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Full text of "Early history of Michigan, with biographies of state officers, members of Congress, judges and legislators"

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B51e 

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1752930 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01071 6378 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 






http://www.archive.org/details/earlyhistoryofmi02bing 



Early History of' Michigan 



BIOGRAPHIES 



STATE OFFICERS, 



MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 



JUDGES AND LEGISLATORS. 



n> J), Q A^ ;■ 



PvBLisKF.n Pursuant to Act 59, 1SS7, 



V. X 



L A S S I X G : 
THORP & GODFREY, STATE PRINTERS AND HINDER: 



$"f0 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 3T1 

came to Michigan with his father, who settled at Canton. As a young 
man he worked at farming and taught school, and attended the 
Ypsilanti seminary several terms, studied law and was admitted to 
the bar in 1854. In 1855 commenced practice at Vassar, where he 
still resides. Was appointed prosecuting attorney and elected to that 
office, and was circuit court commissioner on the democratic ticket. 
In 1SG2 he went into the service as captain in 23d Michigan, saw 
active service, became major, and served until January, 1SC5. In l x o6 
was elected circuit court commissioner and in 1807 was delegate in 
the constitutional convention. He was speaker pro tern, in 1869. 
1871-2, and served as chairman of the judiciary committee. He was 
delegate to the republican national convention in 1872. anl has sev- 
eral times been actively supported for a nomination to congress- 
A Democrat until 1860, since a Republican. 



ALLEN HUTCHIN3, 



1 ?52S 



Representative from Lenawee county in 18:15-6. came to Adrian. Mich., 
from Orleans county. N. Y., as early as 1832-3. He was a lawver. 
and probably the first who settled in Lenawee county. He was an 
active, prominent business man. In politics a Democrat. 



LOOMIS HUTCHINSON 

Was born in Smyrna. N. Y., April 21, 1818. He worked on his 
father's farm, receiving a common school education, and taught 
school winters, working on the farm summers. In lsu he cam - r i 
Michigan and bought a farm in Emmet, Calhoun county. H t was 
supervisor o: Emmet ten years, and Representative m 1869-70. First 
a Whig, since a Republican. 



BENJAMIN F. HYDE, 

Representative from Detroit in 1851, was born at Ferrisburg, Yer. 
mont, September 24, 1819. He was of the well known Hyde faruilv 
who gave their name to Hyde park in Vermont. He came to Detroit 
in 1846, studied law, was admitted to practice, and was for a time a 
law partner with Hon. Geo. Jerome. His tastes were more for 
politics than law. Was a democratic alderman in 1856. His political 
career terminated with his election as judge of the recorder's 
November. 1863. He filled the oflice only from January 16, to May 
16, 1S64, when ill health compelled his retirement. He died July \ 
1865. 



372 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

CHARLES W. INGALLS, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1803, was born in Bristol, N. H., 
April 21, 1812. He came to Michigan in 1837. Most of the time a 
resident of Ionia county, now resides at Harbor Springs. Has served 
as supervisor and postmaster. By occupation a farmer, politically a 
Democrat. 



DANIEL F. INGALLS, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1840, came to Michigan about 
1835, and to Oxford, in 1837. Politically a Whig. He was super- 
visor of Oxford in 1838-9-41, and town clerk in 1844. He removed to 
Ohio and died there. He built a foundry at Oxford with Benjamin 
Knight, and a cannon cast at their foundry was used at many cele- 
brations in Oxford. 



JOHN N. INGERSOLL 

Was born May 4, 1817, in Westchester county, N. Y. He moved to 
New York city when young, and lived for a time with an uncle in 
Connecticut. At the age of thirteen commenced to learn the printer's 
trade in New York city, and worked with Horace Greeley. with whom 
he was always on familiar terms. In 1837 he came to Detroit, was a 
compositor in the Free Press office, and then foreman in the office of 
the Advertiser. In 1839 he became editor of the Mt. Clemens States- 
man, then published the St. Clair Banner from 1842 to 1846. He 
then started the Lake Superior News. He was a clerk in the legisla- 
ture, and in 184S secretary of the Senate. In 18-10 he was a Repre- 
sentative from Chippewa county. He then became editor of the 
Detroit Daily Bulhtin, and of the Hesperian, a monthly magazine, 
organ of the Odd Fellows; was manager of the Detroit Daily Times: 
editor and publisher of the Rochester. N. Y., Tribune; then from 
18o8 to 1862 editor and publisher of the Owosso American; then until 
1866 publisher of the Shiawassee American at Corunna; then started 
the Shiawassee Journal. In 1861-2 he was Senator. He was a 
Democrat until 1858. then a Republican. He was four times mayor 
of Corunna; was justice of the peace, postmaster, and United States 
assessor. He was a Re] resentative in 1869-70. He was a leading 
Odd Fellow, and held the highest office in the grand lodge and the 
grand encampment. For the last years of his life he was blind. 
Died at Corunna, May 13, 1881. 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 373 

SILAS IRELAND, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1877, was born November 10, 
1818, in Concord, Obio. He received his education mostly by his own 
exertions, and came to Michigan in 1839. In 1842 he removed to a 
farm near Berrien Springs. He held the office of supervisor in Ber- 
rien township five years. He was superintendent of the poor for 
twelve years. By occupation a farmer and surveyor. In politics a 
Republican. 

WILLIAM W. IRWIN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1853, was a native of Penn- 
sylvania, born in 1811, and was a farmer by occupation. He was 
supervisor of Springwells, 1851-55. He died in 1855. Politics demo- 
cratic. 

NELSON G. ISBELL, 

Secretary of State from 1859 to 18G1, was born in Charleston, N. Y., 
February 18, 1820. Received an academical education and settled at 
Howell, Mich., in 1844, engaging in mercantile business. He was 
justice, soon became a farmer, and was supervisor, town clerk, and 
Senator in 1S4S-9-50-51. He was one of the first board of control of 
the state reform school. From 1SG1 to 1869, except a short interval, 
he was collector of customs at Detroit. Died at Lansing in 1878. In 
politics a Whig, a Republican after 1854. In 1848 he was the only 
Whig in the Senate. He was a resident of Lansing for several years 
prior to his death. 

EDWIN B. ISIIAM, 

Senator from Menominee. Delta. Marquette, Houghton. Keweenaw, 
Chippewa and Schoolcraft counties in 1S73-4, was born May 9, 1819, 
in the town of Canaan, Conn. He received a common school educa- 
tion. In 18G8 he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Negaunee, 
Marquette county. Occupation mining and iron manufacture. 



SAMUEL G. IVES, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1857. was born in Lansing 
N. Y., Dec. 21, 1812. Settled on a farm in Unadilla, Mich., in 1835. 
He was a republican elector in 1872. He was a commissioner to 
locate, and a trustee of the Pontiac asylum. Removed to Chelsea, 



3T4 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Mich., in 1S76, and has been president of that village. In politics a 
Republican. 

ANDREW JACKSON, 

Representative from Cheboygan. Mackinac. Chippewa and School- 
craft counties in 1879, was born Oct. 29, 1844, in Henry county, Ohio; 
received a high school education at Toledo: entered the army in 1861; 
was promoted gradually to the rank of 1st lieutenant and adjutant, 
and resigned on account of wounds in Aug,, ISG'S. He re-enlisted as 
private in 1S64, and served through the war, receiving the rank of 
brevet major. In 1872 he removed from Louisville, Ky., to Sault Ste. 
Marie. Mich. He was chairman of the board of supervisors in 1S77. 
Occupation, government and railroad contractor. Politics democratic. 



WILLIAM JAY, 

Senator in 1863-4-5, from Washtenaw county, was born at Penning- 
ton, N. J.. July 22, I s - '20. He was a clerk two years in New York city, 
then became one of the firm. He was a merchant at Trenton, N. J., 
filled several city offices, was a member of the New Jersey legislature 
in 1855, and a delegate to the first republican national convention in 
ls.jO. He settled on a farm at Whitmore Lake. Mich., in 1859. In 
1S69 he removed to Emporia, Kansas, and has been twice mayor of 
that city. He is president of the citizens' bank of Emporia, and a 
prominent and successful busings man. 



HENRY H. JENISON, 

Senator from Ingham and Clinton counties in 1883, was born in Eagle. 
Clinton county, Michigan. September 25, 1S42, where he has since 
resided. Occupation, farming. He was elected to the Senate by 
1,189 majority over his republican competitor. 



WILLIAM F. JENISON, 

Representative from Clinton county in l v, >J-4. was horn in Byron, N. 
Y.. Dec. 12, 1812. Attended common schools, and the college at 
Brockport. N. Y. Taught school seven years. Settled as a farmer in 
Eagle. Midi., in 18:57, where he still resides. He was supervisor ten 
years, held mam town offices, and was for four years sheriff of Clin- 
ton county. He kept a hotel tor thirty years. He was a director of 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 375 

the Ionia and Lansing railroad, secured *10, 000 subscription, and gave 
two years' time to secure the road. In politics a Democrat. 

WILLIAM B. JENKINS 

Was born in Greene county. Pa., Oct. 4, 1783. In 1799 he removed 
with his parents to the Cumberland valley, Tennessee. In 1804 the 
family emigrated to Greene county, Ohio. In 1823 lie came to Niles. 
The next year he settled in Pokagon, Cass county, and his was the 
second white family in Cass county, the first being that of Uzziel 
Putnam, sr. He was the first justice in Cass county, and one of the 
first county judges under the territorial law. He was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1835. He was a man of remarkable 
memory, and kept a complete diary of events in his mind. He owned 
large tracts of land in Cass and Berrien counties. Died in 1847 at 
Berrien Centre, Michigan. 

BELA W. JENKS 

Was born at Crown Point. N. Y.. June 6, 1824. lie %vas educated at 
Charlotte, Vt., and settled at St. Clair, Michigan, in 184S. He be- 
came a successful merchant, and dealt in lumber and real estate. 
Has always been a Republican, has held several local offices, and in 
I860, 1870-1-2 was Senator from St. Clair county. 

J ERE ill AH JENKS, 

Senator from Lapeer. Sanilac and Huron counties in 1875, was born in 
Sullivan county, N. H., December 1:!. 1810. He received a common 
school education. He removed from Essex county, N. Y.. to Michi- 
gan in 1854. and has ever since resided in this state. He was inspec- 
tor of customs from 1S61 to 1864, and was also deputy collector of 
internal revenue two years. He has held various other offices of 
public trust, and is by occupation a lumberman. In politics a Re- 
publican. 

JOHN S. JENNESS, 

Representative in 1865, and Senator in 1867 from Lapeer county, was 
born at Newbury. Yt., April 27, .813. Was bred a farmer, then a 
clerk, and for thirty years a merchant. He opposed railroad aid in 
1867, none of the thirty bills passing over the veto of Gov. Crapo. He 
was president of the village of Almont in 1866-7. Now resides in 
Detroit. In politics Whig and Republican. 



376 3JICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



WILLIAM JENNEY. 



Secretary of State from 1879 to 1883, was born at Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., June 18, 1837. Iu 1843 removed with his parents to Mt. Clemens, 
Mich., his present residence. He graduated at Brown University in 
1S59. In 1801 went out as captain of a company in the Oth Michigan 
infantry, served four years, and became a major. Became a lawyer 
at Mt. Clemens, also engaged in farming. He was Senator from 
Macomb county in 1877, also colonel of state militia and aid-de-camp. 
A Republican in politics. 



IRA JENNINGS, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1839 and 1847. was a 
farmer and an early settler in the town of Green Oak, in 1S3G. He 
was supervisor of the town in 1844, and served eight terms in that 
capacity. Deceased. 

HIRAM JENNISON, 

Representative in 1853, from Ottawa county, was born in Canton, N. 
Y., May 11, 1813. A lumberman and farmer by occupation, a Demo- 
crat in politics. He came to Michigan in 1S34. He was the first 
settler in Georgetown, Ottawa county, and for eleven years was 
supervisor of the township. The village of Jenisonville, in George- 
town township, was named after him. 



WILLIAM JENNISON, 

Circuit judge of the third judicial circuit (Wayne county), was born 
in Boston, Mass., Dec. 10, 1S2G. He prepared for college, but ill 
health prevented him from pursuing a college course. The years 
that would have been devoted to study were spent in contact with 
the practical business of mining and manufacturing, in winch his 
father was engaged in Pennsylvania, his leisure hours, however. 
being given to personal study and culture. His legal education was 
acquired chiefly at the Harvard law school, from which he gradu- 
ated in 1S50, subsequently spending a year in the ofhee of the late 
Hon. A. D Fraser, of Detroit, From 1853 until his election as judge 
in 1882 he was in continuous practice in Detroit. He was reporter of the 
Supreme Court, 18G5 to 1»70, preparing for publication live v. -lames 
of reports. He served a year, 1SG9-70, as assistant U. S. districi 
attorney, and one term, 1872-3, as member of the hoard of education. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 377 



DAVID HOWELL JEROME, 



Governor of Michigan. 1881 to 1883, was born at Detroit, Michigan, 
November 17, 1829, and is the son of Horace and Elizabeth Rose (Hart) 
Jerome. His father died when he was an infant, and his mother 
removed to central New York, but in 1834 returned to Michigan and 
settled in St. Clair county, where Governor Jerome was educated. In 
1853 he went to California and engaged in mining. In 1854 he set- 
tled in Saginaw and engaged in merchandise, and is still in the hard- 
ware trade. In 18*32. under appointment of Governor Blair, he raised 
the 23d Michigan infantry in a short time, and was commandant of 
camp with the rank of colonel, until the regiment went to the field. 
In 1S65 and 1S66 he was military aid to Governor Crapo, and in 18G5 
was appointed on the state military board, of which he was member 
and president until 1873. In 1862 he was elected to the State Senate, 
and served six years, being chairman of the committee on state 
affairs throughout that time. He opposed municipal railroad aid and 
supported the vetoes of those measures. In 1873 he was appointed 
on the committee to revise the state constitution. He served several 
years on the board of Indian commissioners; was active in building 
the railroad from Saginaw to St. Louis, and long its president: also 
president of the Saginaw street railroad company; also trustee of the 
Michigan military academy. In 1859 he married Lucy Peck, daugh- 
ter of E. AY. Peck, of Pontiac. In 1S80 he received the republican 
nomination for governor, and was elected by a large majority, serving 
from 1SS1 to 1383. He is a Republican in politics, in religion an Epis- 
copalian. He is still in tin:- prime of life, and in active business at 
Saginaw, He always takes active interest in all matters pertaining 
to the intellectual and moral advancement of his fellow citizens. 



GEORGE JEROME, 

Senator from Detroit, lSVj-7-8, was born in Tompkins county, N. Y.. 
in 1824, coming witli his parents to Michigan in 1827. His father, 
Horace Jerome, in connection witli Thos. Palmer, built the first lum- 
ber mill in the West on Pine River in St. Clair county. Except some 
four years spent at the East in pursuing his education, he has lived 
continuously in Michigan since 182?,and in Detroit since 1844, having 
previously to that time lived in St. I lair county. He was admitted to 
the bar in Detroit in 1848. During his senatorial term he was chair- 
man of the judiciary committee. He has been the general attorney 
of the Detroit, Grand Haven & Milwaukee railway under all changes 
of management from 1859 to the present time. Was collector of cus- 



378 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

toms at Detroit, 1 S 6 ( J to 1875, when he was relieved at his own re- 
quest. He was one of the commissioners on the plan of the city. 
1857 to 1869, and has held other positions of trust. Politically he 
graduated from the whig into the republican party. 



TIMOTHY JEROME, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1857, was born in Truruans- 
burg, N. Y., Feb. 16, 1820. Occupation a lumberman, politics first 
whig, then republican. He came to Detroit in 1828, was an active 
business man and lumberman in St. Clair county until 1803, then 
removed to Saginaw, where he has since been a manufacturer of lum- 
ber and salt, also engaged in steamboating, mining in the western 
territories, and in cattle ranches. 



EDWARD JEWELL, 

Representative from Kent county in 1865-7, was born in Greene 
county, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1818. By occupation a farmer, in politics a 
Republican. Came to Michigan in 1855, and was four terms super- 
visor of Solon. Kent countv. Present residence Petaluma, Cal. 



JOSEPH B. JEWELL, 

Representative from Newaygo county in 1S77, was born in Grattan. 
N. Y., in 1826. From 1836 to 1856 he lived in Allegany county. X. Y. . 
working the last ten years as a carpenter and joiner. He settled on a 
farm in Newaygo county in 1856, and has been also engaged in lum- 
bering. Has twice served as president of the county agricultural 
society, several years as supervisor of Dayton, and has held other 
positions. In politics a Republican. 



GEORGE W. JEWETT 

Was born in Connecticut, and came to Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1830 
from Ohio. In politics a Demoerat. by profession a lawyer. Hewa- 
a member of the second convention of assent which met at Ann Arbor 
December 14, 1836. and accepted the terms prescribed for the admis- 
sion of Michigan as a state. He was also justice of the peace. Die': 
at Ann Arbor before 1860. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 379 



DANIEL JOHNSON, 



Senator from Saginaw county in 1853, was born in Haverstraw, N. Y.. 
in 1821, and was a capitalist and lumberman. He came to Michigan 
in 1S4G, founded Zilwaukie, Sagina%v county: was an extensive ship 
timber dealer in New York city, and also a leading lumberman in the 
Saginaw valley from 181? to 1858. Died August 6, 1S60. 

DANIEL F. JOHNSON 

Was born in Canton (now Cairo), N. Y., Jan. 29, 1801. In 1834 he 
settled on a farm in Groveland, Oakland county. He was supervisor 
in 1836, and in 1851. In 1840 he was representative in the legislature, 
elected bv the whigs. He became a Republican in 1854. 



DAYID JOHNSON 

Was born in Sangerfield, N. Y.. Oct. 20. 1809. Removed to Genesee 
county, N. Y. , in 1824, studied law. and was admitted to the bar. 
He went to Painesville. O.. in 183G, came to Michigan in 1837. and 
settled in practice at Jackson in lbOS. where he died Aug. 28, 1SSG. 
He was in the first rank of lawyers; was prosecuting attorney; repre- 
sentative in 1845-7 : judge of the Supreme Court 1852 to 1857: and 
democratic candidate for that position in 1857. He practiced at Jack- 
son 48 years. He had a strong constitution, an active temperament. 
was decided in his convictions, well versed in law, and a leader at the 
bar. He stamped his impress upon the early history of Michigan 
as one of the ablest of the pioneers. 



FRANKLIN JOHNSON 

Was a native of Yermont. He became a lawyer and settled at Mon- 
roe, Mich., in 1835. He was city attorney of Monroe, prosecuting 
attorney and judge of probate. He was judge of the first circuit 
from 1SG3 to 1809. An able lawyer and judge. Died at Monroe. Oct. 
11, 1870. 

J. EASTMAN JOHNSON 

Was admitted to the bar of St. Joseph county, Michigan, in 1837, and 
practiced law until his death, which occurred at Niles. March 14, 18SS, 
at the age of S3. He bad been a regent of the state University: pro- 
bate judge of St. Joseph county; and was a presidential elector in 



380 MICHIGAN* BIOGRAPHY. 

1884. Politically a Republican. He was a distinguished Mason, was 
long secretary of the grand lodge, and had also been grand master. 



JAMES JOHNSON, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 18S3-5, was born in Sum- 
merset, Ohio, February 22, 1S14; removed to St. Joseph county. Mich- 
igan, April 18, 1832. Occupation, farmer, lumber manufacturer, and 
dealer in real estate. In politics a Democrat. 

SAMUEL JOHNSON, 

Representative from Cass county in 1877-79, was born July 7. 1S39, in 
Springfield. N. Y. He received an academical education, and grad- 
uated at Cazenovia seminary, N. Y. He removed to Michigan in 
1864. He was elected township clerk six years; supervisor of 'Wayne 
township three years; county superintendent of schools in 1S73. He 
was a teacher, but engaged in farming and the breeding of fine stock, 
in which he is deeply interested. He is a Republican. For several 
years past he has been a professor in the state agricultural college at 
Lansing. 

WELCOME W. JOHNSON, 
Representative from Kent county in 1877, was born at Williamstown, 
Mass., Oct. 26, 1817. His parents removed to Oneida county. N. Y.. 
in 1819. He came to Michigan in 1S3j. He received a common school 
education. He served several years as town treasurer in Dundee. 
Monroe county. In 1840 he united with the Michigan confer.; >nce as 
a preacher, of which conference he is still a member and holds a 
supernumerary relation. He resides near Grand Rapids, where he 
has a farm, and preaches occasionally. In polities a Republican. 

DE GARMO JONES, 
Senator from Wayne and other counties in 1840-1, was born in 
Albany, N. Y.. in 17S7, an 1 came to Detroit as a sutler in the army 
under Gen. Harrison in lS13, and subsequently settled there. He 
established a store and became a leading business man. and at a later 
date was prominent in the development of the Lake Superl >r 
mines. He was mayor of the city in 1^39, several times alderman, 
and took an active interest in business, church and educational 
affairs, and left a valuable estate. He was a Whig in politics. Died 
in 1*40. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 381 

EDWARD L. JONES, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1850, was born at Chesterfield. 
Mass., January 1, 1814. Removed to the state of New York and 
became a clerk. In 1833 became clerk in the commercial bank of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1838 cashier of the merchants and mechanics' 
bank of Monroe, Mich., which failed in 1840. Removed to Jackson, 
became a druggist, and sold out in 1849. From 1852 to 1859 was in 
the banking business at Cleveland, Ohio, then in same business at 
Milwaukee. Wis., until 1863, then in the sanitary commission at At- 
lanta and Chattanooga until the close of the war: organized national 
banks at Atlanta and Columbus, Ga., but retired from business in 
1879. Resides at Atlanta. First a Whig, since a Republican. 



GEORGE C. JONES, 

Representative from Ontonagon county in 18G5, was born in Orleans 
county, N. Y., October 1, 1829. By occupation a lawyer, politically a 
Republican. He came with his father in 1S43 to Springfield, Mich., 
where he lived until 1853. He studied law and settled in Ontonagon 
in 1854. Removed to Appleton, Wisconsin, in 18G9, where he now 
resides. 



GEORGE JONES, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1853, was born in Manchester, 

N. Y., August 18, 1810. He came with his father's family to Novi, 
Mich., in 1831. He was captain of militia in 183S. He removed to 
Oneida, Mich., in 1843, and settled near Grand Ledge, where he now 
resides. He has served nine years as supervisor, four years as t iwn 
clerk and been a justice two terms. In politics a Democrat, by occu- 
pation a farmer. 

OILMAN C. JONES. 

Senator from Cass county in 1861-2, was born at Hopkinton, N. H., 
July 26, 1820, was brought up on a farm and became a teacher. He 
settled on a farm in Cass county in 1844, taught school, was a clerk, 
in 1850 became a merchant at D >wagiac, where he now resides. Has 
been president of the village several times, repeatedly a supervisor. 
He was a Republican, but since the war lias affiliated with no 
political party. Is a dealer in wool. 
3'J 



382 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JOHN D. JONES, • 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1S77, was born in London 
Ontario. January 17, 1825. He removed to DeKalb county 111 [q 
1838, thence to St. Claii county, Mich., in 1843, and resides in Brock- 
way. He is engaged in lumbering and farming. He received a 
common school education. He has been supervisor for six terms' 
justice twenty -six years, school director twenty-three years, and held 
all town offices, except treasurer and clerk, for a number of terms. 
He has also been postmaster at Merrillsville twenty-three years. In 
politics a Republican. 

JOHN H. JONES 

Was born at Hopewell. N. Y.. .April 37, 1828, and was educated at 
the Genesee Wesleyan seminary at Lima. N. Y. He afterwards 
became a teacher. In 1854 he settled on a farm at Quincy, Michigan 
For several years he was supervisor. In 1865-7 he was a Representa- 
tive, and Senator in 1809-70-75. He voted to sustain Gov. Crape's 
position on railroad aid Kills, and was one of five Senators who voted 
against the passage of the railroad law. He still resides at Quincy. 



RICHARD JONES, 
Representative from Barry county in lb67, was born in Otsego county, 
N. Y. He came to Michigan in 1848, and now lives at Battle Creek. 
By occupation a farmer, in politics a Republican. Has been super- 
visor and town clerk. 

WHITNEY JONES. 
Auditor General, 1855 to 1859, was born i„ Chautauqua county, N. Y.. 
May 2, 1812. He moved from New York to Michigan in 1S39. He 
was a country merchant, and took up his residence in Deltu, 
Eaton county. He was supervisor and postmaster; Representative 
for the counties of Eaton and Ingham in 1S45-6; postmaster of Lan- 
sing, 1849 to 1853; auditor general two terms, from 1*55 to 1859; state 
senator from Clinton and Ingham counties in 1859; United States 
assessor for the third district, comprising the counties of Washtenaw. 
Jackson, Calhoun, Eaton and higham, 1862 to 1S0G: postmaster oi 
Lansing, 1868 to 1871; and treasurer of Ingham county 1883 to 18-7 
He was a leading Whig until la", I, when he helped organize the 
republican party at Jackson, and was the first nominee of that partv 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 3S3 

for auditor general. He supported Greeley in 1872, and eventually 
became a member of tlie greenback party. In 1SS7 he removed to 
Alameda, California. 



WILLIAM T. JONES, 

Representative from Mecosta county in 1985-7, was born in Water- 
town, Ontario, March 10, 184G, and has been a resident of Michigan 
since 1873. By occupation a lumberman. Mr. Jones has held various 
offices of public trust, among which are township and village treasurer, 
supervisor, superintendent of poor, village president, and president of 
the Mecosta county agricultural society. He was elected Representa- 
tive on the republican ticket by a vote of 2,141 to 1,366 for Joseph H. 
Kilbourne, and 271 for John S. Weidman, Prohibitionist. 



CHAUNCEY JOSLYN 

Was born at Throopsville, New York, June 28, 1813. Educated at 
Temple Hill, Livingston county. After leaving school he engaged in 
teaching for five years, when he began the study of law. In 1837 he 
removed to Ypsilanti. He was elected a Representative in 1S43, a 
member of the state board of education in 1831, and judge of probate. 
Washtenaw county, in 1852. In 1853 he was appointed one of the 
commissioners to construct the St. Mary's falls ship canal. Was mayor 
of Ypsilanti in IS-jS. Mr. Joslyn was elected judge of the 22d judi- 
cial circuit in April. 1881. on the democratic ticket, and served until 
the close of 1887. 

JAMES E. JOY 

Was born at Durham, N. H., Dec. 20, 1S10. He graduated at Dart- 
mouth in 1835, and subsequently at the Cambridge law school. In 
his junior years he was a teacher, and instructed classes at Dart- 
mouth, after graduating. He settled at Detroit in 1836, studied law, 
and became a partner of Geo. E. Porter, under the firm name of Joy 
& Porter. As a lawyer lie was eminently successful. He early gave 
attention to banking. land and railroad interests, and his law practice 
was largely in those directions. In 184G he was a principal agent in 
organizing the Michigan Central railroad company, and be was many 
years connected as attorney, counselor, director and president. He 
built the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, and the Flannibal iV: St. 
Joseph railroads, and in connection purchased for those companies 
800,000 acres of valuable lands. The budding of the Chicago & West 



384 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Michigan: the Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw; Detroit, Lansing & 
Northern; and Detroit & Bay City railroads, were greatly indebted to 
him for aid. Later he directed his attention to the Wabash, opening 
up a new route between Detroit and St. Louis. His success was largely- 
due to the confidence eastern and foreign capitalists had in his saga- 
city and financial ability. He is still in the enjoyment of full physical 
and mental vigor. Formerly a Whig, later a Republican. A Repre- 
sentative in 1801-2, a regent of the Universitv since 1881. 



ETHEL JUDD, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1S55-7, was born in Herkimer 
county, N. Y., April 27, 1807. By occupation a farmer, in politics a 
Republican. Me settled on a farm in Adams, Mich., in 1837, and 
built the first church and school-house in the town, also the first six 
frame dwelling houses. He was five years supervisor. He raised a com- 
pany for the 10th Michigan infantry in 1861, and went south with 
them, but returned in 1862 from ill health. He died Feb. 11, 1880. 



J. BYRON JUDKINS, 

Of Hersey, was born at Coldwater. Ohio, January 18, 1851; was edu- 
cated at the Celina union school and Liber college, Ind.; moved to 
Michigan in 1870; studied law at Big Rapids; was admitted to the bar 
in 1874; settled in Hersey, September, 1S75: was appointed .judge of 
the nineteenth judicial circuit in March, 1880, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Hon. Samuel D. Haight. and was elected with- 
out opposition for the unexpired term, in November. 1880. In the 
spring of 1881 he was re-elected, without opposition, to the same oflice 
for the full term. 



MARTIN KALLANDER, 

Representative from the Ontonagan district in 1887, comprising the 
counties of Baraga. Isle Royal, Keweenaw and Ontonagon, was born 
in Sweden, September 28. 1S52. lie landed in this country in 1^-72 and 
went direct to Eau Clare, Wisconsin, and continued a resident of that 
state until July. 1885, when he located at Bessemer, Michigan. His 
principal occupation has been that of railroad and timber contractor. 
He is running the largest boarding house at Bessemer, and is a 
leader of his fellow countrymen in that region. Mr. Kallander was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 3S5 

nominated for Representative by the labor party and then endorsed 
by the Democrats, the vote being 1,503 to 1,325 for George A. Royce. 
Republican, and GO for Ole Michaelsen, Prohibitionist. 



JACOB KANOUSE 

"Was born in Morris county, N. J., August 23, 1817. He came to 
Michigan at an early day and settled in Livingston county as a 
farmer. He is a resident of Cohoctah township; has held many 
offices, among them, justice, judge of probate four years, and was a 
special commissioner to take the vote of several Michigan regiments 
during the war. He was a Representative in 1861-2, as a Republican'. 

EDWARD KANTER. 

Representative from Detroit in 1857. was born in Breslau, Germany, 
in 1834, and came to this state in 1842. From 1847 to 1867 was in 
active mercantile life, since has been at the head of a banking house, 
now the German-American bank, of which he is president. He was 
for five years an inspector of the Detroit house of correction, four 
years a member of the poor commission, and was a member and 
treasurer of the state commission to the New Orleans exposition in 
1885. In politics a Democrat, four years a member of the state com. 
mittee and eight years of the national, twice on the electoral ticket, 
twice a candidate for state treasurer, and delegate to the national 
convention in 1876. He is president of a number of German societies. 



JONATHAN KEARSLEY 

Was born in Virginia in 1786, and graduated at Washington college 
in 1811. In 1N12 he was appointed 1st lieutenant of the 2d artillery 
corps, and during the war held the positions of captain, major ami 
assistant adjutant general. He was engaged in many battles, and 
lost a leg at Fort Erie. In 1817 was appointed receiver of taxes in 
Virginia, and in 1819 became receiver of the U. S. land office in 
Detroit, which he held for thirty years. He was also regent of the 
University of Michigan, mayor of Detroit, and judge of the recorder's 
court. A Democrat in politics. Died at Detroit in 1859. 



ROBERT C. KEDZIE 
"Was born in Delhi. N. Y.. January 28, 1823. He graduated at Oberlin 
college in 1847, and from the medical department of the Michigan 



386 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



University in 1831. He settled at Kalamazoo, but in 1852 removed to 
Vermontville, where he remained until 1861, when he entered the 
army as surgeon of the 12th Michigan infantry. On his return he 
settled at Lansing, and has been professor of chemistry in the state 
agricultural college since 1SG3. He was for many years a member of 
the state board of health, and its president. He was president of the 
state medical society in 1874, is a member of various societies, 
and has a national reputation as the author of valuable papers on 
health, hygiene and agriculture. He was Representative in 1867 as a 
Republican. 

WILLIAM KEDZIE 

Was born in Scotland in 1771; came to America in 1795: made the 
first entry of public lands in Blissfield (now Deerfield), Mich., in 1824, 
and settled upon it with his family in 1826. He was the first super- 
visor and postmaster, and assisted in organizing Lenawee county. 
He was appointed associate judge of Lenawee county November 27. 
1827, and was re-appointed November 28, 1828. He died in 1828. 



RICHARD KEELER, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1877. was born in Ridgefield, 
Conn., March 1, 1825. He moved to New York in 183-4, and thence 
to Michigan in 1847. He received a common school education, and 
has been town clerk of Pennfield for twelve years. He is a farmer, 
in politics a Republican. 

ANDREW J. KEENEY, 

Representative in l^G3-4, from Monroe county, was born in the state 
of Pennsylvania February 20. 1819. By occupation a farmer and 
stock raiser, and has been largely engaged in lake fisheries. Politi- 
cally a Democrat. Has been supervisor, justice, and held other 
positions. Came to Michigan with his father's family in 1S2S. and 
now lives in Erie, Mich. 



SALMON KEENLY 

Was born July 24, 1794, in Wyoming county, Pa. Came to Michigan, 
and settle.l on a farm in Erie, Monroe county, in 1828. Was ap- 
pointed a judge of the county court the same year, and held thai 
position until the organization of the .state- government. Was the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 387 

first justice of the peace in Erie, and held that position nearly all the 
time until his death in 1847. He was a Democrat, and prominent in 
all matters of public interest in the early history of the county and 
state. 

EDWIN \V. KEIGHTLY 

Was born in Van Buren, Ind., Aug. 7. 1843. He received an academi- 
cal education and graduated at the law department of the University 
in 18G5. He engaged in law practice in St. Joseph county, and in 1872 
was elected prosecuting attorney. He was appointed judge of the 
15th circuit to fill a vacancy, and in 1S75 was elected to that position 
for six years. In 1876 he was elected Representative to congress from 
the fourth district and served one term. He is now engagei in the 
practice of his profession. 

WILLIAM A. KEITH, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1883, was born in Indiana Feb. 
26, 1843, and was educated in tbat state and in Illinois. Served in the 
tenth Illinois cavalry from Sept., 1861, to Jan., 1866, rising from private 
to captain. Then settled as a farmer in Berrien county, Mich. Politi- 
cally a Greenbacker. 

EDWIN KELLOGG, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1850, was born in Sheffield, 
Mass., Feb. 17, 1803. He settled at White Pigeon in 1830. He was a 
merchant at Schoolcraft and Sturgis. and one of the firm of Kellogg 
& Brothers at White Pigeon engaged in merchandise and flour mill- 
ing. He removed to Kansas in 1854, where he was a farmer until his 
death, Jan. 6, 1876. 

FRANCIS W. KELLOGG; 

Was born in Worthington, Mass., May 30, 1810; received a limited 
education, and removing to Michigan, entered into the business of 
lumbering at Kelloggsville, Kent county. As a Republican he was 
elected to the legislature <>f 1857. In 1858 he was elected to the 
thirty-sixthcongress as Representative from the third district of Mich- 
igan, and was re elected in I860 and ISG2, serving from 1859 to 1865. 
During tlte rebellion lie raised six cavalry regiments for the service. 
In 1S65 President Johnson appointed him collector of internal revenue, 
for Alabama, and he was afterwards elected to congress from that 
state. 



388 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JOHN R. KELLOGG 

Was born in New Hartford, N. Y. , in 1793, was a clerk as a young 
man, and from 1818 to 1S36, a successful merchant at Marcellus. N. 
Y. Settled at Allegan, Mich., in 1836, where he resided until his 
death in 1868. He was a Representative in 1838, and for six years a 
member of the state board of education. He was an intimate friend 
of Seward and Cass, and kept up a friendly correspondence with 
them through life. He was largely interested in lands and acquired 
a competence. Often a delegate to state conventions, he had great 
weight in party counsels. A Republican in politics. A man of 
remarkably fine appearance, of genial nature, and greatly respected. 

OLIVER KELLOGG 

Was born in Sharon, Conn., Oct. 2, 1797. He came to Detroit, July 
4th, 1832, and with an ox team conveyed his family to the western 
part of Washtenaw county. He purchased a large tract of land in 
Sharon. Held various positions of public trust, was associate judge 
under the county court system, postmaster, member of the legislature 
of 1837, justice, etc. He sold his farm and moved to Ann Arbor in 
18o6, where he died Feb. 24, l!?59. In politics a Democrat. 

SHIYERICK KELLOGG 

Was born in Murray, N. Y.. Sept. 9. 1S17. He was educated at Pots- 
dam academy, and settled as a farmer in Easton. Ionia county, in 
1549. He held several local offices and was a Representative in 1571- 
2-3 and 4. In politics a Republican. 

HARRISON KELIA, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 15"j9. was born in Jefferson 
county, Ya., Nov. 25, 1797. A farmer, in politics a Whig, Abolition- 
ist, Republican, and now a Greenback Prohibitionist. He came to 
Michigan in 1833, and purchased a farm in Burr Oak, on which he 
still resides. 

MARK N. KELLEY, 

Representative first district of Lapeer in 1N5.V7, %vas born at Pontiac. 
Oakland county, October 17, 1831. Mr. Kelley removed with his par- 
ents, in 1844, to Lapeer county, where he lias since resided. He 
received a common school education, and at an early age 1 egan 



MICHIGAN BIOOBAPHY, 380 

farming, which he followed until 1868, when he engaged in mercan- 
tile business. In 1873 he built an elevator at Metamora, still continu- 
ing farming, and is also engaged in the produce business. He has 
held the office of supervisor, township treasurer, and Representative 
in 1885-6, and was re-elected on the republican ticket member of the 
House of 1887-8, by a vote of 1,309 to 1,187 for J. M. Wattles, and 283 
for Peter Hagle, Prohibitionist. 

ROBERT J. KELLEY, 

Representative from Alpena and other counties in 1877, was born in 
.Monroe county, Mich., Sept. 3. 1844. He received an academical 
education, and in Sept., 1862, enlisted in company K. 5th Michigan 
cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He took a commer- 
cial college course in Detroit, graduated from the law department of 
the University in 1868, and commenced practice at Bay City, but since 
1869 has been in practice at Alpena. 

NEWELL J. KELSEY, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1883. was born at LeRoy, Mich., 
June 20, 1843, received a high school education, and was a teacher at 
sixteen. He served in the war from Aug., 1861, to Sept., I860, first 
in the 2d Michigan infantry, then " Merrill's Horse," 2d Missouri cav- 
alry, and rose to the rank of lieutenant. Now a farmer, in politics a 
Republican. Several years a supervisor, and chairman of the board. 

SULLIVAN R. KELSEY, 
Representative irom Shiawassee county in 1847, 1859, 1861-2, was born 
in Fairhaven, Vt., Aug. 16, 1805. He was educated in private and 
common schools. He was clerk in a store, then engineer in a paper 
mill, and traveling salesman. At twenty-one he became a merchant 
in Fairhaven, and from 1831 to 1833 was in the same business at 
Brockport, N. Y. In 1833 he removed to Bloomfield. Mich., and 
opened the first store in what is now the village of Birmingham, 
where he continued in business for eleven years, and was postmaster 
from 1837 to 1844. He became a resident of Byron, purchased the 
water power, and, with B. W. Dennis, built and operated the Byron 
mills until 1856, then alone until 1858. He then engaged in the hard- 
ware trade until 1865 In 1864 he was elected judge of probate, and 
held that position from 18G5 to 1D81. He was eight years justice, nine 
years supervisor at Byron, and was alderman and mayor of Corunna. 
First a Whig, then a Republican. Died in 1886. 
40 



390 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

REUBEN KEMPF, 

Senator from Washtenaw county in 1SS5, was born in Pennsylvania. 
He has been a resident of Michigan for forty-six years. His former 
occupation was that of merchant, but he is now a banker. He has 
been extensively interested in the commercial affairs of Washtenaw 
county for thirty years. He commenced active work for himself as 
a tinner and gradually worked his way through the various stages of 
business enterprise, until he stands in the foremost rank among the 
commercial men of his county. He is a Republican. 



FRANK KENDRICK, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1881, was born in Waterford. 
Maine. He removed to Michigan with his parents when about six 
years of age. Having received an academical education he engaged in 
teaching. August 18, 1861, he enlisted as a member of Co. A, 5th 
Mich, cavalry, and served until the war closed, being discharged June 
3, 18G5. During his service he participated in forty battles: was 
wounded three times, and returned home in poor health and with a 
broken constitution. He engaged in farming, but was obliged to 
abandon that pursuit on account of his health. He then taught for 
three years, when his health failed so completely that he had to 
abandon all pursuits, and, for a number of years, was a confirmed 
invalid. In 1680 he was elected justice of the peace. Republican. 
Died Nov. 10, 1831. 

FREDERICK G. KENDRICK. 

Representative from Macomb county in 1800-70, was born in Ger- 
many, May 14, 1830. Came to Michigan in 1844. He was at first a 
farmer, then a merchant, and was in the lumber, sash and blind busi- 
ness for nine years. Was sheriff of Macomb county from 1870 to 
1S74. Has been a member of the Mt. Clemens board of education for 
nine years, and is president of' the Mt. Clemens bitter water com- 
pany. Is now postmaster, and in politics a Democrat. 



LUCIUS KENDRICK, 

Representative from Lapeer county in ISG9-70, was born at Darien. 
N. Y., Oct. 9. 1817. and settled in Lapeer county in 1^30. !!.• held 
several offices of trust in Dryden, and in the county. He was for 
many year- a local correspondent of the Detroit Tribune, and con- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 391 

tributed a valuable series of articles to the Lapeer Clarion of remi- 
niscences of Lapeer county. Died Oct. 12, 18^3. A Republican iu 
politics. 

FREDERICK A. KENNEDY, Jr.. 

Representative from Jackson county in 1846, was born in Brighton, 
England, Feb. IS, 1811. He came to Pennsylvania in 1S19. but soon 
removed to Lodi, N. Y. In 1831 became a farmer in Ridgeway, Mich. 
Settled in Hanover, Mich., in 1837, and was supervisor four years. 
justice eight years, and since 1875 superintendent of the poor. He is 
the county agent of the state board of charities. In politics a Demo- 
crat. 

FREDERICK A. KENNEDY, Sr., 

Was born in England, Dec. 27, 1785. He came to America in 1817, 
and resided in Pennsylvania and New York until 1831. when he 
removed to Michigan, settling in Lenawee county in what was after- 
wards called Ridgeway. He was a cooper by trade, but after coming 
to Michigan followed farming principally. In politics a Democrat, 
and in 1850 was a Representative in the legislature. In 1857 he 
removed to Jackson, where he resided until his death. Feb. 26. 1^72. 



MUNNIS KENNEY, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1S40, was born in New- 
fane, Yt., Dec. 10, 17>S. He receive'! an academical education, was 
three years in Williams college, and the fourth at Middlebury. gradu- 
ating in 180'.>. Studied law, and was in practice at Townshend. Yt.. 
and was a member of the Yermont assembly in 1816-17-21. He lived 
at Brighton. Mass.. a few years, and in 1820 settled on a farm in 
Webster. Mich. He was an anti-slavery Whig, the founder of the 
Washtenaw mutual insurance company, and for many years its sec- 
retary. Died April 23, 1843. 

MYRON C. KENNY, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1865, was born in Perry. N. Y., 
in 1823, and came to Michigan in 1^42. By profession a physician, iu 
politics a Repuhlican. Received au academical education at Romeo. 
Mich., and taught several terms in Macomb county and at Lapeer. 
Studied medicine and went into practice at Lapeer in LS4-8. '■ 
still resides. He was three years president of the village and twice 



392 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

mayor of the city of Lapeer, school inspector seven years, and mem- 
ber of the board of education for sixteen years. Was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1807. 



RICHARD KENT 

Was born in Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 30, 1786. He received a good 
academical education, taught school and practiced surveying several 
years. He was an early settler in Adrian, Mich., where he followed 
farming and was Senator in 1853. He was also supervisor and held 
other town offices. Died in 1807. 



WILLIAM A. KENT 

Was a Representative from Branch county in 1833. He was a typical 
pioneer; full of force and energy. A leader in the democratic party 
until the time of his death in 1862. He was associate judge under the 
old system, and was known as Judge Kent. 



JOHN KEN YON 

Was born in Queensimry, N.Y., July 28, 1806, came to Tyrone, Mich., 
in 1810, purchased a farm, and followed that occupation for life. For 
nine years supervisor of the township. In 1849 he was a Representa- 
tive, and Senator in 185.5. He died November 12, 1874. In politics a 
Democrat. 



BENJAMIN B. KERCHEYAL. 

Senator from Wayne and other counties in 1S38-9, and president pro 
tern, in 1839, was born at Winchester. Ya.. April 9. 1793, and was the 
son of an officer of the revolution. Came to Detroit at an early age. 
In 1821 he was appointed pension agent of Indiana, and removed to 
Fort Wayne, but returned to Detroit, where he died. March 23, 1835. 
He was a member of the first convention of assent; alderman in 1830; 
director of the Detroit & St. Joseph railroad company in 1835: trus- 
tee of the Detroit savings hank; a corporator of the Peninsular bank 
in 1849: and for many years a forwarding and commission merchant. 
doing business at the foot of Woodward avenue. A daughter is the 
wife of Moses W. Field. In politics a Democrat. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 393 

DANFORTH KEYES, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1875, was born in Ashford, 
Conn., May 27, 1816. He received a common school education, 
removed to Clinton, Michigan, in 1836, and lias since resided there. 
He was supervisor of Tecumseh in 1863-4-5, and after the division of 
the town in 1869 was supervisor of Clinton in 1869-70. Engaged in 
the milling business, and also a grain dealer. In politics a Demo- 
crat. 

HENRY C. KIBBEE, 

Senator from Macomb county in 1851, was born in Orange county, 
Vt., October 22, 1S18. He came to Michigan in 1839, and commenced 
milling in 1844 at Mt. Clemens. He was contractor for the Erie and 
Kalamazoo canal in 1847, and in 1849 contractor for the Buffalo & 
Blackwell canal, N. Y. In 1831 re-organized the bank of Macomb 
county, and was president, vice president and cashier until 1838, 
when he sold out and went into the lumber firm of Kibbee. Fox & 
Co. In 1S61 was a large contractor in buying horses for the army, 
and in 1*63 was elected cashier of the first national bank of Detroit. 
In 1857 was appointed pension agent, and served through the term of 
Buchanan. Also organized the banking firm of Duncan. Kibbee & 
Co. Not in active business since 1867. In politics a Democrat. 



PORTER KIBBEE, 

Commissioner of the state land office from April 2, 1850, to December 
31, 1^">4. was born in Orange county. Vt., in July, 1813. He came to 
Michigan in 1836, and for many vears was a resident of Mt. Clemens. 
He was for two terms judge of probate for Macomb county. He 
held a partnership with his brother in flouring and lumber mills, the 
firm being P. & H. C. Kibbee. In 1S5S he was elected president of 
the bank of Macomb county. By occupation a merchant, in politics 
a Democrat. Is now an invalid and resides at Detroit. 



RUFUS KIBBEE, 

Senator from Lenawee county in 1846-7, came from the state of New 
York, and was a physician and druggist at Canandaigua. He re- 
moved to Coldwater about 1867, where he died about l>>«3-4. In 
politics a Democrat. 



394 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



JOSEPH H. KILBOUBNE, 



Representative in 1847-9, from Ingham county, was born in West- 
bury, Lower Canada, May 8, 1809. He settled in 183!) in Meridian. 
Michigan, where he now resides. Was postmaster in 1840, in 1844 
county superintendent of the poor, and supervisor in 1840-7. He is 
said to have been very effective in the removal of the capital from 
Detroit to Lansing. A farmer and a Democrat. He was a colonel of 
militia in 1848. 



SAMUEL L. KILBOURXE. 

Representative from Ingham county in 1875, was born near Toronto, 
Canada, in 1839. He removed with his father to Detroit in 1839. and 
to Okemos, Ingham county, in 1841. He received an academical 
education at the agricultural college. He graduated from the law 
department of the Michigan University in I860, and commenced the 
practice of his profession in Lansing, where he still resides. In 1S61 
he edited the Lansing State Journal, in 1868-9 was clerk of the 
Supreme Court. Pie has been city attorney two terms. In politics a 
Democrat. He has an extensive practice, and is one of the law firm 
of Kilbourne & Humphrey. 



JOHN K1LLEAN, 

Representative from Kent county in 1887, was born at Buffalo, N. Y. . 
November 27, 1831. and has been a resident of Michigan since 1S64. 
Formerly his occupation was varied, but at present a grocer. He has 
been alderman of Grand Rapids twice, president of the common coun- 
cil three times, and member of the police and fire commission. He 
was elected Representative on the fusion ticket by a vote of 4.149. 



WILLIAM M. KILPATRICK. 

Senator from Livingston and Shiawassee counties in 1881-2, was born 
at Middlesex, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1840. He received an academical edu- 
cation, and was a teacher. He graduated at the law department of 
the University in 1866, and is in practice at Owosso. He has been 
city attorney two terms, twice supervisor, mayor of Owosso. and 
prosecuting attorney two terms. Has also been chairman of the 
republican county committee, and a member of the state committee. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 305 

EBENEZER C. KIMBERLY, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1831, was born at Manstield. 
Conn., Oct. 9, 1777, and died at Corunna. Michigan, July 8, 185*3. He 
came to Corunna in 1840, as the agent of Trumbull Cary, an exten- 
sive land holder, and devoted himself to that business as a resident. 



EDWARD KING, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1881-2-3, was born in Lon- 
don, England, September 12, 1S30, and came to this country with his 
father in 1833. They resided in New York city until 1837, when they 
settled at Ypsilanti, Mich. He was engaged in mercantile business 
until 1867, when he purchased the farm upon which he has since 
lived. In politics a Democrat. 

GIDEON G. KING 

Was born in the state of New York, about 1S20, came with his father 
from Lima, N. Y., to Ypsilanti in 1S37, and removed to Am boy, 
Hillsdale county, in 1841. He was supervisor of Amboy six years. 
By occupation a farmer, in politics first Whig and then Republican. 
He was Representative in 1855. He died at the age of 39. 

JOHN B KING. 

Representative from Monroe county in 1850, was born in the state of 
New York in 1798. Came to Michigan in 1*32, and settled on a farm 
in SummerhVM, Monroe county. He was town clerk, supervisor, jus- 
tice nine years, and held other town offices. He removed to Raisin- 
ville where he was supervisor, justice, and overseer of the poor. A 
Democrat until 1856. Died March 20, 1857. 



NATHAN G. KING. 

Senator from Jackson county in 1873-1. was born in Nassau, N. Y., 
Feb. 25, 1819, received a common school education, and prepared for 
college under private instruction; was engaged in extensive mercan- 
tile operations in early life, but in 1813 commenced the study of law, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1816. Commenced the practice of his 
profession in Albany, N. Y.. in company with Hon. X. II. Hammond, 
and afterwards had for Ids partner Hon. Henry Hogeboom. He emi- 
grated to Michigan in 1836, and settled in Berrien county. In l s| i-"> he 



306 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

removed to Brooklyn. Jackson county, where he now resides. Politi- 
cally a Republican. 

SOLOMON O. KINGSBURY, 

li7* e 2^v?« Ken ; co , unty in i867 ' ~ born in 

OhTo" if k F SO ° n after rem ° Vin ° t0 Gainesville. 

Ohio, where he received a common school education. In early life 
he was a clerk. He became a resident of Grand Rapids at an early 
ndwasamerchant. He was elected county treasurer in 1848 
and 18o0, serving four years, then resuming mercantile business. In 
1858 he opened a real estate and insurance office and continued in that 

ZT^X 1 !: ^ 186? hG ~ aPP ° hlted P ° StmaSt - « Grand 
Rapids, and held that position two years. Died May 1G, 1836. 

JAMES KINGSLEY, 
Representative from Washtenaw county in 1837, '48/ '69, 70 and 
Senator -1838-9 and 184,, was bom in Canterbury, Conn., January 
0,1797, attended school until nineteen, then took a Latin course" 
either at Brown University, or with one of its professors. From Iff*' 

o G?an7r Tt " thefamily ° f Lud ^ 1J Lee > - Virginia; removed 

to Grand Gulf. M,s,, and from there to Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1826. 

bate 18«>0 toT4 J K Ann Cla, ' k - Fr0m 183 ° t0 1S: ^ *** ^ P~- 
bate. 18„0 to !833 member of the territorial council: a trustee of the 

University of Michigan in 1831; in 1850 a member of the constitu- 

tonal convention: in 1852 elected rege.it of the University: and was 

:;::s oroun " rbor ' ^ P ^ aDemo -^ Died 

DANIEL KINNE 

SSftsrri^ county - x - Y - in i8w and settied ° n a f — »■ 

Reading Hillsdale county. He was live years supervisor, and held 
o her own office. In lM3 he was associate judge of ^ ; fa 

con st Zf P , reSentatiVe ^ tUe le * islature ; aud -as a member of fc e 
constitu tional convention of I80O. He was active in building a plank- 
road from Reading to Hillsdale: in the Reading manufacturing 

company, and cheese factory. He died manv years since 



EDWARD D. KINNE. 



Re 



presentative from Wash 



Witt, N. Y.. 



>" ls '~- He prepared for 



enaw county in ISS1-2, was born at De 



jeat Cazenovia seu)inary 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 397 

N. Y., and graduated in the classical department of Michigan Uni- 
versity in 1864. He also graduated from the Columbian law school 



in 



an 



Washington, D. C, in 1867. Having located at Ann Arbor in 1867,' 
he has practiced law in that city since. He has been city recorder 
and city attorney of Ann Arbor, and mayor two terms. In 1886, as 
the republican candidate, he was elected judge of the circuit com- 
prising the counties of Washtenaw and Monroe. 

GEORGE KIPI\ 

Representative from Genesee county, in 1873-4. was born in Owasco, 
N. Y., November 25, 1811. In 1814 he removed to Erie county, N. Y.' 
He was educated in common scbools. In 1846 he came to Michigan] 
■and settled in Atlas. Genesee county, where he now resides. He°has 
held several local offices. By occupation a farmer. 

JAMES KIPP 

Was born in Cayuga county. N. Y., June 13, 1801. He removed in 
1836 to Atlas, Mich., and was supervisor seven terms, between 1839 
and 1848, justice from 1837 to 18.54, and associate judge of the county. 
He removed to Duplain, Clinton county, in 1855, where he lived two 
years, then became a resident of St. Johns. By occupation a farmer, 
in politics a Republican. He was a Representative in 1857, and 
superintendent of poor in Clinton county from 1866 up to the date of 
his death, October £2, 1884. 

WILLIAM J. KIRBY, 

Representative from Kalamazoo in 1887, was born in Otsego countv, 
N. Y., February 11, 1845. His former occupation was that of sur- 
veyor and civil engineer: at present a farmer. He was appointed 
supervisor of Pavilion in 1SS2, and elected in 1883 and 1S84. He was 
superintendent of the building of the Kalamazoo county court house 
in 1884. Mr. Kirby was elected Representative for 18^7-8 as a Re- 
publican by a vote of 2,130 to 1,645 for David R. Chandler, and 200 
for L. T. Becker, Prohibitionist. 



OTTO K1RCIIXKR, 

Attorney general of Michigan from 1877 to ISSl, was born at Frank- 
fort-on-the-Oder. Prussia. July 13. is,,;. He came to Berlin, On: r. ,, 
with his father in 1854, received an academical education, an 
-II 



398 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the study of law. In 1SG4 was a clerk to the auditor general, and in 
18G3 clerk of the House judiciary committee. Studied law in Detroit, 
and was admitted in 1SGG. He stumped the state for Grant and 
"Wilson in 1872, in 1876 was chairman ot the republican city com- 
mittee, and was a delegate to the Cincinnati convention. In 1885 he 
was appointed one of the professors of law at Ann Arbor, but re- 
signed after a short service. Has a lucrative law practice. In poli- 
tics a Republican. 

GEORGE KIRKLAND, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1855, was born in the state of 
New York, Sept. 1, 1810. By occupation a farmer, a Democrat in 
politics. He came to Bedford. Mich., in 1842. Has held the offices 
of supervisor, road commissioner, justice sixteen years, and treasurer 
of the F. M. F. insurance company several years. Now resides at 
Samaria, Monroe county. 

WILLIAM M. KIRKPATRICK, 

Representative from Marquette county in 1885, was born at Allegheny 
City, Pa., Jan. 17. 1849, where his early years were spent. Has held 
the office of justice and school inspector. In politics a Republican. 



HENRY KLEI, 

Representative from Wayne county in 18S1-2, was born in Germany, 
July 21, 1819. His parents emigrated to America in 1852, and located 
in Detroit, where he has since resided. Mr. Klei received his educa- 
tion in the public schools in Detroit. He was elected alderman in 
1878, and in 1879 for the full terra of two years. He is a cigar manu- 
facturer by occupation, and a Republican in politics. 



PETER KLEIN 

Was born Sept. 12, 18L0, in Oermingen, Alsace, and came with his 
parents to this country in 1828, who settled in Erie county, N. Y. 
He studied medicine and practiced four \ ears at Rochester, N. Y., and 
two years at *t. Catherines. Ontario. He graduated from Geneva 
medical college in 1846, and soon after settled in Detroit, where he 
practiced his profession. He has been city and county physician and 
United States surgeon at tiie Detroit harnuks. He was a Represent- 
ative from Detroit in 1869-70-75. In politics a Democrat. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 399 

ALOXZO F. KXAPP, 
Representative from Oakland county in 18734, was born in Bristol 
N. Y., March 12, 1833. He emigrated to Michigan in 1834, and set- 
tled in Salem, Washtenaw county. He finished his classical educa- 
tion at the state normal school. He studied medicine, and graduated 
from the western medical college, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1805? In 1868 
he removed to South Lyons, where he now resides, and practices his 
profession. 

CORNELIUS KXAPP 
Was born in Nassau. X. Y.. July 12, 1824. When young his parents 
removed to western New York, where they lived until 1835, when 
they removed to Rome. Michigan. He worked on his father 3 farm 
until 1846, then learned the carpenter's trade and followed it until 
1859. He bought a farm in Pome in 1850, and now lives upon it. 
He has been supervisor for sixteen years, and in 1871-2 was a Repre- 
sentative in tiie legislature. 



JACOB KXAPP, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1881-2, was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, October 14, 1S46. He received a common school 
education and came to this country in 1866, and settled in Detroit, 
but in 1863 removed to Saginaw City, where he has since been ( 
in the manufacture of cigars. He was alderman in 1877 and IS79. 
Politically a Democrat. 



SAMUEL O. KXAPP, 

Member of the state board of agriculture from 1808 to 1874. was born 
at Royalton, Vt., April 21, 1816, and died some years since at Jacks n. 
He settled in Jackson in 1844, and introduced the manufacture of 
woolen goods into the state prison. He was several years president 
of the Jackson school board. He was a recognized authority in hor- 
ticulture. He was interested in copper mining in 1847-8, and made a 
valuable report upon the geology of that part of the state. A Repub- 
lican in politics. 

GEORGE W. KXEELAXD 
Settled in Howell, Mich., in 1836, first as a farmer, afterwards 
engaged in running a steam saw mill at Howell, and was in the same 



» 



400 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

business in Iosco where he died. He was judge of probate of Living- 
ston county in 1S40, held other public positions and was elected a 
Representative in 1850. Polititically a Demociat. 

GODFREY E. KNIGHT, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1875, was born Sept. 15, 
1838, in Schoolcraft, Michigan. He graduated from the University 
of Michigan in 18G0. He has held several village offices and been jus- 
tice of the peace in Schoolcraft. Is by occupation a merchant, in 
politics a Democrat. 

HENRY C. KNIGHT 

Was born in East Bethlehem, Pa., Sept. 13, 1817. He graduated at 
Jefferson college, spent one year in Yale law school, came to Michi- 
gan in 1837, and settled at Pontiac. He was admitted to the bar in 
1830, remained in Pontiac until 1848, and was a partner of O. D. 
Richardson. He then taught a classical school, and devoted himself 
to the ministry until 1853, when he settled in Detroit and resumed 
law practice. He was an alderman aud member of the board of edu- 
cation of Detroit; prosecuting attorney of Wayne county, and regent 
of the University, both of which positions he held at the time of his 
death, March 26, 1867. He was for many years superintendent of the 
Fort street Presbyterian Sunday school. In politics a Republican. 

NATHAN KNIGHT, 

Representative from Bay county in 1S77-70, was born at Otisfield, near 
Portland, Maine, July 14, 1817. His father removed to Michigan in 
1826 and settled at Avon. Oakland county. He finished his educa- 
tional studies at Austinburg institute, Ohio. He taught school two 
terms, and came to Bay City in 1854. He was supervisor of Hampton 
for many consecutive years. His principal business is farming. In 
politics a Democrat. 

RICHARD KNIGHT. 

Representative from Antrim and other counties in 1883, was born in 
the county of Surrey, England, and had a common school education. 
He came to Woodstock, Ontario, in 1S50, and was a blacksmith in 
Canada and Wisconsin. Removed to Banks, Mich., in l v 'i3. Has 
been sheriff of Antrim county, sixteen years a justice, and town treas- 
u rer. Politically a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 401 

ELBRIDGE G. KNOWLTON. 

Little can be learned of Mr. Knowlton, Representative from Oakland 
county in 1844. He was a farmer and innkeeper in the town of 
Groveland; was supervisor in 1837-38-41, also justice of the peace. 
He came to Michigan in 1S37 and removed in 1847. Representative in 
1844. 

EZRA L. KOON, 

Senator from Branch and Hillsdale counties in 1869-70-83, was born 
at Tyrone, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1833. Came first to Michigan in 1S44, but 
taught school and attended Franklin academy, Plattsburgh. N. Y.. 
in 1854-5. Studied law in Illinois and at Hillsdale, and was admitted 
in 1859, where he is now engaged in practice. Circuit court com- 
missioner two years, and prosecuting attorney four years. With 
Hon. Charles Upson was a commissioner to examine the compilation 
of 1S71. Has been twice mayor of Hillsdale; since 187j a trustee of 
Hillsdale college: and vice president of second national bank of Hills- 
dale since 1874. Politically a Republican. 

JOSEPH KUHN 

Representative from Detroit in 1879, was born in Neustadt, Hesse 
Cassel, Prussia. March 9. 1826. In 184G he emigrated to Detroit. Tl.e 
same year he removed to Perry county, Ohio, where he received a 
collegiate education. In 1849 he returned to Detroit and established 
a select school. He has served as justice two terms, al ierman, 
school inspector, and a member of the board of estimates. Occupa- 
tion, general foreign and domestic business, exchanges, real est ite. 
loans, etc. Politics, democrat. 

FREDERICK W. A. KCRTH, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1879, was born June 6, 1844 
in Berlin, Germany. In 1852 he emigrated to America and settle i in 
New York city. Iu IS54 he removed to Detroit. He received a lib- 
eral education, and in 1861 enlisted in the war. In 1865 he em'oarked 
in the retail grocery business In 1*78 he was elected superir.:^:. tent 
of schools at Springwells. In politics a Republican. 

EDWARD S. L.VCEY 

Was born in Chili. X. Y.. Nov. ;)>;, 1835. In 18P2 he removed to Cni :i 
City, Mich.; in 1843 to Kalamo, and in 1S57 to Charlotte. His edu- 



4U2 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

cation was received in the common schools and Olivet college. lie 
was elected register of deeds of Eaton county in 1SG0, and re-elected 
in 1862; began the banking business in 1802, and assisted in organiz- 
ing the first national bank of Charlotte in 1871, of which he has ever 
since been a director and cashier. He was mayor of the city of Char- 
lotte; a delegate to the republican national convention at Cincinnati 
in 1S76, a trustee of the Michigan asylum for the insane from 1871 to 
1880. He was a Representative in the forty-seventh congress and 
forty-eighth congress as a Republican. Mr. Lacey was elected chair- 
man of the republican state committee in 1882, which position he 
held for two years. lie is now president of the national bank at 
Charlotte, and was a leading republican candidate for United States 
Senator in 1887. 

ELIJAH LACEY, 

Representative from Berrien connty in 1838, Senator in 18-10-41, 61-2, 
and delegate in the constitutional convention of 183"), was born in 
Loudon county, Va., March 28, 17'Jo. He received a limited educa- 
tion. At the age of ten became a resident of Ohio. Settled at Rich- 
mond. Ind., in 1820, and was for rive years an editor. Settled at 
Niles, Mich., in 1829, where then only two log houses had been erected. 
He laid out the village and built a saw and flouring mill. In 18-15 he 
built the mill race and mills near the railroad bridge, in which he 
retained an interest until his death. Pie was president of the village 
and mayor of the city of Niles. Died before the expiration of his 
term as Senator. 

OBED P. LACEY 

"Was born in Ohio in 1810, and came to Niles, Mich., in 1828. He 
gave the name of Niles to that place in honor of the editor of the 
Niles Weekly Register, a noted New England paper of that time. He 
established a trading house with the Indians, had a postoffice estab- 
lished, and was the 6rst postmaster, and the first clerk of the town of 
Niles. He built the first bridge over St. Joseph river, and owned two 
additions to Niles aud West Niles. He was a Representative in the 
legislature of 1843. Died May 13. 1814. In politics a Democrat. 

SAMUEL S. LACEY, 

Commissioner of the state land office, lSftl-5, was born in Benning- 
ton, Vt., May 28, 1815. His father wa> a captain in the war of 1812, 
and both his grandfathers served in the revolution. His father 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 403 

removed to western New York in 1818, and the son received an aca- 
demical education, and graduated at Hamilton college. Resided in 
Arkansas four years, and was judge of Hot Springs county. Settled 
at Homer, Mich., in 1840, and was ten years a farmer. He removed 
to Marshall, where he now resides, in 1855. He was clerk of Calhoun 
county four years; was agent to select lands for the agricultural col- 
lege: was commandant of camp with authority to raise the 28th 
Michigan infantry; collector of internal revenue; postmaster of Mar- 
shall in 1867, and now in that position; ten years member of city board 
of education, and for some time editor of the Marshall Expounder. 
A Whig until 1804, a Republican until 1872, and a Democrat since 
that time. 

NATHANIEL LADD, 

■Senator from Wayne county in 1855, was a native of Vermont, born 
Dec. 20, 1805. He enjoyed a New England common school education, 
was a farmer by occupation, and settled in Dearborn in 1830. Politics. 
Republican. 

STALLHA.M W. LA DU, 

Representative from Montcalm county in 1881-2-3, was born in Duchess 
county, N. Y., February 28, 1823. His education was mainly received 
at Red Creek union academy, N. Y. After teaching he entered tne 
ministry of the M. E. church in Canada. While acting in this capac- 
ity he became one of the originators and founders of Albert Univer- 
sity, located at Belleville. Ontario, and served on its board of manage 
ment and as one of its senators until his removal to Michigan in the 
fall of 1807. Owing to loss of health he was obliged to forego his 
ministerial duties, and in 1874 located in Montcalm county, where his 
time has been principally occupied in farming. Originally a Demo- 
crat, he embraced abolitionism during the time he was pursuing 
his academic studies, and from that graduated into the republican 
party. He was state oil inspector 1885-7. 

WILLIAM P. LAING 

Was born in Milton. N. Y.. June 26, 1813. and came to Ann Arbor in 
1833. He removed to Shiawassee county in 1830, and helped build the 
second log house in Owosso. In 1837 he settled in Sciota. where he 
held the otlices of supervisor and justiceof the peace. In 1S-30 he moved 
to Perry Center, Shiawassee county, secured a mail route from Lansing 
to Byron through IVrry, and was appointed postmaster. In 1S56 lie 



404 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

was elected sheriff of Shiawassee county, and was re-elected in 1858. 
In 1803 .was a Representative. He is a farmer, and a Republican in 
politics. 

WILLIAM S. LAING, 

Senator from the counties of Marquette, Menominee and Iron in 1887, 
was born in Scotland in 1845, and came to Canada with his parents in 
1849. He removed to Michigan in 1865, where he was engaged to 
work in the lumber woods and at farming until 18T8, when he removed 
to Iron Mountain, and engaged in the butcher business. He is inter- 
ested in a large wholesale and retail meat market at Iron Mountain, 
and at Marinette, Wisconsin, and in a saw-mill and general store at 
Wilson. He was elected to the Senate as a Republican by a vote of 
5,141 to 4,700 for George W. Brown, democratic and labor candidate. 



ALBERT L. LAKEY, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 18S7, was born at 
Uxbridge, Mass., March 25, 1840. He resided in New York and 
Pennsylvania until 1861, when he enlisted at the age of fifteen and 
served until May, 1865. Located at Kalamazoo in 1867, and is engaged 
in the manufacture of paints and roofing. He has been three times 
a member of the common council. 



JACOB C. LAMB 

Was born in Springfield, N. J., April 10, 1828. In 1852 he came to 
Michigan and settled in Dryden, Lapeer county, as a farmer. He 
was a Representative in 1871-2-3 and 4. He was for several years a 
member of the republican state committee. He is a prominent busi- 
ness man at Imlav Citv. 



JOHN M. LAMB, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1841-2-3, and Senator in 1836-8- 
63-4, was born in Springfield, N. J.. Aug. 11, 1808. He came to Mich- 
igan in 1834, and in 1836 settled in Dryden, Lapeer county, improved 
a large farm, and was also in mercantile bu-iness from 1841 to 1869. 
He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1867. He was 
first a Whig and then a Republican. A useful, influential man. Died 
Nov. :j. 1871. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 405 



ROBERT D. LAMOND 



Was a graduate of the Vermont medical college at Castlefon, and 
Fairfield medical college, N. Y. He settled in Flint about 1838, coining 
there from Pontiac where he was in practice prior to 1833. He was a 
member of the Oakland county medical society and was its secretary 
in 1833. He was one of the original members of the Genesee county 
medical society, and became the leading physician of Genesee county. 
He was a Representative in 1811. Died at Flint in 1871. 



COLOMBIA LANCASTER, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1838, was born in New 
Milford, Conn., August 26, 1803. By profession a lawyer, in politics a 
Democrat. He came to White Pigeon, Michigan, in 1830, where he 
remained until the county seat was removed to Centreville, when he 
erected the first residence there. He was a member of the first con- 
vention of assent in 183G. In 1838 he left Michigan with his wife and 
daughter and with an ox team traveled to Oregon territory, where he 
arrived in September of the same year. At the crossing of the Mis- 
souri river lie was elected to the command of the emigrating com- 
pany, consisting of 81 wagons, the command terminating at Ash 
Hollow, beyond the hostile tribes of Indians. He found a provisional 
government established in Oregon. In 1817 he was appointed supreme 
judge of Oregon, which he held until congress organized the territory 
and appointed judges. He was afterwards delegate to congress from 
Oregon. He now resides at Vancouver, Washington territory. 



JOHN LANDON, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1865-71, was born in 1833. in 
Cayuga county, N. Y. He came with his father's family to Spring- 
port, Mich., in 1835, his father building the first house in that town- 
ship. The son received a fair education, and was elected supervisor 
when quite young, holding that position several terms. He was a 
farmer, a Republican in politics. He died March 13, 1871. before the 
expiration of his second term, and his funeral was attended by eight 
representatives as pall bearers, and by the speaker and clerk of the 
House. 

RUFUS W. LANDON 

Was born in Salisbury. Conn.. May 3, 1S15. He received a common 
school education and came to Niles. [Berrien county, May 9, 1532, at 
42 



40G MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the age of seventeen, in the midst of the excitement caused by the 
breaking out of the Black Hawk war. He was one of the first set- 
tlers in Berrien county, and always lived at Niles. In politics a 
Democrat, and by occupation a dealer in real estate. He was post- 
master of Niles from 1837 to 1841, and treasurer of Berrien county 
for ten years, from January 1, 1843, to December 31, 1852. He was 
elected to the State Senate in 186:2, and served in the sessions of 1S63- 
4. He was a gentleman highly respected in the city and county, 
which was his home for more than fifty years. He died in 1886. 

MINOT T. LANE 

Was born at Marlborough, N. H., March 12, 1807. He cameto Michi- 
gan in 1831 and settled at Romeo. He was a Representative in 1838 
and 1848. In politics a Democrat. He removed to Detroit in 1848. 
He was regent of the University from 1845 to 1849, and held several 
municipal offices in Detroit, including that of police justice from 
I860 to 1870. Died February 23, 1875. 

PETER LANE, 

Born April 23, 1823, in Aurelius, N. Y., cameto Flint, Michigan, in 
1814. Moved to Saginaw in 1850, where he has since resided. He 
was town clerk in 1851, and treasurer in 1852. Went to California in 
1853 on horseback. He has been alderman and supervisor in Sagi- 
naw, and for three years chairman of the county board of super- 
visors. In 1869-70 he was a Representative. Has been a millwright, 
and saw-mill engineer, and for eight years was in the lumbering 
business. Now retired. Republican in politics. 

THOMAS D. LANE 

Was born in Victor, N. Y., J.une 26, 1820. He came with his parents 
to Salem, Michigan, in 1836. His father served in the war of 1812. 
The son was reared on a farm, and most of his education was obtained 
nights, by the aid of burning tamarack knots. He was inspector of 
schools fifteen years, supervisor four years, Representative in 1859, 
Senator in 1861-2. He taught school seventeen years. 

NATHANIEL LANGDON, 

Senator from Monroe county in 1865. was born in the state of New 
York, June 18, 1810. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Demo- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 407 

crat. He came to Ida. Monroe county, in 1847, where he still resides. 
He has been supervisor of that town for twenty-seven years. 



LEANDER LAPdAM, 

Representative from Barry county in 18G5, was born in Erie county. 
New York, October 8, 1819. He came to Michigan in 1830, lived i:i 
Wayne county seven years, and in 1837 settled upon a farm in the 
town of Maple Grove, Barry county, where he still resides. Has been 
fifteen terms supervisor. In politics a Republican. 



CHARLES LARNED, 

Attorney General of Michigan territory under Governor Porter. wa : 
born in Pittsfield. Massachusetts. He graduated at Williams college 
in 1806. and studied law in Kentucky with Henry Clay. While a 
student there he enlisted in Colonel Owen's regiment, which marched 
tD the relief of General Harris :>n at Fort Wayne. He rapidly rose to 
the rank of major, and was in the battle of the Thames and other 
engagements. At the close of the war he engaged in law practice in 
Detroit, and became distinguished in the profession. As attornev 
general of the territory, he conducted the difficult negotiations that 
grew out of the Black Hawk war. He died August 13, 1834. 



JAMES B. LARUE 

Was born in Erankhn, N". J., Feb. G. 1800. He ran a paper mill in 
New Prospect, N. J. He came to Michigan in 1838, and took up large 
tracts of land in Berrien county, near St. Joseph. He built a double 
saw-mill and improved a farm seven miles up the St. Joseph river. 
He had 1,000.000 feet of the best whitewood lumber piled up which 
all went to waste during the great depression, because it would not 
pay for shipping to Chicago. He went to California in 1840 with ox 
teams, working at gold digging a year or two, then negotiated with a 
Spaniard for two hundred acres of land near Oakland, opened a st^re 
and boarding-house, laid out the town of San Antonio, now a par: of 
Oakland, was elected to the California legislature, organized a steam 
ferry company, and ran two steamers across the bay from San Fran- 
cisco to Oakland and San Antonio for several years. He died in ls72, 
leavinga valuable property. He was Representative in IS 40 and 1841 
as a Whig. 



408 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



HENRY B. LATUROP 



Was born in Hanover, N. H., in 1808. In 1815 he went to Buffalo, 
N. Y., and remained in that vicinity until 1834, then came to Detroit, 
where he followed the occupation of a mason and contractor. In 
1838 was an alderman. In 1838 he removed to Jackson, where the 
state prison had been located on twenty acres of his farm. He 
donated the stone for the west half of the prison buildings. He was 
a Representative in 1840, and in 1847 was Senator. In 1840 he became 
a government agent, and traveled extensively through the states and 
Canada. In 1852 he went to California with a drove of horses, cattle 
and sheep, and engaged in mining. He was the first man wlio made 
a success of carrying water by a wrought iron pipe thirty inches in 
diameter, crossing Feather river by a truss bridge, 1,081 feet below 
the head or inlet, thence rising 900 feet in a half mile so as to com- 
mand the mines. Against the predictions of engineers it carried 36,- 
000,000 gallons of water per day for sixteen years. Hundreds of 
miles of pipe are now used for die same purpose. In politics, first a 
Whig, since 1854 a Republican. Now resides at Ionia. 



HORACE N. LATIIROP, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1S53, was born at Norwich. 
Conn., March 9, 1805. He settled in Oregon, Lapeer county, Mich., 
in 1836, was the first supervisor of the town, and held that position 
several terms, also other local offices. By occupation a farmer and 
miller, in politics a Democrat. Died in May, 1871. 



W. IRVING LATIMER 

Was born in Dutchess county, N. Y., in 1836. He received a good 
common school education, and came to Michigan in 1859, where lie 
soon took a prominent part in public affairs. During his residence 
in the state he lias held the offices of deputy collector of United 
States revenue, postmaster, township treasurer, city treasurer of Big 
Rapids, and mayor of that city. He has always been a Republican, 
and was a member of the state central committee in 1870. While 
serving his third term as treasurer of Mecosta county, he received the 
nomination, by the republican state convention of 1878, for auditor 
general, to which office he was triumphantly elected. This was 
followed by a re-election in 1830. Mr. Latimer is now a resident of 
Lansing. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 409 

DAVID L. LATOURETTE 

"Was born in Seneca county, N. Y., August 26. 1823. He came to 
Michigan in 1835, and was engaged in the manufacture of linseed oil 
and woolen goods, later became a banker and established a national 
bank in Fenton, of which he was president. He held various posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility, and was Senator from Genesee 
county in 1SG7, as a Republican. He died at Prescott, Arkansas, 
September 22, 1885. 

BENJAMIN LAUBACH, 

Representative from Ottawa county in 1877-79, was born in Fishing 
Creek. Pa., October 8, 1823, and, with his parents, removed to Seneca 
county, Ohio, in 1S3G. He received a common school education. In 
1853 he removed to Michigan and purchased and cleared p, farm four 
miles north of Berlin, Ottawa county, upon which he has since con- 
tinued to reside. He has held the office of justice for fifteen years 
and supervisor for four years, and is largely engaged in the settle- 
ment of estates of deceased persons. In politics a Republican. 



PETER E. LAWRENCE, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1843, was born in Marcellus. 
N. Y., in 1807. He came to Michigan in 1S37 and went into business 
as a merchant at Leoni. In politics a Democrat. He was postmaster 
of Leoni in 1838. Died in California in 1854. 



SOLOMON L. LAWRENCE, 

Representative from Branch county in 1851, was born in Weybridge 
county, Yt., March 1, 1811. By occupation a farmer. He came to 
Coldwater. Michigan, in 1836, removed to Iowa in 1850, and now 
resides in Wilton, Muscatine county. He was a Democrat until 1861, 
now a Republican. In Iowa has been justice twelve years, mayor 
two years, and has held other positions. He was for fifteen years 
chairman of board of school inspectors in Girard, Mich. 



EZRA D. LAY, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1 S 7 5 , was born Dec. 6, 
1807, at Saybrook, Ci>nn., and was educated at district and s< It ' 
fichouls. lie removed to Michigan in 1833, settling on a farm in Ypsi- 



410 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

lanti, where he now resides. He was supervisor of Ypsilanti seven 
terms. He is by occupation a farmer, and has been president of the 
eastern Michigan agricultural society. In politics a Republican. 



DEWITT C. LEACH, 

Representative in congress from 1857 to 1861, was born in Clarence, 
N. Y., Nov. 23, 1832; received a public school education; came when 
young to Genesee county, Michigan; was a Representative in 1850; 
was a delegate in the constitutional conventions of 1850 and 1867; was 
state librarian in 1855 and 1856, removing to Lansing in 1855; was 
editor of the Lansing Republican some years; was elected to congress 
in 1856, serving two terms, from 1857 to 1861. He removed to Trav- 
erse City after 1861. and purchased and edited the Grand Traverse 
Herald for many years, and later went to Springfield, Mo., where he 
edited and published a paper. He was early a strong anti-slavery 
man, and has been a Republican since 1854, 



SIRRELL C. LE BARRON 

Was born in Woodstock, Vt , Jan. 25, 1807. He was educated at 
Woodstock, and removed to Harrisburg, Pa., in 1825. He was dele- 
gate to the Clay convention at Washington in lo32. He removed to 
Tecumseh, Mich., in .832. He was the second clerk of Lenawee 
county in 1834 and held the office until Michigan became a state, and 
was the first county clerk under the state organization. He was a Rrp_ 
resentative in 1840. A merchant for some years at Tecumseh. He 
opened the first grammar school in the county in 1832 and kept it 
until 1836. 

HENRY LED YARD, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1857-8, was born in New York city 
March 3, 1812, and his early life was passed there. He was a gradu- 
ate of Columbia college and was admitted to practice as an att »rney. 
His first official position was as secretary of legation at the French 
court under the ministry of (Jen. Cass, and from this position sprang 
an intimacy with the Cass family which resulted in his marriage in 
1839 to Matilda C, a daughter of Gen. Cass. On the return of the 
latter from Europe in 1844 he came to Detroit and assumed the man- 
agement of the large property interests of his father-in-law. He was 
alderman of his ward, 1849-50, was one of the first members of the 
board of water commissioners of the city, organized in 1853, and was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPIIY. 411 

mayor of the city in 1835. He also served as a member of the school 
board, 1846-7, and his name appears in various business and philan- 
thropic enterprises. He removed to Washington and resided there 
during Gen. Cass' service as secretary of state, and for a short time 
discharged the duties of assistant secretary of state. He removed to 
Newport. R. I., in 1861. He was a Democrat in politics. Died in 
London, England, in 1880. 



DANIEL L. LEE, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1843, was born in Yates 
county, N. Y., in 1806. Settled as a merchant in Farmington, Mich., 
in 183(5, and in 1839 purchased a farm in Novi and removed his busi- 
ness there. In 1844 became a merchant and farmer at Brighton. He 
was largely interested in lands. With Bush & Thomas he owned 
large property interests in Lansing. They built the Benton, now 
Everett, house in 1800. He was a member of the constitutional con- 
vention of 1850. Died Sept. 20, 1857. 



GEORGE W. l.EE 

Was born at Greene, N. Y.. Oct. 24, 1812. He received a common 
school and academical education and came to Livingston county, 
Mich., in 1830. and engaged in farming, and afterwards was a mer- 
chant at Howell until 1SG1. He was a Whig, but a Republican after 
1854. Established the Livingston Republican in 1S55. In 1858 was 
appointed a member of state reform school board of control, which he 
held for many year.-,. He was a presidential elector in 1S60. In 1861 
he was appointed quartermaster, had charge of the equipment aGd 
transp utation of Michigan troops during the war, and was promoted 
to colonel. Later was Indian agent for Michigan. Died several 
years since at Ypsilanti. 

JAMES LEE, 

Representative from Leelanaw and Benzie counties in 1^75-7. was 
born in Yorkshire, England, March 10, 1816, and received a common 
school education. In 1832 he emigrated to Michigan, s-ttling in 
Hamtramck, and engaging in farming and brickmaking. In 1838 I e 
removed to Bingham, Leelanaw county. He held several township 
offices, including that of supervisor for five years, and pursues : 
business of farming. 



412 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JAMES B. LEE 

Was born in Milo Centre, N. Y., April 14, 1819. By occupation a 
merchant, in politics a Democrat. He came to Michigan at the age of 
fifteen and was a clerk in the store of Thomas & Lee at Farmington. 
He removed to Brighton in 1842, where he was a merchant until 1S77. 
He married Samantha B. Chadwick in 1843. He was Representative 
in 1869-70. He died at Brighton, Sept. 5, 1886. He was for sixteen 
years postmaster at Brighton, and held all responsible offices in the 
village corporation. 

JOSIAH LEE 

Representative from Macomb county in 1841, was born in the state of 
Connecticut, June 24, 1781. Came to this state in 1832, where he 
worked two years and brought his family in 1834, settling as a 
farmer in Ray, Michigan. He was an early supervisor of that town, 
also a justice of the peace. A Democrat. Died Sept. o, 1853. 



GURDON C. LEECH 

Was born Feb. 8, 1811, in West Bloomfield, N. Y. He was a mer- 
chant of Palmyra, N. Y., from 1S28 to 1830, when lie came to Utiea, 
Michigan. He engaged there in milling and mercantile business. 
He was Representative in 1841. In politics a democrat. He died at 
Utica, May 10, 1841. 

PAYNE K. LEECH 

Was born in West Bloomfield, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1S09. He received a 
common school education and worked on his father's farm until 1830. 
He then came to Utica, Michigan, and engaged in milling until 1836, 
when he moved upon a farm in the same town. He was a Whig 
until the dissolution of that party. Has since been a Republican. 
He was a Representative hi 1846, Has held the office of supervisor 
several times. He h one of the veterans of the Toledo war. 



ANDREW J. LEETCH 

Was born in the state of New York in 1830. In 1S35 he removed 
with his parents to Canton. Wayne county, Michigan. Was brought 
up on a farm and received a common school education. Became a 
carpenter and joiner l>y trade and followed it for years. He was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 413 

Representative in 1861-2. In 1865 he became a grocer at Ypsilanti, 
and in 1866 built a malt house and brewery. Has been supervisor 
and owns a large farm in the town of Superior. 

JOHN LELTCH, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1833, was born in Scotland, 
November 10, 1832. He moved with his parents to Canada in 1811, 
and settled in Elgin county. There he passed his boyhood and early 
manhood. He moved to Sanilac county, Michigan, in April. 1856. 
and settled on the farm, where he has continued to reside. He has 
always been a farmer by occupation, but held township and school 
offices the greater part of the time. Politically a Democrat. 

ELIJAH LELAND 

Was born iu Mendon, N. Y., in July, 1804. He came to Quincy, 
Michigan, in 1834, bought a farm of 320 acres, and lived there during 
the remainder of his life. He was a Representative in 1S07. He sent 
three sons to defend the union. 

JOSHUA G. LELAND 

Was born in Madison county, N. Y., July 19, 1805, and died April 27, 
1876. He came to Michigan in 1831 and settled in Washtenaw county, 
and was a Representative in 1844-46. He was also president of the 
Washtenaw county agricultural society, of the farmers* insurance 
company, and of the county pioneer society. He %vas a successful 
farmer and business man. 

JOSEPH C. LEONARD. 

Senator from Branch county in 1853, was born at Smyrna. N. Y., 
Aug. 11. 1817. He was educated at Cazenovia, and Hamilton college, 
and settled at Union City, Mi'-h.. in 1842. He was postmaster there 
in 1816 and again in 1858, for twenty years trustee of village schools. 
and director of the Michigan Air Line railroad company. Iti politics 
a Democrat. At first a hoot and shoe dealer, but for many years a 
farmer, also engaged in surveying and conveyancing. 

DANIEL LEROY, 

Attorney General of Michigan, 1830-7, was born iu Nova Scotia. May 
17, 177"). and was educated there and at Binghamton, N. Y. He 
43 



414 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

studied law and was admitted to practice at the age of twenty-five. 
Became to Pontiac, Michigan, and was the first lawyer admitted to 
practice at the Oakland county bar, July 17, 1820. He was prosecut- 
ing attorney of the county for several years and was chief justice of 
the county court from 1S29 to 1833. He was a member of the terri- 
torial council in 1830-31, and a presidential elector in 183G. re- 
appointment of Gov. Mason he was the first attorney general under a 
state government. He was a lawyer of ability and ranked high in 
the bar of the state. Late in life he retired from business, and died 
at Fenton, February 11, 1858. Politically a Democrat. 



JOHN P. LEROY, 

Senator in 1840-41-31 from Oakland county, was born in Johnstown, 
N. Y., Sept. 22, 1804. He settled in Pontiac, Mich., in 1827: was for 
many years a justice, and served as county treasurer. He was a 
Whig and assisted in forming that party in Oakland county, and was 
a delegate to the convention that organized the republican party. 
Died August 23, 1867. 

GEORGE S. LESTER, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1830, was born in Washington 
county, N. Y., March 4. 1812. Came to Michigan in 1840, and has 
resided at Pontiac, Lexington, Port Huron, and for the last twenty- 
four years at Alpena. Has been a lumberman, and built three steam 
saw mills, collector of customs, merchant and real estate dealer, and 
is now judge of probate in Alpena county. In politics a Republican. 

AMOS LEWIS, 

Representative from Oceana county in 1879, was born March G, 1821. 
at Highland county, Ohio. He moved to Laporte county, Itul.. in 
183G, and to Oceana county, Mich., in 18GG, whore he is a farmer. 
Politics, national. 

GEORGE LEWIS, " 

Representative from Bay county in 1873-1, was born in Monroe. N. 
Y., November 8, 1827. He received his early education in common 
schools. In 1S49 he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Saginaw. 
In 1838 he removed to Pay City, where he now resides. He has been 
supervisor, and has held minor positions of trust in Bay county. His 
occupation is that of a hanker and lumberman. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 415 

JOHN D. LEWIS, 

Representative from Tuscola county in IS60, was born in Ellisburgh, 
N. Y., September 2, 1834. He was educated at Union college, and 
graduated from tbe Albany law school in 1861. He settled in prac- 
tice at Vassar, Michigan. From 1SG1 to 1868 he was principal of the 
Vassar union school. He held many local positions, including super- 
visor, circuit court commissioner and county superintendent of 
schools. He removed to Portsmouth, now part of Bay City, and was 
two years principal of schools there, later a merchant. Has been 
alderman, member of board of education, and in 1874 was Senator. 
Now resides in Florida. 

NATHANIEL W. LEWIS. 

Senator from Allegan county in 1879, was born in Washington 
county, Vt., September 11, 1832. He received a common school edu- 
cation. In 183S he removed to Calhoun county, Michigan. He en- 
listed as private in an independent regiment known as "Merrill's 
Horse," in 1862; was promoted through the grades to lieutenant: and 
was mustered out in the fall of 1865. He soon after removed to 
Ganges, Allegan countj". Occupation farmer and fruit-grower. He 
has held the offices of commissioner, clerk and supervisor. In poli- 
tics a National. 

THOMAS LEWIS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1842 and 1846. was born in 
Sandwich, Canada, in 1807. settling in Detroit in 1810. His general 
pursuits were those of merchant and farmer. In 1836. in company 
with Richard Godfroy, he made a business venture at Grand Rapids, 
which was mercantile, milling and buying furs. The firm built a 
steamer, the Gov. .Mason, the loss of which, with a cargo of furs, 
proved so disastrous that he returned to Detroit and located on 
Grosse Isle, where he owned and managed a farm, and was also 
interested in the fisheries thereabout. He w:is for many years a lead- 
ing citizen, and served his township as supervisor and justice. A 
Democrat in polities. Died October 1!). 1887. 



WILLIAM LEWIS. 

Representative from Barry county in IS hi, was born at Weatherfield, 
N. Y.,.in 1802. He came to Yankee Springs, Michigan, in 1S30, 
located a large farm, and built a hotel which became famous as 



416 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

" Yankee Lewis House." Few people of olden pioneer days failed to 
partake of the hospitalities of " Yankee Lewis." He was an enter- 
prising, active, ever busy pioneer, and did his full share in reclaim- 
ing the wilderness. Politically a Democrat. Died September 15, 1853. 



LANSING E. LINCOLN, 

Representative from Huron county in 1885-7, was born at Groton, N. 
Y., in 1842. He enlisted in 1861, and after his term of enlistment 
expired was sutler of the 148th N. Y. volunteers. At the close of the 
war went into business at Richmond, Va., and in 1807 in New York 
city. In 1871 came to Mason, Mich., and was first in the boot and 
shoe business, then engaged in shipping live stock. Since 18S1 has 
been a resident of Huron county, farming and in the live stock busi- 
ness. He was wounded at Ball's Cross Roads, Va. He was elected as 
a Fusionist. 

PETER LINDERMAN, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1857, was born at Wallkill, 
N. Y., Oct. 5, 1795, and settled at Mason in 1836. A Whig until 1854, 
then a Republican. By occupation a farmer. He was the first super- 
visor of Vevay, postmaster of Mason, for many years a justice, and 
judge of probate for Ingham county. Died March 4, 1865. 



WILLIAM S. LINTON, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1887, was born at St. Clair. 
Mich., Feb. 4. 1856. Received a common school education, was a 
book-keeper several years, then superintendent of saw-mills at Wells, 
Bay county. In 1S79 engaged in the lumber business and planing 
mill business at East Saginaw, with his father and brother. Has 
been supervisor, an alderman four years, and held other otfices. In 
politics a Republican. 

WILLIAM E. LITTELL, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1879-81-2, was born May 16, 
1838, at Cayuga. N. Y. He was educated in a district school and an 
academy. Having come to Michigan in 1851, he settled at Orion. 
He served fifteen months in the seventh regiment of Michigan volun- 
teers, during the war. He taught school and held all the varions 
offices in his township except that of treasurer; was postmaster at 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 417 

Orion six years; justice of the peace sixteen years; supervisor fourteen 
years, and chairman of the board of supervisors of Oakland county. 



CHARLES D. LITTLE, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1871-2-5-9, was born in Living- 
ston, N. Y., in 1823, and received a classical education. He came to 
Michigan in 1837, but in 18:39 went to Canandaigua, N. Y., and stud- 
ied law. In 1842 became a law partner of E. H. Thomson, at Flint, 
and was judge of probate for Genesee county. Removed to Saginaw 
in 1850, practiced law until 1861, then went into the army as quarter- 
master of the 23d Michigan infantry, was appointed assistant adju- 
tant general on the staff of Gen. Granger, and held it until 1S63, 
resigning from sickness. He was chairman of the Saginaw board of 
supervisors six years, and has held other local offices. In politics a 
Democrat. 

FLAVIUS J. LITTLEJOHX 

Was born in Herkimer county. N. Y.. in July, 1804. He graduated 
from Hamilton college in 1827, and delivered the valedictory address. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1830, and practiced in Little Falls. N. 
Y., until 1S36, when on account of ill health, he removed to Allegan. 
Michigan, and for several years vra* engaged as a survevor. engii 
and geologist, In 1842-3-S and 1855 he was a Representative in the 
legislature, and was Senator in 1845-6, and president pro tern, of that 
body in 1840. From 1S48 to 1853 he was engaged in the practice of 
law. He was elected judge of the 9th circuit in 185S, which then 
comprised twenty counties on the western shore, extending from Van 
Buren to Emmet, and served until 180,1. In 1849 he was the whig 
and free soil candidate for governor against John S. Harry, and was 
defeated by 4.279 votes. He was at one time circuit court commis- 
sioner of Allegan county. He took great interest in education and 
temperance. He was an eloquent and logical speaker, an able lecturer, 
bore a spotless reputation, and wrote a volume of interesting Indian 
legends. He died April 28, 1880. 



PHILETUS O. LITTLEJOHX 

Was born in Litchfield, N, Y.. Dec. 24, 1814. In polities a Dem icrat. 
He was a Representative in 18(i3-4. He is extensively engaged in farm- 
ing. As a young man he was a railroad contractor in Virginia . I 



418 MICH I CAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Maryland. He was justice fifteen years, member and chairman of the 
board of supervisors of Allegan county for thirteen years, and two 
years, president of the village of Allegau. 

WILLIAM LIVINGSTON, Jr., 
Representative from Wayne county in 187o, was born in Dundas, 
Ontario, Jan. 21. 1842. He removed to Detroit in 1849 and now 
resides in that city. He received an academical education and 
learned the trade of a machinist. In 1801 he became connected with 
the shipping interest, and from year to year increased his investments 
in that direction until he was the owner of a number of steam vessels. 
He has also been largely interested in the lumber business. Mr. Liv- 
ingston has been president of Detroit street railroads. In politics a 
Republican. He was appointed collector of customs at Detroit by 
President Arthur, which lie held for several years. He also published 
the Detroit Journal. 

FIDUS LIVERMORE, 
Representative from Jackson county in 1S43-4, was born at Water- 
ville, N. Y., July 21, 1811. He learned the trade of a tailor and fol- 
lowed that business at Dresden, N. Y., until 180G, then studied law 
three years and settled in practice at Jackson. Mich., in 18o9. He 
held the offices of justice, and prosecuting attorney two terms. He 
was a delegate to the democratic national conventions of 1SG0 and 1872, 
was a democratic candidate for elector in 1SGS, and the candidate of 
that party for congress in 1874 and 187G. From 1846 to 1^07 he was 
senior partner of the law firm of Livermore & Wood. He was nine 
years president of the school board, and was commandant of camp in 
the organization of the 20th and 26th -Michigan infantry. Politically .a 
Democrat. Died May 22, lb*0. 

JOHN S. LIVERMORE, 

Representative from Oakland county in sessions of 1830-42, was born 
in Sangerfield, New York, Jan. 12. 1801. By occupation a physician, 
in politics a Democrat. He located at Rochester, Mich., in 1830. He 
left there in 1S48. and died at Ft. Wilkins, on Lake Superior, Oct. 4, 
1861. He was a volunteer in the war of 1812. 

CHARLES LOCKE 

Was born in Madison county. N. Y.. May 11. 1311. He attended 
common schools and obtained a fair education. From eighteen until 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 419 

twenty-one he worked at building bridges and locks on the Schuykill 
river. He then moved to Oneida county, N. Y. , and worked a small 
farm. He came to Michigan in 1836, and finally settled in Antrim, 
Shiawassee county. After nine years he removed to Perry Center. 
He was licensed to preach in 1858. He was justice thirteen years, and 
in 1S67 Representative in the legislature. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES K. LOCKWOOD 

"Was born in Ottawa. Ohio, July 31, 1822. His education was that of 
common schools. In 1848 he settled in Port Huron, Michigan, and 
in 18G0 removed to Alpena. He held various local offices, and in 1868- 
73-4 was a Representative. In politics a Republican, by occupation 
a lumber merchant. 

MAJOR F. LOCKWOOD 

Was born January 2. 1810, in Sand Lake, X. Y. He removed to 
Parma, N. Y., in 1824, and became a farmer. He settled in Novi, 
Mich., at an early day. for eight years was a merchant, then became 
a farmer. In politics a Democrat. Representative from Oakland 
county in 1849. 

THOMAS W. LOCKWOOD, 

Representative from Detroit in 18G1-2-3-4, was a Republican in politics. 
Pie was a native of Glastenbury, Conn., born in 1817. His early edu- 
cation, which was partly academical, was acquired at Albany. X. Y.. 
where he was admitted to the bar soon after attaining his majority. 
He located in Detroit in 1S39, and to the time of his death in April, 
18GG, enjoyed not only a lucrative practice but the public confidence 
in a marked degree. He served a term as president of the Detroit 
young men's society, and his name is ass. >ciatfd with various 
public and benevolent enterprises. He was prominently connected 
with the Westminister (Presbyterian) church of Detroit. 



JOHN LOMISOX 

Was born in Turbet. Pa., Nov. 14, 1807. He worked at farming until 
the age of nineteen, when he learned the trade of a tanner an 1 cur- 
rier, and worked at it eleven years. In 1836 he settled asafarmer in 
Park, St. Joseph county. He has been several times supervis >r. town 
clerk and justice, and was Representative in l v "i"> as a Republican. 



420 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JEREMIAH D. LONG, 

Representative from Detroit in 1885, .was born in county Cork, Ire- 
land, in 1840, came to this country in 1853 and learned the trade of a 
shoemaker, then worked in the grocery business two years, and in a 
cotton mill. In 1861 enlisted in the 3d battalion rifles, and after the 
war resumed his trade. Elected as a labor candidate by a fusion witli 
the democrats. 



