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Full text of "St Andrew's College Review, Easter 1922"





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Ryrie Bros. Limited 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 

Special attention given to Class Pins and 
College Insignia 

SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET : 

" CLUB AND CLASS PINS." 

134-136-138 Yonge Street 
TORONTO 



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College Men 

who know VALUE 

—who know QUALITY. STYLE and 
TAILORING, buy their clothes at 
DUN FIELDS' — where they know 
they are sure of getting SOCIETY 
BRAND — the best clothes value in 
Canada — all wool materials, newest 
styles, hand-tailoring. 

Suits, Sport Suits, Top Coats 
$30 to $60 

DUNFIELD HABERDASHERY 

— reprtsenls the last word in style combined 
vuilh good taste — and is reasonable priced — 
always. 




1 02 Yonge 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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FOUNTAIN PENS 

The Salesman in our 
Fountain Pen Depart- 
ment will be glad to 
help you select the 
pen best suited for 
your hand. 

It is surprising" how 
much easier it is to 
write with a pen that 
suits your style of 
writing. 

Call in some day, and 
test our pens. You 
will be sure to find one 
that exactly suits you. 

8-14 Wellingrton St., W. Toronto 



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61 Bloor West North 8252 



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and 



Crippen 

Photographs 



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"The cut o'them" 



IT takes a good cutter to turn out 
the suit that a particular man 
will wear. 

IT takes a good cutter to give the 
lines and style to suits that St. 
Andrew's boys desire. 

THE Boys' Clothing department 
in this Store specializes in the 
"cut" of suits and overcoats. 



The Robert Simpson Co. Ltd. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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" BUILD STRONG " 

Strength may be Moral , Mental 
or Muscular- 



All are qualities of men of might. Nature's own [ 
food builds strong bodies. 



For *' Milk of Quality " phone us 



College 2040 




Company, Limited 



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RATHBONE 



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and Co. 



92 Yonge Street 

Importers of 

Exclusive Men's Wear 

FLANNEL and DUCK 

TROUSERS 

SPORT SHIRTS 

and 

BATHING SUITS 

Phone Main 2928 



THE TORONTO 

TROPHY-CRAFT 

COMPANY 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

CLASS PINS 
PENNANTS 
SWEATER CRESTS 
F R A T. PINS 
DANCE PROGRAMS 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 
MEDALS AND 
TROPHIES 



special designs submitted 
free of charge 

1711 ROYAL BANK BUILDING 

KING 8c YONGE STS. 

TORONTO 

PHONE ADELAIDE 4731 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



TRUE TO HIS WORD 

He Studied Hard and Won a Planet 




''Daddy promised me a new 
Planet bicycle if I passed my 
exam.inations — and I did.'' 

Surely no Daddy could offer 
any better inducement for his boy 
or g-irl to study hard and pass on 
the promise of a new bicycle. 

It's time now to consider 
getting- that wheel, we have a 
nice new stock just the latest 
design and you should see the 
PLANET before buying else- 
where. 



THE PLANET BICYCLE CO. 



69-71 QUEEN STREET E. 



TORONTO 



PHONE MAIN 3197 



OE- -3 E- -a c- 3 c- -ran 

BACON 


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LARD 


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Packing Co. 


Limited 


^ 66 Front St. East, Toronto " 


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BUTTER 


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EGGS 



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ELLIS BROS 

LIMITED 

DIAMOND IMPORTERS AND 
JEWELLERS 

96-98 YONGE ST. 



WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 

JEWELLERY, CLOCKS, 

CHINA, SILVERWARE, 

AND ART GOODS 



Highest Quality 

Newest Styles 

Best Values 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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"For Your Digestion's Sake" 

you are recommended to use 

BERMALINE 
BREAD 

Dr. Andrew Wilson, writing in the "British Medical 
Journal," states — 

'■'This Bread should be eaten by all who are in any 
ivay ejected by digestive ailments.^' 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



NASMITHS LIMITED 



Phone Main 6535 



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®[mbergitp of tlToronto ^reSS 

Zloronto 

Solicits the orders of Student Societies for 



— PRINTING — 

Invitations, Tickets, 

Programmes, At-Home 

Cards, etc. 




— BINDING— 


IN ALL 


ITS 


BRANCHES 



R. J. HAMILTON, B.A. 



Manager 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



DEER PARK GARAGE 

1 AND LIVERY LTD. 



North 1300 

Cars 

For 

Dances, 

Weddings, 

Etc. 

A Call Will Send a Car 
To Your Door in a Jiffy 



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Canada's 
Leading 
Outdoor 
Photographers 



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Copying 
and 
Enlarging 
A Specialty 



Galbraith 

Photo Co. 

Carlton and Yonge Sts. 
Toronto 



TELEPHONE MAIN 6725 



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Here's to the Boys! ' 



We were young once ourselves 

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The BRITISH AMERICAN OIL COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Branches in principal towns and cities in Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan and Alberta 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




At. Si. Andrew's Tuck 
and Most Good Stores 



Satisfies 

ALWAYS 



MHflUGHLINS 

GINGER 
ALE 



HYGOA BEST BEVERAGES 



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IMPERIAL BANK 

OF CANADA 



Capital and Reserve $14,500,000 

Going back through the years since St. 
Andrew's opened, students of all years 
will rememberthe Imperial Bank. You are 
proud of the College record— We are proud 
of the Bank's record. 



y The nearest Branch to St, Andrew's College is 

Dat the corner of Yonge and Bloor Sts. 
R. E. Howard, Manager. 



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Fishing 
Sailing 
Shooting 
Camping 
First Aid 
Swimming 
Life Saving 
Fancy Diving 
Canoe Cruises 
Nature Study- 
Sailing Cruises 
Manual Training 



Music 

Games 

Boxing 

Archery 

Canoeing 

Dramatics 

Wrestling 

Woodcraft 

Gymnastics 

Volley Ball 

Photography 

Athletic Sports 



Camp Kagawong 

A SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS 



St. Andrew's Boys at Camp 1921 




Applegath, A. 
Applegath, W. 
Allen. R. 
Bristol, W. 
Brown, J. 
Brown, A. 
Barber, D. 
Blauvelt, F. 
Craig, E. 
Carrick, J. 
Carrick, D. 
Carrick, A. 
C lebrook, G. 
Easton, W. 
Ellsworth E. 
Fair E. 
Fleck, W. 
Grant. R. 
Hoops, H. 
Hoops, H. 
King, B. 



Lumbers, L. 
Lentz, W. 
Macdonald, W. 
McLean, D. 
MacLennan, E. 
McMurty, W. 
Nelles, R. 
Rolph, G. 
Scythes, B. 
Shortley, J. 
Skeaff, S. 
Slemin, H. 
Smily, P. 
Smart, E. 
Stollmeyer, R. 
Stollmeyer, A. 
Stollmeyer, A. 
Temple, C. 
Turnbull, J. 
Watts. L. 
Worts, J. 
Smith. H. 



As the Camp has a full registration 
early each year it should be distinctly 
understood that in fairness to former 
campers all applications can receive 
consideration only in the order in 
which they may come to hand. 

For illustrated booklet and further 
information address 

E. A. CHAPMAN, 

St. Andrew's College. 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




Kent Bld^.t Toronto 



I. SAVE iloZl 



Bartlet Bldti., M'Indsor 



Clothes 

preferred by 

College 

Men 

The proof that we give GREATER 
VALUE is well exemplified in our 
showing of all wool garments in 
styles approved as correct for 
3'oung men. 

Suits, Sport 
Suits, and 
Top Coats 

At Our Upstairs Prices 

$18 to $45 

If you buy by comparison of 
value you will wear Pascoes 
Clothes^ — -they are sold to you at 
prices FREE FROM HIGH 
RENTS AND SELLING EX- 
PENSES and guaranteed to give 
service and satisfaction. 




pAscoE^ 

-^' CLOTHES SHOP ^^ 

_ ' Second Floor Ken< Building - 
Corner YONGE and RICHMOND STREETS. 



^Ije ^t ^ntireto'5 College 

Review 




Caster, 1922 



3£&itonal ifiSoarC) 

MR. A. R. RAMSEY 
R. H. ANDERSON F. R. DAYMENT 

J. E. HOWELL J.V. RUSSELL 

B. B. KING W. A. BEER 

K. B. CARSON E. R. McLELLAND 

Business /IDanaoers 



J. A. CAMERON 
R. J. CAMERON 



W. E. EARLE 

W. G. McMURTRY 



Issued by the Editorial Board 
EVERY CHRISTMAS, EASTER AND MIDSUMMER 



Caster, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

The First Hockey Team Frontispiece 

Editorial 13 

Winter Fishing on Kempenfeldt Bay 15 

A Greenhorn's Experience on the Farm 17 

Spring 19 

The Mexican People 21 

The Voyage of the L6 23 

A Visit to R.M.C 24 

Something 26 

The School 27 

Hockey 35 

Our Old Boys 59 

Exchanges 63 

Skits 66 



St. Andrew's College Review 

lEaster, 1922 

EDITORIAL. 

Looking back over this last term, during which we have been 
favoured with ideal weather, one is inclined to think that there have 
been no events of exceptional interest. Since the winter has been 
of clear cold days, the keen ice has promoted hockey, and the abun- 
dant snow has been perfect for skiing and toboganing. 

The performance of our first team which went even farther than 
winning its group, and the success obtained by all the lesser teams 
has been very gratifying. And now that one more hockey season is 
a matter of memory, we can sum up its material results and regard 
them with a modest measure of satisfaction. 

The spirit displayed by the school itself has been commendable. 
That teams have been able to play in the manner ours have is un- 
doubtedly a true reflection of the morale and spirit which has been 
prevalent throughout the whole school during this past term. After 
the match with the St. Mary's team, a half-holiday was granted by 
the Headmaster, not in recognition of the score, but as an acknow- 
ledgment of the good sportsmanship displayed both by the mem- 
bers of the team and their supporters. 

To those inclined to believe that sports occupy too large a space 
in this issue, we would reply, that being a boy's paper, written by 
boys, we are naturally inclined to dwell at length on a subject 
peculiarly interesting to us. On the other hand, we would add, that 
one must not forget the classwork which has daily had first claim 
on our time and efforts. The result of our preparation for the 
more serious tasks of life will occupy a large portion of the Christ- 
mas issue, when the outcome of the matriculation examinations 
will have been ascertained. 



It was with no slight degree of pleasure that we welcomed Dr. 
Macdonald on his return to our midst. His trip to England was, we 
hope, a pleasure; and his participation in the Headmaster's Con- 
ference at Oxford has brought honour to the school. 

13 



14 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

As it becomes more and more one of the outstanding events of 
the school year, we are pleased with the success of the Cadet Corps' 
At Home. It is on that evening that many of the friends of the 
college are enabled to join in the mirth and jollity of a cadet ball. 
In the past, the corps has on i*ecord numerous happy gatherings ; 
in the future, it is our hope that everyone will participate v/ith a 
degree of pleasure as yet unknown. 



Ere this issue will have reached its final stage of publication, the 
play given by the Dramatic Society will have become a matter of 
history. At the present writing we look forward to the evenings 
of March thirtieth and thirty-first as the dates set. The garden 
scene from "Twelfth Night," with its sparkling humour and its 
masterful Shakespearian treatment of the ridiculous, will form the 
outline of a short play. 

F. Roper Daymemt. 



It is with very deep regret that we record the death of Mr. 
Thomas Findley, Dec. 19th, 1921, after a long and painful illness. 
The late Mr. Findley was for many years a keen supporter and 
admirer of St. Andrew's College, of the character of whose work 
he knew at first hand, as his two sons are Andreans. 

In March, 1918, he became a Governor of the School and always 
took a real interest in the work of the Board, never forgetting the 
responsibilities of his position. He will be much missed by his 
fellow Governors and the Headmaster, who early learned the value 
of his counsel and direction. His interest in the school and in the 
activities of the boys continued to the very end. Almost one of 
the last acts of his busy and unselfish career was his entertainment 
of the victorious football team at a banquet, in recognition of the 
sportsmanlike manner in which they had played the game. It was 
his earnest desire to show a practical interest in the boys' activi- 
ties and to impress upon them his appreciation of true ideals in 
sport. Though confined to bed and sufi'ering great pain, he himself 
arranged the details of his entertainment and deputed to his elder 
son the duty of representing him as host. This last act of generous 
thoughtful ness will have a lasting effect upon those boys who were 
his guests on that occasion. To them Mr. Findley's life was an 
example of a hard game fought courageously to the very end. 



WINTER FISHING ON KEMPENFELDT BAY. 

Fishing is, to most lovers of sport, a well known recreation; 
but perhaps few who delight in angling for the different members 
of the finny tribe have ever fished through an ice-coated bay. Those 
in the ranks of the unemployed in, and around Barrie, find this 
form of fishing a profitable, as well as an enjoyable, winter occupa- 
tion. At the head of Kempenfeldt Bay there are every winter at 
least seventy-five shanties, each sheltering from one to two indus- 
trious men ; indeed, this is the limit of their seating capacity. 

A keen fisherman gets his little hut out as soon as the ice is 
r-trong enough to bear its weight, that is when the ice is three or 
four inches thick. Selecting a suitable location, in from seventy-five 
to one hundred feet of water, and very often the grounds of the 
preceding season, he hauls his little hut to this place on a small 
sleigh. He then chops through the ice and places his shanty so that 
the hole in the floor is directly over that in the ice. This hole is 
about eighteen inches wide and three feet long. Snow is banked 
against the walls of the shanty and everything is made snug and 
warm. 

A fire is kept up in a small stove, which is placed in a small 
alcove directly opposite the seat occupied by the fisherman. When 
the hut is thoroughly warmed, he lets down his line with two or 
three baited hooks attached and is ready for action. 

Whitefish are by far the most numerous species caught, and 
though they reach an average size of only one pound, they make 
excellent eating and are readily sold. But when a ten-pound trout, 
or as they are sometimes called salmon-trout, is caught, a really 
true prize has been obtained. They have a very delicious flavour 
and are, therefore, easily marketed. Dog-fish, weighing two pounds 
2nd upwards, are sometimes caught, but their flesh is not con- 
sidered good eating, and they are fed to domestic animals or thrown 
away. 

I have known a successful day's fishing bring in as many as one 
hundred fish of various kinds. The average run is, however, about 
twenty-five a day, and with whitefish selling at three for a quarter 
and trout at fifteen cents a pound, a good wage is earned by the 
fisherman. 

But, as with other things of this world, winter fishing is not all 
clear sailing; so we find days when the poor fisherman takes home 

15 



10 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



less than ten fish. When such conditions arise and do not better 
themselves within a few days, he is obliged to change his fishing 
grounds, and in his new location he may again ply a prosperous 
trade. 

The enthusiastic fisherman begins his work soon after day- 
break and continues at it all day. His bait usually consists of live 
minnows but som^etimes salted ones are used. The former are kept 
iri a box, placed in the running water of a warm spring, and are 
the more used of the two kinds ; the salted ones are used only in an 
emergency or to keep the supply of live ones from being too quickly 
exhausted. Each night a can of boiled rice is lowered to the bed 
of the lake and its contents deposited there to attract hungry fish. 

The same man who puts out his fish shanty when the ice is 
scarcely strong enough to bear its weight, is very often the most 
reluctant to "pull stakes" and stop the winter's work. It is there- 
fore not an uncomm_on sight to see a hut floating around on some 
drifting ice, having been abandoned in haste by its owner when the 
warm air of spring has made the ice honeycombed and unsafe. 

So, when we speak of fishing, we must not think only of casting 
for fish in a stream, or fishing from a boat, we must remember, too, 
how fish are secured through ice. 

T. V. Wilson. 




RUSHING THE SEASON 



A GREENHORN'S EXPERIENCE ON THE FARM. 

