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Full text of "Early history of Wabaunsee County, Kansas, with stories of pioneer days and glimpses of our western border.."

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1202880 



^SETVHALOGY COLLBCTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




833 00828 6863 



V 



EARLY HISTORY 



-OF- 






-WITH- 



STORIES OF PIONEER DAYS 



-AND- 



GLIMPSES OF OUR WESTERN BORDER. 



I 



Containing Portraits and Biographical Sketches, Historical Reminiscences, Views 

of Towns, Street Scenes, Public Buildings and Private Residences, 

Our Churches and School Houses, Election Returns 

and Notes, Newspaper History, G. A. 

R. Notes, a Short Criminal 

Record, &c. 



MATT THOMSON. 




AXiMA. KANSAS. 
1901. 



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A— Sod tiousc where first teacher boarded— Wabaunsee. 

B— First church— Wabaunsee. 

24— Last log school house— replaced by stone building In 1884. 



Early History of Wabaunsee County, 
Copyrighted 





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BY 

Matt Thomson 
All rights reserved. 



Preface. 

1202880 



In an extra edition of the Alma Signal in 1892 we said: "The next 
enterprise we have in conteniplallon is an Illustrated History of Wa- 
baunsee County. Many of the actors have passed from the scene, but 
the material of facts that they left behind are still obtainable and if 
gathered together would form the ground work of many interesting 
chapters that would be perused with pleasure as well as profit by 
those to whom many of these facts will prove a revelation. That they 
should be preserved while there is yet time, but one opinion prevails," 
Though other duties claimed our attention, we have never yet aban- 
doned the idea of writing the history. Though somewhat deferred, 
our long cherished plans have assumed tangible form. Possibly some 
criticism relative to the subject matter or the manner of presentation 
will be indulged in by those prone to forget the precepts of the golden 
rule. Let this standard be applied toour work and we will be content. 

We have endeavored to acquiant the people of today witli the 
happenings of yesterday; of the events that transpired before the 
advent of railroads and the era of school houses, together with the 
march of progress that has caused the wilderness to blossom as the 
rose. Our mission is to tell of the time when there was much con- 
cern for the necessaries of life, but little care or thought of the 
luxuries of the present. We have tried to be fair and just to all. 
It has been our endeavor to write a book the people will read. We can 
only hope that our effort may be deemed worthy of a careful perusal 
and an impartial verdict. This assured, we shall feel that our labor 
has not been in vain. 

Alma, Kansas, June 14, 1902. 



EARLV HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



mstorical. 



In touching upon the early history of Wabaunsee county, we 
promise nothing startling. We do not propose to recount the exploits 
of Coronado and claim Wabaunsee county as the theatre of some of his 
mostdarlng adventuresand hair-breadth escapeswhile in search of the 
famed seven cities of Cibola; neither are we so chimerical as to claim 
Buffalo Mound as the work of prehistoric man, nor will we advance the 
theory that the original Garden of Eden was located in the Mill creek 
valley. However willing we may be to concede that were beauty of 
landscape and fertility of soil matters of paramount consideration in 
the choice of a site for the abode of our first parents, there might be 
good and ample reasons why no adverse criticism should be placed on 
the Judgment of those upon whom the responsibility might rest of 
making a choice of location. Had the site of the garden been defined 
by metes and bounds, including In theirlimits that small partof God's 
footstool Wabaunsee county people delight in calling their own, we 
could do no less than admire their judgment and applaud their act. 

When as a matter of fact geologists claim that the earth— of which 
Wabaunsee county Is a part— has been in existence about six hundred 
millions of years. It would be an Idle waste of words to claim for Coro- 
nado, or John Smith, or Captain Pike, the right of discovery. Sufllce 
It to say that less than half a hundred years ago all this western coun- 
try, of which our county is but a fractional part, was known— on the 
map— as the "Great American Desert." It is well that we say "it was 
known on the map"— It assuredly was not known elsewhere, at least 
by civilized man. 

Years ago, with characteristic generosity. Uncle Sam had set 
apart for the Pottawatomie and Kaw tribes of Indians certain tracts 
of lands known as Indian Reservations, hoping that the noble red man 
would prosper and grow rich In a country thought to be unfit for the 
abode of his white brother. 

Here the dusky warrior wooed and won the maiden of his choice. 
Here the deer, the antelope, and the buffalo paid tribute to the Indian 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 5 

huntsman's arrow and these valleys and slopes and woodlands but a 
few years a^'o were made the more picturesque by the herds of Indian 
ponies, and the scores of Indian villages, where the prattle of the 
papoose, the ci y maiden's song-, and tlie sound of the tom-tom, gave 
evidence of aboriginal life and iiappiness and contentment. 

But the day dreams were but of short duration being rudely 
disturbed by the inroads of the pioneer who had discovered the fact 
that the (Jreat American Desert had an existence only on the maps. 

But the re.servation laws must be respected. The Kaws on the 
south and the Pottawatomie tribe in the North part of the county 
left the least desirable lands open for settlement. But the most 
valuable of these lands were .soon taken. 



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:MAP of KTCHARDSON COtJNTY. KAS. (noav ^VABAUNSEE) 
PUBLISHED IN 1855, BEFOKE THE SURVEY. 

A cursfiry examination of the above map will reveal the compara- 
tively small amount of desirable lands situated in Richardson (now 
Wabaunsee) county suitable for farming purposes in 1854. In 1861 the 
Kaws were allotted lands on the diminished reserve, on the Neosho and 
lower Rock creek, but not until 1870 was that part of the Pottawato- 
mie reservation lying in Wabaunsee county thrown open to settle- 
ment. The opening of tliis reserve marked a new era in the history of 
our county, tlie settlement of wliich had been retarded by reason of 
the best lands being reserved for the Indians. 



H EA RLY HISTORY OI'^ WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Items from the County FJecords. 



At the April (18.'i9), session of the board of County Commissioners, 
on motion of (J. Z\vanzit,''er tlie municipal townships were declared to 
include territory as follows: 

AVabaunsee townsliip to include all that part of Town 10, Ranpre 9, 
an(i Town 10. Range 10, lying Soutii of Kansas river, East of Town 11, 
Range 9 and Town 11, Range 10. and East of the Davis county line. 

The Ti)wnship of Alma to include Town 12, Range 9, and Town 12, 
Range 10, Town 12, Range 11, Town 13, Range 9, Town 13, Range 1(J, 
and Town 13. Range 11, or so much thereof as lies South of the Potta- 
watomie reservation and East of said County of Davis. 

The town of ]\Iission creek to include Town 13, Range 12, and so 
much of Town 12, Range 12. Town 12, Range 13 and Town 13, Range 13. 
as lies South of the Pottawatomie reservation, and Westof the County 
of Shawnee. Wilmington township to include Town 14 of Ranges 9, 
10, 11, 12, 13, and Town lo of Ranges 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, or so much 
thereof as lies North of Breckenridge county West of Shawnee and 
East of Davis. Motion carried. 

S. F. Ross declining to serve as auditor a special meeting of the 
county board was called for May 10, '59, and Dr. S. E. Beach appointed 
to the office. The meeting then adjourned to Ang. lo. At this meet- 
ing Wm. Mitchell was appointed Ciiaiiinan of the board but he being 
absent E. ii. Ross was appointed Chairman pro tem and .Jehu Hodgson, 
appointed clerk pro tem. At this (August) meeting the Deputy County 
Clerk, E. C. D. Lines, was authorized to procure a suitable room and 
arrange for accomodations for the first .session of the District court to 
be held at Wabaunsee on the Fourtii Monday of September, 1859. 

At this meeting the first bill for furniture for the county offlcers 
was presented and paid to A. C. Cutler. Amount, $18.50. 

On October 18, 1859, a ta.\ of $9(55 was levied as follows: 

Wabaun.see township. $;;51.,")3. 

Wilmington '• 2(59. 'io. 

Mi.ssion Creek •' ls8.(io. 

Altna •' 15(5.12. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 7 

At a meeting of the Board of Supervisors (commissioners) on the 
lOtii day of Feb.. 1860, Petit Jurors were drawn from the following list 
f>f residents: 

*Henry Smith, Peter Sharai, John Willig, J. M. Blsbey, Wm. Ken- 
naman, Thos. D. Rose, I. C. Isbell, C. Noyes, J. E. Piatt, J. F. Willard, 
R. W. Griswold, Enoch Piatt, A. C. Brown, Robert Hubbard. Anton 
Schewe, Joseph Schutter, Henry Schmitz, Chas. Pafkowitz, William 
Lange, Jf)hn Copp. John Hess, Edmond HotTman, Charles Hanson, 
William Krieg. John Bour, Joseph Treu, John Schrouder, Geo. Rich, 
P'ranz Schmidt. Wm. H. Curtiss, S. J. Spear, John Sailor, Simon Dow, 
John W. Ward. James E. Johnson, Samuel B. Harvey, Allen Hodgson, 
Geo. M. Harvey, Perry Lamphere, Henry Shepard, Nathan Hunt, Wm. 
Hovenden, N. S. Spear, Daniel Spear, J. Rich, J. W. Mossman, M. 
Woodford, S. P. Wemple, Wm. H. Hewins, Wm. Ewing, W. A. Wing, 
G. F. Hartwell, S. Higbee. 

(irand Jurors were drawn from the following list : 
Michael Fix. Herman Dierker, Andreas Thowe, Christian Wertz- 
berger, John Mahan. Gottlieb Zwanziger, Ernst Hoheneck, Frederick 
Paleiiske, John P. Gleich, Christian Hankammer, John Spiecker, 
Peter Thoes, F. H. Hebrank, Sebastian Nehring, Edward Krapp, 
F. Doty, Geo. G. Johnson, A. Bliss, Andrew Walters, H. J. Loomis, 
R. P. Miller, E. M. Guile, A. A. Shephard, J. Schaad, Wm. Curtiss, 
(r. W. Bonny, James McCoy, J. W. Glea.sener, E. H. Haskins, T.saiah 
Flarris, Samuel Cripps, O. T. Cook, E. B. Murrell, Jeptha Beebe, 
Henry Easter, J. B. Ingersoll, E. P. Ingersoll, Joseph Johnson, E. M. 
Jilli.son, Chas. A. Hotchkiss, H, F. Brown, S. R. Whitaker, S. R. 
Weed, B. C. Benedict, L. A. Parker, C. Sawin, J. H. Gould, C. J. 
Dutton, J J. Walter, Josiah Gewn, S. M Thomas, Austin Kelsey, 
Robert Banks, Smith W. Kelsey, John Smith. 

First petition for "tavern license" presented by Perry Lamphere 
at the February meeting Petition rejected. 

April, 1860, the county board was composed as follows: 
Wm. Mitcliell, Isaiah Harri.s, G. Zwanziger and H. J. Loomis. 
First petition for county road presented by E. Hoheneck, May 14, 
1860: road from Wabaunsee to Wilmington. I. Harris, J. M. Hubbard 
and August Brasche appointed viewers to locate said road. This road 
was declared illegally laid and the expenses ordered paid by the county. 
At this session John Schwanke presented a petition for a road in Alma 

*The above lists of 108 names are given in full that the early 
settlers mav be known by the records. As but 14o votes were cast at 
an election 'held Dec. 6, 1859, and but 183 votes cast at an election held 
March 6, 1860. it appears that about three-lifths of the actual re.si- 
dent voters of the county are included in the above lists. 



S EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

township. E. Ilolieneck, F. Hebrank and Herman Dierker were 
appoiiitod viewers. 

Ill July, 18(50, levies (by townships) were made as follows: 

Alma: For Townsiiip expenses. .$100.00 

For schools 100.00 

Wilmin^fton: For Township expenses. . l^a.OO 

For schools loo.OO 

Wabaunsee: For Township expenses. . 75.00 

For .schools 200.00 

For bridge (first) 30.00 

Mi.ssion C'r.: For Townsiiip expenses. . 100.00 

For .schools 50.00 

Zeandale: For Township expen.ses. . 74.00 

For schools 100.00 

At the .Inly session S. F. Koss, T. D. I\ose and .John P. (ileich were 
-appointed viewers on a road from Wabaunsee to the west line of the 
county. G. Zwanziger, surveyor. 

In October, 18G0, it was considered inexpedient to allow a salary to 
the Probate Judge, but at the January session, 1861, the matter was 
reconsidered and the Probate Judge's .salary fixed at $40 per annum. 

JUROR LISTS FOR 1804 (APRIL). 

Grand Jury list: 

Abner Allen, T. S. St. John, E. St John, O. Meacham, James W. 
RIain, T. V. Smith, Enoch Piatt, John Willig, J. M. Bi.sbey, Peter 
Sharai, Joshua Smith, James Enlow, C. Noyes, C. A. Lapham, E. Kirk- 
man, A. L. Norton, August Weber, Herman Meseke, Rudolph Arndt, 
Peter Daum, Frederick Palenske, Joseph Schutter, Herman Miller, 
Wm. Drebing, John Iless, C. Pafkowitz, John Copp, Anton Kraus, J. 
L.Thomson, Samuel Woods, Samuel Cripps, John Garinger, Peter A. 
Green and J. M. (Jilless. 

Petit Jury list: 

C. P. McDonald, Thomas Keeiuin, A. J. Vincent, R. Moses. A. J. 
JMnkertcm, Robert Earl, Wm. Marshall, Harry Marshall. E. R. Mc- 
Curdy, Charles Taylor, Sanuiel Pratt, C.Foster, J.J. Walter, A. C 
Tucker, Henry Smith, J. II. Gould, G. S. Beckwith, Smith W. Kelsey. 
Adolph Petting, D. Lughbilil, Michael Fix, A. Brasche, H. Dierker. 
J. P. (ileicli, C. Hankammer, Anton Schewe, Peter Tiioes, F. H. He- 
brank, August (Jerloch, Henry Schmitz, Jo.seph Treu, Wm. liorne. 
Christian Kuenzli, P. F. Johnson, Isaiah Harris, Jehu Hodgson, G. M. 
Harvey, R. ,7. Marrs. Joseph .Johnston, Morris Walton, E. R. Twitchell, 
C. I). Carpenter. Alien Hodgson, D. N. .h)nes, Uriah Sanner, Wm. O. 
Ewing, I). M. Johnston, SVm. H. Hewing.s, John Eberly, John H. Doty. 
Thomas Tomson and I. K. Perry. 

In tlie al)ove lists are Hfi names. Higliest vote cast at last election 
for ciiunly nniciM-s Nov.. "«:{ was l.'{8. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




1882. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 9 

Commissioner Districts formed July, 1860, about as now consti- 
tuted except the Pottawatomie Reserve. 

At the January session, 1861, forty dollars was appropriated to 
procure three seals for the county; one for the county commissioners, 
one for the probate Judge and one for the register of deeds. J. M. 
Hubbard was appointed a committee to procure the seals. 

Among other bills ordered paid was one of $3.00 to A. C. Cutler for 
a book-case for the county treasurer. 

At this (January) session the following is the report of receipts 
and expenditures for 1860: 

Paid County Commissioners $130 25 

" " Clerk 36 00 

" Dept. " 92 20 

" Sheriff 200 85 

" County Assessor 137 50 

" Probate Judge.. 40 00 

" County Attorney 36 00 

Treasurer 57 53 

" " Supt. Schools 12 25 

" Transcript of Record from Davis Co. . 28 50 
" Fees in Butman case, Justices court, 101 95 
" " " " District " 104 21 

^ " Election expenses 60 60 

W " Roads, Hiram Keyes 100 00 

" Wm. Wiley 75 00 

' " W. McCormick 20 00 

' Books, stationery and stamps 26 00 

Township Plats for Assessor 20 00 

I " Office Rent 14 00 

" Printing 63 15 

" Furniture and Stove 10 00 

On tax list of Wabaunsee Twp 50 29 

" " Mission Cr. " 213 08 

" " Wilmington " 29 93 

Outstanding orders 20 90 

Total Liabilities, Jan. 1, '61, $1875 20 

Total Expenses for 1860, $1545 17 

Assets 

For Tax receipts, $309 13 
Tax levied 2311 99 

Total assets, $2621 12 
Liabilities, $1875 20 

Bal. on hand, $745 92 



(t 



10 EAULY HISTORY OF WAIJAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Fch. 2><tli. RmiuI of "Will. F. Cotton and C. R. Linos, as .Tusticos 
of Ihf Teaco for Waliaimsoo townsliip prisciiii'd and approved. 

E. C. I). Lilies was allowed f;{.(M> for cliairs for ofllce. 

The foIiowiriK' bonds were presented for approval, April, 1861: 

Of Trustees: (J. M. Harvey. Wilmin^Moii: H. .1. Looniis, Mission 
Creek: John Spiecker. Alma: (i. (J Hail. Wabaunsee townsliip. 

Of Justices: Allen HodK'Son. Wilniinirton: FL D. Sliepard, VVil- 
iiiin^'toii: Win. H. Hewins. Mi.ssion Creek: F H. Hebiank. Alma. 

Constables: Daniel Spear and Richard M Kendall. Wilmington: 
S. W. Hi>,M)ee and Kd. M. Hewins. >nssion Creek: Edward Krappand 
Hernard Hansjacob. Alma township; John H. Pinkerton. Zeandale. 

At the April se.ssion, 1862, the tax of l.s.")!»of the Wilmington town 
company was abated on account of the ille^rality r»f the assessment. 

At the .luly .se.ssi(tn. 1X62. the following road petitions were pre- 
sented: 

Hy John Spiecker, for road from termination of Wabaun.see 
road to Alma and thence t(» Wilmiiifjton. \'iewers: S. F. Ro.ss, Anton 
Schewe and G. (t. Hall. G. Zwaiizi>;er, surveyor. 

By (i. Zwanzi^er for road from Alma Mills to Herman Dierker's 
(C. Wert/.bertrer's) and up the creek to Chas. Lehmberg'.s. Viewers: 
John P. Gleich, Jo.seph Thoes and John Copp. 

By Jo.seph Thoes for a road from Fred Palenske's to Joseph Thoes' 
and Christoph Schrouder's. Viewers: Michael Fix, August Brasche 
and Edward Krapp. 

At the Octoher session, 1862, bill of Jehu Hodgson, sheiill, in case 
of State vs Ballard, of $9.05 allowed in the sum of $8,5.5— two days 
horse hire (a $1.()0 per day cut to 75 cents per day. 

At the January .session. 186.3, H. D. Shepard was appointed com- 
missioner in place of .lames B. Iiigcr.soll, resigned. 

In March, 1863, the commi.ssioners "voted to request the treasurer 
to give the printing of the delincjuent tax list to the party that will 
give the most incidental printing for the job." 

At an election held March 23, 1863, township officers were elected 
as follows: 

Wabaunsee township: Trustee: A. C. Cutler. Justices: Wm. F. 
Cott<tn and A. W. (tregory. Constables: W. S. Griswold and Smith 
Kelsey. Road Overseers: Charles Taylor, S. A. Baldwin and J. M, 
Bi.sbey. 

In Dist. 4, A. C Tucker and Volney Love received one vote each. 
The board selected A. C. Tucker by lot. 

In Zeandale township, Abner Allen wa.s elected trustee and Jo.seph 
Haines and A. P. St. John, justices. T. S.St. John and Wm. F. Smith 
were elected constables. 

Alma township: August Brasche was elected trustee, and Edward 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 11 

Lower and Adolph Flankiim'ner, justices. John Schwanke and L. 
Muehlenbacher, constables, and August Gerloch and Michael Fix, road 
overseers. 

Mission Creek: H. J. Loomis. trustee, and J. W. Mossman and 
Silas Brittain, justices: Thomas Tomson and Geo. W. Dailey, con- 
stables, and J. W. Mossman and Thomas Barker, road overseers. 
Orson Frizzle and John PL Doty received 5 votes each. The board 
selected Frizzle by lot. 

Wilmington township: George M. Harvey, trustee, and H. T). 
Shepard and Joseph McCoy, justices: E. H. Haskins and Wni. Eldred, 
constables, and Samuel Cripps, Samuel Woods and D. A. Woodard, 
road overseers. 

At the July session, 1863, A. C. Tucker petitioned for a road from 
the foot of Mount Tabor (now Riley Co.) to the northeast corner of 
Tucker's claim, thence to intersect the Wabaunsee and Wilmington 
road near the northwest corner of Lewis Gregory's claim. J. M. Bis- 
bey, J. E. Piatt and Herman Dierker were appointed viewers. G. 
Zwanziger surveyed the road August 3rd. 

At this session, C. Kuenzli petitioned for a road from Mission 
creek to the west line of the county. C. Hankammer. Silas Brittain 
and George M. Harvey, with G Zwanziger, laid out the road Aug. 10th. 

At the October session (1863). A. Pentield, J. A. Hankammer and 
S. A. Baldwin were appointed viewers on a road beginning at a point 
on the Wabaunsee and W^ilmington road between the farms of Ed. 
Krapp and John Schrouder, thence south to school house No. 14 
(Halifax), thence to Elm creek to school house No. 13 (McCoy's). John 
Hess was principal petitioner. 

Another road ordered laid out at this session was one from W. K. 
Beach's to the west line of the county. Geo. M. Harvey. Christian 
Hankammer and J. T. Genn were appointed viewers to meet October 
27, 1863. 

Maple Hill precinct organized April, 1864, and R. H. Waterman's 
designated as the voting place, 

On October 3, 1865, the petition of H. J Loomis and nine others 
to vote $100,000 to aid the Santa Fe Railroad was rejected. Joseph 
Treu voting for the proposition and H. D. Shepard and E. R. McCurdy 
voting against it. 

At the January session, 1866, a petition signed by Rudolph Arndt 
and 132 others was presented praying for the permanent location of 
the county seat. Election ordered for Feb. 20. The vote stoud: 

For Alma, 110; Wabaunsee, 87; Peter Thoes' place, 27; Dragoon, 1: 
Wilmington, i: Zeandale, 1; Maple Hill, 1. Total vote, 222. Necessary 
to a choice, 112. No place receiving a majority vote another election 
was ordered for March 6th. (See page 74.) 



li: EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



At tho July spsslnn, 1866, on petition presented by J. M, Bisbey all 
neat oattlf wert- rt'imin'd to be ('(irrallcd at niRht. 

April 4. 1870, Wliniinjfton township was divided Into three voting | 
precincts, as follows: Dragoon, Elm creek and Kock creek. 

Newbury township organized ApriM2, 187U, and two voting pre- 
cincts established, to be known as East precinct and West precinct: 
elections to be held at Maple Hill and Newbury. 

At tlie tirst election in this township (Newbury), held May 3, 1870, 
eleven votes were cast in the ?]ast precinct (Maple Hill) and twenty- 
three In West precinct (Newbury). John Winkler was elected trustee: 
Allen M. I'hilllps. treasurer: J. ii. How, clerk, and John Mock, ju.stice 
of the peace. 

In the list of taxpayers for the year 1870 the following names 
appear: 

Quash Qua: Mara-anna-una-gah-Rose; Much-quet: Sa-sa-quo-quah; 
Wanip-te-go-ahe-(iua: Sa-qua: Pe-nosh; Naw-go-shuh: Osa-o-niuck; 
Aaligli-inick-Hdurassa; Wali-wid-no-cjua; Joseph Smak-quish; Sah-qua; 
Po-te-go-qua; Pash-Kuni-go-qua, and about twenty other names of 
Pottawaloniie Indians who have since disposed of their real estate 
and removed from the county. 

At the April session, 1871, George C. Corning was granted permis- 
sion to establish a ferry across Kaw river at the big bend above the 
mouth of Mill creek. 

At an election held Aug. 29, 1371, to vote bonds in the sum of 
I1<M),0<X) to the Lawrence, Topeka & Solomon City Railroad 438 votes 
were cast for the bonds and 374 votes against. 

Wilmington precinct established Oct., 1871. 




rmsT SCHOOL housk in dist. no. 14 (HALIFAX). See page 58. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 13 



Sorns ^arly Marriages. 



April Ui, 1837, John P. (Jleich and Mrs Cath.irinp Terrass. 

May 30, 1857, E. C. I). Lines and (irace A. Tiiouuis. 

Dec. 23, 1857, Silas M. Thomas and Cornelia Lines. 

May 16, 1858, Hiram Keyes and Lncinda C. [[ovey. 

July 15, 1859, R. fl. Waterman and Isabella liourassaf Pottawatomie 
Reserve). Rev. Harvey Jones oHiciated at each of the above weddings. 

July 3, 1858, J. T. Genn and Malinda Cotton, by Rev. Lewis Bod- 
well (at Topeka). 

April 20, 1859, Joseph True and Catharine Klein, Ed .vard L. Lower, 

otliciatinu;-. 

Jan 26, 1860, Edward B. Murrell and Mary Jane IIarri.s, Allen 
Hodj^son, J. P —at Jehu I|j;)dgson's. 

April 7, 1860, Daniel Benson and Abigail Hodgson, A. Hodgson, J. P. 

Feb. 25, 1860, Thomas N; Hamilton and Zilphia Dow, by Rev. E. P. 
Ingersoll 

May 5, 1860, Chas. W. Peck, of Wabaunsee and Margaret McKin- 
ney, of the Pottawatomie Nation, by C. B Lines, J. P. 

Sept 26, 1860, Joseph Schulter and Theresa Metzger, John Schultz, 
Cath. Priest, officiating. 

Jan. 1, 1861, H. M. Selden and Christina Terrass, Rev. W. A. Mc- 
Collom officiating. 

March 1, 1861, Julius F. Willard and Mary Elizabeth Terrass^ by 
Rev. W. A. McCollom. 

June 2, 1861, Henry F. Drake and Ellen Keose.'by S. F. Ross, J. P. 

June 16, 1861, Abraham Collins and Francis P. Weld, F. II. Ile- 
brank, J. P. 

May 1, 1861, Adolph Fettingand Mrs. Villa MenaLehmberg, E. L. 
Lower, J. P. officiating. 

]\Iay 5, 1861, John Henry Hanson Meseke and Mr.s. Caroline Wol- 
gast, E. L. Lower, J. P. 

June 9, 1881, Joseph Thoes and Augusta Dieball, E. L. Lower, J. P. 

Feb 2, 1862, John Schwanke and Wilhelmina Hanlcannner, by 
Wm. Lange, Lutheran pastor. 

Feb. 21, 1862, John Doty and Nancy Miller. Allen Hodgson, J. P. 

January 19, 1862, Peter Thoes and Ernestine Dieball, F. H. He- 
bran k, J. P. 



14 KA I5LY II ISTURY OF WA HAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Mar. 7. mvi Gonreo W. Daily niul Eliza Jane Doty, S. F. Ross, J.P. 
Aprili lMt»-j. Clias. E. Hisbcy and Fanny M. Read, Rev. W. A. 
Mc("<i|ltiin. 

Nov. 13, 18t)2. Joslah Richards and Rachel Harriett Dunmire, 11. 

I). Shepard, .1. 1'. 

Dec. 2. lS(i2. Henry .Schnicder and Anna Schwanke, F. 11. lle- 

hrank. J. V. 

April 26, 18««, Wilhelm Frederick August Weber and .lohanna 
Kaniline Enielie Leilnlber^r. Wni. Lanjje, Pastor Lutheran church. 

May 31, 1SG;{, Feter Metzjfer and Louisa Krieg, by L. Dumerticc (at 
St Mary's). 

March 1(5, 1863, Geo. S. Burt and Louisa B. Lines, Rev. Lewis Bod- 
well olTlciatioK'. 

April 2. isi;4. Wni. Lesley and Mrs. Catharine Greemore, Rev. 
Clia.s. (Juild. 

Nov. 30, 1864, Ilartwig Ileidel and Mrs. Apollonia Wertzberger, E. 
L. Lower, .1. P. 

Jan. 19, 1865, Capt. James Smith, Tth Reg. Kans. Vols and Hattie 
E. Kelsey, by Rev. Chas. Guild. 

April 2, 18(a, George F. Hartvvell and. Ester Sharral, Silas Brit- 
tain, J. P. 

October 12, 186">. John Smith and Mary A. Dibble, Rev. Chas. 
Guild. 

Dec. 19. 18ti'), Rev. Chas. L. Berner and Mrs. Christine Selden, M. 
Meyer, Evanu'clical Lutheran minister, oiticiating. 

Jan. 12, 1866, Heinricli Kraus and Emilie Weber, by C. Berner, 
Evan. Luth. minister. 

Jan. 7, 1866, Daniel Treu and Mrs. Johanna Lugibihl, by Rev. C, 
Berner. 

April 11, 1866, Lyherdes Worcester and Jennette A. Rose, by Rev. 
Chas. Guild. 

June 14. 1866, Dr. August Brasche and Wilhelmine Henrietta 
Anna Schultz, by Ph. F. Johnson, J. P. 

.\pril 24, 1866, John Adolph Hankammer and Mrs. Margaretha 
Michel, Rev. C. Berner, offlciating. 

June .3, 1866, Adolph Haiikammor and Wilhelmina Schwanke, by 
Rev. C. Berner. 

.May 20, 1866, Edwin M. Ilewins and Julia E. Ross, S. F. Ross, J. P. 

May 13, 1866, Bernard Schutter and Mary Kraszons, Phillips Call- 
ton, O. S. 

Jan. 1, 1867, Frederick Schepp and Margaritha Muehlenbacher, 
Ph. F. Johnson, J. V. 

April 8, 1867, Henry Loehrand Elizabeth Teford, Joseph Thoe.s, J.P. 
April 8, 1867, Isaac H. Lsbell and Hattie D. Lines, Rev. Chas. L. 

(rUlld. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 15 

May 30, 1867, James Goff and Mettie V. Russell, Rev. Chas. L. 
Guild. 

Nov. 13, 1867, J. M, Bisbey and Mary E. Earl, Rev. Chas. L. Guild. 

Nov. 19, 1867, Louis Liebrock and Christine Hankaninier, by Ph. 
F. Johnson, J. P. 

Dec. 31, 1868, Jequam Cahcoand Wavveed Moquah, M. Gaillard, S I. 

May 1. 1868, John B. Cotton and Eunice M. Allen, Rev. C. S. Guild. 

May 1 1, 1868, August Gerloch and Catherine Engelhardt, G. Zwan- 
ziger, J. P. 

Aug. 20, 1868, Charles Grunewald and Henrietta Moege, G. Zwan- 
ziger, J. P. 

Dec 24, 1868, Arthur M. Read and Anna Isbell, Rev. R. M. Tun- 
nell orticiating. 

Jan. 2, 1869, Peter Coktah and Coach No Quah, Rev. M. Gaillard. 

Jan 29, 1869, Wm. Strasen and Emily Kietzmann, by G. Zwanzi- 
ger. J. P. 

April 8, 1869, John Boettcher and Sarah Sharp, P. F. Johnson, J.P. 

April 18, 1869, Adolph Zeckser and Caroline Leffler, by P. F. John- 
son, J. P. 

June 37, 1869, Moritz Kraus and Wilhelmine VVelk, Carl Lang, J.P. 

Nov. 25, 1869, Henry Klein and Mary Hensel, Carl Lang, J. P. 

Jan. 5, 1870, B. C. Benedict and Sarah Dunbar, by Rev. James G. 
Merrill. 

Feb. 3, 1870, A. C. Cutler and Ellen F. Weaver, Rev. R M. Tunnell. 

March 3, 1870, Wm Carter and Margaret A. Shaw, Rev. Philetus 
Beverly. 

March 6, 1870 Lardner J. McCrumb and Jane A. Barker, J. W. 
Mossman, J. P. 

March 17, 1870, David F. Carter and Margaret A. Harris, by Rev. 
Philetus Beverly. 

April 14, 1870, F. M. Meredith and S. D. Carter, H. M. Reese, J. P. 

May 5, 1870, Ludwig Kaeckel and Henrietta Meyer, H. M. Reese, 
J. P. 

May 15, 1870, Apitec Kijek and Teresa Massowa, by A. Sweere. 




FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE IN DIST. NO. 10— TEMPLIN: BUILT IN 1865. 



IG EARLY II ISTOllY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

The Alma Salt Works— tliat in 1S77 promised muchanrl resulted in 
Hltle V) tlu'slunly fanners of tlie Mill creek valley who furnished the 
means to put the scheme on its feet— at one time sent to market from 
thirty to fifty barrels of pure, white salt every day. The industry 
wasn't all a myth and had the promoters been honest in their efTorts 
our county mi^fht today be proud of her big salt plant. But ready 
easli seemed more desired than salt and the leading farmers in llir 
vicinity of Alma generously donated the needful. The tall brick 
cliinmey, the huge iron kettles and the piles of cord-wood gave evi- 
dence of energy that would probaljly have been well expended in a 
g(Ktd cause but for the tendency to divert other people's money out ol 
legitimate channels and into the pockets of the manipulators. It 
re(iuired years of toil U) counteract the baleful effects entailed on the 
generous farmers who were victimized by those in whom they had 
reposed their confidence. 



Mr. Hiram Ward, in his address before the old settlers' meeting al 
Ilarveyville, Oct. 10, 1895, said: "On my arrival in Kansas in 18<}2 I 
found a string of .settlers along the streams and a few along the roads 
to catch the traveler's dimes and (luarters VkU no orchard.s, though a 
few sprouts of trees were .seen, well trimmed by cattle. The fruit was 
tlie wild grape and crab apple We were told that we were out on the 
borders of the Great American desert and could not rai.se fruit so 
far west. Perhaps in the bottoms as far west as Lawrence .some fruit 
might grow but no further. But Mr. .1. M. Bisbey, of Tavilion had 
planted an orchard in 1855— seven years before— proving by actual test 
that Kan.sas is a fruit country." 



At the October session of the board of commissioners, 18;i6, The 
Wabaunsee J'erry Company was granted a license to run a ferry across 
Kansas river at Wabaun.see, the following to be rates of toll: 

50 cents for one pair of horses or cattle and wagon. 

i") cents for every additional pair of liorscs op cattle. 

25 cents for one horse and buggy. 

20 cents for one horse and man. 

10 cents per liead for cattle. 

5 cents per head for swine and sheep. 

At the .January session, 187 1. II. .lames was granted a license to 
niainfain a fi>rry across Kansas river with rates as follows: 

For four-horse team or two yoke of oxen. 75 cents. 

For tw<i-hoi-s<' team, .50 cent.s. 

For cme-horse team, 2o cent.s. 

Footman, 10 cents. 

LftOSC stock. ])(•]■ ll.'Mfl. .", rents. 



EA RLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 17 



JOHN THOMAS, WITH AN ALIAS. 




One dead and three wounded— that was the result of a wholesale 
shooting at Maple Hill on Wednesday night, May 4, 1898. Until a few 
days before the shooting "Missouri John" had been employed at the 
Prowler ranch. John was best man in the affections of Nellie Brand, a 
pretty Scotch girl, until the bookkeeper, a Swede, crossed his path. 
Other employes, also Swedes, twitted the discharged employe about 
his luck, or misfortune, in the little love affair, until, in a rage, he 
swore he would kill every Swede on the ranch. 

Wednesday night, May 4th, Thomas hired a horse at Romick's 
barn and went to the West ranch to see Miss Brand. Edwin Fransen 
and others advised him to leave, when he said: "All right, I will," 
and began shooting at everyone in sight — inflicting a mortal wound on 
Fransen and shooting Carl Kinstrom through the wrist. Another 
bullet ploughed through Miss Brand's hair but three or four shots fired 
at Smith, the bookkeeper went wild. 

Thomas then rode five miles to the East ranch and calling Gus 
Carlson, the farm foreman, to the door, said: "Gus, you are a pretty 
good fellow, but you gave me away in this thing, now take that," 
accompanying the words by a shot from his revolver. Carlson closed 
the door, catching Thomas' forearm, holding him fast. In this posi- 
tion Thomas emptied his revolver into the room — one ball cutting 
several holes in the covering over young Anderson, lying in bed. 

After being released from the closed door Thomas fired several 
bullets through a window into the bed where Tom Gristy slept, but 
Tom had just returned from Kansas City, and on account of the rain 
had stopped for the night at the hotel kept by Mrs. Beaubien at Maple 
Hill. Fransen died at 8 o'clock Thursday evening. 



IS EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Thomas wont westward, turninjr his horse loose in Nathan 
Mattlu'ws' pasliirt'. ami sccietiiiK' liis saddle in a clump of bushes, 
went to Halifax, stayinK'ull Highland taking breakfast Friday morn- 
ing with Mr. .1. H. Crumb. (Toing eastward on the railroad SheritT 
Treu lost track of the fugitive -he ne.xt appearing at Ernest Wend- 
land's. wheie he stayed Sunday night. Thomas slept two nights at 
John Olson's, near .\lta Vista, cutting off his mustache while here. 
At Olson's he slept with a .son of H. J. .1. Wege, who was unaware of 
the if.')(Mi reward offered for Ids bedfellow. 

May Kith Thomas pas,sed Volland, Alta Vista, and Dwight. on 
f(»ot arriving at White City in the afternoon. Here he played tramp, 
accepting hand-outs of the good people of White City. Thomas took 
the blind baggage for Herington but dropped off at Latin)er, walked 
to Ilerinirton and returned to Templin on the local next morning. 
When last .seen was at Lumb's place, where be took breakfast Tuesday 
morning. May 17th- thirteen days after the shooting at Maple Hill. 

.1. .M. Wilkerson, ex-Cbief of Tolice of Topeka, is still looking for 
Thomas. He describes him as 5 ft. 10 in high, weight, 160, .sandy com- 
l)lexion, very freckled, and has a .scar or birthmark the size of half- 
d<illar near small of back. .lohn plays old-fashif»ned tunes on the banjo 
and is pn»bahly going under any other name than Thomas. 



The Smallpox in 1871. 



Mr. Herman Fink had come over from (iermany and was boarding 
with Mr. Carl Falk. of Templin. Smallpox broke out on the ship on 
which Mr. Fink came acro.ss the ocean but he e.scaped the di.sea.se. 
But the germs evidently .secreted themselves in his clothes-chest, for 
several weeks after bis arrival he gave his clothes an airing and then 
the smallpox germs began making trouble. Mr. Falk's family was the 
first to be taken down. 

Tl)e disease spread until nearly every family in the Templin set- 
tlement had the smallixix, though in some families but one or two 
were taken down with the complaint, the others miraculou.sly escap- 
ing. Though Mr. Ferdinand Zinimennan. Mr. Henry (Jrimm and 
others were in daily cr)ntact with the sick, administering to their 
wants no symptons of smallpox appeared. Several deaths occurred: 
the marks of the dread disea.se left behind indicate that the malady 
was of a malignant type. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 19 

The disease spread to Alma and the settlement on the East branch 
—Mr. Edward Krapp having the malady in its most aggravated form 
and his daughter. Gertrude, dying of the same ailment. Mr. N. H. 
Whittemore, the county attorney died at Mr. Adolph Zeckser's, in 
Alma, where he was boarding, and, in all, quite a number of deaths 
resulted from the pestilential malady. 



FJerTiai'Kable and E^GcentriG, 



I 



Two more fitting adjectives could not be chosen to express the 
characteristics of the one man, who, more than any other, delights in 
regaling his Alma auditors with the varied experiences of a strenuous 
life. 

John Allen— if his calendar can be relied on— has seen 95 years and 
he is as hale and hearty as men of strong physique usually are at 60. 
But the would be skeptic as to John's age is no longer in a doubtful 
mood when his repertoire of adventures is unfolded. 

It wasn't long after the civil war that John pulled into Alma with 
a team of Kentucky thoroughbreds and even now he claims the owner- 
ship of several racers of his own raising that can beat a 2:20 clip any 
day. Having rode Lexington in some of his greatest races, John feels 
that he is entitled to more than usual credit in matters pertaining to 
the race course. John also brought with him a water Spaniel that he 
bought in Australia, on one of his trips around the world. 

When John came to Alma he was suffering from an open wound 
that he said was inflicted in a personal encounter with Colonel Dick 
Taylor. The blow stunned John, and that accounts for his being the 
sole survivor of the Fort Pillow massacre. Had the blow fallen with 
le.ss force it is probable that he wouldn't have been left for dead and 
thereby have escaped further injury. But under the soothing influ- 
ences of our salubrious atmosphere an ugly scar was soon the only 
reminder of one of the terrible scenes enacted during the war. 

In John's boyhood days he was the guardian and protector of the 
boys of the first families of the blue grass region. He tells with 
delight of the days when the Clays and the Breckenridges sent him 
in charge of their boys to school — boys who in after years occupied 
prominent places in our country's history. He refers with special 
pride to one occasion, when, in passing through a dense forest on the 
way to scliool the boys were attacked by panthers. Jolin gives the 



2U EAKLV IIlSTOllY OF WAHAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



number <»f puntlnTs killed in k'oink' 'i n^i\e as 19, and we have his word 
for it that nary a panllu-r k<'1 away. 

Jnlui say.s he r»Mnoniht'rsdisiini-tly the massacre of the people of 
Fort I)earh(»rn, on the present site of Clilcano. He was on the ground 
wlmn Hlack Hawk's liouse and another heloiiKiiiR to the agent of the 
I'ult.uvaloniie Indians was all there was of C'hieago. Of course John 
availed liirnself of t!ie opportunity to get in on the ground floor and 
as his rents come in from the l)lock of lots he had the foresight to take 
in hf realizes that it is hetter t<» he horn lucky than rich. 

We have it direct fmni John that he was with Frenxnit in 1H49 
when he p}i8.sed tlirough this county (m the way to the Pacific coast. 
He remembers distinctly the ringing speech made by Henry Clay from 
the crest of I^utTalo mound and says he planted a tree near the top of 
the mniMid to comuiemorate the occasion and that while Mr. (Jecuge 
Clothier was county superintendent he told liim the tree was still alive 
and in a thriving condition. 

.Idhn claims to have been present when Henry Clay fought a duel 
with Humpiirey Marsliall and that he still has the cane given him by 
Mr. Clay for holding his hat. He says that when Chicago and St. 
Charles, M<». were contest ing for the lK)nor of being the center of the 
wdrUI St. CharU's would liave got it but for Henry Clay, who. during a 
recess <tf the Senate bought the deciding vote that made Chicago the 
winner. 

When acting in the role of Assistant Veterinary Surgeon in a Gov- 
ernment Expedition sent out to the Staked Plains an epidemic carried 
off a large number of the horses used by the cavalry, but John came to 
the rescue. He used heroic measures He would cut open the horses 
and remove the cau.se— a large worm, four or five inches in length and 
larger tlian your finger. Then he would sew up the wound, thus 
titling the horse for the hard service exacted of him on this perilous 
trip in the wilds of Texas 

One of John's most higlily prized pictures is of a woman detective, 
with a colored t)oy as an attendant He regrets that by his going 
under an assumed name he has been deprived of a niche in the temple 
of fame won wliile on detached service, as a detective carrying di.s- 
pitclies bet ween Washington and Richmond. 

While driving from Alma to his farm, three mile-^ out, John says 
tliat more than once he has been delayed on his trip by a big snake 
that he alN'ges reaclu'd clear across the road and for several feet on 
either side. As the snake seemed about two feet in diameter it was of 
course nece.ssary to await his snake.ship's pleasure before continuing 
his journey Jiome 

Hut Julin's wanderings have not been confined to the land, he hav- 
ing pa.ssed many years nf bis life on the ocean. Resides being in Cuba 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. J. P. GLEICH (dec'd), 
Farmer Township. 



MRS. J. P. GLEICH, (dec'd), 
Fanner Township. 





MR. AUGUST BRA8CHE (dec'd), M. D. 
Former Coroner, West Branch. 



MRS. AUGUST BRASCHE, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY. KAN. 





s 


a' 


*»«* 4 


1 


1^^ i 


* 


t 




MR. MICHAEL FIX (dec'd), VoUand. 



MRS. MICHAEL FIX (dec'd), Volland. 





MR. AUGUST MEYER (dec'd j, Alma. 
AJma's First Postmaster. 



MR. LOREXZ PAULY (dec'd), Alma. 
Former Representative, and Commissioner. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. GEO. W. THOMPSON (deed), 
Wabaunsee Township. 



MR. HARVEY P. THOMPSON, 
Wabaunsee Town.ship. 





MR. JOHN COPP (dec'd), 
Paxico. 



MR. CHRISTIAN KUENZLI (dec'd), 
Kuenzli Creek. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. ANDREW BELL, Kaw Township. 
County Commissioner. 



MR. Wm. PRINGLE, Eskridge. 
County Commissioner. 




>^|^! 




MB. HENRY SCHMITZ (dec'd), Alma. 
Former County Commissioner. 



MR. JOSEPH TREU (deed), Halifax. 

Former Representative and County 
Commissioner. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MRS. FRED. PALENSKE, 
Alma. 



MRS. L. PALENSKE, 
Alma. 





MR. FRANZ SCHMIDT. 
Alma. 



MR. G. ZWANZIGER (deceased), 
Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. FRANZ MEIER, 
Halifax. 



ME. JOHN HESS, (deceased) 
Halifax. 





REVEREND SILBERMANN, 
Alma. 



REVEREND ABELE, 
Wells Creek. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




^KWs^V-^^WJ^VJ/TvJft -Hf^-y^yv^^T • 



r 



«?%. 




iL_:_. 




MR. F. L. RAYMOND, Vera. 
Former Representative. 



MR. S. A. BALDWIN', Wabaunsee. 
Former Representative. 





MR. ALBERT F. THAYER, Vera. 



MR. M. W. JANES, Willard. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JAMES M. JOHNSON, HarveyviUe. 
Former Representative. 



MR. W. M. RINEHART, Eskridge. 
Former Representative. 





MR. E. H. SANFORD (Dec'd). 
Eskridge. 



MR. N. H. WHITTEMORE, 
Former County Attorney. 



J 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. ALLEN PHILLIPS (dec'd), Vera. 



MRS. ALLEN PHILLIPS (dec'd) Vera. 





MR. F. M. JONES, Willard. 



MR. PATRICK MAGUIRE (dec'd). 
Maple Hill. 



EARLY HISTORV OF WABAUNSEE^COUNTV.IKAN. 





MR. (jUS DROEGE, Farmer Township. 



MR. ANTON SCHEWE, Farmer Township. 





MR. PETER THOE3 (dec'd), Farmer Township. MR. RUDOLPH ARNDT, Templin. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 21 

and the Philippines long before the Spanish war was thought of he 
went, in an early clay on a voyage to the South seas in search of the 
South pole, but after diligent and persevering effort he concludes the 
South pole is a mytli. 

In fact it is John's firm conviction that the eartli isn't round, but 
square— a theory he urges as tenable on the liypothesis that otherwise 
the biblical reference to the four corners of the earth would be mis- 
leading. We may as well state here that John has been induced to 
keep quiet relative to tlie shape of the earth in consideration of that 
spirit of friendship lie feels towards Mr. Palenske, who lias on sale 
several globes showing the earth to be round. But it cannot be ex- 
pected that after a reasonable length of time has elapsed— whetlier 
the globes are disposed of or not— John will longer withhold forcible 
expression of his convictions as to the earth's alleged spherical form. 

While John was a sailor before the mast he was often detailed to 
ake soundings and to tliose long used to the familiar calls of "Mark 
wain," "Quarter-less twain" "No bottom" the responses made by 
John sound unique. Sometimes it would be "Two tliousand feet" 
then "five thousand feet," fifteen thousand feet," twenty-five thous- 
and feet"— then the Captain would feel safe and give John a rest. 

Ships with masts TOO or 800 feet high, from the tops of which 
voices of sailors ten or twelve miles away can be heard; Mermaids, who 
carry ship-wrecked sailors to their homes and treat them so kindly 
that the Mermen fly off the handle in jealous rage; of the Island of 
j\Iatanzas, with men but three feet higli with beards reaching to their 
knees and of John's perilous trip around the Horn, after three months 

I buffeting the waves in the vain endeavor to accomplish what was 
more than easy on his next trip— when the sea-captains had dug a 
eanal, so wide you couldn't see the shore on either side— tliese are a 
ifew of the many things John delights to tell the land-lubbers, who 
leather about him and talk to him about such nonsensical things as a 
world round like a ball. 

Jf)hn doesn't speak boastingly of his book-learning but as a relator 
of thrilling adventures by land and sea he is a world beater — well de- 
serving the name of Alma's most remarkable and eccentric character. 



ex 

i. 

■|a 
^■t\ 




FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE IN DIST. NO. 5— NEAR DOVER. 



22 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Pem-Go-Wye Repays a Kindness. 



Pom-Co- Wye was a very sick Iiulian aiKl when Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Palonske called at his wipwam one lioL Sunday in August, 1864, he was 
glad to see his pale-faced visitors. 

Peni-Co- Wye's wigwam was located on Mill creek just below where 
Mr. Moritz TTund now lives. All the other Indians had gone fishing, 
leaving the sick Pottawatomie to keep house. 

Tlie Indian had many times eaten a hearty meal at the Palonske 
home and he felt that the time had come to repay their many acts of 
kindness. The absence of the other Indians prompted Pem-Co-Wye 
to unburden his mind of a weight that had caused the good Indian to 
pass many sleepless nights— that his people thought due to the dread 
disease, by reason of which his once robust form was fast being reduced 
to a shadow. 

The Pottawatomies had sent out many war parties against the 
Pawnees but the young warriors of the tribe reasoned that it was use- 
less to go so far from home for ponies when their white neiglibors, 
thinly settled as they were, on the several branches of Mill creek, had 
plenty of good horses and cattle they could get more easily. 

The young warriors had heard that the whites were fighting 
among themselves and they reasoned that now was their golden oppor- 
tunity to wreak terrible revenge on their pale-faced brothers who 
were fast encroaching on their lands. 

The good Indian's warning set Palonske to thinking and the feel- 
ing of uneasiness rendered the homeward journey anything but pleas- 
ant. Rut next day came Pem-Shah, another frequent Indian visitor 
at the Palonske home, and when he left for his tepee on lower Mill 
crock there was a wnsultation that ended with a resolve to leave the 
Mill creek settlement till the storm should blow over. Pem-Shah's 
words that had so deeply impressed Mr. Palonske but corroborated the 
statement made by Pom-Co- Wye the day before. He had said but a 
few words but they were ominous and portended coming evil. "Byrne- 
bye full moon come. Then Indians have heap cattle and horses." 

With these words l\Mn-Shali left. His pale-faced brother could 
unravel any seeming mystery his words might imply. 

In a few days the young warriors rode by in their war paint going 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 23 

South. But they didn't go far. Up at Henry Schroeder's they pitched 
their camp and the nightly din of the tom-tom aroused the few 
settlers along the branches of Mill creek to a sense of danger. Their 
nightly war dances meant something more than a raid against the 
Pawnees. 

Mr. E. G. Ross, their agent, was appealed to,- and he, accompanied 
by Mr. Ed. Krapp, visited their camp and induced their war chiefs to 
return to the reservation. 

Though the settlers felt relieved many of them slept in their corn 
fields for several weeks and Mr. Palenske, with others went to Topeka, 
where they remained five weeks. The young warriors threatened ven- 
geance against Pem-Co-Wye, having heard that he had given them 
away. But before the frosts came the spirit of the good Indian had 
departed for the other shore. Pem-Co-Wye had gone to the Happy 
Hunting Grounds. 



Me Killee PalensKe. 



One day in August, 1863, while Mrs. Palenske was alone in their 
little log cabin home on the banks of Mill creek a drunken Pottawat- 
)mie Indian, accompanied by his squaw, rode up to the house and, 
waving a Colt's navy revolver in a threatening manner, said: "Me 
Killee Palenske." 

And the Indian's manner indicated that he meant just what he 
said. Though frightened, Mrs. Palenske was assured by the squaw 
that she needn't be afraid — that she would see that her spouse didn't 
carry out his threat. She would prevent his getting off his horse. Of 
course this assurance on the part of the squaw was appreciated but 
not until the Indian rode away did the feeling of fear pass off. 

But the Pottawatomie was on murder bent and down below the 
mouth of Hendricks creek the Indian's spree culminated in a brutal 
murder — he wantonly shooting down one of five brothers of an Indian 
family living in a wigwam near where Mr. Henry Schmitz afterwards 
built his residence. 

The brothers of the young Indian had been eye-witnesses to the 
terrible tragedy, and, true to the proverbial attributes of their race, 
wreaked quick retribution on the murderer, who, without the least 
provocation had taken the life of an unarmed boy. 

The drunken Indian who would "killee Palenske" was a quarrel- 



2-1 EAliLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



soincspccimeji of the Lo family upon wlutni the erlucational advan- 
tajrosof a cnllc^ro (laiiiiiif: had had no pfiroptible inlhience for ^i<m(\. 
On nnuniinu to his people he had discarded the ^iH'^^ of civilization 
and donned, a^'ain. (lie blanket of liis tribe. He liad left the chris- 
tianizing' inlhieiu-es of his siirroiindiii^'S behind liiiu but had brout,Oit 
with him from tl)e Eastern school and its environs, the vices that 
were responsible for his undoing. 

A prollikMto career had been summarily clo.sed and the threat to 
'killee Palenske" was never carried out. 



Was it Murder? 



On August 1."). 18G8, Marshall Ray, Emery Fowler, J. C. Hill, Isaac 
Dean, E. F. Arthur and Henry Deibert drove into the Dragoon settle- 
ment looking for claims. Night overtaking them at my father's farm 
they re<piested the privilege of camping near the house and the 
further privilege of picketing their hoises in a small pasture close at 
hand. 

A colored man named George Woods lived on what is now the J. 
M. Lee place, lending part of the plow land on the farm that summer. 
Rut the c<trn had been laid by and George was working Vjy the day for 
sncli farmers as might be in need of his services, going to, and return- 
ing from, his work on horseljack. 

On that day he had gone to Rurlingame and it was late before he 
reached home. Knowing nothing of the presence of campers on the 
place he had let down the bars to the pasture and was in the act of 
turning his pony into the lot when the sharp report of a pistol rang 
out— the first intimat ion to George of the presence of strangers on the 
premises. 

Cieorgedied from the effects of the wound and Ray and Fowler 
were arrested. The other men were detained as witnesses and all 
remanded to the Riley county jail after a preliminary examination 
before J. M. Johnson, J. P., Morris Walton being the prosecuting wit- 
ness and Sam Easter, constable. 

The accused were released on a writ of habeas corpus and a second 
time arrested, but for lack of sulllcient evidence to convict were 
allowed to resume their search for a home. But the prejudice that 
had been aroused against them by reason of what seemed a wanton 
disregard of liuman life if not wilful murder convinced the homeseek- 
crs that Wabaunsee county was a good place to stay away from. 

The people refu.sed to accept the plea that the shooting was due to 
the impression that Woods was a horse thief. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 25 



"PC Precious Pair." 



From the Signal of Oct. 25, 1890: Under the above heading the 
Kansas City Times of a recent date contained an item that was not 
devoid of interest to the people of Alma for the reason that the parties 
referred to were residents here for several months and both were well 
known to our people. 

The parties referred to went by the name of Ben and Arthur 
Claire. On being arrested on suspicion by the police, they claimed to 
be brothers, but when the younger of the two was taken before the 
matron in charge of the woman's department he (or she) acknowledged 
that the clothes were worn as a disguise— that her right name was 
Arthie and that she was the wife of Ben Claire; that the disguise was 
assumed that she might be better enabled to travel through the 
country and the more readily secure work. 

Ben and Arthur (or Arthie) came to Alma sometime in May last, 
claiming to be brothers. Ben worked in Fox's stone quarry and 
Arthur was porter and runner at the Commercial House. 

Arthur, of course, stopped at the Commercial, while Ben boarded 
at Spear's restaurant— except, occasionally, when he would get a little 
lonesome— then he would go down and talk over business with his 
young brother. 

Arthur was a good looking boy and some of Alma's young ladies 
thought he was too cute for anything. But somehow the young man's 
popularity wasn't of the "lasty" kind. He wasn't lavish with his 
funds in the way of patronizing the ice cream parlors. He seemed to 
care more for his brother Ben than he did for the girls. And yet, 
with Ben and Arthur, all wasn't sunshine by any means. One day, 
Ben got outside of too much "original package," and the way his little 
brother went for Ben was a caution. 

He gave Ben a regular tongue-lashing. Several parties took in the 
fun and the wonder is that they didn't suspect the boy of being a 
woman on account of his nimble speech. 

Perhaps they would, but Arthur had a way of throwing people off 
their guard that was effective. He carried out this part of the pro- 
gram by using tobacco— both chewing and smoking. 

When the work shut down at the quarry, Ben and his little 






20 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



brother went out to Herman Mueller's and accepted a position in the 
curn-ciilfinir business. Of course they slept togetlier as brotliers 
sliould. Hut the boys noticed that tlie brothers didn't get along 
together the best In the world. While in the field there was a con- 
st^int war of words and somehow the little fellow (or fellowess) would 
always manage to get in the last word— another bit of evidence that 
might have revealed her sex. 

When the handsome boy first struck Alma some of the gii'ls 
noticed that he was awful shy. Of course they now know the reason: 
All girls are shy and awkward the first time they don their brother's 
clothes— somehow they don't seem to fit. 

Some of our young men now see that they were guilty of very 
ungallant conduct. While acting in the role of runner at the hotel 
the boy slept on a cot in the otlice -being awakened by an alarm clock 
in time to make the trains 

One night, some of our young men (we promised to withhold their 
names) thinking to have some fun at the boy's expense, tied his ankles 
together while he was asleep— for the fun they would have when the 
alarm clock .should "goofT." Of course the boys had their fun, but 
now they blush away back behind their ears when they are twitted 
about tying a wonrin's ankles. The only way they can stop the racket 
is to set up the peanuts. 

There was one peculiarity about the boy— he couldn't be induced 
to play baseball— for fear, perhaps, that he would give himself away in 
trying to catch a "fly." Neither could he be induced to go in swim- 
ming, lie said he couldn't swim and besides he was always afraid of 
the water. 

Well, some of our young men have learned a lesson. Hereafter 
good-looking boys will be treated to ice cream in summer and to 
oysters when the dog-days are gone. 



Item in Signal, Dec. 14, 1889: Our panther has been heard from 
again. As Johnnie Keagy, Fred Ross and Roland Medlicott were in 
the timber on Hendricks creek on Saturday last they heard the pan- 
ther's shrill cry. The cries came nearer and nearer until the animal 
was within a hundred yards of where the boys were. As the sounds 
increased in volume the animal's voice became less musical and the 
boys thereupon concluded they had no further business in that 
locality. It must not be supposed that the boys were afraid at all, but 
as the panther had never harmed them in the least, they had no 
ill feeling toward the brute and besides they were not looking for that 
kind of game. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 27 



Wealth in Cattle. 



From Signal, April 26, 1896: Wabaunsee county has been called 
the Switzerland of Kansas, for the reason, we presume, that our hills 
resemble mountains— to people who never saw a mountain. 

But besides boasting of as fertile valleys as are to be found any- 
-where it is true that many thousands of cattle roam over our hills and 
I fatten on the nutritious grasses thereon — requiring little or no atten- 
tion from their owners. 

These conditions have long been recognized by large cattle dealers 
\n Te.\as, New Mexico, and Arizona, and many rich, golden liarvests 
lave been gathered in by these wide-awake dealers in succulent beef- 
steak. But it is only within the last few years tliat our home people 
lave begun to realize the fact that tlie treasures carried away by 
'others can just as well be taken care of by residents of our own county. 
The result of thiswise conclusion is seen in tlie number of our 
people employed in tlie cattle business, who, a few years ago, had 
^ never entertained a tliought of acquiring a fortune, or even a compe- 
tency, througli the medium of tlie cattle industry. 

We give a partial list of some of our stock men residing in Alma 
^and vicinity wlio liope to reap some of the benefits from our rich, 
freen pasture lands. 

Stuewe Bros 1800 

M. Nicolson 1200 

E. J. Buckingham 800 

A. S. Allendorph 600 

Kinne & Lockhart 600 

Scott Thompson 500 

Henderson Bros 400 

Albert Thoes 400 

Geo. Casey 300 

Frank Brothers 200 

Fred Tliowe 200 

Fred Crafts 130 

Davis Bros 100 

These figures indicate approximately the number of cattle now on 
land, though as several of the number are large dealers the numbers 
luctuate. 

It will be seen that nearly 7,000 head of cattle are owned by a 



2S EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



dozermr more of our people, the ^'rcater number of whom have but 
recetilly awakened to the fact that the profits from our pasturage may 
as well be kept where they rightly belong— at liome. 

In addition to the cattle owned by residents, nearly 20,000 head 
beU»n),'ing to outsiders will be grazed in the vicinity of Alma. 

Of tills number Mr. Buckingham will have charge of 6,000 head; 
Frank Bros., Davis Bros., and Kinne & Lockhart will each graze 
4,000 head— the number to be grazed by the three lirms aggregating 
12,000 head, exclusive of their f>wn cattle. Mr. Casey will graze about 
500 head in addition to his own herd of 300. 

In other parts of the county large herds are owned by men who 
have made fortunes in cattle and who are today none the less enthusi- 
astic than heretofore in the belief that there is big money in the 
cittle business. Of this number, Mr. Frank Rickershauser of Paxico, 
lias a large herd, as have, also, Waugh & Peter.s, John Rehrig and 
Tom Rush, of Eskridge, Fowlers, of Maple Hill, and Mr. C. Langvardt 
and Mr. .1. W. Naylor, of Alta Vista, John Clark, of Dover, Fred 
Miller, of Kaw township and .scores of others who years ago recognized 
the value of our Kansas gra.sses. 

This is a good showing and yet the cattle industry in Wabaunsee 
county is but in its infancy. That there is wealth in cattle has just 
begun to dawn on many, who, heretofore, have seemed oblivious of a 
fact that should have been recognized long ago. 



Since the above was written— six years— there have been several 
changes !n the personnel of those actively engaged in the stock busi- 
ne.ss. While a few have sought wealth in other avocations nearly all 
are exerting renewed efforts in a calling that brings sure returns to 
all. But in addition to those already named we give a partial list of 
others who are fast coming to the front either as dealers, or raisers of 
fine cattle and hogs, as follows: 

Frank Schmidt, Wm. Maas & Sons, August and Chas. Zeckser, 
Schniilz Bros., A. M. Jordan, and C. B. Fields, of Alma; Tom Wilson, 
Ed. Shumate & Soni5, of Eskridge; Sebastian Wertzberger, H. W. 
Steinmeyer, Robert Fix, Henry Grimm and Wm. Home, of Yolland: 
Otto and Henry Hess, Henry Loehr, and Finney Bros., of Halifax: 
C. S. Kelley and the Muckenthalers, of Paxico; Henry Fauerbach, 
Frank and Horace Adams, and W. J. Tod, of Maple Hill; Tom Maney, 
Frank Ronneau and John Maguire, of Kaw township (St. Marys); Geo. 
S. Burt and John O'Malley, of Wabaunsee; S. G. Cantrill, of Harvey- 
ville: Herman Arndt of Templin and James Cessnun of Chalk, and 
scores of our farmers who prove by their works their faith in Wabaun- 
see county as among the best stock raising centres of the world. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 29 



f\ Free Ride in a Cattle Gar. 



Item in Signal, June 21, 1893: A tramp giving his name as John 
Fair appeared at the Atchison (Kan.) police station one night, recent- 
ly, bruised from head to foot, and asked permission to sleep at the 
station till morning. Fair said he had come to Atchison from Omaha 
in a through stock train and that he had the most terrible experience 
of his life. Shortly before the train pulled out of Omaha the tramp 
said he crawled into a car loaded with steers. The steers soon began 
to step on him and seeing that would never do the tramp climbed on 
the back of one of the steers. This enraged the animal and it lunged 
forward, exciting the other steers and there was a panic. The mad- 
dened steers dashed about, hooking the tramp on all sides. He put 
his arms about the neck of the steer that he was riding and held his 
grip until the train stopped at Atchison. The tramp's head had 
struck the top of the car a number of times and was badly bruised. 

When Hartman BoUier who, a few years later, was deputy supreme 
organizer of the Maccabees, read the above item in the Signal he 
called at the office and said: "That was rather a tough experience 
that tramp had in the cattle car wasn't it?" "Well, I got in just 
such a fix last summer down in Texas. I was dead broke and wanted 
to get back home but for the life of me I couldn't get employment of 
any kind. But roasting ears were cheap and car fare away down — 
provided the brakeman didn't watch too close. But there was the 
trouble. After being put off about a dozen times I looked up a cattle 
car and crawled in. The outlook wasn't very inviting but I mounted 
on the back of the biggest steer in the car and waited for develop- 
ments. They came soon enough and I got some hard knocks from the 
long-horns. When the horns would get too uncomfortably close I 
would crawl onto another steer— some would kick like blazes and 
others would tremble through fear. W^hen a steer would get down I 
would lay close to his back to keep out of sight of the cow punchers 
until the train started again. This went on all right till I got to a 
little station down in the Indian Territory. Then one of the cow 
punchers spied me out. "What in the name of the great horn spoon 
are you doing in there," said the cowboy. "Oh, just taking a ride." 
"Come out of that or them Texas steers will kill you." "Me and 



;iO EARLY HISTORY OB^ WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



thpstoorsfor that," I aiiRvvcrtHl. for ton<,Mi as ridinp: in a cattle car 
was it beat walking' all to smash. Ihit on being told I could ride in 
thecalxioso 1 bid tlie steers good-bye and thanked the good Lord at 
the prospector getting back to Kansas. "Hut I wouldn't take that 
ride again for a million dollars." And TIartman meant every word 
he said. 



Our Genius in Umbo. 



From Signal, .Jan. U. ISsi.'J: While in prison. John Runyan wrote 
Pilgrim'.s Progress, and Daniel De Foe gave to the world his Robinson 
Cru.soe. Now Harry Faults may not have heard of either of his pre- 
decessors but he is, nevertheless, furnishing additional evidence that 
imprisonment may at times prove a blessing in disguise. 

Since Harry got into that little trouble by taking hold of a rope 
with a horse attached to the other end of it he hasn't employed his 
time making wooden keys to get out and prospect around for more of 
the .same kind of ropes, but he has philosophically accepted the 
.situation and occupies his time in constructing such things as mouse 
cages, toy furniture, ships, etc., indubitable evidence that Harry is a 
genuine mechanic. He has constructed three mouse cages, each 
succeeding attempt being an improvement on the one preceding. 

Confined in the cage last made are two mice, one a little fellow 
that delights to turn the wheel and the other a staid old mouse who.se 
appearance indicates the eaily necessity of a further enlargement of 
the diminutive prison. It is amusing to watch either of the mice as 
they climb the sides of the rapidly turning wheel, or as they make an 
agile spring for the small circular opening in the upper chamber that 
completely hides the prisoners from view. 

Then, there is a dresser, or bureau, surmounted by a gla.ss frame 
and with three glass drawers below. A neatly made chair and center 
table complete the set. 

Rut a year of Harry's life was passed on the ocean. At one time 
for more than fifty days he did not put his foot on the land— on a 
voyage from (Jalvesfon, Texas, to Amsterdam. Harry hasn't forgotten 
how ships that sail the bright seas over are built, and among other 
things lie lias constructed three models of vessels. The last one made 
Is, of course, the best, and is a thing of beauty. 

Each mast has its shrouds— or rope ladders, as a landsman or an 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 31 

editor would call them— made uf thread. There are the hatchways, 
and the galley, or cook house, and, a genuine wheel with cogs to turn 
it. Our reporter never saw a real ship but he has seen lots of models 
and pictures of them and this looks just like them— it is as pretty as a 
picture. But Harry calls this a brigantine, which goes to show that 
our reporter don't know a ship when he sees one. 

Harry being in jail, you may wonder, maybe, where he got his 
tools. You will think, probably, that he has a full kit. "VYell, he has, 
but the kit is a mighty small one— only a saw, a small nail, and a piece 
of glass — nothing more, and what a saw. It is about four or five 
inches long and nearly a half inch wide, the teeth being mere notches 
in the tin. But with these makeshifts of tools Harry does neat work, 
sawing out thin slabs from old cigar boxes — of which material the 
greater part of the various pieces of handiwork are constructed. 

Harry has gone wrong and his mistake should be a warning to the 
hundreds of young men growing up to man's estate who are leaving 
their manhood in the lurch. But Harry may have a better future 
before him. For awhile he may be compelled to sit on the stool of 
repentance— then, we hope a brighter future will welcome him to a 
field of usefulness in the industrial world beyond the portals of the 
Alma jail. 



/Vttending Court in the Sixties. 



From Signal of Feb. 11, 1893: Mr. L. J. McCrnmb was in attend- 
ance at court doing jury service this week and was, as usual, full of 
reminiscences of Auld Lang Syne. It is nearly 25 years since his first 
experience as a juryman in Wabaunsee county. 

Court was held in the Kaufman building (our first court house), 
Judge Morton presided, and John Winkler kept the only hotel in town, 
but Uncle Henry Schmitz supplied the hungry with crackers and 
cheese, and as many of those in attendance at court brought along 
their provisions in baskets and slept in the hay-mow in Schmitz & 
Meyer's barn — to curtail expenses— such little inconveniences as a 
lack of accommodations were unworthy of mention. There were but 
three or four houses in Alma then and most of the jurors picketed 
their horses on the prairie within fifty yards of the court room. 

A court incident of the term is worthy of mention here. Robert 
Marrs, of Dragoon creek, one of the jurors, had picketed his horse near 



32 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



wlieie Falk's marble works are now located. A case was on trial and 
Mr. Marrs was on tlu^ jury. Looking; out of the window he saw a 
passing,' colporttMir i)ick up liis bridle and drive off witli it. 

Bob couldn't stand that, and, rising? from his seat, he said, 
excitedly: ".hid^e will you excu.se me a minute? A man out yonder 
isstealinjr my bridle." Of course Judpe Morton stopped pruceedings 
and Mr. .Marrs lost no time in .securing' pos.se.ssion of his bridle, at the 
same time Riving the thief a piece of his mind. Mr. McCrumb rode to 
court on the back of an Indian pony of the Pottawatomie breed and 
during his week's stay turned his pony into Schmitz & Meyer's hay 
lot on the Mueller corner. 

The bill for the week's feed for the pony was twenty-five cents. 
Mr. MeC'ruiub will retain many pleasant memories of the early days 
but not the least among them will be the recollection of his first jury 
service in the courts of Wabaunsee county. 



f\ RemlniSGeriGe. 



Thirty-one years ago was the time and tlie little frame school 
house in Alma— just south of the court house— was the place— where 
Wl' attended our lirst examination for a teacher's certificate. 

Mr. William F. Cotton was county superintendent, and Mr. John 
T. Keagy, a young attorney just out from Penn.sylvania, was the only 
associate examiner. 

Am(»ng the other applicants for a certificate was Mr. M. K. Andei- 
son, of Rock creek, who, even then wasn't a young man. Mr. W. A. 
Doolittle, afterwards county attorney, was another applicant. His 
whiskers just as long as when we last saw him and the hair on his 
head souie longer. Mr, l*ercival Hawes, the Alta Vista postmaster, 
was there, also, and he, too, had a flowing beard. Mr. Hawes, a few 
years later was elected clerk of the district court. 

We believe there was but one lady applicant, Miss Sallie Pratt, 
now the wife of Mr. John Sudweeks, ex-representative, of Eskridge. 

There were other applicants but their names we can't recall. 
Amoncr the visiting teachers was Mr. J. M. Lingfcltor, afterwards 
superintendent, then a teacher and resident of Wabamisee. 

The examination was oral and all received certificates. It was our 
first examination and our first experience in the school room was in 
District 27— the (Irst term in the. then, new school house. 



f 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 33 

In those days tlie institute was unknown. But later on it came 
and witli it, many new conditions tliat are commendable. Then, the 
teacliers were to one another unknown, They are better acquainted 
now. 

Besides being beneficial from an educational standpoint the insti- 
tutes are profitable in other ways. The associations of a month are 
sometimes very pleasant, but, occasionally, they deprive our education- 
al system of a teacher. 

We know quite a number who have quit the business — conditions 
due mainly to the institute. But if they are happier as housekeepers 
than as teachers who can say them nay. 

At the first annual institute the teachers boarded more in clubs 
than now. There were even then houses to rent. One — not a very 
large one however — was located on the lot belonging to Mrs. J. R. Fix, 
of Volland— on which the Henry Pauly house was moved. 

By reason of its color the house was called the "Little Brown Jug." 
It was afterwards moved to the corner of Main and Missouri streets, 
and, later, farther north — adjoining the Pries store — the front being 
pulled out to save that, and the adjoining buildings, from burning. 

Among the occupants of the "Little Brown Jug" at that first 
institute was a prominent young lady from Wabaunsee, who, several 
years after attended as a delegate to a temperance convention — 
further proof that there's nothing in a name. 

But it is said that three years is the life of a teacher— in the 
school-room. That was ten times three years ago and a full grown 
young gentleman of Maple Hill now addresses that teacher of but 
yesterday as "Mama." 

But, none the less, the days of Auld Lang Syne are recalled. 



/Vn Innocent /vbroad. 



He was not one of Mark Twain's creations— but a genuine speci- 
men of the genus homo from the rural districts of Wabaunsee county. 

We could tell his name, but for obvious reasons we will call him 
Smith— John Smith will do. 

Well, in the month of January, 1892, John went down to Kansas 
City (that wicked town down at the mouth of the Kaw) on business, 
of course. 



\ 



34 EMILY MlSTOllYOF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



When .Inhrr.s l)uslnoss was transacted he hied liiniself to the 
Union dt'ix't. to tako tli(> train for lioni*.'. 

.loini's only fonipaiiion was a blade carpet sack, containing a well- 
\v(»rn suit of clollies, a pair of overshoes and a last year's almanac— 
not a very vahiibie collection— and for this reason, perhaps, John 
th(»iii,'ht it uinit'cossary to pay ten cents at the check stand to insure 
the safety (»f the aforesaid carpet sack until the departure of his train. 

John liad but a few minutes to wait, but in that few minutes a 
stran^fcr came in with an unsteady jrait and a black carpet sack— tlie 
latter a perfect match to that containing John's ancient wardrobe. 

The stranger sat down in the .seat ne.\t to John and put his carpet 
sack alongside of the one John was patiently guarding 

John noticed the similarity of the two carpet sacks but he failed 
to notice the stranger's disappearance, and with him the black carpet 
sack that contained Jcthn's second best suit of clothes and the last 
year's almanac. 

But l)efore long John's train was called and not until then was he 
aware that the carpet sack he picked up was not his property. 

His suit of clothes didn't weigh much and the last year's almanac 
wouldn't make the old carpet sack pull down like— 

"Brickbats!" 

Yes. John had been l)uncoed. 

That innocent, swaggering stranger wasn't as drunk as he woidd 
have folks believe. 

J(flin had read all al)out just such tricks being played on country 
Jakes, and with all hiscuteness he had been buncoed out of a suit of 
clothes— not a very valuable suit, but they were worth more than all 1| 
the brickbats you could stufl in a dozen black carpet sacks. 

But John had no idea of leaving the supposed brickbats without 
first having made a personal inspection of the inside of that carpet 
sack. 

No .sooner was the train under way than John was peering into 
that load of brickbats. 

But the first thing his eyes rested on wasn't a brickbat— that is, 
it didn't look like one— on the outside. It seemed too long and it was 
round instead of square. 

John unwctund the paper wrapper — or rather the three or four 
paper wrappers, and on the inside was a bottle of John Spangler's 
grippe antidote. 

Underneath this was another package just like the first, and a 
little farther down were two fiat bottles, each labeled "Old Rye 
Whiskey, 18G5." 

On the other side there was a variation in the program. 

In the first bundle ooened was a full suit of silk underwear and 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY", KAN. 35 

besides a pair of kid gloves, two pairs of embroidered slippers, and — 
two half-gallon jugs— one of Jamaica rum and the other of Old Scotch 
whiskey." 

Were it not for the fact that John is a staunch prohibitionist we 
would be tempted to pronounce his story a little bit fishy, but we 
guess it is straight goods, for John wears his good clothes every day 
in the week now, and every time we see him he gets up close— so we 
can smell his breath— and it's all O. K. There's no scent of coffee, 
cloves, or tangle-foot about it. 

Jt)hn says he's going to Kansas City again before long and they 
can bunco him again if they want to. ^le's strictly temperate, but he 
has a mortal fear of the grippe, and when so n^any folks are down 
with the blasted complaint it is mighty handy to have lots of prevent- 
ive in the house — especially in a prohibition state, where, in case of 
sickness, such sovereign remedies can't be had for love nor money. 

If you want corroborative proof of the above write to George 
P^'oster. The last we heard of him his post ottice address was Kansas 
City, Kansas. He was practicing law down there — but it seems to us 
he was taking desperate chances— of being buncoed some more. 



1202880 
Sonie Jail Deliveries. 



"Boys we are going out of here tonight." These were the words 
sed by Thomas Babcock in the Alma jail on the night of June 3, 1890 
The boys referred to were Ed. Gordon and Scott Holt, his two com- 
anions. 

Babcock was a waiter on a Rock Island dining car before his arrest 

for stealing diamonds and jewelry to the amount of $400 from Mrs. W. 

S. Johnson, a lady passenger on the west-bound train at McFarland. 

Holt was charged as an accomplice, and Ed. Gordon was in jail for 

hiring a team at Romlck's barn, at Maple Hill, and driving in the 

wrong direction. His alleged destination was Ad. Thompson's, on 

Mission creek, but when next heard from he was In Carroll county, 

H Arkansas, taking his best girl riding in Romick's buggy. 

^L Sheriff Hull went to Arkansas and on March 23rd placed Gordon 

^■behind the bars in the Alma jail. 

^B The "boys" thought Babcock was joking but when he Inverted 
^rthe jail lock— with a big key-hole in the lower end— and began pouring 

[ 



3(5 EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



in a chaiyo of p()\v(l«M- ihoy concluclcfl to repair to the rear cell for fear 
of accidents. After iiisertintr a fuse and driving in a pine plug, 
Biibcock wrapped a blanket about the lock to deaden the sound and— 
well, although Gordon had covered his head with the blankets, he 
said the explosion sounded like a cannon. 

Habcock had verified his statement. The boys walked out and the 
jail was empty. But time hung heavily on their hands and they went 
fishing— at any rate the first report from the fugitives came from 
Nehring branch, up which stream they were leisurely sauntering with 
fisii poles over tlieir siuKilders and one of them carrying a bait can- 
filled with the remains of their last supper— in the Alma jail. 

Tiie trio stayed at Jacob Schreiber's that night and the next 
niorning hired Millard HIankenship to drive them to Carbondale, but 
Millard, at their request, set the three men out on the prairie two 
miles southwest of Auburn. 

ShorifT Hull was in Eskridge but he immediately offered a reward 
of fifty dollars each for the arrest of the escaped prisoners, and with 
half a dozen assistants was .soon hot on the trail. All stations between 
Burlingame and Topeka were watched and nothing being seen of the 
fugitives the country east of Carbondale was scoured. News that the 
fugitives were seen traveling east was learned at the first hou.se, 
prompting a clo.se watch of the Mi.ssouri Pacific and Carbondale roads. 
Nothing resulting it was at once concluded that the blind man — 
Gordon— was piloting the diamond merchants— Babcock and Holt- 
overland to Lawrence. 

At Lincoln— a small post ofiHce, ten miles east of Carbondale, it 
was learned that a man wearing goggles was taking a rest at a house 
thirty feet from the roadside. A few minutes later Gordon was 
comfortably seated in the buggy between Sheriff Hull and the writer. 

Then it was a red-hot race for Lawrence— it now being evident 
that point was the goal Holt and Babcock hoped to reach. The race 
was a hot one in a double sense. The sweat dripped from the horses' 
sides as they sped on their way. But soon it was learned that a man 
driving a .sewing machine wagon was inquiring for the same parties 
and was nf)t far behind the prisoners. 

Sheriff Hull, feeling that the capture of the jail birds was assured, 
gave the team a much needed rest and a light feed of grain— after 
which the race was resumed. Lawrence was soon reached and when 
Sheriff Hull drove up to the jail, a familiar rig was hitched to a post. 
On the tail-board of the machine wagon was the name: "Will Pippert, 
Alma, Kansas." 

Will had overtaken the prisoners riding on a load of wood. As his 
team was nearly run down he drove leisurely behind the wood wagon 
for two miles and then startled Holt and Babcock by saying: "Boys, 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY^ KAN. 37 

you had better ride with me awhile," emphasizing his request by 
pointing a sliotgun in the direction of tlie wood wagon. They had no 
other thought than that Will was returning from a trip in the 
country after delivering a sewing machine. Had they got sight of 
that sign on the rear end of his spring wagon things might have 
been different. 

Just three and a half days after the explosion in the Alma jail 
Sheriff Hull again turned the key on the three jail birds, but he was 
out just one hundred dollars reward money. 

But Gordon's thoughts were with the girl he left behind him— 
after that buggy ride down in Arkansas. He longed for the invigor- 
ating atmosphere of the (Jzarks. Sheriff Hull thought the trip would 
be bad for Gordon's eyes but one Sunday (Aug. 18th) he would let him 
and Babcock exercise in the hallway of the court house while he and 
Scott Holt — who was about sick with malaria — would enjoy the cool 
breeze on the front door steps. 

Noting the absence of Gordon the sheriff was informed by Babcock 
that he had stepped out of the back door. Hustling the two prisoners 
into the jail as quickly as possible Sheriff Hull made strict but unavail- 
ing search for the runaway. 

Cards were sent out but not until Wednesday was the first clue 
obtained. Frank Blanc brought word that Gordon had stopped Tues- 
day night at Philip Bach's, leaving at 4 o'clock Wednesday evening. 
The reward of $100 offered by Sheriff Hull induced a half dozen parties 
to join in the pursuit, but, Gordon, by his zigzag course and playing the 
farmer racket — building fence, etc.— gave the boys a merry chase till 
Thursday night, when he was captured at Council Grove. Friday 
afternoon Sheriff Hull again turned the key on the slickest prisoner 
ever landed in the Alma jail. 

The latter statement could be corroborated by two well-known 
citizens of Alma, who had joined in the search. Seeing a man walk- 
ing along the road they concluded that hundred dollars was as good as 
theirs, but when he passed under the wire fence and began building 
fence they concluded he was a genuine granger and owner of the farm. 
Asking him the way to Council Grove, his ready answer seemed proof 
positive that he wasn't the man they were looking for. 

On making inquiry at the next house for Gordon they were asked 
if they hadn't seen him a short distance down the road. On driving 
back the bird had flown — but not far away— Gordon was lying in a 
washout just across the road — waiting for his pursuers to tie their 
team and continue their search afoot. If Gordon couldn't take his 
best girl buggy riding he would take an airing on his own account. 
He was tired of walking. 

At the close of the October term of court Gordon took a ride— to 
Lansing. 



38 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Bitten by a Tarantula. 



Ill iho fall of 1S91. sdinc Mnia l)oys\vont down intoOklalioma, and 
on their irliirn had a ^n)od deal to say about the tine climate, the ricli 
soil, and the flocks of wild turkeys in that country, but one of their 
number was iDuiu about his narrow escape from the bite of a taran- 
tula. The boys had lain awake until a late hour rofTaliiifj our tender- 
foot with stories of hu^e rattlers, centipedes and tarantulas, and 
when the occupants of the tent were aroused a few hours later by a 
series of blood curdling yells, they were prepared for the worst. Ten- 
derfoot had been bitten by a sure-enough tarantula. A light was 
struck and there were two plainly visible marks on the calf of the leg, 
where the monster spider had inserted his fangs. The remedies at 
liand were few, but the boys did their best to save the life of their 
comrade. They bound salt on the wound and poured about a pint (all 
they had) of axle grease down the throat of the suffering victim. 
Then tlie patient was dosed with wahoo bark, the bitterest decoction 
a man ever swallowed, but the boys had a desperate case on their 
hands and a successful termination could be hoped for only by resort- 
ing to henjic measures. 

The patient was awful sick— from the effects of the axle grease 
and the wahoo l)ut lie got over it and on his return— with his com- 
rades—to Alma there were no visible evidences of the terrible ordeal 
through which he had passed while down in Oklahoma. But no 
sooner had he arrived in Alma than he availed himself of the oppor- 
t unity to interview one of our attorneys— to see if he couldn't make a 
state case against the boys for the trick they had played upon him. 
The boys had stuck a couple of pins an inch or so into his leg, and the 
joke bfing too good to keep, they had given the whole thing away. 
When (icorgo Tenderfoot came to town he invariably brouglit his 
shotgiMi along, giving it out that he was hunting prairie chicUens, but 
the Oklahoma crowd had important business elsewhere until the 
victim of their joke got out of town. 

Doctor Syntax is a permanent resident of Oklahoma now — in fact 
has lived there several years, but he has never yet been called on to 
administer another dose of axle grease to save a patient from death 
from the bite of a tarantula. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 39 



The Lesson of Sarn. 



Sam wasn't what some people deem fit to call a "calamity howler" 
but one of the boys who had heard every day of the prosperous 
condition of our people. 

But somehow Sam didn't share in that condition of prosperity to 
any great extent. So it was quite natural that he should swipe some 
of the good things around him. 

For instance, one of his neighbors possessed a turkey that was fair 
to look upon. This particular turkey was of the feminine gender, and 
she looked forward to the time when the eggs on which she was setting 
should be transformed into a brood of rambling turkeys. 

But Sam had an eye on the eggs, and their peculiar speckled 
appearance created a desire within his breast to own the whole bakery. 
In this case the thought was father to the wish and Sam lost no time 
in carrying out that wish— and the eggs went along for company. 

But the eggs looked lonesome. Sam had heard the song — "What 
is home without a mother?" and he thought of the motherless turkeys 
that he would have on his hands in case the eggs should hatch without 
the assistance of Mrs. Turkey. 

Now, Sam is of a sympathetic turn and the thoughts of the trials 
and hardships of a dozen orphan turkeys prompted him to look out for 
a mother to the prospective waifs. 

It struck him that his taking the eggs had thrown the old turkey 
out of a job, and, probably, this prompted him to give the turkey that 
laid the eggs the preference in letting the job out. 

At any rate the turkey went the same route taken by the eggs, 
and that is what got Sam into trouble. 

So Sam was allowed to rest in the Alma jail to ponder over the 
penalties attendant upon ways that are dark and tricks that are vain, 
wondering whether the reform movement had anything in store for 
him, or mayhap, he was thinking of the effect the McKinley bill 
would have on unhatched turkey eggs. 



40 f:ARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Item In Si^mal, April 20, 1890: One (i:iy last week, as a man on a 
tricycle, accompanied by a jiiR of snake bite antidote was going 
towards Manhattan he met a freight train going in the opposite direc- 
tion at the rate of 35 miles an hour. As there was not room on the 
track for both— the train and the tricycle— there was a collision. 
When the lone passenger .saw that something must happen he grasped 
the treasure most dear to his heart— the jug, and, shutting his eyes, 
was just preparing for a jump, when the locomotive struck the bow of 
liis craft. Instead of landing on terra firma, as he intended, he found 
him.self .sprawling on the cow-catcher, with his head jammed against 
the boiler— but the jug was all right. The tricycle was thrown on top 
of the bank. When the train men went forward to pick up the piece.s, 
they found the jug's contents in good condition, and the man, save a 
few contusions on the head, able to take a rational view of the situa- 
tion. After a mournful glance over the remains of his tricycle, he 
said: "Boy.s, that was a narrow escape, let's take a drink." 



Years ago Wabaun.see county had an oil excitement. The party 
responsible for it had a few weeks before unearthed a bonanza in the 
way of an ochre bed that had failed to meet the expectations of the 
finder. Rut the prospect for oil was more flattering. In this case the 
oil was to be seen floating on the surface of a spring from which the 
water supply for the family was wont to be taken. But the oil float- 
ing on the surface imparted such a disagreeable flavor to the water 
that it was no longer tit for drinking purposes. An old oil expert was 
called in and when he stated that the offensive odor was a peculiar 
property of coal oil in its crude state the property owner was more 
than ever convinced that he had a bonanza on his premises. But 
further investigation by the expert disclosed the source of the offen- 
sive oil. It came from a point not far above the spring, where lay the 
decaying carcass of a skunk. And thus was blighted the fond hopes of 
one who proved to be the innocent victim of Wabaunsee county's first 
oil excitement. 

But another oil excitement brought better results. It came to 
the people of Alma— in a well, this time. The water tasted so strong 
of coal oil that nobody could drink it. The suggestion that .some joker 
had poured oil into the newly dug well was unheeded. One wiseacre 
said there was more oil in that well than in all the houses and stores 
in town. The news spread far and wide. A company was formed and 
a hole was bored (iOO feet deep. But instead of coal oil, salt was found. 
Then came the Alma .salt works with an output of thirty barrels of 
prime salt a day— an industry that might have proven a very large 
infant and it all grew out of that pint of coal oil, that, in a joke, Mr. 
Fred Link poured into the well he was digging for Mr. John Winkler. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





DR. M. F. TRIVETT, 
Eskridge. 



JUDGE THEODORE S. SPIELMAN, 
Alma. 





MR. P. L. WOODY, 
Snokomo, 



MRS. P. L. WOODY, (deceased), 
Snokomo. 



J 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. S. H. FAIRFIELD, Alma. 
Former Register of Deeds, and County Treas. 



MR. C. O. KINNE, P. M., Alma. 
Former County Clerk. 





MR. ROBERT STROWIG, Paxico. 
Former County Commissioner. 



MR. DOW BUSENBARK, Editor Eskridge Stor. 
Former County Superintendent. 



EARLY HISTOEY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. CHAS. B. HENDERSON, Alma. 



MR. ARTHUR 8. ALLENDORPH, Alma. 





MR. J. H. JONES, Pavilion. 
Former County Attorney, and Surveyor. 



MR. B. BUCHLI (dec'd), Alma. 
Former County Surveyor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. WYATT ROUSH. Alma. 
Clerk District Conrt. 



MR. T. J. PERRY, Alma. 
County Superintendent of Schools. 





MR. B. BUCHLI, Alma. 
County Clerk. 



MR. JOS. LA FONTAINE, Alma. 
County Treasurer. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





Mr. Feed Frey Sheriff, Alma. 



Me. Feank Schmidt, Under Sheriff, Alma. 




1 




p 




ii- 


^ ^^^^"^HI 


1 


ji^J 



Me. Frank Wiedemann, Deputy Sheriff, Alma. Me. Feank Clayton, Deputy Sheriff, Alma. 

FRED AND THE THREE FRANKS. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JAMES CARROLL, 
Alma. 



MB. FRED. A. SEAMAN. 
County Attorney, Alma. 





MR.'.WILLIAM DREBING (deceased), 
Halifax. 



MR. MICHAEL HUND (deceased), 
Newbury. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. J. B. FIELDS, Alma. 



MR. OSCAR SCHMITZ, Alma. 




MR. P. P. SIMMONS, Eskridge. 



MR. H. B. CHANNEL, Chalk. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. J. W. ROBERTSON, Eskridge. 



MR. MARK PALMER, Eskridge. 





MR. WM. T. ECKLE3. Eskridge. 



MR. ROSS Mccormick, Aima. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN, 





^^v^|_^ 




a* 




MR. ED. CAMPBELL. Eskridge. 



MR. A. T. TAYLOR, Eskridge. 





MR. C. C. GARDINER, Bradford. 



MR. J. J. MITCHELL, Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. AND MRS. GEO. S. CONNELL, 
Paxico. 



MR. AND MRS. CHAS. BURGETT, 
Eskridge. 





MR. JOHN A. HANKAMMER (dec'd), 
Farmer Township. 



MR. ADAM KRATZER (dec'd). 
Hendricks Creek. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 41 



[\ Just Tribute to the Gerrnans. 



Signal, Jan. 2, 1892: Our German residents, who are engaged in 
the business of farming, are proverbially thrifty and successful. We 
were led to reflect upon the reason for this recently when going 
through a comparatively new region that had been lately settled by 
them. The fields, to be sure, were clean and well cultivated, but not 
so strikingly different from others in this respect as to care for special 
comment; but every farm possessed a good barn. The houses were 
small, and cheap, as a rule, and no more money had been expended on 
them than was required to make them serve the stern necessities of 
life, but the barns were large and substantial, and, what is more, they 
were utilized. The crops were housed in them, and not left exposed 
in the fields. There was room for all the stock, so that it could be 
kept clean and comfortable. We presume these barns had been built 
only by the most stringent self-denial. Perhaps money had been bor- 
rowed and the farm mortgaged to do it. If so, it was the part of 
wisdom for it is just as true that a good barn will earn double the 
interest on the cost each year as it is true that a poor farm will make 
a poor farmer. — Extract from an Exchange. 

The above will apply to the situation in Wabaunsee county as well 
as anywhere. The foundation for the thrift that is characteristic of 
our German residents lies in the fact that their live stock— the great- 
est source of income are well cared for and comfortably housed. They 
are not f)f that class of farmers who sell off their corn in the fall and 
the hides of their cattle in the spring. Though the above was writ- 
tea years ago no m)re fitting tribute could today be paid our thrifty 
-German farmers, who have done more than their .share to transform 
bleak prairies into comfortable homes no longer typified by the squalid 
structure of pioneer days. Thrift, born of frugality, is evidenced in 
the substantial stone residence or frame mansion, that compared with 
the former liomes of our people, are palatial in a[)poaraiice, to say 
nothing of their comfortable surroundings. 

The following extract from the Ivansas City Star, published in the 
Signal a few weeks subsequent to the above is a deserved tribute to 
our German fellow citizens that we feel constrained to in.sert here. "In 
a hasty estimate of the Germa!i ciiaracter as developed in this country 



42 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



It may bo said that its Icadiiifr traits are honesty, truthfulness, thrift 
and devulioii to home and fauiily. Tlie (icrman, whether as an em- 
ploye, in business for himself, or in tlie pursuit of a profession or 
science, is a steadfast worker. He aims always at a competence, but 
he never seeks it throuKli devious methods. He saves his money, but 
he does not cheat himsolf (»r his family to do so. His home is always 
as good a one as his means alford without extravagance. His family is 
contented and happy because he shares with his wife and children the 
fruits of his labor. He has a high idea of principle and is earnest and 
enthusiastic in his advocacy of what he believes to be right. He is a 
good citizen, is deferential to the law, tenacious of his own rights, but 
tolerant of the rights of others, and seeks all the honest comforts 
which are to be found in life for liimself, his family, and his friends. 



rtow the Old Pioneer UVed. 



Prompted either by verdancy, or a proneness to ask questions, 
inquiries are often made as to the numerous expedients resorted to by 
the old pioneers that the wolf, hunger, might be kept at bay. 

The people living today in Wabaunsee county capable of giving to 
the questions asked answers based on personal observation and experi- 
ence are few in number, and these are fast passing away. 

If we would inform ourselves from first hands the time is oppor- 
tune and the occasion pressing. 

Though reluctant to review the hardships of the early days there 
are those among us who could relate incidents that would impart a 
Munchausen flavor to the recital and yet be as worthy of credence as 
gospel truths. 

And yet these seeming hardships were not without their compen- 
sations. But a little reflection suggests the doubt as to the existence 
of any greater hardships in the experience of the old pioneers than 
have characterized the lives of those who may look upon their own 
period of existence as golden in comparison. If the viands were few 
the appetite was good and digestion was never impaired by partaking 
of a multiplicity of dishes, some of the ingredients of which wouldn't 
pass muster before a board delegated to examine into their hygienic 
value. 

Modern methods and scientific research have but evolved such 
breakfast delicacies as toasted wheat flake from that which the 



EARLY HISTOkY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 43 

pioneer housewife still regards as far superior — musli and milk— often 
with the milk wanting. The modern epicure is over ready to extol 
the merits of the Mexican tortilla but is oblivious to tho toothsome- 
ness of a dish of parched corn — and yet it is simply a case of "before" 
and "after" taking. One is rendered edible before grinding, and the 
other, after being ground in a Mexican hand mill. But our fore- 
mothers used a coffee grinder and never dreamed that the product 
wasn't palatable and wholesome till their grandchildren began to 
enumerate the hardships endured by the old settlers. 

These same granddames never dreamed that it was a liardship to 
wear old clothes, when— there were no callers, or, if so, all met on a 
common level— the one being no better apparelled than the other. 
But those who would withhold their approval of the early-day diet 
of pumpkins and bread might well bear in mind the fact that some- 
times there was a variation in the bill of fare — often the bread was 
lacking. If there was a dearth of cream to render the dish of pump- 
kin more palatable there was no gormandizing, and, perforce, no 
dyspeptics — hence no doctors needed, and the services of no under- 
taker in demand. 

While enumerating the hardships that fell to the lot of the old 
pioneers don't forget the absence of purse proud capitalists with 
mortgages to foreclose, hence from the sheriff or constable there were 
no unwelcome calls, or, in fact, calls from officials— would be— or other- 
wise—except those of biennial recurrence characterized by a periodical 
and newly excited interest in the health of the youngest baby, or the 
outlook for crops, and — votes— and the latter, merely incidental. 

The old pioneer will tell you truly that there were no hardships in 
the early days that would embitter the cup of happiness as do the 
trials of today. If there was isolation, there was, also, contentment. 
If of luxuries there was a dearth, no canker of debt-worm followed in 
the wake of the few that were the more heartily enjoyed by reason of 
that scarcity. 

The pioneer's strong arm and earnest endeavor laid the foundation 
upon which was builded the happy home— where, in later years, sur- 
rounded by those held above all things else most dear, he laid himself 
down to rest. When the last of his kind shall have been gathered to 
his fathers may the living be ever mindful that he left no legacy that 
he would not have them enjoy to the full. In their behalf he labored. 
For them he passed through the many trying ordeals that lay in his 
pathway. 

That our own journey through life might be all the more enjoyable 
the old pioneer endured every hardship without a murmur. He 
obeyed uncomplainingly the Biblical injunction to earn his daily bread 



44 EA RLY HISTORY OF WABAHNOKE COUNTY, KAN. 



by the sweat of his brow a »iil found enjoyment therein. Let us emu- 
hito liis exaniplo; ao homajje to his memory, and endeavor to enjoy 
with him his reward in tliat home beyond the Grave. 



Our Ftesources and Prospects. 



Of resources weliave: 

810 .square miles of territory. 

A desirable climate and a soil of unsurpas.sed fertility. 

Well tilled farmsand an industrious, energetic people. 

A plentiful supply of good water, excellent natural roads and un- 
limited facilities in the line of building material. 

Good health for all and ample wealth as a certain reward for the 
frugal and progressive people of every class who choose to cast their 
lot with us. 

As to our prospects: 

Po.s.sessing many natural advantages and having but few draw- 
backs Wabaunsee county stands second to none as a desirable location 
for the homeseeker. Wiiile fortunes are not made in a day with us 
there is in store for the honest, industrious and deserving a life of 
happiness, contentment and prosperity. 

We enter here no appeal for an influx of population. We speak in 
the interest of no land agent or syndicate. Our duty is simply that of 
a recorder of facts relating to the past and the present. We are will- 
ing that the future shall take care of itself, believing as we do that we 
have a future and such a one as can but be based on a solid foundation. 

The foundation is already laid. The brawn and muscle of pioneers 
of 35 and 40 years ago begun the work tluit has been so creditably 
carried forward by their successors. There is no lack of material for 
the completion of the structure and we have no fear as to the handi- 
work of the builders of the future. 

Our natural resources are unsurpassed, and our acquired facilities 
are unexcelled. We need but to continue what has already begun. 

Right here we are reminded of a remark handed down by one of 
our best informed (ierman citizens of years ago. Tie went down at 
Platte Bridge but his words still live. 

In his broken English the Sebastian Nehring of years ago said: 
"This is a good country— much better in many respects than the 
Fatherland. Tlio vino-clad hills of the old country are not so rich as 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 45 

the rocky hills of Wabaunsee county. Children now living will one day 
see these hills covered with the vine and great clusters of the grape 
will hang pendant on the hills that are now bare." 

And Sebastian Nehring believed in that which will ere long come 
true. The development of our resources may be less nipid than he 
thought but it will come. Look back ten years and see how marked 
the change. Another decade farther back and yet more marked may 
be seen the changes time has wrought. Ten years again and we are 
lost. No school houses, and churches, none. The deer and the ante- 
lope are seen on our hills and the buffalo is not far away. And the 
Indian, though not hostile, his presence is a suggestion of danger that 
is not all a myth. 

Forty years ago the log cabin was the rule and teams of oxen 
furnished the only means of travel and freight transportation. 

From necessity the ways of the people were primitive; from neces- 
sity they were compelled to resort to expedients that were not any the 
more agreeable for the reason that their adoption was not a matter of 
choice. 

But that adversity that inarked the beginning has served to render 
the homes of our people doubly dear to tho.se with whose lives that 
adversity is entwined. 

The dark hours of the past are illumined by the brightness of 
future promise. Now and then there may be a halt. Short crops may 
in the future as in the past cause anxious borebodings, but the dark 
clouds will disappear and the failing heart will be imbued with new 
life by the silver lining that lay hidden beyond. 

With the past we have successfully battled. That a bright future 
is in store for us we mav rest assured. 



Janurary 4th being Saturday, Mr. Oliver Smith, teaching in the 
Thoes district concluded to go to Alma and as it was very cold he 
thought it ivould be a good time to break in his new skates. Being 
asked as to the thickness of the ice, he said he found one place where 
it was about a quarter of an inch thick, but from the temperature of 
the water below the prospect for four foot ice was good. As he didn't 
break through any place where the ice was thick he could give no 
information that would be of value to a man going into the ice busi- 
ness. The point where he broke through was two miles from town 
and the weather being of the zero variety, his clothes were imme- 
diately frozen stiff, but he said he wasn't a bit cold till he got to the 
tire and the water began dripping from his wearing apparel. 



40 EARLY HISTORY OK W A BAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



f\ Cheyenne Raid. 



*.hme.{. IStiS. 400 C'lieyennes with llieir war paint on came swooping 
down oil Council (Jrove. There was a big scare but tlie Cheyennes 
were after the Kaws instead of the whites. A short time before a 
Kaw Indian was herding the ponies belonging to the tribe when 8 
Clieyennes put in their appearance and after killinti the lone Indian 
drove oti tlie ponies he was lierciinj;. 

The Clieyennes then attempted to drive the ponies by a circuitous 
route into their camp, but the Kaws had witnessed the killing from 
t!ie top of a hill and collecting a number of their warriors they KMlled 
7 of the S Clieyennes and captured 40 ponies besides retaking their 
own herd. 

The Cheyennes wanted 7 Kaw scalps and 40 ponies but after skir- 
mishing awhile among the hills about the Grove they left postponing 
the settlement of the scalp account to some future time. 

The same year the Cheyennes raided the farms in Marion county, 
driving otf .some stock but killing none of the settlers. But by reason 
of their presence many families slept for weeks in the corn fields, 
fearing that during the night their houses would be burned to the 
ground. 



Signal, March 19, 1892: A few years ago a bright young fellow was 
working as a farm liand for Uncle Henry Schmitz. But his aspirations 
were in another direction. He attended the Agricultural college at 
Manhattan and afterwards entered the ministry. Among the appoint- 
ments made at the M. E. Conference we notice that of Rev. Dan. 
Brummitt, Maple Hill. liev. Brummitt and tlie young farm hand are 
one and the same, and our knowledge of the young fellow induces the 
belief on our part that the people of Maple Hill will have no cause to 
regret his coming among them by reason of his having followed the 

*One of our youngest county otlicers, Mr. D. U. Millison, distinctly 
reineml)ers tliis raid. His parents resided in Council Grove at the 
time, and though but a boy of six years he remembers being crowded 
into a place of safety with tlie other children and their mothers till 
the scare was over. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 47 

plow. Roger Sherman was a cobbler and yet a few years later he was 
an honored representative of the people at the National capital; the 
poet, Whlttier, was a farmer's boy, and nothing grieved him so much 
on leaving the old homestead as the parting from a pair of favorite 
oxen of his own raising; Henry Clay was a farmer's boy and with his 
rope bridle and sack of corn was known as the "Mill boy of the 
Slashes;" Daniel Webster was another farmer's boy, who received liis 
education from the proceeds of a mortgage on the home that sheltered 
his aged parents, but in after years when he electrified the nation 
with his eloquence, no one honored him the less by reason of his former 
humble avocation. 



"Wooh!" 



It was a terrible night in the winter of '61. The winds howled 
without and the fine particles of snow sifted through the clap-board 
roof of the Michael Fix home on West branch. The war was going on 
and Robert was away in the army — having enlisted in an Indiana 
regiment, while one of the brothers was with Kit Carson, in New 
Mexico. 

In the Fix home there was but one room below and a half story 
above, but the one room was 14x22— a big house in those days. There 
was a stove at one end and a huge fireplace at the other. In cold 
weather it was the custom to replenish the fiire one or more times 
during the night and when Mother Fix awoke the smoldering embers 
and the chilly atmosphere suggested to her that the duty of rebuild- 
ing tlie fire had been too long delayed. 

There was a pile of wood in the corner neaYby and she would get 
up and throw on a few sticks. Michael was sound asleep and it would 
be cruel to wake him. But when that piercing "Wooh!" broke the 
stillness of the night Michael's snoring ceased and he sat bolt upright 
in bed, asking in a tone of anxiety: "What's the matter?" 

But the faint, flickering light from the burning embers told the 
story. Prone on the floor lay a score of Indians— of all ages and both 
sexes. On one of these the feet of Mrs. Fix had rested in getting up 
to rebuild the fire. But a familiar voice answered Mr. Fix's question. 
"No hurtee. Indians cold. Heap storm outside." 

A band of twenty Pottawatomies had been camped down by the 
creek (where the mill was built in 1872) and the storm of wind and 



43 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



snow had driven them (ni( of tlicir hastily constructed wijjwains. 
Many cold nijfhts before they liad enjoyed a good nap, wrapped in 
their l)lankct.s before lliehujic lireplaee in the Fix cabin and wlien llie 
storm burst upon them they didn't wait for an invitation locall a^ain 
—even at an unseemly hour. There was no lock on the door and the 
hitch-string was out— why awaken their pale-face friends from tlieir 
slumber? 

Thus the Indians had reasoned. Tlicy had fur years looked upon 
the old mill-site almost as their own. With each returning winter 
came the same band of Indians, always camping near the spot where 
t he mil! stood later on. 

Tile Indians had many 1 inies eaten a hearty meal in the Fi.v home. 
but they were not beggars, l)y any nie;ins. Many a saddle of vcnisnn 
had been brought to the Fix cabin to partly compensate theii' friends 
for the many kindnesses shown. 

In the hills on West branch there were many deer in those days 
and Mr. I'ix was the owner of one of the best ritles in the country— 
that the visiting Indians never failed to borrow on their annual 
return to their favorite liunting grounds. In the breech of the rifle 
was a compass— that greatly enhanced its value in the eyes of the 
Indian hunters and sometimes when tlie Pottawatomies would go on a 
raid in the Pawnee country for ponies, or on a butTalo hunt, the gun- 
hooks in the Fix home would be unused for months in succession. 
But the gun was always returned- -and with it a goodly supply of 
buffalo meat for the owner. 

That I)and of Pottawatomies long ago encamped for the last time 
on the old mill-site but the incident of that stormy night in the 
winter of l<S(jl will long be remembered by the Fix family— the time 
when (rrosmutter said— "Woohl"' 



No history of Wabaun.see county written and published at this 
time would be complete without mention of the fact that the 
researches and explorations of the eminent explorer and archaeologist. 
.r, V. Brower, now definitely locates the province of Quivira. which 
Coronado with his thirty horsemen explored in 1541 between Walnut 
creek village site in Barton county and the village sites on Deep 
creek and at the heads of the West branch of Mill creek in Riley and 
Waljaunsce counties. Mr. Brower has published two works, "Quivira" 
and "Ilarahey" in which the earliest history jof part of Wabaun.see 
county has been written, and has placed in the Minnesota Historical 
Society Museum such conclusive evidence from an archaeologic and 
historical view that bis conclusions are likely to be accepted by the 
Scientific World. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 49 



No Iron Hrorse, Then. 



But there were meals at all hours, nevertheless. At least, so it 
seemed, to Mr. S. H. Fairfield in 1860— the first night he ever slept on 
the present site of McFarland. He was the guest of Old She-Kah-Za, 
a big chief of the Pottawatomies. 

The old chief made him a comfortable bed of mats and soft-tanned 
buflfalo robes served as covering. But Mr. Fairfield's sleep wasn't as 
sound as it miglit have been. Plumed warriors in their war paint and 
feathers were passing all night and She-Kah-Za, being one of the head 
councilmen of the Pottawatomies, had a right to know the outcome 
of their raid against their old-time enemies — the Pawnees— from 
which the war parties were just returning. 

If the number of extra ponies they had brought back and the gen- 
eral good feeling tliat prevailed were indications of that success 
attendant on the expedition then no further evidence was wanting. 
The old chief would get up and smoke with every party that called 
and in every case, refreshments, consisting of jerked buffalo meat, 
dried venison and boiled pumpkin were set before the nocturnal 
visitors. 

With much gesticulation the warriors would relate the stirring 
events that transpired while raiding the Pawnee villages, and the 
newly kindled fire in tlie old chief's eyes plainly indicated that old- 
time reminiscences were recalled and that, in spirit at least, he was 
fighting over again the battles wherein tlie tomahawk and scalping 
knife played a prominent part. 

Althougli Old She-Kah-Za lived in a bark wigwam he was well 
fixed and one of the most influential members of the Pottawatomie 
nation. But tlie old warrior was long ago laid to rest, and though 
miraculous were the many changes time had wrought in his eventful 
career he never dreamed that in less than half a century the shrill 
neigh of the iron horse would be heard where the tom-tom had so 
often called together the warriors of his tribe. 

The thousands of travelers who daily pass through on the Rock 
Island could hardly be convinced that less than half a century ago the 
bark wigwam of an Indian chief was the most conspicuous object, and 
the most frequented resort, of all the country around about the pres- 
ent city of McFarland. 



50 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Odds and E.nds. 



T)r. E. B. Allen, wlio was :ifl('r\v;iids secretary of state once lived 
at Wabaunsee. He bou^^ht school land at $3.00 an acre on lont? time, 
and planted the grove on the Jos. LaFontaine place. Like his 
neighbors he was poor in everything but hope and future prospects. 
He used a box for a table, tin plates for dishes, and three legged stools 
served the purpose of chairs. But Mi.ss Mary Garrison, who taught 
the first term of school in Dist. No. 5, in 1860, took pity on his lonely 
condition and shared with liim his log cabin home' at Wabaunsee. 
They afterwards nK)ved to Wichita, where fortune and otticial lionors 
smiled on one of our old citizens of pioneer days. 



Old residents of Wabaunsee township have a vivid recollection of 
one of tlieir number, who, in 1859, took all his belongings and with his 
estimable wife, journeyed to Pike's Peak in a wagon drawn by oxen. 
But the wagon was a neighbor's, who went with him to share his 
fortunes in the placer diggings of California Gulch. A fork of a tree 
with standards titted into two-inch augur holes answered the purpose 
of a wagon. This would glide over the prairie gra.ss as smoothly as a 
sled over the snow— a fact that could be attested to by many of the old 
settlers, no better Hxed, tinancially, than the man wlio afterwards 
went to the U. S. Senate from Colorado. Mount Tabor was named for 
the man who selected his claim near the ba.se of that old land mark. 
His old time friends regret their former neighbor's actif»n in casting 
aside the wife of former years— whose bounty his straightened cir- 
cumstances compelled him to accept later on, but the incident is 
valuable to those who miglit otherwise envy the lot of one to whom 
fickle fortune proved a delusion and a snare. The les.son of the old 
pioneer's life serves a good purpose— teaching those who may be 
envious of others holding otticial place, or, seemingly more fortunate 
financially, that a senatorial toga or the possession of riches, isn't an 
essential element in insuring one of the most desirable of earthly con- 
ditions—that of unalloyed happiness. Though that grub-stake may 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 51 

have brought millions to the owner of that little store in the moun- 
tains of Colorado the poor miner left with but a pittance to send home 
to wife and family saw more of true happiness in a day than was 
enjoyed by Senator Tabor in a life time— an excellent argument to 
induce the wayward boys to "stick to the farm." 



In 1858, Mr. Robert Fix followed the example of many of his 
neighbors by going on a buffalo hunt. He found plenty of buffalo on 
the Smoky Hill, twenty miles west of Salina. The pioneers may have 
seen hard times but there are scores of boys living in Wabaunsee 
county today who would risk being scalped by the Indians for the 
privilege of going on a buffalo hunt. But in those days there were 
some drawbacks for those who were absent for several weeks that the 
larder might be replenished. The married man of the hunting party 
couldn't call up the young wife by telephone and ask: "How is the 
baby." And the young men of today with the bare suspicion of a 
mustache shading the upper lip might have enjoyed the trip, but to be 
completely cut off from all communication with the girl he left behind 
him might have altered the case. Then, there was the danger of his 
esteemed rival's taking advantage of the situation during his three 
weeks absence. These are the fellows, who, today, more than others 
realize the fact that the hard times said to have been experienced by 
the old settlers were not all a myth. 



The value of the work of our local pliotographers as an auxiliary 
factor in presenting our readers and those who will come after us with 
true and life like representations of scenes and faces cannot be over- 
estimated. But the photographer of the present can well afford to 
divide the honors with the traveling artist of the past. With un- 
bounded delight do we scan the lineaments of those most dear to us — 
made possible by the old time photographers advent among us even in 
advance of other civilizing influences. While crossing the plains in 
1862 we distinctly remember that at the crossing of the Little Arkan- 
sas, on the Old Santa Fe Trail, one of these traveling artists was 
encamped— going where, it is hard to tell, but maybe he knew. Be- 
sides being of an adventurous spirit he was accomodating as well. 
With what patience did lie upset the contents of box after box in his 
search for— well, it doesn't matter. Suffice it to say that when -we 
returned to our camp we were well satisfied with our trip. That was 
forty years ago next July and we have often wondered where on earth 
that clever old man was going with his tripod and camera, and what 



52 EARLY HISTORY OB^ WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



he was doiiijf away out there on the Little Arkansas. But it doesn't 
seem so far away now. Maybe lie was taking sketches of the immense 
herds of buffalo tliat were never out of sifjht in the sixties, or of the 
bands of Indians, whose presence wasn't always agreeable to the men 
and l)(>ys who always enjoyed life on the plains better when the red- 
skins were out of sight. It was a case wherein distance lent enchant- 
ment to the view. 



Coronado's C;,xpedition. 



Although Wabaunsee county doesn't claim the honor of being 
directly on the line of march taken by the adventurous Spaniard, but, 
undoubtedly, hunting parties belonging to the expedition in search of 
game traversed the fertile valleys of Mill Creek. 