JOHN W. LONGYEAR 

Was born in Shandaken. N. Y., October 22, 1820, and died at Detroit, 
March 11, 1855. He received an academical education and taught 
school for several years, at the same time pursuing the study of the 
law. In 1844 he came to Ingham county, completing his studies at 
Mason, at the same time teaching select -chool. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1840, and removed to Lansing in 1847. engaging in a suc- 
cessful practice of the law, in partnership with his brother— Ephraim 
Longyear. He was one of the ablest lawyers at the bar in central 
Michigan. In 1862 he was elected by the republicans to congress, 
and was re-elected in 1804. He was a delegate to the Philadelphia 
convention in 1S00, and was a member of the Michigan constitutional 
convention in 1*07. In May, 1870, he was appointed judge of the 
United States di-trict court at Detroit, and took high rank as a jurist. 
In politics, first a Whig, then a Republican. In 1849 he married 
Harriet M. Monroe, of Eagle, and left two sons and a daughter. 



HENRY M. LOOK, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1805, was born at Hadley, 
Mich., October 27, 1S37. His ancestors from Scotland, settled at 
Martha's Vineyard in 1750. He received a thorough education, 
studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1859. He was prosecut- 
ing attorney of Oakland county in 1871-2; city attorney of Pontiac. 
.and member of hoard of education, ISiU-^: delegate to the democrati*- 
convention in 1>>72; chairman of the democratic state convention in 
1*72: chairman of the democratic county committee 1870 to 1^75. In 
polities a Democrat. Wrote a work on "The law and practice of 
Masonic trials," and from 18G9 to 1^T»'> was the grand lecturer for 
the Masonic fraternity of Michigan. Now in practice in Utah. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 421 



PETER B. LOOMIS. 



Representative from Jackson county in 18o9, was horn at Amster- 
dam, N. Y., April 14, 1820. With a fair education he was a dry 
goods merchant at Rochester. N. Y., at the age of eighteen. Settled 
at Jackson, Mich., in 1343, and from that year until 1830 was a mem- 
ber of the dry goods firm of Loomis & Dwight. He then bought and 
operated the Kennedy mill for four years. In I806 he established the 
banking firm of Loomis & Whitall, now P. R. Loomis & Co. Has 
been president of the Jackson gas company; president and treasurer 
of the Jackson and Ft. Wayne railroad company; chief of the fire 
department, and alderman. Gave efficient aid in the building of 
railroads. In politics a Republican. 



THOMAS N. LOOMIS 

Was born at Hamilton, N. Y.. July 3, 1807. and died February 20. 
1879. He located on a farm in Brandon, Oakland county, in 1S36, 
where he lived until 1S67, passing the remainder of his life in the 
village of Oak wood. He was eight years supervisor. He was a 
Representative in 1817. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Re- 
publican. 

HENRY W. LORD, 

Representative to congress 1*81 to 1883, was born in Northampton. 
Mass., in 1821. He received an academical education at Andover. 
Mass., and removed to Detroit in 1839. In 1842 went to Pontiac ai I 
resided there until 1876, engaged in farming and mercantile business, 
except from 1861 to 15(17. when he was consul at Manchester. !:!:._-- 
land. He was a presidential elector in 1870: a member of the board 
of state charities from 1S71 to 1882, and its secretary for five years: 
and for several years register of the U. S. land office at Devil's I. ike. 
Dakota. He was a resident of Detroit, while in congress. In politics 
a republican. 

EDWIN II. LOTHROP, 

Was born in Easton. Mass., March 22. 1S06. He settled on Prairie 
Ronde, in the township of Schoolcraft, Michigan, in 1830, and was a 
leading farmer, and a prominent Democrat. II<^ was a Represents 
tive in l835-6-7-'42-3-4-8, was speaker pro tern, in is 12 and 1*1.1. and 
speaker in 1844, and was also commissioner of railroads. Ele held tin* 
local office of supervisor. In 1837 he removed to Three Rivers, 
44 



422 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

he held the office of justice most of the time until his death, 
February 17, 1874. He was an older brother of Hon. G. V. X. 
Lothrop, minister to Russia. 

GEORGE V. N. LOTHROP 

Was born at Eastou, Mass.. August 8, IS 17, and spent his early life on 
a farm. He graduated from Brown University in 1£38. In 1839 he 
came to Michigan for his health, and for three years was with his 
brother Edwin H. Lothrop, on Prairie Ronde. In 1343 he resumed the 
study of law with Joy & Porter, in Detroit. In 184-1 he became a 
partner of D. Bethune Duffield.the firm of Lothrop & Durlield con- 
tinuing until 1857. In 1848 he was appointed attorney general, and 
held that position until 1831. He was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1807. He has several times been a candidate for con- 
gress, and has repeatedly received the votes of the democratic mem- 
bers of the legislature for United States Senator. In 18So he was 
appointed United States minister to Russia. He is a fine orator, and 
has long stood among the leading lawyers of the state. 



CYRUS LOVELL 

"Was born in Grafton. Vermont, Sept. 9, 1804. He received an academ- 
ical education, studied law, emigrated to Michigan in 1829, and set- 
tled at Ann Arbor. In 1831 he married Louise Fargo, and in 1832 
built the first dwelling at Kalamazoo. He enlisted for a short time 
in the Black Hawk war. At Kalamazoo he was justice, supervisor, 
and prosecuting attorney. In 183G he removed to Ionia and was the 
first supervisor in 1837. In 1849 he was Representative in the h _:-:.- 
ture, and a member of the constitutional convention in 1850. In 1855 
he was again a Representative, and was elected speaker of the House. 
the first republican who held that position. He was a Whig until until 
1854, then a Republican until 1SG0, and then supported Stephen A. 
Douglas, and remained a Democrat. " Uncle Cy " as he used to be 
known, is a fine scholar, and an able but eccentric man. He still lives 
at Ionia. 



EXOS T. LOVELL, 

Senator from Kalamazoo county in 1881-2, was born in Grafton. Vt.. 
January 22, 1821; received a common school education, and removed 
with his parents to Climax, Mich., in 1833, where he has since resided. 
He is a fanner. He lias been eleven times supervisor of his township; 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 423 

twice Representative in the state legislature (1867 and 1869); and 
twice county treasurer. He is a Republican. 



GEORGE W. LOVELL 

Was born in Grafton, Vt. , Dec. 9, ISIS. He came to Climax, Michi- 
gan, in 1835, where he lived until 1806, when he moved to Iowa, where 
he now resides. He was Representative from Kalamazoo county in 
1853-5, also held the office of supervisor. Since his removal to Iowa 
he has been elected to the Senate of that state. Was originally a 
Whig, then a Republican, but since 1875 has been a Democrat. Edu- 
cation received in common schools. Is a farmer and of late years 
interested in banking. 



LOUIS LOVELL 

Was born at Grafton, Vt., Nov. 15, 1816. In April following he re- 
moved with his parents to Springfield, Windsor county. He prepared 
for college at Chester and Bellows Falls, entered college at Middle- 
bury in 1832 and graduated in 1830. He then went south and taught 
in Georgia about two years. Having returned north in 1S38, he com- 
menced the study of law with Judge Closon in Springfield. In 1841, 
with his father's family, he located in Ionia, Mich. , where he has since 
resided. In the same year he was admitted to the bar and commenced 
practice. During the Taylor-Fillmore administration he was register 
of the United States land office at Ionia. In 1857 he was elected 
judge of the eighth judicial circuit, and re-elected in 18G3, 1869, 
1875, serving until 1881. Was a candidate for re-election in 1881, but 
was defeated. 

LAFAYETTE W. LOVELL 

Was born at Grafton, Vt., May 27, 1S23, and settled in Climax. Mich.. 
in 1835, where he now resides. He was educated at the Kalamazoo 
branch of the University, graduated at Rush medical college in 1847. 
practiced medicine tifteen years, and became a farmer. He was 
Senator in 1 S 57-S. and has also been a supervisor, and town clerk and 
inspector of the state prison. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN LOWRY 

Was born in Schoharie county. N. Y. Feb. 14, 1793. II" was aWh 
until 1854, then a Republican. II" located a farm in Lodi in I s ,'"'. ai 



424 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

moved upon it in 1820. He added to the eighty acres first taken until 
he had a splendid farm of 700 acres, with a fine house and outbuild- 
ings. He was Representative in 1839. He worked persistently for the 
abolition of slavery until it was accomplished. He held town and 
county offices with acceptance many years. Died April 23, 1S72. 



CHARLES D. LUCE, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1873-4, was born in Arcada, 
N. Y., April 6, 1820. He was educated in a common school In 1S40 
he emigrated to Michigan and settled in the township of Jefferson , 
Hillsdale county. His occupation was that of a farmer. Died in 
the fall of 1887. 

CYRUS GRAY LUCE 

Was born in Windsor. Ashtabula county. Ohio. July 2. 1824. His 
father. Walter Luce, was a native of Tolland, Conn., his ancestors 
having settled on the spot where he was born more than two hun- 
dred years ago. His mother. Mary Gray, was born at Winchester. 
Virginia. Her father having early imbibed a hatred for slavery, and 
the surrounding atmosphere not being congenial to his tastes, he immi- 
grated to northern Ohio, where Mary, the daughter, was married to 
Walter in March, 1820. Cyrus G. was born the second of a family of 
six boys. In September. 1836, the family removed to Steuben county. 
Indiana, where parents and children endured the hardships and suf- 
fered the deprivations incident to pioneer life. Cyrus G. a 
school in the proverbial log school-house during the winter months, 
and the balance of the year worked industriously in clearing away 
the forests and performing other labor usual on new farms. He also 
attended the Northeastern Indiana Collegiate Institute, located at 
Ontario, Indiana, three terms. At the ag;e of seventeen he com- 
menced work in a carding mill and cloth dressing establishm at. 
lowing the business seven years. In 1848, when twenty-four years 
of age, he purchased eighty acres of wild land iu Gilead, Branch 
county, Michigan. In August, 1849, he was married to Juli i A. 
Dickinson, and they immediately made their home upon the Ian 1 
bought the year previous. Upon this spot they continued to live uni 
August, 1882, when Mrs. Luce died. In November, 1SS3, he was 
again married to Mrs. Mary E. Thompson, of Bronson, Michigan. In 
1848, while still a resident of Indiana, he was nominated by the 
whigs as their candidate for Representative in the legislature fr >m a 
district composed of DeKalb and Steuben counties, lie was def« ated 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 425 

by eleven majority. Mr. Luce served the township of Gilead as 
supervisor for twelve years. In 1854 he was elected a member of the 
first republican legislature: in 1858 and 1800 was elected county treas- 
urer, serving two terms: was a member of the Senate in 1805 and 
1867: was also a member of the constitutional convention of 1^67. 
During his service as a member of the legislature in both branches he 
was never absent a single day. In 1879 he was appointed state oil 
inspector by Governor Croswell and re-appointed in 1S81 by Governor 
Jerome. In 1886 he was nominated by acclamation for the office of 
governor by the republican convention held in Grand Rapids, and 
after a very vigorous campaign was elected November 2, 1880, 
by a vote of 181, 474, while his chief opponent, George L. Yaple. 
received 174.042, and Samuel Dickey. 25,179. 

Since 1848 Mr. Luce has devoted time and energies to the cultiva- 
tion o! his farm, having added to the first purchase until he now 
owns a well improved farm of three hundred acres. 



JEREMIAH LUDINGTON. Jr., 

Representative from Huron county in 187o-9. was born in Middle- 
bury, Vt., May 5, 1808. He received a common school education and 
removed to Huron county Michigan, in 1850. For seven years post- 
master of Verona Mills. He has also been township treasurer, 
county surveyor, and local state swamp land road commissioner. Up 
to the time of the great fires of 1871 he was engaged in lumbering, 
but having lost two saw-mills and a grist-mill, he now follows the 
occupation of a farmer and a merchant. In politics a Republican. 



LUTHER H. LUDLOW. 

Representative from Jackson county in 1877, was born July 10, 1814. 
at Ludlow ville, N. Y. He was educated in the common schools, and 
removed to Sprin.L, r port, Jackson county, in 1839. He has served as 
justice four terms: supervisor from 1853 to 1861; in 1861-2 register of 
deeds: in l s 'i'>9-70 county treasurer, and in 1873-4 county clerk of 
Jackson county. In politics a Republican. 



SAMUEL LUDLOW. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1857, was born in Ireland in 
1815, and became a resident of Springwella in early life. He held the 



426 -MICHIGAN BIOGRArilY. ' 

office of justice of the peace for many years, was a farmer by occu- 
pation, a Democrat in politics, and died April 1, 1885. 

GEORGE LUTHER, 

Representative from Ottawa county in 1S63-4-5, was born in Bristol, 
R. I., May 3, 1823. By occupation a merchant, in politics a Republi- 
can. He came to Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1841. Removed to 
Lamont, Ottawa county. Died December 23, 1S84. 

LUCIUS LYON, 

United States Senator, 1835 to 1S40, territorial delegate in congress 
1832 to 1835, and member congress 1843-5, was born at Shelburne, 
Vt., February 26, 1800, and died at Detroit, September 24, 1851. He 
received a common school education and studied engineering and 
surveying. He came to Detroit in 1822, and was appointed by the 
surveyor general, deputy in the territory northwest of the Ohio. 
Held the position until elected to congress in 1832. In 1840, after his 
senatorial term, he removed to Grand Rapids, where he had large 
land interests. Elected to congress in 1842 he served until March 4, 
1S4."», and then was appointed surveyor general of Ohio, Michigan 
and Indiana, and removed to Detroit, holding the position until his 
death. In politics a Democrat, in religion a Swedenborgian. He 
never married. 

TRUMAN H. LYON. 

Was born at Shelburne, Vt., Feb. 21, 1801. He had the advantages 
of common schools, learned the business of a cloth dresser, and carried 
on that business at Hopkinton, N. Y. He was early a justice of the 
peace. In 1836 he came to Lyons. Michigan, where he kept hotel, 
was justice, side judge, and held other local offices. He was also in 
United States employ and was superintendent of light-houses on Lake 
Michigan, and let the contracts for their construction. He moved to 
Grand Rapids in 1840, where lie kept hotel and was a merchant, and 
for many years postmaster. He was Senator in 1833. He was a lead- 
ing business man, and prominent Mason. Died Sept. 14, 1872. 

JAMES H. MACDONALD 

Was born in Northwest Inverness-shire, Scotland, in May. 1832, and 
has been a resident of Michigan for the past twenty-three year-, his 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 42? 

home at present being at Escanaba, Delta county. He was formerly 
roadmaster of the C. & N. W. R'y Co., P. division, but at present has 
no fixed occupation, his income coming from his royalty on iron-ore 
land. He held the office of justice of the peace, and was elected to 
the office of lieutenant-governor for 1 8*7-8 by a vote of 181,830, 
against Solomon S. Curry, Democrat, 173,07'), and Charles Mosher, 
Prohibitionist, 2o,9G9 votes. 

ALMON MACK, 

Representative from Oakland count}- m 1818, was born inTunbridge, 
Vt., in 1806. He joined his father at Pontiac in 1822, and was his 
agent. He was offered and declined the position of secretary of the 
first territorial council in 1824, but furnished the eighteen names from 
which the president selected the first council of nine. He was a mer- 
chant at Rochester, Mich., from 183Dto 1833, and held many positions 
of trust and honor. In politics a Democrat. 



ANDREW blACK, 

Representative from Detroit in 1839, was born in New London, Conn. 
He became a captain in the ocean merchant service and made three 
voyages around the world. In 1804 he drove some merino sheep, pur- 
chased in Spain, over the Cumberland mountains to Cincinnati, and 
built a woolen factory there, and was a member of the Ohio legisla- 
ture. Was a colonel in the war of 1812. Came to Detroit as collector 
of the port in 1829, which he held until 1839. He opened and kept 
the Mansion hotel in 1S30, and was mayor of Detroit in 1S34, during 
the cholera visitation, and did much to relieve the sick, and as a 
health officer. He died in l s 7.">, and wa- buried on his'farm near St. 
Clair. Was in politics a Democrat. 



STEPHEN MACK 

Was born in Connecticut in 17'J3. lie married Temperance Bond, and 
settled in Tunbridge, Vt., when a young man, and engaged in mer- 
cantile business. He built a hotel, and became colonel of the state 
militia. In 1810 he came to Detroit and engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness with Thomas Emerson, and they were in trade when Gen. Hull 
surrendered Detroit. Be again, aft'-r the war of 1812. w 
firm of Mack & Conant until ISIS, tie was one of the first I 
tiers of Pontiac, in 1S18, and was a member and agent of the " P n- 



428 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

tiac company." As one of the firm of Mack, Conant & Sibley, they 
built the first dam, and the first saw and flouring mill at Pontiac. 
He also built a grist mill at Rochester. He was a member of the first 
territorial council of Michigan, which met at Detroit in 1824. He 
died at Pontiac in Nov., 1826. 

JOHN MAKELIM, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1885-7, was born at Nassaga- 
weya, Ontario, June 30, 18-17. In 1804 he went to Illinois, and was a 
railroad employe. He returned, secured an academical education, 
and in 1867 was a teacher at Brockway, Mich., and taught for some 
years. Removed to Maple Valley, Mich., in 1875, where he now 
resides. A merchant and station agent for the P. H. & N. \V. R. R. 
Has been supervisor, justice, and held other offices. In politics a 
Republican. 

PETER D. MAKLEY, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1847, was born in Colombia 
county, N. Y.. in 1896. He came to Michigan in 1836, and settled on 
a farm in Oxford, and was the first supervisor in 1837. He removed 
to Pontiac in 1852. where he kept hotel until his death, August 11, 
1856. Politically a Democrat. 

ROBERT W. MALCOLM, 
Representative from Oakland county m 1S85, was born in West 
Bloomfield. Mich., Feb. 18, is 14, and received his education in the 
common schools. He enlisted in Co. A, 22d Mich. vol. infantry, Aug_ 
11, 1862. Was wound.-d and captured at the battle of Chickamauga, 
Sept. 20. 1863: was hell a prisoner fifteen months; was discharged at 
the close of the war in 186"), and lias been engaged in farming ever 
since. Has held the office of township clerk and supervisor several 
terms. Was elected as a Republican. 

CHARLES G. MALLETT. 

Representative from Monroe county in 1S67, was born in Connecticut, 
Oct. 16, 1829. By occupation a lumberman, in politics a Republican. 
He settled m Monroe- county in 1^58, and was six years director of 
the farmers' insurance company, and eleven years school director at 
Lambertviile. Moved to Toledo in 1871, and to Chicago in 1880, 
where he now resides. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 429 

CHARLES F. MALLORY 

Was born at Albany, N. Y., Jan. 11, 1811. He came to Romeo at an 
early day and followed successfully the business of a merchant, from 
which he retired in 1ST9. He was a Democrat until 1S56, then a 
Republican until 1874, since a Greenbacker and Fusionist. He has 
held the positions of postmaster, president, clerk and trustee of the 
village, township clerk, and was thrice elected Representative, serv- 
ing in the sessions of 1SG3-4-5. He has also been justice, and in 1878 
was the greenback nominee for congress, but was defeated. 



GEORGE L. MALTZ 

Was born at Brooklyn, N. Y.. in 1842. He removed with his parents 
to Detroit in 184G, and was educated in the public schools of Detroit. 
At the age of 18 years he enlisted as a private in the 4th Michigan 
infantry, was wounded in the seven days' fight before Richmond, 
taken prisoner and confined at the "Old Libby." Was exchanged 
and returned to his regiment. At the battle of Fredericksburg he 
was promoted to a lieutenancy. He commanded Co. E lof Hillsdale) 
at the battle of Gettysburg. Here he was made adjutant of his 
regiment, which position he held until the expiration of his service. 
In 186G he was married at Detroit to Miss Elvira E. Whiting. By 
profession he is a banker and lumberman, and has been a resident of 
the state 40 years. In Detroit he was made cashier of the internal 
revenue office. In 1872 he removed to Alpena and founded the bank- 
ing house of Geo. L. Malt/. & Co., winch in 1S33 was organized as the 
Alpena national bank, of which he is now president, and is a stock- 
holder in, and treasurer for the Minor lumber company. He holds 
honorable positions in his city, has three times been made mayor, and 
has filled very acceptably the position of regent of the University. 
He was elected state treasurer by a vote of 1S0,727 to 174,010 for Wil- 
liam G. Beard, Fusionist. and 25,532 for Aaron C. Fisher, Prohi- 
bitionist. 



JAMES W. MANDIGO, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1SC9-70, was born in the 
state of New York, Nov. 30, 1819. A physician and druggist, in poli- 
tics a Republican. Came to White Pigeon in 1813. where he now 
resides. Studied medicine with Dr. W. N. Elliott. Supervisor of 
White Pigeon many years, several times president of the village, an I 
trustee of the union school. 
45 



430 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

CHARLES H. MANLY, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1887, was born in Living- 
ston county, Sept. 16, 1843, and has been a resident of Michigan his 
lifetime. He was formerly a farmer but at present is abstractor of 
real estate titles. During the war he served in Co. A, 1st reg't, Michi- 
gan infantry, and participated in the various battles fought by his 
regiment; was twice wounded and lost his left arm at the battle of 
Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. He has been city collector, city recorder, 
justice of the peace, and register of deeds three times. In politics a 
Democrat. 



EMANUEL MANN. 

Was born in Stuttgart, Germany, Juno 4, 1814. His parents came to 
Pennsylvania in 1826, and to Ann Arbor in 1830, being the first Ger- 
man family in that city. By occupation a druggist, in politics a 
Republican. He retired from business a few years ago, but still 
resides at Ann Arbor. Was Senator from Washtenaw county in 
1871-2. 



RANDOLPH MANNING 

Was born in Plainfield, N. J., May 19, 1804, and died at Pontiac, 
August 31, 1864. He studied law in New York city, came to Michi- 
gan in 1832 and settled at Pontiac in the practice of the law. He was 
a delegate from Oakland county to the first constitutional conven- 
tion of 183.J, and a member of the committee on judiciarv, and. as 
such, was associat-d with Judge Ross Wilkins, William Trowbridge. 
Isaac E. < rary, Robert McClelland and others. He was a State Sena- 
tor in 1837. In 1836 a court of chancery was established, and in 
1S42 he was chancellor as the successor of chancellor Farnsworth. 
This office he held for about three years, and filled it in a 
manner that reflected the highest credit upon him both for integrity 
and professional ability. At the organization of an independent 
Supreme Court in I808, he was elected associate justice, and re- 
elected on the expiration of his term in 1S61 and died while holding 
that position. He was a man of spotless integrity, sound discrimi- 
nating judgment, and of a capacity that enabled him to fill every 
office with honor to himself and advantage to the state. Judce 
Manning was secretary of -t:it.- from LS3S to 1810. Hewas also a 
regent of the State University. In politics a Democrat, until I8o4, 
after that a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 431 

JOSEPH MANWARING, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1885, was bom in Burlington 
county, N. J., in 1829. Removed with his parents to Avon, Oakland 
county, Michigan, in 1836. Received a common school and academical 
education at Rochester, Michigan. In 1852 he went toDryden. where 
he entered into the mercantile business, in which he is still engaged. 
He was elected supervisor several years. Has served as township 
clerk at various times for five years. Was postmaster in 1861, and 
held that office until November, 1884. Has been a Republican since 
1854. 



JOSHUA MANWARING, 

Senator from Lapeer and Macomb counties in 1SS3-5, was born in 
Burlington county, N. J., October 2, 1824. He removed to Avon, 
Michigan, in 1830. and received a common school education. In 1845 
went to the present site of Greenville and engaged two years in sawing 
and rafting lumber. In 18-17 became a merchant at Dry den, Mich., 
and in 1850 built the Manwaring mill at Attica, and erected buildings 
at Dryden and Imlay City, carrying on a lumbering business. Now 
resides in Lapeer. Has been supervisor. In politics a Democrat. 



PATRICK MARANTETTE 
Was born at Sandwich, Canada, March 11, 1807. and died at Mendon, 
Mich., May 23, 1S78. At the age of sixteen he superintended the 
Indian trading post for Peter and James Godfrey. In 1833 he became 
superintendent of the trading post at Nottawa, Mich., and was of 
great service to the government in the removal of the Indians from 
that reservation in 1840. He purchased a large farm in Mendon. In 
1847 he was Representative in the legislature. He left an estate 
valued at * 100,000. 



DANIEL P. MARKEY, 

Representative from the counties of Crawford, Oscoda. Roscommon 
and Ogemaw in 1885 and 1S87, was born in the township of Bunker 
Hill. Mich., June 27, 1857. Most of his early life was spent in Pinck- 
ney, Livingston county, where he pursued his studies, graduating at 
the school in that village and afterwards engaged in teaching for 
several years. I„ 1379 he removed to Ann Arbor, obtaining a posi- 
tion as book-keeper for a manufacturing company. He at the same 



432 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

time entered upon the study of law, and wa3 admitted to the bar in 
April, 1881, in September of which year he removed to West Branch. 
Ogemaw county, where he still resides, and began the practice of his 
profession as an attorney. In 1881 he was appointed circuit court 
commissioner, and elected in 1882. In 1883 he was judge of probate. 
He was a Republican member and was re-elected for 1887-8 by a vote 
of 1,470 to 1,221 for J. Maurice Finn. 



MATT BE \Y MARKET, 

Senator from Detroit in 1877, was born Sept. 13, 1820, in the county 
of Cavan, Ireland. He was educated in a common school. In 1838 
he settled in Haverstraw, X. Y. In 1S48 he removed to Springwells, 
Mich., where he resided until 1873, when he removed to Nankin. He 
has held several township offices. He was a Representative from 
Wayne county in 1*73-4. He is engaged in the manufacture of brick 
and in farming. 

GILES B. MARKHAM, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1877-81-2, was born in San- 
disfield, Mass.. March 2, 1828. He came with his parents to White 
Pigeon, Mich., in 1838, and received his education at a brancli of the 
State University at that place. By occupation a farmer. He spent 
five years in California. He was twice elected supervisor of White 
Pigeon town. In politics a Republican. 



THOMAS MARS, 

Senator from Berrien county in l s 81-2. was born in Giles county, Va., 
May 4, 1829. In the same year the family moved to Berrien town- 
ship, Mich., his present home. He was raised on a farm, working in 
the summer and attending district school in the winter- At the age 
of twenty he served a year's apprenticeship at the carpenter and 
joiner's trade, at which he worked ten years, securing quite a com- 
petence. In 1S~>7 he went to Kansas, spending two summers there, 
and then went to Missouri, where he purchased an interest in a saw- 
mill. When the war broke out the rebels burnt his mill and his 
debtors all went into the rebel army, leaving him nearly financially 
ruined. Having returned to Berrien county in l v *'d, he purchased 120 
acres of land and a steaiu saw-mill located thereon. He has tilled 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 433 

various offices of trust and honor. He has been president of the Ber- 
rien county agricultural society two terms, president of the Berrien 
county pioneer society, and chairman of the executive committee of 
the state grange. In politics a Republican. 



ISAAC MARSTON 

Was born at Poyntzpass, county Armagh, Ireland, January 2, 1839. 
His father, Thomas Marston, was a small landed proprietor, of Eng- 
lish descent. His mother maintained and educated her children 
after their father's death. She apprenticed Isaac, at the age of thir- 
teen, to a grocer, with whom he remained three years. In 1856 he 
emigrated to the United States, and went to work upon a farm in 
Southfield, Oakland county, Michigan, attending school about two 
months. In 1859 he entered the law department of the University of 
Michigan, and graduated in 1861. He practiced law for six months 
at Alma, Gratiot county, where he lost his office and library by fire. 
He then practiced for a little while at Ithaca, and in 1862 removed to 
Bay City, his present home. While there he was elected justice of 
the peace, prosecuting attorney, and city attorney. In 1S72 he was 
elected Representative in the state legislature, to fill vacancy, for the 
extra session of that year. In 1874 he was appointed attorney gen- 
eral by Governor Bagley, to fill the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Byron I). Ball. He held the office niue months, and dispatched 
more business than had ever before been done in that office in an 
equal length of time. In April, 1875, he was elected justice of the 
Supreme Court, to till the vacancy caused by the election of Judge 
Christiancy to the United States Senate. He was baptized into the 
church ox Englan 1. but attended the Presbyterian church. Fie has 
always been a Republican. He was re-elected justice in 1881, but 
resigned in 1SS3, and is now engaged in a lucrative law practice in 
Detroit. 



E. BROOX MARTIN, 

Representative from Osceola county in 18S1-2-3, was born in Oakland 
county, Mich., Aug. 12, 1841. Received a collegiate education, and 
in 1S62 engaged in the milling business. After a few years became a 
resident of Battle Creek, then of Detroit, and in 1ST? of Reed ''ry. 
Is btill in the milling business. Politically a Republican. 



434 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

GEORGE MARTIN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1851, was born in the state of 
New York, July 9, 1810. He came to Michigan with his father's fam- 
ily in 1824. He has held the position of deputy collector of customs, 
and the offices of supervisor and justice. He is by occupation a 
farmer, is a Democrat in politics, and resides in Grosse Pointe. 

GEORGE MARTIN 

Was born in Middlebury, Vt., in 1815. He graduated at Middlebury 
college, studied law, and was admitted in 1830, and the same year 
commenced practice at Grand Rapids, Mich., and soon took high 
rank in the profession. He was appointed judge of the 6th circuit to 
fill vacancy caused by the death of Judge Mundy, and in 1852 elected 
to that position for six years. In 1857 he was elected chief justice of 
the Supreme Court. In the allotment of terms he drew the shortest. 
of two years, and was again chief justice for eight years in 1S59, 
holding the position until his death, December 15, 1867. He was a 
Republican, and helped give the Supreme Court its high standing 
with the bar of this, and the courts of other states. 



JOHN MARTIX, 

Representative from Wayne county iu 1837, was a native of the state 
of New York, born 17S5. He came to Michigan in 1824, residing 
thereafter, with slight exception, either in Hamtramck or Grosse 
Point until the time of his death, May 1. 1848. He was captain of a 
company of New York militia, and was engaged at the sortie of Fort 
Erie in 1814, receiving wounds by reason of which he drew a govern- 
ment pension. He was the first keeper of the Windmill Point light- 
house at the foot of Lake St. Clair. He was the father of fourteen 
children, was a farmer by occupation, and a Democrat in politics. 



MORTIMER B. MARTIN, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1S48-50, was born in 
Johnstown, N. Y., October 18, 1806. He received something more 
than an ordinary education, and became a clerk at the age of four- 
teen and at sixteen took entire charge of the business. At the age of 
twenty-one he became a merchant. He sold out in 1834, and was 
made the agent of a New York syndicate to purchase lands iu the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 435 

west. He spent two years in Illinois, but came to Michigan in 1836. 
In 1837 he bought lands in Antrim, Slvawassee county, where he 
resided until his death, September 26, 1834. He was a supervisor 
for sixteen years, and in politics a Democrat. He had a beautiful 
home, and entertained many men of distinction. The roses and 
flowers set out by him were the first ever planted in Shiawassee 
county. 



STEPHEN MARTIN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1877, was born at High Park, 
Ireland, December 20, 1821. He received a liberal education, pur- 
sued the study of architecture, and adopted the trade of a mason and 
builder. At the age of seventeen he emigrated to America, residing 
first in Brooklyn, N. Y., for eleven years. In 1849 he removed to 
Detroit and followed his avocation of a builder. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Detroit board of education; alderman for two terms; justice 
of the peace and director of the poor for the city of Detroit. He en- 
listed a company of volunteers and joined the sixteenth Michigan 
infantry as captain, participating in all the battles of the regiment 
until April, 1SG3, when, haviug become disabled, he resigned. In 
July, 1S63, he received an appointment as captain in the veteran 
reserve, corps, serving therein until he resigned in November, 18G5. 
In politics a Democrat. 



WELLS R. MARTIN 

Was born at Hoosack Falls. N. Y., March 18, 1811. He was brought 
up a farmer, and came to Yermontville, Michigan, in 1S38. He has 
filled many local offices, and was a Representative in the legislature 
of 1848. He has been engaged in farming, mercantile business and 
lumbering. He secured a competence and has always exerted a 
strong moral influence in the community. In politics a Democrat. 



ANTHONY L. MASON 

Was born in Medina. N. \.. in 1826, and came to Galesburg, Mich., 
in 1848. His early education was that of common schools. He went 
into the dry ^oods trade at Galesburg. in which he continued until 
1867. He removed to Kansas City in 1SG9, with a capital of $2 I 1,0 10, 
since increased to half a million. At one time while in trade he 



436 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

stocked three flouring mills, selling the flour east at a good profit. In 
politics a Republican. He was supervisor of Galesburg in 1857, and 
a Representative in 1S67. 

HENRY MASON, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1845. was born in Washington 
county, N. Y., August 10, 1791. By occupation a farmer, in politics 
a Democrat. He came to Monroe county in 1834, settled upon a 
farm, upon which he lived until his death, in June, 1878. 



H. M. MASON, 

Representative from the counties of Delta, Chippewa, Mackinac and 
Schoolcraft in 1885, was born in the state of New York in 1841. He 
removed to Michigan in 1844; enlisted in 1861 in the 8th Michigan 
infantry, and served until the close of the war. Then engaged in the 
drug business at Flint. Politically a Republican. 



JOHN T. MASON 

Was for a short time secretary of the territory in 1830-1, and acted a 
portion of the time as governor ex-ojtlcio. He was the father of Gov. 
Stevens T. Mason, and was born in Virginia, being the son of United 
States Senator Mason of that state, and of a distinguished family. 
He was hi the territory but a few months, resigning to give his son 
the position he held. He was a general. 



LORENZO M. MASON 

Was Senator from St. Clair and other counties in 1811-5, and Senator 
from Detroit in 1800-70. He was also a Representative from Detroit 
in 180:3-4. He was born in Ca^tleton, Vt.. in 1808, was educated at 
Castleton academy, studied law, and was admitted to practice in his 
native state. He came to Michigan in 183G, locating at Port Huron, 
and served a term or two as prosecuting attorney of St. Clair county. 
He located in Detroit in 1851. He served as police commissioner in 
Detroit 18G5-G9, and as inspector of the house of correction 1SG2-72. 
Mr. Mason did little or no law practice in Detroit, his tastes running 
more to active business, mainly lumbering and banking. He was a 
clear thinker, of cheerful and even temperament, of kindly heart and 
firm principles. Politics democratic. Died in 187:2. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 437 

STEVENS THOMSON MASON 

Was the son of General John T. Mason, of Virginia, and the grand- 
son of Stevens Thomson Mason, also of Virginia, who was a colonel in 
the revolution, a leading member of the Virginia convention of 17S3, 
and United States Senator from Virginia, from 1794 to 1803. The 
mother of Governor Mason was a sister of William T. Batrv, post- 
master-general under Jackson. He was born in Virginia in 1812. 
His father emigrated to Kentucky, where the son received his educa- 
tion. His father was secretary of the territory, and acting governor 
for a short time in 1830-1, and through his influence, the son was 
appointed secretary of the territory of Michigan by President Jack- 
son, although but nineteen years of age. As secretary he was ex- 
offlcio governor, during the absence of that officer, and much feeling 
was manifested, indignation meetings were held, and a deputation 
was sent to him to demand his commission to be returned to * its 
source. To this demand he replied: '-General Jackson appointed 
me with his eyes open, go home and mind your own business." The 
boy in years proved to be a man in thought and action, and repeatedly 
was acting governor, before the death of Gov. Porter, which occurred 
July G, 1834. After that time he was ex-officio governor of the 
territory, and the people, taking upon themselves the right to organ- 
ize a state, without asking the advice of congress, elected him gov- 
ernor of Michigan, November 3, 1835, although the state was not 
admitted into the Union until several months afterwards. It was 
during this time that the fierce conflict arose between Ohio and 
Michigan, as to the ownership of a strip of territory belonging to 
Michigan, but over which Ohio attempted to exercise control. Gov. 
Lucas sent a force of militia to obtain possession, but they were met 
by a larger force headed by Gov. Mason and General Brown, and 
Michigan retained possession until a second convention of assent held 
at Ann Arbor, December 14, 1836, accepted the terms proposed by 
congress, gaining a large portion of the upperjpeninsula, in lieu of 
the small tract in dispute. 

Governor Mason served two terms, from November 3. 1835. to 
January 7, 1810. During his administration occurred the great panic 
of 1837, bringing ruin to many pioneers, and closing the banks which 
had been started without paid-in capital, bringing to a termination 
the gigantic projects contemplated in canals, railroads and other 
internal improvements. These disasters were in part attributed to 
him, and at the close of his second term he was not'a candidate, but 
withdrew from political life, removing to the city of New York, 
where he was engaged in the practice of law until his death. January 
4G 



438 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

4, 1S43. He was a man of ability, polished and genial, of fine per- 
sonal appearance, and was very popular. He was probably the 
youngest man that ever filled the position of governor, in territorial 
or state historv, on this continent. 



ALONZO T. MATHER, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1841, was born in Moncton, 
Vt., May 13, 1S02. He came to Detroit in 183G and>ngaged in mer- 
cantile and manufacturing pursuits. He afterwards removed to a 
farm in Dearborn, and was among the leading and 'prominent citi- 
zens of that township until his death, July S, 1S4G. He was for some 
years a deacon in the Baptist church in Detroit, and was father of 
Rev. A. E. Mather, a well known Baptist clergyman. Politics, Whig 
and Republican. 

GEORGE MATTHEWS. 

Representative from Ingham county in 184S, was born in Watertown, 
Conn., April IT, 1709. He came to Michigan in 1S37, settled in the 
town of Meridian, Ingham county, and gave the name to the town. 
He was the first supervisor and held that position several terms. He 
built the first school-house, and was county treasurer four years. He 
built 23 miles of the Lansing and Detroit plank road, was elected its 
superintendent in 1853, and held the position seventeen years. He 
removed to Farmington, where he was president of the village board 
at the time of his death, April 20, 1870. By occupation a clothier, 
politically Whig, then Republican. 



LEVI C. MATTHEWS 

Was born in Connecticut and removed to Colon, St. Joseph county, 
Michigan, in 1833. By occupation a farmer. Representative in the 



legislature of 1849, 



RUFUS MATTHEWS. 



Representative in the legislature 1S35-G, from Washtenaw county, 
was born in Connecticut, Oct. 10, 1791, was reared in western New- 
York, acquired a common school education, worked as a carpenter 
and joiner, came to Michigan about 1831, and settled in North field as 

a fanner, helped organize the township, was for over twenty years 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 439 

supervisor and justice, and served a term as county treasurer. He 
died at Ann Arbor, Nov. 17, 1869. Politics democratic. 



THOMAS P. MATTHEWS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1853, was born in Middlebury, 
Vt., December 27, 1791. He was a man of liberal education, having 
graduated from Middlebury college in 1811, and from Fairfield medi- 
cal college in 1815. He was a Representative in the Vermont legis- 
lature in 1820. He came to Detroit in 1834, soon after removing to 
Redford, and establishing a medical practice which he followed 
successfully for thirty years. Died November 16, 1SG9. Politics. 
Whig and Republican. 



BENJAMIN MAY, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1805, was a son of Judge 
James May, a prominent citizen of Detroit in the early days. He 
was born in Detroit in 1815. He was a retail trader, and a resident 
of Springwells He seems to have contributed but little to local 
history, and has been dead for some years. Was a Democrat in 
politics. 

CHARLES S. MAY, 

Lieutenant Governor of Michigan in 18(534, was born at Sandistield, 
Mass., March 22. 1830. In 183-1 he removed with his father's family 
to Richland, Michigan, and worked on the farm until fifteen, and 
then became a student of the Kalamazoo branch of the State Uni- 
versity. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He 
was in 1855-6 associate political editor of the Detroit Tribune, and 
later its Washington correspondent. He commenced practice at 
Battle Creek, but soon removed to Kalamazoo, and was elected prose- 
cuting attorney in 1860. In 1861 he resigned, raised a company for 
the second Michigan infantry, went into the field, but on account of 
ill health was compelled to resign after taking part in several battles. 
As lieutenant governor he was an able presiding officer. From 1856 
to 1870 he was a leading republican speaker on the stump. In 1872 
he supported Greeley for president, and acted with and spoke for the 
democratic party, but is now a political prohibitionist. He practiced 
law for a time in Detroit but is now in practice at Kalamazoo. 



4-iO MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

DWIGHT MAY, 

Lieutenant Governor of Michigan 1867-9, and attorney general 1869- 
73, was born in Sandisfield, Mass., September 8, 1822, and removed 
with his father to Richland, Michigan, in 1834. He graduated at the 
University in 1849, and was admitted to the bar in 1850. He removed 
to Kalamazoo in 1852, and from 1855 to 1802 was prosecuting attorney, 
He was also school inspector, village trustee and president. In I s '! 1 
he enlisted as a private, and was elected captain of company I, 2d 
Michigan infantry. He resigned in December, 1SG1, and in October, 
1862, was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 12th Michigan 
infantry, became colonel and was brevetted brigadier general. He 
married Amelia S. Kellogg in 1849. A Republican. Died January 
28, 1880. 

HENRY F. MAY', 

Representative from Grand Traverse and Wexford counties in 1579, 
was born at Plymouth, Michigan, February 14, 1842, where he 
received a common school education. In 1872 he removed to Clam 
Lake (now Cadillac) and engaged in the mercantile business. He 
has been village treasurer, trustee, county superintendent of the poor. 
and a member of the Cadillac city board of education. In polities a 
Republican. 

JAMES MAY 

Was born in England and settled at Detroit in 1778. He was honor- 
ably identified with the early history of the territory. He was a 
colonel of militia; was appointed chief justice of the court of common 
pleas about 1800, and held the position seven years. He died in 
January, 1829. A good portrait of him is found in Sheldon's "early 
history of Michigan.*' When the American flag was hauled down, at 
the surrender of Detroit by General Hull, he got possession of it. and 
hoisted it again when that city was surrendered by the British. He 
was the author of an interesting article on the condition of Detroit in 
1778. 



WILLIAM C. MAY'BURY 

Was born at Detroit, November 20. 1850. He graduated from the 
high school in 1866, and entered the class of 1870, in the Michigan 
University. He entered the law olliee of G. V. N. Lothrop in 1570 
and graduated in the law class of 1871 of the University. He was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 441 

city attorney in 1875 and 1877. He was also lecturer on medical 
jurisprudence in the Michigan college of medicine at Detroit. He 
was nominated for member of congress in 18S0, and defeated. He 
received the degree of " M. A." from the University of Michigan in 
1881. In 1882 he was elected Representative in the forty-eighth 
congress. In 1SS4 he was re-elected to congress on the democratic 
ticket. At the expiration of his congressional term in 18S7 he re- 
sumed law practice in Detroit. 



IRA MAYHEW 

"Was born in Ellisburg, N. Y., in 1814. He received an academical 
education, and taught from 1832 to 1830. He was principal of the 
Adams academy 1837 to 1841, then superintendent of schools in 
Jefferson county. N. Y. He came to Michigan in 1843 and was 
principal of the Monroe branch of the University. By appointment 
he became superintendent of public instruction, and held it from 
April 17, 1845, to March 28, 1849. He was active and efficient in his 
duties, and in 1819 published a book entitled, " Means and ends of 
universal education." 1 In 1851 published a treatise on book-keening. 
In 1852 was principal of Albion seminary, and in 1854 was elected 
superintendent of public instruction, and was again elected in 1S56, 
serving from 1855 to 1859, and in all holding that position eight years. 
He then established the Albion commercial college, which was 
removed to Detroit and successfully managed by him for many 
years. He was collector of internal revenue for the third district. 
1862-5. Now retired. A Democrat until 1854, since a Republican. 



AARON B. MAYXARD 

Was born in Peru, Yt.. October 20. 1810. When young his parents 
removed first to Washington, then to Saratoga county, X. Y.. and 
when he was eighteen, to Cambridge, Yt. He entered Middlebury 
college .in 1836, and in 1837 the University of Vermont, at Burlington, 
where he remained two years. He went to Talbot county, Md., and 
was a tutor three years, returned to Vermont in 1841, studied law* 
was admitted in 1842, and opened an office in Richmond, Vt. In 
1843 he married Julia Edmunds, sister of Senator Edmunds, of Ver- 
mont. He practiced law there until 1855, then removed to Michigan. 
and went into business at Detroit, and had a large and lucrative 
practice. He was U. S. district attorney for eastern Michigan for 
eight years, under President Grant, and is still in practice. He has a 



442 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

fine farm and buildings in the town of Ray, near Romeo, Macomb 
county, which has been his family home. In politics a Republican. 



LOREN MAYXARD, 

Senator from Calhoun county, sessions of 1S46-7, was born in Madi- 
son, N. Y., December 22, 1801. By occupation a farmer, politically a 
Democrat. He settled in Marengo, Mich., m 1833, erected a log house 
and opened a tavern. The first ball in the town was given there in 
1834. He built a better hotel in 1836, which he kept until 1844. He 
was sheriff of Calhoun county from 1839 to 1842. Held the offices of 
postmaster and supervisor. Died December 5, 1855. 



PERRY MAYO, 

Senator from Branch and Calhoun counties in 1837, was born in 
Hancock, N. Y., June 14, 1S29. Settled on a farm with his father in 
1850 at Con vis, Mich., had a fair education, and was a teacher for 
some years. Served three years as a private in the second Michigan 
infantry, and was twice wounded. Now resides on a farm in the 
town of Marshall. Has been town superintendent of schools, and 
lecturer and general deputy for the Michigan state grange. A Re- 
publican in politics. 

ANDREW C. MAXWELL. 

Representative from Bay county in 1865, was born at Pompey Hill, 
X. Y. July 11, 1831. In 1844 his father settled on a farm at White 
Lake, Mich. From 1^49 to 1852 he was a student at Oberlin college > 
He taught school at Lapeer in 1852. Studied law at Pontiac and was 
admitted in 1853, practiced at Lapeer, and was prosecuting attorney 
in 1854. In 1^."",? removed to Bay City and is still there in practice, 
also farming and real estate. Many years a supervisor. Has twice 
been a candidate for the state senate, and ran for congress in 1882. 
In politics a Democrat. 



GEO. C. MCALLISTER, 

Representative from Barry county in 1879, was born in Xorfolk, X. 
Y.. June 12, 1S33. He received a common school education: came to 
Hickory Corners, Mich., in 1856. In i860 lie went to Sonora, Cali- 
fornia, and worked in tin- mines four years. Returned to Michigan 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 443 

in 1864. Removed to Ft. Wayne, Ind., and engaged in insurance 
business, first as deputy secretary, afterwards as director and general 
agent of the Ft. Wayne insurance company. Returning to Prairie- 
ville, Mich., in 1SGG, he engaged in farming. In politics a National. 



WILLIAM Mc ARTHUR, 

Representative from Cheboygan and other counties in 1877, was born 
in Steuben county, N. Y., April 13, 1825, He received an academical 
education, and was a resident of Rochester, N. Y., 1860-70, and of 
Chicago, 111., 1870-3. Settled at Cheboygan, Mich., in 1S73. Since 
1850 was largely engaged as a contractor on railroads, canals, etc. 
Since 1866 has been the head of a large lumber firm at Cheboygan. 
In politics a Democrat. 



SANDS McCAMLEY, 

Representative from Calhoun county 1837-43, and Senator in 1839-40, 
was born in Orleans county, N. Y., and came to Nottawa Prairie, 
Mich., in 1831, then went to Marshall, and in 1834 bought land form- 
ing part of the site of Battle Creek, Gen. Convis being his partner. 
He dug the long race, built a saw-mill and made other improvements. 
He was county associate judge 1833-6. A man of intellect, sagacity, 
sound judgment and resolute will. Died April 30, 1864. 



thomas Mccarty, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1830, was born in Boston, 
Mass., September 10, 1810. He came with his father to Saginaw 
county in 1835, and settled as a farmer in the township of Tittabawas- 
see. He was several terms a supervisor. In politics a Democrat. 
Died September 22, 1855. 



HUGH McCLELEND. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1885, was born in Toronto. 
Ontario. October 27, 1851; received a common school education; 
learned the trade of cigar making, and removed to Detroit in 1-71. 
In 1872 took a trip east, working in several towns in New York state: 
returned to Detroit in l s 7-">, where he has since remained working at 
his trade. In politics Labor-Republican. 



444 ' MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY 



Robert McClelland. 



No man in our history rendered so varied a public service during 
the first quarter of a century of the state's existence as Robert 
McClelland. He was born at Greencastle, Pa., August 2, 1807. As 
a teacher he acquired means to take the course at Dickinson College, 
Carlisle, Pa., from which he graduated in 1829, and in 1831 was 
admitted to the bar at Chambersburg, Pa. . coming to Monroe, Michigan. 
in 1833. He there entered upon practice. His subsequent political 
career may be thus calendared: 1S35, member of the first constitu- 
tional convention; 1830, member and speaker pro tern of the lower 
House of the legislature; 1840, again member of the House; 1843, 
member and speaker of the House; 1843 to 1840, elected for three 
consecutive terms as member of congress, serving through the 
twenty-eighth, twenty-ninth and thirtieth congresses; 1850, member 
of the constitutional convention of that year; 1851, elected governor 
of the state for the then short term of one year, and in 1852 re-elected 
for the term of two years; 1853, appointed March 4, secretary of the 
interior by President Pierce, serving the full term of four years, 
having of necessity re-igned the office of governor, the term extend- 
ing to Dec. 31, 1854. being filled by Lieut. Governor Parsons. Here 
was a period of twenty-two years during fifteen of which Gov. 
McClelland was in the public service, and during the last twelve of 
these years consecutively, receiving continuous promotion. His last 
public service was as a member of the constitutional convention of 
18G7 from "Wayne county, where he was then a resident. He was 
thus a member of the three conventions that have been held to con- 
struct or revise the fundamental law of the state. During his 
congressional term Gov. McClelland was a member and then chair- 
man of the committee on commerce, and favored and procured in 
some degree legislation for the improvement of lake harbors. 

Gov. McClelland supported John Quincy Adams in his demand 
for the right of petition, and voted to receive a bill offered by Mr. 
Giddings for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, also 
supported the " "Wilmot Proviso," designed to prohibit slavery in 
newly acquired territory. As secretary of the interior Gov. Mc- 
Clelland introduced many reforms, and his administration of the 
department was above reproach. He was a pure man, botli in his 
official, his professional, and his personal life. He was a delegate to 
the national conventions in is 18 and 1852. At the close of his term as 
secretary of the interior he settled in Detroit, doing some office 
practice, though mainly giving his attention to private business. He 
made a European tour in 1870, and died at his home in Detroit, 
August 30, 1880. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 445 



henry f. Mccormick, 



Representative from Kent county in 1879, was born July 18, 1844, at 
Alcott , X. Y. He removed with his father's family to Grand Rapids, 
in 1S56. "Was in the army during the war. He was supervisor of 
Grand Rapids five terms. He received an academical education. 
Occupation, farming. Politics, Greenback. 



james w. Mccormick, 

Representative from the first district of Allegan, was born at Allegan, 
Michigan, Feb. 22, 1838. He is at present engaged in farming and 
fruit growing, is a member of the bar, but has never made the 
practice of the law his means of support. Mr. McCormick has held 
the office of justice twenty-four years, supervisor fifteen years, and was 
elected to the legislature of 18S5-G on the Republican ticket, and 
reelected for 1837-8 by a vote of 1,940 to 1,710 for E. R. Reid, and 
543 for N. W. Lewis, Prohibitionist. 



WILLIAM B. McCREERY, 

State treasurer, 1873-9, was born at Mt. Morris, N. Y., Aug. 27, 1820. 
Came with his father to Genesee county, Mich., in 1S38, and received 
a common school and academical education. Worked in his father's 
saw-mill until 1852, then was chief clerk to his father, as county 
treasurer, six: years. Studied law, was admitted in 1800, and began 
practice at Flint. He went into service as a private in 1S01 in the 2d 
Michigan infantry. He was gradually promoted to lieutenant 
colonel, was transferred to the 21st Michigan, and became colonel. 
He was three times wounded, and confined in Libby prison, from 
which he made his escape. He resigned from ill health in 1804, the 
acceptance by Gen. Thomas being the most noteworthy received by 
a Michigan soldier. He was mayor of Flint 1805-0, and in 1871-4 
internal revenue collector. For several years past has been an 
efficient member of the state board of agriculture, in charge of the 
state agricultural college. Politically a Republican, and a delegate 
to the republican national convention of 1S88. 



HUGH McCURDY, 

Senator from Shiawassee county in 1865, was born in Hamilton. 
Scotland, in 1829. Came with his parents to Birmingham. Mich., in 
47 



446 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

1837. Learned the trade of a cooper, and worked at it for years. 
Attended select school, was a freight agent, and from 1847 taught 
several years. Attended Romeo academy, studied law, was admitted 
in 1854, settled in practice at Corunna, where he now resides. Has 
been prosecuting attorney, judge of probate, many years 
supervisor, and from 1865-73, president of the national bank at 
Corunna. In politics, a Democrat. Is a prominent Mason, and has 
held all the high offices in that order, and was lately grand general 
issimo of the grand encampment of the United States. He laid the 
corner stone of the state capitol as grand master in 1872. 



WARREN McCUTCHEON 

Was born at Epsom, N. H., Sept. 17, 1815. By occupation a farmer. 
In politics, a Whig until 1854, since a Republican. He emigrated to 
Ohio where he held local offices, and settled at Ransom, Hillsdale 
county. He was ten years supervisor, and a representative in 1867. 
Died Mav 10. 1876. 



JOHN MeDERMID. 

Senator from Hillsdale county in 1861-2, was born in Ballston, N. Y. 
in 1S08. He was a farmer and miller, and a Republican in politics. 
Came from Livingston county, N. Y., in 1835, and settled in Cambria, 
Hillsdale county. The village of Cambria Mills takes its name from 
the mills built by him. When he settled there were no traces of 
civilization. Died Mav 16, 1SG8. 



JOHN McDERMOTT, 

Representative from Detroit in 1859, was born in Ireland in 1826, and 
came to Detroit in 1844. He was a ship-builder by occupation and 
was connected with vessel interests until 1S61, when he raised a 
company which was mustered into the service as company : 'A" of 
the twenty-third Illinois infantry, and formed part of the famous 
"Mulligan brigade," in the war of the rebellion. He was taken 
prisoner at the siege of Lexington, Mo., resigned his captaincy in 
November, 1861, and in January, 1S62, was appointed lieutenant 
colonel of the fifteenth Michigan infantry, serving until Septetnl r 
18, 1S63, when he was mustered out at his own request. In 1864 Col. 
McDermott removed to Bay City, and was deputy collector of cus- 
toms at that jort from 1806 to 1883. He is now engaged in the 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 447 

insurance business at Bay City. He was a Democrat prior to and 
during his legislative term, but a Republican during and since the 
war. 

james Mcdonald. 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1840-46, was born August 
11, 1796, and died August 19, 1848. A farmer, in politics a Whig. 
Settled in Lenawee count v, Mich., in 1837. 



JOHN McDONNEL 

Was a native of Scotland, born in 1779. The time of his coming to 
Michigan is not known, but he was in business in Detroit during the 
war of 1812, and thoroughly Americanized. His name appears with 
those of other residents signed to a protest against an order of the 
British commandant. Proctor (after Hull's surrender), requiring a 
number of leading citizens to leave the country. He also rendered 
much benevolent service in ransoming American captives from the 
Indians during the British occupation. He was appointed an associ- 
ate justice of the county territorial court in 1817: was a member of 
the legislative council. 1828-34: a member of the constitutional con- 
vention of 1835, and of the first "convention of assent" (or dissent) in 
1836; was a member of the state senate 1855-07, and collector of the 
port of Detroit, 1839-41. He held besides, the local oiiices of alder- 
man, justice, etc. Politically he was in sympathy with the national 
administration during the period of his public life. He died October 
1, 1846. 

MALCOLM M< DOUG ALL, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1S53, was born in thest:iteof 
New York, in May, 1813. A farmer, in politics a Democrat. He 
came to Bridgewater in 1838, where he still resides. He has been a 
justice in that town for thirty-six years. 



'CROCKETT McELROY. 

Senator from St. Clair county in 1877-9. was born December 31. 1835, 
near Dundas. Ontario. He received a common school education: 
came to Michigan in 1848: lived about five years in Detroit: ten years 
in St. Clair county; ten years in Macomb county, then in St. Clair 
City. He has been supervisor, justice, school inspector and com- 
missioner of highways, village trustee, a postmaster, and mayor of 



448 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

St. Clair city. He has been clerk, teacher, merchant and manu- 
facturer. For many years he was extensively engaged in the manu- 
facture of cut staves and circled heading, and president and general 
manager of the Marine City stave company. In politics a Re- 
publican. 



JAMES McFAELANE, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1847. was a native of Scotland. 
born May 10, 1810. He came to the United States at the age of 
eighteen, residing for brief periods at Paterson, N. J., Hudson, N. Y. 
and Peru, 111., and in 1830 settled in Greenfield, Mich, lie was 
supervisor ten years. A democrat in politics, although voting for 
Fremont in 1S56 and Lincoln in 1860. Occupation, farmer. Died 
March 30, 18S0. 



NEAL McGAFFEY, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1857, settled at White 
Pigeon in 1829, and was the first lawyer in St. Joseph county, having 
been admitted to practice August 17, 1^30. He was one of the four 
who owned and recorded the plat of the village of White Pigeon in 
1830. He taught the first school at White Pigeon in 1831. He built a 
house in 1830 and planted the first apple tree. He was town clerk in 
1830-31, justice of the peace from 182'J to 1835, and was public 
prosecutor in 1839, and president of the village in 1837. After 
practicing over a quarter of a century he removed to Texas. 



PATRICK McGINNIS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S77. was born in 18C0, at the 
village of Aranghantareghan, Ireland. In 1831 he emigrated to the 
United States and settled at Mt. Clemens, Michigan. He afterward 
removed to Detroit and went to work in the printing office of the 
old Morning Post in 1830. He subsequently went into the mercantile 
business, afterwards selling out and removing to Laingsburg, Mich., 
where he kept a general store and traded with the Indians. He returned 
to Detroit and went into the real estate auctioneering business. He 
was deputy city marshal and city marshal, and for three years an 
alderman. In polities, a Democrat. Deceased. 






MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 449 

JAMES McGONEGAL, . 

Representative from Detroit in 1871-2. is a native of Ireland, born in 
1821. He came to Detroit when a young man and engaged in active 
business, being for many years a wood dealer, receiving supplies by 
the cargo by means of the river boats. He was an alderman, 1863- 
67. In politics, a Democrat, although affiliating with the Greenback" 
ers, 1876 to 18S0. Now in business at Kansas City. Mo. 



JAMES H. McGOWAN, 

Representative in congress 1S77-S1, was born in Mahoning county, 
Ohio, April 2, 1837. He graduated at the Michigan University in 
1861, became principal of the high school at Coldwater, in 1862 
enlisted as a private in the 5th Michigan cavalry, was captain in the 
9th cavalry, and served until 1864. He studied law and was admitted 
to practice in 1867, graduating from the Ann Arbor law school in 
1868. He practiced at Coldwater, was prosecuting attornev four 
years and senator in 1873, and regent of the university. Now in law 
practice at Washington. D. C. Politically, a Republican. 



THOMAS McGRAW 

Was born in county Armagh, Ireland, March 1, 1783, where he 
learned the crade of linen weaving. Being dissatisfied with the 
union of Ireland and England, which took place early in 1801, he left 
Ireland that year and came to Orange county, N. Y., married and 
lived there weaving and farming until 1830, when he removed to 
Bloomfield, Michigan, settling on a farm, where he died April 19. 
IS.jS. He was a Democrat in politics, and a Representative in 1817. 



JOHN A. McGREGOU, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1885-7, was born in that 
county September 7, 1839. He received a good common school 
education, is a farmer, and a Republican. A supervisor six years, 
and town treasurer two years. 



JAMES R. McGURK, 

Senator from St. Clair county in 1SS1-2, was born in Belfast. Ireland. 
March 16, 1843. Came with his parents to Hamilton, Canada, in 1*48. 



450 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Received a good education and studied medicine in Canada, Ann 
Arbor and Detroit. He was a teacher six years. Graduated at the 
Detroit medical college and in 1870 commenced practice at Capac, 
Mich. Many years town superintendent of schools. In politics a 
Republican. 



DONALD McINTYRE, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1855, was born in Johns- 
town, N. Y., June 5, 1807. He received a common school and 
academical education, -tudied law, was admitted in 1820, and com- 
menced practice. He was the first judge of the new county of 
Fulton. He opened a banking office at Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1845, 
and continued in that business until 1872, then returned to Johns- 
town, N. Y., and is now president of the Johnstown bank. He was 
for six years a regent of the University. In politics a Republican. 



DUGALD McINTYRE, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1881-2, was born in Argyle- 
shire, Scotland, July 15, 1840. He received a common school educa- 
tion; came to Michigan in the fall of 1800, and engaged in lumbering. 
He is now engaged in farming. He was elected supervisor of the 
townsbip of Argyle in 1878, which office he held several years. 
He has been chairman of the board of supervisors. Politically a 
Republican. 

GEORGE R. McRAY 

Was born in 1817, and came to Michigan in 1852. He purchased and 
lived upon a farm in Marengo, Calhoun county. He was supervisor, 
master of the grange, and a Representative in 1865. Now a resident 
of Chicago. 

ROBERT G. McKEE 

Was born in Arlington. Vt., January 10, 1813. He received an 
academical education and attended Rensselaer institute at Troy, N. 
Y. He came to Michigan in 1830, and followed his profession, sur- 
veying roads and farms in the central part of the state. While a 
resident of DeWitt, he was nominated by the democrats and elected 
a Representative in 1S39, being the youngest member of that body, 
his district comprising Genesee, Shiawassee and Clinton counties. Tn 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 451 

1852 he went overland to California, where he remained until 1S56. 
Of late years he has followed farming, and lives in the village of 
Laingsburg. 

SILAS D. McKEEN, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1837, came to Lapeer county 
from New Hampshire and began practice. He had ability and would 
have risen to wealth and high station except for his habits. Died 
many years since. 

ANTHONY McKEY, 

Senator from Lenawee county in 1837-8, was born in Delhi, N. Y. 
Jan. 3, 1800. When nine years old his father removed to Chemung 
county, N. Y.. where he worked until eighteen, when he commenced 
teaching school. He came to Michigan in 1826, taught school for a 
time at Monroe, and in 1828 settled on a farm in Deerfield (then 
Blissfield). In 1828 he was appointed postmaster at Kedzie's Grove 
(now Deerfield), and held that position until his death, Jan. 28, 1S49. 
He was a surveyor and prominent contractor on the Lake Shore 
road, located and surveyed several state roads, and was seven years 
a supervisor. In politics a Democrat, and an intimate friend of Cass, 
Barry and McClelland. Of fine person, and a typical Scotch gentle- 
man of culture. 

JOHN Q. McKERNAN, 

Representative from the Upper Peninsula in 18G3-4-5-7-9-70. was 
born in Little Britain, N. Y., Jan. 10, 1823. He came to Washtenaw 
county in 1S32, lived in White O.ik from 1837 to 18 IS, then removed 
to Houghton county. Has lived in several towns there, and is now 
postmaster at L'Anse. In politics a Democrat. He was four years 
sheriff of Houghton county, has been supervisor, justice, village 
president, superintendent of poor, and held many other offices. He 
was a delegate to the constitutional convention of 1867. By trade a 
carpenter, but has been a lumberman, surface agent of copper mines, 
etc. 

JAMES L. McKIE, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1885-7, was born in Neshoba 
county, Miss., Feb. 10, 1S37. Lived in Illinois from 184-i to iS54 » 
since at Three Oaks, Mich., except two years a clerk at Niks. Now 



452 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

in mercantile business. Has been supervisor five terms, and held 
many village and town offices. In politics a Democrat. 



JOHN McKINNEY 

Was born in Pennsylvania in 1803. He came to Michigan in 1837, 
settled in VanBuren county, where he died July 10, 1870. He was 
Representative in 1348; State Senator in 1849-50; secretary of state 
1855 to 1859; state treasurer in 1859 and 18G0. In politics, first a 
Democrat, a Republican after 1S54. Deceased. 



sheldon Mcknight, 

Representative from Detroit in 1857, was bom in Herkimer county, 
N. Y.. in 1810. Came to Detroit in 1820, learned the trade of a 
printer, in 1827 took an interest in the Detroit Gazette, which was 
merged in the Free Press in 1830, and edited by him until 1830. He 
was postmaster of Detroit 183G to 1841. In 1845 he was appointed by 
President Polk agent to examine the mineral resources of the Upper 
Peninsula, took up his residence at the Sault, established a line of 
vessels, and was the chief factor in building a railroad around the 
rapids, which was the means of transit until the canal was built. 
Politically a Democrat. He was efficient in the establishment of the 
insane asylum at Kalamazoo, and was one of its first board of trus- 
tees. Died at Washington, Julv 21, I860. 



D YOKES McLAOHLIN, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1875. was born in the town of 
Ayr, Scotland, June 20, 1814. He came to Whitehall, N. Y.. in 1822, 
and in 1850 he removed to Summerfield, Mich., where he has been 
engaged in farming, lumbering and selling goods. He has been a 
justice, notary public, and supervisor. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES Mr MAI ION 

Was born in county Clare, Ireland. April 4. 1819. He received his 
education there, leaving college before graduating. Settled in Ann 
Arbor in 1S37, and worked as a blacksmith, a trade learned by him 
when a boy. He was a Whig, but became a Republican at the 
organization of that party. He studied law and served fourteen 
years as justice, with over 5,000 cases on his docket. He was super- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 453 

visor and chairman of the county board for several years; circuit 
court commissioner two years; and during the war provost marshal 
two years. He was Representative from 1857 to 1861, and was an 
able and inlluential member. Deceased 



JOEL W. McMAHON, 
Senator from the counties of Sanilac and Huron in 1833, was born in 
Sanilac county, June 29, 1848, and has never had a residence outside 
of that county. He was admitted to the bar in 1873, since which 
time he has resided at Marlette, engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. He has served as prosecuting attorney one term. He is a 
Republican. 

DANIEL D. McMARTIN, 

Representative from Allegan county in 1863-4, was born in Amster- 
dam, N. Y., February 8, 1S08. By occupation a farmer, in politics a 
Republican. Came to Michigan in 1838, and settled in an unorgan- 
ized town in Allegan county, since called Martin, a part of his name. 
Afterwards removed to Gunplain, where he lived until 1865. Now 
resides at Kalamazoo. Has been justice four terms, and six times a 
supervisor. 

neal McMillan. 

Representative from Kent county in 1877, was born at G >dnian- 
chester, Quebec, December 25, 1845. He has been a resident of 
Michigan since 1850, was formerly farmer and teacher, is now a 
druggist, has held the offices of supervisor, county superintendent of 
schools, village recorder, treasurer and alderman, and was elected 
Representative as a Republican, for 1887-8. by a vote of 2,209 to 1.57S 
for James Ward, and 652 for Charles Oldfield, Prohibitionist. 



JOHN W. McNABB, 

Representative from Newaygo county in 1879-85, was born in Wyan- 
dotte county, Ohio, January 20. 1846. His parents moved to In liana 
in 1851, where he attended the common schools and academy until 
seventeen, when he entered Fort Wayne college. After one year in 
that institution he entered Wabash college, and remained two vears: 
taught school one year; studied medicine three years at R 
Indiana, then entered the medical department of the University of 
4S 



454 MICHIGAN BIOGEAPHY. 

Michigan. He returned to Indiana and practiced medicine one year, 
after which he removed to Newaygo county, Michigan, where he has 
since been engaged in his profession. Dr. McNabb has held the office 
of justice, township clerk, and superintendent of schools; was elected 
to the legislature in 1878 on the national greenback ticket, and again 
in 1*84, receiving 2,155 votes to 1,903 for William T. Carpenter, 
Republican, and 214 for Jas. H. Edwards. Prohibition. He was one 
of the most humorous speakers that ever held a seat in the House. 



WILLIAM McNAIR 

Was born in Bucks county, Pa., January 1, 1800. He emigrated to 
Michigan in l v 20. and became a merchant ac Tecumseh, and after- 
wards a farmer. In politics a Democrat. He was a Representative 
in 1849. 



MOSES A. McNAFGHTON 

Was born in Argyle, N. Y., January 3, 1813. He received an aca- 
demical education, and was two years in Union college; read medicine 
and graduated at Fairfield, N. Y., in 1840. He settled at Jackson, 
Michigan, in 1841, and practiced medicine successfully for ten years- 
when he turned his attention to real estate, in which he was success- 
ful. He also was interested in the building of railroads, among them 
the Jackson branch of the Michigan Southern, and the Grand River 
Valley, of which he was treasurer. He was elected on the free soil 
ticket as Senator in 1853, and was mavor of Jackson in lS'i0-7. 



JOHN L. McNEIL 

Wa? born at Charlotte. Yt.. October 10, 1813. He received a com- 
mon school education and worked on his father's farm until twenty- 
one, and then took charge of his father's hotel in Charlotte. In 1836 
he emigrated to Michigan and settled in Atlas, Genesee county, upon 
a farm. He filled various local offices, and as a Democrat was a 
Representative in 1S49. 



JACOB L. M( PEEK, 

Senator from Barry aud Eaton counties in 1879, was horn in Oxford, 
Ohio. May 4, 1S4S, and removed to Michigan with his parents in 1852, 
settling on a farm near Grand Ledge. In 18G7 he moved into the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 455 

village. He received a good education and opened a real estate and 
collection otlice in Grand Ledge. In 1875 he was admitted to the 
bar, and has since been in the practice of the law. In politics a 
Republican. 

william Mcpherson, jr., 

Commissioner of railroads, 1885 to 1S87, was born at Inverness, Scot- 
land, March 9, 1S34, came to this country and has resided at Howell 
since 1836, and attended such schools as that place afforded at that 
time. At the age of sixteen he entered the store of his father as a 
clerk, and when a little more than twenty-one years of age, in 1856, 
he became a partner with his father, and until about one year ago 
remained in the firm, under the name of William McPherson & Sons, 
general merchants, and dealers in wool and other farm products. He 
also engaged extensively in real estate in Livingston county and out- 
Bide, owning and dealing in farm, timber, and mineral lands, as well 
as village and city property, and lately has given his attention to real 
estate matters, the purchase of wool and other private business. Mr. 
McPherson is a Republican. 



A. T. McREYNOLDS, 

Representative from Detroit in 1S4U, was born at Dungannon, Ireland. 
Dec. £5, 180S, came to Pittsburg, Pa., in 1810, and was a member of 
the " Duquesne Greys," the first military company west of the Alle- 
ghanies, after the war of 1812. Removed to Detroit in 1833. in 1S34 
became a major on the staff of Gen. A. S. Williams, then commanding 
the state militia. In 1834-5 organized the Brady guards. He studied 
law and was admitted in 1810. He was eleven years lieut. colonel 
or colonel of the 1st Michigan regiment; was captain of the Mont- 
gomery guards; in 1317 was captain of dragoons, U. S. army, and served 
in the Mexican war, his company and that of Phil Kearney, forming 
Scott's body guard; for his bravery in the charge on the gates of 
Mexico received the thanks of the president and senate, having been 
disabled for life; returned to Detroit and practiced law until 1861; in 
1801 was commissioned colonel of the " Lincoln cavalry," the first 
regiment in that arm of the service; was in command of a brigade 
two years, and of a division six months. He was an alderman of 
Detroit two years; Indian agent three years; Senator in 1847; mem- 
ber and first president of the Detroit board of education: U. S. 
district attorney of western Michigan under Johnson: dem 
candidate for congress in 1372; prosecuting attorney of Muski _- >u 



456 MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 

county in 1874. He was first a Whig, and was a delegate to the 
national convention of 1839 that nominated Harrison, but of later 
years a Democrat. Resides at Grand Rapids and was long president 
of the state association of veterans of the Mexican war. 

GEORGE MEACHEM, 

Representative from Cass and other counties in 1839, and Senator in 
1859, was born in Oneida county, X. Y., June 18, 1799. He came to 
Ann Arbor in 1826, but soon became a farmer in Cass county, and 
was the first sheriff of that county. He was a supervisor many terms. 
First a Whig then a Republican. Deceased. 

DARIUS MEAD. 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1835, was born in Lanesboro. 
Mass., in 1800. He was a farmer and a Democrat. Settled in Mich- 
igan in 181.53, and was a justice and associate county judge of 
Lenawee county. Died at Blissfield in 1S59. 



ELISHA F. MEAD 

Was born in Hinesburg, Yt.. in 1826. A Republican in politics, a 
lawyer by profession. He came to Michigan with A. B. Maynard in 
1854, opened an office in Romeo, and practiced law until his mind 
failed. He returned to Vermont in 1871. where he still lives. He 
served one term as prosecuting attorney of Macomb county, and was 
a Representative in 1867-9-70. 

HENRY S. MEAD 

Was the first lawyer at Hillsdale, Michigan, and settled in that place 
about 1840. He was an able and popular man. and was Represent- 
ative in 1850, and Senator in 1851. He practiced law for twelve 
years, and died at Hillsdale in 1852. 

CHARLES MEARS, 

Senator from Mason and other counties in 1SG3-4, was born in North 
Billerica. Mass., in 1814. He received an academical education, and 
was for a time a general merchant in Lowell, Mass., but in 1S36 
opened, with his brothers, a store at Paw Paw, Midi. Later removed 
to White Lake, and then to the present site of Ludington. He built 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 457 

the fine harbors of Duck Lake, White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington 
and Pere Marquette, and was a lumberman and owner of pine lands. 
Later he became a leading business man in Chicago. 



JOHN" N. MELLEN, 

Senator from Macomb county in 1873-4-5, was born September 30, 
1831, in Garry, N. Y. He received a common school education. He 
emigrated to Washington, Mich., in 1837. In 1841 he removed to 
Lenox, and in 1869 to Romeo. From 1849 to 1864 he was engaged 
in the United States topographical survey of California, Oregon and 
Washington Territory. He was also employed by the government in 
establishing the subdivisions of counties and towns in Dakota terri- 
tory, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. His occupation now is 
that of a grain and lumber merchant. Politicallv a Democrat. 



DAVID MENZIE 

Was born about 1815 in Johnstown, N. Y. He received a common 
school education, and his medical diploma at Hartford, Conn. He 
came to Concord, Michigan, about 1837, and served as supervisor 
several years. He was a Representative in 1845. He died in 1854. 



JAMES MERCER, 

Senator from Houghton, Ontonagon, Baraga. Keweenaw and Isle 
Royal counties in 1883, was born in London, England, in September, 
1830. His parents emigrated in 1833, and were residents of Michigan 
when it became a state. He received his education at common 
schools and from private tutors. He acquired his early business 
education in Detroit. In 1330 he removed to Lake Superior, where 
he has since remained, being closely identified with the general 
development of that section of the state. He was a member of the 
House in 1881 and '82. 



WILLIAM MERCER, 

Representative from Ionia county, in 1875, was born in Saratoga 
county, N. Y., Oct. 12, 1824. He completed his education at the 
Pontiac district school. He removed to Michigan in 1831, and was 
the first supervisor elected in Campbell, Ionia county. He has been 



458 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

town treasurer and deputy sheriff, a merchant and grain dealer, and 
extensively engaged in manufacturing boat oars. In politics a 
Democrat. 

ELIAS W. MERRILL 

Was born in Falmouth, Maine, Oct. 2, 1812, and was educated at the 
common schools and Maine Wesleyan seminary. He came to Grand 
Rapids in 1837, removed to Muskegon in 1844, and there engaged in 
the lumbering business. He held various offices in town and county. 
He was Representative in 1857, and Senator in 1865. In 1863 he was 
appointed postmaster of Muskegon, and held the office until 1875. 
He has been a prominent business man of Muskegon. In politics a 
Republican. 

ABRAHAM T. METCALF. 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1875, was born Feb. 26, 
1831, in "Whitestown, N. Y. He received an academical education, and 
graduated at the New Orleans dental college. In 1S4S he went to 
Battle Creek, but shortly afterwards returned to New York state. In 
1854 he again came to Michigan, and in February, 1855, commenced 
the practice of his profession in Kalamazoo. He was chairman of 
the democratic county committee from 1860 to 1865: trustee of the 
village of Kalamazoo in 1869, and a member of the board of 
education. In 1855 he took an active part in the organization of the 
Michigan state dental association. In politics a Democrat. 



ALFRED R. METCALF, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1841, was born in Otsego 
county, N. Y., Oct. 3, 1802. Came to Michigan in 1834. A farmer, 
and politically, first Republican, now Prohibitionist. Lived for 
forty-five years on his farm in Michigan, but moved to Blandinsville, 
111., in 1879, where he now resides. 



HENRY MEYER, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1*83. was born Jan. 1. 182S, 
at Vorie, Germany. He received a common school education. He 
learned the carpenter's trade in Hanover. In 1851 he came to 
Detroit, where he worked twelve years for James Shearer, builder. 
In 1863 he moved to Fair Haven, St. Clair county, and 



MICHIGAN KIOGRAPHY. 459 

built in 1875 the Swan Creek steam grist mill; his occupation is 
farming and milling. In politics a Republican. He ha3 held the 
office of town treasurer and supervisor, each eight years. 



LOUIS MEYER, 

Representative from Livingston county, in 1875, was born in Han- 
over, Germany, in 1S3S. He was educated in German and English, 
and removed from Germany to .Michigan in 18j?. He is by occupa- 
tion a farmer. In politics a Democrat. Now resides in Lansing and 
is connected with the Lansing wagon works. 



JOHN MICKLE 

Came from Oswego, New York, to Michigan in 1831. He was the 
first settler in Reading, Hillsdale county. He was a Whig, and 
Representative in the legislature of 1842, and associate judge of the 
county. The home he built of black walnut logs in 1838, is still 
standing. By occupation a farmer. 



CHAS. E. MICKLEY, 

Senator from Lenawee county in 1873. was horn August 26, 1818, in 
Bucks county, Pa. He emigrated to Michigan in 1833, and settled 
in Fairfield. Lenawee county. He was a member of the House in 
1865-7. He was the first to move in the matter of admitting women 
to the state university. He lias also been a member of the state 
public school board, and president of Lenawee county agricultural 
society. A farmer by occupation. 



. CYRUS MILES. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1865-9-70, was born in 
Fowler, N. Y., April 13, 1828. By occupation a lawyer and banker, 
politically a Democrat. Came to Port Huron in 1852, and went into 
the banking business in 1856. Was mayor of Port Huron in 1804 and 
1865. Died March 2, 1877. 



FABIUS MILKS 

Was born in Watertown, N. Y., Dec. 31. is'.!. He received an 
academical education, and became a teacher. In 1838 he established 



460 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the Watertown normal school, and continued it with great success 
until 1844. In 1844 he located in Hartford, Mich., built a saw-mill 
and engaged in lumbering from IS 17 to 18G0. He was the owner of 
several hundred acres of land. Originally a Democrat, he became a 
Free Soiler in 18-18. and helped organize the Republican party in 1854. 
He was a Representative in 1859. He supported Greeley in 1S72, and 
Peter Cooper in 1870. 

GEORGE MILES 

Was born at Amsterdam, N. Y., April 5, 1789. He was of New 
England descent and was self educated. He studied law and was 
admitted in 1820. He attained distinction and was district attorney 
of Alleghany county, N. Y. In 1837 he removed to Ann Arbor, and 
engaged in the practice of his profession. On the resignation of 
Judge Goodwin from the Supreme Court in 1846, he was appointed to 
fill the vacancy, and held it until his death in 1850. He was a man 
of commanding personal appearance, presided with dignity, and his 
opinions upon legal cmestions were concise and able. 

MARCUS H. MILES 

Was born in the State of New York in 1813. Emigrated to Michigan 
about IS 36, and settled at Port Huron. In 1837 he went to Newport, 
now Marine City, and engaged in mercantile business. He was 
postmaster there and a Whig in politics. In IS jS he was elected clerk of 
St. Clair county and removed to St. Clair. He was re-elected in 
1840, serving from 1S39 to 1843. In 1848 and 1850 he was elected 
county clerk, serving in that office eight years. In 1852 he was 
admitted to the bar and began practice: in 1854 was elected circuit 
court commissioner; in 1856 was elected judge of probate, serving 
until IS61. In 186:) he enlisted in the 11th Michigan cavalry as a 
lieutenant, and during nearly all the time of his service acted as 
judge advocate at headquarters in the department of Kentucky. In 
1867 he was a Representative. He was a member of the constitu- 
tional convention of 1S67. In 1870 he was appointed inspector of 
customs at Toronto, Canada, held the position until 1875. He died 
Dec. 13, 1877. at St. Clair. First a Whig in politics, a Republican 
after 1854. 

WINFIELD S. MILLARD, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1S81-2, was born at Three 
Rivers, Mich.. Jan. 22. 1816. Educated at high school and state 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 461 

agricultural college. In 18G1 enlisted in the 11th Michigan infantry, 
and served through the war. For three years in the wholesale 
grocery trade at Laramie City, Dak.; general freight and ticket 
agent for C. , W. & M. R. R. Co. nearly three years; moved to Niles 
in 1872, and was secretary and treasurer of the Michigan wool pulp 
co., the Three Rivers pulp co. and Niles water power co. Has been a 
major of state militia. 

ALBERT MILLER, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1817, and the oldest living 
pioneer of the Saginaw valley, was born in llartland, Vt., May 10, 
1810. With a common school education he settled at Grand Blanc. 
Mich., in 1S31, and taught school. He removed to a farm near 
Saginaw City in 1833; taught the first school in the Saginaw valley 
in 1834-5: was inspector of elections 1833 to 1848; judge of probate 
1835 to 1844; justice thirteen years. He laid out Portsmouth, now 
part of Bay City. In 1836-7 built the second saw-mill on the Saginaw 
river. Has been president of the state pioneer society, postmaster, 
director in banks and manufacturing companies. In politics, first a 
Democrat, then a Republican. In the winter of 1887-8 celebrated his 
golden wedding. 

ELI R. MILLER 

Was born in Winsted, Conn., October 12, 1818. He received an 
academical education, emigrated to Michigan in 1S34, and settled as 
a farmer at Richland, Kalamazoo county. He was a member of the 
Michigan House in 1871-2-3-4, and was active in securing appropria- 
tions for fish propagation, and for several years was one of the state 
fish commissioners. In politics a Republican. 



• HENRY MILLER. 

Representative from Oakland county in 1853, 1803-4, was born in 
BulFalo, N. Y., in 1810. He came to Michigan in 1821, and was 
justice for several terms at Rochester. A merchant, in politics a 
Republican. He removed to Grand Rapids in 1800. and died April 
24, 1879. 

JOHN C. MILLER 

Was born in Ames, Ohio. March 9, l s 2'2. Came with his parents to 
Michigan in 1836, but in 1^13 removed to New Buffalo, where he now 

49 



462 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

resides. Obtained a common school education. By occupation 
a farmer, was a Whig until IS06, a Republican until 1872, since that 
time a Prohibitionist. He was a Representative in 1863-4. Has been 
supervisor six years, justice eight years, and held other local offices. 

JOHN MILLER, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1857, "03-4, was born at Sugar 
Loaf, Canada, February 1, 1818, his parents settling at Rochester, 
Mich., when he was young. With a limited education he went into 
lumbering at St. Clair, and served as clerk, general manager and 
superintendent of the Black river steam mill company. Then went 
into business for himself, was thrice mayor of Port Huron, and be- 
came cashier and manager of the first national bank at Port Huron. 
In politics a Democrat. Died in 1S73. 

JOSEPH MIL*LER, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1840-41, was born in 
Farmington, Conn., October 29, 1779. He graduated at Williams 
college, studied law, married Sarah Slierman in 1S08, a descendant 
of Roger Sherman, and settled at Winsted, Conn., in practice. Was 
a justice 2o years, and a member of the state legislature. In 1834 
removed to Richland, Mich., and was associate judge. Died in June, 
1864. 

LEONARD MILLER 

Was born in the state of New York in 1820, and came to Moscow, 
Mich., in 1839. Later he removed to Jonesville. He was a Repre- 
sentative, sessions of 1841-2. 

LEWIS T. MILLER, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1S35-G, was born in Rensse- 
laer county, N. Y., June 11, 17S7. By occupation a farmer, in politics 
a Democrat. Moved to Moscow, Mich., in 1833 and was the first 
postmaster. He was a delegate to the constitutional convention of 
183"). Died February 14, 1S56. 

LUCTEN B. MILLER, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1877-79, was born in the st:it.- 
of New Yurk, March 6, 1831. His parents removed to LaSalle, Mich., 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 463 

the May following;, and he has resided there ever since. He received 
a common school education. He has held the offices of justice, super- 
visor, school director, assessor and notary puhlic. He is a farmer. 
In politics a Democrat. 

NORTON L. MILLER 

Was born in Berkshire county, Mass., December 2, 1815, his parents 
removing to Monroe county, N. Y., in 1818, and in 1832 to Macomb 
county, Michigan. He is a miller by occupation. Was register of 
deeds for Macomb county, from 1837 to 1861, and Representative in 
1869, 1S70-1-2. He received an academical education and has held 
various local offices. Is now a resident of Ludden, Dakota. 

OLIVER MILLER, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1S44, resided at Ridgeway, 
and was in politics a Democrat. He was a brother of Dan R. Miller, 
of Monroe, a prominent business man at an early day. 

RICHARD C. MILLER 

Was born in Hartland, Conn., April 17, 1S20, and received a common 
school education. He settled iu Greenfield, Wayne county, in 1830, 
and removed to Fairplains, Montcalm county, in 1Sj3, where he now 
resides. He was Representative from Montcalm county in 1871-2-3- 
4. By occupation a farmer and commission merchant, in politics a 
Republican. 

ABEL MILLINGTON 

Was born at Rutland, Vt., February 5, 1787. He becamea physician, 
and removed to Ypsilanti, Michigan, in 1826. He was sheriff of 
Washtenaw county, and was a member of the legislative council in 
1834 and 1835. He removed to St. Charles, Illinois, in 1838, and died 
there the same year. 

CHARLES R. MILLINGTON 

Was born August 5, 1818, at Lebanon, N. Y. The next year removed to 
Shaftsbury, Vt., where he resided until 1836, when his father's 
family settled in Bennington, Vt. He received a good academical 
education, and taught school winters for five years. Studied law and 
was admitted to the bar in Vermont. He removed to Constantine 



•464 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Mich., in 1847, where he resided until 1873. Since that time he has 
been a resident of Independence, Iowa. He was a "Whig until 18ol, 
since that time a Republican, and was a delegate to the convention at 
Jackson which organized that party. From 18G9 to 1873 he was a 
Representative from St. Joseph county. 



ALFRED J. MILLS, 

Of Paw Paw, was born of English parentage in 1851. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1S73 at Kalamazoo. In 1S75 he removed to 
Paw Paw, where he has since resided. He was elected judge of 
probate of Van Buren county in 1876, and circuit judge in the spring 
of 1881. 

CHARLES B. MILLS, 

Representative from Tuscola county in 1S77, and Senator in 1869-70, 
was born in York county, Maine, May 5, 1823. He received a com- 
mon and high school education. At an early age he became a 
minister in the Free Baptist denomination. He was a close student 
and gave frequent lectures in addition to Lis regular pastoral work. 
He removed to Ohio, and from there to Tuscola county in 1S56, 
where he bought a farm. He was for several years judge of probate. 
He has been trustee of Hillsdale college for many years, and was one 
of the incorporators of the Free Baptist printing house at Dover. N. H. 
Of late years he has been in the employ of Hillsdale college, but now 
resides in Tuscola county. 

JOHN W. MILLS, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1855, was born in Phelps, N. 
Y., April 24, 1821. He came to Michigan in 1835, and settled on a 
farm in Pittsfield. Washtenaw county. Lived at Leoni, Jackson 
county, from 1803 to 1856, when he moved to Illinois, and was a member 
of the legislature of that state. In 1865 he removed to Grinned. 
Iowa. By occupation a farmer, politically a Republican. Died 
December 15, I860. 

WILLIAM S. MILLS. 

Senator from Sanilac county in 1859, was born in the state of 
Vermont, Oct. 29, 1820. He came to Michigan in 1854, and was 
prosecuting attorney of Sanilac county in 1800-61. Has been a 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 465 

printer, editor, lumberman, lawyer, publisher, and is now superin- 
tendent of a mining company in El Dorado canon, Lincoln county, 
Nevada. Politically a Republican. 



HIRAM MILLSPAUGH, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1850, was a native of the 
state of New York. The time of his birth and the date of his coming 
to Belleville, Mich., are unknown. He was a Democrat in politics, a 
farmer by occupation, and died November 3, 1883. 



JOSEPH P. MINNIE, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1851, was born at Point aux 
Trembles. Mich., April 21, 1812. When young he weat to St. Louis, 
Mo., and learned the trade of a tailor. Returning, he located at 
Monroe. In 1834 he located at Port Huron, and was a merchant 
tailor. He was justice for twenty years, amassed a large property, 
took an important part in all progressive enterprises, and was one of 
the most favorably known of the early pioneers. Died March 10, 
1865. 

PRESTON MITCHELL, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1871-2-3-4, was born in 
Meredith, N. Y. . April 24. 1812; received a common school education, 
and was a teacher at sixteen; afterwards a clerk and merchant at 
Raldwinsville and Syracuse, N. Y.; came to Marshall, Mich., in 1830. 
and from 1837 to 1842 was a merchant at Marengo: in 1842 removed 
to Marshall and was county treasurer six years; was alderman and 
mayor of Marshall, also supervisor; assessor of internal revenue 
1862-3; and presidential elector in 1876. In politics a Democrat, a 
Republican from 1854. He had landed interests west, and was in 
real estate abstract business. Deceased. 



THOMAS MITCHELL, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 18~>9, was born in Washing- 
ton county, N. Y., June 25, 181.9. He came to St. Joseph county. 
Michigan, in 1843, and engaged in the manufacture of agricultural 
implements and a general foundry business. Politics Republican, 

Now resides at Constantine, retired from business. 



466 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

W. H. C. MITCHELL 

Was born in Perry county, Ohio, May 30, 1825. received a common 
school education, and went to California in 1849. He returned to 
Ohio in 1853, and in 18(36 settled at East Bay, Grand Traverse county, 
Michigan. He was in the army as sutler 1862-5. He was Representa- 
tive in 1809-70-1-2, and in 1873-4-5 a Senator. He was a delegate to the 
republican national convention in 1S76. Was several years register 
of the U. S. land office at Reed City, and still resides in Grand 
Traverse county. In politics a Republican, and by occupation has 
been a tinsmith, sash and furniture manufacturer, lumberman and 
farmer. 

WILLIAM T. MITCHELL 

Was born at Middlebury, N. Y., May 27, 1817. He received a good 
education, read law, and was admitted to the bar in 1S39. Removed 
to Lapeer, Michigan, and was admitted to the Michigan bar in 1839. 
In 1840 he edited the Lapeer Plaindealer, the same year was 
appointed prosecuting attorney, and in the fall was elected register 
of deeds. In 18-12 he removed to Romeo, and became prosecuting 
attorney and master in chancery of Macomb county. He moved to 
Port Huron in 1847, where he now resides. In 1853 was a Repre- 
sentative, and in 1809 was elected circuit judge, which he resigned 
after three years from insufficient salary. In politics a Democrat. 



OTTO MOE, 

Representative from St. Joseph county, in 1879, was born Jan. 29, 
1845, in Conneaut, Ohio. He received a common school education, 
and removed in 183G to Fawn River, Michigan. Occupation, farmer. 
He has been supervisor several years. In politics a National. 



ORLANDO MOFFAT, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1819, was born in Otsego 
county, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1808. By occupation a farmer, in politics 
Whig and Free Soiler. He came to Michigan in 1830, and died Feb. 
20, 18G8. 

SETH C. MOFFAT, 

Was burn at Battle Creek. Mich., Aug. 1, 1S41. lie received a 
common school education, and was two years a teacher at Colon, 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 467 

He graduated from the law department of the University in 1863, 
began practice at Lyons, Mich., removed to Northport in 18G6, and 
was prosecuting attorney of Leelanaw county four years. He was a 
state Senator in 1871-2: a member of the constitutional commission of 
1873; register of the U. S. land office at Traverse City, 1874-8: prose- 
cuting attorney of Grand Traverse county; Representative and 
speaker in the legislature of 1881-2; delegate to the republican 
national convention at Chicago in 1834; and Representative in 
congress from the 11th district, from March 4, 1885, until his death at 
Washington, Dec. 22, 1887. Politically a Republican. 



ISAAC MONFORE. 

Representative from Macomb county in 1835-6-7, was born in Dela- 
ware county, N. Y. , in 1S03. He was educated at Rochester, X. Y. high 
school, and taught several seasons. In 182S he settled on a farm in 
Ray, Mich., afterwards in Shelby. He studied law, was a justice, 
county clerk and supervisor. As a legislator he was one of four 
representatives who opposed the wildcat banking law. In politics a 
Democrat. Died April 21, 1871. 



CHARLES J. MONROE, 

Senator from Allegan and Van Buren counties in 1883-5-7, and 
president pro tern, in 1S87, was born in Lawrence, Mich., Nov. 20, 
1839. He was two and a half years a student in the agricultural 
college. Taught eight terms, and was engaged in surveying and 
land agent several years. Settled in 1866 at South Haven, was 
supervisor three years, and has been in real estate insurance and 
banking since 1867. Took a law course at Ann Arbor in 187S-9, and 
in 1S79 organized a bank at Bangor, now the West Michigan savings 
bank, of which he is president, and also a director and president of 
the Kalamazoo savings bank. In politics a Republican. 



DARIUS MONROE, 

Senator from Branch county in 18G1-2-3-4, and Representative in 
1S6j, was born at Williamstown, Mass., April 16. 1797. He removed 
with his parents to Cayuga county, N. Y. in 1839, and became a 
tanner, then a printer at Auburn, then a hatter. Was a justice at 
Victory, N. Y, twelve years, supervisor four terms, and a member 
of the N. Y. assembly in 1841. In 1832 settle! at Bronson, Mich 



468 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

and was a supervisor. He was appointed a member of the state rail- 
road board by Gov. Crapo, and held it until his death in November, 
1881. In politics a Republican. Of sound judgment, he was a good 
legislator. 

JAMES MONROE, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1857-9, was born in the 
state of New York in 1816. He settled at Albion, Mich., in 1838. In 

184S he started a furnace and shop for the manufacture of stoves, 
thrashers, and general jobbing, which he continued until 1859. He 
has held the positions of sheriff of Calhoun county, and of United 
States marshal for western Michigan. Politically a Republican. 
Now resides at Kalamazoo. 

DANIEL N. MONTAGUE, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1855, was born in Hadley, 
Mass., June 9, 1811. He came to Michigan in 1839, and settled in 
Vienna. Genesee county, and still lives on the farm he carved from 
the wilderness. Politically a Republican. 

HENRY MONTAGUE, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1885. was bom in Hadley, 
Mass., July 30, 1813. He came to Michigan in 1835 and now resides 
at Kalamazoo. He is a farmer, politically a Republican. He was 
trustee of the Michigan asylum from 1857 to 1859, when he was 
appointed steward, which position he held until October 1, 18S5. 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1850, %vas born in Ireland, 
March 22, 1804, and came to this country with his parents, while 
young, who settled in Oneida county, N. Y. Received an ordinary 
education, came to Michigan in 1831, and in 1835 located on a large 
farm in Hamlin, Eaton county. He was a supervisor, and in 1850 a 
brigadier general of state militia. In politics a Democrat. Deceased. 

MARTIN V. MONTGOMERY, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1S71-2, was born near Eaton 
Rapids, Mich., October 20, IS 10. He received a fair education, be- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 459 

came a teacher, and in 1861 enlisted in the 2d Michigan cavalry 

serving until the summer of 18.32. when he resigned from sickness' 
He studied law and was admitted in 1865. He removed to Jackson 
became a successful lawyer, and- in 1874 was the democratic candi- 
date for attorney general. Settled at Lansing in 1875, and became a 
leading member of the Ingham county bar, and had a state reputa- 
tion as a jury lawyer. He was appointed commissioner of patents bv 
Cleveland in 1885, resigned after two years' service, and was ap- 
pointed and confirmed associate judge of the Supreme Court of 
Columbia, a position he now holds. 

ROBERT M. MONTGOMERY, 
Of Grand Rapids, was born at Eaton Rapids, Mich., Mav 12. 1849. and 
attended public schools until he was eighteen years of age. He 'was 
admitted to the bar at the age of twenty-one and began practice at 
Pentwater, where lie remained until 1877, when he removed to Grand 
Rapids, where he has since resided. During his residence at Pent- 
water he was for four years prosecuting attorney of Oceana count v. 
Upon removing to Grand Rapids he was appointed assistant TJ. S. 
attorney, and held that office until October. 1881. He was elected 
circuit judge of the 17th judicial circuit at the April election of 1881 
as a Republican, and has filled the position since January 1. I8r2. 

WILLIAM H. MONTGOMERY 
Was born in Ovid (now Lodi), N. Y., Aug. 8. 1805. He settled on a 
farm on the river Raisin in 1831. In 1833 he was made postmaster at 
West Raisinville. He taught school in New York and Michigan for 
nine years; was school inspector 12 years; justice of the peace 16 
years; and in 1838 was Representative in the legislature. He was 
county judge in 1840: supervisor of Raisinville in 1839 and of Dundee 
in 1851; Senator in 1855: president of the Monroe county agricultural 
society: for two years one of the executive committee of the state 
agricultural society: and county drain commissioner. He removed 
to Hudson in 1862 and became a druggist. He went through various 
grades of military service, was made brigadier general by Gov. Barry 
in 18-14, and major general bv Gov. Greenlv in 1847. 



WILLIAM R. MONTGOMERY 
Was born at Bath, N. Y., March 12. 1S13. Fie moved with his parents 
to Rochester, N. Y.. in 1810, where he lived until 1844. He received 
50 



470 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

a good education, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1835. 
He moved to Camden, Michigan, in 1844, and settled on an unim- 
proved farm of 3'20 acres. He cleared 150 acres and removed to Hills- 
dale in 1855, where he still resides. He was Representative in 1851. 
He held theofficeof assessor and supervisor 21 years and was 12 years 
chairman of the county board. He was register of deeds for Hillsdale 
county eight years. In politics a Whig and Republican until 1S78, 
now an independent Cleveland man. 



WILLIAM J. MOODY 

Was a lawyer and came to Jackson. Michigan, prior to 1838. He was 
also a speculator and politician. He was a Senator in 1S35-6 and 1343-4; 
was also a county judge, and justice of the peace. He removed from 
Jackson to Racine, Wisconsin, where he died in 1853. 