Threshing is a very interesting operation when viewed by an 
outsider; but it loses all its attraction once a person tries it for 
himself. Such was my experience last summer. I was greatly 
pleased with the idea of going out with a threshing gang, and was 
all ready to go one fine Monday morning in the latter part of 
August. The boss called for me about eleven o'clock and drove me 
to the farm, which was about twenty-two miles south-west of 
Winnipeg. 

We arrived about half-past twelve and had a hearty, if 
not dainty, meal. That afternoon I was given a pitchfork and 
was told to go and pitch oats onto the racks in the field. I worked 
steadily for six hours, and was ready for a good meal and a long 
rest when I quit. I had worn no gloves and my hands had blisters 
all over them, besides, I was pretty tired. That night I slept in an 
empty granary on some hay, with four white men and five Galicians. 
1 was so tired, however, that my surroundings were only a minor 
detail. 

The next morning I was up at five a,m,, and after eating a good 
breakfast I began work again, pitching oats in the field. Later in 
the morning we had the field cleared, but as yet we had not used 
the threshing outfit at all. The field we had just cleared had been 
full of wild oats and not worth threshing, so it was stacked in the 
barnyard for rough feed. 

In the afternoon, however, the outfit was set up in another oat 
field, and the threshing began in earnest. The boss intended to put 
the threshed oats in his own granary for winter feed, and I was 
told to stay at the barn and help unload the wagons as they came 
along. I was given a half-bushel grain scoop, which, when full, 
weighed about twenty pounds, and with that I helped to unload 
wagon after wagon until seven p.m. when the whistle blew. That 
night when I had satisfied the inner man I literally hit the hay, and 
slept like a log. 

The next morning I was pulled out at half-past four and told 
to feed, water, and harness my team before breakfast, as we were 
to move the whole outfit to a barley field six miles away, and I was 
to have a team and drive one of the grain wagons. After breakfast 
I hooked up my team and set out with the outfit. We reached the 

17 

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18 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\'1EW 

fiold about ten o'clock, but it was an hour before the outfit was set 
up and going. 

Dinner-time came before I had my wagon filled, and aftei* look- 
ing after the horses 1 headed for the cook-house. Dinner over, I 
harnessed up the team, and as soon as my wagon was full, I set out 
for Brunkhill, a little town six miles away, where I was to take the 
grain to the elevator. I had never driven a team before, and was 
just trusting to luck that eveiything would turn out all right. T 
had no difficulty until I came to a raised railway crossing, where 
1 was to turn to the right toward Brunkhill, Going up the incline 
to cross the tracks the team trotted, and the right rein became 
caught under the tongue. When over the tracks and going down 
the slope on the other side, the team began to turn to the left, and 
owing to the rein being held fast I could not pull them around to 
the right. 

I stopped them, but too late, for they were on the road and 
facing in the wrong direction. I tried to back up, but only suc- 
ceeded in breaking a belly-band, for I had seventy-five bushels of 
barley on the wagon, and it was a fairly heavy load. As the road 
was too narrow to turn around in, the only thing left to do was to 
try and cross the ditch, then turn around in a vacant field adjoining 
the road, cross the ditch again and strike the road. 

I deteiTnined to try it, but I only got as far as the ditch, and 
there I stuck. I could not get the team to pull the load out, and 
broke a "d" in one of the tugs in the attempt. At last the boss 
came along. After repairing the broken tug he tried to get the 
wagon out with the one team, but he finally sent for another, and 
hooked it on the wagon as well. This failed to budge it, so a third 
team was called over, and with the help of the last team the 
wagon was pulled onto the road, this time facing in the right 
direction. This accomplished, the boss turned to me and informed 
jne, in more or less suitable language, that I was fired. 

Stephenson I. 



SPR 



BY 








Shelley has written a very touching lyric, which goes something 
like this : 

"If winter comes 
Can spring be far behind?" 

It is intended as a message of hope and, as such, was used as the 
theme of a novel by an Englishman by the name of Hutchinson. 

We have recently come to the conclusion that Shelley must have 
been a gum-rubber salesman on the side, only in that case can we 
see why he enthuses over the coming of spring, as though six feet 
of mud were more worth warbling over than six feet of snow. 

Spring is a time of dirt when the family vacuum cleaner works 
like a bartender in Montreal, and motor-cars of plutocrats be- 
smatter you with muck as they roll gaily along the boulevard. True, 
the birds come back but "Tweet, tweet, tweets" cannot obscure the 
fact that your feet are soaked through and that you have lost your 
box of Smith Bros, in the five o'clock crush. 

Yet, probably more poems have been written by be-spectacled 
women and long-haired young men with Spring as their inspira- 
tion than on any other subject, except possibly Campbell's soup. 
Spring is a great delusion, almost as great a delusion as the well- 
known one about the superiority of the intellect of an Empire 
Loyalist over the intellect of a m.ere British subject. 

Spring, when men begin to potter around the garage and women 
sot out tomato plants; when the sales of rubber boots, umbrellas 

19 



20 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 

and cough medicines take a sudden rise and doctors and under- 
takers reap a rich harvest — 'tis Spring. 

II. 

Poor business-men labouring under the popular Spring delusion 
find it difficult to dictate that letter to the insurance broker because 
they are thinking of the old Spring days back home. As a matter 
of fact they were buying mustard plasters for their dads at the 
country store, yet they imagine they were out playing leap-frog 
upon a fast greening sward while all around the lambs bleated. 
These poor business men are the victims of a great poetical adver- 
tising campaign conducted for hundreds of years by insolvent 
poets who must earn their pretzels and coffee, and do so in this 
despicable manner. According to these geniuses, Spring is a time 
when all things are young, when octogenarians play at Pan and 
gambol over the hills with hoofs and a flute; a time when youths 
and maidens love (although when we go calling in spring, her 
mother usually throws us out of the front parlour for tracking in 
mud over the carpet) ; a time when dying girls cry, "For I'm to be 
Queen of the May, mother ; I'm to be Queen of the May !" 

So we are going out gunning after this fellow Shelley and see 
whether we can have him follow (in spirit of course, we know he's 
dead) a milk wagon around its route one of these beautiful spring 
mornings and then have him write a sonnet about it. We wagei* 
that the sonnet would read veiy much like "The Three Soldiers," a 
book by that young American realistic novelist and poet, John Dos 
Passos. 

^ ^ :i: >;: ;;: ^: :J: ^i :|^ 

We are not worrying how far Spring is behind, the farther it 
is behind the better, say we. 

K. B. C. 



THE MEXICAN PEOPLE. 

The Mexican people are believed by some to be uncivilized, 
Iroacherous and similar to the old-time cave-man. The main source 
of information which inclines the Anglo-Saxon mind to this belief, 
is popular fiction, which simply mjast have desperate characters, 
and so depict to the English-speaking public, with somewhat ex- 
aggerated detail, a blood-smeared, liquor-soaked half-breed, seeking 
diversion in butchering his compatriots ; or, again, attemptir^g to 
kidnap the beautiful heroine, only to be balked by the fair-haired, 
spry young cow-puncher. This and similarly staged pantomimes 
l;:ad to the impression that all Mexicans are alike. 

I must first of all assure the reader that the popular conception 
does not apply to the better middle and upper classes of Mexico. 
These people are as civilized and as well educated as the average 
Canadian. It is only the lower classes, ignorant people, who be- 
smirch the name of Mexicans. They are, unfortunately by a big 
margin, the greater part of the population. Some have little or no 
education whatever; few know how to write, and consequently 
they mostly perform household duties and do not rise from low 
positions. They are aware of their low standing and hold them- 
selves aloof from their employers. They are, as it were, almost 
a different race ; their copper-coloured skin, dark hair and black or 
brownish eyes, distinguish them from the better classes ; they are 
the "plebe" or low peoples. The women never wear hats ; shawls 
being used while in the street to cover up their heads. 

In the small towns are to be found the poorest families. Their 
condition is very wretched because having to live on the products 
of their small farm, they have but little left for luxuries. Thty 
make their own clothes, and their foot-wear consists of a peculiar 
type of slipper secured to the foot by means of leather thongs. 
These slippers are commonly called "huaraches." Their mode of 
life, if led with cleanliness, would no doubt prove a barrier to sick- 
ness and disease ; for, with the pure air of the mountains, physical 
h<r^lth and happiness would be a natural result, provided that they 
lived an honest life. But life to some people is not worth while 
without wickedness. Drink and frequent disregard of morals make 
their hom.e-life far from happy. "Pulque," a drink obtained from 
the "maguey" plant, is their damnation. It crazes them. The 

21 



22 ST. AN DREW'S C0LLE(;E RE\1E\V 

spirit of madness takes possession of their souls and their evil 
characters are revealed. In this mood they may do terrible things. 

Why cannot prohibition or a similar movement be started to 
stop this terrible condition? This is next to impossible. Acres 
and acres of monster green plants make it easy and profitable for 
the canteen keeper to sell the intoxicating mixture at a very low 
price, and at the present time every labourer must have his small 
iug full of the white liquid with his mid-day meal. 

The present government is unable to cope with this situation, 
as the "maguey" plant grows abundantly in almost all parts of 
Mexico, and the process of making this intoxicating fluid is a very 
simple one. They might easily stop the distilling of whiskey, but 
they are not equal to the task of preventing private manufacture of 
this native drink under these circumstances. 

I have dwelt at too great length on the darker side of the Mexi- 
can people, so it is only just that I should name some of their good 
points. You may have read that Mexico is a very rich country. 
It is indeed very abundant in silver and many other metals. One 
notices always beautiful hills and plains with a background of soft 
blue skies. The cool breeze after a hot noon hour, the long, silent 
nights, followed by a glorious dawn, makes it, in every way, a 
miner's paradise. Not only miners, but all its people are influenced 
by the surroundings and unrivalled climate. Nature shows resplen- 
dent both outside and within the city. At rare intervals only, is the 
natural splendour marred by a dreadful calamity — the earthquake 

One must not suppose, however, that Mexico is still in her infant 
stage as regards city life, for such is not the case. Mexico City, 
though her buildings are not above seven stories high, (earthquakes 
prevent this), is modernized by paved streets, city railways and 
electric lighting. Albert Rivera. 



THE VOYAGE OF THE L6. 

It was on February 30th, 1922, that the good submarine L6, 
commanded by Capt. W. A. Findlay, took her memorable voyage 
around the island via the Easton West gaps. 

On going aboard the ship the first thing one noticed was the 
Sieling which was constructed of many different Lumbers. The 
crew, consisting of Cameron and McLelland, were drinking near- 
Beer, which they had imported from Bristol, but when they saw 
the guests coming aboard, they scrambled to attention and sang, 
"See the Co(n)chrane Hero Comes," Among the guests was Miss 
Gillespie, who began to feel sea-sick the moment she came on board, 
so they had to Tucker in bed immediately. Other guests were 
Premier Drury, Stephenson, the Dean of Oakville, Mrs. Palmer and 
Mr. Anderson. 

Before starting on the voyage the skipper decided to Reid a few 
lines from Milton. The crew then cast off the Moore-ings and the 
captain took a direct Lyon on the Eastern gap. Some of the guests 
wanted to play bridge and called on the captain to Russell up a deck 
of cards. Mrs. Palmer refused to play and said that she would 
Draper self on a chair, because if she played she would only Lewis. 

Ferguson and Thompson, two deck hands, now entered and 
showed the guests a peculiar stuffed fish whose Fin (d) lay on its 
head, and just at this moment Mr. Ashenhurst, who Owens the 
ship startled everyone by shouting, "I Kinsey land." Miss Gillespie 
immediately got up and began to Curry her hair and redecorate her 
hat with the stuffed Robins on the cabin walls. 

Half an hour later the good ship reached the dock, but, unfor- 
tunately, the passengers had to walk home as a Milne coal wagon, 
which had broken down at the corner of King and Church, caused 
a blockade of all the Carson the Church Street line. 

Passengers and crew alike declared the voyage a great success. 
In fact, they enjoyed themselves just as much as they would have 
if the time had been spent studying, and they did not hesitate in 
thanking Capt. Findlay for a very pleasant outing. 

—Extracted from the Log of the L6, by Glen M. Lumbers. 



23 



A VISIT TO R. M. C. 

One afternoon, early in Febriiaiy, a party of eighteen Andreans. 
"including: the first hockey team, visited the Royal Military College 
in Kingston at the invitation of the commandant. On our arrival 
we were met by some of the Cadets, and later the commandant 
joined us. 

After being shown around the ground floor of the main building 
v/o were conducted to the artillery shed. Here were many specimens 




■H.M.S. STONE FRIGATE' —ONE OF THE DORMITORY BUILDINGS 



of guns and shells. At the end of the room was a miniature section 
of a certain war area in France, with a Canadian trench in the fore- 
gi'ound and lights flashing here and there. These flashes, we were 
told, represented the flashes from enemy guns, and the Cadet, who 
is supposed to be an officer on the firing line, is taught to deter- 
mine the exact position of these guns relative to his own location 
and to telephone this to his artillery so that they (the enemy guns) 
may be put out of commission. We examined the trench and sur- 
I'ounding country from close range. It was an exact reproduction, 
we were informed, of a part of the country which the Canadians 

24 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



25 



had held during the late war. We were then taken to another part 
of the building in which were many miniature bridges under con- 
struction. These form the indoor work of the Cadets during the 
v/inter months when it is impossible to construct the larger ones 
out of doors. Here, also, were more trenches which we examined 
closely to see how they are equipped. 

The next point of interest was the riding school, where we were 
given some fine exhibitions of horsemanship. This was completed 




THE HIGH JUMP 



by an exhibition of high jumping, which was especially good. After 
leaving the riding school, we were taken through the completed half 
of the new educational building. Here we were shown through 
Currie Hall, the Physics lecture room, the Physics and Chemistry 
Laboratories, the Drafting Room and several class rooms, all of 
which were large, well lighted and splendidly equipped. 

Our inspection of the grounds and buildings over, we went back 
to the main building, where we proceeded to pass the afternoon in 



26 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

different ways. At 6.30 the Cadets "formed up" and marched into 
the dining hall, where an excellent dinner was served. After din- 
ner, having thanked our hosts, we left for the Arena amid cheer- 
ing and many good wishes for the game that evening with Queen's. 
Thus came the end of our visit to R. M. C, which was thoroughly 
enjoyed by every member of the party. 

E .R. McLelland. 



SOMETHING. 



It's right here among us, 

What it is, I don't know. 
An intangible something 

That just seems to grow — 
As day after day 

We struggle along, 
Sometimes in sorrow. 

Sometimes in song: 
Not a thing you can see 
But it's there just the same, 
A something that grows, and it gets you. 

Then after you've gone. 

It has a queer way 
Of drawing you back 

For a little while, — say 
Just to wander around 

To see if it's there. 
It calls you and wishes 

Your troubles to share. 
Whatever it is, 
It hasn't a name. 
It's just a something that gets you. 

F. Thompson. 



The School 



THE RUGBY DINNER. 

The annual "Rugby Dinner" has not been held since 1914, 
owing probably to the influence of the war in doing away with all 
festivities. However, this year, on Friday, the third of February, 
at about half-past seven, two hungry teams assembled in the main 
hall and were led down to the dining-room by Dr. and Mrs. Mac- 
donald and the staff, who no doubt also shared that very human 
emotion. 

The decorations were red and white, in good taste, and the three 
rugby balls, bearing the scores of the three victories, confronted 
the place of honour held by Dr. Macdonald. Captain Ted Earle 
sat at his right and Mr. Ramsey, our coach, at his left. 

The dinner was no petty affair of salads and "pate de fois- 
gras," but a respectable chicken dinner fit for any rugby team, and 
was dealt with accordingly. 

