Black people are beautiful. 

*Peggy Janey 



A TOUCH OF COSBY 



22. 



"Fat Albert", "Wierd Harold" , Noah, 
and his brother Russel are all charac- 
ters which Bill Cosby has immortalized 
in one way or another. But what about 
the other side of him;the side that 
the audience does not see? What are 
his ideas concerning Black Studies, the 
Panthers, and politics in this country. 

In a taped interview on Saturday, 
February 14th Bill Cosby, who is pessi- 
mistic and does not believe that all 
oppressed people will ever get together 
to form real power , discussed these and 
other issues openly. As the interview ■ 
progressed Bill's natural and casual 
manner served to relax the atmosphere 
which opened up the exchange. When he 
was asked about his thoughts on the 
need for black dormitories and Black 
Studies programs he mentioned that at 
this time dorms are not the answers in 
themselves because there must be some 
integration before America can care 
about a black as well as a white. He 
continued by saying, "This may, however, 
be effective in putting pressure on 
some people to realize that black 
people should be treated equally. You 
are taking a chance, though, by segre- 
gating yourselves with no strength for 
infiltration." He sees , however , the 
Black Studies program as being worth- 
while, but feels there should be more 
white people in them to combat white 
America's basic ignorance. 

The subject changed to the Black 
Panther Party and he stated that he 
agrees with their basic "10 Point 
Program". "However," he adds, "what's 
happening to them is a result of let- 
ting the 'enemy' know what you plan 
to do. If you are going to talk 
about shooting a cop, go ahead and do 
it, or the end result will be that 
they break into your home at 4 o'clock 
in the morning and gun you down'." 

Bill cosby,like any other black 
man, has had his share of confrontations 
with the "man" and considers the most 
decisive factor in winning , to be 
POWER. Says he, "You find out how to 
play the game;play it and beat the 
enemy at it'." When asked if that was 
his own personal philosophy , he dis- 
agreed and went on to say, "There are 
people you dig and believe in;work 



with them. That's my philosophy and 
it's proven to work." 

After approximately five years 
in the public's eye as an acknowledged 
black millionaire, he has had to filter 
out certain kinds of people , mainly for 
financial reasons. In conclusion he 
says , "Everyone with a growl, a clenched 
fist and knowing all the twelve hand- 
shakes doesn't necessarily happen to 
be working for other black people." 
He carries these feelings into his .. 
perceptions of black politicians. Even 
though the trend these days is towards 
electing more black politicians , he be- 
lieves that each and every black man 
in power is not necessarily dedicated 
to freeing other black people ;basical- 
ly there are too many "pay-offs". 

He ended his discussion on poli- 
tics by responding to a question about 
Vice-President Agnew and commenting 
that he considered both Agnew and Nixon 
total threats , not only to black people 
but to poor whites as well(i .e. , cut- 
back on H.E.W.,more expenditures on 
war materials, and the ease of wealth- 
ier people to avoid the draft) . 



The pace of the interview was 
changed and he talked a little about 
his home in Beverly Hills and his child- 
ren. Cosby, truly a thoughtful father, 
tells of how he teaches his two daugh- 
ters to respect all people but also 
to defend themselves if they are called 
a name. He went on to say, "They can do 
one of two things ;smack the person in 
the mouth or defend themselves ver- 
bally. At ages 4 and 5, they 're much 
too young to understand social and 
psychological reasoning." 

Bill Cosby ended the session by 
saying that his plans for the future 
are to continue what he is doing now. 
He wouldn't go into any more detail 
because as he said, "I don't want to 
arm the enemy." 

That evening the members of WMIIA, 
the Hampshire Gazette, Bob Alexander, 
and myself (Jimmy Wilkinson) questioned 
Mr. Cosby for a revealing 45 to 50 min- 
utes. He mixed a casual exterior with 
very definite thoughts on controver- 
sial issues and still managed to slip 



23. 



in a few funny lines. To say the least, 
Cosby, like most contemporary black stars 
is outspoken in his views yet somewhat 
idealistic in his application for change. 
Although he travfls in different circles 
he is hip to what's happening among 
young black people and is in a position 
to lend his support if need be. I guess 
that's all we can expect... 

Or is it? 