JOHN W. MOON, 

Senator from Ottawa and Muskegon counties in 1885-7, was born in 
Wayne county, Mich., Jan. 18, 1836. Until he was eighteen years of 
age he worked on a farm, attending school during the winters. Re- 
moving from Wayne county in 1S52 to Jackson county, and leaving 
there in the fall of 1854, worked in lumber cauips and saw-mills on 
Flat river until the spring of 1856. He then removed to Muskegon 
county, where he has resided since that time, and for the past twenty 
years has been engaged in the manufacture of lumber, being a mem- 
ber of the firm of A. V. Mann & Co., doing business at Lakeside, 
Muskegon county. In the past he has held the offices of township 
treasurer, supervisor, and president of the village. Politically a Re- 
publican. 



ALEXANDER II. MOORE, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1851, was born near Pitts- 
burg, Pa., Nov. 8, 1817. He came to Michigan in 1S41. After serv- 
ing in the legislature of 1851 as Representative, he went to La Porte, 
Ind., graduating at the Indiana medical college, and went into prac- 
tice at Slottville, Michigan, where he remained nine years. Now re- 
sides at Osage, Mitchell county. Iowa. Has been justice and county 
judge. Is in the enjoyment of a large and successful practice. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 471 

CHARLES F. MOORE, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1877, was born August 30, 
1842, at St. Clair, Michigan. He received a good common school edu- 
cation, and has been alderman of St. Clair. He has been engaged in 
the lumber trade from the outset of his business career, and for years 
has combined with it the occupation of farming. In politics a Re- 
publican. 

EDWARD S. MOORE, 

Senator from St. Joseph county in 1853, was born in Trenton, N. J., 
June 4, 1805, and removed when young to Mooresburg, Pa., became a 
tailor and worked several years at the trade. Became a merchant in 
1830, and had stores at Danville and Potrsville, Pa. In 1834 settled 
at Three Rivers, and with A. C. Prutznian had a store at Prairie 
Ronde, removed it to Three Rivers, bought a flouring mill, and con- 
tinued in business until 1859. In 1S64 helped organize and became 
president of the national bank at Three Rivers. Politically a Demo- 
crat. He was a delegate to the constitutional convention of 1850. 
and was regent of the University six vears. 



GEORGE W. MOORE. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1847, was born in Albany, N. 
Y., July 4. 1812. and came to Michigan in 1833. He was one of two 
sons (the other J. Wilkie Moore, of Detroit) of Gen. Win. Moore, of 
Massachusetts, a distinguished oilicer iu the war of the revolution. 
He held the position of postmaster in Brownstown under three 
administrations, and was township clerk of his township. He was a 
Democrat, and a merchant by occupation. Died at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, in 1850. 



HIRAM MOORE, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1S50, was born in New 
Hampshire in 1S00. and died at Brandon, Wisconsin. May 5, lt>75. He 
was a farmer and inventor, in politics a Democrat. He was the 
inventor of Moore's harvester, winch cut a swath fourteen feet wide, 
thrashed, cleaned, and put the ,L;rain in bags. He also claimed the 
invention of the first sickle, and that the McCormick improvement 
was an infringment on his patent, and the case was in the courts for 
several years. 



472 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



HENRY M. MOORE, 



Representative from Montcalm county in 1851, was born in Tomp- 
kins county, N. Y.. about 1S03. He came to Oakland county, 
Michigan, in 1836, and settled at Greenville in 1845. He was a 
merchant, and opened the first store in Montcalm county. Politically 
a Democrat. He was a radical temperance man. He removed to 
the Pacific coast in 1852, and is said to be living at Copperopolis, 
California. He was also a lawyer. 



JOHN MOORE 

Was born in London, England, Feb. 7, 1826; from 1800 to 1834 was 
with his mother, a resident of the state of New York, and then 
resided at Milford, Mich., attended public school until 1846. studied 
law, was admitted in 1848, and commenced practice at Fentonville. 
but removed to Saginaw in 1851. Was prosecuting attorney 1857-61; 
mayor of Saginaw 1861-2-3; judge of the 10th circuit 1871-4, when he 
resigned; Democratic candidate for governor in 1808: and a member 
of the board of education 1855 to 1870. Politically a Democrat, took 
high rank as a lawyer and citizen, and stands high in public 
estimation. 

JOSEPH B. MOORE, 

Senator from Lapeer and Macomb counties, in 1879, was born in 
Commerce, Michigan, Nov. 3, 1845. He was educated at Hillsdale 
college and at the law department of the Michigan University, de- 
fraying his expenses by teaching. He removed to Lapeer in 1S69, 
and was admitted to the practice of the law that year. In 1870 he 
was elected circuit court commissioner for Lapeer county: in 1872 
was elected prosecuting attorney, and in 1874 mayor of Lapeer. In 
the fall of 1S74 he was re-elected prosecuting attornej', which office 
he held until 1877. In politics a Republican. In 1880 he was elected 
judge of the circuit comprising Oakland and Lapeer counties. 



THOMAS F. MOORE 

Was born in Peterborough, N. H., October 2, 1819. He received a 
fair education, and in 1838 went to western New York, working at 
farming and teaching: in 1839 came to Michigan, and in 1S40 settled 
on a farm in York. Washtenaw county, where he lived until 1854. 
He then purchased a farm in Madison, Lenawee countv, where he 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 473 

now resides. Has held the offices of justice and supervisor: was a 
Representative in 1861-2, and Senator in 1S63-4. In 18G5 he was 
appointed inspector of the state prison and served four years. In 
1869 he was made superintendent of the poor in Lenawee county, and 
served ten years. In 1877 he became a manager of the Ionia house 
of correction and served two vears. 



WILLIAM MOORE. 

Senator from Washtenaw county in 1837-S, and Representative in 
1843, was born at Peterboro, N. H.. April 9, 1787. At the age of 
eighteen he emigrated to Phelps. N. Y. , where he married Lucy 
Rice in 1806. During winters he made wheels for spinning flax, 
farming summers. He was justice there sixteen years, and held 
other offices, removing to York. Mich., in 1S31. He was a delegate 
in the constitutional convention of 1835. He served in the war of 
1812. as did his father in the revolution. By occupation a farmer, 
politically a Democrat, in religion a Baptist. Of ten children, only 
one, William A. Moore, is now living. Died Dec. 4. 1850. 



ASA P. MOORMAN. 

Representative from Detroit in 1855, was a native of Ohio, born in 
1803. The time of his coming to Detroit is not known. He was a 
member of the board of education of the city in 1861-2, was a carpenter 
and builder, a Republican in politics, and died in 1S79. 



CHARLES MORAN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1836-8-40, was born in Detroit, 
Mich., April 15 1797, and resided there until his death, Oct. 13, 1876. 
He was a member of the Moran family, prominent in Detroit history. 
At the age of fifteen he enlisted in the war of 1810. fought side by 
side with the late Judge Witherell in Captain Jaques company, was 
under Hull when he surrendered Detroit, and served through the 
war. He was a member of the legislative council 1832-5: also of the 
second convention of assent, 1S!G: associate judge of the county 
court in 1831, and 1837-41; justice, and many years alderman, and 
held other positions of trust. In politics a Democrat. Had large 
real estate interests which occupied much of his time. 



474 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

GEORGE MORAN, 

Representative from Wayne county, 1846-1840, was born in Detroit 
in May, 1805. He descended from the early French settlers of that 
name, became a resident of Grosse Point when 21 years of age, 
and resided there until his death in 1881. He was supervisor of Ham- 
tramck in 1845, and of the township of Grosse Point in 184J\ Was 
paymaster in the service of the Indian bureau for many years, and 
carried the mail to Mackinac on a trail through the woods. He was 
widely known, and was especially influential with the Indians. Hi3 
occupation was nominally that of a farmer on the farm where he 
resided, but he was a free operator in real estate in the vicinity. Was 
democratic in politics. 

ELISHA MORCOM. 

Representative from Menominee county in 1883, was born in Corn- 
wall, England. Mayo, 1835. Emigrated to Michigan in 1854. Resided 
two years in Keweenaw county, going from there in 1856 to Rock- 
land, Ontonagon county, where he served two terms as township 
clerk and was supervisor of Carp Lake for four years. He also held 
important and responsible positions as mining captain and superin- 
tendent in the copper mines. Removed to Quinnesec in 1878. Took 
charge of the underground works of the Quinnesec iron mine as min- 
ing captain. Was appointed superintendent in 1882. He was super- 
visor of Breitung four vears. 



GEORGE MORELL 

Was born at Lenox, Mass., March 22, 1TS6. He was a descendant of 
the French Huguenots. He was educated at Lenox academy and 
Williams college, and received his degree in 1807. He studied law at 
Troy, N. Y., was admitted to the bar in 1810, and settled at Coopers- 
town, N. Y.. where he remained until 1S32. During that time he 
was clerk of the court of common pleas of Otsego county; master in 
chancery: and judge of the court of common pleas. In 1S2S he was 
a member of the New York assembly. In 1832 he was appointed a 
judge of the United .States court for Michigan, and removed to De- 
troit. He held that office until 1837, when Michigan was admitted 
into the union. In 1S3G he was appointed a judge of the state 
Supreme Court, and in 1842 chief justice, on the resignation of Chief 
Justice Fletcher. He married Maria, daughter of Gen. Samuel B. 
Webb. While a resident of the state of New York Judge Morell rose 
through all the ranks of military service up to major general. While 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 475 

serving as chief justice he died at Detroit March 8, 1845. His funeral 
was attended by the state legislature and the bar of Detroit. As a 
judge he presided with great dignity, and was distinguished for his 
legal attainments and untiring industry. In social life he was always 
a welcome guest. Tn politics a Democrat. 



PETER MOREY 

Was born in Cazenovia, N. Y., in 1793, was educated at Hamilton 
academy, studied law and was admitted in 1831. He practiced four 
years in the state of New Y'ork, and in 1835 removed to Tecumseh, 
Michigan. In 1837 he removed to Detroit, having been appointed 
attorney general of the state, which office he held four years. After 
the expiration of his term of office he returned to Tecumseh, where 
he continued in practice for many years, finally going to Marion, 
Ohio, to live with his daughter, until his death in the fall of 1881. He 
was a fine scholar, a courteous old school gentleman, an able and 
energetic lawyer. In politics a Democrat. 



FRANKLIN E. MORGAN, 

Senator from Branch and St. Joseph counties in 1877, was born in 
"Warsaw. N. Y., June 9, 1S36. He was educated at Albion college, 
Michigan. He afterwards pursued select studies at the Michigan 
University for one year, after which he entered the law school at 
Ann Arbor, and graduated in 18G3. The same year he settled in 
Coldwater, where lie has since practiced his profession and dealt 
in real estate. He has been a member of the common council of 
Coldwater, and held the office of circuit court commissioner. In 
politics a Republican. 

GOTJYERNEUR MORRIS 

Was born in Springfield, Yermont. After graduating from Dart- 
mouth college he took a regular course at the Yale college law school; 
spent a year in the office of the late Chief Justice Chase, at Cincin- 
nati, was admitted to the bar in Kentucky: returned to Vermont, 
settled in Brattleboro, and practiced law in Yermont and New 
Hampshire. Having left the law permanently, as he then supposed, 
he engaged in manufacturing enterprises. In 1840 he came to Michi- 
gan and settled on a farm in Monroe county, where he remaini 1 
fifteen years. In 1855 lie removed to Monroe, where he has since 
resided. Having resumed the practice of law in 1S00. he continued 



476 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the same until his election to the bench. Since his residence in 
Monroe county he has been four years a supervisor, four years a 
justice of the peace, four years a circuit court commissioner, two 
years county treasurer, two years city treasurer, four years judge of 
probate, and circuit judge of the district comprising Washtenaw and 
Monroe counties. Politically a Democrat. 

WILLIAM MORRIS 

Was born in Surrey, England, September 25, 1804. He came to this 
country in 1823, and settled with his parents in New York city. In 
1834 he removed to Michigan, first settling at Sturgis, but in 1852 
removed to a farm in Burr Oak. He has been justice, postmaster of 
Sturgis four years, supervisor of Burr Oak, and in 1848 was Repre- 
sentative in the legislature. In politics a Democrat. 



ALEXANDER H. MORRISON 

Was born at Quebec. Canada. February 22, 1822. of Scotch and 
American parentage. He was educated at a private academy, at six- 
teen went to Chicago, and was an employe of a contractor on the 
Illinois and Michigan canal. At nineteen he became a merchant and 
contractor on public works in Illinois and Iowa. In 1850 he removed 
to St Joseph. Mich., where he has since resided as a merchant, manu- 
facturer and railroad builder. In connection with James F. Joy, he 
constructed the Chicago & Michigan Lake Shore railroad, and 
managed it for six years. He has owned and operated witli others, 
railroads in Dakota. Formerly a Whig, later a Republican. In 
1857-8 lie was a Senator: and in 1861-2 Representative. In 1862 he 
was collector of internal revenue, and from 1866 to 18G9 assessor. He 
was six years one of the republican state committee, and on the 
governor's staff from 1854 to 1861. 

WILLIAM V. MORRISON 

Was born at Lansing, N. Y., February 15. 1817. His ancestors on 
both sides served in the revolutionary war. He was brought up on a 
farm, became a clerk and book-keeper, and in 183? removed to Michi- 
gan witii his parents, who settled on a lar^e farm in Jackson county. 
He engaged in farming and teaching, removed to Albion in 1841. 
became interested in milling and carried on that business until 1871. 
In 1850 he was a member of the state constitutional convention. In 
politics a Democrat. For nearly forty years was a justice in Albion. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 477 

THOMAS MORRISON", 

Senator from Detroit in 1881-2, was born in Perth, Scotland, in 1829. 
He came to Canada with his parents while very young, received a 
classical education, and afterward stuJied medicine, graduating at 
the Buffalo medical college in 1855. He then settled in "Wayne 
county, Mich., where he now resides, practicing his profession, but 
engaged principally in the drug trade. In the war he served one 
year as acting assistant surgeon, U. S. A., and resigned at the close 
of the war. He was a Representative in the legislature oJ 1877. 



ALLEN B. MORSE, 

Son of John L. and Susan (Cowles) Morse, was born at Otisco, Michi- 
gan, Jan. 7, 1S39. He was the eldest of nine children, and his father 
was a man of note, having filled many responsible positions. Judge 
Morse received an education mostly at home and excelled in mathe- 
matics, English literature and botany, the last his favorite sport. He 
took a two years' course at the state agricultural college, and in 1 Q 60 
commenced the study of the law. In ISO I he enlisted as a private in 
the lGth Michigan infantry. In 1SG3 he was transferred to the 21st in- 
fantry, and soon after the battle of Chickamauga was assigned to duty 
as acting assistant adjutant general on the statf of Colonel F. T. Sher- 
man, who commanded the first brigade of Sheridan's division. While 
holding this position he lost his arm at the storming of Mission 
Ridge. He was in the battles of Hanover Court House, Gaines' Mill, 
Pope's battle of Manassas, Antietam, Chickamauga, and many skir- 
mishes. He was highly complimented on leaving the service in 1S04. 
He was admitted to practice in 18G5, and in 18CG was elected prose- 
cuting attorney of Ionia county by the republicans. In 1574 he was 
elected by the democrats to the Senate, served in 1875 as chairman of 
the military committee and was a member of other committees. His 
ability as a lawyer gave him, at the democratic state convention in 
1884, the nomination of justice of the Supreme Court, and he was 
elected to that position. Hid term would have commenced January 
1, 133G, but Chief Justice Cooley having resigned October 1. 1S83, he 
received the compliment from a republican governor of being ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy. He is now associate justice, and his term 
will expire at the close of 1893. Judge Morse is a great lover of the 
gun and rod. He is a man of decided individuality aim str< ng i m- 
victions, and has made a good record as a judge. 
51 



478 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

CHARLES H. MORSE, 

Senator from Gratiot and other counties in 1877, and Representative 
in 1873-4-5, was born in Orangeville, N. Y., Jan. 27, 1838. With a 
common school education settled in Orleans, Mich., in 1S55; in 1861 
enlisted in the 3d Michigan cavalry: was made captain of the 117th 
colored troops in 1864, lieut. colonel in 18G5, and brevet colonel in 
1866, serving until Aug., 1867. Since that year has resided in Gratiot 
county and is a farmer. Has been town clerk and a supervisor seven 
years. Politically a Republican. 



JOHN L. MORSE, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1846, was born iu Homer, N. Y., 
May 13, 1815. Taught school at the age of sixteen. Came at an early 
day to Oakland county, Michigan, with his father, and married Susan 
Ann G. Cowles at Avon, Michigan, in 1834. Lived in Lapeer and 
Oakland counties until 1838, when he settled in Otisco, Ionia county, 
where he lived until 1866. Held various township offices; was county 
commissioner; elected judge of probate in 1848, and resigned in 1850, 
going to California. Returned in 1853, was again elected judge of 
probate in 1S56, and in I860. In 1866 removed to Belmond, Iowa, 
where hewas county judge in 1868, county auditor in 1867, holding this 
office seven years. In 1876 was a member of the general assembly of 
Iowa. "Was a Democrat until 1848, then Barnburner, but a Repub- 
lican since 1854. Still resides at Belmond, Iowa. 



RICHARD E. MORSE. 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1835-6, was born iu 
Otsego county, N. Y., in 1809. He came to Ypsilanti, Mich., in 1833, 
and engaged in practice as a physician. He was surgeon of the 
Michigan forces in the "Toledo war;" was postmaster of Ypsilanti 
from 1837 to 1841; and United States consul to Curacoa from 1862 to 
1865. He died at Curacoa in 1865 and was buried there. A Democrat 
until 1861, then a Republican. 



EDWARD G. MORTON 

Was born in St. Albans, Vt., Dec. 15, 1812. When four years old 
his parents removed to the state of New York, where he lived until 
1831, when they came to Monroe, Mielugan, where Mr. Morton lived 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 479 

until his death, with the exception of two years at Detroit. He had 
few educational advantages, and in all attended school less than a 
year. At the age of fourteen, at his own request, he was apprenticed 
for six years, to learn the trade of a printer, at $35 a year and board. 
For more than forty years he was connected with the newspaper 
press. As a writer he was sharp, incisive and keenly alive to the 
weak points of the enemy, and politically was always a Democrat. 
He was Representative in the legislatures of 1849-50-53-63-04-65, and 
was state Senator in 1809-70-71-72. He was a member of the consti- 
tutional convention of 1867. He held various local offices, and was 
mayor of Monroe in 1851. His services as a legislator were not small, 
but he particularly distinguished himself in securing the establish- 
ment of the insane asylum at Kalamazoo, and the asylum for the 
deaf, dumb and blind at Flint. No man was more efficient in estab- 
lishing the asylum for the insane than Mr. Morton, and a speech 
made by him on that subject in March, 1865, was published in the 
journals of both Houses, was republished in the journal of insanity 
in New York, and 2,000 copies were printed for free distribution, of 
which he said it was " the greatest compliment he ever received for 
public service.'' He died at Monroe, Dec. 15, 1875. 



EUROTAS MORTON, 

Representative from "Wayne county in 1841, was born in Hatfield, 
Mass., July 31, 1799. and came to Detroit in 1837. He soon after- 
wards removed to Rawsonville, and engaged in active business as a 
merchant. He held the local offices of postmaster and justice of the 
peace for many years during his residence at Rawsonville. His later 
years were passed at Ypsilanti, as a retired capitalist, where he died 
Jan. 7, 1876. He was a Whig, and subsequently a Republican in 
politics. 



HENRY C. MORTON 

"Was born in Genesee county, N. Y., in 1817. He received a common 
school education. He came with his parents to Michigan in 1834, 
and early became interested in the development of Benton Harbor, 
with his father, Eleazar Morton. He was prominent in politics and 
business, and as a Republican, was Representative in 1SG3-4. He 
was the first postmaster of Benton Harbor, and was a leader in building 
the ship canal which has made the village prosperous. 



480 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

WILLIAM F. MOSELY, 

Representative from Saginaw in 1S3T, was the second practicing 
lawyer :n Oakland county, and was admitted to the bar in 1825. He 
was judge of probate and prosecuting attorney of Oakland county, 
prosecuting attorney in Genesee county, and also in Shiawassee 
county. He died in I860. 

CHARLES MOSHER 

Was born at Chatham, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1822. He settled in Scipio, 
Hillsdale county, in 1842. In 1849 and 1850 he and his brothers laid 
out the village of Mosherville, named in honor of their father. They 
built a saw and grist mill. He is a practical miller and followed 
that business for twenty years. Originally a Whig, he became a 
Republican, but of late years has been a Prohibitionist. He was a 
Representative in 1863-4-77-9. In 1884 he was the prohibition candi- 
date for congress in the second district, and in 1886 their candidate 
for lieutenant governor. 

JABEZ S. MOSHER, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1849, was born in Spring- 
port, N. Y., and came from there to Jackson's mills, in Addison. 
Mich., about 1S40. In politics a Democrat. Died about 1856. 



JAMES B. MOSHIER 

Was born July 19, 1S29, at Warrensburg, N. Y. He removed to 
Genesee county, Michigan, in 1852. He was supervisor of Fenton, 
and held other town offices. He was a Representative in 1871-2-5. 
By occupation a merchant, in politics a Democrat. 



THOMAS H. MOSHER 

Was born at Union Springs, N. Y.. Oct. 18, 1815. He received a com- 
mon school education, and attended the Cayuga academy one year. 
He was a clerk in his father's store from 1831 to 1836. when lie came 
to Cambridge, Michigan, and with John Hart carried on a general 
store until 1848, at Springville, where he built a store for himself. 
With A. S. Berry he built the --Lake Mills'' near Springville, whk'h 
he owned and operated after 1856. He was supervisor and town 
clerk, and in 1844 was Representative. 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 481 

WILLIAM MOTTRAM, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1343, located at Nottawa 
prairie in 1834, as a physician, and for years had an extensive prac- 
tice in St. Joseph county. In 1851 he removed to Kalamazoo, where 
he still resides. He has been president of the local medical society, 
and a delegate to the American medical association. 



LUTHER V. MOULTON, 

Representative from Kent county in 1879, was born in Howard, Mich.. 
Sept. 27, 1843. In 1858 he removed to St. Joseph, and in 1836 engaged 
in photographing at Muskegon. In 1871 he removed to Beaver Dam, 
Wisconsin, and in 1875 returned to this state and located at Grand 
Rapids. Politics, national. Has written and published a work on 
finance. 



JULIUS MOV1US, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1850, was born in Han- 
over. Germany, Nov. 11, 1812. He came to this country in 1833, and 
settled at Ypsilanti, Mich., in 1838, where he remained until 1849, 
when he removed to Detroit. In 1852 he removed to Buffalo, N. Y., 
which was his home until his death, Oct. 14, 1871. He was at first a 
merchant, and then engaged in railroad business. He was general 
agent of three great railroads of Canada, and afterwards general 
agent of the Michigan Central. He married Mary L. Vibbard in 
1839, and two children, Edward H. Movius and Mrs. George J. Sco- 
ville, both of Buffalo, N. Y., are now living. He was a man of un- 
usual ability, and well and widely known. 



HORACE MOWER 

Was born in Woodstock, Vt., and was a graduate of Dartmouth col- 
lege. He was admitted to the bar in Yermont, came to Kalamazoo in 
1833 and engaged in practice. He was Representative in 1847. He 
was afterwards a federal judge in New Mexico. He died Dec. 11, 
18G0. He was a fine classical scholar, a good lawyer, gentlemanly in 
his manners, full of wit and humor, and a master of iruuy and satire. 
He was one of the ablest whig leaders in Michigan, and had great 
influence with his party. 



482 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

ZEBINA M. MO WRY, 

Representative in 1848, and member of the constitutional convention of 
1850, from Oakland county, was born in Berkshire, Mass., September 
20, 1804. By profession a physician, a Democrat until 1866, then a 
Republican. Removed to Michigan from Madison county, N. Y., in 
1838, and settled on a farm in the town of Ann Arbor until 1841 
thence to Milford, where he commenced the practice of medicine 
with H. K. Foot. He died August 1, 1874. 



GILBERT MOVERS, 

Senator from Allegan county in 1857-8, was born in Macomb county 
Mich., September 13, 1833. By profession a lawyer, practiced his 
profession in Allegan county and was prosecuting attorney. Enlisted 
in the 3d Michigan cavalry, was made captain September 7, 1861; 
major, February 27, 1863: lieutenant colonel, August 13, 1862; re- 
signed and was honorably discharged December 21, 1864. In 1865 he 
removed to Memphis, Tenn., where he still resides engaged in the 
practice of his profession. 

JAMES MULHOLLAND, 

Representative from Monroe count}' in 1840 and 1848, was born in 
Olean, N. Y., in 1803. He came to Michigan in 1806. By occupation 
a farmer, politically a Democrat. Was deputy sheriff of Monroe 
county for several years, and for several years a supervisor. Died in 
1871. 

SAMUEL MULHOLLAND 

Was born in Monroe county, Mich., February 10, 1811. By occupa- 
tion a farmer. Lived first in Vienna, and afterwards in Erie. He 
was a Representative in 1849, 1857-S-9, and Senator in 1861-2. 



JOHN MULVEY, 

Representative from Marquette county in 1887, was born in Carrick- 
on-Shannon, Ireland, February 20, 1833. He received a common 
school education, and emigrated to America in 1852, settling in Mar- 
quette county in 1855, where he has since resided. Mr. Mulvey has 
held various offices of trust in Negaunee, having been president of 
the village, a member of the common council, city assessor, school 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 483 

trustee, and a member of the board of supervisors for ten years. He 
is a contractor by occupation, and owner of improved real estate 
in Negaunee. He was elected as a Democrat to the Michigan legisla- 
ture of 1881-2. In April, 1886, he was unanimously elected mayor 
of Negaunee. Mr. Mulvey was a Democrat until 1884. 



EDWARD MUNDY 

Was born in Middlesex county, New Jersey, August 14, 1794. He 
graduated at Rutgers college in 1812. He studied law and com- 
menced practice in his native county. In 1819 he emigrated with his 
family to Illinois and engaged in practice, but after a time returned 
to New Jersey and became a merchant. In 18:51 he removed to Ann 
Arbor, Mich., where he became a justice, and from 1833 to 1S35 was 
associate territorial judge. In 1835 lie was a delegate from Washte- 
naw county to the first constitutional convention, and was a leading 
member of that body. He was the first lieutenant governor of Michi- 
gan, and held that position from 1S35 to 1840. He then resumed the 
practice of the law and was successful. From March, 1847, to April, 
184S, he was attorney general. He was also prosecuting attorney, and 
regent of the University. In 1848 he was appointed by the governor 
and Senate judge of the sixth judicial circuit and associate justice of 
the Supreme Court. By this appointment his residence was changed 
from Ann Arbor to Grand Rapids. He continued as judge until his 
death, March 13, 1851, when he was succeeded by Judge Martin. He 
was a dignified presiding officer and an able judge. He was a man 
of fine personal appearance, and well liked both in public ani private 
life. In religion an Episcopalian, in politics a Democrat. 



ORRIN W. MUNGER 

Was born November 17, 1837, in Huron county, Ohio. He came to 
St. Johns, Mich., in 1856. By occupation a merchant. During the 
war was U. S. assessor for the first division of the sixth district. He 
was a Representative in 18G3. A Republican until 1872, now a Dem- 
ocrat. He is president of the state bank at St. Johns. 



WILLIAM MUNGER, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S37-45-57, was born at 
Sacketts Harbor. X. Y., Aug. 9, 1810. With his mother he came to 
what is now the village of Flat Rock in the spring of 1823. Died at 
Flat Rock, May 5, 1884. Occupation, farmer: politics, democratic. 



484 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JOHN MURPHY, 

Representative from Allegan county in 1853, was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1794, and was brought up in Penfield, N. Y. 
His education was limited, and mostly obtained by reading. He was 
a farmer at first, but became a contractor on Ohio and Pennsylvania 
canals. In 1S35 he bought a farm in Allegan county. He was the 
first supervisor in Gun Plain township, was also justice, and was the 
first sheriff of Allegan county. In politics a Democrat. Died June 
19, 1S74. 

SEBA MURPHY, 

Senator from Monroe county in 1840-41, was born at Scituate, R. I., 
July 25, 1788. "When quite young he was connected with the large 
mercantile house of De Graff, Walton & Co., of Schenectady, N. Y. 
He removed to Ovid, Seneca county, N. Y., in 1817, where he held 
the office of county clerk for two successive terms, and engaged in 
the mercantile business. In 1835 he removed to Monroe, Michigan, 
where he held the offices of county commissioner, register of deeds, 
regent of the state University, and county treasurer, each for the term 
of two years. He was also cashier of the River Raisin bank. Died 
Nov. 16, 1S56. In politics a Democrat. 



WILLIAM W. MURPHY, 

Representative in 1844, was bcrn at Ernestown, Canada, April 3. 
1816, but removed to Ovid, N. Y., at an early age. He came to Mon- 
roe, Michigan, in 1835, and was a clerk in the government land office, 
studying law in leisure hours. In 1837 he removed to Jonesville, and 
in company with William T. Howell opened the first law office in 
Hillsdale county, continuing in practice until 1561. the firm from 1848 
being that of Murphy & Baxter. He was a Democrat, then a Free 
Soiler until 1854, acting with the republican party thereafter. In 1^-61 
he was appointed consul general at Irankfort-cn-the-Main. which 
position he held for nine years, after that continuing his residence in 
Germany as the financial agent of several American railway com- 
panies. It is to him very largely that the countiy is indebted for its 
credit during the darkest hour of the war of 1861-5. He induced 
wealthy German capitalists to invest largely in government bonds to 
meet the financial emergency, and from that time the credit of the 
country stood high. He became quite as well known in Germany 
as in Michigan, and lived there until his death at Heidelburg, June 8, 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 485 

1886. He was a partner of E. O. Grosvenor at Jonesville in the bank- 
ing business for a time, and started the Jonesville Telegraph, now the 
Independent. 

ANDREW MURRAY, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1848, was born at Harrisburg, 
Pa., in Nov., 1813. He graduated at Yale college, studied medicine, 
settled at Berrien, Mich., in 1835, and commenced practice as a 
physician. He removed to South Bend, Ind., then resided at St. 
Joseph, Mich, and finally at Niles, where he died Oct. 13, 18o4. 



ARCHIBALD Y. MURRAY 

Was born in Walkill, N. Y., March 12, 1795. Removed to Michigan 
in 1826, settling in Canton, Wayne county, where he resided during 
life. Was a Democrat in politics, by occupation a farmer, miller and 
lumberman. Held various town offices, and was coroner of Wayne 
county. Was Representative in 1843-5. Died May 23, 1866. 



LYMAN MURRAY, 

Senator from Kent county in 1ST5. was born in 1820, in New York: 
received a common school education, removed to Michigan in 184o, 
and settled in Kent county. He was supervisor, and a Representa- 
tive in the legislatures of 1867-69, also of the constitutional convention 
of 1867. His occupation farming, politics republican. 



DEXTER MUSSEY, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1855-7-9-61-2, and speaker in 
1861-2, was born in Rutland, Mass., Jan. 12, 1811. With a common 
school education became a teacher, then a clerk, then in business for 
himself. He settled at Romeo, Mich., in 1837, where he still resides. 
Has been in business as a merchant, blacksmith, wagon maker, 
farming, foundry, etc. Since 1845 a justice of the peace. He was a 
delegate in the constitutional convention of 1867. In politics a 
Republican. 

NEWTON N. MUSCOTT, • 

Representative from Ingham county in 1S57, came to Leroy, Ingham 
county, Michigan, in 1S44, from Madison county, New York, and 
52 



486 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

cleared up a large farm, where he lived until his death in 1809. In 
politics a Republican. He was several times supervisor. 

JOSEPH MUSGRAYE 

Was born in Lancaster county. Pa., May 20, 1811. When young 
became a resident of Ohio, a teacher, then clerk, then a merchant at 
Nashville, O. He was a Representative to the Ohio assembly 1846-7, 
and Senator in 1855-6. Removed to Charlotte, Mich., in 1857: was a 
member of the constitutional convention of 1807; and long president 
of the national bank at Charlotte. Aided largely in securing rail- 
road communication. A Democrat until 1854, then a Republican. 
Deceased. 

FRANKLIN MUZZY 

Was born in Maine in 1810, and was a graduate of Bowdoin college. 
He came to St. Joseph, Berrien county, in 1842, and in 1843 removed 
to Niles, where he resided until his death in 1S78. He was admitted 
to the bar of Maine, and was at one time a law partner of Hon. Han- 
nibal Hamlin. He was admitted to the Michigan bar in 1846, and 
practiced his profession during life. He was Senator in 1859, and 
mayor of Niles in 1S73. He lived and died a bachelor. He was a 
man of many eccentricities, but as a lawyer had great influence with 
the court and jury. Deceased. 

JOHN L. NEAR 

Was born at Middlebury. N. Y., April 4, 1808. He received a com- 
mon school education, at the age of twenty commenced teaching 
winters, and at the same time studied medicine. He attended 
medical schools at Albany and at Castleton, Yt., and graduated in 
1833. In 1834 he located in the southern part of Wayne county. 
Michigan, where he still resides, and had an extensive practice. He 
was Representative in 1839 and Senator in 1857-8-61-2. He was 
consul for some time at Sarnia, and also at Windsor from 1873 to 
1876. In politics a Republican. Resides at Flat Rock. 



JAMES M. NEASMITU 

Was born Sept 26,- 1823. in Manchester, England, and came to the 
United States with his parents in 1829. Bavins spent two y^ar- in 
New Y'>rk city and Philadelphia, they removed to Pembroke. Gene- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 487 

see county, N. Y. While there, in 1800, he was elected township 
clerk, and in 1853, township supervisor. Having come to Michigan 
in 1854, he purchased a farm in Schoolcraft, Kalamazoo county, 
where he still resides. In 1856 he was elected supervisor, holding the 
office for seven successive years. In 1802 he was elected treasurer of 
Kalamazoo county, and re-elected in 1804 and "GO. During three 
years of that period he was treasurer of Kalamazoo village. Having 
returned to his farm, he interested himself principally in its develop- 
ment and in the improvement of sheep, of which he owns about 300. 
His farm is one of the finest in that county of fine farms. In 1870 
he was elected state Senator from Kalamazoo county, and was re- 
elected in 1872, serving in 1871-2-3-4. In 1878 he was elected as 
commissioner of the state land office on the republican ticket, and 
re-elected in 1880, serving from 1879 to 1SS3. In politics a Republican. 



CADY NEFF, 

Representative from Wayne county, in 1875, was born in Montgom- 
ery county, N. Y. He received a common school education, removed 
to Michigan in 1855, and settled in Wayne county. He is a carriage 
maker by occupation. In politics a Republican. 

CHAS. D. NELSON, 

Senator from Muskegon and Ottawa counties in 1875-7, was born at 
Newbury, Vfc., May 13,1824. He received a common school education 
and attended college at Boston. He removed to Muskegon in 1857. 
He has been alderman, supervisor and chairman of the board of 
supervisors three terms, president of the board of education, and city 
treasurer of Muskegon. He is extensively engaged in the manufac- 
ture and sale of lumber. Tn politics a Republican. 

EDWARD D. NELSON, 

Representative from Marquette county in 1881-2, was born at Canal 
Dover, Ohio, August 27, 1840. Most of his youth was spent on a 
farm. He removed to Ishpeming in 1873, and was for five years 
cashier of the first national bank, but is now engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. He is a Republican. 

WILBUR NELSON, 

Representative from Gratiot county in 1881-2, was born Jan 15. 1839, 
in Madison, Lenawee county, Mich., and removed with his parents t<> 



488 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Gratiot county in 1854. He served over four years in the union army 
during the rebellion, and held the rank of captain when mustered 
out at the close of the war. He has since been engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN M. NEVIKS 

Was born in Braintree. Vt., April 26, 1826. He removed to Michigan 
with his father in 1844, who settled at Richland. The son learned the 
trade of a carpenter, which he followed summers and taught school 
winters. He removed to Hastings in 1853, and became a merchant. 
In politics a Whig until 1854, since a Republican. He was a Repre- 
sentative in 1857 and a Senator in i860. He published the Hastings 
Banner from 1857 to 1866. He was a member of the state republican 
committee in 1S60-2 and 1870-2, and a member of the county republi- 
can committee, and most of the time chairman from 1853 to 1376. 
He has been county superintendent of the poor eighteen years; 
twelve years secretary of the county agricultural society; and 
eighteen years a school trustee. From 1S75 to 1883 he was post- 
master at Hastings. 

JOHN S. NEWBERRY 

Was born at Waterville. N. Y.. November, 1826, and was a descend- 
ant of Thomas Newberry, who emigrated from Devonshire, England, 
in 1605. He graduated from the Michigan University at the age of 
eighteen, and engaged in civil engineering for two years. He studied 
law and was admitted to the Detroit bar in 1853. He was distin- 
guished in admiralty practice, and published a series of admiralty 
reports. In 1862 he engaged in manufacturing and became president 
of the Michigan car company and was largely interested in many 
other corporations. He was one of the corporation that built the 
Mackinaw & Marquette railroad. In 1862 was provost marshal of 
Michigan. Was a member of congress from the first district, from 
1870 to 1881, when he declined to accept a renomination. First a 
Whig, a Republican after 1854. In religion a Presbyterian. Died in 
1837. 

SENECA NEWBERRY, 

Delegate from Oakland county to the constitutional conventions of 
1835 and 1850, was born in Connecticut in 1802. He came to Roches- 
ter, Michigan in 1^26, went into business as a merchant, and con- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 489 

ducted a flourishing business for years. In the convention of 1835 he 
was an influential and conspicuous member. He was Senator in 
1853. He died at Rochester, May 13, 1877. 



GEORGE K. NEWCOMBE, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1867, was born in Westfield, 
N. Y., August 10, 1833. He came to Michigan in 1848. Studied law 
and located first at Owosso. then at East Saginaw, from whence he 
removed to Minneapolis, Minn., in 1885, where he is now practicing 
his profession. He went into the late war as captain 9th Michigan 
infantry, October 12, 1861. He became major of the 7th Michigan 
cavalry December 10, 1862. Was wounded in action at Gettysburg, 
Va., July 3, 1863. Resigned October 13, 1863, and was honorably 
discharged. 

ROLAND B. C. NEWCOMB 

Was born in Williamstown. Yt., September 25, 1822. He lived with 
his father until twenty-one, received a good common school educa- 
tion, and in 1843 went to Madison, Ohio, where he taught school He 
studied medicine and graduated as a physician at Starling medical 
college of Columbus in l84-<, locating the same year at Palmyra, 
Mich., where he commenced practice. He moved to Blissfield in 
1851. He served many years as trustee and inspector of schools, was 
supervisor, in 1865 a Representative, and in 1877, Senator. 

JOHX L. NEWELL, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1867, was born in England, 
in 1828. He came to Port Huron in 1856, and has resided in that 
vicinity ever since. Now resident at Fort Gratiot. Was a painter 
by trade, but is now in the service of the Chicago & Grand Trunk 
railroad, as silver plater of coach trimmings and lamps. He was 
mayor of Port Huron in 180^; supervisor in 1867 and 1881; treasurer 
of the town of Port Huron m 1^70 and 1880: has been a member of 
the board of education of Port Huron: justice of the peace in 1S64. 
Politically a Democrat. 

MINOR S. NEWELL, 

State land commissioner from 1883 to 1887, was born in Bennington. 
N. Y., in 1823. Resides at Flushing. Midi., where he came in 1842. 
In 1847 served in the 1st Michigan through the Mexican war. In the 



490 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

jate war commanded a company in the lGth Michigan infantry, and 
rose to the rank of major. Is a farmer, held various local offices, and 
served several terms as supervisor. Politically a Republican. 

ALMERON NEWMAN, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1859, was born at Newfane, N. 
Y., February 26, 1804. He came to Portland, Michigan, in 1830, and 
built the first woolen mill in that part of the state. At the organiza- 
tion of the town in 1838, he was elected justice, and held that position 
thirty-six years. From 1844 to 1848 he was associate judge for Ionia 
county, was also town clerk, and held other offices. He was inter- 
ested in the building of the Ionia & Lansing railroad. By occupation 
a clothier, in politics first Whig, then Republican. Died November 
13, 1876. 

GEORGE NEWTON 

Was born in Preble county, Ohio, August 10, 1810. He was the son 
of Col. James Newton, who was a member of the Michigan consti- 
tutional convention of 1835, and of the legislature prior to 1840. The 
son came to Volinia, Michigan, in 1831, and became a successfuj 
farmer. He held many local offices, including that of supervisor, and 
as a Republican was Representative in 1859. 



JAMES NEWTON 

Was born in England in 1777. and came to this country when a boy, 
first living at Morristown, N. J., then in Pennsylvania, moving to 
Ohio in 1804. He became a colonel in the Ohio militia, and was in 
active service in the war of 1812, serving under Gen. Harrison. He 
was a member of the constitutional convention of 1835, and Repre- 
sentative from Cass county in 1839-40. A Democrat in politics. 



WILLIAM NEWTON, 

Of Flint, Michigan, now fifty-eight years of age, is a native of Mary- 
land. He came to Michigan in 1848, studied law with Messrs. Loth- 
rop & Duffield, of Detroit. After being admitted to the bar he 
removed to Flint in 1853, where he has since resided, with the excep- 
tion of three years in San Francisco. California. He has been 
prosperous and successful while at the bar. Was elected judge of the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 491 

seventh circuit in the spring of 1881, by a majority of 1,321. He is 
also engaged in farming, having a farm of 240 acres which he has 
cleared from the stump. He was re-elected in 1887. 



LEWIS A. NICHOLS, 

Representative from Barry county in 1881-2, was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., in 1833. He was brought up a farmer in western New 
York, and with a common school education became a teacher. Came 
to Battle Creek in 1854, and engaged in staging and the livery busi- 
ness, and then engaged in farming. In 1873 removed to Orangeville, 
Barry county, and became a miller. Has been a justice and super- 
visor. 

JOHNSON NILES 

"Was boru May 2, 1794. at Richfield. N. Y. His father was a revolu- 
tionary soldier. He grew to manhood in New York, and was made 
paymaster of the state militia. In 1821 he came to Michigan and 
settled in Troy, Oakland county, in 1S22, as a farmer. In 1S23 he 
was appointed postmaster and held the position until 1840. He was 
again appointed by Tyler, and held it until 1856. He was a justice in 
1S23, and held that oftice long after Michigan became a state. He 
was Representative in 1835-6, and Senator in 1844-5. He was a lead- 
ing Democrat. He died March 23, 1872. 



WILLIAM R. NIMS. 

Senator from Sanilac aud other counties in 1S65, was born in Rich- 
mond, Yt., June 7, 1829. By occupation a merchant, in polities a 
Republican. Came to Michigan in 1853, and now resides at Lexing- 
ton. 

THOMAS NINDE 

Was born at Baltimore, ML. September 10, 1815. He removed to 
Lyons, N. Y., in 1823, and in 1847 to Palmyra, N. Y.. and was post- 
master of Palmyra from 1849 to 1853. In 1S55 he removed to Ypsi- 
lanti, Mich., where he is still engaged in law practice. He was 
judge of probate of Washtenaw county from 1S61 to 1865, and a 
member of the constitutional convention of 1SG7. He was mayor of 
Ypsilanti in 1878. By profession a lawyer, in politics a Republic an. 



492 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

SAMUEL NIXON, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1877, was born in Clarkson, 
Monroe county, N. Y., September 21, 1819. He came to Michigan in 
October, 1836, and has resided in Eaton county since that time. His 
education was principally obtained in the district school of the times. 
He has held the office of justice for twenty-seven years in Delta; also 
township treasurer five years, and other offices. lie resides in Delta, 
is a farmer by occupation, and a Republican in politics. 

FRANK A. NOAH, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1879, was born at Rieneck in 
Baden, Germany, December 3, 1841. He emigrated to America in 
1849, locating in Detroit. He received a common school education. 
He was clerk of the police court for several years. In 1S77 ,he was 
admitted to the bar. In politics a Republican. Now in practice in 
Detroit. 

CHARLES NOBLE 

Was born July 4, 1797, at Williamstown, Mass. He graduated at 
Williams college in 1S15, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 
1818. He went to Cleveland, Ohio, the same year, and after a short 
stay settled at Monroe, Mich., and engaged in practice. He remained 
a resident of Monroe until 1S»J7, and during that time was. a member 
of the legislative council from 1328 to 1830, justice of the peace, regis- 
ter of probate, district attorney, county judge, and lawyer general of 
the United States for the country northwest of the Ohio river, and 
Representative in the legislature of 1815. He was one of the company 
that purchased the Michigan Southern railroad from the state, and 
was the first president of the company. He was also cashier of the 
bank of River Raisin. In 1^67 he removed to Detroit and became one 
of the firm of George S. Frost & Co., engaged in the purchase and 
sale of pine lands, and continued in that business until his death, 
December 26. 1874. He was a Whig as long as that party had an ex- 
istence, after that Independent. 

DAVID A. NOBLE 

Was born at Williamstown. Mas,-., Nov. 9. 1802, and died at Monroe. 
Mich., Oct. 13. 1^76. He graduated with honor at Williams college 
in 1825, studied law. was admitted and opened an office in New York 
city for two years, during which time he was associated with Charles 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 493 

O'Connor. He came to Monroe in 1831. He was active in his profes- 
sion, and also in political life as a Democrat. He was recorder of 
Monroe in 1833, afterwards alderman and mayor in 1842. In 1845 he 
was elected to the lower house, and in the session of 184.6 took a con- 
spicuous part in the sale of the Michigan Central and Southern rail- 
roads. He was a member of the convention held at Chicago in 1S47 
in favor of river and harbor improvements, and as one of a commit- 
tee of five drew up an elaborate report of the commerce of the lakes. 
In 1852 he was elected to congress from the second district of Michi- 
gan, defeating Joseph R. Williams, the republican candidate. In 
1854 he made an exhaustive speech on tonnage duties, which lias 
been regarded as standard authority on that subject. In 1S58 he was 
appointed manager of the Louisville. New Albany & Chicago rail- 
road, and held that position four years. He was a delegate to the 
democratic national convention of 18G4. He was a polished gentle- 
man and a fine scholar. 

FRANK NOEKER. 

Representative from Clinton county in 1879-83, was born in Ger- 
many in 1834. Received a common school education in German and 
English; has resided in Michigan thirty-seven years, twtnty-two in 
Wayne, and fifteen in Westphalia, Clinton county. He is proprietor 
of a flouring mill: has been justice of the peace fourteen years, and 
supervisor for two years. In politics a Democrat. 

EZRA B. N ORRIS, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1S77, was born July !»}, 
1845, in Manchester. Mich., where he still resides. He was reared as a 
farmer and received a common school education. In 18<31 he enlisted 
as private in company E, first Michigan infantry. In 1862 he was 
discharged on account of disability at Fortress Monroe. He returned 
and attended fur a season the state normal school and Ypsilanti high 
school, and in 1868 commenced the study of law and was admitted to 
the bar in 1S72, since which time he has continued in the practice of 
his profession in Manchester. In politics a Democrat. 



JASON B. NORR1S 

Was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., Nov. :j. 1823, and was brought u;> 
on a farm, where lie lived until 1845, when he came to Michig 
settled on a farm, eight miles south of Hillsdale. He has been several 
53 



494 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

times supervisor and collector. In 1871-2 he was a Representative as 
a republican. He was a Democrat until 1864, a Republican until 
1884, since a Prohibitionist. 

LYMAN D. NORRIS 

Was born at Covington, N. Y., May 4, 1825. His father removed to 
Ypsilanti in 1828. The son, after a preparatory education, entered 
as the first student of the first class of the Michigan University. 
After nearly three years there he entered Yale college, and graduated 
in 1845. He read law with A. D. Frazer of Detroit, aud was admitted 
in 1847. In 1848 he removed to St. Louis, Mo., and engaged in 
practice. He subsequently studied civil law at Heidelberg, Germany. 
In 1852 he was retained in the famous Dred Scott case, and effected a 
reversal of former decisions of the Supreme Court of Missouri. In 
1854 he returned to Ypsilanti and practiced there until 1871, and has 
since been a prominent lawyer at Grand Rapids. He was a member 
of the constitutional convention of 1867, and in 1869-70 was Senator 
from Washtenaw county. He was the democratic candidate for 
supreme judge in 1S75. He is a man of superior education and 
attainments. 

SETH D. NORTH, 

Representative from Houghton county in 1877-81-2-3-5, was born 
April 9, 1823, in Middlesex county, Connecticut. Having received a 
common school education, he removed to Michigan in 1855. He 
resides at Hancock, ami is engaged in mercantile pursuits, and in 
mining and lumbering. He is also president of the national bank. 
Has been interested in property at Mt. Clemens. In politics a Re- 
publican. 

TOWNSEND NORTH. 

Senator from Bay and Tuscola counties in 1875, was born in Ulster 
county, N. Y.. Sep. 24. 1814. He received a common school educa- 
tion, removed to Michigan in l s :!G, and for six years worked at his 
trade of carpenter, mostly in Washtenaw county. In 1846 he built a 
bridge across the Cass river, and was paid in Michigan internal improve- 
ment lands, which he located in Tuscola county, and removed to 
Vassar in 1850, and has since continued to reside there. He held the 
office of supervisor for many years, and lias been register of deeds. 
He was assessor of internal revenue, 1862-66. He was re-appointed 
in 1871, and held the office until it was discontinued. His occupation 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 495 

is miscellaneous, including lumbering, farming, manufacturing, 
merchandising, and real estate transactions. In politics a Republi- 
can. For many years a trustee of the state blind institute. 

DARWIN B. NORTHROP, 

Representative from Wayne county, in 1375, was born January 19, 
1834. at Perrington, N. Y. In 1850 he removed to Northville, Michi- 
gan, and pursued the trade of an iron moulder until 1858, when he 
went to California. He returned in 18C6 to Northville, and formed 
a partnership with F. R. Beal in the general hardware line, which 
business he has since continued. He has held various township and 
village offices. In politics a Democrat. 

ELIJAH S. NORTHROP 

Was born in Stafford, N. Y., in 1829. In 1350 he removed to Michi- 
gan, settling first at Saline, where he engaged in mercantile business. 
He removed to Houghton county in 1861, where he became an 
insurance agent, residing at Hancock. He was a Senator from the 
upper peninsula in 1S»33, and while serving in that capacity, died at 
Lansing on the 2d of March, 1863, of consumption. Politically a 
Democrat. 

JOHN NORTH WOOD, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1835, was born in London, 
England, July 17. 1838. In 1849 came to Ohio with his parents, who 
removed to Detroit in 1850. Attended school, and was three years a 
sailor Settled on a farm in Maple Grove. Mich., in 1855, where he 
still resides. In 1801 enlisted in the 10th Michigan infantry, lost a 
right arm from wounds received at the battle of Gaines Mills, and 
was in Libby prison for a short time. Has been supervisor, justice, 
held other local offices, and been commander of the G. A. R. in 
Michigan. Politically a Republican. 

HENRY A. NORTON, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1869-70, was born in Bristol, 
N. Y., August 29, 1820. Did not receive a common school education. 
Became a resident of Oakland county in 1830. Politically a Republi- 
can, lie was a delegate to the republican national convention at 
Philadelphia in 1372. Moved to Duluth in 183 1, and is now state 
weighmaster of Minnesota. 



496 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JOHN D. NORTON, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1875-7, was born in Onondaga 
county, N. Y., Dec. 18, 1842. He graduated at Hamilton college. N. 
Y., in 1867, and removed to Michigan in 1868. Mr. Norton married and 
took up his residence in Pontiac in 1809, and has ever since resided 
there. He is a director in the first national bank of Pontiac. His 
occupation is dealing in pine lands and lumber. In politics a 
Democrat. 

JOHN M. NORTON, 

Senator from Oakland county in 1S83, was born in Richmond, N. Y., 
May 5, 1S20. He settled with his father in Avon, Mich., in 1824. 
Had a limited education. A. farmer. In politics first Whig, then 
Republican, later a Greenbacker. Has held several local offices, and 
served four years as deputy sheriff. 



PLEASANT NORTON 

Was born in Grayson county, Ya., in 1806. When two years of ago 
he removed to Champaign county, Ohio, and afterwards to Logan 
county in the same state. He moved into Jefferson, Cass county. 
Michigan, in 1332, and resided there until his death in 1877. By oc- 
cupation a farmer, in politics a Democrat. He was for nine years 
supervisor of Jefferson, and four years town treasurer. He was a 
Representative in 1850-53. He was a man of native ability and force 
of character, and left a large property, the result of persistent 
industry. 

JOHN NOR YELL, 

United States Senator from Michigan, from 1835 to 1841, was born in 
Garrard county, near Danville. Ky., December 21, 1789. He was 
the son of Lipsocomb Norvell, a Yirginian, who served as an officer 
in the war of the revolution, and lived to enjoy a pension until he was 
over ninety years old. The sun. on the advice by letter of Thomas 
Jefferson to learn a trade, went to Baltimore and learned the tra ie of 
a printer. He at the same time studied law, was admitted to the bar. 
and became a journalist and politician. He was a friend and corre- 
spondent of President Madison, gave him warm support on the stump 
and in his paper, especially his war measures. At the close of the 
war in 1816, Mr. Norvell became the democratic editor of a paper in 
Philadelphia, and resided there sixteen years. In May, 1S32 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 497 

came to Detroit, Michigan, having been appointed postmaster of that 
city by Andrew Jackson. He was a leading member of the constitu- 
tional convention of 1835, and was chairman of eight committees, 
and a member of several others. His work in that convention was of 
great value to the welfare of the state. He and Lucius Lyon were 
elected as the United States Senators, and went to Washington before 
the admission of Michigan to the union, and he, with his colleague, 
managed well in securing the mineral wealth and territory of a large 
portion of the upper peninsula, to compensate for the loss of a small 
strip of land on the southern boundary. After the expiration of his 
term as Senator in 1842, he resumed the practice of law at Detroit, 
and served as Representative in the legislature of 1843. In 1845 he 
was appointed U. S. district attorney of Michigan, which he held until 

1849. He supported the administration in the prosecution of the 
Mexican war, and sent three sons to serve in the field. He died in 

1850, at his home in Hamtramck, near Detroit. 



MOSES R. NOWLAND 

Representative from Wayne county in 1865, is a native of New York, 
born in 1828, and came to Michigan in 1831, with his parents, who 
settled in the township of Huron, where he has ever since lived. He 
is a Democrat in politics, combines the professions of lawyer and 
farmer, and has served his township for many years as treasurer, 
clerk and supervisor. 

BETHUEL NOYES, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1848 and 1S50, was born in 
Chenango county, N. Y., November 13, 1813. He came to Michigan 
in 1833. He was a lawyer by profession, and a Democrat in politics. 
Died at Plvmouth, October 30. 1^73. 



HO R ACE A. NOYES 

Was born in Preston, N. Y., February 30, 1810. He received a fair 
education, became a teacher, studied law, and was admitted to 
practice in 1833. He came the same year to Michigan, and began 
practice at Plymouth, where he remained until 1840. He then 
removed to Marshall. In 1835-6 he was a Representative from 
Wayne county. In 1844 he was elected judge of probate of Calhoun 
county, and held the position for twelve years. In 1857 resumed 
law practice and was regarded as an able counsel. He died April 20, 
1877. In polities a Democrat. 



498 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

MICHxiEL J. NOYES, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 187:3-4, was born in 
"Washington, Mich., May 23, 1838. He finished his education at 
Romeo academy. In 1859 he went to Washington Territory, traveled 
extensively in Oregon and California, and passed over the gold fields 
of Montana and Idaho previous to their discovery. He afterwards 
spent six years in the silver mines of Nevada, and is interested in the 
silver mines of that country. In 1861-2 he served on the staff of 
Brigadier General Welty, with the rank of major, in the Indian cam- 
paigns. In 1859 he made a trip to California, over the plains. with an 
ox team, and again in 1866 by overland stage. He is a Republican. 
In 1S6T he removed to Washtenaw county, and settled in Chelsea, 
where he now resides. He was engaged in the banking business in 
that village from 1868 to 1871. 

JEREMIAH O'CALLAHAN, 

Representative from Detroit in 1853, was a native of Ireland, born in 
1823. Very little is known of him except that he was a grocer and 
trader, was a Democrat in politics, and died in 1856. 



HORACE N. OCOBOCK, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1875, was born in Cayuga 
county, N. Y., Feb 17, 1832. He received his education in the schools 
of Auburn, N. Y., and came to Wyandotte, Michigan, in i860. He 
has been alderman and mayor of Wyandotte. By occupation a me- 
chanic, in politics a Republican. 



JAMES ODELL 

Was born in Virginia, July 20, 1779. At tne age of twenty-one he 
removed to Ohio, and in 1831 came to Michigan, settling near Van- 
dalia, Cass county, in 1S32. He was by occupation a farmer and 
miller. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1835, 
and a Representative in 1835-6-8. Died Aug. 23, 1845. 



THOMAS O'DELL, 

Representative from Cass county in 1873-4, was born in Porter. Mich- 
igan, June 30, 1831. He received a common school education, and 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 4H9 

has held from time to time responsible town offices. He is a farmer 
by occupation. 

JAMES O'DONNELL 

Was born at Nor walk, Conn., March 25, 1840: removed with his 
parents to Michigan in 1848; enjoyed no educational advantages, but 
after commencing to learn the printer's trade in 1836 made up this 
deficiency by study after working hours; at the breaking out of the 
war he enlisted as a private in the first Michigan infantry, and served 
out his time, participating in the first battle of Bull Run: was 
elected recorder of the city of Jackson for four terms 1863-1806; es- 
tablished the Jackson Daily Citizen in ISO"), and has owned and 
edited the same since; was presidential elector in 1872, and was des- 
ignated by the state electoral college as messenger to convey the vote 
of Michigan to Washington; was elected mayor of Jackson in 1876, 
and was re-elected in 1877: was appointed in 1878 as aid-de-camp on 
the staff of Governor Croswell, with the rank of colonel; was elected 
to the forty-ninth and re-elected to the fiftieth congress as a Repub- 
lican, receiving 20,215 votes, against 15,499 votes for Hankerd, Fu- 
sionist, and 3,594 votes for Allen, Prohibitionist. 



CORNELIUS OTLYNN, 

Representative from Detroit in 1857, was born in 1810, at Tralee, 
county Kerry, Ireland, and came to America about 1823. He was 
admitted to the bar in Detroit in 1834. He was a classical scholar, a 
man of comprehensive views of things, and a Democrat. He was 
city attorney of Detroit in 1840, judge of probate two terms, 1844-52, 
and postmaster at Detroit during a portion of Buchanan's term. As 
judge of probate he gave a system of practice to the state through 
the blank forms that he prepared. He died in Detroit in 1869. 



ROBERT Y. OGG, 

Representative from Detroit in 1837, was born in Dundas, Ontario, 
July 20. 1800. He received a common school education, was a news- 
boy, became a printer, and a resident of Detroit in 1878, and lias 
worked there continuously at his trade. Has been president of the 
Detroit typographical union. In politics a Labor Republican. 



500 A1ICH1GAX BIOGRAPHY. 

JAMES O'GRADY 

Was born December IS, 1822, in Shelburn, Vt., was educated there, 
was admitted to the bar in 1818, and in 18-19 went to California. lie 
was register of probate in San Francisco, and subsequently register 
and recorder of the city and county. From 1852 to 1804 he resided 
on his farm in Shelburn, Vt. In 1864 he came to Marquette, and 
■engaged in law practice. He was Representative in the legislature of 
I860. In 1806 he removed to Houghton, and in 1S69 was elected 
judge of the 12th circuit, and held that position until his death, Dec. 
24,1878. His judicial decisions were rarely reversed. In politics a 
Democrat. 

GEORGE A. O'KEEFE, 

Representative from Detroit in 1843. was a typical Irishman, born in 
Cork in 1792. He was a graduate of Trinity college, Dublin, and was 
educated for the bar. He came to New York in 1816, spent three 
years in the study of American law and practice in the office of 
Judge Brady, and in 1820 came to Detroit, his future home. He was 
judge of probate. 1837-40. and was an alderman. He was a finished 
lawyer and profound jurist. He was an Irish gentleman in the 
truest and fullest sense, learned, cultured, brilliant and witty. In 
stature, tall and massive, with large blue eyes, large head, and curly 
.hair. Died June 16, 1S53. In politics a Democrat. 



RICHARD D. O'KEEFE, 

■Representative from Sanilac county in 188o-7. was born in Tilson- 
burg, Ontario, March 19, IS.j.j. In 1808 became a resident of Michi- 
gan, worked on his father's farm, taught several years, was superin- 
tendent of schools in Delaware township, and for years station agent 
and telegraph operator at Minden, where he now resides engaged in 
law, loan and insurance business. Politically a Republican. 



MARTIN OLDS, 

Representative from Branch county in 1843, was born in Bolton, 
Mas9., resided in New York and Ohio, and settled as a farmer in Ba- 
tavia. Mich., in 1838, and was the first supervisor and held the office 
seven years, also other local offices. He was judge of probate eight 
years, and president of the company that started the first paper in 
Branch county. Removed to Oregon in 1831, where he was post- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 501 

master, probate judge, and delegate to the constitutional convention. 
Died in 1873. 

CHARLES OLIN, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1841, was born at Coventry, 
R. I., March 4, 1802. Removed from his native state to Bedford, C'aL 
houn county, in 1S33, and was one of the earliest settlers. He was 
the first supervisor in 1836, and was associate county judge in 1S39- 
40. A farmer, and politically a Democrat. Died July 4, I860. 

JOHN F. OLIVER, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1879-81-2. was born in 
Springfield, N. Y. , Oct. 2, 1820, and removed with his parents to Niag- 
ara county in 1826, and in 1S43 to Portage, Mich. He received a 
common school education. He is a farmer by occupation, and has 
held the offices of school inspector, town clerk, supervisor for five 
years, and justice of the peace for several terms. He is a Republican. 

CHARLES M. O'MALLEY 

Was born in Dorrada, county Mayo, Ireland, and came to this coun- 
try in 1834, and to Michigan in 1835. He held several offices in 
Mackinac county, and was Representative in 1846-7-9. He was edu- 
cated for a priest, but became a merchant at Mackinac. In politics 
a Democrat. 

BERNARD O-REILLY, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1887, was born in Westmeath county, 
Ireland, May 20, 1832. By occupation a ship carpenter and caulker: 
has been a resident of Michigan thirty-two years. He came with his 
parents to Kingston, Canada, in 1847, and to Oswego, New York, in 
1848. He received a limited education in the public schools. In 1859 
he shipped on a vessel aud followed the lakes until 1852, when he 
entered a ship-yard and continued to work at his trade up to date. 
He has been alderman of the twelfth ward of Detroit. Politically a 
Democrat. 

JOHN M. OSBURN, 

Senator from Hillsdale county in 1875, was born in Monroe county, 
N. Y., March 9, 1^19. He received a good education in the district 
54 



502 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

and select schools of that state, and removed to Michigan in 1840 
locating at Hudson. In 1817 he purchased a farm in Hillsdale county, 
upon which he has since continued to reside. He has been engage'd 
in various occupations, teaching, mercantile, produce and lumber 
operations, and in banking. He is the head of the banking firm of 
Osburn, Perkins & Co , of Hudson. He has held several township 
offices, and was a Representative in 1869-70-71-2. In politics a Re- 
publican. 

LEANDER D. OSBURN 

Was born December 27, 1825, in Wayne county, Ind., and in 1835 re- 
moved with his father to Calvin, Michigan. He was educated by his 
mother. At the age of twenty-one he became a teacher, afterwards 
read medicine with Dr. Bonine, attended Rush medical college in 
1851 and 1852, and commenced practice at Vandalia, Mich., in 1853. 
He became justice in 1856 and held the position many years, was 
supervisor and Representative in 1S67. 



REUBEN H. OSBURN, 

Senator from Houghton, Ontonagon, Keweenaw and Isle Royal in 
1877, was born in Bloomfield, Ohio, June 27, 1823. He was educated 
in common schools, supplemented by academical instruction. He 
studied medicine and graduated from the Western reserve college, 
Cleveland. Ohio, in 1840. He moved to the Upper Peninsula in 1852, 
where he has since resided. He has held various township offices. 
He is the oldest practicing physician in the Upper Peninsula. In 
politics a Republican. 

WILLIAM H. OSBORN 

Was born in Ovid, N. Y., Oec. 20, 1814. He received an academical 
education, and taught several winters. In 1830 he settled on a farm 
in Macon, Lenawee county, Michigan. He held many town offices, 
and was Representative in 1S65 and 1867. In politics a Republican. 



CHARLES Y. OSBURN 

Was born in Meadville, Pa., in 1^42: moved to Owosso, Michigan, in 
1857. He enlisted in the 5th Michigan cav'aly in 1862; was discharged 
therefrom on account of wounds in 1864. Was a Representative in 
1871-2. He removed to Marquette in 1873, and was collector of cus- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. >503- 

tonis, district of Superior, from 1877 to 1885. He La a Republican in 
politics, and still lives at Marquette. 



GILBERT R. OSMUN 

Was born in Newark, New Jersey, October 8, 1815. He was left 
fatherless at the age of seven years. In early boyhood he did 
" chores " on farms and in shops for his board and clothes, and got 
his schooling as best he could, his longest continuous term at school 
being one year at the Chester, N. Y., academy, where he did the 
janitor work to pay his bills and buy books. He enlisted in the 69th 
New York volunteers, one of the regiments of the famous Irish 
brigade. After much hard service he was severely wounded at 
Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865, and was honorably discharged July 
5, 18G5, coming home on crutches. He then worked at his trade of 
tinsmithing until the following year, when he enlisted in the 43d U. 
S. infantry; did garrison duty in this regiment at Fort Wayne and 
Fort Gratiot, Mich., for about two years, and was again discharged 
for disability arising from his old wounds. Engaged in various 
occupations in Port Huron, and eventually became city editor of the 
Port Huron Times. Later he went to East Saginaw, where he was 
city editor of the Saginaw Republican, and thence to Detroit, where 
for. ten years he was state editor of the Detroit Evening News. Gov- 
ernor Alger selected him as private secretary, which place he filled 
until he assumed the duties of secretary of state. He has been a 
resident of Michigan since 1SG7. As the republican candidate for 
secretary of state, he received 183,335 voters against Philip Wachtel, 
172,628, and John Evans, 25,8.52. He is also one of the editors of the 
Detroit Journal. 

ASA H. OTIS, 

A member of the first constitutional convention in 1S35, and a Rep- 
resentative from Wayne county in 1850, was a native of the state of 
New York, and a farmer by occupation. He was a count}* auditor of 
Wayne county in 1845, and supervisor of Greenfield 1847-52, and 
again in 1S54. Died in 1855. Was democratic in politics. 



GEORGE OVIATT, 

Representative from Lake and Wexford counties in 1885-7, was born 
at Newton Falls, Ohio, March 12. 1849. He removed to Michigan in 
1800 and settled in Lake county in 1805. Mr. Oviatt was a real estate 



504 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

dealer and publisher of a newspaper, and had been sheriff of Lake 
■county two terms. Politically a Republican. Died in 1888. 

JOHN OWEN, 

State treasurer from 1861 to 1867, was born in Toronto, Canada. 
March 20, 1809. He removed with his mother to Detroit in 1818, and 
received a limited education. He then became a clerk in the drug 
store of Dr. Chapin, subsequently a partner, the house finally be- 
coming the wholesale drug house of John Owen & Co.. the precursor 
of the present house of T. H. Hinchman & Sons. But the connection 
of Mr. Owen with the financial and shipping interests of Detroit, and 
with philanthropic enterprises, has left a permanent impress. He 
has been an alderman several times: was a member of the board of 
water commissioners, 1805-79: served a term as regent of the Univer- 
sity; president of the fire department, 1841-3; and, trustee of the 
Detroit medical college. In 1845 he became president of the Michi- 
gan insurance bank and held it for twenty years, until it was merged 
in a national bank. It was the only bank in Michigan which did not 
suspend in the panic of 1S-j7, and his financial ability placed him at the 
head of the finances, which he managed with great ability during the 
war. He is still active and is president of the Detroit dry dock co., 
.and the merchants' navigation company. He is a pro ninent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, and identified with its prog- 
ress in Michigan. 

JOHN G. OWEN, 

Senator from Oakland cranty in 1881, was born at "Woodchureh, 
England, March 28, 1824. He came to this country in 1842, and to 
Michigan in 1843. He was at Armada one year, two years a clerk in 
Detroit, in 1840 settled at Clarkstou as a merchant, and also became a 
farmer in 18">4. In 1800 owned and operated the flouring mills at 
"Waterford in connection with a store. Since 1805 became a leading 
merchant at East Saginaw, and since 1872 has been extensively 
engaged in lumbering. In politics first a Whig, then a Republican. 



TUBAL C. OWEN, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1*70, was born at Caledonia 
Springs, N. Y., March 24, 1819. Came to Newport 'now Marine City), 
Michigan, in 1845, resided there till 1852, then <<n a farm in China till 
1859, then at St. Clair up to 1S71, when he removed to Detroit, now 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 505- 

his home. He was clerk of St. Clair county from 1857 to 1863: mayor 
of St. Clair 1864; supervisor four years; clerk of draft commission, 
and war census taker for St. Clair county. First a "Whig, since a 
Republican, and by profession a lawyer. 



ALBERT PACK, 

Representative in 1863 from Sanilac county, was born in Chittenango. 
N. Y., Nov. 10, 1842. Came to Lexington, Mich., in 1849, and moved 
to Alpena in 1870. Was mayor of Alpena in 1872. Has for many 
years been engaged in lumbering with great success. Is a Republican 
in politics. 

FRANK S. PACKARD, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1875, was born in Cattar- 
augus county, N. Y., February 10, 1S3S. He received an ordinary 
common school education, removed to Michigan in 1S40, and settled 
at Sturgis. His occupation is that of a lumber dealer. In politics a 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM PACKARD 

"Was born in Plainfield, Mass.. July 23. 1808. He received a common 
school education. In early life a farmer. He removed from the 
state of New York to Chatham, Ohio, in 1836, where he cleared a farm 
and remained until 1859, when he removed to Allegan county, Mich., 
and in 1870 to Covert. Van Buren county. Occupied all prominent 
offices of his township while living in Ohio, and was a Representa- 
tive from Allegan county in 1S65-7. In politics a Republican. In 
Michigan he was for many years engaged extensively in lumbering, 
owning thousands of acres of timber, and operating four saw-mills. 



WM. O. PACKARD, 

Senator from Van Buren and Cass counties in 1877, was born Sept. 
14, 1832, in Rensselaer county, N. Y. In 183(3 he removed with his 
father's family to Chatham, Ohio, where he received a common 
school education. In 1859 he moved to Ganges, Michigan, where he 
subsequently held the office of postmaster for several years. In 1870 
he moved to Deerrield (Covert postoffiee). Van Buren county, Mich. 
For the last six years he has been engaged in lumbering, farming, 
manufacturing, merchandising and real estate transactions. Iu 
politics a Republican. 



•506 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

HENRY PACKER, 

"Representative from Hillsdale county in 1845, was born in Colchester, 
Conn., November 1, 1800. He received an academical education 
and taught school several years; then moved to -western New York 
and engaged in getting out staves; then for five years was selling 
books in the southern states. In 1835 settled at Jonesville, Mich.. 
.and became a farmer. He was four years judge of probate. A 
Democrat until 1856, then a Republican until 1872, then a Democrat. 



ALFRED PADDOCK 

Was born in Litchfield, N. Y., January 30, 1805. By occupation a 
merchant and farmer, in politics a Whig. He settled in Concord. 
Mich., about 1844, and resided there until his death, March 29, 1S70. 
He commenced business life as a merchant, was afterwards a farmer 
and miller. He was Senator in 1853. 



CHARLES J. PAILTHORP, 

Representative from Emmet and other counties io 1879, was born 
December 25, 1848, in Mt. Morris, Michigan. He received a common 
school education, and graduated from the law department of the 
University of Michigan in 1875. lie then removed to Petoskey and 
commenced the practice of law. He has been prosecuting attorney, 
also United States commissioner for the western district of Michigan. 
In politics a Democrat. 



RODNEY C. PAINE 

Was born in New Milford, Conn., in 1S06. When young he removed 
with his parents to Auburn, N.Y. He left home at seventeen, passed 
several years in the state of New York, and came from Albany to 
Michigan in 1S3G. He settled at St. Joseph and took charge of the 
Farmers and Mechanics" hank. He removed to Niles in 1842. and 
was there engaged in private banking until his death in 1882. He was 
county treasurer of Berrien county from 1S36 to 1838: Senator in 
1855: president of the village of Niles in 1855: mayor in 187:;. and 
trustee of the union school from 1854 to 1^74. He was actively inter- 
ested in every work that promised to benefit the growth ot Niles. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 507 

CHARLES H. PALMER 

Was born at Lenox, N. Y., in 1814; graduated from Union college in 
1837; was principal of Fredonia and Geneseo academies; in 1847 be- 
came principal of Romeo, Mich, academy, and conducted it success- 
fully many years; was elected regent of the University in 1851, and 
through his exertions the services of Dr. Tappan were secured. From 
1853 until his death in April, 1887, he was a resident of Pontiac. He 
was largely interested in mines in the upper peninsula, also in build- 
ing canals and railroads in that part of the state. He was a trustee 
of the Michigan military academy. A man of culture and great busi- 
ness abihtv. 



JOHN R. PALMER, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1853, was born in the state of 
New York, June 27, 1809. He came to Michigan in 1844. He was a 
farmer, and a Democrat. Died May 1, 1877. 



LEWIS G. PALMER, 

Senator from Mecosta and Montcalm counties in 1887, was born in 
Herkimer county, N. Y., Sept. 17, 1852, and came to Michigan in 
1857. At the age of thirteen he became a drummer boy in the army 
and served three years. He was educated at Detroit schools and the 
state agricultural college. Has been a resident of Big Rapids since 
18G9. He was a teacher and county superintendent of schools. He 
studied law, was admitted in 1877, has been three times prosecuting 
attorney, and held other positions. Now in practice at Big Rapids. 
In politics a Republican. 



OSCAR PALMER, 

Representative from Crawford and other counties in 1883, was born 
at Westfleld, N. Y., Nov. 8, 1811. Moved to Hudson, Mich., with his 
parents in 1843, received an academical education and graduated at 
Georgetown medical college, D. C. He was in the service as soldier, 
hospital steward, and assistant surgeon nearly three and a half years. 
Then was in business several years at Jonesville. Mich., also edited the 
Independent, but in l v ^l removed to Grayling, engaged in farming 
and manufacturing, and publishing the Crawford Avalanche. Politi- 
cally a Republican. 



508 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

SAMUEL H. PALMER 

Was born at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1801. He was by trade a car- 
riage maker, and in politics a Democrat. He came to Micbigan in 
1835, moved to Jackson in 1S41, and was a Representative in 1848. 
Deceased. 

THOMAS WITHERELL PALMER 
Was born in Detroit, January 25, 1830. He remained tbere until the 
age of twelve, when he entered Mr. Thompson's academy, at St. 
Clair. He afterwards spent a year and a half at the University, at 
Ann Arbor. His eyesight failing, he, with five others, left for a 
voyage to Spain in the fall of 1848. He landed at Cadiz, and for two 
mouths traveled on foot through the country, visiting the Alhambra 
at Granada, and other points. He then took ship for South America, 
landing in Rio Janeiro in 1849. After remaining three months in 
South America, he returned home via New Orleans, spending two 
months in the southern states. In 1850 he went to Wisconsin and 
spent one year as agent of a transportation company on the river. In 
1851 he went into the mercantile business at Appleton, Wisconsin, 
where he was burned out and financially rained. Returning to Detroi^ 
in 1853 he engaged in the real estate business. In 1855 he embarked 
in the lumber trade, which, with the purchase and sale of pine lands, 
has been his vocation since. Mr. Palmer was m irried to Miss Lizzie 
P., daughter of Charles P. Merrill, in 1855. He ha? been an active 
member of the republican party since the date of its organization. 
He was nominated by acclamation for state Senator in 1878, and 
elected by a handsome majority. The legislature of 1883, after a pro. 
tracted struggle, elected him United States Senator, to succeed Hon. 
Thomas W. Ferry. His term will expire March 3, 1889. 

WALTER H. PALMER, 
Representative from Osceola and other counties in lb~T-?9, was born 
Aug. 30, 1815. in Oakland county. Michigan. He is a graduate of the 
state normal school, and of the law department of Michigan Univer- 
sity. He has held the offices of circuit court commissioner, justice, 
superintendent of schools, and supervisor. He is by profession a 
lawyer and in practice at Reed City. In politics a, Republican. 

HEMAN PALMERLEE, 

Representative from Kent county in 1831-2, was born in Washington 
county, N. Y.. Dec. 3. 1800, and came to Michigan in 1832, settling in 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 509 

Bruce, Macomb county. During six years of his early manhood he 
lived in Rochester, Oakland county, and was engaged in mercantile 
business. He then, in 1850, removed to Walker, Kent county, where 
he followed farming for about twenty-two years. Since that time has 
been employed as an accountant and collection agent. His education, 
beyond that of the common schools of the new state, was obtained in 
the Romeo academy. Politically a Republican. 



AMAZIAH B. PARDEE, 

Representative from Ionia county, was born in 1834 in Jackson 
county, Michigan. By occupation, a farmer: by political persuasion, 
a Fusionist, on which ticket he was elected Representative for 1887-8 
by a vote of 1,843 to 1,691 for Levi J. Barnard, Republican, and 297 
for Emorv A. Richards, Prohibitionist. 



BURTON PARKER, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1883, was, born in Dundee. 
Mich., April 24, 1844. He served a few months in the Michigan 
mechanics and engineers, being discharged from ill health. He was 
a justice of the peace in 1807, and graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the University in 1870. Has been circuit court commissioner, 
mayor of Monroe, and president of the school board. Politically a 
Republican. 

JAMES H. PARKER, 

Representative from Lenawee couuty in 1855, was born in Masonville. 
N. Y., September 2, 1803. He received a common school education, 
became a teacher, then for ten years a carpenter. He settled in 1S33, 
on a farm at Rome, Mich. He was a supervisor six years, and six 
terms a justice. He and his wife were long conductors on the 
" underground railroad." Deceased. 



JOHN PARKER, 

Senator from Kalamazoo county in 1859. was born in Cavendish, Yt., 
February 7, 1813, and died November 20, 1880. By occupation a 
farmer, a Democrat until 1854, then a Republican. He settled in 
Portage, Kalamazoo county, in 1833, where he was supervisor several 
years; was also United States marshal. 
55 



"510 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



LEONARD B. PARKER, 



Senator from St. Clair county in 1863-4, was born at Moses, X. Y.. 
July 19, 1818. He received a common school -and academical educa- 
tion. Taught school, then studied medicine, graduating at Castleton, 
"Vt., in 1842. Practiced at Cambridge, Vt„ but in 1845 settled at 
^Newport, now Marine City, and built up a large practice. Has filled 
■several local positions. 

LEROY PARKER, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1874-5, was born December 
15, 1814, at Flint. Mich. He graduated at Hamilton college, N. Y., 
in 1865, and attended the law department of the Michigan University 
in 1865-6. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1867, and 
has since continued practice in Flint. He was elected Representative 
in 1874, to fill a vacancy. In politics a Republican. Has been a 
member of the state board of health. 



SAMPSON PARKER 

"Was born in Otsego county, N. Y., November 22, 1818. He was 
reared on a farm and came west with his parents, who settled in Lima, 
Mich., in 1833. He has served as justice several times, and was Rep- 
resentative in 1867. He cultivates a large farm, and is in politics a 
Democrat. 

WARREN PARKER, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1S79-81-2, was born inGreig. 
N. Y., November 15, 1829. His father removed to Michigan in 1833, 
and settled in Chesterfield. Macomb county. He obtained most of 
his education in the primary schools. He is a farmer. The public 
trusts he held were township only: justice, superintendent of schools 
and supervisor. Politically a Democrat. 

CHARLES P. PAHKH1LL 

W r as born in Niagara county, N. Y. Came to Michigan at the age of 
nineteen, and to Owosso in 1841. He was a printer by trade and 
worked a year on the Owosso Argus. He was afterwards a teacher. 
but finally studied medicine and graduated from the Willoughby 
medical college, Ohio, in 1846. After practicing at Bennington. 
Mich., twenty years, he removed ( i Owosso and opened a drugstore. 
He was a Representative in 1857. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 511 

JONATHAN G. PARKHURST, 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1885, was born in Hastings, 
N. Y., in 1828. Coming to Detroit he entered upon the study of the 
law, and was admitted to the bar in 1858. With the exception of five 
years spent in Kansas (1870 to 1875), where he served as district judge, 
he has been continuously engaged in the practice of his profession in 
this state. He is now a resident of Decatur, and in addition to law 
business is extensively interested in fruit growing and stock raising. 
In politics a Republican. 

NATHAN C. PARKHURST 

Was born in Darien, N. Y. After tbe age of ten was a resident of 
Ohio, and later came to Michigan. By occupation a farmer, in poli- 
tics a Democrat. A Representative in 1849 and 1853. 

BYRON F. PARKS. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1883. was born in Otsego 
•county, N. Y., Aug. 24, 1829. He received a common school educa- 
tion and worked on a farm until 18G2, then became a lieutenant of 
infantry, and after expiration of service was engaged in recruiting, 
and later in farming and the sale of agricultural implements. Has 
been deputy sheriff, justice, and held other town and county posi- 
tions. Politicallv a Democrat. 



ABNER C. PARMALEE. 

Representative from Barry county in 184-4, was born in Benson, Vt., 
Jan. 3, 180G. He settled in Hastings. Mich . in 1837, and built the 
second log house. He was six years register of deeds and four years 
deputy county treasurer. He was one of six whig members of the 
House, the Senators being all democrats. He is now a clerk at Wash- 
ington, D. C. In politics a Republican. 



LINUS S. PARMALEE 

Was born August 20. 1815, at Spofford, N.Y., removed to Cattaraugus 
county. N. Y.. in 1823, and in 1840 to Wisconsin. In 1856 lie came to 
Reading, Hillsdale county. Has been a clergyman forty years, and 
in thirty years has officiated at 501 weddings and 1,351 funerals. Was 
a trustee of Hillsdale college fifteen years and a Representative in 
1867. Was postmaster of Reading some ten years, under Johnson and 



512 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Grant. Has also been justice of the peace. At first a Whig, but a 
Republican since 1854. 



ANDREW PARSONS, 

Governor of Michigan from March, 4, 1853, to Dec. 31. 1854, was born 
in Hoosick, N. Y., July 22, 1817, and died June 6, 1855. He traced 
his ancestry back to Walter Parsons, born in Ireland in 1290. Gov. 
Parsons came to [Michigan in 1S35, at the age of seventeen, and 
taught school a few months at Ann Arbor, then was a clerk at 
Prairie Creek in Ionia county. He settled in Shiawassee county in 
1836, and was soon elected register of deeds, which he filled by re- 
election for six years. He was a Senator in 1847-8. In 184S he was 
prosecuting attorney: in 1851 was elected regent of the University; 
and in 1852 was elected lieutenant governor by the democrats. By 
the appointment of Gov. McClelland to the position of secretary of 
the interior, March 4, 1853, he became governor. In 1854 he was 
elected a Representative to the legislature, and retired from the ex- 
ecutive chair to serve in the session of 1855, dying three months after 
the close of the session. He was a man of spotless character, a fluent 
and persuasive speaker; as a politician, candid, frank and free from 
bitterness, and as an executive officer firm, constant and reliable. 
Politicallv a Democrat. 



FAYETTE PARSONS 

Was born in Benson, Vt.. Aug. 12, 1812. and received an academical 
education. He came to Burr Oak, Michigan, in 1857. By occupation 
a physician, in polities a'Republiean. In 1-8G2 he was appointed an 
examining surgeon for St. Joseph county, a position he held many 
years. He was a Representative from St. Joseph county in 1867 and 
1873-4. 



JONATHAN PARSONS, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1S77-9-S1-2, was born in 
West Springfield, Mass.. Oct. 7, 1820. He settled at Marshall, Mich.. 
in 1835, removing to Kalamazoo in 1S44. By occupation a merchant, 
in politics a Republican. Has been a trustee of Kalamazoo several 
times, for many years trustee and treasurer of the Michigan female 
seminary, also president of the Kalamazoo paper company and a bank 
director. 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 513 

LUKE H. PARSONS 

Was born in western New York, Feb. 12, 1812, was liberally educated, 
and was admitted to the bar at Ann Arbor, Mich., about 1835. He 
removed to Corunna about 1839, and became a law partner of his 
brother, Gov. Andrew Parsons. He held the positions of register of 
deeds, judge of probate, prosecuting attorney, and regent of the Uni- 
versity, serving in the last office until his death, Feb. 19, 1862. 



ORRIN PARSONS, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1S46, was born in Sandis- 
field, Mass., in 1794, and settled on a farm in Saline, Mich., in 1820. 
The next year, with his brother, he built the first saw-mill in the 
town. He was supervisor in 1831, and held that office eight terms. 
He was also a justice and held other offices. He erected and managed 
a, grist mill. Died in 1851. 

S. TITUS PARSONS, 

A brother of Governor Andrew Parsons, came to Michigan when a 
young man, and studied law with his brother at Owosso. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1854, and located at Corunna, where he prac- 
ticed for more than twenty years. He was prosecuting attorney six 
years, and was a Representative in 1863-4 and 1667. He was also a 
member of the constitutional convention of 1867, and was a man of 
power and influence. He removed to Detroit in 1877, and engaged in 
practice, but died several years since. He was a Republican in 
politics. 

AZARIAH S. PARTRIDGE, 

Representative from Genesee county in 18S1-2, was borrf in Saratoga 
county, N. Y., Dec. 19. ■ 1831. A farmer and fruit grower, in politics 
formerly a Republican, now a Prohibitionist. He came to Flushing, 
Mich., about 1S5G. As a young man was a teacher for several years. 



BENJAMIN F. PARTRIDGE, 

Commissioner of the state land office 1877-8, was born in Shelby, 
Mich., April 19, 1823. He received a common school and academical 
education; was a teacher, was engaged a year in the study of law, 
was a surveyor and civil engineer, then a lumberman until 1857. He 
was appointed sheritf of E5ay county, and followed surveying several 



514 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

years. In 1861 he went into the army, and by regular promotion 
reached the rank of brevet brigadier general. He was in the U. S. 
revenue service, 1867-71, has been supervisor eight years and chair- 
man of the board six years. Is a farmer near Bay City, and in poli- 
tics a Republican. 

JARED PATCHIN 

Was born in Yates county, N. Y., in 1823, and came to Nankin, Mich., 
when young. He graduated at the State University in 1853, and was 
admitted to the Detroit bar in 1854. He has been deputy county 
clerk, county clerk, prosecuting attorney. He was judge of the third 
circuit from 1870 to 1877. He was interested in an orange plantation 
in Florida, and was a member of the legislature of that state in 1878. 
Now resides in Detroit. Politically a Democrat. 



LEVI PATCH EN, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1843, was born in the state 
of Connecticut, Jan. 5. 1804, and died Sept. 25, '1851. He lived in 
Yates county, N. Y. from 1808 until 1843, when he settled in St. 
Joseph county, Mich., and was a nurseryman and farmer by occupa- 
tion, and politically a Whig. 



ORLANDO R. PATTENGILL, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1871-2, was born in Stow, Vt., 
Feb. 24, 1828. He came to Michigan in 1845, and has resided at or 
near Plymouth. He received a common school education, worked as 
a farm laborer, and from 1849 was a teacher for twelve years, in winter. 
Is a farmer, politically first an Abolitionist, later a Republican. Has 
been secretary and deputy treasurer of the farmers' mutual insurance 
company of Wayne and Monroe counties since 1S71. 



JOHN C. PATTEkSON, 

Senator from Calhoun county in 1879-81-2, was born in Eckford. 
Mich., March 27, 18:58. He graduated at Hillsdale college in 1864, and 
from the law department of the Albany, N. Y., university in 1865. 
He commenced practice at Marshal! in 1867, where he now resides. 
Has been a trustee of Hillsdale college and a lecturer there before the 
senior class on constitutional law. Politically a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 515 

JOSEPH H. PATTERSON 

Was born in Ireland in 1801, came to America in 1819 and located at 
Lockport, N. Y. In 1828 he removed to Adrian, Michigan, where he 
settled on a farm. He was prominent in early Michigan politics, was 
a member of the constitutional convention of 1835, and Representa- 
tive in 1839 and 1818. He is said to have given the names to four 
counties in the state: Antrim, Wexford, Roscommon and Clare. In 
politics a Democrat. 

MICHAEL A. PATTERSON, 

Representative 1846, and Senator from Lenawee county in I844-5-, 
was born in Easton, Pa., March 11, 1S01, and was educated there un- 
til early manhood. He studied medicine in the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and graduated with honor at the age of nineteen. He prac- 
ticed in western New York for four years, and settled in Tecumseh, 
Michigan, where he continued in active practice until 1875. He then 
sought a southern climate for health, and died at Westham Locks, 
Va., April 17, 1877. He was a regent of the University six years, and. 
held many local offices. Politically a Democrat. 

RUSSEL R. PEALER 

Was born atGreenwood, Pa.. Jan. 1, 1842, received an academical edu- 
cation, and served in the lGtli Pennsylvania cavalry over three years, 
rising to the rank of 1st lieutenant. He studied law, was admitted 
in 18G7, and the same year settled in practice at Three Rivers. Mich., 
still his home. Has been prosecuting attorney, circuit court commis- 
sioner, and held other offices. He was elected judge of the 15th cir- 
cuit in 1881. Politically a Republican. 

STEPHEN PEARL 

Was born in Livingston county, N, Y., Nov. 19, 1817. He came to* 
Michigan in 1838 and settled as a farmer in Ovid, Clinton county. 
Now lives in Greenbush, same county. He has been supervisor, 
county treasurer ten years. Representative in 1867, and Senator in 
1809-70. Formerly a Republican, now independent in politics. 



WILLIAM IT. PEASE, 

Representative from Jackson county in l s 15, was born in Seneca 
county, N. Y.,June 7. 1804. He came to Michigan in ISO'.', and 



516 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

settled on a farm in Grass Lake, where his widow and son still re. 
side. Died Nov. 13, 1SG6. 

EDWARD W. PECK 

Was born at West Bloomfield, N. Y., March 19, 1807. He received a 
common school education and was a teacher. He settled in Troy, 
Mich., in 1831, and was a merchant there for 20 years. Now resides 
at Pontiac. Has held many offices, including county clerk, postmas- 
ter, etc. He was a member of the first convention of assent in 1836, 
and was a delegate to the national whig convention in 1848, which 
nominated Taylor. Now a Republican. 



GEORGE W. PECK, 

Representative in congress 1S55-7, Representative in the Michigan 
legislature 1840 7, and speaker of the House in 1847, was born in New 
York city, June 4, 1818. He received an academical education, 
studied law, came to Michigan in 1S30. was admitted to the bar in 
1842, and commenced practice at Brighton. He removed to Lansing 
in 1847, and was the first postmaster. He was appointed by Gov. 
Ransom, secretary of state in 1848, and held the position two years. 
He was proprietor of the State Journal and state printer from 1852 to 
1855. In 1804 went into practice at East Saginaw. Removed to St. 
Louis, Mo., in 1875, and has been attorney of the St. Louis & Iron 
.Mountain railroad. Politically a Democrat. 



EDGAR PEIRCE, 

Representative from Mecosta county in 1883. was born May 6, 1841, 
in Erie county, Pa.: was educated in common schools and an acade- 
my; followed milling until 1SG2; enlisted in the 14th Pennsylvania 
cavalry, and served through the war, and rose to the rank of lieuten- 
ant. In 1871 settled in Mecosta county and engaged in making 
shingles. Has been fuur years county treasurer. In politics a 
Republican. 

JAMES P. PENDILL, 

Representative from Marquette county in 4803-4. was born near 
Batavia, N. Y., in 1812. He was a resident of Niles, Mich., as early 
as 1837, and was often seen there driving his four-in-hand, in broad- 
cloth suit and white gloves. He was engaged at the Sault in mercan- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 517 

tile business from 1845 to 1855, when he engaged in the same business 
.at Marquette. In 1867 he became a resident of Negaunee, and was 
mayor in 1872-3. He returned to Marquette and was mayor from 
1879 to 1882, and many years supervisor and chairman of the board. 
He long served as a school trustee. Died March 9, 1885. 

EDWARD W. PENDLETON, 

Senator from St. Joseph and Branch counties in 1879, was born at 
Broadalbin, N. Y., December 13, 1825. He received a common 
school education. In 1844 he removed to Orleans count}-, N. Y., 
where he engaged in farming until 1819, when he went to California. 
In 1851 he returned to Orleans county, and in 1852 settled at Sturgis. 
Mich., where he now resides. He has been engaged in mercantile, 
manufacturing and agricultural pursuits. He has held many offices 
of trust, and has been justice for seven years. In politics a National. 

OLIN PENGRA, 

Representative from Huron county iu 1883. was born in Seneca 
county, N. Y., October 19, 1847. He received such education as the 
common schools afforded. Was in the army during the last year of 
the war as a member of the 98th Pennsylvania regiment. Removed 
to Michigan in 1807. Taught school for ten years in the counties of 
Tuscola and Huron. Was admitted to the bar in January, 1S78; has 
held many township offices. He is a Republican. 



ORRIN G. PENNELL, 

Senator from the counties of Ingham and Clinton in 1885, was born 
in Cortland county, N. Y., in 1827. After receiving a thorough 
academical education he engaged in teaching. Relinquishing this 
pursuit he purchased a farm. Deciding to go west, he sold his farm 
and bought one in Washtenaw county, Mich., to which he removed in 
1861, remaining there until 1809, when he removed to DeWitt, where 
he still resides. Was elected supervisor of DeWitt in 1883 and 1SS4. 
Is now U. S. marshal for the eastern district of Michigan. 



EBENEZER J. PENNIMAN 

Was born at Lnnsingburg, N. Y. At the age of thirteen he waa 
.apprenticed to the art of printing at Keene, N. H.: went to New York 
5«i 



518 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

at the age of eighteen and engaged in mercantile pursuits; removed 
to Plymouth, Midi., in 1835 and engaged in business; was elected a 
member of congress, serving from December 1, 1851, to Marcho, Is;;:'.; 
receiving 10,741 votes to 8,909 votes for Buell, Democrat. Still resides 
at Plymouth. 

HENRY F. PENNINGTON, 

Senator from Eaton and Barry counties in 1883, was born in Seneca 
county, Ohio, Sept. 9, 1842. In 1852 he removed with his parents to 
Eaton county, Mich. He received an academical education, and 
became a farmer. He studied law and gradu ded from the law 
department of the University in 1-68, and is now engaged in practice 
at Charlotte. In politics a Democrat. 



HENRY PENNOYER, 

Representative in 1849, and Senator in 1S59, from Ottawa county, was 
born in Nor walk, Conn., Feb. 9, 1S09. He received a common school 
education, and removed in 1819 to Cayuga county, N. Y., where he 
worked on a farm. From 1834 to 1836 he lived in Chicago, 111., when 
he removed to Muskegon, Mich., and was elected the first sheriff of 
Ottawa county, of which Muskegon county then formed a part. In 
1838 he was appointed postmaster of Muskegon, and held the office 
until 1843. He removed to Grand Haven in 1843, where he kept a 
hotel until 1856. He then became a farmer in Crockery township, 
where he died April 30, 1836. Always a Democrat, lis was justice, 
supervisor, county treasurer, and deputy collector at Grand Haven. 
He was a political leader, and among the foremost in the promotion 
of every enterprise, agricultural, moral, social and educational. 



JOHN B. PERU AM, 

Representative from' Ottawa county in 1881-C-3, was born in May- 
field, N. Y. He came to Spring Lake, Mich., in 1800, and for several 
years was principal of the public schools, was for many years a mem- 
ber of the board of education, also a supervisor. By occupation a 
merchant, in politics a Republican. 



EDWIN Z. PERKINS, 

Representative from Cheboyan and other counties, was born in June. 
1849, in Oxford county, Ontario. Has been a resident of Michigan 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 519 

ten years. His occupation is attorney at law. Is a graduate of the 
University of Michigan, class of 1378. Mr. Perkins has held the office 
circuit court commissioner, judge of probate two terms, and county 
treasurer, all in Cheboygan county. He is a Republican, and was 
elected Representative for 1837-8 by a vote of 2,111 to 2,010 for Charles 
S. Hampton, Fusionist, and 125 for Burbanks, Prohibitionist. 



JABEZ PERKINS, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1859, was born at Defiance, 
O., Oct. 26, 1820. He received an academical education at Delaware, 
studied medicine, and graduated at Cleveland in 1849. He practiced 
medicine at Springville, Mich., for ten years, but at Owosso since 
1860. He took charge of a hospital at Nashville in 1862, became a 
surgeon of Kentucky volunteers, medical director of the 2d army 
corps, and then medical director of the cavalry corps, army of the 
Cumberland. In politics first a Whig;, then a Republican. 



HENRY M. PERRIN 

"Was born at Berlin, Vt., July 23, 1829. He was educated at Dart- 
mouth college, graduating in 1853. He removed to Michigan in 1S55, 
residing two years in Detroit, when he settled at St. Johns, still his 
home. He was admitted to the bar of Clinton county in 1858. Was 
judge of probate from 1861 to 1865, and Senator from Ingham and 
Clinton counties in 1865. He has successfully followed his profes- 
sion, and is also a dealer in real estate. He indulges in farming as a 
diversion. 



PORTER K. PERRIN, 

Senator from Ingham and Clinton counties in 1877, was born Sept. 13. 
1833, in Berlin, Vt. He received a common school and academical 
education, and was a graduate of the law university of Albany, N. 
Y., in 1856-7. He removed from Cincinnati, Ohio, to Michigan in 1860. 
He has held the positions of first lieutenant, company I, and captain 
of first company sharpshooters, twenty-seventh Michigan infantry, 
and was commissioned major of the second Michigan infantry. He 
was also judge of probate fur Clinton county from 1869 to 1 V T2 
inclusive; United States commissioner for ahout six and a half years, 
and has held some minor positions. He is by profession an attorney. 
In politics a Republican. 



520 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

AARON PERRY, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1873-4, was born in Oakland, 
Mich., Nov. 11, 1848, and graduated from the University of Michigan 
in 1870. He is an attorney in practice at Pontiac, and in politics a 
Democrat. 

EDWIN PERRY 

Was born in Franklin county, N. Y, July 9, 1810. He removed to 
Michigan in 1837. He then removed to Wisconsin, where he lived 
until 1841. He returned to Jackson county and lived at Parma and 
Concord until 1851, when he removed to Union City, since his home. 
He was sergeant-at-arms in the state senate of 1855; Representative 
from the western district of Branch county in 1857 and 1859; post- 
master of Union City from 1851 to 1870; and has been justice of the 
peace for thirty-two years. 

GIDEON D. PERRY 

Was born in Palmyra, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1811. lie was brought up to 
farming, left home at nineteen, became a scholar and teacher until 
1833, when he commenced preaching, and was admitted to the Genesee 
conference of the Methodist Episcopal church. He preached for 
eleven years, when from poor health he abandoned it, came to Mich- 
igan in 1843, and settled on a farm in Franklin, Lenawee county, lb- 
was supervisor of the town; chairman of the board of supervisors: 
Representative in 1857; Senator in 1859. He has preached more or 
less every year. 

