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Full text of "The ecclesiastical and architectural topography of England .."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/ecclesiasticalarOOroyarich 



THE 



ECCLESIASTICAL 



AKD 



AECHITECTUEAL TOPOGRAPHY 



ENGLAND. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OP THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OP THE 



archaeological Institute of ffireat iBxitnin anlr JErelanti. 



DIOCESE OF OXFORD. 



OXFORD AND LONDON, 

JOHN HENEY PARKER. 



M DCCC L. 



iOAN StACX 



THE Y* / 4* 3 



ECCLESIASTICAL 



AECHITECTURAL TOPOGRAPHY 



OF 



ENGLAND, 



rUULlSHED UNDER THE SANCTION OP THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OP THE 



^tcbaeologtcal Institute of CEfreat 99rtta(n anli SrelanH. 



OXFORDSHIRE. 



\ 



OXFORD AND LONDON, 

JOHN HENRY PARKER. 

MOCCCL. 



OXFORD : 
PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTON. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

The publication of this county, with Berkshire and 
Buckinghamshire already published, completes the archi- 
tectural survey of the diocese of Oxford, which is intended 
to form the First Volume of the work. The Notes for this 
county have been prepared chiefly by Mr. I. H. Parker, 
assisted occasionally by diflerent friends, and the whole 
have been submitted to the Archdeacon and other com- 
petent authorities for correction when necessary. 

The next Part to be published will be Cambridgeshire, 
which with Bedfordshire already published, and Hunting- 
don, with part of Suffolk, which are also in preparation, 
will complete the diocese of Ely, and form the Second 
Volume of the work. 

It may be useful to repeat for the use of beginners in the 
study of Gothic Architecture, that the abbreviations used 
throughout this work are N. for Norman, E. E. for Early 
English, D. for Decorated, and P. for Perpendicular, 
according to Mr. Rickman's definitions of the styles or 
periods, and for the sake of more easy reference his 
Chronological Table is repeated with each county. 

The initials of those who have contributed to the work 
are appended to the articles for which each is responsible. 

C. L. — Charles Leslie, Esq. 

B. F. — Benjamin Ferrey, Esq. 

R. C. H.— R. C. Hussey, Esq., F.S.A. 

W. L.— Rev. W. Lloyd. 

J. C. S.— Rev. J. C. Stafford. 

J. M. D.— J. M. Derick, Esq. 

A. N. — Alexander Nesbit, Esq. 

J. B. — John Billing, Esq. 



I 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

Few counties possess a greater variety of objects of 
interest to the student of Gothic Architecture, or of Archae- 
ology in general, than Oxfordshire. The churches are not 
indeed generally on so magnificent a scale as those of the 
fen districts of Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire, or the 
north-eastern part of Northamptonshire, but there are many 
very fine chm^ches. Those of a smaller scale and with less 
outward appearance to attract, are often found on exami- 
nation to be full of interest, and well worthy of a careful 
examination. 

The history of the county shews it to have been of more 
importance in the middle ages than it has been since. In 
the Saxon period it was the frequent abode of the great 
Alfred, and of other Saxon kings. Of this period however 
the remains are very scanty and doubtful ; the tower of St. 
Michael's and the Castle in Oxford seem both to belong 
nearly to the same time, and as the Castle was not built 
until after the Norman Conquest, and it is doubtful whether 
the city had stone walls before that time, it is more reason- 
able to suppose that they are both of the time of William 
the Conqueror. The tower of Northleigh, and the other 
slight remains, scarcely appear to be of earUer character. 

The Norman kings resided much in Oxfordshire, in the 
palace of Beaumont, the favourite abode of Henry the First, 
or sometimes for security in Oxford Castle, or in more peace- 
ful times at the hunting seat at Woodstock. Without doubt 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

the abode of the court attracted many of the nobility and 
gentry to reside in the same neighbourhood, and according 
to the custom of that age, wherever they built a manor- 
house, they built a church also. The houses have disappeared, 
while many of the churches or parts of them still exist. 

The remains of the Norman period are accordingly very 
numerous in Oxfordshire, though with the exception of St. 
Frideswide's, now the Cathedral, and Iffley, they are not 
generally very rich. There are however many fine Norman 
doorways and arches. 

Some of the small churches among the chalk hills seem 
to be of very early foundation, especially the three which 
are terminated by the round east end or apse, Checkendon, 
Woodcote, and Swincombe ; it is well known that this form 
was rarely used after the beginning of the twelfth centmy. 

The Norman Fonts are numerous and some of them 
very good, two only are of lead, at Dorchester and War- 
borough, that of the adjoining parish of Long Wittenham 
in Berkshire is also of lead, but of rather later character. 

In the THIRTEENTH CENTURY this county still continued 
to be the frequent abode of the court. Henry the Third 
resided much at Woodstock, and his brother Richard, king 
of the Romans, at his palace, originally the manor-house, at 
Beckley. Of these two royal palaces scarcely a vestige now 
remains, the site of the palace of Woodstock is pointed out 
in Blenheim Park, and that of Beckley may still be traced 
by the remains of the moat and earth-works, but none of 
the actual building remains. 

There are many fine churches and portions of churches 
of the Early English style in Oxfordshire. Of the earlier 
portion of it, distinguished by its lancet windows, there are 
especially many fine chancels, with their eastern triplets, as 
Stanton Harcourt, Bucknell, Tackley, &c. The chapter-house 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

at Christ Church is a very fine specimen of this style. There 
are also fine Early English spires at Witney, Bampton, and 
Broad well, that of the cathedral is a remarkably early ex- 
ample, though less lofty and elegant than the others. 

Of the later period of this style, or the latter half of the 
thirteenth century, when the windows have foliated circles 
in the head, and begin gradually to change into other 
geometrical forms, but still retain the Early English 
mouldings, there are several good examples ; as the south 
aisle of Woodstock, and a chapel on the south side of the 
chancel of St. Giles's, Oxford ; the series of gables on the 
north side of this church are unusual and picturesque ; the 
circular east window of Westwell is very remarkable from 
its exact resemblance to early French work of about A.D. 
1240. 

The Early English Fonts are not nearly so numerous as 
those of the Norman period, but there are a few fine 
specimens, especially that of St. Giles's, Oxford. 

Of the Domestic Architecture of the thirteenth 
CENTURY the remains are scanty, but some small portions 
of the houses of this period still exist, though the number 
is almost every year decreasing. The prebendal house at 
Thame was a very valuable example of a house of this 
period, but its original character has been almost destroyed 
within the last few years. There is an Early English door- 
way in a house near the town-hall at Chipping Norton ; 
the old manor-house at Cottisford is partly of this period, 
the central part or hall has been rebuilt, but the two wings, 
or square tower-like projections, are original, with some 
windows and a chimney of this period. At Coggs there is 
part of a manor-house, with two good windows of thi^ 
style. The Treasury of Merton College is a curious ex- 
ample of a fire-proof building of the latter part of the 
thirteenth century. 

b 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

Of the early part of the Decorated style, or the last 
quarter of the thirteenth century, the examples in this 
county are particularly fine, as the chancels of Dorchester, 
Haseley, Piddington, Kidlington, Stanton St. John's, Mer- 
ton chapel, and the tower and spire of St. Mary's, Oxford. 

Of the more advanced period of the Decorated style, or 
the middle of the fourteenth century, the examples are also 
numerous and fine, as Great Milton, the eastern part of 
Dorchester, parts of the Cathedral, St. Mary Magdalene, 
and St. Aldate's, Oxford. The towers and spires of Blox- 
ham, Adderbury, Broughton, and St. Aldate's, Oxford. At 
Cassington a Decorated spire has been built upon a Norman 
tower, at Standlake the tower is remarkable as being octa- 
gonal from the ground, with a small spire ; at Newington 
there is a clumsy spire of this period, scarcely worthy of 
notice, excepting as being the only spire in the southern 
division of the county, between Oxford and Henley. 

The Decorated Fonts are more numerous than the 
Early English, and several of them are very good, as 
St. Mary Magdalene, Oxford, Kiddington ; that of Wood- 
stock is still exposed to the weather in a garden ; at 
Nuffield is a very remarkable inscription round the edge 
of the font. 

The Domestic Architecture of the fourteenth 
century is almost as rare as that of the thirteenth, but the 
examples remaining in this county are rather more import- 
ant. One wing of Broughton Castle with the domestic chapel 
is tolerably perfect ; at Wroxton Abbey the east window of 
the chapel and some other fragments of this period have 
been preserved ; in a house at Shutford there is a Deco- 
rated doorway; at Bampton the gate-house which once 
formed the entrance to the mansion or castle of Aymer de 
Valence is tolerably perfect : at Botherfield Greys a brick 
tower and some other portions belong to the early part of 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

this century, if not earlier ; on a house at Woodstock there 
is a good small chimney of this style, the fire-place to which 
is also original, but quite plain. In Oxford, the library and 
hall of Merton College are chiefly of this period, though 
with subsequent alterations. 

About the middle of this century the rebuilding of 
Windsor Castle by King Edward the Third was completed, 
and after that time the court resided very little in Oxford- 
shire, and this county gradually decayed in wealth and 
importance. A short revival took place in the time of 
James 1., of which period the remains are considerable. 
The University however continued to flourish, and perhaps 
never was more flourishing than during the fifteenth 
century, and the beginning of the sixteenth, when several 
new colleges were founded, and most of the older ones 
rebuilt and enlarged. 

In the Perpendicular sTYiiE there are, of course, many 
additions and parts of churches, but not many entire build- 
ings ; there are, however, some good examples, as Minster 
Lovell, the plan of which is believed to be unique, and is 
very good. Ewelme is also a good Perpendicular church 
throughout. There are Perpendicular spires at Hand- 
borough and at Burford ; the porch at Burford is also a 
fine example. The nave and chancel of St. Mary's, Oxford, 
New College, Magdalene and All Souls' College chapels, the 
transept and tower of Merton, are also good specimens of 
the style, and most of the colleges belong to it, though 
some are much debased. 

The Fonts of this style are too numerous to be men- 
tioned, but a few may be selected ; particularly Ewelme, 
with its fine carved wooden cover, Minster Lovell, En- 
sham, Stanton Harcourt, and in Oxford, St. Aldate's and 
St. Martin's. 

Of the Domestic Architecture of the fifteenth 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

CENTURY, the remains in Oxfordshire are not very remark- 
able. The colleges are rather monastic than strictly do- 
mestic buildings, although the kitchens of New College 
and Christ Church and several other parts are quite of do- 
mestic character and good examples. Shirburn Castle 
is still good on the exterior, the interior is modernized. 
The hospital and school-house at Ewelme are good speci- 
mens of the brick-work of the period. A small part of the 
house in Thame park, a house and barn at Upper Heyford, 
the town-hall at Chipping-Norton, a house at Hook Norton, 
the remains of the mynchery at Littlemore, a good brick 
tower at Hanwell, considerable remains of the large manor- 
houses at Minster Lovell and Stanton Harcourt, are of this 
period ; the kitchen of the latter is probably the best ex- 
ample remaining in any part of England. 

At Mapledurham there is a fine manor-house of moulded 
brick- work of the time of Henry VIH. in a very perfect 
state. The remains of the house of Dr. King, the last ab- 
bot of Oseney, and the first bishop of Oxford, in St. Aldate's, 
Oxford, are worthy of notice. Wolsey's alms-houses may 
also be mentioned, though the front is partly modern. 

The houses of Elizabethan character are numerous : a 
few of the principal may be mentioned ; Hardwick house. 
Cote house, near Bampton, Rowsham and Water Eaton ; 
smaller houses at North moor and South Leigh, and nu- 
merous portions of houses in Oxford. 

In this hasty survey of the chief architectural features of 
the county, many of the minor points are entirely passed 
over, and there remain to be noticed some of those details 
and parts of churches which are often more interesting to 
the archaeologist than the general character of the buildings. 
There are Chantry Altars at Chipping Norton and En- 
stone ; at Garsington the original altar-slab has been replaced. 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

There are Squints or Hagioscopes for obtaining an ob- 
lique view of the altar, of Norman date, at Bixbrand and 
Newnham Murren ; of later character at Stokenchurch, 
Clialgrove, Chipping Norton, Ipsden, Kelmscott, and Min- 
ster Lovell. 

There are Low side Windows of the thirteenth centuiy 
at Binsey, Salford, North Stoke, and Broadwell, and of the 
fourteenth at Garsington. 

Stoups or niches for holy water at Wardington, Check- 
endon, Westwell, Aston Rowan t, and Emmington. 

Wooden Bell-cots on the west end of small churches 
are common, in some instances the framework appears to 
be ancient. Stone Bell-cots are less common, but there 
are some good examples in this county ; those at Binsey, 
Forest Hill, and Kelmscott are of early character, either 
transition from Norman or Early English ; there are ex- 
amples of later date at Balscot, Coombe, Fifield, Idbury, 
Holton, SwalclifFe, Tadmarton, and Widford ; some of 
these are for the sanctus-bell only, as at Coombe. 

Gable Crosses have so often suffered from exposure to 
the weather, that it is worth while to enumerate good ex- 
amples of them ; there are specimens of Early English 
work at Bampton, Broadwell, and Cowley. Decorated, 
at the east end of Merton College chapel, Brightwell, Chal- 
grove, Sydenham, Piddington, Asthall, and Taynton ; and 
Perpendicular at Coombe and Northleigh, and the tran- 
sept of Merton College chapel. 

There are Churchyard Crosses in a tolerably perfect state 
at Headington, Ensham, Yarnton, and Waterpery, and the 
shafts or steps or remains of them in numerous instances. 

Stone Pulpits at Black Bourton, Coombe, and at Mag- 
dalene College, all of the Perpendicular style. 

A Stone Chancel-screen of the Decorative style at 
Brougliton, in some other instances the lower part of the 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

screen is a solid stone wall, and sometimes this remains 
when the upper part is destroyed, as at Dorchester. 

There are good specimens of Medieval Sculpture in 
several churches, as in the cornices of Alkerton, Bloxham, 
and Hanwell, on capitals at Hampton Poyle, Adderbury, 
Hanwell, and Caversham; figures in sunk panels at Bi- 
cester and Ducklington, in niches at New College, Mag- 
dalene College, and St. Mary Magdalene Church, Oxford: at 
Bampton figures of angels are used as pinnacles to the 
spire, and are very elegant work of the thirteenth century ; 
there are two rude crucifixes at Langford, and another on 
the tower at Somerton. At Horsepath there are two curious 
figures of a bagpiper and his wife, projecting from the 
wall of the tower in the inside of the church. At Sand- 
ford, near Oxford, there is a remarkable sculpture of the 
assumption of the blessed Virgin. 

The Reredos of an altar remains with the figures in it 
at Somerton, Bampton, and Hanwell, and an elegant one 
of three niches of pecuUar form at St. Michael's, Oxford, 
but this has lost its figures. 

Of Monumental Effigies there are several good ex- 
amples ; as of the fourteenth century in the Cathedral, at 
Dorchester, Harpsden, Brize Norton, Hampton Poyle, and 
Northmoor; of the fifteenth, at Ewelme, Thame, Water- 
pery, Broughton, Minster Lovell, Stanton Harcourt, 
North Aston, Northleigh, and St. Aldate's, Oxford. At 
Drayton, near Banbury, is a good incised slab of alabaster. 
^ Monumental Brasses are so numerous that a list of 
the churches in which they occur has been added to the 
table of contents in preference to enumerating them here. 

In Medieval Iron-work, Oxfordshire is not so rich as 
the neighbouring counties, there are however good hinges 
of the twelfth century at Brightwell Salome and Brightwell 
Prior, Cuxham, and Clanfield ; of the thirteenth at Syden- 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

ham and Ascott ; of the fourteenth, on the door of the 
hall of Merton College, a very rich example ; and of the fif- 
teenth at Shipton and Westcot Barton, and the west door 
of St. Peter's, Oxford. 

Specimens of Medieval wood-work are numerous. 
Of the thirteenth century, we have the screen at Stanton 
Harcourt, and a miserere at Kidlington ; of the fourteenth, 
screens at Dorchester, Cropredy, and Thame, roofs at 
Adderbury, Beckley, Kidlington, Ipsden, Stanton Harcourt, 
and the porch at Harpsden. 

Of the fifteenth, screens at Dorchester, Heyford, Mil- 
combe, SwalclifFe, Shutford, Swinbrook, Yelford, Dunstan, 
Handborough. 

Carved open Seats at Ascott, Heyford, Milcombe, 
Great Tew, Ensham, Steeple Aston and Sandford. Some 
good stalls and stall-desks in the Cathedral, at Dorchester 
and Kidlington ; at Stanton St. John's the poppies are per- 
haps the most curious and remarkable in England. 

Pulpits, at Great Tew, Burford, Widford, Handborough, 
Sandford and Wolvercot. 

Rood-lofts at Sydenham, Hook-Norton, Boddicote, 
Handborough. 

The Eont cover at Ewelme, and the Shrine of St. Erides- 
wide in the Cathedral, are celebrated examples. 

The Perpendicular Roofs of this county are generally 
very poor, a few are however worth mentioning, as of 
St. Mary's, Oxford, and All Souls' chapel; Christ Church 
hall is a very fine example, and some of the other college 
halls have good roofs though late ; Charlbury, South New- 
ington, Kidlington, Alvescott, with a painted ceiling, and 
Eulbrook, may be noticed here, though poor compared to 
some other counties. 

Of Decorative Pavement Tiles there are a few spe- 
cimens, as at Baldwin Brightwell, Easington, Chastleton, 



INTRODUCTION TO OXFORDSHIRE. 

Checkendon, Harpsden, and Ipsden ; in the muniment 
tower at New College the two upper rooms have their ori- 
ginal pavement of ornamented tiles, of the time of the 
founder, William of Wykeham, and therefore belonging to 
the end of the fourteenth century. 

There are Mural Paintings at Islip, Heyford, and Cas- 
sington. Remains of Painted Glass of the fourteenth cen- 
tury in the Cathedral, Merton College chapel, St. Michael's, 
Oxford, Beckley, Baldwin Bright well, Dorchester, Stanton 
Harcourt, and Stanton St. John's. Of the fifteenth cen- 
tury, in Merton, All Souls', and New College ante-chapels, 
St. Peter's church, Oxford, Hardwick, Henley, Shiplake, 
Whitchurch, Broadwell, Burford, Swinbrook, and Yarnton. 
Of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, in Balliol, Lin- 
coln, and Queen's College chapels. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



The Churches best worthy of attention are marked 



Those marked R, are mentioned by Rickman, and his notes of them are 
printed entire. 



No. 

Deanery of Aston. 

1 Adwell. 

2 Aston Rowant. 

3 Stokenchurch. 

4 Baldwin Brightwell. 

5 Brightwell Salome. 

6 Chalgrove. 

7 Berwick Salome. • 
" 8 Chinnor. 

9 Crowell. 

10 CuxhantL 

11 Easington. 

12 Emmington. 

13 EWELMB. 

14 Ipstone. 

15 Lewknor. 

16 Ackhampstead. 

17 Pyrton. 

18 Standelf, or Standhill. 

19 Shirburn. 

20 Stoke Talmage. 

21 Thame. 

22 Tetsworth. 

23 Sydenham. 

24 Watlington. 

25 Weston, (South). 

26 Wheatfield. 

27 Warpsgrove, now Upsgrove. 

Deanery of Bicester. 

28 Ambrosden. 

29 Ardley. 

30 Bicester. 

31 Blechingdon. 



No. 

32 Bucknell. 

33 Charlton on Otmoor. 

34 Chesterton. 

35 Cottisford. 

36 Finmere. 

37 Fringford. 

38 Fritwell. 

39 Goddington. 

40 Hampton Gay. 

' 41 Hampton Poyle. 

42 Hardwick. 

43 Hethe. 

44 Heyford at Bridge, or Lower, 

or Heyford Purcell. 

45 Warren, or Upper 

Heyford. 

46 Islip. 

47 Kirtlington. 

48 Lillingston Lovell. 

49 Laimton. 
* 50 Merton. 

51 Middleton Stoney. 
62 Mixbury. 

53 Newton Purcell. 

54 Shelswell. 

55 Oddington. 
"56 Piddington. 

57 Somerton. 

58 Souldem. 

59 Stoke Lyne. 

60 Stratton Audley. 

61 Tusmore. 

62 Wendlebury. 

63 Weston-on- the- Green. 



CONTENTS. 



No. 

Deanery of Chipping Norton. 

64 Ascott-under-Wychwood. 
W^ Q5 Charlbury. 

66 Cliadlington. 

67 Shorthampton. 

68 Chastleton. 

^ 69 Chipping Norton. 

70 Overnorton. 

71 Churchill. 

72 Comwell. 

73 Enstone. 

74 Fifield. 

75 Heythorpe. 

76 Hooknorton. 

77 Idbury. 

78 Kingham. 

79 Leafield. 

80 Rollright, (Great). 

81 (Little). 

82 Salford. 

83 Sarsden. 

84 Shipton under Wychwood. 

85 Spilsbury. 

86 Swerford. 

Deanery of Cuddesdon. 

87 Albury. 

88 Balden, (Toot). 

89 Beckley. 

90 Bensington 

91 Chiselhampton. 

92 Clifton Hampden. 

93 Cowley. 

94 Cuddesdon. 

95 Culham. 

96 Dorchester . . 

97 Drayton. 

98 Elsfield. 

99 Forest Hill. 

100 Garsingtoru 

101 Haseley. 

102 Rycote Chapel. 

103 Headington. 

104 Hoi ton. 

105 Horsepath. 

106 Marsh Baldon. 



R. 



No. 

107 Marston. 

108 Milton, (Great). 

109 Nettlebed. 

110 Pishill. 
HI Newington. 

112 Brightwell Prior. 

113 Nuneham Courtenay. 

114 Noke. 

115 Sandford. 

1 16 Stadhampton. 

1 1 7 Stanton St. John. 

118 Warborough. 

119 Waterstock. 

120 Waterpery. 

121 Wheatley. 

122 Wood Eaton, 

123 Iffley 



R. 



Deanery of Deddington. 

124 Adderbury. 

125 Milton. 

126 Boddicote. 

127 Barford, (Little). 

128 Alkerton. 

129 Banbury. 

130 Drayton, near Banbury. 

131 Barford, (Great). 

132 Bloxham. 

133 Milcombe. 

134 Broughton. 

135 Cropredy. 

136 Wardington. 

137 Mollington. 

138 Claydon. 

139 Bourton Magna. 

140 Deddington. 

141 Hanwell. 

142 South Newington. 

143 Sibford. 

144 Swalcliffe. 

145 Epwell. 

146 Shutford. 

147 Tadmarton. 

148 Tew, (Great). 

149 (Little). 

150 "Wiggington. 







CONTENTS. 


No. 




No. 


151 


Worton Nether. 


193 Kencote. 


152 Worton Over. 




194 Langford. 


153 


Wroxton, 




195 Faringdon Parva. 


154 


Balscot. 




|^» 196 Minster Lovell. 
|^» 197 Northmoor. 


Deangky of Henley. 




t^° 198 Standlake. 








199 Shilton. 


155 


Bixbrand. 




200 Swinbrook. 


156 


Bixgybwin. 




201 Taynton. 


157 


Caversham. 




202 Westwell. 


158 


Checkendon. 




203 Widford R. 


159 


Crowmarsh Gilford. 




tST 204 Witney R. 


160 


Goring. 




205 Yelford. 


161 


Harpsden. 






162 


Henley 


. R. 


Deanery of Woodstock. 


163 


Mapledurhani. 






164 


Mongewell. 




206 Aston, North. 


165 


Nuffield. 




207 Begbrooke. 


166 


Rotherfield Greys. 




208 Blaydon. 


167 


Peppard. 




209 Woodstock. 


168 


Shiplake. 




210 Cassington. 


169 


North Stoke. 




211 Coombe, (Long). 


170 Newnham Murren. 




212 Dunstew. 


171 


Ipsden. 




213 Ensham. 


172 


Stoke, (South). 




214 Glympton. 


173 Woodcote. 




1^" 215 Handborough. 


174 Swincombe. 




216 Kiddington. 


175 Whitchurch. 




(^* 217 Kidlington. 








218 Water Eaton. 


Deanery of Witney. 




219 Northleigh. 








220 Rowsham. 


176 


Alvescott 




221 Sandford. 


177 Asthall 


. R. 


222 Shipton on Cherwell. 


tB^ 178 Bampton. 




t^^ 223 Stanton Harcourt. 


179 


Shifford. 




224 South Leigh. 


180 


Blackbourton. 




225 Steeple Aston. 


181 


Brize Norton. 




226 Barton. 


1^" 182 


Broadwell. 




227 Stonesfield. 


183 


Kelmscott. 




228 Taekley. 


184 


Broughton Poggs. 




229 Westcott Barton. 


1^° 185 BURFORD .... 


. R. 


230 Wilcot. 


186 


Fulbrook. 




231 Wootton. 


187 


Clanfield. 




232 Yarnton. 


188 


Coggs. 






^ 189 


Ducklington. 






190 


Cokethorpe. 




Deanery of Oxford. 


191 


Hailey. 




233 Oxford, All Saints. 


192 


Holwell. 




iBS» 234 St. Aldate. 



CONTENTS. 



No 

235 Oxford, St. Clement. 

236 - 

237 - 

238 ~ 

239 - 

240 - 

241 - 

242 - 

243 - 

244 - 



245 
246 
247 
248 
249 



St. Ebbe. 

St. Giles . . . R. 

St. John Baptist. 

St. Martin. 

S t Mary Magdalene R. 

St. Mary the Virgin R. 

— - St. Michael . . R. 
St Peter (le Bailey). 

St. Peter (in the 

East) R. 

St. Thomas d. Becket. 

Holywell . . . R. 

St. Paul. 

Holy Trinity. 

The Cathedral of 

Christ Church . . R. 



No. 

250 Oxford, Christ Church . R. 

251 All Souls' College R. J 

252 Brasenose College R. ^ 

253 Balliol College . R. 

254 Corpus Christi Col- 
lege R. 

255 Exeter College R. 

256 Magdalene College R. d 

257 Merton College . R. ^ 

258 New College . R. 

259 Oriel College . R. 

260 St. John's, University, 



and Wadham Colleges R. 

Schools . . . R. 

Castle. 



261 - 

262 - 

263 Wolvercot. 

264 Binsey. 



INDEX OF STYLES. 



Supposed Saxon, or Early Norman, before A.D. 1100 
- 30 



Bicester, arch - 

Crowmarsh Gifford, the whole 

church, especially the west end 159 
Goring, tower - - - 160 

Swincombe, apse and arches - 174 



Northleigh church, tower - 219 

St. Michael's church, Oxford, 

tower - - - 242 

Oxford castle, D'Oyly's tower, 

c. 1100 - - - 262 



Norman, 1100 to 1176. 



Brightwell Salome, doorway 


5 


Sandford, walls and windows 


115 


Crowell, doorways 


9 


Ipfley, rich doorways, arches, and 


Cuxham, doorway 


10 


windows - - - 


123 


Easington, nave and doorway - 


11 


Great Barford, doorway 


131 


Tetsworth, doorway 


22 


Claydon, arches 


138 


Bucknell, tower 


32 


Bixbrand, walls and windows - 


155 


Fringford, nave 


37 


Caversham, arches and doorway 


157 


Fritwell, doorways 


38 


Checkendon, walls, apse, and 




Mixbury, doorway 


52 


arches . - - 


158 


Stoke Lyne, chancel and door- 




Rotherfield Peppard, chancel 


167 


way - 


59 


Newnham Murren, nave and 




Ascott, arches, &c. 


64 


chancel - - - 


170 


Enstone, doorway 


73 


Whitchurch, doorway - 


175 


Heythorpe, doorway and arch - 


75 


Bampton, south doorway 


178 


Idbury, doorway 


77 


Broadwell, tower 


182 


Great Rollright, doorway 


80 


Kelrascott, arches and doorway 


183 


Salford, walls and doorways 


82 


BuRFORD, tower and doorway - 


185 


Dorchester, doorway and chan- 




Clanfield, arches 


187 


cel-arch . _ . 


96 


Kencote, doorway and arch 


193 


Headington, chancel-arch 


103 


Langford, tower 


194 


Newington, doorway 


111 


Standlake, walls 


198 


Brightwell Prior, doorway 


112 


Shilton, arches and porch 


199 



INDEX OF STYLES. 



Norman — continued. 



Westwell, doorways and walls - 202 

Begbrooke, doorway and walls - 207 
Cassington, chancel, and walls of 

nave - - - 210 
Kiddington, chancel - - 216 
South Leigh, doorway and pis- 
cina - - - 224 
Westcott Barton, arches - 229 



Wilcot, doorway - - 230 
Oxford, St. Ebbe's, doorway - 236 
St. Peter's, crypt, chan- 
cel, and doorway - - 244- 

Holywell, chancel- arch 246 

CATiiEDKAL, arches of 

nave and choir, and doorway 

of the chapter-house - - 249 



Transition from Norman to Early English, 1175 to 1200. 



The cathedral, Oxford, clere- 




Alkerton, arches 


128 


story windows of the nave and 




South Newingtou, arches 


142 


transepts, tower-arches and 




Swalcliffe, arches 


144 


tower - - _ 


249 


Shutford, arches 


146 


Chalgrove, nave-arches 


6 


Great Tew, doorway 


148 


Lewknor, nave 


15 


Goring, arches 


160 


Islip, nave-arches 


46 


Shiplake, arches 


168 


Middleton Stoney, nave and door- 




Bampton, tower- arches 


178 


ways _ - » 


51 


Black Bourton, nave 


180 


Somerton, arches 


57 


Broadwell, doorway and porch - 


182 


Chastleton, arches 


68 


Fulbrook, nave-arches 


186 


Cornwell, arch 


72 


Coggs, nave-arches 


188 


Enstone, arches 


73 


Ducklington, arches 


189 


Clifton Hampden, nave -arches - 


92 


Faringdon Parva, chancel and 




CuDDESDON, doorways and tower- 




nave _ _ _ 


195 


arches - _ . 


94 


Swinbrook, arches 


200 


Forest Hill, doorway - 


99 


Westwell, chancel- arch 


202 


Garsington, tower and nave- arches 


100 


Northleigh, arches and doorway 


219 


Holton, walls and doorway 


104 


Rowsham, arches 


220 


Horsepath, arches and doorway 


105 


Sandford, arches 


221 


Marston, arches 


107 


Oxford, St. Giles's, tower 


237 


Pishill, walls and windows 


110 







Early English, 1200 to 1275. 



S token church, doorway - 3 

Ipstone, chancel - 14 

Thame, chancel - - 21 

Sydenham - - - 23 

BucKNELL, chancel and nave - 32 



Fritwell, chancel, nave, tower - 38 
Middleton Stoney, tower - 51 

Oddington, tower - -55 

Charlbury, tower and arches - 65 
Chadlington, arches and doorway 66 



INDEX OF STYLES. 



Early English — coTitinued. 



Chastleton, arches 


68 


Kelmscott, arches 


183 


Fifield, chancel, porch, tower, and 




Broughton Poggs, chancel 


184 


spire ... 


74 


Clanfield, chancel 


187 


Salford, porch . . - 


82 


Ducklington, chancel and aisle 


189 


Shipton under Wychwood, nave 




Kencote, chancel 


193 


and tower ... 


84 


Langford, chancel 


194 


Toot Baldon, church and chancel 


88 


Northmoor, chancel 


197 


Cowley, chancel 


93 


Standlake, arches 


198 


Cuddesdon, nave-arches 


94 


Shilton, chancel 


199 


Elsfield, chancel and nave 


98 


Taynton, chancel 


201 


Haseley, doorways and arches 


101 


Westwell, chancel, with circular 




Headington, south aisle 


103 


east window 


202 


Great Milton, doorway 


108 


Witney, chancel, tower, and 




Waterpery, chancel and windows 


120 


SPIRE 


204 


Iffley, east end 


123 


Woodstock, south aisle and win- 




Atherton, doorway and porch - 


128 


dows 


209 


Milcombe, nave and aisles 


133 


Sandford, arches 


221 


Wiggington, arches and windows 


150 


Stanton Harcourt, chancel 




Nether Worton, doorway 


151 


AND transepts 


223 


Rotherfield Greys, window, door- 




Steeple Aston, arches - 


225 


way, &c. - 


166 


Stonesfield, arches 


227 


Shiplake, south aisle - 


168 


Tackley, chancel 


228 


North Stoke, chancel and tower 


169 


Yarnton, chancel and nave 


232 


Ipsden, chancel and nave 


171 


Oxford, St. Giles's, nave and 




Bampton, tower and spire 


178 


aisles .- - ■ 


237 


Black Bourton, chancel 


180 


St. Thomas's, chancel - 


245 


Brize Norton, tower 
Broadwell, arches, doorway, 


181 




246 




and spire ... 


182 


chapter-house 


249 



Decorated, early, with Geometrical tracery, 1275 to c. 1325. 



Adwell, windows 


- 


1 


Chipping Norton, SOUTH aisle 




Stokenchurch, chancel - 


. 


3 


and chancel - - - 


69 


Chesterton, chancel and sedilia, 




Idbury, chancel and aisle 


77 


and tower 


- 


34 


Dorchester, chancel and 




Hampton Poyle, chancel 


- 


41 


aisles ... 


96 


Mixbury, chancel, nave, 


and 




Haseley, chancel 


100 


tower 


- 


52 


Stanton St. John, chancel 




PiDDINGTON, chancel 


- 


56 


AND clerestory 


117 


Charlbury, windows 


- 


65 


South Newington, aisles 


142 



INDEX OP STYLES. 



Early Decorated — contimted. 



SwalclifFe, aisles and chancel - 144 

Tadmarton, church - - 147 

North Stoke, nave - - 169 

Bampton, nave, windows, and 

DOORWAY ... - 178 

Broadwell, chancel, windows, and 

south transept - - 182 

Kelmscott, transepts - - 183 

Clanfield, chancel-aisle, windows, 

and tower - - - 187 

Coggs, chancel, and tower, and 

aisle - - - 188 

Northmoor, nave and tower - 197 



Standlake, tower and spire 

and chancel • - - 198 

Witney, north transept - 204 

Ensham, chancel - - 213 

Handborough, chancel - 215 

KiDLINGTON, chancel-aisles 

AND PORCH - - - 217 

OxFaRD, St. Mary's tower and 

spire - - . 241 

St. Peter's, north aisle - 244 

St. Thomas's, east window 245 

Cathedral, chapels - 249 

Merton Coll. chapel. 

Choir - - - 257 



Decorated, late, with flowing tracery, 1325 — 1375. 



Aston Rowant, chancel - 2 

Baldwin Brightwell, chancel - 4 

Chalgrove, chancel - 6 

Chinnor, chancel - - 8 

Easington, chancel - - 11 

Emmington, church - - 12 

Lewknor, chancel - - 15 

Thame, nave - - - 21 

Amhrosden, nave and south aisle 28 

Ardley, chancel - - 29 

Charlton on Otmoor, chancel - 33 

Finmere, chancel - - 36 

Hardwick, chancel - - 42 

Merton, near Bicester, chancel 50 

Somerton, chancel and tower - 57 

Kingham, aisle and tomb - 78 
Great Rollright, windows and 

porch - - - 80 
Swerford, church, with tower, and 

spire, and porch - - 86 

Beckley, chancel - - 89 

Clifton Hampden, chancel - 92 

Dorchester, east end - 96 

Garsington, chancel and clerestory 100 

Great Milton, south aisle 108 



Newington, tower and spire - 111 
Adderbury, nave, tower, and 

SPIRB I - - - 124 

Drayton, church and chancel - 130 
Bloxham, nave and aisles, 

tower and spire - - 132 

Brough ton, the whole church - 134 
Cropredy, the greater part of the 

church, and a good porch - 135 
Mollington, chancel, doorway, 

and porch - - - 137 

Deddington, chancel - - 140 

Epwell, chancel and tower - 145 

Great Tew, arches and windows 148 

Wiggington, chancel - - 150 

Nether Worton, nave and aisles 151 

Wroxton, the whole church - 153 

Balscot, church and chancel - 154 

Harpsden, chancel - - 161 

Henley, east window - - 1 62 

Nuffield, arches - - 165 

Shiplake, chancel - - 168 

South Stoke, windows - - 172 

Brize Norton, chancel - - 181 

Ducklington, north aisle - 189 



INDEX OF STYLES. 



Late DEcoBAiED—contintted. 



Taynton, arches, aisle, and porch 201 

Widford, chancel, and part ofnave 203 

North Aston, nave and chancel - 206 

Dunstew, nave and aisle > 212 
Kiddington, nave, and tower, and 

chapel ... 216 

Rowsham, chancel and tower - 220 

Shipton, chancel - - 222 

Stonesfield, chancel and aisle - 227 



Wilcot, west end and porch - 230 
Wootton, chancel and aisle - 231 
Oxford, St. Aldate's, south 

AISLE, A.D. 1336 - - 234 
St. Mary Magdalene, 

SOUTH aisle, A.D. 1327 - 240 
Cathedral, Latin 

Chapel - - - 249 



Perpendicitlae, eablt, 1375 — 1425. 



Sandford, aisle and east window ! 221 
Stanton Harcourt, nave, west win- 
dow, and tower - - 223 
Oxford, St. Bartholomew's chapel 234 

St. Michael's, nave and 

aisle .... 242 



Oxford, Merton College chapel, 

transept, A.D. 1424 - 
New College chapel, &c., 

A.D. 1386 - 



257 



258 



Pprpendiculab, 1425 — 1525. 



EWELME, CHURCH, HOSPITAL, and 

schoolhouse, A.D. 1435 
Thame, tower and transepts 
Ambrosden, chancel 
Bicester, tower 

Upper Hey ford, tower and chan- 
cel - 
Islip, tower - - _ 

Chipping Norton, nave and 
PORCH . , _ 

Idbury, tower and windows 
Kingham, tower and windows - 
Shipton under Wychwood, porch 
Beckley, nave and aisle 
Cuddesdon, chancel 
Rycote Chapel, A.D. 1449 
Marston, chancel and tower 
Stanton St John, tower - 
Wood Eaton, tower 

AdDERBURY, CHANCEL AND VKS- 

try .... 





Deddington, porch 


140 


12 


South Newington, porch 


142 


21 


Wiggington, tower and clerestory. 




28 


and diagonal porch - 


150 


30 


Caversham, two arches, with 






panelled soffits 


157 


45 


Henley, tower ... 


162 


46 


BURFORD, NAVE, AND PINE PORCH 


185 




Fulbrook, tower and aisle 


186 


69 


Langford, aisles 


194 


77 


Minster Lovell, church 


196 


78 


Shilton, tower - - - 


199 


84 


Swinbrook, window 


200 


89 


Witney, west doorway and clere- 




94 


story 


204 


102 


Dunstew, chancel and tower 


212 


107 


Ensham, nave and tower 


213 


117 


Handborough, nave, aisles, and 




122 


tower . - - 


215 




Kidlington, roofs and spire 


217 


124 


Northleigh, Wilcote chapel 


219 



INDEX OF STYLES. 



Perpendiculae, — continued 



South Leigh, nave and aisle 

Steeple Aston, tower 

Tackley, tower and transepts - 

Westcott Barton, chancel and 
tower - _ - 

Wootton, tower 

Oxford, St Mary Magdalene, 
tower - _ > 

■ — St. Mary's Church, chan- 
cel. A.D. 1445 



224 
225 
228 

229 
231 

240 

241 

• naveA.D.1488 ib. 

St. Thomas's, tower, - 245 

Cathedral, vault of 

choir, A.D. 1528 - - 249 

Ch. Ch., hall, kitchen 

&c. A.D. 1528 - - 250 

All Souls' Coll., chapel, 

gateway tower, and front quad- 
rangle, A.D. 1442 - - 251 

Brasenose Coll., gate- 
way tower, A.D. 1512 - 252 



Oxford, Balliol College, library, 

A.D. 1431 - - - 253 

Corpus Christi College, 

quadrangle, and gateway tower, 
with founder's chamber, A.D. 
1517 - - - 254 

■ Magdalene Coll. chapel, 
and gateway tower, A.D. 1480 256 

—— — Magdalene College tower, 
A.D. 1505 - - - ih. 

Merton College, chapel. 



tower _ _ . 

New College_chapel, 

A.D. 1386 - 

Lincoln College, north 

quadrangle, A.D. 1438 
St. John's College, gate- 



way tower, A.D. 1437 
The Divinity School, c. 

1480 
Wolvercot, tower 



257 

258 

260 

ih. 

261 
263 



INDEX OF STYLES, &C. 









FONTS. 






Norman. 






DiECORATED. 




Easington 


- 


- 


11 


Chinnor 




8 


Lewknor 


- 


- 


15 


Fritwell 




- 38 


Fringford 


- 


- 


37 


Somerton 




- 67 


Cornwell 


- 


- 


72 


Chipping Norton 




- 69 


Hook Norton - 


- 


- 


76 


Enstone 




- 73 


Albury 


. 


- 


87 


Bloxham 




- 132 


Dorchester, lead 


_ 


. 


96 


Wroxton 




- 153 


Warborough, lead 


- 


- 


118 


Nuffield, (with inscription) 


- 165 


Iffley - 


- 


- 


123 


Shiplake 


- 


- 168 


Great Barford - 


- 


- 


131 


Burford 


. 


- 185 


South Newington 


- 


- 


142 


Woodstock 


- 


- 209 


Balscot 


- 


- 


154 


Kiddington 


- 


- 216 


Mapledurham - 


- 


• 


163 


Oxford, St. Mary Magdalene 


- 240 


Rotherfield Peppard 


- 


- 


167 








Brize Norton - 


- 


- 


181 








Broadwell 


" 


- 


182 


Perpendicular. 




Kelmscott 


- 


- 


183 








Cokethorpe 


- 


- 


190 


Stokenchurch - 


- 


3 


Shilton 


- 


- 


199 


Ewelme, with cover 


. 


- 13 


Westwell 


. 


• 


202 


Ambrosden 


• 


- 38 


Widford 


- 


- 


203 


Shipton 


- 


- 84 


Northleigh 






219 


Rycote 
Deddington 
Great Tew 


- 


- 102 

- 140 

- 148 


Early English. 






Clanfield 


. 


- 187 


Aston Rowant - 


_ 


_ 


2 


Minster Lovell 


- 


- 196 


Thame 


_ 


- 


21 


Taynton 


- 


- 201 


Adderbury 


- 


- 


124 


Ensham 


- 


- 212 


Rotherfield Greys 


. 


• 


166 


Handborough - 


- 


- 215 


Alvescott 


_ ~ 


. 


176 


Stanton Harcourt 


- 


- 223 


Bampton 


. 


_ 


178 


South Leigh 


- 


- 224 


Wootton 


. 


. 


231 


Oxford, St. Aldate's 


- 


. 234 


Oxford, St Giles's 


- 


- 


237 


-. St. Martin 


- 


- 239 



INDEX OF STYLES, &C. 



BRASSES. 



Adderbury 

Aston Rowant '- 

Baldwin Brightwell 

Bampton 

Bicester 

Brightwell Salome 

Broughton 

Bucknell 

Burford 

Cassington 

Chalgrove 

Charlton on Otmoor 

Chastleton 

Checkendon 

Chesterton 

Chinnor 

Chipping Norton 

Clanfield 

Cottisford 

Crowell 

Cuxham 

Deddington 

Dorchester 

Ewelme 

Garsington 

Goring 

Great Tew 

Hampton Poyle 

Handborough - 

Harpsden 

Haseley 

Henley 

Heythorpe 

Holton 



124 

2 

4 

178 

30 

5 

134 

32 

185 

210 

6 

33 

68 

158 

34 

8 

69 

187 

35 

9 

10 

140 

96 

13 

100 

160 

148 

41 

215 

161 

101 

162 

75 

104 



Ipsden - - - 171 

Kiddington - - - 216 

Launton - - - 49 

Lewknor - - - 15 

Lillingston Lovell - - 48 

Middleton - - - 51 

Noke - - - 114 

Nuffield - - - 165 

Oddington - - ~ 55 

Oxford, The Cathedral - - 249 

Merton College chapel - 257 

New College chapel - 258 

All Souls' College - 251 

Corpus Christi College 254 

Holywell Church - 246 

St. Mary the Virgin - 241 

■' Magdalene College - 256 

Queen's College - 260 

St. John's College - 260 

St. Peter-le- Bailey - 243 

St. Peter's in the East - 244 

Rotherfield Greys - - 166 

Shiplake - - - 168 

Stadhampton - - - 116 

Stanton Harcourt - - 223 

Steeple Aston - - - 225 

Stoken church - - 3 

Swinbrook - _ . 200 

Thame - - - 21 

Wallington - - - 24 

Waterpery - - - 120 

Whitchurch - - - 175 

Woodstock - - - 209 

Yarnton - - . 232 



INDEX OF STYLES, &C. 



DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE. 



Bampton, D. gatehouse - 178 

Blaydon, P. round chimney - 208 

Broughton Castle, D. and Eliz. - 134 
Chipping Norton, town -hall P., 

doorway E.E. - - 69 
Coggs, E.E. - - - 188 
Coombe, P. part of rectory house 211 
Cote house, Elizabethan - 177 
Cottisford, E.E. and Elir. - 35 
Ewelme, hospital and school- 
house, P. - - - 13 
Hanwell, P. tower, brick - J41 
Hardwick house, Elizabethan - 175 
Hook Norton, P. - - 76 
House and barn at Upper Hey- 

ford, P. - - - 45 
Mapledurham, P. moulded brick, 

Henry VIII. - - 163 
Minster Lovell, remains of P. 

manor-house - - 196 

Mynchery, Littlemore, P. - 115 

Nortlimoor, Eliz. parsonage - 197 
Oxford, Wolsey's alms-houses; 

Bp. King's house - - 234 
■ Christ Church hall and 
kitchen, built by Wolsey ; stair- 
case to hall, t. Charles I. - 250 
All Souls' College, first 



quadrangle, and gateway tower 251 

Brasenose College, tower 252 

Balliol College, library 

and oriel window - - 253 



Oxford, Corpus Christi College, 

tower _ . - 254 
Exeter College, hall and 

north tower - - - 255 
• Magdalene College, quad- 
rangle, hall, and towers - 256 
Merton College, treasury, 

library, and hall - - 257 
Oriel College, hall, &c., 

Jacobean ... 259 
^-— St John's College, tower 

and gateway - - 260 
Schools, quadrangle ; 

Wadham hall, Jacobean - 261 

Rotherfield Greys, D. brick tower 1 66 
Rowsham, Elizabethan - 220 

Shirbum castle, P. - - 19 

Shutford, D. doorway - - 146 

South Leigh, Elizabethan - 224 

Stanton Harcourt, tower and 

kitchen of manor-house - 223 

Steeple Barton, remains of 

manor-house - - - 226 

Swalcliffe, parsonage and barn 144 
Thame Park, P. - - 21 

Water Eaton, Jacobean - 218 

"Woodstock, D. fire-place and 

good chimney - - 209 

Wroxton Abbey, remains of a D. 

chapel - - -153 



CHEONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



For the use of the student a table is subjoined, shewing the 
duration of the styles of English architecture, and the kings reigning 
in each period. 



Kings. Date. 

William 1 1066>, 

William II 1087 

Henry 1 1100 

Stephen 1135 

Henry II 1154 to 1189J 

Richard L« 1189 ^ 

John 1199 / 

Henry III 1216r 

Edward I." 1272 to 1307) 



Style. 

Norman. 

[or English 

Romanesque.] 

Early 

English. 

[or 1st Pointed.] 



Remarks. 
Prevailed little more than 
124 years ; no remains 
REALLY KNOWN to be morc 
than a few years older than 
the Conquest. 

Prevailed about 118 years. 



Edward n 1307) 



Decorated r Continued perhaps 10 or 

Edward III.c..1327 to 1377 ( . ^^^^''^l , , Hj^^'' If'' J''^^^'^ 
" ; [or 2nd Pointed.] (. httle more than 70 years. 



Richard II. ., 1377"| 

Henry IV 1399 

Henry V 1413 

Henry VI 1422 

Edward IV 1461 y 

Edward V ]483 

Richard III 1483 

Henry VII 1485 

Henry VIII.... 1509 to 1546 J 



Perpendicu- 
lar English. -{ 
[or 3rd Pointed.] 



Prevailed about 1 69 years. 

Few, if any, whole build- 
ings executed in this style 
later than Henry VIII. 

This style used in addi- 
tions and rebuilding, but 
often much debased, as late 
Las 1630 or 1640. 



» [The reign of Richard I. was the chief 
period of the Transition from the Norman to 
the Early English style. The change began 
perhaps a little earlier in a few instances, and 
continued a little later, some buildings of the 
time of King John being of Transition cha- 
racter. 

b The Transition from the Early English to 
the Decorated style took place chiefly in the 
reign of Edward I. The Eleanor crosses belong 
rather to the latter than the former style. 

In the latter part of the long reign of 
Edward III. the Transition from the Deco- 
rated to the Perpendicular style began, and 
was almost completed by the time of the acces- 



sion of Richard II. Some buildings of the 
Decorated style may be found of his reign, but 
the works of William of Wykeham, West- 
minster Hall, and many other buildings of this 
period, are of very decided Perpendicular cha- 
racter. Perhaps one of the earliest and best 
authenticated examples of this Transition, 
shewing a curious mixture of the two styles, 
is Edington church in Wiltshire, founded by 
bishop William of Edington in 1352, and con- 
secrated in 1361. The same bishop, who died 
in 1366, commenced the alteration of Win- 
Chester cathedral into the Perpendicular style, 
which was continued by William of Wykeham.] 



CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE 

OF DATED EXAMPLES IN OXFORDSHIRE. 
A.D. 

circa 1100, D'Ojly's Tower, Oxford Castle, 
circa 1160, Iffley Church. 

1180, Oxford Cathedral, 
circa 1220, Chapter- House. 

1277, Merton College Chapel, choir. 

1280 — 1300, Dorchester, choir and aisles. 

1324, Bampton, Gate-house, and part of the Church. 

1327, Oxford, St. Mary Magdalene, south aisle. 

1330, Merton Chapel, tower-arches. 

1336, St. Aldate's, south aisle. 

1349, Merton College Library. 

1386, New College Chapel, «&c. 

1424, Merton Chapel, transept. 

1431, Balliol College Library. 

1435, Ewelme, Church, Hospital, and School-house. 

1437, Oxford, St. John's College, Gateway-tower. 

1438, Lincoln College, north quadrangle. 

1442, All Souls' College, Chapel, &c. 

1445, St. Mary's, Chancel. 

1449, Rycote Chapel. 

1450, Minster Lovell Church, and ruins of Manor-house. 
1480, Oxford, Magdalene College Chapel, &c. 

circa 1480, The Divinity School. 

1488, St. Mary's, nave and aisles. 

1496, Balliol College, Gateway-tower. 

1505, Magdalene College tower. 

1512, Brasenose College, Gate way- tower. 

1517, Corpus Christi College, Chapel and Gateway-tower. 

1528, Christ Church, Hall, Kitchen, &c. 

1613, • Wadham College, Chapel and Hall. 

1640, The Bodleian Library and the Pig Market. 

1640, Staircase to the Hall, Christ Church. 



BOOKS RELATING TO THE ARCHITECTUEAL 
TOPOGEAPHY OP OXPOEDSHIEE. 



The Natueal Histoey of Oxfoedshiee, being an Essay towards 
the Natural History of England. By Robert Plot, L.L.D. Oxford, 
1677. Folio. Second Edition. Folio. Oxford. 1705. 

Paeochial Antiquities, attempted in the History of Ambrosden, 
Burcester, and other adjacent parts of the Counties of Oxon and 
Bucks. By White Kennet, D.D. 4to. 1695. 

-^— Second Edition, with additions from the author's 

MS. notes. Edited by Bulkeley Bandinel, D.D. 2 vols. 4to. 
Oxford. 1818. 

A Specimen of a Histoey of Oxfoedshiee, being a History of 
Kiddington in that County. By T. Warton. 4to. 1783. 

Second Edition, London. 4to. 1783. 

Third Edition. 4to. 1815. 

Engeayed Illtjsteations of the Peincipal Antiquities of 
Oxfoedshiee, from original drawings by F. Mackenzie, and accom- 
panied with descriptive and historical notices by Joseph Skelton. 
Royal 4to., with 24 plates and 72 vignettes. 1823. 

The Beauties of England and Wales: or Delineations, Topo- 
graphical and Descriptive, of Oxfordshire. By J. N. Brewer. 8vo. 
1813. 

A TOPOGEAPHICAL AND STATISTICAL DeSCEIPTION OP THE CoUNTY 

OF OxFOED. By G. A. Cooke. 12mo. 

A Compendium of the Histoey of Oxfoedshiee, and the 
OxFOED ClECUiT. By S. Tymms. 12mo. 1882. 

The Histoey and Antiquities of the Hundeeds of Bullingdon 
AND Ploughley. By John Dunkin. 2 vols. 4to., with engravings. 
London. 1823. 

The Histoey and Antiquities of Bicestee, compiled from original 
records, by John Dunkin. 8vo. 1816. 

Memoies of Osney Abbey neae Oxfoed, collected from the most 
authentic sources. By John Swaine, Esq., of Windsor. 1769. 

Desceiption of Nuneham Couetney. 12mo. 1797. 

Paeochial Collections foe the County of Oxfoed, printed by 
Sir Thomas Phillips, at Middle Hill. Never finished. 



BOOKS EFT.ATING TO OXFOEDSHIBE. 

Some Account of Great Milton, by Thomas Ellis. 8vo. Oxon. 
1819. 

History of the Parish and Town of Bampton, &c., by Dr. J. A. 
Giles. 8vo. Bampton, 1848. 

An Account of the Roman Villa discovered at Northletgh, 
in the years 1813—16. By Henry Hakewill. 4to. Lond. 1816. 

An Account of a Roman Pavement lately found at Stones- 
field. By John Pointer. 12mo. Oxford, 1813. 

A History of Banbury in Oxfordshire, including copious His- 
torical and Antiquarian notices of the Neighbourhood. By Alfred 
Beesley. 8vo. Many plates. 1841. 

A Guide to the Architectural Antiquities in the Neigh- 
bourhood OF Oxford, published by the Oxford Society for pro- 
moting the Study of Gothic Architecture. With numerous woodcuts 
by O. Jewitt. 8vo. 1 846. 

Some Remarks upon the Church of Great Haseley, Oxford- 
shire. By the Rev. T. W. Weare, M.A. With numerous wood- 
cuts by O. Jewitt. 8vo. 1840. 

• Second Edition enlarged, to which is appended an 

account of Rycote Chapel. 1848. 

Some Account of the Abbey Church of St. Peter and St. Paul 
AT Dorchester. By the Rev. H. Addington, B.A., with numerous 
illustrations. 8vo, 1845. 

Views and Details of Stanton Harcourt Church, Oxford- 
shire. By J. M. Derick. Folio. 1841. 

Views and Details of Wilcote Church, Oxfordshire. By 
J. C. Buckler. Folio. 1844. 

Views and Details of St. Bartholomew's Chapel, near Oxford. 
By J. C. Buckler. Folio. 1844. 

Views and Details of Minster Lovell Church, Oxfordshire. 
By John Prichard. Folio. 1850. 



LIST OF BOOKS RELATING TO OXTOED. 



OxoNiENSis AcADEMiiE Desckiptio Frierbcrtus. 8vo. Romse, 1602. 

Antiquitatis Academic Oxoniensis Apologia. B, Twyne. 4to. 
Oxon. 1608. 

The History and Antiquities of the University of Oxford. 
By Anthony k Wood, M.A. of Merton College. In two books; 
containing, I. The Annals of the University; II, The History of 
the Colleges and Halls. PubUshed from the original MS., with a 
continuation to the year 1 790. By John Gutch, M.A., Chaplain of 
All Souls' and Corpus Christi Colleges, and Registrar of the Univer- 
sity. Oxford, 1786—96. 5 vols. 4to. 

The History of the City of Oxford, by Mr. Anthony k Wood. 
Published from his MS., with additions by the Rev. Sir J, Peshall, 
Bart. London, 1773. 4to. 

The History of the University of Oxfokd, to the death of William 
the Conqueror. Oxford. 1772. 8vo. 

The History of the University of Oxford, from the death of 
William the Conqueror to the demise of Queen Elizabeth. 4to. 
Lond. 1773. 

Athene Oxonienses. An exact History of all the Writers and 
Bishops who have had their education in the University of Oxford. 
To which are added. The Fasti, or Annals, of the said University. 
By Anthony a Wood, M.A. 

• The third edition, with additions, by Philip Bliss, Fellow 

of St. John's College. London, 1813, 5 vols, royal 4to. 

Henrici Dodwelli de Parma Equestri Woodwardiana Disputa- 
Tio. Accedit Thomse Neli Dialogus inter Reginam Elizabetham et 
Robertum Dudleium, Comitem Leycestriae, &c. in quo de Academise 
iEdificiis prseclare agitur. Oxonii, 1713. 8vo. With 18 plates. 

These plates have also been inserted in Nicliolls's Progresses of Queen 
Elizabeth; and round the Map by Ralph Agar, 1578; republished in 1738. 

The original drawings by Th. Neele, S.T.B. 1566, presented to Queen 
Elizabeth by the Earl of Leicester, then Chancellor, are still preserved in 
the Bodleian Library. 

OxoNiA Illustrata: delineavit et sculpsit Dav. Loggan, Univ. Oxon. 
Chalcographus. Oxonise, 1675. folio. 

OxoNiA Depicta : a G. Williams. London, 1738. folio. 

The ancient and present State of the University of Oxford. 
By John Ayliffe, LL.D. and Fellow of New College. London, 
1714. 2 vols. 8vo. 



BOOKS RELATING TO OXFORD. 

OxoNiENsis AcADEMiA ; or the Antiquities and Curiosities of the Uni- 
versity of Oxford. By John Pointer, M.A. London, 1749. 12mo. 

OxoNiA ExpLicATA ET Ornata ; Proposals for Distinguishing and 
Beautifying the University of Oxford. [By Dr. Tatham, afterwards 
Rector of Lincoln College.] 4to. Lond, 1773. 

Vestiges of Oxford Castle. By Edward King. Fol. Lond. 1796*. 

Collectanea Curiosa ; or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to the His- 
tory and Antiquities of England and Ireland, the Universities, &c. 
Chiefly collected from the Manuscripts of Archbishop Sancroft. By 
John Gutch, M.A. Oxford, 1781. 2 vols. 8vo. 

A History op the Colleges, Halls, and Public Buildings 
ATTACHED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OxFORD ; including the Lives of 
the Founders. By Alexander Chalmers, F.S.A. With Plates. 
Oxford, 1810. 2 vols. 8vo. 

A History of the University of Oxford, its Colleges, Halls, 
AND Public Buildings. London, printed for R. Ackermann, 
2 vols. Royal 4to. (With coloured Plates.) 1814. 

Walks in Oxford ; comprising an account of the Colleges, Halls, and 

Public Buildings of the University, &c. &c. By W. M. Wade. With 

Plates. Oxford, 1821. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Oxoniana (collected and pubhshed by the reverend John Walker, 

Fellow of New College.) London, 4 vols. 12mo. (Printed in 

Oxford, without date.) 

OxoNiA Antiqua Restaurata: containing 170 Engravings from the 
Oxford Almanacks for 1723 to 1823, and from original drawings by 
F. Mackenzie. By Joseph Skelton. Oxford, 1823. 2 vols. Royal 
4to. 

Pietas Oxoniensis; or Records of Oxford Founders : containing 
brief Memoirs of their Lives, &c., and illustrated by numerous En- 
gravings. By Joseph Skelton, F.S.A. Oxford, 1830. Royal 4to. 

Oxford Delineated ; or a sketch of the History and Antiquities, and a 
general topographical description of that celebrated University and 
City : illustrated by a series of Views of the Colleges, Halls, and 
other Public Buildings, and the most remarkable Monuments of 
Antiquitv, drawn and engraved by J. Whessell, [the letter-press by 
T. Joy.]' 4to. Oxford, 1831. 

Memorials of Oxford. By James Ingram, D.D., President of Trinity 
College, (with one hundred Engravings by John Le Keux, from draw- 
ings by F. Mackenzie, and upwards of two hundred woodcuts by 
O. Jewitt.) 3 vols. 8vo., and large paper, 4to. Oxford, 1833 — 7. 

Second Edition (with five additional Plates, and an account of 

the Taylor Institution, the University Galleries, and the Martyrs' 
Memorial.) 4 vols. 8vo. 1 847—48. 

A Hand-Book for Visitors to Oxford, with Plates and Woodcuts. 
8vo. 1848. 

Numerous smaller Guide Books are published every year. I 



books relating to oxford. 

History and Antiquities op the Cathedral Church op Oxpord. 
By Willis. With engravings by J. Storer. 8vo. 1813. 

The History and Antiquities op the Cathedral Church of 
Oxpord. Illustrated by a series of engravings of views, plans, ele- 
vations, sections, and details of that edifice. By John Britton, F.S.A. 
4to. 1820. Second Edition. 4to. 1836. 

Specimens of Gothic Architecture, selected from ancient buildings 
at Oxford, &c., drawn and etched by F. Mackenzie and A. Pugin. 
4to. Lond., 1810. 

Views and Details of St. Giles's Church, Oxford. By 
James P. Harrison. Folio. Oxford, 1842. 

Balliofergus ; or, A Commentary upon the Affairs of Balliol College. 
Oxford, 1688. 4to. At page 89, Natalitia Collegii Pembrochiani 
Oxonii. 1624. By Henry Savage. 

The Annals of University College. By Wilham Smyth, Rector 
of Melsonby. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1728. 8vo. 

The Life op William op Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, Founder 
of New College. By Robert Lowth, D.D. Oxford, 1777. 8vo. 

The Life of Henry Chichele, Archbishop of Canterbury, Founder 
of All Souls' College. By O. L. Spencer, Fellow of that Society, 
Oxford, 1783. 8vo. 