The route of the expedition lay through the counties of Barber, 
Kingman, Reno, Harvey, McPhei-son, Marion, Dickin.son, Davi.s, 
Riley. Pottawatomie, Nemaha, and Atchison, to the Missouri river, 
thence down the Mis.souri to the mouth of the Kaw, thence westerly 
on the northern bank to the North fork of the Smoky Hill, up the 
Smoky Hill to Big Creek, and thence South to the Arkansas. 

• It is just 362 years since Coronado with 300 Spaniards and 800 
natives started from a point in the Northern part of Mexico to find 
the famed seven cities of Cibola. 

After traveling 700 miles in a north-east direction from the Rio 
Grande they arrived at the Arkansas. Their supply of provisions 
running short, the main army, commanded by a subordinate officer re- 
turned to the Rio Grande, while Coronado with 30 horsemen and 6 foot- 
soldiers marched further on. 

When a half million dollars had been expended the Indian guide 
confessed, at the cost of his life, that the fabulous stories told of the 
wealth of the great country of Quivira were conceived in order to 
lure the Spaniards to destruction, that their people might live in the 
enjoyment of life and happiness in their homes in the Land of the 
Aztec. 



¥ 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




OUR COUNTY AND SCHOOLS, 18S6. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE CODNTY, KAN. 63 



Our Schools. 



DISTRICT ORGANIZATION. 

District 1 was formed October 4, 1859; comprised the whole of 
Wabaunsee township. First board of directors; Joshua Snlith, Geo. 
A. Dibble and Enoch Piatt Formed by .I.E. Piatt, county superin- 
tendent. 

District 2 was formed October 15, 1859, with the following board 
of directors: S. A. Baldwin, W. F. Cotton and Joshua Smith— the 
latter resigning in district 1 on account, of change of boundaries. L. A. 
Parker was appointed to till the vacancy in district, 1. J'ormed by J. 
E. Piatt, county superintendent. 

District 3 was formed February 17, 1862, with A. C. Tucker, A. W. 
Gregory and T D. Rose, directors. J. H. Gould, county superinten- 
dent. First meeting March 4 at Volney Love's. 

Note. Prior to August 19, 1862, school districts were numbered 
by townships. On that date the districts were renumbered as follows: 
District 1 was district I, Wabaunsee township: district 2 v\as district 
2, Wabaunsee townsliip, district 3 was district 3, Wabaunsee township: 
district 4 was district I, Mission Creek township: district 5 was district 
2, Mission Creek township; district 6 was district 1, Zeandale township; 
district 7 was district 2, Zeandale townsliip: district 8 was districts 1 
and 2, Alma township; district 9 was district 3, Alma township: dis- 
trict 10 was in Alma township: district 11 was distiict 1. Wilming- 
ton township: district 12 was district 2, AVilmington township: district 
13 was district 1, Elm Creek; district 14was in Alma township: district 
15 was in Mission Creek (Dover) township. 

District 4 was organized by J. E. Piatt, county superintendent. 
S. E. Beach was elected clerk and D. M. Johnston treasurer. (No 
director named in record.) 

District 5, organized March, 1860, with S. E. Beach, W. K. Beach 
and H. .1. Loomis, as directors; J. H. Gould, county superintendent. 

District 6 was district 15 (the original No. 6 being in Zeandale 
toivnsliip). The number was changed to 6 in 1^71. S. F Ross, Anson 



:V» EAKLV II ISTOKY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Ed(iy and Orson Frizzle first district board. J. H. Gould was coiiniy 
suptTinli'iidiMil. 

I>isl rict 7 was or^^ani/cd Marcli 7. 1874. (The original No. 7 wa.s 
dciac-Iu'd wit!) Zraiidalo township.) ']"lic lirst meeting was held at the 
ludise of .John Shaw. March 2(). W. S McC'orniick was county super- 
intendent. 

District 8 was formed by uniting Nos. 1 and 2. Alma township. 
Number changed August 11>, lS(i2. No. 1 was formed November 9, 
l.s(JO: C Zwanziger. clerk, and Franz Schmidt, treasurer: J. fl Gould, 
county superintendent. 

Uistrict 2 was formed November 14. 1860, with John Spieker, 
director, Anton Schewe, clerk, and Wm Drebing, treasurer; J . IT 
Gould, county superintendent. 

District 9 (No. 3, Alma township) was formed April 23, 1862, J. II. 
Gould, county superintendent. Edward Hoffman was director, ITeniy 
Volland, treasurer, and E. L. Lewis, clerk. 

District 10 was formed in 1862 by J. H. Gould, county superinten- 
dent. First otlicers: Rudolph Arndt, director, Chas. Lehmberg, 
clerk: Karl Kopke, treasurer. 

District II was formed June 11, 1861. (This was district 1, of 
Wilmington township.) H. S. Faunce, director, H. D. Shepard, clerk, 
and Samuel Cripps, treasurer; J. H. Gould, county superintendent. 

District 12 was formed by J. H. Gould, county superintendent, 
September 4, 1861. John Garringer was director, Isaiah Harris, clerk 
and James E. Johnson, treasurer. 

District 13 (No. 1, Elm Creek), organized by J. II. Gould, county 
superintendent, February 3, 1862; Wm. Eldred, director, P. A. Green, 
clerk, and Uriah Sanner, treasurer. 

District 14, organized November 8, 1862, by J. II. Gould, county 
superintendent; Joseph True, director, John Hess, treasurer, and 
John Copp, clerk; first meeting November 8, 1862. 

District 15— March 10, 1872; AV. F. Cotton, county superintendent: 
first meeting March 28. 

District 15 (joint), organized by J. H. Gould, county superinten- 
dent, April 23, 1863; John Sage, director, Henry Read, treasurer, and 
Jacob Haskell, clerk. 

District 16, formed January 19, 1865, of parts of districts 3, 8, 9, by 
Isaiah Harris, county superintendent; John Mahan, director, Franz 
Schmidt, treasurer, G, Zwanziger, clerk. The children of school age 
numbered 14, as follows: G. Zwanziger, 3, John Mahan, 2, Franz 
Schmidt, 1, Phillip Litz, 4, Fred Palenske, 4. In the distribution of 
school property the new districts were assessed in amounts as follows: 
From district 9, $I.12i: from district 3, $5.80; from district 8, $70.87. 

District 17, formed March 30, 1874. " First meeting was held at the 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUKSEE COUNTY, KAJS. 55 

home of Francis Meier, April 11: W. S. McCormick, county superin- 
tendent. 

XoTE. A district numbered 17 was formed by Isaiah Harris, 
county superintendent, August 23, 1836, of territory in the northern 
part of Mission Creek township (now Maple Hill). P'irst directors were 
Reuben Haas, James L. "Wightman and R. H. Waterman. 

District 18, formed in 1867 by Isaiah Harris, county superinten- 
dent : Geo. Schade, Wm. Home and Samuel Thackery, first board of 
directors. 

District 19, formed April 16, 1874: first meeting at house of J. L. 
Muehlenbacher, May 7: W. S. McCormick, county superintendent. 

District 20: date of petition December 23, 1867: first officers, Wm. 
.M,cCormick, C. I). Carpenter and W. H. Earle: Isaiah Harris, county 
superintendent; first meeting March 31, 1863. 

District 21, date of petition, December 27, 1867: first officers, Thos. 
Barker, John Nevins, E. K. Drake; Isaiah Harris, county superinten- 
dent. 

District 22, formed January, 1868, by Isaiah Harris, county super- 
intendent; first officers, J. M. Bisbey, H. A. Stiles, L. C. Keyes. 

District 23, formed May 3, 1867; first officers, J. C. Goldsberry, Wm. 
Exori and Geo. Yannatta; Isaiah Harris, county superintendent. 

(District 24 in Zeandale township, by Isaiah Harris, county super- 
intendent.) 

District 24, organized in 1869; Isaiah Harris, county superinten- 
dent. 

District 25 was formed April 18, 1874; first meeting held at house 
of .VI. K. Anderson: W. S. McCormick, county superintendent. 

District 27, organized February 17, 1860; W. D. Ely. Joseph Hughes 
and Enoch Colton, first officers: T. VI. Allen, county superintendent. 

District 28. formed in 1870: Robert McMaster, ('has Owen and 
John Barnell, first officers; T. M. Allen, county superintendent. 

District 29, organized 1870 by T. M. Allen, county superintendent; 
first officers, Wm. Ely, C. D. Carpenter and Samuel Gunsalus. 

District 30. organized 1870: T. M. Allen, county superintendent; J. 
H. Stubbs, Elizabeth Stubbs and Ephraim Elliott, Hrst board. 

District 31, formed .June 20, 1870; first meeting at C. C. Stalker's, 
July 7, 1870: T. M. Allen, county superintendent. 

District 32, 1870, T. M. Allen, county superintendent; James Bur- 
goyne, Sam Sutton and Thos. C. Finney first district board 

District 33, organized January 27, 1871. by R. M. Tunnell, county 
superintendent; M. McVVilliams, J. R. Gross and Geo. F Duroy, first 
district board. 

District 34, organized March 7, 1m71, by R M. Tunnell, county 
superintendent; first board, J. C P. Malone, Thrss. Paxton and Geo. 

/ 



nU EAKLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



RaiiH'. 

District 35, or^'anized April 7. 1871: first meeting April 22; by R. 
M. 'ruiiiicll, county superintendent: C. S. Nicely, O. Keunzli and H. 
llanstm. tirst board. 

District ;JG. ort,^anized April 7, 1:571: tirst meeting April 22; Eli 
Samson, C. M. Trueblood and Eli Trueblood, first board: R. M. Tun- 
nel], county superintendent. 

District 37, or^Mnizcd lR7i: K. M. Tuiinell. county superintendent. 

District 38, organized July 10, 1871; first meeting July 28; R. M. 
Tunnell county superintendent. 

District 39, established January 1, 1872: W. F. Cotton, county 
superintendent: first meeting January 16. 

District 40, organized April 23, 1872; W. F. Cotton, county superin- 
tendent. 

District 41, June, 1872; W. F. Cotton, county superintendent; first 
meeting July 8. 

District 42, July 27, 1872; W. F. Cotton, county superintendent. 

District 30, 1872; W. F. Cotton, county superintendent. 

District 43, organized March 13, 1873; tirst meeting at house of S. 
S. Walkley: W. S. McCormick, county superintendent. 

District 44, formed March 18, 1873, by W. S. McCormick. county 
superintendent; first meeting at Chas. North's, April 19. 

District 45, formed March 17, 1873, by W. S. McCormick, county 
superintendent; first meeting at Herman Mueller's, April 19. 

District 36, formed March 31, 1873, by W. S. McCormick, county 
superintendent; first meeting at J. H. Durham's April 30. 

District 47, formed by W. S. McCormick, county superintendent, 
Jnne23, 1873; first meeting at J. M. Brown's July, 1873. 

Districts 48, 49, 50, formed June 23, 1874; officers of 48, P. Reding, 
A. J. Van Syckle and Henry Ronneau; first meeting held August 13; 
W. S. McCormick, county superintendent. 

District 51 was formed in 1874 by W. S. McCormick, county super- 
intendent; first officers, J. D. Tabor, J. P. Gleich and A. Thowe, sr. 

District 52 was formed at an adjourned meeting of the voters on 
July 15. 1876, by the election of T. Ronsse, director, T. D. Allison, 
clerk, and Michael Sweeney, treasurer; "W. E. Richey, county super- 
intendent. 

District 53 was formed February 19, 1878, by W. E. Richey, county 
superintendent. 

District 54 was formed July 13, 1878, by W. E. Richey, county 
superintendent; first meeting at house of C. J. Malone August 8. 

District 55, first meeting July 13, 1878, by W. E. Richey, county 
superintendent. 

District 56 was formed in 1878 by W. E. Richey, county superin- 



EARLY TIISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAK. 57 

tendent 

Districts 57 to 82, inclusive, and joint district 85 were formed by 
Matt Thomson, county superintendent, as follows: 57, first meeting 
held April 22, 1879: 58, first meeting held July 19, 1879; 59, first meeting 
held September 6, 1876:60, first meeting held April 2, 1881; 61, first 
meeting held April 16, 1881:62, first meeting held June 10, 1881; 63, 
first meeting, August 11, 1881; 64, first meeting, October 18, 1882; 65, 
first meeting, March 10, 1883; 66, first meeting, June 16, 1883; 67, first 
meeting. July 26, 1884: 68, first meeting, September 29, 1884; 69, first 
meeting. September 29, 1834; 70, first meeting, September 10, 1884; 71, 
first meeting, July 6, 1885: 72, first meeting, July 13, 1885; 73, first meet- 
ing July 18, 1885; 74, first meeting, July 18, 1885; 75, first meeting, July 
18, 1885:76, first meeting, August 18, 1885:77, July 10, 1886; 78, first 
meeting, July 17, 18'<6; 79, first meeting, August 12, 1886; 80, first meet- 
ing, August 12, 1886:81, formed September 10, 1887; 82, first meeting, 
April 7, 1888; joint 85, first meeting, June 12, 188S: joint 100, first meet- 
ing, August 24, 1889, W W. Ramey, county superintendent: 83, first 
meeting, July 26, 1890, W. W. Ramey, county superintendent; 84, first 
meeting, July 24, 1890, W. W. Ramey, county superintendent: 85, first 
meeting, July 18, 1893, G. L. Clothier, county superintendent: 86. first 
meeting, July 27, 1893, G. L. Clothier, county superintendent; 87, first 
meeting, October 5, 1893, G. L. Clothier, county superintendent; 88, first 
meeting, September 12, 1895, C. C. Carter, county superintendent. 

SCHOOL NOTES. 

The first school in Wabaunsee county was taught by Miss M. H. 
Cotton ( VI rs. J. T. Genn) in the town of Wabaunsee in the house occu- 
pied by Mr. A. J. Bownam as a residence. The house was built for a 
church. The size of the original structure was 14x20. Miss Cotton 
boarded with a family living in a sod house with a canvass roof. The 
size of this house was 12x14. 

The first school house in district 3 was of logs and was built in 
1862, size of building 12x16. It was located three-fourths of a mile 
northwest of Mr. C. D. Beans residence. This was replaced by the 
stone building (afterwards abandoned on account of the cracked walls) 
in 1875. Miss Milda Gillespie taught the first school in the district. 
Miss Jennette Rose taught in 1863 for $8 per month, A. W. Gregory, 
district clerk. 

The first school in district 4 was taught in 1860 by Miss Anna 
Keyes; wages $4 50 per week. The building was 14x18 feet and after- 
wards moved to the farm of Mr. A. F. Wade and used as a corn crib. 

The first school in district 5 was taught in I860 by Miss Mary Gar- 



58 EAliLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSKE COUNTY, KAN. 

'— " - ■ ■ " ■ — .-■■- ■- I ■ ■ '' ~ 

rison in a lonhoiise 14xlf), located on tlic farm since owned by Mr. 
(Jeor^'c liarnes. Four dollars a week was the wages paid. Miss (Jarri- 
sou was afterwards married to Dr. Allen, secretary of state. 

The first school in district 6 was taught by S. II, Wellingham in 
18S7, in a log house 12x14, located just across the road from the stone 
building since used for school purposes; wages $20 per month. 

The tlrst school in district 8 was taught by G. B. Woostrow, w^ho 
received for his services $15 per month. The school house was of logs 
and for the time, one of the best .school houses in the county. The 
building was valued at $200 and was located about 200 yards southwest 
of the present site, on the farm of Mr. Peter Thoes. 

The first school house in district 9 was built of shakes or clap- 
boards and located on the farm of William Kreig, now owned by 
Henry lleuter. The first school was taught in 1862 by Miss Emma 
Bisbey: wages $8 per month; .size of building 14x16 

Mr. Carl Berner taught the first term of school in district 10 (Tem- 
pling in 1865, receiving $15 per month. The house was of logs and 
although the district was formed in 1864, the school house was not 
built till the year following, for the reason assigned by the clerk in 
his report to the county superintendent: "Owing to the Indian ex- 
citement" The Kaw reservation was but a few miles away, and so 
apprehensive were the settlers of a threatened uprising that a stone 
fort was built within two hundred yards of the present site of the 
school house in anticipation of a raid from the Kaws 

The first school in district 11 ("Wilmington) was taught by Mi.ss 
Mary Ilcrron in 1860; wages $8 per month. School was held in a con- 
crete stone building of one room 10x14 erected by Mr. Spear for a shoe 
shop. 

Miss Anna Harvey taught the first term of school in district 13 in 
I860, in a log house 14x18; wages $6 per month. Miss Harvey boarded 
around. The .school house was located on the farm of Mr. George 
Sanner, who occupied the building as a residence after the completion 
of the stone building near the residence of Mr. Joseph McCoy. Mr. 
W. A. Doolittle taught several terms in the old log school house. 

Mr. G. B. Woostrow taught the first school in district 14 (Halifax) 
in 1863: wages $20 per month. The house was built of logs and after- 
wards weather-boarded; size of building 16x18. The house was located 
j U.St north of J. B Crumb's home, but was moved one hundred yards 
west and used as a residence. The writer taught a six months term 
of .school in this building in the winter of 1877-78. 

The first school in district 19 was taught in Mr. John Frank's 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 59 

house in 1876 by Miss Eola Warner. The building was of logs and the 
size of building 12x14. There were but two pupils, Ulysses and 
Gabriel Frank. 

Miss Arvilla Keyes taught the first school in district 21, in 1868, in 
a log school house 12x16: wages $20 per month. 

The first term of school in district 22 was taught by Miss Ella A. 
Dibble, in 1868. The school house was of logs and located on the farm 
of Mr. S. C. Gladden. Size of building, 10x12. 

Mi.ss Ermina Halderman, in 1868, taught the first term of school 
In district 23— in a double log house on the farm of Horace Paul. 
School was taught in the west room, the east room being occupied t)y 
the family of Mr. George Vannatta. After the west half was torn 
away the east room was occupied by Mr. Walker, an old bachelor. 

The last log school house was built in district 24 in 1869, of logs 
hauled from the PoLtawatomie reserve, after being cut by a squatter 
for his own use. The building was 18 feet square and used for school 
purposes until replaced by a stone building in 1884, after which the 
log house was used as a crib. The building stood on the hill one half 
mile south of the present site and for a number of years church services 
were held in the old log school house. 

Marion Meredith taught the first term of school in district 27, in 
the 10x14 log cabin belonging to an old bachelor named Enoch Colton. 
Mr. S. G. Cantrill afterwards bought the log cabin, moved it onto his 
farm and used it as a corn crib. 

In a small house sided with flooring. Miss Elmah Montgomery 
taught the first school in district 29, in 1870. The house was used by 
Robert Haslett and John Sudweeks when both were bachelors. Miss 
Montgomery is now Mrs. Micajah Hamilton. 

In district 40, Mr. Micajah Hamilton taught the first term of 
school in 1872, in the shed room of the house occupied by Marion 
Reynolds. Mr. Andrew Mairs bought the property and for many years 
resided there. 

The first school house in district 41 was built of logs, on the farm 
of John McCrumb, who after making some alterations, used it as a 
residence. The stone house was then built but later sold and the 
frame building now in use at McFarland erected. 

Miss Eva Ames taught the first school in district 48, in 1875, in a 
frame house on the farm of M r. Henry Ronneau. 

The first school in district 49 was taught in the stone house that 
afterwards served Mr. Peter Taylor as a residence. 



GO 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Ry consiiltinK' the records further relative to the question of wages 
we lliui that the amounts paid, thoujjh small, was perhaps due more to 
a scarcity of funds ilian liom a stint^inosson thepartof district boards. 
In IS()0 the clerk of district 13 in his annual report says: "At our an- 
nual meet inj: last year we voted .all the tax the law would allow 
AN hen all is collected it will amount to about $33." In that year the 
district paid their teacher, Miss Harvey, $(> per month for a three 
months term find two years later employed Miss Rachel Dunmire— 
now Mrs. Joseph Richards, of Burlingame, the same wages as were 
paid Mi.ss Harvey. 

In 18G1 Miss Louisa Todd received $8 per month in district 11. In 
1864 Mrs. Harriet E. Woods received but $2 per week for a five months 
term in di.strict 13. In 1862 Miss Susan Andres— Mrs T. O. Hill- 
taught a term of school in district 12 for $10 per month. 

It is fair to presume that in cases where low wages were received 
the teacher boarded around. But the custom was not universal. In 
1861 Mr. W. F. Cotton received the comparatively high rate of $20 per 
month as teacher in district 2. In 1864 Mr. George Daily received $22 
per month in district 5. Mr. Daily would doubtless look upon the 
amount paid as hardly adequate to support his family, to say nothing 
of laying a.side a nest egg for a rainy day. In 1864 Mr. J. H. Gould re- 
ceived $20 per month in district 1 and two years later Mr. J. E. Piatt 
received $25 per month in the same district. 

The school houses at an early period of our county's history put 
forth no claims to architectural beauty without nor was there any at- 
tempt at inordinate di.-splay within. The rude bench or table besides 
serving the purpojie of the more luxurious appendages of today had 
this to commend them— they were the best the people in their 
straightened circumstances could afford. A people to whom poverty 
was no stranger were concerned about what could be obtained rather 
than what they might desire. 

In the old log school house of the past, pupils with intellects as 
bright, from homes just as hospitable, eagerly listened to the instruc- 
tion imparted by teachers who labored as hard as any to be found in 
the educational field today. 

The auxiliaries that tended to advance the cause of education in 
the past were just as helpful as are their prototypes today. The 
spelling school was equally beneficial (and more frequently called to- 
gether) the singing just as pleasant and the Sunday meeting none the less 
edifying than are similar gatherings of the present— at least for those 
who might be tempted to smile at the picture .suggested by the log 
school house of the past, for 'twas but yesterday that we— our 
brothers, our sisters and ourselves— sat on the rude benches and 
listened to the voice of .song from men and women just as prayerful 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MRS. DAISY THOMSON PALEXSKE, 
Alma. 



MISS AMANDA FIX. Yampa, Colo. 





MR. JAMES L. THOMSON (dec'd). 
Plumb Township. 



MR. EMERSON SHOECRAFT, Eskridge. 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JOHN WINKLER, McFarland. 



MR. JOHN WINKLER, McFarland, 
as an officer in the Prussian army. 





MR. WM. HORNE, Sr., Spring Creek. 



MR. JACOB HORNE, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. ED.:WOR3LEY,TMaple HUl. 
Former County Commissioner. 



MR. D. U. MILLISON (Register of Deeds), 
and family. Alma. 





PROF. C. M. LOWRY, 
Principal of the Eskridge Schools. 



MR. W. C. COOK, 
Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. AUGUST HANSON, McFarland. 



MR. G. H. MEIER, Alma. 



I 





MR. WM. TREU (Dec'd), 
Former Sheriff. 



MR. W. D. DEANS (Dec'd) 
Former Countj' Surveyor. 



EARLY HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY.KAN. 





MR. J. M. HUBBARD. Wabaunsee. 
Lieut., 11th Kansas Volunteers. 



MR. A. A. COTTRELL, Wabaunsee. 










MR. L. RICHARDS, Rock Creek. 
Former Probate Judge. 



MR. J. W. MOBSMAN (dec'd), 
Mission Creek. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



I 





DR. W. H. H. SMITH, Alma. 



DR. C. E. SMITH, Alma. 




MR. L. PALENSKE, Alma. 
Former Representative. 



MR. J. M. ECK (dec'd), Alma. 
Former County Commissioner. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. C. B. LINES (dec'd), Wabaunsee. 
Former Representative. 



MR. G. G. HALL (dec'd). Wabaunsee. 
Former Probate Judge. 




MR. W. S. WILLIAMS (dec'd), 
Wabaunsee. 



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MR. E. J. LINES (dec'd). Wabaunsee, 
Former County Attorney. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WAI5AUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MU. PRIEIt IflVNAltDCDfC'd), 

F.•lc^i(itf(^ 



MR. SAMUEL WOODS (Dec'd). 
Il.krvejvllle. 




DRUMM BROS., Eskridge. 



MU. THOS. OLIVKU, Maple Hill. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MRS. MARY LOUISA KLOCKMAN, Alma. MRS. ANNA ANDERSON (dec'd), AltaVista. 





MR. HERMAN ARNDT, Templin. 



MR. AUGUST WOLGAST, Templin. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. CHAS. X. EARL (dec'd), Eskridge. 
Former County Commissioner. 



MR. ANDREW BELL, Kaw Township. ] 
County Commissioner. 





MR. FRANK RICKERSHAUSER, 
near Pazico. 



MR. JOSEPH SCHDTTER, 
Farmer Township. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 61 

just as earnest, just as devout, as is the devotee of to-day. 
In the early days pupils received instruction from teachers deserv- 
ing of equal praise to that accorded the occupant of the highest chair 
in our State University. They were the pioneers of education — 
engaged in the work of spanning the gulf that separated barbarism 
from civilization. 



Interested in the New education. 



In the early days interest in school work was not lacking; teachers 
of experience were, in all cases, given the preference. The teacher, 
though a stranuer, was received with that spirit of welcome so charac- 
teristic of the people. A case in point was that of a. teacher from an 
eastern state. His recommendations secured him a hearty welcome in 
a district, the people of which, were anxious to enjoy the advantages 
of which his coming gave promise. Arrangements being made that 
were mutually satisfactory our new teacher entered upon his duties. 
After a time a member of the board who took a deep interest in the 
cause of education, concluded to visit the school— on a rainy day, when 
his services on the farm were not particularly needed. Having 
heard much of the progress in matters pertaining to education, 
and being desirous of knowing something more of a system of teaching 
far beyond that within the range of his own experience he was doubly 
anxious to see for himself the wonders of the new education. On 
■opening the door what does he see? There is but one pupil present 
(by reason of the inclemency of the weather) but he is making good his 
claim to apt scholarship, for the teacher, stretched at full length on 
one of the rude benches is fast asleep, and his pupil, beneath the 
bench, equally oblivious of surrounding objects, is trying to rival his 
teacher in his endeavors to raise the roof— by his snoring. This true 
story is of no particular value in the line of corroborative testimony 
relative to the correct estimate to be placed upon the average teacher's 
recommendations. 






i' 



K\ KLV msTOKY OF WaBAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Wrote /+is Sentiments. 



The leacht-r was liandMiiiif and li.-i visiiur had been honored by 
the voters of the county and he was d(»ing the people good service as 
their county attorney. But realizinjf the truti) (»f the old adage that 
all work and no play tends to make of Jack a dull boy, our county 
ofTlcial with the flowing beard concluded to go on a vacation. 

To go to the mountains of Colorado was out of the question for it 
was at a time when competitive rates were \inknown for the very 
good reason that, the large majority of the railroad lines had an 
existenc^e only on the maps. 

But among the pretty school maams ar the examination was 

Mi.ss-- . from Iowa, his own r.ative state. She was teaching near 

Dover arui he would go down and incidentally assist in disposing of a 
few^ of Mrs Loomis's pies. 

Being a .s(;ho()l teacher by profession it was but natural that he 
should visit the school, and as such visitor he was expected to write 
his name in the teacher's register— in that part of the book every 
teacher can refer to with pride— for as a rule in the column of "Re- 
marks" nothing but flattering testimonials ever finds a place. 

Looking over the visitor's register our ex-pedagogue learns that 
Mary Jones has left in the record: "Good school: good teacher." John 
Smith has supplemented the statement with "Good teacher: excellent 
order." When the county superintendent called— a few days before 
the election, he expres.sed his admiration of the teacher's work by: 
"An earnest and etficient teacher and an interesting and progressive 
school." Having no blotter at hand it is possible that our visiting 
superintendent returned the book to the teacher unclosed— for 
fear of blotting the page, of course. More than likely he expected an 
invitation home t<i supper and there is a bare possibility that he wasn't 
disappointed. 

But this matter cuts no figure with our ex-pedagogue out for 
recreation. He finds that Mrs. Williams had indicated her approval 
of the teacher's methods by: "Am well pleased with the school." 
Peter Wll.son. a farmer's boy bluntly says: "Teacher all right: school, 
ditto." When the director called he left in bold characters: "Disci- 
pline perfect, am glad to see the pupils interested in the great cause of 



EA RLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 63 



education; in future years they will realize that knowledge is the 
power that moves the world." 

But our visitor who was elected by the suffrages of the people to 
an important office is no copyist. He looks about him and views with 
complacency the evidences of good government and excellent intellec- 
tual development. The prompt answers elicit his unqualified approval 
and warmest approbation. But he sees more than all this. He ob- 
serves the sparkling eye that is responsible for any talismanic effects 
that may be indicated by the prompt responses to the questions 
propounded by the teacher. It may not be out of place here to state 
that our visitor was the owner in fee simple of an Iowa farm, and the 
occupation of a farmer embodying (to his mind) all the phases of an 
ideal existence all that was needed to render his future a life of 
unalloyed happiness was a home on the farm and a handsome ex-school- 
marm to preside at the opposite end of the table. With this explana- 
tion these written words in the register need no further interpreta- 
tion: "I like the teacher verv much." 



Among the old letters on file in the County Superintendent's office 
is one indicating the difference in the methods of examining teachers 
then and now. The letter is from a patron of a country district 
inquiring as to the date of the superintendent's contemplated visit, 

accompanied by this statement: "Miss is teaching our school 

and wants to be examined for a certiticate when you come into our 
neighborhood." The method has this to recommend it— it is more 
convenient to the teacher and the expense of an examiningr board is 
dispen.sed with. 



Tlie teacher's work in the school room should tend to the forma- 
tion and development of correct habits— the foundation of a good 
character. The work of each day of a pupil's school life sh(»uld add to 
his ability to fight the battle of life successfully: should tend to 
make of each and every pupil a useful member of society. 

The teacher who neglects to avail himself of the opportunity 
afforded on the last day of school lo create a lasting- impres.sion on his 
pupils throws away one of the best of his opporttinities. Though an 
air of solemnity pervade the exercises no fears need be entertained as 
to their harmful effects. However painful the parting words, it will 
hold, none the less, a valued place in memory's storehouse. It will the 
better serve as a medium to impress illegibly upon plastic minds such 
lessons as only on such occasions as this may be readily inculcated. 
No pupil, however listless during the long weeks of the term about to 



r,4 KAI{LY mSTOUY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



close, but feels the linpressiveness of the occasion. However regard- 
less of the teacher's timely admonitions he may have been, he more 
than ever before realizes the value of time lost; more than ever is 
enabled to place a proper »!stiinatp on advice unheeded— on opportuni- 
ties that may never ayain be presented. As the last whispers of a dear 
departing friend are inelTacibly engraved on memory's tablet, so may 
tlie teacher's parting words to his pupils on the last day of school serve 
as a l)eac(tn to many a darkened pat h way —exert a potent inlluence in 
sliaping llie course of a liilherto aimless life. Re careful lest the 
opportunity be thrown away: take heed lest a blighted existence be 
laid at your feet. 

.\t the close of the State Teachers" Association, held during the 
past winter, the President, while addressing the teachers, bluntly 
asked the question, "What is all this about?" "What are we here 
for?" We might well make a personal application of the answer 
suggested. Unless we shall g<» fori h from our labors here the better 
prepared to assist the pupils of i he schools in the work of preparatioji 
for future usefulues.s, then our coming together as teachers has been 
in vain. We feel assured that each and every teacher will go hence 
capable of doing bei lei- work: that they will be prompted by nobler 
impulses We feel uai lanted in the statement that your aims will be 
higher, and that greater results will be acconiplislied. We trust that 
your lalx)rs here and in the .scIkioI room will be appreciated in a man- 
ner commensurate with your most extravagant anticipations. May 
your labors be lightened by that liearty spirit of co-operation .so nec> s- 
sary as an auxiliary in bringing about a correct solution of the educa- 
tional problem. We trust that you will bring to your assistance every 
possii)le aid. The essential elements of success are embodied in a 
tliorougli knowledge of your surroundings, a conscientious regard for 
the welfare f)f your pupils, and a strict application to duty. 

Let some potent inlluence enable us to realize the magnitude of 
our undertaking— thai the footsteps of the little ones placed in our 
keeping may be guided aright. To them tlie future is a dark unfath- 
omable mystery. The great world beyond the portals of the school- 
room is a labyrinth of niystetious windings which will lead to success 
or failure. We cati provide the chart leading to the one, or we can, by 
our care('>sness. permit the placing of such ol)siacles in the way as 
will insure the destruction of all their hopes. The chart once supplied 
let its markings be clear and iiiitnistakable. Here, in a cool, shady 
nook. Idleness is ever Iminging. at (1 at this point we will place our first 
danger signal, .lust i)eyond. Pleasure, awaits the coming of the 
youthful ti-avelers. We will detail, as a guard, our faithful auxiliary, 
iMily. lest Pleasure tire ■ f her wards and give them in charge of her 
twin sister. Vice. With Industry as a constant companion, and 
lIoiKU-. as a guide, where dangers threaten, we need have no fears but 
that our charges will reach the haven of their hopes, and we receive 
niir reward in the heartfelt thanks of our patrons, the lasting grati- 
tude of our pupils, and the consciousness within ourselves of having 
performed our duty. -From Matt. Thomson's address at do.se of Insti- 
tittr of fP«T. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



65 



rt-n EjclUcatlonal ^hibit. 



No better evidence of the interest taken by our people in the 
cause of education could be presented than is here shown by the bonds 
issued by the several school districts for building purposes. 

These contributions have been voluntarily assumed that our 
children may enjoy every possible benefit to be derived from an educa- 
tional system unsurpassed anywhere. The comparatively small amount 
of bonded indebtedness remaining unpaid is a feature that commends 
itself to those seeking a home among our people. 

WHEN ISSUED. 



Di3r. 
1. 



AMT. 



2. 
3. 



4. 

5. 
6. 



8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 



U. 
14. 
15. 

16. 



May 31, '79 $1,000 

May 2, '87 1,000 

Oct. 11, '78 

July 5, '72 



500 

760 

1,200 



Aug. 16, '93 

$400 due 1-1, 1902 
No bonds issued. 

Jan. 25, '82 1,200 

March 20, '71 1,350 

Sept. 26, '84 600 

Dec. 5, '92 200 

No bonds issued. 

June 14, '75 300 

No bonds issued. 

July 1, '70 900 

Oct. 24, '77 700 

Nov. 16, 1901 2,000 

$2,000 due. 

Sept. 23, '73 1,400 

May 27, '81 1,500 

Oct. 1, '74 600 

April 1, '69 1,000 

June 1, '74 5,000 

Feb. 22, '75 1,000 

August 26, '74 500 

May 3, '92 500 



DIST. WHEN ISSUED. 

Jan. 5, '97 

46. June 2, '73 

47. August 15, '73 

April 16, '87 

Oct. 26, '96.... $300 

Nov. 14, '82 

July 30, '84 



48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 



53. 

54. 
55. 

56. 



57. 

58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 



AMT. 
....$ 450 
. ... 1,100 
. ... 1,200 
. ... 1,200 
due 900 
. . . . 530 
. . . . 800 



Sept. 26, '74 1,000 

Oct. 21, '76 1,000 



'86., 
'85. 



May 21, '81 
June 1, '78. 
Oct. 5, 
Sept. 3, 
Sept. 1, '78.. 
May 13, '90 
Oct. 19, '78.. 
Nov. 11, '89. 
Dec. 28, '94. 
Dec. 15, '79. 
Aug. 19, '82. 
Nov. 15, '79. 
Oct. 1, '81... 
Aug. 20, '81. 
Sept. 19, '81 
Sept. 19, '81. 
Sept. 24, '84. 



1,000 
500 
700 
500 
600 
65(» 
500 

2,000 
400 
60« 
600 
500 
800 
350 
300 

1,000 

2.500 



(iG 



EAllLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



18. 

20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 

2'j. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
.32. 



.33. 
34. 
35. 

31). 

37. 

38. 
.3!). 

40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 

44. 

4'). 



Au},'iist 2(i, '78 500 

.luiie 1.3. '!»2 800 

No boiid.s issued. 

Sept. 18, '74> 900 

Sept. 18, '83 800 

March 10, '83 1,100 

August 1, '70 900 

April 1, '71 300 

.lune 9, '83 800 

AuK'ust 11, '87 700 

No bonds i.ssued. 

May 31, '71 paid 1,200 

July 1, '70 600 

March 1, '72 1,100 

November, '70 1,600 

No bonds issued. 

August 7, '71 400 

.hily 9, '90 900 

300 due 1-1-1902 
No bonds issued. 

May 3, "73 600 

Feb. 5, '92 800 

$200 due 1-1-1902 

July 22. '71 400 

Dec. I, '93 $.350 due 800 

Feb. 10, '72 1,200 

Oct. 25, '71 750 

June 1, '72 1,500 

July 24, '90 2,500 

June 2, '73 I.OOO 

Nov. l(t, "91 3^000 

June 2, '73 i.2oO 

June 1, '73 I.OOO 

Sept. 24, '98 1.200 

Feb. 11, '74 1,000 

Sept. 21, "95 900 

Sept. 20, '73 500 



Dec. 1, '85 1,890 

64. April 28, '83 1,000 

65. July 24, '83 600 

66. Sept. 1, '83 600 

Nov. 11, 1901, $1200 due 1,200 

67. Nov. 15, '84 400 

68. Feb. 6, '85 900 

69. Oct. 17, '84 600 

70. Nov. 22, '84 600 

71. Oct. 2, '85 1,000 

72. Sept. 12, '85 650 

73. Aug. 22, '85 600 

74. Aug. 15, '85 1,000 

75. Sept. 5, '85 600 

76. Aug. 29, '85 8u0 

77. Sept. 2, '86 500 

78. Oct. 16, '86 700 

79. Oct. 9, '86 600 

80. Sept. 16, '86 400 

Due Jan. 1, 1902, $100.. 

81. Jan. 5, '89 2,400 

Due Jan. 1, 1902, $900.. 

82. July 14, '88 1,500 

83. Oct. I, '90 500 

84. Aug. 19, '91) 800 

85. Sept. 5, '93 700 

$500 due 1-1-1902 

86. Sept. 15, '93 .350 

87. Nov 14, '93 500 

88. Oct. 2, '95 800 

$500 due 1-1-1902 

89. Oct. 21, 1901... $500 due 500 

Jt. 15. Oct. 4, '69 900 

Jt. 15. Oct. 12, '7": 450 

Jt 100. July 2, '91 800 

$4110 due 1-1-1902... 

Jt. 85. No date 1,900 

Jt. 30. June 10, '95 900 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE (X)UNTY, KAN. 67 



The McMahan Telephone exchange. 



When on June 25, 1898, Mr. McMahan secured from the City of 
Alma a telephone franchi.se for twenty-five years, but few persons 
realized the magnitude the undertaking would assume in so short 
a period of time. At first the growth of the venture was compara- 
tively slow but ere long the convenience connected with the new 
order of things became apparent to the people and the daily increas- 
ing patronage encouraged Mr. McMahan in extending his lines, at 
first, to all points in Wabaunsee county, and, later, to Topeka and 
other outside points, until direct telephone communication is not 
confined to the limits of this and adjoining counties, nor even of the 
State. 

A few data as to the growth of the McMahan telephone system: 
Telephone franchise granted, June 21, 1898. On August 27, fol- 
lowing there were 12 phones in Alma and 12 more ordered. On 
November 12, there were 36 phones. Completed to Maniiattan Decem- 
ber 1, 1898— the M. A. & B. telegraph line being secured for the 
service. April 28, 1899, telephone completed to McFarland. On May 
1, to Eskridge, and on September 16, to Maple Hill. January 27, 1900, 
Alta Vista was reached, and on June 16, 1900, there was telephone 
connection between Alma and Wamego. Topeka was reached Decem- 
ber 15, 1900 — since which time the growth of the McMahan telephone 
system has been phenomenally surprising to all. and extremely flatter- 
ing to the business sagacity of the founder of the system. In the 
illustration, seated in the front row, is Mr. J. H. McMahan, projector 
of the enterprise and proprietor of the system. On the left is Mr. 
William Noller, bookkeeper, and on the right is Mr. Julius Frey, who 
may be found almost constantly in attendance at the keyboard. At 
the extreme ends of the employes standing are Masters Roy and 
Arthur McMahan, who, though young in years are capable of filling 
the place of substitute at the board. Then in succession are Mr. 
Albert Copp, Mr. George Sweitzer, Mr. Wm. Hershey, and Mr. Louis 
Sweitzer, the latter now in charge at Eskridge. By reason of a 
misunderstanding as to the time of sitting for the group picture, the 
portraits of Messrs. Louis and Gus Schroeder, two of the oldest 
employes of the telephone exchange, appear elsewhere. The follow- 
ing are the names of the local managers not already mentioned: 
McFarland, Mr. Arthur Winkler: Paxico, Dr. O. E. Webb (who is, 



68 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



also, the owner of an independent line); Maple Hill, J. N. Dolley; 
Rossvlllc, G. P. Tierce; St. Mary's, Miss Annie Damaris; Willard, Mr. 
R. N. Blackburn; Valencia, Mr. Ed. Mitchell: Wanamaker, Mr. 
Straub; Dwijjht, Mr. 11. Olson; Alta Vista, Mr. Union Thomas; Vol- 
land; Mr. J. \V. Kratzer: Harveyville, Mr. R. D. Lewis; Eskridge, Mrs. 
Louis Sweitzer, assistant; IIalifa.x, Mr. Longabaugh; Templin, Mr. 
(fustav Zimmermann— the services of thirty men being required. 
In Wabaunsee county there are over 200 miles of wire and 225 phones 
in use. Of this number, 110 are in Alma, 70 in Eskridge, and 41 in the 
tlic rural districts. The number of phones is constantly increasing 
and the etllciency of the system is perfect. 



ethnologic Wstory. 



WabaMn.soc County has an ancient history of surpassing interest, 
partly printed in the old Spanish chronicles and partly determined by 
urclui'ological science— the two combined making a record recently 
completed which covers a period of 500 years. In 1897, Mr. 
J. V. Brower discovered near Alma, in Mill creek valley, an ancient 
village site from which he gathered chert spearheads, arrow points, 
knives, scrapers and pieces of clay pots. Judge J. T. Keagy, and 
others, associated with Mr, Brower in the work, have continued eX" 
plorations and investigations until the identity of the people who in- 
liabite.d this county during a pre-Columbian age has been ascertained 
as the same people who were discovered by Coronado in 1541, at two 
provinces called Quivira and Harahey, part of which was constituted 
by the prairies and valleys of Wabaunsee county, the dividing line 
crossing Deep creek and Mill creek near Volland. Two volumes have 
been issued and published concerning the work, entitled respectively, 
Quivira, 1898, and Ilaraliey, 1899. These two books describe in 
particular all of the discoveries and many historic and prehistoric 
facts. In 1901, the Quivira Historical Society was organized at Alma 
for the purpose of continuing the work, and another volume is to be 
issued after a monument is erected for the purpose of commemorat- 
ing the discovery and rediscovery of Quivira and Harahey, by Coronado 
in 1541, and Brower in 1896-7-8. Like many other similar explora- 
tions, an attempt has been made to divert the actual rediscovery, 
made in 1896, to the credit of a plagiarist several years later. But 
tliis will not be successful as the Quivira Historical Society has been 
organized to not only preserve all records, but to prevent literary 
piracy. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. GUS SCHROEDER, Alma. 



MR. LOUIS SCHROEDER, Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. LOUIS SHROEDER, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 69 



The First White Shirt. 



Readers of historical incidents, as a rule, delight in reminiscences 
entitled to first place in any particular line. They would know the 
first settler in this or that locality; the name of the first woman who 
cooked the first meal in the "Hard Scrabble" settlement, and so on to 
the end of the chapter. 

In view of these facts wherein is the harm of a true story involving 
tlie right of the first white shirt to a place at the head of the column? 

In the early settlement of Kansas hundreds of families looked 
upon milk and butter as luxuries beyond their reach. Many families 
were not sutticiently well-to-do as to own a cow. Of course there were 
exceptions, and, as time advanced, other evidences of civilization 
began to appear. Perhaps a little incident might better illustrate our 
meaning. Over in Wabaunsee a genial old gentleman had just arrived 
from Connecticut. His neighbors were somewhat inclined to look 
upon him with envious eyes from the fact that he was the possessor of 
a cow. This particular cow was the mother of a white calf, and, be- 
sides, she possessed qualities that rendered her valuable to an extra- 
ordinary degree. Besides furnishing a daily supply of the lacteal fluid 
her disposition enabled her owner to utilize her as a beast of burden. 
The ease with which our friend was enabled to transfer the products 
of the farm from the field to winter quarters might well excite the 
envy of his less fortunate neighbors. But all did not go "merry as a 
marriage bell." One night a storm came on and misfortune visited 
that little household. When morning dawned it was found that the 
white calf was missing. 

Diligent search and anxious inquiry failed to reward the discon- 
solate owner with the sight of the lost calf. But there came a 
■moment when joy beamed forth from the countenances of the owners 
of the white calf. A white object was seen some distance away on 
the banks of the creek, which the good wife recognized at once as 
"our calf." She "would know that calf anywhere," and as it was the 
only white object known in all the county at the time she was excus- 
able in entertaining the idea that the lost had been found. Procur- 
ing a rope our overjoyed owner preceded at once to capture the truant 
calf, but one can hardly imagine his discomfiture when about to secure 



:o KARLY history of WABAUNSEE county, KAN. 



his prize he discovered that the white object was not the lost calf, but 
a man wlio had just come into the country wearin^r «'i white shirt— the 
lirst ^jarment of that description that had found its way into Wabaun- 
see county. 



The First Wagon Shop. 



When Mr. Wm. Home came to Wabaunsee county in 1859, he had 
two wagons with skeins— the only two of the kind in the Spring 
creek settlement. But Henry Palenske was a wagonmaker and before 
long he was supplying the demand for wagons. 

It didn't take long to make one, either. With a cross-cut saw, a 
.sycamore log about 20 or 24 inches in diameter would soon be trans- 
formed- into wheels— about every six inches, running measure, was 
enough for one wheel, two feet being all that was required for a 
wagon. 

To make tlie running gear was ea.sy. Two big hewed slabs for 
axles, in which two-inch augur holes were bored for standards, a 
coupling pole and tongue, and that wagon was ready for the owner — 
who in all cases, was patiently waiting for the first wagon he ever 
owned— of that particular pattern. 

Grease being a commodity that hadn't found Its way into the 
country, there was music in the air whenever a wagon happened to be 
on the road— and music too, of the semi-calliope variety— that could 
be heard two miles or more — when the wind happened to be right, 
more. Those wagons would last for two or three years, but the supply 
wasn't equal to the demand, and Mr. Home never lacked for oppor- 
tunities to loan one or both of his wagons to his neighbors— and every 
settler in the country at that time considered himself a near enough 
neighbor to borrow a wagon with spokes in the wheels to make a 
hundred- mile trip for a sack of corn meal or a side of bacon. 

There was a kind of caste among the people in those days, indi- 
cated by the make of wagon used on the claim. In Indian nomen- 
clature, William Home would merit the title of High-muck-a-muck, 
or the-man-with-the-sure-enough- wagon. 

Wagons of the Palenske pattern would indicate that the owners 
were in moderate circumstances, unless they owned a cow. Still 
lower in the line of eligibility to a place on the front seats with the 
aristocracy of the frontier .settlements was the man compelled to 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 71 

steer a stone-boat (made of the fork of a tree) over the prairies with a 
pair of oxen for a motor. 

Then, in order, came a fellow with a blind horse or the family cow 
for a beast of burden, followed by the man with all his earthly be- 
longings tied in a handkerchief, on the end of a stick, looking for a 
claim. He was bringing up the tail end of the procession then, but as 
he sits cozily by the grate in the big stone house, you might fail to 
recognize our old pioneer friend with the stick and handkerchief. 
But he is one and the same, nevertheless, and not a whit better or 
worse, by reason of his circumstances. 

Sometimes these old pioneers are just as kind hearted and Chris- 
tian like as in their days of adversity— when they were swelled up 
with pride over the ownership of one of Henry Palenske's wagons, but 
not always. Somehow the canker-worm of prosperty has gnawed a 
hole in their hearts and blinded their eyes to all the good in the world 
e.\cept that measured by the almighty dollar. 



/+e Gathered Thern In. 



In 1880, when the M. A. & B. track was laid to Eskridge there 
were several young men in the south part of Wabaunsee county and 
near the north end of Lyon who were inclined to be sporty. They 
were of that type of young men who start out in life imbued with the 
idea that the world owes them a living and it required several hard 
knocks to drive the notion out of their heads. These boys had seen 
something of the world— just enough, in fact, to create the desire for 
further experience in the same direction. 

They had traveled west as far as the Panhandle country and had 
made several trips to the Kansas City stock yards, and had even 
ventured as far as Chicago on a cattle train. Besides the customary 
pass the boys on these occasions carried with them, as part of their 
t equipment, a large stick with a sharp nail in the end — to give the 
I' cattle a punch when they would persist in lying down in the car. For 
this reason, probably, the boys considered themselves entitled to the 
honorof being called "cow-punchers" or as they preferred, "cowboys." 
About the time referred to another young man put in his appear- 
ance at Eskridge. Having passed the greater part of his life in the 
[. shadow of the Cumberland mountains the boys of sporty tendencies 
dubbed him a tenderfoot and at first were inclined to guy the new- 



4 w 



2 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



comer. Rut later on they began to treat him with respect and on 
furtiier acciuaintance to even admire the man they had prematurely 
dubbed "tenderfoot." 

Somewhere and somehow the younp man had acquired proficiency 
in the use of tlie gloves and after he had several times in quick succes- 
sion sent tiie bully of the crowd sprawling into the corner he was 
voted a tip-top fellow. He also carried a handsome revolver of the 
navy pattern and when he proved himself an expert in its use it was 
the unanimous verdict that a false estimate had been placed on his 
value as a friend. When they had about concluded to adopt the young 
tenderfoot he suddenly left the country. 

But the boys heard from him again. It wasn't long before they 
received letters postmarked Cincinnati. Then in quick succession 
others came from Chicago, New York, Baltimore, and other large 
cities— in each case on the letterheads of a different firm. Later on, 
another letter came. This time he wanted to meet the boys and if 
they would go to Burlinganie on a certain date he would be there. 

The boys went down and if the walls of a little two roomed saloon 
in the town could be induced to impart the secrets divulged at that 
meeting an interesting story would be unfolded. While on his rambles 
in the East he had .struck a sure thing and his old time friendship for 
the boys prompted him to .seek them out and .share with them his 
good fortune. Like Barkis, they were "willin." 

Then he produced .some crisp five dollar bills, just from the press. 
Not the best samples, he said, but he had better "stuff" at head- 
quarters in Chicago. It was a ticklish business and he couldn't trust 
the mails. The detectives were always on his track. He sold them 
five cri.sp new five dollar bills for one dollar each. After swearing each 
one to secrecy he told the boys to try their luck with the bills and 
report. He would remain in concealment and under no circumstances 
must his presence in the town be revealed. 

In a short time the boys returned clamoring for more of the 
"queer.". It was "hot stuff," "i« was good at th&.bank." That set- 
tled it with the boys. But he wouldn't trust them. They must 
select one of their number to meet him in Chicago. It was so 
arranged. 

So the boys went home. Only a few confidential friends were let 
into the .secret— friends they wanted to share with them their good 
fortune. Never did these young fellows work so hard to raise funds 
for investment in a "sure thing." One sold a team, another his saddle 
horse and a third his tine Mexican saddle and a pair of Navajo 
blankets— and all, away down. After a few days of strenuous effort 
and much sacrifice the sum of $1,400 was raised. 

But tliat would bring them $7,000. Then they could again buy 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 72a 



their outfit and take their long anticipated trip to Texas, where they 
would launch out in the cattle business. 

In due time the committee of one went to Chicago, meeting, as 
per agreement, tlieir former acquaintance at the depot. But not 
until a friendly tap on the shoulder turned his attention that way 
was his presence suspected. He was in disguise. He said that was 
the only way to throw the government detectives off his track. 

He was taken in a roundabout way to his room. Up five flights of 
rickety stairs, and through dark, winding passages they went. Two 
well dressed men with revolvers lying on the table in front of them 
were there. They counted out $7,000 in crisp, new bills— just like 
those at Burlingame. He saw the money safely packed in his sachel 
and departed. But his old acquaintance would see him off. He was 
going down the road anyway. 

When the committee of one arrived at Eskridge he was met at 
the train by the boys. All were there. They had parted with their 
last dollar and it had been nearly a week of long and weary waiting. 

They repaired to a room at the hotel to make a division of the 

funds. 

The carpet-sack was opened and inside were seven neatly tied 
packages— just as they had been packed in Chicago— but in another 
carpet-sack. His friend had made the exchange at the depot. The 
boy had bought seven packages of sawdust at $1,400 a pound. 

It is needless to say that that trip to Texas was indefinitely post- 
poned. The boys took their summer vacation in the corn field —walking 
behind a two-horse cultivator — longing for a shot at that tenderfoot, 
who had been raised in the shadow of the Cumberland mountains. 



Were Their Fears Groundless? 



The stranger to pioneer conditions finds it difficult to realize that 
within the memory of the oldest inhabitant, to say nothing of others 
not so far advanced in years, there was ever any real danger to the 
early settlers of Wabaunsee county from Indian raids. Perhaps not. 

But before rendering our verdict let us ask the sturdy German 
farmers of Templin, who put forth all their efforts in building the old 
stone fort in 1864, if there was cause for fear. Ask the Swedish set- 
tlers of Marion county who, four years later, slept for weeks in their 
corn fields. Ask them if their fears were groundless and the antici- 



•12b EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

pated Indian raid but a chimerical conception of a disordered brain. 

While their bones lie mouldering under the sod we will not taunt 
them with cowardice, nor desecrate their memories by the accusation 
that they were other than they seemed— pioneers in the truest sense 
of the term. 

Let us give them proper credit. If ever there was an inkling of 
fear indicated, it was due to the love a parent bears to liis child. It 
was from tlie fear of compulsory separation— either by death at the 
hands of the merciless foe, or capture, followed by death, torture, or 
worse. Ask not the meaning of this— lest you betray your ignorance 
of a captive's fate. 

There were those who laughed at the fears of the settlers in the 
vicinity of Spirit Lake, Iowa, and at New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1862— 
eight years later than the first settlers came to Kansas— but it re- 
quired several regiments of cavalry and years of campaigning to render 
the pioneer homes of Iowa and Minnesota secure from the raids of 
wandering Indians. 

In 1868, fourteen years after the first settlers came to Wabaunsee 
county the old pioneers of Council Grove— men who never knew the 
meaning of the word "fear" hurried their wives and children to a 
haven of safety. Was their act an exhibition of cowardice? Were 
their fears groundless? 

The dead Kaw brave and the seven Cheyenne warriors who lay 
dead on the hill almost in sight of the town say "No!" The presence 
of the raiding Indians in plain view of the people is equivalent to a 
most emphatic denial of the baseless charge of cowardice. 

Because Price Perrill, the lone surveyor, hadn't enough of the 
coward in his makeup, his bones lay bleaching in the sun for weeks on 
the plains of McPherson county. The Kaw Indian charged with his 
killing, gloated over, rather than denied, the accusation, and yet there 
are those who would say the fears of the hardy pioneers were ground- 
less. It is our duty to tell the story, and the reader's privilege, to 
refuse to be convinced. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 73 



Our Stone Fences. 



In traveling over Wabaunsee county the miles of stone fences, 
especially in the Mill Creek Valley, impress everyone favorably, and 
reminds the old settler of that period in our county's history when 
the easy and rapid method of enclosing a farm by a wire fence was 
unlcnown. 

To encourage the building of stone fences and the growing of 
hedges the legislature of 1867 passed a law giving a bounty of five 
cents per rod for stone or hedge fences, the bounty to continue for 
eight years. As the bounty would amount to forty cents per rod many 
of our farmers availed themselves of the benefit of the law. 

As early as 1869 thousands of rods of stone fence had been built, 
the tax roll for that year making the following exhibit: 

Mr. Herman Meseke had built 350 rods of stone fence and Mr. I. L. 
French, 300 rods. Mr. Joseph Thoes came next with 230 rods, followed 
by Mr. Ed. Krapp with 210 rods. 

Others had built stone fence as follows: 

Eli and Carey Walton, 180 rods; M. Walton, 160 rods; John 
Schrouder and John Schwanke each 120 rods; R. J. Marrs, 110 rods; A. 
Fetting, 106 rods; Joseph Treu, 100 rods; Aug. Weber, Aug. Wolgast, 
Rudolph Arndt, John Copp, Aug. Gerloch, L. Grunewald, F. Ricker- 
shauser and H. Schultheis, each reporting between 50 and 100 rods, in 
nearly every case, increasing their fence bounty in accordance with the 
provisions of the statute. 

The fact that in nearly every instance the fences are as substantial 
today as when first built speaks volumes of the value for building 
purposes of Wabaunsee county stone— everywhere abundant, and yet 
not presenting any serious obstacles to the farmer in the use of his 
land for agricultural purposes. 




THE LAST LOG SCHOOL HOUSE. DI8T. NO. 24— "j AKETOWN. ' 
BUILT IN 1869: REPLACED BY STONE BUILDING IN 1884. 



EARLY IIISTOUYOF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



The GoUnty Seat Question. 



Our Stato iiKii Id w itl) l)iit a slight variation mifjlil well apply to 
Alma in llie ellurl to .secure and hold the county seat. 

When the county was organized Wabaunsee was designated as the 
county seat, and being the centre of a large settlement the people 
acquiesced in the location. At that time Alma had no place on the 
map. l)ut later on the settlers in the southeast part of the county 
raised objections to the inconvenience arising from the distance and 
expressed tiiemselves desirous of a change. 

That tile will of the people might be expressed at the polls an 

election was called for March (i, 18K(i. At this election the vote stood: 

For Alma 137 

For Wabaunsee U2 

Total vote. 249 

Necessary to a choice, 125 

The law, at that time, required the officers to move to the place 
having received the highest number of votes within twenty days but a 
session of the district court having been called for April 9th, a resolu- 
tion was passed by the board of commissioners postponing the date of 
removal to May 1, 18fi6. 

But the legality of the vote being questioned and no steps being 
taken to move the records to Alma a petition was presented to the 
board Oct. 6, requesting that a new election be called. The prayer of 
the petitioners was granted and the date of the election set for 
Nov. 22, 1806. 

The vote stood: 

For Alma 142 

For W^abaunsee 114 

Thoes' i'lace 1 

Wilmington 1 

Alma was again declared the county seat and the records moved 
over in time for the meeting of the board at the January session, 1867. 
The records were hauled over in two wagons and deposited in the new 
court house— the frame house known as the Kaufman building, one 
blo{;k east of the present site of the court house. 

Hut other aspirants for the county .seat sprung up. The Pottawa- 
tomie reserve had been opened for settlement (March, ]869).and .settlers 
had taken advantage of the opportunity to secure the rich lands and 
c'imfortable homes for a nominal sum. A town had been laid out at 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 75 



Newbury, the whole of Section 22, Township 11, Range 11 had been 
platted, with a square, containing 8 acres, in the center. The town 
company ofifered to erect a building and donate the use of the same for 
county purposes for five years and to deed the court house square to 
the county in case the county seat should be moved to Newbury. 

Eskridge, with its one house was also an aspirant and offered simi- 
lar inducements, and the citizens of Alma met the situation by the 
offer of a stone court house, the title to which should vest in the 
county after twenty years' occupation. 

At the January session, 1871, a petition to re-locate the county 
seat was granted and another election called for Feb. 7, 1871. 

The vote at this election stood as follows: 





Alma, 


Eskridge, 


Newbury, 


Wabaunsee, 


Alma, City, 


103 


, , 


5 




Alma, East Pre., 


49 


15 


7 




Alma, West Pre., 


61 


, , 


. . . 




Wabaunsee, 


88 


4 


9 


2 


Rock Creek, 


20 


10 


• . . 




Elm Creek, 


6 


51 


■ > • 




Dragoon. 


2 


88 


2 




Mission Creek, 


i 


75 


29 




Zeandale, 


40 


13 


5 




Newbury, East, 




. , 


43 




Newbury, West, 


3 




111 





In the recapitulation of the vote the following figures appear in 

^the records: 

Alma, 369; Eskridge, 256; Newbury, 217; Wabaunsee, 2. 

No place having received a majority of the votes cast another 

election was called for Feb. 21, 1871. 



The vote stood: 


For Alma. 


For Eskridge 


Alma Pre., 


127 


3 


Alma. East Pre., 


55 


23 


Alma, West Pre., 


59 


. . • 


Wabaunsee, 


133 


2 


Rock Creek. 


13 


19 


Elm Creek, 




48 


Dragoon, 


3 


106 


Mission Creek, 


•23 


26 


Zeandale, 


37 


20 


Newbury, East, 


. . . 


34 


Newbury, West, 


12 


85 



Alma, 465 Eskridge, 429 
Alma having received a majority of the votes cast was, for the 
third time, declared the county seat. Since the law requires a three- 
fifths vote to bring about a change, and a petition signed by two-thirds 
of the voters being necessary to call an election for the re-location of a 
county seat the question of a change is not likely to come before the 
people for years to come. - 



76 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Item in Signal February 20, 1899: It is stated on good authority 
that a family living on the Snokomo being somewhat annoyed by the 
presence of a frog in the cellar were surprised one morning to find the 
butter already churned and ready for market. Investigation disclosed 
the fact that the churning had been done by the frog— in his efforts to 
get out of the churn. The agitation of the cream had churned the 
butter into an island on which the frog was calmly waiting for some- 
thing to turn up— monarch of all he surveyed— which in this case was 
a small fringe of buttermilk on the outer edge of the island, and the 
walls of the churn that held his frogship a prisoner. It is said that 
fabulous offers for the frog have been refused and that it will be 
trained to salt and print the product of the nocturnal churnings. 



During the drouth of 1894, the people of Kansas, among other 
afflictions, were imposed upon by a lot of fakirs styling themselves 
rainmakers. Alma, not to be behind the times put forward the claims 
of Dr. Syntax. Of course the Doctor could furnish the usual testi- 
monials as to ability, experience, level-headedness and fair dealing. 
Failure to produce rain would cost nothing more than the net outlay 
for the chemicals used and the pittance of ten dollars a day extra for 
time engaged and insurance— on account of the imminent and con- 
stant danger of being blown up by the least oversight in mixing the 
chemicals used. But soon the windows of Heaven were opened, the 
floods came and the Doctor, with the rest, found himself out of a job. 
But the Doctor, being a man of expedients, moved to Oklahoma and 
married a widow — and never since has had cause to complain of a lack 
of useful and pleasant employment. 



A book published in 1854, describing the trip through Kansas of 
two agents of the Kansas League of Cincinnati contained this pen 
picture of Leavenworth: "A squatter city has little resemblance to 
any other city; it belongs to a distinct genus of cities. This is a large 
and important one, as many hope, of Kansas, and, therefore, worthy 
of description. There was one steam engine; naked as when it was 
born; but at work sawing out its clothes. There were four tents, all 
on one street, a barrel of water (or whiskey) under a tree, and a pot on 
a pole, over a fire. Under a tree a tpye sticker had his case before 
him and was at work on the first number of the new paper; and within 
a frame without a board on side or roof was the editor's desk, and the 
"Notice" stating that the editor had removed his office from under 
the elm tree to the corner of "Broadway and Levee." This Broadway 
was, at that time, much broader than the streets of Old Babylon; for, 
with the exemption of the fort, there was probably not a house on 
either side for thirty miles." 



EARLY FCISTORY OF WABA0NSEE COUNTY, KAN. 77 



ft- ftUnter's Faradjse. 



It is difficult for the average citizen of Wabaunsee county of 
to-day to imagine a condition of things relative to game production, 
but a few short years ago as compared with the present surroundings. 

In 1818 Captain Martin with three companies of United States 
riflemen encamped for the winter on Cow Island, a few miles above the 
present site of Fort Leavenworth, and during that winter the com- 
mand killed nearly three thousand deer, besides great numbers of 
bears, turkeys and other game. 

In the fall of 1830 while McCoy's surveying party was camped on 
Stranger creek, but a few miles out of Fort Leavenworth, a herd of elk, 
estimated to number two or three hundred, was encountered and 
several killed. 

Colonel Gilpin, speaking of '-the Great Plains," of which he con- 
sidered Kansas as the major part, described the country as the home 
of infinite herds of aboriginal cattle peculiar to North America— buf- 
falo, wild horses, elk, antelope, white and black tailed deer, wolves, 
the hare, badger and smaller animals innumerable. He also described 
the Great Plains as swarming with poultry— the turkey, prairie chicken 
the sandhill crane and curlew; water fowl of every variety, the swan, 
goose, brant and ducks; birds of prey— eagles and vultures; small birds 
of game and song: wolves, panthers and wild cats. 

On these the nomadic tribes of Indians subsisted from time im- 
memorial. From these he drew his supplies— his food, his lodge, fuel, 
harness, clothing and bed; his armaments, weapons and utensils. 
These were his sole dependence from the beginning to the end of his 
existence. The innumerable carniverous animals also subsisted upon 
them. 

During the Mexican war when Doniphan's anc Kearney's expedi- 
tions passed through Wabaunsee county— on the old Santa Fe trail — 
they encountered numerous herds of buffalo right in our own country 
and elk, deer and antelope were killed by the hunters every day. 

Bon. P. G. Lowe in his address before the Kansas Historical 
Society, January 14, 1890, speaking of conditions as to game in 1853 



78 EARLY HISTORY OP^ WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



says: "The buffalo range was a little west of aline drawn north and 
south throuK'h Fort Riley (established in 1853). East of that line were 
plenty of turkey, deer and other small game." Spealcing of the plains 
he said tliat by reason of the perennial pastures the whole face of the 
country was a continuous parlv, where ranged the noble buffalo, the 
antlered elk,, deer in the vallies, antelope on a thousand hills and 
smaller game everywhere. 

The turkey roosts ui^on all the timbered creeks would astonish the 
best farmer's wife in America. 

In 18r)3 Major Chilton's command found travel blocked with 
buffalo the whole distaiwe from Cow ereek to Fort Atkinson (six miles 
west of Dodge City). Standing on any high point, as for as the eye 
could reach a vast moving mass could be seen, making the earth trem- 
ble with their tramping and bellowing. It was afterwards learned 
that the Kiowas and Comanches had actually tried to drive the buf- 
falo from the Smoky Ilill south of the Arkansas— in which they were 
partially successful. The line of drive extended two hundred miles 
from east to west and they hunted and worked away on the north side 
of the herds until the great bulk of them drifted to, and across the 
river. 

Colonel W A. Phillips, president of the Kansas Historical Society, 
said in 1890, in his address, that in 1866 he had seen several thousand 
elk in a single herd, and that he had seen immense herds of buffalo 
cover the landscape, and made it as black as ink, in the early summer 
time, as far as the eye could reach. 

While the Kansas Pacific railroad was being built hundreds of 
hunters were engaged in killing butfalos, a few being employed by the 
grading gangs to supply meat for the contractors, but a greater num- 
ber killed the animals for their hides, leaving their carcasses to rot on 
the prairies. I have seen the ground so thickly strewn with the bones 
of dead animals that you could walk for hundreds of yards over the 
prairie and never touch foot to the ground. 

These hunters received the small pittance of one dollar per head 
and many of these men would kill more than a thousand each during 
the season. 

So outrageous was this wholesale slaughter that General Hazen in 
1872 appealed to the government for authority to curtail the nefarious 
work but his appeals were in vain. The Indians were throwing every 
obstacle in the way of building and operating the railroad and the 
argument was used that the killing of the buffalos was necessary to de- 
prive the Indians of their .source of supplies, but the department failed 
to llnd'in General Hazen an advocate of any such methods. 

In January, 1872, while a train of cars on the Kansas Pacific was 
imbedded in a snow drift, a herd of buffalos gathered on the lee side of 



EARLY TflSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 79 

the train for shelter from the storm. It was impossible to drive the 
stupefied animals away by shoutingand the locomotive whistle was no 
moie effective. The animals huddled close together with bowed 
heads and their sides close to the cars waiting for the storm to pass 
over. Had the passengers been so disposed they could have killed the 
whole hai'd from the car windows. Many were frozen to death in their 
tracks near the train. 

The illustration (Buffalo in the Sixties) hardly does justice to 
actual conditions as they existed in the sixties at points on the Santa 
Fe trail between the Cottonwood and Cimarron crossings of the Arkan- 
sas. Soon after the iron horse had penetrated the "Great American 
Desert" trains were compelled to stop that the immense herds of 
buffalo might pass. 

In 1857 James L. and Haynie Thomson, father and brother of the 
author of this book, found plenty of buffalo near the Cottonwood cross- 
ing of the Santa Fe trail. The next year, Mr. Samuel Cripps, and 
brother Haynie, got all the buffalo meat wanted on Running Turkey 
creek. Here we found them two years later, although on account of 
the westward and soi:thern movement of the herds we were compelled 
to go as far west as Cow creek before securing a load of desirable 
meat. We saw many small herds in McPherson county and my 
brother, Davis, killed a buffalo near the site of the present city of Mc- 
Pherson On Turkey creek hundreds of antelope scampered over the 
prairie, but little beyond the range of our rifles. The graceful ani- 
mals were filled with curiosity, showing but little signs of fear at our 
approach. 

As to smaller game, chickens, turkeys and rabbits were plentiful 
here in '57 and for years afterwards. In 1859, ray father killed three 
turkeys with a rifle, all at one shot. 

In the winter of 1868 as many as twenty deer were seen on the 
Dragoon in one herd. Two years later Mr. Squire Cantrill saw ten 
deer in one bunch on the prairie about a mile north of his present resi- 
dence in Plumb township. 

Mr. Sebastian Wertzberger was the champion deer hunter of the 
Mill creek valley, killing from five to twelve each year until the aggre- 
gate reached beyond the hundred mark. 1873 was the banner year, 
Sebastian killing twelve that season, besides wounding three he 
never got. Mr. Wertzberger shot his last deer in 1880. He has several 
pairs of fine bu ck horns as a proof of his prowess as a deer hunter. 

Mr. Jo. Luty, who lived on the farm now owned by Herman Treu 
on the East branch, was fond of hunting but killed but few deer. On 
account of his love for the chase he sold his farm on Mill creek and 
moved to Montana. 

In 1SS5 probably the last deer on West Branch was killed by the 



80 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

section men at Yolland. In the spring of '93 Mr. James Ketterniann 
killed two deer on the Spieker place and three weeks later Mr. Louis 
Drebing killed another on the home place near Halifax, probably the 
last deer killed in Wabaunsee county. 

As to small game, such as prairie chickens and rabbits, they were 
so plentiful in the early days that their presence in many cases was 
detrimental to the farmers' interests, although not a few were enabled 
to replenish their scant larders by conditions they saw no reason to 
deprecate. 

While, at this period in our county's history, our people are not 
boasting of their game supply, jack rabbits are abuddant and the com- 
mon rabbit and quails are plentiful; a few flocks of chickens remain, 
and ducks at certain seasons, provide our amateur hunters with the 
means of diversion; although the country isn't the ideal hunting 
ground it was in years agone our nimrods haven't yet adopted the 
standard of their eastern prototypes and found sport in the slaughter 
of doves, meadow larks and pigeons— these are left to the care of beys 
who find in the plentiful supply an ample field for practice. ' 

But, if not now, Wabaunsee county in the past, as part of the 
Great American Desert, has been in truth, a Hunter's Paradise. 



Mr. J. J. Mitchell, a member of the Eskridge bar, though emi- 
nently successful, his path was not always strewn with roses. Cn 
first entering upon his checkered career he had an office and in the 
course of time a client, but his library was built on the limited plan— 
limitei in h:s case to the massive and well worn lids of the first edition 
of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, and a volume of the 1868 statutes, 
minus the binding, the Index and a few other appurtenances there- 
unto fcelcnging. Mr. Mitchell surmounted all difficulties and tis 
success is of a kind that other rising young attorneys might well con- 
sider worthy of emulation. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. GE03GE SUTHERLAND, Alma. MR." JOHN C. HENDERSON, Alma. 





MR. A. M. JORDAN, Kuenzli Creek. 



MR. AUGUST UTERMANN, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JOHN Y. WAUGH, Eskridge. 



MR. WILLIAM TRUSLER, Eskridge. 





MR. LYNN M. CHRISTY, Eskridge. 



MR. IRA L. MORRIS, Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. ALDEN E. TRUE, Vera. 
Former State Senator. 



MR. A. F. WADE, Keene. 

Former Representative. 





MR. W. G. WEAVER, Alma. 
Former Clerk District Court. 



MR. GEORGE L. CLOTHIER, Vera. 
Former County Superintendent. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JOHN T. KEAGY, Alma. 
Former County Attorney, and Probate Judge. 



DR. G. C. REALS, Alma. 
County Health Officer. 





MR. SAMUEL R. WEED, Wabaunsee. 
Former Representative. 



MR. J. F. WILLARD, Wabaunsee. 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. .J. R. HENDERSON, Alma. 
Former County Clerk. 



MR. H. J. PALENSKE, Alma. 
Former SheriflF. 





MRS. J. M. JOHNSON, Harveyville. 



MR. JAMES E. JOHNSON (deed), AND 
WIFE, Harvej villa. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. MARION MEREDITH, Eskridge. MRS. MARION MEREDITH, Eskridge. 




r 




MR. J. H. LAWLOR, Eskridge. 



MRS. .J. H. LAWLOR, Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



.iyo 





MR. HERBERT C. SHAW, Bradford. 



MR. A. A. JONES, Bradford, 





MR. E. STURDY, Bradford. 
Manager Freeman Ranch, 



MR. W. J. HINSHAW, Harveyville, 






EARLY HISTORV OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. J. B. BARNES, Alma. 
Former County Attorney. 



MR. GEO. G. CORNELL, 
Former Representative, and County Attorney, 





M. W. CHILLSON, Alma. 



MR. S. E. HULL, Alma. 
Former Sheriff. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. LOUIS HORNE (dec'd), Alma. 



MRS. THERESA HORNE, Alma. 





MR. FRANK OEHMANN, Alma. MR. HENRY GRAVES (deed), McFarland. 



EARLY HISTORV OF WABAUNSEE COUNTV, KAN. 





MR. MARK SAGE, MissioQ Creek. 



MR. HENRY ROXNAU (Dec'd). 
Kaw Township. 





MR. P. E. LEONARD, Alma, 
Superintendent County Farm. 



MR. GEORGE FECHTER, Alma. 



EARLY TflSTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 81 



Pierre, the Capital ! 



That is what the dispatches said. To the average reader this item 
is of but little interest, but to the writer this opened up a revelation 
akin to that bewilderment that startled Rip Van Winkle on waking 
from his twenty years slumber. 

In 1862 the country was shocked by one of the most atrocious In- 
dian massacres tliat it was possible for devils in human form to con- 
ceive. There was a general uprising of the confederated Sioux tribes, 
and known as the Minnesota massacre. But a large part of tlie settled 
portion of Dakota, Nebraska and parts of Iowa were visited by tlie 
scourge of devastation at the hands of these human fiends who, in 
warfare, show no mercy, and have no respect forage, sex, or condition. 
At Spirit Lake, in nortnern Iowa, women and children were impaled 
on sharpened poles and subjected to every indignity possible for human 
fiends to perpetrate, until death came to tlie relief of those who had 
suffered tortures equivalent to a thousand deaths. 

Though the powers of the government were strained to their 
utmost, yet the appeals of the distressed pioneer were not made in 
vain. In the spring of 1863, General Sully, with two regiments of 
cavalry, and a park of mountain liowitzers, set out on an expedition 
against the hostile tribes. 

k Sioux City, Iowa, was the outfitting point. Sioux City at that 
ime was about as large as Alma. It was a dull and sleepy town, but 
uwo regiments of volunteers and several hundred quartermaster em- 
ployes put new life into the dull village. But in a short time the 
little army moved on up the river past Fort Randall, on beyond the 
Crow Creek agency, and then to a point opposite old Fort Pierre. The 
river was low and the little stern wheel steamers made slow work of 
transporting supplies to the camp opposite Fort Pierre. So for nearly 
two months the present site of the newly chosen capital of Dakota 
was utilized as a camping ground for Sully's command. A mile below 
hundreds of Sioux Indians were encamped, and with them were several 
squaw men. Of these squaw men, several were chosen as guides to 
lead the command to the camp of their hostile brothers on the plains 
farther north. Among the guides was one that has since become 
famous as "Belden, tlie White Chief." 



82 EARLY II ISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

That was a desolate country then. Not a dozen ranches were in 
existence aV)ove Fort Randall. Fort Pierre, opposite the camp was not 
a government fort but merely a French trading post established by a 
Fronchman, no less wild than the Indians, for the purpose of trading 
with the Sioux. To "stand in" with the Indians was a matter of 
necessity, and the soldiers would as soon trust an Indian as these "Par- 
levoos." But there were no other guides and it was these squaw men 
or notliing, and to this day the members of the 6th Iowa and 2nd 
Nebraska cavalry will insist that the ill success of tlie expedition was 
due to tlie treacherous guides. 

Pierre, the Capital ! And only twenty six years ago the monot- 
onous noise of a military camp was only broken by the braying of hungry 
mules or the sound of the tom-tom wafted across the river from the 
Indian camps around the fort. 

Pierre, the capital ! Pierre with its railroad facilities, and electric 
lights., and handsome school-buildings, and town lots selling at a 
thousand dollars per foot. What a change. 

Where is Rip Van Winkle? Give him another shake. 
"A mass of seething humanity." 

"People driving in buggies over the hills north of town to look at 
property." 

That is the way the dispatches read. It is well to give Rip 
Van Winkle another shake. The wonders that would be unfolded 
might well cause the old fellow to turn in his grave. 

Buggies in Dakota in 1863 would have been as much out of place 
as a bovine in a china shop. 

The only property in that country in those days worth looking after 
was a man's scalp, and each one endeavored to take care of his own. 
But driving or riding over the hills to the north in those days would 
have been a risky venture. 

In August, 1863, Sully's command formed a line of march of five 
columns and moved forward toward the supposed location of the vil- 
lages of the hostile Sioux. 

General Sully, stall and body guard, followed by the mountain 
howitzers, formed the central column. On either side was a long line 
of wagons an d and ambulances, and on the outside of these was a regi- 
ment of cavalry— the 6th Iowa on the right and the 2nd Nebraska on 
the left. A herd of beef cattle, guarded by a company of cavalry, 
brought up the rear. 

In this manner for a distance of 600 miles, the command marched 
through a hostile country in which the house of a white man had 
never been seen. 

Deer and antelope were frequently seen, and there were buft'alo in 
plenty— and that it will be remembered was east of the Missouri river. 



EARLY TflSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 83 

At that time, where buffalo were found, Indians were not far 
away. The carcasses of buffalo, recently killed, was evidence that the 
Indian villages were near and that they were engaged in providing 
themselves with meat for winter use. 

On September 3, 1863, the command, with the exception of a bat- 
talion of cavalry, had gone into camp after a hard day's march. This 
batalion of cavalry was scouting in front and had come upon a village 
of 600 lodges of the hostile Sioux. 

The chief scout, La Frombois, had returned to camp, and reporting 
the near proximity of the Indians, the two regiments were immedi- 
ately put under marching orders. 

Never was the bugle call of "Boots and Saddles" obeyed with 
greater alacrity The two regiments of cavalry had been recruited 
from among the pioneers of Iowa, Nebraska and Minnesota, and many 
of the soldiers had lost friends or relatives in the terrible massacre of 
the year before. 

It was but a few short moments from the time the call was 
sounded until 2000 cavalry and a battery of mountain howitzeis were 
hidden in a cloud of dust raised in the direction of the hostile camp 
ten miles away. 

The battalion of cavalry scouting for Indians in front of Sully's 
command was composed of several companies of the 6th Iowa. In that 
regiment was a company of gray horses, another one of black horses, 
etc. The black horse company was a part of the scouting battalion. 

The Indians, who, by the way, had seen the advancing troops long 
before their village was discovered, had met the advancing column 
some distance from the village, and were quick to notice the absence 
of the white horses. This was evidence to them that only a part of 
the troops were in their immediate front. There being about four 
thousand. warriors in the village the younger warriors of the tribe 
were in favor of annihilating the band before the reinforcements 
arrived, while the older members, men with families in the camp, 
were opposed to doing anything that would jeopardize the loss of their 
property, or that would endanger the lives of their wives and children. 

The Indians were not asleep. They had seen the scout, La 
Frambois, leave the command, and suspected that he had returned 
for the main body of the troops. As soon as this became known, run- 
ners were sent to the Indian village with orders to move camp with- 
out delay. In carrying out these orders no time was lost, and when 
General Sully, with two regiments of cavalry came up, there was but 
one tepee standing in the village. The others, with papooses, puppies 
and other household belongings, were strapped on the backs of the 
little army of Indian ponies ad were scattered for miles and making 
good time in the direction of a more healthful climate. 



84 EARLY niSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

General Sully followed the Indians and overtook the main body in 
a ravine about a mile from the deserted village, and had he permitted 
the mountain howitzers to entilade the ravine, as some of his sub- 
ordinates desired, but few Indians would have been left alive to ren- 
der a second expedition necessary. But being more merciful than the 
Indians had shown themselves, he refused to allow the cannon to be 
used on account of the slaughter of the women and children who were 
scrambling along in a confused mass of ponies, warriors, squaws, 
children and dt)gs. 

Every possible endeavor was made to induce the Indians to sur- 
render. About three hundred took advantage of the opportunity pre- 
sented to save their property and families from possible destruction, 
but the majority kept up their hurried flight. This condition of 
things could not last. A large number of the soldiers had lost friends 
or relatives by Indian barbarities, and had enlisted that they miglil 
inflict on the Indians that punishment they deserved. With or with- 
out orders firing began, and the heaps of dead ponies told of the terri- 
ble execution of the volleys of minnie balls poured into the retreating 
mass. Evidence of the panic that ensued was shown in the piles of 
tepees and camp equipage of every description scattered for miles 
over the prairie, plainly marking the course of the stampede. It was 
a flight for life, but the warriors stood their ground, and it being late 
in the afternoon, they held possession of the field all night, carrying 
off their dead, and, with but few exceptions, their wounded. 

The soldiers lost twenty-two killed and thirty eight wounded. 
Among the latter was the adjutant of the 6th Iowa, who being 
wounded in the hips, was compelled to lie on the field all night. Be- 
ing cold he had pulled over him a bulTalo robe lying near. 

The Indians, in looking for their own dead and wounded, came 
across the adjutant, and, finding him alive, thrust a spear twice 
through his body, cutoff his ears and scalped him.* 

Notwithstanding all this he lived until the next afternoon, being 
able to relate to his sorrowing brother otticers the terrible scenes en- 
acted around him as he lay helpless on the ground the night before. 

At nightfall the command withdrew to a hill overlooking the site 
of the deserted village where they bivouaced without fire or blankets 
until the arrival of the wagon train, which was about sunrise next 
morning. 

On the 15th of September, 1863, a Sioux Indian village of 600 

* In "Belden, the White Chief," Is an Illustration in which the adjutant is por- 
trayed as fighting with his sword, the squaws, who, it is related, inflicted upon the 
adjutant tVie injuries that caused his death. Willi Die e.xception of the prisoneis 
and a few of the wounded, the squaws were miles away, looking after their papooses 
and taking care of their own scalps. 



EARLY TdSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 85 

lodges was located on every side of a small but beautiful lake situated 
near the dividing line between North and South Dakota. 

The lodges were of tanned buffalo skins, supported by a frame 
work of slender spruce poles, brought from the Black Hills. Each 
lodge afforded shelter for about ten persons. 

The country around furnished excellent pasturage for the hun- 
dreds of ponies that constituted the principal wealth of the nomadic 
bands gathered together for protection from the soldiers sent to avenge 
the wrongs suffered at the hands of the savages the year before. 
Every movement of the command had been watched for days, and, but 
for the tell-tale carcasses of the buffalo scattered for miles over the 
prairies, it is doubtful whether the village would have been found, on 
account of its secluded site — the hills on every side rendering it visible 
but a short distance from any direction. 

But the commotion in camp showed too plainly of blasted hopes. 
The camp had been discovered, and the only remaining hope was in 
flight before the arrival of the main body of troops. There was a 
hurried gathering in of the ponies, and there was such a confused 
hustling of household belongings, as they were being packed on the 
backs of ponies, as was seldom seen in an Indian village. 

With the long tepee poles strapped to the sides of the ponies, and 
the huge wickerwork travois strapped to the poles behind the animals, 
and a load on the pony's back he was ready to take his place in the line 
of march. 

With hundreds of hands at work, it was not long before the bust- 
ling village was a thing of the past. This was an extraordinary occa- 
sion, and it was devil take the hindmost. So, long before the arrival 
of Sully and his command, the least encumbered of the Indians were 
streaming over the hills toward some quiet nook where the blue coats 
would not care to follow. But the troops were upon them before the 
main body of the Indians had reached a point a mile beyond the 
village. We have told of the fight and withdrawal of the troops to the 
hill near the site of the deserted village. 

It was long and weary waiting in the cold and darkness, but with 
the dawn of day the soldiers were gladdened by the sight of the ad- 
vancing train. Ere long the camp fires were lighted and but for the 
gloom that overspread the camp, by reason of missing comrades, the 
usual good cheer would soon have prevailed. The last sad rites of 
burying the dead being performed, and the wounded having been 
made as comfortable as posssble under the circumstances, other duties 
must be performed. The Indians were hovering around the camp 
ready to cut off any stragglers that might venture outside the lines. 
Scouting parties were .sent out in search of the Indians, and some of 
them had no difficulty in finding them. One company, save one man, 



86 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

left their pruns behind them in their hurry to reach camp ahead of the 
Indians. 

Marking the line of retreat, and within a mile of camp, the site of 
the deserted village, were hundreds of abandoned tepees, buffalo robes, 
camp e(iuipage, and in fact everything to be found in an Indian camp. 
Hundreds of arrows, bows already strung, tomahawlts, pipes, scalps of 
women and children killed in the massacre a year before, doubtless 
preserved as mementoes of .some brave, who on this occasion concluded 
that discretion was the better part of valor. 

It was now the .soldiers' turn at gathering souvenirs, and many a 
home in Iowa and Nebra.ska of today may boast of some Indian relic 
.saved from the torch that was soon applied to the heaps of traps 
gathered together by the soldiers detailed for the work. 

But all were not souvenirs, that are today valued, though they 
may be of assistance in drawing a pension. Some wounded Indians 
had been missed in the search of their comrades. One of these sent 
an arrow through the arm of a soldier looking for curios, and another 
had a steel arrow head driven into his skull with such force as to re- 
quire the united strength of one of the surgeons and two assistants to 
withdraw the ugly missile. It is needless to add that these members 
of the Lo family were, without ceremony, sent on their journey to the 
"happy hunting grounds." 

Around the camp were hundreds of dogs that had lost their reckon- 
ing during the panic and hovered around the deserted village, that 
was now in the hands of a strange people whom the dogs deemed 
worthy of a nightly serenade of the most dismal howling. 

It was the custom among the Indians to provide the dogs with 
small tepee kennels for shelter. When on the march the small tepee 
poles were strapped to the dogs and a bundle strapped behind. Some- 
times this was the dog tepee, and again a buffalo robe or some article 
of wearing apparel, and occasionally the load would be a more precious 
burden, the idol of the Indian household, the youngest papoose. 

Among the bewildered dogs, dozens of them were aimlessly wan- 
dering about with their packs still strapped to them and these were 
shot down that their valuable loads might be secured. 

As one of the details of soldiers was gathering in heaps the In- 
dian trappings that the torch might be applied, he saw an object 
among the weeds growing in the bed of a dry lake which he supposed 
was a dog with a pack. Thinking to kill the dog that his pack might 
be secured, he proceeded to the spot and after peering cautiously 
around he got sight of the object that had attracted his attention, but 
it proved to be a different animal from that which he expected to find. 
It was a long object covered by a buffalo robe. From under one end a 
beaded moccasin protruded and at the other end the rounded form 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 87 

suggested that underneath that part of the covering lay an Indian's 
head. 

There was the click of the hammer, and a sharp report and another 
member of the Sioux tribe had gone to loin Hiawatha. It was not a 
soldierly act, but the mutilated bodies of their dead comrades found 
on the field and the horrible scenes enacted at Spirit Lake, were too 
fresh in the minds of the Second Nebraska to foster feelings akin to 
sentiment in the matter of dealing with an Indian. 

A new difficulty now presented itself. Fort Pierre was the base of 
supplies, and that was 300 miles away. The supply of rations was run- 
ning short and there were 300 Indian prisoners to feed. The only 
alternative was to draw from the Indians' supply of commissary stores. 
These consisted of jerked (dried) buffalo meat, and were scattered over 
the prairie along the line of the stampede. Hundreds of packages of 
about fifty pounds each were encased in buffalo hides. Ten six-mule 
teams were sent out and were quickly loaded with these supplies, and 
it may be said that they were too much relished by the soldiers to ad- 
mit of the Indian prisoners monopolizing this branch of the commis- 
sary department. 

The work of gathering these supplies furnished an opportunity to 
those engaged in the work of saving from the torch an Indian relic that 
might be considered worth the transportation back to a civilized 
country. And there is doubtless in many a home in Iowa and Ne- 
braska today relics of the Sully expedition against the Sioux Indians 
in 1863. The writer has in his possession a wooden bowl of Sioux man- 
ufacture that he picked up on the line of the stampede. 

In passing over the ground, one of the detail, observing a beauti- 
fully painted robe, raised it up with the intention of appropriating it 
to his own private nse. As he lifted it a faint cry came from beneath 
it— a cry that startled all within the short distance it could be heard. 
It was the cry of a newly born papoose, that had been ushered into the 
world amid such scenes of tumult and carnage as are seldom seen. 
Nothing short of a reign of pandemonium could have caused that 
mother, though an Indian, to leave her babe on the cold ground, with 
but a robe for protection from the chilly air of northern Dakota. 

The robe was replaced with the intention of having the papoose 
placed in the hands of one of the squaws among the prisoners, but the 
same ruthless hands of those, none the less savage in their instincts 
than the merciless Indians, rendered impossible such an act of human- 
ity. 

The little one was deserving of a better fate, and had a mother's 
care been delegated to a foster parent, future years may have developed 
the foundling into a useful member of that great family of brother- 
hood, that can look, with no other feeling than one of abhorrence 



88 EARLY HISTORY OF WARAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

on scenes that tend to rob our natures of all that is good, and pure 
and ennobling, that are essential to tit us for that better life beyond 
the grave. 



Charge of the /V\Ule Brigade. 



When the Santa Fe brakeman called out the station at Iron 
Springs the writer's thoughts were occupied by other things than the 
sage brush skirting the road-bed through the most desolate section of 
Southern Colorado. He was thinking less of the rocky basin marking 
the holes of brackish water with which the weary traveler was, in 
times past, glad to quench his thirst, than of Pat McCloskey's narrow 
escape from the "Texicans." 

In the Spring of 1864 our lot was cast with twenty other govern- 
ment employes returning from Fort Union, New Mexico, to the 
"States." Pat McCloskey, one of our party, was constantly regaling 
the boys with his thrilling adventures, narrow escapes from the In- 
dians, &c. Pat, in his own estimation, was quite a hero, but somehow 
his companions failed to place so high an estimate on his bravery as he 
himself seemed to entertain. 

While at Fort Union some of the garrison manifested a little un- 
easiness lest the Texans should treat them to a repetition of the Val- 
verde raid. At the Fort preparations had been made to give the 
Texans a warm reception and the batteries of light artillery and field 
guns about the post presented a forbidding as well as military appear- 
ance and the boys accused McCloskey of being somewhat cowed by the 
warlike indications. However, in proportion as the distance from the 
scene of the probable invasion increased the spirits of our boasting 
comrade seemed to revive and when we went into camp at Iron Springs 
the horrid "Texicans" had been forgotten. 

But along in the afternoon at a time when the camp had settled 
down for a quiet rest after the fatigues of the day's march the still- 
ness was broken by frantic yells from the direction of Fort Union. 
"The Texicans are coming ! The Texicans are coming!" The camp 
was immediately aroused, and looking down the road whom should we 
see but McCloskey, hat in hand, running for dear life toward camp. 

With pallid face and his long hair streaming in the wind McCloskey 
hardly dared cast behind him a glance to assure him.self of the 



EARLY TriSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY^ KAN. 89 

character of his pursuers — who proved to be a half dozen men with a 
score of pack mules on their way to Fort Lyon, on the Arkansas. 
The mules were on a brisk run and being encumbered by such camp 
equipments as frying pans, sheet iron camp kettles, etc., made quite a 
din and created in the mind of McCloskey the the impression that two 
or three regiments of Texans were making a charge on his rear. 

Not until McCloskey had arrived sufficiently near camp to enable 
him to discover the merriment his appearance was exciting, did he 
realize that he was making a spectacle of himself. 

During the remainder of the trip all that was necessary to put a 
quietus on McCloskey's yarn-spinning was to ask him to tell about 
"The Charge of the Mule Brigade at the Iron Springs." 



Sonie Farrriing Operiences. 



Five Alma boys can tell all about it. They had experience of a 

practical kind. It was somewhat limited— short and — well, not very 

sweet. 

A farmer living five miles south of Alma, seeing that the weeds 

were making inroads into his corn crop, gave it out that a few boys 

could get steady employment in the business of hoeing corn. 

No advertising was done for the very good reason that it wasn't 
necessary. One boy had heard of the soft snap and he lost no time in 
communicating the good tidings to his chums. The idea of getting a 
whole twenty-five-cent piece for such a little thing as a day's work 
seemed too good to be true, but the boys — five of them — concluded to 
go out and investigate. 

Vivid pictures of big piles of corn flitted before the honest farm- 
er's eyes as the boys lined up for inspection before him. 

Yes, they all wanted work. Each of the boys had a good home in 
Alma, but in the city no means is provided by which boys can properly 
exercise their muscle. In town is a poor place for a boy to work off 
his surplus energy, and the boys had come to the country to lend a 
helping hand in saving the crops for and in consideration of the sum of 
twenty-five cents a day, per capita. 

There were five boys but not enough hoes to go around. But so 
small a matter could be easily remedied. A boy could ride to town 
and get a hoe. That was the easiest job he ever had. But using the 



90 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



hoe was different. An hour and a half cutting weeds with that hoe 
convinced that party that the whole farminj? business was a grinding 
monopoly, and pitching the hoe into a clump of weeds our would-be 
farmer made a break for Alma, where the city hires a man for the 
special purpose of attending to the weed cutting business. 

Boy No. 2 worked a full half hour and then gave up— not the ghost, 
but his job, for the better one he left at home. 

Boy No. 3 after working fifteen minutes broke his hoe-handle. 
The farmer put in another, but when he looked for that boy there was 
a big vacant spot that a few minutes before had been occupied by a 65- 
pound would-be farmer. 

Boy No. 4 only came to look on to see how he would like it. He 
liked it. Work was a good thing, but he was generous to a fault, so he 
left the whole job to be divided among the other boys— just as they 
saw fit. 

But boy No. 5 beat the record. He stayed five whole days. He 
had just as hard a job at home and there wasn't any twenty-five cents 
a day in it either, and that is why he stuck to it so long. 

When the boy who had worked an hour and a half returned home 
he had a dismal story to tell of the farmer's hard lot— and it wasn't in 
the cow-lot, either— where he said a part of his duty was to milk three 
cows— two more than at home. 

It was to his mother he went with his grievance— of how the boys 
had to work in the hot sun— of how they sweat and got, oh, so dirty ! 
And the man said they would have to sleep in the barn and worst of 
all, they must work there three or four days before he could determine 
whether or not their work was worth twenty-five cents a day. 

In those few long days— or hours— those boys learned more about 
farming than Horace Greely knew when he wrote his book. Their 
knowledge was of the practical kind, while that possessed by the re- 
nowned Horace was only theoretical. 

But the lesson learned on the farm will not be lost. Not one of 
those boys but returned home better contented with his lot. Each 
had seen a good deal of the world from a boy's standpoint. He had 
tasted the bitterness of life's realities and the impression left was any- 
thing but pleasant— yet just such experiences are necessary to enable 
the average boy to better fight the great battle of life after he has 
once crossed the real threshold. 



EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUKSEE CODNTY, KAN. 91 



/V Rabbit Farm. 



Fake stories of skunk farms, rattle snake farms, frog farms, etc., 
tend to satisfy the curious, but they usually lack the element of truth. 
But one doesn't have to drawn on his imagination to tell of Alma's 
first rabbit farm— or rather a little farm on which the chief Industry 
was the raising of the genuine Belgian hare. 

To Mr. Fred Meyer is the credit due for this infant industry that 
antedated by several years the fad of raising Belgian hares that has 
since spread to every state in the Union. 

Beginning in 1895, Mr. Meyer raised on his five acre tract in the 
north east part of town Belgian hares by the hundreds. Although but 
little outlay was made for advertising, a large number of shipments 
were made to parties residing a thousand miles or more from the little 
farm where the hares first saw the light. 

In addition to the number sold for breeding purposes, Mr. Meyer's 
table was bountifully supplied with dressed Belgian hare, a dish that 
compares favorably with the dantiest the market can provide. 

In 1898 the hares had increased in numbers until about 300 were 
awaiting orders for shipment or were ready to supply the tables of 
those desirous of indulging in a luscious dish of Belgian hare. 

These hares were about the size of our common jack rabbits, a 
little darker in color and as tame and playful as kittens. The industry 
requiring more time and attention than the proprietor felt that he 
could give to it, the business was closed out— just as the fad was being 
taken up and the raising of hares had become a source of income to 
thousands of people unaware of the fact that the initial starting point 
was at the little town of Alma. 

Referring to this farm the Arkansas City Dispatch said in April, 
1897: "This is probably the only farm of the kind in the world. 



Item in Signal, May 15, 1897; We leam that A. A. Jones has had 
an experience with a Texas steer that will last a life time— Alf 's life- 
time, we mean The steer's life is gone— he died of over production— 
of acquaintanceship with Alf— and his son, Ditto. Ditto is the other 
name for Sheldon. Alf was in sore straits— as it looked to a man up a 
tree — that was Sheldon. He had gone to help Alf and concluded he 



92 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

could do him as much good up a tree as on the ground. The precedent 
before him was sutlk-ieiit proof of tlie correctness of his position— tlie 
precedent was separated from Sheldon by a gooseberry patch— and the 
steer wasn't far away— they never are w hen they are mad— at least tlioy 
don't stay faraway very long at a time— and that was what was the 
matter with Alf. The steer was so close he bruised Alf's ribs, skinned 
his face, and poked his horns through his pants, worked out his pocket 
book and scattered tlie contents over something more than an acre of 
ground. That's what the Star says, and the Star's reputation for 
truth and veracity isn't to be doubted, unless one wants to get into a 
scrap, and we don't. 



As time advances the advantages presented by Wabaunsee county 
as a grazing county become more and more apparent. With her 
thousands of acres of grazing lands, with her wooded streams of pure 
and sparkling waters and our proximity to market our facilities are 
unexceled anywhere, and wide-awake stockmen show excellent judg- 
ment in selecting Alma, the center of our large grazing district, as 
their headquarters from which to direct their operations. But our 
farmers and merchants share a large percentage of the benefits de- 
rived. Their share of the profits from the sale of their surplus grain, 
supplies and extra pasturage net them substantial returns. Our 
county has been well named '-The Switzerland of Kansas." While 
the appellation is not inappropriate, the fact remains that few local- 
ities anywhere possess greater advantages to men engaged in the 
cattle industry. 



Item in the Signal, July 10. 1897: If you don't believe it rained on 
Saturday night last ask that McFarland young man how it looked to a 
man up a tree. The good people down at the McCrumb crossing hear- 
ing the roaring waters went down to the crossing where they espied a 
strange pony with a saddle on, almost convincing them that some be- 
lated traveler had gone down in the turbulent waters of Mill creek. 
But a voice from the tree tops announced that the owner of the voice 
wasn't drowned but a little bit damp and somewhat chilled from 
the effects of an involuntary bath. The young gentleman had been 
making a call that had been somewhat prolonged by the refusal on the 
part of the rain to stop. In attempting to cross the northern ap- 
proach to the McCrumb bridge the pony was washed down the stream 
and the rider saved'f^om drowning by an overhanging limb— enabling 
the weary survivor of the Hood to resume his place as manager of the 
Rock Island eating house at McFarland. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 93 



One of (Jncle Sam's Kids. 



As Ira Hodgson's experience is but that of a score of Wabaunsee 
county boys who suffered the pangs of disappointment by reason of 
being unable to fill the requirements necessary to pass the mustering 
officer, we tell his story in his own words: 

"June 1st, 1861, found me 15 years and 4 months old, and the 
North and South in a death grapple for supremacy. What was fret- 
ting me was that the scrimmage would be settled before I was big 
enough to join in the scrap. But I wasn't troubled that way long. 

My parents' folks— the Morgans and Crittendons— were fighters 
from away back, and I considered myself one of the speckled hen's 
chickens, and I wanted to fight too. You don't have to scratch more 
than through the skin to find the barbarian in the best of humanity, 
and I was no exception to the rule. 

There were about 1100 of the Hodgson family but they were 
Quakers and didn't believe much in war. But they were abolitionists 
and would run underground railroads— with colored men as passengers, 
as a matter of course. 

When the war broke out about half of the Hodgson family lived 
North of Mason and Dixon's line and the other half, South. In the 
South, every one that was old enough, was in the Confederate army, 
and they were hard old fighters too. 

In the North, although not so many went into the army, still there 
are scores of Hodgsons that wore the blue that fill unmarked graves in 
the sunny South. 

In 1861 1 was presumptious enough to imagine I was as large as I 
felt. I thought myself a match for any foe if I just had a gun, so I 
enlisted. 

But when the mustering-in officer came around he told me to step 
out and go home and stay with my mother awhile before I was big 
enough to be a soldier. He said they might need me later on. 

I never felt so small in my life. It seemed to me as though I 
settled right down into my boots and could just see over the tops of 



94 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUKSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

thciii. 1 racked right out for home. I couldn't stand the rest of them 
joshing me about being so small. 

But if I couldn't do ono thing I would try another. So I hired to 
a wagon-master of a freight train and made a trip to New Mexico and 
back. Freigining in that day and age was a hard racket for a kid and 
I didn't grow much on the trip. I measured myself but didn't come 
up to tlie standard of a soldier. , 

In the spring of '02 I was still below the standard, and I took an- 
other trip freighting to Santa Fe. I got back Augut 21, '62, and found 
the fighting still going on in dead earnest. Each side had found they 
had a big job on hand, (ireek had met Greek, 

The soldiers of the hardest fighting nation in the world had met 

on several bloody fields and had demonstrated that one side had no 

advantage of the other as far as fighting qualities were concerned. 

'The American is a foe worthy of any man's steel — let him be Russian, 

Prussian, Briton or Turk. 

The country was needing soldiers and now was my chance. I 
hadn't got big enough yet to till the standard, but necessity sometimes 
compels the government to vary a little in regard to height and 
weight. 

They were recruiting now for the 11th Kansas Infantry, so I just 
footed it to Fort Leavenworth and enlisted in Co. E. The mustering- 
In officer scrutinized me pretty close. He said I was pretty small but 
as I had footed it one hundred miles to enlist he thought I had pluck 
enough for a soldier if I didn't have the size. So he said he guessed 
he would have to take me in. 

I felt awful proud of being a Kansas soldier then and I can say I 
have no reason to be ashamed of it yet. The Kansas soldier is one of 
the best that tramps the earth. He has few equals and no superior. 
He has been tried on over one hundred hard fought battle-fields and 
has never been found wanting. 

When the war commenced the Kansas soldier had his record to 
make and he was subjected to a good deal of ridicule and derision from 
regiments from older states that had former records as soldiers. 

But when the war was over the Kansas soldier's fighting qualities 
were not questioned by either friend or foe. 

Well, the regiment was drilled about four weeks at Fort Leaven- 
worth and then we were sent to the front on a forced march — on a 
four hundred mile trip. 

The large boys and men had a good deal of fun at my expense bo- 
cause I was small. They said I couldn't carry a gun, and forty rounds 
of amunition, and my blanket and knapsack and keep up on the march. 
They said I would have to be hauled in one of the wagons or an ambu- 
lance. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 95 

I had nothing to say but I did a whole lot of thinking. I thought 
I knew who would have to crawl into a wagon. That spring and sum- 
mer I had footed it from Fort Leavenworth to Santa Fe and back, 
and from Leavenworth home, and from home to Leavenworth to en- 
list, and I thought I knew what walking meant. 

The first day out the command made about forty-five miles and the 
next day about twenty miles. The second day when we got into camp 
the iDig boys and men were strung out for about five miles, limping 
along with sore feet or stealing a ride in the wagons when they could 
get in. 

The next day it was the same, only worse. Then I had the laugh 
on them. I asked them who had to be hauled in the wagon? I was 
used to walking and could run the best of them down. But they got 
all right after they got used to walking. 

When we got down into Arkansas we camped close to a rebel 
woman's house and near our regiment three soldiers belonging to the 
6th Kansas— dispatch bearers— were encamped. The sergeant of the 
squad was a large, coarse looking old man. He went to the house and 
asked the woman for a skillet to fry his meat in. I was drawing a 
bucket of water at the well near the door and heard the conversation. 

She told the sergeant that she wouldn't lend him anything— that 
soldiers would lie and steal everything they could lay their hands on. 
The old sergeant said: "Madam, I am as honest as I am ugly; I will 
bringyour skillet back!" She looked him all over and then handed 
him the skillet without saying another word. 

Thinks I, old man, if you are as honest as you are ugly, your word 
ought to be as good as your bond. He took the woman's skillet back 
as soon as he got his meat fried and borrowed it again next morning, 
again taking it back. 

Soon after that my father (Allen Hodgson) wrote me that he had 
a cousin in the 6th Kansas Cavalry by the name of Jonathan Hodg- 
son and if I ever got a chance I had better go and see him. The first 
time I ran across the 6th Kansas I inquired for him and when I found 
him who should it be but the old sergeant that borrowed the skillet. 
We had a good laugh over the first time we met in Arkansas. 

At Pea Ridge we met General Scofield's command going North, 
but we pushed on and joined General Blunt in North Western Arkan- 
sas. In a few days we marched to Fort Wagner in the Cherokee 
Nation. Here were about 7000 rebels and Indians. General Blunt 
pitched into them with the 2nd and the 11th Kansas and Rabb's bat- 
tery. The 2nd Kansas charged their battery and captured it before 
the balance of our command got up. 

When we got there on the run the Indian regiment followed them 
up and killed and scalped a good many of them. Our next shindy was 



*-, 



90 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

at Cane Hill. Arkansas. The rebels were ready for us and had every- 
thing' fixed. They had a six fjnn ])attery in position. The 2nd Kan- 
sas, with Ilabb's battery and the 11th Kansas were in the advance. 
Rabb's battery charged up within 400 yards of the rebel battery. The 
rebel battery was already in position and Rabb's battery liad to go 
into position under fire, and before it could get ready for action it was 
pretty badly used up. Tlic first shot from Rabb's battery knocked one 
gun off of the wheels. They done them up in short order when they 
got at it. 

The first man T saw when we came up was one of the battery 
boys leaning up against a tree with his under jaw shot clean off. We 
had a running fight through the mountains for about 11 miles. Night 
came on and that stopped the fight for that day. 

We stayed at Cane Hill till the 7th day of December, '62 The 
5th day of December, (jeneral Hindman made a feint on Cane Hill. 
On the 6th he renewed the attack. IHs idea was to fight us there 
with part of his army and move the main part around on the wire 
road to Rhea's mills where our supply train was. 

Blunt had a scout on that road but neglected his business and let 
Hindman go around the night of the 6th. We were fighting on picket 
line all night and looking for a hard battle the next day, but a little 
after sunrise we heard a heavy artillery fire to the north west. 

We knew then what was up — Hindman was after our supply train. 
As luck would have It, General Herron was on his way to reinforce 
Blunt and met Hindman at Prairie Grove and then the fight com- 
menced. 

Herron had four regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, which 
with Blunt's command made about 8000 men. When we heard the 
cannon at Prairie Grove we started on the double quick and got there 
about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. They had Herron's men pretty badly 
done up. Plindman had about 5000 reinforcements come onto the 
field the same time we got in. We could hear Herron's men cheering. 
When tliey heard us open on tlie left they went in again in dead 
earnest. 

It was a pitched battle from then till after dark. Finally both 
sides fell back. We knew we were badly used up but expected to try 
it again the next day. We stayed in line of battle all night but we 
found the next morning the rebels had retreated. • 

As near as I can recollect we lost about 2000 men, killed and 
wounded. 

The next day we buried the dead and moved the wounded to 
Fayetteville. The 9th of December we started back to Cane Hill. 
The rebels had moved their wounded to that place and they we in our 
lines. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 97 

The government furnished them rations as long as we stayed 
there. 

The last of January we started for Van Buren and Fort Smith. 
From the bluflf above Van Buren we could see the streets filled with 
soldiers. A charge by the 2nd Kansas resulted in the capture of 
about 300 confederates and the town. 

Next we took Fort Smith, capturing three steamboats loaded with 
supplies. We then returned to Huntsville and thence to Vernon 
county, Mo. 

Another short trip South was followed by a furlough — Justin time 
to join U. S. Marshal McDowell's posse in pursuit of Bill Anderson on 
liis raid through his old stamping ground. Bill got within speaking 
distance of our sentries near the Cottonwoyd crossing of the Santa Fe 
Trail, but lie wheeled about and in a few days was back in old Missouri 
without losing a man. 



Was It a IWistaKe? 



On Oct. :i, 18G5, a petition signed by II. J. Loomis and nine others 
was presented to the board of county ccuiimissioners, praying for the 
voting of bonds to the amount of $100,000, to aid the Atchison, Topeka 
it Santa Fe Railroad. 

The petition was rejected, but a few months later the sum of 
$r)0.000 was asked for and an election ordered— to be held Feb. 24, 1866. 
But again the proposition was rejected by a vote of 127 to 49. 

The Santa Fe was then in its swaddling clothes and in view of the 
gigantic undertaking it was but natural tnat the company should seek 
assistiince to enable it to accomplish what then seemed a problem 
impossible of solution. 

Whether or not the residents of Osage and Lyon counties were 
more far-seeing than ourselves is an undetermined question but at any 
rate they voted the bonds asked for and secured for themselves ad van- 
tages in the way of railroad facilities that we might have had 
for the asking. 

Considering the fact that after long and weary waiting we voted 
nearly three times the amount that had been asked for, in bonds, for a 
feeder to what has proven to be a great National highway the question 



9S EARLY HISTORY OF WA.BAUNSER COUNTY, KAN. 



as to the mistake nvide could be correctly answered only by a reply in 
the most emphatic alHrmative. 

Our enthusiasm in the matter of railroads was aroused at an hour 
detrimental tn our material interests, but it came, nevertheless. 



Not at l+ome. 



Our short story refers to* an occasion when absence from hf>me 
possibly .saved the life of the early settler, who, fortunately, was not at 
home when the stranger called to pay, what the circumstances seemed 
to indicate, an unfriendly visit. 

In the early days of 1857 the elder Mr. Crafts was keeping batch in 
the (filbert house (our first home) on Dragoon creek. He had shoul- 
dered his rifle and at the time referred to was sitting on the ridge 
about a quarter of a mile east of the house hoping to get a stray shot 
at a deer that frequented the patch of timber near the old "mill pond." 

While watching for deer Mr. Crafts kept his weather eye on the 
house and to his surprise saw an Indian, with rifle in hand, creeping 
— in a crouched position — towards the old house— expecting, probably, 
to find the old gentleman at home. 

Cautiously and stealthily the Indian crept toward the cabin. 
Arriving near the house he appeared to be listening for some sound 
from within that might indicate the presence of the one whom he was 
evidently seeking for no good purpose 

It is needless to say that the elder Crafts was a close observer as to 
the Indian's movements and it is more than probable that in this 
instance the old pioneer derived considerable satisfaction from the 
fact that more than a quarter of a mile of space intervened between 
his own person and that of the wily Mr. Lo. 

Mr. Crafts often congratulated himself that for once in his life- 
time he was fortunate in being "Not at home." 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 99 



On the Ground Floor. 



All are familiar with the story of the agent, who, having sunk a 
fortune in speculating with his employer's capital held out promising 
inducements in a "'sure thing" by assuring his supposed easy victim 
that he would be let in "on the ground floor." That is al! right, said 
Mr. Go-easy, but my experience has been of a kind to induce the belief 
that the ground floor would be a mighty good place but for the 
that I have invariably found ahead of me in the cellar. 

But there is no cellar in the comparison involving the reputation 
of Charley and Chris Rath for getting in on the ground floor. These 
two enterprising German boys came to Wabaunsee county in the fifties 
and at once proceeded to make things come their way. With com- 
mendable foresight the boys set about preparing for the influx of that 
immigration they felt assured would seek out the good farming lands 
in the Mill creek valley. 

With prophetic vision they beheld the conditions that should con- 
trol in the years to come. It was clear to them that with the advent 
of prosperity the customs of the people would undergo a change. 
While in those days a diet of pumpkins was more than acceptable 
waving wheat fields and cribs brimming full of corn would induce 
aiistocratic tendencies and create a demand for the wherewith to 
manufacture brown bread and biscuits galore. 

The boys would anticipate the advent of the Utopian era by erect- 
ing a mill. Before bidding adieu to the Fatherland they had seen the 
overshot mills of the Upper Khine and had copied in miniature with a 
jack-knife wh.at they now propo.sed to put to a practical test in the 
waters of Mill creek. 

Stone was quarried and hauled to a point on the Droege farm, 
one and a half miles south of Alma. The wheel was put in place and 
the day dreams of the sturdy boys were all but realized when the big 
flood of .June. 1858, blasted their hopes of making a fortune in the mill- 
ing busine.ss, forever. 

But the young men were not altogether discouraged. They drifted 
west and with Grifenstein made a good living poisoning wolves on the 
Walnut— and here is where the boys proved good their proverbial 
aptness for getting in on the ground floor. 



lO;) EARLY inSTOIlYOF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Poiicock, Willi Allison, had made a biff fortune trading with the 
Indians, t rai)i)eis, and overland froiuhters. at their tradintf post at the 
mouth of tiie Walnut. They had no l)anks in wliich to deposit their 
hordes of {fold (Jther than the sandy banks of Walnut creek and the 
Arkansas river. Holes were dug within the stockade and here was 
buried their treasure, taken in exchange for such barter as was accept- 
able to their plainsmen customers. 

But with all Peacock's shrewdness he was indiscreet enough to 
warn tho.se crossing the plains.against the treachery and double deal- 
ing of Satank. the terror of the plains in the sixties. Taking offense 
at the contents of a begging paper given him by Peacock, Satank went 
with a band of his followers to the ranch and expressed to Peacock the 
fear that soldiers were coming. Peacock's assurance to the contrary 
was in vain. Peacock must see. At Satank's urgent request the 
ranchman mounted the stockade and scatmed the horizon with his 
long spyglass. Whil.e looking for the soldiers— with one eyeclosed— 
an arrow from Satank's strong bow sank deep in the socket of the 
other eye — and the life of one of the most daring of the pioneers of the 
plains went out forever. 

