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Full text of "Durham Technical Community College 1999-2000 Catalog and Student Handbook"

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999-2000 



Catalog and 

Student 

Handbook 





A Durham Tech 
application for 
admission to 
curriculum 
programs and 
two request for 
transcript forms 
are at the back 
of this Catalog 
and Student 
Handbook for 
you to pull out 
and use! 



Take a closer look 
at Durham Tech . . . 

where training for the Triangle, 
high-quality university transfer 
programs, and opportunities 
for lifelong learning await you! 




Academic 
Calendar 



Summer Term 1999 (10 weeks) 



Thursday, May 20 
Monday, May 31 
Monday, July 5 
Tuesday, July 27 
Wednesday, July 28 
Monday, August 2 

Fall Semester 1999 

Monday, August 16 
Friday, August 20 
Monday, August 23 
Monday, September 6 
Monday, October 18 
Tuesday, October 19 
Wednesday, October 20 
Wednesday, November 24 
Thursday & Friday, 

November 25 & 26 
Friday, December 17 
Saturday, December 18 
Monday, December 20 



Classes begin 

Memorial Day holiday 

Independence Day holiday 

Monday classes meet 

Classes end (Monday classes meet) 

All grades due 



All faculty return 

Weekend College classes begin 

Classes begin 

Labor Day (classes end at 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 3) 

First Mini-Session ends 

Faculty work day 

Second Mini-Session begins 

College closed — Fall break 

Thanksgiving holiday 
Regular classes end 
Weekend College classes end 
All grades due 



Wednesday, December 22, through Monday, January 3: College closed for winter holiday 



Spring Semester 2000 

Tuesday, January 4 

Monday, January 10 

Friday, January 14 

Monday, January 17 

Monday, March 6 

Tuesday, March 7 

Wednesday-Friday, March 8-10 

Monday, March 13 

Tuesday-Thursday, April 18-20 

Friday, April 21 -Monday, April 24 

Friday, May 12 

Saturday, May 13 

Tuesday, May 16 

Tuesday, May 16 



Faculty and staff return 

Regular classes begin 

Weekend College classes begin 

Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday 

First Mini-Session ends 

Faculty work day 

Inclement weather/Faculty work days 

Second Mini-Session begins 

College closed — Spring break 

Spring holidays 

Regular classes end 

Weekend College classes end 

All grades due 

Commencement (tentative) 



Summer Term 2000 (10 weeks) 



Monday, May 22 
Monday, May 29 
Tuesday, July 4 
Tuesday, August 1 
Thursday, August 3 



Classes begin 
Memorial Day holiday 
Independence Day holiday 
Classes end 
All grades due 



Message 
from the 
President 



Durham Technical Community College was founded as an "open door" institution, one that 
provides area residents with a wide range of opportunities to pursue educational and career goals. 
Durham Tech continues to open new doors so that area residents and businesses can activate the 
continuum of lifelong learning and pursue educational goals in new, innovative ways. 

We are also literally opening new doors. In January 1999, the college began offering career 
training and university transfer courses at the Skills Development Center, a new JobLink site, in 
Chapel Hill. Located at 503 West Franklin Street, the Skills Development Center enables the college 
to expand instructional opportunities in our service area of Durham and Orange counties. 

At the main campus, located off the Briggs Avenue exit of the Durham Freeway (Highway 147), 
the college's $5.8 million Durham Tech/GlaxoWellcome Technology Center opened to students in 
June 1998 thanks to North Carolina voters approving a community college bond referendum. The 
center houses teaching laboratories to support health technology and computer networking courses, 
a distance learning classroom, an 85-seat interactive teaching center, and a multimedia resource 
development center. 

To serve area residents in need of increasing basic skills, the college opened the Basic Skills 
Center in January 1997. In this center, Durham Tech combines classroom instruction with technol- 
ogy to help students succeed in learning for living and for earning a living. This year the college 
has added a career planning lab to assist students in determining their future plans. 

In 1993, the college's Northern Durham Center on Snowhill Road opened for classes. Since then, 
this full-service campus has expanded its facilities to give students in northern Durham and Orange 
counties easier access to day and evening classes. An easy drive for Hillsborough residents, the 
Northern Durham Center serves as the college's public service center for instruction in Basic Law 
Enforcement Training; Criminal Justice Technology; Environment, Health, and Safety Technology; 
Fire Protection Technology; and Emergency Medical Technician. 

Durham Tech is continuing to implement its comprehensive information and communications 
technology plan — a plan that is putting in place the "cutting-edge" equipment and training we 
need to make sure our students are prepared to take their places in the work force of the 21st centu- 
ry. The plan encompasses, among other things, distance learning, technology-based instruction and 
multimedia, academic computing, campus networking, access to databases, and library automa- 
tion. By continually upgrading equipment and labs at our main campus and at our Northern 
Durham Center, we are opening doors to learning every day. 

I invite you to take advantage of Durham Technical Community College's open doors, whether 
you are seeking basic education, entry-level skills, advanced technical training, university-level 
courses to transfer to a four-year institution, or simply personal enrichment. Your community col- 
lege truly offers something for everyone. 



J^ 




Phail Wynnjr., Ed.D., M.B.A. 

President, Durham Technical 
Community College 



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North Carolina 
Community College System 

The community college system was created 
by legislation passed by the 1963 General 
Assembly of North Carolina. The legislation 
provided that the system of community colleges 
and technical institutes would be administered by 
a Department of Community Colleges under the 
State Board of Education. In January 1981, 
supervision of the community college system 
became the responsibility of the State Board of 
Community Colleges. 

The community college system in North 
Carolina provides educational experiences for 
those people who are 18 years or older, whether 
or not they are high school graduates. The 
educational opportunities range from instruction 
in basic literacy skills to college-level courses, 
including general education and occupational, 
technical, and university transfer programs. 
These opportunities are available to all adults 
who wish to learn and who can profit from 
instruction provided. 

In 1964, Dr. Dallas Herring, former chair of 
the State Board of Education, developed a state- 
ment of philosophy for North Carolina communi- 
ty colleges, which is published in the Department 
of Community Colleges Policy Manual. Dr. 
Herring stated: 

"The only valid philosophy for North 
Carolina is the philosophy of total education: a 
belief in the incomparable worth of all human 
beings, whose claims upon the state are equal 
before the law and equal before the bar of 
public opinion, whose talents (however great 
or however limited or however different from 
the traditional) the state needs and must 
develop to the fullest possible degree. 

That is why the doors to the institutions in 
North Carolina's system of community colleges 
must never be closed to anyone of suitable age 
who can learn what they teach. 

We must take the people where they are 
and carry them as far as they can go within 
the assigned function of the system. 

If thej' cannot read, then we will simply 
teach them to read and make them proud of 
their achievement. 

If they did not finish high school, but have 
a mind to do it, then we will offer them a high 



General 
Information 




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school education at a time and in a place 
convenient to them and at a price within their 
reach. 

If their talent is technical or vocational, 
then we simply offer them instruction, whatev- 
er the field, however complex or however sim- 
ple, that will provide them with the knowledge 
and the skill they can sell in the marketplace 
of our state, and thereby contribute to its 
scientific and industrial growth. 

If their needs are in the great tradition of 
liberal education, then we will simply provide 
them the instruction extending through two 
years of standard college work which will 
enable them to go on to the university or to the 
senior college, and on into life, in numbers 
unheard of in North Carolina. 

If their needs are for cultural advance- 
ment, intellectual growth, or civic under- 
standing, then we will simply make available 
to them the wisdom of the ages and the enlight- 
enment of our times and help them on to 
maturity. " 



Durham Technical Community College 

Durham Technical Community College is 
a charter member of the North Carolina 
Community College System. When the North 
Carolina General Assembly authorized a small 
appropriation to establish a limited number of 
area schools to be known as industrial education 
centers in 1957, Durham already had a vigorous 
program in adult education through the 
Vocational and Adult Education Department of 
the Durham City Schools. A Practical Nursing 
program had been established in 1948; other pro- 
grams included training in mechanical drafting, 
architectural drafting, and electronics technology. 
In addition, literacy skills training was offered for 
adults. Courses to upgrade the skills of workers 
were also offered in a variety of trades. 

As a result of the General Assembly's appro- 
priation, a challenge went out from the State 
Board of Education to the various school admin- 
istrative units in North Carolina to establish sepa- 
rate education facilities which would provide for 
the educational needs of the area's adult popula- 
tion. A comprehensive curriculum was devised for 
people needing the education and technical skills 
required to advance satisfactorily in their careers. 

Through action by the Durham City Board 
of Education, Durham was among the first of six 
counties in North Carolina to meet the State 
Board of Education's challenge. In a successful 
referendum in June 1958, Durham County resi- 
dents made $500,000 available to purchase a site 
and erect the initial building. The Durham 
Industrial Education Center officially opened its 
doors on September 5, 1961. The institution 
continued to operate as an Industrial Education 
Center until February 4, 1965, when the State 
Board of Education officially designated that 
henceforth it be properly identified as a technical 
institute. On March 30, 1965, the Board of 
Trustees authorized changing the name of the 
institution to Durham Technical Institute. On 
July 15, 1986, the North Carolina General 
Assembly approved Durham Tech's request to add 
a university transfer program to its curriculum 
offerings. During a meeting on July 22, 1986, the 
Board of Trustees authorized the institution to 
change its name to Durham Technical 
Community College. 



Mission and Purpose 

The primary mission and puipose of 
Durham Technical Community College is to 
provide postsecondary education that prepares 
students for careers in vocational and technical 
fields, the first two years of a baccalaureate degree 
to prepare students for professional careers, basic 
skills and general education programs that enable 
students to live productive lives, and skills devel- 
opment courses that meet workforce training 
needs of the residents and employers of Durham 
and Orange counties. The college seeks to inspire 
an active desire for lifelong learning and knowl- 
edge that will serve them well in the global work- 
place. Financially and geographically, Durham 
Tech provides an educational opportunity not 
otherwise available to area adults. 

As a community-based institution, Durham 
Technical Community College provides education- 
al opportunities for area residents and uses state 
and local resources for students' learning activi- 
ties. Community service is a continuing focus for 
the college's programs and activities. 

As a student-centered organization, Durham 
Tech employs an "open door with guided place- 
ment" policy to provide students a full range of 
educational opportunities while maximizing their 
chances of success. Specifically, Durham Tech 
attempts to accept individuals wherever they are 
educationally and strives to provide them with 
opportunities to pursue educational programs 
and services that assist them in clarifying and 
attaining their career goals. 

With its mission expanded in 1986, Durham 
Technical Community College seeks to fulfill the 
following objectives: 

• To offer adults in the community the full 
range of educational programs and services 
that provide for basic skills improvement, high 
school completion, workplace entry and 
advancement, academic opportunities, knowl- 
edge for the global workplace, and personal 
growth; 

• To offer postsecondary technical education 
that develops the entry-level skills and knowl- 
edge required for students' successful employ- 
ment as qualified technicians and skilled 
craftspersons; 

• To offer educational and training oppor- 
tunities that enhance and upgrade workers' 
skills necessary to meet the challenges of a 
changing workplace; 



General 
Information 



• To offer a two-year course of study in the 
liberal arts and sciences that may be used as 
the first and second years of a baccalaureate 
degree; 

• To offer training that addresses the needs 
of new, expanding, and existing industry in 
Durham and Orange counties; 

• To offer itistruction that is of the highest 
quality and provides accessible, student-cen- 
tered educational services within a supportive 
learning environment; and 

• To provide appropriate community service 
programs that promote cultural enrichment 
and foster a sense of civic responsibility. 

Goals 

Durham Technical Community College's 
stated goals are as follows: 

1. Ensure that all graduates demonstrate mastery 
of critical competencies as stated for each program; 

2. Promote learning through the full range of 
instructional methods; 

3. Foster the development of a well-prepared and 
professional faculty and staff; 

4. Serve residents of Durham and Orange 
counties with educational programs that meet 
their needs and are consistent with the college's 
mission and purpose; 

5. Instill in students a commitment to lifelong 
learning; 



6. Participate as an active partner in the 
educational community; 

7. Engage in continuous improvement to 
promote a flexible, responsive, and dynamic 
institution focused on teaching and learning; 

8. Implement and utilize appropriate technology 
that enhances efficiency and effectiveness of 
instruction and support services; 

9. Assist in workforce development by actively seek- 
ing training partnerships that respond to employer 
needs and meet service area demands; and 

10. Encourage students and employees to 
assume active roles in the college, in the commu- 
nity, and in the global workplace. 

Accreditation 

Durham Technical Community College is 
accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
(1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 
4097; telephone number, 404-679-4501) to award 
associate's degrees. The college is a member of 
the American Association of Community Colleges, 
and the following programs are accredited by 
national associations: the Dental Laboratory 
Technology program is accredited by the 
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the 
American Dental Association; the Occupational 
Therapy Assistant program is accredited by the 
Accreditation Committee for Occupational 
Therapy Education; the Opticianry program is 
accredited by the Commission on Opticianry 
Accreditation; and the Respiratory Care program 
is accredited by the Committee on Accreditation 
for Respiratory Care. In addition, the Pharmacy 
Technology program is accredited by the 
American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. 




Approbation 

Durham Technical Community College is 
approved by and a member of the North Carolina 
System of Community Colleges. The following 
programs are approved by state agencies: the 
Opticianry program is approved by the North 
Carolina State Board of Opticians; the Practical 
Nursing and Associate Degree Nursing programs 
are approved by the North Carolina Board of 
Nursing; the Phlebotomy program is approved by 
the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences; real estate courses are 
approved by the North Carolina Real Estate 
Commission; insurance pre-licensing courses are 
approved by the North Carolina Department of 
Insurance; and the Basic Law Enforcement 
Training program is approved by the North 
Carolina Department of Justice. 

Governance 

The statutes of the State of North Carolina 
provide for the organization and administration 
of a community college system under the direc- 
tion of the State Board of Community Colleges. 
The 20-member board has full authority to adopt 
all policies, regulations, and standards it deems 
necessary for the operation of the system. 
Members of the State Board are appointed by the 
Governor and the General Assembly. The State 
Board has three major functions: equitable distri- 
bution of funds and fiscal accountability; estab- 
lishing and maintaining state priorities; and edu- 
cational program approval and accountability. 

Durham Technical Community College is 
governed by a 12-member Board of Trustees. Four 
members of the Board are appointed by the 
Governor, four are appointed by the Durham 
County Board of Commissioners, and four are 
appointed by the Durham Public Schools Board 
of Education. Trustees serve a four-year term and 
set local policy for the college. 



General 
Information 



General Information 

Durham Technical Community College 
operates under an "open door with guided place- 
ment" policy. Admission to the college's curricu- 
lum programs is open to all students with a high 
school diploma or its equivalent. 

Durham Tech offers programs of study lead- 
ing to a degree, diploma, or certificate in areas of 
business, health, general education, industrial 
and engineering technologies, and public service. 
In addition, the college offers the Associate in Arts 
and Associate in Science degrees through the 
University Transfer program and the Associate in 
General Education. High school graduation or 
high school equivalency is required for admission 
to all curriculum programs. 

The admission process requires the initial 
application, transcripts of secondary and postsec- 
ondary work, and placement tests. (A counseling 
conference is optional.) Health examinations, 
reference forms, and other documents may also 
be required to participate in clinical or practical 
training courses in certain programs. All admis- 
sion documents become the property of the 
college and are not to be copied for release to 
students or third parties. 

In many programs, students not seeking a 
certificate, diploma, or degree may enroll as a 
special student in courses without applying for 
admission. 



Placement in certain programs is limited, 
and the college emphasizes career guidance. 
Through counseling conferences held before 
admission, applicants may obtain assistance in 
setting realistic goals. Counselors use applicants' 
educational achievements and placement test 
results to assess their potential for success in spe- 
cific instructional programs. Admission to some 
programs may require developmental, prepara- 
tory, or prerequisite courses. 

Durham Tech reserves the right to refuse 
admission to an applicant if it appears that this 
action is in the best interest of the college and/or 
the applicant. 

Although potential students may apply any 
time, applicants are encouraged to complete 
the admission process as early as possible. High 
school students should apply early in their senior 
year. 

Write or phone the Admissions office to 
obtain application forms and detailed informa- 
tion about instructional programs or to set up 
an appointment to talk with a counselor. 
Call or write: 

Admissions Office 

Durham Technical Community College 

1637 Lawson Street 

Durham, North Carolina 27703-5023 

(919) 686-3333 

The Admissions office is open from 8 a.m. to 
6 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and from 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Counselors may be seen 
at other times by appointment. An advisor is also 
available to assist international students (for 
more information about international students 
in this publication see Index for page number). 




Retired and Senior Volunteer 
(RSVP) Program 

The Retired and Senior Volunteer (RSVP) 
Program is a special feature of the college's com- 
munity service effort. Officially sponsored by 
Durham Tech, RSVP provides retirees 55 years of 
age and older exciting opportunities for personal 
development and satisfaction through various 
volunteer activities. Each year, more than 350 
retired and senior volunteers contribute over 
40,000 hours of service to area non-profit and 
public agencies through RSVP. 

Admission Procedures 

Application 

Applicants to credit programs should submit 
a completed application to the Admissions office 
for the semester in which they wish to enroll. All 
admission requirements should be completed no 
later than 10 working days before the registration 
date. Early application is recommended to allow 
adequate processing time and to increase the 
likelihood of entry into programs with limited 
enrollment. 

Late Applicants 

Students applying for a program too late to 
secure all the required supporting documents 
before the admission deadline may take courses 
as special students, on a limited basis, in busi- 
ness, university transfer, general education, 
industrial and engineering, and public service 
programs (for more information about special 
students in this publication see Index for page 
number). 

Transcripts 

Admission to a credit program requires a 
transcript from a high school, an adult high 
school diploma program, or a general education 
equivalency certificate program. This must be an 
official, final transcript showing the date of grad- 
uation or program completion. Students who 
have completed an associate's or bachelor's 
degree may substitute their official college tran- 
script, showing the graduation date, in place of 
their high school transcript. Students desiring 
transfer credit must request official transcripts 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 



from postsecondary institutions they have attend- 
ed. In addition, students applying for veterans 
benefits must have all transcripts on file in order 
to be certified for benefits. 

All transcripts and forms required for admis- 
sion become the property of Durham Technical 
Community College and are not to be released to 
students. 

Applicants who have earned the high school 
equivalency diploma in North Carolina should 
ask to have a transcript certifying high school 
equivalency sent to the Admissions office. Write: 

State GED Administrator 

Department of Community Colleges 

200 W.Jones Street 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603-1337 

Academic Assessment/Course 
Placement 

Applicants for most programs may be 
required to take a series of placement examina- 
tions. Test results are used in helping students 
assess their aptitudes and achievements in rela- 
tion to their interests and desires. This informa- 
tion provides a basis for placing students in 
appropriate courses. 

Applicants will be scheduled for testing when 
they submit their applications. Applicants who 
need individualized testing should discuss their 
situation with an admissions counselor before 
they schedule an appointment for testing. 

Counseling Conference 

After applicants complete initial admission 
requirements and placement tests, they may 
request a counseling conference. This conference 
offers an opportunity for applicants to discuss and 
analyze their proposed curriculum choice in rela- 
tion to educational preparation, test scores, 
health factors, work experience, interests, and 
career objectives. 



International Students 

An advisor for students who are not U.S. citi- 
zens is available in the Admissions office to help 
with enrollment. The international student advi- 
sor also issues immigration forms and assists 
with immigration issues. 

According to PL. 87-195, Durham 
Technical Community College is authorized 
under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant 
alien students. Students enrolling under this 
classification are treated as nonresidents with 
respect to tuition and fees, and they cannot be 
classified as residents. 

All students applying for student visas must 
come to the campus for personal interviews and 
placement testing before they can be accepted 
and before the international student advisor can 
issue the Certificate of Eligibility (1-20). Tests 
cannot be mailed outside the United States to 
prospective international students. International 
students are also required to submit official trans- 
lations of documents demonstrating previous 
education equivalent to high school graduation 
and to college-level course work for evaluation of 
transfer credit. 

All students applying for student visas must 
also submit evidence of financial resources ade- 
quate to support themselves throughout their 
educational program, including funds for inter- 
national student insurance coverage. Durham 
Technical Community College has no financial 
assistance available to satisfy tuition costs for stu- 
dents on student visas. 

Permanent resident aliens are subject to the 
same considerations as citizens and may establish 
North Carolina residency in the same manner as 
other nonresidents. These students are required to 
present documentation of their status to the inter- 
national student advisor before being admitted to 
a curriculum program. 

Students who have questions or need assis- 
tance with immigration matters are encouraged 
to contact the International Student Advisor in 
the Admissions office as early as possible before 
their planned enrollment. 



Developmental Studies 

The Developmental Studies program pro- 
vides an "open door" for admission to Durham 
Tech for students who find themselves underpre- 
pared for college-level work. Developmental 
Studies, a preparatory program in academic 
skills, helps students enter their chosen curricu- 
lum with a good probability of success. 

Students who apply for two-year arts, sci- 
ence, or technical degrees; one-year diploma pro- 
grams; and some certificate programs are 
required to take placement tests in reading, 
mathematics, and writing. Any applicant whose 
placement test scores fall below the required min- 
imum established by the college must take the 
indicated Developmental Studies course work. 
These courses must be taken before, or in some 
cases concurrently with, designated curriculum 
courses. 

Developmental Studies courses are open to 
all students with a high school diploma or its 
equivalent who wish to upgrade their basic skills. 
These courses provide opportunities for improve- 
ment in the areas of English grammar and com- 
position, mathematics, sciences, and reading as 
well as enrichment in study skills and personal 
and career development. These courses are 
designed to provide Durham Tech students with 
the ability to build a firm academic foundation 
for success in college and beyond. 

Admission Requirements 

The basic requirement for admission to any 
curriculum program is a high school diploma or 
its equivalent. Placement testing is required for 
most programs. Students who are not United 
States citizens should refer to the International 
Students Section (see Index for page number). 

Some curriculum programs have limited 
capacity, and prospective students are encouraged 
to apply early. Some of these limited-enrollment 
programs may have waiting lists for courses in 
the curriculum. Students on the waiting list may 
take the general education courses required in 
the program, subject to an advisor's approval. 

Due to their specialized nature, the follow- 
ing programs have additional requirements: 
Allied Health: Associate Degree Nursing, 
Clinical Trials Research Associate, 
Occupational Therapy Assistant, Opticianry. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




Pharmacy Technology, Phlebotomy, Practical 
Nursing, Respiratory Care, Surgical 
Technology 

Preparatory or Developmental Studies cours- 
es may be required before admission to one of 
these programs is granted. 

Applicants for the Associate Degree Nursing, 
Clinical Trials Research Associate, Occupational 
Therapy Assistant, and Respiratory Care programs 
must document successful completion of general 
biology and general chemistry courses at the high 
school or college level. These courses must have 
been completed within the past five years. 

To be eligible to enroll in clinical courses, 
students in the Associate Degree Nursing, Clinical 
Trials Research Associate, Occupational Therapy 
Assistant, Pharmacy Technology, Phlebotomy, 
Practical Nursing, Respiratory Care, and Surgical 
Technology programs must complete physical 
examinations and must submit a required med- 
ical form. 

Students in allied health programs must 
submit documentation of the immunizations 
required by their specific program, and they must 
comply with Durham Tech's hepatitis B protocol 
as it applies to the program. Applicants must also 
sign a clinical form signifying that they under- 
stand and agree with the rules and regulations of 
hospital training facilities. 
Dental Laboratory Technology 

Because the Dental Laboratory Technology 
program requires eye-hand coordination and 



manual dexterity, all applicants must take a wax- 
carving test. 

Criminal justice Technolog) 1 , Early Chile/hood 
Associate, Fire Protection Technology, and 
Teacher Associate 

Applicants for these programs will be asked 
to read and sign a form acknowledging they 
understand the requirements of these career 
fields. Applicants for the Early Childhood pro- 
gram and the Teacher Associate program must 
complete physical examinations and must sub- 
mit a required medical form to enroll in practical 
training courses. 

Early Childhood, Occupational Therapy 
Assistant, Pharmacy Technology, Respiratory 
Care, Surgical Technology, and Teacher 
Associate 

Applicants for these programs are required to 
submit a criminal records check form before par- 
ticipating in clinical or practical training courses. 

Acceptance 

Applicants are notified in writing of their 
acceptance into a program of study. This accept- 
ance is valid for one academic year which begins 
with the fall semester and ends with the summer 
semester. If accepted students do not enroll for the 
semester in which they are accepted or if they do 
not enroll for three consecutive semesters, they 
must contact the Admissions office to determine if 
readmission is necessary. Readmission may be 
required if the student discontinues enrollment in 
the sequential courses of allied health programs. 
In this case, the student must consult the pro- 
gram director to prepare a plan for re-entering 
the course sequence. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer students applying for admission to 
Durham Technical Community College must 
meet all admissions requirements for their cho- 
sen program. However, some programs may waive 
placement testing if the applicant has previously 
completed math or English courses. Students 
should consult an admissions counselor about 
transfer admission and transfer credit before tak- 
ing placement tests or enrolling in courses. 

For accepted students, Durham Tech evalu- 
ates transfer credit for equivalent courses with the 
grade of C or better from member institutions of 
the North Carolina Community College System 



and other postsecondary institutions accredited by 
a regional accrediting association. Transfer credit 
may also be granted for certain general education 
courses not offered by Durham Tech. 

Applicants who have been enrolled in any 
postsecondary institution are required to submit 
official transcripts of previous academic work to 
Durham Tech's Admissions office if they desire an 
evaluation of transfer credit. When granting 
transfer credit is in question, the student may be 
asked for supporting documentation such as a 
course description or course syllabus. 

To be eligible for graduation, a student 
transferring from another institution must com- 
plete at least one-fourth of the total credit hours 
required and at least 9 of the last 18 hours com- 
pleted while enrolled at Durham Technical 
Community College. Credit transferred from 
another institution is not used in calculating the 
student's grade point average for academic 
progress and graduation. 

When a student changes from one program 
of study to another within Durham Tech, all aca- 
demic requirements, including the grading poli- 
cies of the new program, must be met for gradua- 
tion. Upon acceptance into the new program, all 
courses which are commonly required by more 
than one program may be transferred with the 
same grade the student originally received. 
Students admitted to a new program of study may 
choose to transfer or repeat these courses. 

Professional or Occupational 
Certification 

In certain cases, Durham Tech will award 
credit to students enrolled in curriculum pro- 
grams who have demonstrated competencies in 
appropriate areas through the completion of mil- 
itary training programs or professional or occu- 
pational certification programs. The amount of 
credit awarded in such cases is established by the 
faculty in the subject area in which the credit will 
be awarded. Such credit is awarded only in areas 
which coincide with the college's regular curricu- 
lum offerings and are appropriate to the student's 
educational goals. 

The decision concerning whether credit will 
be awarded is based on documentation which 
demonstrates academic comparability to credit 
earned by traditional means. The Admissions 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 



office maintains a listing of professional certifica- 
tion activities which have been approved for cred- 
it, the courses for which credit may be awarded, 
and the amount of credit to be awarded. The col- 
lege uses publications from the American Council 
on Education as guides for evaluating military 
credit. 

To receive credit for certification of profes- 
sional, occupational, or military training pro- 
grams, the student must submit documentation 
showing completion of such programs to the 
Admissions office. The maximum credit awarded 
must not exceed 25 percent of the total amount 
of credit required for graduation from the pro- 
gram in which the student is enrolled. Such cred- 
it may not be transferable to another program 
within the college or transferable from Durham 
Tech to other colleges or universities. 

Changing Curriculum Programs 

Students who want to change their program 
of study must apply to the Admissions office and 
meet all admission requirements of the new pro- 
gram. Students should discuss program changes 
with the career counseling staff to make sure 
their program choice will meet their needs. 

Readmission 

Acceptance into a Durham Tech curriculum 
program is valid for one academic year which 
begins with the fall semester and ends with the 
summer semester. Students who had been admit- 
ted to Durham Tech but did not enroll for the 
accepted semester, or who withdraw for one or 
more semesters, should always consult the 
Admissions office before reenrolling to find out if 
official readmission is necessary. 

Eligibility for readmission depends on indi- 
vidual circumstances and the requirements of the 
specific curriculum program. In general, a stu- 
dent is eligible to return when an appropriate 
course schedule can be arranged. Readmission in 
limited-enrollment programs is offered on a 
space-available basis. Certain programs may also 



require students to complete individual readmis- 
sion plans. Readmitted students must complete 
the admission requirements and the program's 
graduation requirements in effect at the time of 
readmission. 

Special Students 

Students interested in taking only a limited 
number of courses may, in many curriculum pro- 
grams, enroll as a special student; they do not 
need to apply for admission. During registration, 
advisors are available to help students complete 
paperwork for registration. 

Special students are not eligible for course 
substitution, credit by examination, financial aid, 
or veterans benefits; and they do not qualify for 
academic recognition (President's List or Dean's 
List). Documentation of prior course work or test- 
ing is required to enroll in courses with prerequi- 
sites. 

Special students who intend to complete a 
program of study at Durham Tech should apply 
for admission as early as possible. Special stu- 
dents applying for admission must meet current 
admission requirements and will be accepted 
under the plan of study in effect for the program 
at the time of acceptance. 

Visiting Students 

Students currently enrolled in another col- 
lege may take university transferable courses at 
Durham Tech to transfer to their home college. 
They may do so by providing specific written per- 
mission from the academic dean of their home 
college and the appropriate academic dean or 
program director at Durham Tech. Visiting stu- 
dents who take courses at Durham Tech are oth- 
erwise treated as special students (see previous 
section). 

Tech Prep Associate Degree 

Durham Tech is supportive of the Tech Prep 
Associate Degree initiative. The college has 
entered into Tech Prep agreements with the pub- 
lic school systems in Durham and Orange coun- 
ties. These agreements encourage interested high 
school students who have progressed beyond the 
normal high school curriculum to take college- 
level course work at Durham Tech. Tuition costs 
may be waived. 



10 



High school students taking part in such 
dual enrollment course work should be at least 
16 years old and must have written permission 
from their high school principal before enrolling. 
These students must be taking at least three high 
school courses and must be making appropriate 
progress toward graduation. The high school and 
Durham Tech will work together to determine 
which courses are best suited to the student's 
needs. High school students may attend courses 
in the college's facilities or, under special 
circumstances, courses may be offered at the 
high school. 

Concurrent Enrollment for High School 
Students 

High school students at least 16 years of age 
may enroll in courses if official written permis- 
sion is obtained from their school systems. The 
principal must certify that the student is taking 
at least three high school courses and is making 
appropriate progress toward graduation. In the 
case of courses taken in the summer, the princi- 
pal must certify that the student took at least 
three high school courses during the preceding 
year and made appropriate progress toward grad- 
uation. The high school will determine available 
hours and courses to be taken by the student. 

Academic Advising 
and Registration 

Advising 

Students accepted into a program of study 
have the opportunity to meet with academic advi- 
sors both in their program of study and in sched- 
uled advising sessions during the registration 
period. Advisors provide information related to 
program content, course content and prerequisite 
requirements, graduation requirements, tele- 
phone registration options, and general informa- 
tion. Advisors assist in course planning and 
scheduling and also make referrals for personal 
counseling, financial aid counseling, or aca- 
demic tutoring. 

All students are required to meet with an 
academic advisor prior to registration or during 
the registration period. The purpose of this meet- 
ing is to ensure that course selection is appropri- 
ate for the student's educational goals and skill 
levels. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




Registration 

Semester class schedules are available in the 
Registration office and the Advising Center. Each 
semester, returning students admitted to a pro- 
gram may register early or use telephone registra- 
tion. To register for courses, all students must 
receive approval from an academic advisor, have 
their course selections recorded by the Registra- 
tion office, and pay their tuition and fees to the 
Business office. Formally accepted program stu- 
dents may also ask their advisor for a Personal 
Identification Number (PIN) to use in telephone 
registration. Students receiving veterans educa- 
tional benefits must also receive approval from 
the Veterans Affairs office before they pay tuition 
and fees. 

Changes of Schedule 

To change their class schedules, students 
may obtain drop/add forms from the Registration 
office, Advising Center, or their advisor. Students 
may not add classes to their class schedules or 
change sections after the last day of drop/add. All 
class schedule changes must be approved by an 
advisor. 

Grade Reports 

Grade reports are mailed at the end of each 
semester. The report includes the semester hour 



credits earned and the grade point average for the 
semester. 

Students who do not want their social secu- 
rity number used as a student identification 
number in the posting of grades should contact 
the assistant dean of Admissions, Registration, 
and Financial Aid upon enrolling or registering 
to request an assigned number. 

Requirements for Graduation 

To be eligible for graduation, students must 
complete all courses and credit hours required in 
the plan of study under which they were admitted 
with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C). 
In addition, specified programs may require a 
grade of no less than C in some courses as desig- 
nated in the appropriate program handbook. 

Every academic year, each curriculum pro- 
gram publicizes a plan of study for students 
admitted in that specific year. A student who 
applies for readmission is accepted under the 
plan of study in effect at the time of readmission, 
not under the plan of study in effect at the time of 
the original admission. Students who change 
their curriculum program are also admitted to 
the new program under the current year's plan of 
study. 

Students should apply for their degree, 
diploma, or certificate one semester before their 
anticipated date of graduation. For example, stu- 
dents should apply for graduation when they reg- 
ister for fall semester if they plan to graduate at 
the end of spring semester. Students must apply 
for graduation in order to have completion infor- 
mation recorded on their transcripts. 

Candidates applying for graduation current- 
ly pay a $7.50 graduation fee to cover the cost of 
the diploma and cover. This fee is subject to 
change. No refunds are possible after the diplo- 
mas have been ordered. Students who wish to 
participate in the annual commencement exer- 
cises may purchase caps and gowns through the 
Student Services office. 

Transcripts 

The Student Records office issues Durham 
Tech transcripts. Students may come to the office 
and complete a transcript release form; or they 
may write a letter stating the name or names 
under which they attended the college, their 
social security number, the years they attended, 
and where the transcript should be sent. 



11 



Telephone requests are not accepted. 

Students must pay a charge of $1 for each 
official transcript, but there is no charge for an 
"issued to student" copy. Adult High School grad- 
uates may request official transcripts at no 
charge. All students must provide a picture identi- 
fication to pick up a transcript. 

Transcripts from other schools and other 
documents or forms that Durham Tech has on 
file are not released, copied, or returned to the 
student. 

Students are not eligible to receive a tran- 
script if they have any outstanding debts to the 
college or if they have failed to make any 
required payment. 

Student Records 

The college follows the guidelines for reten- 
tion and disposal of records as published by the 
North Carolina Community College System. 
Back-up copies of the permanent records are 
stored on computer tape, and other student 
records (high school and college transcripts, 
acceptance, and graduation information) are 
microfilmed. These records are available in the 
Student Records office to requesters with appro- 
priate identification. 

The permanent record includes all informa- 
tion on the student's transcript: name, address, 
social security number, sex, date of birth, major, 
dates enrolled, grades, credit hours earned, grade 
point average, and graduation information. 

Student Withdrawals, Faculty Drops, 
and Class Absences 

Students withdrawing from the college must 
officially withdraw through the Admissions and 
Registration Department. Students may officially 
withdraw from one or all courses during the des- 
ignated withdrawal days of each semester without 
the enrollment being shown on the transcript. 
After the close of the drop/add period and prior to 
the 60 percent date in the semester, students may 
officially withdraw from one or all courses with a 
grade of W. Students may be dropped at the dis- 
cretion of the instructor for lack of attendance 
and receive a grade of W or F depending upon the 
instructor's policy. Failure on the part of the stu- 
dent to withdraw officially from a course could 
result in a grade of F. Therefore, all students 
should refer to the instructor's attendance policy 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 



included on the course syllabus, and students 
with questions or concerns should consult with 
their instructor. 

To initiate an official withdrawal, a student 
should obtain a drop form from the Registration 
office, take it to the instructor for signature, and 
then submit the drop form to the Registration 
office. Students making registration changes may 
be eligible for a refund. The college refund policy 
is described in this publication (see Index for 
page number). 

For an official withdrawal after the 60 per- 
cent day, a grade of W may be assigned only if the 
student presents documentation of extenuating 
circumstances to the instructor. If the student is 
unable to appear in person to withdraw, a written 
notice that includes the reason for a drop along 
with the documentation must be sent to the stu- 
dent's instructor. 

The last date for students to withdraw with a 
refund and the last date to initiate a withdrawal 
with a grade of W will be published in the class 
schedule. During the traditional 1 6-week fall and 
spring semesters, the 60 percent date will ordinar- 
ily be near the end of the tenth week of class; for 
a 10-week semester, near the end of the sixth 
week; and for an 8-week term, near the end of the 



fifth week. For irregular length courses, the last 
day students may withdraw with a grade of W will 
be publicized by the instructor. 

Absences are calculated from the first class 
meeting with no excused absences. When class 
absences total 15 percent of the instructional 
hours of the course (or 10 percent for develop- 
mental courses), the instructor at his or her own 
discretion may drop the student with a grade of 
W. However, for veterans and Pell Grant recipients 
who are no longer in attendance, federal regula- 
tions require that non-attendance be reported by 
the faculty throughout the entire term and that 
non-attendance for first-time Durham Tech stu- 
dents who are Pell Grant recipients will be report- 
ed by the faculty through 60 percent of the 
instructional hours. 

In certain Health Technologies programs, if 
the student exceeds the 15 percent absence limit 
after the 60 percent date, penalty points may be 
imposed when the student is required to fulfill 
licensure certification or program accreditation 
requirements. 

As stated, absences are calculated from the 
first class meeting, not from the student's first 
attendance date. Hence, students registering late 
may have already accumulated part of the 
absence limit which varies according to the con- 
tact hours of class. 

A student who has withdrawn or is dropped 
may request reinstatement subject to the approval 
of and conditions set by the instructor. To be rein- 
stated, the student must have been in good aca- 
demic standing and must provide the instructor 




,, 



12 



with evidence that the extenuating circumstances 
which necessitated the withdrawal or drop will no 
longer be a problem. 

Registration Changes (Drop/Add) 

Any changes in registration must be 
approved by an academic advisor. Course changes 
approved by an advisor must be shown on a 
Registration Change Notice form with the advi- 
sor's signature. Students may obtain this form 
from the Registration office or from their advisor. 

Courses may be added, changed, or dropped 
only during the designated drop/add days of each 
semester. Students may drop courses during the 
drop/add days of each semester with the enroll- 
ment not being shown on the transcript. 

Students making registration changes may 
be eligible for a refund. Durham Tech's refund 
policy is described in this publication (see Index 
for page number). 

Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act 

In compliance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as Amended, 
Durham Technical Community College may 
release "directory information" from student 
educational records without the student's written 
consent. Directory information at Durham Tech 
includes the student's name; program of study; 
dates of enrollment; credit hours earned; degrees, 
diplomas, or certificates awarded; release of aca- 
demic recognition to newspapers; and participa- 
tion in officially recognized activities. Students' 
addresses, phone numbers, and class schedules 
are not released to non-college officials. 

Directory information may be published or 
made available without the student's consent. 
However, any student who prefers that such infor- 
mation not be released may request this by writ- 
ing to the assistant dean of Admissions, 
Registration, and Financial Aid. This written 
request must be made during the first two weeks 
of the student's initial enrollment and is valid for 
one year. 

Students may ask to see their education 
records at the Student Records office. In accor- 
dance with the Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act, students may challenge the contents 
of the records by making a written request to the 
director of Admissions and Registration for a 
hearing. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




/ 



Consumer Information on Graduation 
Rates and Crime Statistics 

Consumer information about graduation 
rates and on-campus crime statistics is available 
in the Admissions office, the library, and the 
Security office. 

Tuition, Fees, and 
Parking Requirements 

Tuition and Fees 

for Curriculum Students 

All tuition and fees are due and payable at 
the Business office on the official days of registra- 
tion. If registering by telephone, formally accept- 
ed program students will be billed by the Business 
office. Students may pay by cash, check, money 
order, or credit card (VISA or MasterCard). Partial 
payments or credits are not accepted. 

No portion of a check made payable to 
Durham Tech will be given to a student except at 
the written request of the person making the 
remittance, and the written request must be 
mailed directly to the college's business manager. 

Tuition for Dual Enrollment 

If a student desires to enroll at Durham Tech 
and another college in the North Carolina 
Community College System for the same semes- 
ter, the total amount of tuition and fees may be 



paid to the student's home college. Home college 
is defined as the college at which the student ini- 
tially registers for classes. The home college 
assumes responsibility for arranging with the 
other college for enrolling the student in appro- 
priate courses without further charge. This 
arrangement shall be made by an exchange of 
letters between the colleges involved. 

Tuition Fee Basis 

North Carolina law (General Statute 115D) 
establishes the Community College System's 
tuition and fees. Tuition charges are for credit 
hours enrolled. Credit hours are calculated as fol- 
lows: one lecture hour equals one credit hour; 
two laboratory hours equal one credit hour; three 
shop hours equal one credit hour. The tuition 
rate per credit hour applies to all regularly 
enrolled students. 

Tuition for Legal Residents of North 
Carolina 

The current tuition for legal residents of 
North Carolina is $26.75 per semester credit hour, 
or a maximum of $374.50 for students enrolled 
for 14 or more semester credit hours. This tuition 
is subject to change by the N.C. General Assembly. 

Tuition for Out-of-State Students 

Any student whose legal residence is outside 
North Carolina is currently charged the nonresi- 
dent tuition of $16975 per semester credit hour, 
or a maximum of $2,376.50 for students enrolled 
for 14 or more semester credit hours. This tuition 
is subject to change by the N.C. General Assembly. 

North Carolina Residency Status 

North Carolina law (General Statute 116-143.1) 
requires that to qualify for in-state tuition, a legal 
resident must have maintained his/her domicile 
in North Carolina for at least the 12 months 
immediately before this classification as a resi- 
dent for tuition purposes. The following defini- 
tion shall be controlled with the interpretation 
and application of General Statute 116-143.1 as it 
pertains to the term domicile. Domicile is one's 
permanent dwelling place of indefinite duration, 
as distinguished from a temporary place of 
abode; it is synonymous with legal residence. 



13 



1 . Domicile may be established as follows: 

a. By birth until there is a legally effective 
change in that domicile; 

b. By operation of law, as in the case of a 
minor whose domicile, in most cases, is 
presumed conclusively to be that of his or 
her parents; or 

c. By choice (after legal age is attained) a 
person may establish his or her domicile 
in a jurisdiction of his or her choice. 

2. One always has a domicile. 

3. One retains a given domicile until it is 
abandoned and another is established. 

4. One never has more than one domicile at a 
given time. 

5. Establishing a domicile by choice requires 
the overt act of establishing physical residential 
presence in North Carolina while concurrently 
maintaining the intent to make it one's perma- 
nent home of indefinite duration. 

6. The requisite domiciliary intent is tested by 
evaluating relevant, objectively verifiable 
conduct which is held to constitute a manifesta- 
tion of the state of mind of the actor. 

7. Any international student (nonimmigrant or 
with permanent resident status) must submit 
immigration documents for review by the inter- 
national student advisor. 

8. Questions about North Carolina residency 
should be addressed to the Admissions office. 

Tuition for Senior Citizens 

North Carolina residents 65 and older are 
exempted from paying tuition, except for courses 
that are conducted on a self-supporting basis. 
However, senior citizens are responsible for pay- 
ing any additional fees and expenses. 

Student Fees 

All curriculum students are charged $12 for 
each fall and spring semester and $4 for the sum- 
mer semester as a student administrative fee. 
These funds support student clubs and social 
activities, maintenance of the parking lots, senior 
college days, job fairs, and other activities. The 
amount of this fee is subject to change. 

A laboratory fee is also charged to students 
enrolling in computer courses and science lab 
courses. The laboratory fee is $5 per course per 
semester. 

Adult education students pay a $6 activity fee 
each semester. This fee is also subject to change. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




Graduation Fee 

A $7.50 fee is payable at the time a student 
applies for graduation. The fee covers the cost of 
the award (degree, diploma, or certificate) and 
the award cover. This fee is subject to change. 

Cap and Gown Fee 

Graduating students pay a $15 fee for their 
caps, tassels, and gowns. This fee is subject to 
change. 

Refund Policy 

Tuition refunds for curriculum classes are 
subject to the following requirements: 

1. A 100 percent refund may be made upon 
request of the student if the student officially 
withdraws from the college prior to the first day 
of classes of the academic semester noted in the 
academic calendar. If a course is cancelled by 
Durham Tech, that portion of tuition which paid 
for the cancelled course will be refunded in full. 

2. A 75 percent refund may be made upon 
request of the student if the student officially 
withdraws from the class(es) prior to or on the 
official 10 percent point of the semester. Requests 
for refunds will not be considered after the 10 
percent point of the semester. 



3. Student fees, including administrative, labo- 
ratory, and graduation fees, cannot be refunded. 
This policy is subject to change by action of 
the North Carolina General Assembly. 

Books and Supplies 

Students may purchase most textbooks, 
supplies, instruments, and materials from the 
bookstore on campus. The cost of books and 
supplies varies with each program. However, 
most full-time students should anticipate spend- 
ing approximately $350 each semester. Students 
should attend each class at least once before 
purchasing texts and materials. 

Accident Insurance 

Students may purchase insurance covering 
expenses incurred as a result of accidents that 
occur while they are participating in college 
activities. This group coverage begins in 
September and ends in August each year. This 
insurance is optional. It may be purchased 
during registration in any semester, but coverage 
ends in August of each year no matter when it 
was purchased. The insurance charge is not 
refundable. Students interested in this coverage 
should contact the Durham Tech Business office. 



14 



Students are encouraged to take advantage 
of this coverage, especially if they are enrolled in 
programs such as Automotive Systems 
Technology, Carpentry, Dental Laboratory 
Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, 
Electrical/Electronics Technology, Respiratory 
Care, or Surgical Technology. Students in chem- 
istry and physics laboratory classes, those working 
in the machine shop, and those participating 
in intramural sports or the federal work-study 
program are also encouraged to obtain this 
coverage. 

Neither the college nor the state of North 
Carolina carries insurance coverage for students' 
accidents and other needs. 

Malpractice and Health Insurance 

Students enrolling in nursing and other 
health programs that require clinical or patient 
care instruction must provide their own malprac- 
tice and health insurance. For more information, 
contact the Durham Tech Business office or the 
appropriate program director. 

Additional Expenses 

Students in certain programs have addition- 
al expenses. Required purchases include instruc- 
tional kits and gold in Dental Laboratory 
Technology, tools in Automotive Systems 
Technology and Electrical/Electronics Technology, 
drafting kits in Architectural Technology, instruc- 
tional kits in Opticianry, scrub suits in Surgical 
Technology, and uniforms and stethoscopes in 
Respiratory Care and nursing programs. Some 
programs also require lab coats and other 
miscellaneous supplies. Certain health programs 
require professional liability insurance. Students 
enrolled in word processing courses and most 
computer courses pay a $5 laboratory fee per 
course. Contact the Admissions office for more 
information about additional expenses. 

Transcript Fee 

A $1 fee is charged for each official copy of 
a student's transcript. There is no charge for an 
"issued to student" copy. Adult High School 
graduates may request official transcripts at no 
charge. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




Parking 

Every vehicle parked on campus must 
display a valid parking decal, either in the lower 
corner of the left rear window or (for convert- 
ibles) in the lower corner of the right front wind- 
shield. Free parking decals are available in the 
Security office, located at the back of the White 
Building. Vehicles parked on campus without a 
current decal will be ticketed and may be towed. 
(Visitors may obtain temporary parking permits 
from the Receptionist/Switchboard office located 
in the White Building, room 31.) 

Students should address questions about 
parking tickets to the Security office (686-3382) 
and pay parking fines in the Business office locat- 
ed in the White Building, room 1 (686-3570). 

Students may have difficulty finding parking 
spaces at peak class times (between 9 a.m. and 1 
p.m. and between 5:30 and 8 p.m.). Daytime 



overflow parking is available one block south at 
the Newton Center on Cooper Street and across 
Lawson Street at the Basic Skills Center. Evening 
overflow parking is located at Exchange Club 
Industries just east of the main campus. Maps of 
the campus are available in the Admissions and 
Security offices. 

Cars parked in the following locations may 
be ticketed or towed: 

• In the parking lots of businesses across the 
street from the main campus; 

• Along the street in front of the campus; 

• In spaces marked "handicapped parking" 
without a proper permit; 

• In spaces marked "loading zone" or in fire 
lanes; or 

• In the open field across from the main cam- 
pus, which is not Durham Tech property. 



15 



Financial Aid 

The Financial Aid office at Durham Tech 
helps students with grant and scholarship appli- 
cations. All students receiving financial aid must 
maintain satisfactory progress in their programs. 
Refer to the Academic Information section of this 
catalog for a complete definition (see Index for 
page number). 

The Financial Aid Handbook, which con- 
tains detailed information, is available from the 
Financial Aid office. Additional financial aid 
information is available on reserve in the 
Durham Tech library. 

Federal Pell Grant 

To be eligible for a grant, students must: 

1. Be enrolled in an eligible curriculum 
program; 

2. Be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen; 

3. Show financial need according to the 
Federal Pell Grant formula; and 

4. Not have a bachelor's degree. 

To apply, students must complete a Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid. The applica- 
tion form is available in the Admissions and 
Financial Aid offices at Durham Tech and from 
high school guidance counselors. 

Grants currently range from $400 - $3,125 
per year. Before receiving any Federal Pell Grant 
funds, selected students must give the Financial 
Aid office acceptable verification of all taxable 
and nontaxable income. Students who have all 
paperwork cleared by the beginning of the semes- 
ter may be eligible to charge tuition and fees. 

Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunities Grant 

The SEOG provides grants to students with 
exceptional need, giving priority to Federal Pell 
Grant recipients. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grant 

Grants are available to residents of North 
Carolina who have not received a bachelor's 
degree and who are enrolled full time in an eligi- 
ble program. Grants range from $200 - $1,500 
per year. To apply, students must complete and 
mail the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
by March 15. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 



Single Parent/Displaced 
Homemaker Grant 

These grants assist single parents and dis- 
placed homemakers. According to the federal 
government, a single parent is defined as a per- 
son who is raising a child or children without the 
help of a partner. A displaced homemaker is a 
person who has worked primarily without pay to 
care for the home and family and, because of 
this, has diminished marketable job skills. 

Students who have been admitted to the col- 
lege in a curriculum program may be eligible to 
receive this grant to help with the costs of tuition, 
books and supplies, child care, and transporta- 
tion. Candidates must meet the eligibility criteria 
required for the Federal Pell Grant. 

Every student who is eligible to be consid- 
ered for grant awards must complete an applica- 
tion each semester. Applications are available in 
the Financial Aid office located in the White 
Building, room 23. 

N.C. Student Loan for Health, Science, 
and Mathematics 

This program makes loans to North 
Carolina residents enrolled full time in an eligi- 
ble two-year undergraduate program. Students 
may borrow a maximum of $2,625 a year. Loan 
repayment may be cancelled on the basis of one 
year of professional practice in North Carolina 
under specified conditions. To apply, students 
should call the N.C. Student Loan Program for 
Health, Science, and Mathematics at (919) 571- 
4178 after January 15 to request an application. 

Federal Work-Study 

A limited number of work-study opportuni- 
ties are available for students with financial need 
who are enrolled at least part time. The program 
offers part-time employment on or off campus in 
offices, labs, the library, or community service 



agencies. To apply, students should complete a 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid and noti- 
fy the Financial Aid office of their interest in the 
program. 

Scholarships 

Students enrolled at least half time with a 
2.0 or higher grade point average are eligible for 
scholarships. Applications are available each 
semester in the Financial Aid office. 

The criteria for eligibility and the amount of 
the award are different for each scholarship. More 
complete information about scholarships and 
application procedures is available from the 
Financial Aid office. 

Other Sources of Aid 

A number of agencies provide financial 
assistance for postsecondary education. For more 
information on these programs, students may 
consult with staff in Durham Tech's Financial Aid 
office. 

Educational benefits may also be available 
to certain veterans of military service and depend- 
ents who meet specific criteria. See the following 
section for more information. The Veterans Affairs 
office is located in the White Building, room 23. 

Durham Technical Community College does 
not participate in any loan programs. 

Satisfactory Progress for Financial Aid 

Students receiving financial aid must main- 
tain satisfactory academic progress as defined by 
the Department of Education in the Student 
Financial Aid Handbook. This handbook is avail- 
able from the Financial Aid office. 

Students falling below acceptable criteria 
may continue to be enrolled, but they are gener- 
ally not eligible for financial aid until they 
achieve and maintain satisfactory progress for 
one semester. 



16 



Veterans Information 

Veterans Educational Benefits 

The Veterans Affairs office assists students 
who are eligible for veterans educational benefits, 
including veterans, active-duty personnel, and 
members of selected reserves and the National 
Guard. The VA office certifies enrollment for eligi- 
ble students in programs that lead to a degree, 
diploma, or certificate and also for eligible stu- 
dents in the Adult High School Diploma or High 
School Equivalency (GED) programs. 

To be eligible for educational benefits, stu- 
dents must be admitted to a curriculum program 
and have high school and all college transcripts 
on file at Durham Tech. 

Before paying tuition and fees each semester, 
students must first have their class schedules 
approved by their academic advisors and then by 
the VA office. Students should request two copies 
of the registration receipt from the Business office 
and take the pink copy to the VA office for certifi- 
cation use. 

Students who are "visiting" from their home 
college and who may be eligible for VA benefits 
must contact the Durham Tech Veterans Affairs 
office to provide appropriate documentation. 

The Veterans Handbook, available in the VA 
office, provides detailed information on college 
procedures and educational benefits. 

Standards of Academic Progress, 
Attendance, and Conduct for Students 
Receiving Veterans Educational 
Benefits 

Public Law 95-908 (the G.I. Bill) requires 
that each educational institution approved for 
veterans to receive educational benefits must 
establish written policies that clearly state what is 
expected of a veteran in the areas of academic 
progress, class attendance, and conduct. 

Veterans whose benefits are terminated for 
unsatisfactory progress, lack of attendance, or 
misconduct must receive counseling before they 
can be recertified for educational benefits. The 
required counseling sessions may delay reinstate- 
ment of benefits from two to four months. 



Admission, Fees, & 
Financial Aid for 
Credit Programs 




Standards of Academic Progress 
for Veterans 

The following standards of academic 
progress are reviewed each semester for all stu- 
dents receiving veterans educational benefits: 

1. Warning/Unsatisfactory Progress - Received 
a grade point average of below 2.0 (C) for one 
semester. Students are referred to Counseling 
Services for academic counseling. 

2. Probation/Unsatisfactory Progress - Received 
a grade point average of below 2.0 (C) for two 
consecutive semesters. Students must report 
immediately to the VA office for counseling refer- 
ral to be eligible for veterans educational benefits. 

3. Suspension/Unsatisfactory Progress - 
Received a grade point average of below 2.0 (C) 



for three consecutive semesters. Veterans are not 
eligible for benefits for the next enrolled semester; 
however, they may continue in college at their 
own expense. 

4. Reinstatement - After not receiving veterans 
benefits for one semester, students may reenter on 
Step 2 at their own expense if the problem caus- 
ing academic difficulty has been resolved. 
However, students must earn a C or better in one 
or more courses before being eligible to begin 
receiving veterans educational benefits. 

Attendance Requirements for Veterans 

All students are expected to pursue good 
faith attendance by limiting absences to 15 per- 
cent or less of the total contact hours required in 
the class for the semester. If a student receiving 
veterans educational benefits must drop a class, 
the student must notify Durham Tech's Veterans 
Affairs office immediately. College officials are 
required to report the student's last day of atten- 
dance, and this information is forwarded to the 
regional Veterans Administration office. Certifica- 
tion ceases to be in effect as of the last day of 
attendance for dropped courses. 

Procedures for Determining Conduct 
for Veterans 

Conduct requirements are the same for vet- 
eran and non-veteran students (see Index for 
page number). 

Course Substitutions for Veterans 

Students receiving veterans educational ben- 
efits will ordinarily be limited to two course sub- 
stitutions in their program of study, not including 
substitutions resulting from changes in course 
numbers. 




17 



Academic Information 

The focus of the Instructional Services 
Division is effective student learning for career 
and personal growth. To this end, the faculty and 
staff are available to work closely with students 
from the point of application for admission 
through the progression of courses to placement 
following completion of studies at Durham Tech. 
This section covers academic policies effective at 
the time of this catalog's publication. These poli- 
cies apply to all students enrolled at the institu- 
tion and supersede all previously published aca- 
demic documents issued by the college. Under 
special conditions, these policies may be modified 
according to procedures approved by the chief 
instructional officer. 

The policies do not attempt to cover stan- 
dards or requirements prescribed by the Veterans 
Administration or other institutions, groups, or 
agencies providing financial aid to Durham Tech 
students. 

Nursing students have special academic 
policies designed to meet standards and require- 
ments defined by the North Carolina Board of 
Nursing. Nursing students should refer to the 
nursing handbooks for specific policies affecting 
their enrollment at Durham Tech. 

Classification of Programs of Study 

The college is authorized by the State Board 
of Community Colleges to award the Associate in 
Arts degree, Associate in Science degree, Associate 
in Applied Science degree, and Associate in 
General Education degree as well as diplomas 
and certificates. Requirements for these awards 
follow: 

Associate in Arts (AA) - Completion of 
all requirements for the Associate in Arts degree 
totaling 64 semester hour credits. 

Associate in Science (A.S.) - Completion 
of all requirements for the Associate in Science 
degree totaling 64 semester hour credits. 

Associate in Applied Science (A AS.) - 
Completion of all required courses as listed on 
the specific program's plan of study totaling no 
fewer than 64 semester hour credits. 

Associate in General Education 
(A.G.E.) - Completion of all requirements for 
the Associate in General Education degree total- 
ing 64 semester hour credits. 



Academic 
Information 



Diploma - Completion of all required 
courses identified on the program's plan of study 
totaling no fewer than 36 semester hour credits. 

Certificate - Completion of all required 
courses identified on the program's plan of study 
totaling 18 semester hour credits. 

Most programs of study require total credit 
hours in excess of the minimum credit hour 
requirements indicated here. 

Classification of Students 

Persons attending the college are classified 
as either curriculum or special students and as 
full-time or part-time students according to the 
following definitions: 

Curriculum Students - Persons who have 
been fully admitted to a program of study leading 
to an associate's degree, diploma, or certificate. 
Curriculum students are served by academic advi- 
sors in their programs of study. They are also eli- 
gible to be considered for course substitutions or 
credit by examination and qualify for academic 
recognition. They may also benefit from other 
academic options offered by the college, unless 
restricted from doing so by the program in which 
they are enrolled. 

Special Students - Persons who have not 
been admitted to a program of study offered by 
the college and, therefore, are not officially pur- 
suing a degree, diploma, or certificate. Special 
students may consult with an academic advisor 
upon request but are not assigned a specific advi- 
sor. They are not eligible to be considered for 
course substitutions or credit by examination and 
do not qualify for academic recognition. 

It is strongly recommended that 
special students intending to complete a 
program of study at Durham Tech not 
proceed beyond one semester of full- 
time study, or 12 credits, as special stu- 
dents before applying for admission. 
Delay in applying for admission may 
result in loss of credits and other 
penalties or disadvantages. 



Full-Time Students - Persons who have 
registered for a minimum of 12 credit hours for 
the semester. 

Part-Time Students - Persons who have 
registered for fewer than 12 credit hours for the 
semester. 

Plan of Study 

A student admitted to a degree, diploma, or 
certificate program must meet the requirements 
listed on the curriculum's plan of study for the 
academic year during which the student was 
accepted. 

The sequence of courses outlined in a pro- 
gram's plan of study (available in the Admissions 
office or from the program director) is based on 
fall semester admittance unless otherwise indicat- 
ed. Students enrolling in other semesters should 
work closely with their advisor to plan their 
course sequence. In general, the student should 
follow the sequence of courses listed on the plan 
of study to meet all course prerequisites and to 
complete the program in the allotted time frame. 
Otherwise, it may be necessary for the student to 
extend the period of enrollment to satisfy all 
requirements for graduation. Effective Fall 1997, 
the college converted all programs to semester- 
based plans. Graduation is based on the plan of 
study in effect on the date the student is admitted 
to the program. Students not enrolled for three 
consecutive semesters and who return in a new 
academic year must be readmitted to the pro- 
gram and must follow the plan of study in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

Course loads for full-time students are estab- 
lished by the list of courses on the student's plan 
of study. 

Only courses listed on the student's plan of 
study and any officially approved substitute 
courses count toward graduation. 

A student must receive a passing grade in 
each course required by the plan of study. Courses 
not completed satisfactorily must be repeated for 
the student to be eligible for graduation. 

A student may not be admitted to and/or 
enrolled in more than one degree, diploma, or 
certificate program at a time without approval of 
the chief instructional officer. 

When changing from one curriculum to 
another, a student must apply for admission to 
the new program through the Admissions office. 



18 



Course Prerequisites and Corequisites 

Some courses have prerequisites and coreq- 
uisites which are listed in the course descriptions 
at the back of this catalog. Before these courses 
may be taken, any prerequisite course must be 
completed with a grade of C or better (completing 
with a grade of B or better is required in some 
Developmental Studies courses). Corequisites 
must have been taken during a previous semester 
or during the same semester. 