The Life op William op Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester, Founder 
of Magdalene College. By Richard Chandler, D.D. London, 1811. 
8vo. 

Observations on the Original Architecture of Saint Mary 
Magdalen College, Oxford : and on the Innovations anciently 
or recently att-empted. [By J. C. Buckler.] 8vo. London, 1823. 

The Lives of William Smyth, Bishop of Lincoln, and Sir Richard 
Sutton, Knight, Founders of Brasenose College. By Ralph Churton, 
M.A., late Fellow of that College. Oxford, 1800. 8vo 

The Life of Cardinal Wolsey. By R. Fiddes, D.D. London, 1724. 
folio. 

The Life of Sir Thomas Pope, Founder of Trinity College. By 
Thomas Warton, B.D. Fellow of Trinity College. Oxford, 1780. 
8v6. 

• There are a number of papers relating to the antiquities of Oxford, and places in 
Oxfordshire, in Hearne's Collectanea. 

*• The engravings of Oxford, and the different Colleges, &c., are so numerous, 
that a catalogue of them would fill a volume. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 



Beaner^) of ^ston. 

1 . Adwell, St. Mary, This church consists of nave and 
chancel, and has no tower. The door of the nave is early 
N., the windows Transition from E. E. to D. They have 
some French painted glass, c. 1700. There is a monu- 
mental effigy, in chain mail with a large shield in the north 
Avail of the nave. c.l. 

2. Aston Rowan t, St. Peter and St. Paul. Chancel, 
nave, with chapels on its north and south sides, and a tower 
at the west end. This church is mostly of D. character, but 
with the mullions and tracery cut out of nearly all the 
windows. The chancel is D., the arch plain with squints 
on both sides, one of them perfect, and a good example. 
The font is E. E., with eight detached shafts. There are 
several brasses in the nave and chancel, and a D. stoup 
remains in the south porch, w. 

3. Stokenchurch, St. Peter and St. Paul. Chancel, 
nave, north aisle, with a very low tower at the west end. 
The chancel is D., lately restored ; the windows have geo- 
metrical tracery ; the nave also has D. windows. The lower 
part of the tower is of stone, with a P. doorway and win- 
dow; the upper part is of wood. The chancel-arch is 
Transition N., with a squint on the north side. There is 
a small chapel with debased windows, and a good wooden 
roof. The south doorway is E. E., with the tooth orna- 
ment in the dripstone ; the font P. In the chancel are 

B 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

two brackets and a piscina. There are two brasses of the 
Morly family, 1410 and 1412. c.l. 

4. Baldwin Brightwell, St. Bartholomew. The east 
window of the chancel is of three lights, good D., the south 
windows of two lights, segmental outside, pointed within, on 
the north side is an original vestry with a D. piscina, and 
westward of this a mortuary chapel with very good D. glass 
in the windows, the chancel-arch and screen are plain D. 
The pillars of the nave are tall, octagonal, with D. caps; the 
aisles D., having some very good glass in the windows ; 
the east window of the south aisle has flamboyant tracery, 
the font is plain, octagonal, probably D. There are two 
good brasses and several tiles. The lower part of the west 
tower is plain P., the upper part modern. The south 
porch is plain D.; there is a good D. wheel cross on the east 
gable of the chancel, and the remains of a rood at the east 
end of the nave. ip. 

5. Brightwell Salome, St. Nicholas. The chancel is 
D., with a modern east window. The chancel-arch small, 
early N., with plain imposts. The south windows of the nave 
are D., on the north side they are modern. There is a good N. 
south doorway, a small brass of a priest, 1592, and a few 
tiles. The roof is plain, with queen-posts, and partly 
spoiled by the ceiling : an old oak door remains with good 
N. hinges. The west window is P., and there is_^a wooden 
bell-cot which seems ancient, ip. 

6. Chalgrove, St. Mary. A mixed church, rickman. 
The chancel is fine D., with a good east window of three 
lights, and side windows of two lights, having flowing tracery, 
good sedilia and piscina, D., with square tops, and a small, 
square, low side window on the south side ; on the north side 
is a very remarkable squint. The nave has three Transi- 
tion N. arches on each side, pointed, and with good foliated 
caps ; the east windows of the aisles are D., the side windows 



DEANERY OF ASTON. 

P., of three lights ; the tower and south porch are P. The 
font is a good specimen of Jacobean imitation of N. ; there 
are two good brasses, c. 1450, in the chancel, and two D. 
crosses on the gables, w. 

The font is engraved in Skelton's Antiquities of Oxfordshire. 

7. Berwick Salome, . Chancel D., with a plain 

east window having intersecting mullions, and a trefoil 
piscina and locker, there is no chancel-arch. The nave is 
poor late P., with two-light windows and a wooden porch. 
There is a late chapel on the south side with an E. E. east 
window, and bracket under it, preserved and built in ; also a 
wooden tower at the west end, with a pyramidal roof. ip. 

8. Chinnor, St. Andrew, A very fine church, D. 
throughout except the roofs. The windows have flowing 
tracery, that at the east end has the head cut off by a plaster 
ceiling ; in the chancel are three sedilia and a piscina of 
plain character. Some of the arches of the nave are Tran- 
sition N. ; the south doorway is richly moulded, and the 
porch has a groined vault. The tower, which is at the 
west end, has a saddle-back roof of low pitch, on each side 
of it is a chapel, forming the west end of the aisle. The 
font is octagonal, D. In the chancel are a series of paint- 
ings of the Apostles, &c., by Sir James Thornhill ; a brass 
to John Hotham, priest, 1361 ; one to John Cray, Esq., 
c. 1380 ; and a fragment of a fine floriated cross, 1330. ip. 

a general view of the church is given in Skelton's Oxfordshire. The three 
brasses are engraved inBoutell's Brasses; and an encaustic tile in the Glossary 
of Architecture. 

9. Crowell, St. Mary. A small church of mixed styles, 
with a modern wooden tower. The chancel is D., and ap- 
pears to have been shortened at an early period. There are 
two sediha close to the east end, and a locker in the north- 
east angle. The doorways are N. ip. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

10. CuxHAM, Holy Bood. Apparently rebuilt of old 
materials at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The 
N. doorway is preserved and has twisted shafts, and sculp- 
tured capitals of the interlaced pattern ; the old door with 
the iron-work and nail-heads remains ; in the jambs close 
to the bottom are built in two sculptured stones, which 
seem to have formed the lid of a stone coffin. The font is 
plain, round, N. On the north side are two good P. square- 
headed windows. There is a brass of John Gregory, his 
two wives, &c., c. 1509; some good open seats; and a 
stone coffin on the south side of the chancel, ip. 

11. Easington, St. Peter. A small church, with a good 
D. chancel, and a N. nave. The east window is of three lights 
with flowing tracery, the side windows single trefoil-headed 
lancets. There is a single D. trefoil-headed window, with 
old quarries in the nave ; the other windows are modern. 
The font is plain N., round ; the doorway N., small and 
plain, with wide square imposts having singular ornaments. 
There is a modern bell-cot at the west end, a small piece 
of good D. glass in the east window, and numerous tiles. 
Some N. hood-moulds remain on the south side. w. 

12. Emmington, St. Nicholas. A small plain fourteenth 
century church. The tower has a saddle-back roof of good 
high pitch, but is of very rude work. The side windows 
are square-headed outside, with pointed arches within ; 
there is a D. stoup inside the south door. This church is 
singularly rustic, and there is not even a path up to the 
door. IP. 

13. EwELME, St. Mary. A fine P. church, oblong, with 
aisles the whole length, and a tower at the west end ; it 
contains fine monuments of Thomas Chaucer, 1435, and 
his daughter Alice, duchess of Suffolk. The east end of 
the south aisle is the chapel of the hospital, and has the 
walls and roof painted, in imitation of the original style. 



DEAT^ERY OF ASTON. 

The font is P., with a very elaborate pyramidal wooden 
cover, and there are some late brasses. 

The hospital and school house are fine specimens of P. 
domestic work, there are some very rich barge-boards in 
the quadrangle of the hospital. These buildings are of 
brick. IP. 

Skelton gives engravings of the porch and tower, the Chaucer and Suffolk 
monuments, the font, the free school, and the quadrangle of the hospital. 
The font is also engraved in Van Voorst's series, and the Suffolk monument 
in Hollis's Monumental Effigies. 

14. Ipstone, St. Nicholas. A small plain church with- 
out aisles, with a wooden bell-cot. The chancel has, at 
the east end, an E. E. triplet of plain lancets, early in the 
style ; there is a priest's door, and a small single-light win- 
dow, square-headed, of the same style, and an early P. win- 
dow of two lights. The chancel-arch is round-headed N., 
with plain imposts. The nave has square-headed D. win- 
dows, and a small N. one at the west end. if. 

15. Lewknor, St. Margaret. A mixed church with a 
P. tower at the west end, the chancel fine D. The chancel 
has an east window of five fights, a good piscina, the sedifia 
destroyed ; there is also a sepulchral recess with canopies, 
a brass to John Aldeburne, priest, c. 1370, and a beautiful 
stone efiigy with one only of the shields remaining, a bend 
with crosses patee. The chancel-arch is Transition N. The 
nave is partly Transition N., and partly D. The south 
aisle, doorway, and porch are D. Eont late N., covered 
with interlaced work, resembling that of St. Martin's, Can- 
terbury. IP. 

The font is engraved in Skelton, and the brass in Boutell's Brasses, 

16. AcKHAMPSTEAD, St. Mary. A smafi, poor P. chapel, 
without any features of interest, c.l. 

17. Pyrton, St. Mary. A mixed church with portions 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

of N. work ; the south doorway, chancel-arch, and one win- 
dow being of that style. There are some D. windows, and 
parts of late P. work. ip. 

The church and manor-house are engraved in Skelton. 

18. Standelf, or Standhill, . Ecclesia destructa. 

There are some remains of Standelf chapel near Stoke Tal- 

niage,now used as a barn : it belonged to the church of Pyrton. 

19. Shirburn, All Saints. Has a N. tower, with later 
work inserted, and the upper part debased. The pillars of 
the nave E. E. The north aisle is carried through to the 
end of the chancel, c.l. 

Shirburn castle is in fine preservation, with its moat. 
It is chiefly P. but much modernized. 

There is a view of the castle and of the entrance hall in Skelton. 

20. Stoke Talmage, St. Mary Magdalen. Chancel, 
nave, tower at west end, it has a low pyramidal roof; the 
windows are debased, c.l. 

21. Thame, St. Mary. A fine cruciform church of mixed 
styles, much mutilated. The chancel is E. E. with a good 
D. east window. On the north side are four lancet win- 
dows, and one of three lights with foliated circles in the 
head, the south windows are D. with flowing tracery. The 
nave has D. arches on each side, but it has a P. west 
window inserted ; both the aisles have good D. windows. 
The font is E. E., round, enriched with foliage. The tower 
and transepts are P. There are some fine tombs and brasses 
of the Quatremaines, Lord Williams, and others, in this 
church, and some good wood- work. ip. 

A short distance north-west of the church of Thame 
are considerable remains of an ancient prebendal house of 
the thirteenth century, with its chapel, which has a good 
triplet at the east end. 

Thame park house is partly of the fifteenth century, 
with a good stair-turret : the chapel is modern Gothic. 



DEANERY OF ASTON. 

The free grammar school, near the church, was founded 
by Sir John Williams, knt., 1558. There is also an inter- 
esting and singularly formed old house in the High-street 
of Thame. 

A general view of the church, the font, and a tomb of the Quatremaines, are 
engraved in Skelton ; there is also a general view in Petit's Remarks on 
Architectural Character ; and a brass of R. Quatremains with his wife and 
son, c. 1460, in Boutell's Brasses. Skelton also gives views of the prebendal 
house, the park house, and the grammar school. 

22. Tetsworth, Sf. Giles. A small plain church of 
mixed styles without aisles, having a wooden belfry at the 
w^est end. The chancel is plain E. E., the south doorway 
N., with some curious sculpture over it. w. 

A view of this church is given in the Gent's. Magazine, vol. Ixiii. p. 719, 
(1793), and of the south doorway in vol. Ix. p. 17. (1790.) 

23. Sydenham, St. Mary. A small plain E. E. church, 
consisting of nave and chancel, with a central tower which 
is of wood. The windows are chiefly original lancets, but 
there are some later insertions. The chancel-arch is spoiled 
by modern plastering. The P. rood-loft remains, but is 
plastered over, the roof has D. springers, but the upper 
part is concealed by modern plaster. The font is plain, 
round, E. E. The doorways are also plain E. E., with good 
iron- work. On the west gable is a good small D. cross 
foliated. The buttresses are mostly spoiled by modern 
brick- work. ip. 

24. Watlington, St. Leonard. A plain church of mixed 
styles, mostly P., with a few D. windows, and remains of 
the sedilia and piscina, ip. 

Two quarries from this church are given in Franks' Ornamental Glazing 
Quarries. 

25. Weston, (South,) St. Laurence. Has no tower or 
any distinction between chancel and nave. The east win- 
dow is good D., the rest are all P. The font is N. There 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

is a N. doorway blocked up on the north side ; in a niche 
over the east window, a statue of St. Laurence still re- 
mains tolerably perfect, c.l. 

26. Wheatfield, St. John'^ Was rebuilt about 1750, 
but the original P. chancel-arch is retained, c.l. 

27. Warpsgrove, now Upsgrove, St. James. Ecclesia 
destructa. 



Beanety of 23tccster. 

[Many of the churches in this deanery are described and illustrated in the 
Guide to the Architectural Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Oxford, 
and to this work the reader is referred for further information, as it has 
not been considered necessary to give such minute descriptions of those 
churches, as of others previously undescribed.] 

28. Ambrosden, St. Mary. A mixed church with 
some portions of very good work. The chancel is P. ; the 
nave D. ; the tower E. E. ; the south aisle is rich D. work ; 
the font is P. ip. 

See Guide to Architectural Antiquities for a general view, &c., of this 
church, and the Glossary of Architecture, vol. ii., for a moulding of the 
doorway. 

29. Ardley, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, and w^est tower. 
The chancel is good D., the east window of three lights, 
with flowing tracery, the side windows of two lights, some 
of them square-headed ; the south-west window has a low 
side opening under it, with the original iron-work. The 
chancel-arch is very small, with shafts and strings at the 
imposts ; there is a sepulchre arch in the north wall, of a 
flat ogee form, foliated, and the cusps enriched, with shields 
of arms at the points. The nave has been rebuilt in the 
last century in the worst possible taste. The tower is good 
D., with a saddle-back roof, and diagonal buttresses of very 
small projection, ip. 

The S.W. window of the chancel with the low side opening is engraved in 
the Archaeological Journal, vol. iv. 



DEANERY OF BICESTER. 

30. Bicester, St. Edhurgh. A large church of mixed 
styles, with a good P. tower at the west end. The chancel 
has N. walls, with later windows inserted : there is an arch 
of early character, supposed to be Saxon. The nave has 
good E. E. arches on the south side, and D. on the north. 
In Bicester church, there is some very curious sculpture 
in small panels built into the south wall. ip. 

Several details are engraved in the Guide to Architectural Antiquities. 
The sculpture is given in Skelton. 

31. Blechingdon, St. Giles. A very poor and late 
church, with a P. tower, ip. 

The spire turret is engraved in the Guide to Architectural Antiquities. 

32. Bucknell, St. Peter. A mixed church, with a 
N. tower in the centre, but without transepts or aisles; 
the chancel is good E. E. ; the nave also E. E., but with a 
P. clerestory added above the lancet windows. There are 
two good E. E. doorways, ip. 

There is a view of the tower in the Architectural Guide. 

33. Charlton on Otmoor, St. Mary. Of mixed styles. 
The chancel Transition from D. to P., it has a fine rood- 
loft, the pulpit good Elizabethan, date 1G16. The tower is 
E. E., with a P. upper story added, ip. 

A general view of this church, the roodloft, and other details, are engraved 
in the Architectural Guide. 

34. Chesterton, St. Mary. A mixed church mostly 
D., the chancel walls are D., but the east window is P., the 
sedilia good D., very elegant, with detached shafts, having 
a square label over them, ornamented with ball -flowers. 
The nave has Transition N. arches on the north side, and 
D. on the south, and a D. clerestory. The tower is good 
D., with a panelled parapet, ip. 

The sedilia are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

35. CoTTisFORD, St. Mary. Consists of a tower and one 
aisle, which is divided into a nave and chancel. The stair- 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

case to the rood-loft remains. A stone coffin richly sculp- 
tured. A brass of male and female, kneeling, with children, 
eight boys and five girls. 

An old house called Cottisford Farm has many interest- 
ing remains of antiquity, skelton. 

36. FiNMERE, St. Michael. A plain church, consisting 
of chancel, nave, and w^est tower. The chancel has a good 
D. east window of three hghts, with flowing tracery, and 
the scroll moulding for a dripstone, the side windows are 
also D., of two and of three lights, the chancel-arch is 
modern. The nave has a good D. window of three lights, 
and small D. clerestory windows, but no aisles. The south 
doorway and porch are of the same style, but very plain. 
The tower is also D., the lower windows of two lights, 
those of the belfry single hghts, it has a battlement, and no 
buttresses. The font is plain round, tub-shaped, w. 

An old farm-house in this parish is known by the name 
of Bacon's House. 

37. Frtngford, St. Michael. A small church of mixed 
styles, consisting of a chancel, nave, and two side aisles, 
partly modern imitation, but very good. The south door- 
way and two of the nave-arches, are N., the porch E. E., 
font is curious, ip. 

38. Fritwell, St. Olave. A small church of mixed 
styles, consisting of chancel, nave with two side aisles, and 
tower. The chancel-arch and both the doorways are good 
N., the north has the cable moulding for a dripstone, with 
good terminations, the south has curious sculpture in 
the head. The chancel side walls are E. E., the east end 
is of singular design. The nave and tower are E. E. The 
font D., octagonal, with carving in low relief, ip. 

The manorial house is handsome, temp. James I. 

The south doorway is engraved in Skelton ; the north doorway in the 
Glossary. 



DEANERY OF BICESTER. 

89. GoDDiNGTON, Holy Trinity, Rebuilt 1792. The 
grave-stones preserved, skelton. 

40. Hampton Gay, St, Giles. Rebuilt in the nineteenth 
century. 

Near the church is a good EUzabethan manor-house, w. 

There is a view of the manor-house in Skelton. 

41. Hampton Poyle, St. Mary. A mixed church with 
some good portions; the east window, a fine specimen of the 
Transition from E. E. to D., with good geometrical tracery, 
has been lately restored. The nave and aisles are mostly 
D., one of the caps is ornamented with half-length figures. 
There are two good monumental effigies of a knight and 
lady, and a brass to John Poyle, Esq., and Elizabeth his 
wife, 1424. ip. 

The east window and a capital are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

42. Hardwick, St. Mary. Has a chancel and nave 
only ; it is a small D. church or chapel, the chancel win- 
dows have good flowing tracery, with some remains of fine 
painted glass ; the west window is P., and rather curious. 
There is no tower, ip. 

43. Hethe, St. Georye and St. Edmund. A small 
church of mixed styles, mostly D., but very plain, w. 

44. Heyford at Bridge, or Lower, or Heyford 
Purcell, St. Mary. A mixed church, the chancel D., the 
nave and aisle and tower P. There is a P. screen and 
some good open seats. On the north wall is a curious 
painting of the Commandments, with the representation of 
a chancel as fitted up in the time of Elizabeth, ip. 

45. Heyford Warren, or Upper Heyford, St. Mary. 
A poor church, chancel with south aisle, nave with tower, 
the south side modern, the tower plain P., but lofty and 
well proportioned. The chancel has a P. east window. 
A fine monument of a priest under a D. arch. ip. 

An old MANOR-HOUSE near the church, and a fine old 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

barn, 120 feet long and 24 wide, built about the time of 

William of Wvkeham. skelton. 

t/ 

46. IsLiP, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave with side aisle. 
Of mixed styles. The nave has Transition N. arches with 
low and massive pillars. The aisles are D., the chancel imita- 
tion Gothic, built by Dr. South in 1660. There are curious 
mural paintings both in the aisles and in the chancel, ip. 

A general view, and numerous details are given in the Architectural Guide, 
and a view of a chapel which formerly existed here, in the Gent's. Magazine, 
vol. Ivi. (1788.) p. 1149. 

47. KiRTLiNGTON, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with two 
side aisles, the lower compartment of the tower only re- 
mains. A plain church of mixed styles, very much muti- 
lated and spoiled in all ways. The walls of the chancel 
and tower-arches are N., the tower itself destroyed. The 
nave has E. E. arches with a P. clerestory. The east 
window has good tracery, with painted glass from the 
chapel of Wickham, near Banbury, ip. 

The piscina is engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

48. LiLLiNGSTON LovELL, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with 
aisles, and west tower. The chancel has been shortened, 
the east wall being modern and supported by unsightly 
brick buttresses. The chancel-arch is pointed and well 
proportioned. The nave is D., and has three pointed 
arches on each side, on octagonal pillars with moulded 
capitals. At the east end of the north aisle is a chantry 
chapel, with a double piscina, and a sedilia, over which 
is a trefoil-headed window. At the east end of the south 
aisle is a similar piscina and sedile. The south doorway 
is E. E. with shafts, the porch has the date of 1639, and 
has a curious circular sun-dial upon it ; the church appears 
to have been extensively repaired about that time. The 
tower is E. E., with a gabled roof. There are three brasses, 
a former rector 1446, two hands issuing from clouds and 



DEANERY OF BICESTER. 

supporting a heart with the sacred monogram ; Sir Thomas 
Dayrell, his wife and children, 1460 ; William Rysley, and 
his wife, 1513; and several handsome modern tombs to 
the family of Wentworth, Creswell, and also to Francis 
Drake, Esq., 1788, with his funeral achievements still 
hanging up in the chancel. The chalice is of the time 
of Elizabeth, the rest of the plate and the font are modern. 
In this parish there are ancient quarries of limestone of 
which the church is built, w.l. 

49. Launton, St. Mary. A small plain church of mixed 
styles, chancel P., with two sedilia and a piscina. The nave 
has Transition N. arches and P. clerestory, roof and aisles. 
The tower is E. E. if. 

50. Merton, St. SwitUn. A good D. church with some P. 
windows inserted. In the chancel are fine sedilia and a 
piscina. The nave has D. arches, P. clerestory and roof. The 
tower at the west end is D., with a good panelled parapet, if. 

Eastward of the chuixh is the old manor-house, now 
used as a farm-house. 

The sedilia and piscina are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

51. MiDDLETON Stoney, All Saints. Chancel, nave 
with two side aisles, and tower. A mixed church, with a 
good E. E. tower at the west end, the chancel is D., the 
chancel-arch and the arches on the north side of the nave 
are Transition N., those on the south side are D. The 
doorways are Transition N. ip. 

Near the east end of the church are the interesting traces 
of an ancient castle, supposed to have been built by Richard 
Camvil in the reign of King Stephen, on the site of a Saxon 
military work. 

There is an engraving of this church in Skelton's Oxfordshire, and a view 
of the tower and south doorway in the Architectural Guide. 

52. MiXBURY, All Saints. A good D. church, consisting 
of chancel, nave with a north aisle, and west tower. The 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

chancel has a fine east window of three hghts, with geo- 
metrical tracery, and side windows of two lights, with a 
small plain doorway: the chancel-arch is modern in the 
Norman style, and the roof modern with a bad gable cross. 
The nave has on the south side two D. windows of two 
lights, the tracery of one geometrical, of the other flowing. 
The south doorway is good N., the arch enriched with zig- 
zags and with shafts set rather far back, with cushion J 
capitals, and curious Runic crosses on the impost stones 
of the arch, within the capitals : the porch is modern. 
On the north side the nave has three D. arches on octa- 
gonal pillars with moulded capitals : the clerestory win- 
dows are small D., of two lights, with trefoil heads, sepa- 
rate externally but united within in a square opening: The 
aisle has good D. windows with flowing tracery, the east 
window of three lights, the side windows of two. The 
font is plain, octagonal, cup-shaped, with a round stem on 
two square steps. The tower is good D., with two diago- 
nal buttresses on the west side, a western doorway with 
the mouldings continuous to the ground, except the drip- 
stone, which is terminated by heads ; the belfry windows 
of two lights with flowing tracery : it has a battlement and 
gurgoyles. ip. 

Some bold remains of a moated fortification called Beau- 
mont exist on the north side of the church, skelton. 

53. Newton Purcell, St. Michael. The whole build- 
ing repaired in 1813. The N. doorway preserved, skelton. 

The north doorway is given in Skelton. 

54. Shelswell, St. Ehha. Ecclesia destructa. 

55. Oddington, St. Andrew. A small plain D. church, 
with a good tower. In the chancel an elegant D. piscina, 
a small brass of a skeleton in a shroud, for Ralph Ham- 
sterley, a fellow of Merton college, Oxford, A.D. 1507. ip. 

There is an engraving of the tower in the Architectural Guide. 



DEANERY OF BICESTER. 

56. PiDDiNGTON, St. Nicholas. Chancel very good 
early D., east window of three lights, foliated ; the interior 
has jamb shafts with moulded caps and bases very ele- 
gant, two of the side windows are of the same character. 
There are two very rich sedilia, D. with detached shafts, 
cusps foHated, with the ball-flower and stalk in the hollow. 
The remains of a third canopy of a similar character is 
visible over the door, the crockets and finials of which 
are very rich. On the north side is a small niche of the 
same D. character, very elegant, with figures of angels 
in the hollows, which has probably served for the Easter 
sepulchre. The north side of the nave has P. inser- 
tions in earlier walls. On the south side are four plain- 
pointed pillars, with octagonal moulded caps. The font 
plain, octagonal, cup-shaped, on a slender stem. Tower late 
and poor P. A good D. cross on the east gable, w. 

Engravings of a D. niche and window are given in Rickman. 

57. SoMERTON, St. James. Chancel, nave with aisles, and 
tower. The chancel D., with a late P. east window, under 
it a singular reredos of D. work, representing the Lord's 
Supper, there are three good sedilia and a square locker, also 
a good low side window with a seat under it. The chancel- 
arch is Transition N. There is a P. chantry chapel of the 
Fermor family on the south side of the chancel, and a good P. 
rood-screen between the chancel and nave. There are four 
Transition N. arches on the north side of the nave, and two 
but with different mouldings on the south side. The font 
is D., with canopies : the clerestory and roof are plain P. The 
north doorway and porch D. The west tower D. On the 
north side is a sculptured holy rood nearly perfect. A good 
brass temp. Henry VIII. remains in the Fermor chantry, ip. 

The reredos is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture, and the low side 
window in the Archaeological Journal, vol. iv. 

58. SouLDERN, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with south 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

aisle, and tower. The chancel is modern. The aisle Avindows 
are good early D. The nave has a clerestory and retains 
some ancient carved seats. The tower is early N. having 
walls of great thickness, j.c.s. 

A cornice from this church is engraved in Rickman, p. 163. 

59. Stoke Lyne, St. Feter. Chancel, nave, and tower. 
A small church of mixed styles, chiefly D., the chancel has 
three small early N. windows, and a N. doorway, and rood- 
arch. The tower is D., and stands in the middle on the 
south side. The south door is good N., with a niche over 
it. IP. 

60. Stratton Audley, Si. Mary. Of mixed styles, 
the chancel P., the nave and north aisle early D., the tower 
P. There is a good sanctus bell-turret, ip. 

61. TusMORE, . Chapelry to Hardwick parish, 

the church is destroyed. 

62. Wendlebury, St. Giles. Rebuilt all but the tower 
in 1762. IP. 

63. Weston-on-the-green, /S'/f. J/<5!rj/. Rebuilt in 1743, 
except the tower, the lower part of which is N., the upper 
part D. Near the church is a Jacobean manor-house, h.j. 



iieanerg of Cftippmg iSorton. 

64. Ascott-under-Wychwood, Holy Trinity. Chancel, 
nave, aisles, west tower. Chancel walls N., east window D., 
of three lights, with flowing tracery. On the north side 
two small N. windows, one has a trefoil-headed light, but the 
splay is N. On the south side a P. piscina and sedilia, side 
windows P., the door is of the square-headed trefoil form, of 
oak, and has E. E. iron-work. Chancel-arch early D. rude 
work. The nave on the north side has three N. arches ; 
on the south side a D. chapel ; clerestory and roof late 
poor P. ; a sanctus bell-cot on the east gable. The north 



DEANERY OF CHIPPING NORTON. 

aisle is P., plain, with square-headed windows and a moulded 
doorway. Tower Transition N., with a P. belfry added, the 
windows are N., but the upper ones have P. labels. Font, 
P. A curious square-headed D. window on the south side 
of the nave ; there are some good poppies of the fleur-de-lis 
form, with bench ends elbow-shaped, jp. 

65. Charlbury, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, with two 
side aisles, and west tower. The tower of this church is 
very lofty and fine, the lower part E. E., with the addition 
of a P. belfry and battlement, the west door is also a P. in- 
sertion. The east window of the chancel is very singular, D. 
of five lights, the roof is also D., of good open timber-work. 
The south aisle is very wide, the east window curious D., 
with the ball-flower in the tracery, the side windows late P., 
the arches between chancel and aisles plain E. E., with octa- 
gonal caps. The north transept has very rich E. E. arches, 
a singular D. north window with a quatrefoil in the head, 
and a good P. roof. The nave has three N. arches on the 
north side, three E. E. arches on the south side, and a 
poor P. roof. The tower-arch is fine and lofty E. E., 
blocked up. ip. 

Cornbury park and chapel, which is much enriched with 
carvings, is in this parish. Also the ruins of Clattercott priory. 

Qi^. Chadlington, St. Mary. A poor church, consist- 
ing of chancel, nave, aisles, and west tower. The chancel 
has been lately rebuilt in the D. style. The nave has four 
E. E. arches on each side, on round pillars with moulded 
capitals : the south doorway is good E. E., round-headed, 
well moulded, with detached shafts : the windows of the 
south aisle are E. E., of two Ughts, except the east window, 
which is fine P. ; the north aisle has also P. windows. 
The tower is tall and narrow, with D. windows built in, 
but the constniction is later, if. 

67. Shorthampton, All Saints. Consists of chancel and 

D 



nave, with a bell-cot over the chancel-arch. The chancel 
was rebuilt about 1820, and has a modern east window, 
but a P. window is preserved on the south side. The 
chancel-arch is small plain E. E. ; there is a large squint 
on the south side of it, blocked up within these few years. 
The nave is considerably wider than the chancel, and this 
squint would enable a large part of the congregation to 
see and hear the priest at the altar : the north wall of the 
nave is N., and has a small original window : the south 
doorway and windows are P. The font is plain round, 
tub-shaped, probably N. ip. 

68. Chastleton, Si. Mary. Chancel, nave, north 
chapel, and south aisle, with tower at the west end of it. 
The chancel has D. windows of two lights ; the chancel- 
arch is E. E., with half-octagon responds, having moulded 
capitals and good chamfered terminations. The north 
chapel is late poor P. ; the nave has four arches on the 
south side, two E. E. and two Transition N. The tower 
was rebuilt in 1689. The font is plain, round, cup-shaped, 
D. There are some carved P. bench-ends, two brasses, and 
a number of very good tiles of uncommon patterns, partly 
heraldic, ip. 

Chastleton Hall, north-east of the church, is a fine mansion 
temp. James 1., in very good preservation. 

The church and manor-house are engraved in Skelton. 

69. Chipping Norton, 8t. Mary. A large and fine 
church of mixed styles, with a modern tower at the west end. 
The chancel is D. The south aisle also good D., with a 
very fine east window and a rich doorway with a curious 
hexagonal P. porch. The nave is late but good P., with 
very large clerestory windows, and panelling under them, 
the pillars are panelled, and continued from the roof to the 
ground. The window over the chancel-arch is a remark- 



i 



DEANERY OF CHIPPING NORTON. 

ably fine specimen of P. work, with an inner plane of orna- 
mental tracery. On the north side of the chancel is the 
original vestry, and a curious squint of open panelling, and 
a room over it. In the vestry is the original stone altar 
and piscina, ip. 

The Town Hall is a small neat building of the fifteenth 
century, with a good doorway and chimney, and near it is a 
rich doorway of the thirteenth century with good mouldings, 
and the tooth ornament, w. 

Engravings of the church and the south doorway are given in Skelton, and 
a moulding of the doorway in the Glossary. 

70. OvERNORTON, . Ecclcsia destructa. 

71. Churchill, All Saints. Rebuilt 1824. 

A view of the old church is given in Skelton. 

72. Corn WELL, . A small church, partly re- 
built in 1830, with a modern bell-cot; but the chancel- 
arch is Transition N., pointed, with good corbels having 
scalloped capitals: the doorway is also plain N.: the win- 
dows are late P., and mostly square-headed. The font 
is good N., round, tub-shaped, and panelled, on a square 
plinth, with heads at the angles as foot ornaments, ip. 

73. Enstone, JSL Kenelm. A church of mixed styles 
with P. tower at the west end. The nave has Transition 
N. arches on the south side, and P. on the north, the ai-les 
are P. At the east end of the south aisle a plain stone 
altar remains with its reredos. The north doorway is fine 
N., with bold mouldings, ip. 

There is an engraving of the altar in the Glossary. 

74. FiFiELD, St. John Baptist. Chancel, nave, west 
tower and spire. Chancel E. E., with lancet windows on the 
north side, and two-light windows on the south, the east 
window D., of three lights with flowing tracery. The 
chancel-arch low and massive, early in the style ; the nave 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

rebuilt 1840, but two D. windows preserved; the south 
porch E. E., with a stone roof and arch-rib. The font P., 
tower and spire E. E. The tower very small, octagonal 
from the ground. The porch has a good bunch of foliage 
as a finial. The nave has an E. E. bell-cot on the east gable, 
with the sanctus-bell remaining, ip. 

75. m^xino^v-E,, St. Nicholas. A small church without 
aisles, mostly rebuilt, and has a modern bell-cot, but the 
old materials were preserved, and some parts were not dis- 
turbed. There is a fine N. doorway, which has not been 
moved, and in the wall above it is a string of the billet 
ornament under the cornice. The chancel-arch is also N., 
and there are some good panels of N. sculpture built into 
the south wall. The chancel has P. windows, a good 
E. E. piscina^ and a small niche for the sepulchre near 
the ground on the north side of the altar. A good brass 
on a panelled tomb, date 1521. Some remains of P. 
painted glass, ip. 

76. HooKNORTON, St. Peter. A large church of mixed 
styles, chancel, nave with two aisles and north semi- tran- 
sept, with a P. tower at the west end. The walls of the 
chancel are N., with later windows inserted. There is a very 
perfect rood-loft with the wooden groining perfect on both 
sides, and the staircase with both its doors. The font is 
N., round, with figures carved upon it. 

Near the church is a small old timber house, with a 
good P. fire-place and chimney, ip. 

The font is engraved in Skelton. 

77. Idbury, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave, north aisle, west 
tower. Chancel E. E., or Transition to D. East window of 
three lights with trefoil heads under a common dripstone, 
which is D. ; side windows single-lights with trefoil heads. 
North aisle very wide, has a fine D. east window, a rich 



DEANERY OF CHIPPING NORTON. 

N. doorway with a variety of ornament, two very good P. 
windows, square, with transom and quatrefoils in the head, 
jind one D. single-light window. A good P. bell-cot on the 
east gable of the nave. Tower at the west end of the north 
aisle, P., with a D. three-light window preserved. West 
window of nave P., three-light, south side of nave good P., 
with upper range of windows ; a plain P. south porch, ip. 

78. KiNGHAM, St. Jndretv. Chancel, nave, north aisle, 
west tower. Chancel has D. east window, P. side win- 
dows; nave has P. square-headed wdndows, and a single-light 
trefoil-headed low side window, near the east end on the 
south side. The tower P., with a D. west window built in, it 
has a square stair-turret on the south side, a bold battlement 
and comer pinnacles. North aisle good D., the side win- 
dows of two lights, and some of three lights with flowing 
tracery. On the outside of the chancel, on the north side, 
is a D. tomb under a canopy, attached to, but not inserted 
in, the wall of the chancel ; a stone coffin has remains of a 
cross floree on the slab, the canopy, a low pyramid with 
open foliation hanging from it. w. 

79. Leafield, SL Michael. Modern, 1820. w. 

80. RoLLRiGHT, (Great,) 8t, Andrew. A small church of 
mixed styles ; chancel, nave, and south aisle, with a P. tower 
at the west end, and a D. aisle on the south side. The north 
wall is N., with later insertions ; in the south wall are some 
very rich D. windows. The south doorway is good rich N., 
there is a very good rood-loft and screen, and a portion of 
the rood itself. The chancel is P. The south porch and 
aisle good D. work, with a rich cornice. Near the south 
porch are the remains of the cross, ip. 

In this parish are the celebrated Druidical stones. 

The south door, and a view of the Druidical stones, are given in Skelton ; 
and in Beesley's History of Banbury, a view and details of the stones. 

81. RoLLRiGHT, (Little,) St. Philip. Is a small plain 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

P. church, with a tower. The chancel windows have good 
dripstone terminations. The tower, built by William Brewer, 
Esq., 1617, is entirely covered with ivy. ip. 

82. Salford, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, and west tower. 
The walls are N., with windows of various periods inserted : 
a small N. window remains on the north side of the chancel, 
and the doorways, north and south, are good N., with sculp- 
ture in the tympanum, a cross in a circle with an animal 
on each side of it ; over the south doorway is an E. E. porch, 
with a stone roof carried on an arch, the entrance doorway 
has a trefoil head. There is an E. E. low side window near 
the chancel-arch, which is small plain N. The tower is 
late D., with a good square stair- turret. There is the bast 
of a cross in the churchyard, and another of a way-side 
cross in the parish, bp. 

83. Sarsden, . Modern. 

Some ancient remains of the old mansion. 

There is a view of the old church in Skelton. 

84. Shipton under Wychwood, St. Mary. A large and 
fine church of mixed styles, consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, 
west tower, and spire. Chancel P., with good side windows 
of two lights, the east window Jacobean, curious but ugly; a 
chapel on each side of the chancel. Chancel-arch E. E., 
well moulded, with triple shafts having good caps and 
foliage. Nave of three bays, arches wide, E. E., plain, on 
round pillars with moulded caps and bases late in the 
style. The north aisle has good three-light windows Tran- 
sition from D. to P., with arches across the aisle to E. E. 
vaulting shafts, and E. E. string under the windows. In 
north wall are D. recesses for tombs. South aisle P., with 
square-headed windows. The font is good P., octagon, 
panelled. The tower stands on E. E. arches, has a fine 
E. E. west doorway, richly moulded, and a P. window 



DEANERY OF CHIPPING NORTON. 

inserted : the upper part of the tower and spire are fine 
E. E., with pinnacles at the angles. The north doorway 
is P. moulded, the door has good iron-work: the north 
porch is good P., with a groined vault springing from heads, 
and a room over it with good P. niches in front, which 
retain their figures. The clerestory is late P., roof modern : 
pulpit P., stone panelled. A vestry on the north side of 
the chancel originally E. E., but altered. 

There are considerable remains of P. building adjoin- 
ing the churchyard, said to have been a monastery, ip. 

A view of the church, and of " Shipton Court," are engraved in Skelton. 

85. Spilsbury, All Saints. A small cruciform church 
with a large N. tower, the upper stoiy of which has been 
rebuilt] with the N. windows preserved. The west door- 
way and window are D., with E. E. arches on each side to 
the aisles, but this part of the church is now destroyed. 
The nave-arches, two on each side, plain E. E., with circular 
pillars and moulded caps. ip. 

86. SwERFORD, St. Mary, A small D. church, with a 
tower and broach spire at the west end. The tower occu- 
pies only half the width of the nave, and there is a second 
arch by the side of the chancel-arch, opening into a vestry 
with a lean-to roof. The south doorway and porch are 
good D. 

Near the church are the remains of a castle, the mound 
and moat of which alone remain, ip. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

Beanerg of CubUesUon. 

[The greater paxt of the churches in this deanery are described and illus- 
ti-ated in the Guide to the Ecclesiastical Antiquities in the Neighbourhood 
of Oxford.] 

87. Albury, St. Helen. Rebuilt in a Gothic style under 
the direction of Mr. Rickman. The N. font has been pre- 
served. IP. 

Views of the old church and font are given in the Architectural Guide. 

88. Baldon, (Toot,) St. Laurence. A small E. E. church 
with aisles to nave, and a bell -gable for two bells at the 
west end. The chancel has lancet windows on the sides, 
but the east window is modern and very bad. The nave- 
arches are E. E., on massive piers, and early in the 
style. IP. 

A view of the church, and other details, are engraved in the Architectural 
Guide. 

89. Beckley, St. Mary. A small church of mixed 
styles. The chancel is good D., with its original open 
timber-roof of the canted form, and quite plain, but with the 
wall-plate well moulded. The nave is late P., the north aisle 
is also P., but earlier in the style. The south aisle is partly 
D. There is a small stone desk attached to the pillar by the 
side of the font. Some good painted glass. 

Studley priory in this parish is an Elizabethan house, with 
a chapel of the same style forming one wing. ip. 

The font and stone desk, the nave roof, and other details, are engraved in 
the Guide to Architectural Antiquities ; and some mural paintings in the 
Archseological Journal, vol. iv. p. 256. Views of Studley priory are also given 
in the Guide, and in Skelton's Oxfordshire. 

90. Bensington, St. Helen. Is a small church with a 
D. east window, and some traces of both earlier and later 
work. The tower is modern, rickman. 

There is a view of the chancel in the Architectural Guide. 

91. Chiselhampton, St. Mary. Modern. 



DEANERY OF CUDDESDON. 

92. Clifton Hampden, St. Micliael. A small church 
of mixed styles in a very picturesque situation. The nave 
has Transition N. arches on the north side, and D. on the 
south. The chancel is D. The roof and bell-turret at the 
west end are modern restoration and very good. The fit- 
tings up are also very rich and good, in the old style, and no 
expense spared. In the chancel, in the place of the Easter 
sepulchre, a fine altar-tomb in the D. style has been intro- 
duced. IP. 

Views of the church, &c., are given in the Guide and in Skelton. 

93. Cowley, St, James. A small church of mixed 
styles, without aisles, a very low P. tower at the west end. 
Chancel E. E., with a good east end having three lancet 
windows and an original cross ; the side windows are E. E. 
single hghts, with square tops. The doors are plain N. 
Some of the seats are open, with poppies, and the date 
1632. IP. 

The south-east view of the church, the tower, and other details, are en- 
graved in the Architectural Guide. 

94. CuDDESDON, All Saints. A fine cruciform church of 
mixed styles. The tower-arches and the doorways are rich 
Transition N., the nave-arches are E. E., the aisles are mixed, 
the chancel P., rather late, with arches sunk in the side 
walls. The upper part of the tower is late. ip. 

The chapel attached to the episcopal palace erected 
by Bishop Wilberforce in 1846, is a very good imitation 
of D. work. The windows are all filled with painted glass, 
by the best artists of the day. ip. 

There is a general view of this church, with numerous details, in the Archi- 
tectural Guide. 

95. CuLHAM, St. Paul. A small plain cruciform church 
of mixed styles, with a P. tower at the west end. The nave 
arches on the south side are E. E., with the mouldings con- 
tinuous without caps or imposts, ip. 

£ 



' OXFORDSHIRE, 

96. Dorchester, St. Feter and Si. Paid. This is a 
large and very curious edifice, with portions of various dates 
mixed with each other. The plan is irregular, the south 
aisle being very large, and part of it having once had a row 
of piers not now existing. There are portions of all the 
styles, and of transitions from one style to another. At the 
west end of the north aisle is a curious N. doorway of 
singular shape, and in the same aisle, under a window, is 
another door of early D. date, with various singular mould- 
ings and combinations. Some of the buttresses of the east 
end have singular mixtures of style, but the principal fea- 
tures are the chancel windows and some stalls. There are 
three windows, north, south, and east ; the wall and archi- 
trave mouldings of which, are clearly of D. date, if not 
earlier, being filled with the ball ornament in the hollows. 
The north window is of four lights, the mullions crossed by 
waving lines, on which are leaves, and the whole forming a 
genealogical tree springing from a figure recumbent under 
the centre muUion, and having statues up the mullions. 
The tracery of the head of the window is not very elabo- 
rate, but a tree springs above the centre mullion into the 
compartment in the centre of the head. The east window 
is divided into two portions of three lights each, by a large 
plain buttress; more than two-thirds of the lights, besides the 
heads, are filled with a description of tracery which must 
be considered a transition from D. to P. ; but this tracery 
has also small statues, and small crocketed pinnacles in- 
termixed. The south window is of four lights, of decidedly 
P. character, and with a transom, on which, at the base of 
the upper mullions, are statues, and the head is filled with 
good plain P. tracery. These windows, if not unique, are 
very curious, and the stalls under the south window are no 
less so ; there are three stalls rising eastward, and a water- 
drain which is rather wider than a stall, but the canopy of 



DEANERY OF CUDDESDON. 

which ranges with that of the stalls. These canopies are 
very rich, and are divided by buttresses, on which have 
been pinnacles now destroyed. Under the canopy of each 
stall, in the back wall, is a small window, with very, beauti- 
ful mouldings and remains of fine stained glass ; the shape 
of this window may be called a waved triangle, and these 
windows on the outside have a series of plain arches over 
them. The whole of these stalls and windows are clearly 
of D. character, and the chancel altogether presents a most 
curious piece of composition. 

There are some good ancient monuments, and there have 
been some fine brasses, but they are now gone. There 
are some other cupboards and drains worth examining, and 
the font is very curious; its upper part is of lead, with 
N. arches and figures : it is set on a P. stone base, finished 
with a battle Qient, the workmanship of which is not very 
good. There is also a wooden porch which appears to be 
of P. date. 

This church must be visited and studied to be pro- 
perly appreciated, as it is hardly possible to describe its 
singularities, rickman. 

The eastern bay of the chancel has been carefiilly re- 
stored under the direction of the Oxford Architectural 
Society. 

There are general views of this church in Skelton, and very numerous de- 
tails are engraved in Addington's History of Dorchester Abbey Church. 

97. Drayton, St, Leonard. A small plain church of 
mixed styles, with a wooden tower at the west end. The 
nave is N., the chancel chiefly D. ip. 

98. Elsiield, 8t, Thomas a Becket. A small church of 
mixed styles, prettily situated upon a hill. The west end 
is good E. E., with a modern bell-turret. The chancel is 
E. E., with a D. east window. The church was partly re- 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

built, and the roof carefully restored on the old model, in 
1849. IP. 

A general view from the south-west, and yaxious details, are given in the 
Architectural Guide. 

99. Forest Hill, St. Nicholas. A small Transition N. 
church, without aisles. It has a remarkable bell- turret for 
two bells at the west end, supported by buttresses of enor- 
mous projection. The outer doorway of the porch is good 
Transition N. The east window of three lancets is modern 
but good. IP. 

Views of this church are given in Skelton and the Architectural Guide, in 
the latter are several details. 

100. Garsington, 8t, Mary. A mixed church, with 
aisles to nave, and tower at the west end. The chancel 
is D., the nave has transition N. arches with D. clere- 
story windows, circular and fohated. The tower is Tran- 
sition N. The roofs and fittings have been very well re- 
stored in 1848-49, and the chancel at the expense of the 
Rector, the Rev. J. Ingram, D.D., President of Trinity 
College. The original altar stone, with its five crosses 
perfect, was found and restored to its place, ip. 

Two general views, a monumental brass of the Radley family, 1584, and 
numerous details, are engraved in the Architectural Guide. A view of the 
cross, and of an old house in this village, forms the frontispiece to vol. Ixxxvii. 
pt. 2, (1817) of the Gentleman's Magazine. 

101. Haseley, St. Peter. A fine large church of mixed 
styles, the chancel very good early D., with a fine east 
window, with geometrical tracery, restored in 1843 with 
great care ; the side windows are remarkably light and 
elegant, with geometrical tracery; there are fine sedilia 
and piscina and a sepulchral recess joining on to them, 
the canopies ornamented with engrailed work, instead of 
crockets. The nave-arches are E. E., square in section, 
and early in the style. The south aisle is D., with three 
sepulclu'al recesses in the south wall. The tower is chiefly 



DEANERY OF CUDDESDON. 

P., but the west doorway under it is fine E. E. The south 
doorway is also good E. E., with the tooth ornament. The 
clerestory and roof of the nave are late P., the roof of the 
chancel is modern, ip. 

There are numerous engravings of details of this church in Mr. Weare's 
Memoir of it. 

102. Rycote Chapel, St. Michael and all Angels, 
Founded 1449, by Richard Quatremain, and Sibylla Engle- 
field his wife. It is a good P. building, with a tower at 
the west end, and two greyhounds in place of pinnacles at 
the east angles. The whole is in a very genuine state, 
with the panelled ceiling, most of the seats are original, 
open, but two large square family pews with canopies have 
been introduced. The font is octagon, panelled, with the 
original wooden cover. 

There are some small remains of the fine Elizabethan 
mansion of the Earl of Abingdon, ip. 

There is an engraving of this chapel in Mr. Weare's Memoir of Haseley. 

103. Headington, Bt. Andrew, A mixed church with a 
good tower at the west end of the south aisle. The chancel- 
arch is rich N., and the side walls of the same period, with 
P. windows inserted on the south side. The east window 
is modern and veiy bad. The nave and south aisle are 
E. E. The tower is partly E. E. and the upper part P. The 
churchyard cross is good P., and unusually perfect. 

A general view of the church, the chancel-arch, the churchyard cross, and 
numerous details, are engraved in the Architectural Guide. A view of the 
cross forms the frontispiece to vol. Ixxxvi. pt. 1, (1816,) of the Gent's. Mag. 
A quarry is also given in Franks' Ornamental Glazing Quarries. 

104. HoLTON, St. Bartholomew. A small cruciform 
church without aisles, the tower at the west end. The 
walls of the nave, and the arches of the transepts and the 
doorway, are Transition N. The chancel is D., the tower P. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

On the east gable of the nave is an elegant sanctus bell- 
turret. IP. 

There is a view of the church, and of the north doorway, in the Architec- 
tural Guide. 

105. Horsepath, St. Giles. A small plain church of 
mixed styles, with a low P. tower at the west end. The 
chancel is modern. The nave has three Transition N. 
arches on the south side. The south doorway is also 
Transition N., by the side of it within is a curious stoup. 
There are two small curious figures of musicians attached 
to the west wall. ip. 

The font, the stoup, and several details, are given in the Architectural Guide. 

106. Marsh Baldon, St. Feter. A small plain church, 
with a D. tower at the west end, the lower part square, 
the upper part octagonal. In the chancel is a fine P. 
piscina. The north aisle is modern, with wooden piers 
and arches. The porch is of wood, of early character, if. 

The porch is engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

107. Marston, St. Nicholas. A plain church of mixed 
styles. The nave has Transition N. arches, the clerestory and 
aisles late P., the chancel and tower also late P. hp. 

The nave-arches, and other details, are given in the Guide. There is a 
general view of the church in the Gent's, Mag. vol. Ixix. pt. 2, (1799,) and of 
the village cross, (destroyed in 1830,) in vol. Ixxxvi. pt. 1, (1816,) also a quarry, 
in Franks' Ornamental Glazing Quarries. 

108. Milton, (Great,) St. Mary. A fine D. church 
with a tower at the west end, the nave has D. arches and 
clerestory, the aisles are wide, with very rich D. windows 
and buttresses. The south porch is groined, with a room 
over it, and a staircase turret, this and the whole of the 
south aisle are particularly good ; the north doorway is 
E. E., very richly moulded, ip. 

Ascot, a chapel in Great Milton parish, now destroyed. 
At Little Milton a new church has been built in 1848, 



DEANERY OF CUDDESDON. 

in the early D. style, under the direction of Mr. Hay ward 
of Exeter. 

There is a general view, the north doorway, several windows and details, in 
the Architectural Guide : and a fine coffin-slab of the thirteenth century, in 
Cutts' Monumental Slabs, &c. 

109. Nettlebed, St. Bartholomew, This church con- 
sists of chancel, nave, south aisle, and tower at the west 
end of the aisle. It was rebuilt in 1844, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Hakewell, of brick, with stone dressings, in the 
D. style. IP. 

110. PiSHiLL, . A small plain church. The 

walls are N., the east window is of two lights, of Transition 
character, there is a piscina of the same period, and a low 
side window on the south side. The chancel-arch is plain 
and small, round-headed N. The Stonor aisle or chapel 
was originally Transition N. work, but has been much 
modernized. There is a stone bench-table along the walls 
of the nave, the doorwav is of wood, w^ith a descent of five 
steps into the church, w. 

A short distance from the church are the remains 
of a chapel, now used as a barn. Part of the elegant door- 
way remains. In this parish is the fine Elizabethan man- 
sion of Stonor. skelton. 

111. Newington, St, Mary. A D. church, with a tower 
and spire at the west end, plan oblong, without aisles. 
Some small portions of N. work are preserved, especially a 
good N. doorway, w. 

The Architectural Guide has a general view of the church, and other de- 
tails, there is also a general view in the Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixvi. pt. 2, (1796.) 

112. Brightwell Prior, . A small church, 

without either tower or bell-cot. The east window of the 
chancel is modern, the side windows E. E., with a small 
plain piscina. The chancel-arch has good N. jambs, but 
the arch is modern and pointed. The nave has two 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

small N. windows, a good N. south doorway, and door 
with the original hinges. Of the other windows two are 
good P., and two are modern. The font octagonal, cup- 
shaped. The bell hangs under the west gable, ip. 

113. NuNEHAM CouRTENAY, All Saiuts. Rebuilt in 1764. 
Some fragments of the old church are preserved in Bal- 

don Park, and are E. E. work. ip. 

The fragmeDts of the old church are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

114. NoKE, SL Giles. A small poor church of mixed 
styles, with a plain E. E. porch, and a small square bell- 
turret on the west gable, ip. 

There is a general view in the Architectural Guide. 

115. Sandford, St, Mary. A small plain N. church, 
with later windows inserted, and a tower added at the west 
end, in imitation of N. work. There is in the chancel 
a rich piece of sculpture of the fifteenth century, represent- 
ing the assumption of the Virgin. 

Near the church are some very slight remains of the 
priory of the Knights Templars. In this parish also are 
the remains of the mynchery, near Littlemore, the existing 
buildings are of the P. style and late, although the nunnery 
was founded in the Saxon times, ip. 

The sculpture, and a N. window, are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 
The sculpture is also given in Skelton. A view of the mjnchery, with a few 
details, is given in the Architectural Guide. 

116. Stadhampton, St, John Baptist. A debased 
church, with the exception of the north aisle, which is P. 
The tower is modern. In the north aisle is a brass to 
John Wilmot, and his wife, 1508. j.b. 

117. Stanton St. John, St. John Baptist. A D. 
church, with a P. tower at the west end ; the chancel is 
very beautiful work, early in the style, the east window of 
very singular character, the tracery formed of straight 



I 



DEANERY OF CUDDESDON. 

lines, crossing each other, forming diamond-shaped open- 
ings, which are foHated, and the whole richly moulded, the 
side windows are single lights, with trefoil heads. The 
nave has Transition N. arches on the north side, D. on the 
south. The clerestory windows are good D. In the chan- 
cel windows are remains of good painted glass. The north 
aisle is P., much wider than the south. There are some 
good open seats with very singular poppy -heads, ip. 

A general view of the church, with very numerous details, are given in the 
Guide. Also of the church and old rectory house, in Skelton. 

118. Warborough, St. Laurence. A poor church, with 
a modern tower at the west end, 1666. The chancel walls 
are E. E., with later windows inserted, there is no chancel- 
arch. The font is of lead, of N. work, on a P. stone 
pedestal, ip. 

The font is engraved in the Architectural Guide, in Van Voorst's Fonts, 
and in Skelton. Also a quarry in Franks' Ornamental Quarries. 

119. Waterstock, St. Leonard. Rebuilt in 1792, all 
but the north aisle and tower, which are P. ip. 

120. Waterpery, St. Mary. A mixed church. The 
chancel E. E., with a D. east window. The nave has 
Transition N. arches, opening to a P. aisle on the south 
side. On the north side are two good E. E. windows of 
three lights, with foliated circles in the head. There is a 
curious palimpsest brass of 1527. In the south aisle is 
a good canopied monument, with a cross-legged figure of 
a knight, c. 1350. In the churchyard a good D. cross, 
nearly perfect, ip. 

The churchyard cross, the palimpsest brass, and other details, are in the 
Architectural Guide. 

121. Wheatley, St. Mary. Modern. 

122. Wood Eaton, Holy Rood. A mixed church, the 
walls E.E.,with various insertions of later date, the tower 
is P., introduced within the west end of the nave, its outer 

F 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

wall built upon the E. E. west end wall, the other three 
walls resting on P. arches. The sedilia are two plain stone 
seats without canopies, the eastern one having a sort of 
elbow to it. IP. 

There are engravings of the church and the sedilia in the Architectural 
Guide. 

123. Iffley, SL Mary. Has been so often described, and 
is now so well figured, that less may be said of it. It has 
small portions of all the styles, but it is principally a N. 
church, with an E. E. addition to the chancel, and a low N. 
tower between the nave and chancel. The two later styles 
have only inserted windows. The N. portion is remarkably 
well executed, and furnishes three very fine doorways, [two 
rich tower arches,] and a handsome west end. The E. E. 
portion presents a remarkably elegant specimen of the 
style, this portion, and the N. chancel, are both groined. 
The font is very large and lined with lead ; it has a square 
top supported on a centre thick shaft, and four thinner 
ones round it. rickman. 

The engravings of this church, both of general views and of details, are so 
numerous, that it is not possible to enumerate them here. The best are in 
Britton's Architectural Antiquities, and in the Archaeological Journal, vol. iv. 



Beanerg of Belilrington. 

124. Adderbury, St. Mary. Has a tower and spire. 
The building is of various dates, and has considerable 
specimens of early sculpture, rickman. The tower and 
spire are D., and the nave has a fine timber roof and clere- 
story of the same period. The chancel is P., and has been 
restored. On the north side of the chancel is an original 
vestry, with a room over it, having an oriel window, this 
building is called " The Monument House ;" probably a 



DEANERY OP DEDDINGTON. 

corruption of muniment. There are D. stone porches and 
doorways on both sides of the nave. There is a fine brass 
of two figures, a knight and lady, about 1460, in good 
preservation, ip. 

There is a view of the church and parsonage in Skelton ; another view of 
the church in the Gent's. Magazine, vol. Ixx. part 1. (1800) ; and a moulding 
of a doorway in the Qlossary of Architecture. 

125. Milton, St John, A chapel to Adderbmy, now 
destroyed. 

126. BoDDicoTE, St, John Baptist, A chapelry to 
Adderbiu*y. A small plain church, mostly D., with a tower 
on the north side. The rood-loft remains perfect, ep. 

127. Barford, (Little,) St. John. A small church, 
with a tower at the south-west corner, open to the church. 
The windows of the nave are D., the east window is square- 
headed. There is a plain N. doorway with the zigzag 
moulding. The font early N. j.c.s. 

128. Alkerton, St, Michael, The chancel was rebuilt 
late in the sixteenth century. The arches of the nave are 
Transition N., clerestory P. ; the windows chiefly E. E. 
with D. insertions. The south porch and doorway are also 
E. E., and have the original stoup in the north-east angle. 
The tower is between the nave and chancel, the lower part 
,E. E., and the upper D. The cornice of the parapet is 
elaborately sculptured with animals and figures with mu- 
sical instruments. J.M.D. 

129. Banbury, St, Mary. Rebuilt in 1793. The old 
church, of which some fragments have been preserved, was 
wantonly destroyed, the walls were so firm as to be obliged 
to be removed by gunpowder. 

In Banbury there are several good old houses, with barge- 
boards and pargetting, one has the date 1570, another 1624 
and 1637, and another 1648 ; they are all good specimens 
of the domestic architecture of the period, ip. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 



Calthorpe house is near Banbury, and has some ancient 
remains, also Wickam has some interesting portions 



remammg. 



Several views of the old church are given in Beesley's History of Banbury 
and in Skelton. In the latter there is also a view of the old vicarage house 
and of Calthorpe House. 

130. Drayton, near Banbury. SL Peter, A small 
D. church. The east window is without tracery, of three 
lights, the side windows of the chancel are square-headed. 
There is an incised alabaster slab 1458, and some old 
painting. The nave has aisles, and a clerestory, all good 
D., in the south aisle are two sedilia and a piscina, muti- 
lated by a monument of 1548. The font is plain, the 
tower modern, ip. 

131. Barford, (Great,) St. Michael. The nave is D., on 
the north side is a lofty N. doorway, having the beak-head 
moulding continued all round. The tower is at the east 
end of the south aisle. The piscina has a locker behind 
it. The porch is P. The font large and early N. J.c.s. 

132. Bloxham, St. Mary. Has a lofty and elegant 
tower and spire, and various other interesting portions. 
HICKMAN. It is a large and fine church of mixed styles. 
In the chancel is a N. doorway and some windows, altered 
from that style. The nave has very wide aisles, the 
north aisle having two arches across it, the south aisle is 
also large and wide ; they are D., with some good P. win- 
dows inserted. On the south side a chapel with four large 
P. windows has been added. The font is D., octagonal 
panelled. The west doorway is very fine and rich D. The 
cornice on the north side of the church contains a curious 
series of grotesque figures of animals, &c., which have been 
engraved by Grose, ip. 

Several views are given in Skelton ; the tower, and spire, and font in Kick- 
man's Architecture ; and various details in the Glossary. 



DEANERY OF DEDDINGTON. 

133. MiLCOMBE, St. Laurence, A small church, chiefly 
E. E. The pillars of the nave are plain E. E., with 
moulded caps. The lower portion of the rood-screen 
remains, and is very good P. ; there are also most of 
the original open seats remaining in the nave, of the same 
date and work as the screen. The north aisle is modern. 
The windows are partly E. E. and D. The font is P., and 
there is a D. doorway to the tower, j.m.d. 