Then followed a horrible and indiscriminate slaughter— only one 
life was spared. A man with the smallpox was not disturbed. Not 
mercy, but fear of the dreaded scourge, was responsible for the seem- 
ing act of lenience on the part of Satank and his minions that day. 

In vain the Indians sought the hiding places of the treasure they 
hoped to lind. They prodded the ground but digging holes was tdo 
much like work. 

Not so with Charley and Chris Rath. True to their punctual 
methods they were on hand in time and a little digging in the soft 
sand was easy as compared with digging the mill race while residents 
of Wabaunsee county. 

During the war Charley Rath was a freitrhter and hay contractor 
at Fort Dodge and if Rumor is to be credited his good luck dated from 
his digging holes in the sand on the banks of the Walnut. 

The boys liad got in on the groun 1 floor. 



In the early history of Kansas people adapt (>d them.selves to sur- 
rounding circumstances. The story goes that three families lived 
together in a house ten feet square, notwithstanding the generally 
accepted statement that no house is big enougli to hold two women 
one and the same time. And it is alleged that in this instance that 
harmony prevailed until one of the families concluded to take in 
boarders. Then there was music in the air 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. GEO. L. HORTON, Harveyville. 



MR. AND MRS. M. P. EARLY, HarveyviUe. 





MR. M. JESTER, Eskridge. 



MR. JOHN N. BARLOW, Harveyville. 



^ 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. E. N. MANN, Alma. 



MR. HARRY NEWMAN, Alma. 





MR. AUGUST IBEDTEL.'Alma. 



MR. C. M. ROSE, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 







-#■■ 1^' 




CAPT. E. C. D. LINES (dec'd), Wabaunsee. 



MR. G. S. BURT, Wabaunsee. 





MR. LOUIS UNDORF, Alma. 



MR. W. S. WHITLOCK, Kavv Township; 
County Surveyor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. L. J. WOODARD (former Probate 
Judge) and Wife, Alta Vista. 



MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM DIEBALL, 
West Brancli. 









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MR. GEORGE BERROTH (dec'd) and 
Wife, Wabaunsee Township. 



MR. AND MRS. KETTERMANN, 
Near Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




w 

w 
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MR. ABE VVELFELT, Tecumseh, I. T. 





MR. CHET DAVIS, Alma. 



MR. S. G. CANTRILL, HarveyviUe. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. ISAIAH HARRIS (dec'd), 
Harveyville. 



MRS. ISAIAH HARRIS. 
Harveyville. 




I I II 





M. E. CHURCH, 
Harveyville. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH, 

Harveyville. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





REV. D. B. SCOTT. 



DR. ED. F. MOORE, Eskridge. 





ORCHARD ON THE FREEMAN FARM, near Bradford. 
E. Sturdy, Manager. 



L 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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MR. HERMAN ME3EKE (deceased), 
Templin. 



MR. H, G. LIGHT, Topeka. 
Former county clerk. 




RESIDENCE OF J. J. MITCHELL, E3KRIDGE. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. MARTIN MUCKENTHALER, 
Newbury. 



MR. CHAS. MUCKENTHALER.: 
Paxico. 




HOTEL PAXICO. 



EARLY llISrOUYOF \VA HAUN8EE COUNTY, KAN, 








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MK. WM. PliOTHKOW, 
WILMINGTON. 



MR. FRANK HODGSON, 
IIARVEYVILLK. 




MRS. E. MEYER S STORE, ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 101 



/Y Pawnee Raid. 



In the Sprin;? of 1859 the Dragoon Creek settlement was considera- 
bl}' alarmed on account of a raid from a band of seven Pawnee Indians. 
The Indians were not lookin": for scalps particularly, thouufh had the 
opportunity presented the probability is it would by no means have 
been netjlected. 

The Pawnees were deadly enemies of the Pottawatomies and had 
come into the country to steal some of their ponies. The Indians 
were af(K)t, ])utas they cameby Sam Devaney'sone morninsj: before day- 
light they couldn't resist the temptation to take his old blind horse 
picketed near his log cabin on the slope just east of where Mr. Eli 
Walton now lives. There was also a two-year-old colt that tlie Indians 
couldn't catcli, but the colt would follow, thus depriving Saui of his 
last honse. 

A man named McCray lived on the Henry Easter place then and 
that night his wife was sick. To this fact was due the timely discov- 
ery of the raiding Indians. While on his way to Sam Devaney 's for medi- 
cine he heard the Indians coming. Hiding till the Pawnees passed, 
McCray, recoguizing the horses hurried to Devaney's and gave the 
alarm. 

The sun was hardly up before Devaney h id got together three of 
his neighbors, Sam Harvey, Ir.i Hodgson and William Bcebe. who with 
himself were soon hot on the trail. Devaney's party were well 
mounted— on four of the five only remaining horses in the neighbor- 
hood — there being but seven horses, all told, in the settlement. 

The ground being soft from recent rains the pursuing party liad 
no difficulty in keeping track of the thieving Pawnees. The trail was 
followed up the creek and over the ridge to the John Copp place— now 
the Allendorph ranch. 

From a clump of bushes near the head of a steep, stony, ravine, a 
tiny column of smoke ascended. Feeling assured that a scrap was com- 
ing the pursuing party made a hasty examination of their arms— and 
such arms— for three men and a boy to give battle to seven Indian 



1U2 EAilLV lliSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



warriors. There were just two guns and three single-barreled pistols- 
Hut there was no backing out. The boys were after Devaney's 
stolen hor.ses and didn't propose to return without them. Malting f(jr 
the mouth of the ravine the pursuing party were confronted by tht- 
Indians, who had evidently been on the lookout for just such a contin- 
gency. 

As the Indians emerged from the ravine they began shooting, 
their tirst shot being aim-nl at Ira Ilodg.son. the boy of the party, ira 
being a lad of but 13 years of age. Ira returned the Indian's tire and 
his .shot probably saved Devaney's life, as the Indian dodged as he 
tired. Though but thirty yards distant every shot tired by the Indians 
went wild. But the Indians were not so fortunate. As they ran. Sam 
Devaney shot one big Indian through the lungs and he fell to the 
ground with a thud. The boys .said when the ball struck the Indian's 
butl'alo robe it sounded like a drum. 

Supposing the Indian who fell had been killed, the boys gave the 
other Pawnees a hot chase for three miles, shooting whenever the 
opportunity offered, but owing to rough ground and brush six of the 
Indians got away. 

Returning to the Indians' camp Devaney and his party found the 
blind hor.se picketed out in a near-by ravine and the colt close at hand. 
They then examined the Indian and though th'3 ball had passed entire- 
ly through his breast there was a possibility that with good care he 
might live. Arrangements were made with John Copp to haul the In- 
dian down to his place and take care of him till he could send word to 
the Kaws, it never for a moment being suspected that the woundod 
Indian was a Pawnee. 

John Copp made the Indian a comfortable bed down by the hay 
stacks and sent word to the Kaws to come and take charge of the 
wounded Indian. 

In a few days the Kaws came over — about thirty of them, but John 
was away. Then for the tirst time it was learned that the wounded 
Indian was a Pawnee. The way the Indians took care of him left no 
doubt on that point --they .scalped him alive and left him in his bod by 
the haystacks. 

But .John wouldn't have it that way. He followed the Kaws and 
told them they must return and kill the Indian they had .scalped and 
purposely left to die a lingering death. 

But the Kaws were in an accommodating mood and they not i»nly 
killed the Indian but proceeded to perform the last sad rites after 
their own peculiar fashion in the case of a dead Pawnee— knowing full 
well a band of Pawnees would gladly return the compliment should 
one of their number fall into tlieir hands under similar circumstances. 

After cutting the Pawnee's throat the Kaws tied one end of a lar- 
iat about his neck and the other to the t;iil f>f the wildest pony in the 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 103 

herd. Then the work of preparing the body for burial commonced. 
With Spear points and sharp sticks thrust into his flanks and roar that 
pony was soon made to know the part ho was expected to play in the 
program and the demoniac yolls from thirty Indian throats caused the 
pony to put such energy into his movements that when that part of 
the ceremony was over there wjre pieces of Pawnee scattered all about 
the stony hills of Mill Creek, but mighty little ilesh left on the bones 
for the coyotes. 

The Indians then cut off the head of the dead Pawnee and used it 

for a foot-ball, after which they dumi)td the now denuded skeleton 

into a ravine and covering it over with stones the Kaws with grunts 

of satisfaction declared the funeral ceremonies ended and at once took 

up their march for their reservation. 

The six remaining Pawnees had no idea of returning to their vil- 
higes without a dozen or more ponies belonging to tlieir more affluent 
neighbors, the Pottawatomies. There was a big village down on the 
east side of Kuenzli Creek, on what is now the Frank Rickershauser 
farm, and the hills and ravines were dotted with ponies. The Paw- 
nees succeeded in cutting out a few fine ones, but the Pottawatomies 
were on the alert and after a running tight of ten miles or more six 
Pawnee scalps furnished the best proof that the Pottawatomies were 
amply able to look after their herds. 

But there was mourning in the Pawnee villages lor the seven 
braves who never returned. 

NoTK.~Mr. John Copp, near whose place the above tragic scene 
was enacted, was an eye witnes to the cruel manner in whicli the 
Kaws disposed of their Pawnee victim. What had been intended as an 
act of kindness on his part prf>ved a sad disappointment to himself and a 
terrible closing act in the life of the raiding Pawnee. After the open- 
ing of the Pottawatomie lands to settlement Mr. Copp located just 
north of the Paxico mill. He served several terms as C'ounty Commis- 
sioner. Mr. Samuel Harvey moved to Colorado in 187(j, where he was 
elected County Clerk of Gunnison County. Mr. Ira Hodgson, the boy 
of the pursuing party, now lives at Frisco, Ok. Devaney returned to 
Missouri and Beebe's whereabouts are unknown. 




104 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Bill Cole's Uast Drive. 



"Larned"' to the old settler and plainnman is a place of historic in- 
terest. Of the many thrilling scenes enacted in the vicinity of what 
was for years the last outpost on the old Santa Fe trail, none was more 
horrifying than Bill Cole's last drive with the Smith boys. 

They were carrying the overland mail from Independence, Mo., to 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, making the trip of 740 miles one way every fif- 
teen days. Three men, seven mules and a Concord coach or mail 
wagon, completed the outfit. There were six mules in harness and one 
for the outrider. 

The captain in command at Fort Larned wanted Smith (the con- 
ductor) to take an escort, but having made many trips witliout one and 
knt)wing that not so good time could be made with an escort. Smith 
said he thought there was no danger and started on the long, lonesome 
drive toward Santa Fe. 

But tlve miles west of the post Conductor Smith had reason to 
come to a different conclusion if not to regret his refusal of an escort. 
When least thinking of danger the mail wagon was overtaken by ten 
or twelve Kiowas in war paint whose actions told too plainly their 
blood-thirsty intentions. Mike Smith was the outrider and his 
brotlier was holding the lines. Bill Cole was taking a nap inside on 
the corn sacks when he was aroused by the shot that killed young 
Smith, who fell forward on the foot-board. 

An agonizing cry from Mike caused Bill Cole to turn his liead tliat 
way when a horrible sight met his gaze — the Indians were filling the 
conductor's body with arrows. Mike with one hand was holding in 
check his frightened mule and with the other (m the sliaft of an ar- 
row driven into his body, exclaimed: "Oh, GodI Isn't tliis a hard 
way to dieV Reeling in his saddle, Mike fell to the ground, wounded 
to the death and in terrible agony. 

Bill Cole, after raising young Smith's body into the mail wagon, 
grabbed a giui and shot an Indian who was trying to stop the team by 
grasping the leader by the bridle-bits. The Indian fell from his pony 
and during the pow-«vow that was held over his body Cole jumped from 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 105 

the wagon and hid in the grass. 

The team, by this time, had become thoroughly frightened and 
was running at full speed across the trackless plain. Their pow-wow 
at an end the Indians followed expecting to find Cole and in him an 
easy victim. But Cole was half a mile away and it being about dusk 
he crawled through the tall grass to Coon Creek and worked his way 
back to Lamed, where he related his adventures. 

A detail of soldiers was sent out, the mail secured and the bodies 
of the Smith brothers brought in for burial. At Larned the boys had 
thoughtlessly covered their pistols with the sacks of corn, thus placing 
themselves at the mercy of the Indians. 

A school house nearly midway between Larned and Garfield stands 
near the spot where the Smith brothers met their death. The cliil- 
dren whose little legs dangle from the patent seats can hardly realize 
that within a stone's throw of their play-ground, so thrilling a tragedy 
was enacted but little more than a score of years ago. 

That was Bill Cole's last drive with the overland mail. Twenty 
years afierward he made another trip to Santa Fe, but this time in a 
Pullman car and without fear of losing his scalp on the way. 

Note.— The Smith boys were killed in the Fall of 1859. While 
part of the family were running the farm on the Dragoon my father 
had charge of the mail station at the crossing of Elm Creek on the 
Santa Fe trail. The Smith boys and Bill Cole were old employes of the 
Overliind Mail company and were favorites with all. Their lives were 
one continued series of adventures and hair-breadth escapes. Al- 
though their vocation was dangerous in the extreme, the pay was good, 
and hundreds of young plainsmen were more than anxious to take their 
places as employes of the mail company. 




106 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



/Vv/enged. 



On the morning of June 2d, 1859, an Indian bedecked in paint and 
feathers and mounted on a fiery steed rode down the main street of 
Council Grove. About the Indian's shoulders was a scarlet red blanket 
and on it was the imprint of a human hand white as the driven snow. 

Something about the appearance of the Indian told the settlers of 
impending danger. They wondered, but they had not long to wait. 
In less than a half hour's time a hundred warriors galloped into town 
and halted in front of Hays' store. 

Hays was the leading merchant and the oldest resident, having lo- 
cated at Council Grove in 1847. The Indians looked upon Seth Hays 
as a chief among the whites and to him they soon disclosed the cause 
of their strange actions. 

A short time before two young men of the Kaw tribe had stolen 
two horses from a Mexican train passing through on the Santa Fe trail. 
The Mexicans soon located their stolen property and communicating 
this knowledge to Hays they left the matter in his hands. 

Hays had a big trade with the Indians but more profitable custom- 
ers in the Mexican freighters and in adjusting the difficulty with the 
Indians it is probable that he was influenced by his trade relations 
. with the freighters fully as much as by a desire to do the Indians 
justice. 

At any rate he demanded that the Indians should not only return 
the stolen horses but that the Kaws should give up for punishment 
the young men who had taken the horses. 

To this the Indians objected. They w^ere willing to return the 
horses, but they thought that Hays was taking an undue interest in 
behalf of the Mexicans in insisting that the young men be given up, 
and the chief was in no wise backward in giving Hays the benefit of 
his opinion. 

The Indian spokesman becoming somewhat personal in his re- 
marks' Hays called for his pistols and, with the idea of bluffing the 
Indians, fired a few shot's— into the air. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 107 

Whatever his intentions or ideas as to the effect of the shooting, 
it had a startling sequel. The Indians galloped down the street firing 
at everything in sight. The result was the shooting of two men — 
Charley Gilicey, proprietor of the Gilkey House, and a young man by 
the name of Parks. The wounds were not fatal in either case, but the 
affair immediately assumed a different phase. 

The Indian camp soon disappeared from the neighboring hill, and 
the whole Kaw tribe, consisting of 400 warrioi-s, prepared for fight. 
The whites immediately raised 40 men and sent runners in all direc- 
tions to apprise the settlers of their danger. 

The settlers responded to the call and soon the old Mission build- 
ing was filled with the women and children of the surrounding 
country, and the men marched, 150 strong, to reinforce the company 
already organized. 

Xow it was the young men who did the shooting who were de- 
manded for punishment. One of these was the son of Fool Chief, one 
of the most influential men of the Kaw tribe, and nothing but threat- 
ened annihilation would induce the Indians to give him up. 

But T. S. Huffaker, the interpreter, and for years a teacher in the 
Mission school, told them the inevitable result of their refusal to ac- 
cede to the demands of the whites. Ten thousand dollars and forty 
ponies were offered by the Indians to appease the whites and refused. 
Huffaker told the Indians that already troops from Fort Riley were 
on the way and it would be useless for the Indians to hold out against 
them. The Indians, seeing the ranks of the whites being continually 
increased by new arrivals, and knowing that the soldiers would soon 
put in an appearance, reluctantly yielded to the demands to surrender 
the young men who shot Gilkey and Parks. 

Soon after being surrendered the young men were hung — without 
judge or jury — on the north side of Main Street, between the Neosho 
Eiver and the present site of the court house. 

But there is a sequel to this story. Indian justice demands an eye 
for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. The spark of life liad gone out of 
two Kaw braves, and the lives of two white men must pay the 
penalty. 

The following Summer, Price Perrill, a surveyor living near Bur- 
lingame, was surveying lands on Running Turkey Creek, in what is 
now McPherson County. His dead body was found one day, and the 
old settlers would oftenfpoint out Bill Johnson, a pock-marked Kaw 
Indian, as the slayer of the young surveyor. 

Who the other victim was is not even a matter of conjecture, but 
according to the Indian's idea of justice, when the life of Price Per- 
rill went out the death of Fool Chief's son was avenged. 



108 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



I\ Uttle (Jnpleasantness. 



"Coming events cast their shadows before." 

The coming event in tliis case was an old-time spelling school, and 
the shadows — well, there was a good deal of substance in tlie shadows 
of the scores of boys who had gathered at the old school house in Dis- 
trict 28 one Saturday evening about 17 years ago. 

Wallace Allen was teaching the school, and, though his pants were 
habitually stuffed in his boot-legs, no teacher had won the respect of 
patrons and pupils in a greater degree than had Wallace. 

Tlie house was crowded, and yet there was a crowd on the outside 
that remained there either from inclination or necessity— perhaps on 
account of the lack of room on tlie inside of tlie little frame scliool 
house under the hill. 

The exercises had hardly begun— on the inside, when exercises of 
quite a different nature appeared— to those within — to be transpiring 
on the outside. 

There was loud talking at first, and then hard blows foHowed. 
There was no announcement of dismissal by the teacher, but the short 
order in which the house was vacated would have warranted such a 
supposition. 

That something unusual was going on was apparent to the writer 
and, as we afterwards learned, not altogether unlooked for by the 
patrons of the district. 

But all surmises were soon set at rest by the appearance, at the 
door, of the bleeding form of a man borne between two of his 
neighbors. 

Water was called for and offered but the drooping head showed 
that the loss of blood had been greater than nature could withstand. 

The limp form was lifted inside and search was made for the 
wounds from which the blood was flowing profusely. 

A small knife-hole was found in the neck just behind the jaw, but 
from tliis the blood had ceased to flow. But a crimson stream running 
from the left sleeve of the man's blouse told of a more dangerous 
wound that was soon found. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 109 

It was a horrid, gaping wound. The great muscle of the forearm 
—the biceps brachialis— had been cut square across and completely 
severed in twain. On the floor was a pool of blood that was being 
constantly augmented by the crimson streams flowing from the 
wound. 

The surroundings looked more like a slaughter-house than a school- 
room. The wife of the unfortunate man, in her white dress all be- 
spattered with blood, presented a distressing sight. 

But where is that crowd that rushed out of the school house? In 
two minutes the place was almost deserted. Save the almost hysteri- 
cal wailings of the grief-stricken wife all was silent, as the few who re- 
mained bent over the prostrate form endeavoring to stay the life 
blood that was fast ebbing away. 

The teacher remained at his post. Old Mr. Blankenship, too, had 
no thought of deserting his fellow man in the time of dire need. Then 
there was "Doc" Johnson and Owens. These, with the writer, were 
all that were left to minister to the wants of the sufferer. With a 
. silken thread and a harness needle the writer of these lines took nine 
stitches in the wounded man's arm. By this means the flow of blood 
was stayed, and then for a doctor. At Dover was the nearest, and to 
Dover we volunteered to go. We had heard of Dover but had never 
l)een there. It was down Mission Creek, 14 miles away in a northeast 
,. direction, and that was all we knew about it. 

P The night was dark and it was 2 o'clock in the morning before we 
found the doctor. He couldn't go till morning, he said, but with 
morning Owens came, fearing we had missed the way. 

After weeks of care the patient recovered— all but the wounded 
arm, and if you ask Bob McMasters the cause of his misfortune he will 
refer back to that little unpleasantness at the little frame school 
house iu District 28, twenty-five years ago. 

Frey was convicted of assault with intent to kill, but before sen- 
tence was pronounced he took French leave of the sheriff. His wife 
soon followed and a few years ago he was in Southern Kansas — one of 
tliat class of patriots who leave their country for their country's good. 




no EARLY HiSTOllY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Our First Hrome in Kansas. 




'^■XOti'^' 



The above cut is a fair representation— drawn from memory— of 
our first home in Kansas — the log house built by a Mr. Gilbert, of 
Pennsylvania, on the southeast quarter of section 24, township 14, 
range 12, in the Summer of 1855— forty-five years ago. 

In 1856 Mr. M. C. Wysong, Mr. Eobidoau and my father, Mr. 
James L. Thomson, made their home here while improving their 
claims, the one taken by my fathar adjoining the Gilbert claim on the 
south— the land now owned by Mr. Shaw, the Gilbert claim now 
known as the J. M. Lee farm. 

On our arrival on the Dragoon in March, 1857, we found a Mr. 
Craft, of Ohio, in possession of the Shaw claim and his son with his 
family living in the Gilbert cabin. 

On the payment of fifty dollars— for their furniture- Mr. Craft 
released all claim to the two quarter sections and moved away. 

The log cabin was afterwards sold to Mr. John Cousins and moved 
to his claim near Eskridge. Being raised a few logs higher it was used 
by his family as a residence until tlio stone house in which ho now 
lives was built. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. HI 



Infant Industries. 



On the side of the old log house are to be seen two wolf skins- 
stretched out on the side of the house to dry. 

Thoy were not put there to fill out the picture, but because a pic- 
ture of the old house would be incomplete v.itliout them. 

In 1857 Tip died. Tip was an ox, and with his flesh we replenished 
the family larder. In what was left of the carcass homeopathic doses 
of strychnine were deposited, and when the wolves had partaken of 
liaich they would ^ive up their ghosts, and their hides would be taken 
as a slight remuneration for the hideous concerts they would give un- 
bidden to ungrateful auditors. 

Each morning, for a week or more, we boys would go out and pros- 
pect for dead wolves. One morning we— Henry and I— found a wolf 
that wasn't as dead as he might be. He could wabble along but 
his gait was rather unsteady— about like that of a man three sheets 
in the wind— one who had indulged in too much tanglefoot. 

The wolf's feet seemed tangled a good deal. He had had a heavy 
dose of strychnine but was probably recovering from the effects of the 
poison. 

Woif hides were worth something those days, and we were more 
afraid of the wolf getting away with his hide than we were of his 
wolf ship. 

But the wolf was getting desperate and he was making strenuous 
elTorts to get out of our presence. He would run a while and then 
take an involuntary rest — when the spasms would come on. But the 
spasms were becoming shorter and less frequent and the wolf was get- 
ting farther away from his late banqueting place. 

As the prospects of the wolfs final escape increased, visions of 
prospective gain from the sale of his hide diminished in a correspond- 
ing ratio. Just then a bright idea seized my brother and at the same 
time he seized the wolf by the tail. 

Then, if ever, was a time for action. He attempted to resent the 
insult offered in the attack on his rear, but on account of the overdose 



r 



112 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

of strychnine his wolfship hadn't full control of his body, and we were 
not an idle spectator to the scene being enacted out on the prairie. 
We were armed with a stick as much as a half inch in diameter at the 
larger end. It wasn't a very big club, but large enough to stun the 
wolf, and an hour later his hide was tacked to the outside wall as you 
see it. 

Wolf hunting for their hides was one of the infant industries of 
the early days. Dollars were scarce and a few wolf hides brought that 
which was so difficult to obtain. 

The poisoning of wolves for their hides was not an "industry" con- 
fined exclusively to the buffalo country. Mr. Samuel Cripps, living on 
Soldier Creek, killed each year from 60 to 75 wolves for several years, 
and among these were several large specimens of the gray wolf of the 
plains. 

Many others were engaged in the business on a smaller scale, not 
because they had a liking for the calling but for the better reason that 
from the proceeds from the sale of the pelts they were enabled to keep 
the more ravenous wolf— hunger — from the door. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 113 



The Old Stone Fort 



Shown in the picture was built on the farm of August Wolgast in 1864, 
in anticipation of a raid from the Kaw Reservation. The school 
district clerk in his report to the county superintendent that year 
said: "Owing to the Indian excitement we did not build our school 
house this year." 

Just think of it! Thirty-seven years ago the people were prevented 
from carrying out their intention of building a school house by the 
probability of an Indian raid. 







If!P. ? 



The Kaw Reservation was but a few miles distant and while they 
did not go on the warpath their restlessness was the cause of much 
anxiety on the part of the whites. 

Words of warning had been sent out from the Grove and the com- 
mandant at Fort Riley had been called on for troops. One day a 
company of cavalry on their way to Council Grove galloped by Templin 
at breakneck speied on the way to the prospective scene of Indian 
hostilities. 

Those who have had any experience in Indian warfare need not 
be told of the excitement such rumors and Incidents are calculated to 
produce. 

1864 was a hard year on the border. The Kiowas and Cheyennes 



114 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

were on the warpath and the tribes located on what was the border at 
that lime were chating under what they considered wrongs suffered at 
the hands of the whites. 

The settlers around Templin niigh't well be alarmed. But they 
would prepare for emergencies and lience the building of the stone fort 
shown in the illustration. 

The site for the fort was a good one. It was about equal distances 
from the homes of Wolgast, Arndt and Lehmberg and Fetting's was 
not far away. Here the families slept at night and to this stone fort 
they would rally in case of an attaci< from the Indians. 

Rut the Indians were too discreet to make an attack. Turbulent 
spirits like Bill Johnson were anxious to involve the tribe in a war 
with the whites but the peace sentiment prevailed and the walls of 
the stone fort never felt the force of Indian bullets. But many a day 
after the excitement had passed away, the children about Templin 
would gather together and have a good time with their dolls and other 
playthings keeping house in the old stone fort. 



Kindness Rernembered. 



If our readers will take a look at the log liouse they will not be 
rewarded by the sight of two Indians — an old man and his young squaw 
wife. The Indians are not in the picture but had you been in the 
neighborhood in April, 1857, you might have seen what caused the 
goose flesh to raise up and little chills to chase up and down our spinal 
column. 

Father, having left us four boys to look after the claim, had 
returned to Independence for mother. On that day my brothers, hav- 
ing installed the writer as cook, were grubbing a piece of land two 
hundred yards east of Herb Shaw's present residence in Plumb town- 
ship. 

The log house was located about two hundred yards east of and a 
little north of the house on the J. M. Lee farm. 

Hearing a noise outside, we looked out and beheld the old Indian 
and his sfiuaw hobbling their ponies, preparing to make a somewhat 
extended visit. 

We would have felt better, perhaps, had our brothers been within 
call, but as it was we had nothing to do but make the best of the sit- 
uation. We had .seen 14 birthdays and during that time had read a 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 115 

good deal about the Indians, and among other things we had read that 
tliey, like other human beings, could appreciate a kind act. 

Then it occurred to us that the proper thing to do would be to set 
before our visitors something to eat. This we did, and we were not 
long in seeing that our hospitable reception had struck the right 
chord, and if grunts of satisfaction from the old man and smiles of 
appreciation from his young squaw were indications that our visitors 
were well pleased with their reception then further evidences were 
unnecessary. 

It is needless to say that the pleasant manner in which our kind- 
ness was received had the effect of doing away with any fear we might 
have felt on first being aware of the presence of our Indian visitors. 

But they soon departed— over the prairies in a northeast direction 
—as we afterwards learned on a visit to the reservation of the half- 
breed Kaws near Topeka. 

One evening a few weeks afterwards on returning from the field, 
where we had been planting sod corn — with an axe — we were surprised 
to find awaiting us our first dish of fried venison. 

Our Indian visitors had returned and with them a boy who could 
speak English fluently. They had inquired after their former host 
and had left as a token of their appreciation of our kindness a quarter 
of venison they had killed on their way from Topeka. 



I 



Queen 



Was nothing but a dog, and our readers may wonder what a dog has 
to do with the history of Kansas or of Wabaunsee county. Of these 
we might ask what a flock of cackling geese had to do with the history 
of the old Roman Empire. 

Yes, Queen was a dog — a Mexican dog. But she hated the sight of 
a Mexican and there was but one thing she hated worse, and that was 
an Indian. 

It was in 1859. We were hoeing corn in the field one day, when, 
looking toward the house we were surprised to see eight or ten Kaw 
Indians with bows strung and arrows in place marching abreast 
through the yard. They were looking for Queen. 

But Queen was lying in an old corn crib — with her back broken — 
the result of an arrow wound several weeks before. 



IK) EARLY H ISTORY OK WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

One Sunday a Kaw Indian and his squaw were encamped a few 
rods from the house. Following the usual custom of his tribe tlie 
Indian came to the house with the purpose of l)e<fging something to 
eat. By moans of tlio gesticulations usually onipldyod tlie Kaw souglit 
to make known his errand and in order to assist the wiiter in correctly 
interpreting his unintelligible language the Indian took hold of the 
latch of the closed kitchen door. 

The Indian had evidently failed to notice the presence of Queen 
but the dog wasn't far away. 

At any rate, no sooner li^d the Indian's hand been laid on the door 

latch than Queen's sharp teeth were inserted in the Indian's bare 

ankle.s, and when the dog relaxed her hold an ugly wound was laid 
open. 

We applied a handful of sugar and tied up the wound and ex- 
pressed our regret, in language that, probably, was not understood by 
the Kaw. 

The Indian addressed a few words to his squaw and in a short 
time her presence with a bow and arrow revealed the nature of his 
request. He was intending to settle accounts with Queen. 

But the squaw had brought a blunt arrow which seemed to meet 
his disapproval as he picked it up and limped away towards camp. 
But in a short time he returned— on horseback, and with a steel 
pointed arrow. Kiding between the house and log kitchen— about four 
feet apart— he reached the kennel, where in a crouched position lay 
the form of Queen, and before she realized the Indian's intention, the 
pointed shaft was buried in her spine. 

There were but two boys of us at home and but one gun in the 
house and that unloaded. There were some powder and a few pewter 
bullets. My brother being maddened at Queen's pitiable condition 
rammed home one of the pewter bullets and as the Indian and his 
squaw, mounted on the one pony, rounded the bend of the creek he 
gave them a parting salute— that did no harm, fortunately for us, per- 
haps, as it was but a few weeks after that Gilkey and Parks were shot 
at the Grove for a less provocation. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 117 



Marion's First School 



The early settlers believed in education and though they had no 
school houses at first they would manage in some way to provide for 
emergencies. 

Down in District 27 there was no lack of children and Marion con- 
sented to teach the school provided a suitable house could be secured. 

An old bachelor named Enoch Colton lived in a log house on sec- 
tion 2G and as he was away most of the time it was thought that the 
use of his house might be secured until the proposed stone house could 
be built. 

As the rent would help pay the living expenses Enoch readily con- 
sented to the arrangement. 

Besides the regular exercises the children were each day — at noon- 
time—presented with an object lesson in domestic economy— fur- 
nished gratis by Enoch while preparing the daily mid-day meal. 

Building a fire at noon added to the summer's heat made it rather 
uncomfortable for the children but soon another cause rendered teach- 
ing school in the old bachelor's hall anything but desirable. 

Marion and the children detected a peculiar and not very agree- 
able odor about the old log shanty. In a few days the peculiar smell 
was not only disagreeable but actually unbearable and at last the con- 
dition of things rendered an investigation absolutely necessary. 

The cause of the trouble was found and with the discovery came 
the general desire to exchange the bachelor's shanty for more agree- 
able quarters— so the teacher and pupils adjourned to a more salu- 
brious place. 

But we neglected to tell you the cause that necessitated the vaca- 
tion of the bachelor's quarters. His only calf had departed this life a 
few days before and the hide that had been stowed away in the loft 
had arrived at the last stage of decomposition — it was a moving sight 
hence the moving of the children's quarters. 

For further particulars call at the Eskridge Hotel and ask Marion 
about his first school in District 27. . 



118 EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUSSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



flr Bit of Frontier Hristory 



In which quite u iniinlxjr of Wabaunsee County boys toolv part is 
found in the history of the Eleventh Kansas, In February, 1865, Col. 
Modiili^hl wasassi}>-necl to tlie command of tlie District of Colorado. 
During Hie season <.)f storm and sleet the rcjjfiment marched from J-'ort 
Riley to Platte Bridge, 130 miles beyond Fort Laramie, in the very 
heart of the Sioux country. 

Tiie Indians were on the warpath and in order to keep open tele- 
graphic communication and to insure the transmis.sion of Ihe mails 
the presence of a military force was necessary. 

Headquarters were established at Platte Bridge and this point 
was made the base of operations. Here Major Anderson was stationed 
wi til a garrison of ab(.)ut 110 men, non-commissioned otticers and the 
regimental band included. 

About eighty of this number had carbines, but with barely twenty 
rounds of ammunition to the man. . Half of the remaining thirty had 
revolvers while the others were without any arms whatever. 

In the latter part of July the Indians were more than usually de- 
monstrative and among other depredations had cut the telegraph 
wires on botli sides of the station. 

Captain Greer and Lieutenant Walker were sent out with parties 
in ditferent directions to chastise the Indians and repair the lines. 
Capt. Greer's squad gave the Indians a sound drubbing but the party 
under Lieut. Walker was not so fortunate. Finding the Indians con- 
fronting him in overwhelming num'oers he fell back to the station 
with the loss of one man killed and several wounded. 

On July 22nd, the fort was practically invested by the hostile 
Sioux who seemed determined to burn the station. To render the sit- 
uation more critical Sergeant Custard, of Co. H, witli twenty-lour 
men detailed to guard a supply train appeared in sight about six miles 
from the Bridge unconscious of the presence of the hostile Sioux. 

The howitzer was fired to warn the approaching troops of their 
danger and in hopes of saving the handful of men from annihilation at 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 119 

!ie hands of the hostiles, Lieut. Collins with twenty-tive picked men 
f the garrison was sent to their assistance. 

Hardly had Lieut. Collins' party reached the first range of hills 
iialf a mile distant from the post when 2,000 hideously painted warriors 
prang from their hidings places and charged down on the little band 
(if blue-coats. The soldiers found it impossible to advance. To re- 
treat was the only alternative. After emptying their carbines the 
little band f(*ught their way back to the bridge as best they could. 
Every available man was sent to the relief of the hard pressed soldiers, 
and with the loss of sixteen killed and wounded the remainder suc- 
ceeded, as by a miracle, in reaching the post in safety. Among the 
live killed was Lieut. Collins, whose horse, becoming crazed by the 
demoniac yells and horrid appearance of the hostile Sioux became un- 
manageable and carried his unwilling rider into the jaws of death. 
^^'hen found his body was literally hacked and shot to pieces and so 
mutilated as to l)e hardly recognized l)y liis most intimate surviving 
imrades. 

Another of the killed was Sebastian Nehring. Misunderstanding 
an order Sebastian had got separated from his comrades and was cap- 
tured unharmed and when found his body showed every indication 
of his having been reserved for torture at the hands of his barbarous 
c;iptors. In his body were seventy-six arrows and his arms and legs 
dismembered, his heart cut out, scalped, his nose and ears cut off and 
otherwise horribly mutilated. 

Among the wounded was Henry Grimm, who was shot through 
the leg with an arro.v and in his spine a barbed arrow was deeply 
buried. The surgeon considering the wounded soldier beyond all hope 
of recovery by reason of his wounds and the loss of blood, refused to 
remove the steel barb that still protruded from the wound in the 
spine. But Mr. Grimm pleaded earnestly to have the barb removed 
;ind Lieut. Hubbard ordered that the soldier's request be complied 
v.iih. To the surprise of all Mr. Grimm recovered and though still 
feeling the elTect of old wounds one would never suspect that Henry 
(^rimm. of VoUand, one of our wealthiest German farmers and the one 
who lay wounded nigh unto death at Platte Bridge 35 years ago are 
one and the same. 

Among those who narrowly escaped death at Platte Bridge was 
Sergeant Adolph Haukammer, of Alma. Adolph was wounded by a 
spear thrust in the back and another spear cut in the leg and had his 
horse shot just as the hotly pressed soldiers reached the bridge. Then 
the horse fell, pinning Adolph to the bridge. But the soldiers had 
sallied out from the fort and driving the Indians back Adolph's life 
was saved. 

Ilenrv Thomson, member of Co. I. and a brother of the v.riter was 



/ 



120 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

one of the detail sent out under Lieut. Collins. In speaking of the 
li^'lit he said the .soldiers were in a tight place— the Indians and troops 
wore a confused mass of struggling humanity. The hor-sesof the cav- 
alry were frenzied with excitement and the demoniac yells of the red- 
slcins and their superiority in point of numbers, made the delivery 
from the jaws of death seem a miracle. 

During the hottest of the tight the soldiers noticed that all at 
once the Indians ceased tiring. It was afterwards learned that the 
order was given by the head chiefs of the war party. The order was 
lieard by some friendly Snake Indians who were encamped just outside 
of the stockade. They thoroughly understood the Sioux language and 
heard the stentorian voice of the Indian chiefs as they ordered the 
warriors to cease tiring, as they were killing more of their own men 
than of the whites. 

Mr. S. II. Fairfield was one of the party sent out to bury the dead 
and from his description of the mutilated bodies left on the field, 
fighting Indians cannot be regarded as a desirable occupation. 

The party of twenty-four men Lieut. Collins was sent out to re- 
lieve were all massacred except three who swam the river and found 
safety in the stockade. Of the twenty-four soldiers, seventeen were 
found in a row, pinned to the ground. The others were tied to the 
wheels of the wagon where they were burned. Allwere scalped and 
otherwise mutilated. 

And this was the kind of service seen by the .soldiers enlisted from 
Wabaunsee County. Long will they rememb?r the fight at Platte 
Bridge. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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EAST SIDE MAIN (MISSOURI) STREET, Alma. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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BUFFALO IN THE '60s. 




MR. WALDO G. BURROUGHS AND FAMILY, Bradford. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 121 



)V\/VTT TH'OIVISON'S/VDDRE.SS 



Delivered at the Old Settlers' Meeting at Harveyvllle, 
October 10, 1895— Old Recollections. Etc. 



Ladies and Gextlemen:— In early days when good old Mother 
Dow, who lived over at Wilmington, had revolved in her mind various 
expedients by which the wolf was to be kept from the door, she put 
out a sign on which was painted: ''Pies, cakes, bread, etc." 

The sign served its purpose and many a weary plainsman went 
from her door happy in the possession of the toothsome morsels pur- 
chased from the owner of the little sign-board by the wayside. 

But the supply was not always up to the demand. The discrep- 
ancy between the hungry followers of the numerous caravans that 
passed over the old Santa Fe trail and the little bake oven made to. do 
service in the unexpected emergency was too great. 

As a result many were turned away disappointed. One day a 
teamster called at the beck of the sign and asked for a pie. But the 
last pie had been sold a few minutes before. Then he would take a 
cake for a change. But the supply of cakes, too, had been overdrawn. 
A loaf of bread would answer, but the bread, too, was gone. "Then," 
said the hungry plainsman, "I guess I'll take a little so-forth." 

But Mother Dow was equal to the emergency — she brought to the 
door a huge chunk of cornbread. 

A man crossing the. plains can't be insulted by an offer of corn- 
bread and the teamster gladly paid a silver quarter for what he would 
probably have called for in the first place had he thought for a 
moment it could have been obtained. 

While this paper has for its head "Early Recollections, Etc.," it 
may as well be understood that should I run out of my small stock of 
recollections I will be compelled to fill in by giving you the benefit of 
a little "so-forth." 

I can only hope that it will prove as satisfactory t-o you as did that 



122 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAB. 



loaf of cornbread to the hungry teamster making a long drive before 
breakfast. 

Long liofore Kansas had aivjuired the name of the Cyclone State 
our home in Tennessee was laid low by one of the most devastating 
tornadoes that ever visited any country. The town of Fayetteville 
was almost wiped out of exist "nee. and among the casualties were live 
people killed an^ more than lifty wounded, among the latter two of 
our own family. ' 

The tornado b3gau the work that brought financial disaster, and 
like thousands of others we looked towards Kansas for a new home. 
Next Spring will be just forty years since my father claimed as a pre- 
emption right the northeast quarter of section 25, township 14. range 
12— the land now owned by Mr. Herb Shaw. 

During that Summer— 185(5— Mr. Robideaux, Mr. Wysong and my 
fatlier kept bachelor's hall in a house on the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 24, built by a Mr. Gilbert, of Pennsylvania, in 1855. 

My father's family followed in the Spring of 1857, finding his 
claim jumped by a Mr. Craft, his son having comfortably located with 
his family on the Gilbert claim. 

Mr. Craft and his father were carpenters and seeing but little 
prospect of employment at their trade, were, by the payment of a 
small sum, irtduced to release their right to the two quarter sections. 

Neighbors were few and the settlements for years were confined 
almost exclusively to timber claims and the bottom lands. All were 
absorbed in the duties of home making. Lands were broken, fences 
built and crops planted. 

The season was propitious and all went well till the influence of 
the malarious climate laid a heavy hand on all. Not a home was 
spared. In many instances whole families were stricken down— all at 
one and the same time with the ague— not one being well enough to 
get for another a drink of water. 

Deprived of medical attendance— no physician being near— and 
possibly lacking proper care, it isn't a matter of surprise that that 
grim monster. Death, entered the portals of the pioneer home and 
took therefrom the mother, whose fondest hope was to see her child- 
ren located mid pleasant surroundings, or the sister just budding into 
womanhood, or the young man on whom an aged father or mother 
was dependent. 

A mother in Western Kansas being asked why she chose to re- 
main in a country that seemed so uninviting, replied: "Stranger, do 
you see that little mound yonder? That is the dearest spot on earth 
to me." Beneath that bit of clay, in Death's cold embrace, lay the 
little one the mother would have given her own life to save. The 
spirit had flown, but nature had implanted within that mother's 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 123 

breast a longing to be near the spot. The place is hallowed and no 
other place on earth could that grief-stricken mother regard as her 
home. 

As through trouble Kansas found her place among the Stars, so 
through tribulation the Kansas pioneer founded a home. Of necessi- 
ties he had but few and of luxuries none. But with years of expe- 
rience there came about a change. Toil brought contentment, and 
talcing a philosophical view of the situation he no longer sighed for 
the fleshpots of the land of his fathers. 

Like Cortez, he burned his ships behind him. His thoughts of the 
old homestead were silenced and he took good care of the present that 
the future might bring enjoyment and independence, and his children 
to-day are enjoying the fruits of liis self-denial. 

But you want to know something of the early recollections of one 
who knew Kansas in the swaddling clothes of infancy. Among these 
recollections not the least is the fact that Kansas as a place to wear 
out one's old clothes had no superior on earth. In the early days 
squirrel-skin caps were fashionable and millinery bills never disturbed 
either the dreams or the waking hours of the head of the family. No 
branch of aristocracy— not even of the cod-fish variety— ever found its 
way into the pioneer settlements scattered along the banks of the 
Dragoon. 

The motive power with the early settlers was a yoke of oxen or a 
team of liorses, the latter a rarity seldom met with. Mr. Jehu Hodg- 
son was the first owner of a team that required a set of harness to 
hitch them up, and because of his being the better equipped for catch- 
ing a thief was selected sheriff of Richardson County. 

We have a distinct recollection that bee-gum hats were seldom tol- 
erated and only then upon positive proof that tlie owner had no other 
— its battered appearance usually indicated that the wardrobe was 
getting low. Dr. Cawkins wore one as a badge of his profession. Our 
opinion is that an attempt to drive through the country in a top- 
buggy would have subjected the driver to mob violence, but we never 
knew anybody so foolhardy as to try the experiment, and we feel 
assured that a dude on a bicycle would have been killed on the spot. 

Among other recollections of pioneer days is the fact that in the 
years 1857-58, the pumpkin crop was good and I might say in addition 
that had stewed pumpkin been eliminated from the bill of fare the 
staff of life would have been lonesome indeed. Squashes were also 
much in demand and the statement that they were highly appreciated 
would be superfluous. 

Fortunately for the early settlers ^he conditions were favorable 
for rabbits and prairie chickens— that filled the place on the bill of 
fare set apart for luxuries. 



124 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



In those days the good housewives along the Dragoon were not 
worrying about the lack of sugar to prevent the big crops of peaches 
from going to waste, but not a few looked forward with pleasure to 
the good time coming when wild onions would be ripe and prairie peas 
would be big enough for stewing purposes. 

The story goes that a man was deprived of the privilege of becom- 
ing the owner of a fifteen hundred acre farm that was offered for a 
pair of boots. But he was compelled to decline the offer of a lifetime, 
because— he didn't have the boots. For a like reason thousands of 
dollars were lost by the early settlers of Kansas— because they didn't 
have the cattle to eat the rich grasses that every year went to waste. 

The inclination of some people to make deprecatory remarks should 
the old reliable M., A. & B. slip a cog by reason of a washout might be 
checked by the information that old settlers grumbled less who de- 
pended on chance to get their mail from Burlingame semi-occasionally 
or oftener, as the case might be. 

Country stores were few and patronized but little— they did a cash 
business, and of all the commodities in the country cash was the 
hardest to get hold of. But in wolf hides was found an equivalent 
and wolf hunting for their pelts was one of the infant industries of 
the early days. 

The poisoning of wolves for their hides was not an industry con- 
fined exclusively to the buffalo country. Mr. Samuel Cripps, who lived 
on Soldier Creek killed each year for several years, from sixty to 
seventj'-five wolves, and among these were several large specimens of 
the gray wolf of the plains. 

Many others were engaged in the business on a smaller scale — not 
because they had a liking for the calling, but for the better reason 
that from the proceeds from the sale of the pelts they were enabled to 
keep the more ravenous wolf —hunger — from tlie door. 

About thirty-seven years ago I had the pleasure of being present 
at a meeting of the board of directois or the mayor and city council 
and possibly some of the hejniest stockholders of the City of Wilming- 
ton. The prospects of the town were set forth in glowing terms and a 
grand future predicted. The location of tlie city at the junction of 
the two greatest highways on the Ameiican continent was considered 
in itself sufficient to insure the building at an early day of long rows 
of business blocks, capital for investment would flow in like water 
through a mill-race, the then financiers would swim in luxury, live in 
splendor and the conditions furnish to the v.-orld another proof that 
it is better to l^e born lucky than ricli. 

But if the founders of .-.iWilmington suffered disappointment, or 
were the victims of circumstances, other town builders have been 
equally unfortunate. Indianola. on the military road north of To- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 125 

peka, that once aspired to be the Capital of Kansas, was moved bodily 
on wheels and to-day the owner of corner lots and the was-to-be Capi- 
tol square is doing some tall bragging about his hund red-bushels- to- 
the-acre corn crop. 

But AVilmington possessed advantages that Indianola never had— 
the houses being built of stone were not so easily hauled away, and to 
this circumstance we are indebted for a permanent landmark that 
will indicate to those that come after us a point of historical interest 
—that one day was the business center of Wabaunsee County. 

To the railroad is due the elimination of Indianola, and scores of 
other towns from the map of the state. The Santa Fe road blotted 
out of existence the old trail as electricity and the bicycle have struck 
heavy blows at the horse market. 

In 1857 my father paid to Mr. James McCoy $90 for a blind mare 
and the bargain was considered a good one. Horses are cheaper now, 
Our Jimmie came to me one day last winter and said he could buy a 
horse for six dollars. A few days before Santa Claus had brought him 
a tiddle and I suggested that he strike up a trade. He went out with 
that fiddle under his arm and in five minutes that horse was running 
up a feed bill and he has been at it ever since. 

We have tried to lose that horse, but it takes two to make a bar- 
gain. He knows too well the location of the feed lot. The Bible tells 
us that the ox knoweth his master's crib. A few days ago we had the 
good fortune to take in a few bushels of corn on subscription, and cir- 
cumstances would indicate that the old horse is keeping tab on our 
subscription list. Though he roams at will nobody will take him up, 
and a standing offer of immunity from punishment has proven no in- 
ducement to anyone to steal him. 

One day a man from Western Kansas made us an excellent offer 
that we refused. He would give us a watch for the horse. The watch 
had been nickel plated, but the plating was gone. One or two of the 
hands and the crystal were lacking and the mainspring was out of 
kilter, but in other respects it was a good watch. The offer was a 
tempting one but when we looked at some other specimens of horse 
flesh that he had brought from the drouth-stricken district we con- 
cluded that Dobbin was deserving of better treatment than their con- 
dition indicated. The Chinaman's belief in the transmigration of 
souls may be a myth, but the bare possibility should insure kind treat- 
ment to the best servant man ever had — the horse. 

But this statement is no reflection on the ox— that brought more 
pioneers to Kansas, ten times over, than the horse. To the early set- 
tler the ox was the more valuable. He was too slow of foot to be 
stolen, was mere hardy, required less feed, and when he had outgrown 
his usefulness as a draft animal his owner could eat him. 



12(3 EARLY lUSTOKY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

But to the early settler the ox was too valuable to eat. Herds f)f 
bufTa] > were not far away. Tu 18")" iny father and brother took their 
lirst buiralo hiMit. securin^^ a full load of choice meal on the Cotton- 
wood, in Marion County. The followin<4- year another hunt was taken 
by my brother and Mr. Samuel Cripps. 

But perhaps a short description of one of these hunts would not 
be uninterestinpr now. I parlicipaled in my first buffalo hunt in 18(50, 
thoujT-h my father and myself had been turned back from the Cotton- 
wood by high water and an attack of the ague in 1858. 

There were five wagons and twelve mens and boys in the company. 
In the party were Mr. Uriah Sanner and liis son, (Jeorge, old Mr. Odell 
and his son, Stephen, William Yvite, Gideon Baughman, CJeorge Bar- 
wick, Abe Manning, Mr. Bakhvin, two older brothers and my.self— I j 
being the youngest member of the hunting party. 

Having ox teams the progress was slow, only about twenty miles a ^ 
day being made. But even at this rate it wasn't many days before 
the buffalo were sighted. The old Santa Fe trail was followed till 
Running Turkey Creek was reached. After crossing this stream the-] 
wagons turned north, and after a few miles' travel the amateur 
hunters were gladdened by the sight of their first buffalo— a few miles 
south of where the city of McPherson now stands. 

Abe ^Manning, armed with a Sharpe's rifle, was the most sueces - 
ful hunter, and to him all looked for a supply of meat ftir the return 
trip. 

Abe, though a young man, was a Hercules in strength and lii> 
power of endurance was wonderful, but for some reascm he failed !•) 
meet with that degree of success expected of him. He killed a few 
calves and brought down without trouble the old bulls that were found 
on the outskirts of the main herds. But the meat of the old male 
buffalo was tough and undesirable, so we pushed farther westward in 
the hope of securing better meat. But the buffalo were traveling 
westward at the rate of about ten miles per day and we gained l)ut lit- 
tle on the herds. 

Passing the Little Arkansas we pushed ■on to the head of Cow 
Creek. Here we seemed surrounded by the herds of buffaht, but w(> 
found it no easy matter for amateur hunters to kill such animals as 
would make desirable meat. 

But the weatlier was getting cold and rainy with an occasional 
snow storm, and as it became more inclement the desire to return 
home increased. As yet but little meat had been secured, though 
great herds of butt'alo were constantly in sight. But relief came when 
least expected. Encamped on the banks of Cov/ C-reek was a party of 
hunters who would for 50 cents per head furnish all the meat desired. 

My brothers contracted lor five head and in an hour's time the; 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 127 

number contracted for were lying on the banks of Cow Creek ready to 
be skinned The hunter, a young man of 22 years, had shot them 
down without moving from his place of concealment under the bank 
of the creek. 

The afternoon and night and the next morning my brothers and 
myself were busily engaged in skinning and stripping the carcasses of 
their flesh, leaving the bones to be picked by the wolves and skunks, 
that infested the country by hundreds. 

The following night we camped at Jarvis" Creek on our way home 
But during this time the wagons had become separated, each of the 
original party looking out for himself. But all arrived safely at home 
after an ab.sence of three weeks without an accident to mar the ro- 
mance of the trip. 

But there were incidents not without interest and though not al- 
together pleasant there was but little disposition to complain. 

On the plain north of the crossing of Running Turkey Creek there 
were droves of antelope, but our hunters found the game still more 
dirticult to kill than v»ere the buffalo. 

While encamped on Cow Creek a band of Kaw Indians broke the 
monotony of camp life by their frequent visits. Their presence was 
welcome for the reason that the Kiowas and Cheyennes were at war 
with the whites and they being deadly enemies of the Kaws the pres- 
ence of the latter tribe on Cow Creek indicated to us that there was 
little danger from the hostile Kiowas and Cheyennes. 

Eight years later— in 1868— these same Cheyennes swooped down 
on the Kaws at Council Grove, killing one Kaw and leaving eight of 
their own number dead on the field. 

That we saw none of the hostiles on the trip was probably due to 
the inclement weather — the Indian realizing as does his white brother 
that in cold, stormy weather there is no place like home— let that 
home be a wigwam on the Smoky Hill or a log cabin in pioneer days on 
the banks of the Dragoon. 

It is just 35 years since that buffalo hunt. George Sanner, of Hal- 
ifax, and myself are the only members of the party now living in AVa- 
jbaunsee County. Mr. William Wife, I believe, still lives just over the 
line in Lyon County— on the old Santa Fe trail. Baughman moved to 
Southern Kansas and Baldwin to Douglas County. Mr. George Bar- 
wick is proprietor of a livery stable in Emporia. 

The hunt was entered upon more from necessity than for the 
sport that might be enjoyed. 

Old settlers will remember that crops were a little short in 1860. 
We realized tl>e fact and each member of that hunting party sought 
to replenish t'.io family larder. It is needless to say that none were 
disappointed. 



12« EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE C30UNTY, KAS. 

It is.not so easy now to remedy a shortage in tlie meat supply, and 
yet not so very long ago the buffalo roamed over Western Kansas. In 
187(;, nineteen years ago, I killed my last buffalo— near (Jrinnell 
station on the Union l*acitic railroad, within two hundred yards of the 
track. Among those wlio dined on the meat were Mr. Sam Harvey, 
his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. Ilinton. Sam, with his brother, 
(leorge. and their father, Mr. Henry Harvey, were the first settlers on 
the Dragoon, Mr. Sam Harvey owning the land on which we now 
stand. Sam was then on his way to Colorado, where, after a short 
residence in his new home, he was elected register of deeds. 

It might be well to remind those present that this admixture of 
facts bearing no relation one to another is the "soforth" referred to. 

This address was prepared under difficulties. When a person at- 
tempts to condense the events of forty years ago into forty minutes of 
time, it shouldn't be a matter of surprise should he leave out many 
items of interest to both the old and the new settlers in Kansas. 

In speaking of our buffalo hunt in 18G0 reference was made to the 
fact that crops were short that year. But we raised two acres of 
Hungarian grass, and we saved the greater part of it. That those who 
think tit may profit by our experience I will state that the entire crop 
was pulled up by hand by the roots and stacked— and it wasn't a very 
big stack either. 

From 75 acres planted to corn not a bushel was gathered, but 
every stalk was cut, tied in bundles and ricked. Hay was liauled 
from the Sac and Fox Reservation, the grass being undisturbed by 
stock was from six to twelve inches in height on the bottom lands. 
The walnut crop was good and the harvesting of the crop was not neg- 
lected—but there were more walnuts to the bushel than were ever 
seen before or since. 

Following the drouth of 'CO came the war of '(51. The drouth had 
taxed our resources to the utmost, but the war took from the homes 
of Kansas the brawn and sinew of the country. 

The great wave of patriotism that swept over the land carried 
with it the flower of Kansas manhood. From almost every family 
along the Dragoon and neighboring settlements one or more of the 
sturdy sons marched forth to battle for the Union and it appals one to 
think that almost without exception, those who went from home so 
buoyant and hopeful never returned. 

That was a beautiful monument dedicated at Chickamauga the 
other day to the heroes of the Eighth Kansas, but it is a mere bauble 
compared to that of which they are deserving— and it holds but a 
trifling place in the memory of the father and brothers who for years 
have borne in silence tliat grief tliat cannot be assuaged. 

Brothers and sons shouldered their nniskets and marched forth to 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 129 

the music of fife and drum— but it would not be for long— so everyone 
said — a few short months and the white wings of peace would be 
spread over a united people. But the days grew into weeks and the 
weeks into months and still the carnage went on. The news would 
come of a terrible battle and our neighbor's boy is among the killed, 
another is wounded unto death, and a third is reported missing. 

The survivors go marching on, but disease thins their ranks and 
yet other names are added to the list of those who will never return. 

Though a few short lines will not serve to relate the events or 
portray the horrors incident to war times, they tell all that one needs 
to know of a period that had as well be forgotten. Meriiories of the 
dead heroes are sacred— these we will never forget. 

After long and weary waiting the war clouds were dispersed, and 
as we gather here to-day we would prove recreant to duty were we 
loth to accord that credit that is due for services rendere(J our country 
in time of need. And again would we be derelict in the performance 
of a duty should we withhold from the early pioneers of Kansas that 
praise that is their due for transforming the bleak plains into a land 
teeming with plenty. 

It is only by traveling from home — through the states farther 
east that one is enabled to realize the true value of a home in Kansas 

With a soil unsurpassed anywhere and a climate that will com- 
pare favorably with that of any country under the sun the people of 
Kansas are indeed fortunate. 

An eastern man will remind you of that terrible cyclone — two 
killed and a half dozen wounded— but should you inquire as to the 
particulars of that terrible mine disaster— in which a hundred or more 
lives went out in darkne-ss — he will suddenly remember that he has 
business elsewhere. 

Ten thousand people- nearly as many as to-day live in "Wabaunsee 
Count}' — perished in the seething waters of the Johnstown flood. 
•Just think of a Pennsylvanian asking a Kansas man if he isn't afraid 
he will be carried away in a cyclonel Our cousins in the east with all 
their opportunities have yet to learn that Kansas as a place of residence 
has a thousand advantages over Indiana, New York or Pennsylvania. 

During the National Educational Association at Topeka in 1886, 
the work of some of our county schools elicited favorable comment 
from leading educators from the eastern states, but a doubting 
Thomas expressed his belief that the children whose work was pre- 
sented had received their education elsewhere. Even when told they 
had resided in Kansas all their lives the doubter seemed skeptical. 

This is their idea of Kansas. Our people are indebted to the East 
for all she possesses and for all our people know. But the fact is, the 
Kansas man is self made. From a condition of poverty he has ad- 



130 EAIILY lUSTOllY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

vaiicerl hy his own cIToits to one of independence. As compared willi 
iiis fatiier who brought to this country all liis possessions in a covered 
wayon drawn by a yoke of oxen, he is a rich man— so far as this 
world's goods are concerned, and yet he is poor in comparison when 
vit'win^'^ the matter from anotlier standpoint. Then there was but 
little strife and contention and fewer jealousies than now. The 
people lived on a common level. Nobody was afraid of g(»ing over the 
hill to the poor house. The reminiscences connected wiiii the old log 
cabin are gold(>n treasures- -not stowed away in the garret af memory's 
storeliouse— tliey occupy tlie place of honor in the parlor— a v,'ord un- 
known to the old-timer who sat on the bed while warming" his toes in 
the oven. 

When the school boy couldn't tell for his life what g-!-a-s-s spelled 
he was asked what it was they put in the window to keep out the 
cold. "Oh, yes, 1 know— dad's old britches and Bill's old hal." Some- 
linies the old settler's cabin had a window with real glass in it aiul 
sometimes not— but in the former case a glass would occasionally get 
broken— that is where Johnnie got his definition. 

As the old colored man said, "If you go by de boss railroad you'll 
get dar to-morrow mawnin, and if yer takes de steam kyars you'll be 
dar mighty quick, but if you takes the telegraph you is dar now." 

Thirty or forty years ago ten days was quick time for a round trip 
to the Missouri River., Should 1 reach home on schedule time to- 
night— 12:19 — I will have traveled 144 miles and be away from home 
less than twenty hours— nearly half of which time will have been 
pleasantly spent at Harveyville. The railroads arc often referred to as 
soulless corporations, but by contrasting our present methods of travel 
with the old time whoa-haw conveyance one is enabled to appreciate 
the change. 

In this (connection lam i-eminded of two dreary, lonesome nights 
passed in a covered wagon 8 miles beyond 110 Creek. Returning from 
Kansas City one of our oxen gave out and my brother leaving me alone 
to take care of our load of winter's supplies came to Mr. McCoy's for 
help. Mr. McCoy was at that time the nabob of the Dragoon valley. 
He had sold his claim in Nebraska, near Omaha, and had more ready 
cash perhaps than all his neighbors combined. He built what was 
then the finest house in the country. It now stands where it was 
built, on tlie hill about 200 yards west of the school house. It may be 
a little out of repair just now, and some of the paint may be gone, and 
possibly it would not strike the casual observer as being ahead of the 
times, but that was the impression in 1857— the year it was built— a 
time when a house with more than one room was the exception and 
the single log cabin the rule. 

Nothing was more desired by the early settler than neighbors. 



EARLY HLSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 131 

The good claims would be pointed and every courtesy extended to the 
man hunting for a home. But in too many instances the old settler 
was the A'ictim of misplaced confidence. 

One day a gentlemanly appearing man —a minister, I believe— 
came along and was favorably impressed with the S. W. i of Sec. 19, 
T. 14, R. 13. His family would be out soon but for the time he would 
build merely for pre-emption purposes. 

My father contracted to build the house, on the condition that he 
was to retain the ow^nership with the privilege of moving the house- 
when the time came. The size of the house was 5x10 feet, with a door 
and window and a clapboard roof. The contract price was $10 in cur- 
' rent funds. 

A young man slept one night on the claim, went next morning 
to the land office and pre-empted the quarter section. The house was 
moved away and held all the corn we rai.sed that year, and room to 
spare, but the new neighbors never came. 

It is presumed that incidents of the early days are expected. A 
record of the incidents as they happened for the first two years of our 
residence would be as monotonous as Mark Twain's first diary. He 
thought he would keep one. The first day's entry was: "Got up, 
washed and went to bed." The second day he could think of nothing 
but "got up, washed and went to bed," and so on for a week, when he 
wisely concluded to postpone the diary business till some future time 

For seven years our home was the western boundary of the Dragoon 
settlement. In on r isolated situation but little was seen of the out- 
side world. In our lonesome condition the presence of a tramp would 
have been welcome and when a bund of Indians broke in on the mo- 
notony of the situation there were no regrets. 

One day a band of twenty Raws stopped for their mid-day meal on 
their way from Council Grove to Topcka. They were afoot and had 
ab.solutely nothing to eat and we but little to give. But they were 
easily satisfied, and while with us taught us a lesson in economy— that 
we never copied. Stowed away in a box an old Indian found a couple 
of gallons of shelled corn from which the heart of the kernels had been 
eaten by the mice — but the solid part of the grain was left, and after 
being washed and boiled an hour or so formed the basis of a hearty 
meal for the whole company. 

On another occasion a band of fifteen took peaceable possession of 
the old log house, my brother and I — batching at the time— prefering, 
on account of the mosquitoes — to sleep outside in the covered wagon. 
There was a sound of revelry by night^ — the Indians doing the revelry 
business. Their proverbial stoicism had departed and they were like a 
lot of school boys out for a good time. This band also belonged to the 
Kaw tribe, but they were well mounted and had plenty of provisions. 



i:{2 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

We treated them well and and when we afterwards met some of the 
same Indians encamped at Cow Creek while on our bulTalo hunt they 
exhibited unmistakable signs that our former meeting was remem- 
bered and our kind reception while batching in the old log cabin on 
the farm was appreciated. 

But the Kaw Indians wore not at all times paragons of perfection- 
In 1800 some Indians stole two horses from a Mexican train and as a 
result of this two Indians were hung. With the Indians it is an eye 
for an eye and a tooth for a tooth. Two white men must be killed and 
when Price Perrill met pock-marked Bill Johnson out on the Running 
Turkey the wily Indian settled half the score by taking the scalp of 
the lone surveyor. 

As I understand that some of the old time tools and farming im- 
plements will receive consideration at the hands of others, I will re- 
frain from touching on that subject and pass on to a brief consideration 
of what we may expect. 

It would be unreasonable to suppose otherwise than that the elec- 
tric age is but dawning, and, however wonderful the inventions put 
forward within a few years past may be, more startling developments 
are yet in store for us. 

The question is: to what degree will the inventions be practical? 
Is it not among the probabilities that before the present generation 
shall have passed away their present ideas and attainments will be 
looked upon as crude and they be regarded as old fogies? 

Among the many applications of electricity is one that enables the 
proprietor to feed his horse by pressing a button connected by wires 
leading to his barn. Pressing another he is enabled to water his stock 
— all this without leaving his comfortable bed. 

Pressing another button he lights the fire in the kitchen. Other 
inventions are expected to follow, and in a few years one need not be 
surprised that some inventive genius will patent a contrivance to land 
in the middle of the floor the cook— should he or she. as the case may 
be. neglect to get out of bed at the ringing of the alarm clock. 

F"'ollowing the demands of the times Sarah's young man will find 
himself thrown out of the front window when he attempts to turn 
down the light. He touches the guage wheel and the electric current 
will do the rest. 

Then some such electrical appliance might be used with good ef- 
fect at old settlers' meetings and when the audience had been surti- 
ciently bored by some long-winded speaker he could be shut oflf by 
simply pressing the button — that would send the electric current to 
the roots of his tongue and enable him to take a hint. 

Ladies and (Jentlkmen: While I am glad to meet with you 
here, I regret that what I have to offer falls below the standard of ex- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 133 



cellence guaged by my own ideas as to what ought to be presented and 
by what was doubtless expected of me on this occasion. I trust that 
the lack of time essential to the preparation of such matter as would 
be appropriate will be accepted' as my excuse for any shortcomings 
that may be apparent. However, should I have added in the least 
degree to the enjoyment of this happy occasion, I shall feel myself 
amply compensated for my coming. I close by thanking you one and 
all for your kind attention. 



/Vt a MexiGan Fandango. 



Baih Este ^Vw7ie (Dance To-Night.) This is the legend— seen in 
the transparency — that catches the eye of the miner, cowboy, or 
tourist seeking recreation in any one of the many New Mexican towns 
dotting the banks of the Rio Grande between Albuquerque and El 
Paso. 

But it must not be taken for granted that only the above men- 
tioned classes are patrons of the fandango. Army officers of high and 
low degree, civilians of nati(mal renown, and others, more or less dis- 
tinguished have, time and again, from motives widely divergent, per- 
haps, whiled away many a tedious hour in these much frequented 
resorts peculiar to our south-western border. 

Should you find yourself among those drawn together at one of 
these motley gatherings and you are a tenderfoot do not deceive your- 
self by the thought that the secret is your own. Possibly you 
expressed surprise at such minor incidents as the clanking of spurs on 
the heels of a vaquero, or that a cow-boy failed to discard his broad- 
brimmed sombrero during the progress of the dance. Perhaps you 
observed a disregard of the conventionalities in the scores of pairs of 
pants stuffed into divers pairs of boots, or in the carrying of a dozen 
or more braces of army revolvers in as many belts worn by participants 
in the evening's recreation. 



i;J4 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

Stranper. or otherwise, unless your eyes are closed to the surround- 
iiij,'s. the (Mitraiice duriiijr the eveniiifH', of certain dark-visaK'cd. 
sera pa-en folded habitues of the fandaiiijo will not escape your atten- 
tion. They are there at the inviUil^ion, or urgent request of the 
proprietor -in case of emeroeicies— that often come— simultaneously 
with shoot ill','' out th- lights -a pastim.' freciuently indul^^'d in by the 
festive cowboy looking for trouble. Bat unmistakable indications in- 
variably being sure forerunners of such trouble, there need be no 
ditticulty in avoiding th? sequel by n(»ting ths surroundings. 

Strains of music, by no m 'ans faultless, entice the stranger who 
might otlierwise resist the temptation to enter. Besides the much 
.sought for diversion the prodigal son here finds the opportunity to 
dispose of his substance preparatory to entering upon the vocation of 
herding swine for more probably goats) in that far off country where 
the echo of a father's coiniStM is unh'ard. and a mother's parting tears 
are but a dim memory. 

If the music is entrancing, the fact is possibly due to contrast — 
with the discor.lant but too familiar voice of the ever-present burro 
(donkey) or the lowing of kine, or th,> bleating of thousands of sheep 
on the range— a burning desire to escape from which might well form 
the basis for an excuse for accepting any change that offers a diversion 
from the monotonous humdrum of life on the range. 

If the music is attractive to tiie wayward and absent son in quest 
of adventure the presence of a score or more of the comely senoritas— 
fair of form and feature— otfers a temptation lis seldom permits him- 
self to resist. The dance hall once entered the inclination to indulge 
in the waltz or S'^hottische as naturally follows as night succeeds day. 

The inclination on the part of the prodigal to indulge his heels in 
their propensity to cut pig(on-\\i i.us may in a measure be due to that 
condition affecting the head brought about by a too free indulgence in 
vino, cerbesa. or aguardiente (wine, beer or. whiskey*. As the inth:- 
ence due to an over-indulgence in the beverage that cheers and 
inebriates increases in potency his feet get clumsy and refuse to keep 
time. He quarrels with the musicians and orders the proprietor to do 
his bidding: makes indiscreet remarks to his partner in the dance and 
re(iuests the floor manager to "talk United States" (English) and 
tiiially expresses a determinaticn to run the whole business himself. 

At this stage of the proceedings discretion would suggest that t h:- 
boisterous "CJringo" be taken care of by his friends. His presenci- at 
future fandangos, or at the close of this one, depends on just such a 
cimtingency. If no friends are present his case may be disposed of in 
a way that may serve as a warning to others, though not in a manner 
to be desired by the interests of the principal actor in this p.articular 
life di'ama. If you would inform youi-s(>lf furtlier rflativf to the point 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. i:^o 

in question consult the local items in the "Weekly Gazette.'" The 
wordintj- doesn't in the least surprise you — it is just what you had 
reason to expect. Here it is: 

•'At an early hour yesterday morning as Don Vicente Romero was 
going to his place of business on the Plaza he discovered the body of 
an American, apparently about twenty-five years of age. just beyond 
the Azequia (Jrande with his throat cut from ear to ear and a bullet 
hole in his temple. The outer clothing had been stripped from the 
l)ody and the crime had evidently been committed for the purpo.se of 
robbery. Nothing was found on the body that would serve as a means 
of identification but it is supposed to be that of a miner down from 
Silverton for a little recreation. The man was seen at the dance-hall 
of Ramon Chavez Wednesday nigiit and left at a late liour alone and 
in a dazed condition. .Some of the cut-throats who hang out less than 
a stone's throw of the Plaza could give us all the information needed 
to solve the mystery. When they conclude to do .so we will gladly en- 
lighten our readers as to the facts in the fourth of a series of murders 
that liave di.sgraced our city within the past thirty days." 

But the cut-throats don't do business that way, and not until the 
sea gives up its dead will some broken-hearted mother know that her 
wayward .son's death was the sad .sequel to a night's carou.sal at a 
Mexican fandango. 

But who can say that his sad end was in vainV As he lay there in 
grim Death's embrace who can deny that more than one repentant 
prodigal resolved before high Heaven to retrace his steps on the down- 
ward road? Young men who left the parental home with no more 
definite object in view than that prompted by an aimless de.sire to see 
the world are susceptible to such influences as bring them face to face 
with the King of Terrors. [Tis on such occasions as these that their 
fioughts are prone to revert to the past: when tlie family circle was 
complete; when there was in the household a joy that since leaving 
the home of their youth they have never felt. Such scenes as the.se 
beget a longing to return to the father's roof: t(» the mother's love: to 
joys which only the companionship of loving brothers and sisters can 
bring. 




136 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



f\ Timely Warning. 



'•Say i)()thin)<. But break camp and don't stop Tliis side of tlic 
Smoky Hill. The Indians are going on the war path." 

The warning was given in an undertone lest either of the two big 
Cheyenne women should hear what was said and block the game. We 
said Cheyenne "women" rather tiian "squaws" for the reason that 
the Indian wife of William GrritTenstein (Dutch Bill) and her sister 
were not ordinary squaws in that they were more than usually intelli- 
gent, and their dress and refined air lifted them so far above the 
average squaw that they deserved a better name. 

The writer was one of a party of twenty government employes re- 
turning from Fort Union, New Mexico, in the spring of 18()4. The 
outfit consisted of two wagons, each drawn by six mules. 

We had made the outgoing trip in the winter by way of the 
Platte and Denver, thence south througii Pueblo and Trinidad and 
were returning by the Arkansas route, and when the warning referred 
to was given we were in camp at the the upper crossing of the Walnut 
at which point Dutch Bill had located a small trading p(»st. 

Among the Cheyennes Bill was a king as far as his inliuence with 
the Indians went. They had implicit confidence in (Jritfenstein. and 
whether well grounded or not there was a suspicion tliat this confi- 
dence wasn't acquired by giving away the Indians" .secrets. 

Not one of our party knew anything about Bill but his reputation 
and that was better among the Indians than with the whites. 

But about a year before another member had been attached to 
Bill's household in the person of one Phillip Bloch, a young Jew, who 
was looked upon by his family— the Blochs, merchants of St. Joseph. 
Mo.— as the black sheep of the family. Philip was bound to see the 
world from an Indian's standpoint, and at that time was a full- 
fledged brother-in-law of Dutch Bill, one of the tall sisters being his 
wife and the other the spouse of (Iritfenstein. 

Two years before Block had made a winter trip to Fort Lyon, on 
the upper Arkansas, as a pilot of one of those ships of the plains 
drawn by six yoke of oxen. But he longed for a change, and at tbe 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 137 

old stage station at the crossing of Elm Creek, in Lyon County, he 
found it— not a very lucrative position, but times were hard and 
rather than run the risk of being drafted into the army or shot he 
concluded to put in the balance of the winter by working for his 
board. 

Phillip wasn't partial to work, but the neighborhood socials and 
spelling schools provided the kind of diversion that rendered the situ- 
ation bearable until the resumption of overland traffic supplied Bloch 
with the means of changing his base of operations from the dull 
routine of farm work to the more congenial occupation of driving dull 
care away in tlie Cheyenne camp on the banks of the Walnut. 

It had been our intention to rest at Dutch Bill's till morning, a 
fact the Indians seemed pleased to learn. Bflt their hostile demon- 
strations were anything but pleasing, and this, in conjunction with 
the knowledge obtained that the squaws and papooses were being 
(juietly moved to some remote fastness of the Smoky, had abont con- 
vinced us that an Indian war was about to be inaugurated. The indi- 
cations pointed to this as a certainty, and discretion suggested the 
heeding of Philip Bloch's warning to get out of the Indian country 
without unnecessary delay. 

The Indians seemed pleased at the prospect of our stay over night 
on the Walnut, but the conditions were reversed when unmistakable 
preparations for our departure were made manifest. Where quiet was 
the rule commotion now reigned and when the two teams ascended 
the steep banks of the Walnut, our party was confronted by a band 
of thirty Dog soldiers, mounted on their war ponies and armed to the 
teeth— as villainous a gang of cut-tliroats as ever went unhung. 

But an Indian reckons the cost before making an attack and no 
life is so valuable to him as his own. Prospective scalps and plunder 
on one side and possible casualties on the other are carefully noted, 
and his day dreams of existence in tlie happy hunting grounds are 
never so blissful as to warrant on his part any needless risks that may 
be mysteriously shrouded in the sequel. 

Hate tlashed from thirty pairs of Indian eyes, but there were none 
of the blood-curdling yells that twenty-four hours later were charac- 
teristic of the thrilling scenes along the Arkansas. Before nightfall 
tlie Cheyenne bottoms had been crossed and a hasty supper disposed 
of at the crossing of Cow Creek. Then a night drive and a camp in 
the hills beyond Plum Creek. But before sunrise we were preparing 
breakfast on the north banks of tlie Smoky — where Fort Harker was 
afterwards established. 

Hardly was our camp on the Smoky Hill brolcen before we were 
joined by the stock tender at the stage station at Dutch Bill's. From 
liim was learned the first details of the desolation and havoc left in 



138 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

the wake of the deatli-dealinpr Kiovvas, Arapahoes and Cheyennes. 
He. too, had a tip from Philip. 

But the score or more of freigliters, who in parties of two and 
three met their death at tlie liands of the Indians tliat day were not 
so fortunate. Tiiey had pas.sed over the road scores of times before 
and had never yet been molested, and why not agJiinV But tlief;:rass 
was g'ood and the tomahawlc had been raised to avenge the killing of 
two Indians at Fort McThorson (tn the Platte two niontlisbefore. 

For four long years war was waged and all this time Dutch Bill 
and Phillip Blocli wore trusted friends if not allies of tlie bloodthinsty 
redskins. (JritTenstein aftervvards settled on tlie present site of 
Wichita and acquired a handsome fortune, the greater part of which 
disappeared when the boom collapsed. Phillip was adopted into the 
Cheyenne tribe, mastered their language and has for years been em- 
ployed as government interpreter at Fort Sill. His wife is a woman 
of acknowledged talent and unboiuided inlluenco among tlie tribes of 
the Southwest. With all Iiis faults Phillip was not all bad. Like 
many otlier young men during tlie troublous times that marked the Civil 
War. liis duty to himself and others was not quite clear. About the 
tented field there was a false glamour that tended to obscure the patli 
of rectitude and right. Around the camp-tire of the plainsman there 
was a fascinating glow that hid from view the better things that lay 
beyond— in the quiet of the home. Phillip bargained his manliood for 
these. The best years of his life were devoted to the rcccomplishment 
of a purpose that could bring naught but disappointment in the end — 
a realization that too often comes when the opportune moment is be- 
yond recall. 

Phillip's greatest enemy was his own perverted will— thiit 
smothered the promptings of his better nature. But with all this he 
did the members of our party a good service by that timely warning at 
I he crossing of the Walnut in the Spring of '(54. 



NOTK.-Griffenstein died at fehawnee, I. T., September :.'6, 189!). He was a politi- 
cal exile. Iiaving been compelled to leave Germany lor his participation in tlic re- 
bellion of 1848. For a time he made his home with Mr. G. Zwanzlger and witii the 
family of Mr. L. Pauly, whom he several times visited while mayoi- of Wiohiia. 
His first experience as an Indian trader was amouir the Pottawatomies. Later lie 
established the post at Walnut creelt, and while tlie Indian war of 1804 was ratfing 
ho made an extended visit witli his old friends on Mill creeU. brInginK witii liini his 
Cheyenne wife. He pitched his lodge or tepee near where Mr. Aderhold after- 
wards built ills residence, camping tliere for several months during tiie summer of 
1864. He then located farthei- down the Arkansas, on the site dT the present .Mty of 
Wichita. The palatial r»"sidence, perhaps the flnes\ in the city, attracts many vis- 
itors, especiaUy those who l<new liim us '•Dutch Kill" at his trading postton the 
Walnut. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 139 



/V Raid by Bill flrnderson. 



"1 know it was Bill Anderson, for tlie moon shone as bright as 
day and 1 recotrnizod him under liis broad-brimmed liat " 

Tliat was part of the information imparted to U. S. Marshal 
McDowell at Topeka in May, 1863, by a farmer living on Elm Creek. 
Mr. Giles, a bachelor farmer, had died and at the request of his 
brother, a Topeka banker, the body was hauled in a two-horse wagon, 
that the remains might be laid away in the Topeka cemetery. 

The weather was warm and for that reason the long drive was 
made in the night. At short intervals along the old Santa Fe trail the 
lone driver met parties of horsemen in pairs and trios, and though 
clad in the garb of plainsmen certain furtive glances that seemed a 
universal characteristic convinced the conveyer of the gruesome 
burden that all was not right. 

If there had been any doubt on this point the matter was set at 
rest when the familiar face of Bill Anderson was recognized among 
the little bands of horsemen wending their way westward on the old 
trail between Chicken Creek and Wilmington. 

Since boyhood Bill had lived with his father at the crossing of 
Bluff Creek. When the Civil War broke out, Bill, with his brother 
Jim, Lee Griffin and the Rice boys were not backward in making it 
known that their sympathies were with the South. Frequent trips 
had been made to and from their old Missouri home, and after their de- 
parture on one of these trips suspicion pointed to the boys as being 
mixed up in a horse deal. 

Lee Griflin was arrested and being brought before A. I. Baker, a 
justice of the peace at Agnes City, a paper town at the crossing of 
Rock Creek, was bound over to answer the charge of horse stealing. 

Old man Anderson, Bill's father, resented this and with his double 
l)arrelled shot-gun proceeded to Baker's house to wreak revenge for 
the fancied insult to the companion of his favorite son. But 
Baker shot first and old man Anderson's life went out at the foot of 
iJaker's stairwav— in the month of June. 1862. 



140 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

On the night of July 3d, Bill and a small company of his Missouri 
friends appeared on the scene and Baker refusing to come out, his 
house was set on fire and Baker was sliot as he attempted to escape 
through a cellar window from the burning building. 

On his way to Missouri Bill called on his old friend, Henry Jacobi, 
at the mail station at the crossing of Elm Creek, but Henry had no 
account against Bill and refused to open the door. The curiously in- 
clined may, today, see the thirty bullet holes made in the door by Bill 
Anderson and his gang on the morning of the 4th of July, 1862. 
Down at Reading there lives an old gray-haired man of 70 years, and 
if you ask him why lie joined the army he will tell you it was because 
he thought his chances for life better in the army than to be a target 
for Bill Anderson and his gang of outlaws. 

Bill joined Quantrill and was one of his trusted lieutenants. Ten 
months had elapsed since the killing of Baker, and lest his old Kan- 
sas friends might forget him. Bill concluded to make his old stamping 
ground another visit. The Elm Creek farmer hauling Giles' body to 
Topeka met Anderson as stated, and his timely recognition resulted in 
the formation of a posse by Marshal McDowell to look after Bill and 
make inquiries as to his business. 

Marshal McDowell, with 100 men, stopped at Wilmington, and 
among others requested to go along for company were Kobt. Marrs, 
Sam Hutchinson, Otho Weaver, Pat Cannon, Mate and AVill Hutchin- 
son, Charley Dodds and the writer of these lines, who, in September, 
1900, so far as we know, penned the first chronicle of the trip. 

That night brought Marshal McDowell and his posse to Council 
Grove. There we learned that Bill had begun his trail of blood by 
shooting a woman. At the posse's next camp at Mud Creek, five miles 
east of the Cottonwood, the outlaws interviewed Charley Dodds, one 
of McDowell's pickets, and, after getting all the information wanted, 
wheeled about for Quantrill's headquarters in Missouri. 

Anderson's men paralleled the old Santa Fe trail, keeping a few 
miles to the north, until Black Jack was reached, where the mail was 
robbed and an army officer barely escaped with his life by concealing 
his identity. On the way back tlireeof Anderson's men had stopped 
at Charley Withington's on 142 Creek, laying in a supply of crackers 
and canned goods, that, it is presumed, a' half-hour later, formed the 
basis of a lunch for thirty of the men who, three months later, were 
with Quantrill at the sacking of Lawrence. 

Marshal McDowell is now a resident of Manhattan. ;iii(l though 
past three score and ten is sill! hale and hearty, and not withstaiuling 
his gray hairs is still depended on in cases where violators of the Fed- 
eral statutes need looking after by a tried and true otticer of the law. 

Bill Anderson was shot on one of his raids in Missouri, leaving be- 
hind him one of the bloodiest records of the war. while his brother 
.lim. v.illi an e(iually blood-stained career, survived the horrors of the 
St rife and a few years ago was living in Te.^as. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RANCH HOME OF MR. SAMUEL FIX, Yampa, Colo. 




MR. D. M. GARDNER AND FAMILY, Alma. 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. AND MRS. FRED STEINMEYER, 
Farmer Township. 



MR. AND MRS. H. W. STEINMEYER, 
Illinois Creek. 





MR. AND MRS. ANDREW MAIRS, 
Eskridge. 



MR. AND MR3. JOHN PETERSON (dec'd), 
Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




FIVE GENERATIONS. 

An evidence of longevity ; also, of a healthful climate. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. C. C. GARDINER, near Bradford. 




FOUR GENEARTIONS, Eskridge. Mr. A. G. BURGETT, Great-graodfatlier. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABA UNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





NKr.LIE nOUUASSA, Maple Hill. 



IS.ABBLLA MAPLE HILL OLIVER, 

Maple Hill. 








WEST SIDE MAIN STI4RET, Eskrldge. 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. W. H. EARL (Dec'd), 
Eskridge. 



MR. LOUIS SCHEPP, Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. THOS. MANEY, Kaw Township. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




Cai.t. Wm. Mitchell. S. R. Weed. 

Matt McKelvey. 

OLD PIONEERS. 



Mr. S. T. Perry. 




MR. BEAUBIEN'S HOTEL, Maple Hill. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. JOSEPH FIELDS. 
Former County Treasurer. 



MR. MORRIS WALTON (dec'd), 
Harveyville. 




SCHOOL IN DISTRICT No. 12. 
Mrs. Mary Hodgson (nee Woods), teacher. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





MR. W. A. McCOY, Alta Vista. 



MR. GOTTLIEB NOLLER, McFarland. 




MR. FRANK KRIENITZ, 
Paiater, Paper-hanger, and Glazier, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF VVABAaNSEE COUJiTY, KAS. 141 



TH-^ FIRST LOG HrOUSt. 



On the Site of Which, Near Harveyvllie, 575,000 in 

Spanish Gold was Found by a Preacher, Who Had 

Watched as Well as Prayed. 



A robbers' roost is responsible for tlie first log house built by white 
men in Wabaunsee county— erected in 1842 in the timber ont he banks 
of Dragoon Creek, near the mouth of Bachelor's branch. Here were 
the headquarters and rendezvous of as hardened a gang of cut-throats 
as ever went unhung— organized for the purpose of robbery, army pay- 
masters and treasure wagons of Mexican caravans forming the tempt- 
ing inducements that drew together this motley gang of outlaws. 

The crest of the big mound on the claim pre-empted by Allen 
Hodgson in 1857, in plain site of the old cabin, as a point of observa- 
tion couldn't be excelled. From this high elevation every train pass- 
ing over either the Santa Fe trail proper, or the military road from 
Fort Leavenworth, could be distinctly seen, the number of wagons de- 
termined, and the probable value of the treasure to be secured ap- 
proximately estimated. 

As early as 1770 the Spaniards from Santa Fe and Chihuahua bought 
merchandise in St. Louis, but in those days pack animals were used, 
freighting with wagons not being in vogue until Lexington, Mo., had 
been fixed upon as the outfitting point by those pioneer traffickers, 
those advance agents of civilization, to whom the '"Great American 
Desert" presented no obstacle they for a moment hesitated to sur- 
mount. 

Starting from Chihuahua or Santa Fe in the early spring, the pro- 
prietor of a train of from twenty-five to forty wagons would consider 
himself fortunate should he succeed in reaching his eastern destina- 
tion, by the latter part of May or the middle of June. As each wagon 
was drawn by ten or twelve mules or oxen, there would be from 300 to 



142 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUJSSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

."jOO mules or oxen and from thirty to fifty men with every train. In 
all (Mses the men were armed in anticipation of possible attacks from 
Indians or the more dangerous and desperate gangs of outlaws as those 
who in the early days made their headquarters on the Dragoon. 

Specie— gold or silver— being the medium of exchange, it was nec- 
essary that the money representing the purchase price of the gof>ds to 
be bought should be hauled in one of the wagons. This fact, known 
to the gangs of robbers rendered caution on the part of the owners 
essential and the guarding against surprises necessary 

As it required from $r>0,000 to $100,(X)0 to load a train of thirty or 
forty wagons with the class of goods usually purchased for the Santa 
Fe trade, and as every train was known to carry a large amount of 
specie for the purpose stated, it can be readily surmised that to des- 
perate and unscrupulous men any east-bound caravan on the old Santa 
Fe trail offered a temptation extremely inviting, especially when the 
probability of punishment for such wrong-doing seemed, at the best, 
remote, with the chances of immunity from pnnishment in favor of 
the robbers. 

A few years prior to, and during the progress of the Mexican war, 
the train robbers were unusually bold and aggressive, and as a majority 
of the robberies were perpetrated between 110 creek and Big John, it 
is more than probable that the gang having their headquarters on the 
Dragoon was responsible for the unlawful depredations. 

Several expeditions were sent out from Fort Leavenworth during 
the years 1842 and 1843, with the object in view of meting out deserved 
punishment to the daring outlaws, but these efforts by the military 
were barren of results. By the time a runner could make the trip to 
Fort Leavenworth and return with a troop of cavalry, the robbers 
would be scattered to the winds, and not until another raid had been 
planned and executed would their whereabouts be known or suspected. 

In the spring of 1844 a mule train of forty-three wagons, owned by 
an American, but manned by Mexican drivers, while encamped 200 
yards west of Log Chain Creek, near the Wabaunsee county line, was 
surprised at night, and of the forty-six men, twenty-seven were killed, 
and the mules, 500 in number, run off by the outlaws, undoubtedly the 
gang having their headquarters within one mile of the present site of 
Harveyville. 

In one of the wagons was an iron box 18x12x8 inches containing 
$75,000 in gold. This treasure box was taken and with the 500 mules 
represented a fortune— a lost fortune to the owner of the train, who 
succeeded in getting safely away. 

Within forty-eight hours he had ridden to Leavenworth and with 
a company of cavalry was on the way to the scene of the terrible mas- 
sacre. But the wagons and harness were all that was left of the 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 143 

splendid ontflt. After burying the dead Mexican trainmen the troops 
attempted to follow the trail of the robbers with the hope of returning 
to the owner th3 treasure box and the mules that he might continue 
his journey to the States. But the herd had been divided and driven 
in different directions and after unavailing effort to locate the robbers 
the Captain with his little band struck westward. 

At the Little Arkansas an old trapper and plainsman by the name 
of H. B. Hobbs offering the most reasonable solution of the problem 
that perplexed the Captain his services were secured to trail the 
robbers. 

Hobbs reasoned that the outlaws would not dare to take the mules 
either to the States or to Mexico but to the only place they could tind 
a safe market-that, in his opinion, was Oregon. Taking a north-east 
direction the trail of the robbers with the mules was struck on the 
Smoky Hill. Following this until nearly the head of the stream was 
reached the troops encountered nineteen of the men in charge of the 
herd of mules. 

In the hard fight that followed fourteen of the nineteen robbers 
were killed. The other live were taken to Fort Leavenworth, tried, 
and sentenced to the penitentiary at Alton, Hi., for life. The mules 
were turned over to the owner but the treasure box was missing. As 
two of the twenty-one outlaws comprising the gang were unaccounted 
for it was supposed that to them had been entrusted tlie keeping of 
the golden treasure. Diligent search was made in the vicinity of the 
robbery for the iron box but the result was a grievous disappointment 
both to the officer in command of the troops and the unfortunate pro- 
prietor of the train. 

In 1857, just thirteen years after the train robbery referred to, Mr. 
Allen Hodgson settled on the claim on which is located the mound 
used by the train robbers as their point of observation. At that time 
there were still evidences of white men having lived north of tlie Dra- 
goon and east of Bachelor's Branch. The ashes of a log house 14x16 
were plainly visible and for years the outlines of the building were 
plainly marked. There was an old wagon road that crossed the creek 
north of the graveyard, extending down the creek on the south side. 

This was an old road when the first settlers came into the neigh- 
borhood. Neither Henry, George or Sam Harvey could give any 
further information as to the old road than that it was there before 
them. They said that white men had lived there 12 or 15 years before 
but who they were they didn't know. That they were white men there 
was no question. Twenty-five or 30 big oak trees had been cut down 
for honey— the beeswax still adhering to the trees wlien the Harveys 
came. In felling a tree a white man cuts on both sides, an Indian but 
one. In everv case the trees had been cut on both sides. 



144 EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUJ4SEE CXJUISTY, KAS. 

In a tree cut for a house log by Mr. Allen Hodgson in 1857 a half- 
inch chisel was foutid driven through the center of the tree. The 
number of circles of growth outside of the chisel indicated that fully 
13 years had elapsed since the chisel had been driven into the tree. 

We are informed by Mr. Ira Hodgson (to whom we are indebted for 
this interesting information) that while crossing the plains in 1861 he 
became acquainted with an old plainsman by the name of Tom Fulton 
who had crossed the "'(Jreat American Desert" every year for twenty 
years or more. When Ira spoke of the old landmarks, Fulton said that 
was where the train robbers had their headquarters— on the Hragoon. 
above the Leavenworth and Santa Fe roads. Fulton said that point 
was chosen because of the pro.ximity to the junction of the two great 
thoroughfares for one thing and that for several other good reasons it 
was the best place for their business— it was too far west for white 
men to molest them and not far enough west for the Indians to inter- 
fere with their nefarious work. 

Fulton told how the robbers laid their plans— by sending (uil 
scouts who pretended to be looking for mules or oxen strayed or 
stampeded from their train. Then they would ask permission to 
travel with the train till their own camp was reached, taking advan- 
tage of the opportunity to inform themselves as to the number of men, 
their arms, the location and probable amount of treasure, &c. Of 
course on the information obtained depended the fate of the train as 
far as the work of the train robbers was concerned. 

In 1859 to 1861 there, was much talk among the employes of the 
Overland Mail Company about buried treasure— somewhere between 
110 ^\(i Big John -enough, the boys said to make them all rich. They 
looked for it some but found nothing. 

In 1867 a man came out from Alton, Ills., and spent the whole 
summer looking for this same iron box tilled with gold. ]?ut in search- 
ing for the box he went farther west than the I>ragoon, his efforts 
l)eing confined to digging along the banks of Big John. Rock, BlutT 
and 142 Creeks. 

A('cording to his description the money was buried on a creek 
crossed by the Santa Fe road. On the south side of the creek there 
was a big blulY. and a creek coming into the main creek from the north 
side. The box was buried on the east side of the creek coming from 
the north. On the bluff south of the creek there was a lot of big Hat 
rock and on one of these rock was cut the figure of a compass pointing 
to the place where the box was buried and the number of rods to the 
box was marked on the rock. 

In the Summer of 1895. just six years ago, an old Englishman 
came into the Ilarveyvilie neighborhood. He had but little to .say to 
any one. thougli he preached some and fished a great deal. He fished 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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OUR FIRST HOME IN KANSAS - built in 1865. 



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l^.B^. S«>. 33 -T I V- -W /3, 



WHERE THE FIRST LOG HOUSE WAS BUILT, IN 1844. 

On the site of which, near Harveyville, $75,000 in Spanish gold was found, in 1891, 

by a preacher who had watched as well as prayed. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 145 

and preached for two or three months. His favorite place for fishing 
was near the mouth of Bachelor's branch, the poorest place to fish in 
the whole countr3\ He fished and preached until some time in Sep- 
tember, when without bidding any of his newly made friends good bye, 
he disappeared 

In a few days it was noised about that some one had dug up a box 
over north of the Harveyville cemetery. Right where stood the old 
log house the robbers had built fifty years before was a hole about four 
feet deep and on the sides was the imprint of an iron box 18x12x8— un- 
doubtedly the same box stolen by the train robbers on Log Chain 
creek in 1844. The iron rust was there, but the $75,000 in Spanish 
gold had disappeared— with the old preacher. He had watched as well 
as prayed. He had been fishing for gold— and had found what he long 
bad sought. 



Our First Vigilance Committee. 

That Was Compelled to Suspend Business for Lack of 

Other Material. 

In 1850, notwithstanding the scarcity of horses, the business of 
horse stealing was by no means neglected. As a matter of protection 
a vigilance committee was organized in the south-east part of the 
county for the purpose of dealing out justice in chunks according to 
the standard laid down by Judge Lynch, to such persons as found it 
difficult to keep their hands from stealing other people's horses. 

This committee of eight waited a long time before being permitted 
to put to the test the value of the organization as a promoter of civiliz- 
ing influences. But few people living in Wabaunsee County to-day 
ever knew that such an organization existed at any time in our history 
and it may be as well to state that they are but little less ignorant 
relative to the matter in question than were a majority of those who 
at the time lived in the country. 

Among those who knew nothing of such an organization was an 
old Englishman by the name of Brain, who lived on the quarter ad- 
joining Joe Johnson's place on the east. Brain's worldly goods con- 
sisted of a one-horse wagon, one horse, one woman, one small kid. a 
one-room house and about as much household goods as could be put in 
the one-horse wagon without crowding the rest of the family. 

Brain's horse was the most valuable piece of property on the 
claim, being worth at that time about $100. One morning, about the 
middle of July, the horse was missing. Some miscreant had cut the 
lariat, taking the end to which the horse was tied, leaving the other 
end of the rope to remind Brain of his irreparable loss. 



146 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

Failing to get any clue of the lost horse, Brain sent a description 
of the lost animal to the sheriffs of adjoining counties and in about 
three months word came that the horse and thief were at Lawrence. 

Borrowing a neighbor's horse, Brain hitched to his little wagon 
and taking a trace chain, padlock and double barrelled shot-gun, went 
to Lawrence after his horse and thief. The sheriff kindly turned both 
over to Brain. 

Locking the trace chain around the thief's ankle and the other 
end being made fast to the wagon Brain returned to his home on the 
Dragoon. For four or five days he kept his prisoner chained to one of 
the sills of his house. 

No one seemed to interpose any objection until one night eight 
masked men put in an appearance and demanded that Brain turn the 
thief over to them. Brain refusing to comply with their request the 
masked men removed the chain from the horse-thief's ankle and at- 
tached it to that of Brain. Taking a rope they tied the hands of 
Brain's wife securely behind her so she could not assist her husband in 
getting loose, the masked men drove away with their prisoner. 

When morning came Brain's wife went up to Joe John.son's, and 
getting Joe to cut the ropes that bound her hands, got him to return 
with her and release her husband. Supposing the masked men had 
hung the thief to some neighboring tree search was made for the body, 
but it could nowhere be found. Then there was a suspicion that the 
masked men were friends of the horse-thief who took that method of 
releasing him. 

For twenty years the matter remained a mystery. It was left for 
John Ward to unravel the skein. John used to live on the Milt Rig- 
gin place, but returned to his old home in Missouri in 1860. In 1878 he 
came out for a visit with old friends and then the story was told for 
the tirst time. 

John was a member of the committee and he said that it was a 
good deal of trouble for Brain to take care of that horse-thief all by 
himself, and they concluded they would lend a hand. They decided 
they had better hang him or he'might get away. 

Driving to Brain's in a two-horse wagon the thief was released, as 
we have stated. The vigilance committee concluded they would take 
him over to the crossing of Onion creek on the Emporia road and hang 
him to a tree by the side of the road as a warning to other men follow- 
ing his line of business 

At that time there was a great deal of travel on the Emporia road, 
and when they got near the designated place the committee found 
three or four wagons encamped at the crossing. Getting back out of 
sight the lynchers waited until the campers should get their break- 
fast and break camp. By that time the sun was an hour high and as 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 147 

hot as a July sun ever gets in Kansas. 

Driving down near the crossing a convenient limb was found, the 
thief commanded to stand up, and after his hands were securely tied 
behind him, a rope was put about his neck and the other end tied to 
the overhanging limb. It was the intention to drive the wagon out 
from under the horse-thief and let him hang until life was extinct, 
but when the captain of the vigilance committee ordered the owner 
of the team to drive away, he refused, emphasizing his refusal by an 
oath, indicating that he meant just what he said. It was too much 
like murder, he said, and every effort to induce the owner of the team 
to drive out was unavailing. 

While the members of the committee were arguing the all im- 
portant question— to the thief— as to who should do the driving, the 
most interested man in the company was shaking like a man with the 
ague, the sweat running in a stream down his face. To make matters 
worse for the lone occupant of the wagon the flies were biting the 
horses like mad. At such times the horses would start up and move, 
and once the prospects were good for the flies settling the question so 
hard for the committee to agree upon. 

But the thief was doing some good talking on his own account. 
He would yell: "Whoa, there !" when their movements would bring 
him painfully near the hind part of the wagon, and he would start 
them up a little when their backing threatened to leave his body 
dangling from the tree in front. While the committee were parleying 
the thief had nothing on which to rely but his feet and his tongue to 
save him from swinging into eternity, and it is unnecessary to state 
that he made good use of his understanding and powers of persuasion 
as he never did before. 

As a last resort, the committee drew cuts to see on whom would 
fall the responsibility of driving the team out from under the tree, 
but the man making the unlucky draw refused point blank to act his 
part. 

Just then a covered wagon was descried coming down the road. 
This hastened the verdict. Two hours and a half had been frittered 
away in argument and child's play— to all but the man in the wagon. 
The flies were keeping him busy. He had passed the dreary hours in 
the effort of his life. He was keeping his feet and tongue busy to save 
his neck. 

With one accord the committee approached the man in the wagon 
and informed him that if he would promise to leave the country and 
never return he would be released. Of coure he promised. It was 
easier than to dangle from the limb of a tree without any support for 
his feet. Would he go? He "reckoned" he would. He didn't think 
this was a very healthy country, anyhow — for him. 



148 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

The conimiltee told him if he was ever caught in the country 
again they would shoM him on the spot. He replied that they would 
be perfectly welcome to shoot him if they ever caught him in the 
country at any time in the future. He kept his word. 

That was the first— as well as the last— work ever done by a vig- 
ilance commitee in Wabaunsee county. 



Bossy Solved the Problern. 



Not the least among the many vexatious problems that presented 
themselves to the early settlers for solution was the all important one 
of transportation. While teams of oxen were the rule and horses the 
exception not all were so fortunate as to possess either. Among those 
so unfortunately situated was Hon. G. G. Hall, who for so many years 
filled so creditably the office of probate judge. The .Judge's memory 
was a store-house of early reminiscences and no one delighted more in 
recounting the trials and the tribulations of the pioneers than the 
Judge. 

Having raised quite a crop of potatoes and considerable corn he 
was puzzled to determine how to move his produce from the field to 
the house— some distance away. Among his worldly possessions was 
neither a team nor a wagon, but he was the fortunate owner of a cow. 
Seeing no better way out of the difficulty he resolved to utilize Bossy 
as a beast of burden. And right well did she serve the purpose. With 
a sack on either side— pack-horse fashion— the Judge soon had his corn 
and potatoes stored away for the winter. 




-^"^■1^4 




BOSSY. 
ALSO A SAMPLE OF A PIONEER FENCE. 



EARLY T[ISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 149 



flrn Unma»1ted Grave, 



It was in October, 1864. Price was threatening to invade Kansas, 
the militia had been called oat and only a few besides the old men 
and boys were left to guard the women and children left behind. 

There were but few settlers on the Copp branch of Mill creek. 
The bottoms were narrow and the hills rocky. But there was a good 
range for cattle and the beauty of the landscape attracted the atten- 
tion of Mr. John Copp, who saw in the claim selected the spot for an 
ideal home. 

His nearest neighbor was Charlie Pafkowich, in plain sight, but 
more than a mile away. Charlie was among those who had gone to 
the front, leaving his young wife to look after the farm. 

Those were lonely days— when Indians were oftener seen than 
white men. They were getting restive, too. They knew the war was 
going on and rumors of an uprising had reached the ears of the anxious 
settlers. It was but a few miles to the Pottawatomie reserve on the 
on the north and the Kaws were uncomfortably close on the other side. 

Only a few short years before, the Kaws had come over from their 
reservation and within sight of the Copp home had wreaked a terrible 
revenge on one of their old time enemies— a Pawnee, that the lonely 
squatter had given a comfortable bed in the hay stack, within a few 
yards of the one-room log cabin. 

Mrs. Copp was at home on the day of which I write, but not alone. 

Four darling children had blessed and made happy the occupants of 

the little log cabin. So fond a mother could never be lonesome with 

the innocent prattle of those she prized above all things else around 

her. 

It was chilly that day and a warm fire had been kindled in the old 

chimney. The wind'was blowing, too, and when a crackling noise was 

heard the fond mother was amazed to find that the house had caught 

fire from the chimney. Hurriedly water was brought from the creek 

near at hand. But the bank was steep and the work tiresome. 

When the fire seemed almost quenched it would again blaze 

up. Help must be had or the house and all would be gone. Tired 

in the extreme with fruitless exertion, and driven almost to the verge 

of distraction, the half crazed mother locked the door with the 



150 EMILY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

children inside, and made haste for help— the nearest at hand— at the 
Paflcowich home, more than a mile away, down the valley. 

Between hysterical sobs she told her story. But a glance at the 
Copp home was all that was needed to convince Mrs. Pafivowlch of the 
terrible truth— the little log cabin was all ablaze and the four children 
were wrapped in a shroud of flames. 

A charred heap near the door told the saddest story in our 
county's history — their doom had been sealed by the turning of the 
key in the lock. 

Under a spreading oak within thirty yards of the tenant house on 
the Allendorph ranch near Halifax station (now the property of Mr. 
Finney), the remains lie burled. 

No mound was raised to mark the place. It would but recall that 
heart-rending scene on that terrible day in the fall of '04. Lest the 
mother's reason be dethroned every effort must be made to efface from 
memory's tablet the horrid spectacle. 

To the memory of Mary, Robert, Ida and Hedwigno inscription on 
slab of marble is needed. Poignant grief, deep-seated sorrow, weighed 
down the years of a life time. That the load of anguish might be 
lightened, that the burden might be bearable — these tell the sad 
story of the unmarked grave by the road-side. 



John Verity, who for a number of years kept a store at Maple Hill, 
and Vera was a genuine cowboy, having worked at the trade for some 
years prior to going into the mercantile business. After leav- 
ing Wabaunsee county John accepted a position with the Swofford 
Dry Goods Co,, of Kansas City, Missouri. While in the employ of this 
company Mr. Verity assumed the management of several branch stores 
in the Indian territory, residing with his family in the Nation for 
several years. On John's first appearance in the territory he was 
dubbed a "tenderfoot." but when the Indians and squaw men 
gathered in front of the company's store to greet his initial perform- 
ance with the usual applause given a new arrival's first attempt at riding 
a bucking broncho there was disappointment on every countenance. 
When the broncho felt his ribs crack from the raps from that wagon 
spoke he forgot to buck and struck out on his fifteen mile run with a 
determination to get there Eli before his ribs were all stove in. When 
the Territory toughs, Indians, and squaw men brought in their verdict 
it was: "Tenderfoot ride like h— 1 !." John had been there before and 
his experience as a cow-boy stood him in good stead while roughing it 
in the Nation. His standing with the rough element had been estab- 
lished on a firm foundation. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




CALVIN BURGER. 




HARRY TANDY. 




JAMES RENDER, 
alias " Denver Kid." 



DICK WILLIAM3, 
alias "Trilby" ; alias "ScowbaU." 



THE McFARLAND MURDERERS AND THEIR VICTIMS. 



EARLY HISTORY Or WABADNSEE COONTY, KAS. 151 



Double Murder at IVlGFarland. 



The most revolting crime ever committed in Wabaunsee county 
was the murder of Harry Tandy and Calvin Burger, at McFarland, on 
the afternoon of Wednesday, June 28, 1899. 

On the following morning, about 9 o'clock, Henry Weaver's at- 
tention was attracted by the gesticulations and incoherent mutterings 
of a man at the foot of a high bank of Mill Creek, about sixty yards 
southwest of the ice-house at McFarland. The man's lower limbs 
were submerged in the water drowning being prevented by projecting 
roots but for which the murderers may have escaped conviction and 
punishment. 

It was found that the young man's skull had been crushed by a 
blow back of the ear, rendering the victim of murderous assault un- 
conscious, in which condition the unfortunate young man remained 
till the time of his death, at 10 o'clock Thursday night. 

The young man was recognized as one, who, the day before, had 
been seated with a companion on the platform in front of Winkler 
Bros.' store at McFarland. It was recalled that the young men had 
made inquiries relative to the country, the prospect of getting work, 
&c. At noon the young men bought some crackers and cheese for 
lunch. 
K Although both wore overalls, there was something about the 
young men that attracted more than ordinary attention. It was 
noticed that each wore a good suit of clothes under his overalls, and 
that one of the young men carried a gold watch— and that his hands 
were as soft as a woman's. 

By letters on the body of the young man found in the creek, the 
body was identified as that of Harry Tandy, a druggist of Creighton, 
Mo." . 

Dr. O. S. Chester was called by telephone to McFarland, and im- 
mediately a message was sent to the young man's father. Starting 
immediately the grief-stricken parent reached the bedside of his dying 
son, but only to return on the saddest mission of his life— the boy's 
spirit had been wafted horrio. 



I 



152 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

So certain were the people that young Tandy's companion had 
also l)e«'n fctiilly murdered that the ereek was drajjged for the missing 
lK)dy, but not until Saturday evening, July 8, was the second victim 
found— in the orchard on the Tom Locke farm, nearly a mile west of 
McFarland— on information secured from one of the men charged with 
tiu' murder— he having furnished Sheriff Cook, of Shawnee County, 
witli a diagram that enabled the ollicers to go directly to the place 
where the body lay, in a badly decomposed condition. 

After the finding of young Tandy's body, several parties recognized 
him as one of the two joung men who had been seen playing cards 
witla two young colored men on the east side of the ice-house the 
evening before the finding of young Tandy's body. 

A young colored man, named AVllliams, had called at Mr. Don- 
nelley's. at McFarland. for lunch for himself and a partner, and before 
leaving had borrowed two fishing poles, leaving the satchel with the 
Misses Donnelley until his return. 

Later in the day Williams returned the fishing poles and called 
for his satchel, his excited manner attracting attention to such a de- 
gree as to make a lasting impression. On leaving the Donnelley home 
he went the back way, going north of the store on his way to the 
stock-yards, near which place he met Render, the other colored man, 
who had called at the store to buy something for lunch. The two 
colored men left McFarland on a freight train for Topeka. going to 
Crook Wright's, where Tandy's gold watch was pawned. This was the 
first clue that led to the arrest of Williams and Render, 

At a barber shop, opposite the Rock Island depot. Render had 
changed his bloody shirt, and at Kansas City, Williams had left his 
blood stained pants. Both showed considerable money at Crook 
Wright's. 

At the trial Williams acknowledged to being present when both 
young men were murdered but said Bill Collins had killed Harry 
Tandy and "Souse" Hawkins had killed Calvin Burger— Williams 
stating that he had been compelled at the point of a revolver to assist 
in the double murder. Williams told how Burger had been decoyed 
to the orchard to get chickens for supper and how Tandy was disposed 
of on his return— how, on bended knees, he had plead for his life— 
otiering to give up his watch and money— everything, if only his life 
was spared. 

As neither ''Souse" nor Collins had been seen at McFarland, and 
it being proven that they were in Topeka at the time the murders 
were committed. Williams' story was devoid of effect. It was re- 
garded as a l)ungling effort at fixing a most horrible crime on innocent 
parties— innocent, at least, of the double murder at McFarland. 

The recital of the l)rutal murder of Harrv Tandv created a heart 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 153 

rending scene in the court-room. Scalding tears coursed down the 
cheeks of the grief stricken mother and the excited condition apparent 
in the equally aggrieved father created the impression that the as- 
sembled spectators might be unwilling witnesses of a second tragedy 
as a sequel to the first. 

The jury brought in a verdict of guilty at noon, and at 1:4-) p. m. 
Williams and Render were on their way to the penitentiary — having 
been convicted of murder in the first degree. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tandy and Mr. and Mrs. Burger, parents of the mur- 
dered boys, were in attendance at the trial, leaving on their sad home- 
ward journey on the same train that carried Williams and Render to 
prison for life. Mr. Tandy is a leading physician and druggist at 
Creighton. Mo., and Mr. Burger is in the restaurant business in 
Kansas City, but until a short time before the murder had been a 
guard at the Kansas State penitentiary at Lansing. Two excellent 
families had been drawn together by sad circumstances that deprived 
each of two homes of a promising son. 

Good detective work was done in bringing the criminals to justice. 
Messers. Barnes and Carroll received deserved commendation for their 
efficient work as prosecutors. Mr. Keagy exerted his best efforts to 
bring about the acquittal of the defendants and with nothing to base 
a hope on, he made the best possible argument in behalf of the 
prisoners — who could have no cause to complain that their conviction 
was due to a lack of legal talent in their defense. 

There were no shoes on young Burger's feet when the body was 
found, though an old pair was found near by. When Mrs. Burger 
came to Alma she identified the shoes Williams was wearing as having 
been worn by her son, Calvin, when he left home for a visit with his 
brother in Oklahoma. 

Though robbery was the motive for the crime a five dollar bill was 
found in the lining of young Burger's hat. It was wrapped in a piece 
of a newspaper published at Minneapolis, Kas.. where the family for- 
merly resided. 

The identification of Calvin Burger's body —decomposed beyond 
recognition— was established by the score book first and later by the 
pants that he wore at the time of the murder. Allowing that "T" in 
the score book stood for Tandy. "D" for Dick Williams and "R'' for 
Render, the other initial, "B"' represented the young man whose 
identity was in question. In their effort to fix the responsibility for 
the crime on "Souse" and Collins the prisoners had stated that the 
young man whose body was found in the orchard had been working 
with the asphalt gang in Kansas City. Attorney Carroll went to 
Kansas City and established the fact that Calvin Burger was young 
Tandy's companion at McFarland. The bit of cloth used in patching 



I 



154 EARLY HISIXDRY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

the pants worn by the murdered boy made the identification complete. 
When on Saturday. July 8, the second body was found and the 
facts developed that the victim had been foully murdeied in the same 
identical manner as was the young druggist the excitement was in- 
tense and the conditions ripe for the infliction of summary punish- 
ment on any one whom the evidence might incrhninate. On Sunday 
when the train bearing Dick Williams, one of the accused, reached 
Alma the excitement which had not yet abated was heightened in the 
extreme and hardly had the outer door of the jail closed on the 
prisoner than the sheriff and his deputies were overpowered, the door 
broken down and in a trice the body of Dick Williams was being 
dragged through the street to the Mahan corner— a block east of the 
court house— and in another moment what was supposed to be a life- 
less body was dangling limp and motionless from a telephone pole ten 
feet from the ground. Six minutes later City Marshal Pippert 
lowered the body. Williams breathed but until midnight his life 
hung as by a thread. Twenty-four hours later, with the exception of 
an abrasion of the scalp, there were no indications that Williams had 
passed through the terrible ordeal that came near depriving him of 
the right of trial by jury for a crime without a parallel in the history 
of Wabaunsee County. 




EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. IM 



The FratiK Mitchell Murder. 



When on Mondny mornintf. M.urh ^K 1*<V»(>, Mr. James Clare, of Alta 
Vista, went to tlie farm of his brother-in-law. Mr. Frank Mitchell, to 
return a borroweri waeron and failed to find Frank at home his sn.spic- 
ions were at once aroused, and he felt assured that somethinir had gone 
wronjr. His suspicions were more than confirmed when lie noticed 
that all the stock on the place appeared in a >?iunted and half-starved 
condition, the water-tank dry and everythinur uroinj; to show that the 
owner had not been on the place for several days at least. 

From inquiries it was learned that not since the Thursday before 
(March o I had Frank l>een seen by anyone. On that day a neighbor 
had called on Frank." leaving there about 4 o'clock in the afternoon. 
AVhile at the Mitchell farm P'rank had .said that John Hoopner had 
one of his hogs and that he w;is gf»iug over to see about it. From the 
fact that Hoepner had once before refused to deliver to Frank a hog of 
his that he had taken up until he had paid him two dollars, it was at 
J once suspected that Frank had got into trouble with Hoepner and had 
been foully dealt with at the hands of his quarrelsome neighbor. 

A searching party of about thirty of Frank's neighbors and friends 
was at once organized, and there being such a unanimity of sentiment 
respecting Hoepner's guilt a warrant was sworn out before M. H. 
(V)oper. a justice of the peace, and placed in the hands of Constable 
.lohn Kistler. to be served in case circumstances should warrant hi.S 
iM'rest. 

.Mthough Hoepner denied having seen Mitchell for several months, 
and his statement was corroborated by his wife, not one of the search- 
ing party believed the story of the one or the other. But persisting in 
their determinatifm to find the body, iiuccess finally rewarded the ef- 
forts of the diligent searchers. About a quarter of a mile north of 
Hoepner's barn poor Frank Mitchell lay prone upon his back, his blood- 
stained lips apart, his eyes glazed and turned heavenward as if mutely 
appealing to a just God who has .said. "'Vengeance is mine. I will re- 
pay."" 



i:)ti EAKLY lllSTOKY OF WABAUJSSEE COUNTY, KAS. 

For four days and niphts the body had lain where John Hoepner 
liad dumped the limp and lifeless form from his wa^on- like a dojf. 

Telegrams were at once sent to Coroner Reals, County Attorney 
Barnes, and Sheriff Treu. Messrs. Otto Meyer, Gilbert Anderson, Geo. 
W. Gantz, David Weidner, and Drs. Eldridge and Goodsell were sworn 
in as jurors, and after hearing the evidence brought in a verdict to the 
effect that Frank Mitchell came to his death from a gunshot wound, 
and that the said shot was fired by John Hoepner with felonious in- 
tent. Hoepner was held for murder in the first degree and only by 
strategy was lynching prevented. 

After being lodged in the Alma jail Hoepner confessed to the mur- 
der, he claiming that Frank had refused to pay the five dollars damage 
he had asked before he would allow him to take his hog; that Frank 
had taken the hog from the pen and was driving it home when he 
overtook and shot him. The shooting was done southeast of Hoep- 
ner's and in the direction of Frank's home. When found the body 
was nearly half a mile from the spot where the killing was done. Two 
slugs had broken the arm Ijone just below the shoulder, entering the 
lung cavity, and must have caused immediate death. 

Several days after the murder Sheriff Treu discovered that the 
front and arms of Hoepner's shirt— that he wore at the time of the 
murder— was a matted mass of blood, showing conclusively that Hoep- 
ner had grasped the body tightly in his arms in lifting it into the 
wagon. 

Hoepner had bought the farm on which he lived at the time of the 
murder about ten years before. He was of a quarrelsome disposition, 
and his life hi the neighborhood had been marked by an uninterrupted 
series of brawls, quarrels, fights, threats to shoot, &c., with game and 
wild fruit hunters, and with neighbors about stray stock, land lines 
and other matters that usually are lightly considered but more often 
unnoticed. In strange contrast was the character of Frank Mitchell, 
who, by his upright conduct and manly bearing, had won for himself 
an enviable place in the esteem of the people. Of him it could be 
truthfully said: 

"None knew him but to love him. 
Nor named him but to praise." 

The remains were buried at the White school house, the funeral 
services being conducted by Rev. Mr. Newcomb, of Beman. 

The case was tried at the May term of court and the murderer 
sentenced to a t«rm of twenty years in the penitentiary. 



EARLY HJSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 157 



The IVliiehlenbaGher Murder. 




On Saturday night, March 17, 1894, at tlie Muehlenliacher home, 
seven miles southeast of Alma on Illinois Creek, was perpetrated one 
of the most atrocious and brutal murders ever committed in Wa- 
iKiunseo county. 

Many years before Louis, Fred 
and Peter Muehlenbacher, three 
bachelor brothers, had located 
on the creek. There was a sis- 
ter who had married a man by 
the name of Schepp, but there 
had been a separation, Margar- 
itha, with her son, Louis, having 
for years made their home with 
the brothers. the muehlenbachku home. 

Several years prior to the murder Fred was found dead in the tim- 
ber, and a little more than a year before the tragedy on Illinois Creek 
Louis was killed by a flying limb while felling a tree in the woods, 
leaving Peter. Margaritha. the sister, and her .son. Louis, to look after 
the work of the farm. 

The brothers had accumulated quite a large amount of property, 
consisting of lands, horses and cattle, money invested in mortgages. 
&:c. Of lands they owned something over two thousand acres and the 
home farm, extending for several miles on either side of Illinois Creek, 
included some of the richest land and most valuable timber in Wa- 
baunsee county. Owning as they did nearly all of the best lands on 
the stream it was as often referred to as the Muehlenbacher branch 
us Illinois Creek. 

Hard work and rigid economy was the rule at the Muehlenbacher 
farm. Three large stone houses had been built on the farm, but the 
attractions of the old home place were many, and here the family had 
remained until the terrible tragedy of March 17, 1894. 

On the evening of that day as Peter, Louis Schepp, and Frank 
Walker were seated at the supper table fnear the south window, shown 



lo8 EAULV mSTUKY OF WABA L'iNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



t^S^H^aS^^K; 






in cut*, a pislol shot was tired on the rmtside near tho fnint door (shown 
in cut of lo^' building) A moment later a masked man stepped into 
the open door and tired a shot at Peter, who had sot up from the table 
as the man entered the ro(»m. The shot had struck I'eter in the side, 
intlictintr a mortal wound, causint: him to fall towards his murderer, 
whom he fjrasped by the leg^ as he fell. 

The masked man then tired a 
shot at Mar^aritha. missing his 
aim. but another shot struck 
Louis as he entered the door 
leading to the north room— the 
ball entering hi.s side, inflictlnfj 
a painful and dangerous wound. 
Peter, still liolding'the murder- 
er's leg's in a death grip, was 
dragged outside the building. makgakitha's housk. 

where another and la.st shot was fired, striking the prostrate man in 
the back of the head and caiising immediate death. 

There was but little liglit in the room and the smoke from the 
shooting was so den.se that nothing could be seen. But Lfuiis and his 
mother had pas.sed into the north room and Louis looking out of the 
window, raised about ten inches, .saw the murderer, wlio. Louis thought 
was reloading his pistol, tie was standing nearly in front of tlie still 
open door and about twenty feet from the liouse. Thougli weak and 
nervous from excitement and loss of blood. Louis got down his double- 
barreled shotgun and loading it with a single ball that just fitted the 
bore, fired under the raised sash at the murderer of his uncle. At the 
crack of the gun the man fell, but rising immediately to his feet dis- 
appeared in the darkne.ss. 

As soon as the excitement had partially subsided Frank Walker 
went t:o George Casey's for help, and Charlie Wenzel came to Alma and 
informed Sheriff Palenske, who immediately organized a posse to go to 
the scene of the murder and if possible to get .some clue as to the per- 
petrators of the atrocious crime. 

THK FIRST CLUE. 

It was 7:30 o'clock when Frank Walker left the Muehlenbacher 
home on the night of the murder. About 9 o'clock the posse started 
to the scene of the murder. When the posse started Jerry and James 
Fields went to the Rock Island depot to watch all passing trains and 
to get any clue as to the perpetrators of the murder. A half hour later 
Jerry Fields had settled in his own mind the identity of at least two 
of the msn guilty of the murder of Peter Muehlenbacher. and later 
developm'^nts proved that his suspicions were woll-founded. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



/;% 





SCHOOL-HOUSE AT McFARLAND. 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AT WABAUNSEE. 



EAltLV IIISTOUV OK \VA I'.A TXSKE COUNTY, KAN. 




First ScliDol ill Disl. 2:5, llock Creek. 




M. E. CnUKCH. ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





CATHOLIC CHURCH AND ALTAR, Newbury. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




M. E. CHURCH, Kaw Township. 



LUTHERAN CHURCH, Kaw Township. 




M. E. CHURCH, Paxico. 



M. E. CHURCH, Wabaunsee. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




ALTAR IN CHURCH BURNED. 



CATHOLIC CHURCH. 
Burned February 6, 1899. 




ALTAR IN THE NEW CATHOLIC CHURCH, ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




Mr. Franz Schmidt's Residence. Parsonage. 

The Parsonage. Rev. Father Hohe. 



Catholic Church, Alma. 
The Old Church. 




Rev. Father Kamp. 



Rev. Father Hundhausen. 
Rev. Father Cihal. 



Rev. Father Bollwig. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 






■;-■■•.;;? 



BAPTIST CHURCH, ESKRIDGE. M.E.CHURCH and PARSONAGE.ESKRIDGE. 




CATHOLIC PARSONAGE. NEWBURY. 



^ 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




M. E. CHURCH, McFarland. 



M. E. CHURCH, Maple Hill. 




DINING-ROOM, ROCK ISLAND EATING HOUSE, McFarland. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




HAYING AT MR. CHRIS. LANGVARDT'S, NEAR ALTA VISTA. 




GERMAN BAPTIST CHURCH, ALTA VISTA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




SCHOOL HOUSE AT ESKKIDGE. 



M. E. CHURCH. ALT A VISTA. 




ROCK ISLAND EATING HOUSE. McFARLAND. 



I 



«:• 



EAKLY iriSTOEY OF WABAUNSEE COUTsTY, KAN. J59 

At the depot were Frank Simon, Jr., and Julius Benke; the latter 
for some time slept on a cot in the depot. Jerry Fields inquired of the 
boys if they had seen anyone going up the railroad track the evening 
before. Both the boys had seen Chris Carpenter going west on the 
Rock Island track late in the afternoon, carrying a bundle. This ex- 
cited Mr. Fields' suspicions, and going to the small frame building 
just north of the Commercial house, where Chris usually stopped, he 
found that he had gone— no one knew where. 

Having seen .Jerry Carpenter in Alma the evening before, Mr. 
Fields at once telegraphed to McFarland (where Jerry Carpenter had 
been at work at the coal chute for the Rock Island company), asking 
if Jerry was there and if not, where he was. In response Mr. Field 
received a dispatch stating that Jerry had gone away the evening be- 
fore with the expressed intention of going to Kansas City but that he 
had not gone on any east bound train. 

This settled in the mind of Jerry Fields the identity of at least 
two of the murderers of Peter Muehlenbacher. From that time every 
word said and every move made by either Jerry or Chris Carpenter but 
added to the proofs that they v/ere two of the parties engaged in the 
murder and attempted robbery of Peter Muehlenbacher on Illinois 
Creek. So confident was Jerry Fields of this fact that he insisted on 
foing out to John Allen's (the brother-in-law of the Carpenters) that 
light and arresting them as participants in the crime. But other 
.counsel prevailed and the arrest was postponed, but in the meantime 
close watch was kept on the suspected parties, every act of whom but 
drew closer the web that was closing about them. 

On Sunday Jerry Carpenter was at McFarland a very sick man. 
He hired a substitute at the coal chute— stating that he was sick — to 
one party that he had the sore eyes and to another that he had the 
dysentery. On Monday he again appeared in Alma. That night 
Jerry and Chris were seen through a slit in the window curtain — 
dressing the gunshot wound received out at Muehlcnbacher's. One 
J. was heard to say to the other: "We are all right if Tom McClain 
don't give us away" Jerry went to McFarland on the mornins train 
but it was seen that he didn't go any farther. Before night Jerry and 
Chris Carpenter and Tom McClain were lodged in the Alma jail. 

TOM 3I'CLAIN'S STATE3IENT. 

Solitary confinement worked on Tom's nerves and he sought 
spiritual consolation. Sending for Rev. J. F. Dennis he unbur- 
'dened his mind. He told Rev. Dennis that on Saturday — the day 
of the murder— that Chris had said to him that there was lots of 
money to be had out at Muehlenbacher's and that he and Jerry 
were going to have it and that Chris invited Tom to go along 
but he stated that he wouldn't go. Tom further said that 



ItJO KAKLY HISTOKY OF WABAUJSfciKE CUUISTY, KAS. 



oti Sunday innrninp Chris came by his place and said that he (Chris) 
iuul Jeir.v wtMt' out, at. Muehlenbacher's the night before and that they 
liad a h— 1 of a time, that they had killed Pete, and Jerry had a hole | 
put throuK'h him. But Tom insisted that he had nothing to do with 
it. Tom sought consolation by singing a few good old Methodist 
songs witli Hov. Dennis. 

jerky's conkkssion. 

Jerry Carpenter was in the room just across the hall-way and when 
told that Tom was giving him away Jerry became excited and said 
lie would have something to say about it— that when the time came 
he would get up in the court room and tell the whole story. Then he 
told how that he and Chris and Tom had gone out to Muehlenbacher's 
- that he did the shooting but Tom and Chris were both in the "* 
room.* 

Jerry said he fell just,.as Louis had said and that he got up and 
walked unaided to the fence when Chris and Tom helped him away. 
Jerry said he never thought of there being a gun in the house and he 
supposed Louis was past shooting. Jerry was doubtless re-loading his 
pistol but on this point he refused to say anything. 

THE MYSTERIOUS BUNDLE. 

When Julius Benke and Frank Simon saw Chris Carpenter he was 
going west on the Rock Island track with a bundle. One of the three . 
men who passed Albert Dieball's and John Diehl's had with him the 
mysterious bundle. Before leaving McFarland Jerry had the sjime 
bundle claiming it to be a pair of pants he wanted altered. It is sus- 
pected that this bundle contained the masks, pistols, &e.. used at 
M uehlenbacher's. 

When Jerry Carpenter left McFarland he had on a dark suit of 
clothes but a light suit when he returned. In Chris' trunk was found 
a pair of pants, wet and soggy— made so perhaps in washing out blood > 
stains. 

One of the masks was found a mile north of Muehlenbacher's on 
Sunday morning by Herman Schroeder. A few days after a coat was 
found near the same place. Tom McClain had lost a coat about which 
he seemed uneasy but he denied the ownership of the coat, though h^- 
said the coat found was something like the one he had lost. 

The reward of $500 offered by the sister, Margaritha, was paid to 
Messrs J. H. McMahan, J. B. Fields and D. M. Gardner, each of whom 
did excellent work in securing the early arrest of the guilty parties 
connected with the murder. j 



*NoTB.— The room was so filled with smoke from the revolver in 
the hands of Jerry that nothing could be seen. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. Itjl 

OLl> OFFENDERS. 

Jerry and Chris Carpenter served two years in the Kansas peni- 
tentiary, having been sent up from Marion county for grand larceny. 

Over a thousand dollars worth of goods, burglarized from a store 
in Marion, were found in the shanty occupied by Chris. But Jerry 
had skipped out and after a long chase was captured at Hot Springs 
in Arkansas 

After the Muehlenbacher murder a large number of keys, saws, 
files, coldchisels, glass cutters and fuse were found in Chris' valise, and 
at the barn where he kept his horses several lap robes and other prop- 
erty, identified as long missing articles belonging to citizens of Alma. 

County Attorney Jones was ably assisted in the prosecution by 
Messrs Barnes, Cornell and McClure. Messrs Case & Nicolson de- 
fended. Chris and Jerry were given life sentences, while McClain was 
acquitted. Finding public sentiment strong against him he went to 
Oklahoma. Chris died at Lansing after serving the state five years in 
the coal mines. I 




102 EAELY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COIINTT, KAN. 



The FooKs-ZVliller FeUd. 



On the morning of Octobers, 1881, the quiet law-abiding? citizens 
of Wasliington township were startled by the news of a tragedy, the 
like of which was never known before among a people whose inclina- 
tions have ever been foreign to the fostering of quarrels and bickerings 
— to say nothing of ditlicultics in the settlement of which, human life 
would be placed in jeopardy. 

On thenorthhalf of section IS, township 12, range 9, lived two neigh- 
bors, George Miller and Matt Fooks— the former a quiet, stolid Ger- 
man, and the latter an Englishman, who, during his residence in the 
neighborhood, had acquired the reputation of being pugilistic, and, as 
some asserted, quarrelsome. 

At any rate, there was friction between the heads of the two 
families. Their farms were adjoining and there was trouble about 
Fooks' cattle breaking into Miller's enclosure. On the morning 
referred to the cattle had made another raid and Miller was driving 
them out. What occurred in the timber near the line fence was but 
little more than conjecture. 

About 9 o'clock Fooks rode by the Moege farm, where Mr. Moege, sr., 
and sons were butchering a hog. Fooks was much excited and telling 
Mr. Moege he had killed Miller rode off towards Alma. It was nearly 
noon when he rode into town and surrendered himself to Sheriff 
Gardner, stating that he had a difficulty with George Miller about his 
(Fooks) cattle that had broken into Miller's enclosure, and that in the 
dispute that followed. Miller struck him with a club, and that he 
drew his revolver and fired several shots at Miller, two of which he 
thought had taken effect in Miller's, body. 

In a short time several of Fooks' neighbors arrived in Alma and 
claimed that a cold-blooded murder had been perpetrated, and that 
the killing was premeditated and without just provocation. 

Drs. Green and Buehner went out and made a post-mortum exam- 
ination, finding that one bullet had passed through the lungs and 
heart, lodging in the back, and that another had entered the side, 
fracturing the spinal column. Either shot would have been fatal. 
The inquest was held by Squire Flnck. The body was found fifty 
yards over the line in Miller's timber, and rendered a plea of self-de- 
fense untenable. Fooks was convicted of manslaughter in the first 
degree and sentenced to six years imprisonment. He was taken to 
Lansing September 24, 1882, but secured a pardon after serving about 
half bis time. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 163 



/V W\& Flood. 



I 



The night of June 28, 1858, will lonf? be remembered by the old 
settlers of VVabaunsec county. The tlood-gatcs of heaven were opened 
and the rain came down in torrents. As a" rule the people had built 
their houses on low ground; generally near some good spiing of clear, 
sparkling water, little thingking of the danger from turbulent floods 
that came so soon. 

Some of the pioneers had retired for the night, while others had 
not yet gone to rest. Klockman's, Thowe's and Schwanke's houses 
went down with the Hood and the occupants were compelled to wade 
in water up to the armpits or swim for their lives. Mr. Klockman was 
away and Mrs. Klockman found herself struggling for her life in 
twenty feet of water. Floating down the stream she caught the limbs 
of a tree that had lodged against another tree, that still resisted the 
torrent of water. Here she remai.ied till the waters subsided, more 
dead than alive from the long exposure from the watery element. 

Mr. Fred Steinmeyer heard the roaring waters and opening the 
door — the bottom of which was two feet from the ground— the waters 
rushed in with such force it would be madness to attempt to get out 
that way. Pushing the clapboards aside, thus making a hole in the 
roof, he climbed on top of the house, where with his wife he remained 
till all danger was past. 

Mr. Moettcher, a near neighbor, seeing them on the roof, and be- 
ing determined to rescue them from their perilous position, mounted 
his pony and dashed into the seething, roaring waters. Mr. Stein- 
meyer shouted for him to stay back, that the water was going down, 
but his voice was unheard. The water was nearly a half mile in width 
and the roaring noise was terrible. It was ten feet deep in places and 
six feet deep in the house. Regardless of danger Moettcher urged his 
pony into the boiling current. But the noble little animal wasn't 
equal to the occasion. The waves tossed pony and rider about as bub- 
bles on the crest. The rider went down to rise no more but the pony 
and two faithful dogs sncceeded in making a landing forty rods below. 

Three days after the flood Mr. Moettcher's body was found in a 
drift nearly a half mile below. Near the place under a cedar tree the 
body was buried. 



1()4 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Some hogs belonging to Mr. Jos. Schutter had been washed four 
miles by the swift current. Mr. Antcme Schewe was on hand ready to 
render any needed assistance. He was so excited by the terrible scenes 
tliat he had failed to notice the fact that he had but one boot on— 
the other he was carrying in his hand. 

Mr. Fred Palenske's corn crib, stable and chicken house were 
washed away and only by wading in the deep water was the family 
saved from drowning, taking refuge on the high ground in what was 
later used by Mr. Pauly as a feed lot— entirely surrounded by the 
seething waters. 

Mr. Palenske had five hogs weighing 150 or 200 pounds. Seeing 
nothing of them he supposed they had been swept down stream, as he 
said, "to New Orleans." But Mr. Zwanziger called and asked if they 
had looked for tracks in the timber. They hadn't looked, but they 
would. No tracks were found but some familiar grunts were heard— 
coming from where? The tree-tops! This may be a Munchausen 
story, but it is true, nevertheless. The five hogs had been lodged in a 
big drift, where they had remained for two days, 38 feet from the 
ground. Corn was brought and the hogs came down— with a thud, 
and all in a heap. But no bones were broken and though stunned, 
after a few moments rest the five hogs ate their corn with a relish born 
of a two days fast in the tree-tops! 

The few settlers on Illinois creek and West Branch were also 
driven out by the flood— some of them escaping from their houses and 
reaching a place of safety just in time to see the lights go out— extin- 
guished by the rising waters. Much of their stock and fencing were 
gone but no lives were lost — for which all were thankful. 

The waters of the Dragoon and Mission creek were the highest 
ever known, but, while, in some cases, the houses were surrounded by 
water, none were washed away and comparatively little damage was 
done. Some fields of corn in the low bottoms were partly washed out 
but after the flood much of the corn straightened up and good crops 
were raised. 

But for years after the old settlers referred to the high waters of 
'58 as "The Big Flood." 




AN OLD-TIME FENCE, 
MORE FREQUENTLY SEEN THAN ANY OTHER, IN THE EARLY SIXTIES 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 165 



E;,leGtioii Returns. 



YOTE OF MARCH 28, 1859. 

The first general election in Wabaunsee county, Kansas Territory, 
was held March 28, 1859, with the following result: 

J. M. Hubbard for Probate Judge 111; G. M. Harvey, Clerk of 
County Court and Board of Supervisors, 111; Jehu Hodgson, Sheriff 
109; Moses C. Welch, Register of Deeds, 111; Robert G. Terry, County 
Attorney, 111; August Brasche, Coroner, 111; Henry Harvey, County 
Treasurer. Ill; G. Zwanziger, County Surveyor, 111; J. E. Piatt, 
County Superintendent, 110; S. F. Ross, Auditor, 111. 

Henry Harvey, J. M. Hubbard and G. Zwanziger canvassed the 
vote. W. S. Griswold, clerk. C. B. Lines was appointed messenger to 
convey the returns to the Governor. 

VOTE OF NOVEMBER 8, 1859. 

At an election held November 8, 1859, the following vote was cast: 
Delegate to Congress: Marcus J. Parrott, 121; Sanders W. Johnson, 8. 
For Councilman (Senator): J. B. Woodward, 121; H. N. Williams, 8. 
For Representative: Amasa Bartlett, 129. 
For Probate Judge: J. W. Hubbard, 101. 
For County Clerk: S. E. Beach, 119. 
For Sheriff: John Hodgson, 122. 
For Register: E. C. D. Lines, 125. 
For Connty Treasurer: H. W. Selden, 121. 
For County Attorney: Woodridge Odlin,* 122. 
For County Surveyor: G. Zwanziger, 124. 
For County Superintendent: J. H. Gould, 122. 
For Coroner: A. Brasche, 125. 

VOTE OF DECEMBER 6, 1859. 

At an election held December 6, 1859, under the Wyandotte Con- 
stitution for the election of state, district, county and township 
officers, the following vote was cast: 
For Congress: Martin F. Conway, 121; John A. Halderman, 26; 

Marcus J. Parrott, 5. 
For Governor: Chailes Robinson, 128; Samuel Medary, 17. 
For Senator: J. M. Hubbard, 109; Robert Reynolds, 17; Wm. Hoven- 

den, 11; 

* Resigned, April, 1861. 



1G6 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



For Representatives: Ernest Ilohencck,* 121; Abner Allen. 101: 
Cieurge W. Churchill, 77: I). M. Adams, 24: Churchill Morris, 24: 
E. J. Lines, 25; W. H. McKinley, 16; Herman Dierker. 16. 

For Probate Juclye: J. M. Hubbard, 1 109: EcUvfircl Lower, 10: Wood- 
bridfi^e Odlin, 6; Vim. Ilovenden, 8: Simon Dow, 4. 

For Clerk of the Court: Edward C. D. Lines, 103; Chas. F. Hotchkiss, 
14; S. E. Beach, 8. 

For County Superintendent: J. H. Gould, 121: Geo. Rulison, 19. 

For District Judge: Jacob Safford, 93; J. 11. McClure, 16; R. A. Wil- 
son, 14. 

The following Justices of the Peace were elected: C. B. Lines and 
W. F. Cotton for Wabaunsee townsliip: Ernest Hoheneok and , 
Edward Lower, Alma: Allen Hodgson and Simon Dow, Wilming- 
ton; J. W. Mossman and S. F, Ross, Mission Creek. 

Vote canvassed by Wm. Mitchell, G. Zwanziger and Isaiah Harris. 

VOTE OF MARCH 6, 1860. 

At an election held March 6, 1860, the following was the vote: 
For Commissioner: James W. Blain, 183; James B. Ingersoll, 111; G. 

Zwanziger, 108; D. M. Johnston, 75; F. Hebrank, 79. 
For County Assessor: H. M. Selden, 175; Isaiah Harris, 7. 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1860. 

For Territorial Superintendent: John C. Douglas, 88; J. S. Magill, 3. 

For County Superintendent: J. H. Gould, 81. 

For Assessor: H. J. Loom is, 89. 

Wm. Mitchell, Frank Hebrank .and J. B. Ingersoll were elected 

County Commissioners. 
For Territorial Representative, C. B. Lines 76 votes. 

ELECTION NOVEMBER 5, 1861. 

For Governor, Geo. A. Crawford, 93; for Sheriff, Jehu Hodgson, 150; 

for Register, S. R. Weed, 153; for Treasurer, S. E. Beach, 151. 
For Clerk of Court, J. V. B. Thompson, 113: Jesse B. Allen, 44. 
For County Clerk, H. M. Selden, 78; G. G. Hall, 73. 
For County Surveyor, G. Zwanziger, 163; for Coroner, A. Brasche, 163. 
For Assessor, D. L. Bates,! 114; H. J. Loomis, 45. 
For District Attorney: A. II. Case, 113; L. DcArthur, 34. 
For Commissioner: Wm. Mitchell, 115; F. X. Hebrank, 133; J. B. 

Ingersoll, § 134. 

* Mr. Hoheneck romoving from the district, W. M, Snow was elected to fill 
vacancy. Election held April 0, 1861. Tlie following are reported In the statutes 
of '61 lis representatives: E. Hoheneck, Abner Allen and E. J. Lines. 

+ Resigned, October 6, 1862. O. G. Hall appointed. 

* Bates dying, J. H. Akin was anpolnted April 6, 1863. 

8 Resigned, and H. D. Siiepard appointed January 6, 1863. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 167 

For Representatives: J. B. Ingersoll, 105; A. C. Pierce, 125; T. F. 
Ilerzog, 146; E. G. Robinson, 60; Tlios. Pierce, 20; Geo. W. Freeman, 
20; Geo. Montague, 20. 

For State Capital: Topelca, 155; Lawrence, 4; Wabaunsee, 3; Manhat- 
tan, 1; Ilendrick's Creek, 1. 

ELECTION NOVEMBER 4, 1862. 

For Governor: Thomas Carney, 156; W. R. Wagstaff, 16. 

For Congress: A. C. Wilder, 154; M. J. Parrott, 16. 

For Senator: S. M. Strickler, 158; L. B. Perry, 12. 

For Representative: J. B. Ingersoll, 77; D. M. Johnston 93. 

For Probate Judge: G. G. Hall, 167. 

For Clerk of Court: S. R. Weed, 109; J. W. Blain, 60, 

For County Superintendent: J. H. Gould, 162. 

ELECTION NOVEMBER 3, 1863. 

For Chief Justice: Robert Crozier, 136. 

For District Attorney: A. H. Case, 85; C. H. Gilchrist, 51. 

For Representative: D. M. Johnston, 109; Frank Meier, 24. 

For Treasurer: S. R. Weed, 138; for County Clerk, H. M. Selden,* 131; 
for Sheriff, Samuel B. Harvey, 138; for Register, S. A. Bald- 
win, 138; for Coroner, August Brasche, 137; for Surveyor, Jesse 
Evans, 137; for Assessor, Wm Krieg, 132. 

For Commissioner: E. R. McCurdy, 135; Joseph Treu, 136; IT. D. 
Shepard, 134. 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 8, 1864. 
Lincoln Electors, 163: McClellan Electors: Thos. Moonlight, 50; 

others 7 each. 
For Governor: S. J. Crawford, 116; S. O. Thatcher, 63. 
For Congress: Sidney Clark, 102; Albert L. Lee, 77. 
For District Judge: David Brockway, 87; John P. Greer, 43; C. R. 

Gilchrist, 25; John G.Otis, 20. 
For Senator: William K. Bartlett, 110; Robt. S. Miller, 67. 
For Representative: H. D. Shepard, 108; G. Zwanziger, 65. 
For Probate Judge, G.G.Hall, 173; for Clerk District Court, S. 11. 

Weed, 133; for Sheriff, Geo. W. Daily, 90; for County Attorney, T. 

N. Hamilton, t 43; E. J. Lines,J 41. 
For County Superintendent: E. R. Twitchell,§ 117;Chas. Guild, 36; 

G. R. Guild, 13. 



* Died, and S. A. Baldwin apointed July 3, 1865. 
+ Election contested and Hamilton loses by default. 

* Petition by E. Plait and 22 others to oust county attorney for drunkenness 
I filed October 2, 1866. 

§ Isaiah Harris appoiutcd April 3, 1865 on account of death of E. R. Twitcbell. 



108 EAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUKSEE COUKTY, KAS. 



Canvass of vote deferred to December 19, to hear from soldier vote, 

but none received. 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 7, 1865. 
For Representative, H. I). Shcpard. 77: for Treasurer, S. R. Weed, 81; 

for County Clerlt, S. 11. Fairfield, 81: for Register, S. A. Baldwin, 

80; for Sheriff, J. H. Pinkerton, 79: for assessor, G. M. Harvey,* 79; 

for County Superintendent, Isaiah Harris,t 78; for Coroner, A. 

Brasche, 76; for Surveyor, G. Zwanziger; for Commissioners, \Vm. 

Mitchell, 77, Henry Schmitz, 80. Wm. D. Evving-, 77. 
ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1866. 
For Governor: S. J. Crawford, 245; J. L. McDowell, 12. 
For Congress: Sidney Clark, 259; Chas. Blain 12. 
For Representative: H. J. Loomis, 168. D M. Adams, 94. 
For Senator: Luke P\ Parsons, 134; Wm. F. Blakely, 124; W. M. S. 

Blakely, 5; Abram Barry, 4. . 

For Probate Judge, G. G. Hall, 268: for Clerk of District Court, S. R. 

Weed, 268; for County Superintendent, Isaiah Harris, 264; for 

County Attorney, N. H. W^hittemore, 262. 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 5, 1867. 

For Representative, Wm. Mitchell, 257; for Sheriff, John H. Pinker- 
ton, 263; for Treasurer,S. H. Fairfield, J 232; G. Zwanziger, 47; for 
County Clerk, S. R. Weed, 279: for Register, S. R. Weed, 278; for 
Surveyor, S R Weed, 279; for Coroner, A. Brasche, 278: for Assessor, 
John Harriott,^ 279; for Commissioners, Henry Schmitz, 170; John 
Copp, 88; H. M. Sanford, 277; Morris Walton, 278. 
ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1868. 

For President : Grant Electors, 333; Democratic, 41. 

For Congress: Sidney Clark, 340; Chas. W. Blain, 42. 

For Governor: James M. Harvey: 341; Geo. "W. Glick, 43. 

For Senator: J. H. Prescott, 369; R. E. Lawrenson, 19. 

For Representative: Samuel R. Weed, 262; Wm. Mitchell, 123. 

For Probate Judge, G. G. Hall, 385; for Clerk District Court, S. R. 
Weed, 342; for County Attorney, N. H. Whittimore, 303; E. H. 
Sanford, 68. 

For County Superintendent: Martin V Allen, 1| 252; T. M. Allen, 87: 
S. L. Russell, 33; W. F. Cotton. 12. 

For Assessor: Ed. Herrick, 144; S. B. Easter, 35; E. Herriott, 35; Allen 
Hodgson, 25. 

For a Jail, 171; against a Jail, 209. 

* Resigned, April 2, 1867. Allen Hodson appoiuted. 

t To fill vacancy caused by death of E. R. Twitchell. 

* Appointed to fill vacancy, January 8, 1868. 

8 April 27, 1808, Ed. Herrick appointed, Harriott not qualifying. 

n Martin V. Allen beinsr declared a non-resident, T. M . Allen was appointed. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 169 

r Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1869. 



Candidates. 



0) 


0) 

O 




r 

O 


> 
B 


B 
o 


Alma 


g 




-1 


P 


en 




/I 


EL 


a 

o 
















P 

01 






•-I 

01 






ft 


»i 


►i 


— 








ft 










O 










f 








rt 


r»- 


• 







J. H. Pinkerton 

Ed Herrlck 

S. H. Fairfield. 
J. M. Matheny 



Representative. 

Sliei-'iff.' 

Treasurer. 

County Clerk. 

Register of Deeds. 



S. H. Fairfield. 

County Superintendent. 

T. M. Allen 

Surveyor. 

J. M. Matheny 

Coroner. 

A. Brasche 

Commissioner. 

Joseph Thoes 

E. Piatt 

J. Copp 

A. Hodgson J 

Wm. Mitchell 



20 


39 


21 


39 


7 


47 


17 


15 


29 


19 


38 


20 


39 




48 


20 


15 


48 


21 


39 


22 


39 




49 


20 


15 


52 


21 


39 


22 


39 




48 


29 


15 


51 


21 


39 


22 


39 




49 


29 


15 


52 


21 


39 


22 


38 




49 


20 


15 


42 


21 


39 


22 


39 




49 


20 


15 


51 


21 


39 


20 


39 




49 


20 


15 


49 


1 


29 


1 


26 




22 


9 




10 


20 


11 


21 


13 


10 


27 


11 


15 


49 


20 


10 


22 


12 


9 


28 


11 


15 


36 


21 


39 


19 


36 


10 


45 


20 


15 


51 


1 


28 


1 


25 


1 


22 


6 




10 



234 

258 

268 

266 

268 

257 

267 

263 

99 
173 
163 
256 

94 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Alma, Saturday, October 9. William 
Mitchell, Wabaunsee, chairman; J. H. Stubbs, Harveyville, secretary. 



DELEGATES. 

Alma: Ed Krapp, John Copp, G. W. Watson, Rudolph Arndt, N. H. 
Whittemore, Louis Muehlenbacher, F. Rickershauser. 

Wabaunsee: Enoch Piatt, S. A. Baldwin, Wm. Mitchell, Milo Wright. 

Mission Creek: J. W Mossman, James Herriott, J. W. Boyer, T. K. 
Tom son. 

Zeandale: Thos. Keenan, J. M. Allen, Oscar Mecham. 

Wilming-ton: Jos. Fields, J. H. Stubbs, Allen Hodgson, J. M. Johnson. 

Central, Committee: G. W. Watson; William Mitchell, J. W. 
Mossman, Thos. Keenan, Joseph Fields. 



170 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1870. 



Candidatks. 



'-'►1 



►1 



Alma 



Oct 

1 2 



n o 
n a 



o 



Congressman. 

D. P. Low 

K. C. Foster 

Governor. 

J. M. Harvey 

Isaac Sharp 

Representative. 

J. H. Pinkerton 

Probate Judge. 

G. G. Hall 

Superintendent. 

R. M. Tunnell * 

County Attorney. 

N. H. Whittemore 

J. T. Keagv 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

R. G. Mossman 

Senator. 
J. H Prescott 



37 
25 


25 


62 
2 


42 
12 


89 


105 


47 


30 


20 
5 


15 
10 


37 
25 


24 
3 


63 
2 


42 
12 


89 


96 


47 


29 


20 
5 


14 
10 


61 


29 


64 


41 


67 


106 


48 


30 


20 


17 


61 


29 


64 


51 


91 


107 


48 


29 


20 


23 


58 


20 


64 


50 


92 


76 


13 


11 


20 


23 


56 
5 


30 


60 
2 


30 
24 


26 
66 


33 

74 


34 
13 


15 
15 


6 
19 


16 

7 


61 


27 


64 


50 


92 


m 


44 


29 


20 


24 


50 


27 


61 


41 


89 


106 


47 


30 


20 


15 



472 
54 

461 
57 

483 

523 

42* 

306 
225 

515 

486 



♦Resigned October 3. 1871, to take effect November 1 . 

NOTES. 

Republican convention, Alma, September 5. G. W. Watson, 
chairman; S. A, Baldwin, secretary. 

DELEGATES. 

Alma: E. Krapp, A. Sellers, Jos. Treu, H. Grimm, A. Dieball, Wm. 
Home, G. W. Watson, John Hess, J. P. Gleich. 

Newbury: John Winkler, J. H. Durham, R. H. Moser, C. C. Stalker, 
J. E. Horn. 

Wabaunsee: S. A. Baldwin, G. S. Burt, B. C. Benedict, Wm. Mitchell, 

E. Piatt, G. G. Hall. 
Mission Creek: Ed Morehouse, E. M. Hewins, S. Sower, C. Little, 

Thos. Barker. 

Wilmington: M. Walton, P. A. Green; H. C. McKee, H. C. Tapscott, 
John Fields, John Barlow, Wm. Prothrow. 

Zeandale: W. Stewart, J. M. Allen, T. Keenan, J. H. Williams. 



No other convention held. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 171 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1871. 



Candidates. 



h3 
O 



Representative. 

J. M. Johnson 

C. C. Little 

Treasurer. 

Chas. Ross 

H. C. McKee 

County Clerk. 

G. W. Watson 

J. M. Matheny 

Sheriff. 

Ed Herrick 

John Herriott 

County Superintendent. 

W. F. Cotton 

S. L. Russell 

Coroner. 

C. S. Montgomery 

John Zenner 

Register Deeds. 

S. H. Fairfield 

R. 6. Mossman 

Surveyor. 
G. Zwanziger 

D. R. Alden 

R. R. Assessor. 

Samuel R. Weed 

S.S.Cooper 

Commissioner 1st District. 

Jos. Thoes 

F. Rickershauser 



397 
365 

410 
395 

411 
354 

400 
369 

408 
362 

406 
368 

399 
373 

405 
366 

215 
126 

145 
101 



NOTES. 



Republican convention, Alma, Tuesday, October 10. 

The following candidates v?ere nominated: representative, C. C. 
Little; treasurer, H. C. McKee; clerk, J. M. Matheny; sheriff, John 
Herriott; county superintendent, S. L. Russell; coroner, John Zenner; 
register deeds, R. G. Mossman; surveyor, D. R. Alden; R. R. assessor, 
S. S. Cooper. 

On October 17, the following "People's Ticket" was nominated: 
representative, J. M. Johnson; treasurer, Chas. Ross; clerk, G. W. 
Watson; register deeds, S. H. Fairfield; surveyor, G. Zwanziger; 
coroner, C. S. Montgomery: county superintendent, W. F. Cotton. 

No tabulated statement of votes for this year was kept by the 
county clerk. Neither does such a statement appear in the only 
newspaper published. 



172 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1872. 





> 


2 


^ 


1 


^ 


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§ 


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Candidates. 




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O 




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CO 


President. 


































Grant Electors 


69 


41 

8 


17 
4 


19 

7 


80 
15 


30 

8 


73 
19 


25 
16 


40 

n 


79 
3 


25 
9 


57 

S 


54 
1? 


23 
11 


632 

188 


444 


Greelev Electors 




Governor. 


































T. A. Osborn 


64 
60 


42 
10 


17 
4 


20 

7 


79 
14 


30 

8 


74 
22 


25 
16 


17 
32 


77 
5 


23 
10 


55 

8 


54 
11 


23 
11 


600 
218 


SW> 


T. H. Walker 




Senator. 




C.S.Martin 


53 
71 


8 
46 


15 
3 


16 
11 


39 
56 


28 
10 


39 
57 


24 
16 


19 
30 


79 
3 


15 
19 


42 

22 


30 
36 


13 
21 


420 
401 


19 


H. D, Shepard 




Representative. 


































A. Sellers 


118 


43 


19 


20 


66 


33 


77 


19 


21 


26 


r; 


36 


19 


8 


522 


391 


J. M. Bisbey 




2 


1 


6 


22 


4 


3 


3 


20 


8 


12 


5 


10 


24 


125 




E. H. Sanford 




4 






1 




13 


18 


8 


48 


11 


3 


35 




131 




Probate Judge. 




G.G.Hall 


125 


51 


21 


27 


95 


38 


94 


40 


40 


81 


33 


59 


67 


34 


814 




Clerk Dist. Court. 


































R. G. MossHsan 


64 
61 


51 


2 
19 


20 
7 


29 
67 


22 
16 


89 
7 


25 
15 


38 
11 


83 


26 

7 


57 
5 


48 
18 


25 
9 


579 
242 


ITT 


A. W. Gregor}' 




County Superintendent. 


































W. S. McCormick 


115 

8 


48 
2 


19 
2 


19 

8 


84 
7 


32 
6 


89 
3 


2o 
15 


37 
11 


78 
3 


26 

6 


42 
11 


37 
27 


22 
12 


6r3 
121 


5(S'> 


I. Harris 




County Attorney. 


































J. T. Keagy 


105 


30 


20 


12 


24 


23 


45 


28 


10 


7 


16 


19 


7 


30 


376 


94 


VV. A. Doolittle 


15 


17 


1 


14 


3 


8 


46 


1 


21 


60 


12 


36 


46 


2 


282 




E. H. Sanford 


1 


4 












10 


4 


15 




1 


8 


1 


44 




S. R. Weed 


4 


1 






67 


4 


3 




3 




2 


3 


1 




88 





NOTES. 



There being" but one newspaper published in the county in 1872, 
and there being no copies of the one paper on file in the State 
Historical Society cov^ering the campaign period of that year, notes 
relative to the convention held are not obtainable. 



EARLY niSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 173 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1873. 



Candidates. 



W 



t_i. 
o 
1-1 



Representative. 
A. Sellers 

A. M. Reed 

Treasurer. 

Chas. Ross 

Sheriff. 

B. Hoskinson 

J. Fields 

County Clerk. 

G. W. Watson 

Register of Deeds. 

S. H. Fairfield 

N. W. Dressie 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

W. A. Doolittle 

Surve3'or. 

G. Zwanziger 

Coroner. 

H. Schmitz 

Commissioner. 

Jos. Thoes 

Robt. Fix 

J. W. Crandall 

A. E. True 

A. Phillips 



121 
2 

123 

HO 
13 

121 

105 
17 

115 

119 

115 

99 
23 



37 4 
2 21 

39 



30 



19 21 

20 9 

39 30 



9 26 
16 13 



60 
36 

103 

59 
41 

102 

65 
37 

102 

103 

90 



21 



27 



44 



26 



28 



47 



486 
328 

752 

479 
267 

745 

433 
304 

730 

745 

439 

192 

77 

172 

184 

99 



258 

752 
203 

745 
129 

730 
745 
439 
115 

172 

85 



I 



NOTES. 



People's Mass convention held in Alma, October 2, 1873. P. A. 
Green, chairman; C. S. Montgomery, secretary. 

The following ticket was nominated: representative, A. M. Reed; 
treasurer, Chas. Ross; clerk, G. W. Watson; sheriff, Joseph Fields; 
register, N, W. Dressie; surveyor, G Zwanziger; clerk court, W. A. 
Doolittle; coroner, Henry Schmitz; commissioners, J. R. Fix, A. E. 
True and J. W. Crandall. 



At the republican convention the same ticket was nominated 
except: A. Sellers for representative; S. H. Fairfield for register of 
deeds and B. Hoskinson for sheriff. 



174 EA IILV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1874. 



CANDIDATK8. 



w 



s 


g 


o 


p 


'r. 


►1 






a 


t 


O 


r* 


ta 


S 






n 
n 

9f 





g 



Governor. 

T. A. Osborn ' 

J. C. Cusey 

Congressman, 

W. K. UroNvn 

J. K. Iluilsou 

Senator. 

C. S. Martin 

T. K. Tomson 

Kepresenlative. 

S. A. Baldwin 

Win. Mitclu'U 

Probate Judge. 

G.G.Hall 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

Percival Ha\ses 

W. W. Cone 

County Superintendent 

W. S, McCorraick 

F. W. Kroenke 

County Attorney 

J. T. Kcagy 

C A. Stringham 



122 
23 


4» 
S4 


37 
42 


14 
13 


2:i 

13 


24 
13 


30 
37 


30 
3 


25 
14 


21 
13 


18 
5 


39 
1 


22 
10 


22 


23 


7 


506 
242 


21 


67 
49 


45 
37 


11 
16 


23 
13 


23 
14 


29 

38 


27 
7 


24 
14 


17 
17 


18 
6 


15 

25 


22 
13 


21 

1 


23 
1 


8 


498 
272 


109 
34 


()7 
42 


21 
62 


11 

16 


11 
21 


16 
18 


24 
43 


18 
16 


22 

17 


15 
I'J 


3 
21 


12 

28 


19 

16 


23 


23 

1 


8 


402 
354 


82 
(5.5 


68 
46 


41 
42 


13 
14 


19 
17 


22 
15 


27 

40 


31 

4 


29 
10 


18 
16 


16 
8 


19 
21 


14 
22 


10 
13 


23 

1 


7 

1 


439 
335 


1-15 


113 


78 


26 


35 


37 


67 


34 


39 


34 


24 


39 


34 


23 


24 


8 


760 


126 
20 


70 
40 


32 

48 


12 

1.1 


13 
22 


14 


28 
38 


13 

18 


29 
9 


17 
16 


13 
7 


18 
22 


20 
15 


22 


24 


8 


359 

292 


29 
116 


72 
39 


36 
47 


13 
13 


22 
13 


22 
14 


35 

27 


32 

1 


32 

6 


27 
i 


14 
6 


10 
30 


32 


7 
16 


7 
17 


7 
1 


367 
385 


145 
3 


71 
37 


22 
61 


16 
11 


15 
20 


16 
20 


9 
55 


21 
9 


16 
22 


18 
15 


3 
21 


35 
4 


34 


23 


23 
1 


8 


475 
279 



,264 

226 

48 N 

104 

760 
67 

18 
196 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Alma, October 8. Mr. E. N. Morehouse, 
chairman; J. P. Evans, secretary. 

Nominations: S. A. Baldwin, representative; G. G. Hall, probate 
jud.jjfe; Percival Hawes, clerk district court; W. S. McCormick, 
county superintendent; J. T. Keag"y, county attorney. 



Reform convention, Alma, Friday, October 9. H. A. Stiles, chair- 
man; L. A. Knapp, secretary. 



Nominations: Wm. Mitchell, representati 
judg"e; W. W. Cone, clerk district court 
superintendent; C. A. Stringham, county attorney. 



sentative: G. G. Hall, probate J 
urt; F. W. Kroenke, county I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 175 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1875. 



Candidatbs. 



H 



ft 



u-t. 

o 



Representative. 

S. A. Baldwin 

Joseph Treu 

Treasurer. 

Joseph Fields 

Walter Ross 

Register of Deeds. 

S. H. Fairfield 

County Clerk. 

G. W. Watson 

Wm. Mitchell 

Sheriff. 

B. Hosfeinson 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

A. W. Gregory 

County Superintendent. 

W. E. Richey 

Surveyor. 

S. R. Weed 

W. T. Mahan 

Coroner. 

T. N. Watts 

Commissioner. 

J. R. Fi.x 

Wm. Strassen 

W. E. Little 

G. W. French 

J. R. Gross 

H. Fauerbach 



M 


78 


25 


22 


46 


36 


36 


32 


49 


11 


11 


2 


3 


4 


8 


413 


83 


12 


7 


1 ^ 


2 


38 


2 


37 


15 


24 


53 


49 


23 


21 


14 


397 


112 


.t3 


18 


7 


43 


39 


13 


30 


49 


15 


57 


13 


13 


12 


3 


477 


19 


36 


12 


31 


1 


33 


23 


40 


14 


20 


7 


38 


13 


13 


19 


319 


131 


82 


27 


38 


46 


70 


38 


67 


63 


35 


64 


49 


26 


25 


21 


782 


99 


40 


29 


36 


42 


18 


32 


40 


23 


15 


43 


40 


11 


13 


19 


500 


33 


.53 


1 


3 


3 


54 


5 


30 


41 


20 


21 


11 


14 


12 


3 


304 


132 


93 


28 


38 


46 


70 


38 


68 


&i 


35 


64 


51 


26 


25 


23 


800 


132 


92 


31 


39 


45 


73 


38 


71 


64 


M 


64 


51 


26 


25 


23 


806 


130 


93 


20 


38 


35 


73 


38 


71 


ft4 


34 


64 


51 


26 


25 


23 


785 


52 


69 


28 


31 


31 


37 


28 


34 


53 


9 


60 


21 


16 


22 


22 


513 


78 


22 


1 


7 


2 


33 


8 


37 


12 


26 


4 


29 


9 


3 


1 


272 


112 


92 


31 


39 


47 


70 


38 


71 


63 


35 


64 


51 


26 


25 


22 


786 


^ 




















24 


4 


14 


7 


13 


159 


31 


78 


13 
17 


5 
34 


41 

4 


42 

21 


26 
12 


33 
34 


54 

2 


15 
19 


4 


47 


10 


18 


7 


153 
118 
101 
189 
42 



16 

158 

780 
196 

800 
808 
779 
241 

767 

6 

17 

147 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Alma, Thursday, September 16. A. 
Sellers, chairman: Geo. W. French, secretary. 

The following candidates were nominated: S. A. Baldwin, repre- 
sentative; Jo?. Fields, treasurer; S. H. Fairfield, register deeds; G. 
W. Watson, county clerk; B. Hoskinson, sheriff; A. W. Gregory, 
district clerk; W. E. Richey, county superintendent; S. R. Weed, 
county surveyor; T. N. Watts, coroner; J. R. Fix, W. E. Little and 
.J. R. Gross, commissioners. 

People's convention, Germania Hall, Alma, October 12. J. M. 
Lingfelter, chairman; H. A. Stiles, secretary. 

Nominations: Joseph Treu, representative; Walter Ross, county 
treasurer; S. H. Fairfield, register deeds: Wm. Mitchell, county 
clerk; B. Hoskinson, sheriff; A. W. Gregory, clerk district court; W. 
E. Richey, county superintendent; T. N. Watts, coroner; W. T. 
Mahan, surveyor; W'm. Strassen, G. W. French and J. R. Gross, 
commissioners. 



170 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY. KAN. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1876. 



Candidates. 



§ 


O 


2 


w 




n 


p 


p 


7) 


3 


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o 


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7t 









w 

«-» 

03 

a 
o 

D" 



s 

o 
1 



President. » 

R. n. Haj-es 

S. J. Tlldeii 

Congressman, 

Thos. R3'an 

S. J. Crawford 

Governor. 

Geo. T. Anthony 

John Martin 

Judge. 

J. G. Morton 

Senator. 
O. H. Sheldon 

D. B. Uurdick 

Representative. 

E. N. Morehouse 

Jos. Treu 

Probate Judge. 
G. G. Hall 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

H. G. Liicht 

£. D. Rose 

Countv Superintendent. 
W. E. Richey 

County Attorney- 

W. A. Doolittle 

W. F. Cotton 

E. H. Sanf ord 



110 
32 

114 

29 

74 

G8 

143 

74 
67 



109 
25 

109 
26 

88 
39 

131 

84 
48 



74 78 
67 49 

142 



86 
51 

141 

92 
37 



135 

89 
38 

129 

68 
60 



66 
49 


45 
10 


77 
14 


41 

18 


66 
48 


42 
15 


75 
16 


39 
20 


57 

57 


34 

21 


,54 
29 


24 
34 


114 


57 


91 


59 


65 
49 


37 

20 


53 

38 


25 
34 


51 
59 


44 
10 


53 
35 


23 
35 


113 


.56 


91 


59 


42 
70 


27 
27 


60 
29 


25 
34 


11! 


56 


91 


57 


62 
23 
19 


38 
15 

O 


36 
19 

38 


25 

30 

1 



57 
10 

56 
II 

28 
36 

6S 

32 
35 

24 
40 



20 51 



29 
17 


18 

7 


29 
17 


16 

7 


24 
22 


8 
15 


46 


26 


4 
42 


5 
14 


^ 


14 

11 


46 


18 


11 
35 


21 

4 


44 


26 


26 
20 


18 
5 



728 
275 

725 
2&1 



453 
441 



5.50 116 
434 



1005 

.544 
457 

534 

450 

990 

.591 
398 

984 

537 

281 
161 



87 
84 

193 

250 



NOTES. 



Republican convention. Alma, Wednesday, September 27. Enoch 
Piatt, Wabaunsee, chairman; W. H. Warren, Maple Hill, secretary. 

The following nominations were made: representative, E. N. 
Morehouse; probate judg"e, G. G. Hall; clerk court, H. G. Licht; 
county superintendent, W. E. Richey; county attorney, W. A. 
Doolittle. 

Mass convention. Alma, October 7. G. S. Kneeland, Keene, 
chairman; Warren Scofield, Alma, secretary. 

Nominated Joseph Treu for representative and W. F. Cotton for 
county attorney. 

Endorsed G. G. Hall for probate judg^e and W. E. Richey for 
county superintendent. 



EARLY TIISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 177 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1877. 



CANUIDATEr.. 


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9 

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CD 
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1 

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CD 


County Clerk. 
T. N. Watts 


85 
8ti 

54 

89 

57 

63 

80 

53 
85 

55 

ai 

58 
81 


15 3 
33 21 

1 
6 1 
47 24 

1 1 


1 i 

14 15 5 15 25 
2tj 61 19 32 11 

15 10 2' 10 16 
25 66 23 34 20 


1 
65 23 25«t^l04 

16 27 17 43 ^ 

64 23 22 60 84 

17 29 23 42 27 

1 
67 27 16 57 99 
121 25 27 65 15 


46 

jl2 

!42 

1^^ 
45 

1" 

46 
13 

46 
13 
1 
47 
13 


41 514 

27 438 
1 

38 447 
30 511 

1 

41 482 

28 481 

39 572 

;-i0 392 

42 483 
27 457 


76 


J. T. Keajry 

County Treasurer. 
A. L. MeN:iir 




Jos. Field*" 


64 


Sherlir. 
n. M. Gardner 


i« 11' • 15 


21 
9 

22 
14 

27 
12 


1 


C. Zehner 


51 

39 
14 

13 
37 

50 

54 


23i 32 S9. 


25 35 




Register. 

S. H. Falrflel.J 

Ch »s. Koss 

County Surveyor. 

J. B Eister 

W.T, Maiian 


8 
16 

2 
2J 

2 
21 

I 
23 


16 49 
•a 26 

18 14 
2^ 62 

18 17 
•Zi 59 

1 
16 15 
23 56 


29 

6 

18 

2 
27 

10 

2u 


17 
35 

11 
34 

11 
36 


63 
18 

65 
16 

67 
13 


' 27 13 64 10 
24 30 37 12 

24 22' 58 87 
27 21 45 8 

26 23 57 100 
26 21 46 14 

1 


180 
32 


Coroner, 

J. P. Brown 

Geo Koeniii 

Commissioaer. 

Jasner Holmiin 

L. P.iuly 


3J 
31 


491 16 
475 

100 

260 160 
164 68 
!I6 
! 239 135 


G. W. French 


11 
33 


36 


66 
15 


31 36 
21 18 








Dwiiflit Ferry 


















Win. .Mitciiell 












. . .1. . . 


58 105 


41 3.: 


Henry Faiirbiich ' . 










1 






4;"i 


5 


17 


35 102 





NOTES. 

Republican convention Thursday, October 4; J. H. 
Wabaunsee, chairman; M. W. Janes, Maple Hill, secretary. 



Gould, 



Two Alma delegations— origin of Watson and Sellers factions. 
Watson delegation H. Schmitz, chairman, seated. Sellers delegation 
led by W. H. Lyons bolted the convention, chairman and secretary 
going out with bolters. Convention was reorganized with H. McKee 
chairman and, G. W. Greenwood, secretary. Bolters repaired to Mc- 
Elroy's store and elected J. C. Henderson chairman and C. C. Little 
secretary. 



Extra mill tax alleged to be assessed for banking purposes the 
leading argument used in the campaign. The candidates iirst named 
were nominated by the Sellers convention. 



178 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1878. 



Candidates. 



w 



s ;s; :o > 



> 


2 










* 


■3 


< 








o 


o 




3 


aa 










T> 






(t 






»r 







n 



Governor. 

J.P.St..Toliu 

J. K. Goodin 

Congress. 

Thos. Kyiiu 

J. li. Fugate 

Senator. 

L. R. Kmch 

D. B. Hnrdick 

Representative. 

C. O. Kinne 

L. J.McCrumb 

G. S. Kueelaiid 

Probate Judtre. 

G. G. Hall 

G Zwanzij^er 

County Attorney. 

J. M. Matheny 

W. A. Doolittle 

Countv Suuerinteudent. 

W. E. Kichey 

Matt. Thomson 

District Clerk. 

W.H. Lyons 

H G.Lioht 

Commissioner. 

A. Schewe 

L. Panly ;. 



84 
80 


111 

20 


45 
I'-' 


52 

8 


42 
10 


48 
67 


57 
11 


28 

1 


52 
20 


32 
47 


33 

43 


12 
3i 


4 
26 


19 
19 


19 
20 


151 
9 


113 

19 


44 
13 


52 

8 


41 
9 


78 

58 


.59 
10 


28 


55 
21 


35 
44 


54 
27 


28 
17 


20 
10 


37 

1 


25 
16 


l.i8 
10 


108 
18 


47 
12 


49 
14 


40 
9 


65 
64 


61 
17 


28 
19 


44 
34 


29 
40 


.53 

18 


25 
17 


20 
11 


38 
16 


19 
15 


5.) 

106 

1 


77 
53 

18 


23 
32 

8 


21 

39 

5 


27 
24 
11 


84 
66 


37 

27 
19 


6 


25 

51 
2 


42 
36 


68 
5 


12 

3;i 


1 
29 


7 
32 
15 


3 
40 

8 


64 
99 


12 
25 


37 
25 


33 
29 


29 
22 


100 
46 


68 
14 


27 

22 


34 
54 


38 
41 


37 
42 


10 
35 


1 
30 


20 
34 


7 
43 


.59 
108 


82 
50 


•21 
36 


21 
30 


21 
27 


82 
67 


61 
23 


23 
23 


24 
68 


60 
34 


18 
62 


12 

20 


30 


20 
34 


/ 

43 


59 

108 


72 
66 


26 

39 


25 

81 


29 
11 


81 
70 


31 
51 


7 
42 


20 
58 


40 

38 


26 
52 


17 

28 


5 

26 


20 
24 


10 
41 


5(i 
110 


88 
57 


36 
28 


29 
37 


28 
24 


107 
44 


63 
21 


24 
24 


13 
53 


35 
44 


13 
66 


12 
32 


1 
30 


20 
34 


8 
43 


64 
101 




















31 

48 


23 
22 


2 
2« 


22 

32 


10 
41 




...i:." 















640,210 
424 1 

I 
820 558 
29-: 

788 474 4 
314 ^ 

427| ' 
6(54 237 ; 
88 



607 
561 

496 
a54 



46 



1.58 



4751 
892217 



.538 
647 

1.52 
273 



1(19 
1:2 1 



NOTES. 

Greenback convention, Thursday, Augu.st 1. H. A. Stiles, chair- 
man; John Sudweel<;s, secretary. 

The following nominations were made: G. S. Knoeland for repre- 
sentative: J. M. Matheny, county attorney; Matt. Thomson, county 
superintendent; G. G. Hall, probate judge and district clerk (nominn- 
tion declined by Judge Hall). 

Republican convention, Thursday. October 10. (Sellers Faction '. 
0. B. Lines, chairman: A. F. Wade, secretary. 

The first named candidates were nominated at this convention. 

Opposition convention, Monday, October 15. (Watson Faction). 
Ed. Herrick, chairman; P. Hawes, secretary. 

In the call "all qualified electors without regard to party" were 
invited to participate in the convention. 

Democratic convention, Saturday, Oct(»ber 19. Jo.scph Treu, chair- 
man: C. H. Thompson, secretary. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUXSEE COUNTY, KAN. 179 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1879. 



Candidates. 



Clerk. 

T. N. Watts 

A J. Ward 

'I'loasiirer. 

('has. Koss 

V'in. Straseii 

KeiTister. 

1. A. Eidv 

S. H. Kairfleld 

T. U. McElroy 

Sheriff. 

D M. Gardoer 

Jolin Mock 

Surveyor. 

W.T. Mahan 

J H. Easier 

J. M. Paiifoast 

Coroner. 

.T. P. Brown 

M. F. Trivett 

Conimissiouers. 
G. W. Ii'rench ... 

John Barlow 

Geo L. Hortou 



1 


1 


^ 


M 


p 


p 


— 


u 


3 


iq 


3 




r» 


o 




( ) 




o 


-1 


1 




3 


(K! 


ft 






* 


77 






3 





n 



o 



138 
43 



1.53 

28 



83 

89 

SI 

ItiO 
14 

IGO 
13 

8 

166 

7 



112 
16 

111 
11 

58 

67 

2 

116 

13 

48 
69 
11 

12 



33 
24 

31 
2,-) 

1 

18 

17 

40 

20 

7 

30 

30 

9' 



69 

77 

79 
64 

40 
9.") 
1-' 

41 
102 

60 
45 
41 

81 
65 



79 
6 

70 



48 



19 



32 34 



838 
274 

899 
186 

464 

568 
9 

838 
373 

674 
271 
152 

875 
219 

203 

52 



564 
713 

104 
565 
403 

656 
151 



NOTES. 

Copies of newspapers not on tile with historical society — hence 
dates of conventions held could not be obtained. 

First named candidates were nominated at a Republican conven- 
tion held .sometime in October. 

Last named candidates — except commissioner — nominated at 
Democratic mass convention. 



Being an off year the campaign was quiet from the beginning. 



180 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1880. 



Candidates. 



> 
? 


B 
o 


* 


■3 


2 


O 
(I 


5* 

O 
S 

Cj 

1 

(S 

re 


3 


5i 

c- 
C 


p: 

c 
o 

c 


O 

3 


^ 

E 

OD 

S 


J- 

a 
c 

O 

D 


5_ 


1 

— 





2; 



Senator. 

L. E. Flncli 

H. D. Shepard 

Representative 

L. J. McCrumb 

Geo. W.Thompson 

A. H. Stiles 

Probate Judge. 

J. T. Keagy , 

G. G. Hall 

A. W. Gregory 

County Attorney. 

G. G. Cornell 

H.A.Pierce ,.. 

E. H. Sanford 

County Superintendent- 
Matt Thomson 

W. E. RIchey 

Clerk of District Court. 

H. G. Licht 

W. H.Lyons 

C. A. Reid 

Commissioner. 

F. L. Raymond 

8. S. BlytoM 



121 
100 

172 

7 

14P 
57 
17 

198 

12 

4 

'li59 
64 

155 
59 

7 



23 72 

101 .59 

51 90 

67 42 

4 1 

43 83 

29 9 

49 42 

66 74 

11 27 

37 25 

I 

97 81 

25 53 



69 89 
42 39 



34 



114 16 
106 67 

I 

188 64 

32 14 

41 3 

1J6 42 

67; 29 
29 12 



148 
67 



142 

77 

141 
56 
21 

148 . 
53 



86 23 
91 41 

I 

123 46 

.56 19 

111 1 

51 35 



104 
32 

1.53 
13 

18 



25 



95 40 

78 24 

118 55 
28' 2 
44i 11 

152 ... 
35 ... 



52 



.50 

108 



748 
1022 



1181254 
;H) 423 
10, 58 

100 1145 
44 455 
18 293 

62 1247 
22 2:17 
72 221 

HI 1220 
40 519 
I 

123 12.52 
14, 239 
22 B03 

... 4.58 
... I 174 



174 
831 

.590 

o 
o 

701 
949 

284 



NOTES. 

Republican convention held Thursday, October 7; J. H Gould, 
Wabaunsee, chairman; L. E. 'North, Eskridge, secretary. 

Democratic convention Friday, October 8; L. Pauly, Alma, chair- 
man; R. A. Wald, secretary. 

Greenback convention Saturday, October 23. 

The interest of the Republican convention was centered on rep- 
resentative—Mr. L. J. McCrumb and Mr. Alden E. True, being the 
contestants. The former was regarded as belonging to the Watson 
faction and Mr. True to the Sellers faction. In forecasting the 
strength of the two factions there appeared to be a majority of four 
in favor of the Sellers side, thus assuring the nomination of Mr. True. 
When the vote was taken Mr. McCrumb was declared the nominee. 
The ballot on superintendent resulted as follows: W. E. Richey, 34; 
A. F. Wade. 22: E. Newby, 10; blank 1, giving Mr. Richey the nomina- 
tion by 1 vote. 

The vote on president: Garfield, 1279; Hancock, 510. 

For governor: John P. St. John, 1032; Edmund G. Ross, 697. 

For congress: Thos. Ryan, 1250; Wade McDonald, 502. 

Forjudge: John T. Morton. 910; Jacob Saflford, 831. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




STUEWE BROS.' CREAMERY, 1S92. 



h 




LUTHERAN CHURCH DEDICATION, TEMPLIN, SEPTEMBER 20, 1891. 



RAKLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KA>J. 




noTTBLK AllCfr IJIlinOK. -K()1T|{ .HrLKS SOlTTri-WKST OF ALMA. 




^VAXOKLICAI, CinitCH. WKLT.S rHKKK. 



*y. 









■■a 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




ALMA SALT-WORKS IN 1874. 



I 



iii i 




i 



SCHOOL-HOUSE. District No. 15. 






^^ 



^ 





''^KlS "W'WMKBapi , 



•''''^•••aiiX'.a^ i, " 



-8 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 2. 



f 


;-"\ 


__— ^=-^^=-^— —" 


^^ \ 


ji a fi 


" — -; 


, N n II 






.-.:r^^i*i. -..-,. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 45. 



SWEDISH LUTHERAN CHURCH, 
Mill Creek Township. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





^^i.-? 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 23, 
Rock Creek. 



UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
Eskridge. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WM. HORNE, 

Alma. 



VIEW OF KANSAS RIVER, 
from the Andy Wilson place. 





fTli 




WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH, 
Keene. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 48. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




BAPTIST CHURCH, ESKRIDGE. 




M. E. CHURCH, ALMA, 1880. 





CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, ALMA. 



EVANGELICAL CHURCH, ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



~f~- 


jHMHsuil^.JHH^^^^kk^' 


1,. 


^ 


t^^^Jgt 


BJiijUJI^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BS'^*^^ 4BHB^^ 


E^ 


, — i 



WEST SIDE SOUTH KANSAS AVENUE, Alma. 





...iSL^fajni 


mmmim"^ 


.*• 


• f-_^ 


MM.^'Sl 






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jsr-^'i,: : .=j«r?r» 




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WEST SIDE SOUTH MISSOURI STREET, Alma. 




■it: 




LUTHERAN CHURCH, PARSONAGE, AND SCHOOL, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




BAPTIST CHURCH. 
Plumb Township. 



SCHOOLHOUSE AT WILMINGTON. 




_ % 'rr" P--J % ' M 



A BAND OF POTTAWATOMIE INDIANS IN ALMA-1881. 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




M. E. CHURCH, ALTA VISTA. 



ROCK ISLAND BRIDGE, MAPLE HILL. 




MR. W. S. ISHAM'S STORE, MAPLE HILL. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





ONE OF -'UNCLE SAM'S KIDS." 
Mr. Ira Hodgson, of Frisco, Ok. 



MRS. WALPURGE DAUM, 
Alma, 1870. 




COVENANTER CHURCH, ESKRIDGE. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH, ESKRIDGE. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




SOHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 9. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 




;:1 11 IHln 





Stone School-hocse. 



Falk School Building. ^ . 







/- ,„^7\, 


,^ 






^^j fi w Tif ^'""^"^yTBiiPfcj " * Yii wbh 






Old School Building. Keene School Building. 

THE ALMA CITY SCHOOLS. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 181 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1881. 



Candidates. 


> 


5 

B 
ffl 

-> 






7i 


S 

1 
5" 

B 


W 

ic 

o 




2: 


Q 




— 

1=! 


E. 

en 
















■^ 


« 




"<: 


(V 






n 








a 






T 




3 




?,' 






m 








3- 






5 
IB 


X 


3 












Treasurer 




























Cbas Kurf8 


127 


12 


126 


60 


79 


91 


69 


263 


136 


53 


52 


1071 


724 


G. Zwauziiifi" 


102 


42 


as 


1 


10 


44 


4 


21 


35 


39 


26 


347 




Keeister of Deeds. 




hi. H. Fairtleld 


90 


24 


87 


18 


62 


87 


22 


137 


84 


61 


34 


706 


28 


Joseph Fields 


135 


28 


60 


45 


26 


41 


47 


139 


85 


28 


44 


078 




County Clerk. 




D. M. Gardner 


98 


6 


100 


27 


30 


65 


"> 


69 


71 


8 


15 


492 


105 


W. A. Ddolitlle 


43 


6 


4 


6 


18 


52 


37 


103 


.35 


50 


34 


387 




T.N. Watts 


2rt 


19 
24 


45 

1 


21 

8 


35 
6 


11 

10 


3 
33 


49 
68 


29 
36 


23 
11 


20 

7 


317 
230 




D. V. Dowd 




SUerlfif. 




























H.J. Pippert 


104 


49 


19 




5 


25 


5 


86 


49 


76 


.52 


470 


113 


W. T. DeArmond 


103 


5 


22 


29 


1 


39 




15 


53 


3 


10 


280 




J. E. Anderson.., 


11 

5 
5 


"2 


81 

1 

24 


9 
19 

4 


72 

7 
3 


27 
16 
30 


42 
20 

7 


82 
28 
67 


19 
49 


7 
'5 


7 
1 
8 


357 
148 
153 




B. F. Huskinsou 




G. A. Woods 




Surveyor. 




























W.T. Maiian 


IW 


49 


100 


53 


24 


77 


18 


89 


128 


82 


43 


827 


259 


W. D. Deaus 


61 


t 


44 


6 


6;s 


55 


56 


192 


42 


9 


33 


568 




Coroner. 




























E W. Eldridjre 


130 


50 


90 


46 


73 


38 


26 


138 


119 


69 


53 


832 


529 


Wm. Johnson 


22 
66 


4 

1 


31 
18 


4 
8 


13 

2 


74 
17 


1 
43 


104 
22 


31 
9 


15 
4 


4 
15 


30:i 
205 




J. C. McElvaln 




Cummlssloaer. 




Geo. MoKge 


223 


54 


. . . 








67 






82 


75 


501 


501 


B. H. Vouukor 












74 
59 




191 

80 








266 
139 


126 






j^-. 




... 








... 





NOTES. 

Republican convention, Thursday, September 7. H. A. Pierce, 
Newbury, chairman; D. C. Robinson, Mission Creek, secretary. 

B. F. Hoskinson was nominated for sheriff on the eighth ballot. 

At this convention Chas. Ross was nominated for treasurer; D. V. 
Dowd for county clerk; Jos. Fields for register of deeds; W. T. Mahan 
for surveyor; E. W. Eldridge for coroner, and Geo. Mogge for com- 
missioner 1st district, and B. H. Younker commissioner 2nd district. 

Among other claims it was urged that all the candidates nom- 
inated, except for sheriff, were residents of Alma. This, with other 
reasons, led to the calling of a mass convention. The claim that the 
convention was packed in the interest of certain candidates led to the 
announcement of several independents — making the contest a com- 
plicated free-for-all race— the divided vote requiring— in case of clerk 
or sheriff— but a comparatively small number to elect. 



182 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1882. 



Candidates. 



w 


S 


2 


5« 


o 


55 


O 


W 


5! 


Ji 


5J 


» 


c 


■3 


a 

X 




o 

a 


-1 

c 


c 
1 


o 
o 


o 
O 


p 

cr 
p 

c 


B 

3 


cc 




p 

(0 

• 








o 




■< 


(t> 






P 

n 












^ 








PT 


s 


O 


-1 












(TJ 


. 










D 


C 




















: 


: 




: 


' 





s 

p 



Governor. 

Goo. W. OlleK, I) 

John F. 8t John, K 

ConBrossrriiin, 4lh Dst. 

Tlios. Kyjiu. K 

JoIju C. Ciiunon, D 

Hep resentatlve. 

L. Piuily, D 

Joseph Little. R 

Probate J udR:e. 

John Keagv, U 

Clerk Dlst. Court. 

H. G. Licht, K 

County Attorney. 

O.G. Cornell, H 

E. n. Siinfoni, D 

County Superintendent. 

Mutt Thomson, D 

E. Nowby, li 

Commlsslonerd. 

J. W. Core, Ind R 

J.C.Henderson, U 



53 


45 
10 


25 
14 


74 
34 


76 
51 


80 
17 


40 
16 


43 
60 


101 

68 


20 

1 i 


47 

48 


58 
91 


16 
30 


614 

5 


95 
109 


942 
6Sl 


l.S.H 

75 


14 


16 
25 


43 
37 


67 
51 


(iO 
45 


41 
4 


101 
17 


90 
30 


92 

8 


66 
35 


129 
6 


41 

6 


8 
53 


170 
39 


1076 
459 


166 
46 


43 
11 


23 
16 


69 
40 


72 
56 


77 
26 


31 
33 


27 
90 


100 
70 


18 
83 


44 

58 


61 
96 


14 
35 


67 
5 


67 
143 


879 
807 


190 


53 


41 


107 


127 


105 


64 


118 


169 


98 


97 


154 


!>0 


71 


213 


1657 


199 


55 


41 


107 


127 


105 


&i 


118 


169 


101 


78 


1.58 


49 


7-4 


212 


16.55 


178 
34 


13 
13 


41 


88 
21 


125 
1 


75 

28 


30 
34 


24 
97 


158 
44 


54 

43 


47 
50 


133 
21 


30 
16 


?2 


5;j 

159 


1151 
522 


166 
45 


41 
15 


32 
11 


64 
47 


69 
58 


86 
19 


51 
13 

18 
45 


72 
47 

46 

72 


100 
71 


22 

78 

36 
54 


51 
50 


100 
56 


9 

42 

43 
4 


70 
3 


142 
70 

147 

04 


1072 
C23 

290 
239 















2i77 
017 
73 > 



626 

447 

51 



NOTES. 

Republican convention held at Alma, Thursday, September 28. 
Henry Rickel, Eskridge, chairman; G. Zwanziger, Alma, secretary. 

The question of resubmission was the controlling issue in the 
contest for state officers, resulting in the election of the lirst dem- 
ocratic governor since the admission of Kansas as a state. The same 
issue resulted in the election of Mr, Pauly for representative. 



The question of rotation in office— the feeling that Wilmington 
was entitled to the commissioner— was made manifest at the polls- 
resulting in the election of Mr. Core. Mr. Henderson having accepted 
the nomination under protest and against his best judgment, and that 
only upon the earnest solicitation of his friends, was perhaps among 
the least disappointed at the result. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 183 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1883. 



Candidates. 



Kl 



s 



District Judije. 

Jobn Martin, 1> , 

W.C Webb, K 

County Clerk. 
H. G. Licht, K 

D. M. Gardner, k 

Reeister of Deeds. 

S. H. Fairfield, K 

P. F. A. Sciiwarting. R., 
County Treasurer, 

Joseph Fields. K 

Wm. Neiswerid«r, D 

Sherifif. 

H. J. Pippert, R 

Surveyor. 

W.T. iMiihan, R 

Coroner. 

E. W. Weems. R 

Cummissioner. 
A. E. True, K 



2W 
43 


45 

8 


141 
19 


16 

IS 


79 
14 


78 
16 


157 

77 


81 
37 


33 
37 


73 
51 


74 

3 


28 
14 


118 

44 


78 
28 


42 

18 


1247 
427 


107 
131 


43 
12 


104 


20 
16 


80 
14 


89 

7 


161 
71 


86 
31 


51 

18 


116 
6 


40 
43 


5 
39 


90 
83 


94 
9 


50 
10 


1126 
.562 


162 


47 

8 


115 
45 


10 
26 


25 

69 


84 
11 


200 


71 
49 


21 
47 


13 
114 


63 

18 


8 
36 


5o 


74 
29 


31 
29 


871 
833 


19(j 
53 


32 
22 


86 
66 


21 
15 


37 
55 


24 
72 


75 
156 


41 

70 


31 
39 


42 

82 


73 
6 


34 
5 


146 
26 


90 
15 


55 
5 


984 
687 


254 


56 


154 


36 


93 


87 


233 


121 


70 


124 


85 


22 


174 


105 


60 1673 


259 


56 


155 


36 


94 


46 


2-^1 


116 


70 


108 


81 


37 


1"6 


106 


601624 


229 


56 


159 


36 


93 


96 


230 


118 


70 


120 


83 


42 


177 


36 


60 1605 






138 




53 


91 














139 


... 


... 


421 















820 

564 

38 

297 



NOTES. 

Republican convention held at Eskridge, October IG. 
Enoch Piatt, Wabaunsee, chairman. 
W. A. Doolittle, Eskridge, secretary. 

Democratic convention held at Eskridge, October 23. 



At the Republican county convention the following nominations 
were made: 

For County Clerk, H. G. Licht. 
For Register, P. F. A. Schwarting! • 
For Treasurer, Joseph Fields. 
For Sheriff, H. J. Pippert. 
For Surveyor, W. T. Mahan. 
For Coroner, E. W. Weems. 
For Commissioner, A. E. True. 



184 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1884. 



Candidates. 



> 


•^ 


T 


7i 


S 


c» 


3» 


O 


Si 


o 


fc 


5: 


:: 


Si 


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(A 


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c 


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■1 

B 


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* 
^ 


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X 


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o 


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1 


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3 


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D 




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, 






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»; 


p 










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?r 


CO 








«• 


« 



c 




: 





^ 

•c 



FresldcDt. 
Blalno. H 


182 


23 


34 


78 


128 


79 




1H4 


4;^ 


Vf 


77 


W' 


65 


Goveruor. 














John A. Martin, R 


143 


15 


29 


63 


122 


42 


Geo. W. Glick. U 


170 


51 


21 


8il 


50 


103 


CouKress. 














Thos. Ryan, R 


18" 


23 


34 


75 


130 


79 


8 N Wood, 1) 


127 


■dA 


15 


75 


32 


66 


Senator. 


Geo. S. Green, R 


105 


17 


41 


123 


136 


41 


H. A. Pierce. Ind. R 


-m 


45 


y 


**•) 


19 


102 


Kepreseiitatlve. 














Robt. McClelland, Resub... 


218 


,58 


29 


48 


.58 


108 


F. L. Raymond. R 


104 


7 


20 


103 


109 


:^6 


Clerk Dist. Court. 














T. 8. Splelnoan. K 


oOl 


fifi 


50 


152 


171 


l4;^ 


Probate JudRe. 














John T. Keagy. R 


311 


66 


50 


150 


172 


172 


County Superintendent. 














Matt Thomson, D 


22(i 


.52 


37 


103 


114 


111 


E. Newbv. R 


i'6' 14 


10 


46 


5^ 


34 


County Attorney. 






E. U. Sanford, D 


188 


.50 


25 


43 


22 


116 


W. A. Doollttle, R 


73 

56 


9 

7 


20 
6 


73 
30 


80 
67 


21 
3 


Geo. G. Cornell, 


A.A.Graham, .. 








..3 






Commissioners 












Geo. Mtiggre. 1> 


223 


55 


1 






97 


Horace Paul, tt 


81 


8 


48 






43 



59 
21 

51 

28 

.58 
21 

45 
34 

48 
32 

80 

80 

56 
23 

24 

41 

10 

5 



125 

26 

123 
29 

125! 

26 

182 
2"J' 

22! 
127 

152 

152 

52 

98 

21 

68 

62 

1 



134 

89 

116 

10 

135 

8-i 

107 

107 

113 
109 

222 

222 

139 

82 

85 
8' 
32 
14 



123 

26 

i.-a 

30 

130 
30 

121 

38 

44 

115 

161 

160 

33 
124 

13 

90 

42 

8 



100 
54 

88 



169 

50 

172 



69 60 

106 177 

.58 48 



65 
94 

111 



132 

83 



56 U9 



161 

164 

96 
69 

93 
5' 
13 
2 



16: 



230 

231 

88 
140 

32 

84 
99 
17 



311 26 
15 68 



77 

237 
101 

261 

74 



6 221 



113 

124 
214 

337 

335 

145 

189 

99 

213 

12 

6 



1.538 
799 

1362 
1041 

1576 
7.56 

1325 
947 

11G8 
1223 

2371 

2381 

1.365 
1011 

910 
936 
461 

58 

471 
a51 



739 
321 
820 
378 

55 

354 

26 

120 



NOTES. 

Republican convention Thursday, September 4. 

Democratic mass convention on Friday, October 17. 

Resubmission convention held on the same day. 

Colored voters held convention October 24. 

Mass convention nominated Robt. McClelland for representative, 
E. H. Sanford for county attorney, J. J. Mitchell probate judge, J. C. 
Henderson clerk of district court, and endorsed H. A. Pierce for state 
senator, Matt Thomson for county superintendent, and Geo. Mogge for 
commissioner. Nominees for probate judge and clerk of court de- 
clined nominations. 



Resubmission was the declared l.ssue in this campaign. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 185 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1885. 



Candidates. 



District Judge, 

R. B. Spillman R 

Ellis Lewis, 

County Treasurer. 

G. S. Burt, R 

Jos. Fields, 

County Clerk. 

H. G. Licht. R 

Geo. W. French 

Keclster of Deeds. 

J. C.Collins, K , 

J.C.Henderson, , 

Sheriflf. 

J. M. Russell, R 

W. T. DeAraiond, .... . 

D. M. Gardner 

K. Shumate 

J. C Plppert , 

hurveyor. 

W. D. Deiins, R 

W. T. Mahan 

Coroner. 

J. C. McElvain. R 

C. J. Sawyer , 

Commissioner, 

A. F. Wade. R 

8. G. Cantrill 



107 
22S 

54 

280 

1.53 
182 

87 
-249 

59 

91 

172 

6 

8 

122 
211 

148 
184 



^ 



a 



182 
53 

148 
63 

178 
36 

153 
51 



13132 

29 

48 

4 

3 



106 
108 

55 
157 



68 
66 

58 
77 

68 
65 

73 
60 

80 

1 

11 

35 

2i 

114 
16 

8 
123 

35 
93 



39 29 
36 20 



109' 37 
27 33 



105 

28 

77 
60 

49 



91 



15 

29 

2 

71 

65 

4 
132 

106 
23 



71 
62 

82 
55 

23 
112 



26i 69 
42 66 



108 
2 

3 

20 

1 

129 

8 

17 
116 



8175 
54 166 



1169 
63 177 



56 
285 

85 
258 

17 

'20 
111 



18 206 
46J142 

11 2 
52 345 



196 
1 150 



851 9 1031 
97 104 1043 



10' 



104 



5 
109 

17 
97 



891 
1169 

995 
115S 



87 13 809 
95il01 1239 



759 
356 
451 
267 
27 

1103 
950 

334 
1741" 

401 
317 



75 


5 


74 


67 


23 


24 


7 


14 


3 


3 


80 


31 


102 


80 


27 


10 


135 


104 




... 



s 



12 



278 



163 



430 
308 



153 



1415 
84 



NOTES. 



Republican convention, Wednesday, September 23. Mr. A. F. 
Thayer, Maple Hill, chairman: Mr. J. B. Fields, Alma, secretary. 

Democratic county convention called People's Mass convention 
to meet at Alma, September 26, 3885. Work unsatisfactory, nearly 
every nominee declining to run. 

People's Mass meeting called to meet Saturday, October 10. 

1^ All candidates nominated at the mass convention, except sheriff, 
Surveyor and commissioner, were elected. 

pf' For the office of sheriff this was a free-for-all race, the lack of 
statutory provisions relative to the printing of tickets offering in- 
ducements to independent candidates that under the Australian ballot 
does not exist. 



18G EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1886. 



Candidates. 



> 

B 
? 


SB 

B 


9 






2 


g 
iT 


B 


p 

D 


a> 

a- 

c 


O 

o 

C3 


W 

o 
o 

1 


IB 
C 

n 


B 

a 




H 

n 

a. 















a 


ri 


• 


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s 


n 


«i 


P 






1 




: 






?r 


•1 


1 






w 




O 

D 


D 
O 







s 

10 



Governor. 

John A. Martin, K 

Thos. Moonlight, D 

ConereBsmuD, 4tb Dst. 

Thoa. Kyan, R 

JobD Martin, D 

Representative. 

Chas Taylor, R 

Jolin Clark, D 

Kred Craft, Ind 

Probate JudKe. 

J.T. Kea»?y R 

A. A. StrlnKham D 

Clerk Dist. Court. 

Theo. S. Spielman, R 

Wm. Berroth, D 

County Attorney. 

J. B. BarneB, R 

E. H. Sanford, D 

County Superintendent. 

W. W. Ramey. R 

MattTbomson, D 

Coroner. 

E. \V. Eldridge, R 

R. A. Ueaburn, D 

Commissioners. 

6. W . Greenwood, R 

Morltz Hund, D 

Henry Bieymeyer, Ind. . 

For Amendment 

ARainst Amendment 



145 
lh3 

1(>5 
15T 

46 

m 

11'6 

213 

108 

138 

187 

162 
158 

64 
259 

IMO 

120 



159 
55 



44 

28 

40 
33 

36 

29 

62 
9 

158 
14 

48 
18 

37 
34 

47 
25 



54 107 

871 36 



.53 36 

89 107 



58 
64 
19 

&3 

58 

59 

82 

65 
74 

52 
91 

30 
21 

85 
39 
15 

2 

105 



,53 

84 

6 

91 

49 

112 
32 

167 
33 

35 

108 

a5 

15 
116 



76 

60 
73 

56 
66 
27 

84 
56 

63 

77 

51 

88 

:« 

101 

74 
65 



103 
22 

104 
22 

98 

19 

8 

78 
48 

105 
20 

77 
43 

107 
17 

107 
19 



106 
95 

105 

96 

76 
80 
47 

107 
92 

110 
93 

120 
80 

74 
128 

112 

91 

92 
110 



104 
42 

102 

4a 

104 

44 

5 

113 
41 

109 
46 

103 

48 

91 
61 

115 
41 



95 
59 

91 

66 

94 

64 

3 

102 
59 

102 
60 

102 

58 



73 

104 
59 



138 



166 
64 

154 
76 

125 
58 
49 

158 
73 

154 

78 

13< 
90 

153 

77 

169 
62 

153 
46 
33 
49 

145 



1 

5 

44 

40 
10 

6 
<:44 



264 
100 

259 
102 

220 

140 

4 

197 
151 

266 
98 

202 
1.55 

280 
84 

269 

87 



76 
112 



1.302 
916 

1307 
960 

1045 
737 
513 

1467 
801 

1502 
896 

1289 
952 

1124 
1160 

1418 
701 

446 

222 

48 

466 

1029 



446 



347 
308 



666 



606 



337 



717 



224 



563 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Saturday, October 2. Mr. H. J. Loomis, 
Mission Creek, chairman: Mr. A. H. Stiles, Wabaunsee, secretary. 

Democratic convention. Saturday, October 9. Mr. L. Pauly, 
Alma, chairman; Mr. E. S. Vance, Harveyville, secretary. 



Resubmission being the paramount issue in the campaign, Mr. 
Crafts was induced to run as an independent candidate— after the 
nomination of Mr. Taylor— leading democrats assuring Mr. Crafts that 
their party convention would put forward no opposing candidate. 
Although prominent democrats having the best interests of their 
party and the issue at heart, made every effort to bring about the 
withdrawal of Mr. Clark, other influences (?) seemed to prevail, 
with the anticipated and inevitable result— the election of Mr. Taylor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 187 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1887. 



Candidates. 



> 

B 
? 


B 

1 


c 

c 


2 

a 
3 
cr 


S 

8° 

■a 

5" 


7i 

SB 

■a 


05 


O 


s 

on 

ce 



3 


o 

o 


p 


D 


2 
® 

c 








• 


(B 






• 






o 


a> 




>< 










!• 




;' 


. 






S 


»r 




3 









p 

o 

1 



County Treasurer. 
J. B. Fields. R 

F. Stuewe, lud. K 

Resrister of Deeds. 

J. C. Henderson. R 

County Clerk. 

G. W, French, R 

J. P. Peters. D 

Sberiff. 

J. M. Russell, R 

J H. McMahan, D 

Purveyor. 

W. D. Deans, R 

Robt. John. D 

Coroner. 

K. W. Eldridge. R 

A. L. Stlers, D 

C«.<mmissloner. 
Gilbert Anderson, R... 
Jos. Treu, D 



198 
162 


32 
57 


133 
57 


106 
44 


63 
67 


84 
95 


111 
175 


73 

48 


47 
23 


77 
65 


86 
44 


6 

47 


74 

98 


61 
51 


1148 
1033 


2(6 


60 


151 


122 


105 


109 


226 


93 


67 


112 


79 


29 


103 


77 


1609 


261 
96 


39'l46 
47 44 


75 
79 


90 
36 


95 

82 


166 
123 


78 
45 


56 
15 


78 
63 


70 
60 


39 
24 


94 

76 


48 
64 


1325 

854 


132 
223 


29138 
60 57 


102 
51 


70 
60 


63 
114 


195 
94 


87 
35 


64 

8 


f6 

47 


49 

81 


29 
24 


78 
97 


43 

68 


1175 
1013 


197 

lai 


43 
46 


149 
40 


107 

4S 


86 
44 


98 

78 


174 
115 


98 
25 


63 

8 


103 
40 


70 
60 


25 

28 


95 
79 


62 
49 


1370 
821 


334 
5 


75 
2 


177 
10 


119 

20 


130 


177 


224 
11 


103 
19 


71 


129 
3 


123 


53 
12 


166 
5 


105 
6 


1810 
70 


139 
223 


29 

60 
















89 
50 


93 
36 


41 


... 


38 
73 


400 

483 































115 

1551 
471 

162 

549 

1740 

83 



NOTES. 



Republican convention, Tuesday, September 27. Mr. John Sud- 
weeks, Eskridge, chairman; Mr. A. H. Stiles. Pavilion, secretary. 

No delegates from Kaw or Washington township. 

Democratic convention, Saturday, October 8. Mr. Geo. W. 
Thompson, Wabaunsee, chairman; Mr. J. Y. Waugh, Eskridge, sec- 
retary. 

The democratic convention made no nomination for register of 
deeds. In this convention Mr. Stuewe was put forward by the demo- 
crats for treasurer. As in the campaign of '96 resubmission entered 
Into the contest, especially in the election of sheriff. 

The News said: John McMahan got right down to business, and 
we were actually afraid about that record. The man that runs against 
J. M. wants to be a long way ahead in the start or else be up early in 
the morning.— D. W. Scott, Ed. 



188 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1888. 



Candidates. 



^ 


03 


^ 


H 


c 


V- 


1 


ni 




r* 




D 


e»- 




£, 


C 


3« 


Tl 


a. 




a 

an 


o 


P 






(C 


m 


3 






<B 




n 







5j 
"I 



Presidential Electors. 

Harrison, R 

Cleveland. D 

Congressman, 4tb Dist. 

Thc>8. Ryan, R 

David Overmyer, D 

Governor. 

L. U. Humphrey, R 

John Martin, D 

Senator, 20th Dl8t. 

John K. Wright, R 

L. Fauly. D 

Representative. 

A, F. Wade, R 

S. G.CantrlU, D 

Probate JudRe. 
L. Richards, R 

B. F.Martin. D 

County Attorney. 

J.B.Barnes, R 

A. A. Graham. D 

Clerk DIst. Court. 

Theo. S. Splelman. R 

Wm. Nelswender, D 

County Superintendent. 

W. W. Ramey. R 

Matt Thomson. D 

Commissioner. 

BIl Walton. R 

E Shumate, D 



198 
198 

196 
202 

194 
300 

143 

176 
221 

152 
244 

:oo 
189 

206 
190 

163 
230 



29 
44 

28 
44 

26 
47 

24 
49 

26 

48 

26 

48 

29 
45 

28 
46 

3i 

40 



82 78 189 
61 85 67 



83 70 
63 93 



190 
65 

178 
99 



73176 

90 78 



155 

97 

190 
66 

194 
60 

194 
61 

173 

83 



141 
31 

143 
30 

136 
34 

141 

32 

127 
39 

14;i 
32 

139 

29 

141 
31 

154 
17 



66 140 
161 34 



156 



156 

128 

156 
128 

153 
131 

146 
134 

156 

128 

156 
121 

154 
130 

138 
144 



144 

46 

144 

46 

144 

48 

152 
49 

116 

85 

133 

70 

1.54 
46 

149 
53 

142 
61 

162 
39 



46 

87 
61 

86 
48 

85 
66 

70 
76 

128 
26 

95 
56 

62 
96 

110 
44 



203 
73 

20-.; 

73 

198 
76 

200 



203 
74 

203 
74 

203 
74 

20.) 
69 

190 
81 



26 



218 1708 



77 

218 

77 

216 

79 

223 
73 

301 



214 
83 

213 

85 

224 
74 

250 
64 

187 
105 



960 

1713 
981 

1684 
1006 

1605 
1094 

15.51 
114M 

1677 
1049 

1747 
942 

1720 
1006 

1696 
1020 

.555 
244 



748 
732 
678 
5U 
408 
6.34 
805 
704 
676 
311 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Saturday, October 6. Mr. I. D. Gardiner, 
Alma, chairman; Mr. T. C. Danforth, secretary. 

Meeting called to order by Mr. A. E. True, chairman county cen- 
tral committee. 

Democratic county convention, Saturday, October 13. Mr. A. A. 
Graham, Eskridge, chairman: Mr. Irwin Boyer, Paxico, secretary. 



This being a presidential campaign party lines were closely drawn 
and the result was a sweeping victory for the entire Republican 
ticket with unprecedented majorities. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 189 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1889. 



Candidates. 





3 

o 

-> 


SB 

e 

3 


2 

B 


5 




s 

B 
IQ 


O 

3 


ST 

B 

5" 

s 

n 


o 


ES 


« 

X 

CO 


OB 


Z 

t 
•< 


3 

Q 
® 


OB 






? 




Mrt 








"t 






B 


ft 










* 


T 






• 


B 






jr 






»r 









s 

SB 

o 



Judge, 35tla District. 

Wm. Tbi>m90n, R 

tiheriff. 

S. E. Hull, R 

G. W. Leonhiirdt. D 

Clerk, unexpired term. 

C O. Kinne. R 

M J Walton. P 

Clerk, regular term. 

CO. Kinne, H 

M. J. Walton, P 

Treasurer, unexpired term. 

F. Stuewe. R 

John Williif, P 

Treasurer, regular term. 

F. Stuewe, R. 

John Willig, P 

Register of Deeds, 

.T. C. Henderson, R I 

0. W, Mallory, D 

Surveyor. ! 

W. I). Deans. R > 

J, H. Jones, D ' 

Coroner. 

Dr. T. H. Hall, R 

A . W, Gregory, D 

Dr. Scheldt, P 

Oom'r. 3d DIst. 

Wm Mitchell, R 

Ed. Worsely. D 



242 

117 
176 

198 

207 
57 

212 
45 

214 
47 

173 

1^ 

171 

130 

184 
58 
42 



41 1 160:106 

6134! 80 

40. 26| 56 

431153 106 



15:jil04 



8 

m 



8 
108 



174 

135 
S5 

174 



171 
21 

173 



3' 24 



42 
2 

41 
2 

41 
2 

82 

13| 10 60| 53 

24 140 100:1731 

22i 2O1 42, .i-'' 

Ml' 

3815.5102 1711 
8 1 40 50 
6 



157; 108 1 170 
3| 24 



llff 82|16S 



68!232 89 



34II67 
90; a^ 



213 
41 

213 
41 

228 
2ti 



56 228 



147.. 
1*.. 



60 
150 



26i 

1.18 

lai 

1981 

m\ 

206 

54 

4 



39 '88 81 



33 46 

7,63| 

35 77 
a:^0 

aj78 

530 

85|8I 
5281 
1 

a5!83| 
5128 



13 161164 



2! 94 



70 14 
10 ... 



121 15 
17 



17 



34 



3»i73 
7,41 

3471 
3 43 
2 



771 14 
10... 

I 
75; 14 17 

ll|...l... 

75! 14 17 
II1...I... 



67 12 16 



6 1 

I 

4 11 

15 6 



701 13 11 



6 6 



125] 

132 
53 

135 
S3 

1.55 
42 

152 
41 

116 
103 

123 
101 

122 
9' 
10 

86 
134 



84 1 1.597 

I 
61 1056 
49{ 891 



1594 
165 



78145711148 
9i 309 



92il479 
311 



1168 



15071237 

370j 

15201250 

270j 

1233! 50 i 



30j 730 

6813'9 
39! 660 

70 1 1380 



481 
96 

346 
368 



659 



803 



22 



NOTES. 

Republican convention, Tuesday. September 24. Malcolm Nicol- 
son, Alma, chairman ; P. S. Taylor, Grant, .secretary. 

Democratic convention, Tuesday, October 1. L. Pauly, Alma, 
chairman : Elmer Thompson, Wabaunsee, secretary. 

Mr. Elmer Thompson and Mr. Fred Zeferjahn, the Democratic 
nominees for clerk and treasurer, withdrawing from the race, a meet- 
ing was held at the Riggs (Commercial) house and the names of Messrs. 
Walton and Willig substituted. Mr. Scheldt was nominated for cor- 
oner and Messrs. Leonhardt and Mallory endorsed. With the excep- 
tion of commissioner the entire Republican ticket was elected. 

The candidates marked "P"" were nominated at the Riggs house 
meeting. 



r 



lyu EARLY HISTORY OF \VABAU^'SEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1890. 



Ca Mil HATES. 



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^ 


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2 


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Governor. 

CbHrles Uobinson, D 

J. F. WUIits. P 

L. U. Huiripiirey. K 

CongTessman. 

John G. Otis. F 

Harrison Kelley. R , 

Representative. 

John RehrlR. F 

L.J. MoCrumb, R 

Probate Jodge. 

L. T. Rice. F 

L. Richiird.s, R 

County Attorney. 

J. H. Jones. F , 

J. It. names. R 

Clerk District Court. 

H. ii. Jones. P 

Theo. Spiel man, R 

County Superintendent. 
Florence Diclcinson, F ... 
W. W. Ilamey. R 

Com'r, Isl Dlst. 

Josepli Treu. D 

J. \V. Spencer, P 

Geo. W. Wilson. R 



^7; 
I 2l[ 
|U0| 

bonj 

I5t 

218 
il61 

1001 

277j 

203 
163 

86 
273' 

181 
181 

260 
2fi 

81 1 



40! 
Ill 
111 

ss! 

14| 

54 
14 



3.5I 561 57 
t)3 751121 

47 18| 79 

91:121(157 

48 28 100 



49 
59 
33 

108 



n8;i5.-)iio 

30 104 33 



8«|121 
54 27 

99 124 
15 23 



24 5l a5l 6 
29' 981 99 l:ii« 
37 i 701 98 108 

! i 
35 1031 179; 129 
50| 701115,111 



.39 

."iO! 



97:162 l-.» 
75 1291111 



115 

25 

96 
49 



28 .. 
62 .. 

54l.. 



157il06i 35 j 104 

102j 34 .56] 69 

163 1091 31 104 

93 33 58 69 



145 
104 



190 100 
68 41 



1 
112 

39 

115 
37 



391 15 
110 15 
lOUi 1 



14/ 30 
102 1 



113 144 30 
39I10;1 1 



1801301102 
1111109! 50 

179'l45lll6 
111; 901 35 



148 20 
100 11 

174: 29 
72 2 



33 102 131 132 111 143 21 
54, 70 130 106: 37:103 8 



.541117 
37 .55 



160 
121 



135 109 15.5 28 
103i 39 89 1 



3 

no 

17 



3! 

I Oil 
164 



22 141 
9|164 



1049 
924 



125 



1640,603 
10371 



221141:1620.54: 



16411073! 






13M479l'.W4 
174 1215' 



146 
151 

131 



131 
173 



1702734 
968, 

K{5l'l03 
l-il8, 

1.593 543 
1050].: 

47s'23l 

2471 
186l 



NOTES. 



Alliance convention, Saturday, August 16. Dow Busenbaik, Esi<- 
ridge, chairman ; A, M. Jordan, Mill Creek, secretary. 

Democratic convention, Saturday, August 16. L. Pauly, Alma, 
chairman: Matt Tiiomson, Alma, secretary. 

.Joseph Treu nominated for commissioner, after which convention 
adjourned to Wednesday, September 3, when all Alliance candidates, ex- 
cept clerk of court and commissioner, were endorsed. Chas. Sawtell 
was nominated for clerk but declined. 

Republican convention, Saturday, August 30. "Wm. F. Cotton, 
Wabaunsee, chairman : W. K. Beach, Grant, secretary. 

The opposition papers in the county during the campaign referred 
to the Alliance as the "Line-Back-Steer Party." But the name ap- 
peared to have no particular effect on the result. 

At the Democratic congressional convention, held at Emporia, no 
nomination was made, the Democrats supporting the Alliance candi- 
datf. 



EARLY HISTOUY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 191 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1891. 



Candidatks. 



> 




^ 


3 


VJ 


s 


:? 


n 

1 


ti» 


? 


2: 


? 


t: 


1 


3; 


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s 
re 


5 
T 


3 


5 


5 


1 

B 
3 


c* 


■J. 
l 

= 


2. 


1 


X 
3 

2. 


5 

t 


5_ 


O 

'6 





Register of Deeds. 

W. B. Small, K 

li. A. Kuapp, A 

B. F. Martin. D 

Tr«a8urf r. 
John H. Mlchaelis, D... 
G. A. Kberliardt, A. 

J. W. Boyer, I 

Sheriff. 

H. J. Palen.ske, K 

•lames Cass. A 

S. K. Hull. I 

Oouuty Clerk. 

C. O. Kinne, U 

Wm.Treu, A 

Surveyor, 

W. D. Deans. K 

B. Buchli. sr.. A 

Coroner. 

Dr.T. H. Hall. R 

Dr. U. R. Schmidt. A... 
Com'r. 3d Dist. 

Ell Walton, R 

A. Pringle, A 



78 

18 

254 

231 
10 
11 

198 

32 

li-T 

2.51 
its 

215 
130 

225 
118 



112101 
9710!) 
17 1 

124 inn 
96 108 



91 78 
.59108 
75i 25 



VSS 24115(1 
102 89' 9fi 
21 45 



";i 



115 .51 188 

118 83100 

101 .. . i 



591:^2100 
lOj 93111 

34 127 99 
36 98112 

I 
26l.'}010l 
^\ 95110 



jI02 

iioe 



114! 34 

112 87 
16 12 

lS3i .52 
HI 83 



71 
91 

8 

6fi 
102 



Uli 74 

87 9 
91 3 



125 
119 

122, 
121 



176 
115 

174 
114 



181 ,, 

110 93 

178 71 

110 98 



51 

25 

1 

43 

30 

3 

50 

24 

3 

51 1 

25 1 

53I 
24 

53 

241 

.50 
27 



49j 64 
88 1 .59 
, . . I 31 



9: 8'109] 
5 13 8« 



49,1017 



3 80 



194 

83 
« 



35 171168 
4 48 

41 7l) 



21(185 
3 101 



126 
16.' 

174 
112 



945 
.550 

1418 

10731 

40 



103 



343 



1210 396 
814 
522 



42 14.56 
89 1082 

I 
.51 '1262 
801277 

,56 1368 
75 116" 



374 

15 
201 



401 60 
34ll 



NOTES. 



I 



Alliance cunvenllon held at Alma, Tuesday, September 22. M. W. 
Janes, "VVillard, chairman ; I. D. Gardiner, Alma, secretary. , 

Republican convention, Saturday, Octobers. A. F. Wade, Grant, 
chairman: W. J. Hinshaw, Harveyville, secretary. 

Democratic convention, Tuesday, October 13. Henry Pauly, Alma, 
chairman: Elmer Thompson, Wabaunsee, secretary. 

The Democratic convention was held in Scheidt's hall. 

The Republicans liaving nominated Mr. Micliuelis (Democrat) for 
treasurer, Mr. Boyer (Rep.) announced himself as an independent can- 
didate. 

The Democrats made no nomination except that of Mr. B. F. Mar- 
tin for register of deeds. 

The mixed political conditions resulted in the election of the can- 
didates nominated by the Republicans witli the exception of surveyor. 



ly2 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1892. 



CANDrnATBS. 



^ 



O 2 



3 
5" 




X 


cs 


m 


o 






O 


m 




a 




•♦ 


Ci 




« 


•^ 




• 


n 






n 






TT 




• 



Presidential Electors. 

Harrlsoa. H 

Weaver, P 

Hid well. Pro 

CoQsjressmari, 4tli Dist. 
Chas. Curtis, li 

E. V. Wharton, P 

(lOveriior. 

A. W. Smith, li 

L. U. Leweillnsr. P 

Seoator, lilst Dist. 

A. l'\ Wado, K 

A. E.True. P 

Rcpreneiitatlve, 46th Dist. 

Wdi. Strowig, K 

.I.Treii. I' 

Probate Judge. 

L. Richards. K 

I..T. Kice, P 

Clerk District Court 

H.O. LIcht, R 

H. B.Jones, P 

County Superintendent. 

F. A. Seaman, K 

G. L. Clothier, P 

County Attorney. 

W. A. Doolittle, K 

J. H.Jones, P 

Com'r, 3d Dist. 

H Wertzberger, R 

M. Hund.P 

Constitutional Convention 

For : 

Ajrainst 



174 
205; 

3 

175 
20,)| 

174! 

aoi) 

17.T 

2o:j 

!213! 

338 
ll.W 

ll(J5 
SOU 

165 
213 

120 
25!) 



139 .^l 



125 

7 

139 
1^5 



ittlS 



I.S9 49 

135 92 

I 

l-~'9 ."iO 

131 92 

I 

139 57 

124' 85 

130 .52 



13 1 

106 
161 

130 
144 

131 
13-^ 

134 
130 

57 
170 



91 

43 

100 

45 
97 

46 
92 



103133 
152191 

1.. 



1931128 
1261109 



10ill32 
154jl92 

102!l.32' 
1.54192 

iwl 30 

150192 

I ] 

10.5;i4.> 

151177 

101129 

1561931 

I I 

99126; 

158198; 

961181 
159,203 

10312(1 



200 
121 

200 
121 



128 
109 

128 
110 



85 66 



203 1281 
121:110 



83 .58 43 
96 93; 45 



!51 

lOR 

150 



197 

129 
193 



200 
125 

199 
126 

196 
130 

199 
136 

105 
130 



11226.5 
65 33 



59 
224 



138 
110 

126 

ml 

128| 
110 

126 
112 

128 
109 



18 
161 



541 22 
96! 68 



96 

84 
2 

101 

79 

102 

78 

102 

78: 

»; 

87 



.59 49 10 

92 40i 81 

61 32' 94 

89 .58| 89 

62 32 103 

89 58 78 



60 21 
89 69 



92 84 56 
40' 3i 91 



4 87 

28| 97 

17i 92 

151 H 

41 88 

201 94 

87 

25 97 



21 4 

33 28 



29 17 
3il28 



1856 

1.52;» 

20 

1362 
1.519 



169 



157 



1361 
1523 162 



.56 1397 
32 1474 



1352 
15251173 



5711440 
30' 1455 15 

54 1298 
:fcj 1 586 1 288 

268 



1572 



1253 
1618 

421 
5()4 

1326 



92 
40il097i 



365 

143 

229 



NOTES. 



Kopnblican county convention, Saturday, Augu.st i;{ Iliram Ward, 
Harveyville, chairman: V. C. Welch. Alma, secretary. 

People's Party convention, Saturday, August 27. Dow Busenbark, 
Eskridge, chairman ; D. C. Robinson, Mission Creek, secretary. 

Democratic convention, Saturday, September 10. People's Party 
ticket endorsed. 

A procession a half mile or more in length was one of the unique 
features of the People's Party convention. The Hendricks Creek 
drum corps led the procession. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



193 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1893. 



Candidates. 



B 
? 


B 
a 


P 

3 


2 

c 
B 


2 

SB 

5 


P5 

SB 


B 

B 
R 
<:♦ 

O 


O 

a 


o 

3 

3 


n 


o 

2. 


03 
t 
P 
S 
n 


CD 

■o 

3 

o 

ft 


® 

c 


2 


cc 






; 




. 






* 

?7 






S" 


K 









p 
£ o 



Judge 35tb Judicial DIst. 

William TtioniBon. U 

J. W. Fltz«rerald, F 

County Treasurer, 

John H. Michaells, V 

W. H. Melrose, K 

Reclster of Deeds. 
W. B Small, R 

A. J.Thoes. F 

County Clerk. 

J R. Henderson, K 

W. O, Gantz, F 

Sheriff. 

H J.Palenske. R 

T. P. Walton. F 

County Surveyor. 
Robt. A. Rutledee, R 

B. Buchli, sr.. F 

Coroner. 

G.C, Beals, R 

H. R.Schmidt. F 

Oom'r, Ist Diet. 

P. P. Johnson, R 

Wm. Mass. D 

Fred Dierklni:. P. P 



239 48 
80 25 


143 
66 


119 
73 


110 

74 


53 
59 


18K 
92 


75 
64 


50 
35 


65 
80 


84 
57 


20 
17 


15 
12 


126 
117 


60 
63 


197 58 
120 15 


99 
114 


96 
93 


87 
91 


74 
35 


80 
212 


63 

78 


31 
49 


81 
65 


67 
76 


24 
13 


24 

6 


144 
101 


72 
50 


197 25 
1-^1 50 


ll:i 
100 


94 
94 


117 
67 


42 

62 


183 
106 


"0 
70 


51 
34 


65 
83 


84 
.55 


20 
17 


9 
20 


107 
134 


60 
63 


2.53 50 
6; 15 


121 
93 


99 
93 


95 

«3 


53 188 
49 100 


73 
C9 


53 
31 


63 
84 


95 
51 


32 
6 


22 
7 


128 
118 


71 

48 


269 n 
^i 


137 

77 


85 
109 


101 
7!) 


63 178 

42 109 

1 


78 
62 


50 
35 


64 

81 


101 
43 


.36 
4 


26 
4 


165 
73 


81 
44 


121 14 
200 55 


109 97 
97, 94 


96 
83 


44 185 
60 101 


88 


53 
32 


62 

83 


78 
65 


t 

31 


6 
24 


99 
141 


44 
79 


128 14 

187 .50 


118 97 

85 91 


87 

83 


47 180 
.56 101 


77 
65 


51 
34 


63 

82 


74 

67 


13 

23 


4 

20 


91 
144 


49 
70 


127 24 

40 \i 

155 40 






1 






55 
9i 


72 

28 
21 


14 
10 
14 


8 

8 

15 




50 
44 
32 


..1 .. 











i 1393 479 
014 



1200 
1121 



82 



1236 160 
1076 



1402 
908 



494 



1.506 686 
820 



1104 
1198 

1093 
11158 

350 
254 

277 



95 

65 
73 



NOTES. 

Democratic judicial convention. Alina. Monday, October 2. J. W. 
Fitzgerald nominated. 

People's Party convention, Alma, August 12. Dow Busenbark. of 
Eskridge, chairman ; J, W. Spencer, of Alta Vista, secretary. 

Republican county convention, Alma. Tuesday, September 19. A. 
F. Wade, Mission Creek, chairman : A. J. Gleason, Alma, secretary. 

Democratic county convention. Alma, Saturday, October 7. L. 
Pauly, Alma, chairman: Matt Thomson, Alma, secretary People's 
Party candidates endorsed. 

For treasurer. Republican convention : 

Ballots 1st. 2d. 3d. 

W. H. Melro.se 54 68 81 

W. K. Beach 61 59 61 

C. O. Kinne 26 15 . . 

County clerk: 1st. 2d. 

J R. Henderson 77 84 

W. .T. Hinshaw 65 58 



194 EARLY lllSTOKY OF WABAUNSP^E COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns. 1894. 



Candidates. 


5 


3 


e 


3 

c 
B 


X 




B 

a 




X 

£. 



n 


r. 
O 


2. 
a 


It 


CO 

■B 

1 
(8 


1 




F 


S 








» 








e* 
© 




c 

T 


9 




a 


«! 














T 








3 




® 
2. 

r 


tr 


. 


o 


» 


; 




: 




Governor. 








i 




; 




















E.N. Morrill. 11 


KiO 


21 


1.11 


i:« 1.3.1 


(58 


190 


9^ 


57 


76 


81 


22 


3 


129 


69 


1893 344 


David Overmyer. D 


iH) 


2.T 


•-'7 


.S 19 


43 


18 


4 


2 


4 


22 


8 


8 


29 


6 


312 




L. W. Lewelling, P 


m 


16 


85 


92 100 


.54 


102 


77 


35 


89 


53 


14 


12 


125 


69 


1049 




Fickeriug, Pro 


a 




11 


10 1 

1 




8 


1 


1 


... 








>> 


• • 


39 




ConKTessman, 4th Dist. 




Chas. Curtis, R 


173 -20 


l.-)« 


137 149 


71 


196 


93 


57 


76 


81 


19 


7 


124 


70 


1415 


1;>3 


T.J. O'Neil. 1) 


ti't 2.) 