During registration, advisors will work with 
students to determine that prerequisites have been 
met. Students who have not met the prereq- 
uisites are referred to the program director or 
department dean for determination of course 
placement. 

Course Repeat 

A student may not enroll in the same course 
more than three times without departmental 
approval. Some Health Technologies programs 
have a limit of two enrollments. 

Credit Hour Calculation 

Durham Technical Community College 
operates on a three-semester academic calendar. 
The fall and spring semesters are each 16 weeks 
long; the summer semester is 10 weeks long. 

A credit hour at Durham Tech, as required 
by the North Carolina Administrative Code, is cal- 
culated according to the following formula as 
based on a 16-week semester: one hour of class- 
room instruction per week equals one credit 
hour; two hours of supervised laboratory instruc- 
tion per week equal one credit hour; three hours 
of supervised manipulative laboratory, shop, or 
clinical practice per week equal one credit hour; 
and 10 hours of work experience, practicum, or 
internship per week equal one credit hour. 

Course Substitutions 

In special circumstances, the chief instruc- 
tional officer may approve an appropriate course 
for substitution of a course listed on the plan of 
study. However, the substituted course must aca- 
demically parallel or enhance the program objec- 
tives, and the total credit hours in each category 
on the plan of study must be satisfied. The substi- 
tution will be made on an individual basis and 
may not apply to all students in a given program. 
Approval for course substitutions must be received 
before registration. 



Academic 
Information 




Transfer Credit 

Transfer students applying for admission to 
Durham Technical Community College must 
meet all admission requirements for their chosen 
programs. However, some programs may waive 
placement testing if the applicant has previously 
completed math or English courses. Students 
should consult an admissions counselor about 
transfer credit before taking placement tests or 
enrolling in courses. 

For accepted students, Durham Tech evalu- 
ates transfer credit for equivalent courses with a 
grade of C or better from member institutions of 
the North Carolina Community College System 
and other postsecondary institutions accredited by 
a regional accrediting association. Transfer credit 
may also be granted for certain general education 
courses not offered by Durham Tech. 

Applicants who have been enrolled in any 
postsecondary institution are required to submit 
official transcripts of previous academic work to 
Durham Tech's Admissions office if they desire an 
evaluation of transfer credit. When granting 
transfer credit is in question, the student may be 
asked for supporting documentation such as a 
course description or course syllabus. 

To be eligible for graduation, a student 
transferring from another institution must com- 
plete at least one-fourth of the total credit hours 
required and at least 9 of the last 18 hours com- 
pleted while enrolled at Durham Technical 



Community College. Credit transferred from 
another institution is not used in calculating the 
student's grade point average for academic 
progress and graduation. 

When a student changes from one program 
of study to another within Durham Tech, all aca- 
demic requirements, including the grading poli- 
cies of the new program, must be met for gradua- 
tion. Upon acceptance into the new program, all 
courses which are commonly required by more 
than one program may be transferred with the 
same grade the student originally received. 
Students admitted to a new program of study may 
choose to transfer or repeat these courses. 

After a student has been admitted to a pro- 
gram of study, approved courses may be taken at 
another accredited institution for transfer to 
Durham Tech with prior permission from the 
department dean. Such courses will satisfy the 
appropriate course requirements in the student's 
program of study. 

Grading System 

Durham Technical Community College 
employs a letter grading system to evaluate the 
student's performance in meeting the stated 
objectives of the classroom, laboratory, shop, clin- 
ical setting, or work experience. 

The following letter grades and grade points 
are used: 





Grade Points 


Grade 


Significance Per Semester Hour 


A 


Superior Work 


4 


B 


Very Good Work 


3 


C 


Average Work 


2 


D 


Below Average Work 


1 


F 


Unsatisfactory Work - 
Must Repeat Course 




I 


Incomplete - Makeup 
Work Required 




IP 


In Progress - Must Repeat 
Developmental Course 




W 


Withdrawal or 
Dropped by Instructor 




AU 


Audit 




CE 


Credit by Examination 





19 



Explanation of Special Grades 

The following special grades are assigned at 
Durham Tech when a grade of A, B, C, D, or F is 
not achieved: 

/: Incomplete - Makeup Work Required 

The special grade of I is assigned when the 
student has performed at a satisfactory level and 
has made significant progress toward the comple- 
tion of course objectives but is unable to complete 
all prescribed work by the end of the semester due 
to extenuating circumstances such as accident, 
illness, or comparable unavoidable developments. 
Under normal circumstances, the grade of I will 
not be assigned to a student who fails to appear 
for the final examination. 

To receive the grade of I, the student must 
confer with the instructor and request the I grade 
on or before the last class day of the semester. The 
student must provide the instructor with docu- 
mentation of particular circumstances necessitat- 
ing the I grade. If such circumstances are consid- 
ered legitimate, the instructor will provide the 
student with written instructions specifying 
the work to be completed and the completion 
deadline. 

If the student completes the work according 
to the instructor's requirements, a grade for that 
work is assigned and computed in the final 
course grade. If the course work is not completed 
during the subsequent semester, the I grade is 
changed to an F grade. 

In no case may the work be completed later 
than the conclusion of the following semester. If 
the incomplete course is an essential prerequisite 
for a subsequent course, the student may be 
required to remove the I grade within a signifi- 
cantly shorter period of time. Otherwise, the sub- 
sequent course must be dropped. 

An I grade received during the semester 
before the semester of graduation must be 
removed by the midterm of the semester in which 
the student intends to graduate. 



Academic 
Information 




IP: In Progress - Must Repeat 
Developmental Course 

The special grade of IP is assigned only to 
some Developmental Studies courses (most 
courses with a number of 99 or lower) when the 
student has not mastered all course competen- 
cies. The student must re-register for the course 
before progressing to the next level of course 
work. 

W: Withdrawal from Course 

The special grade of W is assigned when a 
student officially withdraws or is dropped from a 
course by the instructor during the first 60 
percent of the class meeting hours. After the 60 
percent date, a letter grade other than W will be 
assigned for the course indicating the student's 
academic average (which will include any missed 
assignments). For more information about with- 
drawals and 60 percent dates, see Index for page 
number. 

AU: Course Audit 

The special grade of AU is assigned when a 
student enrolls in and regularly attends a course 
on a non-credit basis. Enrollment is subject to 
space availability and the program director's prior 
approval. The audit student, like the credit 
student, is subject to Durham Tech's attendance 
policy. The student may not change from credit- 
to-audit or audit-to-credit status after the first 10 
calendar days of the semester. 



CE: Credit by Examination 

The special grade of CE is awarded when a 
student has applied for and successfully complet- 
ed the requirements for credit by examination. 
Qualified curriculum students with relevant 
prior training or experience may earn academic 
credit for certain courses by examination. A stu- 
dent interested in receiving such credit should 
contact the appropriate program director for 
information on the procedures for application. 
To receive credit by examination, the student 
must be enrolled in a curriculum and be regis- 
tered for the course for which application is 
made. The application must be approved within 
the first 7 calendar days of the semester, and the 
examination must be completed within the first 
14 calendar days of the semester. 

To receive credit by examination, the stu- 
dent must score at least 85 percent on the exam- 
ination. In certain courses, the required passing 
score may be higher. The examination may be 
taken only once, and a student failing the exam- 
ination must complete the course for credit. No 
more than 10 percent of the total credit hours 
required by the student's plan of study may be 
earned by examination unless the chief instruc- 
tional officer gives special approval to exceed 
this limit. 

Change of Grade 

All change of grade requests are to be sub- 
mitted on change of grade forms for approval 
by the chief instructional officer. All change of 
grade requests other than those converting an I 
grade to a letter grade require written explana- 
tions of the reasons for the changes and must be 
requested within one calendar year after the 
original grade was assigned. 

Grade Point Average 

Academic progress at Durham Technical 
Community College is based on a 4.0, or letter 
grade of A, cumulative grade point average 
system. A final grade point average of 2.0, or a C, 
is required for graduation from all programs of 
study. 



20 



The student accumulates grade points based 
on grades earned per semester. The grade point 
average is determined by dividing grade points 
earned in courses by the number of semester 
credit hours attempted, as shown in the following 
example: 



Academic 
Information 



Course 


Grade 


Credit 
Hours 




Grade 
Points 


Total 


BUS 110 


c 


3 


X 


2 


= 6 


FIP 230 


B 


5 


X 


3 


= 15 


EHS211 


A 


5 


X 


4 


= 20 


ENG 111 


F 


3 
l6~ 


X 





= 




41 





41 -f- 16 = 2.56 Grade Point Average 

Only those courses taken in residence and 
prescribed by the student's plan of study or offi- 
cially approved substitute courses are included in 
calculating the grade point average required for 
graduation. 

A student who earns a grade of D or below 
on a required course may repeat the same course. 
In such an instance, only the higher grade will be 
used in calculating the grade point average for 
graduation. A student may take a different elec- 
tive course instead of repeating the elective course 
in which a grade of D or below was earned; how- 
ever, the credit hours and grade points for both 
courses will be included in calculating the grade 
point average for graduation. 

No grade points are earned when a special 
grade of I, IP, W, AU, or CE is received or when 
credits are transferred to the college. 

All grades remain on the student's transcript. 

Standards of Progress 

Since a minimum grade point average of 
2.0 is required for graduation, students are urged 
to maintain at least 2.0 each semester. Students 
with either a cumulative or semester grade point 
average of less than 2.0 are not considered to be 
making satisfactory progress. Refer to Standards 
for Academic Progress for Students Receiving 
Veterans Educational Benefits section (see Index 
for page number). 

Durham Tech supports a system of academic 
intervention rather than academic dismissal. 
Students whose cumulative grade point average 
has fallen below 2.0 will receive a letter from the 
Student Records office encouraging them to con- 
sult with their faculty advisor, consider a reduced 




course load, and seek academic assistance from 
the Campus Learning Center or the Counseling 
Services Department. 

Academic Recognition 

Full-time curriculum students who earn a 
grade point average between 3-25 and 3-74 for the 
semester are named to the Dean's List for that 
semester. Full-time curriculum students with a 
grade point average of 375 or above are named 
to the President's List for the semester. 

Full-time or part-time students completing 
their plan of study with a grade point average 
between 3.25 and 374 are graduated with hon- 
ors, while students maintaining a grade point 
average of 375 or above throughout their studies 
are graduated with high honors. Students who 
have earned a grade point average of 375 or 
above and who participate in commencement 
exercises are recognized individually at the cere- 
mony. 

In addition, academic achievement of stu- 
dents attending Durham Technical Community 
College is recognized through the Gamma Beta 
Phi Society, an honor and service organization 
for students in two-year and four-year colleges 
and universities in the United States. The Gamma 
Beta Phi Society was chartered at Durham Tech 
in 1990. Students nominated for membership 



must be enrolled full time or part time for at least 
12 credit hours toward a degree, certificate, or 
diploma and have a grade point average ranking 
within the top 20 percent of their class. 

Student-Instructor Responsibilities 

At Durham Technical Community College, 
the student and the instaictor are obliged to meet 
a number of reciprocal responsibilities within the 
student-teacher relationship. 

The student is responsible for arriving at all 
classes on time and preparing to participate in 
assigned work or activities; obtaining assign- 
ments from the instructor before an absence 
whenever possible, so that work may be submitted 
upon returning; requesting to make up assign- 
ments missed due to legitimate absences (make- 
up assignments will follow procedures stipulated 
by the instructor at the outset of the course); and 
seeking instructor assistance when clarification or 
additional assistance is needed to complete an 
assignment. 

The college does not permit a student to 
attend class with a child or leave a child unat- 
tended on campus while attending class. 

The instructor is responsible for being pre- 
pared for each class, starting the class on time, 
and providing a full period of effective instruction 
throughout the semester; providing students with 
complete information on the objectives and 
requirements of the course, including the 
resources available to students outside the class- 
room or laboratory; maintaining an accurate 
record of attendance on all students and consult- 
ing promptly with students on any attendance 
problems; and being available to students outside 
of class in the event additional assistance is need- 
ed in meeting course requirements. 

Attendance 

Regular attendance is required for the stu- 
dent to complete all course requirements and 
receive the optimum benefit of instruction. In the 
event of absence, it is the student's responsibility 
to make up all missed work in the most timely 
manner possible. Failure to make up missed work 
will adversely affect the student's course grade. 
For more information, refer to Student With- 
drawals, Faculty Drops, and Absences in this pub- 
lication (see Index for page numbers). 



21 



Tardiness and Early Departure 

The student should be on time for each class 
session and should be prepared to remain for the 
full duration of the class. Tardiness or early 
departure from class that results in the student 
missing at least 20 percent of the instructional 
session may be considered an absence. Chronic 
tardiness and/or leaving class early may adversely 
affect the student's course grade and may cause 
the student to be dropped from the course. 

Academic Honesty Policy 

Durham Technical Community College 
demands complete academic integrity from each 
student. Academic dishonesty is the participation 
or collaboration in specific prohibited forms of 
conduct. Participation or collaboration may be 
active (such as submitting a term paper which 
includes plagiarized work) or passive (such as 
receiving a copy of a test before class). 

Academic dishonesty includes the following: 

1 . Unauthorized copying, collaboration, or use 
of notes, books, or other materials on examina- 
tions or other academic exercises; 

2. Plagiarism, which is defined as the inten- 
tional representation of another person's work, 
words, thoughts, or ideas as one's own; 

3. Unauthorized possession of any academic 
material, such as tests, research papers, assign- 
ments, or similar materials; or 

4. Furnishing false information with the intent 
to deceive members of the college faculty or 
administration who are acting in the exercise of 
their official duties. 

Violation Procedure 

Any student who commits any of the acts 
described above as well as any other act which 
constitutes a clear offense against the academic 
integrity of the college shall be disciplined in the 
following manner: 

1 . In the case of a first offense of academic dis- 
honesty, a grade of zero shall be given on that 
particular academic exercise in which the act of 
dishonesty occurred. The instructor must notify 
the student of the assigned grade of zero within 
seven working days. The instructor must also pro- 
vide written notice of the violation to the chief 
instructional officer via the program director and 
department dean. The chief instructional officer 



Academic 
Information 




will notify the instructor of any prior final find- 
ings of academic dishonesty against the student. 
If the offense is a second or third violation, the 
student will be assigned a grade of F for the 
course; and the paragraphs below will apply. 

a. If the student wishes to appeal the instruc- 
tor's decision, he/she may appeal to the program 
director. This appeal must be in writing and must 
be presented to the program director within seven 
working days of receiving the grade of zero. The 
appeal must clearly explain why the instructor's 
decision is incorrect or improper. The instructor 
may respond to the student's appeal in writing. 
Any response must be promptly furnished to the 
student by the program director. The program 
director will schedule a meeting with the student, 
investigate the appeal, and present the student 
with a written decision within seven working days 
of receiving the appeal or meeting with the stu- 
dent, whichever is later. 

b. There is no right to appeal a first offense of 
academic dishonesty beyond the instructor's 
immediate supervisor. Upon a final finding that 
the student has violated this academic honesty 
policy, written notice, together with all supporting 
material evidence, shall be forwarded to the chief 
instructional officer. Written notice of such a final 



finding shall also be provided to the Counseling 
Services office. Once a final finding of academic 
dishonesty has been made, the student may not 
return to class until he/she has contacted the 
Counseling Services office. 

c. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in the event 
that the instructor is the program director or 
department dean and the academic dishonesty 
occurs in a class under his/her jurisdiction, the 
appeal shall be to the instructor's immediate 
supervisor. 

d. A determination of academic dishonesty will 
be deemed a "final finding" when the student 
fails to appeal an adverse decision in accordance 
with this policy or when the instructor's initial 
decision is sustained and cannot be further 
appealed. 

2. In the case of a second offense of academic 
dishonesty, the instructor shall expel the student 
from the class with a grade of F for the course. 
The instructor must notify the student of assign- 
ment of the F grade within seven working days. 
The instructor must also provide written notice of 
the violation to the chief instructional officer via 
the program director and department dean. If the 
student wishes to appeal, the procedures outlined 
below shall be followed. 

a. If the student is not satisfied with the pro- 
gram director's decision, he/she may appeal to 
the department dean. This appeal must be in 
writing and must be presented to the department 
dean within seven working days of receiving the 
program director's decision. The appeal must 
clearly explain why previous decisions are incor- 
rect or improper. The department dean will 
schedule a meeting with the student, investigate 
the matter, and present the student with a written 
decision within seven working days of receiving 
the appeal or meeting, whichever is later. 

b. If the student is not satisfied with the depart- 
ment dean's decision, he/she may appeal to the 
chief instructional officer. The chief instructional 
officer may investigate the appeal by assigning 
the appeal to a committee or personally consult- 
ing with the parties. In either case, the student 
will be provided an opportunity to appear before 
the committee or chief instructional officer and 
present relevant evidence as determined by the 
trier of fact. A recommendation by the committee 
shall be made to the chief instructional officer 



22 



within seven days of the hearing. There is no 
right to appeal a second offense of academic 
dishonesty beyond the chief instructional officer 
level. 

c. Rules of procedure for committee hearings 
convened in accordance with this policy shall be 
determined by the committee, approved by the 
chief instructional officer, and published and 
made available to the student prior to the 
hearing. 

3. In the case of a third offense of academic 
dishonesty, the instructor shall expel the student 
from the class and assign a grade of F for the 
course. The instructor must also provide written 
notice of the violation to the chief instructional 
officer via the program director and the depart- 
ment dean. If the student wishes to appeal, the 
applicable procedures outlined above shall be fol- 
lowed. Upon a final finding of a third offense of 
academic dishonesty and upon receiving a writ- 
ten recommendation by the chief instructional 
officer, the president of the college may suspend 
the student for a minimum of one year. 
Suspension because of academic dishonesty will 
be recorded on the student's transcript. 

4. In addition to the procedures described 
above, any student in a clinical, practicum, or 
work placement setting (such as clinicals in the 
Health Technologies programs) who commits 
any serious error or offense or dishonesty which, 
in the opinion of the instructor, compromises the 
health, safety, or well-being of any child, patient, 
fellow student, or any other person may be 
immediately expelled from the class and removed 
from the premises by the instructor or by other 
appropriate personnel. The instructor must 
promptly provide the student with written notice 
of the expulsion. Written notice of the expulsion, 
together with all supporting material evidence, 
shall be provided to the chief instructional officer 
within three working days of the imposition of 
the expulsion. This additional provision is 
imposed in recognition of the fact that in special 
settings, dishonesty and serious errors of judg- 
ment may have consequences that are far more 
significant and far-reaching than those occurring 
in the usual academic setting. The student may 
appeal an expulsion from a clinical, practicum, 
or work placement course in accordance with 
the provisions of this policy and any practicum, 
clinical, or work setting agreements, policies, or 
procedures that may apply. 



Academic 
Information 




5. The right to appeal decisions concerning 
issues addressed by this policy is limited to the 
procedures outline here. 

Transfer to Senior Colleges 
and Universities 

The following information concerning 
transfer credit to senior institutions is subject to 
change without notice. Transferring students 
should contact admissions offices at four-year 
institutions concerning admission requirements 
and transfer credits for specific programs of study. 

Associate in Arts and Associate in 
Science 

Either the Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree or 
the Associate in Science (A.S.) degree is awarded 
for the University Transfer program. For students 
who began their program Fall Semester 1997 or 
later and who complete the University Transfer 
program (for courses with a grade of C or above), 
after being accepted at a four-year university, 
will transfer as a junior to all University of North 
Carolina (UNC) System institutions. Students, 
after being accepted at the four-year university, 
who complete the general education core (for 
courses with a grade of C or above) will meet 
general education requirements for all UNC 
system institutions. Faculty in the University 
Transfer Department can assist students with 
most basic transfer information for public and 
private institutions in North Carolina. 



Associate in Applied Science 

The Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) 
degree is awarded for two-year technical 
programs which focus on preparing the student 
for the job market. There are senior institutions 
which accept some of these degrees as the first 
two years of a four-year program. Other senior 
institutions will evaluate the Associate in Applied 
Science degree on a course-by-course basis. 
Counseling Services staff assist students with 
transfer to other educational institutions. 
Information about the colleges and universities 
that offer transfer credit for courses in the 
Associate in Applied Science degree programs 
completed at Durham Tech is available in the 
Counseling Services office. 

Associate in General Education 

The Associate in General Education (A.G.E.) 
is a highly flexible degree program which a 
student may structure to meet individual needs. 
Courses for the A.G.E. degree may be selected 
from either the University Transfer program or 
from technical programs, provided that a mini- 
mum of 18 credits in a general education core is 
included. Transferability of courses depends on 
which specific courses are selected for the degree. 
Additional information is available from the 
Admissions office or the General Education 
program director. 

Educational Resources 

Durham Tech's Educational Resources 
Center houses the library and the Campus 
Learning Center, with its wide range of resources 
to help students meet their academic goals. 

Mission and Purpose 

The Educational Resources Department sup- 
ports the Durham Technical Community College 
mission to assist the full institutional community 
toward its goals. In addition, the Educational 
Resources Department strives to promote lifelong 
learning, academic learning experiences, and 
new ideas and resources; participate in the 
college's teaching and learning process; and 
provide varied materials, services, and equipment 
for students, faculty, and staff in a flexible and 
caring environment. 



23 



Library 

The library's collection includes more than 
40,000 books, magazines, newspapers, videotapes, 
and a variety of other audiovisual materials. Also, 
students use on-line databases and the Internet to 
find information on topics of interest. 

Most materials may be checked out for three 
weeks. Reference and reserve materials may be 
used only in the library. Members of the staff are 
always available to help students locate and use 
the library's resources. To borrow materials, a 
user must present a valid Durham Tech identifi- 
cation card. 

Library facilities include individual and 
group study areas as well as an area where stu- 
dents may read newspapers, popular magazines, 
professional journals, and paperback books. 

The main library is open from 8 a.m. to 930 
p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 8 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Fridays; and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. The 
library is closed Saturdays during the summer 
semester. 

The Northern Durham Center library houses 
the collections on criminal justice and fire pro- 
tection as well as general reference and circulat- 
ing materials. In addition, library materials are 
available at the Orange County Skills Develop- 
ment Center on Franklin Street in Chapel Hill. 

Campus Learning Center 

The Campus Learning Center (CLC) offers 
students a number of alternatives to the tradition- 
al classroom setting for education. Except for 
self-paced or televised credit courses, all of the 
following CLC services are free: 
1 . Five skills centers offer students individual- 
ized, cost-free tutoring. The Math Center provides 
personalized tutoring in all levels of mathemat- 
ics, including developmental math, math for sci- 
ences, and university transfer math. Videotapes 
offer additional assistance in algebra, trigonome- 
try, and calculus. The Writing Center can help 
students at all levels improve their skills in gram- 
mar and writing. Handbooks, handouts, and 
other materials are also available in the Writing 
Center. The Reading/Science Center provides 



Academic 
Information 




assistance to students who are preparing for the 
Degrees of Reading Power (DRP) or the place- 
ment test and to students enrolled in reading and 
science courses. Materials are offered to assist 
with vocabulary and pronunciation as well. The 
Spanish Center offers students enrolled in 
Spanish courses the opportunity to practice their 
pronunciation and to consult a tutor about 
grammar questions. 

In the Computer Center, students may use 
IBM and Macintosh computers for word process- 
ing, spreadsheets, or other software that is avail- 
able on the machines. A tutor is available to assist 
students who are not familiar with computers or 
who need help with software. 

Depending on tutor availability, the CLC 
may also offer assistance with other subjects. 
Look for CLC flyers each semester. Pick up a copy 
of TechnoBytes in the library, CLC, or Counseling 
Services, or call 686-3554 for more information 
about current offerings. 
2. The CLC co-sponsors a series of Student 
Success Workshops on academic topics, such as 
study skills, note-taking, learning styles, and test 
anxiety; life skills topics, such as stress manage- 
ment; and career skills workshops, including job 



hunting tools and career choices. Additional 
workshops are offered in the CLC for students in 
need of grammar or mathematics skills-building. 
Watch for flyers and brochures for dates, times, 
and locations of these workshops. 

3. The CLC offers a number of special courses 
in mathematics. Students use self-instructional 
materials, supplemented by assistance from CLC 
instructors, to earn course credit. Students may 
adjust their study schedule to suit their conven- 
ience, but all course requirements must be 
completed by the last day of the semester. 

Course content and requirements for CLC's 
special courses are identical to those for class- 
room segments of the same course, and the same 
tuition is charged. Attendance policies are strictly 
enforced from the first day of the semester. For 
example, students enrolled in a three-semester 
contact-hour course must attend the course in 
the CLC for three hours eveiy week. 

Students may register for CLC special courses 
during regular registration but must obtain an 
authorization form in the CLC and sign up for an 
orientation time before registering for the class. 

4. Telecourses are videotaped college-level 
courses televised for adult learners. These are 
complete learning systems designed for home or 
off-campus use, with content identical to compa- 
rable on-campus courses. However, the televised 
lessons allow instructors to provide demonstra- 
tions and other learning experiences which are 
unavailable in the traditional classroom setting. 
Students completing a telecourse earn full 
curriculum credit. 

Students register for telecourses in the same 
way as for classroom sections of credit courses 
and pay the same tuition. Besides viewing the les- 
sons (on television at home or on videotape in 
the CLC), students are expected to attend an ori- 
entation session as well as three to five workshops 
and testing sessions on campus. Students must 
also purchase textbooks and study guides and 
prepare written assignments. Instructors are 
available to meet with telecourse students at the 
workshop sessions, during their scheduled office 
hours, and by telephone. 



24 



Counseling and Student 
Development 

The experience of being a student can be 
both exciting and challenging. The Counseling 
Services Department is aware of the diverse expe- 
riences of Durham Tech students and provides 
many services which foster their academic success 
and personal growth. From admission to gradua- 
tion, students have found these services to be an 
important part of their success. 

Hours of Operation 

The Counseling and Student Development 
office is open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through 
Thursdays and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. Students 
may also make an appointment to meet with a 
staff member at other times by calling (919) 686- 
3652 or by visiting the White Building, room 23. 

Academic and Personal Counseling 

In keeping with Counseling Services' com- 
mitment to student success, counselors also real- 
ize that a student's academic performance is 
affected by pressures of many types and degrees. 
For that reason, counseling staff members are 
available to meet with students individually to 
discuss a wide range of personal concerns. 
Counselors provide encouragement and support, 
intervene in times of crisis, make referrals when 
necessary, and help students identify and resolve 
personal issues. All discussions and consultations 
are confidential. 

Career Services 

Our diverse, rapidly-growing economy offers 
tremendous opportunity for students searching 
for a job. However, identifying the career and spe- 
cific job that suits one's skills, abilities, and per- 
sonality can be a frustrating task. Career Services 
staff offer resource materials, interest inventories, 
workshops, and individual counseling to help 
students develop and clarify career goals. Services 
are available to Durham Tech students and 
alumni. 

Career Services staff also act as a liaison 
between students seeking jobs and prospective 
employers. Counselors maintain information on 
full-time and part-time job opportunities, con- 
duct job fairs, and coordinate placement inter- 
views. In addition, Career Services staff assist 



Student Services & 
Support Programs 




students with resume writing, interviewing 
techniques, and job-seeking skills. 

Durham Tech is a key partner in the 
Durham JobLink Career Center located a few 
blocks from the main campus. This partnership 
enables Durham Tech students and the residents 
of Durham to access countless job opportunities 
throughout the state. In addition, a part-time 
Employment Security Commission counselor is 
available in Counseling Services. Students inter- 
ested in taking advantage of Career Services 
should visit the Counseling Services office located 
in the White Building, room 23. 

Disability Services 

Students with physical, psychological, or 
learning disabilities may utilize services designed 
to create equal access to the many aspects of edu- 
cation. At Durham Tech, Disability Services pro- 
vides accommodations which reflect the college's 
commitment to accessible quality education. 

Students achieve educational access through 
the effective use of accommodations such as indi- 
vidualized educational planning; support staff, 
including note-takers and interpreters; assistive 
technology; alternative testing arrangements; and 
priority assistance during registration. Through a 
process of individual planning, students are 



encouraged to use their diverse abilities to suc- 
ceed. Students requesting accommodations due to 
a disabling condition must provide the college 
with current assessment documentation verifying 
a disability. This documentation must be submit- 
ted on the letterhead of a qualified professional 
and include a clear diagnostic statement, a 
description of the assessment tools used to render 
the diagnosis, and a statement reflecting the stu- 
dent's present needs and level of functioning. 
Copies of the Disability Services Documentation 
Standards are available in the Counseling 
Services office, located in the White Building, 
room 23. Students with disabilities are encour- 
aged to learn more about available accommoda- 
tions and services by calling the Disability 
Services coordinator at (919) 686-3606 (V) or 
(919) 686-3880 (TTY). 

Student Development 

The experience of college goes far beyond 
the classroom. Successful students acquire skills 
to manage education, career, and their personal 
lives. To foster the full development of students, 
Counseling Services staff are involved in all 
aspects of college life. Counseling staff answer 
questions and provide information about college 
activities, provide support to curriculum pro- 
grams, and create support services which address 
the needs of the college's diverse student popula- 
tion. Counselors often facilitate relationship skills 
through effective student and instructor commu- 
nication. 

Counseling staff, in conjunction with 
Campus Learning Center staff, also provide 
Student Success Workshops to address many 
important issues. Study skills, time management, 
test anxiety, health and wellness, career choices, 
and job hunting tools are only a few of the many 
topics addressed. Students are encouraged to take 
advantage of these workshops each semester. For 
information about available workshops and 
times, look for the current schedule of Student 
Success Workshops and the Student Services pub- 
lication TechnoBytes in the Counseling Services 
office located in the White Building, room 23, 
and at various other locations on campus. 



25 



Student Activities 

The college encourages student participation 
in organizations and activities. Student activities 
are designed to provide a variety of meaningful 
educational, cultural, and social experiences. 

All organizations must be chartered and 
approved by the Student Senate and must have a 
faculty or staff advisor. Student organizations 
may not restrict membership on the basis of race, 
sex, color, age, religion, national origin, or dis- 
ability. 

Student Ambassador Program 

Student Ambassadors participate in the col- 
lege's recruitment efforts on campus and in the 
community. They also serve as hosts for school 
functions, conduct campus tours, and assist with 
the registration information table and other reg- 
istration and orientation activities. Through the 
Durham Tech Foundation, ambassadors are 
awarded tuition at the in-state rate and a book 
and supply stipend for their service. 

Student Clubs and Organizations 

Durham Tech acknowledges the importance 
of student life outside the classroom and supports 
a variety of social, cultural, and professional 
opportunities to enhance a student's in-class edu- 
cational experiences. The following organizations 
are among those currently available to students 
at Durham Tech: Amigos Unidos (Spanish club); 
Book of the Month Club, Durham Tech 
Association for Education of Young Children; 
Electronics Engineering Technology Club; 
Gamma Beta Phi (academic honor society); Gay, 
Lesbian, and Bisexual Society; Literary Club; Phi 
Beta Lambda (business society); Practical 
Nursing Students' Club; Scholastic Opticians 
Association; Science Club; Single Parent Club; 
Spanish Honor Society; Student Committee for 
Social Justice; Student Nurses' Organization; 
Student Occupational Therapy Association; Tau 
Eta Sigma (dental); and Thespian Society 
(drama club). 

Activities and special events on campus 
include the following: campus festivals, fall and 
spring; Career Days; plays, and other cultural 
events; Cultural Exchange Day; Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., Day Celebration; Native American 
Celebration; Senior College Day; and Spring 
Talent Show. 



Student Services & 
Support Programs 




•*»"" 




Student Publications 

Recognizing the importance of a public 
forum for the written expression of ideas as well 
as the development of effective communication 
skills, Durham Tech supports student involve- 
ment in campus publications. Students produce 
Final Draft, a student literary magazine. 

While the views expressed in this publication 
do not necessarily reflect those of the college, fac- 
ulty and staff advisors assist students in develop- 
ing the publication in a manner consistent with 
responsible journalism, acceptable English com- 
position, and the stated purposes of the college. 

Student Senate 

The Student Senate provides input to the 
college's administration on decisions affecting 
students, makes decisions regarding the alloca- 
tion of student event funds, and plans student 
activities and events. The Senate also approves 
and provides support for student organizations. 
Student senators represent academic departments 
and student organizations. 



Student interest and leadership are necessary 
for the Student Senate to function effectively; stu- 
dents are encouraged to become actively involved. 
Additional information about the Student Senate 
is available from the Counseling Services office. 

Student Participation in College 
Decision Making 

Durham Tech encourages and provides for 
student involvement in institutional governance 
and decision making through various means. 
These include the following: 

1. The Student Senate consists of student repre- 
sentatives who provide input and recommenda- 
tions to the college's administration. 

2. A student serves as a non-voting member of 
the college's Board of Trustees. 

3. Student involvement also occurs through 
membership on advisory committees, task forces, 
and other campus committees. 

4. Students participate in college decision mak- 
ing through involvement in the evaluation of 
courses and services. 

5. Student involvement is promoted through 
on-going interaction with faculty and staff and 
through participation in student organizations 
and activities. 

Governance and Safety 
Student Code of Conduct 

All Durham Tech students are expected to 
conduct themselves as responsible adults. 
Behavior that persistently or grossly disrupts the 
educational process or functioning of the college, 
whether it occurs on campus or at any college- 
sponsored activity, may result in disciplinary 
action. Specific violations of the student code of 
conduct include the following; 

1 . Academic dishonesty, including cheating 
and plagiarism as outlined in the college's 
Academic Honesty Policy; 

2. Vandalism, damage, destruction, or theft of 
institutional or private property; 

3. Abuse or misuse of computing resources as 
outlined in the college's Appropriate Use of 
Computing Resources policy; 

4. Forgery, falsification, alteration, or misuse of 
college records, documents, or identification; 



26 



5. Violation of regulations concerning drug 
and alcohol use as outlined in the college's Drug 
and Alcohol Policy (see Index for page number); 

6. Possession or use of firearms, knives, explo- 
sives, dangerous chemicals, or other weapons, 
except for legally authorized use of either on 
campus or at any college-sponsored event; 

7. Verbal or physical harassment, assault, or 
battery of a college employee, student, or visitor; 

8. Sexual harassment as outlined in the 
college's Sexual Harassment Policy (see Index 
for page number); 

9. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene 
conduct; 

10. Breach of peace on college property or at 
any college-sponsored function in a manner that 
disturbs the privacy of other individuals and/or 
the instructional program; 

1 1 . Failure to comply with the directions of 
college officials, faculty, staff, or campus security 
officers acting in the performance of their duties; 

12. Failure to identify oneself when on college 
property or at a college-sponsored or college- 
supervised event upon the request of college 
officials, faculty, staff, or campus security officers 
acting in the performance of their duties; 

13. Violation of college regulations or policies; 
and 

14. Breach of any federal, state, or local crimi- 
nal law either on campus or at any college-spon- 
sored activity. 

Violations of this code of conduct may result 
in immediate sanctions including probation or 
suspension from the college by the president, 
upon recommendation by the chief instructional 
officer, or expulsion from the college by the presi- 
dent, upon recommendation by the chief student 
services officer and the chief instructional officer. 
Additionally, the college may defer imposition of 
sanctions pending the outcome of an investiga- 
tion. Students who wish to appeal any sanction 
should consult the Student Grievance Procedure 
as outlined in this publication (see Index for 
page number). 



Student Services & 
Support Programs 




Drug and Alcohol Policy 

Problems with substance abuse are extremely 
complex. Substance abuse on campus can impact 
the safety and well being of faculty, staff, and 
students. Therefore, it is the policy of Durham 
Technical Community College that the unlawful 
manufacture, distribution, dispensation, posses- 
sion, or use of alcohol or a controlled substance 
is prohibited on college premises and is prohibit- 
ed as part of college-sponsored activities. Any 
student violating this policy will be subject to 
disciplinary action up to and including expulsion 
and referral for prosecution. The specifics of this 
policy are outlined as follows: 

1 . Any student who possesses, uses, sells, 
manufactures, gives, or in any way transfers a 
controlled substance or alcoholic beverage to 
another person on college premises or as part of 
any college-sponsored activity will be subject to 
disciplinary action up to and including expulsion 
and referral for prosecution. 

2. The term "controlled substance" means any 
drug listed in 21 CFR Part 1308 and other federal 
regulations as well as those listed in Article V, 
Chapter 90, of the North Carolina General 
Statutes. Generally, these are drugs which have a 
high potential for abuse. They include but are not 
limited to the following: cocaine, heroin, mari- 
juana, PCP, and "crack." They also include any 



"legal" drugs that have not been prescribed 
specifically by a licensed physician. 

3. If any student is convicted of violating any 
criminal drug or alcoholic beverage control 
statute, while on college premises, in the work- 
place, or as part of any college-sponsored activity, 
he or she will be subject to disciplinary action up 
to and included expulsion. Alternatively, the col- 
lege may require the student to successfully finish 
a drug abuse program sponsored by an approved 
private or governmental institution as a precondi- 
tion of continued enrollment at the college. 

4. Each student is required to inform the 
college, in writing, within five days after he or she 
is convicted for violation of any federal, state, or 
local criminal drug or alcoholic beverage control 
statute where such violation occurred while on 
college premises, or in the workplace, or as part 
of any college-sponsored activity. A conviction 
means a finding of guilt (including a plea of 
nolo contendre) or the imposition of a sentence 
by a judge or jury in any federal or state court. 

5. Employees working under federal grants 
who are convicted of violating drug laws in the 
workplace, on college premises, or as part of any 
college-sponsored activity, shall be reported to 
the appropriate federal agency. The Human 
Resources Department of Durham Technical 
Community College must notify the U.S. 
Government agency through which the grant was 
made, within 10 days after receiving notice from 
the employee or otherwise receiving actual notice 
of a violation of a drug statute occurring in the 
workplace. The college shall take appropriate 
disciplinary action within 30 calendar days from 
receipt of notice. All employees must abide by this 
policy as a condition of further employment on 
any federal government grant. 

Students employed under the College Work 
Study Program are considered to be employees 
of the college if the work is performed for the 
college in which the student is enrolled. For work 
performed for a federal, state, or local public 
agency, a private nonprofit, or a private for-profit 
agency, students are considered to be employees 
of the college unless the agreement between the 
college and the other organization specifies that 
the organization is considered to be the employer. 



27 



Possible disciplinary action for students 
violating this policy may include probation, sus- 
pension, expulsion, denial of participation in col- 
lege activities, denial of opportunity to represent 
the college, required completion of a drug or 
alcohol rehabilitation program, termination of 
college work-study employment, and referral for 
prosecution. 

Sexual Harassment Policy 

Any individual who feels that he or she has 
been subjected to acts of sexual harassment 
should report the incident immediately. The indi- 
vidual may choose to report the incident either 
during a private and confidential discussion of 
the issue with a counselor or by initiating a for- 
mal complaint to the affirmative action officer or 
another college administrator. 

A student desiring to pursue the issue 
through a confidential meeting should go to 
Counseling Services to discuss the matter with a 
counselor on an informal basis. An employee 
desiring to pursue the issue in a confidential set- 
ting should meet with the affirmative action offi- 
cer. During this private and confidential discus- 
sion, the counselor or affirmative action officer 
will help the student or employee determine the 
best course of action to resolve the situation. If 
desired by the individual, the counselor may 
facilitate a mediation session between the parties 
involved in order to resolve the situation as 
quickly as possible. Any mediated resolution will 
close the matter. 

A student can report a formal complaint of 
sexual harassment to the dean of Student 
Services/vice president for Administrative and 
Support Services, the affirmative action officer, or 
appropriate program director or academic dean. 
An employee can report a formal complaint of 
sexual harassment to the director of Human 
Resources, the affinnative action officer, or 
his/her immediate supervisor. All formal com- 
plaints of sexual harassment will be investigated. 
The administrator receiving the initial formal 
complaint will complete an Incident Report Form 
which will be forwarded to the affirmative action 
officer for investigation. The person initiating the 
formal complaint will receive a response from the 
affirmative action officer within 10 working days 



Student Services 



of the initial complaint. This written response 
should include an explanation of the investiga- 
tion process and a reasonable time frame for the 
resolution of the complaint. 

Additional information regarding these 
procedures is available from the office of the 
affirmative action officer. 

Appropriate Use of Computing 
Resources Policy 

Durham Technical Community College pro- 
vides a variety of computing resources to faculty, 
staff, students, and in some cases other members 
of the public. The appropriate use of these 
resources, including personal computers, servers, 
networks, data sets, printers, Internet access, and 
software, are the subject of this policy 

The College's Rights 

The college owns most of the computers and 
all of the internal computer network used on 
campus. The college has rights to the software 
and information residing on, developed on, or 
licensed for these computers and networks. The 
college has the right to administer, protect, and 
monitor this collection of computers, software, 
and networks. The college also has the right to 
establish standards for security, privacy, and data 
integrity on its computing systems as it deems 
appropriate. Furthermore, the college may deter- 
mine the nature and extent of access to computer 
resources, may deny individuals access to com- 
puter systems and networks, and may determine 
who may connect a device to the computer sys- 
tem and the specifications for such a device. 

The Individual's Responsibilities 

1. Computers are to be used for instruction, 

research, learning, and administration only. 

Durham Tech's computers are for Durham Tech's 
use. They may not be used for outside business 
projects or personal activities. 



2. Licensing and copyright laws are to be 
respected. All software installed or used on 
Durham Tech computers must be legally licensed 
for use on the college premises. Copyrighted 
software may not be copied from computers on 
campus or installed on campus computers if the 
software is not legally licensed to the college. 
Licenses for software purchased by Durham 
Tech will be kept on file in the Information 
Technology Services Department. All other soft- 
ware licenses obtained by faculty and staff must 
be maintained by that user and produced upon 
request for verification. This includes all software, 
including but not limited to freeware, shareware, 
and complementary software provided to faculty. 
Students are not allowed to load software unless 
under the direction of the faculty or staff. 

3. Secure passwords are to be maintained. 
Account passwords may not be shared with any- 
one, except instructors in certain cases. Valid 
passwords must include at least one nonletter 
character and should be changed at least every 
four months. 

4. College computer facilities are to be 
protected. Users are expected to abide by all fed- 
eral and state laws governing computer use. Users 
may not attempt to evade, disable, or "crack" 
passwords or other security provisions. Also, users 
may not knowingly install any virus or destruc- 
tive computer program onto campus computers. 

Other Limitations and Warnings 

1 . Resource limits may be imposed on all 
systems. Users must abide by any resource limits 
set. 

2. Privacy is not guaranteed. While there are 
technical and administrative policies in place 
that should protect computer information, com- 
puter data security is never perfect. 

• Unauthorized computer users may be 
able to breach security restrictions and gain 
access to your files. 

• Misdirected e-mail is not uncommon. 
Your e-mail messages may be seen by unintended 
recipients at Durham Tech or elsewhere on the 
Internet. If e-mail is considered confidential, it 
should be sent by other means. 



28 



Student Services 



• Systems administrators and other staff 
members may require access to files on any 
Durham Tech computers to perform audits or 
resolve technical problems. The college has the 
right to monitor e-mail transmission over its 
internal computer network. Legal mandates 
regarding confidentiality will be observed by com- 
puter staff when accessing data files. 
3. Users are responsible for backing up 
their data. Users are responsible for backing up 
their own data files unless told that backup serv- 
ices are provided for their system. 

Sanctions 

Anyone who violates this policy is subject to 
the college's student code of conduct, the employ- 
ees' due process policy, and possible criminal 
complaint or civil action for damages. (It is a 
violation of federal and/or state criminal status 
for a person to knowingly access or attempt to 
access a computer, computer system, computer 
network or any part thereof, for the purpose of (i) 
devising or executing any scheme or artifice to 
defraud; (ii) services by means of false or fraudu- 
lent pretenses, representations, or promises; (iii) 
unauthorized access; (iv) altering, damaging, or 
destroying either computer hardware, software, or 
data; (v) without authorization, denying or caus- 
ing the denial of computer system services to any 
authorized user of such computer system services; 
(vi) transmitting a computer virus with the intent 
to cause damage; (vii) transmitting without 
proper authorization a program, information, 
code, or command with reckless disregard of a 
substantial and unjustifiable risk that the trans- 
mission will cause damage; or (viii) trafficking 
in passwords with the intent to defraud. In many 
cases, such violations are felonies and carry 
penalties of up to 10 years in prison [18 U.S.C. 
1030; N.C. General Statutes 14-453 to 14-456]. 

Student Grievance Procedure 

From time to time, conflicts and disagree- 
ments may arise between students and their 
instructors or between students and staff. Students 
are encouraged to first try to resolve any griev- 
ances through open communication with 
involved parties. When this is not possible, or the 
problem remains unresolved, students may utilize 
the grievance procedure detailed here. 




^ 





kafes' 



Purpose of the Student Grievance 
Procedure 

The faculty and staff at Durham Technical 
Community College attempt, in good faith, to 
resolve complaints and problems as they arise. 
However, if a matter remains unresolved, the pur- 
pose of the student grievance procedure is to pro- 
vide a system to resolve student complaints 
against faculty and staff. This procedure applies 
to all student complaints excluding those involv- 
ing claims of discrimination on the basis of age, 
race, sex, or disability, claims of sexual harass- 
ment, or claims concerning individual grades. 
Please refer to the college's Sexual Harassment 
Policy concerning these exceptions. The Sexual 
Harassment Policy is included in this publication 
(see Index for page number). 

Procedure 

The student may elect to seek assistance 
from staff in Counseling Services at the begin- 
ning or during any step in the grievance process. 
Counseling Services staff serve as advocates for 
students by helping provide advice and counsel 
on the proper procedures associated with filing 
and resolving grievances; helping students identi- 
fy specific issues involved in grievance com- 
plaints; and assisting in developing approaches, 
including written grievances, for students to pur- 
sue their grievances within the spirit and intent of 
the student grievance procedures. 



First Step 

The student must go to the instructor or staff 
member where the alleged problem originated. 
An attempt will be made to resolve the matter 
equitably and informally at this level. The confer- 
ence must take place within seven working days 
of the incident that generated the complaint. 

Second Step 

If the grievance is not resolved at the infor- 
mal conference, the student may file a written let- 
ter of grievance. The student should contact 
either the senior vice president or the vice presi- 
dent of Administrative and Support Services, 
depending upon which vice president is the 
supervisor of the employee against whom the 
grievance would be filed. The vice president will 
explain the grievance process to the student. The 
student must present a completed grievance letter 
to the appropriate vice president within seven 
working days after satisfying the first step in the 
grievance process. The vice president will review 
the complaint and determine if the complaint is 
grievable. If the issue is determined by the vice 
president to not be grievable, the vice president 
will notify the student of this decision in writing 
within seven working days. If the issue is deter- 
mined by the vice president to be grievable, the 
vice president will refer the grievance to the 
immediate supervisor involved. The supervisor 
from the department involved shall respond in 
writing to the student within seven working days 
of receipt of the student's grievance letter. 

Third Step 

If the written statement of the supervisor 
does not satisfy the grievant, a request to appear 
before a grievance committee may be made. The 
student must submit a written request within 
seven working days after receiving the written 
response of the supervisor. The request shall 
include a copy of the original grievance letter and 
the reason the supervisor's response is unsatisfac- 
tory. A copy of the supervisor's response must be 
attached to the request by the student. 

The vice president shall ensure that a griev- 
ance hearing committee is appointed in a man- 
ner consistent with the Student Grievance 
Hearing Committee section of this procedure. The 
vice president will send copies of the appeal to the 
members of the committee, the employee, and 



29 



the employee's supervisor. The employee against 
whom the grievance was filed shall be given an 
opportunity to respond in writing to the chairper- 
son of the committee. 

Meeting(s) shall be conducted between 7 
and 15 working days following the date of the 
request. A postponement may be granted by the 
chairperson upon written request of either party if 
the reason stated justifies such action. 

The committee shall hold interviews with 
the grievant, the employee, and the supervisor, 
singularly, and in the absence of other witnesses. 
The committee may interview any additional wit- 
nesses that it considers necessary to render a fair 
decision. 

The committee shall serve as a fact-finding 
group and shall determine the facts of the case. 
Upon completion of all meetings, the committee 
shall make a recommendation to the appropriate 
vice president. The chairperson shall forward a 
copy of the committee's recommendation to all 
parties involved and to the vice president within 
two working days of the decision. 

The vice president will weigh the commit- 
tee's recommendation, review all other pertinent 
information, and render a decision regarding the 
grievance. The vice president shall communicate 
a decision in writing to all involved parties within 
seven working days of receiving the committee's 
recommendation. 

Fourth Step 

Either party may request in writing that the 
president review the vice president's decision 
within seven working days of the vice president's 
decision. The president shall review the previous 
findings, conduct whatever additional inquiries 
are deemed necessary, and render a final decision 
within seven working days of receipt of the 
request. 

The Student Grievance Hearing Committee 

The president may appoint a standing 
Student Grievance Hearing Committee from 
which the vice presidents may select individuals 
to form an ad hoc committee for each individual 
grievance. The committee shall include broad- 
based representation from the campus communi- 
ty and shall include at least one student. 



Student Services 



jbhhmj 



i 



'■ 



■ ;\._ 




Rights of Parties Involved in a Grievance 
When a grievance committee meeting is 
scheduled, the parties involved are entitled to the 
following: 

1 . A written notice of the complaint; 

2. A written notice of the time and place of the 
meeting; 

3. A review of all documentation evidence that 
each party presents at the meeting; 

4. Access to the names of the witnesses who 
may testify; 

5. Appearance in person and presentation of 
information on his or her behalf, including the 
calling of witnesses and asking questions of any 
person present at the meeting; and 

6. The right to counsel with the role of the per- 
son acting as counsel being solely as advisor to 
the client and not as a speaker on behalf of the 
client. 



Safety and Security 

Campus Security provides 24-hours-a-day 
patrol protection for college buildings, grounds, 
and parking lots. It responds to crime reports, 
fires, medical emergencies, traffic accidents, and 
other incidents requiring police assistance. 

Students, faculty, and staff can report emer- 
gencies to Security by dialing extension 3555 
from any on-campus phone or calling the police 
by dialing 9-911- To report security or safety haz- 
ards or other non-emergency situations, call the 
Security Department at 686-3382. 

Anyone who must walk alone on campus 
at night is encouraged to take advantage of a 
Security Department escort by dialing extension 
3555 or 3382 from a campus phone. A member of 
the Security staff will accompany the caller to any 
campus building or parking lot. 

Identification Card 

During registration, a student must obtain 
an identification card and parking decal from the 
Security office, located at the back annex of the 
White Building. 

Campus Safety Tips 

• Park in well-lighted areas and lock your 
car, even in the daytime. Keep packages and 
personal belongings out of sight. 

• Do not walk or jog alone, especially after 
dark. Call Security for an escort. 

• Be aware of people and activities around 
you, and report suspicious behavior to Security. 

First Aid 

Security personnel can provide first aid for 
minor injuries. They are also trained as first 
responders in medical emergencies. For medical 
assistance, call extension 3555 or 9-91 1. 

Lost and Found 

Any lost and found items should be turned 
in to the Security office. Persons looking for lost 
items should check in the Security office. 




30 



Adult Education and 
Basic Skills Programs 

Durham Technical Community College 
offers several programs of study for adults who 
want to improve their basic literacy skills 
or complete their high school education. Many 
graduates of these programs continue their edu- 
cation at Durham Tech or pursue job training 
opportunities. 

Admission to these programs is open to 
adults 18 years of age and older. The admission 
process begins with a placement test to determine 
where students should start in the program. Most 
courses are free, although students in some 
programs must buy their books and pay a small 
student fee. 

Adult Basic Education (ABE) 

The ABE program serves adults who read 
below the ninth-grade level. Students take courses 
in basic reading, writing, and math, which 
prepare them to enter the Adult High School 
Diploma or GED program. 

Adult High School Diploma (AHSD) 

This program offers courses that lead to a 
high school diploma. Students must complete the 
number of courses required by the state of North 
Carolina and must pass the state competency 
tests. Students who meet these requirements 
receive an adult high school diploma. They may 
then continue their education at Durham Tech 
or another college or pursue other postsecondary 
opportunities. Durham Tech offers the AHSD 
program in cooperation with the public school 
systems of Durham and Orange counties. 



Adult Education 

& 

Basic Skills Programs 



General Educational Development 
(GED) 

As an official GED testing center, Durham 
Tech offers instruction for adults who have not 
completed high school but who have learned 
from their life and work experiences. GED courses 
prepare students to take tests in English, social 
studies, science, reading, and math. Students who 
pass all parts of the GED examination receive a 
high school equivalency certificate awarded by 
the North Carolina State Board of Community 
Colleges. GED graduates may enroll at Durham 
Tech or another college for further education, or 
they may gain job skills in other ways. 

English as a Second Language (ESL) 

ESL courses are open to adults whose native 
language is not English. Courses range from 
beginning to advanced levels of instruction. 
Advanced students may take conversation courses 
and other specialized subjects. All ESL courses 
help students cope with real-life situations requir- 
ing the use of English. Fees may be required for 
higher level courses. 







Compensatory Education (CED) 

The CED program serves the needs of men- 
tally retarded adults. It offers instruction in lan- 
guage, math, social science, health, consumer 
education, and community living. The program 
gives students opportunities to become more 
independent; to benefit from pre-vocational 
training; and to acquire the skills they need to 
manage work, community, social, and personal 
responsibilities. 

Human Resources Development (HRD) 

Designed for unemployed and underem- 
ployed adults, the HRD program provides struc- 
tured pre-employment training, counseling, and 
assistance leading to permanent employment or 
further job-related training. The program is 
designed to reduce reliance on public assistance 
and unemployment benefits by preparing partici- 
pants to enter the labor market and become 
economically self-sufficient. No student fee is 
charged. 

Workplace Literacy 

For local industries and businesses, the col- 
lege can provide on-site instruction for employees 
who need to upgrade skills in reading, math, 
communication, and other work-related abilities. 
This customized training may include Adult Basic 
Education, GED, English as a Second Language, 
and other basic job performance skills, depending 
on the organization's specific needs. 






i 



I 



<k * 




31 



Corporate and Continuing 
Education Programs 

Durham Technical Community College 
offers several non-credit education and training 
programs, courses, and activities to meet the life- 
long learning needs of citizens in its service area 
of Durham and Orange counties. 

Corporate Education Department 

The purpose of the Corporate Education 
Department is to identify the training and educa- 
tion needs of businesses and industries in the 
college service area and to provide programs and 
services which meet or exceed those needs. To 
accomplish this purpose, the Corporate Education 
Department engages in extensive and ongoing 
interaction with human resource and training 
professionals from businesses and industries in 
the service area to identify employees' education 
and training needs, identify resources both inside 
and outside the institution necessary to meet 
these needs, and coordinate the delivery of 
resources to meet these identified needs. 
Programs within the Corporate Education 
Department include Occupational Extension, 
New and Expanding Industry Training, Focused 
Industrial Training, the Small Business Center, 
the Personal Computer Training Center, and 
Community Service. 

Occupational Instruction 

One of the most important purposes of the 
Coiporate Education Department is to provide 
opportunities for people wanting to improve their 
job-related skills or to prepare for entering or 
reentering the work force. Occupation-related, 
non-credit courses and programs are conducted 
throughout the year in a wide variety of disci- 
plines. These include computer applications, 
health and safety procedures, certification renew- 
al and licensure preparation health and safety 
procedures, and professional continuing educa- 
tion for specialists in various career fields. 



Corporate & 

Continuing Education 

Programs 



Personal Computer Training 

The personal computer training facility 
housed in the Corporate Education Center has 
state-of-the-art computer hardware technology 
installed in a networked environment. Students 
learn the most recent versions of computer appli- 
cation software. Instructors use "hands-on" 
methods to teach how personal computers and 
software are employed in business and industry 
settings. Computer courses are also conducted at 
the Northern Durham Center and, on a more 
limited basis, at the college's satellite locations in 
Orange County. 

Customized Training 

Training tailored to meet the specific needs 
of the organization and its employees is available 
in such areas as supervision, quality improve- 
ment, management and leadership development, 
team building and communications, and various 
technical applications. The training may be con- 
ducted at the company site or on campus and 
may be scheduled at the employer's convenience. 

New and Expanding Industry 

This customized program is specifically 
intended for new companies moving into the col- 
lege's service region or for existing companies 
that are expanding their operations. The training 
is coordinated with the North Carolina 
Department of Community Colleges and the 
Employment Security Commission. 




Focused Industrial Training 

Tailored to meet an existing company's 
specific needs, this training is directed primarily 
toward workers in construction, maintenance, 
and manufacturing occupations who need to 
upgrade their skills and expand their technical 
knowledge. Focused training can be conducted 
for as few as one or two individuals. This pro- 
gram offers highly specialized instruction that 
otherwise might not be economically feasible. 

Zenger-Miller Human Resource 
Development 

Durham Tech is a licensed provider of 
Zenger-Miller human resource development pro- 
grams. Courses available for business and indus- 
try training include the following copyrighted 
selections: Frontline Leadership, Working, Team 
Leadership, Team Effectiveness, and Facilitating 
Successful Meetings. These courses are led by 
certified Zenger-Miller facilitators. 

Co-Sponsored Job Training 

Durham Tech regularly joins with other 
human resource agencies and programs, such as 
the North Carolina Department of Labor and area 
chambers of commerce, to offer specialized train- 
ing for specific target audiences. These ventures 
are often directed to the needs of underrepresent- 
ed populations in particular industries. 

Small Business Center 

Located in downtown Durham, the Small 
Business Center serves both existing and start-up 
companies of 100 or fewer employees. The center 
provides small business owners and managers 
with information needed to be successful, includ- 
ing advice on marketing, sales, bookkeeping, and 
management. Services include confidential coun- 
seling; technical assistance; seminars, courses 
and other training; referrals to other agencies; 
and access to a small business resource library. 



32 



Public Service Training 

The college also offers non-credit education- 
al opportunities for public service agencies and 
professionals through the Public Services 
Technologies Department. A wide range of public 
service training is available for volunteers and 
other public service personnel to maintain readi- 
ness in such areas as cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion, First Responder, Emergency Medical 
Technician, arson detection, hazardous materials 
management, defensive driving, and firearms 
handling. 

Heath Care Training 

The college provides non-credit training for 
health care agencies, institutions, and profession- 
als. Nursing Assistant I, a 12-week program that 
prepares students to perform basic nursing skills 
under professionals' supervision, is a health 
extension program offered by the college. This 
training emphasizes the mental, social, physical, 
and environmental needs of the patient; safety 
and restorative services; personal and special care 
procedures and activities; observations and meas- 
urements; communication and documentation; 
and the role of the nursing assistant as a member 
of the health care team. 

Community Service Programs 

This lifelong learning program offers cours- 
es, seminars, and other learning activities that 
contribute to the community's overall cultural, 
civic, and intellectual growth. The program offers 
adults the opportunity to develop new or 
increased competence in the avocational, aca- 
demic, or practical skill areas. Courses are offered 
in foreign languages, arts and crafts, home 
improvements and repairs, and a wide variety of 
personal development subjects. 



Corporate & 
Continuing Education 

Programs/General 
Policies & Procedures 



General Policies and 
Procedures 

Admission, Registration, and Fees 

Admission to all publicly offered Adult, 
Corporate Education, and Continuing Education 
programs is open to adults 18 years and older on 
a first-come, space-available basis unless special 
admission requirements must be met. Payment of 
registration fees and any special fees must also be 
made prior to attending class. The current state- 
regulated registration fee for Continuing 
Education courses is $35 per course. This fee is 
subject to change by the N.C. General Assembly. 

Continuing Education Unit (CEU) 

Durham Technical Community College is 
authorized to award continuing education units 
(CEU) for the successful completion of non-credit 
Occupational Extension/Continuing Education 
courses. One CEU is defined as "10 contact hours 
of participation in an organized continuing edu- 
cation program under responsible sponsorship, 
capable direction, and qualified instruction." The 
number of CEUs awarded for a course is recorded 
on the Continuing Education transcript and on 
the certificate of completion awarded for courses 
of 10 or more hours of instruction. The CEU is 
widely accepted as a recognized standard of pro- 
fessional development. 





Course Refunds 

If a Continuing Education course is can- 
celled, a complete refund is made automatically. 
Refunds are otherwise subject to the current poli- 
cy and procedures in effect at the time of registra- 
tion and consistent with state law. A copy of the 
Continuing Education refund policy is available 
at all registration sites and is published in the 
course schedule. 

Course Repeats 

Anyone registering for the same Occupa- 
tional Extension course more than twice in a 
five-year period will be required to pay $35 or 
more to register unless the course is required for 
certification or licensure renewal, in which case 
the regular registration fee would apply. 

Senior Citizens 

Durham Tech waives the registration fee for 
persons 65 years or older, unless a course is con- 
ducted on a self-support basis. Senior citizens are 
responsible for paying any additional fees or 
expenses required for a course, such as the com- 
puter use fee. 

Self-Support Courses 

Some courses are offered by the college on a 
self-support basis, which means they are not con- 
ducted with state funding. The fees for these 
courses vary. Registration fee exemptions for sen- 
ior citizens do not apply to self-support courses. 