Between the courses the boys sang school songs, accompanied 
on the piano by Col. Taylor and Russell I. Mr. Flemming gave a 
vocal solo which was very welcome, and Thompson I and Sieling 
were called upon for an impromptu duet. 

When the dinner was finished, a toast was drunk to His Majesty 
and all sang "God Save the King." 

Then Dr. Macdonald spoke to the boys for a short time about 
the late Mr. Thos. Findley, one time member of the board of gov- 
ernors, who had given the first team a dinner when they became 
champions and who had always taken so keen an interest in the 
school's athletic activities. A silent toast was drunk to his memory. 

Then followed the various toasts which were interrupted by sing- 
ing and one or two m^usical numbers. The following was the list : 

Cameron I. proposed a toast to the School. Dr. Macdonald res- 
ponded, speaking for a while about the school and our respon- 
sibility to it. The Athletic Association ; proposed by King and res- 
ponded to by Mr. Ramsey. The first team : Anderson, Earle. The 
second team : Carrick I., Lyon. The cross-country : Lewis, Howell. 

The dinner closed with three cheers for Mrs. Macdonald and 
the Matron, as a vote of thanks for the trouble they both took in 

27 



28 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE RE\IE\V 

connection with the dinner. Then three cheers for the Headmaster, 
and a most enjoyable evening was ended. 

Those who expect to make the teams next year look forward to 
another such evening as the custom of the annual dinner is to be 
permanently resumed. 

Beer. 



THE PADRE OF POPERINGHE. 

On the morning of Monday, January 23rd, the School was 
visited by Rev. P. B, Clayton, M.C. At the conclusion of prayers 
he gave the school a delightful account of his work as Padre of 
"Toe H." Hidden in a sparkling vein of humour, Rev. Mr. Clayton 
told the school how the organization originated, what it is, and 
what it hopes to do. 

"There were two things definitely good which came out of the 
Great War— Rubber soles for boots, and "Toe H !" 

He went on to say that the noble lads of such promise who had 
been killed during attacks of liquid fire in 1915, had inspired some 
of the men fighting in the Ypres salient to organize a soldiers' 
club in the war-stricken area. Accordingly, a brewer's house was 
rented at Poperinghe, called "Pop" by Tommy. As garrison pastor, 
Capt. Clayton took charge. This Club filled a much-felt need among 
the men of all ranks, with its spirit of deep religious brotherhood 
and uplift. The men were to forget the horrors of the war, and to 
embrace the new spirit which all hoped would spring from the 
conflict's terrors. 

When the war ceased the members of Talbot House decided 
not to make it merely a veterans' association, but to have the spirit 
spread throughout England. Stone monuments were not what the 
boys who gave their lives wanted, but that future generations 
should live in greater love. 

And so the organization has grown in the Old Country until 
it has 70 branches. Its main object is to engender a closer atmos- 
phere of fellowship between all classes, and to lend a helping hand 
to the chap who needs must be lonely in the big cities. Thus, 
through its active and growing membership Talbot House is striv- 
ing to do what those who were killed hoped to and doubtless would 
have done. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



PRINCIPAL GRANT'S SERMON. 

On the morning of Monday, January 23rd, the School was 
ada College addressed the school at our regular chapel service. Mr. 
Grant chose as part of his text these words from Ecclesiastes, 
"There is a time to mourn and a time to dance." He pointed out 
that a man should throw himself energetically into all the activi- 
ties of life but should not make an end of diversions that were 
really only means towards a serious attainment. We may be suc- 
cessful in sport, and although sport is a vital element in the develop- 
ment of character, yet it is only one of many means towards the 
fulfilment of life's purpose. Clean sport is a necessity to the aver- 
age boy, not only in respect to his physical development but, within 
its just limits, it is as essential an element in the building of char- 
acter as our more serious school activities. Mr. Grant impressed 
his facts by vivid illustrations drawn from actual school life. 



CADET CORPS DANCE. 

If you had chanced to be at the College a month or so ago you 
would have noticed endless bustle and preparation for the annual 
Cadet Ball. It had been a forecasted event for some months, and 
needless to say the anticipation reached its height when the day 
itself arrived, February twenty-seventh. 

With the hallway and stairs decked with flags and palms, the 
assembly hall festooned and draped with bunting, and the dining- 
room with its wealth of crimson and white, on every hand there 
was evidence of tireless preparation and the cadets themselves had 
spared no labor in whitening spats and shining buttons for the 
gala event of the school year. 

Lieutenant Allan Findlay was in charge of the guard at the 
entrance, and was on duty at eight-thirty, when the guests began 
to arrive. Soon the corridors were crowded with laughing couples, 
pressing toward the assembly hall. Upon entering they were re- 
ceived by Dr. and Mrs. Macdonald, and, representing the corps. 
Captain Cameron and Lieutenant Bruce King. 

Within a short time programs were filled, the orchestra started 
playing and the dancing began. Scarlet tunics, green kilts, and 
v/hite spats, intermingling with the rainbow colors of the ladies' 

29 



30 ST. AN DREW S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 

[Cowns presented a charming sight. The uniform brought to mind 
not only the tradition associated with it in history, but also the 
memory of numei'ous happy cadet dances at the college in years 
gone by. Among those present who took prominent parts in the 
events of other years were Joe Taylor, Gordon Hewitt, Allen 
Pringle, Joe McDougall, Gerald Smith, Gordon Robertson, W. G. 
Grant, Douglas Wood, Grant Stirrett, Morrison Earle, Rufus Syer, 
and several other old boys. The corps was glad to welcome these 
ex-officers back to share another evening with the present cadets. 

At supper time the guests gradually thronged the dining hall, 
and partook of the delicious refreshments provided. Crimson and 
white candles, satin ribbon, and carnations decorated the tables, 
where salad, ice cream, and tiny cakes were served. Parties were 
formed, and mirth was everywhere. 

During the intermission the school orchestra favored us with 
some splendid jazz, followed by a few numbers with Joe Taylor 
at the piano, and Gerry Smith in his familiar role of master of 
traps. 

The sixteenth number having been played the program ended. 
God Save the King was followed by a roaring "Hoot," and im- 
mediately after was sounded a hearty U.C.C. call. On leaving the 
hall everyone shook hands with Dr. and Mrs. Macdonald, and the 
officers of the corps. 

Strange anxiety and the whirr of automobiles accompanied the 
departing guests past the college gates. And now may be written 
in the school annals another of the many successful At Homes of 
the St. Andrew's College Cadet Corps. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



THE LITERARY SOCIETY. 

During the Easter term the Literary Society has held its usual 
place in the activities of the school. It is a very welcome diversion 
and an interruption to Friday night study. 

There were tw^o open meetings held during the term. At the 
first, Mr. Coyne, a prominent petroleum engineer, very kindly 
gave the boys a talk on "Oil Possibilities in Canada," illustrating 
the lecture with some hundred and fifty lantern slides. This talk 
was very interesting and also instructive. Mr. Coyne finished by 
pointing out the possibilities for boys in this direction and by 
advising them all to give due credit to their studies at college, as 
in his experience, he had found that every one had its use. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 31 

Three weeks later Dr. Fletcher, the attending physician at the 
school, and an old head-boy, gave us a talk on "Recent Investiga- 
tions in Nutrition," accompanied with some interesting slides. The 
lecture was highly instructive and we are very grateful to Dr. 
Fletcher for his trouble. 

We are indebted to the school orchestra for selections given at 
different meetings and to "Hal" Hunter and his saxaphone, and 
to Russell I., our budding pianist. During the term there were 
numerous speeches given. We heard about two or three home- 
towns and many other interesting subjects, such as Aeronautics, 
Muskoka (historical), Impressions of a New-Boy, S.A.C. as it 
might be, etc. 

Palmer II., Brown and Shannon, favoured us with selections 
on the piano. While referring to such things as music, it would 
be unfair not to mention the "Jazz Trio," Hunter, Palmer II. and 
Bingham. This trio sprung into being very suddenly, but they ap- 
pear to have learned quite a repertoire. 

There were readings and other speeches and two or three ag- 
gregations of amateur singers. There was one debate held. The 
subject was "That Capital Punishment Should be Abolished." 
Howell and Lewis supported the affirmative, while Findlay and 
Easton took the negative. Col. Taylor gave the decision of the 
judges to Howell and Lewis, complimenting all four on their de- 
bate. Carson and Ferguson have been looking after the history 
notes very well and these always form an interesting part of the 
program. 

One of the most enjoyable entertainments was given by the 
Lower School alone. Mr. Palmer helped them prepare and present 
an excellent performance. The juniors were very enthusiastic and 
the list of performers is too long to set down here. The program 
opened with a prologue. There were three" well executed piano 
solos, a speech, a reading and one mouth organ solo by Proctor, two 
skits, and we heard three times from our old friend (Miss) 
Crowe. Barrow sang two or three selections very well and the pro- 
gram ended with an epilogue. This was the evening of Dr. Mac- 
donald's birthday and he acknowledged three cheers for him, say- 
ing that they made him feel a year younger. 

The Literary Society is a permanent institution in the school 
and a very useful one for the boys. It is only necessary in the 
"keview" to make a brief report of its proceedings. 

Beer. 




J. A. CAMERON. HEAD PERFECT. 1921-22 



OUR HEAD PREFECT. 

The "Review" takes pleasure in displaying in this issue a strik- 
ing likeness to our Head Prefect — John Archibald Cameron. Born 
in a small village situated on the Ottawa River, John received his 
early education in the country school house, but when still a mere 
child he was brought to St. Andrew's where his Scotch instinct 
of not letting anything past him, soon developed him into a good 
goal-keeper. But keeping goal on the hockey team is probably the 
least of Jack's accomplishments. You ought to see him dance, and, 
Oh Boy! how he can play that mandolin. Jack is no mean student 
and has aspirations of studying architecture at McGill next year. 

During his spare time he drills the Cadet Corps, rustles ads for 
The Review, manages the football team, attends meetings of the 
Dramatic Society and plays a little golf, bridge and parchesi. 

John is not a woman-hater but he finds very little time to devote 
to the fair sex, but brothers "Joe" and "Al" keep up the family 
reputation in this respect. We m.ight write a lot more about our 
Head Prefect, he is a man of many parts, but just take another 
look at his photograph, it speaks for itself. So here's to good old 
John — artist, actor and athlete! 



DRAMATIC SOCIETY. 

There is no question concerning the value of dramatics as a 
method of producing self-reliance and developing an ability in 
public speaking. Heretofore minstrel shows have been given by a 
group of the boys ; but the benefit derived from a more serious and 
highly finished performance has been greatly needed. 

Accordingly an executive committee was elected by the school 
to sit in conjunction with Dr. Macdonald and Mr. Harris. The 
officers chosen at the first meeting are as follows: 

Chairman '.. - - Dayment 

Secretary - King 

Business Manager - - Howell 

Property Manager _ - — ~ Ellis 

Committee „ Ferguson I., Thompson I., Carrick I., Palmer I., 

Findley I. 

33 
—3 



24 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE RE\IE\V 



It was decided to adopt the garden scene from "Twelfth Night" 
as the subject of a shoi-t play. In its lines Shakespeare reaches prob- 
iibly his highest excellence of humour, and certainly his most mas- 
terful presentation of the ridiculous. 

With the teaching of Mr. Harris, who, it might be mentioned, 
is an accomplished actor, we hope to present the play in a credit- 
able manner. 

As far as is now known two performances will be given, on the 
evenings of March the thirtieth and thirty-first. 



A SCHOOLBOY'S MORNING PRAYER. 

Help me this day, God, to play the game, 
To give my best in class and on the field. 
Guard Thou my lips from speech that is unclean, 
May I walk bravely, calmly and serene 
Among my fellows, helping where I can. 
Grant me Thy strength that I may never yield 
To sinful ways, but always play the man. 
Plelp me this day. God, to play the game, 
To be a man, I ask it in Thy Name. 




Hockey 



The School this year had a most successful hockey season — the 
most successful since 1905. Not even when the bright and shining 
lights like Harry Watson and Grant Gordon were here did we 
reach the third round, the best we ever did then was to win the 
group. But this year we put out the fast and heavy Queen's team, 
and had St. Marys worrying for some time as to where they stood. 
]n the group games we met sturdy opposition from Upper Canada 
and St. Michael's, the latter sticking us to the small end of a five 
to one score before our team woke up to the fact, and near the end 
of the race they were too close to our heels for comfort — far too 
close. Another team who lowered our colours was Queen's who 
slapped in two to our one, in the second rounds, but, when we got 
them on our ice we overcame their lead and strung their scalp to 
the red and white belt. The last game of the season was the greatest 
— a thirty-minute overtime battle with St. Marys — ^where, after 
a game struggle, the team was knocked out for the count. St. 
Marys were a great team, and one of the finest bunch of sports 
that it was our good fortune to bump up against. 

The Midgets had a good season, winning their group, but after 
defeating Davisville 1-0 on their own ice, became over-confident, 
and lost on our ice 4-1. It was rather hard luck, nevertheless they 
had a highly successful season. The Bantams tied their group, but 
lost to St. Mikes in the play-off. 



FIRST TEAM PERSONNEL. 

Cameron, "Jack." — An old colour, his fourth year on the team. 
Said to be the best junior goaler in the O.H.A. His wonderful work 
in the opening fixtures undoubtedly won the group for us, and later 
his brilliant playing kept our team in the running. 

King, "B. B." — He caught a place late in the season. He stick- 
handles well, but skates slowly. His persistence, however, nearly 
alv/ays brought him to the opponents' goal. He has a good poke 
check, and a very effective body check. Teamed up well with 
Carrick. 

35 




J. A. CARRICK. CAPTAIN FIRST HOCKEY TEAM. 1922 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 37 

Drury, "Bawb." — Another old colour. Body checks well, and 
never lets his man get away from him. Unfortunate in scoring, 
but was a very effective puck carrier, and has a good shot. 

FiNDLAY, Bruce. — An old colour and last year's captain. A 
hard worker and an excellent back-checker. He is steady and fast 
and can always be counted on to play a very effective game. He 
is very dangerous when in close. 

Callighen, "Potsy." — A graduate from the famous Midgets. 
Gives all he has, and hangs on to his man. His fine work enabled 
us to give St. Marys such a close game. He should be with us for 
some time, as he is only sixteen. 

Lyon, "Freddie." — Although he did not have any special posi- 
tion, Freddie usually played during most of the game. He is dan- 
gerous in any forward position, but inability to pick the corners pre- 
vented him from scoring. 

Kinsey, "Lew." — First year on team and a hard worker. Im- 
proved as season went on, and played exceptionally well in Colling- 
\s^ood. Should be valuable next year. 

MacLaren, "Gord." — An old colour, and hard worker. Was 
very effective in last U. C. C. game. 

White, "Gord." — One of the best managers the school has ever 
had. He is a hard worker, and always on the job. 

P.S. — Mrs. White says Gord is a very light sleeper. 

Fisher, "Dicky." — Gord's assistant, and although managing is 
a thankless job, the Gold Dust Twins always had the work fin- 
ished in time for the game. 

FiNDLEY, "Al." — Business manager. Always had the tickets 
here on time which was very satisfactory. 

Cameron, "Joe," — Sub-goaler — last year's net guardian, and 
still has the ability to stop them — anyway, it's in the family. 

Carrick, "Jess." — Captain. He is one of the best defence men 
we have had for several years. He is the heaviest man on the team 
and used his weight to good advantage. Breaks fast, has a hard 
shot and leads the scoring list. He used good judgment in handling 
his team. 



S. A. C— U. C. C. 



Our first game this season was against our old rivals on the 
Hill, and after a hard struggle we won in ten minutes overtime. 
The Blue and White foi'wards seemed faster than ours, but the 



38 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Carrick and Draper defence was a stone wall, and behind that 
stone wall there was Cameron. Cameron and Lyon showed up well 
for us, while Upper Canada's "bright and shiny's" were Slaght, 
Wright and Meech, who exceeded our expectations, and played 
splendid hockey all season. 