21 


3 8 


30 


11 


3 


1 


3 


18 


4 





U 


H 


197; 


S. M. Scott, P 


681 13 


8t 


loi; 


90 


59 


108 


79 


.17 


87 


54 


17 


14 


129 


65 


10431 


Representative 


1 






























G.G.Cornell, R 


1V9 19 


162 


141 


137 


67 


195 


95 


.58 


78 


76 


16 


5 


126 


63 


1417|144 


Jos. Treu. P 


1431 40 


104 


P9,10tJ 


91 


117 


76 


35 


90 


80 


'-» 


13 


151 


M 


1273] 


Probate Judge. 




























l.-Moi 38 


L. J. Woodara, R 


142 16 


111 


U' 134 


57 


194 


95 


5(! 


77 


81 


18 


3 


117 


67 


J. H. Joues. P 


173' 46 


ua 


102 lOJ 


94 


115 


76 


35 


88 


66 


24 


a2 


l.)8 


76 


1302 


Clerk District Court. 








1 
























W. G. Weaver. R 


140 
16-,' 


20 


162 
105 


1271128 

117 km; 


64 

78 


171 
140 


88 57 


74 
92 


75 
68 


16 
26 


16 


11.T 

1,53 


■<o 

73 


1313 20 


Dow Busenbark, P 


87 


35 


1293 


County Attorney. 


































J. B. Barnes, R 


214 


38 


142 


132 


117 


62 


194 


89 


.50 


71 


73 


24 


1» 


126 


V,i 


•431!276 


A. A. Sturee*!. P 


82 


2:. 


113 


107 


109 


86 


110 


81 


50 


93 


70 


14 


9 


ISl 


69 


1135' 


County Superintendent. 




C. C. Carter. R 


Ifil 


18 


147 


l.il 


136 


60 


20 « 


102 


55 


74 


73 


18 


t 




69 


1397 184 


Ge'\ L Clothier. P 


H3 


42 


117 


80]l0,s 

i 


87 


98 


.71 


40 


88 


71 


24 


17 


152 


75 


1213 


Suffrajfe Amendment. 




For. . 


4t) 


7 


7,S 


73 56 




127 


89 


3 


61 


;w 


l> 




44 


38 


719 


Against 


2I.'5 


47 


Via 


124' 96 




137 


.55 


47 


59 


101 


36 


25 


181 


H2 


14.50 731 


Com'r, 2d District. 








1 






















IHsll'O 


C.N. Earl R 

G. A. Eberhardt. P 








1H5 


31 


319 


88 


46 




















101 


::: 


no 


88 


80 


40 














818' 



NOTES. 

Republican county convention, Tuesday, Augu.st21. W.H.Mel- 
rose. Eskridge. chairman : J. B. Fields, Alma, secretary. 

People's Party convention. Saturday, September 1. Dow Bu.sen- 
bark. Eskridge. chairman : Wm. Treu. Alma, secretary. 

The Democrats desired that J. H. Jones should succeed himself as 
county attorney, and that L. T. Rice should again be a candidate for 
the office of probate .judge, but a resolution against a third term gave 
the nomination for county attorney to A. A. Sturgis, and J. H. Jones 
was nominated for probate judge. By reason of the strained relations 
existing, and the lack of a concert of action, the entire Republican 
ticket was elected. With Democratic representation on the ticket, or 
with nominations in accord with the wishes of the Democrats, the re- 
sult might have been difforenl. 



EAKLY lllbTUiiY OF WABAUNSEE C0U:NTY, KAS. 195 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1895. 



Candidates. 



I 

3 

o 

3 



a 



M C! 






Chief Justice. 

Davtd Martin, b' 

Chas. K. Holliday. K.... 
Treasurer. 

W. H. Melnise, K 

J. M.Lee. F 

Kegister of Deeds. 

Ktutnfi Little, K 

Kd. Worsley, F 

Oonnt.v Clerk. 

J. R. Henderson. R 

Wui, Neiswender, F 

Sheriff. 

S. E. Hull. R 

Wm. Treu. F 

Surveyor. 

W. D. Deans. R 

Coroner, 

G.C. Reals. R 

H. R. Schmidt. F 

Com'r, 3d District. 

W, R. Strowis. R 

I. D. Keyser. F 



.1171 137 
.26 15 

I I 

.140 108 
.!H9 100 

i i 
. l.T:->liT 

:i27| 86 

178 126 
10-1 

lU 
148 



109 
167 



V£i\l29 

26! e« 

114(112 

871150 



134 

30 

160 
148 



103120 192 



102134 

1341162 
75. 94 



95 
117 

i:i6i 

107 
89! 

12ll 
82- 



99 

184 

107 



63120 122 195 



83 1371104 



138165 

1171 1-27 

77] 118 

1-'5179 
68 74 



189 

169 
110 



92 



82 
111 

104 
81 

110 
80 

101 
90 

121 

107 
83 



57 .56 
23 24 

681 64 

88J 87 

77 77 
84| 69 

I 
54 78 
105 65 

i 
71' 49 
83100 

88 88 

70i 70 
80 74 



34 67 
3 13 

isi 67 



38i 65 



7 
4 


71 
30 


t) 
18 


73 
100 


9 
15 


94 
77 


16 
10 


96 

77 


5 

20 


.S2 
90 


13 


108 



1185 
333 

1123 
12S4 



45 1246 
28II101 

I 
47 1392 
23 977 



1170 
1235 

1.5.50 

1163 
1108 



490 
305l 



85a 

161 
135 

415 

65 

54 
185 



NOTES. 

Republican primarie.s. Crawford county system, Saturday, Septem- 
ber 14. . 

People's Party convention, Saturday. September 21. Dow Busen- 
bark, Eskridge. chairman: Wm. Treu. Alma, secretary. 

Democratic central committee met Saturday. September 21, and 
endorsed People's Party ticket. 

The first, and the last, .selection of candidates by the Crawford 
county system. 

At Republican primaries there were six candidates for sheriff, 
three for treasurer, three for register, two for. surveyor, two for cor- 
oner, and one each for clerk and commissioner. 

At the primaries for sheriff S. E. Hull received 307 votes: J. M. 
Russell, 170; J. B. Fields, 146: .John Thompson. 87: John Cromer, 85; 
Frank Mossman. 72. 

For treasurer. W. H. Melrose, ;i32: J. B. Crumb, 284: W. K. Beach, 



llHi EAKLV illSTOUV OF VVABAUJSSEE COUJSTY, KAS. 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1896. 



Candidatkh. 



^ 3 

— c* 

S B 

a ^ 

s 

3 






33 



3 

3. 



2 


s* 


o 


s 








o 


i) 


n 


B 




*• 


r; 




fl> 


n 




w 


» 






ft 






K 




, 



Prosldeiitlal electors. 

liryan, I) 

McKlnley, H 

Uovernor. 

L«?cuy. I> 

Morrill. K 

.\ppollate Judge. 

Hlii.liDHn. 1) 

Wells. K 

Con^ressniiin, 4tli Dlst, 

Miicldeu. D 

Curtis. K 

State Senator. 

Stewart. D 

Ho.s(ilii. K 

Keprosentatlve. 

PaltMiske. D 

ytuewe, K 

Probate Judtre. 

Kowley, D 

Woodard. H 

District Clerk. 

• 'ore. D 

Weaver, R 

County Attorney. 

.loiies, D 

Barnes, R, 

Supi.-rlntendent. 

Uusenbark, D 

Carter. R 

Com'r, l.st District. 

Dlerklnjf, D 

Eck. H 



100 
1S2 



lOtI 98 
18U| 8(1 

10.ji «8 
1731 «i 



1(50 

13: 
l.")B 

i;« 
l.w 

133 
l.V 

137 
.[1721173! 7fl| 1.5.1 

1187 114 11311,38 
I109ll6lj 6a|l47 



l.V) 1.3.31 98 

174'l;->:ji 80 

I I 

149! m 98 

;183jir>7 80 

184!llll 98 



il3-Jll07 
j:20l|l?i 

I 871 79 
I21()2,)l 



97ji:3H 
74 l.W 



13111(54 107 
*22 109i 67 

i 
1301 liie 10.5 



i::7 
151 

1.57 
134 

138 



3091150, 65il4( 

|131!... 
1207: . . 



128' 
121| 

l.«l 
122! 

137 
131 

129 
120 

i.?r 

130 
120 

133 
118 

124 

122 

143 
101 

123 
122 



43 160 
30J180 

40 1.57 
20 189 

43 1.5B 
17187 

421161 
18; 193 

40 160 
20 180 



142110.5 
151 1 80 

wh'mi 



161 
186 

1.54 
192 



141 

150 

41] 157 139 

17 190 1.50 



147 

140 
146 

141 
1.53 

141 
149 



79 

109 

78 

109 

78 

no 



138|I10 
148! 78 



18167 

44 17o 

321171 



69 
113 

150 



24177133 



103 

84 

101 

84 

77 

112 
77 



87 
72 

85 
71 

85' 
69 

88 
70 

8*'. 
09 

91 

67 

9-3 
63 



67 
101 

07 



45 

:» 

42 
30 

43 
27 

42 

28 

42 66 

28 1 102 

,50 1 77 
30 95 

351 62 
36; 108 

30! 6 
40! 105 

28 1 68 



07 20 
104 33 

67i 19 
10:i! 14 



18 

351 

I 

18: 



12 9H 
23 91 



10.3 35i 



io;3 

73 
94 



19 
31 

28 
28 

21 
30 

I 

181 

a5 

13 

40 

24 
39 



78! 
941 -'81 



>2 
23 

13 

2 ' 

20 
19 

14 

18 

11 

%i 

II 
26 

]« 
21 

15! 
24! 



99 
93 

99 
92 

s*9 
93 

98 
93 

95 

96 

110 

76 

no 
79 



1442 
1686 



144 



1421 
15.56, 125 



1431 
1.528 



49 1440 
51 1.561 

48 1481 
.51,1531 



1 555 
1475 

1408 
1562 

i:«)9 
1664 

1427 

1497 
1404 

.501 
510 



97 
121 

.50 

80 

1.54 

;j.5.-) 

130 
3;i 

15 



NOTES. 

Kepublicaii county (•(jtivcMitiun held Tuesday. September 1. A. .1. 
Skeene, of Chalk, chairman: B. P. Morlan, of Halifax, secretary. 

People's Party convention held Saturday. September '>. J. R. 
Moreland. of Eskridge, chairman: Wni. Treu of Alma, secretary. 

Democratic (bounty convention held Wednesday, September .3. M. 
F. Trivctt. of Eskridj^e, chairman : R. L. Shumate, of Eskridge, sec- 
retary. 

The vote on probate judge in the Republican convention : .\ 

'^«";'^-\„: v-, 1st. 2d. M. 4th. 1 

!-. iii'-hards 2.") •>7 20 IS 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 197 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1897. 



Candioatem. 



2. 

X 



-> 

-5 



-"^ hrl 



r" I x" 



* 






District Judge. 
Wm. Thouison, K... 

B. F. Martin, D .... 

Treasurer. 
J. B. Kistlfir, K... . 

J. M. Lee.D 

Iteg-lster of Deeds. 
Emma Little, K... . 

C. H. Thompson P 

County Clerk. 

B.P. Morlan, K 

B Buchll, D 

Sheriff. 
G. VV. Crouch, R... 

Wm. Treu. F 

Surveyor. 
W. 8. Wliltlock, R.. 

J. H, .Tones, P 

Coroner. 

D. H. Hazzard.U... 
H. R.Schmidt. P. .. 

Com'r. -id Dlst. 
C.N. Earl. K 

E. H. McMillan. P. 



'188:136 

I 1501 63 

1108120 
i26J15 

13(1105 
19.5 13;l 



ion 

68 

74 
100 

77 
96 



»>lll9! .59 



I2.5:illl2 



90 

:J47 

•*8 
225 

106 
220 



119 
120 

ItU 

118 

128 
.03 



HO 

76 
98 

99 
74 

71 

87 



152 
67 

142 

103 

148 

98 

134 

109 



140 
109 

120 
130 

126 
122 

lOij 
145 



23 152 

36 91 



145 
157 

177 
il» 

165 



165 123 



81 

141 

99 

135 
97 



132 

124 

128 

128 
123 



.52'l31 



111 

88 

103 
127 



66 72! 35 

82' .56 39 

721 62 19 

96 93| 58 



121 72 77 25 91 
106 91 75 531 68 



105 

55 

132 

37 



29 16 94 40 1465 
It; 19' W 29 1031 



119, 681 57i 8 87 8 
lOS 98100; 65 74 41 



12 1Cljll5 fit; 
.50 138 114 101 



1651112 70 
120 113 97 



19 164 114 
42 118 ilOt) 



22-.'107 
I 7>* 116 



57 U 85 



66 



76 



16 93 

57 66 

15 94 

55 62 



102 



15 89 
23 86 



1261 
1477 



40 ia34 
40 1377 



111 79 41 1155 
29! 98 37 i 1562 



61 87 
33 j 89 



87 



411222 
381 1.517 

4<<1272 
33 140:1 



14 10 90; 4111269 



102i 44 

' 721 3» 



475 
300 



4»4 

21« 

43 

407 

295 

131 

90 
175 



NOTES. 

The Democratic judicial convention held at Alma. Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 14, 1897 : P>. F. Martin nominated. 

People's Party judicial convention held at Alma, Saturday, Sep- 
tember 18, 1897 ; B. F. Martin's nomination endorsed. 

The Republican judicial convention was held at Alma, Wednesday, 
Aug. 4. Judge Wm. Thomson being nominated without opposition. 

Republican county convention held Tuesday, September 14. 1897. 
W. S. Bolton, of Paxico, chairman : Wyatt R )u.sh. of Harveyville, sec- 
retary. 

Democratic county convention held fSaturday, September 18, 1897. 
M. F. Trivett, of E.skridge. chairman: O.scar Schmitz, of Alma, sec- 
retary. 

People's Party convention held Saturday September 18. J. R. 
Moreland. of Eskridge. chairman : Wm. Pringle, of Harveyville. secre- 
tary. 



198 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1898. 



Candidatbb, 


a 


-1 
-1 


3 


2 

c 
B 


3 

X 


9 


B 
a 


O 

P 
a 


w 

2. 
o 

3 


r. 




1 


-I 
o 


o 


CO 

tr 
ft 

B 

9 


"0 

to 
><_ 
o 




3 
c 




S 
o 




• 




■r 










n 


m 




9 


■1 




■^ 




n 




a> 








(* 




1 , '. 




Q 




*% 






a 


i 








rii 










;• 


T 


: 




• 


D 






X 




n 


■B 














Oovornor. 








1 






























J. W. Leedy, K 


i«n 


.-iO 


H7 


89 89 


82 


lOtl 


78 


29 


87 


57 


19 


12 


21 


42 


126 


34 1174 




W. K. Stiinlt-y. R.... 


173 


27 


13!) 


1.39 173 


83 


184 


84 


38 


81 


108 


20 


16 


18 


43 


121 


23 1464 


290 


W. A. PutTec. Pro.... 


5 




10 


12 


2 


1 


15 


. ■ • 


1 


1 


1 


. . . 




• . . 


. . . 


2 




50 




C'oni;.. 4th ilist. 








































H. S. Miirtiii, K 


IW 


4:1 


H3 


87 


90 


79 


106 


73 


30 


82 


54 


15 


10 


20 


41 117 


34 1107 




J. M. MllliT. R 


17!t 


al 


US 


141) 


16- 


82 


188 


86 


37 


87 


HI 


22 


14 


20 


41 124 


24 1497 


39U 


Roprosentatlve. 








































L. Palonske, V 


•M) 


57 


92 


102 


89 


80 


111 


77 


28 


81 


65 


28 


24 


24 


46 


123 


45 


12V2 




W. M. KiiH>li!irt. R.. 


13« 


13 


13.5 


130 1G9 


78 


182 


80 


38 


86 


98 


12 


7 


16 


41 


123 


13 


1355 83 


C<Minty Allirney. 












1 
























H. M, Jones. F 


i:i7 


12 


lie 


94 100 


83 


94 


82 


31 


89 


.59 


19 


16 


19 


47 


116 


>.o 


1180 




V. E. Ciirroll. K .. .. 


:.'12 


23 


nil 


141,1.56 


84 


200 


76 


36 


78 


107 


27 


15 


20 


40 


129 


28 1491 


311 


(Vuinty Siipt. 








1 






























Dow Hiiseiil)iirk, F. . 


ISl 


.53 


no 


117 119; 98 


145 93 


3:^ 


103 


74 


24 


17 


24 


M 


i;30 


36 


1411 


152 


D G. Mtirtin, R .. . 


Kit) 


111 


121 


121 


141 6(5 


154 


66 


33 


68 


90 


16 


1* 


17 


32 


115 


22 


1259 




i'lerk of Dist. Court. 






































J. \V. Taylor. F 


130 


43 


84 


81 


51 78 


121 


83 


31 


88 


51 


12 


16 


21 


44 


122 


34 


11411 




Wytitl Roiish, R 


184 


22 


144 


157 


108 81 


173 


74 


36 


831107 


26 


15 


19 


38 


125 


24 


1460 


320 


Prol)Hte .ludsrt . 










1 


























M. K Anderson. F.. 


I0!» 


33 


71 


81 


88 71 


no 73 


29 


101 


46 


12 


8 


19 


39; 101 


27 1021 




T. S. Spiel man. R. .. 


214 


311 


lot) 


146 


169 90 


182 


83 


36 


69 


117 


30 


18 


20 


46 145 


30:1590 


!)69 


Ciironer. 




























1 




o. R. Webb. P 


145 


45 


H4 


85 


93 79 


91 i 70 


28 


89 


48 


11 


101 Ifl 


39 1341 32il«98| 


T. W. Hunt. R 


169 


19 


14-2 


143 


163 74 


205 bi7 


n 


78 


103 


28 


13! 30 


41 


111 


2.) 


1457aT9 


Com'r, Hri Dlst. 




































Henry Brt vmever.F. 






89 




88 65 


. 






. • • 












71 


15 


828 


A. R. Strowlg. R 






134 




165 


83 




















IVO 


41 


592 265 



NOTES. 

Democratic convention held Saturday, September 3, 1898. J. H. 
Michaelis. of Paxico, chairman; Oscar Schmitz, of Alma, secretary. 

• People's Party convention held Saturday, September 3, 1898. Wm. 
Prinprle. of Harveyville, chairman: W. T. Stewart, of Wabaunsee, 
secretary. 

Republican convention held Tuesday, September 13, 1898. A. J 
Skeene, of Rock Creek, chairman: O. W. Little, of Ahna. secretary. 

J. N. Dolley, of Maple Hill, was nominated for representative by 
the Republicans, but withdrew and W. M. Rinehart, of Eskridge, was 
substituted by the committee. 

In the Republican convention all the nominees were named by 
acclamation, except coroner and probate judjJi'e. there beinptive ballots 
for prol)ate jiidjre— Messrs. Spii'lmaii. Sudweeksand r»ichar(isbeiiiK the 
contestants. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAS. 



199 



Wabaunsee 


Cou 


nty 


Election 


Returns, 


189S 


. 








> 
3 


^ 

p 

? 


2 


?5 


s 




2 


5 


2 
3 


o 
?r 


5 
3 

3 




5: 
3 


C 
to 

3: 


to 


•0 

5" 




3 


2 




2 
"0 


Candidates. 




B 
3 
a> 
IS 

9 


• 


■ 


X 


O 


s 
a 


3 

O 
3 


a- 


-3 


•< 




a. 


p 
2_ 


3? 








-» 
9 




IB 




Treasurer. 
























1 
















Jos. LaKoiitrtiDe, F., 


106 


91 


31 


90 


100 


13« 


48 


110 


90 


84 


47 


20 55 


48 


36 


21 


66 


37 


1306 


36 


Gilbert Stewart, K. 


122 


103 


13 


53 


167 


113 


20 


169 


131 


69 


37 


20 11 


100 


15 


14 


79 


34 


1270 




County rlerk. 








































B Buchli, F 


239 


99 31 


113 


1~'6 


173 


5 J 


134 


98 


94 


74 


28 65 


83 


47 


SO 


82 


46 1616 


591 


O. J. Kose, K 


96 


95 


12 


37 


I3ti 


78 


14 


156 


126 


(i•^ 


18 


13 3 


70 


7 


7 


68 


27 


1025 




Sheriff. 








































F. .T.Frey. V 


240 


80 


3.1 


104 


114 


178 


58 


146 


103 


91 


67 


23 57 


58 


34 


25 


92 


43 


1545 


493 


F M Mere.liT.li. R 


93 


112 


12 


44 


143 


76 


9 


37 


118 


65 


23 


13 8 


90 


19 


11 


52 


27 


1052 




Reprlster of Deeds. 








































v. Dorian. F 


184 


09 


23 


75 


93 


115 


42 


119 


86, 87 


46 


22 48 


45 


23 


22 


7(1 


37 


1206 




D. U. viilli&on, R... 


133 


122 


16 


68 1 164 


126 


25 


169 


130 


68 


42 


18i 17 102 


24 


11 


76 


3;5 


ia52 


146 


Surveyor. 


























1 














J H. .Tones. F . . 


201 


90 


28 


3.-) 


90 


126 


43 


l~'l 


941 89 


48 


20 


56 


52 


21 


18 


VI 


40 1243 




W. 8. Wliitir.cit, R. 


i:i9 


103 


14 


115 


167 


125 


25 


165 


129, 67 


39 


19 


11 


95 


23 


18 


75 


32 


1351 


108 


Coroner. 


















1 






















H. F. P!tlensl<e. F. 


229 


75 


28 


86'100129 


45 


103 


93 88 


49 


t.'2 


56 


.•54 


20 


23 68 


39 


1307 


32 


T. W. Hum, R 


108 


112 


13 


51 I 157 


116 


22 


188 


131 69 


41 


18 


10 


95 


23 


11 


78 


3-2 


1275 




Com.. Ist dist. 


















' 






















L T Hiee F 


158 
162 
















93 


76 
10 


27 
13 


471 62 


20 
27 


15 
22 




'.'. 


tMH 


101 


J." M. R.-k". H.. '.'..'. 
















.. 61 


18 


84 




397 





NOTES. 

Republican convention liekl Tuesday, August 29, 1899. W. S. Bol- 
ton, of Paxico, chairman : L. C. Johnson, of Alta Vista, secretary. 

Democratic convention held Saturday, September 2, 1899. M. F. 
Trivett, of Eskridge, chairman : P. R. Young, of Eskridge, secretary. 

People's Party convention held Saturday, September 2. 1899. Wm. 
Pringle, of Harveyville. chairman : L. T. Rice, of Halifax, secretary. 

In the Republican convention there were contests for the office of 

treasurer, sheriff and register of deed^s. 

For treasurer: 1st ballot. 2d ballot. 

Gilbert Stewart, Maple Hill 44 

Fred Crafts, Alma ' 

W. E. Little. Mission Creek 

For sheriff : 

F. M. Meredith. Eskridge 

John Cromer, Volland 

W. Chillson, Alma 

'For register of deeds: 

T). U. Millison, Chalk 

W. (}. Weaver. Alma 

I H. Hopps. Wabaunsee 



41 
12 

1st ballot. 

48 
28 
21 



37 

8 

2d ballot. 

56 

28 

9 

1st ballot. 

50 
44 

•> 



2U0 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAU>'!SKE COUNTY, KAS. 



Wabaunsee County Election Returns. 1900. 



('ANrnUATKS. 



Pres. electors. 

MoKlnley, r 

BryHii. i 

Governor. 
W. E. Slaiiley. r ... 
J.W.Urcldoiitliiil.f. 

CoDtr 4tli district. 

J. M. Miiler, r 

Thos. H.Grisliaui,f 
Stato 8nn. 21st. dlst. 
G. W MoKiiiKlit. r. 
.1 . W.Liiwderiiiilk, t 

Kep.48th IMstrlct. I 
Jqo. Surtweel{8. r.. 
ArtiiurCale, f....| 
Prol)ttt.e .luage j 
Theo. 8. Splelnian.r 
Clerk district court 

Wyatt Uousli, r 

Will . Bciwes, f I 

County attorney. 

Fred Seaman, r 

J. R. Moreland, t.. 
County Supt. 

T.J. Ferry, r 

J. H. Houston, f... 

Commissioner. 
S. B. Chapman, r.. 
Wni. Prinyle. f 



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NOTES. 

Hepublican convention held July 17. 1900. W. S. Bolton, of Paxico. 
cliairman: S. C. Smith, of Wabaunsee, secretary. 

People's Party convention held July 28, 1900. Wm. Pringle, of 
Harveyvllle, chairman: J. W. Taylor, of Maple Hill, .secretary. 

Democratic convention held July 28, 1900. M. F. Trivett, of Esk- 
ridge. chairman: J. Y. Waugh, of Eskridge. secretary. 

With the exception of Mr. Spielman, every candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket resided in the southeast part of the county. 

One of the surprises of the convention was the nomination of Mr. 
Seaman for countv attorney, he not being an aspirant for the position. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. C. STRATTON, 
Pavilion. 



THE DAN MORLAN QUARRY, 
Near Eskridge. 





SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 35. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 47. 





RESIDENCE OF MR. FRED DIERKING, 
Rock Creek Township. 



RESIDENCE OF MR. AUG. MEINHARDT, 
Newbury Township. 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




GERMAN METHODIST CHURCH, Rock Creek. 




SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 66. 



RESIDENCE OF MR. A. E TRUE, Newbury. 




ROYAL NEIGHBORS' FLOAT, Alma, Woodman Day, August 30, 1900. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




MR. W. J. TOD'S RESIDENCE ON THE FOWLER RANCH, Maple Hill. 





MAPLE HILL SCHOOL, 1902. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




AN OLD LANDMARK. 

Where " Butter-Hanness" kept store in 1869. 




THE "MILL" SCHOOL. 
District No. 59, near Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




MAIN STREET, Alta Vista. 
Looking south from^Bnak. 



WOOD MAX HALL AND POST-OFFICE, 
Chalk. 




■ I 




RESIDENCE OF MR. OTTO WINKLER, 

Vera. 



RESIDENCE OF MR. FRANK SCHMIDT. 
Alma. 




SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 86. 



MISSION POINT BAPTIST CHURCH, 
Plumb Township. 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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RESIDENCE OF MR. PETE HOLMAN 
Alta Vista. 



RESIDENCE OF MR. W. H. MELROSE, 
Eskridge. 




SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 56, Keene. 



SONS OF VETERANS HALL, Keene. 





SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 7. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 44. 



1 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





THE OLD AND THE NEW. 
Schoolhouses at Halifax. 



THE EVANGELICAL CHURCH, ALMA. 
Before spire was built. 




SCHOOLHOUSE, DISTRICT No. 30. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





FRAME SCHOOL-HOUSE, Wabaunsee. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, Paxico. 




SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 71. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE, District No. 3. 



i 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




WE3LEYAN METHODIST COLLEGE, 
Eskridge. 




EARL BROS'. STORE. 
Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




WAUSHARA M. E. CHURCH. 



M. E. CHURCH AT HARVEYVILLE, 




OFFICE AND YARDS OF PAXICO LUMBER COMPANY. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 201 

Wabaunsee County Election Returns, 1901. 





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Commissioner, 3rcl District. 


















Andrew Bell 137 


45 


17 


4A 


35 


40 418 


=S<» 


J. E. Romick 


7 


176 


18 


8 


73 


77 359 









List of County Officers 



Wit}) ISlaroe ar){J Date of Gleetior). 



REPRESENTATIVE. 



Amasa Bartlett November 8, 1859 

Ernest Hohencek December 6, 1859 

Abner Allen " 6.1859 

E. J. Lines " 6, 1859 

C. B. Lines November 6, 1860 

J. B. Ingersoll " 5,1861 

A C. Pierce " 5, 1861 

T. F. Herzog " 5, 1861 

D.M.Johnston •' 4,1862 

D.M.Johnston " 3,1863 

H. D. Rhepard '• 8,1864 

H. D. Shepard " 7,1865 

H. J. Loomis " 6,1866 

Wm. Mitchell " .5,1867 

Samuel R. Weed " 6,1868 

A. Sellers " 5,1872 



A. Sellers November 4, 1873 

S.A.Baldwin " 3,1874 

S. A. Baldwin " 2, 1875 

E.N.Morehouse '• 7,1876 

L. J. McCrumb " 5,1878 

L. J. McCrumb •' 2,1880 

L. Pauly " 7, 1882' 

F.L.Raymond ' 5,1884 

Chas. Taylor " 2,1886 

A. F. Wade " 6, 1888 

John Rehrig " 4,1890 

Joseph Treu " 8,1892 

G. G. Cornell " 6, 1894 

L. Palenske '• 3. 1896 

W. M. Rinehart " 1898 

John Sudweeks " 1900 



COUNTY CLERK. 



Geo. M. Harvey March 28, 1859 

S. E. Beach November 8, 1859 



H. M. Seldon. 
H. M. Seldon*. 
S. H. Fairfield 
S. R. Weed.... 
J. M. Matheny 
G. W. Watson. 
U W. Watson. 
G. W. Watson 
T. N. Watts . . . 



5, 1861 

3, 1863 
7. 1865 

5. 1867 
2, 1869 
7, 1871 

4, 1873 
2, 1875 

6, 1877 



T. N. Watts November 4, 1879 

D.M.Gardner " 8,1881 

H. G. Licht " 6, 1883 

G.W.French " 3,1885 

G. W. Frencht " 8,1887 

C. O. Kinne " 5,1889 

C. O. Kinne " 11,1891 

J.R.Henderson " 7,1893 

J.R.Henderson '• 5.1895 

B. Buchli, Jr ■' 2,1897 

B. Buchli.Jr " 1899 



♦Died in office, S. A. Baldwin appointed July 3, 1865. 
tDied in office, C. O. Kinne appointed December 15, 1888. 



202 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



COUNTY TREASURER. 



Henry Harvey March 28, 1859 

H. M. SeUlon .^ . November 8, 1859 

S. E. Hcach * 5, 1861 

S. R. Weed " 3, 18«3 

S. R. Weed " 7, 1865 

S. H. Falrtleld " 5, 1867 

S. H. Fairfield " 2,1869 

Chas. Ross " 7, 1871 

Chas. Ross " 4, 1873 

Joseph Fields " 2,1875 

Joseph Fields " 6, 1877 



Chas. RO.SS November 4, 1879 

Chas. Ross '• 8,1881 

Joseph Fields " 6,1883 

Joseph Fields " 3,1885 

J. B Fields " 8, 1887 

F. Stuewe " 5, 1889 

J. H. Michaelis " 3,1891 

J. H. Michaelis '• 7,1893 

J. M. Lee " 5, 1H95 

J. M. Lee " 2, 1H97 

Jos. Latontaine " 1895) 



PROBATE JUDGE. 



J. M. Hubbard March 28, 18,59 

J. M. Hubbard November 8, 1859 

G. G. Hall " 4, 1862 

G. G. Hall " 8, 1864 

G.G.Hall " (5,1866 

G.G.Hall " 3,1868 

G. G. Hall " 8,1870 

G. G Hall " 5, 1872 

G.G.Hall " 3.1874 

G.G.Hall " 7,1876 

G.G.Hall " 5,1878 



J. T. Keagy Nov 

J. T. Keagy 

J. T. Keagy 

J. T, Keagy 

L. Richards 

L. T. Rice 

L. T. Rice 

L. J. Woodard 

L. J Woodard 

T. S. Spielman 

T. S. Spielman 



ember 



2, 1880 

7, 1882 

5, 1S84 

2, 1886 

6, 1888 
4, 1890 

8, 1892 
6, 1894 

3, 1896 
1898 
199U 



REGISTER OF DEEDS. 



Moses C. Welch March 28, 1859 

E. C D. Lines November 8, 18.59 

S. R. Weed " 5, 1861 

S.A.Baldwin " 3,1^63 

S. A. Baldwin " 7, 1865 

S. R. Weed " 5, 1867 

S.H.Fairfield " 2,1869 

S. H. Fairfield ," 7,1871 

S. H. Fairfield " 4,1873 

S.H.Fairfield " 2,1875 

S. H. Fairfield " 6,1877 



S. H. Fairfield November 4, 1879 

S.H.Fairfield " 8,1881 

S.H.Fairfield " 6,1883 

J.C.Henderson " 3,1885 

J.C.Henderson " 8,1887 

J.C.Henderson. '* 5,1889 

W. B. Small " 3, 1891 

W. B. Small " 7, 1893 

Emma Little " 5,1895 

C.H.Thompson " 2,1897 

D. U. Millison " 1899 



SHERIFF. 



Jehu Hodgson March 28, 1859 

Jehu Hodgson November 8, 1859 

Jehu Hodgson " 5,1861 

S.B.Harvey " y, 1863 

Geo. W. Daily '• 8,1864 

J. H. Pinkerton " 7,1865 

J. H. Pinkerton " 5,1867 

E. Hcrrick " 2,1869 

E. Herrick •' 7, 1871 

"^Boskin.son ■' 4,1873 

u H,x:^in*<''>i " 2,1875 

L.M. Galt.^J^e'^ " «• '«" 



O. M. Gardner November 4, 1879 

H. J. Pippert " 8, 1881 

H. J. Pippert " 6,1883 

J. M. Russell •' 3, 1885 

J.M.Russell " 8,1887 

S. E. Hull " 5, 1889 

H. J. Palenske " 3,1891 

H. J. Palenske " 7,1893 

Wm. Treu " 5,1895 

Wm. Treu " 2,1897 

FredJ. Frey " 1899 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 203 



COUNTY ATTORNEY. 



R. G. Terry March 28, 1859 

W. Odlin November 8, 1859 

A. H. Case (Dist. Atty) " b, 1861 

A. H. Case (Dist. Atty) 3, 1863 

E. J Lines 8, 1864 

N. H. Whittemore 6,1866 

N. H. Whittemore 3,1868 

N. H. Whittemore*.... 8,1870 

J. T Keagv •• 5,1872 

J.T. Keagy ' 3.1874 

W. A. Doolittle '• 7. 1876 

W. A. Doolittle •• 5,1878 



G. G. Cornell 


..November 2. 1880 


G. G. Cornell 




7. 1882 


W. A. Doolittle ... 




5, 1884 


J. B. Barnes 




2, 1886 


J. B. Barnes 




6, 1888 


J. H. Jones 




4, 1890 


J. H. Jones 




8 1892 


J. B. Barnes 




6, 1894 


H. B. Jones 




3, 1896 


C. E. Carroll 




1898 


F. A. Seaman 




1900 



CLERK DISTRICT COURT. 



E. C. D. Lines December 6, 1859 

J. V. B. Thompson Novembers, 1861 

S. R. Weed •■ 4, 1862 

S. R. Weed •• 8, 18&4 

S. R. Weed 6,1866 

S. R. Weed ■ 3, 1868 

R. G. Mossman • 8,1870 

R. G. Mossman ■ 5,1872 

W. A. Doolittle " 4, 1873 

Percival Hawes " 3,1874 

A.W.Gregory " 2,1875 

H. G. Licht ■• 7,1876 



H. G. Licht November 5, 1878 



H. G. Licht. 

H. G. Licht 

T. S. Spiel man. 
T. S. Spielman. 
T. S. Spielman. 

H. B. Jones 

H. B. Jones 

W. G. Weaver.. 
W. G. Weaver.. 
Wyatt Roush .. 
Wyatt Roush .. 



2, 1880 

7, 1882 

5, 1884 

2, 1886 

6, 1888 
4, 1890 

8, 1892 
6, 1894 

3, 1896 
1898 
1900 



SURVEYOR. 



G. Zwanziger March 28, 1859 

G. Zwanziger November 8, 1859 

G. Zwanziger • 5,1861 

J.E.Evans •• 3,1863 

G. Zwanziger " 7.1865 

S. R. Weed ■■ 5,1867 

J. M. Matheny " 2,1869 

G. Zwanziger " 7,1871 

G. Zwanziger " 4,1873 

S. R. Weed " 2, 1875 

J.B.Easter " 6,1877 

W. T. Mahan " 4,1879 



W. T. Mahan November 8, 1881 

W. T. Mahan 

W. D. Deans 

W. D. Deans 

W. D. Deans 

B. Buchli. Sr 

B. Buchli, Sr 

W. D. Deans 

J. H. Jonest October 14, 1897 

J. H. Jones November 2, 1897 

W. S. Whitlock • 1899 



«, 


1883 


3, 


1885 


8, 


1887 


" 5> 


1889 


3. 


1891 


'■ 7, 


1893 


" a, 


1895 



COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



J. E. Piatt March 28. 18.39 

J. H. Gould November 8. 1859 

J. H. Gould '• 6, 1860 

J. H. Gould ■■ 4, 1862 

Isaiah Harris 7,1865 

Isaiah Harris • 6,1866 

T. M. Allen " 3, 1868 

T.M.Allen " 2,1869 

R. M. Tunnell " 8,1870 

W.F.Cotton " 7,1871 

W. S. McCormick " 5, 1872 

F. W. Kroenke ' 3,1874 

W. E. Richey ' 2,1875 



W. E. Richey 


..November 7, 1876 


Matt Thomson 


5, 1878 


Matt Thomson 


2 1880 


Matt Thomson 


7, 1882 


Matt Thomson 


5, 1884 


Matt Thomson 


2, 1886 


W. W. Ramey 


6, 1888 


Florence Dickinson. 


4, 1890 


Geo. L. Clothier 


8, 1892 


C.C.Carter 


6, 1894 


Dow Busenbark 


3, 1896 


Dow Busenbark 


1898 


T. J Perry 


1900 



*Died in office, J. T. Keagy appointed. 

tMr. Deans died in office. Mr. Jones appointed. 



J 



204 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



CORONER. 



August Brasche March 28, 1859 

August Urasche November 8, 1859 

August Brasche " 5.1861 

August Brasche 3,1863 

August Brasche 7.1865 

August Brasche " 5, 186V 

August Brasche " 2,1869 

C.S.Montgomery " 7,1871 

Henry Schmitz ' 4.1873 

T. N. Watts •■ 2, 1875 

J.P.Brown " 6.1877 

J. P. Brown " 4, 1879 



E. W. Eldrldge November 8, 1881 

E. W. Weems " 6.1883 

J. C. McElvain " .^ 1884 

C. J. Sawyer " 3, li*85 

E. W. Eldridge " 2, 1886 

E. W. Eldridge " 8,1887 

T. H. Hall " 5, 1889 

T. H. Hall " 3, 1891 

H.R.Schmidt " 7,1893 

G. C. Beals " 5. 1895 

H. R.Schmidt " 2, 1897 

H. F. Palenske '• 1899 



ASSESSOR. 



H. M. Seldon March 31, 1860 

H. J. Loomis November 6, 1860 

D. L. Bates '■ 5, 1861 

Wm. Kreig " 3,1863 



Geo. M. Harvey November 7, 186.=s 

John Herriott " 5,1867 

E. Herrick " 3, 1868 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 
(Henry Harvey, J. M. Hubbard and G. Zwanziger appointed by Governor.) 



James W. Blain March 6, 1860 

James B. IngcrsoU " 6,1860 

G. Zwanziger " 6,1860 

Wm. Mitchell November 6, 1860 

F. X. Hebrank " 6,1860 

J. B. IngersoU " 6,1860 

Wm. Mitchell " 5,1861 

F. X. Hebrank " 5.1861 

J. B. IngersoU " .5,1861 

E. R. McCurdy " 3,1863 

Joseph Treu " 3.1863 

H. D. Shepard " 3,1863 

Wm. Mitchell " 7.1865 

Henry Schmitz " 7.1865 

W. D. Ewing " 7,1865 

Henry Schmitz " 5,1867 

H. M. Sanford " 5,1867 

Morris Walton " 5, 1867 

JohnCopp " 2,1869 

Enoch Piatt "' 2,1869 

Allen Hodgson " 2,1869 

Joseph Thoes " 7, 1871 

Allen Hodgson • 7,1871 

Allen Phillips " 7,1871 

Joseph Thoes "' 4,1873 

J. W. Crandall • 4.1873 

A.E.True " 4,1873 

J. R. Fix " 2,1875 



W. E. Little November 2, 1875 

J. R. Gross '• 2, 1875 

Lorenz Pauly " 6' 1877 

Geo. W. French " 6.1877 

Wm. Mitchell " 6,1877 

L. Pauly " 5, 1878 

F.L.Raymond " 2,1880 

Geo. Mogge " 8, 1881 

B. H. Younker " 8, 1881 

J. W. Core " 7, 1882 

A. E. True " 6, 1883 

A. F. Wade " .3, 1885 

G.W.Greenwood " 2,1886 

Joseph Treu " 8, 1887 

Eli Walton " 6, 1888 

Ed Worsley " 5,1889 

Joseph Treu " 4, 1890 

Eli Walton " 3, 1891 

Moritz Hund ' 8,1892 

P.F.Johnson " 7,1893 

C. N. Earl " 6, 1894 

Robert Strowig " 5,1895 

Joseph M. Eck " 3,1896 

C. N. Earl " 2,1897 

Robert Strowig " 1898 

L. T. Rice " 1899 

Wm. Pringle " 1900 

Andrew Bell " 1901 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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IS 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 205 



The Old Santa Fe Trail. 



At the old mail station at Elm creek, just over the line in Brecken- 
ridge (now Lyon Co.) we first became initiated into the mysteries of 
plainscraft. 

It was here that was born the desire to know more of the bound- 
less West — to see with our own eyes the land of the Aztec. 

Throug'h the influence of an uncle, Mr. Ben. Thomson, of Inde- 
pendence, Mo., my father was appointed agent of the Overland Mail 
Company (carrying the U. S. mail from Independence, Mo. to Santa 
Fe, New Mexico). 

My father entered upon his duties March 1, 1859, and for three 
years we lived at the old station, building the frame house seen in the 
illustration in 1859. The old log buildings were constructed several 
years before by former agents of the mail company. 

In the Southeast corner of Richardson county (now Wabaunsee) 
the military road from Fort Leavenworth formed a junction with the 
greatest and most extensively traveled thoroughfare on the American 
continent. 

For three quarters of a century the people of more than a hundred 
flourishing towns in the valley of the Rio Grande and old Mexico had 
received their supplies in wagons drawn by mules and oxen over the 
historic-Santa Fe trail. 

From small ventures the traffic increased until goods to the value 
of two millions of dollars were annually purchased from the merchants 
of Kansas City, Independence. Lexington and Boonville (Old Franklin). 

This meant the employment of an army of men and the purchase 
of thousands of (.xen and mules, with hundreds of wagons to meet the 
constantly increasing demands of the trade between the people of the 
States and those of New Mexico. 

Having crossed the plains half a score of times during the sixties 
and having been a quasi resident of. the territories for nearly three 
years during that period our knowledge of the then existing conditions 
is based upon actual experience among the participants in the stirring 
scenes of a most eventful period in our country's history. 

Our stay at the old mail station we regard as the most pleasurable 
of our existence. For three years we unthoughtedly reveled in an 



206 EA RLY HISTORY OB^ WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

atmosphere of romantic incident. With boyish eas'erness we listened 
to tales of frontier life— to the stories told by plainsmen, army officers, 
soldiers in the ranks, and employes of the mail company— each and 
every one of whom had courted danger from every standpoint. 

While among the relators there were some poltroons there were 
many heroes — heroes without dreaming of it. There was no bragga- 
docio in manner or speech. Tlie greatest difficulty lay in eliciting 
facts from unwilling tongues: only the mock hero is prone to lavish 
and extravagant recitals of tales of personal prowess that have an exis- 
tence only in the relator's vivid imagery. 

But few other than those who know the facts can realize the 
immense volume of trade that passed over the trail through Wabaun- 
see county to Santa Fe prior to the advent of the iron horse. 

For days the rumble of the heavily laden wagons, the cracking of 
whips, and the noise incident to a constant passing of trains made a 
din indescribable and almost incessant. During the summer season 
hundreds of wagons passed daily on their way to Santa Fe. During 
the Pike's Peak excitement in '59 as many as .300 vehicles of all 
descriptions would go into camp near the old mail station at the Elm 
creek crossing. In this motley crowd would be from 500 to 1,000 men 
— but few women — of a dozen nationalities. Usually Americans pre- 
dominated but our Mexican neighbors came in for a clo.se second. 

Fully one-half of the overland traffic was carried on by Mexican 
freighters — in wagons drawn by mules or oxen — about equally divided. 

Around the nightly camptires could be heard songs of mirth, tales 
of adventure, and recitals that would almost congeal the blood in one's 
veins. Possibly exaggeration was purposely engrafted for the editica- 
tion — or discomfiture— of the tenderfoot. 

That in the youthful listener the desire was enkindled to know 
more of the great plains, the historic ground and the quaint people 
beyond was but natural. As with the New England boy the stories of 
people beyond the seas begot a longing to cross the ocean so with the 
youth living on the margin of the Great American Desert — whether 
on the prairies of Kansas or the borders of Missouri— there was early 
instilled in his veins an unquenchable longing to cross the plains. 

He would view with his own eyes the halls of the Montezumas. The 
weird and gruesome tales of the deadly trail across the "Jornada"* 
incited no fears in the boy who Would brave every danger to do as 
many boys had done before him. 

*This refers to the dry route between the Cimarron crossing of the 
Arkansas and the Cimarron (Lost) river. The distance trains were 
compelled to travel without water varied from 60 to 90 miles and dur- 
ing a dry time there was no water for man or beast, except that carried 
in kegs from the tepid waters of the Arkansas or the brackish liquid 
oozing through the sands of the Cimarron. Sometimes whole trains 
would perish and the bones lay bleaching on the Plains. For this 
reason this part of the trail was called "Jornada del Muerto"— "The 
journey of the Dead." 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 207 



He would see the ^ 'Bier Timbers," but in the scattering cotton- 
woods of the Upper Arkansas there was naught but disappointment. 
"Old Fort Atkinson" dwindled into insignificance as the few rods of 
dilapidated stone and adobe walls loomed into view. "Raton Pass," 
"Apache Hill" and the "Turkey Mountains" divested of the romance 
clinging to their names become commonplace, and even Historic Santa 
Fe, Old Baldy Mountain and the turbulent Rio Grande are not worth 
the candle as compared with the pleasant memories clustered about 
the home fireside and the old log cabin of the early pioneers. 

But lack of water wasn't the only unpleasant feature of a journey 
over the old trail. The Indians were a constant source of anxiety if 
not of vexation and trouble. Wagon-masters in charge of trains, no 
matter how large the outfit were given opportunities to disgorge, it 
was a case of put up or lose a "whoa-haw." The custom was to put up 
a sufficient amount of bacon, flour, sugar and coffee for a feast — the 
amount depending on the hostile attitude of the begging Indians, 
their numbers, or estimated ability to enforce their demands. 

The leader of every band of Indians, large or small, went armed 
with his begging-paper. It was just as essential as any other part of 
a warrior's equipment— not so war-like, but equally effective in 
replenishing the empty larder as the rifle and lance, or bow and arrow. 
But all this is changed — by that modern cizilizer, the railroad. The 
modern school-house with its patent seats stands where stood the 
Indian Tepee. Forty years ago (1862) the writer in search of Indian 
curios wandered down the banks of the Pawnee (near Larned) and 
fctund more than he was looking for. He found himself ushered into 
the presence of Satank;* was asked to dine, and— well, he didn't 
refuse. But as Mr. Satank will hardly see these lines and no apology 
be demanded, we will take the liberty of saying that the coffee was 
too strong, the plum stew too sour, and the buffalo soup was altogether 
too fresh. The horn spoons and mussel shell ladles were interesting 
as curiosities but "by the great horn spoon" our appetite did not crave 
soup without salt conveyed to the mouth in a mussel shell. But we 
never grumbled at the fare. Just two years before Satank had settled 
his saore with Peacock at the mouth of the Walnut. Possibly ou|- 
knowledge of this fact caused us to partake of the fare set before us 
with a seeming relish. As we were about starting on our return trip 
to camp we were somewhat startled by a blast from Satank's bugle 
(any person passing over the Santa P'e trail from '60 to '65 will remem- 
ber Satank and his bugle). The blast brought into his presence a 
young Indian mounted on a beautiful pony and leading Satank's war- 
horse. The old chief was going to our camp but he had no idea of 



*His begging paper gave us the first intimation as to his name. 



208 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

walking, nor of pennitlintr oiirsclf to enjoy this niiicli preferred privi- 
lege. We rodc-at. Satank's invitation. It may be that our reaay 
acquiescence in coniplyiiiK' with tlie old chief's every request was due 
to some hypnotic influence, for wliich we were then unable to account. 
Rut at tills, the eleventh hour, we niln{j:le our thanks with contjratu- 
lations. The tlianks are lor Satank and the congratulations for our- 
self— that we are here to chronicle this Ion? deferred account of our 
first banquet with the wiliest of Kiowas in his tepee on the banks of 
the Arkansas. 

Durii)},'^ the summer of 1867 the combined tribes of the plains dis- 
puted the passing of all trains over the Santa Fe trail. If there were 
exceptions the fact was due to advantages in the matter of force or 
organization not in favor of the Indians. They were peaceable or 
otherwise as the probability of losing their scalps seemed apparent. 
But with the advent of the railroad came the conviction to the 
Indian that it was time to be good. The mysterious power of the 
"talking wire" and the facility with which troops could be transported 
from one point to another caused Mr. Lo to put on his thinking cap. 
This thing of swooping down on a train and cutting out a few of the 
hindmost wagons was ended. The iron horse could not be stampeded, 
nor could his locomotion be stopped by the old process of cutting the 
ham-strings. Corraling a train and cutting off the water supply; 
shooting and scalping the teamsters while guarding the herds of cattle 
or mules; picking them off while hastily constructing breastworks 
behind which to conceal their bodies — are among the things of the 
past, and are less to be attributed to a change of heart on the part of 
the Indian tlian to the civilizing influences exerted by the iron horse. 

This article on the Old Trail would be incomplete without some 
reference to the overland mail— carried in the sixties in a Concord 
coacli drawn by six mules with an outrider* — as a promoter of speed. 
Witli each coach were three men and occasionally one or more extra 
coaches were required. The schedule time from Independence to 
Santa Fe was twenty days until 1860, when it was reduced to fifteen 

, *Boyish pleasure never assumed the superlative form in a ^iiore 
eminent degree than in our own case while playing the role of outrider 
on tlie overland mail. If we could manage to meet the mail at Wil- 
mington and be "whipper-up" to the old station and thence to 142 
creek (of course we wanted to go there after the mail) we would feel 
as though we had met with an unusual piece of good luck. Our pre- 
dilection for this employment is probably responsible for our failure to 
take a course at college. Being proffered a scholarship (at Lebanon 
college, Tenn.) my brother Bavis remarked that a place on the mail 
line would be more to my liking. My father's displeasure in the mat- 
ter was shown by his never leferring to the matter again. But we are 
not complaining. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 209 



days. Until 1859 Lost Springs was the last station and outfitting 
point. Beyond this only "long-route mules" were serviceable, the 
broken-down and short winded "short-route mules" being detailed for 
service on short drives on the east and west ends of the line. Here, 
time was made, as much as 150 miles being covered in the first 24 
hours. Conductors and driverswere heavily armed as a protection to 
the mail and the large sums of money sent in the care of the company. 
Though seldom attacked the crews were frequently held up by Indians 
with begging papers. This meant generous treatment or imminent 
risk of the consequences, that were, as a rule, averted. The killing of 
the Smith brothers referred to in "Bill Cole's Last Drive" was an 
exception— one that had little effect in curtailing the number of 
applications for eniployment at the office of the Overland Mail 
Company. 

As early as 1831, the town of Franklin, 150 miles west of St. Louis, 
was an outfitting point for the Santa Fe traders. 

Wagons, drawn by oxen, were first used in 1829, by Major Riley, 
who, with three companies of infantry and one of riflemen, escorted 
the caravan as far as Choteau Island on the Arkansas. The train 
being attacked by Indians the escort continued with the caravan as 
far as Sand creek. The use of oxen by Major Riley was a surprise to 
plainsmen. The oxen stood the trip as well, if not better, than mules 
and after that time about half the freighters used oxen. 

As early as 1831 Council Grove was used as an outfitting point by 
fur traders and emigrants to Oregon, though up to that time there 
was not a house west of Independence. The name— Council Grove — 
had its origin in the fact that in 1825 Messrs Reeves, Sibley and Math- 
ers, commissioners appointed to establish and mark a road from Inde- 
pendence to Santa Fe, made a treaty with the Osages to gain their 
consent to the establishment of the road. The council was held in the 
Grove at the crossing of the Neosho. The caravans organized here by 
electing a captain, detailing guards, etc., for the protection of the 
caravan while passing through the hostile tribes of the plains, and the 
more dangerous hordes of robbers that preyed on unsuspecting outfits 
at will. 

In 1843, large escorts, under Capt. Philip St. George Cook accom- 
panied the caravans as far as the Arkansas river. 

An item from "Annals of the Great Western Plains" is deserving 
of a place here. "In 1857, 9,884 wagons left Kansas City for New 
Mexico. Now, if these wagons were all in one train, they would make 
a caravan 223 miles long, with 98,840 mules and oxen, and freighting 
an amount of merchandise equal to 59,304,000 lbs." 

As fully as many wagons were outfitted at Leavenworth, Inde- 



21U EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



pcndence and other points the above figures represent not more than 
lialf tlie trallic passinj^ over tlie old trail. 

Amontj: tlie items of tratlic received at Kansas City that year was 
one of r^O.OOO butTalo robes. 

Another item in the "Annals" says: "As early as 1840 it was not 
imeoninion. on tlio arrival of Mackinaw boats, to see as many as 300 or 
400 men on tlie levee (at Kansas Cityj at one time, and all of them buy- 
ing more or less from the traders." 

Among other items of trade were rings that cost ten cents in St. 
Louis and sold to the Indians for five or six dollars. In view of these 
prices there need be no cause for wonder at the fabulous fortunes piled 
up by the Astors, 

Among the landmarks of the Old Trail not yet obliterated is an 
old log house on HlutT creek, twelve miles east of Council Grove— made 
memorable as the home of the noted guerilla, Bill Anderson. In 1862, 
Bill was a harmless youth, to all appearances at least. He was a regu- 
lar attendant at the neighborhood debates* and spelling schools, taking 
a part, with other young men, in the vicinity of his old home. Bill's 
first trip, and we believe his last, across the plains, was with Parker's 
mule train, just before the civil war. On this trip Bill became an 
expert at pistol practice, affected broad-brimmed hats and in a few 
months cast his lot with Quantrill; was at the sacking of Lawrence 
and on the night of July 3, 1802, burned Baker's stone house at the 
Santa Fe crossing of Rock creek, shooting Baker as he attempted to 
escape through the cellar window. Bill celebrated the 4th the follow- 
ing morning by shooting 36 holes through the front door of the old 
stage station at Elm creek — then occupied by Henry Jacobi. The bed 
in which two children slept was tilled with lead but the little ones 
were unharmed. 

*At one of these debates (so deeply impressed on memory's tablet, 
as never to be effaced), in which Bill took part in January, 1862, held 
at Charley Withington's, at the crossing of 142 creek, the' writer had 
the honor of acting as secretary. As we remember it a hand.some 
Miss "Muller"— and as worthy and accomplished as handsome — pre- 
sided as one of the judges. Tf the "Judge" failed, through fickleness, 
or from dilatory uncertainty, to make hay while the sun shone so 
brightly it is safe to say that as he looks regretfully down the long 
vista of years his eyes are never so bedimmed that he is unable to see 
the application of Whittier's truthful lines: "It might liave been." 

As to Bill Anderson (in his boyhood days he was known by no other 
name than Bill): Mild in manner and timid in speech, as one might 
have observed him that evening. Bill was a study. Tall and straight 
as an Indian, with his light blue eyes and jet black hair— long and 
flowing, one can harily realize that within one short year, with bridle 
reins in his teeth and a revolver in either hand. Bill Anderson could 
be transformed into a living exemplification of Sherman's truism that 
"war is hell." 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 211 

Santa Fe was the Mecca of boys living on the border in the sixties 
desirous of graduating in plainscraft. This city has the honor of 
being the oldest town but one in the United States. At the time my 
father was agent for the Mail company Santa Fe was the western 
terminus of the line. It is the capital of New Mexico now as it was 
then. It boasts of some fine buildings but a large majority of the 
residences are built of ad'obe. Many wealthy families are located here, 
having grown rich in the mining, ranching or mercantile business — 
being the proprietors of many of the trains that in the early days 
hauled all their merchandise from points on the Missouri river on the 
great thorouglifare passing through Wabaunsee county. 

While many of the families residing here were fabulously rich the 
worldly possessions of the great majority is a matter of but little 
concern to the ta.v collector and but little more perhaps to the average 
Mexican, provided he is of the "Greaser" class and the average Mexi- 
can is always a "Greaser." 

Give the Greaser a serapa (Mexican blanket), a burro (donkey) and 
a few rich relations on his visiting list and he is independent. Add to 
these p()S.sessions a horse, saddle, a huge pair of spurs, and a broad- 
brimmed hat, and he is nionarch, in a literal sense, of all he surveys; 
and. in many instances, of all he can lay his hands on. 

The Greaser's dream of happiness is to marry some rich man's 
daughter that he may live at his ease— and, at the expense of his wife's 
relations. Failing in this he is content to become an outlaw, and firm 
in the belief that the world owes him a living he starts out to look it 
up. As to whether it is to be found at the gambling table, or at the 
end of a lasso, it is immaterial to him. 

But these remarks refer only to the reckless class whom the fates 
ordained should be born in New Mexico. Rowdies with the self-same 
characteristics are not peculiar to that latitude, to the climate, or to 
the people. 

Though Santa Fe was the terminal point of the mail line from 
Independence the trail over which the thousands of tons of freight 
were hauled extended far down the Rio Grande and beyond into old 
Mexico. 

On the lower Rio Grande is another "Jornada del Muerto"— an 
arid waste of sand and cactus, interspersed with sage-brush and some 
dwarfed mesquite. There are no trees and yet the arid plain is not 
destitute of fuel. A species of cactus fifteen feet in height and thick 
as a man's body is found here. This and the sage-brush is utilized as 
a substitute for the more solid woods abounding in the mountains. 

Then, there is the mesquite, the greater part of which, grows 
under ground. In the past, when we were told that on the arid plains 
of New Mexico wood was obtained by digging, we concluded that the 



212 EARLY IIISTOllY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

narration would make a fitting appendix to the stories of Muncliausen, 
but sucli is a fact. 

Prior to the advent of the railroad, nearly all the fuel used by the 
troops at Fort Craig, on the Lower Rio Grande, was nothing more 
nor less than the roots of the mesquite— a small bush furnishing as 
much as a cord of wood. These roots are very easily dug from the 
sandy soil and are less crooked than much of the pinon and other 
scrubby timber growing in the foot-hills. 

Though in a dry time the stretch of arid plain without water lies 
between terminal points ninety miles apart there are occasional rains 
or downpours that till up the holes along the route across the Jornada. 

At the Point of Rocks was one of these holes at which water was 
occasionally found after a hard rain. The place is what the name 
indicates— a rough, jagged promontory, not very high above the sur- 
rounding country, but conspicuous by reason of its altitude above the 
surrounding plains. Here, the dust-begrimed traveler was supplied 
with a fair quality of water with which to quench his thirst after his 
weary march. 

In times past, the weary traveler looked forward to his arrival at 
this point on his route with feelings of joy, mingled with a dread that 
could not be shaken off. Though almost fami.shed, he hardly dared 
approach the water holes for fear that the draught, though refreshing, 
might be his last. He feared that his stooping to drink might be the 
signal for the launching of a shower of arrows sent on their deadly 
errand by a score of Indians that might lay concealed behind the 
boulders. 

Many a lone expressman or mail carrier met his death at the hands 
of the treacherous Apaches at the Point of Rocks. 

But connected with the history of the old trail are hundreds of 
horrifying- incidents for which the Indian is in nowise responsible. 
Just beyond the point where the old trail emerged from the mountains 
at the foot of Raton pass was a little clump of willows where in 1868 
an American miner encamped for the last time. He was on his way to 
the "States," doubtless anticipating the many pleasures in store for 
him at the old homestead. There was no railroad then and he could 
not afford the luxury of a ride in the mail coach at twenty-five cents a 
mile. To his mind it would be extravagant to expend for stage fare, 
at the rate of $25 per day, money that had been earned by hard work 
at perhaps a half a hundred per month. 

Purchasing a burro, he started with his camping outfit for home. 
He had saved considerable money and for this, probably, he was way- 
laid and murdered. His body was found, wrapped in his blankets and 
cast away in the willows— another victim whose murder is unavenged. 
Thirty-four years have gone by and mayhap loving friends are yet 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




MEXICAN BURROS CARRYING WOOD. 




IN THE TURKEY MOUNTAINS. 
On the old Santa Fe trail. 



EARLYHISTORYOF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 213 

listening for the footsteps of him who will never come. But a city 
(Raton) now occupies the spot and long ago neighboring church bells 
have tolled the requiem of the departed spirit of the victim of the 
assassin's treachery. 

Less than a day's drive from this point the old trail crossed the 
Cimarron, just as it emerges from the mountains. Here, lived Lucien 
B. Maxwell, a Frenchman, one of the Fremont party, who, with Kit 
Carson, and several other members, settled in New Mexico, married 
Spanish women, and thereby came into possession of princely fortunes. 
Maxwell's possessions exceeded in area several counties as large as our 
own. Though autocratic, the old guide and ranchman was generous 
to a fault. His will was the only law recognized by the hundreds of 
Indians and Mexicans who looked to him for employment, and— 
protection. 

A one-company post was at one time established within a stone's 
throw of Maxwell's home, but certainly not by reason of any concern 
that might be felt for the safety of himself or his people. The whole 
Ute tribe was as absolutely under his control as is an obedient child to 
its mother. Then, the Mexicans about the place were always suflB- 
ciently numerous to guarantee immunity from the depredations of any 
marauding bands of plains Indians. 

Separated by an adobe wall from the Maxwell home stands a two- 
story hotel of seventy rooms— Lambert's Hotel— that would be a credit 
to any city. Though the walls are of adobe you would never suspect 
it— they being plastered and penciled in imitation of stone and the 
iron caps over the windows with the heavy iron cornice above gives 
the building an appearance that inspires the question— how came it 
here? Look for the answer in the turbid waters of the Cimarron— 
made turbid by the miners washing for gold. Here the miners would 
spend their winters and with the vanishing snows on the range they 
would return to the diggings— wiser, maybe, but penniless. 

Though a number of the rooms are now unused the handsome 
carpets and furnishings of others are indicative of the luxurious tastes 
of the man who built the hotel — Mr. Lambert. 

But Lambert's bar-room has a record. Though built in 1871 no 
less than 25 men have died with their boots on in front of Lambert's 
bar. A flash of steel or a shot and another score was settled— another 
grudge wiped out. 

One wouldn't think that the quiet, thin-faced Frenchman who 
today attends personally to the comfort of his guests at the Hotel 
Lambert had, in the years gone by, with a nerve just as cool, and a 
face just as calm, witnessed time and again, in his own house, scenes 
that would rival those of the French revolution. In the days prior to 
the advent of the railroad Lambert's bar-room, a score of times, pre- 



214 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

sented more the appearance of a slautrhter-pen than of a hotel of 
Metropolitan pretensions. Rut the tourist who todjty conies in con- 
tact witli tile proprietor of the only hotel at the old liistoric ranch 
sees only the genial host in Mr. Lanihert, the friend and companioi»of 
Maxwell. 

While niakintf a tri[) over the Santa Fe trail in ISOT two of our 
teamsters met with a narrow escape from the Indians that may be of 
especial interest to all ''tenderfeet" who may pass that way— on the 
cars. 

The name of one of them was Schaffer, a young Jew, who had 
taken advantage of the high wages paid at the time (on account of 
the Indian hostilities) to laise the funds necessary to get a start in 
the wool business. The air castles he was continually building 
with reference to the profits he hoped to realize in his proposed wool 
speculation lixed upon hi n the sobriquet of "Wool Dealer." During 
the whole trip he was known by no other name, so by that name we 
will call him. One of the six mules composi)ig Wool Dealer's team 
was remarkable for contrariness. The wool speculator had consider- 
able difficulty in picking his team from the herd but this mule he 
claimed to know by his "general appearance." On this account that 
particular mule was dubbed: "General Appearance." 

While encamped at Fort Dodge General Appearance, concluding, 
perhaps, that it was unwise to enter any farther Into any wool specu- 
lations, resolved to follow the fortunes of his master no longer. At 
any rate, he started out over the hills north of the post, followed by 
Wool Dealer and a chosfen companion. F()r three or four miles tlie 
boys followed the mule. 

Then they espied in thte distance what they supposed to be a band 
of Indians on the march— about 500 they thought. To be continually 
joked about the prospects of the wool trade was anything but desirable, 
but life in camp was preferable, by all odds, to the fate in store for 
them in case of capture by the Indians. 

Rapidly taking in the situation the boys put spurs to their saddle 
mules and struck for camp. In a short time they left the formidable 
band of Indians far in the rear. The boys had got within about a 
mile of camp, and were congratulating themselves on their fortunate 
escape when a new danger presented itself. 

Nearly in their front and just behind a little knoll, one of the 
boys (more scared than the other) saw four or five Indians trying to 
cut otf their retreat. Galloping down a ravine, they followed the old 
trail into camp, without having been seen, as they supposed, by the 
straggling Indians. 

The boys told the story of their narrow escape, and the facts being 



EA RLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUXTY, KAN. 215 



communicated to General Brooke he sent out a squad of soldiers to 
reconnoitre. 

In a short time the soldiers overtook the four or five "straggling 
Indians." whom they found to be scouts from tlie fort on their way to 
meet the rock train, hauling stone from the quarries on Saw-Log 
creek. The rock train proved to be what the boys had mistaken for 
the band of Indians on the march. 

"Wool Dealer and his companion never heard the last of their 
''Thrilling adventures among the Kiowas, or of ''How we lost the old 
mule at Fort Dodge." 

On our first trip to Santa Fe over the Old Trail we were impressed 
with the number of goats and burros to be seen everywhere. Back in 
the states a goat is a curiosity and a donkey more of a rarity than his 
bearded lordship. 

Goats are .sometimes kept about the barnyards of our eastern 
neighbors under the impression that their presence is desirable by 
reason of the possession on the part of the goat of peculiar disinfect- 
ing properties. 

If there is any foundation in this, the country about the western 
terminus of the old trail should be, as it is, a healthful country, but it 
is doubtful about the goat being entitled to any part of the credit 
due for the fact. At any rate the two animals named are serviceable 
Creatures and we are unable to see how their place could well be filled. 

The goat is as essential to the welfare of our Xew Mexican neigh- 
bors as is the cow to the average Kansan. The ranchman without his 
herd of goats is an exception. The milk of cows is considered 
unhealthful as food for the human family and good for calves only. A 
Mexican, though the owner of fifty cows would not milk one of them, 
but would keep a herd of goats for the purpose of supplying the fam- 
ily with milk, cheese, etc. By the way. Goat's milk cheese, as an 
active agent In appeasing hunger is a product of no mean value, as the 
writer can testify from personal experience, and were we less willing 
to pander to our vitiated tastes, and more anxious to economize, so as 
to be enabled to live within -our means we would follow the example 
set by our neighbors by keeping a few goats for the cheap food 
products with which they would provide us. 

In other things besides the goat question is the example of our 
Mexican friends worthy of emulation— especially when we would view 
matters from an economical standpoint. A Kansas man must hitch 
a pair of big horses to a heavy lumber wagon to haul a load of wood, 
hay, or corn. If he finds it necessary to go to town for a few groceries, 
the same cumbersome wagon is called into requisition. 

With the Mexican it is different. Should he find the wood supply 
getting short he mounts his burro and starts for the nearest timber. 



216 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



In ii short time he returns with the wood but if you are a tenderfoot 
you may wonder what has become of the donkey. If you are a close 
observer you may discover his long eare and diminutive legs in front 
and beneath a huge mountain of wood. 

With a load of hay you would see as much of the burro as in the 
former case except the ears and legs as aforesaid. Y'ou would probably 
indulge in a little speculation as to what new motive power had been 
invented by the descendants of Montezuma. 

If our Mexican friend desires to go on a visit to his wife's people 
(which he often does) he has only to drive up to the door his favorite 
donkey, and the carriage is in waiting. It is not unusual to see a 
whole family riding upon a single donkey. It might be well to state, 
however, that the families that are in the habit of riding upon one 
donkey do not consist of more than four or five persons, but it is safe 
to add that their combined weight, in many cases, exceeds that of the 
donkey on which they are riding. 

If the head of the family finds it convenient to go on a long 
journey he invariably takes the donkey along— to ride when he is tired, 
for, when he is in a hurry, he invariably goes on foot — in a dog trot, 
driving the donkey before him. On such occasions the donkey is a 
great convenience, the driver can ride while he is resting. 

One must admit that the donkey isn't handsome, but he possesses 
many good qualities that recommend him. He does not object to eat- 
ing hay and a little corn or oats but such luxuries are the exception 
and not the rule. A few dry tufts of grass, and an occasional gunny- 
sack and he is content. His digestive organs are usually in good con- 
dition. It has been said that he can digest miners' overalls, rubber 
boots and stray fruit cans, but these statements are not well authen- 
ticated. 

But taken all in all, the burro, as a faithful servant of man is 
worthy of mention. He is hardy, or he would not survive the treat- 
ment he receives. It is claimed that he is a small eater. He might 
eat more but his opportunities in this direction are not usually good. 
He is reputed to be long lived. This is doubtless true, at least the 
writer never having seen a dead burro is not prepared to refute the 
statement. 

But of one thing he is assured, and that is that the burro is 
utilized in every possible way. The sheep herder carries his sack of 
meal from place to place on the back of his donkey. To the miner he 
is indispensible, carrying his provisions and prospecting outfit along 
precipices and over mountainous districts where a horse would not 
venture. He is well adapted to the work required of him; he is worthy 
of better treatment than he receives and is capable of serving man in 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




MEXICAN OVEN AND ADOBE HOUSE. 




GOAT CURIOSITY, 
On the old Santa Fe Trail. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 217 

a wider field of action. Success to tlie burro and may we have more 
of him. 

One of the many interesting land-marks of the western terminal 
point of the old Santa Fe trail is what is called the Pecos church, 
built more than .300 years ago by the Jesuit missionaries. The quaint 
carvings with which the edifice was oncfe adorned are yet to be seen in 
many of the '"casas" of the rancheros within a radius of many miles 
from the pile of debris that marks the site of the ancient edifice. 

But more interesting still is Old Fort Barclay, twenty miles east 
of Las Vegas. The fort is built in the form of a square. At two of 
the corners, diagonally opposite, is a turret, or block house, the walls 
of which are perforated with holes, through which rifles may be, and 
often have been, thrust, to repel the attacks of marauding bands of 
Apaches, that were wont to make their visits more frequent than 
pleasant. 

And that wasn't very long ago, either. This condition of things 
has existed for more than 300 years, and to this fact is due the quaint 
style of architecture peculiar to the country bordering on that part of 
the Santa Fe trail passing through New Mexico. The house of every 
ranchero is a fort. The home ranch is built in the form of a square 
with a court in the center. The roof is flat and the walls extending 
two feet above the roof furnish excellent means of defense against a 
hostile force. 

What was once a necessity is now a custom and the "plaza" is the 
rule and not the exception in the style of building peculiar to the 
Mexican ranch. 

Fort Fiarclay was for years the home of the proprietor of the 
Kroenig land grant. Mr. Kroenig was one of the scores of men, who, 
after their term of enlistment in the regular army had expired, had 
settled down in the land of the Aztec. He was an old friend and com- 
panion of Maxwell and Kit Carson, and like them, had been smitten 
by a fair Senorita, the charm of whose smile had weaned the soldier 
from a life on the tented field. Within the walls of Fort Barclay and 
for the time a member of the family of Don Julian Kroenig the writer 
of these lines had every reason to be assured that the placid old 
gentleman never regretted that the partner of his joys— and sorrows, 
maybe— was one of the daughters of Castile. 

While domiciled here as a receiver of forage for the Quarter- 
master's department at P\)rt Union (in the winter of '68 and '69) our 
duties were not so pressing as to debar us the privilege of becoming 
thoroughly acquainted with the Mexican character and it is with 
pleasure that we are enabled to testify to the many good traits of this 
quaint people. 

At a distance from the military posts, where the native population 



218 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

has not been contaminated by adverse American influences, hospitality 
is a leading^ trait. Americans receive a hearty welcome at the hands 
of the better classes, and right here it might be said that some of the 
fair occupants of these Mexican homes have, time and again, taken a 
special interest in the welfare of their American cousins— teaching 
tliem to foiget that back in the "States" bedimmed eyes awaited in 
vain their promised home-coming. 

The language of the people is the Spanish. Although Ollendorph 
claims that the pure Castilian is spoken in but two provinces of Spain, 
it may be said that comparatively few provincialisms have crept into 
the language, considering the isolation of the people from the mother 
country, the intermingling of the race with the native tribes of 
Indians, and other natural causes. 

Though it has been claimed by a number of the know-all family 
that the Spanish language, in its purity, is not spoken in New Mexico, 
one can rest assured that no fears need be entertained that should a 
native of the country be addressed in the Spanish language that he 
will not comprehend the meaning of the words spoken. 

The language is musical and flows from the lips in a way that adds 
much to the charm of conversation. Then, too, it is readily learned. 
There are many German residents in the country and their testimony 
is that the language can be mastered in half the time necessary to 
acquire equal familiarity with the English. 

A little insight into the construction of the language will readily 
account for the facility with which it can be learned. For instance, 
the gender of nouns is, in many cases, indicated by the terminal letter 
— the letter "o" representing the masculine, and ''a," the feminine 
gender. The following will illustrate our meaning: 

Muchacho, boy, Muchacha, girl, 

Ilermano, brother, Hermana, sister, 

Hijo, son. Hija, daughter. 

In other words the difference in gender is indicated by the primal 
letter, as padre, father, and mad re, mother. In these words the sim- 
ilarity to the Latin language is recognized. This is further illustrated 
by a comparison of the Latin and Spanish numerals. 



Latin 




% 








Spanish 


■1. Unus. 












L Uno, 


2. Duo. 












2. Dos. 


■A. Tres, 












;i Tres, 


4. Quatuor, 












4. Cuatro, 


5. Quinque, 












5. Cinco, 


H. Sex, 












G. Seis, 


7. Septem, 












7. Siete, 


8. Octo. 












8. Ocho, 


9. Novem, 












9. Nueve, 


10. Decem. 












10. Diez. 


From the above it is appai 


rent 


I that a 


per 


•son 


somewhat familiar with 


Latin will And the labor 


of 


acquiri 


ng 


a 


k 


nowk'dge of the Spanish 


language materially lessened. 













EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 219 

As to the time required to familiarize one's self with the language, 
that would depend, of course, on the degree of application with which 
the study is pursued, and the aptitude of the student. When one is 
thrown on his own resources, his percep^tive faculties are quickened, 
and his memory is the better prepared to endure the tax made upon it. 
The writer can testify to the truth of this statement, having passed 
several weeks with the family of Don Vicente Romero, at La Cueva. 

But one person on the ranch could speak a word of English. This 
was young Romero, who had received the benefit of a college educa- 
tion in the "States." Inasmuch as the greater part of his time was 
passed away from home, but little benefit was derived from his assist- 
ance in communicating with the native population. 

But the result with reference to acquiring a knowledge of the 
language was very satisfactory. The fact that the phrase, "chili-con- 
carne" referred to a conglomerate mass of meat, gravy, and red pep- 
per, with the latter ingredient largely in the majority, was learned at 
an early stage of the lingual development. 

The words almuerzo, comida, and cena (breakfast, dinner, and 
supper) were learned by their association with the several occasions 
when all met around the family board to discuss the superiority of 
"chili-con-carne" over the commonplace American dish of ham and 
eggs. 

But in the discussion let us not forget the more practical side of 
our subject lest by our digression our readers lose all interest in the 
Old Trail. 

A government train consisted of 26 wagons, drawn by six mules 
each. The train was in charge of a wagon-master, and an assistant, 
with a cook and one or two extra hands— usually 30 men to a train. 
Each wagon was drawn by six mules or six yoke (12) of oxen. Wagons 
of private freighters were drawn by 10 or 12 mules each, or by from 
four to six yoke of cattle to the wagon. 

Government mule trains made but one drive of from 25 to 30 miles 
a day — breaking camp at daylight and going into camp about 10 o'clock 
in the summer and about 4 o'clock in winter. With ox trains two 
drives were made — early in the morning and late in the afternoon — 
often extending far into the night. Winter trips were seldom made 
with government trains drawn by oxen, but contractors paid but little 
heed to the weather or season. 

The animals were guarded day and night by from two to six men — 
more if a dry camp* was made, or stormy weather, or the presence of 
Indians deemed extreme caution necessary. 

*In 1862, our train lost 50 head of cattle, while making a dry camp 
in the Chevenne bottoms. Moving the wagons to Cow creek we spent 



220 EA IILY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Wliile passiiifj tlirough llie Indian country— when attacks from 
the hostiles were feared the animals were kept in a corral formed by 
the wagons— in a circle— or were securely tied with lialters or lariats. 

To outfit a government mule train 160 mules were required, but 
for a train drawn by oxen there were 312 oxen and four mules. 

Guards were detailed by the assistant wagon-master. It was also 
his duty to draw and distribute rations, assist in repairing such parts 
of wagons as might be broken through careless driving, stampedes, or 
impeifect timbers. Extra timbers and full kits of tools and a medi- 
cine chest formed a necessary auxiliary to every outlit. 

However inclement the weather men on the plains were seldom 
sick from exposure. To be warmly clad was the rule and to be pre- 
pared to endure the hardships incident to a trip across the plains was 
one of the pre-requisites to employment. Though rough fare and a 
hard life were the rule there was a fascination about the Old Trail 
that tended to obliterate from memory's tablet the pleasures of the 
home tire-side— it requiring years of time to enable the victim of the 
hallucination to realize that that fascination was but a glittering 
bauble. 

Though the Old Santa Fe Trail is of the past, the memories clus- 
tered about it are not all unpleasant. Let us cherish these as we 
would the many kind acts and pleasant incidents that cheer us on as 
we wend our way over that other Trail that leads to the Great Beyond. 

three days looking for the strays. The few water holes along the 
creek were tilled with turtles and while encamped here a band of 
twenty Cheyenne Indians came along and went prospecting for meat. 
In half an hour there were twenty pony loads of turtles on the banks 
of Cow creek but not a single turtle in that hole of water. The 
Indians would dive for the turtles and seldom missed. Failure to 
.secure a turtle brought shouts of derision from the other Indians tliat 
induced renewed exertion and better luck— but n(»t to the turtle. The 
Indians requesting permission for the use of our camp-tire to cook a 
terrapin found on the prairie we were treated to our first lesson in the 
preparation of terrapin a la Cheyenne. The terrapin was placed on 
its back before the fire and roasted alive. Without pepper or salt for 
.seasoning the meal was devoured with seeming relish and the meat 
was .so tender that neither knife nor fork was needed in the servintr. 
Their hunger appeased the Cheyenne braves wrapped their catch of 
turtles in their blankets and, happy and contented, departed for their 
camp on the Arkansas. 

Note. Among the incidents of our visit to the Kiowa camp, near 
the mouth of the Pawnee (see page 207) was a sick call that was unique 
in our experience. Lying under a canopy of green boughs was the worst 
used up specimen of the Lo family T ever saw. The Indian had been 
gored l)y a wounded buffalo and if that Kiowa ever went on another 
hunt the medicine man that patched him up ought to be interviewed 
and the case reported in full for the benefit of the medical profession. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




REV. W. S. CROUCH, 
Pastor Congregational Church, Maple Hill. 



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THE ELIOT CHURCH (CONGREGATIONAL), MAPLE HILL. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 





Rev. George Kettering. 



Rev. R. M. Tunnell. 





Rev. D. R. Steinek. 



Rev. John Scott. 



FORMER MINISTERS OF THE CONGREGATION'L CHURCH, ALMA. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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FLORAL SCENE AT THE HOME OF MR. S. H. FAIRFIELD, Alma. 




REVEREND SCHMID'S CONFIRMATION' CLASS, Lutheran Church, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 221 



MR. A. S. ALLENDORPH 

Was born in Booneville, Mo., Oct. 17, 1867, coming to Kansas when 
a boy of ten years, his parents locating at Lawrence. Here he was 
educated— at the city High School and at the Kansas State University, 
taking a special course in civil engineering. Mr. Allendorph demon- 
strated his fitness for this position by two years of practical work on 
the Wyandotte & Northwestern, the terminal point at that time 
being Hastings, Neb. 

Seeing a more inviting field in the cattle business Mr. Allendorph 
came to Wabaunsee county in 1888, leasing a large body of pasture 
lands, the lease to run five years and the stipulated price being the 
tax on the lands for that period. 

By agreeing to drive the cattle from Douglas county and return- 
ing them in the fall 2,000 head at $1.50 per head for the season were 
secured. Tlie land was all open prairie but the second year seven 
sections were fenced and 4,000 head secured at $1.75, the cattle being 
from the A. L. C. ranch, the property of the Acoma Land & Cattle 
Co., of New Mexico. 

In 1890, the increase in the business necessitated the leasing of 
more pasture land and so great was the demand for pasturage that the 
firm of Allendorph & Co. found themselves compelled to provide for 
16,000 head during a single pasturage season. 

The fourth year others embarked in the business, renting lands at 
$200 per section. In addition to being called the Switzerland of Kan- 
sas our county has gained a reputation throughout Western Kansas, 
Oklahoma, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona for furnishing the best 
summer pasturage to be found anywhere — the best evidence being 
found in the fact that the price has advanced to the present average 
of $3.50 per head for tlie season. When it is considered that but a few 
years ago these same lands would have been thought dear at $3.00 per 
acre the magnitude of the cattle business of today may be readily sur- 
mised. So great has been the change that lands which a few years 
ago were considered valueless except for pasturage are now sought 
after for farming purposes at twenty five dollars per acre. 

Mr. Allendorph having traveled extensively through the cattle 
ranges of the West and being thoroughly conversant with the condi- 
tions as they exist should be competent authority on questions affect- 
ing our county as a desirable range for the vast herds of cattle that 
are annualy pastured within our limits. Mr. Allendorph's opinion is 
that Wabaunsee county is the garden spot of the world so far as cattle 
range is concerned. 

That Mr. Allendorph's judgment is not at fault is in evidence in 
two notable instances; the first in fixing upon our county as a place of 



222 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

residence and, second, in the clioice of a helpmeet — Miss Mame I. 
Flintom, to whom he was happily married on June 18, 1891. Mr. 
Allendorph besides owning r),080 acres of good land resides in one of 
the most pleasant homes in Alma. Coming here with nothing he has 
proven by his works that which he professes to believe — that Wabaun- 
see county, as a place of residence has no superior on earth. 



MR. GEORGE W. THOMPSON (Dec'd) 

W^is born in Clark county, Ohio, Dec. 17, 1831, and in Feb., 1853, 
was joined in wedlock with Miss Sarah Ilerriott, of Union county, Ohio. 
To this union three children were born — Charles II., who so creditably 
tilled the office of register of deeds, Mary, now Mrs. Josiah Iliner, and 
Elmer, now a resident of Manhattan. 

For nearly a third of a century Mr. Thompson was a resident of 
Wabaunsee county, coming to Kansas in 1866, settling on the farm 
where he died on Tuesday morning, Oct. 18, 1898. 

With an unsullied reputation, of sterling integrity and prompted 
by the purest and noblest impulses, no man enjoyed the confidence 
and esteem of his acquaintance to a greater degree than did the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

With him the ties of kinship were sacred and the love of home 
and family were attributes that challenged comparison and com- 
manded that admiration that invariably ripened into the warmest 
friendships that even that grim monster. Death, cannot sever. 

Though not a politician, for more than twenty years the name of 
Mr. Geo. W. Thompson, as chairman of the democratic county com- 
mittee, was familiar to the people of Wabaunsee county. And yet 
he was not a politician. No man would spurn the appellation more 
than he. With him it was: "Not as I desire, but as my party wills." 

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. E Richards, for four 
years pastor at Wabaunsee, assisted by Rev. S. H. Woodhull, the then 
resident minister. 

Characteristic sentences that went home to the heart were: 
"Man lives to labor and dies to rest;" "We grieve because of the cruel 
hand of Death, but with God it is the coming home of his children." 



MR. W. A. DOOLITTLE. 

The subject of the following sketch is a native of New York but 
removed at an early age with his parents to the far west— settling in 
Illinois, removing thence to W^isconsin and afterwards to Iowa, acquir- 
ing such rudiments of an education as the scanty opportunities of the 
frontier afforded, going sometimes as far as six miles on foot to the 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 223 

district school. On the breaking out of the war he enlisted and was 
mustered into Company K, 5th Iowa Infantry, July 15, 1861, and served 
with his regiment in the south and southwest, participating in the 
various battles and sieges in which his regiment was engaged until 
August 9, 1864, when he was mustered out at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 
Upon his return home he began the study of law with Blair & Braw- 
son, attorneys, of Manchester, Iowa. In 1868 he came to Kansas, 
settling in this county, and was admitted to the bar in 1870, when 
court was held in the upper part of what is now known as the old 
Kaufman building. John T. Morton was the judge of the district 
court at that time, and Samuel R. Weed, clerk. 

Mr. Doolittle held several positions of trust in Wabaunsee county, 
among others that of county attorney, to which he was several times 
elected. He was for years identified with the public schools, teaching 
at Alma, but the greater portion of the time he chose to teach in the 
country districts, where he could the better prepare himself for his 
chosen profession— that of the law. 

By close study and constant application Mr. Doolittle became a 
thoroughly educated, well informed man, possessing the conlidence 
and esteem of the people. 

Although now a resident of Iowa, the greater part of his life was 
spent in Wabaunsee county, where Mr. Doolittle has left a host of 
friends and a record of which he may well be proud. 



MR. B. BUCHLI, SR. (Dec'd) 

Was born and raised in Switzerland. In his early days he received 
a thorough training in the excellent system of common schools in his 
native country, and afterwards took a full course of instruction in the 
higlier branches and among others that of trigonometry and surveying 
at Schiers Seminary, graduating with honors. This is a school where 
normal methods are taught and the fact that Mr. Buchli held a life 
certiticate to teach was an evidence that he was assiduous in his efforts 
to gain the topmost round of the ladder. According to national cus- 
tom, Mr. Buchli served his allotted time in the Swiss army, holding, 
when his services were concluded, the rank of first lieutenant. In 
1870 he came to Kansas: and after having lived five years on a home- 
stead in Rilev county, moved to Wabaunsee county. After coming to 
America Mr/Biichli resumed his former occupation of teaching and 
taught successfully some of the best schools in the county, among 
others, the schools at Halifax and Alma. 

Mr. Buchli was elected county surveyor in 1891 and re-elected in 
1893, dying in office but a few days prior to the close of his second term 
—leaving to an estimable family, as an heritage, a life spent in honest 
and conscientious endeavor— looking to the attainment of the highest 
ideals in the life here, and a peaceful haven of rest, beyond the grave, 
in the hereafter. 



224 EARLYIIISTOIIYOF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



SAMUEL WELFELT 

In 1892 was city marshal of Alma. Sam, besides upholding the 
dignity of the law, was the tirst incumbent in that oftice to wear a 
uniform of metropolitan pattern. Sam was also skilled in the art of 
woodcraft, furnishing proof of his prowess in the number of beaver 
and otter pelts, mink hides and skins of other wild animals, the pres- 
ence of which in our county was hardly suspected until ocular proof 
rendered a denial out of the question. After a few months sojourn in 
tlie wilds of the Indian Territory, Sam moved with his family to the 
Pacitic coast, where as captain and owner of the "Katie Thomas," he 
is making a fortune in the fishing industry. 



H. J. PALENSKE 

Was born September 10, 1860, in Richardson county, Kansas, now 
known as Wabaunsee county. Received a common school education. 
Was raised on a farm till he was 17 years old. He then came to Alma 
and worked a year for Kinne & Kerans, again returning to the farm 
for one year, after which he returned to town and held a position in 
the store of F. C Simon, dealer in general merchandise, for two years. 
On March 20, 1891, Herman again returned to the farm. The follow- 
ing fall Mr. Palenske was elected sheriff of Wabaunsee county, enter- 
ing upon the duties of this office January 11, 1902. At the close of his 
term he was re-elected, giving the people four years of honest and 
efficient service as sheriff. 

Mr. Palenske was united in marriage to Miss Marion Ross, of Mis- 
sion creek, on February 3, 1892. 

Since the close of his second term of office as sheriff, Mr. Palenske 
has resided on his farm, one mile south of Alma, where contentment 
reigns in a happy home. 



HIRAM WARD 

Was born in Grayson county, Virginia, January 27, 1837. He was 
brought up on a farm, and in his early life had but few educational 
privileges, having attended school not to exceed 18 months altogether. 
There was no system of common schools in Virginia and subscription 
schools during the winters supplied but meagerly the wants of the 
people. 

In the fall of 1857 Mr. Ward removed to Benton county, Arkansas, 
where he married and lived until November. 1862, when he came to 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 225 



Kansas, locating at Tecamseh, Shawnee county. At that time his 
worldly possessions consisted of a horse and fifty cents in money. The 
condition of his finances compelled him to work on the farm or in the 
quarries as a day laborer. 

When Lawrence was burned and her loyal citizens murdered he 
took an active part in organizing the Second Regiment of Kansas Re- 
serves, being elected second lieutenant of Company C, and when called 
into service took an active part in the campaign on the border in 1864. 
He was a participant in the battle of the Blue under Curtis and Blunt. 

In 1864, Mr. Ward moved to Osage county and engaged in stock 
raising, establishing the School Creek herd of Shorthorns. 

For three years he was president of the Osage County Fair Associa- 
tion. For ten years he was engaged in the mercantile business, at 
Harveyville, where he died Nov 10, 1895, higlily respected by all. 

Mr. Ward was a liberal contributor to church organizations and 
all charitable enterprises. He was frank and courageous in his con- 
victions and an earnest advocate of what he considered just and right. 



J. H. JONES 

Was born in Washington county, Virginia, February 27, 1828. 
Attended the common schools of the country until able to do farm 
work, when he was kept from school to work upon the farm, having 
mastered Websters's Elementary spelling book to the word immate- 
riality Could read by stopping to spell many of the words, could not 
write orcompute with figures, beyond simple addition, subtraction 
and multiplication. At the age of 18 he prevailed on his father to 
send him to school. He went to a high school six months, and was 
again put to work on the farm and denied further school privileges. 
All his leisure moments on the farm were devoted to study in which 
he made such proficiency that at the age of 20 by permission of his 
father he taught public .school. Before he arrived at the age of 21 
was appointed deputy county surveyor of Smyth county, Virginia, 
and soon thereafter was elected county surveyor of the same county 
for a term of seven years. 

During this time he devoted his spare hours to the study of law, 
his hours for study being from 9 p. m. to 3 a. m. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1855, coming to Kansas the same year 

The following year Mr. Jones was married. He was twice elected 
to the legislature, being a member of the House in r863 and of the 
state Senate in 186')-6. In 1864 he was captain of a company of state 
militia, participating in the battle of the Blue, near Wesport, Mis- 
souri, in October. 

From 186.3 to 1868 Mr. Jones was engaged as civil engineer in the 



226 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

location and construction of the U. P. Railway. In 1882 he was 
re-en }:rai]^ed in railway construction for the Union Pacific. 

Mr. .Jones became a resident of Wabaunsee county in 1880 and 
engajjed in farniinj? until 1890 when he was elected county attorney, 
being re-elected two years later, and elected county surveyor in 1897, 
in every ca.se running ahead of his ticket and elected by good majori- 
ties. 

Mr, Jones occupies an enviable place in the hearts of the people 
irrespective of party artl]iation.s, and he has a host of warm friends 
who hope that he will again consent to .serve them in the capacity of 
a public orticial. 



D. U. MILLISON 

Was born Nov. 10, 18fj2, at Council Grove, where his parents had 
lived for many yeans, his father being employed by the Government as 
blacksmith for the Kaw Indians. 

The subject of this sketch was educated at the Council Grove 
High School, being a graduate of that institution. On Sept. 3, 1891, 
Mr. Millison was married to Miss Ida B. Wibert, of Andover, Ohio. 
Two children, David Oren, and Nellie Avilda, twins, were born to 
this union. 

Mr. Millison is a school teacher by profe.ssion, having taught 15 
terms in Wabaunsee county, 6 terms in Nebraska, and 1 term in West 
Virginia, while there on a visit. In 1898 he was elected trustee of 
Rock creek to. vnship and in Nov., 1899, register of deeds of Wabaun- 
see county, a position he now holds, the term being extended one year 
by legislative enactment. 

When a child of six years, on July 3, 1868, Mr. Milli.son distinctly 
remembers being hustled into a large building with all the women 
and children, while all the available men of Council Grove and vicinity 
were in arms to repel a threatened attack from the Ciieyenne Indians, 

A painstaking official and an excellent penman, Mr. Millison bids 
fair to become his own succes.sor in the office of register of deeds for 
Wabaunsee county. 



T. S. SPiELMAN 



Was V)oin in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 22, 1844, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of that city. In 1860, removed to Washing- 
ton county, Maryland. In 1862 he enlisted in the Union army, having 
joined the Baltimore battery of Light Artillery, under command of 
Captain Fred. W. Alexander, a prominent citizen of Baltimore. 

He was discharged from the army on June 17, 1865, and was en- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 227 

gaged during his term of service mostly in the Shenandoah Valley and 
on the borders of Western Maryland. His battery was with Milroy at 
the battle of Winchester and with Wallace at the battle of Monocacy, 
and in several minor engagements in Virginia. After the close of the 
war he taught a public school near the Antietam battle ground, at 
Keedysville, Maryland. 

In 1866 he returned to his native city, St. Louis, and in 1867 was 
appointed a messenger in the office of the assistant treasurer, U. S., 
remaining in that office until the summer of 1876, when he came to 
Wabaunsee, Kansas. 

On July 1, 1884, he was appointed clerk of the district court by 
Hon. .Judge John Martin to fill an unexpired term in said office. At 
the regular elections held in 1884, 1886 and 1888 he was elected on the 
Republican ticket clerk of the district court. In 1890 he was a candi- 
date for re-election but was defeated together with all the nominees 
on the Republican ticket. 

In October, 1892, he was appointed deputy county treasurer and 
served in the treasurer's office six years. At the regular elections in 
1898 and 1900 he was elected probate judge. 

Judge Spielman has been a member of the Congregational church 
for over twenty five years. As a public servant of the people he has 
performed the duties in a manner generally with satisfaction to the 
people. He has honestly endeavored to perform the trusts confided to 
him by the people in such a manner as to gain their confidence and 
support, and he has the friendship and good will of the people irre- 
spective of political affiliations as their faithful and respected public 
.servant. 



C. M. ROSE 



Was born in Onondaga county, New York, June 10, 1839, remov- 
ing with his parents to Michigan when but four years of age. Came 
to Kansas in 1858, going to Eldorado where he worked in a saw mill, 
helping to saw the first boards and assisting in building the first 
house built of boards in Butler county. 

Mr. Rose participated in some of the buffalo hunts of that season 
(1858) after which he returned to his home at Mendon, Mich., where 
he remained until August 5, 1863, when he enlisted in Co. K, 19th 
Michigan Infantry. 

While serving with his regiment Mr. Rose was in some hot chases 
after Morgan; was at Fort Donaldson, Nashville, and Franklin; with 
Rosecranz at Chattanooga and Sherman at Atlanta. Was twice 
wounded— at Spring Hills, Tenn., and at Dallas, Ga., the wound he 
received at Dallas preventing his being with Sherman in his march to 



228 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

the sea. Surrendered with his regiment, Col. Coburn, commanding, 
at Spring Hills, and sent to Libby prison, where, after .30 days, he was 
paroled and sent Nortli. After recovering from wounds received at 
Dallas, lie was on detached service, till the close of the war. 

General Shafter was major of the regiment in which Mr. Rose en- 
listed— surrendering at Spring Hills to General Wheeler— who fought 
under Shafter at Santiago. 

In 1873 Mr. Rose came to Alma, where he has since made his home, 
doing a thriving business in pumps and windmills, unusually hale and 
hearty at the age of 63 years. 



FRED A. SEAMAN 

Was born at Elmore, Portage county, Ohio, on August 16, 1866. 
He attended the Greenspring, Ohio, public schools for six years, gradu- 
ating in May, 1884. After an attendance of two years at the Green- 
spring Academy Mr. Seaman came to Kansas, locating in Wabaunsee 
county, where he has since resided. 

After teaching the Keene schools for three years. Mr. Seaman 
came to Alma, where he taught three terms, being principal of the 
Alma City schools two years. After another year as principal of the 
Eskridge schools, Mr. Seaman taught the home school on Mission 
creek (Dist. No. 4) for five consecutive years. 

During this time, besides looking after the work of the farm Mr. 
Seaman spent his evenings in studying law, being admitted to the bar 
in May, 1899. In November, 1900, he was elected to the office of county 
attorney, the nomination coming to him without solicitation — it being 
a clear case of the office seeking the man. 

On September 30, 1891, Mr. Seaman was happily married to Miss 
Ada Gillis, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Gillis, of Mission 
creek. Subsequent to his marriage, Mr. Seaman took a post graduate 
course at Campbell University that he might the more satisfactorily — 
to himself, at least, fight the battle of life. That he will succeed is 
evidenced by his energetic and progressive spirit— made manifest in 
the performance of his duties as county attorney and as editor of the 
Alma Signal-. 



MRS. WALPURGE DAUM 

Is kindly remembered by every old settler in the (ierman settle- 
ments of the Mill creek valley. Her pleasant greeting insured a hearty 
welcome from her regular patrons who awaited her coming that their 
surplus stores of buttei- and eggs might be exchanged for the many 
things needed in the humble houses of the early pioneers. When it 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 229 



was sucrisrested to Photographer Bliss that he take her picture she 
insisted that it should look as natural as life and she straightway 
adjusted her pack for the occasion. 

Inside the sack was a large tin vessel with compartments for 
butter and eggs that she took in exchange for the goods bought of 
Schmitz & Meyer, at that time the only merchants in Alma. 

While on the farm on Loire creek, now owned by Mr. Frank 
Oehmann, the woman peddler supplied the good people of Alma with 
the best of fresh vegetables, invariably bringing her wares to town on 
foot. The supplies for the farm were carried as shown in the photo 
and whether the load consisted of a few bundles of dry goods or a hun- 
dred pound sack of flour there was no hesitation about making the 
trip. 

After the death of her husband the woman peddler moved to 
Alma, occupying the little frame building between the Commercial 
House and Mr. Simon's store. But a fatal illness came on and the 
familiar face was seen no more by the thrifty housewives in the Mill 
creek valley. 

A goodly sum had been laid up for a rainy day, and a handsome 
donation was left with Father Hundhausen for the benefit of the 
Catholic church, of which organization the woman peddler was a con- 
sistent member. Though long years have elapsed there are hundreds 
of good people living in the German settlements who will readily 
recognize, in the engraving, one who, nearly forty years ago, was a 
weekly and welcome visitor. 



MR. WILLIAM DREBING (Dec'd) 

Was born in Minden, Germany, in May, 1827, coming to America 
in 1845, at the opening of the Mexican war. With the ardor of youth, 
he being at that time in his 19th year, William enlisted in an infantry 
regiment but was later transferred to the artillery and participated in 
every important battle of the war. 

The young recruit had the good fortune to be with General Taylor 
from the time the American forces took up their march from Point 
Isabel until the close of the campaign— crowned with the victory over 
Santa Anna at Buena Vista. In this engagement Mr. Drebing was 
wounded by a lance thrust through the shoulder. As he lay on the 
battlefield, weak from the loss of blood and stiffened by the cold (the 
night of February 23, 1847) the gallant young soldier wes enabled to 
attest from personal observation that the foundation of Hon. Albert 
Pike's beautiful poem, "The Angels of Buena Yista," was not a myth. 
He was one of the many wounded whose thirst was quenched by the 
kind-hearted Mexican women, who knew neither friend nor foe in 



230 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

their ministrations of mercy. A 1 though severely wounded Mr. Dreb- 
ing recovered in time to join General Scott in his memorable campaign 
from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico. 

After the close of the war Mr. Drebing re-enlisted for three years, 

doing service in New Mexico. Being thoroughly conversant with the 
Spanish, as well as the English and German languages, he was after 
his release from army duties, employed by Northrup & Chick, whole- 
sale merchants of Kansas City, as interpreter— necessary in their 
immense business with New Mexican freighters. 

While a resident of Missouri, Mr. Drebing was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary Klein. After engaging in business for several years at 
Wesport, Missouri, he, in company with his father-in-law, Mr. Bert- 
ram Klein, Mr. Henry Schmitz and Mr. Joseph Treu, came to Kansas, 
settling on Mill creek in 1856. 

During the Price raid in the civil war Mr. Drebing did service as 
a lieutenant, his company doing guard duty at the state capital until 
the threatened danger was past, after which all returned to their 
several homes to resume avocations of peace. 

Mr. Drebing was a man with whom love of home and family and 
loyalty to friends were leading characteristics. The golden rule was 
his creed and to be guided by the right in all his dealings with his 
fellow-man was his constant endeavor. 

At 11:30 on Tuesday night, June 27, 1899, the spirit was called 
home. William Drebing had lived 73 years, 1 month and 9 days. 
Revs. Silbermann and Bernard conducted the funeral services at the 
family residence and one of the largest funeral processions ever seen in 
Wabaunsee county followed the remains to their last resting place 
in the Alma cemetery. 

One of the kindest hearted men we ever knew had gone to rest. 

Note. Mr. Drebing was the last survivor of the Mexican war, 
resident of Wabaunsee county. Two others. Mi*. M. W. Rock and Mr. 
Samuel Cummings — now in Oklahoma— were both participants in the 
war with Mexico. 



MRS. MARY LOUISA KLOCKMAN 

Was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, on October 17, 1804, residing 
in the mother country till 1856, when, with her husband Mrs. Klock- 
man came to America, landing at New Orleans in the fall of 1856. 
Coming over in the same ship were the Dieballs, Gongol), Maike and 
Henry Palenske. In March, 1857, Mr. and Mrs. Klockman hired a 
Mexican to haul them to the Mill creek settlement. The Mexican 
dumped their goods out in the snow near Mr. Schewe's, a-nd charged 
$40 for the trip. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 231 

Across the ridge from their home lived Mr. Ed. Krapp, who kept 
a country store, and being away much of the time, as was Mr. Klock- 
man, the two pioneer women passed many lonely days together. But 
they were not alwa}'S lonely. The Indians called often and sometimes 
at unseasonable hours. One night a big Indian broke into the cellar 
and after helping himself to such things as suited him came upstairs 
and lay before the fire till morning. Mrs. Klockman came over and as 
big as the Indian was she bumped his nose against the lounge till the 
brave concluded the climate was too warm and left. 

On another occasion an Indian called at the Krapp home while 
Mrs. Klockman was there and wanted to buy ten cents worth of chil- 
dren. Stepping on one of the little ones toes the little one cried, 
whereupon Mrs. Krapp knocked the Indian over with a broom stick 
and pushed him out of the back door. Mr. Gerlach's coming caused 
the Indian to leave. The Indian slept that night in Peter Thoes' pig 
pen, but next morning returned and tried to get in at a window. Mrs. 
Klockman pointed an old rusty gun at the Indian that hadn't been 
loaded for years but it had the desired effect — the Indian yelled: 
"Don't shoot" and ran away. 

In 1864, while the Indians were having their war dances at the big 
spring Mr. and Mrs. Klockman slept in the timber and thought 
their time had come till Capt. Ed. Krapp went to their camp and 
induced them to return to their reservation. Mrs. Klockman says 
there were so many Indians that they were all day in passing. 

After selling their farm to Mr. Heder, Mr. and Mrs. Klockman 
intended to pass their declining years on the farm but one night a 
man called and attempted to rob the worthy couple of the proceeds of 
the sale of the farm. But Mrs. Klockman by her presence of mind 
thwarted the would-be robber. He had tied his horse in the timber 
and slept in the hen house till two o'clock in the morning when he 
went to the house and broke open the door and demanded money — 
pointing a revolver at Mr. Klockman. 

"Take the money" said Mrs. Klockman, "but don't shoot." 
During the parley Mr. Klockman had climbed to the attic. Mrs. 
Klockman soon followed, and, closing the trap door, called so loudly 
for help that all the dogs in the neighborhood set up a din that scared 
the would-be robbei away. 

The next day a man called to borrow money and was dumbfounded 
by Mrs. Klockman saying: "Why, you were here last night after 
money; why do you come again today?" 

The incident resulted in these worthy people moving to Alma, 
since which time death has deprived Mrs. Klockman of her help-meet. 
Though refusing to give money to the robber the board of trustees of 
the Evangelical church can vouch for the good woman's generosity— 



232 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

she having donated $600 toward the purchase of the bell and the build- 
ing of the spire. 

Since the death of her husband Mrs. Klockman is making her 
home with Mr. and Mrs. Adolpli Zockser. Though in her 97th year 
she is hale and hearty and her mental faculties are not in the least 
impaired. Her store of pioneer incidents is inexhaustible and she 
heartily enjoys their recital. 



P. P. SIMIVIONS. 

We present our readers with a half-tone portrait of P. T. Simmons, 
a specialist in auctioneering, residing at Eskridge, Kansas, but at 
present temporarily doing insurance work in Atchison county. Mr. 
Simmons' appearance would indicate that he was of a happy disposi- 
tion and lived in a healthful climate. 

Mr. Simmons was born in Buchanan county, Missouri, on Septem- 
ber 20, 1861, and moved with his parents to Piatt county, Missouri, 
when three years of age. He lived there until the spring of 1880, then 
moved to Atchison county, Kansas. In the spring of 1883 he moved 
to Wabaunsee county, where he now resides. He commenced crying 
sales in the year 1886 in his neighborhood and vicinity. Five years ago 
he put his advertisement in the Wabaunsee county papers and he has 
made auctioneering a regular business ever since. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Kansas Auctioneers' association. He makes a specialty of 
high grades and thoroughbred cattle and hog sales. 

But Mr. Simmons doesn't confine himself to the business of an 
auctioneer. He is a first class farmer and an all-around good fellow — 
just such a man as the people will be looking for in the not distant 
future to serve them in an official capacity. They could make no 
better selection. 



H. G. LIGHT 

Was born in the city of Copenhagen, Denmark, and received his 
education in that city. At the age of 14 he was bound over to his 
uncle for five years for the purpose of learning the trade of painter, 
continuing with him for six years. At the age of 22 he arrived in 
the city of New York and there joined the Long-Shore Ship Painters 
association and had to serve again a short apprenticeship to become a 
full member. 

He managed to live through his apprenticeship with his board 
and $15 per week. He afterwards received $3.50 a day and nine hours 
work; was member of this organization five years. In order to learn 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 233 



the English language he attended night school in the city of New 
York. 

A strike occurring in 1869, Mr. Licht's ideas and the association's 
did not agree and he came west to Topeka, Kansas. After stopping 
two years in Topeka he came to Wabaunsee county in the fall of 1871. 

Mr. Licht was four times elected to the office of clerk of the dis- 
trict court and once as county clerk. 

After retiring from public office he accepted a position as book- 
keeper in the Topeka sugar works and afterwards was transferred to 
the Attica works, which, unfortunately, made an assignment. Mr. 
Licht remained with the assignee about three months, when he re- 
turned to Alma. 

For a number of years past Mr. Licht has made his home in To- 
peka. But the best part of his life has been spent in Wabaunsee 
county, among friends, who, on five different occasions, by their votes, 
have endorsed his official work in two of the best offices within the 
gift of the people. 



C. E. SMITH, M. D. 

Was born in Jersey county, Illinois, on October 4, 1865. Took a 
normal course at the Indiana State Normal at Valparaiso, Indiana, 
and after his graduation at that institution taught seven years in the 
schools of his native state. Took a course in medicine and surgery at 
the Louisville Medical college, of Louisville, Kentucky, graduating in 
the class of '93, also a post-graduate course at the Rush Medical college, 
of Chicago, Illinois. 

Dr. Smith came to Kansas in 1893, locating in Brown county, 
where, two years later he was united in marriage to Miss Maggie 
Small, of Hiawatha. 

During his three years residence in Alma Dr. Smith has built up 
an excellent practice and the many difficult and complicated surgical 
operations performed under the Doctor's immediate supervision attest 
a thorough knowledge of his profession and insure a continuance of 
that success that has attended him during his residence among the 
people of Wabaunsee county. 



JOHN T. KEAGY 



Was born November 2, 1840, in Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 
Grew up on a farm. Enlisted as a private in Company D, 101st Regt. 
Penn. Volunteers. Was wounded at Fair Oaks, Virginia, May 31, 1802 
and discharged on account of wound December 20, 1862. Read law at 
Bedford, Pennsylvania, and was admitted to the bar at Bedford in 



234 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

February, 1865. After five years practice at Bedford, Mr. Keagy came 
West, locating at Alma in 1870. 

In 1872 Mr. Keagy was elected county attorney, to which position 
he was re-elected two years later. In 1880 he was elected to the office 
of probate judge, serving the people four successive terms. In two of 
the four campaigns there was no opposing candidate. 

Mr. Keagy's thorough knowledge of the law is recognized by liis 
long continuance in the office of justice of the peace, a position to 
which the people, irrespective of party lines, have for years persisted 
in electing one of our oldest and most highly esteemed citizens. 

No man in Wabaunsee county takes a greater interest in archaeo- 
logical researcli than does Mr. Keagy, liis collection of prehistoric 
curios furnishing ample proof of the statement. He is chairman of 
the executive committee of the Quivira Historical Society of which 
the Hon. J. V. Brower, of St. Paul, Minn., is president. The society 
is doing much towards unraveling the long hidden mysteries connected 
with the explorations of Coronado in 1541. 



BARTHOLOMEW BUCHLI 

Was born at Versan, Canton Grison, Switzerland, August 24, 18G2. 
Came to Riley county, Kansas, with his parents in 1870, and to Wa- 
baunsee county in 1876. Attended the common schools, after wliich 
he graduated at the Kansas State Agricultural college, class of '84, 
and at the Iowa State college, class of '86. Taught in the schools of 
Wabaunsee county for eiglit years and is now a member of the Alma 
school board. 

Mr. Buchli was elected county clerk in 1897 and re-elected in 1899. 
He is a competent and painstaking official, and enjoys in an enviable 
degree the confidence of the people. 



MR. HENRY SCHMITZ (Dec'd) 

Was born in the village of Wahn, near Cologne, in Germany. Tlie 
rebellion of 1848 found him a young man of 25 years, an active and 
leading participant in what he considered a just cause. But disaster 
followed and the persecutions in store for the adherents of the lost 
cause drove thousands of the participants to America. Among these 
came Mr. Schmitz, who landed in America in 1852. Four years later 
he came to Kansas, settling on the Klein farm, now owned by Mr. 
Charles Burgett. 

In 1866, together witli Mr. Josepli Treu, Dr. Brasche, Ed. Krapp, 
G. Zwanziger and others organized the Alma Town company. The 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 235 



firm of Schmitz & Meyer was established and for years conducted the 
largest business in Wabaunsee county. 

Mr. Schmitz was foremost in every undertaking that gave promise 
of good to Alma. He was ever at the front, with his means and coun- 
sel, to build up the city. Though never seeking an office, he took an 
active part in party organization and for years the influence of no 
other resident of the county exceeded that wielded by Mr. Henry 
Schmitz — the conditions suggesting the sobriquet of "King Henry" — 
at first used in an ironical sense by his opponents— who in each suc- 
ceeding campaign were furnished additional proof that the term was 
anything but a misnomer. 

But in the privacy of his home— surrounded by his estimable fam- 
ily, the true worth, the characteristic traits, of one of our foremost 
citizens shone brightest. Here, with those in whom his affections 
were centered, he loved to pass his later years. Here, with reading 
and study, Uncle Henry stored his mature mind with knowledge, that, 
added to a long life of usefulness among his fellow men rendered his 
companionship more than usually enjoyable. 

An eventful career was closed at his home, near Alma, on Friday, 
April 7, 1893, at the ripe age of 69 years, 10 months and 26 days. No 
other man in Wabaunsee county had so great a number of his fellow 
citizens bound to him by the ties of consanguinity. No one was more 
highly esteemed and the death of no individual in our midst could 
cause so wide a feeling of regret, such depth of sorrow, or create 
within the breasts of his fellows a more vivid realization of the trans- 
itory nature of all things earthly. 



MR. MICHAEL HUND (Dec'd) 

Was born in Baden, Germany, September 22, 1824. Eight years 
later the family came to America, first settling on a farm near St. 
Charles, Missouri. Here, in 1848, Mr. Hund was married to Miss Ger- 
trude Borgmeyer, of St. Charles. Three children blessed this union- 
Mrs. Mary Guth, Moritz, and Michael Hund, Jr. . 

In 1855 the family moved to Mankato, Minnesota, but Mrs. Hund 
died before their destination was reached. 

Mr. Hund was married a second time to Miss Otilda Peters, of St. 
Charles, Missouri, who still survives. To this union, six children were 
born, five of whom are now living, Joseph, Leo, Phillip, Mrs. Francis 
Meinhardt and Mrs. Theresa Glotzbach. 

In 1872, Mr. Hund moved to Kansas, settling in Newbury town- 
ship. His eight children are all married and with the exception of 
Leo, all reside in Newbury township— being, as was their father before 
them, leading and influential citizens. 



236 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

By his upright conduct; by his forgiving spirit, and by his kind- 
ness of heart Mr. Ilund gained for himself, in a marked degree, the 
esteem of all with wiiom he came in contact. 

Mr. Hund was a pioneer in the truest sense of the term— having 
lived in Minnesota at the time of the Spirit Lake massacre in 1862. 
The family lived in close proximity to the death-dealing Sioux— his 
farm being but a few miles distant from New Ulm, that was almost 
completely destroyed by the murderous Sioux in one of their raids in 
the fall of 1862. 

Mr. Ilund died at his home in Newbury township on Monday, 
June 27, 1898, honored and beloved by all. 



P. L. WOODY 



Was born May 4, 1833, at Dahlonega, Georgia, removing to Platte 
county, Missouri, in 1866, and to Kansas in 1870, locating on the Sno- 
komo, where he still resides. Was married July 4, 1856, in Lumpkin 
county, Georgia, ten children being born to this union. Though by 
no means a politician, Mr. Woody has always had a voice in the coun- 
cils of his party, attested by his familiar presence at state and county 
conventions. He has been treasurer of Newbury township and for 
eighteen years has been a member of the school board. He has always 
been active in church work and has availed himself of every opportun- 
ity to advance any good cause that gave promise of the betterment of 
his fellows. 