134. Broughton, St. Mary. A good D. church with 
a tower and spire of the same style, it has a good stone 
chancel-screen, and contains several fine monuments, some 
D., others P., and a brass of Philippa Byschoppesdon, 
1414. There is a good D. doorway and porch. The east 
end of the south aisle is of good design, with a fine window, 
which has hanging foliation to the inner arch. 

The castle is a good moated house of various periods, 
part of the fourteenth century, with a gate-house of the 
fifteenth. The castle contains a small D. chapel, in 
which the stone altar remains perfect. The north front 
is Elizabethan, ip. 

There is an engraving of the chancel and of a monument in Skelton ; of a 
window in the Glossary of Architecture ; and of the brass in Boutell's Brasses. 
Several views of the castle are also given in Skelton. 

135. Cropredy, St. Mary. A fine D. church of the 
usual plan, with a tower at the west end. The nave- 
arches have the mouldings continuous to the ground, the 
clerestory windows are square-headed, D. The south aisle 
has fine D. windows, and a rich cornice, the north aisle is 
P., the chancel is D. The windows have good flowing 
tracery. There is a fine double piscina, and some very 
good D. screen-work, but cut down and used as a railing. 
The lower part of the tower is D., the upper P., and there 
is a good D. porch, ip. 

The D. screen is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

136. Wardington, St. Mary Magdalene. A small plain 
church of mixed styles, chancel D., nave E. E., south door- 
way plain, early D., with a stoup perfect, the aisles D., the 
tower P, IP. 

Williamscott consolidated with Wardington has an 
ancient school-house, and a house in which King Charles 
slept, after the battle of Cropredy bridge. 

137. MoLLiNGTON, All Saints. The north aisle of this 
church was taken down in 1786, and the pillars built up 
into the wall. The nave is D., and has a good doorway 
and porch of the same date. The chancel is also D. The 
clerestory windows and the tower are P., the font is Tran- 
sition N. j.c.s. 

138. Claydon, St. James. The aisle of this church is 
divided from the nave by four N. arches, the easternmost 
one being rather later than the others. The tower has a 
saddle-back roof. There is no distinction between chancel 
and nave. The font is modern and of wood, j.c.s, 

139. BouRTON Magna, St. Michael. The nave of this 
church is used as a dwelling-house, and the chancel, which 
is converted into a school-room, is all that remains of the 
original church at all perfect. It is early D., and retains 
the original roof. The east window is of two lights with 
good tracery, though much mutilated. The piscina and 
locker remain in their original positions, and there is a 
beautiful D. window in the north wall, j.m.d. 

140. Deddington, St. Feter and St. Paul. A mixed 
church, originally D., but great part rebuilt with the old 
materials in the time of Charles 1. The chancel has a good 
east window, sedilia and piscina of D. work. There is a 
good P. porch to the north door, and a screen. A sepul- 
chral recess in the south wall contains a female figure of 
early character, ip. 



DEANERY OF DEDDINGTON. 

Clifton chapel in this parish is destroyed, it stood near 
the road leading to Deddington. 

A view of the church and rectory is in Skelton ; and a brass in the Gent's, 
Magazine, ?ol. Ixv, part 2. (1795.) 

141. Han WELL, JSL Feter, A fine D. church with some 
portions of E. E. work. The sedilia and piscina are good 
D., the nave-arches have caps ornamented with figure s^. 
elegantly sculptured. At the east end of the north aisle 
is the reredos of an altar with figures under tabernacles : 
there is a very curious D. cornice filled with sculpture of 
figures. 

Near the church are the remains of the castle with a good 
brick tower of P. work. ip. 

See Skelton's Antiquities for views of the church and castle. 

142. South Newington, St, Peter. Chancel D., with a 
crocketed piscina. The chancel-arch is plain E. E. The 
nave-arches Transition N., and E. E. The clerestory is P. 
The north aisle is D., with good windows. The south aisle 
is rather earlier, having two Transition E. E. windows and 
two D. windows, and one P. insertion. The roofs of the 
aisles are open timbered P. The font is cylindrical, N., with 
a single zigzag moulding at the top. The south porch is 
good P. A small fragment of the cross remains, j.m.d. 

143. SiBFORD, . Modern. 

144. SwALCLiFFE, St. Peter and St. Paul. A fine 
church of mixed styles, the exterior chiefly D., with a P. 
tower at the west end. The nave has N. arches on the 
north side, and Tmnsition N. on the south. The clerestory 
and roof are P. The aisles both D., the south earHer 
than the north, with a good E. E. doorway. The chancel 
early D., with good sedilia and piscina. The roof good open 
timber. P., and the chancel-screen retains the old painting 
and gilding. There is a sanctus bell-turret, ip. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

Swalcliffe parsonage is said to have been built by William 
of Wykeliam ; also a fine old barn, skelton. 

145. Epwell, SL Anne. Chancel, nave, tower on south 
side of nave, and a small south aisle adjoining the tower on 
the east, but opening only to the nave. South doorway D. 
Window at west end of three lights. Chancel has its old 
roof, the east window of three lights, Transition from D. 
to P., as are also some of the other windows. The tower 
is fourteenth century. The piscina plain D. j.m.d. 

A fine house in Epwell, temp. James I. skelton. 

146. Shutford, St. Martin. Of mixed styles, singularly 
situated, with a P. tower at the north-west corner. The 
nave has Transition N. arches on the north side, and D. on 
the south. There is an E. E. chapel, with a D. open timber 
roof, and a P. screen with the old painting. The font is N. 

In a house in the village is a fourteenth centmy door- 
way. IP. 

147. Tadmarton, St. Nicholas. A small but good D. 
church, with a tall tower at the west end, it has some good 
early windows of two lights, with lozenges in the head of 
each, and a sanctus bell-turret, ip. 

148. Tew, (Great,) St. Michael. Has a doorway of very 
late N., with apparently some later additions, and an E. E. 
porch. The nave has some piers and arches of D. charac- 
ter, and there are some good windows of that style. The 
tower and clerestory are P., and there are some inserted 
windows of that date. There is a good P. font. The 
pulpit is ancient, of wood, with good panelling, and some of 
the bench-ends are of elegant design. This church is not 
a large one, but in composition and execution it is superior 
to many churches about it. rickman. There is a brass 
to Sir J. Wylcotes and lady, 1410. 

The south doorway is engraved in Skelton ; a bench-end in the Glossary of 
Architecture ; and the brass in Boutell's Brasses. 



DEANKRY OF DEDDTNGTON. 

149. (Tew, Little,) St. Mary. Ecclesia destnicta. 

150. WiGGiNGTON, St. Giles. A good plain church, 
chiefly E. E., chancel D., having a good piscina, a sedile in 
the sill of the window, and a good D. stone seat, with 
crockets and finial, in the south-west angle. There are also 
two remarkable low side windows. The pillars of the nave, 
three on each side, are E. E., those on the north side octa- 
gonal, and earlier in the style than those on the south, 
which are round with moulded caps. Clerestory and 
roof P., the tower good and lofty P. The aisle windows 
are good three-light lancets under one arch, very good E. E. 
On the exterior a very singular tomb is built into the south 
side, the figure stands erect with a child on each side, all 
having their hands clasped, in the costume of the thirteenth 
century. On the outside of the chancel is a D. cornice 
with the ball-flower ornament, stilted up above the P. clere- 
story now blocked up. The porch is placed diagonally at 
the west end of the north aisle, to meet the path fi*om the 
village ; it is apparently P. w. 

The tomb is engraved in Skelton. 

151. WoRTON Nether, St. James. Chancel, nave with 
aisles, west tower. The chancel has been shortened by a few 
feet, but the east window built in again, it and the chancel- 
arch are D. The nave is also D., with three arches on each 
side on octagonal pillars with moulded caps ; the aisles have 
good D. square-headed windows of three lights, the rnullions 
well moulded and each light trefoil-headed. The south 
doorway is good E. E., with the tooth ornament in the arch 
mouldings, and a curious impost. The tower stands at the 
west end of the south aisle, it is very small, and has the 
date of 1630 upon it, the lower part forms a porch, ip. 

152. Worton Over, Holy Trinity. Chancel, nave, 
south aisle and south tower. This church has been almost 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

entirely rebuilt in the D. style, under the direction of Mr. 
Derick, with some of the old work retained, and the imita- 
tion very well done. The tower was added in 1849. The 
font is a very good imitation of the E. E. style. The seats 
are all open and low, and the chancel is paved with en- 
caustic tiles. IP. 

153. Wroxton, All Saints. A plain church of the D. 
style, consisting of nave, aisles, and chancel, with a tower 
at the west end. The chancel has plain windows without 
cusps, and two sedilia. The south doorway and porch are 
good, and there is also a good font. 

Wroxton abbey is a fine mansion of the time of 
Charles XL, but some remains of a D. chapel are pre- 
served. IP. 

The hall of the abbey is engraved in Skelton. 

154. Balscot, ^t. Mary Magdalene. A small D. church. 
The east window is fine, with three lights, and the side win- 
dows also very good, the piscina has a shelf, and a trefoiled 
crocketed canopy. There is another piscina in the south 
aisle, and near it two brackets. The tower is well propor- 
tioned, the font N., large, and plain. The sanctus bell- 
turret remains at the east end of the nave, j.m.d. 



IDeancri) of ^^enkg. 

155. BiXBRAND, St. James. A small poor church, con- 
sisting of chancel and nave, with a wooden bell-cot on 
the west gable. The walls are N., and some of the small 
N. windows remain : there is one lancet window, the 
others are modern, and very bad. The chancel-arch is 
small round-headed N., and has a squint on each side of 
it almost as large as the arch, but not continued to the 
ground, and now blocked up. ip. 

156. ^rLG^x-^y^Y^, St. Michael. Ecclesia destructa. 



DEANERY OF HENLEY. 

157. Caversham, St. Feter. The plan of this church is 
a nave and chancel, with a north aisle to each ; the east 
window of chancel is good *D., that of the aisle plain P. 
On the north side of the chancel are two P. arches, with 
panelled soffits, and the caps formed of carved angels; 
the arches of the nave are N., circular, on plain round 
pillars. The south doorway is N., with the zigzag mould- 
ing very bold. The tower is of wood. ip. 

158. Checkendon, St. Peter and St. Paul. A small 
N. church with a round apse at the east end, a P. tower 
and porch and insertions. The apse has a plain N. win- 
dow, rather large, and on the south side is a P. window, 
blocked up. The arch opening to the apse is good N. The 
chancel has on the north side a D. window, on the south 
an early P. one. The chancel-arch is good N., with shafts 
having sculptured caps, and the billet ornament in the hood- 
mould. The walls of the nave are N., but the windows, 
doorway and porch are P., with a stoup in the porch, and 
some bits of N. moulding. The tower is poor P. There are 
several tiles, some of the same pattern as those at Harpsden, 
three brasses of the fifteenth century. The open seats in 
the chancel erected in 1716. The roof of the nave is good 
P., flat, with carved bosses, ip. 

There is a general view of the church in Skelton ; two of the brasses in 
Boutell ; and two quarries in Franks' Quarries. 

159. Crowmarsh Gifford, St. Mary Magdalene. A 
small church principally early N., very plain and massive, 
the west end is singular, having small round windows. 
The two doorways, several windows, the chancel-arch, and 
a piscina are all N. ip. 

The piscina is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 

160. Goring, St. Thomas a Becket, A curious small 
N. church, with a tower at the west end of the north aisle. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

Many of the original windows remain, but there are some 
late insertions and a modern east window : the three arches 
on the north side are Transition N., on massive round piers 
with N. clerestory windows over them. The tower is very 
curious N., with good stair-turret, the under part has a 
groined N. vault ; the belfry story and battlements are 
P. On the north side is an original lean-to or aisle, very 
narrow and two stories high : there is a small round- 
headed wooden piscina, and the north aisle has a D. east 
window. On the south side are clerestory windows with 
a blank wall under them, there having been a cloister on 

that side of the church. IP. There is a general view in Skelton. 

161. Hk^v^DWii, St. Margaret. Chancel and nave, with 
wooden bell-cot on the west gable. The east window is 
D., of two lights, the side windows D., single lights, in the 
south wall are two recessed arches, in one of them is a good 
figure in armour with the legs crossed, of the fourteenth 
century. There are three brasses. The chancel-arch is 
modern. The west window P., the bell-cot modern. The 
font good round N., with the scallop and cable ornaments. 
The south porch D., open timber, with a good wooden door- 
way and barge-boards, and a trefoil-headed arcade on each 
side. The vestry is modern in imitation of D. work. There 
are some good tiles of uncommon patterns, w. 

162. Henley, St. Mary. Is a large church with some 
portions of chequered work in flint and chalk ; it has a good 
tower, and various interesting portions both D. and P. 
The east window has good D. tracery, rickman. At the 
east end of the chancel are indications of the original altar. 
At the east end of the north aisle is a P. window with 
curious painted glass. On the south side are some rich re- 
cesses. Nearly all the brasses are destroyed. 

A general view of the church is engraved in Skelton. 

163. Mapledurham, St. Margaret. A late P. poor 



DEANERY OF HENLEY. 

church, consisting of chancel, nave, south chapel, and west 
tower. The chancel is very poor, but has a tolerably good 
roof, the chapel of the Blount family is late P., but better 
than the church. The nave is twice as wide as the chancel, 
which stands on one side, as if the pillars and arches had 
been taken away, one arch is Transition N. The tower is of 
brick, debased P. The font round, good N., with a spiral 
cable moulding. 

Near the church is the seat of the Blount family, a fine 
brick mansion temp. Henry VIII., with moulded brick 
chimneys, square-topped pinnacles, and square-headed win- 
dows, pp. The mansion-house is engraved in Skelton. 

164. MoNGRWELL, St. John Baptist. Modern. 

165. Nuffield, Holy Trinity. A small church of 
the D. style, part ancient and part modern, carefully re- 
stored by Mr. Ferrey. It consists of chancel, nave, and 
north aisle, with tower at the west end of the aisle. The 
chancel is modern. The nave and aisle are original D. 
The pillars are round, with moulded capitals and bases. 
The font is plain round, tub-shaped, with the following 
inscription in Lombardic characters round the upper part, 
and the plinth is built in with part of a pillar. 

[iFon]te $acro lotum bel muntat gracia totum 
ITel non est jiacramenti munDacio plena. 
The north and south doorways have been stopped up, 
and a west one opened. There is a small brass, a half- 
length figure of a priest, with a French inscription, ip. 

166. RoTHERFiELD Greys. Chaucel, and nave, with a 

modern wooden bell-cot, the east window E.E., of three lights, 
under one arch not foliated : a good E. E. piscina, and a 
double locker. The nave walls are E. E., the windows 
part lancets, and part modern : the north doorway round- 
headed, E. E., blocked up. The font good E. E., square 
with shafts at the angles : there is a fine brass of Robert 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

de Grey, 1 387, and a debased chapel, with a fine tomb of 
W. Knollys, earl of Banbury, 1632. This chapel is now 
the burial-place of the Stapleton family. 

At Rotherfield Greys, the mansion-house called Greys 
court has a square tower, and some other portions of the 
fourteenth century, of brick-work, but the greater part is 
Elizabethan or later, ip. 

The brass of Sir R. de Grey is engraved in Boutell's Brasses ; the font in 
Van Voorst's Series. 

167. Rotherfield Peppard, All Saints. A small plain 
church, the walls N., the chancel has three N. windows, 
and N. strings : the east and two side windows are D. in- 
sertions: the chancel-arch is plain Transition N. The 
nave is modernized, and has a wooden bell-cot. The font 
is N,, round, cup-shaped, with the cable moulding, ip. 

168. Shiplake, St. Peter and St. Paul. Of mixed 
styles, mostly D., the nave-arches are Transition N., very 
good, the south aisle is E. E., the font good D. The chancel 
has a good D. east window, the side windows are short, 
lancets, there is a good E. E. piscina in the south aisle, 
many old tiles are preserved, and the church is in beautiful 
order, the windows filled with painted glass brought from 
St. Omer at the expense of the incumbent, ip. 

The font is engraved in Rickman. 

169. North Stoke, St. Mary. Chancel very good 
E. E., side windows original, small lancets, with shafts of 
Purbeck marble in the jambs : there are two low side win- 
dows, one on each side ; that on the south has a trefoil 
head, that on the north is square-headed, both original : 
there is a trefoil piscina and a small locker. The nave is 
early D., the windows of two lights. The tower E. E., 
with a good tower-arch. The font is small, plain, and 
round. Over the south doorway is a curious sun-dial, with 
head and hands, early D. ip. 



DEANERY OF HENLEY. 

170. Newnham Murren, SL Mary. A small plain N. 
church. Chancel N., with the original windows in the 
sides, the chancel-arch N., the upper part plastered up. There 
is a trefoil piscina, and a double locker in the chancel, a 
small plain romid N. squint on the south side of the chan- 
cel-arch. The nave is N., with an original doorway on the 
north side, south aisle D. The font plain N., the pulpit 
Jacobean, with a stone base. The porch has good barge- 
boards. IP. 

171. Ipsden, St, Mary, This church consists of chan- 
cel, nave with a chapel attached to the north side, south 
porch, and a wooden bell-turret. The chancel is in the 
earliest E. E. style, with three small windows on each side, 
and a doorway on the south side, with a flat top sur- 
mounted by a semicircular arch. The eastern wall has been 
altered, and a three-light P. window inserted. There is a 
small wood cornice in the inside, which appears to be of 
E. E. character ; the ceiling is in cants, (as are the other 
ceilings of the church,) following the arrangement of the 
rafters and braces of the roof; a portion at the east end is 
boarded, and the remainder is plastered. The chancel-arch 
is small and very plain and poor; it is coeval with the 
chancel, and has one polished shaft, with plain flowered 
capital, on each side against the middle of the wall. There 
appears to be a " squint," now stopped, in the wall on the 
north side of this archway, but it is probably not an original 
feature. The chapel on the north side of the church is 
parted from the nave by two pointed arches : the east wall 
has been rebuilt in the P. style, the other walls are of E. E. 
date, though apparently later than the chancel; a stone 
bench is attached to the inside of the west and north walls. 
The roof has suffered from decay and modern repairs ; it 
appears to be of D. character, and the wood cornice seems 
clearly of that date ; the timbers are large, and there is a 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

little characteristic enrichment on some of those in the 
eastern part, especially on a tie-beam which has a series of 
cuspings cut on one of its sides. The nave is of E. E. 
date, and was originally built with a south aisle, parted 
from the body by five pointed arches ; but this has been 
destroyed, and the arches have been filled up in a later age ; 
the west window is of poor P. character ; and there are two 
windows of similar kind on the south side. Tlie roof is 
of P. date, with large plain moulded tie-beams and good 
battlemented wood cornice ; the ceiling is plastered and 
quite plain. The font is a plain tub-shaped structure, 
made up with rough materials, plastered. A large propor- 
tion of the original open seats remain in the nave. A few 
ancient paving tiles remain, with spread eagles and other 
ornaments on them. In this church are a pair of small 
brass figures, and an inscription to the memory of Thomas 
Englysche and Isbell his wyffe, who both died 1525 ; they 
are loose, and the two figures are found to be made 
from earlier brasses ; the female has at the back, part of 
a rhyming inscription to, apparently, a member of the 
family of Stapleton, and the^ male is cut from a larger 
female figure, r.c.h. 

172. Stoke, (South,) St. Andrew. Tower, nave, chancel, 
chiefly of late D., with some good windows, and some of 
P. character. Attached to the pulpit is an iron hour-glass 
stand. A.N. 

173. WooDCOTE, St. Leonard. A chapelry to Ipsden, 
rebuilt in 1846, in the N. style, in good taste. The old 
apse with three N. windows is faithfully copied on the 
old foundations, ip. 

174. SwiNcoMBE, St. Botolph. A small church, chiefly 
N., with an apse, and without tower or bell-cot, the bell 
being hung in a room above the south porch. The apse is 
N. ; the walls very thick, with a coved vault, and three 



I 



DEANERY OF WITNEY. 

small windows splayed in an unusual manner. The arch 
to the apse and the chancel-arch beyond are plain N. In 
the chancel is one lancet window, and one D., of two 
lights. The nave windows are single lancets, with the ex- 
ception of that at the west end, which is P., inserted in the 
original lancet. The font is plain, tub-shaped, N. The 
porch plain N. HP. 

175. W HITCH VRCBy St. Mary. Chancel and nave. This 
church, originally N., has but little early work remaining. 
The chancel has been refaced with brick in the Roman style, 
the east wall and the west end of the church being wholly 
modern. The S. doorway is good N., with zigzag and 
other ornament, and carved capitals. The porch P., is 
now used as the vestry. There are some plain D. win- 
dows, and one good P. The bell-cot is of wood, square : the 
font is modern. There are two early brasses in the chancel, 
and two small pieces of good painted glass, j. billing. 

Hard wick house, a fine Elizabethan mansion, is in this 
parish. 

Skelton gives a view of Hard wick house. 



©tanerg of Silitneg. 

176. Alvescott, St. Mary? A small plain church of 
mixed styles. Chancel, nave without aisles, north and 
south transepts, with a P. tower at the west end. The 
chancel is modern ; there is a D. chapel on the north side, 
and a P. one on the south ; the latter has its original 
boarded ceiling painted and gilt. The font is E. E., 
square, with shafts at the angles, ip. 

177. AsTHALL, St. Nicliolas. Is a small church, with 
some good E. E. and D. portions, and some of later date. 
Some of the windows have good tracery, and there is an 

H 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

elegant cross on the north porch. In the churchyard is an 
ancient altar-tomb, with quatrefoils and shields, it is not 
common to meet so good an ancient tomb out of doors. 

RICKMAN. 

At Cote, in this parish, is a mansion of Elizabeth's time, 
with some good shields, painted glass, and a sepulchral chapel. 

The gable cross is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 

178. Bampton, SL Mary. A fine large cruciform 
church, mostly of the period of Transition from E.E. to D., 
with a good tower and spire at the intersection, the spire is 
octagonal, springing from a square tower without a parapet. 
At the angles in the place of pinnacles are four figures of 
angels, very elegant, the spire lights are very good with 
flowered crosses on the pediments over them. The west 
doorway is fine D., deeply recessed, and ornamented with the 
ball-flower, &c. The side windows are of three lights, with 
foliated heads under one arch within. At the end of the 
south transept is a rich, late N. doorway. The tower-arches 
are Transition N. The walls of the chancel are N., with 
later insertions, sedilia and piscina good E. E., and a very 
singular Easter sepulchre of P. work. In the east wall of 
the north transept is a very fine reredos of our Saviour with 
twelve Apostles under canopies. The font is square E. E. 

In this parish are the remains of the castle of Aymer 
de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, in the time of Edward II. 
The gate-house is tolerably perfect, ip. 

There is a general view of the church, and of the remains of the castle, in 
Skelton. A general view also in Petit's Remarks on Architectural Character : 
a D. doorway and window in Rickman's Architecture, and a pinnacle in the 
Glossary of Architecture. 

179. Shifford, . The greater part of the old 

church fell in 1772. The present church was completed 
in 1780. SKELTON. 

180. Blackbourton, 8t, Mary, A mixed church, mostly 



DEANERY OF WITNEY. 

Transition N., with one aisle on the north side of the nave 
only. The tower is late P., introduced within the south- 
west angle. The chancel is E. E., and has three small 
lancet windows in the east end, two below connected by a 
dripstone, and one above in the gable ; in the east wall are 
also an E. E. piscina, and a locker, and in the south wall a 
sedile forms the sill of a window. The chancel door is N. 
There is a P. stone pulpit, ip. 

181. Brize Norton, St Brize. A small church of 
mixed styles, chancel with north aisle, nave with north 
aisle, and an E. E. tower at the west end, which has 
a good parapet, and strings early in the style. The chancel 
is D. The nave partly E. E., and partly D. The south 
doorway is N., and there is a good N. font with attached 
shafts, a good D. piscina in the chancel, and a stone bench 
divided into three sedilia. Also a monumental effigy of John 
Daubyngne, 1340 : the head and feet are shewn, as if from 
under the stone slab on which the helmet and shield are 

carved, ip. The Daubyngne monument is given in Skelton. 

182. Broadwell, St. Peter and St. Paul. A fine 
cruciform church, with a western tower and spire. The 
chancel has N. walls, the windows inserted, early D., the 
east window of three lights, with foliated circles in the 
head, and the inner arch or hood enriched with hanging 
foliation ; on the south side are two windows of two lights, 
one of which also has hanging foliation, and some original 
painted glass in the head ; a low side window, which is 
round headed, and has a projection over it; a small D. 
piscina and locker : the chancel-arch is E. E., the whole 
width of the chancel, with shafts attached to the side 
walls ; there is a D. chapel on the north side, with a 
smaller E. E. arch opening to it. The north transept 
is P., with a stair-turret at the north-east angle, the arch 
opening to it is E. E., with good capitals of elegant foliage. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

The south transept is early D., with arch and window 
of the same character, and a very good piscina, with a 
pointed outer arch and a trefoiled inner one, the surface 
of the wall round the outer arch enriched with foliage, and 
a corbel for an image close to it. The nave has P. win- 
dows : the north doorway is small, round-headed, E. E., 
the south doorway is fine Transition N., round-headed, en- 
riched with zigzags and the tooth ornament, and shafts 
with capitals of E. E. foliage. The south porch is also 
Transition N., attached to the end of the aisle. There 
is a good E. E. cross on the east gable of the nave. 
The lower part of the tower is N., with a tower-arch of 
that style, the belfry story and the spire are good E. E., 
the belfry windows are of two hghts, with small fohated 
circles in the head, the spire is of the broach form, with 
mouldings on the angles, a finial of foliage, good spire 
lights with plate tracery and crosses on their gables, and 
pinnacles at the angles. The spire belongs evidently to the 
same family as Witney and Bampton. The font is very 
good late N., with a large basin of the quatrefoil form with 
heads in the hollows, supported on four large shafts with 
scalloped capitals, and small shafts introduced between the 
large ones. ip. 

Near the churchyard are the remains of an ancient cross 
with five steps. 

183. Kelm SCOTT, JSt. George. A small cruciform church, 
with a good E. E. bell-cot over the chancel-arch, and a 
wooden one at the west end. The bell-cot is for two bells, 
the openings trefoiled and a circle in the head. The 
chancel has one D. window, the others P., the chancel- 
arch is plain early D. The transepts are also early D. : 
the end windows of three lights with trefoil heads. The 
nave has four late N. arches on the north side, and square- 
headed P. windows on the south. The south doorway is 



DEANERY OP WiTNEY. 

N., the porch P. The aisle is very narrow, and has had 
a large squint at the east end into the chancel : there are 
good E. E. heads in sunk panels over the two western 
pillars, and good corbels to the roof. The font is plain, 
round, N. w. 

184. Broughton Poggs, St. Feter. Small, but ancient, 
composed of one aisle which is divided into nave and 
chancel. The chancel is E. E., with two lancet windows 
at the east end, the side windows single lancets, the priest's 
door of the square-headed trefoil form, and a small oblong 
low side window. The nave has N. walls, and one small 
original window, the other windows are D. insertions. 
The north and south doorways are plain N. The tower 
has been lowered, and is now level with the roof of the 
nave, and has the bells hung in openings on the west 
side. IP. 

185. BuRFORD, St. John Baptist. Is a large and curious 
edifice. It has a N. central tower, and various portions of 
N. and E. E. work adjacent, but the largest part of the 
church is P., of various dates, and evidently partial rebuild- 
ing, a very fine N. door being preserved at the west end. 
There are several large chapels, and a remarkably rich 
south porch, late P., with very beautiful fan-tracery groining, 
and excellent details. In the interior, the junction of the 
different portions produces various singularities. There are 
several ancient monuments of different dates and varying 
much in their execution. In the nave is a stone chapel used 
as a seat, and another of wood, both good compositions. 
There is an ancient wooden pulpit, and some other good 
wood-work ; there are also small portions of very good an- 
cient painted glass. The roof of the nave has been remark- 
ably rich wood- work, but now much mutilated and altered. 
The upper part of the N. tower has inside some fine arches, 
forming a gallery round that stage of the tower. The spire 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

is of P. date. There is a fine circular font with niches 
and statues, and lined with lead ; it appears to be of D. 
date. Under part of the church is a crypt, used as a bone- 
house. The plan of this edifice is very irregular, but it has 
so many singularities and beautiful portions, that it deserves 
minute examination, rickman. 

There are engravings of several portions of the church in Skelton. The 
aisle roofs are given in Bury's Ecclesiastical Wood- work ; a mullion and a 
pendant in the Glossary of Architecture. 

186. FuLBROOK, St. James. Chancel, have, north aisle, 
north chapel, west tower. Chancel has D. east window of 
three lights, trefoiled, under one arch, the eyes pierced, 
side windows P., square-headed, roof good open timber 
barrel-shaped, with bosses, early P. ; chancel-arch Transition 
N., with moulded imposts, on the west side it has shafts with 
E. E. mouldings. The nave has on the north side four 
Transition N. arches, on short massive pillars with good 
caps, the north chapel is D., the aisle P., with square- 
headed Avindows, and a good roof. On the south side of the 
nave, near the chancel-arch, is a round-headed recess for an 
altar. A good early D. window of two lights, the inner arch 
five-foiled; an upper range of windows square P. The 
south doorway N., with an E. E. porch. Tower plain P., 
font plain round ; a P. high tomb in the churchyard, and a 
fine yew-tree. ip. 

187. Clanfield, St. Stephen. Plan — chancel with north 
aisle, nave with north aisle, west tower. The chancel is 
E. E., with some D. insertions, the east window D. with 
geometrical tracery, an E. E. piscina with trefoil head and 
stone shelf, the sedilia in three steps formed in the sill of a 
window: the chancel-aisle has good geometrical D. win- 
dows. The chancel-arch is Transition N., pointed with 
shafts, there is an E. E. arch on each side of the chancel- 
arch, one lancet-shaped, the other equally narrow but tre- 



DEANERY OF WITNEY. 

foil-headed. The nave has three N. arches on the north 
side : the aisle is partly D. and partly P. : the south door- 
way plain N., the door old oak with good iron-work : the 
porch P. The tower is D. with a good west window, and 
arch, the upper windows plain, it has a battlement and 
pinnacles. The font is P., octagonal, cup-shaped, panelled 
with quatrefoils and roses, ip. 

188. CoGGS, St, Mary. A small church of mixed styles, 
with a singular D. tower at the west end of the north aisle, 
but in a diagonal position. Tlie lower part is square, the 
upper part octagonal. The chancel has a good D. east 
window, and on the north side of it is a chapel with very 
good D. work. The nave has Transition N. arches, the 
south aisle is P. 

In a farm-house near the church are two very good 
E. E. windows, w. 

Skelton gives a view of the west end, and a window ; a moulding and the 
tower are given in the Glossary of Architecture. 

189. DucKLiNGTON, St, Bartholomew, A fine church, 
consisting of chancel, nave with aisles, and west tower. 
The chancel is E.E., with a P. east window, and good E.E. 
sedile, piscina, and locker. The side windows are single 
lancets, widely splayed. The chancel-arch is well moulded, 
E. E. On the south side of the nave are three arches. Tran- 
sition N., opening to an E. E. aisle ; on the north side are 
three good D. arches. The north aisle is very fine D., the 
east window is very rich, and has a singular piece of sculp- 
ture in the head. The west window is of three lights with 
very good fiamboyant tracery, the hood-mould over it is a 
hollow moulding filled with ball-flowers, and this is carried 
as a cornice all round the chapel. In the north wall are 
two very rich D. arches, and in the upper part of the wall 
all round are a series of sculptured panels in alto relievo. 
The lower part of the tower is Transition N., with a tower- 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

arch springing from corbels. The upper part is P. The 
north porch is D., and has a crypt underneath it. IP. 

The east end of the north aisle is engraved in Skelton. 

190. CoKETHORPE, St. Mary. Chapelry to Ducklington. 
A small plain chapel, chiefly P., the tower at the north side 
of the west end, the lower part of which is E. E., the upper 
modern, the whole rough -cast over. The font is good N., 
with intersecting arches, ip. 

191. Hailey, St. John Baptist. Chapelry to Witney. 
Modern. 

192. Holwell, . Achapelry to Broad well. This 

chapel was rebuilt in 1842, in a bad style, in imitation of 
Gothic, with a small tower on the north side, and three 
chancel-arches, the two outer ones being narrow lancets. 

193. Kencote, ^t. George. Chancel, nave and west 
tower. The chancel is E. E., late in the style, the east 
window of three lights, with trefoil heads, the centre the 
highest, the eyes have been open, but are plastered up, the 
side windows are lancet shaped, and there is a trefoil-headed 
piscina with a stone shelf. The chancel-arch is originally 
N., with shafts and the imposts continued as strings; 
under this a D, arch has been introduced, resting on 
corbels of foliage inserted in the N. w^ork. The south 
doorway is N., wdth flat sculpture in the tympanum, re- 
presenting a centaur shooting an arrow down the throat of 
a monster, with the word Sagittarius cut in the stone. The 
nave has N. corbel-heads inside, but the roof which be- 
longed to them is destroyed. The tower-arch is small plain 
Transition N., there is a large square stair-turret on the 
south side of the tower. The font has the date 1642. ip. 

194. Langford, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, north and 
south aisle, central tower. The chancel is E. E., having 
three couplets on each side and two couplets at the east end, 
with banded shafts, and deeply wrought mouldings within. 



DEANERY OP WITNEY. 



On the north side, in the easternmost compartment, is a 
beautifully recessed and canopied priest's door, on the 
exterior, but closed within by a piscina, both E. E. On 
the south side is a good P. aumbrey, there is a good stone 
staircase, E. E., leading from the chancel to the tower. The 
tower is N. having large piers and narrow arches, plain in 
character, and plain belfry windows. The nave has good 
arches of transitional work. The clerestory and aisles are 
chiefly P. The north aisle is curiously supported by a flying 
buttress springing from the ground and terminating imder 
the eaves, P. work. The south porch has two curious 
sculptures of the Crucifixion, one on the south face over the 
entrance, the other on the east side ; the latter is full size, 
both are executed in sunk panels having the form of a 
cross, and are of early work, this church abounds with 
interesting details, b.f. 

195. Faringdon Parva, . A small interesting 

Transition N. church, with a north aisle, and a well moulded 
arcade with semicircular arches having sculptured capitals. 
The chancel has two N. narrow windows on each side, and 
two E. E. at the east end. A good D. aumbrey on the 
north side, and a foliated bracket over the altar, a handsome 
pulpit and desk of Jacobean character. The west gable- 
turret contains two bells, but has been modernized. A 
concealed arch on the south side of the nave indicates the 
position of a chantry chapel at a former time. The south 
porch is P., and there are many P. windows inserted. The 
font is also plain P. b.f. 

196. Minster Lovell, Si. Kenelm. A good P. church, 
cruciform, without aisles, with a tower in the centre. The 
nave is wider than the tower, and there are small narrow 
arches on each side of the western arch, placed diagonally, 
connecting it with the angles of the wall, there are also 
small foliated openings on each side of the eastern arch, 

I 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

looking towards the altar. This arrangement is very un- 
usual and very good ; there is an original vestry on the 
north side of the chancel. A good P. font and a fine altar- 
tomb of Lord Lovell the founder of the church in the time 
of Henry VI. 

Close to the church are the ruins of the mansion-house, 
afterwards a priory, which are of the same age. ip. 

Skelton gives a view of the interior of the church. There is a general ex- 
terior view in Petit's Remarks on Architectural Character, a window in 
Rickman's Architecture, and the font in Van Voorst's Series ; the ruins of 
the mansion are also engraved in Skelton, and in the Beauties of England 
and Wales. A set of drawings of this church by Mr. J. Prichard, architect, 
has been published by the Oxford Architectural Society. 

197. NoRTHMOOR, SL Denis. A mixed church with a 

D. tower at the west end ; the chancel is E. E., with an 
east window of singular design, late in the style. Good 

E. E. sedilia. The nave is D., with very elegant windows, the 
inner arches of which are supported on short shafts and 
corbels. There is a D. chapel on the north side, with two 
sepulchral recesses and a good monument of a cross-legged 
knight and lady. ip. 

Near the church is a good Elizabethan parsonage house. 

Two D. windows are engraved in Rickman, and a corbel in the Glossary of 
Architecture. Skelton gives a view of the Elizabethan parsonage-house. 

198. Standlake, St. Giles. A cruciform church, with 
tower and spire at the west end. The chancel is early D., at 
the east end are three lancet windows plastered up, and P. 
niches inserted, the side windows are good D., of three 
lights ; the chancel-arch is Transition N. The transepts 
are D. ; the arch opening to that on the south side is N., 
en the north side E. E. The nave-arches, four on each side, 
ara E. E., with round pillars on the south side, octagonal 
on the north. The tower is octagonal from the ground, 
small, very good, surmounted by a spire, both early I). The 
walls are chiefly N., as shewn by the strings and buttresses. 



DEANERY OF WITNEY. 

There is an external sepulchral recess of E. E. work on the 
south side of the chancel, kp. 

Gaunt house is in this parish, a curious and interesting 
building, now used as a farm-house, skelton. 

A view of the church is engraved in Skelkn. 

199. SniLTON, . . Chancel, nave with aisle, 

west tower. The chancel is E. E., with lancet windows at 
the sides, and a D. east window of three lights ; a very 
good E. E. piscina, trefoil-headed, with a stone shelf, and 
a quatrefoil basin, quite perfect, supported by foliage ; an 
E.E. priest's door, now blocked. The chancel-arch is E.E., 
with good mouldings and shafts; there is a small squint 
on the south side of the arch. The nave has two plain N. 
arches on round pillars, with scalloped capitals, rather early 
in the style. The doorway is P., but inserted in a N. 
opening, with the round arch remaining above ; the porch 
is plain N. The tower small, and plain P. The font very 
fine N., square, with sculptures of the Passion on each 
side ; the basin is supported by a square central shafts 
with four detached round shafts, ip. 

200. SwiNBROOK, SL Mary. Is a small church with 
a curious small tower, open, with an arch to the west, and 
having a door and window in the west wall of the church 
under this arch. There are some N. piers and pointed 
arches, with some curious windows of later date ; the east 
window is P., a good one of five lights. There are some re- 
mains of a rood-loft and good wood screens. In this 
church are many monumental figures lying on shelves, 
covering one side of the chancel. They seem to be sub- 
sequent to the year 1600. rickman. In the east window 
of the chancel is some good painted glass : there are also 
some ancient carved misereres, and some fine brasses, ip. 

The Fettiplace monuments are engraved in Skelton ; and the stalls and 
pulpit in Talbot Bury's Ecclesiastical Wood-work. There is also a window in 
the Glossary of Architecture. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

201. Taynton, SL John Baptist. Chancel, nave with 
two side aisles, and west tower. The chancel is E. E., with 
a beautiful three-light lancet east window. There is a small 
D. vestry on the south side of the chancel. The nave has 

D. arches, a P. clerestory and roof. The north aisle is good 
D., with the ball-flower in the cornice and cap and in the 
hood-mould of the doorway. There is a good niche across 
the north-east angle of this aisle, the south aisle is also D., 
but with P. windows inserted. The tower plain poor P., 
tall and narrow. Porch D., with a good cross on the gable. 
The south doorway has the four-leaved flower in the mould- 
ings bold and good. Font large octagonal early P., with 
panelling and curious sculpture, ip. 

The font is engraved in Skelton. 

202. Westwell, ^t. Mary. A good small church, with- 
out aisles, with a pigeon-house bell-cot. The chancel is 

E. E., with two lancet windows on the south side, and a 
small Transition N. one on the north ; the east window is 
circular, cinquefoiled of plate tracery of early character, 
the ends of the cusps cut off" square, and united by an iron 
ring, precisely like the \^4ndows of a similar character in 
France. The chancel-arch is Transition N., with the star 
ornament on the imposts ; the responds plain, square, with 
shafts on the west side. The nave has N. walls, with P. 
square-headed windows inserted. The south doorway is 
good N., with shafts having scalloped capitals, and the arch 
enriched with zigzags. The north doorway is also N., but 
plain, and blocked up. The font is very good N., not 
round, but quatrefoil in plan, and the basin of that form ; 
it stands on four massive shafts, with scalloped capitals and 
moulded bases, on a square plinth. The porch is P., with 
a good stoup niche on the side ; there is a descent of three 
steps into the church. There is a good Elizabethan tomb 
with the figure of a civilian, ip. 



DEANERY OF WITNEY. 

203. WiDFORD, St Oswald. A small chapel near Bur- 
ford, is a curious edifice. It has a small bell-niche and a 
nave and chancel. The north door and the font are N. The 
nave and chancel are mostly D. The side windows of one 
light, and the east window of three lights. Part of the 
nave of the west end is of later date. The pulpit is ancient, 
with good panelling, rickman. 

204. Witney, St Mary, Is a large and handsome 
cross church, with a tower and lofty spire at the intersection ; 
the nave has aisles and a clerestory. The transepts are 
large, and the chancel small. The tower and chancel are 
E. E., and the north transept D., with a fine window of 
seven lights. The clerestory and some other parts are P. 
There is a water-drain in the chancel, and two monumental 
effigies in the north transept, rickman. 

The west doorway is fine P., on the south side is a round- 
headed E. E. one, the spire and pinnacles are fine E. E. ip. 

General views are given in Skelton, in the Beauties of England and 
Wales, and in Petit's Remarks on Architectural Character. A doorway, a 
mullion, and two windows are given in the Glossary of Architecture. 

205. Yelford, St, Nicholas and St. SwitJdn, A small 
P. church, without a tower, the two bells being inserted in 
openings made for them in the west gable: all the win- 
dows are square-headed, and the roofs very high pitched; 
the ceilings are flat : the font cup-shaped, panelled. There 
is a good south porch ; there are remains of gable crosses on 
the two eastern gables, and a good rood-screen, if. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 



IDeancrg of agaoobstocL 

[[Several of the churches in this deanery also are described in the Guide to 
the Architectural Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Oxford.] 

206. Aston, North, St. Mary, A mixed church, with a 
P. tower at the west end. The nave and chancel are D., 
and there is a good D. chapel on the south side of the 
chancel. There is a fine altar-tomb of 1416, and some 
good open seats with carved ends. w. 

207. Begbrooke, St. Michael. A small church origin- 
ally N., with many modern alterations. The tower at the 
west end has a roof with two gables, called a saddle-back 
roof: there is a good N. doorway, ff. 

A general view is given in the Guide to the Architectural Antiquities. 

208. Blaydon, aS'^. Martin. Rebuilt in 1804. 

In this parish is a small house with a good round chimney 
and a pretty dormer window, h'. 

There is a view of the old church in Skelton, and one of the house in the 
Architectural Guide. 

209. Woodstock, St. Mary Magdalene. Of mixed styles, 
the north side towards the street rebuilt in 1785. The 
south side with an aisle, has some good E. E. work. There 
is a good D. font, now in a garden. 

On an old house in the town is a curious chimney 
of the fourteenth century, ip. 

The font, the west -porch, and several details, are given in the Architectural 
Guide, and the chimney in Skelton. 

210. Cassington, St. Peter. A small church of mixed 
styles, with tower and spire in the centre, but without either 
transepts or aisles. The chancel is N., with a groined vault 
with D. windows, and piscina inserted : the walls of the nave 



DEANERY OF WOODSTOCK. 

and tower are also N., but a D. spire has been added ; 
there is a good brass of a cross fleuree to Roger Cheyiie, 
c. 1415. There are some good mural paintings of the 
fifteenth century in the nave ; in the belfry there were some 
patterns of much earlier date, apparently contemporary with 
the walls, but these disappeared in some recent repairs, ep. 

A general view is engraved in the Architectural Guide, a window in the 
Glossary of Architecture, and the brass in Bouteirs Brasses. 

211. CooMBE (Long), St. Laurence. A good P. church, 
with tower at the west end. There is a good stone pulpit. 
On the east gable of the nave is a sanctus bell-cot, and on 
that of the chancel a good cross, ip. 

The rectory house has some portions of the original P. 
work remaining. 

The pulpit and doorway, and other details, are given in the Architectural 
Guide ; a general view of the church and rectory, and the stone pulpit, in 
Skelton. 

212. DuNSTEW, St. Mary. A plain church of mixed 
styles, with a P. tower at the west end. The nave and north 
aisle are D. The chancel is chiefly P., and there is a good 
chancel-screen of early P. work. ip. 

213. Ensham, St. Leonard. A mixed church, consist- 
ing of chancel, nave with aisles, and a P. tower at the west 
end of the north aisle. The chancel is D., the nave early 
P., with good arches, the pillars of which are clustered, 
and of uncommon section. The font is good P. Near the 
church is a fine village cross. There are some open 
seats in the nave with rich panelling, ip. 

The tower, the font, and numerous details, are given in the Architectural 
Guide, and a view of the church and village cross in Skelton. 

214. Glympton, St. Mary. Is modern, but the tower- 
arch and the chancel-arch have been preserved, ip. 

K 215. Handborough, St. Peter and St. Paul. A fine 
church, mostly P., with a good tower and spire at the west 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

end. Plan oblong with two aisles. The chancel is E. E., 
but the east window is a debased insertion. The nave- 
arches are P., but the outer walls of the aisles are N. 
The richly panelled oak pulpit, rood-loft, and font, are 
good P. IP. 

A general view, the pulpit, rood-loft, and font, are given, with other details, 
in the Guide to Architectural Antiquities. 

216. KiBm^GTO-s, St. Mc/tolas. A mixed church, mostly 
D., with a small plain tower at the west end. The walls 
of the chancel are N., with a N. arch in the east wall filled 
up with a P. window, the other windows and the piscina 
are D. The nave and tower, and a chapel on the south 
side, are also D., and the roof of this chapel is original. 
The font is good D., hexagonal with panelled tracery on each 
face. At the west end are two small triangular windows 
foliated, which are also D. A brass to a priest, Walter 
Gooden, 1513, rector, ip. 

The font, chapel, roof, and other details, are engraved in the Architectural 
Guide. 

217. KiDLiNGTON, St. Mary. A fine cruciform church, 
with a tower and spire in the centre. It is of mixed styles, 
but the greater part good D., particularly the aisles of the 
chancel. The spire is P., the south porch D., with two 
good doorways. There are several fine D. windows, par- 
ticularly the east window of the south aisle, ip. 

A general view, and very numerous details, are given in the Architectural 
Guide. 

218. Water Eaton, . A small late P. 

chapel of the time of James L, somewhat in imitation of D. 
work, with very good windows for that period. The seats, 
pulpit, and screen, are all of the same charactejj. 

Adjoining to it is a good manor-house of.lhe same 
period, to which the chapel has originally belonged, ip. 

The chapel and manor-house are engraved in the Architectural Guide.* 



DEANERY OF WOODSTOCK. 

219. NoRTHLEiGH, SL Mary. A mixed church with 
two aisles and two chapels, and a tower at the west end. 
The nave has Transition N. arches. The chancel is D., 
but spoiled within by bad Italian work. The south door- 
way is originally N., with a smaller P. door introduced 
imder it. The Wilcot chapel is very rich P., with a fine 
altar-tomb. There is an elegant cross on the east gable. 
The tower is of very early character, with long and short 
work, it appears to have been originally central. The old 
N. font is used as a water-butt in the churchyard, and a 
wooden one is in its j)lace. ip. 

The Wilcot tomb is engraved in Skelton ; the tower, and other details, in 
the Architectural Guide. 

220. RowsHAM, St. Mary. A plain church of mixed 
styles, with an aisle on the south side, and a tower at the 
west end. Tlie chancel is D., the chancel-arch and the 
arch nearest to it are Transition N. The other two arches 
with the aisle, and tlie tower, are D. ip. 

Near the church is a handsome Ehzabethan house, the 
seat of C. Cottrell Dormer, Esq. 

The Elizabethan house is engraved in Skelton. 

221. Sandford, ^t. Martin. A mixed church with a 
P. tower at the west end. The nave has Transition N. 
arches on the north side, and E. E. ones on the soutl>. 
The clerestoiy and roof are P. ; the walls of the chancel iare 
E. E. ; the east window is Transition from D. 4:0 P. The 
south aisle is of the same period. The seats are mostly 
plain old oak, and the pulpit P., with oak panelling, ip. 

The east window is given in the Architectural Guide. 

222. Shipton on Cherwell, St. Mary. Rebuilt in 
1820, all but the chancel, which is late D. 

Skelton gives a general view. 

223. Stanton Harcourt, ^t. Michael. A cruciform 

K 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

church of mixed styles. The walls of the nave are N., with 
some P. windows inserted, and a D. open timber roof, the 
chancel is E. E., and contains some very beautiful work, the 
windows are of the lancet form, arranged in triplets on the 
sides as well as at the east end, the transepts are also fine 
E. E. ; the end windows are P. insertions. The tower-arches 
are E. E., the upper part P. The rood-screen is of oak, 
E. E. The Harcourt chapel is P., and contains some fine 
monuments. In the chancel is a small tomb with a rich 
D. canopy, supposed to have been used for the Easter sepul- 
chre ; and in one window is some very good painted glass. 
The remains of the manor-house of Stanton Harcourt are 
good P., consisting of one of the towers, the gate-house, 
and the kitchen, the latter is very curious with its original 
timber roof and louvre : this and the abbot's kitchen at 
Glastonbury are believed the only remaining examples, ip. 

A general view of the church, the rood-screen, and other details, are given 
in the Architectural Guide. Several details in Skelton ; the font in Van 
Voorst's Series ; a quarry in Franks' Quarries ; some ancient mural paintings 
in the Archaeological Journal, vol. ii. ; a piece of K. E. glass, in Hints on 
Glass Painting ; and two of the Harcourt effigies in Hollis. The tower, the 
kitchen, and the domestic chapel, are also given in Skelton and the Archi- 
tectural Guide ; and a set of working drawings of the church has been pub- 
lished by the Oxford Architectural Society. 

224. South Leigh, St James. A small church, mostly 
P., with a tower at the west end, and an aisle on the north 
side of both nave and chancel, but none on the south side, 
there is a small N. doorway to the chancel, with some sin- 
gular ornament, a N. piscina, some portions of E. E. 
work, but the greater part P. The font is P., panelled ; 
there are some good plain open seats. 

Near the church is an Elizabethan house, with some good 
portions, w. 

The piscina and other details are given in the Architectural Guide. 

225. Steeple Aston, SL Peter. A mixed church, with 



DEANERY OF WOODSTOCK. 

a P. tower at the west end. The nave is E. E., the south 
aisle of nave and north aisle of chancel are D., the north 
aisle of nave is P. The chancel is of a debased character. 
The church is entirely fitted with open seats of good charac- 
ter, with richly carved panelling at the ends. There is a 
very remarkable altar-cloth of the fourteenth century pre- 
served in this church, ip. 

A general view : some open seats, &c., are given in the Architectural Guide. 

226. Steeple Barton, St. Mary. A plain church of 
mixed styles, with a tower at the west end. The chancel is 
D., but sadly patched, the nave is also D. ip. 

The remains of the manor-house are good Elizabethan. 

A few details are given in the Architectural Guide, and a view of the 
manor-house in Skelton. 

227. Stonesfield, St. James. A mixed church. The 
chancel is D. The nave has two E. E. arches on the south 
Bide. The south aisle is D., the north aisle modern. The 
tower originally E. E., with P. windows inserted, and a P. 
belfry added, if. 

Three windows are engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

228. Tackley, St. Nicholas. A cruciform church of 
mixed styles, with a tower in the centre. The chancel is 
E. E., with a good triplet at the east end. Some P. win- 
dows inserted. The nave is partly N., and partly E. E. 
The tower and transepts are P. ip. 

There is an interior view of the chancel, and some other details, in the 
Architectural Guide. 

229. Westcott Barton, St. Edicard. Of mixed styles, 
a P. tower at the west end. The chancel is P., the chan- 
cel-arch and two arches on the north side of the nave are 
N. ; the other parts mostly P. ip. 

The door-handle is engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

230. WiLCOT, St. Peter, A small church without aisles, 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

mostly D. The west end has two windows divided by a tall 
buttress which originally carried a bell-cot now destroyed : 
the design of this end is very good. On the south side is 
a N. doorway. The north doorway and porch are D. hp. 

The west end is engraved in the Architectural Guide. 

231. WooTTON, aS'^. Mary. A plain church with one 
aisle on the north side, and a P. tower at the west end. 
The nave has clumsy E. E. arches. The aisle and the 
chancel are D. Font E. E. ip. 

232. Yarnton, St. Bartholo^new. A mixed church 
mostly E. E., with a very late tower, 1611. The nave has 
E. E. arches. The chancel is E. E., and in the churchyard 
is a good E. E. cross, ip. 

Several fragments from other churches were collected 
and preserved here by the late Alderman Fletcher about 
1820 ; he was a great collector of antiquities, and is buried 
in this church ; there is a high tomb to his memory with 
his effigies engraved in brass, one of the earliest instances 
of the revival of this art. 

The Spenser aisle is engraved in Skelton ; and the churchyard cross in the 
Architectural Guide. 



Beanern of ©xforlr. 

[The engravings of the various buildings in Oxford are so numerous, that 
a mere catalogue of them would fill a volume. The best are in general those 
on the Oxford almanacks, and on a small scale those in Dr. Ingram's Memo- 
rials of Oxford.] 

233. Oxford, All Saints. Rebuilt in 1708, from a de- 
sign of Dean Aid rich. 

234. Oxford, St. Aldate. Has a D. tower and spire, a 



DEANERY OF OXFORD. 

south aisle of very good D. work, built in 1336 by Sir 
John de Docklington. It contains a fine P. high tomb in 
alabaster of John Noble, 1522. kp. 

The effigy of John Noble is engraved by Hollis, the tomb is also given in 
the Glossary of Architecture, together with two D. brackets and a corbel. 

In this parish are Cardinal Wolsey's Almshouses, part 
of which are original work, but the front is a modern re- 
storation ; also the remains of the mansion of Dr. Oliver 
King, the last abbot of Oseney and first bishop of Oxford : 
parts of both of these buildings are engraved in Ingram's 
Memorials. 

235. Oxford, St. Clement. Modern, 1828. 

In the outskirts of this parish are the remains of the 
hospital of St. Bartholomew, the domestic buildings are 
modernized. The chapel remains perfect, it is a small 
building with some good windows of the Transition from 
D. to P., and a screen of the time of the Commonwealth. 
It has neither tower nor bell-cot, but there has been an 
opening for the bell in the west gable, w. 

236. Oxford, St. Ebbe. Rebuilt in 1816. A rich N. 
doorway is preserved in the vestry, ip. 

The N. doorway is given in the Glossary. 

237. Oxford, St. Giles. Has various E. E. portions, 
some good lancet windows, and some portions of later 
date. Its font is very curious, rickman. The tower is a 
good specimen of Transition N. work, the belfry windows 
are each of two lights, with shafts, and a small lancet- 
shaped opening in the head. The north aisle has been a 
series of chapels, each with a separate roof and gable, and 
an arch across the aisle; this range of gables and the 
arches still remain : the windows are good E. E. The 
south doorway and porch are also good E. E. IP. 

The font and an E. E. window are given in the Glossary. 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

238. Oxford, St. John Baptist. See No. 257. 

239. Oxford, St. Martin, (commonly called Carfax.) 
Is modern all but the tower, which is quite plain: there 
is a fine P. font. if. 

The font is given in the Glossary. 

In this parish are some ancient timber houses with 
specimens of pargetting, and good barge-boards, parts of 
which are engraved in Ingram's Memorials, and in the 
Glossary. 

240. Oxford, Bt. Mary Magdalene. Is a small church, 
much of which is of the D. style, with some good windows, 
the south aisle has the w^aved line pierced parapet and 
buttresses, with canopies and niches of remarkably beauti- 
ful composition : its font is a fine one. rickman. The 
south aisle is said to have been built in 1327. The 
tower is late P., with some D. materials brought from 
Oseney abbey, built in ; the stair-turret is very elegant, and 
there is a beautiful little figure of St. Mary Magdalene in 
a niche on the upper part of the tower. The Martyrs' aisle, 
in imitation of the D. style, but not similar to the south 
aisle, was built in 1842, from the design of Mr. G. G. Scott, 
to correspond with the Martyrs' Memorial Cross, which 
stands at a short distance from it. ep. 

The font is engraved in Simpson's Fonts ; one of the south buttresses, and 
a part of the open parapet, a window, and a moulding are given in the 
Glossary : the south aisle in Ingram's Memorials. 

241. Oxford, St. Mary the Virgin. Is one of the prin- 
cipal features of High-street, and though not benefited by 
the very incongruous porch of twisted pillars, is on its 
southern side a very fine church. The plan is a spacious 
nave and aisles, and a large chancel, without aisles. The 
steeple is on the north side. All the building except the 
steeple is P., not very early but very good, the piers and 
arches have delicate mouldings, and over each pier is a 



DEANERY OF OXFORD. 

beautiful niche from the top of which springs the corbel, 
carrying the wood arches of the ceiling ; most of the windows 
are very good ones, and the whole is a fine specimen of the 
style. The steeple consists of a very plain tower, from the top 
of which rises a spire with plain ribs, and one very good large 
canopied window at the bottom. At each corner the double 
buttresses of the tower are finished by rich niches, with 
canopies and pinnacles, and behind the group thus formed, 
rises connected with it a large pedestal with pinnacles at 
the corners, and a large one in the centre. This disposition 
is not common, and produces altogether far the most satis- 
factory arrangement of any for the junction of a tower and 
spire. The whole of the steeple is of D. date, and the 
mouldings of these portions of the spire being filled with 
the ball-flower so common in that style, the effect produced 
is very rich. The niches are filled with statues, rickman. 
On the north side of the present chancel, but separated 
from it by a narrow space, is the chancel of the old church, 
which was of the unusual arrangement of a double chancel, 
one above the other ; the lower one is nearly perfect, with 
its groined vault of the D. style, and evidently belonged to 
the same building as the tower and spire, which stood in 
the centre of the old church ; the upper chancel has been 
modernized, and the north front cased over with late P. 
work to correspond with the rest of the church in external 
appearance. These two chancels were long used as the 
two houses of Convocation, ip. 

There are good general views of the exterior and interior in the Oxford Al- 
manacks, and in Ingram's Memorials, and numerous details in the Glossary. 

242. Oxford, St Michael. Has an elegant though 
plain P. porch, and other ancient features. Its tower of 
long and short quoins marking its early date, rickman. 
The south aisle is D., and has one remarkable window of 
earlier character, of three lights, rather wide lancets under 



OXFORDS HIRE, 

one arch, riclily moulded ; the mullions are also well 
moulded ; a P. chapel on the north side of the chancel has 
a good original reredos. kp. 

There is a good general view in Inp^am's Memorials ; the tower is given 
in Rickman ; the reredos, a niche, a window, a muUion, and a pillar in the 
Glossary. 

243. Oxford, St Peter {le Bailey.) Rebuilt in 1740. 

Some ancient brasses have been preserved. 

244. Oxford, St. Peter {in the East.) Is a curious 
church, the original portions N., with details peculiarly rich 
and well executed. It has had many introductions and 
alterations, particularly some large windows, which with a 
large south porch, a parapet, and other additions, mostly of 
P. character, have much altered the exterior appearance of 
the church. There yet remains the south door, one win- 
dow of the chancel, a portion of groining, and some other 
parts in the original state, and these shew the beauty of the 
N. church. Under tlie chancel is a fine N. crypt, some of 
the capitals of which have sculptures of a curious character. 
The later parts of this church are very good, and the 
whole deserves attentive study, rickman. 

There is a general view in Ingram's Memorials, the crypt and various de- 
tails are given in the Glossary, and a plan and view of the crypt in the Archse- 
ologia, vol. i. p. 155. 

245. Oxford, St. Thomas a Pecket. The chancel is 
E. E., with a good D. east window, the priest's door has 
the original iron-work remaining ; the nave is partly P., 
with a modern aisle in the D. style on the south side ; 
the tower at the west end is P., with an elegant stair- 
t arret, ip. 

A general view and several details are given in Ingram's Memorials. 

246. Oxford, Holywell, IIol^ Cross. Has a tower 
with some curious portions of E. E. composition, with later 
additions and alterations, rickman. This church was 
very well restored in 1845 and the aisles rebuilt; in the 



DEANERY O? OXFORD. 

tower is a singular anomaly, a lancet window with a square- 
headed canopy over it. The chancel- arch is shghtly horse- 
shoed, and the impost enriched with the star ornament, ip. 

A general view and the chancel-arch are given in Ingram's Memorials. 

247. Oxford, St. Paul. Modern, 1838, in the Grecian 
style. 

248. Oxford, JIol^ Trinity. Modem, in the E. E. style. 

249. Oxford. The Cathedral of Christ Church, [ori- 
ginally the chapel of the monastery of St. Erideswide, now] 
the chapel of the college and the cathedral of the diocese. 
It is a N. building, of singular character, from the dispo- 
sition of its arches, which are double, a lower one springing 
from corbels attached to the piers ; part of the nave has 
been demolished, and many windows of late date inserted 
in different parts. The roof of the choir is a curious and 
beautiful groined roof, with pendants ; on the north side of 
the choir are some chapels of later character than the rest 
of the church, and the northernmost one, called the Latin 
chapel, has some D. windows. Part of the cloisters re- 
main ; they are of P. character, and the chapter-house is a 
very beautiful and valuable specimen of E. E. The tower 
is in the centre of the cross, and is a plain English one with 
a spire. This cathedral is so inclosed by the college build- 
ings and by gardens, that no view of the whole can well be 
obtained. The interior has many portions deserving ex- 
amination. In the dean's chapel are two altar-tombs, a D. 
monumental erection, with three canopied arches, and a 
most magnificent P. erection, called the shrine of St. Erides- 
wide; it consists of three tiers of tabernacle-work, the 
upper of which has its niches ornamented with veiy fine 
canopies. The groining and piers of this chapel have some 
singularities, rickman. The stalls and desks in the Latin 
chapel are chiefly Wolsey's work, and very fine, they evi- 

L 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

dently formed part of the original fittings of his choir, and 
have been removed to their present situation. There is 
some good D. glass in the north and west windows, though 
evidently removed from the smaller windows and collected 
in these large ones, and mixed with later glass. The chapter- 
house is a very beautiful specimen of E. E. work, with fine 
groined vault, lancet windows and rich details, it is divided 
into two nearly equal parts by a solid stone wall of the time 
of Cromwell. The entrance doorway is late and rich N. work. 