U.C.C. ' S.A.C. 

McCaig Goal „ Cameron 

Lamport Defense Carrick L 

Branton Defense Draper 

Slaght Centre _ Findlay IIL 

Meech _ L. Wing Drury 

Wright R. Wing _ Carrick II. 

King Subs _ Kinsey 

Morton „ " _ _ _ Lyon 

Period One. 

S.A.C. rushed the puck into U.C.C. territory and very nearly 
scored on a pass from behind the net, but did not beat McCaig. 
Slaght carried the puck back but failed to score. Play went from 
end to end, and then Findlay scored on a long shot from the wing. 
This was all the scoring. 

Period Two. 

In the second period the poor attacking of both teams was 
plainly evident, neither being able to do anything around their 
opponents' net. The game was fairly even till in a melee in front 
of the S.A.C. goal the puck rolled past Cameron. U.C.C.l — S.A.C. 1, 
Findlay, Drury and Kinsey tried to break the tie but were un- 
successful. 

Period Three. 

Both teams were determined to win, and many nasty shots 
were aimed at Cameron and McCaig, but these goalies were im- 
pregnable, and the period was scoreless. 

Overtime. 

Three minutes after the bell had dingled Jess Carrick, on a 
nice rush passed to Findlay who scored. S.A.C. 2 — U.C.C. 1. A 
few minutes later "Jess" got away again and beat McCaig. 
S.A.C. Sr— U.C.C. 1. Game ended 3-1.^ 



st. andrew's college review 39 

Notes. 

Cameron played brilliantly, and saved the team repeatedly. 
Both teams showed weakness in the attack. 
Lyon back-checked well. 



U. T. S. vs. S. A. C. 

Our second game was against the much-heralded University 
Schools — the sextette in "the ol' red shirts" didn't need the wreath 
on the front after all for they finished the game on the large end 
of a two to one score. The game was a fine contest. To pick out 
stars would be hard, but "Teddy-Bear" Kinsey, plus a brand new 
pair of bright and shiny tubes, showed to good advantage, his 
checking worrying the U.T.S. forwards. Jess Carrick, more com- 
monly known as the "Big Wreck Train" got well under way twice. 
Among the injured were McMaster and the goal net. Ross Paul — 
'the child wonder" played a brilliant game for our opponents. The 
Branksome Ladies were out in force, and John Cameron had .great 
difficulty in watching the puck all the time, but Jack seems to be 
able to smell a puck whether it's high or not. "Bawb" Drury was 
as dazzling as the brilliantine on his hair, while Findlay, per 
usual, turned in a fine exhibition. 

Line Up. 

St. Andrew's — Cam.eron, goal; Draper and Carrick, defense; 
Findlay, centre; Kinsey, right wing; Drury, left wing; Lyon and 
Carrick, subs. 

U.T.S. — Stollery, goal; Munro and Paul defense; Plaxton, cen- 
tre; R. Plaxton, right wing; Thom_pson, left wing; McMaster and 
Watson, subs. 

SUMMi^RY. 

Period One. 

1.— St. Andrew's Carrick 10.00 

2.— U.T.S H. Plaxton 9.00 

Period Two. 
3.— St. Andrew's Drury 19.00 

Third Period 
No score. 



40 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE RK\IK\V 

S. A. C. vs. S. M. C. 

In our third game we continued our winning streak, downing 
St. Mikes 1-0. Cameron was largely responsible for the win, and 
the wonderful back-checking of the team was for the first time in 
frvidence. Hunt, the best man for the losers, was lashed to the 
mast, and occasionally, when he did break away, he struck a stone- 
wall defense, or his shot was taken care of by Cameron. Bruce 
Findlay played a splendid game, and his shots again and again 
tickled the goal posts and had the goaler highly worried. The one 
goal came when Kinsey whanged in a long one, and it fooled 
O'Brien. St. Mikes tried again and again to tie it up, but they 
couldn't put one past Cameron who was invincible, or else they 
lost the puck to the defense. In the last period "Jack" broke his 
skate — 'but his luck didn't break, and even when St. Mike's had 
four men on the offensive and were driving four shots to our one, 
he held them scoreless. 

Carrick, Cameron, Kinse\% and Findlay starred for us, while 
Hunt and Ferroni starred for the Irish. 

St, Andrew's — Goal, Cameron; defense. Draper and Carrick; 
centre, Findlay; left wing, Drury; right wing, Kinsey; subs, Lyon 
and McLaren. 

St. Michael's — Goal, O'Brien ; defense, Killen and Ferroni ; cen- 
tre, Millan ; right wing. Hunt ; left wing, Smith ; subs, Barthelmess 
and Irvine. 



S. M. C. vs. S. A. C. 



In the second game with St. Mikes we were decisively defeated 
5-1. It was a good thing for our team, for they got the worst game 
they played this season ofi" their chest, and it kept their upper- 
story from becoming inflated. St. "Mikes" played superb hockey 
all the way, and it was a wonder the score wasn't larger. Our team 
used entirely individual rushes, and against the Irish checking 
these were practically useless. St. Mikes, on the other hand, passed 
the puck on eveiy opportunity. 

The game started badly when "Jess" Carrick lost his skates, 
and was unable to start with his team mates — then "Bawb" Drury 
broke his — in fact, nearly everything seemed to go. wrong. 

Twice our men passed the Ferroni-Killen defense and had an 
open net, but failed to score. St. Mikes, however, never missed a 
chance. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 41 

Cameron in goal played an excellent game, while Killen played 
a fine game for S.M.C., but spoiled it by dirty work in the second 
period. 

Our only score was on a pass from Draper to Findlay in the 
first of the second period, the only "com." we used during the 
whole game. 

S.A.C. Line up — Goal, Cameron; defense, Draper and Carrick; 
centre, Findlay; left wing, Drury; right wing, Kinsey; subs, Mc- 
Laren and Lyon. 

S.M.C. : — Goal, O'Brien ; defense, Killen and Ferroni ; centre, 
Millan ; left wing. Smith ; right wing, Hunt ; subs, Irvine and Bar- 
thelmess. 



S. A. C. vs. U. C. C. 

In our second affair with Upper Canada we shut them out 3-0. 
Jess Carrick swung on the ice with a do or die expression on his 
manly countenance, and he expressed the opinion before the game, 
"We'll cinch this group or bust." Luckily for all concerned, Jess 
didn't have to bust — and all the ladies said, "My! — ain't he just 
grand!!" 

King played for the first time and easily earned a place. He 
scored a goal, and played good hockey all through the game. 

The Upper Canada team were checked to a standstill, and Mc- 
Caig had many pesky shots whistling around him. Drury scored in 
the first period, and King and Carrick slapped in a couple in the 
second, and try as they could the Blue and White failed to score. 

"Dav" Wright played a good game for our old friends on the 
Hill, and Drury, McLaren and King showed up well for St. An- 
drews. Cameron had very little to do at all, and spent his time 
smiling at the fair sex who clustered in the goal judge's box. 

Line-up as in previous game. 



S. A. C. vs. U. T. S. 



Our last game was against U. T. S., and it was more or less a 
listless affair, as we had won the group championship, and were 
saving ourselves for the Queen's game. We nailed down a four- 
to-one lead in the first period and thereafter had no more than an 



42 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

even share of the play, "Joe" Cameron made his first appearance 
this season and played a very fair game, considering the only prac- 
tice he had had was in light practices at the Arena, and on the 
"shinny" rinks. 

Munroe, Stolh^ry and Plaxton shone for University of Toronto 
Schools, while Joe and Jack Cameron, Jess Carrick, Drury and King 
showed up well for us. 

S.A.C. line-up: — Goal, Joe and Jack Cameron; defence, Jess 
Carrick and Bruce King ; centre, Findlay ; wings, Lyon and Drury ; 
sabs, "Don" Carrick and Kinsey. 

U.T.S. : — Goal, Stollery; defence, Munroe and Wright; centre, 
Plaxton; wings, Thompson and Robinson; subs, McMaster and 
Hutchison. 



THE QUEEN'S GAMES. 

Our first game in the second round was against Queen's Jun- 
iors at Kingston, and it was with dark and grim forebodings "Jess" 
and his band of gladiators slid out of the station towards the "Peni- 
tentiary City." 

We were met by members of the Queen's team who treated us 
very kindly, and R. M. C. also, was very hospitable, most of the 
team being able to renew old acquaintances among the Cadets. 
The game was at the Jock Harty Arena, and before the game 
started a fairly good crowd of hockey fans had collected. 

The game was won by Queen's, 2-1. 

Period One. 

Both teams started away at top speed, and the heavy Queen's 
forward line gave Cameron lots to do in goal. However, "the Lit- 
tle Wizard" was just a shade too good and the "Tricolour" didn't 
score. "Joss" Carrick rushed the puck back to the Queen's terri- 
tory, and passed to Drury, who failed to score. Play swayed back 
and forth, and was a shade in favour of Queen's. Plenty of penal- 
ties were the order, and a fairly constant procession went towardr 
the box. Queen's played nice combination, and on a pass Reynolds 
shot a neat goal. Queen's 1, St. Andrew's 0. Period ended Queen's 
1, St. Andrew's 0. 

Period Two. 

Queen's came on determined to increase the score, but they failed 
in passing the Carrick-King defence, while our jockey-like for- 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 43 

wards checked the famous Boucher and Nickle to a standstill. Wil- 
son got away, and almost scored, but King got the puck, and the 
team went down three in a row, but Wilson intercepted Findlay's 
pass to Drury, and in a long rush nearly beat Cameron. Queen's 
1, St. Andrew's 0. 

Period Three. 

At the start of the period Carrick scored on a bullet-like shot 
from outside the defence and tied up the score, but Nickel evened it 
up when he went round the net and scored from the opposite side. 
Queen's 2, St. Andrew's 1. The old fighting spirit then shot to the 
forefront, and Quinn had a difficult time till the end of the game. 
Time after time Findlay, Drury and Kinsey nearly scored, and one 
or two golden opportunities were missed. Game ended Queen's 2 ; 
St. Andrew's 1. 

Queen's: — Goal, Quinn; defence, Reynolds and Wilson; centre, 
Nickle; wings, Johnston and Boucher; subs, Lindsay and Davidson. 

St. Andrew's : — Goal, Cameron ; defence. King and Carrick ; cen- 
tre, Findlay ; wings, Drury and MacLaren ; subs, Kinsey and Lyon. 



THE SECOND QUEEN'S GAME. 

The return game with Queen's was one of the best of the year, 
and our team showed a vast improvement over any of their previous 
performances. The game was fairly clean, although there was 
plenty of good clean checking, and it was this checking which made 
the powerful Queen's sextette look very weak. The Queen's team 
was the heaviest that we have played against this season, but, for- 
tunately for us, they didn't know how to use their weight. 

Period One. 
It took our team just seven minutes to even the round, and ten 
to put us in the lead, but Reynolds evened it up again when King 
and Carrick became confused, and skated through to an open net. 
St. Andrew's 2, Queen's 1. Seeing defeat staring at them. Queen's 
resorted to a reckless passing game which was effectually broken up 
by our forwards. Period ended St. Andrew's 2, Queen's 1. 

Period Two. 

Nickle, Boucher and company started with a flash of speed that 
nearly earned them a goal, but Cameron, per usual, got in the way, 



44 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

and Carrick rushed to the other end, passed the defence, but shot 
wild. Reynolds brought it back, but lost it at the defence. Play- 
was fairly even with one or two penalties. Period ended St. An- 
drew's 2, Queen's 1. 

Period Three. 

Our forwards took the puck at the face off, and by some nice 
individual rushes and clever combination play, kept the Queen's 
defence busy, and ten minutes after the period had commenced, 
Findlay slapped in number three, and a few minutes later Mac- 
Laren scored the fourth in a mixup in front of the goal. St. Au- 
di ew's 4, Queen's 1. Queen's then gave eveiything they had and 
kept out team well bottled up, and Carrick killed time by shooting 
the puck to the other end — much to Queen's disgust. Game ended 
St. Andrew's 4, Queen's 1. 

St. Andrew's win round 5-3. 

Same line up as in previous game. 

Notes. 

Queen's did not play nearly as well here as in Kingston ; maybe 
the artificial ice had something to do with it. 

We take this occasion to thank the Queen's and R. M. C. authori- 
ties for their kindness to us during our visit. 

Cameron and Findlay played splendid games in Toronto, while 
Carrick and King starred in Kingston. 



I 



THE ST. MARY'S GAMES. 



It was in these games that our team, though losing, made great 
fame for themselves, and showed themselves to be greater in defeat 
than in victory. Defensively our team was far better than St. 
Mary's, but our forwards were not as fast and could not stick- 
handle as well as our opponents. 

Period One. 

St. Maiy's started right in, and Cain beat the defence three 
times before they woke up to the fact that there was a game on, 
and then it was too late, as St. Mary's had netted two goals. St. 
Mary's 2, St. Andrew's 0. Then our forwards found out the St. 
Mary's methods and checked them to a standstill. Again and again 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 45 

Cain and Burke would break away, only to lose the puck, and Bozo 
Kells had some peppery ones to stop. Period ended St. Mary's 2, 
St. Andrew's 0. 

Period Two. 

St. Mary's tried to increase their lead, but our defence broke up 
attack after attack, while "Wiz" Cameron in goal looked after all 
the long wing shots. Then St. Andrew's started, and on an exciting 
play Drury passed to Findlay who fooled Kells. St. Mary's 2, St. 
Andrew's 1. Both sides then gave everything they had, and the 
puck was bouncing off both ends. Finally, on the nicest play of 
the night, on a Smythe to Turner combination, St. Mary's scored, 
giving them a two goal lead. Period ended St. Mary's 3, St. An- 
drew's 1. 

Period Three. 

The last period was as hard fought as any seen at the Arena 
this year, and the play was very even. St. Andrew's missed some 
almost sure ones. Both Cameron and Kells played sensational 
games. Findlay shot from in front of the net, and it just missed 
while Burke was right through the defence and the puck bounced 
off the goal post. Game ended St. Mary's 3, St. Andrew's 1. 

St. Andrew's : — Goal, Cameron ; defence, Carrick and King ; cen- 
tre, Findlay; wings, Drury and Kinsey; subs, MacLaren and Lyon. 

St. Mary's: — Goal, Kells; defence, Cain and Frost; wings. Tur- 
ner and Burke; centre, Smythe; subs, Stokes and Wiseman. 



ST. MARY'S vs. ST. ANDREW'S. 

This was our last game, and it was a grandstand finish from 
every point of view. We went into the game two goals down, and 
at the end of the required sixty minutes we were even. 

Every man on the ice stood out at some point, but John 
A. Cameron per usual stood right out and played a wonderful 
game. With the greatest ease he stopped long, close, short and easy 
shots, and he deserves all kinds of praise. Carrick and King broke 
up many telling rushes, and time and again went rushing down the 
ice in "pro" manner. Findlay and Drury also showed up well, and 
their men never got away from them. 

Then there's CalUghen — "the young hero," as some of our fair 
friends called him — ^w^ho was checking the speedy St. Mary's for- 



46 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

wards to a standstill, and after the Irish sextette were one up, he 
tied the game. Cain and Frost, the St. Mary's defence, were towers 
of strength, and both played excellent games. The St. Mary's for- 
ward line left nothing to be desired. 

The game got well under way when Cain slapped the puck from 
behind the goal, and it went in off Kinsey's skate. St. Mary's 1, St. 
Andrew's 0. We weren't at all disheartened, and a few minutes later 
Callighen got a goal and tied the score. Then Carrick made a get- 
away and scored, and \vith forty seconds to go Findlay passed to 
King, who slapped in the rubber and tied the round. 