MRS. ELIZA WOODY (Dec'd) 

Was born January 6, 1833, in Hebersham county, Georgia, and died 
of pneumonia, at the family home on the Snokomo, on January 8, 1901. 
To make home happy was her constant endeavor: to minister to the 
sick and to care for the afflicted was with her a Christian duty— that 
when the Angel of Death should beckon, the spirit might find rest in 
that Home made without hands, eternal in the Heavens. 



MR. JACOB HORNE (Dec'd) 

Was born in Baden, Germany, July 8, 1837, but came to America 
with his parents when but an infant, being but a year old when the 
family first made their home in Chicago. In 1840, the family moved 
to Jamestown, Wisconsin, where Mr. Home passed the greater part of 
his life. 

In 1862, Mr. Home was married to Miss Victoria Lang, of James- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 237 



town. Here, the five children, three sons and two daughters, were 
born. In 1883, the family came to Alma, where Mr. Home died, on 
August 7, 1899, at the age of 62 years and 29 days. 

Love of home and family were characteristic traits of one who was 
highly esteemed for his many good qualities of head and heart. With 
generosity and kindness the strong bond of friendship was cemented 
with the many who revere the memory of one who was always ready 
to lend a helping hand in the hour of need— of one to whom the hand 
seeking charity was never extended in vain. 



MR. HERMAN SCHULTHEIS (Dec'd) 

Was born at Neustadt, Hesse Cassel, Germany, on June 10, 1833, 
coming to America when a young man of 19 years, first locating at 
Cincinnati, where he learned the trade of harness maker; came to 
Osage county in 1857, taking a claim on the Wakarusa. In 1865, came 
to Wabaunsee county settling on the farm where he died on August 8, 
1899, at the age of 66 years, 1 month, and 28 days. 

In 1864, Mr. Schultheis was married to Miss Marguerite Ricker- 
shauser. To this union three daughters were born; Mrs. Henry 
Wertzberger, Mrs. Herman Wertzberger, and Mrs. Nick Thoes. 

Generous to a fault, the soul of probity and honor, no man stood 
in higher esteem with his fellows than did Herman Schultheis. His 
word was as good as his bond, and a promise made by him was as sure 
of fulfillment as the rising of the morning's sun. 



WATERS CHILLSON 



Was born in the city of Rochester, N. Y., March 2, 1843, removing 
with his parents soon after to Oswegt) county, where he grew to man- 
liood on a farm. In April, 1861, he enrolled as a member of Co. C, 24th 
New York infantry, serving two years, when he was discharged, but 
again enlisted — this time in Co. A, 24th N. Y. cavalry, where he re- 
mained till the close of the war. Was twice wounded— on June 18, 1804, 
and on April 5, 1865, being discharged from Hix hospital in Baltimore. 
In September, 1865, Mr. Chillson was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
M. Gardner, of Pennsylvania, in which state he resided but a short 
time, when he returned to his old home in New York. 

In 1866, Mr. Chillson moved to Michigan, where he opened up a 
farm, served the people as supervisor, sheriff (4 years), deputy sherifl:, 
and marshal. Came to Kansas in '76, locating in Saline county, where 
he kept store and postoffice for 9 years, was trustee 7 years and during 
the time managed to cultivate 400 acres of land and raise a few cattle 



238 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

and horses. He then came to Alma, bought the Commercial Hotel, 
kept store in the Odd Fellows building, speculated some in lands and 
patent rights, developed some valuable mining property in Olilahonia, 
and occasionally bobs up as a delegate to slate and county conventions 
— just to let his friends and others know^ he is on earth— a fact they 
never fail to recognize. Has lots of friends and a few enemies. Is 
independent of the one and loyal to the other. 



WYATT ROUSH 



Was born near Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, on July 10, 1858, 
coming to Kansas with his parents in 1879. Enjoyed excellent educa- 
tional privileges at the Hillsboro High School, supplementing his 
work here by a course in the Normal school at Carlisle, Kentucky. 

For Ave years was engaged in teaching, two years in Ohio, and 
three, in Kansas. Was married on September 22, 1881, to Miss Martha 
A. Parmiter, three sons and two daughters being born to this union. 
Mr. Roush served the people of his home township (Plumb) five years 
as treasurer, and three years, as trustee. Was elected clerk of the 
district court in 1898, and re-elected in 1900. He is a capable official, 
and is conscientious in the performance of the duties of his office. 



FRANZ MEIER 

Was born in Mecklenburg Schwerin, on July 7, 1821, coming to 
America, landing at New York on July 13, 1846. Located first in Wis- 
consin, where he remained six years, when he went to St. Louis. 
Came to Kansas in 1854, locating on Pottawatomie creek, in Anderson 
county, where he lived during the troublous times in 1856. Helped 
bury the three Doyles, Will Sherman, and Nicholson, killed by John 
Brown and 15 others, on the 22nd of May, the same year. Was twice 
robbed by Jayhawkers in '56. The settlers took part on one side or 
the other, and robbed their nearest neighbors. Was one of the county 
commissioners of Anderson county when the county was organized. 
Since 1859 has been a resident of Wabaunsee county. 

While residing in Wisconsin, Mr. Meier was married to Miss 
Augusta Stranze, on January 31, 1850, four children resulting from 
this union. While a student at college Mr. Meier took a course in 
civil engineering, the knowledge standing him in good stead in the 
early settlement of Kansas. He is an excellent draughtsman, a good 
penman, and though 81 years of age he appears twenty years younger. 
His kindness of heart, and genial manner make a favorable impres- 
sion on all with whom he comes in contact. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 239 



ED. IVIANN 

Was born on March 2, 1870, in Jefferson county, Kansas. Came to 
Wabaunsee county in 1881, living on a farm near Eslcridge until 1895, 
when he came to Alma. When the President's call for volunteers was 
issued Ed went forth to battle for his country, enlisting in Co. G, of 
the 21st Kansas. Fought the hardest battle of his life in the malarial 
atmosphere in the military camp at Chickamauga, emerging from the 
conflict unscathed. 

Mr. Mann is an expert jeweler; is always busy, and is ever earnest 
in his desire to please his patrons. 



T. J. PERRY 



Was born in North Carolina, April 20, 1868, his parents coming 
the following year to Kansas, locating in Chase county. Since his 
19th year Mr. Perry has been identified with the work of teaching, 
first in Chase county, and since 1896 in Wabaunsee county. Was mar- 
ried August 25, 1892, tu Miss Parthena Harrison, of Emporia, four 
children being born to this union. A thorough course of instruction 
in our excellent system of common schools has been supplemented by 
a business college course and at the State Normal school at Emporia. 
Mr. Perry is also taking correspondence work from Chicago University 
and Zaneriah Art College, of Columbus, Ohio. 

In November, 1900, Mr. Perry was elected to the office of superin- 
tendent of schools for Wabaunsee county, which position he now 
holds. He is active and earnest in educational work, and is up-to-date 
in all that pertains to his chosen profession. 



JOSEPH LaFONTAINE 

Was born in Luxemburg, Belgium, on October 20, 1841, coming to 
America in 1857, locating in Brown county, Ohio, where, on October 
23, 1862, he was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Jacquet, three 
children, two sons and a daughter being born to this union. In 1877, 
Mr. LaFontaine came to Kansas — on the farm formerly owned by Dr. 
E. B. Allen, former secretary of state. Though never aspiring to 
office, Mr. LaFontaine has been twice elected trustee and for seven 
terms was elected to the office of treasurer of his home township — 
Wabaunsee. 

Was elected treasurer of Wabaunsee county in 1899 and is the 
present incumbent in one of the most important offices in the gift of 
the people. Is a capable and efficient officer and enjoys in a high 
degree the confidence of his constituents. 



240 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



GOTTLIEB NOLLER 

Was born in Wurtemburg, (Jcrniany, March 20, 1856, coming,' to 
America in 1881. The following? year was married to Miss Theresa 
Rebholz, of Cleveland, Ohio, to whom three sons were born. While in 
the Fatherland Mr. Noller .served three years in the German army, 
being a corporal in the 29th Wurtemburg Artillery. Came to Kansas 
in ]884 and engaged in farming until 1897, when he took charge of the 
Hotel Paxico. After four ye'ars of success in the hotel business here 
Mr. Noller bought the Denver House at McFarland, where he is now 
running one of the best hotels in the county on up-to-date principles. 
Besides the hotel Mr. Noller owns 340 acres of good faiiuing land. He 
is popular with the traveling public, with whom he has established a 
good reputation as a landlord. 



H. B. CHANNELL 

Was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on November 15, 1848, com- 
ing with his parents to Kansas in 1857, when but nine years of age. 
the family locating in Nehama county. In 1890, Mr. Channell came 
to this county, settling on a good farm in Rock Creek township, where 
he now resides. On New Years day, 1869, was united in marriage to 
Miss Ellen Armstrong, of America City, Nemaha county. Three sons 
and two daughters, with their parents constitute the family in the 
Channell home. Besides farming Mr. Channell has followed the busi- 
ness of auctioneer since 1884. Is hail fellow, well met with the boys, 
and possesses the faculty of getting the full value of any property 
placed on sale in his hands — a fact proven by his constantly increasing 
patronage. 



EDWARD A. KILIAN 

Was born September 1, 1828, at (Jiessen. (fraud Duchy of Hesse, 
Germany. Educated in public schools, Real and Polytechnic school, 
Darmstadt, and Normal school, at Friedburg. Came to the United 
States in consequence of participation in the Revolution of 1848, arriv- 
ing in New York October 12, 1849. Taught school in Illinois, Missouri, 
and Kansas. In 1876-79 was assistant in the Museum of the Society 
of Natural Science, in Buffalo, N. Y. Came to Kansas in August, 
1879, since which time he has resided in Alma. Was principal of the 
Alma schools three years and of the (Jerman-Eiiglish Academy at 
Leavenworth one year. In 1884-85 did journalistic work on the Leav- 
enworth Freie Presse. Enlisted June 14, 1861, in the 1st Missouri 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




GRADUATING CLASS, ESKRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL, 1902. 




A GROUP OF GOOD FELLOWS, Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 241 



Light Artillery. Participated in tlie capture of Camp Jackson, in 
action at Booneville, Dug Spring, and Wilson's Creek, where he 
received severe wound in riglit arm. Discharged November 16, 1861, 
on account of wounds. In November, 1862, enlisted in Co. A, 17th 
Missouri Infantry: promoted to sergeant-major, and adjutant. Par- 
ticipated in Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns. Discharged Septem- 
ber 24, 1864. 

Mr. Kilian has one of the best libraries in the county; is well 
versed in conchology and takes an active interest in historical and 
archaeological research. Has contributed quite a number of valued 
contributions to the magazines and literary journals — many of which 
have been highly appreciated by the reading piiblic. 



MARK SAGE 

Was born in Somerset Shire, England, on April 28, 1836, came to 
Onondaga county, New York, in 1850, and to Dover, Kansas, in July, 
1857. In 1863, freighted across the plains for the government with an 
ox team, hauling corn. In 1864 lie built the stone house at the head 
of Mill creek on the Council Grove road, known as Copp's station. 
This was on the line of the Topeka and Council Grove mail route. 
The mail was carried in a canvas covered hack drawn by two horses, 
changing drivers and horses at the old station. John Copp had charge 
of the station several years until the mail route was discontinued, 
when he moved to Paxico. Mark has probably built more bridges and 
stone houses in Wabaunsee county than any other one man. Though 
not far from the three score and ten mark he is as stout as an ox and 
one of the most obliging men in the county. When he learned inci- 
dentally that we wanted the photo of the ugliest man in the county 
he sent his own as quick as he could get it in the mail. But we must 
admit that his is the handsomest picture for an ugly man to sit for we 
ever saw. W^iiile going through the woi'ld Mark believes in looking 
on the bright side and but few men can scatter more sunshine along 
life's pathway than Mark Sage. 

Note. In February, 1868, a tragedy was enacted at the old Copp 
station that has no parallel in the history of Wabaunsee county. 
The station was dismantled then and the bare walls were anything 
but inviting. But while moving from Alma in March a nephew of W. 
H. Morrison's was prompted to take a look at the old station. In the 
deserted stable he was horrified to find the body of a man apparently 
dead for several weeks. Dr. Brasche was coroner then, John Pinker- 
ton, sheriff, and Mr. W. H. Lyons, his deputy. Dr. Brasche held an 
inquest, Mr. Lyons securing the jury. The man's skull had been frac- 
tured in three places by blows from a heavy cattle-whip. Dr. Brasche 
giving it as his opinion that either one would have caused death. The 
mark of a heavy money belt was plainly visible about the body and the 



242 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

man's pants were covered with white horse-hairs. About six weeks 
before two men liad stopped at Mr. Sebring's, on Mill creek, stating 
tliat tlicy were on their way to Texas to buy cattle. One ol' tlie men 
was riding a white horse. Tlie next night a man leading a wliite 
horse stopped at(iideon liaughman's, on Elm creek. Mr. W. A. Doo- 
little was boarding at Baugliman'.s, teaching school in the old log 
school house in tlie Sanner district (No. 13). Mr. Lyons buried the 
man just outside of the old stable. The weatlier was very cold and 
the man had wrapped about his feet pieces of an Atchison paper. In 
December, 1895, while in cliarge of the Taylor dry goods assignment 
Mr. Lyons was approaclied by a cattleman from Texas, who inquired 
if the dead l)()dy of a man had been found at Copp's station in 18(i8. 
On Mr. Lyons stating that he had buried the man murdered, the 
cattleman stated that in October a man liad been hung in Texas for 
stealing cattle and on the scaffold had confessed to the murder of his 
employer at Copp's station in IS^iS. The ruins of the old station are 
plainly visible from the car window at tlie head of the Copp branch of 
Mill creek, two miles northwest of Eskridge. No inquiries were ever 
received of the young man who had left home with bright prospects 
before him— of making a fortune in the cattle business. 



ANDREW BELL. 



Robert Bell was a gardener and botanist of Dumfries .Shire, Scot- 
land, and Mrs. Bell was raised in one of the romantic glens of the 
highlands of Perth Shire. Mr. Bell, Sr. and wife came to America in 
1849, settling in New York, and five years later came to Wisconsin, 
and to Kansas in 1878, where, ten years later, Mr. Bell, Sr. died, on 
July 24th. Mrs. Robert Bell then lived with her son till her death on 
February 6, 1899, when she died at the advanced age of 100 years. 

Andrew, the only son, removed with his parents to Wisconsin 
when five years of age. 

He was raised on the farm, receiving a common school education, 
supplemented by one term at an academy. When not engaged in 
farming worked at carpentry and blacksmithing. When of age he 
went to the Wisconsin pineries where he learned saw-milling and 
much about machinery. Came to Kansas in February. 1877, and in 
September was married to Miss Rebeka Heberlein. To this happy 
union four children were born, three of whom are now living. The 
two daugliters. Lulu and Bertha, 20 and 17 years of age, respectively, 
are graduates of the St. Marys High School, and the son, Andrew, 
while but ten years of age, promises to be an expert mechanic, know- 
ing more about the steam engine than the average person at sixty. 

With the exception of two years in the grocery business at St. 
Marys and a short time in FlagstaiT, Arizona, Mr. Bell has lived on his 
farm ever since" coming to Kansas. 

Mr. Bell runs his farm on up-to-date principles. Does mixed farm- 
ing and has a large irrigating pump for use in dry seasons. He also 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 243 



runs a large steam thresher and his shop is a )nodel of convenience, 
being supplied with all kinds of blacksmith and carpenter's tools', 
lathe, and gasoline engine, enabling him to do all his machine repair- 
ing. From a financial standpoint Mr. Bell has made farming a suc- 
cess, having accumulated about $20,000 as the result of industry and 
good management. 

Has been elected four times trustee of Kaw township and is now 
serving the people as county commissioner, receiving, practically, the 
unanimous vote of his home township (Kaw), a deserved endorsement 
of one of our best and most popular citizens. 



RUDOLPH ARNDT 



Was born on April 21, 1829, at Koenigsburg, Prussia, coming to 
America and to Kansas in September, 1860, locating on the farm where 
he has since made his home. For years the Templin settlement was 
on the border in its truest sense. It was but a few miles to the Kaw 
reserve and that tribe being engaged in constant warfare with the 
Pawnees, Cheyennes, and Arapahoes the settlers lived in a state of 
apprehension by reason of possible raids from either the Kaws or the 
more hostile and aggressive tribes of the plains. The old stone fort 
(seepage 113) was built in anticipation of one of these possible raids. 
Inasmuch as a war party of Cheyennes appeared in sight of Council 
Grove as late as 1868 it will be readily seen that the fears of the set- 
tlers about Templin were not entirely groundless. During the sum- 
mer of that year while Mr. Adolph Zeckser was on a visit with friends 
at Templin he was surprised to find the Arndt home deserted. The 
doors were wide open but nobody at home. Nobody at home at Fet- 
tings. But going to the Wolgast home the mystery was explained. 
The settlers had gathered together for protection from an expected 
raid. The men were all moulding bullets and the women were there 
to assist in case they could be of service. The old stone fort was still 
standing and here the settlers repaired when night came. The storm 
blew over but the Kaws at the Grove didn't get off without a fight. 
At the Grove, too, the women and children were hustled into the 
Mission building for protection. Three years later the smallpox left a 
trail of death in the Templin settlement, invading among other homes 
that of Mr. Arndt. 

In the years gone by Rudolph's influence was always sought in the 
heat of political campaigns. Though never seeking office himself he 
was always ready to lend a helping hand to his friends. He is a man 
of influence with his neighbors, warm-hearted by nature and is ever 
anxious to welcome a friend beneath his hospitable roof. 



244 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



S. E. HULL 

Was born in Marion county, Ohio, on February 4, 1842. Was 
united in marriage to Miss Phcribce Martin, on December 27, 186G. 
Came to Kansas in tbe fall of 1877, locating on the farm he now owns, 
near Eskridge. On May 9, 1861, enlisted as a musician in Co. C, 26th 
Ohio Infantry, re-enlisting in January, 18«4. Participated in engage- 
ments at Shiloh, Stone River. Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, At- 
lanta, Franklin, and thence to Texas, where he was mustered out at 
Victoria, in October, 1865, having served 4 years, 6 months, and 7 days. 
Mr. Hull was nine times elected trustee of Wilmington township and 
served the people two years as sheriff, showing himself to be a capable 
and efficient officer, having, during liis term, been put to the most rigid 
tests by some of the slickest prisoners ever confined in the Alma jail. 
As a band leader he has few equals and no superior— the Alma A^olun- 
teer band furnishing an excellent example of what can be accom- 
plished by skill, untiring energy, and persistent application. In June, 
1901, Mr. Hull took charge of the New Commercial House In Alma 
and by his tact, good judgment, and genial manner has made his hotel 
one of the popular stopping places on the line of the Rock Island. 



MICHAEL IVIcWILLIAlVIS 

Was born in County Derry, Ireland, on March 5, 1829, coming to 
America in May, 1854, and to Kansas in 1868, locating on the farm 
where he now resides. Was married February 22, 1876, to Miss Maria 
McDonald, at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, at St. 
Marys, Kansas, three sons and a daughter coming to bless a pleasant 
home. 

Besides "Pete and Henry"— Reding and Ronneau, Mr. Mc Wil- 
liams was the first white settler in what is now Kaw township. But 
he had plenty of neighbors— all Pottawatomies. Mr. McWilliams was 
for years one of the most intluential men of Kaw township and though 
73 years of age hasn't lost his interest In matters pertaining to the 
welfare of the people. Looks twenty years younger than is shown by 
the family record and is as spry as a man of fifty. 



FREDERICK L. RAYMOND 

Was born August 11, 1851, on a farm at Westboro, Worcester 
county, Massachusetts. After attending the town schools and the 
high school, he spent two years at Wesleyan Academy, at Wilbraham, 
iMass. After being employed two years in a wholesale canned goods 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 245 



house in Boston came West and settled eleven miles northeast of 
Colorado Springs to try his luck with sheep. As the western terminus 
of the Santa Fe Railway at that time was at Granada (the west line of 
Kansas) and there was a stage ride of about 150 miles to Colorado 
Springs that made the country rather new to a New England boy 
the romance soon wore off. Having a chance to close out he drifted 
to Kansas, arriving at Wamego, May 31, 1874, and the next day drove 
down through the Mill creek valley, and soon located in Maple Hill 
township, where he has since resided. On the building of the Rock 
Island through the farm Mr. Raymond was instrumental in securing 
a flag station and postoftice that was named Vera. Mr. Raymond was 
elected county commissioner in 1880, and representative in the state 
legislature in 1884. Was a capable and popular official. Is happily 
married, has an interesting family, owns one of the best farms in the 
Mill creek valley, and in an enviable degree enjoys the esteem and 
confidence of his fellows. 



FRANZ SCHMIDT 



Was born in Bayern, Germany, on January 27, 1824. Was married 
ill May, 1850, to Miss Lidwina Eschay. Came to America in 1855, stop- 
ping for awhile at Covington, Kentucky, coming in the spring to 
Kansas, locating in the Mill creek valley just west of Alma. This 
was a new country then, game being plentiful everywhere— plenty of 
turkeys in the timber and the deer were so tame that they could fre- 
quently be seen feeding with the cattle. Mr. Schmidt has always 
been a generous contributor to the Catholic church, of which he has 
been a life-long and consistent member. Was made an honorary mem- 
ber of the Liederkranz in recognition of generous concessions to the 
society, their handsome grounds being located on his holdings near the 
City of Alma. Mr. Schmidt owns a fine farm of 640 acres adjoining 
the townsite of Alma and his residence is one of the many handsome 
stone buildings for which Alma is noted. 



ROBERT FIX 



Was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, March 5, 1837, coming 
with his father, Michae'- Fix, to the farm, near Volland, in the fall of 
1856. Enlisted July 1, 1861, in Co. D, 20th Indiana Infantry and re- 
enlisted July 12, 1865. in Co. K, the 7th, 14th, and 19th having been 
consolidated. Was .«ent to Fort Hatteras, but returned to Fortress 
Monroe in time to v itness tlie engagement between the Monitor and 
the Merrimac. The regiment was encamped at Newport News, 
within 300 yards jf where the Congress was burned and sunk and but 



246 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



half II mile from where the Cumberland went down. Participated in 
the seven days fight, the campaign closing with the battle of Malvern 
Hill. 

In 1865, Mr. Fix was married, in Indiana, to Miss Rebecca Larch. 
Besides the father and mother, eight handsome daughters compose 
the Fix family (see illustration); named from left to right, as follows: 
Mrs. Mamie Brasche, Mrs. Alice Cromer, Mrs. Lida Home, Misses 
Pearl, Laura, Emma, Mabel, and Clara. 

Mr. Fix owns a fine farm of 1,000 acres near Volland, besides much 
other property in Alma and Alta Yista, one of the handsomest coun- 
try homes in the county (see illustration). Has served the people two 
years as county commissioner, making one of our county's most popu- 
lar officials. His library is well supplied with the works of the best 
authors, as well as current literature of the day, enabling Mr. Fix to 
keep well posted on the issues before the people. 



MARTIN MUCKENTHALER 

Was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, on January 2, 1825. In 
March, 1853, was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Eha. Left for 
America on March 4, 1854— was 52 days on the water. Located in 
Minnesota, where he lived fifteen years, thirty miles south of St. Paul. 
Came to Kansas in 1859, settling on the Pottawatomie reserve, that 
had a short time before been thrown open to settlement. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Muckentlialer were born fourteen cliildren, eight of whom are 
still living. Mrs. Muckenthaler died November 13, 1890, since which 
time Mr. Muckenthaler has made his home with his daughter, Mr.s. 
Lizzie Hesse. 

Those who know Mr. Muckenthaler best will readily recognize in 
his portrait the kindly face of one of Wabaunsee county's best and 
leading citizens. Devout and consistent as a Christian, honorable 
and conscientious as a man, an obliging neighbor and a loving father, 
Mr. Muckenthaler occupies a warm place in the hearts of the people. 



ALBERT FRANCIS THAYER 

Was born in Boston, Massachusetts, September 4, 1840. His 
mother dying when he was but nine months old he was adopted by an 
uncle. Attended the public schools in Boston, graduating from the 
Dwight school at the age of fifteen and enrolleo as a pupil of the 
English high school, but his brother induced him to accept a position 
in liis grocery store, where he remained three yea.'S. Was manager 
and collector for the Equitable Safety Insurance Co. I'ntil 1862, when 
i 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 247 



he enlisted as a private in Co. E, 44th Mass. Volunteers. Was after- 
wards promoted to \\e 2nd sergeant. As a mark of appreciation the 
Insurance Co. presented him with $300, coupled with the promise of 
his old position at the close of his enlistment— nine months. The 
promise was fulfilled to the letter and Mr. Thayer retained his posi- 
tion until b)' reason of severe marine losses the company was compelled 
to suspend business. After filling various positions of trust, among 
others that of secretary and treasurer of the Huron Copper Mining 
Co.; secretary of the Alabama & Chattanooga R. R. Co. (which com- 
pany built the road from Chattanooga, Tenn., to New Orleans, La.); 
treasurer of the Boston Water Power Co., Mr. Thayer came to Kansas 
—first, on a visit that revealed the beauties of our state and created 
the desire to own a home in Kansas. The purchase of the fine farm 
of 320 acres in Maple Hill township was the result of that visit of Mr. 
and Mrs. Thayer to his wife's sister, Mrs. W. S. Crouch, of Maple Hill. 
Mr. Thayer moved with his family, in December, 1874, but after sev- 
eral years on the farm accepted a position with his old employers (at 
their urgent request) to take charge of the construction of 40 miles of 
the Fort Scott & Wichita R. R. — building, ironing, and equipping the 
road from Ft. Scott to lola in less than 3 months. While on a visit to 
Boston was offered and accepted the position of private secretary to 
Hon. Thos. Nickerson, former president of the Santa Fe R. R., but at 
that time engaged in building the Atlantic and Pacific, the Sonora, 
Southern California, and Mexican Central lines of railroad. But with 
a few months of confinement came the desire to again breathe the 
free air of Kansas. 

Mr. Thayer is well known in political circles, having served many 
times as chairman and secretary of Republican and Populist conven- 
tions. Has served the people of his home township — Maple Hill— one 
term as trustee, has filled the office of district clerk for over 20 years, 
and the position of superintendent of the Sunday school at the Eliot 
church, of Maple Hill, for three years, and treasurer of the church 
and cemetery for eight years, and is still one of the trustees of the 
church, having held the position many years. On December 10, 1867, 
Mr. Thayer was happily married to Miss Ellen Frances Cheney, of 
Newton, Mass. Four children were born to this union, two of whom 
are still living, Mrs. Eleanor T. Brett, and Mr. Ellis C. Thayer. Mr. 
Thayer is a man of honest convictions and an earnest advocate of 
what he believes to be right— the essential requisites of good citizen- 
ship. 



248 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

M. W. JANES 

Was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, July 22, 1841, but the 
greater part of his life prior to coming to Kansas was spent at Erie, 
Pennsylvania, tlie birtliplace of his parents, and where many of his 
relatives resided. Attended the common schools until fourteen years 
of age, when he entered Allegheny College, at Meadville, Pa., where 
he remained two years, completing the course in mathematics. Mr. 
Barker was president of the faculty. Board was two dollars a week. 
There were but few "extras" on the bill of fare but plenty of "sub- 
stantials." After a term at Bryant & Stratton's Mercantile College,* 
at Buffalo, N. Y., Mr. Janes accepted a position as bookkeeper for S. 
N. Scatcherd, an extensive lumber dealer in Buffalo. After one year 
witli this firm returned to Eric, where he kept books for his father, 
who was extensively engaged in the lumber business all along the 
lakes. Enlisted in the first regiment raised at Erie under the three 
months call in 1861. Was appointed assistant commissary for the 
regiment, which was ordered to Pittsburg, where a large number of 
soldiers were encamped. Also acted as assistant commissary for the 
camp, under Major Derickson. of Meadville, Pa. Before the battle of 
Bull's Run the regiment was mustered out. Went to the oil country 
where his father had extensive interests. After remaining here for 
seven years came West, and, after looking at a good deal of country 
located in the northeast part of Wabaunsee county, and has never 
regretted his choice of location. Owns an excellent farm of 1,400 acres 
with a frontage of two miles on the Kaw river, with the best of 
water, soil, and timber. Is fifteen miles west of Topeka, on the Rock 
Island— near Willard— and three miles from Rossville, on the Union 
Pacific. Mr. Janes is an extensive raiser of Hereford cattle and trot- 
ting bred horses, many of which have made more than creditable 
records on the race courses in different parts of the country. 

While not a politician, Mr. Janes has taken a keen interest in 
matters affecting the interests of the people, especially at such times 
as the conditions were out of joint. Has always been regarded as one 
of Wabaunsee county's leading citizens and is ever at the front in 
forwarding public enterprises. 

*Mr. Spencer, father of the Spencerian System of Penmanship, 
was one of the instructors at this college and a great many times has 
sat by Mr. Janes' desk giving instructions in penmanship. Mr. Janes' 
penmanship, today, is an excellent endorsement of Mr. Spencer's work 
as an instructor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 249 



J. J. MITCHELL 

Was born in Jasper county, Illinois, on July 19, 1854. A good 
conimon school education was supplemented by a course at St. Joseph's 
( 'Dllege, at Teutopolis, Illinois. On April 12, 1874, was united in mar- 
riage, at Plainfield, Illinois, to Mi.ss Hannah Bower, four children 
being born to this union— a daughter, Mrs. Lillie Piersol, of Paola, 
Kansas, and three sons— Dr. Eden E. Mitchell, of Alma, J. J. Mitchell, 
Jr., assistant postmaster at Eskridge, and Joseph, who is attending 
school. 

Studied law in the office of Hon. Geo. W. Fithian, member of con- 
gress from Mr. Mitchell's home district. Was admitted to the bar in 
1878, comijig to Kansas two years later, locating at Eskridge— at that 
lime tile prospective county seat of Wabaunsee county. 

Mr. Mitchell stands in the foremost rank of attorneys in Wabaun- 
Mie county and is one of our leading citizens. Has represented one 
^ide of nearly every important lawsuit since his residence in the 
county. Has never been beaten by reason of any defect in his plead- 
ings—a fact that has assured his phenomenal success as a member of 
his chosen profession. 



EDWARD KRAPP 

Was a native of Solingen, Germany — born November 30, 1824. 
Landed at New Orleans, November 26, 1850. After one year on a farm 
near St. Louis, came to Wesport landing, Kansas City. In November, 
1853, was married to Miss Mary Thoes. Came to Wabaun.see county 
with his brother.s-in-law, Peter and Jo.seph Thoes, arriving March 1, 
1855. Built three log houses— one each week, on their claims four miles 
south of Alma. Hauled goods from Westport to Fort Riley for two 
years over the old Mormon Trail, passing through the south part of 
Wabaunsee county. Then started a store on the farm— the store, for 
several years, being one of the busiest places in the county. From 
186(j to 1888 Mr. Krapp was one of our most energetic and successful 
rattle dealers. Moved to Alma in 1888 and ten years later disposed of 
ills fine farm of 360 acres. During the war was captain of a militia 
company called to defend the capital when General Sterling Price 
threatened the invasion of the state. William Drebing and Joseph 
Treu were lieutenants in the same company. Dealt much with the 
Pottawatomie Indians and was a man of great influence with the 
chiefs of that nation. At one of the most critical periods of the early 
sixties came to the relief of the settlers by going to the Indian camp 
on South branch in company with Mr. William Ross, the agent, and 
inducing the Indians to return to their deserted villages on the reserve 



250 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

(See illustration "Coming back to the Reservation"). No man in Wa- 
baunsee county has been more closely identified with our early history 
than has Mr. Krapp. With willing' hands and strong arms he assisted 
in laying the foundation on which tlio people have built a solid super- 
structure. He has ever been ready to help the needy— always a friend 
to the friendless. Though nearly four score years of an eventful life are 
behind him Mr. Krapp is yet in the enjoyment of his mental faculties 
and but lor a terrible experience in a blizzard* on the old Mormon trail 
in 1850, would today present an example of hale and hearty manhood 
with few parallels to be found anywhere. 

*Mr. Krapp's lower limbs were frozen while encamped on the head 
of the Wakarusa in a blizzard. So badly frozen as to be unable to wear 
his shoes he gave them to a fi'iendless boy who accompanied him on 
the trip— freighting to Fort Riley. 



L. J. WOODARD 



Was born in Richmond, Ashtabula county, Ohio, on July 29, 1831. 
After attending the common schools in Richmond and Monroe, com- 
pleted a high school course in a select school at Pierpont. Ohio. On 
October 23, 1850, was united in marriage to Sarah Delilah Davis, six 
children, four sons and two daughters, being boin to this union — 
Havilah, Byron, Zora D, and John D. Woodard, and Mrs. Cora 
Clybourne, dec'd, and Mrs. C. Anderson. 

In 1870, Mr. Woodard came to Kansas, locating near Beman, but 
came to Alta Vista on the completion of the Rock Island to that 
place. Was elected probate judge of Wabaunsee county in 1894 and 
re-elected in 1896, serving the people four years in one of the most 
responsible otlices within the gift of the people. Since his retirement 
from ottice. Judge Woodard, and his estimable help-meet, are enjoying 
1,he fruits of a well spent life in one of the neatest and most plea.santly 
l(jcated homes in Alta Vista. 



MR. AUGUST MEYER (Dec'd) 

Was born at Braunsweitz, IM'ussia, Germany, October 17, 1818, 
coming to America in 1848, locating in St. Louis, Missouri. Came to 
Kansas in 1860, first stopping at Havana, near Wilmington. Came to 
Alma in 1866. With Mr. Henry Schmitz opened the first store in 
Alma under the firm name of Sc^hmitz & Meyer, in the lower story of 
the Kaufman l)uilding— our tirst court house. Was married Septem- 
l)er 9, 1870, to Miss Emilie Dieball. Died April 25, 1886, leaving three 
sons, Otto, Ricliard, and August. Mi'. Meyer was Alma's first post- 
master, iieing appointed in 18(;7. soon after Alma had been designated 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 251 



as the county seat. Mr. Meyer, in conjunction with his business 
partner, Mr. Henry Schraitz, was ever active in advancing the inter- 
ests of Alma. They had been instrumental in fixing upon the loca- 
tion; had erected the first buildings, and left nothing undone that 
would tend to promote the growth of the town. Mr. Meyer was a 
man of strong convictions and possessed a will power capable of ensur- 
ing acquiescence in such views as might be suggested by existing con- 
ditions. Was faithful as a friend, kind and indulgent as a husband 
and father, and to those with whom fortune had dealt unkindly was 
over a friend in the hour of need. 



JOHN C. HENDERSON 

Was born March 29, 1833, at New Athens, Harrison county, Ohio. 
Was married at Peoria, Illinois, June 8, 1859, to Miss Agnes Russell, 
to whom three sons and a daughter were born— B. R., Charles B., and 
James R., and Miss Nellie Henderson. Came to Kansas in February, 
1871. settling in Mission Creek township. Was elected register of 
deeds tliree successive terms, 1885, 1887, and 1889, a period of six years. 
During the civil war was enrolling officer until the re-organization of 
the 14th Illinois, when he was commissioned as first lieutenant of Co. 
(t, of that regiment. AVas attached to Scofield's division, joining 
Sherman after his famous march to the sea, at Goldsboro, North Caro- 
lina. After the close of the war was employed for seven years in the 
internal revenue service, filling the various positions of assistant 
assessor, storekeeper, gauger, and assistant inspector. Is extensively 
engaged, with his sons, in farming and mining investments, but for 
several years past has enjoyed life in his pleasant home in Alma — 
filling a warm place in the hearts of the people. 



CHARLES C. GARDINER 

Was born in Chenango county, New York, in October, 1834. Re- 
moved with his parents to Akron, Ohio, when seven years of age. 
After remaining here five years his parents returned to Rhode Island 
—their native state, where he grew to manhood. A thorough course 
of training in the common schools was followed by a higher course at 
Alfred Academy, in Jamestown, Rliode Island. Came to Kansas in 
May, 1859, pre-empting a quarter section four miles north of Burlin- 
game. After working awhile at his trade — that of carpenter— at 
L:ivvrence, went to Jetferson City, where he was employed as foreman 
in a sash and blind factory. While here, in August, 1860, Mr. Gardiner 
was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Buffington, of Chester county, 
Penn.sylvania, the ceremony performed being tliat in vogue by the 



252 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAU^'SEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Friends, of which society Mrs. Gardiner was a life-long member. In 
1865, Mr. Gardiner returned to Kansas and the following year bought a 
farm near Waveland, Shawnee county. Came to Wabaunsee county in 
1884 and bought the farm of 1,500 acres since known as the Brightside 
farm, where he resided until 1896. when he retired from the active 
management of the place. On the Brightside farm i\re three dwelling 
houses, three large barns, a steam feed mill, cribs, stock sheds, gran- 
ary, etc. The farm is well watered and has 17 miles of fence, 20 acres 
of orchard, and a number of acres of artificial timber, besides many 
acres of alfalfa. 400 head of cattle and from 200 to 300 head of hogs 
are, each year, kept on the place. That Mr. Gardiner has made farm- 
ing a success is evidenced by the fact that the revenue from the 
products of the farm up to 1896 aggregated the sum of $80,000. 

The location of the station and postoffice at Bradford was largely 
due to Mr. Gardiner's efforts and influence. The building of the 
flouring mill— burned in 1899 — and the establishment of a creamery 
resulted fiom Mr. Gardiner's efforts. 

In 1854, the subject of this sketch united with the Congregational 
church, of which organization he has ever been a consistent member. 
Mr. Gardiner was the father of four children, two sons and two daugh- 
ters, all of whom were educated at the State Agricultural College, at 
Manhattan. 



JAMES R. HENDERSON 

Was born September 10, 1866, at Peoria, Illinois. Came to Kansas 
with his parents when but live years of age, Mr. Henderson, Sr., set- 
tling on a farm in Mission Creek township. Tauglit school two terms, 
was deputy register of deeds live years and one year assistant cashier 
of the Alma State Bank. Was elected county clerk in 1893 and re- 
elected in 1895. In 1890 was special agent of the census bureau under 
Noble Prentis— compiling mortgage statistics — his field being the 
counties of Shawnee, Morris, Greenwood, and Pratt. Continued with 
Mr. Prentis until the close of the work at Newton, Mr. Henderson's 
methods and neat manuscript ensuring his retention in clerical woik 
to the last— eflticiency in this as in every other employment being 
characteristic of one of Wabaunsee county's most popular officials. 

Mr. Henderson is one of the firm of Henderson Bros., abstracters 
and dealers in real estate. Are also heavy stockholders in the AVyom- 
iug Copper & Gold Mining Co., Ijesides owning valuable mineral lands 
in the Arkansas lead and zinc fields. 

On June 18, 1896, the subject of this sketch was united in marriage 
to Miss Hannah ('rafts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Crafts, of 
Alma. Little Ruth, aged four years, is the only child. The family 
resides in one of the mziest homes in Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 253 



J. B. BARNES 

Was born in Mahoning county, Ohio, June 20, 1846. Was educated 
atCantleld, and Poland. Ohio, being a graduate of Poland Academy. 
Read law in the office of Hon. S. W. Gilson, of Canfield. Was admitted 
to the bar in 1870 and in 1884 came to Wabaunsee county and two years 
later was elected county attorney. Was re-elected in 1888, and again 
elected in 1894. In criminal litigation as well as in civil practice Mr. 
Barnes has been successful in an eminent degree— the number of crim- 
inals sent to the penitentiary at Lansing through his efforts furnish- 
ing indubitable proof in the one case and the flattering increase in the 
number of his clients indicating his popularity as an attorney. Mr. 
Barnes has been mentioned as an available and possible candidate for 
the judgeship of this, the 35th judicial district. Though reluctant to 
make the race the people may yet present arguments so forcible as to 
insure his candidacy— and election. 



DR. 0. S. CHESTER 

Was born at Fairfield, Jefferson county, Iowa, June 1, 1866. Was 
educated at the Des Moines High school, and the Iowa Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, at Mt. Pleasant. Took a course in medicine at the Missouri 
Medical college, of St. Louis, supplemented by three courses at the 
Marion Sims college, of the same city, being a graduate of the latter 
institution— class of 1889. On September 8, 1891, was united in mar- 
riage at Tescot, Kansas, to Miss Myrtle S. Smith, three children being 
born to this union— Mahrea, Lynn, and Tillie Clair. Dr. Chester came 
to Wabaunsee county in December, 1898. Stands high in his profes- 
sion, and in March, 1902, was appointed by Governor Stanley to the 
office of coroner of Wabaunsee county, to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Dr. H. F. Palenske, by reason of his removal to 
Arkansas. Dr. Chester tilled the position of county health officer two 
successive terms, and during the visitation of smallpox gave evidence 
to the people of the wisdom of his appointment. For several years has 
been at the head of the Order of Maccabees in Alma— whicli, in itself, 
is a certificate of good standing among the people with whom Dr. 
Chester has cast his lot. 



MR. HENRY RONNAU (Dec'd) 

Was born in Schleswig Holstein, Germany, March 23, 1841, Came 
to America in 1866 and to Wabaunsee county in 1868, settling on the 
Pottawatomie reserve when first thrown open to settlement. Pete 
and Henry— Reding and Ronnau— took claims in what is now Kaw 



254 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

townsliip wlieii their only neighbors were Indians, who had chosen 
the best hinds for their allotments. On November 2, 1873, the subject 
of this sketch was united in marriage to Miss Frances Auer, to whom 
four sons were born — Frank, George, Fred, and Edward. On August 
;{, ISy.J, the subject of this sketch died at liis lionie, in Kaw townsliip, 
at the age of 54 years, 4 montlis, and 11 days. A kind husband and 
father had gone to rest. A good citizen, one of our early pioneers, 
liad gone home to that better land beyf)nd the grave. 

HENRY FAUERBACH 

Was born in tlio Kingdom of Hanover. (Jermany, September 14, 
1833. Came to America with his parents, who settled in Monroe 
county, Illinois. Was raised here, getting his education behind the 
plow. Came to Kansas, first, in 185G, but went to Nebraska the same 
year. Was employed by Majors, Russell, and Waddell, who had the 
contract for freigliting supplies to the military posts. Crossed the 
plains a number of times between the Missouri river and Salt Lake. 
In 1S60, .sought for golden treasures in the mountains of Colorado but 
found them not. Again tried freighting — this time on his own hook 
— between the Missouri river and the Rocky Mountains — on both the 
Platte and Santa Fe routes. On the last trip loaded at Lawrence — 
then the terminus of the Union Pacific railroad— for New Mexico. 
Was corraled by Indians on Cow creek for eight days, the incident 
being mentioned by Captain Inman in his book. Settled in Wabaun- 
see county in 1868, being one of the first white settlers on the Potta- 
watomie reserve, soon after the Indian lands were opened for .settle- 
ment. 

Has made a success of farming on one of the finest farms in the 
Mill creek valley. Follows up-to-date methods. Has rai.sed a wortliy 
family of sons and daughters, who have inherited a competence that 
includes the many good qualities of one of Waliaunsee county's leading 
citizens. 



S. A. BALDWIN 



Was born in Meriden, Connecticut, June 29, 1827. When but three 
years of age his parents moved to New Britain, Conn. Attended 
school here until sixteen years of age, when he accepted a position as 
clerk and bookkeeper for his uncle, J. G. Baldwin, in his store at 
Middletown. Remained with his uncle four years when he purchased 
an interest in a manufacturing concern located at Branford, Conn., 
having charge of the packing and shipping department. To better 
distribute tlie goods manufactured by the firm (locks of all de.scrip- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 255 



lions, door knobs, etc.) a store was opened in New York City, Mr. 
Baldwin taking charge. After two years here disposed of a part of 
liis interest and came to Kansas as a member of the "Connecticut 
Colony," ory:anized by Mr. C. B. Lines, of New Haven. The colony 
started early in the spring of 1856. The party outfitted at Kansas 
City, purchasing teams and supplies, and in due time arrived at 
Walxiunsee. near which place Mr. Baldwin has since resided. In the 
fall Mr. Baldwin returned East and was married to Miss Jane Augusta 
Barnes, of New Haven. In the spring of 1857 Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin 
came West and lived in a tent until the completion of their house. 

Besides tilling the office of township treasurer for seven years Mr. 
Baldwin was one of the trustees having in charge the building of the 
Wamego bridge across Kansas river, has served several years as deputy 
clerk of the district court, was twice elected register of deeds— 1863 
and 1S()5: was appointed county clerk on the death of Mr. H. M. Sel- 
den. in July, 1865, and served two terms as a member of the state 
legislature— faithful service in these several offices of trust securing 
for one of our oldest and most highly respected citizens an enviable 
place in the esteem of his constituents. 



ROBERT SIMIVIONS 



Was born August 10, 1845, in. St. Louis, Missouri. Moved with his 
pirents to Illinois in the early fifties. Was married in 1874 to Miss 
Caroline A. Blaksley, of Crystal Lake, Henry county, Illinois. Came 
to I-Cansas in 1879, locating at Eskridge, where the family has since 
resided. During the war enlisted in Co. G, 17th Illinois Cavalry, and 
now holds the' position of Adjutant of W. H. Earl Post, No. 75. Mr. 
and Mrs. Simmons are estimable people. Their only daughter. Miss 
Josie May, is a young lady of rare accomplishments — one of the gradu- 
ates of the Eskridge schools, class of 1892. See illustration. 



L. M. CHRISTY 



Was born at Leetonia, Ohio, April 6, 1873. Came with his parents 
to Kansas in 1879. Was educated in the public schools of Manhattan. 
Learned the printer's trade and has mastered the most intricate prob- 
lems that confront the progressive printer. Was for three years fore- 
man of the Alma Signal office and for a year past has been foreman of 
the Eskridge Star. In the battle of life Mr. Christy has set an example 
worthy of emulation— especially to young men thrown on their own 
resources. On April 23, 1902, Mr. Christy was united in marriage to 
Miss Minnie Paige, an accomplished young lady of Eskridge. 



25(3 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



GEORGE SUTHERLAND 

Was born in Marshall, Michigan, July 27, 1861, removing with liis 
parents to Minnesota when but six years of age. Came to Kansas in 
1871, his parents locating in Franklin county. In 1878 Mr. Sutherland 
came to Alma, where he learned the trade of saddler and liarness 
maker witli Mr. Henry Pippert. In September, 1883, was united in 
marriage to Miss Augusta M. Wendland, six children, a son and five 
daughters, being born to this union. Mr. Sutherland is serving his 
fourth year as a member of tlie school board and his fifth term as 
mayor of Alma — the best of indications that he has the confidence of 
the people, liesides a substantial business house Mr. Sutherland owns 
one of the many handsome residences in Alma. See illustration. 



JOHN SCHWANKE (Dec'd) 

Was born in Prussia, Germany, January (5, 18.%. Came to America 
when but 17 years of age. Three years later came to Kansas, locating 
on South Branch of Mill creek. On February 2, 1862, was married to 
Miss Wilhelmina Hankammer, ten children being born to this union, 
eight of whom are now living— Charles, William, Henry, Mrs. Achah 
Schreiber, Mrs. Emma Koch, Mrs. Clara Schreiber, and Misses Mary 
and Anne. Mr. Schwanke died on July 15, 1887. 

Mr. Schwanke was one of the first settlers of Farmer township- 
then Alma township— and during his life was a man of much influence. 
In February, 187,3, he was appointed postmaster at Moltke (Cobb), on 
the mail line from Alma to Council Grove, holding the office until it 
was discontinued by reason of a lack of patronage resulting from the 
building of the M. A. & B. Railway. 



M. F. TRIVETT 

Was born at Jefferson, Ashe county, North Carolina, July 10, 1845. 
The education received at Jefferson Academy was supplemented by a 
college course at Independence, Virginia. Received his first medical 
education at Jefferson, followed by a course of lectures at Newburn. 
North Carolina. Is also a graduate of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, at St. Louis. After practicing one year at Elk Cross Roads, 
North Carolina, came West in 1874— driving overland. Was six months 
on the road. Was looking for a location and as his funds were 
exhausted concluded to stop— especially as the country in the vicinity 
of Eskridge seemed to possess all the requisites of an ideal liome. 
Bought the Sam Waldo homestead, a half mile .south of the "Corners," 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 257 



and engaged in farming in conjunction with tlie practice of his pro- 
fession. Has been eminently successful as a physician. Was one of 
the organizers of the Eskridge State Rank and has ever since been a 
member of the board of directors and a heavy stockholder of the bank. 
Besides several fine farms, Dr. Trivett owns one of the many hand- 
some homes in Eskridge and is ever at the front in advancing the 
material interests of the city— near which he located nearly thirty 
years ago and in which he built the first house. 

I 



IVIR W. D. DEANS (Dec'd) 

Was born at Moscow, Illinois, October 12, 1826. Came to Alma in 
1883, but kept a store at Albion Postotlice, near the present site of 
Alta Vista several years before moving to the county seat. Was 
county surveyor four terms and was again the nominee for that office 
when tiie end came. Was a member of the city council several years 
and was mayor of Alma at the time of his death, which occurred on 
October 10, 1897. Was also vice-president and one of the directors of 
of the Alma State Bank when Death called him from his earthly 
cares. Nine children survived him, six of whom lived in Kansas- 
Rev. John Deans, of Lyon county, David, for several years foreman of 
tlie Signal office, Oscar, one of our teachers, Charlie, living in Texas, 
Mr.s. Mollie Riley, of Wichita, and Mrs. Ida Brady, of Manhattan. 
Mr. Deans was one of of Alma's most highly esteemed citizens- 
honored as few men have been honored and worthy of every honor 
bestowed upon him. 



WILLIAM PROTHERO 

Was born In Baltimore, Maryland, but lived several years near 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Emigrated to Rock River Valley, near Ster- 
ling, Illinois, in 1840. In 1859 was a delegate to the state convention, 
at Bloomington, Illinois, where .John M. Palmer presided. Witnessed 
the organization of the Republican party in Illinois. Among the del- 
egates present were Abraham Lincoln, Richard Yates, "Long John" 
Wentworth. and Colonel Bissell, who received the nomination as first 
republican candidate for governor. The convention put forward the 
name of Abraham Lincoln for U. S. Senator. The great debate be- 
tween Lincoln and Douglas followed and resulted in the election of 
Lincoln to the presidency. For thirty-five years Mr. Prothero has 
made his home in Wilmington. For many years he has been 
elected and re-elected justice of the peace and is one of our leading 
citizens. 



258 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



MR. JOHN COPP Dec'd) 

Was born at Steinheini, Province of WiirtemV^urg, Germany, 
December 31, 1832. I'ame to America with his uncle, John Copp, 
when but 1(5 years old, locatiiiK^ at Reading. Pennsylvania. Came to 
Kansas in 1856, and in the following year was married to Miss Mary 
Mauzenbrinck, whose parents pre-empted the land afterwards sold to 
Christian AVert/.berger. Mr. Copp lived first on the Finney rancli, 
near Halifax, then at Copp"s station, near Eskridge, on tlie Topeka 
and Council Grove mail route, but later at Paxico. In his day but few 
men in the county wielded greater inlluence. Was county commis- 
sioner from 1870 to 1872— a stormy period in our county's history. He 
was a man of firm convictions, warmly espoused the cause of his 
friends, and his few enemies always knew where to tind hitn— always 
striking out from the shouldei'. irrespective of ccmsequences to himself 
as well as those arrayed against him in a cause he considered just and 
right. Mr. Copp died March 10, 1888, at San Diego, California, highly 
esteemed by all. 



LARDNER J. IVIcCRUIVlB 

Was born in Mercer, now Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, March 
30, 1843. Received as good educational advantages as the country 
alforded. Enlisted in the 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry on August 19. 
1861. Discharged for disability INlarch, 1863. Re-enlisted in June and 
participated in the Gettysburg campaign. Enlisted for the third time 
in February, 1864, in the 14th Pa. Cavalry, and mustered out at Fort 
Leavenworth in November, 1865. In March, 1870, was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Jennie A. F>aiker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Barker, of Mission creek. Besides farming, Mr. McCrumb has madf 
a spejcialty of the best breeds of horses, meeting with financial success 
in whatever he has undertaken. Has also been successful from a 
political standpoint, having been elected representative in 1878, and 
re-elected in 1880. Is president of the Alma National Bank, and 
resides in one of the prettiest homes in the Mill creek valley, one and 
a half miles east of McFarland. 



JOHN LUDWIG SCHEPP 

Was boiii on a farm near Manhattan, October 29, 1867. l)ut ha.s 
lived in Wabaunsee county the greater part of his life— on Illinois 
creek, or the Muehlenbacher branch of Mill creek, where his mother 
owns 2.000 acres of the best land in Wabaunsee countv. besides i)2o 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 259 



acres in Lyon county. :{50 acres of this land is in a high state of culti- 
vation and 2,000 acres is the best of pasture, on which 1,500 head of 
cattle range, in addition to 300 head belonging on the farm. The bal- 
ance is covered with the finest growth of timber in Wabaunsee county. 
•'Louie," as he is always called, lives with his mother in one of the 
three large stone houses on the farm, deals largely in cattle, and is one 
of the slirewdest business men in the county. Is always ready to 
accommodate a friend with a loan at reasonable rates and was never 
known to oppress a creditor. Besides being, prospectively, one of the 
wealtiiiest men in Wabaunsee county. Louis possesses the grit that 
will enable him to protect his holdings even under the most trying 
circumstances, as was proven on March 17. 189-4, when liis Uncle Peter 
was shot down at the old home, wliere for years the tliree bachelor 
brothers, Louis, F'red, and Peter Muehlenbacher, lived with their 
sister, on what, is perhat)S the largest and best farm owned by a single 
indivi<iua] in Wabaunsee county. 



THOMAS MANEY 

Was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, Dec. 21, 1844. Came to 
America in 18(51, entering tlie quartermaster's employ at Fort Leaven- 
wortl). In 1864 went to St. Mary's, where he was married to Miss 
Josephine Iligbee, at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Feb- 
ruary 28. 1868. In 1873, located on Weils creek, on the farm where he 
now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Maney have eight children, four sons, Alva, 
Maurice, Thomas, and Joseph, and four daughters, Margaret, 
Catherine, Mary, and Alice. Mr. IVIaney owns a good farm and deals 
extensively in live stock. Has an interesting family and is one of 
those men of whom it is truly said— "has a heart in him as big as an 
ox.v In other words, is a man generous by nature and warm hearted 
l)ecause he was born that way. 



AUGUST FALK 



Was born in (iroszei'lang, Brandenburg, Germany, on February 21, 
1849. Came to America in 1870— coming direct to Wabaunsee county. 
Aug. 5, 1872, was united in marriage to Miss Malinda Fix, six children, 
four sons and two daughters being born to this union: George, Paul, 
Henry, and Elmer, and Mrs. Laura Smith and Miss Rosa. (See illus- 
tration.) Mr. FaJk is a stone mason and marble cutter, being pro- 
prietor of the Alma Marble Works, that from a small beginning has 
attained more than local celebrity— there being much demand for 
tombstones and memorial tablets of his handiwork in cemeteries far 
removed from his pleasent home in the outskirts of Alma. 



2G0 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



JOHN WINKLER 

Was born in Gettingen, Hanover, Germany, August 26, 1828. On 
March (i, 1860, was united in marriatre to Miss Lena Martin, to whom 
six children were born: Mrs. Augusta Eldridge, and Mrs. Amelia 
Weaver, who were born in Germany, and Robert, Artliur, Otto, and 
Mrs. Lena McCrumb, who were born in America— Robert being the 
first white child born in Alma. Mr. Winkler came to America in 1866, 
coming direct to Kansas, to tlie home of liis cousin, Mr. Joseph Trcu. 
(deceased.) For eighteen years Mr. Winkler was adjutant of the 
Hanover Curassieurs, and was an active participant in the Austro- 
Pru.ssian war, Hanover espousing the cause of Austria. When the 
Hanover troops capitulated to tiie Prussian army, Mr. Winkler was 
among those paroled and came to America. Built the first liotel in 
Alma, wliicli he sold to Mr. Ed. Krapp and went to Maple Hill, where 
he was elected trustee on the organization of tluit township. Returned 
to Alma and built the Winkler Hotel (see illustration) that stood 
where now stands the New Commercial. After a few years of 
successful farming, Mr. Winkler returned to the hotel business, build- 
ing the Denver House at McFarland, wliich he sold to the present 
proprietor, Mr. trottlieb NoUer. Though in his 74th year Mr. Winkler 
looks but little more than tifty and is as hearty and jovial as twenty 
years ago. 



JAMES CARROLL 



Was born March 14, 1844, in the town of Belleville, Ontaiio, Canada, 
removing with his parents a few years later to Sidney, Shelby county, 
Ohio. While a youth acquired a good academic education. When the 
war broke out his patriotic zeal prompted him to enter the service of 
ills country but he was twice rejected. But his persistence was at last 
rewarded and in March, 1864, we find him a momber of Co. F, 4Tth 
Infantry, Ohio A^olunteers. Tlie regiment was at once ordered to the 
front and participated in the Atlanta campaign, after which he was 
taken prisoner near Goldsboro, North Carolina, March 27, 1865, and 
confined as a prisoner of war at Salisbury, North Carolina, until the 
following June. Though the war was over, he, a prisoner was none 
the wiser. On August 27, 1865, was married to Miss M. E. Hodge, to 
which union two children were born, Mr. Carey E. Carroll and Mrs. 
Lilia M. Huber, of DeGratT, Ohio. After the close of the civil war Mr. 
Carroll entered upon tlie study of the law in the ollice of Mf .-tin ^ 
McKercher, being admitted as a member of the bar at Lima, Ohio. I' 
1880 located in Alma, this being his tjrst and last change of resi:leno. 
On May 20. 1S85, Mr. Carroll met his greatest misfortune in the dea i 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 







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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 261 



of Mrs. Carroll. Since his residence in Alma Mr. Carroll has been one 
of our most successful attorneys. He has been admitted to practice in 
the department of the interior and has assisted many of his former 
comrades in securing pensions for services rendered their country in 
the hour of need. 



A. A. COTTRELL 



Was born in Meredith, Delaware county, New York, in 1835. Was 
educated at Delaware Aca'demy, Delhi, New York. Came to Kansas 
in 1856, with the New Haven colony. Was one of the committee that 
located the company at Wabaunsee. Enlisted in Co. E, 10th Illinois 
Infantry at first call for troops. Afterwards re-enlisted in Co. G, 1st 
Illinois Cavalry. Was taken prisoner five different times by General 
Price. In 1862 was united in marriage at Mendon, Illinois, to Miss 
Martha Piatt, nine children, six daughters and three sons, being born 
to this union. Seven of the children are graduates of the Kansas 
State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, and the other two will soon 
add their names to the list of graduates. Mr. Cottrell is an up-to-date 
farmer who has made a success of his calling, and one of our oldest 
and most exemplary citizens. 



GUS THIERER 

Was born in Weston, Platte county, Missouri, November 22, 1851. 
Came to Kansas when but five years of age with his parents, who 
located in Geary county. In 1869, came to Wabaunsee county and in 
August, 1874, was united in marriage to Miss Rosa Fix, five children, 
three sons, F. C, John B., and Geo. W., and two daughters. Misses 
Mamie and Lottie, being born to this union. Besides a farm of 400 
acres on West branch, Mr. Thierer owns another fine farm of 410 acres 
on McDowell creek, in Geary county. This progressive farmer, with 
his estimable family resides in one of the many pretty homes on West 
branch of Mill creek, seven miles southwest of Alma. 



WILLIAM HORNE, SR. 

Was born in Baden, Germany, June 30, 1833, coming to America 
with his parents when but threeyears of age. Located in Jo Daviess 
county, Illinois, but later, moved to Wisconsin. In 1852 joined 
the throng of gold-seekers wending their w^ay to California. Was 
married in San Francisco in 1857, and returned by way of the Isthmus 
to his former home in Wisconsin. Two years later the discovery of 



262 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

new gold fields drew him to the mountains of Colorado, his young wife 
accompanying him on the trip to the mountains and to his present 
home in Kansas in the fall of 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Ilorne have four 
sons and four daughters. The family is pleasantly located on a well 
stocked farm of 1,100 acres on the head of Spring creek, where in the 
days when the mails were carried on horseback from Alma to Junction 
City Mr. Home was postmaster at Elvenia. Tliough nearing the 
three score and ten mark Mr. Home is stout and hearty and as genial 
as in the days of long ago. 



S. H. FAIRFIELD 



Was bom September 4, 1833, in Middleton, E.s.sex county, Massa- 
chusetts. Went to Minden, Illinois, in 1856, reaching Kansas in Sep- 
tember of the same year, selecting a claim near Wabaun.see. In 1860 
was united in marriage to Miss M. H. Burt, of Tabor, Iowa. Return- 
ing to Kansas he was, in 1861, elected doorkeeper of the state senate, 
also of the high court of impeachment. In September, 1861, enlisted 
in Co. K, 11th Kansas Volunteers, Was detailed as clerk at regi- 
mental headquarters, and subsequently assigned to duty as postmaster 
of his division and the army of the border. In 1863, had entire charge 
of the military mail in Kan.sasCity, for Missouri, Kansas, and Colo- 
rado.* Rejoined his company in 1864, the regiment then being cavalry, 
and served as corporal till 1865, when he was detailed as clerk in the 
quartermaster's department of the frontier. During the same year 
rejoined his company at Horse Shoe, Wyoming Territory, where he 
remained while subduing the hostile Sioux. Was mu.stered out at 
Fort Leavenworth, September 15, 1865. While in the army partici- 
pated in the battles of Maysville, Cane Hill, Prairie Grove, Van Buren, 
Lexington, and the Big Blue. In 1865, was elected county clerk, 
county treasurer in 1867 and 1869. Also to the office of register of 
deeds the same year, which office he continued to hold 'till January, 
1886. Was editor and proprietor of the Alma Union two years. Wns 
a member of the court house building committee and took an active 
interest in building the Congregational church, being the first Sunday 
school superintendent. Mr. Fairfield owns a pleasant residence in 
Alma besides several of the best farms in the county. He is largely 
engaged in the real estate and loan business and has always been at 
the front in advancing any public enterpri.se. 

*An item in the Kansas City Journal in December, 1863, says: Mr. 
Fairfield, postmaster at headquarters, keeps himself informed of the 
location of the various regiments and companies, and forwards all 
mail for officers and soldiers without delay. The arrangement uf 
mail matters for convenience of those in the service, seems to be 
about perfect. 



] 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 263 



PROSPER E. LEONARD 

Was born in Luxemburg, Belgium, July 18, 1850. When but two 
years of age his parents came to America, locating in Brown county, 
Ohio, where he received a good education in the county schools. 
In April, 1879, was married to Miss Gertrude May Seurmour. Came to 
Kansas in 1884, locating in Wabaunsee township. Owns a good farm 
of 400 acres neur Alma. Is superintendent of the county Poor Farm, 
a position to which he has been appointed five times in succession — 
the best evidence of satisfactory work, by an honest, conscientious 
official. 



CURTIS IM. LOWRY 



Was born January 30, 1875, in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. 
When but three years of age came to Kansas with his parents, who 
located in Dickinson county. Mr. Lowry was educated at the Dickin- 
son county High school, of which he is a graduate. Is also a graduate 
of the Kansas State Normal school, at Emporia. Has taught school 
live terms. Was principal of the Eskridge schools two years, graduat- 
ing a class of fourteen in the class of 1902. Is a young man of excep- 
tional character and ability and that the future has much in store for 
him is unquestioned. 



DOW BUSENBARK 

Was born at Jonesboro, Grant county, Indiana, November 7, 1853. 
Came with his parents to Kansas March 1, 1860, locating in Jefferson 
county, but came. to Wabaunsee county in 1878. On August 14, 1876, 
was united in marriage to Miss Olive A. Coxen, four sons and four 
daughters being born to this union. Was educated in the common 
schools of Kansas, supplemented by a course of normal work at Leba- 
non, Ohio, and another at Valparaiso, Indiana. The better part of 
his life was passed in the school room, the greater part of which has 
been in the schools of Wabaunsee county. AVas elected county super- 
intendent of schools for Wabaunsee county, in November, 1896, and 
re-elected in November, 1898. Was also appointed for the interim 
of four months resulting from the change in the beginning of the 
official term. During his term of office began the publication of the 
"Teacher, Patron, and Pupil," the first number being Issued in Octo- 
ber, 1897, continuing the publication until April, 1900. Purchased and 
began publishing the Eskridge Star in March, 1900, in which business 
he has ever since been engaged. Mr. Busenbark has made for himself 



264 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

an excellent reputation as a teacher, was even more successful in the 
office of county superintendent, and as editor of the Star has done 
much to raise the standard of journalism. 



JAMES IVl. LEE 

Was born in Manslield, England, March 26, 1852, coming with his 
parents to America when but an infant. Was educated in the city 
schools of Boston, Massachusetts. On September 20, 1871, was united 
in marriage to Miss Hannah M. Shaw, four children, two sons, James 
H. and Elmer William, and two daughters, Mrs. C. C. McMichael and 
Miss Grace, being born to this union. Besides 240 acres of excellent 
farm land, Mr. Lee is proprietor of one of the best appointed stores in 
Eskridge, located in the first story of the Woodman Hall building. 
The official honors that have fallen on Mr. Lee's shoulders are the 
best Indications of the degree of confidence reposed in one of Wabaun- 
see county's best known citizens. Twice elected township treasurer, 
for four years city treasurer, and twice elected mayor of Eskridge it 
wasn't difficult to find in Mr. Lee the material for county treasurer, 
to which office he was twice elected— in 1895 and again in 1897 — being 
for four years one of our most popular officials. 



MR. ANDREW PRINGLE, SR. (Dec'd) 

Was born In Melrose, Scotland, October 28, 1827. Came to America 
in 1857, settling in Canada, but removing to Kansas in 1870— to the 
farm near Harveyville, where he died, March 15, 1889, leaving to 
mourn his loss, a wife and five sons: Andrew, William, John W., 
James T., and Robert— all estimable citizens. Mr. Pringle was a man 
of strict integrity, highly esteemed by all as a conscientious, Christian 
gentleman. 



MR. C. B. LINES (Dec'd) 

Was born in New Haven, Connecticut, March 12, 1807.. Was 
married July 18, 1829, to Miss Maria Woodard. Came to Wabaunsee 
county at the head of the Connecticut colony, in March, 1856, locating 
at Wabaunsee. Mr. Lines was a man of strong convictions and the 
strictest integrity — a leader among men. Besides his wife he left, to 
mourn his loss, three daughters— Mesdames Geo. S. Burt, J. P. Evans, 
and I. H. Lsbell. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 265 



WILLIAM M. RINEHART 

Was born in Knox county, Ohio, September 6, 1839. Came to 
Kansas in 1870, locating on the farm on which he now resides, one mile 
east of Eskridge. For a number of years kept a country store at 
"The Corners"— long before the advent of the railroad. On November 
28, 1860, was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Riley, two sons and 
two daughters being born to this union. During the Civil war Mr. 
Rineliart enlisted as a member of Co. F, 121st Ohio Infantry, and for 
two years was a marine on the steamer Baltic. During the Spanish 
war one of his sons was a member of the "Rough Riders." Three of 
tlie four children are now residents of Montana. In 1898 Mr. Rinehart 
was elected to the legislature, the nomination coming to him unsolic- 
ited. Is an experienced horticulturist, a good citizen and as a member 
of the legislature made a clean record — always bearing in mind the 
interests of his constituents. 



MR. CHRISTIAN KUENZLI (Dec'd) 

Was born August 20, 1831, in Canton Berne, Switzerland. Came 
to America in 1850, locating at Highland, Illinois. Was married in 
1853 to Miss Magdalena Moser, of Highland. In 1856, moved to Buch- 
anan county, Missouri, and in 1859 came to Wabaunsee county, loca- 
ting on the farm where he died on July 10, 1899. No man was held in 
higher esteem by his neighbors and the death of no one could be more 
universally regretted. At the Kueiizli home hospitality was for years 
dispensed with a generous hand and those in need of substantial 
assistance were never turned away if it was possible for Christian 
Kuenzli to lend a helping hand. 



LaFAYETTE RICHARDS 

Was born in Wyoming county. New York, June 12, 1834. Came to 
Kansas in 1880, locating in Rock Creek township, this county. On 
February 28, 1855, was married to Miss Cynthia Spinck, two sons and 
four daughters being b(n-n to this union. Mr. Richards is a graduate 
of the A'arysburg, New York, High scliool and lias taught school four 
terms, one of which was in liis home district on Rock creek. lias 
served the people of his townsliip four terms as trustee and has been 
justice of the peace for twelve years. In 1888 was elected probate 
judge of AVabaunsce county, his education and sound judgment emi- 
nently fitting liim for the duties of this important otfice. 



26(i EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



GUSTAY H. MEIER 

Was born on the home farm near Halifax, January 2, 1865. 
Received a good, practical education in the district school, supple- 
mented by a course at the Kansas State Agricultural College, at Man- 
hattan. In 1887 began the study of photography with L. Palenske. 
Has mastered every branch of the business and is today one of the 
best artists in the state — a fact proven by his handiwork— seldom 
equaled and never excelled. 



DAVID M. GARDNER 



Was born in New York City, July 4, 1850, coming to Illinois in 
1863 and six years later to AVabannsee county. On November 23, 1873, 
was united in marriage to Miss Martha S. CrTindall, of Mission creek, 
a son and a daughter being born to this union. In 1877, was elected 
sheriff of Wabaunsee county and re-elected in 1879; and elected to the 
office of county clerk in 1881, filling with credit two of the most 
important offices in the gift of the people. Has resided in Alma since 
his first election to a county office and is the present incumbent in the 
office of city marshal. His only daughter, Mrs. Flora Taylor, was, for 
several years, a popular teacher in the Alma city schools. 



ROSS C. McCORIVIICK 

Was born in Knoxville, Iowa, April 1, 1872. Came to Kansas with 
his parents in 1879, the family locating at Phillipsburg. Is a graduate 
of the Phillipsburg High School, also, of the Nickerson Normal Col- 
lege, at Nickerson, Kansas. Has taught school three years, one of 
which was principal of the Alma City schools, making for himself a 
most excellent record as a teacher and disciplinarian. Being a young 
man of acknowledged ability and excellent judgment his success in 
the battle of life is assurred. 



CHARLES MUCKENTHALER 

Was born July 30, 1876, at Newbury, Kansas. Supplemented a 
course in the common schools by a four years course at St. Marys Col- 
lege, of which excellent institution he is a graduate. June 12, 1900. 
was united in marriage to Miss Bernadina Kolde, an accomplished 
young lady of Newbury. In 1897, became a member of the Paxico 
Lumber Company, the company adding a stock of hardware in 1899. 
Mr. Muckenthaler is a young man of the strictest integrity, and, com- 
bined with excellent business qualifications there need be no hesitancy 
in predicting for him a bright and successful future. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 267 



J. M. JOHNSON 

Was born in Mount Carmel, Fleming county, Kentuclcy, May 4, 
1836, moving witli his parents to Clinton county, Ohio, in October, 
1849. Worked in a tan-yard until sixteen years of age and then started 
out to be a farmer. In September, 1858, was united in marriage to 
Miss Susan M. Fields. Came to Kansas in 1865, settling in Wabaunsee 
county. Was elected representative in 1871. Has held the offices of 
justice of the peace, townsliip treasurer, and township clerk. Since 
coming to Kansas has been engaged in farming and stock raising. 
Made a good record in the legislature; is successful as a farmer and 
one of our best citizens. 



DAVID F. CLAYTON 



Was born in Sidney, Shelby county, Ohio, October 6, 1851. In 1875, 
went to Illinois. On September 15, 1872, was united in marriage to 
Miss Martha Carroll. Came to Kansas in 1887, locating at Alma, 
wliere he lias since resided. Mr. Clayton is serving his ninth term as 
township trustee and his fifth term as a member of the city council of 
Alma— excellent proof as to the degree of conlldence reposed in him 
as a public official. 



WILLIAM DIEBALL 



Was born in Germany, May 29, 1853. Landed with the family at 
New Orleans, in 1856. coming to Wabaunsee county in the spring of 
1857. On October 27, 1875, was united in marriage to Miss Anna Hess, 
six children being born to this union, five of whom still survive— one 
son, Emil, and four daughters: Mrs. Dora Barger, Mrs. Louise Diehl, 
and the Misses Caroline and Olga. Mr. Dieball owns a well stocked 
farm of 960 acres and has recently erected one of the finest residences 
in Wabaunsee county (see illustration). Though young in years, when 
the family came to Kansas, Mr. Dieball has a vivid remembrance of 
the many incidents of pioneer days. Deer and turkeys were plentiful, 
he having shot many of the latter while in his teens. He remembers 
that deer were very tame, also, and that they often shared with the 
cattle their feed when the weather was severe and the grass covered 
with snow. With his estimable family Mr. Dieball enjoys the fruits 
of years of toil and excellent management of one of the best farms in 
Wabaunsee county. 



268 EARLY. HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



JOHN SUDWEEKS 

Was born in Canada, November 20, 1849. Came to Kansas Auf,nist 
1, 1870. On November 23, 1873, was united in marriage to Miss Sallie 
M. Pratt, to which union four children were born: Mabel, John W., 
James E., and Charles P. Sudweeks. For twenty years Mr. Sudweeks 
was one of the progressive teacliers of Wabaunsee county, was 
appointed county commissioner to till the vacancy caused by the dcatli 
of Mr. C. N. Earl, and was elected representative in November, 1900, 
being the present incumbent in that important office— a convincing 
proof of his high standing among the people. 



A. M. JORDAN 



Was born August 29, 1858, near Topeka, Kansas. Three years 
before, his father, William Jordan, had come west to help make Kan- 
sas a free state. He died in 1895, at the home of his son, with whom 
he had lived for many years before the end came. The subject of this 
sketch received a good education, first, in the county schools of 
Shawnee county, supplemented by a course in the City High School in 
Topeka. On September 5, 1894, Mr. Jordan was united in marriage to 
Miss Luettie Case, to which union three children were born, two sons 
and a daughter. Since 1885, Mr. Jordan has been a resident of Wa- 
baunsee county, and during that period has acquired a more than 
state-wide reputation as a breeder of Poland China Swine, of best 
families, and Plymouth Rock Chickens of leading strains. The 
"Chinquapin Farm" is a fine body of land of 440 acres, well watered 
and adapted to the purpose for which it is used— a stock farm— on 
which are raised and kept for sale nothing but first class stock. By 
the exercise of sound judgment and an intuitive knowledge of the 
business Mr. Jordan has attained that degree of success at which he 
aimed in the beginning. Brain, brawn, and printer's ink — for he has 
called all these into requisition — have brought customers from points 
far removed from the Chinquapin farm — known far and wide as one of 
the best in the state. 



FREDERICK J. FREY 

Was born June 6, 1864, at Davenport, Iowa. Received tlie benefits 
of an excellent system of schools, supplementing a good common school 
education with a course at Davenport Academy. Came to Kan.sas in 
1878, and on April 15, 1896, was united in marriage to Miss Mary Kolde, 
to which union three children were born: Adelaide, Theresa, and 
Frank. Mr. Frey has served the people of Newbury township one 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 269 



term as trustee and has been constable since he was old enough to 
vote, his excellent work in that office pointing him out as the right 
man for the office of sheriff of Wabaunsee county— to which important 
office he was elected in 1899. Mr. Frey has proven himself a capable 
official. His metal has more than once been subjected to the crucial 
tests essential to secure a verdict of approval. He has served the 
people truly and well, and they seldom fail to mete out to the faithful 
that reward to which they are justly entitled. 



MR. GEORGE BERROTH (Dec'd) 

Was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, February 8, 1833. In 1856, 
came to America, locating in Pennsylvania. On August 24, 1856, was 
united in marriage to Miss Magdalena Burkhardt, in the city of Phil- 
adelphia. Uame to Kansas in 1869, locating in Pottawatomie county, 
but five years later came to Wabaunsee county, to the farm where he 
died on March 9, 1896. Mr. Berroth was a successful farmer and stock 
raiser, a man with a kind heart and generous nature, elements in a 
man's character that insure the esteem of his fellows. 



J. W. ROBERTSON 

Was born in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, January 8, 1866. Was edu- 
cated at Newton, Illinois. Came to Kansas, August 1, 1884, and six 
years later was imited in marriage to Miss Alice L. Reynard, to which 
union tliree children were born: Roel R., Donald B., and William H. 
Mr. Robertson is a dealer in paints and wallpaper. From a small 
business at tlie beginning he has seen an infant industry grow to pro- 
portions seldom seen in a city many times the size of the busy little 
town of which he is mayor. He has attained success by hard work and 
well directed effort. 



W. T. ECKLES 



Was born at Mount Vernon, Missouri, July 22, 1868, and when but 
an infant came with his parents to Kansas. Is a graduate of the State 
Normal School, at Emporia, but since 1888 has been in the employ of 
the Mudge Mercantile Company. After eleven years of faithful 
service was installed as manager — another proof that merit wins. In 
the year 1900, Mr. Eckles was mayor of Eskridge and true to his old time 
instinct he was again promoted — on June 12, 1901, when he was united 
ill marriage to Miss Nellie M. Kingman. His popularity is indicated 
by his success — in whatever he undertakes. 



270 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



IVIR. JOHN ADAM KRATZER (Dec'd) 

Was born in IJavaria, (iermaiiy, July 4, 1834. Came to America in 
1856 and to Kansas in 18()0, and four years later, to Wabaunsee county. 
Was educated at Vicid, CJermany. On June 25, 1863, was united in 
marriage to Miss Louise Hubcr, to which union fourteen children 
were born, ten of whom still survive. On Octobers, 1861, Mr. Kratzer 
enlisted in Co. M, 5th Regt. Oliio Cavalry, Capt. John Henry, com- 
manding. On March 5, 1863, was discharged by reason of physical 
disability. Besides an excellent farm of 198 acres Mr. Kratzer left to 
the world ;in estimable wife and family of sons and daughters. With 
hosts of friends and no enemies he passed to the great beyond. His 
memory was revered by all and his departure universally regretted. 



AMOS T. TAYLOR 



Was born in West Virginia, April 12, 1853, coming to Kansas with 
his parents in October, 1867. Celebrated the 4th of July, in 1878, by 
being united in marriage to Miss P^'lora A. Smitli, to which union 
three children were born. Became a voter in Wabaunsee county and 
there is no indication of a desire to change his place of residence. 
Besides a pleasant home owns valuable property interests in Eskridge, 
and just now is in possession of a certificate of good standing in the 
Masonic fraternity— that entitles him to the privilege of a place in 
the East. 



CHARLES H. BURGETT 

Was born in 1869, atQuincy, Illinois. Came to Kansas ten years 
later with his parents, who located at McPherst)n, where he received 
the benetit of a liberal education. On April 10, 1890, was united in 
marriage to Miss Doreta Drebing, to which union three children were 
born— Clyde, Ralph, and Ruth. Though owning one of the best farms 
in Kansas, Mr. Burgett, by reason of an injury received in a runaway, 
has opened a barber shop in Eskridge, where he is pleasantly located 
with his family. 



MR. ANDREW ANDERSON (Dec'd) 

Was born in Norway, January 18, 1818. Came to America in 1866, 
settling on the north half of the northwest quarter of section 2, town- 
ship 14, range 8, in Wabaunsee county, in July, 1870. Mr. Anderson 
died in August, 1883, at the age of 65 years and 6 months. 

Mrs. Anna Anderson was born October 24, 1819, and died Septem- 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 271 



ber 4, 1897, being at the time of her death nearly 78 years of age. Mr. 
and Mrs. Anderson were of that class of sturdy, hard working people 
who did much to redeem Kansas from conditions that were responsible 
for the name of Great American Desert. Besides an unsullied name 
the.se model citizens left behind them the best of legacies— an estim- 
able family of sons and daughters. 



IVIARK PALMER 



Was born November 24, 1877, in Monroe county, Iowa. Was edu- 
cated at Valparaiso, Indiana, being a graduate of the Northern 
Indiana Normal School, located there. On August 1, 1899, was united 
in marriage to Miss May F. Parsonage, an accomplished young 
lady of Esl<ridge, of which city Mr. Palmer is postmaster. Was 
appointed at the age of twenty-one and enjoys the distinction of being 
the youngest postmaster in the United States. Mr. Palmer is affable 
as well as capable and justly entitled to the $1,300 salary allowed by 
the department. ■ 



JERRY B. FIELDS 



Was born March 1, 1861, at Wilmington, Clinton county, Ohio. 
Came to Kansas with his parents in 1865. Supplemented a thorough 
course of training in the public schools by a four yeai'S course at Wash- 
burn College, taking up mineralogy as a special branch— much of the 
practical work of assaying being directly under his supervision. On 
June 26, 1891, Mr. Fields was united in marriage with Miss Olive A. 
DeArmond, for several years a teacher in the Alma city schools. 
Besides 240 acres of good farming and grazing lands Mr. Fields has 
extensive interests in mining properties in Missouri, Wyoming, and 
Oregon. Is one of Alma's leading dealers in real estate, and is inde- 
fatigable in his efforts to please his customeis. 



IRA L. MORRIS 



Was born in Linn county, Missouri, on March 16, 1876. Came to 
Kansas November 25, 1892. A thorough elementary training in the 
schools of liis native state was supplemented by a course at the Esk- 
ridge High School. On January 4, 1897, Mr. Morris was united in 
marriage to Miss Bessie May Luke, an accomplished young lady of 
Eskridge. Is the junior member of the Arm of J. L. Morris & Son, 
and is one of the rising young business men of Eskridge. 



272 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

OSCAR SCHMITZ 

Was born in Alma on December 26, 1875. Besides a tboroiif^li 
course in the Alma city schools Mr. Schmitz is a graduate of the Dick- 
inson County High School, located at Chapman, Kansas. Also took 
the law course at Kansas State University. In June, 1898, Mr. Schmitz 
was united in marriage to Miss Eva DeArmond, of Alma, who, for 
several years was a popular teacher in the city schools. Besides own- 
ing a good farm of 200 acres near Alma, Mr. Schmitz deals extensively 
in stock, and enjoys a lucrative practice in the courts of Wabaunsee 
county, being one of the rising young attorneys of the city in which 
he first .saw the liglit. 



JOSEPH SNYDER 

Was born December 14, 1860, Is a native of Ohio, but when but 
four years of age removed witli his parents to Michigan. Came to 
Kansas in 1889. A good educational training in tlie common schools 
was supplemented by a course in one of the best business colleges in 
Michigan— at Ionia. On June 23, 1895, was united in marriage to 
Miss Agnes Sluirrai, to which union one daughter. Miss Lucille, was 
born. For several years past Mr. .Snyder has had cliarge of tl)e cream- 
ery station at Paxico. Is a good barber and an all around luistler and 
by strict attention to business is winning success. 



REV. J. H. MUELLER, 

Of McFarland, was born October 23, 1872, in Lincoln, Missouri. 
Came to Kansas in September, 1896. On November 22nd of the same 
year was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Boehmer, to \v])ich union 
two daughters were born — Misses Helen and Irene. In 1890, Rev. 
Mueller was called to the pastorate of the several congregations at 
Paxico, McFarland, Wells Creek and Wamego, but at the present time 
the pastorate includes only the charges at McFarland and Paxico, 
Wamego and Wells Creek having become self-sustaining. Thougli the 
congregations at Paxico and McFarland are comparatively limited in 
numbers their appreciation of Rev. Mueller's services are indicated 
by tlie self-sacrilicitig spirit shown— in their cordial support of their 
popular minister, and by the building of an addition to the parsonage 
for the comfort and convenience of their pastor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 273 



Our Illustrations. 



REV. KAMP'S CONFIRMATION CLASS. 

Named from left to right: Herman Haller, Mary Bellinger, Joseph 
Sanders, Anna Steimel, John Steimel, Ella Schubert, Gertrude Schut- 
ter, John Dittman, Frank Terrass, Floribert Eagan, Emma Loehr, 
Matilda Wetzel, Minnie Diehl, John Wentrode, Leo Leonard, Anna 
Bohn, Adam Degenhardt. These worthy young people are members 
of our best families and it may be expected that in after years they 
will reflect credit on themselves, their parents and their spiritual 
counselor and teacher. 



THE ALMA LIEDERKRANZ. 

From left to right: First tier— standing— Alfred Umbehr, Philip 
Birk, G. H. Meier, Hartman Bollier. B. Buchli, Conrad Zehner, Fred 
Meyer. Second tier— seated— Carl Lang, H. R. Schmidt, Emil Beutel, 
Otto Sawallisch, Richard Thoes, Carl Schubert, August Peters, Rein- 
hold Diepenbrock, August Ohst, Fritz Brunner, George Femmel. 

AN OLD LANDMARK 

At Lookout Station, four miles south of Alma. Just across the 
road was the old sawmill. Col. Sanford had brought it down from 
Manhattan. It had an incumbrance but a night drive shook it off, 
and before tlie sun went down again the old mill took a rest. Mr. 
Spieker built the log house for Knopf, who started a store. Then 
came Goldstandt & Cohen, followed by "Butter-Hanness." His other 
name was John or Hans, but because he took butter in trade he was 
known far and wide as "Butter-Hanness." Then came Wm. Sol- 
scheid, before building his store in Alma. Col. Sanford boarded at 
Ed. Krapp's and a lawsuit of six years duration was the sequel. 
Ed. got judgment for $800 and the old mill was sold for scrap 
iron. Spieker ran the postoffice in the log cabin in the ravine north 
of the old station. But in the fall of 1866 Alma was voted the county 
seat and naturally wanted a post office nearer home. The driver on 
the Americus and Wamego mail line reported in favor of Alma and 
one day Mr. August Meyer got his commission and went out and got 
the records. Then the county officers got their mail at home— Alma 
had taken another step forward— it had a postoffice of its own. Then 



274 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

the people bejxan putting on airs— they wanted mail twice a week, and 
asked for a mail route to Council Grove and another to BurliiiRame 
and a third line to Mission creek. They soon objected to the wind 
blowing on mail days, as the waves in the Kaw river ran so high the 
boat couldn't cross and in consequence there was no mail. 



HAYING AT CHRIS LANGVARDT'S. 

Showing how things are done on the broad prairies of Kansas by 
men of push and energy who surprise the world by doing things. For 
years Mr. Chris Langvardt was the leading cattle and hog buyer of 
AltaVista and it was with feelings of deepest regret when it was 
announced that this popular dealer would retire from the business. 
His method of working in the hay field was but an index of Mr. Lang- 
vardt's manner of conducting the farm on business principles. 



Threshing at the Palenske farm by horse power is now a thing of 
the past but in the days gone by all welcomed the coming of the 
threshers. It was like a reunion. With jest and song the work went 
merrily on. Even the women of the household, with their increased 
burdens, couldn't say they disliked the annual threshing bee of ye 
olden time. 



WILMINGTON. 



Historic old town. A few years ago it was our opinion that the 
old stone buildings would insure the old landmark a permanent 
reminder of the old Santa Fe trail. But the stone buildings were con- 
crete and most of them have fallen to decay. But the old town is a 
relic of the past, nevertheless. O. H. Sheldon was the first postmaster 
and H. D. Shepard, the first storekeeper. In 1870, besides Mr. Shep- 
ard, there were two other stores, kept by Penfield & Son, and by James 
Cripps & Co., Dr. Wilkerson had built a drug store and Dr. Easter was 
talking of building another, Henry Burns ran a blacksmith shop and 
J. and H. McPherson, builders, had all they could do. Then came 
John Buchanan with his store and shoe shop, and. soon after, the 
hotel. Then there were Rice Lewis and Jack Turner— two bachelors 
—who, later on, quit the business. Then, there was John Easter, the 
surveyor, and Mr. Dyer, both of whom have gone from among us. 
But Sam Bright still holds the fort and Mr. Prothrow, who has written 
J. P. after his name all his life and he is still at it — a worthy citizen 
and one of the old-timers. Wilmington, as a reminder of the old 
Santa Fe trail is still there— a memory of the long ago. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



HALIFAX STATION 

Before the building of the raih-oad was Icnown as "Bismarck." 
Trouble relative to mail matters was the cause of the change so far as 
the postoffice department was concerned. Sacks of mail intended for 
people attending the fair at "Bismarck Grove," near Lawrence, 
prompted a change in the name. "Go to Halifax" is as old as the 
hills but as many people in Wabaunsee county could not, without 
great inconvenience, obey the mandate, we bring Halifax to them. 



AN INTERESTING FAMILY. 

Alma people will readily recognize Miss Minnie, the handsome 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Palenske, as the principal figure of 
tliis interesting family. How natural to be just a little partial to the 
baby of the household. But Miss Minnie is seemingly proud of them 
all, nevertheless. Child nature is alike the world over and that we 
are all, at best, but children of larger growth is every day exemplified. 
But for the love of the human family for the little ones the world 
would, indeed, be a blank. 



POYNTZ AVENUE IN 1866. 

Those who know something of the bustle and energy characteris- 
tic of Manhattan's busiest thoroughfare of today will hardly realize 
that but a few short years ago the prolonged stopping of a government 
wagon train and scores of lazy ox teams on the main street of the town 
would cause no serious impediment to travel. 

But to the old-timer the immense ricks of hay stacked near the 
timber on the banks of the Blue river tell the story — the train has 
stopped for forage, preparatory to a camp for the night at the "Devil's 
Elbow"— a short distance down the river. This was one of the most 
desirable camping places on the military road from Fort Leavenworth 
to Fort Riley. The timber for firewood v^^as plentiful and there was 
an abundance of good water — two of the essential requisites of a good 
camping place. 

Usually sufficient corn was taken along for the trip but the farm- 
ers along the route were depended on to supply the trains with hay. 
Crossing the Pottawatomie reservation Eli Nadeau, Louis Vieux, and 
Pat Behan were always well supplied with forage, and if chickens, 
butter, and eggs were wanted to help out the commissary supplies 
these worthy people were amply provided with the needed luxuries. 

There were few stores in Manhattan then and the customers were 



27(i EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

not so plentiful that the stopping of a train on the main street of the 
town wasn't a welcome incident of the time. It meant brisk times 
for the merchants and a supply of gloves and warm clothing for their 
customers. The engraving is an excellent index of the conditions as 
they existed when the best of Kansas towns was an infant. 



STUEWE BROS.' CREAMERY. 

Though long since set aside for more lucrative enterprises the 
creamery of ten years ago is an excellent example of what can be 
accomplished by honest elTort and capable management. Teams were 
sent into nearly every neighborhood in the county to gather cream for 
the plant. The product was excellent in quality and the quantity 
surprisingly large. From a small beginning the business grew until 
the proportions were gigantic— laying the foundation for the hand- 
some competence now enjoyed by the firm of Stuevve Bros., bankers 
and heavy dealers in cattle. 



OUT SERVING A WRIT. 

A book devoid of a little spice would be as savorless as meat with- 
out salt— hence the picture of a former popular sheriff out for an 
airing. Born in Kansas he realizes the necessity of taking along at 
any and all seasons, an overcoat, umbrella, and a fan. The umbrella 
you see under his arm, the motion of the mules ears serve the purpose 
of a fan and the overcoat — well, Hertnan has evidently improvised a 
cushion out of that. The picture will cause a smile where frowns 
too often appear — and that accounts for its presence here. 



RETURNING TO THE RESERVATION. 

VVaneka instead of Pem-Co-Wye was the name of the Indian warn- 
ing Mr. Fred Palenske of the intended uprising of the Pottawatomies 
(see page 22). The bulk of the Pottawatomies had gone into camp 
near the big spring at Mike Mueller's, the camp extending as far up 
the creek as Henry Schroeder's. Passing to nnd from the reservation 
over the trail past Ed. Krapp's the settlers became alarmed, the alarm 
V^eing increased by the report that the Indians were nightly called 
together by the din of the tom-tom, and that war dances were being 
indulged in to incite the warriors of the tribe to deeds of valor in 
which the tomahawk and scalping knife were to be prominent factors 
in the coming struggle. To sleep in their corn fields was the rule and 
there were several instances where the families that for some reason 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 277 



had incurred the displeasure of the Indians liad gone to Topeka for 
protection. Personally, Mr. Ed. Krapp believed the fear of an Indian 
uprising to be groundless but being aware of the general feeling of 
unrest among the settlers he went to Mr. Wm. Ross (brother of Mr. 
Chas. Ross), the Indian agent, and induced him to go with him to the 
Indian camp, state the facts to the chiefs, and prevail on the Indians 
to return to their deserted villages on the reservation. That the 
efforts of Mr. Krapp and Agent Ross were successful is indicated by 
the illustration. 



THE ROCK ISLAND EATING HOUSE. 

AtMcFarland, is conducted on up-to-date methods. "We strive 
to please" is the motto of the management, and if excellent meals and 
a lunch counter that would do credit to any city are evidences of an 
intention to carry out the spirit of their motto the Rock Island people 
have no reason to fear any adverse criticism relative to their methods 
as caterers to an appreciative but hungry public. The dining room is 
a model of beauty, the waitresses are polite and attentive and the 
viands tlie best to be had on the market. 



INDIANS IN ALMA IN 1881. 

"Palmer's Indians,"' they were called. The Indians were not look- 
ing for scalps but Palmer was after the settlers' lands. There were 
some flaws in the Indian titles and the members of the "lost band" 
had been found. Palmer came an unbidden guest and a more univer- 
sally despised man never set foot in Wabaunsee county. The old set- 
tlers will tell you that the Indians he brought with him were angels 
in comparison witli the man who discovered them. 



MAIN STREET, HARVEYVILLE, 

Just as you see it from the depot platform. The old settlers of 
that neighborhood will be more than usually interested in this illus- 
tration, by reason of the contrast with the conditions existing 44 
years ago— when the nearest railroad station was at Jefferson City, 
Missouri, and when the settlers got their scant mail from Burlingame, 
by chance. The floor of Mr. Henry Harvey's house was made of 
puncheons and that of Sam Devaney and many others were less costly 
but more substantial — consisting of a solid footing of mother earth. 
The log cabin was the rule and these were few and far between. 



!T8 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



RESIDENCE OF J. B. BARNES. ALMA. 

One of the t'o/Jcsl ami most, all raclivo private i-esirleiu'cs in Alma 
is Ihat of Hon. .J. ii. Barnes, city attoiiiey of Alma. With a handsome 
lawn and walks to correspond— sittiated on llie main business street 
and yet sulliciently removed from the center of trade to insure tliat 
((Uiet so essent ial to a complete liome. 



THE DOUBLE ARCH BRIDGE 

Over West branch of Mill creek, four miles soutliwest of Alma, 
serves to make this one of tilt! most picturesque spots in Wabaunsee 
county. Also a fair sample of the many substantial bridges spanning 
the numerous streams throughout the county— making travel over our 
country roads at all times safe. Delays from high waters and floods 
are now things of the past— a fact that is appreciated by the old set- 
tlers, who, in the early days, could not always leave home with a cer- 
tainty of returning on schedule time. But the clouds are no longer 
scanned— nor the weather bulletins consulted — lest a flood might cause 
unavoidable delays on tlie way. 



THE ELIOT CHURCH 

Is dear to the heart of every resident of Maple Hill township — 
each and every one of whom rejoices that it has not been abandoned — 
if not consigned to oblivion— by the consolidation of the Maple Hill 
churches, as recently proposed. Some alterations have been made in 
the tower since the photograph was taken, but the picture represents 
the old church as it was in the days gone by. The memories clustered 
about the old stone cluirch are numberless and as sacred as they are 
old. In the churchyard lie buried the people's dead. To this hallowed 
spot does the suppliant turn — as the Mohammedan to his Mecca — in 
offering prayers to the Most High. 'Tis here the people come to hold 
silent commune with those who have gone before. 'Tis here they 
expect to return when their earthly task is completed; when the 
Master's work is done. 

HISTORY. 

In 1874, it seemed best by some of the families who had recently 
settled at Maple Hill, from New England, that something be done for 
the religious welfare of the people of that thriving little city. With 
tliat end in view Sunday school was organized in Dist. No. 39. The 
permanent organization was perfected October 11, 1874, with sixteen 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 279 



members. By spring there were one hundred names on the roll, with, 
an actual average attendance of thirty. Rev. L. M. Scribner, of St. 
Marys, as well as some of the Topeka pastors, preached occasionally 
and the desire for a permanent organization increased. 

By the advice of Rev. R. D. Storrs, superintendent of the Kansas 
home missionary society, and other pastors who had preached here, 
the necessary steps were taken, and on June 3, 1875, a council of neigh- 
boring churches convened in the above school house with R. D. Parker, 
of Manhattan, moderator, and the following churches were repre- 
sented by pastor and delegate: 

Topeka. South, Rev. Linus Blakesly and delegate; Topeka, North, 
Mi.ss H. C. Castle, delegate; St. Marys, Rev. L. M. Scribner and dele- 
gate: Louisville, Rev. H. C. Scotford and delegate; Manhattan, Rev. 
R. D. Parker; Alma, Rev. U. Jones and delegate; Dover, Rev. F. P. 
Newcomb and delegate; Wabaunsee, C. B. Lines and E. F. Burt, dele- 
gates; Quindaro, Rev. S. D. Storrs. 

After the devotional exercises Mr. William H. Warren read the 
record of the previous meetings, conducted by the band of Christian 
workers, wlio proposed to organize the church, also the covenant and 
articles of faith they wished to adopt. The council then retired for 
deliberation and reported an approval. 

The following program was then carried out to complete the 
organization: 

Sermon, by Rev. L. Blakesly, of Topeka; Reading of the articles of 
faith and covenant, by Rev. L. M. Scribner; Right hand of fellowship, 
R. D. Parker: Charge to the church, Rev. S. D. Storrs; Prayer, by Rev. 
Harvey Jones; Benediction, by Rev. S. W. Newcomb. 
. The following were enrolled as charter members: 

Messrs. Dura Warren, W. H. AVarren, G. W. Moore, J. W. Wood- 
ford, Henry Allen, Thomas McElroy; Mesdames J. A. M. Cheney, Dura 
AVarren, W. H. Warren, G. W. Moore, Thomas McElroy, A. F. Thayer; 
Mi.sses Alice Warren and Annie E. Warren. 

In the meantime services were continued in the school house 
until August,1882. when the stone church was dedicated, free from 
debt. Cemetery grounds were laid out adjacent to the church and 
the following year the parsonage was built. The following are the 
names of the ministers who have served the church: 

Revs. L. M. Scribner, Albert Matson, Pliny Smith, J. Mavers, 
Oscar Ostrum, William S. Crouch. 

At the time of the dedication in 1882, Rev. W. S. Crouch accepted 
a call as the pastor of the church, and, with a short intermission, has 
continued to preach until the present time. 



280 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

ROCK ISLAND BRIDGE AT MAPLE HILL. 

This substantial combination of stone and steel is but one of the 
eight strong- bridges spanning Mill creek along tlie line of the Rock 
Island between the mouth of the stream and Alta Vista— besides 
quite a number of smaller bridges crossing the many pretty streams 
emptying into the main creek along the route in Wabaunsee county. 
The material for tlie stone work was taken from the Fox quarries, now 
Albert Dieball's, four miles west of Alma— the same quarry furnish- 
ing the stone for the depot buildjng at Topeka. 



AN OLD TIME FENCE, 

When the only cow was picketed out will be recognized by every 
old settler in Wabaunsee county. Settlers who fail to connect the 
illustration with the early incidents of their experience in Kansas are 
not entitled to the use of the prefix "old" in connection with their 
coming to the new country. Cattle and corn were incongruous — in 
that they refused to grow on a farm where fences liadn't been built 
— unless the cow (usually, being the only representative of the brute 
creation on the farm) was restrained by the persuasive argument exer- 
cised by the picket rope — that alone was sufficiently potent to keep 
"Bossy" out of the corn patch— we refrain fiom saying "cornfield" for 
the reason that the small corners grubbed out in the bends of the 
creeks were hardly worthy the name as long since interpreted on the 
broad prairies of Kansas. 



MEXICAN OVEN AND ADOBE HOUSE. 

These are inseparable. A New Mexican home would be lacking 
in one of the essentials were there no oven adjacent to the "casa." 
The adobe house possesses all the requisites in the matter of comfort, 
being cool in summer and warm in winter. As to the oven, a pinon or 
pine stick fire will soon enable the housewife to have ready for the 
table as nice a baking as could be provided by an expert in any city 
bakery. 

The illustration "Goat Curiosity" portrays these active habitues 
of every Mexican ranch as one may see them at any time while passing 
til rough the "Land of the Aztec." For further explanation see our 
reference to the goat in "The Old Santa Fe Trail." 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



■»" ■% 





WEST SIDE MAIN STREET, Maple Hill. 



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1 


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^^■■■^. ' . lilllm 


BB8fe*'wni ' ->w^ : :"/- >/• i 



EA3T SIDE MAIN STREET, Maple Hill. 




WILLIAM ROGGE'S ELEVATOR, Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




TEMPLIN POSTOFFICE. 




VOLLAND STATION. 

Seven miles southwest of Alma. 




MAIN STREET, PAXICO. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE AND FARM BUILDINGS OF MR. J. M. BI3BEY, Pavilion. 




COUNTY POOR FARM, four miles south of Alma. 




McKELVEY'S STORE AND WOODMAN HALL, Wabaunsee. 



\ 



< 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




WILMINGTON, ON THE OLD SANTA FE TRAIL, 1901. 




RESIDENCE OF DR. M. F. TRIVETT, ESKRIDGE. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




FOR TWEVE YEARS THE HOME OF THE SIGNAL, Alma. 
Where this History was written. 




MR. AUGUST UTERMANNS BARN, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




COURT-HOUSE, ALMA. 



ALMA NATIONAL BANK, ALMA. 
( Palenske Block). 




MR. F. C. SIMON'S STORE, ALMA. 



KINNE & KERANS BLOCK, ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. A. H. MESEKE, ALMA. 




THE NEW COMMERCIAL, ALMA. 
Mr. S. E. Hull, Proprietor. 



h. 

0.:- 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




~ y>jt 



THE LIMERICK & CRAFTS BLOCK, ALMA. 




THE DENVER HOUSE, McFARLAND. 
Mr. Gottlieb Noller, Proprietor. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF JUDGE THEODORE S. SPIELMAN, ALMA. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. CAREY E. CARROLL, ALMA. 



/ 



^^ 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. ARTHUR WINKLER, McFARLAND. 




MR. ARTHUR WINKLER'S STORE, McFARLAND. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 281 



MR. E. C. D. LINES (Dec'd) 

Was born May 9, 1836, in New Haven, Connecticut. Was educated 
in the New Haven city schools and at Prof. Lovell's private school. 
Was a son of Hon. C. B. Lines, president of the Connecticut colony, 
coming to Kansas with the colony in 1856. On May 24, 1857, was 
united in marriage to Miss Grace A. Thomas, to which union two 
cliildren were born, Lizzie and Edna. Mr. Lines was elected register 
of deeds in 1859, and clerk of the district court the same year. Was 
clerk of the board of supervisors until 1861, when he joined the army. 
Was captain of Co. B. 2d Kansas, and was killed on the skirmish line 
near Fort Smith, Arkansas, September 1, 1863. Was a man of sterling 
worth and a promising future. It was in his honor the Lines Post, 
Alma, was named. 



G. W. GILLIS 



Was born at Kinsman, Trumbull county, Ohio, Novembers, 1832. 
Came to Kansas in 1855. Landed at Kansas City and walked to 
Topeka, then a town principally composed of shacks. One of these 
where he boarded is yet standing— a short distance north of tlie 
Sliawnee mills. Afterwards went to Lawrence. Drove stage from 
Lawrence to Quindaro. Boarded at same house with a printer named 
Plumb, with whom he was well acquainted— long before Plumb was 
thought of for U. S. senator. Saw Lane shoot Jenkins at Lawrence 
and was principal witne.ss. Served four years in the army during the 
war — was a member of the 6th Ohio cavalry and also a member of the 
1st Kansas cavalry, in border ruffian war, of which company Jim 
Legates was captain. In 1866, was united in marriage to Miss 
Lottie Murdoch, of Kinsman, Ohio, a daughter, now Mrs. F. A. 
Seaman, being born to this union. Mr. Gillis owns a farm of 190 
acres of first class land on Mission creek, but is now a resident of 
Alma. Is full of old time reminiscences and though nearing the 
tliree score and ten mark is hale and hearty and has lost none of that 
genial spirit that has always been a characteristic of one of our most 
highly esteemed citizens. 



C. L. DAVIS. 



Chet Davis was born at Auburn, Kansas, September 15, 1861. 
Received a good common school education— enough to make his way 
through the world, he thought, and has had no reason to complain so 
far. On March 23, 1882, was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. 
Saffle, to which union nine children were born, eight of whom are 



282 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

still livirifj: .Tonnio, Ilfidie, Jeff, Winnie, Daisy, Ora, Clarence, and 
Fiank. Mr. Davis is onool' the tirni of Davis Bros., wlio own 1,2K0 
acres of ^jood land and pasture (),000 head of cattle. Is also one of the 
firm of Fields & Davis, who deal largely in real estate, make loans, 
and write insurance. Mr. Davis owns one of the coziest homes in 
Alma and has hosts of friends wliC) hope he may lon<r enjoy it. 



CHARLES DAILEY 



Was born near Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, February IG, 1842. 
Moved with his parents to Indiana in 1855, and to Kansas, August 7, 
1874. Has followed transfer work nearly all his life— first in the log- 
ging camps with oxen and afterwards with horses. Was engaged in 
freighting between Alma and Wamego before the railroad was built, 
and freighted for Schmitz & Meyer when they were in tlie general 
merchandise business in Alma and is still handling goods for the firm. 
Charley has seen many of the ups and downs of pioneer life in the 
northwest and though coming to Wabaunsee county twenty years 
after the first settlers, came in time to see the country in its infancy. 
Mr. Dailey is a lover of children and Harry Newman, his able assist- 
ant, is a son by adoption. 



WM. PRINGLE 

Was born in Roxburgshire, Scotland, Augnst21, 1856. Came to 
Canada with his parents when but two years of age. and to Kansas at 
the age of 14. Is one of the progressive farmers of Plumb township 
and now resides at the old Pringle homestead. Was twice elected 
clerk of his home township and lield the office of trustee two terms. 
But the best proof of Mr. Pringle's standing among the people who 
know him best was his election in November, 1900, to the ofiice of 
county commissioner, a position he still holds. Is a capable and 
efficient officer, making a creditable record in one of the most import- 
ant positions within the gift of the people. 



MR. J. M. ECK (Dec'd) 

Was born in New York City, January 6, 1852. Received an excel- 
lent educational training in the city schools. Came to Alma in 1878, 
and two years later was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Thoes, to 
which union eight children were born. Mr. Eck held an exalted place 
in the esteem of the people, he having been several times elected as a 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUKSEE COUNTY, KAN. 283 



member of the city council and mayor of tlie city. Served the people 
three years as county commissioner and at the time of his death was 
a member of the school board. For many years Mr. Eck was resident 
manager of the Chicago Lumber Co. Whether as a private citizen or 
as a public official, deceased was one and the same— ever mindful of 
the interests of all. But it was in the home that the best points in 
liis character shone brightest. To his friends he was ever loyal and 
true, but to his family he was more than devoted— ever mindful of the 
duty devolving on iiim as a friend and counselor. 



MR. H. P. THOIVIPSON (Dec'd) 

Was born in Union county, Ohio, December 14, 1835. Came to 
Kansas in 1878. In 1856, was united in marriage to Miss Retina 
Rudolph, throe sons and three daughters being born to this union: 
George, Cliarles, and John, and Rhoda, Sarah, and Hattie. On Feb- 
ruary 25, 1898, death came without warning at his home on Hendricks 
creek. Deceased was a man with a warm heart and of a sympathetic 
nature. His affections were centered in and about the home circle, 
from which he was so suddenly taken away. 



PETER THOES 



Was born in Germany, November 1, 1821. Came to America in 
18.j4, and to Kansas the following year, March 1, 1856, locating on the 
farm where he died. May 30, 1894. On January 19, 1862, was united in 
marriage to Miss Ernestine Dieball, to which union five children were 
born: Albert, Ernest, Mrs. Olga Morris, and Hulda, An)elia dying at 
the age of 14 years. Mrs. Thoes owned a thousand acres of the best 
farming and grazing land in the county — well stocked and with excel- 
lent improvements. Mr. Thoes was a man of industrious habits and 
sterling integrity— characteristics that secured him an enviable place 
in the esteem of the people. 



FREDERICK STEINIVIEYER, SR. 

Was born .January 11, 1824, in Lippe Detmold, Germany. Came 
to America December 21, 1856, and to Kansas March 9, 1857. Was 
educated at AmptSchwalenburg, Germany. On Novembers, 1856, was 
united in marriage to Miss Frederika Holzapple, to which union nine 
children were born: Anna, Henrietta, Louisa, Helena, Caroline, Carl, 
Henry, Frederic, and John. Mr. Steinmeyer owns 320 acres of good 



284 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

farming land and has made a success of liis chosen calling. Has gone 
through all the hardships incident to pioneer life and in his declining 
years has the satisfaction of knowing he has done his duty to the 
world, and in so doing has secured for himself and family the esteem 
of all. 



J. Y. CONNELL 



Was born in Aurora, Indiana, July 2, 1867. Came to Kansas with 
his parents in his infancy. Received a good common school education 
and when but a young man learned the trade of blacksmith, a calling 
for which he is naturally adapted, having proven himself one of the 
best mechanics in the country. Owns a tirst class shop and knows 
how to run it. On March 30, 1892, was united in marriage to Miss 
Kate Hahn, at San Marcial, New Mexico, working at his trade in the 
territory more than five years. He is a diligent worker and is well 
liked by all his acquaintances. 



L. A. WALKER 



Was born at Hinton, West Virginia, August 1, 1868. Came to 
Kansas February 28, 1898. On October 16, 1901, was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sue I. Haller. Dr. Walker is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Old Virginia, also of the Kansas Medical College. Enjoys a 
lucrative practice and has the confidence of the people, the best 
requisite to that success that is already assured. 



JAMES E. JOHNSON 



Was born November 5, 1808, in Lewis county, Kentucky. On 
December 12, 1850, was united in marriage to Miss Alice Disbrow, five 
children being born to this union: James M., Virginia, Martha, 
Thomas R., and John W. Of the daughters, Mrs. Virginia McPher- 
son is a resident of lola, Kansas, and Mrs. Martha Fields resides in 
Topeka. Of the sons, Thomas R. died in Streeter, Illinois, in 1893, 
and John W. died of typhoid fever at Corinth, Mississippi, a member 
of the 8th Kansas Volunteers. Mrs. James M. Johnson was born in 
Clinton county, Ohio, February 8, 1841, coming to Kansas with her 
husband in 1865. (See biography, page 267). Mr. James E. Johnson 
was one of the early pioneers of the Dragoon settlement, locating on 
a claim two miles west of Harvey ville in 1857. Was a kind and genial 
gentleman of the old school. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 285 



S. G. CANTRILL 

Was born April 15, 1849, at Snow Hill, Ohio. Came to Kansas, 
September 5, 1869, locating on Dragoon creek, two miles west of 
Harveyville. On July 4, 1872, was united in marriage to Miss Augusta 
Burroughs, to which union two children were born: Ora and Orville. 
Mr. Cantrill owns nearly 3,000 acres of the best farming land in 
Wabaunsee county, well improved and adapted to stock raising, his 
favorite employment— Mr. Cantrill being one of the most extensive 
dealers in stock in the county. Came to the country when it was new 
and by industry and good management has secured a place in the 
front ranks of those on whom Fortune has smiled from the beginning. 
But few men are more favorably known and none more highly 
esteemed than Squire Cantrill. 



GEORGE A. FECHTER 

Was born October 7, 1879, at Eppingen, Germany. Came to Amer- 
ica witli his parents when but two years of age, the family locating on 
West branch. Was educated in the common schools. At the age of 
17 accepted a clerkship in a store in Alma, and after four years of 
efficient service went to Topeka, where he has launched out into 
business on his own account. The portrait shows Mr, Fechter as he 
appeared at the age of 21. The face bears the Impress of a strong 
character and Indicates a spirit of energy and perseverance that is 
bound to win success. 



H. W. STEINMEYER 



Is a Wabaunsee county boy, having been born in Farmer township, 
July 9, 1866. Received a sound educational training in the common 
schools of the county. On August 3, 1895, was united in marriage to 
Miss Carrie E. Droege, three children being born to this union: 
Mildred, Cordelia, and Irene. Mr. Steinmeyer is the owner of a fine 
farm of 320 acres and besides shipping a car load of prime cattle and 
hogs occasionally, is a breeder of Duroc Jersey swine, his Egypt Valley 
herd being the best of tlie kind in the country. The illustration 
speaks for itself— commendatory of the owner's persevering effort and 
success in reacliing the topmost round of the ladder in his particular 
branch. Mr. Steinmeyer always has a few choice lots on sale, and the 
number of shipments made furnish the best proof of the growing 
popularity of his herd. 



286 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



MR. ALLEN PHILLIPS (Dec'd) 

Was born In Terre Haute, Indiana, June 12, 1819. Received an 
excellent educational training in the schools of his native city. On 
March 3, 1836, was united in marriage to Miss Mary E, Graham, ten 
children being born to this union, seven of whom are still living: 
Levi, now at El Reno, Oklahoma; Nancy Jane Ralston, of Washing- 
ton; Mrs. Mary E. Walker, Paxlco; James, In Oklahoma; Allen A., of 
Vera; William, In California, and Mrs. Martha Higbee, of Falrbury, 
Illinois. Before coming to Kansas, Mr. Phillips had resided In Illi- 
nois, Iowa, and Wisconsin, and had made two overland trips to Cali- 
fornia, once with cattle in 1850, and again with a drove of horses In 
1864. In 1868, Mr. Phillips came to Wabaunsee county, being among 
the first settlers after the opening of the Pottawatomie reserve. Was 
one of the five men who laid out the town of Newbury, and had aid 
been granted the Santa Fe Railway, Newbury would today rank 
among the largest cities In Kansas west of the Missouri river. Mr. 
Phillips was a man of strong personal character, owned a thousand 
acres of land and was one of the largest farmers and most extensive 
wheat raisers in the county. Was county commissioner in the years 
1872 and 1873, and was always at the front In the advancement of any 
public enterprise. (See notes of June 30, 1878, when Mr. and Mrs. 
Phillips, without a moments warning were called home — in life, 
esteemed by everyone, and their death universally regretted. 