The engravings of the Cathedral are very numerous, those in Britton's 
work are considered inferior to most of the others in that valuable series : in 
Ingram's Memorials there are exterior and interior views, and numerous de- 
tails, also a good plate of the interior of the chapter-house. 

250. Oxford. Christ Church has most of the col- 
lege buildings of later date, but the hall is a very beautiful 
room, and its roof a peculiarly fine specimen of an open 
wood roof. In different parts of the buildings some small 
ancient portions may be found deserving examination. 
RiCKMAN. The kitchen remains nearly in its original state 
as built by Wolsey, and has a good plain timber roof, with 
a smoke louvre ; it is traditionally said to have been the 
first part of the college buildings to be finished. The stair- 
case to the hall, with its fan-tracery vault springing from a 
slender central pillar, is much admired, and justly, although 
it is of the time of Charles 1\ 

There are good engravings of the hall and staircase, and various details of 
the college buildings, in Ingram's Memorials. 

251. Oxford. All Souls' College has a gateway, 
and some other portions of good P., but mixed with later 
work of a very different character, rickman. The chapel 
is an elegant specimen of its kind, the pillars and arches of 
the ante-chapel are very good, and a fine roof remains, 
though partly concealed : there are some remains of good 
painted glass, ip. 



DEANERY OF OXFORD. 

252. Oxford. The entrance gate [and tower] of Bra.se- 
NOSE College is a fine composition, with very good details. 
RicKMAN. The chapel is a curious example of the attempt 
to produce a mixed style of Grecian and Gothic, the effect 
is singular and picturesque, worthy of being preserved, but 
not imitated : it has lately been carefully restored, hp. 

253. Oxford. Balliol College has a fine oriel, and 
some other ancient features, rickman. The chapel and the 
library are late P., of the time of Henry VIII., with a very 
picturesque stair-turret, and some tolerably good painted 
glass. The gateway tower also is good P., built by Dr. Bell, 
who was Master from 1494 to 1497; his monogram, a bell, 
is carved in stone on the upper part of the tower, ip. 

The oriel is engraved in Pugin's Specimens ; the library, &c., in Ingram's 
Memorials. 

254. Oxford. Corpus Christi College has over the 
entrance an elegant niche, rickman. The gateway tower 
and the founder's chamber in it, are good late P. : the 
whole quadrangle has a more genuine appearance than 
most of the colleges, ip. 

255. Oxford. Exeter College Chapel is of Per- 
pendicular character, rickman. The chapel is of the very 
latest period for Gothic work, and has a ceiling painted in 
imitation of fan-tracery. The hall has a good open timber 
roof. The original entrance gateway tower on the north 
side is P., and has a good groined vault which appears to 
be D. or very early P., with good bosses, ip. 

250. Oxford. Magdalene College presents a variety 
of curious features ; the whole of one quadrangle is ancient ; 
this contains the hall, chapel, and cloisters, and has a very 
fine entrance tower. The chapel has had a new ceiling, 
and other modern alterations, but its west door is a rich 
and curious specimen; it has a detached stone arch, of 
peculiar lightness and elegance. Near this door, in an 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

angle, is a plain but elegant stone pulpit. The most im- 
posing feature of this college is its lofty and peculiarly elegant 
tower, which, for simplicity of design, is hardly any where 
exceeded ; it is very plain from the ground to the belfry 
story ; this has on each side two fine windows, and a rich 
open battlement ; the tower is crowned with eight rich 
pinnacles, and being seen from its base has a very fine 
effect in the approach to it. rickman. The original gate- 
way tower is also a very fine example. 

The engravings of various parts of this fine college are almost endless, and 
many details are given in Pugin's Specimens, «&c. &c. 

257. Oxford. Merton College is also rich in ancient 
portions ; the chapel is one of the finest in Oxford ; it 
consists of three portions of a cross church, the choir and 
transepts, (there being no nave,) and a tower at the inter- 
section. The choir is of D. character, with very good 
windows ; the east window, of seven lights, is a very curious 
one, with a rich wheel, and crocketed canopies and pin- 
nacles, as part of the tracery; the side windows are also 
very good ones. The tower and transepts are P., the 
windows are very good, and the tower, which is short and 
massive, has a very elegant belfry story, with a pierced 
battlement and eight pinnacles. There are other portions 
of the college buildings deserving attention ; they are 
principally P. rickman. 

The treasury, with its very acute stone roof and groined 
vaults, is very early D., almost E. E., and is fire-proof, it is 
a valuable specimen of the domestic work of the thirteenth 
century. 

The history of this very interesting chapel is preserved 
in the Bursar's rolls of the college; the high altar was 
dedicated in 1277, and the work was continued very 
slowly, as the funds would permit, the tower-arches were 



DEANERY OF OXFORD. 

built in 1330, the upper part of the tower and the tran- 
septs not until 1420. ip. 

A memoir of this chapel, taken chiefly from the college rolls, is given in 
the Archaeological Journal, vol. ii. p. 137, with engravings, there are also 
numerous details in Pugin's works, Ingram's Memorials, &c. 

258. Oxford. New College has the hall, chapel, 
cloisters, and a bold bell-tower, of excellent P. character, 
early in the style, and plain as to the exterior, but with 
excellent details, and the chapel a very rich interior. This 
chapel has been restored, and a very rich screen and organ- 
case erected, but the ante-chapel has had very little alter- 
ation, and is a remarkably fine composition. The windows 
of the cloisters are good, and their details rather singular. 
In this chapel is preserved the crozier of the founder ; it is 
in good condition, and affords a beautiful specimen of the 
mode in which architectural ornament was in that day 
adapted to utensils and furniture, rickman. 

Some of the painted glass in the ante-chapel is original, 
that in the choir is of the last century, the west window is 
well known as executed from the design of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, and a failure from want of attention to the 
nature of the material. The muniment tower and the 
kitchen are worthy of notice, the muniment room has its 
original paving of ornamented glazed tiles, ip. 

259. Oxford. Oriel College hall and chapel, with 
the porch leading to them, afford curious specimens of the 
singularities of debased P. ; the parapet of the porch being 
formed by the letters of an inscription, rickman. 

260. Oxford. St. John's, University, and Wadham 
Colleges, have all examples of the mixture produced by 
the introduction of Italian details before the ancient forms 
were disused, rickman. 

The tower of St. John's College was built by Arch- 
bishop Chichele as part of his foundation of St. Bernard's 



OXFORDSHIRE, 

College, and is good P., with a very remarkable entrance 
gateway. 

Lincoln College has been much altered, but retains 
a good P. doorway, and a smoke louvre on the hall. The 
chapel is a good example of the Oxford Gothic of the time 
of James I., and has good painted glass of that period. 

The chapel of Wadham College, although built at the 
same time with the rest, is in a very superior style ; the 
college documents shew that it was erected by a gang of 
freemasons, who were brought from a distance for that pur- 
pose by the foundress, Dorothy Wadham, in the time of 
James I. ip. 

261. Oxford. Most of the exterior of the Schools is 
of quite a debased character, but small portions are of 
superior design. Amongst these, the Divinity School is 
to be particularly noticed ; the general composition of this 
interior is fine, but its peculiar feature is the roof, which 
consists of bold four-centred arches, the spandrels of which 
are filled with tracery, and the spaces between these ribs 
are groined with two rows of pendants finishing below in 
small niches, which reach much below the ribs, and thus 
form three arches across the span. The details of this roof, 
and the rest of this portion, are very good, rickman. 

262. Oxford Castle has a tower of early N. character, 
the walls batter, and there are good loops in the parapet ; 
the masonry is rude, which gives it an appearance of still 
greater antiquity. The well-room in the mound is a 
curious little structure, with a groined vault of later N. 
character. The crypt of St. George's chapel has been re- 
built, but the ancient dwarf pillars preserved, with curious 
early N. capitals, ip. 

There are engravings and plans of the Castle in King's Munimenta Antiqua, 
Woolnoth's Castles of England, Ingram's Memorials, &c. 

Near the Castle are the remains of Oseney Abbey, but 



DEANERY OF OXFORD. 

scarcely a vestige of them is now standing. Fragments of 
good E. E. work have been dug up occasionally on the site 
of the abbey. Some portions of the old work are recorded 
to have been used in the rebuilding of part of St. Mary 
Magdalene church, shortly after the dissolution. The pre- 
sent burial ground is on part of the site of the abbey; 
several stone coffins and skeletons were dug up in prepar- 
ing for the foundations of the new burial chapel. Rewley 
Abbey was also at a short distance from the Castle, and a 
few fragments of it remain, ip. 

The three burial chapels built in 1848 are deserving of 
notice; the northern one, in the Holy Sepulchre burial 
ground, is in the N. style with an apse : the southern one, 
in the Oseney burial ground, is in the E. E. style : and the 
eastern one, in the Holywell burial ground, is in the D. 
style : all of them are creditably executed. The architect, 
Mr. W. J. Underwood, has published the working drawings 
of them. 

263. Wolvercot, St. Peter. A small plain church of 
mixed styles, with a P. tower, a richly carved oak pulpit 
of late P. work. A fine monument to Chief Baron Walter, 
temp. Charles H. 

In this parish are some slight remains of the nunnery 
of Godstow, which are P. The bridge has two arches, one 
pointed, the other round; it is partly ancient, but has been 
much modernized, ip. 

An engraving of the pulpit has been published by the Oxford Architectural 
Society, and several details are given in their Guide. 

264. BiNSEY, St. Margaret. A small church of mixed 
styles, with a N. doorway, and a Transition N. bell-gable 
with openings for two bells, and a good low side win- 
dow. IP. 

A view of this church, shewing its bell-cot, and the low side window, is 
given in the Archaeological Journal, vol. iv., and in Ingram's Memorials. 



INDEX OF SA.INTS, 

AFTER WHOM CHURCHES ARE NAMED IN OXFORDSHIRE. 



All Saints, 19.51.52.67.71.85.94.113. 

137. 153. 167. 233. 
St. Aldate, 234. 
St. Andrew, 7. 55. 80. 103. 172. 
St. Anne, 145. 

St. Bartholomew, 4. 104. 109. 189. 232. 
St. Botolph, 174. 
St. Brize, 181. 

St. Clement, 235. 

St. Denis, 197. 

St. Ebba, 54. 236. 
St. Edburgh, 30. 
St. Edward, 229. 

St. Frideswide, 249. 

St. George and St. Edmund, 43. 
St. George, 183. 193. 
St. Giles, 22. 31. 40. 62. 105. 114. 150. 
198. 237. 

St. Helen, 90. 

Holy Cross, 246. 

Holy Rood, 10. 122. 

Holy Trinity, 39. 64. 152. 165. 248. 

St. James, 27. 57. 93. 138. 151. 155. 186. 

224. 227. 
St. John, 26. 125. 127. 
St. John Baptist, 74. 116. 117. 126. 164. 

185. 191. 201. 238. 

St. Kenelm, 73. 196. 



St. Laurence, 25. 118. 133. 211. 
St. Leonard, 24. 97. 119. 173. 213. 

St. Margaret, 15. 161. 163. 264. 

St. Martin, 146. 208. 221. 239. 

St. Mary, 1. 6. 9. 13. 16. 17. 21. 23. 28. 

29. 33. 34. 35. 41. 42. 44. 45. 47. 48. 49. 

58. 60. 63. 65. 66. 68. 69. 82. 84. 86. 91. 

100. 108. 111. 115. 120. 12L 123. 124. 

129. 132. 134. 135. 149. 162. 169. 170. 

171. 175. 176. 178. 180. 188. 190. 194. 

200. 202. 204.206. 212. 214.217.219. 

220. 222. 226. 231. 241. 
St. Mary Magdalene, 20. 136. 154. 159. 

209. 240. 
St. Michael, 36. 37. 53. 79. 92. 102. 128. 

131. 139. 148. 156. 207. 223. 242. 

St. Nicholas, 5. 12. 14. 46. 56. 75. 77. 

99. 107. 147. 177. 216. 228. 
St. Nicholas and St. Swithin, 205. 

St. Olave, 38. 
St. Oswald, 203. 

St. Paul, 95. 247. 

St. Peter, 11. 32. 59. 76. 101. 106. 130. 

141. 142. 157. 184. 210. 225. 230. 243. 

244. 263. 
SS. Peter and Paul, 2. 3. 96. 140. 144. 

158. 168. 182. 215. 
St. Philip, 81. 

St. Stephen, 187. 
St. Swithin, 50. 

St. Thomas a Becket, 98. 160. 245. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 







No. 








No. 


A. 






Brightwell Salome 


. 


- 


5 


Ackhampstead 
Adderbury - 




16 
124 


Brize Norton - 
<^" Broadwell 


: 




181 
182 


Adwell - 




1 


Broughton 


- 




134 


Albury - - - 
Alkerton 




87 


Broughton Poggs 


- 




184 




128 


1^" Bucknell 


- 




32 


Alvescott 




176 


tB^ BURFORD 


- 




185 


Ambrosden - 




28 










Ardley - 




29 


c. 








Ascott-under-Wychwood - 
Asthall - - - - 


64 
177 


Cassington - 


. 




210 


Aston, North • 


• 


206 


Caversham '- 


- 




157 






2 


Chadlington • 


- 




66 








Chalgrove 


- 




6 


B. 






Charlbury - 


- 




65 








Charlton on Otmoor 




33 


Baldon (Toot) 




88 


Chastleton - 


_ 




68 


Baldwin Brightwell 




4 


Checkendon - 


. 




158 


Balscot - - - 




154 


Chesterton - 


. 




34 


Bampton 




178 


1^^ Chinnor 


m 




8 


Banbury 




129 


t^^ Chipping Norton 




69 


Barford (Great) - 




131 


Chiselhampton 






91 


^Tifflr'^ 




127 


Churchill 


•- 




71 




Beckley 




89 


Clanfield 






187 


Begbrooke 




207 


Claydon 






138 


Bensington - 




90 


Clifton Hampden 






92 


Berwick Salome 




7 


Coggs - 






188 


Bicester 




30 


Cokethorpe - 






190 


Binsey - ~ - 




264 


Coombe (Long) 






211 


Bixbrand 




155 


Cornwell 






72 


Bixgybwin 




156 


Cottisford 






35 


Blackbourton 




180 


Cowley 






92 


Blaydon 




208 


Cropredy 






135 


Blechingdon - 




31 


Crowell 






9 


Bloxham 




132 


Crowmarsh Gifforc 


I- 




159 


Boddicote 




126 


Cuddesdon 






94 


Bourton Magna 




139 


Culham 






95 


Brightwell Prior - 




112 


Cuxham 






10 







ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 












No. 






No 


D. 








Heyford "Warren, or 


Up. 




Deddington , 


_ 


_ 


140 


per Heyford 




45 


^ Dorchester - 


. 


_ 


96 


Heythorpe 


_ 


75 


Drayton 


- 


. 


97 


Holton - - . 


_ 


104 


Drayton, near Banbury - 


130 


HolweU - 


_ 


192 


^ Ducklington - 


_ 


_ 


189 


Hooknorton - 


_ 


76 


Dunstew 


- 


- 


212 


Horsepath 


- 


105 


E. 








I. 






Easington 


. 




11 


Idbury - - _ 


„ 


77 


Elsfield - 


_ 




98 


^T" Iffley 


_ 


123 


Emmington - 


_ 




12 


Ipsden - 


« 


171 


Ensham 


. 




213 


Ipstone - - - 


■• 


14 


Enstone 


_ 




73 


Islip - 


. 


46 


Epwell - 


. 




145 








" EWELME 


- 




13 


K. 

Kelmscott 




183 


F. 








Kencote 


. 


193 


Faringdon Parva 


_ 


_ 


195 


Kiddington - 


> 


216 


Fifield - 


. 


_ 


74 


j^"" KiDLINGTON - 


_ 


217 


Finmere 


. 


•• 


36 


Kingham 


_ 


78 


Forest Hill ;. 


. 


. 


99 


Kirtlington - 


_ 


47 


Fringford 


_ 


_ 


37 








Fritwell 


. 


, 


38 


L. 






Fulbrook 


- 


- 


186 


Langford 
Launton 


- 


194 
49 


G. 








Leafield 




79 


Garsington - 






100 


Lewknor 


- 


15 


Glympton 


■. 


. 


214 


Lillingston Lovell - 


- 


48 


Goddington - 


- 


_ 


39 








Goring - 


- 


- 


160 


M. 

Mapledurham 




163 


H. 








Marsh Baldon 


„ 


106 


Hailey - 


. 


» 


191 


Marston 


_ 


107 


Hampton Gay 


_ 


. 


40 


J^° Merton - 


. 


50 


Hampton Poyle 


_ 


. 


41 


Middleton Stoney - 


- 


51 


Handborough 


_ 


_ 


215 


Mil combe 


- 


133 


Hanwell 


_ 


_ 


141 


1^^ Milton (Great) 


. 


108 


Hardwick 


. 




42 


Milton ... 


. 


125 


Harpsden 


„ 


. 


161 


I^" Minster Lovell 


_ 


196 


Haseley 


. 


. 


101 


Mixbury 


_ 


52 


Headington - 


. 


. 


103 


Mollington 


_ 


137 


Henley 


_ 


_ 


162 


Mongewell - 


. 


I64 


Hethe - 


_ 


_ 


43 








Hey ford at Bridge, 


or 




N. 






Lower, or Heyford Pur cell 


44 


Nettlebed - 




IW 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



Newington - 
Newnham Murren - 
Newton Purcell 
Noke - 
Northleigh 
Northmoor 
North Stoke - 
Nuffield 
Nuneham Courtenay 



Oddington ... 
Overaorton - - - 
Oxford, All Saints - 

St Aldate - 

St Clement 

St Ebbe - 

St Giles . 

St John Baptist - 

St Martin - 

St Mary Magdalene 

St. Mary the Virgin 

St. Michael 

St Peter (le Bailey) 

StPeter(intbeEa8t) 

StThomas di Becket 

Holywell - 

St Paul - 

Holy Trinity 



m^ 



The Cathedral 

OF Christ Church - 

Christ Church - 

All Souls' College 

Brasenose College 

Balliol College - 

Corpus Christi 

College - - . 

Exeter College - 

Magdalene College 

Merton College - 

New College 

Oriel College 

St John's, Univer- 
sity, and Wadham Col- 
leges ... 



Schools 
Castle 



No. 
Ill 
170 
53 
114 
219 
197 
169 
165 
113 



55 
70 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 

249 
250 
251 
252 
253 

254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 



260 
261 
262 



No. 



jr. 

Piddington - 


. 


„ 


56 


Pishill - 


. 


. 


110 


Pyrton - 


- 


- 


17 


R. 








Rollright (Great) 


- 


- 


80 


/T :4.*i-\ 


- 


- 


81 




Rotherfield Greys 


- 


- 


166 


D^.^^^. 


rd 


- 


167 




Rowsham 


- 


- 


220 


Rycote Chapel 


- 


- 


102 


S. 








Salford - 






82 


Sandford 






221 


Sandford 






115 


Sarsden - 






83 


Sbelswell 






53 


Shifford- 






179 


Shilton - 






J 99 


Shiplake 






1€8 


Shipton on Cherwell 




222 


Shipton under Wychwood 


84 


Sbirbum 


. 




19 


Shorthampton 


. 




67 


Shutford 






146 


Sibford 






143 


Somerton 






57 


Souldern 






58 


South Leigh 






224 


South Newington 






142 


Spilsbury 






85 


Stadhampton - 






116 


Standelf, or Standhill 




18 


Standlake 


- 




198 


Stanton Harcourt 




223 


Stanton St John 






117 


Steeple Aston 






225 


Barton 






226 


Stokenchurch 






4 


Stoke Lyne - 






59 


Stoke (South) 






172 


Stoke Talmage 






20 


Stonesfield 






221 


Stratton Audley 






60 


Swalcliffe - 






144 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX, 









No. 






No. 


Swerford 


• 


_ 


86 


Westcott Barton 


- 


229 


Swinbrook 


_ 


- 


200 


Weston- on- the- G 


reen 


63 


Swincombe - 


- 


- 


174 


Weston (South) 


- 


25 


Sydenham 


- 


- 


23 


Westwell 
Wheatfield - 


- 


202 
26 


T. 








Wheatley 
Whitchurch - 


- 


121 
175 


Tackley 


- 


■ 


228 


Widford 


. 


203 


Tadmarton 
Tayntou 


- 


- 


147 
201 


Wigginton 
Wilcot 


- - 


150 
230 


Tetsworth 
Tew (Great) - 
(Little) - 


': 


- 


22 
148 
149 


|^° Witney 
Wolvercot 
Wood Eaton - 




204 
263 
122 


Thame 


- 


~ 


21 


Woodcote 




173 


Tusmore 


" 


" 


61 


Woodstock - 


_ 


209 


W. 








Wootton - - 


- 


231 








Worton Nether 


- 


151 


Warborough - 


- 


- 


118 


Worton Over - 


- 


152 


Wardington - 


- 


- 


136 


Wroxton 


- 


153 


Warpsgrove, now 


Upsgrove 


27 








Water Eaton - 


- 


- 


218 








Waterpery 


- 


- 


120 


Y. 






Waterstock - 


- 


- 


119 






Watlingtou - 


- 


- 


24 


Yarnton 


- 


232 


Wendlebury - 


- 


- 


62 


Yelford - 


- 


205 



OXFORD : PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTON. 



THE 



ECCLESIASTICAL 



AND 



ARCHITECTUEAL TOPOGEAPHY 



op 



ENGLAND. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OP THE 



^uftacologual Jnstitute of Great 23ritam anil Julanli. 



PART II. 
BERKSHIRE. 



OXFORD AND LONDON, 

JOHN HENRY PARKER. 

MDCCCXLIX. 



OXFORD : 
PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTON. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

The First Part of this work, containing Bedfordshire, 
was published a few months since : it is found impractic- 
able to fix any regidar periodical time for the publication of 
the successive Parts, in consequence of the great difficulty 
of obtaining accurate notices of every church, on which the 
value of the work for future reference mainly depends. 
Each Part contains one county complete in itself, though 
forming part of a whole. It is intended to publish the 
succeeding Parts at the rate of four in the year, and as 
nearly quarterly as possible. The notes for Buckingham- 
shire are prepared, and those of several other counties are 
in a forward state. In order to explain the meaning of the 
technical terms made use of to distinguish the work of 
particular periods in the most concise manner, the Chrono- 
logical Table of Mr. Rickman is repeated with each county, 
for the use of those persons who are not familiar with his 
system. The Architectural Notes of Berkshire have been 
chiefly prepared by Mr. I. H. Parker, and have been sub- 
mitted to the Archdeacon and to several other parties for 
correction. 

The initials of those who have contributed to the work 
are appended to the articles for which each is responsible : 

E. B. — The Ven. Archdeacon Berens. 

B. F. — Benjamin Ferrey, Esq. 

S. R. G.— Sir Stephen R. Gljnne, Bart. 

A. N. — Alexander Nisbet, Esq. 

I. H. P.— Mr. I. H. Parker. 

I. E. R.— Rev. I. E. Robinson. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Those marked R. are mentioned by Ricknian, and his notes of them are 
printed entire. 



No. . 

Deanery op Abingdon. 

1 Abingdon, St Helen. . R. 
2 St Nicholas. R. 

2 Abbey R. 



3 Drayton. 

4 Appleton. 

4 Manor House. 

5 Tubney. 

6 Ardington. 

7 Ashbury. 

8 Aston Tirrold. 

9 Besselsleigh. 

10 Blewbury. 

11 Aston Upthorpe. 

12 Upton. 

13 BUCKLAND. 

14 Buscott 

15 Childrey. 

16 Chilton. 

17 Coleshill. 

18 CUMNOR. 

19 Compton Beauchamp. 

20 Coxwell, Great. 

20 Barn. 

21 Denchworth. 

22 Didcot 

23 Eaton Hastings. 

24 Fyfield. 

24 Manor House. 

25 Fawley, Great 

26 Faringdon. 

26 Radcott Bridge. 

27 Coxwell, Little. 

28 Littleworth. 

29 Hagboum. 

30 Hanney. 



No. 

31 Lyford. 

32 Harwell. 

33 Hatford. 

34 Hendred, East. 

34 Chapels. 

35 Hinksey, North, or Ferry. 

36 Hinksey, South. 

37 Wootton. 

38 Hendred, West 

39 Hinton Walridge. 

40 Kingston Bagpuze. 

40 New Bridge. 

41 Letcombe Basset 

42 Regis. 

42 CasUe. 

43 Challow, East 

44 West 

45 Lockinge. 

46 Longworth. 

47 Charney. 

47 . Manor House. 

48 Marcham. 

49 Garford. 

50 Milton. 

51 MoRETON, North. 

52 South. 

53 Pusey. 

54 Radley. 

55 Shillingford. 

55 Manor House. 

56 Shrivenham. 

57 Longcot 

58 Sparsholt. 

59 Kingston Lisle. 

60 Stanford-in-the-Vale. 

61 Goosey. 



CONTENTS. 



No. 




No. 




62 Steventon. 




102 Reading, Holy Trinity. 




63 Streatly. 




103 St. John. 




64 Sunningwell. 




103 Abbey 


R. 


65 Kennington. 




103 Friary Church. 




66 Sutton Courtney. 




104 Remenham. 




66 Manor House. 




105 Ruscombe. 




67 Appleford. 




106 Sandhurst. 




68 Uffington. . . . 


. R. 


107 Shinfield. 




69 Woolstone. 




108 Swallowfield. 




70 Baulking. 




I^"" 109 Shottesbrooke. . . . 


R. 


71 Wantage. .... 


. R. 


110 White Waltham. . . . 


R. 


72 Grove. 




Ill Stratfield Mortimer. 




73 WlTTENHAM,EARL'SOr 


Long. 


112 Sulham. 




74 Abbott's or 


Little. 


113 Sulhamstead Abbas. 




75 Wytham. 




!^^ 114 Bannister. 

115 Sunning, St. Andrew. 




Deanery of Reading. 




116 Sunning, Holy Trinity. 

117 Sunninghill. 




76 Aldermaston. 




118 Sunningdale. 




77 Arborfield. 




119 Theale. 




78 Bear-wood. 




120 Tidmarsh. 




79 Barkham. 




121 Tilehurst. 




80 Beenham. 




122 Ufton Nervet. 




81 Binfield. 




123 Waltham 


R. 


82 Bisham. 




^"^ 124 Warfield. 




82 Priory. 




125 Wargrave. 




83 Bradfield. 




126 Knoll Hill. 




84 Bray 


. R. 


127 Windsor, Old 


R. 






TOO TTnlv Trinitv 








85 Burghfield. 




^P 129 St. George's Chapel 


. R. 


86 Clewer. 


. R. 


130 New. 

130 Castle. 




87 Cookham. 






88 Cookham Dean. 




131 Winkfield. 




89 Hampstead, East. 




132 Wokingham. 




90 Englefield. 




133 Woolhampton. 




91 Finchampstead. 








92 Hurley. 








92 Priory. 




Deanery of Newbury. 




93 Hurst. 




I^"' 134 Aldworth. 




94 Maidenhead. 




^f" 135 Avington 


R. 


95 Padworth. 




1^=" 136 Beedon. 




96 Pangboume. 




137 Boxford. 




97 Purley. 




138 Bright Waltham. 




98 Reading, St, Mary. 




139 Brimpton. 




99 St. Laurence. 


. R. 


140 Bucklebury. 




100 St. Mary's Chapel. 


141 Marleston. 




101 St. Giles. 




142 Catmere. 





CONTENTS. 



No. 

143 Chaddleworth. 

144 Chieveley. 

145 Winterbourne. 

146 Oare. 

147 Leckhampstead. 

148 Compton. 

149 Garston, East 

150 Enbome. 

151 Famborough. 

152 Frilsham. 

153 Hampstead Marshall. 

154 Norris. 

155 Langley. 

156 Hermitage. 

157 Hungerford. 

158 Ilsley, East 

159 Ilsley, West 

160 Inkpen. 

161 Kintbury. 

162 Lambourne. 

163 Woodlands. 

164 Newbury. 

165 Peasemore. 

166 Shalboume. 

167 Shaw. 

167 Donnington Castle. 

168 Shefford (Great or West). 



No. 

169 ShefTord (Little or East) 

169 Manor House. 

170 Speen. 

171 Speenhamland. 

172 Stock Cross. 

173 Stanford Dingley. 

174 Thatcham. 

175 Greenham. 

176 Midgham. 

177 Wasing. 

178 Welford R. 

179 Wickham. R. 

180 Yattendon. 

181 Woodhaye, West 

Deanery of Wallinoford. 

182 Basilden. 

183 Ashampstead. 

184 BrightwelL 

185 Cholsey. 

186 Moulsford. 

187 Wallir.gford, St Mary. 

188 St Peter. 

189 St. Leonard. 

189 Manor House. 

189 Castle. 

190 Sotwell. 



CHEONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



PoR the use of the student a table is subjoined, shewing the 
duration of the styles of English architecture, and the kings reigning 
in each period. 



Kings. Date. 

William 1 1066>| 

William II 1087 | 

Henry 1 1100 V 

Stephen 1135 I 

Henry II 1154 to 1189 J 

HichajbdI." 1189 ^ 

John 1199r 

Henry m 1216( 

Edward I." 1272 to 1307) 



Style. 

Norman. 

[or English 

Romanesque.] 

Early 

English. 

[or 1st Pointed.] 



Remarks. 

r Prevailed little more than 
124 years ; no remains 
really known to be more 

I than a few years older than 

'^the Conquest. 



\ 



Decorated 

-r. -r-r-r -,o^«j ■^<^rfr,? ENGLISH. 

Edward IIL^. .1327 to 1377 \ ^^, ^^^ p^^^,^^ ^ 



Edward n 1307) 



Richard II 1377^ 

Henry rV 1399 

Henry V 1413" 

Henry YI 1422 Perpendicu- 

Edward IV 1461 y LAR English. 

Edward V 1483 [or 3rd Pointed.] 

Richard III 1483 

Henry VII 1485 

Henry VIII... .1509 to 1546 J 



Prevailed about 118 years. 



Continued perhaps 10 or 
15 years later. Prevailed 
. little more than 70 years. 

Prevailed about 169 years. 

Few, if any, whole build- 
ings executed in this style 
J later than Henry VIII. 

This style used in addi- 
tions and rebuilding, but 
often much debased, as late 
Las 1630 or 1640. 



a [The reign of Richard I. was the chief 
period of the Transition from the Norman to 
the Early English style. The change began 
perhaps a little earlier in a few instances, and 
continued a little later, some buildings of the 
time of King John being of Transition cha- 
racter. 

»> The Transition from the Early English to 
the Decorated style took place chiefly in the 
reign of Edward I. The Eleanor crosses belong 
rather to the latter than the former style. 

In the latter part of the long reign of 
Edward III. the Transition from the Deco- 
rated to the Perpendicular style began, and 
was almost completed by the time of the acces- 



sion of Richard II. Some buildings of the 
Decorated style may be found of his reign, but 
the works of William of Wykeham, West- 
minster Hall, and many other buildings of this 
period, are of very decided Perpendicular cha- 
racter. Perhaps one of the earliest and best 
authenticated examples of this Transition, 
shewing a curious mixture of the two styles, 
is Edington church in Wiltshire, founded by 
bishop William of Edington in 1352, and con- 
secrated in 1361. The same bishop, who died 
in 1366, commenced the alteration of Win- 
chester cathedral into the Perpendicular style, 
which was continued by William of Wykeham.] 



INTEODUCTION TO BEKKSHIRE. 



Berkshire is not one of the counties celebrated for fine 
churches, and it may perhaps be said, that the generality 
are poor and small. Nevertheless, it contains some very 
fine examples of each of the styles, as Lambourne, for 
Norman, Uffington for Early English, Shottesbrooke for 
Decorated, and St. George's chapel, Windsor, for Perpen- 
dicular. The smaller churches are frequently very interest- 
ing, there are a great number of the period between the 
middle of the twelfth, and the middle of the thirteenth 
century. 

Good building stone is scarce in this county, and many 
of the churches are built principally of flint and chalk, 
especially in the more remote parts of the downs, and there 
are numerous brick towers, chiefly of the last century, but 
some earher, and one at Letcombe Basset has stone dress- 
ings of the thirteenth century. A great part of the churches 
in the neighbourhood of Reading and Windsor have been 
either rebuilt or modernized. 

The chm-ches most worthy of notice in the Norman style 
are Avington, the central tower and some other parts of 
Lambourne, and the west part of Henley, the apse of Finch- 
hampstead ; the small churches of Padworth and Remenham 
also have the round east end or apse. Catmere is another 
good small chiu^ch of this style. 

The best Early English churches are Uffington, a very 
fine cruciform church, with a central tower, and some very 

b 



INTRODUCTION TO BERKSHIRE. 

unusual features, raringdon, Buckland, Ardington, and 
the chancel of Cholsey. The best small churches or 
chapels of this style are Lyford, Goosey, Baulking and 
Tidmarsh. The chancel at Baulking, with its stone screen, 
or small chancel-arch with large squints on each side, and 
the hexagonal apse at Tidmarsh, are very remarkable and 
uncommon features. There is a singular doorway of this 
style, with a trefoil head, at Stanford Dingley, and an oval 
window in the same church. 

In the Decorated style, Shottesbrooke is a well known 
and very perfect example, it is cruciform, without aisles, and 
with a central tower and spire. Mr. Rickman calls it a minia- 
ture cathedral. Sparsholt, with its timber roof, and wooden 
screens, of this style, is an unusually good specimen. The 
chancel of Warfield, and the ruins of the church of the 
Friary at Reading also deserve notice. 

Good Perpendicular churches are not common; St.Helen's, 
Abingdon, is perhaps the best parish church of this style, 
but St. George's chapel, Windsor, may well make amends 
for the want of other examples. 

The mixed churches are, as usual, far more numerous, 
and some of these are worthy of attention. The prin- 
cipal examples are, Ashbury, Blewbury, Childrey, Cumnor, 
Hagbourn, Hanney, Hanwell, East and West Hendred, 
North Moreton, Stanford-in-the-Vale, Steventon, Sutton 
Courtney, Wantage, Long Wittenham, Beedon, and Lam- 
bourne. 

Spires are not a common feature in Berkshire, there are 
only six that deserve the name ; these are Welford, with its 
round tower of Early English work, of very elegant and 
beautiful design, Shottesbrooke, which is Decorated, and 
St. Helen's, Abingdon, which is Perpendicular on an Early 
English tower : Sparsholt and Warfield are of wood : 
White Waltham also has a small wooden spire. 



INTRODUCTION TO BERKSHIRE. 

Of towers, Wickham has been described by Mr. Rickman 
as of the supposed Saxon character, Lamboume has been 
already mentioned as Norman, Cumnor is a good Early 
English tower. North Hinksey is very plain and rude, but 
with its pyramidal roof it has a good and pleasing effect. 
Chieveley has a remarkable Decorated tower, the angles of 
the belfry story being chamfered off in a very unusual man- 
ner, and with good ornamented chamfer terminations. 

There are original Decorated vestries at Stanford-in-the- 
Vale, and Sparsholt. 

The stone bell-cots are not very good, there are speci- 
mens at Besselsleigh, Great and Little Coxwell, East 
and West Challow. Many of the smaller churches have 
wooden bell-cots, and some of these appear to be origi- 
nal, or at least if the upper part has been renewed, 
they stand on the original frame-work of early character. 
There are examples at Lyford, Didcot, Enborne, Stanford 
Dingley, and Ashampstead. 

There is a plain stone pulpit at Childrey, and a good 
Perpendicular wooden one at Hagboum. 

The recesses for altars on the east side of the transepts 
at Uffington are probably of unique character, the very 
good Early English porches of the same church should 
also be noticed. 

The ambry or locker at Drayton, still retaining its wooden 
doors and Early English iron work, is a rare example. 
There are good Early English piscinas at Baulking, South 
Moreton, White Waltham, Hampstead Norris, and Uffington: 
Decorated at Cumnor, Harwell, North Moreton, and Spars- 
holt ; that at North Moreton is of a plan which is not very 
common, being placed at the angle formed by the eastern 
jamb of the south-east window ; it has a shaft running up 
the edge, with a small arch from it towards the window, and 
another towards the altar. Some piscinas of similar design 



INTRODUCTION TO BERKSHIRE. 

were noticed in Bedfordshire, and have been called angle 
piscinas, they are very elegant, and not common. There 
is a fine example at Cheltenham. 

The fonts are generally of early character, and there are 
some very good specimens. The Norman fonts are Eaton 
Hastings, Letcombe Regis, Appleford, Finchampstead, 
Parley, Sulhamstead Abbas, Great ShefFord, and Welford. 
Clewer is of lead. There are good Early English fonts at 
Hatford, Wantage, and Englefield ; and at Long Witten- 
ham, Childrey, and Woolhampton of lead. Woolhampton 
is a curious example, being of lead and stone, that is, the 
lead in the space under the arches of the small arcade is 
cut away, and the stone appears. There are good Decorated 
fonts at Ardington and Buckland. The Perpendicular fonts 
which seem best worthy of notice are Compton Beauchamp, 
Denchworth, Hagbourn, Hurley, Steventon, Chieveley, St. 
Laurence, and St. Mary's, Beading. 

The remains of painted glass are not considerable, but 
there are portions of good glass of the fourteenth century 
at Hagbourn, North Moreton, Long Wittenham, Bright- 
well, and Basilden ; and of the fifteenth at Letcombe Regis, 
Shillingford, Sutton Courtney, OckwelFs house, and St. 
George's chapel, Windsor. 

The wood-work will not bear comparison with that of 
the eastern or the western counties, but there are por- 
tions worthy of attention. The roofs at Little Cox well 
and Sparsholt and the screen at Sparsholt are of the 
fourteenth century. There is only one rood-loft remaining 
in the county, which is at Drayton, of the fifteenth cen- 
tury, but there are several good screens of that period, 
as at Fyfield, Little Cox well, Hagbourn, Harwell, Sunning, 
and Warfield. The wooden porches at Blewbury, Pang- 
bourne, and Yattenden are worthy of notice. The stall- 
desks at Cumnor are good with very singular poppies. 



INTRODUCTION TO BERKSHIRE. 

There are many old open benches, but generally of plain 
character. 

There are a number of good tombs, some of the most 
remarkable may be mentioned. One of the thirteenth cen- 
tury, at Didcot, and two of the fourteenth at Cumnor, are 
said by tradition to be of abbots of Abingdon, this is pro- 
bably true at Cumnor, which belonged to the abbey, and the 
abbots had a rectorial manor-house or grange there, but 
Didcot did not belong to the abbey, the figure has a mitre 
and a pastoral staff, which may apply either to a bishop or 
a mitred abbot. Of the fourteenth century there are also 
some slabs with floriated crosses at North Moreton, and 
eflSgies at Hatford, Wantage, and Sunning. At Sparsholt 
there are good effigies of wood under sepulchral recesses of 
this period. The series of tombs of the De la Beche family 
with their canopies, at Aldworth, is probably the finest in 
the kingdom in a mere parish church. Of the fifteenth 
century, there are fine tombs at Fyfield, and Englefield, and 
in St. George's chapel, Windsor. 

The brasses are numerous, the principal are at Blew- 
bury, Hanney, Stanford-in-the-Vale, Stanford Dingley, 
Streatly, Little Wittenham, Bray, St. Laurence's, Reading, 
Sunning, and Lambourne. 

The domestic edifices of the middle ages remaining in 
Berkshire are more numerous than usual in other counties. 
At Appleton and at Sutton Courtney there are doorways 
of the end of the twelfth century, and in both instance the 
walls of the houses appear to be chiefly of the same period, 
they are both rather small manor-houses, and neither of 
them appears to have been an ecclesiastical building. Of the 
thirteenth century, there is a small portion of the domestic 
buildings of Abingdon abbey, with a good fireplace and 
chimney, and the abbot's house or grange at Charney is so 
far perfect that the original plan may be distinctly traced 



INTRODUCTION TO BERKSHIRE, 

and the two wings are nearly entire, though a modern house 
has been built on the site of the old hall between them. 
Radcott Bridge and New Bridge appear also to belong to 
this period, they are interesting structures and tolerably per- 
fect. Of the fourteenth century, the rectorial manor-house 
at Sutton Courtney is nearly entire, and the hall with its 
fine timber roof and low side window, is very valuable. At 
Hurley, and at Bisham, there are some remains of priories 
of this period : the barn at Great Coxwell is a remark- 
ably fine specimen of the structures of this class, and 
superior to many of our modern churches : the room over 
the porch with a chimney of this period at Lambourne 
should perhaps be mentioned, as an instance of those habi- 
tations attached to churches concerning which considerable 
interest is felt. Of the fifteenth century are, the gate-house 
of Donnington castle, the manor-house at Little Sheff'ord, 
Ockwell's house, a house at Wallingford, the manor-house 
at Ey field, some portions of the remains of Abingdon abbey 
and of Hurley priory, a monastic chapel and a domestic 
chapel at East Hendred, and a portion of Shillingford 
castle, with some good chimneys. 



BOOKS EELATING TO THE ARCHITECTUEAL 
TOPOGRAPHY OP BERKSHIRE. 



Ashmole's Antiquities of Berkrhire, with Appendix of the 
Pedigrees of the most remarkable Families in the County, and a 
particular account of Windsor. 3 vols. 8vo. 1719. 

Magna Britannia, being a concise Topographical Account of the 
several Counties of Britain. New edition, edited by the Rev. D. 
Lysons and S. Lysons, Esq. Vol. I. Part 2. Berkshire. 4 to. 1813. 

The Beauties of England and Wales, or Delineations Topogra- 
phical and Descriptive of Berkshire. By S. Britton and E. W. 
Brayley, Esqrs. 8vo. 1801. 

The Journey Book of England. Part I. Berkshire. Including a 
full description of Windsor Castle. With 23 engravings on wood. 
Crown 8vo. 1840. 

A Topographical and Statistical Description of the County 
OF Berks. By G. A. Cooke. 1815. 

Berry's Pedigrees of the Families in Berkshire, Buckingham- 
shire, AND Surrey. Folio. 1837. 

Collections towards a Parochial History of Berkshire. By 
Edward Howe Mores. 4to. 1783. 

A Compendium of the Ancient and Present State of Berk- 
shire. By S. Tymms. Forming Vol. 4. of the Family Topographer. 
8vo. 1837. 

Clarke's (W. N.) Parochial Topography of the Hundred of 
Wanting (Wantage), with other Records relating to the County 
of Berks. 4to. 1824. 

Hewitt's (William) History and Antiquities of the Hundred 
OF Compton, Berks. Being an account of the Parishes of Aldworth, 
Compton, East and West Ilsley, Chilton, Catmere, and Farnborough. 
With plates and maps. 8vo. 1844. 



ARCHITECTURAL BOOKS RELATING TO BERKSHIRE. 

The History of Faringdon, and the Neighbouring Towns and 
Seats in Berkshire. 8vo. 1798. 

An Account of the Parish of Great Coxwell, Berks. By 
Edward Ro we Mores. 4to. 1783. 

The History and Antiquities of Newbury, and its Environs, 
published in Numbers at Speenhamland. 8vo. 1842. 



WINDSOR. 

Pote*s (Joseph) History and Antiquities of Windsor Castle, 
AND the Royal College and Chapel of St. George. 4to. 1749. 

Nash's Views of the Interior and Exterior of St. George's 
Chapel, Windsor, with an Historical and Descriptive Account. 
Folio. 1805. 

Hakewill's (James) History of Windsor and its Neighbour- 
hood. 4to. 1813. 

Illustrations of Windsor Castle, by Sir Jeffry Wyatville, R.A. 
F.R.S., with an Historical Essay by Ambrose Poynter, Esq. 2 vols, 
imperial folio, with 40 plates and numerous woodcuts. 1840-1. 

Architectural Illustrations of Windsor Castle. By Michael 
Gandy and Benjamin Baud, Architects. With a concise Historical 
and Architectural account of that edifice, by John Britton, Esq., 
F.S.A. 42 plates, royal folio. 1842. 

An Account of the Restoration of the Collegiate Chapel of 
St. George, Windsor, with some particulars of the Heraldic Orna- 
ments of that edifice, by Thomas Willement, F.S.A. 4to. 1844. 



READING. 

CoATEs' (Rev. C.) History and Antiquities of Reading, with a 
Supplement. 2 vols, royal 4to. 1802-10. 

The Ancient and Modern History and Antiquities of the 
Borough of Reading. By John Man. 4to. 1816. 

The Environs of Reading. 2 Parts. 8vo. 



BERKSHIRE, 



Beanerp of gCbmglron. 

1 .^* Abingdon, SL Helen. A large church, part of which 
has five divisions, or what is called in foreign churches five 
naves, that is, an additional aisle on each side ; it is mostly 
P. RiCKMAN. The tower is E. E., with a good doorway at 
the west end of the south aisle ; the spire is octagonal, P. 
The nave has a plaster ceiling with wooden ribs of P. work, 
the portion over the altar platform having an ornamental 
pattern upon it : the north aisle has a rich timber ceiling, 
this was probably our Lady's aisle, which was ceiled at the 
expense of Nicholas Gould, one of the fraternity of the Holy 
Cross, and his wife Amy, in the reign of Henry VI. The 
second north aisle has good two-light P. windows ; the two 
end windows are fine large P., with niches. The south aisles 
are rather later, but of the same character ; one was built in 
1539 for the use of a guild. The porch is P., with good 
doorway and niches. In this church are the brass of Geffrey 
Barbour, 1417, a great benefactor to the town, removed 
from the abbey after the dissolution ; and a high tomb to 
John Royse, founder of the grammar school, 1571. i.h.p. 

2. Abingdon, St. Nicholas. This small church has a 
good doorway of late N. character, but much mutilated, 
the rest of the church mostly P. rickman. Attached to 
the north side of the tower is a singular square stair-turret 
of larger dimensions than usual, with a gabled roof and 
a small triangular window in the gable. An open timber 

B 



BERKSHIRE, 

roof, of good character, has lately been put on the chan- 
cel. I.H.P. 

Abingdon abbey gate-house, though much mutilated, has 
a sufficient portion remaining to deserve examination ; it is 
of P. date, and good composition, r. There are a few- 
other remains of the abbey, among which are an E. E. fire- 
place, and chimney of good character, also another portion 
of P. work, with some good tall chimneys, i.h.p. 

A view of St. Nicholas church and the abbey gate is given in Britton's 
Architectural Antiquities, vol. i. ; one of the abbey fire-place, &c., in Lysons, 
and an engraving of an E. E. chimney in the Glossary of Architecture. 

3. Drayton, St. Peter. A church of mixed styles, with 
P. tower, and E. E. chancel; E. E. south chapel, and P. 
north aisle. The chancel has N. walls, and small N. win- 
dows on the north side, these are square-headed loops, 
widely splayed; at the east end is a good triplet, under 
one arch, with bold mouldings. The south chapel has a 
very good double E. E. piscina, a trefoil-headed locker, and 
iron-work on the door of the same date. The rood-loft, 
with its groining and painting, is nearly perfect on both 
sides, but has a modern front and is used as a gallery. 
There is an E. E. piscina in the aisle, and a good P. stair- 
turret on the south side of the tower. The font is plain, 
round : the poor's-box is Elizabethan, a double one, stand- 
ing on a plain post. There are the remains of a reredos 
of very beautiful sculpture in alabaster, with the painting 
and gilding nearly perfect, which were dug up in the 
chancel a few years since, and are now kept in the parish 
chest ; they consist of five groups relating to the history of 
Christ. I.H.P. 

The locker is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture, and the poor's-box 
in Barr's Anglican Church Architecture. 

4. Appleton, St. Laurence. This church is divided 
into two equal parts by a row of arches, pointed. Transition 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

N., with good sculptured capitals. The tower and other 
parts are late P. The porch has an original stone roof, 
and a stoup. There is a small brass of a skeleton in a 
shroud, to John Goodryngton, 1518, and a fine Elizabethan 
tomb to Sir John Fettiplace, 1593. i.h.p. 

Near the church are the remains of a N. manor-house, 
with a good Transition N. doorway : it is moated and 
there are two other moated houses within a quarter of a 
mile of each other, i.h.p. 

A pUlar from the church is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture, and 
the doorway of the manor-house in Lysons. 

5. TuBNET, St. Laurence. Modern, the old church 
having been long destroyed, the present one was built in 
1846, in a more convenient situation. The architect was 
Mr. A. W. Pugin. 

6. ^"Ardington, Holy Trinity. Chancel with side 
chapels, nave with a south aisle, tower on the north side. 
The chancel has E. E. walls, and the original windows on 
the south side, but the east and north windows are P. in- 
sertions : there is an E. E. piscina, and a bracket with 
foliage ; the chancel-arch is fine E. E. The south chapel 
is plain, with a good squint blocked up by a modern tomb ; 
the north chapel has been rebuilt, but an E. E. piscina, 
and a squint with trefoiled arches, and the reredos of an 
altar with good panels are original. The nave has three 
good E. E. arches on the south side, with a curious little 
Transition N. piscina in the eastern pier ; the roof is D., 
but partly modern restoration. The font is D., octagonal, 
quite plain, excepting a row of fine ball-flowers round the 
stem: the seats are modern, but open and good. The 
north doorway is fine E. E. round-headed, with a porch of 
the same style, having a trefoiled outer arch. The south 
doorway is good D., with the ball-flower and foliage on 
the mouldings, i.h.p. 



BERKSHIRE, 

7. AsHBURY, St. Mary. A large churcli, consisting of 
chancel, nave, aisles, transepts, and west tower. The 
chancel is D., with good side windows of two-lights, a 
plain east window, and a piscina with a trefoiled arch : 
the roof and chancel-arch are modern. The nave is P., 
with four arches on each side, having clustered pillars and 
moulded caps ; the roof is P., the timbers well moulded, but 
the upper part plastered over. The transepts are both D. 
The north aisle has D. windows inserted in earlier walls, 
and there are remains of a N. respond at the west end of 
this and the opposite row of P. arches. The south aisle 
has P. windows, and a good N. doorway, with rich zig-zag 
and other ornament : there is a remarkable squint, filled 
with D. tracery, between the south transept and the south 
aisle. The north porch is P., with a good fan-tracery 
vault, and a fine boss in the centre ; it has a room over it. 
The tower is E. E. There is an early massive oak chest, 
quite plain, and in the chancel a good brass to a priest, 
1448 ; a smaller one of a demi-figure, and an inscription. 
The font is good P., octagonal, panelled. In 1794 a pair of 
ancient pricket altar candlesticks were found in the old 
chest ; they are of mixed metal, ornamented with gilding 
and enamel, i.h.p. 

An engraving of one of the candlesticks is given in the Archseologia, 
vol. XV. pi. 37. p. 40. 

8. Aston Tirrold, St. Michael. A small chapel, con- 
sisting of nave and chancel, the doorway of the nave has 
a plain circular arch, and a P. wooden porch. The east 
window is square-headed, P. a.n. 

9. Besselsleigh, St. Laurence. A small long church 
without aisles. The chancel is divided from the nave by a 
wooden screen of the time of James I. ; the chancel-arch being 
destroyed. The east and west windows are early D., each 
of three fights, with trefoil heads, without tracery, but the 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

east window has an elegant inner arch of a cinquefoil form. 
The sedilia are formed in the sill of the south-east window; 
there is a small N. piscina under a D. recess, with a tre- 
foiled arch ; the rood stair-turret remains on the north 
side. The side walls are remarkably low, with square- 
headed P. windows ; there is a bell-gable for two bells 
at the west end. The doorway is plain, and the door has 
some D. iron- work upon it; there is a timber porch of 
fair Jacobean character, i.h.p. 

10. i^° Blewbury, St. Michael. Chancel, with south 
aisle; nave, with aisles ; north and south porches, and west 
tower. The chancel, with its south aisle, is Transition N., 
vaulted, some of the original windows remain, and a small 
round opening in the east gable ; there are several good 
D. insertions. The arches and vault which supported the 
central tower also remain, the original Transition N. tower 
having been destroyed ; there is a squint on each side of 
the chancel-arch, the south one good P., with foHated 
head ; that on the north side is square, probably original. 
The panelled P. wooden door to the rood-loft stairs re- 
mains. The south aisle is Transition N., and separated 
from the nave by five arches of the same date, the two 
western ones being different from the others. The arches 
on the north side are D., the north aisle has Transition N. 
walls, but the windows are all D. There are two wooden 
chests, one plain E. E., the other apparently D., with good 
iron straps and locks. The north and south porches are of 
carved open timber, the south door has fine E. E. iron-work. 
The font is octagonal, P. panelled. There are eight ancient 
brasses, and a slab with an effigy of D. work almost effaced; 
and in the church-yard a tomb, with two effigies almost de- 
stroyed. The present tower is at the west end, and is P., 
with pinnacles and an open parapet, i.h.p. 

11. AsTON Upthorpe, ^// /S(3'^V^^5. Tower P. The south 



BERKSHIRE, 



door of the nave plain N.; there is a south transept, which, 
with the nave and chancel, are principally D.; in the chancel 
is an E. E. low side window, and a priest's door. The east 
window has two lights, with a circle over them, and is round- 
headed. The font is rude massive N., the pulpit late P. a.n. 

12. Upton, jSL Mary. A small N. chapel of early 
character, the walls thick, with small loop windows. The 
chancel-arch small, plain, round, with flat soffit, the imposts 
have the star ornament. The font is plain, round. The door- 
way round-headed, with zig-zag moulding, partly covered 
by a modern square door ; one of the windows also has 
the zig-zag ornament on the exterior, i.h.p. 

13. 0"BucKLAND, St. Mary. A fine cruciform church, 
mostly E. E., with a tower at the intersection. The chan- 
cel is E. E., with sedilia and piscina, having trefoiled heads 
richly moulded, very perfect ; in the south wall is a good 
sepulchral recess, and on the north side another; the 
roof is early P. The tower-arches are fine E. E. The end 
window of the south transept is of three lights, with a flat 
four-centred arch, but good E. E. work. The walls of the 
nave and the north and south doorways are N. The font is 
good D. The tracery has been cut out of nearly all the 
windows. The roofs of the transepts are of plain open tim- 
ber of good early character. One of the doors has the origi- 
nal iron-work. The tower is low and massive, with two 
lancet windows in each face, and a P. battlement. In the 
north transept, which is the burying place of the Throck- 
morton family, is a good Elizabethan brass, 1578. A small 
parish library is attached to the church, i.h.p. 

14. BuscoTT, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, west tower. 
The chancel is good E. E. ; the windows all lancets, and 
the east window a single lancet ; the side windows have 
foliated arches ; within these are two piscinas on the south 
side both E. E., one on each side of the window, the sill of 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

which serves for the sedilia. The chancel-arch is goqd 
Transition N., with two shafts on each side having foHated 
caps, the arch is ornamented with zig-zag moulding. The 
nave has one lancet window, the others are P. The tower 
is P., with a good arch ; the south doorway and porch are 
of the same date, i.h.p. 

15. ^" Childrey, SL Mary, A cruciform church of 
mixed styles with a P. tower at the west end. The chancel 
has D. sedilia and side windows, but the east window is a 
P. insertion : on the north side is a small P. recess, with a 
rich canopy, probably the Easter sepulchre. In the north 
transept is the effigy of a cross-legged knight, (14th cen- 
tury,) under a richly ornamented ogee arch ; a singular pis- 
cina, and a squint to the high altar. By the side of the 
south transept is a curious small stone pulpit projecting 
from the wall, with the entrance behind. The south doorway 
is E. E., with good tooth moulding. The font is remark- 
able, having a cii'cular base of stone, the upper part lead, 
with twelve small figures of bishops with mitres, a crozier 
in one hand, and a book in the other ; it seems to be E. E. 
and all of one date. Some old painted glass, brasses and 
tiles, remain, i.h.p. 

The font is engraved in Lysons. One of the brasses, William Fyndem, 
1444, is engraved in Waller's Brasses. In Relton's Sketches of Churches there 
are engravings of the south-east view of this church, a monument and three 
brasses. 

16. Chilton, All Saints. Chancel, nave, west tower. 
The chancel windows are D., with a Transition D. east 
window, they are probably insertions in an earlier wall 
which seems N. ; the chancel-arch is plain Transition N. ; 
the doorways and nave-arches are also of the same charac- 
ter. The font is plain octagonal. The tower is modern, 
bad, with an open battlement, i.h.p. 

17. CoLESHiLL, All Saints, Chancel, nave, aisles, west 



BERKSHIRE, 

tower. The chancel is modern m the D. style. The north 
side of the nave has two E. E. arches, recessed and cham- 
fered, on round pillars with moulded caps, and a trefoil- 
headed piscina in the east respond ; on the south side, the 
arches are Transition N. The tower is good P., with para- 
pet and pinnacles. The font is plain, round, E. E. ; there 
is a good hour-glass stand quite perfect in its original posi- 
tion near the pulpit. Near the church the shaft and 
steps of the village cross remain, i.e. p. 

18. g^ CuMNOR, St. Michael. Of mixed styles, consist- 
ing of chancel, nave, north aisle, south chapel, and west tower. 
The walls are Transition N. with various insertions of later 
date. The tower is almost E. E., but has a round-headed 
west doorway, and the tower-arch is a fine example of late 
Transition, with E.E. mouldings, but N. capitals to the shafts. 
The chancel has D. windows inserted on the south side, and 
the east window is good D., of three lights, with flowing 
tracery ; one of the original late N. windows remains on the 
north side, and has the billet ornament in the moulding round 
the inner edge ; the chancel-arch is Transition N. supported 
on two fine corbels with good E. E. foliage ; in the chancel 
are some good wooden stall-desks, with poppies, one of 
them ornamented with the emblems of the crucifixion; 
and a fine EHzabethan monument with brasses to Anthony 
Eorster. In the south chapel are two sepulchral recesses 
with pointed arches, under which are tombs with crosses 
flory, said to have been of abbots of Abingdon : it has 
two good D. windows, and a D. piscina, and two bracket 
heads for lights, on each side of the east window, under 
which has been an altar. The nave has three E. E. arches 
on the north side, one pier round, the other octagonal, with 
moulded capitals ; on the south side of the nave is part of 
a N. corbel-table remaining in its original position, with the 
clerestory added above it. The north aisle has D. windows, 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

and the doorway has good mouldings of that style ; at the 
east end is an elegant piscina, with tracery in its arch, and 
there are some good open seats with poppies. The roofs of 
the nave and aisles are P. of plain open timber, supported 
on N. corbels, i.h.p. 

There is a view of this church engraved by G. Hollis, in the Gent. Mag. 
for Dec. 1821. AD. piscina is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 

Cumnor hall, of which there is an engraving in Lysons, has since been de- 
stroyed, and the materials used in rebuilding Wytham church : there is also 
an engraving of the windows, doorway, &c., in the Gent. Mag. for Sept. 1821. 

19. CoMPTON Beauchamp, St. Swit/iin. A cruciform 
church, with tower at the west end. The chancel is D., the 
east window of three lights, with flowing tracery, and some 
original painted glass in the head ; two of the side windows 
are D., there is one small lancet on the north side, and on 
the south a low side window, with a good iron stancheon ; 
there is a pillar piscina with a square basin, having good 

D. mouldings to the cap and base. The transept-arches 
are small plain D., the north transept is of the same date, 
the south transept is modernized. The nave is P., with 
plain north and south doorw^ays, the tower-arch is small 

E. E., the tower small, square, with a pyramidal roof. 
The font is good P., octagonal, panelled : there are several 
good tiles in the chancel, i.h.p. 

20. Coxwell, Great, St. Giles. The chancel is E. E. ; 
the side windows, lancets, blocked up ; the east window of 
three lights with trefoiled heads, under an arch within 
forming a hood; under this window is a trefoil-headed 
recess, and on each side a niche ; there is a cinquefoiled 
piscina with a stone shelf, and round the walls of the chan- 
cel on each side is a stone bench, returned at the west 
end : the chancel-arch is small, with corbelled shafts, late 
E. E. On the north side of the nave is a very good D. 
two-light window, with a foliated hood within, the rest 
of the windows are D. and P. ; the doorway is D., with a 

c 



BERKSHIRE, 

good oak panelled door, the porch is of rude timber-work 
but early. The tower is square, plain P. with an early D. 
window built in : a plain good E. E. sanctus bell-cot over 
the chancel-arch is still in use : and there are two brasses, 
c. 1500, one to William JUtorgs, sutjim farmer of OTol^Bstodl. 
At some distance from the church is a good D. barn, 
with a large entrance on the western side, and a smaller 
one on the eastern. The work is very plain, the windows 
being merely slits with flat heads ; the doorways have a few 
characteristic mouldings : there are remains of crosses on 
the gables ; the roof is original, plain open timber carried 
partly upon two rows of wooden pillars, resting on stone 
plinths. i.H.p. 

21. Denchworth, SL James. Chancel, nave, north and 
south chapels, tower on north side. The chancel is P., in 
the centre stands the font, which is good P. with attached 
shafts ; the sedilia are formed in the sill of the south-east 
window ; the chancel-arch is late D., with moulded im- 
posts, and is much shaken by settlement. A chapel on 
the north side used as a vestry, has a good squint through 
a pier from a chapel beyond. The nave has P. windows, 
and a late roof; on the north side an E. E. arch with 
moulded caps opens into a small chapel ; on the south 
side is a D. arch to another chapel : the south doorway is 
good N. The tower is apparently E. E. at the base, the 
upper part poor P., the buttresses are plain E. E. There 
are several brasses to the Hyde family, and their arms occur 
in various parts of the church. There is the base of a cross 
in the church-yard, and another in the village, i.e. p. 