Our supporters went mad — and many good hats were ruined. 

Overtime then had to be played, and the overtime exhibition will 
live long in the memories of those who saw it. The team played an 
uphill battle for twenty minutes, and lost in the last five. It was 
hard, but our team played the game throughout ; and if we didn't 
win, playing the game is, after all, the main thing. 

This was our last league game, and I think the school should 
long remember the gamest team we've had for many a year. 

Line-up as before. 

St. Mary's win round 7-4. 



THE TRIP TO COLLINGWOOD. 

The team brought its tour of one-night stands to a successful 
conclusion with a trip to Colling\vood and a victory over the Junior 
O.H.A. semi-finalists. The team was allovred to go to Collingwood 
chiefly as a reward for its good season's play. And, although this 
little jaunt was something in the nature of a joy ride, and nothing 
depended on the game, yet our boys gave tl\eir best as they have all 
season, and an excellent exhibition of the winter pastime was pro- 
vided for a large audience. 

The regular Collingwood team, with the exception of Morill, the 
fast centre player, lined up against the visiting team, and play was 
xery evenly divided throughout the entire match. In the first period 
Carrick scored twice for St. Andrew's, and although Cameron was 
given a busy session in the nets the Shipbuilders failed to score. 
The second period was scoreless, although during the last two min- 
utes of this period, with Carrick serving a penalty, some breathless 
moments were given the spectators. Cameron was bombarded from 
all angles and some of his saves bordered on the miraculous. The 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 47 

same fast brand of hockey was served up in the final frame, but St. 
Andrew's had a little the better of the play, and with about five 
minutes to go Kinsey, on a pass from Findlay, notched the third 
goal. 

The game was very ably handled by a local man, and our boys 
were treated very generously by the spectators and the Colling- 
wood Hockey Club. 

Notes. 

Jess Carrick felt right at home in the Collingwood rink. He 
said it reminded him of the Port Arthur "Winter Garden," where 
he learnt the game. 

The Globe Hotel may not be as sumptuously furnished as the 
Ritz or Biltmore, but for good food and comfort it's all that can 
be desired. 

Bruce Findlay's superb rendering of "I Ain't Nobody's Dar- 
ling" on the hotel piano brought the guests flocking from their 
rooms. 

Miss McEachren's advice to hold the Collingwood team to five 
goals was all that was needed to make victory certain. 

Two incidents marred the return journey, the engine jumped the 
rails and Carrick gave a disastrous exhibition of skiing. 

Freddie Lyon had a wonderful chance to break into the scoring 
column, but Freddie in his anxiety missed the open net. Never 
mind, Fred, we are looking forward to seeing you one of our big 
goal getters next season. 

Drury turned in his best game of the season. 

The Collin,gwood boys very kindly provided a hearty supper for 
the members of our team at the conclusion of the game. 

In Mr. J. A. Gibb, Collingwood has a true sportsman who should 
go a long way in keeping his town on the hockey map. 

The Collingwood team will be almost intact next year. All 
cf this year's team, with the exception of two players, v/ill be 
eligible. Here's hoping that we meet them in the finals! 



THE SECOND TEAM. 



Under the guidance of "Al" Findley the Seconds had a most 
successful season. They worked hard, and defeated Upper Canada 
on our rink 7-2, and lost to the same team in an overtime struggle 



48 



ST. ANDREW'S C0LLE(;K REVIEW 



at U. C. C, 2-1, winning the round 9-3. They were unfortunate in 

not obtaining any other games, as they were a well-trained team, 

and would have gone far. 

The following were awarded second team colours : 

Goal: — Cameron II.; defence, Carrick and Curry; centre, Find- 

Icy II. ; wings, Findley I. and Earl ; subs., Stronach, Howell McRae. 




THE SECOND HOCKEY TEAM 



THE MIDGETS. 

The Midgets are another of our 1922 champions, winning their 
group quite handily. They were under the guidance of Gerald 
Usburne Reid, and were managed by "Willay" (Mister) Murcheson, 
of managing fame — so how could they lose? 

Little D'Arcy Palmer and Ted Birkett provided the comedy, 
while Hoops and Whillans provided the offence — I mean defence. 
"Bob" Grant was also on, and scored lots of times. Birkett was the 
really high scorer, though. Chamberlain, the little light from 
Ottawa, usually turned in a swank performance. It was with this 
aggregation of puck chasers that the now famous "Potsy" Callig- 
hcn first saw a puck — and the Midgets are proud of him. 

Altogether the Midgets are a fine little team, and would have 
been going yet — if Davisville hadn't beaten them. 




iM M^ 



fm i 



50 



ST. ANDREWS COLLECiP: RE\'IE\V 



Personnel of Midget Team. 

Birkett, "Ted," Centre — An exceptionally good back check and 
was responsible for a good many goals as the season advanced. 

Chamberlain, "Lome," Left Wing — A very good skater and 
stick-handler, but inclined to roam from his position. 

Palmer, "D'Arcy," Right Wing — A good stick-handler and an 
accurate shot, but his combination was a little slack at times. 

Whillans, "Booty," Right Defence — Showed up to great advan- 
tage on the defence after playing the first two games on the forward 
line. His rushes were also dangerous. 

Hoops, "Benny," Left Defence — His checking was good and he 
improved his rushing towards the end of the season. 

Grant, "Bob," Sub. — A hard worker and a good back check, but 
weak on shooting and inclined to go into the corners. 

Reid, "Gerry," Goal — Captain and handled his team well. Looks 
as if in a year or two he would be a second Cameron. Always on 
the job. 



BANTAMS. 



The Bantams under "Lord" Munn, of Cocky, nearly won their 
group, and MacLean says he'll do it for them next year. He says 




BANTAM HOCKEY TEAM 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 51 

they would have done it this year if he hadn't felt Indisposed in the 
last igame, when they lost to St. Mikes 2-1. 

Careless and Lovering turned into cracking good players, and 
should be valuable on Midgets next year. "Cocky" Munn was the 
high man here, and was veiy good on the defence. 

A lot of ,good games were played and we hope next year the 
rising hockey players of the school will get more support than they 
did this year, as it is very disheartening to play before ten enthusi- 
astic fans. 

Colours : 

Goal, Nugent; defence, Lovering and Munn II.; centre, Cowie; 
wings, McLean and Careless ; subs, Sprott and Banfield. 



FLAT HOCKEY. 

THE UPPER FLAT TEAM. 

"Stumpy's Own." 
"Stump" Robertson's aggregation of puck chasers were one of 
the best on the flat. They beat an Upper Canada team, and downed 
the redoubtable "Eastern Pros" 4-3, much to Charley Lewis' dis- 
gust. They also defeated the Lower Flat 4-3, and conquered several 
other "would-be's." Rivera, Tucker, or some others usually filled 
the nets, v/hile "Stump" and "Garge" Crosbie, of the redoubtable 
Tarzan gang, were the defence. Drynan and one or two others 
"showed the speed," as Crosbie put it. "Stump" says for his team : 
"The team were good, and if we had had Murchison for manager 
we would have been perfect. Requiescat in pacem." 

THE LOWER FLAT. 

"Gerry's Demons." 
Ault and McTaggart headed the ambitious six from the Lower 
Flat. Model downed them. The Upper Flat downed them, but they 
cleaned up on their own class — (which the Editorial Department 
cannot find) — however, they, too, were a good team. 

THE EAS'^ERN FLAT. 

"The Kamloops Lassos." 
Under these colours "Red" Milton, "Spare-Parts" Ferguson, and 
"Dune" Findlay made their debut — they cleaned up on a few teams. 



52 ST. AXDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

"Jimmy" Scott was a forward. Yea ! James. Their colours were 
green black, orange, yellow and vermilion, with a rainbow shade 
0)1 the chest. 

THE EASTERN PROS. 

?????? 

The Eastern Pros, were, as their name implies, from the far 
east. Three Nova Scotians, two Newfoundlanders, and one New 
Brunswicker — and presto! — the Eastern Pros. The goal was filled 
by "Dint" Moores and a pillow or two; the defence by Art Clift, 
while "Charley" Lewis played centre. "Charley" was all for defeat- 
ing "Stumpies' " team, but he didn't. Tough luck. 

R. H. Anderson. 



SPORTLINGS. 

THAT PARKDALE GAME. 



Undoubtedly the biggest jolt St. Andrew's College and the 
hockey public got in the S. P. A. series this year was when Draper 
knocked in that goal and gave us the win over Parkdale — it was 
the first indication of what the St. Andrew's team was to be like- 
under Mr. "Mike" Rodden, our coach — but it wasn't the last indi- 
cation by any means. 



CAMERON— OUR GOALEE. 

One of the six reasons why we did so well in the 0. H. A. this 
year was Jack Cameron — ^he seemed to be everywhere the puck was 
and then some. 



THANKS, JESS! 

The school on a whole owes a debt of gratitude to Jess Carrick, 
known to the fans as "The 01' Wreck Train," for the way he has 
given his spare time to the Bantams and Midgets, making them 
the well balanced teams they were at the end of the season. 



HARD WORK BY ALL TEAMS. 

It is largely through consistent and hard work that our teams, 
both in rugby and hockey, went so far. Besides "quitting them- 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 53 

selves like men," they worked and worked so well this year that they 
beat Parkdale, St. Michael's, U. T.S. and U. C. C. in hockey, and 
Ridley, Trinity, and U. C. C. in rugby. Some claim that spirit 
won these games. Yes, 'twas spirit, plus hard work. 



CRICKET. 



The outlook seems bright — nine old colours back — and John 
Cameron and Freddie Lyon to the forefront, but then the outlook 
was bright last year — very bright ! ! ! 



Messrs. Ramsey, Rodden and Muschamp, Please Blush. 

The school has had great luck this year in her coaches — Mr. 
Ramsey, rugby; Mr. Rodden, hockey, and Mr. Muschamp, cricket. 
Yea, coaches! 



0! POTSY! 

"Potsy" Callighen was some find — so was King. 



HIGH SCORERS. 

First Team. 

"Jess" Carrick 10 

"Bruce" Findlay 7 

"Bawb" Drury 5 

"Lou" Kinsey 4 

"Bruce" King.. 3 

The first team played fourteen games, they tied one, lost four 
and won nine. 

Not counting in the S. P. A. games we have had 19 goals scored 
against us, and we've scored 32. 

Our team is one of the lowest scoring in the 0. H. A. 

This team went farther in the Junior 0. H. A. than any team 
we have had since 1905, when we were runners-up for the junior 
championship, and we lost to Stratford 12-10. 



54 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



Blauvelt has made his annual announcement, only this time it's 
the first cricket team. 



We've heard of indoor baseball and golf, but this is the first 
time we've ever heard of indoor cricket. 



Spats are becoming almost as common as Midget sweaters. 



What the Star thought of our team : 

"Toronto hockey fans who follow the tadpole division, haven't 
done gasping yet over the way in which St. Andrew's College Jun- 
iors held George Awrey's Queen's Juniors to a 2 to 1 score in King- 
ston. The St. Andrew's boys were not regarded as having any 
more chance than a pollywog in a trout pond, but they stepped 
right into the eastern college lads as if they had never heard of 
them or their reputation, and came mighty near winning out." — 
The Daily Star. 



After the St. Mary's game : 

"St. Andrew's put up the gamest fi^ht of the junior season." — 
Star. 




MAC AND HIS PERAMBULATOR 



LOWER SCHOOL HOCKEY. 

During the past winter the Lower School has enjoyed the most 
successful hockey season it has had for a number of years. With 
Colebrook, the only old colour left from last year, the prospects at 
the beginning of the season were not of the brightest. 

The rinks have been in use for nearly two months, and daily 
practices have been the order. Every boy tried hard for a place 
on the team, and some very promising materjal was discovered. 







^-fe.-^^. ill '^"^f^^^ 

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JT 1 11 

il %l jI 


W\m 



LOWER SCHOOL HOCKEY TEAM 



The boys who have represented the school this year have shown 
an abundance of punch and energy, and possess that "never-say- 
die" spirit, which has characterized the play of the Upper School 
teams. Most of the players will be under the age limit for a couple 
of years yet and with all of this year's team, except Colebrook, 
Nugent and Grant, eligible for next year, we are looking forward 
to another good season. 

In all 9 games were played, of which 7 were won, 1 drawn and 
I lost. 

55 



56 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGP: REVIEW 

The following boys were awarded colours : — 
Colebrook — Captain, Noriega I., Hoops, Carrick III., Noriega 
IT., Grant II., Nugent, Stewart II. and Ellsworth. 

PERSONNEL OF THE TEAM. 

Colebrook — Centre, Captained the team in a very admirable 
manner. Fast skater, good stick-handler; strong offensively. 

Carrick III. Left defence. Improved rapidly during season. 
A hard shot. 

Grant II. Goal. Cool and usually reliable. Played best game 
at U.T.S. 

Nugent. Right defence. Possesses a wicked shot for a boy and 
was a great asset to team. 

Noriega I. Right wing. Is rather light and a little weak in 
shooting, but his back-checking would be a credit to a much older 
and more experienced player. 

Noriega II. Left wing. A fast skater but weak in shooting 
and is inclined to wander from his position. 

Stev^art II. Goal for the under 14 team. At U.C.C. he played 
like Cameron I. 

Hoops, Defence-sub. Young yet, but developed into a valuable 
defence player. 

Ellsworth. Left wing-sub. Lacks experience but plays a good 
combination game. 

Nelles and Turnbull substituted in some of the games. These 
boys are very good and improved some, but lack experience. 

S. A. C. vs. Model. 

Three games were played with Model, two away and one at 
nome. All of these games were won by S.A.C., the scores being, 
4-2, 5-0, and 2-0. The S.A.C. boys were superior in that they played 
their positions and combined well. This, Model failed to do. 

U. T. S. vs. S. A. C. 

On Februai-y 1, the team met U.T.S. on our rink. U.T.S. had 
the advantage in weight, but this was offset by the team play of 
S.A.C. Play was about even the first two periods, each team scor- 
ing once. Colebrook missed the open net on two occasions, while 
U.T.S. also had this misfortune. Near the close of the final period 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 57 

U.T.S. circled the net and scored. Within a minute they repeated 
making- the count U.T.S. 3 — S.A.C. 1. Colebrook then led a very 
determined attack on the U.T.S. citadel, but failed to score. This 
was the only defeat suffered by S.A.C. during the season. 

S. A. C. vs. T. C. S. 

St, Andrew's met the Junior School team of T.C.S. at Port 
Hope on February. The teams were quite evenly matched as re- 
gards weight, but S.A.C. easily outskated and outplayed their op- 
ponents. T.C.S. lacked the necessary punch to score and were for- 
tunate to get three goals. Combination plays of the S.A.C. team 
were executed frequently and resulted in several goals. Colebrook 
was the leading S.A.C. man and scored five goals. King was best 
for T.C.S. Game ended S.A.C. 10— T.C.S. 3. 

U. C. C. vs. S. A. C. 

On February 9, U.C.C. visited us. The ice was soft and team 
play was out of the question. It was just a matter of batting the 
puck ahead and following. Conditions such as these favoured the 
U.C.C. boys who were much heavier and faster than S.A.C. This 
game was not productive of good hockey, but Colebrook succeeded 
in tallying in the second period. With only three minutes to play 
in the final period, a long shot from outside the defence beat 
Stewart and tied the score. No overtime was played. The U.C.C. 
goaler turned in a very creditable perfoiTnance. 