ALONZO E. PERSONS, 
Representative from Alpena county in ISO 1-2, was born at Smirhville. 
N. Y., April 25, ISIS. He received a common school education, be- 
came a sailor, and in IS 10 was master of a vessel. He continued in 
that business until 1849, when he removed to Bay City and engage I 
in the fishing business. Removed to Alpena in 1859. and was town 
clerk. From ISO I to 1874 was keeper of the Thunder Bay Island 
light. Built the first steam tug for fishing. Now master since 1882, 
and part owner of the steamer Golden Eagle. Has been justice and 
coroner. In politics first a Whig, since 1S54 a Republican. 

GEORGE PETERS, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1801-2, and Senator in 1867. 
was born in Delaware county, N. Y., September 22. 1822, and came 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 521 

to Michigan in 1831. A farmer and a Republican. Resides at Petere- 
burgh. He has been postmaster sixteen years, and supervisor nine- 
teen years. 

JENS G. PETERSON, 

Representative from Detroit in 1861-2, was a native of Germany, 
born in 1821. He was a retail grocer, and subsequently, in 1854, a 
co-partner in the cabinetmakers' association, a manufacturing firm in 
Detroit. He was register of the U. S. land office in Detroit, 1861-3, 
and probably died in the last named year. Politics Republican. 

WM. H. H. PETTIT, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1887, was born in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, in 1840, and has b-en a resident of Michigan since 1S54. 
Mr. Pettit served three years as a private in company C, 1st Mich, 
infantry. He has served eleven years as supervisor of Ransom 
township. He was elected on the republican ticket by a vote of 2.199 
to 1,365 for Albert J. Baker, and 354 for Albert J. McCutcheon. Pro- 
hibitionist. 

TIMOTHY H. PETTIT 

Was a native of New York state, came to Tecumseh, Mich., in 1835, 
and in 1837 settled on a farm in Essex, Clinton county, where he 
remained until 1854, then went into business at DeWitt. Died in i860. 
He was a Representative in 1855, justice, postmaster and town 
treasurer. 

FITCH PHELPS, 

Representative fr^ni Mecosta and other counties in 1877-9, and Sena- 
tor in 1883-5, was born at Guilford, N. Y., June 30, 1831. He received 
an academical education and was a merchant. In 1802 went to 
California, and was provost marshal of San Mateo county in 1863. In 
18GS located at Colfax, Mich., built a mill, engaged in lumbering, 
also in farming. Resides at Big Rapids. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN W. PHELPS 

Was born in Seneca county, X. Y., June 14, 1819. He came to Michi- 
gan with his father in 1829, and settled at Plymouth. He studied 
medicine and engaged in practice at Mason in 1841. He was also, 



524 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

during the latter portion of his life, a hardware merchant. Ho was 
for several terms a justice, and was Representative in 1859. Died 
August 31, 1S64. 



WILLIAM PHELPS, 

Representative from Detroit in 1861-2, was born in Cayuga county, 
N. Y., November 19, 1816. He received an academical education, 
and went into business at Detroit in 1835, which he continued until 
his death, July 24, 1879, being the head of the firm of Phelps, Brace 
& Co. In 1862-3 he was an " allotment commissioner" for Michigan, 
and became a paymaster in 1863, and in 1865 was made lieuteuant 
colonel. He was on the military staff of Gov. Crapo, and was post 
commander and adjutant general of the G. A. R. for Michigan. A 
leading Mason and Odd Fellow, politically a Republican, in religion a 
Methodist, and an ordained preacher. 



NATHAN S. PHILBRICK, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1841, was born in Maine, 
June 12, 1789. He was a farmer and hotel keeper, and a Democrat. 
He settled in Farmington, Mich., in 1826. Was commissioned a 
justice by Gov. Mason in 1834, and held that office several terms. 
Died in 1854. 



DELOS PHILLIPS 

Was born in Hamburg. N. Y., Oct. 24, 1839. He came to Ypsilanti 
in 1845, graduated at the public schools, taught two years, and was a 
student in the University from 1859 to 1S0'2. He enlisted in 1862 as a 
private in the 17th Michigan infantry, and was promoted through all 
the grades to captain in 1863. In 1864 he was taken prisoner at 
Spottsylrania court-house, but escaped from the cars at night and, 
after 300 miles' travel, reported for duty. He became lieut. colonel of 
the 28th Michigan infantry, but resigned before the close of the war. 
and graduated from the University in 1S65. tie was Senator from 
Kalamazoo county iu 1869-70, a presidential elector in 1876 and 
messenger to carry the vote to Washington. He was for six years a 
member of the board of supervisors. His life was that of a manu- 
facturer and business man. In politics a Republican. He died .it 
Kalamazoo, Feb. 23, 1887. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 523 

GEORGE W. PHILLIPS 

Was born in Livingston county, N. Y\, July 17, 1829. He came with 
his father to Armada, Michigan, in 1831, who settled upon a farm. 
The son was raised a farmer. He was a charter member of the county 
agricultural society, many times its president, and almost continu- 
ously an officer. For eleven years he was a member of the state 
board of agriculture; an officer of the state agricultural society 
twenty-two years, and its president in 1880 and 1881. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics. 

JOHN 1. PHILLIPS, 
Representative from Genesee county in 1871, was born in Canada, 
Sept. 3, 1823. He removed to Monroe county, X.Y., with his parents 
the next year, where he lived until 1844, when he settled in Vienna, 
Michigan. He held several town offices, and was engaged in several 
kinds of business until August 13, 1861. when he enlisted as sergeant 
of company ''G, ! ' 8th Michigan infantry. He served with the regi- 
ment in South Carolina and was promoted to 2d lieutenant Jan. 1. 
1863. He resigned on account of ill health Dec. 15, 1863, and returned 
to his home. He died before the close of his legislative term. In 
politics a Republican. 

NATHANIEL G. PHILLIPS, 
Representative in I860 from Shiawassee county, was born at Preston. 
Conn., Nov. 20, 1825. He attended an academy at Norwalk, O.. for 
three years, and came to Shiawassee county with his widowed mother 
and settled on a farm in 1840. From 1S51 to 1853 was in California. 
His present farm lOrms the location of the village of Bancroft. 

PITTS PHILLIPS. 
Representative from Oakland county in 1^37. was born in the state of 
New York April 24, 17'J2. Lived in Stafford and Sempronius. N. Y.. 
and married Mary Daniels at the latter place. He settled in South- 
field. Mich., in 1830. Was supervisor in 1836, and held the office of 
justice both m New York and Michigan. By occupation a farmer 
and cooper, in politics first a Whig, then an Abolitionist. Died April 
10, 1842. 

EDWIN R. PHINNEY. 
Representative from Saginaw county in 1883, was born at Bangor. 
JUe., Aug. 3, 1346. When young lived in New York city and Penn- 



524 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

sylvania, removing to Richmond, O., in 1855. Came to Michigan in 
1872, engaged in the manufacture of boat oars at Carson City, remov- 
ing the business to East Saginaw in 1876, also engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber, shingles and salt. In politics a Republican. 



ANSEL B. PIERCE, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1887, was born at Can- 
ton, New York, in 1836. He at the age of fifteen years entered the 
St. Lawrence academy, remaining there four years and teaching three 
terms in the meantime. At the age of twenty-one he came west and 
settled in Redford, Wayne county, where he has resided ever since, 
teaching school during the winter and working on his farm in the 
summer. Mr. Pierce lias held the offices of supervisor, town clerk, 
school inspector and justice of the peace. He has been president of 
the Redford agricultural society since its organization, and is a prac- 
tical and thorough agriculturist. Mr. Pierce is a Democrat. 



DARIUS PIERCE, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1846 and 1847, was born 
Sept. 2, 1801, at Farmington, N. Y. Came to Michigan in 1832, and 
was a farmer of the town of Lima. He was justice of the peace four 
years, county commissioner, and ten years a supervisor. Looking to 
the future of the stare, he voted to remove the capital from Detroit to 
Lansing, although Ann Arbor was a contestant. Deceased. 



JOHN D. PIERCE. 

Superintendent of public instruction from 1836 to 1841, was born at 
Chesterfield. N. H.. Feb. 18, 1797. From the age of two to twenty he 
lived with an uncle at Worcester, Mass.. having only eight weeks' 
schooling. He then went to work and earned one hundred dollars, 
his grandfather gave the same amount, and in 1817 he walked four- 
teen miles to take his fir.st lesson of Rev. Enoch Pond, who fitted him 
for college. He graduated at Brown University in 1822: was princi- 
pal of Wrentham academy in 1S23; the same year entered Princeton 
theological seminary; in 1824 was licensed to preach as a Congrega- 
tional minister, and became pastor of a church at Oneida, N. Y. He 
came as a home missionary to Marshall, Mich., in 1831, and held the 
first religious meetings in Jackson. Calhoun and Eaton counties. 
Gov. Mason appointed him the hr>t superintendent of public instruc- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 525 

tion, and he proved to be the right man in the right place, and his 
plans were adopted by the legislature of 1837 without a dissenting 
vote. A full sketch of his labors can be readily found. He was a 
Representative from Calhoun county in 1847-8. Died at Medford, 
Mass., April 6, 1882. 

JOSEPH B. PIERCE, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1850, was born in St. Johns- 
bury, Vt., July 20, 1812. His parents removed to western New York 
in 1814. He came to Grass Lake, Michigan, in 1837, but removed to 
Leoni in 1S39, where he kept a hotel. Later removed to Jackson and 
was a justice for eight years. He had a genial, happy disposition, 
was a great humorist, and delighted in entertaining friends with 
stories and anecdotes. Died July 17, 18G2. 



NATHAN PIERCE 

Was born in Cheshire, Mass., Sept. 27, 1790. In 1795 he removed with 
his parents to Ontario county, N. Y., where he was brought up on a 
farm, and received a common school and academical education. He 
served in the war of 1812. In 1832 he located thirty eighty acre tracts 
in Calhoun, St. Joseph and Washtenaw counties, and settled on a farm 
in Sylvan, Washtenaw county, removing twelve years after to Mar- 
engo, Calhoun county, where he remained through life. He was a 
member of the constitutional conventions of 1835, 1850 and 1SG7, and 
a Representative in 1839-40-1-50-1. A Whig until 1854, then aRepub- 
lican. He was a man of gigantic stature, strong will, noted for his 
integrity, and one of the ablest of the farmer pioneers. 



ONESIMUS O. PIERCE, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S73-4, was born in Potsdam 
N. Y., Aug. 16, 1S09. He was educated at the Potsdam academy. In 
1S33 he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Redford, Wayne 
county, where he still resides. He has held various township offices. 
By occupation a farmer. 

PETER R. L. PIERCE, 

Senator from Kent county in 1*159-70, was born in Geneseo, N. Y., 
May 25. 1823. As a boy. attended common schools, but in 1S30 came 
to Detroit, there attending night schools and reading law. In 1840 
57 



-5^6 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

he removed to Grand Rapids and kept a book store, reading law with 
Judge Martin. Frcm 1843 to 1850 was in mercantile business at Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and wrote a history of the Sons of Temperance, which 
had a circulation c" 100,000 copies, and also wrote for several papers. 
From 1850 to 1857 was a merchant at Grand Rapids. In 1854 was 
city clerk; mayor in 1373-5-6: several terms clerk of Kent county, 
and postmaster of Grand Rapids from 1877 until his death, about 1880. 
In politics a Republican. A man of wit and humor, kind and genial. 
Few men had warmer friends, or better deserved them. 



BENJAMIN PIERSON 

"Was born October 4, 1802. near Cayuga Lake, N. Y. When young 
he moved with his parents to Victor, N. Y. He worked on a farm 
until fifteen years of age, then at carding wool and dressing cloth 
until 1S26, when he came to Michigan and purchased land in Ply- 
mouth. He returned to New York and remained until 1836. He then 
settled on a farm in Livonia, Wayne county. He was a justice, and 
■held various town offices, and was Representative in 1S71-2. In 
.politics a Democrat. 



ELIJAH H. PILCHER, 

Regent of the University from 1845 to 1851, was born in Athens 
county, Ohio. June 2, 1810. He was a student at the Athens Uni- 
versity, and was ordained a Methodist minister in 1S20. From 1S30 
until his death, he was a resident of Michigan, preaching at Detroit, 
Ann Arbor, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Battle Creek, and other places. He 
was ten years secretary of the conference, and for nearly twenty-rlve 
years a presiding elder. He was one of the founders of Albion 
college. He received several degrees, including D. D., and was 
admitted to the bar in 1846. He was the author of "Protestantism 
.in Michigan." 



WASHINGTON PITCHER, 

"Representative from St. Joseph county in 1835, was born in Norwich, 
■Conn., December 28, 1816, and received a fair education. Removed 
to Parma, N. Y.. in 1831, was two years a clerk at Rochester, N. Y., 
and came to White Pigeon, Mich., in 1836. In 1844 removed to Con- 
stantine. He was a merchant, and the late Gov. Bagley was for one 
year his clerk, when a boy. In 1858 removed to Illinois, residing at 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 527 

Franklin Grove, then Wall Lake. Kansas, where he now resides. In 
politics a Democrat. 

ZINA PITCHER, 

Regent of the University, by appointment, several terms from 1S37 to 
1852, was born in Washington county, N. Y., April 12, 1797. and died 
at Detroit, Mich., April 5, 1872. lie received an academical educa- 
tion, and graduated as a physician in 1820. He served as an army 
surgeon until 1SH6, then became a resident of Detroit. The medical 
department of the University was essentially his work. He was 
mayor of Detroit in 1840-1-2, and the whig candidate for governor in 
1843. He was physician of St. Mary's hospital from 1848 to 1S67: 
surgeon of the marine hospital under Buchanan; trustee of the 
Kalamazoo asylum: a member of many scientific and medical 
societies, and one of the ablest and most widely known physicians in 
Michigan. 

FREDERICK PITT, 
Representative from Ionia county in 1883, was born in London. Eng- 
land, June 10, 1824, and came to Ionia county, Mich., in 1830. When 
young worked at engraving, making of pianos, was later a carpenter, 
and is now a farmer. Has been several term3 a supervisor, and held 
other offices. In polities a Republican. 



CHARLES M. PITTS, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1805, was a farmer and for a 
number of terms supervisor in Monroe county. He was a man of 
considerable influence in the town where he resided. Died several 
years ago. 

ZEPHANIAH PLATT, 

Attorney general of Michigan from 1841 to 1843, was born at Pough- 
keepsie. N. Y., Feb. 22. 1707. He graduated at Hamilton college, 
studied law, practiced in western New York and New York city, and 
settled at Kalamazoo in 1837. In 1839 he removed to Detroit. In 1850 
he resumed practice in New York city, and was commissioner to ad- 
just claims of the United States on the Pacific coast. He was then 
appointed United States judge for the second district of South Caro- 
lina. He acquired distinction in that position, and died at Aiken. S. 
C, April 10. 1872. 



528 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

EMERY M. PLYMPTON, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1869-70, was born in Canton. 
Ohio, June 1, 1826. His father was a pioneer Methodist minister in 
Ohio and preached for fifty-five years. The son received a good edu- 
cation and commenced teaching when eighteen, and taught in several 
states for nine years. He was a Whig until 1S54, later a Republican. 
He came to this state in 1849, was in railroad business two years, and 
taught school at Niles from 1851 to 1853. lie was admitted to the 
bar in 1853, and was a justice and prosecuting attorney. He went 
into the service as captain in 4th Michigan cavalry, but resigned in 
1863, from ill health. He was deputy provost marshal in 1863-5, cir- 
cuit court commissioner 1871-2, and held other offices. Died March 
26, 188S. 



ENOS A. POMROY, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1881-2, was born in Bristol, 
N. Y., March 16, 1S32. He came with his father to Allen, Mich., in 
1844, and removed to Litchfield in 1851. He has been six times a 
supervisor. A farmer, in politics a Republican. 



ALFRED POND 

Was born in Camden, N. Y., Feb. 10, 1S06. By occupation a farmer, 
in politics a Democrat. He settled in Clayton, Genesee county, in 
1839, and lived there until 1S80, but since that time has been a resident 
of Flashing. He was a Representative in 1847. 



CORNELIUS V. R. POND, 

Commissioner of labor 1SS5 to 1SS7, was born in Auburn. N. Y., May 
39, 1S36, and received an academical education. He was a clerk in 
New York and Hartford from 1852 to I860, then a manufacturer. He 
was quartermaster of the 12th Connecticut from l^ijl to 1863, and re- 
signed from ill health. He then served in the provost marshal's office 
at Utica. He settled at Coldwater, Michigan, in 1865, and engaged 
in insurance. He went to Quincy in 1809, He was postmaster there 
from 1878 to 1SS5. He established the Quincy Herald in 1878, but 
sold it in issj. He was commander of the G. A. R. for two years. 
A Republican. Now in Kansas. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. ' 529 

ELIHU B. POND, 

Senator from Washtenaw county in 1859, was born in Wilmington, 
N. Y., July 15, 1826. Lived in Ohio from 1832 to 1835, when his father 
settled at Branch, then the county seat of Branch county, removing 
to Cold water in 1843. He learned the trade of a. printer, and worked 
as a young man at various points. He was in 1847 a student at Albion 
college. From 1848 to 1854 he owned and edited the Coldwater Sen- 
tinel; then removed to Ann Arbor and was editor and proprietor of 
the Michigan Argus until 1879. He has been county clerk, alderman, 
member and president of the school board, warden of the state prison, 
etc. He was president of the state press association in 1868-9. In 
politics a Democrat, and now a justice at Ann Arbor. 



JARED POXD, 

Representative from Branch county in 1839, was born at Poultney, 
Vt., Sept. 26, 1790, and died at Ann Arbor, Mich., April 12, 1856. He 
served in the war of 1812. He was a surveyor and iron manufacturer 
at Wilmington , N. Y. . and after a few years' residence in Ohio became 
a resident of Branch county, Mich., in 1835, and was a surveyor. He 
was register of deeds from 1843 to 1847. Later removed to Ann 
Arbor. He was father of E. B. and Ashley Pond. 



ORRIN POPPLETON, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1853, was born in Richmond, 
N. Y., April 22, 1^17, and came to Troy, Mich., with his parents in 
1825. He received a common school education and was a teacher in 
1834-5 and 1839-40. In 1837-8 he attended Granville, O., academy, 
and then was a clerk in the postoftice at Pontiac. From 1840 to the 
present time has been a succes.-ful merchant at Birmingham, Mich., 
and was postmaster from 1853 to 1861. He was a member of the 
democratic congressional committee sixteen years. He is also a 
farmer. In politics a Democrat. A valuable member of the state 
pioneer society. 

WILLIAM POPPLETON, 

Representative in 1843 from Oakland county, was born at Poultney, 
Vt., in 1795, but removed to Richmond, X. Y., at theageof seventeen. 
He purchased a farm in Troy, Mich., in 1823, and settled upon it with 
his family in 1S25. The small farm increased in size until in . : 



530 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

owned 1,200 acres. In 1856 he removed to a place near the village of 
Birmingham, where he died in 1869. 



AUGUSTUS S. PORTER, 

United States Senator from Michigan, 18-10-45, was born in Canan- 
daigua, N. Y., Jan. 18, 1708. He was of a distinguished family, his 
father, Augustus Porter, subsequently removing to Niagara Falls. 
where he became the first proprietor of a property which he occupied. 
The son graduated from Union college in 1818, studied law, and was 
admitted to practice. After locating in Detroit he acquired a leading 
position at the bar, and was identified with the social, political and 
educational history of the city, serving as recorder in 1S34 and mayor 
in 1838. The election of Senator for the term for which he was 
chosen should have been made at the legislative session of 1839, but 
the two houses, both democratic, failed to agree, and allowed the 
election to go by default. The whig party carried the state and the 
legislature in 1839, and at the session of 18-10 elected Mr. Porter to 
the Senate for the term commencing March 4, 1839. He returned to 
Niagara Falls in 1848, after the death of his father. He has been dead 
some years, although members of the family still reside there. 



GEORGE B. PORTER, 

Governor of the territory of Michigan from August 1, 1831, until his 
death, July 6, 1834, was a native of Lancaster, Pa., a lawyer by pro- 
fession, and prior to his coming to Michigan had been United States 
marshal of the eastern district of Pennsylvania. He removed with 
his family to Michigan, bought a farm in Springwells, and began the 
construction of a fine residence. He was a man of executive ability 
and popular. 



JAMES B. PORTER, 

Secretary of State from 1SG1 to 1807, was born at Marcellus. N. Y.. in 
September, 1824. He came to Michigan in 1833, and removed to 
Allegan in 1810, and lived there until 1805, then removed to Lansing 
in 1866, where he still resides. He was county clerk and register of 
deeds of Allegan county from 1851 to 1661. Occupation, real estate 
and insurance; politics, republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 531 

JOHN PORTER 

Was born in Tompkins county, N. Y., in 1819. He came to Michigan 
in 1833. in 1845 settled in Montcalm county, and on the organization 
of that county was elected county treasurer, holding the position 
four years. By ocei pation a farmer, in politics a Republican. He 
was a Representative from Kent county in 1S63-4, having removed 
there in 1855. Present residence, Wyoming, Kent county. 

LEWIS PORTER. 

Representative in 1857-8, and Senator from Kent county in 1859, was 
born in the state of New York, Nov. -4, 1823. He came to Michigan 
in 1838. He was engaged in the clothing trade at Grand Rapids, and 
was an active Republican in politics. Among other positions he was 
assistant postmaster at Washington, D. C, and was the first clerk of 
the U. S. district court for western Michigan. Died January 10, 1882. 

MICAH PORTER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1844, was born in Wey- 
mouth, Mass., Aug. 2, 1793, his ancestors having settled there in 1635.. 
He learned the trade of a mason at Rome, N. Y., working at it sum- 
mers and teaching winters. During the war of 1812 he was a leading 
supporter of Madison. He built a parliament house at Little York, 
near Toronto, Canada. He then resided at Rochester, N. Y., until 
1832, when he breams a farmer at Sharon, Mich., and was many 
years a justice there and supervisor. Died July 7, 1870. 

FLOYD L. POST, 
Senator from Midland and other counties in 1887, was born at Belvi- 
dere, N. Y., in 1857, and is by occupation editor, lawyer and real 
estate dealer. He had school advantages up to thirteen years of age, 
was clerk in a drug store a year, then worked in a shingle mill, be- 
came foreman, then proprietor of a saw and shingle mill with las 
father, also was in lumbering and mercantile business. Has been 
supervisor, town clerk and treasurer, and was a Representative in 
1885. In politics a Republican. Has bsen admitted to the bar. 

SAMUEL POST, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1571-2. was born at Ypsi- 
lauti. Mich., November '.), 1834, which has always been his home. 



532 - MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

He received a common school education, and became a clerk at the 
age of twelve. At the age of nineteen became a dry goods and 
clothing merchant, and continued it successfully for seventeen years. 
In 1873 he was appointed U. S. pension agent at Detroit, and held 
that position nearly thirteen years, until removed by President 
Cleveland. In politics a Republican. Now in business at Detroit. 



ALLEX POTTER 

Was born in Saratoga county, X. Y., October 2, 1818: removed to 
Michigan in 1838. and located at Kalamazoo in 1845; engaged in 
manufacturing, mercantile pursuits and banking; was Representative 
in the legislature in 1837 and 1858; was elected president of the village 
in 1859, 1863, 1^70 and 1872, and president of the board of education 
in 1870 and 1871. He was elected president of the Kalamazoo & 
South Haven railroad company in 1870, and was very efficient in 
securing the building of that road. In 1874, as the candidate of the 
democrats and liberals, he was elected Representative to congress, 
serving from December 0, 1S75 to March 3, 1S77. 



CALVIN B. POTTER. 

Representative from Berrien county in 1875, was born July 15, 1807, 
at Brownville, X. Y. He removed to Michigan in 1838. A lawyer 
by profession, in politics a Democrat. 



FORDYCE H. POTTER, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1S83-5, was born inWavne 
county, N. Y., April 8, 1833. He received a common school educa- 
tion, and became a carpenter. In 1856 he removed to Shiawassee. 
Mich., and is now a contractor and builder. Has held many local 
offices. Elected as a Fusionist. 



GEORGE N. POTTER, 

Senator from Eaton and Barry counties in 1887, was born at Ira. N. 
Y.,Oct. 16, 1827. He came with his parents to Saline, Mich., in 1830. 
his father building the first frame house in that village. Tliey 
removed to Eaton county in 1844. The son received a common school 
education, became a tanner, and is the founder of the village of P'.r- 
terville; was oue of thirteen that effected the organization of the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 533 

Peninsular railroad, now a part of the Grand Trunk, and was a 
director; has been engaged in manufacturing and lumbering. In 
politics a Republican. 

ANTHONY POUCHER 

Was born Nov. 24, 1801, at Claverack, N. Y. He emigrated to Mich- 
igan in 1833, and settled on a farm in Bridgewater, Washtenaw 
county. He died October 7, 1870. As a Democrat, he was a Repre- 
sentative in 1838. 

MILO POWELL, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1848, was born in Berkshire 
county, Mass., Oct. 3, 1800. He came to Michigan in 1835. Has been 
supervisor in Cass county, and justice both in Cass and St. Joseph 
counties. In politics a Democrat. Has been engaged in banking for 
years, but has retired from business, and resides at Constantine. 



NATHAN POWER, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1855. was^born in Farmington, 
N. Y., April 19, 1801. He settled in Farmington. Oakland county, in 
1826. He taught the first school in 1826. He was a man of extensive 
reading, extraordinary memory, and well informed in regard to 
affairs of the state and nation. In politics a Free Soil Republican, by 
occupation a farmer, in religion, a Friend. Died in 1S74. 



PLINY POWER, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1844, and from Wayne in 
1855, was born in Vermont in 1798. He became a physician, practiced 
for a time in Tioga county, Pa., and removed to Oakland county about 
1840. He subsequently removed to Detroit and was county physician 
there in 1852. He was originally a Democrat, but became a Republi- 
can in 1854. He was active in the temperance cause, sometimes 
lecturing on that subject. Died in Detroit in 1861. 

ROBERT D. POWER, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1844-5, was one of the 
earliest settlers of Brighton. The erection and opening of i 
house by him in 1836, was the first step taken to give that place the 
58 



534 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

character of a village. He was sheriff from 1839 to 1843, and was 
also moderator and director of the public schools. He was a man of 
much force of character, intuitive shrewdness and exerted a strong 
influence in politics. Deceased. 



WILLIAM POWERS, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1885-7, was born in Tipper- 
ary county, Ireland, in 1842. He has been a resident of Michigan 
since 1859. Mr. Powers is a farmer, has held the office of township 
treasurer six years, the office of supervisor eight years. In politics a 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM H. POWERS, 

Representative from Kent county in 1879, was born in Troy, N. Y., 
April 7, 1841. He received a common school education at Grand 
Rapids, Mich., to which place he removed in 1847. He is a member 
of the firm of Powers & Walker, manufacturers of undertakers' 
goods, also of the firm of Wm. T. Powers & Son, manufacturers of 
lumber, lath and shingles. He has held the office of city clerk, alder- 
man, and a member of the board of fire commissioners of Grand 
Rapids. In politics a National. 



ABNER PRATT 

Was born in Springfield. N. Y., May 22, 1801. He was brought up on 
a farm, had limited educational advantages, read law, and com- 
menced practice, first at Rush, afterwards at Rochester, X. Y., where 
he remained until 1839, when he resigned the office of district 
attorney, and removed to Marshall, Mich. He was Senator in 1844-5, 
and Representative in 1863. In 1853 he went to Honolulu as U. S- 
consul, where he remained several years. He was a judge of the 
Supreme Court from 1850 to 1852, and circuit judge from 1852 to 1857, 
when he resigned. He was always a Democrat, and a prominent 
Mason. He was an able, fearless judge, and a man of great ability. 
He died March 27, 1863. 

DANIEL L. PRATT 

Was born in Plainfield, Mass., June 24. 1^20. In 1S30 he' removed 
with the family to Geauga county, Ohio. Having studied law, he 
was admitted to the bar in 1844. In 1845 he commence-d the practice 
of law at Hillsdale, where he has since resided He was elected 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 535 

prosecuting attorney for Hillsdale county in 1856, and re-elected in 
1S60; has been twelve years a member of the board of trustees of the 
Michigan asylum for the insane; was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1S67; was elected circuit judge of the first circuit in 
1869; was re-elected in 1875, no nomination having been made against 
him. He has been a trustee of Hillsdale college since its organization 
in 1853, and has contributed liberally of time, monev and counsel to 
its support. He was a Whig until the organization of the Republican 
party, with which he has since acted. He resides on a farm, just 
outside of Hillsdale, which he cleared and improved himself. 

FOSTER PRATT 
Was born at lit. Morris, N. Y., January 9, 1823. His ancestors 
landed at Plymouth in 1622, He received an academical education, 
at seventeen engaged in teaching, and was principal of an academy 
at Angelica. X. Y., and from 1844 to 1847 of one at Moorfield, Va. 
He graduated as a physician in 1849, from the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and practiced his profession at Romney, Va., until 1856, 
when he removed to Kalamazoo, resuming his practice. In 1859 was 
a Representative. He aided in procuring appropriations for the 
asylum at Kalamazoo, of which he has been trustee. A Democrat in 
politics. Was surgeon of the 13th Michigan infantry from 18G1 to 
1865; president of Kalamazoo village in 1871; chairman of demo- 
cratic state committee 1870 to 1876: postmaster of Kalamazoo 1866-7. 



WILLIAM A. PRATT, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1843-4-5, and speaker pro 
tern, in 1845, was born in Vermont. By occupation a millwright. 
Came to Franklin, Michigan, at an early day. There he built several 
mills, and in 183S built a flouring mill, of which he and Winthrop 
Worthing were proprietors. He was supervisor of the town of South- 
field in 1842-3, and justice of the peace. Removed later to Sault Ste 
Marie, where he made money iu land transactions, and finally 
removed to Detroit. Politically a Democrat. Deceased. 



ESEK PRAY. 

Representative in 1838 from Washtenaw county, was born in East 
Killingly, Conn., Nov. id, 1790; in 13U removed to Angelica. X. Y. 

In May, 1823, he came to Michigan, and beeaniea farmer in the town 



536 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

-of Superior. He kept a tavern many years at Dixboro. Gov. Ca.-.-, 
appointed him justice, which position he held for twenty-four years. 
He was a Democrat. Died April 20, 1853. 



GEORGE PRAY, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1879, was born Aug. 27, 1825, in 
Angelica, N. Y. He received an academical education, graduated 
from the University of Michigan in 1845, and from the medical 
department of Western Reserve college in 1849. He removed to 
Michigan in 1825 and settled in Superior, Washtenaw county. He 
commenced the practice of medicine in Salem in 1849. In 1850 h<- 
removed to Ronald, Ionia county, and invested his means in lands. 
From 1863 to 1867 resided at Ann Arbor, practicing his profession, 
but at the expiration of that time returned to Ronald. He has been 
a supervisor, and chairman of the board of supervisors for many 
years. Politics, republican. 

ALMON E. PRESTON, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1875. was born July 15, 1S32, 
in Orleans county, N. Y. He removed to Battle Creek, Mich., in 
1S44. He was educated in common schools, and is by occupation a 
mechanic. He held the position of second lieutenant in 1861 in the 
Michigan engineer corps, and was captain of Co. '"L" of the regiment 
of Merrill's horse, serving in the western department until 1S04. He 
has been three terms a supervisor in Battle Creek, and also a member 
of the board of education. In politics a Republican. 



S. HORACE PRESTON, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1887, was born in Oneida. 
Mich., Oct. 25, 1837. He was educated in common schools and at 
Olivet college. In 1805 he settled on a farm in the town of Lansing. 
Has always been a farmer, been a supervisor seven years, and two 
years chairman of the board. In politics a Democrat. 

FRANCIS J. PREVOST 

came from New York to Michigan before 1830. After living some 
years in Washtenaw county he organized a company, known as the 
Byron company, and bought lands on which the village of Byron is 
located. He moved there in 1S:J6, and was the principal man for 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 53? 

many years. He was the first postmaster, and was a Representative 
in 1843, and a member of the constitutional convention of 1850. Soon 
after removed to California, where he died many years since. 

LAYMAN B. PRICE, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1847, was born at Rush, N. 
Y., Nov. 22, 1811, and came with his father to Shelby, Mich., in 1827, 
where the village of Utica now stands. His father built the first grist 
and saw mill in that part of the county. The son became a farmer, 
but has been a merchant since 1852. He was sergeant-at-arms of the 
Senate in 1837, and sheriff of Macomb county in 1840. He resides at 
Lakeville, Oakland county, and was Senator from that county in 
1871-2. 

DELIVERANCE S. PRIEST 

Was born in Arlington, Vt., Aug. 1814. His education was obtained 
in the common schools. He settled as a farmer in Ray, Macomb 
county, Michigan, in 1838. He was a Representative from the sec- 
ond district of Macomb county in 1871-2-3-4. In politics a Repub- 
lican. Died in February, 1888. 

CLARENCE W. PRINDLE, 

Representative from Kent county in 1877-81-2, was born in Rutland, 
Mich., Dec. 20, 1849, and was two years a student at Albion college. 
He studied medicine, and graduated from Hahnemann medical col- 
lege of Chicago in 1871. Now in practice at Grand Rapids, also a 
member of the drug firm of Prindle Brothers. In politics a Repub- 
lican. 

.EUGENE PRINGLE, 

Representative in 1861-2, and Senator in 1807, was l>orn in Richfield, 
N. Y., Dec. 1, 1826, and received an academical education. He 
studied law, was admitted in 1810. and commenced practice at Jack- 
son, Mich., in 1850, still his home. He has been circuit court com- 
missioner, prosecuting attorney, city recorder, mayor, military secre- 
tary under Gov. Blair, member of the constitutional convention of 
18(17, register in bankrupcy, state insurance commissioner 18S5-7. and 
democratic candidate for lieutenant governor in 1882. He has also 
been active in the building of railroads. In politics, a Whig until 
1854, a Republican until 1872. now a Democrat., 



538 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

BENJAMIN D. PRITCHARD, 

Commissioner of the state land office, 1867 to 1871, and state treas- 
urer 1879 to 1883, was born in Nelson, Ohio, and educated at Western 
Reserve college. He came to Michigan in 1856, graduated from the 
law department of the University in 1860, and commenced practice 
at Allegan, his present home. He went into the war as captain in the 
4th Michigan cavalry, and was promoted to the rank of brevet briga- 
dier general, and a part of his war record was the capture of Jefferson 
Davis. He is a Republican, and president of the national bank at 
Allegan. 

KINTZING PRITCHETT, 

The first secretary of state under the state government, 1835-38, came 
to Michigan under the favor of Governor George B. Porter, about the 
year 1831. He was a favorite with Gov. Porter, also with Gov. 
Mason, by whom he was appointed secretary of state. He was a gen- 
tleman neat and exact in dress, above medium height, straight, clean 
shaven, and a pair of spectacles added to the dignity of his port. 
Richard R. Elliott, of Detroit, in a note, says of him: "I remember 
his personal appearance, which was certainly distinguished, and his 
peculiar name struck my childish imagination." He was a lawyer 
and an educated man, was appointed to the office of bank commis- 
sioner in 1833, and returned east after the close of Gov. Mason's 
administration. His nativity is unknown, but understood to have 
been Pennsylvania or New Jersey. 



WILLIAM PROBERT, 

Representative from Manistee county in 1879, was born in Gloucester- 
shire, England, March ,'4, 1835, and was educated in common schools. 
He emigrated in 1850 and settled in Jefferson county, N. Y. In 1S61 
he enlisted in the first regiment of Wis. Vols., and participated in 
many engagements, and was mustered out at the expiration of enlist- 
ment. In lsGl he removed to Pleasanton, Mich. Has been supervisor, 
and has held minor offices. Occupation, farmer. Politics, demo- 
cratic. 

ABRAHAM C. PRUT/MAN 

Was b.rn in Columbia county. Pa., March G, 1813. Received a com- 
mon school education, and was employed as clerk in Dausville, Pa., 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 539 

•for some years. In 1834 he emigrated to Michigan, and settled on 
Prairie Ronde. In 1838 he removed to Three Rivers, where he now 
resides. He engaged in the milling and merchandise business, in 
which he was concerned for a period of 27 years. He was appointed 
a member of the board of agriculture in 1862, a position he held for 
ten years. In 1868 he was elected Senator from St. Joseph and Cass 
counties, and was twice re-elected. A Republican in politics. 



NICHOLAS W. PULLEN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1845, was born in Ontario 
county, N. Y., in 1803. He came to Michigan in 1831, first settling 
near Royal Oak, but subsequently removing to Romulus, where he 
resided for twelve years, serving much of the time as supervisor and 
justice. Failing health induced his removal to Detroit in 1S4T, and 
from thence he removed to Birmingham, where he died in 1863. He 
was by occupation a farmer, and politically a Democrat. 



HENRY H. PULVER, 

Senator from Shiawassee and Livingston counties in 1855, was born 
Sept. 12, 1843, in Yates county, N. Y. He came to Michigan in 1844, 
served in the 8th Michigan infantry four years, studied law, was ad- 
mitted in 1859, and went into practice at Laingsburg. In politics, 
first a Republican, later a Greenbacker. 



WILLIAM PURCELL, 

Representative from Detroit in 1869-70. was a native of Ireland, born 
1818. He died in 1880. Mr. Purcell was engaged in the foundry bus- 
iness, and was a man of character, conscientious in the discharge of 
his duties. He served his ward four consecutive terms, from lbOl to 
1868, as alderman, was controller of the city June, 1870, to March. 1871 . 
and was a member of the board of public works from 1S76 to 1S79. 
Was a Democrat politically. 

TTZZIEL PUTNAM. JR. 

Was born in Pokagon, Michigan, August 12, 1826. He was the first 
white child born in Cass county, and was the son of Uzziel Putnam, 
a pioneer farmer. He received a good education, and graduated 
from the State University in 1853. He read law with E. C & C. I. 
Walker of Detroit, and was admitted to the bar in 1855. but practiced 



540 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

only a short time. He held the offices of school inspector, justice, and 
circuit court commissioner. He was Representative in 1809-70. and 
Senator in 1871-2. In 1874 he was appointed a member of the stat" 
board of charities, and held that position until his death, Feb. 10, 187U. 
He was president of the Cass county pioneer society, and took great 
interest in all matters of pioneer history. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN RAIRDEN, 

Senator from Wayne county :*i 1387, was born in Ireland, June 24 
1831. Came when young to Canada, moved to Toledo, Ohio, and 
from there to Detroit in 1843. Attended public and private schools, 
and learned the trade of chair painting and furniture finishing. He 
continued his studies, and acquired the German, French and other 
languages. Opened a night school in 1856 and continued it for sev- 
eral years. Was a teacher in the German-American seminary in 
18G4; from 1SG5 to 18G7 was a letter carrier; since taught in private 
and public schools, and since 1874 been principal of a private school. 
Elected as a Labor-Republican. 



STILLMAN RALPH, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1S37 and 1855, was born at 
Reading, Vt., Nov. 7, 1803. He received a common school education. 
and taught school several terms. He commenced the study of medi- 
cine in 1827, graduating at Waterville, Maine, in 1830. The same 
year he commenced practice at Canandaigui, N. Y. In 1835 lie 
removed to Moscow plains, Hillsdale county, which was his home at 
the time of his death. He resided in Jonesville from 1840 to 1847. 
He was first a Whig but became a Republican in 1854. Died at Lan- 
sing, Feb. 18, 1855. 



JONATHAN G. RAMSDELL 

Was born at Plymouth, Mich., in 1830, and was educated at Ply- 
mouth seminary and Albion college. Studied law, was admitted in 
1857, and settled in practice at Traverse City in 1800, his present 
home. He is now serving his fourth term as judge of the 13th cir. 
cuit, and has taken a leading position in the state as a fruit grower, 
and done much develop the capacities of the upper western shore of 
the state for the profitable cultivation of fruit. In politics a Repub 
lican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 541 

NORTON R. RAMSDELL 

"Was a native of New York and removed to Ann Arbor in 1833. Be- 
fore coming to Michigan he had been a licensed exhorter in the 
Methodist Episcopal church, but studied law, was admitted to the 
bar, and came west to practice. He was regarded by his colleagues 
as a good lawyer, and one who excelled as an advocate. He was 
Representative in 1844. In politics a Democrat. Deceased. 

THOMAS J. RAMSDELL 

"Was born in Plymouth, Michigan, July 29, 1833. He worked on his 
father's farm summers, attending school winters until eighteen years 
of age, when he became a student at Plymouth seminary, then at the 
state normal school. Read law in Lansing, and graduated at the 
national law school at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1858. Was admitted 
to the bar in New York, returned to Lansing and opened a law office. 
In the winter of 1859-60 removed to Manistee, and engaged in prac- 
tice. He was a Representative in 1861-2. In 1867 formed a law part- 
nership with E. E. Benedict, and the firm of Ramsdell & Benedict is 
still in practice. In politics a Republican. 

CALEB D. RANDALL 

Was born in Conquest, N. Y., in 1831, and is a descendant of Wm. 
Randall, who settled in Scituate, Mass., in 1635. He removed with 
his father's family to Bronson, Mich., in 1835. He graduated at the 
Albany law school in 1S55. He settled at Coldwater in 1857 and 
practiced law until 1871. He was Senator in 1871-2. It is largely 
through his efforts that the state school for dependent children was 
established at Coldwater. He was a delegate to the Republican 
national convention of 1880. He has been president of the southern 
Michigan national bank of Coldwater since its organization in 1872. 
and for many years has been one of the state board of control of the 
public school at Coldwater. In politics a Republican. 

HARVEY RANDALL, 
Representative from Calhoun county in 1867, was born in Sweden. N. 
Y., June 10, 1819. By occupation an insurance agent, politically a 
Republican. He settled at Tekonsha, Mich., in 1841. Was justice of 
the peace fifteen years, supervisor three years, enrolling officer dur- 
ing ihe rebellion, clerk of the Baptist church over thirty years, and 
held other offices. Died April 1, 1887. 
59 



542 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

FRANCIS H. RANKIN 

Representative from Genesee county in 18G1-2-3 4, and Senator in 
1877, was born in Creymore, Ireland, Oct. 29, 1818, and was educated 
at private schools and Belfast academy. He came to Pontiac. Mich.. 
in 1848, worked two years as a printer, and in 1850 established the 
Wolverine Citizen, now the Flint Citizen, at Flint, and has continued 
to publish and edit it until the present time. lie was state prison 
inspector 1865-9; clerk and recorder of Flint 1871-7; and was post- 
master of Flint eight years. He was one of the commissioners ap- 
pointed in 1867 to examine into the condition of the prison and 
reformatory institutions of the state and report, which resulted in 
establishing the state board of charities. In politics a Republican. 



LEMUEL S. RANNEY, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1875, was born in Ashfield. 
Mass., Jan. 17, 1831. He removed to Phelps, N. Y., in 1833, received 
a common school education, and in 1S43 emigrated to Allen. Michi- 
gan. In 1852 he crossed the plains to California, and again in 185 9, 
and in all spent ten years in various states and territories on the 
Pacific coast. He has been supervisor, and is by occupation a farm er. 
In politics a Republican. 

PEYTON RANNEY, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1SS3, was born in V\ est- 
minster, Vt., Nov. 29, 1826, and became a resident of Kalamazoo in 
1857. He had been a teacher in Vermont for eight years. Has been 
a wholesale and retail grocer, and lately largely interested in the 
grain trade. Has been alderman, and twice president of Kalamazoo. 
In politics a Republican. 

EPAPHRODITUS RANSOM 

Was born at Shelburne Falls, Hampshire county, Mass., February 
1797. He was the second son of Major Ezekiel Ransom, a revolution- 
ary officer, his mother being a daughter of General Fletcher, a man 
that figured prominently in the early history of Vermont, and espe- 
cially during the protracted controversy with New York that preceded 
the admission of the former state into the union. 

He accompanied his parents while still a young lad to Towns! ml. 
Windham countv, Vermont, where he was raised to manhood, work- 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 543 

ing upon the rugged hillsides of the old Fletcher farm during the 
summers, and either attending or teaching school during the winters. 
With such preparation as he was able to make at the common district 
schools, he entered the Chester academy in Windsor county, Vt., 
then one of the most prominent literary institutions in New England. 
Graduating from the academy after four years* attendance, he entered 
the law office of Judge Taft, at Townshend, where he commenced the 
study of law, having for a fellow student the son of his preceptor, 
Alphonso Taft, now of Cincinnati, Ohio, and late attorney general of 
the United States. After two years' study with Judge Taft he en- 
tered the law school at Northampton, Mass., from which he gradu- 
ated with distinction in 1823. 

After graduating from the law school Mr. Ransom returned to 
Windham county, where he had a successful law practice for some 
years, meanwhile, although belonging to the minority party in poli- 
tics, being returned several sessions as a member of the popular 
branch of the legislature of Vermont. In 1834, seeking a wider field 
of labor and better resources of soil and climate than his own state 
afforded, he emigrated to Michigan, then just beginning to attract 
considerable attention at the East. He reached the town of Bronson, 
now Kalamazoo, in October of the last mentioned year. The town 
was then merely a hamlet of not more than twenty houses of all 
descriptions, and a population not exceeding 100 souls. 

He at once entered upon the practice of his profession, afterwards 
associating with himself the late Hon. Charles E. Stuart. The firm 
onjoyed a large and lucrative business until the admission of the state 
into the union in 1S3G, when he was appointed by Governor Mason 
judge of the 2d ju'licial circuit, and associate justice of the Supreme 
Court, being the first to receive a judicial commission under the con- 
stitution of the new state. The 2d judicial circuit at that time com- 
prised all the counties of the state west of Jackson, and the new judge 
reached most of his courts on horseback, the only practicable mode 
of getting about the country at that early day. 

In 1S43 Judge Ransom was promoted to the chief justiceship by 
Governor Barry, and continued in that position until elected governor 
by a majority vote of every county in the state in 1847. He occupied 
the gubernatorial position but one term. Differing with the majority 
of his party upon the slavery question and taking strong grounds in 
his second message in support of the Wilmot proviso, he failed of re- 
•nomiuation and was retired to private life. In 18-j3 he represented 
Kalamazoo county in the state legislature, and four years later, after 
serious reverses in fortune, emigrated to Kansas, having been 



544 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

appointed receiver of the Osage land office in that territory by Presi- 
dent Buchanan. 

He died at Fort Scott, Kansas, in November, 1859, in the 63d year 
of his age, and his remains were subsequently brought to Kalamazoo, 
where they are buried in the Mountain Home cemetery at that place. 

Governor Ransom was greatly interested in agricultural pursuits. 
The Michigan state agricultural society was organized during his 
gubernatorial term, and he was its first president. His farm, at one 
time among the finest in western Michigan, is now the site of the best 
portion of the city of Kalamazoo. He was among the first to interest 
himself in the introduction of blooded stock into the state, and to no 
one is the sheep and cattle interest more indebted than to Governor 
Ransom, whose flocks and herds were in an early day among the 
finest in the "West. 

In person Governor Ransom was tall and straight, of robu.-t 
physique, and commanding and dignified presence. At all times 
approachable and simple in his habits of life he was popular with the 
people among whom he lived, and is still remembered by the old citi- 
zens of western Michigan with the kindest regard and esteem. 



FLETCHER RANSOM, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1845-6, was born in Ver- 
mont in 1S00. By profession a physician. He came to Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, in 1S36. He was elected as a Whig to the legislature, but 
later was a Democrat. Died June 3. 18(57. 



JAMES W. RANSOM, 

Representative from Kent county in 1875, was born at Liberty, N. Y., 
May 20, 1S29. He was educated at the Wilson collegiate institute. N. 
Y., adopting the profession of the law. He removed to Michigan in 
1853, taking up his residence in Grand Rapids, of which place he has 
been city attorney. 

HENRY RAYMOND, 

Representative from Bay county in 1859, was born at "Woodstock, Yt. 
August 29, 1804, his ancestors coming to Massachusetts in 1654. He 
received a common school education. He came to Detroit in 1--"'. 
and resided there until l v ">0, when he removed to Bay City and 
engaged in the manufacture of lumber. From l S| l^ until the < lose <>t 
the war he was a commissioner on the provost marshal board of tli - 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 545 

6th district. In 18G8 he was appointed assessor of that district and 
served four years. From 1872 to 1884 he was a resident of southern 
California. He is now a resident of Detroit. A Whig until 1854, 
since a Republican. 

HENRY S. RAYMOND 

Was born at Grosse Isle, Mich., February 23, 1838. His father settled 
in Detroit more than fifty years ago, removing thence to Grosse Isle. 
and then to Trenton, returned to Detroit, and in 1S51 moved to Bay 
City, where he took up his permanent residence and engaged in the 
lumber business, in which Henry assisted. Henry S. held the office of 
postmaster of that city from 18G1 until 1870. He entered the army as 
second lieutenant 23d Michigan .olunteer infantry, becoming captain 
the same year, and in 1S64 receiving his commission as lieutenant 
colonel, being in command of his regiment for a portion of the time 
until the mustering out of the same in June, 1865. Returning to Bay 
City, engaged in business as a bookseller, stationer, etc.. in which he 
continued until 1884. Was aide de camp upon the staff of Governor 
Jerome, ranking as colonel, and was appointed commissioner of 
insurance by Governor Alger, and was reappointed in 1887 by Governor 
Luce. 

HIRAM RAYMOND 

Was born in Cohocton, N. Y., January 4, 1810. His father settled on 
a farm in Raisin, Lenawee county, in 1S33, where the son commenced 
the life of a pioneer. He was supervisor of Raisin two years. In 
1868 he removed to Tecumseh, and engaged in the manufacture of 
agricultural implements. He was justice in Tecumseh four years, 
and was Representative in 1863—1. 



MAHLON H. RAYMOND. 

Representative from Jackson county in 1879, was born in Sharon, 
Mich., June 19, 1836. He received a good education. In 1859 he 
graduated from the medical department of the University of Michi- 
gan. He removed to Grass Lake and commenced the practice of his 
profession. In 1862 he was commissioned assistant surgeon of the 
twenty-sixth regiment Michigan volunteers, and in 1863 was pro- 
moted to surgeon. He lias been a member of the school board for 
twelve years, and was chosen president of the village. In politics a 
Republican. 



546 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

EBENEZER RAYNALE, 

Member of the constitutional conventions of 183.5 and 1850, and Sena- 
tor in 1835-6-7, was born in Hartland, Vt., Oct. 21, 1804. He studied 
medicine, and received the degree of M. D., in 1S26, and shortlv 
after settled at Franklin, Michigan, and became a successful and dis- 
tinguished practitioner. He married Eliza Cassidy in 1830. He was 
postmaster of Franklin under Jackson. He was the last surviving 
member of the first State Senate. He aided in organizing the first 
state medical society of Michigan. He settled at Birmingham in 1839, 
where he resided until his death, March 24, 1881. In politics a Dem- 
ocrat. 

GILBERT E. READ, 

Representative in 1861-2-3-4-5, pnd Senator in 1877, was born in Lud- 
low, Vt., May 6, 1822. His father, Rev. Peter Read, was the first 
Congregational minister in that town, and its first representative in 
the legislature. He received a limited education, commenced teach- 
ing at the age of eighteen, and followed it for seven years in winter. 
In 1842 he came to Richland, Mich., which has since been his home. 
He is a prosperous farmer, and has also been engaged in the manu- 
facture and sale of lumber. He was first a Whig, a Republican since 
1S54. As a legislator he served on many important committees, and 
was the Speaker of the House in 18G5. He has served several years as 
supervisor, and for three years was chairman of the county board. 
He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and for many years 
superintendent of its Sabbath school. 



' GEORGE H. READER, 

Representative from Mason county in 1887, was born at Lyme-Regis, 
England, Nov. 4, 1853. He came with his parents to the state of New 
York in 1854, and with a high school education settled in Mason 
county, Mich., in 1874, taught school, worked in a factory, then in a 
store, and since 1882 has been a manufacturer of wooden bowls at 
Scotsville. In politics a Republican. 



ALEXANDER II. REDFIELD 

"Was born in Manchester, N. Y., Oct. 5. 1805. He wis well educated, 
spending three years in Hamilton college, ami his fourth year in 
Union college, lie read law with Gen. James Lawrence, of Onou- 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 547 

daga county. N. Y. He was admitted to the Supreme Court of New 
York in 1830, removed to Cass county, Michigan, in 1831, and en- 
gaged in the practice of law. He and Mr. Sherman were the only 
lawyers present at the first court held in 1832 by Judges Sibley and 
Woodbridge, under an oak tree near the public square in Cassopolis. 
He was interested with Sherman in the site of Cassopolis. He was 
the first postmaster in 1837. He was Senator in 18-18-9 and 1857-8. 
He was a regent of the University of Michigan from 1844 to 1852. In 
politics a Democrat. 

GEORGE REDFIELD 
Was born at Duffield, Conn., Oct. 6, 1796. Ue received a common 
school education and one term in an academy, and at the age of 
twenty-five had a fine farm under good cultivation at Clifton Springs, 
N. Y. In 1822 he leased his faiui and spent four years teaching in 
Georgia. In 1826 he returned to his farm, and in 1834 purchased 
eight hundred acres of land in Cass county, Michigan, removing 
there in 1835. He owned at various times ten thousand acres of 
land, cultivating himself eight hundred. In 1841 he was Representa- 
tive in the legislature: in 1842-3-4, Senator; in 1841, presidential 
elector; in 1845-6, stare treasurer; in 1850. secretary of state, and the 
same year a member of the constitutional convention. Held no office 
after 1850. In politics a Democrat. Died in the wiuter of 1887-8. 



HEMAN J. REDFIELD. 

Senator from Monroe county in 1875-7, was born in Leroy. N. Y. . 
Feb. 25, 1823. He graduated at Canandaigua academy in 1836. His 
education was further continued under his father, who was a teacher 
and a fine classical scholar. He removed to Cass county in 1350 and 
came to Monroe in 1858. His occupation was farming, and at the 
same time he was largely engaged in real estate transactions. He 
was president of the Monroe board of education seven years, and for 
four years was mayor of Monroe. A Democrat in politics. 



CHARLES P. REED, 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1SS3. was born in Ingham 
county, Mich., July 20, 1844, where he resided until 1861. Enlisted 
August 27. 1861, in the 2d Michigan cavalry; re-enlisted in l v <'4, and 
served during the war. Mined from Lyons to Berlin in 1806, and 



548 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

from there to Ravenna, Muskegon county, in 1873, where he haa 
since resided, engaged in milling and lumbering. Has held the offices 
of town clerk and supervisor. In politics a Republican. 

LUCIEN REED, 

Representative from Ingham county in L865, was born in Moriah, N. 
Y., Nov. 22, 1824. By profession a lawyer: politically, first a Repub- 
lican, now a Prohibitionist. He was clerk of Ingham county in 
1861-2. Now engaged in practice at Mason. 

MARSHAL REED, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1875, was born in Richmond, 
N. Y., Aug. 21, 1S33. He received a common school education, 
removed to Michigan in 1855, and settled in Rome, Lenawee county. 
He has held the offices of school inspector and justice. His occupa- 
tion is that of farming. In politics a Republican. 



RASSELAS REED, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1877-79, was born Oct. 8, 
1S26, at Dryden, N. Y. He removed to Michigan in 1836. and settled 
in Yernon, in which township lie now resides. He received a common 
school education. He has been supervisor of Yernon five terms, and has 
held minor township offices. His occupation is farming. In politics 
a Republican. 

CORNELIUS J. REILLY, 

Circuit judge of the third judicial district (Wayne county \ was l>orn 
in "Wisconsin in ISIS, received a common school and academical edu- 
cation, came to Detroit in 1867, was admitted to the bar in 1S71, 
elected judge in 1875, and resigned in 1880, on account of the then 
insufficient salary. He was the youngest man ever holding the posi- 
tion. Erom 1884 to 1887 was in practice in Detroit. He was re- 
elected circuit judge in 1887. 

LAWRENCE T. REMER. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1873-4-5, was born in Benton. 
N. Y., Mav 22, 1810. He received an academical education at Ovid. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 549 

N. Y. In 1843 he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in the township 
of China, afterward changed to East China. He was supervisor of 
the town many years. His occupation was that of a farmer. In 
politics a Republican. Deceased. 



GEORGE B. REMICK, 
Representative from Wayne county in 1881-2, was born August 4 
1846, in Lincoln, Maine. He removed with his father's family to this 
state in 1853, and has been ever since a resident of Detroit. He grad- 
uated in the classical department of the State University in 1866, and 
in the law department in 1868. He has, however, been in the active 
practice of his profession only since 1876. He is also interested in 
lumbering operations, having inherited some valuable pine lands 
from his father, the late Royal C. Remick, who died in the spring of 
1878. In politics a Republican. 

JOHN RENO, 

Representative from Detroit in 1853, was a native of the then 
French province of Lorraine, born in 1807, and became a resident of 
Detroit in 1832. He was by trade a tailor, but became a retail grocer 
in Detroit many years ago. continuing in the business until his death. 
December 8, 1880. He filled at various times the local offices of city 
assessor, collector, and member of the board of education. A Demo 
crat in politics. 

THEODORE RENTZ, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S87, was born in Switzerland, 
in 1837, and came to Detroit in 1850, attended the public school, and 
was subsequently employed as clerk. He then commenced business 
for himself and has continued it ever since, with the exception of two 
years— 1860-62. In 1SS2 he was elected to the upper house, or board 
of councilmen, of the city of Detroit, in lbS3 president and acting 
mayor of Detroit, term of office expiring in January, l ss 7. He is 
now engaged in general merchandise trade. In politics a Democrat. 
He was a delegate to the national convention at Chicago, when Cleve- 
land was nominated for the presidency. 

GEORGE REN WICK 

Was born in England, October 31, 1789, and came to America with 
his father's family in 1802. They settled in Gorham. N. Y. He 
GO 



550 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

attended school in Canandaigua. and taught winters. He learned 
the trade of a carpenter, which with farming he followed throu-h 
the early part of his life. He was in service during the war of 1812- 
15. In 1817 moved to Greece. N. Y.. and in 1828 came to Michigan 
and located land in Salem. Washtenaw countv. He was the first 
supervisor and justice, which offices he held several years. He was 
a member of the territorial council in 1834-5, and a Representative 
in 1839-40-1 and 1847. He was an old line Whig in politics. Died 
in June, 1863. 



JOHN RENWICK 

Was born in Gorham. N. Y., May 2. 1803. He moved with his 
father's family in 1817, to Greece, Monroe county, N. Y. Attended 
school at Rochester, N. Y., and taught school winters. In 1824 he 
married Eliza Pratt, and in 1327 emigrated to Michigan, locating 
land in Salem, Washtenaw county. Two years later he sold out and 
located in Northfield, Washtenaw county. In 1333 he was elected 
the first supervisor, and held that office and that of town clerk for 
several years. He was captain of ti_e first militia company organized 
in the town. He was Representative in 1350 and 1853. He was in 
politics a Whig. Died September 24, 1806. 



ASA REYNOLDS 

Was born in Schenectady county. N. Y., November 25, 1S10. He 
removed with his parents to Avon, N. Y., m 1817. remained on 
his father's farm until 1834, and taught school in Monroe county. N. 
Y. In 1830 he removed to Rose, Michigan, and became a farmer. 
He was supervisor ten years: justice of the peace sixteen years: and 
in 1855 was a Representative from Oakland county. Of late years lie 
resided at Fenton. In politics a Democrat. 



EDWIN W. REYNOLDS 

Was born in Shoreliam. Yt., in November, 1820. He was left an 
orphan at the age of seven, but with self denial fitted himself for 
college, and graduated from the Western Reserve college at Hudson, 
Ohio, in 1846. He studied law at Akron, and practiced four years 
at Medina, Ohio. His health failing he removed to Mason, Cass 
county, Michigan, residing there until his death. October 15, 1803. 
He was first a Whig, but became a Republican, and was a Repre- 
sentative in 1859. He was also for many years supervisor of Mason. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 551 

JOHN A. RICE, 

Representative from Lenawee county, session of 1346, was born in 
Cambridge, N. Y., Nov. 29, 1S0G, and died Nov. 6, 1871. He settled 
on a farm in Tekonsha, Calhoun county, in 1836, where he lived until 
1S42, then removed to Adrian, where, with the exception of two 
years, he was connected with the Michigan Southern railroad as ticket 
agent, or general baggage agent, during life. 



JUSTIN RICE, 

Senator from St. Clair county in 1S40-1, was born in West Brook- 
field, Mass., in 1798. A physician by profession. He came to Detroit 
in 1825, and practiced medicine tor nine years, when he engaged in 
the manufacture of lumber at Port Huron, St. Clair, and Detroit, and 
was a pioneer in the lumber business. He died at Detroit in 1854. 
He was Indian agent at Mackinac in 1842-3-4. Was an active mem- 
ber and elder of the First Presbyterian church at Detroit. Politically 
first a Whig, then a Republican. 



HAMPTON RICH, 

Senator in 1S67-9-70, was born in Sharon, Vt., Dec. 1, 1S15. He 
removed with his father, first to St. Lawrence county, N. Y., then to 
Prescott, Canada. He received a common school and academical edu- 
cation and at the age of nineteen had entire charge of a store at 
Kempt ville, Canada. He settled at Ionia, Mich., in 1S37, now his 
home. He was three years a clerk; in mercantile business from 1S4G 
to 1875; was town clerk in 1S38, also justice; county clerk two terms; 
was director and president of the Ionia & Lansing railroad company, 
and active in building the line, and secured the railroad shops at Ionia : 
superintended the erection of the high school building; and was 
active in securing the location of the house of correction, of which he 
is a trustee. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN T. RICH, 

Representative in the legislature from Lapeer county in 1873-4-5-7-9, 
Speaker of the House in 1S77-9, Senator in 1381, and Representative 
in congress from March 11, 1381, to March 4, 1883, was born in Con- 
neaut ville, Pa., April 23, 1341. He received a common school and 
academical education, is a farmer, and in politics a Republican. 
When he was five years of age he removed with his parents to Addi- 



552 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

son county, Vt., and from there to Elba,, Mich., in 1843. He was 
strongly supported for governor in 1880, and was a leading candidate. 
He was defeated as a candidate for a second term to congress. He is 
now commissioner of railroads by appointment of Gov. Luce. 



GABRIEL RICHARD 

Was born at Saintes, France, Oct. 15, 1704, and was a descendant on 
his mother's side of Bishop Bossuet. He received a thorough classi- 
cal and theological education, and in 1791 became a priest of the 
order of Sulpitians. a society devoted to the education of young men 
for the sanctuary. He came to Baltimore in 1792, and accepted the 
charge of the Catholics in Illinois, where he remained six years, com- 
ing to Detroit in 1798 as permanent pastor. Detroit and vicinity then 
contained about 1,800 Catholics, while many families were scattered 
along the lakes and rivers, He at once interested himself zealously 
in the causes of religion and education, and commanded the highest 
respect of both Catholics and Protestants. He was a profound theo- 
logian, a good speaker and mathematician, and a composer of music. 
In 1S04 he opened a school for the education of young men, and an 
academy for ladies in 1805. He brought the first printing press over- 
land from Baltimore, and in August, 1809, issued the first newspaper 
west of the Alleghany mountains, the Impartial Observer. The same 
year he published the first prayer book. Up to 1812 this was the only 
printing establishment in the northwest. In 1812 he was taken 
prisoner and confined at Sandwich, where by his eloquence and influ- 
ence he saved many prisoners from the horrors of Indian torture. 
In 1823 he was elected delegate to congress, over Gen. John R. "Wil- 
liams and Maj. John Biddle, and received a large support from the 
Protestant population. Through his exertions grants were obtained 
for the Fort Gratiot, Pontiac, Grand River, and Chicago roads. He 
was defeated as a candidate in 1825. During the progress of the 
cholera in 1832 he stood at his post giving consolation to the sick and 
dving, until he fell a victim to the disease, September 13, 1832. 



WILLIAM P. RICHARDS, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1859, was born in the state 
of Vermont in 1815. He came to Michigan in 1837, and settled in 
Hillsdale county. By occupation a farmer and lawyer, in politics a 
Republican. In 1S60 he removed to Morenci, and engaged in mer- 
cantile business. Moved to Toledo, Ohio, in 1807, and died in 1882. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 553 

DAVID M. RICHARDSON, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1873-4, was born Jau. 31, 1326, in 
Concord, N. Y. He received his education at the Springville semi- 
nary, N. Y. In 1856 he emigrated to Michigan and settled in Detroit, 
where he now resides. He was a member of the board of education 
in Detroit for two years. He has been extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of matches. 

GEORGE F. RICHARDSON, 

Representative from Ottawa county in 1885, was born in Jamestown, 
same county, in 1850. With a common school education he opened a 
general store in Jamestown Centre, which he carried on until 18S3; 
now has a drug store. Has been a justice repeatedly, and four times 
town clerk. Elected as a Fusionist. 



JOHN H. RICHARDSON, 

Senator from Bay and Tuscola counties in 1883, was born at Ran- 
dolph, Vt, Jan. 24, 1814. He removed to Ipswich, Mass., in 1832, 
and for seven years was overseer for a Boston firm, in the manufac- 
ture of cotton goods; then for eight years was at Palmer, Mass., as 
overseer of the first cambric cotton mill in this country. In 1847 
settled at Tuscola, Mich., and engaged in lumbering and farming. In 
1861 he enlisted, and was a captain in the 7th Michigan infantry: was 
promoted to major in March, 1862, and made lieutenant colonel in 
Feb., 1863. Saw much hard service and resigned from ill health. 
In 1864, as commissioner, took the soldiers' vote in Alabama. Has 
been supervisor fifteen years, and justice eighteen years. In politics 
an Independent. 

ORIGEN D. RICHARDSON 

Was born in the state of Vermont in 179.1. He studied law and was 
admitted to practice in Vermont. He came to Pontiac, Mich., in 
1826, and entered upon practice. He was prosecuting attorney of 
Oakland county in 1832; Representative in 1835-6-41; and lieutenant 
governor in 1842, 1843, 1844 and 1815. He continued in practice 
in Pontiac until 1854. when he removed to Omaha, Nebraska. He 
was a member of the first and second sessions of the legislature of 
that state, and took a prominent part in framing the laws now on 
the statute books. He was one of the three commissioners to codify 
the laws of Nebraska. He died Nov. 29, 1876. In politics a Democrat. 



554 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



PASCHAL RICHARDSON 



Was born in Randolph, "Vr., Dec. 29, 1808. He came to Michigan in 
1842 In politics was a Democrat and by occupation a tanner. 
He was also engaged in lumbering. He was a Representative in 1853 
and 1859. He was also postmaster, and served in other town offices 
during his residence in Michigan for thirty-five years. He died in 
Tuscola, Tuscola county, April 6, 1878. 



CHARLES H. RICHMOND, 

Senator from Washtenaw county in 1883, was born in Aurora, N. Y., 
March G, 1821. He received an academical education, and from 1837 
to 1839 was book-keeper and teller in a bank at Grand Rapids, Mich., 
when he returned to Aurora from ill health. He was fifteen years 
engaged as a farmer and merchant, then chief clerk of the superin- 
tendent and Indian agent of Michigan in 1S48-9. In 1858 removed to 
Ann Arbor, then engaged in banking in New York city, and in 1861 
organized and was the first cashier of the first national bank at Ann 
Arbor, and afterwards vice president. In politics a Democrat. He 
was a delegate in the constitutional convention of 1867, and to the 
democratic national convention at Cincinnati. 



CHARLES L. RICHMOND, 

Representative from Saginaw in 18-15, was born in Woodstown,N. J., 
Feb. 6, 1800. He came to Michigan in 1836. Was a merchant at 
Saginaw City, and in politics first a Whig, then a Republican. Mar- 
ried Amanda M. Sibley, of Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1828. Died in 
Saginaw City, Sept. 6, 1857. 

WILLIAM A. RICHMOND 

Was born at Aurora, N. Y., Jan. 28, 1808. He was brought up on a 
farm, educated at Cayuga academy, was for two years a clerk in 
Geneseo, and in 1828 visited Michigan. He was two years clerk in a 
New York silk house, and two years in business for himself. In 1836 
he settled at Grand Rapids, and with Charles H.Carroll, Lucius Lyon 
and John Almy purchased the " Kent plat." In 1836 he was a mem- 
ber of the first convention of assent; in 1838 was appointed receiver 
of the Ionia land district; in 181-1 and 1815 was Senator; in 1845 be- 
came superintendent of Indian affairs under President Polk; and in 
1S51 was the democratic candidate for lieutenant governor. He was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 555 

twice brigadier general of the state militia, and for several years was 
director of the Michigan Southern railroad. In politics a Democrat, 
in religion an Episcopalian. He was a man of clear intellect and 
sound judgment. Died at Grand Rapids in 1ST0. 



IRA RIDER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1853, was a native of the 
state of New York, born in 1797. He came to Michigan in 1831, and 
settled in Salem, where he died Aug. 17, 1868. Was a farmer by 
occupation, and a Democrat in politics. 



ALMOND B. RIFORD 

Was born in Orange county, Vt., Jan 31, 1839. He removed when 
young to Middlebury, Ind., was in Hillsdale college four years, and 
graduated from the law school at Ann Arbor in I860. He located at 
Benton Harbor, where he was successful in law practice. He was 
Representative in 1S69-70-1-2, and was postmaster at Benton Harbor 
for nearly eight years, until his death, July 10, 1S84. In politics a 
Republican. 



HENRY H. RILEY, 

Senator from St. Joseph county in 1850-1, and 1862, was born at Great 
Barrington, Mass., Sept. 1, 1813, anddiedatConstantine, Mich., Feb. 8, 
1888. He received a common school education, and commenced to learn 
the trade of a printer at the age of seventeen. In 1837 he became the 
editor and publisher of the Seneca Obsen-er at Waterloo, N. Y., where 
he remained five years, and studied law. He came to Kalamazoo in 
1842, and after six months was admitted to the bar, and began prac- 
tice at Constantine, always his home. He was four years prosecuting 
attorney. In 1373 he was one of the commissioners appointed to 
revise the state constitution. In later years he was a trustee of the 
insane asylum at Traverse City. For many years he was a contributor 
to the old Knickerbocker Magazine, and the "Puddleford papers" first 
appeared in that monthly, giving him a national reputation. It was 
published in book form by Derby & Jackson, and has lately been 
republished by Lee & Shepard, of Boston. These papers were strik- 
ing and humorous pictures of pioneer life in Michigan. In politics a 
Democrat. 



OO^J MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



CLAUDE N. RIOPELLE, 



Representative from Detroit in 1869-70. is a descendant of a well 
known French family, of Detroit, his grandfather having come to 
this country with the forces of Lafayette during the revolution. He 
was born in Detroit in 1845, was educated and graduated at Notre 
Dame university, at South Bend, Ind., studied law. and was admitted 
to practice in 1866. He was the first scion of French stock admitted 
to the bar in Detroit, and was the youngest Representative during his 
term. He is still in active law practice in Detroit. Politics demo- 
cratic. 



HYACINTHE F. RIOPELLE, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1883, was born in Wayne 
county, Mich., Aug. S, 1836, and is a member of a pioneer French 
family. He received a common school and commercial college edu- 
cation, and became a teacher. Has been justice since 1863, supervisor 
since 1867, and held other local offices. A farmer, and a Democrat. 
Resides at Ecorce. 



THOMAS C. RIPLEY, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1873-4, was born in the town 
of Easton, N. Y., Jan. 2, 1807. He received his education in a com- 
mon school and commenced the study of law. He completed his 
studies with the late Judge Hurlburt of the state Supreme Court, and 
afterwards entered into partnership with him. He was a Representa- 
tive in congress from the Troy district in 1846-7, to fill a vacancy. 
In 1854 he removed to Michigan and settled in Saginaw, where he 
now resides. His occupation is that of a farmer. 



ORANGE RISDON, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1833. was born at Rupert. 
Vt., Dec. 28, 1786, and died Nov. 28, 1876. When young removed to 
Saratoga county, N. Y., studied surveying, surveyed 100,000 acres of 
land in Genesee and Alleghany counties in 1807, and in 1809 helped lay 
out the cities of Lockport, Brockport and Buffalo, N. Y. He settled 
at Saline, Mich., in 1824. He laid out the state road from Detroit to 
Pontiac in 1825, was chief surveyor of the military road from Detroit 
to Chicago, and from that time until 1856, in the employ of the 
government, surveyed 75 townships in Michigan, ami resurveyed 4-j. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 557 

Ue was postmaster of Saline ten years and justice twelve years. A 
the time of his death he was the oldest living Knight Templar in the 
United States, having taken that degree in 1815. He officiated at 
the laying of the corner stone of the old eaoitol at Detroit in 1823, 
and was present afthe laj ing of the corner stone of the new capitol in 
1873. In politics a Democrat. 

I' OEL RIX 

Was horn at Royalton, Vt.. August 1, 1S04. He came to Romeo in 

1835, and was five years a merchant there; then went to Memphis, 

and built and used a saw and grist mill. He afterwards returned to 

Romeo, thence back to Memphis. He was a Representative iu 1843-4 

and Senator in 184G-7. In politics a Democrat. He built the first 

house in the village of Memphis. Died September 8, 1880. 
i 

RICHARD B. ROBBINS. 

Senator from Lenawee county in 1870, was born at Kingwood. N. J., 
April 27, 1831. He was admitted to the bar of Lenawee county in 
1859. In 1862 he received a commission as second lieutenant, and 
raised a company for the fourth Michigan cavalry. He was grad- 
ually promoted and finally was brevetted lieutenant colonel, U. S. 
volunteers, March 13. 1SG5, " for gallant and meritorious services.'* 
He was mustered out July 20, 1S65. He served three terms as justice 
in Adrian, and one term as mayor. He was chairman of the republi- 
can county committee for four years. He was elected to the House 
of Representatives lor 1^75 and 1^77. In politics a Republican. Has 
served several years as consul in Canada. 

ELIJAH J. ROBERTS, 

Representative from Keweenaw county in 1^50. and Senator in 1851, 
was by profession a lawyer, and was in earlier life in professional 
practice at Detroit. He was master in chancery in 1S39; justice in 
1835-G: publisher of the Craftsman in 1838: merged it in the Morning 
Post and Craftsman in 1839 and 1S40; school inspector, 1812: and 
adjutant general of Michigan, 1842 to 1844. He went to the upper 
peninsula in ls47. Died April 2G, 1851. 

JOHX ROBERTS, 

Senator in 1^57-^. was bom in Warwick, Backs county. Pa., March 
17, 1812. He came to Jonesville in 1810, and located at Hastings in 
(Jl 



00b MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

184"). Bv profession a physician and surgeon, in politics, first Whig. 
then a Republican. lie was postmaster of Hastings from 1817 to 
1851, aud again from 1SGD to 1876. He was appointed examining 
surgeon for Barry county at the close of the war, and held it until 
his death, December 18, 18S6. 



ALEXANDER ROBERTSON, 

Representative from Cass county in 1873-4, was born March 3, 1826, 
in Argyle. N. Y. In 1835 he removed to Spafford, N. Y. He received 
a high school education. In 1854 he removed to Michigan, and 
settled in Pokagon, Cass county, where he still resides. He has 
served in several offices of trust in his town and county. By occupa- 
tion a farmer. 



ANDREW S. ROBERTSON, 

Senator from Macomb county in 1863, was born in Brumley. England, 
August 12, 1822, and was educated at the University of Glasgow. 
He came with his parents to this country in 1S36, who settle 1 at 
White Lake, Michigan. The son became a teacher in Oakland and 
Macomb counties, studied law, was admitted in 1846, and commenced 
practice at Mt. Clemens. He was a delegate in the constitutional 
convention of 1850. Died while Senator in 1863, and a fitting eulogy 
wa^ delivered by Gov. Croswell. then a Senator, December 20. 1S64. 
In politics a Democrat. 

GEORGE ROBERTSON, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1879-81-2, was born in Dry - 
den. N. Y., March 20, 1826. He came to Albion. Mich., with his 
parents in 1^37, and was educated in public schools and Albion si n - 
nary. Since 1800. has been a fanner at South Albion. A Democrat 
until 1872, since a Republican. 



ELISHA S. ROBINSON, 

Delegate in the constitutional convention of 1850, was born in Sara- 
toga county, N. Y., March 2. 1801. He received a limited ed 
and learned the trade of a tanner, which he followed, combined with 
harness and shoe making, for years. Settled as a farmer in Water- 
loo, Mich., in 1^13. He was a supervisor for seventeen year.-. 
twelve years, and he! 1 other ufti :es. In politics a Democrat. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 559 

GEORGE J. ROBINSON, 

Representative from Alpena and other counties in 1883, was born in 
Detroit, Mich.. February 3, 1838, and was educated in the public 
schools. He has been engaged in mechanical, commercial and spec- 
ulative pursuits; and was a commissary clerk during Sherman's 
march to the sea. He was a Republican until 1876, now a Democrat. 
Residence, Alpena. 

GEORGE P. ROBINSON, 

Representative from Branch county in 1875, was horn June 7, 1827. 
at Swanton, Vt. Received a common school education and removed 
to Noble, Michigan, in 1863. He has held the office of supervisor, 
and is by occupation a farmer. In politics a Republican. 

JAMES W. ROBINSON, 

Representative from Montcalm county in 1887, was born near Port 
Huron, Mich., Sept. 11. 1854. He attended public schools, and at the 
age of twenty-one was clerk of Jonesfield, Saginaw county. He has 
been supervisor, and superintendent of schools, and later became a 
merchant and shingle manufacturer at Vestaburg, and has been 
supervisor there four terms. In politics a Fusionist. 



RIX ROBINSON, 

Senator from Kent and attached counties in 1810-7-8-9, was born in 
Cayuga county, N. Y.. in 1702, and died in 1875. He became an 
Indian trader in the Grand river valley in 1821, and was the first 
white settler in Kent county. He established several trading posts, 
the central one at Ada. where he died. When lands were opened for 
settlement he became a farmer. In 1887 a monument was erected to 
his memory in Ada. He was supervisor: associate judge; delegate 
in the constitutional convention of 1850; and commissioner of in- 
ternal improvements in 1846. In politics a Democrat. 



ROBERT ROBINSON. 

Representative in 1887 from Muskegon county, was horn in Sc ttland, 
May 7, 1830. He came to this st ite in 1810, and was several years 
an employe in the lumber business in Saginaw county. Then until 
1857 was a sawyer and log-sealer at Muskegon. Ua~~ h >en super \ isor, 
justice, and held other local offices. In politics a Republican. 



5G0 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

SOLON E. ROBINSON, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1873-4, was born in Claren- 
don, N. Y., Aug. 17, 1820. He received a common school education. 
In 1842 he emigrated to Tekonsha, Calhoun county. In 1S5I he re- 
moved to Battle Creek, and in 18G7 to Eckford, where he now resides. 
He has been honored with several official positions in his town and 
county. His occupation is that of a farmer. 



WALTER ROBINSON 

Was born in Maeedon, N. Y., Dec. 17, 1818. He worked on the farm 
until fourteen years of age, then was clerk in a store for four years, 
and clerk in the Erie canal collector's office for five years. He came 
to Adrian in 1840, was engaged in livery and staging for eight years, 
and then was a merchant for four years. Since that time he has been 
farming. He was deputy provost marshal during the war, and for 
,one year deputy revenue collector. In 1867 lie was a Representative. 
Politically a Republican. 

ANDREW ROBISON 

Was born in Phelps, N. Y., Nov. IS, 1800. He was apprenticed to the 
tanner's trade at Palmyra. N. Y. In 1822 he was married to Gertrude 
Hoag. Came to Michigan in 1841 and purchased a farm in Sharon, 
Washtenaw county. He filled various offices of public trust: was 
Representative in 1859; for several years justice and supervisor: and 
was appointed in 1864 one of the receivers of soldi€-rs" votes in the 
south. He was a man of pronounced views on all leading subjects. 
In politics he was a Democrat until 1854. He assisted in the forma- 
tion of the republican party, of which he remained a member to 
the close of his life. Died Jan. 27. 187'J. 



JOHN J. ROBISON, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1879, was born in Phelps. 
N. Y., Aug. i:j. 1824. He received a common school education, re- 
moving to Michigan in l^bJ, settling in Sharon. Occupation, a far- 
mer. He served as State Senator in 1m>3-4; was county clerk in 
18G8, and again in 1870; delegate to the democratic national conven- 
tion in 1 Q 72; supervisor several terms. He has twice been nominated 
for congress in the second district. Politics, democratic. Now 
countv clerk of Washtenaw county. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 561 

CHANDLER H. ROCK WOOD 

Was born in York, N. Y., May 17. 1825, He received an academical 
education, worked on a farm, and for two years at making fanning 
mills. He settled in Flint in 1S18, and engaged in the manufacture 
of fanning mills. He purchased a farm, and since 1856 has lived in 
the town of Genesee. He was supervisor thirteen years; a Repre- 
sentative from Genesee county in 1S'57; was assistant assessor of 
internal revenue for Genesee, Shiawassee and Clinton counties from 
1871 t'> 1ST3; deputy collector for eighteen months; and county 
treasurer from 1S80 to 1885. In polities a Republican. 

JEREMIAH M. ROGERS, 

Representative from Barry county in 1887, was born in Hector. N. 
Y., March IT, 1832. He came to Michigan with his parents in 1836, 
settling at Carlton, Barry county, where he has since resided, with 
the exception of three years in Nebraska. He has been engaged in 
farming and stock buying principally, and three years ago began, 
in addition, buying grain and farm products and selling agricultural 
implements at Hastings. In politics a Republican. 

JAMES W. ROMEYN. 

Representative in 1SG9-70, and Senator in 1^7 1-2 and 1883, was born 
in Detroit in 1S39. He graduated at Columbia college, N. Y., in 
1858, studied law, and was admitted to practice in 1860. He was 
senior aid of the staff of the general commanding the 1st division, 
9th army corps, with a commission in the 4th Michigan infantry. 
He also held in this state the rank of major and colonel. In politics 
a Democrat. Now consul in Chili. 

HORACE D. ROOD. 
Representative from Lapeer county in 1871-2. was born in Barre. Vt.. 
Dec. 13, 1819. He settled as a farmer in Lapeer county. Michigan, in 
1836. He was treasurer of the town-hip of Lapeer as far back as ! 842. 
has been suj ervisor of Lapeer and of Mayfield, road commissioner, 
and a superintendent of the county poor for twenty years. In politic s. 
a Democrat. 

ALBERT K. ROOF, 
Senator from Clinton and Ionia counties in 1887, was horn at Lyons. 
Michigan. April 6, 1841. By profession, an attorney at law. He is a 



562 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

graduate of the law department of the State University, at Ann 
Arbor. He has held the office of township treasurer, justice, register 
of deeds, was chairman of the board of supervisors in 187S and 1S86, 
and Representative in the legislature in 1871-2. He was elected on 
the fusion ticket by a vote of 0,763 to 6.688 for Alfred H. Smith, re- 
publican, and 93") for James S. Osgood, prohibitionist. 

ADAM L. ROOF, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1845-9-50, and Senator in 1852, 
was born at Canajoharie, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1810. He graduated at 
Hamilton college, in 1832, was admitted to the bar in 1830, and settled in 
practice at Lyons, Mich. , in 1836. He held the offices of register of deeds, 
prosecuting attorney, and judge of probate. In 1859 he retired from 
practice and devoted himself to farming. He was the first lawyer in 
Ionia county. In politics a Democrat. Education, temperance, 
morality and religion received his support, and he was a strong man 
in the early days of the Grand River Valley. Died Jan. 26, 1885. 

JOHN ROOST 

Was born Oct. 9, 1823, in Harderwyk, Netherlands. He emigrated 
to this country in 1847, locating in Ottawa county, then a part of 
Kent. He followed his trade as a wagon-maker. He removed to 
Holland in 1854, and was supervisor in 1S58-59-60. The >; Holland 
colony " in 1859 appointed Mr. Roost financial agent to negotiate a 
loan of $30,000 to open a harbor, connecting Black river and Lake 
Michigan, which he accomplished in the east. Gerrit Smith being the 
first one to invest in the bonds. Soon after he secured 1 1.000 acres of 
swamp land from the state for the same purpose. In 1860 he estab- 
lished "De Grondicet" a Holland republican paper, which had great 
influence in politics. In 1861 he became postmaster, and in 1862 U. 
S. enrolling officer and assistant assessor. In 1871-2 he was a Repre- 
sentative, and in 1883 a Senator. A Republican until 1676, then a 
Democrat. Died May 31, 1S85. 

AMOS ROOT 

Was born at Fort Ann, N. Y., April 8, 1816. With a common school 
education, at the age of sixteen, he became a clerk at Mohawk. N. V.. 
where he remained six years. He came to Michigan in LS38, and 
commenced business at Michigan Center. In l s ll removed t" Jack- 
son, which has since been his home. For sixteen years was a mer- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 5bo* 

chant, when he sold out and operated in lands and city property. 
He also did much hard work to make Jackson a prominent railroad 
center. He was efficient in budding the branch of the Michigan 
Southern from Jackson to Adrian. He was also one of the main sup- 
porters of the Grand River Valley road, from Jackson to Grand Rapids, 
and was president of the company for many years. He was Repre- 
sentative in 1853; for many years a trustee of the village, alderman of 
the city of Jackson; mayor in 1860, postmaster from 1 S G1 to 18(15, 
member and president of the board of public works, and nine years 
inspector of the state prison. First a Whig, from 18-48 to 1854 a Free 
Soiler, since a Republican. 



ROLAND ROOT, 

Representative from Branch county in 1830-51, was born in Onondaga 
county, N.Y., Dec. 23, 1813. He received a district school education, 
taught school, and at the age of eighteen became clerk in a store at 
Norwalk, Ohio. His employer. Judge Baker, sent him to examine 
property he had purchased in Branch county. He reported favorably, 
and was entrusted with $1,600 worth of goods and opened a store in 
1835 at Coldwater. He was for a long time the leading merchant of 
Branch county. He also built and operated a large flouring mill. In 
1861 he enlisted in the celebrated Loomis battery, and became first 
lieutenant in October, 1861, but was obliged to resign from ill health 
in 1802. Married Harriet Chapin in 1837, and his wife and eight chil- 
dren survive him. Died Aus. 11, 1885. 



ROSWELL ROOT, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1^11. was born in New Hamp- 
shire in 17 S U, and settled in the township of Plymouth in 1825, locat- 
ing land upon which he lived until his death in 187:). He was justice 
from 1826 to J842, and postmaster of Borodino postoffice 1820 to 180", 
when the office was discontinued. Was also supervisor for several 
terms. He was Whig and Republican in politics. 



WILLIAM W. ROOT, 

Representative from Ingham county in ISS1-2, was born in Cato, X. 
Y., June 28, 1837. He received a common school and academical 
education. He studied medicine, graduated a.s a physician from the 
Michigan University in 1802, became assistant surgeon of the 75th N'. 



564 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Y. volunteers, afterwards surgeon, served until the close of the war. 
and was executive officer of the 19th army corps hospital during 
Sheridan's campaign in the Shenandoah valley. Afterwards attended 
and received a degree at Bellevue hospital college. Settled in prac- 
tice at Mason. Mich., in 1SGG, and has held several terms as super- 
visor, served many years on the hoard of education, and been four 
years president of the county agricultural society. In politics a 
Republican, now a Prohibitionist. 



ASA D. RORK, 

Representative from Barry county in 1STT. was born Feb. 29, 1S32. at 
Sheridan, N. Y. His parents removing to Wisconsin in 1841, he 
resided in that state until 1S43, in which year they came to Rutland. 
Mich., where he has since continued to reside. He received a com- 
mon school education, taught school several terms, and entered the 
state normal school in 1854, but on account of the death of his father 
left school to take charge of his business. He has held various county 
and township offices, including that of supervisor for five terms, 
county surveyor four years, and county treasurer four years. His 
occupation is farming, in politics a Republican. 



DAVID G. ROSE, 

Senator from Washtenaw county in 1881-2, was born in Sharon 
Conn., Jan. 24, 1826. His parents removed to Sharon in 1833, when 
he stili resides. He received a common school education. Has hel< 
several township offices— school inspector, justice of the peace, ant 
supervisor. He is a Democrat. 



ELIAS O. ROSE. 

"Representative from Mecosta and other counties in 1S73-4, was born 
at Independence, O.. Oct. 13, 1838, and was educated at Hillsdale 
college. He studied law and was admitted in 1839. Lived at Steul en, 
Ind., two years, then enlisted in the 44th Indiana, became a lieuten- 
ant, in 1862 was wounded and resigned. He removed to Bier Rapids 
in 1863; was prosecuting attorney four years, and was a supervisor 
and chairman of the hoard four years. He started the Big Rapids 
Independent in 1870, afterwards the Muyiut. In politics a Repub- 
lican. 



3IICIIIGA>' BIOGRAPHY. 5G5 



JOHN ROBERTSON, 



Adjutant General of Michigan from March 14, 1861, until his death at 
Detroit, March 10, 1887, was born at Banffshire, Scotland, Jan. 2. 
1814; was well educated: became a clerk in the Edinburgh postoffice; 
came to this country in 1833; enlisted in the army and served 
until 1S40: went into business at Detroit; and was appointed a lieuten- 
ant of state troop's in 1855. To his zeal and energy is due the history 
of the '-Flags of Michigan," the -'Roll of Honor," deposited in the 
state library, "Michigan in the "War," and other works. To his eiri- 
ciency and zeal the state of Michigan is greatly indebted, especially 
from 1SG1 to 1865. 

WILLIAM H. ROSE, 

Representative from Clinton county in 1881-2-3, was born in Clinton 
■county, Mich, July 24, 1S44. He received a business education, and 
when eighteen years of age, entered the union army. He com- 
menced active business as an agriculturist^ in connection with lum- 
bering and real estate transactions, in which business he has been 
successful. He has held various official positions of his township. 
He is still owning and residing on the farm where he was born, 
which was located by his father in 1836. In politics a Republican. 



GILES ROSS, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1871-2-7, was born in 
Dover, N. Y., March 23, 1816. Bis education was acquired in dis- 
trict schools. In 1826 he removed to Cayuga county, N. Y., where 
in 184G he was a justice. He was appointed collector of canal tolls at 
Montezuma. N. Y., for two terms. In 18G2 he removed to Hartland, 
Mich, hi 1863 he was elected supervisor. He is a fanner by occu- 
pation. In politics a Democrat. . 



JOHN D. ROSS. 

Representative from Berrien county in 1854, came from Indiana in 
1834, and settled on the present site of Buchanan, Mich., where he 
resided until his death in 188S. He was for many years a merchant, 
and in 1 S G4 became a banker. He was president of the village of 
Buchanan in 1859, 1861-2-3, and 1S79, alsoa member of the common 
council, and was a prominent citizen. In politics a Democrat. He 
was the first postmaster from 1848 to 1852. 
62 



5G6 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

FRANK G. KOUNSVILLE, 

Representative from Livingston county in 18ST, %vas born in Unadilla, 
Livingston county, Feb IS, IS is, has been a resident of Michigan all 
his life, except during the years from 1854 to 1863. By occupation 
he is a farmer and grain dealer. Mr. Rounsville has filled the offices 
of clerk three years, trustee two years of the village of Fowlerville. 
president four years, and supervisor of township two years. In 
politics a Republican. 

SAMUEL H. ROW 

Was born in Sharon, Mich., March 10, 18 -10. The first twenty years 
of his life were spent on his father's farm. At the age of twenty-one 
he was elected school inspector. In August, 1862, he left the Ypsi- 
lanti union seminary, and enlisted in company " B," twentieth 
Michigan infantry, and rose from the ranks to first lieutenant. Hav- 
ing resigned his commission in 1803, he removed to Lansing in 1S64, 
and accepted a clerkship in the state department. In April, 1807, he 
was appointed deputy secretary of state, which position he held until 
April, 1871, when he resigned to accept the position of commissioner 
of insurance. To that position he was re-appointed by Governors 
Barley, Croswell and Jerome. Since his residence in Lansing he has 
served as president of the young men's society, for three years as a 
member of the city board of education, and as alderman. Is now in 
the insurance business. 



SQUIRE W. ROWE, 

Representative fn.>m Oakland county in 1803, was born at Camillus. 
N. Y., June 1, 1815. He settled as a farmer in Highland, Mich., in 
1835, locating twenty-five miles from a grist mill or postoffice. He 
was many years supervisor, and raised a company for the 13th Michi- 
gan, but ill health prevented active service. Died Nov. 19, 180'!. 



DAVID H. ROWLAND, 

Born in Fairfield county, Conn., May 10, 1798, came to Michigan in 
the fall of 1833; was. by occupation a merchant, and in politic- a 
Democrat. He was for a time a teacher, also a localMetln disl 
copal minister, and a man of strict integrity. He was Representa- 
tive in 1843-4. Died June 11. 1800. 



MIClllliAX hlUGKAPin. 5(j' 



THOMAS ROWLAND, 



Secretary of State, 1S40 to 1842, was a native of Ohio, and served as 
a major of infantry under General Hull in 1813-14. He was secre- 
tary of the territory; United States marshal for the Detroit district: 
postmaster of Detroit under President Harrison, 1843 to 1845; and sec- 
retary of state under Governor Woodbridge. He was a man of cul- 
ture and highly esteemed. A paper of his on "Hull's Campaign," 
read before the Detroit Lyceum in 1819, has been quoted with com- 
mendation. He was secretary of the corporation of Detroit from 18 13 
to 1820, and his private seal was made the seal of the corporation; 
was clerk of the county court from 1815 to 1820; United States pen- 
sion agent, 1824 to 1S31; probate judge of Wayne county, 1833-4: 
editor of the Detroit Journal from 1832 to 1834; vice president of the 
Michigan historical society, and held many other positions. He was 
a leading citizen of the territory and state for more than half a cen- 
tury. Died at Detroit in 1848. 



HARVEY B. ROWLSON, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1809, was born at Duanes- 
burg, X. Y., July 15, 1825. He received a common school education, 
and in 1843 spent several months in the printing office of the Adrian 
Neics, which in l s 44 was removed to Hillsdale, and became the Hills- 
dale Gazette. In 1846, with S. D. Clark, started the Hillsdale II hig- 
Stanclard, and in 1851 became sole proprietor, and has been editor 
and proprietor ever since, the paper now being the Hillsdale Standard. 
He has been eight years county treasurer, was collector of internal 
revenue for first district in 18G9 to 1873. and of third* district l v 73 to 
1683, and in 1885 was appointed member of the board of control of the 
state reform school for six years. Politically a Whig until 1804, since 
a Republican. 

JOHN V. RUEHLE 

Was born at Langensteinbach, Baden, Germany, Sept 4, 1812. He 
attended school until It. then learned the trade of a baker. He emi- 
grated with his parents to Detroit in 1832. He was captain of the 
Scott guards of Detroit from 1841 to 1S4G; Representative in 1S44; 
alderman of the 6th ward, Detroit, in 1840and 1811: water commis- 
sioner 1859 to 1861; greenback nominee for congress in 1876; boulevard 
commissioner of Hamtramck in 1880. In 1847 Michigan furnished a 
regiment of volunteers for the war with Mexico, which w 
under Colonel Stockton. A. S. Williams was lieut. col.; J. V. Ruehle, 



568 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

major; and J. E. Pittman, adjutant. Theregiraent was mustered out 
in 1858, having seen little service before the close of the war. In 1$(J1 
he became lieut. colonel of the 10th Michigan infantry, but after 
eight months' service resigned and was honorably discharged. In 
politics a Democrat. 

JOHN' G. RUM II ELL. 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1883, was born in Bavaria. 
Germany, April 13, 1843, and came to this country with his parents 
in 1851. when they settled in Frankenmuth, Mich. He received a 
common school education, and has since resided there, except two 
years in Illinois, working at his trade as carpenter. He has been 
engaged in farming for many years. He has held the office of justice 
Seven years, and the office of school inspector three terms, and has 
been secretary of the German relief society for ten years. In politics 
a Democrat. 

MARSHALL E. RUMSEY. 

Representative from the second district of Ingham county, was born 
in Bethany, X. Y., Jan 17, 1840. He received his education at the 
academy in Bethany Center, and at the high school in Geneseo, Liv- 
ingston county, N. Y. ; worked at farming during the summers and 
taught school winters, from 183? to 1SG2. In 1862 he removed to 
Illinois, doing business in Chicago most of the time until 1S67, when 
he came to Leslie, Michigan, where he has engaged in farming, lum- 
bering, real estate business, and banking; was for several year- a 
member of the village council and twelve years member of the sell ! 
board ; was elected president of the first national bank of Leslie in 
August. 1883. which position he now holds. He was elected Repre- 
sentative from the second district of Ingham county, on the repul li- 
can ticket, for 18S5-6, and re-elected in 1886 to the same position for 
1887-8. He received 2,111 votes to James II. Shafer 2,009, and 386 for 
R. II. Davis, prohibitionist. During both sessions he was chairman 
of the committee of wavs and means. 



HIRAM D. RUNYAN 

Was born in New Jersey, October 10, 1827. He came with his fatlu r 
to Michigan in 1S34, who settled on a farm near Utica, but soon s< I I 
out, and removing to Utica, engaged in brick making. On tin 
of his wife hi^ children were placed among strangers, and the sub . 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 5G9 

of this sketch went to live with a farmer in Disco, with whom he 
remained until he was twenty-three. He has followed farming as an 
occupation. He was Representative in 1871-2, and has held several 
positions of trust. 

PHILIP E. RUNYAN, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1844, was born in the state 
of New Jersey, July 14, 1199. By occupation a farmer, in politics a 
Democrat. He removed from the state of New York to White Pigeon. 
in 1835. Was supervisor and town clerk of White Pigeon. Died 
June 24, 1S45. 

FREDERICK J. RUSSELL 

Was born at Orion, Mich., October 7, 1811, and removed to Oceana 
county with his parents in 1857. Was educated at common schools, 
with two terms at the Normal school. He was admitted to the bar in 
1SG6, and commenced practice. He has served both as United States 
and circuit court commissioner, was nine years judge of probate, and 
has been judge of the 14th circuit since 1881. Is also interested in 
stock raising, agriculture and banking. 



HENRY C. RUSSELL, 

Senator from Kent county in 1881-2, was born in Plainfield, Mich., in 
1842. He received a common school education, resided in Grand 
Rapids several years, became a merchant in 1864 at Cedar Springs, 
and afterwards a druggist. Has also been extensively engaged in 
lumbering in Lake county, and in banking and farming. Has been 
a supervisor, town treasurer and president of the village. 

JAMES I. RUSSELL, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1848, was a farmer and a 
Democrat. He held many offices of trust in the town of Summerlield. 
Monroe county. 