33 



Accounting is often considered "the lan- 
guage of business" because of the need to record, 
classify, summarize, and interpret results of busi- 
ness operations in quantitative or financial terms. 
Its three major fields are public accounting, pri- 
vate or industrial accounting, and governmental 
and non-profit accounting. 

In their work, accountants must often bring 
difficult problems to a satisfactory conclusion by 
gathering and analyzing relevant information; 
and accountants must meet and talk with 
employees throughout the organization. 

Therefore, accountants must communicate 
clearly and effectively and must understand all 
facets of the organization. 

The Accounting program is designed to 
build a solid foundation in accounting principles, 



Programs of Study 
Accounting 



theories, and practices. This is achieved by com- 
bining accounting courses with courses in the 
related fields of business and computing and by 
supplementing this instruction with general edu- 
cation subject matter such as English, public 
speaking, and critical thinking. 

The curriculum prepares the graduate for an 
entry-level accounting position, such as junior 
accountant, bookkeeper, accounting clerk, cost 
clerk, and payroll clerk and for related occupa- 



tions in data processing. With experience and 
sometimes additional education, an individual 
will be able to advance. 

Students planning to sit for the Certified 
Public Accountants' Examination may take 
accounting courses toward fulfillment of that 
exam's accounting education requirement. 

Students may take day or evening classes. 
Day students may complete the program in five 
semesters. Evening students may complete the 
program in eight semesters. The Associate of 
Applied Science degree is awarded upon success- 
ful completion of the program. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Accounting - Degree 

Day Program @ 5 Semesters 



1 - Fall 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 

2 - Spring 



ACC 121 

ACC 140 

BUS 110 

CIS 120 

ENG 112 

3 - Summer 



BUS 115 

COM 231 

HUM 115 

PSY 150 

4 - Fall 



Business Law I 
Public Speaking 
Critical Thinking 
General Psychology 



ACC 129 
ACC 220 
ACC 225 
ECO 251 

5 - Spring 



Principles of Accounting II 3 2 4 

Payroll Accounting 1 2 2 

Intro, to Business 3 3 

Spreadsheet I 2 2 3 

Argument-Based Research 3 3 



Individual Income Taxes 2 2 3 

Intermediate Accounting I 3 2 4 

Cost Accounting 3 3 

Principles of Microeconomics 3 3 
Major Elective 



ACC 221 Intermediate Accounting II 3 2 4 

ACC 227 Practices in Accounting 3 3 

ACC 269 Auditing 3 3 

Major Elective 

Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 63 

Major Elective Credit Hours 9 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 72 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Accounting - Degree 
Evening Program O 8 Semesters 



CLASS 



1 - Fall 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 
CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 
MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 

2 - Spring 



BUS 110 
ENG 112 
PSY 150 

4 - Fall 



ACC 129 Individual Income Taxes 
ACC 221 Intermediate Accounting 
ACC 225 Cost Accounting 

6 - Summer 



HUM 115 



7 - Fall 



Critical Thinking 
Major Elective 



ACC 227 Practices in Accounting 
ACC 269 Auditing 

Major Elective 

8 - Spring 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



ACC 121 Principles of Accounting II 3 2 4 

CIS 120 Spreadsheet I 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

3 - Summer 



Intro, to Business 3 3 

Argument-Based Research 3 3 

General Psychology 3 3 



ACC 140 Payroll Accounting 1 2 2 

ACC 220 Intermediate Accounting I 3 2 4 

BUS 115 Business Law I 3 3 

5 - Spring 



2 3 
2 4 
3 



ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 
COM 231 Public Speaking 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



3 





3 


3 





3 

63 
9 



72 



34 



The Architectural Technology curriculum 
provides individuals with knowledge and skills 
that will lead to employment and advancement 
in the field of architectural technology. Technical 
courses are included which will enable the gradu- 
ate to advance into related areas of work as job 
experience is obtained or to continue toward an 
advanced degree in an associate field of 
technology. 

Architectural technicians translate the archi- 
tect's design sketches into complete, accurate 
plans and drawings for construction purposes. 
The technician is involved in work requiring 



Programs of Study 

Architectural 
Technology 



knowledge of drafting, computer graphics, con- 
struction materials, mechanical and structural 
systems, estimating, building codes, and specifi- 
cations. 

Initial employment opportunities exist with 
architectural and engineering firms, private utili- 
ties, contractors, and municipal governments. 



The Architectural Technology curriculum is a 
two-year program which awards the Associate of 
Applied Science degree. The Architectural 
Technology program is offered during the day 
and may be completed in five semesters. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Architectural Technology - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters 



class 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



ARC 111 Intro, to Architectural Tech. 1 6 3 

ARC 112 Construction Materials and Methods 3 2 4 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

ARC 113 Residential Architectural Tech. 1 6 3 

ARC 114 Architectural CAD 1 3 2 

ARC 131 Building Codes 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I* 2 2 3 



3 - Summer 



ARC 119 Structural Drafting 

ARC 211 Light Construction Tech. 

ARC 240 Site Planning 

PSY 150 General Psychology 

4 - Fall 



ARC 132 

ARC 230 

ARC 236 

ARC 263 

PHY 121 

5 - Spring 



Specifications and Contracts 2 2 

Environmental Systems 3 3 4 

Architectural Mech/Elec Tech. 4 2 

Intro, to ADA Title III 1 2 2 

Applied Physics I 3 2 4 



ARC 212 Commercial Construction Tech. 1 6 3 

ARC 213 Design Project 2 6 4 

ARC 220 Advanced Architectural CAD 1 3 2 

ARC 235 Architectural Portfolio 2 3 3 
Humanities Elective 




Required Course Credit Hours 65 

Humanities Elective Credit Hours 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 68 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



35 



The Associate Degree Nursing curriculum is 
designed to prepare the graduate to assess, ana- 
lyze, plan, implement, and evaluate nursing care. 
The graduate is eligible to apply to take the 
National Council Licensure Examination 
(NCLEX-RN), which is required to practice as a 
registered nurse. 

Individuals desiring a career in registered 
nursing should take biology, algebra, and chem- 
istry courses before entering the program. 

The registered nurse may be employed in a 
wide variety of health care settings, such as hospi- 
tals, long-term care facilities, clinics, physicians' 
offices, industry, and community health agencies. 



Programs of Study 

Associate Degree 
Nursing 



Approved by the North Carolina Board of 
Nursing, the five-semester Associate Degree 
Nursing program provides the knowledge and 
skills needed to function effectively in all areas of 
the profession. Clinical and classroom experi- 
ences represent an integrated approach, with the 
student moving from simple to complex nursing 
concepts and skills. The classroom portion of the 



program is taught during the day. Clinical experi- 
ences are more flexible, with day and limited 
evening rotations available at health care facili- 
ties throughout the Triangle area. 

A new student may enroll in the fall semes- 
ter. Students are required to have CPR certifica- 
tion and be a certified Nursing Assistant I before 
entering the first nursing course. Students who 
are licensed as a Practical Nurse may be enrolled 
as an advanced-standing student. Program grad- 
uates are awarded the Associate in Applied 
Science degree. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 




Associate Degree Nursing - Degree 

Day Program @ 5 Semesters HOURS 



CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 4 

CIS 113 Computer Basics 2 1 

NUR 110 Nursing I 5 3 6 8 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

2 - Spring 

BiO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 4 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

NUR 120A Nursing II 2.5 3 3.5 

NUR 120B Nursing II 2.5 3 3 4.5 



3 - Summer 










NUR 130 Nursing III 

SOC 210 Intro, to Sociology 

4 - Fall 


4 
3 


3 



6 



7 
3 


BIO 275 Microbiology 
NUR 210A Nursing IV 
NUR 210B Nursing IV 

5 - Spring 


3 
2.5 
2.5 


3 
1.5 
1.5 



6 
6 


4 
5 
5 



ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 
NUR 220 Nursing V 

Humanities Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



3 








3 


4 


3 


15 


10 

68 
3 



71 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



36 



One out of every seven people in the United 
States is employed by a business involved in the 
automotive industry. Automotive repair and serv- 
ice technicians are a large part of this group. The 
need for and importance of automotive techni- 
cians can be seen in the fact that more than 200 
million cars, trucks, and buses are on the roads 
today — all requiring maintenance, inspection, 
and repair. 

Work as an automotive technician varies in 
different shops. Some shops provide service and 
repair on all types of vehicles, while others spe- 
cialize in one or two makes of vehicle or types of 
repair. Areas of specialization include engine 
repair, automatic transmissions, manual trans- 
missions and drive trains, suspension and steer- 
ing, brakes, electrical/electronic systems, heating 



Programs of Study 

Automotive Systems 
Technology 



and air conditioning, and engine performance. 

Technicians inspect and test to determine 
the causes of faulty operation and perform main- 
tenance services. They repair or replace defective 
parts to return the vehicle to its proper perform- 
ance and economy using the technical informa- 
tion systems, knowledge, and skills learned in the 
Automotive Systems Technology program. 

This program helps a student develop tech- 
nical and manual skills through class assign- 
ments, discussions, and practical lab experiences 



in the clean and well-equipped automotive shop 
at Durham Tech. Day classes are offered in the 
Automotive Systems Technology program; and 
students may take evening classes to complete 
certificate options in Chassis Servicing and 
Engine Performance. 

An Associate Degree in Applied Science is 
awarded for successful completion of all require- 
ments in the five-semester Automotive Systems 
Technology program, and a diploma is awarded 
for completing the three-semester program. A stu- 
dent who successfully completes an evening cer- 
tificate option is awarded a certificate. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Automotive Systems Technology - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 










AUT 110 


Intro, to Automotive Tech. 


2 


2 


3 


AUT 151 


Brake Systems 


2 


2 


3 


AUT 152 


Brake Systems Lab 





2 


1 


AUT 171 


Heating and Air Conditioning 


2 


3 


3 


CIS 110 


Intro, to Microcomputers 


2 


2 


3 


ENG 111 


Expository Writing* 


3 





3 


MAT 115 


Mathematical Models* 


2 


2 


3 


2 - Spring 










AUT 115 


Engine Fundamentals 


2 


3 


3 


AUT 116 


Engine Repair 


1 


3 


2 


AUT 141 


Suspension and Steering 


2 


4 


4 


AUT 161 


Electrical Systems 


2 


6 


4 


ENG 112 


Argument-Based Research 


3 





3 


HUM 115 


Critical Thinking 


3 





3 



3 - Summer 



COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I 
4 - Fall 



20 



AUT 


164 


Automotive Electronics 


2 


2 


3 


AUT 


181 


Engine Performance-Electrical 


2 


3 


3 


AUT 


182 


Engine Performance-Electrical Lab 





3 


1 


AUT 


231 


Manual Drive Trains/Axles 


2 


3 


3 


AUT 


232 


Manual Drive Trains/Axles Lab 





3 


1 


BUS 


110 


Intro, to Business 


3 





3 


PHY 


121 


Applied Physics I 


3 


2 


4 


5 - Sprina 










AUT 


183 


Engine Performance-Fuels 


2 


3 


3 


AUT 


184 


Engine Performance-Fuels Lab 





3 


1 


AUT 


221 


Automatic Transmissions 


2 


6 


4 


AUT 


281 


Advanced Engine Performance 
Social Science Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 


2 


2 


3 
69 






Social Science Elective Credit Hours 




3 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 72 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 
060, MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be 
required based on placement test results. 



Automotive Systems Technology - Diploma 

Day Program © 3 Semesters HOURS 



CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



AUT 

AUT 

AUT 

CIS 

ENG 

MAT 



110 
151 
152 
110 
111 
115 



Intro, to Automotive Tech. 
Brake Systems 
Brake Systems Lab 
Intro, to Microcomputers 
Expository Writing* 
Mathematical Models* 



2 - Spring 



AUT 115 Engine Fundamentals 2 3 3 

AUT 116 Engine Repair 1 3 2 

AUT 141 Suspension and Steering 2 4 4 

AUT 161 Electrical Systems 2 6 4 

ENG 112 Argument-Basic Research 3 3 

PHY 121 Applied Physics 3 2 4 



3 - Summer 



AUT 181 Engine Performance-Electrical 2 

AUT 183 Engine Performance-Fuels 2 

AUT 231 Manual Drive Trains/Axles 2 

AUT 232 Manual Drive Trains/Axles Lab 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 

Chassis Servicing - Certificate 

Evening Program O 3 Semesters 

AUT 110 Intro, to Automotive Tech. 
Brake Systems 
Brake Systems Lab 
Suspension and Steering Systems 
Manual Drive Trains/Axles 
Manual Drive Trains/Axles Lab 

Engine Performance - Certificate 

Evening Program © 3 Semesters 

AUT 110 Intro, to Automotive Tech. 
Electrical Systems 
Engine Performance-Electrical 
Engine Performance-Electrical Lab 
Engine Performance-Fuels 
Engine Performance-Fuels Lab 



3 
3 
3 

1 

46 



AUT 


151 


AUT 


152 


AUT 


141 


AUT 


231 


AUT 


232 



AUT 


161 


AUT 


181 


AUT 


182 


AUT 


183 


AUT 


184 



37 



The Basic Law Enforcement Training 
(BLET) certificate program prepares individuals 
to take the Basic Training Law Enforcement 
Officers Certification Examination (mandated by 
the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education 
and Training Standards Commission) and the 
Justice Officers Basic Training Certification 
Examination (mandated by the North Carolina 
Sheriff's Education and Training Standards 
Commission). 

To complete this program successfully, the 
student must satisfy the minimum requirements 
for certification by one or both of these commis- 
sions. On completing the program, the successful 
student should possess the general attributes, 
knowledge, and skills needed to function as a law 
enforcement officer. 



Programs of Study 

Basic Law 
Enforcement Training 



Basic Law Enforcement Training is offered 
only as a unit; it must be completed in its entirety 
and cannot be taken in sections. State law 
requires mandatory attendance of all classes. The 
program director can authorize absences for 
emergencies. If absences for any reason exceed 10 
percent of all classes, the student is automatically 
excluded from further attendance and must com- 
plete another offering of BLET in its entirety. 



North Carolina's state, county, and munici- 
pal governments offer job opportunities in law 
enforcement. In addition, the knowledge, skills, 
and abilities acquired in this course of study 
qualify graduates for positions with private enter- 
prise in areas such as industrial, retail, and pri- 
vate security. 

The training includes a program of physical 
activity. To be admitted to the BLET program, a 
student must undergo a physical examination 
which must be completed before starting the pro- 
gram. Persons with felony convictions at any 
time or with class "B" misdemeanor convictions 
within the last five years are not eligible to enroll 
in the program. Students completing this one- 
semester program earn a certificate. 

For more information, please call 686-3500. 




38 



The Business Administration curriculum is 
designed to introduce students to the various 
aspects of the free enterprise system. Students are 
provided with a fundamental knowledge of busi- 
ness functions and processes as well as an under- 
standing of business organizations in today's 
global economy. 

Course work includes the study of business 
concepts such as accounting, business law, 
economics, management, and marketing. Skills 
related to applying these concepts are developed 
through the study of computer applications, 
communication, team building, and decision 
making. 

Through gaining this knowledge and 
developing these skills, students have a sound 



Programs of Study 

Business 
Administration 




education base for lifelong learning. Graduates 
are prepared for employment opportunities in 
government agencies, financial institutions, and 
large to small business or industry. 

Students may complete this program during 
the day or evening. Day students may complete 
the program in five semesters. Evening students 
may complete the program in eight semesters. 
The Associate in Applied Science degree is award- 
ed upon successful completion of the program. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Business Administration - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters 



CLASS 



1 - Fall 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



ACC 
BUS 
ECO 
ENG 
MAT 



120 
110 
251 
111 
115 



Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

Intro, to Business 3 3 

Principles of Microeconomics 3 3 

Expository Writing* 3 3 

Mathematical Models* 2 2 3 



2 - Spring 



ACC 121 Principles of Accounting II 3 2 4 

BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 3 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 



3 - Summer 



BUS 115 Business Law I 
HUM 115 Critical Thinking 
PSY 150 General Psychology 
Major Elective 

4 - Fall 



BUS 225 

BUS 255 

CIS 120 

MKT 120 

5 - Spring 



BUS 153 Human Resource Management 3 

BUS 239 Business Applications Seminar 1 

COM 231 Public Speaking 3 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



Business Finance 2 2 3 

Organizational Behavior in Business 3 3 

Spreadsheet I 2 2 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 3 

Major Elective 



61 
9 

70 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Business Administration - Degree 
Evening Program O 8 Semesters 



CLASS 



1 - Fall 



BUS 110 Intro, to Business 
ENG 111 Expository Writing* 
MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 

2 - Spring 



BUS 115 Business Law I 
HUM 115 Critical Thinking 
PSY 150 General Psychology 

4 - Fall 



ACC 121 Principles of Accounting 
MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 
Major Elective 

6 - Summer 



CIS 120 
COM 231 

7 - Fall 



Spreadsheet I 
Public Speaking 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

3 - Summer 



3 

3 

3 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 3 

ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 3 

5 - Spring 



BUS 153 Human Resource Management 3 3 
BUS 255 Organizational Behavior in Business 3 3 
Major Elective 

8 - Spring 



39 



BUS 225 Business Finance 
BUS 239 Business Applications Seminar 
Major Elective 


2 
1 


2 
2 


3 
2 


Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 






61 
9 


Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. 


Degree 




70 



Operations Management is a concentration 
of study in the Business Administration curricu- 
lum. This concentration is designed to educate 
individuals in the technical and managerial 
aspects of operations for manufacturing and serv- 
ice industries. 

Analytical reasoning, problem solving, and 
continuous improvement concepts required in 
today's dynamic business and industry environ- 
ments are emphasized. Concepts include quality; 
productivity; organizational effectiveness; finan- 
cial analysis; and the management of human, 
physical, and information resources. 

Graduates should qualify for leadership posi- 
tions by enhancing their professional skills in 
supervision, team leadership, operations plan- 
ning, quality assurance, manufacturing and serv- 
ice management, logistics/distribution, health 
and safety, human resources management, and 
inventory/materials management. 



Programs of Study 

Business Administration/ 

Operations Management 

Technology 

Both Associate in Applied Science degree and 
diploma programs are offered for the Operations 
Management concentration in Business 
Administration. The degree program may be 
completed in eight semesters, and the diploma 
program may be completed in five semesters. 
Students may complete either program in the 
evening. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 




■ 



Business Administration/Operations 
Management - Degree 
Evening Program O 8 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



BUS 110 Intro, to Business 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 

2 - Spring 



COM 231 Public Speaking 
HUM 115 Critical Thinking 
PSY 150 General Psychology 

4 - Fall 



BUS 115 
ISC 210 
MKT 120 

6 - Summer 



BUS 
CIS 



153 
120 



7 - Fall 



BUS 255 
ISC 131 
ISC 153 

8 - Spring 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

3 - Summer 



3 

3 

3 



BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 3 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 3 3 

5 - Spring 



Business Law I 3 3 

Operations and Production Planning 3 3 
Principles of Marketing 3 3 



Human Resource Management 3 3 
Spreadsheet I 2 2 3 



Organizational Behavior in Business 3 3 
Quality Management 3 3 

Motion and Time Study 2 3 3 



BUS 239 Business Applications Seminar 1 2 2 

OMT 112 Materials Management 3 3 

OMT 260 Issues in Operations Management 3 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 69 



Business Administration/Operations 

Management - Diploma 

Evening Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 3 3 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

Business Law I 3 3 

Principles of Microeconomics 3 3 

Operations and Production Planning 3 3 



BUS 


115 I 


ECO 


251 I 


ISC 


210 i 


3 - Summer 


ACC 


120 I 


CIS 


110 I 



Principles of Accounting I 
Intro, to Computers 



4 - Fall 



BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 3 

BUS 255 Organizational Behavior in Business 3 3 

ISC 131 Quality Management 3 3 

5 - Spring 

MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 3 

OMT 112 Materials Management 3 

OMT 260 Issues in Operations Management 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 43 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 






3 





3 





3 



40 



The Clinical Trials Research Associate 
curriculum prepares individuals to assist investi- 
gators and clinical researchers in the initiation, 
administration, coordination, and management 
of clinical research studies for the development 
of new drugs, clinical products, and treatment 
regimens. 

Course work includes in-depth study of drug 
development, federal regulations, good clinical 
practices, and clinical research processes. 
Supervised fieldwork provides skills application in 
protocol and CRF design, subject recruitment, 
regulatory compliance, accountability for drugs 
and devices, and auditing documentation in 
clinical research studies. 



Programs of Study 

Clinical Trials 
Research Associate 



Students completing the seven-semester 
evening program, which includes daytime field- 
work rotations, may earn the Associate in Applied 
Science degree. 

Students with current experience in direct 
clinical research may be eligible for the Level I 
and Level II programs. Students completing the 
four-semester Level I evening program or the 
four-semester Level II evening program earn a 
certificate. 



Graduates may be eligible to sit for national 
certification examinations. Research employment 
opportunities include medical centers, hospitals, 
pharmaceutical industries, clinics, research facil- 
ities, biotechnology or device companies, and 
physicians' offices. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Clinical Trials Research Associate - Degree 

Evening Program © 7 Semesters HOURS 

With Daytime Fieldwork Rotations CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



3 








3 


4 








4 


3 








3 



BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 4 

CTR 110 Intro, to Clinical Research 3 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

2 - Spring 

BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 4 

CTR 112 Clinical Research Terminology 2 2 
MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 2 2 3 

3 - Summer 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CTR 115 Clinical Research Regulations 3 3 
HUM 115 Critical Thinking 3 3 

4 - Fall 

BIO 271 Pathophysiology 

CTR 130 Clinical Research Mgmt. 

CTR 220 Research Site Management 

5 - Spring 

CTR 120 Research Protocol Design 3 3 

CTR 150 Research Fieldwork I 15 5 

PHM 120 Pharmacology I 3 3 

6 - Summer 

CTR 210 Research Data and Reports 2 2 
ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 
PHM 125 Pharmacology II 3 3 

7 - Fall 

CTR 250 Research Fieldwork II 
CTR 281 Trends in Clinical Research 
SOC 215 Group Processes 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 71 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 









24 


8 


3 








3 


3 








3 




^ 



Clinical Trials Research Associate - Level I 
Certificate 

Evening Program © 4 Semesters 

Intro, to Clinical Research 
Clinical Research Terminology 
Mathematical Models* 
Clinical Research Regulations 
Critical Thinking 
Research Site Management 



CTR 


110 


CTR 


112 


MAT 


115 


CTR 


115 


HUM 


115 


CTR 


220 



Clinical Trials Research Associate 

Certificate 

Evening Program © 4 Semesters 

Research Protocol Design 
Clinical Research Management 
Research Data and Reports 
Trends in Clinical Research 
Group Processes 



Level II 



CTR 


120 


CTR 


130 


CTR 


210 


CTR 


281 


SOC 


215 



41 



The Computer Programming curriculum 
prepares individuals for employment as computer 
programmers and related positions through study 
and applications in computer concepts, logic, 
programming procedures, languages, operating 
systems, data management, and business 
operations. 

Using appropriate languages and software, 
students solve business computer problems 
through programming techniques and proce- 
dures. The primary emphasis of the program is 
hands-on training in programming and related 
computer areas that prepares students to adapt as 
systems evolve. 



Programs of Study 

Computer 
Programming 




Graduates should qualify for employment in 
business, industry, and government organizations 
as programmers, programmer trainees, program- 
mer/analysts, software developers, systems techni- 
cians, database specialists, computer specialists, 
software specialists, or information systems 
managers. 

Students may complete the five-semester day 
offerings or seven-semester evening offerings in 
the Computer Programming program and receive 
an Associate in Applied Science degree. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Computer Programming - Degree 

Day Program O 5 Semesters 

1 - Fall 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CREDIT 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 3 3 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 2 1 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CIS 152 Database Concepts & Applications 2 2 3 

CSC 139 Visual Basic Programming 2 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

Humanities Elective 

Social Science Elective 



3 - Summer 



CIS 172 Introduction to the Internet 2 3 3 

CIS 246 Operating System - Unix 2 3 3 

COM 231 Public Speaking 3 3 

CSC 141 Visual C++ Programming 2 3 3 

4 - Fall 



ACC 120 
CIS 286 
CSC 143 
CSC 239 

5 - Spring 



Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

Systems Analysis & Design 3 3 

Object Oriented Programming 2 3 3 

Advanced Visual Basic 2 3 3 
Major Elective 



CIS 157 Database Programming I 2 2 

COE 110 World of Work 1 

COE 111 Co-Op Work Experience I 10 

CSC 241 Advanced Visual C++ 2 3 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



61 

7 
3 
3 

74 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, or RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Computer Programming - Degree 
Evening Program © 7 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 3 3 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 2 1 

2 - Spring 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CSC 139 Visual Basic Programming 2 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 2 2 3 



3 - Summer 






ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 
CIS 152 Database Concepts and Applications 2 

4 - Fall 


2 
2 


4 
3 



CIS 172 Intro, to the Internet 

COM 231 Public Speaking 

CSC 141 Visual C++ Programming 

CSC 239 Advanced Visual Basic 

5 - Spring 



CSC 241 



7- Fall 



Advanced Visual C++ 
Humanities Elective 



CIS 246 Operating System - UNIX 2 3 3 

CIS 286 Systems Analysis and Design 3 3 

CSC 143 Object Oriented Programming 2 3 3 
Major Elective 

6 - Summer 



CIS 157 Database Programming I 2 2 3 

COE 110 World of Work 1 1 

COE 111 Co-Op Work Experience I 10 1 

Major Elective 

Social Science Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 61 

Major Elective Credit Hours 7 

Humanities Elective Credit Hours 3 

Social Science Elective Credit Hours 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 74 



42 



The Criminal Justice Technology program 
prepares students for a career in the multifaceted 
criminal justice system. The curriculum is struc- 
tured around a core of courses allowing students 
to acquire the basic knowledge and skills needed 
to work in law enforcement, private security, and 
other related areas of criminal justice. 

The curriculum, which covers a variety of 
topics in criminal justice, focuses on developing 
the ability to understand and apply legal con- 
cepts, investigative techniques, interviewing and 
interrogation methods, evidence collection and 
presentation, report writing, patrol operations, 
and traffic management. 

The program also stresses practical skills 
needed to deal with the complex social, psycho- 
logical, political, and organizational factors that 
affect the discretionary decisions of law enforce- 
ment personnel. This blend of specific skills and 
informed perspectives prepares the Criminal 



Programs of Study 

Criminal Justice 
Technology 



Justice Technology graduate to make the difficult 
decisions often required when serving the needs 
of the community. 

Graduates find job opportunities in federal, 
state, county, and municipal governments. The 
knowledge and skills acquired in this program 



also qualify graduates for positions with private 
enterprise in areas such as industrial, retail, and 
private security. 

Graduates in Criminal Justice Technology 
earn an Associate in Applied Science degree. This 
degree program, which is offered during the day 
and evening, may be completed in five semesters. 
Classrooms, lab facilities, and faculty offices are 
located at the college's Northern Durham Center. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 




Criminal Justice Technology - Degree 

Day O and Evening Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CU\SS LAB CREDIT 

1 - Fall 

Intro, to Criminal Justice** 3 3 

Criminology 3 3 

Law Enforcement Operations** 3 3 

Expository Writing* 3 3 
Major Elective 



CJC 
CJC 
CJC 
ENG 



111 
112 
121 
111 



2 - Spring 



CJC 132 Court Procedure and Evidence 3 3 

CJC 222 Criminalistics 3 3 

CJC 231 Constitutional Law 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

3 - Summer 



CIS 110 



4 - Fall 



Intro, to Computers 
Humanities Elective 
Social Sciences Elective 



CJC 


114 


Investigative Photography 


1 


2 


2 


CJC 


122 


Community Policing 


3 





3 


CJC 


141 


Corrections 


3 





3 


CJC 


212 


Ethics and Community Relations 


3 





3 


CJC 
5-S 


215 
prinq 


Organization and Administration 


3 





3 



CJC 113 Juvenile Justice 

CJC 131 Criminal Law** 

CJC 213 Substance Abuse 

CJC 221 Investigative Principles** 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 



Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Social Sciences Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

60 

3 
3 



69 



43 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 

"Requirements for this course may be met through completion 
of CJC 100 Basic Law Enforcement Training. 



The Dental Laboratory Technology program 
teaches the techniques and skills that enable 
graduates to fabricate artificial dental restora- 
tions, as prescribed by a licensed practicing den- 
tist, and to function effectively in the dental labo- 
ratory. 

With specialized hand instruments and 
equipment, the dental laboratory technician uses 
materials such as gypsum, waxes, acrylics, 
ceramics, and metals to fabricate complete and 
partial dentures, crowns, bridges, and orthodontic 
appliances. Many dental laboratory technicians 
specialize in crowns and bridges, dentures, or 
dental ceramics. They may be employed by den- 
tists, commercial dental laboratories, schools of 
dentistry, or Veterans Administration hospitals. 
Companies manufacturing dental materials and 
equipment also employ technicians as sales rep- 
resentatives. 



Programs of Study 

Dental Laboratory 
Technology 



This curriculum includes courses in com- 
plete and partial denture techniques, crown and 
bridge techniques, ceramics, and orthodontic 
techniques. Students gain practical experience 
during their fifth semester of study when they are 
introduced to actual laboratory work through 
rotations to off-campus laboratory sites. 

Graduates of the five-semester day program 
receive an Associate in Applied Science degree. 
Certificate options are available in Cast Partial 
Denture Techniques, Complete Denture 
Techniques, Crown and Bridge Techniques, and 
Dental Ceramic Techniques. 



The Dental Laboratory Technology program 
is accredited by the Commission on Dental 
Accreditation. The Commission is a specialized 
accrediting body recognized by the Commission 
on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation 
and by the United States Department of 
Education. The Commission on Dental 
Accreditation can be contacted at (312) 440-2719 
or at 21 1 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 
60611. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Dental Laboratory Technology - Degree 

Day Program @ 5 Semesters HOURS 



CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



Dental Anatomy/Physiology 3 6 5 

Dental Materials 1 6 3 

Complete Dentures 1 9 4 

Applied Physical Science I 3 2 4 

Expository Writing* 3 3 



DLT 


111 


DLT 


114 


DLT 


116 


PHS 


121 


ENG 


111 




2 - Spring 



DLT 211 Advanced Complete Dentures 2 12 6 

DLT 123 Crown and Bridge 2 12 6 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 2 2 3 

Social Science Elective 
3 - Summer 



DLT 119 Wrought-Ortho Appliances 
DLT 126 Advanced Crown and Bridge 
Humanities Elective 

4 - Fall 



DLT 118 

DLT 217 

DLT 219 

ENG 112 

CIS 113 

5 - Spring 



Cast Partial Dentures 3 9 6 

Ceramic Techniques 2 9 5 

Jurisprudence and Ethics 1 1 

Argument-Based Research 3 3 

Computer basics 2 1 



DLT 222 Advanced Ceramic Techniques 2 9 

DLT 215 Advanced Partial Dentures 1 6 

DLT 224 Dental Lab Practice 20 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Sciences Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



5 
3 
2 

68 

3 



74 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Cast Partial Denture Techniques - Certificate 
Day Program © 2 Semesters 

DLT 114 Dental Materials 
DLT 118 Cast Partial Dentures 
DLT 215 Advanced Partial Dentures 

Complete Denture Techniques - Certificate 
Day Program © 2 Semesters 

DLT 114 Dental Materials 

DLT 116 Complete Dentures 

DLT 211 Advanced Complete Dentures 

Crown and Bridge Techniques - Certificate 

Day Program © 3 Semesters 

DLT 111 Dental Anatomy/Physiology 

DLT 114 Dental Materials 

DLT 123 Crown and Bridge 

DLT 126 Advanced Crown and Bridge 

Dental Ceramic Techniques - Certificate 

Day Program © 2 Semesters 

DLT 217 Ceramic Techniques 

DLT 222 Advanced Ceramic Techniques 

PHS 121 Applied Physical Science I 



44 



The Early Childhood Associate program is 
designed for individuals interested in working 
with infants and young children. With the 
increasing number of preschool children requir- 
ing early care and education and with increasing 
awareness of the role early experiences play in 
shaping a child's future behavior, attitudes, and 
abilities, the need for trained child care specialists 
has risen dramatically. 

The specialist strives to meet the develop- 
mental needs of the individual child. A source of 
warmth and security, the specialist organizes the 
child's environment and facilitates learning. This 



Programs of Study 

Early Childhood 
Associate 



program integrates classroom learning and field- 
work in child growth and development, the physi- 
cal and nutritional needs of children, their care 
and guidance, and communication with children 
and their parents, thus providing students with 
the training needed to function effectively as a 
child care specialist. 



Early Childhood Associate - Degree 

Afternoon © and Evening Program O 5 Semesters 

HOURS 



CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



EDU 111 
EDU 144 
ENG 111 
MAT 115 


Early Childhood Credential I 
Child Development I 
Expository Writing* 
Mathematical Models* 


2 
3 
3 
2 





2 


2 
3 
3 
3 




Humanities Elective 


3 





3 




Social Science Elective 


3 





3 


2 - Spring 










ENG 112 
EDU 112 
EDU 131 
EDU 145 
EDU 146 


Argument-Based Research 
Early Childhood Credential II 
Child, Family, and Community 
Child Development II 
Child Guidance 


3 
2 
3 
3 
3 









3 
2 
3 
3 
3 


EDU 234 


Infants, Toddlers, and Twos 


3 





3 


EDU 282 


Early Childhood Literature 
Major Elective 


3 





3 


3 - Summer 








CIS 113 
EDU 161 
EDU 221 
EDU 261 
SOC 220 


Computer Basics 
Intro, to Exceptional Child 
Children with Special Needs 
Early Childhood Administration I 
Social Problems 



3 
3 
2 
3 


2 
3 





1 
4 
3 
2 
3 


4 - Fall 










EDU 152 
EDU 153 


Music, Movement, and Language 
Health, Safety, and Nutrition 


3 
3 






3 
3 


EDU 153A 


Health, Safety, and Nutrition Lab 





2 


1 


EDU 251 
EDU 251A 
EDU 262 


Exploration Activities 

Exploration Activities Lab 

Early Childhood Administration II 


3 

3 



2 



3 
1 
3 


5 - Spring 










COE 111 
EDU 154 
EDU 162 


Co-Op Work Experience I 

Social and Emotional Development 

Early Exp./Prosp. Teachers 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 



3 
1 


10 

2 


1 

3 
2 

64 
3 




Major Elective Credit Hours 

Social Science Elective Credit Hours 




2 
3 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



72 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



The Early Childhood Associate program 
offers courses to those who are beginning careers 
in child care, who work with young children and 
would like to increase their professional skills, or 
who would like to start their own child care cen- 
ters or homes. This program also offers the North 
Carolina Early Childhood Credential courses 
(EDU 111 and 112) which the North Carolina 
Division of Child Development requires for lead 
teachers in child care and the Early Childhood 
Administration Credential courses (EDU 261 and 
262) required for directors and administrators in 
child care. Students who plan to transfer to four- 
year institutions can also benefit from the cur- 
riculum. 

Job opportunities are available in many set- 
tings, including child care centers, nursery 
schools, kindergartens, child development cen- 
ters, hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, museums, 
camps, and recreational centers. Classes are 
taught during the afternoon and in the evening 
to accommodate employees of schools and child 
care centers. 

Graduates of the program may receive an 
Associate in Applied Science degree; certificate 
options are available in Child Care Adminis- 
tration and Management as well as Child 
Development. Students successfully completing 
the certificate option receive a certificate of com- 
pletion. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Child Care Administration and 
Management - Certificate 



Afternoon O and Evening Program O 2 Semesters 


BUS 110 


Intro, to Business 


EDU 161 


Intro, to Exceptional Child 


EDU 234 


Infants, Toddlers, and Twos 


EDU 261 


Early Childhood Administration I 


EDU 262 


Early Childhood Administration II 


SOC 220 


Social Problems 



Child Development - Certificate 

Afternoon © and Evening Program © 2 Semesters 

EDU 111 Early Childhood Credential I 

EDU 153 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 

EDU 153A Health, Safety, and Nutrition Lab 

EDU 234 Infant, Toddlers, and Twos 

EDU 112 Early Childhood Credential II 

EDU 131 Child, Family, and Community 

EDU 161 Intro, to Exceptional Child 



45 



The Electrical/Electronics Technology pro- 
gram provides training in the fundamentals of 
electrical trades. Classroom and laboratory expe- 
riences enable the student to become proficient in 
installation and maintenance of electrical wiring; 
transformers; AC and DC motors; motor control 
circuits; lighting circuits; instrumentation; and 
programmable logic controllers as used in resi- 
dential, commercial, and industrial applications. 

Classroom instruction includes the funda- 
mentals of alternating and direct current; resi- 
dential, commercial, and industrial installation 



Programs of Study 

Electrical/Electronics 
Technology 



and maintenance; the National Electrical Code; 
AC and DC motors; transformers; electrical con- 
trol circuit diagrams; programmable logic con- 
trollers; and process control instrumentation. 
Additional classes include architectural drafting, 
English, math, and health. 



Electrical/Electronics Technology - Diploma 

Day Program © 3 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



DFT 115 

ELC 112 

ELC 118 

ENG 111 

HEA 112 

MAT 121 

2 - Spring 



Architectural Drafting 
DC/AC Electricity 
National Electrical Code 
Expository Writing* 
First Aid and CPR 
Algebra/Trigonometry I* 



ELC 113 

ELC 117 

ELC 135 

ELC 213 

3 - Summer 



Basic Wiring I 
Motors and Controls 
Electrical Machines I 
Instrumentation 



ELC 115 Industrial Wiring 2 6 4 

ELC 128 Introduction to PLC 2 3 3 

ELC 215 Electrical Maintenance 2 3 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 42 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 

Construction Electrician - Certificate 
Evening Program © 

ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity 

ELC 113 Basic Wiring I 

ELC 115 Industrial Wiring 

ELC 118 National Electrical Code 

Control Electrician - Certificate 
Evening Program © 

ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity 

ELC 117 Motors and Controls 

ELC 128 Intro, to PLC 

ELC 213 Instrumentation 

Maintenance Electrician - Certificate 
Evening Program © 

ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity 

ELC 117 Motors and Controls 

ELC 135 Electrical Machines I 

ELC 215 Electrical Maintenance 



Students completing the Electrical/ 
Electronics Technology program earn a diploma 
and may complete the day program in three 
semesters or the evening program in six semes- 
ters. Certificate options are available for training 
in specific work needs. Students may complete 
certificates in Construction Electrician, Control 
Electrician, and Maintenance Electrician. The 
certificate options may be completed in the 
evening. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Evening Program © 6 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity 

ELC 113 Basic Wiring I 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry 

2 - Spring 



ELC 115 Industrial Wiring 
ELC 117 Motors and Controls 

3 - Summer 



ELC 128 Introduction to PLC 
ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

4 - Fall 



DFT 
HEA 



115 
112 



Architectural Drafting 
First Aid and CPR 



5 - Spring 



ELC 118 National Electrical Code 
ELC 135 Electrical Machines I 

6 - Summer 



ELC 213 Instrumentation 

ELC 215 Electrical Maintenance 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 




4 
3 

42 






46 



We live in a world of electronics. From elec- 
tronic garage door openers and videotape 
recorders in the home to satellites relaying radio 
and television programs from continent to conti- 
nent, the field of electronics has a profound influ- 
ence on the way we live and work. The electronic 
computer is affecting the world of business and 
industry. Medical electronics is a new frontier 
with a growing number of devices used for diag- 
nostic purposes. The space program depends on 
electronics. Electronics is a diverse and challeng- 
ing field which continues to grow. Because of 
rapid expansion and growth, opportunities for 
careers in the electronics field are excellent. 

The Electronics Engineering Technology 
program provides a theoretical and practical base 
for electronics technicians who may work as 
assistants to engineers or as liaisons between 
engineers and skilled craftspersons. Electronics 
technicians apply their technological skills to 
problems related to research, design, develop- 
ment, installation, operation, maintenance, sales, 
and repair of electronic and computer equipment 
and systems. 



Programs of Study 

Electronics Engineering 
Technology 



Special features of this program include 
additional course offerings in digital and linear 
integrated circuits, electronic communication 
systems, fiber optics, computer upgrade and 
repair, local area networks, robotics, microproces- 
sor technology, and "C++" computer program- 
ming. Curriculum courses are offered during the 
day and in the evening. 



Students may complete the Electronics 
Engineering Technology program in six semes- 
ters and receive the Associate in Applied Science 
degree. Graduates are prepared for employment 
in the electronics field. Those desiring to contin- 
ue their education may transfer the credits earned 
at Durham Technical Community College to a 
number of universities for applying toward a 
Bachelor of Technology degree. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 




Electronics Engineering Technology - Degree 

Day © and Evening Program © 6 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 
1 - Fall 



CIS 110 

EGR 131 

ELC 131 

MAT 121 

2 - Spring 



Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

Intro, to Electronics Technology 12 2 

DC/AC Circuit Analysis 4 3 5 

Algebra/Trigonometry 1 * 2 2 3 



CSC 120 

ELN 131 

ENG 111 

MAT 122 

3 - Summer 



Computing Fundamentals I 3 2 4 

Electronic Devices 3 3 4 

Expository Writing* 3 3 

Algebra/Trigonometry II 2 2 3 



ELN 132 Linear IC Applications 3 3 4 

ELN 150 CAD for Electronics 1 3 2 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

MAT 145 Analytical Math 3 3 

4 - Fall 



ELN 133 Digital Electronics 
ELN 234 Communication Systems 
PHY 131 Physics-Mechanics 
Humanities Elective 

5 - Spring 



CET 111 Computer Upgrade and Repair I 2 3 3 

ELN 232 Intro, to Microprocessors 3 3 4 

ELN 236 Fiber Optics and Lasers 3 2 4 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

6 - Summer 



ATR 211 Robot Programming 2 

CET 211 Computer Upgrade and Repair II 2 
ELN 275 Troubleshooting 1 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



3 
3 
2 

73 
3 

76 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



47 



The Environment, Health, and Safety 
Technology program prepares students for 
employment as technicians in the industrial 
hygiene, occupational safety, and environmental 
technology fields. The program is designed to 
provide students with a strong education in the 
relevant regulations to enable them to work as 
effective compliance officers and initial emer- 
gency response technicians. The program offers a 
concentrated core of courses that examine the 
regulations of the Environmental Protection 
Agency; Occupational, Safety, and Health Act; and 
Department of Transportation which govern safe- 
ty issues in work environments. These courses are 
complemented by lab and lecture courses 
addressing such subjects as occupational safety, 
environmental management, and industrial 
hygiene. Graduating students will be prepared for 
environmental safety or occupational safety tech- 
nician positions in industrial, research, health 
care, and institutional facilities. The Associate in 
Applied Science degree may be completed in five 
semesters in the evening and through distance 
learning options. Certificate programs, which 
may be completed evenings, are available in 
Environmental Management as well as in 
Occupational Health and Safety. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Programs of Study 

Environment, Health, 
& Safety Technology 




■&**< 



Environment, Health, and Safety 
Technology - Degree 
Evening Program © 5 Semesters 

CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



CHM 131 Intro, to Chemistry 3 3 

EHS 111 Occupational Safety and Engineering 5 5 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 
Major Elective 

2 - Spring 



EHS 114 OSHA Regulations 3 

EHS 211 Environmental Health and Toxicology 5 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 2 

3 - Summer 



CIS 110 



4 - Fall 



Intro, to Computers 
Humanities Elective 
Social Science Elective 



EHS 212 Industrial Hygiene Sampling 3 

EHS 215 Incident Management 3 

Biology Elective 

Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



EHS 112 Industrial Hygiene 5 5 

EHS 116 Environmental Management 4 4 

FIP 230 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials I 5 5 
Major Elective 

5 - Spring 



50 
3 

11 
3 

67 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Environmental Management - Certificate 
Evening Program © 3 Semesters 

EHS 116 Environmental Management 

EHS 211 Environmental Health and Toxicology 

EHS 215 Incident Management 

FIP 230 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials I 

Occupational Health and Safety - Certificate 
Evening Program © 2 Semesters 

EHS 111 Occupational Safety and Engineering 

EHS 112 Industrial Hygiene 

EHS 114 OSHA Regulations 

EHS 212 Industrial Hygiene Sampling 



48 



The Fire Protection Technology program 
provides technical and professional knowledge for 
individuals interested in fire service careers. The 
program also enables the graduate to develop the 
management and supervisory skills needed in fire 
service. 

Classroom and laboratory exercises intro- 
duce the student to various fire hazards, fire pre- 
vention problems, and fire service administrative 
issues. The student learns technical skills such as 
calculating pump hydraulics, investigating arson 
scenes, applying firefighting strategies, and treat- 
ing and disposing of hazardous materials. The 



Programs of Study 

Fire Protection 
Technology 



program also emphasizes the management prac- 
tices used in modern fire protection agencies. 

Graduates of the program may be employed 
by local and state government agencies, industri- 
al firms, and insurance companies. 



Graduates of the Fire Protection Technology 
program receive an Associate in Applied Science 
degree. Fire Protection Technology classes are 
taught in the evening for the degree program. 
Arson Investigation and Wildland Fire Suppres- 
sion certificate options are also available and 
may be completed during the day in two semes- 
ters each. Classrooms, lab facilities, and faculty 
offices are located at Durham Tech's Northern 
Durham Center. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Fire Protection Technology - Degree 

Evening Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 

1 - Fall 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

FIP 120 Intro, to Fire Protection 2 2 

FIP 128 Detection and Investigation 3 3 

FIP 132 Building Construction 3 3 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

FIP 124 Fire Prevention and Public Education 3 3 
FIP 136 Inspections and Codes 3 3 

FIP 220 Fire Fighting Strategies 3 3 

MAT 115 Mathematics Models* 2 2 3 

3 - Summer 

POL 120 American Government 3 3 

Humanities Elective 
Social Science Elective 

4 - Fall 



FIP 
FIP 
FIP 
FIP 
FIP 
FIP 



228 
230 
232 
244 
256 
276 



Local Government Finance 2 2 

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials I 5 5 

Hydraulics and Water Distribution 2 2 3 

Fire Protection Project 3 3 

Municipal Public Relations 2 2 

Managing Fire Services 3 3 



5 - Spring 



FIP 152 Fire Protection Law 2 

FIP 240 Fire Service Supervision 2 

FIP 248 Fire Service Personnel Administration 3 

FIP 260 Fire Protection Planning 3 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



60 
3 
3 
3 

69 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Arson Investigation - Certificate 

Day Program © 2 Semesters 

FIP 128 Detection and Investigation 

FIP 160 Fire Protection/Electrical 

FIP 160A Fire Protection/Electrical Lab 

CHM 131 Intro, to Chemistry 

FIP 152 Fire Protection Law 

FIP 264 Flame Propagation and Materials Rating 

Wildland Fire Suppression - Certificate 

Day Program © 2 Semesters 

FIP 180 Wildland Fire Behavior 

FIP 188 Intro, to Wildland Fires 

FIP 268 Wildland Fire Management 

FIP 272 Wildland Fire Strategy 




49 



The General Education program offers max- 
imum flexibility for students who want to individ- 
ualize a plan of study. It is ideal for students who 
want a broad education or for those who have not 
selected a major area of study. 

A total of 64 credit hours is required for the 
Associate in General Education degree; and each 
student must complete a minimum 18-hour core 
of courses in English, social sciences, humanities, 
and mathematics/science. The remaining hours 
may be selected from any of the college's courses 
numbered 1 10 and above which are not designat- 
ed for diploma or certificate programs. 

Students who already have a college degree 
may transfer up to 36 hours of course work into 
the General Education program for elective 
hours. Courses that are equivalent to the 18-hour 
group of courses will also be accepted for transfer. 
Students seeking a first degree may transfer more 
than 36 elective hours into the program, provided 
that at least 18 hours are completed at Durham 
Tech, including 9 of the final 18 hours. 

Students may enroll in this individualized 
program any semester and can complete require- 
ments through day or evening classes. 



Programs of Study 
General Education 




Associate in General Education 



The Associate in General Education degree is awarded upon successful completion of 64 semester credit hours, including the minimum in each of the 
areas below. All courses must be numbered 1 10 or above and not designated as diploma or certificate courses. 



English - 6 credit hours as follows: 

ENG 111 and either ENG 112orll3 

Humanities - 6 credit hours selected from the following: 
ART, ENG [excluding ENG 111, 112, 
113, or 114], HUM, MUS, PHI, REL 

Mathematics or Science - 3 credit hours selected from the following: 
BIO, CHM, MAT, PHY 

Social Sciences - 3 credit hours selected from the following: 
ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, POL, PSY, SOC 



Electives - Sufficient for program total of 64 credit hours selected 
from the following: 

ACA, ANT, ART, BIO, CHM, COM, CSC, 

ECO, ENG, courses numbered 110 and 

above not used to satisfy previous 

requirements (not including ENG 111, 

ENG 112, ENG 113, or ENG 114), FRE, 

GEO, GER, HEA, HIS, MAT, MUS, PED, 

PHI, PHY, POL, PSY, SOC, SPA, or any 

technical courses not designated in the 

common course library as diploma or 

certificate courses 



50 



The Health Information Technology curricu- 
lum prepares individuals with the knowledge and 
skills to process, maintain, compile, and report 
health care information. 

A health information technician or coder 
analyzes health information, assigns codes, and 
indexes diagnoses and procedures to support clin- 
ical care; to assist medical research in hospitals, 
physicians' offices, and other health care facili- 
ties; and to provide information for reimburse- 
ment purposes. 

Graduates may find employment in hospi- 
tals, rehabilitation facilities, long-term care facil- 
ities, health insurance organizations, out-patient 
clinics, mental health facilities, and home health 
organizations. 

A graduate of the diploma program may be 
eligible to write the national examination for cer- 
tification as a Certified Coding Specialist (CCS). 
Courses in computer science, biology, and health 
occupations are helpful to students preparing for 
the Health Information Technology field. Day 
and evening classes are available in this pro- 
gram. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Programs of Study 

Health Information 

Technology 



Health Information Technology - Diploma 

Day Program O 3 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 

1 - Fall 

BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 5 
ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

HIT 112 Health Law and Ethics 3 3 

MED 121 Medical Terminology I 3 3 

2 - Spring 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

HIT 114 Record Systems/Standards 2 3 3 

HIT 212 Coding/Classification I 3 3 4 

HIT 226 Principles of Disease 3 3 

MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 3 

3 - Summer 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

HIT 124 Directed Practice II 10 3 2 

HIT 214 Coding/Classification II 3 3 4 

HIT 222 Directed Practice III 6 2 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 41 




Health Information Technology - Diploma 
Evening Program © 4 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDfT 

1 - Fall 

BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 5 
ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MED 121 Medical Terminology I 3 3 

2 - Spring 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

HIT 212 Coding/Classification I 3 3 4 

HIT 226 Principles of Disease 3 3 

MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 3 



3 - Summer 










CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 
HIT 214 Coding/Classification II 

4 - Fall 


2 
3 


2 
3 






3 

4 



HIT 112 Health Law and Ethics 3 3 

HIT 114 Record Systems/Standards 2 3 3 

HIT 124 Directed Practice II 10 3 2 

HIT 222 Directed Practice III 6 2 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 41 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



51 



The Information Systems curriculum pre- 
pares graduates for employment with organiza- 
tions that use computers to process, manage, and 
communicate information. This flexible program 
is designed to meet community information sys- 
tems needs. 

Course work includes computer systems ter- 
minology, logic, operating systems, database, 
spreadsheet, data communications/networking, 
and related business topics. Studies provide expe- 
rience for students to implement, support, and 
customize industry-standard information systems. 



Programs of Study 
Information Systems 



Graduates should qualify for a variety of 
computer-related, entry-level positions that pro- 
vide opportunities for advancement with increas- 
ing experience and ongoing training. Duties may 



include systems maintenance and troubleshoot- 
ing, support and training, and business applica- 
tions design and implementation. 

Students completing the Information 
Systems program receive an Associate in Applied 
Science degree. Students may complete the pro- 
gram during the day in five semesters and during 
the evening in eight semesters. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Information Systems - Degree 

Day Program G 5 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 3 3 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 2 1 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

CIS 120 Spreadsheet I 2 2 3 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CIS 152 Database Concepts and Applications 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OST 1 36 Word Processing 1 2 2 
Social Science Elective 

3 - Summer 

ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

CIS 145 Operating System - Single User 2 2 3 

CIS 165 Desktop Publishing I 2 2 3 

4 - Fall 

Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 3 

Database Applications 2 2 3 

Business Presentations 1 2 2 

Intro, to the Internet 2 3 3 
Humanities Elective 
Major Elective 



CET 


111 


CIS 


153 


CIS 


169 


CIS 


172 



5 - Spring 



CET 211 Computer Upgrade/Repair II 2 

CIS 162 Multi-Media Presentation Software 2 

CIS 225 Integrated Software 1 

COM 231 Public Speaking 3 

Major Elective 

Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



62 
7 
3 
3 

75 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Information Systems - Degree 
Evening Program O 8 Semesters 



CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 3 3 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 2 1 

2 - Spring 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CIS 152 Database Concepts and Applications 2 2 3 
ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 2 2 3 

3 - Summer 



Computer Upgrade/Repair II 
Major Elective 



7 - Fall 



CIS 162 Multi-Media Presentation Software 2 
CIS 169 Business Presentations 1 

Major Elective 

8 - Spring 

CIS 225 Integrated Software 1 

COM 231 Public Speaking 3 

Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 

CIS 145 Operating System - Single User 

4 - Fall 

CIS 120 Spreadsheet I 

CIS 165 Desktop Publishing I 

OST 136 Word Processing 

Social Science Elective 

5 - Spring 

CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 3 

CIS 153 Database Applications 2 2 3 

CIS 172 Intro, to the Internet 2 3 3 

Humanities Elective 

6 - Summer 

CET 211 



62 

7 
3 
3 

75 



52 



A Network Administration and Support con- 
centration plan of study is also available in the 
Information Systems program. This program 
concentration prepares students to install and 
support networks. Strong analytical skills and 
extensive computer knowledge are also developed. 

Course work includes extensive hands-on 
experience with networks. Classes cover media 
types, topologies, and protocols with installation 
and support of hardware and software, trou- 
bleshooting network and computer problems, and 
administrative responsibilities. Elective choices 
provide opportunity for specialization. 



Programs of Study 

Information Systems/ 

Network Administration 

& Support 



Graduates should qualify for positions such 
as LAN/PC administrator, microcomputer support 
specialist, network control operator, communica- 
tions technician/analyst, network/computer con- 
sultant, and information systems specialist. 



Graduates are also prepared to sit for certification 
exams which can result in industry-recognized 
credentials. 

Students may complete the five-semester day 
offerings or eight-semester evening offerings in 
the Information Systems-Network Administration 
and Support concentration program and receive 
an Associate in Applied Science degree. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



5 - Spring 



Information Systems/Network Administration 
and Support - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 

1 - Fall 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 

2 - Spring 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CIS 174 Network System Manager I 2 2 3 

CIS 175 Network Management I 2 2 3 

BUS 110 Intro, to Business 3 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 
Social Science Elective 

3 - Summer 

CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 3 

CIS 282 Network Technology 3 3 

COM 231 Public Speaking 3 3 

Major Elective 

4 - Fall 

CIS 152 
CIS 172 
CIS 274 
CIS 275 



Database Concepts and Applications 2 2 3 

Intro, to the Internet 2 3 3 

Network System Manager II 2 2 3 

Network Management II 2 2 3 
Humanities Elective 
Major Elective 



CIS 277 Network Design and Implementation 
CIS 287 Network Support 
COE 110 World of Work 
COE 111 Co-Op Work Experience I 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 74 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


1 





1 





10 


1 

60 
8 
3 
3 



Information Systems/Network Administration 

and Support - Degree 

Evening Program © 8 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

CIS 115 Intro, to Programming and Logic 2 2 3 

MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics* 3 3 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 2 1 

NET 110 Data Communication/Networking 2 2 3 

2 - Spring 

CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 3 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 2 3 3 

CIS 175 Network Management I 2 2 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 



3 - Summer 








CIS 282 Network Technology 
ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 

4 - Fall 


3 
3 






3 
3 



CIS 172 Intro, to the Internet 2 3 3 

CIS 174 Network System Manager I 2 2 3 

CIS 275 Network Management II 2 2 3 

BUS 110 Intro, to Business 3 3 

5 - Spring 

CIS 152 Database Concepts and Applications 2 2 3 
CIS 274 Network System Manager II 2 2 3 

Humanities Elective 

Major Elective 

6 - Summer 



CIS 287 



7 - Fall 



Network Support 
Social Science Elective 



CIS 
COM 



277 
231 



Network Design and Implementation 2 2 3 
Public Speaking 3 3 

Major Elective 



8 - Spring 



COE 110 World of Work 
COE 111 Co-Op Work Experience I 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Major Elective Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 74 



1 





1 





10 


1 

60 
8 
3 
3 



53 



A machinist is a skilled craftsperson who 
shapes metal using machine and hand tools. To 
make precision parts from metal, a machinist 
selects the proper tools and materials to cut and 
shape the metal according to size specifications 
stated on a blueprint or in written requirements. 

The Machining Technology program pro- 
vides individuals the opportunity to acquire the 
basic skills and related technical information 
needed to become a machinist. The student 
learns to set up and operate the various machine 
tools found in a modern shop, to read blueprints, 
and to make the calculations required to produce 
precision parts. The program also offers training 
in using such state-of-the-art equipment as com- 
puter numerically controlled machine tools. In 
addition to using machine tools, student machin- 
ists learn the characteristics of various metals and 
how to use instruments to measure the accuracy 
of work. 



Programs of Study 
Machining Technology 




Machinist skills can open the door to a 
career with job security and good earning poten- 
tial. New and expanding industries in the 
Triangle and surrounding areas need skilled 
machinists; thus, the demand is expected to con- 
tinue to grow. Precision is the key to the work of a 
machinist, and the challenge of creating preci- 
sion metal parts can provide a rewarding career. 

Machining Technology classes are offered 
during the day and evening. Students may com- 
plete this diploma program in three semesters 
taking day classes or six semesters taking evening 
classes. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Machining Technology - Diploma 

Day Program © 3 Semesters 

1 - Fall 



class 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



DFT 
MAC 
MAC 
MAT 
PHY 



117 
111 
121 
101 
121 



Technical Drafting 
Machining Technology I 
Intro, to CNC 
Applied Mathematics I* 
Applied Physics I 



2 - Spring 



BPR 111 Blueprint Reading 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAC 112 Machining Technology II 

MAC 124 CNC Milling 

MAC 151 Machining Calculations 

MAC 248 Production Procedures 

3 - Summer 



1 2 

2 12 
2 

2 2 

3 2 



2 

12 
3 
2 
2 



BPR 121 Blueprint Reading: Mechanical 1 2 2 

MAC 113 Machining Technology III 2 12 6 

MAC 224 Advanced CNC Milling 1 3 2 

MAC 241 Jigs and Fixtures I 2 6 4 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 48 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Machining Technology - Diploma 
Evening Program O 6 Semesters 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



MAC 111 Machining Technology I 
2 - Spring 



MAC 112 Machining Technology 
3 - Summer 



DFT 117 Technical Drafting 

MAC 121 Intro, to CNC 

MAC 241 Jigs and Fixtures I 

MAT 101 Applied Mathematics I* 

4 - Fall 



BPR 111 

ENG 111 

MAC 124 

MAC 151 

5 - Spring 



Blueprint Reading 
Expository Writing* 
CNC Milling 
Machining Calculations 



BPR 121 
MAC 224 
MAC 248 
PHY 121 

6 - Summer 



MAC 113 Machining Technology III 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 



12 



12 



1 2 

3 

1 3 

1 2 



12 



Blueprint Reading: Mechanical 1 2 2 

Advanced CNC Milling 1 3 2 

Production Procedures 1 2 2 

Applied Physics I 3 2 4 



48 



54 



Durham Technical Community College 
offers a two-year associate's degree program to 
train occupational therapy assistants in the 
Triangle area. The curriculum prepares graduates 
to work under the guidance and supervision of a 
registered occupational therapist (OTR/L). 
Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants 
(COTAs) help registered therapists in all aspects 
of occupational therapy from screening and 
assessment to treatment and documentation. 

OT is a rehabilitation profession that focuses 
on doing and action. OT professionals work with 
people to improve their ability to participate in 
work, leisure, and self-care activities. They work 
with all age groups in a wide variety of settings. 
Children are assisted with school and play skills. 
Adolescents are assisted with prevocational and 
social skills. Adults are assisted in recovering 
from injuries or helping them cope with long- 
term illnesses or disabilities. Older adults are 
assisted in regaining skills or making changes in 
their homes for safer or more independent living 
situations. OT personnel work in hospitals, reha- 
bilitation centers, schools, nursing homes, com- 
munity settings, home health agencies, psychi- 
atric and mental health centers, hand therapy 
sites, and other health care settings. Treatment 
may be conducted in individual or group ses- 
sions. Activities that are personally meaningful 
are also used to assist clients in meeting their 
goals. OT personnel must be flexible, empathetic, 
organized, and creative to provide clients with the 
best opportunities to progress and achieve what is 
important to them. 