'■'submitted by 

Jimmy Wilkinson 



THE DRUM THE DRUM THE DRUM 
THE DRUM THE DRUM 
THE DRUM 

ANNOUNCES 
meeting of all staff era , writers , 

critics 
who wish to help mold a unique 

BLACK IMAGE 

to be present 
mentally 
physically 
spiritually 



BROADSIDE BULLETINS 



For those interested in: 

Health Careers Summer Program 
Harvard Medical School 
24 Shattuck St. 
Cambridge 

contact : Carol Sanders 
(a 734-3300 



* 



MILLS HOUSE COFFEESHOP 
presents 



BLACK HERITAGE FILM FESTIVAL 
and 
POETRY READINGS 



every Wednesday @ 8pm 
POETS 
Mike Cook 
Bill Hasson 
Bill Wilkinson 
McKinley Moore 
Tom Sellers 
Jean Parrish 
Chuck Reed 
* -k * ^ 

"Are You Listening World", A Thesis 
production of poetry , dance, and 
music 
directed by Shelbe Freeman 
presented April 16-17-18 

@ Mt. Holyoke College, lab theatre 



at a meeting on: 

March 9,1970 
at 4:30pm 

within MILLS HOUSE, 111 
If you wish to work now and write 

with us and cannot make 
the meeting, phone 545-2414 
ask for 

THE DRUM THE DRUM THE DRUM 
THE DRUM THE DRUM 
THE DRUM 



Dudley Randall, poet and teacher 
at University of Michigan 
will read his poetry 
Friday, March 13 @ 4:15pm 

(? Herter Aud 231 



Bill Hasson, grad. student and 
teacher at the U-Mass Sch . of Ed. 

will read his poetry 
Tuesday, March 10(9 4:15pm 

@ Herter Aud 231 
* * 

WANTED '.".".' 

ART WORK 

"Feel Free" to fall on 
in the DRUM office with your 
ART WORK 

scripts available @ MHC Blackhouse 

for private auditions contact: 
Shelbe Freeman 

@536-4000,ext. 405,474,310 



parts openi 



24. 
BROADSIDE 



It seems that one progresive step towards the cause for black 
pride and awareness in the revolution would be that black brothers 
and sisters patronize the functions at other black educational communities 
especially in the immediate vicinity. 

Case in point :Brown University is presenting a Black History and Cult- 
ural Festival this month, March 19-22. Here's what's happening.. 

Thursday (March 19) 

1:00pm Art exhibit in Faunce House 

6:00pm Film "Of Black America" series in Metcalf Auditorium 

8:00pm Opening address with LeRoi Jones at Sayles 

Friday (March 20) 

1:30pm Lecture on Black Music with "Cannonball" Adderley at 

Sayles 

3:00pm Poetry reading with Don L. Lee 

4:30pm Cocktail party wifch Adderley and Lee 

8:00pm Jazz concert featuring Adderley at Meehan Auditorium 

10:00pm Mixer at Sayles with Billy Stewart 

Saturday (March 21) 
12noon Soul food banquet followed by an Afro-fashion show 

((31.25 extra) at Andrews Dining Hall 
2:00pm Cocktail Sip at Afro center with members and guests 
3:00pm Informal lecture given by Dick Gregory at Alumnae Hall 
4:30pm Sherry Hour with Dick Gregory at the Crystal Room 
5:30pm Black Arts Festival buffet at refectory 
8:00pm Memphis Stax/Volt revue with Issac Hayes, Carla Thomas, 
and the Bar-Kays 
10:30pm Mixer at Sayles Hall with the O'Jays or a live band 

Sunday (March 22) 

1:00pm Sermon with Jesse Jackson followed by a concert of 

black spirituals at Manning Chapel 
7:00pm; 

and Showing of the film "Uptight" 

9:00pm 



..for further information write the Black Student Organization 
at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. 



THE DRUM 

wishes to acknowledge the invaluable artistic 
contributions 
of 
Brother Jimmy Wilkinson 

we also wish to acknowledge the constant encouragement of 

the Black Community 
for without their presence and spirits and (har ass ing) 

THE DRUM 

would not become a reality for us all. 



PEACE 



POWER 



PRIDE 



TO THE PEOPLE 



• ■■."-?*.■... ■•■ ■