JOSlAH RUSSELL, 

Senator from Montcalm and other counties in l s "i:j, was born in 
Neary, Maine. April 25, 1SC4. He settled in Oakland county, Mich.. 
in 1S35, removed to Ionia county in 1842, and in 1845 to Greenville, 



570 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

where he was elected county judge, aud opened the first court of 
record in Montcalm county. He became a resident of Oceana countv 
in 1859, and was probate judge, county surveyor, and several times 
supervisor. Died at Hart, Mich., April 25, 1*74. 



DAVID SACKETT, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1850, was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and a Democrat in politics, born in Steuben county, N. Y., in 
1817. He came to Michigan in 1831, settling in Redford. where he 
died July "2. 1SS0. He was supervisor 1852-56, county auditor 1857-60, 
and county drain commissioner in I860. Also held the office of 
justice and other local positions. 



GEORGE W. SACKRIDER, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1877, was born near Grass 
Lake, Mich., September 8. 1842. and received a liberal education at the 
district and union school of that township. In 1867 he removed to 
Mason, and engaged in the furniture and lumber trade, and held the 
offices of township clerk and under-sheriff. He removed to Oakley. 
Saginaw county. September. 1871. and engaged in lumbering, farm- 
ing and general merchandising. He has held the office of supervisor 
of Brady. In politics a Democrat. 



NATHAN SALTER 

Was born in Hopewell, N. J., March 15. 1S04. In 1S32 lie removed to 
Romulus, N. Y., and was there engaged in various pursuits, among 
them farming and carriage making, lie also held various public 
offices. He married in 1837, and in 1839 removed to Northfield, 
Mich., where lie engaged in farming. He was supervisor in 1- 16 and 
1817, and a Representative in 1849. In politics a Whig. 



CUMMING3 SANBORN, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1842, was horn at North 
Haverhill, N. H.. January 15, 1799. In politics a Democrat, in busi- 
ness a lumberman. He came to Michigan as early as 1835, and was 
a prominent business man. Was postmaster of Pore Huron in 1840. 

Died September 17. 1S52. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 571 



JAMES W. SANBORN 



Was born at Falmouth, Maine, in April, 1813. He was the son of a 
physician, one of eleven children. He was in early life a sailor and 
often crossed the Atlantic. He left the sea at the age of twenty-one, 
and came to Port Huron in 1835, in company with Abne-r Coburn, 
since governor of Maine: Charles Merrill, late of Detroit; and Joseph 
L. Kelsey. Together they located 25,000 acres of land in St. Clair 
and Sanilac counties, and Mr. Sanborn, at the age of twenty-two, was 
left in charge of the purchase. In 1836 he established himself at 
Metamora, Lapeer county. In 1840 and 1846 he was Representative in 
the legislature from Lapeer county, and in 1855 from St. Clair county. 
In 1847 he engaged in the dry goods and lumber business at Port 
Huron, with Alvah Sweetzer, the partnership being dissolved by the 
death of the latter in 1864. He had large lumber interests on the 
Muskegon and its tributaries, the Au Sable. Thunder Bay river, Pine 
river, on the Cheboygan, and in the upper peninsula. He also 
owned real estate and personal property in Port Huron and Fort 
Gratiot. In 1858 he was elected commissioner of the state land office 
and held the office for two terms. He was first a Whig, and was one 
of the founders of the republican party at Jackson, in 1834. He died 
at Port Huron several vears since. 



WILLIAM SANBORN, 

Senator from St. Clair county in 1SG7, was born in Belgrade. Maine, 
November 2, 1S34, and died at San Diego. California. June 23, 1S76. 
By occupation a lumberman, in politics a Republican, He was 
deputy commissioner of the state land office from 1859 to 1861. He 
was commissioned major of the 2'2<\ Michigan infantry. August 8. 
180:?; lieutenant colonel. January 5, 1863; wounded in action at Chick- 
amauga. Tenn.. September 20, 1S63. Discharged for disability June 
7,1804. Brevet colonel U. S. volunteers, March 13, 1865, ''for con- 
spicuous gallantry at the battle of Chickamauga, Tenn." Brevet 
brigadier general U. S. volunteers. March 13, l v ''"». " for conspicuous 
gallantry and meritorious services during the war." His residence 
was at Port Huron for many vears. 



RUDOLPH US SANDERS* >N 

Was born in Milton, Chittenden county, Vt.. May 30, 181S. He was 

brought up on a farm and received a common school education. He 

was first a clerk then a merchant in Milton, Yt., and served two 



5?V5 , MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

terms in 1849 and 1830 in the Vermont legislature. On comin" to 
Michigan he purchased a farm in Newton, Calhoun counts- . where 
he resided twenty-one years, afterwards moving to Battle Creek. He 
was supervisor of Newton for nine years, also alderman of Battle 
Creek. He was a Representative in T.-J65, also in 18734. At first a 
"Whig, since 1854 a Republican. 



GEORGE P. SANFORD, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1809-70, was k .born at Byron, 
N. Y., July 0. 1835, and came with his parents to Saline, Mich., in 
1837. He worked at farming, learned the trade of a carpenter, and 
taught school. Graduated at the Normal in 1836, and from the Uni- 
versity in 1861. The same year entered the service as captain in the 
1st Mich, infantry, resigning from illhealth in 1862. In 1864 became 
paymaster, with rank of major. Resigned in 1860 and was brevetted 
lieutenant colonel. Since resided at Lansing. Was a Republican 
until 1872, since a Democrat. Owned au I edited the Lansing Journal 
from 1872 to 18S3; four years member of board of education and one 
year president; democratic candidate for regent ia 1S79, and for 
auditor general in 1884; postmaster, membsr democratic state com- 
mittee, president state press association, and of the alumni of the 
State University. 

HARRY SAUNDERS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1839-44, was born at White- 
hall, N. Y., in 1802. He removed to Michigan with his family in 
1832, locating in Monguagon, where he continued to resile until his 
death in 1872. He filled the office of supervisor for several terms, 
and was county auditor, 1S49-52. He was a prominent officer of 
militia in New York before coming to Michigan, and in Michigan 
began with a captaincy, and was advanced by promotions to the rank 
of brigadier general. A farmer by occupation, a Democrat in poli- 
tics. 

ANDREW J. SAWYER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1877-79, was born in Caro- 
line, N. Y. , Nov. 18,1331 He received an academical education, 
engaged in teaching from the age of eighteen to twenty-five. He 
removed to Michigan in 1857: was admitted to the bar in :-■''. a: i 
lias devoted himself exclusively to the practice of his profession. He 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 573 

has held various township offices. In politics a Republican. Now in 
practice at Ann Arbor. 

FRANKLIN SAWYER, Jr., 
A graduate of Harvard University, came to Michigan about 1830, 
and studied law with Gen. Charles Lamed. He was for a short time 
a law partner of Hon. Jacob M. Howard. He practiced but a few 
years. He was an editor of the Detroit Courier, and afterwards an 
editor and one of the proprietors of the Detroit Daily Advertiser. 
He was one of the founders of the Detroit young men's society, and 
its first president. He had literary taste and was a brilliant, forcible ' 
writer, and withal a man of public spirit. He was appointed by Gov. 
Gordon superintendent of public instruction, and held the office from 
April S, 1841, to May S, 1843. He gave his whole energy to the work, 
with important results to education. S<jon after leaving office he 
went to New Orleans ami was there several years superintendent of 
public instruction. He finally went back to his old home in Massa- 
chusetts, and died many years since. 

JACOB C. SAWYER, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1877, was born Dec. 26, 1822, 
in Manchester, N. Y. ; removed to Ashtabula county, Ohio; was 
admitted to practice law in that state in 1848; removed to Lenawee 
county, this state, in 1853, and engaged in farming in the township 
of Medina; is a graduate of the law department of the University of 
Michigan of the class of 1861; was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1867. 

PETER SCHARS 

Was born in Germany, October 21, 1812. Occupation a farmer. He 
came to Michigan in 1853 and resides at New Baltimore, Macomb 
county. In politics a Republican. He was a Representative in 
1865-7. 

CASPER F. SCHATTLER, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1875, was born in Germany 
in 1838, and received an academical education. He removed to Mich- 
igan in 1848, and settled in Wayne county. He has held the office of 
justice, and other positions of trust. He is a farmer. In politics a 
Democrat. 

G3 



5H MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

BARTHOL. W. SCHERMERHORN 

Was born in Schenectady, N. Y., Dec. 7, 1S23. He came to Michigan 
in 1851, lived at Niles one year, removed to Cass county, and now 
resides at Dowagiac. He followed at first the occupation of a farmer, 
and held many official positions. He was alderman of his native 
town, twelve years supervisor, justice sixteen years, two years presi- 
dent of Dowagiac, sheriff of Cass county, and Representative in 1857. 
In politics a Democrat. 

HENRY R. SCHOOLCRAFT 

"Was born in Albany. N. Y., March 28, 1793, and was educated at 
Middlebury college. In 1817 he visited the west and published "A 
view of the lead mines of Missouri." In 1820 was geologist of the 
exploring expedition, under Gen. Cass, to Lake Superior and the 
head of the Mississippi, and published a report in 1821, and the next 
year made a second tour and published his travels in the Mississippi 
valley. In 1822 was appointed Indian agent for the northwest; from 
1S28 to 1S32 was a member of the Michigan territorial council; in 1822 
founded the Michigan historical society at Detroit; and in 1831 the 
Algic society. In 1832 discovered the source of the Mississippi; in 1834 
made an Indian treaty thatsecured 16.000,000 acres. In 1841 removed 
to New York city and published valuable works for the state of New 
York, and for the general government, his various works numbering 
thirty-one. He was also a tine poet. He died at Washington, Dec. 
10, 1804. 

JOHN E. SCHWARZ 

Was born in Yienna, Austria, in 1790. He received a finished scien- 
tific education, part of which was military. His first years in America 
were spent in Philadelphia. He came to Michigan in 1828. having 
business connections with John Jacob Astor in the northwestern fur 
trade, which took him to the distributing points for that trade, and 
familiarized him with the language and customs of the Indians. He 
held the office of adjutant general of the territorial militia in 1831, 
and the same office under the state government 18-0-9, and 1814 to 
1855. (Jen. Schwarz's chief civil positions were as a member of the 
"second convention of assent" in 1836, Representative in l v tk and 
Senator in 1847-8. In 1852 he purchased a considerable tract of land 
and platted what is now the village of Sehwarzburg, in Wayne county, 
where he built a family residence, which continued the home of t 
family until the death of Mrs. Schwarz, in 1870. During his later 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 575 

years. Gen. Schwarz lived the life of a retired farmer until his death 
in February, 1S58. He was buried at Detroit with marked civic and 
military honors. In politics, democrstic. 



JOHN SCOTT, 

Representative from Detroit, session 1842, was born in Peterboro, N. 
H., in 1798, and came to Detroit in 1829. He was a mason and 
builder, and built the old city hall and market in Detroit in 1834. He 
subsequently became a wholesale grocer. He held at various times 
the local offices of city assessor, city marshal, and alderman. Was a 
Democrat in politics. Died in 1846. 



SAMUEL M. SCOTT, 

Representative from Clinton county in 184G-S-50, was born at Stod- 
dard. N. H., June 29, 1814. He was a resident of Keene, N.Y., from 
1815 to 1838, then coming to Michigan. He settled in the town of 
Essex, Clinton county, in 1841, and died in 1850. He held the offices 
of sheriff, county clerk, and register of deeds. He was also in early 
life a teacher, both in New York and this state. 



WINFIELD SCOTT. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1873-4, was born September 
22, 1819, in the town of Ovid, N. Y. He was educated at the Ovid 
academy. In 1842 he emigrated to Michigan and settled in Fairfield, 
Lenawee county. In 1845 he removed to the village of Plymouth, 
where he now resides. He was supervisor, and held other responsible 
offices. By occupation a farmer. 



GEORGE SEDGWICK 

Was born in Great Barrington, Mass., and came to Ann Arbor, as a 
lawyer, about 1835. He was judge of probate of Washtenaw county 
from 1840 to 1844. and was a Representative in 1850. He was a 
brainy lawyer, active and industrious, and as a man stood high in 
the estimation of his fellow citizens. He was the head of the law- 
firm of Sedgwick. Gott & Walker. He went to Chicago early in the 
sixties and became a leading lawyer there. He was a Whig in poli- 
tics. He died in Chicago. 



576 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



ELIJAH B. SEELEY, 



Born in 1795, came from Warren, N. Y., in 1835. and settled on a 
farm in Pittsford, Hillsdale county. He was frequently called upon 
to fill town offices. He was the first supervisor in 1836, 1837 an i 

1838, and also held it in 1840 and 1- 40. He was a Representative in 

1839. He was a founder of the " First Presbyterian church of Bean 
Creek," afterwards the " Congregational church of Hudson,*' and an 
elder or deacon for forty years. He died April 10, 1876. 



l. Mcknight sellers, 

Representative from Kent county in 1833-5, was born in Franklin 
county, Pa., July 2. 1849. He received an academical education, 
learned the trade of a printer, and settled at Cedar Springs in 18G9, 
and founded and now owns the Cedar Springs Clipper. He was 
speak'er pro tern, in 1885. In politics a Republican. 



ALONZO SESSIONS 

Was born in Marcellus, Onondaga county, N. Y.. Aug. 4, 1810. He 
received a fair education, and became at first a teacher, then a clerk 
for two years in Bennington, Genesee county. In 1S33 he came to 
Michigan, locating land in Ionia county. He clerked at a store in 
Ohio one year, and afterwards taught school at Dayton. Ohio, until 
1835. He settled on a farm in Berlin i then Cass), Ionia county, which 
always remained his home. He built the second log cabin in the 
town, and the first bridges across the streams between Saranac and 
Ionia. In 1837 he married Celia, daughter of Samuel Dexter, the 
pioneer of Ionia county. He was the first supervisor in 1883 of Cass 
(Berlin), and the chairman of the board of supervisors. He was 
supervisor eighteen times, and often chairman of the board. He was 
also justice several years, and sheriff of Ionia county in 1841 and 
1842. He was Representative in the legislature from l v 57 to 1SG3; 
then assessor of internal revenue for the fourth district for four years. 
In 1872 he was a presidential elector: and in 1870 was elected lieuten- 
ant governor, and was re-elected in 1878. He helped organize a 
national bank in Ionia, and was a director and president from 1~ ! " 
His farm comprised eight hundred acres, and was well cared for ami 
valuable. He had a family of thirteen children. In politics a 
Republican. He died July 3, 1886. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 577 

WILLIAM SESSIONS, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1873-4, was born in Marcellus, 
N. Y., May 2, 1821. He received a common school education. In 
1837 he removed to Michigan and settled in North Plains, Ionia 
county. In 1871 he removed to Ionia, where he now resides. He has 
held several positions of trust in his township. By occupation a 
farmer . 

JULIAN M. SEWARD 

Was born in Alexander, N. Y., in 1829. His father settled in Ber- 
trand, Michigan, in 1S36. The son in early life worked at the clearing 
of land, farming, and cooperage, and had small opportunities for an 
education. He remained at home until 1854, afterwards married, 
and was postmaster of Bertrand for several years. He was sheriff of 
Berrien county from 1865 to 1869; Representative in 1869-70: twice 
assistant sergeant-at-armsof the Senate; and when sheriff was deputy 
U. S. marshal for western Michigan. In 18S6 was engaged in the 
grocery trade at Jackson. Republican in politics. 



JARED A. SEXTON, 

A member of the House of Representatives in 1S67 from Wayne 
county, was born in Dearborn, Mich., Sept. 29, 1S38. His primary 
school education was supplemented by a term at the Normal school 
at Ypsilanti. His business has been that of fanner, merchant, and 
banker. He has held many local offices, and was sheriff of Wayne 
county in 1875-6. His present residence is Dearborn. Politics, dem- 
ocratic. 

ELISHA G. SEYMOUR, 

Representative from Chippewa county in 1847, was born in Camillus, 
N. Y., May 25, 1817. By profession a lawyer. He settled at Detroit 
in 1840, where he was socially very popular. Later went to Sault 
Ste. Marie. Died June 18, 1850. 



HENRY SEYMOUR 

Was born at Camillus, N. Y.. Dec. 16. 1821. He came to Grand 
Rapids in 1812, where he resided until his death, June 7, 1877. He 
was engaged in wool buying. In politics a Republican. He was a 



5?8 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

prominent officer in the Congregational church and Sabbath school 
at Grand Rapids. He was a Representative in 1865, and Senator in 
1867. 

HENRY W. SEYMOUR, 

Senator in 1885-7 from Chippewa and other counties of the northern 
peninsula, was born in 1834 in Brockport, N. Y. He graduated at 
Williams college in 1855, studied law, attending the Albany law 
school, and was admitted to the bar in 1856. He settled at Sault Ste. 
Marie in 1873, where he built a saw mill and cleared a farm. He is a 
prominent officer of the national bank, and president of the St. 
Mary's falls water power company. In February, 1888, he was nomi- 
nated and elected to congress to fill vacancy caused by the death of 
Hon. Seth C. Motfatt. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES SEYMOUR, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1853, and Senator in 1S57-S, 
was born in Litchfield, Conn., April 20, 1791. From 1809 to 1840 
he was a resident of Rochester, N. Y., and was a merchant and 
banker. In 1836 he bought part of the land where North Lansing 
now stands, and also the site of Flushing, Genesee county. Removed 
to Flushing in 1846, where he resided until his death, December oO, 
1S64. He wa» active in securing the location of the capital at Lan- 
sing, and in promoting its growth and improvement. The Seymour 
house at North Lansing, the first hotel in the city, was built by him. 
He was a polished gentleman of culture and refined manners. Politi- 
.cally a Republican. 

EDWARD SHANAHAN 

Was born in Sussex county, Delaware, in 1806, and lived in that state 
until 1830, when he came to Michigan, settling at Beardsley prairie. 
Cass county, where he lived until 1855. when he removed to Jeffer- 
son, same county. .By occupation a farmer on a large scale. He « as 
a Representative from Cass county in 1861-2. 



HLLBERT B. SHANK, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1861-2, was born in 

port, N. Y., May 31, 1820. He became a teacher at the age of eight 

een. He graduated as a physician from Geneva medical college in ".- : " 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 57ff 

practiced two years in New York, then settled at Lansing, Mich. r 
where he still resides. As a physician and surgeon he enjoyed a 
large and successful practice. A Whig until 1854, since a Republi- 
can. He was a delegate to the republican national convention of 
1856. He was surgeon of the 8th Michigan infantry until compelled 
to retire from ill health, and then became examining surgeon for the 
3d district until the close of the war. He was several years a mem- 
ber of the board of control of the state reform school; many years a 
member, and president of the Lansing board of education; president 
of the state medical society; and delegate to the national medical 
societv. 



JOHN C. SHARP, 

Senator from the counties of Hillsdale and Jackson in 1887, was born 
in Scott, N. Y., July 18. 1843, where he resided until May, 1863. He 
received his education at Cortland academy. Homer, New York, 
and at the normal school at Albany. In 1S63 he removed with his 
parents to Brooklyn, Jackson county, Mich., where he remained 
upon his father's farm for four years, spending the winters in teach- 
ing school. In the spring of 18G7 he commenced the study of law in 
the city of Jackson, was admitted to the bar in I860, and practiced his 
profession in that city until 1884, since which time he has beenexten. 
sively engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was city attorney of 
Jackson in 1877, supervisor of census for the southern district of 
Michigan in 1880, and prosecuting attorney for Jackson county for 
1S81-2. He is a Republican, and received 9,132 votes to 7,104 for Abel 
N. Howe, fusionist, and 1,547 for Alb-rt H. Stilhvell, prohibitionist- 



PETER SHARP. 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1859, was born at "Wills- 
borough, N. Y., May 14, 1812. His father removed to the Genesee 
valley, and later to Franklin county, Ohio, and the son became a 
traveling minister in 1832, by admission to the Ohio conference of the 
M. E. church, then including nearly all the territory of Michigan. 
After twenty-one years' service as a minister, he settled at Ridgeway, 
Mich., as a retail dealer in drugs and groceries. A Whig until 1854, 
since a Republican. He was thirty years postmaster, also a justice, 
lie still lives at Ridgeway. 



OoO MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 

DERW1N W. S HARTS, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1877-79, was born in Oxford, 
N. Y., August 31, 1830. He graduated from Madison university! 
Hamilton, N. Y., in 1854, and from the Auburn theological seminary 
in 1857. Soon after the close of the war, having spent a portion of 
the last year at the front, he moved into Ohio, thence in 1871, to his 
present residence. He is a Presbyterian clergyman; was ordained bv 
the Catskill presbytery in 1S57. and has preached in the state of New- 
York, in Cleveland, Ohio, and several years for the Congregational- 
ist church in Owo.so. Having pursued the ministry for seventeen 
years, he retired from the work several years since for rest and recu- 
peration. In politics a Republican. 



GILBERT SHATTUCK, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1837, was a resident of 
Ypsilanti. He was one of the stockholdersof the "Huron River bank," 
a "wild cat" bank, started in 1838, which after a career of 18 months 
went down. No other information has been obtained of him. 



WILLARD SHATIUCK, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1879, was born in Saginaw, 
Mich., Sept. 21, 1845. lie received a good education and graduated 
from Goldsmith's Bryant & Stratton commercial college, of Detroit. 
He has held several township offices, has been justice, and county 
superintendent of the poor for several years. In politics a Democrat. 



BRACKLEY SHAW, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1809, and Senator in 1881-2-3, 
■was born in Plainfield, Mass., May 21, 1818, and removed with his 
parents to Ira, N. Y., in 1825. and in 1835 to Dover. Mich., where he 
still resides. Educated in common schools, and a farmer. Has held 
various political positions, and is a prominent agriculturist. Politi- 
cally a Republican. 

HENRY A. SHAW 

Was born in Benson, Vt., June 21, 1818. lb' received an academical 
education, studied law in Ravenna. Ohio, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1839. In 1842 he removed to Eaton Rapids, Michigan, where 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 581 

he now resides. He was twelve years judge of probate for Eaton 
county, and has several times been president of the village of Eaton 
Rapids. He has always been a leading member of the bar in Eaton 
county. He v\ as a Representative in the legislative sessions of 1857- 
9-73-4. In 1859 he was speaker of the house, and was a recognized 
leader of the republican party. In 1801 he went into the army as 
major of the id Michigan cavalry, and served two years, He was 
for some years a director of the Grand River Valley railroad. For 
many years a Republican, but of late has acted with the greenback 
party. 

JAMES SHAW 

"Was born in Berlin, N. Y., Feb. 28, 1S13. He married in 1839, and 
in 1840 settled on a farm in Howard, Michigan, where he now resides. 
Was supervisor in 1844 and 1846, and Representative in 1S45-7. By 
•occupation a farmer, in politics a Democrat. 



JAMES SHEARER 

Was born at Albany, N. Y., May 12, 1823, received a common school 
education, and when young became a clerk. In 1838 came to Detroit, 
and served as an apprentice six years to a builder, studying architec- 
ture, etc., under competent instructors. He then attended an acad- 
emy at .Albany. X. Y., went south, and in 1846 supervised the build- 
ing of the state capitol at Montgomery, Alabama. In 1848 went into 
business at Detroit, as an architect and builder, and continued in that 
business until 1863, and was twice an alderman. Removed to Bay 
Citv in 1865, where he has been largely interested in manufactures. 
He has been president of the first national bank; president of the 
board of water works; from 1871 to 1878 one of the three commis. 
sioners for the building of the capitol at Lansing: and regent of the 
University from 1881 to 1888. In politics a Republican, 



JONATHAN SHEARER 

Was a native of Coleraine. Mass., born Aug. 23, 1796. His early edu- 
cation was academical, with a partial study of medicine, law, and 
business. He settled in Plymouth, Wayne county, in 1836, and was 
a leading citizen of the county, serving many terms as supervisor. 
and as county commissioner, 1S38 to 1841. He was Senator in 1S42- 
3-4, during the time of annual sessions and elections. He was a Rep- 
04 



582 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

resentative in 1851, and of the constitutional convention of 1867. He 
was a leading agriculturist, an eihcient member of the state pioneer 
society, and its president in 1876. He was politically a Democrat, but 
favored the greenback party in his later years. Died Sept. 26, 1881. 



FRANCIS W. SHEARMAN 

Was born at Vernon. N. Y., June 20. 1S17. and died at Marshall, 
Michigan, Dec. 7, 1874. He graduated from Hamilton college at the 
age of nineteen. He was employed by Hon. H. R. Schoolcraft to 
assist him in negotiating treaties with the Indians, and in that capac- 
ity first came to Michigan. He settled at Marshall in 1S37, and soon 
found employment as editor of the Michigan Journal of Education' 
the official organ of the state department of public instruction. In 
1840 he became chief editor of the Democratic Expounder, published 
at Marshall, and that paper soon took a leading position as a demo- 
cratic organ. He was associate judge of Calhoun county in 1843-44. 
He was appointed superintendent of public instruction by Governor 
Ransom, March 28, 1849, and held the office under that appointment 
until 1851. He was elected to that office twice, and held it continu- 
ously until January 1, 1815, and made an able public officer. His 
report for 1852 attracted great attention, was widely distributed, and 
often quoted by educators. He returned to Marshall, became editor 
of the Marshall Expounder, which he held through life. He wasals > 
an acting magistrate for sixteen years. As a writer he was forcible, 
polished, independent, and aggressive. 



CHARLES P. SHELDON. 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1853, was born in Water- 
town, N. Y., in 1817. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Demo- 
crat. He moved to Hartford, Michigan, in 1811, and was supervisor 
and justice for most of the time for ten years. In 1854 moved to 
Cedar county. Iowa. Held various offices there, and was a member 
of the Iowa legislature in 1868. He died at Tipton, Iowa, about 1870. 



HORACE J. SHELDON 

Was born in Kinderhook. N. Y.. Oct. 23. 1812. At the age of eleven 
he was sent to learn the tanners and curriers' trade, which be fol- 
lowed for many years. He prospected Michigan in 1833, and opent d 
a boot and shoe shop at Blisstield in 1S3G. After a few mouths he 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 5S3 

went to Grand Haven and established a tannery. After four years 
he returned to Blissfield, purchased a farm, opened another boot and 
shoe shop, and made that place his home. He was justice some 
thirty years. In 1SG7 he was a member uf the state constitutional 
convention as a Republican. 

JAMES SEIELDON, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1344, was born in Seneca 
county, N. Y., April 4, 1800. He moved to Michigan in 1333, select- 
ing and locating lands in Calhoun county. Settled at Albion in 1835 
on lands which he owned and occupied up to 1860. lie held the posi- 
tions of state prison inspector, justice, school director, and other 
minor offices. Business, farmer an 1 general merchandise, politically 
a Democrat. Died Nov. 9, 1866. 



NEWTON SHELDON 

Was born at Brutus, N. Y., July 9, 1810. Received a common school 
education. He settled on a farm in Lodi, Michigan, in 1832, where 
he remained until 1871. He was a Democrat, and held some public 
trust nearly all his life. He was supervisor, town clerk, justice and 
treasurer, and for many years secretary of the Washtenaw county 
agricultural society. He was a Representative in 1842-69-70. For 
nine years, from 1871 to 18S0, he was secretary of the Washtenaw 
county mutual insurance company. He died at A'm Arbor, January 
12, 1383. 

TIMOTHY F. SHELDON. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1830, was born in New York, 
July 31, 1797. He came to Michigan in 18'26 and settled in Canton. 
Wayne county, where he continued to reside until his death, Sept. 15, 
1869. He was prominent during the thirty years of his residence 
there, and was honored with the more responsible local offices. Was 
a Democrat until the time of the civil war, when he became a Repub- 
lican. 

ALANSON SHELEY 

Was born at Albany, N.Y., August 14, 1809. His early life was spent 
on his grandfather's farm in Jefferson county, N. Y., and attending 
common schools. As a boy he took a timber raft down the St. Law- 
rence river to Quebec, and at 10 was apprenticed three years to learn 



584 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the trade of a mason, and became a foreman on the Rideau canal, 
Canada. He came to Detroit in 1831, and in 1832 built a stone light- 
house on Thunder bay, Lake Huron, the oldest now standing. He 
was a builder and contractor at Detroit several years, and later was 
interested in lumbering for the Black river steam mill company. In 
1859 he became a partner with J. S. Farrand in the drug trade, and 
is still one of the firm of Farrand, Williams & Co. He was an active 
Whig in politics, but helped organize the republican party in 1851. 
He was an alderman five years, and Senator in lS')7-71-2. He is a 
leading Presbyterian, and has acted as superintendent of a Sunday 
school for many years. He has always been a strong temperance 
man. He possessed great strength, and many stories are told of his 
prowess in his younger days. He still lives at Detroit, and is active 
mentally and physically. 

JAMES M. SHEPARD, 

Senator from Van Buren and Cass counties in 1879, was born in North 
Brookfield. Mass., Nov. 34,1842, but soon afterwards removed to Bos- 
ton. He received a classical education at Wesleyan University, Conn., 
and studied medicine and dental durgery in Boston. During the war 
he served in the medical department of the U. S. navy. In 1868 he 
located at Cassopolis, Michigan, where he engaged in publishing the 
Vigilant. In politics a Republican. For several years was private 
secretary of Senator Palmer. 

LUMAN SHEPARD, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1SS3, was born June 17, 1S19, at 
Skaneateles, N.Y. He attended school until twenty -one years of age. 
He married in 1841, and the following year began farming upon land 
of his own, continuing until 1855, when he sold out and removed to 
Chelsea, Michigan, and engaged in farming one mile south of that 
village. Disposing of his farm lie removed to Olivet, Eaton county, 
in 1872. In politics a Republican. 



THOMAS SHEPHERD 

Was born in Arygle, N. Y., May 19, 1S21, and came to Martin, Alle- 
gan county, in 1844, where he has since resided. By occupation a 
farmer. A Republican until 1834, when he joined the prohibition 
party. For five years supervisor, and for twenty years justice. Was 
a Representative in 1*07. Has also been the prohibition nominee tor 
that office. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 585 



BENJAMIN SHERMAN, 



Representative in 1S35-G from St. Joseph county, -was born in Conn., 
in 1792. He settled in Genesee county, N. Y., and came to Nottawa 
Prairie, Michigan, in 1825. Before coming to Michigan he was a con- 
tractor on the Erie canal. In politics a Democrat. He was register 
of the U. S. land office at Ionia under the administration of Van 
Buren and also of Pierce. Died in 1872. 



ALONZO SHERWOOD, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1879, was born in Lima, Ohio, 
April 22, 1832. His parents removed to Michigan the following Jan- 
uary, settling in Berrien county. Occupation, farming. He has 
held the offices of justice, supervisor, and school director. In politics 
a Republican. 

GEORGE SHERWOOD 

Was born in Amenia, N. Y., April 2, 1819. He moved to Cass county, 
Michigan, in 1833, and engaged in mercantile business with his 
brother at Edwardsburg. He was town clerk of Ontwa, county ckrk 
1844 to 1850, and Representative in 1851. He removed to Elkhart. 
Indiana, in 1852. where he was a merchant until 1SG2, and was county 
treasurer of Elkhart county. In 1805 he removed to Chicago, where 
he has been in business as a general commission merchant, and dealer 
in coal and wood. 

HARVEY C. SHERWOOD, 

Senator from the counties of Cass and Berrien in 1835, was born at 
Jamesville. N. Y., Feb. 9, 1835. He received a thorough academical 
and scientific education, with reference to miking farming his voca- 
tion; he graduated in 1853. In 1870 Mr. Sherwood and his family 
came to Michigan, and settled in Watervliet, Berrien county, on an 
unimproved tract of land which is now his home and called Lake 
View farm, containing 400 acres, and classed among the finest fruit 
and grain farms of western Michigan. Mr. Sherwood devotes his 
whole energies to farming and is enthusiastic in its pursuit. He was 
the democratic candidate for congress in 1886. but was defeated. 

THOMAS RUSSELL SHERWOOD 
Was born at Pleasant Valley, N. Y., March 28, 1827. Removed with 
his parents to Monroe county, N. Y., in 1831, and received an aca- 



58b" MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

demical education. Studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1851. 
Practiced his profession at Port Jervis one year, and removed to 
Kalamazoo, Mich., in 1852, where he now resides. He was in active 
practice until his election as justice of the Supreme Court in 1883. 
He was twice city attorney of Kalamazoo, and was repeatedly a 
nominee for prominent offices, including congress in 1878. In politics 
a Democrat, of late years a National. Received the support of the 
democratic and national parties as a candidate for judge. 



SETH K. SnETTERLY, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1867-77, was born in Union 
county, Penn., October 15, 1820. He came to Utica, Mich., with his 
parents in 1833, where he still resides. By profession an attorney, in 
politics a Democrat. Has been a justice since 1854, and has been for 
ten years a circuit court commissioner. 



CHARLES SHIER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1855-65-9-70, was born in 
the state of New York, January 30. 1803. He was for over twenty 
years a resident of Patterson, N. J., where he was engaged in the 
manufacture of cotton goods. He came to Ypsilanti in 1845, engaged 
in farming, and resided near there until his death, January 29, 1883. 
In politics first a Whig, a Republican from 1S54. He was a member 
and class leader in the Methodist Episcopal church for many years. 



JOHN B. SHIPMAN 

Was born in Saybro>k, Conn., and can trace his descent from 1639. 
His father soon removed to Livingston, N. Y., where he received a 
common school education. Thence he came to Ypsilanti, Mich., 
where his father died, leaving him dependent upon his own resources. 
He studied law in Centrevilie with Chester Gurney, the abolition 
candidate for governor when Birney ran for president. Having been 
admitted to the bar in St. Joseph county, he has since been engaged 
in practice. He was prominent as counsel for the defendant in the 
Edmonds impeachment trial. In 1878 he was elected circuit judge by 
a combination of democrats and nationals. February 28. 1879, he 
was nominated by those parties as justice of the Supreme Court, and 
was defeated by Hon. James V. Campbell, the present incumbent. 
Resides at Coldwater. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 587 

JOSEPH P. SHOEMAKER, 

Senator from Ionia and Montcalm counties in 1879, was born Aug. 30, 
1820, at Mohawk, N. Y. He received a common school education. 
In 1837 he removed to Joliet, 111. In 1840 he removed to Sandusky, 
Ohio, and remained one year, helping in locating railroads. In 1842 
engaged in merchandise and buying grain at Republic,- Ohio, and in 
1852 went to Covington, Ky., and engaged in manufacturing iron, 
having charge of a rolling mill. In 1855 he came to Jackson, this 
state, and engaged in farming. He was postmaster at Jackson two 
years, and in 18G1 removed to Montcalm county and engaged in farm- 
ing and lumbering. He was elected justice in 1SGG. In politics a 
National. 



MICHAEL SHOEMAKER, 

Senator from Jackson county in 1848-9-50-1-77-83-5, and president 
pro tern, in 1851, was born at German Flats, N. Y., April G, 1818. 
Attended school until fourteen, then was a clerk at Albany. At the 
age of seventeen located at Joliet, 111., was seven years a partner in 
the mercantile business, and filled contracts in building the Illinois 
and Michigan canal. In 1852 he purchased the mills at Michigan 
Center, which he owned for 28 years. Resides at Jackson and owns 
large farms near that city. He held many offices, including 
inspector of state prison-; collector of customs at Detroit; president 
of the state and county agricultural societies; several terms Grand 
High Priest of Royal Arch Masons; and chairman of the democratic 
state committee. In January, 1S62, he was appointed colonel of the 
13th Michigan infantry, took part in many engagements, with honor 
to himself and his command, and was for a short time an inmate of 
Libby prison. Has long been an active member of the state pioneer 
society, and has served as president. 



DAVID SHOOK, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1851. was born in Milan, N. 
Y., Dec. 27, 1804. He located at Mt. Clemens, Michigan, in 1S3G. He 
was a government contractor and civil engineer, a Democrat in poli- 
tics up to 1861, then a Republican, and a prominent politician in 
Macomb county. While a resident of the state of New York he was 
a lieutenant in the state militia. In 1SG4 he emigrated to Central 
City, Colorado, where he died, Aug. ",', 1865. 



588 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JACOB SHOOK, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1847, was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1779. In 1841 he settled on a farm one mile 
from Mfc. Clemens, where he resided until his death, April 11, 18G2. 
He was a prominent democratic politician, and a leading business 
man in the state of New York, owning and controlling an ashery, 
woolen factory and general store. Was a captain of N. Y. militia. 



PHILIP P. SHORTS, 

Representative from Mason county in 1885, was horn in Ontario, 
Canada, August 4, 1845. He came to Michigan in 1S73, and has been 
continuously engaged in the practice of his profession, which is that 
of a physician. His residence is in Ludington, of which city he has 
been alderman for two terms. 



SOLOMON SIBLEY 

Was born in Sutton, Mass., Oct. 7, 1709. He studied law and 
removed to Ohio in 1795, establishing himself first at Marietta, ami 
then at Cincinnati, in the practice of his profession. He removed t<> 
Detroit in 1797, and in 1799 was elected a delegate from Wayne 
county to the territorial legislature of the northwest territory. In 
1815 he was appointed by President Madison United States district 
attorney of Michigan, which position he held until 1824, when he was 
appointed one of the United States judges of the territory, holding it 
until 1838, when he resigned. He was the territorial delegate in con- 
gress from Michigan from 1820 to 1823. He was interested in a com- 
pany which erected the first saw and flouring mills in Pontiac. He 
was a Democrat in politics. As a lawyer, judge and citizen he was 
universally respected. He died at Detroit April 4, 1S46. He left 
three sons, all of whom became prominent as public men. One was 
Henry H. Sibley, first governor of Minnesota, and a general in the 
late rebellion. 

AARON SICKLES 

Was born at Palmyra, Wayne county, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1817. He came 
with his parents family to Plymouth. Michigan, in 1830. In l*:'. v the 
son moved to Howell, and began life as a farmer, which he followed 
until 1S56, when he removed to Elsie, resuming his calling as :i 
farmer. He filled various positions of public trust, and in 1S09-»0 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 5S9 

was a member of the Michigan House, as a Republican. Since that 
time he has been engaged in mercantile pursuits, first at Walton, 
Grand Traverse county, and at the present time at Elmira, Otsego 
county. 

JOHN M. B. SILL, 

Regent of the University of Michigan from 1867 to 18G9, by appoint- 
ment to fill vacancy, was born at Black Rock, Nov. 24, 1831. His 
parents died when he was eleven, and he came to Jonesville, Mich., 
where he attended school. He was a graduate of the State Normal 
school in 1854. He became a teacher in the school, and wrote an 
English grammar, published in New York. He was president of the 
Michigan stare teachers' association in 18G1. In August, 18G3, he 
became superintendent of the Detroit schools, but resigned in 1SG3, 
and for ten years was principal of the Detroit female seminary. In 
1875 he became again superintendent of the Detroit schools, which 
position he held for many years. He is now president of the State 
Normal school, and everywhere recognized as an able educator. 



ABIEL SILVER 

"Was born in Hopkinton,N. H., in 1797. He removed to St. Lawrence 
county, N. Y., first teaching, and afterwards becoming a merchant. 
In 1831 he came to Cass county, Michigan, and opened a store with 
his brothers at Edwardsburg, and a branch the next year at Cass- 
opolis. He was a man of ability and culture, and had great inlluence 
among the early pioneers. He was a member of the second conven- 
vention of assent in 183G, and was an associate judge in Cass county. 
In 184G he was appointed commissioner of the state land office, and 
held that position until 1850. Under his administration the seat of 
government was laid out at Lansing, and the various state lands 
there were cut up into lots and placed in market. 



JAMES B. SIMONSON T , 

Representative from Oakland county in 1857, was born at Roxbury, 
N. Y., Jan. S, 1S05, and received a common school education. Was 
a merchant at Roxbury from 1825 to 1835, then in trade at Royal Oak, 
Mich., for six years, at Birmingham two years, and at Springfield for 
sixteen years. He removed to Holly in 18G0, was in trade until 18G6, 
then organized and became president of the first national bank of 
65 



590 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Holly. He was for five years supervisor of Springfield. Politically 
a Republican. Deceased. 

EMERY H. SIMPSON, 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1887, was born in Carlton, 
N. Y., Jan. 17, 1S28, is a farmer, and bas been a resident of tins state 
twenty-tbree years. He is a Republican, and was a member of tbe 
House of 1873-4. He has held the office of supervisor and township 
clerk, and was elected Representative for 18S7-8 by a vote of 1,909 to 
1,347 for Sullivan Cook, and 439 for John W. Free, prohibitionist. 



DANIEL D. SINCLAIR, 

Senator from Lenawee county in 1843, was born at Broadalbin. N.Y.. 
April 16, 1805. While young was a clerk at Albany, then learned the 
trade of a tailor, and was in the clothing trade in western New York. 
He settled in Adrian, Micb., in 1335, where he now resides. He was 
in the clothing trade for several years. Has been justice: county 
treasurer six years; brigadier general of state militia; superintendent 
of the Michigan Southern railroad from 1850 to 1358; supervisor for 
eighteen years, and a school trustee. 



ELIAS M. SKINNER, 

Lawyer, was born at Woodstock, Conn.. Oct. 08. 1798, and died Aug. 
6, 1359. After an academical education he entered Brown University 
and graduated in 182(L, Studied law with Governor Stoddard, spent 
a few years teaching, came to Ypsilanti in 1826, and commenced the 
practice of his profession. He took an active part in favor of temper- 
ance and Sabbath school instruction. He served several years as 
prosecuting attorney, and was elected judge of probate in 1845. In 
1850 he was a democratic member of the constitutional convention. 



DAVID G. SLAFTER 

Was born in Norwich, Vt.. Jan. 1, 1817. In 1849 he removed t<> 
Tuscola, Michigan. With the exception of one year has held tbe 
office of justice since lfc'52. Has been judge of Jprobate for Tuscola 
county four years, and was enrolling officer and deputy provost 
marshal from 1863 to the close of the war. He was a Representative 
in 1803 and 1864. Principal business real estate and lumbering. At 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 591 

first a Whig, now a Republican. Is vice president of the national 
bank at Vassar. 

THOMAS J. SLAYTOX, 

Representative from Kent county in 1S67-9-70, was born in Middlesex, 
N. Y., Jan. 9, 1S37. In 1847 removed with his parents to Grattan, 
Michigan. He graduated at Hillsdale college in 1862, and from the 
University law school in 1864. Was for a short time at Vicksburg, 
Miss., in the Freedmen's bureau service, but commenced law practice 
at Lowell, Mich., in the fall of 1864. He retired to a farm in Grattan 
in 1874. In politics a Republican. Died July 15, 1S75. 



DANIEL D. SLOAN, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1850. was born in Herki- 
mer county, N. Y., Nov. 28, 1799. B}' occupation a millwright, in 
politics first a Whig, then a Republican. He came to Michigan in 
1844, built the first large mill at Grand Rapids, also one at Ann Arbor, 
and one at Dover Mills, which he operated until his death, Jan. 29, 
1861. He was several times supervisor and assessor of the town of 
Dexter, and was a man of sterling worth and integrity. 



ALBERT B. SLOCUM 

Was born in Macedon, N. Y., March 19, ISIS. He moved to Michigan 
in 1842 and settled in Wheatland, Hillsdale county. He was a 
supervisor, and president of the Hillsdale county agricultural society. 
Was a Democrat in early life, became a Republican in 1851. He was 
a Representative in 1865. By occupation a farmer. Died May 14, 1883. 



ELLIOTT T. SLOCUM, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1869-70, was born at Trenton, Mich., 
in 1839. He graduated at Union college in 1862, and is now a 
resident of Detroit, and since 1886 a park commissioner. In politics 
a Republican. His time is given to the management of a large estate 
inherited from his father. 

ABNER C. SMITH, 

Senator from Macomb county in 1845-0, was born in Vermont, Feb. 
14, 1814. A lawyer and a Democrat. He came to Michigan in 1839, 



592 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

and was a postmaster, judge of the county court, and judge of 
probate. Edited the .Macomb county Gazette some years, and pub- 
lished the Ancient Landmark, a Masonic magazine. Died at 
Litchfield, Minn., Sept. 20, 1830. 

ABRAM SMITH, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1863-4, was born in Clay, 
Mich., Sept. 8, 1819. Received a common school education, worked 
four years in a saw mill, and then sailed a vessel between Algonac 
and Sandusky. In 1844 engaged in lumber business which he con- 
tinued for many years. He owned a large farm and valuable timber 
lands. Has held various offices, including supervisor, president of the 
village of Algonac, and moderator of the school board for more than 
twenty years. 

AMOS SMITH, 

Senator from Cass county in 1869-70, was born at Springfield, Pa.. 
Aug. 7, 1329, where he received an academical education, and also 
graduated from a business college at Pittsburgh. He taught school 
in Cass county. Mich., in 1848, then in Yazoo county, Miss. Settled 
in Vandalia, Mich., 1852, taught school several years, owned and 
managed a farm, and gave much time to locating lines and corners 
in Cass county. Several years secretary of the Ca;s county farmer-' 
institute; supervisor several terms; county surveyor eighteen years ; 
and has held many other offices. In politics a Republican. 

ANDREW J. SMITH, 

Attorney General of Michigan in 1875-6. was born near Chillicothe, 
Ohio, Sept. 2, 1818. Removed with his parents to Indiana in 1825, 
and to the present site of Valparaiso in 1835. Since 1840 has been a 
resident of Cass county, Mich. Was several years a clerk, then 
studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1857. He was prosecuting 
attorney twelve years, and held other local offices. In 187S he was 
appointed judge of the second circuit to fill vacancy, and was eh :• : 
to that office in 1881, without opposition, serving until the close of 
1887. In politics a Republican. Resides at Cassopolis. 

AURA SMITH, 

Representative from Branch county in 1863. was born in the state of 
New York. Came to Michigan in 1844. Settled on a farm in t li«- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 593 

township of Girard. Was supervisor from 1850 to 1855. In 1864 he 
removed to Missouri, and is still living in that state. He was a 
farmer by occupation, and in the latter years of his residence in 
Michigan, a dealer in stock. 



C. CLIFFORD SMITH, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1367, was born in New Hamp- 
shire in 1828. He graduated as a physician from Portsmouth medical 
college, (N. H.) in 1852, and the same year came to Michigan, locating 
at Red ford, where he has since resided. He was a surgeon in the late 
war, and a member of the jury commission for Wayne county in 
1884. Politics, democratic. 



DAVIS SMITH, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1839, was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., in 1S08. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Demo- 
crat. He came to Tecumseh, Mich., in 1830. Held several public 
offices, and took part in the Black Hawk and Toledo wars. Bore the 
title of general. Died March 26, 1868. 



EZEKIEL C. SMITH, 

Representative from Cass county in 18o0, was born in Erie county, 
N. Y., June 6, 1811. He settled in 1835on a farm in Pokagon, Cass 
county, and has lived there ever since. He has held the office of 
supervisor nine years, and been a justice for 36 years. In politics a 
Democrat. 



FRANK L. SMITH, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1871-0, was born at Stafford 
Springs, Conn., July 8, 1830. In 18-12 removed with his parents to 
Armada, Mich. As a young man worked in the railroad shops at 
Adrian, came to Jackson in 18"k>, and was manager of the American, 
afterwards the Marion house, then clerk of the Hibbard house until 
1864. He was quartermaster of the 29th Michigan until that regi- 
ment consolidated with the 08th. then took charge of the Tremont 
house 1865-8. He had charge of the Hurd house from 1S69 until the 
fall of 1886. Served as alderman and supervisor. Died Dec. 5, 1886. 



594 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

GEORGE A. SMITH, 

Senator from Branch and Hillsdale counties in 1867-85, was born in 
Danbury, Conn., March 8, 1825, and settled at an early day as a 
farmer in Somerset, Mich. Has also been a merchant. He was 
Representative in 1363, and was a member of the board of control of 
the reform school from 1879 to 1884, when he resigned. Has also been 
a supervisor. In politics a Republican. 

GEORGE M. SMITH, 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1S77, was born March 16, 
1841, at Springfield Centre, N. Y. He was educated at Alfred Univer- 
sity, N. Y., and removed to Michigan in 1867. He was president of 
the village of "Whitehall, and a member of the lumbering firm of J. 
Alley & Co. At the age of nineteen he engaged with the Atlantic & 
Great Western railroad at Salamanca, N. Y., as telegraph operator, 
from which position he was subsequently promoted to that of super- 
intendent of telegraph and train dispatcher, and afterward to a simi- 
lar position on the Blossburg, Corning & Tioga radroad at Corning. 
In politics a Republican. Died several years since. 



HENRY SMITH 

Was a native of the state of New York, and graduated at the United 
States military academy in 1815. He was made a lieutenant and 
served in the army until 1836, when he resigned. From 1836 to 1810 
was a civil engineer, superintending harbor improvements on Lake 
Erie, and resided at Monroe. He was a Representative in 1833-41; 
was major general of Michigan militia from 1811 to 1816: mayor of 
Monroe in 1846. In 1847 he was re-appointed to the army with the 
rank of major. He died while on duty in the Mexican war, at Vera 
Cruz, July 24, 1847. 

HENRY C. SMITH 

Was born at Scituate, R. I., Jan. 9, 1804. He worked on a farm 
until of age and enjoyed fair opportunities for an education. He was 
a mason by trade and worked at it until 1836, when he came t<> 
Michigan. Was engaged both in merchandising and lumbering, and 
finally became a farmer in PlainQeld, Kent county. He held various 
town and county offices and was a Representative in 1849 ana 1853. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 595 



HIRAM SMITH, 



Representative from Calhoun county in 184S, was born in Westchester 
county, N. Y. , May 24, 1804. By occupation a merchant and miller, 
in politics a Democrat. He came to Homer, Michigan, in 1837, and was 
a prominent business man and leading Democrat for many years. 
Was a good neighbor and of a social nature. Was moderator of 
school board, took great interest in schools, and often presided at 
public meetings. Died May 4, 1874. 



HIRAM H. SMITH, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1843, was born at Malone, N. 
Y., Dec. 9, 1S09. When young was a resident of Brandon. Yt. He 
received an academical education; was five years a clerk at Castle- 
ton, Yt.; from 1830 to 1835 a merchant at Granville, N. Y.; in 183G 
became a farmer in Ingham county, Mich.; was county treasurer in 
1838, and county clerk in 1841: a merchant at Mason; removed to 
Lansing in 1S47, built the first flour mill, and carried on the milling 
and mercantile business; in 1851-2 was engaged in building the plank 
road from Lansing to Howell; was the first mayor of Lansing in 
1859; was vice president and managing director of the J., L. & S. R. 
R. ; removed to Jackson in 1864, and from 1868 to 1S70 was president 
of the Fort Wayne & Jackson railroad: in 1871-2 superintended the 
building of the D.. L. & N, and the Detroit & Bay City railroads. 
Now resides in Jackson: has large property interests, and is president 
of the Ingham county savings bank. A Democrat until 185G, since a 
Republican. 

JAMES L. SMITH. 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1851, was born in Kilconquhar, 
Scotland, May 11, 1813. He came to Tecuniseh, Mich., in 1838, then 
to Sanilac county in 1840. Business, varied; in politics a Republican. 
He removed to Toledo in 1853, and to Minneapolis in 1S82, where he 
now resides. 

JEREMIAH R. SMITH, 

Was born in Lyme, Conn., June 19, 1795. He came to Michigan in 
1828. He was a blacksmith by trade, and carried on the business at 
Avon, N. Y.. before coming to Michigan. Settling in Genesee county 
he became a farmer. He was associate county judge of Genesee 
county, justice for twenty years, and supervisor for several years of 



596 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Grand Blanc. He was a Representative from Genesee county in 1838 
and 1842. Died March 23, 186S. 



JOHN S. SMITH 

Was born March 26, 1822, at Dighton, Mass. »His father removed to 
Ontario, X. Y., where the son studied medicine, and graduated from 
Cleveland medical college in 1844; practiced medicine in Ontario 
county, N. Y. for two years; removed to Armada. Mich., in 1847, and 
was engaged in medical practice until 18G0. In 1858 he commenced 
the study of law, graduated from the law department at Ann Arbor, 
and went into practice. In 1SG3 he entered the army as quarter- 
master and served one year. He then engaged in farming and deal- 
ing in hops, buying large quantities and sending to distant markets. 
As a Democrat he was Senator in 1853. Died September 19, 18*38. 

JOSEPH SMITH 

Was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, April 11, 1809. He removed 
with his parents to Ohio, in 1812, and settled in Calvin, Michigan, in 
1831. He bought a mill property and ran it until 1835, when he sold 
out and bought one thousand acres of land in Jefferson, Cass county. 
In 1847 he engaged with partners in the mercantile business, after 
three years carrying it on alone. In 1855 he removed to Cassopolis 
and continued his business. In politics a Democrat. He was Repre- 
sentative in 1S35-G-7, also of the second convention of assent in 1S36. 



;le GRAND J. SMITH, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1873-4, was born in Bethel. 
Conn., Jan. 8. 1837. He received a common school education. In 
1839 he settled in Somerset, Billsdale county. In 1859 he removed to 
Woodstock, Lenawee county, where he still resides. In business a 
merchant. 

MORGAN L. SMITH, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1855, was born at Charlton, 
N. Y., Aug. 30, 1810. Learned the trade of a hatter and carried on 
that business at Eaton, X. Y. Removed to Milford, Mich., in 1837, 
where he was justice eighteen years, and postmaster four years. 
Was associate judge of Oakland county lour years. Removed to 
Branch county and farmed it ten years. In politics a Republican. 
Diediin Chicago, Oct. 12. 1866. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 597 

NATHAN D. SMITH, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1861-2, was born in the state 
of New York in 1S03. He came to Michigan in 1833. His business 
has been miscellaneous; politically a Republican. Now resides at 
Algonac, Michigan. 

PERRIN M. SMITH 

"Was born in Middlebury. N. Y., Aug. 22, 1811; received an academi- 
cal education; became a lawyer, and practiced at LeRoy, N. Y.. and 
was also postmaster there; in 1819 settled at Constantine, Mich., and 
was a law partner of Hon. Charles Upson until 18.16. He was elected 
judge of the 4th circuit in 1863, and served until his death, Feb. 12. 
1866. 

ROBERT B. SMITH, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1867-9-70. was born at Fairfield, 
N. Y., April 21, 1S34; was educated as a physician and graduated 
from the University of New York in 18j4; practiced four years at 
Fairfield, then became surgeon on an ocean vessel; in 1S63 settled at 
Ionia, Mich., purchased a mill and engaged in the manufacture of 
flour; was president of the village, and for years a director of the 
Detroit. Lansing & Northern railroad. Inpoliticsa Republican. Now 
resides in Chicago. 

SAMUEL L. SMITH, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1859. was born at Algonac, 
Mich., in 1830. For many years he was a leading merchant at 
Houghton, Michigan. Has always resided in Michigan, and is now a 
resident of Lansing. He is a Democrat in politics, and was their 
candidate for commissioner of the state land office in 1S62. and was 
the democratic nominee for congress in the 6th district in 1864. 



SYDNEY T. SMITH, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1857, was born in Chenango 
county, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1809. He received an academical education, 
taught school two winters, and engaged in mercantile business at 
Pulaski, N. Y. He also with others built a vessel to transport grain 
from Chicago to Oswego. In 1836 they bought a schooner and went 
into the lumber trade on Lake Michigan. In 1839 he settled on a 
6(5 



598 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

farm in Grass Lake, Michigan, opened a store and bought and Bold 
produce on a large scale. He sold out in 1855 and retired to his farm. 
He was for a long time secretary of the farmers' insurance company, 
and acquired a competence. In politics a Republican. Died April 
25, 1878. 

SAMUEL W. SMITH, 

Senator from the county of Oakland in 1885, was born in Independ- 
ence, Michigan, August 23, 1852. Commenced to teach school at the 
age of sixteen years, and during the three years he was principal of 
the Waterford school, was elected superintendent of schools for the 
township of Waterford. Commenced to study law in 1876, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1877, and graduated in the law class of 1878 at 
the University of Michigan. Commenced the practice of law in 
Pontiac in 1878. In 1SS0 was elected prosecuting attorney of Oakland 
county, and was re-elected in the fall of 1882, and resigned said office 
Nov. 3, 1884. 

THADDEUS G. SMITH 

Was born at Cato, N. Y., April 12, 1828. Receiving an academical 
education, he studied law and was admitted at Albany in 1852. He 
practiced his profession in Troy and New York city until 1801, when 
he rt moved to Fentonville, Michigan, where he practiced law until 
1877. He was a Representative in 18G3-4. He was a commissioner 
under Gov. Blair to take the votes of the soldiers in the field. He 
was a member of the constitutional convention of 18G7, and Senator 
in 1SG9-70. In 1S7(3 was elected probate judge, and removed to Hint. 
A Republican in politics. 

VERNON H. SMITH 

Was born in Canada, Dec. 29, 1838, received a common school educa- 
tion, and since 1858 has been a resident of Ionia county, Mich. 
Studied law, was admitted in 1872, and went into practice at Ionia. 
Served as circuit court commissioner one term. A Republican until 
1872, since a Democrat. He was elected judge of the eighth circuit 
in 1881, and re-elected in 1887. 

WILLIAM H. SMITH, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1S75, was born April 15, 1832, 
at Gorham, N. Y. He received an'academical education, removed to 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 599 

Michigan in 1854 and settled in Grass Lake, Jackson county. Has 
been supervisor of Grass Lake, and is by occupation a farmer. 



WILLIAM T. SMITH, 

Representative from St, Joseph county in 1865, was born in Scott, N. 
Y., June 26, 1829. Received an academical education and became a 
teacher. Was in the recruiting service for two years. Came to Cen- 
treville, Mich., in 1862, taught several years, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1866. He was for two terms superintendent of schools in 
Kalamazoo county. Is now a justice, and engaged in furnishing 
school supplies. Politically a free trader. 



WILLIAM SNELL, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1843 and 1844, was born in 
the state of Rhode Island in 1796. By occupation a farmer, in poli- 
tics a Democrat. He settled as a farmer in Oakland, Oakland county, 
in 1828. Died July 28, 1870. 

BYRON A. SNOW, 

Representative from Saginaw county, was born in Jackson county, 
August 21, 1850. Has been a resident of the state all his lifetime, and. 
is by profession a lawyer, by persuasion a Democrat. Mr. Snow has 
held the office of supervisor. He was elected Representative for 
1887-S by a vote of 1,340 to 1,158 for John Northwood, Republican, 
and 87 for Magoffin, Prohibitionist. 

FIELDER S. SNOW, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1843, and Senator in 1849-50- 
3, was born in Ashford, Conn.. May 17, 1814. He became a clerk at 
the age of fifteen, and settled in Clinton, Mich., in 1837. He was a 
merchant and miller, in politics a Democrat. He was a leader in public 
enterprises, and was administrator of many estates. For twenty-five 
years a justice. Deceased. 

WILLIAM T. SNOW, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1S50, came from the state of 
New York, and settled on a farm in Addison, Oakland county, in 
1833. He was a clergyman, an excellent man, and was highly 



600 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

esteemed by the Indians, many of whom became christians un ler 
his preaching. He was town clerk in 1838-9, and supervisor from 
1847 to 1S54. 



STEPHEN F. SNYDER, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1883-5, was born in Cayuga 
county, X. Y., December 27, 1829, and received a common school 
education. He settled as a farmer at Homer, Mich., in 1866, He 
was a supervisor several years, and was county register of deeds six 
years. In politics a Republican. 



MILO SOULE 

Was born in Madison county, N. Y., July 3, 1804. He had fair 
schooling, and from 1820 to 1S30 taught winters, working on his 
father's farm summers. He married in 1830 and was a farmer in 
Murray, N. Y., for five years. In 1835 he came to Michigan and 
bought a farm in Marengo, Calhoun county, which he cultivated 
until I860. He was a justice for 36 years; county treasurer six years: 
supervisor four years; town clerk several years, an I a member of the 
constitutional convention of 1850. In politics a Democrat. 



CHARLES SPAFFORD, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1838, was a merchant and 
miller at Tecumseh, and a Whig in politics. Deceased. 



LEVI SPARKS, 

Senator from Berrien county in 1873-4, was born October 3, 1-23. in 
Centre. Indiana. He emigrated to Michigan in 1828, and settled in 
Niles township. Berrien county, where he now resides. He was 
educated in common schools. In 18G4 he was appointed by Governor 
Blair to go to Arkansas and receive the vote of the twelfth Michigan 
infantry. He has held various offices of trust in his township. In- 
occupation a farmer, politically a Democrat. 



ERASTUS SPAULD1NG 

Was born in Tompkins county. N. Y., July 1, 1818. He grew to man- 
hood in that state, studied medicine, removed to Michigan in 1845, 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 601 

settled in Oakland county, and followed hi3 profession there for 24 
years. He was a Whig, but in 1854 became a Republican. Repre- 
sentative from Oakland county in 1867. He removed to Grand 
Rapids in 1879, and is still engaged in medical practice. Now votes 
the national greenback union ticket. 

OLIVER L. SPAULDIXG 

Was born at Jaff rev, N. H. , August 2, 1S23, and was the son of Lyman 
and Susan (Marshall) Spaulding. He prepared for college at Melville 
academy in Jaffrey, working on the farm during the time. In 1851 
he entered Oberlin college and graduated in 1855. He then spent 
three years in teaching in the union schools at Medina, Ohio, and 
Hillsdale, Mich., and in the academy at Medina, Mich., giving leisure 
time to the study of law. In 1858 he was admitted to the bar and 
opened an office at St. Johns. In 1862 he enlisted as captain in the 
23d Michigan infantry and passed through all the grades to colonel, 
commanding the regiment in 1863. In 1865 he was in command of 
the second brigade of the second division, twenty-third army corps, 
and was brevetted "brigadier general." In 1858 he was elected 
regent of the State University and held that position for six years. 
In I860 he was elected secretary of state and was re-elected in 1868 t 
serving from 1867 to 1871. In 1875 .he was appointed special agent of 
the treasury department, which he held until his nomination by 
acclamation, by the republican convention at Owosso, for congress. 
He served efficiently in congress from 1881 to 1883. He was renomi- 
nated in 18S2 but was defeated by 32 votes, although the average 
democratic majority was 800. In 1885 he again tilled the pcsition of 
special agent for the treasury. He has been a prominent Mason, and 
filled the highest positions in the order. He is a Republican and a 
member of the Episcopal church. He married the daughter of Hon. 
John Swegles, former auditor general of Michigan, and they have 
four children. Fie was chairman of a commission sent by the gov- 
ernment to the Sandwich Islands' in 1883, to investigate alleged vio- 
lations of the Hawaiian reciprocity treaty. In 1887 he was the 
Republican candidate for circuit judge. Resides at St. Johns. 



JOHN J. SPEED 

Was born in Ithaca, N. Y., January 14, 1839. In 1848 came to Detroit; 
graduated at the State University; studied law in Detroit; was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1861; practiced his profession in Detroit; was a Rep- 



602 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

resentative in 1S73-4; was appointed one of the two additional judges 
to the 3d circuit in 1881, and was elected judge in 1882. His term 
expired in 1837. In politics a Republican. Is now engaged in prac- 
tice at Detroit. 



THOMAS R. SPENCE, 

Representative from Detroit, session 1807, was a native of Scotland, 
born in 1825. He was a druggist and physician, but went to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio (where he is supposed to be still a resident), soon after the 
close of his legislative term, to engage in the tobacco business. 



ASA SPENCER, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1863-4, was born in Herkimer 
county, N. Y., in 1807. He settled at Ionia. Mich., in 1845, where he 
kept hotel two years, when he moved to Smyrna, Ionia county, went 
into mercantile business, continuing his residence there until his 
death in 1S7G. Held various town offices and was a justice. In poli- 
tics a Republican. 

GROVE SPENCER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1840-1-8-50, was born at 
West Stockbridge, Mass., Aug. 3, 1806. Came to Ypsilanti, Mich., in 
182G. By profession a lawyer, but health failing, he removed in 1S44 
to his farm near Ypsilanti, which he managed successfully until his 
death Aug. 29, 1854. He was for years a director of the state agricul- 
tural society: was twice a candidate for member of state board of 
education; was president and recorder of Ypsilanti: and deeply inter- 
ested in locating the Normal school. In politics a Whig. 



HORACE C. SPENCER, 

Senator from Genesee county in 1885, was born at Cortland. N. Y., 
July 27. 1832. Removed when young to Springville, N. Y. Was edu- 
cated at an academy, clerked for years, was then a merchant until 
1866, when he settled at Flint, Mich., in the hardware trade. Bought 
a stock farm in 187G, and is now devoted to farming, and especially 
interested in raising fine horses. Politically a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 603 



JAMES W. SPENCER, 



Representative from Tuscola county in 1837, was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., Oct. 3, 1827, and was a resident of Pennsylvania from 
1849tolS61, when he settled in Indian Fields, Mich., his present 
home. Has been supervisor nine terms, twice chairman of the board, 
town treasurer, village president, county register two terms, and has 
held other offices. For nine years a merchant, now a farmer and real 
estate dealer. 

MICHAEL SPENCER, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1841, was born at East Hart- 
ford. Conn., Nov. o, 1804. Came to Calhoun county, Mich., in 1831, 
and located on a farm in Emmett. on which he resided until his death 
Oct. 10, 18-34. In religion a Baptist, in politics a Democrat. 



ROLLIN SPRAGUE, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1840, was born in East 
Bloomfield, N. J., in 1806. By occupation a merchant, politically a 
Republican. He came to Michigan about 1830. Died in August, 1S72. 



ROGER SPRAGUE, 

Member of the territorial council in 1824 and 1832. was born at 
Lebanon, Conn., in 1700. He settled first at Bloomfield, N. Y., and 
was for seven years sheriff of Ontario county, which then included 
nearly all of western New York, and was a member of the assembly 
in 1816-17. In 1821 he settled at Avon, Michigan. Died in July, 1848. 



WILLIAM SPRAGUE 

Was born in the state of Rhode Island; removed to Michigan and 
settled at Kalamazoo. In 1843 he was elected a Representative to 
congress, serving from Dacemb;-r 3, 1S49, to March 3, 1851. He was 
a Free Soiler in politics. Died soon after the close of his term at 
Kalamazoo. 

WILLIAM B. SPRAGUE, 

Representative from Branch county in 1^40, was born in the state of 
New York, Feb. 23, 1707. He graduated as a physician at Fairfield 



604 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

medical college. He practiced in New York until 1835, then settled 
in practice at Coldwater, Mich., and resides on the same spot which 
he first made his home, his second house being the first brick 
residence in that city. lie gave up medical practice thirty years 
ago. In 1836 he formed a partnership and built a saw-mill and 
flouring mill, now the largest roller mill in the county. He was the 
first town clerk of Coldwater in 1836; in 1837 was elected associate 
judge of the county court; in 1842 was elected judge of probate, 
which he held until 1845. At the age of ninety-one he is in good 
health, has good sight, enjoys books and society, and is often seen on 
the streets. He married in 18:51 a daughter of Rev. Francis Smith, 
and has three daughters and one son living. In religion a Methodist. 
He is held in universal respect and esteem. 



HENRY H. STAFFORD. 

Representative from Marquette county in 1877, was born in Boston, 
Mass., Jan. 6, 1833. He received an academical education. He came 
to Michigan in 1855, and took up his resilience in Marquette in 1856, 
where he now resides. He has held numerous public offices. He 
was receiver of the United States laud office at Marquette five years, 
the first mayor of Marquette, town treasurer, member of the school 
board, etc. By occupation a druggist, in politics a Republican. 



JOHN H. STANDISH. 

Senator from Newaygo and other counties in 18G7-9, was born in 
Benson. Vt., February 10, 1816, and is a direct descendant of Captain 
Miles Standish, of Puritan fame. Receiving a common school educa- 
tion, at the age of fifteen taught school in Orleans county, N. Y., 
and in Ohio, and the next year was a clerk in Chicago. From thence 
he traveled through Iowa, aud down the Mississippi, and at the age of 
seventeen was in the Texan service, where he rose to the rank of 
lieutenant. He spent a year in Louisana, came north, and taught 
school in Mt. Carmel, 111., where he married Hester A. Courter. He 
became a lecturer on psychology, and traveled extensively. He was 
admitted to the Illinois bar, and in 1839 settled ar Middleville, Mich. 
In 1852 he became a resident of Newaygo, which is now his home. 
Has been register of deeds, county clerk and prosecuting attorney of 
Newaygo county. In 1803 he became captain of company "A,"' 10th 
Michigan cavalry, and rose in service to the rank of lieutenant 
colonel. In 1869 he was appointed l\ S. di>trict attorney for western 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 605 

Michigan, and held that position eight years. For sonie years was 
engaged in practice at Muskegon, but in 1881 returned to Newaygo. 
In politics a Republican. 

OLIVER O. STANCHFIELD. 

Representative from Mason and Lake counties in 1877-79, was born 
in Washington county, Maine, August 16, 1836. He was educated in 
the academies of his native county, and studied law in the office of 
Hon. F. A. Pike, in Calais, Maine. In 1837 he came west and located" 
at Cedar Rapids Iowa, and was admitted to practice by the Linn 
county district court, of Iowa, in i860. In 1861 he was appointed 
sheriff and was subsequently re-elected twice to the same position. 
In 1871 he was a member of the Iowa legislature from Linn county, 
and was appointed one of the trustees of the Iowa state agricultural 
cDllege, which office he held until his removal to Michigan in 1874. 
In politics a Republican. 

ABIEL S. STANDARD, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1867-09-70, was born in Newport, 
N. H., December 2S, 1823. A farmer by occupation, politically a 
Republican. He came to Michigan with his father in 1S37, who 
located a farm in Boston. Ionia county, now occupied by his son. 
They were among the first pioneers of that section of the state. Mr. 
Stannard has been four terms supervisor of Boston. 



ERASTUS H. STANTON, 

Senator from Ionia and Montcalm counties in 1881-2, was born in 
Durham. N. Y., November 13, 1816, and received an academical 
education. He was four years a clerk, then became a merchant at 
Greenville, N. Y., and was also engaged in farming, banking and 
lumbering. He settled at Ionia, Mich., in 1867. He was a super- 
visor six years, and president of the village and mayor of the city of 
Ionia. In politics a Republican. 



HIRAM E. STAPLES. 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1885, was born in the state 
of New York, June 1, 1836. He has been a resident of this state for 
thirty-seven years, with the exception of the time he served ic the 
war as a member of the fifth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, having 
6? 



606 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

been engaged in business as a lumberman, which he still carries on, 
residing at Whitehall, where he has held the office of president of the 
common council for six years. He has also served as a supervisor. 
In politics a Republican. 

GEORGE P. STARK, 

Senator from Kent county in 1887, was born at Stow, Ohio, August 
19, 1832, and received a common school education, with a term or 
two at Hiram college. He learned the trade of a cooper, followed it 
until 1853, when he became a farmer. Was for one year, 1866, in 
the drug trade at Palestine, 111., then was a farmer until 1871, when 
he removed from Hudson, Ohio, to Cascade. Mich., where he is a 
merchant and farmer. He was a Representative in 1883. In politics 
a Fusionist. 

' LEWIS F. STARKEY, 

Senator from Kalamazoo county in 1843-4, was born in the state 
of New Hampshire, in 1801. He studied medicine at Norwich, N. Y., 
and at Philadelphia. Practiced as a physician and surgeon in a Phi 1- 
adelphia hospital, in Otsego county and Binghampton, N. Y. He 
came with his family to Detroit in 1836, and settled at Kalamazoo in 
1837, where he practiced Ids profession until his death in 1848. By 
appointment of the governor he was one year a visitor to the State 
University. 

GEORGE A. STARKWEATHER, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1859, was born in Plymouth, 
Mich., Feb. 26, 1820. of New England parentage, and still resides 
there. He was the second white child born in the township, as his 
mother was the first white woman to settle there. His early educa- 
tion was such as the time and the locality afforded; and his pursuits 
have been farming ami mercantile. He is now president of the first 
national bank of Plymouth, and has held various local offices. Was 
originally a Whig, and subsequently a Republican in politics. 

FRANCIS C. ST. AUBIN, 

Representative from the second district of Wayne county in 1855, was 
of French descent, and a native of llamtramck. born in 1831. After 
the annexation he represented his ward at different timesas alderman 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 607 

in the common council of Detroit. He was a carpenter and builder 
by occupation, a democrat in politics, and died Feb. 15, 1872. 



WILLIAM M. ST. CLAIR 

Was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1S09, and 
moved to Ohio with his parents in 1814. Became there a merchant. 
Came to Michigan in 1839, and resided at Algonae, St. Clair county, 
when elected as a Whig Representative to the legislature of 1S49. 



JOHN B. ST. JOHN, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1848, was born in Rensselaer 
county, N. Y., Nov. IT, 1804. He came to Michigan in 18:50, and set- 
tled on a farm three miles west of Utica, which he had purchased in 
1827, and where he now resides. In politics a Democrat. 



BENTON R. STEARNS, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1879, was born in Delaware 
county, Ohio, Dec. 12. 1842. He received a common school education, 
and removed to Berrien county. Mich., in 1S43. In 1861 he enlisted 
in company E. twelfth regiment Mich. vols., receiving commissions 
as second and first lieutenant in same regiment, serving four years 
and a half. Occupation, druggist, which he engaged in at Galien, 
Mich. He has filled the offices to township treasurer five years, and 
supervisor. In politics a Republican. 



AMOS E. STEELE, 
Representative from Ingham and Livingston counties in 1810, was 
born in Queensbury, N. Y., June 28. 1806. He settled in Onondaga, 
Mich., in 1836, and was elected associate judge of Ingham county in 
1838: took the county census in 1810: removed to Mason in l s '44, and 
was elected judge of probate in 1848; was justice 27 years, and filled 
many local offices. In politics a Republican after 1854. Died March 
15, 1878. 

GEO. E. STEELE, 
Representative from Antrim and other counties in 1S77, was born in 
West Andover. Ohio, Oct. 28, 1842. He removed to Kingsville, Ohio, 



008 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

in 1845, and in 1861 to Benzonia, Mich. He received an academical 
education. In 1864 he removed to Homestead: attended the state 
agricultural college: was county surveyor of Grand Traverse county 
then including Benzie, and supervisor; removed to Elk Rapids. 
Antrim county, in 1872, since which time he has been county sur- 
veyor of Antrim county, and supervisor of Elk Rapids, and largely 
engaged in examinations of lands, estimates, civil engineering and 
surveying, and in a small way in farming. In politics a Republican, 
later a Prohibitionist. 



JOSEPH H. STEERE. 

Of Sault Ste. Marie, was born May 19, 1852, at Addison, Lenawee 
county, Michigan. Removed to the state of Minnesota with his par- 
ents in 1854. Returned to Adrian. Michigan, in 1861, worked on a 
farm and taught school, attended Raisin Valley seminary and Adrian 
high school winters, until 1872, then entered literary class of Michi- 
gan University, graduated from there in classical course in 1S76. 
Studied law with Messrs. Geddes & Miller, of Adrian. Admitted to 
the bar in 1878. Removed to his present place of resilience and began 
the practice of law in the last named year. Elected prosecuting 
attorney of Chippewa county in 1880. He was elected judge of the 
eleventh circuit in the spring of 1881. 



WILLIAM M. STEPHENS, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1875. was born in Chittenden 
county, Vt., in 1825, where he resided until 1S32, when his father's 
family removed to Niagara county, N. Y. In 1835 the family removed 
to Michigan and settled in Stockbridge, Ingham county, where he 
has since resided, with the exception of four years spent in Califor- 
nia. He received a common school education, and is a farmer by 
occupation. In politics a Democrat. 



ROBERT STEPHENSON. 

Representative from Delta and Menominee counties in 1S81-2, was 
born in New Brunswick in 1836. He removed to Delta county in 
1846, and to Menominee county in 1849, where he has resided ever 
since. He received a common school education; has been engaged 
principally in lumbering, in which he is now largely interested: is 
superintendent of the Ludington, AVells & Van Schoick Lumber Co.. 
in which he is a large stockholder. He is also closely identified with 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 609 

several other important business enterprises in that section of the 
country. In politics a Republican. 



SAMUEL M. STEPHENSON, 

Senator from the 31st district, comprising the counties of Manmette, 
Menominee, Delta, Schoolcraft, Chippewa, and Mackinaw, in 1879-85, 
was born in New Brunswick in 1831. He received a common school 
education, and in 1846 located in Delta county, Mich., where be 
engaged in lumbering. In 1S58 he removed to Menominee, where he 
built the second saw mill on the river. He has been chairman of the 
board of supervisors most of the time since that county was organ 
ized. He is largely interested in "The Kirby Carpenter Co.," of 
Menominee, and the "Stephenson Banking Co.," of Marinette, Wis., 
being an officer of both. He is also engaged in real estate, lumber, 
and general mercantile business, and owns several large farms. He 
was a Representative in the legislature of 1877 and a member of the 
Senate in 1879. In pclitics a Republican, and was a delegate to the 
republican national convention of 1888. 



EZRA STETSON, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1851, was born in Otsego 
county, N. Y., in 1811. Settled as a physician at Galesburg, Mich., 
in 1S37, and was in practice there for twenty years. He was a 
graduate of Fairfield medical college. N. Y. He was supervisor of 
Comstcck, and a public spirited, active and influential citizen. In 
1857 he removed to Bureau county, Illinois, where he became a 
farmer and stock raiser, giving much attention to the Percheron 
breed of horses, and was among the first to bring them to this 
country. Has acquired a fortune. 



AMOS STEVENS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 18 19, and a delegate in the 
constitutional convention of 1835, was born in Sangerfield, N. Y., 
May 31, 1801. He removed to Steuben county in 180(3, and to Canton, 
Mich., in 1831, where lie died in 187U. He filled many local olfices. 
A farmer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, and a Presbyterian 
in religion. 



610 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

APPLETON STEVENS, 

Representative from Bay county in 1861-2, was born at Moodus, 

Conn., August 17, ISIS. Resettled at Portsmouth, Bay county, in 
1856, and was the first supervisor of that town. Died August 29, 

1878. 

FITZ H. STEVENS, 

Senator from Van Buren county in 1S53, was born in Tyngsboro, 
Mass., May 27, 1817. He came to Michigan in 1837, and resided in 
Berrien and Van Buren counties nearly the entire period from that 
date until his death, which occurred at St. Joseph, Sept. 7, 1870. 
In politics a Democrat. He was register of deeds in Van Buren 
county from 1S40 to 1842. Also postmaster of St. Joseph. He was 
active in raidng troops for the 12th Michigan infantry, and went out 
as the chosen quartermaster of the regiment, but did not finally 
receive his commission. 

HERMAN W. STEVENS, 

Of Port Huron, is a native of Michigan. Mr. Stevens graduated 
from the literary department of the Michigan University in 1866, 
and from the law department of that institution in 1S68, and at once 
began the practice of his profession at Port Huron, and was so 
engaged without interruption until January 1, 1882, when he assumed 
the duties of circuit judge of the sixteenth judicial circuit. 



HESTOR L. STEVENS 

Was born at Lima, New York, October, 1803; received an academical 
education; studied law, was admitted to the bar, and commenced 
practice in Rochester. N. Y., where he was also connected with the 
press. He attained eminence as an attorney, removed to 
Michigan in 1845, and locating at Pontiac engaged in practice. Ib- 
was prosecuting attorney of Oakland county in 1847 and 1848. He 
was elected Representative to congress in 1852, as a Democrat, 
receiving 10,740 votes against 8,948 votes for Bradley, Whig, and 
1,048 votes for Calkins, Free Soil. He served from December 5, 
1853 to March 3, 1855. In 1S54 he was defeated as a candidate for 
re-nomination. Soon after the expiration of his term he removed to 
Washington, where he practiced before the court of claims. He was 
an able lawyer, and a man of high social position. He died in 
Georgetown, D. C, May 7, 1^G4. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 611 



HORACE STEVENS, 



Representative from Oakland county in 1845, was born in Sharon 
Conn., August 29, 1799. He came to Michigan in 1835, was in 
business a mill owner and speculator, in politics a Democrat. Was 
a prominent local politician, and a man of wealth and position. Was 
one of the commissioners that located the state prison, and was also a 
judge. Was prominent in securing the Clinton and Kalamazoo 
canal. He gave the casting vote in the congressional convention 
which nominated Kinsley S. Bingham to congress the first term. 
He died in March. 1849. 



JOHN J. STEVENS, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1867, was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio. Oct. 17, 1823. By occupation a builder, in politics a Republican. 
He came to Monroe, Michigan, in 1834, where he now resides. Has 
been alderman and supervisor. He was captain of Co. K, 18th 
Michigan infantry, from June 18, 1802, until the regiment was. 
mustered out in June, 1805. 



STEPHEN R. STEVENS, 

Representative from Montcalm county in 1877-79, was born near 
Geneva, N. Y., Dec. 19, 182-G. He received an education at Hobart 
college, Geneva. He was engaged in teaching for a number of years. 
He removed to Michigan in 1863, and became a citizon of Greenville 
in 1SG6. He has filled various offices of trust. He is by occupation 
a merchant, in politics a Republican. 



WILLIAM C. STEVENS. 

Auditor General from 1883 to 1887. was born at Plymouth, Mich., 
Nov. 14, 1837, and from 1840 to 1861 resided at Whitmore Lake. He 
entered the service as a lieutenant in the 3d Michigan cavalry in 
1861. was discharged in 1862 for disability, but in the fall of that 
year became a captain in the 9th Michigan cavalry, and was pro- 
moted to major, serving until the close of the war. Studied law and 
graduated from the University law class of 1SGS, went into practice 
at East Tawas, served as prosecuting attorney, and ten years county 
treasurer. In politics a Republican. Now resides at Ann Arbor. 



612 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY 



WILLIAM N. STEVENS 



Was born at Elizabeth, N. J., April 29, 1813. He learned the trade 
of a carpenter and worked at it for several years. He moved from 
New York city to Plymouth, Mich., in 1834, and from there to Whit- 
more Lake in 1817. He was engaged in mercantile business from 
1847 to 1872. He was a Representative from Washtenaw county in 
1861-2. He was county clerk in 1872. In 1882 removed to Ann 
Arbor, where he now resides. 



EDWIN STEWART 

Was born at Cambria, N. Y., August 28, 1819. He came to Michigan 
in 1S37. In 18:19 he taught school in Pine Lake. Oakland county. 
He attended the branch of the State University at Kalamazoo, gradu- 
ated as a physician at Rush medical college, Chicago, in 1850, and 
since that time has been a practicing physician. He resides at Men- 
don. He was a Representative in 1861-2-3-4-5, as a Republican. He 
was postmaster at Mendon during President Arthur's administration. 



JAMES STEWART, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1809-70. was born near Glas- 
gow, Scotland, in 1830. His early occupations were machine work 
and railroading. He came to the United States in 1851. After a 
year spent in Penn Yan, N. Y.. he removed to Michigan, settling in 
Van Buren, Wayne county, where he engaged in lumbering. He is 
still in the same business in the village of Belleville, although for 
several years he carried on a flouring mill at New Boston. He has 
always been a Democrat. He has been honored with various offices, 
and is now a justice. 



WILLIAM W. STICKNEY, 

Judge of the 6th circuit from 1881 to 1S8S, was born in Shoreham, 
Yt., January 30, 1832, received an academical education; taught 
school; graduated irom the Poughkeepsie law school in 1855, and 
studied elsewhere. He was admitted in 1850, and commenced prac- 
tice at Lapeer, where he now resides. He was two years prosecuting 
attorney, and served on the school board many years, and was its 
president. In politics a Democrat. Resides on a farm. He was 
defeated for re-election in ISS6. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 613 

ELI L. STILLSON, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1845, was born in Scipio, N. 
Y., May 20, 1804. When young he removed with his father to 
Rochester, N. Y. , and was in the mercantile business in early life. In 
1836 he came to Battle Creek, Mich., and devoted himself to the 
profession of law. He held the offices of master in chancery and 
justice. His court was regarded as a model in point of dignity, pre- 
cision and practice. Died November 11, 1862. 

JOSEPH W. STINCBCOMB, 

Representative from Barry county in 1877, was born in Perry county, 
Ohio, July 2, 1S28. He removed to Seneca county, Ohio, in 1830. 
Received a common school education. In 18G0 he removed to Michi- 
gan and settled in Sunfield, Eaton couuty, removed again to Wood- 
land, Barry county, where he now resides. He has held the offices of 
school inspector, highway commissioner, and justice. In politics a 
Republican. 

FRANCIS B. STOCKBRIDGE, 

Of Kalamazoo, was born in Bath, Me., April 9, 1826. Became a clerk 
at Boston at the age of sixteen, and remained there until 1S47, then 
became a lumber dealer in Chicago. In 1850 engaged in the manu- 
facture of lumber in Allegan county, which he continued until 1874. 
With O. R. Johnson as partner has been heavily engaged in lumber- 
ing in the upper peninsula, is largely interested in silver mining, and 
in southern pine. He was a Representative in the Michigan legisla- 
ture of 1869-70. and Senator in 1871-2. He was a Whig, but a Repub- 
lican since 1854. He declined the position of minister to the Hague 
in 1867. He is largely engaged in the breeding of fine horses with S - . 
A. Brown of Kalamazoo. In 1887 was elected United States Senator 
and his term will expire in 1893. 



JOHN STOCKTON 

Was born in Lancaster. Pa., Dec. 24, 1798, and when young removed 
with his parents to Chillicothe, O., became a clerk, and served in the 
war of 1812, and was in command of Fort Maiden when peace was 
declared. In 1815 was the private secretary of Gov. Cass, and in 1816 
became a Detroit merchant. Removed to Mt. Clemens, and was post- 
master there three years, also county clerk and register of Macomb 
county. He was a justice of the peace from 1S19 to 1874. He was a 
(38 



614 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

member of the territorial council from 1834 to 1332, and again in 1834; 
Senator in 1835; Representative in 18-40-1-50, and speaker pro 
tem. in 1850. In 1824 he was government superintendent of the Lake 
Superior copper mines. He raided the 8th Michigan cavalry in 18G2, 
and escorted it to the field, two of his sons being captains in the regi- 
ment. Dt ceased. 



MARTIN P. STOCKWELL, 

Member of the constitutional convention of 1807, was born in Cato, 
N. Y., and located a farm in Dover, Lenawee county, in 1837. Has 
held the offices of justice and supervisor, and for eight years was 
county superintendent of the poor. Politically a Republican. 

CAMERON C. STODDARD, 

Representative from Tuscola county in 1861-2, was born in Essex 
county, N. Y., in February, 1830. By occupation a farmer, in poli- 
tics a Republican. He came to Michigan from western New York in 
1858. Enlisted as a private in company A, 29th Michigan infantry, in 
1804, and returned home in September, 1865, with a commission as 
1st lieutenant. He was supervisor several terms, and clerk of Tuscola 
county from 1872 to 1870. Died January 24, 1870. 

JESSE STODDARD 

Was born in Litchfield, Conn., July 3, 1792. He married in 1814, 
removed to Genesee county, N. Y.. in 1810, and from there to Hills- 
dale county in 1830, By occupation a farmer. He was a Repre- 
sentative in the legislature of 1819. 



WILLIAM STODDARD 

Was born August 31, 1831, in Sheldon, N. Y., received a common 
school education, came to Michigan in 1830, and settled as a fanner 
in Litchfield, Hillsdale county. He was a Representative in 1857, and 
Senator in 1871-2-3. A Republican in politics. He died in 1873. 

CHARLES W. STONE. 

Representative from Newaygo county in 1883, was born in the county 
of Warren, N. Y. ( June 2, 1833, and received his education in the 
common schools. He came to Michigan in 1854, and settled in 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 615 

Newaygo county, where he has resided since. He is a farmer and 
breeder of short horn cattle, and has lumber interests. He has been 
nine times elected supervisor of his township, and twice elected 
county treasurer. "Was a National in politics. 



CLEMENT W. STONE, 

Representative from Roscommon and other counties in 1877, was 
born May 30, 1840, in Gloucester, Mass. In 1S43 he removed to 
Michigan and located in Kalamazoo. He received an academical 
education. In 1861 enlisted as commissary sergeant in the sixth regi- 
ment, Mich, volunteers, and was promoted to the captaincy of Co. D 
of that regiment. At the close of the war he held the position of 
inspector general of the district of south Alabama and west Florida. 
In 186G, in connection with his brother, he purchased the Kalamazoo 
weekly Telegraph, and afterwards established the daily Telegraph. In 
1872 he located at Houghton Lake. In 1874 he was elected supervisor 
of Roscommon township, at that time being attached to Midland 
county. In 1875 he was elected county treasurer of Roscommon 
county. He was engaged in farming and real estate, In politics a 
Republican. Deceased. 



HIRAM STONE, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1S44-5-8, was a lawyer in fine 
practice at Monroe. Died while on his way to California. 



JOHN W. STONE, 

Representative in congress from 1877 to 1S81, was born in Wads- 
worth, O., July 18, 1838. He received a common and select school 
education, came to Michigan in 1830, and taught school four winters. 
He was clerk of Allegan county two terms. Studied law, was 
admitted in 1800, and was prosecuting attorney of Allegan county 
from 1865 to 1871. Was elected circuit judge in 1873, resigned in 1874, 
and went into practice at Grand Rapids. After the close of his second 
term in congress was U. S. district attorney for western Michigan 
until 1S83. Now in practice at Houghton, Mich. A Republican in 
politics. 



616 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

WALES F. STORRS 

Was born at Westport. N. Y., Jan. 19, 1816. He received the educa- 
tion of common schools, moved with his parents to Portage county, 
Ohio, in 1834, worked on a farm until 1S36, and then taught school 
for several years. In 1S59 he removed to Grand Haven, Michigan, 
and engaged in lumbering. In 1867 he was a Representative, and in 
1871-2 a Senator. A Whig until 1854, then a Republican. 



WILLIAM L. STOUGHTON, 

Attorney General 1867-9, and Representative in congress 1869-73, was 
born in Bangor, N. Y., March 20, 1827. Received an academical edu- 
cation, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He was 
prosecuting attorney of St. Joseph county, 1855-9, and for some 
time U. S. district attorney for Michigan. He resigned, became 
lieutenant colonel of the 11th Michigan infantry, became colonel 
April 1, 1862, lost a leg in battle, was made brigadier general, and at 
the close of the war major general, "for gallantry in the field.'' He 
practiced law several years at Grand Rapids, then resumed practice 
at his old home in Sturgis, where he died in the spring of 1888. 



BYRON G. STOUT, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1857-9, speaker in 1859, and 
Senator in 1861-2, was born near Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1829, and 
became a resident of Oakland county, Mich., in 1S31. He graduated 
from the State University in 1851. Studied law one year, devoted 
eight years to teaching, and since has given most of his time to 
agriculture and real estate. In 1862 he was the union-democratic 
nominee for governor, but was defeated. A Republican until 1862, 
since a Democrat. Was the democratic nominee for congress in 1868 
and 1870, and for State Senator in 1883, was a delegate to the repub- 
lican national convention in 1856, and to the democratic national con- 
ventions of 1868, 1880, and 1888. Resides at Pontiac. 



DAVID B. STOUT, 

Representative in the legislature of 1838, settled at Allegan, Michigan, 
in 1S36. In politics a Whig. He removed to New Jersey in the 
forties, was a Free Soiler in 1848, became a preacher, and died in that 
state. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 617 

ISAAC STOW, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1875, was born in Wey- 
bridge, Vt., Dec. 10, 18:30. In 1830 be came with his parents to the 
western part of Livingston county. He had the advantage of a good 
high school for some months. He has filled nearly every position in 
the gift of his township, and with the exception of three years has 
held the office of supervisor since 1865. He is engaged in agriculture. 
In politics a Democrat. 

ALEXANDER H. STOWELL, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1S53, was born in Vermont in 1808. 
He came to Michigan at an early day, and was a bookbinder by trade. 
He identified himself with the business of Detroit, and became a 
trader in a general way, especially in real estate. He was alderman 
1850-3, and served as assessor and city marshal at various times. Was 
a Democrat in politics. Deceased. 



JAMES J. STRANG 

Was born at Scipio, N. Y., March 21, 1813, and was the son of a 
farmer. He received a common school education, followed by a 
short term at Fredonia academy. When young he became a con- 
spicuous debater in the rural clubs, and had a morbid desire for 
distinction. At the age of twelve he joined the Baptist church, and 
was for some time an active member. He was restlessly active, 
taught school, delivered temperance addresses, worked on his father's 
and other farms, and at the age of twenty-one commenced the study 
of law. He was admitted to the bar in 1836. and soon after married 
Mary Perce. He practiced law at Mayvilleand Ellington, N. Y., and 
was postmaster at Ellington. In 1S43 he emigrated to Burlington, 
Wisconsin, and formed a law partnership with C. P. Barnes. In 
1844 he visited Nauvoo, 111., the Mormon headquarters, was speedily 
converted and baptized into that faith. He was authorized by Joseph 
Smith, as an elder and minister, to establish a Mormon colony in 
Wisconsin. Strang founded his colony at Voree, (now Spring 
Prairie) Wisconsin, and published the Voree Herald. The colony 
grew. In May, 1847, he explored the Beaver Islands, and made it 
his headquarters. St. James was named from him, and in 1850 the 
colony elected hini king. He then published the XortJicrn Inlander, 
and the saints became the owners of homesteads. In 1849 his first 
wife left him, and he had another wife in 1851, a second in 1852, and 



618 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

two others in 1855. In July, 1856, he was murdered on Beaver 
Island, and was buried at Spring Prairie, Wis. He was a Represent- 
ative in 1853-5, as a Democrat. He was a man of ability, and aside 
from polygamy, of upright character, scholarly life and studious 
habits, and a good writer and speaker. 



SAMUEL STREET, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1850, was a native of North 
Carolina. He located a farm in Bertrand, Berrien county, in 1835, 
and built a double log house, where he lived until his death in 1861. 
He was a supervisor of Bertrand. 



RANDOLPH STRICKLAND 

Was born at Dansville, N. Y., February 4, 1823, and died May 5, 1881, 
His grandfather was a revolutionary soldier. His education was 
obtained under great difficulties, mostly at night by the light of 
burning pine knots. From sixteen to twenty-one he was employed 
in a saw-mill, working sixteen hours a day. In 1844 he taught 
school in Ingham county, Michigan. For five years he was engaged 
in studying and working, and was admitted to the bar in 1849. After 
a short time spent in practice at Detroit, he was elected prosecuting 
attorney of Clinton county, and held that position for eight years. 
He first resided at Desvitt, after that at St. Johns. He was a delegate 
to the republican national convention of 1856; a Senator in 1861-2: 
provost marshal, 18G3-5; and Representative in congress 1S69-71. He 
was a Republican in politics. 



DANIEL STRIKER, 

Secretary of State from 1871 to 1875, was born in Rose, N. Y., April 
9, 1835, and came with his parents to Concord, Mich., the same year. 
In 1851 they moved to Baltimore,' Barry county. He became a clerk 
at Hastings from 1855 to 1858. He was clerk of Barry county six 
years; deputy county clerk three years; supervisor and chairman of 
county board; was admitted to the bar in 1870; ha-; been engaged in 
the drug and hardware trade, and a national bank director. He is 
chairman of the Albion college endowment fund committee, and 
devotes his time to that and to banking. In politics a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 619 

GILBERT STRIKER, 

Representative from Barry county in 1873-1, was born in Washing- 
ton, N. Y., October 13. 1811. In 1818 his parents removed to Wayne 
county, N. Y. He received a common school education. In 1835 
removed to Michigan and settled in Concord, Jackson county. In 
1852 he removed to Baltimore, Barry county, where he now resides. 
He has served in several responsible positions in his township. A 
farmer by occupation, and a Republican in politics. 

OLIVER P. STROBRIDGE, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1850, was born in Claremont, 
N. H., June 1, 1818. By profession a physician. He came to Michi- 
gan in 1840, and lived at Farmington until 1845, when he removed to 
Almont, and practiced his profession until 1873. Then went to Cali- 
fornia for his health and did not return to Almont until a short time 
before his death, Feb. 1, 1880. 

JOHN STRONG, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1835-6, was a native of Eng- 
land, born 1799. He came to Michigan in 1822, was a farmer by 
occupation, and died March 25, 1831. His son (of the same name) 
has since held seats both in the House and Senate, from Wayne and 
Monroe counties. 

JOHN STRONG, Jr., 
Was born in Greenfield, Michigan, April 7, 1831. He received a com- 
mon school education and followed farming until 1863, when he 
removed to South R jckwood, Monroe county, and engaged in mill- 
ing, in manufacturing staves, hea ling, and lumber, in merchandise, 
farming and raising short horn stock. In 1861-2 he was a Repre- 
sentative from Wayne county, in 1>>79 in the same position from 
Monroe county, and in 1881-2-3 was a Senator from Monroe couuty. 
In politics a Democrat. 

MYRON STRONG 
Was born and brought up in Rochester, N. Y. He removed to Cass 
county, Michigan, in 1835, and settled on a farm near Edwardsburg. 
In 1838 he was elected an associate judge of the county. He was a 
Representative in 1841. He sold his farm in 1847 and returned to 
Rochester, N. Y., where he lived until the close of the late war, when 
he removed to FloriJa, and died there about 1>>72. 



620 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

SYLVESTER A. STRONG, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1879, was born Sept. 10, 1833, 
in St. Lawrence county. N. Y.; removed to Michigan in 1835, and 
became a resident of Jackson county in 1840. He received a com- 
mon school education, and chose a farmer's life. He has held many 
offices, including treasurer, highway commissioner, and justice. 
Politics, national. 

JOHN STRUBLE, 

Representative from Cass county in l-r75, was born in Union county, 
Pa., Feb. 9, 1S23, removed to Michigan in 1S46, and settled at Three 
Rivers, St. Joseph county. He received a common school education, 
and held the offices of supervisor and justice. His occupation is 
farming. In politics a Democrat. 



CHARLES E STUART 

Was born at Canaan Corners, Columbia county, New York. Novem- 
ber 25, 1810. His father soon removed to Waterloo, X. Y., where he 
received the education of common and grammar schools. At the age 
of nineteen he commenced the study of law, and was admitted to tne 
bar of Seneca county. In 1835 he settled at Kalamazoo, Mich., and 
began his distinguished career as a lawyer and politician. In 1842 he 
was Representative in the state legislature; from 1847 to 1849. and 
from 1831 to 1S53 he was Representative in congres?; and from 1853 to 
1859 was United States Senator from Michigan. He attained high 
reputation as a lawyer, speaker and legislator. His personal appear- 
ance was faultless: he was at once commanding and graceful; just 
above the medium height, and compactly built. A fine eye lighted 
up a classic head and face. In his legal contests he never lost poise 
or temper, never used manuscript or notes, and never abused a wit- 
ness or opponent. As a public speaker he was always in demand. In 
words, look, tone and gesture he carried art to the highest finish. 
With great intellectual endowments, keen perception and courage, he 
attained high position at the bar, and in the political arena. In the 
Senate he was a fine presiding officer. On account of ill health, he 
retired from practice and public life many years ago. He was a dele- 
gate at large from Michigan to the democratic national convention in 
18G0, and was the leader of the Douglass delegates. He was also a 
delegate at large to the democratic national convention in 1863, and 
was a delegate to the union convention at Philadelphia in lbGO. For 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 621 

the last seventeen years of his life he was an in valid, but never lost 
his interest in public affairs. He raised the loth Michigan infantry in 
1862. He died at Kalamazoo May 19, 1887. 