Acceptance for admission is conducted on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Admissions require- 
ments for the Occupational Therapy Assistant 
program are available in the college's Admissions 
office. All requirements must be completed prior 
to a student's placement on the waiting list. 
Courses are offered in a sequential order, starting 
once each year. A limited number of students are 
able to take OTA prefix courses at any time. All 
eligible students may take non-OTA prefix courses 
as soon as they complete college admission 
requirements for curriculum students. Full-time 
clinical internships are a critical part of the OTA 
training program and must be completed within 
18 months of other class work to successfully 
complete the program. Clinical sites are spread 
throughout the region, and reliable transporta- 
tion is essential. 

After completing the curriculum plan of 
study, the student is awarded an Associate in 



Programs of Study 

Occupational 
Therapy Assistant 



Applied Science degree in Occupational Therapy 
Assistant. The program is accredited by the 
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy 
Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupa- 
tional Therapy Association (AOTA). AOTA can be 
contacted for further information about OTA pro- 
grams at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Bethesda, MD 
20824-3425 or by calling (301) 653-AOTA. 



Graduates from the program are eligible to 
sit for the national certification examination for 
occupational therapy assistants. This exam is 
administered by the National Board of 
Certification in Occupational Therapy. To receive 
information, call (301) 990-7979- The state of 
North Carolina requires licensure based on com- 
pletion of an accredited program and passage of 
the NBCOT examination in order to practice 
under OTR supervision. These processes are sepa- 
rate from the college's program and graduation 
requirements. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Occupational Therapy Assistant - Degree 

Day Program © 6 Semesters HOURS 



CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Summer 



BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 4 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

OTA 110 Fundamentals of OT 2 3 3 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

2 - Fall 

BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 4 

CIS 113 Computer Basics 2 1 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OTA 120 OT Media I 13 2 

OTA 140 Professional Skills I 3 1 

PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology 3 3 

3 - Spring 

OTA 130 Assessment Skills 2 3 3 

OTA 161 Fieldwork I - Placement 1 3 1 

OTA 162 Fieldwork I - Placement 2 3 1 

OTA 170 Physical Dysfunction 2 3 3 

OTA 1 80 Psychosocial Dysfunction 2 3 3 

PHY 125 Health Sciences Physics 3 2 4 

4 - Summer 

OTA 150 Life Span Skills I 2 3 3 

OTA 163 Fieldwork I - Placement 3 3 1 

OTA 240 Professional Skills II 3 1 

PSY 241 Developmental Psychology 3 3 

5 - Fall 

OTA 164 Fieldwork I - Placement 4 3 1 

OTA 220 OT Media II 16 3 

OTA 245 Professional Skills III 3 1 

OTA 250 Life Span Skills II 2 3 3 

Humanities Elective 

6 - Spring 

OTA 260 Fieldwork II - Placement 1" 18 6 

OTA 261 Fieldwork II - Placement 2" 18 6 

OTA 280 Professional Transition 2 1 

Required Course Credit Hours 71 

Humanities Elective Credit Hours 3 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 74 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 

"OTA 260 and OTA 261 must be completed within 18 months of 
other course work. 



55 



Well-qualified office personnel are in grow- 
ing demand in business, industry, government, 
and the professions. This curriculum prepares the 
student to perform secretarial and administrative 
support duties in a variety of offices, including 
those with computerized, automated functions. 

Students complete courses designed to devel- 
op proficiency in the use of integrated software, 
oral and written communication, analysis and 
coordination of office duties and systems, and 
other support topics. Emphasis is on non-techni- 
cal as well as technical skills. 



Programs of Study 

Office Systems 
Technology 



Graduates should qualify for employment in 
a variety of positions in business, government, 
and industry. Job classifications range from entry 
level to middle management. Office Systems 



Office Systems Technology - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters 

CLASS 
1 - Fall 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



BUS 
ENG 
MAT 
OST 
OST 
OST 



110 
111 
115 
131 
181 
184 



Intro, to Business 

Expository Writing* 

Mathematical Models* 

Keyboarding 

Intro, to Office Systems 

Records Management 



2 - Spring 



3 - Summer 



COM 111 
OST 223 
OST 286 
OST 289 



5 - Spring 



COE 110 World of Work 1 

COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience I 20 

OST 224 Machine Transcription II 1 2 

OST 233 Office Publications Design 2 2 

OST 236 Adv. Word/Information Processing 2 2 

OST 284 Emerging Technologies 2 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 

Word Processing - Certificate 

Day © and Evening Program O 2 Semesters 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OST 132 Keyboard Skill Building 1 2 2 

OST 1 34 Text Entry and Formatting 3 2 4 



CIS 120 Spreadsheet! 2 2 3 

OST 1 35 Advanced Text Entry and Format 3 2 4 

OST 136 Word Processing 1 2 2 

OST 164 Text Editing Applications 3 3 

4 - Fall 



Voice and Diction I 3 3 

Machine Transcription I 12 2 

Professional Development 2 2 

Office Systems Management 2 2 3 
Social Science Elective 
Humanities Elective 



1 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 

67 
3 
3 

73 



CIS 


110 


Intro, to Computers 


2 


2 


3 


OST 


131 


Keyboarding 


1 


2 


2 


OST 


136 


Word Processing 


1 


2 


2 


OST 


233 


Office Publications Design 


2 


2 


3 


OST 


236 


Adv. Word/Information Processing 


2 


2 


3 


OST 


284 


Emerging Technologies 


2 





2 



Technology classes are offered during the day and 
in the evening. Students may complete the 
Associate in Applied Science degree in five semes- 
ters taking day classes or in seven semesters tak- 
ing evening classes. 

The Word Processing certificate prepares stu- 
dents for positions requiring knowledge of word 
processing applications. This certificate will be 
beneficial for personal or professional use. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Office Systems Technology - Degree 

Evening Program © 7 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 

1 - Fall 

BUS 110 Intro, to Business 3 3 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 2 2 3 

OST 131 Keyboarding 1 2 2 

2 - Spring 

ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OST 132 Keyboard Skill Building 1 2 2 

3 - Summer 



COM 111 Voice and Diction I 

OST 134 Text Entry and Formatting 

OST 181 Intro, to Office Systems 

4 - Fall 



3 

2 4 

3 



OST 135 

OST 136 

OST 164 

OST 184 

5 - Spring 



Advanced Text Entry and Format 
Word Processing 
Text Editing Applications 
Records Management 



OST 223 

OST 233 

OST 236 

OST 284 

6 - Summer 



Machine Transcription I 
Office Publications Design 
Adv. Word/Information Processing 
Emerging Technologies 



3 


2 


4 


1 


2 


2 


3 





3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 





2 



OST 224 Machine Transcription II 
OST 286 Professional Development 
Humanities Elective 

7 - Fall 



CIS 120 Spreadsheet I 
COE 110 World of Work 
COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience 
OST 289 Office Systems Management 
Social Science Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 73 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



2 


2 


3 


1 





1 





20 


2 


2 


2 


3 

67 
3 
3 



56 



For the student seeking diversity, challenge, 
and a role in the rapidly changing world of mod- 
ern medicine, Durham Tech's Office Systems 
Technology/Medical Concentration program 
offers the opportunity to acquire skills and knowl- 
edge as a medical office professional. 

The student develops office skills in such 
basic areas as keyboarding, word processing, and 
communication. These skills are complemented 
by courses in medical legal issues, medical 
terminology, billing and coding, and medical 
transcription. 



Programs of Study 

Office Systems 

Technology/Medical 

Concentration 

Employment opportunities include the 
offices of allied health facilities, HMOs, insurance 
claim processors, laboratories, and manufactur- 
ers and suppliers of medical and hospital 
equipment. 



Classes in Office Systems Technology/ 
Medical Concentration are offered during the day 
and in the evening. Students may complete the 
Associate in Applied Science degree in five semes- 
ters taking classes during the day or in seven 
semesters taking evening classes. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Office Systems Technology/Medical 

Concentration - Degree 

Day Program @ 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 
1 - Fall 



BUS 
ENG 
MAT 
OST 
OST 
OST 



110 
111 
115 
131 
149 
184 



Intro, to Business 
Expository Writing* 
Mathematical Models* 
Keyboarding 
Medical Legal Issues 
Records Management 



2 - Spring 



3 - Summer 



MED 
OST 
OST 
OST 



121 
136 
148 
164 



4 - Fall 



COM 111 

MED 122 

OST 241 

OST 243 

OST 286 

OST 289 

5 - Spring 



COE 110 World of Work 1 

COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience I 20 

OST 236 Adv. Word/Information Processing 2 2 

OST 242 Medical Office Transcription II 1 2 

OST 284 Emerging Technologies 2 
Humanities Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 

Humanities Elective 

Social Science Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 3 2 4 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OST 132 Keyboard Skill Building 1 2 2 

OST 1 34 Text Entry and Formatting 3 2 4 



Medical Terminology I 3 3 

Word Processing 1 2 2 

Medical Coding, Billing, and Insurance 3 3 

Text Editing Applications 3 3 
Social Science Elective 



Voice and Diction I 3 3 

Medical Terminology II 3 3 

Medical Office Transcription I 12 2 

Medical Office Simulation 2 2 3 

Professional Development 2 2 

Office Systems Management 2 2 3 



68 
3 
3 

74 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Office Systems Technology/Medical 
Concentration - Degree 
Evening Program © 7 Semesters 

CLASS 



HOURS 
LAB CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



BUS 110 Intro, to Business 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAT 115 Mathematical Models* 

OST 131 Keyboarding 

2 - Spring 



COM 111 Voice and Diction I 

OST 134 Text Entry and Formatting 

OST 149 Medical Legal Issues 

4 - Fall 



MED 121 

OST 136 

OST 164 

OST 184 

5 - Spring 



Medical Terminology I 
Word Processing 
Text Editing Applications 
Records Management 



MED 122 
OST 148 
OST 236 
OST 284 

6 - Summer 



OST 241 Medical Office Transcription 
OST 286 Professional Development 
Humanities Elective 

7 - Fall 



ACC 120 Principles of Accounting 1 3 2 4 

CIS 110 Intro, to Computers 2 2 3 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OST 132 Keyboard Skill Building 1 2 2 

3 - Summer 



3 

2 4 

2 



Medical Terminology II 3 3 

Medical Coding, Billing, and Insurance 3 3 

Adv. Word/Information Processing 2 2 3 

Emerging Technologies 2 2 



COE 110 World of Work 
COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience I 
OST 242 Medical Office Transcription II 
OST 243 Medical Office Simulation 
OST 289 Office Systems Management 
Social Science Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 
Humanities Elective Credit Hours 
Social Science Elective Credit Hours 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 74 



1 





1 





20 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 

68 
3 
3 



57 



The Opticianry program is a two-year pro- 
gram of study which teaches the student to 
become an optician. Opticians receive lens pre- 
scriptions from eye doctors, determine the size 
and style of eyeglasses desired by the customer, 
make lenses and cut them to fit into an eyeglass 
frame, and adjust finished glasses to fit the cus- 
tomer. The graduate acquires competencies in all 
phases of opticianry, including surfacing which 
consists of blocking, fining, polishing, and 
inspecting both plastic and glass single- 
vision/multifocal lenses; benchwork, which 
includes edging, hand beveling, safety beveling, 
heat treating, chemical tempering, tinting, and 
mounting lenses; and dispensing, which includes 
measuring, adapting, and fitting eyeglasses and 
contact lenses to the patient. 

The curriculum also includes courses in 
communication skills, social sciences, microcom- 
puter fundamentals, and business. These courses 
augment the student's technical instruction and 
provide a well-rounded educational background. 

An important facet of the Opticianry curricu- 
lum is the student practicum, which allows the 
individual student to practice competencies and 
skills learned in the classroom. Practicum activi- 
ties include adjusting and repairing eyeglasses at 
medical centers, retail optical shops, senior citi- 
zen centers, and convalescent centers in the 
greater Durham area. 

Upon completion of the five-semester day 
sequence of courses in the Opticianry program, 
the Associate in Applied Science degree in 
Opticianry is conferred and satisfies the formal 
educational requirements necessary to qualify for 
the licensing examination given by the North 
Carolina State Board of Opticians. An Opticianry 
Apprentice Certificate option is also available. The 




Programs of Study 
Opticianry 



six-course certificate program may be completed 
in the evening or on the Internet. 

The Opticianry* program is accredited by 
the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation and 
approved by the North Carolina State Board of 
Opticians. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 

Opticianry - Degree 

Day Program @ 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDIT 
1 - Fall 



ENG 111 

OPH 111 

OPH 121 

OPH 131 

OPH 140 

OPH 141 

2 - Spring 



Expository Writing* 3 3 

Ophthalmic Laboratory I 2 3 3 

Anatomy and Physiology - Eye 2 2 

Optical Dispensing I 2 2 

Math for Opticians* 5 5 

Optical Theory I 3 3 



BIO 160 
BUS 255 
OPH 112 
OPH 132 
OPH 142 

3 - Summer 



Introductory Life Science 2 3 3 

Organizational Behavior in Business 3 3 

Ophthalmic Laboratory II 2 3 3 

Optical Dispensing II 13 2 

Optical Theory II 3 3 
Humanities Elective 



CIS 113 Computer Basics 2 1 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 3 

OPH 113 Ophthalmic Laboratory III 6 2 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

4 - Fall 

OPH 214 Ophthalmic Laboratory IV 6 2 

OPH 233 Advanced Optical Procedures 2 2 3 

OPH 251 Optical Internship I 3 1 

OPH 261 Contact Lenses I 3 3 4 

OPH 282 Optical Extemship I 6 2 

PHY 145 Geometrical Optics 3 2 4 

5 - Spring 



*Durham Technical 
Community College also 
teaches an Optical 
Laboratory Mechanics 
program in an immured 
setting. This program, 
however, is not open to 
the general public. 



OPH 215 Laboratory Proficiency 

OPH 222 Optical Business Management 2 

OPH 243 Technical Proficiency 3 

OPH 252 Optical Internship II 

OPH 286 Optical Extemship II 
Major Elective 

Required Course Credit Hours 

Major Elective 

Humanities Elective Credit Hours 

Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 

Basic Opticianry - Certificate 
Evening Program © or Internet 



OPH 


111 


Ophthalmic Laboratory I 


OPH 


121 


Anatomy and Physiology - Eye 


OPH 


131 


Optical Dispensing I 


OPH 


140 


Math for Opticians 


OPH 


141 


Optical Theory I 


OPH 


193 


Special Topics in Opticianry 



67 
3 
3 

73 



58 



The Paralegal Technology program prepares 
the student to work under the general direction of 
lawyers, at times assisting them in complicated 
and difficult tasks. Paralegals, also called legal 
assistants, are trained to perform independent 
legal work under the supervision of an attorney, 
supervise legal office personnel, and perform 
many legal functions which do not require a law 
license. The program covers general subjects like 
English, accounting, and psychology as well as 
specialized legal courses that include real proper- 
ty, torts, contracts, criminal law and procedure, 
corporations and partnerships, legal research, 
family law, and real estate transactions. Courses 
such as title abstracting are taught at the 
Durham and Orange County Courthouses. 



Programs of Study 
Paralegal Technology 



Paralegal Technology graduates may per- 
form a wide range of legal services under the 
supervision of an attorney. Graduates are trained 
to search real estate titles, prepare pleadings for 
trial, probate estates, handle real estate closings, 
perfonn legal research, and manage law offices. 
Employment opportunities are excellent for para- 
legal graduates in law firms, government agen- 
cies, and corporations. 

Graduates receive an Associate in Applied 
Science degree. Students may enroll in day or 
evening classes and complete the program in five 
semesters. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 




Paralegal Technology - Degree 

Day © and Evening Program © 5 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CREDrr 



1 - Fall 










CIS 110 
ENG 111 
LEX 110 
LEX 130 
LEX 140 
LEX 160 


Intro, to Computers 

Expository Writing* 

Intro, to Paralegal Study 

Civil Injuries 

Civil Litigation I 

Criminal Law and Procedure 


2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


2 





2 


3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 


LEX 210 


Real Property I 


2 





2 


2 - Spring 










ENG 112 
LEX 150 


Argument-Based Research 
Commercial Law 


3 
2 



2 


3 
3 


LEX 211 
LEX 220 
LEX 240 
MAT 115 


Real Property II 
Corporate Law 
Family Law 
Mathematical Models* 


1 
2 
2 
2 


4 


2 


3 
2 
2 
3 


3 - Summer 








LEX 141 
LEX 214 
LEX 270 


Civil Litigation II 

Investigation and Trial Preparation 

Law Office Management/Technology 


2 
1 

1 


2 
4 
2 


3 
3 
2 


4 - Fall 










ACC 120 
COM 231 
LEX 120 
LEX 250 


Principles of Accounting I 
Public Speaking 
Legal Research/Writing I 
Wills, Estates, and Trusts 


3 
3 
2 
2 


2 

2 
2 


4 
3 
3 
3 


LEX 285 

PHI 240 


Workers' Compensation Law 
Intro, to Ethics 


2 
3 






2 
3 


5 - Spring 










CIS 120 
LEX 121 
LEX 180 
LEX 260 
LEX 280 


Spreadsheet I 
Legal Research/Writing II 
Case Analysis and Reasoning 
Bankruptcy and Collections 
Ethics and Professionalism 


2 
2 
1 
2 
2 


2 
2 
2 




3 
3 
2 
2 
2 


POL 120 


American Government 


3 





3 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



75 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



59 



The Pharmacy Technology program pre- 
pares the student to become a pharmacy techni- 
cian. These allied health professionals are 
employed in a variety of pharmacy practice set- 
tings. Supervised by a registered pharmacist, they 
perform a variety of technical duties related to 
preparing and dispensing drugs in accordance 
with standard procedures and laws. 

Pharmacy technicians are trained to inter- 
pret physicians' medication orders, fill orders to 
be checked by pharmacists, and deliver the 
orders. They prepare admixtures of intravenous 
solutions, replenish drugs, maintain patient pro- 
file records, prepare bulk formulations, assist with 
over-the-counter drugs and health aids, and per- 
form clerical duties, including processing insur- 
ance forms required by third-party payers. 
Pharmacy technicians are vital assets to pharma- 
cists because their training allows them to per- 
form technical pharmaceutical procedures, thus 
enabling pharmacists to devote additional time to 
their professional tasks. 

At Durham Technical Community College, 
the Pharmacy Technology student receives train- 
ing in medication dispensing procedures. 
Additional study includes pharmacology, phar- 
maceutical math, microcomputers, and patho- 
physiology. The student practices procedural skills 
in a simulated pharmacy technology laboratory. 
Clinical practice takes place at Duke University 
Medical Center, Durham Regional Hospital, 
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of 
North Carolina Hospitals, Rex Healthcare, Person 
Memorial Hospital, Lincoln Community Health 
Center, and Hillcrest Convalescent Center. 

Many area hospitals are rapidly expanding 
their pharmacy services to meet the increasing 
need for higher quality patient care and to con- 
form to governmental regulations. Such expan- 
sion has created a greater need for technical sup- 
port personnel to carry out routine functions in 
dispensing drugs. Pharmacy Technology gradu- 
ates are prepared to meet this need, and job 
opportunities for these graduates remain excel- 



Programs of Study 
Pharmacy Technology 



lent. In addition to employment in hospitals, 
graduates may also be employed by nursing 
homes, retail drug stores, drug manufacturers, 
research laboratories, wholesale drug companies, 
and home health care agencies. 



While a student may enroll in this program 
any semester, the three-semester day sequence of 
courses shown in the plan of study is based on a 
full-time student enrolling in the summer semes- 
ter. Graduates receive a diploma. 

Durham Technical Community College is 
accredited for pharmacy technician training by 
the American Society of Health-System 
Pharmacists. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Pharmacy Technology - Diploma 

Day Program @ 3 Semesters HOURS 

CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 

1 - Summer 

BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 5 
PHM 110 Intro, to Pharmacy 3 3 

PHM 111 Pharmacy Practice I 3 3 4 

PHM 115 Pharmacy Calculations 3 3 

2 - Fall 



CIS 113 

ENG 111 

PHM 112 

PHM 118 

PHM 120 

3 - Spring 



Computer Basics 
Expository Writing* 
Pharmacy Practice II 
Sterile Products 
Pharmacology I 



2 1 
3 

3 4 
3 4 
3 



PHM 125 Pharmacology II 

PHM 138 Pharmacy Clinical 

PHM 140 Trends in Pharmacy 

PSY 118 Interpersonal Psychology 



3 3 

24 8 

2 2 

3 3 

46 



Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 




60 



Durham Technical Community College and 
Wake Technical Community College have joined 
together to offer a one-semester program for 
training phlebotomy technicians in the Triangle 
area. The Phlebotomy curriculum prepares the 
graduate to draw blood specimens from patients 
for testing and analysis. A phlebotomy techni- 
cian's duties are related to preparing and main- 
taining equipment used in obtaining blood speci- 
mens; using appropriate communication skills 
when working with patients; selecting venipunc- 
ture sites; caring for blood specimens; entering 
the testing process into the computer; and per- 
forming associated clerical and record-keeping 
duties. 

The program is offered during the day at 
Durham Tech every fall semester and at Wake 
Tech every spring semester. Clinical training takes 
place at University of North Carolina Hospitals, 
WakeMED, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 
Raleigh Community Hospital, Rex Healthcare, 
and Wake County Human Services. 

The program is approved by the National 
Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory 
Science. Graduates receive a certificate. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Programs of Study 
Phlebotomy 



Phlebotomy - Certificate 

Day Program @ 1 Semester 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



PBT 100 Phlebotomy Technology* 5 2 6 

PBT 101 Phlebotomy Practicum 9 3 

PSY 118 Interpersonal Psychology 3 3 



Total Semester Hours Required for a Certificate 



12 



*ENG 070, ENG 080.RED 070, RED 080, MAT 050 and/or MAT 
060 may be required based on placement test results. 




*v 



61 



The Practical Nursing program prepares the 
student to care for patients with a variety of com- 
mon medical-surgical problems in various stages 
of illness. The licensed practical nurse is dedicat- 
ed to helping assess the patient's physical and 
mental health, including the patient's reaction to 
illnesses and treatment regimens; recording and 
reporting the results of the nursing assessment; 
participating in implementing the health care 
plan developed for the patient by other authorized 
health care professionals; reinforcing the teach- 
ing and counseling of a registered nurse, licensed 
physician, or dentist; and recording and reporting 
the nursing care rendered and the patient's 
response to that care. 

Approved by the North Carolina Board of 
Nursing, this one-year program involves both 
classroom and clinical activities. The program 

Practical Nursing - Diploma 

Day Program @ 3 Semesters 



Programs of Study 
Practical Nursing 



class 



focuses on theory and practice in a broad range 
of nursing activities. These activities encompass 
direct patient care in relatively stable nursing sit- 
uations. In addition to instruction in nursing 
care, the student completes related general edu- 
cation courses and is also introduced to micro- 
computers. Formal classroom study takes place at 
Durham Technical Community College. Practical 
experience is gained through clinical courses 
planned to follow theory and conducted under 



HOURS 
LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



the instructor's supervision. Clinical experiences 
take place at Duke University Medical Center, 
Durham Regional Hospital, Lincoln Community 
Health Center, and other area health care facilities. 

Program graduates are awarded diplomas in 
Practical Nursing. They are eligible to take the 
National Council Licensure Examination 
(NCLEX-PN), which is required for practice as a 
practical nurse. Licensed practical nurses are 
employed in hospitals, nursing homes, extended- 
care facilities, clinics, physicians' and dentists' 
offices, and other health care agencies. 
Classes are offered during the day. The program 
may be completed in one year. A new student may 
enroll in the fall or spring semesters. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



1 - Fall or Spring 



BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 5 

NUR 101 Practical Nursing I 7 6 6 11 

PSY 110 Life Span Development 3 3 

2 - Spring or Summer 



ENG 111 Expository Writing* 
NUR 102 Practical Nursing II 

3 - Summer or Fall 



3 3 
8 12 12 



NUR 103 Practical Nursing III 6 12 10 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 44 

*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 




The Licensed Practical Nurse Refresher curriculum provides a refresher 
course for individuals previously licensed as practical nurses and who are 
ineligible for reentry into nursing practice due to a lapse in licensure for 
five or more years. Individuals entering this program must have been previ- 
ously licensed as a practical nurse. Graduates will be able to apply for rein- 
statement of licensure by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. 

Licensed Practical Nurse Refresher - 
Certificate 

Day Program © 1 Semester 

1 - Fall or Spring 

NUR 105 Integrated LPN Refresher 8 6 6 12 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Certificate 12 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



62 



The Real Estate curriculum provides the pre- 
pensing education required by the North 
Carolina Real Estate Commission, prepares indi- 
viduals to enter the profession, and offers addi- 
tional education to meet professional develop- 
ment needs. 

Course work includes the practices and prin- 
ciples of real estate, with emphasis on financial 
and legal applications, property development, 
and property values. 

Graduates should qualify for North Carolina 
Real Estate Sales and Broker examinations. In 
addition, they should be able to enter apprentice- 
ship training and provide real estate services to 
consumers in a competent manner. 

Courses in the Real Estate program are 
offered primarily in the evening. Upon successful 
completion of this five-course program, graduates 
receive a certificate. 

Required courses suggesting the order in 
which they may be taken are shown on this page. 



Programs of Study 

Real Estate & 
Real Estate Appraisal 



The Real Estate Appraisal curriculum is 
designed to prepare individuals to enter the 
appraisal profession as a registered trainee and 
advance to licensed or certified appraiser levels. 
Course work includes appraisal theory and con- 
cepts with applications, the North Carolina 
Appraisers Act, North Carolina Appraisal Board 
rules, and the Uniform Standards of Professional 
Appraisal Practice. The student will find that a 
strong math background is helpful, especially for 
program course work in advanced income capi- 
talization procedures. 

Graduates should be prepared to complete 
the North Carolina Registered Trainee 
Examination and advance to licensure levels as 
requirements are met. 

Courses in the Real Estate Appraisal pro- 
gram are offered primarily in the evening. Upon 
successful completion of this six-course program, 
graduates receive a certificate. 

Required courses suggesting the order in 
which they may be taken are shown on this page. 



Real Estate - Certificate 



RLS 112 Real Estate Fundamentals 

RLS 113 Real Estate Mathematics 

RLS 114 Real Estate Brokerage 

RLS 115 Real Estate Finance 

RLS 116 Real Estate Law 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Certificate 





HOURS 


CLASS 


LAB CREDIT 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 




12 



Real Estate Appraisal - Certificate 











HOURS 






CLASS 


LAB CREDIT 


REA 


101 


Intro, to Real Estate 
Appraisal R-1 


2 


2 


REA 


102 


Valuation Principles and Practices 
R-2 


2 


2 


REA 


103 


Applied Residential Property 
Valuation R-3 


2 


2 


REA 


201 


Intro, to Income Property 
Appraisal G-1 


2 


2 


REA 
REA 


202 
203 


Advanced Income Capitalization 
Procedures G-2 

Applied Income Property Valuatic 


2 
in 2 


2 
2 



G-3 



Total Semester Hours Required for a Certificate 



12 



63 



The respiratory care practitioner is an 
allied health specialist who treats, manages, con- 
trols, and cares for patients with deficiencies and 
abnormalities related to breathing and associated 
organs. Because their training enables them to 
perform specific testing techniques used in moni- 
toring, evaluating, and treating their patients, 
respiratory care practitioners are frequently 
required to exercise considerable independent 
clinical judgment in the respiratory care of 
patients under the direct or indirect supervision of 
a physician. 

In addition to managing patients, the respi- 
ratory care practitioner supervises technicians 
and junior respiratory care practitioners. 
Furthermore, the respiratory care practitioner is 
capable of serving as a technical resource to 
physicians and to the hospital staff for informa- 
tion on safe and effective methods for administer- 
ing respiratory care. 



Programs of Study 
Respiratory Care 



The Respiratory Care program includes 
classroom instruction, clinical laboratory, and in- 
hospital clinical practice. The clinical laboratory 
provides training and evaluation for skills learned 
and demonstrated during lecture sessions. The 
program's clinical phase, conducted at local hos- 
pitals, applies a competency-based educational 
approach to allow mastery of each skill. 

The Respiratory Care program has academic 
classes conducted during the day and clinical 
rotations scheduled during the day and in the 



evening. The graduate of the five-semester pro- 
gram is awarded an Associate in Applied Science 
degree, which satisfies the educational require- 
ments of the National Board for Respiratory Care 
and allows the graduate to sit for the National 
Registry Examinations leading to the credential 
of Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT). The 
graduate of the three-semester day program is 
awarded a diploma and is eligible to sit for the 
certification examination leading to the creden- 
tial of Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT). 

The Respiratory Care program is accredited 
by the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory 
Care. 

Required courses and plans of study suggest- 
ing the order in which courses should be taken 
are shown on this page. 



Respiratory Care - Degree 

Day Program © 5 Semesters 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 4 

Expository Writing* 3 3 

Algebra/Trigonometry I* 2 2 3 

Intro, to Respiratory Care 3 3 4 

RCP Clinical Practice I 6 2 



BIO 


168 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


121 


RCP 


110 


RCP 


132 



2 - Spring 



BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 4 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

RCP 111 Therapeutics/Diagnostics 4 3 5 

RCP 145 RCP Clinical Practice II 15 5 

3 - Summer 



RCP 112 Patient Management 
RCP 115 C-P Pathophysiology 
RCP 155 RCP Clinical Practice 

4 - Fall 



3 4 
2 
15 5 



CIS 113 Computer Basics 

PHI 240 Intro, to Ethics 

RCP 210 Critical Care Concepts 

RCP 235 RCP Clinical Practice IV 

5 - Spring 



ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 

RCP 211 Advanced Monitoring Procedures 

RCP 215 Career Prep-Advanced Level 

RCP 245 RCP Clinical Practice V 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 






2 





1 


3 








3 


3 


3 





4 








15 


5 


3 








3 


3 


3 





4 





3 





1 








15 


5 



70 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
MAT 070, RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required 
based on placement test results. 



Respiratory Care - Diploma 

Day Program © 3 Semesters 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I* 

RCP 110 Intro, to Respiratory Care 

RCP 132 RCP Clinical Practice I 

2 - Spring 



3 3 4 

3 3 

2 2 3 

3 3 4 
6 2 



BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 4 

PSY 150 General Psychology 3 3 

RCP 111 Therapeutics/Diagnostics 4 3 5 

RCP 145 RCP Clinical Practice II 15 5 

3 - Summer 

RCP 112 Patient Management 3 3 4 

RCP 115 C-P Pathophysiology 2 2 

RCP 155 RCP Clinical Practice III 15 5 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 44 




64 



The Surgical Technology curriculum pre- 
pares individuals to assist in the care of the surgi- 
cal patient in the operating room and to function 
as a member of the surgical team. 

Students apply theoretical knowledge to the 
care of patients undergoing surgery and develop 
skills necessary to prepare supplies, equipment, 
and instruments; maintain aseptic conditions; 
prepare patients for surgery; and assist surgeons 
during operations. 

Graduates of the three-semester day program 
receive a diploma and are eligible to apply to take 
the Liaison Council's Certification Examination 
for Surgical Technologists. Employment opportu- 
nities include labor, delivery, and emergency 
departments; inpatient and outpatient surgery 
centers; dialysis units and facilities; physicians' 
offices; and central supply processing units. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



Programs of Study 
Surgical Technology 



Surgical Technology - Diploma 

Day Program © 3 Semesters 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CUNIC CREDIT 



1 - Fall 



BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 5 

ENG 111 Expository Writing* 3 3 

PSY 118 Interpersonal Psychology 3 3 

SUR 110 Intro, to Surgical Technology 3 3 

SUR 111 Periop Patient Care 5 6 7 

2 - Spring 

BIO 175 General Microbiology 2 2 3 

SUR 122 Surgical Procedures I 5 3 6 

SUR 123 Surgical Clinical Practice I 21 7 

3 - Summer 

SUR 134 Surgical Procedures II 5 5 

SUR 135 Surgical Clinical Practice II 12 4 

SUR 137 Professional Success Preparation 10 1 

Total Semester Hours Required for a Diploma 47 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required based on 
placement test results. 




65 



The Teacher Associate program prepares 
individuals to work with children from infancy 
through middle childhood in diverse learning 
environments. Students learn how to work with 
classroom teachers and administrators and con- 
tribute to the effective operation of their places of 
employment. Students combine learning theories 
with practice in actual settings with young chil- 
dren under the supervision of qualified teachers. 

Course work for this degree program 
includes childhood growth and development; 



Programs of Study 
Teacher Associate 




Teacher Associate - Degree 

Day Program G 5 Semesters 
1 - Spring 



HOURS 
CLASS LAB CLINIC CREDIT 



physical and nutritional needs of children; care 
and guidance of children; and communication 
skills with parents and children. Additionally, stu- 
dents are provided with instruction concerning 
appropriate methodologies to teach children the 
fundamental skills in reading, writing, and 
mathematics. Students also learn how to promote 
cognitive and language, physical and motor, 
social and emotional, and creative development 
of young children. 

Graduates are prepared to plan and imple- 
ment developmental ly appropriate programs in 
early childhood settings in a safe and orderly 
manner. They are also prepared to interact in a 
professional manner with parents and student 
support services. Employment opportunities 
include child care programs, preschools, public 
and private schools, recreational centers, Head 
Start programs, and school age programs. 

Required courses and a plan of study sug- 
gesting the order in which courses should be 
taken are shown on this page. 



EDU 116 


Introduction to Education 


3 


2 





4 


EDU 119 


Early Childhood Education 


3 


2 





4 


EDU 144 


Child Development 1 


3 








3 


ENG 111 


Expository Writing* 


3 








3 


PSY 150 


General Psychology 


3 








3 


2 - Summer 










EDU 118 


Teacher Associate Principles 
and Practices 


3 








3 


EDU 145 


Child Development II 


3 








3 


EDU 235 


School Age Development and 
Programs 


2 








2 


ENG 112 


Argument-Based Research 


3 








3 


MAT 121 


Algebra/Trigonometry I* 


2 


2 





3 


3 - Fall 












CIS 110 


Introduction to Computers 


2 


2 





3 


COE 111 


Co-Op Work Experience I 








10 


1 


EDU 186 


Reading and Writing Methods 


3 








3 


EDU 285 


Internship and Experiences - 
School Age 


1 








1 


HEA 112 


First Aid and CPR 


1 


2 





2 


4 - Spring 












COE 121 


Co-Op Experience II 








10 


1 


EDU 131 


Children, Family, and 
Community 


3 








3 


EDU 171 


Instructional Media 
Humanities Elective 
Major Elective 


1 


2 





2 


5 - Summer 










EDU 146 


Child Guidance 


3 








3 


EDU 221 


Children with Special Needs 


3 








3 


EDU 257 


Math Methods and Materials 


2 


2 





3 


EDU 275 


Effective Teacher Training 
Social Science Elective 


2 








2 


Required Course Credit Hours 








58 


Humanities Elective Credit Hours 








3 


Major Elective Credit Hours 








3 


Social Science Elective Credit Hours 








3 



Total Semester Hours Required for an A.A.S. Degree 



67 



*ENG 070, ENG 080, ENG 090, ENG 090A, MAT 050, MAT 060, 
RED 070, RED 080, OR RED 090 may be required based on 
placement test results. 



66 



Durham Tech's University Transfer program 
allows the student to complete up to two years of 
course work for a baccalaureate degree. The wide 
variety of freshman-level and sophomore-level 
courses satisfies general education requirements 
at senior institutions across the United States and 
enables the student to transfer as a junior to 
University of North Carolina System institutions 
after acceptance at the four-year university. 

Areas of study include social sciences, natu- 
ral sciences, foreign languages, the humanities, 
mathematics, and physical education. Students 
who complete the University Transfer program 
are prepared to pursue advanced course work for 
fields such as education, engineering, humani- 
ties, social sciences, nursing, chemistry, business, 
and mathematics. 

The strength of the University Transfer pro- 
gram lies in the quality of its people — both fac- 
ulty and students. Classes are small, and close 
interaction between instructors and students is a 
vital component of the University Transfer experi- 
ence at Durham Tech. While academic standards 
parallel those of nearby universities, a growing 
number of students have transferred to senior 
institutions across the country. Data show that 
Durham Tech students consistently perform 
above the state average following transfer. 

The Associate in Arts or the Associate in 
Science degree is awarded for completion of the 
64-hour plan of study. Complete plans of study 



Programs of Study 
University Transfer 



are offered during the day and in the evening. 

The University Transfer program also offers 
a pre-dental hygiene option in collaboration with 
the University of North Carolina School of 
Dentistry. 

Students are encouraged to contact senior 
institutions for information about specific 
requirements in different majors and professional 
programs. 

Requirements for 44-Hour Core** 

For students successfully completing the 44- 
hour core, following their acceptance at one of 
North Carolina's 16 public universities, the 44 
hours will transfer as a block and will satisfy the 
institution-wide, lower-division general education 
requirements of that university. The 44-hour core 
follows: 

1. English Composition (6 hours) - 
ENG 111, 113 



2. Humanities/Fine Arts (12 hours) - Select 
four courses from at least three of the following 
discipline areas: music, art, drama, dance, for- 
eign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, lit- 
erature, philosophy, and religion. At least one 
course must be a literature course. 

3. Social/Behavioral Sciences (12 hours) - 
Select four courses from at least three of the fol- 
lowing discipline areas: anthropology, economics, 
geography, history, political science, psychology, 
and sociology. At least one course must be a his- 
tory course. 

4. Natural Sciences/Mathematics (14 hours) - 

A. Natural Sciences (8 hours) - Select two 
courses, including accompanying laboratory 
work, from among the biological and 
physical science disciplines. 

B. Mathematics (6 hours) - Select at least 
one course in introductory mathematics 
(college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, 
etc.); the other unit may be selected from 
among other quantitative subjects, such as 
computer science and statistics. 

**Students must meet the receiving university's 
foreign language and/or health and physical 
education requirements, if applicable, prior to or 
after transfer. 




67 




Programs of Study 
University Transfer 




Associate in Arts 



Associate in Science 



English - (6 hours) ENG 111, 113 

Humanities and Fine Arts - (12 hours) Select four courses from at least 
three disciplines. Must include one literature and foreign language 1 1 1 and 
1 1 2 or equivalent with accompanying labs. ART 1 1 1 , 1 14, 1 1 5; ENG 23 1 , 
232, 233, 241, 242, 243, 251, 252, 261, 262; FRE 111, 112, 211; 
GER 111, 112, 211; HUM 110, 121, 160; MUS 110, 213; PHI 215, 240; 
REL110, 211; SPA 111, 112, 211, 212. 

Social/Behavioral Sciences - ( 12 hours) Select four from at least three dis- 
ciplines. Must include one history. ANT 210, 220; ECO 251, 252; GEO 111; 
HIS 115, 121, 122, 131, 132; POL 120, 220; PSY 150, 237, 241, 281; 
SOC 210, 213, 220, 225. 

Mathematics - (6 hours) Must include accompanying labs. 

Select from CIS 115; MAT 140, 155, 171, 172, 263 or 271, 272, 273. 

Natural Science - (8 hours) Select from BIO 1 1 1, 120, 130; CHM 151, 
152; PHY 151, 152 or 251, 252. 

Physical Education - (2 hours) Select from PED 111, 113, 114, 121, 128, 
130, 139, 142, 143, 145, 148, 162, 172, 183. 

Computer Skills - (3 hours) CIS 1 10 

Electives - ( 15 hours) Select from courses above, excluding PED, or from 
ACC 120, 121; ART 121, 131, 132; BIO 168, 169, 275; BUS 110, 115; 
CHM 131, 251, 252; CJC 111, 121, 141; COM 231; CSC 120, 130, 134; 
DFT 170; DRA 170; ENG 272, 273, 274; HEA 110, 112; HIS 236; HUM 
115; MAT 167, 285; POL 130; PSY 263; SPA 141, 221. Foreign languages 
and math labs must be included in elective hours. Students may not receive 
credit for both CHM 131 and 151. 



English- (6 hours) ENG 111, 113 

Humanities and Fine Arts - (12 hours) Select four courses from at least 
three disciplines. Must include one literature and foreign language 1 1 1 and 
1 12 or equivalent with accompanying labs. ART 1 1 1, 1 14, 1 15; ENG 231, 
232, 233, 241, 242, 243, 251, 252, 261, 262; FRE 111, 112, 211; GER 111, 
112, 211; HUM 110, 121, 160; MUS 110, 213; PHI 215, 240; REL 110, 220; 
SPA 111, 112,211,212. 

Social/Behavioral Sciences - (12 hours) Select four from at least three dis- 
ciplines. Must include one history. ANT 210, 220; ECO 251, 252; GEO 111; 
HIS 115, 121, 122, 131, 132; POL 120, 220; PSY 150, 237, 241, 281; 
SOC 210, 213, 220, 225. 

Mathematics - (6 hours) Must include accompanying labs. Select from 
MAT 155, 171, 172, 263 or 271, 272, 273. 

Natural Science - (8 hours) Select from BIO 111, 120, 130; CHM 151, 152; 
PHY 151, 152 or 251, 252. 

Other Natural Science/Mathematics - (14 hours) Select from science and 
mathematics courses above and BIO 168, 169, 275; CHM 131, 251, 252, 
261; CSC 120, 130, 134; MAT 167, 285. Students may not receive credit for 
both CHM 131 and 151. 

Physical Education - (2 hours) Select from PED 111, 113, 114, 121, 128, 
130, 139, 142, 143, 145, 148, 162, 172, 183. 

Electives - (4 hours) Select from courses above, excluding PED, or from 
ACC 120, 121; ART 121, 131, 132; BUS 110, 115; CIS 110, 115; CJC 111, 
121, 141; COM 231; DFT 170; DRA 170; ENG 272, 273, 274; HEA 110, 112; 
HIS 236; HUM 115; MAT 140; POL 130; PSY 263; SPA 141, 221. Foreign 
languages and math labs must be included in elective hours. Students may 
not receive credit for both CHM 131 and 151. 



68 



Academic Related 

ACA090 Study Skills 

This course is intended for those who place into credit-level 
course work but who are not maintaining satisfactory aca- 
demic progress toward meeting program goals. Topics 
include study skills, note taking, learning styles and strate- 
gies, test taking, goal setting, and self- assessment skills. 
Upon completion, students should be able to manage their 
learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ACA 111 College Student Success 

This course introduces the college's physical, academic, and 
social environment and promotes the personal development 
essential for success. Topics include campus facilities and 
resources; policies, procedures, and programs; study skills; 
and life management issues such as health, self-esteem, 
motivation, goal-setting, diversity, and communication. 
Upon completion, students should be able to function effec- 
tively within the college environment to meet their educa- 
tional objectives. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit; 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

ACA 118 College Study Skills 

This course covers skills and strategies designed to improve 
study behaviors. Topics include time management, note tak- 
ing, test taking, memory techniques, active reading strate- 
gies, critical thinking, communication skills, learning 
styles, and other strategies for effective learning. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to apply appropriate study 
strategies and techniques to the development of an effective 
study plan. Emphasis is on providing job-specific informa- 
tion to assist students in identifying their career goals 
through applying critical thinking skills to values clarifica- 
tion. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Accounting 

ACC 120 Principles of Accounting I 

This course introduces the basic principles and procedures 
of accounting. Emphasis is on collecting, summarizing, 
analyzing, and reporting financial information. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to analyze data and prepare 
journal entries and reports as they relate to the accounting 
cycle. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ACC 121 Principles of Accounting 11 

This course is a continuation of ACC 120. Emphasis is on 
corporate and managerial accounting for both external and 



Course 
Descriptions 



internal reporting and decision making. Upon completion, 
students should be able to analyze and record corporate 
transactions, prepare financial statements and reports, and 
interpret them for management. To fulfill these objectives, 
the course covers special asset and liability topics, the state- 
ment of cash flows, and partnership accounting. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ACC 120. 
Corequisite: None. 

ACC 129 Individual Income Taxes 

This course introduces the relevant laws governing individ- 
ual income taxation. Emphasis is on filing status, exemp- 
tions for dependents, gross income, adjustments, deduc- 
tions, and computation of tax. Upon completion, students 
should be able to complete various tax forms pertaining to 
the topics covered in the course. As part of the course, stu- 
dents may also prepare tax returns using computer soft- 
ware. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ACC 130 Business Income Taxes 

This course introduces the relevant laws governing busi- 
ness and fiduciary income taxes. Topics include tax depre- 
ciation, accounting periods and methods, corporations, 
partnerships, S corporations, estates and trusts, and gifts. 
Upon completion, students should be able to complete var- 
ious tax forms pertaining to the topics covered in the 
course. As part of the course, students may also prepare tax 
returns using computer software. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ACC 
129. Corequisite: None. 

ACC 140 Payroll Accounting 

This course covers federal and state laws pertaining to 
wages, payroll taxes, payroll tax forms, and journal and 
general ledger transactions. Emphasis is on computing 
wages; calculating social security, income, and unemploy- 
ment taxes; preparing appropriate payroll tax forms; and 
journalizing/posting transactions. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to analyze data, make appropriate 
computations, complete forms, and prepare accounting 
entries. A comprehensive payroll computer problem will 
complete the course. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisites: ACC 120 and CIS 
110. Corequisite: None. 



ACC 150 Computerized General Ledger 

This course introduces microcomputer applications related 
to the major accounting systems. Topics include general 
ledger; accounts receivable; accounts payable; inventory; 
payroll; and correcting, adjusting, and closing entries. 
Upon completion, students should be able to use a com- 
puter accounting package to solve accounting problems. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: ACC 120 and CIS 110. Corequisite: 
None. 

ACC 220 Intermediate Accounting I 

This course is a continuation of the study of accounting 
principles with in-depth coverage of theoretical concepts 
and financial statements. Topics include generally accepted 
accounting principles, statements, and extensive analyses 
of balance sheet components. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate competence in the concep- 
tual framework underlying financial accounting, includ- 
ing the application of financial standards. Accounting 
computer problems involving preparation and completion 
of spreadsheets are integrated throughout the course. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisites: ACC 121 and CIS 120. Corequisite: 
None. 

ACC 221 Intermediate Accounting II 

This course is a continuation of ACC 220. Emphasis is on 
special problems which may include leases, bonds, invest- 
ments, ratio analyses, present value applications, account- 
ing changes, and corrections. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the 
principles involved and display an analytical problem-solv- 
ing ability for the topics covered. Accounting computer 
problems involving preparation and completion of spread- 
sheets are integrated throughout the course. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: ACC 220. Corequisite: None. 

ACC 225 Cost Accounting 

This course introduces the nature and purposes of cost 
accounting as an information system for planning and 
control. Topics include direct materials, direct labor, factory 
overhead, process, job order, and standard cost systems. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an understanding of the principles involved and display an 
analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. 
Accounting computer problems involving preparation and 
completion of spreadsheets are integrated throughout the 
course. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ACC 121 and CIS 120. 
Corequisite: None. 



69 



ACC226 Managerial Accounting 

This course is designed to develop an appreciation for the 
uses of cost information in the administration and control 
of business organizations. Emphasis is on how accounting 
data can be interpreted and used by management in plan- 
ning and controlling business activities. Upon completion, 
students should be able to analyze and interpret cost infor- 
mation and present this information in a fonn that is 
usable by management. Accounting computer problems 
involving preparation and completion of spreadsheets are 
integrated throughout the course. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
ACC 121 and ACC 225. Corequisite: None. 

ACC227 Practices in Accounting 

This course provides an advanced in-depth study of selected 
topics in accounting using case studies and individual and 
group problem solving. Topics include cash flow, financial 
statement analysis, individual and group problem solving, 
practical approaches to dealing with clients, ethics, and 
critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate competent analytical skills and effective 
communication of their analysis in written and/or oral 
presentations. As part of this course, students may be 
required to prepare a sample joint income tax return for a 
married couple, establish and use an accounting system, 
and use a microcomputer to record accounting informa- 
tion. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ACC 129, ACC 220, and CIS 
120. Corequisite: None. 

ACC 240 Government and Not-for-Profit 
Accounting 

This course introduces principles and procedures applica- 
ble to governmental and not-for-profit organizations. 
Emphasis is on various budgetary accounting procedures 
and fund accounting. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles 
involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability 
for the topics covered. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ACC 121. 
Corequisite: None. 

ACC 269 Auditing 

This course covers the overall framework of the process of 
conducting audits and investigations. Emphasis is on col- 
lecting data from working papers, arranging and system- 
atizing the audit, and writing the audit report. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate compe- 
tence in applying the generally accepted auditing standards 
and the procedures for conducting an audit. As part of the 
course, students prepare and complete audit procedure 
working papers using computer software. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: ACC 220. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



Anthropology 

ANT 210 General Anthropology 

This course introduces the physical, archaeological, lin- 
guistic, and ethnological fields of anthropology. Topics 
include human origins, genetic variations, archaeology, 
linguistics, primatology, and contemporary cultures. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of the four major fields of anthropology. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology 

This course introduces the nature of human culture. 
Emphasis is on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and 
cross-cultural comparisons in the area of ethnology, lan- 
guage, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic 
cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and 
analyzed. Tins course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

Architecture 

ARC HI Introduction to Architectural 
Technology 

This course introduces basic architectural drafting tech- 
niques, lettering, use of architectural and engineer scales, 
and sketching. Topics include orthographic, isometric, and 
oblique drawing techniques using architectural plans, ele- 
vations, sections, and details; reprographic techniques; and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to prepare and print scaled drawings within minimum 
architectural standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 



ARC 112 Construction Materials and 
Methods 

This course introduces construction materials and their 
methodologies. Topics include construction terminology, 
materials and their properties, manufacturing processes, 
construction techniques, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to detail construction 
assemblies and identify construction materials and proper- 
ties. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 113 Residential Architectural 
Technology 

This course covers intermediate residential working draw- 
ings. Topics include residential plans, elevations, sections, 
details, schedules, and other related topics. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to prepare a set of residential 
working drawings that are within accepted architectural 
standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 6; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ARC 111. 
Corequisite: ARC 112. 

ARC 114 Architectural CAD 

This course introduces basic architectural CAD techniques. 
Topics include basic commands and system hardware and 
software. Upon completion, students should be able to pre- 
pare and plot architectural drawings to scale within accept- 
ed architectural standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

ARC 119 Structural Drafting 

This course introduces basic concepts associated with siz- 
ing and detailing stmctural assemblies. Topics include 
vocabulary, span-to-depth ratios, code requirements, shop 
drawings, and other related topics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to perform simple calculations and 
prepare shop drawings and preliminary structural plans. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ARC 113 and MAT 121, Corequisite: 
None. 

ARC 131 Building Codes 

This course covers the methods of researching building 
codes for specific projects. Topics include residential and 
commercial building codes. Upon completion, students 
should be able to determine the code constraints governing 
residential and commercial projects. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ARC 112. Corequisite: None. 



70 



ARC 132 Specifications and Contracts 

This course covers the development of written specifications 
and the implications of different contractual arrange- 
ments. Topics include specification development, contracts, 
bidding material research, and agency responsibilities. 
Upon completion, students should be able to write a speci- 
fication section and demonstrate the ability to interpret 
contractual responsibilities. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: ARC 112. 
Corequisite: None. 

ARC 211 Light Construction Technology 

This course covers working drawings for light construction. 
Topics include plans, elevations, sections, and details; 
schedules; and other related topics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to prepare a set of working drawings 
that are within accepted architectural standards. Course 
Hour Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: ARC 111. Corequisite: ARC 112. 

ARC 212 Commercial Construction 
Technology 

This course introduces regional construction techniques for 
commercial plans, elevations, sections, and details. Topics 
include production of a set of commercial contract docu- 
ments and other related topics. Upon completion, students 
should be able to prepare a set of working drawings in 
accordance with building codes. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ARC 
111. Corequisite: ARC 112. 

ARC 213 Design Project 

This course provides the opportunity to design and prepare 
a set of contract documents within an architectural setting. 
Topics include schematic design, design development, con- 
struction documents, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to prepare a set of com- 
mercial contract documents. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: ARC 111, 
ARC 112, and ARC 114. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 220 Advanced Architectural CAD 

This course provides file management, productivity, and 
CAD customization skills. Emphasis is on developing 
advanced proficiency techniques. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to create prototype drawings and sym- 
bol libraries, compose sheets with multiple details, and use 
advanced drawing and editing commands. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: ARC 1 14. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 230 Environmental Systems 

This course introduces plumbing, mechanical (HVAC), 
and electrical systems for the architectural environment. 
Topics include basic plumbing, mechanical, and electrical 



Course 
Descriptions 



systems for residential and/or commercial buildings with 
an introduction to selected code requirements. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to develop schematic draw- 
ings for plumbing, mechanical, and electrical systems and 
perform related calculations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: ARC 111 
and MAT 121. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 235 Architectural Portfolio 

This course covers the methodology for creating an archi- 
tectural portfolio. Topics include preparation of marketing 
materials and a presentation strategy using conventional 
and/or digital design media. Upon completion, students 
should be able to produce an architectural portfolio of 
selected projects. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

ARC 236 Architectural 
Mechanics/Electronics Technology 

This course covers the production of working drawings for 
plumbing, mechanical, and electrical (PME) systems for 
buildings. Topics include PME working drawing develop- 
ment. Upon completion, students should be able to pro- 
duce PME working drawings and schedules. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 4; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: ARC 230. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 240 Site Planning 

This course introduces the principles of site planning, 
grading plans, and earthwork calculations. Topics include 
site analysis, site work, site utilities, cut and fill, soil ero- 
sion control, and other related topics. Upon completion, 
students should be able to prepare site development plans 
and details as well as perform cut and fill calculations. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ARC 111. Corequisite: None. 

ARC 263 Introduction to ADA Title III 

This course introduces the American Disabilities Act Title 
III requirements. Emphasis is on Title III requirements as 
they apply to building construction. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to interpret and apply Title III 
requirements to buildings. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: ARC 211. 
Corequisite: None 



Art 

ART 111 Art Appreciation 

This course introduces the origins and historical develop- 
ment of art. Emphasis is on the relationship of design prin- 
ciples to various art forms including but not limited to 
sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of 
artistic styles, periods, and media. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 
and RED 080, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. 

ART 114 Art History Survey I 

This course covers the development of art forms from 
ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is on content, 
terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding 
of art as a product reflective of human social development. 
This course includes but is not limited to the art of Ancient 
Egypt, Greece and Rome, the Byzantine era, and the 
"Gothic" time period. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

ART 115 Art History Survey II 

This course covers the development of art forms from the 
Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is on content, termi- 
nology, design, and style. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding 
of art as a product reflective of human social development. 
This course includes but is not limited to the art of the 
Renaissance and Baroque periods, Romanticism, 
Impressionism, and various movements of the 20th centu- 
ry. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 



71 



ART 121 Design I 

This course introduces the elements and principles of 
design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is on 
the structural elements, the principles of visual organiza- 
tion, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. 
Upon completion, students should be able to understand 
and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to 
two-dimensional visual art. Students will be working with 
a variety of media and tools in a studio setting. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 4; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 
and RED 080, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 

ART 131 Drawing I 

This course introduces the language of drawing and the 
use of various drawing materials. Emphasis is on drawing 
techniques, media, and graphic principles. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in 
the use of graphic form and various drawing processes. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

ART 132 Drawing II 

This course continues instruction in the language of draw- 
ing and the use of various materials. Emphasis is on exper- 
imentation in the use of drawing techniques, media, and 
graphic materials. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate increased competence in the expressive 
use of graphic form and techniques. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 6; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test; and ART 131. 
Corequisite: None. 

Automation Training 

ATR 211 Robot Programming 

This course provides the operational characteristics of 
industrial robots and programming in their respective lan- 
guages. Topics include robot programming utilizing teach 
pendants, PLCs, and personal computers as well as the 
interaction of external sensors, machine vision, network 
systems, and other related devices. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to program and demonstrate the oper- 
ation of various robots. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: CIS 1 10 and 
CSC 120. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



Automotive Systems 

AUT 110 Introduction to Automotive 
Technology 

This course covers the basic concepts and terms of automo- 
tive technology, workplace safety, North Carolina state 
inspection, safety and environmental regulations, and use 
of service information resources. Topics include familiar- 
ization with components along with identification and 
proper use of various automotive hand and power tools. 
Upon completion, students should be able to describe terms 
associated with automobiles, identify and use basic tools 
and shop equipment, and conduct North Carolina 
safety/emissions inspections. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

AUT 115 Engine Fundamentals 

This couree covers the theory, construction, inspection, 
diagnosis, and repair of internal combustion engines and 
related systems. Topics include fundamental operating 
principles of engines and diagnosis, inspection, adjust- 
ment, and repair of automotive engines using appropriate 
service information. Upon completion, students should be 
able to perform basic diagnosis and repair of automotive 
engines using appropriate tools, equipment, procedures, 
and service information. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: AUT 116. 

AUT 116 Engine Repair 

This course covers service, repair, and rebuilding of block, 
head, and internal engine components. Topics include 
engine repair and reconditioning using service specifica- 
tions. Upon completion, students should be able to rebuild 
and recondition an automobile engine to service specifica- 
tions. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: AUT 115. 

AUT 141 Suspension and Steering Systems 

This course covers principles of operation, types, and diag- 
nosis and repair of suspension and steering systems to 
include steering geometry. Topics include manual and 
power steering systems as well as standard and electroni- 
cally controlled suspension and steering systems. Upon 
completion, students should be able to service and repair 



various steering and suspension components, check and 
adjust various alignment angles, and balance wheels. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 4; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

AUT 151 Brake Systems 

This course covers principles of operation and types, diag- 
nosis, service, and repair of brake systems. Topics include 
drum and disc brakes involving hydraulic, vacuum boost, 
hydra-boost, electrically powered boost, and anti-lock and 
parking brake systems. Upon completion, students should 
be able to diagnose, service, and repair various automotive 
braking systems. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
AUT 152. 

AUT 152 Brake Systems Lab 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance brake 
system skills. Emphasis is on practical experiences that 
enhance the topics presented in AUT 151. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experi- 
ences to the concepts presented in AUT 151. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: AUT 151. 

AUT 161 Electrical Systems 

This couree covers basic electrical theory and wiring dia- 
grams; test equipment; and diagnosis, repair, and replace- 
ment of batteries, starters, alternators, and basic electrical 
accessories. Topics include diagnosis and repair of battery, 
starting, charging, lighting, and basic accessory systems 
problems. Upon completion, students should be able to 
diagnose, test, and repair the basic electrical components 
of an automobile. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

AUT 164 Automotive Electronics 

This course covers fundamentals of electrical/electronic 
circuitry, semi-conductors, and microprocessors. Topics 
include Ohm's law, circuits, AC/DC current, solid state 
components, digital applications, and the use of digital 
multimeters. Upon completion, students should be able to 
apply Ohm's law to diagnose and repair electrical and elec- 
tronic circuits using digital multimeters and appropriate 
service information. The skills learned in this course will 
be applied to computerized engine controls and automotive 
electronic accessories. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: AUT l6l. 
Corequisite: None. 



72 



AUT 171 Heating and Air Conditioning 

This course covers the theory of refrigeration and heating; 
electrical, electronic, and pneumatic controls; and diagno- 
sis and repair of climate control systems. Topics include 
diagnosis and repair of climate control components and 
systems; recovery and recycling of refrigerant; and safety 
and environmental regulations. Upon completion, students 
should be able to describe the operation, diagnose, and 
safely service climate control systems using appropriate 
tools, equipment, and service information. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

AUT 181 Engine Performance - Electrical 

This course covers the principles, systems, and procedures 
required for diagnosing and restoring engine performance 
using electrical and electronics test equipment. Topics 
include procedures for diagnosis and repair of ignition, 
emission control, and related electronic systems. Upon 
completion, students should be able to describe the opera- 
tion as well as diagnose and repair ignition and emission 
control systems using appropriate test equipment and serv- 
ice information. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: AUT l6l. 
Corequisite: None. 

AUT 182 Engine Performance - Electrical 
Lab 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance the 
skills for diagnosing and restoring engine performance 
using electrical and electronic test equipment. Emphasis is 
on practical experiences that enhance the topics presented 
in AUT 181. Upon completion, students should be able to 
apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented 
in AUT 181. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
AUT 181. 

AUT 183 Engine Performance - Fuels 

This course covers the principles of fuel delivery and man- 
agement, exhaust and emission systems, and procedures 
for diagnosing and restoring engine performance using 
appropriate test equipment. Topics include procedures for 
diagnosis and repair of fuel delivery and management as 
well as exhaust and emission systems using appropriate 
service information. Upon completion, students should be 
able to describe, diagnose, and repair engine fuel delivery 
and management and emission control systems using 
appropriate service information and diagnostic equipment. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: AUT l6l. Corequisite: None. 

AUT 184 Engine Performance - Fuels Lab 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance the 
skills for diagnosing and repairing fuel delivery/manage- 
ment and emission systems. Emphasis is on practical 



Course 
Descriptions 



experiences that enhance the topics presented in AUT 183. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply the lab- 
oratory experiences to the concepts presented in AUT 183. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: AUT 183. 