S. A. C. vs. U. C. C. 

The following Wednesday S.A.C. went to U.C.C. to play the 
leturn game. The rink was large and the ice hard and fast. U.C.C. 
were again heavier and faster and had the bulk of the play through- 
out the game. U.C.C. opened the scoring on a hard shot that gave 
Stewart no chance to save, but S.A.C. came back and evened the 
count in less than a minute on a pretty combination play, Noriega I. 
netting the puck from the rebound. Midway during the second 
period Colebrook scored for S.A.C. on an individual effort, but this 
advantage was short-lived as U.C.C. counted again just as the 
whistle blew. Play reopened fast and furious with U.C.C, having 
a decided edge. In an effort to score U.C.C. used a four-man attack 
and then S.A.C. slipped out and scored what proved to be the win- 



58 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

ning goal. U.C.C. attacked persistently, but were unable to beat 
the Carrick-Hoops-Stewai-t defence. The perfoiTnance of these 
players is worthy of high praise. They again and again saved the 
day for S.A.C. 

Game ended S.A.C. 3— U.C.C. 2. 

T. C. S. vs. S. A. C. 

On Friday, February 17, the T.C.S. team were our guests. This 
game was more evenly contested than the first one at Port Hope, 
although the result was never in doubt. Colebrook and Carrick 
retired in favour of Ellsworth and Turnbull. These last two men- 
tioned played well. The T.C.S. goaler was good, but the forwards 
lacked the scoring punch. Game ended S.A.C. 5 ; T.C.S 0. 

S. A. C. vs. U. T. S. 

The return game with U.T.S. was played on Varsity rink on 
February 28. Both teams had been idle for some time, owing to 
lack of ice and showed the effects of no practice. Neither team 
seemed to be playing true to their best form. Grant II handled 
all shots with comparative ease. Carrick and Nugent played well 
together on the defence, while Colebrook scored the only goal of 
the game on an easy shot. Blake was best for U.T.S. Game ended 
S.A.C. 1; U.T.S. 0. 

L.W.D.' 

This account of the Lower School hockey season would be in- 
complete without mention of the help and encouragement given to 
the players by Mr. Derbyshire. Mr. Derbyshire has been present 
every afternoon at all the practices, and the success of the team 
has been largely due to his active interest and efficient coaching. 



Our Old Boys 



OLD BOYS' NEWS. 

It is inevitable that the names of those taking prominent places 
in the activities of the present generation should be unfamiliar to 
our host of old boys. While the Review is a school boys' magazine, 
yet those who have gone out from our midst have shown a marked 
interest in the success of this paper. Undoubtedly this column, to 
a large measure, is responsible for that interest. From time to 
time bits of information have come to hand from Andreans now 
engaged in business and professional life in this city and else- 
where. We take this opportunity to thank the fellows who have 
kept us in touch with their activities, and also of reminding our 
old boys that we are always glad to hear from them, and are ex- 
tremely anxious that this column may steadily grow in attractive- 
ness. 

Gordon Hewitt is now President of the Varsity Boxing, 
Wrestling, and Fencing Association, and also Secretary of the In- 
tercollegiate Association. 

E. B. Allen is with the Dominion of Canada Guarantee and 
Accident Company. 

Dick Cowie is travelling for Coats Limited. 

Gordon Robertson is President of Third Year at University 
College. 

Jack Applegath is now with the National Trust Company. 

"The Brockville Klan" had a very successful meeting during 
the Christmas holidays. S.A.C. was ably represented by Bill Com- 
stock, Ed. Cossitt, Hugh Davis, and Al. Reynolds. 

Douglas Gordon is attending Varsity, First year "Meds." 

R. Earle and S. M. Skeaff are at the Toronto head office of the 
Imperial Bank. 

Ken McLaughlin is at the Royal School of Infantry, London, 
Ontario. 

Morrison Earle is with A. E. Ames Co., Toronto. 

H. Smith is with the Canada Bond Corporation, Limited. 

John F. McKinley has been appointed Judge of the Juvenile 
Court, Ottawa. He also has been a member of the City Council, 
and Board of Education of that city. 

69 



60 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Harry B. Housser, of Housser, Wood and Company, has been 
elected a member of the Board of Directors of the Canada Foun- 
dries and Forgings, Ltd. 

Staunton Wishart has been offered an associate professorship 
in Oto-Laryngology at Yale University. 

Don't Forget the Annual Old Boys' Dinner to be held at 
the College on Wednesday, April 12th, at 7 p.m. 

It might be well to point out here that the Cadet Corps' Dance 
this year was not the old boys' function that it has been in pre- 
vious years. To avoid over-crowding the hall, it was decided to 
make this dance a present boys' affair. Invitations were sent only 
to ex-officers of the Corps and Prefects of recent years. 



BIRTHS. ' 

To Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Duncanson, on Dec. 8th, 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. N. McL. Birrel, on December 12th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. Clark Acton, on December 15th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Herschkovitz, December, 1921. a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Alan E. Stewart, on December 27th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fred. W. Macdonald, on January 3rd. 1922, 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Norman 0. Wheeler, on January 10th, 1922, 
a daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Carver, on January 1st, 1922, a daugh- 
ter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth MacLaren, on January 5th, 1922, 
a son. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Norman M. I<i;iTH, on January 16th, 1922, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. M. J. De Shereinin, on July 31st, 1921, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. E. Harvey Ellis, on January 24th, 1922, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Maclachlan, on January Slst, 1922, 
a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Magee, on February 15th, 1922, a 
daughter. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 61 

To Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Farquhar, in August, 1921, a son. 
To Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Chapman, on February 25th, 1922, a 



daughter. 



MARRIAGES. 



MclNTOSH, M.D., Peter Douglas, to Miss Katherine Louise 
MacLennan, Manchester, England, on December 2nd, 1921. 

Massey, Denton, to Miss Esther Geralds, at New Haven, 
Conn., on January 21st, 1922. 

Hatch, Samuel Russell, to Miss Elizabeth Henderson Steele, 
at Fergus, Ontario, on January 25th, 1922. 

Barclay, William C, to Miss Mary Catherine Laidlaw, at 
Toronto, on February 2nd, 1922. 



OLD BOYS' INSURANCE. 

It will be remembered that during the winter of 1918-19, the 
Old Boys' Association elected a committee for the purpose of solicit- 
ing subscriptions as a contribution toward the building of the new 
college, it being understood that the Old Boys' contributions were 
to be allocated to the Great Hall, which was to be regarded as a 
memorial hall. Although about $12,000 was actually subscribed, 
it was not sufficient to provide all that was necessary. At the time 
it was felt by the majority of Old Boys approached, that while they 
were desirous of helping the college, they were not in a position to 
make a substantial subscription to the fund, most of them being in 
the process of re-establishment after the war. 

Several months ago, a plan was proposed to Dr. Macdonald and 
the Board of Governors, which it was thought would be an ideal 
way of raising money for the College. This plan, which was sub- 
mitted by Hume Crawford, one of the Old Boys, has been used very 
successfully by colleges and universities in England and the United 
States, and will, it is felt, particularly meet the requirements of St. 
Andrew's College. After going into it thoroughly the Old Boys' 
Executive approved the plan, and authorized Mr. Crawford to go 
ahead with it about the middle of December, 1921. 

It is proposed to approach each Old Boy in a personal way, sug- 
gesting that he purchase an amount of life insurance consistent with 



62 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

his means, with benefits payable to the College. In this way the Col- 
lege will obtain a splendid collateral security for a bond issue, which 
>vill provide the Board of Governors with sufficient funds to build 
the new school. It is felt that this is the only feasible way of raising 
money for the College among the Old Boys, in that each Old Boy 
can give a fair amount of money over a twenty year period without 
feeling it very much at any one time. In the event of the policy 
becoming a claim, the College receives the face value at once, the 
policy having been assigned to the Board of Governors of the 
College. 

In a little less than three months, slightly over $60,000 of in- 
surance has already been written in Toronto, and about $30,000 
promised for a future date, so that we can feel reasonably assured 
of the plan being carried through to a successful issue. So far the 
Old Boys approached have been practically unanimous in voicing 
their approval of the plan and their desire to help the College, if not 
now, certainly as soon as they are in a position to do so. 

A personal letter is being sent to each Old Boy, and a personal 
call will be made. Do what you can to help the College in this way 
and place it in a position where it will be on a sound financial basis 
for good and all. 

It should be pointed out that the Board of Governors do not 
intend to proceed with the building until conditions in the building 
trades have become sufficiently re-adjusted to warrant them in doing 
so. The aim of the Old Boys' executive is $500,000 isurance, 
only a portion of which would be necessary to retire bonds. The 
balance remaining would ultimately form a much-desired Endow- 
ment Fund. 

The school is a trust, owned by no party or persons. Ultimately 
it will be entirely in the hands of the Old Boys, five of whom already 
sit on the Board of Governors. 



I 




Nearly all the Christmas issues received this year do ,great 
credit to the schools they represent. Looking through them, the 
editor was surprised and disappointed not to find more cartoons 
and drawings, which would add interest to the magazines. It is but 
just to mention that those magazines which did publish some 
drawings, offered some very good ones. Some of the publications 
could be improved by different covers. 

We acknowledge the receipt of the following exchanges : 

Macdonald College Magazine: We are always pleased to re- 
ceive such a well-balanced paper. Your pictures and cuts are very 
good. A fine sense of proportion is shown in the direction of the 
different departments. 

The Argus, Appleby School: It is a pity we cannot hear the 
music to your opera, 'The Reward of Virtue." A few snapshots 
and cartoons would add greatly to your magazine. 

...The Collegian, St. Thomas Coll. Inst. : Very good short stories 
and poems. 

The College Times, Upper Canada College: A few more skits 
would be welcome. Your articles written by Old. Boys are par- 
ticularly good. Fine self-confidence is shown in your editorial. A 
very complete magazine. 

The Oracle, Woodstock Coll. Inst. : Your skits are very enjoy- 
able. Why not add a few stories? 

Acta Ridleiana: Yours is one of the best editorials we have 
read this year. Drawings and cartoons are excellent. If your 
magazine could be improved, a few skits would do it. 

Oakwood Oracle : A particularly well-balanced magazine. How 
about inserting a few snapshots? 

Acadia Athenaeum: We appreciate your stories, especially 
"The Cur." 

63 



64 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The Blue and White, Port Hope High School : Your form-notes 
are good. In your "Jokes from Exchanges" you might indicate the 
origin. 

The Ashburian: Why not encourage exchanges by a few com- 
ments in your columns? 

Trinity College School Record : The sports-column is very good. 
A few stories and snapshots would improve your magazine. 

The Collegiate Hermes, Coll. Inst., Saskatoon : Thanks for your 
complete magazine. You have some good poets. 

Blue and White, Rothesay Coll. School : Your cover is attrac- 
tive, and the contents do not contradict the good impression gained 
at first sight. 

Vox Lycee, Hamilton Coll. Inst. : An excellent school magazine. 
Your "personals" are very enjoyable, and so are your cartoons. It 
seems a pity though, to mar the appearance of the whole by insert- 
ing advertisements on pages where text ought to be. 

Royal Military College of Canada Revieiv : To many of us who 
have visited R.M.C., the Review makes most interesting reading. 
Your November number, the last received by us, we consider ex- 
cellent in every respect. 

The University of Toronto Monthly : We do not feel entitled to, 
or capable of criticizing your paper. All we can say, is, that the 
issues we have received have all been up to the usual high standard. 

Crimson and White, Pottsville, Pa.: We are always glad to 
receive exchanges from the other side of the border. Your editorial 
of Jan. 20th is very much to the point. 

The Gateivay, University of Alberta: Some of your contribu- 
tors and editors write like expert, professional journalists. Most 
of your jokes are very good. 

The Sentinel, Harvard School: Your joke column is the best we 
have seen for some time. 

The Albanian: The lack of photo.gi'aphs is a striking feature 
of your paper. Some of your few cuts are good, and so is your 
editorial. 

The Windsorian: Good stories and a well-conducted sports 
column do their bit toward keeping this magazine on its high level. 

J. E. Howell. 



I 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLECiE REVIEW 



65 





IRISH REFLECTION 



i^^ 




Monte Shannon : "Isn't that hockey player fearfully rude ; why, 
he deliberately skated in front of that other fellow and didn't even 
say 'excuse me'." 



Cameron (in geometry) : "He sure draws a mean proportional." 



Miss Hibrow: "Do you like Bernard Shaw?" 
Sam Hughes : "No, I think that Houdini is the best violinist 
in the world." 



A drunken man got off the street car at the second bridge and 
going over to one of the taxis standing there, he inquired in maudlin 
tones, "Who's I'il Ford is Ough?" 



BIG LEAGUE STUFF. 

I used to be quite good looking until I was knocked out in the 
U. C. C. game — Yes. it was a gi'eat game and I think that our 
team deserved to win as much as any FIFTH TEAM the school 
has ever had. 



Noonan : "Did you hear about Yank Blauvelt saving all those 
lives on the street car the other day?" 
Ault: "Why, no." 

Noonan : "He walked home instead of taking a car." 

66 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



67 



AT THE DANCE. 



Monologue to a Flapper. 

"See that guy — ^that's Ed. Morton — ain't he graceful? — yeh, I 
jU£:t adore charlotte russes — So your aunt doesn't like hockey? 

"Well, well look 'at Art Clift, see his hair? — Oh yeh, he just 
uses water on it — so your uncle just adores billiards?" 

"That tall, handsome boy? Why, that's Rufus Curry — Sure he 
won't mind you looking at him, he's used to it don't cha know. — 
Yeh, I adore canaries." 

"Yeh, Wally Reid is just too cute for words — maybe he does 
look like Ben Sieling — yeh, yeh, I love chocolate eclairs." 

"That fellow with the gold braid? Jack Cameron — yeh, he's 
the captain ; see him trip over his sword — yeh, the sword is sharp ; 
he cut all the sandwiches down stairs with it — yeh, really he did." 

"Hot-dog! — Say, did yeh ever hear the one about 'you tell 'em 
gold-fish you been round the globe — I beg your pardon — oh, yeh, 
I just am crazy about banana-nut sundaes," 

"Well shall we go downstairs and sample the hash? — Pardon 
me — yeh I just adore school life — yeh, yeh, yeh, etc., etc. 




THE PUBLIC IDOL . 



68 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



Jimmy Murchison : "You know I'm just learining to dance : now 
don't tell me, I'm a good dancer. You can't fool me, ha-ha." 

Long pause — Jimmy waits for the usual line of "Why, who 
said you can't dance?" 

Girl : "I'm not going to try to fool you." 



Eddie Noonan (after eating 23 sandwiches) , "Gee, I wish they 
would issue knapsacks with these uniforms. 



Ike Cochrane: "I own a tuxedo, you know, but I thought I'd 
wear my uniform so as to be the same as the rest of the boys." 








Mm 



THEM BROGUES. 
Dear ole Hal 
In his cute I'il Dacks, 
Making the other dancers 
Stand still in their tracks. 
Keen complexion 
Hair like wax. 
Dear ole Hal 
And his cute I'il Dacks. 



Anderson in red dress tunic — a bottle of pickles disguised as h 
can of tomatoes. 



Girl : "Do you know the camel ?" 

Hank: "What kind of a looking fellow is he?" 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 69 

Girl (to Ferguson I.) : "Do you mind removing your chewing- 
gum, I can't hear the orchestra. 



Ye Skit editor got a letter the other day wherein was inscribed : 
"The greatest event of the year — Daniel gets a hair cut." And 
we can only remark to some of the other day boys "Dare to be a 
Daniel." 



IVAN DA TURRIBLE. 
(a play.) 

Scene: A barbershop under the Bolshevist regime (one of the 
two allowed in the British Empire) — Ivan Sizzors stands by his 
chair attired in the conventional smock of the Nationalist barbers. 

Enter the first customer in two months. 

Customer: "Here, comrade, a hair cut for my whiskers. 1 have 
stolen a door mat so I don't need them so long anymore." 

Ivan: "Yes, comrade." 

He takes a drink of vodka from a bottle marked "Bay rum" 
and sets to work on the customer's beard — clipping, clipping. 