DAVID STUART 

"Was born in the state cf New York; removed to Detroit, Michigan; 
was elected a Representative from Michigan in the thirty-third con- 
gress as a Democrat, receiving 10.125 votes against 9,370 votes for 
Howard, Whig, and G05 for Dexter, Free Soiler, serving from Dec. 5, 
1853, to March 3, 1855. 

PATRICK STUART, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1887, was born at Tulnagingay, 
Fermanagh county, Ireland, March 17, 1820. His father was a 
mechanic, and died leaving a widow and four children, of which 
Patrick was next to the youngest. In a few years their means were 
exhausted, and when the subject of this sketch was but seven years 
old he was compelled to help make his own living. Afterwards he 
traveled through Ireland, Scotland and England, and finally, in 1843, 
sailed for America, where he learned the brass molder's trade, 
married and settled in Detroit, where he has resided about thirty- 
seven years, working at his trade until three years ago, when he was 
made sewer inspector. Mr. Stuart is a Democrat, and was elected 
Representative by a vote of 12,255. 



ROBERT STUART 

"Was born at Callander, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1785. He received a 
fair education, and at the request of his uncle, David Stuart, then an 
agent of the northwest company, he came to Montreal, Canada, when 
twenty-two years of age. There he made himself master of the 
French language, and subsequently entered the otllce of the attorney 
general of the province. He. with his uncle, John Jacob Astor, and 
others, in 1810 became partners in a scheme for establishing trading 
posts on the Pacific coast and its rivers. In September, 1810, the 
Stuarts with a crew of fifty-one sailed for the mouth of the Columbia 
Tiver, where they founded Astoria, and' established several trading 
posts on the Columbia and its tributaries. The war of 1812 compelled 
them to sell out to the northwest fur co., and Mr. Stuart with a 
party of six traveled overland from Astoria to New York. In 1817 
he removed to the island of Mackinac as the general agent of the 
60 



62 % i MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

American fur company, which he successfully managed until 1835, 
when the business was closed out and he removed to Detroit, invest- 
ing largely in real estate. He became a director in the old bank of 
Michigan, and was appointed state treasurer in 1840, which position 
he held nearly one year. He was a ruling elder in the Presbyterian 
church. In all religious matters his place was in the front rank. He 
died October 29, 1848. 

DAVID STURGIS, 

Senator from Clinton county in 1851, was born in Brant county, 
Ontario, March 10, 1810. By occupation a merchant; in politics a 
Democrat. Came to Detroit in 1S37 and engaged in peddling for the 
wholesale house of Beecher & Abbott, making his trips by the way 
of Pontiac and DeWitt to Grand Rapids, which gave him an oppor- 
tunity to find a place to settle. Commenced mercantile business at 
Portland, then removed to De Witt in 1810, and remaiued there mer- 
chandizing and milling until the founding of St. Johns, in which he 
took an active part with Auditor General Swegles and others in 
1853-4. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1850; 
associate judge in 1842; supervisor of De Witt in 1850 and 1853: and 
trustee of the union school at St. Johns. Fond of pioneer life he took 
pride in the advancement of the state, and was a great favorite of the 
Indians, speaking their language fluently. Died in February, 1864. 



JAMES SULLIVAN 

Was born in Exeter, N. H., Dec. 6, 1811, and was of illustrious ances- 
try, his grandfather being General Sullivan of the revolution, who 
was governor of New Hampshire from 1786 to 1769, and representa- 
tive in congress. His father, George Sullivan, was an eminent law- 
yer, and was attorney general of New Hampshire, and representative 
in congress. James Sullivan graduated from Dartmouth college at 
the age of eighteen, studied and practiced law at Concord, N. H.. in 
1837 came to Niles, Michigan, soon after removing to Edwardsburg 
and thence to Cassopolis. He was a practitioner at the bar of Cass 
county from 1838 to 187« s . and was an able lawyer, tie was prosecut- 
ing attorney from 1852 to 1854. In 1853 he removed to Dowagiac, 
where he resided until his death in August, 1878. He was Senator in 
1855, and a member of the constitutional convention of 1850. He 
there made a speech on the grand jury system which was regarded 
as a masterpiece of eloquence and logic. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. G23 



JACOB SUMMERS 



Was born in the state of New Jersey, Jan. 7, 1787. He was by occu- 
pation a farmer, in politics a Democrat. His father became a judge 
of records in Philadelphia. The son settled in Shelby, Macomb county, 
in 1831. He was supervisor in 1830; Representative in the 
legislature of 1835 and 1835; Senator in 1837-8-9-40-0 and 1850, 
and associate judge of Macomb county. He was a man of strong 
mind, but uneducated, indolent and eccentric. But as a legislator he 
had great influence, and often defeated the strongest men of the State 
in legislation. He was familiarly known as "Uncle Jake." He died 
July 25, 1863. 

JOHN J. SUMNER 

Was born April 17, 1830, in Sodus, N. Y., and received the education 
of common schools. In 1847 he emigrated with his parents to Bed- 
ford, Monroe county, where he now resides. Has been postmaster at 
Lambertville twenty-two years: justice eight years: supervisor five 
years; Representative in the legislature in 1871-2: and Senator in 1873- 
4. Occupation general merchant and farmer. A Republican until 
18S4, since a Prohibitionist. 

JAMES B. SUTHERLAND 

Was born in North Castle, N. Y. He became a clerk'in the dry goods 
with T. Peck, on Cedar street. New York city. He went to Missouri 
in 18-10, and in 1841 engaged in mercantile and lumber business at 
St. Joseph, Michigan, had a lumber yard at Chicago, and was in the 
trade for twenty years. He was a member of the legislature in 1855 
as a temperance democrat, spoke and voted for the.Maine law and 
free railroads. Married the daughter of J. B. Lame in 1853: an inde- 
pendent Democrat up to 1884, now a Prohibitionist. A deacon in the 
Congregational church at St. Joseph, which is still his home. 



JABEZ G. SUTHERLAND 

Was born in Onondaira county. N. Y., Oct. 6, 1825; removed with his 
father to Genesee county in 1836. He studied law and was admitted 
in 1848. In 181!) he began practice in Saginaw City, and became 
prosecuting attorney of the county. In 1850 he was a member of the 
state constitutional convention. In 1853 he was a Representative in 
the state legislature. After that he devoted himself to his practice 
with signal success. In 1S58 he was the democratic candidate for 



624 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

attorney general. In 1SG3 he was elected circuit judge of the tenth 
circuit, and was re-elected in 1809 without opposition. He acquired 
distinction as a judge. In 1807 he was a delegate to the state consti- 
tutional convention. In 1870 he was elected to the 47th congress, 
serving one term. He is now practicing law with success at Salt 
Lake City. 

EDWIN SUTTON 

Was born in Ulster county, N. Y., April 1, 1821. He settled in Mason 
township, Cass county, Michigan, in 1840. He was a farmer and dis- 
trict school teacher, and town clerk and school inspector. Was a 
Democrat until 1854, then a Republican. He was Representative in 
the Michigan House of 1857. Died June 12. 1802. 



GEORGE SUTTON, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1875. was born in Warren 
county, N. J., February 17, 1810. He came with bis father to Michi- 
gan in 1830, and settled upon a farm of five hundred acres, on which 
he now dwells, in Northfield, being now and always having been a 
farmer. He received his education in the common schools. He has 
held office in his township ever since it was organized, having tilled 
the positions of supervisor, justice of the peace, and other offices. In 
politics a Democrat. 

• • NATHAN E. SUTTON, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1885, was born in North- 
field, January 17, 1842, upon the farm purchased in 1824 of the United 
States, by his father's family, who were the first settlers in the town- 
ship. Here he still resides and follows the occupation of a farmer 
and dealer in live stock. In early life Mr. Sutton received a good 
education, passing through the common schools and graduating at 
the Ann Arbor commercial college in 1801. He has filled the office 
of supervisor for two terms, and was elected as a Democrat. 



WILLIAM C. SUTTON, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1873-4, was born December 3, 1811, in 
"Warwick, N. Y. He was educated in the common schools. In 1857 
he emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Battle, Creek. In 1805 lie 
removed to the town of Dearborn, Wayne county, where he now 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 625 

resides. He has served in several responsible offices in the town 
where he has resided, and where he now resides, and before leaving 
New York held various public offices. His occupation is of a miscel- 
laneous character. 



JOHN B. SWEETLA.ND, 

Representative from Cass county in 1875. was born July 4, 1834, in 
Tompkins county, N. Y., and removed to Michigan in July. 1861. He 
was educated at the district schools and New York central college, 
and is a graduate of the medical department of the University of 
Buffalo. He enlisted as a private in the fourth Michigan cavalry, 
serving thirteen months, when he received an appointment upon the 
medical staff in the regular army. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES A. SWEEZEY, 

Representative from Barry county in 18634-7, was born at Brook 
Haven, Long Island, N. Y.. September 19, 1828. A lawyer by pro- 
fession; a Republican in politics. He came to Michigan in 1834, and 
lived with his parents at Napoleon, Jackson county, until June, 1831, 
when he settled in Hastings, and was admitted to the bar at Grand 
Rapids in 1833. He has been prosecuting attorney of Barry county 
for six years, and was regent of the University of Michigan from 
1864 to 1872. Is still in the practice of his profession at Hastings 
Has been twice elected and for two years filled the trust of grand 
chancellor of the order of Knights of Pythias of Michigan. 



JOHN SWEGLES 

Was born in Hector, N. Y., April 10, 1819. He commenced the study 
of medicine at the age of eighteen, and abandoned it to become 
purser's clerk on the brig Porpoise of the Atlantic coast survey. In 
1S40 he removed to Jonesville, Michigan. He was clerk of Hillsdale 
county from 1815 to 1849. In 1850 he was elected auditor general, 
and served for two terms from 1851 to 1855. In 1853 he selected for 
a company of which he was a member the site of the present village 
of St, Johns, the land purchased comprising 900 acres. He built a 
saw-mill and stave house the next year, and employed men to clear 
the land. The village was named St. Johns as a mark of honor to 
him. He died many years since. 



626 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



JAMES H. SWEENEY, 



Representative from Lenawee county in 1846, was a physician. He 
came from the state of New York about 1835, and lived many years 
at the village of Morenei. Deceased. 



GEORGE W. SWIFT 

Was born in Palmyra, N. Y., May 21, 1817. In 1825 he came with 
his father, Rev. Marcus Swift, to Michigan, the family settling on a 
farm in Nankin, W r ayne county, where he remained until twenty 
years of age, receiving his education largely at home. In 1807 he 
went to New York and enjoyed for four years good educational 
advantages. As a speaker he early distinguished himself in debate, 
especially upon the subjects of temperance and anti-slavery, and 
delivered many public addresses. He removed to Lansing with bis 
family and was state librarian from 1857 to 1850. In 1859 he had 
charge of the state fund for the relief of destitute settlers in Gratiot, 
Montcalm, Isabella and adjoining counties, and purchased over 120 
tons of provisions and supplies, which were loaned, notes being taken 
in over 2,000 cases. For this work be received the thanks of the 
state officers. In politics he was a Republican. He was a Repre- 
sentative from Wayne county in 1 J 67-0-70. He was sergeant-at- 
aruis of the House [in 1865. In 1869 he was appointed consul at 
Windsor, which he held for four years. He died at Northville, 
Michigan, April 28, 18S5. 



JOHN M. SWIFT 

Was born in Nankin, Mich., February 11, 1832, and was the youngest 
son of Rev. Marcus Swift. His early life was that of a farmer's son, 
and his education was largely obtained at home, with one year at 
common schools and a short academical course. He commenced the 
study of medicine in 1851. and graduated in 1854 at the eclectic medi- 
cal institute of Cincinnati. He has attained distinction as a physi- 
cian, and has been elected a member of various medical societies 
both in this country and in England. He is also a fine tenor singer, 
has taken great interest in music, and through him, largely, North- 
ville has a wide reputation as a musical town. In politics a Repub- 
lican, in religion a Presbyterian. In 1865 he was a Representative, 
and was one of the commission who located the house of correction 
at Ionia in 1876. 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 62? 

ORSON SWIFT, 

Representative from Barry county in 1885, was born in Huntington, 
Vt., August 3. 1838. He came to Michigan in 1802, and located in 
Leroy, Calhoun county. Five years later he removed to Maple Grove, 
Barry county, where he has since resided. He has always been 
engaged in the business of farming. He lias held the office of super- 
visor of his township six years. In politics a Fusionist. 



WILLIAM F. SWIFT, 

Senator from the thirty-first district, comprising Mackinac, Chip- 
pewa, Schoolcraft, Delta, Menominee, Marquette and Baraga coun- 
ties in 1881-2, was born in the town of Sharon, Litchfield county, 
Conn., July 10, 1848. He removed to Ishpeming, Mich., in 1873. As 
the Republican candidate for Senator he received 5,257 votes, to 
3,001 for Alfred-P. Swineford, Democrat. 



ALBERT P. SWINEFORD 

Was born in Ashland, Ohio, September 14, 1836. A printer by trade, 
in polities a Democrat. He came to Michigan in 1867, and published 
the Mining and Manufacturing Xews, the first paper at Negaunee. 
He started the Mining Journal, at Marquette, in 1808, and is still 
part owner of that paper. Prior to coming to Michigan he had 
published the Star, at Albert Lea, Minn.: Banner, at La Crescent, 
Minn.; started the first daily at La Crosse, Wisconsin: published the 
Daily Enquirer at Milwaukee, in 1860, and the Democratic Press at 
Fond Du Lac, in 1864.-5-6. Then was in the oil business in Canada, 
then an express messenger, thence to Lake Superior. He was a 
Representative in the legislature of 1871-2, and was a commissioner 
to the New Orleans exposition. He was appointed early in the 
administration of President Cleveland, governor of Alaska, and now 
fills that position, residing at Sitka. 



ALEXANDER TACLES, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1835-6-9, came to Michigan 
in 1822, and settled at Romeo. He was a farmer by occupation, 
politically a Democrat. Died April 12, 1855. 



G28 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



MOSES TAGGART 



Was born at Wilson, N. Y., February 27, 1843. Is by profession an 
attorney at law. Mr. Taggart's early life was spent on a farm. He 
prepared for college at Wilson collegiate institute. He was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1SG7, from the law department of the University 
of Michigan, and was admitted to the bar at Buffalo, N. Y„ Decem- 
ber, 1^67. In the fall of 1884. he was elected on the republican 
ticket attorney general of the state of Michigan, and was re-elected 
for the same office in 1880, receiving 181. COG votes, to 172,982 for John 
C. Donnellv, Fusionist, and 25,439 for the Prohibition candidate. 



LEVI B. TAFT 

Was born at Bellingham, Mass., August G. 1821. He came to Michi- 
gan in 1834. He graduated at Dartmouth college in 1843, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1845. He practiced law in Chicago for sixteen 
years, when he removed to Pontiac, Mich. He practiced there until 
1873, when he was elected judge of the Gth circuit. He retired from 
the bench in 1875, and is still in practice at Pontiac. 



HENRY P. TAPPAX 

Was born at Rhinebeck, N. Y.. April 18. 1805. His father. Major 
Peter Tappan, was an officer of the revolution, and took part in the 
siege of Yorktown. The son at fourteen was left dependent on his 
own resources, and with great effort and self denial, graduated with 
high honor at Union college in 1825. Later he received from that 
college thedegreeof D.D.. and of LL. D. from Columbia college. He 
studied theology at Auburn, and for three years was pastor of a Con- 
gregational church at Pittsfield, Mass., resigning on account of a throat 
affection. At the age of twenty-seven he was called to the chair of 
moral and intellectual philosophy in the New Yorli University, where 
he remained until 1838. He then devoted himself to the study of 
mental philosophy, and in 1839-40-1 published works which gave 
him high rank as a thinker throughout the civilized world. He 
published other works in 1841-51-2-3. He spent two years traveling 
in Europe, and in 1851 resinned his professorship in the University of 
New York. In 1852, by a unanimous vote of the regents, he was 
made president of the University of Michigan, and most ably tilled 
that position until 1S63, when he became a resident of Berlin, and 
afterwards of Yevay, where he closed his life in November, 1881. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 629 

HORACE S. TARE ELL 

Was born at Chelsea, Mass., Aug. 19, 1S33. He graduated at 
"Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., in 1859. For three years 
\va? professor of natural sciences in Bellville seminary, Canada: 
from. 1862 to 18G5 was principal of Farmerville county grammar 
school; in 1863 principal of central academy, McGrawville, N. Y. ; 
from 1866 to 1871 principal of schools in Detroit, and in 1869 organized 
the evening school in Detroit house of correction; and was superin- 
tendent of the East Saginaw schools from 1370 to 1877. Elected 
superintendent of public instruction in 1876, he served from January 
1, 1877, until Aug., 1878, when he resigned to accept the position of 
superintendent of schools at Indianapolis, Ind. 

TIMOTHY E. TARSNEY 

Was born at Ransom, Mich., Feb. 4, 1849; was educated at the 
common schools: served seven years as a marine engineer, meantime 
reading law; entered the law department of Michigan University in 
1870, and graduated in the class of 1872: was a justice in 1S73-74; 
was city attorney in- 1875-G-7-8, when he resigned, serving as ex-officio 
member of the board of supervisors at the same time: was elected to 
the forty -ninth, and re-elected to the fiftieth congress as a Fusionist, 
receiving 18.301 votes against 17,615 votes for Horr, Republican, and 
1,930 votes for Abbey, Prohibitionist. 

CHARLES II. TAYLOR 

Was born at Cooperstown, X. Y., Nov. 20, 1813. He was educated at 
an academy, and settled in Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1837. He was 
clerk of Kent county for eight years. In 1847-8 was a Representative 
in the legislature. He was ow of five commissioners who selected 
sites for the insane asylum at Kalamazoo, and the deaf and dumb 
asylum at Flint. He was the first' secretary of state elected under 
the constitution of 1850, and served from 1S51 to 1S53. From 1847 to 
1S55 he edited the Grand Rapids Enquirer. Later he was chief editor 
and part proprietor of the Detroit Free Press, but ill health compelled 
him to retire. In politics a Democrat. Is in business at Grand 
Rapids. 

DANIEL W. TAYLOR, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1845, was born in the state of 
New York, Oct. 5, 1804. By occupation a farmer and carriage 
70 



630 « MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

maker; politically a Democrat. He was one of the earliest pioneers 
in Lapeer county. Was postmaster seven years, and justice of the 
peace several terms. He was a prominent Mason. Died October 
10, I860. 



GEORGE E. TAYLOR, 

Senator from Genesee county in 1883, was born in Oakland countv, 
Michigan, Marcli 21, 1838, He received a common school and 
academical education. He commenced teaching at the age of seven- 
teen, and continued in that occupation until twenty-eight years of 
age. He has held the oftice of school inspector six years, supervisor 
eight years, register of deeds six years, and been one of the aldermen 
of the city of Flint for three years. In politics a Republican. 



HENRY W. TAYLOR, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1847, was born in Deer fk- Id. 
Mass., February "2, 1796. By occupation a lawyer; politically Whig 
and Republican. He graduated at Yale college in 1816, and received 
the degree of LL. D. from that institution in 1849. He went to 
Ontario county, N. Y., in 1816, studied law and practiced until 1840, 
when he removed to Marshall, Michigan, to practice his profession. 
He took high rank as a lawyer, and was learned and eloquent. He 
returned to Canandaigua. N. Y., in 1848, was a member of the 
legislature of that state four years, and judge of the county and 
Supreme Court. He was appointed judge of the court of appeals in 
1850. He was made a corporate member of the A. B. C. F. M. in 
1846. He now resides at Canandaigua, and in a letter written in 
July, 1887, at the age of 91 i years, he says: "Am waiting for the 
end of life to come." 



LORISON J. TAYLOR, 

Representative from Shiawassee countv in 1S74-5, was born at North 
Raisinville, Mich., June 00. 1842. He fitted for and entered the 
University at Ann Arbor, but in 1861 enlisted in the 2d Michigan 
infantry, serving until Nov., 1863, when he was discharged from 
wounds received at Fort Saunders. He re-enlisted in 18G3. and 
became a captain in the 11th Michigan infantry, serving until 
September of that year. Resides at Laingsburg, and is a farmer. 
He was a Senator in 1877. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 631 

WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1865-7, was a native of the 
state of New York, born Feb. 9, 1816. Was a resident of Michigan 
in 183T-8, but returned to New York, kept hotel two years, then for 
two years was in business at IJarrisburg, Pa. Then sold patents 
until 184(3, then moved to Ontario, Canada, engaged in lumbering 
and ran grist and woolen mills; Made his home at Saginaw, Mich., 
in 185*>, was a lumberman until 1865, then kept the Taylor house 
until 1870. He removed to St. Louis, Mich , built the Eastman 
house and kept it until 1874. Deceased. 

CONRAD TEN EYCK 

Was a name identified with the history of Michigan for more than half 
a century. Mr. Ten Eyck was of Dutch extraction, born in Albany N. 
Y., July 17, 1782. He came to Detroit in 1801. His early occupation 
was that of a merchant, to which he added farming by the purchase 
of a farm in Dearborn, which was his family residence during the 
greater part of his life, although his own time was largely spent in 
Detroit. Mr. Ten Eyck's first record is as one of the protestants 
against the brutal expulsion order of the British General Proctor in 
1813; He was county treasurer from 1817 to 1825, and a member of 
the first constitutional convention in 1835. He was Senator in 1835- 
6-7, resigning in the latter year to accept the appointment of U. S. 
marshal under President Van Buren, which office he held until 1841. 
He was a Representative in 1846. He was a Democrat of undoubted 
orthodoxy, was a man of energy and purpose, of decided character, 
and by reason of these traits, of marked influence during his active 
life. Died Aug. 21. 1847. 

PETER T ERNES, 
Representative from Wayne county in 1860-70, was born in Germany 
in 1831, and came to America with his parents during bis mirx rity. 
His occupation was that of a farmer in Greenfield for many years, 
during which he held various local offices, including that of super- 
visor for six years. He removed to Detroit in 1 870, and has since 
been more or less in the service of the city, being now assistant 
receiver of taxes. Politics, democratic. 

HARRIET A. TENNEY, 
State Librarian from April, I860, until the present time, was the eld- 
est daughter of John L. and Delia](Doud) Edgerton, and was born in 



G32 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Essex, Vt., April 1, 1834. She was educated at Franklin academy: 
taught several terms; married J. Eugene Tenney in 1854, and they 
removed to Homer, Mich., where they both engaged in teaching. 
They had charge of the union school at Marshall from the fall of 1S35 
until April, 1839, when she removed to Lansing^with her husband. 
and succeeded him as state librarian in April, 1S39, to which position 
she was appointed by Gov. Baldwin: believed to be the first appoint- 
ment of a woman to such a position in this country. She still holds 
the office by successive appointments of Governors Baldwin, Bagley. 
Croswell, Jerome, Begole, Alger and Luce. During the war she was 
the president of the Lansing military aid society: several years presi- 
dent of the ladies soldiers' monument association; also of the Lan- 
sing woman's club; director of the Lansing library and literary asso- 
ciation, and the able and efficient recording secretary of the state 
pioneer society since its organization, April 23, 1874, and still holds 
that position. 

JESSE E. TENNEY, 

State Librarian from 1859 to 18G9, was born at Orwell. Vt., July 23, 
181G, and received his education at Brandon academy and Middlehury 
college, where he graduatad in 1838. He went south and was admit- 
ted to the bar of Alabama in 1809. He traveled extensively in 
Europe and acted as a commercial agent at Padua, Venice, Marseilles 
and Lyons, returning in 1S49. He practiced law at Franklin, Vt. In 
lSO^narried Harriet A. Edgerton, and the same year became princi- 
pal of the schools at Homer, Mich.: was there two years, then for 
four years was superintendent of the schools at Marshall. Now 
resides at Lansing. Has been recorder and acting mayor, member of 
the board of education, U. S. circuit court commissioner, and 
engaged in law practice, real estate and insurance business. Has 
delivered many addresses and orations, and is a man of litt-rary 
taste, fine cultivation and extensive reading. A Republican in poli- 



HENRY D. TERRY, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1848, was born in Hartford. 
Conn., in 1814. By profession a lawyer, politically first Whig, then 
Republican. He came to Michigan in 1840, and located at Mt. Clem- 
ens, where he practiced his profession until 1855, when ho removed ro 
Detroit and practiced law there until 1861. June 15, 1861, he was 
commissioned colonel of the 5th Michigan infantry, and took the ffidd 
in September. The regiment took part in many battles, and made 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 633 

the first successful bayonet charge at Williamsburg, taking the ene- 
my's works, and leaving sixty-three rebel dead in the enemy's rifle 
pits, all killed by the bayonet. Generals McClellan, Kearney and 
Barry all wrote highly complimentary letters in praise of the regi- 
ment. Colonel Terry was wounded in this action. He was made a 
brigadier general July 18, 18C>2, and continued in service until Feb. 
7, 18G5, when he resigned. He located at Washington, D. C, and 
practiced law until his death, June 29, 1SC9. While a resident of 
Detroit he was prosecuting attorney of Wayne county. He was a 
man of brilliant talent, and of fine personal bearing. 



GEORGE W. THAYER 

Was born in Heath, Mass., Dec. 19, 1809. He came to Michigan in 
1849, and is a resident of Flint. Is a Republican, and was a Repre- 
sentative in 18f33-4 and 5. 



NAHUM P. THAYER, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1837-8-40, was born at St. 
Thomas, Ontario, July 31, 1802, and died on his farm near Detroit, 
Oct. 20, 1851. He came to Greenfield, Mich., in 182", and located a 
farm still occupied by his descendants. He built the first three miles 
of the Chicago turnpike, now Michigan avenue, Detroit. He held 
various local offices, and was a colonel of the state militia. In politics 
a Democrat. 

SIMEON M. THAYER 

Was born January 17, 1841, in Halderman county, Ontario, Canada, 
He came with his parents to Michigan in 1852, and settled in Sanilac 
county. He was Representative in 1871-2, In the spring of lb72 he 
removed to the northwestern country, where he was a sheriff in 1885- 
6. In politics a Republican, in business a real estate dealer. 



GEORGE THOMAS 

Was born in Cayuga county, N. Y., Dec. 23, 1812. He emigrated to 
Michigan in 1837, and settled on a farm in Ross, Kalamazoo county. 
He was a Whig until 1854, and served several times as supervisor. As 
a Republican he was a Representative in 1S59-63-4, Senator in 1S51-69- 
70. He became a resident of Barry county in 1855. Now acts with 
the greenback party. 



634 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

HENRY F. THOMAS, 

Representative from Allegan county in 1873 and Seuatorin 1875, was 
born in Jackson county, Mich., Dec. 17, 1843. He entered Albion 
college in 1859, and remained two years. In 18G2 he enlisted in the 
7th Michigan cavalry, and rose to the rank of first lieutenant, serving 
through the war. He graduated from the medical department of the 
Michigan University in 1SGS, and is in practice at Allegan. 



JOHN THOMAS, 

Representative from Oakland county in 184G, was born in Alleghany, 
Pa., 1S02. When young he removed with his parents to Penn Yan, 
N. Y., and from there to Farmington, Mich., in 1835. He wasapart- 
ner of Daniel S. Lee in a large mercantile business, which he con- 
tinued after his partner removed. In company with Charles P. Bush 
and Daniel S. Lee, he purchased in 1817 a tract of land in Lansing, 
just south of the school section on which the capitol was located, now 
a part of the city. They opened a store on the east side of Grand 
river, and sold goods for six years. They also built the Benton, non- 
Everett house. The first postotfice was in their store. He returned 
to Farmington in 1852, and died March 18, 1803. 



WILLIAM THOMAS, 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1875, was born in Wash- 
ington county, N. Y., March 20, 1815. He became a resident of Mich- 
igan in 1813. He is a farmer by occupation, in politics a Liberal. Has 
been supervisor of Hartford seven years, town clerk and treasurer 
eight years, justice four years. He was active in securing $15,000 
from the town to aid in 'building a railroad connection. Resides at 
Hartford. 



ZIMR1 D. THOMAS, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1SG5, was born at Rowe. 
Mass., Sept. 16, 1809, and removed to central New York in 1820. He 
was for six years postmaster at Hamburgh, N. Y. Came to Michigan 
in 1835, and was three years supervisor of Allen. Has been coroner, 
and a justice for many years. Now resides at Hillsdale. A Repub- 
lican in politics. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. G35 



ALMON A. THOMPSON, 



Representative from Eaton county in 1869, was Lorn in Richmond, 
Vt., March 26, 1829, and removed to Avon, O., in 1840. He graduated 
from Oberlin college in 1854, and from the medical department of the 
Michigan University in 1806. H^ was assistaut surgeon of the 12th 
Michigan infantry and afterwards of the 11th cavalry. Practiced as 
a physician at Yermontville. From 1870 until 1878 was consul at 
Goderich, Canada. Now in practice at Flint, is physician to the 
deaf and dumb institute, and a member of the local pension board. 
In politics a Republican. 

ALBERT THOMPSON, 

Senator from "Van Buren county in 1875, was born in Waterbury, Vt., 
April 28, 1831. He was educated at Oberlin college, and graduated 
from the medical department of the University of Michigan. He 
removed to Michigan in 1860, and enlisted in the third Michigan cav- 
alry when it was organized in 1861; was made hospital steward; after- 
wards promoted to lieutenant, next as assistant surgeon, and finally sur- 
geon, and was mustered out with his regiment in 1866. He has held the 
office of supervisor of South Haven for two terms. He is a practicing 
physician. In politics a Republican. 
—0 
CHARLES C. THOMPSON, 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1873-4, was born in Beek- 
mantown, N. Y.. June 4. 1831. He received a common school educa- 
tion. In 1857 removed to Michigan, and settled in Whitehall, Muske- 
gon county, where he still resides. He has been president of the 
common council, trustee of the village, and held other responsible 
offices. By occupation a lumberman. 



GEORGE W. THOMPSON, 

Representative from Kent county in 1883, was born March 3. 1844, in 
the township of Florida (now Jefferson), Hillsdale county, Michigan. 
Received his education at the schools of Hillsdale, and at Oberlin 
college. Admitted to the bar in 18G9, at Hillsdale. Has resided in 
Gran 1 Rapids since 1S74. 

HENRY W. THOMPSON, 

Representative iu 18^7 from tbe counties of Delta and Iron, was born 
in Brooklyn, Mich., July 14, 1817, but soon removed with his parents 



63G MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

to Tyrone, Livingston county. Educated in common schools. In 1S64 
enlisted as a private in the 10th Michigan infantry, and served until 
the close of the war. At the age of twenty-four became a minister 
and has preached in Ingham, Shiawassee, Baraga and Delta counties. 
In politics a Republican. 

JEREMIAH D. THOMPSON 

Was born in Dutchess county, N. Y., in 1790. He settled on a farm 
in Madison, Lenawee county, in 1834. He was several years super- 
visor, and justice many years. He was Representative in 1848 and 
1853. He died at Hudson, February 16, 1873. 



ROBERT THOMPSON, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1859, came into Macomb 
county when a boy and taught school some years in Mt. Clemens, 
and then sold goods several years. He removed to New Baltimore, 
and was book-keeper fur Hiron Hathaway several years; then was in 
the employ of F. B. Merrill, then removed to Marine City. Later he 
was elected county treasurer of St. Clair county, and died while 
holding that oflice. First a Whig, then a Republican. 

ROBERT R. THOMPSON 

Moved into Washtenaw county at an early day. He settled on a 
farm in Caledonia, Shiawassee county, in 1837. He was connected 
with A. McArthur in a saw-mill, and also engaged in commercial 
ventures in Corunna. He was Representative in the legislature of 
1845. He afterwards sold out and removed to Saginaw, where he 
died several years since. 

EDWARD H. THOMSON 

Was born at Kendall, England. June 15, 1810, and came when young, 
with his parents, to Boston, Mass. He received an academical edu- 
cation, studied law with Millard Fillmore, and commenced practice 
at Buffalo. N. Y., in 1832. He located at Atlas, Mich., in 1837, then 
in Lapeer county, and was appointed prosecuting attorney. He 
removed to Flint in 1838, and became one of the firm of Bartow & 
Thomson. He was prosecuting attorney of Genesee county in 1845-6: 
Senator in 1848-9: Representative in 1859; commissioner of emigra- 
tion under Gov. Ransom, a portion of the time residing in Germany 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 637 

U. S. deputy com missioner to the London exposition in 1851; mem- 
ber and president of the state military board during the war: mayor 
and member of the school board of Flint: and the democratic nomi- 
nee for lieutenant governor in 1S80. He was a polished gentleman, 
well known everywhere, and his splendid Shakesperiau library is 
now in the possession of the Michigan University. Died February 2, 
1886. 

JOHN S. THOMSON, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1877-79, was born at Man- 
chester, England. August 28, 1833. He was educated at the Scotch 
sessional school at that place, and emigrated to Michigan in 1850. 
He is a merchant and salt manufacturer. In politics a Republican. 

CALVIN J. THORl'E, 

Representative from Branch county in 1879. was born Sept. 14, 1834, 
in Warrensville, Ohio. In 1S38 he removed to Volinia, Cass county. 
In 1859 he graduated from the Michigan Normal school. In 1SG2 he 
became principal of the graded schools at Union City. He has also 
been principal at Eaton Rapids, Paw Paw, Sturgis, and Manchester. 
In 1875 he bought a controlling interest in the Coldwater Reporter, 
which he sold in 1S76, and became connected with Trutlt for the Peo- 
ple, in Detroit. In 1877 he removed to Sherwood, Branch county, 
and became a druggist. In politics a National. 



GEORGE P.. THROOP, 

Representative from Detroit in 1847, was a native of New York, and 
came to Detroit as a bank officer during the flush times of 183G-8. 
He had previously been a member of the New York legislature. He 
was a brother of Enos B. Throop. once governor of New York, fie 
died Feb. 23, 1854, at the age of sixty-two. He was a member of the 
Detroit bar. He was a Democrat politically. 



JEFFERSON G. THURBER. 

Representative and Speaker from Monroe county in 1851, and Sena- 
tor in 1844-5-0-7, was born in 1S07, and settled at Monroe Mich., in 
1S33. In politics a Democrat. He was a lawyer by profession, and 
earnestly devoted to the practice. He held the offices of prosecuting 
attorney and judge of probate of Monroe county, and was a presi- 



638 MICBIGA'N BIOGRAPHY. 

dential elector in 1849. He filled all positions with honor to himself 
and the state. Died at Monroe, May G, 1857. 



JOHN S. TIBBITTS, 

Representative from Wayne county in 18G1-2, was born in Arcadia, 
N. Y., Dec. 21, 1821. He came to Plymouth, Mich., with his fath- 
er's family in 1805, the first white settlers in that town. He was edu- 
cated at common schools, taught at the age of sixteen, and winters 
thereafter for 25 years. He was elected supervisor at the age of 
twenty-one, and was subsequently supervisor, school inspector, post- 
master, etc. He was sometime superintendent of the agricultural 
college farm; thiee years auditor of Wayne county, and one year 
horticulturist at the Colorado agricultural college. He published the 
" Free Guide,*' for the benefit of officials. He is a Republican. Now 
resides at Santa Rita, California. 



ALEXANDER R. TIFFANY 

Was born in Niagara. Canada, Oct. 16, 1790. His father, Sylvester 
Tiffany, was a native of Massachusetts and one of four brothers who 
graduated at Dartmouth college. His father published a paper at 
Canandaigua, N. Y., and the son when small used to sit on a high 
stool and set type for the paper. He learned the art of printing, and 
■wh^n a young man studied law with John C. Spencer, a distinguished 
lawyer, and afterwards chief justice of the state of New York. When 
admitted to the bar he commenced practice at Palmyra. N. Y. He 
was soon elected a justice and held that position several years. About 
1823 he was appointed first judge of the county court of Wayne 
county, N. Y., and held the place until compelled to resign from ill 
health. In 1S32 he settled at Palmyra. Michigan, then having the 
promise of becoming a large city. In 1831 he was appointed prose- 
cuting attorney of L< nawee county; in 1S3G was elected judge of pro- 
bate, and held that office eight years; in 1850 was a leading member 
of the state constitutional convention; and was a Representative in 
the legislature of 1855. He was the author of "Tiffany's Justice 
Guide" and '• Tiffany's Criminal Law," of inestimable value in the 
early days of Michigan, and still standard works, as enlarged and 
revised by Judge Andrew Howell. Judge Tiffany was a territorial 
associate judge fur Lenawee county in 1833, was re-appointed in 1834, 
and was county judge from 1^10 to 1S30. He was a man of small 
stature, a lawyer of learning and ability, with a candor and sincerity 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 639 

that carried great weight with court and jury. With poor health he 
worked incessantly. He died at Palmyra, January 14, 1868. 



JUNIUS TILDEN 

Was born in Yarmouth, Mass., Nov. 28, 1813. He lived in that state 
until 1838, when he removed to Dundee, Mich. By profession a law- 
yer, in politics independent. A Representative in 1849. 



PHILO TILLSON, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1844, was born in Winfield, 
N. Y., in 1810. By profession a physician, in politics a Democrat. 
Came to Mt. Clemens. Mich., in 1833, where lie practiced medicine 
ten years, then removed to Romeo, where he continued practice until 
his death, June 25, 1882. 



JEFFERSON K. TINDALL, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1SS7. was born'in Sussex 
county, N. Y., November 25, 1829; and came with his parents to 
Oakland county in 1833. Received a good education, served as clerk 
in a store, then a partner, sdlingout in 1861, and became a farmer. 
He served through the war in the Sth Michigan cavalry. Has been 
eight years supervisor of the town of Rose, and six years secretary of 
the Monitor insurance company. In politics a Republican. 



ALEXANDER TINHAM. 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S03-4-83, was born i ^Middle- 
sex county, England, in 1810. He came to Monroe, Mich., in 1 v "2 J, in 
1830 removed to Detroit, and has been a brick maker by occupation. 
In politics a Democrat. 

RUFCS T1NNEY, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1841, settled in Highland, 
Mich., in 18:).5, coming from Wheatland, Monroe county. N. Y. He 
was a farmer, and resided where he first located until his death in 
1858. lie was the tirst supervisor of the town in l x -!">, and filled that 
office for six terms. 



640 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY, 



BR ACE Y TOBEY 



Was born in Saratoga county, N. Y., March 26. 1802. and died in 
April, 1886. He settled with his family in Burr Oak, Mich., in 1855, 
but removed to Sturgis in 1861. He had the confidence of the people, 
and in New York [and Michigan held office of some kind for half a 
century. Fie was an associate district judge in New York, and was a 
Representative in the Michigan legislature of 1871-2. In politics a 
Democrat, a Republican after 1861. He was justice for many vears, 
also director in the national bank at Sturgis. 



ISAAC D. TOLL 

Was born at Schenectady, N. Y., December 1, 1318, on the family 
homestead of two centuries. Both of his great-grandfathers were 
killed by the French and Indians in 1748. His grandfather served in 
the revolution, and his father in the war of .1812. Mr. Toll was 
educated in the academy at Ovid, N. Y. , settled with his father at 
Centerville, Mich., in 1S34. and engaged with him in manufacturing 
and real estate. He was thirteen years supervisor of Fawn River, 
where his father built flouring: and saw mills. He has held military 
offices by regular promotions, from lieutenant colonel to major gen- 
eral of state militia. In the Mexican war. he was captain of company 
E, loth U. S. infantry, and distinguished himself at Contreras and 
Churubusco. He was a Representative in 1S46: Senator in 1847; 
chief of division in pension office in 1853-4; examiner of patents, 1854 
to 1861; and commandant of the interior guard in 1861. He settled 
at Petoskey in IS80, and was president of the village in 1881-2. His 
wife was the daughter of Judge Charles Moran, of Detroit. In 
politics a Democrat. He is now postmaster at Petoskey. 



JAMES B. TOMPKINS, 

Representative from Branch county in 1855, came from Schoharie 
county, N. Y., and settled in Girard, Mich., the first white settler in 
that township. He was a surveyor by profession, and surveyed the 
ground upon which the city of Coldwater now stands. He was dis- 
tinguished for his energy and for iiis fidelity to convictions in the per- 
formance of the varied duties imposed upon him. He was the first 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 641 

supervisor of his township in 1834, serving in that capacity many 
years afterwards. He was also a justice. Died about 1878. 

WILLIAM M. TOMPKINS, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1867, was born in NewRochelle, 
N. Y., March 6, 1820. He came to Michigan in 1844, went into the 
mercantile business at Eaton Rapids in 1845, was successful, and 
retired to go into the banking business in 1858. Died in 1868. 

JOHN S. TOOKER, 

Senator from Ingham and Clinton counties in 1S79-S1-2. was born in 
Tyrone, N. Y., July 7, 1830. He removed to Ann Arbor, Mich., with 
his parents in 1838, thence to Woodhull in 1810, and to Lansing in 
1847. Received a common school education, purchased a foundry at 
North Lansing at the age of eighteen, ;md manufactured farming 
implements for 14 years. Served one year in the 6th Mich, cavalry, 
but was discharged from ill health; was in both the drug and 
boot and shoe trade. Was three times mayor of Lansing. He was 
secretary of Montana under Arthur, and is nowin business at Helena, 
Montana. In politics a Republican. 

JOSEPH W. TORREY. 

Member of the fifth legislative council from Wayne county in 1832-4, 
was a native of Connecticut and a lawyer by profession. He was at 
one time a law partner with Col. Chas. Larned, and stood high at the 
bar. lie was judge of probate 1829-33, and recorder of Detroit in 
1820. He returned to Connecticut, and died there in 1814. Politically 
he was an administration or Jackson man, during his residence in 
Detroit. 

OSMOND TOWER. 

Senator from Ionia county in 1859-G1-2, was horn in Cummington, 
Mass., Feb. 10. 1811. He received a common school and academical 
education, became a carpenter, and taught school winters. He came 
to Michigan in 1834, and settled in Ionia in 1835. He built the first 
school-house in the Grand River Valley; was engaged in buildinguntil 
1844; then for twenty years manufactured and sold fanning mills: was 
for seven years a partner in the dry goods house of J. S. Cooper & 
Co. ; speculated in real estate: was in the foundry and hardware 



642 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

trade; was a director of the Ionia & Lansing railroad, and its first 
treasurer; was director and president of the Ionia & Stanton railroad; 
clerk of Ionia county, and several times supervisor: was U. S. Mar- 
shal of western Michigan from 18G3 to 18GG; member of the board of 
education many years, and its president. A Whig until 1854, then a 
Republican. Died Aug. 4, 1886. 



OKA TOWN, 

Representative in 1851, was born in Stoddard, N. II., July 2, 1806. In- 
occupation a farmer, in politics a Democrat. He came to Michigan 
in 1631, and has resided in Allegan county since 1S34. Now lives at 
Allegan. He received two commissions from Governor Mason when 
Michigan was a territory, one as justice of the peace in 1S34, and one 
as judge of probate in 18:55. He was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1850. 

WILLIAM B. TOWN, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 18S5, was born in Norwich. 
Ontario, July 23, 1830. Became a resident of Michigan when eight 
years old; received a thorough education, and entered upon the study 
of medicine, receiving his diploma as a physician and surgeon. He 
has since been continuously engaged in the practice of that profession. 
residing at Rollin. In 1851 he was appointed postmaster at Geneva, 
the office near his residence, a position which he held for seventeen 
years. Politically a Democrat. 



AMOS C. TOWNE, 

Representative from Barry county in 1875, was born in Bakersfield, 
Vt, April 10, 1818. From is 13 up to 1848 he resided in the southern 
states. In 18o0 he engaged in farming in DeKalb county, Illinois. 
In 1854 he purchased the farm on which he now resides, in Prairk- 
ville. Barry county, lie has held the office of justice, and been a 
supervisor for several consecutive terms. For thirty-five years he has 
been identified with the insurance business and conveyancer. In 
politics a Republican. 

URIEL TOWNSEND, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1871, was born Dec. 4. 1830, i:i 
Hunter, N. Y. Ho received a common school education. In 1>34 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 64! 

emigrated to Michigan, and settled in Bruce, Macomb county. In 
1859 he removed to Almont, where he now resides. He has been 
supervisor. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Republican. 



JARVIS C. TRAIN", 

Representative from Kent county in 1883, was born in Tunbrklge, 
Vt., July 8, 1834. Came with his parents to Boston, Mich. , in 1840. 
Lived in Whiteside countv, 111., ton years as a farmer, then settled at 
Lowell, Mich., and engaged in buying and selling farm products. 
Served as a Fusionist. 

WILLIAM R. TRAVER . 

Was born in Rensselaer county, N. Y., Oct. 26, 1818. By occupation 
a harness maker; in politics a Republican. He came to Litchfield, 
Michigan, in 1844, and has always resided there. He was a Repre- 
sentative from Hillsdale countv in 1853, and has held other offices of 
trust. 

LOREN L. TREAT, 

Senator from Oakland county in 1865, was admitted to the Oakland 
county bar in 1S44. and located at Canandaigua, now Orion, where 
he had a good practice. He was an effective lawyer before a jury. 
Later he removed to Oxford, and followed farming. He was a justice 
and several times supervisor. 

CHARLES TRIPP 

Was born in Epsom. >*. II., December 2, 1 S 1 "2 . Came t<~> Ann Arbor 
in 1840, and engaged in the foundry business. He resided there until 
his death. He was railroad commissioner under Gov. Bingham, and 
Senator in 1855. He was always interested in public affairs, 
was a man of strong convictions, and in politics a Republican. 



CHARLES C. TROWBRIDGE, 

Regent of the University from 1337 to IS 11, was born in Albany, N. 
Y., Dec. 29, 1800, and died at Detroit, April 3, 18S3. He was trained 
to the mercantile business, and came to Detroit in 1819. He was the 
first seeretiry of the board of regents; idled positions at Green 
Bay and Detroit as Indian agent and interpreter; was cashier or 



644 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

president of the bank of Michigan from 182-j to 1843, except three 
years; president of the Michigan state bank from 1844 to 1833; then 
became secretary and afterwards for many years president of the 
Oakland & Ottawa railroad co.. afterwards the Detroit & Milwaukee. 
He held many local positions, and was the Whig candidate for 
governor in 1837, and was only defeated by 237 votes. He was an 
alderman, and mayor of Detroit in 1834. He was a perfect type of 
the old school gentleman, and on his 82d birthday was given a public 
banquet at the Russell house, by the most distinguished men of the 
citv and state. 



ROWLAND E. TROWBRIDGE 

Was born at Horseheads, N. Y., June IS, 1821, and was brought the 
same year to Troy, Oakland county, Mich., by his father, S. V. R. 
Trowbridge, who settled in that town upon a farm. The son gradu- 
ated from Kenyon college. Ohio, in 1841. Unable to follow his 
chosen profession of the law, from failure of eyesight, he became a 
farmer, and settled in Barry county in 1818, and cleared up a farm. 
In 1840 he was supervisor of the town of Thorndale. In 1851 he 
exchanged his farm for one in Bloomfield, Oakland county, settled 
upon it, having married that year Miss Mary E. Satterlee. He 
worked the farm until 1800, then exchanged for milling property. 
and removed to Birmingham. He was supervisor of Bloom field in 
1855. He was a Senator in 1857-S-9; was elected to congress in IStSO 
from the 4th district, and served from 1S61 to 1803: was defeated by 
a small majority for that position in 1862; was again elected in 1804, 
serving from i860 to 1807. He again became a farmer, and in 1S73 
took charge of the Chandler farm near Lansing, where he was suc- 
cessful. In 1880 he was appointed commissioner of Indian affairs by 
President Hayes, and died while holding that office, April 20, ISS1. 
He was president of the central Michigan agricultural society, and 
was recognized throughout the state as a leading agriculturist, and 
an honest, incorruptible man. In politics iir.^t a Whig, a Republican 
after 1854. 



STEPHEN V. R. TROWBRIDGE. 

Member of the legislative council in 1828, and Senator in 1830-40-1-2. 
was born at Albany. >*. V., July 4, 1704, and died March 1. 1850. He 
was married to Elizabeth Conkling at Horseheads, N. Y. . in 1815, 
and came to Michigan in the fall of 1821. Iff settled for life on a 
farm, purchased of government, in Troy. Oakland county. He was 






MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. G45 

the first supervisor of Troy in 1837, and held that position in 1828 and 
four terms afterwards. His home was headquarters for early emi- 
grants coming to Troy. His services for the town and state were of 
a high order, and he identified himself with every project calculated 
to benefit society. The family of eleven children imitated his 
example. Among them were Charles A,, a New York merchant: 
Rowland E., long in congress; William P., professor in Yale college; 
General Luther S., of Detroit; and Guy M., of Pontiac. One of the 
daughters was the wife of Rev. Mr. Goodell, long a distinguished 
missionary in Turkey. He helped organize the Presbyterian church 
in Troy, and was an elder. He was always a staunch friend of tem- 
perance, and an active christian. In politics, Whig and Republican. 

MORGAN TUPPER, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1865, was born in Monroe county, 
N. Y.. May 19, 1816. He came to Michigan in l^oS, and made the 
first entry of land in Odessa, Ionia county, upon which he remained 
until his death, March 3, 1880. By occupation a minister and farmer. 

MYRON TUPPER, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1865, was born in Monroe county, 
N. Y. , .May 10, 1816. He was a clergyman and farmer, politically a 
Republican. He came to Michigan in 1808. He was ordained a Eree 
Will Baptist minister in 1S4S. Held the positions of postmaster and 
supervisor. Died March 4, 1879. 



WILLTAM S. TURCK, 

Representative from Gratiot county in 1S7T-79, was born in Port 
Hope, Ontario, in 1SJ9. He received a common school education. 
He came to Michigan in i860, and entered the service in the twenty- 
sixth Michigan infantry in 1862, and was mustered out witlfthe regi- 
ment in 1865 as captain of Co, D. He was treasurer of Gratiot county 
for six years, supervisor four years, and president and treasurer of 
the farmers' mutual lire insurance company of Gratiot anil Isabella 
counties. He is a farmer by occupation, and a Republican in politics. 

JAMES D. TURNBULL. 

Representative from Alpena, Alcona and Presque Isle counties in 
1S79, '81-2, was born in Ilarvev, New Brunswick, Feb. 5, 1843. He 



646 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

received a goad common school education, removed to Chelsea, Mich., 
in 1808, entered in 1862 in the 20th Michigan infantry, and served 
through the war, becoming a lieutenant. He took a full course at 
the State Normal school, was principal of the schools at Memphis 
three years, studied law and was admitted in 1871. He commenced 
practice at Alpena in 1872. Has been comptroller of Alpena two 
terms, two years chairman of board of supervisors, and chairman of 
democratic county committee for six years. In politics a Democrat. 

GEORGE B. TURNER 

"Was born in Franklin county, N. Y., in 1822. His parents, named 
Brunt, left him an orphan at the age of three years, and being 
adopted by Sterling A. Turner, a Virginian, he took his name. In 
1835, at the age of thirteen, he became a clerk in an auction and com- 
mission store in Detroit. In a few months he went to Cassopolis. and 
until 1840 was occupied as pupil, teacher and clerk. He studied law 
with A. H. RedBeld and was admitted to the bar in 1S44. In 1843-9 
he was a Representative from Cass county. In 1830 he abandoned 
practice from ill health and became a farmer. He was a delegate to 
the democratic national convention of 1S7G. As a Democrat he has 
been the candidate of his party for probate judge, also for Sena- 
tor, and in lboG ran on the defeated ticket for secretary of state. He 
was editorially connected with the Cass County Advocate, the first 
paper published in that county. 

JAMES TURNER 

Was born at Cazenovia. N. Y., April 1, 1820, and was a descendant 
of Humphrey Turner, who settled at Plymouth, Ct., in 1623. With a 
fair education, self obtained, he came to Leoni, Mich., in 184.0, and 
acted as clerk in a store. In 1841 lie removed to Mason, engaging m 
mercantile business until 1817, when he came to Lansing, continuing 
the mercantile business, and engaged in the construction of the Lan- 
sing and Howell plank road, of which he was treasurer. In I860 he 
became deputy state treasurer, which he held for six years. In 1864 
he became treasurer and land commissioner of the Jackson, Lansing 
& Saginaw railroad, holding it until his death. He was also director 
and treasurer of the Lansing & Ionia railroad, was agent for non-resi- 
dent Michigan land-holders, and loaned money largely for the New 
Lebanon Shakers. In 1867 he was Senator, and was a member of the 
Lansing board of education for nine years. A Republican in politics, 
a Methodist in religion. He died Oct. 10, 1869. 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 647 

JAMES M. TURNER, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1S77, was born in Landing, 
Mich., April 23, 1850. He is the oldest son of the late Hon. James 
Turner, one of the pioneers of Ingham county. He received a com- 
mon school education, and afterwards spent two years at Oneida 
conference seminary, Cazenovia, N. Y. In 1868 he was elected pay- 
master and assistant treasurer of the Ionia & Lansing railroad. In 
1S69 he was elected treasurer of the same company, being the suc- 
cessor of his father. In 1871 he organized the real estate and loan 
agency of Turner, Smith & Co., of Lansing, which dissolved by the 
retirement of D. S. Smith. On the organization of the Chicago & 
Northeastern railroad company, in the year 1S74, he was elected 
president. He was the youngest member of the legislature of 1877. 
He is extensively engaged in manufacturing, mining and real estate, 
and resides at Lansing. Has a large farm well stocked with horses, 
cattle and sheep. 

JEROME W. TURNER 

Was born'at Sheldon, Vt, January 25, 1833. He is by occupation a 
lawyer, in politics, formerly a Republican, now a Democrat. He 
came to Miciiigan with his father, Judge Josiah Turner, in 1839, who 
settled in Howell, and afterwards moved to Owosso. He graduated 
from the University in 1857. He studied law, and is now actively 
engaged in his profession at Owosso. As a Republican he was 
Senator in 1869-70, and at that time wrote a series of humorous 
articles, that attracted great attention, and were published in the 
Detroit Tribune. As a Democrat he was mayor of Owosso in 1879; 
delegate to the democratic national convention at Cincinnati in 1880; 
also to the convention at Chicago in 1841. He was adjutant of the 
30th Michigan infantry, and was the democratic candidate for mem- 
ber of the state board of education in 1886. He has written short 
poems of great merit. 

JESSE F. TURNER 

Was born in Albany, N. Y., in 1810. lie came to DeWitt, Mich., in 
1838, and engaged in mercantile business. Afterwards studied law 
with Joab Baker, lie was county commissioner of Clinton county in 
1841; register of deeds; supervisor of DeWitt; Senator in 1841-15; and 
county judge in 181G. In politics a Democrat. He went to Cali- 
fornia in 1851, and was collector of the port of Sacramento under 
President Pierce. He was circuit judge of the Sacramento judicial 
circuit for twelve years. He died at Oakland, California, in 18S0. 



G48 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

JOHN W. TURNER, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1847-9, was born in Putney, 
Vt., in 1818. By profession a lawyer. He came to Hudson, Mich., 
in 1841, later removed to Cold water, his present home. He was a 
Democrat until 1854, since a Republican. He was the first Republi- 
can nominee for lieutenant governor, but declined in favor of Coe. 
As a public speaker and legal advocate has always stood high in 
southern Michigan. Has published a volume of poems of consider- 
able merit. 



JOHN W. TURNER. 

Representative from Clinton and other counties in 1851, was born in 
Oneida county, N. Y., Feb. 23, 1800. He was several years a clerk. 
Resided at Oswego. N. Y., from 1319 to 1846, and a part of the time 
was deputy collector at Oswego. Settled at DeWitt, Mich., in 1848, 
and engaged in milling and mercantile business. Was five years a 
supervisor, and was sheriff in 1858-9. Removed in 1863 to Vermillion, 
Dakota, was for eleven years a member of the territorial council, and 
from 1869 to 1873 was superintendent of public instruction in Dakota. 
While in Michigan a Democrat. Died at Turner, Dakota, April 11. 
1883. 



JOSIAH TURNER 

Was born in New Haven, Vt. Sept. 1, 1811. He received his educa- 
tion at St. Albans and Middlebury, studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar of Vermont in 1833. After a short practice in that state, he 
came to Michigan and settled in Howell. In 1842 he was elected 
county clerk by the democrats, and served six years, also holding the 
positions of justice, township clerk, and master in chancery. On the 
adoption of the county court system he was elected judge of Living- 
ston county, and held the position until 1850, when the office was 
abolished. In 1856 he was elected probate judge on the republican 
ticket. In 1857 he was appointed by Gov. Bingham to a vacancy on 
the supreme court bench, and the same year was elected judge of the 
seventh judicial circuit for six years, and received three successive 
re-elections, the fourth time being elected without opposition, serving 
from 1857 to 1881. In I860 he removed from Howell to Owosso, and 
was mayor of that city in 1864-5. He was a member of the constitu- 
tional convention of 1807. Since he retired from t lie bench has been 
U. S. consul at Amherstburg, Canada. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 649 

MILO H. TURNER 

Was born at Albany, N. Y., in 1812. Came to Michigan in 1837, and 
was the pioneer merchant of DeWitt, Clinton county. He was elected 
register of deeds in 1839, and was a Representative in 1S42. In politics a 
Whig. He removed to California in 1851, and is now living at Oak- 
land 



STANLEY W. TURNER, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1877, was born in North Fair- 
field, Ohio, July 15, 1843. In 1852 he removed to Reading, Mich., 
and in 1860-1 was a student at Hillsdale college. During the war he 
enlisted as a private in the first Michigan sharpshooters. At the close 
of the war he was promoted to captain, but was never mustered 
in. In 1865 he went to Mason, Mich., and entered the law office of 
H. L. Henderson. In 18G6 he was elected clerk of Ingham county, 
and re-elected in 1868, and served twice as chairman of the 
Republican county committee. Now in business at Roscommon, 
Michigan. 



JAMES TUKRILL 

Was born in Shoreham, Vt., Sept. 24, 1797. He removed to Michigan 
in 1842, and settled on a farm in the town of Lapeer, Lapeer county. 
He was also engaged in mercantile business. He was a Representa- 
tive in 1849. In politics a Whig. 



JONATHAN B. TUTTLE 

Was born August 15, 1841, at Lodi, Ohio. He received a fair educa- 
tion in the common schools and at Oberlin college. At the age of 
eighteen he began the study of law, graduating at the Ohio state and 
Union law colleges in 1862, and was admitted to practice the same 
year. Soon afterward he entered the army, and was promoted until 
he reached the rank of captain in the infantry service. He was 
honorably discharged in 1814, for physical disabilities. He then 
removed to Alpena, where he has since resided and practiced law. 
He has held the offices of judge of probate, prosecuting attorney. U. 
S. commissioner, school inspector, etc. In 1877, on the organization 
of the 23d judicial circuit, he was elected circuit judge, and re-elected 
April 4, 1881, serving until 1887. 



650 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

WARREN TUTTLE, 

Member of the " second convention of assent," 1836, and Representa- 
tive from Wayne county in 1849, was born in Poultney, Vt., Dec. 24, 
1804. He came to Michigan in 1826, and located a farm in Livonia. 
As a pioneer lie made the wilderness to bud and blossom as the rose, 
and died Sept. 17, 1849, on the farm that he had made. -He served 
his town as justice for many years, and the county as superintendent 
of the poor, 1847-49. Politics, democratic. 



RODNEY K. TWADELL, 

Representative from Branch county in 1S77-79, was born in Marion, 
Wayne county, N. Y., Nov. 7. 1827. He received a common school 
education, and removed to Quincy, Michigan, in April, 1851. He is 
a farmer by occupation. In politics a Republican. 



ROYAL T. TYVOMBLY, 

Senator from Berrien county in 1853, was born at Portland, Maine. 
in 1813. He settled in Niles, Michigan, in 1837. In business a mer- 
chant; politically a Democrat. He was for several years a trustee of 
the union school at Niles, was mayor of Niles in 1S77, and a candidate 
for presidential elector on the Douglass ticket in 1SG0. Died October 
14, 1885. 

COLUMBUS V. TYLER, 

Senator from Alcona, Alpena, Bay, Iosco, Ogemaw and Presque 
Isle counties in 1877 and 1879, was born in Auburn, Cayuga county, 
N. Y., in 182*), and in 1830 removed to Genesee county, Michigan. 
He received a common school education, in 1846 commenced the 
study of medicine, in 1850 settled in the village of Flushing, Genesee 
county. He practiced medicine nineteen years in that place. He 
removed to Bay City in 1809, and in 1870 graduated from the Detroit 
medical college, and from that time has continued the practice of his 
profession. In politics a Democrat. 



COMFORT TYLER 

Was born in Marcellus, N. Y., March 7, 1S01, where his parents had 
removed from Connecticut in 1788. He received a common school 
education, and assisted his father in farming, milling and carding 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 651 

■wool and dressing cloth until he was twenty-four. In 1834 he 
removed to Colon, St. Joseph county, Michigan, and bought a large 
farm, where he resided until his death, January 16, 1873. He was 
twenty-five years a supervisor. In 1811 was a Representative, in 
1859 Senator, and in 1SG7 a member of the constitutional conven- 
tion. He was first a Whig, but a Republican from 1S54. 



MADISON J. ULRICH, 

One of the Representatives from Kent county in 1885, was born in 
Park, Mich., Dec. 5, 1835; was reared upon a farm, and for a time 
followed the occupation of a farmer, finally engaging as a tea and 
coffee merchant in Grand Rapids, where he now resides. He has 
been school inspector, collector, school trustee, and supervisor, and 
was elected on the fusion ticket. 



DANIEL K. UNDERWOOD, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1840. was born at Enfield, 
Mass., June 15, 1S03, and died at Adrian, Mich , May 0, 1S75. He 
prepared for college at Amherst academy, was two years at Wil- 
liams college, then went to Dartmouth, graduating as a physician in 
1S2G. Practiced two years at Yarmouth, Mass., then was a druggist 
at Amherst until 1S36. He settled that year at Adrian, Mich., and 
was in the drug trade until 18 10. With the exception of a short time 
in the banking business, the rest of his life he gave to reading, 
study and horticulture. He made a study of fruits and varieties best 
adapted to the climate, and was employed by the United States pomo- 
logical society to prepare a work, published by government. He gave 
the land for the site of Adrian college, and was liberal in other direc- 
tions. 

A. I. UP.SON, 

Senator from the upper peninsula in 1855, was for a few years a mer- 
chant at Eagle Harbor, Keneenaw county. Nothing further known 
of him. 

CHARLES UPSON, 

Attorney General of Michigan, 1801-3, Representative in congress, 
1863 to 1^39, and State Senator, 1S55, '81-2, was born at Southington, 
Conn., March 19, 1831. He received a common school and academical 
education. In 1S.J1 commenced the study of law. and was for one 



652 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

year in the Yale law school. He came to Constantine, Mich., in 1840. 
and the next year removed to Centreville. He taught school, and in 
1847 was deputy county clerk, and was admitted to the bar in 1847. 
Engaged in practice at Centreville, was county clerk two years, and 
two years prosecuting attorney of St. Joseph county. Removed to 
Coldwaterin 1856, and from 1857 to 1861 was a railroad commissioner. 
He continued in practice until 1869, when he was elected judge of the 
5th circuit, which he resigned Dec. 31, 1872. In 1871 he was one of 
two commissioners to examine the compilation of the laws, made that 
year. In 1873 he was one of eighteen commissioners to revise the 
state constitution. In 1876 he declined the position of commissioner 
of Indian affairs. He was first a Whig, a Republican from 1854. He 
practiced his profession until his death at Coldwater, Sept. 5, 1885. 



DANIEL UPTON, 

Representative in 1867 from Jackson county, was born at Fishkill, N. 
Y., Aug. 12, 1818, and came with his father's family in 1835 to Jack- 
son county, Michigan. Bred a farmer, he became a clerk, was a 
merchant at Parma, also a farmer. He was eight years clerk of Jack- 
son county. Removed to Muskegon in 1S68, and purchased a fruit 
farm on Lake Harbor, where his family resides. He is one the firm 
of Upton & Webb, dealers in real estate. Has held the offices of 
supervisor, town clerk and treasurer. 



WILLIAM W. UPTON, 

Representative from Clinton county in 1847, was born in Victor, N. 
Y., and was educated at the Lima seminary. He was a surveyor 
employed on railroads and canals. He located a farm in Victor. 
Mich., studied law, was admitted in 1845. and practiced first at De 
Witt, then at Lansing from 1847 to 1852. Then removed to Califor- 
nia, was in practice twelve years, was a member of the California 
legislature in 1856, and district attorney of Sacramento county in 1S61 
to 1863. Removed to Portland, Oregon, in 1861, practiced law until 
1868, was then appointed a judge of the supreme court to fill vacancy, 
and was elected to that position for six years in 1872. From 1872 to 
1874 was chief justice. In 1877 he was appointed second comptroller 
of the treasury department, a position he held for many years. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 653 



WILLIAM S UTLEY 



Representative from Newaygo county in lc65, was born iu Richmond, 
N. Y., Nov. 6, 1827. He came with his parents to Michigan in 1828, 
was educated in the common schools, learned a trade at Lansing, and 
settled in Newaygo county in 18o0. lie was county clerk 1859 to 
1863; delegate in the constitutional convention of 1867; justice nearly 
all the time since 1852: and school inspector except one year since 
1863. Built the first bridge across the Muskegon river, at Croton, in 
1S50; put up the first mail ever sent from the county: and claims to 
have married more couples than any other magistrate in northern 
Michigan. Has been for 23 years town clerk of Big Prairie, also town 
treasurer. A Whig until ISo-i, a Republican until 1876. now a Green- 
backer. 



JOSEPH L. VALADE, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1S77, was born at Dover East, 
Ontario. March 28, 1822. He attended school in Detroit from 1833 to 
1S37, then at Dundas. Ontario, until 1844. He then taught a trench 
school at various places in the province until 1848. when he com- 
menced to read medicine with the late Dr. Pitcher. In 1850-1 he 
attended medical lectures at Trinity college. Toronto, also at Ann 
Arbor in 1852. from which place he removed to Vienna, Monroe 
county, where he has since resided, and has established for himself a 
respectable medical reputation. 



GEORGE W. VAN AKEN, 

Representative from Branch county in 1873-4-5, was born in Clark- 
ston, N. Y. , Sept. 8, 1828. In 1835 he removed to Michigan and set- 
tled in Lenawee county, near Adrian. In 1838 he removed to Girard. 
Branch county, where he still resides. He received a common school 
education. He has been supervisor of his township for four years. 
By occupation a farmer. 

LAWRENCE VAN DUSEN, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1S83, was born at Fort 
Edward, N. Y., Aug. 27. 1826, and in 1832 removed with his parents 
to Ovid, N. Y. He was seven years clerk in a store, three years 
superintendent of the poor in Seneca county, and door keeper of the 
New York senate in 1S63-4. For four years was deputy provost mar- 
7--S 



654 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

shal, also a deputy collector. Removed to Owosso. Mich., in 1S69. 
Has beeu engaged in the lumber business, and been a justice and 
deputy sheriff. Elected on the fusion ticket, but in politics a Green- 
backer. 

ZACHARIAH VAN DUSER, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1847. was born in Catskill. 
N. Y., November 26. 1S03. By occupation a farmer and druggist, 
politically a Democrat. He settled in Moscow, Hillsdale county, in 
1834, and in 1835 was the first supervisor of that town. He was also 
supervisor in 1841. 1845 and 1840. He died at Hillsdale, March 10. 
1852. He took an active part in the politics of the day. 



PETER VAN EVERY, 

A member of the constitutional convention of 1835, and a Represent- 
ative from Wayne county in 1835-6, was born near Hamilton. 
Canada, January 3. 1795, coming with his parents to Michigan when 
an infant. He served as a private in the war of 1812-15, and was 
advanced to the position of quartermaster of a regiment for faithful 
and meritorious services After the close of the war he was com- 
missioned by the governor as colonel of militia. He resided in Ham- 
tramck on a farm of 400 acres bordering the river, on a portion of 
which the present Detroit water-works are located. He held at 
various times the offices of supervisor and justice of the peace. 
Besides being a farmer he was a miller and general business man.and 
in 1837 removed to Franklin. Oakland county, where he engaged in 
farming, milling and general merchandise, besides operating a dis- 
tillery and ashery, giving employment to a large number of men. 
continuing in active business until near the close of his life, Decem- 
ber 22, 1859. He was democratic in politics up to 1837, and there- 
after Whig and Republican. 

CALEB VAN HUSAN, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1844, was born in Man- 
chester, N. Y.. March 13, 1S15, and died August 20, 1884. He live i 
at home until the age of thirteen, and became an apprentice to a 
cabinet maker. In 1830 he married Catharine Jackson, and became 
interested with her father in mercantile business, lie settled as a 
merchant at Saline, Mich., in 1838, which he continued until 1853. 
when he removed to Detroit, was a merchant there until 1855, when 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 655 

he retired. He was a director in the Detroit locomotive works, also 
in the Michigan insurance company bank, and was president of the 
Detroit fire and marine insurance company from 'its organization 
until his death. Under his management the company prospered. 
His second wife was Emily C. Burr, whom he married in 1S0G. He 
was long a trustee of Madison university. N. Y., was greatly inter- 
ested in Kalamazoo college, and was a member of the Baptist church 
from the age of fourteen. He left a large fortune to his wife and 
six children. 

JAMES VAN KLEECK 

Was born September 20, 1840, at Exeter, Michigan. He enlisted as a 
private in the 17th Michigan infantry in June. 1863. He was severely 
wounded at the battle of Antietam, from which wound he still suf- 
fers. He graduated from the law department, Michigan University, 
in 1870. Removed from Monroe county and settled in Midland 
county in 1870, aud began the practice of law at Midland City, moved 
to Bay City in 1S84, where he is engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. Has held various offices under the village government; also 
the office of prosecuting attorney of Midland county for six years. 
He has always been a Republican, was a member of the House of 
Representatives of 1S83-4, and was commissioner of emigration under 
Gov. Alger. 

CORNELIUS VAN LOO, 

Representative from Ottawa county in 1881-2-3, was born in the 
Netherlands, August 7, 1838. He settled in Ottawa county with his 
parents in 18-19. Attended the agricultural college in 1858-9, also 
Albion college before and after that time. Taught school in 1860-1, 
enlisted in 1862 in the 21st Michigan infantry, and served through the 
war, rising to the rank of first lieutenant, and was twice wounded. 
After the war was a student at Albion college for eighteen months. 
Has been six years register of deeds for Ottawa county; four years 
superintendent of schools; supervisor and chairman of board two 
years. In politics a Republican. 

AARON A. VAN ORTHWICK, 

Representative from Branch county in 1887, was born in Covert^ 
New York, December 19, 1S29. He remained at home until he was 
twenty-one, attending school. He came to Michigan in 1832. Lie 
worked by the month one year in Lenawee count v, when lie removed 



656 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

to Branch county and purchased wild land in Coldwater township. 
In 1864 he sold his farm and purchased one in the township of Butler. 
where he has since resided. Mr. Van Orthwick has held the offices 
of constable, highway commissioner, township superintendent of 
schools, coroner, and supervisor ten terms. He was elected Repre- 
sentative on the republican ticket lor 1887-8 by a vote of 3,5L'.j to 
2,760 for Oliver C. Campbell, and 571 for Benjamin Culver, Prohi- 
bitionist. 

JACOB J. VAN RIPER. 

Attorney General of Michigan from 1881 to 1885, was born at Haver- 
straw, N. Y., March 8, 1838. He received an academical education, 
removed to Cass county, Mich., in 1837, but for many years has 
resided at Buchanan. Attended the law department of the Univer- 
sity, and was admitted to the bar in 1862. Held the offices of deputy- 
collector and assistant assessor of internal revenue. He was the 
youngest delegate in the constitutional convention of 1867. Was 
prosecuting attorney of Berrien countv four years, and by appoint- 
ment of Gov. Croswell regent of the University from March, 1SS0, 
to Dec. 31, 1885. In politics a Republican. 



DIRK B. K. VAN RAALTE, 

Representative from Ottawa county in 1875-7, was born in the 
Netherlands in 1843. He removed with his parents to Holland, Michi- 
gan in 1847, where he has since resided. In 1862 enlisted in the 25th 
Michigan infantry, and served two years. In one of the.engagements 
before Atlanta, Georgia, he lost Ins right arm, and received a bullet 
which, passing through his cheek, came out just below the eye. He 
is a graduate of Hope college, and by occupation a merchant. In 
politics a Republican. 

ROWLAND S. VAN SCOY 

Was burn in Kent, N. Y., November 22. 1814. He received a com- 
mon school education, and was a teacher several winters. In 1S39 
he came to Michigan and bought a farm in De Witt, Clinton county. 
In 1854 he sold his farm and removed to Essex, Clinton county, where 
he now resides on a farm of 1,200 acres. He owns several other 
farms, in all about 2,000 acres, a large number of village lots in Maple 
Rapids, and a large brick block, and carries on a banking business. 
He has held many town offices, including supervisor, treasurer and 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 657 

justice; has bsen president of the village of Maple Rapids, recruiting 
officer during the rebellion, a'ld was a Representative from 1871 to 
187.3. 

JAMES VAN VLEET 

Was born in Romulus, N. Y.. July 28, 1818. He was brought up on 
a farm, received a common school education, married Mary Ann 
Cooley in 1841. and in 1844 settled on a farm in G;iines, Michigan. 
He endured great hardship as a pioneer, but eventually his eighty 
acre farm was increased lo 820 acres, with fine farm buildings. He 
was school inspector twelve years: justice sixteen years: supervisor 
eighteen years, holding the latter olfice from 1847 to 1868, when he 
left it to accept that of county treasurer, and was also deputy treas- 
urer three years. He was a Representative in 1805 and 1867. In 
1800 he removed to Flint, where he has served as alderman, and been: 
engaged in real estate and insurance business. He was a Democrat 
until 1854, since a Republican. 

PHILIP T. VAN ZILE 

Was born in Osceola. Pa., July 20, 1814. He received his education 
n that state, and graduated at Alfred university, Alleghany county, 
N. Y., in 1803. He taught school in Pennsylvania and Ohio, and 
became a resident of the latter state in 1863. He enlisted as a private 
in battery E, 1st Ohio field artillery, and went into service. He 
served until the close of the war. refusing a commission as captain in 
thp 32d Ohio infantry. He then removed to Charlotte. Mich., and 
graduated from the law department of the University in 1867. He 
was four years prosecuting attorney of Eaton county, and served as 
judge of probate until 1875. when he was elected circuit judge for 
Eaton and Calhoun counties, which he resigned in 1878. He served 
several years as United States district attorney to Utah, then returned 
to Charlotte and resumed practice. He was chairman of the state 
Republican committee from 1^84 to 1886. 



JAMES U. VAUGHN. 

Representative from Wayne county (Van Buren township), in 18-13, 
was a native of the state of New York, and came to Michigan in 1832. 
He was a farmer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, and repre- 
sented his township for a number of yearsonthe board of supervisors. 
Died March 29, 1880. 



G58 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

GEORGE F. VEENFLIET, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1879, was born in Wes-.d, 
Prussia, April 2. 1813. He received an academical education, and 
graduated from the University of Bonn as professor of mathematics 
and physical sciences in 1839. In 1849 he emigrated to the United 
States, and came to Michigan in 1849. In 18.j0 he removed to Blum- 
field, Saginaw county. He was appointed commissioner of immigra- 
tion by Gov. Wisner during the seasons of 1S09 GO. In I860 he was 
elected register of deeds for Saginaw county. In 1870 he was elected 
county treasurer, which office he held for six consecutive years. In 
politics a Republican. 

WALTER VICARY, 

Representative from the second district of Marquette, was born in 
Devonshire, England, January 31, 1836. He is by occupation an 
engineer, is a Republican, has been a resident of the state fifteen 
years, was supervisor of the second ward of Ishpeming in 1SS5 and 
1886. He was elected to the house of 1887-8 by a vote of l,32(fcto 1,157 
for Patrick J. McGinty. 

STEPHEN VICKERY, 

Representative from Kalamazoo county in 1838-43-4-5-8, was born in 
the state of New York, removed to Ohio at the age of sixteen, taught 
school in that state several terms, then became a teacher at Monroe. 
Mich. He removed to Prairie Ronde in 1829, was the first county 
clerk and treasurer of Kalamazoo county 1834-6, and was register of 
deeds 1836-8. A prominent Whig, and once the candidate of that 
party for governor. He was a practical surveyor and laid out the 
village of Schoolcraft, where he died Dec. 12, 1857. A man of remark- 
able memory, strong in his convictions, and positive in character. 



JAMES YIDETO 

Was born in Hawksbury. Upper Canada, July 27, 1804. When young 
his parents removed to the state of New York. At the age of eleven 
he went to live with an uncle at Shelburn, Vt., and remained there 
until he became of age. lie came to Detroit in 1828, and was 
engaged for fifteen years in surveying government lands in Michigan. 
Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. After 1832 his home was in 
Jackson county. lie located land in Concord in 1833. He was several 
terms supervisor of Spring Arbor. He was Representative in 1S43-4, 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 650 

and Senator in 1S43-6. In later year* he followed farming. In 
politics a Democrat. He died at Spring Arbor, July 18, 1886. 

EDWARD VINCENT. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1883, was born in Lower 
Canada, October 31, 1825, and removed with his parents to Clyde, 
Michigan, in 1836, and has resided in that town since that time. He 
received a common school education, and is by occupation a farmer. 
Has held the office of county treasurer for four years, and has 
served twenty-two terms as supervisor of the town. Has always 
been a Republican. 

DAVID VINTON, Jr., 

Representative from Grand Traverse and Manitou couuties in 1S83, 
was born in Hampshire county, Massachusetts, September 16, 1828. 
At the age of ten years he was placed at work on a farm, and 
remained to the age of fourteen, when he was apprenticed to learn 
the tanning business at Newark, Ohio. He remained there unt 
1852, removed to Steuben county, Indiana, continuing in the same 
occupation untd 1870, when he removed to Williamsburg, Grand 
Traverse county, and engaged in mercantile business. He has been 
a Republican since 18G0. 

EMORY B VORHEES, 

Representative from Clinton county in 188"), was born in Ovid, Mich- 
igan, October 22, 1853. He received a common school education. 
Has been secretary of the Ovid union agricultural society for eight 
years in succession. He has always been a farmer by occupation. 
He was elected as a Democrat on the fusion ticket. Has been a 
supervisor. 

HIRAM VOORHIES 

Was born in Belvidere, N. Y., February 5, 1809, and died December 
24, 18-78. He came to Orion, Michigan, in 1836. By occupation a 
farmer; in politics a Democrat. He resided in Orion thirty-four 
years and held the positions of supervisor, school director, justice 
and in 1851 was a Representative. In 1870 he was elected county 
treasurer, removed to Pontiac, and served two years in that office. 
He was a member of the common council of Pontile at the time of 
his death. 



(J6U MICHIGAN BIOGRAI'UY. 

ISAAC I. VOORH1ES, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1835-6-48, was born in 
Somerset, N. Y.. in 1799. He removed to Pontiac. Michigan, in 1824. 
He was supervisor of Pontiac in 1833-4, and held other town offices, 
and was a member of the constitutional convention of 1835. He 
removed to Lapeer in 1866, where he died August 2, 1886. In politics 
a Democrat. 

SEBRING VOORHEIS, 

Was born in Fayette, N. Y., January 7, 1815. He came to Michigan 
in 1836, and for three years lived near Ypsilanti. In 1839 he settled 
on a farm in White Lake. Oakland county, where he resided until 
his death, February 3, 1SS2. In politics a Republican. He was 
supervisor in 1843. and held that office seven times, the last in 1S7G. 
Was town clerk in 1851. He was a Representative in 1863-4. He 
was an elder in the First Presbyterian church of White Lake, of 
which he became a member in 1840. 

GEORGE VOWLES 

Was born in Westbury. England. November 10, 1813. He came to 
this country with his parents in 1820, who settled in Onondaga 
county. N. Y. He came to Michigan in 1S35, and resided in Inde- 
pendence, Oakland county, until 1840, then at Milford until 1855, 
from that time living in the town of Lyon until his death, Nov. 4, 
1878. In politics a Republican. He was a Representative in 1S69-70. 

JOHN J. V ROM AN, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1S87, was born in Orleans 
county, New York, August 5, 1840. Has been a resident of Michigan 
thirty years. By occupation, formerly a fanner, at present a mer- 
chant. He lias held the following offices: township clerk, treasurer 
and supervisor, and superintendent of the poor of Wayne county 
three years. He was elected Representative on the democratic ticket 
by a vote of 1.741 to 1,703 for George W. Coomer. Republican, and 
158 for Richard Bird, Prohibitionist. 



SILAS A. WADE, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1857, was born in the state 
of New Jersey, September 4, 1797. By occupation a millwright and 



illCHlGAJf BIOGRAPHY. 661 

miller, in politics a Republican. Came to Rome, Michigan, in 1835. 
Removed to Jeff rson, Hillsdale county, in 1850, and -was supervisor 
in 1862. Died February 19, 1869. 

RALPH WADHAMS, 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1838, was born in Goshen, 
Conn., in 1798, and died in April, 1877. When young his parents 
removed to Leicester, N. Y. He received a good normal education, 
and became a clerk in a store. He landed at Detroit in 182 3, and for 
several years was a member of the firm of Reese & Wadhams, gen- 
eral merchants. They occupied the first brick store built in Detroit, 
corner of Jefferson and Woodward avenues. Later the firm became 
Howard & Wadhams. He came into possession of a tract of pine on 
Black river, and commenced lumbering. In 1829 he located in St- 
Clair county, and in 1830 built the first grist-mill in the county, and 
did an extensive business, employing many men. He was super- 
visor of the town of Desmond in 1832, then comprising all the 
territory from Macomb to Saginaw. He was a delegate to the 
constitutional convention of 18 >5. President Jackson appointed him 
postmaster at Clyde Mills, which he resigned in 1874, after thirty-six 
vears' service. Politically a Democrat. 



JOHN WAGNER 

Was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, April 18, 1818. He came to 
Cleveland, Ohio, in 1838, and remained there until IS 15. He then 
removed to Leroy, Calh >un county, Michigan, and bought a farm. 
He was supervisor for six years, and in 1800-70 was Representative in 
the legislature. He filled other town offices. In politics a Republi- 
can. Died December 13. 1S76. 

JONATHAN G. WAIT, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1851, and Senator in 1803- 
-4-5-7, was born in York, N. Y., November 22, 1811. He traces his 
ancestry ba^k to 1075, and is a descendant of Richard Wait, who 
settled at Watertown, Mass., in 1037. He removed with his father to 
Perry. Ohio, in 1S25, and taught school when seventeen. He settled 
at Sturgis, Mich., in 1835, where he now resides. He engaged in 
lumbering, building, and has been a drover, grain dealer, merchant 
and manufacturer. He built many houses and saw-mills, and a cabi- 
net and chair factory. As agent of the Michigan Southern, he made 
74 



662 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

many contracts for railroad material. In 1857 he was one of the 
organizers of the Grand Rapids & Indiana railroad, and is still a 
director. He was ten years a justice, and many years supervisor. In 
1860 he started the Sturgis Journal, and was its editor and publisher 
until 1872. He was postmaster of Sturgis from 1872 to 188G. He 
married Susan S. Buck in 1832, and they had nine sons and three 
daughters. /For many years a leading man in southwestern Michi- 
gan. 

BENJAMIN VV. WAITE 

Was born in Aurelius, N. Y.. October 13, 1811. In 1839 he settled on 
a farm in Seio, Michigan. He was for about twenty years superin- 
tendent of the poor in 'Washtenaw county, and for four years presi- 
dent of the Washtenaw mutual fire insurance company. He was 
Representative in the legislature of 1849, and was a member of the 
constitutional convention of 1830. In politics a Whig. In 1868 he 
removed to Dexter, where he now resides. 



DANIEL B. WAKEFIELD, 

Representative in 1838, and Senator in 1842 3, from Genesee county, 
was a lawyer and farmer, and a Democrat in politics. He died some 
years since at his home in Grand Blanc, Genesee county. 



M ARCUS WAKEMA N , 

Born in Connecticut, March 17, 1795, moved with his parents to 
Batavia, N. Y.. in 1810. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and 
fought in the battles of Chippewa and Lundy's Lane. He came to 
Michigan in 1837, and settled as a farmer in Jackson county. He was 
elected by the democrats a Representative in the legislature of 1846, 
and filled various township offices. Died Jan. 17, 1869. 



DAVID S. WAL BRIDGE 

Was born at Bennington, Vt., July 30, 1S02. He received a common 
school education. He removed to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1843, and 
was a farmer, a merchant and a miller. He was Senator in 1849 and 
1850. He was nominated and elected to congress in 1854. as a repub- 
lican, receiving 12,865 votes against 10,178 votes lor Samuel Clark, 
democrat; was re-elected in 1856, receiving 23,550 votes against 16,046 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 663 

votes for F. J. Littlejohn, democrat, serving from Dec. 3, 1855, to 

March 3, 1859. He was first a Whig, a Republican after 1854. He 
died at Kalamazoo, June 15, 1808. 



CAMPBELL WALDO, 

Senator in 1848-9 from Calhoun, Eaton. Branch and Kalamazoo 
counties, was born in MiddLetown, Vt.. Dec. 25, 1780, and was brought 
upon a farm. He became a physician, and practiced many years in 
Cayuga county, N. Y.. and was a member of the N. Y. assembly in 
1825. In 1833 he became a merchant at Port Byron, N. Y. In 1837 
he settled at Albion, Mich., built mills at various points, and was a 
leading man. He died at Albion, Nov. 6, 1876, at the age of 98. He 
was a man of fine personal appearance, courteous and affable in his 
manners, a good physician, and a christian. 



HEXRY WALDRON 

Was born at Albany, N. Y. , Oct. 11, 1810; graduated at Rutgers eol- 
loge, N. Y.. in 1836; removed to Michigan in 1837: settled at Hillsdale 
in 1839: built the first warehouse on the Southern railroad: and from 
that date was engaged in manufacturing and banking. In early life 
a civil engineer. He was a director of the Michigan Southern rail- 
road; president of the Detroit. Hillsdale & Indiana railroad: and pres- 
ident of the first national bauk of Hillsdale. He was a Representa- 
tive iu*1843; presidential elector in 1848; a Representative in congress 
from 1855 to 1861 from the second district, also from 1871 to 1877 from 
the first district, in all twelve years. He was a delegate to the repub- 
lican national convention of 18G8. He was a Republican in politics, 
a good speaker, a successful business man. and a political power, 
especially in southern Michigan. He died several years since. 



ARNOLD WALKER, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1873-4, was born in Gibson, 
Pa., in 1821. He removed to Seneca county. N. Y., in 1837, and to 
Ingham county, Mich., in 1844. He received a common school educa- 
tion, and was a practical business man. lie was a director of the 
Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw railroad for many years, and filled large 
railroad contracts. He lived in Yevay until 1860, then became a resi- 
dent of Leslie until his death, Dec. 5, 1-^4. He was Ion- president 
of the Leslie national bank. In politics a Republican. 



6G4 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

ALVAH H. WALKER 

Was born in Rhode Island, February 15, 1802, and removed to Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., with his parents in 1803, where he resided until 
1855, when he removed to Detroit. For many years, at FreJonia, 
Chautauqua county, he was one of the trustees and treasurer of the 
Fredonia academy, and was supervisor of Pomfret. He was on the 
whig electoral ticket in 1852, and in 1854 was a member of the New 
York Senate. In 1855 he removed to Detroit. In 1857 he became 
interested in village property in St. Johns, and removed there in 1861; 
for several year^ was engaged in mercantile business; in 1SG7 was 
elected to the constitutional convention for Clinton county. He has 

been an active Whig or Republican all his life. 

> 

BENJAMIN WALKER, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 1873, was born in Whiting- 
ham. Vt., March 7, 1814. He received a common school education. 
In 1847 removed to Michigan and settled in Perry, where he still 
resides. Held the office of justice 24 years; supervisor two years, 
town clerk three years, and school inspector. He has been treasurer 
of the Shiawassee mutual insurance company ten years. He was 
president of the Shiawassee agricultural association, two years. By 
occupation a farmer. 

CHARLES I. WALKER, 

Representative from Kent county in 1841. was born in Butternuts. N. 
Y., April 25, 1814, his parents moving there from New England He 
received a common and select school education. At sixteen he was 
a teacher, and then a clerk. At twenty-one he was a merchant at 
Cooperstown, N. Y.. but sold out in 18 J6, and removed to Grand 
Rapids, Mich., as agent for eastern capitalists in the buying of Michi- 
gan lands. The panic of 18J7 closed out land speculations, and he 
took an interest and became editor of the Grand River Times. He 
commenced the study of law, went t<> Vermont to complete his 
studies, and was admitted to the Vermont bar at Brattleboro in 1842. 
He practiced in that state until 1851, and then settled at Detroit. He 
was circuit judge for about a year, but resigned, and was professor 
in the law school at Ann Arbor from 185!) to 1874. lie was for several 
years president of the board of state charities. He lias always taken 
an active interest in the early history of the northwest, and has writ- 
ten able papers on that subject. Has been president of the .state 
pioneer society. Is an able lawyer, politically a Democrat. He was 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 665 

a member of the second convention of assent in 1S36, and has held 
several honorable local positions. 



DeWITT C. WALKER, 

Representative in 1840-44-46, and Senator from Macomb county in 
1841-2, was born in Vermont in 1812. He was a graduate of Middle- 
bury college, studied law at the Yale law school, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1836. He then came to Romeo, Mich., and continued 
there in law practice for twenty years. He was prosecuting attorney 
of Macomb county; a regent of the State University in 1845: a dele- 
gate in the constitutional convention of 1850; and four years judge of 
probate. He laid out the village of Capac in 1857, having settled 
there -in 1857, and still resides there. He built a grist and saw mill, 
donated land for churches, and for many years was president of the 
village. 

EDWARD C. WALKER, 

Representative from Detroit in 1867, was born July 4, 1820, at Butter- 
nuts, N. Y. He graduated from Yale college in 1842, studied law, 
attended law school, was admitted to the Detroit bar in 1845. and 
was long a partner of his brother, C. I. Walker, then of Walker & 
Kent, and lately with his son. of the firm of Walker & Walker. He 
was a regent of the University from 1S64 to 1882, and during the 
whole term was chairman of the executive committee. In religion a 
Presbyterian. Politically whig and republican. 

i 

FREDERICK WALKER, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1S72-3-4, was born in York- 
shire, England, in lSuO. By occupation a farmer and lumberman, 
politically a Republican. He emigrated to New York city with his 
parents when two years of age. Settled on a farm in Genesee county, 
now part of Mt. Morris village, in 1836. He was a justice for twenty 
years, for thirty-six years a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and twelve years Sabbath school superintendent. Died 
January 20, 1S79. 

HENRY N. WALKER 

Was born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1813, and was educated at 
the Fredonia academy. He came to Detroit in 1^34 or 1^35, and was 



b6G MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

admitted to practice as an attorney, and was thereafter a leading 
member of the bar for many years. During his life he held the fol- 
lowing official positions: 1837. master in chancery; 1843 to 1845, 
attorney general of the state: 1844, Representative in the legislature, 
same year Supreme Court reporter: April, 1859, to September, 18G0, 
postmaster at Detroit; 1883, state immigration agent. In business life 
he had extended relations. In 1836 he was state agent of the Protec- 
tion insurance company; in 1849, one of the founders and vice presi- 
dent of the Detroit savings fund institute; 1858 to 18G3, president of 
the Detroit & Milwaukee railroad company; 1801 to 1875, proprietor 
and editor of the Detroit Free Press, and during the later portion of 
this period, was president of the western associated press. In 1845, 
while attorney general, he was largely instrumental, in a semi-official 
capacity, in organizing the Michigan Central railroad company, which 
in 1846 purchased the Central railroad from the state. He was 
influential in securing the building of the Great Western railway of 
Canada: also in voluntary enterprises, first in the temperance cause in 
the early days of the movement, 1835-6; as historiographer of Detroit, 
1843 to 1845: and when the building of the Detroit observatory at Ann 
Arbor was first agitated he made a liberal contribution for the build- 
ing, and also purchased the transit instrument at a cost of -$3,500. In 
politics a Democrat, in religion a Episcopalian. He married Miss 
Emily Norvel, daughter of the late Senator JohnNorvel, and left two 
sons and a daughter. Died Feb. 24, 1880. 



. HENRY T. WALKER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1842-5. was born in Bristol. 
N. Y., April 29. 1S08. Ily profession a physician, in politics a Demo- 
crat. He came to Michigan in 1830, and settled in \\'ashtena\v county 
in 1S37. For several terms a justice of the peace. Died October 2. 
1871. 



JAMES B. WALKER, 

Senator from Benzie and several other counties in 1805, was born at 
Philadelphia, Pa., July 29, 1805. He became an operative in a factory 
at Pittsburg, and subsequently a printer: was clerk to M. M. Noah in 
New York, and principal of an academy at New Durham, N. J.: 
studied law at Ravenna. Ohio: graduated at Western Reserve college, 
Hudson. Ohio, in 1831; edited successively religious papers at Hudson, 
Cincinnati and Chicago: was also engaged in the book trade; studied 
theology and was licensed to preach in 1841: was principal of a private 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 667 

-orphan asylum at Mansfield, Ohio; lectured on the harmony of science 
and revealed religion at Oherlin college and Chicago theological sem- 
inary. He held pastorates at Mansfield. Sandusky and Chicago, and 
preached several months at Lansing, Michigan. He was author of 
many theological works published from 1855 to 1870, also of poems 
published in '"Poets and Poetry of the West." His first work, "The 
Philosophy of the plan of Salvation," had a very large circulation in 
English, and was translated into several other languages. He was a 
trustee and interested in the prosperity of Benzonia college, at Benzie, 
Mich., and resided for some time in Benzonia. He received the 
degree of D. D., was the first president of Benzonia college, and gave 
largely to its support. Died several years since at Wheaton, Illinois. 



JOHN WALKER 

WasborninDeerfield.N. Y.,May 12,1818. He received a common school 
education. Settled in Kalamazoo in 1«;]G, and removed to Cooper in 1 840. 
He represented the 3d district of Kalamazoo county in the House in 
18G9-70- 1-2-3-4. In politics a Republican, by occupation a farmer. 



LEVI WALKER, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1873, was born in Granville, 
N. Y. , Dec. 20, 1813. He received an academical education, studied 
law and was admitted to the New York bar in 1835. In 1847 he 
removed to Michigan and settled in Flint. He held several important 
and several minor offices in the town and county. He died before 
the extra session of 1^74. 

SAMUEL S. WALKER 

Was born at Fredoni !, N. Y.. June 11, 1841, and removed with his 
father to Detroit in 1855. He was educated at the Fredonia academy, 
and subsequently at the Barstow union school in Detroit, graduating 
at the University of Michigan in tiie class of 18(51. He rerno ved to St. 
Johns in 1861, and engaged in the mercantile business until 18G5 
when he established a banking office at St. Johns, under the firm 
name of S. S. Walker & Co., continuing that until Septein ber of the 
same year, when, with others, he organized the first national bank of 
St. Johns, of winch he was cashier until August, IS7T. He was a Rep- 
resentative in l*7.">, and was regent of the University from l v 7"> to 
1883. 



G68 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



SYLVESTER WALKER, 



Representative from Lenawee county in 1847, was a hatter In Nor- 
wich, N. Y., in 1313. He settled in Cambridge, Mich., in 1838 
opened a hotel at the junction of the Chicago and La Plaisariw; Bay 
turnpikes, erected tine buildings, where many aweary trav<l<r found 
a genial place of rest. In politics a Democrat. Died Dec, MH 1868. 
His widow was living in Cambridge in 1SS7, at the age of ninety. 



JAMES WALKINSHAW, 

Representative fro,m Calhoun county in 1877, was born in tho parish 
of Boithwick, Mid Lothian, Scotland, July 10, 1810. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools. He emigrated in 1842 to Marshall, 
Mich., and was employed by the state railroad authorities a i ware- 
houseman there, and also in the same capacity at Kalamazoo, until 
the Michigan Central company bought the railroad. He then nettled 
in Convis on a farm. He was supervisor for twelve years. In politics 
a Republican. 



JOHN B. WALLACE, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1859, was born in Mteubcn 
county, N. Y., Oct. 22, 1809, and came to Michigan in 18;:-. U v occu- 
pation a farmer and lumberman. He ran the first saw mill in Wayne 
county propelled by water. He served many years as postmaster at 
Wallaceville (to which he gave his name), and has held mo a .,t' the 
responsible local offices of his township. After a residence of more 
than fifty years on the farm which he located, removed to Detroit 
in 1885, where he now resides. Politics, republican. 



FRANKLIN B. WALLIN, 

Representative from Allegan county in 18G1-2, was born in Nelson, 
Pa., March 25, 1832. By occupation a tanner; in politics a Republi- 
can. He came with his parents to Michigan in 1830, who limited at 
McCoys Creek, Berrien county. He learned the tanner'n trade. In 
1853 he removed to Saugatuck, where with bis father and brother, 
he operated three tanneries under the firm name of C. ( '. Wallin & 
Sons, the store being in Chicago. He built a tannery in (irand 
Rapids in 18S2, where he now resides. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 669 

GEORGE W. WALTBEW, 

Representative from the first district 6f Wayne county in 1885, 
was born at St. Thomas, Ontario, May 30, I860. His parents 
removed with him to Detroit in 1862. He drifted to Colorado when 
eighteen years of age, retured to Detroit when twenty-one, and 
shortly afterwards became manager of the firm of A. Walthew & 
Sons, scenic artists of Detroit. In October, 1883, he took up the 
study of the law; was admitted to the bar in 1884; became the candidate 
of the labor party of Detroit for the legislature; was afterwards put 
upon the democratic and greenback ticket and elected. 

ANDREW WALTON, 

Representative from Bay county iu 1875-0, was born at Batavia. N. 
Y., Jan. 11, 1826, but removed to Ohio when young. He received an 
academical education. In 1863 he removed to Bay City. Occupation, 
lumber merchant. He was a member of the board of education, and 
a commissioner of the Bay City water-works for many years. He 
was one of the original proprietors of the state bank of Bay City, 
and one of the directors until its consolidation with the second 
national bank, and then was elected a director. Politics, democratic. 

JACOB WALTON, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1869-70-1-2-3-4, was born in 
Buckingham, Pa., Feb. 10, 18 IS. He received a common school 
education. In 1834 emigrated to Michigan and settled in Saline. In 
1S51 removed to Raisin, Lenawee county, where ne still resides. By 
occupation a farmer. In politics a Republican. 

JOSEPH WALTZ, 

Representative from Wayne county in 1879-85, was born in Detroit, 
May 24, 1844. He received his education in the public schools, 
receiving also a full commercial education. Mr. Waltz is a merchant, 
but deals extensively in lumber and real estate. He has filled various 
township offices, having been for two years township clerk, and for 
two terms justice, also supervisor of the township of Huron, in which 
he resides. Politically a Democrat. 