22. Did COT, All Saints. Chancel, nave, south aisle, 
wooden bell-cot at west end of the aisle. The north side of 
the chancel has two D. windows, the south two late P., the 
arch is destroyed, but the D. responds remain. The nave 
has three E. E. arches, early in the style on the south side, 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON 



opening into a D. aisle, with good windows, in which, un- 
der a sepulchral arch, is an effigy of a bishop or mitred 
abbot of the thirteenth century : this is conjectured to be 
the first of the mitred abbots of Abingdon, c. 1268. Over 
the chancel-arch are the arms of William and Mary, with 
some ornamental painting ; there is a small D. window of 
two lights in the east gable of the nave, above the screen. 
The font is plain, round, E. E. An old wooden chest, 
some tiles, and some painted glass remain, and at the west 
end of the south aisle is some wooden fi-ame-work to carry 
the bells, of early character, probably D. In the church- 
yard is the base of a cross, and a very fine yew-tree, i.h.p. 

23. Eaton Hastings, St. Michael. A small E. E. 
church, consisting of chancel, nave, and very small bell- 
cot upon the west gable. The chancel has a D. east win- 
dow, of three lights ; the side windows are single lancets, 
well splayed : the sedile is a stone bench, with an arch 
over it, carried on two short pillars, with very good E. E. 
caps resting on corbel-heads, in the east jamb of which is a 
trefoil-headed piscina splayed obliquely : the chancel-arch is 
good Transition N., with the star moulding on the imposts ; 
the roof is plain open timber. Tlie north side of the nave 
is N., and has small N. windows ; the south side is E. E., 
but has N. arches in the wall, which seem to indicate that 
an earlier aisle has been removed : the inner arches of the 
E. E. windows are foliated ; the west window is good D., 
the south doorway is E. E., with a trefoiled arch well 
moulded, and foliated within; on the south side of the 
nave is a trefoiled sepulchral recess. The font is massive 
N., octagonal, w^ith billet mouldings, it has a round plinth, 
but the stem seems to have been added. In the chancel 
are several tiles, some of which are blue and yellow, i.h.p. 

24. Fyfield, 8t. John Baptist. Chancel, nave with aisles, 
and west tower. The chancel is good, D., the east window 



BERKSHIRE, 

of four lights with flowing tracery ; the side windows of two 
lights D. ; the sedilia plain, but elegant, with a rich piscina 
also D. ; the east end has a rich P. cornice to the reredos, 
and a P. credence-table : on the north side is a fine P. 
tomb, with arch and canopy, with Tudor flowers, the old 
painting partly remaining : the cornice on both sides is 
filled with ball-flowers, but the roof is of modern plaster. 
On the north side of the nave is a P. aisle, with four arches 
on plain octagonal pillars, the eastern part of this aisle is 
parted off" by a good P. screen, and forms a chantry chapel, 
in which is a fine monument of Sir John Golafre, 1442, a 
figure in armour above, and a skeleton beneath ; the stalls 
and poppies perfect. The font is octagonal, the base orna- 
mented with fleurs-de-lis, D. On the south side is a small 
plain P. chapel. The west doorway is good E.E., round- 
headed, with bold mouldings and shafts, and caps of stiff"- 
leaved foliage. The tower modern, very bad. i.h.p. 

The credence and piscina, and the screen are engraved in the Glossary of 
Architecture. 

Near the church is part of an old manor-house, with a 
good porch, and two arched D. doorways ; the inner door- 
way has the ball-flower moulding. In the hall, on the west 
side, are two small D. archways. 

25. Pawley, Great. An E. E. tower. The body of the 
church, and the chancel, wholly rebuilt in modern times. 
The nave fitted up in the college chapel manner, and most 
probably arranged by Sir Christopher Wren, who built 
Fawley Court, b.f. 

26 . J^^Earingdon, All Saints. A large cruciform church, 
of mixed styles, but principally E.E., with a low massive 
tower at the intersection. The chancel is fine E.E., with 
lancet windows, and a very good open cradle roof, early P. ; 
the sedilia and piscina fine E. E. The tower-arches are 
good E. E., with rich mouldings and capitals of stiff-leaf 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

foliage. The arches of the nave are semicircular, but with 
E. E. mouldings and foliated capitals. *The north transept 
has portions of Transition N. work, and a chapel on the 
west side with a beautiful D. window of four lights, having 
flowing tracery. This was the chapel of theUnton family, and 
contains several tombs, and a brass of Sir Alexander Unton 
and lady, 1547. On the north side of the nave is a small 
N. doorway, with embattled and zig-zag mouldings. The 
south porch is very good E.E., with a door of the same date, 
having very fine old iron-work. The tower is Transition N. 
There is a low side window on the south side of the chancel, 
the western lancet window being carried down three feet 
lower than the others, under which runs the E. E. string- 
course. There are several other tombs and brasses in this 
church. i.H.p. 

Radcott bridge in this parish is a very early structure, 
apparently of the thirteenth century. 

Engravings of the roof, the D. window, and the iron-work, are given in 
the Glossary of Architecture ; the south doorway is engraved in the fifth edition 
of Hickman, and the sedilia in Lysons. 

27. Cox WELL, Little, St. Mary. A small church, with- 
out aisles, with a good bell-cot over the chancel-arch. The 
walls are all N., as are also the doorways of the nave and 
chancel : the east window is square and late, with a P. 
niche on each side : there is a small D. piscina, and a D. 
window of two lights over it : the chancel-arch is small, 
Transition N., with a double bell-cot over it of the same 
date, having a pierced quatrefoil in the head ; on the south 
side of the chancel-arch is a small square recess, which 
seems to have been an opening through the wall ; there 
is a very good P. rood-screen, with doors. The nave has 
D. and P. windows ; the roof is very good D., with the 
tie-beams chamfered, and cinquefoiled arches to the prin- 
cipals. The porch is P., and has a small niche on the east 



BERKSHIRE, 

side. The font is plain octagon, cup-shaped. Transition N., 
there is a stoup niche, just inside the south door. The 
pulpit is Jacobean, with hangings and a cushion of faded 
green velvet, richly embroidered, Elizabethan, of very 
beautiful workmanship : near it is a remarkably perfect 
hour-glass stand, ornamented with a spread-eagle, i.h.p. 

28. LiTTLEWORTH, St. Mary. Modern, 1836. 

29. Hagbourn, St. Andrew. Chancel with aisles, nave 
with aisles, west tower. The chancel is E.E., with a locker 
and a trefoiled piscina ; on the south side are two Transition 
N. arches : the east window is large P., of cinquefoiled 
lights ; the roof P., open timber, and a P. clerestory. The 
north aisle of the chancel is D., with some painted glass, 
and a good D. piscina. The south aisle of the chancel is 
P., with a good piscina and a squint. The staircase to 
the rood-loft remains perfect, with the original door. The 
chancel-arch is Transition N., with fine corbels ; the lower 
part of a P. rood-screen remains, with the doors perfect, 
having the linen panelling. The north side of the nave has 
three E. E. arches, the south side three of Transition N. cha- 
racter, with round pillars : the roof is P., open timber, flat ; 
the clerestory late P. The north aisle of the nave is D., 
having a door of the same date, with the original iron-work 
very good ; the south aisle is P. ; the tower-arch is E. E. ; 
the tower itself good P., with a stair turret, and a good P. 
sanctus bell-cot, erected on the top, with canopy and pin- 
nacles, and a little bell still in use. The pulpit is good P., 
of wood ; the font is also good P., octagonal, panelled. A 
brass inscription to John York, founder of an aisle 1413, 
seems to have been moved from the south to the north 
aisle. In the capital of the south-western pillar, over the 
font, is a very small P. niche, for the chrismatory. ? The 
village cross remains almost perfect, on lofty steps ; it is 
now used as a sun-dial, i.h.p. 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

30. Hanney, St. James. A fine cross church, with 
south aisle to the nave. The chancel is late and poor P., 
the chancel-arch E. E., very acute, with good corbel shafts : 
there is a good squint on the south side. The south tran- 
sept is E. E., with a trefoiled piscina, and some quarries in 
the east windows ; there is also part of a good P. rood- 
screen. The north transept is under the tower ; the arch 
opening to the nave is Transition N. ; its east window is 
good D. ; the piscina near it of the same date. The nave 
has four D. arches on the south side; one of the pillars is 
plain, massive, round, N., the others appear to have been 
similar but are now mutilated. The south aisle is D., with 
square-headed windows, and a rich panelled parapet on the 
exterior. The north porch is E. E., with a well-moulded door- 
way : the north doorway is good N. ; the south doorway D. 
The upper portion of the tower is P. ; the lower part Tran- 
sition N. There are some fine brasses, one of John Seys, 
priest, c. 1370, a cross, with a small figure of a priest in a 
chasuble. The roof of the nave is late P. t.h.p. 

31. Lyford, All Saints.? A small E.E. chapel, con- 
sisting of nave and chancel, with a wooden bell-cot at the 
west end. There are low side windows on both sides of 
the chancel : that on the south side has the iron-work and 
the wooden shutter with its hinges remaining ; that on the 
north side has a trefoiled head ; both are blocked up. There 
is a good E. E. piscina, with carved basin projecting, and a 
stone shelf : in the north wall is a locker the arch of which 
is a square-headed trefoil. The bell-cot is carried on an 
early wooden frame of four chamfered posts, with braces, 
forming alternately ogee and pointed arches. The font is 
plain E. E., octagonal, cup-shaped. There are some good 
plain open seats, and part of the rood-screen remains ; the 
pulpit is Jacobean : the chancel-arch is destroyed, i.h.p. 

32. Harwell, St. Matthew. A fine church; cruciform. 



BERKSHIRE, 

with aisles to the nave, and a west tower. The chancel is 
good D. ; the east window of five lights, with rather sin- 
gular tracery ; the side windows have some D. painted 
glass ; there are two sediUa and a good D. double piscina : 
the two western windows are lower than the others : the 
roof is plastered, but D. tie-beams and king-posts, with 
moulded caps and bases remain : the chancel-arch is D. : 
the rood-screen good, the shafts being D., the upper part 
P. The transepts are plain E. E., with lancet windows, and 
plain E. E. arches. The font plain E. E. The nave has 
three Transition N. arches on each side : the north aisle 
is D., with an E. E. door ; the south aisle E. E. : the 
doors retain their original iron -work. The tower is good 
E. E., with a stair-turret at the north-east angle ; there is 
a bell-cot at the top, apparently P., with a little bell. The 
base of a cross remains in the church-yard, i.h.p. 

There is a south-east view of the Church in Relton's Sketches. 

33. Hatford, St James. A small mixed church, mostly 
E. E., with a N. doorway and chancel-arch. There is a 
curious E. E. font, round, with detached shafts ; a D. sepul- 
chral recess, with a good figure of a priest, and a modern 
bell-turret on the west gable, i.h.p. 

The figure is engraved in Hollis's Monumental Effigies. 

34. Hendred, East, St. Augustine. A mixed church, con- 
sisting of a chancel, with a south chapel, a nave with aisles, 
and a west tower. The chancel is Transition from D. to P., 
with windows of that character ; there is a good piscina, and 
an open timber roof of four cants, with the portion over the 
altar ceiled in squares, with ribs and bosses : the chancel- 
arch is destroyed, but the shafts remain in the jambs. The 
nave has four arches on each side, which are Transition N., 
with good caps of foliage : the roof is open timber D., 
canted with a piece of P. ceiling over the rood-loft : the 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

clerestory is D. ; the windows spherical triangles, foliated, 
those over the rood-loft P. On the north side is a D. chapel; 
on the south a P. one, the roof of which is supported in 
the centre by a pillar without an arch ; it is the burial- 
place of the Eyston family; the south porch is joined to 
the west end of this chapel : the north aisle is D. ; the 
tower P., with an open parapet. Near to the chancel-arch 
is a brass, with merchants' marks at the corners, partially 
mutilated, to Henry and Roger Eldysley qnUm inratores i%tV 
bille, 1439, and in the south transept an inscription to 
William Whitwey * pannarm' et lanarf 1479. 

In the village of East Hendred are two chapels, one 
attached to the house of Mr. Eyston, and still used by the 
family, the east window of which is D., and there are two 
lancet side windows, but the rest is modernized. The other, 
which belonged to a Carthusian monastery, has long been 
desecrated : it is P. ; the east window of three lights re- 
mains, though mutilated ; within are the brackets for the 
altar aild a piscina, also a screen reaching from the floor to 
the roof, the eastern part having been open to the roof, and 
the western part divided by a floor. In another part of the 
village is a half timber house, with good P. barge-boards 
panelled, i.h.p. 

There are five tiles from this church engraved in Church's Patterns of 
Inlaid Tiles. 

35. HiNKSEY, North, or Ferry, St. Laurence. A small 
plain church of mixed styles, with an E. E. tower at the 
west end with a pyramidal roof. There is a good N. door- 
way to the nave ; and a N. low side window, on the south 
side of the chancel ; on the north side of the chancel-arch is 
a good N. arched recess, with zig-zag moulding, which pro- 
bably was originally open through the wall, and used as a 
squint. The chancel-arch itself has lately been rebuilt and 



BERKSHIRE, 

enlarged. In the churchyard are the steps and shaft of a 
cross. i.H.p. 

The squint is engraved in the ArchsBologicalJournal, vol. iii. p. 301, and the 
low side window in vol. iv. p. 315. Specimens of the N. mouldings are given 
in the Glossary of Architecture. There is a view of the church and church- 
yard cross by G. HoUis in the Gent's. Mag. for May 1817. 

36. HiNKSEY, South, St, John. Chiefly late and poor P., 
consisting of chancel, nave, and west tower, without any 
remarkable features, but a good plain open timber roof. 
The chancel rebuilt in the eighteenth century, i.h.p. 

37. WooTTON, SL Feter. A late and poor P. church 
much modernized, i.h.p. 

38. Hendred, West, Holy Trinity. A mixed church, 
consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, and west tower. The 
chancel is D., with original windows and door, piscina and 
bracket ; the roof is plastered, the buttresses very good, with 
tall pyramidal heads : there is a D. low side window on the 
north side : the chancel-arch D. chamfered, with moulded 
imposts \ there are fragments of the rood-screen, a number 
of old tiles, (see Church's Examples from the Diocese of 
Oxford,) and a plain chest which seems to be D. The 
nave has three D. arches on each side, the roof is plastered. 
The north aisle is D., and also has brackets, and the altar 
slab now forms part of the floor. The south aisle is P., 
with a piscina and brackets : the south doorway and porch 
are plain P., with a stone vault and ribs. The west tower 
is P., with a D. west window built in. i.h.p. 

39. HiNTON Walridge, Bt. Margaret. A small cruci- 
form church, with a tower at the west end. The chancel 
has E. E. walls, with one lancet remaining on the north 
side, and a small doorway on the south, the other windows 
are P. insertions : the chancel-arch is good E. E. spring- 
ing from corbels, one of which is a fine bold mask, the 
other has been cut away. The south transept or chapel 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

has a three-light lancet window under one arch, within, 
springing from singular corbels, and an E.E. piscina, with a 
square basin ; the arch from the nave is small plain E. E. 
The north transept is similar to the south. The nave is D., 
with a P. clerestory and roof: the south doorway is D., with 
a square stoup on the east side. The tower is good D., and 
has a battlement with small heads on the merlons, i.h.p. 

40. Kingston Bagpuze, Si. John Baptist, rebuilt about 
1802. E.B. 

In this parish is New Bridge, a structure of the thir- 
teenth century in tolerable preservation. 

41. Letcombe Basset, All Saints. A small church with 
a west tower. The chancel is E. E., the east window of 
two lights, with a foliated circle in the head; the side 
windows small, of two lights ; on the north side is a N. 
doorway blocked up for a fire-place ; the chancel-arch is 
small plain N. The nave has some D. and some P. win- 
dows ; the roof has tie-beams and curious corbels, with a 
sort of square shield on the face of them, bearing a cross ; 
the doorways north and south are E. E. The tower is square, 
built of brick, with stone quoins, and dressings of E. E. cha- 
racter. The font is plain, round, E. E. i.h.p. 

42. Letcombe Regis, St. Andrew. Chancel, nave, west 
tower. The chancel has D. walls, with a small doorway 
and piscina of that style : the windows are all late P. in- 
sertions; the east window has the original painted glass 
nearly perfect; the chancel-arch is late P., wide and flat. 
The nave has two tiers of small windows, mostly P., square- 
headed, the doorways are D., the northern one has a stoup 
by the side. The tower-arch is Transition N. and the lower 
part of the tower is of the same period with a P. story added ; 
in the tower is a good E. E. window, with an octagon shaft. 
The font is plain round N., with the scallop ornament round 
the rim : there are some good old seats with carved ends, i.h.p. 



BERKSHIRE, 

On the downs near Letcombe is an extensive earth-work 
called Letcombe Castle, supposed to have been a British 
town ; the enclosure is almost circular, and contains about 
twenty-six acres, protected by a double vallum. 

43. Challow, East, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave, south 
aisle. The east window is D., of three lights, with flowing 
tracery, the side windows square-headed of two lights ; the 
chancel-arch is E. E., with shafts. The nave has on the 
south side three good E. E. arches ; the aisle is modern ; 
the south doorway is good late N. ; the west doorway is 
Transition N., with a segmental head, and an E. E. stoup 
on the south side. On the east gable of the nave is a 
pretty D. cross ; on the west gable is an E. E. bell-cot, with 
two bells ; under this is a P. window inserted. The font is 
plain, round, i.h.p. 

44. Challow, West, St. Laurence. Nave, north porch, 
and chancel. The north doorway is circular-headed Tran- 
sition N., the west gable has a double D. bell-cot, below 
which is a D. window, the porch is P., of wood, the chancel 
is also P., and has a rood-screen of the same date. a.n. 

45. LocKiNGE, All Saints. Chancel and nave, with a 
south aisle to both, and a small west tower. The chancel 
is D. with a good east window, square-headed side win- 
dows, and a moulded tie-beam to the roof of the same 
period : and a good chancel-arch with moulded imposts ; 
on the north side of the arch is a recess, with an ogee 
head cinquefoiled, on the south side is the half of a simi- 
lar recess cut off by the wall : these were probably squints, 
blocked up. The nave has late square-headed windows, 
and a plaster ceiling; the north doorway is good N., with 
shafts; the south doorway is D., both the wooden doors 
have very fine D. iron-work. The tower is late P., and has 
the date of 1564. The south aisle has a D. east window, 
a Transition N. arch, and a good squint of the same pe- 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

riod opening to the chancel, but the west window and the 
other arches are late P. In the vestry is a plain round N. 
font, and an E. E. chest, with its original iron-work, i.h.p. 

Two tiles are engraved in Church's Patterns of Inlaid Tiles. 

46. LoNGWORTH, SL Mary. Chancel, nave, aisles, and 
west tower. The chancel is late P. : the chancel-arch is E.E., 
very much of the horse-shoe form from a settlement on the 
north side, it has octagon shafts, with moulded caps. The 
nave has on the north side three Transition N. arches, 
springing from corbels on massive square piers, having 
hoodmoulds of early character, with singular terminations ; 
on the south side are three E. E. arches on plain round 
pillars, the hoodmoulds similar to those on the north side, 
but terminated by heads ; the clerestory and roofs late and 
bad P. The tower-arches are good P., all three open to the 
church and aisles. The south aisle is D., the windows of 
two lights, with a quatrefoil in the head ; the north aisle is 
also D., but has square P. windows inserted, it has a D. 
arch across it. The south doorway and porch are plain 
E. E., but there is a P. roof and battlement to the porch. 
The font is plain round E. E. The tower plain good P. i.h.p. 

47. Charney, St. Peter. Chancel, nave, north aisle, 
Jacobean double bell-cot of stone. The chancel has a P. 
east window, and an E. E. window of two lights trefoiled 
on the south side ; on the north side is a N. doorway, with 
a very richly sculptured tympanum, it is supported on cor- 
bels inwards, forming a square-headed trefoil ; the chancel- 
arch is N., segmental, recessed, and chamfered, with plain 
massive N. imposts. The nave has Transition D. windows, 
and one P. ; the south doorway is N., very good, with a 
singular ornament round the arch : the roof is P., of low 
pitch. The font is plain, E. E., cup-shaped, octagonal ; the 
pulpit is P., of wood, on a stem. There is a Jacobean rood- 
screen in the chancel, and some fragments of P. glass, i.h.p. 



BERKSHIRE, 

In Charney parish, close adjoining to the church on 
the north side, is a chapel, attached to a house, now used 
as a granary. It is E. E., and has an east window of two 
lights, a trefoiled piscina, and a square locker : westward 
of this is a chamber with original windows, and an open 
timber roof of the same period, the end of the thirteenth 
century. Under these are other rooms of plain character, 
they formed the southern wing of the house, the northern 
wing of which is partly of the same period. This house is 
supposed to have been a grange belonging to the abbey of 
Abingdon, i.h.p. 

The N. tympanum and the doorway are engraved in Lysons : and there are 
views, plan, and details of the house in the Archseol. Journal, vol. v. 

48. March AM, All Saints. Lately rebuilt, and the 
arches which divided it into two equal parts removed. The 
P. tower and doorway have been preserved, i.h.p. 

The doorway is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 

49. Garford, St. Michael. A small plain E. E. chapel 
with a wooden bell-cot at the west end, the roof is ancient, 
plain, but good, probably D. ; there is a good D. barge- 
board to the porch, the door has E. E. iron-work, con- 
sisting of good straps and scutcheon ; part of the rood- 
loft remains, and an hour-glass stand. The font is octa- 
gonal, plain, and has the date 1734. i.h.p. 

50. Milton, St. Blaize. A small church, tower, chan- 
cel, nave, with one aisle on the north side rebuilt of brick, 
the D. square-headed windows have been preserved and 
built in. The tower is at the west end, the lower part D. 
with two D. two-light windows, the upper part appears to 
be P., very plain. The chancel has late P. square-headed 
windows : the ceiling has good wooden ribs. The nave on 
the south side has two D. square-headed windows foliated, 
rather good. The porch is late and bad. i.h.p. 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

51.i^"MoRETON, North, All Saints. Chancel, nave, south 
aisles to both, and west tower. The chancel is early D., 
the east window of three lights with geometrical tracery in 
the head, on the north side two plain windows of two lights 
under one arch, early D., on the south side two small 
E. E. arches, and another window of two lights unglazed, 
opening into a fine and rich D. chapel, which has some 
good early D. glass, and some fine though mutilated monu- 
ments with floriated crosses, and one having a Lombardic 
inscription. In this chapel, in the sill of the south-east win- 
dow, is a good example of an angle-piscina, having a shaft at 
the angle with small open arches from it each way, enriched 
with the ball-flower. The nave has D. windows and arches, 
and a roof of the same date ; the arch between the south 
aisle and chapel is E. E. with foliated caps. The tower 
is P. with bold open parapet. The font plain, round, with 
D. base. Some P. wood-work remains in the chancel, and 
in the south aisle a brass to Thomas Mayne, ♦Yoman.' 
1479. T.H.p. 

The piscina is eugmved in Rickman, p. 166, and in the Cambridge Brasses, 
and one of the tiles in Church's Specimens of Inlaid Tiles. 

52. MoRETON, South, St. John. This church consists 
of two parallel aisles of nearly equal length, with four 
Transition N. pillars ; there is no chancel-arch. The east 
window of the south aisle is D. and the others are all P., 
in the south-east angle is a singular double E. E. piscina. 
The nave windows are P., the roof appears to be E. E. but 
very plain. The font is plain Transition N. The outer 

I south wall is Transition N., and has a string-course run- 
ning under the windows both inside and outside, which in 
one place has been cut away for the insertion of a P. tomb ; 
at the west end of the south aisle are the remains of the 
buttress and wall of a bell-gable, now destroyed, i.h.p. 



BERKSHIRE, 

53. PusEY, All Saints. Rebuilt c. 1750. 

54. Radley, St. James. A small P. church, plain, with 
a modern chancel, and a south aisle only to the nave, the 
pillars and arches of which are of wood, quite plain, but 
apparently of the fifteenth century. The font is good P. 
The chancel has recently been restored and fitted up with 
some good P. painted glass, and rich old wood-work. The 
churchyard is celebrated for its beauty and neatness, i.h.p. 

55. Shillingford, St. Faith. A small church with 
tower and spire at the west end. The tower is E. E. with 
small buttresses, the windows lancet, one very long ; the 
spire E. E. with ribs on the angles, and a finial : the south 
porch is good E. E. with a two-light window trefoil- headed 
on the side, the doorway is E. E., and there is a good finial 
on the gable. The chancel walls and buttresses are E. E. ; 
the east window is D. of three Hghts, with flowing tracery ; 
the south window is lancet with foliated head ; there is an 
E. E. plain piscina and locker ; and a P. window on the 
north side with some old painted glass : the chancel-arch 
is N. The nave windows are mostly P., one is D., the 
roofs are all flat late P. The font is octagonal, plain D. ; the 
tower-arch E. E., low and massive. The south doorway of 
the church is good Transition N. with the zigzag and roll 
mouldings to the arch, and the tooth ornament under the 
label : the north doorway late N. with the cat's-head orna- 
ment. The priest's door in the chancel is also Transition 
N. The pulpit Elizabethan, i.h.p. 

The manor-house called Shillingford castle has some fine 
P. chimneys. 

56. ^RRiY's.iiiB.AM, St. Andrew. The only original portion 
of this church is the central tower and its four arches, which 
are good P., with mouldings continued to the ground, and a 
P. vault. The font is E. E., originally altogether of Purbeck 
marble, the basin and plinth of which remain, but the 



DEANKRT OF ABINGDON. 

place of the detached shafts is suppUed by wooden balus- 
ters. The west porch has late P. doorways and drip- 
stones, and close to it is a N. buttress. The rest of this 
church is of singular character, the windows being all 
square-headed, debased, of four lights. The pillars are 
plain, round, with moulded caps in imitation of N. : the 
arches and the outer walls appear to have been rebuilt in 
the seventeenth century. In the eastern tower-arch is a 
very good hour-glass stand, ornamented and gilt. In the 
churchyard at the east end is an effigy of the fourteenth 
century, much defaced, i.h.p. 

57. LoNGCOT, St. Mary. The chancel walls are E. E., 
with one original window, the others D. ; the chancel-arch 
is plain Transition N. ; the staircase to the rood-loft remains 
on the north side. At the east end of the nave on each 
side is a P. square-headed low side window, small single 
cinquefoiled ; the other windows on the north side of the 
nave are P. : on the south side is a modem aisle, with 
round-headed arches. The north doorway is good E. E., 
trefoiled, with moulded shafts and foliated caps. The north 
porch has good barge-boards. The font is plain, round, 
seems to be E. E. The tower was erected in 1724. i.h.p. 

58. t^ Sparsholt, St. Stephen. A fine D. church, con- 
sisting of chancel, nave, south transept, west tower and 
spire, the north transept destroyed. The chancel has a 
good parapet, the side windows are lofty of two lights with 
quatrefoil in the head, the east vrindow modern : the 
sedilia, and piscina, and sepulchral recess, are rich, with 
foliated arches, crockets, pinnacles and finials : on the 
north side is a recess with an ogee arch similarly orna- 
mented, probably the Easter sepulchre, and a small door- 
way to the vestry, which is original, though the windows 
are modem. The nave has good windows of two lights, and 
the original open timber roof of D. work very good and 

E 



BERKSHIRE, 

perfect, the north doorway is E. E., with a round-headed 
arch which has an unusual moulding and shafts having 
caps of good foliage ; on the door is some good iron-work. 
The south transept has a good end window of four lights 
with flowing tracery, under which are two sepulchral re- 
cesses very richly ornamented, with tombs under them per- 
fect, both effigies are female figures of wood, one of the tombs 
has nine weepers in panels, the other is plain ; there is a 
piscina in the east wall with a wooden shelf: across the arch 
of the transept is a D. wooden screen. The tower is plain, 
with angular buttresses, the spire of wood covered with 
shingles. The font plain, round, i.h.p. 

The roof and screen are engraved in the Glossary of Architecture, the north 
doorway in Lysons,and views of the church <' nd north porch in Helton's Sketches 
of Churches ; one of the effigies is also engraved in HoUis's Monumental Effi- 
gies, part 5. 

59. Kingston Lisle, Si. James. A small church with- 
out aisles, the walls N. with later insertions ; the chancel 
has a D. east window of three lights, tall, with a transom, 
and flowing tracery in the head ; on each side of it is a D. 
niche, on the south side are two D. windows, on the north 
side small N. windows, the chancel -arch, flat segmental N. 
but altered. The nave has square late windows ; the door- 
way good late N., with the original iron- work on the door. 
There is a square bell-turret built on the west gable, with 
small windows and D. pinnacles at the angles, i.h.p. 

60.ii^STANFORD-iN-THE-VALE, Sf.Denis. Chaucel, uavc, 
aisles, west tower, and south porch. The chancel is good 
D.y the windows have geometrical tracery, with some 
original painted glass ; the roof is plain open timber, but 
well moulded and seems original. The piscina is very 
curious, the basin perfect, the head of the square trefoil 
form, and over it a sort of tabernacle, a half octagon pro- 
jecting from the wall, with a small oblong opening to it, 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

probably a reliquary : on the north side is a double locker, 
under the north-east window. In the centre of the chancel 
is the brass of a priest, Roger Campedene, 1379, probably 
the founder of the chancel. The nave has three arches on 
the north side, very wide, on octagon piers, without caps or 
imposts : the windows of the aisles are small square-headed 
D., there is a squint from the north aisle to the high 
altar : the original E. E. clerestory windows remain under 
the roof of the aisle, the present clerestory and roof are late 
and bad. The tower is E. E., with tall buttresses and a 
corbel-table, upon which a P. story is added. The south 
porch is E.E., higher than the aisle ; the south doorway also 
E. E., w^ell moulded. The vestry on the north side of the 
chancel is original D. The font is of oak, Elizabethan, with 
canopy, the pulpit good Elizabethan. There is a D. low side 
window at the south-east end of the nave, and a coffin slab 
of the thirteenth century in the churchyard, i.h.p. 

61. Goosey, All Saints. A small E. E. chapel, with 
western bell-cot. There is a good E. E. buttress on the 
north side, but almost all the windows are late, square- 
headed. The chancel has a curious E. E. piscina, with the 
basin projecting from the plane of the wall, and a square 
locker eastward of this : over the altar is a flat P. tester, 
painted with emblems of the Crucifixion, <Src. ; and above 
this, on the east wall, a painting of the Crucifixion : in the 
east window is a small figure of a saint in good P. glass : 
the wall-plate of the chancel is ornamented with a row of 
trefoil-headed panels, there is no chancel-arch. In the nave 
are some good E. E. corbel-heads, and a plain E.E. stoup ; 
the church door key is E. E. There is the base of a cross 
in the churchyard, the stem of which now forms the sill to 
the door. The tester has a shield bearing the arms of the 
Hydes. i.h.p. 

62. Steventon, St. Michael. Chancel, nave, south aisle. 



I 



BERKSHIRE, 

and tower in the middle of the south side of the nave. The 
chancel has a late P. east window, the north windows are 
D., one square-headed ; on the south side is a good P. pis- 
cina with a square-head over, and a small doorway into the 
vestry : the roof is concealed by a coved ceiling with ribs of 
P. work. The nave has on the north side two D. windows, 
and a good doorway ; on the south side are two arches of 
different span, one E. E., the other D. The tower-arches 
are good D., with rich moulded imposts, ornamented on 
one side with the ball-flower, and on the other a rose with 
stalks, a curious and rich specimen. The south aisle is D. 
with good windows. The font is good P. i.h.p. 

63. Streatly, St. Mary. A small church with some 
good Transition N. work, and some later insertions, the 
chancel is Transition N., with lancet windows, having shafts 
on the outside, the east window modern. The nave has a 
small north chapel with a square-headed D. window, and 
two Transition N. arches : the south windows of the nave 
are D. : the tower-arch and south doorway are Transition 
N., but the tower late P. ; the buttresses are Transition N., 
those of the chancel very bold and massive. There are eight 
late brasses in the chancel. The font is modern, i.h.p. 

One of the tiles is engraved in Church's Specimens of Inlaid Tiles. 

64. SuNNiNGWELL, ^t. Leonard. A small church of 
mixed styles, mostly very late, with a tower on the south 
side, and a very singular porch at the west end, octagonal, 
of Elizabethan work, with Gothic doors and windows, and a 
sort of Ionic columns at the angles. The walls are partly 
E.E., and there are lancet windows blocked up in the north 
wall, the east window is early D. : there are some good 
seats, with poppies, and a communion table of fine carved 
oak, Ehzabethan work. The church is supposed to have 
been rebuilt by Bishop Jewell who was curate there in his 
youth. I.H.P. 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

65. Kennington, St. Swithin. Recently built in the 
N. style, c. 1830. i.h.p. 

66.i^"SuTTON CovRTiiEY, All SaMs. Chancel, nave, aisles, 
west tower, south porch with a room over it. The chancel 
walls are Transition N., with some original windows, others 
are D. and P. On the south side is a D. piscina and three 
D. oak stalls with misereres, removed from their original 
place : on the north side a very good D. sepulchral arch, and 
two high tombs. The chancel-arch is Transition N. with 
shafts having good N. caps. The nave has four D. arches 
on each side with the exception of the western arch on the 
south side which is N., with zigzag and embattled mould- 
ings, it is built upon early D. pillars, with well-moulded 
caps, and is evidently an old arch rebuilt ; it was probably 
the original chancel-arch. The windows of the north aisle 
are D. and Transition to P. ; those of the south aisle are 
all P. except the west window which is D. The porch is 
late P., and there is a stoup of Purbeck marble at the 
north-east angle. The tower-arch is plain N. The lower 
part of the tower is Transition N., with good windows 
and a corbel-table ; the upper part is D. There are a good 
P. rood-screen, a Transition N. font, round and arcaded, 
several quarries and remains of good painted glass, and a 
room, used as a vestry and library, over the porch. The 
rood-loft was destroyed in 1842. In the churchyard is a 
mutilated P. high tomb, i.h.p. 

A gablet and a N. window from this church are engraved in the Glossary of 
Architecture, and the font in Lysons. 

Near the chm-ch are two old houses, one opposite the 
tower of the church is of Transition N. and E. E. character ; 
the other at a little distance from it is a manor house of 
the time of Edward III., of which the hall with its roof and 
windows remains nearly perfect : and one of the chambers at 
the end of the hall also has its open timber roof. The front is 



BERKSHIRE, 

tolerably perfect, consisting of two gable ends with the hall 
between them, and the windows have D. tracery, but those 
of the hall have had the upper part cut off by an alteration 
of the roof : under one of the windows is a low side opening 
with foliated tracery, an elegant piece of work and very 
curious, as no other instance is known of a low side win- 
dow in a hall ; unfortunately it is plastered over on the 
outside, but it is nearly perfect within, and has the hinges 
of the shutter, i.h.p. 

See an account of this house with engravings in the Archaeological Journal, 
vol. V. 

67. Appleford, JSt. Feter and St. Faul. A small poor 
church of mixed styles, with a wooden bell-cot on the west 
gable. The chancel is E. E., with a single lancet window 
and plain priest's doorway. The chancel-arch is D., with 
moulded corbels. The nave has N. walls, with plain door- 
ways north and south. The west window is good single- 
light D., with trefoiled head and hood-mould. The font is 
curious. Transition N., octagonal above and round below. 
The octagonal part has each face terminated by a large scal- 
lop at the bottom, and a corbel projecting at the top. i.h.p. 

68. i^° Uffington, Bt. Mary. A large cross church, 
mostly of E. E. character, rickman. The chancel has at 
the east end three lancet windows with detached shafts, 
having bands and foliated caps, under these are three small 
circular openings with good mouldings ; the side windows 
are also lancets with detached shafts, except one which is a 

D. insertion ; the sedilia and piscina are fine examples of 

E. E. work, and the priest's door has a good shallow porch 
over it. The tower-arches are fine and lofty E. E. The 
north transept is of the same style, on the east side of it 
are two very remarkable recesses for altars with high 
pitched gable roofs and three windows in each of a pecu- 
liar form, as if the heads of the windows were cut off by 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

the slope of the roof, but evidently all original work, this 
example is believed to be unique. The south transept is 
nearly the same as the north, but has only one altar recess, 
and at the south-east corner is a doorway and porch, the 
outer doorway of which is round headed, but with good 
E. E. mouldings and a quatrefoil over it in the gable ; at 
the south end is a triplet of good lancets, over which is an 
oblong opening to give air to the roof, and under it a single 
small circular window, in the same situation as the three at 
the east end, below the string. Both the transepts and 
chancel have good buttresses, those of the chancel die into 
the wall, those of the transepts have gabled heads. The 
nave is plain, with north and south doorways; over the 
north doorway is a circular window sixfoiled, the south 
doorway is protected by a fine E. E. porch, with a groined 
vault, and a room over it, in which is an original fireplace 
and chimney ; the doors themselves have good E. E. iron- 
work on them. The tower, which stands in the centre 
upon the arches before mentioned, is octagonal E. E., with 
plain windows in four of the faces, and without but- 
tresses. l.H.P. 

Good general views of this clmrcli are given in the Beauties of England 
and V^^ales, and Relton's Sketches of Churches. The latter work has also an 
engraving of the south porch ; and there are two tiles in Church's Collection. 

69. WooLSTONE, All Saints. This church consists of 
nave, south transept, and chancel, the whole of which was 
originally Transition N., but D. windows have been in- 
serted in the chancel and transept. The north doorway is 
good N. ; the south doorway of the chancel is plain N. of 
chalk, but in good preservation; the east window is debased. 
A bell-cot has been lately placed on the west gable, a.n. 

70. ^^ Baulking, St. Nicholas. A small church or 
chapel, with a modern bell-cot. The chancel is E. E., very 
good ; the east window is of three lancet lights, with shafts 



I 



BERKSHIRE, 

having good moulded caps and bases, the arches also 
moulded within, the exterior being quite plain ; the side 
windows are small lancets. In the angle of the sill of the 
south-east window is a good E. E. piscina, with an angle- 
shaft, the sill itself forms the sedile ; the roof of the chancel 
is good plain open timber, and seems to be E.E. ; under the 
east window is a square mass of stone fixed in the ground, 
with chamfered corners, apparently part of the support of 
the original altar. (?) The chancel-arch is small E. E., with 
shafts in the jambs, having well-moulded caps and bases. 
On the south side of this arch is a very good double E. E. 
squint, and on the north side a single one and the stairs to 
the rood-loft, so that the chancel-arch in fact formed part of 
a stone rood-screen, with the loft on the top. The nave has 
two D. windows on the south side, and one P. on the north 
side ; the roof is open timber, and seems early with later 
tie-beams introduced. The south doorway is plain Tran- 
sition N., the door has good iron -work of the same date. 
The north doorway is also plain Transition N. There is a 

D. cross on the west gable. The font is large octagonal 
Transition N. i.h.p. 

71. ^" Wantage, St. Feter and SL FauL A large 
and fine cross church, with a central tower, nave, and aisles, 
transepts, and choir, and aisles. The general exterior ap- 
pearance is now P. except the tower, which is early D., as 
are the piers and arches of the nave, which have very good 
mouldings. There are a few D. windows, but the clere- 
story, the east window, and many others are P. There is one 

E. E. arch to the transept, and a font of the same character 
with the toothed ornament. There are some monumental 
brasses remaining, and some good wood stalls. There is a 
variety of very good details of the several styles it is com- 
posed of to be found about this church, rickman. 

There is a monument of a cross-legged knight in 



DEANERY OF ABINGDON. 

armour, and one in alabaster to a lady, with head-dress 
of the fourteenth century, much mutilated, i.h.p. 

A view of the church and two of the brasses are engraved in Relton's 
Sketches of Churches, and the stalls in the chancel are figured in Talbot 
Bury's wood- work. 

72. Grove, St. John Baptist. Modern, 1830. 

73. WiTTENHAM, Earl's or Long, St. Peter. An in- 
teresting church of mixed styles, mostly D. Plan oblong, 
with aisles and nave, a P. tower at the west end, and a 
chapel on the south side. This is early D. work, and has 
a very curious piscina and monument combined, having a 
small cross-legged figure in armour lying along the front 
of it on the edge, with the basin behind it. There is a 
good open-timber south porch of D. work, the chancel 
walls are E. E., with D. windows inserted. There is some 
good D. glass in the heads of some of the windows, and 
numerous encaustic tiles in various parts of the church. 
The font is of lead, circular, standing on a massive stone 
base ; it is Transition N., having small circles of foliage and 
a row of figures under pointed arches. There are two other 
leaden fonts of similar character in the immediate neigh- 
bourhood, at Dorchester and Warborough. i.h.p. 

An account of this church, illustrated by numerous engravings, is given in 
the Archaeological Journal, vol. ii. 

74. WiTTENHAM, Abbott's or Little, St. Faith and All 
Saints. A small chm'ch, with a D. tower at the west end. 
The rest of the church is of the same age, with square win- 
dows, much mutilated and very plain. There are several 
brasses, chiefly to the Kidwelly family, A.D. 1433, 1454, 
1472, and 1483, and two large high tombs in a south chapel, 
c. 1650. i.h.p. 

75. Wytham, All Saints. Rebuilt of old materials prin- 
cipally brought from Cumnor Hall, 1814. i.h.p. 

In the Gentleman's Magazine for 1821, vol. ii., is a long account of Cumnor 
Hall with engravings of the details in Wytham church removed from thence. 

P 



BERKSHIRE, 



iSeanerg of IKeabing. 



76. Alderm ASTON, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, south 
chapel, west tower. The east window of the chancel 
is E.E., having three lancets under one arch; the two 
windows on the north side are of the same style, but 
modernized. On the south side is a modern vestry : there 
is no chancel-arch, but at each end of the place for the 
rood-loft are two small windows which have evidently been 
one above, the other below, the loft, one of these windows 
is D., the other altered. The nave has some D. windows 
and some modern. The north doorway is blocked up, 
there is a niche on each side of it. The south chapel has 
a Transition N. arch, the windows are D., and there is a D. 
piscina, it contains a good P. high tomb of alabaster, 1500, 
with effigies and weepers. The font is modern and bad. 
The tower is D. with a N. doorway built in at the west 
end, recessed with .the cable moulding on the arch and 
shafts, and caps with birds sculptured on them ; the abacus 
is remarkably wide, but the doorway is not early N. i.h.p. 

The Norman west doorway is engraved in Lysons. 

77. Arboreield, St. Bartholomew. A poor P. church, 
with a wooden bell-cot at the west end. The arches be- 
tween the chancel and aisle are of wood, with good cor- 
belled heads ; in the aisle is a high tomb to W. Standon 
and wife, 1637, which is the probable date of the side aisle 
and arches. The north doorway is Transition N., and the 
door has good iron- work; there are a few encaustic tiles 
in the chancel, i.h.p. 

78. Bear-wood, St. Catharine. Modern, 1846, built at 
the sole expense of the late John Walter, Esq. 



DEANERY OF READING. 



79. Barkham, SL James. A poor church, without aisles, 
chiefly of timber. There is a piece of ornamented ceiUng 
over the place of the rood-loft, the rest is poor P., but there 
is a window with good wooden tracery, and a wooden 
female effigy of the fourteenth century, i.h.p. 

80. Beenham, St. Mary. Rebuilt. 

81. BiNFiELD, All Saints. Chancel, nave, aisles, west 
tower. The east window is modem, imitation of D. The 
other chancel windows, E.E. and P. ; there is a piscina in 
the east wall of the chancel, and a good cradled open tim- 
ber roof; there is no chancel-arch, but on the south side 
are two early P. arches with moulded caps. The nave has 
on the north side four P. piers and arches, on the south 
side they are modern imitations. The south aisle has two 
P. windows with jamb shafts and rather singular tracery 
resembling D. work ; the north aisle is modern. The 
font is plain, round, probably E.E. on a modern stem. The 
south doorway is P. with flowers in hollow mouldings ; the 
tower-arch is plain P., the tower of the same date, and there 
is a good P. open timber porch. The church was restored 
in 1848, and the north aisle added; the seats are all open 
and in good taste. There is a small brass, i.h.p. 

82. BiSHAM, All Saints. A small church without aisles. 
The tower is Transition N., with a circular tower-arch and 
north doorway ; there is a fine P. tomb ; the windows of the 
nave and chancel are debased P. : the chapel south of the 
chancel is an addition of the same style ; it contains two 
large Elizabethan monuments with effigies of Sir Thomas 
Hoby, 1566, and his widow, afterwards Lady Bussel. The 
lych-gate remains, a.n. and s.r.g. 

The ruins of the priory consist chiefly of two D. 
doorways, a fine early D. window, and a small groined 
porch, there are also traces of a cloister of D. work. a.n. 

An engraving of the priory is given in the Beauties of England and Wales. 



BERKSHIRE, 

83. Bradfield, St. Andrew. This church has been re- 
built by Mr. Scott at the expense and under the personal 
superintendence of the Rector, the Rev. T. Stevens. Of the 
old work two Transition N. arches on the south side of the 
nave, and three D. on the north side, have been preserved, 
and the tower at the west end, which is Jacobean work, of 
flint with brick quoins and stone dressings. The new work 
is executed in the best manner ; the carving both in wood 
and stone is excellent, and the iron-work wrought by a vil- 
lage workman is exceedingly good and elegant, i.h.p. 

84. Bray, St. Michael, is a large edifice, with a nave and 
aisles, and a chancel, with a large flint and stone tower on 
the south side of the south aisle. In this church are por- 
tions of E. E., D., and P. work ; the south doorway, now 
under the tower, is a good one, and there are windows of 
each of the three styles, rickman. The tower is P., and 
clumsily joined on to the early D. aisle. There is a good 
brass of Sir John Eoxley and his two wives, and several 
others. The date of part of this church is ascertained by 
the court rolls to be 1293. i.h.p. 

The brass of Sir John Foxley is engraved in Waller's Brasses; and tliat of 
Sir William Laken, justice of the king's bench, 1475, in Gough's Sepulchral 
Monuments. 

In this parish are the remains of Ockholt or Ockwells 
HOUSE, once a very fine mansion of the fifteenth century ; 
some very rich barge-boards have been preserved, and the 
hall has some fine painted glass in the windows, chiefly 
heraldic, among which are the arms of England with ante- 
lopes as supporters, which renders it probable that it was 
built in the reign of Henry VI., the only monarch who 
used those supporters, i.h.p. 

An engraving of some of the painted glass is given in Lysons, and views of 
the house in Nash's Mansions of England ; the lych-gate at Bray is engraved 
in the Gent's. Mag. for Feb. 1844. 



DEANERY OF READING. 

85. BuRGHFiELD, Si. Mary, A large modern Romanesque 
church, cruciform, with a round apse and half-round porches, 
attached to a round tower with a dwarf spire. In these 
porches are preserved three old effigies, one a very good 
wooden one of the fourteenth century, i.h.p. 

86. Clewer, St. Andrew, is a small church, with portions 
of early N. and all the later styles mixed together. There 
is a curious leaden font (but in a sadly mutilated state) 
now plaster- washed over, and with a modern foot; it is 
round, Avith N. ornaments on it. rickman. 

87. Cook HAM, Holy Trinity. The tower is P. ; the 
church, which consists of nave with aisles of equal height, 
and chancel with a north chapel, is chiefly E.E., but much 
altered ; there is a small E. E. doorway on the north side of 
the nave, and near it a round-headed E. E. window ; the 
chapel on the north side of the chancel retains its altar plat- 
form with the encaustic tiles, and is separated from the 
chancel by Transition N. arches ; it contains a small P. altar- 
tomb, with a canopy and two brasses, a.n. At the east end 
of the south aisle is an E. E. triplet, the centre light curi- 
ously flattened ; the south dooi^way and the nave arches 
are D. s.r.g. 

An account of the monumental brasses remaining in this church is given in 
Nichols' Collectanea Topographica, vol. vi. p. 182, &c. 

88. CooKHAM Dean. Modern, s.r.g. 

89. East Hampstead, St. Mary Magdalene. Chancel, 
nave, north aisle, tower at west end of the aisle. The east 
window is early D. with a moulded inner arch and jamb 
shafts; the exterior modernized. The south side of the 
chancel has two small D. windows ; on the north side are 
two wooden arches apparently P., opening into the aisle. 
The chancel-arch is destroyed, but part of a good P. rood- 
screen remains. On the south side of the nave are a Tran- 
sition N. doorway and two P. windows ; the west window 



BERKSHIRE, 

is E.E. modernized. The north side of the nave has three 
D. arches with octagonal pillars and moulded caps opening 
into an aisle with plain Transition N. windows. The tower 
was rebuilt in 1675 of brick, very substantially. The font 
is octagonal, cup-shaped, probably D. There is a small 
brass to Thomas Burwyk, 1443, a demi-figure : and a fine 
yew-tree in the churchyard, i.h.p. 

90. Engleeield, St. Mark. Chancel with north aisle. 
Nave with south aisle. The nave arches are E. E., with 
very bold mouldings on plain round massive pillars with 
Transition N. caps. The east window of the south aisle is 
a very fine three-light lancet, with detached shafts. The 
font is E. E. round, with tref oiled arcade ; there are some 
fine monuments, a knight in chain armour, and a wooden 
effigy of a lady, of the fourteenth century, under flat arches 
in the south wall, and in the chancel a fine P. monument with 
a rich canopy. The north aisle of the chancel was built in 
1514 as a burial-place for the Englefield family, i.h.p. 

91. Finch ampstead, St. James, has a nave and chan- 
cel, each with a north aisle ; and a brick tower, bearing the 
date 1720 : the principal features are ordinary D. and P. 
The chancel has a semicircular apse. The font is good N., 
with a circular bowl ornamented with an arcade, and nail- 
head mouldings, s.r.g. 

92. Hurley, St. Mary. A long narrow church, once the 
chapel of the priory, consisting of nave, chancel, and south 
porch. The west front of this church retains its original 
N. features, having a good round-headed segmental door- 
way, over which is a large circular-headed window with 
shafts having the zigzag mouldings; the N. corbel-table 
also remains. The whole of this church was originally N., 
except the porch, which is P., and has a plain barge -board ; 
there are several P. insertions in the chancel ; all the win- 
dows on the north side of the church have been blocked, but 



DEANERY OF READING. 

most of the original N. windows remain on the south side. 
The font is massive, panelled, tub-shaped, P. ; in the chancel 
is a huge seventeenth centuiy monument, with several frag- 
ments of brasses, a.n. 

This church is engraved and its architectural features are very fully de- 
scribed by Dr. Bromet, in the Gent's. Mag., March 1839. The font is engraved 
in Van Vooret's Fonts. 

The church forms the south side of a quadrangle, the 
north side consisting of a building which was apparently 
a Refectory, having remains of P. screen-work. The lower 
part of this building is N., the upper part D. Near it is 
a circular dovecot, with buttresses, which seems to be D. 
The Bell Inn is a P. house in good preservation, a.n. 

93. Hurst, St. Nicholas. This is a poor church, of mixed 
styles, mostly of the seventeenth century, with a brick 
tower ; the walls were originally of flint, but have been 
much patched with brick ; it is divided down the middle 
by a row of Transition N. pillars and arches. The two 
east windows have the dates 1627 and 1638 : over them 
there is a singular screen of Elizabethan work painted and 
gilt, and there are some remains of painted glass in the 
windows. The roof of the nave has moulded tie-beams, and 
king-posts, with P. caps and bases with braces spreading 
from each cap. i.h.p. 

94. Maidenhead, St. Andreio and St. Mary Magdalene. 
Modern. 1826. 

An account of the original church erected in this parish, c. 1270, is given 
in Nichols' Collectanea Topographica, &c., vol. vi. 

95. Padworth, St. John Baptist. A small N. church, 
consisting of nave and chancel, with semicircular apse, and 
a wooden tower on the nave roof at the west end. The 
walls are all N., with P. and modern windows inserted. 
The apse is plain, without windows. The chancel-arch is 
good N. recessed, with jamb shafts and sculptured caps. 



BERKSHIRE, 

The north and south doorways are also good N., of similar 
character, recessed, with ornamented arches. The font is 
modern, i.h.p. 

The N. doorway and capitals are engraved in Lysons. 

96. Pangbourne, St. James. A small church, mostly 
modern and bad; but it has a good timber porch, with 
barge-boards, apparently of the fourteenth century. The 
chancel-arch is E. E., with bold, but rather clumsy mould- 
ings. There is a north aisle with plain E. E. arches. In 
the chancel is a fine monument to Sir John Davis and his 
two wives, 1625. i.h.p. 

97. PuRLEY, St Mary. A small church, with a brick 
tower, mostly P. and plain ; it has a N. chancel-arch, and 
a very good and rich N. font with intersecting arcade : on 
the north side is an E. E. doorway, now blocked up ; there 
is a good foliated lancet window of the fourteenth century. 

I.H.P. 

98. Reading, St. Mary. A large church, said to have 
been rebuilt in 1551, of materials brought from the ruins 
of the Abbey and the Friary, and the singular mixture of 
good and bad Gothic seems to verify this account. The 
chancel has a P. open timber roof. The nave has also a 
good roof of early character, which appears older than the 
corbels on which it rests, the measurements of this roof 
agree with the walls of the Friary. The font is P., octa- 
gonal, panelled with a pyramidal crocketed cover. The 
walls are built of flint and ashlar in alternate squares. The 
old poor's box remains, dated 1627. i.h.p. 

99. Reading, St. Laurence, is a large church with a 
fine tower of flint and stone ; the tower, and a large portion 
of the church is P., but there are portions of E. E. work, 
and a few D. windows. The font is octagonal, good P., and 
there are some very good wooden seats and bench-ends 
and several brasses, rickman. The church is said to have 



DEANERY OF READING. 

been rebuilt in 1434. The chancel has lately been restored 
in the E. E. style, and a good P. chantry chapel with its 
fittings on the north side has been preserved, i.h.p. 

A view of this church is given in the Beauties of England and Wales. 

100. Reading, St Mary. Modem. 

101. REABiiio, St Giles. Of mixed styles, much damaged 
during the parliamentary wars. The tower has been re- 
built, with a slender wooden spire, cased with copper. 

102. Reading, Holy Trinity. Modem. 

103. Reading, St. John. Modem. 

Although most of the buildings of the abbey at Reading 
are in ruins, and the walls stript of their stone casing, there 
still exists in tolerable condition one of the gates which well 
deserves attention, rickman. 

The abbey was founded by Henry I. in 1 121, the domes- 
tic buildings were completed in 1124, the great church was 
built several years afterwards, and consecrated by Arch- 
bishop Becket in 1164. See Mon. Angl., vol. iv. p. 28. 

A view of the abhey gate by Paul Sandby, R.A., is engraved by M. A. 
Rooker, 1775, another by C. Tomkins in the Beauties of England and Wales; 
a plan of the abbey taken 1779, in the Archajologia, vol. vi. pi. vii. p. 61 ; 
re-eopied with additions in Coates' History of Reading. 

There are two views of the abbey ruins in Grose's Antiquities. 

The remains of the friary church are also worthy of 
careful examination. The walls are perfect, except the 
chancel, but the roof is gone. The east window is a very 
fine example of D. work ; the arches and the side win- 
dows of the aisles are also good; the walls are of cut 
flint. I.H.P. 

There is a description with engravings of this ruin, by John Billing, Esq., 
in the Archaeological Jounial, vol. iii. 

104. Remenham, St Nicholas. A small church without 
aisles ; of mixed styles, with a semicircular apse ; it is prin- 

G 



BERKSHIRE, 

cipally N. The north porch is of wood with some fine P. 
carving, s.r.g. 

105. RuscoMBE, St. James. The chancel is Transition 
N., with two small pointed windows at the east end. The 
nave and tower are rebuilt of brick in the debased style of 
Charles 11. : on the tower is a good pierced vane, i.h.p. 

106. Sandhurst, Si. Michael, A small church without 
aisles, having north and south doorways and chancel-arch 
of N. work ; most of the windows are E. E., but some are 
of later date. The font is N., having a square bowl on a 
cylindrical stem, s.r.g. 

107. Shinfield, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, south aisle, 
west tower. The east window is P., on the north side of 
the chancel are two D. windows ; the chancel-arch is de- 
stroyed. The windows on the north side of the nave are 
D. and P. ; there is a plain N. doorway. On the south side 
are three pointed arches recessed and continuous to the 
ground, probably N., the south aisle is poor P., date 
1526. The tower is of brick, Jacobean, but good of its 
kind. I.H.P. 

108. SwALLOWFiELD, All Saiuts. A poor church, without 
aisles, with a wooden bell-cot at the west end. It seems 
aU P., except the north doorway, now blocked up, which is 
N., with zigzag and scalloped caps. The south porch is 
modern, but has a good barge-board with P. mouldings, the 
pattern is like D. work. There is a fine yew-tree in the 
church-yard, i.h.p. 

109. t^ Shottesbrooke, St. John. A pure D. build- 
ing and a beautiful miniature of a cathedral, having a nave, 
and choir, and transepts, a centre tower and spire, and a 
north and south porch, all of good design and execution. 
There are no battlements, but all dripping eaves, and as 
small a portion as possible of stone is used for the dressings ; 
the tracery of the windows is very good, and the buttresses 



DEANERY OF READING. 

very good but plain. This church will well repay a careful 
examination, rickman. 

This church was built by Sir William Tressel, in 1337. 

a series of working drawings of it by Mr. Butterfield has been published by 
the Oxford Architectural Society. A general view is given in the Gent's. 
Mag., Feb. 1840, and another in '* Petit's Remarks on Architectural charac- 
ter." A brass of a Priest and Franklyn from this church is engraved in 
Waller, pt. 2, and one to Lady Pennebrygg in Gough's Sepulchral Monu- 
ments. 

110. White Waltham, St. Mary. The east window is 
P. ; there are E. E. windows on the north side of the 
chancel, and on the north side of the nave ; an early D. 
window of two lights on the east side of the transept, and 
some mutilated E. E. arches in the nave. The tower is 
early N., of flint and chalk, and has a small wooden spire ; 
there is a fine and large yew-tree in the north-east corner 
of the churchyard, rickman. The tower-arch is very 
plain and rude. By the gate of the churchyard is a cot- 
tage with a pointed arch doorway of old timber- work. a. n. 
In the chancel is a good double piscina with trefoil arches, 
and there is a grave-stone inscribed with letters of the thir- 
teenth century, s.r.g. 

111. Stratfield Mortimer, St. Mary. A poor church, 
much modernized throughout ; the pillars are plain, cham- 
fered with moulded caps, and the north doorway has N. 
shafts, with a porch, i.h.p. 

112. ^i^hnku, St. Nicholas. Modem. 

113. SuLHAMSTEAD Abbas, St. Bartholomew. A small 
church, consisting of chancel, nave, and north aisles, with 
a wooden bell-cot; the side windows of the chancel are 
small plain lancets ; the east window is debased : the nave 
arches are Transition N. ; the south windows are late, poor 
P. ; the north aisle has P. windows in the N. walls. The 
font is good N.,with an arcade. There is a fine spreading 
yew-tree in the churchyard, i.h.p. 



BERKSHIRE, 

114. SuLHAMSTEAD Bannister, St. Michael. Modern 
imitation of E. E. i.h.p. 

115. Sunning, St. Andrew. A large church with chan- 
cel, nave, and aisles, and a checquered P. tower; the 
walls are of flint, the arches E. E., those of the nave 
have round pillars with octagonal capitals, in the chancel 
the arches on the south side are elliptical, those on the 
north pointed, on clustered pillars ; the eastern arch on the 
north side is the canopy of a tomb of rich and beautiful D. 
work, having very fine and enriched mouldings ; the east 
window is good D., others are P., and some debased. There 
are several brasses of the 15th and 16th centuries, and 
there is much wooden screen- work in the chancel, s.r.g. 

116. Sunning, Holy Trinity. Modern. 

117. SuNNiN GHiLL, St. Micliael. Rebuilt of yellow brick, 
excepting a small part of the chancel wall, s.r.g. 

There was an inscription round the chancel-arch in the old church which is 
engraved in Lysons, and in vol. ii. of Archseologia ; it is now lost. 

118. SUNNINGDALE, . Modem. S.R.G. 

119. Theale, Holy Trinity. A modern church, built in 
a costly manner in the E. E. style, at the expense of the 
late Mrs. Shepherd, and her brother, Dr. Routh, the vener- 
able President of Magdalen College, Oxford. 

120. TiDMARSH, St. Laurence. A small E. E. church 
with a semi-octagon apse at the east end ; this has a small 
lancet window in each face with vaulting shafts in the 
angles between. The vault is modern, but a careful resto- 
ration. At the west end supporting the bell-turret, in 1841, 
was an E. E. beam with the tooth ornament boldly cut at 
the angles. The doorway is rich N. and there are brasses 
of a knight in plate armour and a lady, c. 1500. i.h.p. 

The E. E. apse is engraved in the Glossary of Architecture. 

121. Tilehurst, St. Michael. A poor church of late 



DEANERY OF READING. 

and bad P. work, having a south aisle to the nave; the 
chancel and tower are of brick. There are some brasses 
and a sumptuous monument, date 1627. s.r.g. 

122. Ufton Nervet, St Feter, A late, poor P. church, 
with a modern brick tower and wooden spire. The windows 
are square-headed, i.h.p. 

123. Waltham, St. Laurence. Of mixed styles. The 
tower, which is short, has a lofty stair-turret ; and there is 
a large D. west window ; the south aisle is also D. ; the 
rest of the church is modernized. Rickman. The two 
arches at the west end of the nave are of very rude and 
apparently early N. work, on square piers ; the others are 
D., on octagonal pillars with moulded caps, i.h.p. 