Ivan: "Did you see the executions at the Stadium yesterday, 
comrade ?" 

Customer: "Yes — comrade Sing Falski was there and in com- 
pliance with the general order concerning whiskers he wore side 
chops taken from an Ostermoor." 

Ivan: "Oscar Moore? Where is his shop, comrade?" 

Customer: "Ostermoor mattress for a bed, Comrade Dolthead, 
he used the stuffings from his couch." 

Ivan: "Oh, I see, his face needed a rest." 

Customer : "Yes, that was it, two comrades were standing on it. 

Ivan (bewildered), "Just so." 

Customer : "Very fine executions, comrade ; nothing like them 
since the last rugby game before the revolution !" 

Ivan : "One or two points on your whiskers, comrade?" 

Customer : "One point ; what do you think I am, a starfish ?" 

Ivan : "Pardon me, but some of the comrades have a weakness 
for washing their necks." 

Customer: "I'm not one of them." 

Ivan: "Now, I am finished, do you wish some Italian balm, 
comrade?" 

Customer (harshly) : "No I comrade." 



70 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Ivan: "Then I will give you a very fine Russian bomb for noth- 
ing; wait here, comrade." 

He places a towel over the customer's head and puts a bomb 
with lighted fuse under his chair and runs out. There is a loud 
explosion and the customer is blown to atoms; his whiskers hang 
on the chandelier. 

Enter Ivan waving around a bottle of Odorono. 

The End. 

Note. — For curtain call Ivan comes forward holding up the 
customer's whiskers which he removes from the chandelier. 

K.B.C. 




1st Andrean: "That was a great line I shot to my girl Olive last night." 
2nd Andrean: "Stuffed Olive, eh?" 

A couple of boys use their feet when they dance ; the rest, well 
we'd rather not say, they don't use their heads anyway. 



ADVICE TO NEWSBOYS. 

When the master laughs, laugh yourself, whether you see the 
joke or not. Do likewise, when the prefect tries to be funny. But 
never laugh at your own wise-cracks. 



Now that the hockey season is over and pucks are no more in 
demand it may be possible to keep rubber heels on one's brogues. 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



71 



Anderson is scorer of the first cricket team, if he scoi:es as 
heavily in cricket as he scores in the realms of romance — we ought 
to win the championship. 



"It is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at 
all," said Anderson when he got all of his class pins back in the 
mail. 

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty has reduced McRae's 
laundry to thirty pieces per week. The laundrymen were wearing 
out under the strain. 



The way Red Milton parts his hair : Draw a chalk line on the 
skull and rake them curls to either side of the chalk line ; the effect 
IS picturesque to the extreme — very much the extreme. 



Plaunt: "I gave a classpin to eight girls." 

Palmer: "Gee, eight class pins must have set you back a lot." 

Plaunt: "Not at all, it was the same class-pin." 



Some of the boys who visit other rooms have to be thrown out ; 
a case of "Hard callers." 




Wunguy: "Yeh, she's a won'ful girl, so delicious and refreshing." 
Guytoo: "What's her name, Coca Cola?" 



72 ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE I<E\ lEW 

POPULAR BOYS. 

The generous fellow with the last maple bud always in hia 
mouth. 

The fellow who allows you to lend him a car ticket. 

The prince who makes a hit with your best necktie on Saturday. 

The duke who parks his feet on your shins at the dining table. 



S. B. Wood: "Come on. fellows, and have seconds; I'm not 
hungry to-night. 



Carrick I. : "Come on, Don, lend me a dollar." 
Carrick 11. : "No, I'm saving my money so that I can get some 
of the prefects' trousers pressed." 



HEARD UP THE DUMB WAITER. 
Gossip of Le Theatre Related by Keyhole. 
Keyhole predicts that the "Twelfth Night" is going to have 
bad luck on the thirteenth night. Actors beware! A consign- 
ment of Chinese eggs has gone bad in Oshawa, 



Coming Attractions. 

The Haircut with Niel Campbell (about May 24) . 

The Creditor's Choir — Bobby Grant's room mates. 

The Gamblers — A moral play depicting the evils of gambling. 
Messrs. Aspden and Shannon will thrill the multitudes in this their 
"latest" vehicle. 

The Grand Duke — Cocky Munn in the title role. 

Tickets for these attractions may be obtained from Dawson 
City. 

Keyhole would like to know how much money Miss Lulu Bett 
on the Havana races. 

Jimmy Murchison is making his appearance for the first time 
next month in "Breakfast," a melodrama based on the experiences 
of a plate of toast in Iceland. 

Cameron I. is going to produce "One Buck" for his playwright 
brother, Awan. It will no doubt have an enthusiastic reception in 
Ottawa where it will be produced in the Olympia Candy Kitchen or 
some other ice-cream parlor. 

It may be interesting to Keyhole readers to know that Cully 
Wilson, the ticket collector in the Shanty Bay Theatre, has the finest 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 73 

collection of joke books in Ontario. Beginning with the eighty-fifth 
edition of Rube Jokes, 1905, by persistent effort he has collected a 
fine library wherein such jewels as 200 Hebrew Quips, After-Din- 
ner Speaking, Irish Humour, Hoboes' Handbook may be found. 

Curry, the well-known cornetist, will give a recital some time in 
the near future with a repertoire of college songs, including, "My 
Name is Solomon Levi," and "Jingle Bells, Jingle Bells." Russell 
v/ill assist at the piano. 

Art Clift, the critic, says of "The Frolics : "Full of pep, a reg'lar 
lallapaloozer of a play, rivalled only by "Ten Nights in a Barroom." 

Next time Keyhole will review "Brilliantine," by Abie Flaunt 
and the musical comedy, "I Hate Myself," by Stewart B. Wood. 

Au Revoir, Keyhole. 



Findlay : "That chap pushed me into the nets. 
Referee: "Knocked you for a goal, eh?" 



ROPO'S RAGTIME BAND. 

It practices in the prayer-hall 
With shrieks and a^vf ul groans ; 

Above the tumult awful 
Resound its strident tones. 

The bugles and the bass drum 

All raise the chandeliers 
And leave all hearers dumb 

Or deaf in one or both their ears. 

"Ta-ra-ra, boom, boom, boom," 

The drum and bugles roar. 
And you beat it from the prayer-hall 

By the window or the door. 

"So here's to Ropo's Ragtime Band," 

Sousa is down and out, 
"So here's to Ropo's Ragtime Band," 

We gather all and shout ! 



Fred Bingham is now bass-drummer, and may wear that tiger 
door-mat across his chest when on parade. 



74 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REXIEW 



Charley : "Neither a borrower or a lender be." 
Cochrane: "Well, I'm not a lender anyhow." 



Tragedy — Beating the bass drum on an empty stomach. 



The other day 

One of the boys 

Referred 

To Tom Aspden 

As one of those 

Chesterfield cigarette advertisement 

Poets. 

(With apologies to K. C. B.) 




1 






Anderson's familiar saying: "This is the best drawing I ever did." 
A. WISE CRACK. 

Someone told Doug Cook to "Pack up your troubles in your old 
kit bag and smile" — so Doug threw a double-gating into his laun- 
dry bag and grinned. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 75 

Bring on Apollo 
In his palmiest day, 
His pride he can swallow, 
We've got Shirley McRae ! ! 



Mr. Laidlaw: "Who was Walpole?" 
Banfield : "He invented cod liver emulsion." 



There was a girl called Clara, 
Her laff would shake your marra, 
She had no teeth, 
We'll hand her a wreath, 
She warn't no Theda Bara. 



WELL, BOYS, CAN SHE ? 
Bobby Grant: "Will you sit out this dance?" 
Girl: "Can I trust you?" 



WE ARE TIRED OF: 
Buying soap for Don Carrick. 
Working detention. 
Lending postage stamps. 
Listening to prevaricators. 
Making jokes about Blauvelt. 
Being polite to prefects. 
Shaking hands with Willy Murchison. 



Thompson I. : "Gold is nothing to Hink Russell." 

Berry: "Why so?" 

Thompson I. : "They say 'silence is golden.' " 



G. B. : "Why has Dint Moores got his jaw in a sling?" 
Ellis : "That isn't a sling, that's his collar." 



Master: "So you want leave to the dentist, what dentist?" 
Eddie Noonan (badly rattled) : "Wallace Reid, sir." 



Apartments in Hades 
Three dollars and up. 
For any but ladies 
(No room for "the pup.") 



76 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Master: "I see you have a new suit." 

Boy: "Yes, sir, herring-bone." 

Master: "The design looks more like whalebone." 



PROFESSOR RIGHT'S POPULAR HISTORY. 

Prof. Right studied in the Jail Farm outside of Orillia, Ont., and 
lias reduced the more complex histories to the colloquial speech of 
the masses. Whether he has been successful or not may be ascer- 
tained from the following examples taken at random from his 
book: 

(1) The Battle of Hastings — Harold, the Tough Knut, was 
knocked out in a sudden death bout by Rouen Bill in 1066. As a 
result of the fight Bill became the big noise in Merrie England. 

(2) Geo7'ge Washington — First in a row, first to shove out the 
olive branch and the first guy in the hearts of the other fellers. He 
cut down an apple tree when he was a kid after his dad had said, 
"Woodman, spare that tree," and when his old man called him a 
liar he told him off. He was a surveyor and used to survey bat- 
tles from high hills. Later he was President of the U. S. A. 

He and Abe Lincoln go bigger with the Yanks that any guy except 
Jack Dempsey. 

(3) Lord Bacon — A chancellor of England in James I.'s time. 

Bacon tried to play Ponzi with the taxes, but the Pinkertons 

got after him and he was fired. 

(4) Waterloo — A big scrap in 1815 when Napoleon got the G.B. 
from Wellington. The French (Napoleon was a Frenchman) tried 
all day to knock Wellington for a goal, but the skinny red line held 
out until Blucher arrived and drove the Frenchmen back to Paree. 
This battle was important because it interrupted a dance in Brus- 
sels and a bunch of English officers had to turn their girls over to 

the chaperons and beat it. Blucher had knobby toed shoes named 

after him for winning the battle. 

From these examples it may be seen how simple and direct is 
Prof. Right's History. Already it has been authorized by the Board 

of Education of Baffin Land. Prof. Right says, "Fm right, they 

use the Wrong history now." 



Thompson (crackin' wise) : "How does a sailor come home from 
a home-brew party?" 

Cameron I. (also crackin' wise) : "Soust-by-yeast." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



77 



NEW EVENTS IN THE ASSAULT-AT-ARMS. 

(1) The masters have joined in presenting an inlaid ketchup 
keg to the student who obtains the greatest number of houselates in 
one week. 

(2) The staff will also present a pair of tar paper spats to the 
boy who obtains the greatest number of cakes of soap from the bath- 
loom in one week without buying any. Carrick II. is barred from 
this race. 

(3) An unsafety razor will be presented by Ben Sieling to the 
boy who succeeds in raising a beard surpassing the one grown by 
himself or Thompson I. A moustache is not eligible in this contest 
but it is believed that the Russel Stevenson Trophy will be presented 
to any boy capable of tickling with his upper lip. 

With these trophies added to the less important events such as 
the boxing, wrestling and fencing championships — the assault-at- 
arms should be a gala event. — F. F. 



Jack MacDonald: "Gosh, Art Hillary just swallowed a dime." 
Fisher: "Did Artichoke?" 




1st Cadet; "Did you take your girl into the conservatory to-night.'' 
2nd Cadet: "No, I was afraid of the rubber plant." 



78 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW- 



IT WILL KILL HIM. 

McRae I. : "Dicky Fisher is going to commit suicide." 
McRae II. : "Impossible, he doesn't hate himself!" 
McRae I. : "Well, he's made a bet that he's not going to crack 
one wise one to-day." 



Casual Reader of the Review : "That chap Blauvelt must be a 
prominent boy at the school, I see his name mentioned so often in 
your delightful paper." 



The House of a Thousand Candles — S. A. C. when the hydro 
failed. 




1st Prosperous Citizen: "I'm pretty busy to-day. 
2nd P.O.: "What! work?" 
IstP.C: "Naw, plumbin'?" 



THE RAW SCOTCHMAN. 

There was a fellow called Bruce, 
Whose dome became rather loose. 
He pulled some punk jokes 
Which shocked all the folks, 
And now he is in the caboose. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 79 

BEDLAM FERGUSON. 

Once upon a time S. A. C. was a quiet place; freight trains 
whispered to us, we were even bothered by the songs of birds, and 
then, Frederick Ferguson escaped from the Riverdale Zoo and 
flashed upon us. 



"How to break into the movies" — Knock the ticket-collector 
down. 



LOWER SCHOOL SKITS. 

Barclay: "What did you do with that fellow you caught steal- 
ing your beans last night?" 

Murchison III. : "T beaned him." 



Carrick III.: "Have you seen Mayonnaise?" 
Lentz : "No, she is dressing and won't lettuce." 



Instructor (in cadet corps) : "Now, Graham, will you give me 
a definitioi:! of strategy?" 

Graham: "It's strategy when you don't want the enemy to 
know you're out of ammunition to keep on firing." 



Mr. Cooper (at dinner) : "Any complaints?" 
Stollmeyer II. : "Yes, sir, bread's wrong." 
Mr. Cooper: "What is the matter with it?" 
Stollmeyer II. : "Contradicts the laws of gravity. It is as heavy 
as lead and won't go down." 



Giant: "I wish I had a young brother." 

Grant: "Why?" 

Giant: "I am tired of teasing the cat." 



Newman : "Waiter, this is a very small steak you brought me." 
Waiter (sympathetically) : "Oh, never mind, it will take you a 
long time to eat it." 



Murchison III. : "What did you think of that last joke of mine?" 
Mr. P.: "I'm very glad it is your last one." 



Mr. D. : "Graham, I want you to go round the school." 
Graham : "Sorry, sir, but I am not that big." 



80 



ST. ANDREW'S COIJ.EGE REVIEW 



Mr. Palmer (translating' sentence for Stewart) : "Vido I see, 
copiam abundance." 

Stewart (in astonishment) : "Where, sir?" 

Mr. Palmer (annoyed) : "What do you mean?" 

Stewai-t (innocently) : "Where do you see a bun dance, sir?" 



Said the noedle to the stocking, 

"I'll stick you through and through." 
Said the stocking to the needle, 

"I'll be darned if you do." 



Stollmeyer I. : "Hey, waiter, what are these black specks in my 
grape fruit?" 

Waiter: "Say, boss, dat must be some of dem vitamines '^very- 
one is all talking about." 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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t ^ntiretu'si College 



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BO/^/?D OF GOVERNORS 

CHAIRMAN: 
J. K. Macdonald, Esq. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN: 
Colonel Albert E. Gooderham 



GOVERNORS: 

Rev. Prof. Kilpatrick, D.D. 

Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D. 

Sir Joseph W. Flavelle, Bart. 

D. B. Hanna, Esq. 

Frank A. Rolph, Esq. 

A. M. Campbell, Esq. 

H. E. Irwin, Esq., K.C. 

Sir John C. Eaton 

D. A. Dunlap, Esq. 

Thomas Findley, Esq. 

Ralph Connable, Esq. 

T. A Russell, Esq. 

W. B. McPherson, Esq. 

Albert E. Gooderham, Jr. 

Lyman P. Howe, Esq, 

Kenneth B. MacLaren, Esq. 

Robert J, Gill, Esq. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Candies and Ice Cream 

Main Store: YONGE & BLOOR STS. 

(Tea Rooms in Connection) 



Other Stores: 

245 AVENUE RD. 500 BLOOR ST. WEST 

1200 ST. CLAIR AVE. 

We do catering for banquets, etc. 