AUT 221 Automatic Transmissions 

This course covers operation, diagnosis, service, and repair 
of automatic transmissions and transaxles. Topics include 
hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, and electrical and elec- 
tronic operation of automatic drive trains and the use of 
appropriate service tools and equipment. Upon completion, 
students should be able to explain operational theory and 
diagnose and repair automatic drive trains. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: AUT 231. Corequisite: None. 

AUT 231 Manual Drive Trains/Axles 

This course covers the operation, diagnosis, and repair of 
manual transmissions and transaxles, clutches, driveshafts, 
axles, and final drives. Topics include theory of torque, 
power flow, and manual drive train service and repair 
using appropriate service information, tools, and equip- 
ment. Upon completion, students should be able to explain 
operational theory and diagnose and repair manual drive 
trains. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: AUT 232. 

AUT 232 Manual Drive Trains/Axles Lab 

This course provides a laboratory setting to enhance the 
skills for diagnosing and repairing manual transmissions 
and transaxles, clutches, driveshafts, axles, and final drives. 
Emphasis is on practical experiences that enhance the top- 
ics presented in AUT 231. Upon completion, students 
should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the 
concepts presented in AUT 231. Course Hour Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: AUT 231. 

A UT 281 Advanced Engine Performance 

This course utilizes service information and specialized test 
equipment to diagnose and repair power train control sys- 
tems. Topics include computerized ignition, fuel and emis- 
sion systems, related diagnostic tools and equipment, data 
communication networks, and service information. Upon 
completion, students should be able to perform advanced 



engine performance diagnosis and repair. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: AUT 164, AUT 181, and AUT 183. Corequisite: 
None. 

Biology 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on the college's placement testing policies and 
procedures. Students should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

BIO 092 Basics of Cell Biology 

This course covers basic cell biology. Emphasis is on bio- 
logical chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular 
metabolism, genetics, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate prepared- 
ness for college-level biology courses. Laboratory exercises 
focus on basic biological principles and microscope tech- 
niques. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: MAT 060 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: RED 090 
or satisfactory score on placement test. 

BIO 111 General Biology I 

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biolo- 
gy. Emphasis is on basic biological chemistry, cell structure 
and function, metabolism and energy transformation, 
genetics, evolution, classification, and other related topics. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. 
Laboratory exercises reinforce lecture topics and include 
microscope techniques. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in natural sci- 
ences/mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: ENG 090, MAT 
060, and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 

BIO 120 Introductory Botany 

This course provides an introduction to the classification, 
relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics 
include reproduction and development of seed and non- 
seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of 
systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate comprehension of 
plant form and function, including selected taxa of both 
seed and non-seed plants. The laboratory exercises are 
coordinated with lecture topics and may include field exer- 
cises. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: BIO 111. Corequisite: None. 



73 



BIO 130 Introductory Zoobgy 

This course provides an introduction to the classification, 
relationships, structure, and function of major animal 
phyla. Emphasis is on levels of organization, reproduction 
and development, comparative systems, and a survey of 
selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and func- 
tion, including comparative systems of selected groups. 
Laboratory exercises include microscope observations and 
dissections to reinforce topics discussed in lecture. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: BIO 111. Corequisite: None. 

BIO 160 Introductory Life Science 

This course introduces scientific and biological concepts. 
Topics include basic chemistry, cell structure and function, 
cell division, basic genetic concepts, anatomical terminolo- 
gy, and metric-English measurements and conversions. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an understanding of basic chemistry, cell biology, genetic 
concepts, anatomical terminology, and metric-English 
measurements and conversions. Course Hours per Week: 
Class, 2. Lab, 2. Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
MAT 070 and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisite: None 

BIO 161 Introduction to Human Biology 

This course provides a basic survey of human biology. 
Emphasis is on the basic structure and function of body 
systems and the medical terminology used to describe nor- 
mal and pathological states. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of normal 
anatomy and physiology and the appropriate use of med- 
ical terminology. This course covers a general study of each 
organ system and an overview of common abnormal phys- 
iological conditions associated with each system. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisite: None. 

BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 

This course provides a basic study of the structure and 
function of the human body. Topics include a basic study 
of the body systems as well as an introduction to home- 
ostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and elec- 
trolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental 
principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrela- 
tionships. Laboratory exercises include specific organ dis- 
sections and observations of physiology. Tt)is course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 



Course 
Descriptions 



Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 

This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy 
and physiology of the human body. Topics include body 
organization; homeostasis; cytology; histology; and the 
integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous systems and 
special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of 
anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. 
Laboratory work includes dissection of preserved speci- 
mens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, comput- 
er simulations, and multimedia presentations. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course reqidrement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3- Lab, 
3. Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: RED 090 or sat- 
isfactory score on placement test, BIO 092 or high school 
biology, and CHM 094 or high school chemistry. 
Corequisite: None. 

BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 

This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive 
study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. 
Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, 
respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as 
well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid 
and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of prin- 
ciples of anatomy and physiology and their interrelation- 
ships. Laboratory work includes dissection of preserved 
specimens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, 
computer simulations, and multimedia presentations. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3- Lab, 
3. Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: BIO 168. 
Corequisite: None. 

BIO 175 General Microbiology 

This course covers principles of microbiology with empha- 
sis on microorganisms and human disease. Topics include 
an overview of microbiology and aspects of medical micro- 
biology, identification and control of pathogens, disease 
transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge 



of microorganisms and the disease process as well as asep- 
tic and sterile techniques. This course has been approved 
to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: BIO 163. Corequisite: None. 

BIO 271 Pathophysiology 

This course provides an in-depth study of human patho- 
logical processes and their effects on homeostasis. 
Emphasis is on interrelationships among organ systems in 
deviations from homeostasis. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of 
pathophysiology. Course topics include the etiology, physi- 
cal signs and symptoms, prognosis, and complications of 
commonly occurring diseases and their management. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: BIO 169. 
Corequisite: None. 

BIO 275 Microbiology 

This course covers principles of microbiology and the 
impact these organisms have on man and the environ- 
ment. Topics include the various groups of microorgan- 
isms, their structure, physiology, genetics, microbial patho- 
genicity, infectious diseases, immunology, and selected 
practical applications. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills, including 
microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, culture methods, 
and identification of microorganisms. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: BIO 111 or BIO 168. 
Corequisite: None. 

Blueprint Reading 

BPRlll Blueprint Reading 

This course introduces the basic principles of blueprint 
reading. Topics include line types, orthographic projec- 
tions, dimensioning methods, and notes. Upon completion, 
students should be able to interpret basic blueprints and 
visualize the features of a part. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

BPR 121 Blueprint Reading: Mechanical 

This course covers the interpretation of intermediate blue- 
prints. Topics include tolerancing, auxiliary views, section- 
al views, and assembly drawings. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to read and interpret a mechanical 
working drawing. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: BPR 111. 
Corequisite: None. 



74 



BPR 130 Blueprint Reading: Construction 

This course covers the interpretation of blueprints and 
specifications that are associated with the construction 
trades. Emphasis is on interpretation of details for founda- 
tions, floor plans, elevations, and schedules. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to read and interpret a set of 
construction blueprints. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

Business 

BUS 110 Introduction to Business 

This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics 
include the basic principles and practices of contemporary 
business. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a 
foundation for studying other business subjects. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

BUS 115 Business Law I 

This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of 
business. Emphasis is on contracts, negotiable instruments, 
Uniform Commercial Code, and the workings of the court 
systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply 
ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision 
making situations. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 116 Business Law II 

This course continues the study of ethics and business law. 
Emphasis is on bailments, sales, risk-bearing, forms of 
business ownership, and copyrights. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to apply ethical issues and laws cov- 
ered to selected business decision making situations. 
Course Hour Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: BUS 115. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 137 Principles of Management 

This course is designed to be an overview of the major 
functions of management. Emphasis is on planning, 
organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. 
Upon completion, students should be able to work as con- 
tributing members of a team utilizing these functions of 
management. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



BUS 151 People Skills 

This course introduces the basic concepts of identity and 
communication in the business setting. Topics include self- 
concept; values; communication styles; feelings and emo- 
tions; roles versus relationships; and basic assertiveness, lis- 
tening, and conflict resolution. Upon completion, students 
should be able to distinguish between unhealthy, self- 
destructive communication patterns and healthy, non- 
destructive, positive communication patterns. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 153 Human Resource Management 

This course introduces the functions of personnel/human 
resource management within an organization. Topics 
include equal opportunity and the legal environment, 
recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, employ- 
ee development, compensation planning, and employee 
relations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
anticipate and resolve human resource concerns. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 210 Investment Analysis 

This course examines the concepts related to financial 
investment and the fundamentals of managing invest- 
ments. Emphasis is on the securities markets, stocks, 
bonds, and mutual funds as well as tax implications of 
investment alternatives. Upon completion, students should 
be able to analyze and interpret investment alternatives 
and report findings to users of financial information. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ACC 120. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 225 Business Finance 

This course provides an overview of business financial 
management. Emphasis is on financial statement analysis, 
time value of money, management of cash flow, risk and 
return, and sources of financing. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to interpret and apply the principles of 
financial management. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ACC 120. 
Corequisite: None. 

BUS 228 Business Statistics 

This course introduces the use of statistical methods and 
tools in evaluating research data for business applications. 
Emphasis is on basic probability, measures of spread and 



dispersion, central tendency, sampling, regression analysis, 
and inductive inference. Upon completion, students should 
be able to apply statistical problem solving to business. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 115. 
Corequisite: None. 

BUS 230 Small Business Management 

This course introduces the challenges of entrepreneurship, 
including the startup and operation of a small business. 
Topics include market research techniques, feasibility stud- 
ies, site analysis, financing alternatives, and managerial 
decision making. Upon completion, students should be 
able to develop a small business plan. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ACC 120. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 239 Business Applications Seminar 

This course is designed as a capstone course for Business 
Administration majors. Emphasis is on decision making in 
the areas of management, marketing, production, pur- 
chasing, and finance. Upon completion, students should be 
able to apply the techniques, processes, and vital profes- 
sional skills needed in the work place. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisites: ACC 120, BUS 115, BUS 137, MKT 120, and 
either ECO 251 or ECO 252. Corequisite: None. 

BUS 240 Business Ethics 

This course introduces contemporary and controversial 
ethical issues that face the business community. Topics 
include moral reasoning, moral dilemmas, law and 
morality, equity, justice and fairness, ethical standards, and 
moral development. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of their moral 
responsibilities and obligations as members of the work- 
force and society. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

BUS 255 Organizational Behavior in 
Business 

This course covers the impact of different management 
practices and leadership styles on worker satisfaction and 
morale, organizational effectiveness, productivity, and prof- 
itability. Topics include a discussion of formal and infor- 
mal organizations, group dynamics, motivation, and man- 
aging conflict and change. Upon completion, students 
should be able to analyze different types of interpersonal 
situations and determine an appropriate course of action. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



75 



BUS 261 Diversity in Management 

This course is designed to help managers recognize the 
need to incorporate diversity into all phases of organiza- 
tional management. Topics include self-evaluation, man- 
agement, sexual harassment, workforce diversity, dual 
careers, role conflict, and communication issues. Upon 
completion, students should be able to implement solu- 
tions minimizing policies, attitudes, and stereotypical 
behaviors that block effective team building. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Computer Engineering 
Technology 

CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 

This course is the first of two coursa covering repairing, 
servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in 
preparation for industry certification. Topics include safety 
practices, CPU/memory/bus identification, disk subsystem, 
hardware and software installation and configuration, 
common device drivers, data recovery, system mainte- 
nance, and other related topics. Upon completion, students 
should be able to safely repair and/or upgrade computer 
systems to perform within specifications. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

CET 21 1 Computer Upgrade/Repair II 

This course is the second of two courses covering repairing, 
servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in 
preparation for industry certification. Topics include 
resolving resource conflicts and system bus specifications, 
configuration and troubleshooting peripherals, operating 
system configuration and optimization, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
identify and resolve system conflicts and optimize system 
performance. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2. Lab, 3- 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CET 111. 
Corequisite: None. 

Chemistry 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on the college's placement testing policies and 
procedures. Students should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

CHM 094 Basic Biological Chemistry 

This course introduces the chemistry important to biologi- 
cal processes. Emphasis is on the aspects of general, 
organic, and biological chemistry that apply to biological 
systems and processes. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic 



Course 
Descriptions 



biological chemistry necessary for success in college-level 
biology courses. Laboratory work reinforces the principles 
discussed in lecture. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: MAT 060 
and RED 080, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: MAT 070 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of inor- 
ganic chemistry. Topics include measurement, matter and 
energy, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, 
stoichiometry, chemical formulas and reactions, chemical 
bonding, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic 
understanding of chemistry as it applies to other fields. A 
brief introduction to organic chemistry, biochemistry, 
plastics, polymers, and combustibles is included. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: MAT 070 and RED 090, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CHM 151 General Chemistry I 

This course covers fundamental principles and laws of 
chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and 
molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, 
chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas 
laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental 
chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152. 
Laboratory experiments and computer-based exercises 
augment and reinforce the basic principles discussed in 
lecture as well as provide practical examples. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in natural sciences/ mathematics. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 
4. Prerequisites: RED 090 and MAT 080, or satisfactory 
score on placement test; and CHM 094 or CHM 131 or 
high school chemistry within the last 5 years. 
Corequisite: MAT 171. 



CHM 152 General Chemistry II 

This course continues the study of the fundamental 
principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, 
equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, 
electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to 
nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue 
further study in chemistry and related professional fields. 
Laboratory experiments and computer-based exercises 
augment and reinforce the basic principles discussed in 
lecture as well as provide practical examples. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in natural sciences/ mathematics. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 
4. Prerequisite: CHM 151. Corequisite: None. 

CHM 251 Organic Chemistry 1 

This course provides a systematic study of the theories, 
principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics 
include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and 
mechanisms of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and 
ethers; further topics include isomerization, stereochem- 
istry, and spectroscopy. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamen- 
tal concepts of covered organic topics as needed in CHM 
252. Laboratory experiments, including spectroscopy and 
chromotography, and computer-based exercises augment 
and reinforce the basic principles discussed in lecture as 
well as provide practical examples. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pie-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: CHM 152. Corequisite: None. 

CHM 252 Organic Chemistry II 

This course continues the systematic study of the theories, 
principles, and techniques of organic chemistry. Topics 
include nomenclature, structure, properties, reactions, and 
mechanisms of aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic 
acids and derivatives, amines, and heterocyclics. Multi-step 
synthesis is emphasized. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate an understanding of organic 
concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry 
and related professional fields. Laboratory experiments, 
including spectroscopy and chromotography, and comput- 
er-based exercises augment and reinforce the basic 
principles discussed in lecture as well as provide practical 
examples. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 
4. Prerequisite: CHM 251. Corequisite: None. 



76 



CHM261 Quantitative Analysis 

This course introduces classical methods of chemical 
analysis with an emphasis on laboratory techniques. Topics 
include statistical data treatment; stoichiometric and equi- 
librium calculations; and titrimetric, gravimetric, acid- 
base, oxidation-reduction, and compleximetric methods. 
Upon completion, students should be able to perform clas- 
sical quantitative analytical procedures. Laboratory exercis- 
es in the various classical techniques enhance and rein- 
force lecture material. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: CHM 152. Corequisite: None. 

Information Systems 

CIS 070 Fundamentals of Computing 

This course covers fundamental functions and operations 
of the computer. Topics include identification of compo- 
nents, overview of operating systems, and other basic com- 
puter operations. Upon completion, students should be able 
to operate computers, access files, print documents, and 
perform basic applications operations. Course Hours per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 

This course provides an introduction to computers and 
computing. Topics include the impact of computers on 
society, ethical issues, and hardware/software applications, 
including spreadsheets, databases, word processors, graph- 
ics, the Internet, and operating systems. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding 
of the role and function of computers and use the comput- 
er to solve problems. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in natural sci- 
ences/mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

CIS 113 Computer Basics 

This course introduces basic computer usage for non-com- 
puter majors. Emphasis is on developing basic personal 
computer skills. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate competence in basic computer applications 
sufficient to use computer-assisted instructional software. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



CIS 115 Introduction to Programming 
and Logic 

This course introduces computer programming and prob- 
lem solving in a programming environment, including an 
introduction to operating systems, text editor, and a lan- 
guage translator. Topics include language syntax, data 
types, program organization, problem-solving methods, 
algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to manage files with oper- 
ating system commands, use top-down algorithm design, 
and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming 
language. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/ mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 070. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 120 Spreadsheet! 

This course introduces basic spreadsheet design and devel- 
opment. Topics include writing formulas, using functions, 
enhancing spreadsheets, creating charts, and printing. 
Upon completion, students should be able to design and 
print basic spreadsheets and charts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 130 Survey of Operating Systems 

The course covers operating system concepts which are 
necessary for maintaining and using computer systems. 
Topics include disk, file, and directory structures; installa- 
tion and setup; resource allocation, optimization, and con- 
figuration; system security; and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to install and config- 
ure operating systems and optimize performance. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 145 Operating System - Single-User 

This course introduces operating systems concepts for sin- 
gle-user systems. Topics include hardware management, 
file and memory management, system configuration/opti- 
mization, and utilities. Upon completion, students should 
be able to perform operating system functions at the sup- 
port level in a single-user environment. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: CIS 130. 



CIS 148 Operating System - Windows* NT 

This course introduces operating systems concepts for the 
Windows* NT operating system. Topics include hardware 
management, file and memory management, system con- 
figuration/optimization, networking options, and utilities. 
Upon completion, students should be able to perform oper- 
ating system functions at the single- and multi-user sup- 
port level in a Windows* NT environment. Course Hour 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: CIS 110 and NET 110. Corequisite: CIS 130. 

CIS 152 Database Concepts and 
Applications 

This course introduces database design and creation using 
a DBMS product. Topics include database terminology; 
usage in industry; design theory; types of DBMS models; 
and creation of simple tables, queries, reports, and forms. 
Upon completion, students should be able to create simple 
database tables, queries, reports, and forms which follow 
acceptable design practices. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 1 10 or 
CIS 115. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 153 Database Applications 

This course covers advanced database functions continued 
from CIS 152. Topics include manipulating multiple 
tables, advanced queries, screens and reports, linking, and 
command files. Upon completion, students should be able 
to create multiple table systems that demonstrate updates, 
screens, and reports which are representative of industry 
requirements. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 152. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 157 Database Programming I 

This course is designed to develop programming proficien- 
cy in a selected DBMS. Emphasis is on the Data Definition 
Language (DDL) and Data Manipulation Language (DML) 
of the DBMS as well as on report generation. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to write programs that create, 
update, and produce reports which are representative of 
industry requirements. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: CIS 130 and 
CIS 152. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 162 Multimedia Presentation 
Software 

This course is designed to integrate visual and audio 
resources using presentation software in a simple interac- 
tive multimedia project. Emphasis is on design and audi- 
ence considerations, general prototyping, and handling of 
media resources. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate an original interactive multimedia presen- 
tation implementing all of these resources in a professional 
manner. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 1 10. Corequisite: None. 



77 



CIS 163 Programming Interfaces Internet 

This course creates interactive multimedia applications 
and applets for the Internet using web-specific languages. 
Emphasis is on audio, video, graphic, and network 
resources and on various file formats. Upon completion, 
students should be able to create an interactive multimedia 
application or applet for the Internet. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: CIS 110 and CIS 152. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 165 Desktop Publishing I 

This course provides an introduction to desktop publishing 
software capabilities. Emphasis is on efficient use of a page 
layout software package to create, design, and print publi- 
cations; hardware/software compatibility; and integration 
of specialized peripherals. Upon completion, students 
should be able to prepare publications given design specifi- 
cations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 169 Business Presentations 

This course provides hands-on experience with a graphics 
presentation package. Topics include terminology, effective 
chart usage, design and layout, integrating hardware com- 
ponents, and enhancing presentations with text and graph- 
ics. Upon completion, students should be able to design 
and demonstrate an effective presentation. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 172 Introduction to the Internet 

This course introduces the various navigational tools and 
services of the Internet. Topics include using Internet pro- 
tocols, search engines, file compression/decompression, 
FTP, e-mail, list servers, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to use Internet 
resources; retrieve and decompress files; and use e-mail, 
FTP, and other Internet tools. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 
110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 1 74 Network System Manager I 

This course covers effective network management. Topics 
include network file system design and security, login 
scripts and user menus, printing services, e-mail, and 
backup. Upon completion, students should be able to 
administer an office network system. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: NET 110. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



CIS 1 75 Network Management I 

This course covers fundamental network administration 
and system management. Topics include accessing and 
configuring basic network services, managing directory 
services, and using network management software. Upon 
completion, students should be able to apply system 
administrator skills in developing a network management 
strategy. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: NET 1 10. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 182 Printing on the Network 

This course focuses on effective management of printing 
on a network. Topics include installation, configuration, 
and management of print servers and print queues, remote 
printer setup, and customizing print jobs. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to implement and trou- 
bleshoot network printing. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 174 or 
CIS 175. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 184 TCP/IP and NFS 

This course focuses on installation and configuration of 
TCP/IP on a network. Topics include an overview of 
TCP/IP, SNMP, application of programming interfaces, 
Network File System (NFS), IP addresses, and routing and 
tunneling. Upon completion, students should be able to 
install, monitor, manage, diagnose, and troubleshoot com- 
mon problems in IP networks and internetworks. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CIS 175. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 192 Selected Topics in Networking 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in specific program or discipline areas. 
Emphasis is on subject matter appropriate to the program 
or discipline. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the specific area of study. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. 
Corequisite: None. 



CIS 193 Selected Topics in Networking 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in specific program or discipline areas. 
Emphasis is on subject matter appropriate to the program 
or discipline. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the specific area of study. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: Permission of program director. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 215 Hardware Installation/ 
Maintenance 

This course covers the basic hardware of a personal com- 
puter, including operations and interactions with software. 
Topics include component identification, the memory sys- 
tem, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive 
maintenance, and diagnostics and repair. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to select appropriate comput- 
er equipment, upgrade and maintain existing equipment, 
and troubleshoot and repair non-functioning personal 
computers. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: CIS 110 and NET 
110. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 216 Software Installation/ 
Maintenance 

This course introduces the installation and troubleshooting 
aspects of personal computer software. Emphasis is on ini- 
tial installation and optimization of system software, com- 
mercial programs, system configuration files, and device 
drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to 
install, upgrade, uninstall, optimize, and troubleshoot per- 
sonal computer software. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: CIS 130. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 220 Spreadsheets II 

This course covers advanced spreadsheet design and devel- 
opment. Topics include advanced functions, charting, 
macros, databases, and linking. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate competence in designing 
complex spreadsheets. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: CIS 120. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 225 Integrated Software 

This course provides strategies to perfonn data transfer 
among software programs. Emphasis is on data inter- 
change among word processors, spreadsheets, presentation 
graphics, databases, and communications products. Upon 
completion, students should be able to integrate data to 
produce documents using multiple technologies. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisites: CIS 120, CIS 152, and OST 136. Corequisite: 
None. 



78 



CIS 226 Trends in Technology 

This course introduces emerging information systems tech- 
nologies. Emphasis is on evolving technologies and trends 
in business and industry. Upon completion, students 
should be able to articulate an understanding of the cur- 
rent trends and issues in emerging technologies for infor- 
mation systems. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: CIS 130. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 245 Operating Systems - Multi- Users 

This course includes operating systems concepts for multi- 
user systems. Topics include hardware management, file 
and memory management, system configuration/opti- 
mization, and utilities. Upon completion, students should 
be able to perform operating system functions in a multi- 
user environment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 148. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 246 Operating System - UNIX 

This course includes operating systems concepts for UNIX 
operating systems. Topics include hardware management, 
file and memory management, system configuration/opti- 
mization, utilities, and other related topics. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to use the UNIX operating sys- 
tem and its utilities effectively. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CIS 
130. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 274 Network System Manager II 

This course is a continuation of CIS 174 and focuses on 
advanced network management, configuration, and instal- 
lation. Emphasis is on server configuration files, startup 
procedures, server protocol support, memory and perform- 
ance concepts, and management and maintenance. Upon 
completion, students should be able to install and upgrade 
networks and servers for optimal performance. This course 
is a unique concentration requirement of the Network 
Administration and Support concentration in the 
Information Systems program. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CIS 
174. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 275 Network Management II 

This course is a continuation of CIS 175 and focuses on 
advanced enterprise networks. Topics include directory 
service tree planning, management distribution and pro- 
tection, improving network security, auditing the network, 
printing, networking, and system administration of an 
Internet node. Upon completion, students should be able to 
manage client services and network features and to opti- 
mize network performance. This course is a unique con- 
centration requirement of the Network Administration and 



Course 
Descriptions 



Support concentration in the Information Systems pro- 
gram. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 175. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 277 Network Design and 
Implementation 

This course focuses on the design, analysis, and integration 
of a network operating system. Topics include determina- 
tion of a directory tree structure and object placement, cre- 
ation of time synchronization strategy, security, and rout- 
ing services. Upon completion, students should be able to 
implement a network design strategy, develop a migration 
strategy, and create a network implementation schedule. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 275. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 279 UNIX System Administration 

This course provides an advanced study of the UNIX oper- 
ating system for maintaining UNIX systems. Topics include 
administering user accounts, using back-up utilities, 
installing and maintaining UNIX file systems, configuring 
devices, controlling processes, using advanced scripts, and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to set up, configure, maintain, and administer a UNIX 
system. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: CIS 246. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 282 Network Technology 

This course examines concepts of network architecture. 
Topics include various network types, topologies, transmis- 
sion methods, media and access control, the OSI model, 
and the protocols which operate at each level of the model. 
Upon completion, students should be able to design a net- 
work based on the requirements of a company. This course 
is a unique concentration requirement of the Network 
Administration and Support concentration in the 
Information Systems program. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 
174 or CIS 175. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 286 Systems Analysis and Design 

This course examines established and evolving methodolo- 
gies for the analysis, design, and development of a business 
information system. Emphasis is on business systems char- 
acteristics, managing information systems projects, proto- 
typing, CASE tools, and systems development life cycle 



phases. Upon completion, students should be able to ana- 
lyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a 
combination of tools and techniques. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: CIS 115 and CSC 134. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 287 Network Support 

This course provides experience using CD ROM and on-line 
research tools as well as hands-on experience for advanced 
hardware support and troubleshooting. Emphasis is on 
troubleshooting network adapter cards and cabling, net- 
work storage devices, the DOS workstation, and network 
printing. Upon completion, students should be able to ana- 
lyze, diagnose, research, and repair network hardware 
problems. This course is a unique concentration require- 
ment of the Network Administration and Support concen- 
tration in the Information Systems program. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: CIS 274 or CIS 275. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 288 Systems Project 

This course provides an opportunity to complete a signifi- 
cant systems project from the design phase through imple- 
mentation with minimal instructor support. Emphasis is 
on project definition, documentation, installation, testing, 
presentation, and training. Upon completion, students 
should be able to complete a project from the definition 
phase through implementation. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 4; Semester Hour Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 
286. Corequisite: None. 

CIS 292 Selected Topics in Networking 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in specific program or discipline areas. 
Emphasis is on subject matter appropriate to the program 
or discipline. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the specific area of study. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. 
Corequisite: None. 

CIS 293 Selected Topics in Networking 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in specific program or discipline areas. 
Emphasis is on subject matter appropriate to the program 
or discipline. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the specific area of study. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: Permission of program director. 
Corequisite: None. 



79 



Criminal Justice 

CJC 100 Basic Law Enforcement Training 

This course covers the skills and knowledge needed for 
entry-level employment as a law enforcement officer in 
North Carolina. Emphasis is on topics and areas as defined 
by the North Carolina Administrative Code. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in 
the topics and areas required for the state comprehensive 
examination. This is a certificate-level course. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 9; Lab, 27; Semester Hours Credit, 
18. Prerequisite: Acceptance in the BLET program. 
Corequisite: None. 

CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

This course introduces the components and processes of 
the criminal justice system. Topics include history, struc- 
ture, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice sys- 
tem and their relationship to life in our society. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to define and describe the 
major system components and their interrelationships as 
well as evaluate career options. Special emphasis is on the 
courts of North Carolina and on the constitutional issues 
arising under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course reqidrement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 

CJC 112 Criminology 

This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to 
criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causa- 
tion; statistical analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, 
and future social control initiatives; and other related top- 
ics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain 
and discuss various theories of crime causation and socie- 
tal response. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

CJC 113 Juvenile Justice 

This course covers the juvenile justice system and related 
juvenile issues. Topics include an overview of the juvenile 
justice system, treatment and prevention programs, special 
areas and laws unique to juveniles, and other related top- 
ics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify 
and discuss juvenile court stmcture and procedures, func- 
tion and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies, processing and 
detention of juveniles, and case disposition. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



CJC 114 Investigative Photography 

This course covers the operation of various photographic 
equipment and its application to criminal justice. Topics 
include using various cameras, proper exposure of film, 
developing film and prints, and preparing photographic 
evidence. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate and explain the role of photography and 
proper film exposure as well as development techniques. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: CJC 222; ENG 090 and RED 090, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 121 Law Enforcement Operations 

This course introduces fundamental law enforcement oper- 
ations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law 
enforcement operations and related issues. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, 
and issues related to law enforcement operations. Through 
an application setting, students utilize current methods 
and practices of local agencies in order to acquire a more 
comprehensive understanding of operational needs and 
logistics. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 

CJC 122 Community Policing 

This course covers the historical, philosophical, and practi- 
cal dimensions of community policing. Emphasis is on the 
empowerment of police and the community to find solu- 
tions to problems by forming partnerships. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to define community polic- 
ing, describe how community policing strategies solve 
problems, and compare community policing to traditional 
policing. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: CJC 111; ENG 090 and RED 
090, or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 



CJC 131 Criminal Law 

This course covers the history, evolution, principles, and 
contemporary applications of criminal law. Topics include 
sources of substantive law, classification of crimes, parties 
to crime, elements of crimes, matters of criminal responsi- 
bility, and other related topics. Upon completion, students 
should be able to discuss the sources of law and identify, 
interpret, and apply the appropriate statutes and elements. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

CJC 132 Court Procedure and Evidence 

This course covers judicial structure, process, and proce- 
dure from incident to disposition; kinds and degrees of evi- 
dence; and the rules governing admissibility of evidence in 
court. Topics include consideration of state and federal 
courts, arrest, search and seizure laws, exclusionary and 
statutory rules of evidence, and other related issues. Upon 
completion, students should be able to identify and discuss 
procedures necessary to establish a lawful arrest and 
search, proper judicial procedures, and the admissibility of 
evidence. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 141 Corrections 

This course covers the history, major philosophies, compo- 
nents, and current practices and problems of the field of 
corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions 
of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, 
treatment programs, inmate control, and other related top- 
ics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain 
the various components, processes, and functions of the 
correctional system. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 21 1 Counseling 

This course introduces the basic elements of counseling 
and specific techniques applicable to the criminal justice 
setting. Topics include observation, listening, recording, 
interviewing, and problem exploration necessary to form 
effective helping relationships. Upon completion, students 
should be able to discuss and demonstrate the basic tech- 
niques of counseling. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 



80 



CJC 212 Ethics and Community Relations 

This course covers ethical considerations and accepted 
standards applicable to criminal justice organizations and 
professionals. Topics include ethical systems; social 
change, values, and norms; cultural diversity; citizen 
involvement in criminal justice issues; and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply 
ethical considerations to the decision making process in 
identifiable criminal justice situations. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: CJC 111; ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 213 Substance Abuse 

This course is a study of substance abuse in our society. 
Topics include the history and classifications of drug abuse 
and the social, physical, and psychological impact of drug 
abuse. Upon completion, students should be able to identi- 
fy various types of drugs, their effects on human behavior 
and society, and treatment modalities. Current area drug 
trends and North Carolina statutes regarding controlled 
substances are reviewed. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 

CJC 214 Victimology 

This course introduces the study of victims. Emphasis is on 
roles and characteristics of victims, victim interaction with 
the criminal justice system and society, current victim 
assistance programs, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to discuss and identify vic- 
tims, the uniqueness of victims' roles, and current victim 
assistance programs. In addition, this course assesses mas- 
tery of critical competencies within the Criminal Justice 
program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: CJC 1 1 1, CJC 122, CJC 132, 
CJC 215, CJC 221; ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory 
score on placement test. Corequisites: CJC 121 and CJC 131. 

CJC 215 Organization and Administration 

This course introduces the components and functions of 
organization and administration as it applies to the agen- 
cies of the criminal justice system. Topics include opera- 
tions and functions of organizations; recruiting, training, 
and retention of personnel; funding and budgeting; com- 
munications; span of control and discretion; and other 
related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
identify and discuss the basic components and functions of 
a criminal justice organization and its administrative oper- 
ations. Course Hour Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



CJC 221 Investigative Principles 

This course introduces the theories and fundamentals of 
the investigative process. Topics include crime scene and 
incident processing, information gathering techniques, 
collection and preservation of evidence, preparation of 
appropriate reports, court presentations, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identi- 
fy, explain, and demonstrate the techniques of the inves- 
tigative process, report preparation, and courtroom presen- 
tation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: CJC 111, CJC 214, CJC 122, 
CJC 132, CJC 215, CJC 222; ENG 090 and RED 090, or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 222 Criminalistics 

This course covers the functions of the forensic laboratory 
and its relationship to successful criminal investigations 
and prosecutions. Topics include advanced crime scene 
processing, investigative techniques, current forensic tech- 
nologies, and other related topics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to identify and collect relevant evi- 
dence at simulated crime scenes and request appropriate 
laboratory analysis of submitted evidence. Practical appli- 
cations of course materials are utilized at the instructor's 
discretion. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 
090, or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 

CJC 225 Crisis Intervention 

This course introduces critical incident intervention and 
management techniques as they apply to operational crim- 
inal justice practitioners. Emphasis is on the victim/offend- 
er situation as well as on job-related high stress and dan- 
gerous or problem-solving citizen contacts. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to provide insightful analysis 
of emotional, violent, drug-induced, and other critical 
and/or stressful incidents that require field analysis and/or 
resolution. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 
090, or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 



CJC 231 Constitutional law 

The course covers the impact of the Constitution of the 
United States and its amendments on the criminal justice 
system. Topics include the structure of the Constitution and 
its amendments, court decisions pertinent to contemporary 
criminal justice issues, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to identify and discuss the 
basic structure of the United States Constitution as well as 
the rights and procedures as interpreted by the courts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 232 Civil Liability 

This course covers liability issues for the criminal justice 
professional. Topics include civil rights violations, tort lia- 
bility, employment issues, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to explain civil trial 
procedures and discuss contemporary liability issues. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

CJC 241 Community -Based Corrections 

This course covers programs for convicted offenders that 
are used both as alternatives to incarceration and in post- 
incarceration situations. Topics include offenders, diver- 
sion, house arrest, restitution, community service, proba- 
tion and parole, including both public and private partici- 
pation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students 
should be able to identify and discuss the various programs 
from the perspective of the criminal justice professional, 
the offender, and the community. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisite: None. 

Cooperative Education 

COE110 World of Work 

This course covers basic knowledge necessary for gaining 
and maintaining employment. Topics include job search 
skills, work ethic, meeting employer expectations, work- 
place safety, and human relations. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to make a successful transition from 
school to work. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 0; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: 
Permission of program director. Corequisite: None. 



81 



COE 111 Co-Op Work Experience I 

This course provides work experience with a college- 
approved employer in an area related to the student's pro- 
gram of study. Emphasis is on integrating classroom learn- 
ing with related work experience. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to evaluate career selection, demon- 
strate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work- 
related competencies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 10; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: 
Permission of program director. Corequisite: None. 

COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience I 

This course provides work experience with a college- 
approved employer in an area related to the student's pro- 
gram of study. Emphasis is on integrating classroom learn- 
ing with related work experience. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to evaluate career selection, demon- 
strate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work- 
related competencies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 20; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
Permission of program director. Corequisite: None. 

COE 121 Co-Op Work Experience II 

This course provides work experience with a college- 
approved employer in an area related to the student's 
program of study. Emphasis is on integrating classroom 
learning with related work experience. Upon completion, 
students should be able to evaluate career selection, 
demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform 
work-related competencies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
0; Work Experience, 10; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Communication 

COM 111 Voice and Diction I 

This course provides guided practice in the proper produc- 
tion of speech. Emphasis is on improving speech, includ- 
ing breathing, articulation, pronunciation, and other vocal 
variables. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate effective natural speech in various contexts. 
Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the follow- 
ing areas: articulation, expressiveness, fluency, standard 
English grammar, and pronunciation. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

COM 231 Public Speaking 

This course provides instruction and experience in prepar- 
ing and delivering speeches within a public setting and in 
group discussion. Emphasis is on research, preparation, 
delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and 
special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized 



Course 
Descriptions 



speeches and participate in group discussion with appropri- 
ate audiovisual support. Students should also demonstrate 
the speaking, listening, and interpersonal skills necessary 
to be effective communicators in academic settings, in the 
workplace, and in the community. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in speech/communication. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

Computer Science 

CSC 120 Computing Fundamentals I 

This course provides the essential foundation for the disci- 
pline of computing and a program of study in computer 
science, including the role of the professional. Topics 
include algorithm design, data abstraction, searching and 
sorting algorithms, and procedural programming tech- 
niques. Upon completion, students should be able to solve 
problems, develop algorithms, specify data types, perform 
sorts and searches, and use an operating system. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 080 or MAT 
090. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 130 Computing Fundamentals II 

This course provides in-depth coverage of the discipline of 
computing and the role of the professional. Topics include 
software design methodologies, analysis of algorithm and 
data structures, searching and sorting algorithms, and file 
organization methods. Upon completion, students should 
be able to use software design methodologies and choice of 
data structures as well as understand the social and ethical 
responsibilities of the computing professional. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3- Lab 
2, Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: CSC 120. 
Corequisite: None. 



CSC 134 C++ Programming 

This course introduces object-oriented computer program- 
ming using the C++ programming language. Topics 
include input/output operations, iteration, arithmetic oper- 
ations, arrays, pointers, filters, and other related topics. 
Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, 
test, and debug C++ language programs. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CIS 115. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 135 COBOI Programming 

This course introduces computer programming using the 
COBOL programming language. Topics include input/out- 
put operations, sequence, selection, iteration, arithmetic 
operations, arrays and tables, and other related topics. 
Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, 
test, and debug COBOL language programs. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hour Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CIS 115. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 139 Visual Basic Programming 

This course introduces event-driven computer program- 
ming using the Visual Basic programming language. 
Topics include input/output operations, sequence, selec- 
tion, iteration, arithmetic operations, arrays, forms, 
sequential files, and other related topics. Upon completion, 
students should be able to design, code, test, and debug 
Visual Basic language programs. Course Hours Per Week 
Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CIS 
115. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 141 Visual C+ + Programming 

This course introduces event-driven computer program- 
ming using the Visual C++ programming language. 
Topics include input/output operations, sequence, selec- 
tion, iteration, arithmetic operation, arrays, and other 
related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
design, code, test, and debug Visual C++ Language pro- 
grams. Course Hours Per Week: Class 2; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CIS 115. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 143 Object-Oriented Programming 

This course introduces the concepts of object-oriented pro- 
gramming. Emphasis is on event-driven programming 
methods, including creating and manipulating objects and 
classes as well as using object-oriented tools such as the 
class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able 
to design, test, debug, and implement objects at the appli- 
cation level using the appropriate environment. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: CSC 141. Corequisite: None. 



82 



CSC 148 JAVA Programming 

This course introduces computer programming using the 
JAVA language. Topics include selection, iteration, arith- 
metic and logical operators, classes, inheritance, methods, 
arrays, user interfaces, basic applet creation, and other 
related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
design, code, test, and debug JAVA language programs. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CSC 139 or CSC 141. Corequisite: 
None. 

CSC 152 SAS 

This course introduces the fundamentals of SAS program- 
ming. Emphasis is on learning basic SAS commands and 
statements for solving a variety of data processing applica- 
tions. Upon completion, students should be able to use SAS 
data and procedure steps to create SAS data sets, do statisti- 
cal analysis, and create general customized reports. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: CIS 130. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 193 Selected Topics in Programming 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in programming. Emphasis is on subject 
matter appropriate to the program or discipline. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of the specific area of study. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CSC 139 or CSC 141. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 235 Advanced COBOL 

This course is a continuation of CSC 135 using COBOL 
with structured programming principles. Emphasis is on 
advanced arrays and tables, file management and process- 
ing techniques, data structures, sub-programs, interactive 
processing, sort and merge routines, and libraries. Upon 
completion, students should be able to design, code, test, 
debug, and document programming solutions. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hour Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: CSC 135. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 239 Advanced Visual Basic 

This course is a continuation of CSC 139 using Visual Basic 
with structured programming principles. Emphasis is on 
advanced arrays and tables, file management and process- 
ing techniques, data structures, sub-programs, interactive 
processing, sort and merge routines, and libraries. Upon 
completion, students should be able to design, code, test, 
debug, and document programming solutions. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: CSC 139. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



CSC 241 Advanced Visual C+ + 

This course is a continuation of CSC 141 using Visual C++ 
with object oriented programming principles. Emphasis is 
on advanced arrays, file management/processing tech- 
niques, data structures, sub-programs, interactive process- 
ing, algorithms, and libraries. Upon completion, students 
should be able to design, code, test, debug, and document 
programming solutions. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Semester Hour Credit, 3- Prerequisites: CSC 141 
and CSC 143. Corequisite: None. 

CSC 248 Advanced Internet Programming 

This course covers advanced programming skills required 
to design Internet applications. Emphasis is on program- 
ming techniques required to support network applications. 
Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, 
debug, and document network-based programming solu- 
tions to various real-world problems using an appropriate 
programming language. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CSC 141. 
Corequisite: None. 

Clinical Trials Research 

CTR 110 Introduction to Clinical Research 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the 
clinical research process and its history and evolution. 
Topics include phase of clinical trials, protection of human 
subjects, roles of the clinical research teams, and responsi- 
bilities of clinical research organizations. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to prepare an organizational 
chart depicting a typical research team, defining the roles 
or responsibilities of each member. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Clinical Trials Research Associate pro- 
gram or permission of program director. Corequisite: None. 

CTR 112 Clinical Research Terminology 

This course is designed to enhance and augment the stu- 
dent's knowledge of basic medical terminology. Emphasis 
is on acronyms, abbreviations, and initials commonly used 
in clinical research and the terminology associated with 
pharmaceutical and pharmacological research. Upon com- 
pletion, students will be able to utilize and apply standard 



research terminology in effective written and verbal com- 
munication. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hour Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Clinical Trials Research Associate program. Corequisite: 
None. 

CTR 115 Clinical Research Regulations 

This course coveR the range of national and international 
regulations governing the development of drugs, diagnos- 
tics, medical devices, and biologies. Topics include a review 
of the regulatory agencies, guidelines for regulatory appli- 
cation, required documentation, and preparation for com- 
pliance audits. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate a basic underctanding of regulatory 
processes associated with clinical research and describe 
effective means of compliance. Course Hour Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hour Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
CTR 110 and CTR 112. Corequisite: None. 

CTR 120 Research Protocol Design 

This course introduces the student to the scientific develop- 
ment of research protocols and their key elements. Topics 
include the differentiation between research design types, 
rules for writing protocols, ethical considerations relative to 
research protocols, and the correct preparation of data col- 
lection forms. Upon completion, the student will be able to 
identify the primary components of protocols and effective- 
ly develop a protocol draft. CouRe Hour Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hour Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CTR 115. 
Corequisite: CTR 130. 

CTR 130 Clinical Research Management 

This course introduces the student to the elements involved 
in implementing and managing a clinical study. Topics 
include overall project planning, development of study 
goals, preparation of budget and contracts, implementa- 
tion of monitoring visits, and effective management of 
research sites. Upon completion, students should be able to 
design and prepare a plan for the implementation and 
management of a sample clinical research project. CouRe 
Hour Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 0; Semester Hour Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: CTR 115. Corequisite: CTR 120. 

CTR 150 Research Fieldwork I 

This course provides supervised work experience and obser- 
vation in a clinical research setting. Emphasis is on the 
enhancement of professional skills and the practical appli- 
cation of curriculum concepts in the research setting. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply 
research theory effectively to clinical research practices. 
Course Hour Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 15; Semester Hour 
Credit, 5. Prerequisites: CTR 120 and CTR 130. Corequisite: 
None. 



83 



CTR 210 Research Data and Reports 

This course covers the organization and management of 
study data and the effective presentation of data in reports. 
Topics include database structures, data management sys- 
tems, quality assurance, data confidentially and security, 
key elements of effective reports, and preparation of case 
report forms. Upon completion, students will be able to 
organize, enter, and review effectively the data used in the 
presentation of required reports. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisites: 
CTR 120 and MAT 115. Corequisite: None. 

CTR 220 Research Site Management 

This course covers the guidelines and methodology of 
research site management and the recruitment of research 
sites, investigators, and subjects. Topics include the identifi- 
cation and evaluation of sites and investigators, on-site 
budget management, and the coordination of subject par- 
ticipation. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate the principles and practices of effective 
research site management. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: CTR 210. 
Corequisite: None. 

CTR 250 Research Fieldwork II 

This course provides more advanced work experience in a 
clinical research setting. Emphasis is on the refinement of 
professional skills and the practice of curriculum concepts 
in diverse clinical research areas. Upon completion, stu- 
dents will be able to apply research theory to clinical prac- 
tices. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 24; Semester 
Hours Credit, 8. Prerequisite: CTR 220. Corequisite: CTR 
291. 

CTR 281 Trends in Clinical Research 

This course covers the major issues, trends, and concepts in 
contemporary clinical research practice. Topics include 
professional ethics, continuing education and certification, 
job placement skills, and the latest developments in clini- 
cal research. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate a basic knowledge of the topics covered. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: CTR 220. Corequisite: CTR 250. 

Drafting 

DFT 115 Architectural Drafting 

This course introduces basic drafting practices used in resi- 
dential and light commercial design. Topics include floor 
plans, foundations, details, electrical components, eleva- 
tions, and dimensioning practice. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to complete a set of working drawings 
for a simple structure. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



DFT 117 Technical Drafting 

This course introduces basic drafting practices for non- 
drafting majors. Emphasis is on instrument use and care, 
shape and size description, sketching, and pictorials. Upon 
completion, students should be able to produce drawings of 
assigned parts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

DFT 170 Engineering Graphics 

This course introduces basic engineering graphics skills, 
equipment, and applications (manual and computer- 
aided). Topics include sketching, measurements, lettering, 
dimensioning, geometric construction, orthographic pro- 
jections and pictorial drawings, and sectional and auxil- 
iary views. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of basic engineering graph- 
ics principles and practices. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Dental 

DLT 111 Dental Anatomy/Physiology 

This course introduces the anatomy of the individual tooth 
and the basic anatomy/physiology of the head, oral cavity, 
and supporting structures. Topics include anatomy, con- 
tour, occlusion, malocclusion, the tempormandibular 
joint, and the anatomical structures of the head and oral 
cavity. Upon completion, students should be able to carve 
teeth with proper occlusion, anatomy, and contour and 
understand the anatomy of the head and oral cavity. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Dental Laboratory Technology program. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 114 Dental Materials 

This course provides a study of the composition, properties, 
and uses of non-metal materials as well as the physical 
and mechanical properties of metal alloys. Topics include 
gypsums, waxes, acrylics, metals, and policies related to 
health, safety, and infection control. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to identify gypsums, waxes, acrylics, 
and metal materials and know the proper procedures for 
health, safety, and infection control. Course Hours Per 



Week: Class, 1; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Laboratory 
Technology program. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 116 Complete Dentures 

This course introduces basic and intermediate techniques 
in complete denture construction and also covers 
mandibular movement, occlusion, and infection control. 
Topics include baseplates, occlusion rims, articulator 
mountings, custom trays, setting of teeth, waxing denture 
bases, investing, processing, selective grinding, finishing, 
and polishing of complete dentures. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to construct complete denture pros- 
theses utilizing proper laboratory technique. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 9; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Laboratory 
Technology program. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 118 Cast Partial Dentures 

This course covers techniques used in fabricating cast 
removable partial denture frameworks utilizing a chrome- 
cobalt alloy. Topics include surveying, designing, block-out 
procedures, pouring refractory casts, waxing, casting, fin- 
ishing, polishing frameworks, tooth selection, setup, pro- 
cessing, and finishing of acrylic. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to fabricate cast removable partial 
dentures following the dental prescription. Course Hour 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 9; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 6. Prerequisites: DLT 111 and DLT 114. Corequisite: 
None. 

DLT 119 Wrought-Orthodontic Appliances 

This course introduces techniques for fabricating remov- 
able wrought and orthodontic/pedodontic appliances. 
Topics include wrought clasps, archwires, orthodontic 
clasps, orthodontic acrylic, soldering, fabrication, and 
repair of orthodontic restorations. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to fabricate removable wrought-ortho- 
dontic appliances following the dental prescription. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 9; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 123 Crown and Bridge 

This course introduces techniques for fabricating cast gold 
restorations. Topics include infection control, pouring 
impressions with removable dies, trimming margins, artic- 
ulating, waxing of single and multiple units, soldering, 
and principles of occlusion. Upon completion, students 
should be able to fabricate single and multiple unit cast 
gold fixed restorations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 12; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisites: 
DLT 111 and DLT 114. Corequisite: None. 



84 



DLT 126 Advanced Crown and Bridge 

This course introduces techniques for fabricating advanced 
fixed restorations. Topics include resin veneers, temporary 
crowns, post-core crowns, overdenture copings, non-paral- 
lel bridges, and semi-precision attachments. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to fabricate advanced fixed 
restorations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 9; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: DLT 123. 
Corequisite: None. 

DLT 211 Advanced Complete Dentures 

This course includes instruction in advanced complete 
denture construction. Topics include overdentures, imme- 
diate dentures, cast metal bases, relines, rebases, repairs, 
and various occlusal relationships. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to construct advanced complete den- 
ture prostheses following the dental prescription. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 12; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: DLT 116. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 215 Advanced Partial Dentures 

This course examines the biomechanics of removable par- 
tial denture design as well as fabrication and concepts, 
including gnathalogical principles as applied in the con- 
struction of restorations. Emphasis is on fabricating 
advanced cast metal restorations, including bite raisers, flat 
back facings, tube teeth, and concepts relating to precision 
partial construction, such as implants. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding 
of gnathalogical concepts and the fabrication of special 
types of removable restorations. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: DLT 118. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 217 Ceramic Techniques 

This course includes the physical properties of metals and 
ceramics as well as the fabrication of porcelain fused to 
metal crowns, including porcelain shoulder margins. 
Emphasis is on infection control, model and die fabrica- 
tion, metal substructure fabrication, build up, firing, and 
finishing of ceramic crowns. Upon completion, students 
should be able to complete single unit ceramic crowns. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 9; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: DLT 126. 
Corequisite: None. 

DLT 219 Jurisprudence and Ethics 

This course covers the history as well as the legal and ethi- 
cal aspects of the laboratory profession and in-depth stud- 
ies of the certification program. Topics include dental labo- 
ratory history, dentist-laboratory relationships, certification 
preparation, and legal and ethical requirements of dental 
laboratories and technicians. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the 
legal and ethical requirements of the dental laboratory 



Course 
Descriptions 



profession and dental history. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Dental Laboratory 
Technology program. Corequisite: None. 

DLT 222 Advanced Ceramic Techniques 

This course covers the fabrication of metal-ceramic 
bridges; all-ceramic crowns; and shading, staining, and 
personalizing ceramic restorations. Emphasis is on bond- 
ing dental porcelain on base metal alloys, margination, 
contouring, shading, and soldering. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to fabricate ceramic-to-metal bridge- 
work. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 9; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: DLT 217. 
Corequisite: None. 

DLT 224 Dental Lab Practice 

This course provides practical experience in the commer- 
cial laboratory setting. Emphasis is on all laboratory tech- 
niques pertaining to the specialty area. Upon completion, 
students should be able to function effectively in the com- 
mercial dental laboratory environment. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 20; Semester Hours Credit, 
2. Prerequisites: DLT 211, DLT 215, and DLT 222. 
Corequisite: None. 

Drama 

DRA 170 Play Production 1 

This course provides an applied laboratory study of the 
processes involved in the production of a play. Topics 
include fundamental practices, principles, and techniques 
associated with producing plays of various periods and 
styles. Upon completion, students should be able to partici- 
pate in an assigned position with a college theater produc- 
tion. This course is approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 9; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Economics 

ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, 
business, and industry choices in the market economy. 
Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, 
optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market 



structures, factor markets, income distribution, market 
failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer 
and business alternatives in order to achieve economic 
objectives efficiently. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in social/behav- 
ioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate 
employment, income, and prices. Topics include major 
schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and 
demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; 
money and banking; stabilization techniques; and interna- 
tional trade. Upon completion, students should be able to 
evaluate national economic components, conditions, and 
alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

Education 

EDU 111 Early Childhood Credential I 

This course introduces early childhood education and the 
role of the teacher in environments that encourage explo- 
ration and learning. Topics include professionalism, child 
growth and development, individuality, family, and culture. 
Upon completion, students should be able to identify and 
demonstrate knowledge of professional roles, major areas 
of child growth and development, and diverse families. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 112 Early Childhood Credential II 

This course introduces developmental^ appropriate prac- 
tices; positive guidance; and standards of health, safety, 
and nutrition. Topics include the learning environment; 
planning developmentally appropriate activities; positive 
guidance techniques; and health, safety, and nutrition 
standards. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate developmentally appropriate activities and 
positive guidance techniques as well as describe health, 
sanitation, and nutrition practices that promote healthy 
environments for children. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: EDU 111. 
Corequisite: None. 



85 



EDU 113 Family/Early Childhood 
Credential 

This course covers business and professional practices for 
family early childhood providers, developmentally appro- 
priate practices, positive guidance, and methods of provid- 
ing a safe and healthy environment. Topics include devel- 
opmentally appropriate practices; health, safety, and nutri- 
tion; and business and professionalism. Upon completion, 
students should be able to develop a handbook of policies, 
procedures, and practices for a family child care home. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: EDU 111. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 116 Introduction to Education 

This course introduces the American educational system 
and the teaching profession. Topics include historical and 
philosophical foundations of education, contemporary 
educational trends and issues, curriculum development, 
and observation and participation in public school class- 
rooms. Upon completion, students should be able to relate 
classroom observations to the roles of teachers and schools 
and the process of teacher education. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 118 Teacher Associate Principles and 
Practice 

This course covers the teacher associate's role in the educa- 
tional system. Topics include history of education, profes- 
sional responsibilities and ethics, cultural diversity, com- 
munication skills, and identification of the optimal learn- 
ing environment. Upon completion, students should be 
able to describe the supporting professional role of the 
teacher associate, demonstrate positive communication, 
and discuss educational philosophy. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 119 Early Childhood Education 

This course covers the foundations of the education profes- 
sion, types of programs, professionalism, and planning 
quality programs for children. Topics include historical 
foundations; career options; types of programs; profession- 
alism; observational skills; and planning developmentally 
appropriate schedules, environments, and activities for 
children. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate observational skills, identify appropriate 
schedules and environments, develop activity plans, and 
describe influences on the profession. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



EDU 131 Child, Family, and Community 

This course covers the relationships between the families, 
programs for children and schools, and the community. 
Emphasis is on establishing and maintaining positive col- 
laborative relationships with families and community 
resources. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate strategies for effectively working with diverse 
families and for identifying and utilizing community 
resources. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EDU 144 Child Development I 

This course covers the theories of child development and 
the developmental sequences of children from conception 
through the pre-school years for early childhood educators. 
Emphasis is on sequences in physical/motor, sociai, emo- 
tional, cognitive, and language development as well as 
appropriate experiences for the young child. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to identify developmental 
milestones, plan experiences to enhance development, and 
describe appropriate interaction techniques and environ- 
ments for typical and atypical development. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 145 Child Development II 

This course covers theories of child development and devel- 
opmental sequences of children from pre-school through 
middle childhood for early childhood educators. Emphasis 
is on characteristics of physical/motor, social, emotional, 
and cognitive/language development and appropriate 
experiences for children. Upon completion, students should 
be able to identify developmental characteristics, plan 
experiences to enhance development, and describe appro- 
priate interaction techniques and environments. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: EDU 144. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 146 Child Guidance 

This course introduces practical principles and techniques 
for developmentally appropriate guidance. Emphasis is on 
encouraging self-esteem and cultural awareness, effective 
communication skills, and direct and indirect guidance 
techniques and strategies. Upon completion, students 



should be able to demonstrate strategies which encourage 
positive social interactions; promote conflict resolution; 
and develop self-control, self-motivation, and self-esteem 
in children. Course Hour Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EDU 152 Music, Movement, and Language 

This course introduces historical perspectives of music and 
movement and integrates the whole language concept with 
emphasis on diversity. Emphasis is on designing an envi- 
ronment that focuses on language development through 
developmentally and culturally appropriate music and 
movement. Upon completion, students should be able to 
design an environment that develops language through a 
music and movement curriculum that emphasizes diversi- 
ty. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 153 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 

This course focuses on promoting and maintaining the 
health and well-being of children. Topics include health 
and nutritional needs, safe and healthy environments, as 
well as recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect. 
Upon completion, students should be able to set up and 
monitor safe indoor and outdoor environments and imple- 
ment a nutrition education program. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: EDU 153A. 

EDU 153A Health, Safety, and Nutrition 
Lab 

This course provides a laboratory component to comple- 
ment EDU 153- Emphasis is on practical experiences that 
enhance concepts introduced in the classroom. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical 
understanding of the development and implementation of 
safe indoor and outdoor environments and nutrition edu- 
cation programs. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
EDU 153. 

EDU 154 Social and Emotional 
Development 

This course covers the social and emotional development 
of young children. Topics include interpreting theory, 
assessing children, and planning and implementing devel- 
opmentally appropriate practices. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to plan, implement, and evaluate 
learning experiences in a developmentally appropriate cur- 
riculum. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



86 



EDU 161 Introduction to Exceptional Child 

This course covers exceptional children as learners within 
the context of the community, school, and family. 
Emphasis is on the legal, social, physical, political, and 
cultural issues relating to the analysis and teaching of 
exceptional children. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate knowledge of identification processes, 
mainstreaming techniques, and professional practices and 
attitudes. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 162 Early Exposure/Prospective 
Teachers 

This course provides an opportunity to observe teachers 
and pupils in a natural classroom environment. Emphasis 
is on observation methods, planning, teaching, evaluation, 
personal goal assessment, and curriculum. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of their own personal teaching goals, teaching 
methods, planning methods, and student performance 
evaluation. This course serves as a capstone course for the 
Early Childhood Associate in Applied Science program. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: EDU 112, EDU 131, EDU 146, EDU 
153, EDU 153A, EDU l6l, EDU 221, EDU 234, EDU 251, 
and EDU 262. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 171 Instructional Media 

This course covers the development and maintenance of 
effective teaching materials and the operation of selected 
pieces of equipment. Topics include available community 
resources, various types of instructional materials and bul- 
letin boards, and audiovisual and computer use with chil- 
dren. Upon completion, students should be able to con- 
struct and identify resources for instructional materials and 
bulletin boards and use audiovisual and computer equip- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 172 Education Tools 

This course covers practical applications of technology in 
educational settings. Topics include software selection for 
classroom usage, record keeping, and adaptive technology 
for children with special needs. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate appropriate computer skills 
for the educational environment. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



EDU 186 Reading and Writing Methods 

This course covers concepts, resources, and methods for 
teaching reading and writing to school-age children. 
Topics include the importance of literacy, learning styles, 
skills assessment, various reading and writing approaches, 
and instructional strategies. Upon completion, students 
should be able to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate 
developmental^ appropriate reading and writing experi- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 221 Children with Special Needs 

This course introduces working with children with special 
needs. Emphasis is on the characteristics and assessment of 
children as well as on strategies for adapting the home and 
classroom environment. Upon completion, students should 
be able to recognize atypical development; make appropri- 
ate referrals; and work collaboratively to plan, implement, 
and evaluate inclusion strategies. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
EDU 144 and EDU 145. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 234 Infants, Toddlers, and Twos 

This course covers the skills needed to implement effective- 
ly the group care of infants, toddlers, and two-year-olds. 
Emphasis is on child development and developmental^ 
appropriate practices. Upon completion, students should be 
able to identify, plan, select materials and equipment, and 
implement and evaluate a developmentally appropriate 
curriculum. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EDU 235 School-Age Development and 
Programs 

This course presents developmentally appropriate practices 
in group care for school-age children. Topics include prin- 
ciples of development, environmental planning, and posi- 
tive guidance techniques. Upon completion, students 
should be able to discuss developmental principles for chil- 
dren five to twelve years of age and plan and implement 
age-appropriate activities. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 



EDU 241 Adult-Child Relations 

This course covers self-concept and effective, active listen- 
ing skills in positive one-to-one interactions with individu- 
als and groups of children. Emphasis is on self-concept 
development and effective communication techniques used 
with children. Upon completion, students should be able to 
identify principles underlying self -concept and demonstrate 
effective listening and communication skills adults use 
with children. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EDU 251 Exploration Activities 

This course covers discovery experiences in science, math, 
and social studies. Emphasis is on developing concepts for 
each area and encouraging young children to explore, dis- 
cover, and construct concepts. Upon completion, students 
should be able to discuss the discovery approach to teach- 
ing, explain major concepts in each area, and plan appro- 
priate experiences for children. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: EDU 25 1A. 