124. 1^=* Warfield, St. Michael. A handsome church, 
with a beautiful D. chancel, and a north aisle, a south 
transept, and a western tower with a short wooden spire ; 
the nave has both D. and P. portions ; the arches are 
pointed with octagonal pillars. The chancel has a very 
fine east window of five Ughts, the south windows are of 
two lights, and there is a low side window ; there are 
three very fine sedilia and a piscina: across one of the 
arches of the north chapel is a stone screen, and between 
the two north aisles is a good P. screen, s.r.g. 

125. Wargrave, St. Mary. A cruciform church without 
aisles, with a brick tower of the seventeenth century, at the 
west end. There is a N. doorway on the north side. The 
walls are of flint, but the whole is much modernized and 
spoiled both within and without, s.r.g. 

126. Knoll Hill, . Modern, s.r.g. 

127. Windsor, Old, St. Peter. A good E. E. church 
with a tower at the west end, and a nave and chancel of 
equal breadth. There are some good plain doorways, some 
good E. E. windows, and some D. ones inserted, there are 
also some modernizations, rickman. 



BERKSHIRE, 

128. Windsor, Holy Trinity. Modern, 

129. ^° Windsor, St. Georges Chapel. This is one of 
the finest P. buildings in the kingdom ; it is regular in its 
plan, and (except the remains of a much earlier wall, and 
one door at the east end) all in one style. It is a most 
valuable edifice for study ; but care must be taken to dis- 
tinguish between the ancient work and the modern res- 
torations, or rather additions, which include the altar 
screen, some of the work of the stalls, the organ-screen, 
the font, and several smaller parts. This chapel stands, in 
a great measure, engaged with other buildings, leaving a 
general view of the south front only. The west end is visi- 
ble in a small court ; the north side and east end are built 
up. The exterior of the chapel is plain, and less imposing 
in the castle yard than might be expected from so large a 
building; but its outline at a distance, combining with 
the other buildings of the castle, is very fine, particularly in 
advancing from the west. 

The shape of this building is singular ; it is a cross 
church, with the transepts ending in octagonal projections, 
which have two heights of windows, the lower ranging with 
those of the aisles, the upper with the clerestory. At each 
end of the aisles are also small octagonal projections side- 
ways ; all these are separated by screens, and form monu- 
mental chapels. In the south transept is placed a modern 
font ; and the chapel at the east end of the north aisle forms 
a retiring room, and an approach to the royal gallery on the 
north side of the altar. 

In the eastern wall of the chapel is a doorway of E. E. 
date ; and perhaps other portions of a date prior to the pre- 
sent chapel may remain ; but the whole of the chapel is a 
specimen of the P. style in its advanced, but not latest 
period. This building was, some years since, put in com- 
plete repair; a new organ-screen, altar-piece, and other 



DEANERY OF READING. 



small portions restored ; the roof of the nave being painted 
with armorial bearings, and the whole highly enriched ; so 
that it now presents one of the best examples of the capa- 
bility of English architecture for the reception of splendid 
colouring and gilding. 

The interior presents a complete arrangement of con- 
nected panelling, there being no real portion of plain wall, 
and the windows and doors being pierced portions of the 
general design. The tracery of the windows is not remark- 
ably rich or varied ; but the transoms are almost all battle- 
mented, and the system of mouldings is so excellent, so 
well harmonized, and so completely supported through every 
part, that the whole effect is more satisfactory than that of 
almost any edifice of the same style. The groining of the 
nave has been particularly noticed in the body of this work, 
(Rickman's Gothic Architecture,) and those of the other por- 
tions though not of such rare occurrence, are equally beau- 
tiful of their kind. That portion which is real fan-tracery, 
is remarkable for the excellence of its proportions and beau- 
tiful combinations of form. 

The west window is, in fact, the whole west end of the 
nave, panelled and pierced down to the top of the door ; it 
has a large portion of good stained glass distributed over it, 
and the effect of this, when the sun is westward, must be 
seen to be properly appreciated. 

The east window, and a few others, have been deprived 
of a large portion of tracery, and filled with transparent 
pictures of large size, and (considered as pictures) of great 
beauty; but certainly not producing that rich and mys- 
terious efiect which is caused by the Mosaic glass of ancient 
date. 

The fittings of the choir, in which are placed the banners 
of the Knights of the Garter, are mostly modern, and, as 
well as the other modern portions, have been partially 



BERKSHIRE, 

copied from various parts of the building, and probably 
from remains of the old stalls; but they certainly bear 
marks of being rather copies of parts, than compositions of 
an' ancient architect. 

There are a few ancient monuments, but mostly late, and 
not very good, except a small niche to Bishop Beauchamp, 
and the iron monument of King Edward IV., which, on 
account of the material, deserves minute attention. 

There are seven arches in the nave, and seven in the 
choir. The height of the nave is not great in proportion 
to its breadth ; but the arches being narrow, only one-third 
of the breadth of the nave, the whole effect is very fine. 

The mouldings of the piers are different from those of 
most buildings of the same date, and are much more effec- 
tive as to light and shade than P. piers in general. 

The principal exterior enrichments are the pierced para- 
pet and battlements, which are of very good design. 

The buttresses do not finish with pinnacles, but square 
battlemented turrets, something like those of the Beau- 
champ chapel, at Warwick ; to the east of this chapel, is a 
building of later date, called the tomb-house. 

There are several small portions of the cloisters, and 
other adjacent buildings, that deserve attention. 

The extensive erections, of various dates, which are com- 
prised within the walls of Windsor Castle, claim particu- 
lar notice and attention. The general exterior appear- 
ance of the castle is mostly later than the restoration of 
Charles II. ; but there are various portions of much earher 
date. RiCKMAN. 

The engravings of the castle and chapel are too numerous to specify here, 
but attention may be directed to an interesting paper by Mr. Blore, on the 
cloisters, with an engraving, in vol. iii. of the Archaeological Journal ; to Brit- 
ton's Architectural Antiquities, vol. iii., for a series of views of the chapel ; and 
to Sir Jeffrey Wyatville's " Illustrations of Windsor Castle," for a full and 
elaborate description of that building. 



DEANERY OF READING. 

130. Windsor, New, St. John Baptist. Rebuilt, c. 1821. 

131. Winkfield, St. Mary. Tower, nave, with north 
aisle, chancel, with north and south chapels. The tower is 
of brick, and probably of the seventeenth century, the rest 
of the church P., but so much altered that little of the 
original character remains. The piers have been moved 
from their original places, there are some plain oak seats in 
the nave, and a small sixteenth century brass, a.n. 

132. Wokingham, All Saints. A mixed church partly 
D. and partly P. ; the east window is D. of five lights, 
with foliated heads reaching to the arch without tracery. 
The nave is P., remarkably lofty, with very tall arches ; and 
has a clerestory and an open timber roof. There is a 
plain, clumsy P. tower which is very little higher than the 
nave ; over the chancel-arch is a three-light P. window. 
The font is P. octagon, panelled. In this parish are some 
good timber houses with their original barge-boards, i.h.p. 

A view of this church is engraved in the Beauties of England and Wales. 

133. WooLHAMPTON, St. Peter. A small churchy con- 
sisting of chancel, nave, and wooden bell-cot. The east end 
of the chancel is of modern brick-work, the side windows 
are lancets. The nave also has lancet windows which seem 
original ; the bell-cot is on the west gable ; there are two 
small buttresses about six feet high at the west angles, but 
this end is also patched with brick-work. The font is N., 
round, with circular arches and figures formed of lead, the 
font itself is of stone. The south doorway is Transition N., 
plain. I.H.P. 



H 



BERKSHIRE, 



Beanerg of iSetubury. 

134. i^" Ald WORTH, St. Mary. A small but good D. 
church consisting of a nave, with north aisle, chancel, and 
a tower, at the west end, which is E. E. plain, not square 
but oblong in plan, with a gabled roof, the lower part is 
open to the nave. This church is celebrated for the 
number of very rich tombs it contains ; they are D. 
with rich canopies, mostly of one age, though the figures 
are of different dates ; there are three against the north 
wall, and three against the south wall, all of which 
have very beautiful canopies of uniform design, and two 
altar tombs under the arches between the nave and aisle : 
the effigies remain, though some of them are much mu- 
tilated. The canopies on the north side have shafts with 
capitals of the time of Edward T. The effigies are curious 
and valuable ; that of the lady on the south side is executed 
with much taste and feeling. There was also an external 
sepulchral arch with an effigy. The church has within the 
last few years been restored and modernized in very poor 
taste, the monument in the centre injured, and the one on 
the exterior bricked up. These tombs are supposed to have 
been erected to the De la Beche family, by Sir Nicholas 
de la Beche, who was tutor to Edward the Black Prince, 
and died in 1347. Beche castle, the ancient residence of 
the family, was situated within a short distance south-east 
of the church ; it is now destroyed, and its site occupied by a 
farm-house, but numbers of encaustic tiles have been found 
there. There is a remarkably large yew-tree in the church- 
yard. I.H.P. 

135.^" AviNGTON, St. Mary? This is a very curious 
and fine N. church, with a rich arch between the nave and 



DEANERY OF NEWBURY. 

chancel, which seems to have failed at an early period, and 
has been lately drawn (in Mr. Britton's Architectural An- 
tiquities) much too depressed and looking like two arches, 
which appearance it has not really. This arch and that 
of the south door, are very fine ; there is a curious 
division in the chancel (which is nearly as long as the 
nave) with different groinings, but no appearance of this 
division outside. There is a low side E. E. window in- 
serted on the south side of the chancel, and another E. E. 
window inserted on the north side of the nave ; all the 
other windows are small, and the original N. ; they are 
nearly ten feet from the floor. There is a good N. font, 
and at the west end a small E. E. spire bell-turret. This 
church should be carefully studied, being very good N. 

RICKMAN. 

The chancel-arch and the font with details, are engraved in Lysons ; and 
the arch in the Glossary of Architecture, vol. iii. 

136. 1^" Beedon, SL Nicliolds, A Transition N. church, 
with a bell-cot, the plan oblong without aisles. The east 
end has three Transition N. windows, long and narrow, 
round-headed externally, internally pointed, and well 
moulded with the tooth ornament and banded shafts be- 
tween the lights, over these is a small round window of the 
same date. On the north side are two windows similar to 
those at the east end, and one D. square-headed, on the 
south side an original lancet, a Transition N. priest's door- 
way, a D. low side window. The chancel-arch is Transi- 
tion N. with corbelled shafts. The south doorway is E. E. 
well moulded, with detached banded shafts ; the north door- 
w^ay plain Transition N. The west window is a single 
lancet. The roof is open, high pitched, with tie-beams 
and braces. The font is plain round E. E. i.h.p. 

137. BoxFORD, 8t. Andrew, Chancel, nave, north aisle, 
and west tower. A poor P. church, the east window is 



BERKSHIRE, 

of three lights plain, the windows on the south side of 
the nave are square-headed, the arches and aisle on the 
north side modern. The tower is of brick and flint de- 
based work. i.H.p. 

138. Bright Waltham, All Saints. A small church 
consisting of a chancel, nave, and west tower. The walls 
are E. E. or Transition N. The north doorway is N. with 
a billet moulding ; the south doorway Transition N. pointed, 
with an E. E. hoodmould, which is continued as a string 
round the walls. In the chancel is a good P. low side 
wdndow, cut through the E. E. string. The tower is N., 
with P. windows, the chancel screen has the date 1630, the 
font is good N. ; there is a brass of John Newman, 1517, 
and there are some coped tombs in the churchyard, i.h.p. 

139. Brimpton, St. Peter. Chancel, nave, with south 
chapel, and aisle, modern brick tower at west end. The 
east whidow of the chancel, and the chancel-arch are 
modern, there is a P. piscina with a round basin, perfect, 
on a short pillar under a recess with a pointed arch having 
N. mouldings. The windows on the north side of the 
nave are modern. On the south side are two good Tran- 
sition N. arches, with round pillars and moulded caps, 
opening into a very narrow aisle with a lean-to roof, and 
two Transition N. arches across it ; the chapel is modern- 
ized, but has a single-light E. E. window, with a trefoil 
head. The font is plain round, probably Transition N. ; 
the north doorway plain N., blocked up, the south doorway 
modern, i.h.p. 

140. BucKLEBURY, /S'^. Jl/«ry. Chancel, nave, north aisle, 
and west tower. The greater part of the chancel seems to 
have been rebuilt A.D. 1705, by Sir Henry Winchcomb, 
but there is a small portion of the old wall with one lancet 
window remaining. The chancel-arch is destroyed. The 
nave has on the north side three plain Transition N. arches 



DEANERY OF NEWBURY. 

pointed, opening into a late P. aisle. The windows are all 
late P. : the tower is of the same date, and has a good 
tower-arch ; the south doorway is good N., with shafts and 
sculptured caps, over it is a remarkable N. cross projecting 
from the face of the wall, and carried on a head which 
forms the keystone of the arch. There is a very fine yew- 
tree in the churchyard, i.h.p. 

The Norman south doorway is engraved in Lysons. 

141. Marlston, St. Mary? A chapelry to Bucklebury : 
originally N. but much modernized a few years since, and 
pewed throughout ; a good N. doorway remains at the 
north side. e.b. 

142. Catmere, St. Margaret. A small N. church, 
which has lately been carefully restored. The two door- 
ways are original N. work, that on the south side has the 
billet moulding. The font is round and has a row of zig- 
zags and beak-heads, but is much mutilated. The roof is 
good Jacobean, of high pitch, and well moulded. The 
seats are all open, i.h.p. 

143. Ch ADDLE WORTH, St. Andrew. Chancel, nave, 
tower at west end. The chancel has been much altered, 
but still retains on the north side two lancet windows 
splayed both internally and externally ; the nave has also 
been much modernized. The south doorway is good N., 
^vith zigzag mouldings. The tower-arch has N. jambs, 
and a N. head as the impost on one side, but the arch 
itself is P. ogeed. The west window is TVansition N., 
with the billet ornament on the dripstone. The upper 
part of the tower is P. with a square stair-turret on the 
north side. The old font is plain round, and now placed 
under the tower, i.h.p. 

144. Chieveley, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, north chapel, 
west tower. The chancel is E. E., with a good triplet at 
the east end, and lancet windows at the sides ; the priest's 



BERKSHIRE, 

door is of the same date, square-headed. The window west 
of this is square-headed, D. The chancel-arch and north 
chapel are modern, the nave much altered. The south 
doorway is round-headed, late N., with moulded arch, and 
jamb-shafts, there is a stoup in the east angle. The 
tower-arch and lower part of the tower, are plain E. E., 
with a P. doorway inserted. The upper part, or belfry, 
is D., the angles of which are chamfered off, and have very 
good chamfer terminations; the battlement is also D. 
The font is good P., octagonal, cup-shaped, panelled, i.h.p. 

145. WiNTERBOURNE, St James. Chancel, nave, south 
aisle, west tower. The chancel has a D. east window of 
three lights, with geometrical tracery ; on the south side is 
one lancet, and one two-light E. E. window. The priest's 
door is small, plain P. The windows of the aisle are very 
good D., with trefoiled heads, the arch to this aisle is semi- 
circular, quite plain, recessed, and chamfered. The north 
side of the nave is modernized. The font E. E., plain, 
round, tub-shaped. The tower is of brick, rebuilt in 
1739. I.H.P. 

146. Oare, St. Bartholomew. A small E. E. chapel 
built of brick, with a P. tower and spire, much altered and 
modernized. The east window is a triplet, and there are 
two other lancet windows remaining, and an E. E. chancel- 
arch. The north and south doorways are blocked up, the only 
entrance being through the doorway in the tower, j.e.r. 

147. Leckhampstead, St. James. A small church with- 
out aisles, having a bell-cot at the west end. The chancel- 
has three plain lancets at the east end. There are also 
lancet windows on the north side of the church, one D. on 
the south side, the north and south doorways are good 
Transition N. The font is of the same date, ornamented 
with foliage round the rim and stem. The tie-beams of the 
roof seem like E. E. work, i.h.p. 



DEANERY OP NEWBURY. 

148. CoMPTON, St Nicholas, A small church of mixed 
styles, with a tower, the lower part of which is Transition N., 
the upper part has P. buttresses : on the north side are four 
Transition N. arches, now blocked up in the wall, and the 
aisle destroyed. The font is plain round N., with a singular 
wooden cover, i.h.p. 

149. Garston East, All Saints. A cruciform church, 
with a central tower, the walls late N., with various inser- 
tions. The east window of the chancel is good P., the side 
windows D. There is a pillar piscina, with a sculptured 
cap beneath a trefoiled recess, with a good bold moulding, 
it is Transition N. work, an example rarely met with. The 
priest's doorway is small, plain N. The tower-arches 
are modern imitation of N., the tower is also modern, partly 
imitation of N., and partly of P. On the north side is a 
large D. arch opening into a chapel, with D. windows, the 
transept and windows are also D. The nave has modern 
wooden arches on the south side : the west window is D., 
the north windows P., those on the south side D. The 
south doorway is Transition N. i.h.p. 

150. Enborne, St. Michael. Chancel, nave, south aisle, 
bell-cot at west end. The chancel is E. E., with lancet- 
windows at the sides, and a debased P. east window ; there 
is a double E. E. piscina with shafts and a locker at the back 
of it ; the chancel-arch is N., with imposts of early cha- 
racter ; the arch pointed, but apparently a later alteration 
from a round arch. The nave has three early N. arches on 
the south side, with round pillars and sculptured caps, simi- 
lar arches are built up in the north wall, the aisle is P., 
modernized. The bell-cot is supported on early wooden 
frame-work, at the west end of the nave. The font is N., 
circular, with an arcade round it. i.h.p. 

151. Earnborough, All Saints. A small church, with a 
low pyramidal tower at the west end, and without aisles or 



BERKSHIRE, 

buttresses. The walls are N., the windows all D. and P. in- 
sertions, the chancel-arch is Transition N., small, acutely 
pointed : the north doorway is plain N., blocked up ; the 
south doorway D., the tow^er-arch is good P., with carved 
corbels. The font is modern, a good imitation of P. i.h.p. 

152. Frilsham, St. Frideswide. The walls of this 
church are N. throughout, it consists of chancel, nave, and 
west tower. The chancel has a P. east window of three 
lights, and square-headed side windows of the same cha- 
racter, evidently insertions in the N. walls; the chancel- 
arch is plain N. with square soffit. The nave has on the 
north side a N. doorway, and two small plain N. windows, 
the south doorway is also N. but quite plain, the door 
has the N. iron- work : the windows on this side are some 
modern and some P. insertions. The font is much smaller 
than usual, but original, it is plain, round, tub-shaped. 
There are some late poppy-heads in the nave. The tower 
is modern, of brick, a poor imitation of E. E. i.h.p. 

153. Hampstead Marshall, St. Mary. Of red brick, 
rebuilt in the time of James I. e.b. 

154. Hampstead Norris. St. Mary. Chancel, nave, 
west tower, north porch. The chancel is E. E. ; at the 
east end are two lancet windows externally but splayed in- 
ternally so as to terminate in a single round moulding, 
very simple but good; there is a trefoiled piscina sup- 
ported on a shaft : the sedilia are formed in the sill of 
the south-eastern Avindow : there is a small lancet-shaped 
priest's door : the chancel-arch and roof are modern. The 
nave has two lancet windows on the north side ; those on 
the south side are chiefly P. The north porch is plain, P. ; 
the doorway is N. with the billet moulding ; inside is a 
deep E. E. recess for the stoup : the south doorway is also 
plain N. The staircase to the rood-loft remains, and a 
small P. window to give light to it. The tower-arch is 



DEANERY OF NEWBURY. 

Transition N., pointed ; the tower is plain P. with very 
thick flint walls. The roof of the nave is of the style 
called Jacobean, with the date 1635. i.e. p. 

155. Langley, JSt Mary. Church destroyed. 

156. Hermitage, -. Modern, c. 1830. e.b. 

157. Hungerford, St. Laurence. Rebuilt in 1814. A 
good P. font, a cross-legged effigy and a brass with a 
curious representation of the Trinity are preserved from 
the old church, e.o.t. 

A view of the old church is given in the Beauties of England and Wales. 

158. Ilsley East, St. Mary. A small church of mixed 
styles, with a low D. tower, and an E. E. chancel, with 
foliated lancet windows, one of which has the tooth orna- 
ment in very bold projection on the dripstone ; the east 
window is a single lancet with a foliated head, and a circle 
a short space above it. The nave has Transition N. arches 
on the south side, and a D. doorway with the ball-flower 
ornament. The south aisle is E. E., the north aisle mo- 
dern. I.H.P. 

1 59. Ilsley West, All Saints. A late poor P. church, 
with a wooden bell-cot, no aisles, and the windows square- 
headed P. At the east end is a tolerable barge-board of 
Jacobean character ; the porch has the date of 1632 upon 
it, which is probably the age of the roof, and the greater part 
of the church, i.h.p. 

160. Inkpen, /S'^. Michael. A small plain church, mostly 
modern, with a few E. E. windows, and a Transition N. 
doorway : there is a tomb with a cross-legged effigy, i.h.p. 

161. Kintbury, St. Mary. A small cross church of 
mixed styles. The chancel is D., there is a good three-light 
east window, the chancel-arch is plain N., but mutilated ; 
and has squints on each side. The north transept-arch is 
Transition N., the transept D., the south transept modern : 
the walls of the nave are N., with P. windows inserted, the 

I 



BERKSHIRE, 

south doorway is good N., with the billet and chevron mould- 
ings. The tower is E. E., with a N. west doorway, and a 
Transition N. tower-arch, pointed. In the chancel is a 
good brass, 1626. i.h.p. 

162. i^"' Lambourne, JSt Michael. A large and fine 
cruciform church, with a tower at the intersection. The 
chancel has a fine P. east window of five lights, the inner 
arch of the hood is carried on corbel-heads of good bold 
sculpture ; on the north side are two P. arches opening to 
a P. aisle; on the south side a D. arch, and a D. window 
of four lights, the sill of which formed the sedilia, and has 
a piscina in the angle. The tower-arches are good Tran- 
sition N., almost E. E. ; the caps of the shafts have the N. 
abacus but E. E. foliage ; the edge shafts of the east and 
west arches are terminated by good corbels. The tower itself 
is of N. character, and has good small round N. windows. 
The north transept has a P. window at the end, a Transition 
N. arch on the west side, a D. arch and a lancet window on 
the east side ; the roof is of plain open timber-work of early 
character, with tie-beam and king-post, which wdth the 
corbels appear to be E. E. The south transept has an 
early D. window with geometrical tracery at the end ; on 
the east side is a large and rich D. arch, carried on sin- 
gular corbel-heads ; the roof of this transept is similar to 
that of the north, but not quite so good nor so early. The 
eastern aisle of this transept is a good D. chapel, in which is 
the tomb and brass of the founder, John de Estbury. 1372. 
The nave is of four bays with late N. arches, the capitals 
ornamented with foliage, some of which is rather of a 
Greek character, but all have been much mutilated by the 
galleries, which with the pews are of very bad character ; 
the roof is modern ; the windows on the north side are D., 
square-headed; the north doorway is of the same style 
with moulded imposts; the west doorway is late N., the 



DKANKRt OF NEWBURY. 

arch enriched with chevrons, the caps of the shaft with 
E. E. foHage and bands; a large P. window is inserted over 
this doorway, and in the gable is a small round N. window. 
The south porch is D., with a room over it, in which is a fire- 
place, with a small good D. chimney in place of a finial on the 
gable. On the south side of the chancel is a late P. chapel, 
belonging to some almshouses adjoining to the churchyard ; 
it is fitted up with rude stalls for the almsmen, around a 
high tomb, with the brass of the father of the founder, 
John Estbury, 1485, and here the almsmen are still as- 
sembled to daily prayer. There are other brasses in this 
church to John Estbury, 14 — (the blank never filled up) ; 
another of the fifteenth centuiy in the chancel, mutilated, 
but with the emblems of the evangelists ; and another to 
Thomas Garrard, 1619, with two figures in good preser- 
vation. I.H.P. 

1 63. Woodlands, Si. Mary. A chapelry to Lambourne, 
built c. 1830. E.B. 

164. Newbury, St. Nicholas. A large P. church, with 
a tower at the west end. The nave has aisles, and a 
clerestory, the arches are four-centred, on clustered columns ; 
the clerestory windows are large P. ; the roofs are good, 
open timber. It is dreadfully mutilated by galleries, &c. 
The tower has octagonal turrets at the angles. There is a 
brass to the memory of John Small wood, alias Wynch- 
combe, (Jack of Newbury?) who died 1519, and who is 
said to have built the church, s.r.g. 

165. Peasemork, St. Mary. Rebuilt in 1847, in a 
very handsome manner in the D. style at the expense of 
the incumbent, the Rev. T. A. Houblon. 

166. Shalbourne, St. Michael. A small, oblong church, 
without aisles, but with a chapel on the S. side. The 
chancel is early D. ; the east window of three lights, very 
good, with rich mouldings and jamb shafts; there is a 



BERKSHIRE, 

small early D. trefoiled piscina with a wooden shelf: the 
chancel-arch is destroyed. The nave was originally E. E., 
two lancet windows remain, but the rest are square P. 
insertions ; the south doorway is good N., with chevron and 
scallop mouldings. The tower is late P., the font also P., 
plain octagon, cup-shaped, i.h.p. 

167. ^Rxvf, St.Mari/. Recently rebuilt, e.b. 

In this parish are the remains of Donnington castle, 
consisting of the gateway tower with round turrets at each 
angle ; they are early P. A view of what remains is en- 
graved in Woolnoth's Castles of England. 

168. Shefford, Great or West, St. Mary. A small 
church of mixed styles, oblong, without aisles. The tower 
is at the west end, the lower part round, late N., built of 
flint with massive walls, the upper part is P., octagonal. 
The tower-arch is Transition N., pointed. The chancel is 
E. E. with a D. and P. window inserted. The font which 
is round N. is richly covered with scroll-work. There is a 
Transition N. doorway, i.h.p. 

■[f he font is engraved in Lysons and in Van Voorst's series, and the south 
door in the Archaeologia, vol. xxiii. 

169. Shefford, Little or East, . A small poor P. 

chapel, with square-headed late P. windows, and a wooden 
bell-cot at the west end. In the chancel is the tomb of John 
Eettiplace, Esq., 1524, and in the windows the arms of Eet- 
tiplace quartering Bessels. 

Near the church is a MANOR-HotSE of the time of Henry 
VIIL, long uninhabited, the hall only used as a barn, i.h.p. 

170. Speen, St. Mary. A spacious and handsome 
country church, windows Elamboyant, some of the same 
character recently added. There is much in this church 
that is interesting: the tower is bad. e.b. 

171. Speenhamland, St. Mary. A small chapel c. 
1820, 



DEANKRY OF NEWBURY. 

172. Stock Cross, . Built at the expense of 

the Rev. H. W. Majendie, vicar of Speen, in 1846, at a cost 
of £2500, in the P. style, e.b. 

173. Stanford Dingley, St. Denis. Chancel, nave, 
aisles, wooden bell-tower at the west end. Chancel rebuilt of 
brick c. 1768. The chancel-arch is Transition N., pointed, 
the two eastern arches of the nave are small plain N., the 
others are Transition N., pointed : the north aisle has N. 
east and west windows, the side windows are E. E. The 
south aisle has a remarkable window at the east end, a 
small oval, foliated on the exterior, splayed to a much 
larger circular opening within. The south doorway is very 
uncommon, the inner head trefoiled with a circular orna- 
ment introduced at the point ; over this is a well-moulded 
pointed arch, partly concealed by the plaster ceiling of the 
porch, the door has E. E. iron-work. The font is plain, 
round, tub-shaped, N. The tower is supported upon a 
wooden framework within the walls of the nave; it is 
chamfered and seems to be P. The west doorway and 
window of the nave are also P. There are three brasses, 
one of Margaret Dyneley, 1444, and two small ones of the 
time of James I. i.h.p. 

174. Thatch AM, Si. Luhe. Chancel, nave, aisles, west 
tower. The chancel is modern, the chancel-arch and 
nave-arches Transition N. The south doorway N., and the 
north doorway P. The tower has a D. doorway and good 
D. windows. The font is P., plain, i.h.p. 

The Norman doorway is engrared in Lysons* 

175. Greenham, Chapelry of Thatcham. A small ob- 
long church, with a wooden bell-cot on the west gable. It 
seems to have been originally E. E., but is modernized 
throughout. The font has its original basin, plain round, 
probably E. E. 5 the west doorway is modern and bad. i.h.p. 



MRKSHlREj 

176. MiDGHAM, St. Margaret. Rebuilt 1714. 

177. Wasing, St. Nicholas. Modern and bad, with 
round-headed windows. There is some painted glass con- 
sisting of small groups of figures; one has the date 1658 
and an inscription in Flemish, another 1665 ; this is pro- 
bably the date of the church, i.h.p. 

178. 1^* Welford, St. Gregory. Curious for its round 
tower, the lower part of which and a portion of the wall, 
a north door and some windows now stopped are all N. 
The church and chancel are E. E., with a modern east 
window, and a very good P. south aisle and wooden porch. 
The upper part of the tower and the spire are late E. E. 
and almost D. i the tower becomes octagon above, and the 
spire ribbed, with eight good double windows. This is 
one of the largest of the round towers, and constructed as 
to the early part of it of small stones. There is a very 
fine round font in excellent preservation, and curious from 
its N. form and E. E. details ; it has sixteen intersecting 
arches round it. The E. E. portion of this church is very 
good with fine sedilia. rickman. 

A general view of this church is given in Lysons, and the tower-arch and 
doorway in the Archaeologia, vol. xxiii. 

179. WiCKHAM, St. Swithin. The tower has a balustre 
belfry window, and quoins which look very much like Saxon 
long and short work, but it wants more minute ex- 
amination. Rickman. The walls of this tower are very 
thick, the masonry consisting of flint and mortar in alter- 
nate layers about three inches thick. The windows are 
small, round-headed, splayed both inside and outside. In 
the belfry the north and south windows are similar to 
those below, but the east and west windows are of two 
lights, with a rude balustre between, having a square 
abacus, round mouldings to the cap and base, and a round 
fillet near the top ; each of these balustres stands in the 



DEANERY OF NEWBURY. 

centre of the wall and support a long stone which runs 
right through, slightly projecting on each side, and carries 
the impost which projects almost as far. The body of the 
church, with its aisles and chancel, was rebuilt from a de- 
sign of Mr. B. Ferrey, in the D. style, in 1846-49, at the 
expense of the Rev. W. Nicholson, rector of Welford, to 
which this is a chapel ry. The work is done in the most 
sumptuous manner, and the sculpture of the foliage on the 
capitals and bosses is equal to the best ancient work, i.h.p. 
180. Yattendon, St. Feter and St. Paul. Chancel, nave, 
west tower, south and west porches : this church is of P, 
character throughout, having been rebuilt about 1450 by 
John Norreys, Esq. The east window is of five lights, 
the side windows of three : there is a priest's door, and a 
panelled wooden ceiling with a boss over the altar. The 
chancel-arch is destroyed : part of a P. roodscreen and the 
staircase turret to the rood-loft remain. The nave win- 
dows are all good three-light P. : the pulpit Jacobean : the 
font plain octagonal. The south doorway is good square- 
headed P. ; the dripstone terminations are female heads 
with the horned head-dress. The tower is P., with a good 
west doorway and a west porch, which is of open timber- 
work with a plain five-foiled barge-board, the work is 
very good but evidently later than the doorway, i.h.p. 
p 181, WooBUAYiE, (West), St. Laurence. Of brick, built 
in the eighteenth century, e.b. 



BERKSHIRE, 



IB^anere of OTallingfortr. 

182. Basilden, St. Bartholomew. This church is much 
modernized, but the chancel is good early D., the windows 
original, with some glass in the heads of the same period, 
that in the east window is modern : the chancel- arch is 
good D.; the nave is chiefly of the same style, but with an 
E. E. south doorway and E. E. arches on the north side. 
The tower is of brick, of the time of George III., and the font 
modern P. On the outside of the south wall of the chan- 
cel is a recess for a tomb, with a rich and fine D. canopy, 
under which formerly lay the effigy of the founder, but the 
figure has been long destroyed, i.h.p. 

183. AsHAMPSTEAD, St. Clement. A Transition N. 
church, consisting of chancel, nave, and wooden bell-cot 
at the west end. The east window is a modern triplet ; 
the side windows of the chancel are single lancets, round- 
headed, evidently Transition N., the chancel-arch is de- 
stroyed. The north side of the nave has a lancet window 
and a Transition N. doorway ; the windows on the south 
side are modern ; the west window is a single lancet. The 
south doorway plain Transition N., pointed. The wooden 
bell-tower is carried on timbers with P. mouldings, i.h.p. 

184. Brightwell, St. Agatha. Chancel, nave, aisles, 
west tower. The chancel of this church is D., with one 
small lancet window ; there are two D. sedilia, and a 
piscina of the same date; the east window is a P. in- 
sertion. The nave and aisles are also D., the clerestory 
is P. ; the north doorway is good, but the shafts are 
destroyed ; the south doorway and porch are D., with 
some good iron-work; there are also some fragments of 
good D. glass, and some small brasses, i.h.p. 



DEANERY OF WALLINGFORD. 

185. Cholsey, St. Mary. A cruciform church, without 
aisles. The chancel is very fine E. E., with three lancets 
on each side, and a fine east window of three lights with 
plain circles in the head. There is a plain N. arch in the 
east wall of the north transept : the south transept has a 
single N. window, the others are P. The south doorway 
of the nave is good N., with the zigzag and billet mould- 
ings, and sculptured caps, and the iron-work is original. 
The nave has no windows on the north side ; there are two 
long and narrow N. windows on the south side. The tower- 
arches are very massive, early N., the upper part of the tower 
is D., and a D. octagonal stair-turret with a good pyramidal 
roof also remains. There are some inscriptions on brass 
plates dated 1361 and 1394, and a figure of John Men, 
vicar 1471. i.h.p. 

186. MouLSFORD, St. John Baptist. A small D. church. 
The east window is of three lights, the side windows lan- 
cets : there is a small chapel on the north side. This church 
has lately been restored by Mr. G. G. Scott, at the expense 
of R. Morrell, Esq., lord of the manor, i.h.p. 

187. Wallingford, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, aisles, 
west tower. The nave pillars and arches are D. octagonal, 
with moulded caps, the chancel is debased P. ; the tower 
is P., with a good stair-turret, round, with a bold projection 
in the middle of the south side : the south doorway and 
porch are E. E., the windows are chiefly P., but some are D. 
The interior of this church is much spoiled by galleries and 
pews. On the tower, which was built, according to tradi- 
tion, from the ruins of the castle, there is a sculptured figure 
on horseback, supposed to represent King Stephen, i.h.p. 

188. Wallingford, St. Peter. Rebuilt in 1769, the 
tower in 1777, at the expense of Judge Blackstone. 

189. ^MAA^GYORD, St. Leonard. A small plain church, 
with a N. doorway on the north side of the nave, and lan- 

K 



BERKSHIRE. 

cet windows blocked up in the chancel, a south aisle has 
been destroyed ; there is a modern bell-turret of wood at 
the west end. 

Near the church is a house of the time of Henry VIIL, 
one front perfect, with two bay windows of two stories, 
battlemented, and a fire-place with a four-centred arch. 

The earth-works of Wallingford castle are still nearly 
perfect, and there are some small fragments of building of 
the thirteenth century, i.h.p. 

190. SoTWELL, St. Leonard, A small poor chapel, ob- 
long, with a wooden bell-cot on the west end. The head 
of the north doorway is of the form called the square- 
headed trefoil, and is probably E. E., and one of the 
windows on the north side may be of the same date, 
it is of two lights, with a square label over, the mould- 
ing of which is early, and there is a head between the 
lights, which are round-headed. The other windows are P., 
square-headed, of two lights, foliated. The south doorway 
is round-headed, but quite plain. Over the altar-platform 
is a P. coved ceiling of panelled wood-work, i.h.p. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



k 



Abingdon, St Helen 

St. Nicholas 

Abbey - 

Aldermaston - 
Aldworth - 
Appleford 
Appleton 

Manor House - 

Arborfield 
Ardington - 
Ashampstead - 
Ashbury 
Aston Tirrold 
Aston Upthorpe 
Ayington 

B. 

Barkham 

Basilden 

Baulking 

Bear- wood 

Beedon 

Beenham 

Besselsleigh - 

Binfield 

Bisham - - - 

Priory - 

Blewbury - 

Boxford 

Bradfield 

Bray - 

Ockwell's House 

BUCKLAND - 

Bucklebury - 
Bright Waltham - 
Brightwell 
Brimpton 
Burghfield - 
Buscott 



No. 

1 

2 

ib. 

76 

134 

67 

4 

ib. 

77 

6 

183 

7 

8 

11 

135 



79 

182 

70 

78 

136 

80 

9 

81 

82 

ib. 

10 

137 

83 

84 

ib. 

13 

140 

138 

184 

139 

85 

14 



No. 



Catmere 


- 


142 


Chaddleworth 


- <• 


143 


Challow, East 


. 


43 


West 


- 


44 


Chamey 


- 


47 


Manor House - 


ib. 


Chieveley 


- 


144 


Childrey 


- 


15 


Chilton - 


. 


16 


Cholsey 


- 


185 


Clewer - 


- 


86 


ColeshiU 


_ 


17 


Cookham 


- 


87 


Cookbam Dean 


- 


88 


Compton 


- 


148 


Compton Beauchamp 


19 


Coxwell, Great 


- 


20 


Bam - 


. 


ib. 


Little 


_ 


27 


CUMNOR 


- 


18 


D. 






Denchworth - 


_ 


21 


Didcot - 


- 


22 


Drayton 


- 


3 


E. 






Eaton Hastings 


- 


23 


Enbome 


- 


150 


Englefield - 


- 


90 


F. 






Faringdon - 


- 


26 


Radcott Bridge 


ib. 


Famborough - 


- 


151 


Fawley, Great 


- 


25 


Finchampstead 


- 


91 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 







No. 








No. 


Frilsham 


. 


152 




L. 






Fyfield - 


- 


24 


l^" Lambourne 


. 


_ 


162 


Manor Hous< 


i- 


ib. 


Langley 


- 


- 


155 








Leckhampstead 


- 


147 


G. 






Letcombe Basset - 


- 


41 




. 


49 


V 


egis - 


- 


42 


Garford 




Garston, East 


_ 


149 


Castle 


- 


- 


ib. 


Goosey - 


_ 


61 


Littleworth 


- 


- 


28 


Greenham 


_ 


175 


Lockinge 


- 


- 


45 


Grove - 


_ 


72 


Longcot 


- 


- 


57 








Longworth 


- 


- 


46 


H. 






Lyford - 


- 


- 


31 


Hagbourn 


. 


29 




M. 






Hampstead, East 


- 


89 


Maidenhead 


- 


- 


94 


— Marshall - 


153 


Marcham 


- 


- 


48 


Norris 


_ 


154 


Marlston 


- 


- 


141 


Hanney 


_ 


30 


Midgham 


- 


- 


176 


Harwell 


- 


32 


Milton - 


- 


- 


50 


Hatford 


. 


33 


1^" MORETON, ] 


N^ORTH 


- 


51 


Hendred, East 


- » 


34 


{ 


South - 


- 


52 




- 


ib. 


Moulsford 


- 


- 


186 


Hendred, West 


_ 


38 










Hermitage 


- 


156 




N. 






Hinksey, North, oi 


f Ferry 


35 


Newbury 


_ 


_ 


164 


South 


. 


36 










Hinton Walridge 


- 


39 




0. 






Hungerford - 


- 


157 


Oare - 






146 


Hurley - 


- 


92 










Priory - 


- — 


ib. 




P. 






Hurst - 


- 


93 


Padworth 


_ 


. 


95 








Pangboume 


- 


. 


96 


I. 






Peasemore 


- 


. 


165 








Purley 


_ 


_ 


97 


Ilsley, East - 


- 


158 


Pusey - 


„ 


_ 


53 


'West - 


- 


159 










Inkpen 


- 


160 




R. 












Radley - 


. * 


_ 


54 


K. 






Reading, Holy Trinity 


- 


102 








St Giles - 


_ 


101 


Kennington - 


_ 


65 


C*. T«T 




103 
ib. 


Kingston Bagpuze 


- 


40 


Abbey 


_ 




■ Lisle 


- 


59 


Friary Church 


_ 


ib. 


New Bridge 


- 


ib. 


Oi 


. Laurence 


_ 






99 


Kintbury 


- 


161 


St 


. Mary 


_ 


98 


KnoU HiU - 


- 


126 


— ^St 


. Mary's Chapel 


100 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



No. 
Remenham - - - 104 
Ruscombe - - - 105 



Sandhurst • - - 106 

Shalboume - - - 166 

Shaw .... 167 

Donnington Castle - ib. 

Shefford ( Great or West) - 1 68 

(Little or East) - 169 

Manor House - ib. 

Shillingford ... 55 

Manor House - ib. 

Shinfield - - - 107 

Shottesbrooke - - 109 

Shrivenham - - - 56 

Sotwell - - - - 190 

Sparsholt ... 58 

Speen . ... 170 

Speenhamland - - 171 

Stanford Dingley - - 173 

Stanford-in-the-Vale - 60 

Steventon ... 62 

Stock Cross - - - 172 

Stratford Mortimer - - 111 

Streatly . - - 63 

Sulham . - - 112 

Sulhamstead Abbas - 113 

Bannister- 114 

Sunningdale > - . 118 

Sunninghill - - . 117 

Sunningwell - - . 64 

Sunning, Holy Trinity - 116 

St Andrew . 115 

Sutton Courtney - 66 

Manor House- - ib. 

Swallowfield - - - 108 



Thatcham - - - 174 
Theale - - - - 119 
Tidmarsh - - . 120 



Tilehurst 
Tubney 



U. 



Ufpington - - - 

Ufton Nervet- 

Upton . - . - 

W. 

Wallingford, St Leonard 

St. Mary . 

St Peter - 

Manor House 

Castle - - - 

Waltham 

Wantage - . - 

Warfield 

Wargrave - . - 

Wasing ... 

Welford . - . 

White Waltham - 

Wickham - . _ 

Windsor, Holy Trinity - 

■ New 

Old 

St George's 



Chapel - - . 

Castle - - - 

Wmkfield - 
Winterboume 
Wittenham, Abbott's or 

Little - - _ 

Earl's or Lono 

Wokingham - - - 
Woodhaye, West - 
Woodlands ... 
Woolhampton 
Woolstone . - - 
Wootton - - - 

Wytham ... 



Yattendon 



No. 

121 

5 



68 

122 

12 



189 
187 
188 

ib. 

ib. 
123 

71 
124 
125 
177 
178 
110 
179 
128 
130 
127 

129 

ib. 

131 

145 

74 

73 

132 

181 

163 

133 

69 

37 

75 



180 



INDEX OF saints; 



AFTER WHOM CHURCHES ARE NAMED IN BERKSHIRE. 



St. Agatha, 184. 

All Saints, 11. 16. 17. 22. 26. 31 ? 41. 

45. 48. .51. 53. 61. 66. 69. 75. 81. 82. 108. 

132. 138. 149. 151. 159. 
St. Andrew, 29. 42. 56. 83. 86. 115. 137. 

143. 
SS. Andrew and Mary Magdalene, 94. 
St. Augustine, 34. 

St. Bartholomew, 77. 113. 146. 182. 
St. Blaize, 50. 

St. Catharine, 78. 
St. Clement, 183. 

St. Denis, 60. 173. 

St. Faith, 55. 

St. Faith and All Saints, 74. 

St. Frideswide, 152. 

St. George, 129. 
St. Giles, 20. 101. 
St. Gregory, 178. 

St. Helen, 1. 

Holy Trinity, 6. 38. 87. 102. 116. 119. 
128. 

St. James, 21. 30. 33. 54. 59. 79. 91. 96. 

105. 145. 147. 
St. John, 36. 52. 103. 109. 
St. John Baptist, 24. 40. 72.95. 130. 186. 



St. Laurence, 4. 5. 9. 35. 44. 99. 120. 123. 

157. 181. 
St. Leonard, 64. 189. 190. 
St. Luke, 174. 

St. Margaret, 39. 142. 176. 

St. Mark, 90. 

St. Mary the Virgin, 7. 12. 13. 14. 15. 

25. 27. 28. 46. 57. 63. 68. 76. 80. 85. 92. 

97. 98. 100. 107. 110. 111. 125. 131. 134. 

135? 140.141? 144.153.154.155.158. 

161. 163. 165. 167. 168. 170. 171. 185. 

187. 
St. Mary Magdalene, 89. 
St. Matthew, 32. 
St. Michael, 8. 10. 18. 23. 49. 62. 84. 106. 

114. 117. 121. 124. 150. 160. 162. 166. 

St. Nicholas, 2. 43. 70. 93. 104. 112. 
136. 148. 164. 177. 

St. Peter, 3. 37. 47. 73. 122. 127. 133. 139. 

188. 
SS. Peter and Paul, 67. 71. 180. 

St. Stephen, 58. 

St. Swithin, 19. 65. 179. 

Unknown, 88. 118. 126. 156. 169. 172. 
175. 



oxford : PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTON. 



INDEX OP SAINTS, 



AFTER WHOM CHURCHES ARE NAMED IN BEDFORDSHIRE. 



All Saints, 8. 11. 12. 13. 15.26. 27». 28. 

29. 34. 39. 44. 46. 47. 50. 73. 78. 87. 92. 

93. 94. 96. 98. 99. 108. 110. 113. 123. 

125. 126. 128. 
St. Andrew, 59. 106. 118. 

St. Botolph, 60. 

St. Cuthbert, 1. 

St. Denis, 86. 
St. Dunstan, 85. 

St. Edmund, 107. 

St. George, 55. 112. 
St. Giles, 57. 114. 
St. Guthlake, 103. 

Holy Trinity, 5». 50». 

St. James, 6. 67. 77. 

St John Baptist, 40. 64. 66. 79. 115. 

St. John Evangelist, 2. 

St. Laurence, 14. 35. 80. 
St. Leonard, 32. 49. 127. 



St. Margaret, 27. 43. 53. 

St. Mary Magdalene, 58. 61. 82. 

St. Mary the Virgin, 3. 7. 10. 16. 17. 19. 

20. 23. 30. 33. 38. 42. 50. 52. 54. 62. 68. 

69. 70. 72. 74. 75. 83. 88. 89. 90. 95. 97. 

102. 105. HI. 116. 119. 120. 121. 124. 
St. Mary the Virgin, and St. Helen, 9. 
St. Michael, 25. 76. 109. 

St. Nicholas, 21, 36. 45. 71. 81. 101. 

St. Owen, 18. 

St. Paul, 4. 

St. Peter, 5. 24. 31. 37. 51. 100. 104. 129. 

130. 
SS. Peter and Paul, 41. 63. 65. 91. 

St. Swithin, 122. 

St. Thomas of Canterbury, 22. 

Unknown, 48. 48*. 117. 



THE 



ECCLESIASTICAL 



AliCHITECTURAL TOPOGllAPHY 



ENGLAND. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE 



^(tbaeologtcal institute of Cfiuat ^ntam mh Srelani). 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 



OXFORD AND LONDON, 

JOHN HENRY PARKER. 

MDCCCXLIX. 



OXFORD : 
PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTON. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

The Notes for this county have been prepared chiefly 
by Mr. W. Caveler, with the assistance of the Kev. H. 
Addington, and several others whose experience is the best 
guarantee for their accuracy. The whole have been kindly 
revised by the Rev. A. Baker, the active and zealous 
Secretary of the Buckinghamshire Architectural Society, 
whose remarks and additions have been incorporated. 

The initials of those who have contributed to the work 
are appended to the articles, for which each is responsible. 

H. A. — The Rev. Henry Addington. 

A. B.— The Rev. A. Baker, Aylesbury. 

J. B. — The Rev. John Baron, Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford. 
H. B. — The Rev. Henry Bumey, Rector of Wavendon. 
W. C. — William Caveler, Esq., Architect. 

B. F. — Benjamin Ferrey, Esq., Architect. 
S. R. G.— Sir Stephen R. Glynne, Bart. 
A. N. — Alexander Nisbet, Esq. 

I. H. P.— Mr. I. H. Parker. 

J. L. P. — Rev. John Louis Petit. 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



At the request of several of the subscribers to the work, 
the editor has been induced to abandon the alphabetical 
arrangement of the counties for the future, and to publish 
them in such order as will best consist with the making 
each Diocese complete, before proceeding to another. 

The next county to be published will therefore be 
Oxfordshire, which, with Buckinghamshire and Berkshire, 
already published, wiU complete the diocese of Oxford. 
The Notes for Oxfordshire are nearly ready for the press, 
and it is hoped that this county may be published in 
October. This will be followed by Cambridgeshire, with 
a view to complete the diocese of Ely, to which Bedford- 
shire, already published, belongs. But as each county is 
complete by itself, and the numbering of the pages has 
been purposely avoided, they may be bound together in 
any order that is most convenient to the subscribers. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Those marked R. are mentioned by Rickman, and his notes of them are 
printed entire. 



No. 



Deanery op Buckingham. 



1 Addlngton. 


2 Adstock. 


3 Akeley with Stockholt 


4 Barton Hartshorn. 


5 Chetwode. 


6 Beauchampton. 


7 Biddlesden. 


8 Buckingham. 


9 Caversfield. 


10 Claydon, (Steeple). 


11 Edgcott. 


12 Foscott 


13 Gawcott 


14 HiLLESDON. 


15 Horley. 


16 Hornton. 


17 Leckhampstead. 


18 Lillingstone Dayrell. 


19 Maids Morton. 


20 Marsh Gibbon. 


21 Padburj-. 


22 Preston Bissett. 


23 Radclive. 


24 Shalstone. 


25 Stowe. 


26 Water Stratford. 


27 Sutton, Kings. 


28 Thomborough. 


29 Thornton. 


30 Tingewick. 


31 Turweston. 


32 Twyford. 


33 Westbury. 



No. 



Deanery op Burnham. 

34 Amersham. 

35 Beaconsfield. 

36 Burnham. 

37 Boveney. 

38 Chalfont, St, Giles. 
89 St Peter. 

40 Chesham Bois. 

41 St Mary. 

42 Colnbrook in Horton. 

43 Datchet 

44 Eton. 

45 Ditton. 

46 Denliam. 

47 Dorney. 

48 Chenies. 

49 Latimer. 

50 Famham Royal. 

51 Fulmer. 

52 Hedgerley. 

53 Hitcham. 

54 Horton. 

55 Iver. 

56 Penn. 

57 Penn Street 

58 Stoke Poges. 

59 Taplow. 

60 Upton R. 

61 Wexham. 

62 Wyrardisbury. 

62 Ankerwycke Priory. 

63 Langley Marsh . . . R. 



I 



CONTENTS. 



No. 

Deanery of Muresley. 

64 Astwood R. 

65 Aston Abbots. 

66 Cheddington. 

67 Choulesbury. 

68 Cublington. 

69 Drayton Beauchamp. 

70 Drayton Parsloe. 

71 Dunton. 

72 Edlesborough. 

73 Grandborough. 

74 Grove. 

75 Hardwick. 

76 Hawridge. 

77 Hoggeston. 

78 Great Horwood. 

79 Little Horwood. 

80 Ivinghoe. 

81 Linslade. 

82 Marsworth. 

83 Mentmore. 

84 Mursley. 

85 Nettleden. 

86 Pitstone, or Pightlesthome. 

87 Slapton. 

88 Soulbery. 

89 Stewkley R. 

90 Swanboume. 

91 Tottenhall, or Tottenhoe. 

92 Wliitchurch. 

93 Whaddon. 

93 Snelshall Priory. 

94 WiNGE. 

95 Wingrave. 

96 Winslow. 

Deanery of Newport. 

97 Bletchley. 

98 Bradwell. 

99 Brickhill, (Bow). 

100 (Great). 

101 (Little). 

102 Broughton. 

103 Calverton. 

104 Chicheley. 

105 Clifton Reynes. 



No. 

106 Crawley, (North). 

107 Emberton. 

108 Gayhurst. 

109 Goldington, (Stoke). 

110 Hanslofe. 

111 Castlethorpe. 

112 Hardmead. 

113 Haversham. 

114 Lathbury. 

115 Lavendon. 

116 Brayfield. 

117 Linford, (Great). 

118 Linford, (Little). 

119 Loughton. 

120 Milton Keynes. 

121 Moulsoe. 

122 Newport Pagnel. 

123 Newton Blossomville. 
124 Longueville. 

125 Olney. 

126 Ravenstone. 

127 Shenley Mansell. 

128 Sherrington. 

129 Simpson. 

130 Stanton Bury. 

131 Stoke Hammond. 

132 Stratford, (Fenny). 

133 (Stoney), St. Mary Mag- 
dalene. 

134 • St. Giles. 

135 Tyringham. 

136 Filgrove. 

137 Walton. 

138 Wavendon. 

139 Weston Underwood. 

140 Willen. 

141 Wolverton, Holy Trinity. 
141* St. George. 

142 Wolston (Little). 

143 (Great). 

144 Woughton. 

Deanery of Waddesdon. 

145 Ashendon. 

146 Dorton. 

147 Aston Sandford. 



CONTENTS. 



i 



No. 

148 Brill. 

149 BoarstalL 

150 Chearsley. 

151 Chilton. 

152 Easington. 

153 Claydon, (Middle). 

154 (East). 

155 Crendon, (Long). 
155 Notley Abbey. 

156 Fleet Marston. 

157 Grendon Underwood. 

158 ICKFORD. 

159 Ilmer. 

160 Kingsey. 

161 Ludgershall. 

162 Marston, (North). 

163 Oakley. 

164 Oving. 

165 Pitchcott. 

166 Quainton. 

167 Shabbington. 

168 Waddesdon. 

169 Winchendon, (Upper). 
170 (LowerX 

171 Worminghall. 

172 Wootton Underwood. 

Deanery of Wendover. 

173 Aston Clinton. 

174 St Leonard's. 

175 Aylesbury. 

176 Quarrendon. 

177 Bierton. 

178 Buckland. 

1 79 Stoke Mandevillc, 

180 Bledlow. 

181 Dinton. 

182 Ellesborough. 

183 Haddenham. 



No. 

184 Cuddington. 

185 Halton. 

186 Hampden, (Great). 

187 HartwelL 

188 Hampden, (Little). 

189 Horsenden. 

190 Hulcott. 

191 Great Kimble. 

192 Little Kimble. 

193 Lacy Green. 

194 Lee. 

195 Missenden, (Great). 

196 (Little). 

197 Priors (or Monks) Risborough. 

198 Princes Risborough. 

199 Stone. 

200 Towersey. 

201 Wendover. 

202 Weston Turville, 

Deanery of Wycombe. 

203 Bradenham. 

204 Fawley. 

205 Fingest 

206 Hambledon R. 

207 Hedsor. 

208 Hughendon, or Hitchendon. 

209 Lane End. 

210 Loudwater. 

211 Marlow, (Great). 

212 (Little). 

213 Medmenham. 

214 Radnage. 

215 Saunderton. 

216 Turville. 

217 Woobum. 

218 Wycombe, (High, or Chip- 

ping) R. 

219 (West). 



INTRODUCTION TO BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

It is rather difficult to decide as to the position Bucking- 
hamshire shotdd occupy with regard to its ecclesiastical 
architecture ; it has usually been considered an uninterest- 
ing county, this it certainly is not, neither can it lay claim 
to the possession of any great number of fine churches ; in 
the lower part of the county, the churches are generally 
very inferior both as to size and merit, many of them have 
suffered much from neglect, and others still more from in- 
judicious and tasteless alterations. It must not be imagined 
from this apparently sweeping condemnation that there 
are no churches of value in this part of the county ; there 
are some few of great interest, and which will well repay 
a most attentive examination ; perhaps the best (without 
regard to classification) are North Marston, Priors Ris- 
borough, Chilton, and Hillesdon; the former is a mixed 
church, the best portion being the rich Perpendicular 
chancel with its vestries ; the tower of Priors Risborough 
is very good as to the general design, and has also much 
good detail about it. Chilton is a very fair specimen of a 
mixed church, and Hillesdon a fine specimen of Perpen- 
dicular. There are other churches with some good points 
about them, but it seems only necessary to call attention 
to those named above. In the northern part of the county 
the churches generally are of a superior class, and have a 
great variety of very valuable detail. 



I 



INTRODUCTION TO BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

The external appearance of the churches is usually rather 
plain, there is much rough walHng, and but little very deli- 
cate detail ; this most probably arises from a scarcity of 
good building stone, especially in the lower part of the 
county. 

With the exception of Stewkley, which is well known as 
the rival of Iffley among the richest Norman churches in 
England, there are but few good specimens of Norman 
work remaining, none of any great importance; perhaps 
the best are at Hanslope, Winge, and Leckhampstead ; 
the chancel of Shenley Mansell is a very good specimen 
of transition from Norman to Early English. 

A better account can be given of Early English works, 
for although there are but few churches entirely of that 
style, there is much good detail scattered about ; perhaps 
the finest specimen remaining is the chancel of Chetwode 
church, and after that Lillingstone Dayrell, Cold Bray field, 
the towers of Haddenham and Aylesbury, and parts of 
Leckhampstead ; many of the churches have good win- 
dows, doorways, and other portions of this style ; indeed 
but few of them are without some specimen. The upper 
part of the county is very rich in Decorated work ; Clif- 
ton Reynes, Emberton, Olney, and Great Horwood, are 
all excellent specimens of the style ; in the lower part 
Chesham Bois and the south aisle of North Marston are 
the best examples ; besides these, there is a great amount 
of excellent detail to be found, especially in windows ; 
some are early in the style, others more advanced, and 
have rich flowing tracery of peculiar and elegant design. 

There are but few fine specimens of Perpendicular 
churches remaining ; the best are Maids Morton and 



INTRODUCTION TO BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

Hillesdon, portions of North Crawley, and the chancel 
of North Marston ; the tower of Maids Morton is parti- 
cularly deserving of notice, as having features not to be 
found elsewhere ; the chapel of Eton College should also 
be included in this list, it has some very good portions. 

The list of mixed churches is large, as it will be seen by 
the above classification that very few are entirely of one 
style ; perhaps the best are Aylesbury, Sherrington, Hans- 
lope, Winge, Wingrave, Cuddington, and Great Missenden. 

Spires are a peculiarly rare feature in this county : there 
are only two deserving of especial notice, those at Olney 
and Hanslope ; the first a fine specimen of late Decorated 
work, the latter equally good Perpendicular ; besides these 
there are a very few churches with smaller spires, but 
not of sufficient merit to warrant any particular notice of 
them. 

Towers are numerous and good ; the earlier ones are at 
Haddenham, Aylesbury, Stone, Priors Risborough, Chilton, 
Lillingstone Dayrell, Leckhampstead, Ickford, and some 
others of less merit, these are Early English. Decorated 
towers are neither very common nor good, perhaps the 
best are Preston Blissett, Radclive, Thomborough, Milton 
Keynes, Astwood, and Emberton. As usual the Perpen- 
dicular towers constitute by far the larger number, many 
of them are very good ; Maids Morton has been already 
mentioned; the other good specimens are Hillesdon, 
Winge, Cuddington, Chearsley, Winslow, Bow Brickhill, 
Sherrington, Chicheley, Bletchley, &c. 

Ancient Bell-cots of stone are even more rare than spires, 
there is no doubt but several of the churches once had them 
on the west gable, and in some other situations ; in most 



INTRODUCTION TO BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

cases they have been destroyed, and their place supplied by 
unsightly wooden boxes. 

The only Vestries requiring notice are those at Ayles- 
bury and North Marston, which are fine specimens of Per- 
pendicular work. 

A considerable number of Fonts are still remaining, some 
of them very good ; those at Turville, Priors Risborough, 
Stone, Hawridge, Stoke Goldington, and Castlethorpe, are 
Norman. The Early Enghsh fonts are at Slapton, Cud- 
dington, Choulesbury, and Weston Underwood. The best 
Decorated font is at Drayton Parsloe, there are others at 
Chilton, North Marston, and Astwood. Ditton and Winge 
have good Perpendicular specimens. 

There are several very excellent Sedilia still remaining ; 
those at Lillingstone Dayrell, Leckhampstead and Lee, are 
the best specimens of Early English. Those at Ilmer, Saun- 
derton, Preston BHsset, Lathbury and Milton Keynes, are 
Decorated, and that at North Marston is very good Per- 
pendicular. 

Wherever there are good Sedilia, equally good Piscinas 
are generally to be met with, and as usual, they are more 
numerous than the former. At Towersey the piscina is 
Norman, those at Radnage, Lee, LiUingstone Dayrell, and 
Leckhampstead, are Early English. The best Decorated 
piscina in the county is at North Marston, (in the south 
aisle;) and there are others at Clifton Reynes, Aston 
Abbotts, Great Horwood, Padbury, Grendon Underwood, 
Westbury and Milton Keynes ; there is a fine Perpendicular 
piscina at North Marston. 

There are considerable remains of Carved Wood-work in 
the county, much of it of great merit, although not com- 



INTRODUCTION TO BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 

parable to that which may be seen in other parts of England. 
The best wood roofs are at North Marston, North Crawley, 
Newton Longville, Haddenham, and Wavendon. The rood- 
screen at North Crawley is very fine, and derives additional 
interest from the figures at the base. There are others at 
Cuddington, Bow Brickhill, Stoke Hammond, and Ilmer. 
There is a good parclose-screen at Winge. The only good 
wood pulpit remaining is at Bow Brickhill. The stalls at 
North Marston and Chilton are the best remaining, they 
have fine poppy-heads and rich panelling. Some of the 
open seats are good, the best are at Priors Risborough, 
Princes Risborough, Weston Turville, and Lee. 

Very few good Tombs are now remaining, the best are 
those at CUfton Reynes, which have good effigies and rich 
canopies. Brasses are unusually numerous, but of no great 
interest. 

There is but very little good Painted Glass to be met 
with, the best is in the chancel at Chetwode, which ap- 
pears to be of the thirteenth century ; it has been removed 
from the east window and placed in one on the south side. 