W. H. LYONS 

Was born October 14, 1842, in New York City. Came to Kansas 
in April, 1865. November 4, 1869, was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret Mahan. One daughter, Mrs. Bertha Martin, being born to 
this union. In 1867 Mr. Lyons was appointed deputy sheriff by J. H. 
Pinkerton, serving two years. Was also deputy under Sheriffs Herrlck, 
Gardner, Russell, and Palenske— some of his early experiences as an 
official being among the most exciting periods of the county's 
history— see page 241. Served several terms as city marshal. During 
the Civil War was corporal in Co. B, 11th New York Infantry, and has 
served several terms as Commander of Ed. Lines Post of the G. A. R. 
at Alma. Mr. Lyons is a carpenter by trade, and though in his 60th 
year, would pass muster as twenty years younger. But Mrs. Lyons Is 
the older pioneer, having lived on the borders of the Pottawatomie 
reserve when the settlers slept in their corn fields from choice— at a 
time when "Dutch Bill" was supplying the Indians with firewater of 
his own manufacture. Mrs. Lyons tells of Grifenstein's air castles— 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 287 



how through the tact and the protection afforded by his Cheyenne 
wife, he expected to amass a fortune* big enough to enable him to 
live at his ease— without the wife's further assistance. He discarded 
his Cheyenne bride for Chief Burnett's daughter, and died with 
barely enough of this world's wealth to insure the once millionaire a 
decent burial. 

*In 1864, while Grifenstein with his Cheyenne wife was on a visit 
with old friends in Alma and vicinity he would relate how his shrewd 
wife would trade cups of sugar for fifty dollar bills— the Indian holders 
not knowing the difference between a one dollar bill and a fifty. 
Query: Where did the Indians get the fifty dollar bills? Let the 
ghosts of the lone freighters who met their death on the banks of the 
Walnut in 1864 give answer. (See "A Timely warning," pages 136-138). 



GEO. S. CONNELL 



Was born February 17, 1839, in Aurora, Indiana. In August, 
1862, enlisted in the 10th Kentucky Cavalry and was mustered out in 
September, 1863. On July 1, 1866, was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret A. Nlghbert, to which union six children were born, four of 
whom survive: Mrs. Cora Kasson, Mrs. Hattie Kasson, Joseph and 
Jethro. Though for years a resident on the Snokomo, Mr. and Mrs. 
Connell now reside in Paxico, where he is passing his declining 
years, enjoying the esteem of all. 



AUGUST UTERMANN 

Was born in Westphalia, Germany, December 25, 1857. A good 
educational training in the public school was supplemented by a course 
at the Agricultural college of Westphalia. Came to America in Feb- 
ruary, 1877, stopping in Wisconsin till the following November, when 
he came to Kansas, locating in Lyon county. In 1884 came to Alma, 
where he has since resided. In 1888 was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Undorf, three daughters being born to this union: Maria, 
Augusta and Sophia. Ever since coming to Alma Mr. Utermann has 
been engaged in the livery business. Has built up a good trade and 
has a constantly increasing patronage. 



MR. JOSEPH TREU (Dec'd) 

Was born in Gottingen, Germany, June 22, 1833. Came to 
America in 1850, enlisting soon after in the regular army, serving on 
the border under General Harney in several campaigns against the 



288 EARLY HISTORY OF AVABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Sioux Indians. Was in the engagement at Ash Hollow and for a 
time was stationed at Fort Laramie, protecting the overland traffic 
to Salt Lake and California. Came to Wabaunsee county In 1857, and 
on April 20, 1859, was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Klein, to 
which union seven children, three sons and four daughters were born: 
Mr. Treu received the benefit of a collegiate education and was 
eminently fitted for the many official positions he was called on to fill 
during his lifetime. Besides township and school district offices, he 
served the people eight years as county commissioner and two years as 
representative Jn the state legislature— filling each and every position 
with credit to himself and honor to his constituents. On April 27, 
1901, an eventful life was closed— a man, beloved by the people, one 
whom they delighted to honor, had gone to rest. 



SAMUEL R. WEED 



Was born In Marblehead, Massachusetts, February 21, 1832. Came 
to Kansas in the fall of 1850. Received the benefit of a collegiate 
education at Wilbraham, Massachusetts, thoroughly fitting him.self — 
from an educational standpoint— for the battle of life. In 1861, Mr. 
Weed was elected register of deeds. In 1862, 1864, and 1866, was 
elected clerk of the district court. In 1865, was elected county treas- 
urer, and In 1867 was elected to the offices of county clerk, register of 
deeds, and surveyor, and in 1868, district clerk and representative. 
The battle of life was on. The county had no safe in those days, but 
the old settlers will tell you there was no need of a safe— Sam carried 
the funds in his vest pocket. In those days the office sought the man 
and Mr. Weed was found as many as three times in a single campaign 
—holding as many as five offices at one and the same time. But there 
were no newspapers then and consequently no kicking. Mr. Weed's 
portrait is from a photograph taken while a member of the legislature. 
Today, he is the same genial "Sam" as of old— kind hearted to the 
core, and brimming full of reminiscences of Auld Lang Syne. May 
he live long to relate them. 



ALDEN E. TRUE 



Was born in West Corinth, Orange county, Vermont, June 7, 1845. 
Good educational training In the common schools was supplemented 
by a two years course In the seminary at New Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire. In 1870, Mr. True came to Kansas, locating on the farm in 
Newbury township, where he has since resided. In January, 1878, was 
united in marriage to Miss Marcia L. Castle, to which union two sons 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 289 



and two daughters were born. The many evidences of good will and 
confidence reposed in Mr. True by the people are indicated by the fact 
that he has served one year as township clerk, three years as trustee 
and more than twenty years as a member of the school board. Was 
three years county commissioner and for four years was state senator; 
filled each and every office with credit to himself and honor to the 
people he represented in the full meaning of the term. As senator, Mr. 
True was especially interested in securing liberal appropriations for 
state and educational Institutions, believing that the people and the 
state are insured the best returns from funds thus expended. Mr. True 
owns one of the neatest country homes in the county (see illustration), 
located near the center of a fine farm of 965 acres. Is one of our most 
influential citizens and is universally esteemed— a fact too often 
proven to admit of successful contradiction, and a statement in no 
danger of being challenged. 



A. A. JONES 



Was born November 18, 1844, at Syracuse, Ohio. On October 22, 
1865, was united in marriage to Miss Maria Lanius, to which union 
seven children were born: Cora, Sheldon, Ed., Clyde, Nettie, Pearl, 
and Ellice. Mr. Jones owns a tine farm of 320 acres, at Bradford, the 
J. M. Meredith homestead, where he is engaged in mixed farming and 
stock raising. Has attained success by years of Industry, good man- 
agement and up-to-date methods. Has an interesting family and a 
pleasant home, and enjoys the esteem of all. 



JOHN PETERSON 

Was born in Denmark, December 5, 18.33. Came to America in 
1863, locating in Connecticut. In 1870, came to Kansas, settling on a 
homestead three miles northwest of Eskridge, where he lived until 
his death, on June 17, 1894, at the age of 64 years. But few men have 
fought the battle of life against greater odds than did Mr. Peterson. 
To the young men of today he set an example that they might well 
consider. With a determination to win he knew no such word as fail. 
He started literally at the bottom of the ladder but before the end 
came had left his family located in a comfortable home. At first he 
dug into the bank for a place to rest at night, from the laborious 
employment in which he always engaged during the day. He quarried 
rock and wheeled them to the place selected for a home on a wheel- 
barrow of his own make. For mortar he used clay, and when the 
walls had reached the proper height a roof of sod was laid to shed the 



290 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

rain and snow. The quarters were comfortable, not elegant, maybe, 
but— it was iiome. But provisions must be had. He had no money, 
but stronpr arms, and with these he .sought employment at Topcka. 
The provisions earned by hard labor were wheeled home on that home- 
made wheelbarrow. To say that John Peter.son succeeded in gaining 
a competency for himself and family would be superfluous. Chris- 
tiana Peterson died June 5, 1894, at the age of 60 years. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Peterson eight children were born, six of whom are living: H. 
P., Mary, John, Samuel, Curtis, and Fred. If the children but follow 
the example of their worthy parents success is their.s— and happiness 
and contentment, as well. 



WALDO G. BURROUGHS 

Was born in New York, November 7, 1846. Came to Kansas in 
1869. On November 15, 1876, was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. 
Cantrill, to which union four children were born: Lilly, Leona, Edna 
and Allie. Owns 160 acres of good land on which he erected one of 
the coziest farm homes in Wabaunsee county, planned by his worthy 
helpmeet, whose ability as an architect is proven by practical demon- 
stration in a practical way. A part of Mr. Burroughs' farm was the 
John Meredith homestead. The original claim house was an 8x10 
frame, in which a part of the first term of school in Dist. 27 was 
taught by Marlon Meredith. The house wasn't very big but several 
pupils from outside districts could have been accommodated — if there 
had been any outside districts. Sunday school was held here, and, 
occasionally, Mr. Joseph Hughes exhorted and Mr. W. S. McCormick 
preached. Near at hand is a hole of water where, in 1870, Mr. McCor- 
mick baptized a half dozen converts to the faith that brings solace to 
the soul, buoys up the frail body while here, and fits us for that better 
life beyond the grave. 



MR. HENRY MICHAELIS, SR. (Dec'd) 

Was born in Luxemberg, Germany, January 20, 1823. Came to 
America in 1847, locating at Indianapolis, Indiana. On June 19, 1851, 
was united in marriage to Katharine Ruf, at Indianapolis, where he 
resided until 1868, when he came to Topeka, Kansas. In February, 
1870, came to Wabaunsee county, locating at Newbury. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Michaelis ten children were born, nine of whom are now living: 
Florlbert, Robert, and Joseph (these three living at Indianapolis); 
Lizzie Glotzbach and George, of Los Angeles, California; John, Henry, 
Nicholas, and Mrs. Margaret Eagan— living in this county. Mr. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 291 



Michaelis was a carpenter by trade. He also owned a nice farm, on 
whicli he lived at the time of his death, on January 9, 1894, Mrs. 
Michaelis dying but two days later, at the age of 66 years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Michaelis were kind and genial to all and were universally 
esteemed. 



JOHN H. MICHAELIS 

Was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, November 27, 1852, being the 
eldest son of Henry Michaelis, Sr. (deceased). Came to Kansas with 
his parents when IG years of age. On November 28, 1878, was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary Schroeder, of Indianapolis, seven children 
being born to this union, six of whom are living: John, William, 
Nicholas, Frank, Clara, and Leo. Mr. Michaelis, like his father 
before him, is a carpenter by trade, but has taken time to serve the 
people, faithfully, in one of the most responsible offices in the gift of 
the people — that of county treasurer— serving two terms, from 1892 
td* 1896. Is an up-to-date farmer and one of our most substantial 
citizens. 



FRANK HODGSON 

Was born July 13, 1862, on the farm, near Harveyville, on which 
he has resided all his life. On March 14, 1886, was united in marriage 
to Miss Mary E. Woods, four children being born to this union: Alta, 
Archie, Louis, and Ernest. Mr. and Mrs. Hodgson were both engaged 
in teaching prior to their marriage and are probably the oldest 
married couple, both of whom were born in the county. Mr. Jehu 
Hodgson, father of the subject of this notice, was the first sheriff of 
Wabaunsee county, being three times elected. Brought the first 
team of horses into the Dragoon settlement. Mr. Frank Hodgson has 
followed in the footsteps of his father, being one of the leading horse 
breeders of the county. Was three years president of the Old Set- 
tlers' association and enjoys the confidence and esteem of every one. 



W. S. WHITLOCK 



Was born near Belleville, Illinois, February 4, 1874, his parents 
coming to Kansas tlie following .year, locating in Kaw township. A 
good educational training in the district schools was.supplemented by 
a full course of instruction at the Campbell University at Holton, 
taking in addition a special course in civil engineering For several 



292 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

years Mr. Whltlock has been eriKaped In teaching, being in the front 
rank of laborers in the work of the scliool room. In 1889, was elected 
to the ortlce of county surveyor and is the present incumbent in that 
important office. Mr. Whitlock is the youngest county officer, is pop- 
ular with the people, especially with those of his own township. 



JOHN MOCK 



Was born in Prussia, Germany, November 14, 1836. In 1845, when 
but nine years of age, came with his parents to America, locating at 
Davenport, Iowa. In 1850, the family moved to Illinois, where 
Mr. Mock remained until 1869, when he came to Kansas, where he 
now resides— two miles north of Paxico. In 1858, Mr. Mock was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Meinhardt, fifteen children being 
born to this union, nine living, all in the vicinity of Newbury: Mrs. 
Elibabeth Schmitz, Valentine, Mrs. Emma Rickstatter, James, Paul- 
ine, William, Mrs. Caroline Zeller, John, and Josephine. Mr. Mock is 
one of the prosperous farmers and stock raisers of Newbury township. 
He was for many years a justice of the peace and one of tlie influential 
citizens who could always be relied upon in securing the rights of the 
people in the game of politics. Mr. Mock's father, Nicholas Mock, a 
line old gentleman of the old school, died in 1900, at the advanced age 
of 93 years. The son (in the illustration), Mr. Valentine Mock, is also 
a prosperous farmer and one of the rising men of influence in New- 
bury township. Edward sits on his papa's lap, and if longevity is the 
rule in the family in the future as in the past, he, as a representative 
of the fourth generation, may have the pleasure of showing this 
picture of four generations to his great, great, grandchildren. 



GEORGE S. BURT 

Was born in Walworth county, Wisconsin, in 1838. Received an 
excellent educational training at the high school in New Brittain, 
Connecticut. Came to Kansas in November, 1859, and on March 16, 
1863, was united In marriage to Miss Lulu B. Lines, to which union 
nine children were born, six of whom are living: F. I., George S., 
Henry F., Sherman B., Chas. L., and Louis B. When Mr. Burt came 
to Kansas, he walked from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Wabaunsee. Had 
Just ten cents in money on his arrival. Now owns one of the best 
farms in the county, 160 acres of the best bottom land in the Kaw 
Valley. Served eleven years as township trustee and took the census 
of the county in 1870. Is a leading citizen and enjoys the confidence 
of the people. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 293 



ALBERT MUCKENTHALER 

Was born in Scott county, Minnesota, June 9, 1862. Came to Kan- 
.sas in 1869, and on October 22, 1891, was united in marriage to Miss 
Augusta Ebert, to which union six children were born, four of whom 
survive: Abbie, Walter, Viola, and Lawrence. Owns an excellent 
farm of 140 acres— all bottom, but devotes the greater part of his 
time to buying and shipping hogs and cattle. Always pays the high- 
est price the condition of the markets will allow and in all his dealings 
follows the precepts of the golden rule. 



EDWIN FORREST IVIOORE 

Was born at Fort Callioun, Nebraska, May 6, 1856. Came to Kan- 
sas in December, 1886, and two years later was united in marriage to 
Miss Anna B. Crawford, to which union two children were born: 
Arthur N. and Florence A. Moore. Dr. Moore is a graduate of the 
Kansas City Medical College and a post graduate of one of the leading 
medical colleges in the City of Chicago. Is pleasantly located at Esk- 
ridge, where he enjoys a lucrative practice. 



F. M. MEREDITH 

Was born in Coles county, Missouri, January 10, 1847. Came to 
Kansas in 1869 and in 1870 was united in marriage to Miss Sue D. 
Carter, three children being born to this union. Besides a nice home 
Mr. Meredith is proprietor of the Hotel Meredith, at Eskridge. Is a 
popular landlord and in conjunction with his estimable wife, has 
demonstrated to the traveling public that the leading hotel at Esk- 
ridge is an institution of which that thriving little city may well be 
proud. 



GEORGE G. CORNELL 

Was born November 20, 1828, in Bristol, Ontario county. New 
York, coming to Kansas in 1879, locating at Alma. Received excellent 
educational advantages at Canandagua Academy, supplemented by 
the full course at Genessee College, of which he is a graduate. 
Received his degree as Bachelor of Laws at the State and National 
Law School, at Poughkeepsie, New York, graduating with the highest 
honors. On January 3, 1873, was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary 
Emma Avery. Besides nearly seven hundred acres of land in Wabaun- 
see county, Mr. and Mrs. Cornell own several fine residence properties 



294 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



in Topeka, where the family now resides. On September 27, 1881, Mr. 
Cornell met with one of the severest losses of a life time by the burn- 
ing of the Krueger building— the first big fire in Alma. Besides a 
library of more than a thousand volumes, many of them very valuable, 
many family portraits and souvenirs, much valuable manuscript was 
consumed. Among the latter was the marniscript of a legal work on 
Vested Rights and Eminent Domain that Mr. Cornell, after years of 
hard labor, had just completed and had ready for publication. In 
1894, Mr. Cornell was elected to the state legislature, his legal know- 
ledge and matured judgment eminently fitting him for the responsible 
position. Mr. Cornell is well versed in the law, meeting with 
unusual success in his practice. He is conservative and conscientious 
and in an enviable degree has a warm place in the hearts of the people. 



C. J. GLOTZBACH 

Was born October 1, 1851, in Harrison county, Indiana. Came to 
Kansas, April 18, 1870. On Muy 28, 1878, was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth Fischer, to which union were born nine children. 
Besides owning 320 acres of excellent farm land Mr. Glotzbach is 
carrying one of the largest and best assorted stocks of goods in Wa- 
baunsee county, succeeding by purchase to the business for years 
successfully carried on by Bolton Bros. Mr. Glotzbach enjoys a fine 
trade and is making a success of the mercantile bu.siness as he has 
heretofore on the farm. 



WILLIAM ROGGE 

Was born October 9,' 18(51, in Grant county, Wisconsin, coming to 
Kansas in 1886. On May 1, 1901, was united in marriage to Mi.ss 
Eleanor Guest, one of Alma's most popular young ladies and for 
several years a saleslady with Bolton Bros., of Paxico, and Erbachers, 
of St. Marys. Since 1888 Mr. Rogge has operated a threshing machine 
and elevator and has been a dealer in feed, paying the highest cash 
prices for grain. Is a stirring business man who has attained success 
by treating the people right. 



W. H. EARL (Dec'd) 



Was born in Richland county, Ohio, November 2, 1829. Moved 
with his parents to Indiana. Came to Kansas in 18G9, locating on a 
homestead one mile east of Eskridge, where he died December 20, 1885. 
In 1877, Mr. Earl opened a small country store at the "Corners." In 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 295 



1880, when the M. A. & B. was completed to Eskridge the small stock 
of goods was removed to the new town, and from a small beginning a 
large trade was soon established. After his death, in 1885, the busi- 
ness was continued under the firm name of Earl Bros,, until Charlie's 
death, November 23, 1899, since which time Mr. W. H. Earl, Jr., has 
conducted one of the largest dry goods and grocery stores in the 
county. In the Civil war Mr. Earl was a member of the 4th Iowa 
Battery, the photograph showing him in his uniform being the only 
one available. Of the family but four children survive, two of the 
daughters living in Washington and two sons in Eskridge, Mr, Ed. 
Earl and Mr. W. II. Earl, Jr., proprietor of the store. 



C. C. COPP 



Was born July 3, 1876, at Paxico, Kansas. Received a good, prac- 
tical education in the common schools. On March 15, 1898, was united 
in marriage to Miss Lucy Klein, an estimable young lady of Kansas 
City. Since July 7, 1878, has been engaged in the grocery business with 

HERMAN B. OEHMS 

Another popular young man, of Eskridge, but for many years a 
resident of Paxico. 

Mr. Oehms was born August 2, 1878, and the business is conducted 
under the firm name of Copp & Oehms — two young men who have won 
their way to pcjpular favor by honest and fair dealing and strict 
business methods. 



ANTON SCHEWE 

Was born in Prussia, Germany, November 2, 1830. Landed in New 
York, January 20, 1851, locating at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Came to 
Kansas in the spring of 1856, settling on the farm on which he still 
resides. Owns 800 acres of good farming and grazing lands in Wabaun- 
see county and 900 acres in Louisiana, the value of which is likely to 
reacli the million mark. For fifteen years Mr. Schewe was elected 
trustee of what was then Alma township— Farmer township having 
since been organized— an excellent proof of his standing in the com- 
munity where lie resides. Mr. and Mrs. Schewe have four children: 
Mary, Willie, Anton, and Clara, and are pleasantly located in a com- 
fortable home five miles south of Alma. 



2% EAULY IIISTOUY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



IVI. JESTER 

"Was born November 23, 1838. in Camden, Delaware. Came to 
Kansas in ISiiT, and to Wabaunsee county two years later. On October 
(), 1872, was united in marriaj^e to Miss Kate Woodard, a dauf,'bter, 
Mrs. Birdie Cartwriybt, being born to tliis union. Mi-s. Kate Jester 
dying, was a second time married— to Mrs. Jennie Lowe, on June 18, 
1890. Mr. Jester bas beld tbe ottices of townsbip trustee and treasurer, 
owns 238 acres of good fanning land and by industry and well directed 
energy bas attained tliat degree of success of wbicb be is in every way 
deserving. 



MR. E. H. SANFORD (Dec'd) 

Was born .January 24, 1822, in Allegbeny county. New Yoik. 
Came to Kansas in 1857, and to Eskridge in 1808. In 1863, wys united 
in marriage to Mary J. St. John, two daughters being born to this 
union. Col. Sanford, as he was always called, was educated at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, being a graduate of the law department of Wie Uni- 
versity of Michigan. As a man of letters Col. Sanford ranked far 
above many who attained wider distinction. As a financier he was a 
failure. But he possessed stores of wealth denied to others better 
equipped to win smiles from that tickle goddess — Fortune. He was a 
man with a resourceful brain and generous impulses. He was the 
father of Eskridge. And yet when he staked his all on the issue; 
when he invested his last dollar in the first house built in Eskridge 
there were doubting Thomases who tapped their foreheads with 
ominous meaning. But later on when a change of 19 votes would have 
made Eskridge the county seat, opinions derogatory to the Colonel's 
judgment underwent a change. To his persistence is due the fact 
that, today, Eskridge has a place on the map. Let credit be given to 
whom it is due. On April 11, 1901, at Columbus, Ohio, the spirit left 
the tenement of clay — the rays from a bright intellect had been extin- 
guished; a man with a kind heart had gone home. 



E. STURDY 

Was born in Delaware county, Ohio, in 1858. Came to Kansas in 
1883. On July 24, 1880, was united in marriage to Miss E. J. Flick- 
inger, to which union seven children were born: Esther, Harry, 
Ralph, Guy, Dora, Ray, and Glenn. Mr. Sturdy is manager of the 
Freeman ranch, six miles southeast of Eskridge, owns 600 acres of 
land, and has attained a degree of success that is alike flattering to the 
man and to the country and conditions that have made that success 
possible. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 297 



AUGUST HANSEN 

Was born in Schleswig Holstein, Germany, April 10, 1860. Came 
to America in 1880, and two years later, to Kansas. Received the 
benefits of a good education at Apenlarade, Germany. Owns an 
excellent farm of 160 acres, near McFarland, and one of the prettiest 
farm houses in the county. Is proprietor of the McFarland Creamery, 
and besides supplying the markets with the best quality of choice 
dairy butter has the contract for supplying the Rock Island eating 
house witli cream— annually supplying the Rock Island management 
with more than three thousand gallons of choicest cream. His 
creamery is equipped with all the modern improvements and is one of 
the best in the country. 



WILLIAM MAAS 

Was born May 26, 1841, at Ilagenow, Mecklenburg, Germany. 
Came to America in August, 1869, direct to Wabaunsee county, loca- 
ting on the farm where he now resides— in one of the coziest farm 
residences in the county. (See illustration). Mr. Maas received a 
classical education in the city schools of Hagenow, and started out 
well equipped, from an educational stand-point, for the battle of life. 
On June 11, 1861, Mr. Maas was united in marriage to Miss Lisette 
Stellies, to wliich union nine children were born, five sons and four 
daughters. Mr. Maas owns 920 acres of good land, and the fact that 
lie lias served the people several years as justice of the peace and has 
been elected seven times as township trustee is the best indication of 
his high standing among tho.se best informed as to his merits. 



MR. PATRICK MAGUIRE (Dec'd) 

Was born in County CaA-an, Ireland, in March, 1828. Came to 
America in 1846, locating in Pennsylvania. Came to Kansas in 1871, 
but not did permanently locate here until 1873— on the farm where he 
died, on December 25, 1899, at the age of 71 years and 9 months. Mrs. 
Realiill Maguire died February 6, 1901, at the age of 75 years, 9 months 
and 5 days. To Mr. and Mrs. Maguire, four sons and a daughter were 
born, all but one son surviving: Hugh, John, and Pat, alUivingon 
and near tlie old homestead. Mary, the only daughter, is happily 
married and lives in Kansas City. Mr. Maguire owned a fine farm of 
272 acres and by industry and economy had amply provided for his 
children. He was generous and warm hearted and of a kindred spirit 
was his worthy helpmeet. 



298 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



MR. CHARLES N. EARL (Dec'd) 

Was one of the men holding official place in Wabaunsee county 
who died in office. He had been maj'or of his home town, Eskridgc, 
two terms, and was serving his second teim as county commissioner. 
lie came to Wabaunsee county in 18G9, with his paionts, when he 
was but a small boy. Grew up in the old home near the "Corners." of 
which his father's homestead was a part. Carried on the mercantile 
business, the legacy of his father, for twenty-live year.s, and during 
that time never turned a deaf ear to tiie needy nor refused to lend a 
helping hand to the distressed. Mr. Earl died December 28, 1899. 
His estimable widow and an only daughter reside in Eskridge— a town 
in which Mr. Eail always took a leading part in the upbuilding. 



L. T. RICE 



Was born in West Hartford, Connecticut, September 2, 1852. 
Came to Kansas in 1856, with his parents, who located in Shawnee 
county. Mr. Rice was left motherless at the age of 7 years. Received 
a good common school education, supplemented by a cour.se at a busi- 
ness college. His boyhood was spent on the farm and in driving 
three yoke of oxen, drawing material from Lawrence and Leaven- 
worth, to Topeka, to erect what was then known as Lincoln College 
but now a part of Washburn. After the close of the Civil war 
returned with his parents to Connecticut, but after a two years 
residence again came to Kansas. Worked two years for the Santa Fe 
and again returned to the farm. Was married in 1880, and five years 
later came to this county, locating near Halifax. In 1890 was elected 
probate judge and two years later was re-elected. In 1899, was elected 
county commissioner and is the present incumbent in that office. Is 
a progressive farmer and a popular official. 



JAMES H. LAWLOR 

Was born October 5, 1830, at Buffalo, New York. Became a sailor 
and served twenty years steady on the lakes. Was captain on several 
boats. Served in the U. S. Navy during the Civil war. Came to Kan- 
sas in 1870, locating the first hotel in Eskridge. Was the town 
company's agent for the sale of the whole town site. Mr. Lawlor was 
the first station agent at Eskridge; was one of the first councilmen, 
and served three terms as mayor. On April 3, 1856, was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary F. Mansfield, four children being born to 
this union: Geo. II., Franklin H., Amy M. Swartz, and Lettie J. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 299 



Cosley. Mr. Lawlor has, from the day of its location been an enthusi- 
astic advocate of the prosperity and upbuilding of Eskridge. His 
wife, Mrs. Mary Lawlor, was the first postmistress of Eskridge, and, 
with her husband, lias done much to build up and beautify the town. 
Slie now conducts the Palace House in Eskridge, where she enjoys a 
large trade. 



JOHN Y. WAUGH 



Was born July 31, 1858, in Ontario, Canada. Received the best of 
educational advantages at Listowel, Ontario. In 1888 was united in 
marriage to Miss Sadie D. Gallagher, to which union five children 
were born: Grace, William, Ivan, John Y., Jr., and Davis. Long 
years of service in the banking business, combined with business 
sagacity of no ordinary degree have brought phenomenal success to 
one of Eskridge's most prominent citizens. Mr. Waugh's residence is 
commodious and handsome— one of the prettiest in the city. 



DR. AUGUST BRASCHE (Dec'd) 

Was born June 13, 1820. Came to Wabaunsee county in 1857, from 
Wyandotte, where he first located, running the largest drugstore in 
the city. On June 11, 1866, was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
Schultz, of West Branch. Dr. Brasche was elected coroner March 28, 
1859, and was re-elected six times in succession. Was township treas- 
urer several terms and was eight times elected township trustee, 
holding that office at the time of his death, on March 19, 1883, after a 
few days illness with pneumonia, leaving an estimable wife, three 
sons and a daughter to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father, 
a most estimable citizen, and one who was probably more widely 
known than any other man in the county. Dr. Brasche was a graduate 
of one of the best medical colleges in Europe, located at Halverstadt, 
Prussia. In early life entered the Prussian army as Surgeon with the 
rank of Lieutenant. Was more than usually proficient in the art of 
surgery and on many occasions demonstrated his thorough familiarity 
with every detail of his profession. 



LOUIS PALENSKE 



Was born January 3, 1858, on the farm, near Alma. Received the 
benefits of a good educational training in the Alma city schools, under 
the supervision of Profs. Kroenke and Orlopp. On January 7, 1883, 
was united in marriage to Miss Emma Thoes, to which union three 



300 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

sons: Max, Fred, and Arnold, and two daughters, Miss Minnie and 
little Laura, were born. In 1877, Mr. Palenske took up tlie study of 
photography, under the tutorship of the ablest masters of the art in 
Topeka and Kansas City, mastering the l)usincss in every detail and 
acquiring for himself a reputaticju as an artist of more than local 
celebrity. In 1882, Mr. Palenske opened a small book and stationery 
store; musical instruments and sewing machines were added until his 
business was immense in volume, and today he carries perhaps the 
largest stock of a similar kind in the county. In 1888, banking on a 
small scale was added to his list of business ventures, under the tirm 
name of L. Palenske & Co. Later, in 1889, this was merged into the 
Alma State Bank, and on January 3, 1898, into the Alma National 
Bank, of which excellent institution Mr. Palenske has been cashier 
since the organization of the bank. In 1896, Mr. Palenske was elected 
representative in the state legislature, and in this as well as in all other 
positions of honor and trust, acquitted himself with credit to himself 
and to his constituents. No man in Wabaunsee county is more widely 
known and more highly esteemed than is Mr. Palenske. His father, 
Mr. Fred Palenske, was one of the earliest pioneers, settling on the 
line of the Pottawatomie reserve when there were but few white 
neighbors and when log houses were the rule, and they, few and far 
between. 



MR. HENRY GRAVES (Dec'd) 

Was born in Prussia, Germany, July 9, 1844. Came to America in 
April, 1865, and to Kansas in 1876. On November 9, 1870, whs united 
in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Grafar, eight children being born to 
this union: Lizzie, Katie, Harry, Emma, William, May, Dora, and 
Lena. On July 23, 1900, Mr. Graves died at his home, near McFarland. 
He owned 320 acres of land and by industry and economy had accumu- 
lated a handsome competency for a worthy family who were left to 
mourn the loss of a kind husband and father. 



A. R. STROWIG 



Was born January 9, 1863, in Jackson county, Kansas. Received 
the benefit of an excellent educational training in the Holton city 
schools. On October 24, 1887, was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Kaul, to which union five children were born: Warner, Harry, Edna, 
Olive, and Elmer. Mr. Strowig built the first house on the present 
site of Paxico and resides in one of the coziest homes in the city. 
Started in business in 1887 and by a strict attention to the wants of 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




L 



^««Ji^ 



POVNTZ AVENUE, MANHATTAN, 1866. 
A government train on the way to Fort Leavenworth — taking forage. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. S. H. FAIRFIELD, ALMA. 



EARLY, HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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BOLTON BROS. (NOW C. J. GLOTZBACH'S|)ISTORE,;PAXICO. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. C. O. KINNE, ALMA. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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RESIDENCE MR. FRED REUTER, Alma. 



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RESIDENCE OF MR. J. B. CASSIDY, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MB. C. TOMSON, Paxico. 




RESIDENCE OF DR. O. E. WEBB, Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR, GEORGE SUTHERLAND, Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MRS. E. MEYER, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. J, C. HENDERSON, Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. MORITZ HUND, near Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. J. R. HENDERSON, Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. E. STURDY, Manager Freeman Ranch, Bradford. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. MATT THOMSON, 
Alma. 





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RESIDENCE OF MR. J. H. STDEWE, 
Alma. 





RESIDENCE OF MR. GU3 SCHROEDER, 
Alma. 



RESIDENCE OF WM. RICKERSHAUSER, 
Near Halifax. 




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RESIDENCE OF MR. ROBERT STROWIG, near Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. C. L. DAVIS, Alma. 




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RESIDENCE OF MR. J. H. McMAHAN, Alma. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. J. R. FIX, VOLLAND. 1901. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. ALBERT DIEBALL, NEAR ALMA, 1901. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 301 



his customers has acquired a handsome competency. Deals in grain 
and live stock, hardware, implements, etc. Is an up-to-date business 
man and his success is already assured. 



JOSEPH GLOTZBACH, SR. 

Was born in Grosherzog, Germany, February 12,1825. Came to 
America in 1839. After one year's residence in Louisville, Kentucky, 
the family moved to Indiana. In 1856, moved to Wisconsin and in 
1870, came to Kansas, locating in Newbury township. In 1849, was 
united in marriage to Miss Margaret Sendelbach, to which union eight 
children were born: Charles, George, William, Rosa, Kate, Joseph, 
Mary (deceased), and Valentine. For eight years prior to his marriage 
Mr. Glotzbach was a cigar maker. With the exception of his son, 
George, who, in November, 1900, moved to California, the children 
live in Newbury township, within a short distance of the old home- 
stead— where, in peace and quietude, Mr. Glotzbach, Sr., and his 
estimable helpmeet live at ease, in the enjoyment of the fruits of a 
well spent life. (See illustration). 



PHILLIP HUND 

Was born in Mankato, Minnesota, October 13, 1865. Came to 
Kansas with his parents when but five years of age, the family locating 
near Newbury. Was educated in the district and parochial .schools. 
On May 1, 1888, was united in marriage to Miss Anna Lamm, to wliich 
union seven children were born. Until September, 1900, Mr. Hund 
was one of the progressive farmers of Newbury township, but is at 
present proprietor of the Hotel Paxico, which, under his efficient 
management has attained a reputation as a popular stopping place 
with the traveling public— equalled by few and excelled by none. 



CHARLES H. THOMPSON 

Was born March 9, 1856, in Union county, Ohio. Came with his 
parents to Kansas in 1866, locating on the farm on Hendricks creek. 
A good common school education was supplemented by several years 
attendance at the Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan. 
On December 11, 1877, was united in marriage to Miss Maria Myers, 
daughter of Rev. Hiram Myers. Mrs. Thompson died August 17, 1883, 
and Homer, the only child, died November 25, 1894. On March 18, 
1885, was united in marriage to Miss Minnie C. Rand, four children 
being born to this union: Miss Mabel, Raymond C, George Eldon, 



302 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

and Rollin. For a number of years Mr. Thompson occupied a leading 
place as teacher in the schools of Wabaunsee county. In November, 
1897, was elected to the office of register of deeds of Wabaunsee county. 
After rendering the people efficient service for two years retired from 
office of his own volition and against the urgent wishes of his friends, 
considering his duty to his family and his own private business 
interests paramount to all other considerations. Though now a resi- 
dent of Riley county he will ever occupy a warm place in the hearts of 
the people of Wabaunsee county. 



LOUIS UNDORF 

Was born in New York City, August 2, 1866. Came with his 
parents to Kansas in October, 1878, the family locating in Alma. 
Received the benefit of a good educational training in the city schools 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. When 17 years of age engaged as clerk with Mr. 
J. B. Cassidy, being consecutively employed by Messrs. Cassidy, Lim- 
erick, P. R. Meyers, Green, and Miller for eight years, when he went 
into business for himself as proprietor of the City Meat Market, in 
which he has been ever since engaged— his business growing from an 
infant industry to a volume that would do credit to any city of much 
larger pretensions than Alma. By a strict attention to business 
methods and the needs of his customers Mr. Undorf has achieved that 
degree of success of which he is in every way deserving. 



CHARLES B. HENDERSON 

Was born September 29, 1865, at Peoria, Illinois. Came to Kansas 
with his parents in 1872, the family settling in Mission Creek town- 
ship. Received the benefit of a good educational training in the 
schools of Peoria, Illinois, and in those of his home district. Was 
deputy register of deeds six years. Was admitted to the Wabaunsee 
county bar in 1892, since which time has enjoyed a lucrative practice, 
but finds more agreeable and remunerative employment in looking 
after the investments being made by Henderson Bros, in mining 
properties in Arkansas and Wyoming. Is one of the organizers and 
principal stockholders of the Wyoming Copper & Gold Mining Co., it 
being the purpose of the Company to develop their valuable mining 
properties, twelve miles south of Grand Encampment, Wyoming, the 
investment already promising fabulous returns to the stockholders. 
Equally promising are the prospective returns from investments made 
in the Arkansas lead and zinc fields, valuable timber lands and marble 
quarries constituting auxiliary features none the less desirable. The 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 303 



firm of Henderson Bros, is also largely engaged in the cattle and 
grazing business, real estate, loans, abstracting and insurance. The 
subject of this sketch is a thorough going business man, who, by 
honest dealing and strict application to business methods has secured 
the key to the door of success, the opening of which only awaits his 
bidding. 



HERMAN ARNDT 



Was born November 25, 1860, on the farm at Templin, where he 
now resides. On February 21, 1886, was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida Johnson, five children being born to this union: Eleanor, Arthur, 
Walter, Herman, and Gertrude. Mr. Arndtowns an excellent farm of 
500 acres, and in addition to mixed farming is largely engaged in the 
business of raising thoroughbred Poland Chinas, the demand for 
whicli indicates the wide reputation achieved by his fine hogs. Mr. 
Arndtisnota politician but has served the people of Garfield and 
Washington townships four years as clerk and and five years as town- 
ship trustee. Was a popular official, but his duties on the farm 
engross his entire attention, leaving no time to indulge in the thank- 
less and unprofitable game of politics. 



MR. HEINRICH JOSEPH UNDORF (Dec'd) 

Was born May 28, 1820, at Kommerscheid, Prussia. Came to Alma 
in October, 1878, from New York City, where he had lived many years, 
following the occupation of tailor from his boyhood days until his 
death, on December 17, 1901. Was united in marriage to Miss Mar- 
garet Thoes, eight children being born to this union: Mrs. Catharine 
Femmel, Mrs. Mary Utermarm, Charlie, Mrs Theresa Orff, Louis, 
Sister Mary Leander, Mrs. Barbara Tenbrinck, and Hubert— worthy 
and estimable, all, as was their father before them— with a kindly 
face and a warm heart he passed the threshold of life with an unsul- 
lied name, and beloved by everyone. 



E. WORSLEY 



Was born in Upper Canada, July 1, 1848. Moved to Wappingers 
Falls, New York, in April, 1865, and from thence to Kansas, April 1, 
1877. Received a good educational training, even though it was in a 
log school house in the woods of Upper Canada. On March 13, 1877, 
was united in marriage to Miss J. Whitehead, to which union seven 
children were born: Jolin E., J. P., E. Rowland, Frank W., Fred 



.-504 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Arthur, Edith M., and Constance V. Worsley. In 1889, Mr. Worsley 
was elected county commissioner for a three ycai-s term, rendering the 
people efficient service in one of the most important offices in the gift 
of the people. Owns a good farm of 400 acres and is pleasantly located 
ill a comfortable home in Maple Hill township. 



W. G. WEAVER 



Was born January 7, 1864, in New London, Connecticut. Came to 
Kansas with his parents when but four years of age, the family loca- 
ting at Wabaunsee. Dr. L. P. Weaver, the father, was a skilled 
physician and for several years postmaster at Wabaunsee— where, on 
January 23, 1874, he died at the age of 74 years. - 

On December 14, 1892, the subject of this notice was united in 
marriage to Miss Clara B. Chamberlain, to which union three children 
were born: Marguerite, Hall, and the baby— three months having 
passed in an unavailing search for a name pretty enough to fit the 
little one's personal appearance. Mr. Weaver served the people four 
years as clerk of the district court and several additional years as 
deputy. Was a capable official and as popular as efficient. Since 
November 1, 1899, has been engaged in the abstract business in Alma. 



HENRY GRUVIM 



Was born June 16, 1831, in Weinsberg, Wurtemburg, Germany. 
Came to America in 1852 and five years later to Kansas, locating on 
the farm near Volland, where he now resides. Received excellent 
educational advantages, taking a college course at Meinfels, Germany. 
In 1857, was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Graaf, seven children 
being born to this union: Charles, Emma, Rosa, George, William, 
Edward, and Joseph. Mr. Grimm owns one of the largest farms in 
the county, there being 2,090 acres in the tract, 200 acres being in a 
high state of cultivation. The farm is stocked with 200 head of fine 
cattle, the place furnishing excellent pasturage for a much larger 
number. Though among the early settlers Mr. Grimm had no fear of 
the Indians. He manifested his friendship on so many occasions that 
a strong bond of mutual regard grew up between the pioneer settler 
and the sons of the forest. But on the plains Mr. Grimm didn't fare 
so well. (See page 119). Two gruesome souvenirs remind him of that 
life and death struggle at Platte Bridge in 1864. One arrow point 
passed entirely through his leg, the shaft protruding seven inches on 
either side. Another was buried three inches in his spine. But after 
weeks of suffering his health was partially restored. But though 38 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 305 



years have gone by Mr. Grimm is constantly reminded of that savage 
onslaught of the Sioux Indians at Platte Bridge. Mr. Grimm is one 
of Wabaunsee county's most substantial citizens, who has proven by 
his works what can be accomplished by leading a life of industry, 
strict integrity, and a conscientious regard for the rights of his fellows. 



WILLIAM TRUSLER 



Was born October 10, 1853, in Sinclairville, Chautauqua county, 
New York. Came to Kansas in 1881, locating at Eskridge, where he 
has always been found doing business at the old stand. On September 
25, 1883, was united in marriage to Miss Carrie M. Lown, two children 
l)eing born to this union: Golden and Geraldine. Mr. Trusler has 
been engaged in the hardware business in Eskridge for 21 years and 
his success has been phenomenal. Besides being one of the thorough 
going, energetic business men of our neighboring city he has shown 
himself as generous and public spirited as he is far seeing and pro- 
gressive— his donation to the Wesleyan Metliodist College being the 
best of proof that any statement tending to create a favorable impres- 
sion in Mr. Trusler's behalf cannot be overdrawn. Should the large 
stone building prove inadequate to the needs of the school in the 
near future neither Mr. Trusler nor his friends will have the least 
reason for regret. In proportion as the attendance shall increase in 
numbers just in that ratio will Mr. Trusler's wishes be gratified 
and the expectations of his friends be realized. 



A. F. WADE 

Was born October 29, 1843, at Kinsman, Trumbull county, Ohio. 
Received the benefits of an excellent educational training at James- 
town, Pennsylvania. On October 13, 18(36, was united in marriage to 
Miss Orra C. Cole, two children being born to this union: Harmon C. 
and Dolson N. AVade. On March 26, 1868, came to Kansas, locating on 
the farm near Keene postofHce, where he has since resided. Taught 
school in Pennsylvania and for a number of years after coming to 
Kansas, taking a front place in the work of the school room. Was for 
several years a member of the board of examiners and from 1886 to 
1889 was a member of the board of county commissioners, and in 1889, 
represented Wabaunsee county in the state legislature. Served all 
through the war— in the 2nd Ohio and the 14th Pennsylvania Cavalry. 
Owns 2,900 acres of land and for several years has been largely inter- 
ested in the cattle business. On July 4, 1872, Mr. and Mrs. Wade 
made the first cheese in the Keene factory. They own one of the 



;J0(5 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

prettiest homes in Mission Creek townsliip and enjoy it for the best of 
reasons— they know how they earned it— by tirelcvss industry and hard 
knocks on the farm. 



W. J. HINSHAW 



Was born in Clay county, Indiana, March 15, 1849. Came to Kan- 
sas in March, 1871, and was united in marriage to Miss Sarali .1. 
Elliott, at Anadarko, Oklahoma, on April 12, 187.3. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ilinshaw have four living children: L. M., Fred I., Mary A., and 
Everett B. Hinshaw. Since 1874, Mr. Ilinshaw has lived on the farm, 
three miles northwest o| Harvey ville, but during the time has varied 
the monotony of farm work by the equally arduous duties of the school 
room, belonging to that class of teachers whose services are always in 
demand by school boards having at heart the true interests of the 
children under their immediate supervision. 



M. P. EARLY 



Was born August 30, 1838, in Adams county, Ohio. Came to Kan- 
sas, March 2, 1883. On December 2, 1862, was united in marriage to 
Miss Elizabeth A. Armstrong, at Cincinnati, Ohio, three children 
being born to this union: Mary M., Sarah V., and O. M. Early. Dur- 
ing the war served one year as a member of the 1st Missouri Cavalry 
and in the last year of the war in the ISlst Ohio. Owns 230 acres of 
land near TIarveyville and has been for a number of years one of the 
leading merchants of that progressive and up-to-date town — his suc- 
cess in a new field of labor being the best proof of his zeal in providing 
for the needs of his patrons. 



MR. J. W. MOSSMAN (Dec'd) 

Was born January 5, 1809, in Mercer county, Pennsylvania. Came 
to Kansas in 1857, settling on the claim he pre-empted and on which 
he lived until his death, on March 12, 1891. On September 9, 1845, the 
sul)ject of this notice was united in marriage to Miss Sarah A. Wood- 
ford, five children being born to this union: L. J., R. G., Lois C, S. 
L., and Zada A. Mossman. Mrs. Mossman was born December 28, 
1814, and died January 30, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Mossman were well 
mated, in that they were alike generous and warm hearted; kind and 
considerate as to the rights and opinions of others, and ever willing 
to look on the bright side of life rather than render unpleasant their 
own surroundings or those of their friends with whom they daily came 
in contact. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 307 



EMERSON S. SHOECRAFT 

Was born March 17, 1873, at St. Joseph, Missouri. Came to Kan- 
sas in 1881. Was educated at PhilHpsburg, Kansas, being a graduate 
of the high scliool at that place. Is boolcl^ieeper and cashier at Trus- 
Icr's department store in Eslcridge, an employment where a person's 
ability and efficiency is daily put to the severest tests. That he has 
not been found wanting in any of the requisites essential to a further 
continuance in the esteem of his employer is evident to any one 
acquainted with Mr. Trusler's qualifications as a business manager. 
Mr. Shoecraft is fortunate in the possession of those qualifications 
that, years ago, directed him in tlie right path leading onward to 
success. 



JOHN N. BARLOW 

Was born January 10, .1840, in Clinton county, Ohio. Came to 
Kansas February 13, 1869, locating near Harveyville, wliere he has 
ever since resided. On December 25, 1862, was united in marriage, in 
Warren county, Ohio, to Miss Emiline Murrell, to wliich union two 
sons were born: Charles W. and Ennis N. Barlow. Mr. Barlow owns 
one of the best farms in Wabaunsee county and during liis thirty- 
three years residence liere lias proven by his works what industry and 
persevering energy can accomplish on the rich, agricultural lands of 
the land of sunflowers and wind, drouth and grasshoppers. Mr. Bar- 
low is one of Wabaunsee county's substantial citizens and universally 
esteemed. 



GUY C. BEALS 

Wlis born June 24, 1858, in Ottawa county, Micliigan. Came to 
Kansas in 1893, locating at Alma, where he, with his family, has since 
resided. On September 4, 1888, was united in marriage to Miss 
Cornelia West, three children being born to this union: Florence, 
Gertrude, and Guy Carleten. Dr. Beals is a graduate of Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, of New York City, and has taken wliat is 
equivalent to a post graduate course by unremitting study and a 
determination to keep abreast of the times. In 1895, Dr. Beals was 
elected to the position of county coroner and for several years was 
county physician and health officer, a position lie now holds and tlie 
duties of which-he is eminently qualified to perform. 



:J08 early history of WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



GEORGE L. HORTON 

Was born in Ripley county, Indiana, July 17, 1842. Came to Kan- 
sas in November, 1868, and in March, 1875, was united in marriage to 
Miss Rachel A. Jeffries, two children being born to this union: Piatt 
and Emma Ilorton. Mr. Horton owns a tine farm of 240 acres, two 
miles north of Ilarveyville, where he has continuously resided since 
first coming to Kansas. Was three years in the army and is com- 
mander of the G. A. R. Post at Harveyville. With an interesting 
family, a pleasant home and the esteem of all Mr. Ilorton has no 
reason to complain of Fortune's favors in the past nor cause for 
anxiety as to what the future may bring forth. ,, 



IVIR. CONRAD HESSE (Dec'd) 

Was born in Prussia, Germany, October 20, 1828. From 1847 to 
1849, was in the Prussian Army— the 2nd Cavalry Regiment of the 
Wienen Guards (4th Squadron, Berlin). Came to America in 184!), 
locating for a short time at New Orleans, but later, went to Minne- 
sota, then to Iowa, and in 1878, to Kansas, locating on the farm where 
he lived until his death. February 20, 1898. Was married to Miss Dora 
Daring, one child, now Mrs. Louisa Kallenbach, of Iowa, being born 
to this union. His first wife dying after one and one-half yeans, Mr. 
Hesse was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Meinhardt, of Daven- 
port, Iowa, ten children blessing this union: Philip, now of Adell, 
Oklahoma, Lawrence, Nicholas, John, Adam, Frank, Mrs. Matilda 
Pantler, now of Evansville, Illinois, Joseph, Bernard, and Mary. Mr. 
Ilesse was a tailor by trade but after coming to Kansas devoted his 
efforts to stock and small grain. Was a successful farmer and a most 
estimable citizen, leaving to the world an excellent family of sons and 
daughters. (See full page illustration). 



ANDREW MEARS 



Was born in Scotland, September 24, 1820. Mary Jane McMaster 
was born in England, July 1, 1829. Were married May 15, 1849, coming 
to America the same year, locating at Vinegar Hill, Illinois. Came to 
Kansas in 1870, locating on what is known as the Miss Agnes Young 
farm, three and one-half miles east of Eskridge. Fenced forty acres 
of tliat farm in 1871, with a sod fence— perhaps the largest tract of 
land ever enclosed by a sod fence in Wabaunsee county. Today, not a 
trace of that fence can be seen, being entirely crumbled and worn 
away. Afterwards located four miles south of Eskridge, on what is 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 309 



known as the Mears farm, making them a pleasant home. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Mears were born six sons and two daughters: Jesse, Hannah, 
Lizzie, William, James, John, Oscar, and Walter, Children and 
parents all living. 



MR. JAMES L. THOMSON (Dec'd) 

Was born in Clarke county, Kentucky, June 26, 1813. In 1837, was 
united in marriage to Miss Susan Davis, to which union four sons 
were born: Haynie, Davis, Matt, and Henry. Moved to Lincoln 
county, Tennessee, in 1842, and in 1857, to Wabaunsee county. Be- 
longed to a family of drovers, supplying the Southern markets with 
hogs and mules, all of which were driven overland, requiring several 
months to make a trip. After his removal to Tennessee was largely 
engaged in farming, saw-milling and the mercantile business, until 
1853. when his fortune was wrecked by a tornado that literally de- 
stroyed Fayetteville, the county seat. After stemming the tide for 
three years came to Kansas, in 1856, locating the claim now known as 
the Herbert Shaw farm, on Dragoon creek. On August 6, 1857, 
occurred the first death in the Dragoon settlement, the mother of the 
writer being stricken down with malarial fever. On July 20, 1859, the 
subject of tills sketch was again united in marriage to Miss Jane 
Washburn, of Norris' creek, Tennessee. In 1859, I860, and 1861, was 
agent for the Santa Fe Mail company, having charge of the station at 
Elm creek. On February 4, 1882, death called the spirit home— after 
a pilgrimage here of 68 years, 7 months, and 8 days. Deceased was a 
man with wliom kindness was a characteristic trait. He was a liberal 
contributor to public enterprises and charitable objects, among other 
contributions was one of $500 to Lincoln College, at Fayetteville, of 
which city he was several terms mayor. It was his nature to be 
liberal, a statement that could be amply corroborated by many of the 
later settlers on the Upper Dragoon, who gladly recognized In more 
than one of the old pioneers a friend in the hour of need. 

Note. The portrait was taken from a Daguerreotype. 



MR. MICHAEL SWEENEY (Dec'd) 

Was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1819, coming to America in 
his youth, living in Wisconsin until October, 1874, when he came to 
Kansas, locating in Kaw township. Was united in marrriage to Miss 
Bridget Moye, to which union were born seven children, four sons and 
three daughters: Mary, Mrs. Ellen Finney, Mrs. Margaret Lynn, 
Martin, James, Michael, and Thomas. There were but few settlers 



310 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

on the reserve lands when Mr. Sweenej' first opened up a farm in the 
Kaw bottoms, tliree miles southwest of St. Marys, but 27 years 
wrought many changes and found him the possessor of one of the 
largest farms in the county. On July 25, 1901, Mr. Sweeney died at 
his home in the Kaw Valley. He was a man of a strong will and a 
warm heart. Was ever ready to lend a helping hand to the needy, 
forgive a wrong, and to forget an injury. 



S. D. SHAW 



Was born January 12, 1850, in Warren county, Indiana. Came to 
Kansas in 1868. Received the benefits of excellent educational train- 
ing in the schools of Indiana. Mr. Shaw owns 240 acres of good farm 
land and has attained a measure of success proportionate to well 
directed effort by one who thoroughly understands his business. Has 
an interesting family, a pleasant home, and such surroundings as 
bring happiness and contentment. 



S. M. HARRIS 

Was born August 11, 1858, on the farm where he has ever since 
made his home. On June H, 1881, was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah E. Thackery, nine children being born to this union: May, 
Maud, Frank, Lynn, Carrie, Richard I., Vida, Verda, and Zora. 
Though an old settler himself, still living under the same roof is his 
mother, one of the very first pioneers of the Dragoon settlement. 
Mr. Harris, Sr., who died but a few years ago, was twice elected to the 
office of county superintendent of schools and once appointed to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. E. R. Twitchell. Mr. Harris, 
the subject of this notice, is a poet of more than local fame, his 
poems partaking of the Whitcomb Riley type, many productions of 
his pen rivaling the best efforts of his Hoosier contemporary. But 
one glance at that interesting family group answers the (luery as to 
why Mr. Harris prefers a quiet, contented life on the old homestead 
even though accused of hiding his light under a bushel. 



H. C. SHAW 



Was born P'ebruary 22d, 1849, in England. Came to America in 
in 1854 and to Kansas in 1872. With his father established the first 
woolen mill in Wabaunsee county, on Mission creek. On August 27, 
1879, was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Chrisp, eleven children 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 311 



being born to this union: Ella, Frederick E., Sarah, Charley Ida 
Etta, Bertha, Phoebie, Sebie, Herbert C, Jr., and Esther. Mr. Shaw 
owns 160 acres, the James L. Thomson farm, a fine place with 
excellent improvements, among which is a beautiful park, always open 
foru.se by picnic parties, or others wishing to enjoy the cool, shady 
grove, or a ride in the "Santa Maria," built on the Dragoon in 1895 
Mr. Shaw is an expert machinist and for several years was proprieto 
and manager of the Burlingame woolen mill and later, on the farm, 
supplied the stores of E.skridge and other towns with many articles of 
apparel made at his factory on the old homestead where he now 
resides. 



FRANK RICKERSHAUSER 

Was born at Neustadt, Hesse Cassel, Germany, March 9, 1833. 
Came to America in 1852, locating at Connersville, Indiana. Came to 
Kansas in the fall of 1856, locating a claim on the head of the Waka- 
ru.sa, removing to Wabaunsee county, near Halifax, in 1868, but in 
1875 bought the farm near Paxico, on which he has since resided. 
Owns 4,000 acres of fine farming and grazing land stocked with nearly 
seven luindred head of cattle. Has always farmed on a large scale, as 
is indicated by our illustration, which presents to view one of the 
finest stock and grain ranches In Wabaunsee county — the result of 
hard labor and good management on the part of one of our leading 
citizens — one who has always been foremost in the advancement of 
any public enterprise, and ever just as ready to lend a helping hand 
to tho.se, who, in tlie battle of life, have been less fortunate. A single 
example of Mr. Rickershauser's generous and sympatlietic nature will 
emphasize the statement. In 1873, when the news came to Mr. 
Rickershauser that Judge Hall's fine residence and nearly all his per- 
sonal property had been destroyed by a prairie fire, Mr. Rickershauser 
loaded up his big farm wagon, with double sideboards, with corn, 
hauled it to Wabaunsee, and dumped the contents into Mr. Hall's 
crib. No solicitation was needed. It was but the spontaneous act of 
one of Nature's noblemen. When the Alma Salt Works needed a man 
to push business to the front, Mr. Rickershauser took charge in 
person and with crude appliances made fifty barrels of the finest salt 
per day. Acres of cord wood were piled about the works, giving a 
large number of men employment. Mr. Rickershauser has led an 
active life. Hard work has been the rule of his life and though at 
this writing his health is Impaired it is hoped that for many years he 
may yet enjoy the fruits of industry and well directed effort. He has 
not only seen the wilderness blossom as the rose but he has rendered 
valued assistance in bringing about the miraculous changes that have 
been wrought. 



312 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



0. E. WEBB 

Was born December 2, 1866, in Jefferson county, Iowa. Came to 
Kansas with his parents in 1873, locating in Pawnee county. Was a 
farmer boy for years and l^nows wliat hard work is and thoroughly 
understands the practical side of life— his knowledge being gained by 
experience in starvation times and the grasshopper raids in the short 
grass country. Is a graduate of Central Business College, of Sedalia, 
Missouri. Also graduated in a special science course at the C. N. C, 
Great Bend, Kansas. After teaching eight years in the county and 
city schools of Pawnee county, Kansas, entered upon the study of 
medicine, being a graduate of the Beaumont Hospital Medical Col- 
lege, of St. Louis, Missouri, class of 1896. Located at Paxico in March, 
1895, and by strict application to business, by constant study, and his 
own natural ability has built up a lucrative practice, attaining a 
phenomenal degree of success in his chosen profession. In May, 1896, 
Dr. Webb was united in marriage to Miss Esther C. Willms, of 
Ellinwood, Kansas, three children being born to this union: Charley, 
Florence, and Fleta. Dr. Webb is one among the first of our profes- 
sional men to make a practical application of a system of telephones 
in his business. In 1898, he constructed his first line to McFar- 
land. Since that time he has constructed lines to Keene, Dover, 
and Kuenzli creek. He uses the Bridging system and already has 65 
phones in operation and the number is constantly increasing. He has 
50 miles of wire and on the completion of tlie new stone building — 
the first in Paxico— he will have one of the best appointed offices in 
the county. A view of his pleasant home in Paxico is shown in the 
illustration, and the bundles of wires speak volumes in the Doctor's 
behalf — showing how forethought, energy, and up-to-date methods 
will bring success. 



REV. J. J. SILBERMANN 

Was born at Uman, Russia, December 25, 1854. Was educated at 
Basel, Switzerland, taking a theological course at the University 
located there, graduating in the class of 1880. Came to America the 
same year. In 1883, came to Kansas, locating at Eudora. Has been a 
resident of Alma since 1898. On January 23, 1883, was united in mar- 
riage to Frida Sonderegger, four children being born to this union: 
Olga, Anna, Oscar, and Esther. The Evangelical church, of which 
Mr. Silbermann is pastor, is one of the neatest church edifices in 
Alma. Was built in 1880, though the spire wasn't erected until 1888. 
The church has a membership of forty families and is in a flourishing 
condition— a fact due in a great measure to the personal efforts of 
their highly esteemed minister. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 312a 



ROBERT GUTH 

Was born April 28, 1837, in Baden, Germany. Came to America in 
1847, landing at New Orleans. Lived nine years at Quincy, Illinois, 
going from there to Mankato, Minnesota. Is a harness maker by 
trade and during the Civil war was employed by the government 
at VIcksburg, Mississippi, from 1863 to 1865. On July 23, 1857, was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Magdaline Hund, to which union ten 
children were born, seven living: Moritz and William, of Hutchinson, 
Kansas; Mrs. Ottilia Muckenthaler, August, Mary, Leo, and Henry. 
Mr. Guth came to Newbury in 1873, kept boarding house awhile, and 
worked at his trade. Was postmaster and ran a general store until 
1895. Has retired from business and is comfortably located at his old 
home in Newbury. 



W. H. H. SMITH 



Was born April 6, 1858, at Jersey ville, Illinois. Came to Kansas 
In 1890. Received a good classical education at Valparaiso, Indiana. 
Took the full medical course at the North Western Medical College, 
of St. Joseph, Missouri, and a post graduate course at the Missouri 
Medical College, at St. Louis, Missouri. On February 22, 1882, was 
united in marriage to Miss Maria Rhodes, of Ethingham, Illinois, 
four children being born to this union: Grover Eugene, August 
Herman, Dewey, and Willie H. Dr. Smith has been for six years a 
resident of Wabaunsee county and during that time has demonstrated 
his ability as a physician, and the number of difficult surgical oper- 
ations performed by him attest a thorough and intricate knowledge 
of every detail of his chosen profession. 



ROBERT STROWIG 



Was born July 13, 1853, in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Came to Kansas 
with his parents when five years of age. Received a good education at 
the Banner school, one of the best in Jackson county. On January 1, 
1879, was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Riederer, to which 
union four children were born: Otto, Mabel, Milton, and Homer. 
Was six years county commissioner— from January, 1896, to January, 
1902. Besides being a popular official, Mr. Strowig is one of the best 
millers in the state, the mill being located on Mill creek, near Paxico. 
The mill was built in 1879 and has a capacity of 75 barrels of flour and 
50 barrels of meal per day. Has five double stands of 9x15 rolls on 
wheat, one, three high on corn. Has one sifter, two purifiers, two 



n2b EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

centrifiifiral rolls, smutter and sepnrators. Is one of the best mills 
in Kansas and is operated and owned by Strowig & Son. Mr. StrowiK 
bought his land of an Indian, and for several years after the mill was 
built the last remnant of the Prairie band of Pottawatomies in Wa- 
baunsee county lived in two wigwams within two hundred yards of 
Mr. Strovvig's fine residence near the mill. 



JOSEPH MUCKENTHALER 

Was born in Scott county, Minnesota, May 13, 1868. Came with 
his parents to Wabaunsee county the following year. On September 
8, 1891, was united in .marriage to Miss Ottilia Guth, to which union 
were born five children: Louis, Eleanor, Clements, Joseph, and Paul. 
Owns the old family homestead north of Newbury and that he is 
making a success of farming is indicated by the many improvements 
being made on the farm, among others, the best and most convenient 
swine shed in the county. For many years has been leader of the 
Newbury band and is one of the best cornet players in Kansas. 



ED. L. CAMPBELL 



Was born December 28, 1858, in Kushville, Illinois. Was educated 
in the Rushville schools and came to Kansas in 1881. On September 
18, 1887, was united in mairiage to Miss Mary Sage, of Dover, Kansas, 
to which union three children were born: Lyle, Charlie, and Clyde. 
Mr. Campbell was postmaster at Eskridge four years but is at present 
engaged in farming, owning a good farm of 160 acres on Mission creek. 
Ed. is one of the world's good fellows, was popular as a postmaster 
and is making a success of life on the farm. 



THOMAS OLIVER 



Was born in Dcnholm, Roxburgshire, Scotland, April 28, 1859. 
Came from Edinburg to Old Maple Hill, October, 1884. When the 
new town was laid out in 1887, Mr. Oliver, who already lived on the 
new site, moved liis wagon shop into the new town and assisted in 
erecting the first building, Mr. J. N. Dolley's general store, and built 
the first dwelling house — a five room, two story structure. lie still 
operates the only wagon shop and has erected a majority of the build- 
ings in what is one of the neatest towns in the county, of which Mr. 
Oliver is an esteemed citizen. Isabella Maple Hill Oliver was born 
September 19, 1887— the first child born in the new town and the first 
child baptized in the new M. E. church. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 313 



f\ Court RerninisGeriGe. 



. The following interesting reminiscence of the courts in the years 
agone is from the pen of Hon. A. H. Case, of Topeka. Mr. Case was 
our first district attorney, when Wabaunsee county (or Richardson 
county then) was one of the 13 counties comprising the 3d judicial 
district— taking in Pike's Peak and a good share of the Rocky 
Mountains. 

Under the act of the legislature of 1860, 29 counties were included 
in the 2d judicial district, in which Wabaunsee was one of them, 
Rush Elmore, judge. At that time Arrapahoe was in the 1st district 
and county attorneys were in vogue. In 1861 Wabaunsee was placed in 
the 3d judicial district with Shawnee, and all west of Davis county 
was supposed to be attached to this district for judicial purposes. At 
the fall election in 1861 Jacob Safford was elected judge of this district, 
he being the first judge under the state constitution, and I was 
elected at the same time as district attorney. The judge's salary was 
sure, but the district attorney took his pay in county scrip, worth 
about 20 cents on the dollar. The highest fee was in murder cases, 
$25, but we had no such cases, as no attention was paid to accidents of 
that character. Our whole time was occupied in stock stealing cases 
and the old dram shop law. To convict for the larceny of stock, pos- 
session by the defendant was sure conviction unless he could prove 
that he was not in the United States at the time. Under the dram 
shop act, the grand jury, on proof, would find a bill, the case would be 
continued, and the next term the defendant, by his learned counsel, 
would produce a license, antedated of course, showing, under the 
honest seal of the officials, that he was authorized by law to keep shop. 
We had no railroads so we migrated from court to court by stage, 
horseback, on foot, and wagon. The stage charged ns ten cents a 
mile, provided we carried a rail to help out of a mud hole. When we 
went from Topeka by horse or In wagon we left in the afternoon, went 
to the Wa'terman crossing at Mill creek, tied up, ate cold lunch, 
washed it down with red eye, slept the sleep of the just and in the 
morning drove or rode to Manhattan for breakfast, thence on to 
Junction City, our western terminus, where we stopped with Jim 
Brown, at the Old Eagle Hotel, at $4 per day for bacon and coffee, and 
in the goodness of his heart Jim would place our buffalo robes on the 



314 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

floor for a bed, crowd in an outsider and cliarge liim a dollar for its 
use. 

Lawyers' fees, in those days, were exceedingly small. If we got 
enough to buy grub and the wash down and not leave the town in 
debt, we were satisfied. After Judge Ehnore went off the bench he 
traveled with us, the jolliest and best of men. His heart was in his 
hand and, unless out late, he had imported stuff in his .saddle bags. I 
remember we were at Junction City with liim and all broke. Lucl<ily, 
the grand jury found somebody guilty of something and employed 
Elmore. Two yoke of oxen for fee. Well, we camped in the "Flag-of- 
our-Union-saloon" on the amount realized from the sale of those 
steers. So that steers, as is well known, are good to eat as well as 
drink. Another time we were at Junction City, broke, as usual. 
What to do? 

This was after I was out of office and a private. We concluded we 
would have a mock court, arrest somebody when the judge was 
snug in bed, try him, convict him, tine him ten dollars, get it and let 
him go. With this bountiful ten dollars we managed to allay thirst 
for the next thirty hours. We were young then, no one intended to 
do harm; it was life in the wooly west and we made the best of it as 
we saw it. 

Many things could be said, but no history will ever be written 
that can or will tell all that occurred. A good many things best be 
not told as some are living yet that enacted a part in those early days. 

I want to give your county credit for one thing and that is, the 
scrip issued by it for officers' fees became par and was paid in full the 
first of any county in the state, while Shawnee scrip at that time was 
worth only forty cents. 



The /VIma Salt WorKs, (874. 



The News, of February 12, 1873. speaking of the Alma oil well 
said that it was yielding over one hundred barrels per day of oil 
and water. As Fred Link had poured but a pint of oil in the well he 
was digging at the Winkler hotel there is no risk in stating that it 
was mostly water. 

But what was intended as a hoax resulted in the organization of 
the Alma Oil & Mining Company. A hole was drilled 585 feet in 
depth and a flow of strong brine reached. Analysis of this brine 
showed fifty pounds of salt to fifty-three and one-half gallons of water. 
The result was the Alma Salt Works. John Gibson went East and 
purchased a number of large kettles; two evaporating vats 16x112 feet 
were constructed; a brick smoke stack sixty feet in height was built 
and from thirty to fifty barrels of pure, white salt was the dally 
output. But mismanagement or an undue interest in outside matters 
resulted in closing down the plant. It was afterwards leased to S. T. 
Wright, but the lack of funds prevented the proper development of 
an industry that may yet prove a bonanza at some time in the near 
future. That the brine is sufficient in quantity and strength to 
justify a judicious investment seems apparent. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 315 



htlstorlcal Notes. 



Prior to 1833 the country now known as Wabaunsee county be- 
longed to the Kaw or Kansas Indians. In that year Rev. Isaac McCoy, 
a missionary having charge of the location of the different Indian 
tribes, assisted by his son, John McCoy, surveyed a strip 120 miles in 
length from east to west, and 19 miles in width from north to south, 
for an outlet for the Shawnee Indians from their reservation to the 
Buffalo country. This was known as the Shawnee Purchase. Three 
years later the north line of the Kaw reserve was located. 

By a treaty with the Kaws, January 14, 1846, the Pottawatomies 
were granted a tract of land 30 miles square, comprising a part of the 
counties of Wabaunsee, Pottawatomie, Jackson and Shawnee. In 1847 
the "Pottawatomies of the Woods." and the "Mission Band," about 
1,500 in numbers, located in this tract. In 1850 a band of Michigan 
Pottawatomies numbering about 650 joined the tribe at St. Marys. 

November 15, 1861, a treaty was made by which the Mission band 
was allotted lands in severalty, while the Prairie band elected to con- 
tinue tribal relations. William W. Ross, a brother of Charles Ross, 
was Indian agent at that time and the treaty was made at Rossville. 
On the part of the Indians the treaty was signed by Shaw-que, To- 
Penubbee, We-Weh-Seh, Shomen, Joseph N. Bourassa, George L. 
Young, B. H. Bertrand, M. B, Beaubien, L. H. Ogee, John Tipton 
and Louis Vieux— all well known to the early settlers of Wabaunsee 
county. 

This treaty provided for the sale of all lands not chosen for allot- 
ments to the Santa Fe Railroad Company. The Mission band removed 
to the Indian Territory in 1870, and the Prairie band, 780 strong, was 
given a body of land twelve miles square in Jackson county, on which 
they now live. 

At this treaty a half section of land was reserved for the Baptist 
Mission, located near Uniontown, adjoining the farm of Mr. M. W. 
Janes, opposite the old Darling ferry. This mission was in operation 
until 1859. 

In 1847, St. Marys Mission was moved from Sugar creek to the 
south side of Kaw River but the year following was transferred to its 
present location on the north side. 



316 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

When Ricliardson county was set off and given a name by the 
Territorial legislature of 1855, the width of the county from East to 
West was but 24 miles. The legislature of 1859 changed the name to 
Wabaunsee county and in 1860, through the efforts of Mr. C. B. Lines, 
our representative, a strip six miles in width was added to the west 
side of the county. 

In 1864, 72 square miles of territory were taken from the southwest 
corner of Wabaunsee county and attached to Morris county. This 
territory was recovered by Captain Wm. Mitchell in 1868, but the fol- 
lowing year was returned to Morris county and in 1870 was divided 
between the two counties. In 1871, John Pinl<erton betrayed his 
trust by having himself set over into Riley county, taking a strip six 
miles wide and fifteen miles long from the wqst side. In 1872, Mr. J. 
M. Johnson introduced and caused to be passed by both branches of 
the legislature a bill recovering the lost territory but by some hocus- 
pocus the bill failed to become a law, but the following year Represen- 
tative Sellers succeeded in recovering six miles of this territory. No 
changes have been made since. 

The first white men in the county built a log house in the heavy 
timber on Dragoon creek about the year 1844. But their purpose was 
highway robbery. This gang of cut-throats, if not the company raised 
by John McDaniel, on the frontier, to raid the Mexican trains, was 
one organized for the same purpose. Captain Philip St. George Cooke 
was sent out from Fort Leavenworth on several different occasions to 
capture or disperse these hordes and how well he succeeded is attested 
by the records of the war department of that period. Captain Cooke's 
capture of the remnants of the dispersed bands led by Colonel War- 
field and Major Snively, near where Old Fort Atkinson was afterwards 
established furnishes indisputable evidence of his valor and efliciency 
as an annihilator of robber hordes. (See pages 141-145). 

The first actual settlements by homeseekers were in Wabaunsee 
and Wilmington townships, with the weight of evidence in favor of 
Wabaunsee. Mr. J. M. Bisb&y, of Pavilion— see illustration— is prob- 
ably entitled to first place among the few living settlers of the olden 
time. He came to Wabaunsee in the fall of 1854. Closely following 
were Peter and Bartholomew Sharai, J. 11. Nesbitt (the first store- 
keeper), D. B. Hyatt, Clark Lapham, Joshua Smith, and Rev. Leonard. 

Mr. Henry Harvey and his two sons, George and Samuel, selected 
their claims on the Dragoon in the fall of 1854, but not until May, 
1855, did they make actual settlement. 

Milton Haywood built the first house on Rock creek in 1855, but 
the following year sold his claim to William Exon. 

Ed. Krapp, Joseph Thoes, and Peter Thoes arrived on their claims 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 317 



four miles south of Alma, March 1, 1855, and in three weelcs built 
three log houses, one for each of the newcomers. 

Fred Palenske, Terrass, and Hendricks came up the Missouri river 
on the same boat, arriving May 8th. 

Mr. Mauzenbrinck and wife settled on the claim afterwards owned 
by C. Wertzberger. On a trip to Kansas City to buy goods to start a 
country store Mr. Mauzenbrinck was drowned in the Missouri river. 
Herman Dierker, a returned California miner, married the widow, 
and his place was known as Alma— West Precinct. Mr. Dierker was 
for several years cook in the gold camps of the Pacific coast, receiving 
ten dollars a day for his services. He afterwards sold the farm to Mr. 
C. Wertzberger and bought a farm near Alma. A few years ago left 
for Ohio and when he left surprised a few of his intimate friends by 
inviting them into his smoke house. With the assistance of his 
invited friends he soon dug up a pot of gold containing, according to 
diverse statements, a sum ranging from $20,000 to $70,000. It may be 
unnecessary to state that none of the gold ,is there now, but our 
peddler, Scheminski, feels proud of the fact that many a time he has 
thrown his bundle of hides on the ground where that gold for nearly 
half a century lay hidden. 

In May, 1855, came Ernest Honeke, a surveyor and one of three 
representatives in the state legislature of 1860. Mr. Honeke was one 
of a colony from Cincinnati and laid out what was probably the first 
town-site in the county. It was located on the hill just south of the 
Palenske homestead and was called Humboldt City. 

Honeke, besides being among our first representatives in the 
legislature was one of the first proprietors of a still. William Griflen- 
stein was his partner in the business. The capacity of the still was 
five gallons a day and the Indians were their best customers. The 
Indians would patiently wait until, drop by drop, their bottle was 
filled and then got over on their own side of the reservation. (For 
further notes as to Griffenstein see pages 136-138). 

The first building erected at Fort Riley was in 1854, by Major 
Ogden. 

For the protection of overland traffic across the plains Fort 
Atkinson, six miles above Dodge City, was built by Colonel Sumner 
in 1850. 

Kansas Territory was organized May 30, 1854. 

One of the first houses built in the Mill creek valley was of logs 
on the Christian Hankammer place, and was for many years used by 
Mr. Hankammer as a residence. Wooden pins instead of • nails were 
used in constructing the house built by Gleich & Antoine in 1855 and 
torn down by Mike Boetcher in April, 1890. Before locating on Mill 
creek Mr. Gleich had worked at Darling's ferry, opposite Uniontown, 



318 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

near the east line of the farm owned by Mr. M. W. Janes. Mr. Gleich's 
marriage on April IG, 1857, to Mrs. Catherine Terrass, is the first on 
record in the county. Mr. Terrass had settled on the reservation near 
Mr. Peter Johnson's, and his death, in 1856, was probably the tirst 
in the county. 

The death of Mrs. Susan D. Thomson, wife of Mr. James L. Thom- 
son, and mother of the writer, was the first in Wilmington township. 
The date was August 6, 1857. 

Mr. J. M. Bisbey reports the winter of '55-'56 the coldest of his 
experience in Kansas. On a trip to Kansas City for provisions, was 
snowbound three days and could make but 10 to 15 miles a day. On 
his return found his family out of breadstulls for three days but had 
plenty of frozen potatoes and beef. From December 22, to January 
15 was intensely cold and on February 3 was 32 degrees below. On 
several days was 24 below, while the sun shone brightly. 

Mr. Fred Palenske bought his claim from a man named Gilbert, 
who was living on the place in a tent. He paid $20 for the claim, in- 
cluding tent, tools and provisions. 

Rev. Harvey Jones located at Wabaunsee in 1855. Organized the 
First Church of Christ, of which he was the first pastor till ISflO, 
when he returned to Ohio. In 1864 went to southern Kansas and two 
years later returned to Wabaunsee. 

After Ed. Krapp located his claim he hauled goods from Westport 
Landing to "Whiskey-Point," a small town opposite Fort Riley. Left 
the Old Santa Fe Trail at 110 creek and folluwed the old Mormon trail 
over tne divide between the waters of Mill creek and Rock creek. Be- 
tween the Big Spring near Eskridge and Moss Springs in Geary county, 
a distance of 28 miles, there was no water to be had except that 
hauled in kegs. Fifty or more freighters would be met on the road 
every day, and he would often have several thousand dollars in gold in 
a keg or box in the wagon to buy goods or for deposit. Was badly 
frozen in a blizzard on one of these trips in 1856 while encamped on the 
head of the Wakarusa. 

Richardson county was named by the legislature of 1855 in honor 
of Wm. A. Richardson, congressman from Illinois, who introduced 
the first Kansas-Nebraska bill in the house of representatives. The 
present name, Wabaunsee, was in honor of an Indian chief. The word 
means, in English, "dawn of day." 

The Connecticut colony, or the Beecher Rifle colony, left New 
Haven, Conn., March 31, 1856, and' arrived at Wabaunsee April 28. 
Capt. C. B. Lines was chosen president of the company. The com- 
pany built a town hall and a mill and a church— the latter being a 
part of the residence of Mr. A. J. Bowman. The following members 
of the Connecticut colony remained over three months: C. B. Lines, 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 319 



W. Hartley, Jr., J. D. Farren, Geo. H. Coe, F. H. Hart, S. M. Thomas, 
L. H. Root, J. M. Hubbard, Jr., Wm. Mitchell, Jr., O. Bardwell, 
Rollin Moses, A. A. Cottrell, H. S. Hall, S. A. Baldwin, Benjamin 
Street, J. J. Walter, T. C. P. Hyde, E. C. D. Lines, E. D. Street, Tim- 
othy Read, H. M. Selden, George Wells, W. S. Griswold, Isaac Fenn, 
J. P. Root, J. F. Willard, H. D. Rice, H. Isbell, D. F. Scranton, E. J. 
Lines, F. W. Ingham, L. A. Parker, E. N. Penfleld, R. W. Griswold. 
G. H. Thomas, M. C. Welch, B. C. Porter, F. Johnson, C. E. Pond, L. 
W. Clark, and W. G. McNary. In the fall of 1856, Messrs. S. H. Fair- 
field, S. R. Weed, J. E., L. H., and Enoch Piatt came from Menden, 
Illinois, and joined the settlers at Wabaunsee. So closely identified 
with the early settlement of the township as to be usually considered 
as part of the original colony. Of the original Beecher colony but four 
now reside in the county: Messrs. A. A. Cottrell, S. A. Baldwin, 
Captain Wm. Mitchell, and J. F. Willard. But quite a number of the 
descendants of the New Haven colony still reside at Wabaunsee— on 
the homestead selected by their parents in 1856. Others, though now 
residents of other states, still regard Wabaunsee as the dearest spot 
on earth, by rea.son of the many hallowed associations connected with 
the early settlement of the town. 

The first railroad in Wabaunsee county was of the underground 
pattern, with stations at Wabaunsee and Harveyville— a fact not 
generally known until the road went into liquidation by reason of a 
lack of patronage. 

Among the early settlers of Mission creek township, coming to the 
county in 1856, were: S. F. Ross, Captain Henry, Wm. P. Hill, Mr. 
Mason, William Collins, a brother and three sisters, Mrs. Drummond, 
Dr. James Fletcher, C. C. Brooks, J. N. Winslow, W. K. Beach, and 
Dr. S. E Beach. Dr. Beach was surgeon of the 8th Kansas. Was 
captured at Chickamauga, and died at Nashville soon after being 
exchanged. Of the Ross family, E. G. Ross was U. S. Senator, W. W. 
Ross was agent of the Pottawatomies and Charles Ross was, for eight 
years, county treasurer. 

In 1857, the Mission creek settlement received several additions. 
Among these were: J. W. Mossman, John Shadd, George Johnston, 
S. W. Higbee, C. A. Sexton, H. J. Loomis, D. M. Johnston, A. S. 
Waters and brother, R. P. Miller, Sylvester Moore, John, Fred, and 
Allen Doty, E. M. Hewens, and W. E. Little. July 4th was celebrated 
at Fremont City— three ladies being among the fifteen persons present. 
Boiled rice, milk, and mulberry pies were the luxuries provided for 
the occasion. 

In 1858, Martin and William Woodford, Anson Eddy, T. M. Allen, 
Wm. and Homer Hewins and their mother, Wm. and Harris Ewing, 



320 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

W. T. Berryman, Orson Frizzle and Asaph Frizzle, Tlios. Barker, 
n. F, Drake, Abe and George Ilartwell, settled on Mission creek. 

In the winter of 1856-57, the editor of the New York Sur^ gave 
$250 toward building a school house at Wabaunsee. A church (Con- 
gregational) costing $4,000 was built, also a school house, 2Gx36, two 
stories in height— school room below and hall above. ^ 

Ma'am Sawin's boarding house at Wabaunsee is remembered by 
old timers of 1855 and 1857. There were four young scions of the 
Sawin household, who, in the summer season, were subjected to weekly 
dousings in the raging Kaw. A rope about their bodies saved them 
from drowning during the cleansing process. Pancakes were daily 
served" and even the house cat relished them— a fact evidenced by an 
exclamation of mine hostess: "Scat! This is the third time I have 
caught you in the batter." But the patrons becoming too exacting 
Ma'am Sawin moved to parts unknown. 

In the summer of 1858, the Zeandale and Wabaunsee neighbor- 
hoods were aroused by the report that a child was lost— a little tot of 
two years belonging to the Meacham family, living on Deep creek. 
Hundreds of searchers failed to solve the mystery. But months after- 
wards the bleaching bones of an infant told the heartrending story of 
the little one that strayed from home while the mother was busy with 
the cares of the household. 

G. Zwanziger built a gristmill in Alma in 1858, and Christian 
Hankammer began the construction of a sawmill three miles above 
on Mill creek. Both were badly damaged by the big flood of June 28th. 
In the gristmill there was but one small pair of burrs, run by an old 
fashioned wooden wheel of the "Undershot" pattern. By getting an 
early start eight bushels a day could be ground. There was no roof 
over the mill until 1860, and then there was no water in sight above 
the dam. Occasionally, water could be found in the deep holes but 
they were few and long distances apart. Settlers going to Kansas 
City for bacon or to Atchison for some of "Pomeroy's beans" camped 
in the dry bed of Mill creek at the Rocky Ford crossing, though there 
was plenty of water for stock in Dry creek near its mouth. The mill 
was sold to L. Pauly in 1862. 

Patrick and Ezekial Dix, and Elisha Edwards settled on Rock 
creek in 1858. David Tyler built a house on the Wm. Brewer place, 
and Martin Tyler built a house on the Pardee place. 

During the Pike's Peak excitement in 1859 the steamer Gus Linn 
advertised to go within 150 miles of Pike's Peak. The steamer drew 
23 inches forward and 18, aft. Left Kansas City May 10, with 140 tons 
of freight, three-fourths of which was for Manhattan and Fort Riley. 
May 15, reached St. Marys Mission— a place of 4,000 Indians, half- 
breeds and whites. On the 16th reached Wabaunsee, town containing 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY,KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. JOSEPH MUCKENTHALER, Paxico. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. J. H. MICHAELIS, near Paxico. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. AUGUST UTERMANN.Alma. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. S. D. SHAW, Plumb Township. 



J 



EARLY HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. GDS THIERER, near Volland. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WM. DIEBALL, four miles southwest of Alma, 



1 



i 

J 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. M. W. JANES, near Willard. 




MR. M. W. JANES'S BARN, near Willard. 



t 

I 



i 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




ALMA -LOOKING WEST FROM THE SANTA FE DEPOT. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. G. W. GILLIS, MISSION CREEK. 



4 



Tw9!' 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. A. F. WADE, Mission Creek. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. J. N. BARLOW, near Harveyville. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WM. MASS, Spring Creek. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. HENRY GRIMM, West Branch. 



4 



i 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. HERMAN ARNDT, Templiu. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. D. F. CLAYTON, Alma. 



I 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




i&-if\ n 





OLD HOME OF MR. ANDREW MEIRS, near Eskridge. 




iiiifij!iiniini»!i!fli]lMi>il!>i 



RESIDENCE OF MR. G. G. CORNELL. Alma. 



( 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 







1^ . 



I '^l^.'^'^ 







RESIDENCE OF MR. A. R. STROWIG, Paxico. 





S^':r^:ii^ 







RESIDENCE OF MR. FRED ZEFFERJAHN, Paxico. 



I 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 321 



one store and fifteen houses, and the prospective terminus of an 
important railroad. This boat carried the material for the first paper 
published at Manhattan. Between Lawrence and Topeka a girl baby 
was born to a Mrs. Kelly, on her way to join her husband at Manhat- 
tan. The baby was named after the boat— Gus Linn. There were six 
boats besides the Gus Linn, navigating the Kaw at that time: War 
Eagle, Excel, Silver Lake, Coloma, Star of the West, and Kate 
Sweeney. 

The Wyandotte Constitution was adopted July 29, 1859. Ratified 
October 4, 1859. Act of Admi-ssion approved January 29, 1861. Until 
1860, Wabaunsee county was attached to Geary county for judicial 
purposes. A bill of $761.62 was presented to the board of commis- 
sioners for court expenses. 

The office of district attorney was created on June 4, 1861, and 
abolished, January 1, 1862, and again created February 12, 1864. June 
18, 1861, Almu township was divided into two voting precincts; the 
place of holding the elections in the East precinct to be at the house 
of Peter Thoes, and that for the West precinct at the house of Her- 
man Dierker (C. Wertzberger's). 

March 3, 1863, the county commissioners voted to pay the costs of 
an inquest on the bodies of Gilliland and Menser, before Squire 
Haynes, acting coroner. These men were horse dealers of unsavory 
reputation, who had been overhauled by the sheriff of Shawnee 
county, at Zeandale. All that was given out at the inquest for the 
information of the general public was that they had come to their 
death at the hands of parties unknown. 

On September 1, 1863, Capt. E. C. D. Lines was killed on the skir- 
mish line near Fort Smith, Arkansas. 

Iti the summer of 1863, 1,400 Kickapoo warriors encamped near 
the spring, on the present site of Mr. William Home's orchard, in 
Washington township, on their way to fight the Cheyennes. In three 
or four weeks they returned— camping three or four days at the spring. 
They were short on ponies and long on wounded and sick Indians — 
none of them having much to say and they held no scalp dances. The 
Cheyennes were attending to that part of the program. But the 
Kickapoos buried several Indians near the spring and on several occa- 
sions since that time, in plowing, William has turned up such grue- 
some relics as skulls and other parts of bodies that were buried too 
near the top of the ground in 1863. 

In October, 1864, Governor Carney issued a proclamation requiring 
all able-bodied male citizens between the ages of 18 and 60 to attach 
themselves to some regiment of troops, each man to bring two blank- 
ets, a tin cup, knife and fork, and haversack; a coffee pot and frying 
pan to every five men; each detachment to furnish its own rations and 



322 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

transportation. The company from the East branch of Mill creek 
WHS commanded by Capt. Ed. Krapp; l.st Li.eut. Wm. Drebinp, and 2d 
Lieut. Jos. Treu. The West branch contingent was commanded by 
1st Lieut. Chas. Weber, and 2d Lieut. Wm. Home. All went to 
Topeka to guard the place while the militia from there went to the 
front. The militia dug a trench four feet deep around the town, 
erected a stockade 40 ft. square in the center. The report came that 
Price had taken Lawrence and was marching to Topeka. Then the 
props that supported the bridge over the Shunganunga were knocked 
out that the invaders might be drowned in tlie mud. Orders were 
given to march to the bridge at 3 a. m. Some made their wills before 
retiring but the cook was up early, saying the boys should have a cup 
of coffee before they died, and they did. They all came home in the 
morning. 

In 1864, J. W. Mossman was captain of the militia from Mission 
creek and S. P. Wamplc and T. K. Tomson, lieutenants. 

Af the April session of the board of commissioners the Pottawa- 
tomie reserve was attached to the several townships of Alma, Wa- 
baunsee, and Mission creek, and that part attached to Mission creek 
organized into a precinct to be called Maple Hill, elections to be held 
at the house of R. H. Waterman. 

Henry Schutter, a brother of Joseph and Barney Schutter, was 
killed at Cottonwood Holes by the Kiowas, in the summer of 1864. 
This and other Indian news* alarming the settlers, a meeting was 
held at Wm. Krieg's, on West branch, to take steps fo^- protection. 
The following named settlers were at this meeting: G. Zwanziger, 
August Brasche, Carl Falk, Rudolph Arndt, Fetting, Secrest, Yolland, 
Wm. Home, Lehmberg, Thowes, and Muehlenbachers. At this meet- 
ing it was resolved to build a fort. Zwanziger wanted to build the 
fort at Alma, but others favored a point near Dr. Brasche's as being 
more central. Wm, Home wasn't in favor of building a fort. Pre- 
ferred to go to Manhattan, where there were plenty of stone houses 
and where there was plenty of water. The diversity of opinion 
resulted in the meeting breaking up— not exactly in a row, but not a 
few were warmed up over the discussion about building the fort. The 
final outcome was the building of the fort at Templin. (See page 113). 

In 1866, the first house was built in Alma. (See pages 74-75). But 
not until 1868 was the first village council organized. Sam Weed was 
chairman, and August Meyer, Henry Schmitz, John Winkler, and 
Herman Dierker, the other members. S. R. Weed acted also as police 

*Charlie Lehmberg, Jr., was herding cattle on the ridge southwest 
of the Schuch place. One of the neighbors seeing the cattle took 
them for Indians. The neighboorhood was aroused and not until the 
fort was built was the fear from Indian raids dispelled. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 323 



jiidse, and N. H. Whittemore, as attorney for the council. Alma was 
made a voting precinct April 3, 1867. At the January session a safe 
was voted for the county treasurer, the cost not to exceed $300. But 
the amount was increased in April. 

July 9,^1868,. a new voting precinct was formed of the west part of 
Wilmington township to be called Rock creek. 

July 13, the body of an unknown man was found in the river at 
Wabaunsee. 



Items From the Press- -and Other 

Sources. 



1869. 

First newspaper published: The Ileiald, by Sellers & Bertram. 
First number issued April 1st, 1869. At that time Alma contained 
four houses, besides a frame shanty used by F. C. Simon for a black- 
smith shop, and a log shanty where Winkler's hotel was built. The 
houses were the Kaufman building (the court house), Schmitz & 
Meyer's store, Winkler's Hotel, and Dierker's boarding house. 

From the Herald we learn: 

That Alma boasted of the largest school house in the county, with 
patent seats and capable of seating sixty persons. 

That R. M. Tunnell and S. R. Weed were appointed teachers' ex- 
aminers. 

That Bliss the photographer would be in Alma for a week. 

That Volney Love would auction sales. * 

That the following postmasters were appointed on the new mail 
line to Burlingame: John Hess, Bismark; E. H. Sanford at Finn City 
(Upper Canada), and John Shaw at Harveyville. 

That Carl Braun opened the first barber shop in Alma in August. 

That the Sioux and Cheyennes killed seven men and took three 
women prisoners on the Saline River, 20 miles north of Ellsworth. 

That a ferry had been established at St. Marys in July. 

That on June 3d the Wamego ferry was reported in good condi- 
tion to transfer teams when the boat wasn't leaking or the wind 
didn't blow, or the water wasn't too high or too low, or it didn't 
freeze, snow, or rain, or you didn't call too early or too late, or the 
ferryman isn't up in town. At all other times you could cross. 



324 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

That the ferry boat at Manhattan was sunk in a gale in April, and 
that the editors of the Herald objected to the wind blowing on Wed- 
nesday's and preventing crossing on the ferry boat — thus depriving 
the editor of the news. 

The Herald of April 15th advised the people to cease paying a dol- 
lar a gallon for molasses and plant sorghum. With four cane mills 
running there should be no fears as to getting the cane made up. 

Among the incidents recorded in the Herald was one of a man who 
had poured oil into his ear to cure a bad case of sore throat. 

The Alma Debating society was organized August 11th— Henry 
Schmitz was elected Chairman, and N. H. Whittemore secretary. 

The first house in (the Old Town) Eskridge was built by Col. San- 
ford, Robt, Haslett and John Cousins doing the stone work. 

July 10th the Alma Concordia gave a dance in Adolph Zeckser's 
new house, the Alma String band being in attendance. 

In April a man from Lyon county brought a grist to Pauly's mill — 
having taken 335 pounds of wheat to a local mill and getting but 90 
pounds of flour— and the sacks, concluded to make a change. He ap- 
peared well pleased at the result of his trip. 

We also learn that Dr. L. P. Weaver was appointed postmaster at 
Wabaunsee in place of G. G. Hall, resigned (on account of the moving 
of the county seat to Alma), and that John Winkler had found a good 
salt spring ten miles below Alma on the reserve. 

That a party of buffalo hunters passed through Alma, December 7. 

That District No. 4 had completed a new stone school house and 
that Mrs. G. W. Gillis would teach the school. 

That J. M. Johnson of Dragoon creek had called and reported 91 
bushels of corn to the acre. 

Losses from prairie tires In all parts of the county reported and 
that Alma was saved only by the most stenuous exertions of the citi- 
zens under the leadership of G. Zwanziger— fighting the Are until 
1 o'clock a. m. 

That Charlie Fields, a boy eleven years of age, with his little dog, 
while out in the woods on Dragoon creek, killed, with a spade, one of 
the largest wildcats ever seen in the county. 



I 



1870. 

Andreas Thowc celebrated the New Year by .shooting a hole 
through the palm of his hand while handling a revolver. 

The following persons took claims in Rock creek township: John 
Ilogue, Horace Paul, F. Hecke, M. K. Ander.son, Ben Riggs, Wm. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 325 



Brewer, Charles Cross, W. G. Long, Creed Clement, W. H. Harrison, 
Henry Haas, and H. Slocumb. 

The Herald agitates the question of a daily mail for Alma. 

Mr. Pauly built a new residence near the mill; the Lutheran par- 
sonage was completed in March, and Father Remele raised $400 
towards building a Catholic church. 

P. L. Woody 's arrival is reported in the items from "Jaketown," 
March 10th, and the same month Wm. M. Rinehart bought Charlie 
McCormick's claim, near Eskridge, for $300. 

On March 29th, Mr. Half-day was brought before Squire Lange, in 
Alma, and fined ten dollars for beating his mother-in-law, Mrs. Wa- 
wa-qua. 

The Pittsburg colony arrived in Alma May 11th. 

Messrs. Moore & Thomson, attorneys, inserted card in Herald. 
Mr. Thomson graduated from the Chicago University in 1867. (Judge 
Thomson was the "avant courier" of the firm. Renting an office, he 
went to Burlingame, and while there concluded to locate there 
instead of in Alma. Mr. Moore died in the East before his partner 
became settled in the new country). 

The Kaw reserve was opened to settlement this year, and Wm. 
Exon reports 30 families located in his school district (23). 

Newbury was settled by a colony of Ohioans in April. The town 
was laid out by Dan. Home, Bartling, Kellam, and Lakin, of Topeka, 
and Col. Phillips, of Wabaunsee county. The Santa Fe owned half 
interest in the town. In June, there were eleven houses in the town 
and two or three families in each house. There were two stores, one 
hotel, and a blacksmith shop. 

Goldstandt & Cohen, who had run the Winkler hotel one year, 
left June 1st for the new town. 

The Alma Cemetery was laid out in May. 

Sunday, January 16, was the most sudden change ever known in 
the country. 

200 Arapahoes killed several settlers on Big creek, near Fort Hays, 
in February. 

John Bisbey's stable burned April 13th. 

Allen Phillips' hay and stables burned by prairie fire, Sunday, 
April 24th. 

May 24th, Mr. Ressler killed a large rattlesnake in Pauly's timber 
that had swallowed two rabbits and was trying to swallow another. 
Sheriff Herrick brought in a large badger from the Pottawatomie 
reserve. 

The Herald of April 7tli .said that H. D. Shepard would put in a 
large new store at Wilmington, and that Dr. Wilkerson had erected 
a new store building, and that Dr. Easter was preparing to build 



326 EARLY IIISTOllY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

jinother, Penfield & Son, and James Cripps & Co. had opened stores, 
and ITenry Burns, a blacksmith shop, and that J. and H. McPherson, 
builders, liad all they could do. 

Sunday, June -Ith, Abe Johnson, a young man working for I. H. 
Isbell was drowned while bathing in the Kaw river at "Wabaunsee. 

Wilmington township was divided into three precincts in April: 
Dragoon, Elm creek and Rock creek. 

Postoffices established at Newbury and Grant, J. W. Mossman, 
postmaster. Grant, and P. H. Moser, Newbury. 

August 18th, Soza— Ne-Ma-Acan advertises for lost note for $100. 

November 1st, Seymore's house on Snokomo burned. 

Dr. L. P. Weaver, on a trip to Denver writes, October 12th, of 
seeing herds of buffalo from the car window and that they were very 
tame, one rolling over twice within 15 rods of the train. 

In item in the Herald from the Topeka Commonwealth, says of 
Wichita: "It is located at the junction of the Big and Little Arkan- 
sas rivers and will probably be the point where the A. T. & S. F. will 
cro.ss the Arkansas. It has grown quite rapidly the past season and is 
a place of considerable trade. AVilliam Grifenstein, alias "Dutch 
Bill," a son-in-law of Chief Abram Burnett, of the Pottawatomies, 
called on us yesterday and reported progress of the town. He has 
recently located there and is doing an extensive trade with settlers in 
that locality. There is a large amount of land in that vicinity open 
to pre-emption and there will be more when the treaty with the 
Osages is ratified. The military road to Fort Sill and Fort Arbuckle 
runs through the town. Mr. Grifenstein will start several teams 
loaded with goods for his store in a few days. Glad to hear of Mr. 
Grifenstein 's success." 



1871. 

January 11th, Cummings boys killed catamount between mouth 
of Hendricks creek and Pok-Tah's. 

March 25th, Court House Building association formed; W. T. 
Aderhold, chairman, Joseph Treu, secretary, and S. fl. Fairfield, 
treasurer. Other members of committee: Henry Schmitz, Ed. Krapp, 
Robert Fix, Charles Lehmberg, Peter Thoes, L. Pauly, J. P. Gleich, 
and A. Schevve. Contract let to build court house: Stone work to 
Fred- Link for $2,157; carpenter work to Fritz Vollmer at $2,200, and 
the plastering to George Bender at $600. 

Mr. Ilower's house on Kuenzli creek burned first week in May. 

May 21st, a son of Mr. L. Wendland, 11 years old, drowned while 
in swimming. 



EARLY niSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 327 



May 25th, 200 Indians from Nebraska passed through Alma on a 
visit to the Kaws, near Council Grove. 

June 26th, the nine year old son of J. F. Willard, near Wabaunsee, 
died from the bite of a rattlesnake. 

June 24th, George Colgrove and another horse thief shot by 
Sheriff ITerrick and the sheriff of Dickinson county at a farm house 
in Mill creek township while resisting arrest. Slept with Will Her- 
rick in same room with his father. Escaped night of July 5th. 

July 27th, Schmitz & Meyer had over four tons of butter in cellar. 

August 4th, a German named Speckman, 60 years old, drowned in 
Mill creek, four miles above Alma. 

September 20th, August Weber's coat pocket caught in tumbling- 
rod of threshing machine. Arm, with shoulder blade torn out. 
Wound dressed by Dr. Brasche and fully recovered. 

October 12th, Thomas Barker, Mission creek, lost 200 tons of hay 
by prairie tire. 

October 19tli, body of man found in Mill creek, near Aderhold 
crossing, by L. M. LaDuke. Had been murdered. Pockets turned 
inside out. Had T. S. W. on arm: age 35 or 40; sandy complexion. 

In October, two men named Anderson were caught in prairie fire 
between Manhattan and Zeandale. One was burned to death and the 
recovery of the other doubtful. 

New school house built in Dist. No. 5: also in No. 11. 

November 4th, body of Melancthon In man found dead on bank of 
river, four miles below Wamego. Had died October 11th. Was a 
trapper. John Mock held inquest. 

Mr. Henry Klein killed deer weighing 160 pounds on Klein farm 
on East branch of Mill creek. 

Postofflce at Maple Hill established, John Winkler, postmaster. 
Office supplied from Newbury. 

November 14th, eleven men started from Harvcyville on a buffalo 
hunt. Saw only a few old Buffalo and barely escaped freezing. jNec- 
essary to keep constantly on the move. 

December 23d, contract let for building the bridge over Kansas 
river at Wamego. 

December 2.'^d, a young man named Samuel Walker killed by acci- 
dental discharge of gun. 

December 26th, Smith Kelsey's house at Wabaunsee burned. 



1872. 

January. Stabbing affray on Snokomo— Keeler and Ferrin— over a 
claim. 



328 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Smallpox in Berlin settlement (Tcmplin), Alma, and on East 
branch of Mill creek. Among those dying of smallpox was N. H. 
Whittemore, county attorney. John T. Keagy was appointed by 
Judge Morton to fill vacancy. 

Tuesday night, January 23d, J. M. Matheny stepped out of west 
door of State house, falling 20 feet, breaking left thigh and receiving 
serious injuries in head. 

New courthouse occupied last week in March. St. Marys bridge 
completed in February and Wamego bridge, in June. 

Flock of turkeys ranged in Pauly's timber. Ed. Hcrrick and Dr. 
Wharry brought in one weighing 16 lbs. 

In April, while U. O. Kinne was with his father in the timber on 
Mulberry creek a black bear rose on his liaunches and after a few 
growls ambled across the prairie in a northwest direction. Mr. Kinne 
says he wasn't hunting for bear that day. Hadn't even a pocket 
knife and wasn't liungry for bear, anyway. 

A five year old son of Mr. J. H. Smale died of a chill in the school 
room— Dist. 30, in March. 

March 9th, Alfred Rod, while hunting ducks in Kansas river near 
mouth of Mill creek, shot accidentally by companion. 

March 26th, Rosa, a little daughter of Martin Muckenthalcr, of 
Newbury, burned by clothes catching from tire in yard. Lived until 
the following day. 

April 8th, a 13 year old daughter of Philip Lltz drowned in Mill 
creek. Found by Ferdinand Schmanke three miles above Alma. 

April 14th, whirlwind on Nehring branch hurled cow 20 feet, 
striking against stone wall and breaking her neck. 

During the prevalence of smallpox P. F. Johnson made arrange- 
ments with Drs. Brasche and Wharry to vaccinate all who desired it 
free. Dr. Weaver, of Wabaunsee, vaccinated 466 persons during the 
scare. 

Mrs. Catherine Greemore (nee Bourassa), an historical character 
favorably known to every traveler across the reserve by reason of her 
many kind acts, died March 17th. 



1873. 

Robert Shaw operated the first woolen mill in the county— on the 
head of Mission-creek. Mr. Herb Shaw peddled the product of the 
mills through the adjacent territory in a two-horse wagon. 

In February, John Schwanke was appointed postmaster at Moltke 
(Cobb); Henry (jrlmm, at Grimm postolllce, and Charles Lehmberg, at 
Berlin (Templln). 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN, 329 



J. W. McCoinb killed large catamount within a rod of his house, 
on Mission creek, in May. 

Lincoln house, in Alma, opened by T. R. McElroy, in September. 

Among the many losses from prairie fires this year was the resi- 
dence of Judge Hall, at Wabaunsee, burned Friday night, November 
14th. Loss 84,000, including 60 tons hay, 300 bushels corn, 1,800 lbs. 
cheese, and 6 fat hogs. Also, Geo. S. Burt's stables, grain, etc. Mr. 
Finn, near Eskridge, lost hay and stables. Kuenzli and Nicely, a 
large amount of hay. Much property destroyed on Rock creek. H. J. 
Loomis, W. H. Coleman, and James McMahan, each lost everything 
except dwelling. 



1874. 

Catholic church erected. No resident priest until 1880. Supplied 
by Jesuit fathers from St. Marys. Then Fr: Hundhau.sen until 1891; 
Fr. Hohe until 1892; Fr. Bollwig until 1895; Fr. Cihal, August, 1895, 
until March, 1896; then Fr. Kamp— the present incumbent. 

Sylvester Kraemer, on Rock creek, killed six deer during the 
heavy snows in January. 

John S. Buchanan was appointed postmaster at Wilmington in 
May. I. L. French, at French Valley, in August, and Geo. W. Moore, 
at Maple Hill, the same month. 

In July, stages left Alma for Wamego, daily; for Silver Lake, 
twice each week, Tuesdays and Fridays; for Americus and Council 
Grove, every Wednesday, and for Burlingame and Topeka, every 
Friday. 

In October, 500 Otoe Indians left their reservation in Southern 
Nebraska, to join the Osages, who were reported going on the war- 
path. A runner overtook the band at Marysville and induced about 
half of tlio warriors to return to the reservation. The remainder got 
as far as Wamego vvhen they were intercepted by troops sent out from 
Fort Riley, where the chiefs and head men were imprisoned. About 
200 went into camp three miles northeast of Wamego, alarming the 
settlers by their presence in the vicinity of their homes. 

On a trip from Alma to Wamego, in December, a large gray wolf 
followed the hack several miles. Quite a number of shots were fired 
before his wolfship changed his course. 

During December of this year the first tire department in Alma 
was organized. John Gibson was mayor. 

This is known in Kansas Annals as the "grasshopper year." The 
gras.shoppers (or locusts) came in myriads, obscuring the sun, and in a 
few short liours transformed a land teeming with plenty into a desert 



330 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

waste. A truthful story would savor of Muncliausonisni and tlie 
narrator be set down as unworthy of belief. They devoured every 
green tiling, even to the leaves of the trees and their excrement falling; 
into the streams poi.soned the tlsh. Many cattle died from druikiiiK 
the water and others were fatally poisoned by eating the remains of 
the fodder shocks on which they had aliglited and partly devoured. 
Melons were eaten to the core and the vines destroyed. A patch of 
turnips was but as a luncheon, the insects burrowing into the cham- 
bers hollowed out by their mandibles. There had been a dearth of 
moisture and between drouth and the grasshoppers the settlers were 
ground as between the upper and nether millstones. Millions of holes 
were bored in the ground, wherein myriads of eggs were deposited, 
and when the warm sunshine of spring came, from every egg was 
hatched a grasshopper. To destroy the insects many plans were 
devised but little was accomplisiied. Tliey had come as unbidden 
guests and the plagued pests had seemingly settled down for another 
feast when their wings were unfolded and they departed— as uncer- 
emoniously as they had come, and, it is lioped, to a place where grass- 
hoppers' visits are more welccaue than fn Kansas. 



1875. 

'J'he News of January 6th, said: Three more days of pleasant 
weather will place the Alma Salt Works in full blast. 

School opened in the new stone building, January 18th. 

On Januaiy 20th, fires were started under 25 huge kettles at the 
Salt Works. The owners were: John Winkler, Joseph Treu, Ilcnry 
Schmitz, August Meyer, G. Zwanziger, and Frank Rickershauser. 
The News says: "The town is happy, the community is happy, tiiat 
there is a permanent manufacturing enterprise in our midst that will 
be a source of revenue for all time to come." Hundreds of cords of 
wood, covering several acres of ground were piled near the works. 
Salt was sold at two dollars a barrel. 

The News of March nth, contained this item: "It is reported 
that a spring trap went off at a smoke house door on the East brancli 
of Mill creek one night last week and that a certain man has been 
sick in bed ever since." The smoke house belonged to Ed. Krapp, and 
the man— died. 

April 2()th, George Boydston had an eye knocked out by boys 
throwing stones. 

On the night of March Kith, an attempt was made to burn tlie 
bank but was frustrated by Harry Licht. The tire was among a lot of 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 331 



rubbish and a barrel of coal oil and three kegs of powder were already 
in the blaze. 

The News of May 19th, says: "Prof. M. Kast sends up a grand 
balloon from Winlder's hotel Friday night." 

Snokomo P. O. established in June, G. S. Kneeland, postmaster. 

Alma made a money order office July 5th, Geo. Fechter, post- 
master. First order issued to John T. Keagy. 

July 4th, John Spiecker's house struck by lightning. Mr. Spiecker 
unconscious for six hours. 

August 24th, stranger from Missouri, while herding sheep near 
west line of county, killed by tree falling on him, while asleep. 

September 23d, Carl Fink thrown from wagon near Wm. Krieg's 
place, crossing of Spring creek. Died from injuries following Sunday. 

October 17th, F. C. Simon had leg broken in two places while 
hitching up young horse to light wagon. 

October 20th, Gus Droege reports to News raised 120 bushels corn 

to acre by actual measurement, A. Kettermann reports 800 bushels 
on six acres. 

October. Mrs. Woods, of Rock creek, narrowly escaped death from 
bite of tarantula. 

December 6th, Mr. Buttenhoff, of Spring creek, killed near Bias- 
ing's, on Deep craek, by team running away. Was coming home from 
Manhattan with load of lumber. 

News, December 8th: "The beavers are building a dam on Mill 
creek, near east line of Henry Schmitz' new farm. Their work is a 
curiosity. Large cottonwoods are cut and thrown into the stream 
with as much precision as though felled by the most expert axemen. 
Brush an'd mud are laid upon the logs and their work is well secured. 
They have already raised the water two feet." 

Mails in 1875: Left Alma for Pavilion, Wabaunsee, and Waniego, 
daily. Left Alma for Newbury, Maple Hill, Plowboy, and Silver 
Lake, twice a week. Left Alma for Bismark, Eskridge, Harveyville, 
and Burlingame, weekly. Left Alma for Grimm, Templin, Moss 
Springs, Munson, and Council Grove, weekly. Left Alma for Rockton, 
Grant, Dover, and Topeka, weekly. Left Alma for Cobb, Chalk 
Mound, Agnes City, Dow creek, and Americus, weekly. Left Esk- 
ridge for Clialk Mound and Council Grove, weekly. Left Eskridge for 
French Valley, Waushara, and Emporia, weekly. Left Eskridge tor 
Harveyville and Burlingame, weekly. Left Eskridge for Bismark and 
Alma, weekly. 



332 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



1876. 

February 2d, Ed. Colchcr, age 17, killed in front of school house at 
Newbury by l)cin<i thrown from horse, breakinf? his neck. Horse 
scared by two dogs lighting. 

June 24th, Miss McGregor, of Mission creek, killed by being 
thrown under horses feet while driving a two-horse wagon. 

The sixth annual fair of the Wabaunsee County Agricultural 
association was held at Alma, October 3-4. 

In April, a daughter of Wm. Wiley, of Wabaunsee, died of a 
snake bite inflicted in 1872. 

W. M. Rinehart started store at Corners in tlie spring of 1870. 

At the October term of court W. A. Fry was convicted of maim- 
ing in the fourth degree. Escaped from Sheriff Iloskinson. (Sec 
page 108). 

December Lst, Mrs. Schroeder, of Farmer township, fell dead 
while milking. 



1877. 

In February, Rocky Ford postofflce established, M. W. Janes, 
postmaster. 

Friday night, March 2d, type in News office pied. In the fall 
campaign controversy through the columns of the only newspaper 
were long and bitter — communications from two to six columns in 
length were frequent. The Farmer's Savings bank was a bone of 
contention, it being urged that a levy of an extra mill had been made 
to secure a surplus for the bank. 

Tower to Catholic church erected in March. Rev. Frank R. 
Smith moved into M. E. parsonage in September. 

Bourn's sawmill in Watson's timber, one and one-half miles south- 
west of Alma. 

Item in the News, March 28th: "As Mr. J. W. Emerson was on 
the road to Wamego one day last week, about two miles west of AVa- 
baunsee a large gray wolf suddenly appeared by the side of the wagon 
and attacked his large shepherd dog, which was saved only by the 
interference of Mr. Emerson. Those having little children should be 
careful not to let them wander from the house, alone." 

Stone school house at Harvey ville built, size 31x43. 

J. M. Lingfelter, at April session, was appointed county superin- 
tendent to fill vacancy caused by resignation of F. W. Krocnke. 

Cheese factory opened at Wabaunsee in May. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 333 



W. T. Pollock opened a store in Col. Sanford's building, -at Esk- 
ridge, in October. 

Tuesday, July 3d, Marvin, a son of Capt. R. J. Stephenson, was 
killed by lightning in Maple Hill township while crossing the prairie 
on horseback. His brother, a mile away, was also stunned, and a son 
of Mr. Fauerbach was shocked by lightning. 

While pulling a gun out of a wagon muzzle foremost Arthur Rand 
received gunshot wound in arm. Saturday, November 3d, limb ampu- 
tated by Drs. Patee and Splllman, of Manhattan. 



1878. 

January 30th, a large wildcat killed by J. W. Bowman on Pretty 
creek. 

Mr. Brooks, of Mission creek, erects windmill to grind grain, in 
January. 

D. P. Matthews, of Maple Hill, died of heart disease while eating 
breakfast. Left large family; two daughters taught school. 

Lutheran and M. E. churches built. Also, Waushara M. E. 
church. 

March 9th, Harvey Thomson's residence on Hendrick's creek 
burned. 

March 31st, Mrs. Bertram Klein, of Halifax, died of heart disease 
while sitting in her chair. 

Buildings being scarce at the "Corners" W. M. Rinehart rented a 
part of the room occupied by his store to Ira Hodgson for a harness 
and shoe shop. The two departments were separated by a chalk mark 
on the floor. 

June 30th, W. W. Cone reported a hog raised by D. C. Keeler, of 
Mission creek, weighing 900 pounds, measuring 7 feet 3 inches long; 
height, 3 feet 1 inch: breadth, through .shoulders, 25 inches; circum- 
ference, 7 feet. 