EDU 251 A Exploration Activities Lab 

This course covers discovery experiences in science, math, 
and social studies. Emphasis is on developing concepts for 
each area and encouraging young children to explore, dis- 
cover, and construct concepts. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of 
the development and implementation of appropriate sci- 
ence, math, and social studies activities for children. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: EDU 251. 

EDU 257 Math Methods and Materials 

This course covers concepts, activities, methods, and mate- 
rials for teaching mathematics in elementary through 
middle school grades. Topics include individual instruc- 
tion, developmental skill building, manipulatives, problem 
solving, critical thinking, and numerical concepts. Upon 
completion, students should be able to assess, plan, imple- 
ment, and evaluate developmentally appropriate math 
experiences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



87 



EDU 259 Curriculum Planning 

This course covers early childhood curriculum planning. 
Topics include philosophy, curriculum, indoor and outdoor 
environmental design, scheduling, observation and assess- 
ment, and instructional planning and evaluation. Upon 
completion, students should be able to assess children and 
the curriculum; plan for daily, weekly, and long-range 
instruction; and design environments with appropriate 
equipment and supplies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab,0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: EDU 112 or 
EDU 113 or EDU 119- Corequisite: None. 

EDU 261 Early Childhood Administration I 

This course covers the policies, procedures, and responsibil- 
ities for managing early childhood education programs. 
Topics include implementation of goals, principles of 
supervision, budgeting and financial management, and 
meeting the standards for a N.C. Child Day Care license. 
Upon completion, students should be able to develop pro- 
gram goals, explain licensing standards, determine budg- 
eting needs, and describe effective methods of personnel 
supervision. Students should also be able to develop a plan 
for center site location and start-up. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 262 Early Childhood Administration II 

This course provides a foundation for budgetary, financial, 
and personnel management of the child care center. Topics 
include budgeting, financial management, marketing, hir- 
ing, supervision, and professional development of a child 
care center. Upon completion, students should be able to 
formulate marketing, financial management, and fund 
development plans as well as develop personnel policies, 
including supervision and staff development plans. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: EDU 26l. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 263 Developing School-Age Programs 

This course introduces the methods and procedures for 
operating a school-age program in either the public or 
proprietary setting. Emphasis is on constructing and 
organizing the physical environment as well as planning 
and developing a school-age program. Upon completion, 
students should be able to plan and develop a quality 
school-age program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



EDU 275 Effective Teacher Training 

This course provides specialized training using an experi- 
enced-based approach to learning. Topics include instruc- 
tional preparation and presentation, student interaction, 
time management, learning expectations, evaluation, and 
curriculum principles and planning. Upon completion, 
students should be able to prepare and present a six-step 
lesson plan and demonstrate ways to improve students' 
time-on-task. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EDU 282 Early Childhood Literature 

This course covers the history, selection, and integration of 
literature and language in the early childhood curriculum. 
Topics include the history and selection of developmentally 
appropriate children's literature as well as the use of books 
and other media to enhance language and literacy in the 
classroom. Upon completion, students should be able to 
select appropriate books for storytelling, reading aloud, 
puppetry, flannel board use, and other techniques. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EDU 285 Internship Experiences - School Age 

This course provides an opportunity to discuss internship 
experiences with peers and faculty. Emphasis is on evaluat- 
ing and integrating practicum experiences. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in 
early childhood education. This course is a unique concen- 
tration requirement in the Teacher Associate concentration 
of the Early Childhood Associate program. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 and completion of curriculum core 
requirements. Corequisites: COE 121 orCOE 122. 

EDU 288 Advanced Issues/Early Childhood 
Education 

This course covers advanced topics and issues in early 
childhood. Emphasis is on current advocacy issues, emerg- 
ing technology, professional growth experiences, and other 
related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
list, discuss, and explain advanced current topics and 
issues in early childhood education. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Engineering 

EGR 131 Introduction to Electronics 
Technology 

This course introduces the basic skills required for electri- 
cal/electronics technicians. Topics include soldering/desol- 
dering, safety practices, test equipment, scientific calcula- 
tors, AWG wire table, the resistor color code, electronic 
devices, problem solving, and use of hand tools. Upon 
completion, students should be able to solder/desolder, 
operate test equipment, apply problem-solving techniques, 
and use a scientific calculator. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

Environment, Health, and 
Safety 

EHS 111 Occupational Safety/Engineering 

This course introduces the role of the safety practitioner 
and safety engineer in business, industrial, and institution- 
al settings. Topics include Workers Compensation, record 
keeping and training, and correct handling procedures for 
hazardous materials. Upon completion, students should be 
able to perform preliminary hazards analysis, fault tree 
analysis, and other safety monitoring and compliance 
practices. Additional topics include safety inspections, acci- 
dent investigation, personal protective equipment, 
ergonomics, machine safeguarding, lockout/tagout, con- 
fined space entry, fire protection, electrical safety, and labo- 
ratory safety. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EHS 112 Industrial Hygiene 

This course provides a clear understanding of the history 
and development of the industrial hygiene movement, with 
emphasis on recognizing specific health hazards. Topics 
include an introduction to harmful agents, routes of entry, 
skin diseases, types of airborne contaminants, and a review 
of federal agencies. Upon completion, students should be 
able to identify the role and function of the industrial 
hygienist relative to the industrial environment. Additional 
topics include evaluation of occupational health hazards 
by area and personal sampling as well as control of these 
hazards by means of engineering controls and personal 
protective equipment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 



88 



EHS 113 OSHA Electrical Safety 

This course covers OSHA electrical safety regulations that 
apply to general industry. Emphasis is on controlled electri- 
cal hazards in the workplace, understanding ground paths, 
recognizing electrical hazards, and interpreting electrical 
standards. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of OSHA safety regulations 
within general industry. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

EHS 114 OSHA Regulations 

This course covers OSHA regulations that govern workplace 
safety. Emphasis is on problems and case studies in which 
applicable OSHA regulations are identified and interpreted. 
Upon completion, students should be able to identify inci- 
dents of non-compliance and recommend compliance 
strategies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EHS 115 Environmental Science 

This course covers human interaction with the environ- 
ment. Emphasis is on how ecosystems function in terms of 
nutrient cycles, energy flows, population dynamics, and 
human development. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of the consequences 
of human activity on the environment. Environmental 
health and toxicology are also emphasized. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 116 Environmental Management 

This course covers management of environmental process- 
es in general industry. Emphasis is on environmental 
chemistry, air quality compliance, environmental toxicolo- 
gy, waste disposal techniques, and air emission technology. 
Upon completion, students should be able to provide lead- 
ership in the environmental management area and 
demonstrate knowledge of applicable environmental man- 
agement techniques. The course emphasizes management 
of hazardous materials and hazardous waste in the indus- 
trial and laboratory settings. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
4; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

EHS 118 Environmental Justice 

This course introduces the major ethical issues that are 
encountered in dealing with pollution, hazardous waste, 
and industrial site management in modem society. Topics 
include waste storage, waste management, industrial site 
planning, and related issues. Upon completion, students 
should be able to discuss environmental justice issues in 



Course 
Descriptions 



an infonned and rational manner with concern for all 
affected persons and communities. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hour Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 121 DOT Regulations 

This course introduces U.S. Department of Transportation 
regulations and selected Nuclear Regulatory Commission 
and Environmental Protection Agency regulations regard- 
ing hazardous materials transportation. Emphasis is on 
problems and case studies in which students identify and 
interpret applicable DOT regulations. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify incidents of non-com- 
pliance and recommend compliance strategies. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 211 Environmental Health and 
Toxicology 

This course covers the many effects of environmental 
agents (chemical, physical, and biological) on human 
health. Particular emphasis is on principles of toxicology 
and federal regulations relevant to environmental health. 
Upon completion, students should be able to recommend 
rational strategies for the control of chemical hazards in 
the occupational and general environment. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 212 Industrial Hygiene Sampling 

This course covers industrial hygiene and sampling. Topics 
include the calibration and operation of sampling equip- 
ment and instruments. Upon completion, students should 
be able to perform basic industrial hygiene sampling pro- 
cedures and interpret the results. In addition, the course 
covers applications and use of personal protective equip- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: CHM 131 and EHS 112. 
Corequisite: None. 



EHS 213 Environmental Liability 

This course covers major federal and state laws concerning 
environmental liability. Topics include a review of SARA; 
the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; and 
the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. Upon completion, 
students should be able to discuss and explain major prin- 
ciples of environmental legal liability. In addition, this 
course covers the fundamentals of toxicology as applied to 
hazardous materials management and industrial hygiene. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 214 Industrial Processes 

This course covers common general manufacturing 
processes that involve hazardous materials and wastes. 
Emphasis is on waste minimization strategies, common 
functions within facilities, and selected unit operations in 
industry. Upon completion, students should be able to pro- 
vide a comprehensive account of the industrial processes in 
selected businesses, industries, and institutions. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 215 Incident Management 

This course introduces management of hazardous materi- 
als and incidents. Topics include analysis and application 
of the Incident Command System from the discovery of a 
hazardous substance release to decontamination and ter- 
mination procedures. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of the roles and 
responsibilities of hazardous materials team members. 
This course serves as a capstone course which integrates 
occupational and environmental health skills developed in 
other Environmental Health and Safety courses. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

EHS 21 7 Biomedical Waste Management 

This course covers issues and problems that confront waste 
management professionals in the health services, biologi- 
cal processing, and research industries. Emphasis is on 
programmatic waste collection and processing sterile envi- 
ronments. Upon completion, students should be able to 
develop and implement a plan for disposal of biological 
and medical wastes. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



89 



EHS 218 Industrial Ergonomics 

This course covers ergonomic issues, including cumulative 
trauma disorders and caipal tunnel syndrome. Emphasis is 
on biomechanics, hand-wrist injuries, repetitive-motion 
disorders, and appropriate record keeping requirements. 
Upon completion, students should be able to provide 
ergonomic assistance throughout the facility, conduct 
ergonomic audits, and recognize ergonomic problems in 
the work place. Course Hours Per Week: Class 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

EHS 219 Radiation Protection 

This course covers theory, detection, health effects, and reg- 
ulation of ionizing radiation. Particular emphasis is on 
compliance with federal regulations in the occupational 
setting. Upon completion, students should be able to aid in 
implementation of a radiation protection program in an 
industrial or institutional setting. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

Electricity 

ELC112 DC/AC Electricity 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of and 
computations related to DC/AC electricity. Emphasis is on 
DC/AC circuits, components, operation of test equipment, 
and other related topics. Upon completion, students should 
be able to construct, verify, and analyze simple DC/AC cir- 
cuits. Subject areas include Ohm's Law; capacitance; 
inductance and reactance; true, reactive, and total power; 
and series, parallel, and combination circuits. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 5. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: MAT 121. 



Course 
Descriptions 



ELC113 Basic Wiring I 

This course introduces the care and use of tools and mate- 
rials used in electrical installations as well as the require- 
ments of the National Electrical Code. Topics include elec- 
trical safety and electrical blueprint reading; planning, lay- 
out, and installation of electrical distribution equipment; 
lighting; overcurrent protection; conductors; branch cir- 
cuits; and conduits. Upon completion, students should be 
able to properly install conduits, wiring, and electrical dis- 
tribution equipment associated with basic electrical instal- 
lations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



ELC 115 Industrial Wiring 

This course covers layout, planning, and installation of 
wiring systems in industrial facilities. Emphasis is on 
industrial wiring methods and materials. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to install industrial systems 
and equipment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 113. 
Corequisite: None. 

ELC 117 Motors and Controls 

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors 
and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot 
devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other con- 
trol devices. Upon completion, students should be able to 
properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and con- 
trol circuits. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 112 or ELC 131- 
Corequisite: None. 

ELC 118 National Electrical Code 

This course covers the use of the current National 
Electrical Code (NEC). Topics include the NEC history, 
wiring methods, overcurrent protection, materials, and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to effectively use the NEC. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

ELC 128 Introduction to PLC 

This course introduces the programmable logic controller 
(PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include lad- 
der logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, 
surge protection, selection and installation of controllers, 
and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to install PLCs and create 
simple programs. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ELC 117. 
Corequisite: None. 

ELC 131 DC/AC Circuit Analysis 

This course introduces DC and AC electricity with emphasis 
on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test 
equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit 
analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment 



operation, circuit simulation software, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to inter- 
pret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and ana- 
lyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 5. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: MAT 121 

ELC 135 Electrical Machines I 

This course covers magnetic circuits, transformers, DC/AC 
generators, and a review of the three-phase circuit funda- 
mentals, including power factor. Topics include magnetic 
terms and calculations, transformer calculations based on 
primary or secondary equivalent circuits, and generator 
regulation and efficiency calculations. Upon completion, 
students should be able to perform regulation and efficien- 
cy calculations for DC/AC single- and three-phase trans- 
former and generator circuits. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ELC 
112, ELC 131, or ELC 140. Corequisite: None. 

ELC 136 Electrical Machines II 

This course covers DC/AC motor fundamentals, including 
applications and control. Topics include control devices, 
synchronous and induction single and polyphase AC 
motors, DC motors, stepper, and special purpose motors. 
Upon completion, students should be able to perform regu- 
lation and efficiency calculations and apply motor theory 
to practical control applications. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 
135. Corequisite: None. 

ELC 213 Instrumentation 

This course covers the fundamentals of instrumentation 
used in industry. Emphasis is on electric, electronic, and 
pneumatic instruments. Upon completion, students should 
be able to design, install, maintain, and calibrate instru- 
mentation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 112 or ELC 131. 
Corequisite: None. 

ELC 215 Electrical Maintenance 

This course introduces the theory of maintenance and the 
skills necessary to maintain electrical equipment used in 
industrial and commercial facilities. Topics include main- 
tenance theory, predictive and preventive maintenance, 
electrical equipment operation and maintenance, and 
maintenance documentation. Upon completion, students 
should be able to perform maintenance on electrical 
equipment in industrial and commercial facilities. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ELC 117. Corequisite: None. 



90 



ELC 228 PLC Applications 

This course continues the study of the programming and 
applications of programmable logic controllers. Emphasis 
is on advanced programming, networking, advanced I/O 
modules, reading and interpreting error codes, and trou- 
bleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to 
program and troubleshoot programmable logic controllers. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 128. Corequisite: None. 

Electronics 

ELN 131 Electronic Devices 

This course includes semiconductor-based devices such as 
diodes, bipolar transistors, FETs, thermistors, and related 
components. Emphasis is on analysis, selection, biasing, 
and applications in power supplies; small signal amplifiers; 
and switching and control circuits. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and trou- 
bleshoot discrete component circuits using appropriate 
techniques and test equipment. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 
131. Corequisite: MAT 122. 

ELN 132 Linear IC Applications 

This course introduces the characteristics and applications 
of linear integrated circuits. Topics include op-amp cir- 
cuits, differential amplifiers, instrumentation amplifiers, 
waveform generators, active filters, PLLs, and IC voltage 
regulators. Upon completion, students should be able to 
construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot linear integrat- 
ed circuits using appropriate techniques and test equip- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELN 131. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 133 Digital Electronics 

This course covers combinational and sequential logic cir- 
cuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, 
logic families, MSI and LSI circuits, AC/DC converters, and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital 
circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisites: ELC 112, ELC 131, or ELC 140; and 
ELN 150 and MAT 145. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 143 Television Servicing 

This course provides a detailed study of the operation and 
repair of television receiver systems. Topics include opera- 
tion, alignment, and repair of television receiver systems. 
Upon completion, students should be able to troubleshoot, 
maintain, and repair television receiver systems. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 6. 
Prerequisite: ELN 140. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



ELN 150 CAD for Electronics 

This course introduces computer-aided drafting (CAD) with 
an emphasis on applications in the electronics field. Topics 
include electronics industry standards such as symbols, 
schematic diagrams, and layouts; drawing electronic cir- 
cuit diagrams; and specialized electronic drafting practices 
and components, such as resistors, capacitors, and ICs. 
Upon completion, students should be able to prepare elec- 
tronic drawings with CAD software. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: CIS 
110. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 210 Introduction to Microelectronics 

This course introduces the field of microelectronics and 
semiconductor processing. Topics include an overview of 
the industry, job requirements and opportunities, vocabu- 
lary, and types of microelectronics devices manufactured. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an understanding of the basics of semiconductor materials, 
properties, and fabrication procedures. This course is a 
unique concentration requirement in the Microelectronics 
concentration of the Electronics Engineering Technology 
program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 215 Semiconductor Physics 

This course introduces solid state physics and emphasizes 
semiconductors. Topics include quantum physics, the 
atom, solid state devices, and semiconductor and integrat- 
ed circuit fabrication techniques. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to apply these principles of physics to 
basic semiconductor fabrication. This course is a unique 
concentration requirement in the Microelectronics concen- 
tration of the Electronics Engineering Technology pro- 
gram. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ELN 131 or ELN 210. 
Corequisite: None. 

ELN 220 Semiconductor Analysis 

This course covers the field of microelectronics and semi- 
conductor processing. Topics include circuit layout, mask 
making, photolithography diffusion, and thin-film 
processes for wafer fabrication. Upon completion, students 
should be able to identify different types of measuring, test- 
ing, and inspection equipment used for microelectronics 
circuits and understand failure analysis. This course is a 



unique concentration requirement in the Microelectronics 
concentration of the Electronics Engineering Technology 
program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 4; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELN 210. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 225 Microprocessing Design 

This course provides an in-depth study of the field of 
microelectronics and microchip processing technology. 
Topics include oxidation, diffusion, photolithography, and 
metallization. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of bipolar and unipolar IC 
processes developed by a study of design rules and other 
process parameters. This course is a unique concentration 
requirement in the Microelectronics concentration of the 
Electronics Engineering Technology program. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: ELN 215. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 229 Industrial Electronics 

This course covers semiconductor devices used in industrial 
applications. Topics include basic theory, application, and 
operating characteristics of semiconductor devices such as 
filters, rectifiers, FET, SCR, Diac, Triac, and op-amps. Upon 
completion, students should be able to install and trouble- 
shoot these devices for proper operation in an industrial 
electronic circuit. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 4; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELC 112, ELC 131, 
or ELC 140. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 232 Introduction to Microprocessors 

This course introduces microprocessor architecture and 
microcomputer systems, including memory and input/ 
output interfacing. Topics include assembly language pro- 
gramming, bus architecture, bus cycle types, I/O systems, 
memory systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, 
verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor cir- 
cuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test 
equipment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ELN 133- 
Corequisite: None. 

ELN 234 Communication Systems 

This course introduces the fundamentals of electronic 
communication systems. Topics include the frequency 
spectrum, electrical noise, modulation techniques, charac- 
teristics of transmitters and receivers, and digital commu- 
nications. Upon completion, students should be able to 
interpret analog and digital communication circuit dia- 
grams, analyze transmitter and receiver circuits, and use 
appropriate communication test equipment. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisites: ELN 132 or ELN 140 and MAT 122. 
Corequisite: None. 



91 



ELN 236 Fiber Optics and Lasers 

This course introduces the fundamentals of fiber optics and 
lasers. Topics include the transmission of light, characteris- 
tics of fiber optic and lasers and their systems, fiber optic 
production, types of lasers, and laser safety. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to understand fiber optic 
communications and basic laser fundamentals. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: ELN 234. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 240 Microprocessor Fundamentals 

This course introduces microprocessor architecture and 
microcomputer systems. Topics include use of technical 
documentation, bus architecture, I/O and memory systems, 
and other related topics. Upon completion, students should 
be able to analyze and troubleshoot basic microprocessor 
circuits. This course also includes a comparison of micro- 
processors, including Intel, AMD, and Cyrix. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: ELN 141. Corequisite: None. 

ELN 246 Certified Electronic Technician 
Preparation 

This course covers electronic principles, theories, and con- 
cepts. Emphasis is on those items covered in the Certified 
Electronic Technician examination. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate competence in elec- 
tronics and be prepared for the Certified Electronic 
Technician examination. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

ELN 275 Troubleshooting 

This course covers techniques for analyzing and repairing 
failures in electronic equipment. Topics include safety, sig- 
nal tracing, use of service manuals, and specific trou- 
bleshooting methods for analog, digital, and other elec- 
tronics-based circuits and systems. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to diagnose and isolate faults logically 
and perioral necessary repairs to meet manufacturers' 
specifications. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisites: ELN 232 and ELN 
234. Corequisite: ELN 133 or ELN 141. 

Emergency Medical Science 

EMS 110 EMT-Basic 

This course introduces basic emergency medical care. 
Topics include preparatory, airway, patient assessment, 
medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, and 
operations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate the skills necessary to achieve North Carolina 
State or National Registry EMT-Basic certification. Class, 5; 
Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



English 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on the college's placement testing policies and 
procedures. Students should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

ENG 070 Basic Language Skills 

This course introduces the fundamentals of standard writ- 
ten English. Emphasis is on effective word choice, recogni- 
tion of sentences and sentence parts, and basic usage. 
Upon completion, students should be able to generate a 
variety of sentence types that clearly express ideas. Students 
compose sentences in standard written English using all 
verb tenses and correct punctuation. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 075 Reading and Language Essentials 

This course introduces the fundamentals of standard writ- 
ten English. Emphasis is on effective word choice, recogni- 
tion of sentences and sentence parts, and basic usage. 
Upon completion, students should be able to understand 
and create grammatically and syntactically correct sen- 
tences. Students should also be able to demonstrate com- 
prehension and critical thinking about written text. This 
course integrates ENG 070 and RED 070. This course does 
not satisfy the developmental reading and writing prerequi- 
site for ENG 111. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
ENG 075A. 

ENG 075A Reading and Language 
Essentials Lab 

This laboratory provides the opportunity to practice the 
skills introduced in ENG 075. Emphasis is on practical 
skills for increasing vocabulary, developing comprehension 
skills, and improving grammar. Upon completion, students 
should be able to apply those skills in the production of 
grammatically and syntactically correct sentences. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: ENG 075. 

ENG 080 Writing Foundations 

This course introduces the writing process and stresses 
effective sentences. Emphasis is on applying the conven- 
tions of written English as well as reflecting standard usage 



and mechanics in structuring a variety of sentences. Upon 
completion, students should be able to write correct sen- 
tences and a unified, coherent paragraph. Students are 
introduced to the standard essay form. This course does not 
satisfy the developmental reading and writing prerequisite 
for ENG 111. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: ENG 070 or ENG 
075. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 085 Reading and Writing Foundations 

This course uses whole language to develop proficiency in 
reading and writing for college. Emphasis is on applying 
analytical and critical reading skills to a variety of texts 
and on introducing the writing process. Upon completion, 
students should be able to recognize and use various pat- 
terns of text organization and compose effective para- 
graphs. Students are introduced to the standard essay form. 
This course integrates ENG 080 and RED 080. This course 
does not satisfy the developmental reading and writing pre- 
requisites for ENG 111. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisites: ENG 070 
and RED 070, or ENG 075. Corequisite: ENG 085A. 

ENG 085A Reading and Writing 
Foundations Lab 

This laboratory provides the opportunity to practice the 
skills introduced in ENG 085. Emphasis is on practical 
skills for applying analytical and critical reading skills to a 
variety of texts and on the writing process. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to apply those skills in the 
production of effective paragraphs. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: 
ENG 070 and RED 070, or ENG 075. Corequisite: ENG 085. 

ENG 090 Composition Strategies 

This course provides practice in the writing process and 
stresses effective paragraphs. Emphasis is on learning and 
applying the conventions of standard written English in 
developing paragraphs within the essay. Upon completion, 
students should be able to compose a variety of paragraphs 
and a unified, coherent essay. Students write essays 
responding to assigned readings and using different rhetor- 
ical modes. This course satisfies the developmental reading 
and writing prerequisite for ENG 111. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ENG 080 or ENG 085. Corequisite: ENG 090A. 

ENG 090A Composition Strategies Lab 

This writing lab is designed for practicing the skills intro- 
duced in ENG 090. Emphasis is on learning and applying 
the conventions of standard written English in developing 
paragraphs within the essay. Upon completion, students 
should be able to compose a variety of paragraphs and a 
unified, coherent essay. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hour Credit, 1. Prerequisite: ENG 080 or 
ENG 085. Corequisite: ENG 090. 



92 



ENG 095 Reading and Composition 
Strategies 

This course uses whole language to strengthen proficiency 
in reading and writing for college. Emphasis is on applying 
critical reading skills to narrative and expository texts and 
on using the writing process. Upon completion, students 
should be able to comprehend, analyze, and evaluate col- 
lege texts and to compose essays in preparation for college 
writing. Some sections may be discipline specific. This 
course integrates ENG 090 and RED 090. This course satis- 
fies the developmental reading and writing prerequisites for 
ENG 111. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 
080, or ENG 085. Corequisite: ENG 095A. 

ENG 095A Reading and Composition 
Strategies Lab 

This laboratory provides the opportunity to practice the 
skills introduced in ENG 095. Emphasis is on applying crit- 
ical reading skills to narrative and expository texts and on 
the writing process. Upon completion, students should be 
able to apply those skills in producing effective essays as 
preparation for college writing. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1, Prerequisites: 
ENG 080 and RED 080, or ENG 085. Corequisite: ENG 095. 

ENG 111 Expository Writing 

This is the required first course in a series of two designed 
to develop the ability to produce clear expository prose. 
Emphasis is on the writing process, including audience 
analysis, topic selection, thesis support and development, 
editing, and revision. Upon completion, students should be 
able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays 
using standard written English. Students should also be 
able to respond critically to readings and demonstrate an 
understanding of the fundamentals of research and docu- 
mentation. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in English composition. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090, or ENG 095 
or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 

This course, the second in a series of two, introduces 
research techniques, documentation styles, and argumen- 
tative strategies. Emphasis is on analyzing data and incor- 
porating research findings into documented argumentative 
essays and research projects. Upon completion, students 
should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and 
synthesize information from primary and secondary 
sources using standard research format and style. Students 
should also be able to present material orally in a clear 
and logical format. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 



Course 
Descriptions 



general education core requirement in English compo- 
sition. Cource Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 111. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 

This course, the second in a series of two, expands the con- 
cepts developed in ENG 1 1 1 by focusing on writing that 
involves literature-based research and documentation. 
Emphasis is on critical reading and thinking as well as the 
analysis and interpretation of prose, poetry, and drama, 
including plot, characterization, theme, and cultural con- 
text. Upon completion, students should be able to construct 
mechanically-sound, documented essays and research 
papers that analyze and respond to literary works. Students 
should also be able to present material orally in a clear 
and logical format. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in English compo- 
sition. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 111. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 114 Professional Research and 
Reporting 

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to 
teach professional communications skills. Emphasis is on 
research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, 
interpretation, and design used in oral and written presen- 
tations. Upon completion, students should be able to work 
individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed 
business and professional written and oral presentations. 
Students should also be introduced to various communica- 
tion media, including electronic modes, computer graph- 
ics, and other emerging technologies. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in English composition. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 111. 
Corequisite: None. 

ENG 135 Introduction to Short Fiction 

This course provides intensive study of short fiction as a lit- 
erary form based on close reading of representative texts. 
Emphasis is on the development and analysis of short fic- 
tion. Upon completion, students should be able to inter- 
pret, analyze, and discuss the distinguishing features of 
short fiction. This course has been approved to satisfy the 



Comprehensive Articulation Agreement l)re-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ENG 1 1 1. Corequisite: ENG 1 12 or ENG 113. 

ENG 231 American Literature I 

This course covers selected works in American literature 
from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is on historical 
background, cultural context, and literary analysis of 
selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to 
literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 232 American Literature 11 

This course covers selected works in American literature 
from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is on historical back- 
ground, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected 
prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students 
should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary 
works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113- Corequisite: None. 

ENG 233 Major American Writers 

This course provides an intensive study of the works of sev- 
eral major American authors. Emphasis is on American 
history, culture, and the literary merits. Upon completion, 
students should be able to interpret, analyze, and evaluate 
the works studied. This course has been approved to satis- 
fy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. 
Corequisite: None. 

ENG 241 British Literature I 

This course covers selected works in British literature from 
its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is on his- 
torical background, cultural context, and literary analysis 
of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to 
literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113- Corequisite: None. 



93 



ENG 242 British Literature II 

This course covers selected works in British literature from 
the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is on histori- 
cal background, cultural context, and literary analysis of 
selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to 
literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 243 Major British Writers 

This course provides an intensive study of the works of sev- 
eral major British authors. Emphasis is on British history, 
culture, and the literary merits. Upon completion, students 
should be able to interpret, analyze, and evaluate the works 
studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. Corequisite: 
None. 

ENG 251 Western World Literature I 

This course provides a survey of selected European works 
from the Classical period through the Renaissance. 
Emphasis is on historical background, cultural context, 
and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. 
Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, 
analyze, and respond to selected works. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 112 or 
ENG 113- Corequisite: None. 

ENG 252 Western World Literature II 

This course provides a survey of selected European works 
from the Neoclassical period to the present. Emphasis is on 
historical background, cultural context, and literary analy- 
sis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, 
students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond 
to selected works. This course has been approved to satis- 
fy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. 
Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



ENG 261 World Literature I 

This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, 
Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their literary 
beginnings through the seventeenth century. Emphasis is 
on historical background, cultural context, and literary 
analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and 
respond to selected works. This course has been approved 
to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for 
the general education core requirement in 
humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or 
ENG 113. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 262 World Literature II 

This course introduces selected works from the Pacific, 
Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the eighteenth 
century to the present. Emphasis is on historical back- 
ground, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected 
prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students 
should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to select- 
ed works. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. Corequisite: 
None. 

ENG 272 Southern Literature 

This course provides an analytical study of the works of 
several Southern authors. Emphasis is on the historical 
and cultural contexts, themes, aesthetic features of individ- 
ual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. 
Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, 
analyze, and discuss selected works. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113- 
Corequisite: None. 

ENG 273 African-American Literature 

This course provides a survey of the development of 
African-American literature from its beginnings to the pres- 
ent. Emphasis is on historical and cultural context, 
themes, literary traditions, and backgrounds of the 



authors. Upon completion, students should be able to 
interpret, analyze, and respond to selected texts. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 
113. Corequisite: None. 

ENG 274 Literature by Women 

This course provides an analytical study of the works of 
several women authors. Emphasis is on the historical and 
cultural contexts, themes and aesthetic features of individ- 
ual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. 
Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, 
analyze, and discuss selected works. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or ENG 113. 
Corequisite: None. 

Fire Protection 

FIP 120 Introduction to Fire Protection 

This course provides an overview of the history, develop- 
ment, methods, systems, and regulations as they apply to 
the fire protection field. Topics include history, evolution, 
statistics, suppression, organizations, careers, curriculum, 
and other related topics. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate a broad understanding of the fire 
protection field. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

FIP 124 Fire Prevention and Public 
Education 

This course introduces fire prevention concepts as they 
relate to community and industrial operations. Topics 
include the development and maintenance of fire preven- 
tion programs, educational programs, and inspection pro- 
grams. Upon completion, students should be able to 
research, develop, and present a fire safety program to a 
citizens or industrial group. This course is designed to meet 
the requirements set forth in NFPA 1031, Professional 
Qualifications for Fire Inspector and other selected NFPA 
Standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



94 



PIP 128 Detection and Investigation 

This course covers procedures for determining the origin 
and cause of accidental and incendiary fires. Topics 
include collection and preservation of evidence, detection 
and determination of accelerants, courtroom procedure 
and testimony, and documentation of the fire scene. Upon 
completion, students should be able to conduct a compe- 
tent fire investigation and present those findings to appro- 
priate officials or equivalent. This course is designed to 
meet the requirements set forth in NFPA 1033, Fire 
Investigator Professional Qualifications; Guidelines for Fire 
Investigator Certification; and NFPA 921, Guide for Fire 
and Explosive Investigation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

PIP 132 Building Construction 

This course covers the principles and practices related to 
various types of building construction, including residen- 
tial and commercial, as impacted by fire conditions. Topics 
include types of construction and related elements, fire- 
resistive aspects of construction materials, building codes, 
collapse, and other related topics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to understand and recognize various 
types of construction and their positive or negative aspects 
as related to fire conditions. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

FIP 136 Inspections and Codes 

This course covers the fundamentals of fire and building 
codes as well as procedures to conduct an inspection. 
Emphasis is on reviewing fire and building codes, writing 
inspection reports, identifying hazards, developing plan 
reviews and site sketches, and other related topics. Upon 
completion, students should be able to conduct a fire code 
compliance inspection and produce a written report. In 
addition, students study inspection codes as they relate to 
selected NFPA standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

PIP 144 Sprinklers and Automatic Alarms 

This course introduces various types of automatic sprin- 
klers, standpipes, and fire alarm systems. Emphasis is on 
wet or dry systems, testing and maintenance, water supply 
requirements, fire detection and alarm systems, and other 
related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate a working knowledge of various sprinkler and 
alarm systems as well as required inspection and mainte- 
nance. In addition, students study sprinkler systems and 
automatic alarms as they relate to selected NFPA standards. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



FIP 152 Fire Protection Law 

This course covers fire protection law. Emphasis is on torts, 
legal terms, contracts, liability, review of case histories, and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to discuss laws, codes, and ordinances as they relate to 
fire protection. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

PIP 160 Fire Protection/Electrical 

This course covers the methods and means of electrical 
installations and their uses as related to fire. Topics include 
basic electrical theories, wiring methods, electrical compo- 
nents and circuitry, and an introduction to the National 
Electrical Code. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate a basic knowledge of electricity, including 
its uses, characteristics, and hazards. This course also 
assists students in understanding how electrical fires may 
develop and in conducting electrical fire examinations in 
the context of NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion 
Investigations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAT 115. 
Corequisite: FIP 160A. 

PIP 160A Fire Protection/Electrical Lab 

This course provides practical applications to support FIP 
160. Emphasis is on switching devices, basic circuits, elec- 
trical distribution, and other related topics. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of 
basic electrical equipment and hazards as related to fire 
protection. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
FIP 160. 

FIP 180 midland Fire Behavior 

This course covers the principles of wildland fire behavior 
and meteorology. Emphasis is on fire calculations, fuels, 
and related weather effects. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate and apply fire behavior the- 
ories through written and performance evaluations. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: CIS 110 and MAT 115. Corequisite: None. 



FIP 188 Introduction to Wildland Fires 

This course introduces basic wildland fire suppression 
functions. Emphasis is on the operation of tools, equip- 
ment, aircraft, and basic fire suppression methods. Upon 
completion, students should be able to understand basic 
theories in wildland fire suppression and demonstrate them 
through written and performance evaluations. Course 
Hour Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PIP 220 Fire Fighting Strategies 

This course provides preparation for command of initial 
incident operations involving emergencies within both the 
public and private sector. Topics include incident manage- 
ment, fire-ground tactics and strategies, incident safety, 
and command/control of emergency operations. Upon 
completion, students should be able to describe the initial 
incident system as it relates to operations involving various 
emergencies in fire and non-fire situations. In addition, 
students study fire strategies as they relate to selected NFPA 
standards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

FIP 221 Advanced Fire Fighting Strategies 

This course covers command-level operations for multi- 
company/agency operations involving fire and non-fire 
emergencies. Topics include advanced ICS, advanced inci- 
dent analysis, command-level fire operations, and control 
of both manmade and natural major disasters. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to describe proper and 
accepted systems for mitigating emergencies at the level of 
overall scene command. In addition, students study 
advanced fire strategies as they relate to selected NFPA stan- 
dards. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: FIP 220. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 224 Instructional Methodology > 

This course covers the knowledge, skills, and abilities need- 
ed to train others in fire service operations. Topics include 
planning, presenting, and evaluating lesson plans; learn- 
ing styles; use of media; communication; and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to meet 
all requirements of NFPA 1041, Fire Service Instructor Level 
Two. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



95 



FIP 228 Local Government Finance 

This course introduces local governmental financial prin- 
ciples and practices. Topics include budget preparation and 
justification, revenue policies, statutory requirements, taxa- 
tion, audits, and the economic climate. Upon completion, 
students should be able to comprehend the importance of 
finance as it applies to the operation of a department. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 230 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials I 

This course covers the evaluation of hazardous materials. 
Topics include use of the periodic table, hydrocarbon deriv- 
atives, placards and labels, parameters of combustion, and 
spill and leak mitigation. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the chemical 
behavior of hazardous materials. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 5; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 232 Hydraulics and Water 
Distribution 

This course covers the flow of fluids through fire hoses, 
nozzles, appliances, pumps, standpipes, water mains, and 
other devices. Emphasis is on supply and delivery systems, 
fire flow testing, hydraulic calculations, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to per- 
form hydraulic calculations, conduct water availability 
tests, and demonstrate knowledge of water distribution sys- 
tems. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 115. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 236 Emergency Management 

This course covers the four phases of emergency manage- 
ment: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. 
Topics include organizing for emergency management, 
coordinating for community resources, public sector liabil- 
ity, and the roles of government agencies at all levels. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of comprehensive emergency management 
and the integrated emergency management system. In 
addition, students study areas of emergency management 
as they relate to selected NFPA standards. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 240 Fire Service Supervision 

This course covers supervisory skills and practices in the 
fire protection field. Topics include the supervisor's job, 
supervision skills, the changing work environment, man- 
aging change, organizing for results, discipline and griev- 
ances, and loss control. Upon completion, students should 



Course 
Descriptions 



be able to demonstrate an understanding of the roles and 
responsibilities of the effective fire service supervisor. Class 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 244 Fire Protection Project 

This course provides an opportunity to apply knowledge 
covered in previous courses to employment situations that 
the fire protection professional will encounter. Emphasis is 
on the development of comprehensive and professional 
practices. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate knowledge of the fire protection service 
through written and performance evaluations. In addition, 
this course assesses critical competencies within the Fire 
Protection program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

FIP 248 Fire Service Personnel 
Administration 

This course covers the basics of setting up and administer- 
ing the personnel functions of fire protection organiza- 
tions. Emphasis is on human resource planning, classifica- 
tion and job analysis, equal opportunity employment, affir- 
mative action, recruitment, retention, development, per- 
formance evaluation, and assessment centers. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge 
of the personnel function as it relates to managing fire 
protection. In addition, students study areas of personnel 
administration as they relate to selected NFPA standards. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 256 Municipal Public Relations 

This course is a general survey of municipal public rela- 
tions and their effect on the governmental process. Topics 
include principles of public relations, press releases, press 
conferences, public information officers, image surveys, 
and the effects of perceived service on fire protection deliv- 
ery. Upon completion, students should be able to manage 
the public relations functions of a fire service organization. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



FIP 260 Fire Protection Planning 

This course covers the need for a comprehensive approach 
to fire protection planning. Topics include the planning 
process, using an advisory committee, establishing goals 
and objectives, and techniques used to approve and imple- 
ment a plan. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate a working knowledge of the concepts and 
principles of planning as they relate to fire protection. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 264 Flame Propagation and Materials 
Rating 

This course covers the role of interior finishes in fires, 
smoke obscuration and density, flame spread, pyrolysis, 
and other related topics. Emphasis is on testing equipment 
which includes Rack Impingement, Bench Furnace, and 
the two-foot tunnel. Upon completion, students should be 
able to understand the operation of the testing equipment 
and compile a reference notebook. In addition, students 
study areas as they relate to selected NFPA standards. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 4; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 268 Wildland Fire Management 

This course introduces wildland fire organization and 
management. Emphasis is on the Incident Command 
System and the National Interagency Management System. 
Upon completion, students should be able to understand 
and apply the Incident Command System and the National 
Interagency Management System through written evalua- 
tions. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 272 Wildland Fire Strategy 

This course covers wildland fire strategy and the determi- 
nation of appropriate wildland fire tactics. Emphasis is on 
the use of ground forces, aircraft, and extinguishing 
agents. Upon completion, students should be able to devel- 
op strategy and tactics for responding to a wildland fire 
through written and performance evaluations. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: CIS 110. Corequisite: None. 

FIP 276 Managing Fire Services 

This course provides an overview of fire department opera- 
tive services. Emphasis is on finance, staffing, equipment, 
code enforcement, management information, specialized 
services, legal issues, and planning. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to understand concepts and apply fire 
department management and operations principles. In 
addition, students study fire service management as it 
relates to selected NFPA standards. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 



96 



French 

FRElll Elementary French I 

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the 
French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is on 
the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to 
comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to 
spoken and written French as well as demonstrate cultural 
awareness. This course must be taken with the accompany- 
ing lab. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: FRE 181 and 
ENG 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

FRE 112 Elementary French II 

This course, a continuation of FRE 111, focuses on the 
fundamental elements of the French language within a 
cultural context. Emphasis is on the progressive develop- 
ment of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. 
Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend 
and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and 
written French and demonstrate further cultural aware- 
ness. This course must be taken with the accompanying 
lab. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test; and FRE 111. Corequisites: 
FRE 182 and ENG 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

FRE 181 French Labi 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the French language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of supplementary learning media and materials. Upon 
completion, students should be able to comprehend and 
respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written 
French as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: FRE 111. 

FRE 182 French Lab 2 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the French language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of supplementary learning media and materials. Upon 



Course 
Descriptions 



completion, students should be able to comprehend and 
respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written 
French as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: FRE 181. Corequisite: FRE 112. 

FRE 21 1 Intermediate French I 

This course provides a review and expansion of the essen- 
tial skills of the French language. Emphasis is on the study 
of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. 
Upon completion, students should be able to communicate 
effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, pres- 
ent, and future. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the gener- 
al education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test; and FRE 112. Corequisite: 
ENG 090 or RED 090, or satisfactory score in placement 
test. 

Geography 

GEO 111 World Regional Geography 

This course introduces the regional concept which empha- 
sizes the spatial association of people and their environ- 
ment. Emphasis is on the physical, cultural, and economic 
systems that interact to produce the distinct regions of the 
earth. Upon completion, students should be able to 
describe variations in physical and cultural features of a 
region and demonstrate an understanding of their func- 
tional relationships. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in social/behav- 
ioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

German 

GER 111 Elementary German I 

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the 
German language within a cultural context. Emphasis is 
on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be 



able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accu- 
racy to spoken and written German and demonstrate cul- 
tural awareness. This course must be taken with the 
accompanying lab. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: GER 181 
and ENG 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

GER 112 Elementary German II 

This course, a continuation of GER 111, focuses on the 
fundamental elements of the German language within a 
cultural context. Emphasis is on the progressive develop- 
ment of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. 
Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend 
and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and 
written German as well as demonstrate further cultural 
awareness. This course must be taken with the accompany- 
ing lab. Tliis course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test; and GER 111. Corequisites: 
GER 182 and ENG 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

GER 181 German Labi 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the German language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of supplementary learning media and materials. Upon 
completion, students should be able to comprehend and 
respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written 
German as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: GER 111. 

GER 182 German Lab 2 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the German language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of supplementary learning media and materials. Upon 
completion, students should be able to comprehend and 
respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written 
German as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: GER 181. Corequisite: GER 112. 



97 



GER211 Intermediate German I 

This course provides a review and expansion of the essen- 
tial skills of the Gennan language. Emphasis is on the 
study of authentic and representative literary and cultural 
texts. Upon completion, students should be able to com- 
municate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the 
past, present, and future. This course has been approved 
to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: GER 112, ENG 080, and RED 
080, or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090. 

Health 

HEA 110 Personal Health/Wellness 

This course provides an introduction to basic personal 
health and wellness. Emphasis is on current health issues 
such as nutrition, mental health, and fitness. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of the factors necessary to maintain health and 
wellness. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

HEA 112 First Aid and CPR 

This course introduces the basics of emergency first aid 
treatment. Topics include rescue breathing, CPR, first aid 
for choking and bleeding, and other first aid procedures. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
skills in providing emergency care for the sick and injured 
until medical help can be obtained. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Artiadation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: ENG 080 
and RED 080, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

History 

HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 

This course introduces the study of global history. 
Emphasis is on topics such as colonialism, industrialism, 
and nationalism. Upon completion, students should be 
able to analyze significant global historical issues. This 
course is designed for students with little or no world histo- 
ry background and/or students who will probably not take 
other history courses. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in social/behav- 
ioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 



Course 
Descriptions 



Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 080 and RED 
080, or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

HIS 121 Western Civilization I 

This course introduces western civilization from pre-history 
to the early modern era. Topics include ancient Greece, 
Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and 
the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe. 
Upon completion, students should be able to analyze sig- 
nificant political, socioeconomic, and cultural develop- 
ments in early western civilization. This course is designed 
for students who may take other upper-level history cours- 
es. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

HIS 122 Western Civilization II 

This course introduces western civilization from the early 
modern era to the present. Topics include the religious 
wars, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, and 
the Cold War. Upon completion, students should be able to 
analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural 
developments in modern western civilization. This course 
is designed for students who may take other upper-level 
history courses. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the gener- 
al education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

HIS 131 American History I 

This course is a survey of American history from pre-histo- 
ry through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations 
to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the 
development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to analyze significant 
political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in 
early American history. Native Americans, minorities, 
women, and representative biographies are also examined. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 



Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

HIS 132 American History II 

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil 
War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, 
immigration, the Great Depression, the major American 
wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, 
students should be able to analyze significant political, 
socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American 
history since the Civil War. Native Americans, minorities, 
women, and representative biographies are also examined. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

HIS 236 North Carolina History 

This course is a study of geographical, political, economic, 
and social conditions existing in North Carolina from 
America's discovery to the present. Topics include native 
and immigrant backgrounds; colonial, antebellum, and 
Reconstruction periods; party politics; race relations; and 
the transition from an agrarian to an industrial economy. 
Upon completion, students should be able to analyze sig- 
nificant political, socioeconomic, and cultural develop- 
ments in North Carolina. Regional and national compar- 
isons are examined, and the lives of representative North 
Carolinians are discussed. This course has been approved 
to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for 
the general education core requirement in social/ 
behavioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 090 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: RED 090 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 

Health Information 
Technology 

HIT 110 Health Information Orientation 

This course introduces health information management 
and its role in health care delivery systems. Emphasis is on 
the role and responsibilities of health information profes- 
sionals in a variety of settings. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an underetanding of health 
information management and health care organizations, 
professions, and trends. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Health Information Technology pro- 
gram. Corequisite: None. 



98 



HIT 112 Health Law and Ethics 

This course covers the impact of legal issues on health 
information management and provides an overview of the 
judicial system and legislative process. Topics include con- 
fidentiality, release of information, record retention, 
authentication, informed consent, subpoenaed informa- 
tion, security of computerized health information, liability, 
and legislative trends. Upon completion, students should be 
able to respond appropriately to requests for health infor- 
mation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Health Information Technology program. Corequisite: 
None. 

HIT 114 Record Systems/Standards 

This course covers basic concepts and techniques for man- 
aging and maintaining health record systems. Topics 
include health record content, qualitative analysis, format, 
record control, storage, retention, forms design/control, 
indices and registers, and numbering and filing systems. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an underetanding of health record systems, including their 
maintenance and control. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Health Information Technology pro- 
gram. Corequisite: None. 

HIT 124 Directed Practice II 

This course provides supervised clinical experience in 
health care settings. Emphasis is on practical application 
of curriculum concepts to the health care setting. Upon 
completion, students should be able to apply health infor- 
mation theory to health care facility practices. The majori- 
ty of clinical sites are offered during the day. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Health 
Information Technology program and permission of the 
program director. Corequisite: None. 

HIT 210 Health Care Statistics 

This course covers maintenance, compilation, analysis, 
and presentation of health care statistics. Topics include 
basic statistical principles, morbidity and mortality, com- 
monly computed hospital rates, uniform reporting require- 
ments, and selection and construction of data displays. 
Upon completion, students should be able to calculate 
morbidity, mortality, and commonly computed hospital 
rates; comply with inform reporting requirements; and 
analyze/present statistical data. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 2; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: MAT 110 or MAT 140. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



HIT 212 Coding/Classification I 

This course is the first of a two-course sequence which pro- 
vides a foundation in coding and classification systems in 
a variety of health care settings. Emphasis is on ICD-9-CM 
coding conventions, rates, methodology and sequencing, 
data sets, documentation requirements, information index- 
ing and retrieval, quality control, and coding resources. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply coding 
principles to correctly assign ICD-9-CM. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Health Information 
Technology program. Corequisite: None. 

HIT 214 Coding/Classification II 

This course is the second in a two-course sequence which 
continues the study of coding and classification systems in 
a variety of health care settings. Topics include classifica- 
tion and coding systems emphasizing ICD-9-CM, 
HCPCS/CPT-4, reimbursement and billing systems, 
encoders and groupers, case mix management, and the 
relationship between coding and managed care. Upon 
completion, students should be able to apply coding princi- 
ples to correctly assign ICD-9-CM and HCPCS/CPT-4 codes 
and apply systems to optimize reimbursement. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: HIT 212. Corequisite: None. 

HIT 216 Quality Management 

This course introduces principles of quality improvement, 
utilization management, and risk management in health 
care. Topics include the continuous quality improvement 
philosophy, including tools, data analysis and application, 
and related committee functions; utilization management 
and risk management; and credentialing, accreditation, 
and regulation. Upon completion, students should be able 
to apply performance improvement techniques, analyze 
and display data, apply level of care criteria, and partici- 
pate in risk management activities. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in Health Information 
Technology program. Corequisite: None. 



HIT 222 Directed Practice 111 

This course provides supervised clinical experience in 
health care settings. Emphasis is on practical application 
of curriculum concepts to the health care setting. Upon 
completion, students should be able to apply health infor- 
mation theory to health care facility practices. The majori- 
ty of clinical sites are offered during the day. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Health 
Information Technology program and permission of the 
program director. Corequisite: None. 

HIT 226 Principles of Disease 

This course covers disease etiology and organ system 
involvement, including physical signs and symptoms, 
prognoses, and common complications and their manage- 
ment. Topics include basic microbiology, basic pharmacol- 
ogy, and principles of disease. Upon completion, students 
should be able to relate disease processes to etiology, physi- 
cal signs and symptoms, prognosis, and common compli- 
cations and their management. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: BIO 163- Corequisite: None. 

HIT 280 Professional Issues 

This course provides a comprehensive discussion of topics 
common to the health information profession. Emphasis is 
on application of professional competencies, job search 
tools, and preparation for the certification examination. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
competence in entry-level domains, tasks, and subtasks for 
health information technologies. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: HIT 212. Corequisite: HIT 214. 

Humanities 

HUM 110 Technology and Society 

This course considers technological change from histori- 
cal, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on 
human needs and concerns. Emphasis is on the causes 
and consequences of technological change. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to critically evaluate the 
implications of technology. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement general education core requirement in 
humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 



99 



HUM 115 Critical Thinking 

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in 
the context of human conflict. Emphasis is on evaluating 
information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural 
perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in 
the analysis of appropriate texts. Students will be able to 
engage in rational discussions using reasons, arguments, 
exploration of consequences and motives, and crucial tests 
to explore the complexities of human relations. This 
course is approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. This course may meet the SACS 
humanities requirement for AAS degree programs. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: ENG 111. Corequisite: None. 

HUM 121 The Nature of America 

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of the 
American cultural, social, and political experience. 
Emphasis is on the multicultural character of American 
society, distinctive qualities of various regions, and the 
American political system. Upon completion, students 
should be able to analyze significant cultural, social, and 
political aspects of American life. Students should also be 
able to identify the frames of reference that shape the atti- 
tudes, beliefs, and behaviors of various cultural, social, and 
political groups. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the gener- 
al education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080, or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090, or satisfactory score on placement test. 

HUM 160 Introduction to Film 

This course introduces the fundamental elements of film 
artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, 
and production techniques as well as the social values 
reflected in film art. Upon completion, students should be 
able to analyze critically the elements covered in relation 
to selected films. Students should also be able to analyze 
films effectively within their respective thematic and histor- 
ical contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: ENG 111. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



Industrial Science 

ISC 1 12 Industrial Safety 

This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. 
Emphasis is on industrial safety and OSHA and environ- 
mental regulations. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environ- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ISC 115 Construction Safety 

This course introduces the basic concepts of construction 
site safety. Topics include ladders, lifting, lock-out/tag-out, 
personal protective devices, scaffolds and above^elow 
ground work based on OSHA regulations. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of 
applicable safety regulations and safely participate in con- 
struction projects. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 

This course covers workplace environmental, health, and 
safety issues. Emphasis is on managing the implementa- 
tion and enforcement of environmental health and safety 
regulations as well as on preventing accidents, injuries, 
and illnesses. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts of envi- 
ronmental, health, and safety issues. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ISC 131 Quality Management 

This course provides a study and analysis of the aspects 
and implications of quality management that lead to cus- 
tomer satisfaction through continuous quality improve- 
ment. Topics include Total Quality Management, ISO 9000, 
organizing for quality, supplier/vendor relationships, and 
the role of leadership in quality management. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of quality management concepts and techniques. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ISC 153 Motion and Time Study 

This course covers the principles of motion and time study, 
including practice in time study using a stop watch. 
Emphasis is on the principles of motion economy, perform- 
ance rating, allowances, and development of standards. 



Upon completion, students should be able to perform 
motion and time study, MTM analysis, and work-sampling 
studies. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

ISC 210 Operations and Production 
Planning 

This course includes the fundamentals of operations and 
production planning, forecasting, and scheduling. Topics 
include demand management, production planning and 
control, scheduling, and budgeting. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate an understanding of 
the concepts and techniques involved in operations and 
production planning. This course is a unique concentra- 
tion requirement of the Operations Management concen- 
tration in the Business Administration program. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Completion of curriculum mathematics 
requirement. Corequisite: None. 

Legal Education 

LEX 110 Introduction to Paralegal Study 

This course introduces the paralegal profession and the 
legal system. Topics include regulations and concepts, 
ethics, case analysis, legal reasoning, career opportunities, 
certification, professional organizations, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to 
explain the role of the paralegal and identify the skills, 
knowledge, and ethics required of legal assistants. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 120 Legal Research/Writing I 

This course introduces the techniques of legal research and 
writing. Emphasis is on locating, analyzing, applying, and 
updating sources of law; effective legal writing, including 
proper citation; and the use of electronic research methods. 
Upon completion, students should be able to perform legal 
research and writing assignments using techniques covered 
in the course. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

LEX 121 Legal Research/Writing II 

This course covers advanced topics in legal research and 
writing. Topics include more complex legal issues and 
assignments involving preparation of legal memos, briefs, 
and other documents as well as the advanced use of elec- 
tronic research methods. Upon completion, students 
should be able to perform legal research and writing 
assignments using techniques covered in the course. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: LEX 120. Corequisite: None. 



100 



LEX 130 Civil Injuries 

This course covers traditional tort concepts and the evolv- 
ing body of individual rights created by statute. Topics 
include intentional and non-intentional torts with empha- 
sis on negligence, strict liability, civil rights, workplace and 
environmental liability, remedies, and damages. Upon 
completion, students should be able to recognize, explain, 
and evaluate elements of civil injuries and related defenses. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 140 Civil Litigation I 

This course introduces the structure of the legal system and 
the rules governing civil litigation. Emphasis is on jurisdic- 
tion and the state and federal rules of civil procedure and 
rules of evidence. Upon completion, students should be 
able to assist an attorney in the preparation of a civil case. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 141 Civil Litigation II 

This course covers the paralegal's role in the civil litigation 
process. Topics include investigation, interviewing, plead- 
ings, motions, discovery, and trial and appellate proce- 
dures. Upon completion, students should be able to assist 
an attorney in preparing, directing, and organizing docu- 
ments for civil litigation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: LEX 140. 
Corequisite: None. 

LEX 150 Commercial Law 

This course covers legally enforceable agreements, forms of 
organization, and selected portions of the Uniform 
Commercial Code. Topics include drafting and enforce- 
ment of contracts, leases, and related documents as well as 
selection and implementation of business organization 
forms, sales, and commercial papers. Upon completion, 
students should be able to apply the elements of a contract, 
prepare various business documents, and understand the 
role of commercial paper. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

LEX 160 Criminal Law and Procedure 

This course introduces substantive criminal law and proce- 
dural rights of the accused. Topics include elements of 
state/federal crimes, defenses, constitutional issues, pre- 
trial and trial process, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to explain elements of spe- 
cific crimes and assist an attorney in preparing a criminal 
case. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



LEX 180 Case Analysis and Reasoning 

This course covers the techniques of reading and applying 
legal opinions and the skills of case analysis. Emphasis is 
on the components of opinions and on types of legal writ- 
ing. Upon completion, students should be able to read, 
analyze, and brief opinions as well as prepare legal memo- 
randa, briefs, and other legal documents. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: LEX 120. 

LEX 210 Real Property I 

This course introduces the study of real property law. Topics 
include the distinction between real and personal property, 
various estates, mechanics of conveyance and encum- 
brance, recordation, special proceedings, and other related 
topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identi- 
fy estates, forms of deeds, requirements for recording, and 
procedures to enforce rights to real property. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 211 Real Property II 

This course continues the study of real property law relat- 
ing to title examination and preparation of closing docu- 
ments. Topics include use of courthouse and other public 
records in title examination and preparation of documents 
required in real estate transactions and closings. Upon 
completion, students should be able to plot/draft a descrip- 
tion; perform complete title examination; draft closing 
documents, including title insurance forms; and prepare 
disbursement reconciliation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
1; Lab, 4; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: LEX 210. 
Corequisite: None. 

LEX 214 Investigation and Trial 
Preparation 

This course introduces the fundamentals of investigation. 
Topics include compiling and assembling data for cases; 
investigative planning and information-gathering tech- 
niques; locating and interviewing witnesses; collection, pre- 
serving, and evaluating sufficiency and admissibility of evi- 
dence; preparation of reports; and evidence presentation at 
depositions and court proceedings. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to plan and use investigative check- 
lists, understand and demonstrate investigative techniques, 



prepare reports, and enhance verbal and interpersonal 
communications skills and interviewing techniques. 
Course Hour Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 4; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: LEX 210. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 220 Corporate Law 

This course covers the legal aspects of forming, operating, 
and maintaining a business. Emphasis is on the business 
corporation with additional coverage of sole proprietorships 
and partnerships. Upon completion, students should be 
able to draft basic partnership and corporate documents 
and file these documents as required. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 240 Family Law 

This course covers laws governing domestic relations. 
Topics include marriage, separation, divorce, child custody, 
support, property division, adoption, domestic violence, and 
other related topics. Upon completion, students should be 
able to interview clients, gather information, and draft doc- 
uments related to family law. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 250 Wills, Estates, and Trusts 

This course covers various types of wills, trusts, probate, 
estate administration, and intestacy. Topics include types of 
wills and execution requirements, caveats and dissents, 
intestate succession, inventories and accountings, distribu- 
tion and settlement, and other related topics. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to draft simple wills; pre- 
pare estate forms; understand administration of estates, 
including taxation; and explain terms regarding trusts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 260 Bankruptcy and Collections 

This course provides an overview of the laws of bankruptcy 
and the rights of creditors and debtors. Topics include 
bankruptcy procedures and estate management, attach- 
ment, claim and delivery, repossession, foreclosure, collec- 
tion, garnishment, and post-judgment collection proce- 
dure. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare 
and file bankruptcy forms, collection letters, statutory liens, 
and collection of judgments. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 



101 



LEX 270 Law Office 
Management/Technology 

This course provides an overview of law office management 
and organization. Topics include office forms, filing sys- 
tems, billing/time keeping, computer systems, calendar 
systems, library administration, case management, office 
and personnel procedures, ethics, and technology. Upon 
completion, students should be able to set up and main- 
tain various law office systems, monitor case progress, and 
supervise non-lawyer personnel. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hour Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 280 Ethics and Professionalism 

This course reinforces legal ethics and the role of the para- 
legal in a professional work environment. Topics include a 
review of ethics, employment opportunities, and search 
techniques; paralegal certification; and other related topics. 
Upon completion, students should be able to understand 
the role of a professional paralegal and identify authority 
that can properly be delegated by an attorney. This course 
is designed as a capstone course during which the student 
reviews the various skills acquired during the past three 
semesters in preparation for graduation and certification. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisites: LEX 110, LEX 120, LEX 130, LEX 
140, LEX 141, LEX 150, LEX 210, LEX 220, LEX 240, LEX 
250, LEX 285. Corequisite: None. 

LEX 285 Workers ' Compensation Law 

This course covers the process of initiating and handling 
workers' compensation claims. Emphasis is on reviewing 
and drafting relevant Industrial Commission forms. Upon 
completion, students should be able to interview clients, 
gather information, and draft documents related to work- 
ers' compensation claims. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

Machining 

MAC 111 Machining Technology I 

This course introduces machining operations as they relate 
to the metalworking industry. Topics include machine shop 
safety, measuring tools, lathes, drilling machines, saws, 
milling machines, bench grinders, and layout instruments. 
Upon completion, students should be able to safely perform 
the basic operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, 
turning, and milling. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 12; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

MAC 112 Machining Technology II 

This course provides additional instruction and practice in 
the use of precision measuring tools, lathes, milling 
machines, and grinders. Emphasis is on setup and opera- 
tion of machine tools, including the selection and use of 



Course 
Descriptions 



work-holding devices, speeds, feeds, cutting tools, and 
coolants. Upon completion, students should be able to per- 
form basic procedures on precision grinders and advanced 
operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, turning, 
and milling. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 12; 
Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: MAC 111. 
Corequisite: None. 