BOOKS EELATING TO THE ARCHITECTURAL 
TOPOGRAPHY OP BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 



Magna Britannia, being a concise topographical account of the 
counties of Great Britain. New Edition. Edited by Rev. D. Lysons 
and S. Lysons, Esq. Part 3. Buckinghamshire. 4to. 1806. 

The Beauties of England and Wales : or Delineations, Topo- 
graphical and Descriptive, of Buckinghamshire. By J. Britton and 
E. W. Brayley. Part 3. 8vo. 1803. 

A Topographical and Statistical Description op the County 
OF Buckingham. By G. A. Cooke. 12mo. 

Kennett's, (Bp.) Parochial Antiquities, attempted in the his- 
tory of Ambrosden, Burcester, and other adjacent parts in the 
counties of Oxford and Bucks, with additions by Dr. Bandinel. 
2 Vols. 4to. Oxford, Clarendon Press. 1818. 

Willis' (Brown) History and Antiquities of the Town, Hun- 
dred, AND Deanery of Buckingham. 4to. 1755. 

Tymms' (S.) Compendium of the History of Buckinghamshire, 
AND THE Norfolk Circuit, forming Vol. I. of the Family Topo- 
grapher. 12mo. 1836. 

Langley's (Thomas) History and Antiquities of the Hundred 
of Desborough, and the Deanery of Wycomb, in Bucking- 
hamshire, including the Borough Towns of Wycomb and Marlow, 
and sixteen other Parishes. 4to. 1797. 

Newcomb's Repertorium, or Ecclesiastical Parochial History 
OF THE Diocese of London. 2 Vols. Folio. 1708. 

Lipscomb's History and Antiquities of the County of Buck- 
ingham. 4 vols. 4to. 1831-47. 

Berry's Pedigrees of the Families in Berkshire, Bucking- 
hamshire, AND Surrey, with the Coats of Arms. Folio, 
1837. 

Ackerman*s History of the Colleges of Winchester, Eton, 
AND Westminster, &c. Imperial 4to. Plates. 1816. 

Todd's, H. J., History of the College of Bonhommes, at Ash- 
ridge, IN the County of Buckingham, founded in the year 1278 
by Edward, Earl of Cornwall, to which is added a description of the 
present mansion. Imperial folio. 33 portraits and plates. 1823. 
Privately printed by the Earl of Bridgwater. 

The History of Newport Pagnell and its immediate Vicinity. 
By Joseph Staines. 8vo. Newport Pagnell. 1842. 



CHEONOLOGICAL TABLE. 



EoR the use of the student a table is subjoined, shewing the 
duration of the styles of English architecture, and the kings reigning 
in each period. 



Kings. Date. 

William 1 1066 

William II 1087 

Henry 1 1100 

Stephen 1135 

Henry II 1154 to 1189 J 

Richard L« 1189 ^ 

John 1199r 

Henry III 1216r 

Edward I." 1272 to 1307 ) 

Edward II 1307) 

Edward ni.^.1327 to 1377 j 

BichardII 13771 

Henry IV 1399 

Henry V 1413 

Henry VI 1422 

Edwam)IV 1461 y 

Edward V 1483 

Richard III 1483 

Henry VII 1485 

Henry VIIL... 1509 to 1546 J 



Style. 

Norman. 

[or English 

Romanesque.] 

Early 

English. 

[or 1st Pointed.] 

Decorated 

English. 

[or 2nd Pointed.] 



Remarks. 

Prevailed little more than 

124 years ; no remains 

really known to be more 

I than a few years older than 

^he Conquest. 



Prevailed about 118 years. 



Perpendicu- 
lar English. 
[or 3rd Pointed.] 



Continued perhaps 10 or 
15 years later. Prevailed 
little more than 70 years. 

Prevailed about 169 years . 

Few, if any, whole build- 
ings executed in this style 
) later than Henry VIII. 

This style used in addi- 
tions and rebuilding, but 
often much debased, as late 
Us 1630 or 1640. 



« [The reign of Richard I. was the chief 
period of the Transition from the Norman to 
the Early English style. The change began 
perhaps a little earlier in a few instances, and 
continued a little later, some buildings of the 
time of King John being of Transition cha- 
racter. 

>> The Transition from the Early English to 
the Decorated style took place chiefly in the 
reign of Edward I. The Eleanor crosses belong 
rather to the latter than the former style. 

c In the latter part of the long reign of 
Edward III. the Transition from the Deco- 
rated to the Perpendicular style began, and 
was almost completed by the time of the acces- 



sion of Richard II. Some buildings of the 
Decorated style may be found of his reign, but 
the works of William of Wykeham, West- 
minster Hall, and many other buildings of this 
period, are of very decided Perpendicular cha- 
racter. Perhaps one of the earliest and best 
authenticated examples of this Transition, 
shewing a curious mixture of the two styles, 
is Edington church in Wiltshire, founded by 
bishop William of Edington in 1352, and con- 
secrated in 1361. The same bishop, who died 
in 1366, commenced the alteration of Win- 
chester cathedral into the Perpendicular style, 
which was continued by William of Wykeham.] 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 



Bcflnerp of 33uc]femg5nm. 

1. Addington, SL Mary. Chancel, nave with clere- 
story, aisles, and south porch, tower at the west end. Prin- 
cipally D., with some good two-light windows in the chan- 
cel : the clerestory windows appear all to have been cir- 
cular, but three only are now remaining ; these are filled 
with D. tracery of varied design. The tower is P. The east 
and some other windows are of the same style, w.c. 

2. Adstock, St. Cecilia. Chancel, nave with south porch, 
tower at the west end. The earliest work in this church 
is a very curious N. doorway on the north side, it has 
every appearance of being very early in the style; the 
chancel-arch is good E. E. supported on corbel-heads. The 
chancel is D. with good windows, the two nearest the west 
end have transoms ; the nave has some very excellent three- 
light P. windows with transoms, and with the tracery con- 
siderably below the arch : the tower is good P. w.c. 

3. Akeley with Stockholt, St. James, Chancel, nave, 
and south porch, modern bell-turret on west gable. The 
south doorway is very plain N., and there are some remains 
of another doorway of the same style on the north side, but 
it has been bricked up and a modern window inserted ; 
there is a good two-light D. window on the south side of 
the chancel, and a low side window of one light, with an 
ogee trefoiled head. East window square-headed P. w.c. 

B 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

4. Barton Hartshorn, St. James. Chancel, nave, and 
transepts, a turret for two bells on the west gable. With 
the exception of an E. E. doorway on the north side, and 
one or two P. windows square-headed, there is nothing of 
interest in this church ; the chancel, bell-turret, and indeed 
nearly every other part is modern, w.c. 

li^ 5. Chetwode, St. Mary and St. Nicholas. Chancel, 
nave, and north transept, tower at the north-west angle. 
Chetwode priory being built against the south side of the 
nave, but little of that part is visible ; there are however 
two very good early D. two-light windows remaining, 
also a few other windows of the same style in different 
parts of the church. The chancel is a fine specimen of E. E. ; 
there is a very good triplet on each side, and a fine five- 
light window at the east end ; on the south side is a rich 
arcade, with shafts and foliated capitals, and the toothed 
ornament in the hollow mouldings, one compartment of this 
is now used as the entrance from the priory ; the east win- 
dow has lately been filled with painted glass not particu- 
larly good, all that remained of the ancient glass from this 
window was placed in the triplet on the south side, and is 
a very good specimen of about the same date as the win- 
dow's. The font is modern, w.c. 

There are engravings of the chancel and of the painted glass in Lysons. 

6. Beauchampton, or Bechampton, St. Mary. Chancel, 
nave with aisles, clerestory, and south porch, tower at the 
west end. Style early D., with very good two-light windows 
to the clerestory ; all the other windows (except one of two 
lights in the tower) are P. ; there is a small D. pierced circle 
within a square on the south side of the tower, w.c. 

A curious brass of William Bawdyn, blacksmith, 1600, is engraved in 
Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 533. 

7. BiDDLESDEN, St. Margaret. A chapel of the time of 
Charles II. No vestiges of the ancient abbey remain. At 



DEANERY OF BUCKINGHAM. 

Eversam, in this parish, there was formerly a chapel dedi- 
cated to St. Nicholas. liYSONS. 

8. Buckingham, St. Feter and St. Paul Rebuilt 1781. 
The chapel of the gild or brotherhood of the Holy Trinity 
was converted into a school-house by King Henry VI. The 
walls are ancient, and a Norman doorway remains. 

The old grammar school is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 585. 

9. Caversfikld, St. Laurence. A small church of 
mixed styles, plan a simple oblong, with a very plain 
massive tower having a gable roof, of the supposed Saxon 
character, at the west end. A south aisle has been destroyed, 
the E. E. arches remain in the wall. The doorway and 
porch late N. ; a N. piscina and a N. font with intersecting 
arcade. In the chancel is a high tomb with rich panelled 
sides to John Langston, Esq., 1487, and two brasses, i.h.p. 

There are engravings of windows, tower, piscina, panel from tomb, and 
mouldings and capitals of north doorway, in the " Guide to the Architectural 
Antiquities in the Neighbourhood of Oxford." Of a brass in Lipscomb, 
vol. ii. p. 599. 

10. Claydon, Steeple, St. Michael. Chancel, nave 
with transept, vestry on south side, tower at west end. 
The latter is D., with very good two-light windows on the 
sides, and one of three lights at the east end. Tower P. 
with good doorway and windows, some modern windows 
inserted above the others. Transepts modern. The present 
vestry seems at one time to have been a porch ; a small 
piscina in south wall of chancel, w.c. 

11. Edgcott, St. Michael. Chancel and nave, tower 
at west end. The chancel is early D. with a P. window in- 
serted at the east end ; the nave seems to have been of 
the same style, but has P. windows. Tower P. w.c. 

12. FoscoTT, or Foxcott, St. Leonard. Chancel, nave, 
and south porch. Originally E. E., of which style there is 
a single-light window in the nave. East window good P. 
of three lights, w.c. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

13. Gawcott, St. Catherine. Rebuilt 1828. 

i^= 14. HiLLESDON, St. Nicholas. Chancel with north 
aisle, and vestry with room over, nave with aisles, clere- 
story, and north porch, transept on south side, tower at 
west end. The whole a very fine specimen of P., although 
rather late in the style. The earliest portion is the tower, 
which is not nearly so rich as the other parts ; the piers and 
arches to the nave are very good, the clerestory windows 
are a series of pierced panels extending the whole length of 
the nave : the roof is not so good as the other portions, it is 
divided into panels by slight oak ribs, the spaces being 
filled in with plaster : the windows are of three and four 
lights with rich tracery in the heads and generally with 
transoms, those at the east end are of four and five hghts. 
The south porch has good angular buttresses, the upper 
stage enriched with panels, a fine niche over the outer 
door, and a richly panelled battlement, the pinnacles are 
destroyed : the interior of the porch has panelling on the 
side walls and a groined ceiling. Leading from the vestry 
to the room above is an octagon staircase-tmTct having a 
rich battlement and pinnacles, and an open lanthorn formed 
by crocketed ogee ribs springing from each pinnacle, and 
terminating in the centre with a rich finial ; the buttresses 
have generally been finished with pinnacles, but these are 
now nearly all destroyed. The whole of the mouldings, par- 
ticularly the plinths and the strings under the windows, are 
very bold, and the mouldings to the doorways are equally 
good. The church is said to have been rebuilt in 1493. 
In the east window is some painted glass representing the 
history of St. Nicholas, w.c. 

There is a general view of this church in Lysons ; a north-east view and 
the north porch in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 20. 

15. HoRLEY, St. JEtheldreda. Chancel, nave, aisles, and 
square tower. The chancel and tower are D. The nave- 



DEANERY 01^ BUCKINGHAM. 

arches, clerestory, and south aisle are also D. The north 
aisle is early P. The thi'ee doorways are fine E. E. 
The windows which have escaped alteration are chiefly 
good D., and some are early P. The piscina is E. E., with 
trefoiled head and the tooth ornament, i.h.p. 

16. HoRNTON, St. John Baptist. Chancel, nave with 
aisles, west tower. Chancel E. E., with some remains of N. 
work, and a P. east window. The arches on the north side 
of nave are Transition N., those on the south side D. The 
two lower stages of the tower are E.E., the upper D., it has 
a square bold turret at the north-east angle. The font is 
cylindrical Transition N. There are the remains of painting 
of the fourteenth century ; and a good P. parclose. i.h.p. 

17. Leckhampstead, /Si^.J/rt/y. Chancel, nave with south 
aisle and porch, and tower at west end. The north door- 
way is a very excellent specimen of N. with a rich arch 
and drip moulding, the inner doorway of south porch is an- 
other good specimen of the same style : the tower is E. E., 
wdth a fine west doorway, above which is an enriched single- 
light N. w^indow : the piers and arches are very plain E. E., 
and there are one or two good D. windows ; P. windows 
have been inserted in various parts : there is a rood-loft 
staircase entered from the north aisle ; the sedilia and pis- 
cina are very plain E. E. Font octagonal, with sculptures of 
the crucifixion, St. Catherine, &c. w.c. 

There is an engraving of the font in Simpson's Baptismal Fonts, and 
another in Gent's. Mag. Ixxxvi. ii. 497. 

18. LillingstoneDayrell, /^^.iV/c//o/<25. Chancel, nave, 
south aisle and porch, (north aisle destroyed,) and tower at 
the west end. This has been a fine E. E. church, but has 
sustained much injury. At the east end of the chancel there 
is a curious three-light window, which may almost be called 
D. ; there is a very good two-light window on the south side, 
with a centre shaft and the toothed ornament in the hollows ; 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

the sedilia and piscina are likewise good, the latter having 
a credence shelf ; the inner doorway of the south porch has 
shafts, and good mouldings to the arch ; the porch itself is 
D., with a stone roof : some of the windows are D., one of 
three lights at the east end of the aisle ; others are P. 
Tower plain but good E. E. w.c. 

The brass of Paul and Margaret Dayrell, 1481, is engraved in Lipscomb, 
vol. iii. p. 36. 

j^= 19. Maids Morton, St. Edmund. Chancel with vestry 
on south side, nave and porches, tower and turret at west 
end. The whole a very fine specimen of P., the tower 
particularly so ; the west doorway is very curious, a pro- 
jecting panelled battlement is supported by rich fan-tra- 
cery springing from the jamb mouldings, the window above 
is a very good four-light ; on each face of the upper stage 
are two single-light windows deeply recessed and divided 
by a sort of angular pier, and across the entire width of the 
opening so formed a segmental arch is thrown, which is 
feathered and has rich flowers for the cusps, this supports 
the cornice and battlement which are both very good : the 
whole arrangement of this tower is very singular, but has 
a fine effect. The north porch is in two bays, with rich 
fan-tracery on the ceiling, and a fine oak door with rich 
panelling. The windows are very good, generally of three 
lights with transoms, the east window is of five lights ; this 
part is rather later than the rest of the building. Tower-arch 
very good, roof of oak, not equal to the other portions, w.c. 

A south-west view of the church is given in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 44 ; 
another in the Gent's. Mag. Ixxiv. 813, and the sedilia and font in Lysons. 

20. Marsh Gibbon, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, south 
aisle, west tower. The chancel is E. E., the nave has two 
plain E. E. arches with a P. clerestory and roof. The tower 
is much patched, and the east window is modern, i.h.p. 

The old manor-house of the Crokes, (sixteenth century,) is engraved in 
Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 53. 



IJEANERY OF BUCKINGHAM. 

21. Padbury, SL Mary. Chancel, nave with clere- 
story, aisles, and south porch, and tower at west end. The 
nave and north aisle are D. with good two-light windows, 
the windows in the south aisle are square-headed P. 
Chancel D., with a good three-light window and small pis- 
cina, east window P. Tower and porch modern, w.c. 

There is an engraving of the piscina, &c., in the Gent's. Mag. Ixvi. 841 . 

^^ 22. Preston Bissett, St. John Baptist. Chancel, 
nave,and tower at thewestend. The whole D., with very excel- 
lent two and three-light windows, particularly those at the 
east end of the aisles and chancel ; the north and south 
doorways are also very good, with fine mouldings and cor- 
bel-heads supporting the drips : the chancel windows nearest 
the east end are much higher than the others, and one of 
the windows on the south side of chancel has a transom ; 
good D. sedilia on south side. w.c. 

23. Radclive, St. John Evangelist. Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, tower at the west end. The greater por- 
tion of this church is very early E. E., the south door- 
way is a very good specimen of the style, with banded 
shafts, foliated capitals, and the, toothed with other orna- 
ments in the arch, the chancel-arch has also foliated cajfi- 
tals to the shafts, and the toothed ornament at intervals ; the 
windows are plain two lights, the font also very plain, 
hardly removed from N. : the tower is early D. w.c. 

The old manor-house is now a farm-house. 

24. Shalstone, St. Edicard. Modern, w.c. 

25. Stowe, St. Mary. Chancel with aisle, nave with 
aisles, clerestory and south porch, tower at the west end. 
This church has been D., but with the exception of a good 
three-light window at the east end of the south aisle, and 
another at the east end of the chancel, and some of two 
lights in the upper stage of the tower, there is nothing 
of any interest remaining, w.c. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

20. Water Stratford, Si. Giles. Chancel and nave, 
with tower at the west end. On the south side there is a 
good N. doorway, in the tympanum is a representation of 
the Deity in a vesica attended by angels, a remarkable hori- 
zontal string along the head of the doorway, and a small 
intersecting arcade : there is another N. doorway on the 
north side of the chancel, with sculpture in the tympanum : 
there are two single-light E. E. windows in the chancel, 
and one or two P. in the nave. The upper part of the tower 
has been pulled down, it is covered with tiles, w.c. 

There is an engraving of the doorway in Lysons. 

27. Sutton Kings, St. Feter. [Northants.] This church 
is a beautiful- specimen of the P. style, with a tower and 
crocketed spire, it has suffered much mutilation, rickman. 

28. Thornborough, St, Mary. Chancel, nave with north 
aisle and south porch, tower at west end. The tower is 
D. with a very good west doorway, but P. windows have 
been inserted, piers and arches D., south doorway of the 
same style ; with the exception of two good D. windows on 
the north side, the whole of the windoAVs are P. w.c. 

29. Thornton, St. Michael. This church has been lately 
entirely rebuilt in the modern style. The P. tower was 
allowed to remain, also two fine brasses, j.b. 

There is a view of the old church in the Gent's. Mag. Ixxi. 1081, and the 
brass of Robert Ingylton, 1516, in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 122. 

30. Tingewick, St. Mary Magdalene. Chancel, nave, 
and north aisle, tower nt west end. Nave E. E., with circular 
piers and plain arches, the south side has been rebuilt in 
imitation of N. ; chancel and tower good P., the latter with 
a very good doorway at west end. A small piscina in 
south wall of chancel, w.c. A curious brass to Erasmus 
Williams, who died rector 1608. 

31. TuRWESTON, /S'/. J/«rj/. Chancel, nave with aisles, clere- 
story and south porch, tower at west end : the piers and arches 



DEANERY OF BURNHAM. 

on the north side are very good N., with a variety of en- 
riched capitals, on the south side they are early D., and there 
are some very good two-light windows of that style ; a pis- 
cina in the south and a sepulchre in the north wall of chancel, 
are both D. The east window is P. of three lights, w.c. 

32. TwYFORD, The asmmpiion of St. Mary. Rebuilt. 

The brasses of John Guerdon, rector, 1413, and Thomas Gifford, 1550, are 
engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 135. 

33. Westbury, St. Augustine. Chancel, nave with aisles, 
clerestory and north porch, tower at west end. With the ex- 
ception of two single-light E.E. windows at the sides of the 
chancel, and a three-light D. at the east end, the whole of the 
exterior appears to be modern ; the piers and arches to the 
nave are D., and there is a small piscina of the same style, w.c. 

Bcancrj) of 23urnf)am. 

34. Amersham, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, clerestory 
and aisles, transepts, and porch on south side. There 
is nothing now remaining in this church earlier than P., 
except it may be some of the piers to the nave, which have 
the appearance of late D. ; the church has been much 
modernized, and there is but little good work left : perhaps 
the best thing is the groining of the south porch, which 
has some rich bosses at the intersection of the ribs. w.c. 

35. Beacon sfield. All Saints. Has a tower, and is built 
of flint and stone. In the chancel are some E. E. features, 
and in the north aisle are some D. windows. In a chapel 
on south side of chancel is an altar-tomb : there is also 
some wood screen- work, s.r.g. 

There are views of the church in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 215, and in the 
Gent's. Mag. Ixxx. ii. 105, and the brass of Thomas and Dorothy Waller, 
1627, in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 198. 

36. BuRNHAM, St. Peter. Chancel, nave, aisles, north 
transept, tower at the east end of the south aisle, north and 

c 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

south porches. The chancel is large, and has a fine east 
window D. of five lights, with geometrical tracery; the 
other parts are modernized. The transept has a large and 
curious D. window of four lights, late in the style. The 
west end is chequered of flint and stone, and has a D. win- 
dow of three lights with flowing tracery of peculiar design. 
The nave has E. E. arches and pillars, and some large 
and fine D. windows, of which style is the larger portion 
of this church. The tower is on the south side of the 
nave, the upper part of wood, modern. Part of the rood- 
loft screen remains ; and there are several brasses, s.r.g. 
In this parish are the ruins of the abbey founded in 
1265, by Richard, King of the Romans: there are con- 
siderable remains of E. E. domestic work, built of flint 
in a very substantial manner, with stone dressings; the 
windows are all lancet-shaped, though generally small, the 
chapel and the refectory being entirely destroyed : there 
are some good E. E. doorways and other details, i.h.p. 

There is a view of the church in Lipscomb, iii. 215 ; and the ruins of Burn- 
ham abbey engraved by Hollis from a drawing by Buckler, in the Mon. Ang., 
vol. vi. p. 545. It was presented to the new edition of the work by the late 
Lord Granville, then the proprietor of the abbey. And another view of the 
ruins in Lipscomb, iii. 206. 

37. BovENEY, SL Mary Magdalene. Nave and chancel 
under one roof, modern bell-turret at west end. The whole 
church so much modernized as uot to present any features 
of interest, w.c. 

38. Chaleont, St. Giles. Principally D. and P. The 
east window D., elegant and curious. There is a four- 
foil headed piscina. The font is square, s.r.g. 

Here are the remains of an ancient monastery, the chapel 
of which is attached to the mansion called the Vache. 

The house in which Milton resided in this parish, and the brass of Thomas 
Fletewoode, 1570, with his two wives and eighteen children, is engraved in 
Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 235. 



I 



DEANERY OF BURNHAM. 

39. Chalfont, St.Feter. Rebuilt in 1726. 

40. Chesham Bois, St. Leonard. Chancel and nave, 
with a modern vestry on the north side, and a modern 
tower at the west end. The chancel has an E. E. triplet 
at the east end. The nave is D., with very good two- 
light windows ; those on the south side are ranged in pairs, 
each pair being on a lower level than the other. On each 
side of the chancel- arch is a smaller arch, also leading to the 
chancel. Font modern ; pulpit curious. There are some 
remains of painted glass of the fourteenth century, and se- 
veral brasses, a.n. 

There are engravings of the windows and doorway in Brandon's Analysis 
of Gothic Architecture, of the Painted Glass in Lysons : and the brass of 
Robert and Elizabeth Cheyne, 1552, in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 265. 

41. Chesham, St. Mary. A cross church with clere- 
story and aisles, chancel, and south porch with a room over, 
tower with short modern spire in the centre. The earliest 
part remaining is the chancel, w^hich has some very good 
two-light D. windows on the north side. But the general 
style of the church is P., with fine three-light windows on 
the south side. The north side has been much modernized. 
The west front has a late P. doorway, with a fine five-light 
window above it. East window P. w.c. 

A south-west view of the church is given in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 265. 

42. CoLNBROOK IN HoRTON, St. Mary. Modern. 

43. Datchet, St. Mary. A small church, with a very 
low south aisle and a north chapel. The east window of 
the chancel is late D., of three lights. The arches of the 
nave plain E. E., as is also the base of the tower, which is 
attached to the west of the north chapel. Some windows 
D., some three-foil lancets, and a few P. There is a piscina 
with ogee canopy, and the sill of a window intended for a 
sedile. There are some monuments and brasses, s.r.g. 
' 44. Eton, St, Mary and St. Nicholas. This college 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

chapel consists of an ante-chapel, chapel, and north porch, 
with a small vestry adjoining. The whole is a fine specimen 
of P., with very good details. Like other buildings of the 
same style, it is merely a simple arrangement of windows 
and buttresses on the sides, and larger windows at the west 
end. The turrets at the angles have had some curious cu- 
polas added, which though by no means good in themselves, 
are rather effective at a distance. The south porch and vestry 
are very good, and there is a good panelled door between 
them. The chapel has recently been fitted up afresh with 
stalls, and the windows partly filled with painted glass ; a 
very good original lettern has been restored to its place. In 
the course of the alterations, some curious paintings on the 
walls were discovered. The original buildings of the college 
are of brick, and worthy of notice as specimens of Domestic 
work, but the greater part of them are modern, w.c. 

There are engravings of the chapel, and of some of the chimneys, in 
Britton's Architectural Antiquities, vol. ii. ; in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 465 and 
485, also the chimneys and a fine brass of Henry Bost ; and of the college in 
Astle and Grose's Antiquarian Repertory, vol. iii. p. 274 ; Gent's. Mag., vol. 
Ixviii. p. 109 ; and various views in Ackerman's Public Schools, &c. &c. 

45. DiTTON, St. Mary. A small building standing in 
Ditton Park, (chapel of ease to Stoke Pogis,) consisting of 
a nave, chancel, and south porch. On the east wall of the 
chancel there is the date 1617, but most of the work ap- 
pears to be still more modern. In the open ground adjoin- 
ing there is a good P. font, now used as the pedestal for a 
sun-dial. w.c. 

46. Denham, St. Mary. An ordinary church, having 
chancel, nave with aisles, and a western tower. The cha- 
racter is P., late in the style, but the whole has been much 
modernized. There are three plain P. arches between the 
nave and aisles, and a moulded south doorway. The tower 
is poor ; it bears on a brick in the upper part the date 



DEANERY OF BURNHAM. 

1678. The cliurcli contains several monuments, and 
amongst others an altar-tomb with effigies to Sir Edward 
Peckham, and wife, 1564; two brasses, one to Walter 
Duredent and family, 1494, the other to Agnes Jordan, 
abbess of Sion, 1545. h.a. 

The brass of Agnes Jordan, 1545, is engraved by Waller. 

47. UoRNEY, JSt. James. A small church, consisting only 
of nave and chancel. The tower is of brick, late P., the 
other parts are mixed D. and P. s.r.g. 

48. Chenies, St. Michael. Nave with south aisle, tower 
and turret at the west end, chancel and north aisle. There 
is a very good two-light D. window on the south side of the 
chancel, and some of the piers and arches to the nave are 
also in that style, the rest is P., and not a very good speci- 
men of the style; most of the windows have fiat arched 
heads. The font is N., cup-shaped, with some good orna- 
ments. There are some brasses. On the north side is a 
chapel built in 1556, which was used for a place of sepul- 
ture by the Russell family. In the vault are fifty coffins 
with inscriptions from 1591 to 1819. This chapel contains 
several tombs of the dukes of Bedford, chiefly of the six- 
teenth and seventeenth centuries, in excellent preservation ; 
some are richly painted and gilt, and they form altogether 
a magnificent series of sepulchral memorials, w.c. and a.n. 

The old manor-house which formerly belonged to the 
Cheynies, lords of the manor, and was much improved by 
Lord Russell temp. Hen. VIIL, yet exists adjoining to the 
church. It is of brick, and highly picturesque, having 
numerous stepped gables and tall chimneys, ornamented 
with moulded brick. 

A south-east view of the church, the font, and the brasses of Anna Phelip, 
1510, and Agnes Cheyne, and her second husband, Edmund Molynux, 1484, 
are given in Lipscomb, iii. 253-5 ; and a window in Brandon's Analysis of 
Gothic Architecture. 

49. Latimer, — . Modern, 1844. Architect Mr. Blore. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

50. Farnham Royal, SI. Mary. Of mixed styles. 
KICKMAN. Chancel, nave, tower. The lower part of the 
tower E. E., the upper has been rebuilt ; the nave also 
rebuilt. The chancel has some D. and some P. windows. 
A.N. A brass to Eustace Mabcall, clerk of the works to Car- 
dinal Wolsey at the building of Christ Church, Oxon., being 
then "pistile reader" in Windsor castle: he died 1567. 

51. EuLMER, St. James. Built by Sir Marmaduke Da- 
rell, 1610. It is of brick with stone quoins : several of the 
windows have painted quarries. On the south side of the 
chancel is a fine monument of the founder, dec. 1630. a.n. 

52. Hedgerley, St. Mary. A small mean church, mostly 
modernized, but has part of the base of the roodloft screen. 
The font is circular, and enriched with shields and heads of 
animals, s.r.g. There is a singular palimpsest brass in 
this church, an account of which has been given by Mr. 
Albert Way, in the Archseologia, vol. xxx. p. 121. 

53. HiTCHAM, >S^. J/<2ry. A small church with chancel 
and nave, south porch, and a low west tower. The exterior 
walls chiefly of flint and rubble. The east window is a 
fine and peculiar one, of four lights. In the chancel are 
two monuments, with effigies, of the sixteenth century. 
The chancel-arch N., but the prevailing features D. The 
chancel has very good windows containing beautiful coeval 
painted glass : on the south side of the chancel is a curious 
circular window containing a fohated trefoil. There is a 
brass in good preservation, on a P. high tomb, and there 
are two other brasses, s.r.g. and a.n. 

The brass of Nicolas Clarke, 1551, is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 284. 

54. HoRTON, St. Michael. Chancel, nave with south 
aisle, north chapel and porch, west tower. Here is a round- 
headed doorway, with N. mouldings and other ornaments 
of very great richness. There are E. E. arches between the 
nave and south aisle. The remainder of the church is 



DEANERY OF BURNHAM. 

chiefly plain P. of late date, and some parts modernized. 
The font is plain N., tub shaped, s.r.g. 

55. IvER, St. Feter, Has many N. features, and five 
arches of that style on the north side of the nave. The 
chancel-arch and two small windows at the west of the 
aisles are E. E. The chancel is large, and has some D. 
windows, others P. The font has a square bowl of black 
marble, on a cylindrical pedestal, and four small octagonal 
shafts. S.R.G. A brass in chancel, c. 1500. a.n. 

50. Penn, Holy Trinity. Nave, south aisle, and porches, 
tower at west end, chancel rebuilt in 1736. The original 
style of the church was E.E., but so many modern alterations 
have been made that there is now little of interest, w.c. 

The brass of John Pen, 1641, and family, is engraved in Lipscomb, iii. 291. 

57. Penn Street, Holy Trinity. A new church in the 
D. style, cruciform, with central tower and spire, built in 
1848-9, at the expense of Earl Howe, at a cost of £10,000, 
from the design of Mr. B. Ferrey. 

58. Stoke Poges, St. Giles, An interesting church of 
mixed styles. The tower, which has a wooden spire, is at 
the east end of the north aisle of the nave, and together with 
the arches dividing the aisles of the nave is E. E. The 
chancel-arch is N., and on the north side of the chancel are 
some early windows closed up. Some of the windows in the 
aisles are D., others are double lancets within a pointed arch. 
The east window is P., and the south chapel of the chancel 
debased P., erected c. 1557. There are some good brasses in 
the chancel, and in the north wall a fine rich ogee arch, but 
the tomb, supposed to be that of Sir John Molyns, treasurer 
to Edward III., is destroyed. A fine D. niche in chancel. 
The south porch is good, wood, with pierced tracery and 
feathered gable, s.r.g. The font is massive, plain N. a.n. 

a general view of the church is engraved in Neale's Churches of Great 
Britain, and a window in Brandon's Analysis of Gothic Architecture. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

59. Tavlow, St. Mc/iohs. Rebuilt in vile style, s.r.g. 
But a fine and curious brass cross has been preserved. It 
is floriated, with the eifigy within the quatrefoil at the head 
to Nicholas de Aumberdene, " pensioner de Londres :" the 
stem supported on a fish: the date about 1350. There 
are also several other brasses, one of a " chrism child.'' a.b. 

The brass of Nicholas de Aumberdene is engraved in Gough's Monuments ; 
*' Specimens of Church Plate;" Boutell's Monumental Brasses ; and Lipscomb, 
vol. iii. p. 300, who also gives the curious brass of Richard Manfeld, 1465, in a 
good civil costume, with his wife also in good costume, and his young sister 
in a shroud. 

60. Upton, St. Laurence. Is a small N. church, with 
the tower between the nave and chancel, it has a fine N. 
doorway with good carvings. There are some plain N. and 
some E. E. windows. The east and west windows are 
P. insertions, rickman. The chancel has a plain N. vault, 
and the chancel-arch is also good N. The church has been 
abandoned and is fast falling to ruin. a.n. There are 
three brasses, 1480, 1500, 1599. 

There is a full account of this church, with engravings of the exterior of 
the chancel, the north door, and some tiles, in the Gent's. Mag., 1846, vol. 
xxvi. p. 604, and an account of a very remarkable E. E. arch of wood in the 
north wall of the chancel, with two engravings from drawings by Dr. Bromet, 
in vol. xxviii, p. 489. 

61. Wexham, St. Mary. A very small church, but 
with remarkable features ; the windows of different styles. 
A single piscina, s.r.g. The nave has two small N. win- 
dows, but others and the door are P. The east window 
of chancel is D. The altar platform retains its encaustic 
tiles almost perfect, a.n. 

62. Wyrardisbuuy, St. Andrew. Nave, north aisle, 
chancel, sacristy on north side. The nave and aisle are E. E., 
with piers of a nearly square form, having half or quarter 
shafts at the angles, a good north doorway. The windows 
are P. insertions. The nave roof is highly pitched, and 



DEANERY OF MURESLEY. 

comes down over the aisle without any break. The sacristy- 
is P. The east window of chancel is flowing D., with rather 
poor thin tracery; it has recently been restored, a.n. 
There is a lich-gate to the churchyard, and a brass, 1512, 
the figure in academical costume. 

Some fragments of the walls, and the seal of Ankerwycke priory, are 
engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 593. The seal is curious, representing a 
very early chapel of timber. The church and lich-gate to the churchyard are 
also engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. pp. 611, 612. 

63. Langley Marsh, St. Mary, Of mixed styles. The 
font is octagonal, with four-foils, rickman. Chancel with 
north aisle, nave with north aisle, south chapel and library, 
west tower. The chancel and its aisle are D., on the south 
side are four sedilia, a priest's door, and a window with 
pointed segmental arches. The nave is P., the piers dividing 
it from the aisles have been replaced by wooden columns. 
There is a plain P. rood-screen, surmounted by the com- 
mandments and the royal arms, with the date 1625. The 
pulpit, altar-rails, &c., are of the same date, as are the square 
brick tower, the chapel and library. The latter is a curious 
room, every part of it covered with coats of arms, of which 
there are many in the chapel, alliances of the Kidderminster 
family. There are also some small late brasses, a.n. In 
the churchyard is a very aged and magnificent yew-tree. 



Beancrg of iTOurcslep. 

64. AsTWOOD, St. Peter. Chancel, nave with clerestory, 
south aisle, and modern south porch, tower at west end. 
Tower D. ; the windows on the south side of two and 
three lights are good specimens of the same style, as are 
the piers and arches to the nave ; clerestory and roof P.„ 
with flat arches to the windows, and good moulded ribs 

D 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

to the roof. Font D., the bowl square and quite plain, 
supported on four circular shafts with moulded caps and 
bases. Three small brass figures with an inscription have 
been taken from the pavement and placed in the aisle, w.c. 

65. Aston Abbots, JSt. James. Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, tower and square turret at the west end. The 
inner doorway of the porch is plain N., but the prevaihng 
style of the church is D., with P. windows inserted in various 
parts; a good D. piscina in south wall of chancel, w.c. 

66. Cheddington, St. Giles. A small and plain P. 
church, with a low western tower. The nave has an aisle 
to the north, from which it is divided by three porches on 
octagonal piers. The font is octagonal of D. character, h.a. 

67. Choulesbury, St. Laurence. Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, bell-turret at west end. Principally D., with 
a good three-light window at the east and west ends, those 
on the sides have been destroyed, but seem to have been of 
two lights, a good E. E. doorway in south porch. Pont 
E. E., a plain piscina on south side of chancel, w.c. 

68. CuBLiNGTON, St. Nicliolas. A P. church, consisting 
of a chancel and nave. On either side of the east window 
is a trefoiled niche with an embattled head. Under the 
south-eastern window of the south wall is also a trefoiled 
niche, with a stone shelf, and there is a plain low side 
opening. The chancel-arch is P., springing from two 
brackets of animals. There are north and south doors, and 
a south porch, and in the north porch, which is now used as 
a vestry, is a wooden lectern, having the date 1685. The 
tower is P., and is at the west end. h.a. 

69. Drayton Beauchamp, St. Mary. Has a chancel, 
nave with aisles, and a plain square embattled tower at the 
west end of the nave. It appears to be of two styles, D. 
and late P. To the former may be assigned the nave- 
arches, and the chancel -arch ; to the latter, the chancel, the 



DEANERY OF MURESLEY. 

clerestory of the nave, the aisles and tower. The chancel 
windows are plain, it has on the south side two sediha and 
a piscina, trefoiled and cinquefoiled, on the north side is 
a small trefoiled low side window. The chancel-arch is 
moulded D. The nave arches, four in number, have two 
round pillars, the remainder octagonal, all with moulded 
caps, of the same form as the piers. There are remains of 
a panelled reredos at the east end of the south aisle. The 
font is N., round, with a series of narrow round-headed 
arches panelled on it. The church contains many old seats. 
The east window has some P. glass representing figures of 
the apostles. In the chancel are two celebrated brasses to 
Thomas Cheyne, esq., 13C8, and WiUiam Cheyne, esq., 
1375, and a small figure of a priest, 1515. There is also 
a large monument in white marble of Lord Newhaven, A.D. 
1 728. Richard Hooker held this living in 1584. h.a. 

The brasses of Thomas Cheyne, esq., 1368, and of William Cheyne, esq., 
1375, are engraved by Waller : and in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 333. 

70. Drayton Parsloe, Holy Trinity. Chancel, nave, 
and south porch, tower at west end. There are two late 
D. windows in the chancel, the east window and several 
others are of the same style, together with the tower. The 
best thing in the church is the font, which is D., hexagonal 
in plan, with good angular ogee canopies divided by but- 
tresses and pinnacles ; there are shields bearing arms at each 
angle, and the bowl has good bold mouldings finished by 
a battlement, w.c. 

71. DuNTON, St. Martin. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, tower at west end. On the north side there are 
some remains of a N. doorway, now blocked up. The 
tower and some of the windows are E. E., some few D., 
the rest modern. Doorway in tower P. w.c. 

72. Edlesborough, St. Mary. This church stands in 






a commanding position ; its character is wholly P., it con- 
sists of a chancel, nave with north and south aisles, a north 
porch, and a plain square tower at the west end of the nave. 
The chancel contains a trefoil-headed piscina, and a plain 
recessed sedile. The nave has four arches on either side 
on octagonal pillars, with the same number of clerestory 
windows above. The aisles are plain, with north and south 
doors. The chancel is fitted with stall-desks and seats, 
many of them carved with good misereres. The rood- 
screen is well carved with tracery, &c. The font plain, 
octagonal, with quatrefoils in panels on the sides. The 
pulpit retains its hour-glass stand. In the nave is a stone 
mural monument with brasses to Henry Brugis and wife, 
A.D. 1647. Lysons calls the north aisle RufFord's aisle, in 
it is an incised slab, A.D. 1479, and a brass, A.D. 1540, 
commemorating that family, h.a. 

73. Grandborough, St. John Baptist. Nave, north 
porch, and chancel, tower at west end. There are some 
small D. remains, such as a window, and door on the south 
side. The rest of the church is P., with some good win- 
dows, w.c. 

74. Grove, St. A very small church, 

having the nave and chancel under one roof, with a modern 
bell-turret at west end. There is a late P. doorway on the 
north side, and a D. window at the west end, with the 
tracery partially stopped up. w.c. 

75. Hardwick, St. Mary. The tower, some windows, 
and the arches and piers of the nave D., one window curi- 
ous, being of circular form with fine mouldings. The clere- 
story on the south has one quatrefoil circle. Some of the 
windows are P. The chancel-arch round and very small, 
on each side of it is a hagioscope. On the south of the 
church a low side window, early P. Pont a circular bowl 
on shafts of like form, s.r.g. 



DEANERY OF MURESLEY. 

76. Hawridge, St Mary. A small nave and chancel, 
modern south porch, and bell-turret. Principally E. E., 
with small single-light windows. West windows two-light 
P., east window modern. Font N., circular, w.c. 

77. HoGGESTON, St. Peter and St. Paul Nave, aisles, 
and north porch, chancel with north aisle, tower at west 
end, (the upper part destroyed.) The south side of the nave 
is E. E., the north side D., with some few good win- 
dows. Chancel modern,'the upper part of tower rebuilt of 
wood. w.c. In this church is the tomb of the founder 
of a chantry, William de Bemingham, 1342, much mutilated, 
having his effigy with the figure of the church in his hand. * 

A general view of the chiirch, and the tomb, are engraved in Lipscomb, 
vol. iii. p. 382. 

78. Great Horwood, St. James. Chancel with north 
aisle, nave, aisles and porches, tower at the west end. The 
piers and arches to the nave are good D., the chancel is also 
of that style, with very excellent doorways and windows ; 
the three windows on the south side are all different, the 
earliest being near the west end ; the east window is of four 
lights, with very rich flowing tracery, there are one or two 
straight lines in it which give it rather a late appearance ; 
there is a good D. piscina in south wall, the sedilia have 
been destroyed ; a good niche is still remaining at the east 
end of the south aisle. The aisle to the chancel is now used 
as a school-room, it has a good three-light D. window at 
the east end : the tower is P., and there are several windows 
of the same style, and also some screen-work. w.c. 

79. Horwood, Little, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave, 
south aisle, and porch, tower at west end. South aisle 
E. E., with some P. windows inserted. Tower good P. 
Porch and chancel modem, w.c. 

80. IviNGHOE, St. Mary. This church is D., of cruciform 
plan, with aisles to the nave, north and south porches, a 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

square central tower and small spire ; in the chancel is an 
altar-tomb, ascribed to Henry de Blois, brother of King 
Stephen. There is a fine timber roof much enriched in 
parts with angels. The caps of piers are good; a good 
clerestory, a rich Cinque Cento pulpit, some tall poppy- 
heads. Font modern, but not bad. j.l.p. The tower- 
arches are moulded P., with a groined stone ceiling under 
the tower. The part of the roof over the rood-loft is more 
ornamented than the rest, and panelled with bosses, the 
north and south doorways have the ball-flower and the 
four-leaf flower in the hollows of the mouldings. There is 
a brass in the south transept to John and Alice Hunger- 
ford, 1594, and disused and neglected among some rub- 
bish is a good P. wooden lectern : there is also an iron 
hour-glass stand to the pulpit, h.a. 

There is a view of the church in the Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixxx. i. p. 209: and 
the effigy of John Buncombe, 1594, in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 395. 

81. LiNSLADE, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, south porch, 
west tower. The chancel-arch is plain, semicircular, with a 
squint ; a low side window and some others are D., the 
rest P. A.N. 

82. Marsworth, All Saints. Has a chancel, nave, and 
north aisle continued throughout, with a tower at the west 
end of the nave. The character of the church is plain, prin- 
cipally P. There is no chancel-arch, the aisle is divided by 
three plain arches in the nave, and two in the chancel, all 
having octagonal caps and pillars, but the two eastern arches 
being lower than the others. The tower-arch is D., with 
foliated caps. The tower has at each of the western angles two 
buttresses, and in the angle formed between them is a plain 
niche north and south. The altar at present is in the north 
aisle, the eastern end of the south aisle being occupied by 
an altar-tomb. There are a few ancient figured tiles, h.a. 

The brass of the West femily, 1681, is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 414. 



DEANERY OF MURESLEY. 

83. Mentmore, St. Mary, Chancel, nave, with clere- 
story, and aisles, tower at west end, north and south 
porches, ancient vestry on the north side of the chancel, 
with lean-to roof, and with a squint and priest's door. A 
very early D. church. There is one round-headed window 
on the south side of the chancel, and there are some good 
Transition D. windows, square-headed and pointed, in the 
aisles ; the clerestory windows are large P. ; all the roofs 
are good open oak, with carved figures ; there is a rood- 
screen ; the nave is of three bays, the piers have embattled 
capitals and foliated mouldings at the bases. The north 
aisle extends westward parallel with the tower ; a trefoil- 
headed piscina in the south aisle ; font circular, has a stem 
and base, with annular moulding, a.b. 

84. MuRSLEY, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with aisles, south 
porch, west tower. The chancel is chiefly D., and has 
some good windows of that style ; the tower and other win- 
dows are P., and some debased: in the chancel is a P. tomb, 
with a brass, and one of the seventeenth century, a.n. In 
the churchyard is part of the stem of the cross. 

85. Nettleden, /S'^. Z««re;2c^. Modern. 

80. PiTSTONE, St. Mary. A small D. and P. church, 
containing a chancel, and north chancel aisle, a nave with 
north aisle, and a plain square embattled tower at the west 
end of the nave. The chancel has P. windows, on the 
north side at the east end of the aisle is an original vestry, 
with a small trefoiled single-light window at the east end. 
To the west of the vestry are two good D. arches, on octa- 
gonal piers with foliated caps, dividing the aisle and chan- 
cel, this aisle has square-headed windows, and a crocketed 
piscina in the south wall. The chancel-arch is moulded D., 
with a squint through the south wall. The nave has on 
the south side the stone newel staircase which led to the 
rood-loft, with a door above and below, P. windows, and a 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

plain door and porch, it opens to the north aisle by three 
plain P. arches on octagonal piers. This aisle is D., it has 
a plain door and a window of one light on either side. 
The tower-arch is supported by a bracket on each side. 
The font is round N., the base and basin escalloped with a 
bold cable moulding between them, the rim ornamented 
with roses. The pulpit carved oak, of the seventeenth 
century. The floor of the chancel and altar platform is 
formed of ancient figured tiles, of various patterns : and 
there are some brasses, h.a. and a.b. 

87. Slapton, Holy Cross. Nave with clerestory and aisles, 
tower at west end, modern chancel, and modern vestry on 
north side. The piers and arches to the nave are late D., 
and there is a doorway of the same style on the south side : 
the general appearance of the exterior is P., but the whole 
has been much modernized. Font E. E. w.c. There are 
some brasses, a.b. 

88. SouLBERY, All Saints. Chancel, nave, aisles, south 
porch, west tower. Chiefly D., with P. alterations and addi- 
tions. The priest's doorway is doubly feathered, there is a 
P. low side window on the north side. The nave has P. 
oak seats, a.n. 

^"89. Stewkley, St. Mary. Is an object of curiosity, as 
well for its being a good N. structure, as for its having been 
heretofore almost constantly cited as a Saxon church, al- 
though there does not appear any real evidence of its erec- 
tion before the Conquest, and there is nothing about it to 
distinguish it from many churches known to be erected 
after the Conquest. It is of a frequent N. plan, with a 
short square tower between the nave and chancel, which 
tower is surrounded at the belfry story by a range of in- 
tersecting arches. There are several ornamented doors 
and windows, and its whole arrangement and execution 
is very similar to those of other well-known N. churches. 



DEANERY OF MtRESLEY. 

RiCKMAN. The chancel has a window on either side 
splayed towards the interior, the window arches are orna- 
mented with two orders of zigzag, and one on the exterior. 
The east window is, on the exterior, a triplet of zigzag 
arches, the centre one only being pierced ; under all the 
windows is a stringcourse of zigzag moulding, externally. 
On the north side of the chancel is a plain oblong Easter 
sepulchre, and in the south wall is a plain P. piscina, 
and a stone seat running all along the south side, the 
eastern end being elevated, and separated by an elbow- 
rest. The tower rests on four arches, the fronts of the piers 
on which they rest are plain, with two shafts at the angles, 
having scolloped capitals, the imposts continued as a string, 
the inner order of the eastern arch is ornamented with beak 
heads, and the outer with two courses of zigzag. Under 
the tower is a window, north and south, similar to the 
others, the same stringcourse being continued under them, 
and forming a hood-moulding to a door leading to a newel 
staircase. The western tower-arch is very similar to the 
eastern, except that the outer course of zigzag springs from 
heads. The nave has two windows on either side, precisely 
similar to the rest. The same stringcourse is carried over 
the three doors, of which the south door is recessed, with 
an obtuse inner arch on plain imposts, and an outer arch 
ornamented with zigzag, and a label with the pellet orna- 
ment, the exterior stringcourse being carried over all ; this 
door has a P. porch. The north door is precisely similar 
to that on the south. The west end is rich ; it has a door- 
way recessed with three rows of zigzag, the inner course 
being carried throughout: the other arches, one on each 
side the central arch, spring from shafts, the interior arches 
having a row of cable moulding, they are not pierced. 
Above them is a window similar to those above described. 
The tower has on all the external faces an arcade of pointed 



I 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

afches, with zigzag mouldings, on plain caps ; the central 
arch on each side is pierced with a round-headed loop. 
The font is plain, round, N. There is a corbel-table round 
all the church, except the tower, consisting of blocks, some 
of them cut into figures and heads. The roofs have all 
been considerably lowered, as is apparent from the weather 
mouldings, h.a. 

A general view is engraved in Grose's Antiquities ; the arches at the west 
end, chancel, and general view in LysoDs ; general view, and plan, in Britton's 
Antiquities, vol. ii. ; the font in Archseologia, vol. x. pi. 17 ; the chancel in 
Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 474 ; and general view in Petit's Remarks on Architec- 
tural Character, folio. 

90. SwANBouRNE, St. SwitMn. Nave with clerestory, 
north aisle, and south porch, chancel, and tower at west 
end. The lower part of the tower is E. E., and the upper 
stages early P. The chancel is also E. E., with good lancet 
windows. The rest of the church P., and rather late. w.c. 

91. ToTTENHALL or ToTTENHOE, St GUes. A small, 
mean building, rebuilt in 1540, but for some time dis- 
used and desecrated, then repaired and reconsecrated 
in 1636. LYSONS. 

92. Whitchurch, St. John the Evangelist. Chancel, 
nave, with clerestory, aisles, and south porch, tower at 
west end. This church has been a fine specimen of E. E., 
but is now much altered ; there is a fine doorway of that 
style in the tower, having clustered shafts with foliated capi- 
tals and good arch mouldings. Above is the outline of a rich 
D. window, with niches on the splay of the jamb ; the tra- 
cery has been destroyed, and a P. window inserted. Some 
of the piers to the nave are E. E., others early D., but all 
good as to detail. There are some very good D. windows 
in the aisles. The chancel is early D., with very good two- 
light windows on the sides. The east window has either 
been very badly restored or else is entirely modern. There 



DEANERY OF MURESLEY. 

are good D. sedilia and piscina in the south wall of the 
chancel, and the remains of some rich D. screen- work 
across the chancel-arch : the clerestory is P. w.c. 

There is an engraving of the piscina &c. in the Gent's. Mag., Ixvi. 841 ; a 
view of the church and the sedilia in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 617. 

The manor of Creslow is properly a distinct parish, but 
the church has been long destroyed, and it is now reckoned 
as part of Whitchurch. 

There are two views of the manor-house of Creslow, a building of the six- 
teenth century, in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 325. 

93. Whaddon, SL Mary. Chancel with north chapel, 
nave with aisles, north and south porches, and west tower. 
The chancel has an E. E. piscina and sedilia, but the east 
window, priest's door, and low side window are D. The 
chapel is D., with a sepulchral recess nearly opposite the 
low side window; eastward of this is a P. tomb, with a 
tester, and brass inlaid. The walls of the nave are D., 
piers and arches Transition N., windows P., font E.E. 
Within each door are stoups. a.n. The remains of Snel- 
shall priory in this parish are plain Norman work with a 
later superstructure. 

■ The font is engraved in Archseologia, vol. x. pi. 24 ; and the priory in 
Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 504. 



94. WiNGE, All Saints. Chancel, nave with clere- 
story, aisles and porches, tower at west end. The piers and 
arches to the nave are plain N., and the chancel appears to 
have been of that style, but it is now much modernized 
and some P. windows inserted. There are some good early 
D. windows in various parts of the church, but the general 
style is P., the tower and south porch being fine specimens 
of that style. The former has a good doorway and win- 
dows, the whole finished with a good battlement. The 
porch is in two bays with good windows on the sides, and 



i 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

a niche over the doorway ; the north doorway is D., en- 
riched with flowers. Font P., some fine wooden screen- 
work and a few open seats remain, w.c. 

The most remarkable church in the county, with sup- 
posed Saxon work, a polygonal apse elevated with a crypt 
beneath ; the altar-slab remains in the pavement, and there 
is a rood-loft, approached by a newel staircase, in the south 
wall, and a late brass, a.b. 

There are engravings of the font and the roof in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 627. 

95. WiNGRAVE, St Feter and St. Faul. Chancel, nave 
with clerestory and aisles, tower at west end. The earliest 
work here is in the chancel, which has remains of N. work, 
with a good plain arcade in the interior, but D. and P. 
windows have been inserted in various parts. Piers and 
arches of nave late D., general style of the exterior late P., 
with good windows, south porch modern. The whole of 
the upper part of the chancel-arch is stopped up. w.c. 

96. Win SLOW, St. Laurence. Chancel, nave with aisles 
and south porch, tower at west end. Some D. windows at 
the west end seem to be the earliest work now remaining 
in this church. The general style is P., with good details, 
but without any thing calling for particular remark, w.c. 

There is a general view of the church in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 548. 



Beancrp o! iStfcoport. 

97. Bletchley, St. Mary. Chancel with north aisle, 
nave with aisles, clerestory, and south porch, tower at 
west end. With the exception of a D. window on the south 
side, and a doorway of the same style on the north, the 
whole of the exterior is P. The tower very good, with pin- 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

nacles at the angles, and good double windows. on each 
face of the upper stage. Most of the windows are square- 
headed, and have good tracery ; piers and arches D. w.c. 
There is an effigy of Lord Grey of Wilton on a high tomb, 
A.D. 1442. The church was restored in a bad style, with 
painted Grecian panelling, by Browne WilHs, who also 
added the pinnacles of the tower, recast the bells, and gave 
the font, the whole at a cost of £1,346. There are also 
some brasses of the seventeenth century, a.b. 

There is a view of the church in Lipscomb, yol. iv. p. 25 ; and in the 
Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixiv. p. 305. 

98. Bradwell, St. Laurence. Nave with south aisle 
and north porch, tower at west end, and chancel. E. E. 
and D., with some few good windows of each style. P. 
windows have been inserted in various places, w.c. 

99. Brickhill (Bow), All Saints. Chancel, nave with 
aisles and south porch, tower at the west end. The whole 
a good specimen of P., without the least mixture of any 
other style, or the introduction of modern windows ; the 
windows are nearly all square-headed. Attached to the north 
pier of the chancel-arch is a good oak pulpit, with tracery in 
the head of the panels and crocketed canopies. There is 
also some good screen- w^ork across the chancel-arch. The 
font is a tolerable specimen of the same style, w.c. This 
church was also restored by Browne Willis in 1757. a.b. 

100. Brickhill (Great), St. Mary. Chancel, nave with 
aisles and south porch, tower and turret in the centre. 
There is nothing in this church earlier than P., with the 
exception of a D. doorway on the north side, now stopped 
up. w.c. 

101. Brickhill (Little), St. Mary. Chancel, with ves- 
try on south side, nave with south aisle and porch, tower 
at the west end. The tower is D., with some P. windows 
inserted, the porch of the same style. The whole of the 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

windows, and the north and east walls of the chancel, are 
modern ; the whole building is in a very ruinous state. There 
is a small piscina in the south wall of the chancel, w.c. 

102. Broughton, St. Laurence, Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, tower at the west end. Principally very 
early D., with some good two and three-light windows. 
Some good three-light P. windows have been inserted in 
various places. There is a good staircase-turret at the 
north-east angle of nave. w.c. There is a low side win- 
dow on the south side of the chancel. Some very curious 
frescoes of the Last Judgment, the Passion, St. Dunstan, 
and St. George, have lately been uncovered. There are 
brasses of John de Broughton and his wife, A.D. 1399 
and 1403, and two coped coffin-lids in the churchyard, a.b. 

103. CaJjYerton, All Saints. Rebuilt, 1825. 

There is a view of the old church in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 87. 

104. Chicheley, St. Laurence. Chancel, nave with 
clerestory and north aisle, south porch with room over, 
tower in centre. Much of the work is good D., with 
clustered shafts in the nave, and two very good three- 
light windows at the west end. The tower is P., with double 
windows on each face of the upper stage ; these window^s 
have good tracery and transoms. There is also a good 
three-hght window in the lower stage. Chancel modern, 
with Corinthian pilasters, w.c. 

There is a brass to Anthony Cave and wife, 1558. The brass is engraved 
in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 97. 

105. Clifton Reynes, St. Mary. Chancel with north 
aisle, nave with aisles and south porch, tower at west 
end. General style early D., with good clustered piers in 
the nave and chancel. Some of the windows are of two 
lights and very good, others are P., and some modern. 
There is a very good piscina in the south wall of chancel, 
and a good D. tomb with a curious wooden effigy in the 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

north wall, the canopy has good hanging tracery. There 
are also two fine altar- tombs in the chancel, each with two 
effigies, (male and female,) one has the sides filled with 
tracery in square panels, the other has niches and rich 
canopies. All the interior fittings are modern, w.c. 

^* 106. Crawley (North), St. Firmin. Chancel, nave 
with clerestory, aisles and porch, tower at west end. The 
whole external appearance of the nave is P., with good 
windows; the clerestory windows are of the same style, 
with flat arches. The tower is plain, the chancel is early 
D., with good windows, that at the east end has three 
lights with circles and quatrefoils in the head ; there is also 
a fine doorway on the south side of the chancel, with good 
shafts and mouldings. A small D. piscina on south side. 
The most attractive thing in the church is a fine rood-loft 
screen, which remains in a very perfect state, it is a rich 
D. specimen of open screen- work, divided into sixteen 
compartments, the whole of the tracery and ornaments are 
good ; in the panels at the base sixteen figures are painted, 
these are well drawn and in excellent condition, some wear 
crowns and ermine, others mitre and crozier, and all carry 
scrolls bearing inscriptions ; this is a very interesting re- 
main, and it is seldom so great a variety of costume can be 
found in one place. The roof to both nave and chancel is 
fine P., the principals are supported by carved upright 
figures, and the spaces between are panelled, with finely 
moulded ribs, having rich bosses at their intersections. 
Font plain, with a central shaft and clustered shafts round 
it. The piers and arches to the nave are early D., some of 
the former octagonal, and others clustered, w.c. 

There is a brass of Dr. Garbrand, 1589, with hour-glass and scull. The 
brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 132. 

^" 107. Emberton, Jll Samfs. Chancel, nave with 
clerestory, aisles, and porches, tower at west end. The 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

church is D., with much fine work remaining. The chancel 
has a very fine five-hght window at the east end, the head 
filled with the most elaborate tracery ; on each side of the 
window is a good buttress, having a niche with angular 
crocketed canopy, and a short pinnacle; there are two 
windows on each side of the chancel, each of three lights, 
the tracery not so rich but perhaps of better design than 
the east window; the two nearest to the nave have low 
side openings under them, separated by transoms. All the 
windows in the aisles have been deprived of their tracery. 
The lower part of the tower is D., with a good doorway, 
but the upper stage has P. windows. The chancel has a 
good cornice of masks and flowers. There are good sedilia 
and piscina in the south wall. A good brass of a priest, 
1410, with a curious inscription, w.c. 

The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 141. 

108. Gayhurst, St. Peter. Rebuilt in 1728. The 
manor-house or hall is a fine Elizabethan mansion. 

The house is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 163. 

109. GoLDiNGTON (Stoke), St. Peter. Chancel with 
south aisle, nave with aisles and south porch, tower at 
west end. The piers and arches to the nave, and a door- 
way in the north aisle, are E. E., the lower part of the 
tower D., the windows and upper part P. The east win- 
dows of aisle and chancel good D., some P. square-headed 
windows inserted in various parts. Font N. w.c. ' 

IS" 110. Hanslope, St. James. Chancel with south 
aisle, nave, clerestory, aisles, and porches, and tower and 
spire at west end. This church appears to have been N. 
and E. E.; there are still considerable remains of the 
former style in the chancel ; a fine doorway in the north 
wall, with zigzag and other ornaments in the arch; also 
some extensive remains of piers and arches, and a good 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

cornice of masks. The chancel-arch is of the same style, 
perfectly plain, and supported on each side by fine piers 
with good capitals. There are but two E. E. windows re- 
maining. The rest of the church is P., the best part being 
the tower and spire. The upper stage has good double 
windows on each face, the buttresses panelled, and ter- 
minating in very good octagonal pinnacles ; the flying but- 
tresses have pierced quatrefoils, and the spire itself has 
good windows and richly crocketed ribs. w.c. The spire 
was destroyed by lightning June 23, 1804, and rebuilt by 
subscription at a cost of upwards of £1000. 

There are engravings of the church prior and subsequent to the accident in 
the Gentleman's Magazine, 1799, vol. Ixix., and 1805, vol. Ixxv. 

111. Castlethorpe, ^t. Mary. Chancel, nave, aisles, 
clerestory, modern tower at west end. The piers and 
arches to the nave are very early E. E., hardly removed from 
N. A good three-light D. window at east end of chan- 
cel, and some others of the same style on the sides. The 
clerestory and some other portions P. Font N. w.c. 