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TRINITY UNIVERSITY 

TORONTO 

federated with the University of Toronto, offers 

1. All the advantages of a complete Residental 

System for men and women, in separate 
building's. 

2. A full Arts course leading to the degree of 

B.A. (University of Toronto). 

3. Courses in Divinity leading to the degree of 

L.Th. and B.D., in preparation for the 
Ministr\- of the Church of England in 



Canada. 



For rooms and information apply to 



THE REVD. C. A. SEAGER, >LA., D.D. 

Provost. Trinity Colleg-e. Toronto. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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THE LUMSDEN BLDG. 

j BARBER 

SHOP 



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YONGE and ADELAIDE 

(Basemen' ) 



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8 CHAIRS I 

Absolutely Sanitary 1 

The barbers of this establishment f 

are authorized by the proprietor 
to refuse to shave or do any work 
on customers whose faces or 
scalps give any evidence of in- 
fection whatever. Main 2535 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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#len iHatur 

661 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 
Residential and Day School for Girls 

Principal- MISS J. J. STl ART 

(Successor to Miss Veals) 
Classical Tripos. Cambridge Universitv, Eng^land. Large well-ventilated house, pleasantly 
situated. Highly qualified start of Canadian and European teachers. The curriculum 
shows close touch with modern thought an J education. Prepar.Ttion for matriculation 
examinations. Special attention given to individual needs. Outdoor games. 

School Re-opens April 18th 

■* ew Prospectus from .Miss .Stuart 



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Telephone Adelaide 102 



The Macoomb Press 



Printing 

THAT GETS RESULTS 



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16 JOHNSON STREET 



Toronto 



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Office Phone M. 2877 Warehouse M. 5236 Produce M. 2390 

STRONACH & SONS 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

ForeigTi and Domestic Fruits Butter, Egg's, Produce of all Kinds 

Apples and Potatoes in Car Lots 

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British-American Cleaners and Pressers 

LOOK AFTER YOUR CLOTHES 

Our Special Students Contracts at $5 00 for 12 Suits. Guarantees Satisfaction. 
SUITS <:alled for and delivered. 



485 SPADINA CRESCENT 

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Phone College 5390 
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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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j Toronto Auto Accessories 

LIMITED 



N. 4292 



J. S. GREEN. 
S.A.C.. 'OZ-'OS 



M. S. GOODERHAM. 
S.A.C., 'OI-'IO 



AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT [ 



598 YoNGE Street 



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JESS 

APPLEOATH 

HATS 

SURPASS 
ALL OTHERS 

( 8.S Yonge St. 

Sold only ' >'ear King St. 

at I 280 Yonge St. 

V At Alice St. 
Montreal Store 

473 St. Catherine St. W. 

Near Peel St. 



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Beatty 
Knitting Mills f 



Limited 



Manufacturers o f V-Neck 

and Roll-Collar Sweaters, 

Sweater Coats and Athletic 

Stockings for Clubs and \_ 

Colleges. 

In Pure Wool Only. 



54=56 Wolseley Street 

TORONTO 

Phone College 4148 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



CHERR Y FLIP 



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ROBERTSON BROS. LTD. 
TORONTO 



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DacI^ 5 

SHOES 

Have quality and are the favor- 
ites of men of discernment, both old 
and young. 

FOUE FEATURES OF 
OUR SHOES 

Fetter Wearing qualities. 
Perfect Workmanship. 
Better Leather. 
Exclusive Style. 

Our list of satisfied customers in- 
cludes the majority of St. Andrew's 
College men. 

RDACK& SONS, Limited 

Makers of Men's Shoes for 
over 100 years. 

73 King Street West Toronto 

319 Fort Street Winnipeg 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Men's Furnishings 

Direct Importers of all kinds 
of Men's Furnishings of the 
:: :: very best quality :: :: 

SHIRTS MADE TO MEASURE 

An excellent stock to 
choose from 

Gloves, Socks, Ties, House Coats 
Underwear, Etc. 

At Lowest Possible Prices 

COOPER & CO. 

67 & 69 King St, East 

TORONTO 



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Easter 
Holidays 

will be a splendid 
opportunity to come 
in and select your 
sporting goods for 
the season. 

That new Tennis 
Racket ■ — • Cricket 
Bat — Baseball 
Glove or Golf Club 
that you intend to 
buy for this season 
can best be secured 
now. 

Call and look over the 
splendid values we are 
showing in equipment 
for all these sports. 

The HAROLD A. WILSON Co. Ltd 

297-299 YONGE ST., TORONTO 



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W. H. COX COAL CO. LTD. 

Phone Main 607S 






Wholesale Dealers Urge Householders to tr^ 
1 AMBRICOAL, The Perfect Anthracite Briquet. 
Ask Your Dealer 



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CANADA BROKERAGE CO. 

LIMITED 



Wholesale Grocers 

Main 2281-2-3 
59-63 Front St, E. : : 



TORONTO 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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RELAX GARTER 



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FOR MEN 




COMFORTABLE 

DURABLE 



RELIABLE 



SLIP ON A PAIR OF RELAX IN THE 
MORNING AND IT WILL FAITHFULLY 
HOLD UP YOUR SOCKS ALL DAY WITH- 
OUT GrVING YOU THE LEAST TROUBLE. 

THE SOFT WIDE WEBBING DOES NOT 
BIND YOUR LEG AND NO UNF.\STEN- 
ING POSSIBLE. 

GET A PAIR OF RELAX AT 
ONCE AND BE CONVINCED 



35c. in Lisle. 



50c. in Mercerser. 



Eisman & Company, Ltd. 

Makers 



Toronto 



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IT starts to pay for 
itself as soon as 
the first piece goes 
into your refriger- 
ator. It stops waste; 
it saves time and 
trouble. No house- 
holder can afford to 
be without it. 

Telephone Main 86 



; Lake Simcoe Ice 



LIMITED 



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COPP'S FINE LINEN 
COPP'S KID FINISH 

CORRESPONDENCE 
PAPERS 

Good taste requires the Lady and 
Gentleman of today to use for 

their Correspondence 

SUPERIOR STATIONARY 

of the correct size. 

The superior qualities of these 
papers are unexcelled in Canada 
today. 

In the following sizes: 

Salisbury — Conventional Ladies' size. 
Regina — Note size. 
Louvain • — Oblong size. 
Club —Gentlemen's size. 

also 
Correspondence Cards Visiting Cards 

Ask your Stationer for these. 

The 

Copp Clark Company, Limited 

Toronto, Canada 



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Ice Saves Food m - 



F. A. BowDEN & Sons 



Established i88o 
Phone Gerrard 220—221 

Retail Lumber i 



LATH, SHINGLES, 

SHEETING, SHELVING, 

CRATING, FLAG POLES, 

BEAVER BOARD, Etc. 



Old Boys 

FRANK G. BOWDEN 
HARRY V. BOWDEN 
ARTHUR (Pat) BOWDEN 






Greenwood Ave. G.T.R. Tracks 

stop 31 Yonge St. 
TORONTO 

Branch Lansing, Ont. 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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^f)e ^nibersittj) of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) f 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and its special 
departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: y 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. ^ 

CCMMERCE Bachelor of Commerce. " 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEEEING B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc. 
II C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. ., 

3 MEDICINE M.B., B.Sc. (Med.) & M.D. " 

1 EDUCATION B.Paed. and D.Paed. f 

FOEESTRY B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC Mus.Bac. and Mus.Doc. 

PUBLIC HEALTH D.P.H. (Diploma). L 

HOUJ^EHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. n 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW LL.B., LL.M., & LL.D. (Hon.) 

., DENTISTRY D.D.S. ., 

^ AGFICULTUEE B.S.A. ^ 

1 VETERINARY SCIENCE B.V.S., and D.V.S. f 

PHARMACY Phm.B. 

Teachers' Classes, Correspondence Work, Summer Sessions, Short Courses for 
y Farmers, for Journalists, in To>vn-PIanning and in Household Science, Univer- y 
J sity Classes in various ci ies and Iomus, Tutorial Classes in rural and urban com- 
^ munities, single lectures and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by ^ 
the Department of University Extension. (For information, write the Director.) 
For general information and copies of calendars write the Registrar, University 
. . of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges or Faculties. 

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Percy A. McBrlde 

SPORTING GOODS 



SEE OUR 1922 LINES 



1 CRICKET - TENNIS - GOLF f 

BASEBALL - - CANOES 
i FISHING TACKLE - ETC. ^ 



J CATALOGUES ON REQUEST ^ 

\ 343=345 Yonge St. Toronto 
i 

Phone Ad. 6450 
i^^ \i 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






Buy 



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Eclipse 
Cakes 

for Quality and 
Flavour 



Manufactured by 

ECLIPSE BAKERY 

Limited 



TORONTO 



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WHITE & CO. 11 

LIMITED 

Church and Front Sts. 
TORONTO 



Direct Importers from all 
parts of the world 

Fruits, Nuts, Vegetables, 
Etc. 



Also 

Wholesale Fish Dealers 

Fresh and Salt Water Fish 
Finnan Haddie, Etc. 



, Best facilities for the prompt despatch 
of orders. 



ALSO BRANCH AT HAMILTON 



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PHONES: COLLEGE 814-815 



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We darn your hose 
Repair your clothes 
and sew on buttons 

FREE 



ALL WORK POSITIVELY GUARANTEED 




Puritan Laundry Co., Limited [ 

292 Brunswick Ave. :: :: Toronto 






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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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When You Want the Real Thing 
in Athletic Equipment Look for 
this Trade Mark 




It Stands for the Best and Guarantees Satisfaction and Service 



Baseball, Tennis, Cricket and Golf Supplies, Sweaters, Jerseys, etc. 

CATALOGUE MAILED ON REQUEST 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

207 Yonge Street Toronto 



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MISS STERNBERG 

Modern Dancing 

Aura Lee 

205 Avenue Rd. 

N. 7169 

Year hook on application 

All the New Season's 

Steps in Fox Trot 

and Waltz 






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PARK BROS, i 



Groups 

a 

Specialty 



2 328 K YONGE STREET 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1269 



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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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TORONTO 






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Every College Boy 
in Canada knows 
this mark — It means 
the Smartest Clothes 
made in Canada. 

THE 

LOWNDES COMPANY 

LIMITED 

142-144 West Front St. 

TORONTO 



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Phones 



Main I If ni Established .88. 



GALLAGHER & CO. 

LIMITED 

Direct Importers and Distributors 

0} 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

FISH and OYSTERS 

to 

Hotels, Clubs and Restaurants 

Hospitals and Colleges 

Railway Dining Cars 
Supplies 

107 KING ST. EAST 
TORONTO 



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YOU EAT A 



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CHRISTIE BISCUIT 



YOU EAT THE BEST 



CHRISTIE, BROWM & CO,, LTD., TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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THE STATIONERY 

IN THE BLUE BOX 




^ GAGE'S HOLLAND LINEN 



The distinctive writing paper for social 

corre spondence. 

A I all good dealers. 






W. J. GAGE & CO. LTD. 
TORONTO -:- WINNIPEG 



WEBB'S : 

Great New Bakery . 



DAVENPORT ROAD 

Foot of Walmer Rd. HUI 



Finest in Canada 

fj ELECTRIC DELIVERY 

No Stable No Horses 
No Odors 

The Harry Webb Co., Ltd. 



TELEPHONE CAAA 
HILLCREST jUUU 



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CRICKET, BASEBALL 

AND LACROSSE SUPPLIES 

NEW SPRING AND 

SUMMER 

FOOTWEAR 



J. BROTHERTON 



580 YONGE ST. 



PHONE N. 2092 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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H. P. Eckardt & Co. i 

Wholesale Grocers 



Church Street 

and 

Esplanade 

TORO N TO 



Telephone 
MAIN 4168 




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HENRY SPROATT, L.L.D., R.G.A. 
ERNEST K. ROLPH. 






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J 36 NORTH STREET 
TORONTO 



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Brown Bros. - 



Limited 

1 and 3 St. Lawrence Market 

Main 868 
Main 869 



DEALERS IN 

\\\ kinds of Fresh and Salt 
Meats, Hams and Bacons 



Corned Beef a Specialty 
A II Kinds of Poultry in Season 



2rs 






ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






COLES 

Caterer 

and — 

MANUFACTURING 
CONFECTIONER 



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SDB! 



Catering a Specialty 



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PHONE N. 154 

719 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 



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TAYLOR & CO. 



Painters 

and 

Decorators 



9 BLOOR ST. EAST 
TORONTO 

Phone North 963 



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DANCING LESSONS 

Private, Class, Single, Group and Couples 

IN ADDITION TO THE LATEST BALL ROOM 
DANCES INSTRUCTION IS ALSO GIVEN IN 

CLASSICAL, NATURAL and CLOG 

FORM YOUR CLASSES— NOW 



THE 



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DISTINCTIVE DANCE CRAFT 

North 4530 :: 63 Avenue Road 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



ZSim 



We've Hundreds of Friends 
at St. Andrew's College 

Here Are The Reasons 



GOOD GOODS 
SMART STYLES 
PROMPT SERVICE 
COURTEOUS SALESMEN 
FAIR PRICES 



MURRAY=KAY 

Company, Limited 

KING AND VICTORIA STREETS, TORONTO 



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Blachford 
Shoes 
For Men 



are wonderfully economical because 
they keep their smart appearance 
long after cheaper shoes must be 
repaired or replaced. 

Try them next time ! 



H. & C. Blachford 

LIMITED 

286YongeSt.,opp.DundasE. 






TWO STORES 



BOND BROS. 

Bruqotgtg 



453 YONGE STREET 

Phone North 350 

Cor. MADISON AVE. 

and DUPONT ST. 

Phone Hillcrest 812 

TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



" h 

j CANADIAN 

GOVERNMENT 
MUNICIPAU AND 
CORPORATION 

BONDS 



^ Bought, Sold ami Quoted 

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Dominion Securities 
cokporation limited | 

26 KING ST. EAST :: TORONTO I 

MONTREAL LONDON. ENG. 

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Boys — 



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Your whole future will be affected by the habits 
which you form to-day. 



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n To learn the value of thrift and acquire the habit " 

of saving is just as necessary to success as is 
J knowledge. I 

" We invi'e you to open a savings account here — f 

it will encourage you to save systematically. 



CENTRAL CANADA 

IPAri AND SAVINGS 

COMPA]NY 



IPAN AND SAVINGS 



King 6- Victoria Sts. Toronto. 

ESTABLISHED 1884 



u I 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 






CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

are issued providing in addition to all the regular benefits that 

'"or Total and Permanent Disability inlurla 

1. All future premiums are cancelled 

2. a regular monthly income will be paid the assured 

3. The full amount of the policy will be paid at maturity 



The Association also issues policies on first-class lives for 

$1,000.00 Without Medical Examination [ 



FULL INFORMATION SENT UPON BEQUEST 

n CONFEDERATION LIFE 

ASSOCIATION 

HEAD OFFICE : t TORONTO 



JOSEPH HENDERSON, ESQ. 
J. K. MACDONALD COL. A. E. GOODERHAM C. S. MACDONALD 

President Vice-Presidents General Manager 



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Buy 

COWAN'S 

CHOCOLATE 

BARS 



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They Are Delicious! 



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FELT MATTRESS 

50 



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BED SPRtKC 



HERCULES 




Every house should be piped for Gas. 
It's almost as essential for comfort and 
convenience as doors and windows and 
a roof. 

Gas the ever popular fuel is so clean 
and dependable, is a form of heat 
always on tap, and used by the whole 
household in various ways. 

A full line of modern up-to-date gas 
appliances, GAS RANGES - FIRES 
WATER HEATERS - FIXTURES 
ETC. - etc., are always on view at our:- 



NEW DISPLAY ROOMS 

55 Adelaide Street East 

Telephone Adel. 2180 



The Consumers' Gas Company 



OF TORONTO