EDGAR B. WARD 

Was born in Castleton, N. Y.. Sept. 27. 1835, and removed with his 
parents to Washtenaw county, Mich., in 1836. He was educated at 



670 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Lodi academy, and in 1854 taught school near Millersburg, Ky. In 
the fall of 1854 he began the study of medicine at the University of 
Michigan, and graduated in 1858. He -went to Centreville, Iowa, 
and engaged in medical practice. In 1859 he returned to Owcsso 
Mich., to practice, and in 18G2 removed to Laingsburg, where he now 
resides, and continues the practice of his profession. He is a Repub- 
lican. In 1869-70 he was a Representative. 



- LYMAN M. WARD, 

"Representative from Berrien county in 1879-81-2, was born in Cat- 
taraugus county, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1836. He removed to "Wisconsin in 
1850, and thence to Michigan in 1S0G. He was educated in common 
and high schools. He is a fruit grower by occupation. In 1861 
enlisted in the three months" service and was appointed orderly sergeant 
of company I, first regiment Wisconsin Vol. Inft. After the expira- 
tion of that term re-enlisted for three years, receiving a captain's 
commission. He was successively promoted to major, lieutenant 
colonel, and colonel of the fourteenth regt., Wis. V. V. Inft. He was 
in command of a brigade for two years and received the brevet rank 
of brigadier general. 

ROBERT E. WARD, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1837, was born in Albany, X. 
Y. He came to the village of Berrien Springs in 1835, and was a 
merchant, the partner of Pitt Brown. On a petition drawn by him to 
the postoffice department, the village name was changed from Ber- 
rien to Berrien Springs, so named from valuable medical springs. 
He was a county commissioner in 1837. Removed to Detroit, where 
he died in 1847. 

ROBERT WARDEN* 

Emigrated frotn Greenock, Sc itland, in 1832, and after a br.ef resi- 
cence in Onondaga county, N. Y., purchased with Governor Bingh tm 
a large tract of land in Green Oak. Mich., upon which they settle I in 
18:33. Gov. Bingham had two wives, both of whom were sisters of 
Mr. Warden, while his wife was a sister of Governor Bingham. He 
was a farmer and was supervisor of Green Oak, hr^t in 1838, an I 
served six times afterwards in that capacity. He was a delej 
the constitutional convention of 1850. First a Democrat, a Repub- 
lican after 1*54. Deceased. 



MICHIGAN B10GKAPHY. G71 

GUERNSEY P. WARING, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1881-2, wa3 born August 81, 
1852, in Ridgeway, Mich. He attended school until of age; after- 
wards taught a few terms; and has since mingled farming with mer- 
cantile business in the land of his adoption. 



EDWARD A. WARNER, 

Senator from Branch county in 1812-3, was born in 1812 or 1813. 
He is said to have been in Marshall, Mich., in 1837. Settled at Cold- 
water in 1838, and engaged in practice as a lawyer. He was an 
agreeable and intelligent young man, and had obtained a good prac- 
tice at the time of his death, February 1, 1844. 



HARVEY WARNER 

Was born at Glens Falls, N. Y., April 5, 1809. In 1830 he came to 
Michigan, soon settled at Cold water, and built the first frame house 
and the first frame store and the first church in that city. He was 
postmaster in 1S32, and held the office man}- years. He was justice 
in 1834, and held that position 24 years. He was a delegate to the 
first convention of assent at Ann Arbor, was judge of probate 
from 1819 to 1857, and for several years president of the village of 
Coldwater. 

P. DEAN' WARNER, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1851, 18G5-7, and speaker of 
'the Rouse in 1867, was born in Hector, N. Y., August 18, 1820. He 
came with his father to Farmington, Mich., in 1820. At fourteen 
he was a clerk in a country store, where he remained nine years. In 
1845 became a merchant at Farmington, and still resides there, in the 
same business. He had a fair education. In politics, first a Demo- 
crat, since a Republican. He was deputy postmaster three years; 
three times town clerk; supervisor five terms, and fifteen years a 
member of the board of control of railroads by appointment of the 
governor. He was Senator in 1809-70. 



WILLIAM WARNER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1851, was born in Con- 
necticut in 1S0G. He settled as a farmer in Dexter, Mich., in 1820. 



672 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

He owns several large farms and has been engaged in the lumber 
and hardware trade. In politics a Republican. 



WILLIAM WARNER, 

Representative from Detroit in 1803-4-7, was born at Pittsford. Vt., 
Jan. 28, 1812. He graduated at Middlebury college, and studied for 
the ministry, but abandoned it from health considerations. He was 
several years treasurer of the University of Vermont at Burlington, 
and subsequently connected with the Vermont Central railroad, until 
he came to Detroit in 1855. He was there engaged in the lumber 
business until, in 1800, he became connected with the Detroit bridge 
and iron works, of which he was president at the time of his death in 
July, 1868. 

WILLIAM E. WARNER 

Was born in 1820, in New York, and came to Michigan in 1837. His 
early occupations were those of teacher and clerk in Rawsonville. 
He was a justice in 1845, and held the office of supervisor for many 
years. He was Representative in 1853, Senator in 1859-03-4, was reg- 
ister of deeds 1865-69, and a member of the constitutional convention 
of 1807. He died at Belleville, Sept. 0, 1S79. He is listed as a lawyer, 
though combining the qualities of farmer, politician and general bus- 
iness man in about equal degree. He was a Democrat. 



ASA K. WARREN, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1873-4, and Senator in 1875, was 
born in Eden, N. Y., Jan. 29, 1830. He is a graduate of Oberlin col- 
lege, of the class of "53. He is also a graduate of the medical depart- 
ment of the University, of the class of '50. He became a resident of 
Michigan in 1859, and settled in Olivet, where he still resides. He 
has been a member of the common council of the town ever since its 
organization. He still continues in the practice of his profession. In 
politics a Republican. 

ROBERT L. WARREN, 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1883, was born in Benning- 
ton, Mich., January 2. 1842. He removed to Flint when a boy. raid- 
ing there till 1 V 0'J. He entered Michigan University in 1^00, leaving 
tiiere to enter the military service in the late rebellion, serving until 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 673 

the close of the Vicksburg campaign, when he was discharged by 
reason of disability. Entered law department Michigan University in 
1864, and graduated in l'GG, began the practice of law, continuing 
about one year, then assuming the duties of local editor on the Wol- 
verine Citizen. Subsequently removed to Bay City, taking control 
of the Journal of that city, which he converted into a daily, and con- 
ducted it until sold to Hon. James Birney. Also published Saginaw 
Daily Enterprise. Removed to Van Buren county in ISTo, and pub- 
lished the Lawrence Advertiser, and was editor and publisher of the 
Decatur Republican. He now resides at Albion, and is editor and 
publisher of the Albion Recorder. 



SAMUEL N. WARREN, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1648, was born in Orwell, Vt., 
Sept. 15, 1813. Attended district school and Shoreham academy; 
taught school in Benson, Vt., in 1829; came to Michigan in 1S33, and 
taught school; at the age of twenty-two was a justice and supervisor, 
holding the latter office most of the time for forty years; was post- 
master at Fentonville; director of schools in Flint for ten years; for 
many years chairman of the congressional committee in the sixth 
district; and collector of internal revenue for that district under Lin- 
coln. Married Anne R. West in 1S34, and celebrated lus golden wed- 
ding at Albion, where he now resides. "Was a Whig until 1854, since 
a Republican. 

STEPHEN H. WARREN, 

Senator from Montcalm and other counties in 1857-8, was born in 
Esopus, N. Y., in 1806. Left an orphan at the age of seven, he went 
to live with his brother at Herkimer, N. Y., where he remained until 
1843, when he settled in Eureka, Montcalm county, as a farmer. In 
politics a Democrat until 1854, then a Republican. He held the office 
of justice. Died April 29, 1878. 

NORMAN B. WASHBURN. 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1S87, was born in Adrian, 
Mich., Aug. 13, 1^19, where he has since resided. He received a 
common school education, and at the age of seventeen learned 
telegraphy, but in the following year became an iron molder, .which 
occupation, with the trade of bricklayer, he has since followed. He 
was a charter member and commissioned officer in the Adrian light 



674 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

guard, and served from 1870 to 1876. He was elected Representative 
as a labor candidate and on tbe democratic ticket, receiving 1,732 
votes to 1.724 for Capt. J. H. Lee, Republican, and 245 for C. E. 
Mitchell, Prohibitionist. 

JOHN C. WATERBURY, 

Representative in 1861-2, and Senator in 1871-2-7, was born Nov. 27, 
1815, at Andes, N. Y. He received a common school education, and 
removed to Lerov, Mich.,. in 1838. From 1840 to 1847 resided at St. 
Clair, then removed to Lexington, where he still resides. He has held 
many offices, including justice, judge of probate, assistant assessor of 
internal revenue, and deputy U. S. marshal. In politics first a Whig, 
a Republican since 1854. He for years dealt in bonds and mortgages, 
and did much to develop the resources of the Huron shore. 

CHARLES W. W ATKINS, 

Representative from Allegan county in 1S71-2-3, was born in East 
Salem, N. Y., -larch 5, 1844. He received an academical education. 
In 1856 removed to Leigh ton, Mich. He entered the 6th Michigan 
cavalry as a private in 1861; was transferred to the 10th Michigan 
cavalry in 1863, was commissioned as lieutenant: served as adjutant 
of the regiment for a brief period, and was made a captain by brevet 
for gallant and meritorious services. He followed the mercantile 
business in Allegan county, but removed some years since to Grand 
Rapids, where he is engaged in the insurance business. In politics a 
Republican. 

ERWIN C. YV ATKINS, 

Representative from Kent county in 1873-4-5, was born in Middle- 
bury, N. Y., January 15, 1839. He received a common school educa- 
tion. In 1S44 emigrated -to Michigan and settled in Grattan, Kent 
county, and subsequently removed to Rockford. He studied law, 
and was admitted to the bar in 18GI. In the same year he enlisted in 
a company of cavalry, and when the company was incorporated in 
the first New York regiment of cavalry, was commissioned lieuten- 
ant, and subsequently received a commission as captain. In 1S63 he 
was appointed assistant adjutant general of the department of West 
Virginia, and subsequently assigned to the stall Ot Gen. W. H. 
Seward, where he served until the war ended. He has held sever.il 
local positions. By occupation a lumber merchant, lit' is now 
warden at the house of correction at Ionia. lie was an Indian agent 
in the west for some years. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 675 

FREEMAN C. WATKINS, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1861, and delegate in the 
constitutional convention of 1867, was born in Surry, N. II., March 
29, 1811. Taught primary schools in New Hampshire and Michigan 
from 1829 to 1S34. Located his farm in Napoleon in 1833, and was an 
early pioneer of Jackson county. Was supervisor and justice. A 
Democrat until 1854, then a Republican. Died June 10, 1880. 

MILTON C. WATKINS, 

Representative in 1859, and Senator in 1863-4-5, from Kent county, 
was born in Rutland, Vt., in 1S06. He received a common school 
and academical education. After the age of eighteen was engaged 
several years in teaching. In 1830 he married Susan Joy, and settled 
on a farm in Covington, N. Y., where he taught winters, and worked 
as a carpenter summers, and was also justice and school inspector. 
In 1814, settled on a farm in Grattan, Mich., where he resided until 
his death, May 16, 1836. He was the first supervisor of Grattan. and 
held that and the office of justice, nearly twenty-five years. He was 
U. S. assistant assessor until the office was abolished. In politics a 
Whig until 1854, then a Republican. 

FRANK H. WATSON, 

Representative from Shiawassee county in 18S7, was born in Shia- 
wassee, same county, November 14, 1857. He received his education 
at district and union schools and worked on his father's farm sum- 
mers and taugiit winters, until twenty-one years of age, when he 
entered a law office in Corunna, and was admitted to the bar in 1881. 
He went to Colorado, but remained only about one year, when he 
returned to Corunna and commenced the practice of his profession. 
remaining there until the spring of 1^85. when he removed to Owosso, 
where he still resides. He has been twice elected circuit court com- 
missioner, and is a Republican. 

HENRY WATSON. 

Representative from Montcalm county, was born in Nottingham- 
shire, England, January 29, 1836. By occupation a lumberman 
and fanner. He has filled the office of justice of the peace fifteen 
years, township clerk two years, has been a school officer twenty 
years, and Representative for 1835-G. He is a Republican, and was 



676 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

reelected for 18S7-S by a vote of 1,800 to 1,616 for Henry Sharp, and 
227 for Frank Fuller, Prohibitionist. 



JOHN WM, WATTS, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1887, was born at Leoni, 
Mich., Jan. 13, 1838, and has always been a resident of that county. 
He is a farmer. He has held the office of supervisor six years, clerk 
of his township seven years, and filled other town offices. He is a 
Republican, and was elected Representative by a vote of 2,517 to 
2,135 for Daniel Boynton, Fusionist, and 653 for Lester E. Palmer. 
Prohibitionist. 

CHARLES W. VVEATIIERBY, 

Representative from Branch county in 1801-2, was born in Washing- 
ton county, N. Y.. Jan. 19, 1810. By occupation a mechanic; in 
politics a Republican. He settled at Bronson, Mich., in 1836, where 
he held several local positions, and was a justice. He removed to 
Missouri in 1865, was a resident of Kansas City for two years, and 
now resides at Shelbina, Mo. 

NATHAN WEBB 

Was born in Middlesex, N. Y.. Jan. 25, 1808. He received a good 
education, mostly from private teachers, and in 183G received his 
diploma as a physician, and practiced at Iiushville, N. Y. In 18-16 
removed to Pittsfield, Mich., and purchased a farm, where he resided 
until his death. Dec. 3, 1884. For many years he was supervisor, also 
justice. In 1801-2 he was Senator. lie was first an Anti-Mason, 
then a Democrat, and from 1S54 a Republican. He sent three sons 
to the war, and served as a surgeon for several months. His wide 
information, literary tastes, firm principles and ready wit, made him 
a man of mark and influence. 

ANDREW J. WEBBER, 

Representative from Ionia county in 18H5-7, was born in Steuben 
county, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1831. He received a good common school 
education, removed to Michigan in 1852, and for four years was 
engaged in lumbering on the west shore, then for ten years was a 
farmer and merchant. Has been largely interested in lumbering in 
Mecosta county. He has been mayor of Ionia, twice president of the 
county agricultural society, director and vice president of the second 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 67? 

national bank, and president of Ionia farmers' insurance company. 
In politics a Republican. 

GEORGE W. WEBBER, 

Of Ionia, was born in Newburg, Vt., Nov. 25, 1825. He removed to 
Steuben county, N. Y., in 1S2S; received a public school education, 
and worked on his parents' farm until his twentieth year, when he 
engaged in lumbering and mercantile business for himself. He 
married in 1850 and removed to northern Michigan in 1852, where he 
continued the lumber business until 1858. Since then he has been a 
resident of Ionia county. He has been interested in farming, and in 
building in Ionia, where he has had the management of a mercantile 
business. He has also carried on lumbering operations in Mecosta 
county since 1S66. He was one of the founders of the second national 
bank of Ionia, and has been its president. He has also been mayor 
of the city two terms. He was elected Representative in congress by 
a vote of 22,824, to 11,435 for L. H. Randall, Democrat, and 9,506 for 
J. C. Blanchard, National, and served one term, declining a re- 
nomination. In polities a Republican. 



WILLIAM L. WEBBER, 

Senator from Saginaw county in 1S75, was born in Ogden. N. Y., 
July 19, 1825. He removed with his father to Hartland, Mich., in 
1830. He received a common school education, taught school, studied 
medicine two years, then taught select school at Milford two years. 
Studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He became a resi- 
dent of East Saginaw in 1853, where he now resides. He practiced 
law until :*<■:>. In 1857 he became the attorney of the Flint & Pere 
Marquette railroad company, and still holds that place. He was land 
commissioner of the road from 1870 lo 1S35. A director of the road 
since 1S64. Has also been president of the Tuscola & Huron railroad: 
trustee and executor of the estate of Jesse Hoyt; circuit court com- 
missioner of Saginaw county. 185-1-5: prosecuting attorney: 
mayor of East Saginaw; democratic candidate for governor in 1870. 
and president of the state agricultural society in 1878. In politics a 
Democrat. 

ALANSON J. WEBSTER 

Was born in Pontiac, Mich., Aug. 21, 18J7. He lived in Pontine until 
1851, then removed to White Lake, Oakland county, lie was super- 
76 



678 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

visor seven years, township treasurer and justice, and in 1871-2 a 
Representative. By occupation a farmer, in politics a Democrat. 
Died in 1875. 

JAMES WEBSTER, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1S46, was born in Litchfield, 
Conn., in 1811. He came to Michigan in 1838. Was by trade a 
blacksmith, but became a Methodist preacher; politically a Democrat. 
He removed to Fairfax, Ya., in 1858. 



JOSEril WEIER, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1869-70, was born in Wackern- 
heim, Germany, March 4, 1822. He came to Monroe, Mich., in 1849, 
where he now resides. He kept a grocery store and boarding house 
for years with success. Has been an alderman. About 18G8 he 
became interested in the planting of vineyards and the making of 
wine, his trade extending over many states. For some years has been 
retired from business. In politics a Democrat. 



JAMES D. WEIR, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1879, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y.. 
May 20, 1832. He received his education from private teachers. In 
1S47 removed to Detroit, and in 1^4S apprenticed himself to the foun- 
dry business, which he followed up to 1859. He then studied law, 
and was admitted to the bar in I860. He has been collector of fourth 
ward, school inspector, alderman, county clerk, judge of probate, and 
member of the board of education. In politics a Democrat. 



HENRY W. WEISS, 

Representative from Gratiot county in 1885, was born in Champion, 
Ohio, in 1843. Came to Michigan in 1873, and for some years followed 
the occupation of lumberman, when purchasing the land upon which 
he now resides, in Sumner, he engaged in farming, which occupation 
he still continues. He was a member of the 81th Ohio volunteer 
infantry, serving Ids full time of enlistment; has been supervisor, and 
was elected as a candidate on the fusion ticket. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 679 

HENRY B. WELCH, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1873-4, was born in Augusta, 
Mich., Aug. 2, 1S33. He was educated in common schools. In 18*56 
he removed to Monroe county, and settled in Exeter, where he now 
resides. By occupation a farmer. 



JOHN WELCH, 

Senator from Saginaw county in 1881-2, was born in Augusta, Me., 
Sept. 5, 1825. He received a common school education, and at thir- 
teen was apprenticed to a blacksmith. After one year he became a 
sailor, and followed it six years, rising to the position of second mate. 
In 1846 he went into the lumber business, and in 1803 settled at White 
River, Mich., where he remained until 1872, since that time has 
resided at East Saginaw. Is a successful lumberman, and also a 
farmer. Has been twice mayor of East Saginaw, and held positions 
as alderman and supervisor. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN B. WELCH, 

Representative from Ionia county in 18G3-4-5, was born in the state of 
New York. March 22, 1816. He came to Michigan in 183G. He cut 
the timber on the public square at Ionia. He was commandant to 
raise the 21st Michigan infantry, and recruited 2,000 men for various 
regiments at a great sacrifice of time and money. He was a Republi- 
can while a legislator, now a Greenbacker, living at Ionia. 



ERASTUS J. WELKER, 

Representative from Branch county in 1873-4-7, was born in Walnut. 
Ohio, Sept. 3, 1825. In 183,' he removed with his parents to Seneca 
county, Ohio, they being the second family on the Seneca reserva- 
tion. He was educated in common schools. In 1860 he removed to 
Kinderhook, Branch county. By occupation a blacksmith. Fur sev- 
eral years has been an officer at the Ionia house of correction. In 
politics a Republican. 

CHARLES WELLMAN. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 188-5-7, was born in Canada. 
Jan. 18. 1847. Came to Michigan with his parents in 1853; been 
engaged in various occupations, now in the nulling and mercantile 



680 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

business at Port Huron. He has been an alderman and member of 
the board of estimates. Elected as a Fusionist. 

FRANKLIN WELLS 

Was born at Salem, N. Y., April 19, 1823. He came to Constantine, 
Mich., in 1S37, and is a merchant and farmer. He has been a mem- 
ber of the state board of agriculture since 1873, and his present term 
will expire in 1891. Has served several years on the state republican 
committee. 

FREDERICK L. WELLS, 

Senator from at. Clair county in 1873-4-5, was born March 24, 1833, 
in Stanford, N. Y. He received a common school education, and was 
instructed in the classics by a private tutor. In 1838 he emigrated to 
Michigan, and settled in Port Huron, where he now resides. He has 
served as mayor, city clerk, chief engineer, and alderman. He was 
also a member of the House in 1871-2. By occupation a lumber mer- 
chant. Politically a Republican. 

HENRY B. WELLS 

Was born at Hartwiek, N. Y., Fel>. 4, 1829. In 1835 removed with 
his father to Charleston, Mich., where he received a common school 
education. In 1848 bought a farm in Wayne, Cass county, which 
has since been his home. For a time was in mercantile business in 
Dowagiac. In company with Z. Jarvis he built a grain elevator, and 
was extensively engaged in the produce business. He was super- 
visor several years, and was a Representative in 1SG7. In politics a 
Republican. 

HEZEKIAH G. WELLS 

Was born June 16, 1812, at Steubenville, Ohio, and was educated at 
Kenyon college. He studied law and settled at Kalamazoo, Mich., in 
1833. In 1835 was a delegate in the constitutional convention, and 
the youngest member of that body. From 1845 to 1819 he performed 
circuit court duties as judge. He was a delegate in the constitutional 
convention of 1859. In 1S62, largely by his efforts, the 25th Michigan 
infantry was mustered into service. He was a member of the state 
board of agriculture from 18GL to 1883. and most of the time its presi- 
dent. In 1873 he was one of eighteen appointed to revise the state 
constitution. In 1S74 he was appointed presiding judge of "the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 681 

court of commissioners of Alabama claims," and that court distrib- 
uted over $9,000,000 of the '' Geneva award " to claimants. The court 
was re-established in 1832, and he was again its presiding officer. 
For many years he was an active member of the historical committee 
of the state pioneer society, and was president in 1880. He was a 
man of commanding form, fine personal appearance, and a recog- 
nized leader in the republican party. First a Whig, a Republican 
after 1854. Died at Kalamazoo, April 4, 1883, leaving a wife, but no 
children. 



HENRY H. WELLS. 

Representative from Detroit in 1855, was born in Rochester, N. Y., 
September 17, 1813, and came to Detroit at the age of twenty-one, 
where he studied law and was admitted to practice. He entered the 
military service as lieutenant colonel of the twenty-sixth Michigan 
infantry, in October, 1802, was promotedito the colonelcy of the same 
regiment March 30, 1864, and was brevetted brigadier general in 1865. 
In April, 1808, he was appointed provisional governor of Virginia, 
holding the position until 1869. Was 17. S. district attorney for 
Virginia, 1809-71, and L T . S. district attorney for the district of 
Columbia, from September. 1875, to January, 1880. Politics Republi- 
can; present residence, Washington, D. C. 



MARSHALL M. WELLS 

Was born in Genesee, N. Y., in August, 1822. His father settled at 
an early date on a farm in Lyon, Oakland county, where the son was 
reared. In 1815 he became a clerk in the office of the auditor gen- 
eral. He was a Representative from Oakland county in 1S50, as a 
Democrat. Under Buchanan he was a deputy U. S. marshal. For 
eighteen months he was sutler of the 11th Michigan infantry. 



WILLIAM P. WELLS, 

Representative from Detroit to the legislature of 1805, was born at St. 
Albans, Vt., February 15, 1831. He graduated from the University 
of Vermont in 1851, from Harvard law school in 1854, was admitted 
to the Vermont bar in 1855, and settled in practice at Detroit in 1850. 
He was a partner of Judge J. V. Campbell until IS58. He was a 
member of the Detroit board of education in 1863-4; law lecturer at 
the University in 1371-5, and Kent professor of law from 1876 to l vv ''-. 
when he resigned. In politics a Democrat. 



GS'-i MICHIGAN B10GUAPHY. 

GEORGE T. WENDELL 

Was born at Albany, N. Y. He was a resident of Mackinaw Island 
at an early day. In politics a Democrat, and a Representative in 
1837-9. He was a merchant, and held many local positions, and was 
probate judge of Mackinac county at the time of his death, October 
10. 1879, then about sixty. 

JOHN A. WENDELL, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1842, was born in Charlton, 
N. Y., October 19, 1788. He settled as a farmer in Rose, Oakland 
county, in 1836, and in 1837 was elected the first supervisor, and was 
re-elected in 1838-9-40-1-3-4. He was also town clerk and justice of 
the peace, and was postmaster of Rose from 1837 until his death, in 
ISoS. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. 



JACOB A. T. WENDELL. 

Representative from Mackinac county in 1855, 18Go-9-70, was born in 
Albany. N. Y., April 12, 1826, and died November 2-">. 1879. He be- 
came a resident of Mackinaw Island in 1829. Had a good education 
and was a merchant, doing much to develop the commerce of 
northern Michigan. He was a Democrat, and once candidate for 
lieutenant governor. 

WILLIAM B. WESSON. 

Senator from Wayne county in 1^73-4, was born March 20, 1820, in 
Hardwiek. Ma-s. lie received an academical education. He has 
extensive business relations, is presi lent of the Wayne county sav- 
ings bank: president of the trust and security and sate deposit com- 
pany, of Detroit: president of the Hamtramck street railway; a 
director of the Detroit, Lansing 6c Lake Michigan railroad, and is '".if 
of the trustees of the Detroit medical college. His business is that of 
a dealer in real estate. 

ANSEL W. WESTGATE, 

Senator from Cheboygan and oth^r counties in l s -<7, was born in 
Lenawee county. Mich., Aug. 24, 1841: he resided in Michigan 
twenty-three years; was educated at Hillsdale college. He then 
went to Massachusetts, where lie remained im-.il 1S79; then removed 
to Alpena and was pastor of the Congregational church in that city 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 683 

four years. He is at present a merchant and insurance agent; has 
been a resident of Cheboygan three years. Has been school inspector, 
county examiner and supervisor. Politically a Republican. 



THOMAS J. WEST, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1873-4-5, was born "in William- 
ston, N. Y., May 22, 1831. He received a high school education. In 
1835 he removed to Michigan and settled in Charleston, Kalamazoo 
county. In 186-1 removed to Berrien county and settled in Bain bridge, 
where he still resides. By occupation a farmer. 



LUTHER WESTOVER, 

Representative in 1869-70, from Bay county, was born in Berkshire 
county, Mass., April 24, 1817, and received an academical education. 
In 1845 shipped a cargo of lumber to Connecticut, which proving 
profitable, he went to Canada and engaged in lumbering. Removed 
to Bay City in 18G3; was engaged in lumbering until 1S74: established 
the exchange bank, which in 1873 was merged into the state bank. 
He was active in the completion of the J.. L. & S. railroad, and was 
three years a director. A Democrat until 1861, since a Republican. 



HEZEKIAH WETHERBEE, 

Representative from St. Joseph county in 1857, Mas born in Washing- 
ton county, N". Y., in 1803. By occupation a miller and tanner, in 
politics first whig then republican. He settled in Three Rivers in 
1S33, helped build the first flouring mill in that place, worked as a 
miller in that mill until 1836, when the Emery mill was built, where 
lie worked for twelve years, and also one winter at the Hoffman mill. 
In 1836 he entered land five miles from Three Rivers which after- 
wards became his farm home. He was for fourteen years supervisor. 
Died in 1873. 



AMOS R. WHEELER. 

Representative from Oceana county in 1S73-4-5, was born in Caven- 
dish, Vt., Sept. 12, 1815. He received a common school education, 
emigrated to Kane county, 111., in 183), and in 1853 to Benoa, ' >eeana 
county, Mich. Has baen county treasurer, and held several offices in 
town and county. By occupation a lumberman. 



084: MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

CALVIN WHEELER, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1851, was born in Living- 
ston county, N. Y., Jan. 28, 180G. He settled as a farmer in Salem, 
Washtenaw county, in 1830. He held every town office except con- 
stable; was postmaster at Salem several years, and station agent on 
the D„ L. & N. R. R. for eight years. 



HARRISON H. WHEELER 

Was born at Hadley, Mich., March 22, 1839. He was brought up on 
a farm and attended school winters. Taught school winters from 
1857 to 1SGL. He enlisted as a private in the 10th Michigan inCantry. 
and rose to the rank of captain. He was wounded three times, the 
last crippling his left arm for life. He served in the army over three 
years. In 186? he commenced the study of law with Judge Marston, 
at Bay City, and was admitted to the bar in 1869. He served as Sena- 
tor from Bay county in 1871-2-3. He then removed to Ludington. 
was appointed circuit judge in 1874, and was afterwards elected by 
the support of both parties. He resigned in 1878, and has since been 
engaged in the practice of law. In politics a Republican. 



ISAAC P. WHEELER, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1875, was born at Sudbury, 
Mass., Aug. 10, 1817. He received a common school education. In 
1836 came to Michigan and located where he now resides, on a farm 
in Pulaski, Jackson county. He has been supervisor seven terms. 
postmaster for twenty years, and held other township offices. By 
occupation a farmer. 

JAMES WHEELER, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1835-6, was born in Saratoga 
county, N. Y., March 21, 1793. Later he lived in Wheeler, Steuben 
county, N. Y., a town named from the family. He settled in Tecum- 
seh, Michigan, in 1834, and was a justice from 1837 to 1841. A 
farmer, in politics a Democrat. Died at Tecumseh, February 20, 
1854. 



LYCURGUS J. WHEELER, 

Representative from Barry county in 1SS3, was born in Wheeler, N. 
Y., Feb. 9, 1S30. He came with his father to Washtenaw county. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 685 

Mich., in 1335, removing to "Woodland, Barry county, in 1342. He 
received an academical education, and taught several years. Served 
three years in the war, then located at Nashville as a merchant, and 
is still in that business. Has held several local offices. Politically a 
Republican. 

CHARLES W. WHIPPLE, 

Representative from Detroit in 1835-6-7, and speaker of the House in 
1837, son of Major John Whipple, of the United States army, was 
born in Fort Wayne, Ind., in ISO}, was educated at West Point, sub- 
sequently studied law, and began practice in Detroit. He was princi- 
pal secretary of the constitutional convention of 1S3.*5. He was 
appointed a judge of the Supreme Court in 183S, and chief justice in 
1848, and in 1852 was elected judge of the circuit in which the county 
of Berrien was then situated. Judge Whipple died while in office, 
October, 1855, after a continuous service of seventeen years on the 
bench. He was also a member of the constitutional convention of 
1850, as a delegate from Berrien couuty. He was secretary of the 
sixth legislative council in 1835, was county register in 1830, a master 
in chancery, and school inspector in Detroit. Was a Democrat in 
politics. 

HENRY L. WHIPPLE, 

Auditor General of the state during a short interregnum in that office 
in 1842, was a son of Major John Whipple, born in Detroit in 1S16. 
His pursuits were official in connection with the state departments at 
Detroit and Lansing. He was connected with the auditor general's 
office after the removal of the capital to Lansing. He died in Detroit 
in 1840. His politics will be inferred as democratic from his official 
connection. 

ALPIIEUS WHITE, 

Member of the constitutional convention of 1835, from Detroit, was a 
native of Ireland. He was lieutenant of a company of winch his 
brother was captain, which did gallant service in the defence of New- 
Orleans, under Ueu. Jackson. He became an architect, and in 1830 
was a resident of Cincinnati. He came to Detroit in 1834, and the 
provision of the constitution giving suffrage to the then alien resi- 
dents of the state was the result of his efforts in the convention. He 
had command of the artillery arm of the Michigan forces during the 
Toledo war. He was a Democrat, and a devout Catholic, and was the 
founder of Trinitv church. 



€86 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

DARWIN O. WHITE 

Was bom Sept 8, 1835. He was a farmer, a Democrat, and resided 
at Southfield. Oakland county. He held the local offices of town 
clerk, treasurer, school inspector, and supervisor, the last several 
times. He was a Representative in 1869-70-1-2. Died July 8, 1885/ 



FRANK G. WHITE, 

Senator from the upper peninsula in 1871-2, was born in Massachusetts 
in 1832. Came to Houghton, Michigan, in 1853, and was engaged in 
mining until 188-1. Since that time has been a resident of Leadvdle, 
•Colorado. Politically a Republican. 



GEORGE H. WHITE, 

Representative from Kent county in 1863-4, was born at Dresden, N. 
Y., September 9, 1822. Received a common school education, and 
was a clerk in Indiana until 1842, when he removed to Grands Rapids. 
He was a clerk there two years, and was, in 1814, elected register of 
deeds, and was also partner of Amos Rathbun. He conducted a store 
at Rockford for five years, returned to Grand Rapids; was a super- 
visor., and mayor in 18GL-2. He was a lumberman from 1863 to 1865; 
then engaged in the manufacture of plaster. He has built, with 
Amos Rathbun. many stores, and has been a director of the G. R. & 
I. railroad, and of the Continental Improvement company. A Whig 
until 18j4, since a Democrar. 

JAMES E. WHITE, 

Representative from Oceana county in 1881-2-3, was born in Kalama- 
zoo, Mich.. April 8, 1S30. lie attended Albion college in 1S57-8. He 
went into the army in 1861, as lieutenant in the 13th Michigan infan- 
try, and became a captain in 1S63. After leaving the army was en- 
gaged in mercantile business at Wayland until l^To, when he removed 
to Pentwater, engaged in the hardware trade, and the manufacture 
of shingles. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES H. WHITE. 

Representative from St. Clair county in 1S79-S1-2, was born at Whites- 
boro, N. Y.. April 28, 1822. He received an academical education; 
*vas in business in Utica two years, the same time at Ann Arbor- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. G87 

Mich , and at Yonkers, N. Y. In 1819 settled at Port Huron, and en- 
gaged in farming, insurance, banking and real estate. From 1855 to 
1859 was sheriff, was an alderman four years, deputy collector of 
customs 1SG7 to 1876, and has held other offices. Politically, a Repub- 
lican. 

* 

JONATHAN R. WHITE, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1855, was born in South 
Hadley, Mass., Sept. 10, ISOG. By profession a lawyer: politically a 
Republican. He came to Michigan in 1881, and was commissioned a 
colonel of state militia in 1835 by Gov. Mason. He was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1850. Died July 12, 1881. 



OLIVER K. WHITE, 

Representative from Oceana county in 1S77, was born in Clinton 
county, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1831, removing three months subsequently to 
Erie county, where he received a common school education. In 
1852 he removed to Cattaraugus county, where for two years he held 
the positions of township superintendent of schools and justice. In 
1857 he removed to Michigan and settled in Grant, where he still 
resides. He has been supervisor six years, and was sheriff of Oceana 
county during 1875-70. In politics a Republican. 



ORRIN WHITE, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1842, was born in Pal- 
myra, N. Y., Oct. 25, 17'JO. He. received a fair education, served in 
the war of 1812, and was for several years engaged in mercantile 
business at Palmyra. He settled as a farmer in the town of Ann 
Arbor, Mich., in 1824. He was a supervisor, judge, justice, and 
sheriff, also a member of the constitutional convention of 1885. He 
was a colonel of militia. Died in 1804. 



PETER WHITE 

Was born at Rome, N. Y., Oct. 31. 1831. and has been a resident of 
Michigan since 1885. He went to Marquette in 1840, before a tree 
had been felled upon the site of that beautiful city, still his home. 
He was live years register of the U. S. land ollice at Marquette; 



€88 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

eight years county clerk and register of deeds; deputy collector of 
the port of Marquette six years; postmaster ten years; for many 
years assessor and treasurer of the union school; cashier or president 
of the national bank of Marquette since 1864; and has held other 
positions. He was a Representative from Marquette and Chippewa 
counties in 1857, and was Senator in 1875. He has been in all kinds 
of business, and has always been a leading man in the upper peninsula. 
In politics a Democrat. 

SHUBAEL WHITE, 

Senator from Mason and other counties in 1883, was born at Marshall. 
Mich., June 17, 1841. Graduated at the University of Michigan in 
1864. Served in the war in the 28th Michigan infantry, and rose from 
a private to the rank of captain. Was a provost marshal in North 
Carolina in 1865-6. He graduated at the Albany law school in 1867. 
and engaged in law practice at Ludington. He was a circuit judge 
in 1873-4. Politically a Republican. 



THOMAS WHITE 

Was born in Royalton, N. Y., and his education was that of common 
schools. He emigrated with his parents to Novi, Michigan, in 1833. 
who settled upon a farm. The son engaged alternately in teaching 
and farming. In 1852 he settled on a farm in Northfield and was 
successful. In 18G8 removed to Ann Arbor, and became secretary 
and managing director of the Washtenaw mutual insurance company, 
which he managed with great success. Politically a Democrat, then 
a Free Soiler, and eventually a Republican. He was a Representative 
in 1S67. Died May 10, 18G8. 

THOMAS W. WHITE, 

Representative in 1844, was born in Ashfield, Mass.. Nov. 15, 1805. 
He settled in Grand Haven in 1S36, and was a lumberman by occu- 
pation. He was an active business man at Grand Haven for thirty 
years, when he removed to Grand Rapids. In politics first Whig, 
then Republican. Died Jan. 5, 1884. 



WILLIAM E. WHITE, 

Representative in 1865, was born June 29, 1814. By occupation a 
carpenter, in politics a Whig, then a Republican. Came to Kahuna- 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 689 

zoo in 1835, lived there until 1862, when he removed to Way land, 
Allegan county, where he now resides. He was sheriff of Kalamazoo 
county from 1858 to 1862: was a member of the constitutional con- 
vention of 1867; village trustee, marshal and constable of Wayland. 

HENRY WHITING, 

Regent of the University from 1839 to I860, was born in Bath, N. Y., 
February 7, 1818, attended common schools until thirteen, was a clerk 
four years, then attended grammar school, and became a cadet at 
West Point in 1836, graduating in 1840. in the same class with Sher- 
man and Thomas. He was a lieutenant iu the army until 1846, then 
resigned, became a resident of St. Clair, Mich., and took charge of an 
academy. In 1S48 engaged in lumber business until 1851, and con- 
tinued in mercantile business until 1861. He then became colonel of 
the 2d Vermont infantry, took part in the first battle of Bull Run, 
and in 1862 commanded the Vermont brigade, and was at Fredricks- 
burg and in other battles, resigning in 1863, and again becoming a 
merchant at St. Clair. A Republican until 1876, then a Greenbacker. 
Deceased. 

JUSTIN R. WHITING, 

Of St. Clair, fusion congressman from the seventh district, was born 
in Bath N. Y., February 18, 1S47. Two years later removed with his 
parents to St. Clair, Mich., which place has been his home almost 
continuously since. He attended the union school, prepared himself 
for admission to the State University in 1863. at the age of sixteen. 
He remained only two years in college, having decided not to study a 
profession. Has been engaged in the mercantile business since. In 
1879 was elected mayor: in 1S82 Senator, and declined a renomi- 
nation on account of business. Received the- fusion nomination for 
congress in 1836, and was elected by 814 majority, his republican 
rival receiving 12,973 votes. He was a Republican until 1876, when 
he became a Greenbacker. 

LUTHER D. WHITNEY, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1S57, was born at Granville, 
N. Y., March 13, 1810. He learned the trade of a mason and also 
preached occasionally. Pie came to Michigan in 1832, and was for 
fourteen years a Methodist minister. He tiien. from a bronchial 
affection, retired, studied medicine, and began practice at Commerce, 
Mich., in 1844. In 1819 removed to Hadley, Lapeer county, and con- 



690 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

tinued practice, sometimes preaching. A Whig, then Free Soiler, 
then a Republican. In 187", he moved to Grand Blanc, where he 
died September 11, 1876. 

NATHAN WHITNEY, 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1875, was born in Huron 
county, Ohio, November 11, 1821, removed to Michigan in 1849, 
and settled in Sparta, Kent county. In 1854 he removed to Muske- 
gon county. He received a common school education. He was 
supervisor of Casinovia for sixteen years. In politics a Democrat. 



WILLIAM H. WIGGINS, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 18S5, was born in Floy. N. 
Y., April 12, 1839. He came to Michigan in 1861. At first engaged 
in the patent medicine business, now a farmer and dealer in live 
stock. For eleven years town clerk. Politically a Democrat. 



BUCKMINSTER WIGHT, 

Senator from Wayne county in 1855, was a native of Worcester 
county, Mass., born in 1796. His education was that of common 
schools. He came to Detroit in 1832, engaging actively in the lumber 
business in 1837. He represented his .ward in the council, and was a 
candidate for mayor, but generally shunned office. He was a public 
spirited and useful citizen and amiable gentleman. In politics first 
whig, subsequently republican. He died November 2S, 1879. 

STANLEY G. WIGHT, 

Representative fro'm Detroit in 1863-4, was born in Massachusetts in 
1825, coming to Detroit with his father's family. His early education 
was academical. His active business life was passed as member of the 
lumber firm of B. Wight & Sons, and in the same business on his own 
account, 1848 to 1880. Since his legislative service he has declined al! 
elective offices. He was alderman 1851-2, and a member of the board 
of water commissioners 1863 to 186-\ He was an old line Whig, but 
became a Democrat. 

MARK D. WILDER, 

Senator from Allegan county in 1^73-4, was born in Clinton. N. Y.. 
August 12, 1829. II.' received an academical education, and studied 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 6'Jt 

law in the law department of Yale college. In 1S">G he was admitted 
to the bar. While a resident of New York he was a member of the 
assembly three terrn3. In 1ST0 he settled in Allegan, Mich. Durinc: 
the war he served in the department of the gulf, on the staff of Gen. 
Paine. He was vice-president of first national bank of Allegaa. 
and vice-president of Wilber's Eureka mower and reaper manufac- 
tory, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He was projector of the Poughkeepsie 
& Eastern railroad, a director of the same, and secretary and attor- 
ney until he came to Michigan. "Was also president of the Pough- 
keepsie city railway. He returned to New York, and is now serving 
as U. S. district attornev in that state. 



CHARLES A. WILBUR, 

Representative from Livingston county in 1855, was -in business a 
farmer and merchant and resided at Howell, where he died about 
1867. 

ALBERT WILCOX, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1841, was born at New 
Marlboro, Mass., Nov. 15, 1805. His ancestors were engaged both in 
the French and revolutionary wars. He was brought up on a farm. 
and in 1818 removed with his parents to Guilford, N, Y. He received 
a common school education, and became a teacher. He removed to 
Wheeler, N. Y., where he was a partner of his father in farming and 
the making of wagons, and was a captain of militia. In 1835 he 
came to Michigan and took up a farm in the town of Bridgewater. 
In 1S36 he enlisted as carriage maker in the U. S. arsenal at Dear- 
born, with the rank of orderly sergeant. In 1839 he settled at Cam- 
bridge, Lenawee county.' In politics, whig and republican. Has been 
in the employ of the Lake Shore railroad since 1851, in various 
mechanical positions. He has held many local offices, including jus- 
tice and alderman. During the rebellion he had entire charge of the 
water supply of 420 miles of railroad. Resides at Adrian. 



ELLIOTT R. WILCOX, 

Representative in 18G9-70, and Senator from Oakland county in 1877. 
was born at Rochester. Mich., Feb. 24, 1^38, where Ins father settled 
in 1824. He was educated at the Roche>ter academy and the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. As a young man he held nianv local offices, and 
was a justice. In politics a Democrat, by prof< ssion a lawyer. Was 



€92 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

a farmer on a large scale. Was a member several years of the demo- 
cratic state committee. He rendered important aid in the building 
of the Detroit & Bay City railroad. In 1874 he built a large brick 
paper mill on his farm which is in successful operation. 



MARCUS B. WILCOX 

Was born born June 24, 1821, at Arkwri.srht, N. Y. Received a good 
academical education and a pretty thorough knowledge of Latin. 
Removed to Pinckney. Michigan, in 1852. Read law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1854. In politics a Republican. Was elected 
several terms prosecuting attorney of Livingston county. Held minor 
offices, and was Senator in 1857-8. Was an able lawyer. Died in 
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 8. 1868. 

WILLIAM S. WILCOX, 

Representative in 1865-7, and Senator from Lenawee county in 1871-2, 
was born at Riga, N. Y., April 25, 1819. When young he removed 
with his father to| Bergen, N. Y.. where his father kept hotel and 
postoffice. and ran a sta^e line. He assisted him until 1836, when he 
became a clerk in the store of Ira Bidwoll at Milan. Ohio, and removed 
with him to Adrian, Mich., in 1836. From 1840 to 1811 he was apart- 
ner, then commenced business for himself, w hich he continued until 
1855, then went into the hardware trade, and has been the head 
of a leading banking house in Adrian for many years. He was clerk 
of Adrian in 1848: state prison inspector from 1869 to 1881; has been 
president of the Michigan state insurance company, and held many 
other local positions. He was mayor of Adrian in 1865, and a presi- 
dential elector in 1881. In politics a Republican. 



DANIEL G. WILDER, 

Senator from Tuscola county in 1^61-2, was born in Chesterfield, Mass.. 
April 15, 1823. He removed from Massachusetts to New York, and 
came from that state to Michigan in 1818. He studied law, was 
admitted to the bar at Howell, and be<xan practice at Yassar. He 
held town offices, such as justice, clerk, supervisor, treasurer, and 
school inspector, and was county treasurer, jud^e of probate, prose- 
cuting attorney, county clerk, and register of deeds. In 1872 he went 
into the mercantile business at Watrousville, where he resided until 
.his death in 1885. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. G93 



DAVID W. WILEY 



"Representative from Allegan county in 187.J, was born at Hanover, 
Ohio, June 27, 1838. He removed to Michigan in 1800, and to Doug- 
lass, Allegan county, in 1856. He has served as trustee of Douglass 
village, and held other municipal positions, and has been president of 
the Lake Shore agricultural and pomological society. He received a 
common school education, and is a farmer and fruitgrower. In poli- 
tics a Democrat. 



JEFFERSON WILEY, 

Representative from Detroit in 1867, was born in Boston, Mass., in 
1826, and was educated at Harvard college. Coming to Detroit in 
1852, he first engaged in active business as a member of the firm of 
Jackson & Wiley, iron and brass founders. A term as inspector of 
the house of correction 1872-75, comprises his ofiicial life except as 
above. He is at present lumber agent for the Detroit, Lansing & 
Northern railroad. 



ALFRED WILKERSON 

Was born in Ledyard, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1820. Removed with his parents 
to Dundee. Michigan, in 1836, where he now resides as a farmer. He 
helped organize the republican party, and is still of that faith. He 
was Representative in ISoO. 



ROSS WILKINS 

Was born at Pittsburg, Pa., in February, 1799, and was the son of 
John Wilkins, who served in the wars of the revolution and of 1812, 
and became quartermaster-general in the U. S. army. Judge Wilkins 
graduated at Dickinson college. Pennsylvania, in 1S18, studied law, 
and was prosecuting attorney at Pittsburg in 1820. He was appointed 
judge of Michigan territory by Jackson, and opened his court June 
17, 1832. In 1836 became U. S. district judge, and held that position 
until December. lb''>9, when he resigned, never having been absent a 
term in thirty-two- years. He was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1835, and of the two conventions of assent in 1^3»'«. He 
died May 17, 1872. He was an able judge. In politics, a Democrat 
in religion, a Methodist, but died in the Catholic faith. 



694: MICHIGAN B10GBAPHY, 



SAMUEL M. WILKINS, 



Representative from Eaton county in 1^70-^1-2, was born in Baugh- 
man, Ohio, August 16, 18:36. He was educated in common schools, and 
at Vermillion institute, Ohio. He was engaged in mining in Califor- 
nia from 1859 to 1861. He served in the 102d Ohio infantry. Since, 
studied medicine, and graduated at Wooster University, Ohio. Settled 
at Eaton Rapids in 1806, and engaged in practice, and has held vari- 
ous offices. 



DANIEL S. WILKINSON 

Was born in the state of New York in 1813. He came from Albion, 
N. Y., to Adrian, Mich., in 183-1, where he resided until his death. 
May 24, 1ST5. His business was that of loaning money. In politics 
a Democrat. He was a Representative in 1849. 



GEORGE WILLARD 

Was born in Bolton, Vt., March 20, 1824. His ancestor, Simeon 
Willard. settled in Concord, Mass., in 1035. He came with his father 
to Michigan in 1836, and graduated at Kalamazoo college in 1844. 
After service as a teacher he became an Episcopal minister, and was 
rector at Coldwater, Battle Creek and Kalamazoo. He resigned and 
became a professor in Kalamazoo college. In 1856 he was elected 
member of the state board of education for six years; in 1863 was 
elected regent of the State University, which he held until 1873: In 
1866 was a Representative in the legislature; in 1867 delegate to the 
constitutional convention; in 1872 delegate to the national republican 
convention, and the same year was elected a Representative to con- 
gress, and was reelected in 1S74, holding the position from l s 7o to 
1877. In office he has been a Republican. He has been editor and 
proprietor of the Battle Creek Journal since 1868, establishing a 
daily in 1872. 

ISAAC W. WILLARD, 

Member of the constitutional convention of 1850 from Van Buren 
count}', was born iu Worcester county, Mass.. Dec. 1, 1803. He 
received a common school education, and engaged in business at 
Rochester, Vt. He came to Michigan in l s 27, and in l s 28 engaged in 
the mercantile business with Gov. Barry at White Pigeon, and the 
firm had an extensive business in several counties, there being onl} 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 695 

one other store in southwestern Michigan. From 1833 to 1840 was a 
merchant at Kalamazoo, then engaged in lumbering and farming at 
Paw Paw, and built a ilouring and saw-mill, distillery, plank road, 
etc. Fie was a postmaster and supervisor, and held other offices. He 
was the first clerk of the U. S. court at White Pigeon, and was 
timber agent under Pierce for Michigan and other states. Died in 
April, 1870. Politically a Democrat. A man of positive character, 
fearless and daring, and of a kind and generous heart. 



A. MILAN WILLETT, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1S81-2-3, was born in Oswego 
county, N. Y., April 18, 1829. He received a common school educa- 
tion, learned the joiners' trade, and taught winters. Settled in Ionia 
county in 185-1, engaged in building until 1860, then became a 
farmer. He served for thirteen months as captain of Co. I, Berdan's 
U. S. sharpshooters, resigning from disability. Has been supervisor 
several terms, and president of the agricultural society. Politically 
a Republican. 

JOilN WILLETT, 

Representative from Genesee county in 1S77-0, was born in New 
Brunswick, N. J., in 18'2l>. In 1822 he removed to western New 
York, and there received a common school education. He graduated 
from the Geneva medical college in 1816, removed to Flint. Mich., 
and began the practice of his profession. In 186-2 he received a 
commission as surgeon in the Sth regiment of Michigan infantry, 
and remained in the service until the close of the war. returned to 
Flint and engaged in the drug business, in which he has continued 
until the present tune. He was elected alderman in 1870. In politics 
a Republican. 

ALBERT WILLIAMS, 

Attorney General of Michigan from lSGtf to 1867, was horn at Halifax. 
Yt., Feb. 8, 1817. and is of Welsh descent. His father was a surgeon 
in the war of 1812. He received an academical education, ami came 
to Michigan m 1844. He studied law at Monroe, and was admitted 
in 1815. He engaged in practice in Ionia, where he still resides. He 
was prosecuting attorney from 1847 to 1 Sol, and acting county clerk 
in 185:5-1. He was a Democrat until 1*5 1, but helped organize the 
Republican party, and was on the committee of resolution- and also 



696 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

of nominations. He issued a political address which was widely 
circulated, and for a time edited the first republican paper in Ionia 
county. He was county treasurer from 1855 to 18.)9, and prosecutir g 
attorney from 1861 to 1863. In 1870 he joined the prohibition party, 
and was their candidate for supreme judge in 1872, in 1874 for attornev 
general, and in 187G for governor. He is now a Republican. 



ALPHEUS S. WILLIAMS 

Was born at Saybrook, Conn., Sept. 20, 1810; graduated at Yale 
college in 1831: was a student in the Yale law school in 1832 and 
1833; traveled in Europe from 1^34 to 1836: removed to Detroit. 
Mich., in 1836, and commenced the practice of law: was judge of 
probate for Wayne county 1840-44; and was proprietor and editor of the 
Detroit Advertiser 1843 to 1848. He was lieutenant colonel of the 1st 
Michigan infanfry volunteers in the Mexican war, 1847-48; entered the 
union army as brigadier general of volunteers by appointment of 
President Lincoln, August. 1861: commanded the twelfth corps in the 
battles of South Mountain, Antietam and Gettysburg, and the 
twentieth corps in the siege of Atlanta on " Sherman's march to the 
sea," and in the campaign of the Carolinas, and was mustered out of 
the service in January, 1866. He was appointed in August, IS 1 '.''', one 
of the commissioners to adjust the military claims of Missouri. He 
was minister resident to the republic of Salvador, 1866-69. In 1574 
he was elected to congress on the democratic and reform tickets: 
was reelected in 1876, and served from Dec. 6, 187.3, to March 3. 1879. 
Deceased. 



ANTHONY WILLIAMS. 

Representative from Lapeer count}- in 1883. was born in Superior, 
Mich.. Sept. 29, 1836; removed to Dryden in 1-4:3. and to Attica in 
1851; has been engaged in farming and lumbering: has been several 
terms a supervisor, and held other offices. Politically a Democrat. 



ASA WILLIAMS, 

Representative in 184"), was born in Norwich. Com%, in 1802. He 
came to Michigan in 1824, and was the owner of a large farm in 
Liam, Washtenaw county. He was appointed brigadier general of 
state militia by Governor Cass. He died in 1S69. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 697 

BUEL M. WILLIAMS 

Was born in Granville, Mass., December 6, 1S12. At tbe age of six- 
teen he learned the potters' trade, and continued in that business un- 
til he had saved money enough for his education, when he entered 
Yale college, and graduated in 1838 or 1839. Going to Ohio, he taught 
select school for several years, at Hudson and Shalersville; then went 
to Pittsburg, Pa., and taught until 1854. He then came to Lawrence, 
Mich., and purchased land; went to Kentucky and taught school 
until the war of 1861-4, when he came back to Lawrence, and took 
an active part in support of the union. He was Representative from 
Van Buren county in 1863-4-5, as a Republican. He engaged in real 
estate and loan agency until his death, February 7, 1S7S. 



EDWIN R. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Ionia county in 18S5, was born in West Bloom- 
field, Mich., September 20, 1836, and is a farmer at Orange, and a 
breeder of fine stock. Has held many local offices. Elected as a 
Fusionist. 



FITCH R. WILLIAMS, 

Senator from Antrim and other counties in 1877, was born in Amenia, 
N. Y., December 18, 1834. He removed to Michigan in 1843, gradu- 
ated from the Michigan University in 1858, and was immediately ap- 
pointed instructor in the literary department. While teaching he 
attended lectures in the law department. He was, for two years, d 
professor in Albion college, and commenced the practice of law at 
Albion in 1866. He removed to Elk Rapids, in 1870. He has three 
times been prosecuting attorney of that county. He has also for three 
years acted as judge of probate under appointment by the governor. 
In politics a Republican. 

GARDNER D. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Saginaw count}' in 1835-6-40, and Senator in 
1845-6, was born at Concord, Mass., Sept. 0, 1804, and came with his 
father's family to Detroit in 1815, and from 1819 to 1807 resided at 
Silver Lake. In 1827 he engaged in the fuf trade at Saginaw, as 
agent of the American fur company, and died there Dec. 10. 1858. 
He wa,s a member of the second convention of assent in 1836, com- 
missioner of internal improvements, county judge and treasurer, and 
the first mayor of Saginaw City. 



095 MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 

HARVEY WILLIAMS, 

Senator from Eaton county in 1837, was born in Manchester, Vt., in 
1812, and settled in Chester, Mich., in 1837, and was prominentlv 
identified with the early history of Eaton county. The first political 
county convention met at his house. He held town offices, was 
twelve years county treasurer, and a successful real estate agent. 
Died at Charlotte, Jan. 18, 18G7. Politically a Republican. 

JAMES A. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Branch county in 1809, '70-1-2, was a native of 
Cayuga county, New York, and settled in Algansee, Mich., in 1854. 
He was the first resident physician of that township, and still resides 
there. For ten years was supervisor of his township, and county 
superintendent of schools two years. 

JEREMIAH D. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1855, was born in Sem- 
pronious, N. Y., May 2, 1815. He came to Michigan in 1828 with his 
father, who settled on a farm in Webster, Washtenaw county. He 
received a common school education, and attended an academy at 
Ann Arbor for one year. In 1839 he was appointed postmaster at 
Webster. He Las held the town positions of supervisor, clerk, treas- 
urer, justice, and other offices. He was for ten years auditor of the 
Washtenaw fire insurance company, and lias been secretary of the 
county pioneer society. Now resides on a farm in the town of Ann 
Arbor. He was a Whig until 1854, since a Republican. 



JOHN R. WILLIAMS, 

Member of the constitutional convention of 1835, and member and 
president of the second convention of assent in 1836, was born in 
Detroit, Mich., May 4, 1782. He was in trade there from 1802 to 1832, 
except from 1812 to 1815. He was a captain of artillery in the war of 
1*1-2, and was included in the surrender of Gen. Hull. Hi- was one • >f 
the first trustees of the University of Michigan in 1821, and president 
of the bank of Michigan in 1818. He prepared the first charter of 
Detroit, and was the first mayor in 1824, also filled that position in 
1825-30-4-4-45-4(>. He was three years president of the board of edu- 
cation; took great interest in military affairs; commanded the terri- 
torial troops during the threatened Black Hawk war, and was - ni »r 
major general of state militia at the time of his death. -t. 20, 18 I 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 699 

JOSEPH R. WILLIAMS 

Was born in Taunton, Mass., November 14, 1803, and graduated at 
Harvard college in 1831. He studied law with " honest " John Davis, 
in Worcester, Mass., was admitted to the bar, practiced at New Bed- 
ford, Mass., and settled in Constantine, Mich., in 1839, which was his 
home until his death, June 15, 1801. He was enthusiastic, far seeing, 
enterprising and zealous in the advancement of the interests of the 
people. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1850, 
Senator in 1861, and president pro tern, of the Senate. He died before 
the close of his term, and was succeeded by H. H. Riley. He was 
the first president of the state agricultural college, and was greatly 
interested in the progress of agriculture throughout the state. In 
politics a Republican. 



THEODORE WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Detroit in 1838, was the son of Gen. John R. 
Williams, and was born in Albany. N. Y., July 5, 1S08. He was 
trained in business at Detroit. He was city register 1830-5, county 
clerk 1841-2, city treasurer 1844-5, and several rimes an alderman. 
He was originally a Whig, but in later years a Democrat. Died 
October 28, 1871. 



THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Jackson county in 18S7, was bom at Kirtland. 
Ohio, May 27, 1844. In 1862 he enlisted in the 103d Ohio volunteer 
infantry, and served until the close of the war. Came to .Michigan 
in 1865, was a carpenter until 1871, then began work in the car 
department of the M. C. R. R. at Jackson, where he remained many 
years. Has been an alderman, and commander of the G. A. R. 
post. Politically a Republican. 



WALTER W. WILLIAMS, 

Representative from Eaton county in 1887, was born ami brought up 
on a farm in Lima, Michigan. He lived on the farm until sixteen, 
then spent several years at Ann Arbor in school. He spent three 
years as a commercial traveler and two years roughing it on the 
western frontier. In 1873 he settle 1 near Eaton Rapids, on a farm 
where he still resides. In politics a Republican. 



700 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



WILLIAM B. WILLIAMS 



Was born at Pittsford, N. Y., July 28, 1826. Brought up on a farm, 
he received a fair education, and was a teacher. Studied law in 
Rochester, N. Y., and graduated from the state and national law 
school at Bellston Springs in 1851, and began practice at Rochester. 
N. Y. Settled at Allegan, Mich., in 1855, where he is still in practice. 
Has been judge of probate eight years; served as captain in the 5th 
Michigan cavalry from 1862 to June, 1803, resigning from disability: 
was commandant of camp and organized the 28th Michigan infantry; 
was Senator in 1SG7-9; a member of the constitutional convention of 
18G7; member of the board of state charities 1871 to 1873: Repre- 
sentative in congress from 1873 to 1S77: and railroad commissioner 
from 1877 to 1883. Politically a Republican. 



WILLIAM D. WILLIAMS 

Was born at Lima, Michigan, in 1835. He graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan in 1807, studied law at Detroit, was admitted in 
1859, and settled in practice at Ontonagon, but now resides at Mar- 
quette. He was prosecuting attorney of Ontonagon county, and a 
Representative in 1809. He was elected judge of the 12th circuit in 
1S75, and was re-elected in 1881 and 1887. In politics a Democrat. 



ZEBULON WILLIAMS, 

Was born at Haverstraw. N. Y., Jan. 24. 1795. He learned the trade 
of a carpenter, settled at Phelps. N. Y., in 1820, worked at his trade 
till 1825, when he became a farmer in Clarkson. N. Y. In 183-1 lie 
came to Adrian, Mich. He remained there four years, and in 1838 
settled on land in Wheatland, Hillsdale county. He was Representa- 
tive in 1848, was also supervisor four years, clerk and treasurer of his 
town. Died Nov. 10, 1872. 



BARON B. WILLITS. 

Representative in 1841 and 1S65, was born in Independence, N. J.. 
Jan. 1, 1812. By occupation a farmer, politically a Republican. He 
settled on a farm in Cambria, Hillsdale county, in 1835, and resided 
there until his death. Sept. 23, 1873. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 701 

EDWIN WILLITS, 

Of Monroe, was born at Otto, N. Y. , April 24. 1830, and removed to 
Michigan in 1836. He graduated at the University in 1855, and located 
at Monroe in ISoG, where he studied law with Isaac P. Christiancy, 
until his admission to the bar in 1857. He was prosecuting attorney 
of Monroe county and also a member of the state board of education 
in 1860. Re-elected in 18G6, he held the latter office twelve years. He 
was a member of the constitutional commission of 1873: was appointed 
postmaster at Monroe in 1803, by President Lincoln, and was removed 
by President Johnson, October 15, 1806: was editor of the Monroe 
Commercial from 1856 to 1861; was a Representative in the forty-fifth 
and forty-sixth congresses and was re-elected to the forty-seventh, as 
a republican, by a plurality of 2,349 over his opponent, William H. 
Waldby, serving sis years. He then resumed law practice at Monroe, 
but became principal of tbe state normal school at Ypsilanti in 18S3 
In 1885 he was elected president of the state agricultural college, and 
has served in that position since July 1, 1885. Under his efficient 
management the college has greatly increased in the number of 
students, and in popularity with tbe people. 



WARREN J. WILLITS, 

Senator from the eighth district, Kalamazoo and St. Joseph counties, 
was born in Hillsdale county, Aug. 19, 1853, and is by occupation a 
manufacturer. He has held the offices of township clerk and trustee 
in village council. He was elected to the Senate of 1SST-S on the 
republican ticket by a vote of 7,418 to 6,G74 for Edwin W. Deyoe, and 
719 for Nelson I. Packard, prohibitionist. 



JEREMIAH C. WILSON, 

Settled in Roch-ster, Oakland county in 1857. He was a graduate of 
the State University, and of Castleton medical college. In partner- 
ship with his brother he had an extensive medical practice. They 
were also interested in manufactures, and built and operated tbe 
Eureka mills for eight years. They were also engaged in mercantile 
business. Dr. Wilson was a Representative in 1807. 



JOHN B. WILSON, 

Representative from Lapeer county in 1861-2-3-4, was born in Green- 
field, Pa., Oct. 22, 1822, and came with his parents to Detroit in 1824. 
79 



702 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

In 1S31 returned to Vermont with his mother, and afterwards lived 
in Rochester, N. Y., and Conneautville, Pa. Settled in Arcadia, 
Mich., as a farmer in 1848. Removed to Lapeer in 1887, where he 
now resides. Has been engaged in lumbering, and built the first saw 
mill in Arcadia; has also done a large business in real estate and 
building. Was a supervisor eleven years, justice sixteen years, and 
a state road commissioner. As a legislator was a Republican, now a 
Democrat. 

JOSHUA WILSON, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1SS3, was born in Pickering, 
Canada, Jan. 9, 1827. He came with his father's family to the north- 
ern part of St. Clair county, Mich., in 1841, of which Sanilac county 
was then a part. He has been a resident of Worth since 1841. A 
farmer, politically a Republican. Has held the offices of town clerk, 
school inspector, supervisor, town treasurer, and justice. 

FARWELL A. WILSON, 

Representative from Midland. Clare and Gladwin counties in 1887. 
was born July IS, 1841, in Vienna, Michigan. He received a common 
school education. He was first a farmer, then ran a saw-mill for five 
years. In 1871 removed to Isabella county, where he bought pine 
land, built a saw-mill, and has been interested in other business 
Politically a Democrat. 

LOUIS T. N. WILSON 

Was born at Milo. N. Y.. Sept. 24, 1821. He came with his father to 
Ovid, Mich., in 1^0"i. and learned the tailor's trade at Cold water. He 
studied for the ministry and was licensed as a Methodist minister.- 
Later he studied law and was admitted in 184:3. He was an anti- 
slavery Whig, and made the first abolition speech ever delivered in 
Coldwater. In 1S51 he was elected justice, and in 1855, as a Repub- 
lican, he was Senator from Branch county. He was prosecuting 
attorney two terms. In 1S75 lie removed to Minneapolis and prac- 
ticed law for two years, but returned to Coldwater in 1877, and con- 
tinued his professional career until his death, April 26, 1887. 



PHILO WILSON, 

Representative from Lenawee county in 1842, 'JO, settled in Cauan- 
daigua, Mich., about IS3G, and came from the state of New York. 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 703 

He removed to Adrian about 1870, aad died there. In politics a 
Democrat. 

ROBERT S. WILSON 

Came from Alleghany county, N. Y., to Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1833. 
He was a man of ability, and as a lawyer had great influence with a 
jury. He was judge of probate of Washtenaw county from 1836 to 
1840, and Senator in 1843-4. In 1855 he removed to Chicago, and was 
a police justice in that city for many years. Died in 1883. 



THOMAS M. WILSON, 

Representative from Macomb county in 1861-2-75, was born in Shel- 
burne, Mass., January 6, 1820, and at an early age removed to Madi- 
son county, N. Y., where he received an academical education. He 
came to New Baltimore, Mich., in 1855. and engaged in business as a 
commission and forwarding merchant. He removed to Lansing in 
1877, and since that time has been the efficient clerk of the board of 
state auditors, and still holds that position. 



WILLIAM B. WILSON, 

Representative from Muskegon county in 1835, was born at Palmyra, 
N. Y., in 1829, and removed with his parents to Lenawee county. 
Mich., in 1837. Was with his father in business at Canandaigua, then 
several years clerk at Adrian, afterwards in business at Hillsdale 
until 1875. Became then a resident of Muskegon, and was deputy 
county treasurer, later a druggist. He was grand commander of 
Knights Templars of Michigan in 1830-1. Elected as a Fusionist. 



JACOB M. WILTSE, 

Representative from Saginaw county in 1883, was born in Saginaw, 
November 13. 1839. He received a common school education. His 
principal occupation has always been that of a farmer. He has held 
the office of justice fifteen years, and supervisor five years. In 
politics a Democrat. 

EDWIN B. WINANS, 

Of Hamburg, Livingston county, was born at Avon. N. Y.. May 10, 
1820. and removed with his parents to Michigan in 1n34. He received 



70-i MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

his education in district schools and at Albion college. In the spring 
of 1850 went to California, engaged in gold mining until 1858, when 
he returned and settled on the farm where he now lives. He has 
served two terms in the state legislature, from 1861 to 1805, and one 
term as judge of probate. In politics a Democrat. He was elected 
Representative in the 4Sth congress in 1882 on the fusion ticket, was 
re-elected by a vote of 19,857 to 18,377 for James C. Wilson, republi- 
can, and 2,445 for Leander C. Smith, prohibitionist, serving until 
March 4, 1887. 

AMAZIAH WINCHELL, 

Representative from Ingham county in 1850, was born in Plattsburg. 
N. Y., in 1810. Came to Detroit in 1S33, lived in Lima until 1838, 
then settled in Ingham, Ingham county. There were only three 
houses in the county at that time. Was a farmer, in politics a Demo- 
crat. Was sheriff of Ingham county four years, county superintend- 
ent of poor five years, drain commissioner two years, and held 
other offices. Was orderly sergeant in the Toledo war. Summoned 
the first jury, and opened the first court in Ingham county. 



JEROME WINCHELL. 

Representative from Allegan county in 1877, was born in Union, Ind., 
June S, 1846. When young he removed to Wisconsin, and from thence 
to Minnesota territory. After receiving an academical education, at 
the age of seventeen engaged as teacher in public schools, which 
calling was abandoned a few years later for that of the printers* arr. 
In 1870 he came from Chicago to Michigan, and established at Plain- 
well the Allegan County Republic, of which he has since been editor 
and proprietor, and actively identified with every enterprise for the 
improvement of the village. In politics a Republican. 



AUSTIN E. WING 

Was born in Berkshire county, Mass. . in 1702. He graduated from 
Williams college in 1S14 with honor. He came to Detroit in 1814. but 
Boon settled in Monroe. He was for a number of years sheriff of the 
territory of Michigan, studied ami practiced the profession of law 
and was also a farmer. He was delegate in congress from the terri- 
tory of Michigan three terms, from 1825 to 1827, 1S27 to 1829, and 1S31 
to 1833. He was twice regent of the University of Michigan: United 
States marshal under Polk's administration; Representative in the 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 705 

legislature of 1842; and for many years a leading man in the affairs 
of the territory and state. In politics a Democrat. He died Aug. 25, 
1849. 

GILES M. WING, 

Representative from Manistee county in 1831-2. was born in Canada 
East, July 23, 1835, and moved to Illinois in 1844, where he lived with 
his parents on a farm until 1553. Thtn he went to Wisconsin and 
engaged in the lumber business. In ISO? he moved to Manistee, Mich., 
with his family. There he built a mill, and since that time has been 
engaged in the lumbering business. ■ He has been three times elected 
supervisor. Politically a Republican. 

WARNER WING 
Was born in Marietta, Ohio, Sept. 19, 1805, and was the son of Enoch 
and Mary (Oliver) Wing, an old New England family. His father 
removed from Conway. Mass., to Marietta, in 1790. In 1817, at the 
age of twelve, Judge Wing came to Detroit, and removed to Monroe 
in 182S. He attended law school at Northampton, Mass., and also 
studied in the office of Judge Woodbridge, at Detroit. As early as 
1833 he was engaged in the practice of the law in partnership with 
Hon. David A. Noble, at Monroe. In 1837 he was a Representative, 
and in 1838-9 Senator in the legislature, and was a leading member. In 
1840 he became law partner with Gov. McClelland, with whom he prac- 
ticed until 1845, when he became circuit judge, and a judge of the 
Supreme Court. In 1851 he became chief justice, which position he 
held until 1856, when he resigned to act as general counsel of the 
Lake Shore railroad. He was eminent as a lawyer and judge, and his 
able opinions are found in the state reports. In politics a Democrat. 
He became a member of the Presbyterian church at Monroe in 1843. 
He died at Monroe, March 10, 1S70. 



WASHINGTON WING 

Was born in Sullivan. N. Y.. Dec. 3, 1S08. He came to Scio, Wash- 
tenaw county, in 1830, and settled with his father's family. In 1835 
he settled in Iosco, Livingston county. In 1846 was a Representative. 
In 1836 and 1837 ho aided Godfroy in getting the Indians to Marshall, 
preparatory to their removal to the west, it being the remnant of a 
tribe numbering 150. He removed to Elgin, Illinois, in 1846, and is 
a farmer there. Has held various official positions. Has been a 
Republican since 1S56. 



706 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

RICHARD WINSOR, 

Representative from Huron county in 1863-4-5, and Senator in 1869- 
70-81-2, was born in the county of Middlesex, Ontario, in 1839. He 
settled in Huron county, Michigan, when a young man, studied law. 
was admitted to the bar. and has been prosecuting attorney several 
terms. He was a member of the constitutional convention of 1867. 
and resides at Port Austin, where he has a large law practice, and is 
also engaged in banking. In politics a Republican. 



JAMES WINTERS, 

Representative from Calhoun county in 1853, was born in Chenango. 
N. Y., August 17, 1805, and died January 15, 1882. He came to Ma- 
rengo, Calhoun county, Mich., in 1S36, and from 1839 to 1842, was 
foreman of a large cooper shop in that town. He then removed to 
Athens, same county, and for several years was supervisor, and held 
other town offices, and was also postmaster. In 1S61 he raised a 
company of one hundred men, and became captain of company E, 
6th Michigan infantry, but soon resigned from ill health. He after- 
wards drilled the officers of the 13th Michigan. By trade a cooper: 
politically a Republican. 

CHAUNCEY AY. WISXER, 

Senator from Saginaw county iu 1887, was born April 26, 1835, in Mt. 
Morris, N. Y. In politics a Republican prior to 1872; a Liberal Re- 
publican delegate to the Cincinnati convention in 1872, and a Demo- 
crat ever since. He practiced law in East Saginaw from 1863 to 1877. 
then removed to Bridgeport on a farm. He has held the office of city 
attorney of Flint, prosecuting attorney of Genesee county, mayor of 
East Saginaw and supervisor of Bridgeport township two terms. In 
1872 he was a candidate for congress on the Greeley ticket. 



GEORGE W. WISXER, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1837, was born in Cayuga 
county, X. Y., in 1812. He was the sou of Moses Wisner, a colonel 
of the war of 1812, and a brother of Ciov. Wisner, of Michigan. At 
the age of fifteen he was apprenticed to learn the trade of printer. 
In 1833, at the age of twenty-one, in company with William H. Dey, 
he established the Xew York Sun, the first cheap daily paper in that 
city, of which he was editor. The work broke his health, and in 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 707 

1835 he settled at Pontiac. Mich., studied law, was admitted in 1837; 
soon acquired distinction, and in 1838 was prosecuting attorney of 
Oakland county. In 1847 he became editor of the Detroit Advertiser, 
He died in 1849. He was a leading Whig, a fine lawyer, an eloquent 
speaker in a political campaign, and still holds a leading place in the 
remembrance of the pioneers of Oakland county. 



MOSES WISNER 

Was born at Springport, Cayuga county, N. Y., June 3, 1815. lie was 
brought up to agricultural labor, and received only a common school 
education. In 1837 he came to Michigan, and purchased a farm in 
Lapeer county. After two years he gave up farming, removed to 
Pontiac, studied law with George W. Wisner and Rufus Hosmer, and 
was admitted to practice in 1841. He established his office at Lapeer, 
and became prosecuting attorney of that county. • He soon removed 
to Pontiac, as one of the firm of Wisner & Hosmer. He was an anti- 
slavery Whig, but took little part in politics until 1852, when he 
openly espoused the cause of freedom for the territories. On the or- 
ganization of the republican party in 1854, he was nominated for at- 
torney-general, but declined. The same year he was nominated for 
congress, but was defeated by George W. Peck, the democratic can- 
didate. In 1856 he was on the stump for Fremont, and in 1S57 he was 
one of the Republican candidates for United States Senator. In 1858 
he was the Republican candidate for governor, and was elected, serv- 
ing ably from 1859 to 1801, when he returned to practice. In 1862 
he raised the 22d Michigan infantry, largely from Oakland county, 
of which he took command, and went to Kentucky in September, 
1863. He died of typhoid fever at Lexington. Ky., January 5, 1864. 
He was a great lawyer, an excellent governor, a patriot, and has left 
his impress on the institutions of the state. In his valedictory mes- 
sage was embodied the principles that governed his own action in 
the war, and that governed largely the actions of the people of the 
state. His eloquence was that of conviction and action, and the peo- 
ple believed in him. 

ELIJAH B. W1THERBEE 

Was born in Hopkiuton, Ma>s. July 19, 1894; received an academical 
education: became a clerk in Boston and Medford; went into busi- 
nees for himself until 1836; then came to Michigan, built a saw-mill 
in Genesee county, and engaged in the manufacture of lumber. In 
1841 he remov.-d to Flint, and was soon after appointed receiver of 



708 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

the land office. In 1S45 he entered into the drug business. In 1847 
he was Senator, and died while the legislature was in session, Febru- 
ary 25, 1847. In polities a Whig. 



BENJAMIN F. H. WITHERELL 

"Was born at Fair Haven, Vt., August 4, 1797. By reason of turbu- 
lence on the part of the Indians, preceding and following the war of 
1812, the family of Judge James Witherell did not come permanently 
to reside in Michigan until 1817, the subject of this sketch, up to that 
time, pursuing his studies, which were classical if not collegiate. He 
was admitted to the bar in Detroit in 1810. He was justice of the 
peace in 1824; city recorder 1828; judge of probate 1S34-5, and prose- 
cuting attorney 1835 to 1S39. In 1843 a district criminal court was 
organized, embracing the counties of Wayne, Oakland, "Washtenaw 
and Jackson, and Mr. "Witherell was appointed judge, holding the 
position until 1848. when the court was abolished. In the fall of 1843 
Judge Witherell tried one Chorr, at Ann Arbor, for the murder of a 
neighbor named Dunn, with whom he had had trouble. Chorr was 
convicted and sentenced to death, but pending a new trial, made his 
escape. This was the only capital sentence ever pronounced under a 
law of the state, the death penalty being soon after abrogated. He 
was appointed a regent of the University in 184S, and was circuit 
judge 1857 to 1S07, acting also a portion of the time as judge of the 
recorder's court. He was Senator 1840-1, member of the House in 
1842, and of the constitutional convention of 1850. He held for a 
time the honorary position of historiographer of Detroit, was presi- 
dent of the state historical society, and of the soldiers and sailors* 
monument association, and held high positions in the state militia, 
including that of major general. He contributed to the press and to 
the public archives many papers of great literary and historical value: 
politics, democratic. Died in. Detroit, June 20, 1867. 



JAMES WITHERELL, 

One of the early territorial judges, was born in Mansfield, Mass.. 
June 10, 17.VJ. He served through the greater part of the war of the 
revolution, entering the service as a private, and rising to the rank 
•of adjutant in a Massachusetts regiment. He studied medicine and 
law, and settled in Vermont, where lie held many positions of trust. 
including that of judge, member of the governor's council, and o( the 
legislature. II" was elected to congress in 1807, but resigned his seat 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 709 

to accept an appointment by President Jefferson, as one of the 
judges of the Supreme Court of the territory of Michigan, coming 
here in 1S08. He held a local military command during the war of 
1812, specially raised for the defense of Detroit, and it is reported 
that on the surrender of the town by Gen. Hull, he broke his sword 
to escape the mortification of relinquishing it to an enemy. A similar 
action used to be attributed to Gen. Cass on the same occasion. In 
January, 1828, after a service of twenty years, Judge WithereJl 
relinquished the judges! dp to become secretary of the territory. He 
held this position until May, 1S30, and during the first three months 
of 1S30 was acting governor. He raised a family of several children, 
none of whom are now living. The late Judge B. F. H. Witherell 
was his son, and a daughter, Mrs. Thomas Palmer, was the mother 
of Senator Thos. W. Palmer. Judge Witherell died in Detroit, 
January 9, 1S38. - 

WILLIAM H. WITHINGTON, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1873-1, was born in Dorchester, 
Mass., Feb. 1, 183.5. He received an academical education. He emi- 
grated to Michigan in 1S57, and settled in Jackson, where he now 
resides. In 1861 he entered the first Michigan infantry, as captain. 
He was captured at the first battle of Bull Run. and was held prisoner 
for six months. In 1862 he was commissioned colonel of the seven- 
teenth Michigan infantry, for a prominent part taken in the battles 
of the army of the Potomac, and was brevetted brigadier general of 
volunteers in 1865 for conspicuous gallantry at the battles of South 
Mountain and Antietam. Gen. Withington's business is that of a 
manufacturer of farming tools. As a member of the legislature he 
was very efficient in securing appropriations for volunteer militia, of 
which he has since been commanding general. In politics a Republi- 
can. 

SOLOMON L. W1THEY 

Was born at St. Albans. Vt., April 21. 1^20. His father, Solomon 
Wither, known to early residents of Michigan as General Withey, 
emigrated to Grand Rapids in 1836 with his family. Mr. Withey 
received a common school and academical education, and in l s 39 
entered the law office of Rathbone & Martin. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1843, and engaged in active practice for nineteen years. 
His career at the bar was one that gave him the unlimited confidence 
of his clients, and he acquired a competence. His cool judgment, 
perfect integrity and high character as a man, and thorough knowl- 
80~ 



710 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

edge of the law, made him prominent. From 18-4S to 1852 he was 
judge of probate of Kent county: Senator from 1861 to 1863, and mem- 
ber of the state constitutional convention of 1867. Both in the Senate 
and in that convention he was chairman of the committee on the 
judiciary. In 1863 he was appointed by President Lincoln, United 
States district judge for the western district of Michigan, a position 
he filled with signal ability until his death, which occurred at San 
Diego, California. April 25, 1886. He married Marion L. Hinsdill, in 
1846, and left five children — four sons and one daughter. In 1869 he 
was tendered the position of United States circuit judge for the states 
f Ohio, Michigan, Tennessee and Kentucky, which he declined. 
He was director and president of the first national bank of Grand 
Rapids for many years. He was a Republican in politics, and a con- 
sistent member of the Congregational church. His courts were models 
of propriety and decorum. 

ISAAC WIXOM 

Was born in Hector, N. Y., March 7, 1803. He received an academical 
and medical education in the state of New York. He practiced medicine 
four years in Steuben county, settled at Farmington, Michigan, in 1829 r 
bought a farm and improved it. His practice in medicine and 
surgery became very extensive. In 1845 he removed to Argentine, 
Genesee county, and engaged in a large milling and mercantile 
business in connection with his practice. He was so noted as a 
surgeon that he was called into other states to perform difficult 
surgical operations. In 1838 and 1839 he was Representative in the 
legislature; in 1842 and 1843 was Senator. In 1861 he became 
surgeon of the 3 6th Michigan infantry, followed it through twenty - 
two battles, but at the end of two years resigned from ill health and 
returned to practice. In 1870 he removed to Fentonville. In politics 
a Democrat. He was made a Mason when young and took the 
highest degree known in the United States. In June, 1845, he per- 
formed the first successful amputation of the hip joint known in the 
United States, and afterwards performed sixteen successful operations 
of that kind. Deceased. 

LEVI L. WIXSON 

Was born Jan. 9, 1828, in Pickering, Canada. He is of American 
parentage. He was raised on a farm, and was for several terms 
engaged in teaching school in Sanilac county. After graduating in 
the law department of the University in 1862, lie commenced the 
practice of law at Lexington, and continued in practice there until 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 711 

his election as circuit judge of the newly organized twenty-fourth 
judicial circuit, in the spring of 1870, to which office he was reelected 
April 4, 1881, for the full term. He was elected prosecuting attorney 
in 1862, and has held publie office continuously since that time, having 
been three times elected prosecuting attorney, and three times judge 
of probate of Sanilac county, and twice elected judge of his circuit. 
In politics he has been Republican since 1S5G. 

DANIEL WIXSON, 

Was born in Jersey, (now Orange) Steuben county, N. Y., Feb. 1, 
1822. He received a common school education, and in 1851 settled 
in Lexington, Michigan. He held various township offices. In 1859 
he was a Representative in the legislature, and again in 1873-4. A 
farmer by occupation; in politics a Republican. 



JOSHUA WIXSON, 

Representative from Sanilac county in 1883, was born in Canada, of 
American parentage, Jan. 9, 1827. Removed to Sanilac county in 
1841, where he has since resided. His education was self-acquired. 
He has taught school, held office in Worth, Sanilac county, continu- 
ously for 28 years, including that of township clerk, justice of the 
peace, school inspector, and supervisor, the latter from 1S7G to 1882 
inclusive. His principal occupation is that of a farmer. He is a 
Republican. 

GROVE H. WOLCOTT, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1S81-2, was born in Alabama, 
N. Y., Nov. 8. 1836. He removed with his parents to Hamlin. Mich., 
in 1837. He received an academical education, studied law, was 
admitted to the bar in 18i>2. and went into practice at Jackson. He 
was private secretary to Gov. Blair iu 1861, and has been circuit court 
commissioner two terms. Politically a Democrat. 

ALFRED B. WOOD, 

Senator from Saginaw and other counties in 1869-70-1-2, was born in 
Norwalk, Conn., April IS, 1819, where his ancestors settled in 1648. 
Removed with his mother to Lyons, N. Y., in 1833, and received an 
academical education. From 1845 to 1851 was engaged in the book 
business at Auburn and Geneva, N. Y, and then was in the same 
business at Ann Arbor, Mich. He then became interested in the Ann 



TJ2 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Arbor paper mills, the first in Michigan, until 1862. In 18G3 engaged 
in the real estate and lumber business at East Saginaw, where he now 
resides. Has been an alderman, and was president pro te>u of the 
Senate in 1871-2. Politically a Republican. 

CHAS. M. WOOD, 

Senator from Livingston and Shiawassee counties in 1875, was born at 
West Brookfield, Mass., Sept. 29, 1826. He received a common 
school education, and removed to Michigan in 1835. He resides at 
Pinckney. In politics a Republican. 

EDWIN K. WOOD, 

Representative from Montcalm county in 1833, was born in Wyoming 
county, N. Y., in 1840. Served from 1SG1 to 1863 in 17th N. Y. infan- 
try. He settled in Michigan in 1865: has been a merchant, farmer 
and lumberman, and now resides at Stanton. Has held various local 
offices. In politics a Republican. 

HENRY L. WOOD, 

Representative from Gratiot county in 1887, was born in Troy, Ohio, 
June 17, 1848, where he lived until 1876. He removed to Monroe, 
Mich., where he remained eighteen months, then removed to Gratiot 
county, where he has since resided, following the occupation of 
farming and brick- making. Mr. Wood enlisted in company G, 189th 
Ohio Vol. infantry, at the age of sixteen and served in Tennessee 
and Alabama until the close of the war. Fie is a Republican. He 
has held the offices of supervisor and school trustee. 

JAMES C. WOOD, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1S75-7, was born in Decatur, 
N. Y. . in 1813. He removed to Michigan in 1843, and settled at 
White Pigeon. In 1814 removed to Jackson, where he has continued 
to reside. He lias been treasurer of Jackson county, and mayor of 
the city of Jackson. He is by profession a lawyer, and is also 
engaged in farming. 

THOMAS WOOD 

Was born at Norwich. N. Y., May ','1, 1805. He came to Michigan in 
1826, aivl located a farm in Pittsfield. Washtenaw county, where he 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 713 

lived until his death, September 21, I860. His farm was a fine one, 
and he gave much attention to horticulture. He was Representative 
in 1845. 



WILLIAM WOODBRIDGE 

Was born in Norwich, Conn., August 20, 17S0, and removed to Mari- 
etta, Ohio, with Ids father's family in 1791. He studied law three 
years at Litchfield, Conn., and was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1806. 
The same year married Juliana, daughter of John Trumbull, the dis- 
tinguished lawyer, judge and poet. oi Connecticut. He was a mem- 
ber of the Ohio assembly in 1807, and a Senator from 1809 to 1814. In 
1S14 he was appointed secretary of the territory of Michigan, and was 
also collector of customs at Detroit, and in the absence of the governor, 
superintendent of Indian agencies. In 1819 the people of the 
territory were allowed a delegate in congress, and he was selected 
with the concurrence of all parties, as the right to a delegate had been 
secured by his exertions. As a delegate he secured government aid 
to build the roads from Detroit to Fort Gratiot. Chicago, and through 
the ■' black swamp" to the Miami river. He also secured the settle- 
ment of the old French claims, and the expedition, under Gov. Cass, 
to Lake Superior and the upper valley -of the Mississippi river. He 
refused a second term to congress, acted as secretary until 1824, was 
then appointed one of the commissioners to adjust private land 
claims, and also engaged in law practice. 

In 1828 he was appointed by President Adams, judge of the 
Supreme Court, and served untd 1832. He was a member of the 
constitutional convention of 1S35, and was a Senator in 1838-9. In 
1839 he received the nomination for governor and. was elected as the 
Whig candidate. He served as governor from January 7. 1840, to 
February 23, 1841, when he resigned, having been elected United 
States Senator, by a combination of Whigs and Democrats, over the 
Whig caucus nominee. Lieutenant Governor Gordon. He served six 
years in that office, then retired to private life. He owned the 
Woodbridge farm in Detroit, which has become very valuable prop- 
erty. He died October 20, 1861. 

He was decided in his opinions; earnest, dignified and courteous in 
manner; a profound jurist and constitutional lawyer; the oldest 
member of the Detroit bur: a man of refined and cultivated taste, and 
left a spotless name. In religion a Congregationalism 



714 JTICHIGAX BIOGRAPHY. 

LEMUEL WOODHOUSE, 

Delegate in the constitutional convention of 1S67, was born in the 
state of New York in 1819; became a cabinet maker and millwright, 
and worked near Columbus, Ohio. He removed to Unadilla, Mich., in 
1840, afterwards settled at Leslie. He was eight years treasurer of 
Ingham county, was in the mercantile business at Dansville, resided 
several years in Lansing, was a clerk in the office of the auditor 
general, then ran a store and saw-mill and owned a farm at White 
Oak. Politically a Republican. Died Feb. 32, 1833. 



ELIAS S. WOODMAN, 

Delegate in the constitutional convention of 1850, was born in Rod- 
man, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1815. He came to Michigan with his father in 
1837, who settled on a farm at Novi. His education was limited. He 
was a farmer at Novi until 1373, then removed to Northville, where 
he now resides. He studied law late in life and was admitted to the 
bar in 1870. He has held many local offices. In politics a Democrat. 



JONATHAN J. WOODMAN. 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1861-2-3-4-5-7-9-'70-l-2, 
and Speaker in 1869-'70-l-2, was born in Sutton, Vt., May 24, 1325. 
He received a common school education. He became a resident of 
Paw Paw, Mich., in 1855. He commenced teaching at the age of 
twenty-one, which he continued winters for several years. From 
1852 to 1854 was a worker in the California gold mines. He is a 
farmer, politically a Democrat until 1856. since a Republican. ■ He 
was one of the state board at the Philadelphia exposition in 1376. He 
was master of the state grange from 1874 to 1873, and overseer of the 
national grange from 1875 to 1879. He was one of four agricultural 
commissioners to the Paris exposition in 1878. lie was an able legis- 
lator and an excellent presiding officer. 



ALBERT N. WOODRUFF, 

Representative from Berrien county in 1885, was born in Bainbridge, 
Mich., July 22, 1850. He received an academical and collegiate edu- 
cation, and for three years was a teacher, since a farmer. Has been 
supervisor and held other town offices. Politically a Republican. 



MICHIGAN BIOGKAPHY. 715 

GEORGE WOODRUFF 

Was born in Binghampton, N. Y., July 4. 1S07. He received a good 
■education, graduated at Hobart college, Geneva, N. Y.; studied law, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1833; practiced law in New York state 
four years; settled in practice at Marshall, Mich., in 1837; and resided 
there until his death, May 13, 18S7. He was village recorder in 1842; 
circuit court commissioner from 1855 to 1860, and again from 1862 to 
1866; judge of the fifth circuit from 1866 to 1S76; and held other 
positions. In politics a Republican. 



HENRY WOODRUFF, 

Senator from Clare and other counties in 1885, was born at Seneca 
Falls, N. Y., Feb. 13, 1813. Removed to Flat Rock, Mich., in 1833, to 
East Saginaw in 1855, and to Clare county in 1871. He served two 
and a half years as captain in the 23d Michigan infantry. Has been 
a sheriff and judge of probate. In politics Whig and Republican. 



NEWTON R. WOODRUFF 

Was born in Broome county, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1808. In 1836 he came 
with his family to Michigan, and in 1837 settled in Bainbridge, 
Berrien county, on a farm, where he remained until his death, Dec. 
■24, 1880. From 1852 to 1855 he was in California. In 1865 he was 
Representative in the legislature. A member of the Methodist church 
-and a patron of husbandry. 

AUGUSTUS B. WOODWARD 
Was a native of Virginia. In early life he devoted himself to literary 
work, and wrote and published several works. He became a lawyer, 
and on the 3d of March, 1S05, was appointed by President Jefferson 
United States judge for the territory of Michigan. He, together with 
the two other judges, Bates and Griffin, with the governor of the 
territory, or a majority of them, possessed the legislative power of 
the territory, which they exercised until 1824, when the first 
legislative council held its session at Detroit. Judge Woodward was 
an able lawyer, but very eccentric, and the wheels of government, 
with himself and colleagues often in collision, did not always run 
without friction. He acted as judge until 1824. After the surrender 
of Detroit, in 1812. he did much to ameliorate the condition of the 
citizens of Detroit, who had been placed under martial law by 



716 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Proctor. In August, 1324, he was appointed United States judge for 
the territory of Florida, but died about 1820. lie never married. 



DAVID A. "WOODWARD, 

Representative from Monroe county in 18G9-70, was born in Phelps- 
town, N. Y., in 1812. He came with his parents to Michigan in 1833, 
who settled upon a farm in Milan, where he resided, except the last 
few years of his life. In 1834 he built the first flouring mill and the 
first saw-mill in Milan. In 1834 he was elected justice under the 
territorial laws, and continued to act in that capacity for thirty 
years. He was supervisor of Milan for several years. In politics a 
Democrat. From 1850 until his death, June 13, 1SS4, he devoted 
most of his time to the practice of law. 



HI EL WOODWARD, 

Was born in Bridge water. Vt., Feb. 10, 1824. His grandfather, 
Nehemiah, was a Baptist clergyman, and in the revolution was an 
attar-he of the stall of General Washington. He came to Michigan 
with his father in 1836, and lived at Adrian until 1845. He learned 
the trade of a mechanic, which he followed several years. He 
purchased a farm in Columbia, Jackson county. In 1858 he was 
elected supervisor, and held that office ten years: in 1865 and Is 67 he 
was a Representative, and in 1869-70 Senator in the legislature. In 
1870 he took the census of the south part of Jackson county, hi 1872 
he was appointed postmaster of BroDklyn and held it many years. 

LYSANDER WOODWARD 

Was born in Columbia, Conn., Nov. 19, 1817. He removed with his 
parents to Chili, N. Y., in 1825. In 183S he came to Rochester, Michi- 
gan, and five years afterwards settled on a farm in Avon, same 
county. He was several times supervisor and justice. In 1861-2 he 
was a Representative from Oakland county. From 1866 to 1870 he- 
was county treasurer, and several times has been president of the 
county agricultural society. He was for two years president of the 
Detroit & Bay City railroad company. In politics a Republican. 



JOHN D. WOODWORTH 

Was born in Pembroke, N. Y., Feb. 28. 1826. Emigrated to Jackson 
in 1831, and was educated in the schools of that citv. He studied 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 71? 

medicine, and graduated from Rush medical college, Chicago, in 1853. 
He came to Leslie in 1S49. and represented the town for fifteen years 
on the board of supervisors. He was a Representative from Ingham 
county in 1863-4-5-7, was the first president of the village of Leslie, a 
member of the board of education for 25 years, and director of the 
Leslie schools for fifteen years. A Republican in politics. 



THOMAS B. WOODWORTH, 

Representative from Huron county in 1877. was born Oct. 2, 1841, in 
Wayne county, N. Y. He received an academical education. He 
removed from Auburn, N. Y.. to Huron county, Michigan, in 1867. 
He has been supervisor of the township of Caseville, 1868 to 1876, and 
was county surveyor for two years. He founded the Caseville Adver- 
tiser in Jan.', 1874, and continued its editor until 1876. when it was 
merged in the Huron County Xeics. He is by profession a lawyer. 
In politics a Republican. 



WALTER W. WOOLNOUGH 

Was born in Suffolk county, England in July, 1822. He came to 
Rochester, N. Y., with his parents in 1833, where he learned the art of 
printing. In 1845 came to Battle Creek, Mich., bought the first print- 
ing material and published the Western Citizen, the first newspaper. 
In August, 1846, began to publish the Michigan Tribune, which after 
two years was merged in the Liberty Press. From 1851 to 1S63 was 
editor and publisher of the Battle Creek Journal, From that date 
until 1871 was not engaged in newspaper work, then edited and pub- 
lished the Michigan Tribune until 1877, when he sold out. He was a 
trustee of the village of Battle Creek; a Representative in 1859; an 
alderman four years; nine years a member of the board of education, 
and president, and a justice. In politics a Whig until 1854, a Repub- 
lican until 1872, since a Democrat. Is now connected with the Battle 
Creek Daily Moon. 



ROBERT WORDEN, Jr., 

Representative in 1853, was long a resident of Hillsdale county, and 
was county treasurer from 1818 to 1852. He was a farmer and a 
Democrat. Now resides near Owosso. 
81 



71 S MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 



BERNARD C. WHITTEMORE, 



State Treasurer from 1850 to 1855, was born near Rome, N. Y., in 
1807. He came at an early day to Pontiac, where he was in the 
hardware trade. In politics a Democrat. Died December 7, 1856. 



GIDEON O. WHITTEMORE, 

Secretary of State from 1846 to 1848, was born at St. Albans. Vt., 
August 12. 1800. He settled at Pontiac, Mich., in 182G, and engaged 
in the practice of law. He held many positions of trust, was a 
justice, associate judge of Oakland county, and member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1850. In 1854 he founded Tawas City, 
Iosco county, and built a large steam saw-mill, the first on Tawas 
bay. He was judge of probate and prosecuting attorney of Iosco 
county. Died June 30, 18G3, and was buried at Pontiac. 

DAVID A. WRIGHT 

Was born in Granville N. Y., June 6. 1S13. In 1824 his father removed 
to Oneida county, and in 1843 came with his family to Michigan, and 
the son settled in Springfield, Oakland county. He was appointed 
postmaster at Austin, and held the office twenty-five years. He was 
Representative in 1849, and Senator in 1853. He was for some years 
coroner of Oakland county, and was a prominent Mason. In politics 
a Democrat. Died Januarv 10, 1877. 



HAMILTON M. WRIGHT. 

Representative from Bay county in 18S3-5, was born in New Orleans. 
La., October 26, 1852; graduated from Yale college in 1875, and from 
its law department in 1877.' Removed to Bay City in 1878 and went 
into practice. Has been an alderman. Politically a Democrat. 



HORATIO WRIGHT. 

Representative from Oakland county in 18G7, was born in Granville, 
N. Y.. February 20. 1818. In 1824 he removed, with his parents, to 
Oneida county. N. Y., and in 1839 located in Genesee county. N. Y. 
He settled at Springfield, Oakland county, in 1843. and in 1847 in 
Groveland, same county, where he now resides. He is a farmer: in 
politics a Democrat. He married Sarah M. Campbell in 1842, and of 
seven children, three sons and three daughters are living. He has 



MICHIGAN" BIOGRAPHY. 719 

held the office of supervisor eight years, and was a justice from 1832 
to 1876. He is a prominent Mason. 



HERMAN A. WYCKOFF, 

Representative from Oakland county in 188 1-2, was born in Romulus, 
N. Y., June 17, 1838. lie came to Oakland county in 1843, with his 
parents, who settled near Pontiac. Received a common school edu- 
cation, and is a farmer and breeder of fine stock. Politically a Re- 
publican. 