112. Hardmead, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with clere- 
story, aisles and porches, tower at west end. Style gene- 
rally good D., with some very good two and three-light 
windows, but without any thing requiring particular notice. 
Tower P. East end of chancel modern, w.c. 

113. IIaversham, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, aisles, 
clerestory, and south porch, tower at west end. The tower, 
porch, piers and arches of nave, and one or two windows, 
are E. E., there are some good D. two and three-light 
windows, the clerestory and the remaining parts P. w.c. 
There is a female effigy on a high tomb under a rich 
canopy, supposed to be that of Elizabeth Lady Clinton. 

The south-east view of the church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 204, 
and the high tomb of Lady Clinton in Lysons. 

114. Lathbury, All Saints. Chancel, nave, aisles, and 

F 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

south porch, tower at west end. The earhest work is N., 
of which style the south doorway and some piers and 
arches on that side are plain examples. Tower E. E., with 
a later battlement added. The rest D., with good four- 
light windows at east end, some two-light windows on the 
south side, and good sedilia and piscina, w.c. 

There is a south-east view of the church in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 204. 

115. Lavendon, jSt. Mary. An oblong church of the 
usual plan. The chancel on the north side has two slender 
lancets widely splayed inwards. The east window and the 
eastern window on the south side are P., under the latter 
are three plain seats : on the same side is also a P. cinque- 
foiled piscina, a priest's door, and a square-headed P. win- 
dow of two lights, which has been inserted into a double 
E. E. lancet. The chancel-arch is plain. The nave has 
three acute plain arches on the south side, resting on round 
piers with square imposts. The three northern arches are 
also similar but less lofty, they are all of Transition N. 
character. The caps to the northern arches are plain, 
while those to the south have heads beneath the abaci. In 
the south aisle are a recessed trefoiled niche, and a small 
trefoiled piscina ; the south doorway is E. E., with a plain 
P. porch and a room over it. The north aisle has a good 
moulded E. E. doorway and a P. porch. The tower-arch 
is round, of simple N. character, the tower has plain round- 
headed loops, widely splayed inwards. This tower is one of 
those which has been supposed to be of Saxon date. The 
font is octagonal, with panelled tracery and flowers on the 
sides of the basin, h.a. 

The seal of the abbey of Lavendon is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 215. 

116. Brayfield, St. ^ Mary. Chancel with north aisle, 
nave with north porch, tower at west end. The whole very 
plain E. E. ; perhaps the best part of the church is the porch, 
the outer and inner doorways of which are very good. w.c. 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

117. LiNFORD (Great), St. Andrew, Chancel, nave, 
aisles and south porch, tower at w^est end. The whole of 
this church seems to have been fine early D., but some 
trouble has been taken to disfigure it as much as possible. 
The piers to the nave are cased up in wood, and the tracery 
of all the windows destroyed. They appear to have been 
of three lights, those on the south side have rich four-leaved 
flowers round the outer moulding, the east end of the 
porch has a piece of tracery repeated twice in the thickness 
of the wall, the intervening space being left hollow, w.c. 

118. Little LiNFORD, /S'/. ^;2^r^M7. Modern. 

119. LouGHTON, All Saints. Nave, south aisle and 
porch, tower at west end, and chancel. Principally P., with 
very good windows. There are some small remains of earlier 
work, but nothing calling for any particular remark, w.c. 

iSP° 120. Milton Keynes, All Saints. Chancel with 
north aisle, nave with south porch, tower on north side. The 
whole a very beautiful specimen of D., without any mixture 
of other styles. The windows are mostly of three lights, 
many of them very curious, but all excellent ; there are some 
of two lights on the north side of the chancel equally good. 
The buttresses are in two stages, many of them with cano- 
pies and richly crocketed pinnacles. The arches dividing 
the chancel from its aisle are now bricked up, and the 
aisle used as a school-room, but enough remains to shew 
that the circular piers have fine moulded caps and bases. 
The sedilia and piscina in the south wall are very fine, they 
have detached shafts and rich open tracery in the heads. 
The tower has a fine three-light window on the north side, 
the upper portion and the west front are unfortunately 
modern ; the porch is one of the most striking parts of 
the church, the inner doorway has rich hanging tracery, 
and on the flat space between the arch and drip moulding 
is the ball-flower, connected by a sort of tendril : the sides 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

of the porch are open, divided into three compartments by 
circular shafts, above which is open tracery. This church 
deserves attentive examination, it has a great variety of rich 
detail, and all very uncommon, w.c. In the aisle or chapel 
on the north side of the chancel are two very remarkable 
low side windows on either side of the north door : the 
east one very low, with a four-centred head, now bricked 
up, the hinge of the shutter remaining ; the other E. E., 
with a window above, included in one internal four-centred 
arch. In this chapel is a piscina with a cinquefoiled head, 
and the ball-flower in the mouldings. On the floor of the 
chancel is the brass of Adam Babington, rector, dec. 1427. a. b. 

121. MouLSOE, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with aisles 
and south porch, tower at west end ; there is a clerestory 
to the nave, but it appears to be modern. The whole church 
is a very good specimen of D., some of the two and three- 
light windows are of very good design, particularly one at 
the east end of north aisle, there is one of four lights at 
the east end of the south aisle, but much of the tracery is 
destroyed. East window modern. A brass to Richard 
Moulsoe and wife, 1528. w.c. 

The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 255. 

122. Newport Pagnel, St. Peter and St. Paul. Is a 
large church, which has lately been repaired; there is a 
west tower, nave with aisles, chancel, north and south 
porch. The tower is P., as is the chancel; the tower 
cornice and pinnacles new; the north aisle is P. ; the south 
aisle modern. There are some good D. stalls, and a D. 
south porch late in the style, with hanging tracery; the 
north porch is of an earlier date. There are some good 
wooden roofs, rickman. The north porch has a groined 
vault, and a chamber above, now used as a vestry : the 
south porch has a fine E. E. arcade. There is also a hand- 
some cinquefoiled arcade in the south aisle, and a piscina 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

in the chancel. The nave is of six large bays, with some 
early D. windows, a.b. 

The church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 418. * 

123. Newton Blossom ville, St Nicholas. Chancel 
with north aisle, nave, north aisle, and south porch, tower 
and turret at west end. There are two fine three-light D. 
windows at the east end, and some of two lights on the 
south side equally good ; some P. windows have been in- 
serted on the north side : the tower is also P. ; a piscina in 
the south wall of chancel, w.c. 

124. Newton Longueville, St. Faith. Chancel with 
north aisle, nave with clerestory, aisles and porches, tower at 
west end. The piers and arches to the nave are good plain 
E. E., the porches and the font are also plain specimens 
of the same style; the tower, the chancel, the clerestory, 
and the whole of the external windows, are P.; the nave 
and aisles have good oak roofs, the principals of which are 
supported by stone corbels, w.c. This church was partly 
rebuilt by New College, Oxford, soon after receiving the 
advowson from Henry VI. in 1442. "At the east end of 
the chancel, on the outside, is a figure of St. Faith, to whom 
the priory was dedicated. In the chancel are two piscinae, 
on one of which are the arms of New College." lysons. 

^" 125. Olney, St. Peter and St. Paul. Chancel, nave, 
aisles and porches, tower and spire at west end. A very 
fine D. church, without any mixture of other styles. The 
tower has a fine west doorway and very good two-Ught 
windows ; the spire (an uncommon feature in this county) 
rises from a good cornice of masks and flowers, and has 
small octagonal pinnacles at the angles, there are four win- 
dows on each of the square sides of the spire, the three 
lowest being of two lights, and all with good tracery and 
canopies. The windows on the sides of the nave and chan- 
cel are of three lights with very rich tracery, and of great 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

variety : the whole of these windows have been restored, and 
to all appearance faithfully ; the east window is very late. 
The cornice to the chancel is rich in masks and flowers, 
there are also some fine gurgoyles, and very good piscina 
and sedilia. w.c. 

A general view of the church, and four corbel-heads, are engraved in 
Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 308. 

126. Ravenstone, All Saints. Chancel with south aisle, 
nave with clerestory and south aisle, tower at the west 
end. General style plain E. E., but most of the windows 
are modern. Clerestory P. w.c. 

A fragment of a D. niche from the ancient priory, and two seals, are en- 
graved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 314. 

127. Shenley Mansell, St. Mary. A cross church, 
with aisles, clerestory, and south porch to the nave. The 
tower in the centre has a good octagon staircase -turret, 
one of the few instances in this county of the turret rising 
above the tower. The earliest part is the chancel, which is 
Transition from N. to E. E. ; in the interior the single-light 
windows and a doorway on the north side are very ex- 
cellent, the shafts have bands and rich capitals, and the 
mouldings of the arch are equally good ; there are some very 
fine corbels composed of clustered shafts with rich capitals, 
but the roof which they once supported is gone ; some of the 
piers and arches to the nave are E. E., others D.: many of 
the windows are good D., but as usual P. windows have 
been introduced, w.c. 

128. Sherrington, St. Laud. Chancel, nave, clere- 
story, aisles, and south porch with room over, tower and 
turret in centre. General style good D., with some fine 
three-light windows on the south side. The piers and 
arches to the nave are very good, circular on the north and 
octagonal on the south side, in both cases with good 
moulded capitals. The east window is D., but on the south 



1 



DEANERY OF NEWPORT. 

side of chancel they are good P. ; the tower also is of the 
latter style, with good double windows on each face of 
the upper stage ; about half way up the tower flat arches 
spring from the buttresses, and carry an additional thick- 
ness of wall : west window fine P., of five lights, w.c. 

129. Simpson, SL Nicholas. A cross chiu-ch, with cen- 
tral tower and south porch. The general style is D., with 
good two and three-light windows, but without any thing 
sufficiently] striking to call for particular notice ; the west 
window is of four lights, very good P., east window of the 
same style, square-headed. Tower P. w.c. 

130. Stanton Bury, /S'/. jPt-Z^r. Nave with south porch, 
chancel. The chancel-arch is good N., enriched with the zig- 
zag and other ornaments, the piers supporting it have good 
capitals : there are one or two E. E. windows remaining, but 
nothing of any interest, w.c. 

131. Stokk Hammond, St. Mary. A small cross church, 
with south porch, and low tower in the centre ; the tower 
was probably originally E. E., but the upper part is now 
clearly P. : the chancel has one or two D. windows and a 
door ; the rest of the church is P. : there is a good screen 
across chancel-arch. The font is late N. and curious, having 
four detached shafts, and a central stem. w.c. 

A view of the church, and the font, are engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 363. 

132. Stratford, Fenny, St. Martin. A plain red 
brick building with stone dressings, style debased Gothic, 
date about 1650. w.c. 

133. Stratford, Stoney, St. Mary Magdalen. Burnt 
all but tower in 1742, and not rebuilt. 

134. Stratford, Stoney, St. Giles, Rebuilt all but 
the tower in 1 776. The tower is P., buUt in 1487. 

One of the Eleanor crosses formerly existed here, but there are now no re- 
mains of it. 

135. Tyringham, St, Peter. Chancel, nave, south 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

porch, tower at west end. The tower is late P., and almost 
the only ancient part left. w.c. 

136. FiLGROVE, /S'^f. il/^/y. Church destroyed. 

137. Walton, St. Michael, Chancel, nave, south 
porch, tower at west end. General style D., with good 
windows of two and three lights. The cornice is curious ; 
it is small, and is principally composed of a hollow with 
grotesque heads at intervals. Tower good P. w.c. There 
is a low side window west of the priest's door. a.b. 

iS° 138. Wavendon, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with 
aisles, clerestory and south porch, tower at west end. 
The chancel, which has recently been rebuilt at the expense 
of the rector, is early D., and has a fine east window of four 
lights, a double piscina of curious design, and triple sedilia, 
the sedile farthest from the altar is the largest of the three, 
and has a semicircular head, the other two being lancet- 
pointed : on the north side is an arcade containing four 
stone stalls recessed in the wall, with plain semicircular 
arches. The piers and arches to the nave are very fine D., 
and by an unusual arrangement of the pews, which are con- 
fined to the aisles, they are well seen. There are some very 
excellent windows of two lights in the aisles, especially one 
of three lights at the east end of the north aisle. The whole 
of the roofs, which have been restored, the clerestory and 
tower, are good P. This church was rebuilt under the 
direction of Mr. Butterfield in 1848-9. h.b. 

139. Weston Underwood, St. Laurence. Chancel, nave 
with aisles, clerestory and north porch, tower at west end. 
The whole of the exterior is P., with very good three-light 
square-headed windows in the aisles, and equally good two 
lights with arched heads in the clerestory; chancel and 
tower, piers and arches to nave, plain E. E. ; font of the same 
style, w.c. A good brass of Elizabeth Hungerford, 1553. 

The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iv. p. 405. 



DEANERY OF WADDESDON. 

140. WiLLEN, St. Mary. Erected in 1660 by Dr. Busby, 
head master of Westminster, who endowed it, and gave a 
library for the use of the vicar, w.c. 

There is a view of the church in Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixii. 1168. 

141. WoLVERTON, Holy Trinity. Rebuilt in 1815 in 
the Norman style. 

141 *. WoLVERTON, St. George. A modern church near 
the railway station, built in 1843-4 in the E. E. style, 
chiefly at the expense of the London and Birmingham 
Railway Company. 

142. WoLSTON, Little, Holy Trinity. Modern. 

143. WoLSTON, Great, Holy Trinity. Chancel, nave, 
south porch, and modern bell-turret on west gable. The 
only things worth notice are some three-light D. windows, 
which are good specimens of the style. Porch, late P. w.c. 

144. WouGHTON, St.3fary. Chancel, nave, south aisle 
and porch, tower at west end. General style D., with very 
good two and three-light windows. Porch good, with a 
small two-light window on each side. Tower P. w.c. 



i9cancr|) of aSBabbcstion. 

145. Ashendon, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with clere- 
story, south aisle and porch, tower at west end. The tower 
and some of the windows are early D., a window of three 
lights on the south side is particularly good; some P. 
windows and a door have been inserted in the tower and 
chancel ; the clerestory is also of that style, w.c. 

146. DoRTON, St. JoJin Baptist. Chancel, nave, south 
aisle and porch, bell-turret at west end. With the excep- 
tion of one or two E. E. windows, there is nothing remain- 
ing of any interest, w.c. 

The south view of the church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 245. 

G 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

147. Aston Sandford, St. Michael. A small plain 
clmrch, without aisles or tower. It has a wooden bellcot at 
the west end, supported by a buttress up the centre of the 
west front. The chancel windows are good small D. single . 
lights ; at the east end are two similar windows which have 
been modernized, it has a small figure of the Saviour in 
good D. glass. The chancel-arch has lately been altered, 
the windows of the nave were similar to the chancel, but 
some of them are modernized. The font is modern. There 
is an early king-post and tie-beam in the chancel, but the 
rest of the roof is plastered over, i.h.p. 

There is a woodcut of the church from the south-east in Lipscomb, i. 50. 

148. Brill, All Saints. Tower plain P., two N. door- 
ways, a very good E. E. window at the east end of the north 
aisle ; the north wall is modern, and the rest of the church 
modernized, i.h.p. 

149. BoARSTALL, St. Jamcs. Modern, with the old 
materials used. The remains of the cross are still in the 
churchyard, i.h.p. 

Near the church is a fine P. gate-house, with the original 
turrets and chimneys, and one of the fire-places. Some 
Elizabethan work is introduced, i.h.p. 

There is a bird's-eye view of the tower, &c., in Archaeologia, vol. iii. pL 15 ; 
and Lipscomb's History, vol. i. p. 76. 

150. Chearsley, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave, modern 
south porch, and a good P. tower and staircase-turret at 
the west end. The church seems originally to have been 
E. E., and there are still some single-light windows and a 
doorway of that style remaining, but P. windows have been 
inserted in various parts, particularly in the chancel. There 
is a good E. E. cross on east end of nave. w.c. There is 
a brass of John Erankelyn and wife, 1462. 

There are views of the church in the Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixxix,, p. 497 ; and 
in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 142. The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 125. 



DEANERY OF WADDESDON. 

151. Chilton, St. Mary. Chancel with south aisle, 
nave, south transept and porch, tower and turret on north 
side. The outhne of the tower is E. E., but the windows 
are D., one of three lights on the east side very good. 
Transept E. E., with a triplet enclosed in an arch ; there is 
a good D. screen dividing the chancel from its aisle : the 
other parts of the church are late P. with good windows, 
the porch has a room over, and a good staircase-turret 
leading to it. In the chancel there are some stalls with 
rich panelling and poppy-heads. Font D., with good bold 
mouldings. There is a stone reading-desk. w.c. 

152. Easington, All Saints, No church remaining. 
Parish united with Chilton. 

153. Claydon, Middle, All Saints. Chancel, nave, 
and south porch, tower at west end. The nave is very 
early D., with some plain two-light windows on the sides. 
Tower P., chancel P., very late in the style, with three-hght 
windows on the sides, and one of five lights at the east 
end. There is a brass to Roger Gyffard and wife, 1542, 
and Isabelle Giflard, 1523; and another to Alexander 
Anne, presbyter, 1526. w.c. 

The brasses are engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 193. 

154. Claydon, East, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with 
south porch and vestry, and a small chapel on south side, 
tower at west end. The chapel is E. E., a doorway and 
two-light window on the north side of the chancel are 
good D., the former ornamented with the four-leaved 
flower. Tower and some other parts P. w.c. 

155. Crendon, Long, St. Mary. A mixed church, cru- 
ciform, with tower in the centre, and aisles to the nave only ; 
the chancel is E. E., with a modern east window. The tower- 
arches are E. E., the upper part of the tower P., with an 
octagonal bell-turret carried above the level of the battle- 
ment. The north transept has a fine D. window, the south 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

is Elizabethan. The nave has two E. E. arches on each 
side. The north aisle is D., the south P. The font is very 
good P. A brass, 1468. i.h.p. 

In this parish are the remains of Notley Abbey, founded 
by Walter Giffard 1162. There is some very fine E. E. 
work, consisting of the reredos of an altar, a trefoiled 
arcade, stringcourses, and doorways, the work of which is 
very good, and the sculptures very rich; there are also 
some arches of earlier character, and a farm-house which 
appears to be c. Hen. VI. i.h.p. 

The church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 216 ; the corbel-table in 
Lysons, and in Rickman, fifth edition. 

156. Fleet Marston, 8t. Mary. Nave, south porch, 
chancel. Probably all D. Nave has P. windows, small 
and plain. The chancel had originally three small single- 
light windows, on the north side a square-headed one has 
been inserted, a.n. 

157. Grendon Underwood, St. Leonard. Chancel and 
nave, with tower at the west end. There is a very good 
E. E. doorway on the south side, the shafts of which are 
gone, but the foliated capitals are still remaining ; there has 
been some rich foliage in the arch, but it is now destroyed. 
The chancel is early D., with plain two-light windows and 
a good piscina in the south wall, partly hidden by a modern 
monument. Tower P. w.c. 

iS" 158. IcKFORD, St. Nicholas. A very pretty little 
church of mixed styles, consisting of chancel, nave with 
aisles, and west tower. The chancel is E. E., with lancet 
windows on the side, the east window is D. of three hghts 
with flowing tracery, the two western windows of the chan- 
cel are P., with transoms and low side openings under them. 
There is a small E. E. doorway on the south side, the east 
window on this side is square-headed of two hghts, and a 
curious specimen of the transition from D. to P. ; there are 



DEANERY OF WADDESDON. 

good E. E. strings, both inside and outside of the walls, 
there is a plain E. E. piscina, with the projecting basin per- 
fect, and there are two plain brackets in the east wall : the 
chancel-arch is E. E., with shafts of early character. The 
nave has three E. E. arches on each side, with capitals and 
bases partaking of N. character, the hoodmoulds have very 
good terminations ; the south aisle has a N. window, with 
an E. E. niche close to it, and a good E. E. doorway with 
banded shafts ; the porch is also E. E. but mutilated : the 
north aisle also has a N. window, and a very pretty E. E. 
one, with a trefoil inner arch under a square head and rose, 
in the spandrels ; also aD. window, square-headed, of three 
lights, with fine mouldings. The font is plain, round, on a 
solid base, probably E. E. The tower is very good E. E., 
with a saddle-back roof, the gable on the east and west 
sides, with crosses on both of them ; the west front of the 
4;ower is particularly good, with a lancet window below, 
and two trefoil-headed windows in the belfry ; on the east 
side the belfry window is of two lights, with a quatrefoil in 
the head, the tower-arch is good E.E., with slender shafts 
having elegant capitals, i.h.p. 

The church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 285. 

159. Ilmer, St. Peter, A small church, consisting of 
chancel, nave, and north porch. Style principally D., but 
without any thing worthy of remark. D. sedilia in south 
wall; a P. screen across the chancel-arch. w.c. 

160. Kingsey, St. Nicholas, Rebuilt about 1800, as 
bad as possible, but a good incised slab of the fourteenth 
century, to John de Hedenham, has been preserved, i.h.p. 

161. Ludgershall, St. Mary. Chancel P., with a 
modern east window, roof Elizabethan. The nave has three 
arches on each side, E. E. The caps of the two western 
pillars are carved with bold projecting figures ; the other 
caps are moulded, two D., and two E. E. The tower is 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

built within the west end on buttresses, with D. arches 
inserted under the E. E. ones. The north-west cap has the 
tooth ornament very bold. The east window of the north 
aisle is very fine D., having some painted glass. The other 
windows are P. insertions. The font Transition N., the tower 
good D., west window good D. with flowing tracery. There 
is a sanctus bell-cot at the east end of the nave, and a tomb 
with late brasses on south side of chancel, i.h.p. 

The brass of Anne Englishe, 1565, is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 321. 

ig^ 162. Marston, North, St. Mary. This is one of 
the finest churches in the neighbourhood, it consists of a 
chancel, nave with clerestory, aisles, and south porch, a 
tower at the west end, with a vestry on the north side, the 
latter having a room over it. The original style of this church 
seems to have been E. E., or at least it was commenced 
when that style prevailed, as some E. E. piers and arches 
are still remaining on the north side; on the south side 
they are D., and rather curious in form. The whole of the 
south aisle is D., there is a rich piscina in the south wall, 
a very good three-light window with a niche on each side 
at the east end, and a squint, all profusely ornamented with 
the four-leaved flower; the south doorway is plain, but 
has very good mouldings ; the tower is also in the same 
style, but is'much defaced, and has some P. additions. The 
chancel^ is a remarkably fine specimen of P., the whole 
of the details of an excellent character. The exterior is 
rich in buttresses, pinnacles, windows and battlements. 
The interior has fine sedilia and piscina in the south wall, 
and rich niches on each side of the east window, the whole 
much mutilated; there are also some fine oak stalls with 
rich panelling and poppy heads ; the door on the north 
side leading to the vestry is a rich piece of panelling, and 
the vestry itself is a fine room, having a good water-drain 
on the south side, a window on the east, and a fire-place on 



DEANERY OF WADDESDON. 

the north : a staircase leads from this room to that above, 
which has also a fire-place, and a staircase leading to the 
roof, both these rooms have good panelled ceilings; the 
roofs of both nave and chancel are of oak supported on 
stone corbels. The font is D., the bowl supported by 
angels springing from the shaft, w.c. 

The south view of the church, a D. and a P. piscina, the P. font, and the 
brass of Richard Sanders, 1602, are engraved in Lipscomb, i. 344 — 347. 

163. Oakley, St. Mary. The tower very good D., with 
a remarkably bold stair-turret at the south-east angle, rising 
above the tower with a good finial. A D. chapel on the 
south side projecting like a transept, with good D. windows, 
and at the south end on the outside is a sepulchral recess 
with a cinquefoiled arch. The nave-arches are Transition 
N., the south doorway D., windows P., north windows D. 
Font plain, round, Transition N., chancel debased P. i.h.p. 

A south view of the church and the plan are engraved in Lipscomb, i. 361. 

164. OviNG, All Saints. Chancel, nave, south aisle and 
porch, tower at west end. Principally E. E., with plain 
single-light windows in the chancel, a good three-light D. 
window at east end of aisle, P. windows inserted in various 
parts of the church. Tower P. w.c. 

165. PiTCHCOTT, St. Giles. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, tower at west end. Principally plain E. E., with 
single -light windows in the chancel, P. windows inserted in 
various parts : tower P., but with many modern alterations ; 
a good E. E. cross on east end of chancel, w.c. 

166. QuAiNTON, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, aisles and 
south porch, tower and turret at west end. This church was 
originally D., the piers and arches to the nave, and also 
the tower, are still of that style, the latter having a plain 
moulded doorway and one or two good windows remaining : 
the whole of the windows both to the nave and chancel 
are late P., and many have their tracery destroyed ; there is 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

a rood-loft staircase on the north side. w.c. A brass in fine 
preservation to John Spence, rector, 1485, and a remark- 
able female half figure on brass, Johane Plesh, c. 1360. a.b. 

These brasses and three others are engraved in Lipscomb, i. 428 — 432. 

167. Shabbington, St. Mary Magdaleji. A small plain 
church, the chancel good D. with the original windows, a 
niche with an ogee head by the side of the east window, a 
five-foiled piscina, a square low side opening on the north 
side, and a good gable cross. The nave spoiled, the tower 
at the west end late and poor P., the doorways plain D., 
and the font plain, octagonal, cup shaped. The north porch 
has a D. barge-board, i.h.p. 

168. Waddesdon, St. Michael. Chancel, nave with 
clerestory, aisles and south porch, tower at west end. The 
earliest work in the church is N., one or two of the piers 
of the nave and the inner doorway of the porch being of 
that style, though rather late. The tower, south porch, and 
the piers and arches to the nave, are generally good plain 
E. E., some parts of the chancel are D., but P. windows 
have been inserted there, as also in the tower and other 
parts of the church ; the clerestory is entirely P. w.c. 
There are several stone coffin-lids in the floor of the church. 
The font is D., octagonal, panelled, with shields, &;c. 

A brass of a figure in a shroud is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 510. 

169. WiNCHENDON, UppER, St. Mary Magdalen. 
Chancel, nave, tower. The tower is good massive P., at the 
south-east angle it has a turret, capped by a pointed stone 
roof. The rest of the church has been late N., but has 
windows inserted in the nave. Near the east end of the 
nave a small round-headed window remains near the ground. 
The chancel has at the east end two round-headed win- 
dows rather long, no appearance of a third. A brass to 
Sir John Stodeley, vicar, in good preservation, a.n. 

The south-west view of the church is given in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 570. The 
brass to John Stodeley, 1515, is engraved by Waller, and in Boutell's Brasses. 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

170. WiNCHENDON, LowER, St. Mc/iolas. Chancel, 
nave, and south porch, tower and turret at west end. The 
general style of the church is D., with some good windows, 
the west doorway of tower is very good, and the arch is 
enriched with the four-leaved flower ; some good P. win- 
dows are inserted in various places, w.c. Portions of the 
ancient priory still remain. 

Two brasses of the fifteenth century axe engraved in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 533. 

171. WoRMiNGHALL, St. FetcT. A Small plain church 
of mixed styles, mostly P., with a P. tower at the west end, 
square and battlemented, the east window also P., the south 
doorway plain N. Partly rebuilt in 1847. i.h.p. The 
chancel-arch is N., and there is a widely splayed window, 
N. or E. E., in the north wall of the nave. a.b. 

The brass of Philip King, his wife, and twelve children, 1592, is engraved 
in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 581. 

172. WooTTON Underwood, .^^// /SiQj/^z/*. Chancel and 
nave, tower at west end. The tower is evidently modern, 
and all the other parts of the church have been so much 
modernized as to have but little of interest, the style 
appears to have been D. w.c. The Grenville chapel on 
south aisle was built 1343 by William and Mary Grenville. 

The brass of Edward and Alice Grenville, 1587, is engraved in Lipscomb, 
vol. i. p. 613. 



Beanerp of SKcntrober. 

173. AsTON Clinton, St. Michael. The chancel is fine 
D., with a mutilated east window, it has a piscina and very 
good sedilia with elegant groinings : the chancel-arch and 
arches of the nave are E. E., with circular and octagonal 
pillars alternately: the north clerestory has two circular 
foliated windows; on the south side the windows are 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

modern. There is a low side window on the south side of 
chancel, a very fine ogee niche on the north side, and a pis- 
cina in the south aisle. The font and tower are modern, w.c. 

There is an engraving of stalls, &c,, in Gent's. Mag., vol. Ixvi. p. 841. 

174. AsTON, St. Leonard's. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, bell- turret on west gable. The whole of this church 
has been so completely faced with cement as to have none 
of the original work visible, it appears to have been D. ; the 
interior fittings are modern, w.c. 

^^ 175. Aylesbury, St Mary. Cruciform; chancel 
with aisles, lady-chapel parallel with chancel, central tower, 
transepts, nave with aisles, and side chapels, clerestory, 
porch south-west, and doors north, west, and at extremity 
of south transept. The latter door good late P. The west 
doorway E. E., with handsome external arcade. There is 
also a finely moulded arcade of same date in chancel, in- 
cluding three lancet windows on north side, and again in 
south porch. Tower with fine lantern, and double trifo- 
rium, E. E. Vestry on north of chancel aisle, with upper 
story; ancient fire-place and baluster window in upper 
room ; ancient door to lower vestry, with curious winch 
lock. There is also an ancient moulded wooden cupboard, 
with swinging horse for vestments. Aumbry, sepulchre, 
E. E., and stalls with misereres on north side of chancel ; 
entrance with hanging stone steps to rood-loft. Two pis- 
cinae, (one square-headed, with projecting shaft,) reredos 
trefoil-headed, E. E., and sepulchre E. E., with massive D. 
feathering, and effigy of knight, fourteenth century, (dug up 
on the ground of the hospital of Grey Friars in this town,) 
all in north transept. In south transept remains of altar 
with mullioned squint for reredos, looking through aisle to 
chancel and lady-chapel, and having on north side a moulded 
groove for crucifix, with bracket and shaft (now chiselled 
away) beyond, and on south side a richly coloured niche. 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

with crocketed pediment. There are also piscinae in both 
the side chantry chapels of nave ; in the north two tombs. 
Windows of chancel, three E. E., on each side, with bad P. 
of five lights at east end; all the windows in transepts, 
nave, and clerestory are now bad P. (the west debased), but 
some of the jamb mouldings are D. There is one mutilated 
D. window at the east end of the lady-chapel. The font 
N., with circular escalloped bowl, cushion-moulded base, 
and a double chevron moulding round the shaft. There 
are some very beautiful E. E. arches in the transepts, with 
tooth-moulding, and clustered jamb shafts. Encaustic tiles 
of numerous patterns, and several matrices, but no brass 
remaining. There is a curious little Latin cross floree, 
moulded within a quatrefoil, on a stone now inserted in the 
west wall of north aisle, a.b. 

There is a lithograpbic print of the font in Batty's History of Baptismal 
Fonts, 8vo. 1848. The font is also engraved in Lysons ; a south-east view of 
the church, and various details, in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 47. 

176. QuARRENDON, St. Feter. In ruins, but chiefly D., 
and of remarkably beautiful proportions. 

There are engravings of the outside and inside of this chapel in the Gent's. 
Mag., vol. Ixxxvii. ii. p. 489 ; and a south-east view in Lipscomb, vol. i. p. 411. 

177. BiERTON, St. James. Of mixed styles, the nave 
and aisles under one very low pitched roof, the pillars early 
D. The side windows of the chancel also early D., and a 
good doorway of the same style at the end of the south 
transept. The east window is late P. There are some 
poppy heads and wood- work, and some encaustic tiles. 
J.L.p. The font is plain N., with a cable moulding. The 
tower doorway and south doorway in south transept have 
good ogee crocketed hoods. 

There is a lithographic print of the font in Batty's Fonts. 

178. BucKLAND, ^// ^a?^^. Chancel, nave, north aisle, 
clerestory and south porch, tower at west end. Generally 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

E. E. and D., with P. windows inserted in several places, 
but without any thing calling for particular remark. w,c. 

179. Stoke Mandeville, St. Mary. Chancel, nave 
with clerestory, aisles and north porch, tower at west end. 
The chancel has some E. E. remains, one window and a 
piscina being in that style. The other parts of the church 
are D., with good piers and arches to the nave, and a few 
two-light windows. Some P. windows have been inserted 
in various places, the lower part of the tower is P., the 
upper part brick. There is a fine yew-tree near the south 
porch, w.c. 

180. Bledlow, ^o/y 2V«W^y. A small D. church. The 
chancel has a single-light window in the north wall divided 
by a transom. The nave is separated from the aisles by 
four D. arches on round piers with foliated caps. The south 
doorway is good moulded E. E. recessed, with two shafts. 
There is a large plain round stoup in the south-east angle. 
The north doorway is plain, round-headed, with a moulded 
impost, and seems of E. E. character. The font is round, escal- 
loped, N. There is a square western tower, with a cornice 
of heads. In the churchyard is the base of a cross, h.a. 
There is a remarkable piscina in south aisle, with square 
deep drain. A stoup, very deep and good, east side of 
porch door. A niche east end of north aisle. A brass 
of priest now placed at back of aumbry, on north side 
of chancel. A small oak eagle. The seats in nave are 
moveable, a.b. 

181. DiNTON, S8. Peter and Paul. Chancel, nave, south 
aisle, west tower, south porch. The church is E. E., pure 
though plain, with a triplet at the east end. The nave has 
five E. E. arches on octagonal piers. The south doorway is 
N., in which besides the usual N. ornaments appears a 
Roman guilloche ; the pillars have spiral shafts : in the 
tympanum is a rude carving, in bas relief, of two dragons 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

devouring fruit from a tree, and St. Michael thrusting a 
cross into the mouth of the great dragon with the following 
inscription, 

Praemia pro meritis si quis desperet habenda 
Audiat hie praecepta sibi quae sint retinenda. 

Over the doorway is a P. porch. The windows in the 
north wall are also P. The font is early D., cup-shaped. 
There is the base of a churchyard cross, a.b. 

The N. doorway is engraved in Lysons, in Archaeologia, vol. x. pi. 17, 
and in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 146. 

182. Ellesborough, SS, Peter and Paul. Chancel, 
nave, south aisle, with tower at the west end of the aisle. At 
the east end of the chancel are two N. loops, the side windows 
have had the heads cut olBFby the lowering of the roof. The 
chancel-arch is P., moulded. The nave has four arches on 
the south side, small P., on very lofty octagonal pillars with 
moulded caps and bases, the hood-mouldings have heads at 
the points of junction, the north windows are good P., the 
aisle windows also P., there is a curious squint from the 
east end of the aisle through the angle of the chancel wall 
towards the altar, having a double perforation towards the 
chancel, a single one towards the aisle. The tower stands 
over the west end of the aisle, and has P. arches opening 
into it, and into the nave, on the tower pier is a good 
corbel-head of a bishop. The west doorway and window 
are P., the font is D., the sides ornamented with sunk 
panels, and the rim with quatrefoils. In the aisle is a 
canopied Elizabethan tomb, with effigy of Bridgetta Croke, 
and a small late brass, with a figure in armour, and lady. h.a. 

Lipscomb gives an engraving of a very fine original canopy to the pulpit in 
this church, it is P. pyramidal open tabernacle-work. 

I^p° 183. Haddenham, St. Mary. A fine church of 
mixed styles, consisting of a chancel, a nave with aisles, 
and a west tower. The walls of the chancel are E. E., the 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

side windows very small single lancets, the east window is 
P., of five lights ; there is a D. low side window on the 
south side. The roof of the chancel is D. or early P. The 
tower is fine E. E. with an arcade round the belfry story, a 
corbel-table of masks and a plain parapet. The chancel-arch 
is plain, lofty, Transition N. The rood-screen and side 
screens are P. In the chancel window are some bits of 
E. E. glass. The nave has four plain E. E. arches on each 
side. The south aisle has D. walls with an original door- 
way and window, the others P. insertions. The north aisle 
has D. walls and buttresses, with a P. chapel added at the 
east end. The north porch is fine D., with side windows, 
and a trefoiled niche over the door. The west front is 
good plain E. E. The font is Transition N. There are 
some good open seats. In the north-east chapel, which is 
good P., is a piscina with diaper-work, i.h.p. 

There is an engraving of the arcade and a moulding, in the Glossary of 
Architecture, vol. ii. ; and a good P. bench-end, with a poppy in the form of 
the fleur-de-lis, in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 214. 

184. CuDDiNGTON, St. Nicholas. Chancel, nave with 
aisles and south porch, tower and turret at west end. The 
piers and arches to the nave are N. and E. E., with some 
curious capitals ; a great portion of the exterior, the chancel- 
arch, and some other small portions are good D., an addition 
has been made to the south porch so as to enlarge the aisle ; 
this part has two D. windows with finely carved heads to the 
drip mouldings, but the tracery is gone. There is a good 
D. screen across the chancel-arch. The tower is good P., 
the font N. w.c. 

185. H ALTON, St. Michael. Modern. The foundations 
of the capacious ancient chancel (now supplied by a shallow 
apse) are apparent in the churchyard, a.b. A brass with 
the effigies of Baron Bradschawe, 1553. 

The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 225. 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

186. Hampden, Great, St. Mary Magdalene. Chancel, 
nave with aisle and south porch, tower at south-west angle. 
The lower part of the tower is E. E., the upper part P., with a 
good three-light window at the west end ; the piers and 
arches to the nave are D., with good mouldings : the rest of 
the church is P., with very good three-light windows. Pis- 
cina trefoil-headed, shelf and drain ; a squint on the north 
side of the chancel-arch. There is a stone coffin standing 
in the churchyard. This church is best known as the bui^ial- 
place of John Hampden, w.c. Some monuments to the 
Hampden family, the oldest 1493. 

A view of the church and house, and woodcuts of two brasses of the 
Ilampdens, 1493, and 1553, are given in Lipscomb, vol. ii. pp. 289, 290. 

187. Hartwell, The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. 
Erected by Sir William Lee about 1756. Built after the 
chapter-house at York. Octagonal, with small apse for 
chancel : roof worked in fan-tracery, a.b. 

188. Hampden, Little, . Chancel, nave, 

and north porch, with bell-turret over it. The only portion 
that has any mark of antiquity is a single-light E. E. window 
on the north side of the chancel, now stopped up, all the 
other parts of the church are quite devoid of interest, w.c. 

189. Horsenden, St. Michael. A small P. church, 
having the nave and chancel under one roof, with a low 
tower at the west end, the whole church of one style, with 
good three-light windows, w.c. 

There is a view of the church in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 328. 

190. HuLcoTT, All Saints? or St. Nicholas? Chancel, 
nave with south aisle and north porch, and bell-turret at 
west end. Some portions of this church are very plain 
E. E., this refers to the piers and arches of the nave, a 
doorway on the north side of the chancel, and some other 
small parts, there is one small D. window on the south side 
of the chancel, the remaining parts are P. w.c. 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

191. Great Kimble, St. Nicholas. An oblong D. church, 
with a western tower. In the chancel is a rude piscina in 
the south-eastern angle. The nave has north and south 
aisles, the tower has a cornice of masks and heads under 
the battlements. The font is N., consisting of an es- 
calloped basin on an enriched base. There are several 
encaustic tiles in the chancel, h.a. 

There is a lithographic print of the font in Batty's Fonts. 

192. Little Kimble, All Saints. A small D. church, 
having a chancel and nave. The chancel has pointed win- 
dows, a plain piscina in the east wall, and a low side win- 
dow in the north, which is remarkable as being in imme- 
diate juxtaposition wdth another D. window, itself being a 
small E. E. window with deep internal splay. The chancel- 
arch is moulded D. On the south of the nave is a small 
bracket, and a piscina, aD. doorway with masks at the hood 
terminations, and a P. porch. There is also a north door- 
way and porch. The font is plain, round. Below the altar 
platform are some curious figured tiles, and on the w^alls 
of the church are ancient frescoes, which are nearly obli- 
terated. H.A. and a.b. 

The church is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 354. 

193. Lacey Green, . Modern, 1825. Chapel 

of ease to Risborough. 

194. Lee, St. John Baptist. Chancel and nave, with 
modern south porch, and bell-turret on west gable. Style 
E. E., with single-light windows at the sides, and one of 
three lights at the east end, good piscina and sedile on 
south side of the chancel, and several good old seats, w.c. 

195. MissENDEN, Great, St. Feter and St. Paul. A 
cross church, with aisles and clerestory to the nave, south 
porch, and tower at the west end. The tower has been 
E. E., but has been much modernized, the windows in 
the upper stage are P., the piers and arches to the nave are 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

D., with good moulded capitals, there are goodD. windows 
in various parts of the church, especially some of two lights 
on the south side of the chancel ; P. windows have been in- 
serted in the transepts and other parts ; clerestory P. w.c. 
There is a brass of John Iwardby and his wife Katherine, 
daughter and heiress of Bernard de Missenden, with four 
children, 1536. The man in good civil costume, the lady 
with the homed head-dress. Also a curious one of Margaret 
Metcalf, 1596. There are some small remains of the flint 
walls of Missenden abbey in this parish. 

Lipscomb gives a south-east view of the church, woodcuts of the arms of 
the abbey, and the seals of the abbey and the abbot, and the brasses, ii. 367. 

196. Missenden, Little, SL John Baptist. Chancel 
with north aisle, nave with aisles and south porch, tower 
and turret at west end. The lower part of the tower is E. E., 
the upper portion and the turret good P., the chancel E. E., 
having single-light windows on the side and a triplet at the 
east end ; there are one or two small D. windows remaining, 
and also some P. inserted in various places, w.c. 

197. Monks RisBOROUGH, iS/. i)^^;z5^a;?. A fine church, 
consisting of chancel, nave, aisles, clerestory, tower and 
turret at west end. The general design of the tower and 
some of the details are good E. E., late in the style, they 
have a plain parapet supported by a good block cornice, 
the west doorway and most of the windows are very good 
D., the nave and aisles are D., with some good windows, 
but there are P. windows inserted in various places, chan- 
cel and clerestory P., with good windows. Pont N., curious, 
cup-shaped, and fluted. Some few good bench-ends re- 
maining, w.c. There are a few brasses ; some good painted 
glass ; and some good encaustic tiles. The panels of the 
rood-screen are painted with figures of saints, &c. ; and a 
richly moulded niche at the east end of the north aisle, a.b. 

The font and the brass of a priest are engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 421. 

I 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

198. Princes Risborough, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, 
aisles and south porch, modern tower and sph'e at west end, 
there is a clerestory to the nave. The original style of this 
church was E.E., of which there are still considerable re- 
mains, two good window^s of that style on the north side of 
the chancel, and some good D. Avindows in various parts, 
the east window is square -headed P. The south porch is D., 
with good inner doorway, w.c. A double piscina ; a low side 
window on the north side of chancel. Pont octagonal P. a.b. 

There is a view of the church in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 426. 

199. Stone, St. John Baptist. A cross church, with 
aisles and clerestory to the nave, south porch, modern 
chancel, tower and turret at the west end. There are some 
considerable remains of N. work in this church, such as the 
piers and arches of the nave, and a very good doorway in 
the south porch, but the general style is E. E. ; the tower 
and turret are very good, finished with gables, and a para- 
pet with a good cornice of masks ; there is a D. doorway 
and window inserted in the tower. The chancel and 
transepts are E. E. ; the south transept has a good triplet. 
A stoup in east w^all of porch, the north doorway is stopped 
up, and P. windows have been inserted in various places. 
In the churchyard there is the base of a stone cross, w.c. 
There are remains of a stoup in the porch. The font is 
circular, with rude sculptures of salamander, and other 
figures, very curious. It was lately brought here from a 
garden at Lewisham, Kent, and originally, it is said, from 
the church of Hampstead Norris, Berks, being removed 
thence 200 years ago. (Vide Dash on Hundred of Comp- 
ton.) The chancel is just rebuilt, of considerably smaller 
size than the ancient one, and the nave new seated. Two 
brasses, 1472, 1520, the latter palimpsest, a.b. 

200. TowERSEY, St. Catherine. Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, small transept on north side, modern bell-tur- 



DEANERY OF WENDOVER. 

ret at west end. Most of this church is D., with good two- 
Hght windows, the south porch has a room over it. Pont 
a plain octagon shaft. There is a small N. piscina in the 
chancel, w.c. 

A piscina is engrayed in the Glossary of Architecture, vol. ii. 

201. Wendover, /S^/. J/«/y. Chancel, nave, aisles, west 
tower. The chancel was restored in 1839, it has a square- 
headed trefoiled piscina quite plain, chancel arch D. moulded. 
The nave is also D., and has five arches on each side, with 
clustered pillars on moulded bases, the capitals enriched 
^\ ith foliage and sculpture, some of the pillars have octagonal 
abaci, the others are round, the tower-arch is D., similar to 
the chancel-arch, the tower itself is square and low, with 
diagonal buttresses. The aisles have windows of two lights, 
with a quatrefoil in the head, but from these and from the 
clerestory windows the tracery has been cut out. The 
south aisle contains a plain trefoil piscina, the south door- 
way is D., with good mouldings, and is ornamented with 
ball-flowers and the four-leaved flower in the soffit of an 
arch ; there are remains of a stoup, and a curious mural 
brass, of W. Bradshaw, gent., and Avife, 1537, with their 
nine children, and the names of twenty-three grand-chil- 
dren. H.A. 

The brass is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 491. 

202. Weston Tuhville, St. Mary. Chancel, nave with 
aisles, clerestory, and porches, and tower and turret at west 
end. This church is principally D., with good piers and 
arches to the nave, and good two-light windows; there is 
some screen-work across the chancel-arch, and a piscina on 
south side of chancel, both good specimens of the style. The 
tower is P., and has a good arch opening into the nave; 
there are some old seats remaining in the chancel. Pont N., 
curious, cup-shaped. P. windows inserted in various places 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

There is a brass of a man in a furred gown, without in- 
scription, w.c. 

The font and brass are engraved in Lipscomb, vol. ii. p. 501. 



Beauery of Mgcombe. 

203. Bradenham, St Botolph. A late poor P. church. 
A chapel on the north side of the chancel was built by 
William Lord Windsor in 1542, as appears by an in- 
scription round the cornice. 

204. Fawley, St. Mary. Nave and chancel, tower at 
west end, and a small south transept bearing date 1633. 
With the exception of the tower, which is a good plain 
specimen of E. E., the whole of the church has been so much 
altered as to have no point of interest remaining, w.c. 

205. FiNGEST, St. Bartholomew. Chancel, nave, and 
south porch, tower at west end. The whole of this church 
seems to have been good N.; the tower and nave are still 
of that style, the former having good double windows on 
each side of the upper stage, the lower stage has rather a 
curious D. window : the chancel appears to have been E.E., 
but has P. windows inserted in various places, w.c. 

206. Hambledon, St. Mary. Has been much patched 
and modernized, and various doors and windows stopped It 
is a large cross church, of flint, with a modern west tower ; 
there seems to have been originally aN. tower at the inter- 
section, and there are portions of the three later styles. 
There is a good N. font. A south doorway with plain good 
mouldings, and three stalls and a water- drain in the chancel 
with ogee heads and good crocketed canopies, rickman. 

A brass to John White, 1487, is engraved in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 575. 

207. Hedsor, /S'if. iV/(?/^(5/«5. Chancel and nave. A small 
poor church, without any thing remarkable. Part seems D., 



DEANERY OF WYCOMBE. 

other parts P.; it stands in a pretty situation in Lord Bos- 
ton's park. A.N. " Near the church is a yew-tree, which 
measures 27 feet in circumference." lysons. 

208. HuGHENDON, or HiTCHENDON, St. Michael. Chan- 
cel, north aisle, nave with south porch, tower on north side. 
Some parts of the tower are E. E., but some of the win- 
dows and other portions are P. ; there is a plain N. door- 
way in the porch. At the east end are two curious three- 
light D. windows, and at the west end a very good P. win- 
dow of four lights ; there are also one or two single-light 
E. E. windows remaining, w.c. There are some good effi- 
gies of knights, supposed descendants of Simon de Mont- 
fort. A good brass of a priest, (Robert Thurloe,) A.D. 1493. 

A monumental effigy in this church is engraved in Stothard's Monuments 
of Great Britain, p. 36. The font, an early gravestone with cross, and four 
effigies, are given by Lipscomb, vol. iii. pp. 688 — 591. 

209. Lane End, Holy Trinity. Modem. 

210. LouDWATER, . Rebuilt in 1788. 

211. Marlow, Great, ^// /S'a?;?/^. Rebuilt, a.n. 

212. Marlow, Little, St. John Baptist. Is principally 
P., plain, but good, rickman. Consists of chancel with 
aisle, nave with aisles, and west tower. The chancel is E. E., 
the windows on the north side of two lights not foliated, 
with a circle foliated; internally these windows have E. E. 
shafts, externally the drip is a roll moulding. The nave is 
chiefly P., the tower E. E. or early D. There is an altar- 
tomb of Nicholas Ledwick, 1430, founder either of the church 
or chancel, as appears from his epitaph on a brass, a.n. 

There is a view of the church in Lipscomb, vol. iii. p. 600. 

213. Medmenham, St. Peter. Mave and chancel under 
one roof, P. tower and tun^et at west end, south porch 
modern, the inner doorway N. The prevailing style of the 
church is D., with square-headed windows, east window P. 
The whole of the church and yard are kept in very good 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE, 

order. A short distance from the church are some remains 
of the abbey, now used as a dweUing-house. w.c. 

There is a view of the ruins of the abbey in the Beauties of England and 
Wales, p. 375. 

214. Radnage, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, tower in centre. The latter has some appearance of 
N. work on the lower stage, but the upper stage and most 
of the church are E. E., there is a plain triplet at the east 
end of the chancel, most of the other windows are good D., 
an E. E. piscina on south side. w.c. 

215. Saunderton, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, modern bell- turret at west end. General style D., 
with modern windows inserted in various parts, D. sedilia 
on south side. w.c. 

216. TuRviLLE, St. Mary. Chancel, nave, and south 
porch, with low P. tower at west end. Chancel D., with 
some good two-hght windows, east window stopped up ; 
south doorway Transition from N. to E. E. \ font N.; some 
few old benches remaining, w.c. 

217. WooBURN, St. Fad. Chancel, with north aisle, 
nave with aisles, west tower. The east window of the 
chancel is of singular design, late D. or early P. The 
tower is P. The rest of the church is plain Transition, with 
P. windows inserted, a.n. There are several brasses. 

There is a view of the church in the Beauties of England and Wales, 
p. 386. 

218. %W Wycombe, High, or Chipping, All Saints. Is a 
large church, the exterior of which has lately been repaired 
with cement. There is a west tower, nave and aisles, tran- 
septs, chancel, and aisles. The tower, the piers, and arches, 
the clerestory, and wood roofs are P. The battlements of 
the tower modern ; most of the exterior walls, the south 
porch, and several windows, are of good early D. character. 
The south aisle and east windows are P. There are por- 



DEANERY OF WYCOMBE. 

tions of the rood-loft, and some very good wood screen- 
work remaining. The arches to the transept are earHer 
than those in the nave, and the details of the earlier doors 
and windows are very good. Part of the walling is flint 
and chalk in small squares, rickman. During the repairs 
of the grammar school, (formerly the hospital of St. John,) 
in 1840, discoveries were made of the remains of a Nor- 
man church, including arches, piers/ &c. Dr. Lipscomb 
gives the ground-plan in his work. Several piers with 
caps remain, which Dr. Lipscomb calls N., and describes 
as "ornamented with sculptured fohage and shells, and 
on one of them a dragon." The school-room he sup- 
poses to have been the refectory ; " in the north wall is one 
lancet-shaped window, and another of the D. style." a.b. 
219. Wycombe, West, /S'^. Zfl:2^r^;2c^. Erected in 1763. 



INDEX or SAINTS, 



AFTER WHOM CHURCHES ARE NAMED IN BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 



All Saints, 35. 82. 88. 94. 99. 103. 107. 

114. 117. 119. 120. 126. 148. 152. 153. 

164. 172. 178. 190? 192. 211. 218. 
St. Andrew, 62. 118. 
The Assumption of the Blessed 

Virgin, 187. 
St. Augustine, 33. 

St. Bartholomew, 205. 
St. Botolph, 203. 

St. Catharine, 13. 200. 
St. Cecilia, 2. 

St. Dunstan, 197. 

St. Edmund, 19. 
St. Edward, 24. 
St. Etheldreda, 15. 

St. Faith, 124. 
St. Firmin, 106. 

St. Giles, 26. 38. 58. 66. 91. 134. 165. 

Holy Cross, 87. 

Holy Trinity, 56. 57. 70. 141. 142. 143. 
180. 209. 

St. James, 3. 4. 47. 51. 65. 78. 110. 149. 

177. 
St. John Baptist, 16. 22. 73. 146. 194. 

196. 199. 212. 
St. John Evangelist, 23, 92. 



St. Laud, 128. 

St. Laurence, 9. 60. 67. 85. 96. 98. 102. 

104. 139. 
St. Leonard, 12. 40. 157. 174. 

St. Margaret, 7. 

St. Martin, 71. 132. 

St. Mary the Virgin, 1. 6. 17. 20. 21. 25. 

28. 31. 32. 34. 41. 42. 43. 45. 46. 50. 52. 

53. 61. 63. 69. 72. 75. 76. 80. 81. 83. 84. 

86. 89. 93. 97. 100. 101. 105. 111. 112. 

113. 115. 116.121. 127. 131. 136. 138. 

HO. 144. 145. 151. 154. 155. 156. 161. 

162. 163. 166. 175. 179. 183. 198. 201. 

202. 204. 206. 214. 215. 216. 
St. Mary Magdalene, 30. 37. 133. 167. 

169. 186. 
St. Mary and St. Nicholas, 5. 44. 
St. Michael, 10. 11. 29. 48. 54. 137. 147. 

168. 173. 185. 189. 208. 

St. Nicholas, 14. 18. 59. 68. 79. 123. 129. 
150. 158. 160. 170. 184. 190? 191. 207. 

St. Paul, 217. 

St. Peter, 27. 36. 39. 55. 64. 108. 109. 130. 

135. 159. 171. 176. 213. 
SS. Peter and Paul, 8. 77. 95. 122. 125. 

181. 182.195. 

St. Swithin, 90. 

Unknown, 49. 74. 188. 193. 210. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



No. 



No. 



A. 



C. 



Addington - - . 


1 




Calverton 


103 


Adstock 


2 




Castlethorpe - 


111 


Akeley with Stockholt - 


8 




Caversfield - 


9 


Amersham - - - 


34 




Chalfont, St Giles - 


38 


Ankerwycke Priory 


62 




St. Peter - 


39 


Ashendon . . . 


145 




Chearsley 


150 


Aston Abbotts 


65 




Cheddington - 


66 


Clinton 


173 




Chenies 


48 


St Leonard's 


174 




Chesham Bois 


40 


Sandford 


147 




St Mary - 


41 


Astwood - - . 


64 




Chetwode - 


5 


Aylesbury - - - 


175 




Chicheley - 


104 








Chilton 


151 


B. 






Choulesbury - 


67 


Barton Hartshorn - 


4 




Claydon, (East) - 


154 
153 


Beaconsfield - - - 


35 








6 




/O* 1.\ 


10 


Beauchampton 




Biddlesden - 


7 




Clifton Reynes 


105 


Bierton - . - 


177 




Clinton Aston 


173 


Bledlow 


180 




Colnbrook in Horton 


42 


Bletchley 


97 




Crawley, (North) 


106 


Boarstall 


149 




Crendon, (Long) 


155 


Boveney - . _ 


37 




Cublington - 


68 


Bow Brickhill 


99 




Cuddington - 


184 


Bradenham - - - 


203 








Bradwell - - - 


^ 98 




D. 




Brayfield 


116 




Datchet 


43 


BrickhiU, (Bow) - 


99 




Dayrell Lillingston - 


18 




100 
101 




T^PTiTiJiTn - - « 


46 


riittlr"^ 




Dinton - - - - 


181 




iOX 


Brill . . . . 


148 




Ditton - - - - 


45 


Broughton . . . 


102 




Domey - - - - 


47 


Buckingham - - - 


8 




Dorton - - - - 


146 


Buckland 


178 




Drayton Beauchamp 


69 


Bumham - - - 


36 






70 


Bury Stanton - 


130 




Dunton- - . - 


71 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 





No. 






No. 


£. 




Homton 


- 


16 


Easington - . - 


152 


Horsenden 


- 


189 


Eastmanstead Chenies - 


* 48 


Horton - 


- 


54 


Edgcot - - - - 


11 


Horwood, (Great) 


- 


78 


Edlesborougli 


72 


(Little) 


- 


79 


Ellesborough - - - 


182 


Hulcott- 


- 


190 


Emberton - ^ - 


107 








Eton - - - - 


44 


I. 






F. 




t^° ICKFORD 


- 


158 




Ilmer - 


- 


159 


Farnham Royal 


50 


Iver 


- 


55 


Fawley - - - - 


204 


Ivinghoe 


- 


80 


Filgrove _ . - 


136 








Fingest - - - - 


205 


K. 






Fleet Marston 


156 


Kimble, (Great) 


_ 


191 


Foscott- - - - 


12 


(Little) 


. 


192 


Fulmar - - - - 


51 


Kingsey 


- 


160 


G. 




Kings Sutton - 


- 


27 


Gawcott 


13 


L. 






Gayhurst 


108 








Goldington Stoke - 


109 


Lacy Green - 


- 


193 


Grandborough 


73 


Lane End 


- 


209 


G tendon Underwood 


157 


Langley Marsh 


- 


63 


Grove - - - - 


74 


Lathbury 


- 


114 






Latimer in Chesham 


49 


H. 




Lavendon 


. 


115 


Haddenham - 


183 


Leckhampstead 
Lee - 


• 


17 
194 


Halton - - - - 
Hambledon - 


185 
206 


Lillingstone Dayrell 
Linford, (Great) - 


18 
117 


Hampden, (Great) - 

(J ittlr"\ 


186 

188 


(Little) 

Linslade 


- 


118 




81 


Hanslope - 


110 


Loudwater 




210 


Hardmead 


112 












Loughton 


_ 


119 


Hardwick - - 


75 


Ludgershall - 




161 


Hartshorn Barton - 


4 








Hartwell 


187 








Haversham - 


113 


M. 






Hawridge 


76 


1^" Maids Morton 


- 


19 


Hedgerley 


52 


Mansell Shenley 


- 


127 


Hedsor - - - - 


2U7 


Marlow, (Great) 


- 


211 


HiLLESDON - 

Hitcham 


14 
53 


fj iH^r'\ 




oi o 


Marsh Gibbon 


_ 


20 


Hitchendon - 


208 


^^ Marston, (North) 


162 


Hoggeston . - - 


77 


Marsworth 


- 


82 


Horley - - - - 


15 


Medmenham - 


- 


213 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 





No. 








No. 


Mentmore ... 


83 


S. 








Milton Keynes - 


120 


Sandford Aston 


. 




147 


Missenden, (Great) 


195 


Saunderton - 


. 




215 


(Little) - 


196 


Shabbington - 


. 




167 


Monks Risborough or 




Shalstone 


- 




24 


Priors r ' ' 


197 


Shenley Mansell 


- 




127 


Moulsoe - - - 


121 


Sherrington - 


- 




128 


Mursley . - - 


84 


Simpson 


- 




129 






Slapton 


- 




87 






Snelshall Priory 


- 




93 


N. 




Soulbery 


- 




88 


Nettleden 


85 


Stanton Bury 


- 




ISO 


Newport Pagnel 


122 


Steeple Claydon 


- 




10 


Newton Blossomville 


123 


t^° Stewkley - 


- 




89 




124 


Stockholt with Akeley 




3 




o 


NoUey Abbey 


155 


Stoke Goldington 






109 












131 






Mandeville 






179 


O. 




Poges - 






58 


Oakley - - - - 


163 


Stone - 






199 


Olney - - - - 


125 


Stowe - 






25 


Oving - - - - 


164 


Stratford, (Water) 






26 












132 


P. 




(Stoney), St Mary 






Magdalene 


- 


- 


138 


Padbury 


21 


St Giles 


- 


. 


134 


Penn - - - - 


56 


Sutton Kings - 


. 


. 


27 


Penn Street - 


57 


Swanboume - 


. 


. 


90 


Pitchcott 


165 










Pitstone 


86 


T. 








Preston Bissett - 


22 


Taplow - 


. 




59 


Princes Risborough 


198 


Thornborough 


- 




28 


Priors Risborough - 


197 


Thornton 


. 




29 






Tingewick 


- 




SO 






Tottenhall or Tottenhoe 




91 


Q. 




Tottenhoe or Tattenhall 




91 


Quainton ... 


166 


Towersey 


- 




200 


Quarrendon ... 


176 


Turville 


. 




216 






Turweston 


. 




31 






Twyford 


- 




32 


R. 




Tyringham . 


- 




135 


Radclive - - - 


23 










Radnage • . - - 


214 


U. 








Ravenstone - - - 


126 


Upton and Chawley 


- 


60 


Risborough (Priors or 












Monks) - 


197 


W. 








Risborough Princes 


198 


Waddesdon - 


- 


- 


168 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 





No. 




No. 


Walton- 


137 


Wingrave ... 


95 


Water Stratford - 


26 


Winslow 


96 


Wavendon - . . 


138 


Wolston, (Great) . 


143 


Wendover - - . 


201 


(Little) - 


142 


Westbury - . - 


33 


Wolverton, Holy Trinity - 


141 


Weston Turville - 


202 


St. George 


•141 


Underwood 


139 


Wooburn - . - 


217 


Wexham - - - 


61 


Wootton Underwood 


172 


Whaddon 


93 


Worminghall - 


171 


Whitchurch - 


92 


Wonghton on the Green . 


144 


Willen .... 


140 


1^" Wycombe, (High) 


218 


Winchendon, (Lower) 

^TTnnrr'^ 


170 
169 


CWct^ 


219 
62 


Wyrardisbury 


(^ upper; 


WiNGE 


94 







,^.- 



OXFORD: 
PRINTED BY I. SHRIMPTOIf. 



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