MAC 113 Machining Technology III 

This course provides an introduction to advanced and spe- 
cial machining operations. Emphasis is on working to 
specified tolerances with special and advanced setups. 
Upon completion, students should be able to produce a 
part to specifications. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
12; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: MAC 112. 
Corequisite: None. 

MAC 121 Introduction to CNC 

This course introduces the concepts and capabilities of 
computer numerical control machine tools. Topics include 
setup, operation, and basic applications. Upon completion, 
students should be able to explain operator safety, machine 
protection, data input, program preparation, and program 
storage. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAC 112. Corequisite: None. 

MAC 124 CNC Milling 

This course introduces the manual programming, setup, 
and operation of CNC machining centers. Topics include 
programming formats, control functions, program editing, 
part production, and inspection. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to manufacture simple parts using 
CNC machining centers. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; 
Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAC 121. 
Corequisite: None. 

MAC 151 Machining Calculations 

This course introduces basic calculations as they relate to 
machining occupations. Emphasis is on basic calculations 
and their applications in the machine shop. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to perform basic shop calcu- 
lations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAT 101. Corequisite: None. 

MAC 224 Advanced CNC Milling 

This course covers advanced methods in setup and opera- 
tion of CNC machining centers. Emphasis is on program- 
ming and production of complex parts. Upon completion, 



students should be able to demonstrate skills in program- 
ming, operations, and setup of CNC machining centers. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAC 124. Corequisite: None. 

MAC 241 Jigs and Fixtures I 

This course introduces the application and use of jigs and 
fixtures. Emphasis is on design and manufacture of simple 
jigs and fixtures. Upon completion, students should be able 
to design and build single jigs and fixtures. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: MAC 112. Corequisite: None. 

MAC 248 Production Procedures 

This course covers product planning and control as well as 
scheduling and routing of operations. Topics include cost- 
effective production methods, dimensional and statistical 
quality control, and the tooling and machines required for 
production. Upon completion, students should be able to 
plan, set up, and produce cost-effective quality machined 
parts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MAC 111. Corequisite: None. 

Mathematics 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on individual college placement testing policies 
and procedures. Students should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

MAT 050 Basic Math Skills 

This course is designed to strengthen basic math skills. 
Topics include properties, rounding, estimating, compar- 
ing, converting, and computing whole numbers, fractions, 
and decimals. Upon completion, students should be able to 
perform basic computations and solve relevant mathemati- 
cal problems. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

MAT 060 Essential Mathematics 

This course is a comprehensive study of mathematical 
skills which should provide a strong mathematical founda- 
tion to pursue further study. Topics include principles and 
applications of decimals, fractions, percents, ratio and pro- 
portion, order of operations, geometry, measurement, and 
elements of algebra and statistics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to perform basic computations and 
solve relevant, multi-step mathematical problems using 
technology where appropriate. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 
050 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 



102 



MAT 070 Introductory Algebra 

This course establishes a foundation in algebraic concepts 
and problem solving. Topics include signed numbers, 
exponents, order of operations, simplifying expressions, 
solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing, for- 
mulas, polynomials, factoring, and elements of geometry. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply the 
concepts learned in problem solving using appropriate 
technology. Solving quadratic equations by factoring is also 
included. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 060 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: RED 080 or ENG 085. 

MAT 080 Intermediate Algebra 

This course continues the study of algebraic concepts with 
emphasis on applications. Topics include factoring; ration- 
al expressions; rational exponents; rational, radical, and 
quadratic equations; systems of equations; inequalities; 
graphing; functions; variations; complex numbers; and 
elements of geometry. Upon completion, students should be 
able to apply the concepts learned in problem solving 
using appropriate technology. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 
070 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
RED 080 or ENG 085. 

MAT 101 Applied Mathematics I 

This course is a comprehensive review of arithmetic with 
basic algebra designed to meet the needs of certificate and 
diploma programs. Topics include arithmetic and geomet- 
ric skills used in measurement, ratio and proportion, expo- 
nents and roots, applications of percent, linear equations, 
formulas, and statistics. Upon completion, students should 
be able to solve practical problems in their specific areas of 
study. Also included are definitions and properties of 
angles, polygons, and circles; area; and right triangle 
trigonometry. This course is intended for certificate and 
diploma programs. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 060 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 

This course provides an activity-based approach to utiliz- 
ing, interpreting, and communicating data in a variety of 
measurement systems. Topics include accuracy, precision, 
conversion, and estimation within metric, apothecary, and 
avoirdupois systems; ratio and proportion; measures of 
central tendency and dispersion; and charting of data. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply proper 
techniques to gathering, recording, manipulating, analyz- 
ing, and communicating data. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 
070 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



MAT 115 Mathematical Models 

This course develops the ability to utilize mathematical 
skills and technology to solve problems at a level found in 
non-mathematics-intensive programs. Topics include 
applications to percent, ratio and proportion, formulas, 
statistics, functional notation, linear functions and their 
graphs, probability, sampling techniques, scatter plots, and 
modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to 
solve practical problems; reason and communicate with 
mathematics; and work confidently, collaboratively, and 
independently. Applications may be drawn from, but are 
not limited to, the fields of business, environmental sci- 
ence, health, public services, and various technologies. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satisfactory score on 
placement test. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 

This course provides an integrated approach to technology 
and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret 
mathematical functions and formulas used in problem 
solving. Topics include simplification, evaluation, and 
solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex num- 
bers; right triangle trigonometry; systems of equations; and 
the use of technology. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of mathe- 
matics and technology to solve problems as well as analyze 
and communicate results. A basic introduction to statistics 
is also included. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 122 Algebra/Trigonometry II 

This course extends the concepts covered in MAT 121 to 
include additional topics in algebra, function analysis, and 
trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic 
functions, translation and scaling of functions, Sine Law, 
Cosine Law, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate an understanding of 
the use of technology to solve problems and to analyze and 
communicate results. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 121 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 



MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 

This course provides an introduction in a non-technical 
setting to selected topics in mathematics. Topics include, 
but are not limited to, sets, logic, probability, statistics, 
matrices, mathematical systems, geometry, topology, math- 
ematics of finance, and modeling. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to understand a variety of mathemati- 
cal applications, think logically, and be able to work col- 
laboratively and independently. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in natural sciences/mathematics. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisite: MAT 140A. 

MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 

This course is a laboratory for MAT 140. Emphasis is on 
experiences that enhance the materials presented in the 
class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve 
problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and com- 
municate effectively. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: MAT 070 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: MAT 140. 

MAT 145 Analytical Math 

This course is designed to develop problem solving and 
reasoning skills by the study of selected areas of mathemat- 
ics. Topics include elementary and Boolean algebra, sets, 
logic, number theory, numeration systems, probability, sta- 
tistics, and linear programming. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to apply logic and other mathemati- 
cal concepts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 080 or MAT 
122. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 155 Statistical Analysis 

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential 
statistics. Topics include sampling, distributions, plotting 
data, central tendency, dispersion, Central Limits Theorem, 
confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlations, 
regressions, and multinomial experiments. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to describe data and test infer- 
ences about populations using sample data. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: MAT 080 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. Corequisite: None. 



103 



MAT 167 Discrete Mathematics 

This course is the study of discrete mathematics with 
emphasis on applications. Topics include number systems, 
combinations, and permutations; mathematical logic and 
proofs; sets and counting; Boolean algebra; mathematical 
induction; trees and graphs; and algorithms. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate compe- 
tence in the topics covered. This course is approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3- Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
MAT 121 or MAT 171. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 

This is the first of two courses designed to emphasize topics 
which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis 
is on equations and inequalities; functions, including lin- 
ear, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equa- 
tions and inequalities; and parametric equations. Upon 
completion, students should be able to solve practical prob- 
lems and use appropriate models for analysis and predic- 
tions. Additional topics include, but are not limited to, 
exponential and logarithmic functions and their applica- 
tions. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: MAT 171A. 

MAT 171 A Precalculus Algebra Lab 

This course is a laboratory for MAT 171. Emphasis is on 
experiences that enhance the materials presented in the 
class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve 
problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and com- 
municate effectively. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: MAT 080 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: MAT 171. 

MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry 

This is the second of two courses designed to emphasize 
topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. 
Emphasis is on properties and applications of transcenden- 
tal functions and their graphs, right and oblique triangle 
trigonometry, conic sections, and vectors. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to solve practical problems 
and use appropriate models for analysis and prediction. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 171 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



MAT 263 Brief Calculus 

This course introduces concepts of differentiation and inte- 
gration as well as their applications to solving problems. 
The course is designed for students needing one semester of 
calculus. Topics include functions, graphing, differentia- 
tion, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn 
from business, economics, and biological and behavioral 
sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus 
and technology to solve problems and to analyze and com- 
municate results. This course has been approved to satis- 
fy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in natural sci- 
ences/mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 171 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: MAT 263A. 

MAT263A Brief Calculus Lab 

This course is a laboratory for MAT 263. Emphasis is on 
experiences that enhance the materials presented in the 
class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve 
problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and com- 
municate effectively. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: MAT 171 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: MAT 263. 

MAT 271 Calculus! 

This course covers in depth the differential calculus portion 
of a three-course calculus sequence. Topics include limits, 
continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and tran- 
scendental functions of one variable, with applications. 
Upon completion, students should be able to apply differ- 
entiation and integration techniques to algebraic and tran- 
scendental functions. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in natural sci- 
ences/mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 172 or satis- 
factory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 272 Calculus II 

This course provides a rigorous treatment of integration 
and is the second calculus course in a three-course 
sequence. Topics include applications of definite integrals, 
techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper 



integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equa- 
tions, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon 
completion, students should be able to use integration and 
approximation techniques to solve application problems. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: MAT 271. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 273 Calculus III 

This course covers the calculus of several variables and is 
the third calculus course in a three-course sequence. Topics 
include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, 
multiple integrals, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued 
functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to solve problems involving 
vectors and functions of several variables. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in natural sciences/mathematics. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: MAT 272. Corequisite: None. 

MAT 285 Differential Equations 

This course provides an introduction to ordinary differen- 
tial equations with an emphasis on applications. Topics 
include first-order, linear higher-order, and systems of dif- 
ferential equations; numerical methods; series solutions; 
eigenvalues and eigenvectors; Laplace transforms; and 
Fourier series. Upon completion, students should be able to 
use differential equations to model physical phenomena, 
solve the equations, and use the solutions to analyze the 
phenomena. This course is approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours per 
Week: Class, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: MAT 
272. Corequisite: None. 

Medical Assisting 

MED 121 Medical Terminology I 

This course introduces prefixes, suffixes, and word roots 
used in the language of medicine. Topics include medical 
vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physi- 
ology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected 
systems. Upon completion, students should be able to pro- 
nounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to 
selected body systems and their pathological disorders. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



104 



MED 122 Medical Terminology II 

This course is the second in a series of medical terminolo- 
gy courses. Topics include medical vocabulary and the 
terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological 
conditions, and treatment of selected systems. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and 
define medical terms as related to selected body systems 
and their pathological disorders. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: MED 121. Corequisite: None. 

Marketing and Retailing 

MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 

This course introduces principles and problems of market- 
ing goods and services. Topics include promotion, place- 
ment, and pricing strategies for products. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to apply marketing principles 
in organizational decision making. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

MKT 121 Retailing 

This course examines the role of retailing in the economy. 
Topics include the development of present retail structure, 
functions performed, effective operations, and managerial 
problems resulting from current economic and social 
trends. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of 
retailing. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

MKT 123 Fundamentals of Selling 

This course is designed to emphasize the necessity of sell- 
ing skills in a modern business environment. Emphasis is 
on sales techniques involved in various types of selling sit- 
uations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate an understanding of the techniques covered. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

MKT 220 Advertising and Sales Promotion 

This course covers the elements of advertising and sales 
promotion in the business environment. Topics include 
advertising and sales promotion appeals, selection of 
media, use of advertising and sales promotion as a market- 
ing tool, and means of testing effectiveness. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of the concepts covered through application. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



MKT 221 Consumer Behavior 

This course is designed to describe consumer behavior as 
applied to the exchange processes involved in acquiring, 
consuming, and disposing of goods and services. Topics 
include an analysis of basic and environmental determi- 
nants of consumer behavior with emphasis on the deci- 
sion-making process. Upon completion, students should be 
able to analyze concepts related to the study of the individ- 
ual consumer. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

Music 

MUS 110 Music Appreciation 

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western 
world. Emphasis is on the elements of music, terminology, 
composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of 
music. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

MUS 113 American Music 

This course introduces various musical styles, influences, 
and composers of the United States from pre-Colonial 
times to the present. Emphasis is on the broad variety of 
music particular to American culture. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic lis- 
tening and understanding of American music. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 



MUS 213 Opera and Musical Theatre 

This course covers the origins and development of opera 
and musical theatre from the works of Claudio Monteverdi 
to the present. Emphasis is on how the structure and com- 
ponents of opera and musicals affect dramaturgy through 
listening examples and analysis. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate analytical and listen- 
ing skills in understanding both opera and the musical. 
The listening emphasis in this course is on the musical. 
This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine art. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and 
RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test 

Networking Technology 

NET 110 Data 
Communications/Networking 

This course introduces data communication and network- 
ing. Topics include telecommunication standards, proto- 
cols, equipment, network topologies, communication soft- 
ware, LANs, WANs, the Internet, and network operating sys- 
tems. Upon completion, students should be able to demon- 
strate understanding of the fundamentals of telecommuni- 
cation and networking. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. 
Corequisite: None. 

Nursing 

NUR 101 Practical Nursing I 

This course introduces concepts related to the practical 
nurse's caregiver and discipline-specific roles. Emphasis is 
on the nursing process; legal, ethical, and professional 
issues; wellness and illness patterns; and basic nursing 
skills. Upon completion, students should be able to demon- 
strate beginning understanding of nursing process to pro- 
mote, maintain, and restore optimum health for diverse 
clients throughout the life span. Experiences in the nursing 
laboratory and in health care agencies provide students the 
opportunity to develop nursing skills by providing direct 
client care. This is a diploma-level course. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 7; Lab, 6; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours 
Credit, 11. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Practical 
Nursing program. Corequisite: None. 



105 



NUR 102 Practical Nursing II 

This course includes more advanced concepts related to the 
practical nurse's caregiver and discipline-specific roles. 
Emphasis is on the nursing process; delegation; cost effec- 
tiveness; legal, ethical, and professional issues; and well- 
ness and illness patterns. Upon completion, students 
should be able to begin participating in the nursing 
process to promote, maintain, and restore optimum health 
for diverse clients throughout the life span. Correlation of 
theory to clinical applications is provided on medical, sur- 
gical, mother-baby units, extended care, and rehabilitation 
health facilities. This is a diploma-level course. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 8; Lab, 0; Clinical, 12; Semester 
Hours Credit, 12. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: NUR 101. 

NUR 103 Practical Nursing III 

This course focuses on use of nursing and related concepts 
by practical nurses as providers of care as well as members 
of the nursing discipline in collaboration with health team 
members. Emphasis is on the nursing process, wellness 
and illness patterns, entry-level issues, accountability, advo- 
cacy, professional development, evolving technology, and 
changing health care delivery systems. Upon completion, 
students should be able to use the nursing process to pro- 
mote, maintain, and restore optimum health for diverse 
clients throughout the life span. The clinical experience 
provides opportunities for beginning transition from stu- 
dent to practitioner on medical/surgical units and in pedi- 
atric facilities. This is a diploma-level course. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 6; Lab, 0; Clinical, 12; Semester Hours 
Credit, 10. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: NUR 102. 

NUR 105 Integrated LPN Refresher 

This refresher course is designed to provide a review for the 
previously licensed practical nurse whose license has 
lapsed. Emphasis is on common medical-surgical condi- 
tions and nursing interventions, including mental health 
principles, pharmacological concepts, and safe clinical 
practice. Upon completion, students will be eligible to 
apply for reinstatement of licensure. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 8; Lab, 6; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 
12. Prerequisite: Previous licensure as a Licensed Practical 
Nurse. Corequisite: None. 

NUR 110 Nursing I 

This course introduces concepts which are basic to begin- 
ning nursing practice. Emphasis is on introducing the 
nurse's role as provider of care, manager of care, and 
member of the nursing discipline. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate beginning competence 
in caring for individuals with common alterations in 
health. Theoretical emphasis is on the nursing process and 
the concepts of basic human needs, communication, as 
well as teaching and learning principles. Course Hours Per 



Course 
Descriptions 



Week: Class, 5; Lab, 3; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 8. 
Prerequisite: Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing 
program. Corequisites: BIO 168, CIS 113, and PSY 150. 

NUR120A Nursing II 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on developing the nurse's role as provider of 
care, manager of care, and member of the nursing disci- 
pline. Upon completion, students should be able to partici- 
pate in the delivery of nursing care for individuals with 
common alterations in health. Theoretical concentration 
involves utilizing the nursing process to provide therapeu- 
tic communication and nursing care for clients with men- 
tal health disorders. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2.5; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3-5. Prerequisite: 
NUR 110. Corequisites: BIO 169 and ENG 111. 

NUR120B Nursing II 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on developing the nurse's role as provider of 
care, manager of care, and member of the discipline of 
nursing. Upon completion, students should be able to par- 
ticipate in the delivery of nursing care for individuals with 
common alterations in health. Theoretical concentration 
involves utilizing the nursing process to provide therapeu- 
tic communication and nursing care for clients with select- 
ed medical/surgical disorders. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2.5; Lab, 3; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4.5. 
Prerequisite: NUR 110. Corequisites: BIO 169 and ENG 111. 

NUR 130 Nursing III 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on expanding the nurse's role as provider of 
care, manager of care, and member of the nursing disci- 
pline. Upon completion, students should be able to deliver 
nursing care to individuals with common alterations in 
health. Theoretical foci emphasize utilizing the nursing 
process to provide nursing care for clients with alterations 
in oxygenation, fluid, and electrolytes. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 4; Lab, 3; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 7. 
Prerequisites: NUR 120A and NUR 120B. Corequisite: SOC 
210. 



NUR 189 Nursing Transition 

This course is designed to assist the licensed practical nurse 
in transition to the role of the associate degree nurse. 
Topics include the role of the registered nurse, nursing 
process, homeostasis, and validation of selected nursing 
skills and physical assessment. Upon completion, students 
should be able to articulate into the Associate Degree 
Nursing program at the level of the generic student. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisites: BIO 168, CIS 113, and PSY 
150. Corequisite: None. 

NUR210A Nursing IV 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on using collaboration as a provider of care, 
manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. 
Upon completion, students should be able to modify nurs- 
ing care for individuals with common alterations in 
health. Theoretical foci emphasize the nursing process to 
provide nursing care for childbearing families. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2.5; Lab, 1.5; Clinical, 6; Semester 
Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: NUR 130. Corequisite: BIO 
275. 

NUR 21 OB Nursing W 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on using collaboration as a provider of care, 
manager of care, and member of the nursing discipline. 
Upon completion, students should be able to modify nurs- 
ing care for individuals with common alterations in 
health. Theoretical foci emphasize the nursing process to 
provide nursing care for clients with alterations in move- 
ment, cognition, and sensation. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2.5; Lab, 1.5; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 5. 
Prerequisite: NUR 130. Corequisite: BIO 275. 

NUR 220 Nursing V 

This course provides an expanded knowledge base for 
delivering nursing care to individuals of various ages. 
Emphasis is on the nurse's role as an independent provider 
and manager of care for a group of individuals and as a 
member of a multidisciplinary team. Upon completion, 
students should be able to provide comprehensive nursing 
care to a group of individuals with common complex 
health alterations. Theoretical concentration includes prin- 
ciples of leadership, management, and delegation while 
developing skills necessary for transition into professional 
practice. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 4; Lab, 3; Clinical, 
15; Semester Hours Credit, 10. Prerequisites: NUR 210A and 
NUR 210B. Corequisites: ENG 112 and humanities elective. 



106 



Operations Management 

OMT 112 Materials Management 

This course covers the basic principles of materials man- 
agement. Emphasis is on the planning, procurement, 
movement, and storage of materials. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding 
of the concepts and techniques related to materials man- 
agement. This course is a unique concentration require- 
ment of the Operations Management concentration in the 
Business Administration program. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

OMT 260 Issues in Operations Management 

This course presents a variety of topics that highlight con- 
temporary problems and issues related to operations man- 
agement. Emphasis is on production and operations plan- 
ning, environmental health and safety, materials manage- 
ment, and quality systems. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate the ability to make decisions 
and resolve problems in an operations management envi- 
ronment. This course is a unique concentration require- 
ment of the Operations Management concentration in the 
Business Administration program. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ISC 
121, ISC 131, ISC 210, and OMT 112. Corequisite: None. 

Opticianry 

OPH 101 Math for Opticians 

This course covers the arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and 
trigonometry necessary to evaluate optical formulas. Topics 
include signed arithmetic, evaluation and solution of 
equations, use of the calculator, and basic trigonometric 
functions. Upon completion, students should be able to 
evaluate formulas as used in opticianry courses. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Optical 
Apprentice or Optical Laboratory Mechanics program. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 102 Ophthalmic Lab Concepts 

This course introduces the operations of the ophthalmic 
laboratory. Emphasis is on surfacing and finishing formu- 
las; materials, procedures, and equipment used to fabricate 
glasses; and ANSI, EPA, and OSHA requirements. Upon 
completion, students should be able to perform laboratory- 
related calculations, describe safety and environmental 
regulations, and identify materials and procedures used in 
ophthalmic laboratories. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisites: 
Enrollment in the Optical Apprentice program and OPH 
101. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



OPH 111 Ophthalmic Lab I 

This course introduces optical laboratory practices and pro- 
cedures. Emphasis is on safety, OSHA and EPA require- 
ments, equipment and instrumentation, and lens fabrica- 
tion to ANSI standards. Upon completion, students should 
be able to duplicate lenses, use basic formulas, and identify 
materials and procedures used to safely fabricate prescrip- 
tion lenses to specifications. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Opticianry or Optical 
Laboratory Mechanics program. Corequisite: None. 

OPH 112 Ophthalmic Lab II 

This course continues the study of optical laboratory proce- 
dures introduced in OPH 111. Emphasis is on prescription 
interpretation, focimetry, and finishing techniques. Upon 
completion, students should be able to duplicate lenses, use 
intermediate formulas, and identify materials and proce- 
dures used to safely fabricate prescription eyewear to speci- 
fications. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: OPH 111. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 113 Ophthalmic Lab III 

This course continues the development of laboratory skills 
from OPH 112. Emphasis is on speed and accuracy in eye- 
glass fabrication, special fabrication techniques, and 
repairs. Upon completion, students should be able to use 
laboratory formulas and safely fabricate eyewear to specifi- 
cations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 6; Clinical, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OPH 112. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 121 Anatomy and Physiology - Eye 

This course covers the anatomical and physiological func- 
tions of the eye and its associated structures. Emphasis is 
on normal vision and common disorders of the visual sys- 
tem. Upon completion, students should be able to describe 
the visual process as well as label and describe the function 
of each part of the eye. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Opticianry, Optical Apprentice, or Optical 
Laboratory Mechanics program. Corequisite: None. 



OPH 131 Optical Dispensing I 

This course introduces the historical and modem dispens- 
ing practices and the laws governing opticianry. Topics 
include basic eyeglass choices, measurements, dispensing, 
adjustments, and record keeping. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to evaluate patient needs and wearing 
success. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Opticianry or Optical Apprentice programs. Corequisite: 
None. 

OPH 132 Optical Dispensing II 

This course continues the study of optical dispensing 
begun in OPH 131. Emphasis is on advanced dispensing 
skills. Upon completion, students should be able to design 
and dispense appropriate eyewear for a variety of patients. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OPH 131. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 140 Math for Opticians 

This course covers the arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and 
trigonometry necessary to evaluate optical formulas. Topics 
include signed arithmetic, evaluation and solution of 
equations, use of the calculator, and basic trigonometric 
functions. Upon completion, students should be able to 
evaluate formulas as used in opticianry courses. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Opticianry 
program. Corequisite: None. 

OPH 141 Optical Theory I 

This course introduces the principles of optics and oph- 
thalmic lens design. Topics include basic theory and basic 
optical formulas. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use the metric system, define basic optical terms, 
and perform basic optical calculations. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Opticianry, Optical 
Apprentice, or Optical Laboratory Mechanics programs. 
Corequisite: OPH 140 or OPH 101. 

OPH 142 Optical Theory II 

This course continues the study of optical theory begun in 
OPH 141. Topics include intermediate and advanced theory 
and formulas. Upon completion, students should be able to 
perform intermediate and advanced optical calculations. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: OPH 141. 
Corequisite: None. 



107 



OPH 193 Selected Topics in Opticianry 

This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of 
current interest in opticianry. Emphasis is on rigid and soft 
contact lens design and fitting. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate the competencies required to 
pass a written mock state board in contact lens. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Opticianry program. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 214 Ophthalmic Lab N 

This course is designed to develop competent performance 
in the ophthalmic laboratory. Emphasis is on safety, speed, 
and accuracy in focimetry and all aspects of laboratory 
procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate competence in the stated class objectives. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OPH 113. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 215 Laboratory Proficiency 

This course provides preparation for the N.C. State Board of 
Opticians Examination. Emphasis is on speed and accura- 
cy in all items on the competence list. Upon completion, 
students should be able to safely and accurately demon- 
strate proficiency in all items on the laboratory competence 
list. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OPH 214. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 222 Optical Business Management 

This course covers basic optical business management and 
current eyecare trends and practices. Topics include profes- 
sional ethics, inventory, accounting, personnel, insurance, 
advertising, litigation, equipment, and future trends. Upon 
completion, students should be able to apply basic princi- 
ples of management to the optical business setting. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Opticianry 
or Optical Laboratory Mechanics program. Corequisite: 
None. 

OPH 233 Advanced Optical Procedures 

This course introduces special optical procedures. Topics 
include advanced optical assessments and calculations. 
Upon completion, students should be able to describe 
appropriate patient care. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 2; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: 
OPH 131 and OPH 14 1. Corequisite: None. 

OPH 243 Technical Proficiency 

The course provides preparation for the N.C. State Board of 
Opticians Examination. Emphasis is on topics relevant to 



Course 
Descriptions 



written portions of this examination. Upon completion, 
students should be able to pass each part of a capstone 
examination with a grade of 70 or better. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the first four semes- 
ters of the Opticianry program. Corequisites: OPH 215 and 
OPH 262. 

OPH 251 Optical Internship I 

This course provides practical experience under the direct 
supervision of an opticianry instructor. Emphasis is on 
communication and dispensing skills. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate competence in all 
course objectives. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; 
Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: OPH 
132 and OPH l4l. Corequisite: None. 

OPH 252 Optical Internship II 

This course provides continued practical experience under 
the direct supervision of an Opticianry instructor. Emphasis 
is on communication and dispensing skills. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in 
all course objectives. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: OPH 
251. Corequisite: None. 

OPH 261 Contact Lenses I 

This course introduces contact lens fitting. Emphasis is on 
clinical applications, patient selection, design parameters, 
instrumentation, and corneal physiology. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to describe basic patient eval- 
uation and fitting procedures for rigid and soft lenses, rec- 
ognize problems, and determine effective and appropriate 
solutions. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: OPH 121. 
Corequisite: None. 

OPH 262 Contact Lenses II 

This course continues the study of contact lens fitting. 
Emphasis is on advanced fitting design and techniques. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
the competence required for the National Contact Lens 
Examination and the N.C. State Board of Opticians 
Examination. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: OPH 
26l. Corequisite: None. 



OPH 281 Optical Externship I 

This course provides practical experience in assigned busi- 
nesses, with emphasis on observation and practical appli- 
cation. Emphasis is on working conditions in different pro- 
duction settings and on time demands. Upon completion, 
students should be able to complete eyewear in a safe and 
timely manner according to proper specifications and in 
collaboration with other employees. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses in the 
first year of the Opticianry program or completion of 
appropriate Optical Laboratory Mechanics certificate pro- 
gram courses. Corequisite: OPH 214. 

OPH 282 Optical Externship I 

This course provides practical experience in assigned busi- 
nesses, with emphasis on observation and practical appli- 
cation. Emphasis is on working conditions in different pro- 
duction settings and on time demands. Upon completion, 
students should be able to complete eyewear in a safe and 
timely manner to proper specifications and in collabora- 
tion with other employees. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of all courses in the 
first year of the Opticianry program or completion of 
appropriate Optical Laboratory Mechanics certificate pro- 
gram courses. Corequisite: OPH 214. 

OPH 286 Optical Externship II 

This course continues the practical experience provided in 
OPH 281 or OPH 282. Emphasis is on customer relation 
skills as well as on fitting and dispensing skills for glasses 
and contact lenses. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate competence in all aspects of glasses 
and contact lens dispensing. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisites: OPH 26l and OPH 281 or OPH 282. 
Corequisite: OPH 262. 

Office Systems Technology 

OST131 Keyboarding 

This course covers basic keyboarding skills. Emphasis is on 
the touch system, correct techniques, and development of 
speed and accuracy. Upon completion, students should be 
able to key at acceptable speed and accuracy using the 
touch system. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



108 



OST 132 Keyboard Skill Building 

This course provides accuracy-building and speed-building 
drills. Emphasis is on diagnostic tests to identify accuracy 
and speed deficiencies followed by corrective drills. Upon 
completion, students should be able to keyboard rhythmi- 
cally with greater accuracy and speed. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: OST 131. Corequisite: None. 

OST 134 Text Entry and Formatting 

This course is designed to provide the skills needed to 
increase speed, improve accuracy, and format documents. 
Topics include letters, memos, tables, and business reports. 
Upon completion, students should be able to produce mail- 
able documents. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: OST 131. 
Corequisite: None. 

OST 135 Advanced Text Entry and Format 

This course is designed to incorporate computer applica- 
tion skills in the generation of office documents. Emphasis 
is on the production of letters, manuscripts, business forms, 
tabulation, legal documents, and newsletters. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to make independent deci- 
sions regarding planning, style, and method of presenta- 
tion. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: OST 134. Corequisite: None. 

OST 136 Word Processing 

This course introduces word processing concepts and appli- 
cations. Topics include preparation of a variety of docu- 
ments and mastery of specialized software functions. Upon 
completion, students should be able to work effectively in a 
computerized word processing environment. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

OST 148 Medical Coding Billing and 
Insurance 

This course introduces CPT and ICD coding as they apply 
to medical insurance and billing. Emphasis is on accuracy 
in coding, forms preparation, and posting. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to describe the steps of the 
total billing cycle and explain the importance of accuracy. 
This course is a unique concentration requirement of the 
Medical Office Systems Technology concentration in the 
Office Systems Technology program. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



OST 149 Medical Legal Issues 

This course introduces the complex legal, moral, and 
ethical issues involved in providing health care services. 
Emphasis is on the legal requirements of medical 
practices; the relationship of physician, patient, and office 
personnel; professional liabilities; and medical practice lia- 
bility. Upon completion, students should be able to demon- 
strate a working knowledge of current medical law and 
accepted ethical behavior. This course is a unique concen- 
tration requirement of the Medical Office Systems 
Technology concentration in the Office Systems 
Technology program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

OST 164 Text Editing Applications 

This course provides a comprehensive study of editing skills 
needed in the workplace. Emphasis is on grammar, punc- 
tuation, sentence structure, proofreading, and editing. 
Upon completion, students should be able to use reference 
materials to compose and edit text. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: 
ENG 111, OST 134, and OST 136. Corequisite: None. 

OST 181 Introduction to Office Systems 

This course introduces the skills and abilities needed in 
today's office. Topics include effectively interacting with co- 
workers and the public, processing simple financial and 
informational documents, and performing functions typi- 
cal in today's offices. Upon completion, students should be 
able to display skills and decision-making abilities essen- 
tial for functioning in the total office context. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: OCT 131. Corequisite: None. 

OST 184 Records Management 

This course includes the creation, maintenance, protection, 
security, and disposition of records stored in a variety of 
media forms. Topics include alphabetic, geographic, sub- 
ject, and numeric filing methods. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to set up and maintain a records 
management system. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 



OST 223 Machine Transcription I 

This course covers the use of transcribing machines to pro- 
duce mailable documents. Emphasis is on appropriate for- 
matting, advanced text editing skills, and transcription 
techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to 
transcribe documents into mailable copy. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisites: OST 134 or OST 136 or OST 164. Corequisite: 
None. 

OST 224 Machine Transcription II 

This course provides advanced transcription skills. 
Emphasis is on specialized transcription features. Upon 
completion, students should be able to transcribe complex 
business documents into mailable copy with minimal 
assistance. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OST 223. 
Corequisite: None. 

OST 233 Office Publications Design 

This course provides entry-level skills in using software 
with desktop publishing capabilities. Topics include princi- 
ples of page layout, desktop publishing terminology and 
applications, and legal and ethical considerations of soft- 
ware use. Upon completion, students should be able to 
design and produce professional business documents and 
publications. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: OST 136. 
Corequisite: None. 

OST 236 Advanced Word/Information 
Processing 

This course develops proficiency in the utilization of 
advanced word/information processing functions. Topics 
include tables, graphics, macros, sorting, document assem- 
bly, merging, and newspaper and brochure columns. Upon 
completion, students should be able to produce a variety of 
complex business documents. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit. 3- Prerequisite: OST 
136. Corequisite: None. 

OST 241 Medical Office Transcription I 

This course introduces machine transcription techniques 
as applied to medical documents. Emphasis is on accurate 
transcription, proofreading, and use of reference materials 
as well as vocabulary building. Upon completion, students 
should be able to prepare accurate and usable transcripts 
of voice recordings in the covered specialties. This course is 
a unique concentration requirement of the Medical Office 
Systems Technology concentration in the Office Systems 
Technology program. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: MED 121. 
Corequisite: None. 



109 



0ST242 Medical Office Transcription II 

This course continues building machine transcription 
techniques as applied to medical documents. Emphasis is 
on accurate transcription, proofreading, and use of refer- 
ence materials as well as continued proofreading/editing 
skills and vocabulary building. Upon completion, students 
should be able to perform competently in preparing accu- 
rate and usable transcripts of voice recordings in the cov- 
ered specialties. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: OST 241. 
Corequisite: None. 

OST 243 Medical Office Simulation 

This course introduces medical systems used to process 
information in the automated office. Topics include tradi- 
tional and electronic information resources, information 
storage and retrieval, and the billing cycle. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to use the computer accurate- 
ly to schedule, bill, update, and make corrections. This 
course is a unique concentration requirement of the 
Medical Office Systems Technology concentration in the 
Office Systems Technology program. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: OST 131 or OST 148. Corequisite: None. 

OST 284 Emerging Technologies 

This course provides opportunities to explore emerging 
technologies. Emphasis is on identifying, researching, and 
presenting current technological topics for class considera- 
tion and discussion. Upon completion, students should be 
able to understand the importance of keeping abreast of 
technological changes that affect the office professional. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

OST 286 Professional Development 

This course covers the personal competencies and qualities 
needed to project a professional image in the office. Topics 
include interpersonal skills, healthy lifestyles, appearance, 
attitude, personal and professional growth, multicultural 
awareness, and professional etiquette. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate these attributes in 
the classroom, office, and society. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

057" 289 Office Systems Management 

This course provides a capstone course for the office profes- 
sional. Topics include administrative office procedures, 
imaging, communication techniques, ergonomics, and 
equipment utilization. Upon completion, students should 
be able to function proficiently in a changing office envi- 
ronment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: OST 134 or OST 136 or OST 
164. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



Occupational Therapy 
Assistant 

OTA 110 Fundamentals of OT 

This course introduces occupational therapy theory, prac- 
tices, philosophies, and principles. Emphasis is on provid- 
ing a basic understanding of the profession as well as 
beginning to develop interaction and observation skills. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
basic understanding of occupational therapy practice 
options, uniform terminology, activity analysis, principles, 
process, philosophies, and frames of reference. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Corequisite: BIO 
168. 

OTA 120 OT Media I 

This course provides training in recognizing the therapeu- 
tic value of and in using a wide variety of leisure, self-care, 
and work activities. Topics include crafts, games, personal 
care and work activities as well as teaching and learning 
methods and styles. Upon completion, students should be 
able to design, select, and complete/perform leisure, self- 
care, and work activities that would be therapeutic for des- 
ignated client populations. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
1; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Occupational Therapy 
Assistant program. Corequisite: OTA 110. 

OTA 130 Assessment Skills 

This course provides training in appropriate and accurate 
assessment and intervention skills related to sensory, move- 
ment, perceptual/cognitive, affective systems, and ADL 
skills. Topics include kinesiology, body mechanics, sensory, 
ROM, MMT, cognitive/perceptual, psychosocial, self-care, 
and work-related assessments; treatment approaches; and 
basics of group structure and dynamics. Upon completion, 
students should be able to administer various assessment 
tools and appropriate treatment approaches regarding sen- 
sation, movement, perception/cognition, affect, self-care, 
and work-related skills. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; 
Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Occupational Therapy Assistant pro- 
gram. Corequisite: OTA 1 10. 



OTA 140 Professional Skills I 

This course introduces the roles and responsibilities of 
Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants and 
Occupational Therapists Registered in occupational thera- 
py practice and facilitates development of observation, doc- 
umentation, and therapeutic use of self skills. Topics 
include Code of Ethics, roles and responsibilities, creden- 
tialing and licensing, documentation, therapeutic use of 
self and professional identity/behavior, supervisory rela- 
tionships, time management, and observation skills. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
ethical behavior; discriminate between role and responsi- 
bilities of Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants and 
Occupational Therapists Registered; and participate in 
acceptable supervision, documentation, and scheduling. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the 
Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Corequisite: OTA 
110. 

OTA 150 Life Span Skills I 

This course is designed to use knowledge gained from PSY 
241 as it applies to occupational therapy practice from 
birth to adolescence. Topics include review of normal 
growth and development, identification and discussion of 
common disabilities and delays, assessment, treatment 
planning, and intervention approaches used with these 
populations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
identify and use assessments, screenings, and interventions 
for infants through adolescents for selected disabilities and 
developmental delays in various settings. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Occupational Therapy 
Assistant program. Corequisites: PSY 241 and OTA 170. 

OTA 161 Fieldwork I - Placement 1 

This course provides introductory-level clinical training 
opportunities. Emphasis is on observational and basic 
interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse 
client population. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use observational and interactional skills to relate 
effectively with clients under the guidance and direction of 
fieldwork supervisors. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: OTA 
120 and OTA 140. Corequisite: OTA 130. 

OTA 162 Fieldwork I - Placement 2 

This course provides introductory-level clinical training 
opportunities. Emphasis is on observational and basic 
interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse 
client population. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use observational and interactional skills to relate 
effectively with clients under the guidance and direction of 
fieldwork supervisors. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: OTA 
120 and OTA 140. Corequisite: OTA 130. 



110 



OTA 163 Fieldwork I - Placement 3 

This course provides introductory-level clinical training 
opportunities. Emphasis is on observational and basic 
interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse 
client population. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use observational and interactional skills to relate 
effectively with clients under the guidance and direction of 
fieldwork supervisors. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: OTA 
120 and OTA 140. Corequisite: OTA 130. 

OTA 164 Fieldwork I - Placement 4 

This course provides introductory-level clinical training 
opportunities. Emphasis is on observational and basic 
interactional skills in a setting with a culturally diverse 
client population. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use observational and interactional skills to relate 
effectively with clients under the guidance and direction of 
fieldwork supervisors. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisites: OTA 
120 and OTA 140. Corequisite: OTA 130. 

OTA 170 Physical Dysfunction 

This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills 
needed for working with individuals experiencing varied 
medical and physical conditions within their socioeconom- 
ic and cultural environments. Topics include medical ter- 
minology, common diagnoses, structures, and functions 
that change with disease processes, assessment and treat- 
ment priorities for specific problems and conditions, treat- 
ment planning, and intervention. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to recognize common symptoms, pri- 
oritize problems, and provide for patient safety and infec- 
tion control when planning and implementing treatment. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: BIO 168. 
Corequisite: OTA 130. 

OTA 180 Psychosocial Dysfunction 

This course uses theories and principles related to psycho- 
logical/psychiatric health and illnesses as well as provides 
training in assessing and treating symptoms of dysfunction 
and therapeutic use of self and groups. Topics include psy- 
chiatric illnesses, symptoms of dysfunction, assessment and 
treatment of individuals, planning and facilitating thera- 
peutic groups, client safety, and psychosocial aspects of 
practice. Upon completion, students should be able to plan 
effectively and conduct individual and group treatment for 
client conditions related to psychosocial dysfunction recog- 
nizing temporal, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: PSY 281. 
Corequisite: OTA 130. 



Course 
Descriptions 



OTA 220 OT Medial! 

This course provides training in appropriate and accurate 
assessment and intervention skills related to orthotics, 
prostlietics, assistive devices, environmental controls, and 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) issues. Topics include 
ergonomics and hand function, splint selection/fabrica- 
tion, changes that improve access for persons with disabili- 
ties, use of modalities in treatment, and computers in 
occupational therapy intervention. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate proficiency in fabricat- 
ing and monitoring orthotic devices, constructing and 
modifying assistive devices, using ADA guidelines, and 
using computers for therapeutic purposes. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: OTA 120 and OTA 130. Corequisite: 
None. 

OTA 240 Professional Skills II 

This course builds upon and expands skills developed in 
OTA 140 with emphasis on documentation, supervisory 
relationships, involvement in the profession, and clinical 
management skills. Topics include clarification of roles 
and responsibilities, detailed examination of the superviso- 
ry process, professional participation in organizations, and 
the mechanics of assisting in clinic operations. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to work effectively with a 
supervisor, plan and implement a professional activity, and 
perform routine clinic management tasks. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: OTA 140. Corequisite: None. 

OTA 245 Professional Skills III 

This course provides preparation for Fieldwork II experi- 
ences using skills and knowledge gained in OTA 140 and 
OTA 240 to promote integration into the professional com- 
munity. Topics include interview skills, resume production, 
conflict resolution, professional presentations, participation 
in research activities, and completion of all fomis required 
for Fieldwork II. Upon completion, students should be able 
to complete independently employment-seeking activities 
and provide in-service training. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: OTA 240. Corequisite: None. 

OTA 250 Life Span Skills II 

This course uses knowledge gained from PSY 241 as it 
applies to occupational therapy practice from young adult- 
hood through old age. Emphasis is on identification and 



discussion of common disabilities and chronic diseases, 
assessments, planning and interventions used with these 
populations, and activity programming. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify and use assessments, 
interventions, and activities for adults with selected disabil- 
ities and losses in various settings. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Occupational Therapy 
Assistant program. Corequisites: PSY 241, OTA 170, and 
OTA 180. 

OTA 260 Fieldwork II - Placement 1 

This course provides clinical experience under the direct 
supervision of experienced Occupational Therapist 
Registered or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant per- 
sonnel working in various practice settings. Emphasis is on 
final clinical preparation for entry-level practice in the pro- 
fession. Upon completion, students should be able to meet 
all critical competencies established by the curriculum and 
the American Occupational Therapy Association guidelines 
for entry-level practice. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 18; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: 
Successful completion of all required OTA curriculum 
courses except OTA 26 1 and OTA 280. Corequisite: This 
course must be completed within 18 months of the com- 
pletion of all other OTA course work. 

OTA 261 Fieldwork II - Placement 2 

This course provides clinical experience under the direct 
supervision of experienced Occupational Therapist 
Registered or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant per- 
sonnel working in various practice settings. Emphasis is on 
final clinical preparation for entry-level practice in the pro- 
fession. Upon completion, students should be able to meet 
all critical competencies established by the curriculum and 
the American Occupational Therapy Association guidelines 
for entry-level practice. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 18; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: 
Successful completion of all required OTA curriculum 
courses except OTA 260 and OTA 280. Corequisite: This 
course must be completed within 18 months of the com- 
pletion of all other OTA course work. 

OTA 280 Professional Transitions 

This course provides closure to the educational program 
following Fieldwork II placements. Emphasis is on portfo- 
lio development and presentation, program evaluation, 
Fieldwork II experience analysis and synthesis, and final 
preparation for the certification examination. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to enter the occupational 
therapy work force with supportive documentation demon- 
strating progress toward meeting critical competencies set 
forth by the curriculum. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; 
Lab, 2; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: 
OTA 260 or OTA 26l. Corequisite: Enrollment in either OTA 
260 or OTA 261. 



Ill 



Phlebotomy 

PBT100 Phlebotomy Technology 

This course provides instruction in the skills needed for the 
proper collection of blood and other specimens used for 
diagnostic testing. Emphasis is on ethics, legalities, med- 
ical terminology, safety and universal precautions, health 
care delivery systems, patient relations, anatomy and physi- 
ology, and specimen collection. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate competence in the theoreti- 
cal comprehension of phlebotomy techniques. This is a 
certificate-level course. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; 
Lab, 2; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Phlebotomy Technology program. 
Corequisites: PBT 101 and PSY 118. 

PBT 101 Phlebotomy Practicum 

This course provides supervised experience in the perform- 
ance of venipuncture and microcollection techniques in a 
clinical facility. Emphasis is on patient interaction and 
application of universal precautions, proper collection 
techniques, special procedures, specimen handling, and 
data management. Upon completion, students should be 
able to perform safely the procedures necessary for speci- 
men collections on patients in various health care settings. 
This is a certificate-level course. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 9; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Phlebotomy Technology 
program. Corequisites: PBT 100 and PSY 118. 

Physical Education 

PED 111 Physical Fitness I 

This course provides an individualized approach to physi- 
cal fitness utilizing the five major components. Emphasis 
is on the scientific basis for setting up and engaging in per- 
sonalized physical fitness programs. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to set up and implement an individu- 
alized physical fitness program. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PED 113 Aerobics I 

This course introduces a program of cardiovascular fitness 
involving continuous, rhythmic exercise. Emphasis is on 
developing cardiovascular efficiency, strength, and flexibili- 
ty as well as learning safety precautions. Upon completion, 
students should be able to select and implement a rhyth- 
mic aerobic exercise program. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Semester 
Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



PED 114 Aerobics II 

This course provides a continuation of a program of car- 
diovascular fitness involving rhythmic exercise. Emphasis 
is on a wide variety of aerobic activities which include car- 
diovascular efficiency, strength, and flexibility. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to participate in and 
design a rhythmic aerobic exercise routine. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: PED 113. 
Corequisite: None. 

PED 121 Walk, Jog, Run 

This course covers the basic concepts involved in safely and 
effectively improving cardiovascular fitness. Emphasis is on 
walking, jogging, or running as a means of achieving fit- 
ness. Upon completion, students should be able to under- 
stand and appreciate the benefits derived from these activi- 
ties. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PED 128 Golf - Beginning 

This course emphasizes the fundamentals of golf. Topics 
include the proper grips, stance, alignment, and swings for 
the short and long game; putting; and the rules and eti- 
quette of golf. Upon completion, students should be able to 
perform the basic golf shots and demonstrate a knowledge 
of the rules and the etiquette of golf. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PED 130 Tennis - Beginning 

This course emphasizes the fundamentals of tennis. Topics 
include basic strokes, rules, etiquette, and court play. Upon 
completion, students should be able to play recreational 
tennis. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



PED 139 Bowling - Beginning 

This course introduces the fundamentals of bowling. 
Emphasis is on ball selection, grips, stance, and delivery 
along with rules and etiquette. Upon completion, students 
should be able to participate in recreational bowling. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

PED 142 Lifetime Sports 

This course is designed to give an overview of a variety of 
sports activities. Emphasis is on the skills and rules to par- 
ticipate in a variety of lifetime sports. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of the 
importance of participating in lifetime sports activities. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class,0; Lab 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1, Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

PED 143 Volleyball - Beginning 

This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. 
Emphasis is on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spik- 
ing, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. 
Upon completion, students should be able to participate in 
recreational volleyball. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PED 145 Basketball - Beginning 

This course covers the fundamentals of basketball. 
Emphasis is on skills development, knowledge of the rules, 
and basic game strategy. Upon completion, students should 
be able to participate in recreational basketball. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

PED 148 Softball 

This course introduces the fundamental skills and rules of 
softball. Emphasis is on proper techniques and strategies 
for playing softball. Upon completion, students should be 
able to participate in recreational softball. This course has 
been approved to satisfy' the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 



112 



PED 162 Angling 

This course introduces the sport of angling. Emphasis is on 
fishing with the use of artificial lures. Upon completion, 
students should he able to cast and retrieve using baitcaster 
and spinning reels as well as identify the various types of 
artificial lures. Students also use fly rods and fish with live 
bait. A North Carolina fishing license is required. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective 
course requirement. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: 
None. 

PED 172 Outdoor Living 

This course is designed to acquaint the beginning camper 
with outdoor skills. Topics include camping techniques 
such as cooking and preserving food, safety, and setting up 
camp. Upon completion, students should be able to set up 
camp sites in field experiences using proper procedures. 
Students also learn backpacking techniques and how to 
prepare for overnight backpacking trips. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 1; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

PED 183 Folk Dancing 

This course teaches the fundamental folk dance move- 
ments along with cultural traditions from various coun- 
tries. Emphasis is on the history and traditions of the folk 
dance as well as the movements and the dances them- 
selves. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate folk dances as well as knowledge of their ori- 
gins and cultural traditions. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Lab, 2. Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

Philosophy 

PHI 215 Philosophical Issues 

This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy 
by considering the views of classical and contemporary 
philosophers. Emphasis is on knowledge and belief, 
appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith 
and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify, analyze, and critique 
the philosophical components of an issue. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 111. 
Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



PHI 240 Introduction to Ethics 

This course introduces theories about the nature and foun- 
dations of moral judgments as well as applications to con- 
temporary moral issues. Emphasis is on utilitarianism, 
rule-based ethics, existentialism, relativism versus objec- 
tivism, and egoism. Upon completion, students should be 
able to apply various ethical theories to individual moral 
issues such as euthanasia, abortion, crime and punish- 
ment, and justice. This course has been approved to satis- 
fy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisite: ENG 111. Corequisite: None. 

Pharmacy 

PHM 110 Introduction to Pharmacy 

This course introduces pharmacy practice and the techni- 
cian's role in a variety of pharmacy settings. Topics include 
medical terminology and abbreviations, drug delivery sys- 
tems, law and ethics, prescription and medication orders, 
and the health care system. Upon completion, students 
should be able to explain the role of pharmacy technicians, 
read and interpret drug orders, describe quality assurance, 
and utilize pharmacy references. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Pharmacy Technology pro- 
gram. Corequisites: PHM 111 and PHM 115. 

PHM 111 Pharmacy Practice I 

This course provides instruction in the technical proce- 
dures for preparing and dispensing drugs in the hospital 
and retail settings under supervision of a registered phar- 
macist. Topics include drug packaging and labeling, out- 
patient dispensing, hospital dispensing procedures, con- 
trolled substance procedures, inventory control, and non- 
sterile compounding. Upon completion, students should be 
able to perform basic supervised dispensing techniques in a 
variety of pharmacy settings. Course Hour Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Pharmacy Technology pro- 
gram. Corequisites: PHM 110 and PHM 115. 

PHM 112 Pharmacy Practice II 

This course provides continued instruction in the technical 
procedures for preparing and dispensing drugs in the hos- 
pital setting under a pharmacist's supervision. Topics 



include more detailed coverage of unit-dose dispensing, 
ward stock systems, materials management, automated 
dispensing, and quality assurance. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to perform all technical aspects of 
hospital drug delivery systems. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; .Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisites: PHM 110, PHM 111, and PHM 115. 
Corequisite: None. 

PHM 115 Pharmacy Calculations 

This course provides an introduction to the metric, avoir- 
dupois, and apothecary systems of measurement and the 
calculations used in pharmacy practice. Topics include 
ratio and proportion, dosage determinations, percentage 
preparations, reducing and enlarging fonnulas, dilution 
and concentration, aliquots, specific gravity and density, 
and flow rates. Upon completion, students should be able 
to perform correctly the calculations required to prepare a 
medication order properly. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: 
Enrollment in the Pharmacy Technology program. 
Corequisites: PHM 1 10 and PHM 1 1 1 or permission of the 
program director. 

PHM 118 Sterile Products 

This course provides an introduction to intravenous 
admixture preparation and other sterile products, includ- 
ing total parenteral nutrition and chemotherapy. Topics 
include aseptic techniques; facilities, equipment, and sup- 
plies utilized in admixture preparation; incompatibility 
and stability; laminar flow hoods; immunizations and irri- 
gation solutions; and quality assurance. Upon completion, 
students should be able to describe and demonstrate the 
steps involved in preparing intermittent and continuous 
infusions, total parenteral nutrition, and chemotherapy. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: PHM 1 10, PHM 
111, and PHM 115. Corequisite: None. 

PHM 120 Pharmacology I 

This course introduces the study of the properties, effects, 
and therapeutic value of the primary agents in the major 
drug categories. Topics include nutritional products, blood 
modifiers, hormones, diuretics, cardiovascular agents, res- 
piratory drugs, and gastrointestinal agents. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to place major drugs into cor- 
rect therapeutic categories and identify indications, side 
effects, and trade and generic names. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0: Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Phamiacy Technology pro- 
gram or permission of the program director. Corequisite: 
None. 



113 



PHM 125 Pharmacology II 

This course provides a continuation of the study of the 
properties, effects, and therapeutic value of the primary 
agents in the major drug categories. Topics include auto- 
nomic and central nervous system agents, anti-inflamma- 
tory agents, and anti-infective drugs. Upon completion, 
students should be able to place major drugs into correct 
therapeutic categories and identify indications, side effects, 
and trade and generic names. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: PHM 120 or permission of the program direc- 
tor. Corequisite: None. 

PHM 138 Pharmacy Clinical 

This course provides an opportunity to work in pharmacy 
settings under a pharmacist's supervision. Emphasis is on 
communicating effectively with personnel, developing 
proper employee attitude, and dispensing medications. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an understanding of pharmacy operations, utilize refer- 
ences, dispense medications, prepare patient charges, and 
operate computers efficiently. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 24; Semester Hours Credit, 8. 
Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Pharmacy Technology 
program, PHM 112, PHM 118, and PHM 120. Corequisite: 
Reference program plan of study. 

PHM 140 Trends in Pharmacy 

This course covers the major issues, trends, and concepts in 
contemporary pharmacy practice. Topics include profes- 
sional ethics, continuing education, job placement, and 
the latest developments in pharmacy technician practice. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a 
basic knowledge of the topics discussed. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisites: PHM 112, PHM 118, and PHM 120. 
Corequisite: Pharmacy Clinical as per program plan of 
study (PHM 138). 

Physical Science 

PHS 121 Applied Physical Science I 

This course introduces the general principles of physics 
and chemistry. Topics include measurement, motion, 
Newton's laws of motion, momentum, energy, work, power, 
heat, thermodynamics, waves, sound, light, electricity, 
magnetism, and chemical principles. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate an understanding 
of the physical environment and be able to apply the scien- 
tific principles to observations experienced. This course 
includes concepts of chemistry and physics that apply to 
dental materials; laboratory work reinforces the principles 
discussed in lecture. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: MAT 060 and 
RED 080 or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



Physics 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on the college's placement testing policies and 
procedures. Students should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

PHY 121 Applied Physics I 

This algebra-based course introduces fundamental physi- 
cal concepts as applied to industrial and service technology 
fields. Topics include systems of units, problem-solving 
methods, graphical analyses, vectors, motion, forces, 
Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, power, momentum, 
and properties of matter. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles 
studied as applied in industrial and service fields. 
Laboratory experiments and computer-based exercises 
enhance and consolidate the basic principles of physics as 
used in the industrial and service fields. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisites: MAT 060 and RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

PHY 125 Health Sciences Physics 

This course introduces fundamental physical principles as 
they apply to health technologies. Topics include motion, 
force, work, power, simple machines, and other topics as 
required by students' area of study. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate an understanding of 
the fundamental principles covered as they relate to practi- 
cal applications in the health sciences. Laboratory experi- 
ments and computer-based tutorials consolidate the basic 
principles of physics as applied to health-related sciences. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisites: MAT 070 and RED 090 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: None. 

PHY 131 Physics - Mechanics 

This algebra/trigonometry-based course introduces funda- 
mental physical concepts as applied to engineering tech- 
nology fields. Topics include systems of units, problem- 
solving methods, graphical analysis, vectors, motion, 
forces, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, power, 
momentum, and properties of matter. Upon completion, 
students should be able to apply the principles studied to 
applications in engineering technology fields. Laboratory 
experiments and computer-based tutorials consolidate the 



basic principles of physics that are used in the engineering 
field. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test and MAT 121. Corequisite: None. 

PHY 145 Geometrical Optics 

This course introduces waves, energy, thermal properties of 
materials, and geometrical optics. Topics include thermal 
expansion, calorimetry, electromagnetic waves, geometrical 
optics, and other appropriate areas. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate an understanding of 
the concepts studied and relate them to practical applica- 
tions. Laboratory experiments and computer-based tutori- 
als consolidate the basic principles of geometrical optics as 
applied to opticianry physics. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: 
MAT 070 and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement 
test and OPH 142. Corequisite: None. 

PHY 151 College Physics I 

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathe- 
matical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that 
describe the physical world. Topics include units and meas- 
urement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, 
power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of the principles involved and display analytical 
problem-solving ability for the topics covered. Laboratory 
experiments, along with some computer-based labs and 
tutorials, consolidate the basic principles discussed in lec- 
tures. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in natural sciences/mathe- 
matics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester 
Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisites: RED 090 or satisfactory score 
on placement test and MAT 172. Corequisite: None. 

PHY 152 College Physics II 

This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathe- 
matical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that 
describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic 
forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-cunent cir- 
cuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnet- 
ic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of the principles involved and display ana- 
lytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. 
Laboratory experiments, along with some computer-based 
labs and tutorials, consolidate the basic principles dis- 
cussed in lectures. This course has been approved to satis- 
fy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in natural sci- 
ences/mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 
2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: PHY 151. 
Corequisite: None. 



114 



PHY 251 General Physics I 

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to 
introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the phys- 
ical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector 
operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, 
momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid 
mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles 
involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for 
the topics covered. Laboratory experiments, some of which 
are computer-based, and computer-based tutorials enhance 
and consolidate the basic principles discussed in the theo- 
retical section of the course. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in natural sciences-mathematics. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisites: RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement 
test and MAT 271. Corequisite: MAT 272. 

PHY 252 General Physics II 

This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to 
introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the phys- 
ical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, 
electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic 
forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alter- 
nating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate an understanding of 
the principles involved and display analytical problem- 
solving ability for the topics covered. Laboratory experi- 
ments, some of which are computer-based, and computer- 
based tutorials enhance and consolidate the basic princi- 
ples discussed in the theoretical section of the course. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in natural sciences-mathematics. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisites: MAT 272 and PHY 251. Corequisite: None. 

Political Science 

POL 120 American Government 

This course is a study of the origins, development, struc- 
ture, and functions of American national government. 
Topics include the constitutional framework; federalism; 
the three branches of government, including the bureau- 
cracy; civil rights and liberties; political participation and 
behavior; and policy formation. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the 
basic concepts and participatory processes of the American 
political system. Basic concepts of state and local govern- 
ment and their relationships with the federal government 
are also examined. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in social/behav- 
ioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 



Course 
Descriptions 



Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 
080 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: 
ENG 090 and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

POL 130 State and Local Government 

This course includes state and local political institutions 
and practices in the context of American federalism. 
Emphasis is on procedural and policy differences as well as 
on political issues in state, regional, and local governments 
of North Carolina. Upon completion, students should be 
able to identify and discuss various problems associated 
with intergovernmental politics and their effect on the 
community and the individual. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: None. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

Psychology 

PSY110 Life Span Development 

This course provides an introduction to the study of 
human growth and development. Emphasis is on the phys- 
ical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development 
from conception to death. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development 
across the life span and apply this knowledge to their spe- 
cific field of study. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 
080 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
None. 

PSY 1 18 Interpersonal Psychology 

This course introduces the principles of psychology as they 
relate to personal and professional development. Emphasis 
is on personality traits, communication and leadership 
styles, effective problem solving, and cultural diversity as 
they apply to personal and work environments. Upon com- 
pletion, students should be able to demonstrate an under- 
standing of these principles of psychology as they apply to 
personal and professional development. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisite: None. 



PSY 135 Group Processes 

This course provides an examination of group dynamics 
and structure. Topics include team-building, interpersonal 
communication, leadership, decision making, and prob- 
lem solving Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary for effec- 
tive group participation. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 090, 
090A and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 

PSY 150 General Psychology 

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of 
human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, 
biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, 
cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social 
psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge 
of the science of psychology. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: RED 
090 or satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisite: 
ENG 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

PSY 237 Social Psychology 

This course introduces the study of individual behavior 
within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude 
formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, 
attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
an understanding of the basic principles of social influ- 
ences on behavior. Emphasis is on the application of prin- 
ciples as they relate to contemporary social issues. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisite: PSY 150 or SOC 210. Corequisite: None. 