While passing under a sycamore tree at the Moon crossing of 
Mission creek, on Sunday, June 30th, at 4 p. m., Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Phillips were killed by lightning. The team was uninjured and 
stopped in front of Mr. Moon's house, a quarter of a mile west 
of the creek. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips were returning to their home 
(the Godard ranch) from a visit to his son, L. M. Phillips, of North 
Topeka. Some time previous Mr. Phillips had expres.sed the belief 
that he and his wife would die suddenly and at the same time. Mr. 
Phillips was one of the fir.st settlers in Newbury township and was 
one of the five men who laid out the town of Newbury. Was a lead- 



334 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

inp citizen, and owned one of tlie best farms in the county, being 
extensively en^jaged in raising wheat. 

On February 7th, the following were enrolled In the principal's 
department of the Alma school (two teachers were employed): Otto 
Zwanziger, Ottllie and Arthur Schmitz, Otto Hess. Willie and Minnie 
Pauly, Charles, Jerry, James, Sell, and Ulysses Fields, Emma and 
Richard Thoes, Margery, Lizzie, and John McElroy, Geo. Fechter, 
Amelia, Robert, Arthur, and Otto Winkler, Frank Lenk, Frank 
Jackson, Emil Bcutel, George and Willie Huebner, Rosa, Maggie, and 
Frank Ressler, Josie, Ida, and Frank Wiedemann, Matilda and Henry 
Palenske, and Joseph Hensel. 



1879. 

No newspaper file could be found for this year. 

August 2d, 138,700 bonds voted for M. A. & B. Railroad, to run 30 
years from July 1, 1880. 



1880. 

Eskridge (the new town) platted in April and first house hauled 
on the town site by Dr. Trivett and placed on corner where bank now 
located. First residence built by Dr. Trivett, for O. T. Lamb. 

August 4th, Fred Muehlehbacher found dead in timber. Disap- 
peared tlie 3d. Grape vine around neck with body supported by pole. 

January 5th, attempt made to break into vault in county treas- 
urer's office. Hole drilled through outer door, powder poured in and 
exploded. Vault now used by surveyor. 

March 16th, Willie Fortner, Zeandale, while out hunting shot by 
accidental discharge of companion's gun. 

May 23d, M. Gehrts' house burned. 

The News of June 30th says of Eskridge: "J. H. Lawler has opened 
a hotel, and Mudge, a general store. Three or four dwellings erected 
and foundations for others. 

July 5th (the 4th coming on Sunday) was a gala day for Alma. 
5,000 people and 5 bands. Alma was celebrating the 4th and our first 
railroad. Col. Sanford delivered excellent speech concerning the 
growth of transportation facilities in the United States. 

July 18th, railroad reached Wabaunsee. 

Fairfield postofflce established, Hiram Musselman, postmaster. 

July 26th, arrangements made to move buildings at the "Corners" 
to Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 335 



August 25th, S. T. Wright making 20 barrels salt per day at Alma 
Salt Works. 

September 1st, first mail carried on M. A. & B. 

September 17th, William Hare, brakeman on M. A. & B., got foot 
caught in switch at Alma depot and two wheels ran over leg, necessi- 
tating amputation. Accident occurred Friday morning and operation 
performed at 5 p. m. Died during operation. 



1881. 

In 1881, contracts were let to run mall lines from Alma by way of 
Newbury, Paxico, Maple Hill, Post creek, Plowboy, and Valencia, to 
Topeka. From Alma via Grimm, Templln, Albion, Chester, Damorris, 
and Luther, to Council Grove. From Junction City via Briggs and 
Elvenia, to Alma. From Waushara via Wilmington, to Burlingame. 
From Eskridge via Chalk and Alburtis, to Council Grove. From Esk- 
ridge via French Valley, Allen, Ivy, and Dell, to Emporia. From 
Blsmagnk (Halifax) via Rockton, Snokomo, Mission creek, Keene, and 
Dover, to Topeka. 

January 7th, Charlie Vannatta had left leg shattered by acciden- 
tal discharge of shotgun. Died Tuesday following. 

January 14th, Bennington Ayres, Wabaunsee, commits suicide. 

February 14th, Alexander Chambers, teamster for the "Colony" 
(Rock creek) found frozen on prairie. 

September 1st, Newt Gann killed by lightning while riding a mule 
and leading some horses, six miles northwest of Alma. 

September 8th, German, named Hestel dropped dead while plow- 
ing in field on Kuenzli creek. 

September 27th, first big fire In Alma. Krueger building burned 
at noon. Supposed cause: Boys and matches. G. G. Cornell lost 
library of 1,000 volumes, family souvenirs and valuable manuscript. 
Dr. Greene lost library. Fred Meyer and Mrs. Sawallisch lost every- 
thing. 

October 5th, Matt. Fooks kills George Miller on Spring creek. 
(See page 162). 

November, foundation for Congregational church In Alma put in 
—for stone building. 

Mr. S. T. Wright reports making 25 to 30 barrels purest salt per 
day at Alma Salt Works. 



33(3 EARLY niSTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



1882. 

January 20th, suicide of G. W. Adam— sliotgun. 

April 5th, Charles McQuarrie shot Armenia Lapham and himself 
at the Lapham farm, Wabaunsee. 

April 14th, Mrs. Semena Cann's body found in Farmer township, 
200 yards from house, in hazel brush. Last seen about March 6th. 

A. Ketterman found pieces of lead as large as peas in sand pump 
while drilling well one and one-half miles south of Alma. 

March 31st, Francis Downey kicked to death by horse. Thrown 
and caught foot in harness. 

May 14th, Evangelical church dedicated. 

August 17th, Congregational church and cemetery at Maple Hill 
dedicated. 



1883. 

Annie, the two year old daughter of W. E. Richey, fell from south 
end of west porch at State house. Fell 20 feet. 

April 13th, buildings at Meyer place, used for poor farm, demol- 
ished by cyclone. 

April 13th, Daniel McGonigle, Kaw, killed by lightning. 

April 14th, the five year old son of C. Kobiske died from hydro- 
phobia. 

June, Fred Meyer feeding 30,000 silk worms on leaves of the Osage 
orange. 

October, Copp erected telephone line from store to his house. 

Nov. 8th, W. H. Earl's house burned near Eskridge; loss, $2,000. 

December 17th, F. L. Raymond's house at Vera damaged $300 by 
fire. 



1884. 

May 6th, a small cyclone demoll.shed house occupied by J. Liston 
and family, Maple Hill. Family had just left the house. 

52 buildings erected in Alma during the year. 

The News of May 21st said that the number of plug hats seen on 
the streets was another evidence of Alma's advancement towards 
metropolitan importance. 

June 13th, corner stone of Catholic church at Newbury laid. 

July 23d, Wm. Maike fell 26 feet, receiving severe injuries to spine 
while building Newloury church. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 337 



October Iflth, Greenwood's barn, Kaw township, burned. 

October 2Tth, remains of Charles Koch found by John Bingaman, 
half mile north of Hendricks creek crossing. Identified by clothing; 
last seen April 18th. 

November 1st, Licht & Lingfelter put in telephone from their 
land office to court house. 

November 9th, Frank McKee, 15 year old son of Henry McKee, 
near Eskridge, killed by accidental discharge of gun. 

November 15th. August Kietzmann, Sr., dropped dead in his yard. 

November 16th, George D. Godard accidentally killed by gun 
being drawn through fence. 



1886. 

January 25th, M. E. church, at Wabaunsee, dedicated. 

March, Rockton postofflce established; Agnes Hill, postmistress. 

March 10th, R. B. Spillman appointed judge. 

March 28th, A. O. Hogbin's barn and six liorses burned. 

May 25th, James Sparks died at Star hotel (opposite Mrs. Meyer's) 
from overdose of laudanum. 

June 22^, Ham Stone's house. Maple Hill, burned by lamp up- 
setting. 

July 18th, fire in rear of F. C. Simon's store— loss $1,000. 

August 17th, stone barn of W. S. Combs, Kaw, burned— horses and 
machinery. 

September 12th, John Ewing, on A. Norlin's place died of kick 
from a horse. 

October 2d, Geo. Holmes' barn, three horses burned. 

November 8th, wildcat killed three miles south of Alma. 

November 15th, Arthur Haller killed by accidental discharge of 
gun. 

November, postoffice at Elvenia discontinued. 

December 13th, Dura Warren's residence. Maple Hill, burned. 
Loss $7,000. 



1886. 

January 9th, Lewis Clark's house, Snokomo, bnrned. 
February 13th, M. W. Janes' barn burned, Maple Hill, loss $7,000. 
June 3d, John Clark's barn, Elm creek, burned, loss $6,000. 
June 26th, young man named Krieger killed by lightning on Pretty 
creek. While plowing took shelter in vacant house. 



338 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

July nth, Rock Island bonds voted. In four townships 690 for 
and 29 against. 

August 20th, A. Stech's house, near Paxico, burned. 

August 29th, the 14 year old son of B. F. Funkhouser, Mission 
creek, drowned while bathing. 

August 30th, Arthur Hare, eight years old, drowned while bathing 
In Mill creek at Alma. 

October 19th, barn on Fowler's ranch burned by lamp explosion— 
15 horses— loss $10,000. 

Pike laid out by W. D. Deans in October. Name changed to 
Cable City, and in March, 1887 to Alta Vista. 

Paxico laid out and named in December. 



1887. 

March 8th, Allen Hodgson's house, near Harvey ville, burned. 

March 21st, Fred Jackson's house, Snokomo, burned. 

March 25th, Rock Island reaches Alma. 

March 26th, Timothy McCarthy killed by James Sleet on Rock 
Island grade, near Templin. 

May, McFarland laid out and platted. 

June 19th, H. J. Pippert's barn, Alma, burned. 

August 18th, Mrs. Milton Riggin, near Wilmington, killed by 
lightning. 

August 25th, M. Gehrt's house, Paxico, burned. 

September 24th, Mrs. Bruegger's house. West Alma, burned. 

October 10th, Matt Thomson's barn. Alma, burned. 

November, Congregational parsonage completed. 

December 12th, Brandt hotel opened. 

Wamego bridge made free April 12th. 

July 31st, August Herman drowned near M. A. & B. bridge. 

October 7th, Jack O'Donnell run over and killed by cars at Rock 
Island depot. 

St. Marys bridge made free October 20th. 

November 15th, D. K. Pugh thrown off abutment of Rock Island 
bridge, west of Maple Hill. Lived five minutes; fell 22 feet. 

November 5th, Frank Rice, brakeman, killed at Paxico. 



1888. 

January 16th, J. F. Limerick and ten others injured in wreck on 
Rock Island, one mile west of Willard. Two sleepers derailed. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 339 

February 19th, ten freight cars fell through Deep creek bridge. 
Millard Foster, fireman, killed. 

March 4th, Anthony Saddler killed at McFarland In attempting 
to board moving freight train. 

April 11th, James Woods' child, Rock creek, drowned in spring. 

April 13th, Alma postofflce burglarized and safe blown open. 

April 21st, 13 year old son of T. C. Austin died from kick of mule. 

August 3d, Jersey Small's residence, Maple Hill township, de- 
stroyed by lightning; loss $10,000. 

August 3d, Watson & Aderhold's store at McFarland demolished 
in wind storm. 

September 15th, Herman Oehms, 11 years old, badly crippled at 
Paxico while attempting to cross the track in front of incoming train. 

October 3d, 100 Pottawatomie Indians passed through Alma going 
on a visit with friends in Indian Territory. 

November 3d, J. E. Torrlngton, of Topeka, while hunting near 
Maple Hill, had nearly all flesh torn from lower part of arm while 
pulling loaded gun from wagon. 

November 9th, 75 head of cattle killed in M. A. & B. wreck near 
Pavilion. 

November 19th, H. P. Jesse^ a brakeman, killed while coupling 
cars at Maple Hill. 



1889. 

January 23d, Bank of Wabaunsee county failed with $20,000 lia- 
bilities. 

February 14th, James Nelson, Mission creek, suicides. Had deeded 
his property to his wife. She died, leaving the property to her sisters 
in Sweden. A refusal of one of the sisters to marry Nelson was fol- 
lowed by the tragedy near Eskridge. 

February 22d, a vein of coal 3 feet 8 Inches thick reported at a 
depth of 1,680 feet at Alma coal hole. 

March, first term of court 35th judicial district, Wm. Thomson, 
judge; C. E. Carroll, stenographer. 

April 4th, C. L. Hine, while working in a box car at McFarland, 
killed by pistol shot fired by Chas. E. Jackson from near Denver house, 
150 yards distant. 

April 1st, J. H. Lynn's barn and two horses burned In prairie fire 

near Paxico. 

April 14th, unknown man suicides at Hotel Paxico. 

April 7th, Willetts' barn burned— 17 horses. 

May 8th, C. Kuenzll's barn burned by lightning; loss $1,000. 



340 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

July, Vera postofflce established— at "Grafton." 

June 24th, Alma State Bank opened for business. 

.July 18th, Adam Dichl's two year old child drowned in hole of 
water at Paxico. 

July 28th, seven tribes participate in Indian dances near St. Marys. 

Septen)ber 2d, Robert Walter run over by freight train and killed 
—midnight. 

October 26th, 14 cars derailed by cow on track on Frank Rlcker- 
shauser's farm, near Paxico. 

October, Conrad Mogge throvt'n from cart in crossing ditch and 
killed. 

November 2d, cornerstone of M. E. church, Alta Vista, laid. 

November 3d, E. Worsley's barn and three horses burned. Maple 
Hill. Boys shooting pigeons. 

December 2d, Billy Moore's house, Alma, burned. 

December, panther seen on Hendricks creek. Welfelt boys cap- 
ture 25 beaver before Christmas. Muskrats, mink, and skunks by the 
score. 



1890. 

January 6th, Stephen Perkins, the village blacksmith at Halifax, 
dies suddenly. When found was sitting at stove with half tilled pipe 
in his hand. 

January 3d, John Zellers house, barn, and granary, Paxico, burned. 

January I2th, Palenske building and Wetzel property (Conrad 
Mueller's) burned. Los.ses: L. Palenske, $6,500; C. Mueller, $2,500:11. 
M. Berry, $1,000; D. W. Johnson, $1,000; M. Kast, $500; Masonic Lodge, 
$300; T. Morris, $250; Alma State Bank, $200; Henry Stein, $150. 

January 12th, McNemar's store at Fairfield burned. Postoftice 
in building. 

March 13th, William Crockett and Frank Leggitt killed at coal 
shaft. 

March 15th, Wm. Ilolvey knocked from scaffold and killed while 
cleaning ice from coal shaft. 

March 29th, Jacob S. Crohn knocked off of blind baggage and run 
over by train at McFarland. Raked. by brake rods. Died in Alma, 
April 3d. 

German M. E. church on Rock creek erected. Also Lutheran 
church and school house, in Alma. 

March 12th, big fire at Eskridge; burning all buildings on west 
side, between Mudge's and Trusler's. Loss $25,000. E. L. Shumate & 
Son, W. II. Mills, J. W. Taylor, and Parmiter & Co., being main losers. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. ANTON SCHEWE, Farmer Township. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. FRED THOWE, Farmer Township. 



EARLV HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



ff t 




111 I If rii 

lis ESiS^ » . 




RESIDENCE OF MR. JACOB TERRASS, Farmer Township. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. AUGUST HANSEN, near McFarland. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




^'"\L:i^'- 



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4 










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RESIDENCE OF MR. OTTO HESS, Halifax. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WILLIAM DREBING, near Halifax. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. FRANK BLANC, Illinois Creek. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. CHAS. ZECKSER, on West Branch. 



EARLY HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. GDS DROESE, Farmer Township. 



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RESIDENCE OF MR. JOSEPH THOES, Farmer Townsliip. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 











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HOME AND FARM BUILDINGS OF MR. FRANK RICKERSHAUSER, near Paxlco. 







j^ Si J? v" lar -^ — 



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RESIDENCE OF MR. CHRISTIAN KUENZLI (deceased.) 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




THRESHING AT THE PALENSKE FARM, NEAR ALMA. 




RESIDENCE OF COL. E. H. SANFORD (deceased). 
The First House in Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 






•saiu,. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. JOHN SCHVVALM, Kuenzli Creek. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. CHRIS THOWE, Farmer Township. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




ALMA ROLLER MILLS, H. F. DI3BR0W, PROPRIETOR. 




SCENE AT DAVIS BROS.' RANCH,11898. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WILLIAM HORNE, Spring Creek. 




RESIDENCE OF THE LATE MR. D. A. WOODARD, Wilmington Townsliip. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 341 



March 23d, a destructive prairie fire passes through Mill creek and 
Newbury townships. 

March 24tli, Warren, Saxton & Offord's barn, Maple Hill, burned. 
Loss $20,000. Ten imported stallions. 

March 30th, A. C. Kuenzli's meat market, Paxico, burned. 

April 7th, A. Kettermann's barn, corn, hay, and wheat burned. 

June 27th, Wm. Baldwin, engineer on Rock Island, knocked from 
step and killed by bridge over Mission creek. 

July 3d, Fowler Bros, largest barn struck by lightning and burned 
in 30 minutes. 

October 6th, Squire Cantrill, Harveyville, shipped hog to Kansas 
City market that weighed 980 pounds. 

July 27th, Henry Michaelis' wheat stacks burned. 

August 22d, Charlie Zwanziger's barn burned. 

September 8th, ten empty cars wrecked at Dan Morlan place on 
M., A. & B. 

October, Thos. Cousins severely cut by corn cutter in runaway. 

November 9th, First National Bank (J. F. Limerick, president) 
suspended. 

December 4th, Pancoast house. Alma, burned. 

December 22d, old Alma hotel, bank building and Allen Bros, store 
burned. 

December 23d, Alliance corn crib, power corn sheller and freight 
car burned at Harveyville. 



1891. 

January 2d, David Crawford fell forty feet off of Santa Fe bridge- 
arm broken. 

January 5th, Goddard's barn, Vera, burned— spontaneous com- 
bustion. 

February 17th, Rocky Ford bridge. Maple Hill, completed. Mc- 
Crumb bridge and Dry Creek bridges completed in March. 

Double arch bridge at Dieball crossing completed. 

Church at Templin dedicated, September 20th. 
• March 1st, Dowell killed Wheaton, near Alta Vista, in dispute 
over rented farm. 

March 17th, the biggest steer on record, the property of L. Pauly, 
died; 7 feet high and weighed 2,600 pounds. Hide weighed 300. 

April 21st, C. C. Brooks drowned while attempting to cross Mis- 
sion creek. 

June 4th, coal chute at McFarland burned. 



342 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

School house at McFarland completed in November, 
Kclvue bridge, cost $8,000, completed December 1st. 
15,000 foreign cattle grazed in Wabaunsee county this year. 
September, L. Iluebner's house, Hendricks creek, burned. 
Peter Lang had both legs broken in runaway, caused by load of 
lumber slipping forward on team while going down hill. 



1892. 

John E. Mayes committed suicide in cemetery at Wabaunsee. 

March 3d, Dr. Gulp escaped from Alma jail by the aid of keys made 
from a piece of broom handle. Run over and killed by cars at Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, May 4th. 

March 30th, Frank Meier's barn, near Halifax, with one cow and 
five horses burned. 

April 4th, stone school house In Dist. 18 demolished by cyclone. 

September 17th, drill for coal at McFarland reached a depth of 
1,700 feet. 

M. E. church at Bradford dedicated. 

October, Liederkranz singing society organized in Alma. 

December, Bates Bros, left Vera. 

50 quarrymen and stone cutters employed at Fox's quarrie.s, four 
miles southwest of Alma. 

July 16th, George Eden, baggagemaster, killed in Indiana. While 
train was backing piece of coupling pin broke and hit George in head. 



1893. 

New addition to court house erected. 

February 11th, Louis Drebing killed a deer near Halifax. 

April 9th, George Berroth's house, midway between Alma and 
Wamego, burned. 

April I8th, Jesse Cahill shot in breast by Ira Johnson at Junction 
City. 

January 8th, remains of Wm. Keeler, killed at Falls City, Ne- 
braska, brought to Alma for burial. 

January 11th, II. G. Richter killed 27 jack rabbits at Templin. 

February 7th, James Carroll injured in wreck on the Big Four, 
near Pana, Illinois. 91 passengers injured and baggageman burned in 
wreck. 

February 13th, Louis Muehlenbacher killed by Hying limb while 
felling a tree. Rendered speechless by wound in liead. 



EARLY HISTORY OP WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN, 343 



February, four members of Tillman family died with measles- 
death resulting from exposure on deck of vessel in New York harbor. 

March, Prairie band of Pottawatomies paid at St. Marys. Each 
received $95.75. 

J. Francis Harris, the long haired man— not from Borneo, but 
from the hills of Michigan, the Black Hills, and other parts of the 
world too numerous to mention, discovers Alma. 

April 18th, fire at Rosenstengel's, near Newbury. 

April 7th, Otto Graf Von Wartensleben died at Wheaton, Texas. 
Son-in-law of Charles Hanson; Count; belonged to one of leading 
German families. Great traveler and showed with much pride invi- 
tations to royal receptions. Had letters of recommendation from 
titled personages in old world. Taught home school in Dist. 18. 

James Lumsden one of 300 cowboys to start from Chadron, Ne- 
braska, July 3d, for World's fair, Chicago. 

October, quite a number of pigs killed by wolves four miles south 
of Alma. 

October loth, three colored men killed in collision at Paxico. 

October 22d, John Sudweeks' residence, Eskridge, burned. 

October 23d, Fred Miller's house, South branch, burned— lamp 
explosion. 

October 28th, Conrad Zehner found dead in his office. 

Sunday. December 10th, Miss May Withgot, Paxico, injured in 
runaway. Died Tuesday. 

December 19th, Franz Meier's house near coal shaft burned. 

June 30th, Mrs. J. M. Eck struck by lightning. 



1894. 

January 11th, S. H. Fairfield's office building, McFarland, burned. 

February 2d, Henry Biesterfeldt badly injured by overturned 
wagon on grade of Belvue bridge. Died October 1, 1897. Constant 
sufferer for nearly four years. 

January 22d, the divorced wife of Ira Johnson dies from symptons 
of poisoning. Died at Charles Wenzel's. 

February 10th, John Johnson killed by falling off stone abutment 
of Rock Island bridge over Hendricks creek. 

March 2d, Jo Davis killed by Hugh Russell at Paxico. Struck in 
back of liead by rock thrown by Russell. 

March 12th, James Enlow's house, Wabaunsee, burned. 

March 17th, Peter Muehlenbacher murdered. (See pages 157-161). 

April 23d, Ad Thompson's house. Mission creek, burned. 

June 13th, Henry, the five year old son of Carl Maike, drowned by 



344 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

falling headlong into a barrel while attempting to feed the pigs. 

July 4tli, Charlie Zwanziger's house, near Alma, burned. Before 
retiring the smell of burning pine caused search for tire but could not 
be located. Mr. John Winkler going home from celebration awakened 
the family. 

July 9th, Connell's blacksmith shop, Paxico, burned. 

August 6th, Oke Anderson, Nehring branch, found dead in stock 
well. 

August 6th, freight train parted between Volland and Alma, 
causing collision at Alma depot. 47 head of cattle killed. 

August 7th, Lillian Smith fell from top to bottom of outside 
stairway, Kaufman building. 

August 8th, Mrs. Matt. Thomson, Alma, while opening shutters 
fell from second story window; severely injured. 

August 10th, Dr. Trivett, J. Y. Waugh, and John Sudweeks in- 
jured in runaway. 

August 14th, James Driver's granary, near Vera, burned. 

October 14th, M. E. church, Kaw township, dedicated. 



1895. 

January, vein of red marble found while digging a well on farm of 
Rev. O. F. Zeckser, Templin. 

Sunday, January 27th, 5 p. m., Commercial House burned— defect- 
ive flue. 

January 30th, Henry N. Castle and wife lost, with 400 passengers, 
on steamer Elbe, between San Francisco and Sandwich Islands. 

February 3d, Scheldt building, owned by C. Wertzberger, burned. 

March 1st, Chas. Zwanziger's house and barn, near Alma, burned. 

March 15th, Stuewe Bros, opened Bank of Alma. 

March 24th, Solscheid building, in Alma, burned. 

April 5th, Biglin school house (Jt. Dist. 30) demolished by cyclone. 
Considerable damage done on Illinois creek. 

July 11th, tri-weekly mail service put on between Alma and Esk- 
ridge on account of washout on M. A. & B., July 4th. 12 inches rain 
fell. 150 men repairing track and building bridges. 

September 14th, Dr. Trivett found body of Simon Griffith in his 
house, near Bradford. Death had resulted from a self-inflicted gun- 
shot wound about six days before. 

September 18th, George Ewing's house, barn, and granary, five 
miles northwest of Alma, burned. 

John Clifford Smith, Maple Hill, accidentally shot while looking 
for some article in a trunk. Died nine hours later. 

October 19th, fire discovered under stairway in Brandt's hotel. 
Timely di.scovery saved building. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 345 



1896. 

January, Joseph Tillman, Newbury, loses four children, measles, 
exposed in N. Y. harbor by quarantine ofiBcer. 

January 5th, Vet Stratton's residence near Alta Vista, burned 
while family were at church. 

February 4th, 2 p. m., Richter building, occupied by Louis 
Schroeder, furniture, and restaurant occupied by Enlow, burned. 

March 12th, three different fires at Cornell's residence in Alma— 
10 a. m., noon and 7 p. m. The fire caught from the thimble through 
the ceiling, extending along the joists to the sides and roof. Only by 
the most strenuous exertions was the building saved. 

March 16th, Daniel Shoecraft, of Eskridge, and young grandson, 
Byron Shoecraft, of St. Joseph. Mo., drowned at Krapp crossing of 
Mill creek. The train being late, Claude Shumate undertook to drive 
them to Eskridge. Mr. Shoecraft sank immediately, but the little 
boy, after drifting 200 yards, caught an overhanging limb. Claude 
secured a rope at Geo. Screiber's ( Lund place ) and threw it three 
times, but Byron failed to catch it. With a parting "good bye" the 
noble little fellow went down in the turbid waters of Mill creek. 
Three hundred searchers came together and at 3 p. m. Sunday the 
bodies were found, about ten feet apart, a quarter of a mile below the 
crossing, Jim Moore found the body of little Byron and but a moment 
later Mr. Shoecraf t's body was found by Elmer Meredith. At the time 
this was the only crossing between Alma and Eskridge without a 
bridge. 

March 16th, Wm. Wehrle, formerly of Halifax, found murdered 
on his claim near Alva, Oklahoma, 

March 19th, Frank Mitchell murdered ( see page 155). 

March 26th, Fred Stein meyer, Sr., had both shoulders dislocated 
in a runaway. 

March 28. Alma purchased her first fire apparatus and 500 feet of 
hose from Junction City for $250. 

April 14th, opera house (lower floor Odd Fellows building) narrowly 
escaped destruction by overturned lamp — flames rose to ceiling. 

April 17th, the James Driver building on East Main St., Alma, 
burned, 3 a. m. 

April 23d, John Mc Williams' residence in Kaw township, burned. 

April 24th, cloudburst on Spring creek, wall of water 10 feet high. 
Geo. Schade lost 24 head of stock and Conrad Mueller 2 head. Herman 
Kesitzke compelled to climb a tree where he remained till the flood 
subsided. 

December 26th, Herman Zeckser, 16 year old son of Aug. Zeckser, 
lost three fingers by gun explosion. 



346 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

On the same day J. M. Lee and Ed. Coxen narrowly escaped drown- 
ing while crossintf Mill creek east of the poor farm. 

May 20th, Jansen's house near Maple Hill, destroyed by a small 
cyclone; also the house of John Gilkerson near Valencia. The funnel- 
sliaped cloud was plainly visible from Maple Hill and Newbury. 

May, Charles Hanson narrowly escaped drowning at the Krieg 
crossing of Spring creek. Team drowned, but Mr. Hansf)n caught 
on a tree. Henry Renter waded as far as he could, then witli 
a long pole succeeded in extricating Mr. Hanson from his perilous 
position. 

June 18th, Isidor Hallcr's corn cribs, with 1,700 bushels corn 
burned. 

July 9th, lames Mullin, aged 21, drowned by Ijank caving in while 
(ishing in Rock creek. 

July 12th, Johnnie Christensen, the 14 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. 
N. H. Christensen, of Alta Vista, thrown from horse, dying two days 
later from injuries received. 

August, Alta Vista camp Sons of Veterans mustered. 

August 23d, Eddie Anderson, Halifax, had heel crushed between 
bumpers while attempting to cross between the cars of a cattle train. 

September 2d, a small building owned by X. Wiedemann in south- 
east part of Alma burned at midnight. 

November 29th, DeWitt Allendorph, wliile out hunting witli Roy 
Hensel was shot by the accidental discharge of his shotgun that lie 
had leaned against an old unused boiler in Mr. Pauly's timber. A 
part of the collar bone and four inches of the arm bone were removed 
by a surgical operation. The best of care and a strong constitution 
insured an early and complete recovery. 



1897. 

January 8th, a 14 year old son of Henry Hupe, Kaw township, 
starting on a hunt slipped on icy porch, discharging contents of shot- 
gun in abdomen. Buried following day. 

January 25th, Rock Island depot. Maple Hill, burned. 

McMahan property, built for Odd Fellows Hall, and Jouvenal 
building burned Saturday night, January 29th. 

February 26th, a brakeman whose home was in Belleville, killed 
at crossing of M. A. & B. track, near Pavilion. His first trip. Blinded 
by steam and walked between cars. 

March 3d, Stone's store, Wabaunsee, burglarized. 

March 6th, Jacob Bagwell killed by train near Eskridge. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 347 



Marcli J3tli, Elma, tlie tlir^e year old dang-hter of F. Stuewe, died 
frotii result of an operation. 

March 28tli. Sammie Hull accidentally shot in hand at Eskridge. 

April 22d, llonry Miller's house on Paw Paw creek destroyed by 
cyclone. Henry's le^^ broken in two places; August, his 7 year old son, 
killed; Paulina, a<,-ed 3, arm broken: Mrs. Miller, bad cut in leg; Bessie 
Simuierwell bruised all over, and Paul Schmanke slightly injured. 
Patli of storm 8 feet wide. Struck hill east of house and disappeared 
in clouds. 

April 23d, Rd. Krapp's house burned. Mrs. Krapp making soap, 
boiled over setting house on tire. 

New stone sch(tol house in Dist. 45 built. 

May 2()th, small barn near Lutheran church burned. Small boy 
and matches. 

May 13th, .lames Driver's house, Paxico, burned. 

.'une 21st, Ct)mmercial house barn .burned, at midnight. 

July 8th, Mrs. Robert Enlow died as result of operation performed 
in Topeka. 

August 21st, Mrs. Green, Wabaunsee, seriously burned by explod- 
ing lamp. 

October 19th, club house, Paxico, fired by incendiary. Building 
saved by hard work. 

October 28th. Henry Wille fired house and barn and killed himself. 

November 11th, Herman Diepenbrock's slaughter house burned. 

November 17th, Willie Pries playing with matches set fire to 
house. Extinguished by Vena Lang. 

December fjth, Scott Willis, Maple Hill, found dead. 



1898. 

January 3d, Alma National Bank opened for business. 

May 4th, John Thomas shot four persons at Maple Hill. (See page 17). 

July 16th, the Allm home, the property of Chris. Anderson, and 
lately vacated by him, caiught fire while five children were asleep. 
Mary, Eva, and Edna, aged 13, 3, and 9, burned to death. Others 
badly burned. 

Evangelical church. Wells creek, dedicated. Rev. Abele assisted 
by Revs. Silbermann, Kallich, Nagel, and Barkmann. 

August 9-15th, M. A. & B. track, Alma to Manhattan, torn up. 

August 31st, Catholic fair and festival at Liederkranz Parle— $700 
receipts. 

September 27th, Bradford mill burned. 



348 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

September 29th, the two year old son of John Haynes, near Keene, 
badly mutilated by hogs— having strayed from house and fallen into 
pen. 

October 5th, Wm. Correll killed at bridge near John Boettcher's 
while leaning from cab window. 

October 17th and 18th, worst blizzard ever known for the season, 
many cattle in pastures dying. 

November 19th, five wagon loads of Pottawatomie Indians passed 
through Alma on way from Indian Territory to Reserve. 

November 30th, John Thoes found dead on north side of Ad. 
Lund's barn. Had been dragged four miles. Had left Alma at 
8 p. m. the night before. 17 years before, Nick Thoes, a brother, 
had been drowned at the crossing 200 yards north of where body was 
found, E. Wetzel, with him at the time, swimming ashore. Creek 
swollen from melting snows. 

December 5th, service from Alma to Manhattan over Rock Island 
discontinued. 

December, new school house in Dist. 15 completed. 



1899. 

January 9th, George McCrumb run over and killed one mile east of 
McFarland. 

January 18th, John Spiecker's house, four miles south of Alma, 
burned. 

January 22d, LaFayette Ditty, former resident of Alma, drowned 
himself and son on "Lucky Baldwin's" ranch, near Los Angeles, Cal. 

February 6th, Catholic church, Alma, burned 3:30 a. m. Built in 
1874. Richly furnished. Organ, vestments, and decorations, Build- 
ing 38x60, with tower on west end, 16x16. Loss $10,000, 

February 7th, G. Nehring had ankle badly shattered while cutting 
tree on Nehring branch. 

March 16th, Wm. Freeman, express messenger, burned in wreck 
atVolland; 4 cars burned. 

March 20th, Guy Lumsden killed on A. M. Jordan's farm, Kuenzli 
creek. Team ran away and struck tree, upsetting wagon on pile of 
rails, with body underneath. 

March, McFarland depot moved from north to south side of track. 

June 15th, postofflce at Fairfield discontinued. 

August 22d, Catholic picnic at Liederkranz park; receipts $600, 

October 8th, Waushara M, E. church dedicated. 34x50 and cost 
$1,600, Replaced old church built in 1878. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 349 



AuRustSOth, James Herron's barn, Plumb township, burned, with 
five liorses. 

October, Miller precinct established. 

October 27tb, Harry Sparling thrown from horse near Eskridge, 
dying next day. 

June 16th, son of David Oliver, Maple Hill, killed by horse falling 
backwards. Just one year before to a day another son was drowned. 

June 28th, Harry Tandy and Calvin Burger murdered at Mc- 
Farland. 

June 27th, Wni. Drebing died at his home on Mill creek. (See 
biography). 

July 6th, cloudburst Clapboard ravine came near resulting in dis- 
aster to. the four families camping out. 13 cars ditched on M. A. «& B. 
at Leo. Gersbach's, and washout at Volland on Rock Island. 

December 19th, new Catholic church dedicated by Rt. Rev. 
Bishop Fink. Corner stone laid August 27th. 



1900. 

.January 1st, John Sudweeks appointed county commissioner to 
till vacancy caused by death of C. N. Earl. 

January 15th, Harvey Roark, aged 15, killed by horse falling on 
him while driving cattle on Muehlenbacher branch. 

April, Eskridge State Bank organized. 

June 20th, AltaVista Bank opened. 
August 10th, VV. II. Collier's house. Alma, burned. 
August 30th, 10,000 people at Woodmen celebration, Alma. 
August 31st, Rock Island depot burned 1:30 a. m. 
October 14th, Mr. Hearn's barn (on Dierker place) burned. 
November 19th, barn at Kinne place, occupied by D. U. Millison 
burned. 

December 2d, Evangelical church, Wells creek, dedicated, 700 

present. 

December 24th, 17 year old son of Mr. Blair, Maple Hill, killed by 
discharge of gun he was trying to pull through hedge, muzzle fore- 
most. 

December 28th, George Thierer, Volland, accidentally shot by 
discharge of gun his brother was cleaning. 

While attempting to board freight train at McFarland tramp fell 
off bridge breaking several ribs and dislocating hip. 



350 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



1901. 

January 25th, Rock Island depot burned, origin of fire unknown. 

February 13th, Alva Feaglians, of Alma, killed In Philippines. 

June, new Lutheran parsonage completed. Old building sold to 
Mr. Collier for residence. 

June 26th, John Olson committed suicide. 

August 1st, Stuewe Bros, lose 250 tons alfalfa by spontaneous 
combustion. 

September 30th, wreck at Maple Hill, stock killed, 

November 3d, Woodmen hall and two other buildings burned, 
Maple Hill. 

November 10th, Charles Maas, aged 17, killed by accidental dis- 
charge of gun. 

November, Fred Slusser, fireman on M. A. & B., killed in collision 
with Mo. Pac. at Osage City. 

July 19th, Johnnie Schilling, 8 years old, accidentally killed by 
gun in hands of 10 year old sister. 

Clyde Burkett, 14 year old son of Jerry Burkett, 6 miles east of 
Eskridge, killed by lightning. 



1902. 

January 1st, only four of the Connecticut colony in the county: 
A. A. Cottrell, S. A. Baldwin, J. F. Willard, and Wm. Mitchell. 

February 4th, L. Pries' store, Alma, burned, 1 a. m.; loss $14,000. 

Dolley & Stewart's store at Maple Hill burned. Loss $25,000. 

March 28th, L. B. Moss, of Trenton, Missouri, brakeman on Rock 
Island, killed at McFarland. 

April 22d, a Mr. Quinn drowned in Mill creek at Maple Hill. 

May 13th, half mile of Rock Island track washed out on Henry 
Grimm's farm, near Volland. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 351 



Newspaper Hristory. 



The News: First paper in county, first number issued as The 
Wabaunsee County Herald, by Sellers & Bertram, Alma, April 1st, 
1869. Bertram sold his interest toS. H. Fairfield, October 28th, 1869. 
March 9th, 1871, S. H. Fairfield became sole proprietor and 
clianged name to Alma Union, with R. M. Tunnell, as local editor till 
November 12th, 1871. May 1st, 1872, Sellers becomes sole proprietor 
and changes name to Wabaunsee County News. Sold to Nathan 
Hughes, October 10th, 1883. Sold to D. W. Scott, August 24th, 1887, 
and on July 5th, 1888, to I. D. Gardiner, who changes name to The 
Alma News. Sells an interest to F. W. Graham in December, 1889. 
A. O. Grigsby takes charge of the paper December 8th, 1892, and re- 
tires November 23d, 1893, leaving L. H. Gregory as manager. January 
11th, 1894, the paper suspends publication. The material is shipped 
to Topeka and the subscription list sold to the Alma Enterpise. 

The Alma Blade, R. Cunningham & Co. First number, Alma, 
March ]4th, 1877, and last issue February 20th, 1878. The Mail was 
issued from the Blade office during the fall campaign of 1877. 

The Wabaunsee County Herald, J. B. Campbell & Bro., editors. 
First issue. Alma, October 1880. Sold to W. W. Cone, September 1881, 
and name changed to the Home Weekly. Moved to Eskridge, January 
26th, 1882. April, 1885, Cone sold to Richey & Andrews— The Home 
Weekly Publishing Co., Henry Rickel, editor, till October 29th, 1885, 
when paper was sold to D. V. Dowd. Consolidated with the Eskridge 
Star, September 13th, 1888. 

The Alma Enterprise, Yol. 1, No. 1, Welch & Sage, editors. First 
number issued October 11th, 1884. Welch sold interest to O. W. Little, 
October 16th, 1891, since which time the paper has been conducted by 
Sage & Little. 

The Paxico Courier, L. E. Hoffman, editor. First number Sep- 
tember 1st, 1888. Leased to Oscar Rose, June 21st. 1889. Bought by 
Matt. Thomson September 1st, 1889. Material moved to Alma and 
used in publishing 

The Alma Signal, Vol. 1, No. 1, Matt. Thomson, editor and pub- 
lisher, being issued September 7th, 1889. Sold to Chester & Carroll, 
October 18th, 1901. Chester sold his interest to F. A. Seaman, Feb- 
ruary 16th, 1902. 



352 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

The Progressive Patriot, published at Alma by Mrs. E. W. Crumb 
from September 20th to December 7, 1895. 

Teacher, Patron and Pupil, publi.shed by Dow Busenbark as an 
educational journal from October. 1897, to April, 1901. 

Truth, published at Alma by Rev. J. E. Kirkpatrick, from 1899 to 
1901. 

The Land Mark, E. H. Sanford, editor. First published at Esk- 
ridge, in 1871. It was published at intervals— first at Eskridge, then 
at Alma, and again at Eskridge until the publication was discontinued. 

The Eskridge Star, Vol. ], No. 1, J. J. Mitchell, editor, October 
19, 1883; Mitchell & Dowd, January 31, 1884: Rickel & Dowd, March 
27, 1884; D. V. Dowd, June 21, 1884; Dowd & Shelton, August, 1885; 
E. L. Shelton, October 22, 1885: Perry & Gardiner, July 1, 1886; E. n. 
Perry, June 7, 1888; Mitchell & Melrose, August 15, 1889; W. 11. Mel- 
rose, February 13, 1890; J. J. Mitchell, January 12, 1899; Dow Bu.sen- 
bark. March 29, 1900, the present editor and publisher. 

Wabaunsee County Democrat, Dr. Patte, editor, Eskridge, June 
12, 1886. Published a few weeks and material sold to Perry & Gar- 
diner. 

Plarveyville Herald, E. S. Vance, editor. First number June 11, 
1886. Moved to Eskridge in October and name changed to Wabaunsee 
County Democrat. Sold to A. A. Graham November 12th, and to 
Perry & Gardiner, December 3, 1886. 

Alta Vista Register, Vol. 1, No. 1, June 16, 1887, by S. A. Stauffer. 
Suspended March 27, 1889. 

Alta Vista Bugle. First issue by George W. Foster, June 7, 1889. 
Sold to H. F. Frame July 12th and suspended January 3, 1890. 

Alta Vista Record, Vol. 1, No. 1, by J. C. Padgett, April 17, 1890; 
S. M. Padgett, October 16th. Last issue, December 27, 1895. 

Alta Vista Journal, Vol. 1, No. 1, by Fred D. James, June 9, 1899. 
Sold to B. F. Amsbury, August 4th, and to J. E. Reagan, August 11, 
1899. Bought by J. A. Schilling, January 17, 1902. 

Eskridge Tribune, Frank Hartman, August 23, 1900. October 10, 
1901, F. A. Seaman buys half interest, and January 10, 1902, buys the 
other half interest. March 7, 1902, C. E. Carroll and F. A. Seaman, 
the present publishers. 

Eskridge Sun, October, 1888, by A. A. Graham. Suspends after n 
few weeks. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 353 



PETER RIYNARD 

Was born in France, April 30, 1830. Came to America with his 
parents when but eight years of age. On November 10, 1865, was 
united in marriage to Miss Catherine Zahner at Milwaulcee, Wiscon- 
son, and two years later came to Wabaunsee county, locating near 
Eskridge. Three daughters and two sons came to the Riynard home: 
Mrs. Lena E. Dingman, Mrs. Emma E. Higby, Mrs. Alice L. Robert- 
son, Mr. Albert H. and Mr. Jesse E. Riynard, During the civil war 
Mr. Riynard was a member of Co. D, 1st Oregon Cavalry. Died at 
Eskridge Marc^ 12, 1885. He was an industrious, hard working man 
and one of our most highly esteemed citizens. 



I 
G. HALL 



Was born April 25, 1803, in Herkimer county. New York. In 
1850 was united in marriage to Miss Helen A. Wadsworth, of Utica, 
New York. Came to Kansas in 1858, locating at Wabaunsee where 
lie resided until 1873. He was once appointed and nine times elected 
to the office of probate judge. He was a popular official, but the state- 
ment is superfluous when ills repeated reelection to one of the most 
important offices in the gift of the people is before us. By his upright 
conduct, strict integrity and sterling worth. Judge Hall secured for 
himself an exalted place in the esteem of the people. 



AUGUST WOLGAST, SR. 

Was born December 25, 1835, in Ardmansbalde, Germany. He re- 
ceived a good educational training atGerswalde, and came to America 
and to Kansas in 1860. He was married May 16 of the same year to 
Miss Dorothea Geinther, to which union eight children were born. 
Mr. Wolgast owns an excellent farm of 700 acres near Templin and is 
one of our most substantial and most highly esteemed citizens, witli 
a family of estimable children, who are following in the footsteps of 
their worthy parents. 



WILLIAM TREU 



Was a Wabaunsee county boy, born on the farm, October 16, 
1805. Received good educational advantages, but preferred life on 
the farm, where he remained until elected sheriff of Wabaunsee 
county in 1895. Was reelected two years later and at the close of his 



354 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

second term again returned to the farm, but this time in Texas, in 
the Beaumont oil fields, but before Mr. Treu could reap the beneflt of 
his lucky investment he died on June 8, 1900, aged 34 years, 7 months 
and 22 days. Before going to Texas he was married to Miss Kate 
Little, a son being born to this union. Deceased was a young man of 
sterling worth and by his gentlemanly deportment had secured for 
himself a warm place in the hearts of the people. 



JOHN HESS 



Was born July 7, 1825, in Altenrath, Prussia. He was educated at 
Frankfort-on-the-Main. Came to America in 1853 and to Kansas in 
1857, locating at the mouth of Copp branch of Mill creek. On Decem- 
ber 31, 1854, was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Schmitz, to 
which union six children were born, four of whom are living: Anna, 
Elenora, Otto and Henry. Mr. Hess died April 5, 1877. He was one 
of the leading citizens of his time and a man of much influence, al- 
ways exerting his efforts for the general good. He was highly es- 
teemed and his death universally regretted. 



ABE WELFELT 



This picture of an Alma boy of ye olden time is true to life. Abe 
is now in the Indian Territory and a trusted member of the Indian 
police. While the history was in preparation Abe came to Alma on a 
visit with friends of years agone and before he got away a snap shot 
paved the way for an item in this history that would be much more 
interesting had Abe left behind him the particulars of a few of the 
many incidents that would read like a romance if set before our read- 
ers in cold type. Abe is a good hearted boy that has seen more of the 
rough side of life than one in ten thousand and his many friends need 
have no fears as to his ability to hold his own in any little adventure 
that may chance to come his way. 



W. S. WILLIAMS 

This portrait recalls an amusing as well as a thrilling incident of 
which this old pioneer constable and deputy U. S. Marshal was a par- 
ticipant—in fact one of the principal actors — the other party was a 
wounded buffalo that Williams had shot. There was a scrimmage 
from which Williams emerged pretty much in the condition of our 
first parents before partaking of the forbidden apple. The buffalo's 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 355 



horns were responsible for the lack of apparel but Williams took a 
philosophical view of the situation and attributed his' ill luck to his 
refusing to remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy. His compan- 
ions had remained at the camp, possibly not altogether oblivious of 
the fact that they were out of meat. At any rate, Peter Sharai was 
on the alert and but for a shot from his unerring rifle there would 
have been a funeral in camp instead of a feast. Even horse thieves 
had the greatest respect for Williams and never intentionally crossed 
his path. For the numerous accidents of this character Williams was 
alone responsible. 



LOUIS HORNE 



Was born August 16, 1870, at Jamestown, Wisconsin. Came to 
Alma with his parents when but twelve years of age. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and taught school one term. On May 6, 
1896, was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Schutter, to which union 
one son, Leo, was born. Died August 20, 1901, at the age of 31 years, 
He was proprietor of the Hotel Alma and a director of the Alma 
National Bank. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Silbermann, 
and as a mark of respect all business houses in town were closed. 



THE ALMA LIEDERKRANZ 

Was organized October 1st, 1890. First officers: President, G. H. 
Meier; Vice Pres., Carl L:ing; Secretary, C. Schubert; Treasurer, Otto 
Sawallisch. Fred Meyer was elected instructor in vocal culture. 
After a short stay at Philip Birk's, the Catholic school building was 
used, but the growth of the society demanding more room land was 
rented of Mr. Franz Schmidt, wlio, in recognition of his liberality, 
was made an honorary member of the society. A tract of land con- 
taining three and two-fifths acres was purchased in 1893 and a room 
20x40 erected at a cost of $400. Steps were taken to beautify the 
grounds, Mr. C. Schubert being intrusted with this duty. The 
grounds today are the best evidence that he has been faithful to his 
trust. In 1900 the building was again enlarged, rendered necessary by 
the constant increase in the growth of the society, the number hav- 
ing reached 125 and with many applications for membership on file. 



STREET SCENE IN CHICKASHA. 

Had our readers been in Chickasha at the opening of the Kiowa 
and Comanche lands in Oklahoma in August, 1900, they would have 
seen just what the artist caught with the camera— one of the stirring 



356 EARLY RISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

scenes that for months was daily repeated. But this is but a prototype 
of similar scenes enacted on the streets of Leavenworth and Kansas 
City in 1856 to 1860, when homeseekers were looking for a haven of 
rest in sunny Kansas. In both instances the march of empire was 
wending its way westward. But the settler seeking a home in Okla- 
homa possessed advantages the Kansas pioneer never enjoyed— his 
home market and base of supplies were brought nearer by the railroad. 
But the conditions are undergoing a revolution and a few years hence 
there will be no western border— no vacant lands to offer the pioneer 
a home for the asking. 



ALMA VOLUNTEER BAND. 

Names of members from left to right. First tier: George Linss, 
August Bandel, John Degenhardt, Richard Thoes, William vSpeer, 
Theo. Geisler, Chas. Meyer, John Senge. Second tier: Clarence Eck, 
Ralph Sage, Louis Burt, S. E. Hull (Band Instructor), Charlie Thom- 
son, Paul Geisler. Third tier: Charlie Palenske, Guy Cleaveland. 



OUT FOR A ROUND UP. 

We might say "swapping work"— a custom among cattlemen of 
assisting one another in rounding up and cutting out cattle suitable 
for the market or shipping. Named from left to right: Sell Fields, 
Fred Bates, Ed. Buckingham, John Berroth, Chet Davis, Al Davis, 
A. S. Allendorph and Tom Mankins. Though several ciphers would 
be required to indicate the property holdings of several of these 
parties, all are cowboys for the time being and either one can rope a 
steer with the ease of any expert on the range. 



SCENE ON DAVIS BROS.' RANCH. 

An every day occurrence on the range in the fall when the boys 
"out for a round up" have bunched the cattle preparatory to cutting 
out— the one task being but preliminary to the other. The round up 
means work. It means long rides over hill aUd dale and vigilant 
search through clumps of bushes and in cozy nooks for the widely 
scattered remnants of the herd. In pleasant weather it is agreeable 
employment, but when the threatening clouds lower and the vivid 
lightning plays on the tips of the long horns the thought that wells 
up is "the dearest spot on earth is home" — a thought that is usually 
dispelled by the first, bright rays of the summer's sunshine. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 357 



VISITORS AT THE RANCH. 

A visit at the ranch from the ladies is to the cowboy like an oasis 
in the desert. Their coming means a break in the monotony of every 
day life on the range; it means an array of tempting viands at the 
noon hour to which the boys are hardly accustomed, to say nothing of 
the briglit rays of sunshine for which old Sol is in nowise responsible. 



Catholic Church and Altar, Newbury. 

Witli the pews cost $3410. Built in 1884, by Rev. Father Hund- 
hausen. Two years later the parsonage was built at a cost of more 
than $1500. Capacity of church, 350. Membership, 500— about seventy 
families. Prior to the building of the stone church, services were 
held in the little frame building nearby— built in 1874 by Rev. Father 
Vanderburg. 



REV. WIENER'S CONFIRMATION CLASS. 

The date should be 1900. Members of the class named from left 
to right are as follows: Theo. Muckenthaler, Engelber Richtstadter, 
Eddie Mock, Leo Schmidt, Jos. Werner, Jos. Rosenstengel, Paulina 
Hund, Maggie Zeller, Isidor Glotzbach, Katie Glotzbach, Clemens 
Marstall, Clara Scbultz, Rosa Muckenthaler, August Storch, Aloys 
Frey, Geo. Noller, Mary Schott, Katie Eagan, Elizabeth Michaelis, 
Frankie Michaelis. Victor Muckenthaler. Ida Hund, Johnnie Knoeb- 
ber, Joseph Higert, Margaretha Michaelis, Cecilia Meinliardt, Willie 
Schilling, Lizzie Hund, Clara Meinhardt— forming a classof most es- 
timable young people, members of the best families of Newbury and 
vicinity. That their life work may be all the more commendable by 
reason of their early religious training all may rest assured. 



The Newbury Philharmonic Band 

Was organized October 1, 1883, by Rev. Hundhausen, with Ferdi- 
nand Hermann, of Alma, as musical instructor and Mr. Martin 
Muckenthaler, Jr., (now deceased), band leader. The band is the old- 
est in the county, and, although but three of the old organizntion 
are now members of the band it still ranks as one of the best. The 
members own a nice set of uniforms and a band wagon. The follow- 
ing are the names of the band, named from left to right: Standing- 
Leo Hund, Frank Muckenthaler, (dec'd.), Franz Breitenstein, Albert 



358 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

Mucken thaler. J. P. Zellers, (with flag), Wm. Glotzbach, Jo.seph 
Glotzbach, MoritzGuth, Ferdinand Hermann, (Alma), Fred Zeferjahn, 
John Mock. Standing— Joseph Muckenthaler, James Mock, C. J. 
Glotzbach, Martin Muckenthaler, Jr., (Dec'd.), Val Mock, Leopold 
Muckenthaler, Wm. Mock. 



ALMA VOLUNTEER BAND (STREET SCENE). 

From left to right: Charlie Palenske, Theo. Geisler, Charlie 
Thomson, John Degenhardt, Sam Mongerson. James Thom.son, Rich- 
ard Thoes, Ralph Sage, August Bandel, George Linss, William Speer, 
Louis Burt, Hugo Brandt, Charlie Dilley, Dick Hull, John Senge, 
Paul Geisler, Clarence Eck and Guy Cleaveland. 



THE BOUCHEY STACKER. 

Our illustration shows Al Bouchey, the inventor, at work on an 
invention that is endorsed by the largest ranchmen in Kansas. Sim- 
plicity and durability are features that commend the stacker and 
with the low price at which the machine is offered ought to insure 
Mr. Bouchey a just recompense for time and labor expended in per- 
fecting his invention. The testimonials are of the highest order and 
from men who write from an unbiased standpoint. Mr. Bouchey has 
already secured patents on two valuable inventions and has made ap- 
plication for another patent from which he expects to realize a hand- 
some income. He secured his patents through C. A. Snow & Co., of 
Washington, T>. C. 



August Falk and Family. 

From left to right: Henry, Mr. F'alk, Paul, Elmer, Mrs. Laura 
Smith, Mrs. P''alk, George and Rose. 



Family of Mr. Joseph Glotzbach, Sr. 

Joseph Glotzbach, Sr., and Margaret, his wife: Charles J. and 
Elizabeth, his wife, and children: Tony, Rose, George, Carl, Isador, 
Florian, Otto, Bernard and Martha: Geoige Glotzbach and Elizabeth, 
his wife, and children: Joseph, Katie, John and Benno; Wm. Glotz- 
bach and Theresa, his wife, and children: Richard, Vincent and Ela- 
nore; Joseph Glotzbach and Christina, his wife, and children: Victor, 
Lily, Esther, Irene and Alphon; Lewis Seeling and Kate Glotzbach 
Seeling, his wife, and children; Rose Muckenthaler, daughter of 
Frank Muckenthaler, (deceased): William, Lizzie, Theresa and Mary 
iSeeling; Valentine, Rosa and Mary Glotzbach (the later deceased). 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 359 



Four Generations. 

Mr. A. G. Biirgett, Mrs. W. S. McCauley, Mrs. H. B. Dallas and 
daughter. 



Five Generations. 



Mrs. C. Schwanke, Mrs. P. F. Johnson, Mrs. Henry Kriegenhardt, 
Mrs. Lena Deppish and daughter. All living and enjoying good 
health. 



r 



A Group of Good Fellows. 

From left to right: George Eclcles, C. E. Edlin, W. H. Sparling, 
W. T. Eclcles, F. W. Edlin, R. L. Hershberger and Nilcs Mossman. 



ESKRIDGE CORNET BAND. 

From left to right: Back line — Geo. Eckles, Arthur Moore, Ed- 
gar Bowden, C. E. Edlin, F. W. Edlin, J. H. Lee, J. W. Barnett. 
Middle line— Jesse Reynard, Walter Warren, A. B. Hartman, J. T. 
Mills, C. M. Lowry, J. J. Mitchell, Jr., J. R. Hauschildt. Drummers 
—George D. West and J. W. Robertson. 



WOODMAN TEAM, HARVEYVILLE. 

From left to right: First tier— L. C. Lewis, S. G. Cantrill, Wil- 
liam Boatwright, Harry King. Second tier— Everett Yoacum, O. B. 
Cantrill, Bert Grigsby. Third tier— Lee Heinlein and Dr. L. A. 
Walker. 



CONRAD HESSE AND FAMILY. 

From left to right: First tier— John, Nicholas, Bernard, Adam, 
Frank and Joseph. Second tier— Lawrence, Matilda, Mr. and Mrs. 
Hesse, Mary, Philip and Louisa. 



LADY MACCABEES. 



From left to right: First tier— Miss Carrie Meyer, Mns. Alfred 
Umbehr, Miss Laura Thoes, Mrs. Tena Mongerson, Miss Rosa Eck. 
Second tier— Mrs. J. H. McMahan, Mrs. Matt. Thomson, Mrs. I. S. 
Hastings, Mrs. J. B. Gibson and Mrs. T. N. Watts. 



360 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



OUR COUNTY AND SCHOOLS, 1886: 

Engraved from a drawing by Matt Thomson. Shows sketch of 
every schoolliouse in the county at date of drawing, (1886). with pos- 
sibly one or two exceptions, every building erected for school purposes 
since 1886 will be found in the list of illustrations. The size of the 
original drawing is 20x24. 



TABLEAU— THE FAIRIES. 

From left to right: Elsie Richter, Jeannette Watts, Eva Bernard, 
Marie Fields. Kneeling— Rosa Falk and Nannie Rusenbark. 



FAMILY OF MR. WILLIAM MAAS. 

From left to right: First tier— Mrs. Dora Schaal, Fred, Adolf, 
Richard and Mary Schmitz. Second tier— Ida, Mr. Maas, Charlie, 
Willie, Mi-s. Maas and Alice. 



FAMILY OF MR. GUS THIERER. 

From left to right: Frank, Mamie, George, John, Mr. Theirer, 
Lottie and Mrs. Theirer. 



M. E. CHURCH, ALMA, 1880. 

Built in 1878, when sidewalks were almost unknown in Alma. For 
years the church stood solitary and alone — no trees or buildings near. 
Rev. Geo. E. Nicholson was pastor when the church was built. Prior 
to that service had been held in the court house and school house by 
Revs. Kirkman, Lord, McNair, and B. Frank Smith. The money 
required to build the church was raised entirely by subscription. Mr. 
C. M. Rose had charge of the building, as foreman, while the work 
was being done. The parsonage was built for a residence by Mr. Ben 
Iloskinson, sheriff, in 1875, and bought by the church in 1877 — before 
the church was built. After Mr. Nicholson came Revs. Parlette, 
Collins, Kendall, Murray, Browning, Smith, Meeks, Baker, Johnson, 
Nathan, Dennis, Young, Marsh, Elliott, Bernard, and the present 
minister. Rev. Gib.son. The bell in the M. E. church was the first 
church bell in Alma. The first funeral in the church was that of Mrs. 
C. M. Ro.se, on January 30, 1879. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 











'^^'-^'X'A 



MR. AL BOUCHEY, THE INVENTOR, Maple Hill, 
at work on his hay-stacker. 




HOTEL WINDLER, Maple Hill. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




FIRST HOME OF MR. MICHAEL FIX, 1856. 
Near VoUand. 




MR. CHARLES DAILEY'S EXPRESS LINE IN 1886. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




HOME OF MR. ANDREW BELL, Kaw Township. 




RANCH HOME OF MR. J. W. NAYLOR, near Alta Vista. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




MR. AUGUST ZECKSER'S RESIDENCE AND FARM BUILDINGS, near Alma 




ST. MARY'S BRIDGE. 




WAMEGO BRIDGE. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



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OUT FOR A ROUND-UP. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. WILLIAM WAUGH, ESKRIDGE. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




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EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




HERD OF POLAND-CHINA SWINE. 
Bred by Mr. Herman Arndt, Templin. 




HERD OF PUROC-JERSEYS. 
Bred by Mr. H. W. Steinmeyer, Volland. 




RESIDENCE OF MR. CARL STEINMEYER, lUinois Creek. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




HERD OF HEREFORDS, FOWLER'S RANCH, Maple Hill, 




RURAL SCENE ON THE FOWLER RANCH, Maple Hill. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 







AN OLD-TIME FENCE. 
When the only cow was picketed out. 




THE SPIRIT OF '76, 
Or escaped from the German army - by being born in the United States. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 




ALMA CEMETERY, 1901. 




STREET SCENE AT CHICASHA, OPENING OF THE KIOWA LANDS. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 361 



G. flr. F{. Posts. 



ED. LINES POST, ALMA. 

W. CniLLsoN, Commander. E. A. Kilian, Adjutant. 



E. A. KilUan, Oo. A, 1st, Res, Mo.Light Artillery; P. O. Alma, Kan. 

Gunshot wound right forearm, Wilson Greek, Aug. 10, '01. 
James Carroll, Co. F, 147th Ohio, Inf., P. O., Alma, Kan. 

Injury, left ankle, Oalesta, N. C. 
.Joseph Fields, Oo. D, 79th Ohio, Inf., P. O., TopekaKan. 
Fred Crafts, 1st Lieut., Ist Indian Reg't. P. O., Alma, Kan. 
John T. Keagy, Oo. D, 101 Penn, Inf.; P. O., Alma. Kan, 

Injury.left leg. Fair Oaks, Va., May 31. '62. 
M. W. Rock, 15th Kan. Oav.; P. O., Tecumseh, Ok 
S. H. Fairfield, Oo. K, 11th Kan. Oav. : P. O.. Alma, Kan. 
Edwin Herrick, Oo. H. 14th Penn., Oav. ; P. O., Seattle, Wash. 

Adolph Hnkammer, Co. B. 2nd Kan.. Inf.; Oo. K. 11th Kan. Cay., P. O,, Alma, Kan. 

Lance thrust in back, North Platte bridge, July 20, '65, 
T. N. Watts, Co. E. 32nd 111., Inf., P. O., Alma, Kan. 
A. W. Gregory, Co. L, 11th Kan. Oav., P. O., Alma, Kan. 
S T Wright, Co 0, 13th N J Inf, Sergeant; Address unknown. 
Charles Hensel, Co F, 11th Mo Oav., Corporal. Colorado Springs, Col. 
Charles Fairfield, Co D. 38th N Y Inf, and Oo K, 17th N Y Inf, Capt, address unknown 

Gunshot in right shoulder, Dec 21, '62. 
W T Mahan, Oo E, 11th Kan, Oav,P O. St. Louis, Mo; 

Gunshot in head, Shelby Road, Dec '64. 
Charles Ross, Oo F, 2nd Kan, Cav. Sergeant, P O, Santa Ana, Oal. 
W A Doolittle, Co K, 5th Iowa, inf, P O Wesley, Iowa. 
W W Cone, Co E, 13th N Y, P O. Mo. 

Wm Bandel, OoF, 11th Kan, Oav, Bugler, P O, Alma, Kan. 
J R Fix. Co D, 20th Indiana Inf, P O, Volland, Kan. 
Robert Kath, Co H, 145th N Y, Inf. P O, unknown. 
Geo M Keene, Oo L, 17th Mass, Inf, Corporal, P O, Hartford, Conn. 

L J McCrumb, Co F 83d Pa, Inf, and Co A. 14th Pa, Cav, Corporal, 

P O, McFarland, Kan. 

David Palmer, Co A, 6th Iowa, Inf, Sergeant, Address unknown, 

T S Spielman, Baltimore Battery and Mo Light Artillery. P O, Alma, Kan. 

Wm H Lyons. Oo B. 11th N Y Inf. Corporal, P O. Alma, Kan. 

Geo D Ensign, Co K, 11th Kan, Oav, P O, Topeka, Kan. 

Hiram Keyes, Oo K, 11th Kan, Oav, Address unknown. 

Thomas H Perkins, Co H, 78th 111 Inf, P O, Wamego, Kan, 

Orciila M Yaw, Co G, 8th Iowa, Inf, address unknown. 

Marcellus Yaw. Oo F, 32nd Iowa, Inf, and Co G, 8th Iowa Inf, address unknown. 

C M Rose, Co K, 19th Mich, Inf, Corporal. P O, Alma. Kan ; Gunshot wound right 

leg and left hand, Thompson's Station, May 3 '63 and Dallas, Ga. May 25, "65. 



362 EARLY IIISTOEY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

A G Murray, Oo G, 51.st Ind, Inf, 1st Lieut; P O. Oklahoma City, Ok. 

W T DeAimond, Co A, 2Gth Ohio. Inf. Ooiporal. P O. Alma, Kan. 

Sylvester Hlner, Co D, 15th VV. Va.. Inf. P O, Vollaud, Kan. 

E \V Ames, Co C. 15th 111, Inf, P O. Beivue. Kan. 

W II Morrison, OoE. 86th Ind, Inf, P O, Tooeka, Kan. 

S B Madden. Co H. 80th Ohio, Inf, Paxlco, Kan. 

J B Stephens, Co B, 7th Iowa, Inf, Sergeant. 

Samuel Sutton, Oo C, !)7th Ohio. Inf. and Co F, 97th Ohio. 

Jacob Wilt, 1st Ohio, Battery, P O, Paxlco. 

D W Johnson. Co F, 85th Ind. Inf. Musician, P O. Alma. 

G P Tiffany, Oo B, 52nd Pa. Inf, P O, Topeka, Kan. 

S V Fair. Co E, 30th Ind. Inf, P O Alma, Kan. 

A K Winkoop, P O, Topeka, Kan. 

Wm Feaghans, Oo F. 188th Ohio, Inf, P O. Belknap, 111. 

Daniel Stotler, Oo E. 8, heavy artillery. P O, Alma. Kan. 

A A Grlgsby, Topeka, Kan. 

John E Allen. Oo 1 124th U S C, Inf, Alma, Kan; Skull split open and crushed in 

by saber stroke. Bayonet thrust through body and musket ball through right leg 

etc, etc. etc. 

.Tohn Lucas. Alma, Kan. 

Lebanon Gardcnhlre' Oo E, 9th U S C, Inf, and Co C. 3rd U S O, Inf, Alma. Kan. 

Frank Bevel, Alma. Kan. 



ALTA VISTA POST, NO. 60. 

M. W. Case, Commander. L. J. Woodard, Adjutant. 



L J Woodard 


E 


29th 


Ohio 




Alta Vista Kan 


G W Kiger 


D 


27th 


*l 




11 11 


W A Kiger 


D 


47th 


111 




Topeka 


B H Smith 


B 


7th 


Mo 


OfVv 


Beman " 


J Oleaveland 





59th 


111 


1 


Mo 


J W Spencer 


B 


16th . 


Ohio 


Inf, A V 




Also 


H 


42nd 


n 


O V I 




Robert Cooper 
Geo W Snodgrass 


F 


63rd 


11 


Inf 


Council Grove K. 


H 


92nd 


11 


Inf 


Alta Vista Kan 


Warren Ford 


H 


88th 


11 


Inf 


Mo 


Augustus L Orton 





47th 


111 




Kan 


David Widner 


I 


47th 


Ind 


Ind re- 


enlisted, died 


Geo W Wilson 


K 


13th 


Iowa 




Council Grove Ks 


John A Morrett 


B 


40th 


Ind 




Alta Vista Kau 


Percival Hawes 


B 


12th 


O 


and K 23d O 


ti II 


Wm T Tolbert 


B 


60th use 




Inf 


Oklahoma 


Jas A Fisher 


H 


108th 


111 




Alta Vista Kan 


T J Wilson 


F 


126th 


N Y 


Oav 




Also Lieut 


A 


10th use 






Mo 



HARVEYVILLE POST. 



M P Early 


181st 


Ohio 


Inf 


Harvey 


Levi Stanley, serg, 


14th 


Kan 


Oav 


*• 


K D Lewis F 


60th 


Ohio 


Inf 


(t 


Geo L Horton. corp A 


83rd 


Ind 


Inf 


41 


Asa Carter 


193rd 


Ohio 


Inf 


•' 


Edwin Symes K 
W Holflday, lleut 


76th 


111 


Inf 


tl 


116th 


Ind 


Inf 


tt 


Carey Walton I 
A M Harvey I 


3nd 


Kan 


Inf 




1st 


Kan 


Inf 




Alf Holmes B 


79th 


Ohio Vol 


Inf 




Stephen J Spear E 


8th 


Kan 


Inf 




J W Turner 











EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 363 



J 11 Zabrlske G 

E Parnell. corp'l A 

W E Illchey. serg't A 

Hiram McPhersou D 
Wm M Myers, sertj't A 

Wm Anderson D 

J J Sisson I) 

E U McMlllen F 



47th 


III 


Inf 


72nd 


III 


Inf 


15th 


Ohio 


Inf 


79th 


Ohio 


Inf 


80th 


Ohio 


Inf 


137th 


Tnd 


Inf 


i;jth 


Iowa 


Inf 


1st 


Wis 


Cav 



WM. Mckinley post. no. 133, Wabaunsee. 

M. McKelvey, Commander. H. A. Peury, Adjutant. 



M McKelvey 


G 


15th 


N Y heavy 


Art 


A W Talcott 




10th 


111 


Oav 


A A Oottrell 




10th 


III 


Cav 


M Fairbanks 


G 


9tli 


Kan 


Oav 


Mark Shocknessy 


I 


28Ui 


Iowa 


Inf 


Geo Kramer 


K 


11th 


Kan 


Cav 


J Chapman 






NY 


luf 


A Doremus 




23rd 


Ind 




ETKlncaid 


I) 


1st 


Kan 


Cav 


Wm Osmer 


F 


2nd 


Kan 


Cav 


L Newell 


A 


2nd 


Kan 


Cay 


T A St John 


G 


nth 


Kan 


Cav 


Vint Russell 










it T Perry 


A 


1st 


Tenn 


Inf 


John Zerbe 




13th 


N Y 


Art 


.1 B Day 


A 


25th 


Ohio 


Inf 


Gorden Byers 


B 


6th 


W Va 


Inf 


J W Dorman 






Ohio 


Inf 


II A Perry 


E 


nth 


Kan 


Oav 


John Smith 


L 


nth 


Kan 


Oav 



Wabaunsee Kan. 



G. A. R. POST, NO. 348, ROCK CREEK. 

Frank Ludloav, Commander. I. Singer, Adjutant. 



Frank Ludlow 
H C Sprague, 
I Singer, adj. 
Samuel Shire 
Allen Nixon 
Joseph Cooper 
John Smith 
.lames Fomes 
Wm A Gray 
O G Reynolds 
W W Dow 



A 

G 



2nd 


Ohio 


Inf 


7th 


Mo 


Cav 


54th 


III 


Inf 


2nd 


Wis 




20th 


Iowa 




1 12th 


111 




nth 


Pa 




5tli 


Pa 





Chalk. 



364 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



W. H. EARL POST, ESKRIDGE. 

A. (J. BuRGETT, Commander. Robekt Simmons, Adjutant. 



W H Mills. Oo O. 44th 

Elkanah Eckles " L, 8th 

G E Guthrie " A 29th 

Wni Gallagher " A 1st 

Robert Simmons " G 17th 

John P Hettinger '• G 142d 

W M Johnson " A 18th 

A M Kasson " B 18th 

F M Meredith " D 134th 

W E Little ■• B 1st 

D C Moreland " D 12th 

A G Burgett •' E 78th 

Moritz Kraus " K 11th 

WGOook '• D 137th 

Drayton Gillott 9th 

O O Cook " A 47th 

John I Little " O 152nd 

A Oadwalader '• H 5th 

Eli Tucker, " D 44th 

G W Gillis " G 6th 

S E Hull •• O 26th 

Mark Dill " I 25th 

G R Kinzy " D 152nd 

John Stadler •' B 128th 

W Merser " B 1st 

IT Earl •' A 57th 

G W Hughes " E 4th 

A F Wade " H 14th 

W C Mossman " H 14th 

Samuel Chapman " H 140th 

Joseph Little " B 83d 

Hezekiah Quick •' D 26th 

E J Dally " C 17th 

John Cousins " C 21st 

J B Montgomery " B 53rd 

H O McKee " I 3rd 

M Jester '• F 114th 

Albert D Fuller " A 16th 

T B Henry " B 7th 

O H Ford •• H 36th 

S L Allen " B 135th 

H G Mace " D 8th 
J II Ruble 48th 

Francis Warren " F 1st 

W H Shumate 1st 
John W Wendell U S Navy; Kearsarge, 



111. 
Mo. 
Ind 
R. I. 
Ill 
Ind 
Mo 
Wis 
Ind 
Wis 
Kan 
111 
Kan 
111 
O 
111 
Pa 
Mo 
Mass 
O 
O 

Iowa 
Ind 
Ind 
W Va 
Ind 
Mich 
Pa 
Pa 
O 
Pa 
Ind 
111 

Iowa 
111 
Mo 
O 

Iowa 
Iowa 
111 
Pa 
Iowa 
Iowa 
Mo 
Iowa 



Inf, 

Mil. 

Inf 

Inf 

Cav 

Inf 

Inf 

Inf 

Inf 

Cav 

Inf 
Inf 
Inf 
Inf 

Bat 
Inf 

Inf 
Cav 



Inf 

Art 
Inf 
Inf 
C!av 
Cav 
Inf 

Inf 

Cav 
Inf 

Cav 

Inf 

Inf 

Cav 

Inf 

Inf 

Cav 

Cav 
Bat 



P. O. Eskrldge. Kan. 



Alma 
Eskrldge 



Wlnslow and Alabama. 



Ilallfax 
Topeka 
Eskrldge 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 365 



REV. SCHMID'S CONFIRMATION CLASS. 

From left to right: Amelia Heder, Henry Redemske, Lizzie 
Maike, Henry Grunewald, Freda Stuewe, (Rev. Sclimid), Emma 
Brasche, Robert Weber, Carrie Schmanke and Emma Schmanke. 



FRED ZEFERJAHN 

Was born at Kreis, Templin, Germany. Came to America direct 
to Kansas in 1871. In 1885 was united in marriage to Miss Pauline 
Gehrt, to which union twelve children were born— nine of whom are 
living: August, Louisa, Herman, William, Fred and Pauline, (twins\ 
Ferdinand, Adolph and Walter. Owns a fine farm of over 700 acres 
of good land. Raises cattle, hogs, grain, etc. Is a successful farmer 
and one of our substantial citizens. 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, ALIVIA, 

Was chartered October 2, 1880. Foundation for a stone building 
completed November 3rd. The church, (a frame building), was dedi- 
cated August 28. 1881. Cost, $2700. Rev. D. .B. Scott was the first 
pastor, entering upon his duties in May, 1870 — more than ten years 
prior to the building of the church. Pastors following in their order 
were: Revs. R. M. Tunnell, Morris Oiflcer, Harvey Jones, Hiram 
Myers, J. R. Pryor, John Scott, who built the church and was four 
years pastor, C. S. Marvin, W. C. Wheeler, D. R. Steiner, Geo. Ket- 
tering, J. E. Kirkpatrick and C. W. Turrell, the present pastor. 



RURAL MAIL ROUTES 

Have been established as follows: Route No. 1, Maple Hill, estab- 
lished April. 1, 1901, Wm. Boyles, carrier; Route No. 1, Eskridge, es- 
tablished April 15, 1901, E. S. Graves, carrier; Route No. 2, Eskridge, 
established April 15, 1901, W. C. Cook, carrier; Route No. 3, Eskridge, 
established April 15, 1901, W. H. Moore, carrier; Route No. ], Paxico, 
established April 15, 1901, Charlie Hund, carrier. 



THE FIRST LOG HOUSE. Page 141. 

Was doubtless built by the McDaniel gang. They carried water 
from the same spring used by George Harvey. This path to the spring 
and to the top of Hodgson's hill was plainly visible for years after the 
first settlers came. The gold was dug up about ten years ago instead 
of five. Mr. Asa Gookins kept the hotel at Harveyville at the time. 



366 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 

CATHOLIC CHURCH, ALMA, 

Was built in 1875. Prior to that time services were held at the 
homes of the members, tne Jesuit fathers of St. Marys attending to 
the spiritual wants of the people. Father Hundhausen was the first 
regular priest, his regular pastorate beginning in 1880 and continuing 
till 1891. Then came Father Hohe, who remained one year. Father 
Bollwig remained two years and six months. Father Cihal filling out 
the unexpired year. Rev. Father Kamp came March 30, 1896, and has 
since continued to minister to the spiritual needs of his people. The 
first church was built in 1875 and was destroyed by fire February 6, 
1899. The corner stone of the new church was laid August 17, the 
bell was blessed November 6, and the new church dedicated December 
19. 1899. Right Rev. Bishop Fink, of the diocese of Leavenworth, be- 
ing present and conducting the impressive ceremonies. The parson- 
age was built in 1881. The altar in the new church and the interior 
decorations are the handsomest in the county. See section 8 for por- 
traits and illustrations. 



DARLING'S FERRY 



Was a busy place in the fifties. It was opposite Uniontown and 
provided the only means of crossing the Kavv river, except at low 
stages of water, when the boat wasn't needed. Among those who 
assisted in running the ferry in 1854-5 was J. P. Gleich, who, in the 
latter year, took a claim on Mill creek just north of Joseph Thoes'. 
Darling had a monopoly of the ferry business for many years, but with 
Immigration came the demand for a ferry at the big bend and Dar- 
ling left for the Indian Territory where he went into the hotel busi- 
ness at Shawnee. 



WABAUNSEE COUNTY IN 1901 

Contained 1786 farms; acres fenced, 380,994; not fenced, 6,034; 
acres in Corn, 95,209: Wheat, 6,444; Oats, 3,148; Irish Potatoes, 1,145; 
Sweet Potatoes, 607; Flax, 746; Buckwheat, 257; Sorghum, for syrup, 
225; Sorghum, for forage, 3,495; Kaffir Corn, 11,883; Alfalfa, 8,978; 
Clover. 990; Blue Grass, 389; Timothy, 266; Prairie Pasture, 144,404 
acres; Pounds of butter made by families, 352,355; In factory. 5,243; 
Number of horses, 9,169; Mules, 700; Cows, 10,701; Other cattle, 42,- 
350; Swine, 33,713; Value of animals sold for slaughter in 1901, $2,298,- 
047; Number of apple trees in bearing, 115,021; Peach trees, 33,553. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 367 



In one respect, at least, the farming classesof our county in the 
early days differed from those of the present— in that no farm ma- 
chinery was left from one season to another in the fence corners where 
last used. The reasons are obvious: there were few fence corners and 
less machinery. What little of the latter the farmers possessed was 
well taken care of. 



LUTHERAN CHURCH, ALMA, 

Was built in 1878, the Lutheran school house in 1890 and the new 
parsonage in 1901. For twenty years Rev. H. C. Senne was the resi- 
dent minister. He was followed by Rev. F. W. Pennekamp, and he 
by Rev. A. Schmid, the present pastor. For a number of years Mr. 
J. P. Emrich taught school in the frame building. Mr. Henry Al- 
brecht taught several years, followed by Prof. J. H. Meyer, the present 
teacher of the Lutheran school. See illustration, section 9, leaflet 6. 

EXPENDITURES FOR 1901. 

County Commissioners, $560; Bridges, $2,222.84; County Officers, 
$5,907.57; District Court, $611.90; Probate Court, $241; Sheriff and 
Bailiffs, $78.97; Jails and Prisons, $271.85; Coroners and Inquest, $72.55; 
Justices and Constables, $241.90; Poor Farm, $1,021.71; Outside of Poor 
Farm, $2,242.75; Fuels, Light, Repairs, Janitor and Watchman, 
$648.85; Assessors, $1,824; Books and Stationery, $919.86; Printing, 
$655,30; Insane, $242; Elections, $584.92; Bounty on Animals, $153; 
Road Purposes, $4,199.55; Miscellaneous, $1,208.93. Total, $23,909.65. 
Population of County (1901), 12,405; Acres in Poor Farm, 320. 

In statement of expenditures for 1860 (page 9), no better idea of 
the prosperity of the county could be given. Hundreds of bridges 
span the streams throughout the county, and every farm is in a high 
state of cultivation. 



School statistics: Number of School Districts, 88; Teachers re- 
quired, 101; Different teachers employed: Males, 49, Females, 58, Total, 
107; Average wages: Male teachers, $43; Female teachers, $39.42; Av- 
erage weeks school term, 29; Number of school buildings, 92; Rooms, 
103; Number persons of school age, (5 to 21 years), 4,591; Pupils en- 
rolled, 3,329; Average attendance, 2,139. 



ERRATA. 



M. E. church, Harveyville, Sec. 5 L 6, should read M. E. church, 
Bradford. 

Mr. Martin Muckenthaler came to Kansas in '69, instead of '59, as 
stated in his biography. 

The smallpox in 1871 should read in 1S7^. 



368 EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



JEWELS OF THE HOUSEHOLD. 

(1), Mary, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T.Taylor, Eskridge; (2), 
Ruth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Hendenson, Alma; (3). Clayton, 
son of Dr. and Mrs. M. F. Trivett, Eskridge; (4). Clyde, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. E. L. Campbell, Eskridge; (5). Bessie, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Copp, Paxico; (6). Agnes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. II. F. 
Palenske, Mountain Home, Arkansas; (7). Milford, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Brady, Paxico; (8). Leo. son of Mrs. Theresa Home, Alma: (9). 
Forest and Raymond, two young blacksmiths,, sons of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Baker, Eskridge; (10). Johnnie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Matt. 
Thomson, Henderson, Arkansas; (11). Helen, , daughter of Dr. T. N. 
Watts, Alma; (12). Hal, son of Mr. and ]\Irs. W. G. Weaver, Alma; 
(13). Hazel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt Roush, Alma; (14). 
Charlie and Florence, son and daughter of Dr. and Mrs. O. E. Webb, 
Paxico; (15). Ross and Beryl, son and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dow 
Busenbark, Eskridge; (16). Ruth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Simon, Jr., Alma; (17). Celina, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Schmidt, Alma; (18). Murray, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Barnes, Alma; 
(19). Agnes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Kinne, Alma; (20). Emily 
and Albert, daughter and son of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Wilson, Alma; 
[21). Gladys, daughter of Mrs. Nellie Dilley, Paxico; (22). LeMyra, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Seaman, Alma; (23). Clarence, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Meyer, Alma; (24). Addie and Theresa, daughters 
of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Frey, Alma; (25). Florence, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Winkler, McFarland; Y26). Laurine, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Louis Schroeder, Alma; (27). Leo, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Treu, 
Halifax; (28). Augusta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs, August Utermann, 
Alma. 



One of the objects of this history is to acquaint the people of to- 
day with the conditions that were the rule in the past; of the time 
when a drouth in Kansas meant scanty raiment and a slend&rdiet; of 
the days when bedsteads were double deckers and when curtains 
served as partition walls to separate the two or more families com- 
pelled to occupy the one room or sleep out of doors with the broad 
canopy of Heaven for a covering; of the seemingly endless days of 
weary watching and waiting by the bedside of a fever stricken father 
or mother, brother or sister, hoping against hope, until the spirit had 
flown to God, who gave it— to that home where pain and sickness are 
unknown and where Death shall never come. 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



INDEX. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



AUendorph, A. S 

Arndt, Rudolph 

Arndt, Herman 

Anderson, Andrew *. 
Anderson, Anna *... 



Barnes, J. B — 

Barlow, J. N 

Buchli, B., Sr. * 

Buchli, B.. Jr 

Bell, Andrew 

Baldwin, S. A 

Berroth. Geo. * 

Busenbark, Dow 

Burgett. Chas. H 

Brasche, Dr. August *. 

Beals, Dr. Guy C 

Burt, Geo. S 

Burroughs, Waldo G. . . 

Copp, John * 

Copp, C. C 

Chillson. Waters 

Channell, H. B 

Chester, Dr. O. S 

Christj-, L. M 

Carroll, James 

Cottrell, A. A 

Clayton, D. F 

Cornell, G. G 

Connell, Geo. S 

Connell, J. V 

Cantrill, S. G 

Campbell, Ed L 



Doollttle, W. A 

Daum, Mrs. Walpurge *. 

Dreblng, Wm. * 

Deans. W. D. * 

Dieball, Wm 

Dailey. Chas 

Davis, C. L 



Eck, J. M. * 

Earl, Wm. H., Sr. *. 

Earl. Chas. N. * 

Early, M. P 

Eckles, W. T 



Fix. Robert 

Falk, August 

Frey, Fred, Jr 

Fields. J. B 

Fairfield. S. H 

Fauerbach, Henry 
Fechter, Geo. A 



Gardiner, C. C 

Gardner, D. M 

Gillis, G. W 

Guth, Robert 

Glotzbach, Joseph, Sr. 



221 
243 
313 
270 
270 

253 
307 
223 
234 
242 
2.S4 
2C9 
263 
270 
299 
307 
292 
290 

258 
295 
237 
240 
253 
255 
260 
261 
267 
293 
y87 
284 
285 
312 

222 

228 
229 
257 
267 
282 
281 

282 
294 
298 
306 
239 

245 
259 
268 
271 
262 
254 
285 

251 

266 
281 
312 
301 



Glotzbach, C. J.. 
Graves, Henry *. 
Grimm, Henry... 

Hesse John * 

Henderson, J. C. . 
Henderson, C!. B. 
Henderson, J. R. 
Hund, Michael *. 

Hund, Philip 

Home, Jacob *.. 
Home, Wm., Sr.. 
Horne, Louis *.. 
Horton, Geo. L... 

Hull, S. E 

Hanson, August. 

Harris. S. M 

Hlnshaw, W. J. . 
Hesse, Conrad *. 
Hodgson, Prank. 
Hall, G. G * 



Janes, M. W 

Jones, J. H 

Jones, A. A 

Johnson, James E. 

Johnson, J. M 

Jester, M 

Jordon, A. M 



Keagy, JohnT 

Krapp, Edward 

Kllian, E. A 

Kuenzli, Christian * 

Kratzer, John Adam *.. . . 
Klockman, Mary Louisa.. 

Lee, J. M 

Licht, H. G 

Lafontaine, Jos 

Lowry, CM 

Leonard, P. E 

Lines, C B. * 

Lines. E C. D. * 

Lyons, W. H 

Lawlor, J. H 



Mann, Ed 

Mainey, Thos 

Meier, Franz 

Meier, G. H 

Meyer, August * 

Mears, Andrew 

Maas, Wm 

Moore. Edwin F 

Mitchell, J. J 

Millison, D. U 

McWilliams, Michael.... 
Muckenthaler, Martin... 
Muckenthaler, Albert... 
Muckenthaler, Joseph... 
Muckenthaler, Chas 



294 

3t;0 

.304 

354 
251 
302 
252 
235 
301 
236 
261 
3.V5 
308 
244 
297 
310 
306 
308 
291 
353 

248 
225 
289 
284 
267 
296 
268 

233 
249 
240 
265 
270 
230 

264 
232 
239 
263 
263 
264 
281 
286 
298 

239 
259 
238 
266 
2.iO 
308 
297 
293 
249 
226 
244 
246 
293 
312 
266 



*Died. 



II EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Mock, John 

Michaells, Henry, Sr. *. 

Michaelis, J. H 

McCrumb, L. J 

McCormick, Ross 

Morris, Ira L 

Mueller, Rev. J. H 

Meredith, P.M. 

Maguire, Patrick * 

Mossman, J. W.* 

Noller, Gottlieb 

Oliver, Thos 

Oehms, Herman B 



Palenske, Louis 

Palenske, H. J 

Pringle, Andrew, Sr. *. 

Pringle, Wm 

Prothrow, Wm 

Perry, T. J : 

Palmer, Mark 

Phillips, Allen * 

Peterson, John * 



Rice, L. T 

Rose, CM 

Roush, Wyatt 

Rogge, Wm 

Raymond, Fredrick L. 

Ronnau, Henry * 

Rinehart, W. M 

Robertson, J. W 

Richards, L 

Rickershauser, Frank. 
Reynard, Peter * 



Spielman, T. S 

Seaman, P. A 

Schmitz. Henry * 

Schmitz, Oscar 

Schmidt, Franz 

Smith, Dr. W. H. H.. .. 

Smith, Dr. C. E 

Shaw, H. C 

Shaw. S. D 

Schewe, Anton 

Schepp, Louis 

Sturdy. E 

Steinmeyer, Fred, Sr. 
Steinmeyer, H. W 



*Died. 



292 
290 
291 
258 
266 
271 
272 
293 
297 
306 

240 

313 
295 

299 
224 
264 
282 
2.57 
239 
271 
286 
289 

298 
227 
238 
294 
244 
253 
265 
269 
265 
311 
353 

226 
228 
234 
272 
245 
312 
233 
310 
310 
295 
258 
296 
283 
285 



Simmons, P. P 232 

Simmons, Robert 255 

Schulthies, H. * 237 

Sutherland, George 256 

Sage, Mark 241 

Schwanke, John * 2,56 

Sudweeks, John 268 

Snyder, Joseph 272 

Sanford, E. H. * 296 

Shoecraf t, Emerson S 307 

Silbermann. J. J 312 

Strowig, Robert 312 

Strowig, A. R 300 

Sweeney, Michael 309 

Thomson, James L. * 309 

Thompson, Geo. W. * 222 

Thompson, H. P. * 283 

Thompson, Chas. H 301 

Trivett. M. F 256 

Thayer, Albert P 246 

Thierer, Gus 261 

True, Alden E 288 

Treu, Joseph 287 

Treu, Wm. * 353 

Thoes, Peter* 283 

Trusler, Wm 305 

Taylor, AmosT 270 

Undort, H. J.* 303 

Undorf, Louis 302 

Utermann, August 287 

Worsley, E 303 

Waugh,J.Y 299 

Wade, A. F 305 

Woody, P. L 236 

Woody, Mrs. P. L. * 236 

Woodard, L. J 250 

Webb, O. E 312 

Weed, S. R 288 

Weaver, W. G 304 

Ward, Biram * 224 

Winkler,John 260 

Walker. Dr. L. A 284 

Whitlock, W. S 291 

Wolgast, August 353 

Williams, W. S. * 354 

Welfelt, Abe 354 

Welfelt, Sam 224 

Zeferjahn, Fred 365 



GENERAL ENDEX. 



Auld Lang Syne 2 

Avenged 106- 7 

Address by Matt Thomson at 

Harvey ville 121 

Anderson, Bill, A Raid by 139 

Alma Salt Works 314 

Alma Volunteer Band 356-358 

Brower, J. V 48-68 

Bill Cole's Last Drive 104 

Bossy Solved the Problem y 148 

Barnes, J. B , Residence 278 

Bridge, Double Arch 278 

Bouchey Stacker, The 358 



County Records, Items from 6 

Cattle, Wealth in 27 

Cattle Car, Free Ride in 29 

Court, Attending, in the Sixties. 31 

Cheyenne Raid. A 46 

Coronado'R Expedition 52 

Catholic Church. Alma 366 

Congregational Church, Alma. .. 365 

County Seat Question 74 

Confirmation Classes, 

Rev. Kamp's 273 

Rev. Wieners' 357 

Rev. Schmids 365 

Court Reminiscence, A 313 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Ill 



Chickasha, Street Scene 

Davis Bros.' Ranch, Scene on... 
Darling's Perry 



Education, Interested in. 
Educational Exhibit, An.. 

Ethnologic History 

Election Returns 

Eliot Church 

Eskridge Cornet Band 

Expenditures for 1901 



355 

356 
366 

61 

65 

68 

166-201 

278 

359 

367 



Palk, Aufifust, and Family 

Ferry, Wabaunsee 

Fences, Our Stone 

Fence, An Old-Time 164, 

Farming Experience, Some 

Fairies, The 

Frontier History, A Bit of 

Fooks-MiUer Feud 

Flood, A Big 

Family, An Interesting- 

Glotzbach, Joseph, and Family.. 

G. A. R. Posts 

Good Fellows, A Group of 

Ground Floor, On the 

Genius, Our, in Limbo 

Germans, A Tribute to the 

Generations, Five 

Generations, Four 

Goat Curiosity 



HesBe, Conrad, and Family.. . 

Historical 

Historical Notes 

Historv, A Bit of Frontier . . . 

He Gathered Them In 

Hunter's Paradise, A 

Home, Our First, in Kansas... 
Haying at Chris Langvardt's. 

Halifax Station 

Harvey ville, Main Street 



Innocent Abroad, An 

Ice, Breaking the 

Iron Horse, No, Then. ... 

Infant Industries 

Indians in Alma in 1881 . . . 

Jewels of the Household. 
Jail Deliveries, Some 

Kindness Remembered. . . 



Log House. The First 

Liederkranz, The Alma. 

Landmark, An Old 

Luteran Church, Alma.. 



358 

16 

73 

280 

90 

360 

118 

162 

163 

275 

858 

361 

359 

99 

30 

41 

359 

359 

216 

359 

4 

315 

118 

71 

77 

110 

274 

275 

277 

33 

45 

49 

111 

277 

368 
37 

114 



141 

273, 355 

273 

367 

360 
13 
23 
24 



M. E. Church. Alma 

Marriages, Some Early 

Me Killee Palenske 

Murder, Was it? 

Mule Brigade. Charge of the ... 88 

McParland Murderers and their 

Victims 149 

Mexican Burros 213 

Miscellany 92 

Mistake, Was it a? 97 

Marion's First School 117 

McFarland. Double Murder at. .. 151 

Mitchell, Frank. Murder of 155 

Muehlenbacher Murder 157 



Mexican Oven and Adobe House. 216 

Mexican Fandango, At a. 13s 

Maccabees, Officers of '" 359 

Maas, Wm., and Family '.'. 350 

Not at Home og 

Newspaper History. ...."."".; '.'■.■ 351 

Narrow Escape, A 40 

Newbury Band 357 

Odds and Ends 50 

Oil Excitement 40 

Officers, County, Elected. . 201 

Out Serving a Writ ' ...'■"■ ^q 

Out for a Round-up 35c 

Old Stage Station at Elm Creek 204 

Our County and Schools, 1886.... 52 

Our First Visitors 108 

Preface g 

Pem-Co- Wye repays a Kindness 22 

Precious Pair, A 25 

Pioneer, How He lived '. 4-> 

Pierre, The Capital 81 

Pawnee Raid. A 104 

Poyntz Avenue in 1866 275 

Press, Items from the 323 

Preparing for a Raid hi 

Queen us 

Remarkable and Eccentric 19 

Reminiscence, A 32 

Resources. Our 44 

Rabbit Farm, A 91 

Returning to the Reservation. . . 28 

Rock Island Eating House 277 

Rock Island Bridge, Maple Hill.. 280 

Rural Mail Routes 365 

Richardson County, Map of 5 

Salt Works, Alma I6 

Smallpox in '71 is 

Sam, The Lesson of 39 

Schools, Our 53 

Stone Fort at Templin ii3 

Santa Fe Trail, The old 205 

Stuewe Bros.' Creamery 276 

Smith Brothers, Killing of the 205 

Thomas. John 17 

Tarantula, Bitten by a 38 

Telephone Exchange, The Mc- 

Mahan 67 

Tenderfoot, the 150 

Thierer, Gus, and Family 360 

Turkey Mountains, In the 209 

Uncle Sam's Kids, One of 93 

Unpleasantness, A Little 108 

Unmarked Grave, An 149 

Visitors at the Ranch 357 

Vigilance Committee, Our First. 145 

"Wooh" 47 

Wrote his Sentiments 68 

Words, Last 64 

Wagon Shop, The First 70 

White Shirt, The First 69 

Were Their Fears Groundless. . . 72 

Warning, A Timely 136 

Wilmington 274 

Woodman Team, Harvey ville... 359 

Wabaunsee County 1901 3(6 

Wabaunsee County 1882, Map of 8 



IV EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PORTKAITS. 

Explanation: First section faces page 20, second faces page 40, etc. 

Ten leaflets in each section. 



Sec. I.. 

Abele, Rev 1 6 

Arndt, Rudolph 1 10 

Arndt. Herman 3 9 

Anderson, Anna 3 9 

AUendorph, A. S 2 3 

BoUwig, Rev 8 6 

Bell, Andrew 1 4 

Baldwin. S. A 1 7 

Buchli. B., .=;r 2 3 

Buchli, B., Jr 2 4 

Busenbark, Dow 2 2 

Brasche, Mr and Mrs. Aug. 1 1 

Burgett, Chas., and' Wife 2 10 

Beals. G. C 4 4 

Barnes. J. B 4 8 

Barlow J. N 5 l 

Beutel. Aug 5 2 

Burt, Geo. S 5 3 

Berroth, Geo., and Wife 5 4 

Burroughs, W. G., and Family. . 6 10 

Burgett, A. G., four Generations 7 4 

Bourassa, Nellie 7 6 

Cihal, Rev 8 6 

Copp, John 1 3 

Clayton, D. F 2 5 

Channell, H. B 2 7 

Campbell, Ed 2 9 

Connell, George S., and Wife.... 2 10 

Cook, W. C 3 3 

Cottrell, A. A 3 5 

Christy. Lynn M ,.. 4 2 

Clothier, George L 4 3 

Chillson, Waters 4 8 

Cornell, G. G 4 8 

Cantrill, S. G 5 5 

Crouch, W. S 11 1 

Droege, Gus 1 10 

Drebing.- Wm 2 6 

Deans, W. D .' 3 4 

Dieball, Wm., and Wife 5 4 

Davis, Chef 5 5 

Drumra Bros 3 8 

Eck, J. M 3 6 

Earl, W. H , Sr 7 7 

Earl, C. N 3 10 

Early, M. P., and Wife 5 l 

Eckles. W. T 2 a 

Fix, Mr. and Mrs. Michael 1 2 

Fix, J. R., and Family 6 1 

Fix, Amanda 3 1 

Palk, Aug.. and Family 6 2 

Fairfield, S. H 2 2 

Frey, Fred 2 5 

Fields, Joseph 7 9 

Fields, J. B 2 7 

Fechter, Geo 4 10 

Gleich, J. P., and Wife 1 l 

Graves, Henry 4 9 

Gardner, D. M., and Family 7 l 



Sec. L. 

Gardiner, C C 2 9 

Glotzbach, Joseph, and Family. . G 5 

Hess John i 6 

Henderson, J. C 4 1 

Henderson, C. B 2 3 

Henderson, J. R 4 5 

Hund, Michael, Sr 2 6 

Hankammer, John A 2 10 

Home, Jacob 3 2 

Home, Wm 3 2 

Hanson, Aug 3 4 

Hubbard. J. M 3 .5 

Hall,G. G 3 7 

Hull, S. E 4 8 

Hinshaw, W. J 4 7 

Home, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 4 9 

Horton, Geo. L 5 1 

Harris, Isaiah 5 6 

Harris, Mrs. Isaiah 5 6 

Harris, S. M., and Family 6 9 

Hodgson, Frank 5 10 

Hesse, Conrad, and Family 6 6 

Hundhausen, Rev 8 8 

Hohe, Rev 8 6 

Janes W. W 1 7 

Jones, J. H 2 3 

Jones, F. M 1 9 

Jones, A. A 4 7 

Johnson, James E., and Wife 4 .=> 

Johnson, J. M.. , 1 8 

Johnson, Mrs. J. M 4 5 

Jordon. A. M 4 1 

Jester, M 5 1 

Keagy, J. T 4 4 

Kamp, Rev 8 6 

Kinne. C. 2 2 

Kuenzli, C 1 3 

Kratzer, Adam 2 10 

Kettering, Geo 11 2 

Klockman, Mary Louisa 3 9 

Krapp, Ed 5 ?> 

Krenitz, Frank 7 10 

Kettermann, Mr. and Mrs 5 4 

Lafontaine, Joseph 2 4 

Lines. C. B 3 3 

Lines, E. J 3 7 

Lines, E. CD 5 3 

Lowry, CM 3 3 

Licht, H. G 5 8 

Leonard, P. E 4 10 

Lavvlor and Wife 4 6 

Meyer, August l 2 

Meier, Fran:<. 1 6 

Meier, G.H 3 4 

Mears, Andrew, and Wife 7 2 

Maquire. Pat 1 9 

McCorraick, Ross 2 8 

Mitchell, J. J 2 9 

Mitchell. Wm 7 8 

Millison, D. U., and Family 3 3 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Sec. L. 

Mossman, J. W.. 3 5 

Morris, Ira L 4 2 

Meredith, F. M., aud Wife 4 6 

Mann, Ed 5 2 

Moore, Ed. P 5 7 

Meseke, Herman 5 8 

Muckenthaler, M 5 9 

Muckenthaler, Chas 5 9 

Maa.s, Wm., and Family 6 4 

Mock, John 6 7 

McKelvey, Matt 7 8 

McCoy. W. A 7 10 

McMahan, J. H , (See Telephone 
Exchange.) 

Noller, Gottlieb 7 10 

Newman, Harr}' 5 2 

Oliver, Isabella Maple Hill 7 6 

Oliver, Thomas 3 8 

Oehmann, Frank 4 9 

Pauly, L 1 2 

Pringle, W 1 4 

Perry, T.J 2 4 

Perry, S.T 7 8 

Palenske, Louis 3 6 

Palenske, H. J 4 5 

Palenske, Mrs. Fred 1 5 

Palenske, Mrs. Liouis 1 5 

Palenske, Daisy Thomson 3 l 

Phillips, Mr. and Mrs 1 9 

Palmer, Mark 2 8 

Prothrow, Wra 5 10 

Peterson, John, and Wife 6 2 

Raymond, Fred L 1 7 

Ririehart, W. M 1 8 

Roush, Wyatt 2 4 

Richards, L 3 5 

Robertson, J. W 2 8 

Rose, C. M 5 2 

Ronnau. Henry 4 10 

Reynard, Peter 3 8 

Rickershauser, Frank 3 10 

Schmitz, Henry 1 4 

Schmidt, Franz 1 5 

Schmidt, Frank 2 5 

Schmitz, Oscar 2 7 

Smith, W. H. H 3 6 

Smith, C. E 3 6 

Schmid, A 11 5 

Silbermann. J. J 1 6 

Sanford, E. H 1 8 

Schewe, A 1 10 

Spielman, T. S 2 1 



Sec. 

Strowig, Robt ... 2 

Seaman, Fred A 2 

Simmons, P. P o 

Shoecraft, Emerson 3 

Steiner, D. R ' n 

Scott, John .... 11 

Scott, D. B '/. 5 

Schutter. Joseph 3 

Sutherland, Geo 4 

Shaw, H. C 4 

Sturdy, E 4 

Sage, Mark 4 

Schepp, Louis 7 

Steinmeyer, Fred. Sr.,and Wife. 7 
Steinmeyer, H. W., and Wife. . . . 7 
Schwanke, Mrs. C, (Five Gener- 
ations 6 

Thomson, James L 3 

Thompson, Geo. W 1 

Thompson. H. P 1 

Thomson, Matt, and Family (3 

Treu, Joseph 1 

Treu, Wm 3 

True, A. E 4 

Thayer, A. F 1 

Thoes, Peter 1 

Trivett, M. F 2 

Tavlor, Amos 2 

Tunnell. R. M 11 

Trusler, Wm 4 

Thierer, Gus, and Family 6 

Undorf , Louis 5 

Utermann, August 4 

Whittemore, N. H 1 

Woody, P. L 2 

Woody, Mrs. P. L 2 

Woods, Samuel 3 

Wade, A. F 4 

Weed, S. R 4 

Wiedemann, Frank 2 

Winkler, John 3 

Worsley, Ed » 3 

Williams, W. S 3 

Wolgast, Aug 3 

Waugh, J. Y 4 

Weaver, W.G 4 

Willard, J. F 4 

Whitlock, W. S 5 

Woodard, L. J., and Wife 5 

Welfelt, Abe s 

Walton, Morris 7 

Wieners, Rev 11 

Zwanziger, G 1 



6 
7 
1 
2 
2 
7 

10 
1 
7 
7 

10 
7 
2 



1 
3 
3 

8 
4 
4 
3 
7 

10 
1 
9 
9 



3 
1 

8 
1 
1 
8 
3 
4 
n 
2 
3 
7 
9 
2 

3 
4 
3 
4 
5 
9 
6 

5 



CHURCHES. 



Baptist, Eskridge 8 7 

Baptist, German, Alta Vista 8 9 

Baptist, Eskridge . 9 5 

Baptist, Plumb 9 7 

Baptist, Plumb, Mission Point. . . 10 5 

Christian, Harveyville 5 6 

Congregational, Wabaunsee 8 1 

Catholic, Newbury 8 3 

Catholic, Alma, (Old.) 8 5 

Catholic, Alma, (New.) 8 6 

Congregational, Alma 9 5 



Christian, Eskridge 9 

Congregational, Maple Hill U 

Christian, Wilmington H 

Evangelical, Alma 9 

Evangelical, Alma 10 

Evangelical, Wells Creek 9 

Lutheran, Alma 9 

Lutheran, Kaw. : 8 

Lutheran, Templin 9 

Lutheran, (Swedish.) 9 



VI EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Sec. L 

M. E., Alma 8 2 

M. E., Bradford ♦ 5 6 

M. E., Kaw, 8 4 

M. E., Paxico i 4 

M. E., Wabaunsee 8 4 

M. E., Eskridge 8 7 

M. E., Maple Hill 8 8 

M. E., McFarland 8 8 

M. E., Alta Vista 9 10 



^Sec. 

M. E., (German,) Rock Creek.... 10 

M. E., Harveyville 10 

M. E.. Washara 10 

Presbyterian, (Reformed,) Esk- 
ridge 9 

Presbyterian, (United,) Esk- 
ridge 9 

Wesley an Methodist, Keene 9 



10 
10 



*Harveyville— Incorrect. 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 



AltaVista 13 

Eskridge 8 

McFarland 8 

Paxico 10 

Wabaunsee 10 

District 2 9 

District 3 10 

District 7 10 

District 9 9 

District 11 9 

District 12 7 

District 14 10 

District 15 9 



7 District 16 9 10 

10 District 23 9 4 

1 District 30 10 7 

8 District 35 10 1 

8 District 44 10 6 

3 District 45 9 3 

8 District 47 10 1 

6 District 48 9 4 

10 District 56 10 6 

7 District 59 10 4 

9 District 66 9 10 

7 District 71 10 8 

3 District 86 10 5 



See our County and Schools, 1882, facing page 52. 



HOTELS. 



Hotel Alma 13 8 

Mrs. Beaubien's, Maple Hill 7 8 

Commercijkl, Alma 14 7 



Denver House, McFarland 14 8 

Paxico Hotel 5 9 

Hotel Windier, Maple Hill 18 1 



RESIDENCES. 



Arndt, Herman 16 

Barnes, J. B 13 

Bisbey, J. M 14 

Barlow. J. N 16 

Blanc, Frank 17 

Bell, Andrew 18 

Cornell, G. G 16 

Carroll, C. E 14 

Cassidy, J. B 15 

Clayton, D. F 16 

Davis, C. L 15 

Dierking, Fred 10 

Drebing, Wm 17 

Droege, Gus 17 

Dieball, Albert 15 

Dieball. Wm 16 

Fix, J. R 15 

Fix, Michael (First) 18 

Fairfield, S. H 15 

Grimm, Henry 16 

Gillis, G. W 16 



10 
3 
6 
4 
3 



3 

8 

9 
1 
3 

5 

10 

3 

10 
2 
1 

7 
5 



Horne, Wm., Jr 9 4 

Home, Wm., Sr 17 10 

Holman, Pete 10 6 

Henderson, J. C 15 6 

Henderson, J. R 15 7 

Hund, Moritz 15 6 

Hess, Otto 17 3 

Hanson, August 17 2 

Janes, M. W 16 14 

Kinne. C. 15 2' 

Kuenzli, C 17 6 

Mitchell, J. J 5 8 

Mainey, Thomas 7 7 

Melrose, W. H 10 6 

Meinhardt, August 10 1 

Meseke, A. H 14 7 

Meyer, Mrs. E 15 5 

Meyer's, (Mrs. E.) Store £ 10 

Maas, William 16 7 

McMahan, J. H. 15 9 

Mears, Andrew 16 9 

Michaelis, J. H 16 1 

Muckenthaler, Joseph 16 1 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



VII 



Sec. L. 

Naylor, J. W 18 3 

Ronnau, Henry 12 8 

Keuter, Fred 15 3 

Kickershauser, Wm 15 8 

Kickershauser, Frank 17 6 

Stuewe, F. and A 9 i 

Stuewe, John 15 8 

Schmidt, Frank 10 5 

Schwalm, John 17 8 

Stratton, C 10 i 

Spielman, T. S 14 

Sutherland, George 15 5 

Sturdy, E 15 7 

Schroeder, Gus 15 8 

Strowig, Robert 15 8 

Strowig, A. R 16 10 

Shaw. S. D 16 2 

Sanford, E. H 17 7 

Schewe, Anton 17 1 

Steinmeyer, Carl 18 7 



Sec. L. 

True, A. E . ,0 ■> 

Tod, W. J " . . . ' 10 3 

Trivett, M. F 14 4 

Tomson, C ;& 4 

Thomson, Matt 15 « 

Thlerer, Gus " le 3 

Thoes, Joseph '...'. 17 5 

Thowe, Chris 17 g 

Thowe, Fred 17 1 

Terrass. Jacoh "17 2 

Utermann, August le 2 

Winkler, Otto 10 5 

Winkler, Arthur 14 10 

Wehh.O. E 15 4 

Wade,A.F 16 6 

Woodard, D. A 17 10 

Waugh, Wm is 5 

Zeferjahn, Fred 16 10 

Zeckser. Chas 17 4 

Zeckser, August 18 3 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Allendorph'a Ranch, Scene on. .. 18 6 

Alma, View of 13 1 

Alma in 1868 13 5 

Alma Mill 17 9 

Alma, Missouri Street 13 8 

Alma, Missouri Street, "80 13 9 

Alma National Bank. • 14 6 

Alma from Santa Fe Depot 16 5 

Alma, East Side MainoStreet.... 6 9 

Alma Salt Works 9 3 

Alta Vista, Main Street 10 5 

Band, Alma Volunteer 12 1 

Band, Eskridge Cornet 12 2 

Band, Newbury Philharmonic. 12 3 

Band, Alma Volunteer 12 4 

Buffalo in the Sixties 6 10 

Bouchey, Al, at Work 18 1 

Court House in 1880 13 9 

Court House in 1902 14 6 

Chickasha 18 10 

Cemetery, Alma 18 10 

Catholic Church and Parsonage 8 6 
Confirmation Classes: 

Rev. Kamp's 11 5 

Rev. Wiener's 11 6 

Rev. Schmid's . 11 7 

Creamer}'. Stuewe Bros' 9 1 

Chalk Postofflce and Hall 10 5 

Davis Bros.' Ranch 17 2 

Davis Bros.' Ranch. Scene on — 18 6 

Dailey's Express, '86 18 2 

Duroc-Jerseys, Herd of 18 7 

Dedication, Alta Vista 11 4 

Eskridge, Looking North 13 6 

Eskridge, Looking South 13 7 

Eskridge, West Side Main street 7 5 

Earl's Store, W. H 10 9 

Floral Scene :. 11 5 



Fence, An Old Time 18 9 

Fowler's Ranch, iScene at 18 8 

Fix, Samuel, Ranch Home in 

Colorado 7 1 

Freeman Farm, Orchard on 7 7 

Glotzbach's Store, Paxico 15 2 

Graduating Class, Eskridge 12 10 

Group of Good Fellows 12 10 

Halifax, View of 13 3 

Harveyville, Main Street 13 10 

Herefords, Herd of 18 8 

Haying at Chris Langvardt's 8 9 

Interesting Family. An 12 9 

Indians in Alma in 1881 9 7 

Janes' Barn, M. W 16 4 

Jewels of the Household 7 5 

Kinne & Keran's Block, Alma. .. 14 6 

Liederkranz, Alma 12 7 

Limerick & Crafts Block 14 8 

Landmark, An Old 10 4 

Maccabees, Officers of , 1901 12 5 

Maple Hill, View of 13 1 

McFarland in '94 13 4 

McFarland in 1902 13 5 

Maple Hill, West Side Main 

Street 14 1 

Maple Hill, East Side 14 1 

Morlan's Quarry 10 1 

Out Serving a Writ ■. 12 9 

Paxico, View of 13 2 

Paxico Main Street 14 2 

Poor Farm, View of 14 3 

Poyntz Avenue in '66 15 1 

Poland Chinas, Herd of 18 7 

Paxico Lumber Company 10 10 



vm 



EARLY HISTORY OF WABAUNSEE COUNTY, KAN. 



Sec. 
Rogge s, (William) Elevator. 11 

Round-up, Out for a ig 

Royal Neighbor's Float 10 

R. I. Eating Hou.se, McParland . 8 
R. I. Eating Hou.se, Interior 
View, McParlaad 8 

Strowig's Mill. Paxico 13 

Signal Building 14 

Simon's (F. C.) Store, Alma.. . 14 

Spiritof'76 jg 

St. Marys' Bridge ' I8 

School House, District 23, (ist). 8 
Sunflowers, A Pretty Bunch of 11 

Tableau, The Fairies' 12 

Templin, View of 14 



8 



Sec. 
Threshing Scene. ... 17 

Teachers' lustitute, Vsm. .'...'." " n 
Teachers' Institute, 1897.. " n 

Teachers* Institute, 1901 "..'., n 

Utermann's (Livery) Barn 11 

VoUand, View of 14 

Woodman Team, Harvey ville.. . . 12 
Winkler's Hotel in '80. ... 13 

Woodman Hall, Wabaunsee..!!.'.' 14 

Wilmington. View of 14 

Wamego Bridge "" ih 

Winklers (Arthur) Store, Mc- 

Farland 14 

Wesley an College 10 



L, 

7 

8 

9 

10 



6 
9 
3 
4 
4 

10 
9 



UNCHiASSIFIED. 



Auld Lang Syne 2 

Map of Richardson County. ..! 5 

Wabaunsee County in 1882.. 8 

Old School Hou.se, Halifax 12 

First School House, District io 15 

John Thomas 17 

Our County and Schools.... 53 

Our County and Schools 53 

Absent Members of the McMa- 

han Telephone Exchange.... 08 

Members, Telephone Exchange. 68 

Louis Schroder's Residence .... 68 

A Pawnee Raid 104 

Our First Visitors ' 108 

Our First Home in Kansas. no 

Old Stone Fort at Templin. ... U3 



Preparing for a Raid 144 

Where the First Log House was 

Built ,4^ 

Bossy, also sample of Old-Time 

Fence |<jg 

McFarland Murderers and their 

Victims J50 

The Muehlenbacher Home'. 157 

Margaritha's House .'." " if,s 

Mail Station at Elm Creek .. "04 

Bill Cole's Last Drive 2O8 

Turkey Mountains 213 

Mexican Burros •'.' 013 

Mexican Oven and Adobe House. 216 

Goat Curio.sity ^hq 



2250 



. W