GEORGE C. WYLLIS, 

Representative from Hillsdale county in 1883, was born at Potsdam, 
N. Y., August 1, 1823. Settled with his father at Pulaski, Mich., in 
1838. Educated in common schools, with a few months at Michigan 
central college, at Spring Arbor. Taught school winters until 1852; 
then settled on his farm in Moscow. Has since taught eight terms, 
been a justice eighteen years, and school inspector nine years. In 
politics a Republican. 



HENRY WYMAN, 

Representative from L?nawee county in 1845, was born in Jefferson 
count}*, N. Y., in 1803. By profession a physician; in politics a Demo 
crat. Now resides at Blisstield. 



GEORGE L. YAPLE 

Was born in Leonidas, Mich., February 20, 1831. In 1837 removed 
witli his parents to Mendon, same county. Graduated in the classical 
course at the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, in 1871. 
Studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1872, but immediately 
engaged in farming, and continued in that pursuit until the spring of 
1877, when he entered upon the practice of law. Was defeated as 
greenback candidate for congress in 1880. In 1882 he was elected 
Representative to the forty eighth congress on the union ticket, and 
served from 1883 to lsS-5. In 1880 he was nominated for governor, 
but was defeated by the republican candidate. He is a fine orator on 
the stump, and his speech in congress in favor of free trade was cir- 
culated throughout the countrv. 



?2<> • MICHIGAN BICGRAPHY. 

CHARLES YARRIKGTON, 

Representative from Jackson county in 1881-2, was born April 28, 
1839, in Napoleon, Mich. He was given the advantages of the com- 
mon schools of the times. He alternated between farming and school 
teaching, and attended four terms at the State Normal school. "When 
twenty-one years of age he removed to the Pacific coast, and finally 
located in the mining regions of Idaho. There he remained until 
1866, when he returned to Norvell, with sufficient means to enter the 
mercantile business. He is still engaged in that business. He has 
served three terms as township clerk: was appointed census enumer- 
ator for 1SS0, and has held the office of postmaster. In politics a Re- 
publican. 

SAMUEL W. YAW KEY 

Was born at Massillon, Ohio, April 22, 1S30. He removed to East 
Saginaw, Mich., in 1S52. He there followed the occupation of a 
lumber dealer. In politics a Republican. He was mayor of East 
Saginaw in 1867 and 1S69, and was Representative in 1865-9-'70. He 
died at Elko, Nevada, March 12, 1882. 

GEORGE G. B. YECKLEY, 

Representative from Van Buren county in 1875, was born in Gorhatu . 
N. Y., February 13. 1831. lie received a common school education 
and came to Ypsilanti in 1853. In 1860 he removed to Hamilton. 
Van Buren county. He has held the office of supervisor for seven 
years, also that of justice. By occupation a farmer, in politics a 
Republican. 

SANFORD A. YEOMANS, 

Representative from Ionia county in 1877-79, was born in German 
Flats, N. Y., November 29, 1816. He received a common school 
education. In 1833 he removed to Easton, Ionia county. He was 
a member of the constitutional convention of 1867, and held various 
township and county offices. He was a farmer and dealer in real 
estate, also a stockholder and director of the first national bank of 
Ionia. In politics a Republican. 

GEORGE YERKES. 
Representative from Oakland county in 1879. was born in N:>vi. 
Mich., April 19, 1838. He was educated in the common schools. 



MICHIGAN- BIOGRAPHY. 721 

Occupation, farming. He has held the office of justice two terms; 
also that of supervisor two terms. In politics a Republican. 



WILLIAM YERKES, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1837-57, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1794, and came to Michigan in 1820, settling in what is now 
the town of Novi, but which then embraced several other surrounding 
townships under the name of Farniington. He was a farmer by 
occupation, Whig and Republican in politics, and serveJ at various 
times as supervisor and justice. Died January 5, 1884. 



JOHN K. YOCUM, 

Representative from Washtenaw county in 1851-2, was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Pa., March 27, IS 19. He came with his parents to 
Lyndon, Mich., in 1836. For many years he worked summers and 
taught school winters. In 1316 he married Marie A. Johnson, and 
settled on a farm. Appointed U. S. assessor in 1863, he held the 
position five years, and has held other offices. In politic.-. Whig and 
Republican. For thirty-eight years he has been county or deputy 
surveyor. 

CHESTER YOST 

Was born in Fayette, N. Y. Was a farmer by occupation, and a jus- 
tice iu his native town. Emigrated to Michigan and settled on a 
farm in Washtenaw county, on which he remained several years. 
He then removed to Ypsilantiand became a partner of Benjamin Fol- 
lett in the mercantile business. During the last years of his life was 
not in business. He was a Whig, then a Republican, last a Democrat. 
He was elected to the Senate in 18j9 as a Republican, and was justice 
for a number of years. Died May 21, 1874. 



AMBROSE P. YOUNG, 

Representative from Wayne county in 18 I s -!, '81-2, was born in Phelps- 
town, N. Y., May 23, 1814. He followed farming until seventeen, 
then learned the trade of carriage making. He settled in Romulus, 
Mich., in 1836, and for several years carried on blacksmithing and 
carriage making. He then became a farmer. Has held the offices of 
town clerk, school inspector, supervisor, colonel of militia, associate 



722 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

county judge, and rice president of Monroe and Wayne mutual fire 
insurance company. Has also been a justice for 35 years. In 
politics a Democrat. He claims to have given the vote that changed 
the name of the capital from Michigan to Lansing. 



H. OLIN YOUNG, 

Representative from -Marquette county in 1679, was born at New 
Albion, N. Y., Aug 4, 1850. He attended school at Chamberlin insti- 
tute. He removed to Ishpeming, Michigan, in 1872, and engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. In politics a Republican. 



S. PERRY YOUNG, 

Representative from Montcalm county in 1883, was born in Summit, 
Mich., Sept. 2, 1850. Received a common and high school educa- 
tion. He attended the law school of the University one year. He 
was clerk of Montcalm county from 1875 to 1879, and has been exten- 
sively engaged in farming, lumbering, mercantile pursuits, and spec- 
ulation. Politically a Republican. 



GEORGE YOUNG LOVE, 

Representative from Monroe county in 1843, was born in Berkshire 
county, Mass., Nov. 14. 1704. He was a blacksmith up to 1835, after 
that a farmer. He came to Monroe county in 1831. In politics 
a Democrat. Died Sept. G, 1876. 



ELISHA ZIMMERMAN, 

Representative from Oakland county in 1873-4, was born in St. Johns- 
ville, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1S28. He received a common school education. 
In 1851 he removed to Michigan, and settled iu Grand Blanc, Genesee 
county. In 1865 he removed to Pontiac. By occupation a merchant. 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES IN THE LEGISLATURE 
OF MICHIGAN, FROM 1833 TO 1837, WHOSE BIOGRA- 
PHIES DO NOT APPEAR IN THIS VOLUME : 



Name. Postoftice. Sessions. 

Adams, Oliver.. L T tica 1853 

Alvord, Henry J Lapeer 1S55 

Ashman, Samuel Sault Ste. Marie 1840 

Backus, Ira C Jackson 1859 

Bailey, Isaac G Ft. Pleasant 1840 

Balcombe. John L. _ Battle Creek 1851 

Baldwin, Jas. M Hopkins 1859 

Ball, John C Tecumseh 1S42 

Ballard, Jesse Summerville. 1837 

Barbeau, Peter B Fort Brady... 1845 

Barnes, Norman La Salle 1850 

Bement, Rufus B Dexter '.. 1838 

Bentley, Elijah.. Napoleon 1803-4 

Rlpir Charts (Tecumseh 1845 

Blair, Charles (Tipton.. 1845 

Blake. John E Lauiont 1869-70 

Brewer, John.. .. Ypsilanti 1SJ5-6 

Brown, Thos. J Houghton 1S67 

Browned, Franklin Dowagiac 1855 

Buckley, Chester Battle Creek 1857-63-4 

Burdick. Cyren Bronson.. 1835-6 

Bart, Edwin Isabella City 1863-4 

Canfield. Sam'l P.._ New Haven.... 1853 

Carpenter. Henry D Detroit 1S50 

Carver. Lyman.. . Saline 1848 

Case. Emanuel 1827 

Cawh-y. James P Morenci 1871-2 

Chamberlain, Harmon St. Clair 1S50 

Chapel, Caleb M Gidley"s Station. 1853 

Chapel, Chas. W Sault Ste. Marie 1855 



724 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Name. Postoffice. Sessions. 

Chapin, Sam'l A White Pigeon 1839 

Charter, Francis La Salle. 1835-6-S 

Chubb, Harvey Ann Arbor 1846-7 

Clements, James Ann Arbor 1865 

Clyburn, Wm. L Summerville 1851 

Coleman, Henry... Kendall 1840 

Colwell, Henry J 1874 

Corkin, Wm Petersburg 1863-4 

Cornell, Jerry G... Spring Arbor 1837 

Coulter, Joseph.. Ontonagon.. 1861-2 

Dalton, James, Jr Dalton's Mills.. 1859 

Dalton, Lawrence Dalton's Corners 1871-2 



Davis. John. 



Roval Oak 1844 



'} Birmingham. 1846 

Davis, Wm. R. . _ Oakfield 1869-70 

Dean, Chas. W Pentwater 1867 

Denman, Henry B Dowagiac 1863-4 

Denton, Solomon W Pontiac. 1S48 

Dimond, Reuben B Lexington. 1848 

Divine, John Lexington 1855 

Divine, Rosekrans K Eureka 1855 

Dodge, Henry M. Sault Ste. Marie 1848 

Dodge, Hiram Clinton 1835-6 

Draper, Wm. P Lapeer.... 1838 

Drew, John A. Mackinac 1841 

Eaton, Ebenezer C [ %^^ = :::: }g? 

Eaton, Levi Romulus 1851 

Ecklee, George Rollin 1845 

Emerson, Luther G .. Rockland.. 1867 

Emery, Jared H Burnside.. 1867 

Enos, Uriel Edwardsburgh 1855 

Farrington. Thomas London 1837 

Ferris, Benj. F Sherwood 1848 

Ferris, Richard Bear Lake Mills... 1871-2 

Finch, Silas Saline 1835-6 

Finney, Noble H... Grand Rapids 1S39 

Flower, James Armada 184y 

Funston, George A Capac 1867 

Galloway, John . Waterford Center 1845 

Gleason, John P Memphis 1853 

Goodell, Alfred Armada 1816-7 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 725 

Name. Postomce. Sessions. 

■Goodrich. Chauncej Lansing 1861-2 

Gorman, Patrick Grafton ." _„ 1871-2 

Granger, Lynian Columbus 1S42-3 

Graveraet, Robt. J Marquette 1857-8 

Gray, Thomas Ridgeway 1851 

Green, Coggeshall.. Niles 1835-6 

Griffin, Jas. W Adamaville 1844 

Hadley, John. Jr Holly 1861-2 

Ilaight, Salmon L. Saline 1849-53 

Haire, Elias Manchester 1865 

Haire, John Grand ville.!.. 1861-2 

„ - o i r- i Grand Haven 1847-8 

Hams, Silas G. ...... ( Talmadge 1850 

Hawkins, Olney Ann Arbor 1839-40 

Hawley, Augustus D Jackson 1841 

Hay nes, John Midland City 1871-2 

Hewitt, Win F. .... 1874 

Hill. Fitch Ann Arbor 1845 

Hollister. Hannibal Fort Huron 1846 

Hollister. Henry S Gidlev's Station 1847 

Hopkins, Mordecai L Millpoint 1855 

Horton, Benj. S Bell River 1865 

Hough. Olmstead. Tecumseh 1835-6-7 

Howe, George Clinton... 1835-6 

Howland, Nathaniel Bristol 1839 

Irvine, John D Mackinac. 1850-1 

Ives, Friend Plainwell 1850 

Jackson , Joseph Perry's Grove 1835-6 

Jewell. Chas. A Medina 1869-70 

Johnson, Augustus S Springfield.. 1845 

Johnson. Simeon M Grand Rapids 1843 

Jones. Edward II Constantine 1861-2 

Jones, Loss E Brooklyn 1847 

Keeler, Lucius Union 1865 

f 1835-6-7-8 

Kin*;, Jonathan P Mackinac... ■[ -9, 1842-8, 

L 1849-50 

King, John "Whitmore Lake 1843 

Knight, Benjamin Eaton Rapids 1844-7 

Kore, Jacob C Hadley 1859 

Laphani, Smith Laphamville -J igg~_g 

Lawrence, Edwin Ann Arbor 1848 



726 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Name. Postomce. Session?. 

Lee, Thomas . Dexter 1837 



j 1835-0- 
(8-9 



Levake, Henry A... Sault Ste. Marie... 

Little, Norman Saginaw 1639-4 

Loomis, Chas. A St. Clair 1848-9 



Magoon, Isaac. 



( Columbia Lake 1842 



"( Silver Lake 184- r 

Marsh, Wm. R White Lake 1853 

Marvin, Jarvis E... Ypsilariti 1851 

Mason, Edw. M Flint.. 1869-70 

McCabe, James Pontiac 1848-9 

MeCauley, Wm '. Brighton... 1853 

McCowen, Henry Moscow 1869-70 

-.r t— i i3 - \ Beaver Island 1857 

McKmley. Peter..... ..- |gt< James _____ i 8 59 

McLeod, Wm. Norman Mackinac. 1843-4-5 

McWhorter, David Grass Lake 1853.-- 

Mead, Stephen Paint Cr, ek 1839 

Middlesworth, Abraham Argentine 1855 

Miller, Chas. L Colon 1853-5 

Miller, Hiram L Saginaw 1841-4 

Minnie, Joseph T. S St. Clair 1871-2 

Minnis Adam Wayne 1805 

Newman, Orlando East Ta was 1869-70 

Nixon, Robert --- Oneida. 1805 

Noble, Herman C Byron - 1849 

Ord, Placidus Sault. Ste Marie . 1840 

Ormsby, Caleb N Ann Arbor 18b9 

Patterson, James Fentonville 1851 

Patterson, Jas. A Adrian 1843 

Pattison, Wm. II Saline - 1855-7-8 

Pay ue, Jira - - - Clinton - 1838 

Pearl, Perry D Belleville 1871-2 

Piper, Dan'ID.. Clinton 1861-2-3-1 

Porter, Ira Port Huron 1841 

Pratt, Gilbert E Ithaca 1861-2 

Preston. Otis... - White Pigeon 1842 

Price, Jacob Brandon 1850 

Purdy . Robert Sum mit __ 1837-43 

Quackenboss, Danl G. Tecumseh -- 1848-50-3 

Reeves, Henry I Roseville 1859 

Rexford, Roswell B Napoleon 1855 



MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 72? 

Xame. Postoffice. Sessions. 

Rice, Thomas J... -- Scio - 1842-3 

Rogers, Levi.. Fredonia... 1841 

Rose, Win. O Eoseville 1845 

Rumsey, Henry Ann Arbor 1835-6-7 

Runyan, John (J Carlton. 1865 

Russell, James Summerville.. 1841 

a , , . T T j Sault Ste. Marie 1843 

Schoolcraft, Jas. L ---", Fort Brady 1844 

Seeley, Harry Pontiac 1843 

Seeley, Jesse White Lake - 184? 

Sexton, Jarcd Dearbornville.. 1851 

Sheldon, Orson Utica -— 183i 

Shellhouse, Martin G - Colon 1837 

Sherman, Abner - Ontonagon 1853-5-7-63 

Shoemaker, De Witt Grand Rapids 1853 

( White Pigeon 1857-8 

Shurtz, Frederick - Lockport 1839 

(Three Rivers.. - 1844 

Smith, Calvin - l8:39 ' 

Smith, Job... Van Buren 1837 

Smith, Luther.. St. Louis 1865-7 

Snell, Joseph W - Ora Labor 1869-70 

Spaulding, Phineas S... Elmira lSG7 

Sprague. Paul C - Nebraska. 1863-4 

Stone, Hiram IT Dearbornville... - 1848 

Taylor, Wm. H - Sparta Centre 1861-2 

Ar , . 1853-1861 

Toll, Alexander - - Mackinac 1862-3-4 

Truesdale, Aaron B Bridgewater .- 1847-51 

Tucker, Truer.. - - St. Char.... 1839-40 

Turner, Reuben D Mackinac 1840 

Ullman, Isaac J Constantine.. 1835-6 

Wade, Cerrel B Brooklyn 1861-2 

Ward, Zuel --- Belle River.... 1855 

Warner, Ebenezer Sault Ste. Marie 1859-61-2 

Webb, Dwight Ann Arbor 1849-50 

Welch, Lewis -- Exeter 1857-8-9 

Weld, Washington .. Centreville 1845 

Wheeler, William Flowerfield .- 1861-2-3-4 

Whitmore, Ezra Ann Arbor 1855 

Whitney. Thomas East Saginaw _ 1857-8 

Willard. Wm., Jr. Ontonagon 1869-70 

Williams, Hubert G Marquette 1869-70 



728 MICHIGAN BIOGRAPHY. 

Name. Postoffice. Sessions. 

Wood, Stephen R Sault Ste. Marie... 1841 

Woodbury, Jas. H Adrian. 18-42 

Worden, Ananias _ 1848 

Wright, Chas. R St. James 1861-2 



Note.— On printing the biographies in A and B, it was found that the material 
prepared could not appear in one volume, and thus meet the limited appropria- 
tion, without many biographies were condensed. This has been done in several 
hundred instances, to the great regret of the compiler. 



I N D E X 



History of Michigan . . 
History of Counties .. 



A. 



PAGE. 

..5 to 20 
.21 to 23 



Abell, Oliver C 27 

Abel, Sylvester 27 

Abbott, Adrian 27 

Abbott, Isaac C 2>. 

Abbott, Joshua K 28 

Abbott, Robert 28 

Abbott, Wm. L 29 

Acker, Henry 29 

Ackley, Francis 29 

Adair, Wm 29 

Adam, John J 30 

Adams, Ezra C 31 

Adams, Isaac 31 

Adams, John Q 32 

Adams, Oscar 32 

Adams, Peter R 33 

Adams, Wales 33 

Adsit, Allen C 33 

Aitken. Root. P 33 

Alden, Hiram 34 

Aldrich, Levi 3i 

Alexander, Lorenzo p 35 

Alexander, Sidney I". 35 

Alger, Russell A . . 35-3ti 

Allen, Abram 37 

Allen. Edward P 37 

Allen, George \V ... 37 

Allen. Harmon 3S 

Allen, Hiram M 3S 

Allen. John 38 

Allen, Lewis 39 

Allen. Lovatus C 39 

Alleu. Morris S 39 

Allmau, Wm 40 

Almv, John 40 

Alvord, Nathan 40 

Ambler, Wm. K 41 

Ames, Joseph i.-i 4L 

Ames Michael E. 42 

Anderson, David. 42 

Anderson. Kobt. H 42 

Anderson, Samuel K 42 

Anderson, William A 43 

Andrews, Charles 43 

Andrews, John 41 

Andrews, John L 44 

Andrews, Josiah 44 

Andrus, Wesl -y P 45 

Annable, Fernando C 45 

Anneke. Emil P> 

Auiin. Henry H 46 

Ann*, Willard B 46 

Armstrong, John h 47 

Armstrong, Sullivan 47 

Arnold, Daniel J 47 

Arnold, Joseph 4* 

Arnold, Sevmour 4? 

Arnold, William P 48 



PAGE. 

Arzeno, Alexander M 48 

Ashley, James 48 

Ashman. Henrv C 49 

Ashton, Benjamin D._ 49 

Atwater, Reuben 49 

Atwood, Henrv P 49, 

At wood, Marcus M 49 

Atwood, Wm. A 50 

Austin, Charles 50 

Avery, John 5L 

Axford. Samuel 51 

Axford, William 51 

Allen, Artemas 52 

Andrus, Wm. W 52 

B. 

Babcock, Chas. V 52 

Babcock, Henry S 52 

Babcock, Jonathan W 52 

Babcock, W. Irving 53 

Backus, Henry T. 54 

Backus, William 54 

Bacon, Cyrus 54 

Bacon, Daniel S. 54 

Bacon, John 55 

Bacon, Levi, Jr 55 

Bacon, Nathaniel - 55 

Bagley, John J 55-6 

Bailey, Alvin W 5" 

bailey, Frederick (i 57 

Bailev, Norman z~ 

Baker, Francis »• 

Baker, Frederick A 58 

Baker, Milo S 58 

Baker. Newton 5t 

Baker, Seward 58 

Baker, William, Jr 59 

Baker, William A 59 

Balch, Nathaniel A 59 

Baldwin, Augustus C CO 

Baldwin, Charles 61 

Baldwin, Flias J 61 

Baldwin, EzraP 62 

Baldwin, r rank A 62 

Baldwin, Henrv P 63 

Baldwin, Simeon L 64 

Ball, Bvron D 64 

Ball, John 64 

Ball, William 65 

Ballentine. William II 66 

Bancroft, EdwardC 66 

Bancroft, William L M» 

Barber, Daniel 67 

Barber, Homer G 6, 

Barber, John 61 

Barber, Julius S 6. 

Barbour, John 68 

Ban-lav. Jonathan S 68 

Bardwell, Hiram II ^ 

Barker, Richard P <» 

Barlow, Nathan 69 

Barlow, Nathan. Jr. _ »'■> 



730 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Barnaby, Horace T 60 

Barnard, Ely «9 

Barnard. Newell ---- 0.) 

Barnes, Eleazar «J 

Barnes, Henry ^0 

Barnes, Orlando M - J* 

Barnes, Orsamus S H 

Barrett. Hiram j| 

Barringer, John E <* 

Barry, JohnS. «j 

Barry, Thos B <± 

Bartholomew, Ira H «« 

Bartlett, Wallace R 'j> 

Barton, W. Walter J? 

Bartow, John •«> 

Bartow, Moses £>> 

Bates, Alfred G J* 

Bates, Erastus M «,» 

Bates, Federick j' 

Bates, Geo. C •• 

Bates, Morgan '= 

Bates, Wm. R '8 

Baumgardner, Wi liamG 'J 

Baxter. Benjamin L '9 

Baxter, Levi -9 

Baxter, Witter J 80 

Bayley. James 81 

Beach, Joseph P 81 

Beach, Noah |1 

Beakes, Hiram J 82 

Beal, Isaac D g- 

Beaman, Fernando C £2 

Beamer, George K °3 

Beattie. Adam -- 83 

Beaufait, Louis 84 

Beckwith, Jefferson H 84 

Bedtelvon. Jacob po 

Beebe. Joseph E go 

Beebe, Uriah 8a 

Beecher, Chas. N go 

Beecher, Norinan A - p6 

Beecher, Robert Ii 86 

Beekmr'.n, Benjamin F 86 

Beers, Philo.. °4 

Beeson, Jacob °l 

Beeson, Jesse G. :• 

Beeson, William B 88 

Begole, Josiab W 8S 

Beiden. Eugene II 89 

Belding. Friend 89 

Belkuap, James W 89 

Bel!. Alexander F » 

Bell, Digby V 91 

Bell, George W 91 

Benedict, Alexander II 92 

Benedict, Jacob M 9~ 

Benedict. Peter II 92 

Benjamin. William H. P 9. 

Bennett, Alonzo 9-' 

Bennett, Davis D '-'.; 

Bennett. John II.. 93 

Bennett, Stillman W 94 

Bennett, Th.-odore G 94 

Bentley, John W 94 

Berk. John 94 

Berrick. Francis H - 94 

Berry. Enos G- ••_• 

Berry, Jonathan '■'.» 

Berry, Langtord G 9.; 

Bettinger, Conrad «"| 

Betts, Charles 9-1 

Piddle, John '•'*_> 

Bidelruan, Samuel J.. '•'• 

Billing, Simeon R $* 

Bills, Perley "8 

Bingham, Henry II '-'9 



PAGE. 

Bingham. Kinsley S 90 

Bird, John M... 103 

Birnev. James 103 

Bishop, Jas. C 103 

Bishop, Levi 1C0 

Bi.-hop, Roswell P - 101 

Bitelv, Nathan H 101 

Bixbv, David A 101 

Black. Cyrenius P 102 

Blacker. Robert R 102 

Blackman, Daniel 104 

Blackman, Henry E 104 

Blackman, Sam'l H 104 

Blades, William 104 

Blair, Austin 105-100 

Blakeslee, George 107 

Blindburv, John 107 

Bliss, Aaron T 108 

Bliss, Solomon B 108 

Blodgett, Amos C 109 

Blois, JohnT 109 

Blood, Calvin A 109 

Bioom, Adam E HO 

Boies, Henry M 110 

Boies, John K HI 

Bolger, Robert E Ill 

Bolton, Abraham T HI 

Bond. WiliiamS - HI 

Bonham, Asher.... H~ 

Bonine. Evan J H^ 

Bonnell. Benjamin C 112 

Borgman, Martin V H3 

Boss Alfred J -. 113 

Bostwick, Ezra - 113 

Bottomley. Thomas 114 

Bo wen, Jesse H4 

Bowen, Ozro A.. Hi 

Bowman, John II H-l 

Bowne, John }lo 

Boynton, Daniel H§ 

Bovnton, Nathan S Ho 

Bradfield, Thomas D Ho 

Bradford, Vincent L D^ 

Bradley. Edward lib 

Bradlev, Harmon.. H< 

ilriivv, Nathan B... l|i 

Brads taw, Elias J • 

i Brandon, Calvin K \\° 

I Brant, Lyman A - ll ° 

i Breen, Bartley }}'■} 

Breitung, Edward 19 

Brewer. MarkS H9 

Brewster. Wm. W I™ 

Bridge, Henry P }~0 

Briggs Charle- - 

Briggs, Daniel B }~! 

Brlggs, Edward L }2l 

Briggs, George G. ;-- 

Briggs, Henry C }-- 

Briggs, Robert V J™ 

Bristol, Eli II \~.\ 

j Bntton, Roswell \~;' 

Britain, Calvin - • 

Brock, Martin W •- J- J 

Brcckway, Win. H - 1-J 

Brodhea'i. Thornton F I-*-? 

Brooks. John A ;'-: 

Brook-. Nathaniel W }-■; 

Brotherson, P. C. I! -'; 

Brown, Alvarado J-'.' 

Brown, Ammon J -'J 

Brown, Amos S.. "-^ 

Brown, Asahel l ~J. 

Brown, Benjamin *-; 

Brown, Chai les. l -J 

Brown, Charles R '•- 



?3L 



Brown, David E 

Brown, Ebenezer L. 

Brown, Ethan A 

Brown, Georgd 

Brown, George I. ... 
Brown, George W.. 

Brown, Giles W 

Brown, Henry B.... 

Brown, John S 

Brown, Joseph \V... 

Brown, Samuel B 

Brown, Stephen F.- 
Brown, William . ... 
Brown, William G-. 
Brownell, Ellery A. 
Brownell, George.... 
"Irownell, Seymour. 



PAGE. 

— 129 



129 

130 

130 

130 

130 

131 

131 

131 

132 

133 

132 

133 

... 133 

133 

133 

BrownelL William 134 

Brunson. JohnC 134 

Brush, Elijah 134 

Buck, Phillip H 135 

Buckbee, Waiter A 13} 

Bullions. Philo H._ 135 

Buell, Ahasuerus W 135 

Buell, Alexander W 136 

Buell, Kmrnon* 136 

Buell. HenryS 136 

Buell, John L - 137 

Bunce, Horace E 137 

Buuce, Xephaniah W 137 

Burhauk. William 138 

Burch, John 133 

Burch, Marsden C 138 

Burk, Andrew L 138 

Burke, Wm 130 

Burleigh, John L 130 

Burnett, William 139 

Burns, James 139 

Burr. Henry In 

Burrows, Delabor. Ill 

Burrows, Julius C 140 

Burt. Wm. A Ill 



Burton. Porter 

Bush. Chas. P 

Bush, David 

Bushnell. Daniel P 
Butler. Edward 11. 
Butler, Oran;. 



Bjtler, Richard. 144 

Buttars, Archibald... 144 

Bittern -M, Ira tl 145 

Buttertield. John W 115 

Button, John H. 145 



Cady, Charles IT.. 146 

Cady, Charles T. I4fi 

Cady.Chauncev G.... 116 

Cady, Horace II 146 

(hll,.:!!., S'orman 147 

Calkins, Alanson... 147 

Ctlkins, Ephraim. 147 

Camburn, Levi 147 

Cameron, Alexander. 147 

Campau, Theodore J m 

Campbell, Aimer E 148 

Campbell, Allen in 

CarupbjU, Bradford 148 

Campbell, Daniel.. 14'.t 

Campbell, James FT 149 

'Campbell, James V 1 49 

Campbell, Milo D 150 

Canby, Israel ... 150 

C-tnlield, Lucius H 150 

Canlleld, William 151 



PAOE. 

CanitT, Stephen 151 

Cannon. Ellery C 151 

Caplis, James 152 

C'arleton, Ezra C - 152 

C'arleton, Palmer S 152 

Carlton, Aubern D 152 

Carlton, Israel E 153 

Carmer. Sherlock H 153 

Carpenter, Chas. K.. 153 

Carpenter, David... 154 

Carpenter, Guy 154 

Carpenter, Joel 154 

Carpenter,. Manson 154 

Carpenter, William E 155 

Carr, Nathan T 155 

Carr, William S 155 

Carter, Harleigh 155 

Carter, John 156 

Caruss. Richard B 156 

Carveth. John 156 

Case, Arthur T 156 

Case, Barnabas - 157 

Case, Daniel L 157 

Case, Geo. F 157 

Case, James A 157 

Case, Ovid N 158 

Case, Spaulding M 158 

Cass, Lewis...:. 158-60 

Castle, Lemuel 100 

Cathcart. John G - 160 

Caukin, Volney W 161 

Chafey, Merritt N 161 

Chamberlain, Eli B ■- 161 

Chamberlain, Henry 161 

Chamberlain, William 162 

Chamberlin, Samuel 162 

Cha-nbers. Fitzwilliams H 162 

Champiin, Elisha P 163 

Champlin, John W 163 

Chandler, George 163 

Chandler. Joseph II 164 

Chandler. Zachariah 164-5 

Chapell, Worden R. 165 

Chapman, Adelbert R 166 

Chapman, Leander 166 

Chapman, Warren 166 

Chapoton. Alexander 167 

Chapoton, William 167 

Chase, Eugene V 167 

Chase, Jonathan 167 

Chase, Marcus A 167 

Chase, William 168 

Chattield, Chester C 16-8 

Chauvin, Chas. B 168 

Cheney, Amherst B 168 

Cherry, Henry P 169 

Chester, Easton F 169 

Childs. Aaron 169 

Chihls, Augustus W K>9 

Childs, J. Webster 169 

Chipman, Henry C J70 

Uhipman, J. Logan L0 

Chipman, John S 1.0 

Chipman, Joseph N LI 

Chittenden. Wuliam F LI 

Choate, Emerson }7[ 

Christ iancy. Isaac P --- }«1 

Church. Thomas B L2 

Churchill. Worthy L L2 

Clapp, Leverett A J<~ 

Clark, Albert K r 

Clark, Benjamin J»j 

Clark, Darius }'j> 

Clark. I) ivid ;* 

Clark. Edwin <i •; 

Clark, Elihu L L4 



r.y. 



INDEX. 



PAr.E. 

Clark, Elijah B 174 

Clark, Frederick 174 

Clark, Jeremiah 175 

Clark, John 175 

Clark, John R 175 

Clark, Newcomb 175 

Clark, Orman 170 

Clark, Robert E 176 

Clark, Samuel 170 

Clark, William A 170 

Clarke, Hovev K 177 

Clarke, Luther W 177 

Clemens, Christian 177 

Clement, Joshua 177 

Climie, Andrew 173 

Cline, William M 176 

Clisbee. Chas. W 178 

Clubb, Henry S 178 

Coates, Joseph 179 J 

Coates, Lintsford B 179' 

Cobb, George P 179 

Cobb, James B 179 

Cobb, Thomas S 180 j 

Cochran, Varnum B 180 

Cochrane, James \V 160 

Cochrane, Lvman .- 181 i 

Coe, George A 181 

Coggeshall, Bela 181 

Colbath, Lemuel 182 

Cole, Ezra 182 

Cole, Henry S 182 

Cole, Miner T 182 

Cole, William B 183 

Coleman. George 183 

Collier, Victory P 183 

Collin,, Alpheus 184 

Collins, Frederick W 184 j 

Collins, Lucius H 184 

Colvin. Oliver D 184 

Col well, David 44.. 185 

Colwel!. William M 185 

Comsin, Russell 185 

Combes, Henry P 185 

Compton, Henry 180 

Comstook, Addison J 1845 ! 

Comstock, Charles 180 

Comstoi k, Darius 1*7 

Comstock, Horace II 187 

Comstock, Oliver C 187 

Conant, Harry A 183 

Conelv, Edwin F 188 

Congrton, Elisha 1*8 

Congdon. James M 189 

Conger, Omar 1) 1S9 

Cornier, James L 189 

Conklin, Ebenezer H. 190 

Conkling. Henry C liO 

Connor, Henry . 190 I 

Connor, Richard H 191 

Conrad. Luther F I'd 

Convis. Ezra 101 

Cook, Asa H 192 

<>■»:. !' ivid K 192 

Cook, Elijah F.. 192 

Cook, Fram is W 192 

Cook, H<mry 193 

Cook, Jar., I. yx] 

Cook, John P . 1S)J 

Cook, Levi 194 

Cook, Peter 194 

Cook, Peter J pi+ 

Cook, William 194 

Cooley, Anthony I'm 

Cooley, Sloau.. 195 

Cooley, Thomas M 195 

Coolidge, Henry W 106 



PAGE 

Coomer, George W 196 

Coon, Myron 19fi 

Cooper, George B 197 

Cooper, George H 197 

Coots, Walter H 1«7 

Copeland, Benjamin 198 

Copeland. Joseph T IKS 

Copley, Alexander B IPS 

Corbin, Sanford H 198 

Corbin, William 199 

Corey. Jeremiah I) 199 

Corrigan, Patrick 199 

Cossitt, Charles H 199 

Cottrell, Eber W 200 

Coulter, John F 200 

Covert, Lewis M 201 

Cowan, George Y 200 

Cox, Robert 201 

Craig, James 201 

Crandall, George AV 201 

Crane, Alexander D 201 

Crane, Archer H._ 201 

Crane, Flavius J, B 202 

Crane, George 202 

Crane, George L 202 

Crapo, Henry H._ 203-4 

Crarv. Isaac E._ 204 

Cravath, Isaac M 204 

Craven. Robert E 205 

Crawford, James 205 

Crawford, John G 205 

Crego, Richard J 205 

Cressy, Alonzo 200 

Crocker, Martin 2i.6 

Crocker, Thos. M 207 

Crofoot, George W... 207 

Crosbv, Calvin B 207 

Crosby, Hale E... 207 

Crosby. Moreau S. 207 

Cross, John S.. 2i 8 

Crossman, Alarson 2(8 

Crossman, Daniel L 208 

Crossman, John S 209 

Crosweli, Charles M 209-10 

Crouse, Robert 210 

Crozer, James A 211 

Culver, Jonathan H 211 

Curry, James L 214 

Curry, Solomon S 211 

Curtenius, Frederick W 212 

Curtis, Israel 212 

Curtis, John L 212 

Curtis, Lester 213 

Curtis. Norman D 213 

Curtis, William II 213 

Curtis, Thomas... 213 

Cust. Edwin M 213 

Cutcheon, Byron M. 214 

Cutcheon, Otis E. M. 214 

Cutcheon, Sullivan M 215 



Dakin, Milo H 


... 215 


Daly, James 




Damon. John A 


... 216 


Danforth, Ephriam B 


.. 210 


Danforth. George 


... 216 


Daniels, David i 


... 216 


Daniels, Ebenezer 


21. 


Darling, Henry 


- . • 


Darragh, An hibald B 


... 217 


Darragh, Lewis 


... 


Davenport, George 


. . . - ' ■ 


Davenport, < reorge 


... -. 



INDEX. 



733 



PAGE. 

David, James 1 218 

David, Orrin 213 

Davis, Alexander P 219 

Davis, Alexander \V 219 

Davis, Alonzo C 219 

Davis, Amnios 219 

-"Davis, Calvin : 220 

Davis, Chauncey 220 

Davis, Henry 220 

Davis, Ira 220 

Davis, John M 221 

Davis, Jonathan D 221 

Davis, Lewis C 221 

Davis, Robert W 221 

Davis Willard 222 

Davi-on, Xorinan 222 

Davison, Oliver P 222 

Dayton, Daniel 222 

Deare. rienry \V 233 

Decker, Jesse. 223 

DeLamater, Anson H 223 

Deland. Charles V 223 

Deming, Daniel H 224 

Demiiii,', David E 224 

DennK David B 224 

Denton, Samuel 224 

Desnoyer, Peter 225 

Devlin, John " 225 

Dewey, George M 225 

Dewey, John W 220 

Dewey, James S. 220 

Deyo, Charles 1... " 227 

Dexter. George "W .. 243 

Dexter, Samuel . 227 

Dexter. Samuel W.... 227 

Dickerm.an, Albert 228 

Dickie, Cha»les. .......'. 223 

Dickinson. William E... 228 

Dicks* n, rtobinson J 229 

Diekema, Gerrit J 22i! 

Diller. Henry i: 229 

Dillman. Louis 229 

Dillon. Joseph 2 ,i 

Dinturff, Daniel \V 230 

Divine, Joseph 2,u 

Divine, Wesrbrook 2:50 

-Dix, Roscoe i) 231 

Dixon, John .S 231 

1) ii ker iv, James •>:;» 

Dodge, Frank i 232 

Dole, Sidney 2:;2 

Dolson, Levi K. "" 232 

Donnelly, John C... ...". 232 

Dorsey. Andrew 2:;.! 

Dort, I'itus »i3 

Dotv, Philo -,.; 

Doty, Samuel 233 

D • iglii rty, \; ' :• .' ; K 234 

Doughi", i '"','.in ius < '. 2 14 

Douglass, Frank A "'" 234 

DoiK'la.»s, Samuel '1' 231 

Dovel, Andrew J " '" ••.;-, 

Dow, John ' 23.") 

Dow, Peter. •_•,;> 

Dowiing, Michael A >35 

Dox, Peter " ,, 

Drake, Thomas J •> •;.; 

Drake, William " •":,., 

Draper, Charles "37 

Draper. William :;: 

Drew, John F 237 

Deters, Allied L. 237 

Drtegs, John F •■:- 

Dud-< on, Vnthony 2iS 

Duflield, <; r, •... • ..;„ 

Duflield, V, illiam W ;::,- 

S3 



PAGE. 

Dunakin, Daniel 239 

Dunbar, Addison E 239 

Dunbar, William 239 

Duncan, Delamore 239 

Duncan. Lawson A 2W 

Duncan, Robert W 240 

Duncan. Wm. C 240 

Duncombe. Charles :.. 241 

Dundass, Robert F 241 

Dunham, Nelson 241 

Dunlap, Abijah B 241 

Dunstan, Thomas B 241 

DuPuy, James 242 

Durand, Geo. II 242 

Durkee, Lewis 242 

Durocher, Laurent 242 

Dusseau. Joel J 243 

Dus^eau, Victor A 243 

Dyckman. Evert B 243 

E. 

Eakins, James 244 

Earl. Barney 244 

Earle, Nathaniel A 244 

Eastman, Ahira G 244 

Eastern, David J 245 

Eaton, Crosby 245 

Eaton. Jerome B._ 245 

E< k, William R.. 245 

Eddy, Hiram S 246 

Edmunds, James M. 246 

Edmonds. Charles A 246 

Edsell, Wilson C 247 

Edwards, Abraham 247 

Edwards, Arthur. 247 

Edwards, Edward E 247 

Edwards, George F 248 

Edwards. Henrv D 24S 

Edwards, William J 24s 

Egan, Francis B 248 

Eggleston, Ebenezer S 249 

Eggleston, James 249 

Ei»enmann, John C 2)9 

Eldr id, Alvah D 249 

Eldred. Caleb 249 

l-iidre.l^-. J;i: 4 es B.... 250 

Eldredge, Nathaniel B 250 

KMivu.v, lioo.-rt P 250 

Ellenwood, John 251 

Elliott, Adam 251 

Elliott, Marcus D 251 

Ellis, Edward D 251 

Ellis, Mvron 11 252 

Ellsworth, CI arles ('... 252 

Ely, Elisha 252 

Ely, Heman B 252 

Ely, Ralph 253 

Emerick, Frank 253 

Emerson, Philip H 254 

Emmons. Jed l\ C... 254 

i iim, Hieronynris 254 

Enos, Jehiel 255 

Euos, Morgan 2.55 

Erskine, James. 255 

Estabi iik. JohnS 2.55 

Estabrook, Joseph 255 

Estee, Free 256 

Etheridsre. Samuel 256 

Dwell, Philander 257 

Ewers, Charles 267 

Ewing, Alexander 257 

F. 



Fainield, Ebenezer W 



734 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Fairfield, Edmund B 258 

Fallass, Silas S 258 

Fargo, John D 258 

Fanclier, Ir-aac A 256 

Farmer, John 259 

Farmer, William S 259 

Farnsworth. Elon 259 

Farr, Augustine \V 260 

Farr, George A 260 

Fast, Orlando J 260 

Far, Jonathan P 200 

Faxon, Thomas J 261 

Felch. Alpheus 261-2 

Fellows, OrvilleH 262 

Felt. Dorman 263 

Fenner, George H 262 

Fenton, Charles B 263 

Fenton, Joseph S 263 

Fenton, William M 263 

Ferguson, Daniel, Jr _ 261 

Ferguson, Fenner 261 

Ferguson, James E 204 

Ferguson, Thomas A 265 

Ferrington, George W 265 

Ferris, Jacob 265 

Ferry, Asa P 265 

Ferrv, Thomas W 266 

Fessendeu, C. P.. H 266 

Fey, Conrad 267 

Field, James 267 

Field. Moses \V 267 

Fitiel 1. Francis W ^67 

Finch, A-aiie'. Jr 268 

Hnley. Win,, .rr 268 

Fish. George \V 268 

Fisher, Delos 268 

Fisher, Spencer 26;' 

Fitch, FerrisS 2-M 

Fitch, Lvman A 26!) 

Fitch, MorganL 269 

Fitch, Nathan 26" 

Fitzgerald, Jerome B 27 J 

Fitzgerald, John C 270 

Fitzgerald, Thomas 270 

Fitzsinimons, ' • - >r_- j 271 

Fletcher, John W._ 271 

Fletcher, Niram A 271 

Fletcher. William A 2:1 

tt, Slartin P.. 272 

ro it, , Dan P 272 

Foi te, Henry K 272 

Forbes, John - j72 

Forbes, Joshua 272 

Ford. Henry 271 

Ford. M.ibourneH 27J 

Foster, John II.. 273 

Foster, Wilder D... 273 

Fowle, James ^71 

Fowler, Frederick -7i 

: ilph 274 

Fowler, .~;nith \V -74 

Fox, H ••■ iamin F 275 

Fox. Edwin G 275 

Frali k. Henry ~7) 

I William H -76 

Fraser, Charles L 276 

Fraser, Murdoch 276 

Freeman." handler.. 276 

Freein m, Franklin S '^6 

FrelK .. A.:: i 277 

Fr< nch, Ht-orge 11 277 

French, .h.hn M rr. 277 

French. Willi nn A 277 

Frev.John W ■;:* 

1 27s 

Frisbee, Pni i ■ s 27ts 



PAGE. 

1 Frost, Almon B 278 

Fuller, Cevlon C 278 

; Fuller, Edward L 279 

I Fuller. PhiloC 279 

Fyfe, Lawrence C 279 

G. 

| Gage, Chauncey H 279 

Gage, DewittC 280 

Gage. John L 280 

Gage, Justus 2i0 

Gage, Seneca H 280 

i Cage, William 281 

Gale, Elbridge E.. 281 

Gale, Martin P 281 

Galloway, John H 261 

Gallup. Caleb H 281 

O-J.ntt, Samuel N 282 

Gard, Milton J 282 

Gardner. Amos 2;2 

Gardener, Earl P 262 

Gardner, Ransom 263 

(rarfield. Charles W 283 

Garfield, Samuel M 263 

Gargett, James 284 

Garrison, William D... 284 

1 Garvelink, Jan W 284 

Garvey, Matthew T 2*4 

Garwood. Alonzo 284 

Gaskili, Siias B 2>5 

Gass, Herschel K 265 

Gay, Milo L....*. 2*5 

Gaylord, Augustine S 285 

Geddes. John 286 

Germain, Geo. \V 2*>> 

Gerrish, Nathaniel L 2>6 

Gibbs, Adouiram J 2>6 

leorge O 2^7 

Gibbs, James I 267 

i , - • . Charles F 2*7 

Gibson, John 2~7 

Gidd rigs. Augustine H 2*- 

Giddings. J. Wight 268 

-. Marsh 263 

-. Orrin N 288 

I own-end E 2>'.' 

Gies, Paul 2*9 

Gift'ord, Milo E 2S9 

Gilbert, Linus S 290 

Gilbert, Thomas D 290 

Gillam, George F 290 

. Amasa 290 

Gil ett, Martin S 291 

Gillett, Sh idrach 291 

Gilluly, John 291 

Oilman, Joseph 2'Hl 

Gilm>re, Arthur D 292 

Girardin. Joseph E 292 

Glavin, John M- 292 

Gle.-Uson, Daniel G 2'.'2 

Gl - .James 292 

Glenn. James ! 2<3 

. Augustus S 293 

< rodfroy, J a ines J 293 

Godfrov, Joseph 2V3 

Godfroy. Peter 294 

Goebel, August 291 

Goff. SeWelt S 294 

Goo lell, Daniel. 291 

Goodeil, James M -'■'} 

1 : a, Alonzo A.. 2* 

n, Fni!i< is 2J*o 

Goodman, Lowell. '-"' ' 

Good . B '•"'.' 

Go idrich, Enos -"'•' 



IXDEX. 



735 



PAGE. 

Goodrich, John S 296 

Goodrich, John V " 2W3 

Goodrich, Levi N 298 

Goodrich, Reuben .... 290 

Goodwin, Daniel \\[\ 397 

Goodwin, Justin ..." 297 

Goodwin, William F ...... 298 

Goodye;„r. Henry A '_'_[' 298 

Gordon, Henry 298 

Gordon, James Wright 298 

Gorham, Charles T ." 299 

Gorman. James S '.'.Ill 299 

Gould, Amos llllll 300 

Gould, James 300 

Gould, James J '_[ 3J0 

Gower, Cornelius A 300 

Grace, Benjamin 30] 

Graham, James :;.ji 

Graham, Jonathan B 301 

Granger, Bradley F 302 

Granger, Elihu :in > 

Granger, George II :>._> 

(■Jrant, Alexander ;jti> 

Grant, Claudius B .„,:; 

Grant, Robert J ...." 303 

Graves, Benjamin F 30:5-1 

Graves, William :;04 

Gray, Edgar L. "" 304 

Gray, James S 30.-, 

Grny, Neil llllll 30> 

tureen, Albertus I * "" :;r, 

Green. Edward H I 3 n; 

Green, Isaac .. 31 ; 

Green, James A 306 

Green, Nelson 307 

Green, Noah K ""_".."""" jt); 

Green, Orson ;>;; 

Green, Sanford M ".'.'.'.'.Ill 307 

Greene. Daniel C 303 

Greenfield, Alson '" :jijs 

Greenfield. John :m 

Greenly, William L.. ' . -. 

Greg* ry, Charles ...".'.".'" :!j:l 

Gregory, Ch irles S '.' :> 9 

Gregory, John M :$:« 

Gregory, William 11 310 

Gregory, William si :; c 

Greiner, Michael ::;i 

Grenell, Judson 311 

Greusel, John * 311 

Gridley, G. Thompson 312 

Grier, Theophilus C 312 

Grjffey, Clintun G 3i2 

Grimes, Thompson :;i2 

Grismell, John .,;•> 

Griswold, A igustmj D 313 

Griswold, Geonre K ' 313 

Griswold, Harrison W :,; , 

Groesbeck, Charles C :!l > 

Grosveuor, Ebenezer .1 ...... 314 

Gro-svenor, IraO i!4 

Grove. John ' "314 

Grovier, Isaac J. ... 

Gulick. Nicholas. .. :;r, 

Gulley. Alfred ....'. ;i:, 

Gulley, Alfred B :;i". 

Gullifer, Freeman O "" ;>!.-, 

Gunning. James I. 3;.', 



II. 



Haack, Bernard 

Hackett, Walter 

Hagaman, Francis if. 
Haight, Salmon L 



PAGE. 

Haire, Robert A 3^ 

Halbert, Horace 'si- 
Hale, Davtd B ] ' , 7 

Hale, William 317 

Hall, Alfred D ....II' '.'.III 317 

Hall, Frederick "" 3]g 

Hall, Henry ";"" 318 

Hall, 1. .ratio 31s 

Hall, Moses HI" 31s 

Hall, Salmon C " 31s 

Hall TalmanW '..".liw 

HamilT'.n, John 319- 

Hamilton, Nathaniel A ."."." 319 

Hammond. Andrew G 319 

Hammond, Charles G 320 

Hammond, Horace N 3-v) 

Hammond, William """ 3>n 

Hampton. Charles S 320 

Hance, John W __.; 330 

Hand. George E 321 

Hand, Michael 32] 

Hankerd. Patrick * 321 

Hannab, Perry 321 

Hannahs. Georu-e._ 333 

Hanscom, Alfred H "" 322 

Harbaugh, David E " 322 

Harden, William F 323 

Harding, Fisher A 321 

Harford, William M 323 

Harger, Seeley 324 

Harkness, John U ..."" 324 

Harmon. Henry H 324 

Harper, Egbert P '" 324 

Harrington. Chas. F ' 324 

Harrington, Dan'l B 325 

Harrington, Ebenezer B 323 

Harris, Edward W 325 

Harris, Israel V ..".._.""" 326 

Harris. Myron 336 

Harris, Thomas W 3.'(j 

Harris, William 326 

Hi' si a v. Andrew 327 

Hart, Alvin N. ... 3-7 

Hair, Henrv.. "." 3 : '7 

Hanson, Wm. W. . 327 

Hart, Jonathan 328 

[}«rt. S'oahH... I 328 

HartsutE. Joseph L 328 

Harvie, Andrew 328 

liurv.y. Baiv.illa J 329 

Has all, Charles C 329 

Hascall, Volney 329 

Haskins. Haran 330 

II iskin. Nelson 330 

Hastings, Eurotas P 330 

Hatch, Barnabas C 330 

Hatch, Herschel H "."331 

Hatch. K.vihen ... 331 

Hathaway, Hiron 331 

Hatheway. Gilbert _ 331 

Haven, Martin 332 

Hawes. Josiah L " 332 

3. Du ine 332 

11a,',- us, Lucius D 332 

II iwley, < 'hauncey 333 

Havsc y. Flii th. Jr 333 

Haw:, y, Thomas D 333 

Hawley, Bichard..., 333 

Hayden, Henry a 334 

Hayden, Henrv 334 

Hayden. Philo'tus 334 

Hayes, Eleazer R .. 334 

Hay.-, Nathan 15 334 

Hayncs. Harvey. 333 

Hays, Andrew 1 335 

Haywood, James E 335 



736 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Hazard, Chester 335 

Haze, Charles W 336 

Haze, William H 3!0 

Hazen, Ezra 336 

Hazen, Luke 336 

Hazleton. George II 337 

Heale.v, Wm. P 337 

Heath, John S 337 

Hebard, Charles A 338 

Heisterman, Carl 338 

Hemingway. George F 338 

Hemingway. William 338 j 

Henderson, Eden F.. 338 

Henderson, Henry P.. 339 ; 

Henry, Charles R 339 I 

Herri ng ton, Caleb 339 < 

Herringr.on. Cass E 339 ] 

Hertzler, Christian 340 

Hewitt, Alexander 340 

Hewitt, Cyrus.... 34U 

Hewitt, Henry 341 

Hewitt, Lauren K 311 

Hewitt, Walter B 341 I 

Hickman. Harris H 341 | 

Hicock, .las. W 343 I 

Hicks, Melancthon W 342 I 

Higby, Samuel 312 

Higley, Hiram 342 ' 

High, Oliver ". 312 

Hill, Benjamin L 343 

Hill, E. Parker 343 

Hill, Frederick H 343 

Hill, James W 343 

Hill, Loval W 344 

Hill, Nicholas R 344 

Hill, Samuel W.. 344 

Himebaugh, Emanuel 344 

Hinchman, Theodore H 315 

Hinds Henry H 345 

Hine, James W 345 

Hine, Milton B. 345 

Hitchcock, James H 346 

Hitching?, John P 34>; 

Hison, Daniel 3lti 

Hoar, Richard M 34G 

Hobart, Norton P.. 346 

Hodge, Hiram C 347 

Hodge?, Israel >.. 347 

Hodgkinson. Bradshaw 347 

Holbrook. John 347 

Hulden. Ebenezer D. G 347 

Holland, Charles E 348 

Hoi lister. Isaac T 348 

Hollon, Josci :. A 348 

Holman, Joseph H 349 

Holmes, Alfred 349 I 

Holmes, Charles 1' 319 

Hu.ni--. ~;las M 349 

Holt, Henrv II 350 

Hoobler. Samuel R 350 

Hood, John G 350 ' 

Hooker, Azel 350 

Hooker, Cortes P 350 

Hooker, Frank a 3.">i 

llMpk::.<,<;..-»r,v II 351 

Hopkins, Harvey J 351 

Hopkins, Moses B 352 

Hopkins, Samuel W 352 

Horner. John Scotf 352 

Horr, Roswell G 

Horton, Dexter 

Hosford, Frank II 

Hi sford, Oratnel 

Hosner, On mt v 

Hotchkiss, Lauren 

Ilf.uk, Theodore G 



353 

353 
353 



PAGE. 

Houghton, Douglass 355 

House, Elisha J , 355 

Houseman, Julius 355 

Houston, John 356 

Howard, Cyrus 356 

Howard, Harvey H 356 

Howard, Henrv 356 

Howard, Jacob' M 357-8 

Howard, Joshua 3.58 

Howard, Manly D 358 

Howard, Orrin H 358 

Howard, Sumner 3-59 

Howard. Wm. A 359-60 

Howe, Abel N 360 

Howe, John 3H0 

Howe. Orin 360 

Howell, Andrew 360 

Howell, George 361 

Howell, William T 361 

Howland, Simpson 361 

Hoyt. Birney 362 

Hoyt, Herbert II 362 

Hovt, J«mes M 362 

Hoyt, John P 362 

Hoyt, William C - 363 

Hubbard, Collins B 363 

Hubbard, Giles 363 

Hubbard, John H 363 

Hubbard, Leonidas 304 

Hubbell.JayA 364 

Hubbell. Sardis F 304 

Huckins, Israel 365 

Hudson, Bradley P 365 

Hudson, Jonathan £'55 

Hueston_ James 365 

Huff, Henry 365 

Huggetf, George 366 

Hughes, Bos-el B -m 

Huibert, Edwin J 3»i6 

Hull, Tyler 366 

Hull, William 366 

Humphrey, Elijah 367 

Humphrey, John 36.7 

Humphrey, Levi S 367 

Humphrey, William 368 

Hunt, Cleveland 368 

Hunt, Edmund W 30$ 

Hunt, James B... 369 

Hunt, Leonard H..- 369 

Huntington, George M 369 

Hurd, Homer C 369 

Huid. John S 370 

Hurlbut, Wiiliam II 370 

Ilussey, Erastus 370 

Huston, Benjamin W._ 370 

Hutchins, Allen 371 

Hutchinson, Loomis 371 

Hyde, Benjamin F 371 



I. 

Ingalls, Charles W.. 
Inga Is. Daniel F.... 
Ingersoll, John >T... 

Ireland. Silas 

[rwin, Wm. W 

Isbell, Nelson G 

[sham, Edwin B.... 
Ives, Samuel G 



J. 



Jackson, Andrew 374 

Jay, William 374 

Jenison, Henry II •'•* 



INDEX. 



:r, 



PAGE. 

Jenison, William F 374 

Jerkin*. WilKim B 375 

Jenks, Bela W 375 

Jenks. Jeremiah 375 

Jenne-s. John S 375 

Jenney, William 376 

Jennings, I rii 37'j 

Jennison, Hiram 37^ 

Jennisoii. William 37t> 

Jerome, David H :->:: 

Jerome, Ueorge 377 

Jerome. Timothy 378 

Jewell, Edward 378 

Jewell, Joseph B 378 

Jewett, George \V 378 

Johnson, Daniel 37y 

Johnson. Daniel F 379 

Johnson. David 379 

Johnson, J. Eastman 379 

Johnson, Franklin 370 

Johnson, James 360 

Johnson, Samuel 38.1 

Johnson, Welcome YV - 

Jones. Dt-'iarrno 380 

Jones, Edward L 3*1 

Jones, George C 3*L 

Jones, George 3-1 

Jone--, Gillara C 381 

Jones. John I) 332 

Jones. John H 3S2 

Jones. Richard.. :.--' 

Jones, Whitney 3*2 

Jones, William T 383 

Joslyn, Chauncey... 383 

Joy, James F 383 

Judd. Ethel 384 

Judkins, J. Byron 384 



Kallander. Martin 384 

Kanoase, Jacob 3-85 

Edward 3S5 

385 

Kedzie, "Robert C 385 

Ked/i", Wii'.i im 

Keeler. Richard -; 

An Irew J .-; 

Keenev, Salmon :.■- i 

:: . ■ •'. K lwin W 3*7 

Keith. William A :SS7 

Keliocg, Edwin 3x7 

Keiloig. Francis W 3*7 

Kellogg. •! din K. :■-• 

V ■ • '' ■■ r ::•* 

K - ri •: .-* 

:M 

Kellev. M ,• - N ..- 

Ki t.l :►«'.) 

Kelsey, Newell. 1 3-J 

Kels« ••. Su • • 1:. • • 

Kempf, Reuben 3» 

Ki It -. -.- ■'" 

KeDdr - . f ;■• ■ eri. k U M) 

K h -.!-■■ us ''■) 

i , I rick A . Jr I 

Fred . a.. >r :t.n 

Kenney, Munnis :••! 

Kenny, Mvron C ■ ' ■ 

Kent, Ri.-lurd ■ ■: 

Kent, Wil iam A ••"'- 

I • . lohn ■ ■'■ 

- - . • B 

• • r ti • 

K ' ,; 



PAGE. 

Kibbee, Henry C 393 

Kibbee. Porter 393 

Kilbourne, Joseph H 394 

Kilbourne, Samuel L 394 

K llean, John Z'^i 

Kiluatrick. Wall.. 394 

Kimberly, Ehenezer C 305 

King, Edward . 395 

: . - G deonG 305 

King, John B 395 

King, Nathan G 395 

Kingsbury, Solomon O 396 

Kin<ssley, James 396 

Kinne, Daniel 396 

Kinne, Edward D..._ 396 

Kipp. Ueor^'e 307 

Kipp, James 397 

Kirby. WilliamJ 397 

Kirchner, Otto 307 

Kirkland, lieorsre... 39s. 

Kirkpatrick, William M 398 

Klei, Henrv 393 

Klein. Peter 398 

Knapp, AlonzoF 399 

Knapp, Cornelius... 399 

Knapp, Jacob , 309 

Knapp, Samuel 399 

Kneeland, Georu-e VV 309 

Kn g t, Godfrey E 400 

Knight, Henry O. 4* 

Knight, Nathan 400 

Knight, Richard... 400 

Knowlton, Eidridge G 401 

Koon, Ezra L 401 

Kuhn. Joseph 4ol 

Kurth, Frederick W. A 401 

L. 

Lacey, Edward S 401 

Lacey, Elijah. 402 

Lacey, Obed P 402 

Lacey, Samuels 41c* 

Lad i". Nathaniel 403 

La Du, Stallham W 403 

Latng, William P 403 

Laing, William S 403 

Lakey. Albert L 403 

Lamb, Jacob C 404 

Lamb, John M. 404 

. Robert D 405 

".Colombia 4"5 

.John 405 

. Rufus W 405 

La ie. Mi not T 406 

Lane, I rter 406 

L •.:.• . Th >mas D 4 +> 

.Nathaniel 406 

Lapbam, Leander 4u7 

Larned. Charles 407 

is. B 407 

Henrv B 4'-* 

. Horace X I ■> 

Latimer, W. Irvii _- 408 

Lau>urette, David L i>9 

imin.. 409 

ter 409 

e. So omon 1 409 

Lav. li/raD 409 

• I 410 

Lt-Barroii, Sirrell C 4i0 

Led yard. Hi-nry 410 

I L... 411 

- W 411 

Lee, James 411 



738 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Lee, James B 412 

Lee, Josiah 412 

Leech, Gurdon C 412 

Leech, Payne K.. 412 

Leetch, Andrew J 412 

Leitch, John 413 

Leland, Elijah 413 

Leland. Joshua G 413 

Leonard, Joseph C - - 413 

Lerov, Daniel 413 

Leroy, John P 414 

Lester, George S 414 

Lewis, Amos 414 

Lewis, George 414 

Lewis, John D » •> 

Lewis, Nathaniel W 415 

Lewis, Thomas 41o 

Lewis, William 41o 

Lincoln, Lansiiv_r E 410 

Linderman. Peter 41G 

Linton, William S 4 hi 

Littell, William E 41b 

Little. Charles D 417 

Littlejohn, Flavins J 41, 

Littlejohn. Philetus 417 

Livingston, William, Jr 418 

Livermore, Fidus 418 

Livermore, John S 418 

Locke. Charles 4.8 

Lockwood, James K 419 

Lock wood, Major F 419 

Lockwood, Thomas W 419 

Lomison, John 419 

Long, Jeremiah D 420 

Longyear, John W 420 

Look,' Henry M 420 

Lootnis, Peter B 421 

Loomis, Thomas M 421 

Lord. Henry W 421 

Lothr. p, Edwin 11 421 

Lothrop, George V. N 422 

Lovell, Cyrus 4-_ 

Lovell EnosT 422 

Lovell. George W 4-'3 

Lovell, Louis 4'_ : 3 

Lovell, Lafayette W 423 

Lowrv, John 4:.-j 

Luee,Chas. D 424 

Luce, Cyrus Gray 424 •> 

Ludirgton, Jeremiah, Jr 125 

Ludlow, Luther 11 425 

Ludlow, Samuel 42. > 

Luther. George - 420 

Lvon, Lucius 42o 

Lyon, Truman H 420 



M. 



Macdonald, James H.. 

Mack, AluK.u 

Mack, Andrew 

Mack. Stephen 

Makelim, John. 

Makley, Peter D... ... 

Malcolm. Robert W... 

Mallett, Chas. <3 

Mallory, Chas. F 

Maltz, Ovo. L 

Mandigo. James W..._ 

Manly, Charles H 

Mann. Emanuel 

Manning, Randolph..- 
Manwaring, Jos< oh .. 
Man waring, Joshua... 
Marantetle, Patrick... 



PAGE. 

Markey, Daniel P 431 

Markey, Matthew 432 

Markham, Giles B 432 

Mars. Thomas 432 

Marston, Isaac 433 

Martin, E. Broox 433 

Martin, George 434 

Martin, John 434 

Martin, Mortimer B 434 

Martin, Stephen.-.. 435 

Martin, Wells K 435 

Ma-on. Anthony L 4 55 

Mason, Henrv 436 

Mason, H. M 430 

Mason, John T 430 

Mason, Lorenzo M 430 

Mason. Stevens Thomson 137 

Mather, Alonzo T 438 

Matthews, George.. 43S 

Matthews, Levi C 438 

Matthews, Rufus 4:8 

Matthews, Thomas P 439 

May, Benjamin 439 

May, Charles S 439 

May, Dwight 440 

May, Henry F 440 

May, James 44U 

Mayburv, William C 440 

Mayhew, Ira 441 

Maynard, Aaron B 441 

Mavnard, Loren 44', 

Mayo, Perry 442 

Maxwell, Andrew C 442 

McAllister, George C 442 

Mc Arthur. William 413 

McCamley, Sands 443 

MeCarty.'Thnmas 443 

McClelend. Hugh 443 

McClelland, Robert 444 

McCormick, Henry F 445 

McCormick, James W 44o 

McCreery, Wm. B 445 

McCurdy, Hmrh 44o 

McCutcheon. Warren 44<> 

McDermid, John 440 

McDermott, John 446 

McD malti, James 417 

McDonnel. John 4!. 

McDon rail, Malcolm 4i. 

McElroy, Cro< kett 41, 

McFarlane, James }4i? 

McGatley,Neal 45? 

McGinnis, Patrick 448 

McGonegal, James. 449 

McGowan. James II 449 

McGraw, Tlum as 449 

McGregor. John A 44.' 

VcGurk, James R 449 

Mclnrve, Donald 4o0 

Mclntvre, Duyald ■ 4o0 

McKay, George K *?•' 

McKee, Rob< rt G. *-?0 

McKeen, Silas D.. 4ol 

McKev, Anthd v f?l 

McRernan, John Q \ : >\ 

McKie, James 1 ill 

SlcKimiey, John 452 

McKnisbt, Sheldon 4 - 

McLaclilin. Dyekes 4o'. 

McMabon, James «'- 

Mc.Mahon, Jo< 1 W i-> . 

McMartin, Daniel 1) f-w 

McMillan. Seal *■» 

McNabb, John W *■» 

McNair, Willi nn 4-«* 

McNaughton, Moses A 4 . 



INDEX'. 



739 





PAGE. 


McNeil, John L 


454 


McPeek, Jacob L 


454 


McPherson, William. Jr. ... 


4.55 


McReynolds, A. T.. 


455 


Meacham. <ieo 


456 


Mead, Darius 


456 


Mead. Klisha F 


456 


Mead, Henry S 


456 


Mears, < harles 


456 


Mellen, John N 


457 


Menzie, David 




Mercer, James 


".'.'.'.'.'.'. 457 


Mercer, William 


457 


Merrill. Elias \V '..'..... 


453 


Metcalf, Abraham T 


45S 


Metcalf, Alfred R 


458 


Meyer, Henry 


45s 


Meyer, Louis 


459 


Mickle, John 


459 


Mickley, Charles E 


45!) 


Miles, Cyrus 


459 


Miles, Fai.ius. ...;.....:;;;;; 


459 


Miles, George 


460 


Miles. Maivus h". ........ ~ 


460 


Millard. Wintield S 


460 


Miller, Albert 


461 


Miller, Kli R ....'.!'..!'. 


461 


•Miller, Henry 


461 


Miller, John C 


461 


Miller, John 


462 


Miller, Joseph . . 


462 


Miller. Leonard 


462 


Miller. Lewis T. 


462 


Miller, Linden B 


462 


Miller, Norton L.. . 


463 


Miller, Oliver 


463 


Miller, Richard C... . 


463 


Millington, Abel 


463 


Millington, Chas. R. 


463 


Mills, Alfred J 


461 


-Mills, Charles B 


464 


Mills, John W. 


461 


Mills. Wi,liamS .'."'.'." 


4»i4 


Millspaugh, Hiram 


465 


Minnie, .Joseph P 


465 


Mitchell, Preston . .. 


165 


Mitel.. -'J, Thomas 




Mitchell, Wm. H. C 


466 


Mitchell, Wm. T... 




Moe. Otto 


..* 466 


Moffatt. Orlando 




Moffatt. Seth C. 


166 


Monfore, [saac „ 


4r,7 


Monroe, Charles J 


4C7 


Monroe, Darius 


467 


Monroe, James 


is 


Montague, Daniel N 




Montague, Henrv . 


163 


Montgomery, John.... 


46.3 


Montgomerv, Martin V 


!• - 


Montgomery, Robert M. .... 


|..' 


Montgomery, William H. ... 


4li'.l 


Montgomery, William R. 


i>; i 


Moo.lv. Win. J... . 


470 


Moon; John w 


4hl 


Moore, Alexander If 


470 


Moore, Charles F 


471 


Moore, Ertw ird S 


471 


Moor.-, Georgo W 


471 


Moore. Hiram "... 


47! 


Moore, Henry M 




Moore, John 


) ; ■_• 


Moore, Joseph B.... 


4;-.' 


Moore. Thomas F 


172 


Moore, Will iam 


4;.i 


Moorman. Asa P .... 





PAGE. 

i Moran, Charles 473 

! Moran. ( reorge 473 

Morcom, Elisba ..'.'."'.'. 474 

Morell, George 474 

I Morey. Peter ...'.'.'.'.'.'.'."'." 475 

1 Morgan, Franklin K 475 

j .Morris, Governeur 475, 

1 Morris, William 476 

\ Morrison, Alexander H 476 

. Morrison, Wm. V 4; f ; 

I Morrison. Thomas " 477 

; Morse, Allen B 477 

: Morse, Chas. H 478 

' Morse, John L 47.3 

I Morse, Richard E 47.3 

1 Morton, Edward E. 47s 

Morton, Eurotas 479 

Morton. Henrv C. 47 ( t 

; Mosely, William F 4^0 

! Mosher, Charles 430 

Mosher, Jabez S 48O 

Moshier, .lames B 48O 

Mosher, Thomas H._ 480 

Mottram, William 481 

I Moulton, Luther V 4<L 

, Movius, Julius 481 

I Mower, Horace 481 

Mowry, Zebina M 4-»2 

Mover*. Gilbert 4-2 

Mulholland, James 4-2 

: Mulholiand, Samuel 482 

Mulvey, John 482 

Mundy, Edward 4-3 

Munger, Orrin W 4-:; 

M linger, William 4-3 

Murphy, John .. 4-4 

Murphy, Seba ....... 4-4 

Murphy, Wm. W " 48I 

Murray, Andrew "" 48.5 

Murray, Archibald Y '. . 485 

Murray, Lyman 4,-5 

Mussey, Dexter 4-5 

Muscott, Newton N. . 4.-5 

Mu-grave, Joseph ".." 4-6 

Muzzy, Franklin 4t>6 

X. 

Near, John L 4s, 1 , 

Neasmith, James M.. i^.i 

N. tr. c tdv 4 s- 

NV -on, Charles D ^7 

NeNon, Fdward D. ' """ 4*7 

N>i*on, wiibur...........;;;;;:::;:; 4I7 

Nevins, John M 4 -s 

Newberry, John S 4- 

\ .,-I:,r- .- . ,: 

Newcombe, George K 489 

Newcomb, Roland B. C 489 

Newell, John L '"" 4-) 

Newell, Minor S .....'.'.'.'."'.'. 4-'' 

New man, Almeron 490 

nvw!::„:jv;;:^' -■-'■'■■'■ w, 

Newton, William rM 

Ni< ho!-. Lewi* A 491 

Niles, Johnson '" 49} 

Niuis, William R " 49i 

^."" 1 "' Tliomas 491 

Nixon, Samuel 4'i-> 

Noah, Frank A. ' "" x<£ 

Nobie, ci ,ries......;;;; & 

v ■ •»< e, David A ;.' "'."""' K ij 

No. ker, Frank '"" , ."; 

Norri.-, Ezra B 4110 



740 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Norris, Jason B 493 

Norris, Lyman D 494 

North, Seth D - 494 

North, Townsend 494 

Northrop Darwin B 495 

Northrop, Elijah S 495 

Northwood, John 495 

Norton, Henry A 495 

Norton. John D 496 

Norton. John M 490 

Norton, Pleasant 496 

Norvell, John 490 

Nowlanl, Moses R 407 

Noyes, Bethuel 494 

Noyes, Horace A 497 

Noyes, .Michael J 498 

O. 

O'Callahan, Jeremiah 498 

Ocobock. Horace X 498 

O'Dell, James 498 

O'Dell, Thomas.. -J9S 

O'Donnell. James 499 

O'Flynn, Cornelius 499 

Ogg, Kobt. Y 499 

O'Gradv, James 500 

O'Keefe, George A 500 

O'Keefe, Richard D 500 

Olds, Martin 500 

Olin. Charles 501 

Oliver, John F 501 

O'Mallev, Charles M 501 

O'Reilly, Bernard 501 

Ostium, John M 501 

Osburn. Leander D 503 

Osburn, Rev. hen H 502 

Osborn, William H .502 

Osburn. Charles Y 502 

O-muii, Gilbert R .-. 503 

Otis. Asa H 503 

Oviatt, George 503 

Owen, John 504 

Owen, John G 504 

Owen, Tuba'. C 501 

P. 

Pack. Albert 505 

Packard, Frank S 50a 

Packard, William 505 

Packard, William 505 

Packer, Henry 506 

Paddock, Alfred 5(6 

Pailthorp, Charles J oOb 

Paine, Rodney C 50:5 

Palmer.Chas. H ■-- 507 

Palmer. John R 507 

Palmer, Lewis G 50^ 

Palmer, Oscar. 507 

Palmer, S imuel H 503 

Palmer, Thomas W 508 

Palmer. Walter H 508 

Palmerh e, Heman 508 

Pardee, Amaziah B 509 

Parker, Burton 509 

Parker, James H o09 

Parker, John 509 

Parker, Lt »nard B 510 

Parker, Leroy 510 

Parker, Sampson 510 

Park.-r. Warren 510 

ParkhilLCli irle* P 510 

Parkhurst, Jonathan G 511 

Parkhurst, Nathan C - all 



PAGE. 

Parks, Byron F 511 

Parmahe, Abner C 511 

Parraalee, Linus S 511 

Parsons, Andrew 512 

Parsons, la>ette 512 

Parsons, Jonathan 512 

Parsons, Luke H 513 

Parson-, Orrin 513 

Par- ns, S. Tr.us 513 

Partridge, Azariah S.. 513 

Partridge, Benjamin F 513 

Patchin, .Tared 514 

Patchen. Levi 514 

Patten-rill. Orlando R 514 

Patterson, John C 514 

Patterson, Jo-eph H 515 

Patterson, Michael A 515 

Pealer, Russell R 515 

Pearl, Stephen 515 

Pease, William H 515 

Peck, Edward W 516 

Peck, George \V 51*5 

Peirce, Edgar 510 

Pendill. James P 516 

Pendleton. Edward W 517 

Pengra, Olin - 517 

Pennell, Orrin G 517 

Penniman. Ebenezer J 517 

Pennington. Henry F 518 

Pennoyer. Henry 518 

Perham. John B 518 

Perkins, Edward Z 518 

Perkins. Jabez 519 

Perrin, Henry M 519 

Perrin, Porter K 519 

Perry, Aaron 520 

Perry, Edwin 520 

Perry, Gideon D 520 

Person*. Alonzo E 32U 

Peters, George 520 

Peterson. Jens G 521 

Pettit, William H. H 521 

Pettit, Timothy H 521 

Phelps, Fitch. 521 

Phelps. John W 521 

Phelps. William 522 

Philbrick, Nathan S 522 

Phillips. Delos 522 

Phillips, (..eoru r e \\ 523 

Phillips. John 1 523 

Phillips, Nathaniel G 523 

Phillip.-. Pitts.... 52.; 

Phinney, Edwin R 523 

Pierce, Ansel B 524 

Pierce, Darius 524 

Pier :e, John 1).. 524 

Pierce, Joseph B 525 

Pien-c, Nathan 525 

Pierce, Onesimus U 525 

Pierce, Peter R. L 525 

Pierson, K njimin 520 

Pilcher, Elijah .1 520 

Pitcher, Washington - r, 20 

Pitcher, '/Ana... 527 

Pitt. Frederick 527 

Pitts, CharlesM ."-27 

Piatt, Zephaniah 527 

Plimpton. Em iry M 528 

Pomrov, Enos A 528 

Pond. Alfred 528 

Pond, Cornelius V. R.. 528 

Pond, Elih'i B 528 

Pond. Jared 528 

Poppleton, Orrin - 529 

: . William ... 529 

Porter, Augustus S 530 



INDEX. 



741 



PAGE. 

Porter, George B 53'J 

Porter, James B 530 

Porter, John 531 

Porter, Lewis 531 

Porter. Micab 531 

Post, Floyd L 531 

Post, Samuel 531 

Potter, Allen 532 

Potter, Calvin B 532 

Potter, Fordyce H 532 

Potter, Giorge S. - 532 

Poucher, Anthony 533 

Powell, Milo. 533 

Power, Nathan 533 

Power. Pliny 533 

Power, Robert D 535 

Powers, William 531 

Powers, William H 53t 

Pratt, Abner 534 

Pratt, Daniel L 5-31 

Pratt, Foster 535 

Pratt, William A 535 

Pray, Esek ... 535 

Pray, George 536 

Preston, Almon E 530 

Preston, S. Horace 536 

Prevost, FraucisJ 536 

Price, Layman B 537 

Priest, Deliverance^ 537 

Prindle, Clarence W 537 

Pr ingle, Eugene - 537 

Pritchard, BenUmin D 53$ 

Pritchett. Kintzing. 53S 

Probert, William 53S 

Prutzman, Abraham C 533 

Fallen, Nicholas W 530 

Pulver. Henry H 539 

Purcell. William 539 

Putnam, L'zziel, Jr 539 

I 



Rairdeu. John 540 

Ralph, Stillman 540 

Ramsdell, Jonathan G 540 

Ramsdell, Norton 11 511 

Ramsdell. Tii .mis J 541 

Randall, C aleb D 511 

Randall, Harvey 541 

Rankin, Francis II 542 

Ranney, Lemuel S 512 

Ranney, Peyton - 512 

Rtnso.u, Enapl.roditns 542-3 

Ransom, Fletcher 541 

Ransom, J irues W Ml 

Raym md, Henry 541 

Raymond, Henry S.. 515 

Ravmond, Hiram. - 54-5 

Raymond. M.ihlon II 545 

Raynale. Eh nezer ... 54-5 

Read, Gilbert E 516 

Reader, George II 516 

l; i' M. Ai-xander II 516 

Redrield, Georg. 547 

R sdrteld, Herain J 517 

Reed, Charle-i P 517 

Reod, Lucien 54s 

Reed, Marsh il- 548 

Reed, Rasselas 54* 

Reilly, Cornelias .1. - 51$ 

Remer, Liwreni ■ V 54$ 

Re mick, George B 549 

Reno, John - 54 > 

Rentz, Theodore 549 

Renwick, George ; >49 

81 



PAGE. 

Renwick, John 5.50 

Reynolds, Asa 550 

Reynolds. Edwin \V 550 

Rice, John A .5.51 

Rice, Justin 551 

Rich, Hampton 551 

Rich, John T 551 

Richard. Gabriel 552 

Richards, Wm. P 552 

Richardson, David M 553 

Richardson, Geo. F 5-53 

Richardson, John H 55.5 

Richardson, Origen D 553 

Richardson, Paschal 554 

Richmond, diaries H 554 

Richmond, Charles L 5.54 

Richmond, Wm. A 554 

Rider, Ira -555 

Kiford, Almond B 555 

Riley, Henry H 555 

Riopelle, Claude N 5-56 

Riopelle, Hyacinthe F. 55o 

Ripley, Thomas C 556 

Risdon, Orange 556 

Rix, Oel 557 

Robbins, Richard B 557 

Roberts, Elijah J 5.57 

Roberts, John 557 

Robertson, Alexander :. 553 

Robertson, Andrew S 558 

Robertson, George 558 

Robinson, Elisha S 558 

Rooinson, George J 559 

Robinson, George P 559 

Robinson, James W 559 

Robinson, Rix.. .5-59 

Robinson, Robert 559 

Robinson, Solon E 560 

Robinson, Walter 560 

Robison, Andrew 560 

Robison, John J. 560 

Rockwood, Chandler H 561 

Rogers, Jeremiah M 561 

Ronievn, James W 561 

Rood, Horace D 561 

Roof, Albert K 561 

Roof, Adam L 562 

Roost, John 502 

R?ot, Amos 562 

Root, Roland. 563 

Root, lloswel! 563 

Rout. Wm. W 563 

Rork. Asa D 564 

Rose, David G 564 

Rose, EliasO 564 

Robertson, John 565 

1! ise.Wm. H. 565 

R iss, Giles 565 

K ,--, John D 565 

Rounsville, Frank G 566 

Row, Samuel H 560 

Rowe. Squire W 566 

Rowland, David H 566 

Row ; tnd, Thomas 5<;7 

Rowlson. Harvey B 5- ; 7 

Ruchle. John V 567 

Rummel, John G - 5t>8 

Rnmsev, Marshall E 568 

Runyaii, Hiram D ■*'>* 

Runyun, Philip E "" ■' 

Russell, Frederick J ■>"' 

Russell, Henry C 569 

K is . II, .lames I >■'•' 

Russell, Josiah 569 



742 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Sackett, David 570 

Sackrider, George W 570 

Salyer, Nathan 57n 

Sanborn, Cummings 570 

Sanborn, Jas. W 571 

Sanborn, William 571 

Sanderson, Kudolphus 571 

Sanford, Geo. P 572 

Saunders, Harry 572 

Sawyer, Andrew J 572 

Sawyer, Franklin, Jr 573 

Sawyer, Jacob C 573 

Schars, Peter 573 

Schattler, Casper F 573 

Schermerhorn, Barthol. W 574 

Schoolcraft, Henry R 574 

Sen ware, John E 574 

Scott, John 575 

Scott, Samuel M 575 

Scott, Winfield 575 

Sedgwick, Geome 575 

Seeley, Elijah B 576 

Sellers, L. McKnight 57ri 

Sessions, Alonzo 576 

Sessions, William 577 

Seward, Julian M 577 

Sexton. .Tared A 577 

Seymour, Elisha G 577 

Seymour, Henry 577 

Seymour, Henry \V 578 

Seymour, James 578 

Shanahan, Edward 578 

Shank, Hulbert B 57.8 

Sharp. John C 5" 9 

Sharpe, Peter 579 

Sharts. Derwin W 580 

Shattuek, Gilbert 580 

Shattuck, Willard 580 

Shaw, P rack ley 580 

Shaw, Henry A.. 580 

Shaw, James 5-81 

Shearer, James 5.81 

Shearer, Jonathan 581 

Shearman. Francis W 582 

Sheldon, Charles P 5S2 

Sheldon, Horace J 582 

Sheldon, James -,-:; 

Sheldon, Newton 583 

Sheldon. Timothy F 583 

Sku.-v, Alanson . 583 

She] ard, James M 584 

Shepard, Luman 584 

Shepherd, Thomas 584 

Sherman, Benjamin 585 

Sherwood, Alonzo 585 



Sherwood, Harvev 


585 


Sherwood, Thomas R 


585 




58*5 






Shipman, John B 


58*S 


Shoemaker, Joseph P 


587 


Shoi maker, Michael 


587 


Shoo',;, David 


5s7 


Shook. Jacob 


5tr6 


Shorts, Philip P 


588 


Siblev, Solomon 


588 


Sickle?. Aaron 


588 


Sill, John M. B 


... aS9 


Silver. Abiel 


... 5S9 


Simonson. James P. 


589 


Simpson, Emery II 


... 5!»n 


Sinclair, Daniel D. 


. 590 


Skinner, Elias M 


590 



PAGE. 

Slafter, David G 590 - 

Slayton, Thomas J 591 

Sloan, Daniel D 591 

Slocum, Albert B 591 

Slocum, Ellioit T 591 

Smith, Aimer U 591 

Smith, Abram 592 

Smith, Amos 592 

Smith, Andrew J 592 

Smith, Aura 592 

Smith, C. Clifford 593 

Smith, Davis 593 

Smith, Ezekiel C 593 

Smith, Frank L 593 

Smith, George A 594 

Smith, George M 594 

Smith, Henry 594 

Smitn, Henry C 594 

Smith, Hiram 595 

Smith, Hiram H 595 

Smith, James L 595 

Smith, Jeremiah R 595 

Smith, John S 596 

Smith, Joseph 596 

Smith, LeGrand J 590 

Smith, Morgan L 590 

Smith, Nathan D 597 

Smith. Perrin M. 597 

smith. Kobert B 597 

Smith. Samuel I, 597 

Smith. Sidney T 597 

Smith, Samuel W" 598 

Smith, Thaddeus G 598 

Smith, Vernon H 598 

Smith, William H 598 

Smith. William T 599 

Snell, William 599 

Snow, Byron A 599 

Snow, FielderS.. 599 

Snow, William T 599 

Snyder, Stephen F... Ct-0 

Soule. Milo tOO 

Spafford, Charles 6C0 

Sparks. Levi 6C0 

Spaulding, Erastus en* 

Spauldinsr, Oliver L 601 

Speed, John J 601 

Spence, 'I homas R 102 

Spencer, Asa 602 

Spencer. Grove 602 

speiic.-r. HoraceC 602 

spi. er, .!.<!■ .- W 603 

Spi ,« er, Ml 1 ael 603 

Spracrue, R illin 603 

Sprauue, Boger 603 

Spra.-'ir. \V m 603 

SpraLTue, W,,,. B P03 

Stafford, Henrj II 604 

Standish, John H 004 

Stanchfield, Oliver 605 

Stannard. Abiel S 605 

Staiiion. Erastus II 6C*5 

Staples. Hiram E. 605 

Stark, George P 606 

Starkey, Lewis F 6<0 

Starkweather, George A 606 

St. Aubin, Francis (' 606 

St. Clair, William M *"7 

St. John, John B.. 607 

Stearn >, Benton V, 607 

Steele. Amos E. 607 

Steele, George E. 607 

Steere, Ji scpli II 608 

Stephens William M 60S 

Stephenson, Kobert 6"8 

on, Samuel M. 609 



743 



PAGE. 

Stetson, Ezra 609 

Stevens, Amos 609 

Stevens, Appleton 610 

Stevens. Kit,: H. 610 

Stevens, Herman W 010 

Stevens. Hestor 1 BIO 

Stevens, Horace 611 

Stevens, John .1 oil 

Stevens, Stephen R oil 

Stevens, William C oil 

Steven-, Wiiiiam N 012 

Stewart. Edwin 615 

Stewart. James 012 

Stickney. William W 612 

Stillson, Eli L... 613 

Stinchcorab, Joseph W 613 

Stockbridge, FraLeia B 613 

Stockton, John 013 

Stockwell, Martin P 01 + 

Stoddard. Cameron C 0U 

Stoddard, Jesse 614 

Stoddard, William 614 

.Stone, Char;.- W 614 

Stone, Clement W 615 

Stone, Hiram 015 

Stone. Ji.tm W... 615 

Storrs. Wales F 616 

Stouu-hton. Win. L .■ 010 

Stout, Byron <i 610 

Stout, David B. 010 

Stow.-, Isaac 017 

Stowell, Alexander H 017 

Strang, James J 017 

Street, Samuel 01S 

Stricklai I. Randolph 618 

Striker, Daniel 618 

Striker, Gilbert 619 

Strobridse, Oliver P 619 

Strong, John 019 

Str.ji._-, John. Jr 019 

Strong, Mvron 619 

Strong, Svlvester A 620 

Struble.J'ohn.... 620 

Stuart, Charier E 620 

Stuart. David 621 

Stuart. Patrick - 621 

Stuart. Robert 021 

Sturgis, David. 622 

Sullivan, James. 022 

Summers. Jacob 623 

Sumner, John J 623 

Sutherlan 1. James B 623 

Sutl md, Jabez G ■■•-■• 

Sutton, Edwin 624 

Sutto i. George 024 

Sutton, Nat':, u E. 024 

Sutton, Wiiihun C 624 

Sweel ind, John H ' '■'-'•' 

Sweezey, .James A • ''-'} 

Swe ■.■-.• 625 

Swei uey. rallies H 620 

Swift, tieorg. W 6.26 

Swift, .Jo in M 620 

Swift, Or-m 627 

S-.virt. Wi... .!.•: ? 627 

Swineford, A btrt P 62i 

T. 

Tacles, Ah , in ler 627 

Taegart, Mi >( - '-- 

Taft. Lev: B 62H 

Tappan, H. ti •• P. 62h 

T irb. II, H»r ■ •- S 0211 

Tarsney. I i I ' "' 

Taylor. Cl.ati.-s ii '--■' 



PAGE. 

1 Taylor. Daniel W 629 

Tavlor, George E &-.0 

Tav'or. Henry W 630 

Taylor, Lori.-on J 630 

: Taylor, William H 031 

Ten Evck, Conrad.. 631 

Ternes, Peter 631 

Tenney, Harriet A 63l 

Tenney. Jesse E 032 

'• Terry, Henry D... 632 

Thayer, George W 033 

Thayer, Nahum 633 

! Thayer. Simeon M 633 

I Thomas, George 633' 

Thomas, Henry F 034 

Thomas, John 634 

Thomas, William 014 

i Thomas, Zimri D 634 

; Thompson. Almon A 635 

Thompson, Albert 635 

Thompson. ChaiiesC 635 

Thompson, George W 635 

Thompson, Henry W 635 

Thompson, Jeremiah D. 636 

Thompson, 1: bert 630 

Thompson, R rl R. 636 

Thomson, Edward 11 636 

Thomson, John S 637 

Thorpe, Calvin J 637 

Thr. .op, in- .■■_'.■ B 637 

1 Thnrber, Jen rson G o;;7 

Tibbitts, John S Oj- 1 

Tiffany, Alexander R 638 

! Tilden, Junius.. 639 

i Tillson. Philo 039 

i Tindall, Jefferson K. 639 

Tinham, Alexander 639 

I Tinney, Rufus 639 

Tobev, Braoey - 640 

Toll, Isaac D 640 

Tompkins. .Tames B 040 

Tompkins, William M.. 041 

Tooker, J< nnS 041 

Torrey, Jos ph W 641 

| Tower, Osmond 641 

Town, Oka - 642 

Town, William K 042 

Towne, AmosC 012 

Townsend, L'riel -- 642 

Train, Jarvis C. 643 

Traver, William R 643 

Treat, Loren L 643 

Tripp. Cha-L-s 613 

! 643 

. i land l\ 644 

Trowbrid re. St. . hen V. R ,; 44 

. Morgan 615 

Tu] • ■-. M\ ron 615 

Tank, Wir.la::) S... 645 

3 D 615 

! u n er, G verge 15 - 646 

1 urner, James »•♦" 

Turner, James M 64. 

T:ir..-r. .I.Ton... W 647 

T ir: er, J. =se F 64, 

Turner, John W '-I s 

Turner, Jovial. 648 

Turner, Milo ii - <'<■> 

Turner, Stanley W 64!) 

Turrill, Jam. s 649 

Tuttle, Jonathan B 6VJ 

i .'■ . . \\ urren '■ '' 

Twaddell, !'■:•..'. K 650 

■. Royal T - W' 

Tvhr, Columbus V '■ 

Tyler, ' '> 



m 



INDEX. 



U. 

Ulrich, Madison J 

Underwood, Daniel K.. 
Upson, A. I 

Upson, Charles 

Upton, Daniel 

Upton, William \V 

Utley, William S 



PAGE. I 

...651 

... 651 • 
... 651 
... 631 



Valade, Joseph L 

Van Akeo, George W 

Van Dusen, Lawrence.. 
Van Dnser, /. achariah.. 

Van Every, Peter 

Van Husa'n, Caleb 

Van Kleeek, James 

Van Loo, Cornelius 

Van Orthwick, Aaron A. 
Van Kaalte, Dirk B. K... 

Van Riper, Jacob J 

Van Scoy, Rowland S... 

Van Vleet, James. 

Van Zile, Philip T 

Vaughn, James C 

Veenniet. George F 

Vicary, Walter 

Vickery, Stephen 

Videto, James 

Vinr-ent, Edward 

Vintdh, David Jr 

Voorhees, Emory B 

Voorhies, Hiram 

Voorhies, Isa ic I 

Voorheis, Sebring 

Vowles, George 

Vroman, John J 



653 

6iJ 
651 



o .»; 
656 
6)6 

t'.')T 
>,;; 
657 



6,- 
658 

fi.W 



660 
660 

& ;o 



W. 

Wade, Silas A 

Wadhanis, Ralph.... 
Wagner, John 

Wait, Jonathan G 

Waite, Beii'amin W.. 
WakehV. 1, Daniel B.. 
Wakeman, Marcus... 
Walbrid_-e. David S.. 
Waldo, Campbell.... 

Waldron. Henry 

Walker, Arnold 

Walker, Alvah H.... 
Walker, B--n ianiin.. 
Walker, Charles I... 
Walker. DeWitt C. . 
Wal ker, Edward C... 
Walker, Frederick... 
Walker, Henrv X... 

Walker, Flenry T 

Walker, James B 

Walker, John 

Walker, Levi 

Walker. Samuel S... 
Walker, Sylv< ster... 
Wal k inshaw, James. 

Wai ■a-e, John B 

Walliu, Eranklin B . 
Wal: hew, Ge irge W, 

Walton, Andrew 

. Walton. Jacob 

Wall/, Joseph 

Ward, rYl : w B 

W ■ :. !. :. in M 

Ward, K:/..Ti E 



>;■■•■) 

601 
661 
661 



PAGE. 

Warden, Robert 670 

Waring, Guernsey P._ 671 

Warner, Edward A 671 

Warner, Harvey 071 

Warner, P. Dean 67i 

Warner, William 671 

Warner, William 67i 

Warner, William E 672 

Warren, Asa K 672 

Warren, Robert L 672 

Warren, Samuel N 67.1 

Warren, Stephen H 67? 

Washburn, Norman B 673 

Waterburv, John C 674 

Watkins, Charles W 674 

Watkins, ErwinC. 674 

Watkins, Freeman C 675 

Watkins. Milton C. 675 

Watson, Frank H 675 

Watson. Henrv 675 

Watts, John W 676 

Weatherby, Charles W 676 

Webb, Nathan 676 

Webber, Andrew J 676 

Webber, George W 677 

Webber, William L 677 

Webster, Alanson J 677 

Webster, James 67S 

Weier, Joseph 673 

Weir, James D 67s 

Weiss, Henrv W 673 

Welch, Henry B 679 

Welch, John 679 

Welch, John B 679 

Welker, Erastus J 679 

Wellman, Chas 679 

Wells, Franklin 6-0 

Wells Frederick L 6S0 

Wells, Henry B 6-SO 

Well-, Hezekiah G 6S0 

Wells. Henry H 6SI 

Wells, Mar-hall M 6-1 

Wells William P. 6S1 

Wendell, Georsre 

Wendell, John A 6*2 

Wesson, William B »>-' 

. Ansel W 6S2 

West, Thomas J 0-3 

Westover. Luther 6S3 

Wetherbee, Hezekiah. 6S3 

Wheeler, Amos R 633 

Wheeler, Calvin 6?4 

Wheeler, Harrison H 6*4 

Wheeler, Isaac P 6-4 

Wheeler, James 634 

'. Lycurgus J ■'-; 

Wl ipple, ( : irlesW 685 

Whipple, Henry 1 6*5 

White, Alpheus 685 

White, Darwin O ->'- 

White. Frank G. ov. 

White, George H 6S6 

White, James E •''■'■ 

White, James H.. <>»'■ 

White, Jonathan R.. '37 

White, Oliver K 6?7 

White, Onin ''•-• 

White, Peter 

White, Shul ;\tl 653 

v li ,TI o uas 6SS 

White, Tla.mas W ' ^ 

Whit.-, \V: 1. mi E 6>8 

Whiting, Henry 6S9 

Whiting, Justin R 6<9 

. Luther D ' v ' 

Whitney, Nathan. 690 



745 



PAGE. 

Wigg.ns, William II 690 

Wight, Buckminsfer 690 

Wight. Stanley G 690 

Wilher, Mark D... 090 

Wilbur, Charles A 691 

Wilcox, Albert 691 

Wilcox, Elliott R 691 

Wilcox, Marcus B 692 

Wilcox, William S 692 

Wilder, Daniel G 692 

Wiley, David W 693 

Wilev, Jefferson 693 

Wilkersqn, Alfred 693 

Wilkins, Ross 693 

Wilkin*, Samuel M 694 

Wilkinson, Daniel S... C'.U 

Willard, George 694 

Willard Isaac W 694 

Willett, A. Milan 695 

Willett, John 695 

Williams, Albert _ 695 

Williams. Alpheus S 696 

Williams, Asa. 696 

Williams, Anthony 096 

Williams. BuelM 697 

Williams. Edwin R 697 

Williams, Fitch R 697 

Williams, Gardner D 697 

Williams, Harvey 69S 

Williams, James A 69S 

WiUiams, Jeremiah D 69H 

Williams, John R 693 

Williams. Joseph R 699 

Williams, Theodore 699 

Williams, Thomas H 699 

Williams, Walter W 699 

William*. William B 700 

William-. William I) . 700 

Williams, Zebulon 700 

Willils, Baron B 700 

Willits, Edwin 701 

Willits, Warren J 701 

Wilson, Jeremiah C 701 

Wilson, John B.. 701 

Wilson, Farwell A 702 

Wilson, Joshua 702 

Wilson, Lou - T. N 702 

Wilson. Philo 7":.' 

Wils m, Robert s 701 

Wilson, Thomas M 703 

Wilson, William B 703 

Wiltse. Jacob M 703 

Winans, Edwin B 703 

Winchel!, Amaziah 701 

Winchell, Jerom< 704 

Wing, Austin K 704 

Wing, Giles M 7C5 

Wing, Warner to:, 

Wing, Washington 705 

Winsor, Richard 7C6 

Winters, James 706 

Wisner, Chauncev W 706 

Wisner, George W 706 



PAGE. 

Wisner, Moses 707 

Witherbee, Elijah B 707 

Witherell, I>nj. F. II 708 

Witherell, James 708 

Withington, William H 709 

Witney, Solomon L. 709 

Wixom, Isaa' 710 

Wixen, Levi L 710 

Wixson, Daniel 711 

Wixson, Joshua 711 

Wolcott, Grove II 711 

Wood, Alfred B 711 

Wood, Charles M 712 

Wood, Edwin K 712 

Wood, Henry L 712 

Wood, James C 712 

Wood. Thomas 712 

Woodbridge, William 713 

Woodhouse, Lemuel 714 

Woodman, FliasS 714 

Woodman, Jonathan J 714 

Woodruff, Albert N 714 

Woodruff, it. orge. 715 

Wo< riruff, Henry 715 

Woodruff. Newton R.... 715 

Woodward, Augustus B 715 

Woodward, David A 716 

Woodward, Hiel 716 

Woodward. Lysander 716 

Wood worth, John D... 716 

Woodworth, Thomas B 717 

Woolnough, Waller W 717 

Wordeu, Robert, Jr. 717 

Whittemore, Bernard C 718 

Whittemore, Gideon 718 

Wright, David A.. 718 

Wright, Hamilton M 718 

Wright. Horatio 718 

Wvc-koff, lleman A 719 

Wyllis, George C 719 

Wyman, Henry 719 



Yaple, George 1 719 

Yarrington, < 'harles 720 

Yawkev, Samuel W 720 

Ye, kley. to-orge ii. B 720 

Yeoman?, Santord A .20 

Yerki-.'.-nrge 720 

Verk, -. William 721 

Yoc-um, John K 721 

Yost, Chester 721 

Young, Ambrose 1" 721 

Young, H. >Mia. 722 

You: g, S. Perry 7-2 

Youngiove, George 722 






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