PSY 241 Developmental Psychology 

This course is a study of human growth and development. 
Emphasis is on major theories and perspectives as they 
relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of 
development from conception to death. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of devel- 
opment across the life span. Course work includes projects 
which emphasize research. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: PSY 
150. Corequisite: None. 



115 



PSY 263 Educational Psychology 

This course examines the application of psychological the- 
ories and principles to the educational process and setting. 
Topics include learning and cognitive theories, achieve- 
ment motivation, teaching and learning styles, teacher and 
learner roles, assessment, and developmental issues. Upon 
completion, students should be able to demonstrate an 
understanding of the application of psychological theory to 
educational practice. This course has been approved to 
satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course work 
includes projects. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: PSY 150. 
Corequisite: None. 

PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology 

This course provides an examination of the various psy- 
chological disorders as well as theoretical, clinical, and 
experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. 
Emphasis is on terminology, classification, etiology, assess- 
ment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to distinguish between nor- 
mal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demon- 
strate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic 
techniques. Course work includes projects. This course has 
been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement for the general education core requirement 
in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: PSY 
150. Corequisite: None. 

Respiratory Care 

RCP 110 Introduction to Respiratory Care 

This course introduces the respiratory care profession. 
Topics include the role of the respiratory care practitioner, 
medical gas administration, basic patient assessment, 
infection control, and medical terminology. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in 
concepts and procedures through written and laboratory 
evaluations. Introductory concepts in respiratory anatomy 
and physiology are covered. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Respiratory Care program. 
Corequisite: RCP 132. 

RCP 111 Therapeutics/Diagnostics 

This course is a continuation of RCP 1 10. Emphasis is on 
entry-level therapeutic and diagnostic procedures used in 
respiratory care. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures 
through written and laboratory evaluations. Concepts in 
respiratory pharmacology are covered. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 4; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. 
Prerequisite: RCP 110. Corequisite: RCP 145. 



Course 
Descriptions 



RCP 112 Patient Management 

This course provides entry-level skills in adult and pediatric 
mechanical ventilation as well as respiratory care proce- 
dures in traditional and alternative settings. Emphasis is 
on therapeutic modalities and physiological effects of car- 
diopulmonary rehabilitation, home care, mechanical ven- 
tilation, and monitoring. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and 
procedures through written and laboratory evaluations. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: RCP 111. 
Corequisite: RCP 155. 

RCP 115 C-P Pathophysiology 

This course introduces the etiology, pathogenesis, and 
physiology of cardiopulmonary diseases and disorders. 
Emphasis is on clinical signs and symptoms along with 
diagnoses, complications, prognoses, and management. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
competence in these concepts through written evaluations. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: BIO 168. 
Corequisite: None. 

RCP 132 RCP Clinical Practice I 

This course provides entry-level clinical experience. 
Emphasis is on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
clinical competence in required performance evaluations. 
Topics include basic Cardiac Life Support, Universal 
Precautions, patient assessment techniques, oxygen, 
humidity, and aerosol delivery devices. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 6; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Respiratory Care program. 
Corequisite: RCP 110. 

RCP 145 RCP Clinical Practice II 

This course provides entry-level clinical experience. 
Emphasis is on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
clinical competence in required performance evaluations. 
Medicated aerosol administration, pulmonary clearance 
mechanisms, and artificial airway maintenance are 
emphasized. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; 
Clinical, 15; Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: RCP 
110. Corequisite: RCP 111. 



RCP 155 RCP Clinical Practice III 

This course provides entry-level clinical experience. 
Emphasis is on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. 
Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate 
clinical competence in required performance evaluations. 
Equipment and techniques for intermittent, non-invasive, 
and invasive mechanical ventilation are introduced. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 15; 
Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: RCP 111. 
Corequisite: RCP 112. 

RCP 210 Critical Care Concepts 

This course provides further refinement of acute patient 
care and underlying pathophysiology. Topics include a 
continuation in the study of mechanical ventilation, 
underlying pathophysiology, and introduction of critical 
care monitoring. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures 
through written and laboratory evaluations. This course 
also covers knowledge and skills the student must have to 
provide respiratory care for neonatal and pediatric patients. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; 
Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: Successful comple- 
tion of three semesters of the Respiratory Care program. 
Corequisite: RCP 235. 

RCP 21 1 Advanced Monitoring/Procedures 

This course includes advanced information gathering and 
decision making for the respiratory care professional. 
Topics include advanced cardiac monitoring and special 
procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to 
evaluate, design, and recommend appropriate care plans 
through written and laboratory evaluations. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisite: RCP 210. Corequisite: RCP 245. 

RCP 215 Career Prep - Advanced Level 

This course provides preparation for employment and for 
the advanced-level practitioner credentialing exam. 
Emphasis is on review of the NBRC Advanced-Level 
Practitioner Exam as well as on supervision and manage- 
ment. Upon completion, students should be able to com- 
plete successfully the appropriate self-assessment examina- 
tions and meet the requirements for employment. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 3; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Respiratory 
Care program. Corequisite: None. 



116 



RCP 235 RCP Clinical Practice IV 

This course provides advanced practitioner clinical experi- 
ence. Emphasis is on therapeutic and diagnostic patient 
care. Upon completion, students should be able to demon- 
strate clinical competence in required performance evalua- 
tions. Advanced concepts in adult mechanical ventilation 
as well as equipment and techniques for pediatric and 
neonatal mechanical ventilation are introduced. Course 
Hour Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 15; Semester 
Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisites: RCP 111 and RCP 112. 
Corequisite: RCP 210. 

RCP 245 RCP Clinical Practice V 

This course provides advanced practitioner clinical experi- 
ence. Emphasis is on therapeutic and diagnostic patient 
care. Upon completion, students should be able to demon- 
strate clinical competence in required performance evalua- 
tions. Adult, pediatric, and neonatal critical care experi- 
ences are continued; and invasive and noninvasive moni- 
toring devices are discussed. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 15; Semester Hours Credit, 5. 
Prerequisite: RCP 210. Corequisite: RCP 211. 

Real Estate Appraisal 

REA 101 Introduction Real Estate 
Appraisal R-l 

This course introduces the entire valuation process, with 
specific coverage of residential neighborhood and property 
analysis. Topics include basic real property law, concepts of 
value and operation of real estate markets, mathematical 
and statistical concepts, finance, and residential construc- 
tion/design. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate adequate preparation for REA 102. This 
course is required for the Real Estate Appraisal certificate. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

REA 102 Valuation Principles and 
Practice R-2 

This course introduces procedures used to develop an esti- 
mate of value and introduces how the various principles of 
value relate to the application of such procedures. Topics 
include the sales comparison approach, site valuation, 
sales comparison, the cost approach, the income approach, 
and reconciliation. Upon completion, students should be 
able to complete the Uniform Residential Appraisal Report 
(URAR). This course is required for the Real Estate 
Appraisal certificate. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 
0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: REA 101. 
Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



REA 103 Applied Residential Property 
Valuation R-3 

This course covers the laws and standards practiced by 
appraisers in the appraisal of residential 1-4 unit properties 
and small farms. Topics include Financial Institutions 
Reform and Recovery Enforcement Act (FIRREA), Uniform 
Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), and 
North Carolina statutes and rules. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to demonstrate eligibility to sit for the 
N.C. Appraisal Board license trainee examination and to 
enroll in REA 201. This course is required for the Real 
Estate Appraisal certificate. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: REA 102. 
Corequisite: None. 

REA 201 Introduction Income Property 
Appraisal G-l 

This course introduces concepts and techniques used to 
appraise real estate income properties. Topics include real 
estate market analysis, property analysis and site valuation, 
how to use financial calculators, present value, NOI, and 
before-tax cash flow. Upon completion, students should be 
able to estimate income property values using direct capi- 
talization and to sit for the N.C. Certified Residential 
Appraiser examination. This course is required for the Real 
Estate Appraisal certificate. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: REA 103. 
Corequisite: None. 

REA 202 Advanced Income Capital 
Procedures G-2 

This course expands direct capitalization techniques and 
introduces yield capitalization. Topics include yield rates, 
discounted cash flow, financial leverage, and traditional 
yield capitalization formulas. Upon completion, students 
should be able to estimate the value of income-producing 
property by using yield capitalization techniques. This 
course is required for the Real Estate Appraisal certificate. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: REA 201. Corequisite: A financial 
calculator is required for this course. 

REA 203 Applied Income Property 
Valuation G-3 

This course covers the laws, rules, and standards pertaining 
to the principles and practices applicable to the appraisal 
of income properties. Topics include FIRREA, USPAP, 
Uniform Commercial and Industrial Appraisal Report 



(UC1AR) form, North Carolina statutes and rules, and case 
studies. Upon completion, students should be able to pre- 
pare a narrative report that conforms to the USPAP and sit 
for the N.C. Certified General Appraisal examination. This 
course is required for the Real Estate Appraisal certificate. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: REA 202. Corequisite: None. 

Reading 

Initial student placement in developmental courses is 
based on the college's placement testing policies and 
procedures. Student should begin developmental 
course work at the appropriate level indicated by the 
college's placement test. 

RED 070 Essential Reading Skills 

This course is designed for those with limited reading 
skills. Emphasis is on basic word attack skills, vocabulary, 
transitional words, paragraph organization, basic compre- 
hension skills, and learning strategies. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate competence in the 
skills required for RED 080. Emphasis is also on demon- 
strating successful academic skills and using current mate- 
rials such as a newspaper. This course does not satisfy the 
developmental reading prerequisite for ENG 111. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None. 

RED 080 Introduction to College Reading 

This course introduces effective reading and inferential 
thinking skills in preparation for RED 090. Emphasis is on 
vocabulary, comprehension, and reading strategies. Upon 
completion, students should be able to determine main 
ideas and supporting details, recognize basic patterns of 
organization, draw conclusions, and understand vocabu- 
lary in context. Emphasis is also on demonstrating suc- 
cessful academic behaviors and using diverse materials 
such as periodicals. This course does not satisfy the devel- 
opmental reading prerequisite for ENG 1 1 1 . Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: ENG 075 or RED 070. Corequisite: None. 

RED 090 Improved College Reading 

This course is designed to improve reading and critical 
thinking skills. Topics include vocabulary enhancement; 
extracting implied meaning; analyzing author's purpose, 
tone, and style; and drawing conclusions and responding 
to written material. Upon completion, students should be 
able to comprehend and analyze college-level reading 
material. Some sections may specialize in discipline-specif- 
ic reading and academic success skills This course satisfies 
the developmental reading prerequisite for ENG 111. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 4. Prerequisite: RED 080 or ENG 085. Corequisite: 
None. 



117 



RED 111 Critical Reading for College 

This course is designed to enhance critical reading skills. 
Topics include vocabulary enrichment; reading flexibility; 
metacognitive strategies; and advanced comprehension 
skills, including analysis and evaluation. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehen- 
sion and analysis as well as respond effectively to material 
across disciplines. Some sections may be paired with other 
courses. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisite: RED 090. Corequisite: None. 

Religion 

RELUO World Religions 

This course introduces the world's major religious tradi- 
tions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon comple- 
tion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, 
beliefs, and practices of the religions studied. Major topics 
include the role of women in the various religions, the 
relationship between religion and science, and the involve- 
ment of religion in world peace and in preservation of the 
environment. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the gener- 
al education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. Corequisite: ENG 090 and 
RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

REL 211 Introduction to Old Testament 

This course is a survey of the literature of the Hebrews with 
readings from the law, prophets, and other writings. 
Emphasis is on the use of literary, historical, archeological, 
and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be 
able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and under- 
stand Old Testament literature. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement general education core requirement in 
humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; 
Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090. Corequisite: None. 

Real Estate 

RLS 1 12 Real Estate Fundamentals 

This course provides basic instruction in real estate princi- 
ples and practices. Topics include law, finance, brokerage, 
closing, valuation, management, taxation, mathematics, 
construction, land use, property insurance, and NC License 
Law and Commission Rules. Upon completion, students 
should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills 
necessary for real estate sales. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 4; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 4. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 



Course 
Descriptions 



RLS 113 Real Estate Mathematics 

This course provides basic instruction in business mathe- 
matics applicable to real estate situations. Topics include 
area computations, percentage of profit/loss, bookkeeping 
and accounting methods, appreciation and depreciation, 
financial calculations and interest yields, property valua- 
tion, insurance, taxes, and commissions. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in 
applied real estate mathematics. Course Hours Per Week: 
Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: 
None. Corequisite: None. 

RLS 114 Real Estate Brokerage 

This course provides basic instruction in the various real 
estate brokerage operations, including trust account 
records and procedures. Topics include establishing a bro- 
kerage firm, management concepts and practices, person- 
nel and training, property management, advertising and 
publicity, records and bookkeeping systems, and financial 
operations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
establish, operate, and manage a realty brokerage practice 
in a manner which protects and serves the public interest. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: RLS 112 or current Real Estate 
license. Corequisite: None. 

RLS 115 Real Estate Finance 

This course provides advanced instruction in financing real 
estate transactions and real property valuation. Topics 
include sources of mortgage funds, financing instruments, 
mortgage types, loan underwriting, essential mathematics, 
and property valuation. Upon completion, students should 
be able to demonstrate knowledge of real estate finance 
necessary to serve as real estate brokers. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 2. 
Prerequisite: RLS 112 or current Real Estate license. 
Corequisite: None. 

RLS 116 Real Estate Law 

This course provides advanced instruction in legal aspects 
of real estate brokerage. Topics include property ownership 
and interests, brokerage relationships, agency law, con- 
tracts, settlement statements, and N.C. License Law and 
Commission Rules. Upon completion, students should be 
able to demonstrate knowledge of laws relating to real 
estate brokerage necessary to serve as real estate brokers. 



Course Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 2. Prerequisite: RLS 112 or current Real Estate 
license. Corequisite: None. 

Sociology 

SOC210 Introduction to Sociology 

This course introduces the scientific study of human socie- 
ty, culture, and social interactions. Topics include social- 
ization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooper- 
ation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and 
organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to 
demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they 
apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and soci- 
eties. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

SOC 213 Sociology of the Family 

This course covers the institution of the family and other 
intimate relationships. Emphasis is on mate selection, gen- 
der roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, 
parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and 
economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able 
to analyze the family as a social institution and the social 
forces which influence its development and change. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 

SOC 215 Group Processes 

This course introduces group processes and dynamics. 
Emphasis is on small group experiences, roles and rela- 
tionships within groups, communication, cooperation and 
conflict resolution, and managing diversity within and 
among groups. Upon completion, students should be able 
to demonstrate the knowledge and skills essential to ana- 
lyze group interaction and to work effectively in a group 
context. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major 
and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Semester Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 
080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: None. 



118 



SOC220 Social Problems 

This course provides an in-depth study of current social 
problems. Emphasis is on causes, consequences, and possi- 
ble solutions to problems associated with families, schools, 
workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon 
completion, students should be able to recognize, define, 
analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This 
course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in social/behavioral sciences. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 

S0C225 Social Diversity 

This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, inter- 
ests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social 
life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orienta- 
tion, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should 
be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences 
evolve and how they affect personality development, values, 
and tolerance. This course has been approved to satisfy 
the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the gener- 
al education core requirement in social/behavioral sci- 
ences. Course Hour Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: ENG 090 
and RED 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

Spanish 

SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I 

This course introduces the fundamental elements of the 
Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is 
on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, 
and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be 
able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accu- 
racy to spoken and written Spanish as well as demonstrate 
cultural awareness. This course must be taken with the 
accompanying lab. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. Corequisites: SPA 181 
and ENG 090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 



Course 
Descriptions 



SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II 

This course is a continuation of SPA 1 1 1 and focuses on 
the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within 
a cultural context. Emphasis is on the progressive develop- 
ment of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. 
Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend 
and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and 
written Spanish and should be able to demonstrate further 
cultural awareness. This course must be taken with the 
accompanying lab. This course has been approved to sat- 
isfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the 
general education core requirement in humanities/fine 
arts. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3- Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or 
satisfactory score on placement test and SPA 1 1 1. 
Corequisites: SPA 182 and ENG 090 or satisfactory score on 
placement test. 

SPA 120 Spanish for the Workplace 

This course offers applied Spanish for the workplace to 
facilitate basic communication with people whose native 
language is Spanish. Emphasis is on oral communication 
and career-specific vocabulary that targets health, business, 
and/or public service professions. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to communicate at a functional level 
with native speakers and demonstrate cultural sensitivity. 
Strong emphasis will be on the knowledge and understand- 
ing of the Hispanic culture. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 
and RED 080 or satisfactory score on placement test. 
Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory score on placement 
test. 

SPA 141 Culture and Civilization 

This course provides an opportunity to explore issues relat- 
ed to the Hispanic world. Topics include historical and cur- 
rent events, geography, and customs. Upon completion, 
students should be able to identify and discuss selected top- 
ics and cultural differences related to the Hispanic world. 
This course is taught in English. Tf)is course is approved 



to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre- 
major and/or elective course requirement. Course Hours 
Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3. 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test, Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfactory 
score on placement test. 

SPA 181 Spanish Labi 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the Spanish language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of various supplementary learning media and materials. 
Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend 
and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and 
written Spanish as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: SPA 111. 

SPA 182 Spanish Lab 2 

This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition 
of the fundamental elements of the Spanish language. 
Emphasis is on the progressive development of basic listen- 
ing, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use 
of various supplementary learning media and materials. 
Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend 
and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and 
written Spanish as well as demonstrate cultural awareness. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 2; Semester Hours 
Credit, 1. Prerequisite: SPA 181. Corequisite: SPA 112. 

SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I 

This course provides a review and expansion of the essen- 
tial skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is on the 
study of authentic and representative literary and cultural 
texts. Upon completion, students should be able to com- 
municate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the 
past, present, and future. Listening comprehension is rein- 
forced with audiotapes outside the classroom. This course 
has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive 
Articulation Agreement for the general education core 
requirement in humanities/fine arts. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 3- 
Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfactory score 
on placement test and SPA 112. Corequisite: ENG 090 or 
satisfactory score on placement test. 



119 



SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II 

This course provides a continuation of SPA 2 1 1 . Emphasis 
is on the continuing study of authentic and representative 
literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students 
should be able to communicate spontaneously and accu- 
rately with increasing complexity and sophistication. 
Listening comprehension is reinforced with audiotapes out- 
side of class. This course has been approved to satisfy the 
Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for the general 
education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. 
Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester Hours 
Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test and SPA 21 1. Corequisite: ENG 
090 or satisfactory score on placement test. 

SPA 221 Spanish Conversation 

This course provides an opportunity for intensive commu- 
nication in spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on vocabulary 
acquisition and interactive communication through the 
discussion of media materials and authentic texts. Upon 
completion, students should be able to discuss selected top- 
ics, express ideas and opinions clearly, and engage in for- 
mal and informal conversations. This course has been 
approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation 
Agreement pre-major and/or elective course require- 
ment. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 3; Lab, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 3. Prerequisites: ENG 080 and RED 080 or 
satisfactory score on placement test and SPA 212 or permis- 
sion of program director. Corequisite: ENG 090 or satisfac- 
tory score on placement test. 

Surgical Technology 

SUR 110 Introduction to Surgical 
Technology 

This course provides a comprehensive study of the opera- 
tive environment; professional roles; moral, legal, ethical 
responsibilities; and medical communication techniques 
used in surgical technology. Topics include historical devel- 
opment; medical terminology; physical environment and 
safety measures; interdepartmental, peer, and patient rela- 
tionships; and professional behaviors. Upon completion, 
students should be able to apply theoretical knowledge of 
the course topics to the operative environment. Course 
Hours Per Week: Class, 2; Lab, 0; Clinical, 0; Semester 
Hours Credit, 2. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Surgical 
Technology program. Corequisite: SUR 111. 



Course 
Descriptions 



SUR 111 Perioperative Patient Care 

This course provides theoretical knowledge for the applica- 
tion of essential operative skills during the perioperative 
phase. Topics include surgical asepsis, sterilization and dis- 
infection, and perioperative patient care. Upon completion, 
students should be able to demonstrate the principles and 
practices of aseptic technique, sterile attire, basic care 
preparation, and other relevant skills. Course Hours Per 
Week: Class, 5; Lab, 6; Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 7. 
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Surgical Technology pro- 
gram. Corequisite: SUR 110. 

SUR 122 Surgical Procedures I 

This course introduces surgical pharmacology; anesthesia; 
wound healing physiology; and general, gastrointestinal, 
obstetrical/gynecological, urological, ENT, and plastic sur- 
gery specialties. Emphasis is on related surgical anatomy, 
pathology, and procedures to enhance theoretical knowl- 
edge of patient care, instrumentation, supplies, and equip- 
ment. Upon completion, students should be able to corre- 
late, integrate, and apply theoretical knowledge of the 
course topics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 3; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 6. Prerequisites: SUR 
110 and SUR 111. Corequisite: SUR 123. 

SUR 123 Surgical Clinical Practice I 

This course provides clinical experience with a variety of 
perioperative assignments to build upon skills learned in 
SUR 111. Emphasis is on the scrub and circulating roles of 
the surgical technologist, including aseptic technique and 
basic case preparation for selected surgical procedures. 
Upon completion, students should be able to prepare, assist 
with, and dismantle basic surgical cases in both the scrub 
and circulating roles. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 0; Lab, 
0; Clinical, 21; Semester Hours Credit, 7. Prerequisites: SUR 
110 and SUR 111. Corequisite: SUR 122. 



SUR 134 Surgical Procedures II 

This course introduces orthopedic, neurosurgical, peripher- 
al vascular, thoracic, cardiovascular, and ophthalmology 
surgical specialties. Emphasis is on related surgical anato- 
my, pathology, and procedures thereby enhancing theoreti- 
cal knowledge of patient care, instrumentation, supplies, 
and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able 
to correlate, integrate, and apply theoretical knowledge of 
the course topics. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 5; Lab, 0; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 5. Prerequisite: SUR 
123. Corequisite: None. 

SUR 135 Surgical Clinical Practice II 

This course provides clinical experience with a variety of 
perioperative assignments to build skills required for com- 
plex perioperative patient care. Emphasis is on greater 
technical skills, critical thinking, speed, efficiency, and 
autonomy in the operative setting. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to function in the role of an entry- 
level surgical technologist. Course Hours Per Week: Class, 
0; Lab, 0; Clinical, 12; Semester Hours Credit, 4. 
Prerequisite: SUR 123. Corequisite: None. 

SUR 137 Professional Success Preparation 

This course provides job-seeking skills and an overview of 
theoretical knowledge in preparation for certification. 
Topics include test-taking strategies, resume preparation, 
and interviewing techniques. Upon completion, students 
should be able to prepare a resume, demonstrate appropri- 
ate interview techniques, and identify strengths and weak- 
nesses in preparation for certification. Class, 1; Lab, 0; 
Clinical, 0; Semester Hours Credit, 1. Prerequisite: SUR 
123. Corequisites: SUR 134 and SUR 135. 



120 



Board of Trustees 



Appointed by the Governor 

Mr. C. Darrell DeLoatche 
Mr. Byron K. Hawkins 
Mrs. Barbara S. Moore 
Dr. Charles A. Sanders 

Appointed by the County Commissioners 

Mr. Jesse B. Anglin, Chair 
Mr. William T.Coman 
Mrs. Louise W. McCutcheon 
Mr. Thomas J. White 

Appointed by the Durham Public Schools Board 

Mr. James I. Bolden 
Mrs. Wanda J. Garrett, Esq. 
Mr. Dennis B. Nicholson, AIA 
Dr. Mary Ann Peter, Vice Chair 

Student Trustee 

Mr. Daryl Jerome Mitchell 

Administrative Staff 

Phail Wynn, Jr., BA, M.Ed, M.BA, Ed.D. 
President 

Barbara A Baker, AA, BA, M.S.LS. 

Vice President, Administrative & Support Services 

Juani Munoz Beaver, AAS. 

Executive Secretary/Administrative Assistant 

Dorothy Brower Brokaw, BA 

Assistant to the President/Resource Development 

Officer 

Cynthia D Carter, B.S, M.BA 

Business Manager, Chief Financial Officer 

Clifford P. Harbour, BA, MA, J.D. 
Dean, Academic Programs/Associate Dean & 
Department, Public Services Technologies 

Patricia A Hemingway, BA, MA 
Director, Human Resources 

William G. Ingram, BA, M.S., Ed.D. 

Senior Vice President/Chief Instructional Officer 

Lou R. Russell, B.S. 

Executive Assistant to the President/Executive 

Director, Durham Technical Community College 

Foundation, Inc. 

Wanda S. Winslow, BA, BA, MA 
Special Assistant to the President/Director, Marketing 
& Communications 



Trustees & 
College Personnel 



INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 
Department Heads & Program 
Directors 

Raymond J. Bernard, BA, M.Ed. 

Program Director, English as a Second Language 

William M. Bilbrey, AA, B.S., M.Ed. 
Program Director, Architectural Technology; Industrial & 
Engineering Technologies 

Rhonda K. Bradshaw, B.S., MA, J.D. 

Program Director, Accounting, Business Technologies 

IleneLBritt,BA,MA 

Program Director, Early Childhood Associate; Public 
Services Technologies 

John R. Bubar, AAS., BA, M.BA 
Program Director, Surgical Technology; Health 
Technologies 

Joan S. Carter, BA, M.S. 

Program Director, Mathematics - Sciences; General 
Education 

Patrick Coin, B.S, Ph.D. 

Program Director, Environment, Health, & Safety 
Technology; Public Services Technologies 

Michael M. Conley, B.S. 

Assistant Dean & Department Head, Adult Education & 
Basic Skills; Coordinator, Workplace Literacy 

CarolA.Connell,R.N. 

Program Director, Clinical Trials Research Associate; 
Health Technologies 

Gordon E Copeland, AAS, B.S, M.Ed. 

Associate Dean & Department Head, Corporate Education; 

Program Director, New Industry & Focused Industrial 

Training 

Mary Marsha Cupitt, BA, MA 

Program Director, Associate in Science; University Transfer 

CharleneB. Dave, B.S, M.S. 

Associate Dean & Department Head, Business 

Technologies; Program Director, Office Systems & 

Health Information Technology 

Gloria C. Drew, BA, MA 

Program Director, Community Service & Corporate 
Education 



Wayne E. Durkee, BA, MA 
Assistant to the Department Head for Non-Credit 
Programs, Public Services Technologies 

Randall J. Egsegian, B.S. 

Assistant to the Department Head for Public Services 
Technologies 

Thomas W. Fore, B.S. 

Program Director, Electrical/Electronics Technology; 
Industrial & Engineering Technologies 

Maria Fraser-Molina, BA, MAT, Ph.D. 

Assistant Dean & Department Head, University Transfer 

Wayne C. George, IAM. Certified Journeyman Machinist 
Program Director, Machining Technology; Industrial & 
Engineering Technologies 

Louise J. Gooche, B.S.N, MA, Ed.D, R.N. 

Program Director, Practical Nursing; Health Technologies 

Mary Anne E Grabarek BA, MAT. 
Associate Dean & Department Head, General 

Education/Director, Center for Teaching & Learning 

William H.Gulley, B.S. 

Program Director, Small Business Center 

John K. Hill, BA, J.D. 

Program Director, Paralegal Technology; Public Services 
Technologies 

Sue E.Jackson, BA, MA 

Program Director, Corporate Education 

Donald R. Kritsch, BA, MA, C.L.T, S.M.AS.C.P 
Associate Dean & Department Head, Health Technologies; 
Program Director, Pharmacy Technology 

Ruth L Lewis, BA,M.S.W. 

Assistant for Workforce Development; Program Director, 

Compensatory Education & Human Resources 

Development 

Terry C. Lowrance, B.S, MA 

Program Director, Business Administration & Real Estate 

Betty A. Lyons, B.S. 

Program Director, Adult Basic Education; Adult Education 
& Basic Skills 

Amanda S. McBride, BA, M.Ed. 

Program Director, English; General Education 

Richard D. Miller AAS, B.S, Ph.D, R.R.T. 

Program Director, Respiratory Care; Health Technologies 

Gregory J. Mimmack 

Program Director/Instructor, Electronics Engineering 
Technology 



121 



Beatrice A. Muhammad, B.S. 

Program Director, Adult High School & General 

Educational Development; Adult Education & Basic 

Skills 

Michael T. Patrick, AA, AAS, C.D.T. 
Program Director, Dental Laboratory Technology; Health 
Technologies 

Russell 0. Pratt, B.A, M.A 
Associate Dean & Department Head; Industrial & 
Engineering Technologies 

David H. Ronco, B.A 

Program Director, Automotive Systems Technology; 
Industrial & Engineering Technologies 

Douglas A Scott, AAS, B.A 
Program Director, Criminal Justice Technology; Public 
Services Technologies 

Gene M.Sharpe, B.S. 

Program Director, Carpentry; Industrial & Engineering 
Technologies 

Margaret I, Skulnik, B.S, M.S., R.N. 
Program Director, Associate Degree Nursing; Health 
Technologies 

Teepa L. Snow, B.S, M.S., O.T.R. 
Program Director, Occupational Therapy Assistant; Health 
Technologies 

James S. Steinberg, B.A, J.D. 
Program Director, Basic Law Enforcement Training; 
Public Services Technologies 

Bonnie V. Stone, B.A, MA 
Associate Dean & Department Head, Educational 
Resources 

Ellen DStonerBA, MA 

Program Director, Opticianry; Health Technologies 

CharleneC. West, AA, B.S, M.Ed. 
Interim Program Director, Information Systems 
Technology; Business Technologies 

Marianne Williams, B.S, M.Ed. 
Program Director, Developmental Studies; General 
Education 

Faculty and Staff 

Penelope W. Augustine, BA, M.Ed, Ph.D. 
Advising Coordinator, Educational Resources 

J. Ellen Austin, BA, MA, Ed.D. 

Admissions Coordinator, Admissions & Registration 

Helen C. Ayres, B.S.N, M.S.N, M.BA, R.N. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 



Trustees & 
College Personnel 



Robbi W. Badgett, AAS. 

Accounting Systems Technician, Accounting & Payroll 
Services 

Dora R Bailey, AAS, AAS. 
Instructor, Office Systems Technologies 

Angela C. Baker, AAS. 
Secretary/Receptionist, Human Resources 

SumanaG. Banerjee, B.S, M.S., Ph.D. 
Instructor, Biology; University Transfer 

Gwen L. Barclay-Toy, BA, MA, M.Ed. 

Instructor, Developmental English; General Education 

David E. Barringer, AA, B.S. 
Instructor, Architectural Technology 

AngelineM. Battle, B.S.N,R.N. 
Instructor, Practical Nursing 

Sharon M. Becker, AAS, B.S. 

Coordinator, Health Extension; Health Technologies 

Emilie A Beglane, AAS, B.S, C.Ph.T 
Instructor, Pharmacy Technology 

Judith L Birchfield, J.D. 
Instructor, Paralegal Technology 

William D. Boesche 

Heating & Air Conditioning Technician, Facility Services 

Roger D.Bond, B.S. 

Instructor/Coordinator, Physical Education; University 
Transfer 

Jean W Boyd, BA 

Instructor, Early Childhood Associate 

Catherine A Brawley, BA, M.Ed. 
Student Development Specialist, Adult Education & Basic 
Skills 

Vernon L. Bridges II, B.S, M.S. 
Instructor, Developmental Mathematics; General 
Education 

RitaM.Buhr,B.S,MA 

Instructor, English; General Education 

Harry TBulbrook, B.S. 
Instructor, Infonnation Systems 

Kay B.Burmss, B.S, M.Ed. 

Coordinator, Financial Aid; Admissions & Registration 



John M. Butkowsky 

Graphics Assistant, Marketing & Communications 

Larry J. Byrd 

Operations Manager, Facility Services 

Samuel A Calderone, B.S, AAR.T, R.R.T. 
Clinical Coordinator & Instructor, Respiratory Care 

C. Alberto Camacho, AAS, C.D.T. 
Instructor, Dental Laboratory Technology 

Susan L Cheng, B.S, M.S. 

Instructor, Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Michael D. Cheatham 
Network Administrator 

Crystal W. Clark, AA 

Advising Assistant, Educational Resources 

Brenda Geary, Diploma 

Departmental Secretary, University Transfer 

Diane R. Clinton, B.S.N, M.S.N, R.N. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Joseph W Cole, Ph.D. 

Instructor, Humanities; University Transfer 

Horace B. Collins, AG.E, AAS. 
Instructor, Opticianry 

Gail M. Cook, B.S.N, M.Ed. 
Clinical Coordinator & Instructor, Associate Degree 
Nursing 

Sarah L. Cooley, BA 

Interim Coordinator, Orange County Programs 

Victoria H. Crill, B.S.N, M.S.N, R.N. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Perry C. Cumbie, BA, M.Div, MA 
Instructor, English; General Education 

MarciaH. Daniell, BA, MA 
Instructor, English; University Transfer 

A Barry Dark, AAS. 
Instructor, Opticianry 

Michaela Davidai, AAS, BA 
Departmental Secretary, Health Technologies 

Cynthia B. Davis 

Receptionist, Corporate Education 

Nanette M. Dernar, BA, MA 
Counselor/Retention Specialist, Counseling Services 

Leland A Dixon 

Security Coordinator, Facility Services 

Susan M. Doody, BA, M.Ed. 

Instructor, Developmental English; General Education 



122 



James T. Dore, AAS., AAS. 
Director, Facility Services 

jean W. Draper 

Accounts Payable Technician, General Accounting 

DuaneADreyer,B.S,Ph.D. 

Instructor, Biology; Mathematics - Sciences 

Felix M, Drye, BA 

Evening Shift Security Supervisor, Facility Services 

Roylee V. Duvall 

Instructor, Computer-Based Training; Corporate Education 

Christa L. Eaves, B A 

Recruiter, Marketings Communications 

Bette L. Edgerton, LPN., B.S.N., R.N. 
Instructor, Practical Nursing 

Kevin L. Egypt, BA.B.S. 

Instructor/Systems Administrator, Information Systems 

Lynn R. Eisenberg, B.M, M.M, MAT, PhD. 
Instructor, Mathematics & Music; University Transfer 

Dorothea D. Eley, AA 
Secretary/Receptionist, Small Business Center 

Zenobia Ellis 

Testing/Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Ann C. Faircloth 
Director, Auxiliary Services 

Helen T. Featherson, B.S. 

Director, Retired & Senior Volunteer Program; Marketing 
& Communications 

Michael K. Fire, A.D.N., B.S.N, M.S.N., 

M.P.H.,MA,Ph.D.,R.N. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Lillie A. Forbes, B.S. 

Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Bruce M. Franklin, AAS. 

Instructor, Occupational Therapy Assistant; Health 
Technologies 

KathyW. Franklin, B.S. 

Departmental Secretary, Public Service Technologies 

Diana C. Garrett, AAS., B.S. 

Science Labs Coordinator, Mathematics - Sciences 

Janice B. Gentry, AAS. 
Assistant Director, Facility Services 

Pamela R.Gladson, B.S. 

Program Director, Computer-Based Training; Corporate 
Education 

Ricky A. Glasgow, AAS., C.D.T 
Instructor, Dental Laboratory Technology 



Trustees & 
College Personnel 



Richard L Godfrey, B.S, M.LS. 

Coordinator, Media Services; Educational Resources 

Constanza Gomez, MA 

Instructor, Spanish/French; University Transfer 

Lettie Robinson Goode, B.S. 

Accounting Technician/Cashier, General Accounting 

Thomas E. Gould, BA, MA, Ph.D. 
Instructor, English; University Transfer 

Philip B. Gowins, B.S. 

Instructor, Mathematics; Adult Education 

Linda M. Green, BA 
Instructor, Information Systems 

Joe Anne Griffith, B.S.,R.Ph. 

Clinical Coordinator & Instructor, Pharmacy Technology 

Hyacinth E. Harding, BA 

Accounts Receivable Technician, General Accounting 

Levonne Hardy, Sr, AAS. 
Housekeeper, Facilities Services 

Donald E. Harris, C.PR, C.D.T, BA 
Instructor, Dental Laboratory Technology 

TrevaJ. Haynes, B.S, MA 
Instructor, Human Resources Development; Adult 
Education & Basic Skills 

Cherry D. Hudson 

Departmental Secretary, Industrial & Engineering 
Technologies 

E. Charles Hunt, B.S.C. 
General Accounting Director 

Sylvia A Hunt, AAS. 

Admissions Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

JohnA.Hurlburt,B.S. 
Instructor, Infonnation Systems 

Hussein Islami, B.S, MA 
Instructor, Developmental Mathematics; General 
Education 

MicheleE.Jacobsen,B.S. 

Instructor, Office Systems Technologies 

D. Thomas Jaynes, BA, M.S.Ed. 
Director, Counseling Services 



OllieC.Jeffers.AAS. 

Secretary/Receptionist, Northern Durham Center 

Polly R.Johnson 

Central Supply Clerk/Communications Technician, 
Auxiliary Services 

Patricia C.Jones, B.S, MA 

Assistant Dean; Admissions, Registration, & Financial Aid 

Claudia E.Joyner, AAS. 

Executive Secretary/Office Manager, Instructional Services 

Jo Ann Judkins-Mason, AAS., B.S. 
Admissions Officer, Admissions & Registration 

Agnetta K. Kamugisha, AAS, B.S. 
Systems Administrator/Operator, Information Technology 
Services 

CamiS. KinahanJ.D. 

Co-Director, Curriculum Improvement Project 

Christine Kelly Kleese, B.S, MAT. 
Center Director/Instructor, Campus Learning Center, 
Educational Resources 

Lijen "Jane" Ko, M.S., Ph.D. 
Instructor, Information Systems 

Megan H. Lascallette, AAS. 

PC Technician, Information Technology Services 

Irene H. Laube, BA, M.S.L.S. 
Coordinator, Library Services 

Melissa J. Lennon, AAS. 

Departmental Secretary, Business Technologies 

Alan D. Magid, B.S, M.S., Ph.D. 
Instructor, Biology; Mathematics - Sciences 

Deborah H. Maloney, AAS. 

Financial Aid Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Carol L. Marcus, B.S, M.S. 

Clinical Coordinator & Instructor, Occupational Therapy 
Assistant 

John R. Martin, BA, MA, Ph.D. 
Instructor, History; University Transfer 

Anna R. Mason, Secretarial Diploma 

Assistant to Auxiliary Services Director, Auxiliary Services 

Rosallene J. Massey, AAS. 

Programmer/Analyst, Infonnation Technology Services 

Ralph D. Matthews, AAS, BA, MA 
Maintenance Manager, Facilities Services 

Ruth W.Matthews, AAS. 

Director, Accounting & Payroll Services 

Beverly S. McComb, AAS, AAS, B.S. 
Director, Information Technology Services 



123 



JenyS. McDaniel, BA, B.D., M.Ed. 

Admissions Counselor, Admissions & Registration 

Karen E. McPhaul, B.S., M.Ed. 
Coordinator, Instructional Computing; Educational 
Resources 

Ronald L Merritt, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor, Mathematics; University Transfer 

Edward E. Moore, B.S.,M.BA 
Instructor, Accounting 

Larry W. Morrison 

Network Technician, Information Technology Services 

DollieL.Moser,AAS. 

Student Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

L Cameron Murray, B.S. 

Financial Aid Officer, Admissions & Registration 

Thomas J. Mustillo, BA, M.S. 
Coordinator, Evaluation & Research Services 

Paul D. Nagy, B.S., M.PA, Ph.D. 
Director, Institutional Research & Planning; Evaluation & 
Research Services 

Catherine P. Nelson, AIM, B.S.N, MSN, RN.-C. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing; Health Technologies 

Margaret G. Newhouse, BA 
Admissions Officer & International Student Advisor, 
Admissions & Registration 

Vickie A. Newsome, BA, MA 

Instructor, Social Sciences; General Education 

Clara B. Nichols, AAS. 

Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Susan Osgood, B.S.N. 
Instructor, Practical Nursing 

A.R. "Susie" Page 

Special Assistant for Administrative Services, Business 
Office 

Ida R. Page, BA, MA 

Instaictor, English; General Education 

James L. Painter, AAS., B.S., M.Ed. 
Instructor, Electronics Engineering Technology 

Mary Jo Parker, AAS. 

Departmental Secretary/Office Manager, Adult Education 
& Basic Skills 

Andrea M. Parrish, AAS. 
Instmctor, Information Systems 

Barbara W. Patterson, Secretarial Diploma 
Registration/Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 



Trustees & 
College Personnel 



Marie G. Phelps 

Publications & Administrative Assistant, Marketing 8 
Communications 

Catherine S. Portaro, B.S., MAEd., C.PA 
Instructor, Accounting 

Robert L. Potter, AAS., AA, B.S., J.D. 
Instructor, Business Administration & Paralegal 
Technology 

John D. Ragland 

Midnight Operations Supervisor, Facility Services 

Wendy M. Ramseur, M.L.S. 

Librarian, Public Services; Educational Resources 

Dorothy J. Rascoe, AAS, AAS, AAS, BA 

Veterans Affairs Officer, Admissions & Registration 

Robert N. Reaves, AAS., B.S.EA 

Instmctor, Electronics Engineering Technology 

Jewelite Reid, AAS. 

Testing/Student Records Assistant, Admissions & 
Registration 

Jimmy C. Roberts, AAS. 

Photographer & Production Assistant, Marketing & 
Communications 

Jimmy E. Rogers 

Maintenance Technician/Plumber, Facility Services 

Joe L. Rogers 

Groundskeeper, Facility Services 

Robert M. Rogers 

Shipping & Receiving Clerk, Facility Services 

Judith A Ruggiero, AAS., B.S. 
Instructor, Respiratory Care 

Thomas F Russo, BA, M.Ed. 

Coordinator, Career Services; Counseling Services 

James R. Scanlan, B.S., M.S. 

Instmctor, Mathematics; Mathematics - Sciences 

BillieVSessoms,BA, C.N.I. 
Instmctor, Information Systems 

William J. Sewell, AA, BA, MA, PhD. 
Coordinator, Northern Durham Center & Instmctor, 
English; General Education 



Ashish Shah, B.S. 

PC/Network Support Technician, Information Technology 
Services 

Santosh Shonek, M.L.S. 

Librarian, Northern Durham Center, Educational 
Resources 

CharlesASlappy,BA,MA 
Instmctor, Sociology; University Transfer 

Marilyn B. Slaughter, B.S. 

Secretary, Administrative & Support Services 

Christopher R. Snow 

Mail Service Technician/Courier, Facility Services 

Lee Ann Spahr,B.S., M.Ed. 
Instmctor, Mathematics; Mathematics Coordinator; 
Mathematics - Sciences 

DaleS. Smith, AD.N, B.S.N. 
Instmctor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Phyllis J. Spray, B.S., M.S. 
Coordinator, Extension Programs & Instmctor, 
Developmental English; General Education 

Alma S. Squires, Secretarial Diploma 
Registration/Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Shirley D. Strum 

Transcript Clerk, Admissions & Registration 

Janice R. Stuart, BA, M.Ed. 
Instmctor, English; Adult Education 

June G. Sullivan 

Secretary/Receptionist, Counseling Services 

ZelphiaS. Sullivan, BA,M.Ed. 
Recruitment & Admissions Specialist, Adult Education & 
Basic Skills 

Anant G. Tambe, B.S., MA 

Instmctor, Physics; Mathematics - Sciences & University 
Transfer 

Ward Taylor III, Automotive Diploma 
Instmctor, Automotive Systems Technology 

JuliaA.Teasley, B.S. 

Coordinator, Scheduling & Student Records Management; 
Admissions & Registration 

Carolyn D. Thomas 

Instructional Services Secretary, Instructional Services 

Helen D. Thompson, BA, M.Ed. 
Associate Dean, Curriculum Development; Instructional 
Services 

Jeannete E. Thompson, AA 

Secretary, Human Resources/Retired and Senior Volunteer 
Program 



124 



Lee D. Toomer, AAS, AG.E. 
Security Supervisor, Northern Durham Center, Facilities 
Services 

Andriea L. Troy, B.S.N. 
Instructor, Practical Nursing 

Jesse L Uzzell, B.S, MA 

Director, Evening & Weekend College 

Maria F. Vallecillo, BA, MA 
Instructor, Spanish; University Transfer 

Richard I. Vaughan, Jr., B.S., M.BA 
Instructor, Business Administration 

GinaK. Wagner, AAS. 

Payroll Accounting Technician, Accounting & Payroll 
Services 

Jane E. Walter, AAS, A.B., MA, R.R.T 
Instructor, Respiratory Care 

Gregory C.Walton, AAS, BA 
Instructor, Dental Laboratory Technology 

Denise K. Ward, B.S, MA 

Instructor, Biology; Mathematics - Sciences 

Chester G.T. Waters, BA, MA 
Instructor, Economics; General Education 

James T.Watkins, AAS, BA 

Programmer/Analyst, Information Technology Services 

Annette N.Wells, B.S, M.Ed. 
Instructor, Biology; University Transfer 

Charles D.Wessell, B.S, M.S. 
Mathematics Instructor, Campus Learning Center; 
Educational Resources 

Vanessa W White, BA, MA 

Admissions Officer, Admissions & Registration 

Adrienne F. Williams, AAS, A.G.E. 
Registration/Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Dorothy M. Williams, B.S, MAT. 
Instructor, Mathematics; General Education 

Martha B. ' Josie" Williams, AA, BA, MA 
Instructor, Developmental Reading; General Education 

Matthew Williams, B A 

Special Assistant for Fiscal Services, Business Office 

Pauline B. Williams 

Departmental Secretary, Corporate Education 

Melinda B.Wills 

Program Assistant, Nursing Programs 

A Dillon Wilson, B.S, MA 

Instructor, English & Speech; General Education 



Trustees & 
College Personnel 



Sherry B. Wilson, B.S.N, M.S.N. 
Instructor, Associate Degree Nursing 

Mary A Winbome 

Administrative Assistant, Human Resources 

Tseng - Yuan "Tim" Woo, B.S.E, M.S.E, DIP. 
Instructor, Electronics Engineering Technology 

CandiceE. Woods, AAS, AG.E. 

Registration/Records Assistant, Admissions & Registration 

Shereyll C.Woods, AG.E. 

Departmental Secretary, General Education 

Peter W Wooldridge, AA, B.S, MA, Ph.D. 
Program Director, Associate in Arts & Instructor, 
Psychology; University Transfer 

Joseph S.Wooten, Jr. 

Evening Operations Supervisor, Facility Services 

KathyAZarilla,B.S,Ph.D. 
Instructor, Biology; Mathematics - Sciences; General 
Education 

Joanna L. Ziolkowski 

Library Technician, Library Services; Educational 
Resources 



ADJUNCT FACULTY 
Pharmacy Technology 

Sandra Covington, C.Ph.T, Durham Regional Hospital 
Christine Guarrera, R.Ph, Durham Regional Hospital 
James Hall, R.Ph, Rex Healthcare 
William L. Harris, R.Ph, Duke University Medical Center 
Linda Hollowell, R.Ph, Duke University Medical Center 
Hortense Jones, C.Ph.T, Lincoln Community Health Center 
Michael Martz, R.Ph, Ph.D., Veterans Administration 

Medical Center 
Carolyn D. Robbins, R.Ph, Lincoln Community 

Health Center 
John Stand, R.Ph, Hillcrest Convalescent Center 
David Stines, R.Ph, UNC Hospitals 
Clara Thompson, C.Ph.T, UNC Hospitals 
Lynn Whitlow, C.Ph.T, Person County Memorial Hospital 



Phlebotomy 

Janice Bean, Raleigh Community Hospital 

Karen Sanderson, Rex Healthcare 

Shirley Brown, WakeMed 

Janet Chamblee, Wake County Human Services 

Kim Harris, UNC Hospitals 

Bill Green, Veterans Administration Medical Center 

Respiratory Care 

Charles Alford, R.R.T, Durham Regional Hospital 
Karen Bartles, R.R.T, Alamance Regional Hospital 
Bob Campbell, R.R.T, Veterans Administration 

Medical Center 
Gary D. Coates, R.R.T, Person Memorial Hospital 
Timothy Safley, R.R.T, Pediatric Services of America 
Gary Stevens, R.R.T, UNC Hospitals 
Kathy Waters, R.R.T, UNC Hospitals 
A West, R.R.T, Veterans Administration Medical Center 
James R. Yankaskas, M.D, UNC School of Medicine 

Surgical Technology 

Sandra L. Albright, R.N, C.N.O.R, WakeMed 

Gwen M. Boyles, R.N, C.N.0.R, UNC Hospitals 

Patsy Davis, R.N, C.N.O.R, WakeMed 

Cordelia Edwards, R.N, Durham Regional Hospital 

Lael Jackson, R.N, Veterans Administration Medical Center 

Kimberly Martin, R.N, Duke University Medical Center 

Sharon Messmer, C.S.T, Rex Healthcare 

Melissa Polkinghorn, R.N, Duke University Medical Center 

Liane Salmon, R.N, C.N.O.R, Rex Healthcare 

Carol White, R.N, Raleigh Community Hospital 



125 



REQUEST FOR HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE TRANSCRIPT 

(PLEASE SUBMIT AN ADMISSION APPLICATION TO DURHAM TECH BEFORE REQUESTING TRANSCRIPT) 

INSTRUCTION TO APPLICANT: Type or print legibly with ballpoint pen and forward this form to your high school counselor or to the college 
registrar. 



Social Security Number . 



Date of Birth 



LAST NAME 



FIRST 



M.I. 



MAIDEN NAME 



ADDRESS 

School (or GED center) 



Dates enrolled in school: From 



To 



Date of Graduation 



Proposed program of study at Durham Technical Community College 



MAIL TRANSCRIPT TO : Admissions Office 

Durham Technical Community College 
1637 Lawson Street 
Durham, North Carolina 27703 



School Official: 

Please return this form with transcript. 



Signature of Student Date 

Temale applicants should give both married and maiden name, if applicable. 



Durham Technical 
nunity 
College. 



Community ys. 



REQUEST FOR HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE TRANSCRIPT 

(PLEASE SUBMIT AN ADMISSION APPLICATION TO DURHAM TECH BEFORE REQUESTING TRANSCRIPT.) 
INSTRUCTION TO APPLICANT: Type or print legibly with ballpoint pen and forward this form to your high school counselor or to the college 



registrar. 

Social Security Number . 



Date of Birth 



LAST NAME 



FIRST 



M.I. 



MAIDEN NAME 



ADDRESS 

School (or GED center) 



Dates enrolled in school: From 



To. 



Date of Graduation 



Proposed program of study at Durham Technical Community College 



MAIL TRANSCRIPT TO : Admissions Office 

Durham Technical Community College 
1637 Lawson Street 
Durham, North Carolina 27703 



School Official: 

Please return this form with transcript. 



Signature of Student Date 

Temale applicants should give both married and maiden name, if applicable. 



126 



Durham Technical 
nunity 
College. 



Community y\. 



Application for Admission 



To the Applicant: Type or print in ink. Answer all questions completely. Mail or submit to: Admissions Office, Durham Technical 

Use legal name (no nicknames). Foreign students should use their Community College/1637 Lawson St./Durham, NC 27703. 

family name (surname) as their last name. Phone: (919) 686-3333. 

The information you provide below will be placed in our master file. If any of this data changes, you must notify the Registration Office imme- 
diately. Information on race and sex is requested for data-gathering purposes only. Please answer all questions completely and accurately. 

Student Background Information 

[1] Social Security Number: - - 

Name: [3] [4] [5] 



Last First Maiden or Middle 

Address: [6] [7] [8] [1 0] 

Street, Route, RO. Box, Apartment Number City State Zip Code + 4 

[11] Home Telephone: ( ) : [12] Work Telephone: ( ) : 



[13] Sex: G Male G Female [14] Date of Birth (month/date/year): 

[17] Ethnic Origin: 1. G White 2. G Black 3. G American Indian 4. G Hispanic 5. O Asian 6. O Other 

Educational Background 

[19] Circle years of education completed: 123456789101112 14 15 16 17 

High Vocational Associate Bachelor's Graduate 

School Diploma Degree Degree School 

OR Check if you completed: GED [ ] or Adult High School [ ] Date Place where earned 

[21] Employment Status: G Unemployed G Part Time G Full Time 



[23] Residency Status 

'To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must have established legal residence in North Carolina and maintained that legal resi- 
dence for at least 12 months immediately prior to his or her classification as a resident for tuition purposes." For additional information about 
this law or to apply for in-state tuition status, contact the Admissions Office in Room 30, White Building, Durham Technical Community College. 
Students should promptly notify the Admissions Office if they feel a change in their circumstances warrants a change in their residency status. 

Have you lived outside of North Carolina in the last 1 2 months? G Yes G No 

If yes, previous state of residence: 



If no, North Carolina county of residence: 

Citizenship: G U.S. citizen G Non-immigrant alien G Permanent residence alien Foreign country of origin 

Date "green card" issued 



What date did you move to North Carolina? 



Have you maintained your permanent legal residence in North Carolina for the preceding 12 months? G Yes "1 No 

A pplicant Information 

[30] Applicant Status: G First time enrolled in any college or technical school 

G Transfer student (have previously attended another college) G Visiting student from another college 

G Returning student Last date enrolled at Durham Tech: Last date applied to Durham Tech: 

Other name(s) under which records may be listed: 

[31] You plan to attend: G Day G Evening G Weekend 

[35] Plan to attend: G Full Time (12 or more credit hours) G Part Time (fewer than 12 credit hours) 

[37] Plan to enter Durham Tech in (Year) G Fall Term G Spring Term G Summer Term 

[37] Please print clearly your choice of program as listed on Durham Tech's "Programs of Study" sheet. 

You may list only one program. Program Name: 



Check One: G Degree G Diploma G Certificate 

If you are applying for the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program, are you currently a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)? G Yes G No 

127 



Schools Attended 

Name of last high school attended: 

(GED or Adult High School graduates should list the last high school attended prior to beginning the GED or Adult High School program) 

High School Name: 

County: State: 



Dates Attended: 

If you received GED or Adult High School Diploma Date: 



Graduation Date: 
Place: 



Colleges and/or Technical Institutes Attended: 


State From (dates) Until (dates) Degrees 





















































Official copies of high school and college transcripts, GED, or Adult High School Diploma must be submitted to the Admissions Office. 
All transcripts become the property of Durham Technical Community College and cannot be returned to the student or reproduced. 



Are you eligible for veterans' benefits? 1 . Q Yes 2. O No 
In case of emergency, person to contact: 



Name 



Telephone 



Important Deadline Information for Applicants and for Students Changing Programs 

To ensure that necessary information is received and processed on time, students should observe the deadlines listed for these semesters: 

Summer Term 1999: May 10, 1999 

Fall Semester 1999: August 6, 1999 

Spring Semester 2000: December 10, 1999 

Summer Term 2000: May 12, 2000 

All admissions requirements (testing, transcripts, forms, etc.) must be submitted by these dates. 

If admissions requirements are submitted after these deadlines, they will be processed for acceptance the following semester. 

If the student enrolls, it will be under Special Student status (not eligible for VA benefits or Financial Aid). 

If an accepted student does not enroll for the semester in which he/she was accepted, or if the student does not enroll for three 
consecutive semesters, he/she must contact the Admissions Office to determine if readmission is necessary. 



This is only an application for admission, not a guarantee of admission. 

Students requesting assistance with admissions, registration, classroom, or testing situations due to any physical, psychological, or learning disability 
should contact the Disability Services coordinator upon completing an application. The coordinator can be reached by calling (91 9) 686-3606 
(V/TTY) or by visiting Counseling Services in Room 23 of the White Building on the Main Campus. 

I certify that the above responses are true to the best of my knowledge, pursuant to reasonable inquiry where needed, and I am aware that knowing 
falsification hereon may result in discretionary action, including denial of admission or dismissal after admission. 



Signature 



Date 

Consumer information regarding graduation rates is available upon request in the Admissions Office and the Durham Tech Library. 

Durham Technical Community College is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity, ADA, Section 504 Institution 

and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, age, religion, national origin, or disability. 



128 



Academic Advising 11 

Academic Assessment and Course Placement 8 

Academic Calendar 3 

Academic Department Heads 121-122 

Academic Honesty Policy 22-23 

Academic Information 18-24 

Academic Recognition 21 

Accounting 34 

Additional Expenses 15 

Adjunct Faculty 125 

Administrative Staff of the College 121 

Admission 

Corporate and Continuing Education 

Programs 33 

Admission 

Credit Programs 8-16 

Late 8 

Placement Testing 8 

Procedures 8-9 

Requirements 9-11 

Adult and Basic Skills Education 31 

Adult Basic Education 31 

Adult Education Programs 31 

Adult High School Diploma Program 31 

Appropriate Use of Computer Resources 28-29 

Architectural Technology 35 

Associate Degree Nursing 9, 36 

Associate Degrees 18, 23 

Attendance Requirements 21-22 

Automotive Systems Technology 37 

Basic Law Enforcement Training 38 

Board of Trustees 121 

Books and Supplies 14 

Business Administration 39 

Business Administration-Operations 

Management 40 

Campus Learning Center 24 

Career Services 25 

Certificates 18 

Certifications 10 

Classifications of Programs of Study 18 

Classification of Students 18 

Clinical Trials Research Associate 9, 41 

College Work-Study 16 

Compensatory Education 31 

Community Service Programs 33 

Concurrent Enrollment (High School) 11 

Continuing Education Fees and Registration ... .33 

Continuing Education Units (CEU) 33 

Corequisite Courses 19 

Corporate Education 32 

Computer Programming 42 

Counseling, Academic and Personal 8, 25 

Counseling Services 25 

Course Audit 20 

Course Descriptions 69-120 

Credit by Examination 20 

Crime Statistics 13 

Criminal Justice Technology 9, 43 

Customized Training for Business and Industry . .32 

Dental Laboratory Technology 9, 43 

Developmental Studies 9 



Index 



Diplomas 18 

Disability Services 25 

Drug and Alcohol Policy 27-28 

Durham Technical Community College 

Accreditation and Approbation 6-7 

Goals 6 

Governance 7 

History 5 

Mission and Purpose 6 

Early Childhood Associate 9, 45 

Educational Resources 23-24 

Electrical/Electronics Technology 46 

Electronics Engineering Technology 47 

English as a Second Language 31 

Environment, Health, and Safety Technology . . .48 

Faculty and Staff of the College 122-125 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 13 

Fees 13-14,33 

Financial Aid 15-16 

Fire Protection Technology 9, 49 

Full-Time Students 18 

General Educational Development (GED) 31 

General Education 23, 50 

General Information 7 

Grade 

Change 20 

Incomplete 19 

Reports 11 

Special 20 

Grade Point Average 20 

Grading System 19-21 

Graduation 

Fee 14 

Rates 13 

Requirements 11 

Grants 16 

Health Care Training 32 

Health Information Technology 51 

High School Equivalency Program (GED) 31 

Human Resources Development 31 

Information Systems 52 

Information Systems-Network Administration 

and Support 53 

Insurance 14-15 

International Students 8 

Library 24 

Machining Technology 54 

Occupational Instruction 32 

Occupational Therapy Assistant 9, 55 

Office Systems Technology 56 

Office Systems Technology-Medical 57 

Opticianry 9, 58 

Paralegal Technology 59 

Parking Requirements 15, 30 



Part-Time Students 18 

Personal Counseling 25 

Pharmacy Technology 9, 60 

Phlebotomy 9, 6l 

Placement Testing 9 

Plan of Study 18 

Practical Nursing 9, 62 

Prerequisite Courses 19 

Program Directors 121-122 

Public Service Training 32 

Readmission 10 

Real Estate 63 

Real Estate Appraisal 63 

Refund Policy (Credit Programs) 14 

Registration 11-13, 33 

Release of Information 13 

Residency Status 13-14 

Respiratory Care 9, 64 

Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) . . .8 

Scholarships 16 

Safety and Security 30 

Sexual Harassment Policy 28 

Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Grant 16 

Small Business Center 32 

Special Students 10, 18 

Standards of Progress 21 

Student Ambassador Program 26 

Student Life 

Activities 26 

Code of Conduct 26-27 

Development 25 

Disciplinary Procedures 26-30 

Grievance Procedures 29-30 

Clubs and Organizations 26 

Publications 26 

Student-Instructor Responsibilities 21 

Student Records 12 

Student Senate 26 

Surgical Technology 9, 65 

Teacher Associate 9, 66 

Telephone Registration 11 

Transfer 

To Another Program 9-10 

To Senior Institutions 23 

Transfer Credit 9-10, 19 

Transcripts 8, 15 

Tuition 

Exemption for Senior Citizens 11-12, 14 

North Carolina Residents 13 

Out-of-State Students 13 

Refund Policy 13,33 

Tuition and Fees (Credit Courses) 13 

Tutorial Services 24 

University Transfer Programs 9, 20, 67-68 

Veterans 

Attendance Requirements 17 

Education Benefits 17 

Standards of Academic Progress 17 

Visiting Students 10 

Withdrawal 

From a Course 12-13, 20 

Regulations 12-13 

Workplace Literacy 31 



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